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Sample records for alanine amino transferase

  1. 21 CFR 862.1030 - Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system. 862.1030 Section 862.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  2. 21 CFR 862.1030 - Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system. 862.1030 Section 862.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  3. 21 CFR 862.1030 - Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system. 862.1030 Section 862.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1030 - Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system. 862.1030 Section 862.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1030 - Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system. 862.1030 Section 862.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  6. Requirement for alanine in the amino acid control of deprivation-induced protein degradation in liver.

    PubMed Central

    Pösö, A R; Mortimore, G E

    1984-01-01

    Protein degradation in liver is actively controlled by a small group of inhibitory amino acids--leucine, tyrosine (or phenylalanine), glutamine, proline, histidine, tryptophan, and methionine. Other evidence, however, suggests that one or more of the remaining 12 noninhibitory amino acids is also required for suppression of proteolysis at normal concentrations. This question was investigated in livers of fed rats perfused in the single-pass mode. The deletion of alanine at normal (1x), but not at 4x or 10x normal, plasma amino acid concentrations evoked a near-maximal acceleration of protein degradation. No other noninhibitory amino acid was effective. Because alanine alone was not directly inhibitory and its omission was not associated with a decrease in inhibitory amino acid pools, alanine was presumed to act as a coregulator in the expression of inhibitory activity. When tested alone, the inhibitory group was as effective as the complete mixture at 0.5x and 4x levels, but it lost its suppressive ability within a narrow zone of concentration centered slightly above 1x. The addition of 1x (0.48 mM) alanine completely restored the inhibition. Pyruvate and lactate could be effectively substituted, but only at concentrations 10-20 times greater than that of alanine. These, together with earlier findings, indicate the existence of a regulatory complex that recognizes specific amino acids and transmits positive and negative signals to proteolytic sites. The results also suggest that alanine can provide an important regulatory link between energy demands and protein degradation. PMID:6589593

  7. 21 CFR 862.1100 - Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system. 862.1100 Section 862.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1100 - Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system. 862.1100 Section 862.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1100 - Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system. 862.1100 Section 862.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  10. 21 CFR 862.1100 - Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system. 862.1100 Section 862.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  11. 21 CFR 862.1100 - Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system. 862.1100 Section 862.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  12. Structural and biochemical analyses reveal how ornithine acetyl transferase binds acidic and basic amino acid substrates.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Aman; Clifton, Ian J; Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Ivison, David; Domene, Carmen; Schofield, Christopher J

    2011-09-21

    Structural and biochemical analyses reveal how ornithine acetyl-transferases catalyse the reversible transfer of an acetyl-group from a basic (ornithine) to an acidic (glutamate) amino acid by employing a common mechanism involving an acetyl-enzyme intermediate but using different side chain binding modes. PMID:21796301

  13. Synthesis of beta-hydroxy-alpha-amino acids with a reengineered alanine racemase.

    PubMed

    Fesko, Kateryna; Giger, Lars; Hilvert, Donald

    2008-11-15

    The Y265A mutant of alanine racemase (alrY265A) was evaluated as a catalyst for the synthesis of beta-hydroxy-alpha-amino acids. It promotes the PLP-dependent aldol condensation of glycine with a range of aromatic aldehydes. The desired products were obtained with complete stereocontrol at C(alpha) (ee>99%, D) and moderate to high selectivity at C(beta) (up to 97% de). The designed enzyme is thus similar to natural d-threonine aldolases in its substrate specificity and stereoselectivity. Moreover, its ability to utilize alanine as an alternative donor suggests an expanded scope of potential utility for the production of biologically active compounds. PMID:18760921

  14. Effect of arsenic and chromium on the serum amino-transferases activity in Indian major carp, Labeo rohita.

    PubMed

    Vutukuru, Sesha Srinivas; Prabhath, N Arun; Raghavender, M; Yerramilli, Anjaneyulu

    2007-09-01

    Arsenic and hexavalent chromium toxicity results from their ability to interact with sulfahydryl groups of proteins and enzymes, and to substitute phosphorus in a variety of biochemical reactions. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT; E.C: 2.6.1.2) and Aspartate amino transferase (AST; EC 2.6.1.1) play a crucial role in transamination reactions and can be used as potential biomarkers to indicate hepatotoxicity and cellular damage. While histopathological studies in liver tissue require more time and expertise, simple and reliable biochemical analysis of ALT and AST can be used for a rapid assessment of tissue and cellular damage within 96 h. The main objective of this study was to determine the acute effects of arsenic and hexavalent chromium on the activity of ALT and AST in the Indian major carp, Labeo rohita for 24 h and 96 h. Significant increase in the activity of ALT (P < 0.01) from controls in arsenic exposed fish indicates serious hepatic damage and distress condition to the fish. However, no such significant changes were observed in chromium-exposed fish suggesting that arsenic is more toxic to the fish. These findings indicate that ALT and AST are candidate biomarkers for arsenic-induced hepatotoxicity in Labeo rohita. PMID:17911661

  15. Effect of Arsenic and Chromium on the Serum Amino-Transferases Activity in Indian Major Carp, Labeo rohita

    PubMed Central

    Vutukuru, Sesha Srinivas; Arun Prabhath, N.; Raghavender, M.; Yerramilli, Anjaneyulu

    2007-01-01

    Arsenic and hexavalent chromium toxicity results from their ability to interact with sulfahydryl groups of proteins and enzymes, and to substitute phosphorus in a variety of biochemical reactions. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT; E.C: 2.6.1.2) and Aspartate amino transferase (AST; EC 2.6.1.1) play a crucial role in transamination reactions and can be used as potential biomarkers to indicate hepatotoxicity and cellular damage. While histopathological studies in liver tissue require more time and expertise, simple and reliable biochemical analysis of ALT and AST can be used for a rapid assessment of tissue and cellular damage within 96 h. The main objective of this study was to determine the acute effects of arsenic and hexavalent chromium on the activity of ALT and AST in the Indian major carp, Labeo rohita for 24 h and 96 h. Significant increase in the activity of ALT (P < 0.01) from controls in arsenic exposed fish indicates serious hepatic damage and distress condition to the fish. However, no such significant changes were observed in chromium-exposed fish suggesting that arsenic is more toxic to the fish. These findings indicate that ALT and AST are candidate biomarkers for arsenic-induced hepatotoxicity in Labeo rohita. PMID:17911661

  16. Gliotoxicity of the cyanotoxin, β-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA)

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Alexander S.; Gehringer, Michelle M.; Braidy, Nady; Guillemin, Gilles J.; Welch, Jeffrey H.; Neilan, Brett A.

    2013-01-01

    The amino acid variant β-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA) has long been associated with the increased incidence and progression of the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS/PDC). Previous studies have indicated that BMAA damages neurons via excitotoxic mechanisms. We have challenged rat olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) with exogenous BMAA and found it to be cytotoxic. BMAA also induces a significant increase in Ca2+ influx, enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and disrupts mitochondrial activity in OECs. This is the first study investigating BMAA toxicity using pure glial cells. These findings align BMAA with the three proposed mechanisms of degeneration in ALS, those being non-cell autonomous death, excitotoxicity and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:23508043

  17. Gliotoxicity of the cyanotoxin, β-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA).

    PubMed

    Chiu, Alexander S; Gehringer, Michelle M; Braidy, Nady; Guillemin, Gilles J; Welch, Jeffrey H; Neilan, Brett A

    2013-01-01

    The amino acid variant β-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA) has long been associated with the increased incidence and progression of the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS/PDC). Previous studies have indicated that BMAA damages neurons via excitotoxic mechanisms. We have challenged rat olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) with exogenous BMAA and found it to be cytotoxic. BMAA also induces a significant increase in Ca2+ influx, enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and disrupts mitochondrial activity in OECs. This is the first study investigating BMAA toxicity using pure glial cells. These findings align BMAA with the three proposed mechanisms of degeneration in ALS, those being non-cell autonomous death, excitotoxicity and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:23508043

  18. Helix propensities of conformationally restricted amino acids. Non-natural substitutes for helix breaking proline and helix forming alanine.

    PubMed

    Alías, Miriam; Ayuso-Tejedor, Sara; Fernández-Recio, Juan; Cativiela, Carlos; Sancho, Javier

    2010-02-21

    Alpha helices are useful scaffolds to build biologically active peptides. The intrinsic stability of an alpha-helix is a key feature that can be successfully designed, and it is governed by the constituting amino acid residues. Their individual contributions to helix stability are given, according to Lifson-Roig theory, by their w parameters, which are known for all proteinogenic amino acids, but not for non-natural ones. On the other hand, non-natural, conformationally-restricted amino acids can be used to impart biochemical stability to peptides intended for in vivo administration. Efficient design of peptides based on these amino acids requires the previous determination of their w parameters. We begin here this task by determining the w parameters of two restricted analogs of alanine: (alpha-methyl)alanine and 1-aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid. According to their w values (alpha-methyl)alanine is almost as good a helix forming residue as alanine, while 1-aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid is, similarly to proline, a helix breaker. PMID:20135035

  19. Streptomyces beta-alanine:alpha-ketoglutarate aminotransferase, a novel omega-amino acid transaminase. Purification, crystallization, and enzymologic properties.

    PubMed

    Yonaha, K; Suzuki, K; Toyama, S

    1985-03-25

    An enzyme which catalyzes the transamination of beta-alanine with alpha-ketoglutarate was purified to homogeneity from Streptomyces griseus IFO 3102 and crystallized. Molecular weight of the enzyme was found to be 185,000 +/- 10,000 by a gel-filtration method. The enzyme consists of four subunits identical in molecular weight (51,000 +/- 1,000). The transaminase is composed of 483 amino acids/subunit containing 7 and 8 residues of half-cystine and methionine, respectively. The enzyme exhibits absorption maxima at 278 and 415 nm. The pyridoxal 5'-phosphate content was determined to be 4 mol/mol of enzyme. The enzyme catalyzes transamination of omega-amino acids including taurine and hypotaurine. beta-Alanine and DL-beta-aminoisobutyrate served as a good amino donor; the Michaelis constants are 8.0 and 12.5 mM, respectively. alpha-Ketoglutarate is the only amino acceptor (Km = 4.0 mM); pyruvate and oxalacetate are inactive. Based on the substrate specificity, the terminology of beta-alanine:alpha-ketoglutarate transaminase is proposed for the enzyme. Carbonyl reagents, HgCl2,DL-gabaculine, and alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine strongly inhibited the enzyme. PMID:3972825

  20. Chiral selectivity of amino acid adsorption on chiral surfaces—The case of alanine on Pt

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, J.-H.; Kosov, D. S.

    2015-02-07

    We study the binding pattern of the amino acid alanine on the naturally chiral Pt surfaces Pt(531), Pt(321), and Pt(643). These surfaces are all vicinal to the (111) direction but have different local environments of their kink sites and are thus a model for realistic roughened Pt surfaces. Alanine has only a single methyl group attached to its chiral center, which makes the number of possible binding conformations computationally tractable. Additionally, only the amine and carboxyl group are expected to interact strongly with the Pt substrate. On Pt(531), we study the molecule in its pristine as well as its deprotonated form and find that the deprotonated one is more stable by 0.47 eV. Therefore, we study the molecule in its deprotonated form on Pt(321) and Pt(643). As expected, the oxygen and nitrogen atoms of the deprotonated molecule provide a local binding “tripod” and the most stable adsorption configurations optimize the interaction of this “tripod” with undercoordinated surface atoms. However, the interaction of the methyl group plays an important role: it induces significant chiral selectivity of about 60 meV on all surfaces. Hereby, the L-enantiomer adsorbs preferentially to the Pt(321){sup S} and Pt(643){sup S} surfaces, while the D-enantiomer is more stable on Pt(531){sup S}. The binding energies increase with increasing surface density of kink sites, i.e., they are largest for Pt(531){sup S} and smallest for Pt(643){sup S}.

  1. The ribosome can discriminate the chirality of amino acids within its peptidyl-transferase center.

    PubMed

    Englander, Michael T; Avins, Joshua L; Fleisher, Rachel C; Liu, Bo; Effraim, Philip R; Wang, Jiangning; Schulten, Klaus; Leyh, Thomas S; Gonzalez, Ruben L; Cornish, Virginia W

    2015-05-12

    The cellular translational machinery (TM) synthesizes proteins using exclusively L- or achiral aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs), despite the presence of D-amino acids in nature and their ability to be aminoacylated onto tRNAs by aa-tRNA synthetases. The ubiquity of L-amino acids in proteins has led to the hypothesis that D-amino acids are not substrates for the TM. Supporting this view, protein engineering efforts to incorporate D-amino acids into proteins using the TM have thus far been unsuccessful. Nonetheless, a mechanistic understanding of why D-aa-tRNAs are poor substrates for the TM is lacking. To address this deficiency, we have systematically tested the translation activity of D-aa-tRNAs using a series of biochemical assays. We find that the TM can effectively, albeit slowly, accept D-aa-tRNAs into the ribosomal aa-tRNA binding (A) site, use the A-site D-aa-tRNA as a peptidyl-transfer acceptor, and translocate the resulting peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA into the ribosomal peptidyl-tRNA binding (P) site. During the next round of continuous translation, however, we find that ribosomes carrying a P-site peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA partition into subpopulations that are either translationally arrested or that can continue translating. Consistent with its ability to arrest translation, chemical protection experiments and molecular dynamics simulations show that P site-bound peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA can trap the ribosomal peptidyl-transferase center in a conformation in which peptidyl transfer is impaired. Our results reveal a novel mechanism through which D-aa-tRNAs interfere with translation, provide insight into how the TM might be engineered to use D-aa-tRNAs, and increase our understanding of the physiological role of a widely distributed enzyme that clears D-aa-tRNAs from cells. PMID:25918365

  2. The ribosome can discriminate the chirality of amino acids within its peptidyl-transferase center

    PubMed Central

    Englander, Michael T.; Avins, Joshua L.; Fleisher, Rachel C.; Liu, Bo; Effraim, Philip R.; Wang, Jiangning; Schulten, Klaus; Leyh, Thomas S.; Gonzalez, Ruben L.; Cornish, Virginia W.

    2015-01-01

    The cellular translational machinery (TM) synthesizes proteins using exclusively L- or achiral aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs), despite the presence of D-amino acids in nature and their ability to be aminoacylated onto tRNAs by aa-tRNA synthetases. The ubiquity of L-amino acids in proteins has led to the hypothesis that D-amino acids are not substrates for the TM. Supporting this view, protein engineering efforts to incorporate D-amino acids into proteins using the TM have thus far been unsuccessful. Nonetheless, a mechanistic understanding of why D-aa-tRNAs are poor substrates for the TM is lacking. To address this deficiency, we have systematically tested the translation activity of D-aa-tRNAs using a series of biochemical assays. We find that the TM can effectively, albeit slowly, accept D-aa-tRNAs into the ribosomal aa-tRNA binding (A) site, use the A-site D-aa-tRNA as a peptidyl-transfer acceptor, and translocate the resulting peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA into the ribosomal peptidyl-tRNA binding (P) site. During the next round of continuous translation, however, we find that ribosomes carrying a P-site peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA partition into subpopulations that are either translationally arrested or that can continue translating. Consistent with its ability to arrest translation, chemical protection experiments and molecular dynamics simulations show that P site-bound peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA can trap the ribosomal peptidyl-transferase center in a conformation in which peptidyl transfer is impaired. Our results reveal a novel mechanism through which D-aa-tRNAs interfere with translation, provide insight into how the TM might be engineered to use D-aa-tRNAs, and increase our understanding of the physiological role of a widely distributed enzyme that clears D-aa-tRNAs from cells. PMID:25918365

  3. Plasma glutathione S-transferase and F protein are more sensitive than alanine aminotransferase as markers of paracetamol (acetaminophen)-induced liver damage.

    PubMed

    Beckett, G J; Foster, G R; Hussey, A J; Oliveira, D B; Donovan, J W; Prescott, L F; Proudfoot, A T

    1989-11-01

    Concentrations of glutathione S-transferase (GST; glutathione transferase; EC 2.5.1.18) B1 subunits, F protein, and the activity of alanine aminotransferase (ALT; EC 2.6.1.2) were measured in sequential plasma samples taken from nine patients with self-administered paracetamol (acetaminophen) poisoning. GST exceeded the reference interval in all patients at the time of admission, and F protein was increased in seven. In contrast, abnormal activities of ALT in plasma were found in only one of the nine on admission, a patient admitted 12 h after poisoning. Subsequent to admission nine, eight, and five patients, respectively, had abnormal concentrations of GST, F protein, and ALT. When expressed as multiples of the upper reference limit, the highest values for GST measured in each patient always far exceeded the greatest abnormalities in ALT; this was true for F protein in only five patients. Patients in whom the concentration of GST exceeded 10 micrograms/L on admission subsequently went on to develop moderate or severe liver damage, despite treatment with N-acetylcysteine. F protein and ALT measurements on admission were not as efficient as GST at predicting the clinical outcome of the patients. We conclude that GST and F protein offer clear advantages over ALT for detecting minor degrees of acute liver dysfunction, particularly when only centrilobular damage may be involved. PMID:2582614

  4. The natural non-protein amino acid N-β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is incorporated into protein during synthesis.

    PubMed

    Glover, W Broc; Mash, Deborah C; Murch, Susan J

    2014-11-01

    N-β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is an amino acid produced by cyanobacteria and accumulated through trophic levels in the environment and natural food webs. Human exposure to BMAA has been linked to progressive neurodegenerative diseases, potentially due to incorporation of BMAA into protein. The insertion of BMAA and other non-protein amino acids into proteins may trigger protein misfunction, misfolding and/or aggregation. However, the specific mechanism by which BMAA is associated with proteins remained unidentified. Such studies are challenging because of the complexity of biological systems and samples. A cell-free in vitro protein synthesis system offers an excellent approach for investigation of changing amino acid composition in protein. In this study, we report that BMAA incorporates into protein as an error in synthesis when a template DNA sequence is used. Bicinchoninic acid assay of total protein synthesis determined that BMAA effectively substituted for alanine and serine in protein product. LC-MS/MS confirmed that BMAA was selectively inserted into proteins in place of other amino acids, but isomers N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine (AEG) and 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) did not share this characteristic. Incorporation of BMAA into proteins was significantly higher when genomic DNA from post-mortem brain was the template. About half of BMAA in the synthetic proteins was released with denaturation with sodium dodecylsulfonate and dithiothreitol, but the remaining BMAA could only be released by acid hydrolysis. Together these data demonstrate that BMAA is incorporated into the amino acid backbone of proteins during synthesis and also associated with proteins through non-covalent bonding. PMID:25096519

  5. Oral administration of D-alanine in monkeys robustly increases plasma and cerebrospinal fluid levels but experimental D-amino acid oxidase inhibitors had minimal effect.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Camilo; Alt, Jesse; Ator, Nancy A; Wilmoth, Heather; Rais, Rana; Hin, Niyada; DeVivo, Michael; Popiolek, Michael; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Slusher, Barbara S

    2016-09-01

    Hypofunction of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is thought to exacerbate psychosis in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. Consistent with this hypothesis, D-alanine, a co-agonist at the glycine site of the NMDA receptor, was shown to improve positive and cognitive symptoms when used as add-on therapy for schizophrenia treatment. However, D-alanine had to be administered at high doses (~7 g) to observe clinical effects. One possible reason for the high dose is that D-alanine could be undergoing oxidation by D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) before it reaches the brain. If this is the case, the dose could be reduced by co-administration of D-alanine with a DAAO inhibitor (DAAOi). Early studies with rodents showed that co-administration of D-alanine with 5-chloro-benzo[d]isoxazol-3-ol (CBIO), a prototype DAAOi, significantly enhanced the levels of extracellular D-alanine in the frontal cortex compared with D-alanine alone. Further, the use of CBIO reduced the dose of D-alanine needed to attenuate prepulse inhibition deficits induced by dizocilpine. The objective of the work reported herein was to confirm the hypothesis that DAAO inhibition can enhance D-alanine exposure in a species closer to humans: non-human primates. We report that while oral D-alanine administration to baboons (10 mg/kg) enhanced D-alanine plasma and CSF levels over 20-fold versus endogenous levels, addition of experimental DAAOi to the regimen exhibited a 2.2-fold enhancement in plasma and no measurable effect on CSF levels. The results provide caution regarding the utility of DAAO inhibition to increase D-amino acid levels as treatment for patients with schizophrenia. PMID:27287825

  6. Efficient optical resolution of amino acid by alanine racemaze chiral analogue supported on mesoporous carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, D.; Kim, K.; Park, D.; Kim, G.

    2012-09-01

    Optically pure D-amino acids are industrially important chiral building blocks for the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, food ingredients, and drug intermediates. Chemoenzymatic dynamic kinetic-resolution processes have recently been developed for deracemization of amino acids. S-ARCA would be a good candidate for the selective adsorption of D amino acid through the imine formation reaction. The organic phase containing S-ARCA adsorbent, TPPC or Ionic Liquid (as a phase transfer catalyst) in MC were coated on the surfaces of mesoporous carbon C-SBA-15(CMK). The aqueous solution of racemic D/L-amino acid and NaOH were added to the carbon support coated with ARCA. The D/L ratios on ARCA and in solution were determined with increasing reaction time. S-ARCA has a unique property for the selective adsorption of D- amino acid (up to 90% selcetivity) in the racemic mixture. The fixed bed reactor containing ARCA/carbon support was also adopted successfully for the selective separation of amino acid.

  7. Amino acid transport across the tonoplast of vacuoles isolated from barley mesophyll protoplasts: Uptake of alanine, leucine, and glutamine. [Hordeum vulgare L

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, K.J.; Jaeger, R.; Kaiser, G.; Martinoia, E. )

    1990-01-01

    Mesophyll protoplasts from leaves of well-fertilized barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) plants contained amino acids at concentrations as high as 120 millimoles per liter. With the exception of glutamic acid, which is predominantly localized in the cytoplasm, a major part of all other amino acids was contained inside the large central vacuole. Alanine, leucine, and glutamine are the dominant vacuolar amino acids in barley. Their transport into isolated vacuoles was studied using {sup 14}C-labeled amino acids. Uptake was slow in the absence of ATP. A three- to sixfold stimulation of uptake was observed after addition of ATP or adenylyl imidodiphosphate an ATP analogue not being hydrolyzed by ATPases. Other nucleotides were ineffective in increasing the rate of uptake. ATP-Stimulated amino acid transport was not dependent on the transtonoplast pH or membrane potential. p-Chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid and n-ethyl maleimide increased transport independently of ATP. Neutral amino acids such as valine or leucine effectively decreased the rate of alanine transport. Glutamine and glycine were less effective or not effective as competitive inhibitors of alanine transport. The results indicate the existence of a uniport translocator specific for neutral or basic amino acids that is under control of metabolic effectors.

  8. Determination of β-Cyano-L-alanine, γ-Glutamyl-β-cyano-L-alanine, and Common Free Amino Acids in Vicia sativa (Fabaceae) Seeds by Reversed-Phase High-Performance Liquid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Megías, Cristina; Cortés-Giraldo, Isabel; Girón-Calle, Julio; Vioque, Javier; Alaiz, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    A method for determination of β-cyano-L-alanine, γ-glutamyl-β-cyano-L-alanine and other free amino acids in Vicia sativa is presented. Seed extracts were derivatized by reaction with diethyl ethoxymethylenemalonate and analyzed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Calibration curves showed very good linearity of the response. The limit of detection and quantification was 0.15 and 0.50 μM, respectively. The method has high intra- (RSD = 0.28–0.31%) and interrepeatability (RSD = 2.76–3.08%) and remarkable accuracy with a 99% recovery in spiked samples. The method is very easy to carry out and allows for ready analysis of large number of samples using very basic HPLC equipment because the derivatized samples are very stable and have very good chromatographic properties. The method has been applied to the determination of γ-glutamyl-β-cyano-L-alanine, β-cyano-L-alanine, and common free amino acids in eight wild populations of V. sativa from southwestern Spain. PMID:25587488

  9. The cyanobacterial amino acid β-N-methylamino-l-alanine perturbs the intermediary metabolism in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Engskog, Mikael K R; Karlsson, Oskar; Haglöf, Jakob; Elmsjö, Albert; Brittebo, Eva; Arvidsson, Torbjörn; Pettersson, Curt

    2013-10-01

    The neurotoxic amino acid β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) is produced by most cyanobacteria. BMAA is considered as a potential health threat because of its putative role in neurodegenerative diseases. We have previously observed cognitive disturbances and morphological brain changes in adult rodents exposed to BMAA during the development. The aim of this study was to characterize changes of major intermediary metabolites in serum following neonatal exposure to BMAA using a non-targeted metabolomic approach. NMR spectroscopy was used to obtain serum metabolic profiles from neonatal rats exposed to BMAA (40, 150, 460mg/kg) or vehicle on postnatal days 9-10. Multivariate data analysis of binned NMR data indicated metabolic pattern differences between the different treatment groups. In particular five metabolites, d-glucose, lactate, 3-hydroxybutyrate, creatine and acetate, were changed in serum of BMAA-treated neonatal rats. These metabolites are associated with changes in energy metabolism and amino acid metabolism. Further statistical analysis disclosed that all the identified serum metabolites in the lowest dose group were significantly (p<0.05) decreased. The neonatal rat model used in this study is so far the only animal model that displays significant biochemical and behavioral effects after a low short-term dose of BMAA. The demonstrated perturbation of intermediary metabolism may contribute to BMAA-induced developmental changes that result in long-term effects on adult brain function. PMID:23886855

  10. The molecular basis for the post-translational addition of amino acids by L/F transferase in the N-end rule pathway.

    PubMed

    Fung, Angela Wai S; Fahlman, Richard P

    2015-01-01

    The N-end rule pathway is a conserved targeted proteolytic process observed in organisms ranging from eubacteria to mammals. The N-end rule relates the metabolic stability of a protein to its N-terminal amino acid residue. The identity of the N-terminal amino acid residue is a primary degradation signal, often referred to as an N-degron, which is recognized by the components of the N-end rule when it is a destabilizing N-terminus. N-degrons may be exposed by non-processive proteolytic cleavages or by post-translational modifications. One modification is the post-translational addition of amino acids to the N-termini of proteins, a reaction catalyzed by aminoacyl-tRNA protein transferases. The aminoacyl-tRNA protein transferase in eubacteria like Escherichia coli is L/F transferase. Recent investigations have reported unexpected observations regarding the L/F transferase catalytic mechanism and its mechanisms of substrate recognition. Additionally, recent proteome-wide identification of putative in vivo substrates facilitates hypothesis into the yet elusive biological functions of the prokaryotic N-end rule pathway. Here we summarize the recent findings on the molecular mechanisms of catalysis and substrate recognition by the E. coli L/F transferase in the prokaryotic N-end rule pathway. PMID:25692952

  11. Excitotoxic potential of the cyanotoxin β-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA) in primary human neurons.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Alexander S; Gehringer, Michelle M; Braidy, Nady; Guillemin, Gilles J; Welch, Jeffrey H; Neilan, Brett A

    2012-11-01

    The toxicity of the cyanobacterial modified amino acid, BMAA, has been described in rat, mouse and leech neurons. Particular emphasis has been placed on the potential ability of BMAA to induce neuronal damage via excitotoxic mechanisms. Here we present data indicating that the effects observed on lower organisms are also evident in a human model. Our data indicates that BMAA induces increased intracellular Ca²⁺ influx, DNA damage, mitochondrial activity, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The amelioration of LDH release in the presence of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist MK801 indicates that the neurotoxic effects of BMAA are mediated via NMDA receptor activation. Additionally, we have shown that BMAA induces the expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and caspase-3 indicating that it can stimulate apoptosis in human neurons, presumably via activation of NMDA receptors. PMID:22885173

  12. Quantitative proteomics analysis of zebrafish exposed to sub-lethal dosages of β-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA)

    PubMed Central

    Frøyset, Ann Kristin; Khan, Essa Ahsan; Fladmark, Kari Espolin

    2016-01-01

    The non-protein amino acid β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a neurotoxin present in microalgae and shown to accumulate in the food web. BMAA has been linked to the complex neurodegenerative disorder of Guam and to increased incidents sporadic ALS. Two main neurotoxic routes are suggested; an excitotoxic by acting as an agonist towards glutamate receptors and a metabolic by misincorporating into cellular proteins. We have used zebrafish, an increasingly used model for neurodegenerative diseases, to further identify signaling components involved in BMAA-induced toxicity. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to sub-lethal dosages of BMAA and a label-free proteomics analysis was conducted on larvae 4 days post fertilization. The exposed larvae showed no developmental abnormalities, but a reduced heart rate and increased expression of GSK3 isoforms. Search towards a reviewed database containing 2968 entries identified 480 proteins. Only 17 of these were regulated 2-fold or more in the exposed larvae. Seven of these proteins could be associated to glutamate receptor signaling and recycling. The remaining nine have all been linked to disturbance in protein homeostasis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) development or neuronal cell death. We also found that BMAA influenced the endocannabinoid system by up-regulation of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and that FAAH inhibitor URB597 reduced the BMAA effect on heart rate and GSK3 expression. PMID:27404450

  13. Assessment of the mutagenic and genotoxic activity of cyanobacterial toxin beta-N-methyl-amino-L-alanine in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Novak, Matjaž; Hercog, Klara; Žegura, Bojana

    2016-08-01

    A neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-BMAA) is a non-protein amino acid produced by most cyanobacteria ubiquitously present in aquatic and terrestrial environments. Due to its global presence in surface waters, a widespread human exposure is possible and therefore this toxin represents a health risk for humans and animals. L-BMAA has been linked to the development of a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. Its neurotoxic activity has been extensively studied, while nothing is known on its genotoxic properties. In the present study we evaluated for the first time L-BMAA mutagenic potential using Ames assay on several Salmonella typhimurium strains (TA97a, TA98, TA100, TA102 and TA1535). The results showed that the toxin (up to 0.9 mg/plate) did not induce mutations without or with S9 metabolic activation. Its genotoxic activity was further studied with the SOS/umuC assay on S. typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002 and the results showed that it was not cytotoxic nor genotoxic for bacteria. The present study represents the first evidence that L-BMAA is not mutagenic nor genotoxic for bacteria even at concentrations much higher than those typically found in the environment. However, as most of the cyanobacterial toxins are not bacterial mutagens it is very important to further elucidate its genotoxic activity in eukaryotic cells. PMID:27137670

  14. Quantitative proteomics analysis of zebrafish exposed to sub-lethal dosages of β-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA).

    PubMed

    Frøyset, Ann Kristin; Khan, Essa Ahsan; Fladmark, Kari Espolin

    2016-01-01

    The non-protein amino acid β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a neurotoxin present in microalgae and shown to accumulate in the food web. BMAA has been linked to the complex neurodegenerative disorder of Guam and to increased incidents sporadic ALS. Two main neurotoxic routes are suggested; an excitotoxic by acting as an agonist towards glutamate receptors and a metabolic by misincorporating into cellular proteins. We have used zebrafish, an increasingly used model for neurodegenerative diseases, to further identify signaling components involved in BMAA-induced toxicity. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to sub-lethal dosages of BMAA and a label-free proteomics analysis was conducted on larvae 4 days post fertilization. The exposed larvae showed no developmental abnormalities, but a reduced heart rate and increased expression of GSK3 isoforms. Search towards a reviewed database containing 2968 entries identified 480 proteins. Only 17 of these were regulated 2-fold or more in the exposed larvae. Seven of these proteins could be associated to glutamate receptor signaling and recycling. The remaining nine have all been linked to disturbance in protein homeostasis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) development or neuronal cell death. We also found that BMAA influenced the endocannabinoid system by up-regulation of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and that FAAH inhibitor URB597 reduced the BMAA effect on heart rate and GSK3 expression. PMID:27404450

  15. The metabolism of the non-proteinogenic amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803.

    PubMed

    Downing, Simoné; Downing, Timothy Grant

    2016-06-01

    The neurotoxic amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is produced by cyanobacteria under nitrogen starvation conditions and its metabolism is closely associated with cellular nitrogen control. Very little is known regarding the metabolism or biosynthesis of this amino acid in the producing organisms and current knowledge is limited to the spontaneous formation of carbamate adducts in the presence of aqueous carbon dioxide, the rapid removal of free cellular BMAA upon the addition of ammonia to nitrogen-starved cyanobacterial cultures, and the link between cellular nitrogen status and BMAA synthesis. Data presented here show that exogenous BMAA is readily metabolised by cyanobacteria during which, the primary amino group is rapidly transferred to other cellular amino acids. Furthermore, data suggest that BMAA is metabolised in cyanobacteria via a reversible transamination reaction. This study presents novel data on BMAA metabolism in cyanobacteria and provides the first proposed biosynthetic precursor to BMAA biosynthesis in cyanobacteria. PMID:26948425

  16. Palladium-catalyzed β-C(sp(3))-H arylation of phthaloyl alanine with hindered aryl iodides: synthesis of complex β-aryl α-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuekai; He, Gang; Chen, Gong

    2016-06-28

    An efficient protocol for palladium-catalyzed β-C(sp(3))-H arylation of aliphatic carboxamides equipped with a 2-(2-pyridyl) ethylamine (PE) auxiliary was developed. The PE auxiliary is uniquely effective at facilitating the arylation of primary C(sp(3))-H bonds with sterically hindered aryl iodides. A variety of aryl iodides bearing alkoxyl, carbonyl, nitro and halogen groups on the ortho position can react with the PE-coupled phthaloyl alanine substrate in moderate to excellent yield. These reactions offer a useful solution for preparing complex β-aryl α-amino acid products from readily accessible starting materials. PMID:26781005

  17. Amino acids (L-arginine and L-alanine) passivated CdS nanoparticles: Synthesis of spherical hierarchical structure and nonlinear optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talwatkar, S. S.; Tamgadge, Y. S.; Sunatkari, A. L.; Gambhire, A. B.; Muley, G. G.

    2014-12-01

    CdS nanoparticles (NPs) passivated with amino acids (L-alanine and L-arginine) having spherical hierarchical morphology were synthesized by room temperature wet chemical method. Synthesized NPs were characterized by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy to study the variation of band gaps with concentration of surface modifying agents. Increase in band gap has been observed with the increase in concentration of surface modifying agents and was found more prominent for CdS NPs passivated with L-alanine. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis were carried out for the study of crystal structure and morphology of CdS NPs. The average particle size of CdS NPs calculated from Debye-Scherer formula was found to less than 5 nm and agrees well with those determined from UV-vis spectra and TEM data. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was performed to know the functional groups of the grown NPs. Peaks in FT-IR spectra indicate the formation of CdS NPs and capping with L-alanine and L-arginine. Photoluminescence spectra of these NPs were also studied. Finally, colloidal solution of CdS-PVAc was subjected to Z-scan experiment under low power cw laser illumination to characterize them for third order nonlinear optical properties. CdS-PVAc colloidal solution shows enhanced nonlinear absorption due to RSA and weak FCA on account of two photon absorption processes triggered by thermal effect.

  18. Amino acid residues in the GerAB protein important in the function and assembly of the alanine spore germination receptor of Bacillus subtilis 168.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Gareth R; Moir, Anne

    2011-05-01

    The paradigm gerA operon is required for endospore germination in response to c-alanine as the sole germinant, and the three protein products, GerAA, GerAB, and GerAC are predicted to form a receptor complex in the spore inner membrane. GerAB shows homology to the amino acid-polyamine-organocation (APC) family of single-component transporters and is predicted to be an integral membrane protein with 10 membrane-spanning helices. Site-directed mutations were introduced into the gerAB gene at its natural location on the chromosome. Alterations to some charged or potential helix-breaking residues within membrane spans affected receptor function dramatically. In some cases, this is likely to reflect the complete loss of the GerA receptor complex, as judged by the absence of the germinant receptor protein GerAC, which suggests that the altered GerAB protein itself may be unstable or that the altered structure destabilizes the complex. Mutants that have a null phenotype for Instituto de Biotecnología de León, INBIOTEC, Parque Científico de León, Av. Real, 1, 24006 León, Spain-alanine germination but retain GerAC protein at near-normal levels are more likely to define amino acid residues of functional, rather than structural, importance. Single-amino-acid substitutions in each of the GerAB and GerAA proteins can prevent incorporation of GerAC protein into the spore; this provides strong evidence that the proteins within a specific receptor interact and that these interactions are required for receptor assembly. The lipoprotein nature of the GerAC receptor subunit is also important; an amino acid change in the prelipoprotein signal sequence in the gerAC1 mutant results in the absence of GerAC protein from the spore. PMID:21378181

  19. Protein association of the neurotoxin and non-protein amino acid BMAA (β-N-methylamino-L-alanine) in the liver and brain following neonatal administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Oskar; Jiang, Liying; Andersson, Marie; Ilag, Leopold L; Brittebo, Eva B

    2014-04-01

    The environmental neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is not an amino acid that is normally found in proteins. Our previous autoradiographic study of (3)H-labeled BMAA in adult mice unexpectedly revealed a tissue distribution similar to that of protein amino acids. The aim of this study was to characterize the distribution of free and protein-bound BMAA in neonatal rat tissues following a short exposure using autoradiographic imaging and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). The autoradiographic imaging of (14)C-L-BMAA demonstrated a distinct uptake of radioactivity that was retained following acid extraction in tissues with a high rate of cell turnover and/or protein synthesis. The UHPLC-MS/MS analysis conclusively demonstrated a dose-dependent increase of protein-associated BMAA in neonatal rat tissues. The level of protein-associated BMAA in the liver was more than 10 times higher than that in brain regions not fully protected by the blood-brain barrier which may be due to the higher rate of protein synthesis in the liver. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that BMAA was associated with rat proteins suggesting that BMAA may be misincorporated into proteins. However, protein-associated BMAA seemed to be cleared over time, as none of the samples from adult rats had any detectable free or protein-associated BMAA. PMID:24472610

  20. Global cellular responses to β-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA) by olfactory ensheathing glial cells (OEC).

    PubMed

    Chiu, Alexander S; Braidy, Nady; Marçal, Helder; Welch, Jeffrey H; Gehringer, Michelle M; Guillemin, Gilles J; Neilan, Brett A

    2015-06-01

    This study utilised a proteomics approach to identify any differential protein expression in a glial cell line, rat olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), treated with the cyanotoxin β-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA). Five proteins of interest were identified, namely Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor 1 (RhoGDP1), Nck-associated protein 1 (NCKAP1), voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 1 (VDAC1), 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase type-2 (3hCoAdh2), and ubiquilin-4 (UBQLN4). Four of these candidates, nuclear receptor subfamily 4 group A member 1 (Nur77), cyclophilin A (CyPA), RhoGDP1 and VDAC1, have been reported to be involved in cell growth. A microarray identified UBQLN4, palladin and CyPA, which have been implicated to have roles in excitotoxicity. Moreover, the NCKAP1, UBQLN4, CyPA and 3hCoAdh2 genes have been associated with abnormal protein aggregation. Differential expression of genes involved in mitochondrial activity, Nur77, 3hCoAdh2, VDAC1 and UBQLN4, were also identified. Confirmatory reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis of transcripts generated from the genes of interest corroborated the differential expression trends identified in the global protein analysis. BMAA induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase of OEC and apoptosis after 48 h at concentrations of 250 μM and 500 μM. Collectively, this work advances our understanding of the mechanism of BMAA-mediated glial-toxicity in vitro. PMID:25797319

  1. Effect of pH, urea, peptide length, and neighboring amino acids on alanine alpha-proton random coil chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Carlisle, Elizabeth A; Holder, Jessica L; Maranda, Abby M; de Alwis, Adamberage R; Selkie, Ellen L; McKay, Sonya L

    2007-01-01

    Accurate random coil alpha-proton chemical shift values are essential for precise protein structure analysis using chemical shift index (CSI) calculations. The current study determines the chemical shift effects of pH, urea, peptide length and neighboring amino acids on the alpha-proton of Ala using model peptides of the general sequence GnXaaAYaaGn, where Xaa and Yaa are Leu, Val, Phe, Tyr, His, Trp or Pro, and n = 1-3. Changes in pH (2-6), urea (0-1M), and peptide length (n = 1-3) had no effect on Ala alpha-proton chemical shifts. Denaturing concentrations of urea (8M) caused significant downfield shifts (0.10 +/- 0.01 ppm) relative to an external DSS reference. Neighboring aliphatic residues (Leu, Val) had no effect, whereas aromatic amino acids (Phe, Tyr, His and Trp) and Pro caused significant shifts in the alanine alpha-proton, with the extent of the shifts dependent on the nature and position of the amino acid. Smaller aromatic residues (Phe, Tyr, His) caused larger shift effects when present in the C-terminal position (approximately 0.10 vs. 0.05 ppm N-terminal), and the larger aromatic tryptophan caused greater effects in the N-terminal position (0.15 ppm vs. 0.10 C-terminal). Proline affected both significant upfield (0.06 ppm, N-terminal) and downfield (0.25 ppm, C-terminal) chemical shifts. These new Ala correction factors detail the magnitude and range of variation in environmental chemical shift effects, in addition to providing insight into the molecular level interactions that govern protein folding. PMID:17054116

  2. Knockdown of a putative alanine aminotransferase gene affects amino acid content and flight capacity in the Colorado potato beetle Leptinotarsa decemlineata.

    PubMed

    Wan, Pin-Jun; Fu, Kai-Yun; Lü, Feng-Gong; Guo, Wen-Chao; Li, Guo-Qing

    2015-07-01

    Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) plays important physiological and biochemical roles in insect. In this study, a full-length Ldalt cDNA was cloned from Leptinotarsa decemlineata. It was ubiquitously expressed in the eggs, larvae, pupae and adults. In the adults, Ldalt mRNA was widely distributed in thorax muscles, fat body, midgut, foregut, hindgut, Malpighian tubules, ventral ganglion and epidermis, with the expression levels from the highest to the lowest. Two double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) (dsLdalt1 and dsLdalt2) targeting Ldalt were constructed and bacterially expressed. After adults fed on dsLdalt1- and dsLdalt2-immersed foliage for 3 day, Ldalt mRNA abundance was significantly decreased by 79.5 and 71.1 %, and ALT activities were significantly reduced by 64.5 and 67.6 %, respectively. Moreover, silencing Ldalt affected free amino acid contents. Lysine was decreased by 100.0 and 100.0 %, and arginine was reduced by 87.5 and 89.4 %, respectively, in the hemolymph from dsLdalt1- and dsLdalt2-ingested beetles, compared with control ones. In contrast, proline was increased by 88.7 and 96.4 %. Furthermore, ingestion of dsLdalt1 and dsLdalt2 significantly decreased flight speed, shortened flight duration time and flight distance. In addition, knocking down Ldalt significantly increased adult mortality. These data imply that LdALT plays important roles in amino acid metabolism and in flight in L. decemlineata. PMID:25868655

  3. Three-dimensional structure of Schistosoma japonicum glutathione S-transferase fused with a six-amino acid conserved neutralizing epitope of gp41 from HIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Kap; Ho, Joseph X.; Keeling, Kim; Gilliland, Gary L.; Ji, Xinhua; Rueker, Florian; Carter, Daniel C.

    1994-01-01

    The 3-dimensional crystal structure of glutathione S-transferase (GST) of Schistosoma japonicum (Sj) fused with a conserved neutralizing epitope on gp41 (glycoprotein, 41 kDa) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) was determined at 2.5 A resolution. The structure of the 3-3 isozyme rat GST of the mu gene class was used as a molecular replacement model. The structure consists of a 4-stranded beta-sheet and 3 alpha-helices in domain 1 and 5 alpha-helices in domain 2. The space group of the Sj GST crystal is P4(sub 3)2(sub 1)2 with unit cell dimensions of a = b = 94.7 A, and c = 58.1 A. The crystal has 1 GST monomer per asymmetric unit, and 2 monomers that form an active dimer are related by crystallographic 2-fold symmetry. In the binding site, the ordered structure of reduced glutathione is observed. The gp41 peptide (Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala) fused to the C-terminus of Sj GST forms a loop stabilized by symmetry-related GSTs. The Sj GST structure is compared with previously determined GST structures of mammalian gene classes mu, alpha, and pi. Conserved amino acid residues among the 4 GSTs that are important for hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions for dimer association and glutathione binding are discussed.

  4. Ingesting a preworkout supplement containing caffeine, creatine, β-alanine, amino acids, and B vitamins for 28 days is both safe and efficacious in recreationally active men.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Kristina L; Moon, Jordan R; Fairman, Ciaran M; Spradley, Brandon D; Tai, Chih-Yin; Falcone, Paul H; Carson, Laura R; Mosman, Matt M; Joy, Jordan M; Kim, Michael P; Serrano, Eric R; Esposito, Enrico N

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of consuming a preworkout supplement (SUP) containing caffeine, creatine, β-alanine, amino acids, and B vitamins for 28 days. We hypothesized that little to no changes in kidney and liver clinical blood markers or resting heart rate and blood pressure (BP) would be observed. In addition, we hypothesized that body composition and performance would improve in recreationally active males after 28 days of supplementation. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, participants were randomly assigned to ingest one scoop of either the SUP or placebo every day for 28 days, either 20 minutes before exercise or ad libitum on nonexercise days. Resting heart rate and BP, body composition, and fasting blood samples were collected before and after supplementation. Aerobic capacity as well as muscular strength and endurance were also measured. Significant (P < .05) main effects for time were observed for resting heart rate (presupplementation, 67.59 ± 7.90 beats per minute; postsupplementation, 66.18 ± 7.63 beats per minute), systolic BP (presupplementation, 122.41 ± 11.25 mm Hg; postsupplementation, 118.35 ± 11.58 mm Hg), blood urea nitrogen (presupplementation, 13.12 ± 2.55 mg/dL; postsupplementation, 15.24 ± 4.47 mg/dL), aspartate aminotransferase (presupplementation, 34.29 ± 16.48 IU/L; postsupplementation, 24.76 ± 4.71 IU/L), and alanine aminotransferase (presupplementation, 32.76 ± 19.72 IU/L; postsupplementation, 24.88 ± 9.68 IU/L). Significant main effects for time were observed for body fat percentage (presupplementation, 15.55% ± 5.79%; postsupplementation, 14.21% ± 5.38%; P = .004) and fat-free mass (presupplementation, 70.80 ± 9.21 kg; postsupplementation, 71.98 ± 9.27 kg; P = .006). A significant decrease in maximal oxygen consumption (presupplementation, 47.28 ± 2.69 mL/kg per minute; postsupplementation, 45.60 ± 2.81 mL/kg per minute) and a significant increase in percentage of

  5. Three-dimensional structure of Schistosoma japonicum glutathione S-transferase fused with a six-amino acid conserved neutralizing epitope of gp41 from HIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, K.; Ho, J. X.; Keeling, K.; Gilliland, G. L.; Ji, X.; Ruker, F.; Carter, D. C.

    1994-01-01

    The 3-dimensional crystal structure of glutathione S-transferase (GST) of Schistosoma japonicum (Sj) fused with a conserved neutralizing epitope on gp41 (glycoprotein, 41 kDa) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) (Muster T et al., 1993, J Virol 67:6642-6647) was determined at 2.5 A resolution. The structure of the 3-3 isozyme rat GST of the mu gene class (Ji X, Zhang P, Armstrong RN, Gilliland GL, 1992, Biochemistry 31:10169-10184) was used as a molecular replacement model. The structure consists of a 4-stranded beta-sheet and 3 alpha-helices in domain 1 and 5 alpha-helices in domain 2. The space group of the Sj GST crystal is P4(3)2(1)2, with unit cell dimensions of a = b = 94.7 A, and c = 58.1 A. The crystal has 1 GST monomer per asymmetric unit, and 2 monomers that form an active dimer are related by crystallographic 2-fold symmetry. In the binding site, the ordered structure of reduced glutathione is observed. The gp41 peptide (Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala) fused to the C-terminus of Sj GST forms a loop stabilized by symmetry-related GSTs. The Sj GST structure is compared with previously determined GST structures of mammalian gene classes mu, alpha, and pi. Conserved amino acid residues among the 4 GSTs that are important for hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions for dimer association and glutathione binding are discussed.

  6. Catalytic Stereoinversion of L-Alanine to Deuterated D-Alanine.

    PubMed

    Moozeh, Kimia; So, Soon Mog; Chin, Jik

    2015-08-01

    A combination of an achiral pyridoxal analogue and a chiral base has been developed for catalytic deuteration of L-alanine with inversion of stereochemistry to give deuterated D-alanine under mild conditions (neutral pD and 25 °C) without the use of any protecting groups. This system can also be used for catalytic deuteration of D-alanine with retention of stereochemistry to give deuterated D-alanine. Thus a racemic mixture of alanine can be catalytically deuterated to give an enantiomeric excess of deuterated D-alanine. While catalytic deracemization of alanine is forbidden by the second law of thermodynamics, this system can be used for catalytic deracemization of alanine with deuteration. Such green and biomimetic approach to catalytic stereocontrol provides insights into efficient amino acid transformations. PMID:26119066

  7. Inhibitors of alanine racemase enzyme: a review.

    PubMed

    Azam, Mohammed Afzal; Jayaram, Unni

    2016-08-01

    Alanine racemase is a fold type III PLP-dependent amino acid racemase enzyme catalysing the conversion of l-alanine to d-alanine utilised by bacterial cell wall for peptidoglycan synthesis. As there are no known homologs in humans, it is considered as an excellent antibacterial drug target. The standard inhibitors of this enzyme include O-carbamyl-d-serine, d-cycloserine, chlorovinyl glycine, alaphosphin, etc. d-Cycloserine is indicated for pulmonary and extra pulmonary tuberculosis but therapeutic use of drug is limited due to its severe toxic effects. Toxic effects due to off-target affinities of cycloserine and other substrate analogs have prompted new research efforts to identify alanine racemase inhibitors that are not substrate analogs. In this review, an updated status of known inhibitors of alanine racemase enzyme has been provided which will serve as a rich source of structural information and will be helpful in generating selective and potent inhibitor of alanine racemase. PMID:26024289

  8. Ionization constants of aqueous amino acids at temperatures up to 250°C using hydrothermal pH indicators and UV-visible spectroscopy: Glycine, α-alanine, and proline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Rodney G. F.; Collins, Christopher M.; Roberts, Jenene C.; Trevani, Liliana N.; Bartholomew, Richard J.; Tremaine, Peter R.

    2005-06-01

    Ionization constants for several simple amino acids have been measured for the first time under hydrothermal conditions, using visible spectroscopy with a high-temperature, high-pressure flow cell and thermally stable colorimetric pH indicators. This method minimizes amino acid decomposition at high temperatures because the data can be collected rapidly with short equilibration times. The first ionization constant for proline and α-alanine, K a,COOH, and the first and second ionization constants for glycine, K a,COOH and K a,NH4+, have been determined at temperatures as high as 250°C. Values for the standard partial molar heat capacity of ionization, Δ rC po, COOH and Δ rC po, NH4+, have been determined from the temperature dependence of ln (K a,COOH) and ln (K a,NH4+). The methodology has been validated by measuring the ionization constant of acetic acid up to 250°C, with results that agree with literature values obtained by potentiometric measurements to within the combined experimental uncertainty. We dedicate this paper to the memory of Dr. Donald Irish (1932-2002) of the University of Waterloo—friend and former supervisor of two of the authors (R.J.B. and P.R.T.).

  9. Blood-brain barrier permeability to leucine-enkephalin, D-alanine2-D-leucine5-enkephalin and their N-terminal amino acid (tyrosine).

    PubMed

    Zlokovic, B V; Begley, D J; Chain-Eliash, D G

    1985-06-10

    The permeability of the blood-brain barrier to [tyrosyl-3,5-3H]enkephalin-(5-L-leucine) (abbreviated to Leu-Enk) and of its synthetic analogue D-alanine2-[tyrosyl-3,5-3H]enkephalin-(5-D-leucine) (abbreviated to D-Ala2-D-Leu5-Enk) was studied, in the adult rat, by means of Oldendorf's27 intracarotid injection technique. The brain uptake index (BUI) corrected for residual vascular radioactivity was about the same for both peptides, indicating a low extraction from the blood during a 5- or 15-s period of exposure to the peptides. Transport of Leu-Enk was not saturated by unlabelled Enk at a concentration as high as 5 mM but was completely abolished by 5mM tyrosine and by the inhibitor of aminopeptidase activity, bacitracin (2 mM). Also the typical L-transport system substrate, 2-aminobicyclo(2,2,1)heptane-2 carboxylic acid (BCH)9 at 10 mM concentration markedly reduced (by 80%) Leu-Enk uptake by the brain. In contrast, brain uptake of D-Ala2-D-Leu5-Enk was reduced only to about one-half of its control value by bacitracin or by 25% by BCH. Brain uptake for L-tyrosine was typically large and markedly inhibited by BCH but not inhibited by 5 mM unlabelled Leu-Enk. These results show that the measurable but low first-pass extractions for enkephalins are not representative of the uptake of these peptides into the brain, but rather reflect their extreme sensitivity to enzymatic degradation with a release of the N-terminal tyrosine residue. The results also suggest that small amounts of D-Ala2-D-Leu5-Enk might cross the blood-brain barrier in an intact form.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3891014

  10. REVERSAL OF d-CYCLOSERINE INHIBITION OF BACTERIAL GROWTH BY ALANINE

    PubMed Central

    Zygmunt, Walter A.

    1962-01-01

    Zygmunt, Walter A. (Mead Johnson & Co., Evansville, Ind.). Reversal of d-cycloserine inhibition of bacterial growth by alanine. J. Bacteriol. 84:154–156. 1962.—Reversal of the antibacterial activity of d-4-amino-3-isoxazolidone by alanine in bacterial cultures actively growing on chemically defined media was compared in cultures requiring exogenous alanine and those capable of its synthesis. dl-Alanine was the most effective reversal agent in Pediococcus cerevisiae, an alanine-requiring organism, and d-alanine was effective in Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, organisms synthesizing alanine. With all three cultures, l-alanine was the least effective reversal agent. PMID:16561951

  11. Developmental changes in the activities of aromatic amino acid decarboxylase and catechol-O-methyl transferase in the porcine brain: a positron emission tomography study.

    PubMed

    Brust, Peter; Walter, Bernd; Hinz, Rainer; Füchtner, Frank; Müller, Marco; Steinbach, Jörg; Bauer, Reinhard

    2004-07-01

    Newborn (7-10 days old) and young (6-8 weeks old) pigs were used to study the metabolism of 6-[18F]fluoro-L-DOPA (FDOPA) in various brain regions with positron emission tomography (PET). Compartmental modeling of PET data was used to calculate the rate constants for the decarboxylation of FDOPA (k3) and for the metabolism of the resulting [18F]fluoro-dopamine (kcl). Whereas general physiological parameters such as cerebral blood flow, cerebral oxygen uptake, arterial blood gases and glucose concentration remained unchanged in young pigs as compared to newborns, a 50-200% increase of k3 in frontal cortex, striatum and mesencephalon was found. Also a 60% enhancement of kcl in the frontal cortex was measured, which is related to changes of the catechol-O-methyl-transferase (COMT) activity and implies a special function of this enzyme in the development of this brain region. In addition, measurement of plasma metabolites of FDOPA with HPLC was performed. The metabolism of FDOPA in young pigs was significantly faster than in newborns. Calculation of the rate constant for O-methylation of FDOPA by COMT revealed a significant elevation of this enzyme activity in young pigs compared to newborns. The increase of AADC and COMT activity with brain development is considered to be associated with special stages of neuronal maturation and tissue differentiation. PMID:15196667

  12. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa antimetabolite L -2-amino-4-methoxy-trans-3-butenoic acid (AMB) is made from glutamate and two alanine residues via a thiotemplate-linked tripeptide precursor

    PubMed Central

    Rojas Murcia, Nelson; Lee, Xiaoyun; Waridel, Patrice; Maspoli, Alessandro; Imker, Heidi J.; Chai, Tiancong; Walsh, Christopher T.; Reimmann, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa toxin L-2-amino-4-methoxy-trans-3-butenoic acid (AMB) is a non-proteinogenic amino acid which is toxic for prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Production of AMB requires a five-gene cluster encoding a putative LysE-type transporter (AmbA), two non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (AmbB and AmbE), and two iron(II)/α-ketoglutarate-dependent oxygenases (AmbC and AmbD). Bioinformatics analysis predicts one thiolation (T) domain for AmbB and two T domains (T1 and T2) for AmbE, suggesting that AMB is generated by a processing step from a precursor tripeptide assembled on a thiotemplate. Using a combination of ATP-PPi exchange assays, aminoacylation assays, and mass spectrometry-based analysis of enzyme-bound substrates and pathway intermediates, the AmbB substrate was identified to be L-alanine (L-Ala), while the T1 and T2 domains of AmbE were loaded with L-glutamate (L-Glu) and L-Ala, respectively. Loading of L-Ala at T2 of AmbE occurred only in the presence of AmbB, indicative of a trans loading mechanism. In vitro assays performed with AmbB and AmbE revealed the dipeptide L-Glu-L-Ala at T1 and the tripeptide L-Ala-L-Glu-L-Ala attached at T2. When AmbC and AmbD were included in the assay, these peptides were no longer detected. Instead, an L-Ala-AMB-L-Ala tripeptide was found at T2. These data are in agreement with a biosynthetic model in which L-Glu is converted into AMB by the action of AmbC, AmbD, and tailoring domains of AmbE. The importance of the flanking L-Ala residues in the precursor tripeptide is discussed. PMID:25814981

  13. Relationship between lactate and glutamine metabolism in vitro by the kidney: differences between dog and rat and importance of alanine synthesis in the dog.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, G; Vinay, P; Baverel, G; Brière, R; Gougoux, A

    1979-10-01

    Interaction between lactate (1 or 5 mM) and glutamine (1 or 5 mM) metabolism was studied with renal cortical slices incubated at a pH of 7.0 and obtained from acidotic (ammonium chloride) dogs and rats. The effect of aminooxyacetate (0.2 mM), dichloroacetate (3 mM), and fluoroacetate (0.05 mM) was also studied. Significant differences were observed between dog and rat. In the dog, lactate had no effect on glutamine uptake and vice versa, but gluconeogenesis increased. Ammonia production, however, decreased by 13 to 21%, whereas a significant increase in alanine production was noted. In the rat, glutamine extraction and ammonia production dropped by 33% with 5 mM lactate. In contrast to the observation in the dog, no production of alanine was noted, but significant accumulation of glutamate took place. Amino-oxyacetate inhibited alanine production in the dog and reestablished ammoniagenesis, and it led to a marked decrement in the uptake of lactate and glucose production in both species. Dichloroacetate in the dog resulted in a reduction in pyruvate, alanine, glucose, and ammonia production while glutamate accumulation was observed. In both species, fluoroacetate stimulated glutamine uptake and ammonia production. With lactate alone, fluoroacetate decreased lactate uptake and glucose production. With both lactate and glutamine in the medium, fluoroacetate prevented any effect of lactate on ammoniagenesis. The present study demonstrates that lactate has a modest depressing effect on renal ammonia production by dog slices through increased synthesis of alanine and redistribution of nitrogen from glutamine. In the rat, the depressing effect of lactate on ammonia production in the alanine amino-transferase deficient kidney occurs through accumulation of glutamate. The data also reveal that oxidation of lactate to carbon dioxide is greater in the dog than it is in the rat, but that gluconeogenesis from lactate is more important in the rat. PMID:548591

  14. Alteration of substrate specificity of alanine dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Puja; Aldeborgh, Hannah; Carlucci, Lauren; Walsh, Lauren; Wasserman, Jordan; Zhou, Edward; Lefurgy, Scott T.; Mundorff, Emily C.

    2015-01-01

    The l-alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) has a natural history that suggests it would not be a promising candidate for expansion of substrate specificity by protein engineering: it is the only amino acid dehydrogenase in its fold family, it has no sequence or structural similarity to any known amino acid dehydrogenase, and it has a strong preference for l-alanine over all other substrates. By contrast, engineering of the amino acid dehydrogenase superfamily members has produced catalysts with expanded substrate specificity; yet, this enzyme family already contains members that accept a broad range of substrates. To test whether the natural history of an enzyme is a predictor of its innate evolvability, directed evolution was carried out on AlaDH. A single mutation identified through molecular modeling, F94S, introduced into the AlaDH from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtAlaDH) completely alters its substrate specificity pattern, enabling activity toward a range of larger amino acids. Saturation mutagenesis libraries in this mutant background additionally identified a double mutant (F94S/Y117L) showing improved activity toward hydrophobic amino acids. The catalytic efficiencies achieved in AlaDH are comparable with those that resulted from similar efforts in the amino acid dehydrogenase superfamily and demonstrate the evolvability of MtAlaDH specificity toward other amino acid substrates. PMID:25538307

  15. Respiration of [14C]alanine by the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus.

    PubMed

    Chalot, M; Brun, A; Finlay, R D; Söderström, B

    1994-08-01

    The ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus efficiently took up exogenously supplied [14C]alanine and rapidly converted it to pyruvate, citrate, succinate, fumarate and to CO2, thus providing direct evidence for the utilisation of alanine as a respiratory substrate. [14C]alanine was further actively metabolised to glutamate, glutamine and aspartate. Exposure to aminooxyacetate completely suppressed 14CO2 evolution and greatly reduced the flow of carbon from [14C]alanine to tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates and amino acids, suggesting that alanine aminotransferase plays a pivotal role in alanine metabolism in Paxillus involutus. PMID:8082830

  16. Alanine transport across in vitro rabbit vagina.

    PubMed

    Hajjar, J J; Mroueh, A M

    1979-04-01

    Transmural flux of alanine across the vaginal epithelium of the rabbit is a specialized mechanism. There is a net serosal to mucosal translocation of the amino acid in the absence of a concentration gradient. Changes in reproductive cycle do not influence this mechanism but, in castrated animals, it is abolished. Transport properties of vaginal epithelium is important because of increasing utilization of intravaginal contraceptives. PMID:455986

  17. Interrelationship between anionic and cationic forms of glutathione S-transferases of human liver.

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Y C; Dao, D D; Saneto, R P

    1980-01-01

    Human liver glutathione S-transferases (GSH S-transferases) were fractionated into cationic and anionic proteins. During fractionation with (NH4)2SO4 the anionic GSH S-transferases are concentrated in the 65%-saturated-(NH4)2SO4 fraction, whereas the cationic GSH S-transferases separate in the 80%-saturated-(NH4)2SO4 fraction. From the 65%-saturated-(NH4)2SO4 fraction two new anionic GSH S-transferases, omega and psi, were purified to homogeneity by using ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, Sephadex G-200 gel filtration, affinity chromatography on GSH bound to epoxy-activated Sepharose and isoelectric focusing. By a similar procedure, cationic GSH S-transferases were purified from the 80%-saturated-(NH4)2SO4 fraction. Isoelectric points of GSH S-transferases omega and psi are 4.6 and 5.4 respectively. GSH S-transferase omega is the major anionic GSH S-transferase of human liver, whereas GSH S-transferase psi is present only in traces. The subunit mol.wt. of GSH S-transferase omega is about 22500, whereas that of cationic GSH S-transferases is about 24500. Kinetic and structural properties as well as the amino acid composition of GSH S-transferase omega are described. The antibodies raised against cationic GSH S-transferases cross-react with GSH S-transferase omega. There are significant differences between the catalytic properties of GSH S-transferase omega and the cationic GSH S-transferases. GSH peroxidase II activity is displayed by all five cationic GSH S-transferases, whereas both anionic GSH S-transferases do not display this activity. Images Fig. 3. PMID:7470087

  18. Atomic Layer Deposition of L-Alanine Polypeptide

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fu, Yaqin; Li, Binsong; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Dunphy, Darren R.; Tsai, Andy; Tam, Siu-Yue; Fan, Hongyou Y.; Zhang, Hongxia; Rogers, David; Rempe, Susan; et al

    2014-10-30

    L-Alanine polypeptide thin films were synthesized via atomic layer deposition (ALD). Rather, instead of using an amino acid monomer as the precursor, an L-alanine amino acid derivatized with a protecting group was used to prevent self-polymerization, increase the vapor pressure, and allow linear cycle-by-cycle growth emblematic of ALD. Moreover, the successful deposition of a conformal polypeptide film has been confirmed by FTIR, TEM, and Mass Spectrometry, and the ALD process has been extended to polyvaline.

  19. Postirradiation effects in alanine dosimeter probes of two different suppliers.

    PubMed

    Anton, Mathias

    2008-03-01

    The measurand relevant for the dosimetry for radiation therapy is the absorbed dose to water, DW. The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) is establishing a secondary standard for DW for high-energy photon and electron radiation based on electron spin resonance (ESR) of the amino acid alanine. For practical applications, like, for example, intercomparison measurements using the ESR/alanine dosimetry system, the temporal evolution of the ESR signal of irradiated probes is an important issue. This postirradiation behaviour is investigated for alanine pellets of two different suppliers for different storage conditions. The influence of the storage conditions on the temporal evolution may be dependent on the type of probes used. The measurement and analysis method developed at the PTB is able to circumvent the apparent difficulties in the case of alanine/paraffin probes. Care has to be taken in case this method cannot be applied. PMID:18296760

  20. A single amino acid change (substitution of the conserved Glu-590 with alanine) in the C-terminal domain of rat liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase I increases its malonyl-CoA sensitivity close to that observed with the muscle isoform of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Napal, Laura; Dai, Jia; Treber, Michelle; Haro, Diego; Marrero, Pedro F; Woldegiorgis, Gebre

    2003-09-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPTI) catalyzes the conversion of long-chain fatty acyl-CoAs to acylcarnitines in the presence of l-carnitine. To determine the role of the highly conserved C-terminal glutamate residue, Glu-590, on catalysis and malonyl-CoA sensitivity, we separately changed the residue to alanine, lysine, glutamine, and aspartate. Substitution of Glu-590 with aspartate, a negatively charged amino acid with only one methyl group less than the glutamate residue in the wild-type enzyme, resulted in complete loss in the activity of the liver isoform of CPTI (L-CPTI). A change of Glu-590 to alanine, glutamine, and lysine caused a significant 9- to 16-fold increase in malonyl-CoA sensitivity but only a partial decrease in catalytic activity. Substitution of Glu-590 with neutral uncharged residues (alanine and glutamine) and/or a basic positively charged residue (lysine) significantly increased L-CPTI malonyl-CoA sensitivity to the level observed with the muscle isoform of the enzyme, suggesting the importance of neutral and/or positive charges in the switch of the kinetic properties of L-CPTI to the muscle isoform of CPTI. Since a conservative substitution of Glu-590 to aspartate but not glutamine resulted in complete loss in activity, we suggest that the longer side chain of glutamate is essential for catalysis and malonyl-CoA sensitivity. This is the first demonstration whereby a single residue mutation in the C-terminal region of the liver isoform of CPTI resulted in a change of its kinetic properties close to that observed with the muscle isoform of the enzyme and provides the rationale for the high malonyl-CoA sensitivity of muscle CPTI compared with the liver isoform of the enzyme. PMID:12826662

  1. Earthworms accumulate alanine in response to drought.

    PubMed

    Holmstrup, Martin; Slotsbo, Stine; Henriksen, Per G; Bayley, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Earthworms have ecologically significant functions in tropical and temperate ecosystems and it is therefore important to understand how these animals survive during drought. In order to explore the physiological responses to dry conditions, we simulated a natural drought incident in a laboratory trial exposing worms in slowly drying soil for about one month, and then analyzed the whole-body contents of free amino acids (FAAs). We investigated three species forming estivation chambers when soils dry out (Aporrectodea tuberculata, Aporrectodea icterica and Aporrectodea longa) and one species that does not estivate during drought (Lumbricus rubellus). Worms subjected to drought conditions (< -2MPa) substantially increased the concentration of FAAs and in particular alanine that was significantly upregulated in all tested species. Alanine was the most important FAA reaching 250-650μmolg(-1) dry weight in dehydrated Aporrectodea species and 300μmolg(-1) dry weight in L. rubellus. Proline was only weakly upregulated in some species as were a few other FAAs. Species forming estivation chambers (Aporrectodea spp.) did not show a better ability to conserve body water than the non-estivating species (L. rubellus) at the same drought level. These results suggest that the accumulation of alanine is an important adaptive trait in drought tolerance of earthworms in general. PMID:27107492

  2. Single prenyl-binding site on protein prenyl transferases

    PubMed Central

    Desnoyers, Luc; Seabra, Miguel C.

    1998-01-01

    Three distinct protein prenyl transferases, one protein farnesyl transferase (FTase) and two protein geranylgeranyl transferases (GGTase), catalyze prenylation of many cellular proteins. One group of protein substrates contains a C-terminal CAAX motif (C is Cys, A is aliphatic, and X is a variety of amino acids) in which the single cysteine residue is modified with either farnesyl or geranylgeranyl (GG) by FTase or GGTase type-I (GGTase-I), respectively. Rab proteins constitute a second group of substrates that contain a C-terminal double-cysteine motif (such as XXCC in Rab1a) in which both cysteines are geranylgeranylated by Rab GG transferase (RabGGTase). Previous characterization of CAAX prenyl transferases showed that the enzymes form stable complexes with their prenyl pyrophosphate substrates, acting as prenyl carriers. We developed a prenyl-binding assay and show that RabGGTase has a prenyl carrier function similar to the CAAX prenyl transferases. Stable RabGGTase:GG pyrophosphate (GGPP), FTase:GGPP, and GGTase-I:GGPP complexes show 1:1 (enzyme:GGPP) stoichiometry. Chromatographic analysis of prenylated products after single turnover reactions by using isolated RabGGTase:GGPP complex revealed that Rab is mono-geranylgeranylated. This study establishes that all three protein prenyl transferases contain a single prenyl-binding site and suggests that RabGGTase transfers two GG groups to Rabs in independent and consecutive reactions. PMID:9770475

  3. Effect of L-tryptophan injection in rats on some enzymes of amino acid metabolism in liver. I. In vitro studies of the effect of L-tryptophan and its metabolites on the extramitochondrial L-alanine: 2-ketoglutaric aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Katsos, A; Philippidis, H; Palaiologos, G

    1981-02-01

    Fed and fasted rats were injected with L-tryptophan (12.5 mg/100 g body weight) and the specific activities of L-glutamic: NAD oxidoreductase (deaminating) (EC 1.4.1.2) (GDH), L-aspartic-2-ketoglutaric aminotransferase (EC 2.6.1.1) (GOT) and L-alanine-2-ketoglutaric aminotransferase (EC 2.6.1.2) (GPT) from hepatic mitochondria and cytosol were compared. L-tryptophan results in a decrease of mitochondrial GDH activity by 22% and of cytosolic GPT and GOT by 42% and 38% respectively in the liver of fasted rats. Xanthurenate is a potent inhibitor of purified extramitochondrial GPT, whereas anthranilate and quinolinate are less potent inhibitors. L-tryptophan, 5-OH-tryptophan and indole exert a slight inhibition. Kynurenine, 5-OH-tryptamine, tryptamine, picolinic acid, nicotinic acid and indoloacetic acid do not show any inhibition of GPT. It is suggested that L-tryptophan injection inhibits extramitochondrial GPT by its transformation to xanthurenate and anthranilate. PMID:7227974

  4. Alanine aminotransferase controls seed dormancy in barley.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kazuhiro; Yamane, Miki; Yamaji, Nami; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Tagiri, Akemi; Schwerdt, Julian G; Fincher, Geoffrey B; Matsumoto, Takashi; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Komatsuda, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Dormancy allows wild barley grains to survive dry summers in the Near East. After domestication, barley was selected for shorter dormancy periods. Here we isolate the major seed dormancy gene qsd1 from wild barley, which encodes an alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT). The seed dormancy gene is expressed specifically in the embryo. The AlaAT isoenzymes encoded by the long and short dormancy alleles differ in a single amino acid residue. The reduced dormancy allele Qsd1 evolved from barleys that were first domesticated in the southern Levant and had the long dormancy qsd1 allele that can be traced back to wild barleys. The reduced dormancy mutation likely contributed to the enhanced performance of barley in industrial applications such as beer and whisky production, which involve controlled germination. In contrast, the long dormancy allele might be used to control pre-harvest sprouting in higher rainfall areas to enhance global adaptation of barley. PMID:27188711

  5. Alanine aminotransferase controls seed dormancy in barley

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Kazuhiro; Yamane, Miki; Yamaji, Nami; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Tagiri, Akemi; Schwerdt, Julian G.; Fincher, Geoffrey B.; Matsumoto, Takashi; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Komatsuda, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Dormancy allows wild barley grains to survive dry summers in the Near East. After domestication, barley was selected for shorter dormancy periods. Here we isolate the major seed dormancy gene qsd1 from wild barley, which encodes an alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT). The seed dormancy gene is expressed specifically in the embryo. The AlaAT isoenzymes encoded by the long and short dormancy alleles differ in a single amino acid residue. The reduced dormancy allele Qsd1 evolved from barleys that were first domesticated in the southern Levant and had the long dormancy qsd1 allele that can be traced back to wild barleys. The reduced dormancy mutation likely contributed to the enhanced performance of barley in industrial applications such as beer and whisky production, which involve controlled germination. In contrast, the long dormancy allele might be used to control pre-harvest sprouting in higher rainfall areas to enhance global adaptation of barley. PMID:27188711

  6. How similar is the electronic structures of β-lactam and alanine?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Subhojyoti; Ahmed, Marawan; Wang, Feng

    2016-02-01

    The C1s spectra of β-lactam i.e. 2-azetidinone (C3H5NO), a drug and L-alanine (C3H7NO2), an amino acid, exhibit striking similarities, which may be responsible for the competition between 2-azetidinone and the alanyl-alanine moiety in biochemistry. The present study is to reveal the degree of similarities and differences between their electronic structures of the two model molecular pairs. It is found that the similarities in C1s and inner valence binding energy spectra are due to their bonding connections but other properties such as ring structure (in 2-azetidinone) and chiral carbon (alanine) can be very different. Further, the inner valence region of ionization potential greater than 18 eV for 2-azetidinone and alanine is also significantly similar. Finally the strained lactam ring exhibits more chemical reactivity measured at all non-hydrogen atoms by Fukui functions with respect to alanine.

  7. Alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase-deficient mice, a model for primary hyperoxaluria that responds to adenoviral gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Salido, Eduardo C; Li, Xiao M; Lu, Yang; Wang, Xia; Santana, Alfredo; Roy-Chowdhury, Namita; Torres, Armando; Shapiro, Larry J; Roy-Chowdhury, Jayanta

    2006-11-28

    Mutations in the alanine-glyoxylate amino transferase gene (AGXT) are responsible for primary hyperoxaluria type I, a rare disease characterized by excessive hepatic oxalate production that leads to renal failure. We generated a null mutant mouse by targeted mutagenesis of the homologous gene, Agxt, in embryonic stem cells. Mutant mice developed normally, and they exhibited hyperoxaluria and crystalluria. Approximately half of the male mice in mixed genetic background developed calcium oxalate urinary stones. Severe nephrocalcinosis and renal failure developed after enhancement of oxalate production by ethylene glycol administration. Hepatic expression of human AGT1, the protein encoded by AGXT, by adenoviral vector-mediated gene transfer in Agxt(-/-) mice normalized urinary oxalate excretion and prevented oxalate crystalluria. Subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence studies revealed that, as in the human liver, the expressed wild-type human AGT1 was predominantly localized in mouse hepatocellular peroxisomes, whereas the most common mutant form of AGT1 (G170R) was localized predominantly in the mitochondria. PMID:17110443

  8. Expression, purification, and characterization of alanine racemase from Pseudomonas putida YZ-26.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Lin; Liu, Xiao-Qin; Shi, Ya-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Alanine racemase catalyzes the interconversion of D: - and L: -alanine and plays an important role in supplying D: -alanine, a component of peptidoglycan biosynthesis, to most bacteria. Alanine racemase exists mostly in prokaryotes and is generally absent in higher eukaryotes; this makes it an attractive target for the design of new antibacterial drugs. Here, we present the cloning and characterization of a new gene-encoding alanine racemase from Pseudomonas putida YZ-26. An open reading frame (ORF) of 1,230 bp, encoding a protein of 410 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 44,217.3 Da, was cloned into modified vector pET32M to form the recombinant plasmid pET-alr. After introduction into E.coli BL21, the strain pET-alr/E.coli BL21 expressed His(6)-tagged alanine racemase. The recombinant alanine racemase was efficiently purified to homogeneity using Ni(2+)-NTA and a gel filtration column, with 82.5% activity recovery. The amino acid sequence deduced from the alanine racemase gene revealed identity similarities of 97.0, 93, 23, and 22.0% with from P. putida F1, P. putida200, P. aeruginosa, and Salmonella typhimurium, respectively. The recombinant alanine racemase is a monomeric protein with a molecular mass of 43 kDa. The enzyme exhibited activity with L: -alanine and L: -isoleucine, and showed higher specificity for the former compared with the latter. The enzyme was stable from pH 7.0-11.0; its optimum pH was at 9.0. The optimum temperature for the enzyme was 37°C, and its activity was rapidly lost at temperatures above 40°C. Divalent metals, including Sr(2+), Mn(2+), Co(2+), and Ni(2+) obviously enhanced enzymatic activity, while the Cu(2+) ion showed inhibitory effects. PMID:22806802

  9. Physiological hypercortisolemia increases proteolysis, glutamine, and alanine production

    SciTech Connect

    Darmaun, D.; Matthews, D.E.; Bier, D.M. Cornell Univ. Medical College, New York, NY )

    1988-09-01

    Physiological elevations of plasma cortisol levels, as are encountered in stress and severe trauma, were produced in six normal subjects by infusing them with hydrocortisone for 64 h. Amino acid kinetics were measured in the postabsorptive state using three 4-h infusions of L-(1-{sup 13}C)leucine, L-phenyl({sup 2}H{sub 5})phenylalanine, L-(2-{sup 15}N)glutamine, and L-(1-{sup 13}C)alanine tracers (1) before, (2) at 12 h, and (3) at 60 h of cortisol infusion. Before and throughout the study, the subjects ate a normal diet of adequate protein and energy intake. The cortisol infusion raised plasma cortisol levels significantly from 10 {plus minus} 1 to 32 {plus minus} 4 {mu}g/dl, leucine flux from 83 {plus minus} 3 to 97 {plus minus} 3 {mu}mol{center dot}kg{sup {minus}1}{center dot}h{sup {minus}1}, and phenylalanine flux from 34 {plus minus} 1 to 39 {plus minus} 1 (SE) {mu}mol{center dot}kg{sup {minus}1}{center dot}h{sup {minus}1} after 12 h of cortisol infusion. These increases were maintained until the cortisol infusion was terminated. These nearly identical 15% increases in two different essential amino acid appearance rates are reflective of increased whole body protein breakdown. Glutamine flux rose by 12 h of cortisol infusion and remained elevated at the same level at 64 h. The increase in flux was primarily due to a 55% increase in glutamine de novo synthesis. Alanine flux increased with acute hypercortisolemia and increased further at 60 h of cortisol infusion, a result primarily of increased alanine de novo synthesis. Insulin, alanine, and lactate plasma levels responded similarly with significant rises between the acute and chronic periods of cortisol infusion. Thus hypercortisolemia increases both protein breakdown and the turnover of important nonessential amino acids for periods of up to 64 h.

  10. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5118 Alanine. (a) Product. Alanine...

  11. Amino acid imbalance in cystinuria

    PubMed Central

    Asatoor, A. M.; Freedman, P. S.; Gabriel, J. R. T.; Milne, M. D.; Prosser, D. I.; Roberts, J. T.; Willoughby, C. P.

    1974-01-01

    After oral ingestion of a free amino acid mixture by three cystinuric patients, plasma increments of lysine and arginine were lower and those of many other amino acids were significantly higher than those found in control subjects. Similar results were obtained in control subjects after amino acid imbalance had been artificially induced by the omission of cystine, lysine, and arginine from the amino acid mixture. Especially high increments of alanine and proline provided the best evidence of amino acid imbalance caused by a temporary lysine and, to a lesser extent, arginine and cystine deficit. No such amino acid imbalance was found to occur in the cystinuric patients after ingestion of whole protein, indicating that absorption of oligopeptides produced by protein digestion provided a balanced physiological serum amino acid increment. This is considered to explain the lack of any unequivocal nutritional deficit in cystinuric patients despite poor absorption of the essential free amino acid, lysine. PMID:4411931

  12. Role of alanine-valine transaminase in Salmonella typhimurium and analysis of an avtA::Tn5 mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Berg, C M; Whalen, W A; Archambault, L B

    1983-01-01

    In Salmonella typhimurium, as in Escherichia coli, mutations in avtA, the gene encoding the alanine-valine transaminase (transaminase C), are silent unless they are combined with mutations involved in isoleucine-valine biosynthesis. avtA is repressed by leucine or alanine but not by valine. Transaminase C is found at reduced levels upon starvation for any one of several amino acids. We hypothesize that this is due to repression of avtA by the elevated alanine and leucine pools found in amino acid-starved cells. PMID:6309735

  13. Role of alanine-valine transaminase in Salmonella typhimurium and analysis of an avtA::Tn5 mutant.

    PubMed

    Berg, C M; Whalen, W A; Archambault, L B

    1983-09-01

    In Salmonella typhimurium, as in Escherichia coli, mutations in avtA, the gene encoding the alanine-valine transaminase (transaminase C), are silent unless they are combined with mutations involved in isoleucine-valine biosynthesis. avtA is repressed by leucine or alanine but not by valine. Transaminase C is found at reduced levels upon starvation for any one of several amino acids. We hypothesize that this is due to repression of avtA by the elevated alanine and leucine pools found in amino acid-starved cells. PMID:6309735

  14. Purification and characterization of alanine dehydrogenase from a cyanobacterium, Phormidium lapideum.

    PubMed

    Sawa, Y; Tani, M; Murata, K; Shibata, H; Ochiai, H

    1994-11-01

    Alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) was purified to homogeneity from cell-free extracts of a non-N2-fixing filamentous cyanobacterium, Phormidium lapideum. The molecular mass of the native enzyme was 240 kDa, and SDS-PAGE revealed a minimum molecular mass of 41 kDa, suggesting a six-subunit structure. The NH2 terminal amino acid residues of the purified AlaDH revealed marked similarity with that of other AlaDHs. The enzyme was highly specific for L-alanine and NAD+, but showed relatively low amino-acceptor specificity. The pH optimum was 8.4 for reductive amination of pyruvate and 9.2 for oxidative deamination of L-alanine. The Km values were 5.0 mM for L-alanine and 0.04 mM for NAD+, 0.33 mM for pyruvate, 60.6 mM for NH4+ (pH 8.7), and 0.02 mM for NADH. Various L-amino acids including alanine, serine, threonine, and aromatic amino acids, inhibited the aminating reaction. The enzyme was inactivated upon incubation with pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) followed by reduction with sodium borohydride. The copresence of NADH and pyruvate largely protected the enzyme against the inactivation by PLP. PMID:7896761

  15. Formation of simple biomolecules from alanine in ocean by impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Y.; Sekine, T.; Furukawa, Y.; Kakegawa, T.; Kobayashi, T.

    2013-12-01

    The biomolecules on the Earth are thought either to have originated from the extraterrestrial parts carried with flying meteorites or to have been formed from the inorganic materials on the Earth through given energy. From the standpoint to address the importance of impact energy, it is required to simulate experimentally the chemical reactions during impacts, because violent impacts may have occurred 3.8-4.0 Gyr ago to create biomolecules initially. It has been demonstrated that shock reactions among ocean (H2O), atmospheric nitrogen, and meteoritic constitution (Fe) can induce locally reduction environment to form simple bioorganic molecules such as ammonia and amino acid (Nakazawa et al., 2005; Furukawa et al., 2009). We need to know possible processes for alanine how chemical reactions proceed during repeated impacts and how complicated biomolecules are formed. Alanine can be formed from glycine (Umeda et al., in preparation). In this study, we carried out shock recovery experiments at pressures of 4.4-5.7 GPa to investigate the chemical reactions of alanine. Experiments were carried out with a propellant gun. Stainless steel containers (30 mm in diameter, 30 mm long) with 13C-labeled alanine aqueous solution immersed in olivine or hematite powders were used as targets. Air gap was present in the sample room (18 mm in diameter, 2 mm thick) behind the sample. The powder, solution, and air represent meteorite, ocean, and atmosphere on early Earth, respectively. Two powders of olivine and hematite help to keep the oxygen fugacity low and high during experiments, respectively in order to investigate the effect of oxygen fugacity on chemical processes of alanine. The recovered containers, after cleaned completely, were immersed into liquid nitrogen to freeze sample solution and then we drilled on the impact surface to extract water-soluble run products using pure water. Thus obtained products were analyzed by LC/MS for four amino acids (glycine, alanine, valine, and

  16. Degradation of Glycine and Alanine on Irradiated Quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlikowski, Maciej; Benko, Aleksandra; Wróbel, Tomasz P.

    2013-04-01

    Recent researches suggest participation of minerals in the formation of life under primordial conditions. Among all of the minerals, quartz seems to be one of the most probable to take part in such processes. However, an external source of energy is needed, e.g. electric discharge. A device simulating the proposed conditions was designed and was used to simulate prebiotic conditions. Investigation of processes occurring during the stimulation of quartz with electric discharge was studied by means of Ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectroscopy, in order to monitor the generation kinetics of free radicals. Additionally, infrared spectroscopy was applied to identify chemical reaction products created in a solution of alanine or glycine, in the presence of quartz treated with electric discharge. Formation of increased amounts of free radicals, compared to experiments performed without quartz and/or amino acid, is reported, along with identification of possible degradation products of alanine. No synthetic reactions were observed.

  17. Crystal Structures of Aedes Aegypt Alanine Glyoxylate Aminotransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Han,Q.; Robinson, H.; Gao, Y.; Vogelaar, N.; Wilson, S.; Rizzi, M.; Li, J.

    2006-01-01

    Mosquitoes are unique in having evolved two alanine glyoxylate aminotransferases (AGTs). One is 3-hydroxykynurenine transaminase (HKT), which is primarily responsible for catalyzing the transamination of 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) to xanthurenic acid (XA). Interestingly, XA is used by malaria parasites as a chemical trigger for their development within the mosquito. This 3-HK to XA conversion is considered the major mechanism mosquitoes use to detoxify the chemically reactive and potentially toxic 3-HK. The other AGT is a typical dipteran insect AGT and is specific for converting glyoxylic acid to glycine. Here we report the 1.75{angstrom} high-resolution three-dimensional crystal structure of AGT from the mosquito Aedes aegypti (AeAGT) and structures of its complexes with reactants glyoxylic acid and alanine at 1.75 and 2.1{angstrom} resolution, respectively. This is the first time that the three-dimensional crystal structures of an AGT with its amino acceptor, glyoxylic acid, and amino donor, alanine, have been determined. The protein is dimeric and adopts the type I-fold of pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP)-dependent aminotransferases. The PLP co-factor is covalently bound to the active site in the crystal structure, and its binding site is similar to those of other AGTs. The comparison of the AeAGT-glyoxylic acid structure with other AGT structures revealed that these glyoxylic acid binding residues are conserved in most AGTs. Comparison of the AeAGT-alanine structure with that of the Anopheles HKT-inhibitor complex suggests that a Ser-Asn-Phe motif in the latter may be responsible for the substrate specificity of HKT enzymes for 3-HK.

  18. Sodium dependency of L-alanine absorption in canine Thiry-Vella loops.

    PubMed

    Fleshler, B; Nelson, R A

    1970-03-01

    The effect of sodium on the absorption of L-alanine in vivo was tested by measuring the absorption of L-alanine from Thiry-Vella loops in dogs. Solutions containing L-alanine (10 or 50 mM) sodium at concentrations of 0, 74, or 145 m-equiv/1 and mannitol, as needed to maintain isotonicity were instilled into the loops for 10 minutes. Similar studies were done with L-alanine 50 mM and either 0 or 145 m-equiv/1 of sodium for five minutes. Under all conditions absorption of alanine was significantly less from the solution initially free of sodium. Although these differences were statistically significant, the physiological significance was not great since the actual differences in amounts of L-alanine absorbed were small. Insorption of sodium was low from the fluid which initially had no sodium, but exsorption proceeded rapidly and was unaffected by the luminal sodium concentration. This resulted in a rapid rise of intraluminal sodium concentration when no sodium was initially present. This persistent exsorption of sodium was, therefore, adequate to provide sodium in the lumen to activate the sodium-dependent carrier, postulated on the basis of studies in vitro. These data in vivo are consistent with the view that sodium at the intraluminal surface is important in accelerating amino acid transport, but indicate that in the absence of added intraluminal sodium the gut mucosa itself, under normal circumstances, provides the sodium needed for L-alanine absorption. PMID:5423904

  19. L-alanine in a droplet of water: a density-functional molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Degtyarenko, Ivan M; Jalkanen, Karl J; Gurtovenko, Andrey A; Nieminen, Risto M

    2007-04-26

    We report the results of a Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics study on an L-alanine amino acid in neutral aqueous solution. The whole system, the L-alanine zwitterion and 50 water molecules, was treated quantum mechanically. We found that the hydrophobic side chain (R = CH3) defines the trajectory path of the molecule. Initially fully hydrated in an isolated droplet of water, the amino acid moves to the droplet's surface, exposing its hydrophobic methyl group and alpha-hydrogen out of the water. The structure of an L-alanine with the methyl group exposed to the water surface was found to be energetically favorable compared to a fully hydrated molecule. The dynamic behavior of the system suggests that the first hydration shell of the amino acid is localized around carboxylate (CO2-) and ammonium (NH3+) functional groups; it is highly ordered and quite rigid. In contrast, the hydration shell around the side chain is much less structured, suggesting a modest influence of the methyl group on the structure of water. The number of water molecules in the first hydration shell of an alanine molecule is constantly changing; the average number was found to equal 7. The molecular dynamics results show that L-alanine in water does not have a preferred conformation, as all three of the molecule's functional sites (i.e., CH3, NH3+, CO2-) perform rotational movements around the C(alpha)-site bond. PMID:17407339

  20. A novel low molecular weight alanine aminotransferase from fasted rat liver.

    PubMed

    Vedavathi, M; Girish, K S; Kumar, M Karuna

    2006-01-01

    Alanine is the most effective precursor for gluconeogenesis among amino acids, and the initial reaction is catalyzed by alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT). Although the enzyme activity increases during fasting, this effect has not been studied extensively. The present study describes the purification and characterization of an isoform of AlaAT from rat liver under fasting. The molecular mass of the enzyme is 17.7 kD with an isoelectric point of 4.2; glutamine is the N-terminal residue. The enzyme showed narrow substrate specificity for L-alanine with Km values for alanine of 0.51 mM and for 2-oxoglutarate of 0.12 mM. The enzyme is a glycoprotein. Spectroscopic and inhibition studies showed that pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) and free -SH groups are involved in the enzymatic catalysis. PLP activated the enzyme with a Km of 0.057 mM. PMID:16487061

  1. Vibrational dynamics of crystalline L-alanine

    SciTech Connect

    Bordallo, H.N.; Eckert, J.; Barthes, M.

    1997-11-01

    The authors report a new, complete vibrational analysis of L-alanine and L-alanine-d{sub 4} which utilizes IINS intensities in addition to frequency information. The use of both isotopomers resulted in a self-consistent force field for and assignment of the molecular vibrations in L-alanine. Some details of the calculation as well as a comparison of calculated and observed IINS spectra are presented. The study clarifies a number of important issues on the vibrational dynamics of this molecule and presents a self-consistent force field for the molecular vibrations in crystalline L-alanine.

  2. Glucose and Alanine Metabolism in Children with Maple Syrup Urine Disease

    PubMed Central

    Haymond, Morey W.; Ben-Galim, Ehud; Strobel, Karen E.

    1978-01-01

    In vitro studies have suggested that catabolism of branched chain amino acids is linked with alanine and glutamine formed in, and released from, muscle. To explore this possibility in vivo, static and kinetic studies were performed in three patients with classical, and one patient with partial, branched chain α-ketoacid decarboxylase deficiency (maple syrup urine disease, MSUD) and compared to similar studies in eight age-matched controls. The subjects underwent a 24-30-h fast, and a glucose-alanine flux study using stable isotopes. Basal plasma leucine concentrations were elevated (P <0.001) in patients with MSUD (1,140±125 μM vs. 155±18 μM in controls); and in contrast to the controls, branched chain amino acid concentrations in plasma increased during the fast in the MSUD patients. Basal plasma alanine concentrations were lower (P <0.01) in patients with classical MSUD (153±8 μM vs. 495±27 μM in controls). This discrepancy was maintained throughout the fast despite a decrease in alanine concentrations in both groups. Plasma alanine and leucine concentrations in the patient with partial MSUD were intermediate between those of the controls and the subjects with the classical form of the disease. Circulating ketone bodies and glucoregulatory hormones concentrations were similar in the MSUD and normal subjects during the fast. Alanine flux rates in two patients with classical MSUD (3.76 and 4.00 μmol/Kg per min) and the patient with partial MSUD (5.76 μmol/Kg per min) were clearly lower than those of the controls (11.72±2.53 [SD] μmol/Kg per min). After short-term starvation, glucose flux and fasting concentrations were similar in the MSUD patients and normal subjects. These data indicate that branched chain amino acid catabolism is an important rate limiting event for alanine production in vivo. PMID:670400

  3. Characterization of psychrophilic alanine racemase from Bacillus psychrosaccharolyticus.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Y; Yokoigawa, K; Esaki, N; Soda, K; Kawai, H

    1999-03-16

    A psychrophilic alanine racemase gene from Bacillus psychrosaccharolyticus was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli SOLR with a plasmid pYOK3. The gene starting with the unusual initiation codon GTG showed higher preference for codons ending in A or T. The enzyme purified to homogeneity showed the high catalytic activity even at 0 degrees C and was extremely labile over 35 degrees C. The enzyme was found to have a markedly large Km value (5.0 microM) for the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) cofactor in comparison with other reported alanine racemases, and was stabilized up to 50 degrees C in the presence of excess amounts of PLP. The low affinity of the enzyme for PLP may be related to the thermolability, and may be related to the high catalytic activity, initiated by the transaldimination reaction, at low temperature. The enzyme has a distinguishing hydrophilic region around the residue no. 150 in the deduced amino acid sequence (383 residues), whereas the corresponding regions of other Bacillus alanine racemases are hydrophobic. The position of the region in the three dimensional structure of C atoms of the enzyme was predicted to be in a surface loop surrounding the active site. The region may interact with solvent and reduce the compactness of the active site. PMID:10080917

  4. Pancreatic stellate cells support tumour metabolism through autophagic alanine secretion.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cristovão M; Biancur, Douglas E; Wang, Xiaoxu; Halbrook, Christopher J; Sherman, Mara H; Zhang, Li; Kremer, Daniel; Hwang, Rosa F; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Ying, Haoqiang; Asara, John M; Evans, Ronald M; Cantley, Lewis C; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Kimmelman, Alec C

    2016-08-25

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive disease characterized by an intense fibrotic stromal response and deregulated metabolism. The role of the stroma in PDAC biology is complex and it has been shown to play critical roles that differ depending on the biological context. The stromal reaction also impairs the vasculature, leading to a highly hypoxic, nutrient-poor environment. As such, these tumours must alter how they capture and use nutrients to support their metabolic needs. Here we show that stroma-associated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are critical for PDAC metabolism through the secretion of non-essential amino acids (NEAA). Specifically, we uncover a previously undescribed role for alanine, which outcompetes glucose and glutamine-derived carbon in PDAC to fuel the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and thus NEAA and lipid biosynthesis. This shift in fuel source decreases the tumour’s dependence on glucose and serum-derived nutrients, which are limited in the pancreatic tumour microenvironment. Moreover, we demonstrate that alanine secretion by PSCs is dependent on PSC autophagy, a process that is stimulated by cancer cells. Thus, our results demonstrate a novel metabolic interaction between PSCs and cancer cells, in which PSC-derived alanine acts as an alternative carbon source. This finding highlights a previously unappreciated metabolic network within pancreatic tumours in which diverse fuel sources are used to promote growth in an austere tumour microenvironment. PMID:27509858

  5. Substrate Specificity of the Aspartate:Alanine Antiporter (AspT) of Tetragenococcus halophilus in Reconstituted Liposomes*

    PubMed Central

    Sasahara, Ayako; Nanatani, Kei; Enomoto, Masaru; Kuwahara, Shigefumi; Abe, Keietsu

    2011-01-01

    The aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of the lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus is a member of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAEx) transporter family. T. halophilus AspT catalyzes the electrogenic exchange of l-aspartate1− with l-alanine0. Although physiological functions of AspT were well studied, l-aspartate1−:l-alanine0 antiport mechanisms are still unsolved. Here we report that the binding sites of l-aspartate and l-alanine are independently present in AspT by means of the kinetic studies. We purified His6-tagged T. halophilus AspT and characterized its kinetic properties when reconstituted in liposomes (Km = 0.35 ± 0.03 mm for l-aspartate, Km = 0.098 ± 0 mm for d-aspartate, Km = 26 ± 2 mm for l-alanine, Km = 3.3 ± 0.2 mm for d-alanine). Competitive inhibition by various amino acids of l-aspartate or l-alanine in self-exchange reactions revealed that l-cysteine selectively inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange but only weakly inhibited l-alanine self-exchange. Additionally, l-serine selectively inhibited l-alanine self-exchange but barely inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange. The aspartate analogs l-cysteine sulfinic acid, l-cysteic acid, and d-cysteic acid competitively and strongly inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange compared with l-alanine self-exchange. Taken together, these kinetic data suggest that the putative binding sites of l-aspartate and l-alanine are independently located in the substrate translocation pathway of AspT. PMID:21719707

  6. Substrate specificity of the aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of Tetragenococcus halophilus in reconstituted liposomes.

    PubMed

    Sasahara, Ayako; Nanatani, Kei; Enomoto, Masaru; Kuwahara, Shigefumi; Abe, Keietsu

    2011-08-19

    The aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of the lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus is a member of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAEx) transporter family. T. halophilus AspT catalyzes the electrogenic exchange of L-aspartate(1-) with L-alanine(0). Although physiological functions of AspT were well studied, L-aspartate(1-):L-alanine(0) antiport mechanisms are still unsolved. Here we report that the binding sites of L-aspartate and L-alanine are independently present in AspT by means of the kinetic studies. We purified His(6)-tagged T. halophilus AspT and characterized its kinetic properties when reconstituted in liposomes (K(m) = 0.35 ± 0.03 mm for L-aspartate, K(m) = 0.098 ± 0 mm for D-aspartate, K(m) = 26 ± 2 mm for L-alanine, K(m) = 3.3 ± 0.2 mm for D-alanine). Competitive inhibition by various amino acids of L-aspartate or L-alanine in self-exchange reactions revealed that L-cysteine selectively inhibited L-aspartate self-exchange but only weakly inhibited L-alanine self-exchange. Additionally, L-serine selectively inhibited L-alanine self-exchange but barely inhibited L-aspartate self-exchange. The aspartate analogs L-cysteine sulfinic acid, L-cysteic acid, and D-cysteic acid competitively and strongly inhibited L-aspartate self-exchange compared with L-alanine self-exchange. Taken together, these kinetic data suggest that the putative binding sites of L-aspartate and L-alanine are independently located in the substrate translocation pathway of AspT. PMID:21719707

  7. Functional Characterization of Alanine Racemase from Schizosaccharomyces pombe: a Eucaryotic Counterpart to Bacterial Alanine Racemase

    PubMed Central

    Uo, Takuma; Yoshimura, Tohru; Tanaka, Naotaka; Takegawa, Kaoru; Esaki, Nobuyoshi

    2001-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe has an open reading frame, which we named alr1+, encoding a putative protein similar to bacterial alanine racemase. We cloned the alr1+ gene in Escherichia coli and purified the gene product (Alr1p), with an Mr of 41,590, to homogeneity. Alr1p contains pyridoxal 5′-phosphate as a coenzyme and catalyzes the racemization of alanine with apparent Km and Vmax values as follows: for l-alanine, 5.0 mM and 670 μmol/min/mg, respectively, and for d-alanine, 2.4 mM and 350 μmol/min/mg, respectively. The enzyme is almost specific to alanine, but l-serine and l-2-aminobutyrate are racemized slowly at rates 3.7 and 0.37% of that of l-alanine, respectively. S. pombe uses d-alanine as a sole nitrogen source, but deletion of the alr1+ gene resulted in retarded growth on the same medium. This indicates that S. pombe has catabolic pathways for both enantiomers of alanine and that the pathway for l-alanine coupled with racemization plays a major role in the catabolism of d-alanine. Saccharomyces cerevisiae differs markedly from S. pombe: S. cerevisiae uses l-alanine but not d-alanine as a sole nitrogen source. Moreover, d-alanine is toxic to S. cerevisiae. However, heterologous expression of the alr1+ gene enabled S. cerevisiae to grow efficiently on d-alanine as a sole nitrogen source. The recombinant yeast was relieved from the toxicity of d-alanine. PMID:11244061

  8. Amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . Amino acids and proteins are the building blocks of life. When proteins are digested or broken down, amino acids are left. The human body uses amino acids ...

  9. Radiolysis of alanine adsorbed in a clay mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Ovando, Ellen Y.; Negrón-Mendoza, Alicia

    2013-07-01

    Optical activity in molecules is a chemical characteristic of living beings. In this work, we examine the hypothesis of the influence of different mineral surfaces on the development of a specific chirality in organic molecules when subjected to conditions simulating the primitive Earth during the period of chemical evolution. By using X-ray diffraction techniques and HPLC/ELSD to analyze aqueous suspensions of amino acids adsorbed on minerals irradiated in different doses with a cobalt-60 gamma source, the experiments attempt to prove the hypothesis that some solid surfaces (like clays and meteorite rocks) may have a concentration capacity and protective role against external sources of ionizing radiation (specifically γ-ray) for some organic compounds (like some amino acids) adsorbed on them. Preliminary results show a slight difference in the adsorption and radiolysis of the D-and L-alanine.

  10. Radiolysis of alanine adsorbed in a clay mineral

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Ovando, Ellen Y.; Negron-Mendoza, Alicia

    2013-07-03

    Optical activity in molecules is a chemical characteristic of living beings. In this work, we examine the hypothesis of the influence of different mineral surfaces on the development of a specific chirality in organic molecules when subjected to conditions simulating the primitive Earth during the period of chemical evolution. By using X-ray diffraction techniques and HPLC/ELSD to analyze aqueous suspensions of amino acids adsorbed on minerals irradiated in different doses with a cobalt-60 gamma source, the experiments attempt to prove the hypothesis that some solid surfaces (like clays and meteorite rocks) may have a concentration capacity and protective role against external sources of ionizing radiation (specifically {gamma}-ray) for some organic compounds (like some amino acids) adsorbed on them. Preliminary results show a slight difference in the adsorption and radiolysis of the D-and L-alanine.

  11. Nonprotein Amino Acids from Spark Discharges and Their Comparison with the Murchison Meteorite Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Wolman, Yecheskel; Haverland, William J.; Miller, Stanley L.

    1972-01-01

    All the nonprotein amino acids found in the Murchison meteorite are products of the action of electric discharge on a mixture of methane, nitrogen, and water with traces of ammonia. These amino acids include α-amino-n-butyric acid, α-aminoisobutyric acid, norvaline, isovaline, pipecolic acid, β-alanine, β-amino-n-butyric acid, β-aminoisobutyric acid, γ-aminobutyric acid, sarcosine, N-ethylglycine, and N-methylalanine. In addition, norleucine, alloisoleucine, N-propylglycine, N-isopropylglycine, N-methyl-β-alanine, N-ethyl-β-alanine α,β-diaminopropionic acid, isoserine, α,γ-diaminobutyric acid, and α-hydroxy-γ-aminobutyric acid are produced by the electric discharge, but have not been found in the meteorite. PMID:16591973

  12. Nonprotein amino acids from spark discharges and their comparison with the murchison meteorite amino acids.

    PubMed

    Wolman, Y; Haverland, W J; Miller, S L

    1972-04-01

    All the nonprotein amino acids found in the Murchison meteorite are products of the action of electric discharge on a mixture of methane, nitrogen, and water with traces of ammonia. These amino acids include alpha-amino-n-butyric acid, alpha-aminoisobutyric acid, norvaline, isovaline, pipecolic acid, beta-alanine, beta-amino-n-butyric acid, beta-aminoisobutyric acid, gamma-aminobutyric acid, sarcosine, N-ethylglycine, and N-methylalanine. In addition, norleucine, alloisoleucine, N-propylglycine, N-isopropylglycine, N-methyl-beta-alanine, N-ethyl-beta-alanine alpha,beta-diaminopropionic acid, isoserine, alpha,gamma-diaminobutyric acid, and alpha-hydroxy-gamma-aminobutyric acid are produced by the electric discharge, but have not been found in the meteorite. PMID:16591973

  13. Nonprotein Amino Acids in the Murchison Meteorite

    PubMed Central

    Kvenvolden, Keith A.; Lawless, James G.; Ponnamperuma, Cyril

    1971-01-01

    Twelve nonprotein amino acids appear to be present in the Murchison meteorite. The identity of eight of them has been conclusively established as N-methylglycine, β-alanine, 2-methylalanine, α-amino-n-butyric acid, β-amino-n-butyric acid, γ-amino-n-butyric acid, isovaline, and pipecolic acid. Tentative evidence is presented for the presence of N-methylalanine, N-ethylglycine, β-aminoisobutyric acid, and norvaline. These amino acids appear to be extraterrestrial in origin and may provide new evidence for the hypothesis of chemical evolution. PMID:16591908

  14. Effects of high-salinity seawater acclimation on the levels of D-alanine in the muscle and hepatopancreas of kuruma prawn, Marsupenaeus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Naoko; Yokoyama, Masahumi

    2015-12-10

    Changes in D- and L-alanine contents were determined in the muscle and hepatopancreas of kuruma prawn Marsupenaeus japonicus, during acclimation from seawater containing 100% salinity to artificial seawater containing 150% salinity. In the hepatopancreas, contents of both amino acids increased by approximately threefold. The activity of alanine racemase, which catalyzes the interconversion of D- and L-alanine, also increased in the high-salinity seawater. In addition, the expression of the gene encoding alanine racemase increased in the hepatopancreas with an increase in the alanine racemase activity. These data indicate that the biosynthesis of D- and L-alanine is controlled by the gene expression level of alanine racemase, and D-alanine in the hepatopancreas functions as a major osmolyte for isosmotic regulation. In contrast, the content of D-alanine and alanine racemase activity did not change in the muscle during hyper-osmotic acclimation. Therefore, we suggest that D-alanine, which exists in the several tissues of M. japonicus, is considered to be utilized in some different physiological phenomena in different tissues. PMID:26025417

  15. Ultraviolet radiation induces stress in etiolated Landoltia punctata, as evidenced by the presence of alanine, a universal stress signal: a ¹⁵N NMR study.

    PubMed

    Monselise, E B-I; Levkovitz, A; Kost, D

    2015-01-01

    Analysis with (15) N NMR revealed that alanine, a universal cellular stress signal, accumulates in etiolated duckweed plants exposed to 15-min pulsed UV light, but not in the absence of UV irradiation. The addition of 10 mm vitamin C, a radical scavenger, reduced alanine levels to zero, indicating the involvement of free radicals. Free D-alanine was detected in (15) N NMR analysis of the chiral amino acid content, using D-tartaric acid as solvent. The accumulation of D-alanine under stress conditions presents a new perspective on the biochemical processes taking place in prokaryote and eukaryote cells. PMID:24889211

  16. Survivability and reactivity of glycine and alanine in early oceans: effects of meteorite impacts.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Yuhei; Fukunaga, Nao; Sekine, Toshimori; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kakegawa, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Takamichi; Nakazawa, Hiromoto

    2016-01-01

    Prebiotic oceans might have contained abundant amino acids, and were subjected to meteorite impacts, especially during the late heavy bombardment. It is so far unknown how meteorite impacts affected amino acids in the early oceans. Impact experiments were performed under the conditions where glycine was synthesized from carbon, ammonia, and water, using aqueous solutions containing (13)C-labeled glycine and alanine. Selected amino acids and amines in samples were analyzed with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS). In particular, the (13)C-labeled reaction products were analyzed to distinguish between run products and contaminants. The results revealed that both amino acids survived partially in the early ocean through meteorite impacts, that part of glycine changed into alanine, and that large amounts of methylamine and ethylamine were formed. Fast decarboxylation was confirmed to occur during such impact processes. Furthermore, the formation of n-butylamine, detected only in the samples recovered from the solutions with additional nitrogen and carbon sources of ammonia and benzene, suggests that chemical reactions to form new biomolecules can proceed through marine impacts. Methylamine and ethylamine from glycine and alanine increased considerably in the presence of hematite rather than olivine under similar impact conditions. These results also suggest that amino acids present in early oceans can contribute further to impact-induced reactions, implying that impact energy plays a potential role in the prebiotic formation of various biomolecules, although the reactions are complicated and depend upon the chemical environments as well. PMID:26369758

  17. Repeated Supramaximal Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress: Effect of β-Alanine Plus Creatine Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Belviranli, Muaz; Okudan, Nilsel; Revan, Serkan; Balci, Serdar; Gokbel, Hakki

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carnosine is a dipeptide formed from the β-alanine and histidine amino acids and found in mainly in the brain and muscle, especially fast twitch muscle. Carnosine and creatine has an antioxidant effect and carnosine accounts for about 10% of the muscle's ability to buffer the H+ ions produced by exercise. Objectives: The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of beta alanine and/or creatine supplementation on oxidant and antioxidant status during repeated Wingate tests (WTs). Patients and Methods: Forty four sedentary males participated in the study. Participants performed three 30s WTs with 2 minutes rest between exercise bouts. After the first exercise session, the subjects were assigned to one of four groups: Placebo, Creatine, Beta-alanine and Beta-alanine plus creatine. Participants ingested twice per day for 22 consecutive days, then four times per day for the following 6 days. After the supplementation period the second exercise session was applied. Blood samples were taken before and immediately after the each exercise session for the analysis of oxidative stress and antioxidant markers. Results: Malondialdehyde levels and superoxide dismutase activities were affected by neither supplementation nor exercise. During the pre-supplementation session, protein carbonyl reduced and oxidized glutathione (GSH and GSSG) levels increased immediately after the exercise. However, during the post-supplementation session GSH and GSSG levels increased in beta-alanine and beta-alanine plus creatine groups immediately after the exercise compared to pre-exercise. In addition, during the post-supplementation session total antioxidant capacity increased in beta-alanine group immediately after the exercise. Conclusions: Beta-alanine supplementation has limited antioxidant effect during the repeated WTs. PMID:27217925

  18. Anaerobic Accumulation of γ-Aminobutyric Acid and Alanine in Radish Leaves (Raphanus sativus, L.)

    PubMed Central

    Streeter, John G.; Thompson, John F.

    1972-01-01

    In leaves, the anaerobic accumulation of alanine was accompanied by a loss of aspartate, and these changes preceded γ-aminobutyrate accumulation and glutamate loss. Changes in keto acid content did not appear to be the cause of amino acid changes. Accumulation of γ-aminobutyrate was due to acceleration of glutamate decarboxylation and arrest of γ-aminobutyrate transamination. Changes in enzyme content did not explain the changes in reaction rates in vivo. Most of the aspartate may be converted anaerobically to alanine via oxalacetate and pyruvate. PMID:16658004

  19. Prebiotic Amino Acid Thioester Synthesis: Thiol-Dependent Amino Acid Synthesis from Formose substrates (Formaldehyde and Glycolaldehyde) and Ammonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1998-01-01

    Formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde (substrates of the formose autocatalytic cycle) were shown to react with ammonia yielding alanine and homoserine under mild aqueous conditions in the presence of thiol catalysts. Since similar reactions carried out without ammonia yielded alpha-hydroxy acid thioesters, the thiol-dependent synthesis of alanine and homoserine is presumed to occur via amino acid thioesters-intermediates capable of forming peptides. A pH 5.2 solution of 20 mM formaldehyde, 20 mM glycolaldehyde, 20 mM ammonium chloride, 23 mM 3-mercaptopropionic acid, and 23 mM acetic acid that reacted for 35 days at 40 C yielded (based on initial formaldehyde) 1.8% alanine and 0.08% homoserine. In the absence of thiol catalyst, the synthesis of alanine and homoserine was negligible. Alanine synthesis required both formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde, but homoserine synthesis required only glycolaldehyde. At 25 days the efficiency of alanine synthesis calculated from the ratio of alanine synthesized to formaldehyde reacted was 2.1%, and the yield (based on initial formaldehyde) of triose and tetrose intermediates involved in alanine and homoserine synthesis was 0.3 and 2.1%, respectively. Alanine synthesis was also seen in similar reactions containing only 10 mM each of aldehyde substrates, ammonia, and thiol. The prebiotic significance of these reactions that use the formose reaction to generate sugar intermediates that are converted to reactive amino acid thioesters is discussed.

  20. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in Orgueil and Ivuna: Tracing the Parent Body of CI Type Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael (Technical Monitor); Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Glavin, Daniel P.; Bota, Oliver; Cooper, George; Bada, Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    Amino acid analyses using HPLC of pristine interior pieces of the CI carbonaceous chondrites Orgueil and Ivuna have found that beta-alanine, glycine, and gamma-amino-n-butyric acid (ABA) are the most abundant amino acids in these two meteorites, with concentrations ranging from approx. 600 to 2,000 parts per billion (ppb). Other alpha-amino acids such as alanine, alpha-ABA, alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), and isovaline are present only in trace amounts (less than 200 ppb). Carbon isotopic measurements of beta-alanine and glycine and the presence of racemic (D/L 1) alanine and beta-ABA in Orgueil suggest that these amino acids are extraterrestrial in origin. In comparison to the CM carbonaceous chondrites Murchison and Murray, the amino acid composition of the CIs is strikingly distinct, suggesting that these meteorites came from a different type of parent body, possibly an extinct comet, than did the CM carbonaceous chondrites.

  1. Enantiomeric Excesses of Acid Labile Amino Acid Precursors of the Murchison Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzarello, Sandra

    1998-01-01

    Amino acids present in carbonaceous chondrite are extracted in water in part as free compounds and in approximately equal part as acid labile precursors. On the assumption that they would be free of contamination, the precursors of two Murchison amino acids that have terrestrial occurrence, alanine and glutamic acid, have been targeted for analysis of their enantiomeric ratios. Pyroglutamic acid, the precursor of glutamic acid, was found with an L-enantiomeric excess comparable to that of the free acid, while alanine's precursor, N-acetyl alanine, appears approximately racemic. Also alpha-imino propioacetic acid, a proposed end product of alanine synthesis in the meteorite, was analyzed and found racemic.

  2. Stereochemistry of amino acids in surface samples of a marine sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollock, G.E.; Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1978-01-01

    In two surface samples of marine sediment, the percentages of d-alanine and d-aspartic acid are significantly higher than the other d-amino acids and are similar to the range found in soils. The percentage of d-glutamic acid is also higher than the other amino acids but less than d-alanine and d-aspartic acid. These d-amino acids may come mainly from bacteria. ?? 1978.

  3. Exogenous amino acids as fuel in shock.

    PubMed

    Daniel, A M; Kapadia, B; MacLean, L D

    1982-01-01

    It has been suggested that in shock branched-chain amino acids are preferentially oxidized resulting in continued proteolysis and stimulated gluconeogenesis. To determine if exogenous amino acids could be used as fuel in shock, dogs rendered hypotensive by controlled cardiac tamponade and normotensive controls were infused with amino acid mixtures and individual amino acids. When Nephramine, a mixture rich in branched-chain amino acids, was infused, plasma alpha-amino nitrogen levels rose but urea output did not increase in either the control state or in shock, suggesting that these amino acids were not rapidly deaminated to serve as fuels. Travasol, which in addition contained large amounts of alanine and glycine, tripled urea output in the controls and doubled it in shock. The limit of urea production was reached in both groups at 35 mumoles urea/minute/kg. In the Travasol-infused animals plasma alpha-amino nitrogen levels were maintained in normotension but rose sharply in shock. When glycine alone was infused into five dogs in shock urea production rate was 30.6 + 2.1 mumoles/minute/kg; with alanine the same value was 22.5 + 2.2 mumoles/minute/kg. In both cases plasma alpha-amino nitrogen levels were high, suggesting that transport of these amino acids into the cell was slow in shock. In four dogs in shock glycine-14C was added to the glycine infusate as a tracer. At radioactive equilibrium 28% of the label infused appeared in CO2; another 22% appeared in glucose. It is concluded that of all the amino acids tested only glycine and alanine are deaminated rapidly enough to serve as exogenous fuels in shock. PMID:6814205

  4. The effect of immunonutrition (glutamine, alanine) on fracture healing

    PubMed Central

    Küçükalp, Abdullah; Durak, Kemal; Bayyurt, Sarp; Sönmez, Gürsel; Bilgen, Muhammed S.

    2014-01-01

    Background There have been various studies related to fracture healing. Glutamine is an amino acid with an important role in many cell and organ functions. This study aimed to make a clinical, radiological, and histopathological evaluation of the effects of glutamine on fracture healing. Methods Twenty rabbits were randomly allocated into two groups of control and immunonutrition. A fracture of the fibula was made to the right hind leg. All rabbits received standard food and water. From post-operative first day for 30 days, the study group received an additional 2 ml/kg/day 20% L-alanine L-glutamine solution via a gastric catheter, and the control group received 2 ml/kg/day isotonic via gastric catheter. At the end of 30 days, the rabbits were sacrificed and the fractures were examined clinically, radiologically, and histopathologically in respect to the degree of union. Results Radiological evaluation of the control group determined a mean score of 2.5 according to the orthopaedists and 2.65 according to the radiologists. In the clinical evaluation, the mean score was 1.875 for the control group and 2.0 for the study group. Histopathological evaluation determined a mean score of 8.5 for the control group and 9.0 for the study group. Conclusion One month after orally administered glutamine–alanine, positive effects were observed on fracture healing radiologically, clinically, and histopathologically, although no statistically significant difference was determined.

  5. Exchange interactions and magnetic dimension in Cu(L-alanine)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, R.; Passeggi, M. C. G.; Novak, M. A.; Symko, O. G.; Oseroff, S. B.; Nascimento, O. R.; Terrile, M. C.

    1991-01-01

    A study of the magnetic properties of the copper (II) complex of the amino acid l-alanine [Cu(l-alanine)2] is reported. The susceptibility of a powder sample has been measured between 0.013 and 240 K. A linear-spin-chain model with antiferromagnetic exchange coupling J=-0.52 K fits well the susceptibility data above 0.3 K. Room-temperature electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of single crystals of Cu(l-alanine)2 at 9 and 35 GHz show a single, exchange-narrowed resonance. The g tensor, with principal values g1=2.0554+/-0.0005, g2=2.1064+/-0.0005, and g3=2.2056+/-0.0005, reflects the crystal structure of Cu(l-alanine)2 and the electronic properties of the copper ions. The observed angular variation of the linewidth is attributed to the magnetic interactions, narrowed by the exchange coupling between copper ions, and shows a contribution characteristic of the dipole-dipole interaction in a spin system with a predominant two-dimensional spin dynamics. Considering the exchange-collapsed resonance corresponding to the two lattice sites for copper in Cu(l-alanine)2, we evaluate an exchange constant ||J(AB1)||=0.47 K between nonequivalent copper neighbors in a spin chain, similar to the value obtained from the susceptibility data. The one-dimensional magnetic behavior suggested by the susceptibility data in Cu(l-alanine)2, where the metal ions are distributed in layers, is explained by proposing that carboxylate bridges provide electronic paths for superexchange interactions between coppers. Considering the characteristics of the molecular structure of Cu(l-alanine)2, the layers seem to be magnetically split off into one-dimensional zigzag ribbons. The apparent disagreement between the one-dimensional behavior suggested by the susceptibility data and the two-dimensional behavior of the spin dynamics suggested by the EPR linewidth is analyzed.

  6. Isolation and characterization of cytosolic alanine aminotransferase isoforms from starved rat liver.

    PubMed

    Vedavathi, M; Girish, K S; Kumar, M Karuna

    2004-12-01

    Alanine is the most effective precursor for gluconeogenesis among amino acids and the initial reaction is catalyzed by alanine aminotransferases (AlaATs). It is a less extensively studied enzyme under starvation and known to that the enzyme activity increases in liver under starvation. The present study describes the purification and characterization of two isoforms of alanine aminotransferases from starved male rat liver under starvation. The molecular mass of isoforms was found to be 17.7 and 112.2 kDa with isoelectric points of 4.2 and 5.3 respectively for AlaAT I and AlaAT II. Both the enzymes showed narrow substrate specificity for L-alanine with different Km for alanine and 2-oxoglutarate. Both the enzymes were glycoprotein in nature. Inhibition, modification and spectroscopic studies showed that both PLP and free-SH groups are directly involved in the enzymatic catalysis. PLP activated both the enzymes with a Km 0.057 mM and 0.2 mM for AlaAT I and II respectively. PMID:15663181

  7. Combination of amino acids reduces pigmentation in B16F0 melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Masago; Kawase, Ichiro; Ishii, Fumio

    2007-04-01

    Amino acids, the building blocks of proteins, play significant roles in numerous physiological events in mammals. As the effects of amino acids on melanogenesis have yet to be demonstrated, the present study was conducted to identify whether amino acids, in particular alanine, glycine, isoleucine and leucine, influence melanogenesis in B16F0 melanoma cells. Glycine and L-isoleucine, but not D-isoleucine, reduced melanogenesis in a concentration-dependent manner without any morphological changes in B16F0 melanoma cells. L-Alanine and L-leucine, but not D-alanine and D-leucine, also reduced melanogenesis without any morphological changes in B16F0 melanoma cells. However these amino acids did not show a concentration-dependency. Combination of L-alanine and the other amino acids, particularly 4 amino acids combination, had an additive effect on the inhibition of melanogenesis compared with single treatment of L-alanine. None of the amino acids affected the activity of tyrosinase, a key enzyme in melanogenesis. These results suggest that L-alanine, glycine, L-isoleucine and L-leucine, but not the D-form amino acids, have a hypopigmenting effect in B16F0 melanoma cells, and that these effects are not due to the inhibition of tyrosinase activity. Combination of these 4 amino acids had the additive effect on hypopigmentation that was as similar as that of kojic acid. PMID:17409501

  8. Determination of muscle protein synthesis rates in fish using (2)H2O and (2)H NMR analysis of alanine.

    PubMed

    Marques, Cátia; Viegas, Filipa; Rito, João; Jones, John; Viegas, Ivan

    2016-09-15

    Following administration of deuterated water ((2)H2O), the fractional synthetic rate (FSR) of a given endogenous protein can be estimated by (2)H-enrichment quantification of its alanine residues. Currently, this is measured by mass spectrometry following a derivatization procedure. Muscle FSR was measured by (1)H/(2)H NMR analysis of alanine from seabass kept for 6 days in 5% (2)H-enriched saltwater, following acid hydrolysis and amino acid isolation by cation-exchange chromatography of muscle tissue. The analysis is simple and robust, and provides precise measurements of excess alanine (2)H-enrichment in the 0.1-0.4% range from 50 mmol of alanine recovered from muscle protein. PMID:27418547

  9. Amino Acid Racemization in Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    PubMed Central

    Radkov, Atanas D.

    2013-01-01

    d-Amino acids have been shown to play an increasingly diverse role in bacterial physiology, yet much remains to be learned about their synthesis and catabolism. Here we used the model soil- and rhizosphere-dwelling organism Pseudomonas putida KT2440 to elaborate on the genomics and enzymology of d-amino acid metabolism. P. putida KT2440 catabolized the d-stereoisomers of lysine, phenylalanine, arginine, alanine, and hydroxyproline as the sole carbon and nitrogen sources. With the exception of phenylalanine, each of these amino acids was racemized by P. putida KT2440 enzymes. Three amino acid racemases were identified from a genomic screen, and the enzymes were further characterized in vitro. The putative biosynthetic alanine racemase Alr showed broad substrate specificity, exhibiting measurable racemase activity with 9 of the 19 chiral amino acids. Among these amino acids, activity was the highest with lysine, and the kcat/Km values with l- and d-lysine were 3 orders of magnitude greater than the kcat/Km values with l- and d-alanine. Conversely, the putative catabolic alanine racemase DadX showed narrow substrate specificity, clearly preferring only the alanine stereoisomers as the substrates. However, DadX did show 6- and 9-fold higher kcat/Km values than Alr with l- and d-alanine, respectively. The annotated proline racemase ProR of P. putida KT2440 showed negligible activity with either stereoisomer of the 19 chiral amino acids but exhibited strong epimerization activity with hydroxyproline as the substrate. Comparative genomic analysis revealed differences among pseudomonads with respect to alanine racemase genes that may point to different roles for these genes among closely related species. PMID:23995642

  10. Blood Test: Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... may signal a decrease in kidney function. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) , alanine amino transferase (ALT) , aspartate amino transferase (AST) , and bilirubin ; ALP, ALT, and AST are liver enzymes; bilirubin is produced by the liver. Elevated concentrations ...

  11. Kinetics of amino acids equilibration in the dialysate during CAPD.

    PubMed

    De Santo, N G; Capodicasa, G; Di Leo, V A; Di Serafino, A; Cirillo, D; Esposito, R; Fiore, R; Cucciniello, E; Damiano, M; Buonadonna, L; Di Iorio, R; Capasso, G; Giordano, C

    1981-01-01

    The equilibrium between plasma and peritoneal dialysis fluid has been studies for 23 amino acids during peritoneal exchanges at dwell times up to 8 hours in patients on CAPD. It is demonstrated that equilibration is a particular process typical for each amino acid which after 8 hour is nearly complete only for Glycine, Alanine and Asparagine. PMID:7216530

  12. Inactivation of 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)alanine decarboxylase by 2-(fluoromethyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)alanine.

    PubMed

    Maycock, A L; Aster, S D; Patchett, A A

    1980-02-19

    2-(Fluoromethyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)alanine [alpha-FM-Dopa (I)] causes rapid, time-dependent, stereospecific, and irreversible inhibition of hog kidney aromatic amino acid (Dopa) decarboxylase. The inactivation occurs with loss of both the carboxyl carbon and fluoride from I and results in the stoichimetric formation of a covalent enzyme-inhibitor adduct. The data are consistent with I being a suicide inactivator of the enzyme, and a plausible mechanism for the inactivation process is presented. The inactivation is highly efficient in that there is essentially no enzymatic turnover of I to produce the corresponding amine, 1-(fluoromethyl)-2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)ethylamine [alpha-FM-dopamine (II)]. Amine II is also a potent inactivator of the enzyme. In vivo compound I is found to inactivate both brain and peripheral (liver) Dopa decarboxylase activity. The possible significance of these data with respect to the known antihypertensive effect of I is discussed. PMID:7356954

  13. Contribution of proteolysis and de novo synthesis to alanine production in diabetic rat skeletal muscle: a 15N/1H nuclear magnetic resonance study.

    PubMed

    Meynial-Denis, D; Chavaroux, A; Foucat, L; Mignon, M; Prugnaud, J; Bayle, G; Renou, J P; Arnal, M

    1997-10-01

    To assess the role of leucine as a precursor of alanine alpha-amino nitrogen in skeletal muscle during diabetes, extensor digitorum longus muscles from control (n = 7 experiments) and streptozotocin-diabetic rats (n = 8 experiments) were isolated and superfused with [15N]leucine (3 mmol/l) in the presence of glucose (10 mmol/l) for 2 h. Muscle perchloric acid extraction was performed at the end of superfusion in order to quantify newly synthesized alanine by 15N/1H nuclear magnetic resonance. Release of [15N]alanine in the superfusion medium was also measured. The pool of newly synthesized [15N]alanine was significantly increased (approximately 40%) in extensor digitorum longus muscles from streptozotocin-diabetic rats. Whereas a significant enhancement of total alanine release from muscle was induced by diabetes (20%), only a slight increase in [15N]alanine release was detectable under our experimental conditions. Consequently, we conclude that streptozotocin-diabetes in growing rats induces in skeletal muscle: 1) an increase in nitrogen exchange between leucine and alanine leading to newly synthesized [15N]alanine; and 2) an increase of total alanine release from muscle originating from both proteolysis and de novo synthesis. PMID:9349596

  14. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  15. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  16. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  17. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  18. Amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002222.htm Amino acids To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . ...

  19. Glycolysis and the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Are Linked by Alanine Aminotransferase during Hypoxia Induced by Waterlogging of Lotus japonicus1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Marcio; Licausi, Francesco; Araújo, Wagner L.; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Sodek, Ladaslav; Fernie, Alisdair R.; van Dongen, Joost T.

    2010-01-01

    The role of nitrogen metabolism in the survival of prolonged periods of waterlogging was investigated in highly flood-tolerant, nodulated Lotus japonicus plants. Alanine production revealed to be a critical hypoxic pathway. Alanine is the only amino acid whose biosynthesis is not inhibited by nitrogen deficiency resulting from RNA interference silencing of nodular leghemoglobin. The metabolic changes that were induced following waterlogging can be best explained by the activation of alanine metabolism in combination with the modular operation of a split tricarboxylic acid pathway. The sum result of this metabolic scenario is the accumulation of alanine and succinate and the production of extra ATP under hypoxia. The importance of alanine metabolism is discussed with respect to its ability to regulate the level of pyruvate, and this and all other changes are discussed in the context of current models concerning the regulation of plant metabolism. PMID:20089769

  20. DeltapH-Dependent Amino Acid Transport into Plasma Membrane Vesicles Isolated from Sugar Beet (Beta vulgaris L.) Leaves: II. Evidence for Multiple Aliphatic, Neutral Amino Acid Symports.

    PubMed

    Li, Z C; Bush, D R

    1991-08-01

    Proton-coupled aliphatic, neutral amino acid transport was investigated in plasma membrane vesicles isolated from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L., cv Great Western) leaves. Two neutral amino acid symport systems were resolved based on inter-amino acid transport competition and on large variations in the specific activity of each porter in different species. Competitive inhibition was observed for transport competition between alanine, methionine, glutamine, and leucine (the alanine group) and between isoleucine, valine, and threonine (the isoleucine group). The apparent K(m) and K(i) values were similar for transport competition among amino acids within the alanine group. In contrast, the kinetics of transport competition between these two groups of amino acids did not fit a simple competitive model. Furthermore, members of the isoleucine group were weak transport antagonists of the alanine group. These results are consistent with two independent neutral amino acid porters. In support of that conclusion, the ratio of the specific activity of alanine transport versus isoleucine transport varied from two- to 13-fold in plasma membrane vesicles isolated from different plant species. This ratio would be expected to remain relatively stable if these amino acids were moving through a single transport system and, indeed, the ratio of alanine to glutamine transport varied less than twofold. Analysis of the predicted structure of the aliphatic, neutral amino acids in solution shows that isoleucine, valine, and threonine contain a branched methyl or hydroxyl group at the beta-carbon position that places a dense electron cloud close to the alpha-amino group. This does not occur for the unbranched amino acids or those that branch further away, e.g. leucine. We hypothesize that this structural feature of isoleucine, valine, and threonine results in unfavorable steric interactions with the alanine transport system that limits their flux through this porter. Hydrophobicity and

  1. Persistent GABAA/C responses to gabazine, taurine and beta-alanine in rat hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Chesnoy-Marchais, D

    2016-08-25

    In hypoglossal motoneurons, a sustained anionic current, sensitive to a blocker of ρ-containing GABA receptors, (1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl)methylphosphinic acid (TPMPA) and insensitive to bicuculline, was previously shown to be activated by gabazine. In order to better characterize the receptors involved, the sensitivity of this atypical response to pentobarbital (30μM), allopregnanolone (0.3μM) and midazolam (0.5μM) was first investigated. Pentobarbital potentiated the response, whereas the steroid and the benzodiazepine were ineffective. The results indicate the involvement of hybrid heteromeric receptors, including at least a GABA receptor ρ subunit and a γ subunit, accounting for the pentobarbital-sensitivity. The effects of the endogenous β amino acids, taurine and β-alanine, which are released under various pathological conditions and show neuroprotective properties, were then studied. In the presence of the glycine receptor blocker strychnine (1μM), both taurine (0.3-1mM) and β-alanine (0.3mM) activated sustained anionic currents, which were partly blocked by TPMPA (100μM). Thus, both β amino acids activated ρ-containing GABA receptors in hypoglossal motoneurons. Bicuculline (20μM) reduced responses to taurine and β-alanine, but small sustained responses persisted in the presence of both strychnine and bicuculline. Responses to β-alanine were slightly increased by allopregnanolone, indicating a contribution of the bicuculline- and neurosteroid-sensitive GABAA receptors underlying tonic inhibition in these motoneurons. Since sustained activation of anionic channels inhibits most mature principal neurons, the ρ-containing GABA receptors permanently activated by taurine and β-alanine might contribute to some of their neuroprotective properties under damaging overexcitatory situations. PMID:27246441

  2. Amino acids in the Yamato carbonaceous chrondrite from Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimoyama, A.; Ponnamperuma, C.; Yanai, K.

    1979-01-01

    Evidence for the presence of amino acids of extraterrestrial origin in the Antarctic Yamato carbonaceous chrondrite is presented. Hydrolyzed and nonhydrolyzed water-extracted amino acid samples from exterior, middle and interior portions of the meteorite were analyzed by an amino acid analyzer and by gas chromatography of N-TFA-isopropyl amino acid derivatives. Nine protein and six nonprotein amino acids were detected in the meteorite at abundances between 34 and less than one nmole/g, with equal amounts in interior and exterior portions. Nearly equal abundances of the D and L enantiomers of alanine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid were found, indicating the abiotic, therefore extraterrestrial, origin of the amino acids. The Antarctic environment and the uniformity of protein amino acid abundances are discussed as evidence against the racemization of terrestrially acquired amino acids, and similarities between Yamato amino acid compositions and the amino acid compositions of the Murchison and Murray type II carbonaceous chrondrites are indicated.

  3. Response of amino acids in hindlimb muscles to recovery from hypogravity and unloading by tail-cast suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.; Henriksen, E. J.; Jacob, S.; Cook, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    Concentrations of glutamine, glutamate, aspartate (+ asparagine) and alanine were compared in hindlimb muscles of SL-3 and ground control rats. Alanine was lower in the soleus of flown rats but not of suspended animals, with no response in other muscles except a slight increase in the unloaded plantaris. With recovery, alanine in the soleus was elevated. Since no differences in alanine metabolism were found by isolated muscle, changes in muscle alanine are probably due to altered body use of this amino acid leading to varied plasma levels.

  4. Exploration of Sitagliptin as a potential inhibitor for the M1 Alanine aminopeptidase enzyme in Plasmodium falciparum using computational docking

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamoorthy, Mohana; Achary, Anant

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum has limited capacity for de novo amino acid synthesis and rely on degradation of host hemoglobin to maintain protein metabolism and synthesis of proteins. M1 alanine aminopeptidase enzyme of the parasite involved in the terminal degradation of host hemoglobin was subjected to in silico screening with low molecular weight protease inhibitors. The km (avg) of the enzyme M1 alanine aminopeptidase for the substrate DL – Alanine β Napthylamide Hydrochloride was estimated as 322.05µM. The molecular interactions between the enzyme and the substrate and the mechanism of enzyme action were analyzed which paved way for inhibition strategies. Among all the inhibitors screened, Sitagliptin was found to be most potent inhibitor with ki of 0.152 µM in its best orientation whereas the ki(avg) was 2.0055 µM. The ki of Sitagliptin is lower than the km of M1 alanine aminopeptidase for the substrate DL – Alanine β Napthylamide Hydrochloride (322.05 µM) and Ki of the known inhibitor Bestatin. Therefore Sitagliptin may serve as a potent competitive inhibitor of the enzyme M1 alanine aminopeptidase of Plasmodium falciparum. PMID:23559748

  5. Amino acids in the Martian meteorite Nakhla

    PubMed Central

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Brinton, Karen L. F.; McDonald, Gene D.

    1999-01-01

    A suite of protein and nonprotein amino acids were detected with high-performance liquid chromatography in the water- and acid-soluble components of an interior fragment of the Martian meteorite Nakhla, which fell in Egypt in 1911. Aspartic and glutamic acids, glycine, alanine, β-alanine, and γ-amino-n-butyric acid (γ-ABA) were the most abundant amino acids detected and were found primarily in the 6 M HCl-hydrolyzed, hot water extract. The concentrations ranged from 20 to 330 parts per billion of bulk meteorite. The amino acid distribution in Nakhla, including the d/l ratios (values range from <0.1 to 0.5), is similar to what is found in bacterially degraded organic matter. The amino acids in Nakhla appear to be derived from terrestrial organic matter that infiltrated the meteorite soon after its fall to Earth, although it is possible that some of the amino acids are endogenous to the meteorite. The rapid amino acid contamination of Martian meteorites after direct exposure to the terrestrial environment has important implications for Mars sample-return missions and the curation of the samples from the time of their delivery to Earth. PMID:10430856

  6. Amino acids in the Martian meteorite Nakhla

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. L.; Brinton, K. L.; McDonald, G. D.

    1999-01-01

    A suite of protein and nonprotein amino acids were detected with high-performance liquid chromatography in the water- and acid-soluble components of an interior fragment of the Martian meteorite Nakhla, which fell in Egypt in 1911. Aspartic and glutamic acids, glycine, alanine, beta-alanine, and gamma-amino-n-butyric acid (gamma-ABA) were the most abundant amino acids detected and were found primarily in the 6 M HCl-hydrolyzed, hot water extract. The concentrations ranged from 20 to 330 parts per billion of bulk meteorite. The amino acid distribution in Nakhla, including the D/L ratios (values range from <0.1 to 0.5), is similar to what is found in bacterially degraded organic matter. The amino acids in Nakhla appear to be derived from terrestrial organic matter that infiltrated the meteorite soon after its fall to Earth, although it is possible that some of the amino acids are endogenous to the meteorite. The rapid amino acid contamination of Martian meteorites after direct exposure to the terrestrial environment has important implications for Mars sample-return missions and the curation of the samples from the time of their delivery to Earth.

  7. L-alanine uptake in membrane vesicles from Mytilus edulis gills

    SciTech Connect

    Pajor, A.M.; Wright, S.H.

    1986-03-05

    Previous studies have shown that gills from M. edulis can accumulate L-alanine from seawater by a saturable process specific for ..cap alpha..-neutral amino acids. This uptake occurs against chemical gradients in excess of 10/sup 6/ to 1. To further characterize this uptake, membrane vesicles were prepared from M. edulis gill tissue by differential centrifugation. Enrichments of putative enzyme markers (relative to that in combined initial fractions) were as follows: ..gamma..-Glutamyltranspeptidase, 25-30x; Alkaline Phosphatase, 5-6x; K/sup +/-dependent para-Nitrophenyl Phosphatase, 3-5x; Succinate Dehydrogenase 0.1-0.2x. These results suggest that the preparation is enriched in plasma membranes, although histochemical studies will be needed to verify this. The time course of /sup 14/C-L-alanine uptake in the presence of inwardly-directed Na/sup +/ gradient showed a transient overshoot (3-5 fold) at 10 minutes which decreased to equilibrium after six hours. The size of the overshoot and early uptake rates depended on the size of the inwardly-directed Na/sup +/ gradient. No overshoot was seen in the presence of inwardly-directed gradients of LiCl or choline-Cl, or with equilibrium concentrations NaCl or mannitol. A reduced overshoot was seen with a gradient of NaSCN. A small overshoot was seen with an inwardly-directed gradient of KCl. Transport of L-alanine included saturable and diffusive components. Uptake of 6 ..mu..M L-alanine was inhibited more than 80% by 100 ..mu..M ..cap alpha..-zwitterionic amino acids (alanine, leucine, glycine); by 30 to 75% by proline, aspartate and lysine; and less than 20% by a ..beta..-amino acid, taurine. The results of these experiments agree with those from intact gill studies and support the hypothesis that L-alanine is transported into gill epithelial cells by a secondary active transport process involving Na/sup +/.

  8. Protein Homeostasis Defects of Alanine-Glyoxylate Aminotransferase: New Therapeutic Strategies in Primary Hyperoxaluria Type I

    PubMed Central

    Pey, Angel L.; Albert, Armando; Salido, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase catalyzes the transamination between L-alanine and glyoxylate to produce pyruvate and glycine using pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) as cofactor. Human alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase is a peroxisomal enzyme expressed in the hepatocytes, the main site of glyoxylate detoxification. Its deficit causes primary hyperoxaluria type I, a rare but severe inborn error of metabolism. Single amino acid changes are the main type of mutation causing this disease, and considerable effort has been dedicated to the understanding of the molecular consequences of such missense mutations. In this review, we summarize the role of protein homeostasis in the basic mechanisms of primary hyperoxaluria. Intrinsic physicochemical properties of polypeptide chains such as thermodynamic stability, folding, unfolding, and misfolding rates as well as the interaction of different folding states with protein homeostasis networks are essential to understand this disease. The view presented has important implications for the development of new therapeutic strategies based on targeting specific elements of alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase homeostasis. PMID:23956997

  9. AlaScan: A Graphical User Interface for Alanine Scanning Free-Energy Calculations.

    PubMed

    Ramadoss, Vijayaraj; Dehez, François; Chipot, Christophe

    2016-06-27

    Computation of the free-energy changes that underlie molecular recognition and association has gained significant importance due to its considerable potential in drug discovery. The massive increase of computational power in recent years substantiates the application of more accurate theoretical methods for the calculation of binding free energies. The impact of such advances is the application of parent approaches, like computational alanine scanning, to investigate in silico the effect of amino-acid replacement in protein-ligand and protein-protein complexes, or probe the thermostability of individual proteins. Because human effort represents a significant cost that precludes the routine use of this form of free-energy calculations, minimizing manual intervention constitutes a stringent prerequisite for any such systematic computation. With this objective in mind, we propose a new plug-in, referred to as AlaScan, developed within the popular visualization program VMD to automate the major steps in alanine-scanning calculations, employing free-energy perturbation as implemented in the widely used molecular dynamics code NAMD. The AlaScan plug-in can be utilized upstream, to prepare input files for selected alanine mutations. It can also be utilized downstream to perform the analysis of different alanine-scanning calculations and to report the free-energy estimates in a user-friendly graphical user interface, allowing favorable mutations to be identified at a glance. The plug-in also assists the end-user in assessing the reliability of the calculation through rapid visual inspection. PMID:27214306

  10. Translocation of Radioactive Carbon after the Application of 14C-Alanine and 14CO2 to Sunflower Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Chopowick, R. E.; Forward, D. F.

    1974-01-01

    14C-(UL)-l-Alanine was applied to the surface of mature leaves at the second node of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. cv Commander) plants, under illumination. The alanine was absorbed during a 4-hour period, and some of it was metabolized by the absorbing tissue. After a lag period of about 15 minutes from first application, distribution of 14C through the plant proceeded in much the same pattern as when 14CO2 is assimilated by similar leaves. Most, if not all, of the 14C exported from the absorbing regions was in sucrose. Only minute amounts appeared in alanine or other amino acids in surrounding parts of the leaf blade or in the petiole, although these were strongly labeled in the tissue absorbing 14C-alanine. When 14CO2 was supplied for 15 minutes to leaves of different ages, amino acids were lightly labeled in the leaf blade. Mature green leaves exported only sucrose. Yellowing leaves on 60-day-old plants exported a variety of substances including amino acids. PMID:16658645

  11. Probing the leucyl/phenylalanyl tRNA protein transferase active site with tRNA substrate analogues.

    PubMed

    Fung, Angela Wai Shan; Ebhardt, H Alexander; Krishnakumar, Kollappillil S; Moore, Jack; Xu, Zhizhong; Strazewski, Peter; Fahlman, Richard P

    2014-07-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA protein transferases post-translationally conjugate an amino acid from an aminoacyl-tRNA onto the N-terminus of a target polypeptide. The eubacterial aminoacyl-tRNA protein transferase, L/F transferase, utilizes both leucyl-tRNA(Leu) and phenylalanyl-tRNA(Phe) as substrates. X-ray crystal structures with substrate analogues, the minimal substrate phenylalanyl adenosine (rA-Phe) and inhibitor puromycin, have been used to characterize tRNA recognition by L/F transferase. However analyses of these two X-ray crystal structures reveal significant differences in binding. Through structural analyses, mutagenesis, and enzymatic activity assays, we rationalize and demonstrate that the substrate analogues bind to L/F transferase with similar binding affinities using a series of different interactions by the various chemical groups of the analogues. Our data also demonstrates that enlarging the hydrophobic pocket of L/F transferase selectively enhances puromycin inhibition and may aid in the development of improved inhibitors for this class of enzymes. PMID:24521222

  12. Roles for glutathione transferases in antioxidant recycling

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, David P; Steel, Patrick G

    2011-01-01

    Uniquely among the plant glutathione transferases, two classes possess a catalytic cysteine capable of performing glutathione-dependent reductions. These are the dehydroascorbate reductases (DHARs) and the lambda-class glutathione transferases (GSTLs). Using immobilized GSTLs probed with crude plant extracts we have identified flavonols as high affinity ligands and subsequently demonstrated a novel glutathione-dependent role for these enzymes in recycling oxidized quercetin. By comparing the activities of DHARs and GSTLs we now propose a unified catalytic mechanism that suggests oxidized anthocyanidins and tocopherols may be alternative polyphenolic substrates of GSTLs. PMID:21778824

  13. Stereospecificity of reactions catalyzed by bacterial D-amino acid transaminase.

    PubMed

    Martínez del Pozo, A; Merola, M; Ueno, H; Manning, J M; Tanizawa, K; Nishimura, K; Soda, K; Ringe, D

    1989-10-25

    The spectral shift from 420 to 338 nm when pure bacterial D-amino acid transaminase binds D-amino acid substrates is also exhibited in part by high concentrations of L-amino acids (L-alanine and L-glutamate) but not by simple dicarboxylic acids or monoamines. Slow processing of L-alanine to D-alanine was observed both by coupled enzymatic assays using D-amino acid oxidase and by high pressure liquid chromatography analysis employing an optically active chromophore (Marfey's reagent). When the acceptor for L-alanine was alpha-ketoglutarate, D-glutamate was also formed. This minor activity of the transaminase involved both homologous (L-alanine and D-alanine) and heterologous (L-alanine and D-glutamate) substrate pairs and was a function of the nature of the keto acid acceptor. In the presence of alpha-ketoisovalerate, DL-alanine was almost completely processed to D-valine; within the limits of the assay no L-valine was detected. With alpha-ketoisocaproate, 90% of the DL-alanine was converted to D-leucine. In the mechanism of this transaminase reaction, there may be more stereoselective constraints for the protonation of the quinonoid intermediate during the second half-reaction of the transamination reaction, i.e. the donation of the amino group from the pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate coenzyme to a second keto acid acceptor, than during removal of the alpha proton in the initial steps of the reaction pathway. Thus, with this D-amino acid transaminase, the discrete steps of transamination ensure fidelity of the stereospecificity of reaction pathway. PMID:2808352

  14. Plasma and cerebrosponal fluid amino acid levels in diabetic ketoacidosis before and after corrective therapy.

    PubMed

    Aoki, T T; Assal J-P; Manzano, F M; Kozak, G P; Cahill, G F

    1975-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of insulin-saline-bicarbonate therapy on amino acid metabolism in diabetic ketoacidosis, arterial and venous blood samples as well as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were obtained from six patients before and after initiation of corrective therapy. Levels of CSF glutamine were decreased while alanine alpha-amino-n-butyrate, valine, isoleucine and leucine were increased significantly compared to a control group composed of six normal, postabsorptive adults free of any neurologic disease. Following therapy, CSF levels of alanine, alpha-amino-n-butyrate, valine, isoleucine, and leucine declined while glutamine levels did not change. Admission arterial plasma levels of the glycogenic amino acids were lower than normal while the branched-chain amino acids were elevated. Plasma alanine and glutamine arterio-venous (A-V) differences across forearm tissue were larger. After four hours of corrective therapy, arterial plasma levels of most of the amino acids had declined sharply and A-V differences for glutamine and alanine were markedly reduced (p smaller than.025 and p smaller than.01, paired t, respectively). Coincident with the decrease in A-V amino acid differences, plasma glucagon and free fatty acid levels declined significantly. These data suggest that the effect exerted by insulin-saline-bicarbonate therapy on amino acid metabolism is manifested by diminished A-V plasma alanine and glutamine differences across forearm tissue. Thus, the role played by the splanchnic bed both before and following corrective measures may be secondary to substrate availability. PMID:805076

  15. The Origin of Amino Acids in Lunar Regolith Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Glavin, Daniel P.; McLain, Hannah L.; Noble, Sarah K.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the amino acid content of seven lunar regolith samples returned by the Apollo 16 and Apollo 17 missions and stored under NASA curation since collection using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Consistent with results from initial analyses shortly after collection in the 1970s, we observed amino acids at low concentrations in all of the curated samples, ranging from 0.2 parts-per-billion (ppb) to 42.7 ppb in hot-water extracts and 14.5 ppb to 651.1 ppb in 6M HCl acid-vapor-hydrolyzed, hot-water extracts. Amino acids identified in the Apollo soil extracts include glycine, D- and L-alanine, D- and L-aspartic acid, D- and L-glutamic acid, D- and L-serine, L-threonine, and L-valine, all of which had previously been detected in lunar samples, as well as several compounds not previously identified in lunar regoliths: -aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), D-and L-amino-n-butyric acid (-ABA), DL-amino-n-butyric acid, -amino-n-butyric acid, -alanine, and -amino-n-caproic acid. We observed an excess of the L enantiomer in most of the detected proteinogenic amino acids, but racemic alanine and racemic -ABA were present in some samples.

  16. Membrane topology of the electrogenic aspartate-alanine antiporter AspT of Tetragenococcus halophilus.

    PubMed

    Nanatani, Kei; Ohonishi, Fumito; Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Tasuku; Abe, Keietsu

    2005-03-01

    AspT is an electrogenic aspartate:alanine exchange protein that represents the vectorial component of a proton-motive metabolic cycle found in some strains of Tetragenococcus halophilus. AspT is the sole member of a new family, the Aspartate: Alanine Exchanger (AAE) family, in secondary transporters, according to the computational classification proposed by Saier et al. (http://www.biology.ucsd.edu/~msaier/transport/). We analyzed the topology of AspT biochemically, by using fusion methods in combination with alkaline phosphatase or beta-lactamase. These results suggested that AspT has a unique topology; 8 TMS, a large cytoplasmic loop (183 amino acids) between TMS5 and TMS6, and N- and C-termini that both face the periplasm. These results demonstrated a unique 2D-structure of AspT as the novel AAE family. PMID:15670744

  17. Chiral effects on helicity studied via the energy landscape of short (d, l)-alanine peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelamraju, Sridhar; Oakley, Mark T.; Johnston, Roy L.

    2015-10-01

    The homochirality of natural amino acids facilitates the formation of regular secondary structures such as α-helices and β-sheets. Here, we study the relationship between chirality and backbone structure for the example of hexa-alanine. The most stable stereoisomers are identified through global optimisation. Further, the energy landscape, a database of connected low-energy local minima and transition points, is constructed for various neutral and zwitterionic stereoisomers of hexa-alanine. Three order parameters for partial helicity are applied and metric disconnectivity graphs are presented with partial helicity as a metric. We also apply the Zimm-Bragg model to derive average partial helicities for Ace-(l-Ala)6-NHMe, Ace-(d-Ala-l-Ala)3-NHMe, and Ace-(l-Ala)3-(d-Ala)3-NHMe from the database of local minima and compare with previous studies.

  18. Unusual hydroxyl migration in the fragmentation of β-alanine dication in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Piekarski, Dariusz Grzegorz; Delaunay, Rudy; Maclot, Sylvain; Adoui, Lamri; Martín, Fernando; Alcamí, Manuel; Huber, Bernd A; Rousseau, Patrick; Domaracka, Alicja; Díaz-Tendero, Sergio

    2015-07-14

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of the fragmentation of doubly positively charged β-alanine molecules in the gas phase. The dissociation of the produced dicationic molecules, induced by low-energy ion collisions, is analysed by coincidence mass spectrometric techniques; the coupling with ab initio molecular dynamics simulations allows rationalisation of the experimental observations. The present strategy gives deeper insights into the chemical mechanisms of multiply charged amino acids in the gas phase. In the case of the β-alanine dication, in addition to the expected Coulomb explosion and hydrogen migration processes, we have found evidence of hydroxyl-group migration, which leads to unusual fragmentation products, such as hydroxymethyl cation, and is necessary to explain some of the observed dominant channels. PMID:26035826

  19. Effect of amino acid immobilization on the impedance of graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Minh-Hai; Han, Jinwoo; Min, Byeong June; Lee, ChangWoo; Jang, Sei-Heon; Jeong, Hae Kyung

    2015-05-01

    A single residue, dipeptide, or tripeptide of alanine or histidine is covalently attached to graphene oxide (GO), and the effect of the amino acid immobilization on the impedance of GO is investigated using the impedance spectroscopy. The histidine of a tripeptide exhibits the lowest resistance compared to the single or dipeptide histidine in the KCl electrolyte, and the single alanine residue shows the lowest resistance in an acidic electrolyte compared to the dipeptide or tripeptide alanine. The peculiar behavior of the impedance could be explained by different net charges of the amino acids, chain length, and π-π stacking interaction.

  20. Detection of non-protein amino acids in the presence of protein amino acids. II.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapshak, P.; Okaji, M.

    1972-01-01

    Studies conducted with the JEOL 5AH amino acid analyzer are described. This instrument makes possible the programming of the chromatographic process. Data are presented showing the separations of seventeen non-protein amino acids in the presence of eighteen protein amino acids. It is pointed out that distinct separations could be obtained in the case of a number of chemically similar compounds, such as ornithine and lysine, N-amidino alanine and arginine, and iminodiacetic acid and S-carboxymethyl cysteine and aspartic acid.

  1. Metabolism of 3H- and 14C-labeled glutamate, proline, and alanine in normal and adrenalectomized rats using different sites of tracer administration and sampling.

    PubMed

    Said, H M; Chenoweth, M; Dunn, A

    1989-08-01

    Alanine, glutamate and proline labeled with 14C and 3H were infused into fasted normal and adrenalectomized rats. Alanine was administered by the A-V mode (arterial administration-venous sampling), and glutamate and proline by both the A-V and V-A (venous administration-arterial sampling) modes. The kinetics of 14C alanine and 14C glutamate differed markedly from those of the tritium-labeled compounds, but there was little difference in the kinetics of 3H and 14C proline. The replacement rate calculated from the A-V mode for glutamate was about half that obtained in the V-A mode, but there was little difference with proline. The masses of the amino acids (total content of amino acids in the body) were calculated from the washout curves of the tritium-labeled compounds after the infusion of tracer was terminated. The masses for the normal rats were 407 mumol/kg for alanine, 578 mumol/kg for glutamate and 296 mumol/kg for proline. The so-called distribution spaces calculated conventionally from total masses and the amino acid concentrations in plasma are much greater than the volume of the body, reflecting the fact that amino acid concentrations in tissues greatly exceed those in plasma. Adrenalectomy markedly affected the kinetics of the three amino acids, and their replacement rates were greatly reduced. The proline and glutamate masses were reduced by at least one half, while that of alanine was unchanged. Adrenalectomy markedly reduced the conversion of proline to glutamate. The hydrocortisone regimen used in this study restored the metabolism of alanine and glutamate to normal, but had no effect on that of proline. PMID:2569659

  2. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from Streptococcus mutans

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yong-Zhi; Sheng, Yu; Li, Lan-Fen; Tang, De-Wei; Liu, Xiang-Yu; Zhao, Xiaojun; Liang, Yu-He Su, Xiao-Dong

    2007-09-01

    A potential target for antibiotic drug design, d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from S. mutans, was expressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution. d-Alanine-d-alanine ligase is encoded by the gene ddl (SMU-599) in Streptococcus mutans. This ligase plays a very important role in cell-wall biosynthesis and may be a potential target for drug design. To study the structure and function of this ligase, the gene ddl was amplified from S. mutans genomic DNA and cloned into the expression vector pET28a. The protein was expressed in soluble form in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3). Homogeneous protein was obtained using a two-step procedure consisting of Ni{sup 2+}-chelating and size-exclusion chromatography. Purified protein was crystallized and the cube-shaped crystal diffracted to 2.4 Å. The crystal belongs to space group P3{sub 1}21 or P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 79.50, c = 108.97 Å. There is one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  3. Racemization of alanine by the alanine racemases from Salmonella typhimurium and Bacillus stearothermophilus: energetic reaction profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Faraci, W.S.; Walsh, C.T.

    1988-05-03

    Alanine racemases are bacterial pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) dependent enzymes providing D-alanine as an essential building block for biosynthesis of the peptidoglycan layer of the cell wall. Two isozymic alanine racemases, encoded by the dadB gene and the alr gene, from the Gram-negative mesophilic Salmonella typhimurium and one from the Gram-positive thermophilic Bacillus stearothermophilus have been examined for the racemization mechanism. Substrate deuterium isotope effects and solvent deuterium isotope effects have been measured in both L ..-->.. D and D..-->.. L directions for all three enzymes to assess the degree to which abstraction of the ..cap alpha..-proton or protonation of substrate PLP carbanion is limiting in catalysis. Additionally, experiments measuring internal return of ..cap alpha..-/sup 3/H from substrate to product and solvent exchange/substrate conversion experiments in /sup 3/H/sub 2/O have been used with each enzyme to examine the partitioning of substrate PLP carbanion intermediates and to obtain the relative heights of kinetically significant energy barriers in alanine racemase catalysis.

  4. Identification of a diazinon-metabolizing glutathione S-transferase in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kohji; Yamada, Naotaka

    2016-01-01

    The glutathione S-transferase superfamily play key roles in the metabolism of numerous xenobiotics. We report herein the identification and characterization of a novel glutathione S-transferase in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. The enzyme (bmGSTu2) conjugates glutathione to 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, as well as metabolizing diazinon, one of the organophosphate insecticides. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of transcripts demonstrated that bmGSTu2 expression was induced 1.7-fold in a resistant strain of B. mori. Mutagenesis of putative amino acid residues in the glutathione-binding site revealed that Ile54, Glu66, Ser67, and Asn68 are crucial for enzymatic function. These results provide insights into the catalysis of glutathione conjugation in silkworm by bmGSTu2 and into the detoxification of organophosphate insecticides. PMID:27440377

  5. Identification of a diazinon-metabolizing glutathione S-transferase in the silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kohji; Yamada, Naotaka

    2016-01-01

    The glutathione S-transferase superfamily play key roles in the metabolism of numerous xenobiotics. We report herein the identification and characterization of a novel glutathione S-transferase in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. The enzyme (bmGSTu2) conjugates glutathione to 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, as well as metabolizing diazinon, one of the organophosphate insecticides. Quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction analysis of transcripts demonstrated that bmGSTu2 expression was induced 1.7-fold in a resistant strain of B. mori. Mutagenesis of putative amino acid residues in the glutathione-binding site revealed that Ile54, Glu66, Ser67, and Asn68 are crucial for enzymatic function. These results provide insights into the catalysis of glutathione conjugation in silkworm by bmGSTu2 and into the detoxification of organophosphate insecticides. PMID:27440377

  6. A search for endogenous amino acids in martian meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bada, J. L.; Glavin, D. P.; McDonald, G. D.; Becker, L.

    1998-01-01

    Trace amounts of glycine, serine, and alanine were detected in the carbonate component of the martian meteorite ALH84001 by high-performance liquid chromatography. The detected amino acids were not uniformly distributed in the carbonate component and ranged in concentration from 0.1 to 7 parts per million. Although the detected alanine consists primarily of the L enantiomer, low concentrations (<0.1 parts per million) of endogenous D-alanine may be present in the ALH84001 carbonates. The amino acids present in this sample of ALH84001 appear to be terrestrial in origin and similar to those in Allan Hills ice, although the possibility cannot be ruled out that minute amounts of some amino acids such as D-alanine are preserved in the meteorite.

  7. A search for endogenous amino acids in martian meteorite ALH84001.

    PubMed

    Bada, J L; Glavin, D P; McDonald, G D; Becker, L

    1998-01-16

    Trace amounts of glycine, serine, and alanine were detected in the carbonate component of the martian meteorite ALH84001 by high-performance liquid chromatography. The detected amino acids were not uniformly distributed in the carbonate component and ranged in concentration from 0.1 to 7 parts per million. Although the detected alanine consists primarily of the L enantiomer, low concentrations (<0.1 parts per million) of endogenous D-alanine may be present in the ALH84001 carbonates. The amino acids present in this sample of ALH84001 appear to be terrestrial in origin and similar to those in Allan Hills ice, although the possibility cannot be ruled out that minute amounts of some amino acids such as D-alanine are preserved in the meteorite. PMID:9430583

  8. Purification and characterization of the Oligosaccharyl transferase

    SciTech Connect

    Kapoor, T.M.

    1990-11-01

    Oligosaccharyl transferase was characterized to be a glycoprotein with at least one saccharide unit that had a D-manno or D- glucopyranose configuration with unmodified hydroxy groups at C-3, C-4 and C-6, using a Concanavalin A affinity column. This afforded a 100 fold increase in the transferase purity in the solubilized microsomal sample and also removed over 90% of the microsomal proteins (the cytosolic ones being removed before solubilization). The detergent, N,N-Dimethyldodecylamine N-oxide (LDAO) was used for solubilization and it yielded a system compatible with the assay and the purification steps. An efficient method for detergent extraction without dilution of sample or protein precipitation was also developed.

  9. Accumulated analyses of amino acid precursors in returned lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Harada, K.; Hare, P. E.

    1973-01-01

    Six amino acids (glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, and threonine) obtained by hydrolysis of extracts have been quantitatively determined in ten collections of fines from five Apollo missions. Although the amounts found, 7-45 ng/g, are small, the lunar amino acid/carbon ratios are comparable to those of the carbonaceous chondrites, Murchison and Murray, as analyzed by the same procedures. Since both the ratios of amino acid to carbon, and the four or five most common types of proteinous amino acid found, are comparable for the two extraterrestrial sources despite different cosmophysical histories of the moon and meteorites, common cosmochemical processes are suggested.

  10. Functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with uracil, guanine, thymine and L-alanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silambarasan, D.; Iyakutti, K.; Vasu, V.

    2014-06-01

    Experimental investigation of functionalization of oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (OSWCNTs) with three nucleic acid bases such as uracil, guanine, thymine and one amino acid, L-alanine is carried out. Initially, the SWCNTs are oxidized by acid treatment. Further, the oxidized SWCNTs are effectively functionalized with aforementioned biological compounds by ultrasonication. The diameter of OSWCNTs has increased after the adsorption of biological compounds. The cumulative Π-Π stacking, hydrogen bond and polar interaction are the key factors to realize the adsorption. The amount of adsorption of each biological compound is estimated. The adsorption of guanine is more among all the four biological compounds.

  11. International society of sports nutrition position stand: Beta-Alanine.

    PubMed

    Trexler, Eric T; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Stout, Jeffrey R; Hoffman, Jay R; Wilborn, Colin D; Sale, Craig; Kreider, Richard B; Jäger, Ralf; Earnest, Conrad P; Bannock, Laurent; Campbell, Bill; Kalman, Douglas; Ziegenfuss, Tim N; Antonio, Jose

    2015-01-01

    The International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) provides an objective and critical review of the mechanisms and use of beta-alanine supplementation. Based on the current available literature, the conclusions of the ISSN are as follows: 1) Four weeks of beta-alanine supplementation (4-6 g daily) significantly augments muscle carnosine concentrations, thereby acting as an intracellular pH buffer; 2) Beta-alanine supplementation currently appears to be safe in healthy populations at recommended doses; 3) The only reported side effect is paraesthesia (tingling), but studies indicate this can be attenuated by using divided lower doses (1.6 g) or using a sustained-release formula; 4) Daily supplementation with 4 to 6 g of beta-alanine for at least 2 to 4 weeks has been shown to improve exercise performance, with more pronounced effects in open end-point tasks/time trials lasting 1 to 4 min in duration; 5) Beta-alanine attenuates neuromuscular fatigue, particularly in older subjects, and preliminary evidence indicates that beta-alanine may improve tactical performance; 6) Combining beta-alanine with other single or multi-ingredient supplements may be advantageous when supplementation of beta-alanine is high enough (4-6 g daily) and long enough (minimum 4 weeks); 7) More research is needed to determine the effects of beta-alanine on strength, endurance performance beyond 25 min in duration, and other health-related benefits associated with carnosine. PMID:26175657

  12. Amyloid Aggregates Arise from Amino Acid Condensations under Prebiotic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, Jason; Friedmann, Michael P; Riek, Roland

    2016-09-12

    Current theories on the origin of life reveal significant gaps in our understanding of the mechanisms that allowed simple chemical precursors to coalesce into the complex polymers that are needed to sustain life. The volcanic gas carbonyl sulfide (COS) is known to catalyze the condensation of amino acids under aqueous conditions, but the reported di-, tri-, and tetra-peptides are too short to support a regular tertiary structure. Here, we demonstrate that alanine and valine, two of the proteinogenic amino acids believed to have been among the most abundant on a prebiotic earth, can polymerize into peptides and subsequently assemble into ordered amyloid fibers comprising a cross-β-sheet quaternary structure following COS-activated continuous polymerization of as little as 1 mm amino acid. Furthermore, this spontaneous assembly is not limited to pure amino acids, since mixtures of glycine, alanine, aspartate, and valine yield similar structures. PMID:27511635

  13. Effects of β-alanine administration on selected parameters of oxidative stress and phosphoryltransfer network in cerebral cortex and cerebellum of rats.

    PubMed

    Gemelli, Tanise; de Andrade, Rodrigo Binkowski; Rojas, Denise Bertin; Bonorino, Nariélle Ferner; Mazzola, Priscila Nicolao; Tortorelli, Lucas Silva; Funchal, Cláudia; Filho, Carlos Severo Dutra; Wannmacher, Clovis Milton Duval

    2013-08-01

    β-Alanine is a β-amino acid derivative of the degradation of pyrimidine uracil and precursor of the oxidative substrate acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA). The accumulation of β-alanine occurs in β-alaninemia, an inborn error of metabolism. Patients with β-alaninemia may develop neurological abnormalities whose mechanisms are far from being understood. In this study we evaluated the effects of β-alanine administration on some parameters of oxidative stress and on creatine kinase, pyruvate kinase, and adenylate kinase in cerebral cortex and cerebellum of 21-day-old rats. The animals received three peritoneal injections of β-alanine (0.3 mg /g of body weight) and the controls received the same volume (10 μL/g of body weight) of saline solution (NaCl 0.85 %) at 3 h intervals. CSF levels of β-alanine increased five times, achieving 80 μM in the rats receiving the amino acid. The results of β-alanine administration in the parameters of oxidative stress were similar in both tissues studied: reduction of superoxide dismutase activity, increased oxidation of 2',7'-dihydrodichlorofluorescein, total content of sulfhydryl and catalase activity. However, the results of the phosphoryltransfer network enzymes were similar in all enzymes, but different in the tissues studied: the β-alanine administration was able to inhibit the enzyme pyruvate kinase, cytosolic creatine kinase, and adenylate kinase activities in cerebral cortex, and increase in cerebellum. In case this also occurs in the patients, these results suggest that oxidative stress and alteration of the phosphoryltransfer network may be involved in the pathophysiology of β-alaninemia. Moreover, the ingestion of β-alanine to improve muscular performance deserves more attention in respect to possible side-effects. PMID:23620342

  14. Amino Acid Racemization and the Preservation of Ancient DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poinar, Hendrik N.; Hoss, Matthias

    1996-01-01

    The extent of racemization of aspartic acid, alanine, and leucine provides criteria for assessing whether ancient tissue samples contain endogenous DNA. In samples in which the D/L ratio of aspartic acid exceeds 0.08, ancient DNA sequences could not be retrieved. Paleontological finds from which DNA sequences purportedly millions of years old have been reported show extensive racemization, and the amino acids present are mainly contaminates. An exception is the amino acids in some insects preserved in amber.

  15. Inhibition of O-GlcNAc transferase activity reprograms prostate cancer cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Itkonen, Harri M.; Gorad, Saurabh S.; Duveau, Damien Y.; Martin, Sara E.S.; Barkovskaya, Anna; Bathen, Tone F.; Moestue, Siver A.; Mills, Ian G.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic networks are highly connected and complex, but a single enzyme, O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) can sense the availability of metabolites and also modify target proteins. We show that inhibition of OGT activity inhibits the proliferation of prostate cancer cells, leads to sustained loss of c-MYC and suppresses the expression of CDK1, elevated expression of which predicts prostate cancer recurrence (p=0.00179). Metabolic profiling revealed decreased glucose consumption and lactate production after OGT inhibition. This decreased glycolytic activity specifically sensitized prostate cancer cells, but not cells representing normal prostate epithelium, to inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation (rotenone and metformin). Intra-cellular alanine was depleted upon OGT inhibitor treatment. OGT inhibitor increased the expression and activity of alanine aminotransferase (GPT2), an enzyme that can be targeted with a clinically approved drug, cycloserine. Simultaneous inhibition of OGT and GPT2 inhibited cell viability and growth rate, and additionally activated a cell death response. These combinatorial effects were predominantly seen in prostate cancer cells, but not in a cell-line derived from normal prostate epithelium. Combinatorial treatments were confirmed with two inhibitors against both OGT and GPT2. Taken together, here we report the reprogramming of energy metabolism upon inhibition of OGT activity, and identify synergistically lethal combinations that are prostate cancer cell specific. PMID:26824323

  16. Inhibition of O-GlcNAc transferase activity reprograms prostate cancer cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Itkonen, Harri M; Gorad, Saurabh S; Duveau, Damien Y; Martin, Sara E S; Barkovskaya, Anna; Bathen, Tone F; Moestue, Siver A; Mills, Ian G

    2016-03-15

    Metabolic networks are highly connected and complex, but a single enzyme, O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) can sense the availability of metabolites and also modify target proteins. We show that inhibition of OGT activity inhibits the proliferation of prostate cancer cells, leads to sustained loss of c-MYC and suppresses the expression of CDK1, elevated expression of which predicts prostate cancer recurrence (p=0.00179). Metabolic profiling revealed decreased glucose consumption and lactate production after OGT inhibition. This decreased glycolytic activity specifically sensitized prostate cancer cells, but not cells representing normal prostate epithelium, to inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation (rotenone and metformin). Intra-cellular alanine was depleted upon OGT inhibitor treatment. OGT inhibitor increased the expression and activity of alanine aminotransferase (GPT2), an enzyme that can be targeted with a clinically approved drug, cycloserine. Simultaneous inhibition of OGT and GPT2 inhibited cell viability and growth rate, and additionally activated a cell death response. These combinatorial effects were predominantly seen in prostate cancer cells, but not in a cell-line derived from normal prostate epithelium. Combinatorial treatments were confirmed with two inhibitors against both OGT and GPT2. Taken together, here we report the reprogramming of energy metabolism upon inhibition of OGT activity, and identify synergistically lethal combinations that are prostate cancer cell specific. PMID:26824323

  17. Kinetics and mechanism of the beta-alanine + OH gas phase reaction: a quantum mechanical approach.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Torres, Armando; Galano, Annia; Alvarez-Idaboy, J Raúl

    2006-01-14

    The OH hydrogen abstraction reaction from beta-alanine has been studied using the BHandHLYP hybrid HF-density functional and 6-311G(d,p) basis sets. The energies have been improved by single point calculations at the CCSD(T)/6-311G(d,p) level of theory. The structures of the different stationary points are discussed. Reaction profiles are modeled including the formation of pre-reactive and product complexes. Negative net activation energy is obtained for the overall reaction. A complex mechanism is proposed, and the rate coefficients are calculated using transition state theory over the temperature range of 250-400 K. The rate coefficients are proposed for the first time and it was found that in the gas phase the hydrogen abstraction occurs mainly from the CH(2) group next to the amino end. The following expressions, in cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1), are obtained for the overall rate constants, at 250-400 and 290-310 K, respectively: k(250-400)= 2.36 x 10(-12) exp(340/T), and k(290-310)= 1.296 x 10(-12) exp(743/T). The three parameter expression that best describes the studied reaction is k(250-400)= 1.01 x 10(-21)T(3.09) exp(1374/T). The beta-alanine + OH reaction was found to be 1.5 times faster than the alpha-alanine + OH reaction. PMID:16482271

  18. The Amino Acid Composition of the Sutter's Mill Carbonaceous Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Burton, A. S.; Elsila, J. E.; Dworkin, J. P.; Yin, Q. Z.; Cooper, G.; Jenniskens, P.

    2012-01-01

    In contrast to the Murchison meteorite which had a complex distribution of amino acids with a total C2 to Cs amino acid abundance of approx.14,000 parts-per-billion (ppb) [2], the Sutters Mill meteorite was found to be highly depleted in amino acids. Much lower abundances (approx.30 to 180 ppb) of glycine, beta-alanine, L-alanine and L-serine were detected in SM2 above procedural blank levels indicating that this meteorite sample experienced only minimal terrestrial amino acid contamination after its fall to Earth. Carbon isotope measurements will be necessary to establish the origin of glycine and beta-alanine in SM2. Other non-protein amino acids that are rare on Earth, yet commonly found in other CM meteorites such as aaminoisobutyric acid (alpha-AIB) and isovaline, were not identified in SM2. However, traces of beta-AIB (approx.1 ppb) were detected in SM2 and could be" extraterrestrial in origin. The low abundances of amino acids in the Sutter's Mill meteorite is consistent with mineralogical evidence that at least some parts of the Sutter's Mill meteorite parent body experienced extensive aqueous and/or thermal alteration.

  19. Hair and amino acids: the interactions and the effects.

    PubMed

    Oshimura, Eiko; Abe, Hiroshi; Oota, Rina

    2007-01-01

    The interaction and the function of some amino acids in hair care applications are discussed. When amino acids are applied to hair in the form of simple aqueous solution, uptake of the amino acids is mainly controlled by ionic equilibrium. When amino acids were incorporated in a hair conditioner, the result was quite different, suggesting the importance of interaction between the amino acids and the cationic surfactants. Uptake of pyrrolidone carboxylic acid (PCA), a derivative of glutamic acid, is enhanced by combining with arginine, an amino with strong affinity towards hair. Effects of some amino acids on bleached/dyed hair are described. A hair conditioner incorporated with alanine improves hair surface hydrophobicity of bleach-damaged hair. Histidine and phenylalanine improve tensile strength. PCA was proved to be effective to improve color-retention of dyed hair. PMID:17728935

  20. Incorporation of D-alanine into lipoteichoic acid and wall teichoic acid in Bacillus subtilis. Identification of genes and regulation.

    PubMed

    Perego, M; Glaser, P; Minutello, A; Strauch, M A; Leopold, K; Fischer, W

    1995-06-30

    The Bacillus subtilis dlt operon (D-alanyl-lipoteichoic acid) is responsible for D-alanine esterification of both lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and wall teichoic acid (WTA). The dlt operon contains five genes, dltA-dltE. Insertional inactivation of dltA-dltD results in complete absence of D-alanine from both LTA and WTA. Based on protein sequence similarity with the Lactobacillus casei dlt gene products (Heaton, M. P., and Neuhaus, F. C. (1992) J. Bacteriol. 174, 4707-4717), we propose that dltA encodes the D-alanine-D-alanyl carrier protein ligase (Dcl) and dltC the D-alanyl carrier protein (Dcp). We further hypothesize that the products of dltB and dltD are concerned with the transport of activated D-alanine through the membrane and the final incorporation of D-alanine into LTA. The hydropathy profiles of the dltB and dltD gene products suggest a transmembrane location for the former and an amino-terminal signal peptide for the latter. The incorporation of D-alanine into LTA and WTA did not separate in any of the mutants studied which indicates that either one and the same enzyme is responsible for D-alanine incorporation into both polymers or a separate enzyme, encoded outside the dlt operon, transfers the D-alanyl residues from LTA to WTA (Haas, R., Koch, H.-U., and Fischer, W. (1984) FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 21, 27-31). Inactivation of dltE has no effect on D-alanine ester content of both LTA and WTA, and at present we cannot propose any function for its gene product. Transcription analysis shows that the dlt operon is transcribed from a sigma D-dependent promoter and follows the pattern of transcription of genes belonging to the sigma D regulon. However, the turn off of transcription observed before sporulation starts seems to be dependent on the Spo0A and AbrB sporulation proteins and results in a D-alanine-free purely anionic LTA in the spore membrane. The dlt operon is dispensable for cell growth; its inactivation does not affect cell growth or morphology as

  1. Correlation between liver cell necrosis and circulating alanine aminotransferase after ischaemia/reperfusion injuries in the rat liver.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Anders R; Andersen, Kasper J; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen; Nyengaard, Jens R; Mortensen, Frank V

    2016-04-01

    Circulating liver enzymes such as alanine transaminase are often used as markers of hepatocellular damage. Ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is an inevitable consequence of prolonged liver ischaemia. The aim of this study was to examine the correlation between liver enzymes and volume of liver cell necrosis after ischaemia/reperfusion injuries, using design-unbiased stereological methods. Forty-seven male Wistar rats were subjected to 1 h of partial liver ischaemia, followed by either 4 or 24 h of reperfusion. Within each group, one-third of animals were subjected to ischaemic preconditioning and one-third to ischaemic postconditioning. At the end of reperfusion, blood and liver samples were collected for analysis. The volume of necrotic liver tissue was subsequently correlated to circulating markers of I/R injury. Correlation between histological findings and circulating markers was performed using Pearson's correlation coefficient. Alanine transferase peaked after 4 h of reperfusion; however, at this time-point, only mild necrosis was observed, with a Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.663 (P = 0.001). After 24 h of reperfusion, alanine aminotransferase was found to be highly correlated to the degree of hepatocellular necrosis R = 0.836 (P = 0.000). Furthermore, alkaline phosphatase (R = 0.806) and α-2-macroglobulin (R = 0.655) levels were also correlated with the degree of necrosis. We show for the first time that there is a close correlation between the volume of hepatocellular necrosis and alanine aminotransferase levels in a model of I/R injury. This is especially apparent after 24 h of reperfusion. Similarly, increased levels of alkaline phosphatase and α-2-macroglobulin are correlated to the volume of liver necrosis. PMID:27292534

  2. The Formation of Racemic Amino Acids by UV Photolysis of Interstellar Ice Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Max P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Sandford, Scott A.; Cooper, George; Allamandola, Louis J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Small biologically relevant organic molecules including the amino acids glycine, alanine, and marine were formed in the laboratory by the UV (Ultraviolet) photolysis of realistic interstellar ice analogs, composed primarily of H2O, and including CH3OH, NH3, and HCN, under interstellar conditions. N-formyl glycine, cycloserine (4-amino-3-isoxazolidinone), and glycerol were detected before hydrolysis, and glycine, racemic alanine, racemic marine, glycerol, ethanolamine, and glyceric acid were found after hydrolysis. This suggests that some meteoritic amino acids (and other molecules) may be the direct result of interstellar ice photochemistry, expanding the current paradigm that they formed by reactions in liquid water on meteorite parent bodies.

  3. The influence of various cations on the catalytic properties of clays. [polymerization of alanine adenylate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paecht-Horowitz, M.

    1978-01-01

    The polymerization of alanine adenylate in the presence of the sodium form of various clays was studied, and hectorite was found to cause more polymerization than nontronite and montmorillonite (in that order) although the differences were not great. The effect on polymerization of presaturating montmorillonite with different cations was determined. Hectorite, with increased basicity of the interspatial planes, allows polymerization of lysine, which montmorillonite does not. The general trend is that, for the same amino acid, higher degrees of polymerization are obtained when the cation in the octahedral lattice of the clay is divalent rather than trivalent. With the exchangeable cations the order is reversed, for a reason that is explained. The main role of clays in the polymerization mechanism of amino acids is concentration and neutralization of charges.

  4. Controlled radical polymerization of an acrylamide containing L-alanine moiety via ATRP.

    PubMed

    Rafiee, Zahra

    2016-02-01

    Homopolymerization of an optically active acrylamide having an amino acid moiety in the side chain, N-acryloyl-L-alanine (AAla) was carried out via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) at room temperature using 2-hydroxyethyl-2'-methyl-2'-bromopropionate (HMB) or sodium-4-(bromomethyl)benzoate (SBB) as initiator in pure water, methanol/water mixture and pure methanol solvents. The polymerization reaction resulted in the optically active biocompatible amino acid-based homopolymer in good yield with narrow molecular weight distribution. The number average molecular weight increased with conversion and polydispersity was low. The structure and molecular weight of synthesized polymer were characterized by (1)H NMR, FT-IR spectroscopic techniques and size-exclusion chromatography. PMID:26385362

  5. Characterization of Lactobacillus salivarius alanine racemase: short-chain carboxylate-activation and the role of A131.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Jyumpei; Yukimoto, Jotaro; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Ohmori, Taketo; Suzuki, Hirokazu; Doi, Katsumi; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Many strains of lactic acid bacteria produce high concentrations of d-amino acids. Among them, Lactobacillus salivarius UCC 118 produces d-alanine at a relative concentration much greater than 50 % of the total d, l-alanine (100d/d, l-alanine). We characterized the L. salivarius alanine racemase (ALR) likely responsible for this d-alanine production and found that the enzyme was activated by carboxylates, which is an unique characteristic among ALRs. In addition, alignment of the amino acid sequences of several ALRs revealed that A131 of L. salivarius ALR is likely involved in the activation. To confirm that finding, an L. salivarius ALR variant with an A131K (ALR(A131K)) substitution was prepared, and its properties were compared with those of ALR. The activity of ALR(A131K) was about three times greater than that of ALR. In addition, whereas L. salivarius ALR was strongly activated by low concentrations (e.g., 1 mM) of short chain carboxylates, and was inhibited at higher concentrations (e.g., 10 mM), ALR(A131K) was clearly inhibited at all carboxylate concentrations tested (1-40 mM). Acetate also increased the stability of ALR such that maximum activity was observed at 35 °C and pH 8.0 without acetate, but at 50 °C in the presence of 1 mM acetate. On the other hand, maximum ALR(A131K) activity was observed at 45 °C and around pH 9.0 with or without acetate. It thus appears that A131 mediates the activation and stabilization of L. salivarius ALR by short chain carboxylates. PMID:26543773

  6. Active Sites of Spinoxin, a Potassium Channel Scorpion Toxin, Elucidated by Systematic Alanine Scanning.

    PubMed

    Peigneur, Steve; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Kawano, Chihiro; Nose, Takeru; Nirthanan, Selvanayagam; Gopalakrishnakone, Ponnampalam; Tytgat, Jan; Sato, Kazuki

    2016-05-31

    Peptide toxins from scorpion venoms constitute the largest group of toxins that target the voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv). Spinoxin (SPX) isolated from the venom of scorpion Heterometrus spinifer is a 34-residue peptide neurotoxin cross-linked by four disulfide bridges. SPX is a potent inhibitor of Kv1.3 potassium channels (IC50 = 63 nM), which are considered to be valid molecular targets in the diagnostics and therapy of various autoimmune disorders and cancers. Here we synthesized 25 analogues of SPX and analyzed the role of each amino acid in SPX using alanine scanning to study its structure-function relationships. All synthetic analogues showed similar disulfide bond pairings and secondary structures as native SPX. Alanine replacements at Lys(23), Asn(26), and Lys(30) resulted in loss of activity against Kv1.3 potassium channels, whereas replacements at Arg(7), Met(14), Lys(27), and Tyr(32) also largely reduced inhibitory activity. These results suggest that the side chains of these amino acids in SPX play an important role in its interaction with Kv1.3 channels. In particular, Lys(23) appears to be a key residue that underpins Kv1.3 channel inhibition. Of these seven amino acid residues, four are basic amino acids, suggesting that the positive electrostatic potential on the surface of SPX is likely required for high affinity interaction with Kv1.3 channels. This study provides insight into the structure-function relationships of SPX with implications for the rational design of new lead compounds targeting potassium channels with high potency. PMID:27159046

  7. Comparison of EPR response of alanine and Gd₂O₃-alanine dosimeters exposed to TRIGA Mainz reactor.

    PubMed

    Marrale, M; Schmitz, T; Gallo, S; Hampel, G; Longo, A; Panzeca, S; Tranchina, L

    2015-12-01

    In this work we report some preliminary results regarding the analysis of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) response of alanine pellets and alanine pellets added with gadolinium used for dosimetry at the TRIGA research reactor in Mainz, Germany. Two set-ups were evaluated: irradiation inside PMMA phantom and irradiation inside boric acid phantom. We observed that the presence of Gd2O3 inside alanine pellets increases the EPR signal by a factor of 3.45 and 1.24 in case of PMMA and boric acid phantoms, respectively. We can conclude that in the case of neutron beam with a predominant thermal neutron component the addition of gadolinium oxide can significantly improve neutron sensitivity of alanine pellets. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of both response of alanine and Gd-added alanine pellets with FLUKA code were performed and a good agreement was achieved for pure alanine dosimeters. For Gd2O3-alanine deviations between MC simulations and experimental data were observed and discussed. PMID:26315099

  8. Molecular cloning and heterologous expression of a cDNA encoding a mouse glutathione S-transferase Yc subunit possessing high catalytic activity for aflatoxin B1-8,9-epoxide.

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, J D; Judah, D J; Neal, G E; Nguyen, T

    1992-01-01

    Resistance to the carcinogenic effects of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) in the mouse is due to the constitutive expression of an Alpha-class glutathione S-transferase (GST), YcYc, with high detoxification activity towards AFB1-8,9-epoxide. A cDNA clone (pmusGST Yc) for a murine GST Yc polypeptide has been isolated. Sequencing has shown the cDNA insert of pmusGST Yc to be 922 bp in length, with an open reading frame of 663 bp that encodes a polypeptide of M(r) 25358. The primary structure of the murine GST Yc subunit predicted by pmusGST Yc is in complete agreement with the partial amino acid sequence of the aflatoxin-metabolizing mouse liver GST described previously [McLellan, Kerr, Cronshaw & Hayes (1991) Biochem. J. 276, 461-469]. A plasmid, termed pKK-musGST Yc, which permits the expression of the murine Yc subunit in Escherichia coli, has been constructed. The murine GST expressed in E. coli was purified and found to be catalytically active towards several GST substrates, including AFB1-8,9-epoxide. This enzyme was also found to possess electrophoretic and immunochemical properties closely similar to those of the GST Yc subunit from mouse liver. However, the GST synthesized in E. coli and the constitutive mouse liver Alpha-class GST exhibited small differences in their chromatographic behaviour during reverse-phase h.p.l.c. Automated Edman degradation revealed alanine to be the N-terminal amino acid in the GST Yc subunit expressed in E. coli, whereas the enzyme in mouse liver possesses a blocked N-terminus. Although sequencing showed that the purified Yc subunit from E. coli lacked the initiator methionine, the amino acid sequence obtained over the first eleven N-terminal residues agreed with that predicted from the cDNA clone, pmusGST Yc. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of the mouse Yc polypeptide with the primary structures of the rat Alpha-class GST enzymes revealed that it is more closely related to the ethoxyquin-induced rat liver Yc2 subunit than to

  9. Amino acid analyses of R and CK chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Aaron S.; McLain, Hannah; Glavin, Daniel P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Davidson, Jemma; Miller, Kelly E.; Andronikov, Alexander V.; Lauretta, Dante; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2015-03-01

    Exogenous delivery of amino acids and other organic molecules to planetary surfaces may have played an important role in the origins of life on Earth and other solar system bodies. Previous studies have revealed the presence of indigenous amino acids in a wide range of carbon-rich meteorites, with the abundances and structural distributions differing significantly depending on parent body mineralogy and alteration conditions. Here we report on the amino acid abundances of seven type 3-6 CK chondrites and two Rumuruti (R) chondrites. Amino acid measurements were made on hot water extracts from these meteorites by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Of the nine meteorites analyzed, four were depleted in amino acids, and one had experienced significant amino acid contamination by terrestrial biology. The remaining four, comprised of two R and two CK chondrites, contained low levels of amino acids that were predominantly the straight chain, amino-terminal (n-ω-amino) acids β-alanine, and γ-amino-n-butyric acid. This amino acid distribution is similar to what we reported previously for thermally altered ureilites and CV and CO chondrites, and these n-ω-amino acids appear to be indigenous to the meteorites and not the result of terrestrial contamination. The amino acids may have been formed by Fischer-Tropsch-type reactions, although this hypothesis needs further testing.

  10. Helix Stability of Oligoglycine, Oligoalanine and Oligo-β-alanine Dodecamers Reflected by Hydrogen-Bond Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chengyu; Ponder, Jay W.; Marshall, Garland R.

    2014-01-01

    Helices are important structural/recognition elements in proteins and peptides. Stability and conformational differences between helices composed of α- and β-amino acids as scaffolds for mimicry of helix recognition has become a theme in medicinal chemistry. Furthermore, helices formed by β-amino acids are experimentally more stable than those formed by α-amino acids. This is paradoxical because the larger sizes of the hydrogen-bonding rings required by the extra methylene groups should lead to entropic destabilization. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations using the second-generation force field, AMOEBA [1], explored the stability and hydrogen-bonding patterns of capped oligo-β-alanine, oligoalanine and oligoglycine dodecamers in water. The MD simulations showed that oligo-β-alanine has strong acceptor+2 hydrogen bonds, but surprisingly did not contain a large content of 312-helical structures, possibly due to the sparse distribution of the 312-helical structure and other structures with acceptor+2 hydrogen bonds. On the other hand, despite its backbone flexibility, the β-alanine dodecamer had more stable and persistent <3.0 Å hydrogen bonds. Its structure was dominated more by multicentered hydrogen bonds than either oligoglycine and oligoalanine helices. The 31 (PII) helical structure, prevalent in oligoglycine and oligoalanine, does not appear to be stable in oligo-β-alanine indicating its competition with other structures (stacking structure as indicated by MD analyses). These differences are among the factors that shape helical structural preferences and the relative stabilities of these three oligopeptides. PMID:25116421

  11. Homology between O-linked GlcNAc transferases and proteins of the glycogen phosphorylase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Wrabl, J O; Grishin, N V

    2001-11-30

    The O-linked GlcNAc transferases (OGTs) are a recently characterized group of largely eukaryotic enzymes that add a single beta-N-acetylglucosamine moiety to specific serine or threonine hydroxyls. In humans, this process may be part of a sugar regulation mechanism or cellular signaling pathway that is involved in many important diseases, such as diabetes, cancer, and neurodegeneration. However, no structural information about the human OGT exists, except for the identification of tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR) at the N terminus. The locations of substrate binding sites are unknown and the structural basis for this enzyme's function is not clear. Here, remote homology is reported between the OGTs and a large group of diverse sugar processing enzymes, including proteins with known structure such as glycogen phosphorylase, UDP-GlcNAc 2-epimerase, and the glycosyl transferase MurG. This relationship, in conjunction with amino acid similarity spanning the entire length of the sequence, implies that the fold of the human OGT consists of two Rossmann-like domains C-terminal to the TPR region. A conserved motif in the second Rossmann domain points to the UDP-GlcNAc donor binding site. This conclusion is supported by a combination of statistically significant PSI-BLAST hits, consensus secondary structure predictions, and a fold recognition hit to MurG. Additionally, iterative PSI-BLAST database searches reveal that proteins homologous to the OGTs form a large and diverse superfamily that is termed GPGTF (glycogen phosphorylase/glycosyl transferase). Up to one-third of the 51 functional families in the CAZY database, a glycosyl transferase classification scheme based on catalytic residue and sequence homology considerations, can be unified through this common predicted fold. GPGTF homologs constitute a substantial fraction of known proteins: 0.4% of all non-redundant sequences and about 1% of proteins in the Escherichia coli genome are found to belong to the GPGTF

  12. Probing protein stability with unnatural amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, D.; Ellman, J.A.; Zhiyuh Chang; Veenstra, D.L.; Kollman, P.A.; Schultz, P.G. )

    1992-06-26

    Unnatural amino acid mutagenesis, in combination with molecular modeling and simulation techniques, was used to probe the effect of side chain structure on protein stability. Specific replacements at position 133 in T4 lysozyme included (1) leucine (wt), norvaline, ethylglycine, and alanine to measure the cost of stepwise removal of methyl groups from the hydrophobic core, (2) norvaline and O-methyl serine to evaluate the effects of side chain solvation, and (3) leucine, S,S-2-amino-4-methylhexanoic acid, and S-2-amino-3-cyclopentylpropanoic acid to measure the influence of packing density and side chain conformational entropy on protein stability. All of these factors (hydrophobicity, packing, conformational entropy, and cavity formation) significantly influence protein stability and must be considered when analyzing any structural change to proteins.

  13. The prebiotic synthesis of amino acids - interstellar vs. atmospheric mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierhenrich, U. J.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Schutte, W. A.; Barbier, B.; Arcones Segovia, A.; Rosenbauer, H.; Thiemann, W. H.-P.; Brack, A.

    2002-11-01

    Until very recently, prebiotic amino acids were believed to have been generated in the atmosphere of the early Earth, as successfully simulated by the Urey-Miller experiments. Two independent studies now identified ice photochemistry in the interstellar medium as a possible source of prebiotic amino acids. Ultraviolet irradiation of ice mixtures containing identified interstellar molecules (such as H2O, CO2, CO, CH3OH, and NH3) in the conditions of vacuum and low temperature found in the interstellar medium generated amino acid structures including glycine, alanine, serine, valine, proline, and aspartic acid. After warmup, hydrolysis and derivatization, our team was able to identify 16 amino acids as well as furans and pyrroles. Enantioselective analyses of the amino acids showed racemic mixtures. A prebiotic interstellar origin of amino acid structures is now discussed to be a plausible alternative to the Urey-Miller mechanism.

  14. Structures of aminoarabinose transferase ArnT suggest a molecular basis for lipid A glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Petrou, Vasileios I; Herrera, Carmen M; Schultz, Kathryn M; Clarke, Oliver B; Vendome, Jérémie; Tomasek, David; Banerjee, Surajit; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; Belcher Dufrisne, Meagan; Kloss, Brian; Kloppmann, Edda; Rost, Burkhard; Klug, Candice S; Trent, M Stephen; Shapiro, Lawrence; Mancia, Filippo

    2016-02-01

    Polymyxins are antibiotics used in the last line of defense to combat multidrug-resistant infections by Gram-negative bacteria. Polymyxin resistance arises through charge modification of the bacterial outer membrane with the attachment of the cationic sugar 4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose to lipid A, a reaction catalyzed by the integral membrane lipid-to-lipid glycosyltransferase 4-amino-4-deoxy-L-arabinose transferase (ArnT). Here, we report crystal structures of ArnT from Cupriavidus metallidurans, alone and in complex with the lipid carrier undecaprenyl phosphate, at 2.8 and 3.2 angstrom resolution, respectively. The structures show cavities for both lipidic substrates, which converge at the active site. A structural rearrangement occurs on undecaprenyl phosphate binding, which stabilizes the active site and likely allows lipid A binding. Functional mutagenesis experiments based on these structures suggest a mechanistic model for ArnT family enzymes. PMID:26912703

  15. (2R,1'S,2'R)- and (2S,1'S,2'R)-3-[2-Mono(di,tri)fluoromethylcyclopropyl]alanines and their incorporation into hormaomycin analogues

    PubMed Central

    Kozhushkov, Sergei I; Yufit, Dmitrii S; Grosse, Christian; Kaiser, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Summary Efficient and scalable syntheses of enantiomerically pure (2R,1'S,2'R)- and (2S,1'S,2'R)-3-[2-mono(di,tri)fluoromethylcyclopropyl]alanines 9a–c, as well as allo-D-threonine (4) and (2S,3R)-β-methylphenylalanine (3), using the Belokon' approach with (S)- and (R)-2-[(N-benzylprolyl)amino]benzophenone [(S)- and (R)-10] as reusable chiral auxiliaries have been developed. Three new fluoromethyl analogues of the naturally occurring octadepsipeptide hormaomycin (1) with (fluoromethylcyclopropyl)alanine moieties have been synthesized and subjected to preliminary tests of their antibiotic activity. PMID:25550751

  16. Polymer resins with amino acid containing pendants for sorption of bilirubin. II. Polyamide resins with various basic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Henning, D S; Brown, G R; St-Pierre, L E

    1986-01-01

    Short peptides, three to eight amino acids in length, containing various combinations of alanine, arginine, lysine, histidine and tyrosine have been synthesized onto water-swellable polyamide resin by the solid phase peptide synthesis method. The amount of bilirubin adsorbed from aqueous buffer solution (pH = 7.8) by the resins increases with increasing basicity of the amino acids in the pendant. As the number of basic amino acids on the pendant is increased from one to five a 4.7 fold enhancement in the adsorption capacity is seen for arginine while a 9.3 fold enhancement is obtained for lysine. A corresponding increase in length for the non-basic histidine results in a 6 fold enhancement. With alanine the adsorption capacity is uneffected by an increase in pendant length. PMID:3957453

  17. Design and Synthesis of Novel Isoxazole Tethered Quinone-Amino Acid Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Ravi Kumar, P.; Sambaiah, M.; Kandula, Venu; Payili, Nagaraju; Jaya Shree, A.; Yennam, Satyanarayana

    2014-01-01

    A new series of isoxazole tethered quinone-amino acid hybrids has been designed and synthesized involving 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction followed by an oxidation reaction using cerium ammonium nitrate (CAN). Using this method, for the first time various isoxazole tethered quinone-phenyl alanine and quinone-alanine hybrids were synthesized from simple commercially available 4-bromobenzyl bromide, propargyl bromide, and 2,5-dimethoxybenzaldehyde in good yield. PMID:25709839

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of the Amino Acid-Fermenting Clostridium propionicum X2 (DSM 1682)

    PubMed Central

    Poehlein, Anja; Schlien, Katja; Chowdhury, Nilanjan Pal; Gottschalk, Gerhard; Buckel, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium propionicum is a strict anaerobic, Gram positive, rod-shaped bacterium that belongs to the clostridial cluster XIVb. The genome consists of one replicon (3.1 Mb) and harbors 2,936 predicted protein-encoding genes. The genome encodes all enzymes required for fermentation of the amino acids α-alanine, β-alanine, serine, threonine, and methionine. PMID:27081148

  19. Prebiotic Synthesis of Hydrophobic and Protein Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Ring, David; Wolman, Yecheskel; Friedmann, Nadav; Miller, Stanley L.

    1972-01-01

    The formation of amino acids by the action of electric discharges on a mixture of methane, nitrogen, and water with traces of ammonia was studied in detail. The presence of glycine, alanine, α-amino-n-butyric acid, α-aminoisobutyric acid, valine, norvaline, isovaline, leucine, isoleucine, alloisoleucine, norleucine, proline, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, threonine, allothreonine, α-hydroxy-γ-aminobutyric acid, and α,γ-diaminobutyric acid was confirmed by ion-exchange chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. All of the primary α-amino acids found in the Murchison Meteorite have been synthesized by this electric discharge experiment. PMID:4501592

  20. The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis II. Amino Acids

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Stepka, W.; Benson, A. A.; Calvin, M.

    1948-05-25

    The radioactive amino acid's synthesized from C{sup 14}O{sub 2} by green algae both in the light and in the dark after CO{sub 2}-free preillumination have been separated and identified using paper chromatography and radioautography. The radioactive amino acids identified were aspartic acid, alanine and smaller amounts of 3- and 4-carbon amino acids. This finding as well as the total absence of radioactive glutamic acid substantiates the mechanism for reduction of CO{sub 2} previously postulated by members of this laboratory.

  1. Photoacoustic spectral studies on lanthanide amino acid complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yue-tao; Zhao, Gui-wen; Zhang, Shu-yi

    2003-01-01

    Several kinds of lanthanide complexes with glycine, alanine, phenylalanine, and tryptophan were synthesized and their photoacoustic (PA) spectra were measured. For the complexes of weakly fluorescent lanthanide ions with amino acids, the PA spectra reflect the influences of the ligands on the energy levels of lanthanide ions, whereas for the complexes of fluorescent lanthanide ions with amino acids, the PA spectra can be used to study the energy transfer from aromatic amino acids to lanthanide ions. At last, separating the overlapping peaks of lanthanide complex with tryptophan using the PA phase resolved method is introduced.

  2. Metabolomics Analysis Identifies D-Alanine-D-alanine Ligase as the Primary Lethal Target of D-cycloserine in Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Halouska, Steven; Fenton, Robert J.; Zinniel, Denise K.; Marshall, Darrell D.; Barletta, Raúl G.; Powers, Robert

    2014-01-01

    D-cycloserine is an effective second line antibiotic used as a last resort to treat multi (MDR)- and extensively (XDR)- drug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. D-cycloserine interferes with the formation of peptidoglycan biosynthesis by competitive inhibition of Alanine racemase (Alr) and D-Alanine-D-alanine ligase (Ddl). Although, the two enzymes are known to be inhibited, the in vivo lethal target is still unknown. Our NMR metabolomics work has revealed that Ddl is the primary target of DCS, as cell growth is inhibited when the production of D-alanyl-D-alanine is halted. It is shown that inhibition of Alr may contribute indirectly by lowering the levels of D-alanine thus allowing DCS to outcompete D-alanine for Ddl binding. The NMR data also supports the possibility of a transamination reaction to produce D-alanine from pyruvate and glutamate, thereby bypassing Alr inhibition. Furthermore, the inhibition of peptidoglycan synthesis results in a cascading effect on cellular metabolism as there is a shift toward the catabolic routes to compensate for accumulation of peptidoglycan precursors. PMID:24303782

  3. Effect of protein restriction on (15)N transfer from dietary [(15)N]alanine and [(15)N]Spirulina platensis into urea.

    PubMed

    Hamadeh, M J; Hoffer, L J

    2001-08-01

    Six normal men consumed a mixed test meal while adapted to high (1.5 g. kg(-1) x day(-1)) and low (0.3 g. kg(-1) x day(-1)) protein intakes. They completed this protocol twice: when the test meals included 3 mg/kg of [(15)N]alanine ([(15)N]Ala) and when they included 30 mg/kg of intrinsically labeled [(15)N]Spirulina platensis ([(15)N]SPI). Six subjects with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) receiving conventional insulin therapy consumed the test meal with added [(15)N]Ala while adapted to their customary high-protein diet. Protein restriction increased serum alanine, glycine, glutamine, and methionine concentrations and reduced those of leucine. Whether the previous diet was high or low in protein, there was a similar increase in serum alanine, methionine, and branched-chain amino acid concentrations after the test meal and a similar pattern of (15)N enrichment in serum amino acids for a given tracer. When [(15)N]Ala was included in the test meal, (15)N appeared rapidly in serum alanine and glutamine, to a minor degree in leucine and isoleucine, and not at all in other circulating amino acids. With [(15)N]SPI, there was a slow appearance of the label in all serum amino acids analyzed. Despite the different serum amino acid labeling, protein restriction reduced the postmeal transfer of dietary (15)N in [(15)N]Ala or [(15)N]SPI into [(15)N]urea by similar amounts (38 and 43%, respectively, not significant). The response of the subjects with IDDM was similar to that of the normal subjects. Information about adaptive reductions in dietary amino acid catabolism obtained by adding [(15)N]Ala to a test meal appears to be equivalent to that obtained using an intrinsically labeled protein tracer. PMID:11440912

  4. Genetics of Amino Acid Taste and Appetite.

    PubMed

    Bachmanov, Alexander A; Bosak, Natalia P; Glendinning, John I; Inoue, Masashi; Li, Xia; Manita, Satoshi; McCaughey, Stuart A; Murata, Yuko; Reed, Danielle R; Tordoff, Michael G; Beauchamp, Gary K

    2016-07-01

    The consumption of amino acids by animals is controlled by both oral and postoral mechanisms. We used a genetic approach to investigate these mechanisms. Our studies have shown that inbred mouse strains differ in voluntary amino acid consumption, and these differences depend on sensory and nutritive properties of amino acids. Like humans, mice perceive some amino acids as having a sweet (sucrose-like) taste and others as having an umami (glutamate-like) taste. Mouse strain differences in the consumption of some sweet-tasting amino acids (d-phenylalanine, d-tryptophan, and l-proline) are associated with polymorphisms of a taste receptor, type 1, member 3 gene (Tas1r3), and involve differential peripheral taste responsiveness. Strain differences in the consumption of some other sweet-tasting amino acids (glycine, l-alanine, l-glutamine, and l-threonine) do not depend on Tas1r3 polymorphisms and so must be due to allelic variation in other, as yet unknown, genes involved in sweet taste. Strain differences in the consumption of l-glutamate may depend on postingestive rather than taste mechanisms. Thus, genes and physiologic mechanisms responsible for strain differences in the consumption of each amino acid depend on the nature of its taste and postingestive properties. Overall, mouse strain differences in amino acid taste and appetite have a complex genetic architecture. In addition to the Tas1r3 gene, these differences depend on other genes likely involved in determining the taste and postingestive effects of amino acids. The identification of these genes may lead to the discovery of novel mechanisms that regulate amino acid taste and appetite. PMID:27422518

  5. Nomenclature for mammalian soluble glutathione transferases.

    PubMed

    Mannervik, Bengt; Board, Philip G; Hayes, John D; Listowsky, Irving; Pearson, William R

    2005-01-01

    The nomenclature for human soluble glutathione transferases (GSTs) is extended to include new members of the GST superfamily that have been discovered, sequenced, and shown to be expressed. The GST nomenclature is based on primary structure similarities and the division of GSTs into classes of more closely related sequences. The classes are designated by the names of the Greek letters: Alpha, Mu, Pi, etc., abbreviated in Roman capitals: A, M, P, and so on. (The Greek characters should not be used.) Class members are distinguished by Arabic numerals and the native dimeric protein structures are named according to their subunit composition (e.g., GST A1-2 is the enzyme composed of subunits 1 and 2 in the Alpha class). Soluble GSTs from other mammalian species can be classified in the same manner as the human enzymes, and this chapter presents the application of the nomenclature to the rat and mouse GSTs. PMID:16399376

  6. R76 in transmembrane domain 3 of the aspartate:alanine transporter AspT is involved in substrate transport.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Satomi; Nanatani, Kei; Abe, Keietsu

    2016-01-01

    The L-aspartate:L-alanine antiporter of Tetragenococcus halophilus (AspT) possesses an arginine residue (R76) within the GxxxG motif in the central part of transmembrane domain 3 (TM3)-a residue that has been estimated to transport function. In this study, we carried out amino acid substitutions of R76 and used proteoliposome reconstitution for analyzing the transport function of each substitution. Both l-aspartate and l-alanine transport assays showed that R76K has higher activity than the AspT-WT (R76), whereas R76D and R76E have lower activity than the AspT-WT. These results suggest that R76 is involved in AspT substrate transport. PMID:26849958

  7. Effect of taurine on the concentrations of glutamate, GABA, glutamine and alanine in the rat striatum and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Molchanova, Svetlana M; Oja, Simos S; Saransaari, Pirjo

    2007-01-01

    Taurine, a non-protein amino acid, acts as an osmoregulator and inhibitory neuromodulator in the brain. Here we studied the effects of intraperitoneal injections of taurine on the concentrations of glutamate and GABA, and their precursors, glutamine and alanine, in the rat striatum and hippocampus. Injections of 0.25, 0.5 and 1 g/kg taurine led to a gradual increase in taurine tissue concentrations in both hippocampus and striatum. Glutamate and GABA also increased in the hippocampus, but not in the striatum. Glutamine increased and alanine decreased markedly in both brain structures. The results corroborate the neuromodulatory role of taurine in the brain. Taurine administration results in an imbalance in inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission in the glutamatergic (hippocampus) and GABAergic (striatum) brain structures, affecting more markedly the neurotransmitter precursors. PMID:18605241

  8. Synthesis of novel MMT/acyl-protected nucleo alanine monomers for the preparation of DNA/alanyl-PNA chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Roviello, G. N.; Gröschel, S.; Pedone, C.

    2009-01-01

    Alanyl-peptide nucleic acid (alanyl-PNA)/DNA chimeras are oligomers envisaged to be beneficial in efficient DNA diagnostics based on an improved molecular beacon concept. A synthesis of alanyl-PNA/DNA chimera can be based on the solid phase assembly of the oligomer with mixed oligonucleotide/peptide backbone under DNA synthesis conditions, in which the nucleotides are introduced as phosphoramidites, whereas the nucleo amino acids make use of the acid labile monomethoxytrityl (MMT) group for temporary protection of the α-amino groups and acyl protecting groups for the exocyclic amino functions of the nucleobases. In this work, we realized for the first time the synthesis of all four MMT/acyl-protected nucleo alanines, achieved by deprotection/reprotection of the newly synthesized Boc/acyl intermediates, useful monomers for the obtainment of (alanyl-PNA)/DNA chimeras by conditions fully compatible with the standard phosphoramidite DNA synthesis strategy. PMID:19629638

  9. Expression of an L-alanine dehydrogenase gene in Zymomonas mobilis and excretion of L-alanine

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlenbusch, I.; Sahm, H.; Sprenger, G.A. )

    1991-05-01

    Gene alaD for L-alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus sphaericus was cloned and introduced into Z. mobilis. Under the control of the strong promoter of the pyruvate decarboxylase (pdc) gene, the enzyme was expressed up to a specific activity of nearly 1 {mu}mol {center dot} min{sup {minus}1} {center dot} mg of protein{sup {minus}1} in recombinant cells. As a result of this high L-alanine dehydrogenase activity, growing cells excreted up to 10 mmol of alanine per 280 mmol of glucose utilized into a mineral salts medium. By the addition of 85 mM NH{sub 4}{sup +} to the medium, growth of the recombinant cells stopped, and up to 41 mmol of alanine was secreted. As alanine dehydrogenase competed with pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) for the same substrate (pyruvate), PDC activity was reduced by starvation for the essential PDC cofactor thiamine PP{sub i}. A thiamine auxotrophy mutant of Z. mobilis which carried the alaD gene was starved for 40 h in glucose-supplemented mineral salts medium and then shifted to mineral salts medium with 85 mM NH {sub 4}{sup +} and 280 mmol of glucose. The recombinants excreted up to 84 mmol of alanine over 25 h. Alanine excretion proceeded at an initial velocity of 238 nmol {center dot} min{sup {minus}1} {center dot} mg(dry weight){sup {minus}1}. Despite this high activity, the excretion rate seemed to be a limiting factor, as the intracellular concentration of alanine was as high as 260 mM at the beginning of the excretion phase and decreased to 80 to 90 mM over 24 h.

  10. Simultaneous Determination of Glutamate, Glycine, and Alanine in Human Plasma Using Precolumn Derivatization with 6-Aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl Carbamate and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qing Xian; Li, Shu Cui; Yang, Mei Zi; Rao, Bin

    2012-01-01

    A simple, sensitive and reproducible high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method has been validated for determining concentrations of glutamate, glycine, and alanine in human plasma. Proteins in plasma were precipitated with perchloric acid, followed by derivatization with 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate (AQC). Simultaneous analysis of glutamate, glycine, and alanine is achieved using reversed-phase HPLC conditions and ultraviolet detection. Excellent linearity was observed for these three amino acids over their concentration ranges with correlation coefficients (r)>0.999. The intra- and inter-day precision were below 10%. This method utilizes quality control samples and demonstrates excellent plasma recovery and accuracy. The developed method has been successfully applied to measure plasma glutamate, glycine, and alanine in twenty volunteers. PMID:23118561

  11. Reconfiguration of N Metabolism upon Hypoxia Stress and Recovery: Roles of Alanine Aminotransferase (AlaAT) and Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH)

    PubMed Central

    Diab, Houssein; Limami, Anis M.

    2016-01-01

    In the context of climatic change, more heavy precipitation and more frequent flooding and waterlogging events threaten the productivity of arable farmland. Furthermore, crops were not selected to cope with flooding- and waterlogging-induced oxygen limitation. In general, low oxygen stress, unlike other abiotic stresses (e.g., cold, high temperature, drought and saline stress), received little interest from the scientific community and less financial support from stakeholders. Accordingly, breeding programs should be developed and agronomical practices should be adapted in order to save plants’ growth and yield—even under conditions of low oxygen availability (e.g., submergence and waterlogging). The prerequisite to the success of such breeding programs and changes in agronomical practices is a good knowledge of how plants adapt to low oxygen stress at the cellular and the whole plant level. In the present paper, we summarized the recent knowledge on metabolic adjustment in general under low oxygen stress and highlighted thereafter the major changes pertaining to the reconfiguration of amino acids syntheses. We propose a model showing (i) how pyruvate derived from active glycolysis upon hypoxia is competitively used by the alanine aminotransferase/glutamate synthase cycle, leading to alanine accumulation and NAD+ regeneration. Carbon is then saved in a nitrogen store instead of being lost through ethanol fermentative pathway. (ii) During the post-hypoxia recovery period, the alanine aminotransferase/glutamate dehydrogenase cycle mobilizes this carbon from alanine store. Pyruvate produced by the reverse reaction of alanine aminotransferase is funneled to the TCA cycle, while deaminating glutamate dehydrogenase regenerates, reducing equivalent (NADH) and 2-oxoglutarate to maintain the cycle function. PMID:27258319

  12. Reconfiguration of N Metabolism upon Hypoxia Stress and Recovery: Roles of Alanine Aminotransferase (AlaAT) and Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH).

    PubMed

    Diab, Houssein; Limami, Anis M

    2016-01-01

    In the context of climatic change, more heavy precipitation and more frequent flooding and waterlogging events threaten the productivity of arable farmland. Furthermore, crops were not selected to cope with flooding- and waterlogging-induced oxygen limitation. In general, low oxygen stress, unlike other abiotic stresses (e.g., cold, high temperature, drought and saline stress), received little interest from the scientific community and less financial support from stakeholders. Accordingly, breeding programs should be developed and agronomical practices should be adapted in order to save plants' growth and yield-even under conditions of low oxygen availability (e.g., submergence and waterlogging). The prerequisite to the success of such breeding programs and changes in agronomical practices is a good knowledge of how plants adapt to low oxygen stress at the cellular and the whole plant level. In the present paper, we summarized the recent knowledge on metabolic adjustment in general under low oxygen stress and highlighted thereafter the major changes pertaining to the reconfiguration of amino acids syntheses. We propose a model showing (i) how pyruvate derived from active glycolysis upon hypoxia is competitively used by the alanine aminotransferase/glutamate synthase cycle, leading to alanine accumulation and NAD⁺ regeneration. Carbon is then saved in a nitrogen store instead of being lost through ethanol fermentative pathway. (ii) During the post-hypoxia recovery period, the alanine aminotransferase/glutamate dehydrogenase cycle mobilizes this carbon from alanine store. Pyruvate produced by the reverse reaction of alanine aminotransferase is funneled to the TCA cycle, while deaminating glutamate dehydrogenase regenerates, reducing equivalent (NADH) and 2-oxoglutarate to maintain the cycle function. PMID:27258319

  13. Preferential Treatment: Interaction Between Amino Acids and Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crapster-Pregont, E. J.; Cleaves, H. J.; Hazen, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins and are important for some models of the origin of life. Polymerization of amino acids from dilute solution is unlikely without a scaffold or catalyst. The surfaces of early Earth minerals are the most likely candidates for this role. The surface adsorption behavior of 12 amino acids (L-alanine, L-serine, L-aspartic acid, L-proline, L- phenylalanine, L-valine, L-arginine, d-amino valeric acid, glycine, L-lysine, L-isoleucine, and B-alanine) on 21 minerals (quartz, calcite, enstatite, illite, olivine, pyrrhotite, pyrite, alkali basalt, albite, analcime, chlorite, barite, hydroxyl apatite, hematite, magnetite, aluminum hydroxide, kaolin, silica gel, corundum, rutile, and montmorillonite) was determined via batch adsorption experiments. Absorption was determined for concentrations between 10-4M and 10-6M in the presence of 0.1M NaCl, and between pH values of 3 and 9 at 25 degrees C. The equilibrated solutions were centrifuged, filtered, derivatized using a fluorescent amino group tag (dansyl-chloride) and analyzed by HPLC. Adsorption was standardized using BET surface area measurements for each mineral to give the number of mols of each amino acid adsorbed per square meter for each mineral. The results indicate an enormous difference in the adsorption of amino acids between minerals, along with major differences in the adsorption of individual amino acids on the same mineral surface. There is also a change in the absorbance of amino acids as the pH changes. Many previous studies of amino acid concentration and catalysis by minerals have used clay minerals because of their high surface areas, however, this data suggests that the surfaces of minerals such as calcite, quartz and pyrite have even higher affinities for amino acids. The results suggest mineral surfaces that could be optimal locations for the polymerization of molecules linked to the origin of life.

  14. Structure of D-alanine-D-alanine ligase from Yersinia pestis: nucleotide phosphate recognition by the serine loop.

    PubMed

    Tran, Huyen Thi; Hong, Myoung Ki; Ngo, Ho Phuong Thuy; Huynh, Kim Hung; Ahn, Yeh Jin; Wang, Zhong; Kang, Lin Woo

    2016-01-01

    D-Alanyl-D-alanine is an essential precursor of bacterial peptidoglycan and is synthesized by D-alanine-D-alanine ligase (DDL) with hydrolysis of ATP; this reaction makes DDL an important drug target for the development of antibacterial agents. Five crystal structures of DDL from Yersinia pestis (YpDDL) were determined at 1.7-2.5 Å resolution: apo, AMP-bound, ADP-bound, adenosine 5'-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate-bound, and D-alanyl-D-alanine- and ADP-bound structures. YpDDL consists of three domains, in which four loops, loop 1, loop 2 (the serine loop), loop 3 (the ω-loop) and loop 4, constitute the binding sites for two D-alanine molecules and one ATP molecule. Some of them, especially the serine loop and the ω-loop, show flexible conformations, and the serine loop is mainly responsible for the conformational change in substrate nucleotide phosphates. Enzyme-kinetics assays were carried out for both the D-alanine and ATP substrates and a substrate-binding mechanism was proposed for YpDDL involving conformational changes of the loops. PMID:26894530

  15. Concerted modulation of alanine and glutamate metabolism in young Medicago truncatula seedlings under hypoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Limami, Anis M.; Glévarec, Gaëlle; Ricoult, Claudie; Cliquet, Jean-Bernard; Planchet, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    The modulation of primary nitrogen metabolism by hypoxic stress was studied in young Medicago truncatula seedlings. Hypoxic seedlings were characterized by the up-regulation of glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GDH1) and mitochondrial alanine aminotransferase (mAlaAT), and down-regulation of glutamine synthetase 1b (GS1b), NADH-glutamate synthase (NADH-GOGAT), glutamate dehydrogenase 3 (GDH3), and isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) gene expression. Hypoxic stress severely inhibited GS activity and stimulated NADH-GOGAT activity. GDH activity was lower in hypoxic seedlings than in the control, however, under either normoxia or hypoxia, the in vivo activity was directed towards glutamate deamination. 15NH4 labelling showed for the first time that the adaptive reaction of the plant to hypoxia consisted of a concerted modulation of nitrogen flux through the pathways of both alanine and glutamate synthesis. In hypoxic seedlings, newly synthesized 15N-alanine increased and accumulated as the major amino acid, asparagine synthesis was inhibited, while 15N-glutamate was synthesized at a similar rate to that in the control. A discrepancy between the up-regulation of GDH1 expression and the down-regulation of GDH activity by hypoxic stress highlighted for the first time the complex regulation of this enzyme by hypoxia. Higher rates of glycolysis and ethanol fermentation are known to cause the fast depletion of sugar stores and carbon stress. It is proposed that the expression of GDH1 was stimulated by hypoxia-induced carbon stress, while the enzyme protein might be involved during post-hypoxic stress contributing to the regeneration of 2-oxoglutarate via the GDH shunt. PMID:18508812

  16. Comparative study of glycine, alanine or casein as inert nitrogen sources in endotoxemic rats.

    PubMed

    Chambon-Savanovitch, C; Felgines, C; Farges, M C; Raul, F; Cézard, J P; Davot, P; Vasson, M P; Cynober, L A

    1999-10-01

    Pharmacological effects of dietary amino acids (AA) and peptides must be compared to an isonitrogenous control that is as inert as possible. To establish a rationale for the choice of such a control, potential metabolic and nutritional effects of three currently used nitrogenous controls (glycine, alanine, and casein) were evaluated in an endotoxemic rat model that has well-defined alterations in AA and protein metabolism. Five-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats (113 +/- 1 g) were randomly assigned to four groups and received at d 0 an intraperitoneal injection of endotoxin (3 mg/kg). After withdrawal of food for 24 h, the rats were enterally refed for 48 h with a liquid diet (Osmolite((R))) supplemented with 0.19 g N. kg(-1). d(-1) in the form of glycine [lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-GLY group], alanine (LPS-ALA group) or casein (LPS-CAS group). One group (LPS group) received only Osmolite((R)). Plasma, two skeletal muscles, the liver and the intestine were then removed. Body and tissue weights and tissue protein contents did not differ among the four groups. Intestine histomorphometry showed no significant difference among groups. Jejunal hydrolase activities were significantly affected by the nitrogenous supplementations, but no effect was observed in the ileum. Only limited significant effects were observed on plasma and tissue-free AA concentrations, except for an accumulation of glycine in the plasma and tissues from the LPS-GLY group, compared to other groups. Overall, whereas glycine as a nitrogenous control should be used with care, either alanine or casein may be used as the "placebo," with the choice depending on the study to be performed. PMID:10498760

  17. Crystal Structure of a Thermostable Alanine Racemase from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis MB4 Reveals the Role of Gln360 in Substrate Selection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Shujing; Ju, Jiansong; Xu, Xiaoling

    2015-01-01

    Pyridoxal 5’-phosphate (PLP) dependent alanine racemase catalyzes racemization of L-Ala to D-Ala, a key component of the peptidoglycan network in bacterial cell wall. It has been extensively studied as an important antimicrobial drug target due to its restriction in eukaryotes. However, many marketed alanine racemase inhibitors also act on eukaryotic PLP-dependent enzymes and cause side effects. A thermostable alanine racemase (AlrTt) from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis MB4 contains an evolutionarily non-conserved residue Gln360 in inner layer of the substrate entryway, which is supposed to be a key determinant in substrate specificity. Here we determined the crystal structure of AlrTt in complex with L-Ala at 2.7 Å resolution, and investigated the role of Gln360 by saturation mutagenesis and kinetic analysis. Compared to typical bacterial alanine racemase, presence of Gln360 and conformational changes of active site residues disrupted the hydrogen bonding interactions necessary for proper PLP immobilization, and decreased both the substrate affinity and turnover number of AlrTt. However, it could be complemented by introduction of hydrophobic amino acids at Gln360, through steric blocking and interactions with a hydrophobic patch near active site pocket. These observations explained the low racemase activity of AlrTt, revealed the essential role of Gln360 in substrate selection, and its preference for hydrophobic amino acids especially Tyr in bacterial alanine racemization. Our work will contribute new insights into the alanine racemization mechanism for antimicrobial drug development. PMID:26218070

  18. THE EFFECTS OF SALINITY CHANGE ON THE FREE AMINO ACID POOLS OF TWO NEREID POLYCHAETES, 'NEANTHES SUCCINEA' AND 'LEONEREIS CULVERI'

    EPA Science Inventory

    The response of the free amino acid pools of two nereid polychaetes, Neanthes succinea and Leonereis culveri to both increased and decreased salinities was examined. In both species, glycine and alanine accounted for most of the observed change in the total free amino acid (FAA) ...

  19. EPR/alanine dosimetry for two therapeutic proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrale, Maurizio; Carlino, Antonio; Gallo, Salvatore; Longo, Anna; Panzeca, Salvatore; Bolsi, Alessandra; Hrbacek, Jan; Lomax, Tony

    2016-02-01

    In this work the analysis of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) response of alanine pellets exposed to two different clinical proton beams employed for radiotherapy is performed. One beam is characterized by a passive delivery technique and is dedicated to the eyes treatment (OPTIS2 beam line). Alanine pellets were irradiated with a 70 MeV proton beam corresponding to 35 mm range in eye tissue. We investigated how collimators with different sizes and shape used to conform the dose to the planned target volume influence the delivered dose. For this purpose we performed measurements with varying the collimator size (Output Factor) and the results were compared with those obtained with other dosimetric techniques (such as Markus chamber and diode detector). This analysis showed that the dosimeter response is independent of collimator diameter if this is larger than or equal to 10 mm. The other beam is characterized by an active spot-scanning technique, the Gantry1 beam line (maximum energy 230 MeV), and is used to treat deep-seated tumors. The dose linearity of alanine response in the clinical dose range was tested and the alanine dose response at selected locations in depth was measured and compared with the TPS planned dose in a quasi-clinical scenario. The alanine response was found to be linear in the dose in the clinical explored range (from 10 to 70 Gy). Furthermore, a depth dose profile in a quasi-clinical scenario was measured and compared to the dose computed by the Treatment Planning System PSIPLAN. The comparison of calibrated proton alanine measurements and TPS dose shows a difference under 1% in the SOBP and a "quenching" effect up to 4% in the distal part of SOBP. The positive dosimetric characteristics of the alanine pellets confirm the feasibility to use these detectors for "in vivo" dosimetry in clinical proton beams.

  20. Polymers with complexing properties. Simple poly(amino acids)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roque, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    The free amino (0.3 equiv/residue) and carboxyl (0.5 equiv/residue) groups of thermal polylysine increased dramatically on treatment with distilled water. The total hydrolysis of such a polymer was abnormal in that only about 50% of the expected amino acids were recovered. Poly (lysine-co-alanine-co-glycine) under usual conditions hydrolyzed completely in 8 hours; whereas, when it was pretreated with diazomethane, a normal period of 24 hours was required to give (nearly) the same amounts of each free amino acid as compared with those obtained from the untreated polymer. The amino groups of the basic thermal poly(amino acids) were sterically hindered. The existence of nitrogen atoms linking two or three chains and reactive groups (anhydride, imine) were proposed.

  1. Elevational Variation in Soil Amino Acid and Inorganic Nitrogen Concentrations in Taibai Mountain, China.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaochuang; Ma, Qingxu; Zhong, Chu; Yang, Xin; Zhu, Lianfeng; Zhang, Junhua; Jin, Qianyu; Wu, Lianghuan

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids are important sources of soil organic nitrogen (N), which is essential for plant nutrition, but detailed information about which amino acids predominant and whether amino acid composition varies with elevation is lacking. In this study, we hypothesized that the concentrations of amino acids in soil would increase and their composition would vary along the elevational gradient of Taibai Mountain, as plant-derived organic matter accumulated and N mineralization and microbial immobilization of amino acids slowed with reduced soil temperature. Results showed that the concentrations of soil extractable total N, extractable organic N and amino acids significantly increased with elevation due to the accumulation of soil organic matter and the greater N content. Soil extractable organic N concentration was significantly greater than that of the extractable inorganic N (NO3--N + NH4+-N). On average, soil adsorbed amino acid concentration was approximately 5-fold greater than that of the free amino acids, which indicates that adsorbed amino acids extracted with the strong salt solution likely represent a potential source for the replenishment of free amino acids. We found no appreciable evidence to suggest that amino acids with simple molecular structure were dominant at low elevations, whereas amino acids with high molecular weight and complex aromatic structure dominated the high elevations. Across the elevational gradient, the amino acid pool was dominated by alanine, aspartic acid, glycine, glutamic acid, histidine, serine and threonine. These seven amino acids accounted for approximately 68.9% of the total hydrolyzable amino acid pool. The proportions of isoleucine, tyrosine and methionine varied with elevation, while soil major amino acid composition (including alanine, arginine, aspartic acid, glycine, histidine, leucine, phenylalanine, serine, threonine and valine) did not vary appreciably with elevation (p>0.10). The compositional similarity of many

  2. Elevational Variation in Soil Amino Acid and Inorganic Nitrogen Concentrations in Taibai Mountain, China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xin; Zhu, Lianfeng; Zhang, Junhua; Jin, Qianyu; Wu, Lianghuan

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids are important sources of soil organic nitrogen (N), which is essential for plant nutrition, but detailed information about which amino acids predominant and whether amino acid composition varies with elevation is lacking. In this study, we hypothesized that the concentrations of amino acids in soil would increase and their composition would vary along the elevational gradient of Taibai Mountain, as plant-derived organic matter accumulated and N mineralization and microbial immobilization of amino acids slowed with reduced soil temperature. Results showed that the concentrations of soil extractable total N, extractable organic N and amino acids significantly increased with elevation due to the accumulation of soil organic matter and the greater N content. Soil extractable organic N concentration was significantly greater than that of the extractable inorganic N (NO3−-N + NH4+-N). On average, soil adsorbed amino acid concentration was approximately 5-fold greater than that of the free amino acids, which indicates that adsorbed amino acids extracted with the strong salt solution likely represent a potential source for the replenishment of free amino acids. We found no appreciable evidence to suggest that amino acids with simple molecular structure were dominant at low elevations, whereas amino acids with high molecular weight and complex aromatic structure dominated the high elevations. Across the elevational gradient, the amino acid pool was dominated by alanine, aspartic acid, glycine, glutamic acid, histidine, serine and threonine. These seven amino acids accounted for approximately 68.9% of the total hydrolyzable amino acid pool. The proportions of isoleucine, tyrosine and methionine varied with elevation, while soil major amino acid composition (including alanine, arginine, aspartic acid, glycine, histidine, leucine, phenylalanine, serine, threonine and valine) did not vary appreciably with elevation (p>0.10). The compositional similarity of many

  3. Bidirectional Interaction of Alanine with Sulfuric Acid in the Presence of Water and the Atmospheric Implication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Yu; Ma, Yan; Chen, Jiao; Jiang, Shuai; Liu, Yi-Rong; Wen, Hui; Feng, Ya-Juan; Hong, Yu; Huang, Teng; Huang, Wei

    2016-04-21

    Amino acids are recognized as important components of atmospheric aerosols, which impact on the Earth's climate directly and indirectly. However, much remains unknown about the initial events of nucleation. In this work, the interaction of alanine [NH2CH(CH3)COOH or Ala], one of the most abundant amino acids in the atmosphere, with sulfuric acid (SA) and water (W) has been investigated at the M06-2X/6-311++G(3df, 3pd) level of theory. We have studied thermodynamics of the hydrated (Ala)(SA) core system with up to four water molecules. We found that Ala, with one amino group and one carboxyl group, can interact with H2SO4 and H2O in two directions and that it has a high cluster stabilizing effect similar to that of ammonia, which is one of the key nucleation precursor. The corresponding Gibbs free energies of the (Ala)(SA)(W)n (n = 0-4) clusters formation at 298.15 K predicted that Ala can contribute to the stabilization of small binary clusters. Our results showed that the hydrate distribution is temperature-dependent and that a higher humidity and temperature can contribute to the formation of hydrated clusters. PMID:26997115

  4. The origin of amino acids in lunar regolith samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsila, Jamie E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Glavin, Daniel P.; McLain, Hannah L.; Noble, Sarah K.; Gibson, Everett K.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the amino acid content of seven lunar regolith samples returned by the Apollo 16 and Apollo 17 missions and stored under NASA curation since collection using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Consistent with results from initial analyses shortly after collection in the 1970s, we observed amino acids at low concentrations in all of the curated samples, ranging from 0.2 parts-per-billion (ppb) to 42.7 ppb in hot-water extracts and 14.5-651.1 ppb in 6 M HCl acid-vapor-hydrolyzed, hot-water extracts. Amino acids identified in the Apollo soil extracts include glycine, D- and L-alanine, D- and L-aspartic acid, D- and L-glutamic acid, D- and L-serine, L-threonine, and L-valine, all of which had previously been detected in lunar samples, as well as several compounds not previously identified in lunar regoliths: α-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), D- and L-β-amino-n-butyric acid (β-ABA), DL-α-amino-n-butyric acid, γ-amino-n-butyric acid, β-alanine, and ε-amino-n-caproic acid. We observed an excess of the L enantiomer in most of the detected proteinogenic amino acids, but racemic alanine and racemic β-ABA were present in some samples. We also examined seven samples from Apollo 15, 16, and 17 that had been previously allocated to a non-curation laboratory, as well as two samples of terrestrial dunite from studies of lunar module engine exhaust that had been stored in the same laboratory. The amino acid content of these samples suggested that contamination had occurred during non-curatorial storage. We measured the compound-specific carbon isotopic ratios of glycine, β-alanine, and L-alanine in Apollo regolith sample 70011 and found values of -21‰ to -33‰. These values are consistent with those seen in terrestrial biology and, together with the enantiomeric compositions of the proteinogenic amino acids, suggest that terrestrial biological contamination is a primary source of the

  5. The Genetic Architecture of Murine Glutathione Transferases

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lu; Pandey, Ashutosh K.; Houseal, M. Trevor; Mulligan, Megan K.

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes play a protective role against oxidative stress and may influence disease risk and drug pharmacokinetics. In this study, massive multiscalar trait profiling across a large population of mice derived from a cross between C57BL/6J (B6) and DBA2/J (D2)—the BXD family—was combined with linkage and bioinformatic analyses to characterize mechanisms controlling GST expression and to identify downstream consequences of this variation. Similar to humans, mice show a wide range in expression of GST family members. Variation in the expression of Gsta4, Gstt2, Gstz1, Gsto1, and Mgst3 is modulated by local expression QTLs (eQTLs) in several tissues. Higher expression of Gsto1 in brain and liver of BXD strains is strongly associated (P < 0.01) with inheritance of the B6 parental allele whereas higher expression of Gsta4 and Mgst3 in brain and liver, and Gstt2 and Gstz1 in brain is strongly associated with inheritance of the D2 parental allele. Allele-specific assays confirmed that expression of Gsto1, Gsta4, and Mgst3 are modulated by sequence variants within or near each gene locus. We exploited this endogenous variation to identify coexpression networks and downstream targets in mouse and human. Through a combined systems genetics approach, we provide new insight into the biological role of naturally occurring variants in GST genes. PMID:26829228

  6. The structure of alanine racemase from Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Emily; Scaletti-Hutchinson, Emma; Opel-Reading, Helen; Nakatani, Yoshio; Krause, Kurt L.

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic Gram-negative bacterium which is a common cause of hospital-acquired infections. Numerous antibiotic-resistant strains exist, emphasizing the need for the development of new antimicrobials. Alanine racemase (Alr) is a pyridoxal 5′-phosphate dependent enzyme that is responsible for racemization between enantiomers of alanine. As d-alanine is an essential component of the bacterial cell wall, its inhibition is lethal to prokaryotes, making it an excellent antibiotic drug target. The crystal structure of A. baumannii alanine racemase (AlrAba) from the highly antibiotic-resistant NCTC13302 strain has been solved to 1.9 Å resolution. Comparison of AlrAba with alanine racemases from closely related bacteria demonstrates a conserved overall fold. The substrate entryway and active site of the enzymes were shown to be highly conserved. The structure of AlrAba will provide the template required for future structure-based drug-design studies. PMID:25195891

  7. Caramelization of maltose solution in presence of alanine.

    PubMed

    Fadel, H H M; Farouk, A

    2002-01-01

    Two solutions of maltose in water were used to prepare caramels. Alanine as a catalyst was added to one of these solutions. The caramelization was conducted at 130 degrees C for total time period 90 minutes. Convenient samples were taken of each caramel solution every 30 min and subjected to sensory analysis and isolation of volatile components. The odour and colour sensory tests were evaluated according to the international standard methods (ISO). The results showed that, the presence of alanine gave rise to a high significant (P < 0.01) decrease in acid attributes and remarkable increase in the sweet and caramel attributes, which are the most important caramel notes. On the other hand the increase in heating time in presence of alanine as a catalyst resulted in a high significant (P < 0.01) increase in the browning rate of caramel solution. The new technique Solid Phase Micro Extraction (SPME) was used for trapping the volatile components in the headspace of each caramel samples followed by thermal desorption and GC and GC - MS analysis. The 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (HMF), the main characteristic caramel product, showed its highest value in sample containing alanine after heating for 60 minutes. The best sensory results of the sample contains alanine were confirmed by the presence of high concentrations of the most potent odorants of caramel besides to the formation of some volatile compounds have caramel like flavours such as 2-acetyl pyrrole, 2-furanones and 1-(2-furanyl)1,2-propandione. PMID:12395187

  8. The fate of the cyanobacterial toxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine in freshwater mussels.

    PubMed

    Downing, Simoné; Contardo-Jara, Valeska; Pflugmacher, Stephan; Downing, Timothy Grant

    2014-03-01

    The cyanobacterial neurotoxin, β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) has been suggested as a causative agent for certain neurodegenerative diseases. This cyanotoxin bioaccumulates in an array of aquatic organisms, in which it occurs as both a free amino acid and in a protein-associated form. This study was intended to investigate the environmental fate of BMAA by examining the metabolism of isotopically labeled BMAA in four freshwater mussel species. All species showed substantial uptake of BMAA from the culture media. Data showed no significant evidence for BMAA catabolism in any of the animals but did suggest metabolism via the reversible covalent modification of BMAA in freshwater mussels, a process that appears to be variable in different species. PMID:24507126

  9. Synthesis and Characterization in Vitro and in Vivo of (l)-(Trimethylsilyl)alanine Containing Neurotensin Analogues.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, Roberto; Besserer-Offroy, Élie; René, Adeline; Côté, Jérôme; Tétreault, Pascal; Collerette-Tremblay, Jasmin; Longpré, Jean-Michel; Leduc, Richard; Martinez, Jean; Sarret, Philippe; Cavelier, Florine

    2015-10-01

    The silylated amino acid (l)-(trimethylsilyl)alanine (TMSAla) was incorporated at the C-terminal end of the minimal biologically active neurotensin (NT) fragment, leading to the synthesis of new hexapeptide NT[8-13] analogues. Here, we assessed the ability of these new silylated NT compounds to bind to NTS1 and NTS2 receptors, promote regulation of multiple signaling pathways, induce inhibition of the ileal smooth muscle contractions, and affect distinct physiological variables, including blood pressure and pain sensation. Among the C-terminal modified analogues, compound 6 (JMV2007) carrying a TMSAla residue in position 13 exhibits a higher affinity toward NT receptors than the NT native peptide. We also found that compound 6 is effective in reversing carbachol-induced contraction in the isolated strip preparation assay and at inducing a drop in blood pressure. Finally, compound 6 produces potent analgesia in experimental models of acute and persistent pain. PMID:26348111

  10. Plasma amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    All measurements are in micromole per liter (micro mol/L). Normal values may vary between different laboratories. Talk to your health care provider about your specific test results. Alanine Children: 200 ...

  11. Detection of glutathione transferase activity on polyacrylamide gels.

    PubMed

    Ricci, G; Lo Bello, M; Caccuri, A M; Galiazzo, F; Federici, G

    1984-12-01

    A simple and sensitive assay for glutathione transferase activity on polyacrylamide gel is described. The method is based on the fast reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium salt by glutathione. Blue insoluble formazan colors the gel except in the glutathione transferase area. The stable and defined colorless zone is still detectable with 0.005 unit enzyme. This technique has been successfully applied with enzyme preparations of human heart and other tissues. PMID:6532239

  12. GMXPBSA 2.1: A GROMACS tool to perform MM/PBSA and computational alanine scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paissoni, C.; Spiliotopoulos, D.; Musco, G.; Spitaleri, A.

    2015-01-01

    GMXPBSA 2.1 is a user-friendly suite of Bash/Perl scripts for streamlining MM/PBSA calculations on structural ensembles derived from GROMACS trajectories, to automatically calculate binding free energies for protein-protein or ligand-protein complexes [R.T. Bradshaw et al., Protein Eng. Des. Sel. 24 (2011) 197-207]. GMXPBSA 2.1 is flexible and can easily be customized to specific needs and it is an improvement of the previous GMXPBSA 2.0 [C. Paissoni et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. (2014), 185, 2920-2929]. Additionally, it performs computational alanine scanning (CAS) to study the effects of ligand and/or receptor alanine mutations on the free energy of binding. Calculations require only for protein-protein or protein-ligand MD simulations. GMXPBSA 2.1 performs different comparative analyses, including a posteriori generation of alanine mutants of the wild-type complex, calculation of the binding free energy values of the mutant complexes and comparison of the results with the wild-type system. Moreover, it compares the binding free energy of different complex trajectories, allowing the study of the effects of non-alanine mutations, post-translational modifications or unnatural amino acids on the binding free energy of the system under investigation. Finally, it can calculate and rank relative affinity to the same receptor utilizing MD simulations of proteins in complex with different ligands. In order to dissect the different MM/PBSA energy contributions, including molecular mechanic (MM), electrostatic contribution to solvation (PB) and nonpolar contribution to solvation (SA), the tool combines two freely available programs: the MD simulations software GROMACS [S. Pronk et al., Bioinformatics 29 (2013) 845-854] and the Poisson-Boltzmann equation solver APBS [N.A. Baker et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A 98 (2001) 10037-10041]. All the calculations can be performed in single or distributed automatic fashion on a cluster facility in order to increase the

  13. Forced swimming and imipramine modify plasma and brain amino acid concentrations in mice.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tatsuro; Yamane, Haruka; Tomonaga, Shozo; Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2009-01-01

    The relationships between monoamine metabolism and forced swimming or antidepressants have been well studied, however information is lacking regarding amino acid metabolism under these conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of forced swimming and imipramine on amino acid concentrations in plasma, the cerebral cortex and the hypothalamus in mice. Forced swimming caused cerebral cortex concentrations of L-glutamine, L-alanine, and taurine to be increased, while imipramine treatment caused decreased concentrations of L-glutamate, L-alanine, L-tyrosine, L-methionine, and L-ornithine. In the hypothalamus, forced swimming decreased the concentration of L-serine while imipramine treatment caused increased concentration of beta-alanine. Forced swimming caused increased plasma concentration of taurine, while concentrations of L-serine, L-asparagine, L-glutamine and beta-alanine were decreased. Imipramine treatment caused increased plasma concentration of all amino acid, except for L-aspartate and taurine. In conclusion, forced swimming and imipramine treatment modify central and peripheral amino acid metabolism. These results may aid in the identification of amino acids that have antidepressant-like effects, or may help to refine the dosages of antidepressant drugs. PMID:19010319

  14. Deuterium Fractionation during Amino Acid Formation by Photolysis of Interstellar Ice Analogs Containing Deuterated Methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, Yasuhiro; Takano, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Naoki; Kouchi, Akira

    2016-08-01

    Deuterium (D) atoms in interstellar deuterated methanol might be distributed into complex organic molecules through molecular evolution by photochemical reactions in interstellar grains. In this study, we use a state-of-the-art high-resolution mass spectrometer coupled with a high-performance liquid chromatography system to quantitatively analyze amino acids and their deuterated isotopologues formed by the photolysis of interstellar ice analogs containing singly deuterated methanol CH2DOH at 10 K. Five amino acids (glycine, α-alanine, β-alanine, sarcosine, and serine) and their deuterated isotopologues whose D atoms are bound to carbon atoms are detected in organic residues formed by photolysis followed by warming up to room temperature. The abundances of singly deuterated amino acids are in the range of 0.3–1.1 relative to each nondeuterated counterpart, and the relative abundances of doubly and triply deuterated species decrease with an increasing number of D atoms in a molecule. The abundances of amino acids increase by a factor of more than five upon the hydrolysis of the organic residues, leading to decreases in the relative abundances of deuterated species for α-alanine and β-alanine. On the other hand, the relative abundances of the deuterated isotopologues of the other three amino acids did not decrease upon hydrolysis, indicating different formation mechanisms of these two groups upon hydrolysis. The present study facilitates both qualitative and quantitative evaluations of D fractionation during molecular evolution in the interstellar medium.

  15. Morphosynthesis of alanine mesocrystals by pH control.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yurong; Cölfen, Helmut; Antonietti, Markus

    2006-06-01

    Crystallization of DL-alanine is studied as a single polymorph model case to analyze the different modes of crystallization of polar organic molecules in absence of any structure directing additives. Depending on supersaturation, which is controlled either by temperature or by pH, and in the absence of additives, crystallization by mesoscale assembly of nanoparticles is found over a wide range of conditions, leading to so-called mesocrystals. This supplements the classical molecule-based crystallization mechanism, which is identified at lower supersaturations and at pH values away from the isoelectric point (IEP). The resulting alanine crystals are characterized by SEM, XRD, and single-crystal analysis. Time-resolved conductivity measurements and dynamic light scattering of the reaction solutions reveal information about precursor structures and reaction kinetics. A formation mechanism is proposed for the alanine mesocrystals. PMID:16771332

  16. First-principles studies of pure and fluorine substituted alanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Sardar; Vaizie, Hamide; Rahnamaye Aliabad, H. A.; Ahmad, Rashid; Khan, Imad; Ali, Zahid; Jalali-Asadabadi, S.; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Khan, Amir Abdullah

    2016-05-01

    This paper communicates the structural, electronic and optical properties of L-alanine, monofluoro and difluoro substituted alanines using density functional calculations. These compounds exist in orthorhombic crystal structure and the calculated structural parameters such as lattice constants, bond angles and bond lengths are in agreement with the experimental results. L-alanine is an indirect band gap insulator, while its fluorine substituted compounds (monofluoroalanine and difluoroalanine) are direct band gap insulators. The substitution causes reduction in the band gap and hence these optically tailored direct wide band gap materials have enhanced optical properties in the ultraviolet (UV) region of electromagnetic spectrum. Therefore, optical properties like dielectric function, refractive index, reflectivity and energy loss function are also investigated. These compounds have almost isotropic nature in the lower frequency range while at higher energies, they have a significant anisotropic nature.

  17. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... defects & other health conditions > Amino acid metabolism disorders Amino acid metabolism disorders E-mail to a friend Please ... baby’s newborn screening may include testing for certain amino acid metabolism disorders. These are rare health conditions that ...

  18. Plasma amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    Amino acids blood test ... types of methods used to determine the individual amino acid levels in the blood. ... test is done to measure the level of amino acids in the blood. An increased level of a ...

  19. Serum gamma glutamyl transferase as a specific indicator of bile duct lesions in the rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, T. B.; Neptun, D. A.; Popp, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Serum gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), a marker of hepatic injury used extensively in humans, has been used rarely in rats because its specificity has not been previously defined. Studies were designed for investigation of the specificity of serum GGT activity with the use of cell type specific hepatotoxicants in Fischer 344 rats. Single necrogenic doses of CCl4, allyl alcohol (AA), and alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT) were used to produce cell specific injury in centrilobular hepatocytes, periportal hepatocytes, and bile duct cells, respectively. Administration of CCl4 markedly increased serum activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (AP), and serum bile acid concentrations within 24 hours but had no effect on serum GGT activity. ANIT treatment increased serum GGT and AP activities and bile acid concentration 24 hours following administration. Allyl alcohol administration increased serum ALT activity but had no effect on GGT activity. Administration of ANIT in the diet at 0.01%, 0.022%, 0.047%, and 0.1% for 2, 4, and 6 weeks produced dose- and time-dependent increases in serum GGT activity which strongly correlated with quantitative increases in hepatic bile duct volume, which was determined morphometrically. These observations support the use of serum GGT activity in the rat as diagnostic of bile duct cell necrosis when increases are detected shortly after the insult and as an indicator of possible bile duct hyperplasia. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:6147091

  20. Serum gamma glutamyl transferase as a specific indicator of bile duct lesions in the rat liver.

    PubMed

    Leonard, T B; Neptun, D A; Popp, J A

    1984-08-01

    Serum gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), a marker of hepatic injury used extensively in humans, has been used rarely in rats because its specificity has not been previously defined. Studies were designed for investigation of the specificity of serum GGT activity with the use of cell type specific hepatotoxicants in Fischer 344 rats. Single necrogenic doses of CCl4, allyl alcohol (AA), and alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT) were used to produce cell specific injury in centrilobular hepatocytes, periportal hepatocytes, and bile duct cells, respectively. Administration of CCl4 markedly increased serum activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (AP), and serum bile acid concentrations within 24 hours but had no effect on serum GGT activity. ANIT treatment increased serum GGT and AP activities and bile acid concentration 24 hours following administration. Allyl alcohol administration increased serum ALT activity but had no effect on GGT activity. Administration of ANIT in the diet at 0.01%, 0.022%, 0.047%, and 0.1% for 2, 4, and 6 weeks produced dose- and time-dependent increases in serum GGT activity which strongly correlated with quantitative increases in hepatic bile duct volume, which was determined morphometrically. These observations support the use of serum GGT activity in the rat as diagnostic of bile duct cell necrosis when increases are detected shortly after the insult and as an indicator of possible bile duct hyperplasia. PMID:6147091

  1. GMXPBSA 2.0: A GROMACS tool to perform MM/PBSA and computational alanine scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paissoni, C.; Spiliotopoulos, D.; Musco, G.; Spitaleri, A.

    2014-11-01

    GMXPBSA 2.0 is a user-friendly suite of Bash/Perl scripts for streamlining MM/PBSA calculations on structural ensembles derived from GROMACS trajectories, to automatically calculate binding free energies for protein-protein or ligand-protein complexes. GMXPBSA 2.0 is flexible and can easily be customized to specific needs. Additionally, it performs computational alanine scanning (CAS) to study the effects of ligand and/or receptor alanine mutations on the free energy of binding. Calculations require only for protein-protein or protein-ligand MD simulations. GMXPBSA 2.0 performs different comparative analysis, including a posteriori generation of alanine mutants of the wild-type complex, calculation of the binding free energy values of the mutant complexes and comparison of the results with the wild-type system. Moreover, it compares the binding free energy of different complexes trajectories, allowing the study the effects of non-alanine mutations, post-translational modifications or unnatural amino acids on the binding free energy of the system under investigation. Finally, it can calculate and rank relative affinity to the same receptor utilizing MD simulations of proteins in complex with different ligands. In order to dissect the different MM/PBSA energy contributions, including molecular mechanic (MM), electrostatic contribution to solvation (PB) and nonpolar contribution to solvation (SA), the tool combines two freely available programs: the MD simulations software GROMACS and the Poisson-Boltzmann equation solver APBS. All the calculations can be performed in single or distributed automatic fashion on a cluster facility in order to increase the calculation by dividing frames across the available processors. The program is freely available under the GPL license. Catalogue identifier: AETQ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETQ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing

  2. Β-alanine and l-histidine transport across the inner blood-retinal barrier: potential involvement in L-carnosine supply.

    PubMed

    Usui, Takuya; Kubo, Yoshiyuki; Akanuma, Shin-Ichi; Hosoya, Ken-Ichi

    2013-08-01

    The supply of L-carnosine, a bioactive dipeptide of β-alanine and l-histidine, to the retina across the blood-retinal barrier (BRB) was studied. The in vivo and in vitro studies revealed low uptake activities for [(3)H]Gly-Sar, a representative dipeptide, suggesting that l-carnosine transport plays only a minor role at the BRB. The in vivo study using rats showed approximately 18- and 23-fold greater retinal uptake indexes (RUI) for [(3)H]β-alanine and [(3)H]l-histidine compared with that of a paracellular marker, respectively. The RUI of [(3)H]β-alanine was taurine- and γ-aminobutyric acid-sensitive, and the in vitro uptake by TR-iBRB2 cells showed time- concentration- and temperature-dependent [(3)H]β-alanine uptake, suggesting that a carrier-mediated process was involved in β-alanine transport across the inner BRB. [(3)H]β-Alanine uptake was inhibited by taurine and β-guanidinopropionic acid, suggesting that taurine transporter (TAUT/SLC6A6) is responsible for the influx transport of β-alanine across the inner BRB. Regarding l-histidine, the l-leucine-sensitive RUI of [(3)H]l-histidine was identified, and the in vitro [(3)H]l-histidine uptake by TR-iBRB2 cells suggested that a carrier-mediated process was involved in l-histidine transport across the inner BRB. The inhibition profile suggested that L-type amino acid transporter (LAT1/SLC7A5) is responsible for the influx transport of l-histidine across the inner BRB. These results show that the influx transports of β-alanine and l-histidine across the inner BRB is carried out by TAUT and LAT1, respectively, suggesting that the retinal l-carnosine is supplied by enzymatic synthesis from two kinds of amino acids transported across the inner BRB. PMID:23773890

  3. Stereoselective aminoacylation of a dinucleoside monophosphate by the imidazolides of DL-alanine and N-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)-DL-alanine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Profy, A. T.; Usher, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The aminoacylation of diinosine monophosphate was studied experimentally. When the acylating agent was the imidazolide of N-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)-DL-alanine, a 40 percent enantiomeric excess of the isomer was incorporated at the 2' site and the positions of equilibrium for the reversible 2'-3' migration reaction differed for the D and L enantiomers. The reactivity of the nucleoside hydroxyl groups was found to decrease on the order 2'(3') less than internal 2' and less than 5', and the extent of the reaction was affected by the concentration of the imidazole buffer. Reaction of IpI with imidazolide of unprotected DL-alanine, by contrast, led to an excess of the D isomer at the internal 2' site. Finally, reaction with the N-carboxy anhydride of DL-alanine occurred without stereoselection. These results are found to be relevant to the study of the evolution of optical chemical activity and the origin of genetically directed protein synthesis.

  4. Subcritical Water Extraction of Amino Acids from Atacama Desert Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amashukeli, Xenia; Pelletier, Christine C.; Kirby, James P.; Grunthaner, Frank J.

    2007-01-01

    Amino acids are considered organic molecular indicators in the search for extant and extinct life in the Solar System. Extraction of these molecules from a particulate solid matrix, such as Martian regolith, will be critical to their in situ detection and analysis. The goals of this study were to optimize a laboratory amino acid extraction protocol by quantitatively measuring the yields of extracted amino acids as a function of liquid water temperature and sample extraction time and to compare the results to the standard HCl vapor- phase hydrolysis yields for the same soil samples. Soil samples from the Yungay region of the Atacama Desert ( Martian regolith analog) were collected during a field study in the summer of 2005. The amino acids ( alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycine, serine, and valine) chosen for analysis were present in the samples at concentrations of 1 - 70 parts- per- billion. Subcritical water extraction efficiency was examined over the temperature range of 30 - 325 degrees C, at pressures of 17.2 or 20.0 MPa, and for water- sample contact equilibration times of 0 - 30 min. None of the amino acids were extracted in detectable amounts at 30 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), suggesting that amino acids are too strongly bound by the soil matrix to be extracted at such a low temperature. Between 150 degrees C and 250 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), the extraction efficiencies of glycine, alanine, and valine were observed to increase with increasing water temperature, consistent with higher solubility at higher temperatures, perhaps due to the decreasing dielectric constant of water. Amino acids were not detected in extracts collected at 325 degrees C ( at 20.0 MPa), probably due to amino acid decomposition at this temperature. The optimal subcritical water extraction conditions for these amino acids from Atacama Desert soils were achieved at 200 degrees C, 17.2 MPa, and a water- sample contact equilibration time of 10 min.

  5. An Anhydro-N-Acetylmuramyl-l-Alanine Amidase with Broad Specificity Tethered to the Outer Membrane of Escherichia coli▿

    PubMed Central

    Uehara, Tsuyoshi; Park, James T.

    2007-01-01

    From its amino acid sequence homology with AmpD, we recognized YbjR, now renamed AmiD, as a possible second 1,6-anhydro-N-acetylmuramic acid (anhMurNAc)-l-alanine amidase in Escherichia coli. We have now confirmed that AmiD is an anhMurNAc-l-Ala amidase and demonstrated that AmpD and AmiD are the only enzymes present in E. coli that are able to cleave the anhMurNAc-l-Ala bond. The activity was present only in the outer membrane fraction obtained from an ampD mutant. In contrast to AmpD, which is specific for the anhMurNAc-l-alanine bond, AmiD also cleaved the bond between MurNAc and l-alanine in both muropeptides and murein sacculi. Unlike the periplasmic murein amidases, AmiD did not participate in cell separation. ampG mutants, which are unable to import GlcNAc-anhMurNAc-peptides into the cytoplasm, released mainly peptides into the medium due to AmiD activity, whereas an ampG amiD double mutant released a large amount of intact GlcNAc-anhMurNAc-peptides into the medium. PMID:17526703

  6. STT3, a highly conserved protein required for yeast oligosaccharyl transferase activity in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Zufferey, R; Knauer, R; Burda, P; Stagljar, I; te Heesen, S; Lehle, L; Aebi, M

    1995-01-01

    N-linked glycosylation is a ubiquitous protein modification, and is essential for viability in eukaryotic cells. A lipid-linked core-oligosaccharide is assembled at the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum and transferred to selected asparagine residues of nascent polypeptide chains by the oligosaccharyl transferase (OTase) complex. Based on the synthetic lethal phenotype of double mutations affecting the assembly of the lipid-linked core-oligosaccharide and the OTase activity, we have performed a novel screen for mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with altered N-linked glycosylation. Besides novel mutants deficient in the assembly of the lipid-linked oligosaccharide (alg mutants), we identified the STT3 locus as being required for OTase activity in vivo. The essential STT3 protein is approximately 60% identical in amino acid sequence to its human homologue. A mutation in the STT3 locus affects substrate specificity of the OTase complex in vivo and in vitro. In stt3-3 cells very little glycosyl transfer occurs from incomplete lipid-linked oligosaccharide, whereas the transfer of full-length Glc3Man9GlcNAc2 is hardly affected as compared with wild-type cells. Depletion of the STT3 protein results in loss of transferase activity in vivo and a deficiency in the assembly of OTase complex. Images PMID:7588624

  7. A study of L-leucine, L-phenylalanine and L-alanine transport in the perfused rat mammary gland: possible involvement of LAT1 and LAT2.

    PubMed

    Shennan, D B; Calvert, D T; Travers, M T; Kudo, Y; Boyd, C A R

    2002-08-19

    The transport of L-leucine, L-phenylalanine and L-alanine by the perfused lactating rat mammary gland has been examined using a rapid, paired-tracer dilution technique. The clearances of all three amino acids by the mammary gland consisted of a rising phase followed by a rapid fall-off, respectively, reflecting influx and efflux of the radiotracers. The peak clearance of L-leucine was inhibited by BCH (65%) and D-leucine (58%) but not by L-proline. The inhibition of L-leucine clearance by BCH and D-leucine was not additive. L-leucine inhibited the peak clearance of radiolabelled L-leucine by 78%. BCH also inhibited the peak clearance of L-phenylalanine (66%) and L-alanine (33%) by the perfused mammary gland. Lactating rat mammary tissue was found to express both LAT1 and LAT2 mRNA. The results suggest that system L is situated in the basolateral aspect of the lactating rat mammary epithelium and thus probably plays a central role in neutral amino acid uptake from blood. The finding that L-alanine uptake by the gland was inhibited by BCH suggests that LAT2 may make a significant contribution to neutral amino acid uptake by the mammary epithelium. PMID:12101005

  8. DNA sequencing and expression of the formyl coenzyme A transferase gene, frc, from Oxalobacter formigenes.

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, H; Ogden, S D; Lung, H Y; Luttge, B G; Baetz, A L; Peck, A B

    1997-01-01

    Oxalic acid, a highly toxic by-product of metabolism, is catabolized by a limited number of bacterial species utilizing an activation-decarboxylation reaction which yields formate and CO2. frc, the gene encoding formyl coenzyme A transferase, an enzyme which transfers a coenzyme A moiety to activate oxalic acid, was cloned from the bacterium Oxalobacter formigenes. DNA sequencing revealed a single open reading frame of 1,284 bp capable of encoding a 428-amino-acid protein. A presumed promoter region and a rho-independent termination sequence suggest that this gene is part of a monocistronic operon. A PCR fragment containing the open reading frame, when overexpressed in Escherichia coli, produced a product exhibiting enzymatic activity similar to the purified native enzyme. With this, the two genes necessary for bacterial catabolism of oxalate, frc and oxc, have now been cloned, sequenced, and expressed. PMID:9150242

  9. Biochemical properties of an omega-class glutathione S-transferase of the silkmoth, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kohji; Nagaoka, Sumiharu; Banno, Yutaka; Aso, Yoichi

    2009-05-01

    A cDNA encoding an omega-class glutathione S-transferase of the silkmoth, Bombyx mori (bmGSTO), was cloned by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The resulting clone was sequenced and deduced for amino acid sequence, which revealed 40, 40, and 39% identities to omega-class GSTs from human, pig, and mouse, respectively. A recombinant protein (rbmGSTO) was functionally overexpressed in Escherichia coli cells in a soluble form and purified to homogeneity. rbmGSTO was able to catalyze the biotranslation of glutathione with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, a model substrate for GST, as well as with 4-hydroxynonenal, a product of lipid peroxidation. This enzyme was shown to have high affinity for organophosphorus insecticide and was present abundantly in silkmoth strain exhibiting fenitrothion resistance. These results indicate that bmGSTO could be involved in the increase in level of insecticide resistance for lepidopteran insects. PMID:19022397

  10. Effects of ruminally degradable nitrogen intake and in vitro addition of ammonia and propionate on the metabolic fate of L-[1-14C]alanine and L-[15N]alanine in isolated sheep hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Mutsvangwa, T; Buchanan-Smith, J G; McBride, B W

    1997-04-01

    Isolated hepatocytes prepared from sheep fed a basal diet (bromegrass hay-corn, 50:50 wt/ wt, as-fed basis) with or without urea were used to determine the effects of added ammonia (as NH4Cl) and propionate on the partitioning of C from 1.25 mM L-[1-14C]alanine between oxidation and gluconeogenesis, and the flux of 15N from 1.25 mM L-[15N]alanine to [14N15N]urea and [15N15N]urea. Hepatocyte suspensions were incubated with NH4Cl (0, .31, .63, and 1.25 mM) and (or) propionate (0, .31, .63, and 1.25 mM) in the presence of either 1.25 mM L-[15N]alanine or 1.25 mM L-alanine plus 18.5 kBq of L-[1-14C]alanine. Feeding dietary urea did not affect [1-14C]alanine oxidation to 14CO2 (P = .601), or its conversion to [14C]glucose (P = .576) by isolated hepatocytes. Increasing in vitro concentrations of NH4Cl and propionate between 0 and 1.25 mM reduced [1-14C]alanine oxidation to 14CO2 (P < .001). Increasing NH4Cl concentration between 0 and 1.25 mM reduced [1-14C]alanine conversion to [14C]glucose in isolated hepatocytes (P < .001), whereas addition of propionate between 0 and 1.25 mM stimulated production of [14C]glucose from [1-14C]alanine (P < .001). Feeding urea did not affect in vitro rates of total urea production (P = .655) but increased the production of [14N15N]urea and [15N15N]urea (P < .05). Addition of NH4Cl increased total urea, [14N15N]urea, and [15N15N]urea production (P < .001), but reduced 15N isotopic enrichments of [14N15N]urea and [15N15N]urea (P < .001). Increasing propionate concentration between 0 and 1.25 mM reduced total urea production (P < .001), but [14N15N]urea and [15N15N]urea production was reduced only at 1.25 mM propionate (P < .001). We conclude that NH3 detoxification by isolated sheep hepatocytes increases amino acid deamination and this might have implications for nitrogen retention in ruminants consuming diets that promote considerable NH3 absorption from the digestive tract. PMID:9110231

  11. Spectrophotometric readout for an alanine dosimeter for food irradiation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebraheem, S.; Beshir, W. B.; Eid, S.; Sobhy, R.; Kovács, A.

    2003-06-01

    The alanine-electron spin resonance (EPR) readout system is well known as a reference and transfer dosimetry system for the evaluation of high doses in radiation processing. The high cost of an EPR/alanine dosimetry system is a serious handicap for large-scale routine application in irradiation facilities. In this study, the use of a complex produced by dissolving irradiated L-alanine in 1,4-phenyl diammonium dichloride solution was investigated for dosimetry purposes. This complex—having a purple colour—has an increasing absorbance with increasing dose in the range of 1-20 kGy. The applicability of spectrophotometric evaluation was studied by measuring the absorbance intensity of this complex at 360 and 505 nm, respectively. Fluorimetric evaluation was also investigated by measuring the emission of the complex at 435 nm as a function of dose. The present method is easy for routine application. The effect of the dye concentration as well as the suitable amount of irradiated alanine has been studied. With respect to routine application, the stability of the product complex after its formation was also investigated.

  12. Formation of {gamma}-alumina nanorods in presence of alanine

    SciTech Connect

    Dabbagh, Hossein A.; Rasti, Elham; Yalfani, Mohammad S.; Medina, Francesc

    2011-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Nanorod aluminas with a possible hexagonal symmetry, high surface area and relatively narrow pore size distribution were obtained. Research highlights: {yields} Research highlights {yields} Boehmite was prepared using a green sol-gel process in the presence of alanine. {yields} Nanorod aluminas with a high surface area were obtained. {yields} Addition of alanine would shape the size of the holes and crevices. {yields} The morphologies of the nanorods were revealed by transmission electron microscope. -- Abstract: Boehmite and alumina nanostructures were prepared using a simple green sol-gel process in the presence of alanine in water medium at room temperature. The uncalcined (dried at 200 {sup o}C) and the calcined materials (at 500, 600 and 700 {sup o}C for 4 h) were characterized using XRD, TEM, SEM, N{sub 2} physisorption and TGA. Nanorod aluminas with a possible hexagonal symmetry, high surface area and relatively narrow pore size distribution were obtained. The surface area was enhanced and crystallization was retarded as the alanine content increased. The morphologies of the nanoparticles and nanorods were revealed by a transmission electron microscope (TEM).

  13. Addition of amino acids and dipeptides to fullerene C{sub 60} giving rise to monoadducts

    SciTech Connect

    Romanova, V.S.; Tsyryapkin, V.A.; Vol`pin, M.E.

    1994-12-01

    The authors have developed a general method for the direct addition of amino acids and dipeptides of various structures to fullerene C{sub 60}. In all cases the addition involves the amino group. The reaction proceeds when the solutions of fullerene and an amino acid (or dipeptide) are mixed at 50-100 {degrees}C. The fullerene derivatives of the following amino acids and dipeptides have been obtained: glycine, p-aminobenzoic acid, {omega}-aminocaproic acid, L-proline, L-alanine, L-alanyl-Lalanine, D,L-alanyl-D,L-alanine, glycyl-L-valine. The adduct of methyl L-ananinate with C{sub 60} was also prepared.

  14. Thermodynamics of helix-coil transitions in amino-acid homopolymers studied by multicanonical algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.; Okamoto, Yuko

    1996-03-01

    Thermodynamics of helix-coil transitions in amino-acid homopolymers are studied by the multicanonical algorithms. Homopolymers of length 10 are considered for three characteristic amino acids, alanine (helix former), valine (helix indifferent), and glycine (helix breaker). For alanine other lengths (15 and 20) are also considered in order to examine the length dependence. From one multicanonical production run with completely random initial conformations, we have obtained various thermodynamic quantities (average helix length, specific heat, etc.) as functions of temperature. The results, though preliminary, suggest that the helix-coil transition for poly-alanine is second-order, while the nature of phase transition is not clear for poly-valine and poly-glycine.

  15. Effect of amino acids on insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism in fat cells.

    PubMed

    Mizunuma, T; Takahashi, Y; Okuda, H

    1981-02-01

    The effect of amino acids on insulin responsiveness in epididymal adipose tissue was examined. It was found that insulin-stimulated glucose oxidation in fat cells was significantly inhibited by glycine, alanine, valine, leucine, isoleucine, cysteine, methionine, lysine, phenylalanine, and proline. The effect of insulin on glucose incorporation into triglyceride is also severely diminished by these amino acids. In addition, alanine reduced the incorporation of precursors ([U-14C]glucose or [1-14C]palmitate) into triglyceride both in vitro and in vivo. The Ki values of alanine were 0.4 and 0.5 mM toward the precursors of glucose and palmitate, respectively. The mechanism of reduction of insulin responsiveness in rat adipose tissue is discussed on the basis of these results. PMID:7016847

  16. Alkylamine-Dependent Amino-Acid Oxidation by Lysine Monooxygenase—Fragmented Substrate of Oxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Shozo; Yamauchi, Takashi; Hayaishi, Osamu

    1972-01-01

    Lysine monooxygenase catalyzes the oxygenative decarboxylation of L-lysine and produces a corresponding acid amide. L-Alanine was inactive as substrate. However, when propylamine was present, oxidation, but not oxygenation, of alanine was demonstrated with the oxygenase. Alanine was converted to pyruvate, with the liberation of ammonia and hydrogen peroxide, but propylamine remained unchanged. Other α-monoamino acids were also oxidized in the presence of alkylamines with various carbon chain lengths. The highest oxidase activity was observed when the total chain length of both amino acid and amine was nearly identical with that of lysine. Available evidence indicates that the amine-dependent amino-acid oxidase activity is associated with the lysine oxygenase activity. PMID:4509334

  17. Glutathione S-transferase GSTT1 and GSTM1 allozymes: beyond null alleles.

    PubMed

    Agúndez, José A G; Ladero, José M

    2008-03-01

    Moyer AM, Salavaggione OE, Hebbring SJ et al.: Glutathione S-transferase T1 and M1: gene sequence variation and functional genomics. Clin. Cancer Res. 13, 7207-7216 (2007). Genetic variations in the glutathione S-transferases GSTT1 and GSTM1 have been studied in many human populations, and association of these variations with environmentally-related cancers, drug-induced hepatotoxicity and even chronification of viral hepatitis has been shown. However, studies carried out to date have been limited to gene deletion, designated as null alleles, and no extensive studies on other types of genetic variations have been carried out. This study is of great importance, as it describes the occurrence and the allele frequencies for 18 SNPs in the GSTT1 gene, including four nonsynonymous SNPs, and 69 SNPs, two of which are nonsynonymous, in the GSTM1 gene. The GSTT1 SNPs leading to the amino acid substitutions Asp43Asn, Thr65Met, Thr104Pro and a single nucleotide deletion in exon 4 cause a decrease in immunoreactive protein. Interestingly, the previously described nonsynonymous GSTT1 SNPs rs2266635 (Ala21Thr), rs11550606 (Leu30Pro), rs17856199 (Phe45Cys), rs11550605 (Thr104Pro), rs2266633 (Asp141Asn) and rs2234953 (Glu173Lys) were not identified in 400 subjects, thus indicating that these variant alleles are expected to occur at extremely low frequencies. This study reinforces the need to combine SNP databases and resequencing. On combining the data reported in this study with SNP databases, the most promising target SNPs for GSTT1 association studies are those causing the amino acid changes Asp43Asn, Thr65Met, Thr104Pro and the single nucleotide deletion in exon 4. These gene variants should be analyzed in African-American and Hispanic subjects to increase the predictive capacity of genetic tests. For Caucasians and Oriental subjects, testing for null alleles seems to be sufficient. PMID:18303971

  18. Amino Acid Transporters and Release of Hydrophobic Amino Acids in the Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Pernil, Rafael; Picossi, Silvia; Herrero, Antonia; Flores, Enrique; Mariscal, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that can use inorganic compounds such as nitrate or ammonium as nitrogen sources. In the absence of combined nitrogen, it can fix N2 in differentiated cells called heterocysts. Anabaena also shows substantial activities of amino acid uptake, and three ABC-type transporters for amino acids have been previously characterized. Seven new loci encoding predicted amino acid transporters were identified in the Anabaena genomic sequence and inactivated. Two of them were involved in amino acid uptake. Locus alr2535-alr2541 encodes the elements of a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter that is mainly involved in the uptake of glycine. ORF all0342 encodes a putative transporter from the dicarboxylate/amino acid:cation symporter (DAACS) family whose inactivation resulted in an increased uptake of a broad range of amino acids. An assay to study amino acid release from Anabaena filaments to the external medium was set up. Net release of the alanine analogue α-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) was observed when transport system N-I (a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter) was engaged in the uptake of a specific substrate. The rate of AIB release was directly proportional to the intracellular AIB concentration, suggesting leakage from the cells by diffusion. PMID:25915115

  19. Amino Acid Transporters and Release of Hydrophobic Amino Acids in the Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Pernil, Rafael; Picossi, Silvia; Herrero, Antonia; Flores, Enrique; Mariscal, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that can use inorganic compounds such as nitrate or ammonium as nitrogen sources. In the absence of combined nitrogen, it can fix N2 in differentiated cells called heterocysts. Anabaena also shows substantial activities of amino acid uptake, and three ABC-type transporters for amino acids have been previously characterized. Seven new loci encoding predicted amino acid transporters were identified in the Anabaena genomic sequence and inactivated. Two of them were involved in amino acid uptake. Locus alr2535-alr2541 encodes the elements of a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter that is mainly involved in the uptake of glycine. ORF all0342 encodes a putative transporter from the dicarboxylate/amino acid:cation symporter (DAACS) family whose inactivation resulted in an increased uptake of a broad range of amino acids. An assay to study amino acid release from Anabaena filaments to the external medium was set up. Net release of the alanine analogue α-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) was observed when transport system N-I (a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter) was engaged in the uptake of a specific substrate. The rate of AIB release was directly proportional to the intracellular AIB concentration, suggesting leakage from the cells by diffusion. PMID:25915115

  20. Amino Acid Synthesis in a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide - Water System

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Kouki; Futamura, Yasuhiro; Shiohara, Tomoo; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Kanaya, Fumihide; Manome, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Mars is a CO2-abundant planet, whereas early Earth is thought to be also CO2-abundant. In addition, water was also discovered on Mars in 2008. From the facts and theory, we assumed that soda fountains were present on both planets, and this affected amino acid synthesis. Here, using a supercritical CO2/liquid H2O (10:1) system which mimicked crust soda fountains, we demonstrate production of amino acids from hydroxylamine (nitrogen source) and keto acids (oxylic acid sources). In this research, several amino acids were detected with an amino acid analyzer. Moreover, alanine polymers were detected with LC-MS. Our research lights up a new pathway in the study of life’s origin. PMID:19582225

  1. EFFECT OF TETRACYCLINES ON THE INTRACELLULAR AMINO ACIDS OF MOLDS.

    PubMed

    FREEMAN, B A; CIRCO, R

    1963-07-01

    Freeman, Bob A. (University of Chicago, Chicago, Ill.) and Richard Circo. Effect of tetracyclines on the intracellular amino acids of molds. J. Bacteriol. 86:38-44. 1963.-The tetracycline antibiotics were shown to alter the amino acid metabolism of molds whose growth is not markedly affected. Eight molds were grown in the presence of these antiobiotics; four exhibited a general reduction in the concentration of the intracellular amino acids, except for glutamic acid and alanine. In most of these four cultures, the tetracyclines also caused the complete disappearance of arginine, lysine, proline, phenylalanine, and tyrosine from the intracellular amino acid pool. The significance of these observations and the usefulness of the method in the study of the mechanisms of antibiotic action are discussed. PMID:14051820

  2. Beta-alanine supplementation in high-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Harris, Roger C; Sale, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Glycolysis involves the oxidation of two neutral hydroxyl groups on each glycosyl (or glucosyl) unit metabolised, yielding two carboxylic acid groups. During low-intensity exercise these, along with the remainder of the carbon skeleton, are further oxidised to CO(2) and water. But during high-intensity exercise a major portion (and where blood flow is impaired, then most) is accumulated as lactate anions and H(+). The accumulation of H(+) has deleterious effects on muscle function, ultimately impairing force production and contributing to fatigue. Regulation of intracellular pH is achieved over time by export of H(+) out of the muscle, although physicochemical buffers in the muscle provide the first line of defence against H(+) accumulation. In order to be effective during high-intensity exercise, buffers need to be present in high concentrations in muscle and have pK(a)s within the intracellular exercise pH transit range. Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is ideal for this role given that it occurs in millimolar concentrations within the skeletal muscle and has a pK(a) of 6.83. Carnosine is a cytoplasmic dipeptide formed by bonding histidine and β-alanine in a reaction catalysed by carnosine synthase, although it is the availability of β-alanine, obtained in small amounts from hepatic synthesis and potentially in greater amounts from the diet that is limiting to synthesis. Increasing muscle carnosine through increased dietary intake of β-alanine will increase the intracellular buffering capacity, which in turn might be expected to increase high-intensity exercise capacity and performance where this is pH limited. In this study we review the role of muscle carnosine as an H(+) buffer, the regulation of muscle carnosine by β-alanine, and the available evidence relating to the effects of β-alanine supplementation on muscle carnosine synthesis and the subsequent effects of this on high-intensity exercise capacity and performance. PMID:23075550

  3. The unresolved puzzle why alanine extensions cause disease.

    PubMed

    Winter, Reno; Liebold, Jens; Schwarz, Elisabeth

    2013-08-01

    The prospective increase in life expectancy will be accompanied by a rise in the number of elderly people who suffer from ill health caused by old age. Many diseases caused by aging are protein misfolding diseases. The molecular mechanisms underlying these disorders receive constant scientific interest. In addition to old age, mutations also cause congenital protein misfolding disorders. Chorea Huntington, one of the most well-known examples, is caused by triplet extensions that can lead to more than 100 glutamines in the N-terminal region of huntingtin, accompanied by huntingtin aggregation. So far, nine disease-associated triplet extensions have also been described for alanine codons. The extensions lead primarily to skeletal malformations. Eight of these proteins represent transcription factors, while the nuclear poly-adenylate binding protein 1, PABPN1, is an RNA binding protein. Additional alanines in PABPN1 lead to the disease oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). The alanine extension affects the N-terminal domain of the protein, which has been shown to lack tertiary contacts. Biochemical analyses of the N-terminal domain revealed an alanine-dependent fibril formation. However, fibril formation of full-length protein did not recapitulate the findings of the N-terminal domain. Fibril formation of intact PABPN1 was independent of the alanine segment, and the fibrils displayed biochemical properties that were completely different from those of the N-terminal domain. Although intranuclear inclusions have been shown to represent the histochemical hallmark of OPMD, their role in pathogenesis is currently unclear. Several cell culture and animal models have been generated to study the molecular processes involved in OPMD. These studies revealed a number of promising future therapeutic strategies that could one day improve the quality of life for the patients. PMID:23612654

  4. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in the Almahata Sitta Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Parker, Eric T.; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2010-01-01

    Amino acid analysis of a meteorite fragment of asteroid 2008 TC3 called Almahata Sitta was carried out using reverse-phase liquid chromatography coupled with UV fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-FD/ToF-MS) as part of a sample analysis consortium. LC-FD/ToF-MS analyses of hot-water extracts from the meteorite revealed a complex distribution of two- to seven-carbon aliphatic amino acids and one- to three-carbon amines with abundances ranging from 0.5 to 149 parts-per-billion (ppb). The enantiomeric ratios of the amino acids alanine, R-amino-n-butyric acid (beta-ABA), 2-amino-2-methylbutanoic acid (isovaline), and 2-aminopentanoic acid (norvaline) in the meteorite were racemic (D/L approximately 1), indicating that these amino acids are indigenous to the meteorite and not terrestrial contaminants. Several other non-protein amino acids were also identified in the meteorite above background levels including alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (alpha-AIB), 4-amino-2- methylbutanoic acid, 4-amino-3-methylbutanoic acid, and 3-, 4-, and 5-aminopentanoic acid. The total abundances of isovaline and alpha-AIB in Almahata Sitta are 1000 times lower than the abundances of these amino acids found in the CM carbonaceous chondrite Murchison. The extremely low abundances and unusual distribution of five carbon amino acids in Almahata Sitta compared to Cl, CM, and CR carbonaceous chondrites may reflect extensive thermal alteration of amino acids on the parent asteroid by partial melting during formation or subsequent impact shock heating. It is also possible that amino acids were synthesized by catalytic reactions on the parent body after asteroid 2008 TC3 cooled to lower temperatures.

  5. Extraterrestrial amino acids in the Almahata Sitta meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Parker, Eric T.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Jenniskens, Peter; Shaddad, Muawia H.

    2010-10-01

    Amino acid analysis of a meteorite fragment of asteroid 2008 TC3 called Almahata Sitta was carried out using reverse-phase liquid chromatography coupled with UV fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-FD/ToF-MS) as part of a sample analysis consortium. LC-FD/ToF-MS analyses of hot-water extracts from the meteorite revealed a complex distribution of two- to seven-carbon aliphatic amino acids and one- to three-carbon amines with abundances ranging from 0.5 to 149 parts-per-billion (ppb). The enantiomeric ratios of the amino acids alanine, β-amino-n-butyric acid, 2-amino-2-methylbutanoic acid (isovaline), and 2-aminopentanoic acid (norvaline) in the meteorite were racemic (D/L ˜ 1), indicating that these amino acids are indigenous to the meteorite and not terrestrial contaminants. Several other nonprotein amino acids were also identified in the meteorite above background levels including α-aminoisobutyric acid (α-AIB), 4-amino-2-methylbutanoic acid, 4-amino-3-methylbutanoic acid, and 3-, 4-, and 5-aminopentanoic acid. The total abundances of isovaline and α-AIB in Almahata Sitta are approximately 1000 times lower than the abundances of these amino acids found in the CM carbonaceous chondrite Murchison. The extremely low abundances and unusual distribution of five-carbon amino acids in Almahata Sitta compared to CI, CM, and CR carbonaceous chondrites may reflect extensive thermal alteration of amino acids on the parent asteroid by partial melting during formation or subsequent impact shock heating. It is also possible that amino acids were synthesized by catalytic reactions on the parent body after asteroid 2008 TC3 cooled to lower temperatures, or introduced as a contaminant from unrelated meteorite clasts and chemically altered by α-decarboxylation.

  6. Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase: The Story of a Misguided DNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Motea, Edward A.; Berdis, Anthony J.

    2009-01-01

    Nearly every DNA polymerase characterized to date exclusively catalyzes the incorporation of mononucleotides into a growing primer using a DNA or RNA template as a guide to direct each incorporation event. There is, however, one unique DNA polymerase designated terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase that performs DNA synthesis using only single-stranded DNA as the nucleic acid substrate. In this chapter, we review the biological role of this enigmatic DNA polymerase and the biochemical mechanism for its ability to perform DNA synthesis in the absence of a templating strand. We compare and contrast the molecular events for template-independent DNA synthesis catalyzed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase with other well-characterized DNA polymerases that perform template-dependent synthesis. This includes a quantitative inspection of how terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase binds DNA and dNTP substrates, the possible involvement of a conformational change that precedes phosphoryl transfer, and kinetic steps that are associated with the release of products. These enzymatic steps are discussed within the context of the available structures of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase in the presence of DNA or nucleotide substrate. In addition, we discuss the ability of proteins involved in replication and recombination to regulate the activity of the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase. Finally, the biomedical role of this specialized DNA polymerase is discussed focusing on its involvement in cancer development and its use in biomedical applications such as labeling DNA for detecting apoptosis. PMID:19596089

  7. Inhibition of hepatic glutathione transferases by propylthiouracil and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Kariya, K; Sawahata, T; Okuno, S; Lee, E

    1986-05-01

    The effects of propylthiouracil (PTU) and its metabolites on the activity of GSH transferases were examined using rat liver cytosol. PTU inhibited the enzyme activity toward both CDNB and DCNB in a concentration-dependent manner. At the concentration of 10 mM, PTU caused 25% inhibition, which was the maximum effect. PTU derivatives such as propyluracil and thiouracil showed the same effect as the parent compound. On the other hand, S-oxides of PTU such as PTU-SO2 and PTU-SO3, which were chemically synthesized by the oxidation of PTU, were more potent inhibitors of GSH transferases than the parent PTU. A significant inhibition was observed at a concentration of 0.1 mM of PTU S-oxides. At a concentration of 10 mM the S-oxides caused an 80% inhibition of the enzyme activity. PTU inhibited the transferase activity by competing with GSH but the S-oxides of PTU acted by another mechanism. In contrast to the effect on GSH transferases, PTU-SO3 had a weak inhibitory effect on GSH peroxidase activity. Thus, oxidation of PTU leads to products which are potent inhibitors of GSH transferases. PMID:3707612

  8. Human milk nonprotein nitrogen components: changing patterns of free amino acids and urea in the course of early lactation.

    PubMed

    Harzer, G; Franzke, V; Bindels, J G

    1984-08-01

    Free amino acids and urea were analyzed in 78 human milk samples obtained during the first 5 wk of lactation from 10 mothers delivering at term. Significant differences (p less than 0.05) in the concentrations between colostral and mature milk were found for glutamic acid, glutamine, alanine, glycine, cystine, and phosphoethanolamine which increased, and with serine, phosphoserine, aspartic acid + asparagine, arginine, lysine, isoleucine, phenylalanine, proline, methionine, tryptophan, and beta-alanine which decreased. Some of these changes occurred within the first 5 days of lactation, so that differences between transitional and mature milk became negligible (glutamic acid, alanine, and serine, aspartic acid + asparagine, lysine, isoleucine, methionine, tryptophan, respectively). No significant differences between any of the three stages of lactation were found regarding the concentrations of total free amino acids, urea, taurine, threonine, valine, leucine, histidine, and tyrosine. Possible relevances for free amino acids, including nonprotein ones, in human milk are discussed. PMID:6147084

  9. Amino acids in seeds and seedlings of the genus Lens.

    PubMed

    Rozan, P; Kuo, Y H; Lambein, F

    2001-09-01

    The amino acid content of seeds and 4-day-old seedlings were studied in five species of lentil: Lens culinaris, L. orientalis, L. ervoides, L. nigricans and L. odemensis. Free amino acid and also total protein amino acid content after HCl hydrolysis were determined by HPLC. The nonprotein UV-absorbing amino acids were determined by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). The content of free protein amino acids in seeds varied among species and increased dramatically after germination. Asparagine is quantitatively most important in both seed and seedling. The content of free nonprotein amino acids is variable in seeds and seedlings. gamma-Hydroxyarginine, gamma-hydroxyornithine, alpha-aminobutyric acid and taurine were found in both seeds and seedlings. Homoarginine was found in four species but not in L. orientalis while gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), alpha-aminoadipic acid (alpha-aaa) and three isoxazolinone derivatives: beta-(isoxazolin-5-on-2-yl)-alanine (BIA), gamma-glutamyl-BIA (gamma-glu-BIA) and 2-carboxymethyl-isoxazolin-5-one (CMI) were found exclusively in the seedlings. CMI was identified for the first time in lentil species. Lathyrine, beta-(2-amino-pyrimidine-4-yl)-alanine, which was reported to be in the seeds of some Lathyrus species was confirmed to be present also in the seedling of L. culinaris (trace amount), L. nigricans and L. odemensis. Trigonelline (N-methyl-nicotinic acid), a plant hormone, is present both in seeds and seedlings in different concentrations except in L. ervoides. The different combination of nonprotein amino acids among the species gives indication of their genetic relationship and might partly explain the varying compatibility for interspecies crossing. PMID:11551552

  10. Topology of AspT, the aspartate:alanine antiporter of Tetragenococcus halophilus, determined by site-directed fluorescence labeling.

    PubMed

    Nanatani, Kei; Fujiki, Takashi; Kanou, Kazuhiko; Takeda-Shitaka, Mayuko; Umeyama, Hideaki; Ye, Liwen; Wang, Xicheng; Nakajima, Tasuku; Uchida, Takafumi; Maloney, Peter C; Abe, Keietsu

    2007-10-01

    The gram-positive lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus catalyzes the decarboxylation of L-aspartate (Asp) with release of L-alanine (Ala) and CO(2). The decarboxylation reaction consists of two steps: electrogenic exchange of Asp for Ala catalyzed by an aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) and intracellular decarboxylation of the transported Asp catalyzed by an L-aspartate-beta-decarboxylase (AspD). AspT belongs to the newly classified aspartate:alanine exchanger family (transporter classification no. 2.A.81) of transporters. In this study, we were interested in the relationship between the structure and function of AspT and thus analyzed the topology by means of the substituted-cysteine accessibility method using the impermeant, fluorescent, thiol-specific probe Oregon Green 488 maleimide (OGM) and the impermeant, nonfluorescent, thiol-specific probe [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl]methanethiosulfonate bromide. We generated 23 single-cysteine variants from a six-histidine-tagged cysteineless AspT template. A cysteine position was assigned an external location if the corresponding single-cysteine variant reacted with OGM added to intact cells, and a position was assigned an internal location if OGM labeling required cell lysis. The topology analyses revealed that AspT has a unique topology; the protein has 10 transmembrane helices (TMs), a large hydrophilic cytoplasmic loop (about 180 amino acids) between TM5 and TM6, N and C termini that face the periplasm, and a positively charged residue (arginine 76) within TM3. Moreover, the three-dimensional structure constructed by means of the full automatic modeling system indicates that the large hydrophilic cytoplasmic loop of AspT possesses a TrkA_C domain and a TrkA_C-like domain and that the three-dimensional structures of these domains are similar to each other even though their amino acid sequences show low similarity. PMID:17660287

  11. Anisotropy-Guided Enantiomeric Enhancement in Alanine Using Far-UV Circularly Polarized Light.

    PubMed

    Meinert, Cornelia; Cassam-Chenaï, Patrick; Jones, Nykola C; Nahon, Laurent; Hoffmann, Søren V; Meierhenrich, Uwe J

    2015-06-01

    All life on Earth is characterized by its asymmetry - both the genetic material and proteins are composed of homochiral monomers. Understanding how this molecular asymmetry initially arose is a key question related to the origins of life. Cometary ice simulations, L-enantiomeric enriched amino acids in meteorites and the detection of circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation in star-forming regions point to a possible interstellar/protostellar generation of stereochemical asymmetry. Based upon our recently recorded anisotropy spectra g(λ) of amino acids in the vacuum-UV range, we subjected amorphous films of racemic (13)C-alanine to far-UV circularly polarized synchrotron radiation to probe the asymmetric photon-molecule interaction under interstellar conditions. Optical purities of up to 4% were reached, which correlate with our theoretical predictions. Importantly, we show that chiral symmetry breaking using circularly polarized light is dependent on both the helicity and the wavelength of incident light. In order to predict such stereocontrol, time-dependent density functional theory was used to calculate anisotropy spectra. The calculated anisotropy spectra show good agreement with the experimental ones. The European Space Agency's Rosetta mission, which successfully landed Philae on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on 12 November 2014, will investigate the configuration of chiral compounds and thereby obtain data that are to be interpreted in the context of the results presented here. PMID:25773582

  12. Anisotropy-Guided Enantiomeric Enhancement in AlanineUsing Far-UV Circularly Polarized Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinert, Cornelia; Cassam-Chenaï, Patrick; Jones, Nykola C.; Nahon, Laurent; Hoffmann, Søren V.; Meierhenrich, Uwe J.

    2015-06-01

    All life on Earth is characterized by its asymmetry - both the genetic material and proteins are composed of homochiral monomers. Understanding how this molecular asymmetry initially arose is a key question related to the origins of life. Cometary ice simulations, l-enantiomeric enriched amino acids in meteorites and the detection of circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation in star-forming regions point to a possible interstellar/protostellar generation of stereochemical asymmetry. Based upon our recently recorded anisotropy spectra g( λ) of amino acids in the vacuum-UV range, we subjected amorphous films of racemic 13C-alanine to far-UV circularly polarized synchrotron radiation to probe the asymmetric photon-molecule interaction under interstellar conditions. Optical purities of up to 4 % were reached, which correlate with our theoretical predictions. Importantly, we show that chiral symmetry breaking using circularly polarized light is dependent on both the helicity and the wavelength of incident light. In order to predict such stereocontrol, time-dependent density functional theory was used to calculate anisotropy spectra. The calculated anisotropy spectra show good agreement with the experimental ones. The European Space Agency's Rosetta mission, which successfully landed Philae on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on 12 November 2014, will investigate the configuration of chiral compounds and thereby obtain data that are to be interpreted in the context of the results presented here.

  13. Plasma Amino Acid Levels in Children with Autism and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldred, Sarah; Moore, Kieran M.; Fitzgerald, Michael; Waring, Rosemary H.

    2003-01-01

    Plasma amino acid levels were measured in autistic (n=12), Asperger syndrome (n=11) patients, their parents and siblings. Patients with autism or Asperger syndrome and their siblings and parents all had raised glutamic acid, phenyalanine, asparagine, tyrosine, alanine, and lysine levels than age-matched controls. Results suggest dysregulated amino…

  14. Irritable Bowel Syndrome May Be Associated with Elevated Alanine Aminotransferase and Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Hwa; Kim, Kwang-Min; Joo, Nam-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies have revealed close relationships between hepatic injury, metabolic pathways, and gut microbiota. The microorganisms in the intestine also cause irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The aim of this study was to examine whether IBS was associated with elevated hepatic enzyme [alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST)], gamma-glutamyl transferase (γ-GT) levels, and metabolic syndrome (MS). Materials and Methods This was a retrospective, cross-sectional, case-control study. The case and control groups comprised subjects who visited our health promotion center for general check-ups from June 2010 to December 2010. Of the 1127 initially screened subjects, 83 had IBS according to the Rome III criteria. The control group consisted of 260 age- and sex-matched subjects without IBS who visited our health promotion center during the same period. Results Compared to control subjects, patients with IBS showed significantly higher values of anthropometric parameters (body mass index, waist circumference), liver enzymes, γ-GT, and lipid levels. The prevalences of elevated ALT (16.9% vs. 7.7%; p=0.015) and γ-GT (24.1% vs. 11.5%; p=0.037) levels were significantly higher in patients with IBS than in control subjects. A statistically significant difference was observed in the prevalence of MS between controls and IBS patients (12.7% vs. 32.5%; p<0.001). The relationships between elevated ALT levels, MS, and IBS remained statistically significant after controlling for potential confounding factors. Conclusion On the basis of our study results, IBS may be an important condition in certain patients with elevated ALT levels and MS. PMID:26632395

  15. Structure of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis D-Alanine:D-Alanine Ligase, a Target of the Antituberculosis Drug D-Cycloserine

    SciTech Connect

    Bruning, John B.; Murillo, Ana C.; Chacon, Ofelia; Barletta, Raúl G.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2011-09-28

    D-Alanine:D-alanine ligase (EC 6.3.2.4; Ddl) catalyzes the ATP-driven ligation of two D-alanine (D-Ala) molecules to form the D-alanyl:D-alanine dipeptide. This molecule is a key building block in peptidoglycan biosynthesis, making Ddl an attractive target for drug development. D-Cycloserine (DCS), an analog of D-Ala and a prototype Ddl inhibitor, has shown promise for the treatment of tuberculosis. Here, we report the crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ddl at a resolution of 2.1 {angstrom}. This structure indicates that Ddl is a dimer and consists of three discrete domains; the ligand binding cavity is at the intersection of all three domains and conjoined by several loop regions. The M. tuberculosis apo Ddl structure shows a novel conformation that has not yet been observed in Ddl enzymes from other species. The nucleotide and D-alanine binding pockets are flexible, requiring significant structural rearrangement of the bordering regions for entry and binding of both ATP and D-Ala molecules. Solution affinity and kinetic studies showed that DCS interacts with Ddl in a manner similar to that observed for D-Ala. Each ligand binds to two binding sites that have significant differences in affinity, with the first binding site exhibiting high affinity. DCS inhibits the enzyme, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC{sub 50}) of 0.37 mM under standard assay conditions, implicating a preferential and weak inhibition at the second, lower-affinity binding site. Moreover, DCS binding is tighter at higher ATP concentrations. The crystal structure illustrates potential drugable sites that may result in the development of more-effective Ddl inhibitors.

  16. The properties of solid Zn(II)-amino acid complexes in the form of suspensions.

    PubMed

    Dolińska, B

    2001-10-01

    An investigation was made into the experimental conditions for the formation of poorly soluble complexes of the divalent Zinc(II) combined with the following selected amino acids: tyrosine, tryptophan, cysteine, histidine, and alanine, in the form of suspensions for parenteral administration. The number of Zn(II)-binding sites in the amino acid (n) as well as the amino acid affinity to Zn(II) (Ka), were determined. Cysteine was found to have the highest number of Zn(II)-binding sites--3, whereas alanine the lowest--1. In the conditions described herein, Zn(II) amino acid complexes of diverse stability (durability) were obtained. The analysis of the kinetics of the binding revealed that the most stable complexes were those formed by Zn(II) in combination with tryptophan (Ka = 405.78 microM(-1) +/- 12.17), and with tyrosine (Ka = 343.88 microM +/- 22.35); whereas the least stable complexes were those formed by Zn(II) in combination with histidine (Ka = 29.90 microM +/- 4.78), and with alanine (Ka = 13.0 microM(-1) +/- 1.04). Cysteine formed complexes of intermediate stability (Ka = 168.53 microM(-1) +/- 12.36). The stability ofthe Zn(II) amino acid complexes obtained was conditioned by both the molecular weight (P = 0.033) of the amino acid and its isoelectric point (P < 0.001). PMID:11718265

  17. Fluorescent techniques for discovery and characterization of phosphopantetheinyl transferase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kosa, Nicolas M.; Foley, Timothy L.; Burkart, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphopantetheinyl transferase (E.C. 2.7.8.-) activates biosynthetic pathways that synthesize both primary and secondary metabolites in bacteria. Inhibitors of these enzymes have the potential to serve as antibiotic compounds that function through a unique mode of action and possess clinical utility. Here we report a direct and continuous assay for this enzyme class based upon monitoring polarization of a fluorescent phosphopantetheine analog as it is transferred from a low molecular weight coenzyme A substrate to higher molecular weight protein acceptor. We demonstrate the utility of this method for the biochemical characterization of phosphopantetheinyl transferase Sfp, a canonical representative from this class. We also establish the portability of this technique to other homologs by adapting the assay to function with the human phosphopantetheinyl transferase, a target for which a microplate detection method does not currently exist. Comparison of these targets provides a basis to predict therapeutic index of inhibitor candidates and offers a valuable characterization of enzyme activity. PMID:24192555

  18. Thioltransferase activity of bovine lens glutathione S-transferase.

    PubMed Central

    Dal Monte, M; Cecconi, I; Buono, F; Vilardo, P G; Del Corso, A; Mura, U

    1998-01-01

    A Mu-class glutathione S-transferase purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from bovine lens displayed thioltransferase activity, catalysing the transthiolation reaction between GSH and hydroxyethyldisulphide. The thiol-transfer reaction is composed of two steps, the formation of GSSG occurring through the generation of an intermediate mixed disulphide between GSH and the target disulphide. Unlike glutaredoxin, which is only able to catalyse the second step of the transthiolation process, glutathioneS-transferase catalyses both steps of the reaction. Data are presented showing that bovine lens glutathione S-transferase and rat liver glutaredoxin, which was used as a thioltransferase enzyme model, can operate in synergy to catalyse the GSH-dependent reduction of hydroxyethyldisulphide. PMID:9693102

  19. 23S rRNA nucleotides in the peptidyl transferase center are essential for tryptophanase operon induction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Cruz-Vera, Luis R; Yanofsky, Charles

    2009-06-01

    Distinct features of the ribosomal peptide exit tunnel are known to be essential for recognition of specific amino acids of a nascent peptidyl-tRNA. Thus, a tryptophan residue at position 12 of the peptidyl-tRNA TnaC-tRNA(Pro) leads to the creation of a free tryptophan binding site within the ribosome at which bound tryptophan inhibits normal ribosome functions. The ribosomal processes that are inhibited are hydrolysis of TnaC-tRNA(Pro) by release factor 2 and peptidyl transfer of TnaC of TnaC-tRNA(Pro) to puromycin. These events are normally performed in the ribosomal peptidyl transferase center. In the present study, changes of 23S rRNA nucleotides in the 2585 region of the peptidyl transferase center, G2583A and U2584C, were observed to reduce maximum induction of tna operon expression by tryptophan in vivo without affecting the concentration of tryptophan necessary to obtain 50% induction. The growth rate of strains with ribosomes with either of these changes was not altered appreciably. In vitro analyses with mutant ribosomes with these changes showed that tryptophan was not as efficient in protecting TnaC-tRNA(Pro) from puromycin action as wild-type ribosomes. However, added tryptophan did prevent sparsomycin action as it normally does with wild-type ribosomes. These findings suggest that these two mutational changes act by reducing the ability of ribosome-bound tryptophan to inhibit peptidyl transferase activity rather than by reducing the ability of the ribosome to bind tryptophan. Thus, the present study identifies specific nucleotides within the ribosomal peptidyl transferase center that appear to be essential for effective tryptophan induction of tna operon expression. PMID:19329641

  20. Sensitive determination of D-amino acids in mammals and the effect of D-amino-acid oxidase activity on their amounts.

    PubMed

    Hamase, Kenji; Konno, Ryuichi; Morikawa, Akiko; Zaitsu, Kiyoshi

    2005-09-01

    The determination of small amounts of D-amino acids in mammalian tissues is still a challenging theme in the separation sciences. In this review, various gas-chromatographic and high-performance liquid chromatographic methods are discussed including highly selective and sensitive column-switching procedures. Based on these methods, the distributions of D-aspartic acid, D-serine, D-alanine, D-leucine and D-proline have been clarified in the mouse brain. As the regulation mechanisms of D-amino acid amounts in mammals, we focused on the D-amino-acid oxidase, which catalyzes the degradation of D-amino acids. Using the mutant mouse strain lacking D-amino-acid oxidase activity, the effects of the enzymatic activity on the amounts and distributions of various D-amino acids have been investigated. PMID:16141519

  1. Cellular and Physiological Effects of Dietary Supplementation with β-Hydroxy-β-Methylbutyrate (HMB) and β-Alanine in Late Middle-Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vallejo, Julian; Spence, Madoka; Cheng, An-Lin; Brotto, Leticia; Edens, Neile K.; Garvey, Sean M.; Brotto, Marco

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that severe decline of skeletal muscle mass and function with age may be mitigated by exercise and dietary supplementation with protein and amino acid ingredient technologies. The purposes of this study were to examine the effects of the leucine catabolite, beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB), in C2C12 myoblasts and myotubes, and to investigate the effects of dietary supplementation with HMB, the amino acid β-alanine and the combination thereof, on muscle contractility in a preclinical model of pre-sarcopenia. In C2C12 myotubes, HMB enhanced sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium release beyond vehicle control in the presence of all SR agonists tested (KCl, P<0.01; caffeine, P = 0.03; ionomycin, P = 0.03). HMB also improved C2C12 myoblast viability (25 μM HMB, P = 0.03) and increased proliferation (25 μM HMB, P = 0.04; 125 μM HMB, P<0.01). Furthermore, an ex vivo muscle contractility study was performed on EDL and soleus muscle from 19 month old, male C57BL/6nTac mice. For 8 weeks, mice were fed control AIN-93M diet, diet with HMB, diet with β-alanine, or diet with HMB and β-alanine. In β-alanine fed mice, EDL muscle showed a 7% increase in maximum absolute force compared to the control diet (202 ± 3vs. 188± 5 mN, P = 0.02). At submaximal frequency of stimulation (20 Hz), EDL from mice fed HMB plus β-alanine showed an 11% increase in absolute force (88.6 ± 2.2 vs. 79.8 ± 2.4 mN, P = 0.025) and a 13% increase in specific force (12.2 ± 0.4 vs. 10.8 ± 0.4 N/cm2, P = 0.021). Also in EDL muscle, β-alanine increased the rate of force development at all frequencies tested (P<0.025), while HMB reduced the time to reach peak contractile force (TTP), with a significant effect at 80 Hz (P = 0.0156). In soleus muscle, all experimental diets were associated with a decrease in TTP, compared to control diet. Our findings highlight beneficial effects of HMB and β-alanine supplementation on skeletal muscle function in aging mice. PMID

  2. Cellular and Physiological Effects of Dietary Supplementation with β-Hydroxy-β-Methylbutyrate (HMB) and β-Alanine in Late Middle-Aged Mice.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Julian; Spence, Madoka; Cheng, An-Lin; Brotto, Leticia; Edens, Neile K; Garvey, Sean M; Brotto, Marco

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that severe decline of skeletal muscle mass and function with age may be mitigated by exercise and dietary supplementation with protein and amino acid ingredient technologies. The purposes of this study were to examine the effects of the leucine catabolite, beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB), in C2C12 myoblasts and myotubes, and to investigate the effects of dietary supplementation with HMB, the amino acid β-alanine and the combination thereof, on muscle contractility in a preclinical model of pre-sarcopenia. In C2C12 myotubes, HMB enhanced sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium release beyond vehicle control in the presence of all SR agonists tested (KCl, P<0.01; caffeine, P = 0.03; ionomycin, P = 0.03). HMB also improved C2C12 myoblast viability (25 μM HMB, P = 0.03) and increased proliferation (25 μM HMB, P = 0.04; 125 μM HMB, P<0.01). Furthermore, an ex vivo muscle contractility study was performed on EDL and soleus muscle from 19 month old, male C57BL/6nTac mice. For 8 weeks, mice were fed control AIN-93M diet, diet with HMB, diet with β-alanine, or diet with HMB and β-alanine. In β-alanine fed mice, EDL muscle showed a 7% increase in maximum absolute force compared to the control diet (202 ± 3vs. 188± 5 mN, P = 0.02). At submaximal frequency of stimulation (20 Hz), EDL from mice fed HMB plus β-alanine showed an 11% increase in absolute force (88.6 ± 2.2 vs. 79.8 ± 2.4 mN, P = 0.025) and a 13% increase in specific force (12.2 ± 0.4 vs. 10.8 ± 0.4 N/cm2, P = 0.021). Also in EDL muscle, β-alanine increased the rate of force development at all frequencies tested (P<0.025), while HMB reduced the time to reach peak contractile force (TTP), with a significant effect at 80 Hz (P = 0.0156). In soleus muscle, all experimental diets were associated with a decrease in TTP, compared to control diet. Our findings highlight beneficial effects of HMB and β-alanine supplementation on skeletal muscle function in aging mice. PMID

  3. Amino acid biogeo- and stereochemistry in coastal Chilean sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomstein, Bente Aa.; Jørgensen, Bo B.; Schubert, Carsten J.; Niggemann, Jutta

    2006-06-01

    The spatial distribution of total hydrolysable amino acids (THAA) and amino acid enantiomers ( D- and L-forms) was investigated in sediments underlying two contrasting Chilean upwelling regions: at ˜23 °S off Antofagasta and at ˜36 °S off Concepción. The contribution of amino acids to total organic carbon (%T AAC: 7-14%) and total nitrogen (%T AAN: 23-38%) in surface sediments decreased with increasing water depth (from 126 to 1350 m) indicating that organic matter becomes increasingly decomposed in surface sediments at greater water depth. Changes in the ratio between the protein amino acid aspartate and its non-protein degradation product β-alanine confirmed this observation. Furthermore, estimates of THAA mineralization showed that sedimentary amino acid reactivity decreased with both increasing water depth as well as progressive degradation status of the organic matter that was incorporated into the sediment. Reactivity of organic matter in the sediment was also assessed using the Degradation Index (DI) developed by [Dauwe, B., Middelburg, J.J., 1998. Amino acids and hexosamines as indicators of organic matter degradation state in North Sea sediments. Limnol. Oceanogr.43, pp. 782-798.]. Off Concepción, DI was successfully applied to examine the degradation status of sedimentary organic matter at different water depths. However, unexpected results were obtained at the Antofagasta stations as DI increased with sediment depth, suggesting more degraded organic matter at the surface than deeper in the cores. The contribution of peptidoglycan amino acids to THAA was estimated from the concentrations of D-aspartate, D-glutamic acid, D-serine, and D-alanine. Peptidoglycan amino acids accounted for >18% of THAA in all investigated samples. In surface sediments peptidoglycan amino acids accounted for a progressively larger fraction of THAA at increasing water depths (up to >26%). Further, the contribution of peptidoglycan amino acids to THAA increased with

  4. Interaction of metal ions and amino acids - Possible mechanisms for the adsorption of amino acids on homoionic smectite clays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, A.; Loew, G. H.; Lawless, J.

    1983-01-01

    A semiempirical molecular orbital method is used to characterize the binding of amino acids to hexahydrated Cu(2+) and Ni(2+), a process presumed to occur when they are adsorbed in the interlamellar space of homoionic smectite clays. Five alpha-amino acids, beta-alanine, and gamma-aminobutyric acid were used to investigate the metal ion and amino acid specificity in binding. It was assumed that the alpha, beta, and gamma-amino acids would bind as bidentate anionic ligands, forming either 1:1 or 1:2 six-coordinated five, six, and seven-membered-ring chelate complexes, respectively. Energies of complex formation, optimized geometries, and electron and spin distribution were determined; and steric constraints of binding of the amino acids to the ion-exchanged cations in the interlamellar spacing of a clay were examined. Results indicate that hexahydrated Cu(2+) forms more stable complexes than hexahydrated Ni(2+) with all the amino acids studied. However, among these amino acids, complex formation does not favor the adsorption of the biological subset. Calculated energetics of complex formation and steric constraints are shown to predict that 1:1 rather than 1:2 metal-amino acid complexes are generally favored in the clay.

  5. Cerebral uptake and protein incorporation of cyanobacterial toxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaobin; Basile, Margaret; Mash, Deborah C

    2013-10-01

    β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a nonprotein amino acid produced by diverse species of free-living cyanobacteria found in terrestrial and aquatic environments worldwide. BMAA has been detected as a soluble (free) and insoluble protein-bound (bound) amino acid in brains of Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Guamanian amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinsonism dementia complex patients. A toxic reservoir of BMAA in the brain may be excitotoxic to neurons or serve to disrupt cerebral protein homeostasis. Here, we report tracer uptake kinetics and a time course for protein incorporation of [C]-L-BMAA into the brain of C57/BL6 mice. BMAA pharmacokinetic parameters measured in plasma show a rapid distribution phase and a terminal elimination half-life of 1.7 days following bolus intravenous administration. Total [C]-L-BMAA uptake to the brain reached a maximum at 1.5 h. Ex-vivo autoradiography of [C]-labeled BMAA showed dense labeling within the ventricles, choroid plexus, and whole-brain gray matter structures. Radioactivity measured in soluble and trichloroacetic acid precipitates was compared to determine the incorporation of [C]-L-BMAA into total brain protein. The maximal concentration of [C]-L-BMAA was measured in protein-bound fractions of brain at 4 h, followed by a corresponding decrease in the free pool of this nonprotein amino acid. The time-dependent association of [C]-L-BMAA in the protein-bound fraction suggests that BMAA may be trapped in new proteins by protein synthesis-dependent processes. BMAA may accumulate into growing polypeptide chains and recycle to the free pool with protein turnover. PMID:23979257

  6. Amino acid-containing membrane lipids in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Otto; González-Silva, Napoleón; López-Lara, Isabel M; Sohlenkamp, Christian

    2010-01-01

    In the bacterial model organism Escherichia coli only the three major membrane lipids phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, and cardiolipin occur, all of which belong to the glycerophospholipids. The amino acid-containing phosphatidylserine is a major lipid in eukaryotic membranes but in most bacteria it occurs only as a minor biosynthetic intermediate. In some bacteria, the anionic glycerophospholipids phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin can be decorated with aminoacyl residues. For example, phosphatidylglycerol can be decorated with lysine, alanine, or arginine whereas in the case of cardiolipin, lysine or d-alanine modifications are known. In few bacteria, diacylglycerol-derived lipids can be substituted with lysine or homoserine. Acyl-oxyacyl lipids in which the lipidic part is amide-linked to the alpha-amino group of an amino acid are widely distributed among bacteria and ornithine-containing lipids are the most common version of this lipid type. Only few bacterial groups form glycine-containing lipids, serineglycine-containing lipids, sphingolipids, or sulfonolipids. Although many of these amino acid-containing bacterial membrane lipids are produced in response to certain stress conditions, little is known about the specific molecular functions of these lipids. PMID:19703488

  7. Carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism of Spironucleus vortens.

    PubMed

    Millet, Coralie O M; Lloyd, David; Coogan, Michael P; Rumsey, Joanna; Cable, Joanne

    2011-09-01

    The metabolism of Spironucleus vortens, a parasitic, diplomonad flagellate related to Giardia intestinalis, was investigated using a combination of membrane inlet mass spectrometry, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, bioscreen continuous growth monitoring, and ion exchange chromatography. The products of glucose-fuelled and endogenous metabolism were identified by (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR as ethanol, acetate, alanine and lactate. Mass spectrometric monitoring of gas metabolism in buffered cell suspensions showed that glucose and ethanol could be used by S. vortens as energy-generating substrates, but bioscreen automated monitoring of growth in culture medium, as well as NMR analyses, suggested that neither of these compounds are the substrates of choice for this organism. Ion-exchange chromatographic analyses of free amino-acid and amino-acid hydrolysate of growth medium revealed that, despite the availability of large pools of free amino-acids in the medium, S. vortens hydrolysed large amounts of proteins during growth. The organism produced alanine and aspartate, and utilised lysine, arginine, leucine, cysteine and urea. However, mass spectrometric and bioscreen investigations showed that addition of the utilised amino acids to diluted culture medium did not induce any significant increase in metabolic or growth rates. Moreover, as no significant amounts of ornithine were produced, and addition of arginine under aerobic conditions did not generate NO production, there was no evidence of the presence of an energy-generating, arginine dihydrolase pathway in S. vortens under in vitro conditions. PMID:21679707

  8. [Amino acids in saliva].

    PubMed

    Klinger, G; Gruhn, K

    1984-01-01

    Total amino acids in saliva and free and peptide-bound amino acids from 21 saliva samples were determined. The contents of amino acids was 25 mmol/1; total nitrogen content was 78-80 mmol/1. Amino acids consist of Prolin in 25%. Some patients were examined before and after application of the depot estrogen ethinyl estradiosulfonat, which stimulates the assimilation of protein. After application, amino acids increased and the authors found a shift between the single amino acids. Estrogen medication induced an increase in proteins with the character of collagens. Clinical effects are discussed. (author's modified) PMID:6240853

  9. ESR/alanine dosimetry applied to radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosse, D. C.

    The radiation processing of food products is specified in terms of absorbed dose, and processing quality is assessed on the basis of absorbed dose measurements. The validity of process quality control is highly dependent on the quality of the measurements and associated instrumentation; in this respect, dosimetry calibration by an Organization with official status provides an essential guarantee of validity to the quality control steps taken. The Laboratoire de Métrologie des Rayonnements Ionisants (L.M.R.I.) is the primary standards and evaluation laboratory approved by the Bureau National de Métrologie (B.N.M.), which is the French National Bureau of Standards. The LMRI implements correlation procedures in response to the various requirements which arise in connection with high doses and doserates. Such procedures are mainly based on ESR/alanine spectrometry, a dosimetry technique ideally suited to that purpose. Dosemeter geometry and design are tailored to operating conditions. "Photon" dosemeters consist of a detector material in powder or compacted form, and a wall with thickness and chemical composition consistent with the application. "Electron" dosemeters have a detector core of compacted alanine with thickness down to a few tenths of a millimeter. The ESR/alanine dosimetry technique, developed at LMRI is a flexible, reliable and accurate tool which effectively meets the various requirements arising in the field of reference dosimetry, where high doses and doserates are involved.

  10. Amino Acid Metabolism of Lemna minor L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, David; Hogan, Austin L.; Deal, Luanne; Jamieson, Gene C.; Haworth, Philip

    1987-01-01

    alanine. We propose that chlorsulfuron inhibition of acetolactate synthase may lead to accumulation of 2-oxobutyrate in the isoleucine branch of the pathway, and transamination of 2-oxobutyrate to α-amino-n-butyrate by a constitutive transaminase utilizing either glutamate or alanine as α-amino-N donors. PMID:16665521

  11. METAL-INDUCED INHIBITION OF GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The glutathione S-transferases comprise a group of multi-functional enzymes involved in the biotransformation/detoxication of a broad spectrum of hydrophobic compounds bearing an electrophilic center. The enzymes facilitate the nucleophilic attack of the -SH group of reduced glut...

  12. Rational design of an organometallic glutathione transferase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, W.H.; Parker, L.J.; De Luca, A.; Juillerat-Jeanneret, L.; Morton, C.J.; LoBello, M.; Parker, M.W.; Dyson, P.J.

    2010-08-17

    A hybrid organic-inorganic (organometallic) inhibitor was designed to target glutathione transferases. The metal center is used to direct protein binding, while the organic moiety acts as the active-site inhibitor. The mechanism of inhibition was studied using a range of biophysical and biochemical methods.

  13. GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE-MEDIATED METABOLISM OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE

    EPA Science Inventory

    GLUTATHIONE s-TRANSFERASE-MEDIATED METABOLISM OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE. M K Ross1 and R A Pegram2. 1Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; 2Experimental Toxicology Division, NHEERL/ORD, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangl...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1535 - Ornithine carbamyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ornithine carbamyl transferase test system. 862.1535 Section 862.1535 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1535 Ornithine...

  15. Hypertonic upregulation of amino acid transport system A in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, J G; Klus, L R; Steenbergen, D K; Kempson, S A

    1994-08-01

    The A10 line of vascular smooth muscle cells has Na+ dependent transport systems for alanine, proline, and Pi, whereas uptake of leucine, myo-inositol and D-glucose is Na+ independent. When A10 cells were incubated for 4 h in medium made hypertonic by addition of sucrose, there was a marked increase in Na(+)-dependent transport of alanine and proline but no change in Na(+)-dependent Pi uptake or Na(+)-independent uptake of leucine and inositol. Intracellular alanine content was increased 61% by the hypertonic treatment. Other nonpenetrating solutes, such as cellobiose and mannitol, reproduced the effect of sucrose, but urea, a penetrating solute, did not. Studies with 2-(methylamino)-isobutyric acid revealed that the upregulation by hypertonicity involved only system A. Increases in alanine and proline uptake also occurred after incubating the cells in isotonic medium containing 0.1 mM ouabain, suggesting that an increase in intracellular Na+ may be part of the intracellular signal for upregulation of system A. Hypertonic upregulation of Na(+)-dependent alanine transport occurred also in primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells. The response was blocked by actinomycin D and cycloheximide, indicating that gene transcription and protein synthesis play important roles in the mechanism leading to increased alanine uptake. We conclude that vascular smooth muscle cells, during prolonged hypertonic stress, activate system A and accumulate specific neutral amino acids which may act as organic osmolytes to help maintain normal cell volume. PMID:8074188

  16. Activated Drosophila Ras1 is selectively suppressed by isoprenyl transferase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Kauffmann, R C; Qian, Y; Vogt, A; Sebti, S M; Hamilton, A D; Carthew, R W

    1995-01-01

    Ras CAAX (C = cysteine, A = aliphatic amino acid, and X = any amino acid) peptidomimetic inhibitors of farnesyl protein transferase suppress Ras-dependent cell transformation by preventing farnesylation of the Ras oncoprotein. These compounds are potential anticancer agents for tumors associated with Ras mutations. The peptidomimetic FTI-254 was tested for Ras1-inhibiting activity in whole animals by injection of activated Ras1val12 Drosophila larvae. FTI-254 decreased the ability of Ras1val12 to form supernumerary R7 photoreceptor cells in the compound eye of transformed flies. In contrast, it had no effect on the related supernumerary R7 phenotypes of flies transformed with either the activated sevenless receptor tyrosine kinase, Raf kinase, or a chimeric Ras1val12 protein that is membrane associated through myristylation instead of isoprenylation. Therefore, FTI-254 acts as an isoprenylation inhibitor to selectively inhibit Ras1val12 signaling activity in a whole-animal model system. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7479910

  17. In Vivo d-Serine Hetero-Exchange through Alanine-Serine-Cysteine (ASC) Transporters Detected by Microelectrode Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    d-Serine, a co-agonist of N-methyl d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, has been implicated in neurological and psychiatric disorders such as cerebral ischemia, lateral amyotrophic sclerosis, or schizophrenia. d-Serine signaling represents an important pharmacological target for treating these diseases; however, the biochemical mechanisms controlling extracellular d-serine levels in vivo are still unclear. d-Serine heteroexchange through small neutral amino acid transporters has been shown in cell cultures and brain slices and could provide a biochemical mechanism for the control of d-serine extracellular concentration in vivo. Alternatively, exocytotic d-serine release has also been proposed. In this study, the dynamics of d-serine release and clearance were explored in vivo on a second-by-second time scale using microelectrode biosensors. The rate of d-serine clearance in the rat frontal cortex after a microionophoretic injection revealed a transporter-mediated uptake mechanism. d-Serine uptake was blocked by small neutral l-amino acids, implicating alanine-serine-cysteine (ASC) transporters, in particular high affinity Asc-1 and low affinity ASCT2 transporters. Interestingly, changes in alanine, serine, or threonine levels resulted in d-serine release through ASC transporters. Asc-1, but not ASCT2, appeared to release d-serine in response to changes in amino acid concentrations. Finally, neuronal silencing by tetrodotoxin increased d-serine extracellular concentration by an ASC-transporter-dependent mechanism. Together, these results indicate that d-serine heteroexchange through ASC transporters is present in vivo and may constitute a key component in the regulation of d-serine extracellular concentration. PMID:23581544

  18. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α transactivates the mitochondrial alanine aminotransferase gene in the kidney of Sparus aurata.

    PubMed

    Salgado, María C; Metón, Isidoro; Anemaet, Ida G; González, J Diego; Fernández, Felipe; Baanante, Isabel V

    2012-02-01

    Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) plays an important role in amino acid metabolism and gluconeogenesis. The preference of carnivorous fish for protein amino acids instead of carbohydrates as a source of energy lead us to study the transcriptional regulation of the mitochondrial ALT (mALT) gene and to characterize the enzyme kinetics and modulation of mALT expression in the kidney of gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) under different nutritional and hormonal conditions. 5'-Deletion analysis of mALT promoter in transiently transfected HEK293 cells, site-directed mutagenesis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays allowed us to identify HNF4α as a new factor involved in the transcriptional regulation of mALT expression. Quantitative RT-PCR assays showed that starvation and the administration of streptozotocin (STZ) decreased HNF4α levels in the kidney of S. aurata, leading to the downregulation of mALT transcription. Analysis of the tissue distribution showed that kidney, liver, and intestine were the tissues with higher mALT and HNF4α expression. Kinetic analysis indicates that mALT enzyme is more efficient in catalyzing the conversion of L: -alanine to pyruvate than the reverse reaction. From these results, we conclude that HNF4α transactivates the mALT promoter and that the low levels of mALT expression found in the kidney of starved and STZ-treated fish result from a decreased expression of HNF4α. Our findings suggest that the mALT isoenzyme plays a major role in oxidazing dietary amino acids, and points to ALT as a target for a biotechnological action to spare protein and optimize the use of dietary nutrients for fish culture. PMID:21607544

  19. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in the Almahata Sitta Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Parker, Eric T.; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    Amino acid analysis of a meteorite fragment of asteroid 2008 TC(sub 3) called Almahata Sitta was carried out using reverse-phase high-perfo rmance liquid chromatography coupled with UV fluorescence detection a nd time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-FD/ToF-MS) as part of a sam ple analysis consortium. HPLC analyses of hot-water extracts from the meteorite revealed a complex distribution of two- to six-carbon aliph atic amino acids and one- to three carbon amines with abundances rang ing from 0.5 to 149 parts-per-billion (ppb). The enantiomeric ratios of the amino acids alanine, Beta-amino-n-butyric acid (Beta-ABA), 2-amino-2- methylbutanoic acid (isovaline), and 2-aminopentanoic acid (no rvaline) in the meteorite were racemic (D/L approximately 1), indicat ing that these amino acids are indigenous to the meteorite and not te rrestrial contaminants. Several other non-protein amino acids were also identified in the meteorite above background levels including alpha -aminoisobutyric acid (alpha-AIB), 4-amino-2- methybutanoic acid, 4-a mino-3-methylbutanoic acid, and 3-, 4-, and 5-aminopentanoic acid. Th e total abundances of isovaline and AlB in Almahata Sitta are approximately 1000 times lower than the abundances of these amino acids found in the CM carbonaceous meteorite Murchison. The extremely love abund ances and unusual distribution of five carbon amino acids in Almahata Sitta compared to Cl, CM, and CR carbonaceous meteorites and may be due to extensive thermal alteration of amino acids on the parent aster oid by partial melting during formation or impact shock heating.

  20. Synthesis and sweetness characteristics of L-aspartyl-D-alanine fenchyl esters.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Y; Nagakura, A; Tsuruta, H

    2001-10-01

    Four isomers of the L-aspartyl-D-alanine fenchyl esters were prepared as potential peptide sweeteners. L-Aspartyl-D-alanine (+)-alpha-fenchyl ester and L-aspartyl-D-alanine (-)-beta-fenchyl ester showed sweetness with potencies 250 and 160 times higher than that of sucrose, respectively. In contrast, L-aspartyl-D-alanine (+)-beta-fenchyl ester and L-aspartyl-D-alanine (-)-alpha-fenchyl ester had the highest sweetness potencies at 5700 and 1100 times that of sucrose, respectively. In particular, L-aspartyl-D-alanine (-)-alpha-fenchyl ester had an excellent sweetness quality; but L-aspartyl-D-alanine (+)-beta-fenchyl ester did not have an excellent quality of sweetness because it displayed an aftertaste caused by the strong sweetness. PMID:11600060

  1. Modulation of antimicrobial effects of beta-lactams by amino acids in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gillissen, G; Schumacher, M; Breuer-Werle, M

    1991-06-01

    Glycine as well as 11 and 10, respectively, out of a total of 12 D-amino-acids tested increased the antimicrobial efficacy of imipenem (IMI) and of ampicillin (AMP) using the serosensitive strain E. coli ATCC 8739. D-proline was ineffective in assays with IMI as well as D-proline and D-leucine in assays with AMP. - In contrast, L-amino-acids behaved differently: In assays with IMI, 9 out of 13 isomers were ineffective whereas 3 were antagonistic (L-phenylalanine, L-serine, L-tryptophan). In combination with AMP, however, 10 L-amino acids had an antagonistic effect and 2 (L-leucine, L-methionine) were ineffective. L-alanine was an exception and showed a synergism with both antibiotics which was assumed to have been due to a racemase activity of cells. - Seroresistance of E. coli apparently reduced the synergistic effect of glycine and beta-lactams. - Glycine, alanine and tryptophan lost their typical synergistic or antagonistic effect with AMP when tested as di- or tri-amino-acid compounds. This was not the case with di-L-alanine - It is supposed that the synergistic effect of glycine or of D-amino-acids with beta-lactams can be explained mainly by an inhibition of carboxypeptidases. PMID:1930574

  2. Amino acid and peptide absorption in patients with coeliac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis

    PubMed Central

    Silk, D. B. A.; Kumar, Parveen J.; Perrett, D.; Clark, M. L.; Dawson, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    A double-lumen perfusion technique has been used to study amino acid and peptide absorption in eight normal control subjects, 13 patients with untreated adult coeliac disease, and 16 patients with dermatitis herpetiformis who had varying morphological abnormalities of the small bowel. All subjects were perfused with isotonic solutions containing 10 mM glycyl-L-alanine and 10 mM glycine + 10 mM L-alanine. Patients with adult coeliac disease had impaired absorption of glycine (p < 0·01) and L-alanine (p < 0·05) from the amino acid solution compared with the control subjects. Amino acid uptake from the dipeptide solution was not significantly impaired, although four individual patients had impaired uptake of both amino acids. In contrast to these findings, very few patients with dermatitis herpetiformis had impaired amino acid absorption from either solution. Sodium absorption was impaired from both solutions when the groups of patients with adult coeliac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis with subtotal villous atrophy and partial villous atrophy were studied, and there were patients in each group who secreted sodium and water. The results suggest that malabsorption of dietary protein is unlikely to occur in dermatitis herpetiformis but may occur and contribute to protein deficiency seen in some severe cases of adult coeliac disease. The impairment of sodium and water absorption provides evidence that there may be functional impairment of the jejunal mucosa in dermatitis herpetiformis as well as in adult coeliac disease. PMID:4820629

  3. Analysis of cyclic pyrolysis products formed from amino acid monomer.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sung-Seen; Ko, Ji-Eun

    2011-11-18

    Amino acid was mixed with silica and tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) to favor pyrolysis of amino acid monomer. The pyrolysis products formed from amino acid monomer were using GC/MS and GC. 20 amino acids of alanine, arginine, asparagine, aspartic acid, cysteine, glutamic acid, glutamine, glycine, histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, proline, serine, threonine, tryptophan, tyrosine, and valine were analyzed. The pyrolysis products were divided into cyclic and non-cyclic products. Among the 20 amino acids, arginine, asparagine, glutamic acid, glutamine, histidine, lysine, and phenylalanine generated cyclic pyrolysis products of the monomer. New cyclic pyrolysis products were formed by isolation of amino acid monomers. They commonly had polar side functional groups to 5-, 6-, or 7-membered ring structure. Arginine, asparagine, glutamic acid, glutamine, histidine, and phenylalanine generated only 5- or 6-membered ring products. However, lysine generated both 6- and 7-membered ring compounds. Variations of the relative intensities of the cyclic pyrolysis products with the pyrolysis temperature and amino acid concentration were also investigated. PMID:21993510

  4. Designing amino acids to determine the local conformations of peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, A W

    1994-01-01

    The local conformations of proteins and peptides are determined by the amino acid sequence. However, the 20 amino acids encoded by the genome allow the peptide backbone to fold into many conformations, so that even for a small peptide it becomes very difficult to predict the three-dimensional structure. By using empirical conformational energy calculations, a set of amino acids has been designed that would be expected to constrain the conformation of a peptide or a protein to one or two local minima. Most of these amino acids are based on asymmetric substitutions at the C alpha atom of each residue. The H alpha atom of alanine was replaced by various groups: -OCH3, -NCH3, -SCH3, -CONH2, -CONHCH3, -CON(CH3)2, -NH.CO.CH3, -phenyl, or -o-(OCH3)phenyl. Several of these new amino acids are predicted to fold into unique peptide conformations such as right-handed alpha-helical, left-handed alpha-helical, or extended. In an attempt to produce an amino acid that favored the C(eq)7 conformation (torsion angles: phi = -70 degrees and psi = +70 degrees), an extra amide group was added to the C beta atom of the asparagine side chain. Conformationally restricted amino acids of this type could prove useful for developing new peptide pharmaceuticals, catalysts, or polymers. Images PMID:8146170

  5. Soil Bacteria Take Up D-Amino Acids, Protect Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, H. J.; Zhang, G.

    2011-12-01

    Recently, many groups reported D-amino acid uptake by plant roots, raising the question of whether soil D-amino acids represent a source of nitrogen or a source of toxicity. The discussion needs to be placed in the context of competition with rhizosphere bacteria. To provide this context, we followed the concentrations of D- and L-enantiomers of alanine, glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and leucine after they were added to soils in the laboratory. In all cases, the uptake of L-enantiomer began immediately and proceeded rapidly until exhausted. In contrast, the uptake of D-enantiomer required induction: an initial period of inactivity followed by rapid consumption comparable in rate to L-enantiomer. The induced nature of the D activity was confirmed by the addition of rifampicin, an mRNA synthesis inhibitor. Preventing the synthesis of new enzymes abolished soil flora's ability to consume D-amino acids, but not L-amino acids. These results suggest that inducible special racemase enzymes, which can convert D-amino acids back to their native L-forms, are widespread among soil microorganisms. This finding does not rule out the possibility that some plants may out-compete microorganisms and be able to access D-amino acids. It does suggest, however, that rhizosphere bacteria can shield plants from the toxic effect of D-amino acids.

  6. Dye-linked D-amino acid dehydrogenases: biochemical characteristics and applications in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Satomura, Takenori; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Suye, Shin-Ichiro; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2015-11-01

    Dye-linked D-amino acid dehydrogenases (Dye-DADHs) catalyze the dehydrogenation of free D-amino acids in the presence of an artificial electron acceptor. Although Dye-DADHs functioning in catabolism of L-alanine and as primary enzymes in electron transport chains are widely distributed in mesophilic Gram-negative bacteria, biochemical and biotechnological information on these enzymes remains scanty. This is in large part due to their instability after isolation. On the other hand, in the last decade, several novel types of Dye-DADH have been found in thermophilic bacteria and hyperthermophilic archaea, where they contribute not only to L-alanine catabolism but also to the catabolism of other amino acids, including D-arginine and L-hydroxyproline. In this minireview, we summarize recent developments in our understanding of the biochemical characteristics of Dye-DADHs and their specific application to electrochemical biosensors. PMID:26362681

  7. Genetics Home Reference: succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase deficiency succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase deficiency Enable Javascript to view ... PDF Open All Close All Description Succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase (SCOT) deficiency is an inherited ...

  8. Proteins and Amino Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the most abundant substances in living organisms and cells. All proteins are constructed from the same twenty amino acids that are linked together by covalent bonds. Shorter chains of two or more amino acids can be linked by covalent bonds to form polypeptides. There are twenty amino...

  9. A sodium-indpendent low affinity transport system for neutral amino acids in rabbit ileal mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, J Y; Sepúlveda, F V; Smith, M W

    1980-01-01

    1. The kinetic parameters for serine, alanine and methionine uptake by rabbit ileal mucosa have been determined in the absence of Na. 2. Uptake of all three amino acids took place through a single mediated system. The apparent Km values of serine, alanine and methionine for this system were equal to their respective apparent K1 values (approximately 89, 75 and 23 mM respectively). 3. Autoradiography was used to measure the cellular location of alanine uptake by rabbit ileum. Approximately 80% of the total uptake took place in the upper third of each villus. This uptake was reduced by 75% either by removal of Na or addition of serine. The proportional distribution of Na-dependent and Na-independent alanine uptakes along the villus was found to be equal. 4. The kinetic properties of the low affinity uptake mechanism for neutral amino acids, seen in the absence of Na, were virtually identical with those of one of the uptake mechanisms seen previously in the presence of Na. 5. The low affinity uptake mechanism appears to be Na-independent. It is suggested that the Na-coupled uptake of amino acid takes place through the high affinity system. PMID:7359411

  10. Partial characterization of glutathione S-transferases from wheat (Triticum spp.) and purification of a safener-induced glutathione S-transferase from Triticum tauschii.

    PubMed Central

    Riechers, D E; Irzyk, G P; Jones, S S; Fuerst, E P

    1997-01-01

    Hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) has very low constitutive glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity when assayed with the chloroacetamide herbicide dimethenamid as a substrate, which may account for its low tolerance to dimethenamid in the field. Treatment of seeds with the herbicide safener fluxofenim increased the total GST activity extracted from T. aestivum shoots 9-fold when assayed with dimethenamid as a substrate, but had no effect on glutathione levels. Total GST activity in crude protein extracts from T. aestivum, Triticum durum, and Triticum tauschii was separated into several component GST activities by anion-exchange fast-protein liquid chromatography. These activities (isozymes) differed with respect to their activities toward dimethenamid or 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as substrates and in their levels of induction by safener treatment. A safener-induced GST isozyme was subsequently purified by anion-exchange and affinity chromatography from etiolated shoots of the diploid wheat species T. tauschii (a progenitor of hexaploid wheat) treated with the herbicide safener cloquintocet-mexyl. The isozyme bound to a dimethenamid-affinity column and had a subunit molecular mass of 26 kD based on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The purified enzyme (designated GST TSI-1) was recognized by an antiserum raised against a mixture of maize (Zea mays) GSTs. Amino acid sequences obtained from protease-digested GST TSI-1 had significant homology with the safener-inducible maize GST V and two auxin-regulated tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) GST isozymes. PMID:9276955

  11. Amino acid profile during exercise and training in Standardbreds.

    PubMed

    Westermann, C M; Dorland, L; Wijnberg, I D; de Sain-van der Velden, M G M; van Breda, E; Barneveld, A; de Graaf-Roelfsema, E; Keizer, H A; van der Kolk, J H

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the influence of acute exercise, training and intensified training on the plasma amino acid profile. In a 32-week longitudinal study using 10 Standardbred horses, training was divided into four phases, including a phase of intensified training for five horses. At the end of each phase, a standardized exercise test, SET, was performed. Plasma amino acid concentrations before and after each SET were measured. Training significantly reduced mean plasma aspartic acid concentration, whereas exercise significantly increased the plasma concentrations of alanine, taurine, methionine, leucine, tyrosine and phenylalanine and reduced the plasma concentrations of glycine, ornithine, glutamine, citrulline and serine. Normally and intensified trained horses differed not significantly. It is concluded that amino acids should not be regarded as limiting training performance in Standardbreds except for aspartic acid which is the most likely candidate for supplementation. PMID:20863542

  12. NMR chemical shifts in amino acids: Effects of environments, electric field, and amine group rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Young-Gui; Pfrommer, Bernd G.; Louie, Steven G.; Canning, Andrew

    2002-03-03

    The authors present calculations of NMR chemical shifts in crystalline phases of some representative amino acids such as glycine, alanine, and alanyl-alanine. To get an insight on how different environments affect the chemical shifts, they study the transition from the crystalline phase to completely isolated molecules of glycine. In the crystalline limit, the shifts are dominated by intermolecular hydrogen-bonds. In the molecular limit, however, dipole electric field effects dominate the behavior of the chemical shifts. They show that it is necessary to average the chemical shifts in glycine over geometries. Tensor components are analyzed to get the angle dependent proton chemical shifts, which is a more refined characterization method.

  13. Free amino acid composition of quince (Cydonia oblonga Miller) fruit (pulp and peel) and jam.

    PubMed

    Silva, Branca M; Casal, Susana; Andrade, Paula B; Seabra, Rosa M; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Ferreira, Margarida A

    2004-03-10

    Twenty-one free amino acids present in several samples of quince fruit (pulp and peel) and quince jam (homemade and industrially manufactured) were analyzed by GC/FID. The analyses showed some differences between quince pulps and peels. Generally, the highest content in total free amino acids and in glycine was found in peels. As a general rule, the three major free amino acids detected in pulps were aspartic acid, asparagine, and hydroxyproline. For quince peels, usually, the three most abundant amino acids were glycine, aspartic acid, and asparagine. Similarly, for quince jams the most important free amino acids were aspartic acid, asparagine, and glycine or hydroxyproline. This study suggests that the free amino acid analysis can be useful for the evaluation of quince jam authenticity. It seems that glycine percentage can be used for the detection of quince peel addition while high alanine content can be related to pear addition. PMID:14995121

  14. A new D-stereospecific amino acid amidase from Ochrobactrum anthropi.

    PubMed

    Asano, Y; Mori, T; Hanamoto, S; Kato, Y; Nakazawa, A

    1989-07-14

    A new D-stereospecific amino acid amidase has been partially purified from Ochrobactrum anthropi SCRC SV3, which had been isolated and selected from soil. The Mr of the enzyme was estimated to be about 38,000, and its isoelectric point was 5.3. The enzyme catalyzes the stereospecific hydrolysis of D-amino acid amide to yield D-amino acid and ammonia. The major substrates included D-phenylalanine amide, D-tyrosine amide, D-tryptophan amide, D-leucine amide, and D-alanine amide. PMID:2751665

  15. Functional differentiation of human jejunum and ileum: A comparison of the handling of glucose, peptides, and amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Silk, D. B. A.; Webb, Joan P. W.; Lane, Annette E.; Clark, M. L.; Dawson, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of glucose, glycine, L-alanine, and glycyl-L-alanine absorption from the jejunum and ileum have been compared in normal human subjects. A perfusion technique has been used, and correct positioning of the perfusion tube has been confirmed by measuring the differential jejunal and ileal handling of bicarbonate. Glucose and glycine were absorbed faster from the jejunum than from the ileum of all subjects studied, and L-alanine was absorbed faster from the jejunum than from the ileum in five out of six subjects studied. In contrast, the dipeptide glycyl-L-alanine was absorbed at comparable rates from the jejunum and ileum. Higher concentrations of free amino acids were detected in the luminal contents aspirated during the ileal dipeptide perfusions. These results emphasize the importance of oligopeptide transport in the absorption of protein digestion products, especially in the human ileum, and the practical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:4852103

  16. Formation of Amino Acid Thioesters for Prebiotic Peptide Synthesis: Catalysis By Amino Acid Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The origin of life can be described as a series of events in which a prebiotic chemical process came increasingly under the control of its catalytic products. In our search for this prebiotic process that yielded catalytic takeover products (such as polypeptides), we have been investigating a reaction system that generates peptide-forming amino acid thioesters from formaldehyde, glycolaldehyde, and ammonia in the presence of thiols. As shown below, this model process begins by aldol condensation of formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde to give trioses and releases. These sugars then undergo beta-dehydration yielding their respective alpha-ketoaldehydes. Addition of ammonia to the alpha-ketoaldehydes yields imines which can either: (a) rearrange in the presence of thesis to give amino acid thioesters or (be react with another molecule of aldehyde to give imidazoles. This 'one-pot' reaction system operates under mild aqueous conditions, and like modem amino acid biosynthesis, uses sugar intermediates which are converted to products by energy-yielding redox reactions. Recently, we discovered that amino acids, such as the alanine reaction product, catalyze the first and second steps of the process. In the presence of ammonia the process also generates other synthetically useful products, like the important biochemical -- pyruvic acid.

  17. Branched-chain amino acid supplementation during bed rest: effect on recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.; Donaldson, M. R.; Leskiw, M. J.; Schluter, M. D.; Baggett, D. W.; Boden, G.

    2003-01-01

    Bed rest is associated with a loss of protein from the weight-bearing muscle. The objectives of this study are to determine whether increasing dietary branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) during bed rest improves the anabolic response after bed rest. The study consisted of a 1-day ambulatory period, 14 days of bed rest, and a 4-day recovery period. During bed rest, dietary intake was supplemented with either 30 mmol/day each of glycine, serine, and alanine (group 1) or with 30 mmol/day each of the three BCAAs (group 2). Whole body protein synthesis was determined with U-(15)N-labeled amino acids, muscle, and selected plasma protein synthesis with l-[(2)H(5)]phenylalanine. Total glucose production and gluconeogenesis from alanine were determined with l-[U-(13)C(3)]alanine and [6,6-(2)H(2)]glucose. During bed rest, nitrogen (N) retention was greater with BCAA feeding (56 +/- 6 vs. 26 +/- 12 mg N. kg(-1). day(-1), P < 0.05). There was no effect of BCAA supplementation on either whole body, muscle, or plasma protein synthesis or the rate of 3-MeH excretion. Muscle tissue free amino acid concentrations were increased during bed rest with BCAA (0.214 +/- 0.066 vs. 0.088 +/- 0.12 nmol/mg protein, P < 0.05). Total glucose production and gluconeogenesis from alanine were unchanged with bed rest but were significantly reduced (P < 0.05) with the BCAA group in the recovery phase. In conclusion, the improved N retention during bed rest is due, at least in part, to accretion of amino acids in the tissue free amino acid pools. The amount accreted is not enough to impact protein kinetics in the recovery phase but does improve N retention by providing additional essential amino acids in the early recovery phase.

  18. Plane wave density functional theory studies of the structural and the electronic properties of amino acids attached to graphene oxide via peptide bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Byeong June; Jeong, Hae Kyung; Lee, ChangWoo

    2015-08-01

    We studied via plane wave pseudopotential total-energy calculations within the local spin density approximation (LSDA) the electronic and the structural properties of amino acids (alanine, glycine, and histidine) attached to graphene oxide (GO) by peptide bonding. The HOMO-LUMO gap, the Hirshfeld charges, and the equilibrium geometrical structures exhibit distinctive variations that depend on the species of the attached amino acid. The GO-amino acid system appears to be a good candidate for a biosensor.

  19. Solid state radiolysis of amino acids in an astrochemical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cataldo, Franco; Angelini, Giancarlo; Iglesias-Groth, Susana; Manchado, Arturo

    2011-01-01

    The aliphatic amino acids L-alanine and L-leucine and the aromatic amino acids L-phenylalanine, L-tyrosine and L-tryptophan were irradiated in the solid state to a dose of 3.2 MGy. The degree of decomposition was measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Furthermore the degree of radioracemization was measured by optical rotatory dispersion (ORD) spectroscopy. From the DSC measurement a radiolysis rate constant k and the half life T1/2 for each amino acid have been determined and extrapolated to a dose of 14 MGy, which corresponds to the expected total dose delivered by the decay of radionuclides to the organic molecules present in comets and asteroids in 4.6×109 years, the age of the Solar System. It is shown that all the amino acids studied can survive a radiation dose of 14 MGy although they are reduced to 1/4-1/5 of their original value they had at the beginning of the history of the Solar System. Consequently, the amount of alanine or leucine found today in the meteorites known as carbonaceous chondrites is just 1/4-1/5 of the amount originally present at the epoch of the formation of the Solar System 4.6×109 years ago. Among the amino acids studied, tyrosine shows the highest radiation resistance while tryptophan does not combine its relatively high radiation resistance with an elevated level of radioracemization resistance. Apart from the exception of tryptophan, it is shown that the radiolysis rate constants k of all the amino acids studied are in reasonable agreement with the radioracemization rate constant krac.

  20. Vertebrate Acyl CoA synthetase family member 4 (ACSF4-U26) is a β-alanine-activating enzyme homologous to bacterial non-ribosomal peptide synthetase.

    PubMed

    Drozak, Jakub; Veiga-da-Cunha, Maria; Kadziolka, Beata; Van Schaftingen, Emile

    2014-03-01

    Mammalian ACSF4-U26 (Acyl CoA synthetase family member 4), a protein of unknown function, comprises a putative adenylation domain (AMP-binding domain) similar to those of bacterial non-ribosomal peptide synthetases, a putative phosphopantetheine attachment site, and a C-terminal PQQDH (pyrroloquinoline quinone dehydrogenase)-related domain. Orthologues comprising these three domains are present in many eukaryotes including plants. Remarkably, the adenylation domain of plant ACSF4-U26 show greater identity with Ebony, the insect enzyme that ligates β-alanine to several amines, than with vertebrate or insect ACSF4-U26, and prediction of its specificity suggests that it activates β-alanine. In the presence of ATP, purified mouse recombinant ACSF4-U26 progressively formed a covalent bond with radiolabelled β-alanine. The bond was not formed in a point mutant lacking the phosphopantetheine attachment site. Competition experiments with various amino acids indicated that the reaction was almost specific for β-alanine, and a KM of ~ 5 μm was calculated for this reaction. The loaded enzyme was used to study the formation of a potential end product. Among the 20 standard amino acids, only cysteine stimulated unloading of the enzyme. This effect was mimicked by cysteamine and dithiothreitol, and was unaffected by absence of the PQQDH-related domain, suggesting that β-alanine transfer onto thiols is catalysed by the ACSF4-U26 adenylation domain, but is physiologically irrelevant. We conclude that ACSF4-U26 is a β-alanine-activating enzyme, and hypothesize that it is involved in a rare intracellular reaction, possibly an infrequent post-translational or post-transcriptional modification. PMID:24467666

  1. Performance effects of acute β-alanine induced paresthesia in competitive cyclists.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, Phillip M; Minahan, Clare L

    2016-01-01

    β-alanine is a common ingredient in supplements consumed by athletes. Indeed, athletes may believe that the β-alanine induced paresthesia, experienced shortly after ingestion, is associated with its ergogenic effect despite no scientific mechanism supporting this notion. The present study examined changes in cycling performance under conditions of β-alanine induced paresthesia. Eight competitive cyclists (VO2max = 61.8 ± 4.2 mL·kg·min(-1)) performed three practices, one baseline and four experimental trials. The experimental trials comprised a 1-km cycling time trial under four conditions with varying information (i.e., athlete informed β-alanine or placebo) and supplement content (athlete received β-alanine or placebo) delivered to the cyclist: informed β-alanine/received β-alanine, informed placebo/received β-alanine, informed β-alanine/received placebo and informed placebo/received placebo. Questionnaires were undertaken exploring the cyclists' experience of the effects of the experimental conditions. A possibly likely increase in mean power was associated with conditions in which β-alanine was administered (±95% CL: 2.2% ± 4.0%), but these results were inconclusive for performance enhancement (p = 0.32, effect size = 0.18, smallest worthwhile change = 56% beneficial). A possibly harmful effect was observed when cyclists were correctly informed that they had ingested a placebo (-1.0% ± 1.9%). Questionnaire data suggested that β-alanine ingestion resulted in evident sensory side effects and six cyclists reported placebo effects. Acute ingestion of β-alanine is not associated with improved 1-km TT performance in competitive cyclists. These findings are in contrast to the athlete's "belief" as cyclists reported improved energy and the ability to sustain a higher power output under conditions of β-alanine induced paresthesia. PMID:25636080

  2. Properties of succinyl-coenzyme A:L-malate coenzyme A transferase and its role in the autotrophic 3-hydroxypropionate cycle of Chloroflexus aurantiacus.

    PubMed

    Friedmann, Silke; Steindorf, Astrid; Alber, Birgit E; Fuchs, Georg

    2006-04-01

    The 3-hydroxypropionate cycle has been proposed to operate as the autotrophic CO2 fixation pathway in the phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus. In this pathway, acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) and two bicarbonate molecules are converted to malate. Acetyl-CoA is regenerated from malyl-CoA by L-malyl-CoA lyase. The enzyme forming malyl-CoA, succinyl-CoA:L-malate coenzyme A transferase, was purified. Based on the N-terminal amino acid sequence of its two subunits, the corresponding genes were identified on a gene cluster which also contains the gene for L-malyl-CoA lyase, the subsequent enzyme in the pathway. Both enzymes were severalfold up-regulated under autotrophic conditions, which is in line with their proposed function in CO2 fixation. The two CoA transferase genes were cloned and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant enzyme was purified and studied. Succinyl-CoA:L-malate CoA transferase forms a large (alphabeta)n complex consisting of 46- and 44-kDa subunits and catalyzes the reversible reaction succinyl-CoA + L-malate --> succinate + L-malyl-CoA. It is specific for succinyl-CoA as the CoA donor but accepts L-citramalate instead of L-malate as the CoA acceptor; the corresponding d-stereoisomers are not accepted. The enzyme is a member of the class III of the CoA transferase family. The demonstration of the missing CoA transferase closes the last gap in the proposed 3-hydroxypropionate cycle. PMID:16547052

  3. Developmental aspects of glutathione S-transferase B (ligandin) in rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Hales, B F; Neims, A H

    1976-01-01

    The postnatal development in male Sprague-Dawley rats of hepatic glutathione S-transferase B (ligandin) in relation to the other glutathione S-transferases is described. The concentration of glutathione S-transferase B in 1-day-old male rats is about one-fifth of that in adult animals. The enzyme reaches adult concentrations 4-5 weeks later. When assessed by substrate specificity or immunologically, the proportion of transferase B relative to the other glutathione S-transferases is high during the first week after birth. At this age, 67.5% of the transferase activity towards 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene is immunoprecipitable by anti-(transferase B), compared with about 50% in adults and older pups. Between the second and the fifth postnatal week, the fraction of transferase B increases in parallel fashion with the other transferases in hepatic cytosol. Neither L-thyroxine nor cortisol induce a precocious increase in glutathione S-transferase activity. Phenobarbital did induce transferase activity towards 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene and 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene in both pups and adults. The extent of induction by phenobarbital was a function of basal activity during development such that the percentage stimulation remained constant from 5 days postnatally to adulthood. PMID:1008852

  4. Stability of amino acids and their oligomerization under high-pressure conditions: implications for prebiotic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Otake, Tsubasa; Taniguchi, Takashi; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kawamura, Fumio; Nakazawa, Hiromoto; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2011-10-01

    The polymerization of amino acids leading to the formation of peptides and proteins is a significant problem for the origin of life. This problem stems from the instability of amino acids and the difficulty of their oligomerization in aqueous environments, such as seafloor hydrothermal systems. We investigated the stability of amino acids and their oligomerization reactions under high-temperature (180-400°C) and high-pressure (1.0-5.5 GPa) conditions, based on the hypothesis that the polymerization of amino acids occurred in marine sediments during diagenesis and metamorphism, at convergent margins on early Earth. Our results show that the amino acids glycine and alanine are stabilized by high pressure. Oligomers up to pentamers were formed, which has never been reported for alanine in the absence of a catalyst. The yields of peptides at a given temperature and reaction time were higher under higher-pressure conditions. Elemental, infrared, and isotopic analyses of the reaction products indicated that deamination is a key degradation process for amino acids and peptides under high-pressure conditions. A possible NH(3)-rich environment in marine sediments on early Earth may have further stabilized amino acids and peptides by inhibiting their deamination. PMID:21961531

  5. Stimulation of Lysine Decarboxylase Production in Escherichia coli by Amino Acids and Peptides1

    PubMed Central

    Cascieri, T.; Mallette, M. F.

    1973-01-01

    A commercial hydrolysate of casein stimulated production of lysine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.18) by Escherichia coli B. Cellulose and gel chromatography of this hydrolysate yielded peptides which were variably effective in this stimulation. Replacement of individual, stimulatory peptides by equivalent amino acids duplicated the enzyme levels attained with those peptides. There was no indication of specific stimulation by any peptide. The peptides were probably taken up by the oligopeptide transport system of E. coli and hydrolyzed intracellularly by peptidases to their constituent amino acids for use in enzyme synthesis. Single omission of amino acids from mixtures was used to screen them for their relative lysine decarboxylase stimulating abilities. Over 100 different mixtures were evaluated in establishing the total amino acid requirements for maximal synthesis of lysine decarboxylase by E. coli B. A mixture containing all of the common amino acids except glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and alanine increased lysine decarboxylase threefold over an equivalent weight of casein hydrolysate. The nine most stimulatory amino acids were methionine, arginine, cystine, leucine, isoleucine, glutamine, threonine, tyrosine, and asparagine. Methionine and arginine quantitatively were the most important. A mixture of these nine was 87% as effective as the complete mixture. Several amino acids were inhibitory at moderate concentrations, and alanine (2.53 mM) was the most effective. Added pyridoxine increased lysine decarboxylase activity 30%, whereas other B vitamins and cyclic adenosine 5′-monophosphate had no effect. PMID:4588201

  6. Purification and characterization of a DNA strand transferase from broccoli.

    PubMed

    Tissier, A F; Lopez, M F; Signer, E R

    1995-05-01

    A protein with DNA binding, renaturation, and strand-transfer activities has been purified to homogeneity from broccoli (Brassica oleracea var italica). The enzyme, broccoli DNA strand transferase, has a native molecular mass of at least 200 kD and an apparent subunit molecular mass of 95 kD and is isolated as a set of isoforms differing only in charge. All three activities are saturated at very low stoichiometry, one monomer per approximately 1000 nucleotides of single-stranded DNA. Strand transfer is not effected by nuclease activity and reannealing, is only slightly dependent on ATP, and is independent of added Mg2+. Transfer requires homologous single- and double-stranded DNA and at higher enzyme concentrations results in very high molecular mass complexes. As with Escherichia coli RecA, transfer by broccoli DNA strand transferase depends strongly on the presence of 3' homologous ends. PMID:7784508

  7. Biotransfer of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in a eutrophicated freshwater lake.

    PubMed

    Lage, Sandra; Annadotter, Heléne; Rasmussen, Ulla; Rydberg, Sara

    2015-03-01

    β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a neurotoxic non-protein amino acid, plays a significant role as an environmental risk factor in neurodegenerative diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. BMAA producers occur globally, colonizing almost all habitats and represent species from distinct phytoplanktonic groups, i.e., cyanobacteria, diatoms, and dinoflagellates. Bioaccumulation of BMAA in invertebrate and vertebrate organisms has also been registered around the globe. In the Baltic Sea, BMAA has been detected in several commercial fish species, raising the question of the bioaccumulation of BMAA in Swedish limnic systems. Here we find the presence of BMAA in water samples from Lake Finjasjön and identify its bioaccumulation patterns in both plankti-benthivorous and piscivorous fish, according to fish species, total weight, gender, and season of collection. For the first time, a large number of fish individuals were used in order to draw conclusions on BMAA bioaccumulation in a closed ecological community based on a statistical approach. We may, therefore, conclude that feeding patterns (plankti-benthivorous) and increased age of fish may lead to a higher tissue concentration of BMAA. PMID:25738330

  8. β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) metabolism in the aquatic macrophyte Ceratophyllum demersum.

    PubMed

    Downing, Simoné; Esterhuizen-Londt, Maranda; Grant Downing, Timothy

    2015-10-01

    The cyanobacterial neurotoxin, β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) bioaccumulates and biomagnifies within the environment. However, most reports on the environmental presence of BMAA focus on the presence of BMAA in animals rather than in plants. Various laboratory studies have reported that this neurotoxin, implicated in neurodegenerative disease, is rapidly taken up by various aquatic and terrestrial plants, including crop plants. In this study the metabolism of BMAA in the aquatic macrophyte, Ceratophyllum demersum, was investigated using stable isotopically labelled BMAA. Data show that the toxin is rapidly removed from the environment by the plant. However, during depuration cellular BMAA concentrations decrease considerably, without excretion of the toxin back into the environment and without catabolism of BMAA, evidenced by the absence of label transfer to other amino acids. This strongly suggests that BMAA is metabolised via covalent modification and sequestered inside the plant as a BMAA-derivative. This modification may be reversed in humans following consumption of BMAA-containing plant material. These data therefore impact on the assessment of the risk of human exposure to this neurotoxin. PMID:26036420

  9. Bacteria do not incorporate β-N-methylamino-L-alanine into their proteins.

    PubMed

    van Onselen, Rianita; Cook, Niall A; Phelan, Richard R; Downing, Tim G

    2015-08-01

    β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), is commonly found in both a free and proteinassociated form in various organisms exposed to the toxin. The long latency of development of neurodegeneration attributed to BMAA, is hypothesized to be the result of excitotoxicity following slow release of the toxin from protein reservoirs. It was recently suggested that these BMAA-protein associations may reflect misincorporation of BMAA in place of serine, as occurs, for example, when canavanine misincorporates in place of arginine. We therefore compared BMAA and canavanine toxicty in various bacterial species, and misincorporation of these amino acids into proteins in a bacterial protein expression system. None of the bacterial species showed any physiological stress responses to BMAA in contrast to the growth reduction observed when cultures were incubated in media containing canavanine. LC-MS analysis confirmed uptake of BMAA from growth media. However, after immobilized metal affinity chromatography and SDS-PAGE purification of proteins produced in an E scherichia coli expression system, no BMAA was detected by either LC-MS or LC-MS/MS analysis using two derivatization methods, or by orbitrap MS of trypsin digests of the protein. We therefore conclude that BMAA is not misincorporated into proteins in bacteria and that the observed BMAA-protein association in bacteria is superficial. PMID:26051985

  10. Membrane topology of aspartate:alanine antiporter AspT from Comamonas testosteroni.

    PubMed

    Fujiki, Takashi; Nanatani, Kei; Nishitani, Kei; Yagi, Kyoko; Ohnishi, Fumito; Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Uchida, Takafumi; Nakajima, Tasuku; Abea, Keietsu

    2007-01-01

    We cloned the aspT gene encoding the L-aspartate:L-alanine antiporter AspTCt in Comamonas testosteroni genomic DNA. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence revealed that C. testosteroni has an asp operon containing aspT upstream of the l-aspartate 4-decarboxylase gene, and that the gene order of the asp operon of C. testosteroni is the inverse of that of Tetragenococcus halophilus. We used proteoliposomes to confirm the transport processes of AspTCt. To elucidate the two-dimensional structure of AspTCt, we analysed its membrane topology by means of alkaline phosphatase (PhoA) and beta-lactamase (BlaM) fusion methods. The fusion analyses revealed that AspTCt has seven transmembrane segments (TMs), a large cytoplasmic loop containing approximately 200 amino acid residues between TM4 and TM5, a cytoplasmic N-terminus, and a periplasmic C-terminus. These results suggest that the orientation of the N-terminus of AspTCt differs from that of tetragenococcal AspT, even though these two AspT orthologues catalyse the same transport reactions. PMID:17158863

  11. Biotransfer of β-N-Methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) in a Eutrophicated Freshwater Lake

    PubMed Central

    Lage, Sandra; Annadotter, Heléne; Rasmussen, Ulla; Rydberg, Sara

    2015-01-01

    β-N-Methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), a neurotoxic non-protein amino acid, plays a significant role as an environmental risk factor in neurodegenerative diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. BMAA producers occur globally, colonizing almost all habitats and represent species from distinct phytoplanktonic groups, i.e., cyanobacteria, diatoms, and dinoflagellates. Bioaccumulation of BMAA in invertebrate and vertebrate organisms has also been registered around the globe. In the Baltic Sea, BMAA has been detected in several commercial fish species, raising the question of the bioaccumulation of BMAA in Swedish limnic systems. Here we find the presence of BMAA in water samples from Lake Finjasjön and identify its bioaccumulation patterns in both plankti-benthivorous and piscivorous fish, according to fish species, total weight, gender, and season of collection. For the first time, a large number of fish individuals were used in order to draw conclusions on BMAA bioaccumulation in a closed ecological community based on a statistical approach. We may, therefore, conclude that feeding patterns (plankti-benthivorous) and increased age of fish may lead to a higher tissue concentration of BMAA. PMID:25738330

  12. Development of an alanine dosimeter for gamma dosimetry in mixed environments

    SciTech Connect

    Vehar, D.W.; Griffin, P.J.

    1992-12-31

    L-{alpha}a-Alanine, a nontoxic polycrystalline amino acid, has been investigated for use in high-precision, high-level absorbed-dose measurements in mixed neutron/photon environments such as research and test reactors. The technique is based on the use of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to determine the extent of free radical production in a sample exposed to ionizing radiation, and has been successfully used for photon absorbed-dose measurements at levels exceeding 10{sup 5} Gy with high measurement precision. Application of the technique to mixed environments requires knowledge of the energy-dependent response of the dosimeter for both photons and neutrons. Determination of the dosimeter response to photons is accomplished by irradiations in {sup 60}Co and bremsstrahlung sources and by calculations of energy-dependent photon kerma. Neutron response is determined by calculations in conjunction with CaF{sub 2}:Mn thermoluminescence dosimeters and by calculations of energy-dependent neutron kerma. Several neutron environments are used, including the ACRR and SPR-III reactors.

  13. Development of an alanine dosimeter for gamma dosimetry in mixed environments -- Summary of research

    SciTech Connect

    Vehar, D.W.; Griffin, P.J.

    1994-02-01

    L-{alpha}-alanine, a nontoxic polycrystalline amino acid, has been investigated for use in high-precision, high-level absorbed-dose measurements in mixed neutron/photon environments such as research and test reactors. The technique is based on the use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to determine the extent of free radical production in a sample exposed to ionizing radiation, and has been successfully used for photon absorbed-dose measurements at levels exceeding 10{sup 5} Gy with high measurement precision. Application of the technique to mixed environments requires knowledge of the energy-dependent response of the dosimeter for both photons and neutrons. Determination of the dosimeter response to photons is accomplished by irradiations in {sup 60}Co and bremsstrahlung sources and by calculations of energy-dependent photon kerma. Neutron response is determined by irradiations in conjunction with CaF{sub 2}:Mn thermoluminescence dosimeters and by calculations of energy-dependent neutron kerma. Several neutron environments are used, including those provided by the Annular Core Research Reactor and Sandia Pulsed Reactor.

  14. Enantioselective hydrogenation of pyruvic acid oxime to alanine on Pd/Alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Borszeky, K.; Mallat, T.; Aeschiman, R.

    1996-06-01

    The chemo- and enantioselective hydrogenation of pyruvic acid oxime have been studied on Pd/alumina, the latter in the presence of the 1,2-amino alcohol type alkaloids ephedrine, cinchonidine, and cinchonine. High yields of racemic alanine (90-98%) were obtained in the absence of alkaloids in polar solvents at 0-45{degrees}C and 10 bar. Enantioselection increased with higher temperature and alkalid: oxime molar ratio. A 1:1 ephedrine: oxime molar ratio afforded the best enantiomeric excess (26%). The presence of alkaloid resulted in a decrease of reaction rate by a factor of up to 140, compared to the racemic hydrogenation. Based on X-ray crystal structure analysis of the alkaloid-pyruvic acid oxime adduct, a mechanism is proposed for the steric course of the reaction. Extended interactions by multiple H bonds between the adsorbed alkaloid-oxime salt units on the Pd surface is assumed to be at the origin of the moderate enantioselectivity and the very low enantioselective hydrogenation rate. 28 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Determination of free L- and D-alanine in hydrolysed protein fertilisers by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Cavani, Luciano; Ciavatta, Claudio; Gessa, Carlo

    2003-01-24

    of racemisation of hydrolysed protein fertilisers (HPFs) using an The objective of this study was to determine the degree inexpensive and easy to handle analytical method for qualitative control of the products. Using a polyacrylamide coated capillary and a run buffer containing 0.1 M Tris-borate+2.5 mM EDTA-Na2+0.1% sodium dodecylsulfate+10 mM beta-cyclodextrin a quantitative separation of D- and L-alanine (Ala) was made from an not treated HPF sample derivatised with dansyl chlorine by capillary electrophoresis. The D-Ala:[D-Ala+L-Ala] ratio, called degree of racemisation (RD), was calculated. The analysis of ten commercial HPFs has shown that more than 60% of HPFs have an RD > or = 40%. while only one product has shown an RD <5%. These results showed that most of the HPFs on the market are obtained with strong hydrolytic processes and high contents of D-amino acids are probably less effective as plant nutrients or even potentially dangerous to plants. PMID:12580515

  16. The role of herpes simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase alanine 168 in substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Candice L, Willmon; Django, Sussman; Margaret E, Black

    2008-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV) thymidine kinase (TK) has been widely used in suicide gene therapy for the treatment of cancer due to its broad substrate specificity and the inability of the endogenous human TK to phosphorylate guanosine analogs such as ganciclovir (GCV). The basis of suicide gene therapy is the introduction of a gene that encodes a prodrug-activating enzyme into tumor cells. After administration, the prodrug is selectively converted to a toxic drug by the suicide gene product thereby bringing about the eradication of the cancer cells. A major drawback to this therapy is the low activity the enzyme displays towards the prodrugs, requiring high prodrug doses that result in adverse side effects. Earlier studies revealed two HSV TK variants (SR39 and mutant 30) derived by random mutagenesis with enhanced activities towards GCV in vitro and in vivo. While these mutants contain multiple amino acid substitutions, molecular modeling suggests that substitutions at alanine 168 (A168) may be responsible for the observed increase in prodrug sensitivity. To evaluate this, site-directed mutagenesis was used to individually substitute A168 with phenylalanine or tyrosine to reflect the mutations found in SR39 and mutant 30, respectively. Additionally, kinetic parameters and the ability of these mutants to sensitize tumor cells to GCV in comparison to wild-type thymidine kinase were determined. PMID:18949076

  17. Amino Acid Chemistry as a Link Between Small Solar System Bodies and Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Botta, Oliver; Cooper, George; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2000-01-01

    Establishing chemical links between meteorites and small solar system bodies, such as comets and asteroids, provides a tool for investigating the processes that occurred during the formation of the solar system. Carbonaceous meteorites are of particular interest, since they may have seeded the early Earth with a variety of prebiotic organic compounds including amino acids, purines and pyrimidines, which are thought to be necessary for the origin of life. Here we report the results of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) based amino acid analyses of the acid-hydrolyzed hot water extracts from pristine interior pieces of the CI carbonaceous chondrites Orgueil and Ivuna and the CM meteorites Murchison and Murray. We found that the CI meteorites Orgueil and Ivuna contained high abundances of beta-alanine and glycine, while only traces of other amino acids like alanine, alpha-amino-n-butryic acid (ABA) and alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) were detected in these meteorites. Carbon isotopic measurements of beta-alanine and glycine in Orgueil by gas chromatography combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry clearly indicate an extraterrestrial origin of these amino acids. The amino acid composition of Orgueil and Ivuna was strikingly different from the CM chondrites Murchison and Murray. The most notable difference was the high relative abundance of B-alanine in Orgueil and Ivuna compared to Murchison and Murray. Furthermore, AIB, which is one of the most abundant amino acids found in Murchison and Murray, was present in only trace amounts in Orgueil and Ivuna. Our amino acid data strongly suggest that the CI meteorites Orgueil and Ivuna came from a different type of parent body than the CM meteorites Murchison and Murray, possibly from an extinct comet. It is generally thought that carbonaceous meteorites are fragments of larger asteroidal bodies delivered via near Earth objects (NEO). Orbital and dynamic studies suggest that both fragments of main belt asteroids

  18. D-Amino acids influence ultrasonic calling in mice pups: effects of D-phenylalanine and D-leucine.

    PubMed

    Albonetti, M E; D'Udine, B; Oliverio, A

    1985-06-24

    6-day-old mice pups were injected with D-amino acids (D-phenyl-alanine + D-leucine), and their ultrasonic distress vocalizations were measured. D-Amino acids, which exert opioid-like effects, reduce the number of ultrasonic calls without affecting the activity of the pups. This effect is reversed by naloxone, an opioid antagonist. The role of endogenous opioids in modulating early attachment is discussed. PMID:4041020

  19. Dietary protein reduction in sheep and goats: different effects on L-alanine and L-leucine transport across the brush-border membrane of jejunal enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Schröder, B; Schöneberger, M; Rodehutscord, M; Pfeffer, E; Breves, G

    2003-08-01

    It was the aim of this study to examine the potential regulatory effects of a long-term low dietary protein supply on the transport capacity of the jejunal brush-border membrane for amino acids. For this purpose, we used the neutral amino acids L-alanine (representative for nonessential amino acids) and L-leucine (representative for essential amino acids) as model substances. Ten sheep lambs, 8 weeks of age and 19-27 kg body weight, were allotted to two dietary regimes with either adequate or reduced protein supply which was achieved by 17.9% and 9.7% of crude protein in the concentrated feed, respectively. The feeding periods were 4-6 weeks in length. Similarly, eight goat kids of 5-7 weeks of age and 8-14 kg body weight were allotted to either adequate (crude protein 20.1%, feeding period 9-12 weeks) or reduced protein supply (10.1%, feeding period 17-18 weeks). Dietary protein reduction in lambs caused a significant body weight loss of 0.6 +/- 0.7 kg, whereas the body weight in control animals increased by 1.9 +/- 0.7 kg (P<0.05). Plasma urea concentrations decreased significantly by 60% (low protein 2.3 +/- 0.1 versus control 5.7 +/- 0.2 mmol l(-1), P<0.001). In kids, reduction of dietary protein intake led to significant decreases of the daily weight gain by 48% from 181 +/- 8 g to 94 +/- 3 g (P<0.001) and daily dry matter intake by 27% from 568 +/- 13 g to 417 +/- 6 g (P<0.01). Respective urea concentrations in plasma were reduced by 77% from 5.2 +/- 0.4 to 1.2 +/- 0.2 mmol l(-1) (P<0.01). Kinetic analyses of the initial rates of alanine uptake into isolated jejunal brush-border membrane vesicles from sheep and goats as affected by low dietary protein supply yielded that the apparent Km was neither significantly different between the species nor significantly affected by the feeding regime thus ranging between 0.12 and 0.16 mmol.l(-1). Reduction of dietary protein, however, resulted in significantly decreased Vmax values of the transport system by 25

  20. Functional characterization of a member of alanine or glycine: cation symporter family in halotolerant cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica.

    PubMed

    Bualuang, Aporn; Kageyama, Hakuto; Tanaka, Yoshito; Incharoensakdi, Aran; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins of amino acid-polyamine-organocation (APC) superfamily transport amino acids and amines across membranes and play important roles in the regulation of cellular processes. The alanine or glycine: cation symporter (AGCS) family belongs to APC superfamily and is found in prokaryotes, but its substrate specificity remains to be clarified. In this study, we found that a halotolerant cyanobacterium, Aphanothece halophytica has two putative ApagcS genes. The deduced amino acid sequence of one of genes, ApagcS1, exhibited high homology to Pseudomonas AgcS. The ApagcS1 gene was expressed in Escherichia coli JW4166 which is deficient in glycine uptake. Kinetics studies in JW4166 revealed that ApAgcS1 is a sodium-dependent glycine transporter. Competition experiments showed the significant inhibition by glutamine, asparagine, and glycine. The level of mRNA for ApagcS1 was induced by NaCl and nitrogen-deficient stresses. Uptake of glutamine by ApAgcS1 was also observed. Based on these data, the physiological role of ApAgcS1 was discussed. PMID:25421789

  1. Caffeine–N-phthaloyl-β-alanine (1/1)

    PubMed Central

    Bhatti, Moazzam H.; Yunus, Uzma; Shah, Syed Raza; Flörke, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    The title co-crystal [systematic name: 3-(1,3-dioxoisoindolin-2-yl)propanoic acid–1,3,7-trimethyl-1H-purine-2,6(3H,7H)-dione (1/1)], C8H10N4O2·C11H9NO4, is the combination of 1:1 adduct of N-phthaloyl-β-alanine with caffeine. The phthalimide and purine rings in the N-phthaloyl-β-alanine and caffeine mol­ecules are essentially planar, with r.m.s. deviations of the fitted atoms of 0.0078 and 0.0118 Å, respectively. In the crystal, the two mol­ecules are linked via an O—H⋯N hydrogen bond involving the intact carb­oxy­lic acid (COOH) group. The crystal structure is consolidated by C—H⋯O inter­actions. The H atoms of a methyl group of the caffeine mol­ecule are disordered over two sets of sites of equal occupancy. PMID:22719646

  2. β-N-methylamino-L-alanine induces changes in both GSK3 and TDP-43 in human neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Saez, Emma; de Munck, Estefanía; Arahuetes, Rosa M; Solas, M Teresa; Martínez, Ana M; Miguel, Begoña G

    2013-01-01

    β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-BMAA) is a neurotoxic amino acid produced by most cyanobacteria, which are extensively distributed in different environments all over the world. L-BMAA has been linked to a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. This work aims to analyze the toxicological action of L-BMAA related to alterations observed in different neurodegenerative illness as Alzheimer disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Our results demonstrate that neuroblastoma cells treated with L-BMAA show an increase in glycogen synthase kinase 3 β (GSk3β) and induce accumulation of TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) truncated forms (C-terminal fragments), phosphorylated  and high molecular weight forms of TDP-43, that appears frequently in some neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23665941

  3. Identification of a Vibrio cholerae chemoreceptor that senses taurine and amino acids as attractants.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, So-ichiro; Takahashi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Suzuki, Daisuke; Itoh, Yasuaki; Sumita, Kazumasa; Uchida, Yumiko; Homma, Michio; Imada, Katsumi; Kawagishi, Ikuro

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the etiological agent of cholera, was found to be attracted by taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid), a major constituent of human bile. Mlp37, the closest homolog of the previously identified amino acid chemoreceptor Mlp24, was found to mediate taxis to taurine as well as L-serine, L-alanine, L-arginine, and other amino acids. Methylation of Mlp37 was enhanced upon the addition of taurine and amino acids. Isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrated that a purified periplasmic fragment of Mlp37 binds directly to taurine, L-serine, L-alanine and L-arginine. Crystal structures of the periplamic domain of Mlp37 revealed that L-serine and taurine bind to the membrane-distal PAS domain in essentially in the same way. The structural information was supported by characterising the in vivo properties of alanine-substituted mutant forms of Mlp37. The fact that the ligand-binding domain of the L-serine complex had a small opening, which would accommodate a larger R group, accounts for the broad ligand specificity of Mlp37 and allowed us to visualise ligand binding to Mlp37 with fluorescently labelled L-serine. Taken together, we conclude that Mlp37 serves as the major chemoreceptor for taurine and various amino acids. PMID:26878914

  4. Identification of a Vibrio cholerae chemoreceptor that senses taurine and amino acids as attractants

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, So-ichiro; Takahashi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Suzuki, Daisuke; Itoh, Yasuaki; Sumita, Kazumasa; Uchida, Yumiko; Homma, Michio; Imada, Katsumi; Kawagishi, Ikuro

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the etiological agent of cholera, was found to be attracted by taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid), a major constituent of human bile. Mlp37, the closest homolog of the previously identified amino acid chemoreceptor Mlp24, was found to mediate taxis to taurine as well as L-serine, L-alanine, L-arginine, and other amino acids. Methylation of Mlp37 was enhanced upon the addition of taurine and amino acids. Isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrated that a purified periplasmic fragment of Mlp37 binds directly to taurine, L-serine, L-alanine and L-arginine. Crystal structures of the periplamic domain of Mlp37 revealed that L-serine and taurine bind to the membrane-distal PAS domain in essentially in the same way. The structural information was supported by characterising the in vivo properties of alanine-substituted mutant forms of Mlp37. The fact that the ligand-binding domain of the L-serine complex had a small opening, which would accommodate a larger R group, accounts for the broad ligand specificity of Mlp37 and allowed us to visualise ligand binding to Mlp37 with fluorescently labelled L-serine. Taken together, we conclude that Mlp37 serves as the major chemoreceptor for taurine and various amino acids. PMID:26878914

  5. Consummatory feeding behavior to amino acids in intact and anosmic channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus.

    PubMed

    Valentincic, T; Caprio, J

    1994-05-01

    The entire sequence of feeding behavior patterns exhibited by intact and anosmic channel catfish to food extracts was also released by single amino acids. L-arginine (> 10(-6) M), L-alanine (> 10(-6) M), and L-proline (> 10(-4) M) were each highly effective at releasing consummatory behavior patterns, such as turning, increasing pumping of water across the gill arches, and biting-snapping. Swallowing required solid objects, whereas rhythmic movement of the hyoid was released by > 10(-2) M L-arginine alone. For the biting-snapping behavior, the number of bites depended upon both the number of eddies containing the amino acid above the behavioral threshold concentration and the amino acid applied. Multiple eddies of > 10(-3) M L-proline and L-alanine provoked up to 25 bites per test; however, the most effective stimulus for releasing biting-snapping behavior at low concentrations was L-arginine (behavioral threshold 3 x 10(-7) M). In comparison to 10(-4) M L-alanine and L-arginine, other amino acids were less effective stimuli. PMID:8022905

  6. Amino acid analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winitz, M.; Graff, J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The process and apparatus for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the amino acid content of a biological sample are presented. The sample is deposited on a cation exchange resin and then is washed with suitable solvents. The amino acids and various cations and organic material with a basic function remain on the resin. The resin is eluted with an acid eluant, and the eluate containing the amino acids is transferred to a reaction vessel where the eluant is removed. Final analysis of the purified acylated amino acid esters is accomplished by gas-liquid chromatographic techniques.

  7. Organic compounds in lunar samples: pyrolysis products, hydrocarbons, amino acids.

    PubMed

    Nagy, B; Drew, D M; Hamilton, P B; Modzeleski, V E; Murphy, M E; Scott, W M; Urey, H C; Young, M

    1970-01-30

    Lunar fines and a chip from inside a rock pyrolyzed in helium at 700 degrees C gave methane, other gases, and aromatic hydrocarbons. Benzene/methanol extracts of fines yielded traces of high molecular weight alkanes and sulfur. Traces of glycine, alanine, ethanolamine, and urea were found in aqueous extracts. Biological controls and a terrestrial rock, dunite, subjected to exhaust from the lunar module descent engine showed a different amino acid distribution. Interpretation of the origin of the carbon compounds requires extreme care, because of possible contamination acquired during initial sample processing. PMID:5410553

  8. Determination of Activity of the Enzymes Hypoxanthine Phosphoribosyl Transferase (HPRT) and Adenine Phosphoribosyl Transferase (APRT) in Blood Spots on Filter Paper.

    PubMed

    Auler, Kasie; Broock, Robyn; Nyhan, William L

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase (HPRT) deficiency is the cause of Lesch-Nyhan disease. Adenine phosphoribosyl-transferase (APRT) deficiency causes renal calculi. The activity of each enzyme is readily determined on spots of whole blood on filter paper. This unit describes a method for detecting deficiencies of HPRT and APRT. PMID:26132002

  9. Waste nitrogen excretion via amino acid acylation: benzoate and phenylacetate in lysinuric protein intolerance.

    PubMed

    Simell, O; Sipilä, I; Rajantie, J; Valle, D L; Brusilow, S W

    1986-11-01

    Benzoate and phenylacetate improve prognosis in inherited urea cycle enzyme deficiencies by increasing waste nitrogen excretion as amino acid acylation products. We studied metabolic changes caused by these substances and their pharmacokinetics in a biochemically different urea cycle disorder, lysinuric protein intolerance (LPI), under strictly standardized induction of hyperammonemia. Five patients with LPI received an intravenous infusion of 6.6 mmol/kg L-alanine alone and separately with 2.0 mmol/kg of benzoate or phenylacetate in 90 min. Blood for ammonia, serum urea and creatinine, plasma benzoate, hippurate, phenylacetate, phenylacetylglutamine, and amino acids was obtained at 0, 120, 180, and 270 min. Urine was collected in four consecutive 6-h periods. Alanine caused hyperammonemia: maximum increase 107, 28-411 microM (geometric mean, 95% confidence interval); ammonia increments were nearly identical after alanine + benzoate (60, 17-213 microM) and alanine + phenylacetate (79, 13-467 microM) (NS). Mean plasma benzoate was 6.0 mM when extrapolated to the end of alanine + benzoate infusions; phenylacetate was 4.9 mM at the end of alanine + phenylacetate. Transient toxicity (dizziness, nausea, vomiting) occurred in four patients at the end of combined infusions, and we suggest upper therapeutic plasma concentrations of 4.5 mM for benzoate and 3.5 mM for phenylacetate. Benzoate and phenylacetate then decreased following first-order kinetics with t1/2S of 273 and 254 min, respectively. Maximal plasma hippurate (0.24, 0.14-0.40 mM) was lower than maximal phenylacetylglutamine (0.48, 0.22-1.06 mM, p = 0.008).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3099249

  10. GMXPBSA 2.0: A GROMACS tool to perform MM/PBSA and computational alanine scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paissoni, C.; Spiliotopoulos, D.; Musco, G.; Spitaleri, A.

    2014-11-01

    GMXPBSA 2.0 is a user-friendly suite of Bash/Perl scripts for streamlining MM/PBSA calculations on structural ensembles derived from GROMACS trajectories, to automatically calculate binding free energies for protein-protein or ligand-protein complexes. GMXPBSA 2.0 is flexible and can easily be customized to specific needs. Additionally, it performs computational alanine scanning (CAS) to study the effects of ligand and/or receptor alanine mutations on the free energy of binding. Calculations require only for protein-protein or protein-ligand MD simulations. GMXPBSA 2.0 performs different comparative analysis, including a posteriori generation of alanine mutants of the wild-type complex, calculation of the binding free energy values of the mutant complexes and comparison of the results with the wild-type system. Moreover, it compares the binding free energy of different complexes trajectories, allowing the study the effects of non-alanine mutations, post-translational modifications or unnatural amino acids on the binding free energy of the system under investigation. Finally, it can calculate and rank relative affinity to the same receptor utilizing MD simulations of proteins in complex with different ligands. In order to dissect the different MM/PBSA energy contributions, including molecular mechanic (MM), electrostatic contribution to solvation (PB) and nonpolar contribution to solvation (SA), the tool combines two freely available programs: the MD simulations software GROMACS and the Poisson-Boltzmann equation solver APBS. All the calculations can be performed in single or distributed automatic fashion on a cluster facility in order to increase the calculation by dividing frames across the available processors. The program is freely available under the GPL license. Catalogue identifier: AETQ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETQ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing

  11. Decreased alanine aminotransferase activity in serum of man during gamma-acetylenic-GABA treatment.

    PubMed

    Olsen, R; Hørder, M

    1980-06-01

    Decreasing concentrations of alanine aminotransferase were observed in nine patients receiving gamma-acetylenic-GABA, an inhibitor of GABA aminotransferase. In vitro studies showed that preincubation at 37 degrees C of serum with gamma-acetylenic-GABA and with urine from a patient receiving the drug led to inhibition of alanine aminotransferase. This inhibition of alanine aminotransferase by gamma-acetylenic-GABA was neutralized by 1-analine, the natural substrate for the enzyme. The mechanism of inhibition may be a competition between the drug and 1-alanine for the substrate binding site of the enzyme. PMID:7414257

  12. Effect of β-alanine supplementation on high-intensity exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Harris, Roger C; Stellingwerff, Trent

    2013-01-01

    Carnosine is a dipeptide of β-alanine and L-histidine found in high concentrations in skeletal muscle. Combined with β-alanine, the pKa of the histidine imidazole ring is raised to ∼6.8, placing it within the muscle intracellular pH high-intensity exercise transit range. Combination with β-alanine renders the dipeptide inert to intracellular enzymic hydrolysis and blocks the histidinyl residue from participation in proteogenesis, thus making it an ideal, stable intracellular buffer. For vegetarians, synthesis is limited by β-alanine availability; for meat-eaters, hepatic synthesis is supplemented with β-alanine from the hydrolysis of dietary carnosine. Direct oral β-alanine supplementation will compensate for low meat and fish intake, significantly raising the muscle carnosine concentration. This is best achieved with a sustained-release formulation of β-alanine to avoid paresthesia symptoms and decreasing urinary spillover. In humans, increased levels of carnosine through β-alanine supplementation have been shown to increase exercise capacity and performance of several types, particularly where the high-intensity exercise range is 1-4 min. β-Alanine supplementation is used by athletes competing in high-intensity track and field cycling, rowing, swimming events and other competitions. PMID:23899755

  13. Assessing microbial utilization of free versus sorbed Alanine by using position-specific 13C labeling and 13C-PLFA analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herschbach, Jennifer; Apostel, Carolin; Spielvogel, Sandra; Kuzyakov, Yakov; Dippold, Michaela

    2016-04-01

    Microbial utilization is a key transformation process of soil organic matter (SOM). Sorption of low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS) to soil mineral surfaces blocks or delays microbial uptake and therefore mineralization of LMWOS to CO2, as well as all other biochemical transformations. We used position-specific labeling, a tool of isotope applications novel to soil science, combined with 13C-phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis, to assess microbial utilization of sorbed and non-sorbed Alanine in soil. Alanine has various functional groups enabling different sorption mechanisms via its positive charge (e.g. to clay minerals by cation exchange), as well as via its negative charge (e.g. to iron oxides by ligand exchange). To assess changes in the transformation pathways caused by sorption, we added uniformly and position-specifically 13C and 14C labeled Alanine to the Ap of a loamy Luvisol in a short-term (10 days) incubation experiment. To allow for sorption of the tracer solution to an aliquot of this soil, microbial activity was minimized in this subsample by sterilizing the soil by γ-radiation. After shaking, the remaining solutions were filtered and the non-sorbed Alanine was removed with Millipore water and then added to non-sterilized soil. For the free Alanine treatment, solutions with Alanine of similar amount and isotopic composition were prepared, added to the soil and incubated as well. The respired CO2 was trapped in NaOH and its 14C-activity was determined at increasing times intervals. Microbial utilization of Alanine's individual C positions was evaluated in distinct microbial groups classified by 13C-PLFA analysis. Sorption to soil minerals delayed respiration to CO2 and reduced initial respiration rate by 80%. Irrespective of sorption, the highest amount was respired from the carboxylic position (C-1), whereas the amino-bound (C-2) and the methylic position (C-3) were preferentially incorporated into PLFA of microorganisms due to the

  14. Unusual Nonterrestrial L-proteinogenic Amino Acid excesses in the Tagish Lake Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Burton, Aaron S.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Hilts, Robert W.; Herd, D. K.

    2012-01-01

    The distribution and isotopic and enantiomeric compositions of amino acids found in three distinct fragments of the Tagish Lake C2-type carbonaceous chondrite were investigated via liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry and gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Large L-enantiomeric excesses (L(sub ee) approximately 43-59%) of the alpha-hydrogen aspartic and glutamic amino acids were measured in Tagish Lake, whereas alanine, another alpha hydrogen protein amino acid, was found to be nearly racemic (D much approximately L) using both techniques. Carbon isotope measurements of D- and L-aspartic acid and 1)- and L-alanine in Tagish Lake fall well outside of the terrestrial range and indicate that the measured aspartic acid enantioenrichment is indigenous to the meteorite. Alternate explanations for the L-excesses of aspartic acid such as interference from other compounds present in the sample, analytical biases, or terrestrial amino acid contamination were investigated and rejected. These results can be explained by differences in the solid-solution phase behavior of aspartic acid, which can form conglomerate enantiopure solids during crystallization, and alanine, which can only form racemic crystals. Amplification of a small initial L-enantiomer excess during aqueous alteration on the meteorite parent body could have led to the large L-enrichments observed for aspartic acid and other conglomerate amino acids in Tagish Lake. The detection of non terrestrial L-proteinogenic amino acid excesses in the Tagish Lake meteorite provides support for the hypothesis that significant enantiomeric enrichments for some amino acids could form by abiotic processes prior to the emergence of life.

  15. Structure and expression of a cluster of glutathione S-transferase genes from a marine fish, the plaice (Pleuronectes platessa).

    PubMed Central

    Leaver, M J; Wright, J; George, S G

    1997-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases are involved in the detoxification of reactive electrophilic compounds, including intracellular metabolites, drugs, pollutants and pesticides. A cluster of three glutathione S-transferase genes, designated GSTA, GSTA1 and GSTA2, was isolated from the marine flatfish, plaice (Pleuronectes platessa). GSTA and GSTA1 code for protein products with 76% amino acid identity. GSTA2 appears to contain a single nucleotide deletion which would render any product non-functional. All of these genes consist of six exons of similar sizes and greater than 70% nucleotide identity, and are interrupted by five introns of differing sizes. GSTA and GSTA1 mRNAs were present in a range of tissues, while GSTA2 mRNA was no detected. Expression of GSTA mRNA was increased in plaice intestine and spleen by pretreatment with beta-naphthoflavone, and expression of both GSTA and GSTA1 mRNAs was increased in plaice liver and gill by pretreatment with the peroxisome proliferating agent perfluoro-octanoic acid. PMID:9020873

  16. [Changes in the amino acid levels in hydrolysates of bacteria adhering to the rumen in sheep during feeding with high and low nitrogen diets].

    PubMed

    Legáth, J

    1992-01-01

    The effects of low and high nitrogen diets on amino acid levels were studied in hydrolyzates of ruminal bacteria adhered to four topographically different anatomic parts of the ruminal wall (dorsal, ventral and caudal parts as well as reticulum) in 18 sheep + of the Slovak Merino breed divided into three experimental groups. The epimural bacteria of the dorsal and ventral parts of the ovine rumen revealed the most sensitive reaction to the varying amounts of nitrogen ingested with the diet. In hydrolyzates of ruminal bacteria adhered to the dorsal and ventral epithelium, 15 and 14 amino acids were changing (Figs. 1, 2). In hydrolyzates of epimural bacteria, a sensitive reaction was observed in the following amino acids: alanine, histidine, thyroxin, arginine and proline (Tabs. I-IV). In all topographical and anatomical parts of the rumen, both alanine and histidine levels in hydrolyzates of epimural ruminal bacteria significantly increased with the diet with high-nitrogen content fed, but was falling in sheep fed with low-nitrogen diet. Changes in alanine concentrations may be explained by the fact that alanine forms a part of the mechanism for short-time storage of ammonia in bacterial cells (Bartos, 1987). The fact that alanine is in its lack deaminated to pyruvate (Havassy, 1976) is explained by significant fall in alanine contained in hydrolyzates of bacterial proteins when fed low nitrogen diets. Significant fall in alanine in shortage of amino acid bound nitrogen can be explained by the fact that under these conditions, the alanine skeleton is being incorporated in to 80% of amino acids synthetized de novo by ruminal bacteria (Syväoja and Kreula, 1980). When sheep flock was fed the high-nitrogen diet, thyroxin and proline levels were significantly reduced in hydrolyzates of epimural bacteria from all parts of the rumen, while low-nitrogen diet significantly increased the concentrations of both given amino acids in comparison with the control. Bartos (1987

  17. Amino Acid Crossword Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Learning the 20 standard amino acids is an essential component of an introductory course in biochemistry. Later in the course, the students study metabolism and learn about various catabolic and anabolic pathways involving amino acids. Learning new material or concepts often is easier if one can connect the new material to what one already knows;…

  18. The Sugar Model: Catalysis by Amines and Amino Acid Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    2001-02-01

    Ammonia and amines (including amino acids) were shown to catalyze the formation of sugars from formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde, and the subsequent conversion of sugars to carbonyl-containing products under the conditions studied (pH 5.5 and 50°C). Sterically unhindered primary amines were better catalysts than ammonia, secondary amines, and sterically hindered primary amines (i.e. α-aminoisobutyric acid). Reactions catalyzed by primary amines initially consumed formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde about 15-20 times faster than an uncatalyzed control reaction. The amine-catalyzed reactions yielded aldotriose (glyceraldehyde), ketotriose (dihydroxyacetone), aldotetroses (erythrose and threose), ketotetrose (erythrulose), pyruvaldehyde, acetaldehyde, glyoxal, pyruvate, glyoxylate, and several unindentified carbonyl products. The concentrations of the carbonyl products, except pyruvate and ketotetrose, initially increased and then declined during the reaction, indicating their ultimate conversion to other products (like larger sugars or pyruvate). The uncatalyzed control reaction yielded no pyruvate or glyoxylate, and only trace amounts of pyruvaldehyde, acetaldehyde and glyoxal. In the presence of 15 mM catalytic primary amine, such as alanine, the rates of triose and pyruvaldehyde of synthesis were about 15-times and 1200-times faster, respectively, than the uncatalyzed reaction. Since previous studies established that alanine is synthesized from glycolaldehyde and formaldehyde via pyruvaldehyde as its direct precursor, the demonstration that the alanine catalyzes the conversion of glycolaldehyde and formaldehyde to pyruvaldehyde indicates that this synthetic pathway is capable of autocatalysis. The relevance of this synthetic process, named the Sugar Model, to the origin of life is discussed.

  19. The sugar model: catalysis by amines and amino acid products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, A. L.

    2001-01-01

    Ammonia and amines (including amino acids) were shown to catalyze the formation of sugars from formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde, and the subsequent conversion of sugars to carbonylcontaining products under the conditions studied (pH 5.5 and 50 degrees C). Sterically unhindered primary amines were better catalysts than ammonia, secondary amines, and sterically hindered primary amines (i.e. alpha-aminoisobutyric acid). Reactions catalyzed by primary amines initially consumed formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde about 15-20 times faster than an uncatalyzed control reaction. The amine-catalyzed reactions yielded aldotriose (glyceraldehyde), ketotriose (dihydroxyacetone), aldotetroses (erythrose and threose), ketotetrose (erythrulose), pyruvaldehyde, acetaldehyde, glyoxal, pyruvate, glyoxylate, and several unindentified carbonyl products. The concentrations of the carbonyl products, except pyruvate and ketotetrose, initially increased and then declined during the reaction, indicating their ultimate conversion to other products (like larger sugars or pyruvate). The uncatalyzed control reaction yielded no pyruvate or glyoxylate, and only trace amounts of pyruvaldehyde, acetaldehyde and glyoxal. In the presence of 15 mM catalytic primary amine, such as alanine, the rates of triose and pyruvaldehyde of synthesis were about 15-times and 1200-times faster, respectively, than the uncatalyzed reaction. Since previous studies established that alanine is synthesized from glycolaldehyde and formaldehyde via pyruvaldehyde as its direct precursor, the demonstration that the alanine catalyzes the conversion of glycolaldehyde and formaldehyde to pyruvaldehyde indicates that this synthetic pathway is capable of autocatalysis. The relevance of this synthetic process, named the Sugar Model, to the origin of life is discussed.

  20. Efficient L-Alanine Production by a Thermo-Regulated Switch in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Deng, Can; Cui, Wen-Jing; Liu, Zhong-Mei; Zhou, Zhe-Min

    2016-01-01

    L-Alanine has important applications in food, pharmaceutical and veterinary and is used as a substrate for production of engineered thermoplastics. Microbial fermentation could reduce the production cost and promote the application of L-alanine. However, the presence of L-alanine significantly inhibit cell growth rate and cause a decrease in the ultimate L-alanine productivity. For efficient L-alanine production, a thermo-regulated genetic switch was designed to dynamically control the expression of L-alanine dehydrogenase (alaD) from Geobacillus stearothermophilus on the Escherichia coli B0016-060BC chromosome. The optimal cultivation conditions for the genetically switched alanine production using B0016-060BC were the following: an aerobic growth phase at 33 °C with a 1-h thermo-induction at 42 °C followed by an oxygen-limited phase at 42 °C. In a bioreactor experiment using the scaled-up conditions optimized in a shake flask, B0016-060BC accumulated 50.3 g biomass/100 g glucose during the aerobic growth phase and 96 g alanine/100 g glucose during the oxygen-limited phase, respectively. The L-alanine titer reached 120.8 g/l with higher overall and oxygen-limited volumetric productivities of 3.09 and 4.18 g/l h, respectively, using glucose as the sole carbon source. Efficient cell growth and L-alanine production were reached separately, by switching cultivation temperature. The results revealed the application of a thermo-regulated strategy for heterologous metabolic production and pointed to strategies for improving L-alanine production. PMID:26453031

  1. Cloning, expression and analysis of the olfactory glutathione S-transferases in coho salmon

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Herbert M.; Shireman, Laura M.; McClain, Valerie; Atkins, William; Gallagher, Evan P.

    2013-01-01

    The glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) provide cellular protection by detoxifying xenobiotics, maintaining redox status, and modulating secondary messengers, all of which are critical to maintaining olfaction in salmonids. Here, we characterized the major coho salmon olfactory GSTs (OlfGSTs), namely omega, pi, and rho subclasses. OlfGST omega contained an open reading frame of 720 bp and encoded a protein of 239 amino acids. OlfGST pi and OlfGST rho contained open reading frames of 727 and 681 bp, respectively, and encoded proteins of 208 and 226 amino acids. Whole-protein mass spectrometry yielded molecular weights of 29,950, 23,354, and 26,655 Da, respectively, for the GST omega, pi, and rho subunits. Homology modeling using four protein-structure prediction algorithms suggest that the active sites in all three OlfGST isoforms resembled counterparts in other species. The olfactory GSTs conjugated prototypical GST substrates, but only OlfGST rho catalyzed the demethylation of the pesticide methyl parathion. OlfGST pi and rho exhibited thiol oxidoreductase activity towards 2-hydroxyethyl disulfide (2-HEDS) and conjugated 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), a toxic aldehyde with neurodegenerative properties. The kinetic parameters for OlfGST pi conjugation of HNE were KM = 0.16 ± 0.06 mM and Vmax = 0.5 ± 0.1 μmol min−1 mg−1 for OlfGST pi, whereas OlfGST rho was more efficient at catalyzing HNE conjugation (KM = 0.022 ± 0.008 mM and Vmax = 0.47 ± 0.05 μmol min−1 mg−1). Our findings indicate that the peripheral olfactory system of coho expresses GST isoforms that detoxify certain electrophiles and pesticides and that help maintain redox statusand signal transduction. PMID:23261526

  2. Cloning, expression and analysis of the olfactory glutathione S-transferases in coho salmon.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Herbert M; Shireman, Laura M; McClain, Valerie; Atkins, William; Gallagher, Evan P

    2013-03-15

    The glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) provide cellular protection by detoxifying xenobiotics, maintaining redox status, and modulating secondary messengers, all of which are critical to maintaining olfaction in salmonids. Here, we characterized the major coho salmon olfactory GSTs (OlfGSTs), namely omega, pi, and rho subclasses. OlfGST omega contained an open reading frame of 720bp and encoded a protein of 239 amino acids. OlfGST pi and OlfGST rho contained open reading frames of 627 and 681nt, respectively, and encoded proteins of 208 and 226 amino acids. Whole-protein mass spectrometry yielded molecular weights of 29,950, 23,354, and 26,655Da, respectively, for the GST omega, pi, and rho subunits. Homology modeling using four protein-structure prediction algorithms suggest that the active sites in all three OlfGST isoforms resembled counterparts in other species. The olfactory GSTs conjugated prototypical GST substrates, but only OlfGST rho catalyzed the demethylation of the pesticide methyl parathion. OlfGST pi and rho exhibited thiol oxidoreductase activity toward 2-hydroxyethyl disulfide (2-HEDS) and conjugated 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), a toxic aldehyde with neurodegenerative properties. The kinetic parameters for OlfGST pi conjugation of HNE were K(M)=0.16 ± 0.06mM and V(max)=0.5 ± 0.1μmolmin⁻¹mg⁻¹, whereas OlfGST rho was more efficient at catalyzing HNE conjugation (K(M)=0.022 ± 0.008 mM and V(max)=0.47 ± 0.05μmolmin⁻¹mg⁻¹). Our findings indicate that the peripheral olfactory system of coho expresses GST isoforms that detoxify certain electrophiles and pesticides and that help maintain redox status and signal transduction. PMID:23261526

  3. Cloning, expression and identification of two glutathione S-transferase isoenzymes from Perna viridis.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenzhen; Chen, Rong; Zuo, Zhenghong; Mo, Zhengping; Yu, Ang

    2013-08-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs; EC 2.5.1.18) are phase II enzymes involved in major detoxification reactions of xenobiotic in many organisms. In the present study, two classes of GSTs (PvGST1 and PvGST2) were cloned from P. viridis by rapid amplification of cDNA ends method. Sequence alignments and phylogenetic analysis together supported that PvGST1 and PvGST2 belonged to the pi and omega classes, respectively. The PvGST1 cDNA was 1214 nucleotides (nt) in length and contained a 618 nt open reading frame (ORF) encoding 206 amino acid residues, and had 46 nt of 5'-untranslated region (UTR) and a 3' UTR of 550 nt including a tailing signal (AATAAA) and a poly (A) tail. The molecular mass of the predicted PvGST1 was 23.815kDa, with the calculated isoelectric point being 5.39. PvGST2 was 1093bp, consisting of a 5' UTR of 13bp, a 3' UTR of 246bp and an ORF of 834bp. The deduced protein was composed of 278 amino acids, with an estimated molecular mass of 32.476kDa and isoelectric point of 8.88. Tissue distribution analysis of the PvGST1 and PvGST2 mRNA revealed that the GST expression level was higher in digestive gland and gonad, while lower in gill and mantle in both genders. Molecular modeling analysis of two GSTs implicated their various functions account for their different enzymatic features. PMID:23711756

  4. Molecular docking and simulation of Curcumin with Geranylgeranyl Transferase1 (GGTase1) and Farnesyl Transferase (FTase).

    PubMed

    Subramani, Parasuraman Aiya; Narala, Venkata Ramireddy; Michael, R Dinakaran; Lomada, Dakshayani; Reddy, Madhava C

    2015-01-01

    Protein prenylation is a posttranslational modification that is indispensable for translocation of membrane GTPases like Ras, Rho, Ras etc. Proteins of Ras family undergo farnesylation by FTase while Rho family goes through geranylgeranylation by GGTase1. There is only an infinitesimal difference in signal recognition between FTase and GGTase1. FTase inhibitors mostly end up selecting the cells with mutated Ras proteins that have acquired affinity towards GGTase1 in cancer microcosms. Therefore, it is of interest to identify GGTase1 and FTase dual inhibitors using the docking tool AutoDock Vina. Docking data show that curcumin (from turmeric) has higher binding affinity to GGTase1 than that of established peptidomimetic GGTase1 inhibitors (GGTI) such as GGTI-297, GGTI-298, CHEMBL525185. Curcumin also interacts with FTase with binding energy comparable to co-crystalized compound 2-[3-(3-ethyl-1-methyl-2-oxo-azepan-3-yl)-phenoxy]-4-[1-amino-1-(1-methyl-1h-imidizol-5-yl)-ethyl]-benzonitrile (BNE). The docked complex was further simulated for 10 ns using molecular dynamics simulation for stability. Thus, the molecular basis for curcumin binding to GGTase1 and FTase is reported. PMID:26124569

  5. A glutathione S-transferase gene associated with antioxidant properties isolated from Apis cerana cerana.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuchang; Liu, Feng; Jia, Haihong; Yan, Yan; Wang, Hongfang; Guo, Xingqi; Xu, Baohua

    2016-06-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are an important family of multifunctional enzymes in aerobic organisms. They play a crucial role in the detoxification of exogenous compounds, especially insecticides, and protection against oxidative stress. Most previous studies of GSTs in insects have largely focused on their role in insecticide resistance. Here, we isolated a theta class GST gene designated AccGSTT1 from Apis cerana cerana and aimed to explore its antioxidant and antibacterial attributes. Analyses of homology and phylogenetic relationships suggested that the predicted amino acid sequence of AccGSTT1 shares a high level of identity with the other hymenopteran GSTs and that it was conserved during evolution. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that AccGSTT1 is most highly expressed in adult stages and that the expression profile of this gene is significantly altered in response to various abiotic stresses. These results were confirmed using western blot analysis. Additionally, a disc diffusion assay showed that a recombinant AccGSTT1 protein may be roughly capable of inhibiting bacterial growth and that it reduces the resistance of Escherichia coli cells to multiple adverse stresses. Taken together, these data indicate that AccGSTT1 may play an important role in antioxidant processes under adverse stress conditions. PMID:27126403

  6. Ghrelin O-Acyl Transferase in Zebrafish Is an Evolutionarily Conserved Peptide Upregulated During Calorie Restriction.

    PubMed

    Hatef, Azadeh; Yufa, Roman; Unniappan, Suraj

    2015-10-01

    Ghrelin is a multifunctional orexigenic hormone with a unique acyl modification enabled by ghrelin O-acyl transferase (GOAT). Ghrelin is well-characterized in nonmammals, and GOAT sequences of several fishes are available in the GenBank. However, endogenous GOAT in non-mammals remains poorly understood. In this research, GOAT sequence comparison, tissue-specific GOAT expression, and its regulation by nutrient status and exogenous ghrelin were studied. It was found that the bioactive core of zebrafish GOAT amino acid sequence share high identity with that of mammals. GOAT mRNA was most abundant in the gut. GOAT-like immunoreactivity (i.r.) was found colocalized with ghrelin in the gastric mucosa. Food deprivation increased, and feeding decreased GOAT and preproghrelin mRNA expression in the brain and gut. GOAT and ghrelin peptides in the gut and brain showed corresponding decrease in food-deprived state. Intraperitoneal injection of acylated fish ghrelin caused a significant decrease in GOAT mRNA expression, suggesting a feedback mechanism regulating its abundance. Together, these results provide the first in-depth characterization of GOAT in a non-mammal. Our results demonstrate that endogenous GOAT expression is responsive to metabolic status and availability of acylated ghrelin, providing further evidences for GOAT in the regulation of feeding in teleosts. PMID:26226634

  7. Erythrocyte glutathione transferase: a general probe for chemical contaminations in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Bocedi, A; Fabrini, R; Lai, O; Alfieri, L; Roncoroni, C; Noce, A; Pedersen, JZ; Ricci, G

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are enzymes devoted to the protection of cells against many different toxins. In erythrocytes, the isoenzyme (e-GST) mainly present is GSTP1-1, which is overexpressed in humans in case of increased blood toxicity, as it occurs in nephrophatic patients or in healthy subjects living in polluted areas. The present study explores the possibility that e-GST may be used as an innovative and highly sensitive biomarker of blood toxicity also for other mammals. All distinct e-GSTs from humans, Bos taurus (cow), Sus scrofa (pig), Capra hircus (goat), Equus caballus (horse), Equus asinus (donkey) and Ovis aries (sheep), show very similar amino acid sequences, identical kinetics and stability properties. Reference values for e-GST in all these mammals reared in controlled farms span from 3.5±0.2 U/gHb in the pig to 17.0±0.9 U/gHb in goat; such activity levels can easily be determined with high precision using only a few microliters of whole blood and a simple spectrophotometric assay. Possibly disturbing factors have been examined to avoid artifact determinations. This study provides the basis for future screening studies to verify if animals have been exposed to toxicologic insults. Preliminary data on cows reared in polluted areas show increased expression of e-GST, which parallels the results found for humans. PMID:27551520

  8. Erythrocyte glutathione transferase: a general probe for chemical contaminations in mammals.

    PubMed

    Bocedi, A; Fabrini, R; Lai, O; Alfieri, L; Roncoroni, C; Noce, A; Pedersen, J Z; Ricci, G

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are enzymes devoted to the protection of cells against many different toxins. In erythrocytes, the isoenzyme (e-GST) mainly present is GSTP1-1, which is overexpressed in humans in case of increased blood toxicity, as it occurs in nephrophatic patients or in healthy subjects living in polluted areas. The present study explores the possibility that e-GST may be used as an innovative and highly sensitive biomarker of blood toxicity also for other mammals. All distinct e-GSTs from humans, Bos taurus (cow), Sus scrofa (pig), Capra hircus (goat), Equus caballus (horse), Equus asinus (donkey) and Ovis aries (sheep), show very similar amino acid sequences, identical kinetics and stability properties. Reference values for e-GST in all these mammals reared in controlled farms span from 3.5±0.2 U/gHb in the pig to 17.0±0.9 U/gHb in goat; such activity levels can easily be determined with high precision using only a few microliters of whole blood and a simple spectrophotometric assay. Possibly disturbing factors have been examined to avoid artifact determinations. This study provides the basis for future screening studies to verify if animals have been exposed to toxicologic insults. Preliminary data on cows reared in polluted areas show increased expression of e-GST, which parallels the results found for humans. PMID:27551520

  9. A glutathione S-transferase gene associated with antioxidant properties isolated from Apis cerana cerana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuchang; Liu, Feng; Jia, Haihong; Yan, Yan; Wang, Hongfang; Guo, Xingqi; Xu, Baohua

    2016-06-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are an important family of multifunctional enzymes in aerobic organisms. They play a crucial role in the detoxification of exogenous compounds, especially insecticides, and protection against oxidative stress. Most previous studies of GSTs in insects have largely focused on their role in insecticide resistance. Here, we isolated a theta class GST gene designated AccGSTT1 from Apis cerana cerana and aimed to explore its antioxidant and antibacterial attributes. Analyses of homology and phylogenetic relationships suggested that the predicted amino acid sequence of AccGSTT1 shares a high level of identity with the other hymenopteran GSTs and that it was conserved during evolution. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that AccGSTT1 is most highly expressed in adult stages and that the expression profile of this gene is significantly altered in response to various abiotic stresses. These results were confirmed using western blot analysis. Additionally, a disc diffusion assay showed that a recombinant AccGSTT1 protein may be roughly capable of inhibiting bacterial growth and that it reduces the resistance of Escherichia coli cells to multiple adverse stresses. Taken together, these data indicate that AccGSTT1 may play an important role in antioxidant processes under adverse stress conditions.

  10. 3-Methyleneoxindole: an affinity label of glutathione S-transferase pi which targets tryptophan 38.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, N E; Brush, E J; Colman, R F

    2001-06-26

    The compound 3-methyleneoxindole (MOI), a photooxidation product of the plant auxin indole-3-acetic acid, functions as an affinity label of the dimeric pi class glutathione S-transferase (GST) isolated from pig lung. MOI inactivates the enzyme to a limit of 14% activity. The k for inactivation by MOI is decreased 20-fold by S-hexylglutathione but only 2-fold by S-methylglutathione, suggesting that MOI does not react entirely within the glutathione site. The striking protection against inactivation provided by S-(hydroxyethyl)ethacrynic acid indicates that MOI reacts in the active site region involving both the glutathione and the xenobiotic substrate sites. Incorporation of [(3)H]MOI up to approximately 1 mol/mol of enzyme dimer concomitant with maximum inactivation suggests that there are interactions between subunits. Fractionation of the proteolytic digest of [(3)H]MOI-modified GST pi yielded Trp38 as the only labeled amino acid. The crystal structure of the human GST pi-ethacrynic acid complex (2GSS) shows that the indole of Trp38 is less than 4 A from ethacrynic acid. Similarly, MOI may bind in this substrate site. In contrast to its effect on the pi class GST, MOI inactivates much less rapidly and extensively alpha and mu class GSTs isolated from the rat. These results show that MOI reacts preferentially with GST pi. Such a compound may be useful in novel combination chemotherapy to enhance the efficacy of alkylating cancer drugs while minimizing toxic side effects. PMID:11412109

  11. ΔpH-Dependent Amino Acid Transport into Plasma Membrane Vesicles Isolated from Sugar Beet Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen-Chang; Bush, Daniel R.

    1990-01-01

    Amino acid transport into plasma membrane vesicles isolated from mature sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. cv Great Western) leaves was investigated. The transport of alanine, leucine, glutamine, glutamate, isoleucine, and arginine was driven by a trans-membrane proton concentration difference. ΔpH-Dependent alanine, leucine, glutamine, and glutamate transport exhibited simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and double-reciprocal plots of the data were linear with apparent Km values of 272, 346, 258, and 1981 micromolar, respectively. These results are consistent with carrier mediated transport. ΔpH-Dependent isoleucine and arginine transport exhibited biphasic kinetics, suggesting these amino acids may be transported by at least two transport systems. Symport mediated alanine transport was electrogenic as demonstrated by the effect of membrane potential (ΔΨ) on ΔpH-dependent flux. In the absence of significant charge compensation, a low rate of alanine transport was observed. When ΔΨ was held at 0 millivolt with symmetric potassium concentrations and valinomycin, the rate of flux was stimulated fourfold. In the presence of a negative ΔΨ, alanine transport increased sixfold. These results are consistent with an electrogenic transport process which results in a net flux of positive charge into the vesicles. The effect of changing ΔΨ on the kinetics of alanine transport altered Vmax with no apparent change in Km. Amino acid transport was inhibited by the protein modifier diethyl pyrocarbonate, but was insensitive to N-ethylmaleimide, 4,4′-diisothiocyano-2,2′-stilbene disulfonic acid, p-chloromercuribenzenesulfonic acid, phenylglyoxal, and N,N′-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. Four amino acid symport systems, two neutral, one acidic, and one basic, were resolved based on inter-amino acid competition experiments. One neutral system appears to be active for all neutral amino acids while the second exhibited a low affinity for isoleucine, threonine, valine, and proline

  12. Olfactory discrimination of amino acids in brown bullhead catfish.

    PubMed

    Valentincic, T; Metelko, J; Ota, D; Pirc, V; Blejec, A

    2000-02-01

    Olfactory discrimination of amino acids was investigated in brown bullhead catfish (Ameiurus nebulosus). Based on the magnitude of the observed food search activity of catfish conditioned to single amino acids, the tested compounds were classified as being detected by the catfish as equal to, similar to, or different from the conditioned stimulus. L-Proline (L-Pro)-conditioned brown bullhead catfish discriminated all amino acids from L-Pro, but catfish conditioned to L-valine (L-Val) and L-isoleucine (L-Ile) did not discriminate L-Val from L-Ile nor L-Ile from L-Val; however, all other amino acids tested were always discriminated from these two compounds. Catfish conditioned to L-alanine (L-Ala) discriminated basic, acidic and several neutral amino acids with long side-chains (LCNs) from L-Ala; however, they did not always discriminate L-Ala from all neutral amino acids with short side-chains (SCNs). The L-norleucine (L-nLeu)-conditioned fish responded to L-norvaline (L-nVal), L-methionine (L-Met) and L-Ala similarly to L-nLeu, indicating that these amino acids are detected as similar or identical to L-nLeu. L-nLeu was, however, discriminated from L-Ala in L-Ala-conditioned catfish. Interestingly, L-leucine (L-Leu) was discriminated from the conditioned stimuli, L-Ala, L-Ile and L-Val, indicating independent receptors for L-Leu. Although conditioned catfish discriminated other amino acids from L-arginine hydrochloride (L-Arg), in some tests they were unable to discriminate L-Arg from L-lysine hydrochloride (L-Lys). These results imply the existence of independent olfactory receptive pathways for: (i) L-Pro; (ii) basic amino acids (L-Arg and L-Lys); (iii) L-Leu; (iv) other neutral amino acids with branched side-chains (L-Ile and L-Val); (v) neutral amino acids with long linear side-chains (L-nLeu, L-nVal and L-Met); (vi) neutral amino acids with short side-chains; and (vii) amino acids with sulfhydryl groups (L-Cys and L-homoCys). PMID:10667990

  13. Amino Acid Synthesis in Photosynthesizing Spinach Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Peder Olesen; Cornwell, Karen L.; Gee, Sherry L.; Bassham, James A.

    1981-01-01

    Isolated cells from leaves of Spinacia oleracea have been maintained in a state capable of high rates of photosynthetic CO2 fixation for more than 60 hours. The incorporation of 14CO2 under saturating CO2 conditions into carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, and amino acids, and the effect of ammonia on this incorporation have been studied. Total incorporation, specific radioactivity, and pool size have been determined as a function of time for most of the protein amino acids and for γ-aminobutyric acid. The measurements of specific radio-activities and of the approaches to 14C “saturation” of some amino acids indicate the presence and relative sizes of metabolically active and passive pools of these amino acids. Added ammonia decreased carbon fixation into carbohydrates and increased fixation into carboxylic acids and amino acids. Different amino acids were, however, affected in different and highly specific ways. Ammonia caused large stimulatory effects in incorporation of 14C into glutamine (a factor of 21), aspartate, asparagine, valine, alanine, arginine, and histidine. No effect or slight decreases were seen in glycine, serine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine labeling. In the case of glutamate, 14C labeling decreased, but specific radioactivity increased. The production of labeled γ-aminobutyric acid was virtually stopped by ammonia. The results indicate that added ammonia stimulates the reactions mediated by pyruvate kinase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, as seen with other plant systems. The data on the effects of added ammonia on total labeling, pool sizes, and specific radioactivities of several amino acids provides a number of indications about the intracellular sites of principal synthesis from carbon skeletons of these amino acids and the selective nature of effects of increased intracellular ammonia concentration on such synthesis. PMID:16661904

  14. Substrate specificity of duckling hepatic and renal D-amino acid oxidase.

    PubMed

    Elkin, R G; Lyons, M L

    1988-05-01

    The substrate specificity of duckling hepatic and renal D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO; D-amino acid: O2 oxidoreductase [deaminating], E.C. 1.4.3.3) was determined using a method based on the combination of coupled enzyme reactions and a colorimetric procedure. When activities were averaged across tissues, D-proline was the most reactive substrate, followed by (in order) D-phenylalanine, D-alanine, D-methionine, D-leucine, D-isoleucine, D-valine, D-tryptophan, D-arginine, and D-lysine. Compared with D-alanine, duckling DAAO had minimal or no reactivity with D-asparagine, D-glutamine, D-histidine, D-threonine, D-cysteine, glycine, or D-serine. These results were in general agreement with data from other vertebrate species. PMID:2900508

  15. Using Position-Specific 13C and 14C Labeling and 13C-PLFA Analysis to Assess Microbial Transformations of Free Versus Sorbed Alanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostel, C.; Herschbach, J.; Bore, E. K.; Kuzyakov, Y.; Dippold, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Sorption of charged or partially charged low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS) to soil mineral surfaces delays microbial uptake and therefore mineralization of LMWOS to CO2, as well as all other biochemical transformations. We used position-specific labeling, a tool of isotope applications novel to soil sciences, to compare the transformation mechanisms of sorbed and non-sorbed alanine in soil. Alanine as an amino acid links C- and N-cycles in soil and therefore is a model substance for the pool of LMWOS. To assess transformations of sorbed alanine, we added position-specific and uniformly 13C and 14C labeled alanine tracer to soil that had previously been sterilized by γ-radiation. The labeled soil was added to non-sterilized soil from the same site and incubated. Soil labeled with the same tracers without previous sorption was prepared and incubated as well. We captured the respired CO2 and determined its 14C-activity at increasing time intervals. The incorporation of 14C into microbial biomass was determined by chloroform fumigation extraction (CFE), and utilization of individual C positions by distinct microbial groups was evaluated by 13C-phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA). A dual peak in the respired CO2 revealed two sorption mechanisms. To compare the fate of individual C atoms independent of their concentration and pool size in soil, we applied the divergence index (DI). The DI reveals the convergent or divergent behavior of C from individual molecule positions during microbial utilization. Alanine C-1 position was mainly oxidized to CO2, while its C-2 and C-3 were preferentially incorporated in microbial biomass and PLFA. This indicates that sorption by the COOH group does not protect this group from preferential oxidation. Microbial metabolism was determinative for the preferential oxidation of individual molecule positions. The use of position-specific labeling revealed mechanisms and kinetics of microbial utilization of sorbed and non

  16. Raman spectra of amino acids and their aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guangyong; Zhu, Xian; Fan, Qi; Wan, Xueliang

    2011-03-01

    Amino acids are the basic "building blocks" that combine to form proteins and play an important physiological role in all life-forms. Amino acids can be used as models for the examination of the importance of intermolecular bonding in life processes. Raman spectra serve to obtain information regarding molecular conformation, giving valuable insights into the topology of more complex molecules (peptides and proteins). In this paper, amino acids and their aqueous solution have been studied by Raman spectroscopy. Comparisons of certain values for these frequencies in amino acids and their aqueous solutions are given. Spectra of solids when compared to those of the solute in solution are invariably much more complex and almost always sharper. We present a collection of Raman spectra of 18 kinds of amino acids ( L-alanine, L-arginine, L-aspartic acid, cystine, L-glutamic acid, L-glycine, L-histidine, L-isoluecine, L-leucine, L-lysine, L-phenylalanine, L-methionone, L-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, L-tryptophan, L-tyrosine, L-valine) and their aqueous solutions that can serve as references for the interpretation of Raman spectra of proteins and biological materials.

  17. Plasma amino-acid patterns in liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, M Y; Marshall, A W; Milsom, J P; Sherlock, S

    1982-01-01

    Plasma amino-acid concentrations were measured in 167 patients with liver disease of varying aetiology and severity, all free of encephalopathy, and the results compared with those in 57 control subjects matched for age and sex. In the four groups of patients with chronic liver disease (26 patients with chronic active hepatitis, 23 with primary biliary cirrhosis, 11 with cryptogenic cirrhosis, and 48 with alcoholic hepatitis +/- cirrhosis) plasma concentrations of methionine were significantly increased, while concentrations of the three branched chain amino-acids were significantly reduced. In the first three groups of patients plasma concentrations of aspartate, serine, and one or both of the aromatic amino-acids tyrosine and phenylalanine were also significantly increased, while in the patients with alcoholic hepatitis +/- cirrhosis plasma concentrations of glycine, alanine, and phenylalanine were significantly reduced. In the three groups of patients with minimal, potentially reversible liver disease (31 patients with alcoholic fatty liver, 10 with viral hepatitis, and 18 with biliary disease) plasma concentrations of proline and the three branched chain amino-acids were significantly reduced. Patients with alcoholic fatty liver also showed significantly reduced plasma phenylalanine values. Most changes in plasma amino-acid concentrations in patients with chronic liver disease may be explained on the basis of impaired hepatic function, portal-systemic shunting of blood, and hyperinsulinaemia and hyperglucagonaemia. The changes in patients with minimal liver disease are less easily explained. PMID:7076013

  18. Analysis of amino acids and carbohydrates in green coffee.

    PubMed

    Murkovic, Michael; Derler, Karin

    2006-11-30

    The analysis of carbohydrates and amino acids in green coffee is of the utmost importance since these two classes of compounds act as precursors of the Maillard reaction during which the colour and aroma are formed. During the course of the Maillard reaction potentially harmful substances like acrylamide or 5-hydroxymethyl-furfural accrue as well. The carbohydrates were analysed by anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection and the amino acids by reversed phase chromatography after derivatization with 6-amino-quinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate and fluorescence detection. Both methods had to be optimized to obtain a sufficient resolution of the analytes for identification and quantification. Sucrose is the dominant carbohydrate in green coffee with a concentration of up to 90 mg/g (mean = 73 mg/g) in arabica beans and significantly lower amounts in robusta beans (mean=45 mg/g). Alanine is the amino acid with the highest concentration (mean = 1200 microg/g) followed by asparagine (mean = 680 microg/g) in robusta and 800 microg/g and 360 microg/g in arabica respectively. In general, the concentration of amino acids is higher in robusta than in arabica. PMID:16563515

  19. Catalytic properties of Sepharose-bound L-alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Mureşan, L; Vancea, D; Presecan, E; Porumb, H; Lascu, I; Oargă, M; Matinca, D; Abrudan, I; Bârzu, O

    1983-02-15

    (1) L-Alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus cereus was purified by a two-step chromatographic procedure involving Cibacron-Blue 3G-A Sepharose 4B-CL, and Sepharose 6B-CL, and immobilized on CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B. (2) Following immobilization via two of the six subunits, L-alanine dehydrogenase retained 66% of the specific activity of the soluble enzyme. The affinity of the immobilized enzyme for NH4+, pyruvate and L-alanine, was not different to that of the soluble form. The Km of the Sepharose-bound L-alanine dehydrogenase for pyridine coenzymes was 6-8-times higher than in the soluble case. (3) The stability of L-alanine dehydrogenase towards urea or thermal denaturation was increased by immobilization. (4) The incubation at 37 degrees C for 24 h of the immobilized L-alanine dehydrogenase with 3 M NH4Cl/NH4OH buffer (pH 9) released 70% of the enzyme. The specific activity and the affinity of the 'solubilized' L-alanine dehydrogenase for the pyridine coenzymes was the same as that obtained with the original, soluble L-alanine dehydrogenase. PMID:6404304

  20. Polymerization of alanine in the presence of a non-swelling montmorillonite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paecht-Horowitz, M.; Lahav, N.

    1977-01-01

    Alanine, starting from alanine-adenylate, has been polymerized in the presence of non-swelling Al-montmorillonite. The yield of polymerization is much lower than that obtained in the presence of swelling Na-montmorillonite. The possibility that the changing interlayer spacing in Na-montmorillonite might be responsible for its catalytic properties, is discussed.

  1. Initiation of Spore Germination in Bacillus subtilis: Relationship to Inhibition of l-Alanine Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Chandan

    1974-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of anthranilic acid esters (methyl anthranilate and N-methyl anthranilate) on the l-alanine-induced initiation of spore germination was examined in Bacillus subtilis 168. Methyl anthranilate irreversibly inhibited alanine initiation by a competitive mechanism. In its presence, the inhibition could be reversed only by the combined addition of d-glucose, d-fructose, and K+. Both l-alanine dehydrogenase and l-glutamate-pyruvate transaminase, enzymes which catalyze the first reaction in l-alanine metabolism, were competitively inhibited by methyl anthranilate. The Ki values for germination initiation (0.053 mM) and of l-glutamate-pyruvate transaminase (0.068 mM) were similar, whereas that for l-alanine dehydrogenase (0.4 mM) was six to seven times higher. Since a mutant lacking l-alanine dehydrogenase activity germinated normally in l-alanine alone, it is speculated that the major pathway of l-alanine metabolism during initiation may be via transmination reaction. PMID:4212093

  2. Amino acid sequence of the Amur tiger prion protein.

    PubMed

    Wu, Changde; Pang, Wanyong; Zhao, Deming

    2006-10-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders in human and animal associated with conformational conversion of a cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into the pathologic isoform (PrP(Sc)). Various data indicate that the polymorphisms within the open reading frame (ORF) of PrP are associated with the susceptibility and control the species barrier in prion diseases. In the present study, partial Prnp from 25 Amur tigers (tPrnp) were cloned and screened for polymorphisms. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (T423C, A501G, C511A, A610G) were found; the C511A and A610G nucleotide substitutions resulted in the amino acid changes Lysine171Glutamine and Alanine204Threoine, respectively. The tPrnp amino acid sequence is similar to house cat (Felis catus ) and sheep, but differs significantly from other two cat Prnp sequences that were previously deposited in GenBank. PMID:16780982

  3. The Benzyl Ester Group of Amino Acid Monomers Enhances Substrate Affinity and Broadens the Substrate Specificity of the Enzyme Catalyst in Chemoenzymatic Copolymerization.

    PubMed

    Ageitos, Jose Manuel; Yazawa, Kenjiro; Tateishi, Ayaka; Tsuchiya, Kousuke; Numata, Keiji

    2016-01-11

    The chemoenzymatic polymerization of amino acid monomers by proteases involves a two-step reaction: the formation of a covalent acyl-intermediate complex between the protease and the carboxyl ester group of the monomer and the subsequent deacylation of the complex by aminolysis to form a peptide bond. Although the initiation with the ester group of the monomer is an important step, the influence of the ester group on the polymerization has not been studied in detail. Herein, we studied the effect of the ester groups (methyl, ethyl, benzyl, and tert-butyl esters) of alanine and glycine on the synthesis of peptides using papain as the catalyst. Alanine and glycine were selected as monomers because of their substantially different affinities toward papain. The efficiency of the polymerization of alanine and glycine benzyl esters was much greater than that of the other esters. The benzyl ester group therefore allowed papain to equally polymerize alanine and glycine, even though the affinity of alanine toward papain is substantially higher. The characterization of the copolymers of alanine and glycine in terms of the secondary structure and thermal properties revealed that the thermal stability of the peptides depends on the amino acid composition and resultant secondary structure. The current results indicate that the nature of the ester group drastically affects the polymerization efficiency and broadens the substrate specificity of the protease. PMID:26620763

  4. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1315 Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. (a)...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1315 Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. (a)...

  6. Alanine-Threonine Polymorphism of Helicobacter pylori RpoB Is Correlated with Differential Induction of Interleukin-8 in MKN45 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Keun-Hwa; Cho, Myung-Je; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Graham, David Y.; Yun, Yeo-Jun; Woo, So-Yon; Lim, Chang-Young; Ko, Kwan-Soo; Kim, Bum-Joon; Jung, Hyun-Chae; Lee, Woo-Kon; Rhee, Kwang-Ho; Kook, Yoon-Hoh

    2004-01-01

    Geographical differences in the genetic diversity of Helicobacter pylori isolates were examined by analyzing rpoB sequences. An extremely high level of allelic diversity among H. pylori strains was found. The rpoB sequences of Asian and non-Asian (North and South American, European, and South African) strains were found to differ. An amino acid polymorphism (alanine and threonine RpoB types) was found at the 497th residue by deduced amino acid analysis. RpoB with a threonine residue (RpoBThr) was uniquely present in East Asian countries, and two-thirds of the H. pylori isolate population in this region was RpoBThr; however, this type was rare or absent in Western countries, where RpoBAla predominated. RpoBThr strains induced a much larger amount of interleukin-8, a chemokine that plays an important role in chronic inflammation, than RpoBAla strains in cultured MKN45 cells. PMID:15297492

  7. Thermal decomposition behavior of potassium and sodium jarosite synthesized in the presence of methylamine and alanine

    SciTech Connect

    J. Michelle Kotler; Nancy W. Hinman; C. Doc Richardson; Jill R. Scott

    2010-10-01

    Biomolecules, methylamine and alanine, found associated with natural jarosite samples peaked the interest of astrobiologists and planetary geologists. How the biomolecules are associated with jarosite remains unclear although the mechanism could be important for detecting biosignatures in the rock record on Earth and other planets. A series of thermal gravimetric experiments using synthetic K-jarosite and Na-jarosite were conducted to determine if thermal analysis could differentiate physical mixtures of alanine and methylamine with jarosite from samples where the methylamine or alanine was incorporated into the synthesis procedure. Physical mixtures and synthetic experiments with methylamine and alanine could be differentiated from one another and from the standards by thermal analysis for both the K-jarosite and Na-jarosite end-member suites. Changes included shifts in on-set temperatures, total temperature changes from on-set to final, and the presence of indicator peaks for methylamine and alanine in the physical mixture experiments.

  8. Amino acid racemization dating of fossil bones, I. inter-laboratory comparison of racemization measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bada, J.L.; Hoopes, E.; Darling, D.; Dungworth, G.; Kessels, H.J.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Blunt, D.J.

    1979-01-01

    Enantiomeric measurements for aspartic acid, glutamic acid, and alanine in twenty-one different fossil bone samples have been carried out by three different laboratories using different analytical methods. These inter-laboratory comparisons demonstrate that D/L aspartic acid measurements are highly reproducible, whereas the enantiomeric measurements for the other amino acids show a wide variation between the three laboratories. At present, aspartic acid measurements are the most suitable for racemization dating of bone because of their superior analytical precision. ?? 1979.

  9. Electrophysiological responses of Xenopus oocytes to amino acids: criteria for expression of injected mRNA coding chemoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Etoh, M; Yoshii, K

    1994-10-01

    Responses of endogenous transporters/receptors of Xenopus oocytes to L-alanine, L-arginine, L-leucine and L-serine were investigated under voltage clamp conditions. (a) Concentration-response relations for the amino acids followed Langmuir's adsorption isotherm. (b) The neutral amino acids required Na+ to elicit the responses, whereas L-arginine did not. (c) The responses to L-alanine decreased with decreasing pH and became undetectable at pH 5.5. The present experiments supply criteria to judge if the oocytes translate exogenous mRNA coding taste or olfactory receptor proteins for the amino acids, the best characterized stimuli, especially in fishes. PMID:7956120

  10. Microbial transformations of free versus sorbed alanine analyzed by position-specific 13C and 14C labeling and 13C-PLFA analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostel, Carolin; Dippold, Michaela; Bore, Ezekiel; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Sorption of charged or partially charged low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS) to soil mineral surfaces delays microbial uptake and therefore mineralization of LMWOS to CO2, as well as all other biochemical transformations. We used position-specific labeling, a tool of isotope applications novel to soil sciences, to compare the transformation mechanisms of sorbed and non-sorbed alanine in soil. Alanine as an amino acid links C- and N-cycles in soil and therefore is a model representative for the pool of LMWOS. To assess transformations of sorbed alanine, we combined position-specifically and uniformly 13C and 14C labeled alanine tracer solution with a loamy haplic luvisol that had previously been sterilized by γ-radiation. After shaking the mixtures, the supernatant was removed, as was all non-sorbed alanine by repeated shaking with millipore water. The labeled soil was added to non-sterilized soil from the same site. To compare the effect of sorption, soil labeled with the same position-specifically labeled tracers without previous sorption was prepared and incubated as well. We captured the respired CO2 and determined its 14C-activity at increasing time steps. The incorporation of 14C into microbial biomass was determined by CFE, and utilization of individual C positions by distinct microbial groups was evaluated by 13C-PLFA analysis. A dual peak in the respired CO2 revealed the influence of two sorption mechanisms. Microbial uptake and transformation of the sorbed alanine was 3 times slower compared to non-sorbed alanine. To compare the fate of individual C atoms independent of their concentration and pool size in soil, we introduced the divergence index (DI). The DI reveals the convergent or divergent behaviour of C from individual molecule positions during microbial utilization. The DI revealed, that alanines C-1 position was mainly oxidized to CO2, while its C-2 and C-3 were preferentially incorporated in microbial biomass and PLFAs. This indicates

  11. Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aspiration Syndrome Additional Content Medical News Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism By Lee M. Sanders, MD, MPH NOTE: ... Metabolic Disorders Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders of Lipid Metabolism Amino acids are ...

  12. Regional distribution and postnatal changes of D-amino acids in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Hamase, K; Homma, H; Takigawa, Y; Fukushima, T; Santa, T; Imai, K

    1997-03-15

    Regional distribution of D-amino acids in rat brain was studied by the modified highly sensitive analytical method which was previously developed. The method includes fluorogenic derivatization of each amino acid, isolation of each amino acid by reverse-phase HPLC, followed by enantiomeric separation with Pirkle-type chiral stationary phases. D-Amino acid contents were determined in the cerebrum, cerebellum, hippocampus, medulla oblongata, pituitary gland and pineal gland. D-Aspartic acid was observed in the pineal gland (3524 +/- 263 nmol/g, data are for male rats of 6 weeks of age) and the pituitary gland (80.5 +/- 9.0 nmol/g). D-Serine was found in various regions of the brain except for the cerebellum and medulla oblongata. D-Alanine was observed exclusively in the pituitary gland (25.9 +/- 4.4 nmol/g), whereas D-leucine was found in the pineal gland (3.4 +/- 0.4 nmol/g) and the hippocampus (1.6 +/- 0.07 nmol/g). No other D-amino acids were detected in the brain. The contents of D-aspartic acid in the pituitary gland and D-serine in the pineal gland were higher in female rats. In contrast the contents of D-alanine in the pituitary gland and D-leucine in the pineal gland and the hippocampus were higher in males. Postnatal changes of D-aspartic acid and D-leucine in the pineal gland and D-alanine in the pituitary gland were also investigated. The results described in this paper suggested that distinct regulatory mechanisms exist for individual D-amino acids in the corresponding region of rat brain. PMID:9101716

  13. Amino Acid Analyses of Acid Hydrolysates in Desert Varnish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Randall S.; Staley, James T.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Engel, Mike

    2001-01-01

    There has long been a debate as to whether rock varnish deposits are microbially mediated or are deposited by inorganic processes. Varnished rocks are found throughout the world primarily in arid and semi-arid regions. The varnish coats are typically up to 200 microns thick and are composed of clays and alternating layers enriched in manganese and iron oxides. The individual layers range in thickness from 1 micron to greater than 10 microns and may continue laterally for more than a 100 microns. Overlapping botryoidal structures are visible in thin section and scanning electron micrographs. The coatings also include small amounts of organic mater and detrital grains. Amino-acid hydrolysates offer a means of assessing the organic composition of rock varnish collected from the Sonoran Desert, near Phoenix, AZ. Chromatographic analyses of hydrolysates from powdered samples of rock varnish suggest that the interior of rock varnish is relatively enriched in amino acids and specifically in d-alanine and glutamic acid. Peptidoglycan (murein) is the main structural component of gram-positive bacterial cell walls. The d-enantiomer of alanine and glutamic acid are specific to peptidoglycan and are consequently an indicator for the presence of bacteria. D-alanine is also found in teichoic acid which is only found in gram-positive bacteria. Several researchers have cultured bacteria from the surface of rock varnish and most have been gram-positive, suggesting that gram-positive bacteria are intimately associated with varnish coatings and may play a role in the formation of varnish coatings.

  14. Amino Acid and Vitamin Requirements of Several Bacteroides Strains

    PubMed Central

    Quinto, Grace

    1966-01-01

    Nutritional studies were performed on nine Bacteroides strains, by use of the methodology and media of anaerobic rumen microbiology. Ristella perfoetens CCI required l-arginine hydrochloride, l-tryptophan, l-leucine, l-histidine hydrochloride, l-cysteine hydrochloride, dl-valine, dl-tyrosine, and the vitamin calcium-d-pantothenate, since scant turbidity developed in media without these nutrients. R. perfoetens was stimulated by glycine, dl-lysine hydrochloride, dl-isoleucine, l-proline, l-glutamic acid, dl-alanine, dl-phenylalanine, dl-methionine, and the vitamins nicotinamide and p-aminobenzoic acid, since maximal turbidity developed more slowly in media without these nutrients than in complete medium. Medium A-23, which was devised for R. perfoetens, contained salts, 0.0002% nicotinamide and calcium d-pantothenate, 0.00001% p-aminobenzoic acid, 0.044% l-tryptophan, 0.09% l-glutamic acid, and 0.1% of the other 13 amino acids listed above. Zuberella clostridiformis and seven strains of R. pseudoinsolita did not require vitamins, and showed no absolute requirement for any one amino acid. Various strains produced maximal turbidity more slowly in media deficient in l-proline, glycine, l-glutamic acid, dl-serine, l-histidine hydrochloride, dl-alanine, or l-cysteine hydrochloride, than in complete medium. These eight strains grew optimally in medium A-23 plus 0.1% dl-serine but without vitamins. PMID:16349673

  15. Glutathione transferase mimics: micellar catalysis of an enzymic reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Lindkvist, B; Weinander, R; Engman, L; Koetse, M; Engberts, J B; Morgenstern, R

    1997-01-01

    Substances that mimic the enzyme action of glutathione transferases (which serve in detoxification) are described. These micellar catalysts enhance the reaction rate between thiols and activated halogenated nitroarenes as well as alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyls. The nucleophilic aromatic substitution reaction is enhanced by the following surfactants in descending order: poly(dimethyldiallylammonium - co - dodecylmethyldiallylammonium) bromide (86/14) >>cetyltrimethylammonium bromide>zwittergent 3-16 (n-hexadecyl-N,N-dimethyl-3-ammonio-1-propanesulphonate)>zwittergent+ ++ 3-14 (n-tetradecyl-N,N-dimethyl - 3 - ammonio -1 - propanesulphonate) approximately N,N - dimethyl - laurylamine N-oxide>N,N-dimethyloctylamine N-oxide. The most efficient catalyst studied is a polymeric material that incorporates surfactant properties (n-dodecylmethyldiallylammonium bromide) and opens up possibilities for engineering sequences of reactions on a polymeric support. Michael addition to alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyls is exemplified by a model substance, trans-4-phenylbut-3-en-2-one, and a toxic compound that is formed during oxidative stress, 4-hydroxy-2-undecenal. The latter compound is conjugated with the highest efficiency of those tested. Micellar catalysts can thus be viewed as simple models for the glutathione transferases highlighting the influence of a positive electrostatic field and a non-specific hydrophobic binding site, pertaining to two catalytic aspects, namely thiolate anion stabilization and solvent shielding. PMID:9173899

  16. Nucleotidyl transferase assisted DNA labeling with different click chemistries

    PubMed Central

    Winz, Marie-Luise; Linder, Eva Christina; André, Timon; Becker, Juliane; Jäschke, Andres

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present a simple, modular and efficient strategy that allows the 3′-terminal labeling of DNA, regardless of whether it has been chemically or enzymatically synthesized or isolated from natural sources. We first incorporate a range of modified nucleotides at the 3′-terminus, using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase. In the second step, we convert the incorporated nucleotides, using either of four highly efficient click chemistry-type reactions, namely copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition, strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition, Staudinger ligation or Diels-Alder reaction with inverse electron demand. Moreover, we create internal modifications, making use of either ligation or primer extension, after the nucleotidyl transferase step, prior to the click reaction. We further study the influence of linker variants on the reactivity of azides in different click reactions. We find that different click reactions exhibit distinct substrate preferences, a fact that is often overlooked, but should be considered when labeling oligonucleotides or other biomolecules with click chemistry. Finally, our findings allowed us to extend our previously published RNA labeling strategy to the use of a different copper-free click chemistry, namely the Staudinger ligation. PMID:26013812

  17. Amino Acids and Chirality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie E.

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids are among the most heavily studied organic compound class in carbonaceous chondrites. The abundance, distributions, enantiomeric compositions, and stable isotopic ratios of amino acids have been determined in carbonaceous chondrites fi'om a range of classes and petrographic types, with interesting correlations observed between these properties and the class and typc of the chondritcs. In particular, isomeric distributions appear to correlate with parent bodies (chondrite class). In addition, certain chiral amino acids are found in enantiomeric excess in some chondrites. The delivery of these enantiomeric excesses to the early Earth may have contributed to the origin of the homochirality that is central to life on Earth today. This talk will explore the amino acids in carbonaceous chondritcs and their relevance to the origin of life.

  18. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism is the process your body uses to make energy from the food you eat. Food is ... One group of these disorders is amino acid metabolism disorders. They include phenylketonuria (PKU) and maple syrup ...

  19. Topology of AspT, the Aspartate:Alanine Antiporter of Tetragenococcus halophilus, Determined by Site-Directed Fluorescence Labeling▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Nanatani, Kei; Fujiki, Takashi; Kanou, Kazuhiko; Takeda-Shitaka, Mayuko; Umeyama, Hideaki; Ye, Liwen; Wang, Xicheng; Nakajima, Tasuku; Uchida, Takafumi; Maloney, Peter C.; Abe, Keietsu

    2007-01-01

    The gram-positive lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus catalyzes the decarboxylation of l-aspartate (Asp) with release of l-alanine (Ala) and CO2. The decarboxylation reaction consists of two steps: electrogenic exchange of Asp for Ala catalyzed by an aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) and intracellular decarboxylation of the transported Asp catalyzed by an l-aspartate-β-decarboxylase (AspD). AspT belongs to the newly classified aspartate:alanine exchanger family (transporter classification no. 2.A.81) of transporters. In this study, we were interested in the relationship between the structure and function of AspT and thus analyzed the topology by means of the substituted-cysteine accessibility method using the impermeant, fluorescent, thiol-specific probe Oregon Green 488 maleimide (OGM) and the impermeant, nonfluorescent, thiol-specific probe [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl]methanethiosulfonate bromide. We generated 23 single-cysteine variants from a six-histidine-tagged cysteineless AspT template. A cysteine position was assigned an external location if the corresponding single-cysteine variant reacted with OGM added to intact cells, and a position was assigned an internal location if OGM labeling required cell lysis. The topology analyses revealed that AspT has a unique topology; the protein has 10 transmembrane helices (TMs), a large hydrophilic cytoplasmic loop (about 180 amino acids) between TM5 and TM6, N and C termini that face the periplasm, and a positively charged residue (arginine 76) within TM3. Moreover, the three-dimensional structure constructed by means of the full automatic modeling system indicates that the large hydrophilic cytoplasmic loop of AspT possesses a TrkA_C domain and a TrkA_C-like domain and that the three-dimensional structures of these domains are similar to each other even though their amino acid sequences show low similarity. PMID:17660287

  20. Effect of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine on oxidative stress of liver and kidney in rat.

    PubMed

    de Munck, Estefanía; Muñoz-Sáez, Emma; Antonio, María Teresa; Pineda, Javier; Herrera, Amparo; Miguel, Begoña G; Arahuetes, Rosa María

    2013-03-01

    β-N-methylamino-(L)-alanine (L)-BMAA) is a neurotoxic amino acid, found in the majority of cyanbacterial genera tested. Evidence for implication of (L)-BMAA in neurodegenerative disorders, like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), relies on bioaccumulation and biomagnification from symbiotic cyanobacteria. The involvement of (L)-BMAA in oxidative stress was demonstrated in several studies in the central nervous system. In the present study, we investigated the effect of (L)-BMAA on the oxidative stress responses of liver and kidney in rats treated by intraperitoneal administration with this amino acid. Oxidative stress was demonstrated by the quantification of lipid peroxidation, the measurement of both catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities, as well as the quantification of glutathione (GSH) levels and the total antioxidant capacity. It was observed that (L)-BMAA caused a significant increase in the degree of lipid peroxidation and catalase activity in both organs. A significant increase in glutathione peroxidase activity was obtained only in liver, whereas glutathione levels were also increased in both organs. The total antioxidant capacity decreased in liver and increased in kidney. These results suggest that the oxidative stress was higher in liver than in kidney, and might be crucial for (L)-BMAA toxicological action. PMID:23328118

  1. Instantaneous normal mode analysis of the vibrational relaxation of the amide I mode of alanine dipeptide in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farag, Marwa H.; Zúñiga, José; Requena, Alberto; Bastida, Adolfo

    2013-05-01

    Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations coupled to instantaneous normal modes (INMs) analysis are used to study the vibrational relaxation of the acetyl and amino-end amide I modes of the alanine dipeptide (AlaD) molecule dissolved in water (D2O). The INMs are assigned in terms of the equilibrium normal modes using the Effective Atomic Min-Cost algorithm as adapted to make use of the outputs of standard MD packages, a method which is well suited for the description of flexible molecules. The relaxation energy curves of both amide I modes show multiexponential decays, in good agreement with the experimental findings. It is found that ˜85%-90% of the energy relaxes through intramolecular vibrational redistribution. The main relaxation pathways are also identified. The rate at which energy is transferred into the solvent is similar for the acetyl-end and amino-end amide I modes. The conformational changes occurring during relaxation are investigated, showing that the populations of the alpha and beta region conformers are altered by energy transfer in such a way that it takes 15 ps for the equilibrium conformational populations to be recovered after the initial excitation of the AlaD molecule.

  2. A low-CO2-inducible gene encoding an alanine: alpha-ketoglutarate aminotransferase in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Z Y; Burow, M D; Mason, C B; Moroney, J V

    1996-01-01

    At low-CO2 (air) conditions, the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii acquires the ability to raise its internal inorganic carbon concentration. To study this adaptation to low CO2, cDNA clones induced under low-CO2 growth conditions were selected through differential screening. One full-length clone is 2552 bp, with an open reading frame encoding 521 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence shows about 50% identity with alanine: alpha-ketogutarate aminotransferase (Ala AT, EC 2.6.1.2) from plants and animals, and the mRNA of this clone increased 4- to 5-fold 4 h after cells were switched from high-CO2 to low-CO2 growth conditions. The expression of the enzyme and its activity also increased accordingly at low-CO2 growth conditions. To study the physiological role of Ala AT, a pyridoxal phosphate inhibitor, aminooxyacetic acid, was added at 40 microM to the growth medium when cells were beginning to adapt to low CO2. This caused a 30% decrease in the maximum photosynthetic rate in air-adapting cells 8 h later. The addition of the inhibitor also caused the cells to excrete glycolate, a photorespiratory intermediate, but did not change the apparent affinity of the cell for external CO2. These physiological studies are consistent with the assumption that Ala AT is involved in the adaptation to low-CO2 conditions. PMID:8883380

  3. A low-CO2-inducible gene encoding an alanine: alpha-ketoglutarate aminotransferase in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z Y; Burow, M D; Mason, C B; Moroney, J V

    1996-10-01

    At low-CO2 (air) conditions, the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii acquires the ability to raise its internal inorganic carbon concentration. To study this adaptation to low CO2, cDNA clones induced under low-CO2 growth conditions were selected through differential screening. One full-length clone is 2552 bp, with an open reading frame encoding 521 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence shows about 50% identity with alanine: alpha-ketogutarate aminotransferase (Ala AT, EC 2.6.1.2) from plants and animals, and the mRNA of this clone increased 4- to 5-fold 4 h after cells were switched from high-CO2 to low-CO2 growth conditions. The expression of the enzyme and its activity also increased accordingly at low-CO2 growth conditions. To study the physiological role of Ala AT, a pyridoxal phosphate inhibitor, aminooxyacetic acid, was added at 40 microM to the growth medium when cells were beginning to adapt to low CO2. This caused a 30% decrease in the maximum photosynthetic rate in air-adapting cells 8 h later. The addition of the inhibitor also caused the cells to excrete glycolate, a photorespiratory intermediate, but did not change the apparent affinity of the cell for external CO2. These physiological studies are consistent with the assumption that Ala AT is involved in the adaptation to low-CO2 conditions. PMID:8883380

  4. Voltage-dependent processes in the electroneutral amino acid exchanger ASCT2

    PubMed Central

    Zander, Catherine B.; Albers, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Neutral amino acid exchange by the alanine serine cysteine transporter (ASCT)2 was reported to be electroneutral and coupled to the cotransport of one Na+ ion. The cotransported sodium ion carries positive charge. Therefore, it is possible that amino acid exchange is voltage dependent. However, little information is available on the electrical properties of the ASCT2 amino acid transport process. Here, we have used a combination of experimental and computational approaches to determine the details of the amino acid exchange mechanism of ASCT2. The [Na+] dependence of ASCT2-associated currents indicates that the Na+/amino acid stoichiometry is at least 2:1, with at least one sodium ion binding to the amino acid–free apo form of the transporter. When the substrate and two Na+ ions are bound, the valence of the transport domain is +0.81. Consistently, voltage steps applied to ASCT2 in the fully loaded configuration elicit transient currents that decay on a millisecond time scale. Alanine concentration jumps at the extracellular side of the membrane are followed by inwardly directed transient currents, indicative of translocation of net positive charge during exchange. Molecular dynamics simulations are consistent with these results and point to a sequential binding process in which one or two modulatory Na+ ions bind with high affinity to the empty transporter, followed by binding of the amino acid substrate and the subsequent binding of a final Na+ ion. Overall, our results are consistent with voltage-dependent amino acid exchange occurring on a millisecond time scale, the kinetics of which we predict with simulations. Despite some differences, transport mechanism and interaction with Na+ appear to be highly conserved between ASCT2 and the other members of the solute carrier 1 family, which transport acidic amino acids. PMID:23669717

  5. Alanine Scanning of Cucumber Mosaic Virus (CMV) 2B Protein Identifies Different Positions for Cell-To-Cell Movement and Gene Silencing Suppressor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Nemes, Katalin; Gellért, Ákos; Balázs, Ervin; Salánki, Katalin

    2014-01-01

    The multifunctional 2b protein of CMV has a role in the long distance and local movement of the virus, in symptom formation, in evasion of defense mediated by salicylic acid as well as in suppression of RNA silencing. The role of conserved amino acid sequence domains were analyzed previously in the protein function, but comprehensive analysis of this protein was not carried out until recently. We have analyzed all over the 2b protein by alanine scanning mutagenesis changing three consecutive amino acids (aa) to alanine. We have identified eight aa triplets as key determinants of the 2b protein function in virus infection. Four of them (KKQ/22-24/AAA, QNR/31-33/AAA, RER/34-36/AAA, SPS/40-42/AAA) overlap with previously determined regions indispensable in gene silencing suppressor function. We have identified two additional triplets necessary for the suppressor function of the 2b protein (LPF/55-57/AAA, NVE/10-12/AAA), and two other positions were required for cell-to-cell movement of the virus (MEL/1-3/AAA, RHV/70-72/AAA), which are not essential for suppressor activity. PMID:25380036

  6. Manageable cytotoxicity of nanocapsules immobilizing D-amino acid oxidase via exogenous administration of nontoxic prodrug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Zhu, Yingchun; Fu, Jingke

    2014-02-01

    D-Amino acid oxidase (DAO), which could catalyze generation of hydrogen peroxide with strong oxidbility and cytotoxicity, has become of interest as a biocatalyst for therapeutic treatments. Herein we report that amino-functional hollow mesoporous silica with large pore size (10.27 nm) and positively charged surface effectively immobilize DAO with negative charge. The adsorption, activity and stability of DAO are demonstrated to depend mainly on the amino-functionalization of surface. Significant cancer cell killing effect is observed when the cells are treated by the nanocapsules entrapping DAO together with D-alanine, showing distinct dose-dependency on concentration of the nanocapsules entrapping DAO or D-alanine. Nevertheless, the toxicity is completely neutralized by the addition of catalase, and anti-tumor effect is not observed when either the nanocapsules entrapping DAO or D-alanine is applied alone. The results indicate that cytotoxicity of the nanocapsules entrapping DAO could be managed by exogenous administration of nontoxic prodrug to tumor tissue, due to the stereoselectivity of DAO and the scarcity of its substrates in mammalian organisms. Thus, the method might be exploited as a potential treatment for cancer therapy.

  7. D-cycloserine transport in human intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells: mediation by a H(+)-coupled amino acid transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Thwaites, D. T.; Armstrong, G.; Hirst, B. H.; Simmons, N. L.

    1995-01-01

    1. The ability of D-cycloserine to act as a substrate for H+/amino acid symport has been tested in epithelial layers of Caco-2 human intestinal cells. 2. In Na(+)-free media with the apical bathing media held at pH 6.0, D-cycloserine (20 mM) is an effective inhibitor of net transepithelial transport (Jnet) of L-alanine (100 microM) and its accumulation (across the apical membrane) in a similar manner to amino acid substrates (L-alanine, beta-alanine, L-proline and glycine). In contrast L-valine was ineffective as an inhibitor for H+/amino acid symport. Both inhibition of L-alanine Jnet and its accumulation by D-cycloserine were dose-dependent, maximal inhibition being achieved by 5-10 mM. 3. Both D-cycloserine and known substrates for H+/amino acid symport stimulated an inward short circuit current (Isc) when voltage-clamped monolayers of Caco-2 epithelia, mounted in Ussing chambers, were exposed to apical substrate in Na(+)-free media, with apical pH held at 6.0. The D-cycloserine dependent increase in Isc was dose-dependent with an apparent Km = 15.8 +/- 2.0 (mean +/- s.e. mean) mM, and Vmax = 373 +/- 21 nmol cm-2h-1. 4. D-Cycloserine (20 mM) induced a prompt acidification of Caco-2 cell cytosol when superfused at the apical surface in both Na+ and Na(+)-free conditions. Cytosolic acidification in response to D-cycloserine was dependent upon superfusate pH, being attenuated at pH 8 and enhanced in acidic media. 5. The increment in Isc with 20 mM D-cycloserine was non-additive with other amino acid substrates for H+/amino acid symport. PMID:8548174

  8. Calibration of helical tomotherapy machine using EPR/alanine dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Perichon, Nicolas; Garcia, Tristan; Francois, Pascal; Lourenco, Valerie; Lesven, Caroline; Bordy, Jean-Marc

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: Current codes of practice for clinical reference dosimetry of high-energy photon beams in conventional radiotherapy recommend using a 10x10 cm{sup 2} square field, with the detector at a reference depth of 10 cm in water and 100 cm source to surface distance (SSD) (AAPM TG-51) or 100 cm source-to-axis distance (SAD) (IAEA TRS-398). However, the maximum field size of a helical tomotherapy (HT) machine is 40x5 cm{sup 2} defined at 85 cm SAD. These nonstandard conditions prevent a direct implementation of these protocols. The purpose of this study is twofold: To check the absorbed dose in water and dose rate calibration of a tomotherapy unit as well as the accuracy of the tomotherapy treatment planning system (TPS) calculations for a specific test case. Method: Both topics are based on the use of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) using alanine as transfer dosimeter between the Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNHB) {sup 60}Co-{gamma}-ray reference beam and the Institut Curie's HT beam. Irradiations performed in the LNHB reference {sup 60}Co-{gamma}-ray beam allowed setting up the calibration method, which was then implemented and tested at the LNHB 6 MV linac x-ray beam, resulting in a deviation of 1.6% (at a 1% standard uncertainty) relative to the reference value determined with the standard IAEA TRS-398 protocol. Results: HT beam dose rate estimation shows a difference of 2% with the value stated by the manufacturer at a 2% standard uncertainty. A 4% deviation between measured dose and the calculation from the tomotherapy TPS was found. The latter was originated by an inadequate representation of the phantom CT-scan values and, consequently, mass densities within the phantom. This difference has been explained by the mass density values given by the CT-scan and used by the TPS which were not the true ones. Once corrected using Monte Carlo N-Particle simulations to validate the accuracy of this process, the difference between corrected TPS

  9. Production of amino acids by analog-resistant mutants of the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis.

    PubMed Central

    Riccardi, G; Sora, S; Ciferri, O

    1981-01-01

    Mutants of Spirulina platensis resistant to 5-fluorotryptophan, beta-3-thienyl-alanine, ethionine, p-fluorophenylalanine, or azetidine-2-carboxylic acid were isolated. Some of these mutants appeared to be resistant to more than one analog and to overproduce the corresponding amino acids. A second group was composed of mutants that were resistant to one analog only. Of the latter mutants, one resistant to azetidine-2-carboxylic acid was found to overproduce proline only, whereas one resistant to fluorotryptophan and one resistant to ethionine did not overproduce any of the tested amino acids. PMID:6792182

  10. Identification of a mutation affecting an alanine-alpha-ketoisovalerate transaminase activity in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Falkinham, J O

    1979-10-01

    A mutation affecting alanine-alpha-ketoisovalerate transaminase activity has been shown to be cotransducible with ilv gene cluster. The transaminase deficiency results in conditional isoleucine auxotrophy in the presence of alanine. PMID:396446

  11. Solubility calculations of branched and linear amino acids using lattice cluster theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischlschweiger, Michael; Enders, Sabine; Zeiner, Tim

    2014-09-01

    In this work, the activity coefficients and the solubility of amino acids in water were calculated using the lattice cluster theory (LCT) combined with the extended chemical association lattice model allowing self-association as well as cross-association. This permits the study of the influence of the amino acids structure on the thermodynamic properties for the first time. By the used model, the activity coefficient and solubilities of the investigated fourteen amino acids (glycine, alanine, γ-aminobutyric acid, dl-valine, dl-threonine, dl-methionine, l-leucine, l-glutamic acid, l-proline, hydroxyproline, histidine, l-arginine, α-amino valeric acid) could be described in good accordance with experimental data. In the case of different α-amino acids, but different hydrocarbon chains, the same interaction energy parameter can be used within the LCT. All studied amino acids could be modelled using the same parameter for the description of the amino acid association properties. The formed cross-associates contain more amino acids than expressed by the overall mole fraction of the solution. Moreover, the composition of the cross-associates depends on temperature, where the amount of amino acids increases with increasing temperature.

  12. Folding simulations of alanine-based peptides with lysine residues.

    PubMed Central

    Sung, S S

    1995-01-01

    The folding of short alanine-based peptides with different numbers of lysine residues is simulated at constant temperature (274 K) using the rigid-element Monte Carlo method. The solvent-referenced potential has prevented the multiple-minima problem in helix folding. From various initial structures, the peptides with three lysine residues fold into helix-dominated conformations with the calculated average helicity in the range of 60-80%. The peptide with six lysine residues shows only 8-14% helicity. These results agree well with experimental observations. The intramolecular electrostatic interaction of the charged lysine side chains and their electrostatic hydration destabilize the helical conformations of the peptide with six lysine residues, whereas these effects on the peptides with three lysine residues are small. The simulations provide insight into the helix-folding mechanism, including the beta-bend intermediate in helix initiation, the (i, i + 3) hydrogen bonds, the asymmetrical helix propagation, and the asymmetrical helicities in the N- and C-terminal regions. These findings are consistent with previous studies. PMID:7756550

  13. Alanine synthesis from glyceraldehyde and ammonium ion in aqueous solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    The formation of alanine (ala) form C(14)-glyceraldehyde and ammonium phosphate in the presence or absence of a thiol is reported. At ambient temperature, ala synthesis was six times more rapid in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid than in its absence (0.6 and 0.1 percent, respectively, after 60 days). Similarly, the presence of another thiol, N-acetylcysteinate, increased the production of ala, as well as of lactate. The reaction pathway of thiol-catalyzed synthesis of ala, with the lactic acid formed in a bypath, is suggested. In this, dehydration of glyceraldehyde is followed by the formation of hemithioacetal. In the presence of ammonia, an imine is formed, which eventually yields ala. This pathway is consistent with the observation that the rate ratio of ala/lactate remains constant throughout the process. The fact that the reaction takes place under anaerobic conditions in the presence of H2O and with the low concentrations of simple substrates and catalysts makes it an attractive model prebiotic reaction in the process of molecular evolution.

  14. Energy landscapes and global thermodynamics for alanine peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somani, Sandeep; Wales, David J.

    2013-09-01

    We compare different approaches for computing the thermodynamics of biomolecular systems. Techniques based on parallel replicas evolving via molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo simulations produce overlapping histograms for the densities of states. In contrast, energy landscape methods employ a superposition partition function constructed from local minima of the potential energy surface. The latter approach is particularly powerful for systems exhibiting broken ergodicity, and it is usually implemented using a harmonic normal mode approximation, which has not been extensively tested for biomolecules. The present contribution compares these alternative approaches for small alanine peptides modelled using the CHARMM and AMBER force fields. Densities of states produced from canonical sampling using multiple temperature replicas provide accurate reference data to evaluate the effect of the harmonic normal mode approximation in the superposition calculations. This benchmarking lays foundations for the application of energy landscape methods to larger biomolecules. It will also provide well characterised model systems for developing enhanced sampling methods, and for the treatment of anharmonicity corresponding to individual local minima.

  15. The fatty acids as penetration enhancers of amino acids by ion pairing.

    PubMed

    Arct, J; Chelkowska, M; Kasiura, K; Pietrzykowski, P

    2002-12-01

    The influence of palmitic acid on n-octanol/water partition coefficient (log P) of selected amino acids, alanine, glycine, proline, hydroxyproline, seine, valine, threonine and lysine, was measured at a wide range of pH. A parabolic shape curve was obtained in every case (pH vs. Deltalog P), with maximum depending on the amino acid. In each case in the presence of palmitic acid, the apparent partition coefficient increased. To check the possible mechanism of extraction of amino acids into n-octanol phase in the presence of palmitate additionally, the influence of an amount of counter ion on partition coefficient of lysine was investigated. The results suggest that the enhanced partitioning of lysine results from the ion pair formation with palmitate. The ion pair stratum corneum-lipid membrane transport of the amino acids was investigated as well, using palmitate as a counter ion. The apparent permeability coefficients were enhanced significantly by palmitic acid at pH 7.4. As many substances (e.g. organic solvents, unsaturated fatty acids, etc.) are penetration enhancers which change the structure of intercellular lipid, the influence of palmitic acid on membrane was investigated. After pretreatment of membrane with palmitic acid, no changes in permeation of alanine were observed. Investigations suggest the enhanced permeation of amino acids via ion pairing. The method for prediction of pH in which the possibility of ion pairing is the highest was developed as well. PMID:18494885

  16. Determination of the D and L isomers of some protein amino acids present in soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, G. E.; Cheng, C.-N.; Cronin, S. E.

    1977-01-01

    The D and L isomers of some protein amino acids present in soils were measured by using a gas chromatographic technique. The results of two processing procedures were compared to determine the better method. Results of the comparison indicated that the determination of D and L percentages requires amino acid purification if one is to obtain accurate data. It was found that very significant amounts of D-alanine, D-aspartic acid, and D-glutamic acid were present in the contemporary soils studied. Valine, isoleucine, leucine, proline, and phenylalanine generally contained only a trace to very small amounts of the D isomer. It is probable that the D-amino acids from the alanine, aspartic, and glutamic acids are contributed to the soil primarily via microorganisms. The finding of very significant quantities of some D-amino acids (about 5-16%) in present-day soils may alert some investigators of geological sediments to a possible problem in using amino acid racemization as an age-dating technique.

  17. Alanine-EPR as a transfer standard dosimetry system for low energy X radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoury, H. J.; da Silva, E. J.; Mehta, K.; de Barros, V. S.; Asfora, V. K.; Guzzo, P. L.; Parker, A. G.

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the use of alanine-EPR as a transfer standard dosimetry system for low energy X radiation, such as that in RS-2400, which operates in the range from 25 to 150 kV and 2 to 45 mA. Two types of alanine dosimeters were investigated. One is a commercial alanine pellets from Aérial-Centre de Ressources Technologiques, France and one was prepared in our laboratory (LMRI-DEN/UFPE). The EPR spectra of the irradiated dosimeters were recorded in the Nuclear Energy Department of UFPE, using a Bruker EMX10 EPR spectrometer operating in the X-band. The alanine-EPR dosimetry system was calibrated in the range of 20-220 Gy in this X-ray field, against an ionization chamber calibrated at the relevant X-ray energy with traceability to PTB. The results showed that both alanine dosimeters presented a linear dose response the same sensitivity, when the EPR signal was normalized to alanine mass. The total uncertainty in the measured dose was estimated to be about 3%. The results indicate that it is possible to use the alanine-EPR dosimetry system for validation of a low-energy X ray irradiator, such as RS-2400.

  18. Light-activated amino acid transport in Halobacterium halobium envelope vesicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, R. E.; Lanyi, J. K.

    1977-01-01

    Vesicles prepared from Halobacterium halobium cell envelopes accumulate amino acids in response to light-induced electrical and chemical gradients. Nineteen of 20 commonly occurring amino acids have been shown to be actively accumulated by these vesicles in response to illumination or in response to an artificially created Na+ gradient. On the basis of shared common carriers the transport systems can be divided into eight classes, each responsible for the transport of one or several amino acids: arginine, lysine, histidine; asparagine, glutamine; alanine, glycine, threonine, serine; leucine, valine, isoleucine, methionine; phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan; aspartate; glutamate; proline. Available evidence suggests that these carriers are symmetrical in that amino acids can be transported equally well in both directions across the vesicle membranes. A tentative working model to account for these observations is presented.

  19. Learned olfactory discrimination versus innate taste responses to amino acids in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus).

    PubMed

    Valentincic, T; Wegert, S; Caprio, J

    1994-05-01

    Intact channel catfish conditioned to the L-amino acids, proline, arginine, alanine, and lysine, discriminated these stimuli from all other amino acids tested. Behavioral structure-activity tests indicated that L-pipecolate was the only effective agonist of the L-proline conditioned response. For channel catfish in which one of the paired olfactory organs was surgically removed, the number of turns to the conditioned stimulus was 40% fewer than those of intact catfish; however, these semiosmic channel catfish discriminated the conditioned from nonconditioned stimuli, as evidenced by their responding to the conditioned amino acid, with a two- to threefold greater number of turns than to the nonconditioned amino acids. Irrespective of the number of conditioning trials attempted, catfish with both olfactory organs removed were unable to discriminate the conditioned from the nonconditioned stimuli. PMID:8022906

  20. In-Situ Measurements of the Radiation Stability of Amino Acids at 15-140 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerakines, Perry A.; Hudson, Reggie L.; Moore, Marla H.; Bell, Jan-Luca

    2012-01-01

    We present new kinetics data on the radiolytic destruction of amino acids measured in situ with infrared spectroscopy. Samples were irradiated at 15, 100, and 140 K with D.8-MeV protons, and amino-acid decay was followed at each temperature with and without H2O present. Observed radiation products included CO2 and amines, consistent with amino-acid decarboxylation. The half-lives of glycine, alanine, and phenylalanine were estimated for various extraterrestrial environments. Infrared spectral changes demonstrated the conversion from the non-zwitterion structure NH2-CH2(R)-COOH at 15 K to the zwitterion structure +NH3-CH2(R)-COO- at 140 K for each amino acid studied.

  1. Amino Acid and Protein Metabolism in Bermuda Grass During Water Stress 12

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, N. M.; Naylor, A. W.

    1966-01-01

    The ability of Arizona Common and Coastal Bermuda grass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] to synthesize amino acids and proteins during water stress was investigated. Amino acids were continually synthesized during the water stress treatments, but protein synthesis was inhibited and protein levels decreased. Water stress induced a 10- to 100-fold accumulation of free proline in shoots and a 2- to 6-fold accumulation of free asparagine, both of which are characteristic responses of water-stressed plants. Valine levels increased, and glutamic acid and alanine levels decreased. 14C labeling experiments showed that free proline turns over more slowly than any other free amino acid during water stress. This proline is readily synthesized and accumulated from glutamic acid. It is suggested that during water stress free proline functions as a storage compound. No significant differences were found in the amino acid and protein metabolism of the 2 varieties of Bermuda grass. PMID:16656387

  2. Study of Stationary Phase Metabolism Via Isotopomer Analysis of Amino Acids from an Isolated Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikh, AfshanS.; Tang, YinjieJ.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Martin, Hector Garcia; Gin, Jennifer; Benke, Peter; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-09-14

    Microbial production of many commercially important secondary metabolites occurs during stationary phase, and methods to measure metabolic flux during this growth phase would be valuable. Metabolic flux analysis is often based on isotopomer information from proteinogenic amino acids. As such, flux analysis primarily reflects the metabolism pertinent to the growth phase during which most proteins are synthesized. To investigate central metabolism and amino acids synthesis activity during stationary phase, addition of fully 13C-labeled glucose followed by induction of green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression during stationary phase was used. Our results indicate that Escherichia coli was able to produce new proteins (i.e., GFP) in the stationary phase, and the amino acids in GFP were mostly from degraded proteins synthesized during the exponential growth phase. Among amino acid biosynthetic pathways, only those for serine, alanine, glutamate/glutamine, and aspartate/asparagine had significant activity during the stationary phase.

  3. Formation of amino acids by cobalt-60 irradiation of hydrogen cyanide solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweeney, M. A.; Toste, A. P.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the pathway for the prebiotic origin of amino acids from hydrogen cyanide (HCN) under the action of ionizing radiation considered as an effective source of energy on the primitive earth. The irradiations were performed in a cobalt-60 source with a dose rate of 200,000 rad/hr. Seven naturally occurring amino acids are identified among the products formed by the hydrolysis of gamma-irradiated solutions of HCN: glycine, alanine, valine, serine, threonine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid. The identity of these amino acids is established by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Control experiments provided evidence that the amino acids are not the result of contamination.

  4. [Selective N-heterylazimine inhibition of reactions catalyzed by rat liver glutathione transferase].

    PubMed

    Stulovskiĭ, A V; Voznyĭ, I V; Rozengart, E V; Suvorov, A A; Khovanskikh, A E

    1992-01-01

    Three reactions (nucleophile substitution, thiolysis and N-deoxygenation) catalyzed by rat liver glutathione transferase have been studied using several N-heterylazimine inhibitors. The inhibitors are sharply different in their effectiveness in the transferase reactions. Their efficiency depends on their structure. The mechanism which underlies the found regularities is suggested. PMID:1413125

  5. Mitochondrial defects associated with β-alanine toxicity: relevance to hyper-beta-alaninemia.

    PubMed

    Shetewy, Aza; Shimada-Takaura, Kayoko; Warner, Danielle; Jong, Chian Ju; Mehdi, Abu-Bakr Al; Alexeyev, Mikhail; Takahashi, Kyoko; Schaffer, Stephen W

    2016-05-01

    Hyper-beta-alaninemia is a rare metabolic condition that results in elevated plasma and urinary β-alanine levels and is characterized by neurotoxicity, hypotonia, and respiratory distress. It has been proposed that at least some of the symptoms are caused by oxidative stress; however, only limited information is available on the mechanism of reactive oxygen species generation. The present study examines the hypothesis that β-alanine reduces cellular levels of taurine, which are required for normal respiratory chain function; cellular taurine depletion is known to reduce respiratory function and elevate mitochondrial superoxide generation. To test the taurine hypothesis, isolated neonatal rat cardiomyocytes and mouse embryonic fibroblasts were incubated with medium lacking or containing β-alanine. β-alanine treatment led to mitochondrial superoxide accumulation in conjunction with a decrease in oxygen consumption. The defect in β-alanine-mediated respiratory function was detected in permeabilized cells exposed to glutamate/malate but not in cells utilizing succinate, suggesting that β-alanine leads to impaired complex I activity. Taurine treatment limited mitochondrial superoxide generation, supporting a role for taurine in maintaining complex I activity. Also affected by taurine is mitochondrial morphology, as β-alanine-treated fibroblasts undergo fragmentation, a sign of unhealthy mitochondria that is reversed by taurine treatment. If left unaltered, β-alanine-treated fibroblasts also undergo mitochondrial apoptosis, as evidenced by activation of caspases 3 and 9 and the initiation of the mitochondrial permeability transition. Together, these data show that β-alanine mediates changes that reduce ATP generation and enhance oxidative stress, factors that contribute to heart failure. PMID:27023909

  6. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in the Almahata Sitta Meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, Michael; Aubrey, A.; Bada, J. L.; Dworkin, J. P.; Elsila, J. E.; Glavin, D. P.; Parker, E.; Jenniskens, P.

    2009-09-01

    The recovery of meteorite fragments from the 2008 TC3 asteroid impact, collectively named Almahata Sitta, revealed a rare, anomalous polymict ureilite containing large carbonaceous grains (Jenniskens et al. 2009). Here we report the first amino acid analysis of a meteorite from an F-type asteroid as part of the Almahata Sitta meteorite sample analysis consortium. A single fragment (piece #4, 1.2 grams) was crushed to a powder, and separate 0.1 g aliquots of the same meteorite were carried through identical hot-water extraction, acid hydrolysis and desalting procedures at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. The o-phthaldialdehyde/N-acetyl-L-cysteine amino acid derivatives in the extracts were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography with UV fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Analyses of the meteorite extracts revealed a complex distribution of two- to six-carbon aliphatic amino acids with abundances ranging from 0.5 to 69 parts-per-billion (ppb). Glycine was the most abundant amino acid detected, however, since this protein amino acid is a common terrestrial contaminant, we are currently unable to rule out at least a partial terrestrial source. However, the D/L ratio of alanine in the meteorite was racemic, suggesting that very little terrestrial amino acid contamination. Several non-protein amino acids that are rare in the biosphere were also identified in the meteorite above background levels including D,L-4-amino-2-methybutyric acid (65 ± 8 ppb), D-isovaline (1.3 ± 0.1 ppb), L-isovaline (1.4 ± 0.1 ppb), and α-aminoisobutryic acid (7.1 ± 5.8 ppb). The abundance of isovaline and AIB are 1000 times lower than the abundances found in the CM2 meteorite Murchison while D,L-4-amino-2-methybutyric acid is similar. The very low amino acid abundances and the presence of several amino acid decomposition products including methylamine, ethylamine, and isopropylamine are consistent with

  7. Characterization of the l-alanine exporter AlaE of Escherichia coli and its potential role in protecting cells from a toxic-level accumulation of l-alanine and its derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seryoung; Ihara, Kohei; Katsube, Satoshi; Hori, Hatsuhiro; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Yoneyama, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that the alaE gene of Escherichia coli encodes the l-alanine exporter AlaE. The objective of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of the AlaE exporter. The minimum inhibitory concentration of l-alanine and l-alanyl-l-alanine in alaE-deficient l-alanine-nonmetabolizing cells MLA301ΔalaE was 4- and >4000-fold lower, respectively, than in the alaE-positive parent cells MLA301, suggesting that AlaE functions as an efflux pump to avoid a toxic-level accumulation of intracellular l-alanine and its derivatives. Furthermore, the growth of the alaE-deficient mutant derived from the l-alanine-metabolizing strain was strongly inhibited in the presence of a physiological level of l-alanyl-l-alanine. Intact MLA301ΔalaE and MLA301ΔalaE/pAlaE cells producing plasmid-borne AlaE, accumulated approximately 200% and 50%, respectively, of the [3H]l-alanine detected in MLA301 cells, suggesting that AlaE exports l-alanine. When 200 mmol/L l-alanine-loaded inverted membrane vesicles prepared from MLA301ΔalaE/pAlaE were placed in a solution containing 200 mmol/L or 0.34 μmol/L l-alanine, energy-dependent [3H]l-alanine accumulation occurred under either condition. This energy-dependent uphill accumulation of [3H]l-alanine was strongly inhibited in the presence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone but not by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, suggesting that the AlaE-mediated l-alanine extrusion was driven by proton motive force. Based on these results, physiological roles of the l-alanine exporter are discussed. PMID:26073055

  8. Characterization of the l-alanine exporter AlaE of Escherichia coli and its potential role in protecting cells from a toxic-level accumulation of l-alanine and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seryoung; Ihara, Kohei; Katsube, Satoshi; Hori, Hatsuhiro; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Yoneyama, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    We previously reported that the alaE gene of Escherichia coli encodes the l-alanine exporter AlaE. The objective of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of the AlaE exporter. The minimum inhibitory concentration of l-alanine and l-alanyl-l-alanine in alaE-deficient l-alanine-nonmetabolizing cells MLA301ΔalaE was 4- and >4000-fold lower, respectively, than in the alaE-positive parent cells MLA301, suggesting that AlaE functions as an efflux pump to avoid a toxic-level accumulation of intracellular l-alanine and its derivatives. Furthermore, the growth of the alaE-deficient mutant derived from the l-alanine-metabolizing strain was strongly inhibited in the presence of a physiological level of l-alanyl-l-alanine. Intact MLA301ΔalaE and MLA301ΔalaE/pAlaE cells producing plasmid-borne AlaE, accumulated approximately 200% and 50%, respectively, of the [(3) H]l-alanine detected in MLA301 cells, suggesting that AlaE exports l-alanine. When 200 mmol/L l-alanine-loaded inverted membrane vesicles prepared from MLA301ΔalaE/pAlaE were placed in a solution containing 200 mmol/L or 0.34 μmol/L l-alanine, energy-dependent [(3) H]l-alanine accumulation occurred under either condition. This energy-dependent uphill accumulation of [(3) H]l-alanine was strongly inhibited in the presence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone but not by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, suggesting that the AlaE-mediated l-alanine extrusion was driven by proton motive force. Based on these results, physiological roles of the l-alanine exporter are discussed. PMID:26073055

  9. Glutathione S-transferase class {pi} polymorphism in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Aivaliotis, M.J.; Cantu, T.; Gilligan, R.

    1995-02-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) comprises a family of isozymes with broad substrate specificities. One or more GST isozymes are present in most animal tissues and function in several detoxification pathways through the conjugation of reduced glutathione with various electrophiles, thereby reducing their potential toxicity. Four soluble GST isozymes encoded by genes on different chromosomes have been identified in humans. The acidic class pi GST, GSTP (previously designated GST-3), is widely distributed in adult tissues and appears to be the only GST isozyme present in leukocytes and placenta. Previously reported electrophoretic analyses of erythrocyte and leukocyte extracts revealed single bands of activity, which differed slightly in mobility between the two cell types, or under other conditions, a two-banded pattern. To our knowledge, no genetically determined polymorphisms have previously been reported in GSTP from any species. We now report a polymorphism of GSTP in baboon leukocytes, and present family data that verifies autosomal codominant inheritance. 14 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Recombinant baculovirus vectors expressing glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Davies, A H; Jowett, J B; Jones, I M

    1993-08-01

    Recombinant baculoviruses are a popular means of producing heterologous protein in eukaryotic cells. Purification of recombinant proteins away from the insect cell background can, however, remain an obstacle for many developments. Recently, prokaryotic fusion protein expression systems have been developed allowing single-step purification of the heterologous protein and specific proteolytic cleavage of the affinity tag moiety from the desired antigen. Here we report the introduction of these attributes to the baculovirus system. "Baculo-GEX" vectors enable baculovirus production of fusion proteins with the above advantages, but in a eukaryotic post-translational processing environment. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) fusions are stable cytoplasmic proteins in insect cells and may therefore be released by sonication alone, avoiding the solubility problems and detergent requirements of bacterial systems. Thus large amounts of authentic antigen may be purified in a single, non-denaturing step. PMID:7763917

  11. Polymers from amino acids: development of dual ester-urethane melt condensation approach and mechanistic aspects.

    PubMed

    Anantharaj, S; Jayakannan, M

    2012-08-13

    A new dual ester-urethane melt condensation methodology for biological monomers-amino acids was developed to synthesize new classes of thermoplastic polymers under eco-friendly and solvent-free polymerization approach. Naturally abundant L-amino acids were converted into dual functional ester-urethane monomers by tailor-made synthetic approach. Direct polycondensation of these amino acid monomers with commercial diols under melt condition produced high molecular weight poly(ester-urethane)s. The occurrence of the dual ester-urethane process and the structure of the new poly(ester-urethane)s were confirmed by (1)H and (13)C NMR. The new dual ester-urethane condensation approach was demonstrated for variety of amino acids: glycine, β-alanine, L-alanine, L-leucine, L-valine, and L-phenylalanine. MALDI-TOF-MS end group analysis confirmed that the amino acid monomers were thermally stable under the melt polymerization condition. The mechanism of melt process and the kinetics of the polycondensation were studied by model reactions and it was found that the amino acid monomer was very special in the sense that their ester and urethane functionality could be selectively reacted by polymerization temperature or catalyst. The new polymers were self-organized as β-sheet in aqueous or organic solvents and their thermal properties such as glass transition temperature and crystallinity could be readily varied using different l-amino acid monomers or diols in the feed. Thus, the current investigation opens up new platform of research activates for making thermally stable and renewable engineering thermoplastics from natural resource amino acids. PMID:22713137

  12. Polarized Raman spectra and intensities of aliphatic amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himmler, Hans J.; Eysel, Hans H.

    1989-01-01

    Raman spectra of aliphatic α- L-amino acids, glycine, alanine, and valine were re-investigated both in aqueous solution and deuterium oxide solution. The spectra were taken of the zwitterionic and of the completely deprotonated form of the amino acids. Spectra of leucine and isoleucine were studied in water at the isoelectric point. Spectra were recorded both with parallel and perpendicular polarization and the isotropic and anisotropic scattering components were isolated. The integrated intensities of CH stretch, CC stretch and carboxylate bend vibrations are discussed. Linear relations between the number of CC and CH bonds and the total scattered intensity in the appropriate spectral regions are observed. The sum over the carboxylate modes shows characteristic intensities for the first three members of the aliphatic amino acids. An increase of isotropic scattering of ϱ co 2 near 510 cm -1 with increasing chain length of the amino acid (or with increasing concentration) is interpreted as the result of micelle formation.

  13. Plant and Soil Emissions of Amines and Amino Acids: A Source of Secondary Aerosol Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, M. L.; Doskey, P. V.; Pypker, T. G.

    2011-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is the most abundant alkaline gas in the atmosphere and forms secondary aerosol by neutralizing sulfuric and nitric acids that are released during combustion of fossil fuels. Ammonia is primarily emitted by cropping and livestock operations. However, C2 and C3 amines (pKb 3.3-3.4), which are stronger bases than NH3 (pKb 4.7) have been observed in nuclei mode aerosol that is the precursor to secondary aerosol. Mixtures of amines and amino acids have been identified in diverse environments in aerosol, fog water, cloud water, the soluble fraction of precipitation, and in dew. Glycine (pKb 4.2), serine (pKb 4.8) and alanine (pKb 3.7 and 4.1 for the D and L forms, respectively) are typically the most abundant species. The only reported values of gas-phase glycine, serine and alanine were in marine air and ranged from 6-14 pptv. The origin of atmospheric amines and amino acids has not been fully identified, although sources are likely similar to NH3. Nitrate assimilation in plants forms glycine, serine, and L-alanine, while D-alanine is present in bacterial cell walls. Glycine is converted to serine during C3 plant photorespiration, producing CO2 and NH3. Bacteria metabolize glycine and alanine to methylamine and ethylamine via decarboxylation. Likely sources of amino acids are plants and bacteria, thus concentrations near continental sources are likely greater than those measured in marine air. The overall goal of the research is to examine seasonal variations and relationships between the exchange of CO2, NH3, amines, and amino acids with a corn/soybean rotation in the Midwest Corn Belt. The study presents gaseous profiles of organic amine compounds from various species of vegetation using a mist chamber trapping technique and analysis of the derivatized species by high pressure liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Amino acid and amine profiles were obtained for red oak (Quercus rubra), sugar maple (Acer saccharinum), white pine (Pinus

  14. Functional analysis and localisation of a delta-class glutathione S-transferase from Sarcoptes scabiei.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, Eva U; Ljunggren, Erland L; Morrison, David A; Mattsson, Jens G

    2005-01-01

    The mite Sarcoptes scabiei causes sarcoptic mange, or scabies, a disease that affects both animals and humans worldwide. Our interest in S. scabiei led us to further characterise a glutathione S-transferase. This multifunctional enzyme is a target for vaccine and drug development in several parasitic diseases. The S. scabiei glutathione S-transferase open reading frame reported here is 684 nucleotides long and yields a protein with a predicted molecular mass of 26 kDa. Through phylogenetic analysis the enzyme was classified as a delta-class glutathione S-transferase, and our paper is the first to report that delta-class glutathione S-transferases occur in organisms other than insects. The recombinant S. scabiei glutathione S-transferase was expressed in Escherichia coli via three different constructs and purified for biochemical analysis. The S. scabiei glutathione S-transferase was active towards the substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, though the positioning of fusion partners influenced the kinetic activity of the enzyme. Polyclonal antibodies raised against S. scabiei glutathione S-transferase specifically localised the enzyme to the integument of the epidermis and cavities surrounding internal organs in adult parasites. However, some minor staining of parasite intestines was observed. No staining was seen in host tissues, nor could we detect any antibody response against S. scabiei glutathione S-transferase in sera from naturally S. scabiei infected dogs or pigs. Additionally, the polyclonal sera raised against recombinant S. scabiei glutathione S-transferase readily detected a protein from mites, corresponding to the predicted size of native glutathione S-transferase. PMID:15619514

  15. Inducible l-Alanine Exporter Encoded by the Novel Gene ygaW (alaE) in Escherichia coli ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Hatsuhiro; Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Tobe, Ryuta; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Katsumata, Ryoichi

    2011-01-01

    We previously isolated a mutant hypersensitive to l-alanyl-l-alanine from a non-l-alanine-metabolizing Escherichia coli strain and found that it lacked an inducible l-alanine export system. Consequently, this mutant showed a significant accumulation of intracellular l-alanine and a reduction in the l-alanine export rate compared to the parent strain. When the mutant was used as a host to clone a gene(s) that complements the dipeptide-hypersensitive phenotype, two uncharacterized genes, ygaW and ytfF, and two characterized genes, yddG and yeaS, were identified. Overexpression of each gene in the mutant resulted in a decrease in the intracellular l-alanine level and enhancement of the l-alanine export rate in the presence of the dipeptide, suggesting that their products function as exporters of l-alanine. Since ygaW exhibited the most striking impact on both the intra- and the extracellular l-alanine levels among the four genes identified, we disrupted the ygaW gene in the non-l-alanine-metabolizing strain. The resulting isogenic mutant showed the same intra- and extracellular l-alanine levels as observed in the dipeptide-hypersensitive mutant obtained by chemical mutagenesis. When each gene was overexpressed in the wild-type strain, which does not intrinsically excrete alanine, only the ygaW gene conferred on the cells the ability to excrete alanine. In addition, expression of the ygaW gene was induced in the presence of the dipeptide. On the basis of these results, we concluded that YgaW is likely to be the physiologically most relevant exporter for l-alanine in E. coli and proposed that the gene be redesignated alaE for alanine export. PMID:21531828

  16. Solvation free energies of alanine peptides: the effect of flexibility.

    PubMed

    Kokubo, Hironori; Harris, Robert C; Asthagiri, Dilipkumar; Pettitt, B Montgomery

    2013-12-27

    The electrostatic (ΔGel), van der Waals cavity-formation (ΔGvdw), and total (ΔG) solvation free energies for 10 alanine peptides ranging in length (n) from 1 to 10 monomers were calculated. The free energies were computed both with fixed, extended conformations of the peptides and again for some of the peptides without constraints. The solvation free energies, ΔGel, and components ΔGvdw, and ΔG, were found to be linear in n, with the slopes of the best-fit lines being γel, γvdw, and γ, respectively. Both γel and γ were negative for fixed and flexible peptides, and γvdw was negative for fixed peptides. That γvdw was negative was surprising, as experimental data on alkanes, theoretical models, and MD computations on small molecules and model systems generally suggest that γvdw should be positive. A negative γvdw seemingly contradicts the notion that ΔGvdw drives the initial collapse of the protein when it folds by favoring conformations with small surface areas. When we computed ΔGvdw for the flexible peptides, thereby allowing the peptides to assume natural ensembles of more compact conformations, γvdw was positive. Because most proteins do not assume extended conformations, a ΔGvdw that increases with increasing surface area may be typical for globular proteins. An alternative hypothesis is that the collapse is driven by intramolecular interactions. We find few intramolecular H-bonds but show that the intramolecular van der Waals interaction energy is more favorable for the flexible than for the extended peptides, seemingly favoring this hypothesis. The large fluctuations in the vdw energy may make attributing the collapse of the peptide to this intramolecular energy difficult. PMID:24328358

  17. Solvation Free Energies of Alanine Peptides: The Effect of Flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Kokubo, Hironori; Harris, Robert C.; Asthigiri, Dilipkumar; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2014-01-01

    The electrostatic (ΔGel), van der Waals cavity-formation (ΔGvdw), and total (ΔG) solvation free energies for 10 alanine peptides ranging in length (n) from 1 to 10 monomers were calculated. The free energies were computed both with fixed, extended conformations of the peptides and again for some of the peptides without constraints. The solvation free energies, ΔGel, and components ΔGvdw, and ΔG, were found to be linear in n, with the slopes of the best-fit lines being γel, γvdw, and γ, respectively. Both γel and γ were negative for fixed and flexible peptides, and γvdw was negative for fixed peptides. That γvdw was negative was surprising, as experimental data on alkanes, theoretical models, and MD computations on small molecules and model systems generally suggest that γvdw should be positive. A negative γvdw seemingly contradicts the notion that ΔGvdw drives the initial collapse of the protein when it folds by favoring conformations with small surface areas. When we computed ΔGvdw for the flexible peptides, thereby allowing the peptides to assume natural ensembles of more compact conformations, γvdw was positive. Because most proteins do not assume extended conformations, a ΔGvdw that increases with increasing surface area may be typical for globular proteins. An alternative hypothesis is that the collapse is driven by intramolecular interactions. We find few intramolecular h-bonds but show that the intramolecular van der Waal’s interaction energy is more favorable for the flexible than for the extended peptides, seemingly favoring this hypothesis. The large fluctuations in the vdw energy may make attributing the collapse of the peptide to this intramolecular energy difficult. PMID:24328358

  18. Solvation Free Energies of Alanine Peptides: The Effect of Flexibility

    SciTech Connect

    Kokubo, Hironori; Harris, Robert C.; Asthagiri, Dilip; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2013-12-03

    The electrostatic (?Gel), cavity-formation (?Gvdw), and total (?G) solvation free energies for 10 alanine peptides ranging in length (n) from 1 to 10 monomers were calculated. The free energies were computed both with xed, extended conformations of the peptides and again for some of the peptides without constraints. The solvation free energies, ?Gel, ?Gvdw, and ?G, were found to be linear in n, with the slopes of the best-fit lines being gamma_el, gamma_vdw, and gamma, respectively. Both gamma_el and gamma were negative for fixed and flexible peptides, and gamma_vdw was negative for fixed peptides. That gamma_vdw was negative was surprising, as experimental data on alkanes, theoretical models, and MD computations on small molecules and model systems generally suggest that gamma_vdw should be positive. A negative gamma_vdw seemingly contradicts the notion that ?Gvdw drives the initial collapse of the protein when it folds by favoring conformations with small surface areas, but when we computed ?Gvdw for the flexible peptides, thereby allowing the peptides to assume natural ensembles of more compact conformations, gamma-vdw was positive. Because most proteins do not assume extended conformations, a ?Gvdw that increases with increasing surface area may be typical for globular proteins. An alternative hypothesis is that the collapse is driven by intramolecular interactions. We show that the intramolecular van der Waal's interaction energy is more favorable for the flexible than for the extended peptides, seemingly favoring this hypothesis, but the large fluctuations in this energy may make attributing the collapse of the peptide to this intramolecular energy difficult.

  19. Enrichment of Non-Terrestrial L-Proteinogenic Amino Acids by Aqueous Alteration on the Tagish Lake Meteorite Parent Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Burton, Aaron S.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Herd, Christopher D. K.

    2012-01-01

    The distribution and isotopic and enantiomeric compositions of amino acids found in three distinct fragments of the Tagish Lake C2-type carbonaceous chondrite were investigated via liquid chromatography fluorescence detection time-of-flight mass spectrometry and gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Large L-enantiomeric excesses (L(sub ee) approx. 43 to 59%) of the a-hydrogen aspartic and glutamic amino acids were measured in Tagish Lake, whereas alanine, another alpha-hydrogen protein amino acid, was found to be nearly racemic (D approx. L) using both techniques. Carbon isotope measurements of D- and L-aspartic acid and D- and L-alanine in Tagish Lake fall well outside of the terrestrial range and indicate that the measured aspartic acid enantioenrichment is indigenous to the meteorite. Alternate explanations for the Lexcesses of aspartic acid such as interference from other compounds present in the sample, analytical biases, or terrestrial amino acid contamination were investigated and rejected. These results can be explained by differences in the solid-solution phase behavior of aspartic acid, which can form conglomerate enantiopure solids during crystallization, and alanine, which can only form racemic crystals.

  20. β-Amino acid and amino-alcohol conjugation of a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) imparts hydrogelation displaying remarkable biostability, biocompatibility, and anti-inflammatory properties.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Joydeb; Das, Mahua Rani; Deb, Jolly; Jana, Siddhartha Sankar; Dastidar, Parthasarathi

    2013-08-13

    A well-known nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), namely, naproxen (Np), was conjugated with β-alanine and various combinations of amino alcohols and l-alanine. Quite a few bioconjugates, thus synthesized, were capable of gelling pure water, NaCl solution (0.9 wt %), and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (pH 7.4). The hydrogels were characterized by rheology and electron microscopy. Hydrogelation was probed by FT-IR and temperature-variable (1)H NMR studies. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction (SXRD) of a nonhydrogelator and a hydrogelator in the series established a useful structure-property (gelation) correlation. MTT assay of the hydrogelators in the mouse macrophage RAW 264.7 cell line showed excellent biocompatibility. The prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) assay of the hydrogelators revealed their anti-inflammatory response, which was comparable to that of the parent NSAID naproxen sodium (Ns). PMID:23859562

  1. Photosensitizing effect of cations on amino acids and peptides.

    PubMed

    Bogdanova, N P; Khenokh, M A

    1969-01-01

    In connection with a study of the chemical evolution of abiogenically synthesized organic compounds on primitive Earth and the physical conditions of other planets, this paper reports the experimental results obtained by the photolysis of solutions of aliphatic amino acids (glycine, alanine, valine, leucine, n. leucine) and peptides in the atmosphere of the air, N2, Ar and CO2 in the presence of the most simple photocatalyzers-cations of sulphates. The evidence shows that the photochemical conversion of NH2 acids depends on the content of the atmosphere. The decay of NH2-group is most active in air. N2 and Ar exert no significant influence on deamination, whereas in the atmosphere of CO2 the formation of ammonia in valine, for example, was only 29 per cent of its total amount during photolysis in the air. Cu2+ and Fe2+ catalyzed while Al3+ inhibited the ammonia excretion. The formation of acetaldehyde during alanine photolysis was actually independent from the atmosphere of N2 and was inhibited in Ar and CO2. Oxydative processes inducing the formation of glyoxalic acid and formaldehyde were sharply inhibited in Ar, N2 and CO2. Under the influence of ultraviolet light of the decay of NH2-acids is also accompanied by the formation of new NH2-acids. The photosensitizing effect of cations induces a rupture of -CO-NH-bonds in peptides and, provided heavy radiation doses, prevents the formation of new NH2-acids. The longer the dipeptide chain, the more significant the quantum yield of its decomposition. The photolysis of dipeptides, leading to their decay, does not necessarily induce a hydrolytic rupture of -CO-NH-bonds resulting in the formation of three amino acids. The results obtained permit approaching problems concerning the effect of the gas content of the atmosphere and various cations (photocatalyzers) on photolytic conversion of abiogenically synthesized and biogenically significant substances, amino acids for example, at the action of ultraviolet light. PMID

  2. Titration of Alanine Monitored by NMR Spectroscopy: A Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Francis J.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The experiment described here involves simultaneous monitoring of pH and NMR chemical shifts during an aqueous titration of alpha- and beta-alanine. This experiment is designed for use in an undergraduate biochemistry course. (MR)

  3. PARTICIPATION OF Y89 AND Y97 IN THE CONJUGATING ACTIVITY OF Drosophila melanogaster GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE D3 (DmGSTD3).

    PubMed

    Vignesvaran, Kithalakshmi; Alias, Zazali

    2016-07-01

    Drosophila melanogaster glutathione S-transferase D3 (DmGSTD3) has a shorter amino acid sequence as compared to other GSTs known in the fruit flies. This is due to the 15 amino acid N-terminal truncation in which normally active amino acid residue is located. The work has made use of homology modeling to visualize the arrangement of amino acid side chains in the glutathione (GSH) substrate cavity. The identified amino acids were then replaced with amino acids without functional groups in the side chains and the mutants were analyzed kinetically. Homology modeling revealed that the side chains of Y89 and Y97 were shown facing toward the substrate cavity proposing their possible role in catalyzing the conjugation. Y97A and Y89A GSH gave large changes in Km (twofold increase), Vmax (fivefold reduction), and Kcat /Km values for GSH suggesting their significant role in the conjugation reaction. The replacement at either positions has not affected the affinity of the enzyme toward 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as no significant change in values of Kmax was observed. The replacement, however, had significantly reduced the catalytic efficiency of both mutants with (Kcat /Km )(GSH) and (Kcat /Km )(CDNB) of eight- and twofold reduction. The recombinant DmGSTD3 has shown no activity toward 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene, 2,4-hexadienal, 2,4-heptadienal, p-nitrobenzyl chloride, ethacrynic acid, and sulfobromophthalein. Therefore, it was evident that DmGSTD3 has made use of distal amino acids Y97 and Y89 for GSH conjugation. PMID:27075600

  4. Cloning and characterization of a complementary deoxyribonucleic acid encoding haploid-specific alanine-rich acidic protein located on chromosome-X.

    PubMed

    Uchida, K; Tsuchida, J; Tanaka, H; Koga, M; Nishina, Y; Nozaki, M; Yoshinaga, K; Toshimori, K; Matsumiya, K; Okuyama, A; Nishimune, Y

    2000-10-01

    We have isolated a cDNA clone encoding a germ cell-specific protein from an expression cDNA library prepared from the mouse testis using testis-specific polyclonal antibodies. Northern blot analysis showed a transcript of 1.1 kilobases exclusively expressed in haploid germ cells of the testis. Sequence analysis of the cDNA revealed one long open reading frame consisting of 238 deduced amino acids, rich in basic amino acids in the N-terminal one-third that also contained the nuclear localization signal, and rich in acidic amino acids, including two type of acidic alanine-rich repeats, in the rest of the deduced protein. The protein having a molecular weight of approximately 55 kDa and an isoelectric point of pH 4.3-4.7 was also exclusively detected in the testis by Western blot analysis. As the cDNA was located on chromosome-X, Halap-X (haploid-specific alanine-rich acidic protein located on chromosome-X) was proposed for the name of the protein encoded by the cDNA. Immunohistochemical observation revealed that the Halap-X protein was predominantly present in the nucleoplasm of round spermatids but gradually decreased as spermatids matured, followed by the subsequent appearance in the cytoplasm of elongating spermatids. Thus, the Halap-X protein was transferred from the nuclei to the cytoplasm during the spermatid maturation when the chromatin condensation and transformation of the nuclei occurred. The Halap-X may facilitate specific association of nuclear DNA with some basic chromosomal proteins and play important roles in the process of chromatin condensation. PMID:10993819

  5. Adsorption of amino acids and glucose by sediments of Resurrection Bay, Alaska, USA: Functional group effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrichs, Susan M.; Sugai, Susan F.

    1993-02-01

    The adsorption of amino acids and glucose was investigated in sediments from Resurrection Bay, Alaska. Adsorption of the basic amino acid lysine was greater than adsorption of glutamic acid, alanine, leucine, or glucose. Formaldehyde and heat treatments were used to separate adsorption from biological uptake, but can alter adsorption significantly; formaldehyde treatment, followed by a seawater rinse, was the most satisfactory. Much of the rapid amino acid adsorption by these sediments was due to the formation of ionic bonds, since adsorbed amino acids could be extracted using concentrated solutions of amino acid, cesium chloride, sodium citrate, ammonium chloride, or sodium acetate. However, most amino acid adsorption was not reversible by ion exchange solutions, indicating that additional processes or chemical reactions occur which result in irreversible binding to sediment. Consistent with literature reports of the negative surface charge of marine particulate matter, lysine (with a net positive charge) was adsorbed to the greatest extent and had the largest cation-exchangeable adsorption. However, negatively charged amino acid functional groups also influenced adsorption. Chemical modification of sediments with reagents reactive with aldehydes decreased lysine adsorption. This suggests that reactive functional groups of sediment organic matter contribute to adsorption, consistent with a melanoidintype reaction. An estimate of the rate of amino acid adsorption indicates that adsorption could produce a significant amount of the total refractory sediment organic nitrogen.

  6. Composition of antioxidants and amino acids in Stevia leaf infusions.

    PubMed

    Periche, Angela; Koutsidis, Georgios; Escriche, Isabel

    2014-03-01

    Stevia, a non-caloric natural sweetener with beneficial properties and considerable antioxidants and amino acids, is increasingly consumed as an infusion. This work evaluates the influence of the conditions (temperature: 50, 70 or 90 °C and time: 1, 5, 20 or 40 min) applied to obtain Stevia infusions, on antioxidants (total phenols, flavonoids and antioxidant activity) and amino acids. The total concentration of the eleven amino acids found was 11.70 mg/g in dried leaves and from 6.84 to 9.11 mg/g per gram of Stevia in infusions. However, infusions showed higher levels of certain amino acids (alanine, asparagine, leucine and proline), and greater values of the three antioxidant parameters in comparison with dry leaves. Temperature had more influence (minimum values at 50 °C and maximum at 90 °C) than time in the case of antioxidants. At 90 °C there were no important increases in the extraction of antioxidant compounds after 5 min; each gram of Stevia had 117 mg trolox (total antioxidant activity), 90 mg gallic acid (total phenols) and 56 mg catechin equivalents (flavonoids). Varying the temperature and time conditions no notable differences were observed in the concentrations of the majority of amino acids. However, the infusion treatment at 90 °C for 5 min was the best, as it gave the highest yield of 8 of the 11 amino acids. Therefore, with respect to the compounds analyzed in this study, the best way to obtain Stevia leaf infusions is the same as the domestic process, almost boiling water for a short time. PMID:24293005

  7. Activities of the peptidyl transferase center of ribosomes lacking protein L27

    PubMed Central

    Maracci, Cristina; Wohlgemuth, Ingo; Rodnina, Marina V.

    2015-01-01

    The ribosome is the molecular machine responsible for protein synthesis in all living organisms. Its catalytic core, the peptidyl transferase center (PTC), is built of rRNA, although several proteins reach close to the inner rRNA shell. In the Escherichia coli ribosome, the flexible N-terminal tail of the ribosomal protein L27 contacts the A- and P-site tRNA. Based on computer simulations of the PTC and on previous biochemical evidence, the N-terminal α-amino group of L27 was suggested to take part in the peptidyl-transfer reaction. However, the contribution of this group to catalysis has not been tested experimentally. Here we investigate the role of L27 in peptide-bond formation using fast kinetics approaches. We show that the rate of peptide-bond formation at physiological pH, both with aminoacyl-tRNA or with the substrate analog puromycin, is independent of the presence of L27; furthermore, translation of natural mRNAs is only marginally affected in the absence of L27. The pH dependence of the puromycin reaction is unaltered in the absence of L27, indicating that the N-terminal α-amine is not the ionizing group taking part in catalysis. Likewise, L27 is not required for the peptidyl-tRNA hydrolysis during termination. Thus, apart from the known effect on subunit association, which most likely explains the phenotype of the deletion strains, L27 does not appear to be a key player in the core mechanism of peptide-bond formation on the ribosome. PMID:26475831

  8. Multiple isoforms of mitochondrial glutathione S-transferases and their differential induction under oxidative stress.

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Haider; Robin, Marie-Anne; Fang, Ji-Kang; Avadhani, Narayan G

    2002-01-01

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain, which consumes approx. 85-90% of the oxygen utilized by cells, is a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mitochondrial genetic and biosynthetic systems are highly susceptible to ROS toxicity. Intramitochondrial glutathione (GSH) is a major defence against ROS. In the present study, we have investigated the nature of the glutathione S-transferase (GST) pool in mouse liver mitochondria, and have purified three distinct forms of GST: GSTA1-1 and GSTA4-4 of the Alpha family, and GSTM1-1 belonging to the Mu family. The mitochondrial localization of these multiple GSTs was confirmed using a combination of immunoblot analysis, protease protection assay, enzyme activity, N-terminal amino acid sequencing, peptide mapping and confocal immunofluorescence analysis. Additionally, exogenously added 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), a reactive byproduct of lipid peroxidation, to COS cells differentially affected the cytosolic and mitochondrial GSH pools in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Our results show that HNE-mediated mitochondrial oxidative stress caused a decrease in the GSH pool, increased membrane lipid peroxidation, and increased levels of GSTs, glutathione peroxidase and Hsp70 (heat-shock protein 70). The HNE-induced oxidative stress persisted for longer in the mitochondrial compartment, where the recovery of GSH pool was slower than in the cytosolic compartment. Our study, for the first time, demonstrates the presence in mitochondria of multiple forms of GSTs that show molecular properties similar to those of their cytosolic counterparts. Our results suggest that mitochondrial GSTs may play an important role in defence against chemical and oxidative stress. PMID:12020353

  9. AMP-activated protein kinase regulates nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase expression in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Brandauer, Josef; Vienberg, Sara G; Andersen, Marianne A; Ringholm, Stine; Risis, Steve; Larsen, Per S; Kristensen, Jonas M; Frøsig, Christian; Leick, Lotte; Fentz, Joachim; Jørgensen, Sebastian; Kiens, Bente; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F P; Richter, Erik A; Zierath, Juleen R; Goodyear, Laurie J; Pilegaard, Henriette; Treebak, Jonas T

    2013-01-01

    Deacetylases such as sirtuins (SIRTs) convert NAD to nicotinamide (NAM). Nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase (Nampt) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the NAD salvage pathway responsible for converting NAM to NAD to maintain cellular redox state. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) increases SIRT activity by elevating NAD levels. As NAM directly inhibits SIRTs, increased Nampt activation or expression could be a metabolic stress response. Evidence suggests that AMPK regulates Nampt mRNA content, but whether repeated AMPK activation is necessary for increasing Nampt protein levels is unknown. To this end, we assessed whether exercise training- or 5-amino-1-β-d-ribofuranosyl-imidazole-4-carboxamide (AICAR)-mediated increases in skeletal muscle Nampt abundance are AMPK dependent. One-legged knee-extensor exercise training in humans increased Nampt protein by 16% (P < 0.05) in the trained, but not the untrained leg. Moreover, increases in Nampt mRNA following acute exercise or AICAR treatment (P < 0.05 for both) were maintained in mouse skeletal muscle lacking a functional AMPK α2 subunit. Nampt protein was reduced in skeletal muscle of sedentary AMPK α2 kinase dead (KD), but 6.5 weeks of endurance exercise training increased skeletal muscle Nampt protein to a similar extent in both wild-type (WT) (24%) and AMPK α2 KD (18%) mice. In contrast, 4 weeks of daily AICAR treatment increased Nampt protein in skeletal muscle in WT mice (27%), but this effect did not occur in AMPK α2 KD mice. In conclusion, functional α2-containing AMPK heterotrimers are required for elevation of skeletal muscle Nampt protein, but not mRNA induction. These findings suggest AMPK plays a post-translational role in the regulation of skeletal muscle Nampt protein abundance, and further indicate that the regulation of cellular energy charge and nutrient sensing is mechanistically related. PMID:23918774

  10. Glutathione S-transferases in rat olfactory epithelium: purification, molecular properties and odorant biotransformation.

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Arie, N; Khen, M; Lancet, D

    1993-01-01

    The olfactory epithelium is exposed to a variety of xenobiotic chemicals, including odorants and airborne toxic compounds. Recently, two novel, highly abundant, olfactory-specific biotransformation enzymes have been identified: cytochrome P-450olf1 and olfactory UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT(olf)). The latter is a phase II biotransformation enzyme which catalyses the glucuronidation of alcohols, thiols, amines and carboxylic acids. Such covalent modification, which markedly affects lipid solubility and agonist potency, may be particularly important in the rapid termination of odorant signals. We report here the identification and characterization of a second olfactory phase II biotransformation enzyme, a glutathione S-transferase (GST). The olfactory epithelial cytosol shows the highest GST activity among the extrahepatic tissues examined. Significantly, olfactory epithelium had an activity 4-7 times higher than in other airway tissues, suggesting a role for this enzyme in chemoreception. The olfactory GST has been affinity-purified to homogeneity, and shown by h.p.l.c. and N-terminal amino acid sequencing to constitute mainly the Yb1 and Yb2 subunits, different from most other tissues that have mixtures of more enzyme classes. The identity of the olfactory enzymes was confirmed by PCR cloning and restriction enzyme analysis. Most importantly, the olfactory GSTs were found to catalyse glutathione conjugation of several odorant classes, including many unsaturated aldehydes and ketones, as well as epoxides. Together with UGT(olf), olfactory GST provides the necessary broad coverage of covalent modification capacity, which may be crucial for the acuity of the olfactory process. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8503873

  11. Methods for purification of glutathione transferases in the earthworm genus Eisenia, and their characterization.

    PubMed

    Borgeraas, J; Nilsen, K; Stenersen, J

    1996-06-01

    Isoenzymes of glutathione transferase (GST) were partially purified from the earthworm species Eisenia andrei and E. veneta using affinity chromatography followed by ion exchange chromatography and reversed-phase HPLC. In E. veneta, five activity peaks, named EvGST Ia, Ib, II, III and IV, were separated by anion exchange chromatography. The GSTs in E. andrei were resolved by cation exchange chromatography into six groups, named EaGST I-VI. Using reversed-phase HPLC, the affinity-purified GSTs from E. andrei and E. veneta were resolved into 14 subunits, named Ea1-Ea14 and Ev1-Ev14, respectively. EaGST I, II, IV and EvGST Ia were further characterized. These forms displayed different substrate specificity towards the substrates 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB), 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene, ethacrynic acid (ETHA) and cumene hydroperoxide, as well as different subunit composition determined by SDS-PAGE and reversed-phase HPLC. EaGST IV and EvGST Ia showed exceptionally high ETHA activity compared with the other forms. EaGST IV consisted of a homodimeric protein involving subunit Ea6 with an apparent molecular weight of 26.5 kDa, whereas EvGST Ia is composed of two different subunits (Ev9 and Ev10). Amino acid composition and N-terminal analysis of the first 33 residues of Ea6 indicated that the enzyme is most related to the pi class. Subunit Ev10 had 67% identity with Ea6, over the region sequenced (12 residues), but up to 90% identity with GSTs from several nematodes. Exposure of both species to trans-stilbene oxide, 3-methylcholanthrene and phenobarbital for three weeks did not elevate the activity of GST measured with CDNB and ETHA. PMID:8760608

  12. Internal bias field in triglycine sulphate crystals with L-, α-alanine grown at negative temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovidova, S. D.; Rogazinskaya, O. V.; Sidorkin, A. S.; Ionova, E. V.; Kirichenko, A. P.; Bavykin, S. A.

    2010-09-01

    The dielectric and pyroelectric properties of triglycine sulphate (TGS) crystals with L, α-alanine impurities grown at negative temperatures have been investigated. It is shown that a lower impurity concentration (2 mol % in solution) in this temperature range leads to the formation of internal bias fields of the same order of magnitude (˜800 V/cm) as for TGS crystals grown at T ⩽ 50°C but with an L, α-alanine concentration of 20 mol % in solution.

  13. IR spectroscopic signatures of solid glycine and alanine in astrophysical ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Lazcano, Y.; Maté, B.; Tanarro, I.; Herrero, V.; Escribano, R.

    2012-09-01

    The conversion from solid neutral to zwitterionic glycine (or alanine) is studied using infrared spectroscopy from the point of view of the interactions of this molecule with polar (water) and non-polar (CO2, CH4) surroundings. Such environments could be found on astrophysical matter. Different spectral features are suggested as suitable probes for the presence of glycine (or alanine) in astrophysical media, depending on their form (normal or zwitterionic), temperature, and composition.

  14. Brain amino acid sensing.

    PubMed

    Tsurugizawa, T; Uneyama, H; Torii, K

    2014-09-01

    The 20 different amino acids, in blood as well as in the brain, are strictly maintained at the same levels throughout the day, regardless of food intake. Gastric vagal afferents only respond to free glutamate and sugars, providing recognition of food intake and initiating digestion. Metabolic control of amino acid homeostasis and diet-induced thermogenesis is triggered by this glutamate signalling in the stomach through the gut-brain axis. Rats chronically fed high-sugar and high-fat diets do not develop obesity when a 1% (w/v) monosodium glutamate (MSG) solution is available in a choice paradigm. Deficiency of the essential amino acid lysine (Lys) induced a plasticity in rats in response to Lys. This result shows how the body is able to identify deficient nutrients to maintain homeostasis. This plastic effect is induced by activin A activity in the brain, particularly in certain neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) which is the centre for amino acid homeostasis and appetite. These neurons respond to glutamate signalling in the oral cavity by which umami taste is perceived. They play a quantitative role in regulating ingestion of deficient nutrients, thereby leading to a healthier life. After recovery from malnutrition, rats prefer MSG solutions, which serve as biomarkers for protein nutrition. PMID:25200295

  15. Rational design of mirror-like peptides with alanine regulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Weizhong; Tan, Tingting; Xu, Wei; Xu, Lin; Dong, Na; Ma, Deying; Shan, Anshan

    2016-02-01

    To generate effective antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with good antimicrobial activities and cell selectivity, many synthetic strategies have been implemented to facilitate the development of AMPs. However, these synthetic strategies represent only a small proportion of the methods used for the development of AMPs and are not optimal with the requirements needed for the design of AMPs. In this investigation, we designed a mirror-like structure with a lower charge and a higher number of hydrophobic amino acids. The amino acid sequence of the designed mirror-like peptides was XXYXXXYXXXYXX [X represents L (Leu) and/or A (Ala); Y represents K (Lys)]. These mirror-like peptides displayed antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Hemolysis activity and cytotoxicity, detected by using human red blood cells (hRBCs) and human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293), respectively, demonstrated that the frequency of Ala residues in this structure had a regulatory effect on the high hydrophobic region. In particular, KL4A6 showed a greater antimicrobial potency than the other three mirror-like peptides, folded into an α-helical structure, and displayed the highest therapeutic index, suggesting its good cell selectivity. Observations from fluorescence spectroscopy, flow cytometry, and electron microscopy experiments indicated that KL4A6 exhibited good membrane penetration potential by inducing membrane blebbing, disruption and lysis. Therefore, generating mirror-like peptides is a promising strategy for designing effective AMPs with regions of high hydrophobicity. PMID:26385363

  16. [Alanine solution as enzyme reaction buffer used in A to O blood group conversion].

    PubMed

    Li, Su-Bo; Zhang, Xue; Zhang, Yin-Ze; Tan, Ying-Xia; Bao, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Ying-Li; Ji, Shou-Ping; Gong, Feng; Gao, Hong-Wei

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of alanine solution as α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase enzyme reaction buffer on the enzymatic activity of A antigen. The binding ability of α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase with RBC in different reaction buffer such as alanine solution, glycine solution, normal saline (0.9% NaCl), PBS, PCS was detected by Western blot. The results showed that the efficiency of A to O conversion in alanine solution was similar to that in glycine solution, and Western blot confirmed that most of enzymes blinded with RBC in glycine or alanine solution, but few enzymes blinded with RBC in PBS, PCS or normal saline. The evidences indicated that binding of enzyme with RBC was a key element for A to O blood group conversion, while the binding ability of α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase with RBC in alanine or glycine solution was similar. It is concluded that alanine solution can be used as enzyme reaction buffer in A to O blood group conversion. In this buffer, the α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase is closely blinded with RBC and α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase plays efficient enzymatic activity of A antigen. PMID:24989301

  17. EPR dosimetry of radiotherapy photon beams in inhomogeneous media using alanine films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helge Østerås, Bjørn; Olaug Hole, Eli; Rune Olsen, Dag; Malinen, Eirik

    2006-12-01

    In the current work, EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) dosimetry using alanine films (134 µm thick) was utilized for dose measurements in inhomogeneous phantoms irradiated with radiotherapy photon beams. The main phantom material was PMMA, while either Styrofoam or aluminium was introduced as an inhomogeneity. The phantoms were irradiated to a maximum dose of about 30 Gy with 6 or 15 MV photons. The performance of the alanine film dosimeters was investigated and compared to results from ion chamber dosimetry, Monte Carlo simulations and radiotherapy treatment planning calculations. It was found that the alanine film dosimeters had a linear dose response above approximately 5 Gy, while a background signal obscured the response at lower dose levels. For doses between 5 and 60 Gy, the standard deviation of single alanine film dose estimates was about 2%. The alanine film dose estimates yielded results comparable to those from the Monte Carlo simulations and the ion chamber measurements, with absolute differences between estimates in the order of 1 15%. The treatment planning calculations exhibited limited applicability. The current work shows that alanine film dosimetry is a method suitable for estimating radiotherapeutical doses and for dose measurements in inhomogeneous media.

  18. Association of Alanine Aminotransferase and Periodontitis: A Cross-Sectional Analysis—NHANES 2009–2012

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, R. Constance; Sambamoorthi, Usha; Jurevic, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Alanine Aminotransferase is an enzyme associated with not only liver diseases, liver conditions, and metabolic syndrome, but also inflammation. Periodontitis is associated with increased cytokines and other markers of inflammation. The purpose of this study is to determine if an independent association between Alanine Aminotransferase and periodontitis exists. Methods. Data from the 2009-2010 and 2011-2012 National Health and Nutrition Surveys (NHANES) were combined. Data concerning periodontitis and Alanine Aminotransferase were extracted and analyzed with Rao Scott Chi-square and logistic regressions. Serum Alanine Aminotransferase was dichotomized at 40 units/liter, and periodontitis was dichotomized to the presence or absence of periodontitis. Results. In bivariate Chi-square analyses, periodontitis and Alanine Aminotransferase were associated (p = 0.0360) and remained significant in unadjusted logistic regression (OR = 1.30 [95% CI: 1.02, 1.65]). However, when other known risk factors of periodontitis were included in the analyses, the relationship attenuated and failed to reach significance (adjusted OR = 1.17 [95% CI: 0.85, 1.60]). Conclusion. Our study adds to the literature a positive but attenuated association of serum Alanine Aminotransferase with periodontitis which failed to reach significance when other known, strong risk factors of periodontitis were included in the analysis. PMID:26981311

  19. Energetics of the molecular interactions of L-alanine and L-serine with xylitol, D-sorbitol, and D-mannitol in aqueous solutions at 298.15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezhevoi, I. N.; Badelin, V. G.

    2013-04-01

    Integral enthalpies of dissolution Δsol H m of L-alanine and L-serine are measured via the calorimetry of dissolution in aqueous solutions of xylitol, D-sorbitol, and D-mannitol. Standard enthalpies of dissolution (Δsol H ○) and the transfer (Δtr H ○) of amino acids from water to binary solvent are calculated from the experimental data. Using the McMillan-Mayer theory, enthalpy coefficients of pairwise interactions h xy of amino acids with molecules of polyols are calculated that are negative. The obtained results are discussed within the theory of the prevalence of different types of interactions in mixed solutions and the effect of the structural features of interacting biomolecules on the thermochemical parameters of dissolution of amino acids.

  20. Nuclear translocation of glutathione S-transferase {pi} is mediated by a non-classical localization signal

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakatsu, Miho; Goto, Shinji; Yoshida, Takako; Urata, Yoshishige; Li, Tao-Sheng

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} Nuclear translocation of GST{pi} is abrogated by the deletion of the last 16 amino acid residues in the carboxy-terminal region, indicating that residues 195-208 of GST{pi} are required for nuclear translocation. {yields} The lack of a contiguous stretch of positively charged amino acid residues within the carboxy-terminal region of GST{pi}, suggests that the nuclear translocation of GST{pi} is mediated by a non-classical nuclear localization signal. {yields} An in vitro transport assay shows that the nuclear translocation of GST{pi} is dependent on cytosolic factors and ATP. -- Abstract: Glutathione S-transferase {pi} (GST{pi}), a member of the GST family of multifunctional enzymes, is highly expressed in human placenta and involved in the protection of cellular components against electrophilic compounds or oxidative stress. We have recently found that GST{pi} is expressed in the cytoplasm, mitochondria, and nucleus in some cancer cells, and that the nuclear expression of GST{pi} appears to correlate with resistance to anti-cancer drugs. Although the mitochondrial targeting signal of GST{pi} was previously identified in the amino-terminal region, the mechanism of nuclear translocation remains completely unknown. In this study, we find that the region of GST{pi}195-208 is critical for nuclear translocation, which is mediated by a novel and non-classical nuclear localization signal. In addition, using an in vitro transport assay, we demonstrate that the nuclear translocation of GST{pi} depends on the cytosolic extract and ATP. Although further experiments are needed to understand in depth the precise mechanism of nuclear translocation of GST{pi}, our results may help to establish more efficient anti-cancer therapy, especially with respect to resistance to anti-cancer drugs.

  1. Isotope labelling of Rubisco subunits provides in vivo information on subcellular biosynthesis and exchange of amino acids between compartments

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Doug K; Laclair, Russell W; Ohlrogge, John B; Shachar-Hill, Yair

    2012-01-01

    The architecture of plant metabolism includes substantial duplication of metabolite pools and enzyme catalyzed reactions in different subcellular compartments. This poses challenges for understanding the regulation of metabolism particularly in primary metabolism and amino acid biosynthesis. To explore the extent to which amino acids are made in single compartments and to gain insight into the metabolic precursors from which they derive, we used steady state 13C labelling and analysed labelling in protein amino acids from plastid and cytosol. Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is a major component of green tissues and its large and small subunits are synthesized from different pools of amino acids in the plastid and cytosol, respectively. Developing Brassica napus embryos were cultured in the presence of [U-13C]-sucrose, [U-13C]-glucose, [U-13C]-glutamine or [U-13C]-alanine to generate proteins. The large subunits (LSU) and small subunits (SSU) of Rubisco were isolated and the labelling in their constituent amino acids was analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Amino acids including alanine, glycine and serine exhibited different 13C enrichment in the LSU and SSU, demonstrating that these pools have different metabolic origins and are not isotopically equilibrated between the plastid and cytosol on the time scale of cellular growth. Potential extensions of this novel approach to other macromolecules, organelles and cell types of eukaryotes are discussed. PMID:22292468

  2. Salinity and pH affect Na+-montmorillonite dissolution and amino acid adsorption: a prebiotic chemistry study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farias, Ana Paula S. F.; Tadayozzi, Yasmin S.; Carneiro, Cristine E. A.; Zaia, Dimas A. M.

    2014-06-01

    The adsorption of amino acids onto minerals in prebiotic seas may have played an important role for their protection against hydrolysis and formation of polymers. In this study, we show that the adsorption of the prebiotic amino acids, glycine (Gly), α-alanine (α-Ala) and β-alanine (β-Ala), onto Na+-montmorillonite was dependent on salinity and pH. Specifically, adsorption decreased from 58.3-88.8 to 0-48.9% when salinity was increased from 10 to 100-150% of modern seawater. This result suggests reduced amino acid adsorption onto minerals in prebiotic seas, which may have been even more saline than the tested conditions. Amino acids also formed complexes with metals in seawater, affecting metal adsorption onto Na+-montmorillonite, and amino acid adsorption was enhanced when added before Na+-montmorillonite was exposed to high saline solutions. Also, the dissolution of Na+-montmorillonite was reduced in the presence of amino acids, with β-Ala being the most effective. Thus, prebiotic chemistry experiments should also consider the integrity of minerals in addition to their adsorption capacity.

  3. Efficient Enzymatic Preparation of (13) N-Labelled Amino Acids: Towards Multipurpose Synthetic Systems.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Eunice S; Gómez-Vallejo, Vanessa; Baz, Zuriñe; Llop, Jordi; López-Gallego, Fernando

    2016-09-12

    Nitrogen-13 can be efficiently produced in biomedical cyclotrons in different chemical forms, and its stable isotopes are present in the majority of biologically active molecules. Hence, it may constitute a convenient alternative to Fluorine-18 and Carbon-11 for the preparation of positron-emitter-labelled radiotracers; however, its short half-life demands for the development of simple, fast, and efficient synthetic processes. Herein, we report the one-pot, enzymatic and non-carrier-added synthesis of the (13) N-labelled amino acids l-[(13) N]alanine, [(13) N]glycine, and l-[(13) N]serine by using l-alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus subtilis, an enzyme that catalyses the reductive amination of α-keto acids by using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) as the redox cofactor and ammonia as the amine source. The integration of both l-alanine dehydrogenase and formate dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii in the same reaction vessel to facilitate the in situ regeneration of NADH during the radiochemical synthesis of the amino acids allowed a 50-fold decrease in the concentration of the cofactor without compromising reaction yields. After optimization of the experimental conditions, radiochemical yields were sufficient to carry out in vivo imaging studies in small rodents. PMID:27515007

  4. Tracer studies on the biosynthesis of amino acids from lactate by Peptostreptococcus elsdenii

    PubMed Central

    Somerville, H. J.; Peel, J. L.

    1967-01-01

    Peptostreptococcus elsdenii, a strict anaerobe from the rumen, was grown on a medium containing yeast extract and [1-14C]- or [2-14C]-lactate. Radioisotope from lactate was found in all cell fractions, but mainly in the protein. The label in the protein fraction was largely confined to a few amino acids: alanine, serine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid and diaminopimelic acid. The alanine, serine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid were separated, purified and degraded to establish the distribution of 14C from lactate within the amino acid molecules. The labelling patterns in alanine and serine suggested their formation from lactate without cleavage of the carbon chain. The pattern in aspartic acid suggested formation by condensation of a C3 unit derived directly from lactate with a C1 unit, probably carbon dioxide. The distribution in glutamic acid was consistent with two possible pathways of formation: (a) by the reactions of the tricarboxylic acid cycle leading from oxaloacetate to 2-oxoglutarate, followed by transamination; (b) by a pathway involving the reaction sequence 2 acetyl-CoA→crotonyl-CoA→glutaconate→glutamate. PMID:6069834

  5. Enzymatic properties of the glycine D-alanine [corrected] aminopeptidase of Aspergillus oryzae and its activity profiles in liquid-cultured mycelia and solid-state rice culture (rice koji).

    PubMed

    Marui, Junichiro; Matsushita-Morita, Mayumi; Tada, Sawaki; Hattori, Ryota; Suzuki, Satoshi; Amano, Hitoshi; Ishida, Hiroki; Yamagata, Youhei; Takeuchi, Michio; Kusumoto, Ken-Ichi

    2012-01-01

    The gdaA gene encoding S12 family glycine-D-alanine aminopeptidase (GdaA) was found in the industrial fungus Aspergillus oryzae. GdaA shares 43% amino acid sequence identity with the D-aminopeptidase of the Gram-negative bacterium Ochrobactrum anthropi. GdaA purified from an A. oryzae gdaA-overexpressing strain exhibited high D-stereospecificity and efficiently released N-terminal glycine and D-alanine of substrates in a highly specific manner. The optimum pH and temperature were 8 to 9 and 40°C, respectively. This enzyme was stable under alkaline conditions at pH 8 to 11 and relatively resistant to acidic conditions until pH 5.0. The chelating reagent EDTA, serine protease inhibitors such as AEBSF, benzamidine, TPCK, and TLCK, and the thiol enzyme inhibitor PCMB inhibited the enzyme. The aminopeptidase inhibitor bestatin did not affect the activity. GdaA was largely responsible for intracellular glycine and D-alanine aminopeptidase activities in A. oryzae during stationary-phase growth in liquid media. In addition, the activity increased in response to the depletion of nitrogen or carbon sources in the growth media, although the GdaA-independent glycine aminopeptidase activity highly increased simultaneously. Aminopeptidases of A. oryzae attract attention because the enzymatic release of a variety of amino acids and peptides is important for the enhancement of the palatability of fermented foods. GdaA activity was found in extracts of a solid-state rice culture of A. oryzae (rice koji), which is widely used as a starter culture for Japanese traditional fermented foods, and was largely responsible for the glycine and D-alanine aminopeptidase activity detected at a pH range of 6 to 9. PMID:22005737

  6. Amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Crabb, J W; West, K A; Dodson, W S; Hulmes, J D

    2001-05-01

    Amino acid analysis (AAA) is one of the best methods to quantify peptides and proteins. Two general approaches to quantitative AAA exist, namely, classical postcolumn derivatization following ion-exchange chromatography and precolumn derivatization followed by reversed-phase HPLC (RP-HPLC). Excellent instrumentation and several specific methodologies are available for both approaches, and both have advantages and disadvantages. This unit focuses on picomole-level AAA of peptides and proteins using the most popular precolumn-derivatization method, namely, phenylthiocarbamyl amino acid analysis (PTC-AAA). It is directed primarily toward those interested in establishing the technology with a modest budget. PTC derivatization and analysis conditions are described, and support and alternate protocols describe additional techniques necessary or useful for most any AAA method--e.g., sample preparation, hydrolysis, instrument calibration, data interpretation, and analysis of difficult or unusual residues such as cysteine, tryptophan, phosphoamino acids, and hydroxyproline. PMID:18429107

  7. Photoacoustic spectroscopy study of neodymium complexes with alanine, valine, phenylalanine and tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuetao; Zhang, Shuyi

    2003-04-01

    Neodymium complexes with amino acids: Nd(Ala)(3)Cl(3).3H(2)O, Nd(Val)(3)Cl(3).3H(2)O, Nd(Phe)Cl(3).5H(2)O and Nd(Trp)(3)Cl(3).3H(2)O (Ala: L-alanine, Val: L-valine, Phe: L-phenylalanine, Trp: L-tryptophan) are synthesized and their photoacoustic (PA) spectra are reported. The nephelauxetic ratio beta, bonding parameter b(1/2) and Sinha parameter delta are calculated based on their PA spectra. The variation of these parameters and correlation of them with the nature of metal-ligand bonding are discussed. The PA intensity analysis of the f-f transitions of neodymium ion is carried out by calculating the intensity branching vector. The environmental effect on the f-f transitions of neodymium ion is also studied. The branching vectors of the f-f transitions of Nd(Ala)(3)Cl(3).3H(2)O and Nd(Val)(3)Cl(3).3H(2)O are similar, which indicates the perturbation of the two ligand fields is similar. The branching vectors of energy levels 4G(5/2)+(2)G(7/2) of Nd(Phe)Cl(3).5H(2)O and Nd(Trp)(3)Cl(3).3H(2)O increase remarkably compared with those of Nd(Ala)(3)Cl(3).3H(2)O and Nd(Val)(3)Cl(3).3H(2)O. As the degree of covalency increases, the oscillator strength of the hypersensitive transition exhibits a corresponding increase. The relaxation process of Nd(Ala)(3)Cl(3).3H(2)O is established through its PA and electron absorption spectroscopy (EAS). A method used to resolve the PA amplitude spectrum is suggested. With the phase spectrum, PA absorption bands of Nd(Trp)(3)Cl(3).3H(2)O are resolved well in the region of ligand absorption. PMID:12659889

  8. Oxidative decarboxylation of free and peptide-linked amino acids in phagocytizing guinea pig granulocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Adeniyi-Jones, S K; Karnovsky, M L

    1981-01-01

    The oxidative decarboxylation of amino acids by a system consisting of myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-chloride has been demonstrated previously by others and the process has been considered to be part of the microbicidal armamentarium of some phagocytic leukocytes. We were able to translate these earlier observations, made on model systems, to intact guinea pig granulocytes. We could demonstrate differences in the cellular handling of peptide-linked amino acids as particles, compared with free amino acids. Specific inhibitors were used to explore two routes of oxidative decarboxylation: (a) the myeloperoxidase-catalyzed direct decarboxylation-deamination reaction, and (b) oxidation of alpha-keto acids after transamination of amino acids. These inhibitors were cyanide, azide, and tapazole for the former pathway, and amino-oxyacetate for the latter. Amino-oxyacetate profoundly inhibited the decarboxylation of free 14C-amino acids (alanine and aspartate) in both resting and stimulated cells, but had only a minimal effect on 14CO2 production from ingested insoluble 14C-protein. On the other hand, the peroxidase inhibitors cyanide, azide, and tapazole dramatically inhibited the production of 14CO2 from ingested particulate 14C-protein, but had only small effects on the decarboxylation of free amino acid. Soluble, uniformly labeled 14C-protein was not significantly converted to 14CO2 even in the presence of phagocytizable polystyrene beads. These observation suggest that the amino acids taken up by phagocytosis (e.g., as denatured protein particles) are oxidatively decarboxylated and deaminated in the phagosomes by the myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system; soluble free amino acids that enter the cytoplasm by diffusion or transport are oxidatively decarboxylated after transamination by the normal cellular amino acid oxidative pathway. PMID:6267101

  9. Crystal structure of E. coli lipoprotein diacylglyceryl transferase.

    PubMed

    Mao, Guotao; Zhao, Yan; Kang, Xusheng; Li, Zhijie; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Xianping; Sun, Fei; Sankaran, Krishnan; Zhang, Xuejun C

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein biogenesis is essential for bacterial survival. Phosphatidylglycerol:prolipoprotein diacylglyceryl transferase (Lgt) is an integral membrane enzyme that catalyses the first reaction of the three-step post-translational lipid modification. Deletion of the lgt gene is lethal to most Gram-negative bacteria. Here we present the crystal structures of Escherichia coli Lgt in complex with phosphatidylglycerol and the inhibitor palmitic acid at 1.9 and 1.6 Å resolution, respectively. The structures reveal the presence of two binding sites and support the previously reported structure-function relationships of Lgt. Complementation results of lgt-knockout cells with different mutant Lgt variants revealed critical residues, including Arg143 and Arg239, that are essential for diacylglyceryl transfer. Using a GFP-based in vitro assay, we correlated the activities of Lgt with structural observations. Together, the structural and biochemical data support a mechanism whereby substrate and product, lipid-modified lipobox-containing peptide, enter and leave the enzyme laterally relative to the lipid bilayer. PMID:26729647

  10. Inactivation of Anopheles gambiae Glutathione Transferase ε2 by Epiphyllocoumarin

    PubMed Central

    Marimo, Patience; Hayeshi, Rose; Mukanganyama, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are part of a major family of detoxifying enzymes that can catalyze the reductive dehydrochlorination of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT). The delta and epsilon classes of insect GSTs have been implicated in conferring resistance to this insecticide. In this study, the inactivation of Anopheles gambiae GSTε2 by epiphyllocoumarin (Tral 1) was investigated. Recombinant AgGSTε2 was expressed in Escherichia coli cells containing a pET3a-AGSTε2 plasmid and purified by affinity chromatography. Tral 1 was shown to inactivate GSTε2 both in a time-dependent manner and in a concentration-dependent manner. The half-life of GSTε2 in the presence of 25 μM ethacrynic acid (ETA) was 22 minutes and with Tral 1 was 30 minutes, indicating that Tral 1 was not as efficient as ETA as an inactivator. The inactivation parameters kinact and KI were found to be 0.020 ± 0.001 min−1 and 7.5 ± 2.1 μM, respectively, after 90 minutes of incubation. Inactivation of GSTε2 by Tral 1 implies that Tral 1 covalently binds to this enzyme in vitro and would be expected to exhibit time-dependent effects on the enzyme in vivo. Tral 1, therefore, would produce irreversible effects when used together with dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) in malaria control programmes where resistance is mediated by GSTs. PMID:26925266

  11. Crystal structure of E. coli lipoprotein diacylglyceryl transferase

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Guotao; Zhao, Yan; Kang, Xusheng; Li, Zhijie; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Xianping; Sun, Fei; Sankaran, Krishnan; Zhang, Xuejun C.

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein biogenesis is essential for bacterial survival. Phosphatidylglycerol:prolipoprotein diacylglyceryl transferase (Lgt) is an integral membrane enzyme that catalyses the first reaction of the three-step post-translational lipid modification. Deletion of the lgt gene is lethal to most Gram-negative bacteria. Here we present the crystal structures of Escherichia coli Lgt in complex with phosphatidylglycerol and the inhibitor palmitic acid at 1.9 and 1.6 Å resolution, respectively. The structures reveal the presence of two binding sites and support the previously reported structure–function relationships of Lgt. Complementation results of lgt-knockout cells with different mutant Lgt variants revealed critical residues, including Arg143 and Arg239, that are essential for diacylglyceryl transfer. Using a GFP-based in vitro assay, we correlated the activities of Lgt with structural observations. Together, the structural and biochemical data support a mechanism whereby substrate and product, lipid-modified lipobox-containing peptide, enter and leave the enzyme laterally relative to the lipid bilayer. PMID:26729647

  12. Benzene oxide is a substrate for glutathione S-transferases.

    PubMed

    Zarth, Adam T; Murphy, Sharon E; Hecht, Stephen S

    2015-12-01

    Benzene is a known human carcinogen which must be activated to benzene oxide (BO) to exert its carcinogenic potential. BO can be detoxified in vivo by reaction with glutathione and excretion in the urine as S-phenylmercapturic acid. This process may be catalyzed by glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), but kinetic data for this reaction have not been published. Therefore, we incubated GSTA1, GSTT1, GSTM1, and GSTP1 with glutathione and BO and quantified the formation of S-phenylglutathione. Kinetic parameters were determined for GSTT1 and GSTP1. At 37 °C, the putative Km and Vmax values for GSTT1 were 420 μM and 450 fmol/s, respectively, while those for GSTP1 were 3600 μM and 3100 fmol/s. GSTA1 and GSTM1 did not exhibit sufficient activity for determination of kinetic parameters. We conclude that GSTT1 is a critical enzyme in the detoxification of BO and that GSTP1 may also play an important role, while GSTA1 and GSTM1 seem to be less important. PMID:26554337

  13. Modulation of Rab GTPase function by a protein phosphocholine transferase.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Shaeri; Liu, Xiaoyun; Arasaki, Kohei; McDonough, Justin; Galán, Jorge E; Roy, Craig R

    2011-09-01

    The intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila modulates the activity of host GTPases to direct the transport and assembly of the membrane-bound compartment in which it resides. In vitro studies have indicated that the Legionella protein DrrA post-translationally modifies the GTPase Rab1 by a process called AMPylation. Here we used mass spectrometry to investigate post-translational modifications to Rab1 that occur during infection of host cells by Legionella. Consistent with in vitro studies, DrrA-mediated AMPylation of a conserved tyrosine residue in the switch II region of Rab1 was detected during infection. In addition, a modification to an adjacent serine residue in Rab1 was discovered, which was independent of DrrA. The Legionella effector protein AnkX was required for this modification. Biochemical studies determined that AnkX directly mediates the covalent attachment of a phosphocholine moiety to Rab1. This phosphocholine transferase activity used CDP-choline as a substrate and required a conserved histidine residue located in the FIC domain of the AnkX protein. During infection, AnkX modified both Rab1 and Rab35, which explains how this protein modulates membrane transport through both the endocytic and exocytic pathways of the host cell. Thus, phosphocholination of Rab GTPases represents a mechanism by which bacterial FIC-domain-containing proteins can alter host-cell functions. PMID:21822290

  14. FTIR spectra and conformational structure of deutero-β-alanine isolated in argon matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanian, Stepan G.; Ivanov, Alexander Yu; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2016-02-01

    Low temperature FTIR spectra of β-alanine-d3 isolated in argon matrices are used to determine the conformational composition of this compound. UV irradiation of the matrix samples is found to change the relative populations of the β-alanine-d3 conformers. The populations of conformers I and II with an Nsbnd D⋯O intramolecular H-bond decrease after the UV irradiation while the populations of conformer V with an N⋯Dsbnd O H-bond and conformer IV which has no intramolecular H-bonds increase. This behavior of the β-alanine-d3 conformers are used to separate the bands of the different conformers. The analysis of the experimental FTIR spectra is based on the calculated harmonic B3LYP/6-311++G(df,pd) frequencies and on the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ frequencies calculated with a method that includes anharmonic effects. Polynomial scaling of the calculated frequencies is used to achieve better agreement with the experimental data. The observation of the wide band of the OD stretching vibration at 2201 cm-1 is a direct evidence of the presence of the β-alanine-d3 conformer V in the Ar matrix. In total ten bands of conformer V are detected. The influence of the matrix environment on the structures and the IR spectra of the β-alanine and β-alanine-d3 conformers is investigated. This involves performing calculations of the β-alanine conformers embedded in argon clusters containing from 163 to 166 argon atoms using the M06-2X and B3LYP(GD3BJ) density-functional methods. Good agreement between the calculated and the experimental matrix splitting is demonstrated.

  15. Effect alteration of methamphetamine by amino acids or their salts on ambulatory activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Kuribara, H; Tadokoro, S

    1983-02-01

    Effect alterations of methamphetamine by pretreatment of amino acids or their salts on ambulatory activity in mice were investigated to confirm a fact that certain amino acids, particularly monosodium L-glutamate, are added to methamphetamine by the street users, and that the amino acids augment the effect of methamphetamine. The ambulatory activity of mouse was measured by a tilting-type round activity cage of 25 cm in diameter. The amino acids or their salts tested were monosodium L-glutamate, monosodium L-aspartate, gamma-amino-butyric acid, L-alanine, L-lysine hydrochloride and L-arginine hydrochloride. A single administration of each chemical at doses of 1 and 2 g/kg i.p. did not induce a marked change in the ambulatory activity in mice. Methamphetamine 2 mg/kg s.c. induced an increase in the ambulatory activity with a peak at 40 min after the administration, and the increased ambulatory activity persisted for 3 hr. The ambulation-increasing effect of methamphetamine was augmented by the pretreatment of monosodium L-glutamate and monosodium L-aspartate at 30 min before the methamphetamine administration, while attenuated by the pretreatment of L-lysine hydrochloride and L-arginine hydrochloride in a dose-dependent manner. Gamma-aminobutyric acid and L-alanine did not affect the effect of methamphetamine. Similar augmentation and attenuation in the ambulation-increasing effect of methamphetamine were induced by the pretreatment of sodium bicarbonate 0.9 g/kg i.p. (urinary alkalizer) and ammonium chloride 0.07 g/kg i.p. (urinary acidifier), respectively. The urinary pH level was elevated by the administration of monosodium L-glutamate, monosodium L-aspartate and sodium bicarbonate, and decreased by L-lysine hydrochloride, L-arginine hydrochloride and ammonium chloride. Gamma-aminobutyric acid and L-alanine did not elicit a marked change in the urinary pH level. The present experiment confirms the fact in human that monosodium L-glutamate augments the effect of

  16. Glutathione S-transferase activity and glutathione S-transferase mu expression in subjects with risk for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Szarka, C E; Pfeiffer, G R; Hum, S T; Everley, L C; Balshem, A M; Moore, D F; Litwin, S; Goosenberg, E B; Frucht, H; Engstrom, P F

    1995-07-01

    The glutathione S-transferases (alpha, mu, and pi), a family of Phase II detoxication enzymes, play a critical role in protecting the colon mucosa by catalyzing the conjugation of dietary carcinogens with glutathione. We investigated the efficacy of using the glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity of blood lymphocytes and GST-mu expression as biomarkers of risk for colorectal cancer. GST activity was measured in the blood lymphocytes of control individuals (n = 67) and in the blood lymphocytes (n = 60) and colon tissue (n = 34) of individuals at increased risk for colon cancer. Total GST activity was determined spectrophotometrically with the use of 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as a substrate. The ability to express the um subclass of GST was determined with the use of an ELISA. Although interindividual variability in the GST activity of blood lymphocytes was greater than 8-fold (range, 16.7-146.8 nmol/min/mg), the GST activity of blood lymphocytes and colon tissue within an individual was constant over time and was unrelated to sex, age, or race. The GST activity of blood lymphocytes from high-risk individuals was significantly lower than that of blood lymphocytes from control individuals (P < or = 0.004). No association was observed between the frequency of GST-mu phenotype and risk for colorectal cancer. Blood lymphocytes from high-risk individuals unable to express GST-mu had lower levels of GST activity than did those from control subjects with the GST-mu null phenotype; however, this difference was significant in male subjects only (P < or = 0.006). Analysis of paired samples of blood lymphocytes and colon tissue indicated a strong correlation between the GST activity of the two tissue types (Spearman's rank correlation, r = 0.87; P < or = 0.0001). The GST activity of blood lymphocytes may be used to identify high-risk individuals with decreased protection from this Phase II detoxication enzyme who may benefit from clinical trials evaluating GST modulators

  17. Identification of antigenic epitopes in an alanine-rich repeating region of a surface protein antigen of Streptococcus mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Okahashi, N; Takahashi, I; Nakai, M; Senpuku, H; Nisizawa, T; Koga, T

    1993-01-01

    A surface protein antigen (PAc) of Streptococcus mutans with a molecular mass of 190 kDa is considered to play an important role in the initial attachment of this streptococcus to the tooth surface. Two internal repeating amino acid sequences are present in the PAc molecule. One repeating region located in the N-terminal region is rich in alanine (A-region), and the other, located in the central region, is rich in proline (P-region). To identify antigenic epitopes on the A-region of the PAc protein, 82 sequential overlapping synthetic decapeptides covering one of the repetitive units of the A-region were synthesized. In the epitope scanning analyses using murine antisera raised against recombinant PAc (rPAc), multiple antigenic epitopes were found in the repetitive unit of the A-region, and some of them reacted with antisera to rPAc from BALB/c, B10, B10.D2, and B10.BR mice. In particular, a peptide YEAALKQY (residues 366 to 373) was recognized by anti-rPAc sera from all four strains of mice. The reactivities of anti-rPAc sera in the epitope scanning were confirmed by using a purified synthetic peptide, NAKATYEAALKQYEADLAA (corresponding to residues 361 to 379). Furthermore, antisera against a surface protein antigen PAg (SpaA) of Streptococcus sobrinus from BALB/c mice reacted strongly to residues 330 to 337, 362 to 369, and 366 to 373 of the PAc protein by the epitope scanning analysis. An AKATYEAALKQY (residues 362 to 373 of the PAc protein)-like sequence, AKANYEAKLAQY, was found within the A-region of S. sobrinus PAg, suggesting that the amino acid sequences AKA-YEA and YEA-L-QY may be major cross-reactive epitopes of the S. mutans PAc protein and the S. sobrinus PAg protein. PMID:7681043

  18. Maternal transfer of the cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) via milk to suckling offspring.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Marie; Karlsson, Oskar; Bergström, Ulrika; Brittebo, Eva B; Brandt, Ingvar

    2013-01-01

    The cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been implicated in the etiology of neurodegenerative disease and proposed to be biomagnified in terrestrial and aquatic food chains. We have previously shown that the neonatal period in rats, which in humans corresponds to the last trimester of pregnancy and the first few years of age, is a particularly sensitive period for exposure to BMAA. The present study aimed to examine the secretion of (14)C-labeled L- and D-BMAA into milk in lactating mice and the subsequent transfer of BMAA into the developing brain. The results suggest that secretion into milk is an important elimination pathway of BMAA in lactating mothers and an efficient exposure route predominantly for L-BMAA but also for D-BMAA in suckling mice. Following secretion of [(14)C]L-BMAA into milk, the levels of [(14)C]L-BMAA in the brains of the suckling neonatal mice significantly exceeded the levels in the maternal brains. In vitro studies using the mouse mammary epithelial HC11 cell line confirmed a more efficient influx and efflux of L-BMAA than of D-BMAA in cells, suggesting enantiomer-selective transport. Competition experiments with other amino acids and a low sodium dependency of the influx suggests that the amino acid transporters LAT1 and LAT2 are involved in the transport of L-BMAA into milk. Given the persistent neurodevelopmental toxicity following injection of L-BMAA to neonatal rodent pups, the current results highlight the need to determine whether BMAA is enriched mother's and cow's milk. PMID:24194910

  19. Maternal Transfer of the Cyanobacterial Neurotoxin β-N-Methylamino-L-Alanine (BMAA) via Milk to Suckling Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Marie; Karlsson, Oskar; Bergström, Ulrika; Brittebo, Eva B.; Brandt, Ingvar

    2013-01-01

    The cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been implicated in the etiology of neurodegenerative disease and proposed to be biomagnified in terrestrial and aquatic food chains. We have previously shown that the neonatal period in rats, which in humans corresponds to the last trimester of pregnancy and the first few years of age, is a particularly sensitive period for exposure to BMAA. The present study aimed to examine the secretion of 14C-labeled L- and D-BMAA into milk in lactating mice and the subsequent transfer of BMAA into the developing brain. The results suggest that secretion into milk is an important elimination pathway of BMAA in lactating mothers and an efficient exposure route predominantly for L-BMAA but also for D-BMAA in suckling mice. Following secretion of [14C]L-BMAA into milk, the levels of [14C]L-BMAA in the brains of the suckling neonatal mice significantly exceeded the levels in the maternal brains. In vitro studies using the mouse mammary epithelial HC11 cell line confirmed a more efficient influx and efflux of L-BMAA than of D-BMAA in cells, suggesting enantiomer-selective transport. Competition experiments with other amino acids and a low sodium dependency of the influx suggests that the amino acid transporters LAT1 and LAT2 are involved in the transport of L-BMAA into milk. Given the persistent neurodevelopmental toxicity following injection of L-BMAA to neonatal rodent pups, the current results highlight the need to determine whether BMAA is enriched mother's and cow's milk. PMID:24194910

  20. The effects of short intensive exercise on plasma free amino acids in standardbred trotters.

    PubMed

    Hackl, S; van den Hoven, R; Zickl, M; Spona, J; Zentek, J

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of short intense exercise on plasma amino acid concentrations in trotters and to test the repeatability of plasma amino acids concentration in samples obtained on two independent days under field conditions. Plasma amino acid concentrations were analysed in blood samples of 36 standardbred trotters before and after intense exercise over a distance of 2000 m. Sampling was repeated in 20 horses after 35 days. Exercise intensity was estimated from post-exercise lactate levels. Horses were divided in two groups according to a cut-off lactate concentration at 15 mmol/l. The plasma concentrations of alanine, aspartate, glutamate, isoleucine, leucine, lysine and taurine increased and arginine, asparagine, citrulline, glutamine, glycine, histidine, methionine, serine, tryptophan and 3-methylhistidine decreased after exercise. Ornithine, threonine, tyrosine, phenylalanine and valine concentrations remained constant. Higher intensity of exercise significantly decreased tryptophan and increased taurine concentrations. Sampling day had a significant effect on the absolute pre- and post-exercise amino acid concentrations. Exercise had a significant influence on the concentrations of most plasma amino acids in trotters. These changes could reflect shifts between the free amino acid compartments, but there were also some indications for muscle catabolism. The amino acid supply of sporting horses could be of specific significance for maintaining muscle integrity and for the improvement of post-exercise recovery of competition horses. PMID:19320929

  1. Determination of amino acids in Chinese rice wine by fourier transform near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shen, Fei; Niu, Xiaoying; Yang, Danting; Ying, Yibin; Li, Bobin; Zhu, Geqing; Wu, Jian

    2010-09-01

    Chinese rice wine is abundant in amino acids. The possibility of quantitative detection of 16 free amino acids (aspartic acid, threonine, serine, glutamic acid, proline, glycine, alanine, valine, methionine, isoleucine, leucine, tyrosine, phenylalanine, lysine, histidine, and arginine) in Chinese rice wine by Fourier transform near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy was investigated for the first time in this study. A total of 98 samples from vintage 2007 rice wines with different aging times were analyzed by NIR spectroscopy in transmission mode. Calibration models were developed using partial least-squares regression (PLSR) with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) by postcolumn derivatization and diode array detection as a reference method. To validate the calibration models, full cross (leave-one-out) validation was employed. The results showed that the calibration statistics were good (rcal>0.94) for all amino acids except proline, histidine, and arginine. The correlation coefficient in cross validation (rcv) was >0.81 for 12 amino acids. The residual predictive deviation (RPD) value obtained was >1.5 in all amino acids except proline and arginine, and it was >2.0 in 6 amino acids. The results obtained in this study indicated that NIR spectroscopy could be used as an easy, rapid, and novel tool to quantitatively predict free amino acids in Chinese rice wine without sophisticated methods. PMID:20707307

  2. Metabolism of nonessential N-15-labeled amino acids and the measurement of human whole-body protein synthesis rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.; Settle, R. G.; Albina, J. A.; Melnick, G.; Dempsey, D. T.

    1991-01-01

    Eight N-15-labeled nonessential amino acids plus (N-15)H4Cl were administered over a 10-h period to four healthy adult males using a primed-constant dosage regimen. The amount of N-15 excreted in the urine and the urinary ammonia, hippuric acid, and plasma alanine N-15 enrichments were measured. There was a high degree of consistency across subjects in the ordering of the nine compounds based on the fraction of N-15 excreted.

  3. N-Amino acid linoleoyl conjugates: anti-inflammatory activities.

    PubMed

    Burstein, Sumner; McQuain, Catherine; Salmonsen, Rebecca; Seicol, Benjamin

    2012-01-15

    Several N-linked amino acid-linoleic acid conjugates were studied for their potential as anti inflammatory agents. The parent molecule, N-linoleoylglycine was tested in an in vivo model, the mouse peritonitis assay where it showed activity in reducing leukocyte migration at doses as low as 0.3mg/kg when administered by mouth in safflower oil. Harvested peritoneal cells produced elevated levels of the inflammation-resolving eicosanoid 15-deoxy-Δ(13,14)-PGJ(2). These results are similar to those obtained in earlier studies with N-arachidonoylglycine. An in vitro model using mouse macrophage RAW cells was used to evaluate a small group of structural analogs for their ability to stimulate 15-deoxy-Δ(13,14)-PGJ(2) production. The d-alanine derivative was the most active while the d-phenylalanine showed almost no response. A high degree of stereo specificity was observed comparing the d and l alanine isomers; the latter being the less active. It was concluded that linoleic acid conjugates could provide suitable templates in a drug discovery program leading to novel agents for promoting the resolution of chronic inflammation. PMID:22217875

  4. Equilibrium Dynamics of β-N-Methylamino-L-Alanine (BMAA) and Its Carbamate Adducts at Physiological Conditions.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, David; Goto, Joy J; Krishnan, Viswanathan V

    2016-01-01

    Elevated incidences of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/Parkinsonism Dementia complex (ALS/PDC) is associated with β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a non-protein amino acid. In particular, the native Chamorro people living in the island of Guam were exposed to BMAA by consuming a diet based on the cycad seeds. Carbamylated forms of BMAA are glutamate analogues. The mechanism of neurotoxicity of the BMAA is not completely understood, and BMAA acting as a glutamate receptor agonist may lead to excitotoxicity that interferes with glutamate transport systems. Though the interaction of BMAA with bicarbonate is known to produce carbamate adducts, here we demonstrate that BMAA and its primary and secondary adducts coexist in solution and undergoes a chemical exchange among them. Furthermore, we determined the rates of formation/cleavage of the carbamate adducts under equilibrium conditions using two-dimensional proton exchange NMR spectroscopy (EXSY). The coexistence of the multiple forms of BMAA at physiological conditions adds to the complexity of the mechanisms by which BMAA functions as a neurotoxin. PMID:27513925

  5. The use of L-serine to prevent β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA)-induced proteotoxic stress in vitro.

    PubMed

    Main, Brendan J; Dunlop, Rachael A; Rodgers, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a non-protein amino acid synthesised by cyanobacteria, has been linked to a complex neurological disorder on Guam and more recently to other cases of sporadic ALS (sALS), however the mechanisms of BMAA toxicity are not completely understood. We have previously demonstrated that BMAA is misincorporated into newly synthesised proteins by human neuroblastoma cells and fibroblasts, resulting in the formation of autofluorescent material and the induction of apoptotic cell death. In the present study we show that BMAA at low levels does not cause an acute toxicity in neuroblastoma cells but increases the expression of the ER stress marker, C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and increases the activity of the pro-apoptotic enzyme caspase-3. We also observed an increase in the activity of the lysosomal cysteine proteases cathepsin B and L, characteristic of the accumulation of proteins in the lysosomal system. We were able to prevent these proteotoxic effects in neuroblastoma cells through co-treatment with l-serine suggesting that they resulted from incorporation of BMAA into proteins. Misincorporation provides a possible mechanism whereby BMAA could initiate misfolding, and the accumulation of aggregate-prone proteins in neurons. This build-up of misfolded proteins could explain the long latency period of the disease previously reported on Guam. PMID:26559613

  6. Is there a role for naturally occurring cyanobacterial toxins in neurodegeneration? The beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) paradigm.

    PubMed

    Papapetropoulos, Spiridon

    2007-06-01

    The naturally occurring, non-essential amino acid beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been recently found in high concentrations in brain tissues of patients with tauopathies such as the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis-Parkinsonism-Dementia Complex (ALS/PDC) in the South Pacific island of Guam and in a small number of Caucasian, North American patients with sporadic Alzheimer's disease. BMAA is produced by cyanobacteria that are present in all conceivable aquatic and/or terrestrial ecosystems and may be accumulated in living tissues in free and protein-bound forms through the process of biomagnification. Although its role in human degenerative disease is highly debated, there is mounting evidence in support of the neurotoxic properties of BMAA that may be mediated via mechanisms involving among others the regulation of glutamate. Glutamate-related excitotoxicity is among the most prominent factors in the etiopathogenesis of human neurodegenerative diseases. Due to the wide geographical distribution of cyanobacteria and the possible implications of BMAA neurotoxic properties in public health more research towards this direction is warranted. PMID:17296249

  7. Equilibrium Dynamics of β-N-Methylamino-L-Alanine (BMAA) and Its Carbamate Adducts at Physiological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, David; Goto, Joy J.; Krishnan, Viswanathan V

    2016-01-01

    Elevated incidences of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/Parkinsonism Dementia complex (ALS/PDC) is associated with β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a non-protein amino acid. In particular, the native Chamorro people living in the island of Guam were exposed to BMAA by consuming a diet based on the cycad seeds. Carbamylated forms of BMAA are glutamate analogues. The mechanism of neurotoxicity of the BMAA is not completely understood, and BMAA acting as a glutamate receptor agonist may lead to excitotoxicity that interferes with glutamate transport systems. Though the interaction of BMAA with bicarbonate is known to produce carbamate adducts, here we demonstrate that BMAA and its primary and secondary adducts coexist in solution and undergoes a chemical exchange among them. Furthermore, we determined the rates of formation/cleavage of the carbamate adducts under equilibrium conditions using two-dimensional proton exchange NMR spectroscopy (EXSY). The coexistence of the multiple forms of BMAA at physiological conditions adds to the complexity of the mechanisms by which BMAA functions as a neurotoxin. PMID:27513925

  8. Effects of Beta-Alanine on Muscle Carnosine and Exercise Performance:A Review of the Current Literature

    PubMed Central

    Culbertson, Julie Y.; Kreider, Richard B.; Greenwood, Mike; Cooke, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Muscle carnosine has been reported to serve as a physiological buffer, possess antioxidant properties, influence enzyme regulation, and affect sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium regulation. Beta-alanine (β-ALA) is a non-essential amino acid. β-ALA supplementation (e.g., 2-6 grams/day) has been shown to increase carnosine concentrations in skeletal muscle by 20-80%. Several studies have reported that β-ALA supplementation can increase high-intensity intermittent exercise performance and/or training adaptations. Although the specific mechanism remains to be determined, the ergogenicity of β-ALA has been most commonly attributed to an increased muscle buffering capacity. More recently, researchers have investigated the effects of co-ingesting β-ALA with creatine monohydrate to determine whether there may be synergistic and/or additive benefits. This paper overviews the theoretical rationale and potential ergogenic value of β-ALA supplementation with or without creatine as well as provides future research recommendations. PMID:22253993

  9. Alanine zipper-like coiled-coil domains are necessary for homotypic dimerization of plant GAGA-factors in the nucleus and nucleolus.

    PubMed

    Wanke, Dierk; Hohenstatt, Mareike L; Dynowski, Marek; Bloss, Ulrich; Hecker, Andreas; Elgass, Kirstin; Hummel, Sabine; Hahn, Achim; Caesar, Katharina; Schleifenbaum, Frank; Harter, Klaus; Berendzen, Kenneth W

    2011-01-01

    GAGA-motif binding proteins control transcriptional activation or repression of homeotic genes. Interestingly, there are no sequence similarities between animal and plant proteins. Plant BBR/BPC-proteins can be classified into two distinct groups: Previous studies have elaborated on group I members only and so little is known about group II proteins. Here, we focused on the initial characterization of AtBPC6, a group II protein from Arabidopsis thaliana. Comparison of orthologous BBR/BPC sequences disclosed two conserved signatures besides the DNA binding domain. A first peptide signature is essential and sufficient to target AtBPC6-GFP to the nucleus and nucleolus. A second domain is predicted to form a zipper-like coiled-coil structure. This novel type of domain is similar to Leucine zippers, but contains invariant alanine residues with a heptad spacing of 7 amino acids. By yeast-2-hybrid and BiFC-assays we could show that this Alanine zipper domain is essential for homotypic dimerization of group II proteins in vivo. Interhelical salt bridges and charge-stabilized hydrogen bonds between acidic and basic residues of the two monomers are predicted to form an interaction domain, which does not follow the classical knobs-into-holes zipper model. FRET-FLIM analysis of GFP/RFP-hybrid fusion proteins validates the formation of parallel dimers in planta. Sequence comparison uncovered that this type of domain is not restricted to BBR/BPC proteins, but is found in all kingdoms. PMID:21347358

  10. Loss of Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier 2 in the Liver Leads to Defects in Gluconeogenesis and Compensation via Pyruvate-Alanine Cycling.

    PubMed

    McCommis, Kyle S; Chen, Zhouji; Fu, Xiaorong; McDonald, William G; Colca, Jerry R; Kletzien, Rolf F; Burgess, Shawn C; Finck, Brian N

    2015-10-01

    Pyruvate transport across the inner mitochondrial membrane is believed to be a prerequisite for gluconeogenesis in hepatocytes, which is important for the maintenance of normoglycemia during prolonged food deprivation but also contributes to hyperglycemia in diabetes. To determine the requirement for mitochondrial pyruvate import in gluconeogenesis, mice with liver-specific deletion of mitochondrial pyruvate carrier 2 (LS-Mpc2(-/-)) were generated. Loss of MPC2 impaired, but did not completely abolish, hepatocyte conversion of labeled pyruvate to TCA cycle intermediates and glucose. Unbiased metabolomic analyses of livers from fasted LS-Mpc2(-/-) mice suggested that alterations in amino acid metabolism, including pyruvate-alanine cycling, might compensate for the loss of MPC2. Indeed, inhibition of pyruvate-alanine transamination further reduced mitochondrial pyruvate metabolism and glucose production by LS-Mpc2(-/-) hepatocytes. These data demonstrate an important role for MPC2 in controlling hepatic gluconeogenesis and illuminate a compensatory mechanism for circumventing a block in mitochondrial pyruvate import. PMID:26344101

  11. Alanine Zipper-Like Coiled-Coil Domains Are Necessary for Homotypic Dimerization of Plant GAGA-Factors in the Nucleus and Nucleolus

    PubMed Central

    Bloss, Ulrich; Hecker, Andreas; Elgass, Kirstin; Hummel, Sabine; Hahn, Achim; Caesar, Katharina; Schleifenbaum, Frank; Harter, Klaus; Berendzen, Kenneth W.

    2011-01-01

    GAGA-motif binding proteins control transcriptional activation or repression of homeotic genes. Interestingly, there are no sequence similarities between animal and plant proteins. Plant BBR/BPC-proteins can be classified into two distinct groups: Previous studies have elaborated on group I members only and so little is known about group II proteins. Here, we focused on the initial characterization of AtBPC6, a group II protein from Arabidopsis thaliana. Comparison of orthologous BBR/BPC sequences disclosed two conserved signatures besides the DNA binding domain. A first peptide signature is essential and sufficient to target AtBPC6-GFP to the nucleus and nucleolus. A second domain is predicted to form a zipper-like coiled-coil structure. This novel type of domain is similar to Leucine zippers, but contains invariant alanine residues with a heptad spacing of 7 amino acids. By yeast-2-hybrid and BiFC-assays we could show that this Alanine zipper domain is essential for homotypic dimerization of group II proteins in vivo. Interhelical salt bridges and charge-stabilized hydrogen bonds between acidic and basic residues of the two monomers are predicted to form an interaction domain, which does not follow the classical knobs-into-holes zipper model. FRET-FLIM analysis of GFP/RFP-hybrid fusion proteins validates the formation of parallel dimers in planta. Sequence comparison uncovered that this type of domain is not restricted to BBR/BPC proteins, but is found in all kingdoms. PMID:21347358

  12. Postnatal changes of plasma amino acids in suckling pigs.

    PubMed

    Flynn, N E; Knabe, D A; Mallick, B K; Wu, G

    2000-09-01

    Amino acids, ammonia, urea, orotate, and nitrate plus nitrite (stable oxidation products of nitric oxide) were determined in plasma of 1- to 21-d-old suckling pigs. Jugular venous blood samples were obtained from pigs at 1, 3, 7, 14, and 21 d of age for analysis of plasma amino acids and metabolites by HPLC and enzymatic methods. Plasma concentrations of arginine and its immediate precursors (citrulline and ornithine) decreased (P < 0.01) progressively (20 to 41%) with increasing age from 3 to 14 d. Plasma concentrations of glutamine declined (P < 0.01) progressively (10 to 31%) during the 1st wk of life. Plasma concentrations of branched-chain amino acids, threonine, and alanine decreased (P < 0.01) (5 to 12%) in 14- and 21-d-old pigs, compared with 1- and 3-d-old pigs. There were no postnatal changes (P > 0.05) in plasma concentrations of other amino acids. Plasma concentrations of ammonia increased (P < 0.01) by 18 and 46%, whereas those of nitrate plus nitrite decreased (P < 0.01) by 16 and 29%, in 7- and 14-d-old pigs, respectively, compared with 1- to 3-d-old pigs. Because arginine plays a crucial role in ammonia detoxification via the hepatic urea cycle and is the physiological substrate for nitric oxide synthesis, our results of the decreased plasma concentrations of arginine and nitrate plus nitrite, as well as the increased plasma ammonia concentration, indicate a hitherto unrecognized deficiency of arginine in 7- to 21-d-old suckling pigs. Arginine is an essential amino acid for piglets and has a great potential to enhance neonatal growth; therefore, further studies are necessary to elucidate the mechanism responsible for arginine deficiency in sow-reared piglets and to identify hormonal and metabolic means for improving neonatal arginine nutrition and growth. PMID:10985412

  13. Formation and Survival of Amino Acids in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, M. P.; Sandford, S. A.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2003-01-01

    The detection of deuterium enrichments in meteoritic hydroxy and amino acids demonstrates that there is a connection between organic material in the interstellar medium and in piimitive meteorites. It has generally been assumed that such molecules formed via reactions of small deuterium enriched insterstellar precursors in liquid water on a large asteroidal or cometary parent body. We have recently show that the W photolysis of interstellar/presolar ices can produce the amino acids alanine, serine, and glycine, as well as hydroxy acids, and glycerol, all of which have been extracted from the Murchison meteorite. Thus, some of the probiologically interesting organic compounds compounds found in meteorites may have formed in presolar ice and have not solely been a product of parent body liquid water chemistry. We will report on our isotopic labeling studies of the mechanism of formation of these inteiesting compounds, and on astrophysically relevant kinetic studies UV photo-decomposition of amino acid precursors in the solid state. This is our first year of exobiology funding on this project.

  14. Formation and Survival of Amino Acids in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, M. P.; Sandford, S. A.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2003-01-01

    The detection of deuterium enrichments in meteoritic hydroxy and amino acids demonstrates that there is a connection between organic material in the interstellar medium and in primitive meteorites. It has generally been assumed that such molecules formed via reactions of small deuterium enriched insterstellar precursors in liquid water on a large asteroidal or cometary parent body. We have recently show that the W photolysis of interstellar/presolar ices can produce the amino acids alanine, serine, and glycine, as well as hydroxy acids, and glycerol, all of which have been extracted from the Murchison meteorite. Thus, some of the probiologically interesting organic compounds, compounds found in meteorites may have formed in presolar ice and have not solely been a product of parent body liquid water chemistry. We will report on our isotopic labeling studies of the mechanism of formation of these interesting compounds, and on astrophysically relevant kinetic studies UV photodecomposition of amino acid precursors in the solid state. This is our first year of exobiology funding on this project.

  15. Effects of ascorbate and ATP upon amino acid transport in the toad's cornea.

    PubMed

    Cooperstein, D F; Scott, W N

    1978-04-01

    We have examined the effects of ascorbate upon amino acid uptake by the in vitro toad cornea. Physiologic levels of ascorbate increase the uptake of leucine by approximately 35% but have no effect upon the uptake of alanine. Uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation do not inhibit the stimulation by ascorbic acid of leucine accumulation, indicating the increased synthesis of ATP is not the mechanism; exogenous ATP, unlike ascorbate, stimulates the uptake of both alanine and leucine. Carbon monoxide blocks the effects of ascorbate, whereas 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (HOQNO), which inhibits "reverse" electron transfer, enhances the accumulation of leucine. The evidence suggests that ascorbate serves as an energy source for the uptake of leucine. PMID:417042

  16. Acquisition of Raman spectra of amino acids using portable instruments: Outdoor measurements and comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culka, A.; Jehlička, J.; Edwards, H. G. M.

    2010-12-01

    Raman spectra of 13 amino acids: L-alanine, β-alanine, L-asparagine, L-aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid, L-glutamine, glycine, L-methionine, L-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, L-tryptophan and L-tyrosine were acquired outdoors using two portable Raman instruments from the Ahura and Delta Nu manufacturers, both with 785 nm laser excitation. Both instruments provide quality Raman spectra with nevertheless a variable dependence upon the prevailing experimental conditions. The data acquired in these experiments will inform the selection of suitable Raman spectrometers for the in-field detection of biomolecules of relevance to the search for life signatures spectroscopically in terrestrial extreme environments and in extraterrestrial exploration, especially of planetary surfaces and subsurfaces using robotic instrumentation.

  17. Synthesis and Site-Specific Incorporation of Red-Shifted Azobenzene Amino Acids into Proteins.

    PubMed

    John, Alford A; Ramil, Carlo P; Tian, Yulin; Cheng, Gang; Lin, Qing

    2015-12-18

    A series of red-shifted azobenzene amino acids were synthesized in moderate-to-excellent yields via a two-step procedure in which tyrosine derivatives were first oxidized to the corresponding quinonoidal spirolactones followed by ceric ammonium nitrate-catalyzed azo formation with the substituted phenylhydrazines. The resulting azobenzene-alanine derivatives exhibited efficient trans/cis photoswitching upon irradiation with a blue (448 nm) or green (530 nm) LED light. Moreover, nine superfolder green fluorescent protein (sfGFP) mutants carrying the azobenzene-alanine analogues were expressed in E. coli in good yields via amber codon suppression with an orthogonal tRNA/PylRS pair, and one of the mutants showed durable photoswitching with the LED light. PMID:26650435

  18. Acquisition of Raman spectra of amino acids using portable instruments: outdoor measurements and comparison.

    PubMed

    Culka, A; Jehlička, J; Edwards, H G M

    2010-12-01

    Raman spectra of 13 amino acids: L-alanine, β-alanine, L-asparagine, L-aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid, L-glutamine, glycine, L-methionine, L-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, L-tryptophan and L-tyrosine were acquired outdoors using two portable Raman instruments from the Ahura and Delta Nu manufacturers, both with 785 nm laser excitation. Both instruments provide quality Raman spectra with nevertheless a variable dependence upon the prevailing experimental conditions. The data acquired in these experiments will inform the selection of suitable Raman spectrometers for the in-field detection of biomolecules of relevance to the search for life signatures spectroscopically in terrestrial extreme environments and in extraterrestrial exploration, especially of planetary surfaces and subsurfaces using robotic instrumentation. PMID:20863748

  19. Salmonella Evades d-Amino Acid Oxidase To Promote Infection in Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Tuinema, Brian R.; Reid-Yu, Sarah A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neutrophils engulf and kill bacteria using oxidative and nonoxidative mechanisms. Despite robust antimicrobial activity, neutrophils are impaired in directing Salmonella clearance and harbor viable intracellular bacteria during early stages of infection that can subsequently escape to more-permissive cell types. The mechanisms accounting for this immune impairment are not understood. We report that Salmonella limits exposure to oxidative damage elicited by d-amino acid oxidase (DAO) in neutrophils by expressing an ABC importer specific for d-alanine, a DAO substrate found in peptidoglycan stem peptides. A Salmonella dalS mutant defective for d-alanine import was more susceptible to killing by DAO through exposure to greater oxidative stress during infection. This fitness defect was reversed by selective depletion of neutrophils or by inhibition of DAO in vivo with a small-molecule inhibitor. DalS-mediated subversion of neutrophil DAO is a novel host-pathogen interaction that enhances Salmonella survival during systemic infection. PMID:25425233

  20. Membranotropic properties of the water soluble amino acid and peptide derivatives of fullerene C60.

    PubMed

    Kotelnikova, R A; Kotelnikov, A I; Bogdanov, G N; Romanova, V S; Kuleshova, E F; Parnes, Z N; Vol'pin, M E

    1996-07-01

    The modifying effects of the products of the equimolar addition Of DL-alanine and DL-alanyl-DL-alanine to fullerene C60 on the structure and permeability of the lipid bilayer of phosphatidylcholine liposomes has been studied using the luminescence probe technique. It is shown that these water soluble amino acid and dipeptide derivatives of fullerene (C60-AD) are quenchers of pyrene fluorescence and erythrosine phosphorescence of in both a water solution and liposomes. To study the permeability of the lipid bilayer a procedure based on the triplet probe technique has been developed. It has been found that the C60-AD derivatives under study are able to localize inside the artificial membrane, to penetrate into the liposomes through the lipid bilayer and to perform activated transmembrane transport of bivalent metal ions. PMID:8766810

  1. Ligand Discovery for the Alanine-Serine-Cysteine Transporter (ASCT2, SLC1A5) from Homology Modeling and Virtual Screening

    PubMed Central

    Gameiro, Armanda; Albers, Thomas; Singh, Kurnvir; Shere, Helen; Bonomi, Massimiliano; Holst, Jeff; Schlessinger, Avner

    2015-01-01

    The Alanine-Serine-Cysteine transporter ASCT2 (SLC1A5) is a membrane protein that transports neutral amino acids into cells in exchange for outward movement of intracellular amino acids. ASCT2 is highly expressed in peripheral tissues such as the lung and intestines where it contributes to the homeostasis of intracellular concentrations of neutral amino acids. ASCT2 also plays an important role in the development of a variety of cancers such as melanoma by transporting amino acid nutrients such as glutamine into the proliferating tumors. Therefore, ASCT2 is a key drug target with potentially great pharmacological importance. Here, we identify seven ASCT2 ligands by computational modeling and experimental testing. In particular, we construct homology models based on crystallographic structures of the aspartate transporter GltPh in two different conformations. Optimization of the models’ binding sites for protein-ligand complementarity reveals new putative pockets that can be targeted via structure-based drug design. Virtual screening of drugs, metabolites, fragments-like, and lead-like molecules from the ZINC database, followed by experimental testing of 14 top hits with functional measurements using electrophysiological methods reveals seven ligands, including five activators and two inhibitors. For example, aminooxetane-3-carboxylate is a more efficient activator than any other known ASCT2 natural or unnatural substrate. Furthermore, two of the hits inhibited ASCT2 mediated glutamine uptake and proliferation of a melanoma cancer cell line. Our results improve our understanding of how substrate specificity is determined in amino acid transporters, as well as provide novel scaffolds for developing chemical tools targeting ASCT2, an emerging therapeutic target for cancer and neurological disorders. PMID:26444490

  2. Structure of an Amino Acid-Decorated Exopolysaccharide Secreted by a Vibrio alginolyticus Strain

    PubMed Central

    Drouillard, Sophie; Jeacomine, Isabelle; Buon, Laurine; Boisset, Claire; Courtois, Anthony; Thollas, Bertrand; Morvan, Pierre-Yves; Vallée, Romuald; Helbert, William

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio alginolyticus (CNCM I-4994) secretes an exopolysaccharide that can be used as an ingredient in cosmetic applications. The structure was resolved using chromatography and one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy experiments. The results show that the carbohydrate backbone is made of two residues: d-galacturonic acid and N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (GlcNac), which together constitute a tetrasaccharide repetition unit: [→3)-α-d-GalA-(1→4)-α-d-GalA-(1→3)-α-d-GalA-(1→3)-β-GlcNAc(1→]. Two amino acids, alanine and serine, are linked to GalA residues via amido linkages. The position and the distribution of the amino acids were characterized by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a structure for a marine exopolysaccharide decorated with an amino acid. PMID:26528992

  3. Principal component analysis and neural networks for detection of amino acid biosignatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorn, Evan D.; McDonald, Gene D.; Storrie-Lombardi, Michael C.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    2003-12-01

    We examine the applicability of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) methods of data analysis to biosignature detection. These techniques show promise in classifying and simplifying the representation of patterns of amino acids resulting from biological and non-biological syntheses. PCA correctly identifies glycine and alanine as the amino acids contributing the most information to the task of discriminating biotic and abiotic samples. Trained ANNs correctly classify between 86.1 and 99.5% of a large set of amino acid samples as biotic or abiotic. These and similar techniques are important in the design of automated data analysis systems for robotic missions to distant planetary bodies. Both techniques are robust with respect to noisy and incomplete data. Analysis of the performance of PCA and ANNs also lends insight into the localization of useful information within a particular data set, a feature that may be exploited in the selection of experiments for efficient mission design.

  4. The effect of amino acids on the intestinal absorption of immunoglobulins in the neonatal rat

    PubMed Central

    Bamford, D. R.; Donnelly, H.

    1974-01-01

    An in vitro preparation of 10-day-old rat intestine was used to examine the absorption of a number of amino acids and immunoglobulins. Evidence was obtained for the active absorption of alanine, leucine, methionine, histidine and lysine, but not for aspartic acid. A selective absorption of the homologous molecule was found in experiments where 131I-labelled rat and bovine IgG were presented to the ileum in 10-minute incubations. The greater uptake of rat IgG was unrelated to the relative rates of catabolism of the two molecules. Although the uptake of rat IgG was unaffected by 100 mM concentrations of neutral and acidic amino acids, the basic amino acids arginine and lysine significantly stimulated uptake. PMID:4854740

  5. Occurrence of Free d-Amino Acids and Aspartate Racemases in Hyperthermophilic Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Megumi; Homma, Hiroshi; Long, Zhiqun; Imai, Kazuhiro; Iida, Toshii; Maruyama, Tadashi; Aikawa, Yuko; Endo, Isao; Yohda, Masafumi

    1999-01-01

    The occurrence of free d-amino acids and aspartate racemases in several hyperthermophilic archaea was investigated. Aspartic acid in all the hyperthermophilic archaea was highly racemized. The ratio of d-aspartic acid to total aspartic acid was in the range of 43.0 to 49.1%. The crude extracts of the hyperthermophiles exhibited aspartate racemase activity at 70°C, and aspartate racemase homologous genes in them were identified by PCR. d-Enantiomers of other amino acids (alanine, leucine, phenylalanine, and lysine) in Thermococcus strains were also detected. Some of them might be by-products of aspartate racemase. It is proven that d-amino acids are produced in some hyperthermophilic archaea, although their function is unknown. PMID:10515953

  6. Spectral and thermal study of the ternary complexes of nickel with sulfasalazine and some amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliman, Ahmed A.

    2006-12-01

    The ternary complexes of Ni(II) with sulfasalazine (H 3SS) as a primary ligand and alanine (ala), aspartic acid (asp), histidene (hist), methionine (meth) and serine (ser) amino acids as secondary ligands have been synthesized. Characterization of the complexes was based on elemental analyses, IR, UV-vis, mass spectra, magnetic moment and thermal analysis (TG). The isolated complexes were found to have the general formula [M(HSS)(AA)]4H 2O (AA = ala, asp, hist, meth, or ser amino acid) where nickel is tetra-coordinated. The thermal stability of the complexes was studied and the weight losses for the decomposition of the complexes were calculated and correlated with the mass fragmentation pattern. In most cases, the amino acid moiety is removed along with the Schiff base moiety leaving NiO as a metallic residue. The metallic residue was confirmed by powder XRD measurements.

  7. Synthesis and Cytotoxic Activity on Human Cancer Cells of Novel Isoquinolinequinone-Amino Acid Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Valderrama, Jaime A; Delgado, Virginia; Sepúlveda, Sandra; Benites, Julio; Theoduloz, Cristina; Buc Calderon, Pedro; Muccioli, Giulio G

    2016-01-01

    A variety of aminoisoquinoline-5,8-quinones bearing α-amino acids moieties were synthesized from 3-methyl-4-methoxycarbonylisoquinoline-5,8-quinone and diverse l- and d-α-amino acid methyl esters. The members of the series were evaluated for their cytotoxic activity against normal and cancer cell lines by using the (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) (MTT) assay. From the current investigation, structure-activity relationships demonstrate that the location and structure of the amino acid fragment plays a significant role in the cytotoxic effects. Moderate to high cytotoxic activity was observed and four members, derived from l-alanine, l-leucine, l-phenylalanine, and d-phenylalanine, were selected as promising compounds by their IC50 ranging from 0.5 to 6.25 μM and also by their good selectivity indexes (≥2.24). PMID:27617997

  8. Role of Alanine Dehydrogenase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during Recovery from Hypoxic Nonreplicating Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Giffin, Michelle M.; Shi, Lanbo; Gennaro, Maria L.; Sohaskey, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis can maintain a nonreplicating persistent state in the host for decades, but must maintain the ability to efficiently reactivate and produce active disease to survive and spread in a population. Among the enzymes expressed during this dormancy is alanine dehydrogenase, which converts pyruvate to alanine, and glyoxylate to glycine concurrent with the oxidation of NADH to NAD. It is involved in the metabolic remodeling of M. tuberculosis through its possible interactions with both the glyoxylate and methylcitrate cycle. Both mRNA levels and enzymatic activities of isocitrate lyase, the first enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, and alanine dehydrogenase increased during entry into nonreplicating persistence, while the gene and activity for the second enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, malate synthase were not. This could suggest a shift in carbon flow away from the glyoxylate cycle and instead through alanine dehydrogenase. Expression of ald was also induced in vitro by other persistence-inducing stresses such as nitric oxide, and was expressed at high levels in vivo during the initial lung infection in mice. Enzyme activity was maintained during extended hypoxia even after transcription levels decreased. An ald knockout mutant of M. tuberculosis showed no reduction in anaerobic survival in vitro, but resulted in a significant lag in the resumption of growth after reoxygenation. During reactivation the ald mutant had an altered NADH/NAD ratio, and alanine dehydrogenase is proposed to maintain the optimal NADH/NAD ratio during anaerobiosis in preparation of eventual regrowth, and during the initial response during reoxygenation. PMID:27203084

  9. Role of Alanine Dehydrogenase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during Recovery from Hypoxic Nonreplicating Persistence.

    PubMed

    Giffin, Michelle M; Shi, Lanbo; Gennaro, Maria L; Sohaskey, Charles D

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis can maintain a nonreplicating persistent state in the host for decades, but must maintain the ability to efficiently reactivate and produce active disease to survive and spread in a population. Among the enzymes expressed during this dormancy is alanine dehydrogenase, which converts pyruvate to alanine, and glyoxylate to glycine concurrent with the oxidation of NADH to NAD. It is involved in the metabolic remodeling of M. tuberculosis through its possible interactions with both the glyoxylate and methylcitrate cycle. Both mRNA levels and enzymatic activities of isocitrate lyase, the first enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, and alanine dehydrogenase increased during entry into nonreplicating persistence, while the gene and activity for the second enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, malate synthase were not. This could suggest a shift in carbon flow away from the glyoxylate cycle and instead through alanine dehydrogenase. Expression of ald was also induced in vitro by other persistence-inducing stresses such as nitric oxide, and was expressed at high levels in vivo during the initial lung infection in mice. Enzyme activity was maintained during extended hypoxia even after transcription levels decreased. An ald knockout mutant of M. tuberculosis showed no reduction in anaerobic survival in vitro, but resulted in a significant lag in the resumption of growth after reoxygenation. During reactivation the ald mutant had an altered NADH/NAD ratio, and alanine dehydrogenase is proposed to maintain the optimal NADH/NAD ratio during anaerobiosis in preparation of eventual regrowth, and during the initial response during reoxygenation. PMID:27203084

  10. Perturbation correction for alanine dosimeters in different phantom materials in high-energy photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Voigts-Rhetz, P.; Anton, M.; Vorwerk, H.; Zink, K.

    2016-02-01

    In modern radiotherapy the verification of complex treatments plans is often performed in inhomogeneous or even anthropomorphic phantoms. For dose verification small detectors are necessary and therefore alanine detectors are most suitable. Though the response of alanine for a wide range of clinical photon energies in water is well know, the knowledge about the influence of the surrounding phantom material on the response of alanine is sparse. Therefore we investigated the influence of twenty different surrounding/phantom materials for alanine dosimeters in clinical photon fields via Monte Carlo simulations. The relative electron density of the used materials was in the range {{n}e}/{{n}e,\\text{w}}=0.20 up to 1.69, covering almost all materials appearing in inhomogeneous or anthropomorphic phantoms used in radiotherapy. The investigations were performed for three different clinical photon spectra ranging from 6 to 25 MV-X and Co-60 and as a result a perturbation correction {{k}\\text{env}} depending on the environmental material was established. The Monte Carlo simulation show, that there is only a small dependence of {{k}\\text{env}} on the phantom material and the photon energy, which is below  ±0.6%. The results confirm the good suitability of alanine detectors for in-vivo dosimetry.

  11. Perturbation correction for alanine dosimeters in different phantom materials in high-energy photon beams.

    PubMed

    von Voigts-Rhetz, P; Anton, M; Vorwerk, H; Zink, K

    2016-02-01

    In modern radiotherapy the verification of complex treatments plans is often performed in inhomogeneous or even anthropomorphic phantoms. For dose verification small detectors are necessary and therefore alanine detectors are most suitable. Though the response of alanine for a wide range of clinical photon energies in water is well know, the knowledge about the influence of the surrounding phantom material on the response of alanine is sparse. Therefore we investigated the influence of twenty different surrounding/phantom materials for alanine dosimeters in clinical photon fields via Monte Carlo simulations. The relative electron density of the used materials was in the range [Formula: see text] up to 1.69, covering almost all materials appearing in inhomogeneous or anthropomorphic phantoms used in radiotherapy. The investigations were performed for three different clinical photon spectra ranging from 6 to 25 MV-X and Co-60 and as a result a perturbation correction [Formula: see text] depending on the environmental material was established. The Monte Carlo simulation show, that there is only a small dependence of [Formula: see text] on the phantom material and the photon energy, which is below  ±0.6%. The results confirm the good suitability of alanine detectors for in-vivo dosimetry. PMID:26758810

  12. Upper limits for stereoselective photodissociation of free amino acids in the vacuum ultraviolet region and at the C 1s edge

    SciTech Connect

    Pruemper, Georg; Viefhaus, Jens; Cvejanovic, Slobodan; Rolles, Daniel; Gessner, Oliver; Lischke, Toralf; Hentges, Rainer; Wienberg, Christian; Mahler, Willy; Becker, Uwe; Langer, Burkhard; Prosperi, Tommaso; Zema, Nicola; Turchini, Stefano; Zada, Birgitt; Senf, Fred

    2004-06-01

    We measured the total and partial ion yields of the two chiral amino acids alanine and serine in the gas phase both in the vacuum ultraviolet region and at the C(1s) edge using circularly polarized light. We did not detect any circular dichroism asymmetry larger than 1x10{sup -3}. A similar measurement of fixed-in-space amino acids yielded an upper limit of 1x10{sup -2} for the stereoselective effect of circularly polarized light. The results obtained are relevant for quantitative models of stereoselective photodecomposition of amino acids that try to explain the homochirality of life.

  13. Differential localization of putative amino acid receptors in taste buds of the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus.

    PubMed

    Finger, T E; Bryant, B P; Kalinoski, D L; Teeter, J H; Böttger, B; Grosvenor, W; Cagan, R H; Brand, J G

    1996-09-01

    The taste system of catfish, having distinct taste receptor sites for L-alanine and L-arginine, is highly sensitive to amino acids. A previously described monoclonal antibody (G-10), which inhibits L-alanine binding to a partial membrane fraction (P2) derived from catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) taste epithelium, was found in Western blots to recognize a single band, at apparent MW of 113,000 D. This MW differs from the apparent MW for the presumed arginine receptor identified previously by PHA-E lectin affinity. In order to test whether PHA-E lectin actually reacts with the arginine-receptor, reconstituted membrane proteins partially purified by PHA-E affinity were used in artificial lipid bilayers. These reconstituted channels exhibited L-arginine-activated activity similar to that found in taste cell membranes. Accordingly, we utilized the PHA-E lectin and G-10 antibody as probes to differentially localize the L-alanine and L-arginine binding sites on the apical surface of catfish taste buds. Each probe labels numerous, small (0.5-1.0 micron) patches within the taste pore of each taste bud. This observation suggests that each bud is not tuned to a single taste substance, but contains putative receptor sites for both L-arginine and L-alanine. Further, analysis of double-labeled tissue reveals that the PHA-E and G-10 sites tend to be separate within each taste pore. These findings imply that in catfish, individual taste cells preferentially express receptors to either L-arginine or L-alanine. In addition, PHA-E binds to the apices of solitary chemoreceptor cells in the epithelium, indicating that this independent chemoreceptor system may utilize some receptor sites similar to those in taste buds. PMID:8876468

  14. Alanine substitution of conserved residues in the cytoplasmic tail of herpes simplex virus gB can enhance or abolish cell fusion activity and viral entry

    SciTech Connect

    Ruel, Nancy . E-mail: n-ruel@northwestern.edu; Zago, Anna . E-mail: anna_zago@acgtinc.com; Spear, Patricia G. . E-mail: p-spear@northwestern.edu

    2006-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoprotein B (gB) is one of the four viral glycoproteins required for viral entry and cell fusion and is highly conserved among herpesviruses. Mutants of HSV type 2 gB were generated by substituting conserved residues in the cytoplasmic tail with alanine or by deleting 41 amino acids from the C-terminus. Some of the mutations abolished cell fusion activity and also prevented transport of gB to the cell surface, identifying residues in the gB cytoplasmic tail that are critical for intracellular transport of this glycoprotein. These mutations also prevented production of infectious virus, possibly because the mutant forms of gB were not transported to the site of envelopment. Other mutations, particularly the deletion, significantly enhanced cell fusion activity. These mutations, as well as others described previously, identify regions of the gB cytoplasmic domain that modulate cell fusion activity.

  15. Hint, Fhit and GalT: Function, Structure, Evolution and Mechanism of Three Branches of the Histidine Triad Superfamily of Nucleotide Hydrolases and Transferases

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Charles

    2008-01-01

    HIT (histidine triad)1 proteins, named for a motif related to the sequence HφHφHφφ, (φ a hydrophobic amino acid) are a superfamily of nucleotide hydrolases and transferases, which act on the α-phosphate of ribonucleotides, and contain a ∼30 kDa domain that is typically either a homodimer of ∼15 kDa polypeptides with two active-sites or an internally, imperfectly repeated polypeptide that retains a single HIT active site. On the basis of sequence, substrate specificity, structure, evolution and mechanism, HIT proteins can be classified into the Hint branch, which consists of adenosine 5′-monophosphoramide hydrolases, the Fhit branch, which consists of diadenosine polyphosphate hydrolases, and the GalT branch, which consists of specific nucleoside monophosphate transferases including galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase, diadenosine tetraphosphate phosphorylase, and adenylylsulfate:phosphate adenylytransferase. At least one human representative of each branch is lost in human diseases. Aprataxin, a Hint branch hydrolase, is mutated in ataxia-oculomotor apraxia syndrome. Fhit is lost early in development of many epithelially derived tumors. GalT is deficient in galactosemia. Additionally, ASW is an avian Hint family member that has evolved to have unusual gene expression properties and the complete loss of its nucleotide binding-site. The potential roles of ASW and Hint in avian sexual development are discussed in an accompanying manuscript. Here we review what is known about biological activities of HIT proteins, the structural and biochemical bases for their functions, and propose a new enzyme mechanism for Hint and Fhit that may account for the differences between HIT hydrolases and transferases. PMID:12119013

  16. Protein Synthesis with Ribosomes Selected for the Incorporation of β-Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In an earlier study, β3-puromycin was used for the selection of modified ribosomes, which were utilized for the incorporation of five different β-amino acids into Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). The selected ribosomes were able to incorporate structurally disparate β-amino acids into DHFR, in spite of the use of a single puromycin for the selection of the individual clones. In this study, we examine the extent to which the structure of the β3-puromycin employed for ribosome selection influences the regio- and stereochemical preferences of the modified ribosomes during protein synthesis; the mechanistic probe was a single suppressor tRNACUA activated with each of four methyl-β-alanine isomers (1–4). The modified ribosomes were found to incorporate each of the four isomeric methyl-β-alanines into DHFR but exhibited a preference for incorporation of 3(S)-methyl-β-alanine (β-mAla; 4), i.e., the isomer having the same regio- and stereochemistry as the O-methylated β-tyrosine moiety of β3-puromycin. Also conducted were a selection of clones that are responsive to β2-puromycin and a demonstration of reversal of the regio- and stereochemical preferences of these clones during protein synthesis. These results were incorporated into a structural model of the modified regions of 23S rRNA, which included in silico prediction of a H-bonding network. Finally, it was demonstrated that incorporation of 3(S)-methyl-β-alanine (β-mAla; 4) into a short α-helical region of the nucleic acid binding domain of hnRNP LL significantly stabilized the helix without affecting its DNA binding properties. PMID:25982410

  17. Effects of Heat Shock on Amino Acid Metabolism of Cowpea Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Randall R.; Cherry, Joe H.; Rhodes, David

    1990-01-01

    When cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) cells maintained at 26°C are transferred to 42°C, rapid accumulation of γ-aminobutyrate (>10-fold) is induced. Several other amino acids (including β-alanine, alanine, and proline) are also accumulated, but less extensively than γ-aminobutyrate. Total free amino acid levels are increased approximately 1.5-fold after 24 hours at 42°C. Heat shock also leads to release of amino acids into the medium, indicating heat shock damage to the integrity of the plasmalemma. Some of the changes in metabolic rates associated with heat shock were estimated by monitoring the 15N labeling kinetics of free intracellular, extracellular and protein-bound amino acids of cultures supplied with 15NH4+, and analyzing the labeling data by computer simulation. Preliminary computer simulation models of nitrogen flux suggest that heat shock induces an increase in the γ-aminobutyrate synthesis rate from 12.5 nanomoles per hour per gram fresh weight in control cells maintained at 26°C, to as high as 800 nanomoles per hour per gram fresh weight within the first 2 hours of heat shock. This 64-fold increase in the γ-aminobutyrate synthesis rate greatly exceeds the expected (Q10) change of metabolic rate of 2.5- to 3-fold due to a 16°C increase in temperature. We suggest that this metabolic response may in part involve an activation of glutamate decarboxylase in vivo, perhaps mediated by a transient cytoplasmic acidification. Proline appears to be synthesized from glutamate and not from ornithine in cowpea cells. Proline became severalfold more heavily labeled than ornithine, citrulline and arginine in both control and heat-shocked cultures. Proline synthesis rate was increased 2.7-fold by heat shock. Alanine, β-alanine, valine, leucine, and isoleucine synthesis rates were increased 1.6-, 3.5-, 2.0-, 5.0-, and 6.0-fold, respectively, by heat shock. In contrast, the phenylalanine synthesis rate was decreased by 50% in response to heat shock. The

  18. Slow-binding and competitive inhibition of 8-amino-7-oxopelargonate synthase, a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent enzyme involved in biotin biosynthesis, by substrate and intermediate analogs. Kinetic and binding studies.

    PubMed

    Ploux, O; Breyne, O; Carillon, S; Marquet, A

    1999-01-01

    8-Amino-7-oxopelargonate synthase catalyzes the first committed step of biotin biosynthesis in micro-organisms and plants. Because inhibitors of this pathway might lead to antibacterials or herbicides, we have undertaken an inhibition study on 8-amino-7-oxopelargonate synthase using six different compounds. d-Alanine, the enantiomer of the substrate of this pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent enzyme was found to be a competitive inhibitor with respect to l-alanine with a Ki of 0.59 mm. The fact that this inhibition constant was four times lower than the Km for l-alanine was interpreted as the consequence of the inversion-retention stereochemistry of the catalyzed reaction. Schiff base formation between l or d-alanine and pyridoxal-5'-phosphate, in the active site of the enzyme, was studied using ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy. It was found that l and d-alanine form an external aldimine with equilibrium constants K = 4.1 mm and K = 37.8 mm, respectively. However, the equilibrium constant for d-alanine aldimine formation dramatically decreased to 1.3 mm in the presence of saturating concentration of pimeloyl-CoA, the second substrate. This result strongly suggests that the binding of pimeloyl-CoA induces a conformational change in the active site, and we propose that this new topology is complementary to d-alanine and to the putative reaction intermediate since they both have the same configuration. (+/-)-8-Amino-7-oxo-8-phosphonononaoic acid (1), the phosphonate derivative of the intermediate formed during the reaction, was our most potent inhibitor with a Ki of 7 microm. This compound behaved as a reversible slow-binding inhibitor, competitive with respect to l-alanine. Kinetic investigation showed that this slow process was best described by a one-step mechanism (mechanism A) with the following rate constants: k1 = 0.27 x 103 m-1.s-1, k2 = 1.8 s-1 and half-life for dissociation t1/2 = 6.3 min. The binding of compound 1 to the enzyme was also studied using

  19. Gustatory responsiveness to the 20 proteinogenic amino acids in the spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi).

    PubMed

    Larsson, Jenny; Maitz, Anna; Hernandez Salazar, Laura Teresa; Laska, Matthias

    2014-03-29

    The gustatory responsiveness of four adult spider monkeys to the 20 proteinogenic amino acids was assessed in two-bottle preference tests of brief duration (1min). We found that Ateles geoffroyi responded with significant preferences for seven amino acids (glycine, l-proline, l-alanine, l-serine, l-glutamic acid, l-aspartic acid, and l-lysine) when presented at a concentration of 100mM and/or 200mM and tested against water. At the same concentrations, the animals significantly rejected five amino acids (l-tryptophan, l-tyrosine, l-valine, l-cysteine, and l-isoleucine) and were indifferent to the remaining tastants. Further, the results show that the spider monkeys discriminated concentrations as low as 0.2mM l-lysine, 2mM l-glutamic acid, 10mM l-proline, 20mM l-valine, 40mM glycine, l-serine, and l-aspartic acid, and 80mM l-alanine from the alternative stimulus, with individual animals even scoring lower threshold values. A comparison between the taste qualities of the proteinogenic amino acids as described by humans and the preferences and aversions observed in the spider monkeys suggests a fairly high degree of agreement in the taste quality perception of these tastants between the two species. A comparison between the taste preference thresholds obtained with the spider monkeys and taste detection thresholds reported in human subjects suggests that the taste sensitivity of A. geoffroyi for the amino acids tested here might match that of Homo sapiens. The results support the assumption that the taste responses of spider monkeys to proteinogenic amino acids might reflect an evolutionary adaptation to their frugivorous and thus protein-poor diet. PMID:24480073

  20. Relative Amino Acid Concentrations as a Signature for Parent Body Processes of Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botta, Oliver; Glavin, Daniel P.; Kminek, Gerhard; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2002-01-01

    Most meteorites are thought to have originated from objects in the asteroid belt. Carbonaceous chondrites, which contain significant amounts of organic carbon including complex organic compounds, have also been suggested to be derived from comets. The current model for the synthesis of organic compounds found in carbonaceous chondrites includes the survival of interstellar organic compounds and the processing of some of these compounds on the meteoritic parent body. The amino acid composition of five CM carbonaceous chondrites, two CIs, one CR, and one CV3 have been measured using hot water extraction-vapor hydrolysis, OPA/NAC derivatization and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Total amino acid abundances in the bulk meteorites as well as the amino acid concentrations relative to glycine = 1.0 for beta-alanine, alpha-aminoisobutyric acid and D-alanine were determined. Additional data for three Antarctic CM meteorites were obtained from the literature. All CM meteorites analyzed in this study show a complex distribution of amino acids and a high variability in total concentration ranging from approx. 15,300 to approx. 5800 parts per billion (ppb), while the CIs show a total amino acid abundance of approx. 4300 ppb. The relatively (compared to glycine) high AIB content found in all the CMs is a strong indicator that Strecker-cyanohydrin synthesis is the dominant pathway for the formation of amino acids found in these meteorites. The data from the Antarctic CM carbonaceous chondrites are inconsistent with the results from the other CMs, perhaps due to influences from the Antarctic ice that were effective during their residence time. In contrast to CMs, the data from the CI carbonaceous chondrites indicate that the Strecker synthesis was not active on their parent bodies.