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Sample records for alanine amino transferase

  1. 21 CFR 862.1030 - Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system. 862.1030 Section 862.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  2. 21 CFR 862.1030 - Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system. 862.1030 Section 862.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  3. 21 CFR 862.1030 - Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system. 862.1030 Section 862.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1030 - Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system. 862.1030 Section 862.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1030 - Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system. 862.1030 Section 862.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  6. Elevation of alanine amino transferase and aspartate amino transferase produced by pyoverdin, a photolabile pigment of Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Eraso, A J; Albesa, I

    1998-01-01

    The effect of three forms pyoverdin on mouse liver was studied. Significant increases of alanine amino transferase (ALT) and aspartate amino transferase (AST) were obtained in mice after ingestion of water with forms A and C. The effect on liver was more evident with A than with C. Pyoverdin was purified by means of salt saturation, solvent extractions and ion-exchange chromatography. Fluorescent peaks obtained in the presence of light were different from those eluted under dark conditions. The relative amounts of pyoverdin A, B and C varied when dark purification procedure was employed. Form A decreased while C increased in the absence of light. Optimum conditions for C were in the dark without iron. When C was exposed to light, it changed to form A. Fast Atom Bombardment (FAB) mass spectrometry of pyoverdin form C gave a form at M+ = 1324 m.u., which is 9 m.u. less than pyoverdin purified in the presence of light. The results suggest that light can influence pyoverdin stability and toxicity. PMID:9888631

  7. A photoactivable amino acid based on a novel functional coumarin-6-yl-alanine.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Andrea S C; Gonçalves, M Sameiro T; Costa, Susana P G

    2012-12-01

    A novel fluorescent amino acid, L-4-chloromethylcoumarin-6-yl-alanine, was obtained from tyrosine by a Pechmann reaction. The assembly of the heterocyclic ring at the tyrosine side chain could be achieved before or after incorporation of tyrosine into a dipeptide, and amino acid and dipeptide ester conjugates were obtained by coupling to a model N-protected alanine. The behaviour of one of the fluorescent conjugates towards irradiation was studied in a photochemical reactor at different wavelengths (254, 300, 350 and 419 nm). The photoreaction course in methanol/HEPES buffer solution (80:20) was followed by HPLC/UV monitoring. It was found that the novel unnatural amino acid could act as a fluorescent label, due to its fluorescence properties, and, more importantly, as a photoactivable unit, due to the short irradiation times necessary to cleave the ester bond between the model amino acid and the coumarin-6-yl-alanine.

  8. 21 CFR 862.1100 - Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system. 862.1100 Section 862.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1100 - Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system. 862.1100 Section 862.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  10. 21 CFR 862.1100 - Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system. 862.1100 Section 862.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  11. 21 CFR 862.1100 - Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system. 862.1100 Section 862.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  12. 21 CFR 862.1100 - Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system. 862.1100 Section 862.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  13. Electron attachment to amino acid clusters in helium nanodroplets: Glycine, alanine, and serine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira da Silva, F.; Denifl, S.; Märk, T. D.; Ellis, A. M.; Scheier, P.

    2010-06-01

    The first detailed study of electron attachment to amino acid clusters is reported. The amino acids chosen for investigation were glycine, alanine, and serine. Clusters of these amino acids were formed inside helium nanodroplets, which provide a convenient low temperature (0.37 K) environment for growing noncovalent clusters. When subjected to low energy (2 eV) electron impact the chemistry for glycine and alanine clusters was found to be similar. In both cases, parent cluster anions were the major products, which contrasts with the corresponding monomers in the gas phase, where the dehydrogenated products ([AAn-H]-, where AA=amino acid monomer) dominate. Serine clusters are different, with the major product being the parent anion minus an OH group, an outcome presumably conferred by the facile loss of an OH group from the β carbon of serine. In addition to the bare parent anions and various fragment anions, helium atoms are also observed attached to both the parent anion clusters and the dehydrogenated parent anion clusters. Finally, we present the first anion yield spectra of amino acid clusters from doped helium nanodroplets as a function of incident electron energy.

  14. Probing the interaction of the amino acid alanine with the surface of ZnO(1010).

    PubMed

    Gao, Y K; Traeger, F; Shekhah, O; Idriss, H; Wöll, C

    2009-10-01

    The adsorption modes and stability of the amino acid alanine (NH(2)-CH(CH(3))-COOH) have been studied on the nonpolar single crystal surface of zinc oxide, ZnO(1010), experimentally by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and computationally using density functional theory (DFT). Deposition at 200 K was found to lead to the formation of multilayers identified by an XPS N1s peak at 401.7 eV assigned to the NH(3)(+) group, a fingerprint of the zwitterionic structure of alanine in the solid state. Heating to 300 K resulted in the removal of most of the multilayers with the remaining surface coverage estimated to 0.4 with respect to Zn cations. At this temperature most of the alanine molecules are found to be deprotonated (dissociated), yielding a carboxylate species (NH(2)-CH(CH(3))-COO(-) (a) + OH (s); where O is surface oxygen, (a) for adsorbed and (s) for surface species). Further heating of the surface resulted in a gradual decrease of the surface coverage and by 500 K a large fraction of adsorbed alanine molecules have desorbed from the surface. Total energy DFT computations of different adsorbate species identified two stable dissociative adsorption modes: bidentate and monodentate. The bidentate species with adsorption energy of 1.75 eV was found to be more stable than the monodentate species by about 0.7 eV.

  15. Probing the interaction of the amino acid alanine with the surface of ZnO(1010).

    PubMed

    Gao, Y K; Traeger, F; Shekhah, O; Idriss, H; Wöll, C

    2009-10-01

    The adsorption modes and stability of the amino acid alanine (NH(2)-CH(CH(3))-COOH) have been studied on the nonpolar single crystal surface of zinc oxide, ZnO(1010), experimentally by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and computationally using density functional theory (DFT). Deposition at 200 K was found to lead to the formation of multilayers identified by an XPS N1s peak at 401.7 eV assigned to the NH(3)(+) group, a fingerprint of the zwitterionic structure of alanine in the solid state. Heating to 300 K resulted in the removal of most of the multilayers with the remaining surface coverage estimated to 0.4 with respect to Zn cations. At this temperature most of the alanine molecules are found to be deprotonated (dissociated), yielding a carboxylate species (NH(2)-CH(CH(3))-COO(-) (a) + OH (s); where O is surface oxygen, (a) for adsorbed and (s) for surface species). Further heating of the surface resulted in a gradual decrease of the surface coverage and by 500 K a large fraction of adsorbed alanine molecules have desorbed from the surface. Total energy DFT computations of different adsorbate species identified two stable dissociative adsorption modes: bidentate and monodentate. The bidentate species with adsorption energy of 1.75 eV was found to be more stable than the monodentate species by about 0.7 eV. PMID:19596338

  16. Chiral selectivity of amino acid adsorption on chiral surfaces—The case of alanine on Pt

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, J.-H.; Kosov, D. S.

    2015-02-07

    We study the binding pattern of the amino acid alanine on the naturally chiral Pt surfaces Pt(531), Pt(321), and Pt(643). These surfaces are all vicinal to the (111) direction but have different local environments of their kink sites and are thus a model for realistic roughened Pt surfaces. Alanine has only a single methyl group attached to its chiral center, which makes the number of possible binding conformations computationally tractable. Additionally, only the amine and carboxyl group are expected to interact strongly with the Pt substrate. On Pt(531), we study the molecule in its pristine as well as its deprotonated form and find that the deprotonated one is more stable by 0.47 eV. Therefore, we study the molecule in its deprotonated form on Pt(321) and Pt(643). As expected, the oxygen and nitrogen atoms of the deprotonated molecule provide a local binding “tripod” and the most stable adsorption configurations optimize the interaction of this “tripod” with undercoordinated surface atoms. However, the interaction of the methyl group plays an important role: it induces significant chiral selectivity of about 60 meV on all surfaces. Hereby, the L-enantiomer adsorbs preferentially to the Pt(321){sup S} and Pt(643){sup S} surfaces, while the D-enantiomer is more stable on Pt(531){sup S}. The binding energies increase with increasing surface density of kink sites, i.e., they are largest for Pt(531){sup S} and smallest for Pt(643){sup S}.

  17. A versatile proline/alanine transporter in the unicellular pathogen Leishmania donovani regulates amino acid homoeostasis and osmotic stress responses.

    PubMed

    Inbar, Ehud; Schlisselberg, Doreen; Suter Grotemeyer, Marianne; Rentsch, Doris; Zilberstein, Dan

    2013-01-15

    Unlike all other organisms, parasitic protozoa of the family Trypanosomatidae maintain a large cellular pool of proline that, together with the alanine pool, serve as alternative carbon sources as well as reservoirs of organic osmolytes. These reflect adaptation to their insect vectors whose haemolymphs are exceptionally rich in the two amino acids. In the present study we identify and characterize a new neutral amino acid transporter, LdAAP24, that translocates proline and alanine across the Leishmania donovani plasma membrane. This transporter fulfils multiple functions: it is the sole supplier for the intracellular pool of proline and contributes to the alanine pool; it is essential for cell volume regulation after osmotic stress; and it regulates the transport and homoeostasis of glutamate and arginine, none of which are its substrates. Notably, we provide evidence that proline and alanine exhibit different roles in the parasitic response to hypotonic shock; alanine affects swelling, whereas proline influences the rate of volume recovery. On the basis of our data we suggest that LdAAP24 plays a key role in parasite adaptation to its varying environments in host and vector, a phenomenon essential for successful parasitism.

  18. The ribosome can discriminate the chirality of amino acids within its peptidyl-transferase center

    PubMed Central

    Englander, Michael T.; Avins, Joshua L.; Fleisher, Rachel C.; Liu, Bo; Effraim, Philip R.; Wang, Jiangning; Schulten, Klaus; Leyh, Thomas S.; Gonzalez, Ruben L.; Cornish, Virginia W.

    2015-01-01

    The cellular translational machinery (TM) synthesizes proteins using exclusively L- or achiral aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs), despite the presence of D-amino acids in nature and their ability to be aminoacylated onto tRNAs by aa-tRNA synthetases. The ubiquity of L-amino acids in proteins has led to the hypothesis that D-amino acids are not substrates for the TM. Supporting this view, protein engineering efforts to incorporate D-amino acids into proteins using the TM have thus far been unsuccessful. Nonetheless, a mechanistic understanding of why D-aa-tRNAs are poor substrates for the TM is lacking. To address this deficiency, we have systematically tested the translation activity of D-aa-tRNAs using a series of biochemical assays. We find that the TM can effectively, albeit slowly, accept D-aa-tRNAs into the ribosomal aa-tRNA binding (A) site, use the A-site D-aa-tRNA as a peptidyl-transfer acceptor, and translocate the resulting peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA into the ribosomal peptidyl-tRNA binding (P) site. During the next round of continuous translation, however, we find that ribosomes carrying a P-site peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA partition into subpopulations that are either translationally arrested or that can continue translating. Consistent with its ability to arrest translation, chemical protection experiments and molecular dynamics simulations show that P site-bound peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA can trap the ribosomal peptidyl-transferase center in a conformation in which peptidyl transfer is impaired. Our results reveal a novel mechanism through which D-aa-tRNAs interfere with translation, provide insight into how the TM might be engineered to use D-aa-tRNAs, and increase our understanding of the physiological role of a widely distributed enzyme that clears D-aa-tRNAs from cells. PMID:25918365

  19. The ribosome can discriminate the chirality of amino acids within its peptidyl-transferase center.

    PubMed

    Englander, Michael T; Avins, Joshua L; Fleisher, Rachel C; Liu, Bo; Effraim, Philip R; Wang, Jiangning; Schulten, Klaus; Leyh, Thomas S; Gonzalez, Ruben L; Cornish, Virginia W

    2015-05-12

    The cellular translational machinery (TM) synthesizes proteins using exclusively L- or achiral aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs), despite the presence of D-amino acids in nature and their ability to be aminoacylated onto tRNAs by aa-tRNA synthetases. The ubiquity of L-amino acids in proteins has led to the hypothesis that D-amino acids are not substrates for the TM. Supporting this view, protein engineering efforts to incorporate D-amino acids into proteins using the TM have thus far been unsuccessful. Nonetheless, a mechanistic understanding of why D-aa-tRNAs are poor substrates for the TM is lacking. To address this deficiency, we have systematically tested the translation activity of D-aa-tRNAs using a series of biochemical assays. We find that the TM can effectively, albeit slowly, accept D-aa-tRNAs into the ribosomal aa-tRNA binding (A) site, use the A-site D-aa-tRNA as a peptidyl-transfer acceptor, and translocate the resulting peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA into the ribosomal peptidyl-tRNA binding (P) site. During the next round of continuous translation, however, we find that ribosomes carrying a P-site peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA partition into subpopulations that are either translationally arrested or that can continue translating. Consistent with its ability to arrest translation, chemical protection experiments and molecular dynamics simulations show that P site-bound peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA can trap the ribosomal peptidyl-transferase center in a conformation in which peptidyl transfer is impaired. Our results reveal a novel mechanism through which D-aa-tRNAs interfere with translation, provide insight into how the TM might be engineered to use D-aa-tRNAs, and increase our understanding of the physiological role of a widely distributed enzyme that clears D-aa-tRNAs from cells.

  20. Potential Application of N-Carbamoyl-β-Alanine Amidohydrolase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 for β-Amino Acid Production▿

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Gómez, Ana Isabel; Martínez-Rodríguez, Sergio; Pozo-Dengra, Joaquín; Tessaro, Davide; Servi, Stefano; Clemente-Jiménez, Josefa María; Rodríguez-Vico, Felipe; Las Heras-Vázquez, Francisco Javier

    2009-01-01

    An N-carbamoyl-β-alanine amidohydrolase of industrial interest from Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 (βcarAt) has been characterized. βcarAt is most active at 30°C and pH 8.0 with N-carbamoyl-β-alanine as a substrate. The purified enzyme is completely inactivated by the metal-chelating agent 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid (HQSA), and activity is restored by the addition of divalent metal ions, such as Mn2+, Ni2+, and Co2+. The native enzyme is a homodimer with a molecular mass of 90 kDa from pH 5.5 to 9.0. The enzyme has a broad substrate spectrum and hydrolyzes nonsubstituted N-carbamoyl-α-, -β-, -γ-, and -δ-amino acids, with the greatest catalytic efficiency for N-carbamoyl-β-alanine. βcarAt also recognizes substrate analogues substituted with sulfonic and phosphonic acid groups to produce the β-amino acids taurine and ciliatine, respectively. βcarAt is able to produce monosubstituted β2- and β3-amino acids, showing better catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) for the production of the former. For both types of monosubstituted substrates, the enzyme hydrolyzes N-carbamoyl-β-amino acids with a short aliphatic side chain better than those with aromatic rings. These properties make βcarAt an outstanding candidate for application in the biotechnology industry. PMID:19011069

  1. Potential application of N-carbamoyl-beta-alanine amidohydrolase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 for beta-amino acid production.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Gómez, Ana Isabel; Martínez-Rodríguez, Sergio; Pozo-Dengra, Joaquín; Tessaro, Davide; Servi, Stefano; Clemente-Jiménez, Josefa María; Rodríguez-Vico, Felipe; Las Heras-Vázquez, Francisco Javier

    2009-01-01

    An N-carbamoyl-beta-alanine amidohydrolase of industrial interest from Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 (beta car(At)) has been characterized. Beta car(At) is most active at 30 degrees C and pH 8.0 with N-carbamoyl-beta-alanine as a substrate. The purified enzyme is completely inactivated by the metal-chelating agent 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid (HQSA), and activity is restored by the addition of divalent metal ions, such as Mn(2+), Ni(2+), and Co(2+). The native enzyme is a homodimer with a molecular mass of 90 kDa from pH 5.5 to 9.0. The enzyme has a broad substrate spectrum and hydrolyzes nonsubstituted N-carbamoyl-alpha-, -beta-, -gamma-, and -delta-amino acids, with the greatest catalytic efficiency for N-carbamoyl-beta-alanine. Beta car(At) also recognizes substrate analogues substituted with sulfonic and phosphonic acid groups to produce the beta-amino acids taurine and ciliatine, respectively. Beta car(At) is able to produce monosubstituted beta(2)- and beta(3)-amino acids, showing better catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) for the production of the former. For both types of monosubstituted substrates, the enzyme hydrolyzes N-carbamoyl-beta-amino acids with a short aliphatic side chain better than those with aromatic rings. These properties make beta car(At) an outstanding candidate for application in the biotechnology industry.

  2. SEROEPIDEMIOLOGY OF HEPATITIS B VIRUS (HBV) AND HEPATITIS C VIRUS (HCV) AND RELATIONSHIP TO ALANINE TRANSFERASE (ALT) IN SAUDI WORKERS AT YANBU INDUSTRIAL CITY

    PubMed Central

    Kashgari, Rashad H.; Mohamad, Adel A.

    1997-01-01

    Objectives: To study the epidemiology of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and Hepatitis C virus (HCP) in a relatively new industrial community in Yanbu, and to find out whether any relationship exists between increased serum Alanine Transferase (ALT) and HBV infection. Method: A group of Saudi male workers (n=332) (mean age = 32 years) were screened for Hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc), Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), Hepatitis C virus antibody (anti-HCV), and Alanine Transferase (ALT) level and the results were correlated with age and marital status. Results: Overall, the prevalence of anti-HBc, HBsAg, and anti-HCV were 23.2%, 7.7% and 0.6% respectively. Age-related HBsAg carrier rates were 7.8%, 6.4% and 9.4% for age groups 18-20, 21-30 and over 30 years respec-tively. Anti-HBc positivity rates lucre 7.8%, 24.3% and 23.1 M for the same age groups. Anti-HCV was positive in only two cases (0.6%) of all subjects. Con-sidering marital status, HBsAg and anti-HBc positivity rates were 7.8% and 20.5% for single subjects compared with 7.4% and 24.5% for married subjects (P=> 0.5 and > 0.5). Twenty-two percent of all subjects had ALT levels above 35 U/L with no correlation between the increase of ALT and anti-HBc or HBsAg positivity. Conclusions: The findings of this work: (1) Support the notion of relatively low prevalence of HCV in the Saudi Population as compared to HBV. (2) Provide clues regarding possible routes of transmission of HBV in Saudis that may help in vaccination policies for control of HBV infection. (3) Emphasize the fact that ALT level is an independent factor of HBV infection, and (4) Signify the need to screen industrial workers fir non-viral causes of liver disease. PMID:23008562

  3. Structural Isotopic Effects in the smallest chiral amino acid: Observation of a structural phase transition in fully deuterated alanine.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordallo, Heloisa; de Souza, Joelma; de Tarso, Paulo; Argyriou, Dimitri

    2008-03-01

    A first study of possible changes instigated by deuteration in amino acids was carried out using neutron diffraction, inelastic neutron scattering and Raman scattering in L-alanine, C2H4(NH2)COOH. Careful analysis of the structural parameters shows that deuteration of L-alanine engenders significant geometric changes as a function of temperature, which can be directly related to the observation of new lattice vibration modes in the Raman spectra. The combination of the experimental data suggests that C2D4(ND2)COOD undergoes a structural phase transition (or a structural rearrangement) at about 170 K. Considering that this particular amino acid is a hydrogen-bonded system with short hydrogen bonds (OH ˜ 1.8 å), we evoke the Ubbelohde effect to conclude that substitution of hydrogen for deuterium gives rise to changes in the hydrogen-bonding interactions. The structural differences suggest distinct relative stabilities for the hydrogenous and deuterated L-alanine. De Souza et al. - Journal of Physical Chemistry B (Letters) 111, 5034-39 (2007)

  4. Theoretical and experimental study of valence photoelectron spectrum of D,L-alanine amino acid.

    PubMed

    Farrokhpour, H; Fathi, F; De Brito, A Naves

    2012-07-01

    In this work, the He-I (21.218 eV) photoelectron spectrum of D,L-alanine in the gas phase is revisited experimentally and theoretically. To support the experiment, the high level ab initio calculations were used to calculate and assign the photoelectron spectra of the four most stable conformers of gaseous alanine, carefully. The symmetry adapted cluster/configuration interaction (SAC-CI) method based on single and double excitation operators (SD-R) and its more accurate version, termed general-R, was used to separately calculate the energies and intensities of the ionization bands of the L- and D-alanine conformers. The intensities of ionization bands were calculated based on the monopole approximation. Also, natural bonding orbital (NBO) calculations were employed for better spectral band assignment. The relative electronic energy, Gibbs free energy, and Boltzmann population ratio of the conformers were calculated at the experimental temperature (403 K) using several theoretical methods. The theoretical photoelectron spectrum of alanine was calculated by summing over the spectra of individual D and L conformers weighted by different population ratios. Finally, the population ratio of the four most stable conformers of alanine was estimated from the experimental photoelectron spectrum using theoretical calculations for the first time.

  5. Neurotoxic Non-proteinogenic Amino Acid β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine and Its Role in Biological Systems.

    PubMed

    Popova, A A; Koksharova, O A

    2016-08-01

    Secondary metabolites of photoautotrophic organisms have attracted considerable interest in recent years. In particular, molecules of non-proteinogenic amino acids participating in various physiological processes and capable of producing adverse ecological effects have been actively investigated. For example, the non-proteinogenic amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is neurotoxic to animals including humans. It is known that BMAA accumulation via the food chain can lead to development of neurodegenerative diseases in humans such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases as well as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Moreover, BMAA can be mistakenly incorporated into a protein molecule instead of serine. Natural sources of BMAA and methods for its detection are discussed in this review, as well as the role of BMAA in metabolism of its producers and possible mechanisms of toxicity of this amino acid in different living organisms. PMID:27677549

  6. Oral administration of D-alanine in monkeys robustly increases plasma and cerebrospinal fluid levels but experimental D-amino acid oxidase inhibitors had minimal effect.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Camilo; Alt, Jesse; Ator, Nancy A; Wilmoth, Heather; Rais, Rana; Hin, Niyada; DeVivo, Michael; Popiolek, Michael; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Slusher, Barbara S

    2016-09-01

    Hypofunction of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is thought to exacerbate psychosis in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. Consistent with this hypothesis, D-alanine, a co-agonist at the glycine site of the NMDA receptor, was shown to improve positive and cognitive symptoms when used as add-on therapy for schizophrenia treatment. However, D-alanine had to be administered at high doses (~7 g) to observe clinical effects. One possible reason for the high dose is that D-alanine could be undergoing oxidation by D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) before it reaches the brain. If this is the case, the dose could be reduced by co-administration of D-alanine with a DAAO inhibitor (DAAOi). Early studies with rodents showed that co-administration of D-alanine with 5-chloro-benzo[d]isoxazol-3-ol (CBIO), a prototype DAAOi, significantly enhanced the levels of extracellular D-alanine in the frontal cortex compared with D-alanine alone. Further, the use of CBIO reduced the dose of D-alanine needed to attenuate prepulse inhibition deficits induced by dizocilpine. The objective of the work reported herein was to confirm the hypothesis that DAAO inhibition can enhance D-alanine exposure in a species closer to humans: non-human primates. We report that while oral D-alanine administration to baboons (10 mg/kg) enhanced D-alanine plasma and CSF levels over 20-fold versus endogenous levels, addition of experimental DAAOi to the regimen exhibited a 2.2-fold enhancement in plasma and no measurable effect on CSF levels. The results provide caution regarding the utility of DAAO inhibition to increase D-amino acid levels as treatment for patients with schizophrenia. PMID:27287825

  7. Efficient optical resolution of amino acid by alanine racemaze chiral analogue supported on mesoporous carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, D.; Kim, K.; Park, D.; Kim, G.

    2012-09-01

    Optically pure D-amino acids are industrially important chiral building blocks for the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, food ingredients, and drug intermediates. Chemoenzymatic dynamic kinetic-resolution processes have recently been developed for deracemization of amino acids. S-ARCA would be a good candidate for the selective adsorption of D amino acid through the imine formation reaction. The organic phase containing S-ARCA adsorbent, TPPC or Ionic Liquid (as a phase transfer catalyst) in MC were coated on the surfaces of mesoporous carbon C-SBA-15(CMK). The aqueous solution of racemic D/L-amino acid and NaOH were added to the carbon support coated with ARCA. The D/L ratios on ARCA and in solution were determined with increasing reaction time. S-ARCA has a unique property for the selective adsorption of D- amino acid (up to 90% selcetivity) in the racemic mixture. The fixed bed reactor containing ARCA/carbon support was also adopted successfully for the selective separation of amino acid.

  8. First principles DFT study of weak C-H…O bonds in crystalline amino acids under pressure-alanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaniah, Lavanya M.; Kamal, C.; Sikka, S. K.

    2013-02-01

    Many crystalline solids containing C-H…O hydrogen bonds display blue shifting of the C-H stretching frequency under pressure. No agreed explanation is available for this. Here, we use first principles density functional theory, to determine the hydrogen atom positions to understand the cause of this blue shift. No neutron diffraction is feasible due to flux limitations for this purpose. As a first case, we have taken up the study of the amino acid, alanine. We find that the C_H_…O bond in it no longer remain isolated under compression as is case at ambient pressure. The hydrogen atom in the bond has now repulsive contacts with other atoms. This results in contraction of the C-H bond length and consequently to blue shifting as is found experimentally.

  9. Amino acid transport across the tonoplast of vacuoles isolated from barley mesophyll protoplasts: Uptake of alanine, leucine, and glutamine. [Hordeum vulgare L

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, K.J.; Jaeger, R.; Kaiser, G.; Martinoia, E. )

    1990-01-01

    Mesophyll protoplasts from leaves of well-fertilized barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) plants contained amino acids at concentrations as high as 120 millimoles per liter. With the exception of glutamic acid, which is predominantly localized in the cytoplasm, a major part of all other amino acids was contained inside the large central vacuole. Alanine, leucine, and glutamine are the dominant vacuolar amino acids in barley. Their transport into isolated vacuoles was studied using {sup 14}C-labeled amino acids. Uptake was slow in the absence of ATP. A three- to sixfold stimulation of uptake was observed after addition of ATP or adenylyl imidodiphosphate an ATP analogue not being hydrolyzed by ATPases. Other nucleotides were ineffective in increasing the rate of uptake. ATP-Stimulated amino acid transport was not dependent on the transtonoplast pH or membrane potential. p-Chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid and n-ethyl maleimide increased transport independently of ATP. Neutral amino acids such as valine or leucine effectively decreased the rate of alanine transport. Glutamine and glycine were less effective or not effective as competitive inhibitors of alanine transport. The results indicate the existence of a uniport translocator specific for neutral or basic amino acids that is under control of metabolic effectors.

  10. Determination of β-Cyano-L-alanine, γ-Glutamyl-β-cyano-L-alanine, and Common Free Amino Acids in Vicia sativa (Fabaceae) Seeds by Reversed-Phase High-Performance Liquid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Megías, Cristina; Cortés-Giraldo, Isabel; Girón-Calle, Julio; Vioque, Javier; Alaiz, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    A method for determination of β-cyano-L-alanine, γ-glutamyl-β-cyano-L-alanine and other free amino acids in Vicia sativa is presented. Seed extracts were derivatized by reaction with diethyl ethoxymethylenemalonate and analyzed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Calibration curves showed very good linearity of the response. The limit of detection and quantification was 0.15 and 0.50 μM, respectively. The method has high intra- (RSD = 0.28–0.31%) and interrepeatability (RSD = 2.76–3.08%) and remarkable accuracy with a 99% recovery in spiked samples. The method is very easy to carry out and allows for ready analysis of large number of samples using very basic HPLC equipment because the derivatized samples are very stable and have very good chromatographic properties. The method has been applied to the determination of γ-glutamyl-β-cyano-L-alanine, β-cyano-L-alanine, and common free amino acids in eight wild populations of V. sativa from southwestern Spain. PMID:25587488

  11. The molecular basis for the post-translational addition of amino acids by L/F transferase in the N-end rule pathway.

    PubMed

    Fung, Angela Wai S; Fahlman, Richard P

    2015-01-01

    The N-end rule pathway is a conserved targeted proteolytic process observed in organisms ranging from eubacteria to mammals. The N-end rule relates the metabolic stability of a protein to its N-terminal amino acid residue. The identity of the N-terminal amino acid residue is a primary degradation signal, often referred to as an N-degron, which is recognized by the components of the N-end rule when it is a destabilizing N-terminus. N-degrons may be exposed by non-processive proteolytic cleavages or by post-translational modifications. One modification is the post-translational addition of amino acids to the N-termini of proteins, a reaction catalyzed by aminoacyl-tRNA protein transferases. The aminoacyl-tRNA protein transferase in eubacteria like Escherichia coli is L/F transferase. Recent investigations have reported unexpected observations regarding the L/F transferase catalytic mechanism and its mechanisms of substrate recognition. Additionally, recent proteome-wide identification of putative in vivo substrates facilitates hypothesis into the yet elusive biological functions of the prokaryotic N-end rule pathway. Here we summarize the recent findings on the molecular mechanisms of catalysis and substrate recognition by the E. coli L/F transferase in the prokaryotic N-end rule pathway.

  12. Quantitative proteomics analysis of zebrafish exposed to sub-lethal dosages of β-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA).

    PubMed

    Frøyset, Ann Kristin; Khan, Essa Ahsan; Fladmark, Kari Espolin

    2016-01-01

    The non-protein amino acid β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a neurotoxin present in microalgae and shown to accumulate in the food web. BMAA has been linked to the complex neurodegenerative disorder of Guam and to increased incidents sporadic ALS. Two main neurotoxic routes are suggested; an excitotoxic by acting as an agonist towards glutamate receptors and a metabolic by misincorporating into cellular proteins. We have used zebrafish, an increasingly used model for neurodegenerative diseases, to further identify signaling components involved in BMAA-induced toxicity. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to sub-lethal dosages of BMAA and a label-free proteomics analysis was conducted on larvae 4 days post fertilization. The exposed larvae showed no developmental abnormalities, but a reduced heart rate and increased expression of GSK3 isoforms. Search towards a reviewed database containing 2968 entries identified 480 proteins. Only 17 of these were regulated 2-fold or more in the exposed larvae. Seven of these proteins could be associated to glutamate receptor signaling and recycling. The remaining nine have all been linked to disturbance in protein homeostasis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) development or neuronal cell death. We also found that BMAA influenced the endocannabinoid system by up-regulation of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and that FAAH inhibitor URB597 reduced the BMAA effect on heart rate and GSK3 expression. PMID:27404450

  13. Quantitative proteomics analysis of zebrafish exposed to sub-lethal dosages of β-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA)

    PubMed Central

    Frøyset, Ann Kristin; Khan, Essa Ahsan; Fladmark, Kari Espolin

    2016-01-01

    The non-protein amino acid β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a neurotoxin present in microalgae and shown to accumulate in the food web. BMAA has been linked to the complex neurodegenerative disorder of Guam and to increased incidents sporadic ALS. Two main neurotoxic routes are suggested; an excitotoxic by acting as an agonist towards glutamate receptors and a metabolic by misincorporating into cellular proteins. We have used zebrafish, an increasingly used model for neurodegenerative diseases, to further identify signaling components involved in BMAA-induced toxicity. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to sub-lethal dosages of BMAA and a label-free proteomics analysis was conducted on larvae 4 days post fertilization. The exposed larvae showed no developmental abnormalities, but a reduced heart rate and increased expression of GSK3 isoforms. Search towards a reviewed database containing 2968 entries identified 480 proteins. Only 17 of these were regulated 2-fold or more in the exposed larvae. Seven of these proteins could be associated to glutamate receptor signaling and recycling. The remaining nine have all been linked to disturbance in protein homeostasis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) development or neuronal cell death. We also found that BMAA influenced the endocannabinoid system by up-regulation of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and that FAAH inhibitor URB597 reduced the BMAA effect on heart rate and GSK3 expression. PMID:27404450

  14. Growth of transplastomic cells expressing D-amino acid oxidase in chloroplasts is tolerant to D-alanine and inhibited by D-valine.

    PubMed

    Gisby, Martin F; Mudd, Elisabeth A; Day, Anil

    2012-12-01

    Dual-conditional positive/negative selection markers are versatile genetic tools for manipulating genomes. Plastid genomes are relatively small and conserved DNA molecules that can be manipulated precisely by homologous recombination. High-yield expression of recombinant products and maternal inheritance of plastid-encoded traits make plastids attractive sites for modification. Here, we describe the cloning and expression of a dao gene encoding D-amino acid oxidase from Schizosaccharomyces pombe in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plastids. The results provide genetic evidence for the uptake of D-amino acids into plastids, which contain a target that is inhibited by D-alanine. Importantly, this nonantibiotic-based selection system allows the use of cheap and widely available D-amino acids, which are relatively nontoxic to animals and microbes, to either select against (D-valine) or for (D-alanine) cells containing transgenic plastids. Positive/negative selection with d-amino acids was effective in vitro and against transplastomic seedlings grown in soil. The dual functionality of dao is highly suited to the polyploid plastid compartment, where it can be used to provide tolerance against potential D-alanine-based herbicides, control the timing of recombination events such as marker excision, influence the segregation of transgenic plastid genomes, identify loci affecting dao function in mutant screens, and develop D-valine-based methods to manage the spread of transgenic plastids tagged with dao.

  15. Excess of L-alanine in amino acids synthesized in a plasma torch generated by a hypervelocity meteorite impact reproduced in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Managadze, George G.; Engel, Michael H.; Getty, Stephanie; Wurz, Peter; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Shokolov, Anatoly G.; Sholin, Gennady V.; Terent'ev, Sergey A.; Chumikov, Alexander E.; Skalkin, Alexander S.; Blank, Vladimir D.; Prokhorov, Vyacheslav M.; Managadze, Nina G.; Luchnikov, Konstantin A.

    2016-10-01

    We present a laboratory reproduction of hypervelocity impacts of a carbon containing meteorite on a mineral substance representative of planetary surfaces. The physical conditions of the resulting impact plasma torch provide favorable conditions for abiogenic synthesis of protein amino acids: We identified glycine and alanine, and in smaller quantities serine, in the produced material. Moreover, we observe breaking of alanine mirror symmetry with L excess, which coincides with the bioorganic world. Therefore the selection of L-amino acids for the formation of proteins for living matter could have been the result from plasma processes occurring during the impact meteorites on the surface. This indicates that the plasma torch from meteorite impacts could play an important role in the formation of biomolecular homochirality. Thus, meteorite impacts possibly were the initial stage of this process and promoted conditions for the emergence of a living matter.

  16. Alanine water complexes.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, Vanesa; Sanz, M Eugenia; Peña, Isabel; Mata, Santiago; Cabezas, Carlos; López, Juan C; Alonso, José L

    2014-04-10

    Two complexes of alanine with water, alanine-(H2O)n (n = 1,2), have been generated by laser ablation of the amino acid in a supersonic jet containing water vapor and characterized using Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. In the observed complexes, water molecules bind to the carboxylic group of alanine acting as both proton donors and acceptors. In alanine-H2O, the water molecule establishes two intermolecular hydrogen bonds forming a six-membered cycle, while in alanine-(H2O)2 the two water molecules establish three hydrogen bonds forming an eight-membered ring. In both complexes, the amino acid moiety is in its neutral form and shows the conformation observed to be the most stable for the bare molecule. The microsolvation study of alanine-(H2O)n (n = 1,2) can be taken as a first step toward understanding bulk properties at a microscopic level.

  17. The snakehead Channa asiatica accumulates alanine during aerial exposure, but is incapable of sustaining locomotory activities on land through partial amino acid catabolism.

    PubMed

    Chew, Shit F; Wong, Mei Y; Tam, Wai L; Ip, Yuen K

    2003-02-01

    The freshwater snakehead Channa asiatica is an obligatory air-breather that resides in slow-flowing streams and in crevices near riverbanks in Southern China. In its natural habitat, it may encounter bouts of aerial exposure during the dry seasons. In the laboratory, the ammonia excretion rate of C. asiatica exposed to terrestrial conditions in a 12 h:12 h dark:light regime was one quarter that of the submerged control. Consequently, the ammonia contents in the muscle, liver and plasma increased significantly, and C. asiatica was able to tolerate quite high levels of ammonia in its tissues. Urea was not the major product of ammonia detoxification in C. asiatica, which apparently did not possess a functioning ornithine urea cycle. Rather, alanine increased fourfold to 12.6 micromol g(-1) in the muscle after 48 h of aerial exposure. This is the highest level known in adult teleosts exposed to air or an ammonia-loading situation. The accumulated alanine could account for 70% of the deficit in ammonia excretion during this period, indicating that partial amino acid catabolism had occurred. This would allow the utilization of certain amino acids as energy sources and, at the same time, maintain the new steady state levels of ammonia in various tissues, preventing them from rising further. There was a reduction in the aminating activity of glutamate dehydrogenase from the muscle and liver of specimens exposed to terrestrial conditions. Such a phenomenon has not been reported before and could, presumably, facilitate the entry of alpha-ketoglutarate into the Krebs cycle instead of its amination to glutamate, as has been suggested elsewhere. However, in contrast to mudskippers, C. asiatica was apparently unable to reduce the rates of proteolysis and amino acid catabolism, because the reduction in nitrogenous excretion during 48 h of aerial exposure was completely balanced by nitrogenous accumulation in the body. Alanine accumulation also occurred in specimens exposed to

  18. Amino acids (L-arginine and L-alanine) passivated CdS nanoparticles: Synthesis of spherical hierarchical structure and nonlinear optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talwatkar, S. S.; Tamgadge, Y. S.; Sunatkari, A. L.; Gambhire, A. B.; Muley, G. G.

    2014-12-01

    CdS nanoparticles (NPs) passivated with amino acids (L-alanine and L-arginine) having spherical hierarchical morphology were synthesized by room temperature wet chemical method. Synthesized NPs were characterized by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy to study the variation of band gaps with concentration of surface modifying agents. Increase in band gap has been observed with the increase in concentration of surface modifying agents and was found more prominent for CdS NPs passivated with L-alanine. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis were carried out for the study of crystal structure and morphology of CdS NPs. The average particle size of CdS NPs calculated from Debye-Scherer formula was found to less than 5 nm and agrees well with those determined from UV-vis spectra and TEM data. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was performed to know the functional groups of the grown NPs. Peaks in FT-IR spectra indicate the formation of CdS NPs and capping with L-alanine and L-arginine. Photoluminescence spectra of these NPs were also studied. Finally, colloidal solution of CdS-PVAc was subjected to Z-scan experiment under low power cw laser illumination to characterize them for third order nonlinear optical properties. CdS-PVAc colloidal solution shows enhanced nonlinear absorption due to RSA and weak FCA on account of two photon absorption processes triggered by thermal effect.

  19. Identification of the roles of individual amino acid residues of the helix E of the major antenna of photosystem II (LHCII) by alanine scanning mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng; Rao, Yan; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Chunhong

    2014-10-01

    The functions of the helix E (W97-F105), an amphiphilic lumenal 310 helix of the major antenna of photosystem II (LHCII), are still unidentified. To elucidate the roles of individual amino acid residue of the helix E, alanine scanning mutagenesis has been performed to mutate every residue of this domain to alanine. The influence of every alanine substitution on the structure and function of LHCII has been investigated biochemically and spectroscopically. The results show that all mutations have little impact on the pigment binding and configuration. However, many mutants presented decreased thermo- or photo-stability compared with the wild type, highlighting the significance of this helix to the stability of LHCII. The most critical residue for stability is W97. The mutant W97A yielded very fragile trimeric pigment protein complexes. The structural analysis revealed that the hydrogen bonding and aromatic interactions between W97, F195, F194 and a water molecule contributed greatly to the stability of LHCII. Moreover, Q103A and F105A have been identified to be able to reinforce the tendency of aggregation in vitro. The structural analysis suggested that the enhancement in aggregation formation for Q103A and F105A might be attributed to the changing hydrophobicity of the region.

  20. Amino acid residues in the GerAB protein important in the function and assembly of the alanine spore germination receptor of Bacillus subtilis 168.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Gareth R; Moir, Anne

    2011-05-01

    The paradigm gerA operon is required for endospore germination in response to c-alanine as the sole germinant, and the three protein products, GerAA, GerAB, and GerAC are predicted to form a receptor complex in the spore inner membrane. GerAB shows homology to the amino acid-polyamine-organocation (APC) family of single-component transporters and is predicted to be an integral membrane protein with 10 membrane-spanning helices. Site-directed mutations were introduced into the gerAB gene at its natural location on the chromosome. Alterations to some charged or potential helix-breaking residues within membrane spans affected receptor function dramatically. In some cases, this is likely to reflect the complete loss of the GerA receptor complex, as judged by the absence of the germinant receptor protein GerAC, which suggests that the altered GerAB protein itself may be unstable or that the altered structure destabilizes the complex. Mutants that have a null phenotype for Instituto de Biotecnología de León, INBIOTEC, Parque Científico de León, Av. Real, 1, 24006 León, Spain-alanine germination but retain GerAC protein at near-normal levels are more likely to define amino acid residues of functional, rather than structural, importance. Single-amino-acid substitutions in each of the GerAB and GerAA proteins can prevent incorporation of GerAC protein into the spore; this provides strong evidence that the proteins within a specific receptor interact and that these interactions are required for receptor assembly. The lipoprotein nature of the GerAC receptor subunit is also important; an amino acid change in the prelipoprotein signal sequence in the gerAC1 mutant results in the absence of GerAC protein from the spore.

  1. Synthesis and carbonic anhydrase inhibitory properties of amino acid - coumarin/quinolinone conjugates incorporating glycine, alanine and phenylalanine moieties.

    PubMed

    Küçükbay, F Zehra; Küçükbay, Hasan; Tanc, Muhammet; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-12-01

    N-Protected amino acids (Gly, Ala and Phe) were reacted with amino substituted coumarin and quinolinone derivatives, leading to the corresponding N-protected amino acid-coumarin/quinolinone conjugates. The carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) inhibitory activity of the new compounds was assessed against various human (h) isoforms, such as hCA I, hCA II, hCA IV and hCA XII. The quinolinone conjugates were inactive as enzyme inhibitors, whereas the coumarins were ineffective hCA I/II inhibitors (KIs > 50 μM) but were submicromolar hCA IV and XII inhibitors, with inhibition constants ranging between 92 nM and 1.19 μM for hCA IV, and between 0.11 and 0.79 μM for hCA XII. These coumarin derivatives, as many others reported earlier, thus show an interesting selective inhibitory profile for the membrane-bound over the cytosolic CA isoforms.

  2. Effect of pH, urea, peptide length, and neighboring amino acids on alanine alpha-proton random coil chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Carlisle, Elizabeth A; Holder, Jessica L; Maranda, Abby M; de Alwis, Adamberage R; Selkie, Ellen L; McKay, Sonya L

    2007-01-01

    Accurate random coil alpha-proton chemical shift values are essential for precise protein structure analysis using chemical shift index (CSI) calculations. The current study determines the chemical shift effects of pH, urea, peptide length and neighboring amino acids on the alpha-proton of Ala using model peptides of the general sequence GnXaaAYaaGn, where Xaa and Yaa are Leu, Val, Phe, Tyr, His, Trp or Pro, and n = 1-3. Changes in pH (2-6), urea (0-1M), and peptide length (n = 1-3) had no effect on Ala alpha-proton chemical shifts. Denaturing concentrations of urea (8M) caused significant downfield shifts (0.10 +/- 0.01 ppm) relative to an external DSS reference. Neighboring aliphatic residues (Leu, Val) had no effect, whereas aromatic amino acids (Phe, Tyr, His and Trp) and Pro caused significant shifts in the alanine alpha-proton, with the extent of the shifts dependent on the nature and position of the amino acid. Smaller aromatic residues (Phe, Tyr, His) caused larger shift effects when present in the C-terminal position (approximately 0.10 vs. 0.05 ppm N-terminal), and the larger aromatic tryptophan caused greater effects in the N-terminal position (0.15 ppm vs. 0.10 C-terminal). Proline affected both significant upfield (0.06 ppm, N-terminal) and downfield (0.25 ppm, C-terminal) chemical shifts. These new Ala correction factors detail the magnitude and range of variation in environmental chemical shift effects, in addition to providing insight into the molecular level interactions that govern protein folding.

  3. Knockdown of a putative alanine aminotransferase gene affects amino acid content and flight capacity in the Colorado potato beetle Leptinotarsa decemlineata.

    PubMed

    Wan, Pin-Jun; Fu, Kai-Yun; Lü, Feng-Gong; Guo, Wen-Chao; Li, Guo-Qing

    2015-07-01

    Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) plays important physiological and biochemical roles in insect. In this study, a full-length Ldalt cDNA was cloned from Leptinotarsa decemlineata. It was ubiquitously expressed in the eggs, larvae, pupae and adults. In the adults, Ldalt mRNA was widely distributed in thorax muscles, fat body, midgut, foregut, hindgut, Malpighian tubules, ventral ganglion and epidermis, with the expression levels from the highest to the lowest. Two double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) (dsLdalt1 and dsLdalt2) targeting Ldalt were constructed and bacterially expressed. After adults fed on dsLdalt1- and dsLdalt2-immersed foliage for 3 day, Ldalt mRNA abundance was significantly decreased by 79.5 and 71.1 %, and ALT activities were significantly reduced by 64.5 and 67.6 %, respectively. Moreover, silencing Ldalt affected free amino acid contents. Lysine was decreased by 100.0 and 100.0 %, and arginine was reduced by 87.5 and 89.4 %, respectively, in the hemolymph from dsLdalt1- and dsLdalt2-ingested beetles, compared with control ones. In contrast, proline was increased by 88.7 and 96.4 %. Furthermore, ingestion of dsLdalt1 and dsLdalt2 significantly decreased flight speed, shortened flight duration time and flight distance. In addition, knocking down Ldalt significantly increased adult mortality. These data imply that LdALT plays important roles in amino acid metabolism and in flight in L. decemlineata.

  4. Knockdown of a putative alanine aminotransferase gene affects amino acid content and flight capacity in the Colorado potato beetle Leptinotarsa decemlineata.

    PubMed

    Wan, Pin-Jun; Fu, Kai-Yun; Lü, Feng-Gong; Guo, Wen-Chao; Li, Guo-Qing

    2015-07-01

    Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) plays important physiological and biochemical roles in insect. In this study, a full-length Ldalt cDNA was cloned from Leptinotarsa decemlineata. It was ubiquitously expressed in the eggs, larvae, pupae and adults. In the adults, Ldalt mRNA was widely distributed in thorax muscles, fat body, midgut, foregut, hindgut, Malpighian tubules, ventral ganglion and epidermis, with the expression levels from the highest to the lowest. Two double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) (dsLdalt1 and dsLdalt2) targeting Ldalt were constructed and bacterially expressed. After adults fed on dsLdalt1- and dsLdalt2-immersed foliage for 3 day, Ldalt mRNA abundance was significantly decreased by 79.5 and 71.1 %, and ALT activities were significantly reduced by 64.5 and 67.6 %, respectively. Moreover, silencing Ldalt affected free amino acid contents. Lysine was decreased by 100.0 and 100.0 %, and arginine was reduced by 87.5 and 89.4 %, respectively, in the hemolymph from dsLdalt1- and dsLdalt2-ingested beetles, compared with control ones. In contrast, proline was increased by 88.7 and 96.4 %. Furthermore, ingestion of dsLdalt1 and dsLdalt2 significantly decreased flight speed, shortened flight duration time and flight distance. In addition, knocking down Ldalt significantly increased adult mortality. These data imply that LdALT plays important roles in amino acid metabolism and in flight in L. decemlineata. PMID:25868655

  5. Deduced amino acid sequence, gene structure and chromosomal location of a novel human class Mu glutathione S-transferase, GSTM4.

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, S; Spurr, N K; Hayes, J D; Wolf, C R

    1993-01-01

    The Mu-Class glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are subject to marked inter-individual variation in man, owing to the fact that 40-50% of the population fail to express M1 subunits. Mu-Class GST from two lymphoblastoid cell lines (expressing M1 subunits and the other 'nulled' for M1) have been studied. Both cell lines were found to express a Mu-Class GST that has not been described previously. The cDNA encoding this novel transferase, designated 'GSTM4' has been isolated and the enzyme shown to be comprised of 218 amino acids (including the initiator methionine residue) with an M(r) of approx. 25.5 kDa. Molecular cloning demonstrated that the lymphoblastoid cell line which expressed GSTM1 possessed the b allelic variant (i.e. that with an asparagine residue at position 173). The genes for GSTM4 and GSTM1b have been cloned and found to contain seven introns and eight exons. The coding region of the GSTM4 gene, including the seven introns, encompasses 5.0 kb, whereas the same region of GSTM1b is 5.5 kb; the difference in the size of the two genes is due to the length of intron 7. DNA sequencing allowed a GSTM4-gene-specific oligo-primer to be designed which has been utilized in a PCR-based assay to determine that the GSTM4 gene is located on chromosome 1. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 6 PMID:8471052

  6. Three-dimensional structure of Schistosoma japonicum glutathione S-transferase fused with a six-amino acid conserved neutralizing epitope of gp41 from HIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Kap; Ho, Joseph X.; Keeling, Kim; Gilliland, Gary L.; Ji, Xinhua; Rueker, Florian; Carter, Daniel C.

    1994-01-01

    The 3-dimensional crystal structure of glutathione S-transferase (GST) of Schistosoma japonicum (Sj) fused with a conserved neutralizing epitope on gp41 (glycoprotein, 41 kDa) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) was determined at 2.5 A resolution. The structure of the 3-3 isozyme rat GST of the mu gene class was used as a molecular replacement model. The structure consists of a 4-stranded beta-sheet and 3 alpha-helices in domain 1 and 5 alpha-helices in domain 2. The space group of the Sj GST crystal is P4(sub 3)2(sub 1)2 with unit cell dimensions of a = b = 94.7 A, and c = 58.1 A. The crystal has 1 GST monomer per asymmetric unit, and 2 monomers that form an active dimer are related by crystallographic 2-fold symmetry. In the binding site, the ordered structure of reduced glutathione is observed. The gp41 peptide (Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala) fused to the C-terminus of Sj GST forms a loop stabilized by symmetry-related GSTs. The Sj GST structure is compared with previously determined GST structures of mammalian gene classes mu, alpha, and pi. Conserved amino acid residues among the 4 GSTs that are important for hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions for dimer association and glutathione binding are discussed.

  7. β-Alanine does not act through branched-chain amino acid catabolism in carp, a species with low muscular carnosine storage.

    PubMed

    Geda, F; Declercq, A; Decostere, A; Lauwaerts, A; Wuyts, B; Derave, W; Janssens, G P J

    2015-02-01

    This study was executed to investigate the effect of dietary β-alanine (BA) on amino acid (AA) metabolism and voluntary feed intake in carp (Cyprinus carpio) at mildly elevated temperature to exert AA catabolism. Twenty-four fish in 12 aquaria were randomly assigned to either a control diet or the same diet with 500 mg BA/kg. A 14-day period at an ideal temperature (23 °C) was followed by 15 days at chronic mildly elevated temperature (27 °C). After the 15 days, all fish were euthanised for muscle analysis on histidine-containing dipeptides (HCD), whole blood on free AA and carnitine esters. The carnosine and anserine analysis indicated that all analyses were below the detection limit of 5 µmol/L, confirming that carp belongs to a species that does not store HCD. The increases in free AA concentrations due to BA supplementation failed to reach the level of significance. The effects of dietary BA on selected whole blood carnitine esters and their ratios were also not significant. The supplementation of BA tended to increase body weight gain (P = 0.081) and feed intake (P = 0.092). The lack of differences in the selected nutrient metabolites in combination with tendencies of improved growth performance warrants further investigation to unravel the mechanism of BA affecting feed intake. This first trial on the effect of BA supplementation on AA catabolism showed that its metabolic effect in carp at chronic mildly elevated temperature was very limited. Further studies need to evaluate which conditions are able to exert an effect of BA on AA metabolism.

  8. The Chaperoning Activity of Amino-oxyacetic Acid on Folding-Defective Variants of Human Alanine:Glyoxylate Aminotransferase Causing Primary Hyperoxaluria Type I.

    PubMed

    Oppici, Elisa; Montioli, Riccardo; Dindo, Mirco; Maccari, Laura; Porcari, Valentina; Lorenzetto, Antonio; Chellini, Sara; Voltattorni, Carla Borri; Cellini, Barbara

    2015-10-16

    The rare disease Primary Hyperoxaluria Type I (PH1) results from the deficit of liver peroxisomal alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT), as a consequence of inherited mutations on the AGXT gene frequently leading to protein misfolding. Pharmacological chaperone (PC) therapy is a newly developed approach for misfolding diseases based on the use of small molecule ligands able to promote the correct folding of a mutant enzyme. In this report, we describe the interaction of amino-oxyacetic acid (AOA) with the recombinant purified form of two polymorphic species of AGT, AGT-Ma and AGT-Mi, and with three pathogenic variants bearing previously identified folding defects: G41R-Ma, G170R-Mi, and I244T-Mi. We found that for all these enzyme AOA (i) forms an oxime at the active site, (ii) behaves as a slow, tight-binding inhibitor with KI values in the nanomolar range, and (iii) increases the thermal stability. Furthermore, experiments performed in mammalian cells revealed that AOA acts as a PC by partly preventing the intracellular aggregation of G41R-Ma and by promoting the correct peroxisomal import of G170R-Mi and I244T-Mi. Based on these data, we carried out a small-scale screening campaign. We identified four AOA analogues acting as AGT inhibitors, even if only one was found to act as a PC. The possible relationship between the structure and the PC activity of these compounds is discussed. Altogether, these results provide the proof-of-principle for the feasibility of a therapy with PCs for PH1-causing variants bearing folding defects and provide the scaffold for the identification of more specific ligands. PMID:26161999

  9. β-Alanine does not act through branched-chain amino acid catabolism in carp, a species with low muscular carnosine storage.

    PubMed

    Geda, F; Declercq, A; Decostere, A; Lauwaerts, A; Wuyts, B; Derave, W; Janssens, G P J

    2015-02-01

    This study was executed to investigate the effect of dietary β-alanine (BA) on amino acid (AA) metabolism and voluntary feed intake in carp (Cyprinus carpio) at mildly elevated temperature to exert AA catabolism. Twenty-four fish in 12 aquaria were randomly assigned to either a control diet or the same diet with 500 mg BA/kg. A 14-day period at an ideal temperature (23 °C) was followed by 15 days at chronic mildly elevated temperature (27 °C). After the 15 days, all fish were euthanised for muscle analysis on histidine-containing dipeptides (HCD), whole blood on free AA and carnitine esters. The carnosine and anserine analysis indicated that all analyses were below the detection limit of 5 µmol/L, confirming that carp belongs to a species that does not store HCD. The increases in free AA concentrations due to BA supplementation failed to reach the level of significance. The effects of dietary BA on selected whole blood carnitine esters and their ratios were also not significant. The supplementation of BA tended to increase body weight gain (P = 0.081) and feed intake (P = 0.092). The lack of differences in the selected nutrient metabolites in combination with tendencies of improved growth performance warrants further investigation to unravel the mechanism of BA affecting feed intake. This first trial on the effect of BA supplementation on AA catabolism showed that its metabolic effect in carp at chronic mildly elevated temperature was very limited. Further studies need to evaluate which conditions are able to exert an effect of BA on AA metabolism. PMID:25549626

  10. Ingesting a preworkout supplement containing caffeine, creatine, β-alanine, amino acids, and B vitamins for 28 days is both safe and efficacious in recreationally active men.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Kristina L; Moon, Jordan R; Fairman, Ciaran M; Spradley, Brandon D; Tai, Chih-Yin; Falcone, Paul H; Carson, Laura R; Mosman, Matt M; Joy, Jordan M; Kim, Michael P; Serrano, Eric R; Esposito, Enrico N

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of consuming a preworkout supplement (SUP) containing caffeine, creatine, β-alanine, amino acids, and B vitamins for 28 days. We hypothesized that little to no changes in kidney and liver clinical blood markers or resting heart rate and blood pressure (BP) would be observed. In addition, we hypothesized that body composition and performance would improve in recreationally active males after 28 days of supplementation. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, participants were randomly assigned to ingest one scoop of either the SUP or placebo every day for 28 days, either 20 minutes before exercise or ad libitum on nonexercise days. Resting heart rate and BP, body composition, and fasting blood samples were collected before and after supplementation. Aerobic capacity as well as muscular strength and endurance were also measured. Significant (P < .05) main effects for time were observed for resting heart rate (presupplementation, 67.59 ± 7.90 beats per minute; postsupplementation, 66.18 ± 7.63 beats per minute), systolic BP (presupplementation, 122.41 ± 11.25 mm Hg; postsupplementation, 118.35 ± 11.58 mm Hg), blood urea nitrogen (presupplementation, 13.12 ± 2.55 mg/dL; postsupplementation, 15.24 ± 4.47 mg/dL), aspartate aminotransferase (presupplementation, 34.29 ± 16.48 IU/L; postsupplementation, 24.76 ± 4.71 IU/L), and alanine aminotransferase (presupplementation, 32.76 ± 19.72 IU/L; postsupplementation, 24.88 ± 9.68 IU/L). Significant main effects for time were observed for body fat percentage (presupplementation, 15.55% ± 5.79%; postsupplementation, 14.21% ± 5.38%; P = .004) and fat-free mass (presupplementation, 70.80 ± 9.21 kg; postsupplementation, 71.98 ± 9.27 kg; P = .006). A significant decrease in maximal oxygen consumption (presupplementation, 47.28 ± 2.69 mL/kg per minute; postsupplementation, 45.60 ± 2.81 mL/kg per minute) and a significant increase in percentage of

  11. Ingesting a preworkout supplement containing caffeine, creatine, β-alanine, amino acids, and B vitamins for 28 days is both safe and efficacious in recreationally active men.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Kristina L; Moon, Jordan R; Fairman, Ciaran M; Spradley, Brandon D; Tai, Chih-Yin; Falcone, Paul H; Carson, Laura R; Mosman, Matt M; Joy, Jordan M; Kim, Michael P; Serrano, Eric R; Esposito, Enrico N

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of consuming a preworkout supplement (SUP) containing caffeine, creatine, β-alanine, amino acids, and B vitamins for 28 days. We hypothesized that little to no changes in kidney and liver clinical blood markers or resting heart rate and blood pressure (BP) would be observed. In addition, we hypothesized that body composition and performance would improve in recreationally active males after 28 days of supplementation. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, participants were randomly assigned to ingest one scoop of either the SUP or placebo every day for 28 days, either 20 minutes before exercise or ad libitum on nonexercise days. Resting heart rate and BP, body composition, and fasting blood samples were collected before and after supplementation. Aerobic capacity as well as muscular strength and endurance were also measured. Significant (P < .05) main effects for time were observed for resting heart rate (presupplementation, 67.59 ± 7.90 beats per minute; postsupplementation, 66.18 ± 7.63 beats per minute), systolic BP (presupplementation, 122.41 ± 11.25 mm Hg; postsupplementation, 118.35 ± 11.58 mm Hg), blood urea nitrogen (presupplementation, 13.12 ± 2.55 mg/dL; postsupplementation, 15.24 ± 4.47 mg/dL), aspartate aminotransferase (presupplementation, 34.29 ± 16.48 IU/L; postsupplementation, 24.76 ± 4.71 IU/L), and alanine aminotransferase (presupplementation, 32.76 ± 19.72 IU/L; postsupplementation, 24.88 ± 9.68 IU/L). Significant main effects for time were observed for body fat percentage (presupplementation, 15.55% ± 5.79%; postsupplementation, 14.21% ± 5.38%; P = .004) and fat-free mass (presupplementation, 70.80 ± 9.21 kg; postsupplementation, 71.98 ± 9.27 kg; P = .006). A significant decrease in maximal oxygen consumption (presupplementation, 47.28 ± 2.69 mL/kg per minute; postsupplementation, 45.60 ± 2.81 mL/kg per minute) and a significant increase in percentage of

  12. Three-dimensional structure of Schistosoma japonicum glutathione S-transferase fused with a six-amino acid conserved neutralizing epitope of gp41 from HIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, K.; Ho, J. X.; Keeling, K.; Gilliland, G. L.; Ji, X.; Ruker, F.; Carter, D. C.

    1994-01-01

    The 3-dimensional crystal structure of glutathione S-transferase (GST) of Schistosoma japonicum (Sj) fused with a conserved neutralizing epitope on gp41 (glycoprotein, 41 kDa) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) (Muster T et al., 1993, J Virol 67:6642-6647) was determined at 2.5 A resolution. The structure of the 3-3 isozyme rat GST of the mu gene class (Ji X, Zhang P, Armstrong RN, Gilliland GL, 1992, Biochemistry 31:10169-10184) was used as a molecular replacement model. The structure consists of a 4-stranded beta-sheet and 3 alpha-helices in domain 1 and 5 alpha-helices in domain 2. The space group of the Sj GST crystal is P4(3)2(1)2, with unit cell dimensions of a = b = 94.7 A, and c = 58.1 A. The crystal has 1 GST monomer per asymmetric unit, and 2 monomers that form an active dimer are related by crystallographic 2-fold symmetry. In the binding site, the ordered structure of reduced glutathione is observed. The gp41 peptide (Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala) fused to the C-terminus of Sj GST forms a loop stabilized by symmetry-related GSTs. The Sj GST structure is compared with previously determined GST structures of mammalian gene classes mu, alpha, and pi. Conserved amino acid residues among the 4 GSTs that are important for hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions for dimer association and glutathione binding are discussed.

  13. Synthesis of polysubstituted β-amino cyclohexane carboxylic acids via Diels-Alder reaction using Ni(II)-complex stabilized β-alanine derived dienes.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiao; Wang, Hengshuai; Wang, Jiang; Wang, Sinan; Lin, Daizong; Lv, Li; Zhou, Yu; Luo, Xiaomin; Jiang, Hualiang; Aceña, José Luis; Soloshonok, Vadim A; Liu, Hong

    2013-02-01

    This paper describes the design and synthesis of a new class of β-alanine derived dienes stabilized by Ni(II)-complex. Preliminary study of their Diels-Alder cycloaddition reactions with several types of dienophiles demonstrates their significant synthetic potential for the preparation of various polyfunctional β-aminocyclohexane carboxylic acids.

  14. Catalytic Stereoinversion of L-Alanine to Deuterated D-Alanine.

    PubMed

    Moozeh, Kimia; So, Soon Mog; Chin, Jik

    2015-08-01

    A combination of an achiral pyridoxal analogue and a chiral base has been developed for catalytic deuteration of L-alanine with inversion of stereochemistry to give deuterated D-alanine under mild conditions (neutral pD and 25 °C) without the use of any protecting groups. This system can also be used for catalytic deuteration of D-alanine with retention of stereochemistry to give deuterated D-alanine. Thus a racemic mixture of alanine can be catalytically deuterated to give an enantiomeric excess of deuterated D-alanine. While catalytic deracemization of alanine is forbidden by the second law of thermodynamics, this system can be used for catalytic deracemization of alanine with deuteration. Such green and biomimetic approach to catalytic stereocontrol provides insights into efficient amino acid transformations.

  15. A new amino acid, 3-(2,5-SS-dicysteinyl-3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)alanine, from the tapetum lucidum of the gar (Lepisosteidae) and its enzymic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ito, S; Nicol, J A

    1977-03-01

    The tapetum lucidum of the alligator gar Lepisosteus was shown by t.l.c. to contain a new phenolic amino acid, which is apparently a major constituent of the reflecting material. It was isolated in a yield of 0.5 mg/eye and its physical and chemical characteristics, especially reductive hydrolysis with hydriodic acid giving dopa (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) and cysteine, suggested that it might to SS-dicysteinyldopa. Tyrosinase oxidation of L-dopa in the presence of an excess of L-cysteine yielded, in addition to known 5- and 2-S-cysteinyldopa, the same amino acid as that isolated from the eye of the gar, thus confirming the gross structure. The position of the two cysteine residues was established by the fact that tyrosinase oxidation of catechol and cyteine gave 3-S-cysteinylcatechol and 3,6-SS-dicysteinylcatechol. The natural amino acid is therefore formulated as 3-(2,5-SS-dicysteinyl-3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)alanine (2,5-SS-dicysteinyldopa), which may be formed by two consecutive additions of cysteine, first to dopaquinone and then to 5-S-cysteinyldopaquinone. The enzymic synthesis of 2,5-SS-dicysteinyldopa in vitro suggests that it may also be involved in the biosynthesis of phaeomelanin. PMID:403909

  16. A new amino acid, 3-(2,5-SS-dicysteinyl-3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)alanine, from the tapetum lucidum of the gar (Lepisosteidae) and its enzymic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ito, S; Nicol, J A

    1977-03-01

    The tapetum lucidum of the alligator gar Lepisosteus was shown by t.l.c. to contain a new phenolic amino acid, which is apparently a major constituent of the reflecting material. It was isolated in a yield of 0.5 mg/eye and its physical and chemical characteristics, especially reductive hydrolysis with hydriodic acid giving dopa (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) and cysteine, suggested that it might to SS-dicysteinyldopa. Tyrosinase oxidation of L-dopa in the presence of an excess of L-cysteine yielded, in addition to known 5- and 2-S-cysteinyldopa, the same amino acid as that isolated from the eye of the gar, thus confirming the gross structure. The position of the two cysteine residues was established by the fact that tyrosinase oxidation of catechol and cyteine gave 3-S-cysteinylcatechol and 3,6-SS-dicysteinylcatechol. The natural amino acid is therefore formulated as 3-(2,5-SS-dicysteinyl-3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)alanine (2,5-SS-dicysteinyldopa), which may be formed by two consecutive additions of cysteine, first to dopaquinone and then to 5-S-cysteinyldopaquinone. The enzymic synthesis of 2,5-SS-dicysteinyldopa in vitro suggests that it may also be involved in the biosynthesis of phaeomelanin.

  17. A new amino acid, 3-(2,5-SS-dicysteinyl-3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)alanine, from the tapetum lucidum of the gar (Lepisosteidae) and its enzymic synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, S; Nicol, J A

    1977-01-01

    The tapetum lucidum of the alligator gar Lepisosteus was shown by t.l.c. to contain a new phenolic amino acid, which is apparently a major constituent of the reflecting material. It was isolated in a yield of 0.5 mg/eye and its physical and chemical characteristics, especially reductive hydrolysis with hydriodic acid giving dopa (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) and cysteine, suggested that it might to SS-dicysteinyldopa. Tyrosinase oxidation of L-dopa in the presence of an excess of L-cysteine yielded, in addition to known 5- and 2-S-cysteinyldopa, the same amino acid as that isolated from the eye of the gar, thus confirming the gross structure. The position of the two cysteine residues was established by the fact that tyrosinase oxidation of catechol and cyteine gave 3-S-cysteinylcatechol and 3,6-SS-dicysteinylcatechol. The natural amino acid is therefore formulated as 3-(2,5-SS-dicysteinyl-3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)alanine (2,5-SS-dicysteinyldopa), which may be formed by two consecutive additions of cysteine, first to dopaquinone and then to 5-S-cysteinyldopaquinone. The enzymic synthesis of 2,5-SS-dicysteinyldopa in vitro suggests that it may also be involved in the biosynthesis of phaeomelanin. PMID:403909

  18. Ionization constants of aqueous amino acids at temperatures up to 250°C using hydrothermal pH indicators and UV-visible spectroscopy: Glycine, α-alanine, and proline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Rodney G. F.; Collins, Christopher M.; Roberts, Jenene C.; Trevani, Liliana N.; Bartholomew, Richard J.; Tremaine, Peter R.

    2005-06-01

    Ionization constants for several simple amino acids have been measured for the first time under hydrothermal conditions, using visible spectroscopy with a high-temperature, high-pressure flow cell and thermally stable colorimetric pH indicators. This method minimizes amino acid decomposition at high temperatures because the data can be collected rapidly with short equilibration times. The first ionization constant for proline and α-alanine, K a,COOH, and the first and second ionization constants for glycine, K a,COOH and K a,NH4+, have been determined at temperatures as high as 250°C. Values for the standard partial molar heat capacity of ionization, Δ rC po, COOH and Δ rC po, NH4+, have been determined from the temperature dependence of ln (K a,COOH) and ln (K a,NH4+). The methodology has been validated by measuring the ionization constant of acetic acid up to 250°C, with results that agree with literature values obtained by potentiometric measurements to within the combined experimental uncertainty. We dedicate this paper to the memory of Dr. Donald Irish (1932-2002) of the University of Waterloo—friend and former supervisor of two of the authors (R.J.B. and P.R.T.).

  19. Neutral penta- and hexacoordinate silicon(IV) complexes containing two bidentate ligands derived from the alpha-amino acids (S)-alanine, (S)-phenylalanine, and (S)-tert-leucine.

    PubMed

    Cota, Smaranda; Beyer, Matthias; Bertermann, Rüdiger; Burschka, Christian; Götz, Kathrin; Kaupp, Martin; Tacke, Reinhold

    2010-06-11

    The neutral hexacoordinate silicon(IV) complex 6 (SiO(2)N(4) skeleton) and the neutral pentacoordinate silicon(IV) complexes 7-11 (SiO(2)N(2)C skeletons) were synthesized from Si(NCO)(4) and RSi(NCO)(3) (R = Me, Ph), respectively. The compounds were structurally characterized by solid-state NMR spectroscopy (6-11), solution NMR spectroscopy (6 and 10), and single-crystal X-ray diffraction (8 and 11 were studied as the solvates 8 x CH(3)CN and 11 x C(5)H(12) x 0.5 CH(3)CN, respectively). The silicon(IV) complexes 6 (octahedral Si-coordination polyhedron) and 7-11 (trigonal-bipyramidal Si-coordination polyhedra) each contain two bidentate ligands derived from an alpha-amino acid: (S)-alanine, (S)-phenylalanine, or (S)-tert-leucine. The deprotonated amino acids act as monoanionic (6) or as mono- and dianionic ligands (7-11). The experimental investigations were complemented by computational studies of the stereoisomers of 6 and 7.

  20. Solved? The reductive radiation chemistry of alanine.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Ewald; De Cooman, Hendrik; Waroquier, Michel; Hole, Eli O; Sagstuen, Einar

    2014-02-14

    The structural changes throughout the entire reductive radiation-induced pathway of l-α-alanine are solved on an atomistic level with the aid of periodic DFT and nudged elastic band (NEB) simulations. This yields unprecedented information on the conformational changes taking place, including the protonation state of the carboxyl group in the "unstable" and "stable" alanine radicals and the internal transformation converting these two radical variants at temperatures above 220 K. The structures of all stable radicals were verified by calculating EPR properties and comparing those with experimental data. The variation of the energy throughout the full radiochemical process provides crucial insight into the reason why these structural changes and rearrangements occur. Starting from electron capture, the excess electron quickly localizes on the carbon of a carboxyl group, which pyramidalizes and receives a proton from the amino group of a neighboring alanine molecule, forming a first stable radical species (up to 150 K). In the temperature interval 150-220 K, this radical deaminates and deprotonates at the carboxyl group, the detached amino group undergoes inversion and its methyl group sustains an internal rotation. This yields the so-called "unstable alanine radical". Above 220 K, triggered by the attachment of an additional proton on the detached amino group, the radical then undergoes an internal rotation in the reverse direction, giving rise to the "stable alanine radical", which is the final stage in the reductive radiation-induced decay of alanine.

  1. REVERSAL OF d-CYCLOSERINE INHIBITION OF BACTERIAL GROWTH BY ALANINE

    PubMed Central

    Zygmunt, Walter A.

    1962-01-01

    Zygmunt, Walter A. (Mead Johnson & Co., Evansville, Ind.). Reversal of d-cycloserine inhibition of bacterial growth by alanine. J. Bacteriol. 84:154–156. 1962.—Reversal of the antibacterial activity of d-4-amino-3-isoxazolidone by alanine in bacterial cultures actively growing on chemically defined media was compared in cultures requiring exogenous alanine and those capable of its synthesis. dl-Alanine was the most effective reversal agent in Pediococcus cerevisiae, an alanine-requiring organism, and d-alanine was effective in Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, organisms synthesizing alanine. With all three cultures, l-alanine was the least effective reversal agent. PMID:16561951

  2. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa antimetabolite L -2-amino-4-methoxy-trans-3-butenoic acid (AMB) is made from glutamate and two alanine residues via a thiotemplate-linked tripeptide precursor

    PubMed Central

    Rojas Murcia, Nelson; Lee, Xiaoyun; Waridel, Patrice; Maspoli, Alessandro; Imker, Heidi J.; Chai, Tiancong; Walsh, Christopher T.; Reimmann, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa toxin L-2-amino-4-methoxy-trans-3-butenoic acid (AMB) is a non-proteinogenic amino acid which is toxic for prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Production of AMB requires a five-gene cluster encoding a putative LysE-type transporter (AmbA), two non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (AmbB and AmbE), and two iron(II)/α-ketoglutarate-dependent oxygenases (AmbC and AmbD). Bioinformatics analysis predicts one thiolation (T) domain for AmbB and two T domains (T1 and T2) for AmbE, suggesting that AMB is generated by a processing step from a precursor tripeptide assembled on a thiotemplate. Using a combination of ATP-PPi exchange assays, aminoacylation assays, and mass spectrometry-based analysis of enzyme-bound substrates and pathway intermediates, the AmbB substrate was identified to be L-alanine (L-Ala), while the T1 and T2 domains of AmbE were loaded with L-glutamate (L-Glu) and L-Ala, respectively. Loading of L-Ala at T2 of AmbE occurred only in the presence of AmbB, indicative of a trans loading mechanism. In vitro assays performed with AmbB and AmbE revealed the dipeptide L-Glu-L-Ala at T1 and the tripeptide L-Ala-L-Glu-L-Ala attached at T2. When AmbC and AmbD were included in the assay, these peptides were no longer detected. Instead, an L-Ala-AMB-L-Ala tripeptide was found at T2. These data are in agreement with a biosynthetic model in which L-Glu is converted into AMB by the action of AmbC, AmbD, and tailoring domains of AmbE. The importance of the flanking L-Ala residues in the precursor tripeptide is discussed. PMID:25814981

  3. β-Alanine supplementation.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Jay R; Emerson, Nadia S; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2012-01-01

    β-Alanine is rapidly developing as one of the most popular sport supplements used by strength/power athletes worldwide. The popularity of β-alanine stems from its unique ability to enhance intramuscular buffering capacity and thereby attenuating fatigue. This review will provide an overview of the physiology that underlies the mechanisms of action behind β-alanine, examine dosing schemes, and examine the studies that have been conducted on the efficacy of this supplement. In addition, the effect that β-alanine has on body mass changes or whether it can stimulate changes in aerobic capacity also will be discussed. The review also will begin to explore the potential health benefits that β-alanine may have on older adult populations. Discussion will examine the potential adverse effects associated with this supplement as well as the added benefits of combining β-alanine with creatine.

  4. Secretion of d-alanine by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Katsube, Satoshi; Sato, Kazuki; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Yoneyama, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Escherichia coli has an l-alanine export system that protects the cells from toxic accumulation of intracellular l-alanine in the presence of l-alanyl-l-alanine (l-Ala-l-Ala). When a DadA-deficient strain was incubated with 6.0 mM l-Ala-l-Ala, we detected l-alanine and d-alanine using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis at a level of 7.0 mM and 3.0 mM, respectively, after 48 h incubation. Treatment of the culture supernatant with d-amino acid oxidase resulted in the disappearance of a signal corresponding to d-alanine. Additionally, the culture supernatant enabled a d-alanine auxotroph to grow without d-alanine supplementation, confirming that the signal detected by HPLC was authentic d-alanine. Upon introduction of an expression vector harbouring the alanine racemase genes, alr or dadX, the extracellular level of d-alanine increased to 11.5 mM and 8.5 mM, respectively, under similar conditions, suggesting that increased metabolic flow from l-alanine to d-alanine enhanced d-alanine secretion. When high-density DadA-deficient cells preloaded with l-Ala-l-Ala were treated with 20 µM carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP), secretion of both l-alanine and d-alanine was enhanced ~twofold compared with that in cells without CCCP treatment. In contrast, the ATPase inhibitor dicyclohexylcarbodiimide did not exert such an effect on the l-alanine and d-alanine secretion. Furthermore, inverted membrane vesicles prepared from DadA-deficient cells lacking the l-alanine exporter AlaE accumulated [3H]D-alanine in an energy-dependent manner. This energy-dependent accumulation of [3H]D-alanine was strongly inhibited by CCCP. These results indicate that E. coli has a transport system(s) that exports d-alanine and that this function is most likely modulated by proton electrochemical potential. PMID:27166225

  5. D-Serine metabolism in C6 glioma cells: Involvement of alanine-serine-cysteine transporter (ASCT2) and serine racemase (SRR) but not D-amino acid oxidase (DAO)

    PubMed Central

    Sikka, Pilleriin; Walker, Rosie; Cockayne, Rebecca; Wood, Matthew JA; Harrison, Paul J; Burnet, Philip WJ

    2010-01-01

    D-serine is an endogenous N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor coagonist. It is synthesized from L-serine by serine racemase (SRR), but many aspects of its metabolism remain unclear, especially in the forebrain, which lacks active D-amino acid oxidase (DAO), the major D-serine degradative enzyme. Candidate mechanisms include SRR operating in α,β-eliminase mode (converting D-serine to pyruvate) and regulation by serine transport, in which the alanine-serine-cysteine transporter ASCT2 is implicated. Here we report studies in C6 glioma cells, which “simulate” the forebrain, in that the cells express SRR and ASCT2 but lack DAO activity. We measured D-serine, ASCT2, SRR, and DAO expression and DAO activity in two situations: after incubation of cells for 48 hr with serine isomers and after increased or decreased SRR expression by transfection and RNA interference, respectively. Incubation with serine enantiomers decreased [3H]D-serine uptake and ASCT2 mRNA and increased SRR immunoreactivity but did not alter DAO immunoreactivity, and DAO activity remained undetectable. SRR overexpression increased D-serine and pyruvate and decreased [3H]D-serine uptake and ASCT2 mRNA but did not affect DAO. SRR knockdown did not alter any of the parameters. Our data suggest that D-serine transport mediated by ASCT2 contributes prominently to D-serine homeostasis when DAO activity is absent. The factors regulating D-serine are important for understanding normal NMDA receptor function and because D-serine, along with DAO and SRR, is implicated in the pathogenesis and treatment of schizophrenia. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20091774

  6. Infrared Spectroscopy of Alanine in Solid Parahydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toh, Shin Yi; Wong, Ying-Tung Angel; Djuricanin, Pavle; Momose, Takamasa

    2014-06-01

    Amino acids are the building blocks of biological molecules, and thus the investigation of their physical and chemical properties would allow for further understanding of their functions in biological systems. In addition, the existence of amino acids in interstellar space has been discussed for many years, but it is still under intense debate. The effect of UV radiation on amino acids is one of the keys for their search in interstellar space, where strong UV radiation exists. In this experiment, conformational compositions of alpha and beta alanine and their UV photolysis were investigated via matrix-isolation FTIR spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. Solid parahydrogen was used as the matrix, which provides higher resolution spectra than other noble gas matrices. We have identified several stable conformers for both alpha and beta alanine in solid parahydrogen. A clear correlation between conformational ratio and sublimation temperature was found for beta alanine. Furthermore, it was found that UV photolysis of alanine yields not only its conformational changes, but also photodissociation into a CO2 molecule and fragments. Observed spectra and their analysis will be discussed in relation to interstellar chemistry.

  7. Beta-alanine as a small molecule neurotransmitter.

    PubMed

    Tiedje, K E; Stevens, K; Barnes, S; Weaver, D F

    2010-10-01

    This review discusses the role of beta-alanine as a neurotransmitter. Beta-alanine is structurally intermediate between alpha-amino acid (glycine, glutamate) and gamma-amino acid (GABA) neurotransmitters. In general, beta-alanine satisfies a number of the prerequisite classical criteria for being a neurotransmitter: beta-alanine occurs naturally in the CNS, is released by electrical stimulation through a Ca(2+) dependent process, has binding sites, and inhibits neuronal excitability. beta-Alanine has 5 recognized receptor sites: glycine co-agonist site on the NMDA complex (strychnine-insensitive); glycine receptor site (strychnine sensitive); GABA-A receptor; GABA-C receptor; and blockade of GAT protein-mediated glial GABA uptake. Although beta-alanine binding has been identified throughout the hippocampus, limbic structures, and neocortex, unique beta-alaninergic neurons with no GABAergic properties remain unidentified, and it is impossible to discriminate between beta-alaninergic and GABAergic properties in the CNS. Nevertheless, a variety of data suggest that beta-alanine should be considered as a small molecule neurotransmitter and should join the ranks of the other amino acid neurotransmitters. These realizations open the door for a more comprehensive evaluation of beta-alanine's neurochemistry and for its exploitation as a platform for drug design.

  8. Vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) transports β-alanine.

    PubMed

    Juge, Narinobu; Omote, Hiroshi; Moriyama, Yoshinori

    2013-11-01

    Vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) is expressed in GABAergic and glycinergic neurons, and is responsible for vesicular storage and subsequent exocytosis of these inhibitory amino acids. In this study, we show that VGAT recognizes β-alanine as a substrate. Proteoliposomes containing purified VGAT transport β-alanine using Δψ but not ΔpH as a driving force. The Δψ-driven β-alanine uptake requires Cl(-). VGAT also facilitates Cl(-) uptake in the presence of β-alanine. A previously described VGAT mutant (Glu213Ala) that disrupts GABA and glycine transport similarly abrogates β-alanine uptake. These findings indicated that VGAT transports β-alanine through a mechanism similar to those for GABA and glycine, and functions as a vesicular β-alanine transporter. Vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) is expressed in GABAergic and glycinergic neurons, and is responsible for vesicular storage and subsequent exocytosis of these inhibitory amino acids. In the present study, we showed that proteoliposomes containing purified VGAT transport β-alanine using Δψ as a driving force. VGAT also facilitates Cl(-) uptake. Our findings indicated that VGAT functions as a vesicular β-alanine transporter.

  9. Alteration of substrate specificity of alanine dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Puja; Aldeborgh, Hannah; Carlucci, Lauren; Walsh, Lauren; Wasserman, Jordan; Zhou, Edward; Lefurgy, Scott T.; Mundorff, Emily C.

    2015-01-01

    The l-alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) has a natural history that suggests it would not be a promising candidate for expansion of substrate specificity by protein engineering: it is the only amino acid dehydrogenase in its fold family, it has no sequence or structural similarity to any known amino acid dehydrogenase, and it has a strong preference for l-alanine over all other substrates. By contrast, engineering of the amino acid dehydrogenase superfamily members has produced catalysts with expanded substrate specificity; yet, this enzyme family already contains members that accept a broad range of substrates. To test whether the natural history of an enzyme is a predictor of its innate evolvability, directed evolution was carried out on AlaDH. A single mutation identified through molecular modeling, F94S, introduced into the AlaDH from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtAlaDH) completely alters its substrate specificity pattern, enabling activity toward a range of larger amino acids. Saturation mutagenesis libraries in this mutant background additionally identified a double mutant (F94S/Y117L) showing improved activity toward hydrophobic amino acids. The catalytic efficiencies achieved in AlaDH are comparable with those that resulted from similar efforts in the amino acid dehydrogenase superfamily and demonstrate the evolvability of MtAlaDH specificity toward other amino acid substrates. PMID:25538307

  10. Experimental and computational thermochemical study of α-alanine (DL) and β-alanine.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Manuel A V Ribeiro; da Silva, Maria das Dores M C Ribeiro; Santos, Ana Filipa L O M; Roux, Maria Victoria; Foces-Foces, Concepción; Notario, Rafael; Guzmán-Mejía, Ramón; Juaristi, Eusebio

    2010-12-16

    This paper reports an experimental and theoretical study of the gas phase standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpies of formation, at T = 298.15 K, of α-alanine (DL) and β-alanine. The standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpies of formation of crystalline α-alanine (DL) and β-alanine were calculated from the standard molar energies of combustion, in oxygen, to yield CO2(g), N2(g), and H2O(l), measured by static-bomb combustion calorimetry at T = 298.15 K. The vapor pressures of both amino acids were measured as function of temperature by the Knudsen effusion mass-loss technique. The standard molar enthalpies of sublimation at T = 298.15 K was derived from the Clausius−Clapeyron equation. The experimental values were used to calculate the standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) enthalpy of formation of α-alanine (DL) and β-alanine in the gaseous phase, Δ(f)H(m)°(g), as −426.3 ± 2.9 and −421.2 ± 1.9 kJ·mol(−1), respectively. Standard ab initio molecular orbital calculations at the G3 level were performed. Enthalpies of formation, using atomization reactions, were calculated and compared with experimental data. Detailed inspections of the molecular and electronic structures of the compounds studied were carried out.

  11. Atomic Layer Deposition of L-Alanine Polypeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yaqin; Li, Binsong; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Dunphy, Darren R.; Tsai, Andy; Tam, Siu-Yue; Fan, Hongyou Y.; Zhang, Hongxia; Rogers, David; Rempe, Susan; Atanassov, Plamen; Cecchi, Joseph L.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2014-10-30

    L-Alanine polypeptide thin films were synthesized via atomic layer deposition (ALD). Rather, instead of using an amino acid monomer as the precursor, an L-alanine amino acid derivatized with a protecting group was used to prevent self-polymerization, increase the vapor pressure, and allow linear cycle-by-cycle growth emblematic of ALD. Moreover, the successful deposition of a conformal polypeptide film has been confirmed by FTIR, TEM, and Mass Spectrometry, and the ALD process has been extended to polyvaline.

  12. Substrate specificity of amino acid transport in sheep erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Young, J D; Ellory, J C

    1977-01-01

    The specificity of amino acid transport in normal (high-glutathione) sheep erythrocytes was investigated by studying the interaction of various neutral and dibasic amino acids in both competition and exchange experiments. Apparent Ki values were obtained for amino acids as inhibitors of L-alanine influx. Amino acids previously found to be transported by high-glutathione cells at fast rates (L-cysteine, L-alpha-amino-n-butyrate) were the most effective inhibitors. D-Alanine and D-alpha-amino-n-butyrate were without effect. Of the remaining amino acids studied, only L-norvaline, L-valine, L-norleucine, L-serine and L-2,4-diamino-n-butyrate significantly inhibited L-alanine uptake. L-Alanine efflux from pre-loaded cells was markedly stimulated by extracellular L-alanine. Those amino acids that inhibited L-alanine influx also stimulated L-alanine efflux. In addition, D-alanine, D-alpha-amino-n-biutyrate, L-threonine, L-asparagine, L-alpha, beta-diaminoproprionate, L-ornithine, L-lysine and S-2-aminoethyl-L-cysteine also significantly stimulated L-alanine efflux. L-Lysine uptake was inhibited by L-alanine but not by D-alanine, and the inhibitory potency of L-alanine was not influenced by the replacement of Na+ in the incubation medium with choline. L-Lysine efflux from pre-loaded cells was stimulated by L-alanine but not by D-alanine. It is concluded that these cells possess a highly selective stero-specific amino acid-transport system. Although the optimum substrates are small neutral amino acids, this system also has a significant affinity for dibasic amino acids. PMID:849280

  13. A single amino acid change (substitution of the conserved Glu-590 with alanine) in the C-terminal domain of rat liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase I increases its malonyl-CoA sensitivity close to that observed with the muscle isoform of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Napal, Laura; Dai, Jia; Treber, Michelle; Haro, Diego; Marrero, Pedro F; Woldegiorgis, Gebre

    2003-09-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPTI) catalyzes the conversion of long-chain fatty acyl-CoAs to acylcarnitines in the presence of l-carnitine. To determine the role of the highly conserved C-terminal glutamate residue, Glu-590, on catalysis and malonyl-CoA sensitivity, we separately changed the residue to alanine, lysine, glutamine, and aspartate. Substitution of Glu-590 with aspartate, a negatively charged amino acid with only one methyl group less than the glutamate residue in the wild-type enzyme, resulted in complete loss in the activity of the liver isoform of CPTI (L-CPTI). A change of Glu-590 to alanine, glutamine, and lysine caused a significant 9- to 16-fold increase in malonyl-CoA sensitivity but only a partial decrease in catalytic activity. Substitution of Glu-590 with neutral uncharged residues (alanine and glutamine) and/or a basic positively charged residue (lysine) significantly increased L-CPTI malonyl-CoA sensitivity to the level observed with the muscle isoform of the enzyme, suggesting the importance of neutral and/or positive charges in the switch of the kinetic properties of L-CPTI to the muscle isoform of CPTI. Since a conservative substitution of Glu-590 to aspartate but not glutamine resulted in complete loss in activity, we suggest that the longer side chain of glutamate is essential for catalysis and malonyl-CoA sensitivity. This is the first demonstration whereby a single residue mutation in the C-terminal region of the liver isoform of CPTI resulted in a change of its kinetic properties close to that observed with the muscle isoform of the enzyme and provides the rationale for the high malonyl-CoA sensitivity of muscle CPTI compared with the liver isoform of the enzyme. PMID:12826662

  14. Glutathione transferase gene family from the housefly Musca domestica.

    PubMed

    Syvanen, M; Zhou, Z H; Wang, J Y

    1994-10-17

    Three new glutathione transferase (GST) genes from the housefly Musca domestica are described. These genes, identified as MdGST-2, -3, and -4, were from cDNA clones obtained from a cDNA bank in phage lambda. The bank was prepared using poly(A)+ RNA from a housefly that is highly resistant to organophosphate insecticides because of enhanced expression of multiple members of the glutathione transferase gene family. The DNA sequence of each is reported and has a complete open reading frame that specified an amino acid sequence similar to other dipteran glutathione transferases. Based on phylogenetic analysis, we can conclude that the insect glutathione transferase gene family falls into two groups, each of which evolves at a different rate, presumably due to differences in functional constraints. We show that MdGST-1 (and their homologues from Drosophila and Lucilia) evolve at a significantly slower rate than the other members of the gene family. Each housefly GST cDNA was inserted into a bacterial plasmid expression system and a glutathione transferase activity was expressed in Escherichia coli. The transcription pattern of each of these glutathione transferases was examined in a variety of different housefly strains that are known to differ in their resistance to organophosphate insecticides due to different patterns of glutathione transferase expression. We found that the level of transcription for two of our clones was positively correlated with the level of organophosphate resistance.

  15. Earthworms accumulate alanine in response to drought.

    PubMed

    Holmstrup, Martin; Slotsbo, Stine; Henriksen, Per G; Bayley, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Earthworms have ecologically significant functions in tropical and temperate ecosystems and it is therefore important to understand how these animals survive during drought. In order to explore the physiological responses to dry conditions, we simulated a natural drought incident in a laboratory trial exposing worms in slowly drying soil for about one month, and then analyzed the whole-body contents of free amino acids (FAAs). We investigated three species forming estivation chambers when soils dry out (Aporrectodea tuberculata, Aporrectodea icterica and Aporrectodea longa) and one species that does not estivate during drought (Lumbricus rubellus). Worms subjected to drought conditions (< -2MPa) substantially increased the concentration of FAAs and in particular alanine that was significantly upregulated in all tested species. Alanine was the most important FAA reaching 250-650μmolg(-1) dry weight in dehydrated Aporrectodea species and 300μmolg(-1) dry weight in L. rubellus. Proline was only weakly upregulated in some species as were a few other FAAs. Species forming estivation chambers (Aporrectodea spp.) did not show a better ability to conserve body water than the non-estivating species (L. rubellus) at the same drought level. These results suggest that the accumulation of alanine is an important adaptive trait in drought tolerance of earthworms in general. PMID:27107492

  16. Optical and Spectral Studies on β Alanine Metal Halide Hybrid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweetlin, M. Daniel; Selvarajan, P.; Perumal, S.; Ramalingom, S.

    2011-10-01

    We have synthesized and grown β alanine metal halide hybrid crystals viz. β alanine cadmium chloride (BACC), an amino acid transition metal halide complex crystal and β alanine potassium chloride (BAPC), an amino acid alkali metal halide complex crystal by slow evaporation method. The grown crystals were found to be transparent and have well defined morphology. The optical characteristics of the grown crystals were carried out with the help of UV-Vis Spectroscopy. The optical transmittances of the spectrums show that BAPC is more transparent than BACC. The Photoluminescence of the materials were determined by the Photoluminescent Spectroscopy

  17. Ergogenic effects of β-alanine and carnosine: proposed future research to quantify their efficacy.

    PubMed

    Caruso, John; Charles, Jessica; Unruh, Kayla; Giebel, Rachel; Learmonth, Lexis; Potter, William

    2012-07-01

    β-alanine is an amino acid that, when combined with histidine, forms the dipeptide carnosine within skeletal muscle. Carnosine and β-alanine each have multiple purposes within the human body; this review focuses on their roles as ergogenic aids to exercise performance and suggests how to best quantify the former's merits as a buffer. Carnosine normally makes a small contribution to a cell's total buffer capacity; yet β-alanine supplementation raises intracellular carnosine concentrations that in turn improve a muscle's ability to buffer protons. Numerous studies assessed the impact of oral β-alanine intake on muscle carnosine levels and exercise performance. β-alanine may best act as an ergogenic aid when metabolic acidosis is the primary factor for compromised exercise performance. Blood lactate kinetics, whereby the concentration of the metabolite is measured as it enters and leaves the vasculature over time, affords the best opportunity to assess the merits of β-alanine supplementation's ergogenic effect. Optimal β-alanine dosages have not been determined for persons of different ages, genders and nutritional/health conditions. Doses as high as 6.4 g day(-1), for ten weeks have been administered to healthy subjects. Paraesthesia is to date the only side effect from oral β-alanine ingestion. The severity and duration of paraesthesia episodes are dose-dependent. It may be unwise for persons with a history of paraesthesia to ingest β-alanine. As for any supplement, caution should be exercised with β-alanine supplementation.

  18. [Effects of ß-alanine supplementation on athletic performance].

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Raúl; Hernández Lougedo, Juan; Maté-Muñoz, José Luis; Garnacho-Castaño, Manuel Vicente

    2014-10-06

    Carnosine, dipeptide formed by amino acids ß-alanine and L-histidine, has important physiological functions among which its antioxidant and related memory and learning. However, in connection with the exercise, the most important functions would be associated with muscle contractility, improving calcium sensitivity in muscle fibers, and the regulatory function of pH. Thus, it is proposed that carnosine is the major intracellular buffer, but could contribute to 7-10% in buffer or buffer capacity. Since carnosine synthesis seems to be limited by the availability of ß-alanine supplementation with this compound has been gaining increasing popularity among the athlete population. Therefore, the objective of this study literature review was to examine all those research works have shown the effect of ß-alanine supplementation on athletic performance. Moreover, it also has attempted to establish a specific dosage that maximizing the potential benefits, minimize paresthesia, the main side effect presented in response to supplementation.

  19. Alanine aminotransferase controls seed dormancy in barley

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Kazuhiro; Yamane, Miki; Yamaji, Nami; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Tagiri, Akemi; Schwerdt, Julian G.; Fincher, Geoffrey B.; Matsumoto, Takashi; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Komatsuda, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Dormancy allows wild barley grains to survive dry summers in the Near East. After domestication, barley was selected for shorter dormancy periods. Here we isolate the major seed dormancy gene qsd1 from wild barley, which encodes an alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT). The seed dormancy gene is expressed specifically in the embryo. The AlaAT isoenzymes encoded by the long and short dormancy alleles differ in a single amino acid residue. The reduced dormancy allele Qsd1 evolved from barleys that were first domesticated in the southern Levant and had the long dormancy qsd1 allele that can be traced back to wild barleys. The reduced dormancy mutation likely contributed to the enhanced performance of barley in industrial applications such as beer and whisky production, which involve controlled germination. In contrast, the long dormancy allele might be used to control pre-harvest sprouting in higher rainfall areas to enhance global adaptation of barley. PMID:27188711

  20. Alanine aminotransferase controls seed dormancy in barley.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kazuhiro; Yamane, Miki; Yamaji, Nami; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Tagiri, Akemi; Schwerdt, Julian G; Fincher, Geoffrey B; Matsumoto, Takashi; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Komatsuda, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Dormancy allows wild barley grains to survive dry summers in the Near East. After domestication, barley was selected for shorter dormancy periods. Here we isolate the major seed dormancy gene qsd1 from wild barley, which encodes an alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT). The seed dormancy gene is expressed specifically in the embryo. The AlaAT isoenzymes encoded by the long and short dormancy alleles differ in a single amino acid residue. The reduced dormancy allele Qsd1 evolved from barleys that were first domesticated in the southern Levant and had the long dormancy qsd1 allele that can be traced back to wild barleys. The reduced dormancy mutation likely contributed to the enhanced performance of barley in industrial applications such as beer and whisky production, which involve controlled germination. In contrast, the long dormancy allele might be used to control pre-harvest sprouting in higher rainfall areas to enhance global adaptation of barley. PMID:27188711

  1. Bovine Parathyroid Hormone: Amino Acid Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, H. Bryan; Ronan, Rosemary

    1970-01-01

    Bovine parathyroid hormone has been isolated in homogeneous form, and its complete amino acid sequence determined. The bovine hormone is a single chain, 84 amino acids long. It contains amino-terminal alanine, and carboxyl-terminal glutamine. The bovine parathyroid hormone is approximately three times the length of the newly discovered hormone, thyrocalcitonin, whose action is reciprocal to parathyroid hormone. Images PMID:5275384

  2. Compound-specific nitrogen isotope analysis of D-alanine, L-alanine, and valine: application of diastereomer separation to delta15N and microbial peptidoglycan studies.

    PubMed

    Takano, Yoshinori; Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Ogawa, Nanako O; Kitazato, Hiroshi; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2009-01-01

    We have developed an analytical method to determine the compound-specific nitrogen isotope compositions of individual amino acid enantiomers using gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry. A novel derivatization of amino acid diastereomers by optically active (R)-(-)-2-butanol or (S)-(+)-2-butanol offers two advantages for nitrogen isotope analysis. First, chromatographic chiral separation can be achieved without the use of chiral stationary-phase columns. Second, the elution order of these compounds on the chromatogram can be switched by a designated esterification reaction. We applied the method to the compound-specific nitrogen isotope analysis of D- and L-alanine in a peptidoglycan derived from the cell walls of cultured bacteria (Firmicutes and Actinobacteria; Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus staphylolyticus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus, and Streptomyces sp.), natural whole bacterial cells (Bacillus subtilis var. natto), (pseudo)-peptidoglycan from archaea (Methanobacterium sp.), and cell wall from eukaryota (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). We observed statistically significant differences in nitrogen isotopic compositions; e.g., delta15N ( per thousand vs air) in Staphylococcus staphylolyticus for d-alanine (19.2 +/- 0.5 per thousand, n = 4) and L-alanine (21.3 +/- 0.8 per thousand, n = 4) and in Bacillus subtilis for D-alanine (6.2 +/- 0.2 per thousand, n = 3) and L-alanine (8.2 +/- 0.4 per thousand, n = 3). These results suggest that enzymatic reaction pathways, including the alanine racemase reaction, produce a nitrogen isotopic difference in amino acid enantiomers, resulting in 15N-depleted D-alanine. This method is expected to facilitate compound-specific nitrogen isotope studies of amino acid stereoisomers.

  3. How similar is the electronic structures of β-lactam and alanine?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Subhojyoti; Ahmed, Marawan; Wang, Feng

    2016-02-01

    The C1s spectra of β-lactam i.e. 2-azetidinone (C3H5NO), a drug and L-alanine (C3H7NO2), an amino acid, exhibit striking similarities, which may be responsible for the competition between 2-azetidinone and the alanyl-alanine moiety in biochemistry. The present study is to reveal the degree of similarities and differences between their electronic structures of the two model molecular pairs. It is found that the similarities in C1s and inner valence binding energy spectra are due to their bonding connections but other properties such as ring structure (in 2-azetidinone) and chiral carbon (alanine) can be very different. Further, the inner valence region of ionization potential greater than 18 eV for 2-azetidinone and alanine is also significantly similar. Finally the strained lactam ring exhibits more chemical reactivity measured at all non-hydrogen atoms by Fukui functions with respect to alanine.

  4. Prevention by 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate of the induction but not growth of putative preneoplastic, glutathione S-transferase placental form-positive, focal lesions in the livers of rats fed a choline-deficient, L-amino acid-defined diet.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Y; Nakae, D; Akai, H; Kishida, H; Okajima, E; Kitayama, W; Denda, A; Tsujiuchi, T; Murakami, A; Koshimizu, K; Ohigashi, H; Konishi, Y

    1998-10-01

    The effects of 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA) on endogenous rat liver carcinogenesis because of chronic feeding of a choline-deficient, L-amino acid-defined (CDAA) diet were examined. Male Fischer 344 rats, 6 weeks old, received the CDAA diet containing ACA at doses of 0, 0.005, 0.010 and 0.050% for 12 weeks and were then killed. ACA decreased the numbers of putative preneoplastic, glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P)-positive, focal lesions developing in the livers of rats fed the CDAA diet but did not alter their sizes. At the same time, ACA reduced the levels of 8-hydroxyguanine, a parameter of oxidative DNA damage, but did not significantly affect generation of 2-thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances, indicators of oxidative extra-DNA damage, or hepatocyte proliferation. Furthermore, ACA did not exert any significant effects on the numbers or sizes of GST-P-positive lesions in the livers of rats when administered between weeks 2 and 8 after initiation with a single i.p. dose of 200 mg/kg body wt of N-nitrosodiethylamine. These results indicate that ACA prevents the CDAA diet-associated induction of putative preneoplastic lesions by reduction of oxidative DNA damage but does not affect their subsequent growth.

  5. Alanine-dependent reactions of 5'-deoxypyridoxal in water.

    PubMed

    Go, Maybelle K; Richard, John P

    2008-12-01

    The non-enzymatic reaction of 5'-deoxypyridoxal (DPL) with l-alanine in water at 25 degrees C was investigated. DPL reacts with alanine to form an imine, which then undergoes deprotonation at the alpha-amino carbon of alanine to form a resonance delocalized DPL-stabilized carbanion. At early reaction times the only detectable products are pyruvate and the dimeric species formed by addition of the alpha-pyridine stabilized carbanion to DPL. No Claisen-type products of addition of the alpha-amino carbanion to DPL, as was previously reported to form from the reaction between DPL and glycine [K. Toth, T.L. Amyes, J.P. Richard, J.P.G. Malthouse, M.E. Ni Beilliu, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 126 (2004) 10538-10539], are observed. The electrophile reacts instead at the alpha-pyridyl carbon. This dimer is in chemical equilibrium with reactants. At longer reaction times about 50% of DPL is converted to 5'-deoxypyridoxamine, the thermodynamically favored product of formal transamination of DPL.

  6. Alanine radicals, part 3: properties of the components contributing to the EPR spectrum of X-irradiated alanine dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Malinen, Eirik; Heydari, Mojgan Z; Sagstuen, Einar; Hole, Eli O

    2003-01-01

    The amino acid l-alpha-alanine has attracted considerable interest for use in radiation dosimetry and has been formally accepted as a secondary standard for high-dose and transfer dosimetry. Recent results have shown that the alanine EPR spectrum consists of contributions from three different radicals. A set of benchmark spectra describing the essential spectral features of these three radical components was used for reconstructions of the experimental spectra. In the present work, these basis spectra have been used to investigate the differential effects of variations in radiation doses and microwave power, as well as the dependence upon temperature annealing and UV illumination. The results presented here, based solely on relatively low-energy (60-80 keV) X rays, indicate that the three components behave very similarly with respect to radiation dose at room temperature. However, with respect to the thermal annealing/fading behavior and microwave power saturation properties, the three species behave significantly differently. It is concluded that even if it is now realized that three different radicals contribute to the composite EPR alanine spectrum, this has a minor impact on the established protocols for present-day applications (high-dose) of EPR/alanine dosimetry. However, some care should be exercised when e.g. constructing calibration curves, since fading and power saturation behavior may vary over the dose range in question. New results from UV-illumination experiments suggest a possible procedure for experimental spectral separation of the EPR signals due to the three radicals.

  7. Purification and characterization of alanine dehydrogenase from a cyanobacterium, Phormidium lapideum.

    PubMed

    Sawa, Y; Tani, M; Murata, K; Shibata, H; Ochiai, H

    1994-11-01

    Alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) was purified to homogeneity from cell-free extracts of a non-N2-fixing filamentous cyanobacterium, Phormidium lapideum. The molecular mass of the native enzyme was 240 kDa, and SDS-PAGE revealed a minimum molecular mass of 41 kDa, suggesting a six-subunit structure. The NH2 terminal amino acid residues of the purified AlaDH revealed marked similarity with that of other AlaDHs. The enzyme was highly specific for L-alanine and NAD+, but showed relatively low amino-acceptor specificity. The pH optimum was 8.4 for reductive amination of pyruvate and 9.2 for oxidative deamination of L-alanine. The Km values were 5.0 mM for L-alanine and 0.04 mM for NAD+, 0.33 mM for pyruvate, 60.6 mM for NH4+ (pH 8.7), and 0.02 mM for NADH. Various L-amino acids including alanine, serine, threonine, and aromatic amino acids, inhibited the aminating reaction. The enzyme was inactivated upon incubation with pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) followed by reduction with sodium borohydride. The copresence of NADH and pyruvate largely protected the enzyme against the inactivation by PLP. PMID:7896761

  8. Formation of simple biomolecules from alanine in ocean by impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Y.; Sekine, T.; Furukawa, Y.; Kakegawa, T.; Kobayashi, T.

    2013-12-01

    The biomolecules on the Earth are thought either to have originated from the extraterrestrial parts carried with flying meteorites or to have been formed from the inorganic materials on the Earth through given energy. From the standpoint to address the importance of impact energy, it is required to simulate experimentally the chemical reactions during impacts, because violent impacts may have occurred 3.8-4.0 Gyr ago to create biomolecules initially. It has been demonstrated that shock reactions among ocean (H2O), atmospheric nitrogen, and meteoritic constitution (Fe) can induce locally reduction environment to form simple bioorganic molecules such as ammonia and amino acid (Nakazawa et al., 2005; Furukawa et al., 2009). We need to know possible processes for alanine how chemical reactions proceed during repeated impacts and how complicated biomolecules are formed. Alanine can be formed from glycine (Umeda et al., in preparation). In this study, we carried out shock recovery experiments at pressures of 4.4-5.7 GPa to investigate the chemical reactions of alanine. Experiments were carried out with a propellant gun. Stainless steel containers (30 mm in diameter, 30 mm long) with 13C-labeled alanine aqueous solution immersed in olivine or hematite powders were used as targets. Air gap was present in the sample room (18 mm in diameter, 2 mm thick) behind the sample. The powder, solution, and air represent meteorite, ocean, and atmosphere on early Earth, respectively. Two powders of olivine and hematite help to keep the oxygen fugacity low and high during experiments, respectively in order to investigate the effect of oxygen fugacity on chemical processes of alanine. The recovered containers, after cleaned completely, were immersed into liquid nitrogen to freeze sample solution and then we drilled on the impact surface to extract water-soluble run products using pure water. Thus obtained products were analyzed by LC/MS for four amino acids (glycine, alanine, valine, and

  9. Glutathione transferases and neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Mazzetti, Anna Paola; Fiorile, Maria Carmela; Primavera, Alessandra; Lo Bello, Mario

    2015-03-01

    There is substantial agreement that the unbalance between oxidant and antioxidant species may affect the onset and/or the course of a number of common diseases including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Many studies suggest a crucial role for oxidative stress in the first phase of aging, or in the pathogenesis of various diseases including neurological ones. Particularly, the role exerted by glutathione and glutathione-related enzymes (Glutathione Transferases) in the nervous system appears more relevant, this latter tissue being much more vulnerable to toxins and oxidative stress than other tissues such as liver, kidney or muscle. The present review addresses the question by focusing on the results obtained by specimens from patients or by in vitro studies using cells or animal models related to Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. In general, there is an association between glutathione depletion and Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease. In addition, a significant decrease of glutathione transferase activity in selected areas of brain and in ventricular cerebrospinal fluid was found. For some glutathione transferase genes there is also a correlation between polymorphisms and onset/outcome of neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, there is a general agreement about the protective effect exerted by glutathione and glutathione transferases but no clear answer about the mechanisms underlying this crucial role in the insurgence of neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Degradation of glycine and alanine on irradiated quartz.

    PubMed

    Pawlikowski, Maciej; Benko, Aleksandra; Wróbel, Tomasz P

    2013-04-01

    Recent researches suggest participation of minerals in the formation of life under primordial conditions. Among all of the minerals, quartz seems to be one of the most probable to take part in such processes. However, an external source of energy is needed, e.g. electric discharge. A device simulating the proposed conditions was designed and was used to simulate prebiotic conditions. Investigation of processes occurring during the stimulation of quartz with electric discharge was studied by means of Ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectroscopy, in order to monitor the generation kinetics of free radicals. Additionally, infrared spectroscopy was applied to identify chemical reaction products created in a solution of alanine or glycine, in the presence of quartz treated with electric discharge. Formation of increased amounts of free radicals, compared to experiments performed without quartz and/or amino acid, is reported, along with identification of possible degradation products of alanine. No synthetic reactions were observed.

  11. Crystal Structures of Aedes Aegypt Alanine Glyoxylate Aminotransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Han,Q.; Robinson, H.; Gao, Y.; Vogelaar, N.; Wilson, S.; Rizzi, M.; Li, J.

    2006-01-01

    Mosquitoes are unique in having evolved two alanine glyoxylate aminotransferases (AGTs). One is 3-hydroxykynurenine transaminase (HKT), which is primarily responsible for catalyzing the transamination of 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) to xanthurenic acid (XA). Interestingly, XA is used by malaria parasites as a chemical trigger for their development within the mosquito. This 3-HK to XA conversion is considered the major mechanism mosquitoes use to detoxify the chemically reactive and potentially toxic 3-HK. The other AGT is a typical dipteran insect AGT and is specific for converting glyoxylic acid to glycine. Here we report the 1.75{angstrom} high-resolution three-dimensional crystal structure of AGT from the mosquito Aedes aegypti (AeAGT) and structures of its complexes with reactants glyoxylic acid and alanine at 1.75 and 2.1{angstrom} resolution, respectively. This is the first time that the three-dimensional crystal structures of an AGT with its amino acceptor, glyoxylic acid, and amino donor, alanine, have been determined. The protein is dimeric and adopts the type I-fold of pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP)-dependent aminotransferases. The PLP co-factor is covalently bound to the active site in the crystal structure, and its binding site is similar to those of other AGTs. The comparison of the AeAGT-glyoxylic acid structure with other AGT structures revealed that these glyoxylic acid binding residues are conserved in most AGTs. Comparison of the AeAGT-alanine structure with that of the Anopheles HKT-inhibitor complex suggests that a Ser-Asn-Phe motif in the latter may be responsible for the substrate specificity of HKT enzymes for 3-HK.

  12. Prolonged L-alanine exposure induces changes in metabolism, Ca(2+) handling and desensitization of insulin secretion in clonal pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    McClenaghan, Neville H; Scullion, Siobhan M; Mion, Brian; Hewage, Chandralal; Malthouse, J Paul G; Flatt, Peter R; Newsholme, Philip; Brennan, Lorraine

    2009-02-01

    Acute insulin-releasing actions of amino acids have been studied in detail, but comparatively little is known about the beta-cell effects of long-term exposure to amino acids. The present study examined the effects of prolonged exposure of beta-cells to the metabolizable amino acid L-alanine. Basal insulin release or cellular insulin content were not significantly altered by alanine culture, but acute alanine-induced insulin secretion was suppressed by 74% (P<0.001). Acute stimulation of insulin secretion with glucose, KCl or KIC (2-oxoisocaproic acid) following alanine culture was not affected. Acute alanine exposure evoked strong cellular depolarization after control culture, whereas AUC (area under the curve) analysis revealed significant (P<0.01) suppression of this action after culture with alanine. Compared with control cells, prior exposure to alanine also markedly decreased (P<0.01) the acute elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) (intracellular [Ca(2+)]) induced by acute alanine exposure. These diminished stimulatory responses were partially restored after 18 h of culture in the absence of alanine, indicating reversible amino-acid-induced desensitization. (13)C NMR spectra revealed that alanine culture increased glutamate labelling at position C4 (by 60%; P<0.01), as a result of an increase in the singlet peak, indicating increased flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase. Consistent with this, protein expression of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases PDK2 and PDK4 was significantly reduced. This was accompanied by a decrease in cellular ATP (P<0.05), consistent with diminished insulin-releasing actions of this amino acid. Collectively, these results illustrate the phenomenon of beta-cell desensitization by amino acids, indicating that prolonged exposure to alanine can induce reversible alterations to metabolic flux, Ca(2+) handling and insulin secretion. PMID:18702613

  13. Glutathione analogue sorbents selectively bind glutathione S-transferase isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Castro, V M; Kelley, M K; Engqvist-Goldstein, A; Kauvar, L M

    1993-06-01

    Novel affinity sorbents for glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) were created by binding glutathione (GSH) analogues to Sepharose 6B. The GSH molecule was modified at the glycine moiety and at the group attached to the sulphur of cysteine. When tested by affinity chromatography in a flow-through microplate format, several of these sorbents selectively bound GST isoenzymes. gamma E-C(Hx)-phi G (glutathione with a hexyl moiety bound to cysteine and phenylglycine substituted for glycine) specifically bound rat GST 7-7, the Pi-class isoenzyme, from liver, kidney and small intestine. gamma E-C(Bz)-beta A (benzyl bound to cysteine and beta-alanine substituted for glycine) was highly selective for rat subunits 3 and 4, which are Mu-class isoenzymes. By allowing purification of the isoenzymes under mild conditions that preserve activity, the novel sorbents should be useful in characterizing the biological roles of GSTs in both normal animal and cancer tissues.

  14. Alanine racemase mutants of Mycobacterium tuberculosis require D-alanine for growth and are defective for survival in macrophages and mice.

    PubMed

    Awasthy, Disha; Bharath, Sowmya; Subbulakshmi, Venkita; Sharma, Umender

    2012-02-01

    Alanine racemase (Alr) is an essential enzyme in most bacteria; however, some species (e.g. Listeria monocytogenes) can utilize d-amino acid transaminase (Dat) to generate d-alanine, which renders Alr non-essential. In addition to the conflicting reports on gene knockout of alr in Mycobacterium smegmatis, a recent study concluded that depletion of Alr does not affect the growth of M. smegmatis. In order to get an unambiguous answer on the essentiality of Alr in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and validate it as a drug target in vitro and in vivo, we have inactivated the alr gene of M. tuberculosis and found that it was not possible to generate an alr knockout in the absence of a complementing gene copy or d-alanine in the growth medium. The growth kinetics of the alr mutant revealed that M. tuberculosis requires very low amounts of d-alanine (5-10 µg ml(-1)) for optimum growth. Survival kinetics of the mutant in the absence of d-alanine indicated that depletion of this amino acid results in rapid loss of viability. The alr mutant was found to be defective for growth in macrophages. Analysis of phenotype in mice suggested that non-availability of d-alanine in mice leads to clearance of bacteria followed by stabilization of bacterial number in lungs and spleen. Additionally, reversal of d-cycloserine inhibition in the presence of d-alanine in M. tuberculosis suggested that Alr is the primary target of d-cycloserine. Thus, Alr of M. tuberculosis is a valid drug target and inhibition of Alr alone should result in loss of viability in vitro and in vivo.

  15. A novel low molecular weight alanine aminotransferase from fasted rat liver.

    PubMed

    Vedavathi, M; Girish, K S; Kumar, M Karuna

    2006-01-01

    Alanine is the most effective precursor for gluconeogenesis among amino acids, and the initial reaction is catalyzed by alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT). Although the enzyme activity increases during fasting, this effect has not been studied extensively. The present study describes the purification and characterization of an isoform of AlaAT from rat liver under fasting. The molecular mass of the enzyme is 17.7 kD with an isoelectric point of 4.2; glutamine is the N-terminal residue. The enzyme showed narrow substrate specificity for L-alanine with Km values for alanine of 0.51 mM and for 2-oxoglutarate of 0.12 mM. The enzyme is a glycoprotein. Spectroscopic and inhibition studies showed that pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) and free -SH groups are involved in the enzymatic catalysis. PLP activated the enzyme with a Km of 0.057 mM. PMID:16487061

  16. Vibrational dynamics of crystalline L-alanine

    SciTech Connect

    Bordallo, H.N.; Eckert, J.; Barthes, M.

    1997-11-01

    The authors report a new, complete vibrational analysis of L-alanine and L-alanine-d{sub 4} which utilizes IINS intensities in addition to frequency information. The use of both isotopomers resulted in a self-consistent force field for and assignment of the molecular vibrations in L-alanine. Some details of the calculation as well as a comparison of calculated and observed IINS spectra are presented. The study clarifies a number of important issues on the vibrational dynamics of this molecule and presents a self-consistent force field for the molecular vibrations in crystalline L-alanine.

  17. Characterization of the genes encoding beta-ketoadipate: succinyl-coenzyme A transferase in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed Central

    Parales, R E; Harwood, C S

    1992-01-01

    beta-Ketoadipate:succinyl-coenzyme A transferase (beta-ketoadipate:succinyl-CoA transferase) (EC 2.8.3.6) carries out the penultimate step in the conversion of benzoate and 4-hydroxybenzoate to tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates in bacteria utilizing the beta-ketoadipate pathway. This report describes the characterization of a DNA fragment from Pseudomonas putida that encodes this enzyme. The fragment complemented mutants defective in the synthesis of the CoA transferase, and two proteins of sizes appropriate to encode the two nonidentical subunits of the enzyme were produced in Escherichia coli when the fragment was placed under the control of a phage T7 promoter. DNA sequence analysis revealed two open reading frames, designated pcaI and pcaJ, that were separated by 8 bp, suggesting that they may comprise an operon. A comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of the P. putida CoA transferase genes with the sequences of two other bacterial CoA transferases and that of succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase from pig heart suggests that the homodimeric structure of the mammalian enzyme may have resulted from a gene fusion of the bacterial alpha and beta subunit genes during evolution. Conserved functional groups important to the catalytic activity of CoA transferases were also identified. Images PMID:1624453

  18. Amino acid metabolism during prolonged starvation

    PubMed Central

    Felig, Philip; Owen, Oliver E.; Wahren, John; Cahill, George F.

    1969-01-01

    Plasma concentration, splanchnic and renal exchange, and urinary excretion of 20 amino acids were studied in obese subjects during prolonged (5-6 wk) starvation. Splanchnic amino acid uptake was also investigated in postabsorptive and briefly (36-48 hr) fasted subjects. A transient increase in plasma valine, leucine, isoleucine, methionine, and α-aminobutyrate was noted during the 1st wk of starvation. A delayed, progressive increase in glycine, threonine, and serine occurred after the 1st 5 days. 13 of the amino acids ultimately decreased in starvation, but the magnitude of this diminution was greatest for alanine which decreased most rapidly during the 1st week of fasting. In all subjects alanine was extracted by the splanchnic circulation to a greater extent than all other amino acids combined. Brief fasting resulted in an increased arterio-hepatic venous difference for alanine due to increased fractional extraction. After 5-6 wk of starvation, a marked falloff in splanchnic alanine uptake was attributable to the decreased arterial concentration. Prolonged fasting resulted in increased glycine utilization by the kidney and in net renal uptake of alanine. It is concluded that the marked decrease in plasma alanine is due to augmented and preferential splanchnic utilization of this amino acid in early starvation resulting in substrate depletion. Maintenance of the hypoalaninemia ultimately serves to diminish splanchnic uptake of this key glycogenic amino acid and is thus an important component of the regulatory mechanism whereby hepatic gluconeogenesis is diminished and protein catabolism is minimized in prolonged fasting. The altered renal extraction of glycine and alanine is not due to increased urinary excretion but may be secondary to the increased rate of renal gluconeogenesis observed in prolonged starvation. PMID:5773094

  19. Peptidyl transferase inhibition by the nascent leader peptide of an inducible cat gene.

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Z; Rogers, E J; Lovett, P S

    1993-01-01

    The site of ribosome stalling in the leader of cat transcripts is critical to induction of downstream translation. Site-specific stalling requires translation of the first five leader codons and the presence of chloramphenicol, a sequence-independent inhibitor of ribosome elongation. We demonstrate in this report that a synthetic peptide (the 5-mer) corresponding to the N-terminal five codons of the cat-86 leader inhibits peptidyl transferase in vitro. The N-terminal 2-, 3-, and 4-mers and the reverse 5-mer (reverse amino acid sequence of the 5-mer) are virtually without effect on peptidyl transferase. A missense mutation in the cat-86 leader that abolishes induction in vivo corresponds to an amino acid replacement in the 5-mer that completely relieves peptidyl transferase inhibition. In contrast, a missense mutation that does not interfere with in vivo induction corresponds to an amino acid replacement in the 5-mer that does not significantly alter peptidyl transferase inhibition. Our results suggest that peptidyl transferase inhibition by the nascent cat-86 5-mer peptide may be the primary determinant of the site of ribosome stalling in the leader. A model based on this concept can explain the site specificity of ribosome stalling as well as the response of induction to very low levels of the antibiotic inducer. Images PMID:7690023

  20. Pancreatic stellate cells support tumour metabolism through autophagic alanine secretion.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cristovão M; Biancur, Douglas E; Wang, Xiaoxu; Halbrook, Christopher J; Sherman, Mara H; Zhang, Li; Kremer, Daniel; Hwang, Rosa F; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Ying, Haoqiang; Asara, John M; Evans, Ronald M; Cantley, Lewis C; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Kimmelman, Alec C

    2016-08-25

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive disease characterized by an intense fibrotic stromal response and deregulated metabolism. The role of the stroma in PDAC biology is complex and it has been shown to play critical roles that differ depending on the biological context. The stromal reaction also impairs the vasculature, leading to a highly hypoxic, nutrient-poor environment. As such, these tumours must alter how they capture and use nutrients to support their metabolic needs. Here we show that stroma-associated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are critical for PDAC metabolism through the secretion of non-essential amino acids (NEAA). Specifically, we uncover a previously undescribed role for alanine, which outcompetes glucose and glutamine-derived carbon in PDAC to fuel the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and thus NEAA and lipid biosynthesis. This shift in fuel source decreases the tumour’s dependence on glucose and serum-derived nutrients, which are limited in the pancreatic tumour microenvironment. Moreover, we demonstrate that alanine secretion by PSCs is dependent on PSC autophagy, a process that is stimulated by cancer cells. Thus, our results demonstrate a novel metabolic interaction between PSCs and cancer cells, in which PSC-derived alanine acts as an alternative carbon source. This finding highlights a previously unappreciated metabolic network within pancreatic tumours in which diverse fuel sources are used to promote growth in an austere tumour microenvironment. PMID:27509858

  1. Characterization of psychrophilic alanine racemase from Bacillus psychrosaccharolyticus.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Y; Yokoigawa, K; Esaki, N; Soda, K; Kawai, H

    1999-03-16

    A psychrophilic alanine racemase gene from Bacillus psychrosaccharolyticus was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli SOLR with a plasmid pYOK3. The gene starting with the unusual initiation codon GTG showed higher preference for codons ending in A or T. The enzyme purified to homogeneity showed the high catalytic activity even at 0 degrees C and was extremely labile over 35 degrees C. The enzyme was found to have a markedly large Km value (5.0 microM) for the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) cofactor in comparison with other reported alanine racemases, and was stabilized up to 50 degrees C in the presence of excess amounts of PLP. The low affinity of the enzyme for PLP may be related to the thermolability, and may be related to the high catalytic activity, initiated by the transaldimination reaction, at low temperature. The enzyme has a distinguishing hydrophilic region around the residue no. 150 in the deduced amino acid sequence (383 residues), whereas the corresponding regions of other Bacillus alanine racemases are hydrophobic. The position of the region in the three dimensional structure of C atoms of the enzyme was predicted to be in a surface loop surrounding the active site. The region may interact with solvent and reduce the compactness of the active site. PMID:10080917

  2. Pancreatic stellate cells support tumour metabolism through autophagic alanine secretion.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cristovão M; Biancur, Douglas E; Wang, Xiaoxu; Halbrook, Christopher J; Sherman, Mara H; Zhang, Li; Kremer, Daniel; Hwang, Rosa F; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Ying, Haoqiang; Asara, John M; Evans, Ronald M; Cantley, Lewis C; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Kimmelman, Alec C

    2016-08-25

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive disease characterized by an intense fibrotic stromal response and deregulated metabolism. The role of the stroma in PDAC biology is complex and it has been shown to play critical roles that differ depending on the biological context. The stromal reaction also impairs the vasculature, leading to a highly hypoxic, nutrient-poor environment. As such, these tumours must alter how they capture and use nutrients to support their metabolic needs. Here we show that stroma-associated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are critical for PDAC metabolism through the secretion of non-essential amino acids (NEAA). Specifically, we uncover a previously undescribed role for alanine, which outcompetes glucose and glutamine-derived carbon in PDAC to fuel the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and thus NEAA and lipid biosynthesis. This shift in fuel source decreases the tumour’s dependence on glucose and serum-derived nutrients, which are limited in the pancreatic tumour microenvironment. Moreover, we demonstrate that alanine secretion by PSCs is dependent on PSC autophagy, a process that is stimulated by cancer cells. Thus, our results demonstrate a novel metabolic interaction between PSCs and cancer cells, in which PSC-derived alanine acts as an alternative carbon source. This finding highlights a previously unappreciated metabolic network within pancreatic tumours in which diverse fuel sources are used to promote growth in an austere tumour microenvironment.

  3. D-amino acid-induced expression of D-amino acid oxidase in the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shouji; Okada, Hirotsune; Abe, Katsumasa; Kera, Yoshio

    2012-12-01

    We investigated D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) induction in the popular model yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The product of the putative DAO gene of the yeast expressed in E. coli displayed oxidase activity to neutral and basic D-amino acids, but not to an L-amino acid or acidic D-amino acids, showing that the putative DAO gene encodes catalytically active DAO. DAO activity was weakly detected in yeast cells grown on a culture medium without D-amino acid, and was approximately doubled by adding D-alanine. The elimination of ammonium chloride from culture medium induced activity by up to eight-fold. L-Alanine also induced the activity, but only by about half of that induced by D-alanine. The induction by D-alanine reached a maximum level at 2 h cultivation; it remained roughly constant until cell growth reached a stationary phase. The best inducer was D-alanine, followed by D-proline and then D-serine. Not effective were N-carbamoyl-D,L-alanine (a better inducer of DAO than D-alanine in the yeast Trigonopsis variabilis), and both basic and acidic D-amino acids. These results showed that S. pombe DAO could be a suitable model for analyzing the regulation of DAO expression in eukaryotic organisms. PMID:22986818

  4. Importance of intrahepatic mechanisms to gluconeogenesis from alanine during exercise and recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, D.H.; Williams, P.E.; Lacy, D.B.; Green, D.R.; Cherrington, A.D.

    1988-04-01

    These studies were performed to assess the importance of intrahepatic mechanisms to gluconeogenesis in the dog during 150 min of treadmill exercise and 90 min of recovery. Sampling catheters were implanted in an artery and portal and hepatic veins 16 days before experimentation. Infusions of (U-/sup 14/C)alanine, (3-/sup 3/H)glucose, and indocyanine green were used to assess gluconeogenesis. During exercise, a decline in arterial and portal vein plasma alanine and in hepatic blood flow led to a decrease in hepatic alanine delivery. During recovery, hepatic blood flow was restored to basal, causing an increase in hepatic alanine delivery beyond exercise rates but still below resting rates. Hepatic fractional alanine extraction increased from 0.26 +/- 0.02 at rest to 0.64 +/- 0.03 during exercise and remained elevated during recovery. Net hepatic alanine uptake was 2.5 +/- 0.2 mumol.kg-1.min-1 at rest and remained unchanged during exercise but was increased during recovery. The conversion rate of (/sup 14/C)alanine to glucose had increased by 248 +/- 38% by 150 min of exercise and had increased further during recovery. The efficiency with which alanine was channeled into glucose in the liver was accelerated to a rate of 338 +/- 55% above basal by 150 min of exercise but declined slightly during recovery. In conclusion, 1) gluconeogenesis from alanine is accelerated during exercise, due to an increase in the hepatic fractional extraction of the amino acid and through intrahepatic mechanisms that more efficiently channel it into glucose.

  5. Amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... amino acids are: histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, tryptophan , and valine. Nonessential amino acids "Nonessential" means that our bodies produce an amino ...

  6. Functional Characterization of Alanine Racemase from Schizosaccharomyces pombe: a Eucaryotic Counterpart to Bacterial Alanine Racemase

    PubMed Central

    Uo, Takuma; Yoshimura, Tohru; Tanaka, Naotaka; Takegawa, Kaoru; Esaki, Nobuyoshi

    2001-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe has an open reading frame, which we named alr1+, encoding a putative protein similar to bacterial alanine racemase. We cloned the alr1+ gene in Escherichia coli and purified the gene product (Alr1p), with an Mr of 41,590, to homogeneity. Alr1p contains pyridoxal 5′-phosphate as a coenzyme and catalyzes the racemization of alanine with apparent Km and Vmax values as follows: for l-alanine, 5.0 mM and 670 μmol/min/mg, respectively, and for d-alanine, 2.4 mM and 350 μmol/min/mg, respectively. The enzyme is almost specific to alanine, but l-serine and l-2-aminobutyrate are racemized slowly at rates 3.7 and 0.37% of that of l-alanine, respectively. S. pombe uses d-alanine as a sole nitrogen source, but deletion of the alr1+ gene resulted in retarded growth on the same medium. This indicates that S. pombe has catabolic pathways for both enantiomers of alanine and that the pathway for l-alanine coupled with racemization plays a major role in the catabolism of d-alanine. Saccharomyces cerevisiae differs markedly from S. pombe: S. cerevisiae uses l-alanine but not d-alanine as a sole nitrogen source. Moreover, d-alanine is toxic to S. cerevisiae. However, heterologous expression of the alr1+ gene enabled S. cerevisiae to grow efficiently on d-alanine as a sole nitrogen source. The recombinant yeast was relieved from the toxicity of d-alanine. PMID:11244061

  7. Radiolysis of alanine adsorbed in a clay mineral

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Ovando, Ellen Y.; Negron-Mendoza, Alicia

    2013-07-03

    Optical activity in molecules is a chemical characteristic of living beings. In this work, we examine the hypothesis of the influence of different mineral surfaces on the development of a specific chirality in organic molecules when subjected to conditions simulating the primitive Earth during the period of chemical evolution. By using X-ray diffraction techniques and HPLC/ELSD to analyze aqueous suspensions of amino acids adsorbed on minerals irradiated in different doses with a cobalt-60 gamma source, the experiments attempt to prove the hypothesis that some solid surfaces (like clays and meteorite rocks) may have a concentration capacity and protective role against external sources of ionizing radiation (specifically {gamma}-ray) for some organic compounds (like some amino acids) adsorbed on them. Preliminary results show a slight difference in the adsorption and radiolysis of the D-and L-alanine.

  8. Structural insight into the active site of a Bombyx mori unclassified glutathione transferase.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Tofazzal; Yamamoto, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are major detoxification enzymes that play central roles in the defense against various environmental toxicants as well as oxidative stress. Here, we identify amino acid residues of an unclassified GST from Bombyx mori, bmGSTu-interacting glutathione (GSH). Site-directed mutagenesis of bmGSTu mutants indicated that amino acid residues Asp103, Ser162, and Ser166 contribute to catalytic activity.

  9. Effects of high-salinity seawater acclimation on the levels of D-alanine in the muscle and hepatopancreas of kuruma prawn, Marsupenaeus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Naoko; Yokoyama, Masahumi

    2015-12-10

    Changes in D- and L-alanine contents were determined in the muscle and hepatopancreas of kuruma prawn Marsupenaeus japonicus, during acclimation from seawater containing 100% salinity to artificial seawater containing 150% salinity. In the hepatopancreas, contents of both amino acids increased by approximately threefold. The activity of alanine racemase, which catalyzes the interconversion of D- and L-alanine, also increased in the high-salinity seawater. In addition, the expression of the gene encoding alanine racemase increased in the hepatopancreas with an increase in the alanine racemase activity. These data indicate that the biosynthesis of D- and L-alanine is controlled by the gene expression level of alanine racemase, and D-alanine in the hepatopancreas functions as a major osmolyte for isosmotic regulation. In contrast, the content of D-alanine and alanine racemase activity did not change in the muscle during hyper-osmotic acclimation. Therefore, we suggest that D-alanine, which exists in the several tissues of M. japonicus, is considered to be utilized in some different physiological phenomena in different tissues.

  10. Nonprotein Amino Acids from Spark Discharges and Their Comparison with the Murchison Meteorite Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Wolman, Yecheskel; Haverland, William J.; Miller, Stanley L.

    1972-01-01

    All the nonprotein amino acids found in the Murchison meteorite are products of the action of electric discharge on a mixture of methane, nitrogen, and water with traces of ammonia. These amino acids include α-amino-n-butyric acid, α-aminoisobutyric acid, norvaline, isovaline, pipecolic acid, β-alanine, β-amino-n-butyric acid, β-aminoisobutyric acid, γ-aminobutyric acid, sarcosine, N-ethylglycine, and N-methylalanine. In addition, norleucine, alloisoleucine, N-propylglycine, N-isopropylglycine, N-methyl-β-alanine, N-ethyl-β-alanine α,β-diaminopropionic acid, isoserine, α,γ-diaminobutyric acid, and α-hydroxy-γ-aminobutyric acid are produced by the electric discharge, but have not been found in the meteorite. PMID:16591973

  11. Nonprotein Amino Acids in the Murchison Meteorite

    PubMed Central

    Kvenvolden, Keith A.; Lawless, James G.; Ponnamperuma, Cyril

    1971-01-01

    Twelve nonprotein amino acids appear to be present in the Murchison meteorite. The identity of eight of them has been conclusively established as N-methylglycine, β-alanine, 2-methylalanine, α-amino-n-butyric acid, β-amino-n-butyric acid, γ-amino-n-butyric acid, isovaline, and pipecolic acid. Tentative evidence is presented for the presence of N-methylalanine, N-ethylglycine, β-aminoisobutyric acid, and norvaline. These amino acids appear to be extraterrestrial in origin and may provide new evidence for the hypothesis of chemical evolution. PMID:16591908

  12. Ultraviolet radiation induces stress in etiolated Landoltia punctata, as evidenced by the presence of alanine, a universal stress signal: a ¹⁵N NMR study.

    PubMed

    Monselise, E B-I; Levkovitz, A; Kost, D

    2015-01-01

    Analysis with (15) N NMR revealed that alanine, a universal cellular stress signal, accumulates in etiolated duckweed plants exposed to 15-min pulsed UV light, but not in the absence of UV irradiation. The addition of 10 mm vitamin C, a radical scavenger, reduced alanine levels to zero, indicating the involvement of free radicals. Free D-alanine was detected in (15) N NMR analysis of the chiral amino acid content, using D-tartaric acid as solvent. The accumulation of D-alanine under stress conditions presents a new perspective on the biochemical processes taking place in prokaryote and eukaryote cells.

  13. Alanine increases blood pressure during hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlay, L. A.; Maher, T. J.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of L-alanine administration on blood pressure (BP) during haemorrhagic shock was investigated using anesthetized rats whose left carotid arteries were cannulated for BP measurement, blood removal, and drug administration. It was found that L-alanine, in doses of 10, 25, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, increased the systolic BP of hypotensive rats by 38 to 80 percent (while 100 mg/kg pyruvate increased BP by only 9.4 mmhg, not significantly different from saline). The results suggest that L-alanine might influence cardiovascular function.

  14. Survivability and reactivity of glycine and alanine in early oceans: effects of meteorite impacts.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Yuhei; Fukunaga, Nao; Sekine, Toshimori; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kakegawa, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Takamichi; Nakazawa, Hiromoto

    2016-01-01

    Prebiotic oceans might have contained abundant amino acids, and were subjected to meteorite impacts, especially during the late heavy bombardment. It is so far unknown how meteorite impacts affected amino acids in the early oceans. Impact experiments were performed under the conditions where glycine was synthesized from carbon, ammonia, and water, using aqueous solutions containing (13)C-labeled glycine and alanine. Selected amino acids and amines in samples were analyzed with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS). In particular, the (13)C-labeled reaction products were analyzed to distinguish between run products and contaminants. The results revealed that both amino acids survived partially in the early ocean through meteorite impacts, that part of glycine changed into alanine, and that large amounts of methylamine and ethylamine were formed. Fast decarboxylation was confirmed to occur during such impact processes. Furthermore, the formation of n-butylamine, detected only in the samples recovered from the solutions with additional nitrogen and carbon sources of ammonia and benzene, suggests that chemical reactions to form new biomolecules can proceed through marine impacts. Methylamine and ethylamine from glycine and alanine increased considerably in the presence of hematite rather than olivine under similar impact conditions. These results also suggest that amino acids present in early oceans can contribute further to impact-induced reactions, implying that impact energy plays a potential role in the prebiotic formation of various biomolecules, although the reactions are complicated and depend upon the chemical environments as well. PMID:26369758

  15. Survivability and reactivity of glycine and alanine in early oceans: effects of meteorite impacts.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Yuhei; Fukunaga, Nao; Sekine, Toshimori; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kakegawa, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Takamichi; Nakazawa, Hiromoto

    2016-01-01

    Prebiotic oceans might have contained abundant amino acids, and were subjected to meteorite impacts, especially during the late heavy bombardment. It is so far unknown how meteorite impacts affected amino acids in the early oceans. Impact experiments were performed under the conditions where glycine was synthesized from carbon, ammonia, and water, using aqueous solutions containing (13)C-labeled glycine and alanine. Selected amino acids and amines in samples were analyzed with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS). In particular, the (13)C-labeled reaction products were analyzed to distinguish between run products and contaminants. The results revealed that both amino acids survived partially in the early ocean through meteorite impacts, that part of glycine changed into alanine, and that large amounts of methylamine and ethylamine were formed. Fast decarboxylation was confirmed to occur during such impact processes. Furthermore, the formation of n-butylamine, detected only in the samples recovered from the solutions with additional nitrogen and carbon sources of ammonia and benzene, suggests that chemical reactions to form new biomolecules can proceed through marine impacts. Methylamine and ethylamine from glycine and alanine increased considerably in the presence of hematite rather than olivine under similar impact conditions. These results also suggest that amino acids present in early oceans can contribute further to impact-induced reactions, implying that impact energy plays a potential role in the prebiotic formation of various biomolecules, although the reactions are complicated and depend upon the chemical environments as well.

  16. The determination of tRNALeu recognition nucleotides for Escherichia coli L/F transferase.

    PubMed

    Fung, Angela Wai Shan; Leung, Charles Chung Yun; Fahlman, Richard Peter

    2014-08-01

    Escherichia coli leucyl/phenylalanyl-tRNA protein transferase catalyzes the tRNA-dependent post-translational addition of amino acids onto the N-terminus of a protein polypeptide substrate. Based on biochemical and structural studies, the current tRNA recognition model by L/F transferase involves the identity of the 3' aminoacyl adenosine and the sequence-independent docking of the D-stem of an aminoacyl-tRNA to the positively charged cluster on L/F transferase. However, this model does not explain the isoacceptor preference observed 40 yr ago. Using in vitro-transcribed tRNA and quantitative MALDI-ToF MS enzyme activity assays, we have confirmed that, indeed, there is a strong preference for the most abundant leucyl-tRNA, tRNA(Leu) (anticodon 5'-CAG-3') isoacceptor for L/F transferase activity. We further investigate the molecular mechanism for this preference using hybrid tRNA constructs. We identified two independent sequence elements in the acceptor stem of tRNA(Leu) (CAG)-a G₃:C₇₀ base pair and a set of 4 nt (C₇₂, A₄:U₆₉, C₆₈)-that are important for the optimal binding and catalysis by L/F transferase. This maps a more specific, sequence-dependent tRNA recognition model of L/F transferase than previously proposed.

  17. The determination of tRNALeu recognition nucleotides for Escherichia coli L/F transferase

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Angela Wai Shan; Leung, Charles Chung Yun; Fahlman, Richard Peter

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli leucyl/phenylalanyl-tRNA protein transferase catalyzes the tRNA-dependent post-translational addition of amino acids onto the N-terminus of a protein polypeptide substrate. Based on biochemical and structural studies, the current tRNA recognition model by L/F transferase involves the identity of the 3′ aminoacyl adenosine and the sequence-independent docking of the D-stem of an aminoacyl-tRNA to the positively charged cluster on L/F transferase. However, this model does not explain the isoacceptor preference observed 40 yr ago. Using in vitro-transcribed tRNA and quantitative MALDI-ToF MS enzyme activity assays, we have confirmed that, indeed, there is a strong preference for the most abundant leucyl-tRNA, tRNALeu (anticodon 5′-CAG-3′) isoacceptor for L/F transferase activity. We further investigate the molecular mechanism for this preference using hybrid tRNA constructs. We identified two independent sequence elements in the acceptor stem of tRNALeu (CAG)—a G3:C70 base pair and a set of 4 nt (C72, A4:U69, C68)—that are important for the optimal binding and catalysis by L/F transferase. This maps a more specific, sequence-dependent tRNA recognition model of L/F transferase than previously proposed. PMID:24935875

  18. Repeated Supramaximal Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress: Effect of β-Alanine Plus Creatine Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Belviranli, Muaz; Okudan, Nilsel; Revan, Serkan; Balci, Serdar; Gokbel, Hakki

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carnosine is a dipeptide formed from the β-alanine and histidine amino acids and found in mainly in the brain and muscle, especially fast twitch muscle. Carnosine and creatine has an antioxidant effect and carnosine accounts for about 10% of the muscle's ability to buffer the H+ ions produced by exercise. Objectives: The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of beta alanine and/or creatine supplementation on oxidant and antioxidant status during repeated Wingate tests (WTs). Patients and Methods: Forty four sedentary males participated in the study. Participants performed three 30s WTs with 2 minutes rest between exercise bouts. After the first exercise session, the subjects were assigned to one of four groups: Placebo, Creatine, Beta-alanine and Beta-alanine plus creatine. Participants ingested twice per day for 22 consecutive days, then four times per day for the following 6 days. After the supplementation period the second exercise session was applied. Blood samples were taken before and immediately after the each exercise session for the analysis of oxidative stress and antioxidant markers. Results: Malondialdehyde levels and superoxide dismutase activities were affected by neither supplementation nor exercise. During the pre-supplementation session, protein carbonyl reduced and oxidized glutathione (GSH and GSSG) levels increased immediately after the exercise. However, during the post-supplementation session GSH and GSSG levels increased in beta-alanine and beta-alanine plus creatine groups immediately after the exercise compared to pre-exercise. In addition, during the post-supplementation session total antioxidant capacity increased in beta-alanine group immediately after the exercise. Conclusions: Beta-alanine supplementation has limited antioxidant effect during the repeated WTs. PMID:27217925

  19. On the fragmentation of biomolecules: Fragmentation of alanine dipeptide along the polypeptide chain

    SciTech Connect

    Solov'yov, I. A. Yakubovich, A. V.; Solov'yov, A. V.; Greiner, W.

    2006-09-15

    The interaction potential between amino acids in alanine dipeptide has been studied for the first time taking into account exact molecular geometry. Ab initio calculation has been performed in the framework of density functional theory taking into account all electrons in the system. The fragmentation of dipeptide along the polypeptide chain, as well as the interaction between alanines, has been considered. The energy of the system has been analyzed as a function of the distance between fragments for all possible dipeptide fragmentation channels. Analysis of the energy barriers makes it possible to estimate the characteristic fragmentation times and to determine the degree of applicability of classical electrodynamics for describing the system energy.

  20. Feruloyl-CoA:monolignol transferase

    DOEpatents

    Wilkerson, Curtis; Ralph, John; Withers, Saunia; Mansfield, Shawn D.

    2016-09-13

    The invention relates to nucleic acids encoding a feruloyl-CoA:monolignol transferase and the feruloyl-CoA:monolignol transferase enzyme that enables incorporation of monolignol ferulates, for example, including p-coumaryl ferulate, coniferyl ferulate, and sinapyl ferulate, into the lignin of plants.

  1. Isotope labeling studies on the formation of multiple addition products of alanine in the pyrolysis residue of glucose/alanine mixtures by high-resolution ESI-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Chu, Fong Lam; Sleno, Lekha; Yaylayan, Varoujan A

    2011-11-01

    Pyrolysis was used as a microscale sample preparation tool to generate glucose/alanine reaction products to minimize the use of expensive labeled precursors in isotope labeling studies. The residue remaining after the pyrolysis at 250 °C was analyzed by electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF-MS). It was observed that a peak at m/z 199.1445 in the ESI-TOF-MS spectrum appeared only when the model system contained at least 2-fold excess alanine. The accurate mass determination indeed indicated the presence of two nitrogen atoms in the molecular formula (C(10)H(18)N(2)O(2)). To verify the origin of the carbon atoms in this unknown compound, model studies with [(13)U(6)]glucose, [(13)C-1]alanine, [(13)C-2]alanine, [(13)C-3]alanine, and [(15)N]alanine were also performed. Glucose furnished six carbon atoms, and alanine provides four carbon (2 × C-2 and 2 × C-3) and two nitrogen atoms. When commercially available fructosylalanine (N-attached to C-1) was reacted with only 1 mol of alanine, a peak at m/z 199.1445 was once again observed. In addition, when 3-deoxyglucosone (3-DG) was reacted with a 2-fold excess of alanine, a peak at m/z 199.1433 was also generated, confirming the points of attachment of the two amino acids at C-1 and C-2 atoms of 3-DG. These studies have indicated that amino acids can undergo multiple addition reactions with 1,2-dicarbonyl compounds such as 3-deoxyglucosone and eventually form a tetrahydropyrazine moiety.

  2. Glutathione transferases: a structural perspective.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Aaron

    2011-05-01

    The glutathione transferases (GSTs) are one of the most important families of detoxifying enzymes in nature. The classic activity of the GSTs is conjugation of compounds with electrophilic centers to the tripeptide glutathione (GSH), but many other activities are now associated with GSTs, including steroid and leukotriene biosynthesis, peroxide degradation, double-bond cis-trans isomerization, dehydroascorbate reduction, Michael addition, and noncatalytic "ligandin" activity (ligand binding and transport). Since the first GST structure was determined in 1991, there has been an explosion in structural data across GSTs of all three families: the cytosolic GSTs, the mitochondrial GSTs, and the membrane-associated proteins in eicosanoid and glutathione metabolism (MAPEG family). In this review, the major insights into GST structure and function will be discussed.

  3. β-Alanine supplementation and military performance.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Jay R; Stout, Jeffrey R; Harris, Roger C; Moran, Daniel S

    2015-12-01

    During sustained high-intensity military training or simulated combat exercises, significant decreases in physical performance measures are often seen. The use of dietary supplements is becoming increasingly popular among military personnel, with more than half of the US soldiers deployed or garrisoned reported to using dietary supplements. β-Alanine is a popular supplement used primarily by strength and power athletes to enhance performance, as well as training aimed at improving muscle growth, strength and power. However, there is limited research examining the efficacy of β-alanine in soldiers conducting operationally relevant tasks. The gains brought about by β-alanine use by selected competitive athletes appears to be relevant also for certain physiological demands common to military personnel during part of their training program. Medical and health personnel within the military are expected to extrapolate and implement relevant knowledge and doctrine from research performed on other population groups. The evidence supporting the use of β-alanine in competitive and recreational athletic populations suggests that similar benefits would also be observed among tactical athletes. However, recent studies in military personnel have provided direct evidence supporting the use of β-alanine supplementation for enhancing combat-specific performance. This appears to be most relevant for high-intensity activities lasting 60-300 s. Further, limited evidence has recently been presented suggesting that β-alanine supplementation may enhance cognitive function and promote resiliency during highly stressful situations.

  4. Prebiotic Amino Acid Thioester Synthesis: Thiol-Dependent Amino Acid Synthesis from Formose substrates (Formaldehyde and Glycolaldehyde) and Ammonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1998-01-01

    Formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde (substrates of the formose autocatalytic cycle) were shown to react with ammonia yielding alanine and homoserine under mild aqueous conditions in the presence of thiol catalysts. Since similar reactions carried out without ammonia yielded alpha-hydroxy acid thioesters, the thiol-dependent synthesis of alanine and homoserine is presumed to occur via amino acid thioesters-intermediates capable of forming peptides. A pH 5.2 solution of 20 mM formaldehyde, 20 mM glycolaldehyde, 20 mM ammonium chloride, 23 mM 3-mercaptopropionic acid, and 23 mM acetic acid that reacted for 35 days at 40 C yielded (based on initial formaldehyde) 1.8% alanine and 0.08% homoserine. In the absence of thiol catalyst, the synthesis of alanine and homoserine was negligible. Alanine synthesis required both formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde, but homoserine synthesis required only glycolaldehyde. At 25 days the efficiency of alanine synthesis calculated from the ratio of alanine synthesized to formaldehyde reacted was 2.1%, and the yield (based on initial formaldehyde) of triose and tetrose intermediates involved in alanine and homoserine synthesis was 0.3 and 2.1%, respectively. Alanine synthesis was also seen in similar reactions containing only 10 mM each of aldehyde substrates, ammonia, and thiol. The prebiotic significance of these reactions that use the formose reaction to generate sugar intermediates that are converted to reactive amino acid thioesters is discussed.

  5. β-alanine biosynthesis in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Xu, Huimin; White, Robert H

    2014-08-01

    One efficient approach to assigning function to unannotated genes is to establish the enzymes that are missing in known biosynthetic pathways. One group of such pathways is those involved in coenzyme biosynthesis. In the case of the methanogenic archaeon Methanocaldococcus jannaschii as well as most methanogens, none of the expected enzymes for the biosynthesis of the β-alanine and pantoic acid moieties required for coenzyme A are annotated. To identify the gene(s) for β-alanine biosynthesis, we have established the pathway for the formation of β-alanine in this organism after experimentally eliminating other known and proposed pathways to β-alanine from malonate semialdehyde, l-alanine, spermine, dihydrouracil, and acryloyl-coenzyme A (CoA). Our data showed that the decarboxylation of aspartate was the only source of β-alanine in cell extracts of M. jannaschii. Unlike other prokaryotes where the enzyme producing β-alanine from l-aspartate is a pyruvoyl-containing l-aspartate decarboxylase (PanD), the enzyme in M. jannaschii is a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent l-aspartate decarboxylase encoded by MJ0050, the same enzyme that was found to decarboxylate tyrosine for methanofuran biosynthesis. A Km of ∼0.80 mM for l-aspartate with a specific activity of 0.09 μmol min(-1) mg(-1) at 70°C for the decarboxylation of l-aspartate was measured for the recombinant enzyme. The MJ0050 gene was also demonstrated to complement the Escherichia coli panD deletion mutant cells, in which panD encoding aspartate decarboxylase in E. coli had been knocked out, thus confirming the function of this gene in vivo.

  6. 21 CFR 172.540 - DL-Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false DL-Alanine. 172.540 Section 172.540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES....540 DL-Alanine. DL-Alanine (a racemic mixture of D- and L-alanine; CAS Reg. No. 302-72-7) may...

  7. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in Orgueil and Ivuna: Tracing the Parent Body of CI Type Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael (Technical Monitor); Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Glavin, Daniel P.; Bota, Oliver; Cooper, George; Bada, Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    Amino acid analyses using HPLC of pristine interior pieces of the CI carbonaceous chondrites Orgueil and Ivuna have found that beta-alanine, glycine, and gamma-amino-n-butyric acid (ABA) are the most abundant amino acids in these two meteorites, with concentrations ranging from approx. 600 to 2,000 parts per billion (ppb). Other alpha-amino acids such as alanine, alpha-ABA, alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), and isovaline are present only in trace amounts (less than 200 ppb). Carbon isotopic measurements of beta-alanine and glycine and the presence of racemic (D/L 1) alanine and beta-ABA in Orgueil suggest that these amino acids are extraterrestrial in origin. In comparison to the CM carbonaceous chondrites Murchison and Murray, the amino acid composition of the CIs is strikingly distinct, suggesting that these meteorites came from a different type of parent body, possibly an extinct comet, than did the CM carbonaceous chondrites.

  8. Extraterrestrial amino acids in Orgueil and Ivuna: Tracing the parent body of CI type carbonaceous chondrites

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Glavin, Daniel P.; Botta, Oliver; Cooper, George; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2001-01-01

    Amino acid analyses using HPLC of pristine interior pieces of the CI carbonaceous chondrites Orgueil and Ivuna have found that β-alanine, glycine, and γ-amino-n-butyric acid (ABA) are the most abundant amino acids in these two meteorites, with concentrations ranging from ≈600 to 2,000 parts per billion (ppb). Other α-amino acids such as alanine, α-ABA, α-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), and isovaline are present only in trace amounts (<200 ppb). Carbon isotopic measurements of β-alanine and glycine and the presence of racemic (D/L ≈ 1) alanine and β-ABA in Orgueil suggest that these amino acids are extraterrestrial in origin. In comparison to the CM carbonaceous chondrites Murchison and Murray, the amino acid composition of the CIs is strikingly distinct, suggesting that these meteorites came from a different type of parent body, possibly an extinct comet, than did the CM carbonaceous chondrites. PMID:11226205

  9. Enantiomeric Excesses of Acid Labile Amino Acid Precursors of the Murchison Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzarello, Sandra

    1998-01-01

    Amino acids present in carbonaceous chondrite are extracted in water in part as free compounds and in approximately equal part as acid labile precursors. On the assumption that they would be free of contamination, the precursors of two Murchison amino acids that have terrestrial occurrence, alanine and glutamic acid, have been targeted for analysis of their enantiomeric ratios. Pyroglutamic acid, the precursor of glutamic acid, was found with an L-enantiomeric excess comparable to that of the free acid, while alanine's precursor, N-acetyl alanine, appears approximately racemic. Also alpha-imino propioacetic acid, a proposed end product of alanine synthesis in the meteorite, was analyzed and found racemic.

  10. Use of the entire spectrum of irradiated alanine for dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Dolo, J M; Moignau, F

    2005-02-01

    Alanine is an amino acid commonly used in ESR dosimetry as a reference detector. The classic approach for the measurement of irradiated samples is to determine the amplitude of the central peak of the first derivative spectrum. It is generally considered that this technique represents the best and most reproducible solution for achieving an accurate proportionality between the concentration of free radicals inside the resonant cavity, characterized by the amplitude, and the dose. It is also accepted that this central peak corresponds to the free radical CH3CHCOO-. The hyperfine structure of this radical in the spectrum shows five main peaks with the approximate ratios 1:4:6:4:1 as regards coupling. This paper presents another approach featuring analysis of the entire spectrum: (i) ratios of identified peaks, (ii) ratio variation vs time with regard to several parameters affecting fading. These variations in the alanine spectrum are probably correlated with the variation of the concentrations of different free radical species. These variations and their positions in the spectrum are very important constraints that increase the uncertainty of this type of measurement.

  11. The effect of immunonutrition (glutamine, alanine) on fracture healing

    PubMed Central

    Küçükalp, Abdullah; Durak, Kemal; Bayyurt, Sarp; Sönmez, Gürsel; Bilgen, Muhammed S.

    2014-01-01

    Background There have been various studies related to fracture healing. Glutamine is an amino acid with an important role in many cell and organ functions. This study aimed to make a clinical, radiological, and histopathological evaluation of the effects of glutamine on fracture healing. Methods Twenty rabbits were randomly allocated into two groups of control and immunonutrition. A fracture of the fibula was made to the right hind leg. All rabbits received standard food and water. From post-operative first day for 30 days, the study group received an additional 2 ml/kg/day 20% L-alanine L-glutamine solution via a gastric catheter, and the control group received 2 ml/kg/day isotonic via gastric catheter. At the end of 30 days, the rabbits were sacrificed and the fractures were examined clinically, radiologically, and histopathologically in respect to the degree of union. Results Radiological evaluation of the control group determined a mean score of 2.5 according to the orthopaedists and 2.65 according to the radiologists. In the clinical evaluation, the mean score was 1.875 for the control group and 2.0 for the study group. Histopathological evaluation determined a mean score of 8.5 for the control group and 9.0 for the study group. Conclusion One month after orally administered glutamine–alanine, positive effects were observed on fracture healing radiologically, clinically, and histopathologically, although no statistically significant difference was determined.

  12. Stereochemistry of amino acids in surface samples of a marine sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollock, G.E.; Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1978-01-01

    In two surface samples of marine sediment, the percentages of d-alanine and d-aspartic acid are significantly higher than the other d-amino acids and are similar to the range found in soils. The percentage of d-glutamic acid is also higher than the other amino acids but less than d-alanine and d-aspartic acid. These d-amino acids may come mainly from bacteria. ?? 1978.

  13. Stereochemistry of amino acids in surface samples of a marine sediment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, G. E.; Kvenvolden, K. A.

    1978-01-01

    In two surface samples of marine sediment, the percentages of D-alanine and D-aspartic acid are significantly higher than the other D-amino acids and are similar to the range found in soils. The percentage of D-glutamic acid is also higher than the other amino acids but less than D-alanine and D-aspartic acid. These D-amino acids may come mainly from bacteria.

  14. Isolation and characterization of cytosolic alanine aminotransferase isoforms from starved rat liver.

    PubMed

    Vedavathi, M; Girish, K S; Kumar, M Karuna

    2004-12-01

    Alanine is the most effective precursor for gluconeogenesis among amino acids and the initial reaction is catalyzed by alanine aminotransferases (AlaATs). It is a less extensively studied enzyme under starvation and known to that the enzyme activity increases in liver under starvation. The present study describes the purification and characterization of two isoforms of alanine aminotransferases from starved male rat liver under starvation. The molecular mass of isoforms was found to be 17.7 and 112.2 kDa with isoelectric points of 4.2 and 5.3 respectively for AlaAT I and AlaAT II. Both the enzymes showed narrow substrate specificity for L-alanine with different Km for alanine and 2-oxoglutarate. Both the enzymes were glycoprotein in nature. Inhibition, modification and spectroscopic studies showed that both PLP and free-SH groups are directly involved in the enzymatic catalysis. PLP activated both the enzymes with a Km 0.057 mM and 0.2 mM for AlaAT I and II respectively. PMID:15663181

  15. Conformational composition and population analysis of β-alanine isolated in solid parahydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel Wong, Y. T.; Toh, Shin Y.; Djuricanin, Pavle; Momose, Takamasa

    2015-04-01

    The conformational composition and the change in conformational ratio induced by UV irradiation of β-alanine have been investigated using solid parahydrogen FT-IR matrix isolation spectroscopy for the first time. In order to assign the observed spectra, the vibrational wavenumbers and intensities of the eleven lowest energy β-alanine conformers were calculated at the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory. In-situ UV photo-irradiation of β-alanine in solid parahydrogen was used to assist the spectral assignment. Out of the eleven lowest energy conformers, conformers I, II, III, IV, and VII were identified in the solid parahydrogen matrix, with conformer III observed in a matrix environment for the first time. Argon matrix FT-IR spectra of β-alanine were also recorded for comparison and only four conformers, conformers I, II, IV and VII, were found, as reported previously. Conformational changes to higher energy structures were observed when β-alanine was irradiated with UV radiation. These changes were more pronounced in parahydrogen matrices than in argon matrices, indicating the usefulness of solid parahydrogen matrix isolation spectroscopy for the conformational study of amino acids.

  16. UV-induced isomerization of β-alanine isolated in argon matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanian, Stepan G.; Ivanov, Alexander Yu.; Smyrnova, Daryna A.; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2012-10-01

    We have employed low-temperature matrix-isolation FTIR spectroscopy, the density functional theory and ab initio calculations at the MP2 and CCSD(T) levels of theory to determine the conformational composition of the simplest β-amino acid, β-alanine. UV irradiation and thermal annealing of the samples together with the FTIR spectra of deuterated β-alanine were used to separate bands of different conformers. A detailed study of the potential energy surface of β-alanine obtained at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory reveals twenty β-alanine conformers, but only five of them may exist in matrices due to their sufficiently high relative stabilities and low energy barriers separating them from each other. An analysis of the FTIR spectra allows us to confirm the presence of four β-alanine conformers in argon matrices with certainty. Two of them, conformers I and II, have an Nsbnd H⋯O intramolecular H-bond, the third, conformer V, has an N⋯Hsbnd O H-bond, and the fourth, conformer IV, has no intramolecular H-bonds. The relative populations of the conformers determined using the relative Gibbs free energies calculated at the CCSD(T)/CBS level of theory at 420 K are 48.1%, 23.7%, 16.8% and 3.2% for the conformers I, II, IV, and V, respectively. Some trace amount of conformer VII was also detected.

  17. Glial cells transform glucose to alanine, which fuels the neurons in the honeybee retina.

    PubMed

    Tsacopoulos, M; Veuthey, A L; Saravelos, S G; Perrottet, P; Tsoupras, G

    1994-03-01

    The retina of honeybee drone is a nervous tissue with a crystal-like structure in which glial cells and photoreceptor neurons constitute two distinct metabolic compartments. The phosphorylation of glucose and its subsequent incorporation into glycogen occur in glia, whereas O2 consumption (QO2) occurs in the photoreceptors. Experimental evidence showed that glia phosphorylate glucose and supply the photoreceptors with metabolic substrates. We aimed to identify these transferred substrates. Using ion-exchange and reversed-phase HPLC and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, we demonstrated that more than 50% of 14C(U)-glucose entering the glia is transformed to alanine by transamination of pyruvate with glutamate. In the absence of extracellular glucose, glycogen is used to make alanine; thus, its pool size in isolated retinas is maintained stable or even increased. Our model proposes that the formation of alanine occurs in the glia, thereby maintaining the redox potential of this cell and contributing to NH3 homeostasis. Alanine is released into the extracellular space and is then transported into photoreceptors using an Na(+)-dependent transport system. Purified suspensions of photoreceptors have similar alanine aminotransferase activity as glial cells and transform 14C-alanine to glutamate, aspartate, and CO2. Therefore, the alanine entering photoreceptors is transaminated to pyruvate, which in turn enters the Krebs cycle. Proline also supplies the Krebs cycle by making glutamate and, in turn, the intermediate alpha-ketoglutarate. Light stimulation caused a 200% increase of QO2 and a 50% decrease of proline and of glutamate. Also, the production of 14CO2 from 14C-proline was increased. The use of these amino acids would sustain about half of the light-induced delta QO2, the other half being sustained by glycogen via alanine formation. The use of proline meets a necessary anaplerotic function in the Krebs cycle, but implies high NH3 production. The results showed

  18. Neutron diffraction investigations of L- and D-alanine at different temperatures: The search for structural evidence for parity violation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Chick C.; Ghosh, Minakshi; Johnson, Louise N.; Wang, Wenging

    2005-09-01

    Single crystal neutron diffraction has been used in an investigation of the structures of the amino acids L- and D-alanine. The aim of the study was to look for proposed phase transitions around T{sub c} {approx} 270 K. Measurements of both structures at 295 K and 60 K - the neutron structure of D-alanine being determined for the first time - show no significant structural basis for this phase transition in alanine. Further, confirmatory, investigation of the structure of D-alanine at temperatures of 240, 250, 260 and 300 K also showed no significant changes in bond lengths or angles. We can thus offer no structural support to other physical measurements, which are indicative of the observable effect of parity violation of the electroweak force in these phase transitions.

  19. Alanine racemase from the acidophile Acetobacter aceti.

    PubMed

    Francois, Julie A; Kappock, T Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Acetobacter aceti converts ethanol to acetic acid, and survives acetic acid exposure by tolerating cytoplasmic acidification. Alanine racemase (Alr) is a pyridoxal 5' phosphate (PLP) -dependent enzyme that catalyzes the interconversion of the d- and l-isomers of alanine and has a basic pH optimum. Since d-alanine is essential for peptidoglycan biosynthesis, Alr must somehow function in the acidic cytoplasm of A. aceti. We report the partial purification of native A. aceti Alr (AaAlr) and evidence that it is a rather stable enzyme. The C-terminus of AaAlr has a strong resemblance to the ssrA-encoded protein degradation signal, which thwarted initial protein expression experiments. High-activity AaAlr forms lacking a protease recognition sequence were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Biophysical and enzymological experiments confirm that AaAlr is intrinsically acid-resistant, yet has the catalytic properties of an ordinary Alr.

  20. Blood Test: Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... may signal a decrease in kidney function. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) , alanine amino transferase (ALT) , aspartate amino transferase (AST) , and bilirubin ; ALP, ALT, and AST are liver enzymes; bilirubin is produced by the liver. Elevated concentrations ...

  1. Amino Acid Racemization in Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    PubMed Central

    Radkov, Atanas D.

    2013-01-01

    d-Amino acids have been shown to play an increasingly diverse role in bacterial physiology, yet much remains to be learned about their synthesis and catabolism. Here we used the model soil- and rhizosphere-dwelling organism Pseudomonas putida KT2440 to elaborate on the genomics and enzymology of d-amino acid metabolism. P. putida KT2440 catabolized the d-stereoisomers of lysine, phenylalanine, arginine, alanine, and hydroxyproline as the sole carbon and nitrogen sources. With the exception of phenylalanine, each of these amino acids was racemized by P. putida KT2440 enzymes. Three amino acid racemases were identified from a genomic screen, and the enzymes were further characterized in vitro. The putative biosynthetic alanine racemase Alr showed broad substrate specificity, exhibiting measurable racemase activity with 9 of the 19 chiral amino acids. Among these amino acids, activity was the highest with lysine, and the kcat/Km values with l- and d-lysine were 3 orders of magnitude greater than the kcat/Km values with l- and d-alanine. Conversely, the putative catabolic alanine racemase DadX showed narrow substrate specificity, clearly preferring only the alanine stereoisomers as the substrates. However, DadX did show 6- and 9-fold higher kcat/Km values than Alr with l- and d-alanine, respectively. The annotated proline racemase ProR of P. putida KT2440 showed negligible activity with either stereoisomer of the 19 chiral amino acids but exhibited strong epimerization activity with hydroxyproline as the substrate. Comparative genomic analysis revealed differences among pseudomonads with respect to alanine racemase genes that may point to different roles for these genes among closely related species. PMID:23995642

  2. Formation of Amino Acids from Reactor Irradiated Ammonium Acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akaboshi, M.; Kawai, K.; Maki, H.; Kawamoto, K.; Honda, Y.

    1982-12-01

    Ammonium acetate in various conditions was irradiated in a reactor to examine the contributions of both the reactor radiations and recoiled14C nucleis to form the biologically interesting molecules. Present investigations demonstrated that several amino acids, glycine, alanine, β-alanine and GABA, and may-be aspartic acid, serine and valine by prolonged irradiation, were formed in the aqueous solutions of ammonium acetate.14C-radioactivities were also found distributed in these amino acids. However, no special relationship between14C-radioactivity and these amino acids formed was observed.

  3. A general and practical palladium-catalyzed monoarylation of β-methyl C(sp³)-H of alanine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Zhang, Shuo-Qing; Xu, Jing-Wen; Hu, Fang; Shi, Bing-Feng

    2014-11-21

    A palladium-catalyzed monoarylation of β-methyl C(sp(3))-H of an alanine derivative with aryl iodides using an 8-aminoquinoline auxiliary is described. The reaction is highly efficient, scalable and compatible with a variety of functional groups with complete retention of chirality, providing a general and practical access to various β-aryl-α-amino acids. The synthetic potential of this protocol is further demonstrated in the sequential synthesis of diverse β-branched α-amino acids.

  4. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  5. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  6. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  7. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  8. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  9. A common fold for peptide synthetases cleaving ATP to ADP: glutathione synthetase and D-alanine:d-alanine ligase of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Fan, C; Moews, P C; Shi, Y; Walsh, C T; Knox, J R

    1995-01-01

    Examination of x-ray crystallographic structures shows the tertiary structure of D-alanine:D-alanine ligase (EC 6.3.2.4). a bacterial cell wall synthesizing enzyme, is similar to that of glutathione synthetase (EC 6.32.3) despite low sequence homology. Both Escherichia coli enzymes, which convert ATP to ADP during ligation to produce peptide products, are made of three domains, each folded around a 4-to 6-stranded beta-sheet core. Sandwiched between the beta-sheets of the C-terminal and central domains of each enzyme is a nonclassical ATP-binding site that contains a common set of spatially equivalent amino acids. In each enzyme, two loops are proposed to exhibit a required flexibility that allows entry of ATP and substrates, provides protection of the acylphosphate intermediate and tetrahedral adduct from hydrolysis during catalysis, and then permits release of products. PMID:7862655

  10. Persistent GABAA/C responses to gabazine, taurine and beta-alanine in rat hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Chesnoy-Marchais, D

    2016-08-25

    In hypoglossal motoneurons, a sustained anionic current, sensitive to a blocker of ρ-containing GABA receptors, (1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl)methylphosphinic acid (TPMPA) and insensitive to bicuculline, was previously shown to be activated by gabazine. In order to better characterize the receptors involved, the sensitivity of this atypical response to pentobarbital (30μM), allopregnanolone (0.3μM) and midazolam (0.5μM) was first investigated. Pentobarbital potentiated the response, whereas the steroid and the benzodiazepine were ineffective. The results indicate the involvement of hybrid heteromeric receptors, including at least a GABA receptor ρ subunit and a γ subunit, accounting for the pentobarbital-sensitivity. The effects of the endogenous β amino acids, taurine and β-alanine, which are released under various pathological conditions and show neuroprotective properties, were then studied. In the presence of the glycine receptor blocker strychnine (1μM), both taurine (0.3-1mM) and β-alanine (0.3mM) activated sustained anionic currents, which were partly blocked by TPMPA (100μM). Thus, both β amino acids activated ρ-containing GABA receptors in hypoglossal motoneurons. Bicuculline (20μM) reduced responses to taurine and β-alanine, but small sustained responses persisted in the presence of both strychnine and bicuculline. Responses to β-alanine were slightly increased by allopregnanolone, indicating a contribution of the bicuculline- and neurosteroid-sensitive GABAA receptors underlying tonic inhibition in these motoneurons. Since sustained activation of anionic channels inhibits most mature principal neurons, the ρ-containing GABA receptors permanently activated by taurine and β-alanine might contribute to some of their neuroprotective properties under damaging overexcitatory situations. PMID:27246441

  11. (S)-Styryl-α-alanine used to probe the intermolecular mechanism of an intramolecular MIO-aminomutase.

    PubMed

    Wanninayake, Udayanga; Deporre, Yvonne; Ondari, Mark; Walker, Kevin D

    2011-11-22

    A Taxus canadensis phenylalanine aminomutase (TcPAM) catalyzes the isomerization of (S)-α- to (R)-β-phenylalanine, making (E)-cinnamate (~10%) as a byproduct at steady state. A currently accepted mechanism for TcPAM suggests that the amino group is transferred from the substrate to a prosthetic group comprised of an amino acid triad in the active site and then principally rebinds to the carbon skeleton of the cinnamate intermediate to complete the α-β isomerization. In contrast, when (S)-styryl-α-alanine is used as a substrate, TcPAM produces (2E,4E)-styrylacrylate as the major product (>99%) and (R)-styryl-β-alanine (<1%). Comparison of the rates of conversion of the natural substrate (S)-α-phenylalanine and (S)-styryl-α-alanine to their corresponding products (k(cat) values of 0.053 ± 0.001 and 0.082 ± 0.002 s(-1), respectively) catalyzed by TcPAM suggests that the amino group resides in the active site longer than styrylacrylate. To demonstrate this principle, inhibition constants (K(I)) for selected acrylates ranging from 0.6 to 106 μM were obtained, and each had a lower K(I) compared to that of (2E,4E)-styrylacrylate (337 ± 12 μM). Evaluation of the inhibition constants and the rates at which both the α/β-amino acids (between 7 and 80% yield) and styrylacrylate were made from a corresponding arylacrylate and styryl-α-alanine, respectively, by TcPAM catalysis revealed that the reaction progress was largely dependent on the K(I) of the acrylate. Bicyclic amino donor substrates also transferred their amino groups to an arylacrylate, demonstrating for the first time that ring-fused amino acids are productive substrates in the TcPAM-catalyzed reaction.

  12. GalNAc-transferase specificity prediction based on feature selection method.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lin; Niu, Bing; Zhao, Jun; Liu, Liang; Lu, Wen-Cong; Liu, Xiao-Jun; Li, Yi-Xue; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2009-02-01

    GalNAc-transferase can catalyze the biosynthesis of O-linked oligosaccharides. The specificity of GalNAc-transferase is composed of nine amino acid residues denoted by R4, R3, R2, R1, R0, R1', R2', R3', R4'. To predict whether the reducing monosaccharide will be covalently linked to the central residue R0(Ser or Thr), a new method based on feature selection has been proposed in our work. 277 nonapeptides from reference [Chou KC. A sequence-coupled vector-projection model for predicting the specificity of GalNAc-transferase. Protein Sci 1995;4:1365-83] are chosen for training set. Each nonapeptide is represented by hundreds of amino acid properties collected by Amino Acid Index database (http://www.genome.jp/aaindex) and transformed into a numeric vector with 4554 features. The Maximum Relevance Minimum Redundancy (mRMR) method combining with Incremental Feature Selection (IFS) and Feature Forward Selection (FFS) are then applied for feature selection. Nearest Neighbor Algorithm (NNA) is used to build prediction models. The optimal model contains 54 features and its correct rate tested by Jackknife cross-validation test reaches 91.34%. Final feature analysis indicates that amino acid residues at position R3' play the most important role in the recognition of GalNAc-transferase specificity, which were confirmed by the experiments [Elhammer AP, Poorman RA, Brown E, Maggiora LL, Hoogerheide JG, Kezdy FJ. The specificity of UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase as inferred from a database of in vivo substrates and from the in vitro glycosylation of proteins and peptides. J Biol Chem 1993;268:10029-38; O'Connell BC, Hagen FK, Tabak LA. The influence of flanking sequence on the O-glycosylation of threonine in vitro. J Biol Chem 1992;267:25010-8; Yoshida A, Suzuki M, Ikenaga H, Takeuchi M. Discovery of the shortest sequence motif for high level mucin-type O-glycosylation. J Biol Chem 1997;272:16884-8]. Our method can be used as a tool for predicting O

  13. Accumulation of D- vs. L-isomers of alanine and leucine in rat prostatic adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Conti, P.S.; Schmall, B.; Bigler, R.E.; Zanzonico, P.B.; Kleinert, E.; Whitmore, W.F. Jr.

    1985-05-01

    It has been reported that tumor tissue may accumulate some D-amino acids preferentially over the L-isomers. In order to investigate the potential use of carbon-11 labeled amino acid isomers for in vivo tumor studies with positron emission tomography in patients, the tissue distributions of alanine and leucine, substrates for the A-type and L-type amino acid transport systems, respectively, were studied in Copenhagen rates bearing the Dunning R3327G prostatic adenocarcinoma. The authors have previously reported differences in the accumulation of A-type vs. L-type amino acids in rat prostatic adenocarcinoma and normal tissues. All compounds were labeled with C-14 in the carboxyl position with specific activities of 30.0-56.6 mCi/mmol. Higher levels of C-14 activity (Relative Concentration (RC)=dpm found per gm tissue + dpm inject per gm animal mass) were observed in tumor tissue using D-alanine (0.71) compared to L- (0.21) or DL-alanine (0.27) at 45 min post-injection. While tumor/prostate and tumor/liver ratios were above 2 for all three substrates, tumor/blood and tumor/muscle were above one for only the D-isomer. Comparisons made with D-, L-, and DL-leucine also demonstrated a higher level of RC in tumor tissue with the D-isomer (0.84) vs. the L-(0.66) and DL-leucine (0.63). In this case, however, tumor/blood, tumor/prostate, and tumor/muscle ratios were above one for all three substrates, while tumor/liver ratios were below one. These results support the observation of a preferential accumulation of D-amino acids in tumor tissue over the natural L-isomers. Observed differences in the accumulation of the isomers in normal tissues are discussed.

  14. β-alanine suppresses malignant breast epithelial cell aggressiveness through alterations in metabolism and cellular acidity in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Deregulated energetics is a property of most cancer cells. This phenomenon, known as the Warburg Effect or aerobic glycolysis, is characterized by increased glucose uptake, lactate export and extracellular acidification, even in the presence of oxygen. β-alanine is a non-essential amino acid that has previously been shown to be metabolized into carnosine, which functions as an intracellular buffer. Because of this buffering capacity, we investigated the effects of β-alanine on the metabolic cancerous phenotype. Methods Non-malignant MCF-10a and malignant MCF-7 breast epithelial cells were treated with β-alanine at 100 mM for 24 hours. Aerobic glycolysis was quantified by measuring extracellular acidification rate (ECAR) and oxidative metabolism was quantified by measuring oxygen consumption rate (OCR). mRNA of metabolism-related genes was quantified by qRT-PCR with corresponding protein expression quantified by immunoblotting, or by flow cytometry which was verified by confocal microscopy. Mitochondrial content was quantified using a mitochondria-specific dye and measured by flow cytometry. Results Cells treated with β-alanine displayed significantly suppressed basal and peak ECAR (aerobic glycolysis), with simultaneous increase in glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1). Additionally, cells treated with β-alanine exhibited significantly reduced basal and peak OCR (oxidative metabolism), which was accompanied by reduction in mitochondrial content with subsequent suppression of genes which promote mitochondrial biosynthesis. Suppression of glycolytic and oxidative metabolism by β-alanine resulted in the reduction of total metabolic rate, although cell viability was not affected. Because β-alanine treatment reduces extracellular acidity, a constituent of the invasive microenvironment that promotes progression, we investigated the effect of β-alanine on breast cell viability and migration. β-alanine was shown to reduce both cell migration and proliferation

  15. Amino acids in the Yamato carbonaceous chrondrite from Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimoyama, A.; Ponnamperuma, C.; Yanai, K.

    1979-01-01

    Evidence for the presence of amino acids of extraterrestrial origin in the Antarctic Yamato carbonaceous chrondrite is presented. Hydrolyzed and nonhydrolyzed water-extracted amino acid samples from exterior, middle and interior portions of the meteorite were analyzed by an amino acid analyzer and by gas chromatography of N-TFA-isopropyl amino acid derivatives. Nine protein and six nonprotein amino acids were detected in the meteorite at abundances between 34 and less than one nmole/g, with equal amounts in interior and exterior portions. Nearly equal abundances of the D and L enantiomers of alanine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid were found, indicating the abiotic, therefore extraterrestrial, origin of the amino acids. The Antarctic environment and the uniformity of protein amino acid abundances are discussed as evidence against the racemization of terrestrially acquired amino acids, and similarities between Yamato amino acid compositions and the amino acid compositions of the Murchison and Murray type II carbonaceous chrondrites are indicated.

  16. BarR, an Lrp-type transcription factor in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, regulates an aminotransferase gene in a β-alanine responsive manner.

    PubMed

    Liu, Han; Orell, Alvaro; Maes, Dominique; van Wolferen, Marleen; Lindås, Ann-Christin; Bernander, Rolf; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Charlier, Daniel; Peeters, Eveline

    2014-05-01

    In archaea, nothing is known about the β-alanine degradation pathway or its regulation. In this work, we identify and characterize BarR, a novel Lrp-like transcription factor and the first one that has a non-proteinogenic amino acid ligand. BarR is conserved in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and Sulfolobus tokodaii and is located in a divergent operon with a gene predicted to encode β-alanine aminotransferase. Deletion of barR resulted in a reduced exponential growth rate in the presence of β-alanine. Furthermore, qRT-PCR and promoter activity assays demonstrated that BarR activates the expression of the adjacent aminotransferase gene, but only upon β-alanine supplementation. In contrast, auto-activation proved to be β-alanine independent. Heterologously produced BarR is an octamer in solution and forms a single complex by interacting with multiple sites in the 170 bp long intergenic region separating the divergently transcribed genes. In vitro, DNA binding is specifically responsive to β-alanine and site-mutant analyses indicated that β-alanine directly interacts with the ligand-binding pocket. Altogether, this work contributes to the growing body of evidence that in archaea, Lrp-like transcription factors have physiological roles that go beyond the regulation of α-amino acid metabolism.

  17. Alpha-amino acid behaves differently from beta- or gamma-amino acids as treated by trimetaphosphate.

    PubMed

    Gao, X; Liu, Y; Xu, P X; Cai, Y M; Zhao, Y F

    2008-01-01

    The condensation reactions of sodium trimetaphosphate with single amino acids, namely glycine, L-alanine, beta-alanine and gamma-aminobutyric acid or pairs of these amino acids were reinvestigated by electrospray ion-trap mass spectrometry and high performance liquid chromatography. It was found when mixtures were treated by sodium trimetaphosphate only in the presence of alpha-amino acid dipeptides were formed. Without addition of alpha-amino acids, the beta-amino acid or gamma-aminobutyric acid could not form peptide either by themselves or with their mixtures under the same conditions. From the data it is concluded that phosphate might select alpha-amino acids to produce the peptides being important precursors for the origin of life. PMID:17973074

  18. Response of amino acids in hindlimb muscles to recovery from hypogravity and unloading by tail-cast suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.; Henriksen, E. J.; Jacob, S.; Cook, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    Concentrations of glutamine, glutamate, aspartate (+ asparagine) and alanine were compared in hindlimb muscles of SL-3 and ground control rats. Alanine was lower in the soleus of flown rats but not of suspended animals, with no response in other muscles except a slight increase in the unloaded plantaris. With recovery, alanine in the soleus was elevated. Since no differences in alanine metabolism were found by isolated muscle, changes in muscle alanine are probably due to altered body use of this amino acid leading to varied plasma levels.

  19. 21 CFR 172.540 - DL-Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true DL-Alanine. 172.540 Section 172.540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents and Related Substances § 172.540 DL-Alanine. DL-Alanine (a racemic mixture of D- and...

  20. 21 CFR 172.540 - DL-Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false DL-Alanine. 172.540 Section 172.540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents and Related Substances § 172.540 DL-Alanine. DL-Alanine (a racemic mixture of D- and...

  1. On the existence of 'L-alanine cadmium bromide'.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Bikshandarkoil R

    2013-12-01

    It is argued that the recently reported nonlinear optical crystal L-alanine cadmium bromide, grown by slow solvent evaporation method at room temperature [P. Ilayabarathi, J. Chandrasekaran, Spectrochim. Acta 96A (2012) 684-689] is the well-known L-alanine crystal. The isolation of L-alanine crystal is explained due to fractional crystallization.

  2. 21 CFR 172.540 - DL-Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false DL-Alanine. 172.540 Section 172.540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents and Related Substances § 172.540 DL-Alanine. DL-Alanine (a racemic mixture of D- and...

  3. 21 CFR 172.540 - DL-Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false DL-Alanine. 172.540 Section 172.540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents and Related Substances § 172.540 DL-Alanine. DL-Alanine (a racemic mixture of D- and...

  4. Alanine aminotransferase variants conferring diverse NUE phenotypes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chandra H; Good, Allen G

    2015-01-01

    Alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT, E.C. 2.6.1.2), is a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent (PLP) enzyme that catalyzes the reversible transfer of an amino group from alanine to 2-oxoglutarate to produce glutamate and pyruvate, or vice versa. It has been well documented in both greenhouse and field studies that tissue-specific over-expression of AlaAT from barley (Hordeum vulgare, HvAlaAT) results in a significant increase in plant NUE in both canola and rice. While the physical phenotypes associated with over-expression of HvAlaAT have been well characterized, the role this enzyme plays in vivo to create a more N efficient plant remains unknown. Furthermore, the importance of HvAlaAT, in contrast to other AlaAT enzyme homologues in creating this phenotype has not yet been explored. To address the role of AlaAT in NUE, AlaAT variants from diverse sources and different subcellular locations, were expressed in the wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 background and alaat1;2 (alaat1-1;alaat2-1) knockout background in various N environments. The analysis and comparison of both the physical and physiological properties of AlaAT over-expressing transgenic plants demonstrated significant differences between plants expressing the different AlaAT enzymes under different external conditions. This analysis indicates that the over-expression of AlaAT variants other than HvAlaAT in crop plants could further increase the NUE phenotype(s) previously observed.

  5. Probing the leucyl/phenylalanyl tRNA protein transferase active site with tRNA substrate analogues.

    PubMed

    Fung, Angela Wai Shan; Ebhardt, H Alexander; Krishnakumar, Kollappillil S; Moore, Jack; Xu, Zhizhong; Strazewski, Peter; Fahlman, Richard P

    2014-07-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA protein transferases post-translationally conjugate an amino acid from an aminoacyl-tRNA onto the N-terminus of a target polypeptide. The eubacterial aminoacyl-tRNA protein transferase, L/F transferase, utilizes both leucyl-tRNA(Leu) and phenylalanyl-tRNA(Phe) as substrates. X-ray crystal structures with substrate analogues, the minimal substrate phenylalanyl adenosine (rA-Phe) and inhibitor puromycin, have been used to characterize tRNA recognition by L/F transferase. However analyses of these two X-ray crystal structures reveal significant differences in binding. Through structural analyses, mutagenesis, and enzymatic activity assays, we rationalize and demonstrate that the substrate analogues bind to L/F transferase with similar binding affinities using a series of different interactions by the various chemical groups of the analogues. Our data also demonstrates that enlarging the hydrophobic pocket of L/F transferase selectively enhances puromycin inhibition and may aid in the development of improved inhibitors for this class of enzymes.

  6. L-alanine uptake in membrane vesicles from Mytilus edulis gills

    SciTech Connect

    Pajor, A.M.; Wright, S.H.

    1986-03-05

    Previous studies have shown that gills from M. edulis can accumulate L-alanine from seawater by a saturable process specific for ..cap alpha..-neutral amino acids. This uptake occurs against chemical gradients in excess of 10/sup 6/ to 1. To further characterize this uptake, membrane vesicles were prepared from M. edulis gill tissue by differential centrifugation. Enrichments of putative enzyme markers (relative to that in combined initial fractions) were as follows: ..gamma..-Glutamyltranspeptidase, 25-30x; Alkaline Phosphatase, 5-6x; K/sup +/-dependent para-Nitrophenyl Phosphatase, 3-5x; Succinate Dehydrogenase 0.1-0.2x. These results suggest that the preparation is enriched in plasma membranes, although histochemical studies will be needed to verify this. The time course of /sup 14/C-L-alanine uptake in the presence of inwardly-directed Na/sup +/ gradient showed a transient overshoot (3-5 fold) at 10 minutes which decreased to equilibrium after six hours. The size of the overshoot and early uptake rates depended on the size of the inwardly-directed Na/sup +/ gradient. No overshoot was seen in the presence of inwardly-directed gradients of LiCl or choline-Cl, or with equilibrium concentrations NaCl or mannitol. A reduced overshoot was seen with a gradient of NaSCN. A small overshoot was seen with an inwardly-directed gradient of KCl. Transport of L-alanine included saturable and diffusive components. Uptake of 6 ..mu..M L-alanine was inhibited more than 80% by 100 ..mu..M ..cap alpha..-zwitterionic amino acids (alanine, leucine, glycine); by 30 to 75% by proline, aspartate and lysine; and less than 20% by a ..beta..-amino acid, taurine. The results of these experiments agree with those from intact gill studies and support the hypothesis that L-alanine is transported into gill epithelial cells by a secondary active transport process involving Na/sup +/.

  7. AlaScan: A Graphical User Interface for Alanine Scanning Free-Energy Calculations.

    PubMed

    Ramadoss, Vijayaraj; Dehez, François; Chipot, Christophe

    2016-06-27

    Computation of the free-energy changes that underlie molecular recognition and association has gained significant importance due to its considerable potential in drug discovery. The massive increase of computational power in recent years substantiates the application of more accurate theoretical methods for the calculation of binding free energies. The impact of such advances is the application of parent approaches, like computational alanine scanning, to investigate in silico the effect of amino-acid replacement in protein-ligand and protein-protein complexes, or probe the thermostability of individual proteins. Because human effort represents a significant cost that precludes the routine use of this form of free-energy calculations, minimizing manual intervention constitutes a stringent prerequisite for any such systematic computation. With this objective in mind, we propose a new plug-in, referred to as AlaScan, developed within the popular visualization program VMD to automate the major steps in alanine-scanning calculations, employing free-energy perturbation as implemented in the widely used molecular dynamics code NAMD. The AlaScan plug-in can be utilized upstream, to prepare input files for selected alanine mutations. It can also be utilized downstream to perform the analysis of different alanine-scanning calculations and to report the free-energy estimates in a user-friendly graphical user interface, allowing favorable mutations to be identified at a glance. The plug-in also assists the end-user in assessing the reliability of the calculation through rapid visual inspection.

  8. Translocation of Radioactive Carbon after the Application of 14C-Alanine and 14CO2 to Sunflower Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Chopowick, R. E.; Forward, D. F.

    1974-01-01

    14C-(UL)-l-Alanine was applied to the surface of mature leaves at the second node of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. cv Commander) plants, under illumination. The alanine was absorbed during a 4-hour period, and some of it was metabolized by the absorbing tissue. After a lag period of about 15 minutes from first application, distribution of 14C through the plant proceeded in much the same pattern as when 14CO2 is assimilated by similar leaves. Most, if not all, of the 14C exported from the absorbing regions was in sucrose. Only minute amounts appeared in alanine or other amino acids in surrounding parts of the leaf blade or in the petiole, although these were strongly labeled in the tissue absorbing 14C-alanine. When 14CO2 was supplied for 15 minutes to leaves of different ages, amino acids were lightly labeled in the leaf blade. Mature green leaves exported only sucrose. Yellowing leaves on 60-day-old plants exported a variety of substances including amino acids. PMID:16658645

  9. Barrier-Free Intermolecular Proton Transfer Induced by Excess Electron Attachment to the Complex of Alanine with Uracil

    SciTech Connect

    Dabkowska, Iwona; Rak, Janusz; Gutowski, Maciej S.; Nilles, J.M.; Stokes, Sarah; Bowen, Kit H.

    2004-04-01

    The photoelectron spectrum of the uracil-alanine anionic complex (UA)- has been recorded with 2.540 eV photons. This spectrum reveals a broad feature with a maximum between 1.6-2.1 eV. The vertical electron detachment energy is too large to be attributed to an (UA)- anionic complex in which an intact uracil anion is solvated by alanine, or vice versa. The neutral and anionic complexes of uracil and alanine were studied at the B3LYP and second order Moeller-Plesset level of theory with 6-31++G** basis sets. The neutral complexes form cyclic hydrogen bonds and the three most stable neutral complexes are bound by 0.72, 0.61 and 0.57 eV. The electron hole in complexes of uracil with alaninie is localized on uracil, but the formation of a complex with alanine strongly modulates the vertical ionization energy of uracil. The theoretical results indicate that the excess electron in (UA)- occupies a p* orbital localized on uracil. The excess electron attachment to the complex can induce a barrier-free proton transfer (BFPT) from the carboxylic group of alanine to the O8 atom of uracil. As a result, the four most stable structures of the uracil-alanine anionic complex can be characterized as the neutral radical of hydrogenated uracil solvated by the anion of deprotonated alanine. Our current results for the anionic complex of uracil with alanine are similar to our previous results for the anion of uracil with glycine [Eur. Phys. J. D 20, 431 (2002)], and together they indicate that the BFPT process is not very sensitive to the nature of the amino acid's hydrophobic residual group. The BFPT to the O8 atom of uracil may be relevant to the damage suffered by nucleic acid bases due to exposure to low energy electrons.

  10. Effect of β-alanine treatment on mitochondrial taurine level and 5-taurinomethyluridine content

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The β-amino acid, taurine, is a nutritional requirement in some species. In these species, the depletion of intracellular stores of taurine leads to the development of severe organ dysfunction. The basis underlying these defects is poorly understood, although there is some suggestion that oxidative stress may contribute to the abnormalities. Recent studies indicate that taurine is required for normal mitochondrial protein synthesis and normal electron transport chain activity; it is known that defects in these events can lead to severe mitochondrial oxidative stress. The present study examines the effect of taurine deficiency on the first step of mitochondrial protein synthesis regulation by taurine, namely, the formation of taurinomethyluridine containing tRNA. Methods Isolated rat cardiomyocytes were rendered taurine deficient by incubation with medium containing the taurine transport inhibitor, β-alanine. The time course of cellular and mitochondrial taurine depletion was measured. The primer extension method was employed to evaluate the effect of β-alanine treatment on taurinomethyluridine content of tRNALeu. The protein levels of ND6 were also determined by Western blot analysis. Results β-alanine caused a time-dependent decrease in cellular taurine content, which were reduced in half after 48 hrs of incubation. The amount of taurine in the mitochondria was considerably less than that in the cytosol and was unaffected by β-alanine treatment. Approximately 70% of the tRNALeu in the untreated cell lacked taurinomethyluridine and these levels were unchanged following β-alanine treatment. Protein content of ND6, however, was significantly reduced after 48 hours incubation with β-alanine. Conclusions The taurine levels of the cytosol and the mitochondria are not directly coupled. The β-alanine-mediated reduction in taurine levels is too small to affect taurinomethyluridine levels. Nonetheless, it interferes with mitochondrial protein synthesis

  11. Amino acids in the Martian meteorite Nakhla

    PubMed Central

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Brinton, Karen L. F.; McDonald, Gene D.

    1999-01-01

    A suite of protein and nonprotein amino acids were detected with high-performance liquid chromatography in the water- and acid-soluble components of an interior fragment of the Martian meteorite Nakhla, which fell in Egypt in 1911. Aspartic and glutamic acids, glycine, alanine, β-alanine, and γ-amino-n-butyric acid (γ-ABA) were the most abundant amino acids detected and were found primarily in the 6 M HCl-hydrolyzed, hot water extract. The concentrations ranged from 20 to 330 parts per billion of bulk meteorite. The amino acid distribution in Nakhla, including the d/l ratios (values range from <0.1 to 0.5), is similar to what is found in bacterially degraded organic matter. The amino acids in Nakhla appear to be derived from terrestrial organic matter that infiltrated the meteorite soon after its fall to Earth, although it is possible that some of the amino acids are endogenous to the meteorite. The rapid amino acid contamination of Martian meteorites after direct exposure to the terrestrial environment has important implications for Mars sample-return missions and the curation of the samples from the time of their delivery to Earth. PMID:10430856

  12. Amino acids in the Martian meteorite Nakhla

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. L.; Brinton, K. L.; McDonald, G. D.

    1999-01-01

    A suite of protein and nonprotein amino acids were detected with high-performance liquid chromatography in the water- and acid-soluble components of an interior fragment of the Martian meteorite Nakhla, which fell in Egypt in 1911. Aspartic and glutamic acids, glycine, alanine, beta-alanine, and gamma-amino-n-butyric acid (gamma-ABA) were the most abundant amino acids detected and were found primarily in the 6 M HCl-hydrolyzed, hot water extract. The concentrations ranged from 20 to 330 parts per billion of bulk meteorite. The amino acid distribution in Nakhla, including the D/L ratios (values range from <0.1 to 0.5), is similar to what is found in bacterially degraded organic matter. The amino acids in Nakhla appear to be derived from terrestrial organic matter that infiltrated the meteorite soon after its fall to Earth, although it is possible that some of the amino acids are endogenous to the meteorite. The rapid amino acid contamination of Martian meteorites after direct exposure to the terrestrial environment has important implications for Mars sample-return missions and the curation of the samples from the time of their delivery to Earth.

  13. [Structure and functions of glutathione transferases].

    PubMed

    Fedets, O M

    2014-01-01

    Data about classification, nomenclature, structure, substrate specificity and role of many glutathione transferase's isoenzymes in cell functions have been summarised. The enzyme has been discovered more than 50 years ago. This family of proteins is updated continuously. It has very different composition and will have demand for system analysis for many years.

  14. Biosynthesis of prodigiosin by non-proliferating wild-type Serratia marcescens and mutants deficient in catabolism of alanine, histidine, and proline.

    PubMed

    Lim, D V; Qadri, S M; Nichols, C; Williams, R P

    1977-01-01

    Mutants of Serratia marcescens Nima, designated as Aut, Hut, or Put, did not utilize L-alanine, L-histidine, or L-proline, respectively, as a sole carbon source but did utilize other amino acids or glycerol as carbon sources. The bacteria were permeable to alanine, histidine, and proline but lacked the enzymes responsible for degradation of these amino acids. The Aut mutant contained no L-alanine dehydrogenase activity, whereas the Hut and Put mutants contained only 7 and 4% of the histidase and proline oxidase activities, respectively, found in the wild-type strain. Rates of oxygen uptake and protein synthesis were significantly lower when the mutants were incubated in the presence of amino acids they could not degrade. Studies of L-[14C]alanine, L-[14C]histidine, and L-[14C]proline incorporation into prodigiosin synthesized by these mutants and the wild-type strain revealed that proline was incorporated intact, whereas all of alanine except the carboxyl group was incorporated into the pigment molecule. Histidine did not enter prodigiosin directly. These data suggested that the presence of unique biosynthetic pathways, independent of primary metabolism, leads to formation of prodigiosin from specific amino acids.

  15. Chiral effects on helicity studied via the energy landscape of short (D, L)-alanine peptides.

    PubMed

    Neelamraju, Sridhar; Oakley, Mark T; Johnston, Roy L

    2015-10-28

    The homochirality of natural amino acids facilitates the formation of regular secondary structures such as α-helices and β-sheets. Here, we study the relationship between chirality and backbone structure for the example of hexa-alanine. The most stable stereoisomers are identified through global optimisation. Further, the energy landscape, a database of connected low-energy local minima and transition points, is constructed for various neutral and zwitterionic stereoisomers of hexa-alanine. Three order parameters for partial helicity are applied and metric disconnectivity graphs are presented with partial helicity as a metric. We also apply the Zimm-Bragg model to derive average partial helicities for Ace-(L-Ala)6-NHMe, Ace-(D-Ala-L-Ala)3-NHMe, and Ace-(L-Ala)3-(D-Ala)3-NHMe from the database of local minima and compare with previous studies.

  16. Chiral effects on helicity studied via the energy landscape of short (d, l)-alanine peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelamraju, Sridhar; Oakley, Mark T.; Johnston, Roy L.

    2015-10-01

    The homochirality of natural amino acids facilitates the formation of regular secondary structures such as α-helices and β-sheets. Here, we study the relationship between chirality and backbone structure for the example of hexa-alanine. The most stable stereoisomers are identified through global optimisation. Further, the energy landscape, a database of connected low-energy local minima and transition points, is constructed for various neutral and zwitterionic stereoisomers of hexa-alanine. Three order parameters for partial helicity are applied and metric disconnectivity graphs are presented with partial helicity as a metric. We also apply the Zimm-Bragg model to derive average partial helicities for Ace-(l-Ala)6-NHMe, Ace-(d-Ala-l-Ala)3-NHMe, and Ace-(l-Ala)3-(d-Ala)3-NHMe from the database of local minima and compare with previous studies.

  17. Different hydroxyl radical scavenging activity of water-soluble beta-alanine C60 adducts.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Jia, Zhishen; Xu, Zhude

    2004-04-01

    Three C(60) derivatives [C(60) (NHCH(2)CH(2)COONa)(n)(H)(n)], n=1, 5, 9] (A, B, C) with different additional number of beta-alanine were synthesized by the control of relative amount of C(60) and beta-alanine added. Hydroxyl radical scavenging activity of the adducts was evaluated in a copper-catalyzed Haber-Weiss reaction by chemiluminescence technology. The 50% inhibition concentrations (IC(50)'s) of A, B, and C were 147.2 micromol/L, 76.3 micromol/L, and 96.2 micromol/L, respectively. The difference should be closely related to the numbers of residual C=C bonds in C(60), steric effect and electron-withstanding effect of amino group especially.

  18. Unusual hydroxyl migration in the fragmentation of β-alanine dication in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Piekarski, Dariusz Grzegorz; Delaunay, Rudy; Maclot, Sylvain; Adoui, Lamri; Martín, Fernando; Alcamí, Manuel; Huber, Bernd A; Rousseau, Patrick; Domaracka, Alicja; Díaz-Tendero, Sergio

    2015-07-14

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of the fragmentation of doubly positively charged β-alanine molecules in the gas phase. The dissociation of the produced dicationic molecules, induced by low-energy ion collisions, is analysed by coincidence mass spectrometric techniques; the coupling with ab initio molecular dynamics simulations allows rationalisation of the experimental observations. The present strategy gives deeper insights into the chemical mechanisms of multiply charged amino acids in the gas phase. In the case of the β-alanine dication, in addition to the expected Coulomb explosion and hydrogen migration processes, we have found evidence of hydroxyl-group migration, which leads to unusual fragmentation products, such as hydroxymethyl cation, and is necessary to explain some of the observed dominant channels.

  19. D-alanine incorporation into macromolecules and effects of D-alanine deprivation on active transport in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Clark, V L; Young, F E

    1978-03-01

    An auxotroph of Bacillus subtilis 168 unable to synthesize D-alanine loses the ability to support endogenously energized transport when deprived of D-alanine. Revertants of the mutant retain transport activity. The loss of transport is specific for substrates taken up by active transport; substrates taken up by group translocation are transported at normal rates. The loss of transport can be retarded by pretreatment of the cells with inhibitors of protein synthesis. Since the loss of transport could be due to an alteration in a D-alanine-containing polymer, we investigated the incorporation of D-[14C]alanine into macromolecules. The major D-alanine-containing polymers in B. subtilis are peptidoglycan and teichoic acid, with 4 to 6% of the D-[14C]alanine label found in trypsin-soluble material. Whereas the peptidoglycan and teichoic acid undergo turnover, the trypsin-soluble material does not. Treatment of the trypsin-soluble material with Pronase releases free D-alanine. Analysis of acid-hydrolyzed trypsin-soluble material indicated that approximately 75% of the radioactivity is present as D-alanine, with the remainder present as L-alanine. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of partially purified D-[14C]alanine-labeled membranes indicated the presence of two peaks of radioactivity (molecular weights, 230,000 and 80,000) that could be digested by trypsin. The results suggest that D-alanine may be covalently bound to cellular proteins.

  20. Thiophenyl-substituted triazolyl-thione L-alanine: asymmetric synthesis, aggregation and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Saghyan, Ashot S; Simonyan, Hayarpi M; Petrosyan, Satenik G; Geolchanyan, Arpine V; Roviello, Giovanni N; Musumeci, Domenica; Roviello, Valentina

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we report the asymmetric synthesis and characterization of an artificial amino acid based on triazolyl-thione L-alanine, which was modified with a thiophenyl-substituted moiety, as well as in vitro studies of its nucleic acid-binding ability. We found, by dynamic light scattering studies, that the synthetic amino acid was able to form supramolecular aggregates having a hydrodynamic diameter higher than 200 nm. Furthermore, we demonstrated, by UV and CD experiments, that the heteroaromatic amino acid, whose enzymatic stability was demonstrated by HPLC analysis also after 24 h of incubation in human serum, was able to bind a RNA complex, which is a feature of biomedical interest in view of innovative antiviral strategies based on modulation of RNA-RNA molecular recognition.

  1. The Origin of Amino Acids in Lunar Regolith Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Glavin, Daniel P.; McLain, Hannah L.; Noble, Sarah K.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the amino acid content of seven lunar regolith samples returned by the Apollo 16 and Apollo 17 missions and stored under NASA curation since collection using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Consistent with results from initial analyses shortly after collection in the 1970s, we observed amino acids at low concentrations in all of the curated samples, ranging from 0.2 parts-per-billion (ppb) to 42.7 ppb in hot-water extracts and 14.5 ppb to 651.1 ppb in 6M HCl acid-vapor-hydrolyzed, hot-water extracts. Amino acids identified in the Apollo soil extracts include glycine, D- and L-alanine, D- and L-aspartic acid, D- and L-glutamic acid, D- and L-serine, L-threonine, and L-valine, all of which had previously been detected in lunar samples, as well as several compounds not previously identified in lunar regoliths: -aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), D-and L-amino-n-butyric acid (-ABA), DL-amino-n-butyric acid, -amino-n-butyric acid, -alanine, and -amino-n-caproic acid. We observed an excess of the L enantiomer in most of the detected proteinogenic amino acids, but racemic alanine and racemic -ABA were present in some samples.

  2. Detection of non-protein amino acids in the presence of protein amino acids. II.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapshak, P.; Okaji, M.

    1972-01-01

    Studies conducted with the JEOL 5AH amino acid analyzer are described. This instrument makes possible the programming of the chromatographic process. Data are presented showing the separations of seventeen non-protein amino acids in the presence of eighteen protein amino acids. It is pointed out that distinct separations could be obtained in the case of a number of chemically similar compounds, such as ornithine and lysine, N-amidino alanine and arginine, and iminodiacetic acid and S-carboxymethyl cysteine and aspartic acid.

  3. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from Streptococcus mutans

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yong-Zhi; Sheng, Yu; Li, Lan-Fen; Tang, De-Wei; Liu, Xiang-Yu; Zhao, Xiaojun; Liang, Yu-He Su, Xiao-Dong

    2007-09-01

    A potential target for antibiotic drug design, d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from S. mutans, was expressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution. d-Alanine-d-alanine ligase is encoded by the gene ddl (SMU-599) in Streptococcus mutans. This ligase plays a very important role in cell-wall biosynthesis and may be a potential target for drug design. To study the structure and function of this ligase, the gene ddl was amplified from S. mutans genomic DNA and cloned into the expression vector pET28a. The protein was expressed in soluble form in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3). Homogeneous protein was obtained using a two-step procedure consisting of Ni{sup 2+}-chelating and size-exclusion chromatography. Purified protein was crystallized and the cube-shaped crystal diffracted to 2.4 Å. The crystal belongs to space group P3{sub 1}21 or P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 79.50, c = 108.97 Å. There is one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  4. Crystal structures of Acetobacter aceti succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetate CoA-transferase reveal specificity determinants and illustrate the mechanism used by class I CoA-transferases.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Elwood A; Kappock, T Joseph

    2012-10-23

    Coenzyme A (CoA)-transferases catalyze transthioesterification reactions involving acyl-CoA substrates, using an active-site carboxylate to form covalent acyl anhydride and CoA thioester adducts. Mechanistic studies of class I CoA-transferases suggested that acyl-CoA binding energy is used to accelerate rate-limiting acyl transfers by compressing the substrate thioester tightly against the catalytic glutamate [White, H., and Jencks, W. P. (1976) J. Biol. Chem. 251, 1688-1699]. The class I CoA-transferase succinyl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase is an acetic acid resistance factor (AarC) with a role in a variant citric acid cycle in Acetobacter aceti. In an effort to identify residues involved in substrate recognition, X-ray crystal structures of a C-terminally His(6)-tagged form (AarCH6) were determined for several wild-type and mutant complexes, including freeze-trapped acetylglutamyl anhydride and glutamyl-CoA thioester adducts. The latter shows the acetate product bound to an auxiliary site that is required for efficient carboxylate substrate recognition. A mutant in which the catalytic glutamate was changed to an alanine crystallized in a closed complex containing dethiaacetyl-CoA, which adopts an unusual curled conformation. A model of the acetyl-CoA Michaelis complex demonstrates the compression anticipated four decades ago by Jencks and reveals that the nucleophilic glutamate is held at a near-ideal angle for attack as the thioester oxygen is forced into an oxyanion hole composed of Gly388 NH and CoA N2″. CoA is nearly immobile along its entire length during all stages of the enzyme reaction. Spatial and sequence conservation of key residues indicates that this mechanism is general among class I CoA-transferases.

  5. Inhibition of glutamine synthesis induces glutamate dehydrogenase-dependent ammonia fixation into alanine in co-cultures of astrocytes and neurons.

    PubMed

    Dadsetan, Sherry; Bak, Lasse K; Sørensen, Michael; Keiding, Susanne; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Ott, Peter; Leke, Renata; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2011-09-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that ammonia exposure of neurons and astrocytes in co-culture leads to net synthesis not only of glutamine but also of alanine. The latter process involves the concerted action of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and alanine aminotransferase (ALAT). In the present study it was investigated if the glutamine synthetase (GS) inhibitor methionine sulfoximine (MSO) would enhance alanine synthesis by blocking the GS-dependent ammonia scavenging process. Hence, co-cultures of neurons and astrocytes were incubated for 2.5h with [U-(13)C]glucose to monitor de novo synthesis of alanine and glutamine in the absence and presence of 5.0 mM NH(4)Cl and 10 mM MSO. Ammonia exposure led to increased incorporation of label but not to a significant increase in the amount of these amino acids. However, in the presence of MSO, glutamine synthesis was blocked and synthesis of alanine increased leading to an elevated content intra- as well as extracellularly of this amino acid. Treatment with MSO led to a dramatic decrease in glutamine content and increased the intracellular contents of glutamate and aspartate. The large increase in alanine during exposure to MSO underlines the importance of the GDH and ALAT biosynthetic pathway for ammonia fixation, and it points to the use of a GS inhibitor to ameliorate the brain toxicity and edema induced by hyperammonemia, events likely related to glutamine synthesis.

  6. Three-dimensional structure of a Bombyx mori Omega-class glutathione transferase.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kohji; Suzuki, Mamoru; Higashiura, Akifumi; Nakagawa, Atsushi

    2013-09-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are major phase II detoxification enzymes that play central roles in the defense against various environmental toxicants as well as oxidative stress. Here we report the crystal structure of an Omega-class glutathione transferase of Bombyx mori, bmGSTO, to gain insight into its catalytic mechanism. The structure of bmGSTO complexed with glutathione determined at a resolution of 2.5Å reveals that it exists as a dimer and is structurally similar to Omega-class GSTs with respect to its secondary and tertiary structures. Analysis of a complex between bmGSTO and glutathione showed that bound glutathione was localized to the glutathione-binding site (G-site). Site-directed mutagenesis of bmGSTO mutants indicated that amino acid residues Leu62, Lys65, Lys77, Val78, Glu91 and Ser92 in the G-site contribute to catalytic activity.

  7. Structural characterization of the catalytic site of a Nilaparvata lugens delta-class glutathione transferase.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kohji; Higashiura, Akifumi; Hossain, Md Tofazzal; Yamada, Naotaka; Shiotsuki, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Atsushi

    2015-01-15

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are a major class of detoxification enzymes that play a central role in the defense against environmental toxicants and oxidative stress. Here, we studied the crystal structure of a delta-class glutathione transferase from Nilaparvata lugens, nlGSTD, to gain insights into its catalytic mechanism. The structure of nlGSTD in complex with glutathione, determined at a resolution of 1.7Å, revealed that it exists as a dimer and its secondary and tertiary structures are similar to those of other delta-class GSTs. Analysis of a complex between nlGSTD and glutathione showed that the bound glutathione was localized to the glutathione-binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis of nlGSTD mutants indicated that amino acid residues Ser11, His52, Glu66, and Phe119 contribute to catalytic activity.

  8. Identification of a diazinon-metabolizing glutathione S-transferase in the silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kohji; Yamada, Naotaka

    2016-01-01

    The glutathione S-transferase superfamily play key roles in the metabolism of numerous xenobiotics. We report herein the identification and characterization of a novel glutathione S-transferase in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. The enzyme (bmGSTu2) conjugates glutathione to 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, as well as metabolizing diazinon, one of the organophosphate insecticides. Quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction analysis of transcripts demonstrated that bmGSTu2 expression was induced 1.7-fold in a resistant strain of B. mori. Mutagenesis of putative amino acid residues in the glutathione-binding site revealed that Ile54, Glu66, Ser67, and Asn68 are crucial for enzymatic function. These results provide insights into the catalysis of glutathione conjugation in silkworm by bmGSTu2 and into the detoxification of organophosphate insecticides. PMID:27440377

  9. Identification of a diazinon-metabolizing glutathione S-transferase in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kohji; Yamada, Naotaka

    2016-01-01

    The glutathione S-transferase superfamily play key roles in the metabolism of numerous xenobiotics. We report herein the identification and characterization of a novel glutathione S-transferase in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. The enzyme (bmGSTu2) conjugates glutathione to 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, as well as metabolizing diazinon, one of the organophosphate insecticides. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of transcripts demonstrated that bmGSTu2 expression was induced 1.7-fold in a resistant strain of B. mori. Mutagenesis of putative amino acid residues in the glutathione-binding site revealed that Ile54, Glu66, Ser67, and Asn68 are crucial for enzymatic function. These results provide insights into the catalysis of glutathione conjugation in silkworm by bmGSTu2 and into the detoxification of organophosphate insecticides. PMID:27440377

  10. Neonatal taurine and alanine modulate anxiety-like behavior and decelerate cortical spreading depression in rats previously suckled under different litter sizes.

    PubMed

    Francisco, Elian da Silva; Guedes, Rubem Carlos Araújo

    2015-11-01

    The amino acids taurine and alanine play a role in several physiological processes, including behavior and the electrical activity of the brain. In this study, we investigated the effect of treatment with taurine or alanine on anxiety-like behavior and the excitability-dependent phenomenon known as cortical spreading depression (CSD), using rats suckled in litters with 9 and 15 pups (groups L9 and L15). From postnatal days 7 to 27, the animals received per gavage 300 mg/kg/day of taurine or alanine or both. At 28 days, we tested the animals in the elevated plus maze, and at 33-35 days, we recorded CSD and analyzed its velocity of propagation, amplitude, and duration. Compared with water-treated controls, the L9 groups treated with taurine or alanine displayed anxiolytic behavior (higher number of entries in the open arms; p < 0.05), and reduced CSD velocity (p < 0.001). The effect of both amino acids on CSD was also found in the L15 groups and in five additional L9 groups (naïve, water, taurine, alanine, or both) treated at adulthood (90-110 days). The L15 condition resulted in smaller durations and higher CSD velocities compared with the L9 condition. Besides reinforcing previous evidence of behavioral modulation by taurine and alanine, our data are the first confirmation that treatment with these amino acids decelerates CSD regardless of lactation conditions (normal versus unfavorable lactation) or age at amino acid administration (young versus adult). The results suggest a modulating role for both amino acids on anxiety behavior and neuronal electrical activity.

  11. International society of sports nutrition position stand: Beta-Alanine.

    PubMed

    Trexler, Eric T; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Stout, Jeffrey R; Hoffman, Jay R; Wilborn, Colin D; Sale, Craig; Kreider, Richard B; Jäger, Ralf; Earnest, Conrad P; Bannock, Laurent; Campbell, Bill; Kalman, Douglas; Ziegenfuss, Tim N; Antonio, Jose

    2015-01-01

    The International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) provides an objective and critical review of the mechanisms and use of beta-alanine supplementation. Based on the current available literature, the conclusions of the ISSN are as follows: 1) Four weeks of beta-alanine supplementation (4-6 g daily) significantly augments muscle carnosine concentrations, thereby acting as an intracellular pH buffer; 2) Beta-alanine supplementation currently appears to be safe in healthy populations at recommended doses; 3) The only reported side effect is paraesthesia (tingling), but studies indicate this can be attenuated by using divided lower doses (1.6 g) or using a sustained-release formula; 4) Daily supplementation with 4 to 6 g of beta-alanine for at least 2 to 4 weeks has been shown to improve exercise performance, with more pronounced effects in open end-point tasks/time trials lasting 1 to 4 min in duration; 5) Beta-alanine attenuates neuromuscular fatigue, particularly in older subjects, and preliminary evidence indicates that beta-alanine may improve tactical performance; 6) Combining beta-alanine with other single or multi-ingredient supplements may be advantageous when supplementation of beta-alanine is high enough (4-6 g daily) and long enough (minimum 4 weeks); 7) More research is needed to determine the effects of beta-alanine on strength, endurance performance beyond 25 min in duration, and other health-related benefits associated with carnosine. PMID:26175657

  12. International society of sports nutrition position stand: Beta-Alanine.

    PubMed

    Trexler, Eric T; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Stout, Jeffrey R; Hoffman, Jay R; Wilborn, Colin D; Sale, Craig; Kreider, Richard B; Jäger, Ralf; Earnest, Conrad P; Bannock, Laurent; Campbell, Bill; Kalman, Douglas; Ziegenfuss, Tim N; Antonio, Jose

    2015-01-01

    The International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) provides an objective and critical review of the mechanisms and use of beta-alanine supplementation. Based on the current available literature, the conclusions of the ISSN are as follows: 1) Four weeks of beta-alanine supplementation (4-6 g daily) significantly augments muscle carnosine concentrations, thereby acting as an intracellular pH buffer; 2) Beta-alanine supplementation currently appears to be safe in healthy populations at recommended doses; 3) The only reported side effect is paraesthesia (tingling), but studies indicate this can be attenuated by using divided lower doses (1.6 g) or using a sustained-release formula; 4) Daily supplementation with 4 to 6 g of beta-alanine for at least 2 to 4 weeks has been shown to improve exercise performance, with more pronounced effects in open end-point tasks/time trials lasting 1 to 4 min in duration; 5) Beta-alanine attenuates neuromuscular fatigue, particularly in older subjects, and preliminary evidence indicates that beta-alanine may improve tactical performance; 6) Combining beta-alanine with other single or multi-ingredient supplements may be advantageous when supplementation of beta-alanine is high enough (4-6 g daily) and long enough (minimum 4 weeks); 7) More research is needed to determine the effects of beta-alanine on strength, endurance performance beyond 25 min in duration, and other health-related benefits associated with carnosine.

  13. A search for endogenous amino acids in martian meteorite ALH84001.

    PubMed

    Bada, J L; Glavin, D P; McDonald, G D; Becker, L

    1998-01-16

    Trace amounts of glycine, serine, and alanine were detected in the carbonate component of the martian meteorite ALH84001 by high-performance liquid chromatography. The detected amino acids were not uniformly distributed in the carbonate component and ranged in concentration from 0.1 to 7 parts per million. Although the detected alanine consists primarily of the L enantiomer, low concentrations (<0.1 parts per million) of endogenous D-alanine may be present in the ALH84001 carbonates. The amino acids present in this sample of ALH84001 appear to be terrestrial in origin and similar to those in Allan Hills ice, although the possibility cannot be ruled out that minute amounts of some amino acids such as D-alanine are preserved in the meteorite. PMID:9430583

  14. A search for endogenous amino acids in martian meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bada, J. L.; Glavin, D. P.; McDonald, G. D.; Becker, L.

    1998-01-01

    Trace amounts of glycine, serine, and alanine were detected in the carbonate component of the martian meteorite ALH84001 by high-performance liquid chromatography. The detected amino acids were not uniformly distributed in the carbonate component and ranged in concentration from 0.1 to 7 parts per million. Although the detected alanine consists primarily of the L enantiomer, low concentrations (<0.1 parts per million) of endogenous D-alanine may be present in the ALH84001 carbonates. The amino acids present in this sample of ALH84001 appear to be terrestrial in origin and similar to those in Allan Hills ice, although the possibility cannot be ruled out that minute amounts of some amino acids such as D-alanine are preserved in the meteorite.

  15. An alternative mechanism for the catalysis of peptide bond formation by L/F transferase: substrate binding and orientation.

    PubMed

    Fung, Angela W; Ebhardt, H Alexander; Abeysundara, Heshani; Moore, Jack; Xu, Zhizhong; Fahlman, Richard P

    2011-06-17

    Eubacterial leucyl/phenylalanyl tRNA protein transferase (L/F transferase) catalyzes the transfer of a leucine or a phenylalanine from an aminoacyl-tRNA to the N-terminus of a protein substrate. This N-terminal addition of an amino acid is analogous to that of peptide synthesis by ribosomes. A previously proposed catalytic mechanism for Escherichia coli L/F transferase identified the conserved aspartate 186 (D186) and glutamine 188 (Q188) as key catalytic residues. We have reassessed the role of D186 and Q188 by investigating the enzymatic reactions and kinetics of enzymes possessing mutations to these active-site residues. Additionally three other amino acids proposed to be involved in aminoacyl-tRNA substrate binding are investigated for comparison. By quantitatively measuring product formation using a quantitative matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry-based assay, our results clearly demonstrate that, despite significant reduction in enzymatic activity as a result of different point mutations introduced into the active site of L/F transferase, the formation of product is still observed upon extended incubations. Our kinetic data and existing X-ray crystal structures result in a proposal that the critical roles of D186 and Q188, like the other amino acids in the active site, are for substrate binding and orientation and do not directly participate in the chemistry of peptide bond formation. Overall, we propose that L/F transferase does not directly participate in the chemistry of peptide bond formation but catalyzes the reaction by binding and orientating the substrates for reaction in an analogous mechanism that has been described for ribosomes.

  16. Post-translational Introduction of D-Alanine into Ribosomally Synthesized Peptides by the Dehydroalanine Reductase NpnJ.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao; van der Donk, Wilfred A

    2015-10-01

    Ribosomally synthesized peptides are generally limited to L-amino acid building blocks. Given the advantageous properties of peptides containing D-amino acids such as stabilization of certain turns and against proteolytic degradation, methods to introduce D-stereocenters are valuable. Here we report the first in vitro reconstitution and characterization of a dehydrogenase that carries out the asymmetric reduction of dehydroalanine. NpnJA reduces dehydroalanine to D-Ala using NAPDH as cosubstrate. The enzyme displays high substrate tolerance allowing introduction of D-Ala into a range of non-native substrates. In addition to the in vitro reactions, we describe five examples of using Escherichia coli as biosynthetic host for D-alanine introduction into ribosomal peptides. A deuterium-label-based coupled-enzyme assay was used to rapidly determine the stereochemistry of the newly installed alanine.

  17. Context-specific inhibition of translation by ribosomal antibiotics targeting the peptidyl transferase center

    PubMed Central

    Marks, James; Kannan, Krishna; Roncase, Emily J.; Klepacki, Dorota; Kefi, Amira; Orelle, Cédric; Vázquez-Laslop, Nora; Mankin, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    The first broad-spectrum antibiotic chloramphenicol and one of the newest clinically important antibacterials, linezolid, inhibit protein synthesis by targeting the peptidyl transferase center of the bacterial ribosome. Because antibiotic binding should prevent the placement of aminoacyl-tRNA in the catalytic site, it is commonly assumed that these drugs are universal inhibitors of peptidyl transfer and should readily block the formation of every peptide bond. However, our in vitro experiments showed that chloramphenicol and linezolid stall ribosomes at specific mRNA locations. Treatment of bacterial cells with high concentrations of these antibiotics leads to preferential arrest of translation at defined sites, resulting in redistribution of the ribosomes on mRNA. Antibiotic-mediated inhibition of protein synthesis is most efficient when the nascent peptide in the ribosome carries an alanine residue and, to a lesser extent, serine or threonine in its penultimate position. In contrast, the inhibitory action of the drugs is counteracted by glycine when it is either at the nascent-chain C terminus or at the incoming aminoacyl-tRNA. The context-specific action of chloramphenicol illuminates the operation of the mechanism of inducible resistance that relies on programmed drug-induced translation arrest. In addition, our findings expose the functional interplay between the nascent chain and the peptidyl transferase center. PMID:27791002

  18. Β-alanine and l-histidine transport across the inner blood-retinal barrier: potential involvement in L-carnosine supply.

    PubMed

    Usui, Takuya; Kubo, Yoshiyuki; Akanuma, Shin-Ichi; Hosoya, Ken-Ichi

    2013-08-01

    The supply of L-carnosine, a bioactive dipeptide of β-alanine and l-histidine, to the retina across the blood-retinal barrier (BRB) was studied. The in vivo and in vitro studies revealed low uptake activities for [(3)H]Gly-Sar, a representative dipeptide, suggesting that l-carnosine transport plays only a minor role at the BRB. The in vivo study using rats showed approximately 18- and 23-fold greater retinal uptake indexes (RUI) for [(3)H]β-alanine and [(3)H]l-histidine compared with that of a paracellular marker, respectively. The RUI of [(3)H]β-alanine was taurine- and γ-aminobutyric acid-sensitive, and the in vitro uptake by TR-iBRB2 cells showed time- concentration- and temperature-dependent [(3)H]β-alanine uptake, suggesting that a carrier-mediated process was involved in β-alanine transport across the inner BRB. [(3)H]β-Alanine uptake was inhibited by taurine and β-guanidinopropionic acid, suggesting that taurine transporter (TAUT/SLC6A6) is responsible for the influx transport of β-alanine across the inner BRB. Regarding l-histidine, the l-leucine-sensitive RUI of [(3)H]l-histidine was identified, and the in vitro [(3)H]l-histidine uptake by TR-iBRB2 cells suggested that a carrier-mediated process was involved in l-histidine transport across the inner BRB. The inhibition profile suggested that L-type amino acid transporter (LAT1/SLC7A5) is responsible for the influx transport of l-histidine across the inner BRB. These results show that the influx transports of β-alanine and l-histidine across the inner BRB is carried out by TAUT and LAT1, respectively, suggesting that the retinal l-carnosine is supplied by enzymatic synthesis from two kinds of amino acids transported across the inner BRB.

  19. Effects of β-alanine administration on selected parameters of oxidative stress and phosphoryltransfer network in cerebral cortex and cerebellum of rats.

    PubMed

    Gemelli, Tanise; de Andrade, Rodrigo Binkowski; Rojas, Denise Bertin; Bonorino, Nariélle Ferner; Mazzola, Priscila Nicolao; Tortorelli, Lucas Silva; Funchal, Cláudia; Filho, Carlos Severo Dutra; Wannmacher, Clovis Milton Duval

    2013-08-01

    β-Alanine is a β-amino acid derivative of the degradation of pyrimidine uracil and precursor of the oxidative substrate acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA). The accumulation of β-alanine occurs in β-alaninemia, an inborn error of metabolism. Patients with β-alaninemia may develop neurological abnormalities whose mechanisms are far from being understood. In this study we evaluated the effects of β-alanine administration on some parameters of oxidative stress and on creatine kinase, pyruvate kinase, and adenylate kinase in cerebral cortex and cerebellum of 21-day-old rats. The animals received three peritoneal injections of β-alanine (0.3 mg /g of body weight) and the controls received the same volume (10 μL/g of body weight) of saline solution (NaCl 0.85 %) at 3 h intervals. CSF levels of β-alanine increased five times, achieving 80 μM in the rats receiving the amino acid. The results of β-alanine administration in the parameters of oxidative stress were similar in both tissues studied: reduction of superoxide dismutase activity, increased oxidation of 2',7'-dihydrodichlorofluorescein, total content of sulfhydryl and catalase activity. However, the results of the phosphoryltransfer network enzymes were similar in all enzymes, but different in the tissues studied: the β-alanine administration was able to inhibit the enzyme pyruvate kinase, cytosolic creatine kinase, and adenylate kinase activities in cerebral cortex, and increase in cerebellum. In case this also occurs in the patients, these results suggest that oxidative stress and alteration of the phosphoryltransfer network may be involved in the pathophysiology of β-alaninemia. Moreover, the ingestion of β-alanine to improve muscular performance deserves more attention in respect to possible side-effects.

  20. Inhibition of O-GlcNAc transferase activity reprograms prostate cancer cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Itkonen, Harri M.; Gorad, Saurabh S.; Duveau, Damien Y.; Martin, Sara E.S.; Barkovskaya, Anna; Bathen, Tone F.; Moestue, Siver A.; Mills, Ian G.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic networks are highly connected and complex, but a single enzyme, O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) can sense the availability of metabolites and also modify target proteins. We show that inhibition of OGT activity inhibits the proliferation of prostate cancer cells, leads to sustained loss of c-MYC and suppresses the expression of CDK1, elevated expression of which predicts prostate cancer recurrence (p=0.00179). Metabolic profiling revealed decreased glucose consumption and lactate production after OGT inhibition. This decreased glycolytic activity specifically sensitized prostate cancer cells, but not cells representing normal prostate epithelium, to inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation (rotenone and metformin). Intra-cellular alanine was depleted upon OGT inhibitor treatment. OGT inhibitor increased the expression and activity of alanine aminotransferase (GPT2), an enzyme that can be targeted with a clinically approved drug, cycloserine. Simultaneous inhibition of OGT and GPT2 inhibited cell viability and growth rate, and additionally activated a cell death response. These combinatorial effects were predominantly seen in prostate cancer cells, but not in a cell-line derived from normal prostate epithelium. Combinatorial treatments were confirmed with two inhibitors against both OGT and GPT2. Taken together, here we report the reprogramming of energy metabolism upon inhibition of OGT activity, and identify synergistically lethal combinations that are prostate cancer cell specific. PMID:26824323

  1. Amyloid Aggregates Arise from Amino Acid Condensations under Prebiotic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, Jason; Friedmann, Michael P; Riek, Roland

    2016-09-12

    Current theories on the origin of life reveal significant gaps in our understanding of the mechanisms that allowed simple chemical precursors to coalesce into the complex polymers that are needed to sustain life. The volcanic gas carbonyl sulfide (COS) is known to catalyze the condensation of amino acids under aqueous conditions, but the reported di-, tri-, and tetra-peptides are too short to support a regular tertiary structure. Here, we demonstrate that alanine and valine, two of the proteinogenic amino acids believed to have been among the most abundant on a prebiotic earth, can polymerize into peptides and subsequently assemble into ordered amyloid fibers comprising a cross-β-sheet quaternary structure following COS-activated continuous polymerization of as little as 1 mm amino acid. Furthermore, this spontaneous assembly is not limited to pure amino acids, since mixtures of glycine, alanine, aspartate, and valine yield similar structures. PMID:27511635

  2. Characterisation of L-alanine and glycine absorption across the gut of an ancient vertebrate.

    PubMed

    Glover, Chris N; Bucking, Carol; Wood, Chris M

    2011-08-01

    This study utilised an in vitro technique to characterise absorption of two amino acids across the intestinal epithelium of Pacific hagfish, Eptatretus stoutii. Uptake of L-alanine and glycine conformed to Michaelis-Menten kinetics. An uptake affinity (K(m); substrate concentration required to attain a 50% uptake saturation) of 7.0 mM and an uptake capacity (J (max)) of 83 nmol cm(-2) h(-1) were described for L-alanine. The K(m) and J(max) for glycine were 2.2 mM and 11.9 nmol cm(-2) h(-1), respectively. Evidence suggested that the pathways of L-alanine and glycine absorption were shared, and sodium dependent. Further analysis indicated that glycine uptake was independent of luminal pH and proline, but a component of uptake was significantly impaired by 100-fold excesses of threonine or asparagine. The presence of a short-term (24 h) exposure to waterborne glycine, similar in nature to that which may be expected to occur when feeding inside an animal carcass, had no significant impact on gastrointestinal glycine uptake. This may indicate a lack of cross talk between absorptive epithelia. These results are the first published data to describe gastrointestinal uptake of an organic nutrient in the oldest extant vertebrate and may provide potential insight into the evolution of nutrient transport systems.

  3. VUV photodynamics and chiral asymmetry in the photoionization of gas phase alanine enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Tia, Maurice; Cunha de Miranda, Barbara; Daly, Steven; Gaie-Levrel, François; Garcia, Gustavo A; Nahon, Laurent; Powis, Ivan

    2014-04-17

    The valence shell photoionization of the simplest proteinaceous chiral amino acid, alanine, is investigated over the vacuum ultraviolet region from its ionization threshold up to 18 eV. Tunable and variable polarization synchrotron radiation was coupled to a double imaging photoelectron/photoion coincidence (i(2)PEPICO) spectrometer to produce mass-selected threshold photoelectron spectra and derive the state-selected fragmentation channels. The photoelectron circular dichroism (PECD), an orbital-sensitive, conformer-dependent chiroptical effect, was also recorded at various photon energies and compared to continuum multiple scattering calculations. Two complementary vaporization methods-aerosol thermodesorption and a resistively heated sample oven coupled to an adiabatic expansion-were applied to promote pure enantiomers of alanine into the gas phase, yielding neutral alanine with different internal energy distributions. A comparison of the photoelectron spectroscopy, fragmentation, and dichroism measured for each of the vaporization methods was rationalized in terms of internal energy and conformer populations and supported by theoretical calculations. The analytical potential of the so-called PECD-PICO detection technique-where the electron spectroscopy and circular dichroism can be obtained as a function of mass and ion translational energy-is underlined and applied to characterize the origin of the various species found in the experimental mass spectra. Finally, the PECD findings are discussed within an astrochemical context, and possible implications regarding the origin of biomolecular asymmetry are identified.

  4. Triazolyl-donor-acceptor chromophore-decorated unnatural amino acids and peptides: FRET events in a β-turn conformation.

    PubMed

    Bag, Subhendu Sekhar; Jana, Subhashis; Yashmeen, Afsana; Senthilkumar, K; Bag, Raghunath

    2014-01-14

    The β-turn conformation and FRET process were established in the designed tripeptide containing fluorescent triazolyl donor and acceptor-decorated unnatural amino acids separated by a natural alanine.

  5. Amino Acid Racemization and the Preservation of Ancient DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poinar, Hendrik N.; Hoss, Matthias

    1996-01-01

    The extent of racemization of aspartic acid, alanine, and leucine provides criteria for assessing whether ancient tissue samples contain endogenous DNA. In samples in which the D/L ratio of aspartic acid exceeds 0.08, ancient DNA sequences could not be retrieved. Paleontological finds from which DNA sequences purportedly millions of years old have been reported show extensive racemization, and the amino acids present are mainly contaminates. An exception is the amino acids in some insects preserved in amber.

  6. Alanine repeats influence protein localization in splicing speckles and paraspeckles.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shuo-Hsiu; Chang, Wei-Lun; Lu, Chia-Chen; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2014-12-16

    Mammalian splicing regulatory protein RNA-binding motif protein 4 (RBM4) has an alanine repeat-containing C-terminal domain (CAD) that confers both nuclear- and splicing speckle-targeting activities. Alanine-repeat expansion has pathological potential. Here we show that the alanine-repeat tracts influence the subnuclear targeting properties of the RBM4 CAD in cultured human cells. Notably, truncation of the alanine tracts redistributed a portion of RBM4 to paraspeckles. The alanine-deficient CAD was sufficient for paraspeckle targeting. On the other hand, alanine-repeat expansion reduced the mobility of RBM4 and impaired its splicing activity. We further took advantage of the putative coactivator activator (CoAA)-RBM4 conjoined splicing factor, CoAZ, to investigate the function of the CAD in subnuclear targeting. Transiently expressed CoAZ formed discrete nuclear foci that emerged and subsequently separated-fully or partially-from paraspeckles. Alanine-repeat expansion appeared to prevent CoAZ separation from paraspeckles, resulting in their complete colocalization. CoAZ foci were dynamic but, unlike paraspeckles, were resistant to RNase treatment. Our results indicate that the alanine-rich CAD, in conjunction with its conjoined RNA-binding domain(s), differentially influences the subnuclear localization and biogenesis of RBM4 and CoAZ.

  7. Correlation between liver cell necrosis and circulating alanine aminotransferase after ischaemia/reperfusion injuries in the rat liver.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Anders R; Andersen, Kasper J; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen; Nyengaard, Jens R; Mortensen, Frank V

    2016-04-01

    Circulating liver enzymes such as alanine transaminase are often used as markers of hepatocellular damage. Ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is an inevitable consequence of prolonged liver ischaemia. The aim of this study was to examine the correlation between liver enzymes and volume of liver cell necrosis after ischaemia/reperfusion injuries, using design-unbiased stereological methods. Forty-seven male Wistar rats were subjected to 1 h of partial liver ischaemia, followed by either 4 or 24 h of reperfusion. Within each group, one-third of animals were subjected to ischaemic preconditioning and one-third to ischaemic postconditioning. At the end of reperfusion, blood and liver samples were collected for analysis. The volume of necrotic liver tissue was subsequently correlated to circulating markers of I/R injury. Correlation between histological findings and circulating markers was performed using Pearson's correlation coefficient. Alanine transferase peaked after 4 h of reperfusion; however, at this time-point, only mild necrosis was observed, with a Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.663 (P = 0.001). After 24 h of reperfusion, alanine aminotransferase was found to be highly correlated to the degree of hepatocellular necrosis R = 0.836 (P = 0.000). Furthermore, alkaline phosphatase (R = 0.806) and α-2-macroglobulin (R = 0.655) levels were also correlated with the degree of necrosis. We show for the first time that there is a close correlation between the volume of hepatocellular necrosis and alanine aminotransferase levels in a model of I/R injury. This is especially apparent after 24 h of reperfusion. Similarly, increased levels of alkaline phosphatase and α-2-macroglobulin are correlated to the volume of liver necrosis. PMID:27292534

  8. Mechanisms of itch evoked by β-alanine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qin; Sikand, Parul; Ma, Chao; Tang, Zongxiang; Han, Liang; Li, Zhe; Sun, Shuohao; LaMotte, Robert H; Dong, Xinzhong

    2012-10-17

    β-Alanine, a popular supplement for muscle building, induces itch and tingling after consumption, but the underlying molecular and neural mechanisms are obscure. Here we show that, in mice, β-alanine elicited itch-associated behavior that requires MrgprD, a G-protein-coupled receptor expressed by a subpopulation of primary sensory neurons. These neurons exclusively innervate the skin, respond to β-alanine, heat, and mechanical noxious stimuli but do not respond to histamine. In humans, intradermally injected β-alanine induced itch but neither wheal nor flare, suggesting that the itch was not mediated by histamine. Thus, the primary sensory neurons responsive to β-alanine are likely part of a histamine-independent itch neural circuit and a target for treating clinical itch that is unrelieved by anti-histamines.

  9. Use of β-alanine as an ergogenic aid.

    PubMed

    Derave, Wim

    2013-01-01

    Despite the large variety of so-called ergogenic supplements used by the sporting community, only few of them are effectively supported by scientific proof. One of the recent evidence-based supplements that entered the market is β-alanine. β-Alanine is the rate-limiting precursor for the synthesis of the dipeptide carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) in human muscle. The chronic daily ingestion of β-alanine can markedly elevate muscle carnosine content, which results in improved exercise capacity, especially in sports that include high-intensity exercise episodes. The use of β-alanine is exponentially growing in recent years. This chapter aims to (1) discuss the scientific basis and physiological background of β-alanine and its synthesis product carnosine, and (2) translate these scientific findings to practical applications in sports.

  10. ΔpH-Dependent Amino Acid Transport into Plasma Membrane Vesicles Isolated from Sugar Beet (Beta vulgaris L.) Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen-Chang; Bush, Daniel R.

    1991-01-01

    Proton-coupled aliphatic, neutral amino acid transport was investigated in plasma membrane vesicles isolated from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L., cv Great Western) leaves. Two neutral amino acid symport systems were resolved based on inter-amino acid transport competition and on large variations in the specific activity of each porter in different species. Competitive inhibition was observed for transport competition between alanine, methionine, glutamine, and leucine (the alanine group) and between isoleucine, valine, and threonine (the isoleucine group). The apparent Km and Ki values were similar for transport competition among amino acids within the alanine group. In contrast, the kinetics of transport competition between these two groups of amino acids did not fit a simple competitive model. Furthermore, members of the isoleucine group were weak transport antagonists of the alanine group. These results are consistent with two independent neutral amino acid porters. In support of that conclusion, the ratio of the specific activity of alanine transport versus isoleucine transport varied from two- to 13-fold in plasma membrane vesicles isolated from different plant species. This ratio would be expected to remain relatively stable if these amino acids were moving through a single transport system and, indeed, the ratio of alanine to glutamine transport varied less than twofold. Analysis of the predicted structure of the aliphatic, neutral amino acids in solution shows that isoleucine, valine, and threonine contain a branched methyl or hydroxyl group at the β-carbon position that places a dense electron cloud close to the α-amino group. This does not occur for the unbranched amino acids or those that branch further away, e.g. leucine. We hypothesize that this structural feature of isoleucine, valine, and threonine results in unfavorable steric interactions with the alanine transport system that limits their flux through this porter. Hydrophobicity and hydrated

  11. Size does matter: 18 amino acids at the N-terminal tip of an amino acid transporter in Leishmania determine substrate specificity

    PubMed Central

    Schlisselberg, Doreen; Mazarib, Eldar; Inbar, Ehud; Rentsch, Doris; Myler, Peter J.; Zilberstein, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Long N-terminal tails of amino acid transporters are known to act as sensors of the internal pool of amino acids and as positive regulators of substrate flux rate. In this study we establish that N-termini of amino acid transporters can also determine substrate specificity. We show that due to alternative trans splicing, the human pathogen Leishmania naturally expresses two variants of the proline/alanine transporter, one 18 amino acid shorter than the other. We demonstrate that the longer variant (LdAAP24) translocates both proline and alanine, whereas the shorter variant (∆18LdAAP24) translocates just proline. Remarkably, co-expressing the hydrophilic N-terminal peptide of the long variant with ∆18LdAAP24 was found to recover alanine transport. This restoration of alanine transport could be mediated by a truncated N-terminal tail, though truncations exceeding half of the tail length were no longer functional. Taken together, the data indicate that the first 18 amino acids of the negatively charged N-terminal LdAAP24 tail are required for alanine transport and may facilitate the electrostatic interactions of the entire negatively charged N-terminal tail with the positively charged internal loops in the transmembrane domain, as this mechanism has been shown to underlie regulation of substrate flux rate for other transporters. PMID:26549185

  12. The Amino Acid Composition of the Sutter's Mill Carbonaceous Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Burton, A. S.; Elsila, J. E.; Dworkin, J. P.; Yin, Q. Z.; Cooper, G.; Jenniskens, P.

    2012-01-01

    In contrast to the Murchison meteorite which had a complex distribution of amino acids with a total C2 to Cs amino acid abundance of approx.14,000 parts-per-billion (ppb) [2], the Sutters Mill meteorite was found to be highly depleted in amino acids. Much lower abundances (approx.30 to 180 ppb) of glycine, beta-alanine, L-alanine and L-serine were detected in SM2 above procedural blank levels indicating that this meteorite sample experienced only minimal terrestrial amino acid contamination after its fall to Earth. Carbon isotope measurements will be necessary to establish the origin of glycine and beta-alanine in SM2. Other non-protein amino acids that are rare on Earth, yet commonly found in other CM meteorites such as aaminoisobutyric acid (alpha-AIB) and isovaline, were not identified in SM2. However, traces of beta-AIB (approx.1 ppb) were detected in SM2 and could be" extraterrestrial in origin. The low abundances of amino acids in the Sutter's Mill meteorite is consistent with mineralogical evidence that at least some parts of the Sutter's Mill meteorite parent body experienced extensive aqueous and/or thermal alteration.

  13. The influence of various cations on the catalytic properties of clays. [polymerization of alanine adenylate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paecht-Horowitz, M.

    1978-01-01

    The polymerization of alanine adenylate in the presence of the sodium form of various clays was studied, and hectorite was found to cause more polymerization than nontronite and montmorillonite (in that order) although the differences were not great. The effect on polymerization of presaturating montmorillonite with different cations was determined. Hectorite, with increased basicity of the interspatial planes, allows polymerization of lysine, which montmorillonite does not. The general trend is that, for the same amino acid, higher degrees of polymerization are obtained when the cation in the octahedral lattice of the clay is divalent rather than trivalent. With the exchangeable cations the order is reversed, for a reason that is explained. The main role of clays in the polymerization mechanism of amino acids is concentration and neutralization of charges.

  14. Controlled radical polymerization of an acrylamide containing L-alanine moiety via ATRP.

    PubMed

    Rafiee, Zahra

    2016-02-01

    Homopolymerization of an optically active acrylamide having an amino acid moiety in the side chain, N-acryloyl-L-alanine (AAla) was carried out via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) at room temperature using 2-hydroxyethyl-2'-methyl-2'-bromopropionate (HMB) or sodium-4-(bromomethyl)benzoate (SBB) as initiator in pure water, methanol/water mixture and pure methanol solvents. The polymerization reaction resulted in the optically active biocompatible amino acid-based homopolymer in good yield with narrow molecular weight distribution. The number average molecular weight increased with conversion and polydispersity was low. The structure and molecular weight of synthesized polymer were characterized by (1)H NMR, FT-IR spectroscopic techniques and size-exclusion chromatography.

  15. Hair and amino acids: the interactions and the effects.

    PubMed

    Oshimura, Eiko; Abe, Hiroshi; Oota, Rina

    2007-01-01

    The interaction and the function of some amino acids in hair care applications are discussed. When amino acids are applied to hair in the form of simple aqueous solution, uptake of the amino acids is mainly controlled by ionic equilibrium. When amino acids were incorporated in a hair conditioner, the result was quite different, suggesting the importance of interaction between the amino acids and the cationic surfactants. Uptake of pyrrolidone carboxylic acid (PCA), a derivative of glutamic acid, is enhanced by combining with arginine, an amino with strong affinity towards hair. Effects of some amino acids on bleached/dyed hair are described. A hair conditioner incorporated with alanine improves hair surface hydrophobicity of bleach-damaged hair. Histidine and phenylalanine improve tensile strength. PCA was proved to be effective to improve color-retention of dyed hair.

  16. Hair and amino acids: the interactions and the effects.

    PubMed

    Oshimura, Eiko; Abe, Hiroshi; Oota, Rina

    2007-01-01

    The interaction and the function of some amino acids in hair care applications are discussed. When amino acids are applied to hair in the form of simple aqueous solution, uptake of the amino acids is mainly controlled by ionic equilibrium. When amino acids were incorporated in a hair conditioner, the result was quite different, suggesting the importance of interaction between the amino acids and the cationic surfactants. Uptake of pyrrolidone carboxylic acid (PCA), a derivative of glutamic acid, is enhanced by combining with arginine, an amino with strong affinity towards hair. Effects of some amino acids on bleached/dyed hair are described. A hair conditioner incorporated with alanine improves hair surface hydrophobicity of bleach-damaged hair. Histidine and phenylalanine improve tensile strength. PCA was proved to be effective to improve color-retention of dyed hair. PMID:17728935

  17. Amino acid concentrations in human embryological fluids.

    PubMed

    Jauniaux, E; Sherwood, R A; Jurkovic, D; Boa, F G; Campbell, S

    1994-06-01

    The concentrations of amino acids in samples of coelomic fluid (n = 15), amniotic fluid (n = 9) and maternal serum (n = 15) obtained from normal pregnancies between 7 and 12 weeks of gestation were measured using reversed-phase chromatography with pre-column derivatization. The total molar concentration of the 18 amino acids measured was 2.3 times higher in coelomic fluid than in maternal serum. All amino acids except serine and tryptophan were present in significantly higher concentrations in coelomic fluid than in maternal serum. Significant correlations between maternal serum and coelomic fluid were only found for proline, tyrosine, and tryptophan, suggesting that levels of the other amino acids are mainly influenced by placental synthesis and do not directly depend on maternal amino acid metabolism. Levels of all amino acids were significantly higher in coelomic fluid compared to amniotic fluid. Compared to maternal serum, the amniotic fluid contained significantly higher levels of arginine, lysine, alanine and tyrosine and lower levels of serine, glutamine and tryptophan. The total molar amino acid concentration decreased significantly with gestational age in both coelomic fluid and maternal serum. These results suggest that amino acids accumulate in coelomic fluid to support the metabolism of the secondary yolk sac, and that the exocoelomic cavity is the reservoir for most nutrients needed by the embryo and early fetus in the first trimester of human pregnancy.

  18. Comparison of EPR response of alanine and Gd₂O₃-alanine dosimeters exposed to TRIGA Mainz reactor.

    PubMed

    Marrale, M; Schmitz, T; Gallo, S; Hampel, G; Longo, A; Panzeca, S; Tranchina, L

    2015-12-01

    In this work we report some preliminary results regarding the analysis of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) response of alanine pellets and alanine pellets added with gadolinium used for dosimetry at the TRIGA research reactor in Mainz, Germany. Two set-ups were evaluated: irradiation inside PMMA phantom and irradiation inside boric acid phantom. We observed that the presence of Gd2O3 inside alanine pellets increases the EPR signal by a factor of 3.45 and 1.24 in case of PMMA and boric acid phantoms, respectively. We can conclude that in the case of neutron beam with a predominant thermal neutron component the addition of gadolinium oxide can significantly improve neutron sensitivity of alanine pellets. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of both response of alanine and Gd-added alanine pellets with FLUKA code were performed and a good agreement was achieved for pure alanine dosimeters. For Gd2O3-alanine deviations between MC simulations and experimental data were observed and discussed. PMID:26315099

  19. Comparison of EPR response of alanine and Gd₂O₃-alanine dosimeters exposed to TRIGA Mainz reactor.

    PubMed

    Marrale, M; Schmitz, T; Gallo, S; Hampel, G; Longo, A; Panzeca, S; Tranchina, L

    2015-12-01

    In this work we report some preliminary results regarding the analysis of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) response of alanine pellets and alanine pellets added with gadolinium used for dosimetry at the TRIGA research reactor in Mainz, Germany. Two set-ups were evaluated: irradiation inside PMMA phantom and irradiation inside boric acid phantom. We observed that the presence of Gd2O3 inside alanine pellets increases the EPR signal by a factor of 3.45 and 1.24 in case of PMMA and boric acid phantoms, respectively. We can conclude that in the case of neutron beam with a predominant thermal neutron component the addition of gadolinium oxide can significantly improve neutron sensitivity of alanine pellets. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of both response of alanine and Gd-added alanine pellets with FLUKA code were performed and a good agreement was achieved for pure alanine dosimeters. For Gd2O3-alanine deviations between MC simulations and experimental data were observed and discussed.

  20. Synthesis of amino acids by the heating of formaldehyde and ammonia.

    PubMed

    Fox, S W; Windsor, C R

    1970-11-27

    The heating of formaldehyde and ammonia yields a product that, on hydrolysis, is converted into seven amino acids: aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, proline, valine, glycine, and alanine. Glycine is the predominant amino acid. Inasmuch as formaldehyde and ammonia have been identified as compounds in galactic clouds, these experimental results are interpreted in a cosmochemical and geochemical context.

  1. Active Sites of Spinoxin, a Potassium Channel Scorpion Toxin, Elucidated by Systematic Alanine Scanning.

    PubMed

    Peigneur, Steve; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Kawano, Chihiro; Nose, Takeru; Nirthanan, Selvanayagam; Gopalakrishnakone, Ponnampalam; Tytgat, Jan; Sato, Kazuki

    2016-05-31

    Peptide toxins from scorpion venoms constitute the largest group of toxins that target the voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv). Spinoxin (SPX) isolated from the venom of scorpion Heterometrus spinifer is a 34-residue peptide neurotoxin cross-linked by four disulfide bridges. SPX is a potent inhibitor of Kv1.3 potassium channels (IC50 = 63 nM), which are considered to be valid molecular targets in the diagnostics and therapy of various autoimmune disorders and cancers. Here we synthesized 25 analogues of SPX and analyzed the role of each amino acid in SPX using alanine scanning to study its structure-function relationships. All synthetic analogues showed similar disulfide bond pairings and secondary structures as native SPX. Alanine replacements at Lys(23), Asn(26), and Lys(30) resulted in loss of activity against Kv1.3 potassium channels, whereas replacements at Arg(7), Met(14), Lys(27), and Tyr(32) also largely reduced inhibitory activity. These results suggest that the side chains of these amino acids in SPX play an important role in its interaction with Kv1.3 channels. In particular, Lys(23) appears to be a key residue that underpins Kv1.3 channel inhibition. Of these seven amino acid residues, four are basic amino acids, suggesting that the positive electrostatic potential on the surface of SPX is likely required for high affinity interaction with Kv1.3 channels. This study provides insight into the structure-function relationships of SPX with implications for the rational design of new lead compounds targeting potassium channels with high potency. PMID:27159046

  2. The Formation of Racemic Amino Acids by UV Photolysis of Interstellar Ice Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Max P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Sandford, Scott A.; Cooper, George; Allamandola, Louis J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Small biologically relevant organic molecules including the amino acids glycine, alanine, and marine were formed in the laboratory by the UV (Ultraviolet) photolysis of realistic interstellar ice analogs, composed primarily of H2O, and including CH3OH, NH3, and HCN, under interstellar conditions. N-formyl glycine, cycloserine (4-amino-3-isoxazolidinone), and glycerol were detected before hydrolysis, and glycine, racemic alanine, racemic marine, glycerol, ethanolamine, and glyceric acid were found after hydrolysis. This suggests that some meteoritic amino acids (and other molecules) may be the direct result of interstellar ice photochemistry, expanding the current paradigm that they formed by reactions in liquid water on meteorite parent bodies.

  3. Alanine substitutions of noncysteine residues in the cysteine-stabilized αβ motif

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying-Fang; Cheng, Kuo-Chang; Tsai, Ping-Hsing; Liu, Chung-Cheng; Lee, Tian-Ren; Ping-Chiang Lyu

    2009-01-01

    The protein scaffold is a peptide framework with a high tolerance of residue modifications. The cysteine-stabilized αβ motif (CSαβ) consists of an α-helix and an antiparallel triple-stranded β-sheet connected by two disulfide bridges. Proteins containing this motif share low sequence identity but high structural similarity and has been suggested as a good scaffold for protein engineering. The Vigna radiate defensin 1 (VrD1), a plant defensin, serves here as a model protein to probe the amino acid tolerance of CSαβ motif. A systematic alanine substitution is performed on the VrD1. The key residues governing the inhibitory function and structure stability are monitored. Thirty-two of 46 residue positions of VrD1 are altered by site-directed mutagenesis techniques. The circular dichroism spectrum, intrinsic fluorescence spectrum, and chemical denaturation are used to analyze the conformation and structural stability of proteins. The secondary structures were highly tolerant to the amino acid substitutions; however, the protein stabilities were varied for each mutant. Many mutants, although they maintained their conformations, altered their inhibitory function significantly. In this study, we reported the first alanine scan on the plant defensin containing the CSαβ motif. The information is valuable to the scaffold with the CSαβ motif and protein engineering. PMID:19533758

  4. Dissociation of alkaliated alanine in the gas phase: the role of the metal cation.

    PubMed

    Abirami, Seduraman; Wong, Catherine Chiu Lan; Tsang, Chun Wai; Ma, Ngai Ling

    2005-09-01

    The dissociation of prototypical metal-cationized amino acid complexes, namely, alkaliated alanine ([Ala+M]+, M+ = Li+, Na+, K+), was studied by energy-resolved tandem mass spectrometry with an ion-trap mass analyzer and by density functional theory. Dissociation leads to formation of fragment ions arising from the loss of small neutrals, such as H2O, CO, NH3, (CO+NH3), and the formation of Na+/K+. The order of appearance threshold voltages for different dissociation pathways determined experimentally is consistent with the order of critical energies (energy barriers) obtained theoretically, and this provides the necessary confidence in both experimental and theoretical results. Although not explicitly involved in the reaction, the alkali metal cation plays novel and important roles in the dissociation of alkaliated alanine. The metal cation not only catalyzes the dissociation (via the formation of loosely bound ion-molecule complexes and by stabilizing the more polar intermediates and transition structures), but also affects the dissociation mechanisms, as the cation can alter the shape of the potential energy surfaces. This compression/expansion of the potential energy surface as a function of the alkali metal cation is discussed in detail, and how this affects the competitive loss of H2O versus CO/(CO+NH3) from [Ala+M]+ is illustrated. The present study provides new insights into the origin of the competition between various dissociation channels of alkaliated amino acid complexes.

  5. Differentiation Between Intracellular and Cell Surface Glycosyl Transferases: Galactosyl Transferase Activity in Intact Cells and in Cell Homogenate

    PubMed Central

    Deppert, Wolfgang; Werchau, Hermann; Walter, Gernot

    1974-01-01

    Intact BHK (baby hamster kidney) cells catalyze the hydrolysis of UDP-galactose to free galactose. The generation of galactose from UDP-galactose and its intracellular utilization impede the detection of possible galactosyl transferases on the cell surface of intact cells. Several independent procedures have been used to distinguish between intracellular and cell surface glycosyl transferases. With these procedures, no evidence was obtained for the presence of detectable amounts of galactosyl transferase activity on the surface of BHK cells. The data suggest that galactosyl transferases do not play a general role in the phenomena of cell adhesion and contact inhibition. PMID:4528509

  6. Helix stability of oligoglycine, oligoalanine, and oligo-β-alanine dodecamers reflected by hydrogen-bond persistence.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengyu; Ponder, Jay W; Marshall, Garland R

    2014-11-01

    Helices are important structural/recognition elements in proteins and peptides. Stability and conformational differences between helices composed of α- and β-amino acids as scaffolds for mimicry of helix recognition has become a theme in medicinal chemistry. Furthermore, helices formed by β-amino acids are experimentally more stable than those formed by α-amino acids. This is paradoxical because the larger sizes of the hydrogen-bonding rings required by the extra methylene groups should lead to entropic destabilization. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations using the second-generation force field, AMOEBA (Ponder, J.W., et al., Current status of the AMOEBA polarizable force field. J Phys Chem B, 2010. 114(8): p. 2549-64.) explored the stability and hydrogen-bonding patterns of capped oligo-β-alanine, oligoalanine, and oligoglycine dodecamers in water. The MD simulations showed that oligo-β-alanine has strong acceptor+2 hydrogen bonds, but surprisingly did not contain a large content of 3(12) -helical structures, possibly due to the sparse distribution of the 3(12) -helical structure and other structures with acceptor+2 hydrogen bonds. On the other hand, despite its backbone flexibility, the β-alanine dodecamer had more stable and persistent <3.0 Å hydrogen bonds. Its structure was dominated more by multicentered hydrogen bonds than either oligoglycine or oligoalanine helices. The 3(1) (PII) helical structure, prevalent in oligoglycine and oligoalanine, does not appear to be stable in oligo-β-alanine indicating its competition with other structures (stacking structure as indicated by MD analyses). These differences are among the factors that shape helical structural preferences and the relative stabilities of these three oligopeptides.

  7. On the abiotic formation of amino acids. I - HCN as a precursor of amino acids detected in extracts of lunar samples. II - Formation of HCN and amino acids from simulated mixtures of gases released from lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuasa, S.; Flory, D.; Basile, B.; Oro, J.

    1984-01-01

    Two studies on the abiotic formation of amino acids are presented. The first study demonstrates the role of hydrogen cyanide as a precursor of amino acids detected in extracts of lunar samples. The formation of several amino acids, including glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid, under conditions similar to those used for the analysis of lunar samples is demonstrated. The second study investigates the formation of hydrogen cyanide as well as amino acids from lunar-sample gas mixtures under electrical discharge conditions. These results extend the possibility of synthesis of amino acids to planetary bodies with primordial atmospheres less reducing than a mixture of methane, ammonia, hydrogen and water.

  8. β-Alanine supplementation for athletic performance: an update.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, Phillip M

    2014-06-01

    β-alanine supplementation has become a common practice among competitive athletes participating in a range of different sports. Although the mechanism by which chronic β-alanine supplementation could have an ergogenic effect is widely debated, the popular view is that β-alanine supplementation augments intramuscular carnosine content, leading to an increase in muscle buffer capacity, a delay in the onset of muscular fatigue, and a facilitated recovery during repeated bouts of high-intensity exercise. β-alanine supplementation appears to be most effective for exercise tasks that rely heavily on ATP synthesis from anaerobic glycolysis. However, research investigating its efficacy as an ergogenic aid remains equivocal, making it difficult to draw conclusions as to its effectiveness for training and competition. The aim of this review was to update, summarize, and critically evaluate the findings associated with β-alanine supplementation and exercise performance with the most recent research available to allow the development of practical recommendations for coaches and athletes. A critical review of the literature reveals that when significant ergogenic effects have been found, they have been generally shown in untrained individuals performing exercise bouts under laboratory conditions. The body of scientific data available concerning highly trained athletes performing single competition-like exercise tasks indicates that this type of population receives modest but potentially worthwhile performance benefits from β-alanine supplementation. Recent data indicate that athletes may not only be using β-alanine supplementation to enhance sports performance but also as a training aid to augment bouts of high-intensity training. β-alanine supplementation has also been shown to increase resistance training performance and training volume in team-sport athletes, which may allow for greater overload and superior adaptations compared with training alone. The ergogenic

  9. Amino acid analyses of R and CK chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Aaron S.; McLain, Hannah; Glavin, Daniel P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Davidson, Jemma; Miller, Kelly E.; Andronikov, Alexander V.; Lauretta, Dante; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2015-03-01

    Exogenous delivery of amino acids and other organic molecules to planetary surfaces may have played an important role in the origins of life on Earth and other solar system bodies. Previous studies have revealed the presence of indigenous amino acids in a wide range of carbon-rich meteorites, with the abundances and structural distributions differing significantly depending on parent body mineralogy and alteration conditions. Here we report on the amino acid abundances of seven type 3-6 CK chondrites and two Rumuruti (R) chondrites. Amino acid measurements were made on hot water extracts from these meteorites by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Of the nine meteorites analyzed, four were depleted in amino acids, and one had experienced significant amino acid contamination by terrestrial biology. The remaining four, comprised of two R and two CK chondrites, contained low levels of amino acids that were predominantly the straight chain, amino-terminal (n-ω-amino) acids β-alanine, and γ-amino-n-butyric acid. This amino acid distribution is similar to what we reported previously for thermally altered ureilites and CV and CO chondrites, and these n-ω-amino acids appear to be indigenous to the meteorites and not the result of terrestrial contamination. The amino acids may have been formed by Fischer-Tropsch-type reactions, although this hypothesis needs further testing.

  10. Preparation and Characterisation of Pva Doped with Beta Alanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuvaneshwari, R.; Karthikeyan, S.; Rajeswari, N.; Selvasekarapandian, S.; Sanjeeviraja, C.

    2013-07-01

    Pure PVA has been doped with different amount of β - alanine. Film has been prepared by Solution Casting Technique using water as a solvent. The Complex formation between the PVA and β - alanine has been confirmed by FTIR. The Pure PVA conductivity is in the order 10-10 Scm-1 at ambient temperature. The conductivity has been found to increase to the order 10-6 when doped with 10% β - alanine. In this paper characterization of a PVA doped with β-ala has been studied using XRD, FTIR, AC impedance analysis and the results are reported.

  11. Glutamine and alanine-induced differential expression of intracellular IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α in LPS-stimulated monocytes in human whole-blood.

    PubMed

    Raspé, C; Czeslick, E; Weimann, A; Schinke, C; Leimert, A; Kellner, P; Simm, A; Bucher, M; Sablotzki, A

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the effects of the commonly-used immunomodulators l-glutamine, l-alanine, and the combination of both l-alanyl-l-glutamine (Dipeptamin(®)) on intracellular expression of IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α during endotoxemia, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human monocytes in a whole blood system were investigated by flow cytometry. Whole blood of twenty-seven healthy volunteers was stimulated with LPS and incubated with three different amino acid solutions (1. l-glutamine, 2. l-alanine, 3. l-alanyl-l-glutamine, each concentration 2 mM, 5 mM, incubation time 3 h). CD14(+) monocytes were phenotyped in whole-blood and intracellular expression of cytokines was assessed by flow cytometry. Our investigations showed for the first time in whole blood probes, imitating best physiologically present cellular interactions, that l-glutamine caused a dose-independent inhibitory effect on IL-6 and TNF-α production in human monocytes stimulated with LPS. However, l-alanine had contrary effects on IL-6 expression, significantly upregulating expression of IL-6 in LPS-treated monocytes. The impact of l-alanine on the expression of TNF-α was comparable with glutamine. Neither amino acid was able to affect IL-8 production in LPS-stimulated monocytes. The combination of both did not influence significantly IL-6 and IL-8 expression in monocytes during endotoxemia, however strongly reduced TNF-α production. For the regulation of TNF-α, l-glutamine, l-alanine and the combination of both show a congruent and exponentiated downregulating effect during endotoxemia, for the modulation of IL-6, l-glutamine and l-alanine featured opposite regulation leading to a canceling impact of each other when recombining both amino acids.

  12. Structures of aminoarabinose transferase ArnT suggest a molecular basis for lipid A glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Petrou, Vasileios I; Herrera, Carmen M; Schultz, Kathryn M; Clarke, Oliver B; Vendome, Jérémie; Tomasek, David; Banerjee, Surajit; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; Belcher Dufrisne, Meagan; Kloss, Brian; Kloppmann, Edda; Rost, Burkhard; Klug, Candice S; Trent, M Stephen; Shapiro, Lawrence; Mancia, Filippo

    2016-02-01

    Polymyxins are antibiotics used in the last line of defense to combat multidrug-resistant infections by Gram-negative bacteria. Polymyxin resistance arises through charge modification of the bacterial outer membrane with the attachment of the cationic sugar 4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose to lipid A, a reaction catalyzed by the integral membrane lipid-to-lipid glycosyltransferase 4-amino-4-deoxy-L-arabinose transferase (ArnT). Here, we report crystal structures of ArnT from Cupriavidus metallidurans, alone and in complex with the lipid carrier undecaprenyl phosphate, at 2.8 and 3.2 angstrom resolution, respectively. The structures show cavities for both lipidic substrates, which converge at the active site. A structural rearrangement occurs on undecaprenyl phosphate binding, which stabilizes the active site and likely allows lipid A binding. Functional mutagenesis experiments based on these structures suggest a mechanistic model for ArnT family enzymes.

  13. Activity of the lactate-alanine shuttle is independent of glutamate-glutamine cycle activity in cerebellar neuronal-astrocytic cultures.

    PubMed

    Bak, Lasse K; Sickmann, Helle M; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    The glutamate-glutamine cycle describes the neuronal release of glutamate into the synaptic cleft, astrocytic uptake, and conversion into glutamine, followed by release for use as a neuronal glutamate precursor. This only explains the fate of the carbon atoms, however, and not that of the ammonia. Recently, a role for alanine has been proposed in transfer of ammonia between glutamatergic neurons and astrocytes, denoted the lactate-alanine shuttle (Waagepetersen et al. [ 2000] J. Neurochem. 75:471-479). The role of alanine in this context has been studied further using cerebellar neuronal cultures and corresponding neuronal-astrocytic cocultures. A superfusion paradigm was used to induce repetitively vesicular glutamate release by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) in the neurons, allowing the relative activity dependency of the lactate-alanine shuttle to be assessed. [(15)N]Alanine (0.2 mM), [2-(15)N]/[5-(15)N]glutamine (0.25 mM), and [(15)N]ammonia (0.3 mM) were used as precursors and cell extracts were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Labeling from [(15)N]alanine in glutamine, aspartate, and glutamate in cerebellar cocultures was independent of depolarization of the neurons. Employing glutamine with the amino group labeled ([2-(15)N]glutamine) as the precursor, an activity-dependent increase in the labeling of both glutamate and aspartate (but not alanine) was observed in the cerebellar neurons. When the amide group of glutamine was labeled ([5-(15)N]glutamine), no labeling could be detected in the analyzed metabolites. Altogether, the results of this study support the existence of the lactate-alanine shuttle and the associated glutamate-glutamine cycle. No direct coupling of the two shuttles was observed, however, and only the glutamate-glutamine cycle seemed activity dependent.

  14. Enantiomer-specific selection of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xueying; Tellez, Luis A; de Araujo, Ivan E

    2013-12-01

    Dietary intake of L-amino acids impacts on several physiological functions, including the control of gastrointestinal motility, pancreatic secretion, and appetite. However, the biological mechanisms regulating behavioral predilections for certain amino acid types remain poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that, in mice, the potency with which a given glucogenic amino acid increases glucose utilization reflects its rewarding properties. We have found that: (1) during long-, but not short-, term preference tests, L-alanine and L-serine were preferred over their D-enantiomer counterparts, while no such effect was observed for L-threonine vs. D-threonine; (2) these behavioral patterns were closely associated with the ability of L-amino acids to promote increases in respiratory exchange ratios such that those, and only those, L-amino acids able to promote increases in respiratory exchange ratios were preferred over their D-isomers; (3) these behavioral preferences were independent of gustatory influences, since taste-deficient Trpm5 knockout mice displayed ingestive responses very similar to those of their wild-type counterparts. We conclude that the ability to promote increases in respiratory exchange ratios enhances the reward value of nutritionally relevant amino acids and suggest a mechanistic link between substrate utilization and amino acid preferences.

  15. Nomenclature for mammalian soluble glutathione transferases.

    PubMed

    Mannervik, Bengt; Board, Philip G; Hayes, John D; Listowsky, Irving; Pearson, William R

    2005-01-01

    The nomenclature for human soluble glutathione transferases (GSTs) is extended to include new members of the GST superfamily that have been discovered, sequenced, and shown to be expressed. The GST nomenclature is based on primary structure similarities and the division of GSTs into classes of more closely related sequences. The classes are designated by the names of the Greek letters: Alpha, Mu, Pi, etc., abbreviated in Roman capitals: A, M, P, and so on. (The Greek characters should not be used.) Class members are distinguished by Arabic numerals and the native dimeric protein structures are named according to their subunit composition (e.g., GST A1-2 is the enzyme composed of subunits 1 and 2 in the Alpha class). Soluble GSTs from other mammalian species can be classified in the same manner as the human enzymes, and this chapter presents the application of the nomenclature to the rat and mouse GSTs. PMID:16399376

  16. Nomenclature for mammalian soluble glutathione transferases.

    PubMed

    Mannervik, Bengt; Board, Philip G; Hayes, John D; Listowsky, Irving; Pearson, William R

    2005-01-01

    The nomenclature for human soluble glutathione transferases (GSTs) is extended to include new members of the GST superfamily that have been discovered, sequenced, and shown to be expressed. The GST nomenclature is based on primary structure similarities and the division of GSTs into classes of more closely related sequences. The classes are designated by the names of the Greek letters: Alpha, Mu, Pi, etc., abbreviated in Roman capitals: A, M, P, and so on. (The Greek characters should not be used.) Class members are distinguished by Arabic numerals and the native dimeric protein structures are named according to their subunit composition (e.g., GST A1-2 is the enzyme composed of subunits 1 and 2 in the Alpha class). Soluble GSTs from other mammalian species can be classified in the same manner as the human enzymes, and this chapter presents the application of the nomenclature to the rat and mouse GSTs.

  17. Catalytic and structural diversity of the fluazifop-inducible glutathione transferases from Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Chronopoulou, Evangelia; Madesis, Panagiotis; Asimakopoulou, Basiliki; Platis, Dimitrios; Tsaftaris, Athanasios; Labrou, Nikolaos E

    2012-06-01

    Plant glutathione transferases (GSTs) comprise a large family of inducible enzymes that play important roles in stress tolerance and herbicide detoxification. Treatment of Phaseolus vulgaris leaves with the aryloxyphenoxypropionic herbicide fluazifop-p-butyl resulted in induction of GST activities. Three inducible GST isoenzymes were identified and separated by affinity chromatography. Their full-length cDNAs with complete open reading frame were isolated using RACE-RT and information from N-terminal amino acid sequences. Analysis of the cDNA clones showed that the deduced amino acid sequences share high homology with GSTs that belong to phi and tau classes. The three isoenzymes were expressed in E. coli and their substrate specificity was determined towards 20 different substrates. The results showed that the fluazifop-inducible glutathione transferases from P. vulgaris (PvGSTs) catalyze a broad range of reactions and exhibit quite varied substrate specificity. Molecular modeling and structural analysis was used to identify key structural characteristics and to provide insights into the substrate specificity and the catalytic mechanism of these enzymes. These results provide new insights into catalytic and structural diversity of GSTs and the detoxifying mechanism used by P. vulgaris.

  18. (2R,1'S,2'R)- and (2S,1'S,2'R)-3-[2-Mono(di,tri)fluoromethylcyclopropyl]alanines and their incorporation into hormaomycin analogues

    PubMed Central

    Kozhushkov, Sergei I; Yufit, Dmitrii S; Grosse, Christian; Kaiser, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Summary Efficient and scalable syntheses of enantiomerically pure (2R,1'S,2'R)- and (2S,1'S,2'R)-3-[2-mono(di,tri)fluoromethylcyclopropyl]alanines 9a–c, as well as allo-D-threonine (4) and (2S,3R)-β-methylphenylalanine (3), using the Belokon' approach with (S)- and (R)-2-[(N-benzylprolyl)amino]benzophenone [(S)- and (R)-10] as reusable chiral auxiliaries have been developed. Three new fluoromethyl analogues of the naturally occurring octadepsipeptide hormaomycin (1) with (fluoromethylcyclopropyl)alanine moieties have been synthesized and subjected to preliminary tests of their antibiotic activity. PMID:25550751

  19. Influence of exercise on plasma and muscle free amino acids in trained rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Marín, J F; Mendiola, P; Hernández, M D; De Costa, J; Zamora, S

    1999-12-01

    Variations in the concentration of free amino acids in the muscle and plasma of trout submitted to 5 minutes of intense exercise have been studied. The responses of untrained fish and those trained performing the same type of exercise twice daily for 28 days are compared. Total amino acid concentrations in muscle tend to diminish after intense exercise. Significant decreases are observed in muscle content of alanine, beta-alanine, isoleucine and ornithine. Plasma amino acids tend to increase after exercise with significant differences in glutamate, GABA, methionine and NH4+. The small variations due to intense exercise suggest that the amino acids are mobilised. Training led to a decrease in total amino acid concentration in plasma but not in muscle, where levels of aspartate and ornithine increased. This suggests a metabolic adaptation to exercise, with amino acid level retention in the muscle.

  20. Gamma radiation affects active electrolyte transport by rabbit ileum. II. Correlation of alanine and theophylline response with morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Gunter-Smith, P.J.

    1989-03-01

    The response of ileal segments isolated from rabbits to an actively transported amino acid and a secretagogue was evaluated following exposure to 10 Gy whole-body gamma irradiation. The ability of ileal segments to respond to the actively transported amino acid, alanine, was not significantly diminished until 96 h postexposure. Decreased responsiveness to the secretagogue, theophylline, occurred earlier at 72 h. These effects did not appear to be accounted for by decreased food intake of irradiated animals alone. Examination of intestinal morphological changes with respect to these changes in electrolyte transport revealed that decreased amino acid transport coincides with loss of intestinal villi. Although a morphological correlate of decreased secretory response was not as striking as that for absorption, the theophylline response appeared to decline concomitant with the appearance of increased mitotic activity in the intestinal crypts. The results of this study indicate that, following a dose of 10 Gy, the inability of these tissues to respond to amino acids is due to a loss of mature villus absorptive cells subsequent to denudation of the intestinal mucosa. There appeared to be little impairment of cell membrane transport processes for alanine. In contrast, the decreased secretory response could not be correlated with the disappearance of any one cell type and perhaps results from increased proliferation in the crypts at the expense of differentiation.

  1. Gamma-radiation affects active electrolyte transport by rabbit ileum. 2. Correlation of alanine and theophylline response with morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Gunter-Smith, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    The response of ileal segments isolated from rabbits to an actively transported amino acid and a secretagogue was evaluated following exposure to 10-Gy whole-body gamma irradiation. The ability of ileal segments to respond to the actively transported amino acid, alanine, was not significantly diminished until 96 h postexposure. Decreased responsiveness to the secretagogue, theophylline, occurred earlier at 72 h. These effects did not appear to be accounted for by decreased food intake of irradiated animals alone. Examination of intestinal morphological changes with respect to these changes in electrolyte transport revealed that decreased amino acid transport coincides with loss of intestinal villi. Although a morphological correlate of decreased secretory response was not as striking as that for absorption, the theophylline response appeared to decline concomitant with the appearance of increased mitotic activity in the intestinal crypts. The result of this study indicate that, following a dose of 10 Gy, the inability of these tissues to respond to amino acids is due to a loss of mature villus absorptive cells subsequent to denudation of the intestinal mucosa. There appeared to be little impairment of cell membrane transport processes for alanine. In contrast, the decreased secretory response could not be correlated with the disappearance of any one cell type and perhaps results from increased proliferation in the crypts at the expense of differentiation.

  2. Probing protein stability with unnatural amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, D.; Ellman, J.A.; Zhiyuh Chang; Veenstra, D.L.; Kollman, P.A.; Schultz, P.G. )

    1992-06-26

    Unnatural amino acid mutagenesis, in combination with molecular modeling and simulation techniques, was used to probe the effect of side chain structure on protein stability. Specific replacements at position 133 in T4 lysozyme included (1) leucine (wt), norvaline, ethylglycine, and alanine to measure the cost of stepwise removal of methyl groups from the hydrophobic core, (2) norvaline and O-methyl serine to evaluate the effects of side chain solvation, and (3) leucine, S,S-2-amino-4-methylhexanoic acid, and S-2-amino-3-cyclopentylpropanoic acid to measure the influence of packing density and side chain conformational entropy on protein stability. All of these factors (hydrophobicity, packing, conformational entropy, and cavity formation) significantly influence protein stability and must be considered when analyzing any structural change to proteins.

  3. Polymorphism in supramolecular chiral structures of R- and S-alanine on Cu(1 1 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, S. M.; Louafi, S.; Le Roux, D.; Williams, J.; Muryn, C.; Haq, S.; Raval, R.

    2005-10-01

    A comprehensive study of the local and supramolecular adsorption structures created by the chiral R- and S-enantiomers of alanine on the Cu(1 1 0) surface has been conducted using a multi-technique approach, including reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). Over the entire 300-470 K temperature range studied, the amino acid is found to adsorb as an alaninate species with a local chiral adsorption motif. However, this singular preference of local chemical form contrasts sharply with the supramolecular organisation at the surface where polymorphism is exhibited. This polymorphic behaviour arises from subtle and dynamic changes in the bonding, orientation and adsorption footprints of individual molecules, leading to alterations in the molecule-metal, intermolecular and metal-metal interactions that dictate self-assembly. Thus, at low coverage, a single disordered phase is observed but at higher coverage, three other temperature dependent phases occur. At room temperature, a two-dimensional equivalent of a 'nematic' phase is constructed from short single- and double-chain chiral assemblies that possess a preferred chiral orientation but no long range periodicity. This 'nematic' phase acts as a precursor to a highly ordered chiral supramolecular assembly, created at 430 K, that consists of regular arrays of size- and shape-defined chiral clusters. This phase possesses global organisational chirality with only one chiral domain observed for each enantiomer. For both the 'nematic' and the highly ordered chiral phase, the organisation for the R-enantiomer is the mirror image of that seen for the S-enantiomer, i.e., there is chirality transfer from the nanoscale to the macroscale. By 470 K, both R- and S-alanine form an achirally organised (3 × 2) structure that appears to be the thermodynamically favoured phase for the alanine/Cu(1 1 0

  4. The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis II. Amino Acids

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Stepka, W.; Benson, A. A.; Calvin, M.

    1948-05-25

    The radioactive amino acid's synthesized from C{sup 14}O{sub 2} by green algae both in the light and in the dark after CO{sub 2}-free preillumination have been separated and identified using paper chromatography and radioautography. The radioactive amino acids identified were aspartic acid, alanine and smaller amounts of 3- and 4-carbon amino acids. This finding as well as the total absence of radioactive glutamic acid substantiates the mechanism for reduction of CO{sub 2} previously postulated by members of this laboratory.

  5. Photochemical properties of copper(II)-amino acid complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Natarajan, P.; Ferraudi, G.

    1981-11-01

    The photochemistry of copper(II)-amino acid complexes (amino acid = glutamic acid, ..beta..-alanine, or glycine) has been investigated by continuous and flash photolysis. The charge-transfer irradiations induce the oxidation of the ligand and the reduction of copper(II) to copper(I). Transients observed in flash photolysis have been assigned as copper-alkyl complexes. Moreover, other copper-alkyl species are produced when carbon-centered radicals react with excess of copper(II) complexes. The photochemical properties of the copper(II)-amino acid complexes are discussed in terms of population of charge transfer to copper excited states.

  6. Prebiotic Synthesis of Hydrophobic and Protein Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Ring, David; Wolman, Yecheskel; Friedmann, Nadav; Miller, Stanley L.

    1972-01-01

    The formation of amino acids by the action of electric discharges on a mixture of methane, nitrogen, and water with traces of ammonia was studied in detail. The presence of glycine, alanine, α-amino-n-butyric acid, α-aminoisobutyric acid, valine, norvaline, isovaline, leucine, isoleucine, alloisoleucine, norleucine, proline, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, threonine, allothreonine, α-hydroxy-γ-aminobutyric acid, and α,γ-diaminobutyric acid was confirmed by ion-exchange chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. All of the primary α-amino acids found in the Murchison Meteorite have been synthesized by this electric discharge experiment. PMID:4501592

  7. Structural analysis and mutant growth properties reveal distinctive enzymatic and cellular roles for the three major L-alanine transaminases of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Peña-Soler, Esther; Fernandez, Francisco J; López-Estepa, Miguel; Garces, Fernando; Richardson, Andrew J; Quintana, Juan F; Rudd, Kenneth E; Coll, Miquel; Vega, M Cristina

    2014-01-01

    In order to maintain proper cellular function, the metabolism of the bacterial microbiota presents several mechanisms oriented to keep a correctly balanced amino acid pool. Central components of these mechanisms are enzymes with alanine transaminase activity, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes that interconvert alanine and pyruvate, thereby allowing the precise control of alanine and glutamate concentrations, two of the most abundant amino acids in the cellular amino acid pool. Here we report the 2.11-Å crystal structure of full-length AlaA from the model organism Escherichia coli, a major bacterial alanine aminotransferase, and compare its overall structure and active site composition with detailed atomic models of two other bacterial enzymes capable of catalyzing this reaction in vivo, AlaC and valine-pyruvate aminotransferase (AvtA). Apart from a narrow entry channel to the active site, a feature of this new crystal structure is the role of an active site loop that closes in upon binding of substrate-mimicking molecules, and which has only been previously reported in a plant enzyme. Comparison of the available structures indicates that beyond superficial differences, alanine aminotransferases of diverse phylogenetic origins share a universal reaction mechanism that depends on an array of highly conserved amino acid residues and is similarly regulated by various unrelated motifs. Despite this unifying mechanism and regulation, growth competition experiments demonstrate that AlaA, AlaC and AvtA are not freely exchangeable in vivo, suggesting that their functional repertoire is not completely redundant thus providing an explanation for their independent evolutionary conservation.

  8. Dose response of alanine detectors irradiated with carbon ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Rochus; Jaekel, Oliver; Palmans, Hugo; Sharpe, Peter; Bassler, Niels

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The dose response of the alanine detector shows a dependence on particle energy and type when irradiated with ion beams. The purpose of this study is to investigate the response behavior of the alanine detector in clinical carbon ion beams and compare the results to model predictions. Methods: Alanine detectors have been irradiated with carbon ions with an energy range of 89-400 MeV/u. The relative effectiveness of alanine has been measured in this regime. Pristine and spread out Bragg peak depth-dose curves have been measured with alanine dosimeters. The track structure based alanine response model developed by Hansen and Olsen has been implemented in the Monte Carlo code FLUKA and calculations were compared to experimental results. Results: Calculations of the relative effectiveness deviate less than 5% from the measured values for monoenergetic beams. Measured depth-dose curves deviate from predictions in the peak region, most pronounced at the distal edge of the peak. Conclusions: The used model and its implementation show a good overall agreement for quasimonoenergetic measurements. Deviations in depth-dose measurements are mainly attributed to uncertainties of the detector geometry implemented in the Monte Carlo simulations.

  9. Genetics of Amino Acid Taste and Appetite.

    PubMed

    Bachmanov, Alexander A; Bosak, Natalia P; Glendinning, John I; Inoue, Masashi; Li, Xia; Manita, Satoshi; McCaughey, Stuart A; Murata, Yuko; Reed, Danielle R; Tordoff, Michael G; Beauchamp, Gary K

    2016-07-01

    The consumption of amino acids by animals is controlled by both oral and postoral mechanisms. We used a genetic approach to investigate these mechanisms. Our studies have shown that inbred mouse strains differ in voluntary amino acid consumption, and these differences depend on sensory and nutritive properties of amino acids. Like humans, mice perceive some amino acids as having a sweet (sucrose-like) taste and others as having an umami (glutamate-like) taste. Mouse strain differences in the consumption of some sweet-tasting amino acids (d-phenylalanine, d-tryptophan, and l-proline) are associated with polymorphisms of a taste receptor, type 1, member 3 gene (Tas1r3), and involve differential peripheral taste responsiveness. Strain differences in the consumption of some other sweet-tasting amino acids (glycine, l-alanine, l-glutamine, and l-threonine) do not depend on Tas1r3 polymorphisms and so must be due to allelic variation in other, as yet unknown, genes involved in sweet taste. Strain differences in the consumption of l-glutamate may depend on postingestive rather than taste mechanisms. Thus, genes and physiologic mechanisms responsible for strain differences in the consumption of each amino acid depend on the nature of its taste and postingestive properties. Overall, mouse strain differences in amino acid taste and appetite have a complex genetic architecture. In addition to the Tas1r3 gene, these differences depend on other genes likely involved in determining the taste and postingestive effects of amino acids. The identification of these genes may lead to the discovery of novel mechanisms that regulate amino acid taste and appetite. PMID:27422518

  10. Synthesis of novel MMT/acyl-protected nucleo alanine monomers for the preparation of DNA/alanyl-PNA chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Roviello, G. N.; Gröschel, S.; Pedone, C.

    2009-01-01

    Alanyl-peptide nucleic acid (alanyl-PNA)/DNA chimeras are oligomers envisaged to be beneficial in efficient DNA diagnostics based on an improved molecular beacon concept. A synthesis of alanyl-PNA/DNA chimera can be based on the solid phase assembly of the oligomer with mixed oligonucleotide/peptide backbone under DNA synthesis conditions, in which the nucleotides are introduced as phosphoramidites, whereas the nucleo amino acids make use of the acid labile monomethoxytrityl (MMT) group for temporary protection of the α-amino groups and acyl protecting groups for the exocyclic amino functions of the nucleobases. In this work, we realized for the first time the synthesis of all four MMT/acyl-protected nucleo alanines, achieved by deprotection/reprotection of the newly synthesized Boc/acyl intermediates, useful monomers for the obtainment of (alanyl-PNA)/DNA chimeras by conditions fully compatible with the standard phosphoramidite DNA synthesis strategy. PMID:19629638

  11. Synthesis of novel MMT/acyl-protected nucleo alanine monomers for the preparation of DNA/alanyl-PNA chimeras.

    PubMed

    Roviello, G N; Gröschel, S; Pedone, C; Diederichsen, U

    2010-05-01

    Alanyl-peptide nucleic acid (alanyl-PNA)/DNA chimeras are oligomers envisaged to be beneficial in efficient DNA diagnostics based on an improved molecular beacon concept. A synthesis of alanyl-PNA/DNA chimera can be based on the solid phase assembly of the oligomer with mixed oligonucleotide/peptide backbone under DNA synthesis conditions, in which the nucleotides are introduced as phosphoramidites, whereas the nucleo amino acids make use of the acid labile monomethoxytrityl (MMT) group for temporary protection of the alpha-amino groups and acyl protecting groups for the exocyclic amino functions of the nucleobases. In this work, we realized for the first time the synthesis of all four MMT/acyl-protected nucleo alanines, achieved by deprotection/reprotection of the newly synthesized Boc/acyl intermediates, useful monomers for the obtainment of (alanyl-PNA)/DNA chimeras by conditions fully compatible with the standard phosphoramidite DNA synthesis strategy.

  12. Noncovalent and covalent functionalization of a (5, 0) single-walled carbon nanotube with alanine and alanine radicals.

    PubMed

    Rajarajeswari, Muthusivarajan; Iyakutti, Kombiah; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2012-02-01

    We have systematically investigated the noncovalent and covalent adsorption of alanine and alanine radicals, respectively, onto a (5, 0) single-walled carbon nanotube using first-principles calculation. It was found that XH···π (X = N, O, C) interactions play a crucial role in the non-ovalent adsorption and that the functional group close to the carbon nanotube exhibits a significant influence on the binding strength. Noncovalent functionalization of the carbon nanotube with alanine enhances the conductivity of the metallic (5, 0) nanotube. In the covalent adsorption of each alanine radical onto a carbon nanotube, the binding energy depends on the adsorption site on CNT and the electronegative atom that binds with the CNT. The strongest complex is formed when the alanine radical interacts with a (5, 0) carbon nanotube through the amine group. In some cases, the covalent interaction of the alanine radical introduces a half-filled band at the Fermi level due to the local sp (3) hybridization, which modifies the conductivity of the tube.

  13. Structure of D-alanine-D-alanine ligase from Yersinia pestis: nucleotide phosphate recognition by the serine loop.

    PubMed

    Tran, Huyen Thi; Hong, Myoung Ki; Ngo, Ho Phuong Thuy; Huynh, Kim Hung; Ahn, Yeh Jin; Wang, Zhong; Kang, Lin Woo

    2016-01-01

    D-Alanyl-D-alanine is an essential precursor of bacterial peptidoglycan and is synthesized by D-alanine-D-alanine ligase (DDL) with hydrolysis of ATP; this reaction makes DDL an important drug target for the development of antibacterial agents. Five crystal structures of DDL from Yersinia pestis (YpDDL) were determined at 1.7-2.5 Å resolution: apo, AMP-bound, ADP-bound, adenosine 5'-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate-bound, and D-alanyl-D-alanine- and ADP-bound structures. YpDDL consists of three domains, in which four loops, loop 1, loop 2 (the serine loop), loop 3 (the ω-loop) and loop 4, constitute the binding sites for two D-alanine molecules and one ATP molecule. Some of them, especially the serine loop and the ω-loop, show flexible conformations, and the serine loop is mainly responsible for the conformational change in substrate nucleotide phosphates. Enzyme-kinetics assays were carried out for both the D-alanine and ATP substrates and a substrate-binding mechanism was proposed for YpDDL involving conformational changes of the loops.

  14. Structure of D-alanine-D-alanine ligase from Yersinia pestis: nucleotide phosphate recognition by the serine loop.

    PubMed

    Tran, Huyen Thi; Hong, Myoung Ki; Ngo, Ho Phuong Thuy; Huynh, Kim Hung; Ahn, Yeh Jin; Wang, Zhong; Kang, Lin Woo

    2016-01-01

    D-Alanyl-D-alanine is an essential precursor of bacterial peptidoglycan and is synthesized by D-alanine-D-alanine ligase (DDL) with hydrolysis of ATP; this reaction makes DDL an important drug target for the development of antibacterial agents. Five crystal structures of DDL from Yersinia pestis (YpDDL) were determined at 1.7-2.5 Å resolution: apo, AMP-bound, ADP-bound, adenosine 5'-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate-bound, and D-alanyl-D-alanine- and ADP-bound structures. YpDDL consists of three domains, in which four loops, loop 1, loop 2 (the serine loop), loop 3 (the ω-loop) and loop 4, constitute the binding sites for two D-alanine molecules and one ATP molecule. Some of them, especially the serine loop and the ω-loop, show flexible conformations, and the serine loop is mainly responsible for the conformational change in substrate nucleotide phosphates. Enzyme-kinetics assays were carried out for both the D-alanine and ATP substrates and a substrate-binding mechanism was proposed for YpDDL involving conformational changes of the loops. PMID:26894530

  15. Reconfiguration of N Metabolism upon Hypoxia Stress and Recovery: Roles of Alanine Aminotransferase (AlaAT) and Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH)

    PubMed Central

    Diab, Houssein; Limami, Anis M.

    2016-01-01

    In the context of climatic change, more heavy precipitation and more frequent flooding and waterlogging events threaten the productivity of arable farmland. Furthermore, crops were not selected to cope with flooding- and waterlogging-induced oxygen limitation. In general, low oxygen stress, unlike other abiotic stresses (e.g., cold, high temperature, drought and saline stress), received little interest from the scientific community and less financial support from stakeholders. Accordingly, breeding programs should be developed and agronomical practices should be adapted in order to save plants’ growth and yield—even under conditions of low oxygen availability (e.g., submergence and waterlogging). The prerequisite to the success of such breeding programs and changes in agronomical practices is a good knowledge of how plants adapt to low oxygen stress at the cellular and the whole plant level. In the present paper, we summarized the recent knowledge on metabolic adjustment in general under low oxygen stress and highlighted thereafter the major changes pertaining to the reconfiguration of amino acids syntheses. We propose a model showing (i) how pyruvate derived from active glycolysis upon hypoxia is competitively used by the alanine aminotransferase/glutamate synthase cycle, leading to alanine accumulation and NAD+ regeneration. Carbon is then saved in a nitrogen store instead of being lost through ethanol fermentative pathway. (ii) During the post-hypoxia recovery period, the alanine aminotransferase/glutamate dehydrogenase cycle mobilizes this carbon from alanine store. Pyruvate produced by the reverse reaction of alanine aminotransferase is funneled to the TCA cycle, while deaminating glutamate dehydrogenase regenerates, reducing equivalent (NADH) and 2-oxoglutarate to maintain the cycle function. PMID:27258319

  16. Reconfiguration of N Metabolism upon Hypoxia Stress and Recovery: Roles of Alanine Aminotransferase (AlaAT) and Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH).

    PubMed

    Diab, Houssein; Limami, Anis M

    2016-01-01

    In the context of climatic change, more heavy precipitation and more frequent flooding and waterlogging events threaten the productivity of arable farmland. Furthermore, crops were not selected to cope with flooding- and waterlogging-induced oxygen limitation. In general, low oxygen stress, unlike other abiotic stresses (e.g., cold, high temperature, drought and saline stress), received little interest from the scientific community and less financial support from stakeholders. Accordingly, breeding programs should be developed and agronomical practices should be adapted in order to save plants' growth and yield-even under conditions of low oxygen availability (e.g., submergence and waterlogging). The prerequisite to the success of such breeding programs and changes in agronomical practices is a good knowledge of how plants adapt to low oxygen stress at the cellular and the whole plant level. In the present paper, we summarized the recent knowledge on metabolic adjustment in general under low oxygen stress and highlighted thereafter the major changes pertaining to the reconfiguration of amino acids syntheses. We propose a model showing (i) how pyruvate derived from active glycolysis upon hypoxia is competitively used by the alanine aminotransferase/glutamate synthase cycle, leading to alanine accumulation and NAD⁺ regeneration. Carbon is then saved in a nitrogen store instead of being lost through ethanol fermentative pathway. (ii) During the post-hypoxia recovery period, the alanine aminotransferase/glutamate dehydrogenase cycle mobilizes this carbon from alanine store. Pyruvate produced by the reverse reaction of alanine aminotransferase is funneled to the TCA cycle, while deaminating glutamate dehydrogenase regenerates, reducing equivalent (NADH) and 2-oxoglutarate to maintain the cycle function. PMID:27258319

  17. EPR/alanine dosimetry for two therapeutic proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrale, Maurizio; Carlino, Antonio; Gallo, Salvatore; Longo, Anna; Panzeca, Salvatore; Bolsi, Alessandra; Hrbacek, Jan; Lomax, Tony

    2016-02-01

    In this work the analysis of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) response of alanine pellets exposed to two different clinical proton beams employed for radiotherapy is performed. One beam is characterized by a passive delivery technique and is dedicated to the eyes treatment (OPTIS2 beam line). Alanine pellets were irradiated with a 70 MeV proton beam corresponding to 35 mm range in eye tissue. We investigated how collimators with different sizes and shape used to conform the dose to the planned target volume influence the delivered dose. For this purpose we performed measurements with varying the collimator size (Output Factor) and the results were compared with those obtained with other dosimetric techniques (such as Markus chamber and diode detector). This analysis showed that the dosimeter response is independent of collimator diameter if this is larger than or equal to 10 mm. The other beam is characterized by an active spot-scanning technique, the Gantry1 beam line (maximum energy 230 MeV), and is used to treat deep-seated tumors. The dose linearity of alanine response in the clinical dose range was tested and the alanine dose response at selected locations in depth was measured and compared with the TPS planned dose in a quasi-clinical scenario. The alanine response was found to be linear in the dose in the clinical explored range (from 10 to 70 Gy). Furthermore, a depth dose profile in a quasi-clinical scenario was measured and compared to the dose computed by the Treatment Planning System PSIPLAN. The comparison of calibrated proton alanine measurements and TPS dose shows a difference under 1% in the SOBP and a "quenching" effect up to 4% in the distal part of SOBP. The positive dosimetric characteristics of the alanine pellets confirm the feasibility to use these detectors for "in vivo" dosimetry in clinical proton beams.

  18. Effect of substituting arginine and lysine with alanine on antimicrobial activity and the mechanism of action of a cationic dodecapeptide (CL(14-25)), a partial sequence of cyanate lyase from rice.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masayuki; Takahashi, Nobuteru; Takayanagi, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Atsuo; Ishiyama, Yohei; Saitoh, Eiichi; Kato, Tetsuo; Ochiai, Akihito; Tanaka, Takaaki

    2014-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of analogs obtained by substituting arginine and lysine in CL(14-25), a cationic α-helical dodecapeptide, with alanine against Porphyromonas gingivalis, a periodontal pathogen, varied significantly depending on the number and position of cationic amino acids. The alanine-substituted analogs had no hemolytic activity, even at a concentration of 1 mM. The antimicrobial activities of CL(K20A) and CL(K20A, K25A) were 3.8-fold and 9.1-fold higher, respectively, than that of CL(14-25). The antimicrobial activity of CL(R15A) was slightly lower than that of CL(14-25), suggesting that arginine at position 15 is not essential but is important for the antimicrobial activity. The experiments in which the alanine-substituted analogs bearing the replacement of arginine at position 24 and/or lysine at position 25 were used showed that arginine at position 24 was crucial for the antimicrobial activity whenever lysine at position 25 was substituted with alanine. Helical wheel projections of the alanine-substituted analogs indicate that the hydrophobicity in the vicinity of leucine at position 16 and alanines at positions 18 and/or 21 increased by substituting lysine at positions 20 and 25 with alanine, respectively. The degrees of diSC3 -5 release from P. gingivalis cells and disruption of GUVs induced by the alanine-substituted analogs with different positive charges were not closely related to their antimicrobial activities. The enhanced antimicrobial activities of the alanine-substituted analogs appear to be mainly attributable to the changes in properties such as hydrophobicity and amphipathic propensity due to alanine substitution and not to their extents of positive charge (cationicity).

  19. Crystal Structure of a Thermostable Alanine Racemase from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis MB4 Reveals the Role of Gln360 in Substrate Selection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Shujing; Ju, Jiansong; Xu, Xiaoling

    2015-01-01

    Pyridoxal 5’-phosphate (PLP) dependent alanine racemase catalyzes racemization of L-Ala to D-Ala, a key component of the peptidoglycan network in bacterial cell wall. It has been extensively studied as an important antimicrobial drug target due to its restriction in eukaryotes. However, many marketed alanine racemase inhibitors also act on eukaryotic PLP-dependent enzymes and cause side effects. A thermostable alanine racemase (AlrTt) from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis MB4 contains an evolutionarily non-conserved residue Gln360 in inner layer of the substrate entryway, which is supposed to be a key determinant in substrate specificity. Here we determined the crystal structure of AlrTt in complex with L-Ala at 2.7 Å resolution, and investigated the role of Gln360 by saturation mutagenesis and kinetic analysis. Compared to typical bacterial alanine racemase, presence of Gln360 and conformational changes of active site residues disrupted the hydrogen bonding interactions necessary for proper PLP immobilization, and decreased both the substrate affinity and turnover number of AlrTt. However, it could be complemented by introduction of hydrophobic amino acids at Gln360, through steric blocking and interactions with a hydrophobic patch near active site pocket. These observations explained the low racemase activity of AlrTt, revealed the essential role of Gln360 in substrate selection, and its preference for hydrophobic amino acids especially Tyr in bacterial alanine racemization. Our work will contribute new insights into the alanine racemization mechanism for antimicrobial drug development. PMID:26218070

  20. The Genetic Architecture of Murine Glutathione Transferases

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lu; Pandey, Ashutosh K.; Houseal, M. Trevor; Mulligan, Megan K.

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes play a protective role against oxidative stress and may influence disease risk and drug pharmacokinetics. In this study, massive multiscalar trait profiling across a large population of mice derived from a cross between C57BL/6J (B6) and DBA2/J (D2)—the BXD family—was combined with linkage and bioinformatic analyses to characterize mechanisms controlling GST expression and to identify downstream consequences of this variation. Similar to humans, mice show a wide range in expression of GST family members. Variation in the expression of Gsta4, Gstt2, Gstz1, Gsto1, and Mgst3 is modulated by local expression QTLs (eQTLs) in several tissues. Higher expression of Gsto1 in brain and liver of BXD strains is strongly associated (P < 0.01) with inheritance of the B6 parental allele whereas higher expression of Gsta4 and Mgst3 in brain and liver, and Gstt2 and Gstz1 in brain is strongly associated with inheritance of the D2 parental allele. Allele-specific assays confirmed that expression of Gsto1, Gsta4, and Mgst3 are modulated by sequence variants within or near each gene locus. We exploited this endogenous variation to identify coexpression networks and downstream targets in mouse and human. Through a combined systems genetics approach, we provide new insight into the biological role of naturally occurring variants in GST genes. PMID:26829228

  1. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase deficiency.

    PubMed

    de Bruyn, C H

    1976-02-29

    In man congential lack of enzyme of the purine salvage system, hypoxanthineguanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HG-PRT E.C. 2.4.2.8), is mostly accompanied by a picture known as the Lesch-Nyhan snydrome. The degree of deficiency may vary from zero to a few percent of normal activity but a correlation between the severity of HG-PRT deficiency and the clinical picture has not been observed, no more than a correlation HG-PRT deficiency and neurological dysfunction. But individuals with undetectable HG-PRT activity but without the Lesch-Nyhan syndrome have been described. Patients with partial HG-PRT defiency have clinically distinctive findings. Sometimes mild neurological abnormalities are observed. Because of marked overproduction of ric acid severe gouty arthritis and renal dysfunction are often encountered in both complete and partial deficiency. There is considerable molecular heterogeneity in HG-PRT deficiency in man. Mutant ebnzymes may exhibit different kinetic and electrophoretic properties, indicating that hterwe might be a mutation on the structural gene coding for HG-PRT. Lack of HG-PRT disturbs purine interconversions profoundly. In addition to an important function of HG-PRT in the uptake of the purine hypoxantine and guanine into the cell, the effective uptake of inosine, guanosine and adenosine also seems to be dependent on HG-PRT...

  2. Tuning electronic transport via hepta-alanine peptides junction by tryptophan doping.

    PubMed

    Guo, Cunlan; Yu, Xi; Refaely-Abramson, Sivan; Sepunaru, Lior; Bendikov, Tatyana; Pecht, Israel; Kronik, Leeor; Vilan, Ayelet; Sheves, Mordechai; Cahen, David

    2016-09-27

    Charge migration for electron transfer via the polypeptide matrix of proteins is a key process in biological energy conversion and signaling systems. It is sensitive to the sequence of amino acids composing the protein and, therefore, offers a tool for chemical control of charge transport across biomaterial-based devices. We designed a series of linear oligoalanine peptides with a single tryptophan substitution that acts as a "dopant," introducing an energy level closer to the electrodes' Fermi level than that of the alanine homopeptide. We investigated the solid-state electron transport (ETp) across a self-assembled monolayer of these peptides between gold contacts. The single tryptophan "doping" markedly increased the conductance of the peptide chain, especially when its location in the sequence is close to the electrodes. Combining inelastic tunneling spectroscopy, UV photoelectron spectroscopy, electronic structure calculations by advanced density-functional theory, and dc current-voltage analysis, the role of tryptophan in ETp is rationalized by charge tunneling across a heterogeneous energy barrier, via electronic states of alanine and tryptophan, and by relatively efficient direct coupling of tryptophan to a Au electrode. These results reveal a controlled way of modulating the electrical properties of molecular junctions by tailor-made "building block" peptides.

  3. Selective control of Cu(II) complex stability in histidine peptides by β-alanine.

    PubMed

    Nagaj, Justyna; Stokowa-Sołtys, Kamila; Zawisza, Izabela; Jeżowska-Bojczuk, Małgorzata; Bonna, Arkadiusz; Bal, Wojciech

    2013-02-01

    The cooperativity of formation of 5-membered and 6-membered chelate rings is the driving force for specificity and selectivity in Cu(II) peptidic complexes. α-Amino acids enable the formation of 5-membered rings, while a 6-membered ring is provided by the coordination of the His side chain imidazole. Introduction of β-alanine is another way of creating a 6-membered ring in the Cu(II) complex. The potentiometric and spectroscopic (UV-vis and CD) study of Cu(II) complexation by a series of four peptides, AAH-am, ABH-am, BAH-am, and BBH-am (where B stands for β-alanine, and -am for C-terminal amide) revealed a very strong effect of the sizes of individual rings, with the order of complex stability AAH-am (5,5,6)>BAH-am (6,5,6)>ABH-am (5,6,6)≫BBH-am (6,6,6). The stabilities of ABH-am and BAH-am complexes are intermediate between those of strong His-3 peptides but these complexes are still able to saturate the coordination sphere of the Cu(II) ion at neutral pH. This fact opens up new possibilities in engineering specific peptide-based chelates.

  4. Tuning electronic transport via hepta-alanine peptides junction by tryptophan doping.

    PubMed

    Guo, Cunlan; Yu, Xi; Refaely-Abramson, Sivan; Sepunaru, Lior; Bendikov, Tatyana; Pecht, Israel; Kronik, Leeor; Vilan, Ayelet; Sheves, Mordechai; Cahen, David

    2016-09-27

    Charge migration for electron transfer via the polypeptide matrix of proteins is a key process in biological energy conversion and signaling systems. It is sensitive to the sequence of amino acids composing the protein and, therefore, offers a tool for chemical control of charge transport across biomaterial-based devices. We designed a series of linear oligoalanine peptides with a single tryptophan substitution that acts as a "dopant," introducing an energy level closer to the electrodes' Fermi level than that of the alanine homopeptide. We investigated the solid-state electron transport (ETp) across a self-assembled monolayer of these peptides between gold contacts. The single tryptophan "doping" markedly increased the conductance of the peptide chain, especially when its location in the sequence is close to the electrodes. Combining inelastic tunneling spectroscopy, UV photoelectron spectroscopy, electronic structure calculations by advanced density-functional theory, and dc current-voltage analysis, the role of tryptophan in ETp is rationalized by charge tunneling across a heterogeneous energy barrier, via electronic states of alanine and tryptophan, and by relatively efficient direct coupling of tryptophan to a Au electrode. These results reveal a controlled way of modulating the electrical properties of molecular junctions by tailor-made "building block" peptides. PMID:27621456

  5. Production of a new D-amino acid oxidase from the fungus Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Gabler, M; Fischer, L

    1999-08-01

    The fungus Fusarium oxysporum produced a D-amino acid oxidase (EC 1. 4.3.3) in a medium containing glucose as the carbon and energy source and ammonium sulfate as the nitrogen source. The specific D-amino acid oxidase activity was increased up to 12.5-fold with various D-amino acids or their corresponding derivatives as inducers. The best inducers were D-alanine (2.7 microkat/g of dry biomass) and D-3-aminobutyric acid (2.6 microkat/g of dry biomass). The addition of zinc ions was necessary to permit the induction of peroxisomal D-amino acid oxidase. Bioreactor cultivations were performed on a 50-liter scale, yielding a volumetric D-amino acid oxidase activity of 17 microkat liter(-1) with D-alanine as an inducer. Under oxygen limitation, the volumetric activity was increased threefold to 54 microkat liter(-1) (3,240 U liter(-1)).

  6. Combined supplementation of carbohydrate, alanine, and proline is effective in maintaining blood glucose and increasing endurance performance during long-term exercise in mice.

    PubMed

    Nogusa, Yoshihito; Mizugaki, Ami; Hirabayashi-Osada, Yuri; Furuta, Chie; Ohyama, Kana; Suzuki, Katsuya; Kobayashi, Hisamine

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrate supplementation is extremely important during prolonged exercise because it maintains blood glucose levels during later stages of exercise. In this study, we examined whether maintaining blood glucose levels by carbohydrate supplementation could be enhanced during long-term exercise by combining this supplementation with alanine and proline, which are gluconeogenic amino acids, and whether such a combination would affect exercise endurance performance. Male C57BL/6J mice were orally administered either maltodextrin (1.25 g/kg) or maltodextrin (1.0 g/kg) with alanine (0.225 g/kg) and proline (0.025 g/kg) 15 min before running for 170 min. Combined supplementation of maltodextrin, alanine, and proline induced higher blood glucose levels than isocaloric maltodextrin alone during the late exercise phase (100-170 min). The hepatic glycogen content of mice administered maltodextrin, alanine, and proline was higher than that of mice ingesting maltodextrin alone 60 min after beginning exercise, but the glycogen content of the gastrocnemius muscle showed no difference. We conducted a treadmill running test to determine the effect of alanine and proline on endurance performance. The test showed that running time to exhaustion of mice that were supplemented with maltodextrin (2.0 g/kg) was longer than that of mice that were supplemented with water alone. Maltodextrin supplementation (1.0 g/kg) with alanine (0.9 g/kg) and proline (0.1 g/kg) further increased running time to exhaustion compared to maltodextrin alone (2.0 g/kg). These results indicate that combined supplementation of carbohydrate, alanine, and proline is effective for maintaining blood glucose and hepatic glycogen levels and increasing endurance performance during long-term exercise in mice.

  7. The influence of secretion elicitors and external pH on the kinetics of D-alanine uptake by the trap lobes of Dionaea muscipula Ellis (Venus's Flytrap).

    PubMed

    Rea, P A; Whatley, F R

    1983-08-01

    Simple kinetic techniques were used to examine the mechanism of D-alanine uptake by the adaxial surfaces of the trap lobes of Dionaea muscipula Ellis (Venus's Flytrap.) On the basis of these analyses, the uptake of D-alanine was found to depend on the time during which the trap lobes were inoculated with elicitors of secretion before excision and measurement of uptake. Disks taken from traps that had not been subjected to a preceding period of inoculation with secretion elicitors showed a low basal rate of uptake which was neither pH-dependent nor exhibited saturation with respect to external D-alanine concentration. Disks from preinoculated traps, on the other hand, displayed an enhanced rate of uptake which showed both pH-dependence and saturation with respect to external D-alanine concentration. The capacity for enhanced uptake was lost upon prolonged inoculation or when inoculation was stopped. Of the compounds tested, only elicitors of secretion caused an enhancement of uptake. The enhanced rate of D-alanine uptake is temperature-sensitive with a Q10 characteristic of a mediated process. Uncouplers cause an instantaneous abolition of uptake whereas the effects of terminal-oxidase inhibitors are time-dependent. The pH-dependence of uptake is inferred to result from an increased affinity of the carrier system for D-alanine at low pH values. Although the ionic state of D-alanine is relatively unaffected over the pH range examined, a decrease in the external pH from 6.0 to 3.8 decreases the apparent K m for uptake by four-fold but increases V max by only 30%. It is concluded that the acid secreted by the digestive glands of Dionaea plays a direct role in facilitating the uptake of amino acids from the trap cavity.

  8. Enzymatic syntheses of (1-(C-11))pyruvic acid and L-(1-(C-11))lactic acid via DL-(1-(C-11))alanine

    SciTech Connect

    Ropchan, J.R.; Barrio, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    L-(1-(C-11)) Lactic acid was prepared in three steps using a remote, semi-automated procedure: (1) production of DL-(1-(C-11)) alanine (2) enzymatic conversion of DL (1-(C-11)) alanine to (1-(C-11)) pyruvate and (3) enzymatic transformation of (1-(C-11)) pyruvate to L-(1-(C-11)) lactic acid. DL-(1-(C-11)) Alanine was synthesized from NCA C-11 HCN using a modification of the Bucherer-Strecker reaction. The DL-isomers were converted to (1-(C-11)) pyruvate by passage through (1) immobilized D-amino acid oxidase enzyme column followed by (2) immobilized L-alanine dehydrogenase (l-ADH) enzyme column. (1-(C-11)) Pyruvate was then transformed to L-(1-(C-11)) lactic acid by elution through a L-lactic dehydrogenase enzyme column. These enzyme columns are reusable beyond three months, give high radiochemical purity (>98%), eliminate the possibility of protein contamination, assure sterile, pyrogen-free products and allow rapid separation and quantitative conversion of DL-isomers to the desired products. Typically the synthesis required 30-40 min after cyclotron production of NCA C-11 HCN with radiochemical yields of 15-25 mCi (23%) of L-(1-(C-11)) lactic acid and 20-35 mCi (33%) of (l-(C-11)) pyruvic acid starting with 250-400 mCi of C-11 HCN. Also 10-20 mCi (19%) of L-(1-(C-11)) alanine was produced by resin separation (AG50W-X8), H/sup +/ form of (1-(C-11)) pyruvate and L-(1-(C-11)) alanine following elution through D-AAO enzyme column. The radiochemical purities of (1-(C-11)) pyruvic acid, L-(1-(C-11)) lactic acid and L-(1-(C-11)) alanine were verified routinely by reversed-phase HPLC.

  9. Structural snapshots along the reaction pathway of Yersinia pestis RipA, a putative butyryl-CoA transferase

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Rodrigo; Lan, Benson; Latif, Yama; Chim, Nicholas; Goulding, Celia W.

    2014-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic plague, is able to survive in both extracellular and intracellular environments within the human host, although its intracellular survival within macrophages is poorly understood. A novel Y. pestis three-gene rip (required for intracellular proliferation) operon, and in particular ripA, has been shown to be essential for survival and replication in interferon γ-induced macrophages. RipA was previously characterized as a putative butyryl-CoA transferase proposed to yield butyrate, a known anti-inflammatory shown to lower macrophage-produced NO levels. RipA belongs to the family I CoA transferases, which share structural homology, a conserved catalytic glutamate which forms a covalent CoA-thioester intermediate and a flexible loop adjacent to the active site known as the G(V/I)G loop. Here, functional and structural analyses of several RipA mutants are presented in an effort to dissect the CoA transferase mechanism of RipA. In particular, E61V, M31G and F60M RipA mutants show increased butyryl-CoA transferase activities when compared with wild-type RipA. Furthermore, the X-ray crystal structures of E61V, M31G and F60M RipA mutants, when compared with the wild-type RipA structure, reveal important conformational changes orchestrated by a conserved acyl-group binding-pocket phenyl­alanine, Phe85, and the G(V/I)G loop. Binary structures of M31G RipA and F60M RipA with two distinct CoA substrate conformations are also presented. Taken together, these data provide CoA transferase reaction snapshots of an open apo RipA, a closed glutamyl-anhydride intermediate and an open CoA-thioester intermediate. Furthermore, biochemical analyses support essential roles for both the catalytic glutamate and the flexible G(V/I)G loop along the reaction pathway, although further research is required to fully understand the function of the acyl-group binding pocket in substrate specificity. PMID:24699651

  10. Polymers with complexing properties. Simple poly(amino acids)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roque, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    The free amino (0.3 equiv/residue) and carboxyl (0.5 equiv/residue) groups of thermal polylysine increased dramatically on treatment with distilled water. The total hydrolysis of such a polymer was abnormal in that only about 50% of the expected amino acids were recovered. Poly (lysine-co-alanine-co-glycine) under usual conditions hydrolyzed completely in 8 hours; whereas, when it was pretreated with diazomethane, a normal period of 24 hours was required to give (nearly) the same amounts of each free amino acid as compared with those obtained from the untreated polymer. The amino groups of the basic thermal poly(amino acids) were sterically hindered. The existence of nitrogen atoms linking two or three chains and reactive groups (anhydride, imine) were proposed.

  11. Pyridyl-alanine as a Hydrophilic, Aromatic Element in Peptide Structural Optimization.

    PubMed

    Mroz, Piotr A; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Liu, Fa; Gelfanov, Vasily; DiMarchi, Richard D; Mayer, John P

    2016-09-01

    Glucagon (Gcg) 1 serves a seminal physiological role in buffering against hypoglycemia, but its poor biophysical properties severely complicate its medicinal use. We report a series of novel glucagon analogues of enhanced aqueous solubility and stability at neutral pH, anchored by Gcg[Aib16]. Incorporation of 3- and 4-pyridyl-alanine (3-Pal and 4-Pal) enhanced aqueous solubility of glucagon while maintaining biological properties. Relative to native hormone, analogue 9 (Gcg[3-Pal6,10,13, Aib16]) demonstrated superior biophysical character, better suitability for medicinal purposes, and comparable pharmacology against insulin-induced hypoglycemia in rats and pigs. Our data indicate that Pal is a versatile surrogate to natural aromatic amino acids and can be employed as an alternative or supplement with isoelectric adjustment to refine the biophysical character of peptide drug candidates. PMID:27509198

  12. Familial amyloid polyneuropathy: alanine-for-threonine substitution in the transthyretin (prealbumin) molecule.

    PubMed

    Koeppen, A H; Wallace, M R; Benson, M D; Altland, K

    1990-11-01

    A previously reported family with amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) was reinvestigated to determine the type of mutation in the transthyretin (prealbumin) molecule. Transthyretin was isolated from amyloid-laden myocardium and serum, and tryptic peptides were resolved by high-performance liquid chromatography. Amino acid sequencing of an anomalous peptide revealed an alanine-for-threonine substitution corresponding to position No. 60 of the transthyretin monomer. Detection of the FAP gene in asymptomatic carriers was accomplished by hybrid isoelectric focusing of transthyretin in the presence of dithiothreitol and high concentrations of urea, and by Southern blotting of Pvull-digested leukocyte deoxyribonucleic acid. This type of FAP was found to be identical to the previously described Appalachian amyloid. Patients with FAP and their asymptomatic gene-carrying offspring had significantly reduced levels of serum transthyretin and retinol-binding protein.

  13. Synthesis of thiocarbamide derivatives of. beta. -alanine and aminalon and study of their antiradiation action

    SciTech Connect

    Golubev, A.A.; Shlykov, Yu.V.; Mandrugin, A.A.; Semenenko, M.N.; Fedoseev, V.M.; Dontsova, G.V.; Rakhmanina, O.N.; Konstantinova, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have synthesized the carboxyl derivatives of S-(2-Amino-ethyl)isothiourea (AET) and S-(3-Aminopropyl)isothiourea (3-APT), the dihydrobromides of S-(1-carboxy-2-aminoethyl)- and S-(1-carboxy-3-aminopropyl)isothioureas, and studied their toxicity and antiradiation effectiveness. Their work is based on data for the high radiation-protective activity of the corresponding aminoalkylisothioureas and on the fact that the introduction of the carboxylic group into the molecule influences the pharmacological properties of a compound. The starting compound for the preparation of S(1-carboxy-2-aminoethyl)isothiourea was beta-alanine. Mice were used in the investigations and in determining the toxicity of the compounds, the amounts of LD/sub 16/, LD/sub 50/, and LD/sub 84/ are given. In studying the anti-radiation activity, the mice were subjected to the action of /sup 60/Co-gamma rays.

  14. Reanalysis of the effects of phenylalanine, alanine, and aspartame on food intake in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Rogers, P J; Blundell, J E

    1994-08-01

    In 1987 Ryan-Harshman et al. reported finding no effects on food intake after administering high doses (up to 10.08 g) of phenylalanine and aspartame in capsules to human volunteers. However, this is contrary to the results of other studies, and trends in their tabulated data suggest that certain effects may have been overlooked. This is confirmed by a reanalysis of the raw data (available from a Ph.D. thesis: Ryan-Harshman, 1987) that can be interpreted as showing a dose-related suppression of food intake by phenylalanine. Furthermore, the data are consistent with an anorexic action of aspartame and perhaps also of alanine (which was designated as the placebo treatment by Ryan-Harshman et al.). These, together with other findings, suggest that the appetite effects of amino acids and small peptides should be investigated further. In addition to its theoretical importance, such work may have potential for therapeutic applications.

  15. Elevational Variation in Soil Amino Acid and Inorganic Nitrogen Concentrations in Taibai Mountain, China.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaochuang; Ma, Qingxu; Zhong, Chu; Yang, Xin; Zhu, Lianfeng; Zhang, Junhua; Jin, Qianyu; Wu, Lianghuan

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids are important sources of soil organic nitrogen (N), which is essential for plant nutrition, but detailed information about which amino acids predominant and whether amino acid composition varies with elevation is lacking. In this study, we hypothesized that the concentrations of amino acids in soil would increase and their composition would vary along the elevational gradient of Taibai Mountain, as plant-derived organic matter accumulated and N mineralization and microbial immobilization of amino acids slowed with reduced soil temperature. Results showed that the concentrations of soil extractable total N, extractable organic N and amino acids significantly increased with elevation due to the accumulation of soil organic matter and the greater N content. Soil extractable organic N concentration was significantly greater than that of the extractable inorganic N (NO3--N + NH4+-N). On average, soil adsorbed amino acid concentration was approximately 5-fold greater than that of the free amino acids, which indicates that adsorbed amino acids extracted with the strong salt solution likely represent a potential source for the replenishment of free amino acids. We found no appreciable evidence to suggest that amino acids with simple molecular structure were dominant at low elevations, whereas amino acids with high molecular weight and complex aromatic structure dominated the high elevations. Across the elevational gradient, the amino acid pool was dominated by alanine, aspartic acid, glycine, glutamic acid, histidine, serine and threonine. These seven amino acids accounted for approximately 68.9% of the total hydrolyzable amino acid pool. The proportions of isoleucine, tyrosine and methionine varied with elevation, while soil major amino acid composition (including alanine, arginine, aspartic acid, glycine, histidine, leucine, phenylalanine, serine, threonine and valine) did not vary appreciably with elevation (p>0.10). The compositional similarity of many

  16. Elevational Variation in Soil Amino Acid and Inorganic Nitrogen Concentrations in Taibai Mountain, China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xin; Zhu, Lianfeng; Zhang, Junhua; Jin, Qianyu; Wu, Lianghuan

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids are important sources of soil organic nitrogen (N), which is essential for plant nutrition, but detailed information about which amino acids predominant and whether amino acid composition varies with elevation is lacking. In this study, we hypothesized that the concentrations of amino acids in soil would increase and their composition would vary along the elevational gradient of Taibai Mountain, as plant-derived organic matter accumulated and N mineralization and microbial immobilization of amino acids slowed with reduced soil temperature. Results showed that the concentrations of soil extractable total N, extractable organic N and amino acids significantly increased with elevation due to the accumulation of soil organic matter and the greater N content. Soil extractable organic N concentration was significantly greater than that of the extractable inorganic N (NO3−-N + NH4+-N). On average, soil adsorbed amino acid concentration was approximately 5-fold greater than that of the free amino acids, which indicates that adsorbed amino acids extracted with the strong salt solution likely represent a potential source for the replenishment of free amino acids. We found no appreciable evidence to suggest that amino acids with simple molecular structure were dominant at low elevations, whereas amino acids with high molecular weight and complex aromatic structure dominated the high elevations. Across the elevational gradient, the amino acid pool was dominated by alanine, aspartic acid, glycine, glutamic acid, histidine, serine and threonine. These seven amino acids accounted for approximately 68.9% of the total hydrolyzable amino acid pool. The proportions of isoleucine, tyrosine and methionine varied with elevation, while soil major amino acid composition (including alanine, arginine, aspartic acid, glycine, histidine, leucine, phenylalanine, serine, threonine and valine) did not vary appreciably with elevation (p>0.10). The compositional similarity of many

  17. Elevational Variation in Soil Amino Acid and Inorganic Nitrogen Concentrations in Taibai Mountain, China.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaochuang; Ma, Qingxu; Zhong, Chu; Yang, Xin; Zhu, Lianfeng; Zhang, Junhua; Jin, Qianyu; Wu, Lianghuan

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids are important sources of soil organic nitrogen (N), which is essential for plant nutrition, but detailed information about which amino acids predominant and whether amino acid composition varies with elevation is lacking. In this study, we hypothesized that the concentrations of amino acids in soil would increase and their composition would vary along the elevational gradient of Taibai Mountain, as plant-derived organic matter accumulated and N mineralization and microbial immobilization of amino acids slowed with reduced soil temperature. Results showed that the concentrations of soil extractable total N, extractable organic N and amino acids significantly increased with elevation due to the accumulation of soil organic matter and the greater N content. Soil extractable organic N concentration was significantly greater than that of the extractable inorganic N (NO3--N + NH4+-N). On average, soil adsorbed amino acid concentration was approximately 5-fold greater than that of the free amino acids, which indicates that adsorbed amino acids extracted with the strong salt solution likely represent a potential source for the replenishment of free amino acids. We found no appreciable evidence to suggest that amino acids with simple molecular structure were dominant at low elevations, whereas amino acids with high molecular weight and complex aromatic structure dominated the high elevations. Across the elevational gradient, the amino acid pool was dominated by alanine, aspartic acid, glycine, glutamic acid, histidine, serine and threonine. These seven amino acids accounted for approximately 68.9% of the total hydrolyzable amino acid pool. The proportions of isoleucine, tyrosine and methionine varied with elevation, while soil major amino acid composition (including alanine, arginine, aspartic acid, glycine, histidine, leucine, phenylalanine, serine, threonine and valine) did not vary appreciably with elevation (p>0.10). The compositional similarity of many

  18. On the existence of "L-threonine formate", "L-alanine lithium chloride" and "bis L-alanine lithium chloride" crystals.

    PubMed

    Petrosyan, A M; Ghazaryan, V V; Fleck, M

    2013-03-15

    We argue that the recently reported crystals "L-threonine formate" as well as "L-alanine lithium chloride" and "bis L-alanine lithium chloride" actually are the well-known crystals L-threonine and L-alanine, respectively.

  19. The origin of amino acids in lunar regolith samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsila, Jamie E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Glavin, Daniel P.; McLain, Hannah L.; Noble, Sarah K.; Gibson, Everett K.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the amino acid content of seven lunar regolith samples returned by the Apollo 16 and Apollo 17 missions and stored under NASA curation since collection using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Consistent with results from initial analyses shortly after collection in the 1970s, we observed amino acids at low concentrations in all of the curated samples, ranging from 0.2 parts-per-billion (ppb) to 42.7 ppb in hot-water extracts and 14.5-651.1 ppb in 6 M HCl acid-vapor-hydrolyzed, hot-water extracts. Amino acids identified in the Apollo soil extracts include glycine, D- and L-alanine, D- and L-aspartic acid, D- and L-glutamic acid, D- and L-serine, L-threonine, and L-valine, all of which had previously been detected in lunar samples, as well as several compounds not previously identified in lunar regoliths: α-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), D- and L-β-amino-n-butyric acid (β-ABA), DL-α-amino-n-butyric acid, γ-amino-n-butyric acid, β-alanine, and ε-amino-n-caproic acid. We observed an excess of the L enantiomer in most of the detected proteinogenic amino acids, but racemic alanine and racemic β-ABA were present in some samples. We also examined seven samples from Apollo 15, 16, and 17 that had been previously allocated to a non-curation laboratory, as well as two samples of terrestrial dunite from studies of lunar module engine exhaust that had been stored in the same laboratory. The amino acid content of these samples suggested that contamination had occurred during non-curatorial storage. We measured the compound-specific carbon isotopic ratios of glycine, β-alanine, and L-alanine in Apollo regolith sample 70011 and found values of -21‰ to -33‰. These values are consistent with those seen in terrestrial biology and, together with the enantiomeric compositions of the proteinogenic amino acids, suggest that terrestrial biological contamination is a primary source of the

  20. Post-Irradiation Study of the Alanine Dosimeter

    PubMed Central

    Desrosiers, Marc F.

    2014-01-01

    Post-irradiation stability of high-dose dosimeters has traditionally been an important measurement influence quantity. Though the exceptional stability of the alanine dosimeter response with time has rendered this factor a non-issue for routine work, the archival quality of the alanine dosimeter has not been characterized. Here the alanine pellet dosimeter response is measured up to seven years post-irradiation for a range of absorbed doses. This long-term study is accompanied by an examination of the environmental influence quantities (e.g., ambient light) on the relatively short-term (3–4 month) stability of both pellet and film commercial dosimeters. Both dosimeter types demonstrated exceptional stability in the short term and proved to be relatively insensitive to common influence quantities. The long-term data revealed a complex dose-dependent response trend. PMID:26601033

  1. Morphosynthesis of alanine mesocrystals by pH control.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yurong; Cölfen, Helmut; Antonietti, Markus

    2006-06-01

    Crystallization of DL-alanine is studied as a single polymorph model case to analyze the different modes of crystallization of polar organic molecules in absence of any structure directing additives. Depending on supersaturation, which is controlled either by temperature or by pH, and in the absence of additives, crystallization by mesoscale assembly of nanoparticles is found over a wide range of conditions, leading to so-called mesocrystals. This supplements the classical molecule-based crystallization mechanism, which is identified at lower supersaturations and at pH values away from the isoelectric point (IEP). The resulting alanine crystals are characterized by SEM, XRD, and single-crystal analysis. Time-resolved conductivity measurements and dynamic light scattering of the reaction solutions reveal information about precursor structures and reaction kinetics. A formation mechanism is proposed for the alanine mesocrystals. PMID:16771332

  2. First-principles studies of pure and fluorine substituted alanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Sardar; Vaizie, Hamide; Rahnamaye Aliabad, H. A.; Ahmad, Rashid; Khan, Imad; Ali, Zahid; Jalali-Asadabadi, S.; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Khan, Amir Abdullah

    2016-05-01

    This paper communicates the structural, electronic and optical properties of L-alanine, monofluoro and difluoro substituted alanines using density functional calculations. These compounds exist in orthorhombic crystal structure and the calculated structural parameters such as lattice constants, bond angles and bond lengths are in agreement with the experimental results. L-alanine is an indirect band gap insulator, while its fluorine substituted compounds (monofluoroalanine and difluoroalanine) are direct band gap insulators. The substitution causes reduction in the band gap and hence these optically tailored direct wide band gap materials have enhanced optical properties in the ultraviolet (UV) region of electromagnetic spectrum. Therefore, optical properties like dielectric function, refractive index, reflectivity and energy loss function are also investigated. These compounds have almost isotropic nature in the lower frequency range while at higher energies, they have a significant anisotropic nature.

  3. Tolerance of Arc repressor to multiple-alanine substitutions.

    PubMed

    Brown, B M; Sauer, R T

    1999-03-01

    Arc repressor mutants containing from three to 15 multiple-alanine substitutions have spectral properties expected for native Arc proteins, form heterodimers with wild-type Arc, denature cooperatively with Tms equal to or greater than wild type, and, in some cases, fold as much as 30-fold faster and unfold as much as 50-fold slower than wild type. Two of the mutants, containing a total of 14 different substitutions, also footprint operator DNA in vitro. The stability of some of the proteins with multiple-alanine mutations is significantly greater than that predicted from the sum of the single substitutions, suggesting that a subset of the wild-type residues in Arc may interact in an unfavorable fashion. Overall, these results show that almost half of the residues in Arc can be replaced by alanine en masse without compromising the ability of this small, homodimeric protein to fold into a stable, native-like structure. PMID:10051581

  4. Glutathione transferases in the bioactivation of azathioprine.

    PubMed

    Modén, Olof; Mannervik, Bengt

    2014-01-01

    The prodrug azathioprine is primarily used for maintaining remission in inflammatory bowel disease, but approximately 30% of the patients suffer adverse side effects. The prodrug is activated by glutathione conjugation and release of 6-mercaptopurine, a reaction most efficiently catalyzed by glutathione transferase (GST) A2-2. Among five genotypes of GST A2-2, the variant A2*E has threefold-fourfold higher catalytic efficiency with azathioprine, suggesting that the expression of A2*E could boost 6-mercaptopurine release and adverse side effects in treated patients. Structure-activity studies of the GST A2-2 variants and homologous alpha class GSTs were made to delineate the determinants of high catalytic efficiency compared to other alpha class GSTs. Engineered chimeras identified GST peptide segments of importance, and replacing the corresponding regions in low-activity GSTs by these short segments produced chimeras with higher azathioprine activity. By contrast, H-site mutagenesis led to decreased azathioprine activity when active-site positions 208 and 213 in these favored segments were mutagenized. Alternative substitutions indicated that hydrophobic residues were favored. A pertinent question is whether variant A2*E represents the highest azathioprine activity achievable within the GST structural framework. This issue was addressed by mutagenesis of H-site residues assumed to interact with the substrate based on molecular modeling. The mutants with notably enhanced activities had small or polar residues in the mutated positions. The most active mutant L107G/L108D/F222H displayed a 70-fold enhanced catalytic efficiency with azathioprine. The determination of its structure by X-ray crystallography showed an expanded H-site, suggesting improved accommodation of the transition state for catalysis.

  5. GMXPBSA 2.1: A GROMACS tool to perform MM/PBSA and computational alanine scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paissoni, C.; Spiliotopoulos, D.; Musco, G.; Spitaleri, A.

    2015-01-01

    GMXPBSA 2.1 is a user-friendly suite of Bash/Perl scripts for streamlining MM/PBSA calculations on structural ensembles derived from GROMACS trajectories, to automatically calculate binding free energies for protein-protein or ligand-protein complexes [R.T. Bradshaw et al., Protein Eng. Des. Sel. 24 (2011) 197-207]. GMXPBSA 2.1 is flexible and can easily be customized to specific needs and it is an improvement of the previous GMXPBSA 2.0 [C. Paissoni et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. (2014), 185, 2920-2929]. Additionally, it performs computational alanine scanning (CAS) to study the effects of ligand and/or receptor alanine mutations on the free energy of binding. Calculations require only for protein-protein or protein-ligand MD simulations. GMXPBSA 2.1 performs different comparative analyses, including a posteriori generation of alanine mutants of the wild-type complex, calculation of the binding free energy values of the mutant complexes and comparison of the results with the wild-type system. Moreover, it compares the binding free energy of different complex trajectories, allowing the study of the effects of non-alanine mutations, post-translational modifications or unnatural amino acids on the binding free energy of the system under investigation. Finally, it can calculate and rank relative affinity to the same receptor utilizing MD simulations of proteins in complex with different ligands. In order to dissect the different MM/PBSA energy contributions, including molecular mechanic (MM), electrostatic contribution to solvation (PB) and nonpolar contribution to solvation (SA), the tool combines two freely available programs: the MD simulations software GROMACS [S. Pronk et al., Bioinformatics 29 (2013) 845-854] and the Poisson-Boltzmann equation solver APBS [N.A. Baker et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A 98 (2001) 10037-10041]. All the calculations can be performed in single or distributed automatic fashion on a cluster facility in order to increase the

  6. Plasma amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    All measurements are in micromole per liter (micro mol/L). Normal values may vary between different laboratories. Talk to your health care provider about your specific test results. Alanine Children: 200 ...

  7. Serum gamma glutamyl transferase as a specific indicator of bile duct lesions in the rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, T. B.; Neptun, D. A.; Popp, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Serum gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), a marker of hepatic injury used extensively in humans, has been used rarely in rats because its specificity has not been previously defined. Studies were designed for investigation of the specificity of serum GGT activity with the use of cell type specific hepatotoxicants in Fischer 344 rats. Single necrogenic doses of CCl4, allyl alcohol (AA), and alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT) were used to produce cell specific injury in centrilobular hepatocytes, periportal hepatocytes, and bile duct cells, respectively. Administration of CCl4 markedly increased serum activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (AP), and serum bile acid concentrations within 24 hours but had no effect on serum GGT activity. ANIT treatment increased serum GGT and AP activities and bile acid concentration 24 hours following administration. Allyl alcohol administration increased serum ALT activity but had no effect on GGT activity. Administration of ANIT in the diet at 0.01%, 0.022%, 0.047%, and 0.1% for 2, 4, and 6 weeks produced dose- and time-dependent increases in serum GGT activity which strongly correlated with quantitative increases in hepatic bile duct volume, which was determined morphometrically. These observations support the use of serum GGT activity in the rat as diagnostic of bile duct cell necrosis when increases are detected shortly after the insult and as an indicator of possible bile duct hyperplasia. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:6147091

  8. Serum gamma glutamyl transferase as a specific indicator of bile duct lesions in the rat liver.

    PubMed

    Leonard, T B; Neptun, D A; Popp, J A

    1984-08-01

    Serum gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), a marker of hepatic injury used extensively in humans, has been used rarely in rats because its specificity has not been previously defined. Studies were designed for investigation of the specificity of serum GGT activity with the use of cell type specific hepatotoxicants in Fischer 344 rats. Single necrogenic doses of CCl4, allyl alcohol (AA), and alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT) were used to produce cell specific injury in centrilobular hepatocytes, periportal hepatocytes, and bile duct cells, respectively. Administration of CCl4 markedly increased serum activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (AP), and serum bile acid concentrations within 24 hours but had no effect on serum GGT activity. ANIT treatment increased serum GGT and AP activities and bile acid concentration 24 hours following administration. Allyl alcohol administration increased serum ALT activity but had no effect on GGT activity. Administration of ANIT in the diet at 0.01%, 0.022%, 0.047%, and 0.1% for 2, 4, and 6 weeks produced dose- and time-dependent increases in serum GGT activity which strongly correlated with quantitative increases in hepatic bile duct volume, which was determined morphometrically. These observations support the use of serum GGT activity in the rat as diagnostic of bile duct cell necrosis when increases are detected shortly after the insult and as an indicator of possible bile duct hyperplasia. PMID:6147091

  9. Structural insights into the dehydroascorbate reductase activity of human omega-class glutathione transferases.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huina; Brock, Joseph; Liu, Dan; Board, Philip G; Oakley, Aaron J

    2012-07-13

    The reduction of dehydroascorbate (DHA) to ascorbic acid (AA) is a vital cellular function. The omega-class glutathione transferases (GSTs) catalyze several reductive reactions in cellular biochemistry, including DHA reduction. In humans, two isozymes (GSTO1-1 and GSTO2-2) with significant DHA reductase (DHAR) activity are found, sharing 64% sequence identity. While the activity of GSTO2-2 is higher, it is significantly more unstable in vitro. We report the first crystal structures of human GSTO2-2, stabilized through site-directed mutagenesis and determined at 1.9 Å resolution in the presence and absence of glutathione (GSH). The structure of a human GSTO1-1 has been determined at 1.7 Å resolution in complex with the reaction product AA, which unexpectedly binds in the G-site, where the glutamyl moiety of GSH binds. The structure suggests a similar mode of ascorbate binding in GSTO2-2. This is the first time that a non-GSH-based reaction product has been observed in the G-site of any GST. AA stacks against a conserved aromatic residue, F34 (equivalent to Y34 in GSTO2-2). Mutation of Y34 to alanine in GSTO2-2 eliminates DHAR activity. From these structures and other biochemical data, we propose a mechanism of substrate binding and catalysis of DHAR activity.

  10. Amino acids derived from Titan Tholins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, Bishun N.; Sagan, Carl; Ogino, Hiroshi; Nagy, Bartholomew; Er, Cevat; Schram, Karl H.; Arakawa, Edward T.

    1986-10-01

    An organic heteropolymer(Titan tholin) was produced by continuous dc discharge through a 0.9 N 2/0.1 CH 4 gas mixture at 0.2 mbar pressure, roughly simulating the cloudtop atmosphere of Titan. Treatment of this tholin with 6 N HCI yielded 16 amino acids by gas chromatography after derivazation to N-trifluroacetyl isopropyl esters on two different capillary columns. Identifications were confirmed by GC/MS. Glycine, aspartic acid, and α- and β-alanine were produced in greatest abundance; the total yield of amino acids was ˜ 10 -2, approximately equal to the yield of urea. The presence of "nonbiological" amino acids, the absence of serine, and the fact that the amino acids are racemic within experimental error together indicate that these molecules are not due to microbial or other contamination, but are derived from the tholin. In addition to the HCN, HC 2CN, and (CN) 2 found by Voyager, nitriles and aminonitriles should be sought in the Titanian atmosphere and, eventually, amino acids on the surface. These results suggest that episodes of liquid water in the past or future of Titan might lead to major further steps in prebiological organic chemistry on that body.

  11. Amino acids derived from Titan tholins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, B. N.; Sagan, C.; Ogino, H.; Nagy, B.; Er, C.; Schram, K. H.; Arakawa, E. T.

    1986-01-01

    An organic heteropolymer (Titan tholin) was produced by continuous dc discharge through a 0.9 N2/0.1 CH4 gas mixture at 0.2 mbar pressure, roughly simulating the cloudtop atmosphere of Titan. Treatment of this tholin with 6N HCl yielded 16 amino acids by gas chromatography after derivatization of N-trifluroacetyl isopropyl esters on two different capillary columns. Identifications were confirmed by GC/MS. Glycine, aspartic acid, and alpha- and beta-alanine were produced in greatest abundance; the total yield of amino acids was approximately 10(-2), approximately equal to the yield of urea. The presence of "nonbiological" amino acids, the absence of serine, and the fact that the amino acids are racemic within experimental error together indicate that these molecules are not due to microbial or other contamination, but are derived from the tholin. In addition to the HCN, HC2CN, and (CN)2 found by Voyager, nitriles and aminonitriles should be sought in the Titanian atmosphere and, eventually, amino acids on the surface. These results suggest that episodes of liquid water in the past or future of Titan might lead to major further steps in prebiological organic chemistry on that body.

  12. Stereoselective aminoacylation of a dinucleoside monophosphate by the imidazolides of DL-alanine and N-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)-DL-alanine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Profy, A. T.; Usher, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The aminoacylation of diinosine monophosphate was studied experimentally. When the acylating agent was the imidazolide of N-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)-DL-alanine, a 40 percent enantiomeric excess of the isomer was incorporated at the 2' site and the positions of equilibrium for the reversible 2'-3' migration reaction differed for the D and L enantiomers. The reactivity of the nucleoside hydroxyl groups was found to decrease on the order 2'(3') less than internal 2' and less than 5', and the extent of the reaction was affected by the concentration of the imidazole buffer. Reaction of IpI with imidazolide of unprotected DL-alanine, by contrast, led to an excess of the D isomer at the internal 2' site. Finally, reaction with the N-carboxy anhydride of DL-alanine occurred without stereoselection. These results are found to be relevant to the study of the evolution of optical chemical activity and the origin of genetically directed protein synthesis.

  13. STT3, a highly conserved protein required for yeast oligosaccharyl transferase activity in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Zufferey, R; Knauer, R; Burda, P; Stagljar, I; te Heesen, S; Lehle, L; Aebi, M

    1995-01-01

    N-linked glycosylation is a ubiquitous protein modification, and is essential for viability in eukaryotic cells. A lipid-linked core-oligosaccharide is assembled at the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum and transferred to selected asparagine residues of nascent polypeptide chains by the oligosaccharyl transferase (OTase) complex. Based on the synthetic lethal phenotype of double mutations affecting the assembly of the lipid-linked core-oligosaccharide and the OTase activity, we have performed a novel screen for mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with altered N-linked glycosylation. Besides novel mutants deficient in the assembly of the lipid-linked oligosaccharide (alg mutants), we identified the STT3 locus as being required for OTase activity in vivo. The essential STT3 protein is approximately 60% identical in amino acid sequence to its human homologue. A mutation in the STT3 locus affects substrate specificity of the OTase complex in vivo and in vitro. In stt3-3 cells very little glycosyl transfer occurs from incomplete lipid-linked oligosaccharide, whereas the transfer of full-length Glc3Man9GlcNAc2 is hardly affected as compared with wild-type cells. Depletion of the STT3 protein results in loss of transferase activity in vivo and a deficiency in the assembly of OTase complex. Images PMID:7588624

  14. Forced swimming and imipramine modify plasma and brain amino acid concentrations in mice.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tatsuro; Yamane, Haruka; Tomonaga, Shozo; Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2009-01-01

    The relationships between monoamine metabolism and forced swimming or antidepressants have been well studied, however information is lacking regarding amino acid metabolism under these conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of forced swimming and imipramine on amino acid concentrations in plasma, the cerebral cortex and the hypothalamus in mice. Forced swimming caused cerebral cortex concentrations of L-glutamine, L-alanine, and taurine to be increased, while imipramine treatment caused decreased concentrations of L-glutamate, L-alanine, L-tyrosine, L-methionine, and L-ornithine. In the hypothalamus, forced swimming decreased the concentration of L-serine while imipramine treatment caused increased concentration of beta-alanine. Forced swimming caused increased plasma concentration of taurine, while concentrations of L-serine, L-asparagine, L-glutamine and beta-alanine were decreased. Imipramine treatment caused increased plasma concentration of all amino acid, except for L-aspartate and taurine. In conclusion, forced swimming and imipramine treatment modify central and peripheral amino acid metabolism. These results may aid in the identification of amino acids that have antidepressant-like effects, or may help to refine the dosages of antidepressant drugs. PMID:19010319

  15. Deuterium Fractionation during Amino Acid Formation by Photolysis of Interstellar Ice Analogs Containing Deuterated Methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, Yasuhiro; Takano, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Naoki; Kouchi, Akira

    2016-08-01

    Deuterium (D) atoms in interstellar deuterated methanol might be distributed into complex organic molecules through molecular evolution by photochemical reactions in interstellar grains. In this study, we use a state-of-the-art high-resolution mass spectrometer coupled with a high-performance liquid chromatography system to quantitatively analyze amino acids and their deuterated isotopologues formed by the photolysis of interstellar ice analogs containing singly deuterated methanol CH2DOH at 10 K. Five amino acids (glycine, α-alanine, β-alanine, sarcosine, and serine) and their deuterated isotopologues whose D atoms are bound to carbon atoms are detected in organic residues formed by photolysis followed by warming up to room temperature. The abundances of singly deuterated amino acids are in the range of 0.3–1.1 relative to each nondeuterated counterpart, and the relative abundances of doubly and triply deuterated species decrease with an increasing number of D atoms in a molecule. The abundances of amino acids increase by a factor of more than five upon the hydrolysis of the organic residues, leading to decreases in the relative abundances of deuterated species for α-alanine and β-alanine. On the other hand, the relative abundances of the deuterated isotopologues of the other three amino acids did not decrease upon hydrolysis, indicating different formation mechanisms of these two groups upon hydrolysis. The present study facilitates both qualitative and quantitative evaluations of D fractionation during molecular evolution in the interstellar medium.

  16. Deuterium Fractionation during Amino Acid Formation by Photolysis of Interstellar Ice Analogs Containing Deuterated Methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, Yasuhiro; Takano, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Naoki; Kouchi, Akira

    2016-08-01

    Deuterium (D) atoms in interstellar deuterated methanol might be distributed into complex organic molecules through molecular evolution by photochemical reactions in interstellar grains. In this study, we use a state-of-the-art high-resolution mass spectrometer coupled with a high-performance liquid chromatography system to quantitatively analyze amino acids and their deuterated isotopologues formed by the photolysis of interstellar ice analogs containing singly deuterated methanol CH2DOH at 10 K. Five amino acids (glycine, α-alanine, β-alanine, sarcosine, and serine) and their deuterated isotopologues whose D atoms are bound to carbon atoms are detected in organic residues formed by photolysis followed by warming up to room temperature. The abundances of singly deuterated amino acids are in the range of 0.3-1.1 relative to each nondeuterated counterpart, and the relative abundances of doubly and triply deuterated species decrease with an increasing number of D atoms in a molecule. The abundances of amino acids increase by a factor of more than five upon the hydrolysis of the organic residues, leading to decreases in the relative abundances of deuterated species for α-alanine and β-alanine. On the other hand, the relative abundances of the deuterated isotopologues of the other three amino acids did not decrease upon hydrolysis, indicating different formation mechanisms of these two groups upon hydrolysis. The present study facilitates both qualitative and quantitative evaluations of D fractionation during molecular evolution in the interstellar medium.

  17. Dipeptide Nanotubes Containing Unnatural Fluorine-Substituted β(2,3)-Diarylamino Acid and L-Alanine as Candidates for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Andrea; Pellegrino, Sara; Das, Priyadip; Yuran, Sivan; Bucci, Raffaella; Ferri, Nicola; Meneghetti, Fiorella; Castellano, Carlo; Reches, Meital; Gelmi, Maria Luisa

    2015-09-18

    The synthesis and the structural characterization of dipeptides composed of unnatural fluorine-substituted β(2,3)-diarylamino acid and L-alanine are reported. Depending on the stereochemistry of the β amino acid, these dipeptides are able to self-assemble into proteolytic stable nanotubes. These architectures were able to enter the cell and locate in the cytoplasmic/perinuclear region and represent interesting candidates for biomedical applications.

  18. GMXPBSA 2.0: A GROMACS tool to perform MM/PBSA and computational alanine scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paissoni, C.; Spiliotopoulos, D.; Musco, G.; Spitaleri, A.

    2014-11-01

    GMXPBSA 2.0 is a user-friendly suite of Bash/Perl scripts for streamlining MM/PBSA calculations on structural ensembles derived from GROMACS trajectories, to automatically calculate binding free energies for protein-protein or ligand-protein complexes. GMXPBSA 2.0 is flexible and can easily be customized to specific needs. Additionally, it performs computational alanine scanning (CAS) to study the effects of ligand and/or receptor alanine mutations on the free energy of binding. Calculations require only for protein-protein or protein-ligand MD simulations. GMXPBSA 2.0 performs different comparative analysis, including a posteriori generation of alanine mutants of the wild-type complex, calculation of the binding free energy values of the mutant complexes and comparison of the results with the wild-type system. Moreover, it compares the binding free energy of different complexes trajectories, allowing the study the effects of non-alanine mutations, post-translational modifications or unnatural amino acids on the binding free energy of the system under investigation. Finally, it can calculate and rank relative affinity to the same receptor utilizing MD simulations of proteins in complex with different ligands. In order to dissect the different MM/PBSA energy contributions, including molecular mechanic (MM), electrostatic contribution to solvation (PB) and nonpolar contribution to solvation (SA), the tool combines two freely available programs: the MD simulations software GROMACS and the Poisson-Boltzmann equation solver APBS. All the calculations can be performed in single or distributed automatic fashion on a cluster facility in order to increase the calculation by dividing frames across the available processors. The program is freely available under the GPL license. Catalogue identifier: AETQ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETQ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing

  19. Amino acid abundances and stereochemistry in hydrothermally altered sediments from the Juan de Fuca Ridge, northeastern Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Andersson, E; Simoneit, B R; Holm, N G

    2000-09-01

    The Juan de Fuca Ridge is a hydrothermally active, sediment covered, spreading ridge situated a few hundred kilometres off the west coast of North America in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. Sediments from seven sites drilled during the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Legs 139 and 168 were analyzed for total hydrolyzable amino acids (THAA), individual amino acid distributions, total organic C (TOC) and total N (TN) contents. The aim was to evaluate the effects of hydrothermal stress on the decomposition and transformation of sedimentary amino acids. Hydrolyzable amino acids account for up to 3.3% of the total organic C content and up to 12% of the total N content of the upper sediments. The total amounts of amino acids decrease significantly with depth in all drilled holes. This trend is particularly pronounced in holes with a thermal gradient of around 0.6 degrees C/m or higher. The most abundant amino acids in shallow sediments are glycine, alanine, lysine, glutamic acid, valine and histidine. The changes in amino acid distributions in low temperature holes are characterized by increased relative abundances of non-protein beta-alanine and gamma-aminobutyric acid. In high temperature holes the amino acid compositions are characterized by high abundances of glycine, alanine, serine, ornithine and histidine at depth. D/L ratios of samples with amino acid distributions similar to those found in acid hydrolysates of kerogen, indicate that racemization rates of amino acids bound by condensation reactions may be diminished.

  20. [Regulation of key enzymes of L-alanine biosynthesis by Brevibacterium flavum producer strains].

    PubMed

    Melkonian, L O; Avetisova, G E; Ambartsumian, A A; Chakhalian, A Kh; Sagian, A S

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms of L-alanine overproduction by Brevibacterium flavum producer strains were studied. It was shown that beta-CI-L-alanine is an inhibitor of some key enzymes involved in the synthesis of L-alanine, including alanine transaminase and valine-pyruvate transaminase. Two highly active B. flavum GL1 and GL1 8 producer strains, which are resistant to the inhibitory effect of beta-Cl-L-alanine, were obtained using a parental B. flavum AA5 producer strain, characterized by a reduced activity of alanine racemase (>or=98%). It was demonstrated that the increased L-alanine synthesis efficiency observed in the producer strains developed in this work is associated with the absence of inhibition of alanine transaminase by the end product of the biosynthesis reaction, as well as with the effect of derepression of both alanine transaminase and valine-pyruvate transaminase synthesis by the studied compound.

  1. Oligomerization of glycine and alanine on metal(II) octacynaomolybdate(IV): role of double metal cyanides in prebiotic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anand; Kamaluddin

    2012-12-01

    Condensation reactions of amino acid (glycine and alanine) on the surface of metal(II) octacyanomolybdate(IV) (MOCMo) complexes are investigated using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and electron spray ionizations-mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS). The series of MOCMo have been synthesized and the effect of outer sphere metal ions present in the MOCMo on the oligomerization of glycine and alanine at different temperature and time found out. Formation of peptides was observed to start after 7 days at 60 °C. Maximum yield of peptides was found after 35 days at 90 °C. It has been found that zinc(II) octacyanomolybdate(IV) and cobalt(II) were the most effective metal cations present in outer sphere of the MOCMo for the production of high yield of oligomerized products. Surface area of MOCMo seems to play dominating parameter for the oligomerization of alanine and glycine. The results of the present study reveal the role of MOCMo in chemical evolution for the oligomerization of biomolecules.

  2. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... defects & other health conditions > Amino acid metabolism disorders Amino acid metabolism disorders E-mail to a friend Please ... baby’s newborn screening may include testing for certain amino acid metabolism disorders. These are rare health conditions that ...

  3. Electrostatic study of Alanine mutational effects on transcription: application to GATA-3:DNA interaction complex.

    PubMed

    El-Assaad, Atlal; Dawy, Zaher; Nemer, Georges

    2015-01-01

    Protein-DNA interaction is of fundamental importance in molecular biology, playing roles in functions as diverse as DNA transcription, DNA structure formation, and DNA repair. Protein-DNA association is also important in medicine; understanding Protein-DNA binding kinetics can assist in identifying disease root causes which can contribute to drug development. In this perspective, this work focuses on the transcription process by the GATA Transcription Factor (TF). GATA TF binds to DNA promoter region represented by `G,A,T,A' nucleotides sequence, and initiates transcription of target genes. When proper regulation fails due to some mutations on the GATA TF protein sequence or on the DNA promoter sequence (weak promoter), deregulation of the target genes might lead to various disorders. In this study, we aim to understand the electrostatic mechanism behind GATA TF and DNA promoter interactions, in order to predict Protein-DNA binding in the presence of mutations, while elaborating on non-covalent binding kinetics. To generate a family of mutants for the GATA:DNA complex, we replaced every charged amino acid, one at a time, with a neutral amino acid like Alanine (Ala). We then applied Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatic calculations feeding into free energy calculations, for each mutation. These calculations delineate the contribution to binding from each Ala-replaced amino acid in the GATA:DNA interaction. After analyzing the obtained data in view of a two-step model, we are able to identify potential key amino acids in binding. Finally, we applied the model to GATA-3:DNA (crystal structure with PDB-ID: 3DFV) binding complex and validated it against experimental results from the literature. PMID:26737172

  4. Eating a healthy lunch improves serum alanine aminotransferase activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nutritional guidance and diet control play important roles in the treatment of obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver. However, in Japan, nutritional guidance is difficult to provide in practice. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of providing the ‘once-a-day’ intervention of a healthy lunch on various metabolic parameters. Methods For a 1-month preparatory period, 10 subjects generally consumed the lunches that were provided by the worksite cafeteria. This was followed by a 1-week washout period, after which, the subjects consumed healthy, low-calorie, well-balanced lunches for a 1-month test period. After the preparatory and test periods, blood samples were obtained from all subjects. The serum levels of indices relevant to metabolic syndrome and fatty liver were measured. Results Serum alanine aminotransferase activity significantly decreased by 20.3% after the healthy intervention. However, the indices of metabolic syndrome did not significantly change. Analysis of the relationship between serum alanine aminotransferase activity and nutrient content indicated that the improvement of serum alanine aminotransferase status was due to the higher vegetable content and lower animal-source protein of the meals provided. Conclusions In summary, the ‘once-a-day’ intervention of providing a healthy lunch improved serum alanine aminotransferase status. A diet high in vegetables and low in animal-based protein is important in maintaining a healthy condition. PMID:24034595

  5. Formation of {gamma}-alumina nanorods in presence of alanine

    SciTech Connect

    Dabbagh, Hossein A.; Rasti, Elham; Yalfani, Mohammad S.; Medina, Francesc

    2011-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Nanorod aluminas with a possible hexagonal symmetry, high surface area and relatively narrow pore size distribution were obtained. Research highlights: {yields} Research highlights {yields} Boehmite was prepared using a green sol-gel process in the presence of alanine. {yields} Nanorod aluminas with a high surface area were obtained. {yields} Addition of alanine would shape the size of the holes and crevices. {yields} The morphologies of the nanorods were revealed by transmission electron microscope. -- Abstract: Boehmite and alumina nanostructures were prepared using a simple green sol-gel process in the presence of alanine in water medium at room temperature. The uncalcined (dried at 200 {sup o}C) and the calcined materials (at 500, 600 and 700 {sup o}C for 4 h) were characterized using XRD, TEM, SEM, N{sub 2} physisorption and TGA. Nanorod aluminas with a possible hexagonal symmetry, high surface area and relatively narrow pore size distribution were obtained. The surface area was enhanced and crystallization was retarded as the alanine content increased. The morphologies of the nanoparticles and nanorods were revealed by a transmission electron microscope (TEM).

  6. Spectrophotometric readout for an alanine dosimeter for food irradiation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebraheem, S.; Beshir, W. B.; Eid, S.; Sobhy, R.; Kovács, A.

    2003-06-01

    The alanine-electron spin resonance (EPR) readout system is well known as a reference and transfer dosimetry system for the evaluation of high doses in radiation processing. The high cost of an EPR/alanine dosimetry system is a serious handicap for large-scale routine application in irradiation facilities. In this study, the use of a complex produced by dissolving irradiated L-alanine in 1,4-phenyl diammonium dichloride solution was investigated for dosimetry purposes. This complex—having a purple colour—has an increasing absorbance with increasing dose in the range of 1-20 kGy. The applicability of spectrophotometric evaluation was studied by measuring the absorbance intensity of this complex at 360 and 505 nm, respectively. Fluorimetric evaluation was also investigated by measuring the emission of the complex at 435 nm as a function of dose. The present method is easy for routine application. The effect of the dye concentration as well as the suitable amount of irradiated alanine has been studied. With respect to routine application, the stability of the product complex after its formation was also investigated.

  7. Subcritical Water Extraction of Amino Acids from Atacama Desert Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amashukeli, Xenia; Pelletier, Christine C.; Kirby, James P.; Grunthaner, Frank J.

    2007-01-01

    Amino acids are considered organic molecular indicators in the search for extant and extinct life in the Solar System. Extraction of these molecules from a particulate solid matrix, such as Martian regolith, will be critical to their in situ detection and analysis. The goals of this study were to optimize a laboratory amino acid extraction protocol by quantitatively measuring the yields of extracted amino acids as a function of liquid water temperature and sample extraction time and to compare the results to the standard HCl vapor- phase hydrolysis yields for the same soil samples. Soil samples from the Yungay region of the Atacama Desert ( Martian regolith analog) were collected during a field study in the summer of 2005. The amino acids ( alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycine, serine, and valine) chosen for analysis were present in the samples at concentrations of 1 - 70 parts- per- billion. Subcritical water extraction efficiency was examined over the temperature range of 30 - 325 degrees C, at pressures of 17.2 or 20.0 MPa, and for water- sample contact equilibration times of 0 - 30 min. None of the amino acids were extracted in detectable amounts at 30 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), suggesting that amino acids are too strongly bound by the soil matrix to be extracted at such a low temperature. Between 150 degrees C and 250 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), the extraction efficiencies of glycine, alanine, and valine were observed to increase with increasing water temperature, consistent with higher solubility at higher temperatures, perhaps due to the decreasing dielectric constant of water. Amino acids were not detected in extracts collected at 325 degrees C ( at 20.0 MPa), probably due to amino acid decomposition at this temperature. The optimal subcritical water extraction conditions for these amino acids from Atacama Desert soils were achieved at 200 degrees C, 17.2 MPa, and a water- sample contact equilibration time of 10 min.

  8. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of latent alkylating agents activated by glutathione S-transferase.

    PubMed

    Satyam, A; Hocker, M D; Kane-Maguire, K A; Morgan, A S; Villar, H O; Lyttle, M H

    1996-04-12

    In search of compounds with improved specificity for targeting the important cancer-associated P1-1 glutathione S-transferase (GST) isozyme, new analogs 4 and 5 of the previously reported glutathione S-transferase (GST)-activated latent alkylating agent gamma-glutamyl-alpha-amino-beta-[[[2-[[bis[bis(2-chloroethyl)amino]ph osp horyl]oxy]ethyl]sulfonyl]propionyl]-(R)-(-)-phenylglycine (3) have been designed, synthesized, and evaluated. One of the diastereomers of 4 exhibited good selectivity for GST P1-1. The tetrabromo analog 5 of the tetrachloro compound 3 maintained its specificity and was found to be more readily activated by GSTs than 3. The GST activation concept was further broadened through design, synthesis, and evaluation of a novel latent urethane mustard 8 and its diethyl ester 9. Interestingly, 8 showed very good specificity for P1-1 GST. Cell culture studies were carried out on 4, 5, 8, and 9 using cell lines engineered to have varying levels of GST P1-1 isozyme. New analogs 4 and 5 exhibited increased toxicity to cell lines with overexpressed GST P1-1 isozyme. The urethane mustard 8 and its diethyl ester 9 were found to be not as toxic. However, they too exhibited more toxicity to a cell line engineered to have elevated P1-1 levels, which was in agreement with the observed in vitro specificity of 8 for P1-1 GST isozyme. Mechanistic studies on alkaline as well as enzyme-catalyzed decomposition of latent mustard 3 provided experimental proof for the hypothesis that 3 breaks down into an active phosphoramidate mustard and a reactive vinyl sulfone. The alkylating nature of the decomposition products was further demonstrated by trapping those transient species as relatively stable diethyldithiocarbamic acid adducts. These results substantially extend previous efforts to develop drugs targeting GST and provide a paradigm for development of other latent drugs. PMID:8648613

  9. The unresolved puzzle why alanine extensions cause disease.

    PubMed

    Winter, Reno; Liebold, Jens; Schwarz, Elisabeth

    2013-08-01

    The prospective increase in life expectancy will be accompanied by a rise in the number of elderly people who suffer from ill health caused by old age. Many diseases caused by aging are protein misfolding diseases. The molecular mechanisms underlying these disorders receive constant scientific interest. In addition to old age, mutations also cause congenital protein misfolding disorders. Chorea Huntington, one of the most well-known examples, is caused by triplet extensions that can lead to more than 100 glutamines in the N-terminal region of huntingtin, accompanied by huntingtin aggregation. So far, nine disease-associated triplet extensions have also been described for alanine codons. The extensions lead primarily to skeletal malformations. Eight of these proteins represent transcription factors, while the nuclear poly-adenylate binding protein 1, PABPN1, is an RNA binding protein. Additional alanines in PABPN1 lead to the disease oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). The alanine extension affects the N-terminal domain of the protein, which has been shown to lack tertiary contacts. Biochemical analyses of the N-terminal domain revealed an alanine-dependent fibril formation. However, fibril formation of full-length protein did not recapitulate the findings of the N-terminal domain. Fibril formation of intact PABPN1 was independent of the alanine segment, and the fibrils displayed biochemical properties that were completely different from those of the N-terminal domain. Although intranuclear inclusions have been shown to represent the histochemical hallmark of OPMD, their role in pathogenesis is currently unclear. Several cell culture and animal models have been generated to study the molecular processes involved in OPMD. These studies revealed a number of promising future therapeutic strategies that could one day improve the quality of life for the patients.

  10. Beta-alanine supplementation in high-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Harris, Roger C; Sale, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Glycolysis involves the oxidation of two neutral hydroxyl groups on each glycosyl (or glucosyl) unit metabolised, yielding two carboxylic acid groups. During low-intensity exercise these, along with the remainder of the carbon skeleton, are further oxidised to CO(2) and water. But during high-intensity exercise a major portion (and where blood flow is impaired, then most) is accumulated as lactate anions and H(+). The accumulation of H(+) has deleterious effects on muscle function, ultimately impairing force production and contributing to fatigue. Regulation of intracellular pH is achieved over time by export of H(+) out of the muscle, although physicochemical buffers in the muscle provide the first line of defence against H(+) accumulation. In order to be effective during high-intensity exercise, buffers need to be present in high concentrations in muscle and have pK(a)s within the intracellular exercise pH transit range. Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is ideal for this role given that it occurs in millimolar concentrations within the skeletal muscle and has a pK(a) of 6.83. Carnosine is a cytoplasmic dipeptide formed by bonding histidine and β-alanine in a reaction catalysed by carnosine synthase, although it is the availability of β-alanine, obtained in small amounts from hepatic synthesis and potentially in greater amounts from the diet that is limiting to synthesis. Increasing muscle carnosine through increased dietary intake of β-alanine will increase the intracellular buffering capacity, which in turn might be expected to increase high-intensity exercise capacity and performance where this is pH limited. In this study we review the role of muscle carnosine as an H(+) buffer, the regulation of muscle carnosine by β-alanine, and the available evidence relating to the effects of β-alanine supplementation on muscle carnosine synthesis and the subsequent effects of this on high-intensity exercise capacity and performance.

  11. Characterization of a broad-scope amino acid transport system in sand dollars

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.P.; Bellis, S.; Stephens, G.C. )

    1988-03-01

    Both echinoderm embryos and adults take up {sup 14}C-labelled-{alpha}-amino acids by an apparent broad-scope transport system. This transporter can be characterized as follows: alanine transport is not blocked by {alpha}-(methylamino)isobutyric acid. Leucine and other lipophilic neutral amino acids are preferentially transported. Transport is sodium dependent and blocked by 2-aminobicyclo-(2,2,1)heptane-2-carboxyclic acid. Lysine and aspartate transport is inhibited by lipophilic neutral amino acids. Taurine, a {beta}-neutral amino acid is translocated via a second and independent carrier.

  12. Amino acid transport in the intestine of the caiman.

    PubMed

    Coulson, R A; Hernandez, T

    1983-01-01

    Seventeen amino acids were fed singly to small caimans and the rates of their disappearance from the gut lumen, and of their appearance in intestinal mucosa, whole intestine, whole stomach, and plasma were determined. The results were compared with those in which massive amounts of protein were fed. When single amino acids were fed, only traces of arginine, ornithine, lysine, aspartate and asparagine were absorbed intact. Glycine, alanine and serine were absorbed rapidly reaching mucosal concentrations as high as 40 mM. The others were not concentrated as highly and most were absorbed by the mucosa more slowly than the glycine group. Protein feeding did not result in high amino acid concentrations in the mucosa. Whether amino acids were ingested as protein or in the free state, glycine, alanine and glutamine increased in the mucosa, suggesting these three incorporate nitrogen released from the others. It appeared that several transport systems operate if amino acids are given singly, and that a different more efficient transport system operates during protein digestion.

  13. Addition of amino acids and dipeptides to fullerene C{sub 60} giving rise to monoadducts

    SciTech Connect

    Romanova, V.S.; Tsyryapkin, V.A.; Vol`pin, M.E.

    1994-12-01

    The authors have developed a general method for the direct addition of amino acids and dipeptides of various structures to fullerene C{sub 60}. In all cases the addition involves the amino group. The reaction proceeds when the solutions of fullerene and an amino acid (or dipeptide) are mixed at 50-100 {degrees}C. The fullerene derivatives of the following amino acids and dipeptides have been obtained: glycine, p-aminobenzoic acid, {omega}-aminocaproic acid, L-proline, L-alanine, L-alanyl-Lalanine, D,L-alanyl-D,L-alanine, glycyl-L-valine. The adduct of methyl L-ananinate with C{sub 60} was also prepared.

  14. Irritable Bowel Syndrome May Be Associated with Elevated Alanine Aminotransferase and Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Hwa; Kim, Kwang-Min; Joo, Nam-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies have revealed close relationships between hepatic injury, metabolic pathways, and gut microbiota. The microorganisms in the intestine also cause irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The aim of this study was to examine whether IBS was associated with elevated hepatic enzyme [alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST)], gamma-glutamyl transferase (γ-GT) levels, and metabolic syndrome (MS). Materials and Methods This was a retrospective, cross-sectional, case-control study. The case and control groups comprised subjects who visited our health promotion center for general check-ups from June 2010 to December 2010. Of the 1127 initially screened subjects, 83 had IBS according to the Rome III criteria. The control group consisted of 260 age- and sex-matched subjects without IBS who visited our health promotion center during the same period. Results Compared to control subjects, patients with IBS showed significantly higher values of anthropometric parameters (body mass index, waist circumference), liver enzymes, γ-GT, and lipid levels. The prevalences of elevated ALT (16.9% vs. 7.7%; p=0.015) and γ-GT (24.1% vs. 11.5%; p=0.037) levels were significantly higher in patients with IBS than in control subjects. A statistically significant difference was observed in the prevalence of MS between controls and IBS patients (12.7% vs. 32.5%; p<0.001). The relationships between elevated ALT levels, MS, and IBS remained statistically significant after controlling for potential confounding factors. Conclusion On the basis of our study results, IBS may be an important condition in certain patients with elevated ALT levels and MS. PMID:26632395

  15. Thioltransferase activity of bovine lens glutathione S-transferase.

    PubMed Central

    Dal Monte, M; Cecconi, I; Buono, F; Vilardo, P G; Del Corso, A; Mura, U

    1998-01-01

    A Mu-class glutathione S-transferase purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from bovine lens displayed thioltransferase activity, catalysing the transthiolation reaction between GSH and hydroxyethyldisulphide. The thiol-transfer reaction is composed of two steps, the formation of GSSG occurring through the generation of an intermediate mixed disulphide between GSH and the target disulphide. Unlike glutaredoxin, which is only able to catalyse the second step of the transthiolation process, glutathioneS-transferase catalyses both steps of the reaction. Data are presented showing that bovine lens glutathione S-transferase and rat liver glutaredoxin, which was used as a thioltransferase enzyme model, can operate in synergy to catalyse the GSH-dependent reduction of hydroxyethyldisulphide. PMID:9693102

  16. Oligomerization of Glycine and Alanine Catalyzed by Iron Oxides: Implications for Prebiotic Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanker, Uma; Bhushan, Brij; Bhattacharjee, G.; Kamaluddin

    2012-02-01

    Iron oxide minerals are probable constituents of the sediments present in geothermal regions of the primitive earth. They might have adsorbed different organic monomers (amino acids, nucleotides etc.) and catalyzed polymerization processes leading to the formation of the first living cell. In the present work we tested the catalytic activity of three forms of iron oxides (Goethite, Akaganeite and Hematite) in the intermolecular condensation of each of the amino acids glycine and L-alanine. The effect of zinc oxide and titanium dioxide on the oligomerization has also been studied. Oligomerization studies were performed for 35 days at three different temperatures 50, 90 and 120°C without applying drying/wetting cycling. The products formed were characterized by HPLC and ESI-MS techniques. All three forms of iron oxides catalyzed peptide bond formation (23.2% of gly2 and 10.65% of ala2). The reaction was monitored every 7 days. Formation of peptides was observed to start after 7 days at 50°C. Maximum yield of peptides was found after 35 days at 90°C. Reaction at 120°C favors formation of diketopiperazine derivatives. It is also important to note that after 35 days of reaction, goethite produced dimer and trimer with the highest yield among the oxides tested. We suggest that the activity of goethite could probably be due to its high surface area and surface acidity.

  17. Anisotropy-Guided Enantiomeric Enhancement in AlanineUsing Far-UV Circularly Polarized Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinert, Cornelia; Cassam-Chenaï, Patrick; Jones, Nykola C.; Nahon, Laurent; Hoffmann, Søren V.; Meierhenrich, Uwe J.

    2015-06-01

    All life on Earth is characterized by its asymmetry - both the genetic material and proteins are composed of homochiral monomers. Understanding how this molecular asymmetry initially arose is a key question related to the origins of life. Cometary ice simulations, l-enantiomeric enriched amino acids in meteorites and the detection of circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation in star-forming regions point to a possible interstellar/protostellar generation of stereochemical asymmetry. Based upon our recently recorded anisotropy spectra g( λ) of amino acids in the vacuum-UV range, we subjected amorphous films of racemic 13C-alanine to far-UV circularly polarized synchrotron radiation to probe the asymmetric photon-molecule interaction under interstellar conditions. Optical purities of up to 4 % were reached, which correlate with our theoretical predictions. Importantly, we show that chiral symmetry breaking using circularly polarized light is dependent on both the helicity and the wavelength of incident light. In order to predict such stereocontrol, time-dependent density functional theory was used to calculate anisotropy spectra. The calculated anisotropy spectra show good agreement with the experimental ones. The European Space Agency's Rosetta mission, which successfully landed Philae on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on 12 November 2014, will investigate the configuration of chiral compounds and thereby obtain data that are to be interpreted in the context of the results presented here.

  18. Oligomerization of glycine and alanine catalyzed by iron oxides: implications for prebiotic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Shanker, Uma; Bhushan, Brij; Bhattacharjee, G; Kamaluddin

    2012-02-01

    Iron oxide minerals are probable constituents of the sediments present in geothermal regions of the primitive earth. They might have adsorbed different organic monomers (amino acids, nucleotides etc.) and catalyzed polymerization processes leading to the formation of the first living cell. In the present work we tested the catalytic activity of three forms of iron oxides (Goethite, Akaganeite and Hematite) in the intermolecular condensation of each of the amino acids glycine and L-alanine. The effect of zinc oxide and titanium dioxide on the oligomerization has also been studied. Oligomerization studies were performed for 35 days at three different temperatures 50, 90 and 120°C without applying drying/wetting cycling. The products formed were characterized by HPLC and ESI-MS techniques. All three forms of iron oxides catalyzed peptide bond formation (23.2% of gly2 and 10.65% of ala2). The reaction was monitored every 7 days. Formation of peptides was observed to start after 7 days at 50°C. Maximum yield of peptides was found after 35 days at 90°C. Reaction at 120°C favors formation of diketopiperazine derivatives. It is also important to note that after 35 days of reaction, goethite produced dimer and trimer with the highest yield among the oxides tested. We suggest that the activity of goethite could probably be due to its high surface area and surface acidity.

  19. The Cyanobacteria Derived Toxin Beta-N-Methylamino-L-Alanine and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Banack, Sandra Anne; Caller, Tracie A.; Stommel, Elijah W.

    2010-01-01

    There is mounting evidence to suggest that environmental factors play a major role in the development of neurodegenerative diseases like ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis). The non-protein amino acid beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) was first associated with the high incidence of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/Parkinsonism Dementia Complex (ALS/PDC) in Guam, and has been implicated as a potential environmental factor in ALS, Alzheimer’s disease, and other neurodegenerative diseases. BMAA has a number of toxic effects on motor neurons including direct agonist action on NMDA and AMPA receptors, induction of oxidative stress, and depletion of glutathione. As a non-protein amino acid, there is also the strong possibility that BMAA could cause intraneuronal protein misfolding, the hallmark of neurodegeneration. While an animal model for BMAA-induced ALS is lacking, there is substantial evidence to support a link between this toxin and ALS. The ramifications of discovering an environmental trigger for ALS are enormous. In this article, we discuss the history, ecology, pharmacology and clinical ramifications of this ubiquitous, cyanobacteria-derived toxin. PMID:22069578

  20. Anisotropy-Guided Enantiomeric Enhancement in Alanine Using Far-UV Circularly Polarized Light.

    PubMed

    Meinert, Cornelia; Cassam-Chenaï, Patrick; Jones, Nykola C; Nahon, Laurent; Hoffmann, Søren V; Meierhenrich, Uwe J

    2015-06-01

    All life on Earth is characterized by its asymmetry - both the genetic material and proteins are composed of homochiral monomers. Understanding how this molecular asymmetry initially arose is a key question related to the origins of life. Cometary ice simulations, L-enantiomeric enriched amino acids in meteorites and the detection of circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation in star-forming regions point to a possible interstellar/protostellar generation of stereochemical asymmetry. Based upon our recently recorded anisotropy spectra g(λ) of amino acids in the vacuum-UV range, we subjected amorphous films of racemic (13)C-alanine to far-UV circularly polarized synchrotron radiation to probe the asymmetric photon-molecule interaction under interstellar conditions. Optical purities of up to 4% were reached, which correlate with our theoretical predictions. Importantly, we show that chiral symmetry breaking using circularly polarized light is dependent on both the helicity and the wavelength of incident light. In order to predict such stereocontrol, time-dependent density functional theory was used to calculate anisotropy spectra. The calculated anisotropy spectra show good agreement with the experimental ones. The European Space Agency's Rosetta mission, which successfully landed Philae on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on 12 November 2014, will investigate the configuration of chiral compounds and thereby obtain data that are to be interpreted in the context of the results presented here. PMID:25773582

  1. Amino Acid Transporters and Release of Hydrophobic Amino Acids in the Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Pernil, Rafael; Picossi, Silvia; Herrero, Antonia; Flores, Enrique; Mariscal, Vicente

    2015-04-23

    Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that can use inorganic compounds such as nitrate or ammonium as nitrogen sources. In the absence of combined nitrogen, it can fix N2 in differentiated cells called heterocysts. Anabaena also shows substantial activities of amino acid uptake, and three ABC-type transporters for amino acids have been previously characterized. Seven new loci encoding predicted amino acid transporters were identified in the Anabaena genomic sequence and inactivated. Two of them were involved in amino acid uptake. Locus alr2535-alr2541 encodes the elements of a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter that is mainly involved in the uptake of glycine. ORF all0342 encodes a putative transporter from the dicarboxylate/amino acid:cation symporter (DAACS) family whose inactivation resulted in an increased uptake of a broad range of amino acids. An assay to study amino acid release from Anabaena filaments to the external medium was set up. Net release of the alanine analogue α-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) was observed when transport system N-I (a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter) was engaged in the uptake of a specific substrate. The rate of AIB release was directly proportional to the intracellular AIB concentration, suggesting leakage from the cells by diffusion.

  2. Amino Acid Transporters and Release of Hydrophobic Amino Acids in the Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Pernil, Rafael; Picossi, Silvia; Herrero, Antonia; Flores, Enrique; Mariscal, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that can use inorganic compounds such as nitrate or ammonium as nitrogen sources. In the absence of combined nitrogen, it can fix N2 in differentiated cells called heterocysts. Anabaena also shows substantial activities of amino acid uptake, and three ABC-type transporters for amino acids have been previously characterized. Seven new loci encoding predicted amino acid transporters were identified in the Anabaena genomic sequence and inactivated. Two of them were involved in amino acid uptake. Locus alr2535-alr2541 encodes the elements of a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter that is mainly involved in the uptake of glycine. ORF all0342 encodes a putative transporter from the dicarboxylate/amino acid:cation symporter (DAACS) family whose inactivation resulted in an increased uptake of a broad range of amino acids. An assay to study amino acid release from Anabaena filaments to the external medium was set up. Net release of the alanine analogue α-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) was observed when transport system N-I (a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter) was engaged in the uptake of a specific substrate. The rate of AIB release was directly proportional to the intracellular AIB concentration, suggesting leakage from the cells by diffusion. PMID:25915115

  3. Amino Acid Transporters and Release of Hydrophobic Amino Acids in the Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Pernil, Rafael; Picossi, Silvia; Herrero, Antonia; Flores, Enrique; Mariscal, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that can use inorganic compounds such as nitrate or ammonium as nitrogen sources. In the absence of combined nitrogen, it can fix N2 in differentiated cells called heterocysts. Anabaena also shows substantial activities of amino acid uptake, and three ABC-type transporters for amino acids have been previously characterized. Seven new loci encoding predicted amino acid transporters were identified in the Anabaena genomic sequence and inactivated. Two of them were involved in amino acid uptake. Locus alr2535-alr2541 encodes the elements of a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter that is mainly involved in the uptake of glycine. ORF all0342 encodes a putative transporter from the dicarboxylate/amino acid:cation symporter (DAACS) family whose inactivation resulted in an increased uptake of a broad range of amino acids. An assay to study amino acid release from Anabaena filaments to the external medium was set up. Net release of the alanine analogue α-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) was observed when transport system N-I (a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter) was engaged in the uptake of a specific substrate. The rate of AIB release was directly proportional to the intracellular AIB concentration, suggesting leakage from the cells by diffusion. PMID:25915115

  4. Accurate determination of the amino acid content of selected feedstuffs.

    PubMed

    Rutherfurd, Shane M

    2009-01-01

    The accurate determination of the amino acid content is important. In the present study, a least-squares non-linear regression model of the amino acid content determined over multiple hydrolysis times was used to accurately determine the content of amino acids in five different feedstuffs. These values were compared with 24-h hydrolysis values determined for the same feedstuffs. Overall, approximately two-thirds of the amino acids determined in this study (aspartic acid, threonine, glutamic acid, proline, glycine, alanine, leucine, tyrosine, phenylalanine and arginine) using 24-h hydrolysis were in good agreement (<3% difference). When examined across feedstuffs, the concentration of serine was underestimated by the 24-h hydrolysis method by 4.8%, while the concentrations of histidine and lysine were overestimated by 3.9% and 3.1%, respectively.

  5. Amino Acid Synthesis in a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide - Water System

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Kouki; Futamura, Yasuhiro; Shiohara, Tomoo; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Kanaya, Fumihide; Manome, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Mars is a CO2-abundant planet, whereas early Earth is thought to be also CO2-abundant. In addition, water was also discovered on Mars in 2008. From the facts and theory, we assumed that soda fountains were present on both planets, and this affected amino acid synthesis. Here, using a supercritical CO2/liquid H2O (10:1) system which mimicked crust soda fountains, we demonstrate production of amino acids from hydroxylamine (nitrogen source) and keto acids (oxylic acid sources). In this research, several amino acids were detected with an amino acid analyzer. Moreover, alanine polymers were detected with LC-MS. Our research lights up a new pathway in the study of life’s origin. PMID:19582225

  6. Topology of AspT, the aspartate:alanine antiporter of Tetragenococcus halophilus, determined by site-directed fluorescence labeling.

    PubMed

    Nanatani, Kei; Fujiki, Takashi; Kanou, Kazuhiko; Takeda-Shitaka, Mayuko; Umeyama, Hideaki; Ye, Liwen; Wang, Xicheng; Nakajima, Tasuku; Uchida, Takafumi; Maloney, Peter C; Abe, Keietsu

    2007-10-01

    The gram-positive lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus catalyzes the decarboxylation of L-aspartate (Asp) with release of L-alanine (Ala) and CO(2). The decarboxylation reaction consists of two steps: electrogenic exchange of Asp for Ala catalyzed by an aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) and intracellular decarboxylation of the transported Asp catalyzed by an L-aspartate-beta-decarboxylase (AspD). AspT belongs to the newly classified aspartate:alanine exchanger family (transporter classification no. 2.A.81) of transporters. In this study, we were interested in the relationship between the structure and function of AspT and thus analyzed the topology by means of the substituted-cysteine accessibility method using the impermeant, fluorescent, thiol-specific probe Oregon Green 488 maleimide (OGM) and the impermeant, nonfluorescent, thiol-specific probe [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl]methanethiosulfonate bromide. We generated 23 single-cysteine variants from a six-histidine-tagged cysteineless AspT template. A cysteine position was assigned an external location if the corresponding single-cysteine variant reacted with OGM added to intact cells, and a position was assigned an internal location if OGM labeling required cell lysis. The topology analyses revealed that AspT has a unique topology; the protein has 10 transmembrane helices (TMs), a large hydrophilic cytoplasmic loop (about 180 amino acids) between TM5 and TM6, N and C termini that face the periplasm, and a positively charged residue (arginine 76) within TM3. Moreover, the three-dimensional structure constructed by means of the full automatic modeling system indicates that the large hydrophilic cytoplasmic loop of AspT possesses a TrkA_C domain and a TrkA_C-like domain and that the three-dimensional structures of these domains are similar to each other even though their amino acid sequences show low similarity.

  7. Structure of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis D-Alanine:D-Alanine Ligase, a Target of the Antituberculosis Drug D-Cycloserine

    SciTech Connect

    Bruning, John B.; Murillo, Ana C.; Chacon, Ofelia; Barletta, Raúl G.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2011-09-28

    D-Alanine:D-alanine ligase (EC 6.3.2.4; Ddl) catalyzes the ATP-driven ligation of two D-alanine (D-Ala) molecules to form the D-alanyl:D-alanine dipeptide. This molecule is a key building block in peptidoglycan biosynthesis, making Ddl an attractive target for drug development. D-Cycloserine (DCS), an analog of D-Ala and a prototype Ddl inhibitor, has shown promise for the treatment of tuberculosis. Here, we report the crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ddl at a resolution of 2.1 {angstrom}. This structure indicates that Ddl is a dimer and consists of three discrete domains; the ligand binding cavity is at the intersection of all three domains and conjoined by several loop regions. The M. tuberculosis apo Ddl structure shows a novel conformation that has not yet been observed in Ddl enzymes from other species. The nucleotide and D-alanine binding pockets are flexible, requiring significant structural rearrangement of the bordering regions for entry and binding of both ATP and D-Ala molecules. Solution affinity and kinetic studies showed that DCS interacts with Ddl in a manner similar to that observed for D-Ala. Each ligand binds to two binding sites that have significant differences in affinity, with the first binding site exhibiting high affinity. DCS inhibits the enzyme, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC{sub 50}) of 0.37 mM under standard assay conditions, implicating a preferential and weak inhibition at the second, lower-affinity binding site. Moreover, DCS binding is tighter at higher ATP concentrations. The crystal structure illustrates potential drugable sites that may result in the development of more-effective Ddl inhibitors.

  8. Kinetic mechanism and inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis D-alanine:D-alanine ligase by the antibiotic D-cycloserine.

    PubMed

    Prosser, Gareth A; de Carvalho, Luiz Pedro S

    2013-02-01

    D-cycloserine (DCS) is an antibiotic that is currently used in second-line treatment of tuberculosis. DCS is a structural analogue of D-alanine, and targets two enzymes involved in the cytosolic stages of peptidoglycan synthesis: alanine racemase (Alr) and D-alanine:D-alanine ligase (Ddl). The mechanisms of inhibition of DCS have been well-assessed using Alr and Ddl enzymes from various bacterial species, but little is known regarding the interactions of DCS with the mycobacterial orthologues of these enzymes. We have over-expressed and purified recombinant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ddl (MtDdl; Rv2981c), and report a kinetic examination of the enzyme with both its native substrate and DCS. MtDdl is activated by K(+), follows an ordered ter ter mechanism and displays distinct affinities for D-Ala at each D-Ala binding site (K(m,D-Ala1) = 0.075 mm, K(m,D-Ala2) = 3.6 mm). ATP is the first substrate to bind and is necessary for subsequent binding of D-alanine or DCS. The pH dependence of MtDdl kinetic parameters indicate that general base chemistry is involved in the catalytic step. DCS was found to competitively inhibit D-Ala binding at both MtDdl D-Ala sites with equal affinity (K(i,DCS1) = 14 μm, K(i,DCS2) = 25 μm); however, each enzyme active site can only accommodate a single DCS molecule at a given time. The pH dependence of K(i,DCS2) revealed a loss of DCS binding affinity at high pH (pK(a) = 7.5), suggesting that DCS binds optimally in the zwitterionic form. The results of this study may assist in the design and development of novel Ddl-specific inhibitors for use as anti-mycobacterial agents.

  9. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in the Almahata Sitta Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Parker, Eric T.; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2010-01-01

    Amino acid analysis of a meteorite fragment of asteroid 2008 TC3 called Almahata Sitta was carried out using reverse-phase liquid chromatography coupled with UV fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-FD/ToF-MS) as part of a sample analysis consortium. LC-FD/ToF-MS analyses of hot-water extracts from the meteorite revealed a complex distribution of two- to seven-carbon aliphatic amino acids and one- to three-carbon amines with abundances ranging from 0.5 to 149 parts-per-billion (ppb). The enantiomeric ratios of the amino acids alanine, R-amino-n-butyric acid (beta-ABA), 2-amino-2-methylbutanoic acid (isovaline), and 2-aminopentanoic acid (norvaline) in the meteorite were racemic (D/L approximately 1), indicating that these amino acids are indigenous to the meteorite and not terrestrial contaminants. Several other non-protein amino acids were also identified in the meteorite above background levels including alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (alpha-AIB), 4-amino-2- methylbutanoic acid, 4-amino-3-methylbutanoic acid, and 3-, 4-, and 5-aminopentanoic acid. The total abundances of isovaline and alpha-AIB in Almahata Sitta are 1000 times lower than the abundances of these amino acids found in the CM carbonaceous chondrite Murchison. The extremely low abundances and unusual distribution of five carbon amino acids in Almahata Sitta compared to Cl, CM, and CR carbonaceous chondrites may reflect extensive thermal alteration of amino acids on the parent asteroid by partial melting during formation or subsequent impact shock heating. It is also possible that amino acids were synthesized by catalytic reactions on the parent body after asteroid 2008 TC3 cooled to lower temperatures.

  10. Extraterrestrial amino acids in the Almahata Sitta meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Parker, Eric T.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Jenniskens, Peter; Shaddad, Muawia H.

    2010-10-01

    Amino acid analysis of a meteorite fragment of asteroid 2008 TC3 called Almahata Sitta was carried out using reverse-phase liquid chromatography coupled with UV fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-FD/ToF-MS) as part of a sample analysis consortium. LC-FD/ToF-MS analyses of hot-water extracts from the meteorite revealed a complex distribution of two- to seven-carbon aliphatic amino acids and one- to three-carbon amines with abundances ranging from 0.5 to 149 parts-per-billion (ppb). The enantiomeric ratios of the amino acids alanine, β-amino-n-butyric acid, 2-amino-2-methylbutanoic acid (isovaline), and 2-aminopentanoic acid (norvaline) in the meteorite were racemic (D/L ˜ 1), indicating that these amino acids are indigenous to the meteorite and not terrestrial contaminants. Several other nonprotein amino acids were also identified in the meteorite above background levels including α-aminoisobutyric acid (α-AIB), 4-amino-2-methylbutanoic acid, 4-amino-3-methylbutanoic acid, and 3-, 4-, and 5-aminopentanoic acid. The total abundances of isovaline and α-AIB in Almahata Sitta are approximately 1000 times lower than the abundances of these amino acids found in the CM carbonaceous chondrite Murchison. The extremely low abundances and unusual distribution of five-carbon amino acids in Almahata Sitta compared to CI, CM, and CR carbonaceous chondrites may reflect extensive thermal alteration of amino acids on the parent asteroid by partial melting during formation or subsequent impact shock heating. It is also possible that amino acids were synthesized by catalytic reactions on the parent body after asteroid 2008 TC3 cooled to lower temperatures, or introduced as a contaminant from unrelated meteorite clasts and chemically altered by α-decarboxylation.

  11. 23S rRNA nucleotides in the peptidyl transferase center are essential for tryptophanase operon induction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Cruz-Vera, Luis R; Yanofsky, Charles

    2009-06-01

    Distinct features of the ribosomal peptide exit tunnel are known to be essential for recognition of specific amino acids of a nascent peptidyl-tRNA. Thus, a tryptophan residue at position 12 of the peptidyl-tRNA TnaC-tRNA(Pro) leads to the creation of a free tryptophan binding site within the ribosome at which bound tryptophan inhibits normal ribosome functions. The ribosomal processes that are inhibited are hydrolysis of TnaC-tRNA(Pro) by release factor 2 and peptidyl transfer of TnaC of TnaC-tRNA(Pro) to puromycin. These events are normally performed in the ribosomal peptidyl transferase center. In the present study, changes of 23S rRNA nucleotides in the 2585 region of the peptidyl transferase center, G2583A and U2584C, were observed to reduce maximum induction of tna operon expression by tryptophan in vivo without affecting the concentration of tryptophan necessary to obtain 50% induction. The growth rate of strains with ribosomes with either of these changes was not altered appreciably. In vitro analyses with mutant ribosomes with these changes showed that tryptophan was not as efficient in protecting TnaC-tRNA(Pro) from puromycin action as wild-type ribosomes. However, added tryptophan did prevent sparsomycin action as it normally does with wild-type ribosomes. These findings suggest that these two mutational changes act by reducing the ability of ribosome-bound tryptophan to inhibit peptidyl transferase activity rather than by reducing the ability of the ribosome to bind tryptophan. Thus, the present study identifies specific nucleotides within the ribosomal peptidyl transferase center that appear to be essential for effective tryptophan induction of tna operon expression. PMID:19329641

  12. Plasma Amino Acid Levels in Children with Autism and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldred, Sarah; Moore, Kieran M.; Fitzgerald, Michael; Waring, Rosemary H.

    2003-01-01

    Plasma amino acid levels were measured in autistic (n=12), Asperger syndrome (n=11) patients, their parents and siblings. Patients with autism or Asperger syndrome and their siblings and parents all had raised glutamic acid, phenyalanine, asparagine, tyrosine, alanine, and lysine levels than age-matched controls. Results suggest dysregulated amino…

  13. Energy Coupling in H+-Amino Acid Cotransport 1

    PubMed Central

    Kinraide, Thomas B.; Etherton, Bud

    1982-01-01

    Experiments were undertaken in order to test the mechanism of energy coupling for amino acid uptake proposed in the cotransport hypothesis. According to the hypothesis an electrochemical potential difference in H+ is established by active H+ extrusion. That potential difference then drives the cotransport of H+ and amino acids into the cells. Application of amino acids to oat (Avena sativa var. Victory) coleoptiles induced transient depolarizations of the cell membrane electrical potentials considered to reflect the joint uptake of H+ and amino acids followed by an enhanced H+ extrusion. In the presence of KCN, cysteine induced strong depolarizations, but the rate of repolarization depended linearly upon the cyanide-adjusted ATP level of the tissue. At an ATP level 44% of normal, the membrane potential was 74% of normal, but the repolarization after cysteine-induced depolarization was practically nil. Sudden transitions from room temperature to temperatures below 15° C induced sharp depolarizations of the membrane which then repolarized within 3 min; the ATP content of the tissues was unaffected. Cysteine and alanine induced strong depolarizations at temperatures between 5 and 25°C, and the Q10 for the rate of depolarization was 1.5 for cysteine and 1.6 for alanine. The Q10 for the rate of repolarization was 3.0 for cysteine and 2.0 for alanine. These experiments support the prevailing view that the depolarizations are caused by the passive joint influx of H+ and amino acids and that the repolarizations depend upon the ATP-dependent extrusion of H+. PMID:16662266

  14. Study on the EPR/dosimetric properties of some substituted alanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gancheva, Veselka; Sagstuen, Einar; Yordanov, Nicola D.

    2006-02-01

    Polycrystalline phenyl-alanine and perdeuterated L- α-alanine ( L- α-alanine-d 4) were studied as potential high-energy radiation-sensitive materials (RSM) for solid state/EPR dosimetry. It was found that phenyl-alanine exhibits a linear dose response in the dose region 0.1-17 kGy. However, phenyl-alanine is about 10 times less sensitive to γ-irradiation than standard L- α-alanine irradiated at the same doses. Moreover, the EPR response from phenyl-alanine is unstable and, independent of the absorbed dose, decreases by about 50% within 20 days after irradiation upon storage at room temperature. γ-irradiated polycrystalline perdeuterated L- α-alanine (CD 3CD(NH 2)COOH) has not previously been studied at room temperature by EPR spectroscopy. The first part of the present analysis was with respect to the structure of the EPR spectrum. By spectrum simulations, the presence of at least two radiation induced free radicals, R 1=CH 3C •(H)COOH and R 2=H 3N +-C •(CH 3)COO -, was confirmed very clearly. Both these radicals were suggested previously from EPR and ENDOR studies of standard alanine crystals. The further investigations into the potential use of alanine-d 4 as RSM, after choosing optimal EPR spectrometer settings parameters for this purpose, show that it is ca. two times more sensitive than standard L- α-alanine.

  15. The properties of solid Zn(II)-amino acid complexes in the form of suspensions.

    PubMed

    Dolińska, B

    2001-10-01

    An investigation was made into the experimental conditions for the formation of poorly soluble complexes of the divalent Zinc(II) combined with the following selected amino acids: tyrosine, tryptophan, cysteine, histidine, and alanine, in the form of suspensions for parenteral administration. The number of Zn(II)-binding sites in the amino acid (n) as well as the amino acid affinity to Zn(II) (Ka), were determined. Cysteine was found to have the highest number of Zn(II)-binding sites--3, whereas alanine the lowest--1. In the conditions described herein, Zn(II) amino acid complexes of diverse stability (durability) were obtained. The analysis of the kinetics of the binding revealed that the most stable complexes were those formed by Zn(II) in combination with tryptophan (Ka = 405.78 microM(-1) +/- 12.17), and with tyrosine (Ka = 343.88 microM +/- 22.35); whereas the least stable complexes were those formed by Zn(II) in combination with histidine (Ka = 29.90 microM +/- 4.78), and with alanine (Ka = 13.0 microM(-1) +/- 1.04). Cysteine formed complexes of intermediate stability (Ka = 168.53 microM(-1) +/- 12.36). The stability ofthe Zn(II) amino acid complexes obtained was conditioned by both the molecular weight (P = 0.033) of the amino acid and its isoelectric point (P < 0.001). PMID:11718265

  16. Cellular and Physiological Effects of Dietary Supplementation with β-Hydroxy-β-Methylbutyrate (HMB) and β-Alanine in Late Middle-Aged Mice.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Julian; Spence, Madoka; Cheng, An-Lin; Brotto, Leticia; Edens, Neile K; Garvey, Sean M; Brotto, Marco

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that severe decline of skeletal muscle mass and function with age may be mitigated by exercise and dietary supplementation with protein and amino acid ingredient technologies. The purposes of this study were to examine the effects of the leucine catabolite, beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB), in C2C12 myoblasts and myotubes, and to investigate the effects of dietary supplementation with HMB, the amino acid β-alanine and the combination thereof, on muscle contractility in a preclinical model of pre-sarcopenia. In C2C12 myotubes, HMB enhanced sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium release beyond vehicle control in the presence of all SR agonists tested (KCl, P<0.01; caffeine, P = 0.03; ionomycin, P = 0.03). HMB also improved C2C12 myoblast viability (25 μM HMB, P = 0.03) and increased proliferation (25 μM HMB, P = 0.04; 125 μM HMB, P<0.01). Furthermore, an ex vivo muscle contractility study was performed on EDL and soleus muscle from 19 month old, male C57BL/6nTac mice. For 8 weeks, mice were fed control AIN-93M diet, diet with HMB, diet with β-alanine, or diet with HMB and β-alanine. In β-alanine fed mice, EDL muscle showed a 7% increase in maximum absolute force compared to the control diet (202 ± 3vs. 188± 5 mN, P = 0.02). At submaximal frequency of stimulation (20 Hz), EDL from mice fed HMB plus β-alanine showed an 11% increase in absolute force (88.6 ± 2.2 vs. 79.8 ± 2.4 mN, P = 0.025) and a 13% increase in specific force (12.2 ± 0.4 vs. 10.8 ± 0.4 N/cm2, P = 0.021). Also in EDL muscle, β-alanine increased the rate of force development at all frequencies tested (P<0.025), while HMB reduced the time to reach peak contractile force (TTP), with a significant effect at 80 Hz (P = 0.0156). In soleus muscle, all experimental diets were associated with a decrease in TTP, compared to control diet. Our findings highlight beneficial effects of HMB and β-alanine supplementation on skeletal muscle function in aging mice.

  17. Cellular and Physiological Effects of Dietary Supplementation with β-Hydroxy-β-Methylbutyrate (HMB) and β-Alanine in Late Middle-Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vallejo, Julian; Spence, Madoka; Cheng, An-Lin; Brotto, Leticia; Edens, Neile K.; Garvey, Sean M.; Brotto, Marco

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that severe decline of skeletal muscle mass and function with age may be mitigated by exercise and dietary supplementation with protein and amino acid ingredient technologies. The purposes of this study were to examine the effects of the leucine catabolite, beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB), in C2C12 myoblasts and myotubes, and to investigate the effects of dietary supplementation with HMB, the amino acid β-alanine and the combination thereof, on muscle contractility in a preclinical model of pre-sarcopenia. In C2C12 myotubes, HMB enhanced sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium release beyond vehicle control in the presence of all SR agonists tested (KCl, P<0.01; caffeine, P = 0.03; ionomycin, P = 0.03). HMB also improved C2C12 myoblast viability (25 μM HMB, P = 0.03) and increased proliferation (25 μM HMB, P = 0.04; 125 μM HMB, P<0.01). Furthermore, an ex vivo muscle contractility study was performed on EDL and soleus muscle from 19 month old, male C57BL/6nTac mice. For 8 weeks, mice were fed control AIN-93M diet, diet with HMB, diet with β-alanine, or diet with HMB and β-alanine. In β-alanine fed mice, EDL muscle showed a 7% increase in maximum absolute force compared to the control diet (202 ± 3vs. 188± 5 mN, P = 0.02). At submaximal frequency of stimulation (20 Hz), EDL from mice fed HMB plus β-alanine showed an 11% increase in absolute force (88.6 ± 2.2 vs. 79.8 ± 2.4 mN, P = 0.025) and a 13% increase in specific force (12.2 ± 0.4 vs. 10.8 ± 0.4 N/cm2, P = 0.021). Also in EDL muscle, β-alanine increased the rate of force development at all frequencies tested (P<0.025), while HMB reduced the time to reach peak contractile force (TTP), with a significant effect at 80 Hz (P = 0.0156). In soleus muscle, all experimental diets were associated with a decrease in TTP, compared to control diet. Our findings highlight beneficial effects of HMB and β-alanine supplementation on skeletal muscle function in aging mice. PMID

  18. Identification of dietary alanine toxicity and trafficking dysfunction in a Drosophila model of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Matthew C W; West, Ryan J H; Lloyd-Evans, Emyr; Sweeney, Sean T

    2015-12-15

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 (HSAN1) is characterized by a loss of distal peripheral sensory and motorneuronal function, neuropathic pain and tissue necrosis. The most common cause of HSAN1 is due to dominant mutations in serine palmitoyl-transferase subunit 1 (SPT1). SPT catalyses the condensation of serine with palmitoyl-CoA, the initial step in sphingolipid biogenesis. Identified mutations in SPT1 are known to both reduce sphingolipid synthesis and generate catalytic promiscuity, incorporating alanine or glycine into the precursor sphingolipid to generate a deoxysphingoid base (DSB). Why either loss of function in SPT1, or generation of DSBs should generate deficits in distal sensory function remains unclear. To address these questions, we generated a Drosophila model of HSAN1. Expression of dSpt1 bearing a disease-related mutation induced morphological deficits in synapse growth at the larval neuromuscular junction consistent with a dominant-negative action. Expression of mutant dSpt1 globally was found to be mildly toxic, but was completely toxic when the diet was supplemented with alanine, when DSBs were observed in abundance. Expression of mutant dSpt1 in sensory neurons generated developmental deficits in dendritic arborization with concomitant sensory deficits. A membrane trafficking defect was observed in soma of sensory neurons expressing mutant dSpt1, consistent with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to Golgi block. We found that we could rescue sensory function in neurons expressing mutant dSpt1 by co-expressing an effector of ER-Golgi function, Rab1 suggesting compromised ER function in HSAN1 affected dendritic neurons. Our Drosophila model identifies a novel strategy to explore the pathological mechanisms of HSAN1.

  19. Identification of dietary alanine toxicity and trafficking dysfunction in a Drosophila model of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1

    PubMed Central

    Oswald, Matthew C. W.; West, Ryan J. H.; Lloyd-Evans, Emyr; Sweeney, Sean T.

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 (HSAN1) is characterized by a loss of distal peripheral sensory and motorneuronal function, neuropathic pain and tissue necrosis. The most common cause of HSAN1 is due to dominant mutations in serine palmitoyl-transferase subunit 1 (SPT1). SPT catalyses the condensation of serine with palmitoyl-CoA, the initial step in sphingolipid biogenesis. Identified mutations in SPT1 are known to both reduce sphingolipid synthesis and generate catalytic promiscuity, incorporating alanine or glycine into the precursor sphingolipid to generate a deoxysphingoid base (DSB). Why either loss of function in SPT1, or generation of DSBs should generate deficits in distal sensory function remains unclear. To address these questions, we generated a Drosophila model of HSAN1. Expression of dSpt1 bearing a disease-related mutation induced morphological deficits in synapse growth at the larval neuromuscular junction consistent with a dominant-negative action. Expression of mutant dSpt1 globally was found to be mildly toxic, but was completely toxic when the diet was supplemented with alanine, when DSBs were observed in abundance. Expression of mutant dSpt1 in sensory neurons generated developmental deficits in dendritic arborization with concomitant sensory deficits. A membrane trafficking defect was observed in soma of sensory neurons expressing mutant dSpt1, consistent with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to Golgi block. We found that we could rescue sensory function in neurons expressing mutant dSpt1 by co-expressing an effector of ER–Golgi function, Rab1 suggesting compromised ER function in HSAN1 affected dendritic neurons. Our Drosophila model identifies a novel strategy to explore the pathological mechanisms of HSAN1. PMID:26395456

  20. Hydration of amino acids: FTIR spectra and molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Panuszko, Aneta; Adamczak, Beata; Czub, Jacek; Gojło, Emilia; Stangret, Janusz

    2015-11-01

    The hydration of selected amino acids, alanine, glycine, proline, valine, isoleucine and phenylalanine, has been studied in aqueous solutions by means of FTIR spectra of HDO isotopically diluted in H2O. The difference spectra procedure and the chemometric method have been applied to remove the contribution of bulk water and thus to separate the spectra of solute-affected HDO. To support interpretation of obtained spectral results, molecular dynamics simulations of amino acids were performed. The structural-energetic characteristic of these solute-affected water molecules shows that, on average, water affected by amino acids forms stronger and shorter H-bonds than those in pure water. Differences in the influence of amino acids on water structure have been noticed. The effect of the hydrophobic side chain of an amino acid on the solvent interactions seems to be enhanced because of the specific cooperative coupling of water strong H-bond chain, connecting the carboxyl and amino groups, with the clathrate-like H-bond network surrounding the hydrocarbon side chain. The parameter derived from the spectral data, which corresponds to the contributions of the population of weak hydrogen bonds of water molecules which have been substituted by the stronger ones in the hydration sphere of amino acids, correlated well with the amino acid hydrophobicity indexes.

  1. Probing alanine transaminase catalysis with hyperpolarized 13CD3-pyruvate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barb, A. W.; Hekmatyar, S. K.; Glushka, J. N.; Prestegard, J. H.

    2013-03-01

    Hyperpolarized metabolites offer a tremendous sensitivity advantage (>104 fold) when measuring flux and enzyme activity in living tissues by magnetic resonance methods. These sensitivity gains can also be applied to mechanistic studies that impose time and metabolite concentration limitations. Here we explore the use of hyperpolarization by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in mechanistic studies of alanine transaminase (ALT), a well-established biomarker of liver disease and cancer that converts pyruvate to alanine using glutamate as a nitrogen donor. A specific deuterated, 13C-enriched analog of pyruvic acid, 13C3D3-pyruvic acid, is demonstrated to have advantages in terms of detection by both direct 13C observation and indirect observation through methyl protons introduced by ALT-catalyzed H-D exchange. Exchange on injecting hyperpolarized 13C3D3-pyruvate into ALT dissolved in buffered 1H2O, combined with an experimental approach to measure proton incorporation, provided information on mechanistic details of transaminase action on a 1.5 s timescale. ALT introduced, on average, 0.8 new protons into the methyl group of the alanine produced, indicating the presence of an off-pathway enamine intermediate. The opportunities for exploiting mechanism-dependent molecular signatures as well as indirect detection of hyperpolarized 13C3-pyruvate and products in imaging applications are discussed.

  2. Amino acid biogeo- and stereochemistry in coastal Chilean sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomstein, Bente Aa.; Jørgensen, Bo B.; Schubert, Carsten J.; Niggemann, Jutta

    2006-06-01

    The spatial distribution of total hydrolysable amino acids (THAA) and amino acid enantiomers ( D- and L-forms) was investigated in sediments underlying two contrasting Chilean upwelling regions: at ˜23 °S off Antofagasta and at ˜36 °S off Concepción. The contribution of amino acids to total organic carbon (%T AAC: 7-14%) and total nitrogen (%T AAN: 23-38%) in surface sediments decreased with increasing water depth (from 126 to 1350 m) indicating that organic matter becomes increasingly decomposed in surface sediments at greater water depth. Changes in the ratio between the protein amino acid aspartate and its non-protein degradation product β-alanine confirmed this observation. Furthermore, estimates of THAA mineralization showed that sedimentary amino acid reactivity decreased with both increasing water depth as well as progressive degradation status of the organic matter that was incorporated into the sediment. Reactivity of organic matter in the sediment was also assessed using the Degradation Index (DI) developed by [Dauwe, B., Middelburg, J.J., 1998. Amino acids and hexosamines as indicators of organic matter degradation state in North Sea sediments. Limnol. Oceanogr.43, pp. 782-798.]. Off Concepción, DI was successfully applied to examine the degradation status of sedimentary organic matter at different water depths. However, unexpected results were obtained at the Antofagasta stations as DI increased with sediment depth, suggesting more degraded organic matter at the surface than deeper in the cores. The contribution of peptidoglycan amino acids to THAA was estimated from the concentrations of D-aspartate, D-glutamic acid, D-serine, and D-alanine. Peptidoglycan amino acids accounted for >18% of THAA in all investigated samples. In surface sediments peptidoglycan amino acids accounted for a progressively larger fraction of THAA at increasing water depths (up to >26%). Further, the contribution of peptidoglycan amino acids to THAA increased with

  3. Characterization and isolation of oligosaccharyl transferase

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, H.A.; Lennarz, W.J.

    1986-05-01

    Oligosaccharyltransferases (OT), the enzyme catalyzing the transfer of oligosaccharride from dolichol-PP-GlcNAc/sub 2/Man/sub 9/Glc/sub 3/ to asparagine residues of -Asn-X-Thr/Ser-sequences within nascent polypeptides, was labeled with a new active site-directed photoaffinity probe, N/sup ..cap alpha../-(/sup 125/I)-3-(4-hydroxyphenylpropionyl)-Asn-Lys(N/sup epsilon/-p-azidobenzoyl)-Thr-NH/sub 2/. Using this sensitive selective labelling probe, the authors have characterized and isolated the enzyme from hen oviduct. Analysis by 2-D gel electrophoresis revealed that the major photoaffinity-labeled OT has a pI = 5.2; minor forms exist at pI = 6.0-6.2. Kinetic experiments demonstrated that the probe interacts with a 57 kDa Coomassie Blue stainable protein at short incubation times, with the radioactive signal appearing at 60 kDa after longer incubations. The 60 kDa /sup 125/I-photoaffinity labeled OT decreased in molecular mass to 57 kDa following endoglucosaminidase H digestion with no shift in pI. The 57 dKa Coomassie Blue stainable protein is not endoglucosaminidase H sensitive. When microsomal dolichol-P-P-oligosaccharide was depleted by preincubating with excess competing peptide, only the 57 kDa /sup 125/I-labeled OT formed. These data suggest that (1) OT is a 57 kDa protein that does not contain polymannose chains, and (2) the formation of the 60 kDa /sup 125/I-labeled OT is likely the result of the glycosylation of the covalently linked tripeptide probe. The enzyme has been isolated to homogeneity by preparative 2-D gel electrophoresis and amino acid sequence analysis and polyclonal antibody production is being performed.

  4. Rational design of an organometallic glutathione transferase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, W.H.; Parker, L.J.; De Luca, A.; Juillerat-Jeanneret, L.; Morton, C.J.; LoBello, M.; Parker, M.W.; Dyson, P.J.

    2010-08-17

    A hybrid organic-inorganic (organometallic) inhibitor was designed to target glutathione transferases. The metal center is used to direct protein binding, while the organic moiety acts as the active-site inhibitor. The mechanism of inhibition was studied using a range of biophysical and biochemical methods.

  5. Homogentisate solanesyl transferase (HST) cDNA’s in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize white seedling 3 (w3) has served as a model albino-seedling mutant since its discovery in 1923. We show that the w3 phenotype is caused by disruptions in homogentisate solanesyl transferase (HST), an enzyme that catalyzes the committed step in plastoquinone-9 (PQ9) biosynthesis. This reaction ...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1535 - Ornithine carbamyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ornithine carbamyl transferase test system. 862.1535 Section 862.1535 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1535 Ornithine...

  7. Histamine N-methyl transferase: inhibition by drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Pacifici, G M; Donatelli, P; Giuliani, L

    1992-01-01

    1. Histamine N-methyl transferase activity was measured in samples of human liver, brain, kidney, lung and intestinal mucosa. The mean (+/- s.d.) rate (nmol min-1 mg-1 protein) of histamine N-methylation was 1.78 +/- 0.59 (liver, n = 60), 1.15 +/- 0.38 (renal cortex, n = 8), 0.79 +/- 0.14 (renal medulla, n = 8), 0.35 +/- 0.08 (lung, n = 20), 0.47 +/- 0.18 (human intestine, n = 30) and 0.29 +/- 0.14 (brain, n = 13). 2. Inhibition of histamine N-methyl transferase by 15 drugs was investigated in human liver. The IC50 for the various drugs ranged over three orders of magnitude; chloroquine was the most potent inhibitor. 3. The average IC50 values for chloroquine were 12.6, 22.0, 19.0, 21.6 microM in liver, renal cortex, brain and colon, respectively. These values are lower than the Michaelis-Menten constant for histamine N-methyltransferase in liver (43.8 microM) and kidney (45.5 microM). Chloroquine carried a mixed non-competitive inhibition of hepatic histamine N-methyl transferase. Some side-effects of chloroquine may be explained by inhibition of histamine N-methyl transferase. PMID:1457266

  8. Elevation of retinol levels and suppression of alanine aminotransferase activity in the liver of taurine-deficient kittens.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, A; Knutsson, L; Bosaeus, I

    1990-10-01

    In taurine-deficient cats, the secretion of bile acids is impaired, and this impairment may reduce intestinal uptake of lipophilic vitamins. It was therefore hypothesized that retinol deficiency is involved in the generation of retinal lesions in taurine-deficient kittens. To this end, the concentration of retinol in plasma and liver was determined in taurine-deficient kittens. Further, the effects of taurine deficiency on amino acid concentrations of heart, liver and kidney were investigated. To see whether taurine deficiency adversely affects the liver, hepatic enzymes were measured in plasma and liver of kittens suffering from taurine deficiency. In addition, liver morphology, growth and food intake were studied. Taurine was the only amino acid whose concentration was consistently decreased in plasma of the experimental group. Unexpectedly, retinol level was increased in plasma and liver from taurine-depleted kittens. Several alterations were noted in amino acid concentrations in liver and kidney, but not in heart. Plasma alanine aminotransferase activity was diminished, probably reflecting decreased activity in the liver. Perivenular steatosis was found in both groups. Controls grew linearly, in contrast to deficient animals, which nevertheless consumed more food. The results demonstrate that retinol deficiency is not involved in taurine-deficiency retinopathy. Moreover, taurine is required for linear growth of juvenile cats and for the maintenance of hepatic and renal pools of certain amino acids. PMID:2213246

  9. Interaction of metal ions and amino acids - Possible mechanisms for the adsorption of amino acids on homoionic smectite clays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, A.; Loew, G. H.; Lawless, J.

    1983-01-01

    A semiempirical molecular orbital method is used to characterize the binding of amino acids to hexahydrated Cu(2+) and Ni(2+), a process presumed to occur when they are adsorbed in the interlamellar space of homoionic smectite clays. Five alpha-amino acids, beta-alanine, and gamma-aminobutyric acid were used to investigate the metal ion and amino acid specificity in binding. It was assumed that the alpha, beta, and gamma-amino acids would bind as bidentate anionic ligands, forming either 1:1 or 1:2 six-coordinated five, six, and seven-membered-ring chelate complexes, respectively. Energies of complex formation, optimized geometries, and electron and spin distribution were determined; and steric constraints of binding of the amino acids to the ion-exchanged cations in the interlamellar spacing of a clay were examined. Results indicate that hexahydrated Cu(2+) forms more stable complexes than hexahydrated Ni(2+) with all the amino acids studied. However, among these amino acids, complex formation does not favor the adsorption of the biological subset. Calculated energetics of complex formation and steric constraints are shown to predict that 1:1 rather than 1:2 metal-amino acid complexes are generally favored in the clay.

  10. Synthesis and antimicrobial activity in vitro of new amino acids and peptides containing thiazole and oxazole moieties.

    PubMed

    Stanchev, M; Tabakova, S; Videnov, G; Golovinsky, E; Jung, G

    1999-09-01

    2-(Pyrrolidinyl)thiazole-4-carboxylic acid 5d, 2-(1-aminoalkyl)thiazole-4-carboxamides and hydrazides 8, 10 have been synthesized using alanine, valine, and proline as educts. In addition oxazole amino acids derived from leucine 20a and alanine 20b and some peptides 13, 14, 16 containing the 5-ring heterocyclic backbone modifications have been prepared. The thiazole and oxazole containing amino acids and peptides showed moderate antibacterial activity in vitro against various Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, etc.) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Protens vulgaris, etc.) bacteria, fungi (Candida albicans), and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisae, etc.). PMID:10520298

  11. Dynamic monitoring of plasma amino acids and carnitine during chemotherapy of patients with alimentary canal malignancies and its clinical value

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Jiaqi; Wang, Zhenghua; Wang, Qingjun; Li, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to observe the plasma amino acid and carnitine characteristics in patients with metastatic gastrointestinal malignancies during chemotherapy and to identify markers for the early diagnosis and evaluation of adverse reactions and prognosis of the digestive tract malignant tumor patients. Methods Blood samples of 30 patients with metastatic gastrointestinal malignancies were collected at four time points: before chemotherapy, the first day after chemotherapy (+1 day), bone marrow depression period (+14 days), and hematopoietic recovery period (+21 days). The plasma amino acids and carnitine from those 30 patients were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry method. Simultaneously, the levels of 21 amino acids were detected in 30 healthy individuals, who were considered as control. Biochemical indexes were also detected at four time points, adverse reactions were recorded during the chemotherapy process, and patients were followed up for 1 year to observe time to progression (TTP) and progression-free survival (PFS). Results Compared to healthy people in the control group, patients with malignancies showed significantly increased levels of plasma amino acids such as Arg, Asp, Cit, Gly, Orn, Tyr, Val, and carnitine (such as C2). The levels of compounds such as C3, Asn, Leu, Lys, Pip, Pro, C0, C5:1 decreased significantly before chemotherapy. The levels of Cit, Cys, Lys, Pro, Tyr, Val, C0, and C2 decreased significantly on the second day of chemotherapy (+1 day), whereas the level of C3 increased significantly. During myelosuppression (+14 days), the levels of Asp, Cit, Met, and Orn were observed to still decrease significantly, whereas the level of Val appeared to increase significantly. The levels of Asp, Glu, and Met were clearly different among patients with gastric carcinoma, rectal cancer, and colon cancer. Compared to the control group, aspartate amino transferase and alanine

  12. Glutathione transferase isoenzymes from Bufo bufo embryos at an early developmental stage.

    PubMed Central

    Di Ilio, C; Aceto, A; Bucciarelli, T; Dragani, B; Angelucci, S; Miranda, M; Poma, A; Amicarelli, F; Barra, D; Federici, G

    1992-01-01

    Six forms of glutathione transferase (GST) were resolved from the cytosolic fraction of Bufo bufo embryos at developmental stage 4 by GSH-Sepharose affinity chromatography followed by f.p.l.c. chromatofocusing in the 9-6 pH range. They have apparent isoelectric points at pH 8.37 (GST I), 8.22 (GST II), 8.10 (GST III), 7.84 (GST IV), 7.37 (GST V) and 7.12 (GST VI), and each displayed an apparent subunit molecular mass of 23 kDa by SDS/PAGE. The Bufo bufo embryo enzymes showed very similar structural, catalytic and immunological properties, as indicated by their substrate-specificities, inhibition characteristics, c.d. spectra, h.p.l.c. elution profiles and immunological reactivities, as well as by their N-terminal amino acid sequences. Although Bufo bufo embryo GSTs do not correspond to any other known GSTs, the results of our experiments indicate that amphibian GSTs could be included in the Pi family of GSTs. This conclusion is supported by the analysis of c.d. spectra, and by the fact that mammalian Pi class GSTs and amphibian GSTs showed about 80% identity in their N-terminal amino acid sequences. Furthermore, antisera prepared against Bufo bufo GST III cross-reacted in immunoblotting analysis with Pi class GSTs, and vice versa. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:1567369

  13. Changes of hippocampal beta-alanine and citrulline levels are paralleling early and late phase of retrieval in the Morris Water Maze.

    PubMed

    Sase, Ajinkya; Dahanayaka, Sudath; Höger, Harald; Wu, Guoyao; Lubec, Gert

    2013-07-15

    Although a series of amino acids (AA) have been associated with spatial memory formation, there is limited information on concentrations of beta-alanine and citrulline in rodent brains. Given the importance of AA metabolism in cognitive functions it was the aim of the study to determine hippocampal levels of beta-alanine and citrulline in rats during two different phases of memory retrieval in a spatial memory paradigm. Ten rats were used per group and the first group was trained and sacrificed five min, the second six hours following retrieval in the Morris Water Maze (MWM) and the third and fourth group were untrained, yoked controls. Hippocampi were taken and free AA were determined using a well-established HPLC protocol. Beta-alanine and citrulline levels were higher in trained rat hippocampi, during both, early and late phase of memory retrieval. Taurine, methionine, cysteine, lysine and ornithine levels were higher in yoked rats at the late phase while tyrosine was higher in yoked rats during the early phase. There were no significant correlations between time spent in the target quadrant and any of the AA levels. Herein, an AA pattern, different between yoked and trained animals at early and late phase of memory retrieval is shown, indicating probable involvement of different AA pathways in animals trained and untrained in the MWM. The results may be useful for the interpretation of previous studies and the design of future experiments to identify amino acids as possible targets for modulating spatial memory.

  14. Carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism of Spironucleus vortens.

    PubMed

    Millet, Coralie O M; Lloyd, David; Coogan, Michael P; Rumsey, Joanna; Cable, Joanne

    2011-09-01

    The metabolism of Spironucleus vortens, a parasitic, diplomonad flagellate related to Giardia intestinalis, was investigated using a combination of membrane inlet mass spectrometry, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, bioscreen continuous growth monitoring, and ion exchange chromatography. The products of glucose-fuelled and endogenous metabolism were identified by (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR as ethanol, acetate, alanine and lactate. Mass spectrometric monitoring of gas metabolism in buffered cell suspensions showed that glucose and ethanol could be used by S. vortens as energy-generating substrates, but bioscreen automated monitoring of growth in culture medium, as well as NMR analyses, suggested that neither of these compounds are the substrates of choice for this organism. Ion-exchange chromatographic analyses of free amino-acid and amino-acid hydrolysate of growth medium revealed that, despite the availability of large pools of free amino-acids in the medium, S. vortens hydrolysed large amounts of proteins during growth. The organism produced alanine and aspartate, and utilised lysine, arginine, leucine, cysteine and urea. However, mass spectrometric and bioscreen investigations showed that addition of the utilised amino acids to diluted culture medium did not induce any significant increase in metabolic or growth rates. Moreover, as no significant amounts of ornithine were produced, and addition of arginine under aerobic conditions did not generate NO production, there was no evidence of the presence of an energy-generating, arginine dihydrolase pathway in S. vortens under in vitro conditions.

  15. Amino acid suppression of taurine-sensitive chemosensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, R A; Ache, B W

    1985-05-27

    Single unit recordings from chemoreceptors on the antennule of the spiny lobster revealed a population of taurine-sensitive cells whose response is suppressed when taurine is presented in mixture with certain amino acids. A synthetic mixture of 21 amino acids plus betaine, which mimics the composition of a natural food stimulus (crab muscle tissue) and itself contains taurine, totally and reversibly blocked the taurine response of this group of receptor cells. An analysis of the contribution to this suppression by the six major components (based on concentration) in the mixture revealed partial or complete inhibitory activity by five of the compounds. In a sample group of the inhibited cells, mean percent suppression of the taurine response was 99% for glycine and L-arginine, 98% for L-glutamine, 60% for L-alanine and 43% for L-proline. Both glycine and alanine in binary mixture with taurine caused a right-shift in the concentration-response function for taurine, suggesting a competitive mechanism of suppression. pA2 values determined from these data yielded 4.17 for glycine and 3.55 for alanine. These results suggest that the processing of chemical information in quality and/or intensity coding of natural stimulus mixtures can be tempered by interactions of the components at the receptor-cell level, and possibly at the receptor-sites themselves.

  16. Characterization of amino acid aminotransferases of Methanococcus aeolicus.

    PubMed Central

    Xing, R Y; Whitman, W B

    1992-01-01

    Four aminotransferases were identified and characterized from Methanococcus aeolicus. Branched-chain aminotransferase (BcAT, EC 2.6.1.42), aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT, EC 2.6.1.1), and two aromatic aminotransferases (EC 2.6.1.57) were partially purified 175-, 84-, 600-, and 30-fold, respectively. The apparent molecular weight, substrate specificity, and kinetic properties of the BcAT were similar to those of other microbial BcATs. The AspAT had an apparent molecular weight of 162,000, which was unusually high. It had also a broad substrate specificity, which included activity towards alanine, a property which resembled the enzyme from Sulfolobus solfataricus. An additional alanine aminotransferase was not found in M. aeolicus, and this activity of AspAT could be physiologically significant. The apparent molecular weights of the aromatic aminotransferases (ArAT-I and ArAT-II) were 150,000 and 90,000, respectively. The methanococcal ArATs also had different pIs and kinetic constants. ArAT-I may be the major ArAT in methanococci. High concentrations of 2-ketoglutarate strongly inhibited valine, isoleucine, and alanine transaminations but were less inhibitory for leucine and aspartate transaminations. Aromatic amino acid transaminations were not inhibited by 2-ketoglutarate. 2-Ketoglutarate may play an important role in the regulation of amino acid biosynthesis in methanococci. PMID:1729242

  17. Genetics Home Reference: succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase deficiency succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase deficiency Enable Javascript to view ... PDF Open All Close All Description Succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase (SCOT) deficiency is an inherited ...

  18. Phosphorylation and inhibition of. gamma. -glutamyl transferase activity by cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesnichenko, L.S.; Chernov, N.N.

    1986-10-20

    It was shown that preparations of bovine kidney ..gamma..-glutamyl transferase of differing degrees of purity are phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. This is accompanied by a decrease in both the transferase and hydrolase activities of the enzyme. Consequently, ..gamma..-glutamyl transferase may serve as the substrate and target of the regulation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

  19. In Vivo d-Serine Hetero-Exchange through Alanine-Serine-Cysteine (ASC) Transporters Detected by Microelectrode Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    d-Serine, a co-agonist of N-methyl d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, has been implicated in neurological and psychiatric disorders such as cerebral ischemia, lateral amyotrophic sclerosis, or schizophrenia. d-Serine signaling represents an important pharmacological target for treating these diseases; however, the biochemical mechanisms controlling extracellular d-serine levels in vivo are still unclear. d-Serine heteroexchange through small neutral amino acid transporters has been shown in cell cultures and brain slices and could provide a biochemical mechanism for the control of d-serine extracellular concentration in vivo. Alternatively, exocytotic d-serine release has also been proposed. In this study, the dynamics of d-serine release and clearance were explored in vivo on a second-by-second time scale using microelectrode biosensors. The rate of d-serine clearance in the rat frontal cortex after a microionophoretic injection revealed a transporter-mediated uptake mechanism. d-Serine uptake was blocked by small neutral l-amino acids, implicating alanine-serine-cysteine (ASC) transporters, in particular high affinity Asc-1 and low affinity ASCT2 transporters. Interestingly, changes in alanine, serine, or threonine levels resulted in d-serine release through ASC transporters. Asc-1, but not ASCT2, appeared to release d-serine in response to changes in amino acid concentrations. Finally, neuronal silencing by tetrodotoxin increased d-serine extracellular concentration by an ASC-transporter-dependent mechanism. Together, these results indicate that d-serine heteroexchange through ASC transporters is present in vivo and may constitute a key component in the regulation of d-serine extracellular concentration. PMID:23581544

  20. Resistance to acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in glutathione S-transferase Mu 1-null mice.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Shingo; Maejima, Takanori; Fujimoto, Kazunori; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Yagi, Masae; Sugiura, Tomomi; Atsumi, Ryo; Yamazoe, Yasushi

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the role of glutathione S-transferases Mu 1 (GSTM1) in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity using Gstm1-null mice. A single oral administration of APAP resulted in a marked increase in plasma alanine aminotransferase accompanied by hepatocyte necrosis 24 hr after administration in wild-type mice, but its magnitude was unexpectedly attenuated in Gstm1-null mice. Therefore, it is suggested that Gstm1-null mice are resistant to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. To examine the mechanism of this resistance in Gstm1-null mice, we measured phosphorylation of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), which mediates the signal of APAP-induced hepatocyte necrosis, by Western blot analysis 2 and 6 hr after APAP administration. A marked increase in phosphorylated JNK was observed in wild-type mice, but the increase was markedly suppressed in Gstm1-null mice. Therefore, it is suggested that suppressed phosphorylation of JNK may be a main mechanism of the resistance to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in Gstm1-null mice, although other possibilities of the mechanism cannot be eliminated. Additionally, phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4, which are upstream kinases of JNK in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, were also suppressed in Gstm1-null mice. A decrease in liver total glutathione 2 hr after APAP administration, which is an indicator for exposure to N-acetyl-p-benzoquinoneimine, the reactive metabolite of APAP, were similar in wild-type and Gstm1-null mice. In conclusion, Gstm1-null mice are considered to be resistant to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity perhaps by the suppression of JNK phosphorylation. This study indicates the novel role of GSTM1 as a factor mediating the cellular signal for APAP-induced hepatotoxicity.

  1. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in the Almahata Sitta Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Parker, Eric T.; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    Amino acid analysis of a meteorite fragment of asteroid 2008 TC(sub 3) called Almahata Sitta was carried out using reverse-phase high-perfo rmance liquid chromatography coupled with UV fluorescence detection a nd time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-FD/ToF-MS) as part of a sam ple analysis consortium. HPLC analyses of hot-water extracts from the meteorite revealed a complex distribution of two- to six-carbon aliph atic amino acids and one- to three carbon amines with abundances rang ing from 0.5 to 149 parts-per-billion (ppb). The enantiomeric ratios of the amino acids alanine, Beta-amino-n-butyric acid (Beta-ABA), 2-amino-2- methylbutanoic acid (isovaline), and 2-aminopentanoic acid (no rvaline) in the meteorite were racemic (D/L approximately 1), indicat ing that these amino acids are indigenous to the meteorite and not te rrestrial contaminants. Several other non-protein amino acids were also identified in the meteorite above background levels including alpha -aminoisobutyric acid (alpha-AIB), 4-amino-2- methybutanoic acid, 4-a mino-3-methylbutanoic acid, and 3-, 4-, and 5-aminopentanoic acid. Th e total abundances of isovaline and AlB in Almahata Sitta are approximately 1000 times lower than the abundances of these amino acids found in the CM carbonaceous meteorite Murchison. The extremely love abund ances and unusual distribution of five carbon amino acids in Almahata Sitta compared to Cl, CM, and CR carbonaceous meteorites and may be due to extensive thermal alteration of amino acids on the parent aster oid by partial melting during formation or impact shock heating.

  2. Loss of Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier 2 in the Liver Leads to Defects in Gluconeogenesis and Compensation via Pyruvate-Alanine Cycling.

    PubMed

    McCommis, Kyle S; Chen, Zhouji; Fu, Xiaorong; McDonald, William G; Colca, Jerry R; Kletzien, Rolf F; Burgess, Shawn C; Finck, Brian N

    2015-10-01

    Pyruvate transport across the inner mitochondrial membrane is believed to be a prerequisite for gluconeogenesis in hepatocytes, which is important for the maintenance of normoglycemia during prolonged food deprivation but also contributes to hyperglycemia in diabetes. To determine the requirement for mitochondrial pyruvate import in gluconeogenesis, mice with liver-specific deletion of mitochondrial pyruvate carrier 2 (LS-Mpc2(-/-)) were generated. Loss of MPC2 impaired, but did not completely abolish, hepatocyte conversion of labeled pyruvate to TCA cycle intermediates and glucose. Unbiased metabolomic analyses of livers from fasted LS-Mpc2(-/-) mice suggested that alterations in amino acid metabolism, including pyruvate-alanine cycling, might compensate for the loss of MPC2. Indeed, inhibition of pyruvate-alanine transamination further reduced mitochondrial pyruvate metabolism and glucose production by LS-Mpc2(-/-) hepatocytes. These data demonstrate an important role for MPC2 in controlling hepatic gluconeogenesis and illuminate a compensatory mechanism for circumventing a block in mitochondrial pyruvate import.

  3. Temperature related alterations in the acidic alanine-rich "A" protein from the 50S ribosomal particle of the extreme halophile, Halobacterium cutirubrum.

    PubMed

    Strom, A R; Oda, G; Hasnain, S; Yaguchi, M; Visentin, L P

    1975-09-15

    50-S ribosomal subunits from the extreme halophilic bacterium, Halobacterium cutirubrum, contain an alanine-rich acidic "A" protein which resembles the L7--L12 multimer (Kaltschmidt and Wittmann, 1970) found in the 50-S ribosomal subunit of Escherichia coli cells. The protein contains 24 mole % alanine and is devoid of histidine, tryptophan and cysteine. Unlike E. coli which has two forms of the "A" protein distinguished solely by the acetylation state of the serine amino terminus. H. cutirubrum 50-S subunits contain only one unsubstituted form of the "A" protein in vivo. However, during purification of ribosomes from cells grown between 25 and 37 degrees C the latter "A" protein undergoes rapid, specific, in vitro enzymatic alteration at its carboxy-terminal end. When the halophile is grown in the temperature range of 40 to 42 degrees C the cleaving enzyme is not active and only one form of the "A" protein is found on the ribosomes.

  4. Dye-linked D-amino acid dehydrogenases: biochemical characteristics and applications in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Satomura, Takenori; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Suye, Shin-Ichiro; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2015-11-01

    Dye-linked D-amino acid dehydrogenases (Dye-DADHs) catalyze the dehydrogenation of free D-amino acids in the presence of an artificial electron acceptor. Although Dye-DADHs functioning in catabolism of L-alanine and as primary enzymes in electron transport chains are widely distributed in mesophilic Gram-negative bacteria, biochemical and biotechnological information on these enzymes remains scanty. This is in large part due to their instability after isolation. On the other hand, in the last decade, several novel types of Dye-DADH have been found in thermophilic bacteria and hyperthermophilic archaea, where they contribute not only to L-alanine catabolism but also to the catabolism of other amino acids, including D-arginine and L-hydroxyproline. In this minireview, we summarize recent developments in our understanding of the biochemical characteristics of Dye-DADHs and their specific application to electrochemical biosensors. PMID:26362681

  5. Dye-linked D-amino acid dehydrogenases: biochemical characteristics and applications in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Satomura, Takenori; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Suye, Shin-Ichiro; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2015-11-01

    Dye-linked D-amino acid dehydrogenases (Dye-DADHs) catalyze the dehydrogenation of free D-amino acids in the presence of an artificial electron acceptor. Although Dye-DADHs functioning in catabolism of L-alanine and as primary enzymes in electron transport chains are widely distributed in mesophilic Gram-negative bacteria, biochemical and biotechnological information on these enzymes remains scanty. This is in large part due to their instability after isolation. On the other hand, in the last decade, several novel types of Dye-DADH have been found in thermophilic bacteria and hyperthermophilic archaea, where they contribute not only to L-alanine catabolism but also to the catabolism of other amino acids, including D-arginine and L-hydroxyproline. In this minireview, we summarize recent developments in our understanding of the biochemical characteristics of Dye-DADHs and their specific application to electrochemical biosensors.

  6. New salts of amino acids with dimeric cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazaryan, V. V.; Fleck, M.; Petrosyan, A. M.

    2010-10-01

    Among salts of amino acids there are compounds with the composition 2A..HX, which consist of dimeric A...A+ cations with short symmetric or asymmetric hydrogen bonds between zwitter-ionic and protonated moieties. These species are materials liable to undergo phase transitions or possess interesting nonlinear optical properties. Here, we report the preparation of 20 new salts with dimeric cations from aqueous solutions, including compounds of glycine, betaine, β- alanine, L-alanine, L-phenylalanine, L-threonine, L-valine, L-leucine and L-proline, with BF4-, ClO4-, Cl-, Br-, HSeO3-, and HC2O4-; as anions. The prepared salts are characterized by IR and Raman spectroscopy. Some of them are grown in form of good quality single crystals, which allowed the determination of their crystal structure.

  7. Amino acid profile during exercise and training in Standardbreds.

    PubMed

    Westermann, C M; Dorland, L; Wijnberg, I D; de Sain-van der Velden, M G M; van Breda, E; Barneveld, A; de Graaf-Roelfsema, E; Keizer, H A; van der Kolk, J H

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the influence of acute exercise, training and intensified training on the plasma amino acid profile. In a 32-week longitudinal study using 10 Standardbred horses, training was divided into four phases, including a phase of intensified training for five horses. At the end of each phase, a standardized exercise test, SET, was performed. Plasma amino acid concentrations before and after each SET were measured. Training significantly reduced mean plasma aspartic acid concentration, whereas exercise significantly increased the plasma concentrations of alanine, taurine, methionine, leucine, tyrosine and phenylalanine and reduced the plasma concentrations of glycine, ornithine, glutamine, citrulline and serine. Normally and intensified trained horses differed not significantly. It is concluded that amino acids should not be regarded as limiting training performance in Standardbreds except for aspartic acid which is the most likely candidate for supplementation. PMID:20863542

  8. Abiotic racemization kinetics of amino acids in marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Steen, Andrew D; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Lomstein, Bente Aa

    2013-01-01

    The ratios of d- versus l-amino acids can be used to infer the sources and composition of sedimentary organic matter. Such inferences, however, rely on knowing the rates at which amino acids in sedimentary organic matter racemize abiotically between the d- and the l-forms. Based on a heating experiment, we report kinetic parameters for racemization of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, and alanine in bulk sediment from Aarhus Bay, Denmark, taken from the surface, 30 cm, and 340 cm depth below seafloor. Extrapolation to a typical cold deep sea sediment temperature of 3°C suggests racemization rate constants of 0.50×10(-5)-11×10(-5) yr(-1). These results can be used in conjunction with measurements of sediment age to predict the ratio of d:l amino acids due solely to abiotic racemization of the source material, deviations from which can indicate the abundance and turnover of active microbial populations.

  9. Interaction of L-alanyl-L-valine and L-valyl-L-alanine with organic vapors: thermal stability of clathrates, sorption capacity and the change in the morphology of dipeptide films.

    PubMed

    Ziganshin, Marat A; Gubina, Nadezhda S; Gerasimov, Alexander V; Gorbatchuk, Valery V; Ziganshina, Sufia A; Chuklanov, Anton P; Bukharaev, Anastas A

    2015-08-21

    The strong effect of the amino acid sequence in L-alanyl-L-valine and L-valyl-L-alanine on their sorption properties toward organic compounds and water, and the thermal stability of the inclusion compounds of these dipeptides have been found. Generally, L-valyl-L-alanine has a greater sorption capacity for the studied compounds, but the thermal stability of the L-alanyl-L-valine clathrates is higher. Unusual selectivity of L-valyl-L-alanine for vapors of few chloroalkanes was observed. The correlation between the change in the surface morphology of thin film of dipeptides and stoichiometry of their clathrates with organic compounds was found. This discovery may be used to predict the influence of vapors on the morphology of films of short-chain oligopeptides.

  10. NMR chemical shifts in amino acids: Effects of environments, electric field, and amine group rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Young-Gui; Pfrommer, Bernd G.; Louie, Steven G.; Canning, Andrew

    2002-03-03

    The authors present calculations of NMR chemical shifts in crystalline phases of some representative amino acids such as glycine, alanine, and alanyl-alanine. To get an insight on how different environments affect the chemical shifts, they study the transition from the crystalline phase to completely isolated molecules of glycine. In the crystalline limit, the shifts are dominated by intermolecular hydrogen-bonds. In the molecular limit, however, dipole electric field effects dominate the behavior of the chemical shifts. They show that it is necessary to average the chemical shifts in glycine over geometries. Tensor components are analyzed to get the angle dependent proton chemical shifts, which is a more refined characterization method.

  11. Free amino acid profiling in the giant puffball mushroom (Calvatia gigantea) using UPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Kıvrak, İbrahim; Kıvrak, Şeyda; Harmandar, Mansur

    2014-09-01

    Wild edible and medicinal mushroom, Calvatia gigantea, was quantitatively analyzed for the determination of its free amino acids using ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). The concentrations of total free amino acids, essential and non-essential amino acids were 199.65 mg/100 g, 113.69 mg/100 g, and 85.96 mg/100 g in C. gigantea, respectively. This study showed that C. gigantea, so called a giant puffball mushroom, has free amino acids content. The essential amino acids: tryptophan, isoleucine, valine, phenylalanine, leucine, threonine, lysine, histidine, methionine, and the non-essential amino acids: tyrosine, 4-hyrdroxy proline, arginine, proline, glycine, serine, alanine, glutamine, glutamic acid, aspargine, aspartic acid were detected.

  12. Distribution and enantiomeric composition of amino acids in the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, M. H.; Nagy, B.

    1982-01-01

    Studies of the amino acid contents and enantiomeric compositions of a single stone from the Murchison meteorite are reported. Water-extracted and 6M HCl-extracted samples from the meteorite interior of meteorite fragments were analyzed by gas chromatography and combined gas chromatography-chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Examination of the D/L ratios of glutamic acid, aspartic acid, proline, leucine and alanine reveals those amino acids extractable by water to be partially racemized, whereas the acid-extracted amino acids were less racemized. The amino acid composition of the stone is similar to those previously reported, including the absence of serine, threonine, tyrosine phenylalanine and methionine and the presence of unusual amino acids including such as isovaline, alpha-aminoisobutyric acid and pseudoleucine. It is concluded that the most likely mechanism accounting for the occurrence of nonracemic amino acid mixtures in the Murchison meteorite is by extraterrestrial stereoselective synthesis or decomposition reactions.

  13. Formation of Amino Acid Thioesters for Prebiotic Peptide Synthesis: Catalysis By Amino Acid Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The origin of life can be described as a series of events in which a prebiotic chemical process came increasingly under the control of its catalytic products. In our search for this prebiotic process that yielded catalytic takeover products (such as polypeptides), we have been investigating a reaction system that generates peptide-forming amino acid thioesters from formaldehyde, glycolaldehyde, and ammonia in the presence of thiols. As shown below, this model process begins by aldol condensation of formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde to give trioses and releases. These sugars then undergo beta-dehydration yielding their respective alpha-ketoaldehydes. Addition of ammonia to the alpha-ketoaldehydes yields imines which can either: (a) rearrange in the presence of thesis to give amino acid thioesters or (be react with another molecule of aldehyde to give imidazoles. This 'one-pot' reaction system operates under mild aqueous conditions, and like modem amino acid biosynthesis, uses sugar intermediates which are converted to products by energy-yielding redox reactions. Recently, we discovered that amino acids, such as the alanine reaction product, catalyze the first and second steps of the process. In the presence of ammonia the process also generates other synthetically useful products, like the important biochemical -- pyruvic acid.

  14. Branched-chain amino acid supplementation during bed rest: effect on recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.; Donaldson, M. R.; Leskiw, M. J.; Schluter, M. D.; Baggett, D. W.; Boden, G.

    2003-01-01

    Bed rest is associated with a loss of protein from the weight-bearing muscle. The objectives of this study are to determine whether increasing dietary branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) during bed rest improves the anabolic response after bed rest. The study consisted of a 1-day ambulatory period, 14 days of bed rest, and a 4-day recovery period. During bed rest, dietary intake was supplemented with either 30 mmol/day each of glycine, serine, and alanine (group 1) or with 30 mmol/day each of the three BCAAs (group 2). Whole body protein synthesis was determined with U-(15)N-labeled amino acids, muscle, and selected plasma protein synthesis with l-[(2)H(5)]phenylalanine. Total glucose production and gluconeogenesis from alanine were determined with l-[U-(13)C(3)]alanine and [6,6-(2)H(2)]glucose. During bed rest, nitrogen (N) retention was greater with BCAA feeding (56 +/- 6 vs. 26 +/- 12 mg N. kg(-1). day(-1), P < 0.05). There was no effect of BCAA supplementation on either whole body, muscle, or plasma protein synthesis or the rate of 3-MeH excretion. Muscle tissue free amino acid concentrations were increased during bed rest with BCAA (0.214 +/- 0.066 vs. 0.088 +/- 0.12 nmol/mg protein, P < 0.05). Total glucose production and gluconeogenesis from alanine were unchanged with bed rest but were significantly reduced (P < 0.05) with the BCAA group in the recovery phase. In conclusion, the improved N retention during bed rest is due, at least in part, to accretion of amino acids in the tissue free amino acid pools. The amount accreted is not enough to impact protein kinetics in the recovery phase but does improve N retention by providing additional essential amino acids in the early recovery phase.

  15. Elevation of plasma glucose, alanine, and urea levels by mammalian ACTH in the American bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana).

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, E J; deRoos, R

    1985-08-01

    The effects of a single infusion of mammalian ACTH on plasma glucose, alanine, urea, and lactate were determined in the American bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana). The ACTH (10 U/250 g body wt) was administered, and serial blood samples were collected via a nonocclusive cannula chronically placed in the right truncus arteriosus. Plasma metabolite levels were estimated by standard enzymatic techniques. The plasma metabolites declined following the surgery to levels that were relatively stable by postoperative Day 2. The levels did not vary significantly for the remainder of the 3- or 4-day pretreatment period and in the control bullfrogs during the 48-hr experiments. Plasma glucose levels were essentially unchanged from the time-zero levels at 6 hr following ACTH infusion. Plasma glucose levels subsequently increased to levels that were approximately 24% greater than the control levels by 24 hr and then declined to near control levels by 48 hr. Plasma alanine increased to levels that were approximately 60% greater than the control levels by 12 hr after ACTH treatment and returned to essentially the time-zero levels by 24 hr. Plasma urea rose to levels that were approximately 110% greater than the control levels by 45 min after ACTH infusion, but urea returned to essentially the time-zero levels by 1.5 through 3 hr. Plasma urea increased again to levels that were approximately 90% greater than the control levels by 6 hr and returned to essentially the initial levels by 24 hr. Plasma lactate levels were not significantly influenced by ACTH treatment. The results suggest that a function of the bullfrog hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis is to regulate gluconeogenesis from alanine, and probably other glucogenic amino acids.

  16. Performance effects of acute β-alanine induced paresthesia in competitive cyclists.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, Phillip M; Minahan, Clare L

    2016-01-01

    β-alanine is a common ingredient in supplements consumed by athletes. Indeed, athletes may believe that the β-alanine induced paresthesia, experienced shortly after ingestion, is associated with its ergogenic effect despite no scientific mechanism supporting this notion. The present study examined changes in cycling performance under conditions of β-alanine induced paresthesia. Eight competitive cyclists (VO2max = 61.8 ± 4.2 mL·kg·min(-1)) performed three practices, one baseline and four experimental trials. The experimental trials comprised a 1-km cycling time trial under four conditions with varying information (i.e., athlete informed β-alanine or placebo) and supplement content (athlete received β-alanine or placebo) delivered to the cyclist: informed β-alanine/received β-alanine, informed placebo/received β-alanine, informed β-alanine/received placebo and informed placebo/received placebo. Questionnaires were undertaken exploring the cyclists' experience of the effects of the experimental conditions. A possibly likely increase in mean power was associated with conditions in which β-alanine was administered (±95% CL: 2.2% ± 4.0%), but these results were inconclusive for performance enhancement (p = 0.32, effect size = 0.18, smallest worthwhile change = 56% beneficial). A possibly harmful effect was observed when cyclists were correctly informed that they had ingested a placebo (-1.0% ± 1.9%). Questionnaire data suggested that β-alanine ingestion resulted in evident sensory side effects and six cyclists reported placebo effects. Acute ingestion of β-alanine is not associated with improved 1-km TT performance in competitive cyclists. These findings are in contrast to the athlete's "belief" as cyclists reported improved energy and the ability to sustain a higher power output under conditions of β-alanine induced paresthesia.

  17. Properties of Succinyl-Coenzyme A:l-Malate Coenzyme A Transferase and Its Role in the Autotrophic 3-Hydroxypropionate Cycle of Chloroflexus aurantiacus

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann, Silke; Steindorf, Astrid; Alber, Birgit E.; Fuchs, Georg

    2006-01-01

    The 3-hydroxypropionate cycle has been proposed to operate as the autotrophic CO2 fixation pathway in the phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus. In this pathway, acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) and two bicarbonate molecules are converted to malate. Acetyl-CoA is regenerated from malyl-CoA by l-malyl-CoA lyase. The enzyme forming malyl-CoA, succinyl-CoA:l-malate coenzyme A transferase, was purified. Based on the N-terminal amino acid sequence of its two subunits, the corresponding genes were identified on a gene cluster which also contains the gene for l-malyl-CoA lyase, the subsequent enzyme in the pathway. Both enzymes were severalfold up-regulated under autotrophic conditions, which is in line with their proposed function in CO2 fixation. The two CoA transferase genes were cloned and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant enzyme was purified and studied. Succinyl-CoA:l-malate CoA transferase forms a large (αβ)n complex consisting of 46- and 44-kDa subunits and catalyzes the reversible reaction succinyl-CoA + l-malate → succinate + l-malyl-CoA. It is specific for succinyl-CoA as the CoA donor but accepts l-citramalate instead of l-malate as the CoA acceptor; the corresponding d-stereoisomers are not accepted. The enzyme is a member of the class III of the CoA transferase family. The demonstration of the missing CoA transferase closes the last gap in the proposed 3-hydroxypropionate cycle. PMID:16547052

  18. Identification and characterization of two bile acid coenzyme A transferases from Clostridium scindens, a bile acid 7α-dehydroxylating intestinal bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ridlon, Jason M.; Hylemon, Phillip B.

    2012-01-01

    The human bile acid pool composition is composed of both primary bile acids (cholic acid and chenodeoxycholic acid) and secondary bile acids (deoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid). Secondary bile acids are formed by the 7α-dehydroxylation of primary bile acids carried out by intestinal anaerobic bacteria. We have previously described a multistep biochemical pathway in Clostridium scindens that is responsible for bile acid 7α-dehydroxylation. We have identified a large (12 kb) bile acid inducible (bai) operon in this bacterium that encodes eight genes involved in bile acid 7α-dehydroxylation. However, the function of the baiF gene product in this operon has not been elucidated. In the current study, we cloned and expressed the baiF gene in E. coli and discovered it has bile acid CoA transferase activity. In addition, we discovered a second bai operon encoding three genes. The baiK gene in this operon was expressed in E. coli and found to encode a second bile acid CoA transferase. Both bile acid CoA transferases were determined to be members of the type III family by amino acid sequence comparisons. Both bile acid CoA transferases had broad substrate specificity, except the baiK gene product, which failed to use lithocholyl-CoA as a CoA donor. Primary bile acids are ligated to CoA via an ATP-dependent mechanism during the initial steps of 7α-dehydroxylation. The bile acid CoA transferases conserve the thioester bond energy, saving the cell ATP molecules during bile acid 7α-dehydroxylation. ATP-dependent CoA ligation is likely quickly supplanted by ATP-independent CoA transfer. PMID:22021638

  19. Solid state radiolysis of amino acids in an astrochemical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cataldo, Franco; Angelini, Giancarlo; Iglesias-Groth, Susana; Manchado, Arturo

    2011-01-01

    The aliphatic amino acids L-alanine and L-leucine and the aromatic amino acids L-phenylalanine, L-tyrosine and L-tryptophan were irradiated in the solid state to a dose of 3.2 MGy. The degree of decomposition was measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Furthermore the degree of radioracemization was measured by optical rotatory dispersion (ORD) spectroscopy. From the DSC measurement a radiolysis rate constant k and the half life T1/2 for each amino acid have been determined and extrapolated to a dose of 14 MGy, which corresponds to the expected total dose delivered by the decay of radionuclides to the organic molecules present in comets and asteroids in 4.6×109 years, the age of the Solar System. It is shown that all the amino acids studied can survive a radiation dose of 14 MGy although they are reduced to 1/4-1/5 of their original value they had at the beginning of the history of the Solar System. Consequently, the amount of alanine or leucine found today in the meteorites known as carbonaceous chondrites is just 1/4-1/5 of the amount originally present at the epoch of the formation of the Solar System 4.6×109 years ago. Among the amino acids studied, tyrosine shows the highest radiation resistance while tryptophan does not combine its relatively high radiation resistance with an elevated level of radioracemization resistance. Apart from the exception of tryptophan, it is shown that the radiolysis rate constants k of all the amino acids studied are in reasonable agreement with the radioracemization rate constant krac.

  20. Proton mobilities in crambin and glutathione S-transferase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanderlingh, U. N.; Corsaro, C.; Hayward, R. L.; Bée, M.; Middendorf, H. D.

    2003-08-01

    Using a neutron backscattering spectrometer, the temperature dependence of mean-square atomic displacements derived from window-integrated quasielastic spectra was measured for two D 2O-hydrated proteins: crambin and glutathione S-transferase. Analyses show that the anharmonic dynamics observed around and above 200 K is consistent with a description in terms of proton/deuteron jumps within asymmetric double-minimum potentials. Also determined were activation energies along with estimates of effective masses and average oscillator energies.

  1. Plane wave density functional theory studies of the structural and the electronic properties of amino acids attached to graphene oxide via peptide bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Byeong June; Jeong, Hae Kyung; Lee, ChangWoo

    2015-08-01

    We studied via plane wave pseudopotential total-energy calculations within the local spin density approximation (LSDA) the electronic and the structural properties of amino acids (alanine, glycine, and histidine) attached to graphene oxide (GO) by peptide bonding. The HOMO-LUMO gap, the Hirshfeld charges, and the equilibrium geometrical structures exhibit distinctive variations that depend on the species of the attached amino acid. The GO-amino acid system appears to be a good candidate for a biosensor.

  2. Vertebrate Acyl CoA synthetase family member 4 (ACSF4-U26) is a β-alanine-activating enzyme homologous to bacterial non-ribosomal peptide synthetase.

    PubMed

    Drozak, Jakub; Veiga-da-Cunha, Maria; Kadziolka, Beata; Van Schaftingen, Emile

    2014-03-01

    Mammalian ACSF4-U26 (Acyl CoA synthetase family member 4), a protein of unknown function, comprises a putative adenylation domain (AMP-binding domain) similar to those of bacterial non-ribosomal peptide synthetases, a putative phosphopantetheine attachment site, and a C-terminal PQQDH (pyrroloquinoline quinone dehydrogenase)-related domain. Orthologues comprising these three domains are present in many eukaryotes including plants. Remarkably, the adenylation domain of plant ACSF4-U26 show greater identity with Ebony, the insect enzyme that ligates β-alanine to several amines, than with vertebrate or insect ACSF4-U26, and prediction of its specificity suggests that it activates β-alanine. In the presence of ATP, purified mouse recombinant ACSF4-U26 progressively formed a covalent bond with radiolabelled β-alanine. The bond was not formed in a point mutant lacking the phosphopantetheine attachment site. Competition experiments with various amino acids indicated that the reaction was almost specific for β-alanine, and a KM of ~ 5 μm was calculated for this reaction. The loaded enzyme was used to study the formation of a potential end product. Among the 20 standard amino acids, only cysteine stimulated unloading of the enzyme. This effect was mimicked by cysteamine and dithiothreitol, and was unaffected by absence of the PQQDH-related domain, suggesting that β-alanine transfer onto thiols is catalysed by the ACSF4-U26 adenylation domain, but is physiologically irrelevant. We conclude that ACSF4-U26 is a β-alanine-activating enzyme, and hypothesize that it is involved in a rare intracellular reaction, possibly an infrequent post-translational or post-transcriptional modification.

  3. D-Alanine in the islets of Langerhans of rat pancreas.

    PubMed

    Ota, Nobutoshi; Rubakhin, Stanislav S; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2014-05-01

    Relatively high levels of D-alanine (D-Ala), an endogenous D-amino acid, have been found in the endocrine systems of several animals, especially in the anterior pituitary; however, its functional importance remains largely unknown. We observed D-Ala in islets of Langerhans isolated from rat pancreas in significantly higher levels than in the anterior/intermediate pituitary; specifically, 180±60 fmol D-Ala per islet (300±100 nmol/gislet), and 10±2.5 nmol/g of wet tissue in pituitary. Additionally, 12±5% of the free Ala in the islets was in the d form, almost an order of magnitude higher than the percentage of D-Ala found in the pituitary. Surprisingly, glucose stimulation of the islets resulted in D-Ala release of 0.6±0.5 fmol per islet. As D-Ala is stored in islets and released in response to changes in extracellular glucose, D-Ala may have a hormonal role.

  4. β-N-methylamino-L-alanine induces neurological deficits and shortened life span in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xianchong; Escala, Wilfredo; Papapetropoulos, Spyridon; Zhai, R Grace

    2010-11-01

    The neurotoxic non-protein amino acid, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), was first associated with the high incidence of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/Parkinsonism Dementia Complex (ALS/PDC) in Guam. Recently, BMAA has been implicated as a fierce environmental factor that contributes to the etiology of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, in addition to ALS. However, the toxicity of BMAA in vivo has not been clearly demonstrated. Here we report our investigation of the neurotoxicity of BMAA in Drosophila. We found that dietary intake of BMAA reduced life span, locomotor functions, and learning and memory abilities in flies. The severity of the alterations in phenotype is correlated with the concentration of BMAA detected in flies. Interestingly, developmental exposure to BMAA had limited impact on survival rate, but reduced fertility in females, and caused delayed neurological impairment in aged adults. Our studies indicate that BMAA exposure causes chronic neurotoxicity, and that Drosophila serves as a useful model in dissecting the pathogenesis of ALS/PDC.

  5. Development of an alanine dosimeter for gamma dosimetry in mixed environments

    SciTech Connect

    Vehar, D.W.; Griffin, P.J.

    1992-12-31

    L-{alpha}a-Alanine, a nontoxic polycrystalline amino acid, has been investigated for use in high-precision, high-level absorbed-dose measurements in mixed neutron/photon environments such as research and test reactors. The technique is based on the use of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to determine the extent of free radical production in a sample exposed to ionizing radiation, and has been successfully used for photon absorbed-dose measurements at levels exceeding 10{sup 5} Gy with high measurement precision. Application of the technique to mixed environments requires knowledge of the energy-dependent response of the dosimeter for both photons and neutrons. Determination of the dosimeter response to photons is accomplished by irradiations in {sup 60}Co and bremsstrahlung sources and by calculations of energy-dependent photon kerma. Neutron response is determined by calculations in conjunction with CaF{sub 2}:Mn thermoluminescence dosimeters and by calculations of energy-dependent neutron kerma. Several neutron environments are used, including the ACRR and SPR-III reactors.

  6. Development of an alanine dosimeter for gamma dosimetry in mixed environments -- Summary of research

    SciTech Connect

    Vehar, D.W.; Griffin, P.J.

    1994-02-01

    L-{alpha}-alanine, a nontoxic polycrystalline amino acid, has been investigated for use in high-precision, high-level absorbed-dose measurements in mixed neutron/photon environments such as research and test reactors. The technique is based on the use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to determine the extent of free radical production in a sample exposed to ionizing radiation, and has been successfully used for photon absorbed-dose measurements at levels exceeding 10{sup 5} Gy with high measurement precision. Application of the technique to mixed environments requires knowledge of the energy-dependent response of the dosimeter for both photons and neutrons. Determination of the dosimeter response to photons is accomplished by irradiations in {sup 60}Co and bremsstrahlung sources and by calculations of energy-dependent photon kerma. Neutron response is determined by irradiations in conjunction with CaF{sub 2}:Mn thermoluminescence dosimeters and by calculations of energy-dependent neutron kerma. Several neutron environments are used, including those provided by the Annular Core Research Reactor and Sandia Pulsed Reactor.

  7. Enantioselective hydrogenation of pyruvic acid oxime to alanine on Pd/Alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Borszeky, K.; Mallat, T.; Aeschiman, R.

    1996-06-01

    The chemo- and enantioselective hydrogenation of pyruvic acid oxime have been studied on Pd/alumina, the latter in the presence of the 1,2-amino alcohol type alkaloids ephedrine, cinchonidine, and cinchonine. High yields of racemic alanine (90-98%) were obtained in the absence of alkaloids in polar solvents at 0-45{degrees}C and 10 bar. Enantioselection increased with higher temperature and alkalid: oxime molar ratio. A 1:1 ephedrine: oxime molar ratio afforded the best enantiomeric excess (26%). The presence of alkaloid resulted in a decrease of reaction rate by a factor of up to 140, compared to the racemic hydrogenation. Based on X-ray crystal structure analysis of the alkaloid-pyruvic acid oxime adduct, a mechanism is proposed for the steric course of the reaction. Extended interactions by multiple H bonds between the adsorbed alkaloid-oxime salt units on the Pd surface is assumed to be at the origin of the moderate enantioselectivity and the very low enantioselective hydrogenation rate. 28 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Determination of free L- and D-alanine in hydrolysed protein fertilisers by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Cavani, Luciano; Ciavatta, Claudio; Gessa, Carlo

    2003-01-24

    of racemisation of hydrolysed protein fertilisers (HPFs) using an The objective of this study was to determine the degree inexpensive and easy to handle analytical method for qualitative control of the products. Using a polyacrylamide coated capillary and a run buffer containing 0.1 M Tris-borate+2.5 mM EDTA-Na2+0.1% sodium dodecylsulfate+10 mM beta-cyclodextrin a quantitative separation of D- and L-alanine (Ala) was made from an not treated HPF sample derivatised with dansyl chlorine by capillary electrophoresis. The D-Ala:[D-Ala+L-Ala] ratio, called degree of racemisation (RD), was calculated. The analysis of ten commercial HPFs has shown that more than 60% of HPFs have an RD > or = 40%. while only one product has shown an RD <5%. These results showed that most of the HPFs on the market are obtained with strong hydrolytic processes and high contents of D-amino acids are probably less effective as plant nutrients or even potentially dangerous to plants.

  9. Biotransfer of β-N-Methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) in a Eutrophicated Freshwater Lake

    PubMed Central

    Lage, Sandra; Annadotter, Heléne; Rasmussen, Ulla; Rydberg, Sara

    2015-01-01

    β-N-Methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), a neurotoxic non-protein amino acid, plays a significant role as an environmental risk factor in neurodegenerative diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. BMAA producers occur globally, colonizing almost all habitats and represent species from distinct phytoplanktonic groups, i.e., cyanobacteria, diatoms, and dinoflagellates. Bioaccumulation of BMAA in invertebrate and vertebrate organisms has also been registered around the globe. In the Baltic Sea, BMAA has been detected in several commercial fish species, raising the question of the bioaccumulation of BMAA in Swedish limnic systems. Here we find the presence of BMAA in water samples from Lake Finjasjön and identify its bioaccumulation patterns in both plankti-benthivorous and piscivorous fish, according to fish species, total weight, gender, and season of collection. For the first time, a large number of fish individuals were used in order to draw conclusions on BMAA bioaccumulation in a closed ecological community based on a statistical approach. We may, therefore, conclude that feeding patterns (plankti-benthivorous) and increased age of fish may lead to a higher tissue concentration of BMAA. PMID:25738330

  10. Formation of chloroform during chlorination of alanine in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wen-Hai; Gao, Nai-Yun; Deng, Yang; Dong, Bing-Zhi

    2009-11-01

    Currently, dissolved nitrogenous organic matters in water, important precursors of disinfection by-products (DBPs), are of significant concern. This study was to explore the formation of chloroform (CF) during chlorination of alanine (Ala), an important nitrogenous organic compound commonly present in water sources. Our results indicated that the CF yield reached a maximum value of 0.143% at the molar ratio of chlorine atom to nitrogen atom (Cl/N)=1.0 over a Cl/N range of 0.2-5.0 (pH=7.0, reaction time=5d, and initial Ala=0.1mM). At an acidic-neutral condition (pH 4-7), the formation of CF was suppressed. However, the highest CF yield (0.227%) occurred at weakly alkaline condition (pH 8.0) (initial Ala=0.1mM, and Cl/N=1.0). The increase of Br(-) in water can increase total trihalomethanes (THMs) and bromo-THMs. However, the bromo-THMs level reached a plateau at Br(-)/Cl>0.04. Finally, based on the computation of frontier electron density and identification and measurement of key intermediates during Ala chlorination, we proposed a formation pathway of CF from Ala chlorination: Ala-->monochloro-N-alanine (MC-N-Ala)-->acetaldehyde (AAld)-->monochloroacetaldehyde acetaldehyde (MCAld)-->dichloroacetaldehyde (DCAld)-->trichloroacetaldehyde (TCAld)-->CF.

  11. Photophysical properties of 3-[2-(N-phenylcarbazolyl)benzoxazol-5-yl]alanine derivatives--experimental and theoretical studies.

    PubMed

    Guzow, Katarzyna; Czerwińska, Marlena; Ceszlak, Agnieszka; Kozarzewska, Marta; Szabelski, Mariusz; Czaplewski, Cezary; Łukaszewicz, Anna; Kubicki, Aleksander A; Wiczk, Wiesław

    2013-02-01

    Solvatochromic probes are often used in biophysical studies to obtain information about polarity of the microenvironment. As there is not much natural fluorophores with such properties, there is still need for new synthetic compounds such as 3-(2-benzoxazol-5-yl)alanine derivatives. Among this group of non-proteinogenic fluorescent amino acids especially interesting are 3-[2-(4-aminophenyl)benzoxazol-5-yl]alanine derivatives whose solvatochromism depends on the substituents on the nitrogen atom, as revealed by our recent studies. To expand them we synthesized two new derivatives with an N-phenylcarbazole moiety in position 2 of the benzoxazole ring and studied their photophysical properties in solvents of different polarity and ability to form hydrogen bonds using absorption and steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Applying single parameter and multi-linear correlations with different solvent parameters, the excited state dipole moments were determined as well as the influence of solvent parameters on each photophysical property was estimated. Moreover, the geometry of compounds and vertical absorption transition were theoretically calculated (DFT and TD DFT methods). It was found that the place of substitution of the N-phenylcarbazole part by the benzoxazole unit determines the character of the electron transition (π-π* or ICT) and thereby the spectral and photophysical properties of the compounds studied.

  12. Functional characterization of a member of alanine or glycine: cation symporter family in halotolerant cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica.

    PubMed

    Bualuang, Aporn; Kageyama, Hakuto; Tanaka, Yoshito; Incharoensakdi, Aran; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins of amino acid-polyamine-organocation (APC) superfamily transport amino acids and amines across membranes and play important roles in the regulation of cellular processes. The alanine or glycine: cation symporter (AGCS) family belongs to APC superfamily and is found in prokaryotes, but its substrate specificity remains to be clarified. In this study, we found that a halotolerant cyanobacterium, Aphanothece halophytica has two putative ApagcS genes. The deduced amino acid sequence of one of genes, ApagcS1, exhibited high homology to Pseudomonas AgcS. The ApagcS1 gene was expressed in Escherichia coli JW4166 which is deficient in glycine uptake. Kinetics studies in JW4166 revealed that ApAgcS1 is a sodium-dependent glycine transporter. Competition experiments showed the significant inhibition by glutamine, asparagine, and glycine. The level of mRNA for ApagcS1 was induced by NaCl and nitrogen-deficient stresses. Uptake of glutamine by ApAgcS1 was also observed. Based on these data, the physiological role of ApAgcS1 was discussed.

  13. Involvement of alanine racemase in germination of Bacillus cereus spores lacking an intact exosporium.

    PubMed

    Venir, Elena; Del Torre, Manuela; Cunsolo, Vincenzo; Saletti, Rosaria; Musetti, Rita; Stecchini, Mara Lucia

    2014-02-01

    The L-alanine mediated germination of food isolated Bacillus cereus DSA 1 spores, which lacked an intact exosporium, increased in the presence of D-cycloserine (DCS), which is an alanine racemase (Alr) inhibitor, reflecting the activity of the Alr enzyme, capable of converting L-alanine to the germination inhibitor D-alanine. Proteomic analysis of the alkaline extracts of the spore proteins, which include exosporium and coat proteins, confirmed that Alr was present in the B. cereus DSA 1 spores and matched to that encoded by B. cereus ATCC 14579, whose spore germination was strongly affected by the block of conversion of L- to D-alanine. Unlike ATCC 14579 spores, L-alanine germination of B. cereus DSA 1 spores was not affected by the preincubation with DCS, suggesting a lack of restriction in the reactant accessibility.

  14. Stability of amino acids and their oligomerization under high-pressure conditions: implications for prebiotic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Otake, Tsubasa; Taniguchi, Takashi; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kawamura, Fumio; Nakazawa, Hiromoto; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2011-10-01

    The polymerization of amino acids leading to the formation of peptides and proteins is a significant problem for the origin of life. This problem stems from the instability of amino acids and the difficulty of their oligomerization in aqueous environments, such as seafloor hydrothermal systems. We investigated the stability of amino acids and their oligomerization reactions under high-temperature (180-400°C) and high-pressure (1.0-5.5 GPa) conditions, based on the hypothesis that the polymerization of amino acids occurred in marine sediments during diagenesis and metamorphism, at convergent margins on early Earth. Our results show that the amino acids glycine and alanine are stabilized by high pressure. Oligomers up to pentamers were formed, which has never been reported for alanine in the absence of a catalyst. The yields of peptides at a given temperature and reaction time were higher under higher-pressure conditions. Elemental, infrared, and isotopic analyses of the reaction products indicated that deamination is a key degradation process for amino acids and peptides under high-pressure conditions. A possible NH(3)-rich environment in marine sediments on early Earth may have further stabilized amino acids and peptides by inhibiting their deamination.

  15. Stability of amino acids and their oligomerization under high-pressure conditions: implications for prebiotic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Otake, Tsubasa; Taniguchi, Takashi; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kawamura, Fumio; Nakazawa, Hiromoto; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2011-10-01

    The polymerization of amino acids leading to the formation of peptides and proteins is a significant problem for the origin of life. This problem stems from the instability of amino acids and the difficulty of their oligomerization in aqueous environments, such as seafloor hydrothermal systems. We investigated the stability of amino acids and their oligomerization reactions under high-temperature (180-400°C) and high-pressure (1.0-5.5 GPa) conditions, based on the hypothesis that the polymerization of amino acids occurred in marine sediments during diagenesis and metamorphism, at convergent margins on early Earth. Our results show that the amino acids glycine and alanine are stabilized by high pressure. Oligomers up to pentamers were formed, which has never been reported for alanine in the absence of a catalyst. The yields of peptides at a given temperature and reaction time were higher under higher-pressure conditions. Elemental, infrared, and isotopic analyses of the reaction products indicated that deamination is a key degradation process for amino acids and peptides under high-pressure conditions. A possible NH(3)-rich environment in marine sediments on early Earth may have further stabilized amino acids and peptides by inhibiting their deamination. PMID:21961531

  16. Amino Acid Chemistry as a Link Between Small Solar System Bodies and Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Botta, Oliver; Cooper, George; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2000-01-01

    Establishing chemical links between meteorites and small solar system bodies, such as comets and asteroids, provides a tool for investigating the processes that occurred during the formation of the solar system. Carbonaceous meteorites are of particular interest, since they may have seeded the early Earth with a variety of prebiotic organic compounds including amino acids, purines and pyrimidines, which are thought to be necessary for the origin of life. Here we report the results of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) based amino acid analyses of the acid-hydrolyzed hot water extracts from pristine interior pieces of the CI carbonaceous chondrites Orgueil and Ivuna and the CM meteorites Murchison and Murray. We found that the CI meteorites Orgueil and Ivuna contained high abundances of beta-alanine and glycine, while only traces of other amino acids like alanine, alpha-amino-n-butryic acid (ABA) and alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) were detected in these meteorites. Carbon isotopic measurements of beta-alanine and glycine in Orgueil by gas chromatography combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry clearly indicate an extraterrestrial origin of these amino acids. The amino acid composition of Orgueil and Ivuna was strikingly different from the CM chondrites Murchison and Murray. The most notable difference was the high relative abundance of B-alanine in Orgueil and Ivuna compared to Murchison and Murray. Furthermore, AIB, which is one of the most abundant amino acids found in Murchison and Murray, was present in only trace amounts in Orgueil and Ivuna. Our amino acid data strongly suggest that the CI meteorites Orgueil and Ivuna came from a different type of parent body than the CM meteorites Murchison and Murray, possibly from an extinct comet. It is generally thought that carbonaceous meteorites are fragments of larger asteroidal bodies delivered via near Earth objects (NEO). Orbital and dynamic studies suggest that both fragments of main belt asteroids

  17. GABA, β-alanine and glycine in the digestive juice of privet-specialist insects: convergent adaptive traits against plant iridoids.

    PubMed

    Konno, Kotaro; Hirayama, Chikara; Yasui, Hiroe; Okada, Sachiko; Sugimura, Masahiro; Yukuhiro, Fumiko; Tamura, Yasumori; Hattori, Makoto; Shinbo, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Masatoshi

    2010-09-01

    The privet tree, Ligustrum obtusifolium (Oleaceae), defends its leaves against insects with a strong lysine-decreasing activity that make proteins non-nutritive. This is caused by oleuropein, an iridoid glycoside. We previously found that some privet-specialist caterpillars adapt by secreting glycine in the digestive juice as a neutralizer that prevents the loss of lysine. Here, we extended the survey into 42 lepidopteran and hymenopteran species. The average concentration of glycine in digestive juice for 11 privet-feeding species (40.396 mM) was higher than that for 32 non-privet-feeding species (2.198 mM). The glycine concentrations exceeded 10 mM in 7 out of 11 privet-feeding species. In Macrophya timida (Hymenoptera), it reached 164.8 mM. Three out of the four remaining privet-feeding species had other amino acids instead. Larvae of a privet-specialist butterfly, Artopoetes pryeri (Lycaenidae), had a high concentration (60.812 mM) of GABA. In two other specialists, β-alanine was found. GABA, β-alanine, and glycine as well as alanine, amines, and ammonium ion inhibited the lysine decrease, indicating that amino residues are responsible for the inhibition. However, the three amino acids found in the specialists were far more effective (20 mM showed 80% inhibition) than the rest (>140 mM was required for 80% inhibition). Our results show a clear and rare case of the apparent convergent evolution of herbivores' molecular adaptations of feeding on a plant with a chemical defense in a manner that minimizes the cost of adaptation. The novel role of GABA in plant-herbivore interactions shown here is probably the first reported non-neuronal role of animal-derived GABA.

  18. Structural and Functional Analysis of Interhelical Interactions in the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 gp41 Envelope Glycoprotein by Alanine-Scanning Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Min; Stoller, Marisa O.; Wang, Shilong; Liu, Jie; Fagan, Melinda B.; Nunberg, Jack H.

    2001-01-01

    Membrane fusion by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is promoted by the refolding of the viral envelope glycoprotein into a fusion-active conformation. The structure of the gp41 ectodomain core in its fusion-active state is a trimer of hairpins in which three antiparallel carboxyl-terminal helices pack into hydrophobic grooves on the surface of an amino-terminal trimeric coiled coil. In an effort to identify amino acid residues in these grooves that are critical for gp41 activation, we have used alanine-scanning mutagenesis to investigate the importance of individual side chains in determining the biophysical properties of the gp41 core and the membrane fusion activity of the gp120-gp41 complex. Alanine substitutions at Leu-556, Leu-565, Val-570, Gly-572, and Arg-579 positions severely impaired membrane fusion activity in envelope glycoproteins that were for the most part normally expressed. Whereas alanine mutations at Leu-565 and Val-570 destabilized the trimer-of-hairpins structure, mutations at Gly-572 and Arg-579 led to the formation of a stable gp41 core. Our results suggest that the Leu-565 and Val-570 residues are important determinants of conserved packing interactions between the amino- and carboxyl-terminal helices of gp41. We propose that the high degree of sequence conservation at Gly-572 and Arg-579 may result from selective pressures imposed by prefusogenic conformations of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. Further analysis of the gp41 activation process may elucidate targets for antiviral intervention. PMID:11602754

  19. Synthesis and biological activity of 3-[phenyl(1,3-thiazol-2-yl)-amino]propanoic acids and their derivatives.

    PubMed

    Mickevičius, Vytautas; Voskienė, Aušra; Jonuškienė, Ilona; Kolosej, Ramūnė; Šiugždaitė, Jūratė; Venskutonis, Petras Rimantas; Kazernavičiūtė, Rita; Brazienė, Zita; Jakienė, Elena

    2013-01-01

    New N,N-disubstituted β-amino acids and their derivatives with thiazole, aromatic, and heterocyclic substituents were synthesized from N-phenyl-N-thiocarbamoyl-β-alanine by the Hantzsch method; derivatives with hydrazone fragments were also obtained. Some of the synthesized compounds exhibited discrete antimicrobial activity, and 3-[(4-oxo-4,5-dihydro-1,3-thiazol-2-yl)(phenyl)amino]propanoic acid was found to promote rapeseed growth and to increase seed yield and oil content.

  20. Carbobenzoxy amino acids: Structural requirements for cholecystokinin receptor antagonist activity

    SciTech Connect

    Maton, P.N.; Sutliff, V.E.; Jensen, R.T.; Gardner, J.D.

    1985-04-01

    The authors used dispersed acini prepared from guinea pig pancreas to examine 28 carbobenzoxy (CBZ) amino acids for their abilities to function as cholecystokinin receptor antagonists. All amino acid derivatives tested, except for CBZ-alanine, CBZ-glycine, and N alpha-CBZ- lysine, were able to inhibit the stimulation of amylase secretion caused by the C-terminal octapeptide of cholecystokinin. In general, there was a good correlation between the ability of a carbobenzoxy amino acid to inhibit stimulated amylase secretion and the ability of the amino acid derivative to inhibit binding of /sup 125/I-cholecystokinin. The inhibition of cholecystokinin-stimulated amylase secretion was competitive, fully reversible, and specific for those secretagogues that interact with the cholecystokinin receptor. The potencies with which the various carbobenzoxy amino acids inhibited the action of cholecystokinin varied 100-fold and CBZ-cystine was the most potent cholecystokinin receptor antagonist. This variation in potency was primarily but not exclusively a function of the hydrophobicity of the amino acid side chain.

  1. GMXPBSA 2.0: A GROMACS tool to perform MM/PBSA and computational alanine scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paissoni, C.; Spiliotopoulos, D.; Musco, G.; Spitaleri, A.

    2014-11-01

    GMXPBSA 2.0 is a user-friendly suite of Bash/Perl scripts for streamlining MM/PBSA calculations on structural ensembles derived from GROMACS trajectories, to automatically calculate binding free energies for protein-protein or ligand-protein complexes. GMXPBSA 2.0 is flexible and can easily be customized to specific needs. Additionally, it performs computational alanine scanning (CAS) to study the effects of ligand and/or receptor alanine mutations on the free energy of binding. Calculations require only for protein-protein or protein-ligand MD simulations. GMXPBSA 2.0 performs different comparative analysis, including a posteriori generation of alanine mutants of the wild-type complex, calculation of the binding free energy values of the mutant complexes and comparison of the results with the wild-type system. Moreover, it compares the binding free energy of different complexes trajectories, allowing the study the effects of non-alanine mutations, post-translational modifications or unnatural amino acids on the binding free energy of the system under investigation. Finally, it can calculate and rank relative affinity to the same receptor utilizing MD simulations of proteins in complex with different ligands. In order to dissect the different MM/PBSA energy contributions, including molecular mechanic (MM), electrostatic contribution to solvation (PB) and nonpolar contribution to solvation (SA), the tool combines two freely available programs: the MD simulations software GROMACS and the Poisson-Boltzmann equation solver APBS. All the calculations can be performed in single or distributed automatic fashion on a cluster facility in order to increase the calculation by dividing frames across the available processors. The program is freely available under the GPL license. Catalogue identifier: AETQ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETQ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing

  2. Use of alanine-silicone pellets for electron paramagnetic resonance gamma dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, J.; Galindo, S. )

    1991-03-01

    Silicone is proposed as an alternative binding substance in the production of D-L alanine pellets used in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry of gamma rays. The dosimeters are manufactured at room temperature, making the production simple. Examination by EPR silicone-alanine pellets irradiated with 60Co gamma rays in the dose range 10 to 10(6) Gy shows that the proposed silicone binder does not affect typical alanine dose-response curves. Thermal stability of the pellets below 40 degrees C is good, but their pre-dose EPR signal amplitude is slightly higher than for nonirradiated alanine.

  3. Effect of β-alanine supplementation on high-intensity exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Harris, Roger C; Stellingwerff, Trent

    2013-01-01

    Carnosine is a dipeptide of β-alanine and L-histidine found in high concentrations in skeletal muscle. Combined with β-alanine, the pKa of the histidine imidazole ring is raised to ∼6.8, placing it within the muscle intracellular pH high-intensity exercise transit range. Combination with β-alanine renders the dipeptide inert to intracellular enzymic hydrolysis and blocks the histidinyl residue from participation in proteogenesis, thus making it an ideal, stable intracellular buffer. For vegetarians, synthesis is limited by β-alanine availability; for meat-eaters, hepatic synthesis is supplemented with β-alanine from the hydrolysis of dietary carnosine. Direct oral β-alanine supplementation will compensate for low meat and fish intake, significantly raising the muscle carnosine concentration. This is best achieved with a sustained-release formulation of β-alanine to avoid paresthesia symptoms and decreasing urinary spillover. In humans, increased levels of carnosine through β-alanine supplementation have been shown to increase exercise capacity and performance of several types, particularly where the high-intensity exercise range is 1-4 min. β-Alanine supplementation is used by athletes competing in high-intensity track and field cycling, rowing, swimming events and other competitions.

  4. Effect of β-alanine supplementation on high-intensity exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Harris, Roger C; Stellingwerff, Trent

    2013-01-01

    Carnosine is a dipeptide of β-alanine and L-histidine found in high concentrations in skeletal muscle. Combined with β-alanine, the pKa of the histidine imidazole ring is raised to ∼6.8, placing it within the muscle intracellular pH high-intensity exercise transit range. Combination with β-alanine renders the dipeptide inert to intracellular enzymic hydrolysis and blocks the histidinyl residue from participation in proteogenesis, thus making it an ideal, stable intracellular buffer. For vegetarians, synthesis is limited by β-alanine availability; for meat-eaters, hepatic synthesis is supplemented with β-alanine from the hydrolysis of dietary carnosine. Direct oral β-alanine supplementation will compensate for low meat and fish intake, significantly raising the muscle carnosine concentration. This is best achieved with a sustained-release formulation of β-alanine to avoid paresthesia symptoms and decreasing urinary spillover. In humans, increased levels of carnosine through β-alanine supplementation have been shown to increase exercise capacity and performance of several types, particularly where the high-intensity exercise range is 1-4 min. β-Alanine supplementation is used by athletes competing in high-intensity track and field cycling, rowing, swimming events and other competitions. PMID:23899755

  5. Amino acids and proteins.

    PubMed

    van Goudoever, Johannes B; Vlaardingerbroek, Hester; van den Akker, Chris H; de Groof, Femke; van der Schoor, Sophie R D

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids and protein are key factors for growth. The neonatal period requires the highest intake in life to meet the demands. Those demands include amino acids for growth, but proteins and amino acids also function as signalling molecules and function as neurotransmitters. Often the nutritional requirements are not met, resulting in a postnatal growth restriction. However, current knowledge on adequate levels of both amino acid as well as protein intake can avoid under nutrition in the direct postnatal phase, avoid the need for subsequent catch-up growth and improve later outcome.

  6. Amino acid analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winitz, M.; Graff, J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The process and apparatus for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the amino acid content of a biological sample are presented. The sample is deposited on a cation exchange resin and then is washed with suitable solvents. The amino acids and various cations and organic material with a basic function remain on the resin. The resin is eluted with an acid eluant, and the eluate containing the amino acids is transferred to a reaction vessel where the eluant is removed. Final analysis of the purified acylated amino acid esters is accomplished by gas-liquid chromatographic techniques.

  7. Identification of a Vibrio cholerae chemoreceptor that senses taurine and amino acids as attractants

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, So-ichiro; Takahashi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Suzuki, Daisuke; Itoh, Yasuaki; Sumita, Kazumasa; Uchida, Yumiko; Homma, Michio; Imada, Katsumi; Kawagishi, Ikuro

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the etiological agent of cholera, was found to be attracted by taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid), a major constituent of human bile. Mlp37, the closest homolog of the previously identified amino acid chemoreceptor Mlp24, was found to mediate taxis to taurine as well as L-serine, L-alanine, L-arginine, and other amino acids. Methylation of Mlp37 was enhanced upon the addition of taurine and amino acids. Isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrated that a purified periplasmic fragment of Mlp37 binds directly to taurine, L-serine, L-alanine and L-arginine. Crystal structures of the periplamic domain of Mlp37 revealed that L-serine and taurine bind to the membrane-distal PAS domain in essentially in the same way. The structural information was supported by characterising the in vivo properties of alanine-substituted mutant forms of Mlp37. The fact that the ligand-binding domain of the L-serine complex had a small opening, which would accommodate a larger R group, accounts for the broad ligand specificity of Mlp37 and allowed us to visualise ligand binding to Mlp37 with fluorescently labelled L-serine. Taken together, we conclude that Mlp37 serves as the major chemoreceptor for taurine and various amino acids. PMID:26878914

  8. Amino acid analyses of type 3 chondrites Colony, Ornans, Chainpur, and Bishunpur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, H.-S.; Martins, Zita; Sephton, Mark A.

    2012-09-01

    The CO3s Colony and Ornans and LL3s Chainpur and Bishunpur were analyzed for the first time for amino acids using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Type 3 chondrites have relatively unaltered metamorphic and petrological histories. Chainpur was the most amino acid rich of the four type 3 chondrites with a total amino acid abundance of 3330 parts per billion (ppb). The other type 3 chondrites had total amino acid abundances that ranged from 660 to 1110 ppb. A D/L ratio of <0.7 for all proteic amino acids suggests at least some amino acid terrestrial contamination. However, a small fraction of indigenous extraterrestrial amino acids cannot be excluded because of the presence of the nonprotein amino acid α-aminoisobutyric acid (α-AIB), and unusually high relative abundances (to glycine) of β-alanine and γ-ABA. The comparisons between the free and total amino acid contents of the samples also indicate a low free/total amino acid ratio (ranging from about 1:4 in CO chondrites to about 1:50 in Chainpur), which indicate that amino acids are present mainly in the bound form and were made detectable after acid hydrolysis.

  9. Assessing microbial utilization of free versus sorbed Alanine by using position-specific 13C labeling and 13C-PLFA analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herschbach, Jennifer; Apostel, Carolin; Spielvogel, Sandra; Kuzyakov, Yakov; Dippold, Michaela

    2016-04-01

    Microbial utilization is a key transformation process of soil organic matter (SOM). Sorption of low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS) to soil mineral surfaces blocks or delays microbial uptake and therefore mineralization of LMWOS to CO2, as well as all other biochemical transformations. We used position-specific labeling, a tool of isotope applications novel to soil science, combined with 13C-phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis, to assess microbial utilization of sorbed and non-sorbed Alanine in soil. Alanine has various functional groups enabling different sorption mechanisms via its positive charge (e.g. to clay minerals by cation exchange), as well as via its negative charge (e.g. to iron oxides by ligand exchange). To assess changes in the transformation pathways caused by sorption, we added uniformly and position-specifically 13C and 14C labeled Alanine to the Ap of a loamy Luvisol in a short-term (10 days) incubation experiment. To allow for sorption of the tracer solution to an aliquot of this soil, microbial activity was minimized in this subsample by sterilizing the soil by γ-radiation. After shaking, the remaining solutions were filtered and the non-sorbed Alanine was removed with Millipore water and then added to non-sterilized soil. For the free Alanine treatment, solutions with Alanine of similar amount and isotopic composition were prepared, added to the soil and incubated as well. The respired CO2 was trapped in NaOH and its 14C-activity was determined at increasing times intervals. Microbial utilization of Alanine's individual C positions was evaluated in distinct microbial groups classified by 13C-PLFA analysis. Sorption to soil minerals delayed respiration to CO2 and reduced initial respiration rate by 80%. Irrespective of sorption, the highest amount was respired from the carboxylic position (C-1), whereas the amino-bound (C-2) and the methylic position (C-3) were preferentially incorporated into PLFA of microorganisms due to the

  10. Organic compounds in lunar samples: pyrolysis products, hydrocarbons, amino acids.

    PubMed

    Nagy, B; Drew, D M; Hamilton, P B; Modzeleski, V E; Murphy, M E; Scott, W M; Urey, H C; Young, M

    1970-01-30

    Lunar fines and a chip from inside a rock pyrolyzed in helium at 700 degrees C gave methane, other gases, and aromatic hydrocarbons. Benzene/methanol extracts of fines yielded traces of high molecular weight alkanes and sulfur. Traces of glycine, alanine, ethanolamine, and urea were found in aqueous extracts. Biological controls and a terrestrial rock, dunite, subjected to exhaust from the lunar module descent engine showed a different amino acid distribution. Interpretation of the origin of the carbon compounds requires extreme care, because of possible contamination acquired during initial sample processing.

  11. Organic compounds in lunar samples: pyrolysis products, hydrocarbons, amino acids.

    PubMed

    Nagy, B; Drew, D M; Hamilton, P B; Modzeleski, V E; Murphy, M E; Scott, W M; Urey, H C; Young, M

    1970-01-30

    Lunar fines and a chip from inside a rock pyrolyzed in helium at 700 degrees C gave methane, other gases, and aromatic hydrocarbons. Benzene/methanol extracts of fines yielded traces of high molecular weight alkanes and sulfur. Traces of glycine, alanine, ethanolamine, and urea were found in aqueous extracts. Biological controls and a terrestrial rock, dunite, subjected to exhaust from the lunar module descent engine showed a different amino acid distribution. Interpretation of the origin of the carbon compounds requires extreme care, because of possible contamination acquired during initial sample processing. PMID:5410553

  12. Alanine Aminotransferase-Old Biomarker and New Concept: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhengtao; Que, Shuping; Xu, Jing; Peng, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) is a common, readily available, and inexpensive laboratory assay in clinical practice. ALT activity is not only measured to detect liver disease, but also to monitor overall health. ALT activity is influenced by various factors, including viral hepatitis, alcohol consumption, and medication. Recently, the impact of metabolic abnormalities on ALT variation has raised concern due to the worldwide obesity epidemic. The normal ranges for ALT have been updated and validated considering the metabolic covariates in the various ethnic districts. The interaction between metabolic and demographic factors on ALT variation has also been discussed in previous studies. In addition, an extremely low ALT value might reflect the process of aging, and frailty in older adults has been raised as another clinically significant feature of this enzyme, to be followed with additional epidemiologic investigation. Timely updated, comprehensive, and systematic introduction of ALT activity is necessary to aid clinicians make better use of this enzyme. PMID:25013373

  13. Charge dependent photodynamic activity of alanine based zinc phthalocyanines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ao; Li, Yejing; Zhou, Lin; Yuan, Linxin; Lu, Shan; Lin, Yun; Zhou, Jiahong; Wei, Shaohua

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, to minimize the effects of different structure, three alanine-based zinc phthalocyanines (Pcs) of differing charges were engineered and synthesized with the same basic structure. On this premise, the relationship between nature of charge and photodynamic activity was studied. Besides, further verification and explanation of some inconsistent results were also carried out. The results showed that charge can influence the aggregation state, singlet oxygen generation ability and cellular uptake of Pcs, thereby affecting their photodynamic activity. In addition, the biomolecules inside cells may interact with Pcs of differing charges, which can also influence the aggregation state and singlet oxygen generation of the Pcs, and then influence the relationship between nature of charge and photodynamic activity.

  14. In vitro synthesis of arachidonoyl amino acids by cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    McCue, Jeffrey M; Driscoll, William J; Mueller, Gregory P

    2009-11-01

    Arachidonoyl amino acids are a class of endogenous lipid messengers that are expressed in the mammalian central nervous system and peripherally. While several of their prominent pharmacologic effects have been documented, the mechanism by which arachidonoyl amino acids are biosynthesized has not been defined. We have previously observed that the mitochondrial protein, cytochrome c, is capable of catalyzing the formation of the prototypic arachidonoyl amino acid, arachidonoyl glycine, utilizing arachidonoyl CoA and glycine as substrates, in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Here we report that cytochrome c is similarly able to catalyze the formation of N-arachidonoyl serine, N-arachidonoyl alanine, and N-arachidonoyl gamma aminobutyric acid from arachidonoyl CoA and the respective amino acids. The identities of the arachidonoyl amino acid products were verified by mass spectral fragmentation pattern analysis. The synthetic reactions exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics and continued favorably at physiologic temperature and pH. Spectral data indicate that both cytochrome c protein structure and a +3 heme iron oxidation state are required for the reaction mechanism to proceed optimally. Reactions designed to catalyze the formation of N-arachidonoyl dopamine were not efficient due to the rapid oxidation of dopamine substrate by hydrogen peroxide, consuming both reactants. Finally, under standard assay conditions, arachidonoyl CoA and ethanolamine were found to react spontaneously to form anandamide, independent of cytochrome c and hydrogen peroxide. Accordingly, it was not possible to demonstrate a potential role for cytochrome c in the biosynthetic mechanism for either arachidonoyl dopamine or anandamide. However, the ability of cytochrome c to effectively catalyze the formation of N-arachidonoyl serine, N-arachidonoyl alanine, and N-arachidonoyl gamma aminobutyric acid in vitro highlights its potential role for the generation of these lipid messengers in vivo.

  15. Effects of beta-alanine supplementation on sprint endurance.

    PubMed

    Jagim, Andrew R; Wright, Glenn A; Brice, A Glenn; Doberstein, Scott T

    2013-02-01

    Recent research has shown that beta-alanine (BA) supplementation can increase intramuscular carnosine levels. Carnosine is an intramuscular buffer, and it has been linked to improvements in performance, specifically during bouts of high-intensity exercise that are likely limited by muscle acidosis. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the effect of BA supplementation on sprint endurance at 2 different supramaximal intensities. Twenty-one anaerobically trained (rugby players [n = 4], wrestlers [n = 11], and recreationally strength trained athletes [n = 6]) college-aged men participated in a double-blind, placebo controlled study. The subjects performed an incremental VO2max test and 2 sprint to exhaustion tests set at 115 and 140% of their VO2max on a motorized treadmill before (PRE) and after (POST) a 5-week supplementation period. During this time, the subjects ingested either a BA supplement or placebo (PLA) with meals. The subjects ingested 4 g·d(-1) of BA or PLA during the first week and 6 g·d(-1) the following 4 weeks. Capillary blood samples were taken before and after each sprint to determine blood lactate response to the sprint exercise. No significant group (BA, PLA) × intensity (115%, 140%; p = 0.60), group by time (PRE, POST; p = 0.72), or group × intensity × time (p = 0.74) interactions were observed for time to exhaustion. In addition, similar nonsignificant observations were made for lactate response to the sprints (group × intensity, p = 0.43; group × time, p = 0.33, group × intensity × time, p = 0.56). From the results of this study, it was concluded that beta-alanine supplementation did not have a significant effect on sprint endurance at supramaximal intensities.

  16. Radiation dose measurements with alanine/agarose gel and thin alanine films around a 192Ir brachytherapy source, using ESR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Olsson, S; Bergstrand, E S; Carlsson, A K; Hole, E O; Lund, E

    2002-04-21

    Alanine/agarose gel and alanine films in stacks have been used for measurements of absorbed dose around an HDR 192Ir source in a vaginal cylinder-applicator, with and without a 180 degrees tungsten shield. The gel and the films were analysed by means of ESR spectroscopy and calibrated against an ion chamber in a 4 MV photon beam to obtain absolute dose values. The gel serves as both dosimeter and phantom material, and the thin (130 microm) films are used to achieve an improved spatial resolution in the dose estimations. Experimental values were compared with Monte Carlo simulations using two different codes. Results from the measurements generally agree with the simulations to within 5%, for both the alanine/agarose gel and the alanine films.

  17. Cloning, expression and analysis of the olfactory glutathione S-transferases in coho salmon

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Herbert M.; Shireman, Laura M.; McClain, Valerie; Atkins, William; Gallagher, Evan P.

    2013-01-01

    The glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) provide cellular protection by detoxifying xenobiotics, maintaining redox status, and modulating secondary messengers, all of which are critical to maintaining olfaction in salmonids. Here, we characterized the major coho salmon olfactory GSTs (OlfGSTs), namely omega, pi, and rho subclasses. OlfGST omega contained an open reading frame of 720 bp and encoded a protein of 239 amino acids. OlfGST pi and OlfGST rho contained open reading frames of 727 and 681 bp, respectively, and encoded proteins of 208 and 226 amino acids. Whole-protein mass spectrometry yielded molecular weights of 29,950, 23,354, and 26,655 Da, respectively, for the GST omega, pi, and rho subunits. Homology modeling using four protein-structure prediction algorithms suggest that the active sites in all three OlfGST isoforms resembled counterparts in other species. The olfactory GSTs conjugated prototypical GST substrates, but only OlfGST rho catalyzed the demethylation of the pesticide methyl parathion. OlfGST pi and rho exhibited thiol oxidoreductase activity towards 2-hydroxyethyl disulfide (2-HEDS) and conjugated 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), a toxic aldehyde with neurodegenerative properties. The kinetic parameters for OlfGST pi conjugation of HNE were KM = 0.16 ± 0.06 mM and Vmax = 0.5 ± 0.1 μmol min−1 mg−1 for OlfGST pi, whereas OlfGST rho was more efficient at catalyzing HNE conjugation (KM = 0.022 ± 0.008 mM and Vmax = 0.47 ± 0.05 μmol min−1 mg−1). Our findings indicate that the peripheral olfactory system of coho expresses GST isoforms that detoxify certain electrophiles and pesticides and that help maintain redox statusand signal transduction. PMID:23261526

  18. Efficient L-Alanine Production by a Thermo-Regulated Switch in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Deng, Can; Cui, Wen-Jing; Liu, Zhong-Mei; Zhou, Zhe-Min

    2016-01-01

    L-Alanine has important applications in food, pharmaceutical and veterinary and is used as a substrate for production of engineered thermoplastics. Microbial fermentation could reduce the production cost and promote the application of L-alanine. However, the presence of L-alanine significantly inhibit cell growth rate and cause a decrease in the ultimate L-alanine productivity. For efficient L-alanine production, a thermo-regulated genetic switch was designed to dynamically control the expression of L-alanine dehydrogenase (alaD) from Geobacillus stearothermophilus on the Escherichia coli B0016-060BC chromosome. The optimal cultivation conditions for the genetically switched alanine production using B0016-060BC were the following: an aerobic growth phase at 33 °C with a 1-h thermo-induction at 42 °C followed by an oxygen-limited phase at 42 °C. In a bioreactor experiment using the scaled-up conditions optimized in a shake flask, B0016-060BC accumulated 50.3 g biomass/100 g glucose during the aerobic growth phase and 96 g alanine/100 g glucose during the oxygen-limited phase, respectively. The L-alanine titer reached 120.8 g/l with higher overall and oxygen-limited volumetric productivities of 3.09 and 4.18 g/l h, respectively, using glucose as the sole carbon source. Efficient cell growth and L-alanine production were reached separately, by switching cultivation temperature. The results revealed the application of a thermo-regulated strategy for heterologous metabolic production and pointed to strategies for improving L-alanine production.

  19. A glutathione S-transferase gene associated with antioxidant properties isolated from Apis cerana cerana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuchang; Liu, Feng; Jia, Haihong; Yan, Yan; Wang, Hongfang; Guo, Xingqi; Xu, Baohua

    2016-06-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are an important family of multifunctional enzymes in aerobic organisms. They play a crucial role in the detoxification of exogenous compounds, especially insecticides, and protection against oxidative stress. Most previous studies of GSTs in insects have largely focused on their role in insecticide resistance. Here, we isolated a theta class GST gene designated AccGSTT1 from Apis cerana cerana and aimed to explore its antioxidant and antibacterial attributes. Analyses of homology and phylogenetic relationships suggested that the predicted amino acid sequence of AccGSTT1 shares a high level of identity with the other hymenopteran GSTs and that it was conserved during evolution. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that AccGSTT1 is most highly expressed in adult stages and that the expression profile of this gene is significantly altered in response to various abiotic stresses. These results were confirmed using western blot analysis. Additionally, a disc diffusion assay showed that a recombinant AccGSTT1 protein may be roughly capable of inhibiting bacterial growth and that it reduces the resistance of Escherichia coli cells to multiple adverse stresses. Taken together, these data indicate that AccGSTT1 may play an important role in antioxidant processes under adverse stress conditions.

  20. Erythrocyte glutathione transferase: a general probe for chemical contaminations in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Bocedi, A; Fabrini, R; Lai, O; Alfieri, L; Roncoroni, C; Noce, A; Pedersen, JZ; Ricci, G

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are enzymes devoted to the protection of cells against many different toxins. In erythrocytes, the isoenzyme (e-GST) mainly present is GSTP1-1, which is overexpressed in humans in case of increased blood toxicity, as it occurs in nephrophatic patients or in healthy subjects living in polluted areas. The present study explores the possibility that e-GST may be used as an innovative and highly sensitive biomarker of blood toxicity also for other mammals. All distinct e-GSTs from humans, Bos taurus (cow), Sus scrofa (pig), Capra hircus (goat), Equus caballus (horse), Equus asinus (donkey) and Ovis aries (sheep), show very similar amino acid sequences, identical kinetics and stability properties. Reference values for e-GST in all these mammals reared in controlled farms span from 3.5±0.2 U/gHb in the pig to 17.0±0.9 U/gHb in goat; such activity levels can easily be determined with high precision using only a few microliters of whole blood and a simple spectrophotometric assay. Possibly disturbing factors have been examined to avoid artifact determinations. This study provides the basis for future screening studies to verify if animals have been exposed to toxicologic insults. Preliminary data on cows reared in polluted areas show increased expression of e-GST, which parallels the results found for humans. PMID:27551520

  1. Synthesis of isotopically labeled P-site substrates for the ribosomal peptidyl transferase reaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Minghong

    2010-01-01

    Isotopomers of the ribosomal P-site substrate, the trinucleotide peptide conjugate CCA-pcb,1 have been designed and synthesized in 26–350020steps. These include individual isotopic substitution at the α-proton, carbonyl carbon, and carbonyl oxygen of the amino acid, the O2' and O3' of the adenosine, and a remote label in the N3 and N4 of both cytidines. These isotopomers were synthesized by coupling cytidylyl-(3'5')-cytidine phosphoramidite isotopomers, as the common synthetic intermediates, with isotopically substituted A-Phe-cap-biotin (A-pcb). The isotopic enrichment is higher than 99% for 1-13C (Phe), 2-2H (Phe), and 3,4-15N2 (cytidine), 93% for 2'/3'- 18O (adenosine), and 64% for 1-18O (Phe). A new synthesis of highly enriched [1-18O2] phenylalanine has been developed. The synthesis of [3'-18O] adenosine was improved by Lewis acid aided regioselective ring opening of the epoxide and by an economical SN2-SN2 method with high isotopic enrichment (93%). Such substrates are valuable for studies of the ribosomal peptidyl transferase reaction by complete kinetic isotope effect analysis and of other biological processes catalyzed by nucleic acid related enzymes, including polymerases, reverse transcriptases, ligases, nucleases, and ribozymes. PMID:18081346

  2. Isolation and characterization of two mouse Pi-class glutathione S-transferase genes.

    PubMed Central

    Bammler, T K; Smith, C A; Wolf, C R

    1994-01-01

    Pi-class glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) play an important role in the detoxification of chemical toxins and mutagens and are implicated in neoplastic development and drug resistance. In all species characterized to date, only one functional Pi-class GST gene has been described. In this report we have identified two actively transcribed murine Pi-class GST genes, Gst p-1 and Gst p-2. The coding regions of Gst p-1 and the mouse Pi-class GST cDNA (GST-II) reported by Hatayama, Satoh and Satoh (1990) (Nucleic Acids Res. 18, 4606) are identical, whereas Gst p-2 encodes a protein that has not been described previously. The two genes are approximately 3 kb long and contain seven exons interrupted by six introns. In addition to a TATA box and a sequence motif matching the phorbol-ester-responsive element, the promoters of Gst p-1 and Gst p-2 exhibit one and two G+C boxes (GGGCGG) respectively. The cDNAs of the two genes were isolated from total liver RNA using reverse PCR. The peptide sequence deduced from the cDNAs share 97% identity and differ in six amino acids. Both genes are transcribed at significantly higher levels in male mouse liver than in female, and Gst p-1 mRNA is more abundant in both sexes than Gst p-2. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8135745

  3. Ghrelin O-Acyl Transferase in Zebrafish Is an Evolutionarily Conserved Peptide Upregulated During Calorie Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Hatef, Azadeh; Yufa, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Ghrelin is a multifunctional orexigenic hormone with a unique acyl modification enabled by ghrelin O-acyl transferase (GOAT). Ghrelin is well-characterized in nonmammals, and GOAT sequences of several fishes are available in the GenBank. However, endogenous GOAT in non-mammals remains poorly understood. In this research, GOAT sequence comparison, tissue-specific GOAT expression, and its regulation by nutrient status and exogenous ghrelin were studied. It was found that the bioactive core of zebrafish GOAT amino acid sequence share high identity with that of mammals. GOAT mRNA was most abundant in the gut. GOAT-like immunoreactivity (i.r.) was found colocalized with ghrelin in the gastric mucosa. Food deprivation increased, and feeding decreased GOAT and preproghrelin mRNA expression in the brain and gut. GOAT and ghrelin peptides in the gut and brain showed corresponding decrease in food-deprived state. Intraperitoneal injection of acylated fish ghrelin caused a significant decrease in GOAT mRNA expression, suggesting a feedback mechanism regulating its abundance. Together, these results provide the first in-depth characterization of GOAT in a non-mammal. Our results demonstrate that endogenous GOAT expression is responsive to metabolic status and availability of acylated ghrelin, providing further evidences for GOAT in the regulation of feeding in teleosts. PMID:26226634

  4. Ghrelin O-Acyl Transferase in Zebrafish Is an Evolutionarily Conserved Peptide Upregulated During Calorie Restriction.

    PubMed

    Hatef, Azadeh; Yufa, Roman; Unniappan, Suraj

    2015-10-01

    Ghrelin is a multifunctional orexigenic hormone with a unique acyl modification enabled by ghrelin O-acyl transferase (GOAT). Ghrelin is well-characterized in nonmammals, and GOAT sequences of several fishes are available in the GenBank. However, endogenous GOAT in non-mammals remains poorly understood. In this research, GOAT sequence comparison, tissue-specific GOAT expression, and its regulation by nutrient status and exogenous ghrelin were studied. It was found that the bioactive core of zebrafish GOAT amino acid sequence share high identity with that of mammals. GOAT mRNA was most abundant in the gut. GOAT-like immunoreactivity (i.r.) was found colocalized with ghrelin in the gastric mucosa. Food deprivation increased, and feeding decreased GOAT and preproghrelin mRNA expression in the brain and gut. GOAT and ghrelin peptides in the gut and brain showed corresponding decrease in food-deprived state. Intraperitoneal injection of acylated fish ghrelin caused a significant decrease in GOAT mRNA expression, suggesting a feedback mechanism regulating its abundance. Together, these results provide the first in-depth characterization of GOAT in a non-mammal. Our results demonstrate that endogenous GOAT expression is responsive to metabolic status and availability of acylated ghrelin, providing further evidences for GOAT in the regulation of feeding in teleosts.

  5. Erythrocyte glutathione transferase: a general probe for chemical contaminations in mammals.

    PubMed

    Bocedi, A; Fabrini, R; Lai, O; Alfieri, L; Roncoroni, C; Noce, A; Pedersen, J Z; Ricci, G

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are enzymes devoted to the protection of cells against many different toxins. In erythrocytes, the isoenzyme (e-GST) mainly present is GSTP1-1, which is overexpressed in humans in case of increased blood toxicity, as it occurs in nephrophatic patients or in healthy subjects living in polluted areas. The present study explores the possibility that e-GST may be used as an innovative and highly sensitive biomarker of blood toxicity also for other mammals. All distinct e-GSTs from humans, Bos taurus (cow), Sus scrofa (pig), Capra hircus (goat), Equus caballus (horse), Equus asinus (donkey) and Ovis aries (sheep), show very similar amino acid sequences, identical kinetics and stability properties. Reference values for e-GST in all these mammals reared in controlled farms span from 3.5±0.2 U/gHb in the pig to 17.0±0.9 U/gHb in goat; such activity levels can easily be determined with high precision using only a few microliters of whole blood and a simple spectrophotometric assay. Possibly disturbing factors have been examined to avoid artifact determinations. This study provides the basis for future screening studies to verify if animals have been exposed to toxicologic insults. Preliminary data on cows reared in polluted areas show increased expression of e-GST, which parallels the results found for humans. PMID:27551520

  6. Erythrocyte glutathione transferase: a general probe for chemical contaminations in mammals.

    PubMed

    Bocedi, A; Fabrini, R; Lai, O; Alfieri, L; Roncoroni, C; Noce, A; Pedersen, J Z; Ricci, G

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are enzymes devoted to the protection of cells against many different toxins. In erythrocytes, the isoenzyme (e-GST) mainly present is GSTP1-1, which is overexpressed in humans in case of increased blood toxicity, as it occurs in nephrophatic patients or in healthy subjects living in polluted areas. The present study explores the possibility that e-GST may be used as an innovative and highly sensitive biomarker of blood toxicity also for other mammals. All distinct e-GSTs from humans, Bos taurus (cow), Sus scrofa (pig), Capra hircus (goat), Equus caballus (horse), Equus asinus (donkey) and Ovis aries (sheep), show very similar amino acid sequences, identical kinetics and stability properties. Reference values for e-GST in all these mammals reared in controlled farms span from 3.5±0.2 U/gHb in the pig to 17.0±0.9 U/gHb in goat; such activity levels can easily be determined with high precision using only a few microliters of whole blood and a simple spectrophotometric assay. Possibly disturbing factors have been examined to avoid artifact determinations. This study provides the basis for future screening studies to verify if animals have been exposed to toxicologic insults. Preliminary data on cows reared in polluted areas show increased expression of e-GST, which parallels the results found for humans.

  7. Human Polymorphisms in the Glutathione Transferase Zeta 1/Maleylacetoacetate Isomerase Gene Influence the Toxicokinetics of Dichloroacetate

    PubMed Central

    Shroads, Albert L.; Langaee, Taimour; Coats, Bonnie S.; Kurtz, Tracie L.; Bullock, John R.; Weithorn, David; Gong, Yan; Wagner, David A.; Ostrov, David A.; Johnson, Julie A.; Stacpoole, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA), a chemical relevant to environmental science and allopathic medicine, is dehalogenated by the bifunctional enzyme glutathione transferase zeta (GSTz1) maleylacetoacetate isomerase (MAAI), the penultimate enzyme in the phenylalanine/tyrosine catabolic pathway. The authors postulated that polymorphisms in GSTz1/MAAI modify the toxicokinetics of DCA. GSTz1/MAAI haplotype significantly affected the kinetics and biotransformation of 1,2-13C-DCA when it was administered at either environmentally (μg/kg/d) or clinically (mg/kg/d) relevant doses. GSTz1/MAAI haplotype also influenced the urinary accumulation of potentially toxic tyrosine metabolites. Atomic modeling revealed that GSTz1/MAAI variants associated with the slowest rates of DCA metabolism induced structural changes in the enzyme homodimer, predicting protein instability or abnormal protein-protein interactions. Knowledge of the GSTz1/MAAI haplotype can be used prospectively to identify individuals at potential risk of DCA’s adverse side effects from environmental or clinical exposure or who may exhibit aberrant amino acid metabolism in response to dietary protein. PMID:21642471

  8. A glutathione S-transferase gene associated with antioxidant properties isolated from Apis cerana cerana.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuchang; Liu, Feng; Jia, Haihong; Yan, Yan; Wang, Hongfang; Guo, Xingqi; Xu, Baohua

    2016-06-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are an important family of multifunctional enzymes in aerobic organisms. They play a crucial role in the detoxification of exogenous compounds, especially insecticides, and protection against oxidative stress. Most previous studies of GSTs in insects have largely focused on their role in insecticide resistance. Here, we isolated a theta class GST gene designated AccGSTT1 from Apis cerana cerana and aimed to explore its antioxidant and antibacterial attributes. Analyses of homology and phylogenetic relationships suggested that the predicted amino acid sequence of AccGSTT1 shares a high level of identity with the other hymenopteran GSTs and that it was conserved during evolution. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that AccGSTT1 is most highly expressed in adult stages and that the expression profile of this gene is significantly altered in response to various abiotic stresses. These results were confirmed using western blot analysis. Additionally, a disc diffusion assay showed that a recombinant AccGSTT1 protein may be roughly capable of inhibiting bacterial growth and that it reduces the resistance of Escherichia coli cells to multiple adverse stresses. Taken together, these data indicate that AccGSTT1 may play an important role in antioxidant processes under adverse stress conditions.

  9. Antenna-specific glutathione S-transferase in male silkmoth Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiang; Hu, Xiao-Ming; Zhong, Xiao-Wu; Chen, Quan-Mei; Xia, Qing-You; Zhao, Ping

    2014-04-29

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are multifunctional enzymes that are widely distributed in different species. GSTs detoxify exogenous and endogenous substances by conjugation to reduced glutathione. We characterized BmGSTD4, an antenna-specific GST, in male silkmoths. The full-length mRNA of Bmgstd4 was cloned by RACE-PCR and contained an open reading frame of 738 bp encoding a 245 amino acid protein. The antenna specificity of BmGSTD4 was validated at the mRNA and protein levels and BmGSTD4 was shown to localize in the sensillum of male silkmoth antennae. Homology modeling and multi-sequence alignment suggested that BmGSTD4 was a typical GST belonging to the δ class and had a canonical GST fold with a conserved N-terminus, including a glutathione-binding site and a C-terminal domain harboring a hydrophobic substrate-binding site. Restricted expression of BmGSTD4 in silkmoth antennae combined with GST activity suggested that BmGSTD4 was involved in the detoxification of harmful chemicals.

  10. Identification of the nuclear localisation signal of O-GlcNAc transferase and its nuclear import regulation

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyeon Gyu; Kim, Han Byeol; Kang, Min Jueng; Ryum, Joo Hwan; Yi, Eugene C.; Cho, Jin Won

    2016-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) attaches a single GlcNAc to hydroxyl groups of serine and threonine residues. Although the cellular localisation of OGT is important to regulate a variety of cellular processes, the molecular mechanisms regulating the nuclear localisation of OGT is unclear. Here, we characterised three amino acids (DFP; residues 451–453) as the nuclear localisation signal of OGT and demonstrated that this motif mediated the nuclear import of non-diffusible β-galactosidase. OGT bound the importin α5 protein, and this association was abolished when the DFP motif of OGT was mutated or deleted. We also revealed that O-GlcNAcylation of Ser389, which resides in the tetratricopeptide repeats, plays an important role in the nuclear localisation of OGT. Our findings may explain how OGT, which possesses a NLS, exists in the nucleus and cytosol simultaneously. PMID:27713473

  11. Amino Acid Composition of the Host-specific Toxin of Helminthosporium carbonum1

    PubMed Central

    Pringle, Ross B.

    1971-01-01

    The host-specific toxin of Helminthosporium carbonum (C32H50N6O10) was hydrolyzed by 6 n HCl to yield a number of α-amino acids. The common amino acids, proline and alanine, occurred in a ratio of 1:2. Two other unstable α-amino acids that produced lower color values with ninhydrin were also produced. One of these was tentatively identified as 2-amino-2,3-dehydro-3-methylpentanoic acid by electrolytic reduction to isoleucine. Additional ninhydrin-reacting substances were produced in low yield and probably represented secondary hydrolysis products of the unstable amino acids. The finding of an α,β-unsaturated linkage in H. carbonum toxin explains the instability of the compound and may also account for its specific toxicity. PMID:16657874

  12. [Free amino acids of hemolymph during pubertal molting and senescence in Spaeroma serratum (Isopoda, Flabellifera].

    PubMed

    Charmantier, G; Voss-Foucart, M F; Trilles, J P; Jeuniaux, Ch

    1975-08-01

    In Sphaeroma serratum, the amino-acidemia is high (about 120 mg/100 ml) during the intermolt stages. The relative proportions of the different free amino acids show only slight differences in young males and senescent ones. At the time of the puberty molt, the total amino-acids concentration (including taurine) of the hemolymph increases sharply during premolt (up to 267 mg/100 ml), falls after ecdysis (down to 97 mg/100 ml and then rises up to the level of the intermolt stage. These variations are due not only to concentration or dilution of the whole hemolymph constituents, but also to specific modifications of the concentration of some of the free amino-acids with respect to the others. These variations of the amino-acidemia, mainly those of serine, proline, glycine, alanine and of the amine taurine, could play a definite role in increasing the osmotic pressure of the hemolymph during premolt, as a preparation to ecdysis.

  13. Interactive network analysis of the plasma amino acids profile in a mouse model of hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takayuki; Mochida, Taiga; Maki, Yukihiro; Shiraki, Yasuko; Mori, Hiroko; Matsumoto, Shirou; Shimbo, Kazutaka; Ando, Toshihiko; Nakamura, Kimitoshi; Endo, Fumio; Okamoto, Masahiro

    2013-12-01

    Amino acids are a group of metabolites that are important substrates for protein synthesis, are important as signaling molecules and play central roles as highly connected metabolic hubs, and therefore, there are many reports that describe disease-specific abnormalities in plasma amino acids profile. However, the causes of progression from a healthy control to a manifestation of the plasma amino acid changes remain obscure. Here, we extended the plasma amino acids profile to relationships that have interactive properties, and found remarkable differences in the longitudinal transition of hyperglycemia as a diabetes emergency. What is especially important is to understand pathogenesis for better treatment and early diagnosis of diabetes. In this study, we performed interactive analysis using time course data of the plasma samples of AKITA mice, which develop hyperglycemia. Primarily, we decided to analyze the interactive property of amino acids which had highly significant association with hyperglycemia, namely alanine, glycine, leucine, isoleucine and valine. Next, we inferred the interactive network structure, which reproduces the actual time course within an error allowance of 10% using an S-system model (a conceptual mathematical model for analyzing and simulating networks). The emphasis of this study was altered interactions of plasma amino acids that show stabilizing and destabilizing features in a variety of clinical settings. By performing sensitivity analysis, the most dominant relations in this network were selected; the control paths from glycine to isoleucine in healthy control and from alanine to glycine in hyperglycemia. This result is in good agreement with the biological knowledge regarding branched-chain amino acids, and suggests the biological importance of the effect from alanine to glycine.

  14. Unusual Nonterrestrial L-proteinogenic Amino Acid excesses in the Tagish Lake Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Burton, Aaron S.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Hilts, Robert W.; Herd, D. K.

    2012-01-01

    The distribution and isotopic and enantiomeric compositions of amino acids found in three distinct fragments of the Tagish Lake C2-type carbonaceous chondrite were investigated via liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry and gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Large L-enantiomeric excesses (L(sub ee) approximately 43-59%) of the alpha-hydrogen aspartic and glutamic amino acids were measured in Tagish Lake, whereas alanine, another alpha hydrogen protein amino acid, was found to be nearly racemic (D much approximately L) using both techniques. Carbon isotope measurements of D- and L-aspartic acid and 1)- and L-alanine in Tagish Lake fall well outside of the terrestrial range and indicate that the measured aspartic acid enantioenrichment is indigenous to the meteorite. Alternate explanations for the L-excesses of aspartic acid such as interference from other compounds present in the sample, analytical biases, or terrestrial amino acid contamination were investigated and rejected. These results can be explained by differences in the solid-solution phase behavior of aspartic acid, which can form conglomerate enantiopure solids during crystallization, and alanine, which can only form racemic crystals. Amplification of a small initial L-enantiomer excess during aqueous alteration on the meteorite parent body could have led to the large L-enrichments observed for aspartic acid and other conglomerate amino acids in Tagish Lake. The detection of non terrestrial L-proteinogenic amino acid excesses in the Tagish Lake meteorite provides support for the hypothesis that significant enantiomeric enrichments for some amino acids could form by abiotic processes prior to the emergence of life.

  15. Amino Acid Crossword Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Learning the 20 standard amino acids is an essential component of an introductory course in biochemistry. Later in the course, the students study metabolism and learn about various catabolic and anabolic pathways involving amino acids. Learning new material or concepts often is easier if one can connect the new material to what one already knows;…

  16. AMINO ACIDS AND HEMOGLOBIN PRODUCTION IN ANEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Whipple, G. H.; Robscheit-Robbins, F. S.

    1940-01-01

    Certain individual amino acids when given to standard anemic dogs cause an increase in new hemoglobin production. Occasional negative experiments are recorded. Glycine, glutamic acid, aspartic acid, cystine, histidine, phenylalanine, and proline when given in 1 gm. doses daily for 2 weeks, increase hemoglobin output on the average 23 to 25 gm. above the control level. This reaction amounts to 25 to 30 per cent of the new hemoglobin produced by the feeding of 300 gm. liver daily for 2 weeks—a standard liver test. Alanine, valine, isoleucine, and arginine in the same dosage increase the hemoglobin output on the average 13 to 17 gm. per 2 weeks over the control level. Leucine, methionine, lysine, tryptophane, and tyrosine fall in a middle group with hemoglobin output of about 20 gm. Isovaleric acid, β-hydroxybutyric acid, glutaric acid, and asparagine have shown positive effects and the butyrate is unusually potent for hemoglobin production (Table 2). The isomeric and dl-synthetic forms of the amino acids are as effectively utilized in this reaction as are the natural forms. PMID:19870982

  17. The sugar model: catalysis by amines and amino acid products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, A. L.

    2001-01-01

    Ammonia and amines (including amino acids) were shown to catalyze the formation of sugars from formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde, and the subsequent conversion of sugars to carbonylcontaining products under the conditions studied (pH 5.5 and 50 degrees C). Sterically unhindered primary amines were better catalysts than ammonia, secondary amines, and sterically hindered primary amines (i.e. alpha-aminoisobutyric acid). Reactions catalyzed by primary amines initially consumed formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde about 15-20 times faster than an uncatalyzed control reaction. The amine-catalyzed reactions yielded aldotriose (glyceraldehyde), ketotriose (dihydroxyacetone), aldotetroses (erythrose and threose), ketotetrose (erythrulose), pyruvaldehyde, acetaldehyde, glyoxal, pyruvate, glyoxylate, and several unindentified carbonyl products. The concentrations of the carbonyl products, except pyruvate and ketotetrose, initially increased and then declined during the reaction, indicating their ultimate conversion to other products (like larger sugars or pyruvate). The uncatalyzed control reaction yielded no pyruvate or glyoxylate, and only trace amounts of pyruvaldehyde, acetaldehyde and glyoxal. In the presence of 15 mM catalytic primary amine, such as alanine, the rates of triose and pyruvaldehyde of synthesis were about 15-times and 1200-times faster, respectively, than the uncatalyzed reaction. Since previous studies established that alanine is synthesized from glycolaldehyde and formaldehyde via pyruvaldehyde as its direct precursor, the demonstration that the alanine catalyzes the conversion of glycolaldehyde and formaldehyde to pyruvaldehyde indicates that this synthetic pathway is capable of autocatalysis. The relevance of this synthetic process, named the Sugar Model, to the origin of life is discussed.

  18. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1315 Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. (a)...

  19. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1315 Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. (a)...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1315 Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. (a)...

  1. Regulation of the ald gene encoding alanine dehydrogenase by AldR in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ji-A; Baek, Eun-Young; Kim, Si Wouk; Choi, Jong-Soon; Oh, Jeong-Il

    2013-08-01

    The regulatory gene aldR was identified 95 bp upstream of the ald gene encoding L-alanine dehydrogenase in Mycobacterium smegmatis. The AldR protein shows sequence similarity to the regulatory proteins of the Lrp/AsnC family. Using an aldR deletion mutant, we demonstrated that AldR serves as both activator and repressor for the regulation of ald gene expression, depending on the presence or absence of L-alanine. The purified AldR protein exists as a homodimer in the absence of L-alanine, while it adopts the quaternary structure of a homohexamer in the presence of L-alanine. The binding affinity of AldR for the ald control region was shown to be increased significantly by L-alanine. Two AldR binding sites (O1 and O2) with the consensus sequence GA-N₂-ATC-N₂-TC and one putative AldR binding site with the sequence GA-N₂-GTT-N₂-TC were identified upstream of the ald gene. Alanine and cysteine were demonstrated to be the effector molecules directly involved in the induction of ald expression. The cellular level of L-alanine was shown to be increased in M. smegmatis cells grown under hypoxic conditions, and the hypoxic induction of ald expression appears to be mediated by AldR, which senses the intracellular level of alanine.

  2. Polymerization of alanine in the presence of a non-swelling montmorillonite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paecht-Horowitz, M.; Lahav, N.

    1977-01-01

    Alanine, starting from alanine-adenylate, has been polymerized in the presence of non-swelling Al-montmorillonite. The yield of polymerization is much lower than that obtained in the presence of swelling Na-montmorillonite. The possibility that the changing interlayer spacing in Na-montmorillonite might be responsible for its catalytic properties, is discussed.

  3. 40 CFR 721.520 - Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...)(4), (c)(4) (where N = 100). The requirement of 40 CFR 721.91(a)(4) that the amount of the substance... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.520 Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt. (a) Chemical...

  4. 40 CFR 721.520 - Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...)(4), (c)(4) (where N = 100). The requirement of 40 CFR 721.91(a)(4) that the amount of the substance... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.520 Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt. (a) Chemical...

  5. 40 CFR 721.520 - Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...)(4), (c)(4) (where N = 100). The requirement of 40 CFR 721.91(a)(4) that the amount of the substance... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.520 Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt. (a) Chemical...

  6. 40 CFR 721.520 - Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...)(4), (c)(4) (where N = 100). The requirement of 40 CFR 721.91(a)(4) that the amount of the substance... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.520 Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt. (a) Chemical...

  7. 40 CFR 721.520 - Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...)(4), (c)(4) (where N = 100). The requirement of 40 CFR 721.91(a)(4) that the amount of the substance... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.520 Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt. (a) Chemical...

  8. Using Position-Specific 13C and 14C Labeling and 13C-PLFA Analysis to Assess Microbial Transformations of Free Versus Sorbed Alanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostel, C.; Herschbach, J.; Bore, E. K.; Kuzyakov, Y.; Dippold, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Sorption of charged or partially charged low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS) to soil mineral surfaces delays microbial uptake and therefore mineralization of LMWOS to CO2, as well as all other biochemical transformations. We used position-specific labeling, a tool of isotope applications novel to soil sciences, to compare the transformation mechanisms of sorbed and non-sorbed alanine in soil. Alanine as an amino acid links C- and N-cycles in soil and therefore is a model substance for the pool of LMWOS. To assess transformations of sorbed alanine, we added position-specific and uniformly 13C and 14C labeled alanine tracer to soil that had previously been sterilized by γ-radiation. The labeled soil was added to non-sterilized soil from the same site and incubated. Soil labeled with the same tracers without previous sorption was prepared and incubated as well. We captured the respired CO2 and determined its 14C-activity at increasing time intervals. The incorporation of 14C into microbial biomass was determined by chloroform fumigation extraction (CFE), and utilization of individual C positions by distinct microbial groups was evaluated by 13C-phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA). A dual peak in the respired CO2 revealed two sorption mechanisms. To compare the fate of individual C atoms independent of their concentration and pool size in soil, we applied the divergence index (DI). The DI reveals the convergent or divergent behavior of C from individual molecule positions during microbial utilization. Alanine C-1 position was mainly oxidized to CO2, while its C-2 and C-3 were preferentially incorporated in microbial biomass and PLFA. This indicates that sorption by the COOH group does not protect this group from preferential oxidation. Microbial metabolism was determinative for the preferential oxidation of individual molecule positions. The use of position-specific labeling revealed mechanisms and kinetics of microbial utilization of sorbed and non

  9. Thermal decomposition behavior of potassium and sodium jarosite synthesized in the presence of methylamine and alanine

    SciTech Connect

    J. Michelle Kotler; Nancy W. Hinman; C. Doc Richardson; Jill R. Scott

    2010-10-01

    Biomolecules, methylamine and alanine, found associated with natural jarosite samples peaked the interest of astrobiologists and planetary geologists. How the biomolecules are associated with jarosite remains unclear although the mechanism could be important for detecting biosignatures in the rock record on Earth and other planets. A series of thermal gravimetric experiments using synthetic K-jarosite and Na-jarosite were conducted to determine if thermal analysis could differentiate physical mixtures of alanine and methylamine with jarosite from samples where the methylamine or alanine was incorporated into the synthesis procedure. Physical mixtures and synthetic experiments with methylamine and alanine could be differentiated from one another and from the standards by thermal analysis for both the K-jarosite and Na-jarosite end-member suites. Changes included shifts in on-set temperatures, total temperature changes from on-set to final, and the presence of indicator peaks for methylamine and alanine in the physical mixture experiments.

  10. Electrochemical evaluation of glutathione S-transferase kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Enache, Teodor Adrian; Oliveira-Brett, Ana Maria

    2015-02-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), are a family of enzymes belonging to the phase II metabolism that catalyse the formation of thioether conjugates between the endogenous tripeptide glutathione and xenobiotic compounds. The voltammetric behaviour of glutathione (GSH), 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and glutathione S-transferase (GST), as well as the catalytic conjugation reaction of GSH to CDNB by GST was investigated at room temperature, T=298.15K (25°C), at pH6.5, for low concentration of substrates and enzyme, using differential pulse (DP) voltammetry at a glassy carbon electrode. Only GSH can be oxidized; a sensitivity of 0.14nA/μM and a LOD of 6.4μM were obtained. The GST kinetic parameter electrochemical evaluation, in relation to its substrates, GSH and CDNB, using reciprocal Michaelis-Menten and Lineweaver-Burk double reciprocal plots, was determined. A value of KM~100μM was obtained for either GSH or CDNB, and Vmax varied between 40 and 60μmol/min per mg of GST.

  11. Use of primary deuterium and /sup 15/N isotope effects to deduce the relative rates of steps in the mechanisms of alanine and glutamate dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, P.M.; Chen, C.Y.; Cleland, W.W.; Cook, P.F.

    1988-06-28

    The authors have used deuterium and /sup 15/N isotope effects to study the relative rates of the steps in the mechanisms of alanine and glutamate dehydrogenases. The proposed chemical mechanisms for these enzymes involve carbinolamine formation, imine formation, and reduction of the imine to the amino acid. These steps are almost equally rate limiting for V/K/sub ammonia/ with alanine dehydrogenase, while with glutamate dehydrogenase carbinolamine formation, imine formation, and release of glutamate after hydride transfer provide most of the rate limitation of V/K/sub ammonia/. Release of oxidized nucleotide is largely rate limiting for V/sub max/ for both enzymes. When ..beta..-hydroxypyruvate replaces pyruvate, or 3-acetylpyridine NADH (Acpyr-NADH) or thio-NADH replaces NADH with alanine dehydrogenase, nucleotide release no longer limits V/sub max/, and hydride transfer becomes more rate limiting. With glutamate dehydrogenase, replacement of ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate by ..cap alpha..-ketovalerate makes hydride transfer more rate limiting. Use of Acpyr-NADPH has a minimal effect with ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate but causes an 8-fold decrease in V/sub max/ with ..cap alpha..-ketovalerate, with hydride transfer the major rate-limiting step. In contrast, thio-NADPH with either ..cap alpha..-keto acid causes carbinolamide formation to become almost completely rate limiting. These studies show the power of multiple isotope effects in deducing details of the chemistry and changes in rate-limiting step(s) in complicated reaction mechanisms such as those of alanine and glutamate dehydrogenases.

  12. Raman spectra of amino acids and their aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guangyong; Zhu, Xian; Fan, Qi; Wan, Xueliang

    2011-03-01

    Amino acids are the basic "building blocks" that combine to form proteins and play an important physiological role in all life-forms. Amino acids can be used as models for the examination of the importance of intermolecular bonding in life processes. Raman spectra serve to obtain information regarding molecular conformation, giving valuable insights into the topology of more complex molecules (peptides and proteins). In this paper, amino acids and their aqueous solution have been studied by Raman spectroscopy. Comparisons of certain values for these frequencies in amino acids and their aqueous solutions are given. Spectra of solids when compared to those of the solute in solution are invariably much more complex and almost always sharper. We present a collection of Raman spectra of 18 kinds of amino acids ( L-alanine, L-arginine, L-aspartic acid, cystine, L-glutamic acid, L-glycine, L-histidine, L-isoluecine, L-leucine, L-lysine, L-phenylalanine, L-methionone, L-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, L-tryptophan, L-tyrosine, L-valine) and their aqueous solutions that can serve as references for the interpretation of Raman spectra of proteins and biological materials.

  13. [Absorption of amino acids from the perfused ovine rumen].

    PubMed

    L' Leng; Tomás, J; Várady, J; Szányiová, M

    1978-06-01

    The experiments with extracoroporeal perfusion of sheep rumen were performed [Leng et al., 1977]. Bovine plasma, diluted in a 1:1ratio with an isotonic solution of sodium chloride, was used for four perfusions, and autologous blood was used for two perfusions in the course of 150 minutes. After 60 minutes perfusion 20 g enzymatic casein hydrolyzate were applied to the rumen. The levels of free amino acids in the perfusate were recorded after 60 minutes' perfusion [the first phase of perfusion] and at the end of the experiment [the second phase]. The levels of lysine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid increased after perfusions with bovine plasma during the first phase, the levels of glutamic acid, phenylalanine, and in one case of alanine, increased after perfusions with autologus blood. Simultaneously the level of valine decreased after perfusions with bovine plasma, and after perfusions with blood the levels of arginine and valine, and/or lysine, dropped. During the second phase of perfusion, the levels of all the observed amino acids except methionine [bovine plasma], and/or orginine and methionine [blood] rose in the perfusate. The experiments showed that the level of amino acids in the rumen content presented a decisive factor affecting amino acid absorption from the rumen into the blood. Transformation of the amino acids during their passage through the remen wall may be assumed, and glutamic acid is one of the chief products of this process.

  14. Solution nonideality related to solute molecular characteristics of amino acids.

    PubMed Central

    Keener, C R; Fullerton, G D; Cameron, I L; Xiong, J

    1995-01-01

    By measuring the freezing-point depression for dilute, aqueous solutions of all water-soluble amino acids, we test the hypothesis that nonideality in aqueous solutions is due to solute-induced water structuring near hydrophobic surfaces and solute-induced water destructuring in the dipolar electric fields generated by the solute. Nonideality is expressed with a single solute/solvent interaction parameter I, calculated from experimental measure of delta T. A related parameter, I(n), gives a method of directly relating solute characteristics to solute-induced water structuring or destructuring. I(n)-values correlate directly with hydrophobic surface area and inversely with dipolar strength. By comparing the nonideality of amino acids with progressively larger hydrophobic side chains, structuring is shown to increase with hydrophobic surface area at a rate of one perturbed water molecule per 8.8 square angstroms, implying monolayer coverage. Destructuring is attributed to dielectric realignment as described by the Debye-Hückel theory, but with a constant separation of charges in the amino-carboxyl dipole. By using dimers and trimers of glycine and alanine, this destructuring is shown to increase with increasing dipole strength using increased separation of fixed dipolar charges. The capacity to predict nonideal solution behavior on the basis of amino acid characteristics will permit prediction of free energy of transfer to water, which may help predict the energetics of folding and unfolding of proteins based on the characteristics of constituent amino acids. Images FIGURE 6 PMID:7711253

  15. Detection and substrate selectivity of new microbial D-amino acid oxidases.

    PubMed

    Gabler; Hensel; Fischer

    2000-11-01

    In order to screen for new microbial D-amino acid oxidase activities a selective and sensitive peroxidase/o-dianisidine assay, detecting the formation of hydrogen peroxide was developed. Catalase, which coexists with oxidases in the peroxisomes or the microsomes and, which competes with peroxidase for hydrogen peroxide, was completely inhibited by o-dianisidine up to a catalase activity of 500 nkat ml(-)(1). Thus, using the peroxidase/o-dianisidine assay and employing crude extracts of microorganisms in a microplate reader, a detection sensitivity for oxidase activity of 0.6 nkat ml(-)(1) was obtained.Wild type colonies which were grown on a selective medium containing D-alanine as carbon, energy and nitrogen source were examined for D-amino acid oxidase activity by the peroxidase/o-dianisidine assay. The oxidase positive colonies possessing an apparent oxidase activity > 2 nkat g dry biomass(-)(1) were isolated. Among them three new D-amino acid oxidase-producers were found and identified as Fusarium oxysporum, Verticilium lutealbum and Candida parapsilosis. The best new D-amino oxidase producer was the fungus F. oxysporum with a D-amino acid oxidase activity of about 900 nkat g dry biomass(-)(1) or 21 nkat mg protein(-)(1). With regard to the use as a biocatalytic tool in biotechnology the substrate specificities of the three new D-amino acid oxidases were compared with those of the known D-amino acid oxidases from Trigonopsis variabilis, Rhodotorula gracilis and pig kidney under the same conditions. All six D-amino acid oxidases accepted the D-enantiomers of alanine, valine, leucine, proline, phenylalanine, serine and glutamine as substrates and, except for the D-amino acid oxidase from V. luteoalbum, D-tryptophane, D-tyrosine, D-arginine and D-histidine were accepted as well. The relative highest activities (>95%) were measured versus D-alanine (C. parapsilosis, F. oxysporum, T. variabilis), D-methionine (V. luteoalbum, R. gracilis), D-valine (T. variabilis, R

  16. Heterologous expression and functional characterization of avian mu-class glutathione S-transferases.

    PubMed

    Bunderson, Brett R; Kim, Ji Eun; Croasdell, Amanda; Mendoza, Kristelle M; Reed, Kent M; Coulombe, Roger A

    2013-08-01

    Hepatic glutathione S-transferases (GSTs: EC2.5.1.1.8) catalyze the detoxification of reactive electrophilic compounds, many of which are toxic and carcinogenic intermediates, via conjugation with the endogenous tripeptide glutathione (GSH). Glutathione S-transferase (GST)-mediated detoxification is a critical determinant of species susceptibility to the toxic and carcinogenic mycotoxin aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), which in resistant animals efficiently detoxifies the toxic intermediate produced by hepatic cytochrome P450 bioactivation, the exo-AFB1-8,9-epoxide (AFBO). Domestic turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) are one of the most sensitive animals known to AFB1, a condition associated with a deficiency of hepatic GST-mediated detoxification of AFBO. We have recently shown that unlike their domestic counterparts, wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo silvestris), which are relatively resistant, express hepatic GST-mediated detoxification activity toward AFBO. Because of the importance of GSTs in species susceptibility, and to explore possible GST classes involved in AFB1 detoxification, we amplified, cloned, expressed and functionally characterized the hepatic mu-class GSTs tGSTM3 (GenBank accession no. JF340152), tGSTM4 (JF340153) from domestic turkeys, and a GSTM4 variant (ewGSTM4, JF340154) from Eastern wild turkeys. Predicted molecular masses of tGSTM3 and two tGSTM4 variants were 25.6 and 25.8kDa, respectively. Multiple sequence comparisons revealed four GSTM motifs and the mu-loop in both proteins. tGSTM4 has 89% amino acid sequence identity to chicken GSTM2, while tGSTM3 has 73% sequence identity to human GSTM3 (hGSTM3). Specific activities of Escherichia coli-expressed tGSTM3 toward 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and peroxidase activity toward cumene hydroperoxide were five-fold greater than tGSTM4 while tGSTM4 possessed more than three-fold greater activity toward 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene (DCNB). The two enzymes displayed equal activity toward ethacrynic acid (ECA

  17. Calibration of helical tomotherapy machine using EPR/alanine dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Perichon, Nicolas; Garcia, Tristan; Francois, Pascal; Lourenco, Valerie; Lesven, Caroline; Bordy, Jean-Marc

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: Current codes of practice for clinical reference dosimetry of high-energy photon beams in conventional radiotherapy recommend using a 10x10 cm{sup 2} square field, with the detector at a reference depth of 10 cm in water and 100 cm source to surface distance (SSD) (AAPM TG-51) or 100 cm source-to-axis distance (SAD) (IAEA TRS-398). However, the maximum field size of a helical tomotherapy (HT) machine is 40x5 cm{sup 2} defined at 85 cm SAD. These nonstandard conditions prevent a direct implementation of these protocols. The purpose of this study is twofold: To check the absorbed dose in water and dose rate calibration of a tomotherapy unit as well as the accuracy of the tomotherapy treatment planning system (TPS) calculations for a specific test case. Method: Both topics are based on the use of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) using alanine as transfer dosimeter between the Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNHB) {sup 60}Co-{gamma}-ray reference beam and the Institut Curie's HT beam. Irradiations performed in the LNHB reference {sup 60}Co-{gamma}-ray beam allowed setting up the calibration method, which was then implemented and tested at the LNHB 6 MV linac x-ray beam, resulting in a deviation of 1.6% (at a 1% standard uncertainty) relative to the reference value determined with the standard IAEA TRS-398 protocol. Results: HT beam dose rate estimation shows a difference of 2% with the value stated by the manufacturer at a 2% standard uncertainty. A 4% deviation between measured dose and the calculation from the tomotherapy TPS was found. The latter was originated by an inadequate representation of the phantom CT-scan values and, consequently, mass densities within the phantom. This difference has been explained by the mass density values given by the CT-scan and used by the TPS which were not the true ones. Once corrected using Monte Carlo N-Particle simulations to validate the accuracy of this process, the difference between corrected TPS

  18. The Benzyl Ester Group of Amino Acid Monomers Enhances Substrate Affinity and Broadens the Substrate Specificity of the Enzyme Catalyst in Chemoenzymatic Copolymerization.

    PubMed

    Ageitos, Jose Manuel; Yazawa, Kenjiro; Tateishi, Ayaka; Tsuchiya, Kousuke; Numata, Keiji

    2016-01-11

    The chemoenzymatic polymerization of amino acid monomers by proteases involves a two-step reaction: the formation of a covalent acyl-intermediate complex between the protease and the carboxyl ester group of the monomer and the subsequent deacylation of the complex by aminolysis to form a peptide bond. Although the initiation with the ester group of the monomer is an important step, the influence of the ester group on the polymerization has not been studied in detail. Herein, we studied the effect of the ester groups (methyl, ethyl, benzyl, and tert-butyl esters) of alanine and glycine on the synthesis of peptides using papain as the catalyst. Alanine and glycine were selected as monomers because of their substantially different affinities toward papain. The efficiency of the polymerization of alanine and glycine benzyl esters was much greater than that of the other esters. The benzyl ester group therefore allowed papain to equally polymerize alanine and glycine, even though the affinity of alanine toward papain is substantially higher. The characterization of the copolymers of alanine and glycine in terms of the secondary structure and thermal properties revealed that the thermal stability of the peptides depends on the amino acid composition and resultant secondary structure. The current results indicate that the nature of the ester group drastically affects the polymerization efficiency and broadens the substrate specificity of the protease.

  19. Instantaneous normal mode analysis of the vibrational relaxation of the amide I mode of alanine dipeptide in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farag, Marwa H.; Zúñiga, José; Requena, Alberto; Bastida, Adolfo

    2013-05-01

    Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations coupled to instantaneous normal modes (INMs) analysis are used to study the vibrational relaxation of the acetyl and amino-end amide I modes of the alanine dipeptide (AlaD) molecule dissolved in water (D2O). The INMs are assigned in terms of the equilibrium normal modes using the Effective Atomic Min-Cost algorithm as adapted to make use of the outputs of standard MD packages, a method which is well suited for the description of flexible molecules. The relaxation energy curves of both amide I modes show multiexponential decays, in good agreement with the experimental findings. It is found that ˜85%-90% of the energy relaxes through intramolecular vibrational redistribution. The main relaxation pathways are also identified. The rate at which energy is transferred into the solvent is similar for the acetyl-end and amino-end amide I modes. The conformational changes occurring during relaxation are investigated, showing that the populations of the alpha and beta region conformers are altered by energy transfer in such a way that it takes 15 ps for the equilibrium conformational populations to be recovered after the initial excitation of the AlaD molecule.

  20. Mycobacterium smegmatis L-alanine dehydrogenase (Ald) is required for proficient utilization of alanine as a sole nitrogen source and sustained anaerobic growth.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhengyu; Cáceres, Nancy E; Sarath, Gautam; Barletta, Raúl G

    2002-09-01

    NAD(H)-dependent L-alanine dehydrogenase (EC 1.4.1.1) (Ald) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of L-alanine and the reductive amination of pyruvate. To assess the physiological role of Ald in Mycobacterium smegmatis, we cloned the ald gene, identified its promoter, determined the protein expression levels, and analyzed the combined effects of nutrient supplementation, oxygen availability, and growth stage on enzyme activity. High Ald activities were observed in cells grown in the presence of L- or D-alanine regardless of the oxygen availability and growth stage. In exponentially growing cells under aerobic conditions, supplementation with alanine resulted in a 25- to 50-fold increase in the enzyme activity. In the absence of alanine supplementation, 23-fold-higher Ald activities were observed in cells grown exponentially under anaerobic conditions. Furthermore, M. smegmatis ald null mutants were constructed by targeted disruption and were shown to lack any detectable Ald activity. In contrast, the glycine dehydrogenase (EC 1.4.1.10) (Gdh) activity in mutant cells remained at wild-type levels, indicating that another enzyme protein is responsible for the physiologically relevant reductive amination of glyoxylate. The ald mutants grew poorly in minimal medium with L-alanine as the sole nitrogen source, reaching a saturation density 100-fold less than that of the wild-type strain. Likewise, mutants grew to a saturation density 10-fold less than that of the wild-type strain under anaerobic conditions. In summary, the phenotypes displayed by the M. smegmatis ald mutants suggest that Ald plays an important role in both alanine utilization and anaerobic growth.

  1. Amino acid racemization dating of fossil bones, I. inter-laboratory comparison of racemization measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bada, J.L.; Hoopes, E.; Darling, D.; Dungworth, G.; Kessels, H.J.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Blunt, D.J.

    1979-01-01

    Enantiomeric measurements for aspartic acid, glutamic acid, and alanine in twenty-one different fossil bone samples have been carried out by three different laboratories using different analytical methods. These inter-laboratory comparisons demonstrate that D/L aspartic acid measurements are highly reproducible, whereas the enantiomeric measurements for the other amino acids show a wide variation between the three laboratories. At present, aspartic acid measurements are the most suitable for racemization dating of bone because of their superior analytical precision. ?? 1979.

  2. Auxin amidohydrolases from Brassica rapa cleave the alanine conjugate of indolepropionic acid as a preferable substrate: a biochemical and modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Savić, Bojana; Tomić, Sanja; Magnus, Volker; Gruden, Kristina; Barle, Katja; Grenković, Renata; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Salopek-Sondi, Branka

    2009-09-01

    Two auxin amidohydrolases, BrIAR3 and BrILL2, from Chinese cabbage [Brassica rapa L. ssp. pekinensis (Lour.) Hanelt] were produced by heterologous expression in Escherichia coli, purified, and screened for activity towards N-(indol-3-ylacetyl)-L-alanine (IAA-Ala) and the long-chain auxin-amino acid conjugates, N-[3-(indol-3-yl)propionyl]-L-alanine (IPA-Ala) and N-[4-(indol-3-yl)butyryl]-L-alanine (IBA-Ala). IPA-Ala was shown to be the favored substrate of both enzymes, but BrILL2 was approximately 15 times more active than BrIAR3. Both enzymes cleaved IBA-Ala and IAA-Ala to a lesser extent. The enzyme kinetics were measured for BrILL2 and the obtained parameters suggested similar binding affinities for the long-chain auxin-amino acid conjugates (IPA-Ala and IBA-Ala). The velocity of the hydrolyzing reaction decreased in the order IPA-Ala > IBA-Ala > IAA-Ala. In a root growth bioassay, higher growth inhibition was caused by IPA-Ala and IBA-Ala in comparison with IAA-Ala. Neither these conjugates nor the corresponding free auxins affected the expression of the BrILL2 gene. A modeling study revealed several possible modes of IPA-Ala binding to BrILL2. Based on these results, two possible scenarios for substrate hydrolysis are proposed. In one the metal binding water is activated by the carboxyl group of the substrate itself, and in the other by a glutamate residue from the active site of the enzyme.

  3. Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aspiration Syndrome Additional Content Medical News Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism By Lee M. Sanders, MD, MPH NOTE: ... Metabolic Disorders Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders of Lipid Metabolism Amino acids are ...

  4. Hydrogen production using amino acids obtained by protein degradation in waste biomass by combined dark- and photo-fermentation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jun; Ding, Lingkan; Xia, Ao; Lin, Richen; Li, Yuyou; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2015-03-01

    The biological hydrogen production from amino acids obtained by protein degradation was comprehensively investigated to increase heating value conversion efficiency. The five amino acids (i.e., alanine, serine, aspartic acid, arginine, and leucine) produced limited hydrogen (0.2-16.2 mL/g) but abundant soluble metabolic products (40.1-84.0 mM) during dark-fermentation. The carbon conversion efficiencies of alanine (85.3%) and serine (94.1%) during dark-fermentation were significantly higher than those of other amino acids. Residual dark-fermentation solutions treated with zeolite for NH4(+) removal were inoculated with photosynthetic bacteria to further produce hydrogen during photo-fermentation. The hydrogen yields of alanine and serine through combined dark- and photo-fermentation were 418.6 and 270.2 mL/g, respectively. The heating value conversion efficiency of alanine to hydrogen was 25.1%, which was higher than that of serine (21.2%).

  5. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism is the process your body uses to make energy from the food you eat. Food is ... One group of these disorders is amino acid metabolism disorders. They include phenylketonuria (PKU) and maple syrup ...

  6. Amino Acids and Chirality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie E.

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids are among the most heavily studied organic compound class in carbonaceous chondrites. The abundance, distributions, enantiomeric compositions, and stable isotopic ratios of amino acids have been determined in carbonaceous chondrites fi'om a range of classes and petrographic types, with interesting correlations observed between these properties and the class and typc of the chondritcs. In particular, isomeric distributions appear to correlate with parent bodies (chondrite class). In addition, certain chiral amino acids are found in enantiomeric excess in some chondrites. The delivery of these enantiomeric excesses to the early Earth may have contributed to the origin of the homochirality that is central to life on Earth today. This talk will explore the amino acids in carbonaceous chondritcs and their relevance to the origin of life.

  7. Tb(3+)-triggered luminescence in a supramolecular gel and its use as a fluorescent chemoprobe for proteins containing alanine.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sung Ho; Kim, Ka Young; Woo, Dong Kyun; Lee, Shim Sung; Jung, Jong Hwa

    2014-11-01

    A tetracarboxylic acid-appended thiacalix[4]arene-based ligand with Tb(3+) formed a supramolecular gel which showed novel fluorogenic sensor capability for probing alanine and proteins containing alanine.

  8. Amino Acid Analyses of Acid Hydrolysates in Desert Varnish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Randall S.; Staley, James T.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Engel, Mike

    2001-01-01

    There has long been a debate as to whether rock varnish deposits are microbially mediated or are deposited by inorganic processes. Varnished rocks are found throughout the world primarily in arid and semi-arid regions. The varnish coats are typically up to 200 microns thick and are composed of clays and alternating layers enriched in manganese and iron oxides. The individual layers range in thickness from 1 micron to greater than 10 microns and may continue laterally for more than a 100 microns. Overlapping botryoidal structures are visible in thin section and scanning electron micrographs. The coatings also include small amounts of organic mater and detrital grains. Amino-acid hydrolysates offer a means of assessing the organic composition of rock varnish collected from the Sonoran Desert, near Phoenix, AZ. Chromatographic analyses of hydrolysates from powdered samples of rock varnish suggest that the interior of rock varnish is relatively enriched in amino acids and specifically in d-alanine and glutamic acid. Peptidoglycan (murein) is the main structural component of gram-positive bacterial cell walls. The d-enantiomer of alanine and glutamic acid are specific to peptidoglycan and are consequently an indicator for the presence of bacteria. D-alanine is also found in teichoic acid which is only found in gram-positive bacteria. Several researchers have cultured bacteria from the surface of rock varnish and most have been gram-positive, suggesting that gram-positive bacteria are intimately associated with varnish coatings and may play a role in the formation of varnish coatings.

  9. Energy landscapes and global thermodynamics for alanine peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somani, Sandeep; Wales, David J.

    2013-09-01

    We compare different approaches for computing the thermodynamics of biomolecular systems. Techniques based on parallel replicas evolving via molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo simulations produce overlapping histograms for the densities of states. In contrast, energy landscape methods employ a superposition partition function constructed from local minima of the potential energy surface. The latter approach is particularly powerful for systems exhibiting broken ergodicity, and it is usually implemented using a harmonic normal mode approximation, which has not been extensively tested for biomolecules. The present contribution compares these alternative approaches for small alanine peptides modelled using the CHARMM and AMBER force fields. Densities of states produced from canonical sampling using multiple temperature replicas provide accurate reference data to evaluate the effect of the harmonic normal mode approximation in the superposition calculations. This benchmarking lays foundations for the application of energy landscape methods to larger biomolecules. It will also provide well characterised model systems for developing enhanced sampling methods, and for the treatment of anharmonicity corresponding to individual local minima.

  10. Alanine synthesis from glyceraldehyde and ammonium ion in aqueous solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    The formation of alanine (ala) form C(14)-glyceraldehyde and ammonium phosphate in the presence or absence of a thiol is reported. At ambient temperature, ala synthesis was six times more rapid in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid than in its absence (0.6 and 0.1 percent, respectively, after 60 days). Similarly, the presence of another thiol, N-acetylcysteinate, increased the production of ala, as well as of lactate. The reaction pathway of thiol-catalyzed synthesis of ala, with the lactic acid formed in a bypath, is suggested. In this, dehydration of glyceraldehyde is followed by the formation of hemithioacetal. In the presence of ammonia, an imine is formed, which eventually yields ala. This pathway is consistent with the observation that the rate ratio of ala/lactate remains constant throughout the process. The fact that the reaction takes place under anaerobic conditions in the presence of H2O and with the low concentrations of simple substrates and catalysts makes it an attractive model prebiotic reaction in the process of molecular evolution.

  11. Folding simulations of alanine-based peptides with lysine residues.

    PubMed Central

    Sung, S S

    1995-01-01

    The folding of short alanine-based peptides with different numbers of lysine residues is simulated at constant temperature (274 K) using the rigid-element Monte Carlo method. The solvent-referenced potential has prevented the multiple-minima problem in helix folding. From various initial structures, the peptides with three lysine residues fold into helix-dominated conformations with the calculated average helicity in the range of 60-80%. The peptide with six lysine residues shows only 8-14% helicity. These results agree well with experimental observations. The intramolecular electrostatic interaction of the charged lysine side chains and their electrostatic hydration destabilize the helical conformations of the peptide with six lysine residues, whereas these effects on the peptides with three lysine residues are small. The simulations provide insight into the helix-folding mechanism, including the beta-bend intermediate in helix initiation, the (i, i + 3) hydrogen bonds, the asymmetrical helix propagation, and the asymmetrical helicities in the N- and C-terminal regions. These findings are consistent with previous studies. PMID:7756550

  12. Amino Acid and Vitamin Requirements of Several Bacteroides Strains

    PubMed Central

    Quinto, Grace

    1966-01-01

    Nutritional studies were performed on nine Bacteroides strains, by use of the methodology and media of anaerobic rumen microbiology. Ristella perfoetens CCI required l-arginine hydrochloride, l-tryptophan, l-leucine, l-histidine hydrochloride, l-cysteine hydrochloride, dl-valine, dl-tyrosine, and the vitamin calcium-d-pantothenate, since scant turbidity developed in media without these nutrients. R. perfoetens was stimulated by glycine, dl-lysine hydrochloride, dl-isoleucine, l-proline, l-glutamic acid, dl-alanine, dl-phenylalanine, dl-methionine, and the vitamins nicotinamide and p-aminobenzoic acid, since maximal turbidity developed more slowly in media without these nutrients than in complete medium. Medium A-23, which was devised for R. perfoetens, contained salts, 0.0002% nicotinamide and calcium d-pantothenate, 0.00001% p-aminobenzoic acid, 0.044% l-tryptophan, 0.09% l-glutamic acid, and 0.1% of the other 13 amino acids listed above. Zuberella clostridiformis and seven strains of R. pseudoinsolita did not require vitamins, and showed no absolute requirement for any one amino acid. Various strains produced maximal turbidity more slowly in media deficient in l-proline, glycine, l-glutamic acid, dl-serine, l-histidine hydrochloride, dl-alanine, or l-cysteine hydrochloride, than in complete medium. These eight strains grew optimally in medium A-23 plus 0.1% dl-serine but without vitamins. PMID:16349673

  13. Manageable cytotoxicity of nanocapsules immobilizing D-amino acid oxidase via exogenous administration of nontoxic prodrug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Zhu, Yingchun; Fu, Jingke

    2014-02-01

    D-Amino acid oxidase (DAO), which could catalyze generation of hydrogen peroxide with strong oxidbility and cytotoxicity, has become of interest as a biocatalyst for therapeutic treatments. Herein we report that amino-functional hollow mesoporous silica with large pore size (10.27 nm) and positively charged surface effectively immobilize DAO with negative charge. The adsorption, activity and stability of DAO are demonstrated to depend mainly on the amino-functionalization of surface. Significant cancer cell killing effect is observed when the cells are treated by the nanocapsules entrapping DAO together with D-alanine, showing distinct dose-dependency on concentration of the nanocapsules entrapping DAO or D-alanine. Nevertheless, the toxicity is completely neutralized by the addition of catalase, and anti-tumor effect is not observed when either the nanocapsules entrapping DAO or D-alanine is applied alone. The results indicate that cytotoxicity of the nanocapsules entrapping DAO could be managed by exogenous administration of nontoxic prodrug to tumor tissue, due to the stereoselectivity of DAO and the scarcity of its substrates in mammalian organisms. Thus, the method might be exploited as a potential treatment for cancer therapy.

  14. Deuterium NMR study of amino acid coordination to chromium(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Green, C.A.; Place, H.; Willett, R.D.; Legg, J.I.

    1986-12-17

    A series of bis(ethylenediamine)Cr(III)-amino acid complexes, synthesized with deuterium-labeled alanine, glycine, homoserine, leucine, methionine, phenylalanine, serine, and threonine, was characterized by /sup 2/H NMR spectroscopy. The spectra show that these bidentate-coordinated amino acid complexes decompose via monodentate species. In addition, the diastereomeric isomers of alanine and leucine can be distinguished in the spectra. This was confirmed by the isolation of one of the L-leucine isomers. The bis(1,3-propanediamine)Cr(III) complexes of glycine and alanine were also synthesized, and the NMR spectra of these complexes and ..cap alpha..-cis-(Cr(ethylenediaminediacetate)(glycinate)) show changes due to variation in the ligand complement. The crystal structure of ..cap alpha..-cis(Cr(ethylenediaminediacetate)(glycinate)) x 2H/sub 2/O (CrO/sub 6/N/sub 3/C/sub 8/H/sub 14/ x 2H/sub 2/O) was determined and supports the NMR observations. This complex crystallizes in the space group P2/sub 1//c of the monoclinic crystal system with a = 8.9231 (19) A, b = 10.1889 (22) A, c = 15.4180 (30) A, ..beta.. = 102.657 (17)/sup 0/, and Z = 4. An improved method for the synthesis of bis(diamine)Cr(III)-amino acid complexes is also reported. 24 references, 3 figures, 7 tables.

  15. Alanine-EPR as a transfer standard dosimetry system for low energy X radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoury, H. J.; da Silva, E. J.; Mehta, K.; de Barros, V. S.; Asfora, V. K.; Guzzo, P. L.; Parker, A. G.

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the use of alanine-EPR as a transfer standard dosimetry system for low energy X radiation, such as that in RS-2400, which operates in the range from 25 to 150 kV and 2 to 45 mA. Two types of alanine dosimeters were investigated. One is a commercial alanine pellets from Aérial-Centre de Ressources Technologiques, France and one was prepared in our laboratory (LMRI-DEN/UFPE). The EPR spectra of the irradiated dosimeters were recorded in the Nuclear Energy Department of UFPE, using a Bruker EMX10 EPR spectrometer operating in the X-band. The alanine-EPR dosimetry system was calibrated in the range of 20-220 Gy in this X-ray field, against an ionization chamber calibrated at the relevant X-ray energy with traceability to PTB. The results showed that both alanine dosimeters presented a linear dose response the same sensitivity, when the EPR signal was normalized to alanine mass. The total uncertainty in the measured dose was estimated to be about 3%. The results indicate that it is possible to use the alanine-EPR dosimetry system for validation of a low-energy X ray irradiator, such as RS-2400.

  16. Revised mechanism of D-alanine incorporation into cell wall polymers in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Reichmann, Nathalie T; Cassona, Carolina Picarra; Gründling, Angelika

    2013-09-01

    Teichoic acids (TAs) are important for growth, biofilm formation, adhesion and virulence of Gram-positive bacterial pathogens. The chemical structures of the TAs vary between bacteria, though they typically consist of zwitterionic polymers that are anchored to either the peptidoglycan layer as in the case of wall teichoic acid (WTA) or the cell membrane and named lipoteichoic acid (LTA). The polymers are modified with D-alanines and a lack of this decoration leads to increased susceptibility to cationic antimicrobial peptides. Four proteins, DltA-D, are essential for the incorporation of d-alanines into cell wall polymers and it has been established that DltA transfers D-alanines in the cytoplasm of the cell onto the carrier protein DltC. However, two conflicting models have been proposed for the remainder of the mechanism. Using a cellular protein localization and membrane topology analysis, we show here that DltC does not traverse the membrane and that DltD is anchored to the outside of the cell. These data are in agreement with the originally proposed model for D-alanine incorporation through a process that has been proposed to proceed via a D-alanine undecaprenyl phosphate membrane intermediate. Furthermore, we found that WTA isolated from a Staphylococcus aureus strain lacking LTA contains only a small amount of D-alanine, indicating that LTA has a role, either direct or indirect, in the efficient D-alanine incorporation into WTA in living cells.

  17. Production of amino acids by analog-resistant mutants of the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis.

    PubMed Central

    Riccardi, G; Sora, S; Ciferri, O

    1981-01-01

    Mutants of Spirulina platensis resistant to 5-fluorotryptophan, beta-3-thienyl-alanine, ethionine, p-fluorophenylalanine, or azetidine-2-carboxylic acid were isolated. Some of these mutants appeared to be resistant to more than one analog and to overproduce the corresponding amino acids. A second group was composed of mutants that were resistant to one analog only. Of the latter mutants, one resistant to azetidine-2-carboxylic acid was found to overproduce proline only, whereas one resistant to fluorotryptophan and one resistant to ethionine did not overproduce any of the tested amino acids. PMID:6792182

  18. Photolabile protection for amino acids: studies on the release from novel benzoquinolone cages.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Andrea S C; Soares, Ana M S; Gonçalves, M Sameiro T; Costa, Susana P G

    2015-12-01

    The synthesis of a novel fused nitrogen heterocycle, benzoquinolone, for evaluation as a photocleavable protecting group is described for the first time by coupling to model amino acids (alanine, phenylalanine and glutamic acid). Conversion of the phenylalanine ester conjugate to the thionated derivative was accomplished by reaction with Lawesson's reagent. Photocleavage studies of the carbonyl and thiocarbonyl benzoquinolone conjugates in various solvents and at different wavelengths (300, 350 and 419 nm) showed that the most interesting result was obtained at 419 nm for the thioconjugate, revealing that the presence of the thiocarbonyl group clearly improved the photolysis rates, giving practicable irradiations times for the release of the amino acids (less than 1 min).

  19. Geranylgeranyl transferase type II inhibition prevents myeloma bone disease.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Michelle A; Coulton, Les; Ebetino, Frank H; Vanderkerken, Karin; Croucher, Peter I

    2008-12-12

    Geranylgeranyl transferase II (GGTase II) is an enzyme that plays a key role in the isoprenylation of proteins. 3-PEHPC, a novel GGTase II inhibitor, blocks bone resorption and induces myeloma cell apoptosis in vitro. Its effect on bone resorption and tumor growth in vivo is unknown. We investigated the effect of 3-PEHPC on tumor burden and bone disease in the 5T2MM model of multiple myeloma in vivo. 3-PEHPC significantly reduced osteoclast numbers and osteoclast surface. 3-PEHPC prevented the bone loss and the development of osteolytic bone lesions induced by 5T2MM myeloma cells. Treatment with 3-PEHPC also significantly reduced myeloma burden in bone. The magnitude of response was similar to that seen with the bisphosphonate, risedronate. These data show that targeting GGTase II with 3-PEHPC can prevent osteolytic bone disease and reduce tumor burden in vivo, and represents a novel approach to treating tumors that grow in bone.

  20. Pleiotropic Functions of Glutathione S-Transferase P

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Grek, Christina; Ye, Zhi-Wei; Manevich, Yefim; Tew, Kenneth D.; Townsend, Danyelle M.

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP) is one member of the GST superfamily that is prevalently expressed in mammals. Known to possess catalytic activity through deprotonating glutathione allowing formation of thioether bonds with electrophilic substrates, more recent discoveries have broadened our understanding of the biological roles of this protein. In addition to catalytic detoxification, other properties so far ascribed to GSTP include chaperone functions, regulation of nitric oxide pathways, regulation of a variety of kinase signaling pathways, and participation in the forward reaction of protein S-glutathionylation. The expression of GSTP has been linked with cancer and other human pathologies and more recently even with drug addiction. With respect to human health, polymorphic variants of GSTP may determine individual susceptibility to oxidative stress and/or be critical in the design and development of drugs that have used redox pathways as a discovery platform. PMID:24974181

  1. Glutathione S-transferase class {pi} polymorphism in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Aivaliotis, M.J.; Cantu, T.; Gilligan, R.

    1995-02-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) comprises a family of isozymes with broad substrate specificities. One or more GST isozymes are present in most animal tissues and function in several detoxification pathways through the conjugation of reduced glutathione with various electrophiles, thereby reducing their potential toxicity. Four soluble GST isozymes encoded by genes on different chromosomes have been identified in humans. The acidic class pi GST, GSTP (previously designated GST-3), is widely distributed in adult tissues and appears to be the only GST isozyme present in leukocytes and placenta. Previously reported electrophoretic analyses of erythrocyte and leukocyte extracts revealed single bands of activity, which differed slightly in mobility between the two cell types, or under other conditions, a two-banded pattern. To our knowledge, no genetically determined polymorphisms have previously been reported in GSTP from any species. We now report a polymorphism of GSTP in baboon leukocytes, and present family data that verifies autosomal codominant inheritance. 14 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Pleiotropic functions of glutathione S-transferase P.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Grek, Christina; Ye, Zhi-Wei; Manevich, Yefim; Tew, Kenneth D; Townsend, Danyelle M

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP) is one member of the GST superfamily that is prevalently expressed in mammals. Known to possess catalytic activity through deprotonating glutathione allowing formation of thioether bonds with electrophilic substrates, more recent discoveries have broadened our understanding of the biological roles of this protein. In addition to catalytic detoxification, other properties so far ascribed to GSTP include chaperone functions, regulation of nitric oxide pathways, regulation of a variety of kinase signaling pathways, and participation in the forward reaction of protein S-glutathionylation. The expression of GSTP has been linked with cancer and other human pathologies and more recently even with drug addiction. With respect to human health, polymorphic variants of GSTP may determine individual susceptibility to oxidative stress and/or be critical in the design and development of drugs that have used redox pathways as a discovery platform.

  3. Solubility calculations of branched and linear amino acids using lattice cluster theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischlschweiger, Michael; Enders, Sabine; Zeiner, Tim

    2014-09-01

    In this work, the activity coefficients and the solubility of amino acids in water were calculated using the lattice cluster theory (LCT) combined with the extended chemical association lattice model allowing self-association as well as cross-association. This permits the study of the influence of the amino acids structure on the thermodynamic properties for the first time. By the used model, the activity coefficient and solubilities of the investigated fourteen amino acids (glycine, alanine, γ-aminobutyric acid, dl-valine, dl-threonine, dl-methionine, l-leucine, l-glutamic acid, l-proline, hydroxyproline, histidine, l-arginine, α-amino valeric acid) could be described in good accordance with experimental data. In the case of different α-amino acids, but different hydrocarbon chains, the same interaction energy parameter can be used within the LCT. All studied amino acids could be modelled using the same parameter for the description of the amino acid association properties. The formed cross-associates contain more amino acids than expressed by the overall mole fraction of the solution. Moreover, the composition of the cross-associates depends on temperature, where the amount of amino acids increases with increasing temperature.

  4. Monoclonal antibodies recognizing single amino acid substitutions in hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Stanker, L.H.; Branscomb, E.; Vanderlaan, M.; Jensen, R.H.

    1986-06-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to non-human primate hemoglobin referred to as Cap-4, Cap-5, Rh-2, and Rh-4, and two mAb to human hemoglobin, referred to as H-1 and H-3 were isolated and were partially characterized. Binding studies with these mAb on a panel of hemoglobins and isolated ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. globin chains revealed a unique reactivity pattern for each mAb. Amino acid sequence analysis of the antigens used to generate the binding data suggests that the specific recognition of certain hemoglobin antigens by each mAb is controlled by the presence of a particular amino acid at a specific position within the epitope. The use of synthetic peptides as antigens confirmed this observation for five of the mAb. No synthetic peptides were tested with the sixth mAb, Rh-2. The amino acids required for binding of mAb Cap-4, Cap-5, Rh-4, and Rh-2 to hemoglobin are alanine at ..beta..5, threonine at ..beta..13, glutamine at ..beta..125, and leucine at ..cap alpha..68. The non-human primate hemoglobin antibodies require a specific amino acid that is not present in human hemoglobin. The amino acid required for binding of Cap-4, Cap-5, and Rh-4 could arise by a single base change in the ..beta.. globin gene, whereas the amino acid required for Rh-2 binding could only occur if two base changes occurred. Thus these mAb are candidate probes for a somatic cell mutation assay on the basis of the detection of peripheral blood red cells that possess single amino acid substituted hemoglobin as a result of single base substitutions in the globin genes of precursor cells.

  5. Characterization of the l-alanine exporter AlaE of Escherichia coli and its potential role in protecting cells from a toxic-level accumulation of l-alanine and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seryoung; Ihara, Kohei; Katsube, Satoshi; Hori, Hatsuhiro; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Yoneyama, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    We previously reported that the alaE gene of Escherichia coli encodes the l-alanine exporter AlaE. The objective of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of the AlaE exporter. The minimum inhibitory concentration of l-alanine and l-alanyl-l-alanine in alaE-deficient l-alanine-nonmetabolizing cells MLA301ΔalaE was 4- and >4000-fold lower, respectively, than in the alaE-positive parent cells MLA301, suggesting that AlaE functions as an efflux pump to avoid a toxic-level accumulation of intracellular l-alanine and its derivatives. Furthermore, the growth of the alaE-deficient mutant derived from the l-alanine-metabolizing strain was strongly inhibited in the presence of a physiological level of l-alanyl-l-alanine. Intact MLA301ΔalaE and MLA301ΔalaE/pAlaE cells producing plasmid-borne AlaE, accumulated approximately 200% and 50%, respectively, of the [(3) H]l-alanine detected in MLA301 cells, suggesting that AlaE exports l-alanine. When 200 mmol/L l-alanine-loaded inverted membrane vesicles prepared from MLA301ΔalaE/pAlaE were placed in a solution containing 200 mmol/L or 0.34 μmol/L l-alanine, energy-dependent [(3) H]l-alanine accumulation occurred under either condition. This energy-dependent uphill accumulation of [(3) H]l-alanine was strongly inhibited in the presence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone but not by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, suggesting that the AlaE-mediated l-alanine extrusion was driven by proton motive force. Based on these results, physiological roles of the l-alanine exporter are discussed.

  6. Applicability of EPR/alanine dosimetry for quality assurance in proton eye radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Michalec, B; Mierzwinska, G; Ptaszkiewicz, M; Sowa, U; Stolarczyk, L; Weber, A

    2014-06-01

    A new quality assurance and quality control method for proton eye radiotherapy based on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)/alanine dosimetry has been developed. It is based on Spread-Out Bragg Peak entrance dose measurement with alanine detectors. The entrance dose is well correlated with the dose at the facility isocenter, where, during the therapeutic irradiation, the tumour is placed. The unique alanine detector features namely keeping the dose record in a form of stable radiation-induced free radicals trapped in the material structure, and the non-destructive read-out makes this type of detector a good candidate for additional documentation of the patient's exposure over the therapy course.

  7. Progress towards an alanine/ESR therapy level reference dosimetry service at NPL.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, P H; Rajendran, K; Sephton, J P

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes work being carried out at the National Physical Laboratory towards the establishment of an alanine reference dosimetry service for radiotherapy applications. A precision fused quartz holder has been constructed to allow precise positioning of alanine dosimeters in the ESR cavity. A novel method of signal analysis based on spectrum fitting has been developed to minimize the effect of baseline distortions. Data are also presented on the relative response of alanine to 60Co gamma rays and high energy photons (4-12 MeV).

  8. Treponema denticola cystalysin exhibits significant alanine racemase activity accompanied by transamination: mechanistic implications.

    PubMed Central

    Bertoldi, Mariarita; Cellini, Barbara; Paiardini, Alessandro; Di Salvo, Martino; Borri Voltattorni, Carla

    2003-01-01

    To obtain information on the reaction specificity of cystalysin from the spirochaete bacterium Treponema denticola, the interaction with L- and D-alanine has been investigated. Binding of both alanine enantiomers leads to the appearance of an external aldimine absorbing at 429 nm and of a band absorbing at 498 nm, indicative of a quinonoid species. Racemization and transamination reactions were observed to occur with both alanine isomers as substrates. The steady-state kinetic parameters for racemization, k (cat) and K (m), for L-alanine are 1.05+/-0.03 s(-1) and 10+/-1 mM respectively, whereas those for D-alanine are 1.4+/-0.1 s(-1) and 10+/-1 mM. During the reaction of cystalysin with L- or D-alanine, a time-dependent loss of beta-elimination activity occurs concomitantly with the conversion of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) coenzyme into pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate (PMP). The catalytic efficiency of the half-transamination of L-alanine is found to be 5.3x10(-5) mM(-1) x s(-1), 5-fold higher when compared with that of D-alanine. The partition ratio between racemization and half-transamination reactions is 2.3x10(3) for L-alanine and 1.4x10(4) for D-alanine. The pH dependence of the kinetic parameters for both the reactions shows that the enzyme possesses a single ionizing residue with p K values of 6.5-6.6, which must be unprotonated for catalysis. Addition of pyruvate converts the PMP form of the enzyme back into the PLP form and causes the concomitant recovery of beta-elimination activity. In contrast with other PLP enzymes studied so far, but similar to alanine racemases, the apoform of the enzyme abstracted tritium from C4' of both (4' S)- and (4' R)-[4'-(3)H]PMP in the presence of pyruvate. Together with molecular modelling of the putative binding sites of L- and D-alanine at the active site of the enzyme, the implications of these studies for the mechanisms of the side reactions catalysed by cystalysin are discussed. PMID:12519070

  9. Determination of the D and L isomers of some protein amino acids present in soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, G. E.; Cheng, C.-N.; Cronin, S. E.

    1977-01-01

    The D and L isomers of some protein amino acids present in soils were measured by using a gas chromatographic technique. The results of two processing procedures were compared to determine the better method. Results of the comparison indicated that the determination of D and L percentages requires amino acid purification if one is to obtain accurate data. It was found that very significant amounts of D-alanine, D-aspartic acid, and D-glutamic acid were present in the contemporary soils studied. Valine, isoleucine, leucine, proline, and phenylalanine generally contained only a trace to very small amounts of the D isomer. It is probable that the D-amino acids from the alanine, aspartic, and glutamic acids are contributed to the soil primarily via microorganisms. The finding of very significant quantities of some D-amino acids (about 5-16%) in present-day soils may alert some investigators of geological sediments to a possible problem in using amino acid racemization as an age-dating technique.

  10. Alanine-aminotransferase: an early marker for insulin resistance?

    PubMed

    Salazar, Martin R; Carbajal, Horacio A; Curciarello, Jose O; Aizpurua, Marcelo; Adrover, Raul E; Riondet, Beatriz

    2007-01-01

    In a population-based sample, after excluding alcohol consumption, hepatotoxic drugs and hepatitis B and C infected, we investigated if alanine-aminotransferase (ALT) was associated with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance, and if this association was caused by non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The sample (432 female and 119 male) was divided into two ALT thresholds corresponding to the 50th and 75th percentiles (P) (female > or = 15 and > or = 19 U/L; male > or = 17 and > or = 23 U/I, respectively). Blood pressure, body mass index, waist circumference, cholesterol, HDL cholesterol (HDLc), triglyceride (TG), TG/HDLc ratio, glycemia and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were compared between those above and below each ALT threshold. Female placed above the 50th P of ALT had higher levels of TG/HDLc ratio (p=0.029), glycemia (p=0.028), and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, (p=0.045), and above the 75th P had higher SBP (p=0.036), DBP (p=0.018), TG (p=0.024), TG/HDLc ratio (p=0.028), glycemia (p=0.004) and HOMA-IR (p=0.0014). Male placed above the 50th P of ALT had higher BMI (p=0.017) and TG/HDLc ratio (p=0.048), and above the 75th P had lower values of HDLc (p=0.042). Only 16.5% of women and 14.5% of men, above the 75th P of ALT, showed an increase in liver brightness in the echography. This work shows in woman an early association of ALT with TG/HDLc ratio and HOMA-IR. Since the last two are independent predictors of cardiovascular risk, attention should be drawn to ALT values near the upper limit of the normal range even in the absence of NAFLD and obesity. PMID:17593595

  11. Solvation Free Energies of Alanine Peptides: The Effect of Flexibility

    SciTech Connect

    Kokubo, Hironori; Harris, Robert C.; Asthagiri, Dilip; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2013-12-03

    The electrostatic (?Gel), cavity-formation (?Gvdw), and total (?G) solvation free energies for 10 alanine peptides ranging in length (n) from 1 to 10 monomers were calculated. The free energies were computed both with xed, extended conformations of the peptides and again for some of the peptides without constraints. The solvation free energies, ?Gel, ?Gvdw, and ?G, were found to be linear in n, with the slopes of the best-fit lines being gamma_el, gamma_vdw, and gamma, respectively. Both gamma_el and gamma were negative for fixed and flexible peptides, and gamma_vdw was negative for fixed peptides. That gamma_vdw was negative was surprising, as experimental data on alkanes, theoretical models, and MD computations on small molecules and model systems generally suggest that gamma_vdw should be positive. A negative gamma_vdw seemingly contradicts the notion that ?Gvdw drives the initial collapse of the protein when it folds by favoring conformations with small surface areas, but when we computed ?Gvdw for the flexible peptides, thereby allowing the peptides to assume natural ensembles of more compact conformations, gamma-vdw was positive. Because most proteins do not assume extended conformations, a ?Gvdw that increases with increasing surface area may be typical for globular proteins. An alternative hypothesis is that the collapse is driven by intramolecular interactions. We show that the intramolecular van der Waal's interaction energy is more favorable for the flexible than for the extended peptides, seemingly favoring this hypothesis, but the large fluctuations in this energy may make attributing the collapse of the peptide to this intramolecular energy difficult.

  12. Formation of amino acids by cobalt-60 irradiation of hydrogen cyanide solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweeney, M. A.; Toste, A. P.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the pathway for the prebiotic origin of amino acids from hydrogen cyanide (HCN) under the action of ionizing radiation considered as an effective source of energy on the primitive earth. The irradiations were performed in a cobalt-60 source with a dose rate of 200,000 rad/hr. Seven naturally occurring amino acids are identified among the products formed by the hydrolysis of gamma-irradiated solutions of HCN: glycine, alanine, valine, serine, threonine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid. The identity of these amino acids is established by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Control experiments provided evidence that the amino acids are not the result of contamination.

  13. Effects of preservation methods on amino acids and 5'-nucleotides of Agaricus bisporus mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Huang, Fan; Yang, Hong; Ibrahim, S A; Wang, Yan-Feng; Huang, Wen

    2014-04-15

    In this study, the proximate composition, free amino acids content and 5'-nucleotides in frozen, canned and salted Agaricus bisporus (A. bisporus) were investigated. We found that the three kinds of A. bisporus products were good sources of protein, with amount varying in the ranges of 16.54-24.35g/100g (dry weight). Freezing, canning and salting process, followed by 6months of storage led to a significant reduction in free amino acids, especially tyrosine, alanine, glutamine and cysteine. There were medium levels of MSG-like amino acids in frozen A. bisporus and canned A. bisporus, and low levels of MSG-like amino acids in salted A. bisporus. The mount of flavor 5'-nucleotides in frozen A. bisporus was higher than that of canned and salted A. bisporus. The present study thus suggests that freezing is beneficial for the preservation of A. bisporus.

  14. Light-activated amino acid transport in Halobacterium halobium envelope vesicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, R. E.; Lanyi, J. K.

    1977-01-01

    Vesicles prepared from Halobacterium halobium cell envelopes accumulate amino acids in response to light-induced electrical and chemical gradients. Nineteen of 20 commonly occurring amino acids have been shown to be actively accumulated by these vesicles in response to illumination or in response to an artificially created Na+ gradient. On the basis of shared common carriers the transport systems can be divided into eight classes, each responsible for the transport of one or several amino acids: arginine, lysine, histidine; asparagine, glutamine; alanine, glycine, threonine, serine; leucine, valine, isoleucine, methionine; phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan; aspartate; glutamate; proline. Available evidence suggests that these carriers are symmetrical in that amino acids can be transported equally well in both directions across the vesicle membranes. A tentative working model to account for these observations is presented.

  15. Synthesis of amino acyl adenylates using the tert-butoxycarbonyl protecting group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, D. W.; Seguin, R.; Saburi, M.; Fendler, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    The synthesis of amino acyl adenylates using N-tert-butoxycarbonyl-protected amino acids is reported. Anhydrous solutions containing N-tert-butoxycarbonyl alanine, phenylalanine, and methionine were combined with the anhydrous mono (tri-n-octylammonium) salt of adenosine 5'-phosphate and the resultant amino acyl adenylates were characterized by means of elemental analysis, and infrared and proton NMR spectroscopy. Amino acyl adenylate yields of up to 60% were obtained with high purity at room temperatures. The reported synthesis is considered to represent a large improvement over previous methods due to the purity of the products, normal temperature requirements, and the stability of the starting compounds, which suggests its use in investigations of prebiotic oligo- and polypeptide synthesis.

  16. In situ measurements of the radiation stability of amino acids at 15-140 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerakines, Perry A.; Hudson, Reggie L.; Moore, Marla H.; Bell, Jan-Luca

    2012-08-01

    We present new kinetics data on the radiolytic destruction of amino acids measured in situ with infrared spectroscopy. Samples were irradiated at 15, 100, and 140 K with 0.8-MeV protons, and amino-acid decay was followed at each temperature with and without H2O present. Observed radiation products included CO2 and amines, consistent with amino-acid decarboxylation. The half-lives of glycine, alanine, and phenylalanine were estimated for various extraterrestrial environments. Infrared spectral changes demonstrated the conversion from the non-zwitterion structure NH2sbnd CH2(R)sbnd COOH at 15 K to the zwitterion structure +NH3sbnd CH2(R)sbnd COO- at 140 K for each amino acid studied.

  17. In-Situ Measurements of the Radiation Stability of Amino Acids at 15-140 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerakines, Perry A.; Hudson, Reggie L.; Moore, Marla H.; Bell, Jan-Luca

    2012-01-01

    We present new kinetics data on the radiolytic destruction of amino acids measured in situ with infrared spectroscopy. Samples were irradiated at 15, 100, and 140 K with D.8-MeV protons, and amino-acid decay was followed at each temperature with and without H2O present. Observed radiation products included CO2 and amines, consistent with amino-acid decarboxylation. The half-lives of glycine, alanine, and phenylalanine were estimated for various extraterrestrial environments. Infrared spectral changes demonstrated the conversion from the non-zwitterion structure NH2-CH2(R)-COOH at 15 K to the zwitterion structure +NH3-CH2(R)-COO- at 140 K for each amino acid studied.

  18. Study of Stationary Phase Metabolism Via Isotopomer Analysis of Amino Acids from an Isolated Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikh, AfshanS.; Tang, YinjieJ.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Martin, Hector Garcia; Gin, Jennifer; Benke, Peter; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-09-14

    Microbial production of many commercially important secondary metabolites occurs during stationary phase, and methods to measure metabolic flux during this growth phase would be valuable. Metabolic flux analysis is often based on isotopomer information from proteinogenic amino acids. As such, flux analysis primarily reflects the metabolism pertinent to the growth phase during which most proteins are synthesized. To investigate central metabolism and amino acids synthesis activity during stationary phase, addition of fully 13C-labeled glucose followed by induction of green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression during stationary phase was used. Our results indicate that Escherichia coli was able to produce new proteins (i.e., GFP) in the stationary phase, and the amino acids in GFP were mostly from degraded proteins synthesized during the exponential growth phase. Among amino acid biosynthetic pathways, only those for serine, alanine, glutamate/glutamine, and aspartate/asparagine had significant activity during the stationary phase.

  19. Cloning, characterisation and bacterial expression of full length cDNA for the mouse liver microsomal glutathione S-transferase.

    PubMed

    Raza, H; Mullick, J; John, A; Bhagwat, S V; Avadhani, N G

    2000-01-01

    We have isolated a cDNA encoding full length microsomal glutathione S-transferase (MGST) from mouse liver. The cDNA was isolated by RT-PCR using primers designed from published cDNA sequence of rat MGST with the addition of 5' Nde-1 and 3' HindIII sites, and cloned into bacterial expression vector pSP19T7LT. Deduced amino acid sequence (155 amino acids, calculated mol.mass 17512 Dalton) confirmed the identity of microsomal GST from mouse liver which has sequence homology with that of rat and human liver MGST1. Recombinant GST cDNA (Genbank accession # 159050) was expressed in BL21(DE3) in the presence of 1 mM IPTG at 30 degrees C. The expressed GST protein was found to be localised in the bacterial membrane as determined by measuring catalytic activity using CDNB and cumene hydroperoxide substrates, SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. We have demonstrated the cloning and expression of full length cDNA for MGST from mouse liver and have characterised the functionally active product as MGST protein. These results should facilitate studies on the role of MGST in the regulation of chemical carcinogenesis and in the prevention of oxidative stress caused by endogenous and exogenous chemicals.

  20. Rapid Ti(III) reduction of perchlorate in the presence of beta-alanine: kinetics, pH effect, complex formation, and beta-alanine effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Huang, Zhengdao; Lippincott, Lee; Meng, Xiaoguang

    2010-03-15

    Ti(III) reduction of perchlorate might be a useful method for the treatment of highly perchlorate-contaminated water. Though the reaction rate was usually low, we observed that beta-alanine (HOOCCH(2)CH(2)NH(2)) could significantly promote the reaction. A complete (>99.9%) perchlorate removal was obtained in a solution containing [ClO(4)(-)]=1.0mM, [Ti(III)]=40 mM, and [beta-alanine]=120 mM after 2.5h of reaction under 50 degrees C. The effects of both pH and complex formation on the reaction were then studied. The results showed that without beta-alanine the optimal pH was 2.3. When pH increased from 1.6 to 2.3, the reduction rate increased remarkably. In the pH range >2.3, however, the reduction was significantly inhibited, attributed to the formation of Ti(III) precipitate. The presence of beta-alanine at a molar ratio of [beta-alanine]:[Ti(III)]=3:1 significantly increased the reduction rate of perchlorate even at near neutral pH. This is because beta-alanine formed complexes with Ti(III), which greatly improved the total soluble [Ti(III)] in the pH range between 3.5 and 6. The findings may lead to the development of rapid treatment methods for intermittent and small stream of highly perchlorate-contaminated water, which are resulted from the manufacturing, storage, handling, use and/or disposal of large quantities of perchlorate salts. PMID:19864064