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Sample records for alanine aspartic acid

  1. Predicting Three-Dimensional Conformations of Peptides Constructed of Only Glycine, Alanine, Aspartic Acid, and Valine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Akifumi; Fukuyoshi, Shuichi

    2015-06-01

    The GADV hypothesis is a form of the protein world hypothesis, which suggests that life originated from proteins (Lacey et al. 1999; Ikehara 2002; Andras 2006). In the GADV hypothesis, life is thought to have originated from primitive proteins constructed of only glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and valine ([GADV]-proteins). In this study, the three-dimensional (3D) conformations of randomly generated short [GADV]-peptides were computationally investigated using replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations (Sugita and Okamoto 1999). Because the peptides used in this study consisted of only 20 residues each, they could not form certain 3D structures. However, the conformational tendencies of the peptides were elucidated by analyzing the conformational ensembles generated by REMD simulations. The results indicate that secondary structures can be formed in several randomly generated [GADV]-peptides. A long helical structure was found in one of the hydrophobic peptides, supporting the conjecture of the GADV hypothesis that many peptides aggregated to form peptide multimers with enzymatic activity in the primordial soup. In addition, these results indicate that REMD simulations can be used for the structural investigation of short peptides.

  2. Predicting three-dimensional conformations of peptides constructed of only glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and valine.

    PubMed

    Oda, Akifumi; Fukuyoshi, Shuichi

    2015-06-01

    The GADV hypothesis is a form of the protein world hypothesis, which suggests that life originated from proteins (Lacey et al. 1999; Ikehara 2002; Andras 2006). In the GADV hypothesis, life is thought to have originated from primitive proteins constructed of only glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and valine ([GADV]-proteins). In this study, the three-dimensional (3D) conformations of randomly generated short [GADV]-peptides were computationally investigated using replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations (Sugita and Okamoto 1999). Because the peptides used in this study consisted of only 20 residues each, they could not form certain 3D structures. However, the conformational tendencies of the peptides were elucidated by analyzing the conformational ensembles generated by REMD simulations. The results indicate that secondary structures can be formed in several randomly generated [GADV]-peptides. A long helical structure was found in one of the hydrophobic peptides, supporting the conjecture of the GADV hypothesis that many peptides aggregated to form peptide multimers with enzymatic activity in the primordial soup. In addition, these results indicate that REMD simulations can be used for the structural investigation of short peptides.

  3. Aspartic acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hormone production and release Normal nervous system function Plant sources of aspartic acid include: Legumes such as soybeans, garbanzo beans, and lentils Peanuts, almonds, walnuts, and flaxseeds Animal ...

  4. NMR studies of protonation and hydrogen bond states of internal aldimines of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate acid-base in alanine racemase, aspartate aminotransferase, and poly-L-lysine.

    PubMed

    Chan-Huot, Monique; Dos, Alexandra; Zander, Reinhard; Sharif, Shasad; Tolstoy, Peter M; Compton, Shara; Fogle, Emily; Toney, Michael D; Shenderovich, Ilya; Denisov, Gleb S; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2013-12-01

    Using (15)N solid-state NMR, we have studied protonation and H-bonded states of the cofactor pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) linked as an internal aldimine in alanine racemase (AlaR), aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT), and poly-L-lysine. Protonation of the pyridine nitrogen of PLP and the coupled proton transfer from the phenolic oxygen (enolimine form) to the aldimine nitrogen (ketoenamine form) is often considered to be a prerequisite to the initial step (transimination) of the enzyme-catalyzed reaction. Indeed, using (15)N NMR and H-bond correlations in AspAT, we observe a strong aspartate-pyridine nitrogen H-bond with H located on nitrogen. After hydration, this hydrogen bond is maintained. By contrast, in the case of solid lyophilized AlaR, we find that the pyridine nitrogen is neither protonated nor hydrogen bonded to the proximal arginine side chain. However, hydration establishes a weak hydrogen bond to pyridine. To clarify how AlaR is activated, we performed (13)C and (15)N solid-state NMR experiments on isotopically labeled PLP aldimines formed by lyophilization with poly-L-lysine. In the dry solid, only the enolimine tautomer is observed. However, a fast reversible proton transfer involving the ketoenamine tautomer is observed after treatment with either gaseous water or gaseous dry HCl. Hydrolysis requires the action of both water and HCl. The formation of an external aldimine with aspartic acid at pH 9 also produces the ketoenamine form stabilized by interaction with a second aspartic acid, probably via a H-bond to the phenolic oxygen. We postulate that O-protonation is an effectual mechanism for the activation of PLP, as is N-protonation, and that enzymes that are incapable of N-protonation employ this mechanism. PMID:24147985

  5. Un-catalyzed peptide bond formation between two monomers of glycine, alanine, serine, threonine, and aspartic acid in gas phase: a density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhunia, Snehasis; Singh, Ajeet; Ojha, Animesh K.

    2016-05-01

    In the present report, un-catalyzed peptide bond formation between two monomers of glycine (Gly), alanine (Ala), serine (Ser), threonine (Thr), and aspartic acid (Asp) has been investigated in gas phase via two steps reaction mechanism and concerted mechanism at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) and M062X/6-31G(d,p) level of theories. The peptide bond is formed through a nucleophilic reaction via transition states, TS1 and TS2 in stepwise mechanism. The TS1 reveals formation of a new C-N bond while TS2 illustrate the formation of C=O bond. In case of concerted mechanism, C-N bond is formed by a single four-centre transition state (TS3). The energy barrier is used to explain the involvement of energy at each step of the reaction. The energy barrier (20-48 kcal/mol) is required for the transformation of reactant state R1 to TS1 state and intermediate state I1 to TS2 state. The large value of energy barrier is explained in terms of distortion and interaction energies for stepwise mechanism. The energy barrier of TS3 in concerted mechanism is very close to the energy barrier of the first transition state (TS1) of the stepwise mechanism for the formation of Gly-Gly and Ala-Ala di- peptide. However, in case of Ser-Ser, Thr-Thr and Asp-Asp di-peptide, the energy barrier of TS3 is relatively high than that of the energy barrier of TS1 calculated at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) and M062X/6-31G(d,p) level of theories. In both the mechanisms, the value of energy barrier calculated at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory is greater than that of the value calculated at M062X/6-31G(d,p) level of theory.

  6. Simultaneous analysis of D-alanine, D-aspartic acid, and D-serine using chiral high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and its application to the rat plasma and tissues.

    PubMed

    Karakawa, Sachise; Shimbo, Kazutaka; Yamada, Naoyuki; Mizukoshi, Toshimi; Miyano, Hiroshi; Mita, Masashi; Lindner, Wolfgang; Hamase, Kenji

    2015-11-10

    A highly sensitive and selective chiral LC-MS/MS method for D-alanine, D-aspartic acid and D-serine has been developed using the precolumn derivatization reagents, 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate (AccQ-Tag) or p-N,N,N-trimethylammonioanilyl N'-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate iodide (TAHS). The thus N-tagged enantiomers of the derivatized amino acids were nicely separated within 20min using the cinchona alkaloid-based zwittterionic ion-exchange type enantioselective column, Chiralpak ZWIX(+). The selected reaction monitoring was applied for detecting the target d-amino acids in biological matrices. By using the present chiral LC-MS/MS method, the three d-amino acids and their l-forms could be simultaneously determined in the range of 0.1-500nmol/mL. Finally, the technique was successfully applied to rat plasma and tissue samples.

  7. Non-enzymic beta-decarboxylation of aspartic acid.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doctor, V. M.; Oro, J.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the mechanism of nonenzymic beta-decarboxylation of aspartic acid in the presence of metal ions and pyridoxal. The results suggest that aspartic acid is first converted to oxalacetic acid by transamination with pyridoxal which in turn is converted to pyridoxamine. This is followed by decarboxylation of oxalacetic acid to form pyruvic acid which transaminates with pyridoxamine to form alanine. The possible significance of these results to prebiotic molecular evolution is briefly discussed.

  8. Critical aspartic acid residues in pseudouridine synthases.

    PubMed

    Ramamurthy, V; Swann, S L; Paulson, J L; Spedaliere, C J; Mueller, E G

    1999-08-01

    The pseudouridine synthases catalyze the isomerization of uridine to pseudouridine at particular positions in certain RNA molecules. Genomic data base searches and sequence alignments using the first four identified pseudouridine synthases led Koonin (Koonin, E. V. (1996) Nucleic Acids Res. 24, 2411-2415) and, independently, Santi and co-workers (Gustafsson, C., Reid, R., Greene, P. J., and Santi, D. V. (1996) Nucleic Acids Res. 24, 3756-3762) to group this class of enzyme into four families, which display no statistically significant global sequence similarity to each other. Upon further scrutiny (Huang, H. L., Pookanjanatavip, M., Gu, X. G., and Santi, D. V. (1998) Biochemistry 37, 344-351), the Santi group discovered that a single aspartic acid residue is the only amino acid present in all of the aligned sequences; they then demonstrated that this aspartic acid residue is catalytically essential in one pseudouridine synthase. To test the functional significance of the sequence alignments in light of the global dissimilarity between the pseudouridine synthase families, we changed the aspartic acid residue in representatives of two additional families to both alanine and cysteine: the mutant enzymes are catalytically inactive but retain the ability to bind tRNA substrate. We have also verified that the mutant enzymes do not release uracil from the substrate at a rate significant relative to turnover by the wild-type pseudouridine synthases. Our results clearly show that the aligned aspartic acid residue is critical for the catalytic activity of pseudouridine synthases from two additional families of these enzymes, supporting the predictive power of the sequence alignments and suggesting that the sequence motif containing the aligned aspartic acid residue might be a prerequisite for pseudouridine synthase function.

  9. Synthesis of β-alanine from L-aspartate using L-aspartate-α-decarboxylase from Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yan; Zhao, Lianzhen; Li, Youran; Zhang, Liang; Shi, Guiyang

    2014-08-01

    β-Alanine is mainly produced by chemical methods in current industrial processes. Here, panD from Corynebacterium glutamicum encoding L-aspartate-α-decarboxylase (ADC) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). ADC C.g catalyzes the α-decarboxylation of L-aspartate to β-alanine. The purified ADC C.g was optimal at 55 °C and pH 6 with excellent stability at 16-37 °C and pH 4-7. A pH-stat directed, fed-batch feeding strategy was developed for enzymatic synthesis of β-alanine to keep the pH value within 6-7.2 and thus attenuate substrate inhibition. A maximum conversion of 97.2 % was obtained with an initial 5 g L-aspartate/l and another three feedings of 0.5 % (w/v) L-aspartate at 8 h intervals. The final β-alanine concentration was 12.85 g/l after 36 h. This is the first study concerning the enzymatic production of β-alanine by using ADC.

  10. Topology of AspT, the aspartate:alanine antiporter of Tetragenococcus halophilus, determined by site-directed fluorescence labeling.

    PubMed

    Nanatani, Kei; Fujiki, Takashi; Kanou, Kazuhiko; Takeda-Shitaka, Mayuko; Umeyama, Hideaki; Ye, Liwen; Wang, Xicheng; Nakajima, Tasuku; Uchida, Takafumi; Maloney, Peter C; Abe, Keietsu

    2007-10-01

    The gram-positive lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus catalyzes the decarboxylation of L-aspartate (Asp) with release of L-alanine (Ala) and CO(2). The decarboxylation reaction consists of two steps: electrogenic exchange of Asp for Ala catalyzed by an aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) and intracellular decarboxylation of the transported Asp catalyzed by an L-aspartate-beta-decarboxylase (AspD). AspT belongs to the newly classified aspartate:alanine exchanger family (transporter classification no. 2.A.81) of transporters. In this study, we were interested in the relationship between the structure and function of AspT and thus analyzed the topology by means of the substituted-cysteine accessibility method using the impermeant, fluorescent, thiol-specific probe Oregon Green 488 maleimide (OGM) and the impermeant, nonfluorescent, thiol-specific probe [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl]methanethiosulfonate bromide. We generated 23 single-cysteine variants from a six-histidine-tagged cysteineless AspT template. A cysteine position was assigned an external location if the corresponding single-cysteine variant reacted with OGM added to intact cells, and a position was assigned an internal location if OGM labeling required cell lysis. The topology analyses revealed that AspT has a unique topology; the protein has 10 transmembrane helices (TMs), a large hydrophilic cytoplasmic loop (about 180 amino acids) between TM5 and TM6, N and C termini that face the periplasm, and a positively charged residue (arginine 76) within TM3. Moreover, the three-dimensional structure constructed by means of the full automatic modeling system indicates that the large hydrophilic cytoplasmic loop of AspT possesses a TrkA_C domain and a TrkA_C-like domain and that the three-dimensional structures of these domains are similar to each other even though their amino acid sequences show low similarity.

  11. Aspartate protects Lactobacillus casei against acid stress.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chongde; Zhang, Juan; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of aspartate on the acid tolerance of L. casei. Acid stress induced the accumulation of intracellular aspartate in L. casei, and the acid-resistant mutant exhibited 32.5 % higher amount of aspartate than that of the parental strain at pH 4.3. Exogenous aspartate improved the growth performance and acid tolerance of Lactobacillus casei during acid stress. When cultivated in the presence of 50 mM aspartate, the biomass of cells increased 65.8 % compared with the control (without aspartate addition). In addition, cells grown at pH 4.3 with aspartate addition were challenged at pH 3.3 for 3 h, and the survival rate increased 42.26-fold. Analysis of the physiological data showed that the aspartate-supplemented cells exhibited higher intracellular pH (pHi), intracellular NH4 (+) content, H(+)-ATPase activity, and intracellular ATP pool. In addition, higher contents of intermediates involved in glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle were observed in cells in the presence of aspartate. The increased contents of many amino acids including aspartate, arginine, leucine, isoleucine, and valine in aspartate-added cells may contribute to the regulation of pHi. Transcriptional analysis showed that the expression of argG and argH increased during acid stress, and the addition of aspartate induced 1.46- and 3.06-fold higher expressions of argG and argH, respectively, compared with the control. Results presented in this manuscript suggested that aspartate may protect L. casei against acid stress, and it may be used as a potential protectant during the production of probiotics. PMID:23292549

  12. 21 CFR 582.5017 - Aspartic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aspartic acid. 582.5017 Section 582.5017 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary...

  13. 21 CFR 582.5017 - Aspartic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aspartic acid. 582.5017 Section 582.5017 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary...

  14. 21 CFR 582.5017 - Aspartic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aspartic acid. 582.5017 Section 582.5017 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary...

  15. 21 CFR 582.5017 - Aspartic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aspartic acid. 582.5017 Section 582.5017 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary...

  16. 21 CFR 582.5017 - Aspartic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aspartic acid. 582.5017 Section 582.5017 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary...

  17. Aspartic acid racemization in tooth enamel from living humans.

    PubMed Central

    Helfman, P M; Bada, J L

    1975-01-01

    The aspartic acid in human tooth enamel shows increasing racemization with age. This increase is not seen in the metabolically active protein hemoglobin. The rate constant for the racemization reaction of aspartic acid in human tooth enamel was found to be 8.29 X 10(-4) yr-1. This rate constant suggests that in any protein with a long in vivo lifetime, D-aspartic acid will accumulate with age (about 8% of total aspartic acid in enamel will be the D-enantiomer after 60 years). Thus, racemization may play some role in the aging process affecting metabolically stable tissues in long-lived homeotherms. Aspartic acid racemization in toogh enamel also provides a biochronological tool for assessing the age of living mammals. PMID:1059082

  18. L-aspartic acid transport by cat erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.W.; Preston, R.L.

    1986-03-01

    Cat and dog red cells are unusual in that they have no Na/K ATPase and contain low K and high Na intracellularly. They also show significant Na dependent L-aspartate (L-asp) transport. The authors have characterized this system in cat RBCs. The influx of /sup 3/H-L-asp (typically 2..mu..M) was measured in washed RBCs incubated for 60 s at 37/sup 0/C in medium containing 140 mM NaCl, 5 mM Kcl, 2 mM CaCl/sub 2/, 15 mM MOPS pH 7.4, 5 mM glucose, and /sup 14/C-PEG as a space marker. The cells were washed 3 times in the medium immediately before incubation which was terminated by centrifuging the RBCs through a layer of dibutylphthalate. Over an L-asp concentration range of 0.5-1000..mu..M, influx obeyed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a small added linear diffusion component. The Kt and Jmax of the saturable component were 5.40 +/- 0.34 ..mu..M and 148.8 +/- 7.2 ..mu..mol 1. cell/sup -1/h/sup -1/ respectively. Replacement of Na with Li, K, Rb, Cs or choline reduce influx to diffusion. With the addition of asp analogues (4/sup +/M L-asp, 40/sup +/M inhibitor), the following sequence of inhibition was observed (range 80% to 40% inhib.): L-glutamate > L-cysteine sulfonate > D-asp > L-cysteic acid > D-glutamate. Other amino acids such as L-alanine, L-proline, L-lysine, L-cysteine, and taurine showed no inhibition (<5%). These data suggest that cat red cells contain a high-affinity Na dependent transport system for L-asp, glutamate, and closely related analogues which resembles that found in the RBCs of other carnivores and in neural tissues.

  19. Mechanism of cysteine-dependent inactivation of aspartate/glutamate/cysteine sulfinic acid α-decarboxylases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pingyang; Torrens-Spence, Michael P; Ding, Haizhen; Christensen, Bruce M; Li, Jianyong

    2013-02-01

    Animal aspartate decarboxylase (ADC), glutamate decarboxylase (GDC) and cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase (CSADC) catalyze the decarboxylation of aspartate, glutamate and cysteine sulfinic acid to β-alanine, γ-aminobutyric acid and hypotaurine, respectively. Each enzymatic product has been implicated in different physiological functions. These decarboxylases use pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP) as cofactor and share high sequence homology. Analysis of the activity of ADC in the presence of different amino determined that beta-alanine production from aspartate was diminished in the presence of cysteine. Comparative analysis established that cysteine also inhibited GDC and CSADC in a concentration-dependent manner. Spectral comparisons of free PLP and cysteine, together with ADC and cysteine, result in comparable spectral shifts. Such spectral shifts indicate that cysteine is able to enter the active site of the enzyme, interact with the PLP-lysine internal aldimine, form a cysteine-PLP aldimine and undergo intramolecular nucleophilic cyclization through its sulfhydryl group, leading to irreversible ADC inactivation. Cysteine is the building block for protein synthesis and a precursor of cysteine sulfinic acid that is the substrate of CSADC and therefore is present in many cells, but the presence of cysteine (at comparable concentrations to their natural substrates) apparently could severely inhibit ADC, CSADC and GDC activity. This raises an essential question as to how animal species prevent these enzymes from cysteine-mediated inactivation. Disorders of cysteine metabolism have been implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases. The results of our study should promote research in terms of mechanism by which animals maintain their cysteine homeostasis and possible relationship of cysteine-mediated GDC and CSADC inhibition in neurodegenerative disease development. PMID:22718265

  20. Mechanism of cysteine-dependent inactivation of aspartate/glutamate/cysteine sulfinic acid α-decarboxylases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pingyang; Torrens-Spence, Michael P; Ding, Haizhen; Christensen, Bruce M; Li, Jianyong

    2013-02-01

    Animal aspartate decarboxylase (ADC), glutamate decarboxylase (GDC) and cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase (CSADC) catalyze the decarboxylation of aspartate, glutamate and cysteine sulfinic acid to β-alanine, γ-aminobutyric acid and hypotaurine, respectively. Each enzymatic product has been implicated in different physiological functions. These decarboxylases use pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP) as cofactor and share high sequence homology. Analysis of the activity of ADC in the presence of different amino determined that beta-alanine production from aspartate was diminished in the presence of cysteine. Comparative analysis established that cysteine also inhibited GDC and CSADC in a concentration-dependent manner. Spectral comparisons of free PLP and cysteine, together with ADC and cysteine, result in comparable spectral shifts. Such spectral shifts indicate that cysteine is able to enter the active site of the enzyme, interact with the PLP-lysine internal aldimine, form a cysteine-PLP aldimine and undergo intramolecular nucleophilic cyclization through its sulfhydryl group, leading to irreversible ADC inactivation. Cysteine is the building block for protein synthesis and a precursor of cysteine sulfinic acid that is the substrate of CSADC and therefore is present in many cells, but the presence of cysteine (at comparable concentrations to their natural substrates) apparently could severely inhibit ADC, CSADC and GDC activity. This raises an essential question as to how animal species prevent these enzymes from cysteine-mediated inactivation. Disorders of cysteine metabolism have been implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases. The results of our study should promote research in terms of mechanism by which animals maintain their cysteine homeostasis and possible relationship of cysteine-mediated GDC and CSADC inhibition in neurodegenerative disease development.

  1. 2-Methyl-aspartic acid monohydrate.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Greg; Burton, Aaron S; Dworkin, Jason P; Butcher, Ray J

    2013-11-30

    The title compound, C5H9NO4·H2O, is an isomer of the α-amino acid glutamic acid that crystallizes from water in its zwitterionic form as a monohydrate. It is not one of the 20 proteinogenic α-amino acids that are used in living systems and differs from the natural amino acids in that it has an α-methyl group rather than an α-H atom. In the crystal, an O-H⋯O hydrogen bond is present between the acid and water mol-ecules while extensive N-H⋯O and O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the components into a three-dimensional array. PMID:24454270

  2. Elevation of alanine amino transferase and aspartate amino transferase produced by pyoverdin, a photolabile pigment of Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Eraso, A J; Albesa, I

    1998-01-01

    The effect of three forms pyoverdin on mouse liver was studied. Significant increases of alanine amino transferase (ALT) and aspartate amino transferase (AST) were obtained in mice after ingestion of water with forms A and C. The effect on liver was more evident with A than with C. Pyoverdin was purified by means of salt saturation, solvent extractions and ion-exchange chromatography. Fluorescent peaks obtained in the presence of light were different from those eluted under dark conditions. The relative amounts of pyoverdin A, B and C varied when dark purification procedure was employed. Form A decreased while C increased in the absence of light. Optimum conditions for C were in the dark without iron. When C was exposed to light, it changed to form A. Fast Atom Bombardment (FAB) mass spectrometry of pyoverdin form C gave a form at M+ = 1324 m.u., which is 9 m.u. less than pyoverdin purified in the presence of light. The results suggest that light can influence pyoverdin stability and toxicity. PMID:9888631

  3. Serum γ-Glutamyltransferase, Alanine Aminotransferase and Aspartate Aminotransferase Activity in Healthy Blood Donor of Different Ethnic Groups in Gorgan

    PubMed Central

    Mehrpouya, Masoumeh; Pourhashem, Zeinab

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Measure of liver enzymes may help to increase safety of blood donation for both blood donor and recipient. Determination of liver enzymes may prepare valuable clinical information. Aim To assess serum γ-Glutamyltransferase (GGT), Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT), and Aspartate Aminotransferase (AST) activities in healthy blood donors in different ethnic groups in Gorgan. Materials and Methods This study was performed in 450 healthy male blood donors, in three ethnic groups (Fars, Sistanee and Turkman) who attended Gorgan blood transfusion center. Liver enzymes (GGT, ALT and AST) were determined. Results Serum AST and ALT in three ethnic groups were significant except for serum GGT levels. There was significant correlation between family histories of liver disease and systolic blood pressure and AST in Fars, and GGT in Sistanee ethnic groups. Conclusion Several factors, such as age, family history of diabetes mellitus, family history of liver disease and smoking habit had no effect on some liver enzymes in different ethnic groups in this area. Variation of AST, ALT, and GGT enzyme activities in healthy subjects was associated with some subjects in our study groups. According to our study, it suggests that screening of AST and GGT enzymes in subjects with family history of liver disease is necessary in different ethnic groups. PMID:27630834

  4. Properties of Copolymers of Aspartic Acid and Aliphatic Dicarboxylic Acids Prepared by Reactive Extrusion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspartic acid may be prepared chemically or by the fermentation of carbohydrates. Currently, low molecular weight polyaspartic acids are prepared commercially by heating aspartic acid at high temperatures (greater than 220 degrees C) for several hours in the solid state. In an effort to develop a ...

  5. Behavior of aspartic acid as a corrosion inhibitor for steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kalota, D.J.; Silverman, D.C. )

    1994-02-01

    Corrosion inhibition of steel by aspartic acid (C[sub 4]H[sub 7]NO[sub 4]), an amino acid of low molecular weight, was found to depend strongly on pH. At a pH less than the ionization constant at [approximately]9.5 to 10 (measured at 25 C), C[sub 4]H[sub 7]NO[sub 4] appeared to accelerate corrosion. Above the pH, it acted as a corrosion inhibitor for steel. A specially constructed potential-pH diagram for iron (Fe) that incorporated C[sub 4]H[sub 7]NO[sub 4] showed the change in behavior was accompanied by the most stable thermodynamic state changing from an iron aspartate complex to iron oxide. Polymerized C[sub 4]H[sub 7]NO[sub 4] (polyaspartic acid) behaved in a similar manner. Some other amino acids of low molecular weight behaved similarly.

  6. A multinuclear NMR relaxation study of the interaction of divalent metal ions with L-aspartic acid.

    PubMed

    Khazaeli, S; Viola, R E

    1984-09-01

    Carbon-13 spin-lattice relaxation times, T1, have been measured for aqueous solutions of L-aspartic acid, L-alanine, O-phospho-L-serine, and 2-mercapto-L-succinic acid in the presence of the paramagnetic metal ions, Cu2+ and Mn2+, and Mg2+ as a diamagnetic control, at ambient temperature and neutral pH. Nitrogen-15, oxygen-17 and proton relaxation times were also obtained for L-aspartic acid and phosphorus-31 relaxation times for O-phospho-L-serine under similar conditions. The structures of these complexes in solution were determined from the various metal ion-nuclei distances calculated from the paramagnetically-induced relaxation. These results indicate that the Cu2+ interaction with L-aspartic acid is through alpha-amino and beta-carboxyl groups while Mn2+ coordinates most strongly through alpha- and beta-carboxyl groups, with the possibility of a weak interaction through the amino group. An examination of the coordination of these divalent metal ions to an analog of L-aspartic acid in which the beta-carboxyl group is replaced by a phosphate group (O-phospho-L-serine) indicated that Cu2+ coordination is now probably through the alpha-amino and phosphate groups, while this analog is a monodentate ligand for Mn2+ coordinating through the phosphate group. Removal of the beta-carboxyl group (L-alanine) also results in Cu2+ coordination through the alpha-carboxyl and alpha-amino groups, and the same ligand interactions are observed with Mn2+. Replacement of the alpha-amino group of L-aspartic acid with an -SH group (2-mercapto-L-succinate) is sufficient to eliminate any specific coordination with either Cu2+ or Mn2+. PMID:6491655

  7. The effects of the stress caused by experimental procedures on alanine aspartate, glutamate and glutamine in rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Heath, D. F.; George, D. R.; Rose, J. G.

    1971-01-01

    Rats were stressed by intravenous injection, tail-warming or moderate restraint for 30s, i.e. by stresses imposed by normal handling during experiment. Liver glutamate concentrations were greatly affected. The results were substantially the same in two varieties of rat (Wistar and Sprague–Dawley), in two laboratories, in experiments carried out by two sets of workers, and after all three stresses. The following detailed results refer to Wistar rats. 1. In starved rats at 20°C and 30°C and in post-absorptive rats at 20°C stress by injection raised liver glutamate concentrations from 1.54, 1.57 and 1.88μmol/g wet wt. 30s after injection to 3.4, 2.7 and 3.6μmol/g wet wt. respectively a few minutes later. In starved rats at 20°C the concentration then fell slowly to 2.3μmol/g wet wt., in starved rats at 30°C it remained steady, and in post-absorptive rats at 20°C it rose slowly to about 4.3μmol/g wet wt. The final values seemed fairly steady and corresponded to an `alert' state. 2. In starved rats at 20°C anaesthesia, with or without injection or cannulation during it, raised glutamate concentrations to the `alert' values, which were maintained for 2–3h. 3. Liver alanine concentration in post-absorptive rats initially fell from 1.5 to 0.8μmol/g, and then stayed fairly constant. 4. Aspartate and glutamine concentrations altered only in starved rats, and proportionately much less than those of glutamate. 5. The necessity for knowing the time-dependence of glutamate concentrations after experimental handling is emphasized. 6. There is no wholly satisfactory explanation of the observations. PMID:5145894

  8. Structural and functional importance of transmembrane domain 3 (TM3) in the aspartate:alanine antiporter AspT: topology and function of the residues of TM3 and oligomerization of AspT.

    PubMed

    Nanatani, Kei; Maloney, Peter C; Abe, Keietsu

    2009-04-01

    AspT, the aspartate:alanine antiporter of Tetragenococcus halophilus, a membrane protein of 543 amino acids with 10 putative transmembrane (TM) helices, is the prototype of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAE) family of transporters. Because TM3 (isoleucine 64 to methionine 85) has many amino acid residues that are conserved among members of the AAE family and because TM3 contains two charged residues and four polar residues, it is thought to be located near (or to form part of) the substrate translocation pathway that includes the binding site for the substrates. To elucidate the role of TM3 in the transport process, we carried out cysteine-scanning mutagenesis. The substitutions of tyrosine 75 and serine 84 had the strongest inhibitory effects on transport (initial rates of l-aspartate transport were below 15% of the rate for cysteine-less AspT). Considerable but less-marked effects were observed upon the replacement of methionine 70, phenylalanine 71, glycine 74, arginine 76, serine 83, and methionine 85 (initial rates between 15% and 30% of the rate for cysteine-less AspT). Introduced cysteine residues at the cytoplasmic half of TM3 could be labeled with Oregon green maleimide (OGM), whereas cysteines close to the periplasmic half (residues 64 to 75) were not labeled. These results suggest that TM3 has a hydrophobic core on the periplasmic half and that hydrophilic residues on the cytoplasmic half of TM3 participate in the formation of an aqueous cavity in membranes. Furthermore, the presence of l-aspartate protected the cysteine introduced at glycine 62 against a reaction with OGM. In contrast, l-aspartate stimulated the reactivity of the cysteine introduced at proline 79 with OGM. These results demonstrate that TM3 undergoes l-aspartate-induced conformational alterations. In addition, nonreducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analyses and a glutaraldehyde cross-linking assay suggest that functional AspT forms homo-oligomers as a

  9. An archaeal glutamate decarboxylase homolog functions as an aspartate decarboxylase and is involved in β-alanine and coenzyme A biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Hiroya; Yokooji, Yuusuke; Ishibashi, Takuya; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Atomi, Haruyuki

    2014-03-01

    β-Alanine is a precursor for coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis and is a substrate for the bacterial/eukaryotic pantothenate synthetase and archaeal phosphopantothenate synthetase. β-Alanine is synthesized through various enzymes/pathways in bacteria and eukaryotes, including the direct decarboxylation of Asp by aspartate 1-decarboxylase (ADC), the degradation of pyrimidine, or the oxidation of polyamines. However, in most archaea, homologs of these enzymes are not present; thus, the mechanisms of β-alanine biosynthesis remain unclear. Here, we performed a biochemical and genetic study on a glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) homolog encoded by TK1814 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis. GADs are distributed in all three domains of life, generally catalyzing the decarboxylation of Glu to γ-aminobutyrate (GABA). The recombinant TK1814 protein displayed not only GAD activity but also ADC activity using pyridoxal 5'-phosphate as a cofactor. Kinetic studies revealed that the TK1814 protein prefers Asp as its substrate rather than Glu, with nearly a 20-fold difference in catalytic efficiency. Gene disruption of TK1814 resulted in a strain that could not grow in standard medium. Addition of β-alanine, 4'-phosphopantothenate, or CoA complemented the growth defect, whereas GABA could not. Our results provide genetic evidence that TK1814 functions as an ADC in T. kodakarensis, providing the β-alanine necessary for CoA biosynthesis. The results also suggest that the GAD activity of TK1814 is not necessary for growth, at least under the conditions applied in this study. TK1814 homologs are distributed in a wide range of archaea and may be responsible for β-alanine biosynthesis in these organisms.

  10. Oral administration of D-alanine in monkeys robustly increases plasma and cerebrospinal fluid levels but experimental D-amino acid oxidase inhibitors had minimal effect.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Camilo; Alt, Jesse; Ator, Nancy A; Wilmoth, Heather; Rais, Rana; Hin, Niyada; DeVivo, Michael; Popiolek, Michael; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Slusher, Barbara S

    2016-09-01

    Hypofunction of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is thought to exacerbate psychosis in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. Consistent with this hypothesis, D-alanine, a co-agonist at the glycine site of the NMDA receptor, was shown to improve positive and cognitive symptoms when used as add-on therapy for schizophrenia treatment. However, D-alanine had to be administered at high doses (~7 g) to observe clinical effects. One possible reason for the high dose is that D-alanine could be undergoing oxidation by D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) before it reaches the brain. If this is the case, the dose could be reduced by co-administration of D-alanine with a DAAO inhibitor (DAAOi). Early studies with rodents showed that co-administration of D-alanine with 5-chloro-benzo[d]isoxazol-3-ol (CBIO), a prototype DAAOi, significantly enhanced the levels of extracellular D-alanine in the frontal cortex compared with D-alanine alone. Further, the use of CBIO reduced the dose of D-alanine needed to attenuate prepulse inhibition deficits induced by dizocilpine. The objective of the work reported herein was to confirm the hypothesis that DAAO inhibition can enhance D-alanine exposure in a species closer to humans: non-human primates. We report that while oral D-alanine administration to baboons (10 mg/kg) enhanced D-alanine plasma and CSF levels over 20-fold versus endogenous levels, addition of experimental DAAOi to the regimen exhibited a 2.2-fold enhancement in plasma and no measurable effect on CSF levels. The results provide caution regarding the utility of DAAO inhibition to increase D-amino acid levels as treatment for patients with schizophrenia. PMID:27287825

  11. Aspartic acid 413 is important for the normal allosteric functioning of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, T.W.; Woodbury, R.L.; Okita, T.W.

    1996-11-01

    As part of a structure-function analysis of the higher-plant ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGP), we used a random mutagenesis approach in combination with a novel bacterial complementation system to isolate over 100 mutants that were defective in glycogen production. One mutant of the large subunit M27 was identified by its capacity to only partially complement a mutation in the structural gene for the bacterial AGP (glg C), as determined by its light-staining phenotype when cells were exposed to I{sub 2} vapors. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and enzymatic pyrophosphorylysis assays of M27 cell extracts showed that the level of expression and AGP activity was comparable to those of cells that expressed the wildtype recombinant enzyme. Kinetic analysis indicated that the M27 AGP displays normal Michaelis constant values for the substrates glucose-1-phosphate and ATP but requires 6- to 10-fold greater levels of 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PGA) than the wild-type recombinant enzyme for maximum activation. DNA sequence analysis showed that M27 contains a single point mutation that resulted in the replacement of aspartic acid 413 to alanine. Substitution of a lysine residue at this site almost completely abolished activation by 3-PGA. Aspartic acid 413 is adjacent to a lysine residue that was previously identified by chemical modification studies to be important in the binding of 3-PGA. The kinetic properties of M27 corroborate the importance of this region in the allosteric regulation of a higher-plant AGP. 28 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Ontogenetic trends in aspartic acid racemization and amino acid composition within modern and fossil shells of the bivalve Arctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodfriend, Glenn A.; Weidman, Christopher R.

    2001-06-01

    Ontogenetic trends (umbo to growth edge of shell) in aspartic acid (Asp) racemization and amino acid composition and their evolution over time are examined in serial samples of annual growth bands from a time-series of three live-collected and two fossil (ca. 500 and 1000 y BP) shells of the long-lived bivalve Arctica islandica. The rate of Asp racemization is shown to be higher in the umbonal portion of the shells (laid down when the clams are young) but constant from a biological age of 10 to 20 y to more than 100 y. Corresponding changes are also seen in amino acid composition and concentration: with increasing biological age of the clam: total amino acid concentration increases substantially, the acidic amino acids Asp, glutamic acid, and alanine decrease in relative concentration (mole-percent) and more basic amino acids including tyrosine, phenylalanine, and lysine increase in relative concentration. These ontogenetic trends are generally retained in the fossil shells. These trends may reflect changing protein composition related to changes in growth rate. Clams grow considerably faster in their youth than when they are older, as indicated by changes in the annual growth increments. Production of more acidic proteins, which play a role in crystal growth, may be favored during the phase of faster growth, whereas more structural proteins, perhaps enhancing structural strength of the shell, may be favored during later growth. These ontogenetic differences in protein composition affect the observed rates of racemization of the protein pool. Some weak diagenetic trends in amino acid composition and abundance may be represented in the time series of shells. These results emphasize the importance of standardization of the location from which samples are taken from shells for dating by amino acid racemization analysis.

  13. Plastidic aspartate aminotransferases and the biosynthesis of essential amino acids in plants.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, Fernando; Cañas, Rafael A; Pascual, M Belén; Avila, Concepción; Cánovas, Francisco M

    2014-10-01

    In the chloroplasts and in non-green plastids of plants, aspartate is the precursor for the biosynthesis of different amino acids and derived metabolites that play distinct and important roles in plant growth, reproduction, development or defence. Aspartate biosynthesis is mediated by the enzyme aspartate aminotransferase (EC 2.6.1.1), which catalyses the reversible transamination between glutamate and oxaloacetate to generate aspartate and 2-oxoglutarate. Plastids contain two aspartate aminotransferases: a eukaryotic-type and a prokaryotic-type bifunctional enzyme displaying aspartate and prephenate aminotransferase activities. A general overview of the biochemistry, regulation, functional significance, and phylogenetic origin of both enzymes is presented. The roles of these plastidic aminotransferases in the biosynthesis of essential amino acids are discussed.

  14. β-alanine biosynthesis in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Xu, Huimin; White, Robert H

    2014-08-01

    One efficient approach to assigning function to unannotated genes is to establish the enzymes that are missing in known biosynthetic pathways. One group of such pathways is those involved in coenzyme biosynthesis. In the case of the methanogenic archaeon Methanocaldococcus jannaschii as well as most methanogens, none of the expected enzymes for the biosynthesis of the β-alanine and pantoic acid moieties required for coenzyme A are annotated. To identify the gene(s) for β-alanine biosynthesis, we have established the pathway for the formation of β-alanine in this organism after experimentally eliminating other known and proposed pathways to β-alanine from malonate semialdehyde, l-alanine, spermine, dihydrouracil, and acryloyl-coenzyme A (CoA). Our data showed that the decarboxylation of aspartate was the only source of β-alanine in cell extracts of M. jannaschii. Unlike other prokaryotes where the enzyme producing β-alanine from l-aspartate is a pyruvoyl-containing l-aspartate decarboxylase (PanD), the enzyme in M. jannaschii is a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent l-aspartate decarboxylase encoded by MJ0050, the same enzyme that was found to decarboxylate tyrosine for methanofuran biosynthesis. A Km of ∼0.80 mM for l-aspartate with a specific activity of 0.09 μmol min(-1) mg(-1) at 70°C for the decarboxylation of l-aspartate was measured for the recombinant enzyme. The MJ0050 gene was also demonstrated to complement the Escherichia coli panD deletion mutant cells, in which panD encoding aspartate decarboxylase in E. coli had been knocked out, thus confirming the function of this gene in vivo.

  15. Acid-Base Titration of (S)-Aspartic Acid: A Circular Dichroism Spectrophotometry Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaleiro, Ana M. V.; Pedrosa de Jesus, Júlio D.

    2000-09-01

    The magnitude of the circular dichroism of (S)-aspartic acid in aqueous solutions at a fixed wavelength varies with the addition of strong base. This laboratory experiment consists of the circular dichroism spectrophotometric acid-base titration of (S)-aspartic acid in dilute aqueous solutions, and the use of the resulting data to determine the ionization constant of the protonated amino group. The work familiarizes students with circular dichroism and illustrates the possibility of performing titrations using a less usual instrumental method of following the course of a reaction. It shows the use of a chiroptical property in the determination of the concentration in solution of an optically active molecule, and exemplifies the use of a spectrophotometric titration in the determination of an ionization constant.

  16. Concordance of collagen-based radiocarbon and aspartic-acid racemization ages.

    PubMed

    Bada, J L; Schroeder, R A; Protsch, R; Berger, R

    1974-03-01

    By determining the extent of racemization of aspartic acid in a well-dated bone, it is possible to calculate the in situ first-order rate constant for the interconversion of the L and D enantiomers of aspartic acid. Collagen-based radiocarbon-dated bones are shown to be suitable samples for use in "calibrating" the racemization reaction. Once the aspartic-acid racemization reaction has been "calibrated" for a site, the reaction can be used to date other bones from the deposit. Ages deduced by this method are in good agreement with radiocarbon ages. These results provide evidence that the aspartic-acid racemization reaction is an important chronological tool for dating bones either too old or too small for radiocarbon dating. As an example of the potential application of the technique for dating fossil man, a piece of Rhodesian Man from Broken Hill, Zambia, was analyzed and tentatively assigned an age of about 110,000 years.

  17. Chiral Asymmetric Structures in Aspartic Acid and Valine Crystals Assessed by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Teschke, Omar; Soares, David Mendez

    2016-03-29

    Structures of crystallized deposits formed by the molecular self-assembly of aspartic acid and valine on silicon substrates were imaged by atomic force microscopy. Images of d- and l-aspartic acid crystal surfaces showing extended molecularly flat sheets or regions separated by single molecule thick steps are presented. Distinct orientation surfaces were imaged, which, combined with the single molecule step size, defines the geometry of the crystal. However, single molecule step growth also reveals the crystal chirality, i.e., growth orientations. The imaged ordered lattice of aspartic acid (asp) and valine (val) mostly revealed periodicities corresponding to bulk terminations, but a previously unreported molecular hexagonal lattice configuration was observed for both l-asp and l-val but not for d-asp or d-val. Atomic force microscopy can then be used to identify the different chiral forms of aspartic acid and valine crystals.

  18. The standard enthalpies of formation of crystalline N-(carboxymethyl)aspartic acid and its aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytkin, A. I.; Chernyavskaya, N. V.; Volkov, A. V.; Nikol'Skii, V. M.

    2007-07-01

    The energy of combustion of N-(carboxymethyl)aspartic acid (CMAA) was determined by bomb calorimetry in oxygen. The standard enthalpies of combustion and formation of crystalline N-(carboxymethyl)aspartic acid were calculated. The heat effects of solution of crystalline CMAA in water and a solution of sodium hydroxide were measured at 298.15 K by direct calorimetry. The standard enthalpies of formation of CMAA and its dissociation products in aqueous solution were determined.

  19. Efficient aspartic acid production by a psychrophile-based simple biocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Takahisa; Hamada, Mai; Nakashimada, Yutaka; Kato, Junichi

    2015-10-01

    We previously constructed a Psychrophile-based Simple bioCatalyst (PSCat) reaction system, in which psychrophilic metabolic enzymes are inactivated by heat treatment, and used it here to study the conversion of aspartic acid from fumaric acid mediated by the activity of aspartate ammonia-lyase (aspartase). In Escherichia coli, the biosynthesis of aspartic acid competes with that of L-malic acid produced from fumaric acid by fumarase. In this study, E. coli aspartase was expressed in psychrophilic Shewanella livingstonensis Ac10 heat treated at 50 °C for 15 min. The resultant PSCat could convert fumaric acid to aspartic acid without the formation of L-malic acid because of heat inactivation of psychrophilic fumarase activity. Furthermore, alginate-immobilized PSCat produced high yields of aspartic acid and could be re-used nine times. The results of our study suggest that PSCat can be applied in biotechnological production as a new approach to increase the yield of target compounds. PMID:26254042

  20. A New Pathway to Aspartic Acid from Urea and Maleic Acid Affected by Ultraviolet Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasaki, Masanori; Nomoto, Shinya; Mita, Hajime; Shimoyama, Akira

    2002-04-01

    The photochemistry of a mixture of urea and maleic acid, which are thought to have been widely present on the primitive Earth, was studied in order to examine a possibility of the formation of amino acids. When an aqueous solution of urea and maleic acid was irradiated with an ultraviolet light of wavelength 172 nm, urea was revealed to be rather resistant to photochemical decomposition. In contrast, maleic acid was completely decomposed within 4 h, reflecting the reactivity of a C-C double bond in the molecule. In the reaction mixture, 2-isoureidosuccinic acid was detected. The acid was considered to be formed by addition of an isoureido radical which had been produced from urea by the action of a hydroxyl radical, to a C-C double bond of maleic acid. The isoureido group of the product was revealed to undergo thermal rearrangement to afford 2-ureidosuccinic acid (N-carbamoylaspartic acid). The result suggested a novel pathway leading to the formation of aspartic acid from non-amino acid precursors, possibly effected by UV-light on the primitive Earth. The formation of ureidocarboxylic acids is of another significance, since they are capable of undergoing thermal polymerization, resulting in formation of polyamino acids.

  1. Distinguishing Aspartic and Isoaspartic Acids in Peptides by Several Mass Spectrometric Fragmentation Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGraan-Weber, Nick; Zhang, Jun; Reilly, James P.

    2016-09-01

    Six ion fragmentation techniques that can distinguish aspartic acid from its isomer, isoaspartic acid, were compared. MALDI post-source decay (PSD), MALDI 157 nm photodissociation, tris(2,4,6-trimethoxyphenyl)phosphonium bromide (TMPP) charge tagging in PSD and photodissociation, ESI collision-induced dissociation (CID), electron transfer dissociation (ETD), and free-radical initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS) with CID were applied to peptides containing either aspartic or isoaspartic acid. Diagnostic ions, such as the y-46 and b+H2O, are present in PSD, photodissociation, and charge tagging. c•+57 and z-57 ions are observed in ETD and FRIPS experiments. For some molecules, aspartic and isoaspartic acid yield ion fragments with significantly different intensities. ETD and charge tagging appear to be most effective at distinguishing these residues.

  2. Biodegradation and Osteosarcoma Cell Cultivation on Poly(aspartic acid) Based Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Juriga, Dávid; Nagy, Krisztina; Jedlovszky-Hajdú, Angéla; Perczel-Kovách, Katalin; Chen, Yong Mei; Varga, Gábor; Zrínyi, Miklós

    2016-09-14

    Development of novel biodegradable and biocompatible scaffold materials with optimal characteristics is important for both preclinical and clinical applications. The aim of the present study was to analyze the biodegradability of poly(aspartic acid)-based hydrogels, and to test their usability as scaffolds for MG-63 osteoblast-like cells. Poly(aspartic acid) was fabricated from poly(succinimide) and hydrogels were prepared using natural amines as cross-linkers (diaminobutane and cystamine). Disulfide bridges were cleaved to thiol groups and the polymer backbone was further modified with RGD sequence. Biodegradability of the hydrogels was evaluated by experiments on the base of enzymes and cell culture medium. Poly(aspartic acid) hydrogels possessing only disulfide bridges as cross-links proved to be degradable by collagenase I. The MG-63 cells showed healthy, fibroblast-like morphology on the double cross-linked and RGD modified hydrogels. Thiolated poly(aspartic acid) based hydrogels provide ideal conditions for adhesion, survival, proliferation, and migration of osteoblast-like cells. The highest viability was found on the thiolated PASP gels while the RGD motif had influence on compacted cluster formation of the cells. These biodegradable and biocompatible poly(aspartic acid)-based hydrogels are promising scaffolds for cell cultivation. PMID:27541725

  3. A photoactivable amino acid based on a novel functional coumarin-6-yl-alanine.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Andrea S C; Gonçalves, M Sameiro T; Costa, Susana P G

    2012-12-01

    A novel fluorescent amino acid, L-4-chloromethylcoumarin-6-yl-alanine, was obtained from tyrosine by a Pechmann reaction. The assembly of the heterocyclic ring at the tyrosine side chain could be achieved before or after incorporation of tyrosine into a dipeptide, and amino acid and dipeptide ester conjugates were obtained by coupling to a model N-protected alanine. The behaviour of one of the fluorescent conjugates towards irradiation was studied in a photochemical reactor at different wavelengths (254, 300, 350 and 419 nm). The photoreaction course in methanol/HEPES buffer solution (80:20) was followed by HPLC/UV monitoring. It was found that the novel unnatural amino acid could act as a fluorescent label, due to its fluorescence properties, and, more importantly, as a photoactivable unit, due to the short irradiation times necessary to cleave the ester bond between the model amino acid and the coumarin-6-yl-alanine.

  4. Beta-alanine/alpha-ketoglutarate aminotransferase for 3-hydroxypropionic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Jessen, Holly Jean; Liao, Hans H.; Gort, Steven John; Selifonova, Olga V.

    2011-10-04

    The present disclosure provides novel beta-alanine/alpha ketoglutarate aminotransferase nucleic acid and protein sequences having increased biological activity. Also provided are cells containing such enzymes, as well as methods of their use, for example to produce malonyl semialdehyde and downstream products thereof, such as 3-hydroxypropionic acid and derivatives thereof.

  5. Beta-alanine/alpha-ketoglutarate aminotransferase for 3-hydroxypropionic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Jessen, Holly Jean; Liao, Hans H; Gort, Steven John; Selifonova, Olga V

    2014-11-18

    The present disclosure provides novel beta-alanine/alpha ketoglutarate aminotransferase nucleic acid and protein sequences having increased biological activity. Also provided are cells containing such enzymes, as well as methods of their use, for example to produce malonyl semialdehyde and downstream products thereof, such as 3-hydroxypropionic acid and derivatives thereof.

  6. Racemization reaction of aspartic Acid and its use in dating fossil bones.

    PubMed

    Bada, J L; Protsch, R

    1973-05-01

    In the time interval datable by radiocarbon, and at the temperatures of most archeological sites, a substantial amount of racemization of aspartic acid takes place. By determination of the amount of racemization of aspartic acid in bones from a particular location which have been dated by the radiocarbon technique, it is possible to calculate the in situ first-order rate constant for interconversion of the L- and D enantiomers of aspartic acid. Once this "calibration" has been calculated, the reaction can be used to date other bones from the deposit that are either too old to be dated by radiocarbon or that are too small for radiocarbon dating. The only assumption required with this approach is that the average temperature experienced by the "calibration" sample is representative of the average temperature experienced by older samples. This "calibration" technique is used herein to date bones from the Olduvai Gorge area in Tanzania, Africa.

  7. Racemization Reaction of Aspartic Acid and Its Use in Dating Fossil Bones

    PubMed Central

    Bada, Jeffrey L.; Protsch, Reiner

    1973-01-01

    In the time interval datable by radiocarbon, and at the temperatures of most archeological sites, a substantial amount of racemization of aspartic acid takes place. By determination of the amount of racemization of aspartic acid in bones from a particular location which have been dated by the radiocarbon technique, it is possible to calculate the in situ first-order rate constant for interconversion of the L- and D enantiomers of aspartic acid. Once this “calibration” has been calculated, the reaction can be used to date other bones from the deposit that are either too old to be dated by radiocarbon or that are too small for radiocarbon dating. The only assumption required with this approach is that the average temperature experienced by the “calibration” sample is representative of the average temperature experienced by older samples. This “calibration” technique is used herein to date bones from the Olduvai Gorge area in Tanzania, Africa. PMID:16592082

  8. Aspartic acid in the hippocampus: a biomarker for postoperative cognitive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hu, Rong; Huang, Dong; Tong, Jianbin; Liao, Qin; Hu, Zhonghua; Ouyang, Wen

    2014-01-15

    This study established an aged rat model of cognitive dysfunction using anesthesia with 2% isoflurane and 80% oxygen for 2 hours. Twenty-four hours later, Y-maze test results showed that isoflurane significantly impaired cognitive function in aged rats. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry results showed that isoflurane also significantly increased the levels of N,N-diethylacetamide, n-ethylacetamide, aspartic acid, malic acid and arabinonic acid in the hippocampus of isoflurane-treated rats. Moreover, aspartic acid, N,N-diethylacetamide, n-ethylacetamide and malic acid concentration was positively correlated with the degree of cognitive dysfunction in the isoflurane-treated rats. It is evident that hippocampal metabolite changes are involved in the formation of cognitive dysfunction after isoflurane anesthesia. To further verify these results, this study cultured hippocampal neurons in vitro, which were then treated with aspartic acid (100 μmol/L). Results suggested that aspartic acid concentration in the hippocampus may be a biomarker for predicting the occurrence and disease progress of cognitive dysfunction.

  9. Aspartic acid in the hippocampus: a biomarker for postoperative cognitive dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Rong; Huang, Dong; Tong, Jianbin; Liao, Qin; Hu, Zhonghua; Ouyang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    This study established an aged rat model of cognitive dysfunction using anesthesia with 2% isoflurane and 80% oxygen for 2 hours. Twenty-four hours later, Y-maze test results showed that isoflurane significantly impaired cognitive function in aged rats. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry results showed that isoflurane also significantly increased the levels of N,N-diethylacetamide, n-ethylacetamide, aspartic acid, malic acid and arabinonic acid in the hippocampus of isoflurane-treated rats. Moreover, aspartic acid, N,N-diethylacetamide, n-ethylacetamide and malic acid concentration was positively correlated with the degree of cognitive dysfunction in the isoflurane-treated rats. It is evident that hippocampal metabolite changes are involved in the formation of cognitive dysfunction after isoflurane anesthesia. To further verify these results, this study cultured hippocampal neurons in vitro, which were then treated with aspartic acid (100 μmol/L). Results suggested that aspartic acid concentration in the hippocampus may be a biomarker for predicting the occurrence and disease progress of cognitive dysfunction. PMID:25206795

  10. Does aspartic acid racemization constrain the depth limit of the subsurface biosphere?

    SciTech Connect

    Onstott, T. C.; Aubrey, A.D.; Kieft, T L; Silver, B J; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Van Heerden, E.; Opperman, D. J.; Bada, J L.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies of the subsurface biosphere have deduced average cellular doubling times of hundreds to thousands of years based upon geochemical models. We have directly constrained the in situ average cellular protein turnover or doubling times for metabolically active micro-organisms based on cellular amino acid abundances, D/L values of cellular aspartic acid, and the in vivo aspartic acid racemization rate. Application of this method to planktonic microbial communities collected from deep fractures in South Africa yielded maximum cellular amino acid turnover times of ~89 years for 1 km depth and 27 C and 1 2 years for 3 km depth and 54 C. The latter turnover times are much shorter than previously estimated cellular turnover times based upon geochemical arguments. The aspartic acid racemization rate at higher temperatures yields cellular protein doubling times that are consistent with the survival times of hyperthermophilic strains and predicts that at temperatures of 85 C, cells must replace proteins every couple of days to maintain enzymatic activity. Such a high maintenance requirement may be the principal limit on the abundance of living micro-organisms in the deep, hot subsurface biosphere, as well as a potential limit on their activity. The measurement of the D/L of aspartic acid in biological samples is a potentially powerful tool for deep, fractured continental and oceanic crustal settings where geochemical models of carbon turnover times are poorly constrained. Experimental observations on the racemization rates of aspartic acid in living thermophiles and hyperthermophiles could test this hypothesis. The development of corrections for cell wall peptides and spores will be required, however, to improve the accuracy of these estimates for environmental samples.

  11. Does aspartic acid racemization constrain the depth limit of the subsurface biosphere?

    PubMed

    Onstott, T C; Magnabosco, C; Aubrey, A D; Burton, A S; Dworkin, J P; Elsila, J E; Grunsfeld, S; Cao, B H; Hein, J E; Glavin, D P; Kieft, T L; Silver, B J; Phelps, T J; van Heerden, E; Opperman, D J; Bada, J L

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies of the subsurface biosphere have deduced average cellular doubling times of hundreds to thousands of years based upon geochemical models. We have directly constrained the in situ average cellular protein turnover or doubling times for metabolically active micro-organisms based on cellular amino acid abundances, D/L values of cellular aspartic acid, and the in vivo aspartic acid racemization rate. Application of this method to planktonic microbial communities collected from deep fractures in South Africa yielded maximum cellular amino acid turnover times of ~89 years for 1 km depth and 27 °C and 1-2 years for 3 km depth and 54 °C. The latter turnover times are much shorter than previously estimated cellular turnover times based upon geochemical arguments. The aspartic acid racemization rate at higher temperatures yields cellular protein doubling times that are consistent with the survival times of hyperthermophilic strains and predicts that at temperatures of 85 °C, cells must replace proteins every couple of days to maintain enzymatic activity. Such a high maintenance requirement may be the principal limit on the abundance of living micro-organisms in the deep, hot subsurface biosphere, as well as a potential limit on their activity. The measurement of the D/L of aspartic acid in biological samples is a potentially powerful tool for deep, fractured continental and oceanic crustal settings where geochemical models of carbon turnover times are poorly constrained. Experimental observations on the racemization rates of aspartic acid in living thermophiles and hyperthermophiles could test this hypothesis. The development of corrections for cell wall peptides and spores will be required, however, to improve the accuracy of these estimates for environmental samples.

  12. Does Aspartic Acid Racemization Constrain the Depth Limit of the Subsurface Biosphere?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onstott, T C.; Magnabosco, C.; Aubrey, A. D.; Burton, A. S.; Dworkin, J. P.; Elsila, J. E.; Grunsfeld, S.; Cao, B. H.; Hein, J. E.; Glavin, D. P.; Kieft, T. L.; Silver, B. J.; Phelps, T. J.; Heerden, E. Van; Opperman, D. J.; Bada, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies of the subsurface biosphere have deduced average cellular doubling times of hundreds to thousands of years based upon geochemical models. We have directly constrained the in situ average cellular protein turnover or doubling times for metabolically active micro-organisms based on cellular amino acid abundances, D/L values of cellular aspartic acid, and the in vivo aspartic acid racemization rate. Application of this method to planktonic microbial communities collected from deep fractures in South Africa yielded maximum cellular amino acid turnover times of approximately 89 years for 1 km depth and 27 C and 1-2 years for 3 km depth and 54 C. The latter turnover times are much shorter than previously estimated cellular turnover times based upon geochemical arguments. The aspartic acid racemization rate at higher temperatures yields cellular protein doubling times that are consistent with the survival times of hyperthermophilic strains and predicts that at temperatures of 85 C, cells must replace proteins every couple of days to maintain enzymatic activity. Such a high maintenance requirement may be the principal limit on the abundance of living micro-organisms in the deep, hot subsurface biosphere, as well as a potential limit on their activity. The measurement of the D/L of aspartic acid in biological samples is a potentially powerful tool for deep, fractured continental and oceanic crustal settings where geochemical models of carbon turnover times are poorly constrained. Experimental observations on the racemization rates of aspartic acid in living thermophiles and hyperthermophiles could test this hypothesis. The development of corrections for cell wall peptides and spores will be required, however, to improve the accuracy of these estimates for environmental samples.

  13. Changes in D-aspartic acid and D-glutamic acid levels in the tissues and physiological fluids of mice with various D-aspartate oxidase activities.

    PubMed

    Han, Hai; Miyoshi, Yurika; Koga, Reiko; Mita, Masashi; Konno, Ryuichi; Hamase, Kenji

    2015-12-10

    D-Aspartic acid (D-Asp) and D-glutamic acid (D-Glu) are currently paid attention as modulators of neuronal transmission and hormonal secretion. These two D-amino acids are metabolized only by D-aspartate oxidase (DDO) in mammals. Therefore, in order to design and develop new drugs controlling the D-Asp and D-Glu amounts via regulation of the DDO activities, changes in these acidic D-amino acid amounts in various tissues are expected to be clarified in model animals having various DDO activities. In the present study, the amounts of Asp and Glu enantiomers in 6 brain tissues, 11 peripheral tissues and 2 physiological fluids of DDO(+/+), DDO(+/-) and DDO(-/-) mice were determined using a sensitive and selective two-dimensional HPLC system. As a result, the amounts of D-Asp were drastically increased with the decrease in the DDO activity in all the tested tissues and physiological fluids. On the other hand, the amounts of D-Glu were almost the same among the 3 strains of mice. The present results are useful for designing new drug candidates, such as DDO inhibitors, and further studies are expected.

  14. Immobilized cells of recombinant Escherichia coli strain for continuous production of L-aspartic acid.

    PubMed

    Szymańska, Grazyna; Sobierajski, Bogusław; Chmiel, Aleksander

    2011-01-01

    For L-aspartic acid biosynthesis, high production cells of Escherichia coli mutant B-715 and P1 were immobilized in chitosan gel using a technique developed in our laboratory. The immobilization process reduced initial activity of the intact cells, however, the biocatalyst produced was very stabile for long-term use in multi-repeated batch or continuous processes. Temperature influence on the conversion of ammonium fumarate to L-aspartic acid was investigated. In long-term experiments, over 603 hours, the temperature 40 degrees C was found to be the best for both biocatalyst stability and high conversion rate. The optimum substrate concentration was 1.0 M. Continuous production of L-aspartic acid was investigated in three types of column bioreactors characterized by different volumes as well as different high to biocatalyst bed volume rations (Hz/Vz). The highest conversion rate, 99.8%, and the productivity 6 g/g/h (mass of L-aspartic acid per dry mass of cells in biocatalyst per time unit) was achieved in the bioreactor with the highest value Hz/Vz = 3.1, and liquid hour space velocity value of 5.2, defined as the volume of feeding substrate passed per volume of catalyst in bioreactor per one hour. PMID:21905626

  15. A Green Polymerization of Aspartic Acid for the Undergraduate Organic Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, George D.

    2005-01-01

    The green polymerization of aspartic acid carried out during an organic-inorganic synthesis laboratory course for undergraduate students is described. The procedure is based on work by Donlar Corporation, a Peru, Illinois-based company that won a Green Chemistry Challenge Award in 1996 in the Small Business category for preparing thermal…

  16. Racemization of aspartic acid and phenylalanine in the sweetener aspartame at 100 degrees C.

    PubMed Central

    Boehm, M F; Bada, J L

    1984-01-01

    The racemization half-lives (i.e., the time required to reach a D/L = 0.33) at pH 6.8 for aspartic acid and phenylalanine in the sweetener aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) were determined to be 13 and 23 hours, respectively, at 100 degrees C. Racemization at this pH does not occur in aspartame but rather in its diketopiperazine decomposition product. Our results indicate that the use of aspartame to sweeten neutral pH foods and beverages that are then heated at elevated temperature could generate D-aspartic acid and D-phenylalanine. The nutritive consequences of these D-amino acids in the human diet are not well established, and thus aspartame should probably not be used as a sweetener when the exposure of neutral pH foods and beverages to elevated temperatures is required. At pH 4, a typical pH of most foods and beverages that might be sweetened with aspartame, the half-lives are 47 hours for aspartic acid and 1200 hours for phenylalanine at 100 degrees C. Racemization at pH 4 takes place in aspartame itself. Although the racemization rates at pH 4 are slow and no appreciable racemization of aspartic acid and phenylalanine should occur during the normal use of aspartame, some food and beverage components could conceivably act as catalysts. Additional studies are required to evaluate whether the use of aspartame as a sugar substitute might not in turn result in an increased human consumption of D-aspartic acid and D-phenylalanine. PMID:6591191

  17. Racemization of aspartic acid and phenylalanine in the sweetener aspartame at 100 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Boehm, M F; Bada, J L

    1984-08-01

    The racemization half-lives (i.e., the time required to reach a D/L = 0.33) at pH 6.8 for aspartic acid and phenylalanine in the sweetener aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) were determined to be 13 and 23 hours, respectively, at 100 degrees C. Racemization at this pH does not occur in aspartame but rather in its diketopiperazine decomposition product. Our results indicate that the use of aspartame to sweeten neutral pH foods and beverages that are then heated at elevated temperature could generate D-aspartic acid and D-phenylalanine. The nutritive consequences of these D-amino acids in the human diet are not well established, and thus aspartame should probably not be used as a sweetener when the exposure of neutral pH foods and beverages to elevated temperatures is required. At pH 4, a typical pH of most foods and beverages that might be sweetened with aspartame, the half-lives are 47 hours for aspartic acid and 1200 hours for phenylalanine at 100 degrees C. Racemization at pH 4 takes place in aspartame itself. Although the racemization rates at pH 4 are slow and no appreciable racemization of aspartic acid and phenylalanine should occur during the normal use of aspartame, some food and beverage components could conceivably act as catalysts. Additional studies are required to evaluate whether the use of aspartame as a sugar substitute might not in turn result in an increased human consumption of D-aspartic acid and D-phenylalanine.

  18. DNA interaction with octahedral and square planar Ni(II) complexes of aspartic-acid Schiff-bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallam, S. A.; Orabi, A. S.; Abbas, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    Ni(II) complexes of (S,E)-2-(2-OHbenzilydene)aspartic acid; (S,E)-2-(2,3-diOHbenzilydene)aspartic acid-; (S,E)-2-(2,4-diOH-benzilydene)aspartic acid; (S,E)-2-(2,5-diOHbenzilydene)aspartic acid and (S,E)-2-((2-OHnaphthalene-1-yl)methylene)aspartic acid Schiff-bases have been synthesized by template method in ethanol or ammonia media. They were characterized by elemental analyses, conductivity measurements, magnetic moment, UV, IR and 1H nmr spectra as well as thermal analysis (TG, DTG, DTA). The Schiff-bases are dibasic tridentate or tetradentate donors and the complexes have square planar and octahedral structures. The complexes decompose in two or three steps where kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the decomposition steps were computed. The interactions of the formed complexes with FM-DNA were monitored by UV and fluorescence spectroscopy.

  19. Antifouling gold surfaces grafted with aspartic acid and glutamic acid based zwitterionic polymer brushes.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenchen; Liu, Qingsheng; Liu, Lingyun

    2014-10-28

    We report two new amino acid based antifouling zwitterionic polymers, poly(N(4)-(2-methacrylamidoethyl)asparagine) (pAspAA) and poly(N(5)-(2-methacrylamidoethyl)glutamine) (pGluAA). The vinyl monomers were developed from aspartic acid and glutamic acid. Surface-initiated photoiniferter-mediated polymerization was employed to graft polymer brushes from gold surfaces. Different thickness of polymer brushes was controlled by varying UV irradiation time. The nonspecific adsorption from undiluted human blood serum and plasma was studied by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). With the polymer film as thin as 11-12 nm, the adsorption on pAspAA from serum and plasma was as low as 0.75 and 5.18 ng/cm(2), respectively, and 1.88 and 10.15 ng/cm(2), respectively, for pGluAA. The adsorption amount is comparable to or even better than other amino acid based zwitterionic polymers such as poly(serine methacrylate), poly(lysine methacrylamide), and poly(ornithine methacrylamide) and other widely used antifouling polymers such as poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate), even under thinner polymer film thickness. The pAspAA and pGluAA grafted surfaces also showed strong resistance to endothelial cell attachment. The possession of both zwitterionic structure and hydrophilic amide groups, biomimetic property, and multifunctionality make pAspAA and pGluAA promising candidates for biocompatible antifouling functionalizable materials. PMID:25262768

  20. Antifouling gold surfaces grafted with aspartic acid and glutamic acid based zwitterionic polymer brushes.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenchen; Liu, Qingsheng; Liu, Lingyun

    2014-10-28

    We report two new amino acid based antifouling zwitterionic polymers, poly(N(4)-(2-methacrylamidoethyl)asparagine) (pAspAA) and poly(N(5)-(2-methacrylamidoethyl)glutamine) (pGluAA). The vinyl monomers were developed from aspartic acid and glutamic acid. Surface-initiated photoiniferter-mediated polymerization was employed to graft polymer brushes from gold surfaces. Different thickness of polymer brushes was controlled by varying UV irradiation time. The nonspecific adsorption from undiluted human blood serum and plasma was studied by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). With the polymer film as thin as 11-12 nm, the adsorption on pAspAA from serum and plasma was as low as 0.75 and 5.18 ng/cm(2), respectively, and 1.88 and 10.15 ng/cm(2), respectively, for pGluAA. The adsorption amount is comparable to or even better than other amino acid based zwitterionic polymers such as poly(serine methacrylate), poly(lysine methacrylamide), and poly(ornithine methacrylamide) and other widely used antifouling polymers such as poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate), even under thinner polymer film thickness. The pAspAA and pGluAA grafted surfaces also showed strong resistance to endothelial cell attachment. The possession of both zwitterionic structure and hydrophilic amide groups, biomimetic property, and multifunctionality make pAspAA and pGluAA promising candidates for biocompatible antifouling functionalizable materials.

  1. Associations of White Blood Cell Count,Alanine Aminotransferase,and Aspartate Aminotransferase in the First Trimester withGestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    2016-06-10

    Objective To explore the associations of white blood cell (WBC) count,alanine aminotransferase (ALT),and aspartate aminotransferase(AST) in the first trimester of pregnancy with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Methods Totally 725 GDM women and 935 women who remained euglycemic throughout pregnancy were enrolled in this study. Pre-pregnancy weight/height were recorded. WBC,ALT,and AST levels were detected between 8 and 12 weeks of pregnancy.At 24 to 28 weeks of pregnancy,the glucose and insulin levels were measured. The WBC,ALT,and AST levels were compared between two groups,and the associations of WBC,ALT,and AST levels with the blood glucose and insulin levels were retrospectively analyzed. Meanwhile,the potential associations of those factors with the occurrence of GDM were analzyed. Results WBC count [9.41(8.15,10.84)?10(9)/L vs. 9.04 (7.64,10.37)?10(9)/L,P=1.0?10(-5)] and ALT levels [18.00(12.00,30.00)U/L vs. 16.00 (11.00,26.00)U/L,P=0.004] in the first trimester of pregnancy were significantly increased in GDM subjects than in normal glucose tolerance(NGT)subjects;however,the AST level showed no significant difference between these two groups [41.00 (26.00,43.00)U/L vs. 41.00 (23.00,43.00)U/L,P=0.588]. Logistic regression analysis illustrated that elevated WBC count was an independent risk factor for GDM after adjustment for age,pre-pregnancy body mass index,blood pressure,and family history of diabetes(OR=1.119,P=0.001). The ROC curve revealed that threshold of WBC count was 7.965?10(9)/L(AUC=0.566,P=1?10(-5)),which had a sensitivity of 79.4% and a specificity of 31.3%. Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance was positively correlated with WBC count(B=0.051,P=0.022,R(2)=0.083);1-hour blood glucose after oral 50 grams of sugar (B=0.044,P=0.001,R(2)=0.044) and fasting plasma true insulin(B=0.214,P=0.032,R(2)=0.066) were positively correlated

  2. Developmental changes in aspartate-family amino acid biosynthesis in pea chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, W.R.; Cato, L.W.; Stephens, B.W.; Reeves, M. )

    1990-05-01

    Isolated chloroplasts are known to synthesize the asp-derived amino acids (ile, hse, lys and thr) from ({sup 14}C)asp (Mills et al, 1980, Plant Physiol. 65, 1166). Now, we have studied the influence of tissue age on essential amino acid biosynthesis in pea (Pisum sativum) plastids. Chloroplasts from the younger (third and fourth) leaves of 12 day old plants, were 2-3 times more active in synthesizing lys and thr from ({sup 14}C)asp than those from older (first or second) leaves. We also examined two key pathway enzymes (aspartate kinase and homoserine dehydrogenase); with each enzyme,a activity in younger leaves was about 2 times that in plastids from older tissue. Both lys- and thr-sensitive forms of aspartate kinase are known in plants; in agreement with earlier work, we found that lys-sensitive activity was about 4 times higher in the younger tissues, while the thr-sensitive activity changed little during development (Davies and Miflin, 1977, Plant Sci. Lett. 9, 323). Recently the role of aspartate kinase and homoserine dehydrogenase in controlling asp-family amino acid synthesis has been questioned (Giovanelli et al, 1989, Plant Physiol. 90, 1584); we hope that measurements of amino acid levels in chloroplasts as well as further enzyme studies will help us to better understand the regulation of asp-family amino acid synthesis.

  3. Age estimation in forensic sciences: Application of combined aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Alkass, K; Buchholz, B A; Ohtani, S; Yamamoto, T; Druid, H; Spalding, S L

    2009-11-02

    Age determination of unknown human bodies is important in the setting of a crime investigation or a mass disaster, since the age at death, birth date and year of death, as well as gender, can guide investigators to the correct identity among a large number of possible matches. Traditional morphological methods used by anthropologists to determine age are often imprecise, whereas chemical analysis of tooth dentin, such as aspartic acid racemization has shown reproducible and more precise results. In this paper we analyze teeth from Swedish individuals using both aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon methodologies. The rationale behind using radiocarbon analysis is that above-ground testing of nuclear weapons during the cold war (1955-1963) caused an extreme increase in global levels of carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) which have been carefully recorded over time. Forty-four teeth from 41 individuals were analyzed using aspartic acid racemization analysis of tooth crown dentin or radiocarbon analysis of enamel and ten of these were split and subjected to both radiocarbon and racemization analysis. Combined analysis showed that the two methods correlated well (R2=0.66, p < 0.05). Radiocarbon analysis showed an excellent precision with an overall absolute error of 0.6 {+-} 04 years. Aspartic acid racemization also showed a good precision with an overall absolute error of 5.4 {+-} 4.2 years. Whereas radiocarbon analysis gives an estimated year of birth, racemization analysis indicates the chronological age of the individual at the time of death. We show how these methods in combination can also assist in the estimation of date of death of an unidentified victim. This strategy can be of significant assistance in forensic casework involving dead victim identification.

  4. Anticonvulsant effects of phencyclidine-like drugs: relation to N-methyl-D-aspartic acid antagonism.

    PubMed

    Leander, J D; Rathbun, R C; Zimmerman, D M

    1988-06-28

    Various compounds that have been identified in the literature as binding to the [3H]phencyclidine receptor site and as producing behavioral effects similar to phencyclidine (phencyclidine-like) protected mice from maximal electric shock-induced tonic-extensor seizures. These anticonvulsant effects appear to be due to blockade of the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor, as recently reported for phencyclidine-like compounds. Phencyclidine-like compounds produced their anticonvulsant effects at doses that were also neurologically impairing.

  5. Age estimation in forensic sciences: application of combined aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon analysis.

    PubMed

    Alkass, Kanar; Buchholz, Bruce A; Ohtani, Susumu; Yamamoto, Toshiharu; Druid, Henrik; Spalding, Kirsty L

    2010-05-01

    Age determination of unknown human bodies is important in the setting of a crime investigation or a mass disaster because the age at death, birth date, and year of death as well as gender can guide investigators to the correct identity among a large number of possible matches. Traditional morphological methods used by anthropologists to determine age are often imprecise, whereas chemical analysis of tooth dentin, such as aspartic acid racemization, has shown reproducible and more precise results. In this study, we analyzed teeth from Swedish individuals using both aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon methodologies. The rationale behind using radiocarbon analysis is that aboveground testing of nuclear weapons during the cold war (1955-1963) caused an extreme increase in global levels of carbon-14 ((14)C), which has been carefully recorded over time. Forty-four teeth from 41 individuals were analyzed using aspartic acid racemization analysis of tooth crown dentin or radiocarbon analysis of enamel, and 10 of these were split and subjected to both radiocarbon and racemization analysis. Combined analysis showed that the two methods correlated well (R(2) = 0.66, p < 0.05). Radiocarbon analysis showed an excellent precision with an overall absolute error of 1.0 +/- 0.6 years. Aspartic acid racemization also showed a good precision with an overall absolute error of 5.4 +/- 4.2 years. Whereas radiocarbon analysis gives an estimated year of birth, racemization analysis indicates the chronological age of the individual at the time of death. We show how these methods in combination can also assist in the estimation of date of death of an unidentified victim. This strategy can be of significant assistance in forensic casework involving dead victim identification.

  6. Age estimation in forensic sciences: application of combined aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon analysis.

    PubMed

    Alkass, Kanar; Buchholz, Bruce A; Ohtani, Susumu; Yamamoto, Toshiharu; Druid, Henrik; Spalding, Kirsty L

    2010-05-01

    Age determination of unknown human bodies is important in the setting of a crime investigation or a mass disaster because the age at death, birth date, and year of death as well as gender can guide investigators to the correct identity among a large number of possible matches. Traditional morphological methods used by anthropologists to determine age are often imprecise, whereas chemical analysis of tooth dentin, such as aspartic acid racemization, has shown reproducible and more precise results. In this study, we analyzed teeth from Swedish individuals using both aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon methodologies. The rationale behind using radiocarbon analysis is that aboveground testing of nuclear weapons during the cold war (1955-1963) caused an extreme increase in global levels of carbon-14 ((14)C), which has been carefully recorded over time. Forty-four teeth from 41 individuals were analyzed using aspartic acid racemization analysis of tooth crown dentin or radiocarbon analysis of enamel, and 10 of these were split and subjected to both radiocarbon and racemization analysis. Combined analysis showed that the two methods correlated well (R(2) = 0.66, p < 0.05). Radiocarbon analysis showed an excellent precision with an overall absolute error of 1.0 +/- 0.6 years. Aspartic acid racemization also showed a good precision with an overall absolute error of 5.4 +/- 4.2 years. Whereas radiocarbon analysis gives an estimated year of birth, racemization analysis indicates the chronological age of the individual at the time of death. We show how these methods in combination can also assist in the estimation of date of death of an unidentified victim. This strategy can be of significant assistance in forensic casework involving dead victim identification. PMID:19965905

  7. Probing the interaction of the amino acid alanine with the surface of ZnO(1010).

    PubMed

    Gao, Y K; Traeger, F; Shekhah, O; Idriss, H; Wöll, C

    2009-10-01

    The adsorption modes and stability of the amino acid alanine (NH(2)-CH(CH(3))-COOH) have been studied on the nonpolar single crystal surface of zinc oxide, ZnO(1010), experimentally by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and computationally using density functional theory (DFT). Deposition at 200 K was found to lead to the formation of multilayers identified by an XPS N1s peak at 401.7 eV assigned to the NH(3)(+) group, a fingerprint of the zwitterionic structure of alanine in the solid state. Heating to 300 K resulted in the removal of most of the multilayers with the remaining surface coverage estimated to 0.4 with respect to Zn cations. At this temperature most of the alanine molecules are found to be deprotonated (dissociated), yielding a carboxylate species (NH(2)-CH(CH(3))-COO(-) (a) + OH (s); where O is surface oxygen, (a) for adsorbed and (s) for surface species). Further heating of the surface resulted in a gradual decrease of the surface coverage and by 500 K a large fraction of adsorbed alanine molecules have desorbed from the surface. Total energy DFT computations of different adsorbate species identified two stable dissociative adsorption modes: bidentate and monodentate. The bidentate species with adsorption energy of 1.75 eV was found to be more stable than the monodentate species by about 0.7 eV.

  8. Probing the interaction of the amino acid alanine with the surface of ZnO(1010).

    PubMed

    Gao, Y K; Traeger, F; Shekhah, O; Idriss, H; Wöll, C

    2009-10-01

    The adsorption modes and stability of the amino acid alanine (NH(2)-CH(CH(3))-COOH) have been studied on the nonpolar single crystal surface of zinc oxide, ZnO(1010), experimentally by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and computationally using density functional theory (DFT). Deposition at 200 K was found to lead to the formation of multilayers identified by an XPS N1s peak at 401.7 eV assigned to the NH(3)(+) group, a fingerprint of the zwitterionic structure of alanine in the solid state. Heating to 300 K resulted in the removal of most of the multilayers with the remaining surface coverage estimated to 0.4 with respect to Zn cations. At this temperature most of the alanine molecules are found to be deprotonated (dissociated), yielding a carboxylate species (NH(2)-CH(CH(3))-COO(-) (a) + OH (s); where O is surface oxygen, (a) for adsorbed and (s) for surface species). Further heating of the surface resulted in a gradual decrease of the surface coverage and by 500 K a large fraction of adsorbed alanine molecules have desorbed from the surface. Total energy DFT computations of different adsorbate species identified two stable dissociative adsorption modes: bidentate and monodentate. The bidentate species with adsorption energy of 1.75 eV was found to be more stable than the monodentate species by about 0.7 eV. PMID:19596338

  9. Absorption and utilization of organic matter by the strict autotroph, Thiobacillus thiooxidans, with special reference to aspartic acid.

    PubMed

    Butler, R G; Umbreit, W W

    1966-02-01

    Butler, Richard G. (Rutgers, The State University, New Brunswick, N.J.), and Wayne W. Umbreit. Absorption and utilization of organic matter by the strict autotroph, Thiobacillus thiooxidans, with special reference to aspartic acid. J. Bacteriol. 91:661-666. 1966.-The strictly autotrophic bacterium, Thiobacillus thiooxidans, can be shown to assimilate a variety of organic materials. Aspartic acid can be assimilated into protein and can be converted into CO(2), but even in the presence of sulfur it cannot serve as the sole source of carbon for growth. The reason appears to be that aspartic acid is converted into inhibitory materials.

  10. Effect of aspartame and aspartate loading upon plasma and erythrocyte free amino acid levels in normal adult volunteers.

    PubMed

    Stegink, L D; Filer, L J; Baker, G L

    1977-10-01

    Aspartame is a dipeptide (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanyl-methyl ester) with a sweeting potential 180 to 200 times that of sucrose. Questions have been raised about potential toxic effects of its constituent amino acids, aspartate and phenylalanine when the compound is ingested in large amounts. Plasma and erythrocyte amino acid levels were measured in 12 normal subjects after administration of either Aspartame (34 mg/kg) or equimolar quantities of aspartate (13 mg/kg) in a crossover design. No changes in either plasma or erythrocyte aspartate levels were noted at any time after either Aspartame or aspartate ingestion. Plasma phenylalanine levels decrease slightly after aspartate loading, and increased from fasting levels (4.9 +/- 1 mumoles/100 ml) to 10.7 +/- 1.9 mumoles/100 ml about 45 to 60 minutes after Aspartame loading. Phenylalanine levels returned to baseline by 4 hours. Erythrocyte phenylalanine levels showed similar changes.

  11. The metabolism of histamine in the Drosophila optic lobe involves an ommatidial pathway: β-alanine recycles through the retina.

    PubMed

    Borycz, Janusz; Borycz, Jolanta A; Edwards, Tara N; Boulianne, Gabrielle L; Meinertzhagen, Ian A

    2012-04-15

    Flies recycle the photoreceptor neurotransmitter histamine by conjugating it to β-alanine to form β-alanyl-histamine (carcinine). The conjugation is regulated by Ebony, while Tan hydrolyses carcinine, releasing histamine and β-alanine. In Drosophila, β-alanine synthesis occurs either from uracil or from the decarboxylation of aspartate but detailed roles for the enzymes responsible remain unclear. Immunohistochemically detected β-alanine is present throughout the fly's entire brain, and is enhanced in the retina especially in the pseudocone, pigment and photoreceptor cells of the ommatidia. HPLC determinations reveal 10.7 ng of β-alanine in the wild-type head, roughly five times more than histamine. When wild-type flies drink uracil their head β-alanine increases more than after drinking l-aspartic acid, indicating the effectiveness of the uracil pathway. Mutants of black, which lack aspartate decarboxylase, cannot synthesize β-alanine from l-aspartate but can still synthesize it efficiently from uracil. Our findings demonstrate a novel function for pigment cells, which not only screen ommatidia from stray light but also store and transport β-alanine and carcinine. This role is consistent with a β-alanine-dependent histamine recycling pathway occurring not only in the photoreceptor terminals in the lamina neuropile, where carcinine occurs in marginal glia, but vertically via a long pathway that involves the retina. The lamina's marginal glia are also a hub involved in the storage and/or disposal of carcinine and β-alanine.

  12. [Application of aspartic acid as a non-specific binding inhibitor in the enrichment of phosphopeptides with titanium dioxide].

    PubMed

    Chi, Ming; Bi, Wei; Lu, Zhuang; Song, Lina; Jia, Wei; Zhang, Yangjun; Qian, Xiaohong; Cai, Yun

    2010-02-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is one of metal oxides widely used for phosphopeptide enrichment in phosphoproteomic research nowadays. However it can bind to some non-phosphorylated peptides containing one or more aspartic acid residues and/or glutamic acid residues. These non-phosphorylated peptides can be eluted along with phosphorylated peptides and cause the reduction of the selectivity. Conventional inhibitors for the non-specific binding of non-phosphorylated peptides can often contaminate the ion source of mass spectrometry and therefore their applications are limited in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). In this study, aspartic acid was reported as a novel non-specific binding inhibitor for phosphopeptide enrichment by titanium dioxide. Firstly, the tryptic peptide mixtures of 3 and 9 standard proteins were used for the comparison of the enrichment efficiency of titanium dioxide. The effects with the presence of aspartic acid, glutamic acid and no-inhibitor in the enrichment systems were compared separately. The results showed that aspartic acid can greatly improve the selectivity of titanium dioxide for phosphopeptide enrichment. Then, aspartic acid was used for the enrichment of tryptic peptide mixture of C57BL/6J mouse liver lysate and good results were also obtained which demonstrated that aspartic acid was a promising non-specific binding inhibitor for complex biological samples. Besides, no contamination in the ion source occurred during the mass spectrometric analysis.

  13. The (unusual) aspartic acid in the metal coordination sphere of the prokaryotic zinc finger domain.

    PubMed

    D'Abrosca, Gianluca; Russo, Luigi; Palmieri, Maddalena; Baglivo, Ilaria; Netti, Fortuna; de Paola, Ivan; Zaccaro, Laura; Farina, Biancamaria; Iacovino, Rosa; Pedone, Paolo Vincenzo; Isernia, Carla; Fattorusso, Roberto; Malgieri, Gaetano

    2016-08-01

    The possibility of choices of protein ligands and coordination geometries leads to diverse Zn(II) binding sites in zinc-proteins, allowing a range of important biological roles. The prokaryotic Cys2His2 zinc finger domain (originally found in the Ros protein from Agrobacterium tumefaciens) tetrahedrally coordinates zinc through two cysteine and two histidine residues and it does not adopt a correct fold in the absence of the metal ion. Ros is the first structurally characterized member of a family of bacterial proteins that presents several amino acid changes in the positions occupied in Ros by the zinc coordinating residues. In particular, the second position is very often occupied by an aspartic acid although the coordination of structural zinc by an aspartate in eukaryotic zinc fingers is very unusual. Here, by appropriately mutating the protein Ros, we characterize the aspartate role within the coordination sphere of this family of proteins demonstrating how the presence of this residue only slightly perturbs the functional structure of the prokaryotic zinc finger domain while it greatly influences its thermodynamic properties. PMID:27238756

  14. Aspartic acid-promoted highly selective and sensitive colorimetric sensing of cysteine in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Qian, Qin; Deng, Jingjing; Wang, Dalei; Yang, Lifen; Yu, Ping; Mao, Lanqun

    2012-11-01

    Direct selective determination of cysteine in the cerebral system is of great importance because of the crucial roles of cysteine in physiological and pathological processes. In this study, we report a sensitive and selective colorimetric assay for cysteine in the rat brain with gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) as the signal readout. Initially, Au-NPs synthesized with citrate as the stabilizer are red in color and exhibit absorption at 520 nm. The addition of an aqueous solution (20 μL) of cysteine or aspartic acid alone to a 200 μL Au-NP dispersion causes no aggregation, while the addition of an aqueous solution of cysteine into a Au-NP dispersion containing aspartic acid (1.8 mM) causes the aggregation of Au-NPs and thus results in the color change of the colloid from wine red to blue. These changes are ascribed to the ion pair interaction between aspartic acid and cysteine on the interface between Au-NPs and solution. The concentration of cysteine can be visualized with the naked eye and determined by UV-vis spectroscopy. The signal output shows a linear relationship for cysteine within the concentration range from 0.166 to 1.67 μM with a detection limit of 100 nM. The assay demonstrated here is highly selective and is free from the interference of other natural amino acids and other thiol-containing species as well as the species commonly existing in the brain such as lactate, ascorbic acid, and glucose. The basal dialysate level of cysteine in the microdialysate from the striatum of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats is determined to be around 9.6 ± 2.1 μM. The method demonstrated here is facile but reliable and durable and is envisaged to be applicable to understanding the chemical essence involved in physiological and pathological events associated with cysteine. PMID:23025476

  15. Solvent-Free Polymerization of L-Aspartic Acid in the Presence of D-Sorbitol to Obtain Water Soluble or Network Copolymers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    L-aspartic acid was thermally polymerized in the presence of D-sorbitol with the goal of synthesizing new, higher molecular weight water soluble and absorbent copolymers. No reaction occurred when aspartic acid alone was heated at 170 or 200 degrees C. In contrast, heating sorbitol and aspartic ac...

  16. Catalysis of the Oligomerization of O-Phospho-Serine, Aspartic Acid, or Glutamic Acid by Cationic Micelles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehler, Christof; Hill, Aubrey R., Jr.; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1996-01-01

    Treatment of relatively concentrated aqueous solutions of O-phospho-serine (50 mM), aspartic acid (100 mM) or glutamic acid (100 mM) with carbonyldiimidazole leads to the formation of an activated intermediate that oligomerizes efficiently. When the concentration of amino acid is reduced tenfold, few long oligomers can be detected. Positively-charged cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide micelles concentrate the negatively-charged activated intermediates of the amino acids at their surfaces and catalyze efficient oligomerization even from dilute solutions.

  17. Catalysis of the Oligomerization of O-Phospho-Serine, Aspartic Acid, or Glutamic Acid by Cationic Micelles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohler, Christof; Hill, Aubrey R., Jr.; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1996-01-01

    Treatment of relatively concentrated aqueous solutions of 0-phospho-serine (50 mM), aspartic acid (100 mM) or glutamic acid (100 mM) with carbonyldiimidazole leads to the formation of an activated intermediate that oligomerizes efficiently. When the concentration of amino acid is reduced tenfold, few long oligomers can be detected. Positively-charged cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide micelles concentrate the negatively-charged activated intermediates of the amino acids at their surfaces and catalyze efficient oligomerization even from dilute solutions.

  18. Electron attachment to amino acid clusters in helium nanodroplets: Glycine, alanine, and serine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira da Silva, F.; Denifl, S.; Märk, T. D.; Ellis, A. M.; Scheier, P.

    2010-06-01

    The first detailed study of electron attachment to amino acid clusters is reported. The amino acids chosen for investigation were glycine, alanine, and serine. Clusters of these amino acids were formed inside helium nanodroplets, which provide a convenient low temperature (0.37 K) environment for growing noncovalent clusters. When subjected to low energy (2 eV) electron impact the chemistry for glycine and alanine clusters was found to be similar. In both cases, parent cluster anions were the major products, which contrasts with the corresponding monomers in the gas phase, where the dehydrogenated products ([AAn-H]-, where AA=amino acid monomer) dominate. Serine clusters are different, with the major product being the parent anion minus an OH group, an outcome presumably conferred by the facile loss of an OH group from the β carbon of serine. In addition to the bare parent anions and various fragment anions, helium atoms are also observed attached to both the parent anion clusters and the dehydrogenated parent anion clusters. Finally, we present the first anion yield spectra of amino acid clusters from doped helium nanodroplets as a function of incident electron energy.

  19. [Aspartic Acid Generated in the Process of Chlorination Disinfection By-product Dichloroacetonitrile].

    PubMed

    Ding, Chun-sheng; Li, Nai-jun; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Meng-qing

    2016-05-15

    In this study, a method was developed for the determination of dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) in drinking water by liquid- liquid micro-extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry ( LLE-GC/MS), which used 1,2-dibromopropane as the internal standard and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) as the extractant for high accuracy. The aspartic acid was used as the precursor of the DCAN formation during chlorination and the influencing factors were evaluated. The formation mechanism of DCAN was also discussed. The results showed that the DCAN amount increased with the increase of pH value under the neutral and acidic conditions, however, the amount of DCAN decreased with the increase of pH value under the alkali condition. And the final amount of DCAN under the alkali condition was much less than that under the neutral and acidic conditions. It was also found that the DCAN amount increased with the increase of chlorine addition, while the temperature in the range of 10-30°C had little influence on the DCAN formation. The formation process of the DCAN from aspartic acid by chlorination included seven steps, such as substitution, decarboxylation, oxidation, etc and ultimately formed DCAN. PMID:27506037

  20. [Aspartic Acid Generated in the Process of Chlorination Disinfection By-product Dichloroacetonitrile].

    PubMed

    Ding, Chun-sheng; Li, Nai-jun; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Meng-qing

    2016-05-15

    In this study, a method was developed for the determination of dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) in drinking water by liquid- liquid micro-extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry ( LLE-GC/MS), which used 1,2-dibromopropane as the internal standard and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) as the extractant for high accuracy. The aspartic acid was used as the precursor of the DCAN formation during chlorination and the influencing factors were evaluated. The formation mechanism of DCAN was also discussed. The results showed that the DCAN amount increased with the increase of pH value under the neutral and acidic conditions, however, the amount of DCAN decreased with the increase of pH value under the alkali condition. And the final amount of DCAN under the alkali condition was much less than that under the neutral and acidic conditions. It was also found that the DCAN amount increased with the increase of chlorine addition, while the temperature in the range of 10-30°C had little influence on the DCAN formation. The formation process of the DCAN from aspartic acid by chlorination included seven steps, such as substitution, decarboxylation, oxidation, etc and ultimately formed DCAN.

  1. The role for an invariant aspartic acid in hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferases is examined using saturation mutagenesis, functional analysis, and X-ray crystallography.

    PubMed

    Canyuk, B; Focia, P J; Eakin, A E

    2001-03-01

    The role of an invariant aspartic acid (Asp137) in hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferases (HPRTs) was examined by site-directed and saturation mutagenesis, functional analysis, and X-ray crystallography using the HPRT from Trypanosoma cruzi. Alanine substitution (D137A) resulted in a 30-fold decrease of k(cat), suggesting that Asp137 participates in catalysis. Saturation mutagenesis was used to generate a library of mutant HPRTs with random substitutions at position 137, and active enzymes were identified by complementation of a bacterial purine auxotroph. Functional analyses of the mutants, including determination of steady-state kinetic parameters and pH-rate dependence, indicate that glutamic acid or glutamine can replace the wild-type aspartate. However, the catalytic efficiency and pH-rate profile for the structural isosteric mutant, D137N, were similar to the D137A mutant. Crystal structures of four of the mutant enzymes were determined in ternary complex with substrate ligands. Structures of the D137E and D137Q mutants reveal potential hydrogen bonds, utilizing several bound water molecules in addition to protein atoms, that position these side chains within hydrogen bond distance of the bound purine analogue, similar in position to the aspartate in the wild-type structure. The crystal structure of the D137N mutant demonstrates that the Asn137 side chain does not form interactions with the purine substrate but instead forms novel interactions that cause the side chain to adopt a nonfunctional rotamer. The results from these structural and functional analyses demonstrate that HPRTs do not require a general base at position 137 for catalysis. Instead, hydrogen bonding sufficiently stabilizes the developing partial positive charge at the N7-atom of the purine substrate in the transition-state to promote catalysis.

  2. Aspartic acid-96 is the internal proton donor in the reprotonation of the Schiff base of bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, H.; Marti, T.; Holz, M.; Mogi, T.; Lindau, M.; Khorana, H.G.; Heyn, M.P. )

    1989-12-01

    Above pH 8 the decay of the photocycle intermediate M of bacteriorhodopsin splits into two components: the usual millisecond pH-independent component and an additional slower component with a rate constant proportional to the molar concentration of H+, (H+). In parallel, the charge translocation signal associated with the reprotonation of the Schiff base develops a similar slow component. These observations are explained by a two-step reprotonation mechanism. An internal donor first reprotonates the Schiff base in the decay of M to N and is then reprotonated from the cytoplasm in the N----O transition. The decay rate of N is proportional to (H+). By postulating a back reaction from N to M, the M decay splits up into two components, with the slower one having the same pH dependence as the decay of N. Photocycle, photovoltage, and pH-indicator experiments with mutants in which aspartic acid-96 is replaced by asparagine or alanine, which we call D96N and D96A, suggest that Asp-96 is the internal proton donor involved in the re-uptake pathway. In both mutants the stoichiometry of proton pumping is the same as in wild type. However, the M decay is monophasic, with the logarithm of the decay time (log (tau)) linearly dependent on pH, suggesting that the internal donor is absent and that the Schiff base is directly reprotonated from the cytoplasm. Like H+, azide increases the M decay rate in D96N. The rate constant is proportional to the azide concentration and can become greater than 100 times greater than in wild type. Thus, azide functions as a mobile proton donor directly reprotonating the Schiff base in a bimolecular reaction. Both the proton and azide effects, which are absent in wild type, indicate that the internal donor is removed and that the reprotonation pathway is different from wild type in these mutants.

  3. Aspartic acid racemization in dentin of the third molar for age estimation of the Chaoshan population in South China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shisheng; Lv, Yanyi; Wang, Dian; Yu, Xiaojun

    2016-09-01

    Aspartic acid racemization in teeth has been increasingly used to estimate chronological age with a considerably high accuracy in forensic practice. The Chaoshan population in South China is relatively isolated in geography, and has specific lifestyle and dietary inhibits. It is still unknown whether this method is suitable for this population. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between chronological age and the d/l aspartic acid ratio in dentin in the third molar tooth of the Chaoshan population. Fifty-eight non-carious third molar teeth (31 mandibles and 27 maxillae), from 58 living individuals of known age (24 males and 34 females), were retrieved. Dentin was extracted from these teeth. The d- and l-aspartic acids in dentins were separated and detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Linear regression was performed between the d/l aspartic acid ratio of dentins and chronological age. Results showed that the correlation coefficient (r) was 0.969, and the mean absolute error (MAE) was 2.19 years, its standard deviation (SD) was ±1.53 years, indicating excellent correlation. There was no significant difference in racemization rates of dentin between sexes (P=0.113, F=2.6), or between mandibles and maxillae (P=0.964, F=0.000). Results indicate that the ratio of the d and l forms of aspartic acid of dentins, in the third molar, is closely correlated with chronological age, special lifestyle do no obviously affect the accuracy of the age estimations by aspartic acid racemization of the dentin in the third molar and that aspartic acid racemization in the third molar dentin can be used as an accurate method to estimate chronological age in the Chaoshan population in South China.

  4. Therapeutic effects of D-aspartic acid beta-hydroxamate (DAH) on Friend erythroleukemia.

    PubMed

    Tournaire, R; Malley, S; Hamedi-Sangsari, F; Thomasset, N; Grange, J; Dore, J F; Vila, J

    1994-08-01

    D-aspartic acid beta-hydroxamate (DAH), an aspartic acid analogue, exerts anti-tumoral activity against murine leukemia L5178Y both in vitro and in vivo. We show here that DAH displays activity against Friend leukemia cells (FLC) in vitro: a concentration of 2 mM results in a total inhibition of cell growth. DAH is also active in vivo against Friend virus (FV-P)-induced erythroleukemia. Treatment with DAH, given for 95 days as a single daily i.p. injection to DBA/2 mice 3 days following FV-P inoculation, induced a marked increase of 212% in the mean survival time (MST) of treated animals. Since FV-P-induced erythroleukemia is characterized by the proliferation of mature erythroid precursors, we examined the effect of DAH treatment on erythroid colony-forming cells (CFU-E) and observed that the number of CFU-E per spleen was 30 times lower in DAH-treated mice than in the controls. To gain further insight into the early effects of DAH treatment on the early phase of Friend disease, we examined the effects of short DAH treatment on spleen size, hematocrit and viremia in FV-P-infected mice. DAH treatment initiated 3 days post infection (p.i.) inhibited splenomegaly, prevented virus-induced polycythemia, and reduced serum viremia. Late DAH treatment (18 days p.i.) induced regression of FVP-induced disease as evidenced by reduction of spleen weight.

  5. Poly(aspartic acid) (PAA) hydrolases and PAA biodegradation: current knowledge and impact on applications.

    PubMed

    Hiraishi, Tomohiro

    2016-02-01

    Thermally synthesized poly(aspartic acid) (tPAA) is a bio-based, biocompatible, biodegradable, and water-soluble polymer that has a high proportion of β-Asp units and equivalent moles of D- and L-Asp units. Poly(aspartic acid) (PAA) hydrolase-1 and hydrolase-2 are tPAA biodegradation enzymes purified from Gram-negative bacteria. PAA hydrolase-1 selectively cleaves amide bonds between β-Asp units via an endo-type process, whereas PAA hydrolase-2 catalyzes the exo-type hydrolysis of the products of tPAA hydrolysis by PAA hydrolase-1. The novel reactivity of PAA hydrolase-1 makes it a good candidate for a biocatalyst in β-peptide synthesis. This mini-review gives an overview of PAA hydrolases with emphasis on their biochemical and functional properties, in particular, PAA hydrolase-1. Functionally related enzymes, such as poly(R-3-hydroxybutyrate) depolymerases and β-aminopeptidases, are compared to PAA hydrolases. This mini-review also provides findings that offer an insight into the catalytic mechanisms of PAA hydrolase-1 from Pedobacter sp. KP-2. PMID:26695157

  6. The amino acid sequence of the aspartate aminotransferase from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, V B; Maras, B; Barra, D; Doonan, S

    1991-01-01

    1. The single (cytosolic) aspartate aminotransferase was purified in high yield from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). 2. Amino-acid-sequence analysis was carried out by digestion of the protein with trypsin and with CNBr; some of the peptides produced were further subdigested with Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase or with pepsin. Peptides were sequenced by the dansyl-Edman method and/or by automated gas-phase methods. The amino acid sequence obtained was complete except for a probable gap of two residues as indicated by comparison with the structures of counterpart proteins in other species. 3. The N-terminus of the enzyme is blocked. Fast-atom-bombardment m.s. was used to identify the blocking group as an acetyl one. 4. Alignment of the sequence of the enzyme with those of vertebrate cytosolic and mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferases and with the enzyme from Escherichia coli showed that about 25% of residues are conserved between these distantly related forms. 5. Experimental details and confirmatory data for the results presented here are given in a Supplementary Publication (SUP 50164, 25 pages) that has been deposited at the British Library Document Supply Centre, Boston Spa. Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7 BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1991) 273, 5. PMID:1859361

  7. Multifunctional Environmental Smart Fertilizer Based on l-Aspartic Acid for Sustained Nutrient Release.

    PubMed

    Lü, Shaoyu; Feng, Chen; Gao, Chunmei; Wang, Xinggang; Xu, Xiubin; Bai, Xiao; Gao, Nannan; Liu, Mingzhu

    2016-06-22

    Fertilizer is one of the most important elements of modern agriculture. However, conventional fertilizer, when applied to crops, is vulnerable to losses through volatilization, leaching, nitrification, or other means. Such a loss limits crop yields and pollutes the environment. In an effort to enhance nutrient use efficiency and reduce environmental pollution, an environmental smart fertilizer was reported in the current study. Poly(aspartic acid) and a degradable macro-cross-linker based on l-aspartic acid were synthesized and introduced into the fertilizer as a superabsorbent to improve the fertilizer degradability and soil moisture-retention capacity. Sustained release behavior of the fertilizer was achieved in soil. Cumulative release of nitrogen and phosphorus was 79.8% and 64.4% after 30 days, respectively. The water-holding and water-retention capacities of soil with the superabsorbent are obviously higher than those of the control soil without superabsorbent. For the sample of 200 g of soil with 1.5 g of superabsorbent, the water-holding capacity is 81.8%, and the water-retention capacity remains 22.6% after 23 days. All of the current results in this study indicated that the as-prepared fertilizer has a promising application in sustainable modern agriculture. PMID:27244106

  8. Energetics and dynamics of the fragmentation reactions of protonated peptides containing methionine sulfoxide or aspartic acid via energy- and time-resolved surface induced dissociation.

    PubMed

    Lioe, Hadi; Laskin, Julia; Reid, Gavin E; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2007-10-25

    The surface-induced dissociation (SID) of six model peptides containing either methionine sulfoxide or aspartic acid (GAILM(O)GAILR, GAILM(O)GAILK, GAILM(O)GAILA, GAILDGAILR, GAILDGAILK, and GAILDGAILA) have been studied using a specially configured Fourier transform ion-cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS). In particular, we have investigated the energetics and dynamics associated with (i) preferential cleavage of the methionine sulfoxide side chain via the loss of CH3SOH (64 Da), and (ii) preferential cleavage of the amide bond C-terminal to aspartic acid. The role of proton mobility in these selective bond cleavage reactions was examined by changing the C-terminal residue of the peptide from arginine (nonmobile proton conditions) to lysine (partially mobile proton conditions) to alanine (mobile proton conditions). Time- and energy-resolved fragmentation efficiency curves (TFECs) reveal that selective cleavages due to the methionine sulfoxide and aspartic acid residues are characterized by slow fragmentation kinetics. RRKM modeling of the experimental data suggests that the slow kinetics is associated with large negative entropy effects and these may be due to the presence of rearrangements prior to fragmentation. It was found that the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor (A) for peptide fragmentations occurring via selective bond cleavages are 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than nonselective peptide fragmentation reactions, while the dissociation threshold (E0) is relatively invariant. This means that selective bond cleavage is kinetically disfavored compared to nonselective amide bond cleavage. It was also found that the energetics and dynamics for the preferential loss of CH3SOH from peptide ions containing methionine sulfoxide are very similar to selective C-terminal amide bond cleavage at the aspartic acid residue. These results suggest that while preferential cleavage can compete with amide bond cleavage energetically, dynamically, these processes

  9. Energetics and Dynamics of the Fragmentation Reactions of Protonated Peptides Containing Methionine Sulfoxide or Aspartic Acid via Energy- and Time-Resolved Surface Induced Dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Lioe, Hadi; Laskin, Julia; Reid, Gavin E.; O'Hair, Richard Aj

    2007-10-25

    The surface-induced dissociation (SID) of six model peptides containing either methionine sulfoxide or aspartic acid (GAILM(O)GAILR, GAILM(O)GAILK, GAILM(O)GAILA, GAILDGAILR, GAILDGAILK, and GAILDGAILA) have been studied using a specially configured Fourier transform ion-cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS). In particular, we have investigated the energetics and dynamics associated with (i) preferential cleavage of the methionine sulfoxide side chain via the loss of CH3SOH (64Da), and (ii) preferential cleavage of the amide bond C-terminal to aspartic acid. The role of proton mobility on these selective bond cleavage reactions was examined by changing the C-terminal residue of the peptide from arginine (non-mobile proton conditions) to lysine (partially-mobile proton conditions) to alanine (mobile proton conditions). Time- and energy-resolved fragmentation efficiency curves (TFEC) reveals that selective cleavages due to the methionine sulfoxide and aspartic acid residues are characterized by slow fragmentation kinetics. RRKM modeling of the experimental data suggests that the slow kinetics is associated with large negative entropy effects and these may be due to the presence of rearrangements prior to fragmentation. It was found that the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor (A) for peptide fragmentations occurring via selective bond cleavages are 1–2 orders of magnitude lower than non-selective peptide fragmentation reactions, while the dissociation threshold (E0) is relatively invariant. This means that selective bond cleavage is kinetically disfavored compared to non-selective amide bond cleavage. It was also found that the energetics and dynamics for the preferential loss of CH3SOH from peptide ions containing methionine sulfoxide are very similar to selective C-terminal amide bond cleavage at the aspartic acid residue. These results suggest that while preferential cleavage can compete with amide bond cleavage energetically, dynamically, these

  10. Solution structure of the squash aspartic acid proteinase inhibitor (SQAPI) and mutational analysis of pepsin inhibition.

    PubMed

    Headey, Stephen J; Macaskill, Ursula K; Wright, Michele A; Claridge, Jolyon K; Edwards, Patrick J B; Farley, Peter C; Christeller, John T; Laing, William A; Pascal, Steven M

    2010-08-27

    The squash aspartic acid proteinase inhibitor (SQAPI), a proteinaceous proteinase inhibitor from squash, is an effective inhibitor of a range of aspartic proteinases. Proteinaceous aspartic proteinase inhibitors are rare in nature. The only other example in plants probably evolved from a precursor serine proteinase inhibitor. Earlier work based on sequence homology modeling suggested SQAPI evolved from an ancestral cystatin. In this work, we determined the solution structure of SQAPI using NMR and show that SQAPI shares the same fold as a plant cystatin. The structure is characterized by a four-strand anti-parallel beta-sheet gripping an alpha-helix in an analogous manner to fingers of a hand gripping a tennis racquet. Truncation and site-specific mutagenesis revealed that the unstructured N terminus and the loop connecting beta-strands 1 and 2 are important for pepsin inhibition, but the loop connecting strands 3 and 4 is not. Using ambiguous restraints based on the mutagenesis results, SQAPI was then docked computationally to pepsin. The resulting model places the N-terminal strand of SQAPI in the S' side of the substrate binding cleft, whereas the first SQAPI loop binds on the S side of the cleft. The backbone of SQAPI does not interact with the pepsin catalytic Asp(32)-Asp(215) diad, thus avoiding cleavage. The data show that SQAPI does share homologous structural elements with cystatin and appears to retain a similar protease inhibitory mechanism despite its different target. This strongly supports our hypothesis that SQAPI evolved from an ancestral cystatin.

  11. β-alanine suppresses malignant breast epithelial cell aggressiveness through alterations in metabolism and cellular acidity in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Deregulated energetics is a property of most cancer cells. This phenomenon, known as the Warburg Effect or aerobic glycolysis, is characterized by increased glucose uptake, lactate export and extracellular acidification, even in the presence of oxygen. β-alanine is a non-essential amino acid that has previously been shown to be metabolized into carnosine, which functions as an intracellular buffer. Because of this buffering capacity, we investigated the effects of β-alanine on the metabolic cancerous phenotype. Methods Non-malignant MCF-10a and malignant MCF-7 breast epithelial cells were treated with β-alanine at 100 mM for 24 hours. Aerobic glycolysis was quantified by measuring extracellular acidification rate (ECAR) and oxidative metabolism was quantified by measuring oxygen consumption rate (OCR). mRNA of metabolism-related genes was quantified by qRT-PCR with corresponding protein expression quantified by immunoblotting, or by flow cytometry which was verified by confocal microscopy. Mitochondrial content was quantified using a mitochondria-specific dye and measured by flow cytometry. Results Cells treated with β-alanine displayed significantly suppressed basal and peak ECAR (aerobic glycolysis), with simultaneous increase in glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1). Additionally, cells treated with β-alanine exhibited significantly reduced basal and peak OCR (oxidative metabolism), which was accompanied by reduction in mitochondrial content with subsequent suppression of genes which promote mitochondrial biosynthesis. Suppression of glycolytic and oxidative metabolism by β-alanine resulted in the reduction of total metabolic rate, although cell viability was not affected. Because β-alanine treatment reduces extracellular acidity, a constituent of the invasive microenvironment that promotes progression, we investigated the effect of β-alanine on breast cell viability and migration. β-alanine was shown to reduce both cell migration and proliferation

  12. Development of poly(aspartic acid-co-malic acid) composites for calcium carbonate and sulphate scale inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mithil Kumar, N; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Jagadeesh, Dani; Kanny, K; Bux, F

    2015-01-01

    Polyaspartic acid (PSI) is suitable for the inhibition of inorganic scale deposition. To enhance its scale inhibition efficiency, PSI was modified by reacting aspartic acid with malic acid (MA) using thermal polycondensation polymerization. This reaction resulted in poly(aspartic acid-co-malic acid) (PSI-co-MA) dual polymer. The structural, chemical and thermal properties of the dual polymers were analysed by using scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and gel permeation chromatography. The effectiveness of six different molar ratios of PSI-co-MA dual polymer for calcium carbonate and calcium sulphate scale inhibition at laboratory scale batch experiments was evaluated with synthetic brine solution at selected doses of polymer at 65-70°C by the static scale test method. The performance of PSI-co-MA dual polymer for the inhibition of calcium carbonate and calcium sulphate precipitation was compared with that of a PSI single polymer. The PSI-co-MA exhibited excellent ability to control inorganic minerals, with approximately 85.36% calcium carbonate inhibition and 100% calcium sulphate inhibition at a level of 10 mg/L PSI-co-MA, respectively. Therefore, it may be reasonably concluded that PSI-co-MA is a highly effective scale inhibitor for cooling water treatment applications.

  13. Development of anti-scale poly(aspartic acid-citric acid) dual polymer systems for water treatment.

    PubMed

    Nayunigari, Mithil Kumar; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Kokkarachedu, Varaprasad; Kanny, K; Bux, F

    2014-01-01

    The formation of calcium sulphate and calcium carbonate scale poses major problems in heat exchangers and water cooling systems, thereby affecting the performance of these types of equipment. In order to inhibit these scale formations, new types of biodegradable water soluble single polymer and dual poly(aspartic acid-citric acid) polymers were developed and tested. The effectiveness of single polymer and four different compositions of poly aspartic acid and citric acid dual polymer systems as scale inhibitors were evaluated. Details of the synthesis, thermal stability, scale inhibition and the morphological characterization of single and dual polymers are presented in this scientific paper. It was found that the calcium sulphate scale inhibition rate was in the range 76.06-91.45%, while the calcium carbonate scale inhibition rate observed was in the range 23.37-30.0% at 65-70 °C. The finding suggests that the water soluble dual polymers are very effective in sulphate scale inhibition in comparison of calcium carbonate scale inhibition.

  14. Development of anti-scale poly(aspartic acid-citric acid) dual polymer systems for water treatment.

    PubMed

    Nayunigari, Mithil Kumar; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Kokkarachedu, Varaprasad; Kanny, K; Bux, F

    2014-01-01

    The formation of calcium sulphate and calcium carbonate scale poses major problems in heat exchangers and water cooling systems, thereby affecting the performance of these types of equipment. In order to inhibit these scale formations, new types of biodegradable water soluble single polymer and dual poly(aspartic acid-citric acid) polymers were developed and tested. The effectiveness of single polymer and four different compositions of poly aspartic acid and citric acid dual polymer systems as scale inhibitors were evaluated. Details of the synthesis, thermal stability, scale inhibition and the morphological characterization of single and dual polymers are presented in this scientific paper. It was found that the calcium sulphate scale inhibition rate was in the range 76.06-91.45%, while the calcium carbonate scale inhibition rate observed was in the range 23.37-30.0% at 65-70 °C. The finding suggests that the water soluble dual polymers are very effective in sulphate scale inhibition in comparison of calcium carbonate scale inhibition. PMID:25189837

  15. Neuroprotective Effect of Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid on N-Methyl-D-Aspartate-Induced Retinal Ganglion Cell Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Rondón, Netxibeth; Esquiva, Gema; Germain, Francisco; de la Villa, Pedro; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell degeneration underlies the pathophysiology of diseases affecting the retina and optic nerve. Several studies have previously evidenced the anti-apoptotic properties of the bile constituent, tauroursodeoxycholic acid, in diverse models of photoreceptor degeneration. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of systemic administration of tauroursodeoxycholic acid on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced damage in the rat retina using a functional and morphological approach. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid was administered intraperitoneally before and after intravitreal injection of NMDA. Three days after insult, full-field electroretinograms showed reductions in the amplitudes of the positive and negative-scotopic threshold responses, scotopic a- and b-waves and oscillatory potentials. Quantitative morphological evaluation of whole-mount retinas demonstrated a reduction in the density of retinal ganglion cells. Systemic administration of tauroursodeoxycholic acid attenuated the functional impairment induced by NMDA, which correlated with a higher retinal ganglion cell density. Our findings sustain the efficacy of tauroursodeoxycholic acid administration in vivo, suggesting it would be a good candidate for the pharmacological treatment of degenerative diseases coursing with retinal ganglion cell loss. PMID:26379056

  16. Neuroprotective Effect of Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid on N-Methyl-D-Aspartate-Induced Retinal Ganglion Cell Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Vicente, Violeta; Lax, Pedro; Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Rondón, Netxibeth; Esquiva, Gema; Germain, Francisco; de la Villa, Pedro; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell degeneration underlies the pathophysiology of diseases affecting the retina and optic nerve. Several studies have previously evidenced the anti-apoptotic properties of the bile constituent, tauroursodeoxycholic acid, in diverse models of photoreceptor degeneration. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of systemic administration of tauroursodeoxycholic acid on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced damage in the rat retina using a functional and morphological approach. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid was administered intraperitoneally before and after intravitreal injection of NMDA. Three days after insult, full-field electroretinograms showed reductions in the amplitudes of the positive and negative-scotopic threshold responses, scotopic a- and b-waves and oscillatory potentials. Quantitative morphological evaluation of whole-mount retinas demonstrated a reduction in the density of retinal ganglion cells. Systemic administration of tauroursodeoxycholic acid attenuated the functional impairment induced by NMDA, which correlated with a higher retinal ganglion cell density. Our findings sustain the efficacy of tauroursodeoxycholic acid administration in vivo, suggesting it would be a good candidate for the pharmacological treatment of degenerative diseases coursing with retinal ganglion cell loss.

  17. Chlorogenic acid increased 5-hydroxymethylfurfural formation when heating fructose alone or with aspartic acid at two pH levels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenhua; Zou, Yueyu; Wu, Taigang; Huang, Caihuan; Pei, Kehan; Zhang, Guangwen; Lin, Xiaohua; Bai, Weibin; Ou, Shiyi

    2016-01-01

    Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is a phenolic acid that ubiquitously exists in fruits. This work aims to investigate whether and how CGA influences HMF formation during heating fructose alone, or with an amino acid. The results showed that that CGA increased 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) formation. At pH 5.5 and 7.0, the addition of 5.0 μmol/ml CGA increased HMF formation by 49.4% and 25.2%, respectively when heating fructose alone, and by 9.0% and 16.7%, respectively when heating fructose with aspartic acid. CGA significantly increased HMF formation by promoting 3-deoxosone formation, and its conversion to HMF by inhibiting HMF elimination, especially in the Maillard reaction system. A comparison of the catalytic capacity of CGA with its six analogous compounds showed that both its di-hydroxyphenyl and carboxyl groups function in increasing HMF formation.

  18. Elevated Preoperative Serum Alanine Aminotransferase/Aspartate Aminotransferase (ALT/AST) Ratio Is Associated with Better Prognosis in Patients Undergoing Curative Treatment for Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shu-Lin; Li, Jian-Pei; Li, Lin-Fang; Zeng, Tao; He, Xia

    2016-01-01

    The level of anine aminotransferase/aspartate aminotransferase (ALT/AST) ratio in the serum was often used to assess liver injury. Whether the ALT/AST ratio (LSR) was associated with prognosis for gastric adenocarcinoma (GA) has not been reported in the literature. Our aim was to investigate the prognostic value of the preoperative LSR in patients with GA. A retrospective study was performed in 231 patients with GA undergoing curative resection. The medical records collected include clinical information and laboratory results. We investigated the correlations between the preoperative LSR and overall survival (OS). Survival analysis was conducted with the Kaplan–Meier method, and Cox regression analysis was used to determine significant independent prognostic factors for predicting survival. A p value of <0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. A total of 231 patients were finally enrolled. The median overall survival was 47 months. Multivariate analysis indicated that preoperative LSR was an independent prognostic factor in GA. Patients with LSR ≤ 0.80 had a greater risk of death than those with LSR > 0.80. The LSR was independently associated with OS in patients with GA (hazard ratio: 0.610; 95% confidence interval: 0.388–0.958; p = 0.032), along with tumor stages (hazard ratio: 3.118; 95% confidence interval: 2.044–4.756; p < 0.001) and distant metastases (hazard ratio: 1.957; 95% confidence interval: 1.119–3.422; p = 0.019). Our study first established a connection between the preoperative LSR and patients undergoing curative resection for GA, suggesting that LSR was a simple, inexpensive, and easily measurable marker as a prognostic factor, and may help to identify high-risk patients for treatment decisions. PMID:27294917

  19. Application and appreciation of chemical sand fixing agent-poly (aspartic acid) and its composites.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Cao, Hui; Wang, Fang; Tan, Tianwei

    2007-12-01

    The sand fixing agent-poly (aspartic acid) (PASP) and its composites were applied in the field by two forms (spraying around by PASP solution and PASP powder directly). It was found that the sand fixing effect in powder form was not as good as in solution form, but it was more practical in dry region. It needed 9, 6 and 7 days for PASP, xanthan gum-PASP (X2) and ethyl cellulose-PASP (E3) to attain the maximal mechanical strength after they were applied, respectively. The sand fixing effect decreased when the material was subjected to repeated hydration-dehydration cycles and the material had no negative influence on plant growth. The PASP and its composites had water-retaining ability and could reduce the water evaporation. PMID:17628237

  20. Substitution of a single amino acid (aspartic acid for histidine) converts the functional activity of human complement C4B to C4A

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, M.C.; Fathallah, D.M.; Bergamaschini, L.; Alicot, E.M. ); Isenman, D.E. )

    1990-09-01

    The C4B isotype of the fourth component of human complement (C4) displays 3- to 4-fold greater hemolytic activity than does its other isotype C4A. This correlates with differences in their covalent binding efficiencies to erythrocytes coated with antibody and complement C1. C4A binds to a greater extent when C1 is on IgG immune aggregates. The differences in covalent binding properties correlate only with amino acid changes between residues 1101 and 1106 (pro-C4 numbering)-namely, Pro-1101, Cys-1102, Leu-1105, and Asp-1106 in C4A and Leu-1101, Ser-1102, Ile-1105, and His-1106 in C4B, which are located in the C4d region of the {alpha} chain. To more precisely identify the residues that are important for the functional differences, C4A-C4B hybrid proteins were constructed by using recombinant DNA techniques. Comparison of these by hemolytic assay and binding to IgG aggregates showed that the single substitution of aspartic acid for histidine at position 1106 largely accounted for the change in functional activity and nature of the chemical bond formed. Surprisingly, substitution of a neutral residue, alanine, for histidine at position 1106 resulted in an increase in binding to immune aggregates without subsequent reduction in the hemolytic activity. This result strongly suggests that position 1106 is not catalytic as previously proposed but interacts sterically/electrostatically with potential acceptor sites and serves to select binding sites on potential acceptor molecules.

  1. Glycation of aspartate aminotransferase by methylglyoxal, effect of hydroxycitric and uric acid.

    PubMed

    Bousová, Iva; Bacílková, Eliska; Dobrijević, Sanja; Drsata, Jaroslav

    2009-11-01

    Glycation is a process closely related to the aging and pathogenesis of diabetic complications. Reactive alpha-dicarbonyl compounds (e.g., methylglyoxal) are formed during middle stage of glycation reaction. Compounds that would inhibit the glycation process have been seeked for years. The objective of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of hydroxycitric (0.25-2.5 mM) and uric acid (0.4-1.2 mM) on middle stage of protein glycation in vitro using the model containing aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and 0.5 mM methylglyoxal. Hydroxycitric acid, at all tested concentrations, reduced AST activity decrease and formation of fluorescent AGEs during incubation of the enzyme with methylglyoxal at 37 degrees C. This compound also prevented formation of high-molecular weight protein cross-links and changes in molecular charge of AST caused by glycation. Uric acid showed no positive anti-glycation activity. The results support the hypothesis that hydroxycitric acid has beneficial effects in controlling protein glycation. PMID:19449196

  2. Structural and functional characterization of aspartate racemase from the acidothermophilic archaeon Picrophilus torridus.

    PubMed

    Aihara, Takayuki; Ito, Toshiya; Yamanaka, Yasuaki; Noguchi, Keiichi; Odaka, Masafumi; Sekine, Masae; Homma, Hiroshi; Yohda, Masafumi

    2016-07-01

    Functional and structural characterizations of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-independent aspartate racemase of the acidothermophilic archaeon Picrophilus torridus were performed. Picrophilus aspartate racemase exhibited high substrate specificity to aspartic acid. The optimal reaction temperature was 60 °C, which is almost the same as the optimal growth temperature. Reflecting the low pH in the cytosol, the optimal reaction pH of Picrophilus aspartate racemase was approximately 5.5. However, the activity at the putative cytosolic pH of 4.6 was approximately 6 times lower than that at the optimal pH of 5.5. The crystal structure of Picrophilus aspartate racemase was almost the same as that of other pyridoxal 5'-phosphate -independent aspartate racemases. In two molecules of the dimer, one molecule contained a tartaric acid molecule in the catalytic site; the structure of the other molecule was relatively flexible. Finally, we examined the intracellular existence of D-amino acids. Unexpectedly, the proportion of D-aspartate to total aspartate was not very high. In contrast, both D-proline and D-alanine were observed. Because Picrophilus aspartate racemase is highly specific to aspartate, other amino acid racemases might exist in Picrophilus torridus. PMID:27094682

  3. Quantum Computational Calculations of the Ionization Energies of Acidic and Basic Amino Acids: Aspartate, Glutamate, Arginine, Lysine, and Histidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Guzman, C. P.; Andrianarijaona, M.; Lee, Y. S.; Andrianarijaona, V.

    An extensive knowledge of the ionization energies of amino acids can provide vital information on protein sequencing, structure, and function. Acidic and basic amino acids are unique because they have three ionizable groups: the C-terminus, the N-terminus, and the side chain. The effects of multiple ionizable groups can be seen in how Aspartate's ionizable side chain heavily influences its preferred conformation (J Phys Chem A. 2011 April 7; 115(13): 2900-2912). Theoretical and experimental data on the ionization energies of many of these molecules is sparse. Considering each atom of the amino acid as a potential departing site for the electron gives insight on how the three ionizable groups affect the ionization process of the molecule and the dynamic coupling between the vibrational modes. In the following study, we optimized the structure of each acidic and basic amino acid then exported the three dimensional coordinates of the amino acids. We used ORCA to calculate single point energies for a region near the optimized coordinates and systematically went through the x, y, and z coordinates of each atom in the neutral and ionized forms of the amino acid. With the calculations, we were able to graph energy potential curves to better understand the quantum dynamic properties of the amino acids. The authors thank Pacific Union College Student Association for providing funds.

  4. Membrane potential and proton cotransport of alanine and phosphate as affected by permeant weak acids in Lemna gibba

    SciTech Connect

    Basso, B.; Ullrich-Eberius, C.I.

    1987-11-01

    The treatment of Lemna gibba plants with the weak acids (trimethylacetic acid and butyric acid), used as tools to decrease intracellular pH, induced a hyperpolarization of membrane potential, dependent on the concentration of the undissociated permeant form of the weak acid and on the value of the resting potential. Measurements were carried out both with high potential and low potential plants and the maximum values of acid induced hyperpolarization were about 35 and 71 millivolts, respectively. Weak acids influenced also the transient light-dark membrane potential changes, typical for photosynthesizing material, suggesting a dependence of these changes on an acidification of cytoplasm. In the presence of the weak acids, the membrane depolarization induced by the cotransport of alanine and phosphate with protons was reduced; the maximum reduction (about 90%) was obtained with alanine during 2 millimolar trimethylacetic acid perfusion at pH 5. A strong inhibition of the uptake rates (up to 48% for (/sup 14/C)alanine and 68% for /sup 32/P-phosphate) was obtained in the presence of the weak acids, both by decreasing the pH of the medium and by increasing the concentration of the acid. In these experimental conditions, the ATP level and O/sub 2/ uptake rates did not change significantly. These results constitute good evidence that H/sup +//solute cotransport in Lemna, already known to be dependent on the electrochemical potential difference for protons, is also strongly regulated by the cytoplasmic pH value.

  5. A versatile proline/alanine transporter in the unicellular pathogen Leishmania donovani regulates amino acid homoeostasis and osmotic stress responses.

    PubMed

    Inbar, Ehud; Schlisselberg, Doreen; Suter Grotemeyer, Marianne; Rentsch, Doris; Zilberstein, Dan

    2013-01-15

    Unlike all other organisms, parasitic protozoa of the family Trypanosomatidae maintain a large cellular pool of proline that, together with the alanine pool, serve as alternative carbon sources as well as reservoirs of organic osmolytes. These reflect adaptation to their insect vectors whose haemolymphs are exceptionally rich in the two amino acids. In the present study we identify and characterize a new neutral amino acid transporter, LdAAP24, that translocates proline and alanine across the Leishmania donovani plasma membrane. This transporter fulfils multiple functions: it is the sole supplier for the intracellular pool of proline and contributes to the alanine pool; it is essential for cell volume regulation after osmotic stress; and it regulates the transport and homoeostasis of glutamate and arginine, none of which are its substrates. Notably, we provide evidence that proline and alanine exhibit different roles in the parasitic response to hypotonic shock; alanine affects swelling, whereas proline influences the rate of volume recovery. On the basis of our data we suggest that LdAAP24 plays a key role in parasite adaptation to its varying environments in host and vector, a phenomenon essential for successful parasitism.

  6. In Vitro antioxidative activity of pumpkin seed (Cucurbita pepo) protein isolate and its In Vivo effect on alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase in acetaminophen-induced liver injury in low protein fed rats.

    PubMed

    Nkosi, C Z; Opoku, A R; Terblanche, S E

    2006-09-01

    The antioxidative effects of pumpkin seed protein isolate (Cucurbita pepo) were investigated in vitro. The isolate exhibited about 80% radical scavenging activity, chelating activity of approximately 64% on Fe2+ ions and an inhibition of approximately 10% of xanthine oxidase. Subsequently the effects of the isolate on the plasma activity levels of alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase against acetaminophen induced acute liver injury in low-protein fed male Sprague-Dawley rats were ascertained. The rats were maintained on a low-protein diet for 5 days and divided into three subgroups. Two subgroups were injected with acetaminophen and the other with an equivalent amount of polyethylene glycol 400. Two hours after intoxication one of the two subgroups was administered with the protein isolate. Rats from the different subgroups were killed at 24, 48 and 72 h after treatment. After 5 days on the low-protein diet the activity levels of the enzymes were significantly higher than their counterparts on a normal balanced diet. The administration of protein isolate after acetaminophen intoxication resulted in significantly reduced activity levels. It is concluded that the protein isolate has promising antioxidative properties. Furthermore, the isolate administration was effective in alleviating the detrimental effects associated with protein malnutrition and acetaminophen intoxication.

  7. Stereochemistry of amino acids in surface samples of a marine sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollock, G.E.; Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1978-01-01

    In two surface samples of marine sediment, the percentages of d-alanine and d-aspartic acid are significantly higher than the other d-amino acids and are similar to the range found in soils. The percentage of d-glutamic acid is also higher than the other amino acids but less than d-alanine and d-aspartic acid. These d-amino acids may come mainly from bacteria. ?? 1978.

  8. Stereochemistry of amino acids in surface samples of a marine sediment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, G. E.; Kvenvolden, K. A.

    1978-01-01

    In two surface samples of marine sediment, the percentages of D-alanine and D-aspartic acid are significantly higher than the other D-amino acids and are similar to the range found in soils. The percentage of D-glutamic acid is also higher than the other amino acids but less than D-alanine and D-aspartic acid. These D-amino acids may come mainly from bacteria.

  9. Enzymatic syntheses of (1-(C-11))pyruvic acid and L-(1-(C-11))lactic acid via DL-(1-(C-11))alanine

    SciTech Connect

    Ropchan, J.R.; Barrio, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    L-(1-(C-11)) Lactic acid was prepared in three steps using a remote, semi-automated procedure: (1) production of DL-(1-(C-11)) alanine (2) enzymatic conversion of DL (1-(C-11)) alanine to (1-(C-11)) pyruvate and (3) enzymatic transformation of (1-(C-11)) pyruvate to L-(1-(C-11)) lactic acid. DL-(1-(C-11)) Alanine was synthesized from NCA C-11 HCN using a modification of the Bucherer-Strecker reaction. The DL-isomers were converted to (1-(C-11)) pyruvate by passage through (1) immobilized D-amino acid oxidase enzyme column followed by (2) immobilized L-alanine dehydrogenase (l-ADH) enzyme column. (1-(C-11)) Pyruvate was then transformed to L-(1-(C-11)) lactic acid by elution through a L-lactic dehydrogenase enzyme column. These enzyme columns are reusable beyond three months, give high radiochemical purity (>98%), eliminate the possibility of protein contamination, assure sterile, pyrogen-free products and allow rapid separation and quantitative conversion of DL-isomers to the desired products. Typically the synthesis required 30-40 min after cyclotron production of NCA C-11 HCN with radiochemical yields of 15-25 mCi (23%) of L-(1-(C-11)) lactic acid and 20-35 mCi (33%) of (l-(C-11)) pyruvic acid starting with 250-400 mCi of C-11 HCN. Also 10-20 mCi (19%) of L-(1-(C-11)) alanine was produced by resin separation (AG50W-X8), H/sup +/ form of (1-(C-11)) pyruvate and L-(1-(C-11)) alanine following elution through D-AAO enzyme column. The radiochemical purities of (1-(C-11)) pyruvic acid, L-(1-(C-11)) lactic acid and L-(1-(C-11)) alanine were verified routinely by reversed-phase HPLC.

  10. Chiral selectivity of amino acid adsorption on chiral surfaces—The case of alanine on Pt

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, J.-H.; Kosov, D. S.

    2015-02-07

    We study the binding pattern of the amino acid alanine on the naturally chiral Pt surfaces Pt(531), Pt(321), and Pt(643). These surfaces are all vicinal to the (111) direction but have different local environments of their kink sites and are thus a model for realistic roughened Pt surfaces. Alanine has only a single methyl group attached to its chiral center, which makes the number of possible binding conformations computationally tractable. Additionally, only the amine and carboxyl group are expected to interact strongly with the Pt substrate. On Pt(531), we study the molecule in its pristine as well as its deprotonated form and find that the deprotonated one is more stable by 0.47 eV. Therefore, we study the molecule in its deprotonated form on Pt(321) and Pt(643). As expected, the oxygen and nitrogen atoms of the deprotonated molecule provide a local binding “tripod” and the most stable adsorption configurations optimize the interaction of this “tripod” with undercoordinated surface atoms. However, the interaction of the methyl group plays an important role: it induces significant chiral selectivity of about 60 meV on all surfaces. Hereby, the L-enantiomer adsorbs preferentially to the Pt(321){sup S} and Pt(643){sup S} surfaces, while the D-enantiomer is more stable on Pt(531){sup S}. The binding energies increase with increasing surface density of kink sites, i.e., they are largest for Pt(531){sup S} and smallest for Pt(643){sup S}.

  11. Neutralizing Aspartate 83 Modifies Substrate Translocation of Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter 3 (EAAT3) Glutamate Transporters*

    PubMed Central

    Hotzy, Jasmin; Machtens, Jan-Philipp; Fahlke, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) terminate glutamatergic synaptic transmission by removing glutamate from the synaptic cleft into neuronal and glial cells. EAATs are not only secondary active glutamate transporters but also function as anion channels. Gating of EAAT anion channels is tightly coupled to transitions within the glutamate uptake cycle, resulting in Na+- and glutamate-dependent anion currents. A point mutation neutralizing a conserved aspartic acid within the intracellular loop close to the end of transmembrane domain 2 was recently shown to modify the substrate dependence of EAAT anion currents. To distinguish whether this mutation affects transitions within the uptake cycle or directly modifies the opening/closing of the anion channel, we used voltage clamp fluorometry. Using three different sites for fluorophore attachment, V120C, M205C, and A430C, we observed time-, voltage-, and substrate-dependent alterations of EAAT3 fluorescence intensities. The voltage and substrate dependence of fluorescence intensities can be described by a 15-state model of the transport cycle in which several states are connected to branching anion channel states. D83A-mediated changes of fluorescence intensities, anion currents, and secondary active transport can be explained by exclusive modifications of substrate translocation rates. In contrast, sole modification of anion channel opening and closing is insufficient to account for all experimental data. We conclude that D83A has direct effects on the glutamate transport cycle and that these effects result in changed anion channel function. PMID:22532568

  12. Gender differences in D-aspartic acid content in skull bone.

    PubMed

    Torikoshi-Hatano, Aiko; Namera, Akira; Shiraishi, Hiroaki; Arima, Yousuke; Toubou, Hirokazu; Ezaki, Jiro; Morikawa, Masami; Nagao, Masataka

    2012-12-01

    In forensic medicine, the personal identification of cadavers is one of the most important tasks. One method of estimating age at death relies on the high correlation between racemization rates in teeth and actual age, and this method has been applied successfully in forensic odontology for several years. In this study, we attempt to facilitate the analysis of racemized amino acids and examine the determination of age at death on the basis of the extent of aspartic acid (Asp) racemization in skull bones. The specimens were obtained from 61 human skull bones (19 females and 42 males) that underwent judicial autopsy from October 2010 to May 2012. The amount of D-Asp and L-Asp, total protein, osteocalcin, and collagen I in the skull bones was measured. Logistic regression analysis was performed for age, sex, and each measured protein. The amount of D-Asp in the female skull bones was significantly different from that in the male skull bones (p = 0.021), whereas the amount of L-Asp was similar. Thus, our study indicates that the amount of D-Asp in skull bones is different between the sexes.

  13. Differentiating N-terminal aspartic and isoaspartic acid residues in peptides.

    PubMed

    Sargaeva, Nadezda P; Lin, Cheng; O'Connor, Peter B

    2011-09-01

    Formation of isoaspartic acid (isoAsp) is a common modification of aspartic acid (Asp) or asparagine (Asn) residue in proteins. Differentiation of isoAsp and Asp residues is a challenging task owing to their similar properties and identical molecular mass. It was recently shown that they can be differentiated using ion-electron or ion-ion interaction fragmentation methods (ExD) because these methods provide diagnostic fragments c + 57 and z(•) - 57 specific to the isoAsp residue. To date, however, the presence of such fragments has not been explored on peptides with an N-terminal isoAsp residue. To address this question, several N-terminal isoAsp-containing peptides were analyzed using ExD methods alone or combined with chromatography. A diagnostic fragment [M + 2H - 74](+•) was observed for the doubly charged precursor ions with N-terminal isoAsp residues. For some peptides, identification of the N-terminal isoAsp residue was challenging because of the low diagnostic ion peak intensity and the presence of interfering peaks. Supplemental activation was used to improve diagnostic ion detection. Further, N-terminal acetylation was offered as a means to overcome the interference problem by shifting the diagnostic fragment peak to [M + 2H - 116](+•).

  14. Enantioselective hydrogenation of pyruvic acid oxime to alanine on Pd/Alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Borszeky, K.; Mallat, T.; Aeschiman, R.

    1996-06-01

    The chemo- and enantioselective hydrogenation of pyruvic acid oxime have been studied on Pd/alumina, the latter in the presence of the 1,2-amino alcohol type alkaloids ephedrine, cinchonidine, and cinchonine. High yields of racemic alanine (90-98%) were obtained in the absence of alkaloids in polar solvents at 0-45{degrees}C and 10 bar. Enantioselection increased with higher temperature and alkalid: oxime molar ratio. A 1:1 ephedrine: oxime molar ratio afforded the best enantiomeric excess (26%). The presence of alkaloid resulted in a decrease of reaction rate by a factor of up to 140, compared to the racemic hydrogenation. Based on X-ray crystal structure analysis of the alkaloid-pyruvic acid oxime adduct, a mechanism is proposed for the steric course of the reaction. Extended interactions by multiple H bonds between the adsorbed alkaloid-oxime salt units on the Pd surface is assumed to be at the origin of the moderate enantioselectivity and the very low enantioselective hydrogenation rate. 28 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Alanine water complexes.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, Vanesa; Sanz, M Eugenia; Peña, Isabel; Mata, Santiago; Cabezas, Carlos; López, Juan C; Alonso, José L

    2014-04-10

    Two complexes of alanine with water, alanine-(H2O)n (n = 1,2), have been generated by laser ablation of the amino acid in a supersonic jet containing water vapor and characterized using Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. In the observed complexes, water molecules bind to the carboxylic group of alanine acting as both proton donors and acceptors. In alanine-H2O, the water molecule establishes two intermolecular hydrogen bonds forming a six-membered cycle, while in alanine-(H2O)2 the two water molecules establish three hydrogen bonds forming an eight-membered ring. In both complexes, the amino acid moiety is in its neutral form and shows the conformation observed to be the most stable for the bare molecule. The microsolvation study of alanine-(H2O)n (n = 1,2) can be taken as a first step toward understanding bulk properties at a microscopic level.

  16. Potential Application of N-Carbamoyl-β-Alanine Amidohydrolase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 for β-Amino Acid Production▿

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Gómez, Ana Isabel; Martínez-Rodríguez, Sergio; Pozo-Dengra, Joaquín; Tessaro, Davide; Servi, Stefano; Clemente-Jiménez, Josefa María; Rodríguez-Vico, Felipe; Las Heras-Vázquez, Francisco Javier

    2009-01-01

    An N-carbamoyl-β-alanine amidohydrolase of industrial interest from Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 (βcarAt) has been characterized. βcarAt is most active at 30°C and pH 8.0 with N-carbamoyl-β-alanine as a substrate. The purified enzyme is completely inactivated by the metal-chelating agent 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid (HQSA), and activity is restored by the addition of divalent metal ions, such as Mn2+, Ni2+, and Co2+. The native enzyme is a homodimer with a molecular mass of 90 kDa from pH 5.5 to 9.0. The enzyme has a broad substrate spectrum and hydrolyzes nonsubstituted N-carbamoyl-α-, -β-, -γ-, and -δ-amino acids, with the greatest catalytic efficiency for N-carbamoyl-β-alanine. βcarAt also recognizes substrate analogues substituted with sulfonic and phosphonic acid groups to produce the β-amino acids taurine and ciliatine, respectively. βcarAt is able to produce monosubstituted β2- and β3-amino acids, showing better catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) for the production of the former. For both types of monosubstituted substrates, the enzyme hydrolyzes N-carbamoyl-β-amino acids with a short aliphatic side chain better than those with aromatic rings. These properties make βcarAt an outstanding candidate for application in the biotechnology industry. PMID:19011069

  17. Potential application of N-carbamoyl-beta-alanine amidohydrolase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 for beta-amino acid production.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Gómez, Ana Isabel; Martínez-Rodríguez, Sergio; Pozo-Dengra, Joaquín; Tessaro, Davide; Servi, Stefano; Clemente-Jiménez, Josefa María; Rodríguez-Vico, Felipe; Las Heras-Vázquez, Francisco Javier

    2009-01-01

    An N-carbamoyl-beta-alanine amidohydrolase of industrial interest from Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 (beta car(At)) has been characterized. Beta car(At) is most active at 30 degrees C and pH 8.0 with N-carbamoyl-beta-alanine as a substrate. The purified enzyme is completely inactivated by the metal-chelating agent 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid (HQSA), and activity is restored by the addition of divalent metal ions, such as Mn(2+), Ni(2+), and Co(2+). The native enzyme is a homodimer with a molecular mass of 90 kDa from pH 5.5 to 9.0. The enzyme has a broad substrate spectrum and hydrolyzes nonsubstituted N-carbamoyl-alpha-, -beta-, -gamma-, and -delta-amino acids, with the greatest catalytic efficiency for N-carbamoyl-beta-alanine. Beta car(At) also recognizes substrate analogues substituted with sulfonic and phosphonic acid groups to produce the beta-amino acids taurine and ciliatine, respectively. Beta car(At) is able to produce monosubstituted beta(2)- and beta(3)-amino acids, showing better catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) for the production of the former. For both types of monosubstituted substrates, the enzyme hydrolyzes N-carbamoyl-beta-amino acids with a short aliphatic side chain better than those with aromatic rings. These properties make beta car(At) an outstanding candidate for application in the biotechnology industry.

  18. The Role of Poly(Aspartic Acid) in the Precipitation of Calcium Phosphate in Confinement

    PubMed Central

    Cantaert, Bram; Beniash, Elia

    2013-01-01

    Many questions remain regarding the formation of ultrathin hydroxapatite (HAP) crystals within the confines of collagen fibrils of bones. These structures form through the interplay of the collagen matrix and non-collagenous proteins, and in vitro mineralization studies employing poly(aspartic acid) (PAsp) as a mimic of the non-collagenous proteins have generated mineralized fibrils with structures comparable to their biogenic counterparts. In this article, we employ the nanoscale cylindrical pores perforating track-etch filtration membranes to investigate the role of PAsp in controlling the infiltration and crystallization of calcium phosphate (CaP) within confined volumes. Oriented polycrystalline HAP and non-oriented octacalcium phosphate (OCP) rods precipitated within the membrane pores via an amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) precursor, where PAsp increased the proportion of OCP rods. Further, ACP crystallized faster within the membranes than in bulk solution when PAsp was present, suggesting that PAsp inhibits crystallization in solution, but promotes it when bound to a substrate. Finally, in contrast to the collagen system, PAsp reduced the yield of intra-membrane mineral and failed to enhance infiltration. This suggests that a specific interaction between the collagen matrix and ACP/PAsp precursor particles drives effective infiltration. Thus, while orientation of HAP crystals can be achieved by confinement alone, the chemistry of the collagen matrix is necessary for efficient mineralisation with CaP. PMID:24409343

  19. Biphasic effects of ethanol and sodium oleate on synaptic transport of aspartic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, T.; Rhoads, D.E.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have examined the effects of ethanol and sodium oleate on the transport of aspartic acid (ASP) by nerve-ending preparations from rat cerebral cortex. Physiologically relevant ethanol concentrations of up to 100mM stimulated ASP uptake while concentrations greater than 200mM caused inhibition. A similar biphasic effect was observed with oleate stimulating ASP uptake at 0.1 to 1..mu..M and inhibiting ASP uptake at concentrations greater than 1..mu..M. Maximum stimulation was observed at 0.1..mu..M oleate and at 50mM ethanol. In contrast, when synaptosomes were prepared from rats that had been exposed for 2-3 weeks to 10% ethanol in their drinking water, higher concentrations of ethanol and oleate were required to obtain comparable stimulation of ASP uptake. These biphasic effects on ASP transport can be interpreted in terms of physicochemical alterations in the synaptic membranes, with from alcohol-exposed rats showing tolerance to these fluidizing effects.

  20. N-Methyl D-Aspartate Receptor Antagonist Kynurenic Acid Affects Human Cortical Development

    PubMed Central

    Bagasrawala, Inseyah; Zecevic, Nada; Radonjić, Nevena V.

    2016-01-01

    Kynurenic acid (KYNA), a neuroactive metabolite of tryptophan degradation, acts as an endogenous N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist. Elevated levels of KYNA have been observed in pregnant women after viral infections and are considered to play a role in neurodevelopmental disorders. However, the consequences of KYNA-induced NMDAR blockade in human cortical development still remain elusive. To study the potential impact of KYNA on human neurodevelopment, we used an in vitro system of multipotent cortical progenitors, i.e., radial glia cells (RGCs), enriched from human cerebral cortex at mid-gestation (16–19 gestational weeks). KYNA treatment significantly decreased RGCs proliferation and survival by antagonizing NMDAR. This alteration resulted in a reduced number of cortical progenitors and neurons while number and activation of astrocytes increased. KYNA treatment reduced differentiation of RGCs into GABAergic neurons, while differentiation into glutamatergic neurons was relatively spared. Furthermore, in mixed cortical cultures KYNA triggered an inflammatory response as evidenced by increased levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. In conclusion, elevated levels of KYNA play a significant role in human RGC fate determination by antagonizing NMDARs and by activating an inflammatory response. The altered cell composition observed in cell culture following exposure to elevated KYNA levels suggests a mechanism for impairment of cortical circuitry formation in the fetal brain after viral infection, as seen in neurodevelopmental disorders such as schizophrenia. PMID:27746712

  1. Evaluation of poly (aspartic acid sodium salt) as a draw solute for forward osmosis.

    PubMed

    Gwak, Gimun; Jung, Bokyung; Han, Sungsoo; Hong, Seungkwan

    2015-09-01

    Poly (aspartic acid sodium salt) (PAspNa) was evaluated for its potential as a novel draw solute in forward osmosis (FO). The inherent advantages of PAspNa, such as good water solubility, high osmotic pressure, and nontoxicity, were first examined through a series of physicochemical analyses and atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations. Then, lab-scale FO tests were performed to evaluate its suitability in practical processes. Compared to other conventional inorganic solutes, PAspNa showed comparable water flux but significantly lower reverse solute flux, demonstrating its suitability as a draw solute. Moreover, fouling experiments using synthetic wastewater as a feed solution demonstrated that PAspNa reversely flowed to the feed side reduced inorganic scaling on the membrane active layer. The recyclability of PAspNa was studied using both nanofiltration (NF) and membrane distillation (MD) processes, and the results exhibited its ease of recovery. This research reported the feasibility and applicability of FO-NF or FO-MD processes using PAspNa for wastewater reclamation and brackish water desalination. PMID:26005789

  2. Evaluation of poly (aspartic acid sodium salt) as a draw solute for forward osmosis.

    PubMed

    Gwak, Gimun; Jung, Bokyung; Han, Sungsoo; Hong, Seungkwan

    2015-09-01

    Poly (aspartic acid sodium salt) (PAspNa) was evaluated for its potential as a novel draw solute in forward osmosis (FO). The inherent advantages of PAspNa, such as good water solubility, high osmotic pressure, and nontoxicity, were first examined through a series of physicochemical analyses and atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations. Then, lab-scale FO tests were performed to evaluate its suitability in practical processes. Compared to other conventional inorganic solutes, PAspNa showed comparable water flux but significantly lower reverse solute flux, demonstrating its suitability as a draw solute. Moreover, fouling experiments using synthetic wastewater as a feed solution demonstrated that PAspNa reversely flowed to the feed side reduced inorganic scaling on the membrane active layer. The recyclability of PAspNa was studied using both nanofiltration (NF) and membrane distillation (MD) processes, and the results exhibited its ease of recovery. This research reported the feasibility and applicability of FO-NF or FO-MD processes using PAspNa for wastewater reclamation and brackish water desalination.

  3. Aspartic acid racemization dating of Holocene brachiopods and bivalves from the southern Brazilian shelf, South Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour Wood, Susan L.; Krause, Richard A.; Kowalewski, Michał; Wehmiller, John; Simões, Marcello G.

    2006-09-01

    The extent of racemization of aspartic acid (Asp) has been used to estimate the ages of 9 shells of the epifaunal calcitic brachiopod Bouchardia rosea and 9 shells of the infaunal aragonitic bivalve Semele casali. Both taxa were collected concurrently from the same sites at depths of 10 m and 30 m off the coast of Brazil. Asp D/L values show an excellent correlation with radiocarbon age at both sites and for both taxa ( r2Site 9 B. rosea = 0.97, r2Site 1 B. rosea = 0.997, r2Site 9 S. casali = 0.9998, r2Site 1 S. casali = 0.93). The Asp ratios plotted against reservoir-corrected AMS radiocarbon ages over the time span of multiple millennia can thus be used to develop reliable and precise geochronologies not only for aragonitic mollusks (widely used for dating previously), but also for calcitic brachiopods. At each collection site, Bouchardia specimens display consistently higher D/L values than specimens of Semele. Thermal differences between sites are also notable and in agreement with theoretical expectations, as extents of racemization for both taxa are greater at the warmer, shallower site than at the cooler, deeper one. In late Holocene marine settings, concurrent time series of aragonitic and calcitic shells can be assembled using Asp racemization dating, and parallel multi-centennial to multi-millennial records can be developed simultaneously for multiple biomineral systems.

  4. Acetic Acid Can Catalyze Succinimide Formation from Aspartic Acid Residues by a Concerted Bond Reorganization Mechanism: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota; Manabe, Noriyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Succinimide formation from aspartic acid (Asp) residues is a concern in the formulation of protein drugs. Based on density functional theory calculations using Ace-Asp-Nme (Ace = acetyl, Nme = NHMe) as a model compound, we propose the possibility that acetic acid (AA), which is often used in protein drug formulation for mildly acidic buffer solutions, catalyzes the succinimide formation from Asp residues by acting as a proton-transfer mediator. The proposed mechanism comprises two steps: cyclization (intramolecular addition) to form a gem-diol tetrahedral intermediate and dehydration of the intermediate. Both steps are catalyzed by an AA molecule, and the first step was predicted to be rate-determining. The cyclization results from a bond formation between the amide nitrogen on the C-terminal side and the side-chain carboxyl carbon, which is part of an extensive bond reorganization (formation and breaking of single bonds and the interchange of single and double bonds) occurring concertedly in a cyclic structure formed by the amide NH bond, the AA molecule and the side-chain C=O group and involving a double proton transfer. The second step also involves an AA-mediated bond reorganization. Carboxylic acids other than AA are also expected to catalyze the succinimide formation by a similar mechanism. PMID:25588215

  5. Measurement of aspartic acid in oilseed rape leaves under herbicide stress using near infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chu; Kong, Wenwen; Liu, Fei; He, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Oilseed rape is used as both food and a renewable energy resource. Physiological parameters, such as the amino acid aspartic acid, can indicate the growth status of oilseed rape. Traditional detection methods are laborious, time consuming, costly, and not usable in the field. Here, we investigate near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) as a fast and non-destructive detection method of aspartic acid in oilseed rape leaves under herbicide stress. Different spectral pre-processing methods were compared for optimal prediction performance. The variable selection methods were applied for relevant variable selection, including successive projections algorithm (SPA), Monte Carlo-uninformative variable elimination (MC-UVE) and random frog (RF). The selected effective wavelengths (EWs) were used as input by multiple linear regression (MLR), partial least squares (PLS) and least-square support vector machine (LS-SVM). The best predictive performance was achieved by SPA-LS-SVM (Raw) model using 22 EWs, and the prediction results were Rp = 0.9962 and RMSEP = 0.0339 for the prediction set. The result indicated that NIR combined with LS-SVM is a powerful new method to detect aspartic acid in oilseed rape leaves under herbicide stress. PMID:27441244

  6. Adsorption of L-glutamic acid and L-aspartic acid to γ-Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, Edward; Kumar, Kartik; Sumit, Madhuresh; Giuffre, Anthony; Zhao, Weilong; Pedersen, Joel; Sahai, Nita

    2014-05-01

    The interactions of amino acids with mineral surfaces have potential relevance for processes ranging from pre-biotic chemistry to biomineralization to protein adsorption on biomedical implants in vivo. Here, we report the results of experiments investigating the adsorption of L-glutamic (Glu) and L-aspartic (Asp) acids to γ-Al2O3. We examined the extent of Glu and Asp coverage as a function of pH and solution concentration (pH edges and isotherms) in solution-depletion experiments and used in situ Attenuated Total Refkectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy to estimate the molecular conformations of the adsorbed molecules. Glu and Asp exhibited similar adsorption behavior on γ-Al2O3 with respect to pH and solution concentration. In general, adsorption decreased as pH increased. At low and high amino acid concentrations, the isotherms exhibited two apparent saturation coverages, which could be interpreted as 1:4 or 1:2 ratios of adsorbed molecule/surface Al sites. Tetradentate tetranuclear and bidentate binuclear species were the dominant conformations inferred independently from FTIR spectra. In these conformations, both carboxylate groups are involved in bonding to either four or to two Al surface atoms, through direct covalent bonds or via H-bonds. An outer sphere species, in which one carboxylate group interacts with a surface Al atom, could not be ruled out based on the FTIR spectra.

  7. Accumulation of aspartic acid421- and glutamic acid391-cleaved tau in neurofibrillary tangles correlates with progression in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Basurto-Islas, Gustavo; Luna-Muñoz, Jose; Guillozet-Bongaarts, Angela L; Binder, Lester I; Mena, Raul; García-Sierra, Francisco

    2008-05-01

    Truncations of tau protein at aspartic acid421 (D421) and glutamic acid391 (E391) residues are associated with neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in the brains of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. Using immunohistochemistry with antibodies to D421- and E391-truncated tau (Tau-C3 and MN423, respectively), we correlated the presence of NFTs composed of these truncated tau proteins with clinical and neuropathologic parameters in 17 AD and 23 non-AD control brains. The densities of NFTs composed of D421- or E391-truncated tau correlated with clinical dementia index and Braak staging in AD. Glutamic acid391 tau truncation was prominent in the entorhinal cortex, whereas D421 truncation was prominent in the subiculum, suggesting that NFTs composed of either D421- or E391-truncated tau may be formed mutually exclusively in these areas. Both truncations were associated with the prevalence of the apolipoprotein E epsilon4 allele. By double labeling, intact tau in NFTs was commonly associated with D421-cleaved tau but not with E391-truncated tau; D421-cleaved tau was never associated with E391-truncated tau. These results indicate that tau is not randomly proteolyzed at different domains, and that proteolysis occurs sequentially from the C-terminus to inner regions of tau in AD progression. Identification of NFTs composed of tau at different stages of truncation may facilitate assessment of neurofibrillary pathology in AD.

  8. Biosynthesis of d-Alanyl-Lipoteichoic Acid: Characterization of Ester-Linked d-Alanine in the In Vitro-Synthesized Product

    PubMed Central

    Childs, Warren C.; Neuhaus, Francis C.

    1980-01-01

    d-Alanyl-lipoteichoic acid (d-alanyl-LTA) contains d-alanine ester residues which control the ability of this polyer to chelate Mg2+. In Lactobacillus casei a two-step in vitro reaction sequence catalyzed by the d-alanine-activating enzyme and d-alanine:membrane acceptor ligase incorporates d-alanine into membrane acceptor. In this paper we provide additional evidence that the in vitro system catalyzes the covalent incorporation of d-[14C]alanine into membrane acceptor which is the poly([3H]glycerol phosphate) moiety of d-alanyl-LTA. This conclusion was supported by the observation that the d-[14C]alanine and [3H]glycerol labels of the partially purified product were co-precipitated by antiserum containing globulins specific for poly(glycerol phosphate). The isolation of d-[14C]alanyl-[3H]glycerol from d-[14C]alanine·[3H]glycerol-labeled d-alanyl-LTA synthesized in the in vitro system indicated that the d-alanine was linked to the poly(glycerol phosphate) chain of the LTA. A comparison of the reactivities of the d-alanine residues of d-alanyl-glycerol and d-alanyl-LTA supported the conclusion that the incorporated residue of d-alanine was attached by an ester linkage. Thus, the data indicated that the in vitro system catalyzes the incorporation of d-alanine covalently linked by ester linkages to the glycerol moieties of the poly(glycerol phosphate) chains of d-alanyl-LTA. New procedures are presented for the partial purification of d-alanyl-LTA with a high yield of ester-linked d-alanine and for the sequential degradation of the poly(glycerol phosphate) moiety substituted with d-alanine of d-alanyl-LTA with phosphodiesterase II/phosphatase from Aspergillus niger. PMID:6772629

  9. Predicting protein decomposition: the case of aspartic-acid racemization kinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, M J; Waite, E R; van Duin, A C

    1999-01-01

    The increase in proportion of the non-biological (D-) isomer of aspartic acid (Asp) relative to the L-isomer has been widely used in archaeology and geochemistry as a tool for dating. the method has proved controversial, particularly when used for bones. The non-linear kinetics of Asp racemization have prompted a number of suggestions as to the underlying mechanism(s) and have led to the use of mathematical transformations which linearize the increase in D-Asp with respect to time. Using one example, a suggestion that the initial rapid phase of Asp racemization is due to a contribution from asparagine (Asn), we demonstrate how a simple model of the degradation and racemization of Asn can be used to predict the observed kinetics. A more complex model of peptide bound Asx (Asn + Asp) racemization, which occurs via the formation of a cyclic succinimide (Asu), can be used to correctly predict Asx racemization kinetics in proteins at high temperatures (95-140 degrees C). The model fails to predict racemization kinetics in dentine collagen at 37 degrees C. The reason for this is that Asu formation is highly conformation dependent and is predicted to occur extremely slowly in triple helical collagen. As conformation strongly influences the rate of Asu formation and hence Asx racemization, the use of extrapolation from high temperatures to estimate racemization kinetics of Asx in proteins below their denaturation temperature is called into question. In the case of archaeological bone, we argue that the D:L ratio of Asx reflects the proportion of non-helical to helical collagen, overlain by the effects of leaching of more soluble (and conformationally unconstrained) peptides. Thus, racemization kinetics in bone are potentially unpredictable, and the proposed use of Asx racemization to estimate the extent of DNA depurination in archaeological bones is challenged. PMID:10091247

  10. Association between Serum Uric Acid and Elevated Alanine Aminotransferase in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuang; Guo, Xiaofan; Yu, Shasha; Sun, Guozhe; Yang, Hongmei; Li, Zhao; Sun, Yingxian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Both the serum uric acid (SUA) level and elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT) are related to metabolic syndrome. However, the association between SUA and elevated ALT has not been elucidated in the general population. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between SUA and elevated ALT in the general population of China; Methods: A total of 11,572 adults (≥35 years of age) participated in this survey. Elevated ALT was defined as >40 U/L. SUA ≥ 7.0 mg/dL in males or ≥6.0 mg/dL in females was defined as hyperuricemia. SUA within the reference range was divided into quartiles, and its associations with elevated ALT were evaluated by logistic regressions; Results: A total of 7.4% participants had elevated ALT. The prevalence of hyperuricemia was 14.9% in males and 7.3% in females. There was a significantly positive dose-response association between SUA levels and the prevalence of elevated ALT. After adjusting for potential confounders, a positive relationship for elevated ALT was observed in subjects with hyperuricemia (odds ratio [OR]: 2.032, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.443–2.861 for men; OR: 2.045, 95% CI: 1.221–3.425 for women, both p < 0.05). Within the reference range, the association between SUA and elevated ALT persisted in the fourth quartile (OR: 1.467, 95% CI: 1.063–2.025 for men; OR: 1.721, 95% CI: 1.146–2.585 for women, both p < 0.05); Conclusions: Our results indicated that an increased SUA level, even within the reference range, was independently associated with elevated ALT in Chinese adults. PMID:27563918

  11. Theoretical and experimental study of valence photoelectron spectrum of D,L-alanine amino acid.

    PubMed

    Farrokhpour, H; Fathi, F; De Brito, A Naves

    2012-07-01

    In this work, the He-I (21.218 eV) photoelectron spectrum of D,L-alanine in the gas phase is revisited experimentally and theoretically. To support the experiment, the high level ab initio calculations were used to calculate and assign the photoelectron spectra of the four most stable conformers of gaseous alanine, carefully. The symmetry adapted cluster/configuration interaction (SAC-CI) method based on single and double excitation operators (SD-R) and its more accurate version, termed general-R, was used to separately calculate the energies and intensities of the ionization bands of the L- and D-alanine conformers. The intensities of ionization bands were calculated based on the monopole approximation. Also, natural bonding orbital (NBO) calculations were employed for better spectral band assignment. The relative electronic energy, Gibbs free energy, and Boltzmann population ratio of the conformers were calculated at the experimental temperature (403 K) using several theoretical methods. The theoretical photoelectron spectrum of alanine was calculated by summing over the spectra of individual D and L conformers weighted by different population ratios. Finally, the population ratio of the four most stable conformers of alanine was estimated from the experimental photoelectron spectrum using theoretical calculations for the first time.

  12. Amino acid racemization dating of fossil bones, I. inter-laboratory comparison of racemization measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bada, J.L.; Hoopes, E.; Darling, D.; Dungworth, G.; Kessels, H.J.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Blunt, D.J.

    1979-01-01

    Enantiomeric measurements for aspartic acid, glutamic acid, and alanine in twenty-one different fossil bone samples have been carried out by three different laboratories using different analytical methods. These inter-laboratory comparisons demonstrate that D/L aspartic acid measurements are highly reproducible, whereas the enantiomeric measurements for the other amino acids show a wide variation between the three laboratories. At present, aspartic acid measurements are the most suitable for racemization dating of bone because of their superior analytical precision. ?? 1979.

  13. The catalytic role of aspartic acid-92 in a human dual-specific protein-tyrosine-phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Denu, J M; Zhou, G; Guo, Y; Dixon, J E

    1995-03-14

    The mechanism of catalysis for the human dual-specific (vaccinia H1-related) protein-tyrosine-phosphatase was investigated. The pH dependence of the kcat value is bell-shaped when p-nitrophenyl phosphate was employed as a model substrate. The kcat/Km pH profile rises with a slope of 2 and decreases with a slope of -1, indicating that two groups must be unprotonated and one group must be protonated for activity. An amino acid residue with an apparent pKa value of 5.5 +/- 0.2 must be unprotonated and a residue with a pKa value of 5.7 must be unprotonated for activity. The pKa value of the catalytic cysteine-124 (C124) was 5.6 +/- 0.1. The aspartic acid-92-asparagine (D92N) mutant enzyme was 100-fold less active than the native enzyme and exhibited the loss of the basic limb in the pH profiles, suggesting that in the native enzyme D92 must be protonated for activity. The D92 residue is conserved throughout the entire family of dual-specific phosphatases. Mutants glutamic acid-6-glutamine, glutamic acid-32-glutamine, aspartic acid-14-asparagine, and aspartic acid-110-asparagine had less than a 2-fold effect on the kinetic parameters when compared to native enzyme. Based upon the lack of a "burst" in rapid reaction kinetics, formation of the intermediate is rate-limiting with both native and D92N mutant enzymes. In agreement with rate-limiting formation of the intermediate, the pKa value of 5.5 for the group which must be unprotonated for activity was assigned to C124.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Uptake and metabolism of (14C)-aspartate by developing kernels of maize (Zea mays L. )

    SciTech Connect

    Muhitch, M.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Pulse-chase experiments were performed to determine the metabolic fate of (14C)-aspartate in the pedicel region and subsequent uptake into the endosperm. Kernels were removed from the cob, leaving the pedicel attached but removing glumes, palea, and lemma. The basal tips were incubated in (14C)-aspartate for 0.5 h, followed by a 2 h chase period with unlabeled aspartate. In contrast to a previous study in which 70% of the 14C from aspartate was recovered in the organic acid fraction (Lyznik, et al., Phytochemistry 24: 425, 1985), only 20 to 25% of the radioactivity found in the 2 h chase period. While a small amount of the 14C transiently appeared in alanine at the beginning of the chase period, the most heavily labeled non-fed amino acid was glutamine, which accounted for 21% of the radioactivity within the pedicel amino acid fraction by 0.5 h into the chase period. There was no evidence for asparagine synthesis within the pedicel region of the kernel. 14C recovered from the endosperm in the form of amino acids were aspartate (60%), glutamine (20%), glutamate (15%), and alanine (5%). These results suggest that some of the maternally supplied amino acids undergo metabolic conversion to other amino acids before being taken up by the endosperm.

  15. A novel aspartic acid protease gene from pineapple fruit (Ananas comosus): cloning, characterization and relation to postharvest chilling stress resistance.

    PubMed

    Raimbault, Astrid-Kim; Zuily-Fodil, Yasmine; Soler, Alain; Cruz de Carvalho, Maria H

    2013-11-15

    A full-length cDNA encoding a putative aspartic acid protease (AcAP1) was isolated for the first time from the flesh of pineapple (Ananas comosus) fruit. The deduced sequence of AcAP1 showed all the common features of a typical plant aspartic protease phytepsin precursor. Analysis of AcAP1 gene expression under postharvest chilling treatment in two pineapple varieties differing in their resistance to blackheart development revealed opposite trends. The resistant variety showed an up-regulation of AcAP1 precursor gene expression whereas the susceptible showed a down-regulation in response to postharvest chilling treatment. The same trend was observed regarding specific AP enzyme activity in both varieties. Taken together our results support the involvement of AcAP1 in postharvest chilling stress resistance in pineapple fruits.

  16. Comments on the paper: 'Optical reflectance, optical refractive index and optical conductivity measurements of nonlinear optics for L-aspartic acid nickel chloride single crystal'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Bikshandarkoil R.; Naik, Suvidha G.; Dhavskar, Kiran T.

    2016-02-01

    We argue that the 'L-aspartic acid nickel chloride' crystal reported by the authors of the title paper (Optics Communications, 291 (2013) 304-308) is actually the well-known diaqua(L-aspartato)nickel(II) hydrate crystal.

  17. Structural Isotopic Effects in the smallest chiral amino acid: Observation of a structural phase transition in fully deuterated alanine.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordallo, Heloisa; de Souza, Joelma; de Tarso, Paulo; Argyriou, Dimitri

    2008-03-01

    A first study of possible changes instigated by deuteration in amino acids was carried out using neutron diffraction, inelastic neutron scattering and Raman scattering in L-alanine, C2H4(NH2)COOH. Careful analysis of the structural parameters shows that deuteration of L-alanine engenders significant geometric changes as a function of temperature, which can be directly related to the observation of new lattice vibration modes in the Raman spectra. The combination of the experimental data suggests that C2D4(ND2)COOD undergoes a structural phase transition (or a structural rearrangement) at about 170 K. Considering that this particular amino acid is a hydrogen-bonded system with short hydrogen bonds (OH ˜ 1.8 å), we evoke the Ubbelohde effect to conclude that substitution of hydrogen for deuterium gives rise to changes in the hydrogen-bonding interactions. The structural differences suggest distinct relative stabilities for the hydrogenous and deuterated L-alanine. De Souza et al. - Journal of Physical Chemistry B (Letters) 111, 5034-39 (2007)

  18. Active-site mutations of diphtheria toxin: effects of replacing glutamic acid-148 with aspartic acid, glutamine, or serine.

    PubMed

    Wilson, B A; Reich, K A; Weinstein, B R; Collier, R J

    1990-09-18

    Glutamic acid-148, an active-site residue of diphtheria toxin identified by photoaffinity labeling with NAD, was replaced with aspartic acid, glutamine, or serine by directed mutagenesis of the F2 fragment of the toxin gene. Wild-type and mutant F2 proteins were synthesized in Escherichia coli, and the corresponding enzymic fragment A moieties (DTA) were derived, purified, and characterized. The Glu----Asp (E148D), Glu----Gln (E148Q), and Glu----Ser (E148S) mutations caused reductions in NAD:EF-2 ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of ca. 100-, 250-, and 300-fold, respectively, while causing only minimal changes in substrate affinity. The effects of the mutations on NAD-glycohydrolase activity were considerably different; only a 10-fold reduction in activity was observed for E148S, and the E148D and E148Q mutants actually exhibited a small but reproducible increase in NAD-glycohydrolytic activity. Photolabeling by nicotinamide-radiolabeled NAD was diminished ca. 8-fold in the E148D mutant and was undetectable in the other mutants. The results confirm that Glu-148 plays a crucial role in the ADP-ribosylation of EF-2 and imply an important function for the side-chain carboxyl group in catalysis. The carboxyl group is also important for photochemical labeling by NAD but not for NAD-glycohydrolase activity. The pH dependence of the catalytic parameters for the ADP-ribosyltransferase reaction revealed a group in DTA-wt that titrates with an apparent pKa of 6.2-6.3 and is in the protonated state in the rate-determining step.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Establishing a synthetic pathway for high-level production of 3-hydroxypropionic acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae via β-alanine.

    PubMed

    Borodina, Irina; Kildegaard, Kanchana R; Jensen, Niels B; Blicher, Thomas H; Maury, Jérôme; Sherstyk, Svetlana; Schneider, Konstantin; Lamosa, Pedro; Herrgård, Markus J; Rosenstand, Inger; Öberg, Fredrik; Forster, Jochen; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Microbial fermentation of renewable feedstocks into plastic monomers can decrease our fossil dependence and reduce global CO2 emissions. 3-Hydroxypropionic acid (3HP) is a potential chemical building block for sustainable production of superabsorbent polymers and acrylic plastics. With the objective of developing Saccharomyces cerevisiae as an efficient cell factory for high-level production of 3HP, we identified the β-alanine biosynthetic route as the most economically attractive according to the metabolic modeling. We engineered and optimized a synthetic pathway for de novo biosynthesis of β-alanine and its subsequent conversion into 3HP using a novel β-alanine-pyruvate aminotransferase discovered in Bacillus cereus. The final strain produced 3HP at a titer of 13.7±0.3gL(-1) with a 0.14±0.0C-molC-mol(-1) yield on glucose in 80h in controlled fed-batch fermentation in mineral medium at pH 5, and this work therefore lays the basis for developing a process for biological 3HP production.

  20. Establishing a synthetic pathway for high-level production of 3-hydroxypropionic acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae via β-alanine.

    PubMed

    Borodina, Irina; Kildegaard, Kanchana R; Jensen, Niels B; Blicher, Thomas H; Maury, Jérôme; Sherstyk, Svetlana; Schneider, Konstantin; Lamosa, Pedro; Herrgård, Markus J; Rosenstand, Inger; Öberg, Fredrik; Forster, Jochen; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Microbial fermentation of renewable feedstocks into plastic monomers can decrease our fossil dependence and reduce global CO2 emissions. 3-Hydroxypropionic acid (3HP) is a potential chemical building block for sustainable production of superabsorbent polymers and acrylic plastics. With the objective of developing Saccharomyces cerevisiae as an efficient cell factory for high-level production of 3HP, we identified the β-alanine biosynthetic route as the most economically attractive according to the metabolic modeling. We engineered and optimized a synthetic pathway for de novo biosynthesis of β-alanine and its subsequent conversion into 3HP using a novel β-alanine-pyruvate aminotransferase discovered in Bacillus cereus. The final strain produced 3HP at a titer of 13.7±0.3gL(-1) with a 0.14±0.0C-molC-mol(-1) yield on glucose in 80h in controlled fed-batch fermentation in mineral medium at pH 5, and this work therefore lays the basis for developing a process for biological 3HP production. PMID:25447643

  1. Characterization of lipoteichoic acid structures from three probiotic Bacillus strains: involvement of D-alanine in their biological activity.

    PubMed

    Villéger, Romain; Saad, Naima; Grenier, Karine; Falourd, Xavier; Foucat, Loïc; Urdaci, Maria C; Bressollier, Philippe; Ouk, Tan-Sothea

    2014-10-01

    Probiotics represent a potential strategy to influence the host's immune system thereby modulating immune response. Lipoteichoic Acid (LTA) is a major immune-stimulating component of Gram-positive cell envelopes. This amphiphilic polymer, anchored in the cytoplasmic membrane by means of its glycolipid component, typically consists of a poly (glycerol-phosphate) chain with D-alanine and/or glycosyl substitutions. LTA is known to stimulate macrophages in vitro, leading to secretion of inflammatory mediators such as Nitric Oxide (NO). This study investigates the structure-activity relationship of purified LTA from three probiotic Bacillus strains (Bacillus cereus CH, Bacillus subtilis CU1 and Bacillus clausii O/C). LTAs were extracted from bacterial cultures and purified. Chemical modification by means of hydrolysis at pH 8.5 was performed to remove D-alanine. The molecular structure of native and modified LTAs was determined by (1)H NMR and GC-MS, and their inflammatory potential investigated by measuring NO production by RAW 264.7 macrophages. Structural analysis revealed several differences between the newly characterized LTAs, mainly relating to their D-alanylation rates and poly (glycerol-phosphate) chain length. We observed induction of NO production by LTAs from B. subtilis and B. clausii, whereas weaker NO production was observed with B. cereus. LTA dealanylation abrogated NO production independently of the glycolipid component, suggesting that immunomodulatory potential depends on D-alanine substitutions. D-alanine may control the spatial configuration of LTAs and their recognition by cell receptors. Knowledge of molecular mechanisms behind the immunomodulatory abilities of probiotics is essential to optimize their use.

  2. Characterization of lipoteichoic acid structures from three probiotic Bacillus strains: involvement of D-alanine in their biological activity.

    PubMed

    Villéger, Romain; Saad, Naima; Grenier, Karine; Falourd, Xavier; Foucat, Loïc; Urdaci, Maria C; Bressollier, Philippe; Ouk, Tan-Sothea

    2014-10-01

    Probiotics represent a potential strategy to influence the host's immune system thereby modulating immune response. Lipoteichoic Acid (LTA) is a major immune-stimulating component of Gram-positive cell envelopes. This amphiphilic polymer, anchored in the cytoplasmic membrane by means of its glycolipid component, typically consists of a poly (glycerol-phosphate) chain with D-alanine and/or glycosyl substitutions. LTA is known to stimulate macrophages in vitro, leading to secretion of inflammatory mediators such as Nitric Oxide (NO). This study investigates the structure-activity relationship of purified LTA from three probiotic Bacillus strains (Bacillus cereus CH, Bacillus subtilis CU1 and Bacillus clausii O/C). LTAs were extracted from bacterial cultures and purified. Chemical modification by means of hydrolysis at pH 8.5 was performed to remove D-alanine. The molecular structure of native and modified LTAs was determined by (1)H NMR and GC-MS, and their inflammatory potential investigated by measuring NO production by RAW 264.7 macrophages. Structural analysis revealed several differences between the newly characterized LTAs, mainly relating to their D-alanylation rates and poly (glycerol-phosphate) chain length. We observed induction of NO production by LTAs from B. subtilis and B. clausii, whereas weaker NO production was observed with B. cereus. LTA dealanylation abrogated NO production independently of the glycolipid component, suggesting that immunomodulatory potential depends on D-alanine substitutions. D-alanine may control the spatial configuration of LTAs and their recognition by cell receptors. Knowledge of molecular mechanisms behind the immunomodulatory abilities of probiotics is essential to optimize their use. PMID:25090957

  3. Structures of an alanine racemase from Bacillus anthracis (BA0252) in the presence and absence of (R)-1-aminoethylphosphonic acid (l-Ala-P)

    SciTech Connect

    Au, Kinfai; Ren, Jingshan; Walter, Thomas S.; Harlos, Karl; Nettleship, Joanne E.; Owens, Raymond J.; Stuart, David I.; Esnouf, Robert M.

    2008-05-01

    Structures of BA0252, an alanine racemase from B. anthracis, in the presence and absence of the inhibitor (R)-1-aminoethylphosphonic acid (l-Ala-P) and determined by X-ray crystallography to resolutions of 2.1 and 1.47 Å, respectively, are described. Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, has been targeted by the Oxford Protein Production Facility to validate high-throughput protocols within the Structural Proteomics in Europe project. As part of this work, the structures of an alanine racemase (BA0252) in the presence and absence of the inhibitor (R)-1-aminoethylphosphonic acid (l-Ala-P) have determined by X-ray crystallo@@graphy to resolutions of 2.1 and 1.47 Å, respectively. Difficulties in crystallizing this protein were overcome by the use of reductive methylation. Alanine racemase has attracted much interest as a possible target for anti-anthrax drugs: not only is d-alanine a vital component of the bacterial cell wall, but recent studies also indicate that alanine racemase, which is accessible in the exosporium, plays a key role in inhibition of germination in B. anthracis. These structures confirm the binding mode of l-Ala-P but suggest an unexpected mechanism of inhibition of alanine racemase by this compound and could provide a basis for the design of improved alanine racemase inhibitors with potential as anti-anthrax therapies.

  4. Determination of β-Cyano-L-alanine, γ-Glutamyl-β-cyano-L-alanine, and Common Free Amino Acids in Vicia sativa (Fabaceae) Seeds by Reversed-Phase High-Performance Liquid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Megías, Cristina; Cortés-Giraldo, Isabel; Girón-Calle, Julio; Vioque, Javier; Alaiz, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    A method for determination of β-cyano-L-alanine, γ-glutamyl-β-cyano-L-alanine and other free amino acids in Vicia sativa is presented. Seed extracts were derivatized by reaction with diethyl ethoxymethylenemalonate and analyzed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Calibration curves showed very good linearity of the response. The limit of detection and quantification was 0.15 and 0.50 μM, respectively. The method has high intra- (RSD = 0.28–0.31%) and interrepeatability (RSD = 2.76–3.08%) and remarkable accuracy with a 99% recovery in spiked samples. The method is very easy to carry out and allows for ready analysis of large number of samples using very basic HPLC equipment because the derivatized samples are very stable and have very good chromatographic properties. The method has been applied to the determination of γ-glutamyl-β-cyano-L-alanine, β-cyano-L-alanine, and common free amino acids in eight wild populations of V. sativa from southwestern Spain. PMID:25587488

  5. Neurotoxic Non-proteinogenic Amino Acid β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine and Its Role in Biological Systems.

    PubMed

    Popova, A A; Koksharova, O A

    2016-08-01

    Secondary metabolites of photoautotrophic organisms have attracted considerable interest in recent years. In particular, molecules of non-proteinogenic amino acids participating in various physiological processes and capable of producing adverse ecological effects have been actively investigated. For example, the non-proteinogenic amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is neurotoxic to animals including humans. It is known that BMAA accumulation via the food chain can lead to development of neurodegenerative diseases in humans such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases as well as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Moreover, BMAA can be mistakenly incorporated into a protein molecule instead of serine. Natural sources of BMAA and methods for its detection are discussed in this review, as well as the role of BMAA in metabolism of its producers and possible mechanisms of toxicity of this amino acid in different living organisms. PMID:27677549

  6. Recognition of the folded conformation of plant hormone (auxin, IAA) conjugates with glutamic and aspartic acids and their amides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolić, S.; Kveder, M.; Klaić, B.; Magnus, V.; Kojić-Prodić, B.

    2001-01-01

    The molecular structure of the endogenous plant hormone (auxin) conjugate, N-(indol-3-ylacetyl)- L-glutamic acid, is deduced by comparison with N2-(indol-3-ylacetyl)glutamine (IAA-Gln), N2-(indol-3-ylacetyl)asparagine (IAA-Asn) and N-(indol-3-ylacetyl)- L-aspartic acid using X-ray structure analysis, 1H-NMR spectroscopy (NOE measurements) and molecular modelling. The significance of the overall molecular shape, and of the resulting amphiphilic properties, of the compounds studied are discussed in terms of possible implications for trafficking between cell compartments. Both in the solid state and in solution, the molecules are in the hair-pin (folded) conformation in which the side chain is folded over the indole ring. While extended conformations can be detected by molecular dynamics simulations, they are so short-lived that any major influence on the biological properties of the compounds studied is unlikely.

  7. Independent highly sensitive characterization of asparagine deamidation and aspartic acid isomerization by sheathless CZE-ESI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Gahoual, Rabah; Beck, Alain; François, Yannis-Nicolas; Leize-Wagner, Emmanuelle

    2016-02-01

    Amino acids residues are commonly submitted to various physicochemical modifications occurring at physiological pH and temperature. Post-translational modifications (PTMs) require comprehensive characterization because of their major influence on protein structure and involvement in numerous in vivo process or signaling. Mass spectrometry (MS) has gradually become an analytical tool of choice to characterize PTMs; however, some modifications are still challenging because of sample faint modification levels or difficulty to separate an intact peptide from modified counterparts before their transfer to the ionization source. Here, we report the implementation of capillary zone electrophoresis coupled to electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (CZE-ESI-MS/MS) by the intermediate of a sheathless interfacing for independent and highly sensitive characterization of asparagine deamidation (deaN) and aspartic acid isomerization (isoD). CZE selectivity regarding deaN and isoD was studied extensively using different sets of synthetic peptides based on actual tryptic peptides. Results demonstrated CZE ability to separate the unmodified peptide from modified homologous exhibiting deaN, isoD or both independently with a resolution systematically superior to 1.29. Developed CZE-ESI-MS/MS method was applied for the characterization of monoclonal antibodies and complex protein mixture. Conserved CZE selectivity could be demonstrated even for complex samples, and foremost results obtained showed that CZE selectivity is similar regardless of the composition of the peptide. Separation of modified peptides prior to the MS analysis allowed to characterize and estimate modification levels of the sample independently for deaN and isoD even for peptides affected by both modifications and, as a consequence, enables to distinguish the formation of l-aspartic acid or d-aspartic acid generated from deaN. Separation based on peptide modification allowed, as supported by the ESI

  8. Independent highly sensitive characterization of asparagine deamidation and aspartic acid isomerization by sheathless CZE-ESI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Gahoual, Rabah; Beck, Alain; François, Yannis-Nicolas; Leize-Wagner, Emmanuelle

    2016-02-01

    Amino acids residues are commonly submitted to various physicochemical modifications occurring at physiological pH and temperature. Post-translational modifications (PTMs) require comprehensive characterization because of their major influence on protein structure and involvement in numerous in vivo process or signaling. Mass spectrometry (MS) has gradually become an analytical tool of choice to characterize PTMs; however, some modifications are still challenging because of sample faint modification levels or difficulty to separate an intact peptide from modified counterparts before their transfer to the ionization source. Here, we report the implementation of capillary zone electrophoresis coupled to electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (CZE-ESI-MS/MS) by the intermediate of a sheathless interfacing for independent and highly sensitive characterization of asparagine deamidation (deaN) and aspartic acid isomerization (isoD). CZE selectivity regarding deaN and isoD was studied extensively using different sets of synthetic peptides based on actual tryptic peptides. Results demonstrated CZE ability to separate the unmodified peptide from modified homologous exhibiting deaN, isoD or both independently with a resolution systematically superior to 1.29. Developed CZE-ESI-MS/MS method was applied for the characterization of monoclonal antibodies and complex protein mixture. Conserved CZE selectivity could be demonstrated even for complex samples, and foremost results obtained showed that CZE selectivity is similar regardless of the composition of the peptide. Separation of modified peptides prior to the MS analysis allowed to characterize and estimate modification levels of the sample independently for deaN and isoD even for peptides affected by both modifications and, as a consequence, enables to distinguish the formation of l-aspartic acid or d-aspartic acid generated from deaN. Separation based on peptide modification allowed, as supported by the ESI

  9. Spatiotemporal Localization of d-Amino Acid Oxidase and d-Aspartate Oxidases during Development in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Saitoh, Yasuaki; Katane, Masumi; Kawata, Tomonori; Maeda, Kazuhiro; Sekine, Masae; Furuchi, Takemitsu; Kobuna, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Taro; Inoue, Takao; Arai, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Yasuhito

    2012-01-01

    Recent investigations have shown that a variety of d-amino acids are present in living organisms and that they possibly play important roles in physiological functions in the body. d-Amino acid oxidase (DAO) and d-aspartate oxidase (DDO) are degradative enzymes stereospecific for d-amino acids. They have been identified in various organisms, including mammals and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, although the significance of these enzymes and the relevant functions of d-amino acids remain to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the spatiotemporal localization of C. elegans DAO and DDOs (DDO-1, DDO-2, and DDO-3) and measured the levels of several d- and l-amino acids in wild-type C. elegans and four mutants in which each gene for DAO and the DDOs was partially deleted and thereby inactivated. Furthermore, several phenotypes of these mutant strains were characterized. The results reported in this study indicate that C. elegans DAO and DDOs are involved in egg-laying events and the early development of C. elegans. In particular, DDOs appear to play important roles in the development and maturation of germ cells. This work provides novel and useful insights into the physiological functions of these enzymes and d-amino acids in multicellular organisms. PMID:22393259

  10. Molecular cloning and enzymological characterization of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate independent aspartate racemase from hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus litoralis DSM 5473.

    PubMed

    Washio, Tsubasa; Kato, Shiro; Oikawa, Tadao

    2016-09-01

    We succeeded in expressing the aspartate racemase homolog gene from Thermococcus litoralis DSM 5473 in Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3) and found that the gene encodes aspartate racemase. The aspartate racemase gene consisted of 687 bp and encoded 228 amino acid residues. The purified enzyme showed aspartate racemase activity with a specific activity of 1590 U/mg. The enzyme was a homodimer with a molecular mass of 56 kDa and did not require pyridoxal 5'-phosphate as a coenzyme. The enzyme showed aspartate racemase activity even at 95 °C, and the activation energy of the enzyme was calculated to be 51.8 kJ/mol. The enzyme was highly thermostable, and approximately 50 % of its initial activity remained even after incubation at 90 °C for 11 h. The enzyme showed a maximum activity at a pH of 7.5 and was stable between pH 6.0 and 7.0. The enzyme acted on L-cysteic acid and L-cysteine sulfinic acid in addition to D- and L-aspartic acids, and was strongly inhibited by iodoacetic acid. The site-directed mutagenesis of the enzyme showed that the essential cysteine residues were conserved as Cys83 and Cys194. D-Forms of aspartic acid, serine, alanine, and valine were contained in T. litoralis DSM 5473 cells. PMID:27438592

  11. Function of aspartic acid residues in optimum pH control of L-arabinose isomerase from Lactobacillus fermentum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zheng; Li, Sha; Feng, Xiaohai; Zhan, Yijing; Xu, Hong

    2014-05-01

    L-Arabinose isomerase (L-AI) catalyzes the isomerization of L-arabinose to L-ribulose and D-galactose to D-tagatose. Most reported L-AIs exhibit neutral or alkaline optimum pH, which is less beneficial than acidophilic ones in industrial D-tagatose production. Lactobacillus fermentum L-AI (LFAI) is a thermostable enzyme that can achieve a high conversion rate for D-galactose isomerization. However, its biocatalytic activity at acidic conditions can still be further improved. In this study, we report the single- and multiple-site mutagenesis on LFAI targeting three aspartic acid residues (D268, D269, and D299). Some of the lysine mutants, especially D268K/D269K/D299K, exhibited significant optimum pH shifts (from 6.5 to 5.0) and enhancement of pH stability (half-life time increased from 30 to 62 h at pH 6.0), which are more favorable for industrial applications. With the addition of borate, D-galactose was isomerized into D-tagatose by D268K/D269K/D299K at pH 5.0, resulting in a high conversion rate of 62 %. Based on the obtained 3.2-Å crystal structure of LFAI, the three aspartic acid residues were found to be distant from the active site and possibly did not participate in substrate catalysis. However, they were proven to possess similar optimum pH control ability in other L-AI, such as that derived from Escherichia coli. This study sheds light on the essential residues of L-AIs that can be modified for desired optimum pH and better pH stability, which are useful in D-tagatose bioproduction.

  12. Development of novel radiogallium-labeled bone imaging agents using oligo-aspartic acid peptides as carriers.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kazuma; Ishizaki, Atsushi; Takai, Kenichiro; Kitamura, Yoji; Kiwada, Tatsuto; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Odani, Akira

    2013-01-01

    (68)Ga (T 1/2 = 68 min, a generator-produced nuclide) has great potential as a radionuclide for clinical positron emission tomography (PET). Because poly-glutamic and poly-aspartic acids have high affinity for hydroxyapatite, to develop new bone targeting (68)Ga-labeled bone imaging agents for PET, we used 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) as a chelating site and conjugated aspartic acid peptides of varying lengths. Subsequently, we compared Ga complexes, Ga-DOTA-(Asp)n (n = 2, 5, 8, 11, or 14) with easy-to-handle (67)Ga, with the previously described (67)Ga-DOTA complex conjugated bisphosphonate, (67)Ga-DOTA-Bn-SCN-HBP. After synthesizing DOTA-(Asp)n by a Fmoc-based solid-phase method, complexes were formed with (67)Ga, resulting in (67)Ga-DOTA-(Asp)n with a radiochemical purity of over 95% after HPLC purification. In hydroxyapatite binding assays, the binding rate of (67)Ga-DOTA-(Asp)n increased with the increase in the length of the conjugated aspartate peptide. Moreover, in biodistribution experiments, (67)Ga-DOTA-(Asp)8, (67)Ga-DOTA-(Asp)11, and (67)Ga-DOTA-(Asp)14 showed high accumulation in bone (10.5 ± 1.5, 15.1 ± 2.6, and 12.8 ± 1.7% ID/g, respectively) but were barely observed in other tissues at 60 min after injection. Although bone accumulation of (67)Ga-DOTA-(Asp)n was lower than that of (67)Ga-DOTA-Bn-SCN-HBP, blood clearance of (67)Ga-DOTA-(Asp)n was more rapid. Accordingly, the bone/blood ratios of (67)Ga-DOTA-(Asp)11 and (67)Ga-DOTA-(Asp)14 were comparable with those of (67)Ga-DOTA-Bn-SCN-HBP. In conclusion, these data provide useful insights into the drug design of (68)Ga-PET tracers for the diagnosis of bone disorders, such as bone metastases. PMID:24391942

  13. Synthesis, characterization and application of a novel chemical sand-fixing agent-poly(aspartic acid) and its composites.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Wang, Fang; Fang, Li; Tan, Tianwei

    2007-09-01

    A novel sand-fixing agent-poly(aspartic acid) and its composites were synthesized to improve sand particles compressive strength and anti-wind erosion properties. The relationship between the concentration of sand-fixing agent and the sand-fixing properties was studied by three kinds of aging tests. Some composites were choose to improve the sand-fixing property and the composition of 40% xanthan gum and 60% ethyl cellulose were chosen to compare sand-fixing property with lignosulfonate. The results showed that the sand-fixing and water-retaining properties of xanthan gum and ethyl cellulose composites were better than that of lignosulfonate. The biodegradability experiment showed that the PASP and its composites were environment-friendly products and the field test showed that the PASP composites could improve wind erosion disturbance.

  14. Preparation of γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane cross-linked poly(aspartic acid) superabsorbent hydrogels without organic solvent.

    PubMed

    Meng, Hongyu; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Shenyu; Tan, Tianwei; Cao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Poly(aspartic acid) (PASP) hydrogel is a type of biodegradable and biocompatible polymer with high water absorbing ability. Traditionally, the production of PASP hydrogel is expensive, complex, environmentally unfriendly, and consumes a large amount of organic solvents, e.g. dimethylformamide or dimethylsulfoxide. This study introduces a one-step synthesis of PASP resin, in which the organic phase was replaced by distilled water and γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane was used as the cross-linker. Absorbent ability and characteristics were determined by swelling ratio, FTIR, (13)C SSNMR, and SEM. In vitro cytotoxicity evaluation and animal skin irritation tests showed the hydrogel has body-friendly properties. Preparing PASP hydrogel in aqueous solution is promising and finds its use in many applications. PMID:26499167

  15. IgE binding to peanut allergens is inhibited by combined D-aspartic and D-glutamic acids.

    PubMed

    Chung, Si-Yin; Reed, Shawndrika

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if D-amino acids (D-aas) bind and inhibit immunoglobulin E (IgE) binding to peanut allergens. D-aas such as D-Asp (aspartic acid), D-Glu (glutamic acid), combined D-[Asp/Glu] and others were each prepared in a cocktail of 9 other D-aas, along with L-amino acids (L-aas) and controls. Each sample was mixed with a pooled plasma from peanut-allergic donors, and tested by ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and Western blots for IgE binding to peanut allergens. Results showed that D-[Asp/Glu] (4 mg/ml) inhibited IgE binding (75%) while D-Glu, D-Asp and other D-aas had no inhibitory effect. A higher inhibition was seen with D-[Asp/Glu] than with L-[Asp/Glu]. We concluded that IgE was specific for D-[Asp/Glu], not D-Asp or D-Glu, and that D-[Asp/Glu] was more reactive than was L-[Asp/Glu] in IgE inhibition. The finding indicates that D-[Asp/Glu] may have the potential for removing IgE or reducing IgE binding to peanut allergens in vitro. PMID:25053052

  16. Chiral analysis of UV nonabsorbing compounds by capillary electrophoresis using macrocyclic antibiotics: 1. Separation of aspartic and glutamic acid enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Bednar, P; Aturki, Z; Stransky, Z; Fanali, S

    2001-07-01

    Glycopeptide antibiotics, namely vancomycin or teicoplanin, were evaluated in capillary electrophoresis for the analysis of UV nonabsorbing compounds such as aspartic and glutamic acid enantiomers. Electrophoretic runs were performed in laboratory-made polyacrylamide-coated capillaries using the partial filling-counter current method in order to avoid the presence on the detector path of the absorbing chiral selector. The background electrolyte consisted of an aqueous or aqueous-organic buffer in the pH range of 4.5-6.5 of sorbic acid/histidine and the appropriate concentration of chiral selector. Several experimental parameters such as antibiotic concentration and type, buffer pH, organic modifier, type and concentration of absorbing co-ion (for the indirect UV detection) were studied in order to find the optimum conditions for the chiral resolution of the two underivatized amino acids in their enantiomers. Among the two investigated chiral selectors, vancomycin resulted to be the most useful chiral selector allowing relatively high chiral resolution of the studied compounds even at low concentration. The optimized method (10 mM sorbic acid/histidine, pH 5, and 10 mM of vancomycin) was used for the analysis of real samples such as teeth dentine and beer.

  17. First principles DFT study of weak C-H…O bonds in crystalline amino acids under pressure-alanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaniah, Lavanya M.; Kamal, C.; Sikka, S. K.

    2013-02-01

    Many crystalline solids containing C-H…O hydrogen bonds display blue shifting of the C-H stretching frequency under pressure. No agreed explanation is available for this. Here, we use first principles density functional theory, to determine the hydrogen atom positions to understand the cause of this blue shift. No neutron diffraction is feasible due to flux limitations for this purpose. As a first case, we have taken up the study of the amino acid, alanine. We find that the C_H_…O bond in it no longer remain isolated under compression as is case at ambient pressure. The hydrogen atom in the bond has now repulsive contacts with other atoms. This results in contraction of the C-H bond length and consequently to blue shifting as is found experimentally.

  18. A single amino acid change (substitution of the conserved Glu-590 with alanine) in the C-terminal domain of rat liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase I increases its malonyl-CoA sensitivity close to that observed with the muscle isoform of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Napal, Laura; Dai, Jia; Treber, Michelle; Haro, Diego; Marrero, Pedro F; Woldegiorgis, Gebre

    2003-09-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPTI) catalyzes the conversion of long-chain fatty acyl-CoAs to acylcarnitines in the presence of l-carnitine. To determine the role of the highly conserved C-terminal glutamate residue, Glu-590, on catalysis and malonyl-CoA sensitivity, we separately changed the residue to alanine, lysine, glutamine, and aspartate. Substitution of Glu-590 with aspartate, a negatively charged amino acid with only one methyl group less than the glutamate residue in the wild-type enzyme, resulted in complete loss in the activity of the liver isoform of CPTI (L-CPTI). A change of Glu-590 to alanine, glutamine, and lysine caused a significant 9- to 16-fold increase in malonyl-CoA sensitivity but only a partial decrease in catalytic activity. Substitution of Glu-590 with neutral uncharged residues (alanine and glutamine) and/or a basic positively charged residue (lysine) significantly increased L-CPTI malonyl-CoA sensitivity to the level observed with the muscle isoform of the enzyme, suggesting the importance of neutral and/or positive charges in the switch of the kinetic properties of L-CPTI to the muscle isoform of CPTI. Since a conservative substitution of Glu-590 to aspartate but not glutamine resulted in complete loss in activity, we suggest that the longer side chain of glutamate is essential for catalysis and malonyl-CoA sensitivity. This is the first demonstration whereby a single residue mutation in the C-terminal region of the liver isoform of CPTI resulted in a change of its kinetic properties close to that observed with the muscle isoform of the enzyme and provides the rationale for the high malonyl-CoA sensitivity of muscle CPTI compared with the liver isoform of the enzyme. PMID:12826662

  19. Co-expression of bacterial aspartate kinase and adenylylsulfate reductase genes substantially increases sulfur amino acid levels in transgenic alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Tong, Zongyong; Xie, Can; Ma, Lei; Liu, Liping; Jin, Yongsheng; Dong, Jiangli; Wang, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is one of the most important forage crops used to feed livestock, such as cattle and sheep, and the sulfur amino acid (SAA) content of alfalfa is used as an index of its nutritional value. Aspartate kinase (AK) catalyzes the phosphorylation of aspartate to Asp-phosphate, the first step in the aspartate family biosynthesis pathway, and adenylylsulfate reductase (APR) catalyzes the conversion of activated sulfate to sulfite, providing reduced sulfur for the synthesis of cysteine, methionine, and other essential metabolites and secondary compounds. To reduce the feedback inhibition of other metabolites, we cloned bacterial AK and APR genes, modified AK, and introduced them into alfalfa. Compared to the wild-type alfalfa, the content of cysteine increased by 30% and that of methionine increased substantially by 60%. In addition, a substantial increase in the abundance of essential amino acids (EAAs), such as aspartate and lysine, was found. The results also indicated a close connection between amino acid metabolism and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. The total amino acid content and the forage biomass tested showed no significant changes in the transgenic plants. This approach provides a new method for increasing SAAs and allows for the development of new genetically modified crops with enhanced nutritional value. PMID:24520364

  20. Ligand-functionalized degradable polyplexes formed by cationic poly(aspartic acid)-grafted chitosan-cyclodextrin conjugates.

    PubMed

    Song, Hai-Qing; Li, Rui-Quan; Duan, Shun; Yu, Bingran; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Da-Fu; Xu, Fu-Jian

    2015-03-19

    Polypeptide-based degradable polyplexes attracted considerable attention in drug delivery systems. Polysaccharides including cyclodextrin (CD), dextran, and chitosan (CS) were readily grafted with cationic poly(aspartic acid)s (PAsps). To further enhance the transfection performances of PAsp-based polyplexes, herein, different types of ligand (folic acid, FA)-functionalized degradable polyplexes were proposed based on the PAsp-grafted chitosan-cyclodextrin conjugate (CCPE), where multiple β-CDs were tied on a CS chain. The FA-functionalized CCPE (i.e., CCPE-FA) was obtained via a host-guest interaction between the CD units of CCPE and the adamantane (Ad) species of Ad-modified FA (Ad-FA). The resulting CCPE/pDNA, CCPE-FA/pDNA, and ternary CCPE-FA/CCPE/pDNA (prepared by layer-by-layer assembly) polyplexes were investigated in detail using different cell lines. The CCPE-based polyplexes displayed much higher transfection efficiencies than the CS-based polyplexes reported earlier by us. The ternary polyplexes of CCPE-FA/CCPE/pDNA produced excellent gene transfection abilities in the folate receptor (FR)-positive tumor cells. This work would provide a promising means to produce highly efficient polyplexes for future gene therapy applications. PMID:25758351

  1. Amino acid transport across the tonoplast of vacuoles isolated from barley mesophyll protoplasts: Uptake of alanine, leucine, and glutamine. [Hordeum vulgare L

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, K.J.; Jaeger, R.; Kaiser, G.; Martinoia, E. )

    1990-01-01

    Mesophyll protoplasts from leaves of well-fertilized barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) plants contained amino acids at concentrations as high as 120 millimoles per liter. With the exception of glutamic acid, which is predominantly localized in the cytoplasm, a major part of all other amino acids was contained inside the large central vacuole. Alanine, leucine, and glutamine are the dominant vacuolar amino acids in barley. Their transport into isolated vacuoles was studied using {sup 14}C-labeled amino acids. Uptake was slow in the absence of ATP. A three- to sixfold stimulation of uptake was observed after addition of ATP or adenylyl imidodiphosphate an ATP analogue not being hydrolyzed by ATPases. Other nucleotides were ineffective in increasing the rate of uptake. ATP-Stimulated amino acid transport was not dependent on the transtonoplast pH or membrane potential. p-Chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid and n-ethyl maleimide increased transport independently of ATP. Neutral amino acids such as valine or leucine effectively decreased the rate of alanine transport. Glutamine and glycine were less effective or not effective as competitive inhibitors of alanine transport. The results indicate the existence of a uniport translocator specific for neutral or basic amino acids that is under control of metabolic effectors.

  2. 40 CFR 721.4575 - L-aspartic acid, N,N′- [(1E) - 1,2 - ethenediylbis[(3-sulfo-4, 1-phenylene)imino [6-(phenylamino...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-, hexasodium salt. 721.4575 Section 721.4575 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4575 L-aspartic acid, N,N′-

  3. 40 CFR 721.4575 - L-aspartic acid, N,N′- [(1E) - 1,2 - ethenediylbis[(3-sulfo-4, 1-phenylene)imino [6-(phenylamino...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-, hexasodium salt. 721.4575 Section 721.4575 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4575 L-aspartic acid, N,N′-

  4. 40 CFR 721.4575 - L-aspartic acid, N,N′- [(1E) - 1,2 - ethenediylbis[(3-sulfo-4, 1-phenylene)imino [6-(phenylamino...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-, hexasodium salt. 721.4575 Section 721.4575 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4575 L-aspartic acid, N,N′-

  5. Facilitatory effect of docosahexaenoic acid on N-methyl-D-aspartate response in pyramidal neurones of rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, M; Kimura, S; Akaike, N

    1994-01-01

    1. The effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) responses in the presence of glycine was investigated in pyramidal neurons acutely dissociated from rat cerebral cortex in whole-cell and single channel configurations. 2. DHA potentiated the NMDA-induced response but reduced the non-NMDA (kainate-induced) response in a concentration-dependent manner at a holding potential of -60 mV under voltage-clamp conditions. 3. Arachidonic acid (AA) also potentiated the NMDA-induced response in a manner similar to DHA. Oleic acid caused a slight potentiation. However, other polyunsaturated and saturated fatty acids had no such effects. 4. The facilitatory action of DHA on the NMDA-induced response was not affected by adding inhibitors of cyclo-oxygenase, lipoxygenase or phospholipase A2, suggesting that DHA may exert its facilitatory effect directly on the NMDA receptor. 5. The facilitatory action of DHA was observed in the presence of a saturating dose of NMDA. Moreover, a detailed analysis of the NMDA receptor-operated single channel currents revealed that, in the presence of DHA, the open probability of the channel increased without changing the conductance, indicating that DHA may act by binding directly to a novel site on the NMDA receptor or by altering the lipid environment of the NMDA receptor and thereby potentiating the response to NMDA. 6. The results are discussed in terms of the possibility that DHA may play an important role in the genesis of long-term potentiation, at least that involving the activation of NMDA receptors. PMID:7514666

  6. Synthesis of polysubstituted β-amino cyclohexane carboxylic acids via Diels-Alder reaction using Ni(II)-complex stabilized β-alanine derived dienes.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiao; Wang, Hengshuai; Wang, Jiang; Wang, Sinan; Lin, Daizong; Lv, Li; Zhou, Yu; Luo, Xiaomin; Jiang, Hualiang; Aceña, José Luis; Soloshonok, Vadim A; Liu, Hong

    2013-02-01

    This paper describes the design and synthesis of a new class of β-alanine derived dienes stabilized by Ni(II)-complex. Preliminary study of their Diels-Alder cycloaddition reactions with several types of dienophiles demonstrates their significant synthetic potential for the preparation of various polyfunctional β-aminocyclohexane carboxylic acids.

  7. Efficient optical resolution of amino acid by alanine racemaze chiral analogue supported on mesoporous carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, D.; Kim, K.; Park, D.; Kim, G.

    2012-09-01

    Optically pure D-amino acids are industrially important chiral building blocks for the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, food ingredients, and drug intermediates. Chemoenzymatic dynamic kinetic-resolution processes have recently been developed for deracemization of amino acids. S-ARCA would be a good candidate for the selective adsorption of D amino acid through the imine formation reaction. The organic phase containing S-ARCA adsorbent, TPPC or Ionic Liquid (as a phase transfer catalyst) in MC were coated on the surfaces of mesoporous carbon C-SBA-15(CMK). The aqueous solution of racemic D/L-amino acid and NaOH were added to the carbon support coated with ARCA. The D/L ratios on ARCA and in solution were determined with increasing reaction time. S-ARCA has a unique property for the selective adsorption of D- amino acid (up to 90% selcetivity) in the racemic mixture. The fixed bed reactor containing ARCA/carbon support was also adopted successfully for the selective separation of amino acid.

  8. Amino Acid Racemization and the Preservation of Ancient DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poinar, Hendrik N.; Hoss, Matthias

    1996-01-01

    The extent of racemization of aspartic acid, alanine, and leucine provides criteria for assessing whether ancient tissue samples contain endogenous DNA. In samples in which the D/L ratio of aspartic acid exceeds 0.08, ancient DNA sequences could not be retrieved. Paleontological finds from which DNA sequences purportedly millions of years old have been reported show extensive racemization, and the amino acids present are mainly contaminates. An exception is the amino acids in some insects preserved in amber.

  9. Studies on the influence of combustion exhaust gases and the products of their reaction with ammonia on the living organism. II. The influence on aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT) and alanine aminotransferase (AiAt) activities in the liver of guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Lewandowska-Tokarz, A; Stanosek, J; Ludyga, K; Kochanski, L

    1981-01-01

    The behaviour of aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT) an alanine aminotransferase (AIAT) in the whole homogenate and subcellular liver fractions of guinea pigs exposed to combustion exhaust gases and the neutralization products of these gases is presented in this paper. In the liver of animals exposed to the chronic action of combustion exhaust gases a decrease of both enzyme activities in the whole homogenate as well as in the subcellular fractions could be noted. Statistically significant changes are shown by AspAT. In the group of animals subjected to the action of neutralization products an increase of AIAT activity was observed. The activity of AspAT still shows a decrease, but less distinct in comparison with group I. An exception here is the mitochondrial fraction in which the AspAT activity is distinctly increased.

  10. Acute central stimulation of luteinizing hormone by parenterally administered N-methyl-D,L-aspartic acid in the male rat.

    PubMed

    Schainker, B A; Cicero, T J

    1980-02-24

    N-methyl-D,L-aspartic acid (NMA), a potent neuroexcitatory and neurotoxic glutamic acid analogue, acutely elevated serum luteinizing hormone (LH) in male rats when given subcutaneously in doses below those that cause morphologically detectable hypothalamic neurotoxicity. NMA treatment in doses known to be subtoxic by morphological criteria fails to induce any permanent neuroendocrine dysfunction as assessed by several physiological parameters, including NMA responsiveness after multiple consecutive dosees spaced at 24 h intervals, subsequent basal LH levels and subsequent postcastration LH elevations. Like naloxone, NMA elevates serum LH by reversibly stimulating a central labile pool. Neither has a direct stimulatory effect on the pituitary in vitro. Treatment with either attenuates naloxone-induced LH stimulation 2 h, but not 14 days, later while pituitary responsiveness to LHRH in vivo remains unaltered. Neither NMA nor naloxone is dependent upon testosterone for its LH stimulatory action and both increase serum LH through physiological mechanisms responsive to testosterone inhibition. It is concluded that subtoxic LH stimulating doses of NMA provide a useful tool in discerning neurotransmitter systems involved in central control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  11. Cloning and characterization of a complementary deoxyribonucleic acid encoding haploid-specific alanine-rich acidic protein located on chromosome-X.

    PubMed

    Uchida, K; Tsuchida, J; Tanaka, H; Koga, M; Nishina, Y; Nozaki, M; Yoshinaga, K; Toshimori, K; Matsumiya, K; Okuyama, A; Nishimune, Y

    2000-10-01

    We have isolated a cDNA clone encoding a germ cell-specific protein from an expression cDNA library prepared from the mouse testis using testis-specific polyclonal antibodies. Northern blot analysis showed a transcript of 1.1 kilobases exclusively expressed in haploid germ cells of the testis. Sequence analysis of the cDNA revealed one long open reading frame consisting of 238 deduced amino acids, rich in basic amino acids in the N-terminal one-third that also contained the nuclear localization signal, and rich in acidic amino acids, including two type of acidic alanine-rich repeats, in the rest of the deduced protein. The protein having a molecular weight of approximately 55 kDa and an isoelectric point of pH 4.3-4.7 was also exclusively detected in the testis by Western blot analysis. As the cDNA was located on chromosome-X, Halap-X (haploid-specific alanine-rich acidic protein located on chromosome-X) was proposed for the name of the protein encoded by the cDNA. Immunohistochemical observation revealed that the Halap-X protein was predominantly present in the nucleoplasm of round spermatids but gradually decreased as spermatids matured, followed by the subsequent appearance in the cytoplasm of elongating spermatids. Thus, the Halap-X protein was transferred from the nuclei to the cytoplasm during the spermatid maturation when the chromatin condensation and transformation of the nuclei occurred. The Halap-X may facilitate specific association of nuclear DNA with some basic chromosomal proteins and play important roles in the process of chromatin condensation. PMID:10993819

  12. Ingesting a preworkout supplement containing caffeine, creatine, β-alanine, amino acids, and B vitamins for 28 days is both safe and efficacious in recreationally active men.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Kristina L; Moon, Jordan R; Fairman, Ciaran M; Spradley, Brandon D; Tai, Chih-Yin; Falcone, Paul H; Carson, Laura R; Mosman, Matt M; Joy, Jordan M; Kim, Michael P; Serrano, Eric R; Esposito, Enrico N

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of consuming a preworkout supplement (SUP) containing caffeine, creatine, β-alanine, amino acids, and B vitamins for 28 days. We hypothesized that little to no changes in kidney and liver clinical blood markers or resting heart rate and blood pressure (BP) would be observed. In addition, we hypothesized that body composition and performance would improve in recreationally active males after 28 days of supplementation. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, participants were randomly assigned to ingest one scoop of either the SUP or placebo every day for 28 days, either 20 minutes before exercise or ad libitum on nonexercise days. Resting heart rate and BP, body composition, and fasting blood samples were collected before and after supplementation. Aerobic capacity as well as muscular strength and endurance were also measured. Significant (P < .05) main effects for time were observed for resting heart rate (presupplementation, 67.59 ± 7.90 beats per minute; postsupplementation, 66.18 ± 7.63 beats per minute), systolic BP (presupplementation, 122.41 ± 11.25 mm Hg; postsupplementation, 118.35 ± 11.58 mm Hg), blood urea nitrogen (presupplementation, 13.12 ± 2.55 mg/dL; postsupplementation, 15.24 ± 4.47 mg/dL), aspartate aminotransferase (presupplementation, 34.29 ± 16.48 IU/L; postsupplementation, 24.76 ± 4.71 IU/L), and alanine aminotransferase (presupplementation, 32.76 ± 19.72 IU/L; postsupplementation, 24.88 ± 9.68 IU/L). Significant main effects for time were observed for body fat percentage (presupplementation, 15.55% ± 5.79%; postsupplementation, 14.21% ± 5.38%; P = .004) and fat-free mass (presupplementation, 70.80 ± 9.21 kg; postsupplementation, 71.98 ± 9.27 kg; P = .006). A significant decrease in maximal oxygen consumption (presupplementation, 47.28 ± 2.69 mL/kg per minute; postsupplementation, 45.60 ± 2.81 mL/kg per minute) and a significant increase in percentage of

  13. Ingesting a preworkout supplement containing caffeine, creatine, β-alanine, amino acids, and B vitamins for 28 days is both safe and efficacious in recreationally active men.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Kristina L; Moon, Jordan R; Fairman, Ciaran M; Spradley, Brandon D; Tai, Chih-Yin; Falcone, Paul H; Carson, Laura R; Mosman, Matt M; Joy, Jordan M; Kim, Michael P; Serrano, Eric R; Esposito, Enrico N

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of consuming a preworkout supplement (SUP) containing caffeine, creatine, β-alanine, amino acids, and B vitamins for 28 days. We hypothesized that little to no changes in kidney and liver clinical blood markers or resting heart rate and blood pressure (BP) would be observed. In addition, we hypothesized that body composition and performance would improve in recreationally active males after 28 days of supplementation. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, participants were randomly assigned to ingest one scoop of either the SUP or placebo every day for 28 days, either 20 minutes before exercise or ad libitum on nonexercise days. Resting heart rate and BP, body composition, and fasting blood samples were collected before and after supplementation. Aerobic capacity as well as muscular strength and endurance were also measured. Significant (P < .05) main effects for time were observed for resting heart rate (presupplementation, 67.59 ± 7.90 beats per minute; postsupplementation, 66.18 ± 7.63 beats per minute), systolic BP (presupplementation, 122.41 ± 11.25 mm Hg; postsupplementation, 118.35 ± 11.58 mm Hg), blood urea nitrogen (presupplementation, 13.12 ± 2.55 mg/dL; postsupplementation, 15.24 ± 4.47 mg/dL), aspartate aminotransferase (presupplementation, 34.29 ± 16.48 IU/L; postsupplementation, 24.76 ± 4.71 IU/L), and alanine aminotransferase (presupplementation, 32.76 ± 19.72 IU/L; postsupplementation, 24.88 ± 9.68 IU/L). Significant main effects for time were observed for body fat percentage (presupplementation, 15.55% ± 5.79%; postsupplementation, 14.21% ± 5.38%; P = .004) and fat-free mass (presupplementation, 70.80 ± 9.21 kg; postsupplementation, 71.98 ± 9.27 kg; P = .006). A significant decrease in maximal oxygen consumption (presupplementation, 47.28 ± 2.69 mL/kg per minute; postsupplementation, 45.60 ± 2.81 mL/kg per minute) and a significant increase in percentage of

  14. Dipeptide Nanotubes Containing Unnatural Fluorine-Substituted β(2,3)-Diarylamino Acid and L-Alanine as Candidates for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Andrea; Pellegrino, Sara; Das, Priyadip; Yuran, Sivan; Bucci, Raffaella; Ferri, Nicola; Meneghetti, Fiorella; Castellano, Carlo; Reches, Meital; Gelmi, Maria Luisa

    2015-09-18

    The synthesis and the structural characterization of dipeptides composed of unnatural fluorine-substituted β(2,3)-diarylamino acid and L-alanine are reported. Depending on the stereochemistry of the β amino acid, these dipeptides are able to self-assemble into proteolytic stable nanotubes. These architectures were able to enter the cell and locate in the cytoplasmic/perinuclear region and represent interesting candidates for biomedical applications.

  15. Ligand-functionalized degradable polyplexes formed by cationic poly(aspartic acid)-grafted chitosan-cyclodextrin conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hai-Qing; Li, Rui-Quan; Duan, Shun; Yu, Bingran; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Da-Fu; Xu, Fu-Jian

    2015-03-01

    Polypeptide-based degradable polyplexes attracted considerable attention in drug delivery systems. Polysaccharides including cyclodextrin (CD), dextran, and chitosan (CS) were readily grafted with cationic poly(aspartic acid)s (PAsps). To further enhance the transfection performances of PAsp-based polyplexes, herein, different types of ligand (folic acid, FA)-functionalized degradable polyplexes were proposed based on the PAsp-grafted chitosan-cyclodextrin conjugate (CCPE), where multiple β-CDs were tied on a CS chain. The FA-functionalized CCPE (i.e., CCPE-FA) was obtained via a host-guest interaction between the CD units of CCPE and the adamantane (Ad) species of Ad-modified FA (Ad-FA). The resulting CCPE/pDNA, CCPE-FA/pDNA, and ternary CCPE-FA/CCPE/pDNA (prepared by layer-by-layer assembly) polyplexes were investigated in detail using different cell lines. The CCPE-based polyplexes displayed much higher transfection efficiencies than the CS-based polyplexes reported earlier by us. The ternary polyplexes of CCPE-FA/CCPE/pDNA produced excellent gene transfection abilities in the folate receptor (FR)-positive tumor cells. This work would provide a promising means to produce highly efficient polyplexes for future gene therapy applications.Polypeptide-based degradable polyplexes attracted considerable attention in drug delivery systems. Polysaccharides including cyclodextrin (CD), dextran, and chitosan (CS) were readily grafted with cationic poly(aspartic acid)s (PAsps). To further enhance the transfection performances of PAsp-based polyplexes, herein, different types of ligand (folic acid, FA)-functionalized degradable polyplexes were proposed based on the PAsp-grafted chitosan-cyclodextrin conjugate (CCPE), where multiple β-CDs were tied on a CS chain. The FA-functionalized CCPE (i.e., CCPE-FA) was obtained via a host-guest interaction between the CD units of CCPE and the adamantane (Ad) species of Ad-modified FA (Ad-FA). The resulting CCPE/pDNA, CCPE

  16. Dimerization of a PACAP peptide analogue in DMSO via asparagine and aspartic acid residues.

    PubMed

    Severs, Joanne C; Froland, Wayne A

    2008-03-01

    To optimize the stability of a peptide development candidate for the treatment of type II diabetes, formulation studies were initiated in organic solvents and compared to results obtained in aqueous solutions. Stability was assessed by reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Previous studies had shown deamidation and hydrolysis to be the primary mechanisms of degradation in aqueous formulations. Surprisingly, the use of an organic solvent did not decrease the rate of degradation and, as presented here, produced degradation products including dimers. We propose here that deamidation can readily occur in polar anhydrous organic solvents such as DMSO and that the dimer forms through intermolecular nucleophilic attack of an amino acid side chain on a stabilized cyclic imide intermediate.

  17. Aspartic acid-484 of nascent placental alkaline phosphatase condenses with a phosphatidylinositol glycan to become the carboxyl terminus of the mature enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Micanovic, R; Bailey, C A; Brink, L; Gerber, L; Pan, Y C; Hulmes, J D; Udenfriend, S

    1988-01-01

    A carboxyl-terminal chymotryptic peptide from mature human placental alkaline phosphatase was purified by HPLC and monitored by a specific RIA. Sequencing and amino acid assay showed that the carboxyl terminus of the peptide was aspartic acid, representing residue 484 of the proenzyme as deduced from the corresponding cDNA. Further analysis of the peptide showed it to be a peptidoglycan containing one residue of ethanolamine, one residue of glucosamine, and two residues of neutral hexose. The inositol glycan is apparently linked to the alpha carboxyl group of the aspartic acid through the ethanolamine. Location of the inositol glycan on Asp-484 of the proenzyme indicates that a 29-residue peptide is cleaved from the nascent protein during the post-translational condensation with the phosphatidylinositol-glycan. PMID:3422741

  18. A general strategy to prepare different types of polysaccharide-graft-poly(aspartic acid) as degradable gene carriers.

    PubMed

    Song, Hai-Qing; Dou, Xue-Bo; Li, Rui-Quan; Yu, Bing-Ran; Zhao, Na-Na; Xu, Fu-Jian

    2015-01-01

    Owing to their unique properties such as low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility, poly(aspartic acid) (PAsp) and polysaccharides are good candidates for the development of new biomaterials. In order to construct better gene delivery systems by combining polysaccharides with PAsp, in this work, a general strategy is described for preparing series of polysaccharide-graft-PAsp (including cyclodextrin (CD), dextran (Dex) and chitosan (CS)) gene vectors. Such different polysaccharide-based vectors are compared systematically through a series of experiments including degradability, pDNA condensation capability, cytotoxicity and gene transfection ability. They possess good degradability, which would benefit the release of pDNA from the complexes. They exhibit significantly lower cytotoxicity than the control 'gold-standard' polyethylenimine (PEI, ∼25kDa). More importantly, the gene transfection efficiency of Dex- and CS-based vectors is 12-14-fold higher than CD-based ones. This present study indicates that properly grafting degradable PAsp from polysaccharide backbones is an effective means of producing a new class of degradable biomaterials. PMID:25448351

  19. Effect of poly(aspartic acid) on calcium phosphate removal from stainless steel tubing under turbulent flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littlejohn, Felicia

    Calcium phosphate deposition causes cleaning problems in a number of situations including water treatment, dairy processing, and dental applications. This problem is exacerbated by the limited choices of cleaning chemicals that meet environmental regulations. To promote the development of biodegradable, non-toxic alternatives, this research examines the removal of calcium phosphate deposits consisting of brushite (dicalcium phosphate dihydrate; DCPD) and a mixture of hydroxyapatite (HAP) and DCPD from stainless steel in the presence of poly(aspartic acid) and its sodium salt (PASP). The effects of solvent pH, PASP concentration, and flow rate on the calcium phosphate removal rates are measured from stainless steel tubing under turbulent flow conditions using a solid scintillation detection technique. A mechanistic evaluation of the cleaning data in the absence of PASP indicates that DCPD removal is dominated by shear while HAP/DCPD deposit removal is limited by a combination of mass transfer and interfacial processes. Although the removal mechanisms differ, the results conclusively show that PASP promotes calcium phosphate removal under conditions that favor calcium sequestration in both cases. An in-depth study of DCPD removal in the presence of PASP reveals that this additive is most effective under conditions where calcium sequestration and phosphate protonation occur simultaneously.

  20. Face-selective crystal growth behavior of L-aspartic acid in the presence of L-asparagine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hiroyasu; Doki, Norihito; Yoshida, Saki; Yokota, Masaaki; Shimizu, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    The kinetic mechanism of L-asparagine (L-Asn) action on L-aspartic acid (L-Asp) crystal growth, namely the face-selective effect of L-Asn on the L-Asp crystal growth rate in each direction, was examined. In the a-axis direction, the effect of L-Asn on the L-Asp crystal growth rate was small. Enhancement and inhibition of L-Asp crystal growth, and interestingly the dissolution of the L-Asp crystal face, were observed in the b-axis direction, depending on the amount of L-Asn added. In the c-axis direction, the L-Asp crystal growth rate decreased with the increase in the amount of L-Asn added, and the experimental results were well fitted with a Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The study showed that there were crystal growth conditions where enhancement and inhibition, as well as inhibition and dissolution, coexisted in the presence of an additive with a structure similar to the growing crystal.

  1. Aspartic acid at position 57 of the HLA-DQ beta chain protects against type I diabetes: a family study.

    PubMed Central

    Morel, P A; Dorman, J S; Todd, J A; McDevitt, H O; Trucco, M

    1988-01-01

    One hundred seventy-two members from 27 randomly selected multiple case Caucasian families of patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) were studied at the DNA level to ascertain the reliability of codon 57 of the HLA-DQ beta-chain gene as a disease protection/susceptibility marker. The analysis was carried out by polymerase chain reaction amplification of DNA encoding the first domain of the DQ beta chain and by dot blot analysis of the amplified material with allele-specific oligonucleotide probes. One hundred twenty-three randomly selected healthy Caucasian donors were also tested. The results demonstrated that haplotypes carrying an aspartic acid in position 57 (Asp-57) of their DQ beta chain were significantly increased in frequency among nondiabetic haplotypes (23/38), while non-Asp-57 haplotypes were significantly increased in frequency among diabetic haplotypes (65/69). Ninety-six percent of the diabetic probands in our study were homozygous non-Asp/non-Asp as compared to 19.5% of healthy unrelated controls. This conferred a relative risk of 107 (chi 2 = 54.97; P = 0.00003) for non-Asp-57 homozygous individuals. Even though the inheritance and genetic features of IDDM are complex and are not necessarily fully explained by DQ beta chain polymorphism, this approach is much more sensitive than HLA serolog in assessing risk for IDDM. PMID:3186714

  2. An aspartate and a water molecule mediate efficient acid-base catalysis in a tailored antibody pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Debler, Erik W.; Müller, Roger; Hilvert, Donald; Wilson, Ian A.

    2009-12-01

    Design of catalysts featuring multiple functional groups is a desirable, yet formidable goal. Antibody 13G5, which accelerates the cleavage of unactivated benzisoxazoles, is one of few artificial enzymes that harness an acid and a base to achieve efficient proton transfer. X-ray structures of the Fab-hapten complexes of wild-type 13G5 and active-site variants now afford detailed insights into its mechanism. The parent antibody preorganizes Asp{sup H35} and Glu{sup L34} to abstract a proton from substrate and to orient a water molecule for leaving group stabilization, respectively. Remodeling the environment of the hydrogen bond donor with a compensatory network of ordered waters, as seen in the Glu{sup L34} to alanine mutant, leads to an impressive 10{sup 9}-fold rate acceleration over the nonenzymatic reaction with acetate, illustrating the utility of buried water molecules in bifunctional catalysis. Generalization of these design principles may aid in creation of catalysts for other important chemical transformations.

  3. An aspartate and a water molecule mediate efficient acid-base catalysis in a tailored antibody pocket.

    PubMed

    Debler, Erik W; Müller, Roger; Hilvert, Donald; Wilson, Ian A

    2009-11-01

    Design of catalysts featuring multiple functional groups is a desirable, yet formidable goal. Antibody 13G5, which accelerates the cleavage of unactivated benzisoxazoles, is one of few artificial enzymes that harness an acid and a base to achieve efficient proton transfer. X-ray structures of the Fab-hapten complexes of wild-type 13G5 and active-site variants now afford detailed insights into its mechanism. The parent antibody preorganizes Asp(H35) and Glu(L34) to abstract a proton from substrate and to orient a water molecule for leaving group stabilization, respectively. Remodeling the environment of the hydrogen bond donor with a compensatory network of ordered waters, as seen in the Glu(L34) to alanine mutant, leads to an impressive 10(9)-fold rate acceleration over the nonenzymatic reaction with acetate, illustrating the utility of buried water molecules in bifunctional catalysis. Generalization of these design principles may aid in creation of catalysts for other important chemical transformations.

  4. Site-Directed Mutagenesis and Structural Studies Suggest that the Germination Protease, GPR, in Spores of Bacillus Species Is an Atypical Aspartic Acid Protease

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Thomas M.; Setlow, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Germination protease (GPR) initiates the degradation of small, acid-soluble spore proteins (SASP) during germination of spores of Bacillus and Clostridium species. The GPR amino acid sequence is not homologous to members of the major protease families, and previous work has not identified residues involved in GPR catalysis. The current work has focused on identifying catalytically essential amino acids by mutagenesis of Bacillus megaterium gpr. A residue was selected for alteration if it (i) was conserved among spore-forming bacteria, (ii) was a potential nucleophile, and (iii) had not been ruled out as inessential for catalysis. GPR variants were overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the active form (P41) was assayed for activity against SASP and the zymogen form (P46) was assayed for the ability to autoprocess to P41. Variants inactive against SASP and unable to autoprocess were analyzed by circular dichroism spectroscopy and multiangle laser light scattering to determine whether the variant's inactivity was due to loss of secondary or quaternary structure, respectively. Variation of D127 and D193, but no other residues, resulted in inactive P46 and P41, while variants of each form were well structured and tetrameric, suggesting that D127 and D193 are essential for activity and autoprocessing. Mapping these two aspartate residues and a highly conserved lysine onto the B. megaterium P46 crystal structure revealed a striking similarity to the catalytic residues and propeptide lysine of aspartic acid proteases. These data indicate that GPR is an atypical aspartic acid protease. PMID:16199582

  5. Growth, structural, spectral, mechanical, thermal and dielectric characterization of phosphoric acid admixtured L-alanine (PLA) single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, A. S. J. Lucia; Selvarajan, P.; Perumal, S.

    2011-10-01

    Phosphoric acid admixtured L-alanine (PLA) single crystals were grown successfully by solution method with slow evaporation technique at room temperature. Crystals of size 18 mm × 12 mm × 8 mm have been obtained in 28 days. The grown crystals were colorless and transparent. The solubility of the grown samples has been found out at various temperatures. The lattice parameters of the grown crystals were determined by X-ray diffraction technique. The reflection planes of the sample were confirmed by the powder X-ray diffraction study and diffraction peaks were indexed. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) studies were used to confirm the presence of various functional groups in the crystals. UV-visible transmittance spectrum was recorded to study the optical transparency of grown crystal. The nonlinear optical (NLO) property of the grown crystal was confirmed by Kurtz-Perry powder technique and a study of its second harmonic generation efficiency in comparison with potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) has been made. The mechanical strength of the crystal was estimated by Vickers hardness test. The grown crystals were subjected to thermo gravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA). The dielectric behavior of the sample was also studied.

  6. Mutation of aspartic acid residues in the fructosyltransferase of Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 25975.

    PubMed Central

    Song, D D; Jacques, N A

    1999-01-01

    The site-directed mutated fructosyltransferases (Ftfs) of Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 25975, D312E, D312S, D312N and D312K were all active at 37 degrees C, indicating that Asp-312 present in the 'sucrose box' was not the nucleophilic Asp residue responsible for the formation of a covalent fructosyl-enzyme intermediate required for enzyme activity. Analysis of the kinetic constants of the purified mutated forms of the enzyme showed that Asp-312 was most likely an essential amino acid involved in determining acceptor recognition and/or stabilizing a beta-turn in the protein. In contrast, when the Asp-397 of the Ftf present in the conserved triplet RDP motif of all 60 bacterial and plant family-32 glycosylhydrolases was mutated to a Ser residue, both sucrose hydrolysis and polymerization ceased. Tryptophan emission spectra confirmed that this mutation did not alter protein structure. Comparison of published data from other site-directed mutated enzymes implicated the Asp residue in the RDP motif as the one that may form a transient covalent fructosyl intermediate during the catalysis of sucrose by the Ftf of S. salivarius. PMID:10548559

  7. Energy compensation mechanism for charge-separated protonation states in aspartate-histidine amino acid residue pairs.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Katsumasa; Boero, Mauro; Shiraishi, Kenji; Oshiyama, Atsushi; Shigeta, Yasuteru

    2010-05-20

    The initial stage of proton propagation in the D-path channel of bovine cytochrome c oxidase, consisting of the approach of an H(+) to the entrance of this specific pathway, is inspected via first-principles calculations. Our model, extracted from the X-ray crystallographic structure, includes the amino acid residue pair aspartate (Asp91) and histidine (His503) as protonatable sites. Our calculations show that an additional proton, corresponding to the H(+) uptake by the enzyme from the inner bulk water, is transferred to either Asp91 or His503, leading to the formation of a neutral or a charge-separated protonation state. The relative stability between the two states amounts to a total energy difference of about 5 kcal/mol; this indicates that both Asp91 and His503 are involved in the proton supply to the D-path, playing the role of proton acceptors. The hydrogen-bond environment around Asp91 and His503 has an important influence on both the energetics and the electronic structure of the system; for instance, it compensates the Coulomb-energy cost in the charge-separated protonation state. An energy partitioning analysis shows that the compensatory effect is mainly due to local electrostatic interactions among the charged Asp91 and His503 side chains and the surrounding polar residues. The energy compensation mechanism we found in this work balances the energetics of Asp-His pairs, hence permitting an efficient and selective regulation of the protonatable amino acid residues, where several protonation states are accessible within energy differences of the order of a few H-bonds. PMID:20411975

  8. Comparison of molecular dynamics simulation methods for amyloid β(1-42) monomers containing D-aspartic acid residues for predicting retention times in chromatography.

    PubMed

    Oda, Akifumi; Kobayashi, Kana; Takahashi, Ohgi

    2011-11-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of amyloid β(1-42) containing D-aspartic acid residues were performed using several continuous solvent models to investigate the usefulness of simulation methods for D-amino acid-containing proteins and peptides. Normal molecular dynamics simulations and replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations, which are one of the generalized-ensemble algorithms, were performed. Because the β-structure contents of amyloid β(1-42) peptides obtained by replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations with Onufriev-Bashford-Case generalized Born implicit solvent were qualitatively consistent with experimental data, replica exchange molecular dynamics rather than other methods appeared to be more reasonable for calculations of amyloid β(1-42) containing D-aspartic acid residues. Computational results revealed that peptides with stereoinversion of Asp23 tend to form β-sheet structures by themselves, in contrast to the wild-type peptides that form β-sheet structures only after aggregation. These results are expected to be useful for computational investigations of proteins and peptides such as prediction of retention time of peptides and proteins containing D-aspartic acid residues.

  9. Regulatory structure of the biosynthetic pathway for the aspartate family of amino acids in Lemna paucicostata Hegelm. 6746, with special reference to the role of aspartokinase

    SciTech Connect

    Giovanelli, J.; Mudd, S.H.; Datko, A.H. )

    1989-08-01

    Comprehensive studies were made with Lemna paucicostate Hegelm. 6746 of the effects of combinations of lysine, methionine, and threonine on growth rates, soluble amino acid contents, aspartokinase activities, and fluxes of 4-carbon moieties from aspartate through the aspartokinase step into the amino acids of the aspartate family. These studies show that flux in vitro through the aspartokinase step is insensitive to inhibition by lysine or threonine, and confirm previous in vitro data in establishing that aspartokinase in vivo is present in two orders of magnitude excess of its requirements. No evidence of channeling of the products of the lysine- and threonine-sensitive aspartokinases was obtained, either form of the enzyme along being more than adequate for the combined in vivo flux through the aspartokinase step. The marked insensitivity of flux through the aspartokinase step to inhibition by lysine or threonine strongly suggests that inhibition of aspartokinase by these amino acids is not normally a major factor in regulation of entry of 4-carbon units into the aspartate family of amino acids. Direct measurement of fluxes of 4-carbon units demonstrated that: (a) Lysine strongly feedback regulates its own synthesis, probably at the step catalyzed by dihydrodipicolinate synthase. (b) Threonine alone does not regulate its own synthesis in vivo, thereby confirming previous studies of the metabolism of ({sup 14}C)threonine and ({sup 14}C)homoserine in Lemna.

  10. Dynamics of dilute solutions of poly(aspartic acid) and its sodium salt elucidated from atomistic molecular dynamics simulations with explicit water.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Sanoop; Katha, Anki Reddy; Kolake, Subramanya Mayya; Jung, Bokyung; Han, Sungsoo

    2013-11-01

    The use of forward osmosis (FO) process for seawater desalination has attracted tremendous interest in recent years. Besides the manufacture of suitable membranes, the major technical challenge in the efficient deployment of the FO technology lies in the development of a suitable "draw solute". Owing to its inherent advantages, poly(aspartic acid) has arisen to be an attractive candidate for this purpose. However, an investigation of its molecular level properties has not been studied in detail. In this paper, the dynamics of poly(aspartic acid) and its sodium salt in the dilute concentration regime have been reported. The quantification of the polymer conformational properties, its solvation behavior, and the counterion dynamics are studied. The neutral polymer shows a preferentially coiled structure whereas the fully ionized polymer has an extended structure. Upon comparing with poly(acrylic acid) polymer, another polymer which has been used as a draw solute, poly(aspartic acid) forms more number of hydrogen bonds as well as fewer ion pairs.

  11. Dynamics of dilute solutions of poly(aspartic acid) and its sodium salt elucidated from atomistic molecular dynamics simulations with explicit water.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Sanoop; Katha, Anki Reddy; Kolake, Subramanya Mayya; Jung, Bokyung; Han, Sungsoo

    2013-11-01

    The use of forward osmosis (FO) process for seawater desalination has attracted tremendous interest in recent years. Besides the manufacture of suitable membranes, the major technical challenge in the efficient deployment of the FO technology lies in the development of a suitable "draw solute". Owing to its inherent advantages, poly(aspartic acid) has arisen to be an attractive candidate for this purpose. However, an investigation of its molecular level properties has not been studied in detail. In this paper, the dynamics of poly(aspartic acid) and its sodium salt in the dilute concentration regime have been reported. The quantification of the polymer conformational properties, its solvation behavior, and the counterion dynamics are studied. The neutral polymer shows a preferentially coiled structure whereas the fully ionized polymer has an extended structure. Upon comparing with poly(acrylic acid) polymer, another polymer which has been used as a draw solute, poly(aspartic acid) forms more number of hydrogen bonds as well as fewer ion pairs. PMID:24099271

  12. Growth of transplastomic cells expressing D-amino acid oxidase in chloroplasts is tolerant to D-alanine and inhibited by D-valine.

    PubMed

    Gisby, Martin F; Mudd, Elisabeth A; Day, Anil

    2012-12-01

    Dual-conditional positive/negative selection markers are versatile genetic tools for manipulating genomes. Plastid genomes are relatively small and conserved DNA molecules that can be manipulated precisely by homologous recombination. High-yield expression of recombinant products and maternal inheritance of plastid-encoded traits make plastids attractive sites for modification. Here, we describe the cloning and expression of a dao gene encoding D-amino acid oxidase from Schizosaccharomyces pombe in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plastids. The results provide genetic evidence for the uptake of D-amino acids into plastids, which contain a target that is inhibited by D-alanine. Importantly, this nonantibiotic-based selection system allows the use of cheap and widely available D-amino acids, which are relatively nontoxic to animals and microbes, to either select against (D-valine) or for (D-alanine) cells containing transgenic plastids. Positive/negative selection with d-amino acids was effective in vitro and against transplastomic seedlings grown in soil. The dual functionality of dao is highly suited to the polyploid plastid compartment, where it can be used to provide tolerance against potential D-alanine-based herbicides, control the timing of recombination events such as marker excision, influence the segregation of transgenic plastid genomes, identify loci affecting dao function in mutant screens, and develop D-valine-based methods to manage the spread of transgenic plastids tagged with dao.

  13. Effect of L-aspartic acid on the growth, structure and spectral studies of Zinc (tris) Thiourea Sulphate (ZTS) single crystals.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Bincy Susan; Krishnamurthy, R; Rajasekaran, R

    2014-11-11

    Single crystals of pure and L-aspartic acid doped Zinc (Tris) Thiourea Sulphate (ZTS) were grown from aqueous solution by solution growth method. The cell parameters and structure of the grown crystals were determined by X-ray diffraction studies. The presence of functional group in the compound has been confirmed by FTIR and FT-Raman analysis. The optical transparency range has been studied through UV-Vis spectroscopy. TGA/DTA studies show thermal stability of the grown crystals. Microhardness study reveals that the hardness number (Hv) increases with load for pure and doped ZTS crystals. Dielectric studies have been carried out and the results are discussed. The second harmonic generation was confirmed for l-aspartic acid doped ZTS which is greater than pure ZTS.

  14. Crystal growth of calcium carbonate on the cellulose acetate/pyrrolidon blend films in the presence of L-aspartic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiuzhen; Xie, Anjian; Huang, Fangzhi; Shen, Yuhua

    2014-03-01

    The morphogenesis and growth process of calcium carbonate on the cellulose acetate/polyvinyl pyrrolidone (CA/PVP) blend films in the presence of L-aspartic acid was carefully investigated. The results showed that the concentration of L-aspartic acid, the initial pH value of reaction solution and temperature turned out to be important factors for the control of morphologies and polymorphs of calcium carbonate. Complex morphologies of CaCO3 particles, such as cubes, rose-like spheres, twinborn-spheres, cone-like, bouquet-like, etc. could be obtained under the different experimental conditions. The dynamic process of formation of rose-like sphere crystals was analyzed by monitoring the continuous morphological and structural evolution and components of crystals in different crystal stages. This research may provide a promising method to prepare other inorganic materials with complex morphologies.

  15. Estimation of free energy barriers in the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase reactions probed by hydrogen-exchange kinetics of C alpha-labeled amino acids with solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Julin, D.A.; Wiesinger, H.; Toney, M.D.; Kirsch, J.F. )

    1989-05-02

    The existence of the postulated quinonoid intermediate in the cytoplasmic aspartate amino-transferase catalyzed transamination of aspartate to oxaloacetate was probed by determining the extent of transfer of tritium from the C alpha position of tritiated L-aspartate to pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate in single turnover experiments in which washout from the back-reaction was obviated by product trapping. The maximum amount of transferred tritium observed was 0.7%, consistent either with a mechanism in which a fraction of the net transamination reaction proceeds through a quinonoid intermediate or with a mechanism in which this intermediate is formed off the main reaction pathway. It is shown that transfer of labeled hydrogen from the amino acid to cofactor cannot be used to differentiate a stepwise from a concerted transamination mechanism. The amount of tritium transferred is a function of the rate constant for torsional equilibration about the epsilon-amino group of Lys-258, the presumptive abstractor of the C alpha proton; the relative rate constants for hydrogen exchange with solvent versus cofactor protonation; and the tritium isotope effect on this ratio. The free energy barriers facing the covalent intermediate between aldimine and keto acid product (i.e., ketimine and possibly quinonoid) were evaluated relatively by comparing the rates of C alpha-hydrogen exchange in starting amino acid with the rates of keto acid formation. The value of theta (= kexge/kprod) was found to be 2.6 for the reaction of cytoplasmic isozyme with aspartate and ca. 0.5 for that of the mitochondrial form with glutamate.

  16. Excess of L-alanine in amino acids synthesized in a plasma torch generated by a hypervelocity meteorite impact reproduced in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Managadze, George G.; Engel, Michael H.; Getty, Stephanie; Wurz, Peter; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Shokolov, Anatoly G.; Sholin, Gennady V.; Terent'ev, Sergey A.; Chumikov, Alexander E.; Skalkin, Alexander S.; Blank, Vladimir D.; Prokhorov, Vyacheslav M.; Managadze, Nina G.; Luchnikov, Konstantin A.

    2016-10-01

    We present a laboratory reproduction of hypervelocity impacts of a carbon containing meteorite on a mineral substance representative of planetary surfaces. The physical conditions of the resulting impact plasma torch provide favorable conditions for abiogenic synthesis of protein amino acids: We identified glycine and alanine, and in smaller quantities serine, in the produced material. Moreover, we observe breaking of alanine mirror symmetry with L excess, which coincides with the bioorganic world. Therefore the selection of L-amino acids for the formation of proteins for living matter could have been the result from plasma processes occurring during the impact meteorites on the surface. This indicates that the plasma torch from meteorite impacts could play an important role in the formation of biomolecular homochirality. Thus, meteorite impacts possibly were the initial stage of this process and promoted conditions for the emergence of a living matter.

  17. Regulating Pyruvate Carboxylase in the Living Culture of Aspergillus Terreus Nrrl 1960 by L-Aspartate for Enhanced Itaconic Acid Production.

    PubMed

    Songserm, Pajareeya; Thitiprasert, Sitanan; Tolieng, Vasana; Piluk, Jiraporn; Tanasupawat, Somboon; Assabumrungrat, Sutthichai; Yang, Shang-Tian; Karnchanatat, Aphichart; Thongchul, Nuttha

    2015-10-01

    Aspergillus terreus was reported as the promising fungal strain for itaconic acid; however, the commercial production suffers from the low yield. Low production yield was claimed as the result of completing the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle towards biomass synthesis while under limiting phosphate and nitrogen; TCA cycle was somewhat shunted and consequently, the metabolite fluxes move towards itaconic acid production route. By regulating enzymes in TCA cycle, it is believed that itaconic acid production can be improved. One of the key responsible enzymes involved in itaconic acid production was triggered in this study. Pyruvate carboxylase was allosterically inhibited by L-aspartate. The presence of 10 mM L-aspartate in the production medium directly repressed PC expression in the living A. terreus while the limited malate flux regulated the malate/citrate antiporters resulting in the increasing cis-aconitate decarboxylase activity to simultaneously convert cis-aconitate, citrate isomer, into itaconic acid. The transport of cis-aconitate via the antiporters induced citrate synthase and 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase activities in response to balance the fluxes of TCA intermediates. Successively, itaconic acid production yield and final concentration could be improved by 8.33 and 60.32 %, respectively, compared to those obtained from the control fermentation with the shortened lag time to produce itaconic acid during the production phase.

  18. Adolescent social defeat alters N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor expression and impairs fear learning in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Novick, Andrew M; Mears, Mackenzie; Forster, Gina L; Lei, Yanlin; Tejani-Butt, Shanaz M; Watt, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Repeated social defeat of adolescent male rats results in adult mesocortical dopamine hypofunction, impaired working memory, and increased contextual anxiety-like behavior. Given the role of glutamate in dopamine regulation, cognition, and fear and anxiety, we investigated potential changes to N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors following adolescent social defeat. As both NMDA receptors and mesocortical dopamine are implicated in the expression and extinction of conditioned fear, a separate cohort of rats was challenged with a classical fear conditioning paradigm to investigate whether fear learning is altered by adolescent defeat. Quantitative autoradiography was used to measure 3H-MK-801 binding to NMDA receptors in regions of the medial prefrontal cortex, caudate putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala and hippocampus. Assessment of fear learning was achieved using an auditory fear conditioning paradigm, with freezing toward the auditory tone used as a measure of conditioned fear. Compared to controls, adolescent social defeat decreased adult NMDA receptor expression in the infralimbic region of the prefrontal cortex and central amygdala, while increasing expression in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. Previously defeated rats also displayed decreased conditioned freezing during the recall and first extinction periods, which may be related to the observed decreases and increases in NMDA receptors within the central amygdala and CA3, respectively. The alteration in NMDA receptors seen following adolescent social defeat suggests that dysfunction of glutamatergic systems, combined with mesocortical dopamine deficits, likely plays a role in the some of the long-term behavioral consequences of social stressors in adolescence seen in both preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:26876136

  19. Functional Role of the Interaction between Polysialic Acid and Myristoylated Alanine-rich C Kinase Substrate at the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Theis, Thomas; Mishra, Bibhudatta; von der Ohe, Maren; Loers, Gabriele; Prondzynski, Maksymilian; Pless, Ole; Blackshear, Perry J.; Schachner, Melitta; Kleene, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Polysialic acid (PSA) is a homopolymeric glycan that plays crucial roles in the developing and adult nervous system. So far only a few PSA-binding proteins have been identified. Here, we identify myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS) as novel PSA binding partner. Binding assays showed a direct interaction between PSA and a peptide comprising the effector domain of MARCKS (MARCKS-ED). Co-immunoprecipitation of PSA-carrying neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) with MARCKS and co-immunostaining of MARCKS and PSA at the cell membrane of hippocampal neurons confirm the interaction between PSA and MARCKS. Co-localization and an intimate interaction of PSA and MARCKS at the cell surface was seen by confocal microscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analysis after the addition of fluorescently labeled PSA or PSA-NCAM to live CHO cells or hippocampal neurons expressing MARCKS as a fusion protein with green fluorescent protein (GFP). Cross-linking experiments showed that extracellularly applied PSA or PSA-NCAM and intracellularly expressed MARCKS-GFP are in close contact, suggesting that PSA and MARCKS interact with each other at the plasma membrane from opposite sides. Insertion of PSA and MARCKS-ED peptide into lipid bilayers from opposite sides alters the electric properties of the bilayer confirming the notion that PSA and the effector domain of MARCKS interact at and/or within the plane of the membrane. The MARCKS-ED peptide abolished PSA-induced enhancement of neurite outgrowth from cultured hippocampal neurons indicating an important functional role for the interaction between MARCKS and PSA in the developing and adult nervous system. PMID:23329829

  20. Response of amino acids in hindlimb muscles to recovery from hypogravity and unloading by tail-cast suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.; Henriksen, E. J.; Jacob, S.; Cook, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    Concentrations of glutamine, glutamate, aspartate (+ asparagine) and alanine were compared in hindlimb muscles of SL-3 and ground control rats. Alanine was lower in the soleus of flown rats but not of suspended animals, with no response in other muscles except a slight increase in the unloaded plantaris. With recovery, alanine in the soleus was elevated. Since no differences in alanine metabolism were found by isolated muscle, changes in muscle alanine are probably due to altered body use of this amino acid leading to varied plasma levels.

  1. Antiproliferative effect of D-aspartic acid beta-hydroxamate (DAH) on Friend virus-infected erythropoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Tournaire, R; Arnaud, S; Hamedi-Sangsari, F; Malley, S; Grange, J; Blanchet, J P; Doré, J F; Vila, J

    1994-10-01

    D-aspartic beta-hydroxamate (DAH), an aspartic acid analog, exerts antitumoral activity on murine leukemia L5178Y, both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we show that DAH is also active in vivo against Friend virus (FV-P)-induced erythroleukemia, and we report the effects of DAH in vivo an in vitro on FV-P target cells, i.e. the mature erythroid colony-forming cells (CFU-E). DAH treatment (2 g/kg/day) given for 95 days as a single daily i.p. injection to DBA/2 mice either 3 or 12 days following inoculation with a high dose (10(3) plaque-forming units) of FV-P resulted in a marked increase in the mean survival time of treated animals (212 and 191%, respectively). Since FV-P elicits spleen enlargement and polycythemia, we examined the effects of DAH on spleen size, spleen-nucleated cell number, and hematocrit, in normal and FV-P infected mice, at different times in the course of continuous DAH treatments. DAH treatment initiated 3 days after viral infection inhibits the virus-induced splenomegaly, with at day 26 p.i. 1.15 x 10(8) and 12.6 x 10(8) nucleated cells per spleen observed in DAH-treated mice and untreated mice respectively, whereas only 1.03 x 10(8) nucleated cells were observed in uninfected mice. Furthermore, DAH prevents virus-induced polycythemia: on day 26, an hematocrit of 39% was measured in DAH-treated mice as compared to 60% in untreated mice. DAH treatment initiated 12 days after viral infection reduces splenomegaly, the number of nucleated spleen cells and the hematocrit of infected mice. DAH treatment initiated 3 days after viral infection prevents the tremendous increase of CFU-E in the spleen of infected mice: on day 11, the spleen of infected mice contained 4.6 x 10(6) CFU-E, while the spleen of treated mice only contained 26 x 10(3) CFU-E, and on day 26 the spleen CFU-E numbers were 45.4 x 10(6) and 1.5 x 10(6) in untreated and treated infected mice, respectively. In control uninfected mice, DAH treatment induced a transient decrease in

  2. Synthesis of amino acids by the heating of formaldehyde and ammonia.

    PubMed

    Fox, S W; Windsor, C R

    1970-11-27

    The heating of formaldehyde and ammonia yields a product that, on hydrolysis, is converted into seven amino acids: aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, proline, valine, glycine, and alanine. Glycine is the predominant amino acid. Inasmuch as formaldehyde and ammonia have been identified as compounds in galactic clouds, these experimental results are interpreted in a cosmochemical and geochemical context.

  3. Co-localisation of advanced glycation end products and d-β-aspartic acid-containing proteins in gelatinous drop-like corneal dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Oshika, Tetsuro; Takazawa, Yutaka; Fukayama, Masashi; Fujii, Noriko

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Gelatinous drop-like corneal dystrophy (GDLD), also known as familial subepithelial corneal amyloidosis, is an autosomal recessive disorder that causes progressive corneal opacity due to accumulation of amyloid fibrils in the corneal stroma. Genetic analyses have revealed that a mutation in membrane component chromosome 1 surface marker 1 gene is responsible for GDLD. However, the mechanism of amyloid formation in the corneal stroma remains unclear. The present study attempted to reveal the role of advanced glycation end products (AGE) and d-amino acids in amyloid formation in GDLD. Methods Informed consent was obtained from five patients with GDLD, three patients with bullous keratopathy and three patients with interstitial keratitis and all the specimens were analysed. Localisation of amyloid fibrils was analysed using Congo-red and thioflavin T staining. In addition, the localisation of AGE (Nɛ-carboxy(methyl)-l-lysine, pyrraline and pentosidine) and d-β-aspartic acid-containing proteins, a major form of d-amino acid-containing proteins, was analysed immunohistochemically. Results In all GDLD specimens, strong immunoreactivity to AGE and d-β-aspartic acid-containing proteins was detected in the subepithelial amyloid-rich region. In contrast, amyloid fibrils, AGE, or d-amino acid-containing proteins were slightly detected in the corneal stroma of patients with bullous keratopathy and interstitial keratitis. Conclusions Abnormally accumulated proteins rich in AGE and d-β-aspartic acid co-localise in the amyloid lesions in GDLD. These results indicate that non-enzymatic post-translational modifications of proteins, including AGE formation and isomerisation of aspartyl residues, will be the cause as well as the result of amyloid fibril formations in GDLD. PMID:22694960

  4. The snakehead Channa asiatica accumulates alanine during aerial exposure, but is incapable of sustaining locomotory activities on land through partial amino acid catabolism.

    PubMed

    Chew, Shit F; Wong, Mei Y; Tam, Wai L; Ip, Yuen K

    2003-02-01

    The freshwater snakehead Channa asiatica is an obligatory air-breather that resides in slow-flowing streams and in crevices near riverbanks in Southern China. In its natural habitat, it may encounter bouts of aerial exposure during the dry seasons. In the laboratory, the ammonia excretion rate of C. asiatica exposed to terrestrial conditions in a 12 h:12 h dark:light regime was one quarter that of the submerged control. Consequently, the ammonia contents in the muscle, liver and plasma increased significantly, and C. asiatica was able to tolerate quite high levels of ammonia in its tissues. Urea was not the major product of ammonia detoxification in C. asiatica, which apparently did not possess a functioning ornithine urea cycle. Rather, alanine increased fourfold to 12.6 micromol g(-1) in the muscle after 48 h of aerial exposure. This is the highest level known in adult teleosts exposed to air or an ammonia-loading situation. The accumulated alanine could account for 70% of the deficit in ammonia excretion during this period, indicating that partial amino acid catabolism had occurred. This would allow the utilization of certain amino acids as energy sources and, at the same time, maintain the new steady state levels of ammonia in various tissues, preventing them from rising further. There was a reduction in the aminating activity of glutamate dehydrogenase from the muscle and liver of specimens exposed to terrestrial conditions. Such a phenomenon has not been reported before and could, presumably, facilitate the entry of alpha-ketoglutarate into the Krebs cycle instead of its amination to glutamate, as has been suggested elsewhere. However, in contrast to mudskippers, C. asiatica was apparently unable to reduce the rates of proteolysis and amino acid catabolism, because the reduction in nitrogenous excretion during 48 h of aerial exposure was completely balanced by nitrogenous accumulation in the body. Alanine accumulation also occurred in specimens exposed to

  5. Effect of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid on activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and reduced glutathione level in selected organs of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Szaroma, Waldemar; Dziubek, K; Kapusta, E

    2014-09-01

    One of the major classes of ionotropic glutamate receptors is the class of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). Receptor activation recruits, via calcium signal transduction mechanisms which play important roles in oxidative metabolism, mitochondrial free radical production and occurrence of other mitochondrial factors which potentially contribute to excitotoxicity and neuronal death. In the present study, the effects of stimulation of NMDARs by applying N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) in the brain, liver, kidneys and pancreas on change of the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) and in the amount of reduced glutathione (GSH) in blood, brain, liver and kidneys has been investigated. Statistically significant decrease of the activity of SOD, CAT and GSHPx and in the amount of reduced glutathione (GSH) was found in the examined organs after administration of NMDA, an agonist of NMDA receptors, demonstrating that NMDA administration compromises the antioxidant status in the investigated organs of the mouse.

  6. Temperature related alterations in the acidic alanine-rich "A" protein from the 50S ribosomal particle of the extreme halophile, Halobacterium cutirubrum.

    PubMed

    Strom, A R; Oda, G; Hasnain, S; Yaguchi, M; Visentin, L P

    1975-09-15

    50-S ribosomal subunits from the extreme halophilic bacterium, Halobacterium cutirubrum, contain an alanine-rich acidic "A" protein which resembles the L7--L12 multimer (Kaltschmidt and Wittmann, 1970) found in the 50-S ribosomal subunit of Escherichia coli cells. The protein contains 24 mole % alanine and is devoid of histidine, tryptophan and cysteine. Unlike E. coli which has two forms of the "A" protein distinguished solely by the acetylation state of the serine amino terminus. H. cutirubrum 50-S subunits contain only one unsubstituted form of the "A" protein in vivo. However, during purification of ribosomes from cells grown between 25 and 37 degrees C the latter "A" protein undergoes rapid, specific, in vitro enzymatic alteration at its carboxy-terminal end. When the halophile is grown in the temperature range of 40 to 42 degrees C the cleaving enzyme is not active and only one form of the "A" protein is found on the ribosomes.

  7. Synthesis of aqueous suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles with the co-precipitation of iron ions in the presence of aspartic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pušnik, Klementina; Goršak, Tanja; Drofenik, Miha; Makovec, Darko

    2016-09-01

    There is increasing demand for the production of large quantities of aqueous suspensions of magnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles. Amino acids are one possible type of inexpensive, nontoxic, and biocompatible molecules that can be used as the surfactants for the preparation of stable suspensions. This preparation can be conducted in a simple, one-step process based on the co-precipitation of Fe3+/Fe2+ ions in the presence of the amino acid. However, the presence of this amino acid changes the mechanism of the magnetic nanoparticles' formation. In this investigation we analyzed the influence of aspartic amino acid (Asp) on the formation of magnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles during the co-precipitation. The process of the nanoparticles' formation was followed using a combination of TEM, x-ray diffractometry, magnetic measurements, in-situ FT-IR spectroscopy, and chemical analysis, and compared with the formation of nanoparticles without the Asp. The Asp forms a coordination complex with the Fe3+ ions, which impedes the formation of the intermediate iron oxyhydroxide phase and suppresses the growth of the final magnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles. Slower reaction kinetics can lead to the formation of nonmagnetic secondary phases. The aspartic-acid-absorbed nanoparticles can be dispersed to form relatively concentrated aqueous suspensions displaying a good colloidal stability at an increased pH.

  8. Analysis of Loss-of-Function Mutants in Aspartate Kinase and Homoserine Dehydrogenase Genes Points to Complexity in the Regulation of Aspartate-Derived Amino Acid Contents1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Teresa J.; Lu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Biosynthesis of aspartate (Asp)-derived amino acids lysine (Lys), methionine (Met), threonine (Thr), and isoleucine involves monofunctional Asp kinases (AKs) and dual-functional Asp kinase-homoserine dehydrogenases (AK-HSDHs). Four-week-old loss-of-function Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants in the AK-HSDH2 gene had increased amounts of Asp and Asp-derived amino acids, especially Thr, in leaves. To explore mechanisms behind this phenotype, we obtained single mutants for other AK and AK-HSDH genes, generated double mutants from ak-hsdh2 and ak mutants, and performed free and protein-bound amino acid profiling, transcript abundance, and activity assays. The increases of Asp, Lys, and Met in ak-hsdh2 were also observed in ak1-1, ak2-1, ak3-1, and ak-hsdh1-1. However, the Thr increase in ak-hsdh2 was observed in ak-hsdh1-1 but not in ak1-1, ak2-1, or ak3-1. Activity assays showed that AK2 and AK-HSDH1 are the major contributors to overall AK and HSDH activities, respectively. Pairwise correlation analysis revealed positive correlations between the amount of AK transcripts and Lys-sensitive AK activity and between the amount of AK-HSDH transcripts and both Thr-sensitive AK activity and total HSDH activity. In addition, the ratio of total AK activity to total HSDH activity negatively correlates with the ratio of Lys to the total amount of Met, Thr, and isoleucine. These data led to the hypothesis that the balance between Lys-sensitive AKs and Thr-sensitive AK-HSDHs is important for maintaining the amounts and ratios of Asp-derived amino acids. PMID:26063505

  9. Amino acids (L-arginine and L-alanine) passivated CdS nanoparticles: Synthesis of spherical hierarchical structure and nonlinear optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talwatkar, S. S.; Tamgadge, Y. S.; Sunatkari, A. L.; Gambhire, A. B.; Muley, G. G.

    2014-12-01

    CdS nanoparticles (NPs) passivated with amino acids (L-alanine and L-arginine) having spherical hierarchical morphology were synthesized by room temperature wet chemical method. Synthesized NPs were characterized by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy to study the variation of band gaps with concentration of surface modifying agents. Increase in band gap has been observed with the increase in concentration of surface modifying agents and was found more prominent for CdS NPs passivated with L-alanine. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis were carried out for the study of crystal structure and morphology of CdS NPs. The average particle size of CdS NPs calculated from Debye-Scherer formula was found to less than 5 nm and agrees well with those determined from UV-vis spectra and TEM data. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was performed to know the functional groups of the grown NPs. Peaks in FT-IR spectra indicate the formation of CdS NPs and capping with L-alanine and L-arginine. Photoluminescence spectra of these NPs were also studied. Finally, colloidal solution of CdS-PVAc was subjected to Z-scan experiment under low power cw laser illumination to characterize them for third order nonlinear optical properties. CdS-PVAc colloidal solution shows enhanced nonlinear absorption due to RSA and weak FCA on account of two photon absorption processes triggered by thermal effect.

  10. Identification of the roles of individual amino acid residues of the helix E of the major antenna of photosystem II (LHCII) by alanine scanning mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng; Rao, Yan; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Chunhong

    2014-10-01

    The functions of the helix E (W97-F105), an amphiphilic lumenal 310 helix of the major antenna of photosystem II (LHCII), are still unidentified. To elucidate the roles of individual amino acid residue of the helix E, alanine scanning mutagenesis has been performed to mutate every residue of this domain to alanine. The influence of every alanine substitution on the structure and function of LHCII has been investigated biochemically and spectroscopically. The results show that all mutations have little impact on the pigment binding and configuration. However, many mutants presented decreased thermo- or photo-stability compared with the wild type, highlighting the significance of this helix to the stability of LHCII. The most critical residue for stability is W97. The mutant W97A yielded very fragile trimeric pigment protein complexes. The structural analysis revealed that the hydrogen bonding and aromatic interactions between W97, F195, F194 and a water molecule contributed greatly to the stability of LHCII. Moreover, Q103A and F105A have been identified to be able to reinforce the tendency of aggregation in vitro. The structural analysis suggested that the enhancement in aggregation formation for Q103A and F105A might be attributed to the changing hydrophobicity of the region.

  11. Crystal structure of Clostridium acetobutylicum Aspartate kinase (CaAK): An important allosteric enzyme for amino acids production.

    PubMed

    Manjasetty, Babu A; Chance, Mark R; Burley, Stephen K; Panjikar, Santosh; Almo, Steven C

    2014-09-01

    Aspartate kinase (AK) is an enzyme which is tightly regulated through feedback control and responsible for the synthesis of 4-phospho-L-aspartate from L-aspartate. This intermediate step is at an important branch point where one path leads to the synthesis of lysine and the other to threonine, methionine and isoleucine. Concerted feedback inhibition of AK is mediated by threonine and lysine and varies between the species. The crystal structure of biotechnologically important Clostridium acetobutylicum aspartate kinase (CaAK; E.C. 2.7.2.4; Mw=48,030Da; 437aa; SwissProt: Q97MC0) has been determined to 3Å resolution. CaAK acquires a protein fold similar to the other known structures of AKs despite the low sequence identity (<30%). It is composed of two domains: an N-terminal catalytic domain (kinase) domain and a C-terminal regulatory domain further comprised of two small domains belonging to the ACT domain family. Pairwise comparison of 12 molecules in the asymmetric unit helped to identify the bending regions which are in the vicinity of ATP binding site involved in domain movements between the catalytic and regulatory domains. All 12 CaAK molecules adopt fully open T-state conformation leading to the formation of three tetramers unique among other similar AK structures. On the basis of comparative structural analysis, we discuss tetramer formation based on the large conformational changes in the catalytic domain associated with the lysine binding at the regulatory domains. The structure described herein is homologous to a target in wide-spread pathogenic (toxin producing) bacteria such as Clostridium tetani (64% sequence identity) suggesting the potential of the structure solved here to be applied for modeling drug interactions. CaAK structure may serve as a guide to better understand and engineer lysine biosynthesis for the biotechnology industry.

  12. Conformational manifold of alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) containing alanine-based tripeptides in aqueous solution explored by vibrational spectroscopy, electronic circular dichroism spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard; Gonzales, Widalys; Bourne, Gregory T; Feng, Jianwen A; Marshall, Garland R

    2007-10-31

    Replacement of the alpha-proton of an alanine residue to generate alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) in alanine-based oligopeptides favors the formation of a 3(10) helix when the length of the oligopeptide is about four to six residues. This research was aimed at experimentally identifying the structural impact of an individual Aib residue in an alanine context of short peptides in water and Aib's influence on the conformation of nearest-neighbor residues. The amide I band profile of the IR, isotropic and anisotropic Raman, and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectra of Ac-Ala-Ala-Aib-OMe, Ac-Ala-Aib-Ala-OMe, and Ac-Aib-Ala-Ala-OMe were measured and analyzed in terms of different structural models by utilizing an algorithm that exploits the excitonic coupling between amide I' modes. The conformational search was guided by the respective 1H NMR and electronic circular dichroism spectra of the respective peptides, which were also recorded. From these analyses, all peptides adopted multiple conformations. Aib predominantly sampled the right-handed and left-handed 3(10)-helix region and to a minor extent the bridge region between the polyproline (PPII) and the helical regions of the Ramachandran plot. Generally, alanine showed the anticipated PPII propensity, but its conformational equilibrium was shifted towards helical conformations in Ac-Aib-Ala-Ala-OMe, indicating that Aib can induce helical conformations of neighboring residues positioned towards the C-terminal direction of the peptide. An energy landscape exploration by molecular dynamics simulations corroborated the results of the spectroscopic studies. They also revealed the dynamics and pathways of potential conformational transitions of the corresponding Aib residues.

  13. Catalytic Stereoinversion of L-Alanine to Deuterated D-Alanine.

    PubMed

    Moozeh, Kimia; So, Soon Mog; Chin, Jik

    2015-08-01

    A combination of an achiral pyridoxal analogue and a chiral base has been developed for catalytic deuteration of L-alanine with inversion of stereochemistry to give deuterated D-alanine under mild conditions (neutral pD and 25 °C) without the use of any protecting groups. This system can also be used for catalytic deuteration of D-alanine with retention of stereochemistry to give deuterated D-alanine. Thus a racemic mixture of alanine can be catalytically deuterated to give an enantiomeric excess of deuterated D-alanine. While catalytic deracemization of alanine is forbidden by the second law of thermodynamics, this system can be used for catalytic deracemization of alanine with deuteration. Such green and biomimetic approach to catalytic stereocontrol provides insights into efficient amino acid transformations.

  14. Synthesis and Properties of pH-, Thermo-, and Salt-Sensitive Modified Poly(aspartic acid)/Poly(vinyl alcohol) IPN Hydrogel and Its Drug Controlled Release.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jingqiong; Li, Yinhui; Hu, Deng; Chen, Xiaoling; Liu, Yongmei; Wang, Liping; Zhao, Yansheng

    2015-01-01

    Modified poly(aspartic acid)/poly(vinyl alcohol) interpenetrating polymer network (KPAsp/PVA IPN) hydrogel for drug controlled release was synthesized by a simple one-step method in aqueous system using poly(aspartic acid) grafting 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (KH-550) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) as materials. The hydrogel surface morphology and composition were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The thermal stability was analyzed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The swelling properties and pH, temperature, and salt sensitivities of KPAsp, KPAsp/PVA semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN), and KPAsp/PVA IPN hydrogels were also investigated. All of the three hydrogels showed ampholytic pH-responsive properties, and swelling behavior was also extremely sensitive to the temperature, ionic strength, and cationic species. Finally, the drug controlled release properties of the three hydrogels were evaluated and results indicated that three hydrogels could control drug release by external surroundings stimuli. The drug controlled release properties of KPAsp/PVA IPN hydrogel are the most outstanding, and the correlative measured release profiles of salicylic acid at 37°C were 32.6 wt% at pH = 1.2 (simulated gastric fluid) and 62.5 wt% at pH = 7.4 (simulated intestinal fluid), respectively. These results indicated that KPAsp/PVA IPN hydrogels are a promising carrier system for controlled drug delivery.

  15. Possible modulation of N-methyl-D,L-aspartic acid induced prolactin release by testicular steroids in the adult male rhesus monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Arslan, M.; Rizvi, S.S.R.; Jahan, S.; Zaidi, P.; Shahab, M. )

    1991-01-01

    N-methyl-D,L-aspartic acid (NMA), an agonist of the neurotransmitter glutamate has been shown to acutely stimulate the release of prolactin (PRL) in intact rats and monkeys. To further investigate the role of neuroexcitatory amino acids in PRL secretion, the effects of NMA administration were examined on PRL release in long term orchidectomized adult rhesus monkeys, in both the absence and presence of testosterone. Intact and long term castrated adult male monkeys weighing between 8-13 kg, were implanted with a catheter via the saphenous vein for blood withdrawal and drug infusion. Blood samples were collected at 10 min intervals for 50 min before and 70 min after administration of the drug or vehicle. Plasma PRL concentrations were estimated using radioimmunoassay. Whereas a single iv injection of NMA induced a prompt discharge of PRL in intact monkeys, an identical dose had surprisingly no effect on PRL secretion in orchidectomized animals. On the other hand, plasma PRL increases in response to a challenge dose of thyrotropin releasing hormone were similar in magnitude in the two groups of monkeys. Testosterone replacement in orchidectomized animals by parenteral administration of testosterone enanthate reinitiated the PRL responsiveness to acute NMA stimulation. These results indicate that N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) dependent drive to PRL release in the adult male rhesus monkey may be overtly influenced by the sex steroid milieu.

  16. Synthesis and Properties of pH-, Thermo-, and Salt-Sensitive Modified Poly(aspartic acid)/Poly(vinyl alcohol) IPN Hydrogel and Its Drug Controlled Release.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jingqiong; Li, Yinhui; Hu, Deng; Chen, Xiaoling; Liu, Yongmei; Wang, Liping; Zhao, Yansheng

    2015-01-01

    Modified poly(aspartic acid)/poly(vinyl alcohol) interpenetrating polymer network (KPAsp/PVA IPN) hydrogel for drug controlled release was synthesized by a simple one-step method in aqueous system using poly(aspartic acid) grafting 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (KH-550) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) as materials. The hydrogel surface morphology and composition were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The thermal stability was analyzed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The swelling properties and pH, temperature, and salt sensitivities of KPAsp, KPAsp/PVA semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN), and KPAsp/PVA IPN hydrogels were also investigated. All of the three hydrogels showed ampholytic pH-responsive properties, and swelling behavior was also extremely sensitive to the temperature, ionic strength, and cationic species. Finally, the drug controlled release properties of the three hydrogels were evaluated and results indicated that three hydrogels could control drug release by external surroundings stimuli. The drug controlled release properties of KPAsp/PVA IPN hydrogel are the most outstanding, and the correlative measured release profiles of salicylic acid at 37°C were 32.6 wt% at pH = 1.2 (simulated gastric fluid) and 62.5 wt% at pH = 7.4 (simulated intestinal fluid), respectively. These results indicated that KPAsp/PVA IPN hydrogels are a promising carrier system for controlled drug delivery. PMID:26351630

  17. Synthesis and Properties of pH-, Thermo-, and Salt-Sensitive Modified Poly(aspartic acid)/Poly(vinyl alcohol) IPN Hydrogel and Its Drug Controlled Release

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jingqiong; Li, Yinhui; Hu, Deng; Chen, Xiaoling; Liu, Yongmei; Wang, Liping; Zhao, Yansheng

    2015-01-01

    Modified poly(aspartic acid)/poly(vinyl alcohol) interpenetrating polymer network (KPAsp/PVA IPN) hydrogel for drug controlled release was synthesized by a simple one-step method in aqueous system using poly(aspartic acid) grafting 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (KH-550) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) as materials. The hydrogel surface morphology and composition were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The thermal stability was analyzed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The swelling properties and pH, temperature, and salt sensitivities of KPAsp, KPAsp/PVA semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN), and KPAsp/PVA IPN hydrogels were also investigated. All of the three hydrogels showed ampholytic pH-responsive properties, and swelling behavior was also extremely sensitive to the temperature, ionic strength, and cationic species. Finally, the drug controlled release properties of the three hydrogels were evaluated and results indicated that three hydrogels could control drug release by external surroundings stimuli. The drug controlled release properties of KPAsp/PVA IPN hydrogel are the most outstanding, and the correlative measured release profiles of salicylic acid at 37°C were 32.6 wt% at pH = 1.2 (simulated gastric fluid) and 62.5 wt% at pH = 7.4 (simulated intestinal fluid), respectively. These results indicated that KPAsp/PVA IPN hydrogels are a promising carrier system for controlled drug delivery. PMID:26351630

  18. Glutamate and aspartate are decreased in the skin in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, S.; Yamauchi, M.

    1992-01-01

    We measured the levels of amino acids in biopsied skin from eight patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and seven controls. The most conspicuous changes in ALS patients were as follows. First, the contents of the acidic amino acids glutamate and aspartate were significantly decreased in ALS, and were negatively and significantly associated with the duration of illness. Second, the levels of the collagen-associated amino acids hydroxyproline, proline, glycine, alanine, and hydroxylysine were significantly decreased in ALS, and correlated inversely with the duration of illness. These results suggest that there are abnormalities of acidic amino acids and collagen-associated amino acids in the skin of patients with ALS. These changes may underlie the pathogenesis of ALS.

  19. Peptidyl prolyl isomerase Pin1-inhibitory activity of D-glutamic and D-aspartic acid derivatives bearing a cyclic aliphatic amine moiety.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Hidehiko; Seike, Suguru; Sugimoto, Masatoshi; Ieda, Naoya; Kawaguchi, Mitsuyasu; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Miyata, Naoki

    2015-12-01

    Pin1 is a peptidyl prolyl isomerase that specifically catalyzes cis-trans isomerization of phosphorylated Thr/Ser-Pro peptide bonds in substrate proteins and peptides. Pin1 is involved in many important cellular processes, including cancer progression, so it is a potential target of cancer therapy. We designed and synthesized a novel series of Pin1 inhibitors based on a glutamic acid or aspartic acid scaffold bearing an aromatic moiety to provide a hydrophobic surface and a cyclic aliphatic amine moiety with affinity for the proline-binding site of Pin1. Glutamic acid derivatives bearing cycloalkylamino and phenylthiazole groups showed potent Pin1-inhibitory activity comparable with that of known inhibitor VER-1. The results indicate that steric interaction of the cyclic alkyl amine moiety with binding site residues plays a key role in enhancing Pin1-inhibitory activity.

  20. Chirality sensing and size recognition of N-Boc-amino acids by cage-type dimeric lanthanide complexes: chirality detection of N-Boc-aspartate anions via luminescence colour change.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiroshi; Shinoda, Satoshi

    2015-03-01

    Chiral luminescent lanthanide complexes, characterized by covalently-linked face-to-face octadentate cyclen (tetraaza-12-crown-4) ligands, specifically bound a chiral N-Boc-aspartate among various N-Boc amino acid anions to enhance Eu(III) luminescence intensity at 615 nm. The combination of Tb(III) and Eu(III) complexes enabled naked-eye discrimination of N-Boc-D- and L-aspartates via the luminescence colour change.

  1. D-Serine metabolism in C6 glioma cells: Involvement of alanine-serine-cysteine transporter (ASCT2) and serine racemase (SRR) but not D-amino acid oxidase (DAO)

    PubMed Central

    Sikka, Pilleriin; Walker, Rosie; Cockayne, Rebecca; Wood, Matthew JA; Harrison, Paul J; Burnet, Philip WJ

    2010-01-01

    D-serine is an endogenous N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor coagonist. It is synthesized from L-serine by serine racemase (SRR), but many aspects of its metabolism remain unclear, especially in the forebrain, which lacks active D-amino acid oxidase (DAO), the major D-serine degradative enzyme. Candidate mechanisms include SRR operating in α,β-eliminase mode (converting D-serine to pyruvate) and regulation by serine transport, in which the alanine-serine-cysteine transporter ASCT2 is implicated. Here we report studies in C6 glioma cells, which “simulate” the forebrain, in that the cells express SRR and ASCT2 but lack DAO activity. We measured D-serine, ASCT2, SRR, and DAO expression and DAO activity in two situations: after incubation of cells for 48 hr with serine isomers and after increased or decreased SRR expression by transfection and RNA interference, respectively. Incubation with serine enantiomers decreased [3H]D-serine uptake and ASCT2 mRNA and increased SRR immunoreactivity but did not alter DAO immunoreactivity, and DAO activity remained undetectable. SRR overexpression increased D-serine and pyruvate and decreased [3H]D-serine uptake and ASCT2 mRNA but did not affect DAO. SRR knockdown did not alter any of the parameters. Our data suggest that D-serine transport mediated by ASCT2 contributes prominently to D-serine homeostasis when DAO activity is absent. The factors regulating D-serine are important for understanding normal NMDA receptor function and because D-serine, along with DAO and SRR, is implicated in the pathogenesis and treatment of schizophrenia. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20091774

  2. Auxin amidohydrolases from Brassica rapa cleave the alanine conjugate of indolepropionic acid as a preferable substrate: a biochemical and modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Savić, Bojana; Tomić, Sanja; Magnus, Volker; Gruden, Kristina; Barle, Katja; Grenković, Renata; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Salopek-Sondi, Branka

    2009-09-01

    Two auxin amidohydrolases, BrIAR3 and BrILL2, from Chinese cabbage [Brassica rapa L. ssp. pekinensis (Lour.) Hanelt] were produced by heterologous expression in Escherichia coli, purified, and screened for activity towards N-(indol-3-ylacetyl)-L-alanine (IAA-Ala) and the long-chain auxin-amino acid conjugates, N-[3-(indol-3-yl)propionyl]-L-alanine (IPA-Ala) and N-[4-(indol-3-yl)butyryl]-L-alanine (IBA-Ala). IPA-Ala was shown to be the favored substrate of both enzymes, but BrILL2 was approximately 15 times more active than BrIAR3. Both enzymes cleaved IBA-Ala and IAA-Ala to a lesser extent. The enzyme kinetics were measured for BrILL2 and the obtained parameters suggested similar binding affinities for the long-chain auxin-amino acid conjugates (IPA-Ala and IBA-Ala). The velocity of the hydrolyzing reaction decreased in the order IPA-Ala > IBA-Ala > IAA-Ala. In a root growth bioassay, higher growth inhibition was caused by IPA-Ala and IBA-Ala in comparison with IAA-Ala. Neither these conjugates nor the corresponding free auxins affected the expression of the BrILL2 gene. A modeling study revealed several possible modes of IPA-Ala binding to BrILL2. Based on these results, two possible scenarios for substrate hydrolysis are proposed. In one the metal binding water is activated by the carboxyl group of the substrate itself, and in the other by a glutamate residue from the active site of the enzyme.

  3. Corticosterone, cortisol, triglycerides, aspartate aminotransferase and uric acid plasma concentrations during foie gras production in male mule ducks (Anas platyrhynchos × Cairina moschata).

    PubMed

    Flament, A; Delleur, V; Poulipoulis, A; Marlier, D

    2012-01-01

    1. Corticosterone, cortisol, triglycerides, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and uric acid (UA) plasma concentration were measured at 8 (7 days after group housing), 12 (after 7 days of force feeding) and 13 weeks of age (at slaughter after 12 days of force feeding), and 45 min after an adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) stimulation test at 8 weeks of age in 12 male mule ducks in an on-farm experiment. 2. No significant increase of corticosterone was found during the force-feeding period compared with the concentration after housing. 3. Comparison of corticosterone and cortisol values indicates that cortisol can be considered as a reliable acute stress indicator in future routine examinations. 4. Plasma concentrations of triglycerides and aspartate aminotransferase increased progressively from pre-force feeding period to slaughtering. 5. Plasma concentrations of uric acid increased from the start at 8 weeks of age to the mid-force feeding period but no difference was noticed between the mid-force feeding period and slaughtering. 6. It is concluded that acute stress induced by force-feeding is similar at the beginning and end of the commercial production of foie gras.

  4. Nitrosation of aspartic acid, aspartame, and glycine ethylester. Alkylation of 4-(p-nitrobenzyl)pyridine (NBP) in vitro and binding to DNA in the rat.

    PubMed

    Meier, I; Shephard, S E; Lutz, W K

    1990-05-01

    In a colorimetric assay using 4-(p-nitrobenzyl)pyridine (NBP) as a nucleophilic scavenger of alkylating agents, the nitrosation and alkylation reactions were investigated for a number of amino acids and derivatives. The alkylating activity increased with the square of the nitrite concentration. The nitrosation rate constants for aspartic acid, aspartame, and glycine ethylester (= precursors C) were 0.08, 1.4 and less than or equal to 0.2, respectively, expressed in terms of the pH-dependent k2 rate constant of the equation dNOC/dt = k2.[C].[nitrite]2. The rates correlated inversely with the basicity of the amino group. The stability of the alkylating activity was astonishingly high, both in acid and at neutral pH. Half-lives of 500, 200, and 30 min were determined for aspartic acid (pH 3.5), aspartame (pH 2.5), and glycine ethylester (pH 2.5). Values of 60, 15, and 2 min, respectively, were found at pH 7. It is concluded that rearrangement of the primary N-nitroso product to the ultimate alkylating agent could be rate-limiting. The potential of nitrosated alpha-amino acids to bind to DNA in vivo was investigated by oral gavage of radiolabelled glycine ethylester to rats, followed immediately by sodium nitrite. DNA was isolated from stomach and liver and analysed for radioactivity and modified nucleotides. No indication of DNA adduct formation was obtained. Based on an estimation of the dose fraction converted from glycine ethylester to the nitroso product under the given experimental conditions, the maximum possible DNA-binding potency of nitroso glycine ethylester is about one order of magnitude below the methylating potency of N-nitrosomethylurea in rat stomach. The apparent discrepancy to the in vitro data could be due to efficient detoxification processes in mammalian cells.

  5. An examination of aspartate decarboxylase and glutamate decarboxylase activity in mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Graham; Ding, Haizhen; Rocheleau, Tom; Mayhew, George; Reddy, Erin; Han, Qian; Christensen, Bruce M.; Li, Jianyong

    2010-01-01

    A major pathway of beta-alanine synthesis in insects is through the alpha-decarboxylation of aspartate, but the enzyme involved in the decarboxylation of aspartate has not been clearly defined in mosquitoes and characterized in any insect species. In this study, we expressed two putative mosquito glutamate decarboxylase-like enzymes of mosquitoes and critically analyzed their substrate specificity and biochemical properties. Our results provide clear biochemical evidence establishing that one of them is an aspartate decarboxylase and the other is a glutamate decarboxylase. The mosquito aspartate decarboxylase functions exclusively on the production of beta-alanine with no activity with glutamate. Likewise the mosquito glutamate decarboxylase is highly specific to glutamate with essentially no activity with aspartate. Although insect aspartate decarboxylase shares high sequence identity with glutamate decarboxylase, we are able to closely predict aspartate decarboxylase from glutamate decarboxylase based on the difference of their active site residues. PMID:19842059

  6. Amino acid residues in the GerAB protein important in the function and assembly of the alanine spore germination receptor of Bacillus subtilis 168.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Gareth R; Moir, Anne

    2011-05-01

    The paradigm gerA operon is required for endospore germination in response to c-alanine as the sole germinant, and the three protein products, GerAA, GerAB, and GerAC are predicted to form a receptor complex in the spore inner membrane. GerAB shows homology to the amino acid-polyamine-organocation (APC) family of single-component transporters and is predicted to be an integral membrane protein with 10 membrane-spanning helices. Site-directed mutations were introduced into the gerAB gene at its natural location on the chromosome. Alterations to some charged or potential helix-breaking residues within membrane spans affected receptor function dramatically. In some cases, this is likely to reflect the complete loss of the GerA receptor complex, as judged by the absence of the germinant receptor protein GerAC, which suggests that the altered GerAB protein itself may be unstable or that the altered structure destabilizes the complex. Mutants that have a null phenotype for Instituto de Biotecnología de León, INBIOTEC, Parque Científico de León, Av. Real, 1, 24006 León, Spain-alanine germination but retain GerAC protein at near-normal levels are more likely to define amino acid residues of functional, rather than structural, importance. Single-amino-acid substitutions in each of the GerAB and GerAA proteins can prevent incorporation of GerAC protein into the spore; this provides strong evidence that the proteins within a specific receptor interact and that these interactions are required for receptor assembly. The lipoprotein nature of the GerAC receptor subunit is also important; an amino acid change in the prelipoprotein signal sequence in the gerAC1 mutant results in the absence of GerAC protein from the spore.

  7. Arundic acid attenuates retinal ganglion cell death by increasing glutamate/aspartate transporter expression in a model of normal tension glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Yanagisawa, M; Aida, T; Takeda, T; Namekata, K; Harada, T; Shinagawa, R; Tanaka, K

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness worldwide and is characterized by gradual visual impairment owing to progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons. Glutamate excitotoxicity has been implicated as a mechanism of RGC death in glaucoma. Consistent with this claim, we previously reported that glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST)-deficient mice show optic nerve degeneration that is similar to that observed in glaucoma. Therefore, drugs that upregulate GLAST may be useful for neuroprotection in glaucoma. Although many compounds are known to increase the expression of another glial glutamate transporter, EAAT2/GLT1, few compounds are shown to increase GLAST expression. Arundic acid is a glial modulating agent that ameliorates delayed ischemic brain damage by attenuating increases in extracellular glutamate. We hypothesized that arundic acid neuroprotection involves upregulation of GLAST. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effect of arundic acid on GLAST expression and glutamate uptake. We found that arundic acid induces GLAST expression in vitro and in vivo. In addition, arundic acid treatment prevented RGC death by upregulating GLAST in heterozygous (GLAST+/−) mice. Furthermore, arundic acid stimulates the human GLAST ortholog, EAAT1, expression in human neuroglioblastoma cells. Thus, discovering compounds that can enhance EAAT1 expression and activity may be a novel strategy for therapeutic treatment of glaucoma. PMID:25789968

  8. Different types of degradable vectors from low-molecular-weight polycation-functionalized poly(aspartic acid) for efficient gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Dou, X B; Hu, Y; Zhao, N N; Xu, F J

    2014-03-01

    Poly(aspartic acid) (PAsp) has been employed as the potential backbone for the preparation of efficient gene carriers, due to its low cytotoxicity, good biodegradability and excellent biocompatibility. In this work, the degradable linear or star-shaped PBLA was first prepared via ring-opining polymerization of β-benzyl-L-aspartate N-carboxy anhydride (BLA-NCA) initiated by ethylenediamine (ED) or ED-functionalized cyclodextrin cores. Then, PBLA was functionalized via aminolysis reaction with low-molecular-weight poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) with one terminal primary amine group (PDMAEMA-NH2), followed by addition of excess ED or ethanolamine (EA) to complete the aminolysis process. The obtained different types of cationic PAsp-based vectors including linear or star PAsp-PDM-NH2 and PAsp-PDM-OH exhibited good condensation capability and degradability, benefiting gene delivery process. In comparison with gold standard polyethylenimine (PEI, ∼ 25 kDa), the cationic PAsp-based vectors, particularly star-shaped ones, exhibited much better transfection performances.

  9. Different types of degradable vectors from low-molecular-weight polycation-functionalized poly(aspartic acid) for efficient gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Dou, X B; Hu, Y; Zhao, N N; Xu, F J

    2014-03-01

    Poly(aspartic acid) (PAsp) has been employed as the potential backbone for the preparation of efficient gene carriers, due to its low cytotoxicity, good biodegradability and excellent biocompatibility. In this work, the degradable linear or star-shaped PBLA was first prepared via ring-opining polymerization of β-benzyl-L-aspartate N-carboxy anhydride (BLA-NCA) initiated by ethylenediamine (ED) or ED-functionalized cyclodextrin cores. Then, PBLA was functionalized via aminolysis reaction with low-molecular-weight poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) with one terminal primary amine group (PDMAEMA-NH2), followed by addition of excess ED or ethanolamine (EA) to complete the aminolysis process. The obtained different types of cationic PAsp-based vectors including linear or star PAsp-PDM-NH2 and PAsp-PDM-OH exhibited good condensation capability and degradability, benefiting gene delivery process. In comparison with gold standard polyethylenimine (PEI, ∼ 25 kDa), the cationic PAsp-based vectors, particularly star-shaped ones, exhibited much better transfection performances. PMID:24388816

  10. Effect of aspartame and protein, administered in phenylalanine-equivalent doses, on plasma neutral amino acids, aspartate, insulin and glucose in man.

    PubMed

    Møller, S E

    1991-05-01

    Six human males each received 0.56 g phenylalanine (Phe) in the form of 1.0 g aspartame or 12.2 g bovine albumin in 200 ml water or water alone. Venous blood samples collected before consumption and during the following 4 hr were assayed for plasma levels of large, neutral amino acids (LNAA), aspartate, insulin and glucose. The area under the curve for plasma Phe was 40% greater, although not significant, after aspartame compared with albumin intake. The indicated increased clearance rate of plasma Phe after albumin may be caused by the significant increase of insulin, on which aspartame had no effect. There was a significant main effect of aspartame for plasma tyrosine but not for tryptophan, valine, isoleucine or leucine. Plasma aspartate was significantly increased at 0.25 hr after the aspartame intake. The percentage Phe/LNAA decreased slightly in response to albumin but increased 55% after aspartame and remained significantly increased for 2 hr. Tyrosine/LNAA increased and tryptophan/LNAA decreased modestly after aspartame intake. The study showed that the intake of aspartame in a not unrealistically high dose produced a marked and persistent increase of the availability of Phe to the brain, which was not observed after protein intake. The study indicated, furthermore, that Phe was cleared faster from the plasma after consumption of protein compared with aspartame.

  11. Glial cells transform glucose to alanine, which fuels the neurons in the honeybee retina.

    PubMed

    Tsacopoulos, M; Veuthey, A L; Saravelos, S G; Perrottet, P; Tsoupras, G

    1994-03-01

    The retina of honeybee drone is a nervous tissue with a crystal-like structure in which glial cells and photoreceptor neurons constitute two distinct metabolic compartments. The phosphorylation of glucose and its subsequent incorporation into glycogen occur in glia, whereas O2 consumption (QO2) occurs in the photoreceptors. Experimental evidence showed that glia phosphorylate glucose and supply the photoreceptors with metabolic substrates. We aimed to identify these transferred substrates. Using ion-exchange and reversed-phase HPLC and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, we demonstrated that more than 50% of 14C(U)-glucose entering the glia is transformed to alanine by transamination of pyruvate with glutamate. In the absence of extracellular glucose, glycogen is used to make alanine; thus, its pool size in isolated retinas is maintained stable or even increased. Our model proposes that the formation of alanine occurs in the glia, thereby maintaining the redox potential of this cell and contributing to NH3 homeostasis. Alanine is released into the extracellular space and is then transported into photoreceptors using an Na(+)-dependent transport system. Purified suspensions of photoreceptors have similar alanine aminotransferase activity as glial cells and transform 14C-alanine to glutamate, aspartate, and CO2. Therefore, the alanine entering photoreceptors is transaminated to pyruvate, which in turn enters the Krebs cycle. Proline also supplies the Krebs cycle by making glutamate and, in turn, the intermediate alpha-ketoglutarate. Light stimulation caused a 200% increase of QO2 and a 50% decrease of proline and of glutamate. Also, the production of 14CO2 from 14C-proline was increased. The use of these amino acids would sustain about half of the light-induced delta QO2, the other half being sustained by glycogen via alanine formation. The use of proline meets a necessary anaplerotic function in the Krebs cycle, but implies high NH3 production. The results showed

  12. Inhibition of glutamine synthesis induces glutamate dehydrogenase-dependent ammonia fixation into alanine in co-cultures of astrocytes and neurons.

    PubMed

    Dadsetan, Sherry; Bak, Lasse K; Sørensen, Michael; Keiding, Susanne; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Ott, Peter; Leke, Renata; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2011-09-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that ammonia exposure of neurons and astrocytes in co-culture leads to net synthesis not only of glutamine but also of alanine. The latter process involves the concerted action of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and alanine aminotransferase (ALAT). In the present study it was investigated if the glutamine synthetase (GS) inhibitor methionine sulfoximine (MSO) would enhance alanine synthesis by blocking the GS-dependent ammonia scavenging process. Hence, co-cultures of neurons and astrocytes were incubated for 2.5h with [U-(13)C]glucose to monitor de novo synthesis of alanine and glutamine in the absence and presence of 5.0 mM NH(4)Cl and 10 mM MSO. Ammonia exposure led to increased incorporation of label but not to a significant increase in the amount of these amino acids. However, in the presence of MSO, glutamine synthesis was blocked and synthesis of alanine increased leading to an elevated content intra- as well as extracellularly of this amino acid. Treatment with MSO led to a dramatic decrease in glutamine content and increased the intracellular contents of glutamate and aspartate. The large increase in alanine during exposure to MSO underlines the importance of the GDH and ALAT biosynthetic pathway for ammonia fixation, and it points to the use of a GS inhibitor to ameliorate the brain toxicity and edema induced by hyperammonemia, events likely related to glutamine synthesis.

  13. Arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-polyethylene glycol-polyamidoamine dendrimer conjugate improves liver-cell aggregation and function in 3-D spheroid culture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhanfei; Lian, Fen; Wang, Xiaoqian; Chen, Yanling; Tang, Nanhong

    2016-01-01

    The polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer, a type of macromolecule material, has been used in spheroidal cell culture and drug delivery in recent years. However, PAMAM is not involved in the study of hepatic cell-spheroid culture or its biological activity, particularly in detoxification function. Here, we constructed a PAMAM-dendrimer conjugate decorated by an integrin ligand: arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide. Our studies demonstrate that RGD-polyethylene glycol (PEG)-PAMAM conjugates can promote singly floating hepatic cells to aggregate together in a sphere-like growth with a weak reactive oxygen species. Moreover, RGD-PEG-PAMAM conjugates can activate the AKT-MAPK pathway in hepatic cells to promote cell proliferation and improve basic function and ammonia metabolism. Together, our data support the hepatocyte sphere treated by RGD-PEG-PAMAM conjugates as a potential source of hepatic cells for a biological artificial liver system. PMID:27621619

  14. Facilitation of cell adhesion by immobilized dengue viral nonstructural protein 1 (NS1): arginine-glycine-aspartic acid structural mimicry within the dengue viral NS1 antigen.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsin-Hou; Shyu, Huey-Fen; Wang, Yo-Ming; Sun, Der-Shan; Shyu, Rong-Hwa; Tang, Shiao-Shek; Huang, Yao-Shine

    2002-09-15

    Dengue virus infection causes life-threatening hemorrhagic fever. Increasing evidence implies that dengue viral nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) exhibits a tendency to elicit potentially hazardous autoantibodies, which show a wide spectrum of specificity against extracellular matrix and platelet antigens. How NS1 elicits autoantibodies remains unclear. To address the hypothesis that NS1 and matrix proteins may have structural and functional similarity, cell-matrix and cell-NS1 interactions were evaluated using a cell-adhesion assay. The present study showed that dengue NS1 immobilized on coverslips resulted in more cell adhesion than did the control proteins. This cell adhesion was inhibited by peptides containing arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD), a motif important for integrin-mediated cell adhesion. In addition, anti-NS1 antibodies blocked RGD-mediated cell adhesion. Although there is no RGD motif in the NS1 protein sequence, these data indicate that RGD structural mimicry exists within the NS1 antigen.

  15. The effect of an arginine-glycine-aspartic acid peptide and hyaluronate synthetic matrix on epithelialization of meshed skin graft interstices.

    PubMed

    Cooper, M L; Hansbrough, J F; Polarek, J W

    1996-01-01

    Keratinocytes and fibroblasts interact with proteins of the extracellular matrix such as fibronectin and vitronectin through RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) cell-attachment sequences. This study evaluated the ability of a provisional synthetic matrix composed of an RGD peptide and hyaluronic acid to accelerate the epithelialization of the interstices of meshed, human, split-thickness skin when placed on full-thickness wounds of athymic mice. Full-thickness skin defects, sparing the panniculus carnosus, were created on athymic mice and 3:1 meshed, human skin was placed on them. The grafts had four central, isolated interstices, which epithelialized by migration of human keratinocytes. Conditions were either the addition to the wound of the synthetic matrix or a matrix of hyaluronic acid alone. The time to closure of the graft interstices was decreased (p < 0.02) in the wounds treated with the RGD peptide-hyaluronic acid provisional matrix. The resultant epithelium of the closed interstices was significantly thicker 8 days after surgery for the RGD-treated wounds. Basement membrane proteins (laminin and type IV collagen) were also found to be present at the dermoepidermal junction earlier in the RGD-treated wounds. These results imply that use of the RGD peptide conjugate to effect cell-matrix interactions may have clinical significance in the field of wound healing.

  16. β-Alanine supplementation.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Jay R; Emerson, Nadia S; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2012-01-01

    β-Alanine is rapidly developing as one of the most popular sport supplements used by strength/power athletes worldwide. The popularity of β-alanine stems from its unique ability to enhance intramuscular buffering capacity and thereby attenuating fatigue. This review will provide an overview of the physiology that underlies the mechanisms of action behind β-alanine, examine dosing schemes, and examine the studies that have been conducted on the efficacy of this supplement. In addition, the effect that β-alanine has on body mass changes or whether it can stimulate changes in aerobic capacity also will be discussed. The review also will begin to explore the potential health benefits that β-alanine may have on older adult populations. Discussion will examine the potential adverse effects associated with this supplement as well as the added benefits of combining β-alanine with creatine.

  17. Role of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid and cholecystokinin receptors in apomorphine-induced aggressive behaviour in rats.

    PubMed

    Lang, A; Harro, J; Soosaar, A; Kõks, S; Volke, V; Oreland, L; Bourin, M; Vasar, E; Bradwejn, J; Männistö, P T

    1995-04-01

    We studied the aggressive behaviour induced by repeated treatment with apomorphine, a dopamine agonist (0.5 mg/kg s.c. twice daily, 10 days), in rats. The first signs of defensive aggressiveness appeared on the third day of apomorphine treatment and were generally seen on the 7th day. Aggressiveness induced by a challenge dose of apomorphine (0.5 mg/kg s.c.) on the 11th day was antagonized by haloperidol (0.05 and 0.1 mg/kg i.p.) and clozapine (10 mg/kg i.p.). An antagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-gated channels, dizocilpine (MK-801), also blocked the aggressive behaviour at 0.25 and 0.5 mg/kg i.p. but caused ataxia. When dizocilpine (0.25 mg/kg i.p.) and apomorphine were coadministered for 10 days, aggressive behaviour did not develop. At 0.025 mg/kg i.p., dizocilpine even accelerated the appearance of apomorphine-induced aggressive behaviour, which manifested on the 3rd day in all rats. In a separate study, a 7-day treatment with dizocilpine (0.25-1 mg/kg i.p.) of rats, sensitized by a prior 10-day apomorphine treatment, did not reverse the established aggressive behaviour. The coadministration of apomorphine and cholecystokinin (CCK) -A or -B antagonists, devazepide or L-365,260 (0.01-2.5 mg/kg i.p.) respectively, neither affected development of apomorphine-induced aggressive behaviour nor intensity of aggressiveness in the sensitized rats. In binding studies neither density nor affinity of striatal dopamine D2 receptors was changed by acute or chronic apomorphine treatment. The number of [3H]pCCK-8 binding sites in the frontal cortex increased already after a single injection of apomorphine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Effect of the aspartic acid D2 on the affinity of Polybia-MP1 to anionic lipid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Leite, Natália Bueno; Dos Santos Alvares, Dayane; de Souza, Bibiana Monson; Palma, Mário Sérgio; Ruggiero Neto, João

    2014-05-01

    Polybia-MP1 (IDWKKLLDAAKQIL-NH2), a helical peptide extracted from the venom of a Brazilian wasp, has broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities without being hemolytic or cytotoxic. This peptide has also displayed anticancer activity against cancer cell cultures. Despite its high selectivity, MP1 has an unusual low net charge (Q = +2). The aspartic residue (D2) in the N-terminal region plays an important role in its affinity and selectivity; its substitution by asparagine (D2N mutant) led to a less selective peptide. Aiming to explore the importance of this residue for the peptides' affinity, we compared the zwitterionic and anionic vesicle adsorption activity of Polybia-MP1 versus its D2N mutant and also mastoparan X (MPX). The adsorption, electrostatic, and conformational free energies were assessed by circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence titrations using large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) at the same conditions in association with measurement of the zeta potential of LUVs in the presence of the peptides. The adsorption free energies of the peptides, determined from the partition coefficients, indicated higher affinity of MP1 to anionic vesicles compared with the D2N mutant and MPX. The electrostatic and conformational free energies of MP1 in anionic vesicles are less favorable than those found for the D2N mutant and MPX. Therefore, the highest affinity of MP1 to anionic vesicles is likely due to other energetic contributions. The presence of D2 in MP1 makes these energetic components 1.2 and 1.5 kcal/mol more favorable compared with the D2N mutant and MPX, respectively.

  19. IgE binding to peanut allergens is inhibited by combined D-aspartic and D-glutamic acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    D-amino acids (D-aas) are reported to bind to IgE antibodies from people with allergy and asthma. The objectives of this study were to determine if D-aas bind or inhibit IgE binding to peanut allergens, and if they are more effective than L-amino acids (L-aas) in this respect. Several D-aa cocktails...

  20. Enrichment of Non-Terrestrial L-Proteinogenic Amino Acids by Aqueous Alteration on the Tagish Lake Meteorite Parent Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Burton, Aaron S.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Herd, Christopher D. K.

    2012-01-01

    The distribution and isotopic and enantiomeric compositions of amino acids found in three distinct fragments of the Tagish Lake C2-type carbonaceous chondrite were investigated via liquid chromatography fluorescence detection time-of-flight mass spectrometry and gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Large L-enantiomeric excesses (L(sub ee) approx. 43 to 59%) of the a-hydrogen aspartic and glutamic amino acids were measured in Tagish Lake, whereas alanine, another alpha-hydrogen protein amino acid, was found to be nearly racemic (D approx. L) using both techniques. Carbon isotope measurements of D- and L-aspartic acid and D- and L-alanine in Tagish Lake fall well outside of the terrestrial range and indicate that the measured aspartic acid enantioenrichment is indigenous to the meteorite. Alternate explanations for the Lexcesses of aspartic acid such as interference from other compounds present in the sample, analytical biases, or terrestrial amino acid contamination were investigated and rejected. These results can be explained by differences in the solid-solution phase behavior of aspartic acid, which can form conglomerate enantiopure solids during crystallization, and alanine, which can only form racemic crystals.

  1. Structures of aspartic acid-96 in the L and N intermediates of bacteriorhodopsin: analysis by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maeda, A.; Sasaki, J.; Shichida, Y.; Yoshizawa, T.; Chang, M.; Ni, B.; Needleman, R.; Lanyi, J. K.

    1992-01-01

    The light-induced difference Fourier transform infrared spectrum between the L or N intermediate minus light-adapted bacteriorhodopsin (BR) was measured in order to examine the protonated states and the changes in the interactions of carboxylic acids of Asp-96 and Asp-115 in these intermediates. Vibrational bands due to the protonated and unprotonated carboxylic acid were identified by isotope shift and band depletion upon substitution of Asp-96 or -115 by asparagine. While the signal due to the deprotonation of Asp-96 was clearly observed in the N intermediate, this residue remained protonated in L. Asp-115 was partially deprotonated in L. The C = O stretching vibration of protonated Asp-96 of L showed almost no shift upon 2H2O substitution, in contrast to the corresponding band of Asp-96 or Asp-115 of BR, which shifted by 9-12 cm-1 under the same conditions. In the model system of acetic acid in organic solvents, such an absence of the shift of the C = O stretching vibration of the protonated carboxylic acid upon 2H2O substitution was seen only when the O-H of acetic acid is hydrogen-bonded. The non-hydrogen-bonded monomer showed the 2H2O-dependent shift. Thus, the O-H bond of Asp-96 enters into hydrogen bonding upon conversion of BR to L. Its increased hydrogen bonding in L is consistent with the observed downshift of the O-H stretching vibration of the carboxylic acid of Asp-96.

  2. Formation of Amino Acids from Reactor Irradiated Ammonium Acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akaboshi, M.; Kawai, K.; Maki, H.; Kawamoto, K.; Honda, Y.

    1982-12-01

    Ammonium acetate in various conditions was irradiated in a reactor to examine the contributions of both the reactor radiations and recoiled14C nucleis to form the biologically interesting molecules. Present investigations demonstrated that several amino acids, glycine, alanine, β-alanine and GABA, and may-be aspartic acid, serine and valine by prolonged irradiation, were formed in the aqueous solutions of ammonium acetate.14C-radioactivities were also found distributed in these amino acids. However, no special relationship between14C-radioactivity and these amino acids formed was observed.

  3. Just three water molecules can trigger the undesired nonenzymatic reactions of aspartic acid residues: new insight from a quantum-chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, O.

    2014-03-01

    Aspartic acid (Asp) residues in peptides and proteins (L-Asp) can undergo spontaneous, nonenzymatic reactions under physiological conditions by which abnormal L-β-Asp, D-Asp, and/or D-β-Asp residues are formed. These altered Asp residues may affect the three-dimensional structures of the peptides and proteins and hence their properties and functions. In fact, the altered Asp residues are relevant to age-related diseases such as cataract and Alzheimer's disease. Most of the above reactions of the L-Asp residue proceed via a cyclic succinimide intermediate. In this paper, I propose a detailed mechanism of cyclization of an Asp residue (forming a precursor of the succinimide) by the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) density functional theory calculations carried out for a small Asp-containing model compound complexed with three water molecules which act as general acid-base catalysts in proton transfers. In the proposed mechanism, the amide group on the C-terminal side of the Asp residue is first converted to the tautomeric iminol form. Then, successive reorientation of a water molecule and conformational change occur followed by the nucleophilic attack of the iminol nitrogen atom on the carboxyl carbon atom of the Asp side chain to form a five-membered ring. A satisfactory agreement was obtained between the calculated and experimental energetics.

  4. Functional characterization of a novel aspartic acid rich lipase, TALipC, from Trichosporon asahii MSR54: solvent-dependent enantio inversion during esterification of 1-phenylethanol.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Arti; Gupta, Rani

    2015-01-01

    A novel lipase gene TAlipC was isolated from Trichosporon asahii MSR54 and functionally expressed in Pichia pastoris. The protein was His-tagged and purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography. Sequence comparison revealed a high homology with lipases from Cryptococcus sp. It had a GX type oxyanion hole and a GHSLG-type conserved penta-peptide similar to those in the lipases from Yarrowia lipolytica. The enzyme had optimal activity at pH 8 and 50 °C. It was specific for long chain fatty acid groups of p-nitrophenol esters and triacylglycerols, showing regio- and enantio-selectivity. It was activated by Mg(2+) ions (20 mM) and had a predicted Mg-binding domain at the aspartic acid-rich C-terminal. Solvent-based enantio- inversion was the key feature of the enzyme where it showed (S)-selectivity in 1,4-dioxane and 2-propanol and (R)-selectivity in hexane during chiral separation of (±)1-phenylethanol by esterification.

  5. [Evalution of activity of acid aspartic proteinase in Candida strains isolated from oral cavity of patients with increased risk of mycosis].

    PubMed

    Rózga, A; Kurnatowska, A J; Raczyńsak-Witońska, G; Loga, G

    2001-01-01

    We have evaluated the activity of acid aspartic protease in 195 strains of Candida isolated from the oral cavity of three groups of patients. The first group comprised patients with cancer of the larynx qualified for surgery, the second- patients with neoplastic disease ( Hodgkin s disease, lymphoma, acute granulocytic leukaemia, lymphatic leukaemia, lung cancer, multiple myeloma, stomach cancer, breast cancer) who were not treated, the third group- patients with neoplastic diseases treated by chemotherapy. The strains of fungi were differentiated using API 20C and Api 20C AUX tests according to the protocol adopted at the Department of Medical Parasitology and Biology, Medical University of Lódz. The activity of acid protease was studied by Staib method in Rózga modification. Almost all strains showed high and very high proteolytic activity. The rang of proteolysis zone of Candida strains from the three groups of patients varied from 2,5 to 12,5 mm. We have found the mean proteolytic zones of strains isolated from groups I and III differed statistically significantly (p<0,001). Similarly, statisticall sihnificant difference was seen between these parameters for groups II and III (p<0,05), while there was no difference between strains from group I and II.

  6. Effect of Exogenous Indole-3-Acetic Acid and Indole-3-Butyric Acid on Internal Levels of the Respective Auxins and Their Conjugation with Aspartic Acid during Adventitious Root Formation in Pea Cuttings.

    PubMed

    Nordström, A C; Jacobs, F A; Eliasson, L

    1991-07-01

    The influence of exogenous indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) on the internal levels of these auxins was studied during the first 4 days of adventitious root formation in cuttings of Pisum sativum L. The quantitations were done by high performance liquid chromatography with spectrofluorometric detection. IBA, identified by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), was found to naturally occur in this plant material. The root inducing ability of exogenous IBA was superior to that of IAA. The IAA level in the tissue increased considerably on the first day after application of IAA, but rapidly decreased again, returning to a level twice the control by day 3. The predominant metabolic route was conjugation with aspartic acid, as reflected by the increase in the level of indole-3-acetylaspartic acid. The IBA treatment resulted in increases in the levels of IBA, IAA, and indole-3-acetylaspartic acid. The IAA content rapidly returned to control levels, whereas the IBA level remained high throughout the experimental period. High amounts of indole-3-butyrylaspartic acid were found in the tissue after feeding with IBA. The identity of the conjugate was confirmed by (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance and GC-MS. IBA was much more stable in solution than IAA. No IAA was detected after 48 hours, whereas 70% IBA was still recovered after this time. The relatively higher root inducing ability of IBA is ascribed to the fact that its level remained elevated longer than that of IAA, even though IBA was metabolized in the tissue. Adventitious root formation is discussed on the basis of these findings. PMID:16668265

  7. Identification of enzyme activity that conjugates indole-3-acetic acid to aspartate in immature seeds of pea (Pisum sativum).

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Maciej; Jakubowska, Anna

    2008-01-01

    This study describes the first identification of plant enzyme activity catalyzing the conjugation of indole-3-acetic acid to amino acids. Enzymatic synthesis of indole-3-acetylaspartate (IAA-Asp) by a crude enzyme preparation from immature seeds of pea (Pisum sativum) was observed. The reaction yielded a product with the same Rf as IAA-Asp standard after thin layer chromatography. The identity of IAA-Asp was verified by HPLC analysis. IAA-Asp formation was dependent on ATP and Mg2+, and was linear during a 60 min period. The enzyme preparation obtained after poly(ethylene glycol) 6000 fractionation showed optimum activity at pH 8.0, and the temperature optimum for IAA-Asp synthesis was 30 degrees C. PMID:17920159

  8. Highly Amino Acid Selective Hydrolysis of Myoglobin at Aspartate Residues as Promoted by Zirconium(IV)-Substituted Polyoxometalates.

    PubMed

    Ly, Hong Giang T; Absillis, Gregory; Janssens, Rik; Proost, Paul; Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N

    2015-06-15

    SDS-PAGE/Edman degradation and HPLC MS/MS showed that zirconium(IV)-substituted Lindqvist-, Keggin-, and Wells-Dawson-type polyoxometalates (POMs) selectively hydrolyze the protein myoglobin at Asp-X peptide bonds under mildly acidic and neutral conditions. This transformation is the first example of highly sequence selective protein hydrolysis by POMs, a novel class of protein-hydrolyzing agents. The selectivity is directed by Asp residues located on the surface of the protein and is further assisted by electrostatic interactions between the negatively charged POMs and positively charged surface patches in the vicinity of the cleavage site.

  9. Effect of pH, urea, peptide length, and neighboring amino acids on alanine alpha-proton random coil chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Carlisle, Elizabeth A; Holder, Jessica L; Maranda, Abby M; de Alwis, Adamberage R; Selkie, Ellen L; McKay, Sonya L

    2007-01-01

    Accurate random coil alpha-proton chemical shift values are essential for precise protein structure analysis using chemical shift index (CSI) calculations. The current study determines the chemical shift effects of pH, urea, peptide length and neighboring amino acids on the alpha-proton of Ala using model peptides of the general sequence GnXaaAYaaGn, where Xaa and Yaa are Leu, Val, Phe, Tyr, His, Trp or Pro, and n = 1-3. Changes in pH (2-6), urea (0-1M), and peptide length (n = 1-3) had no effect on Ala alpha-proton chemical shifts. Denaturing concentrations of urea (8M) caused significant downfield shifts (0.10 +/- 0.01 ppm) relative to an external DSS reference. Neighboring aliphatic residues (Leu, Val) had no effect, whereas aromatic amino acids (Phe, Tyr, His and Trp) and Pro caused significant shifts in the alanine alpha-proton, with the extent of the shifts dependent on the nature and position of the amino acid. Smaller aromatic residues (Phe, Tyr, His) caused larger shift effects when present in the C-terminal position (approximately 0.10 vs. 0.05 ppm N-terminal), and the larger aromatic tryptophan caused greater effects in the N-terminal position (0.15 ppm vs. 0.10 C-terminal). Proline affected both significant upfield (0.06 ppm, N-terminal) and downfield (0.25 ppm, C-terminal) chemical shifts. These new Ala correction factors detail the magnitude and range of variation in environmental chemical shift effects, in addition to providing insight into the molecular level interactions that govern protein folding.

  10. Synthesis and carbonic anhydrase inhibitory properties of amino acid - coumarin/quinolinone conjugates incorporating glycine, alanine and phenylalanine moieties.

    PubMed

    Küçükbay, F Zehra; Küçükbay, Hasan; Tanc, Muhammet; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-12-01

    N-Protected amino acids (Gly, Ala and Phe) were reacted with amino substituted coumarin and quinolinone derivatives, leading to the corresponding N-protected amino acid-coumarin/quinolinone conjugates. The carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) inhibitory activity of the new compounds was assessed against various human (h) isoforms, such as hCA I, hCA II, hCA IV and hCA XII. The quinolinone conjugates were inactive as enzyme inhibitors, whereas the coumarins were ineffective hCA I/II inhibitors (KIs > 50 μM) but were submicromolar hCA IV and XII inhibitors, with inhibition constants ranging between 92 nM and 1.19 μM for hCA IV, and between 0.11 and 0.79 μM for hCA XII. These coumarin derivatives, as many others reported earlier, thus show an interesting selective inhibitory profile for the membrane-bound over the cytosolic CA isoforms.

  11. D-alanine incorporation into macromolecules and effects of D-alanine deprivation on active transport in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Clark, V L; Young, F E

    1978-03-01

    An auxotroph of Bacillus subtilis 168 unable to synthesize D-alanine loses the ability to support endogenously energized transport when deprived of D-alanine. Revertants of the mutant retain transport activity. The loss of transport is specific for substrates taken up by active transport; substrates taken up by group translocation are transported at normal rates. The loss of transport can be retarded by pretreatment of the cells with inhibitors of protein synthesis. Since the loss of transport could be due to an alteration in a D-alanine-containing polymer, we investigated the incorporation of D-[14C]alanine into macromolecules. The major D-alanine-containing polymers in B. subtilis are peptidoglycan and teichoic acid, with 4 to 6% of the D-[14C]alanine label found in trypsin-soluble material. Whereas the peptidoglycan and teichoic acid undergo turnover, the trypsin-soluble material does not. Treatment of the trypsin-soluble material with Pronase releases free D-alanine. Analysis of acid-hydrolyzed trypsin-soluble material indicated that approximately 75% of the radioactivity is present as D-alanine, with the remainder present as L-alanine. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of partially purified D-[14C]alanine-labeled membranes indicated the presence of two peaks of radioactivity (molecular weights, 230,000 and 80,000) that could be digested by trypsin. The results suggest that D-alanine may be covalently bound to cellular proteins.

  12. Aspartic acid functionalized water-soluble perylene diimide as “Off-On” fluorescent sensor for selective detection Cu2+ and ATP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Lina; Xing, Feifei; Bai, Yueling; Zhao, Yongmei; Zhu, Shourong

    2013-11-01

    Aspartic functionalized water-soluble perylene diimide, N,N‧-di(2-succinic acid)-perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic diimide (PASP) has two absorbance maximums at 527 and 498 nm (ε ≈ 1.7 × 104 L cm-1 mol-1) and two emission peaks at 547 and 587 nm respectively. Emission intensities decrease with the increase of PASP concentrations in 20-100 μM ranges. Spectral titrations demonstrate that each PASP can coordinate to two Cu2+ ions in the absence of HEPES buffer. Its stability constant is estimated to be about 1.0 × 1012 L2 mol-2 at pH 7.20 and its coordinate stoichiometry increased to 7.5 in the same pH in the presence of HEPES buffer. The emission of PASP will be completely quenched upon formation of Cu2+ complex. The lowest “turn-off” fluorescence detection limit was calculated to be 0.3 μM Cu2+. PASP-Cu solution was used as a “turn-on” fluorescence biosensor to detect ATP. The sensitivity towards ATP is 0.3 μM in 50 mM HEPES buffer at pH 7.20, which is one of the most sensitive fluorescence sensors.

  13. Static and dynamic investigations of poly(aspartic acid) and Pluronic F127 complex prepared by self-assembling in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nita, Loredana E.; Chiriac, Aurica P.; Bercea, Maria; Nistor, Manuela T.

    2015-12-01

    The present investigation is focused on evaluation of self-assembling ability in aqueous solutions of two water soluble polymers: poly(aspartic acid) (PAS) and Pluronic F127 (PL). The intermolecular complexes, realized between polyacid and neutral copolymer surfactant in different ratios, have been studied by combining various characterization techniques as rheology, DLS, spectroscopy, microscopy, chemical imaging, and zeta potential determination, measurements performed in static and/or dynamic conditions. In static conditions, when the equilibrium state between PAS/PL polymeric pair was reached, and depending on the polymers mixture composition, and of experimental rheological conditions, positive or negative deviations from the additive rule are registered. Conformational changes of the macromolecular chains and correspondingly physical interactions are generated between PL and PAS for self-assembly and the formation of interpolymer complex as suprastructure with micellar configuration. The phenomenon was better evidenced in case of 1/1 wt ratio between the two polymers. In dynamic conditions of determination, during "in situ" evaluation of the hydrodynamic diameter, zeta potential and conductivity, when the equilibrium state is not reached and as result either the intermolecular bonds are not achieved, the self-assembling process is not so obvious evidenced.

  14. Surface aggregation of urinary proteins and aspartic acid-rich peptides on the faces of calcium oxalate monohydrate investigated by in situ force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, M L; Qiu, S R; Hoyer, J R; Casey, W H; Nancollas, G H; De Yoreo, J J

    2008-05-28

    The growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate in the presence of Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP), osteopontin (OPN), and the 27-residue synthetic peptides (DDDS){sub 6}DDD and (DDDG){sub 6}DDD [where D = aspartic acid and X = S (serine) or G (glycine)] was investigated via in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that these three growth modulators create extensive deposits on the crystal faces. Depending on the modulator and crystal face, these deposits can occur as discrete aggregates, filamentary structures, or uniform coatings. These proteinaceous films can lead to either the inhibition or increase of the step speeds (with respect to the impurity-free system) depending on a range of factors that include peptide or protein concentration, supersaturation and ionic strength. While THP and the linear peptides act, respectively, to exclusively increase and inhibit growth on the (-101) face, both exhibit dual functionality on the (010) face, inhibiting growth at low supersaturation or high modulator concentration and accelerating growth at high supersaturation or low modulator concentration. Based on analyses of growth morphologies and dependencies of step speeds on supersaturation and protein or peptide concentration, we argue for a picture of growth modulation that accounts for the observations in terms of the strength of binding to the surfaces and steps and the interplay of electrostatic and solvent-induced forces at crystal surface.

  15. Hemoglobin Yoshizuka (G10(108)β asparagine→aspartic acid): a new variant with a reduced oxygen affinity from a Japanese family

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Takashi; Fujita, Shigeru; Ohta, Yoshiro; Hanada, Motosuke; Yanase, Toshiyuki

    1969-01-01

    During the course of a survey, a new hemoglobin, designated hemoglobin Yoshizuka, has been encountered in a Japanese family. Clinically, mild anemia was noted in five of six heterozygous individuals but no other significant abnormalities were found. Hemoglobin Yoshizuka is characterized by the substitution of aspartic acid for asparagine at the tenth residue of the G helix in the β-chain. Reduced oxygen affinity with almost normal heme-heme interaction was found to be a property of this abnormal hemoglobin. The asparagine residue G10(108)β lies in the internal cavity of the tetrameric molecule and its main chain carbonyl is thought to be hydrogen bonded to histidine G10(103)α at the region of contact between α- and β-chains. It would appear likely that the introduction of a carboxyl group into the central cavity might result in interactions between the polar groups and the substituted side chain, disrupting the system of hydrogen bonds which contribute to the stability of the contacts between unlike subunits. Images PMID:5355345

  16. Abnormal presence of the matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein-derived acidic serine- and aspartate-rich motif peptide in human hypophosphatemic dentin.

    PubMed

    Boukpessi, Tchilalo; Gaucher, Celine; Léger, Thibaut; Salmon, Benjamin; Le Faouder, Julie; Willig, Cyril; Rowe, Peter S; Garabédian, Michèle; Meilhac, Olivier; Chaussain, Catherine

    2010-08-01

    Severe dental troubles are associated with X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets and are mainly related to impaired dentin mineralization. In dentin matrix, matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) may be protected from proteolysis by a specific interaction with PHEX (phosphate regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X chromosome). The objective of our work was to determine whether PHEX impairment induces MEPE cleavage in dentin and the subsequent release of the C-terminal acidic serine- and aspartate-rich motif (ASARM) peptide, which is known to inhibit mineralization. By Western blot analysis, we explored dentin extracts from seven hypophosphatemic patients with mutations of the PHEX gene. A proteomic approach combining immunoprecipitation, surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight analysis of the samples completed this exploration. This study shows a 4.1-kDa peptide containing the MEPE-derived ASARM peptide in hypophosphatemic samples. The presence of ASARM was less marked in patients treated with 1-hydroxylated vitamin D and phosphate during growth. Moreover, recombinant ASARM implanted in a rat pulp injury model disturbed the formation of the reparative dentin bridge. These results suggest that abnormal MEPE cleavage occurs when PHEX activity is deficient in humans, the ASARM peptide may be involved in the mineralization defects and the PHEX-MEPE interaction may be indirect, as ensuring a better phosphate and vitamin D environment to the mineralizing dentin prevents MEPE cleavage.

  17. Using an experimental medicine model to understand the antidepressant potential of the N-Methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist memantine.

    PubMed

    Pringle, A; Parsons, E; Cowen, L G; McTavish, S F; Cowen, P J; Harmer, C J

    2012-11-01

    There is growing interest in the role of the glutamatergic system both in depression and as a novel target for treatments. Preclinical studies suggested that the non-competitive N-Methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist memantine might have antidepressant properties, but a randomised controlled trial failed to support this. A healthy volunteer model of emotional processing was used to assess the neuropsychological profile of action of memantine. Healthy volunteers (n=32) were randomised to receive a single dose of memantine (10 mg) or placebo, and subsequently completed a battery of tasks measuring emotional processing, including facial expression recognition, emotional memory, dot-probe and emotion-potentiated startle tasks, as well as working and verbal memory. Memantine treated volunteers showed an increased emotion-potentiated startle, and a reduced bias for negative items in emotional recognition memory. There were no effects of the drug on any other aspect of emotional or non-emotional information processing. These results suggest that a single dose of memantine produces an early anxiogenic response in the emotion-potentiated startle similar to that seen following a single dose of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, citalopram. However, the overall profile of effects is more limited than that which might be expected in response to a conventional antidepressant.

  18. Repeated ketamine administration alters N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor subunit gene expression: implication of genetic vulnerability for ketamine abuse and ketamine psychosis in humans.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ke; Lipsky, Robert H

    2015-02-01

    For more than 40 years following its approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as an anesthetic, ketamine, a non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist, has been used as a tool of psychiatric research. As a psychedelic drug, ketamine induces psychotic symptoms, cognitive impairment, and mood elevation, which resemble some symptoms of schizophrenia. Recreational use of ketamine has been increasing in recent years. However, little is known of the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for ketamine-associated psychosis. Recent animal studies have shown that repeated ketamine administration significantly increases NMDA receptor subunit gene expression, in particular subunit 1 (NR1 or GluN1) levels. This results in neurodegeneration, supporting a potential mechanism where up-regulation of NMDA receptors could produce cognitive deficits in chronic ketamine abuse patients. In other studies, NMDA receptor gene variants are associated with addictive behavior. Here, we focus on the roles of NMDA receptor gene subunits in ketamine abuse and ketamine psychosis and propose that full sequencing of NMDA receptor genes may help explain individual vulnerability to ketamine abuse and ketamine-associated psychosis.

  19. Aspartic acid functionalized water-soluble perylene diimide as "Off-On" fluorescent sensor for selective detection Cu(2+) and ATP.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Lina; Xing, Feifei; Bai, Yueling; Zhao, Yongmei; Zhu, Shourong

    2013-11-01

    Aspartic functionalized water-soluble perylene diimide, N,N'-di(2-succinic acid)-perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic diimide (PASP) has two absorbance maximums at 527 and 498nm (ε≈1.7×10(4)Lcm(-1)mol(-1)) and two emission peaks at 547 and 587nm respectively. Emission intensities decrease with the increase of PASP concentrations in 20-100μM ranges. Spectral titrations demonstrate that each PASP can coordinate to two Cu(2+) ions in the absence of HEPES buffer. Its stability constant is estimated to be about 1.0×10(12)L(2)mol(-2) at pH 7.20 and its coordinate stoichiometry increased to 7.5 in the same pH in the presence of HEPES buffer. The emission of PASP will be completely quenched upon formation of Cu(2+) complex. The lowest "turn-off" fluorescence detection limit was calculated to be 0.3μM Cu(2+). PASP-Cu solution was used as a "turn-on" fluorescence biosensor to detect ATP. The sensitivity towards ATP is 0.3μM in 50mM HEPES buffer at pH 7.20, which is one of the most sensitive fluorescence sensors.

  20. Interactions of L-Aspartic Acid with Aqueous Solution of 1,2-Propanediol at Different Temperatures: A Volumetric, Compressibility and Viscometric Approach.

    PubMed

    Rani, Ruby; Kumar, Ashwani; Sharma, Tanu; Saini, Balwinder; Bamezai, Rajinder Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The volumetric, acoustic and viscometric methods are used for investigating the interactions of L-aspartic acid (Asp) in aqueous solution of 1,2-propanediol (PD) over a temperature of (298.15, 303.15 and 308.15) K at atmospheric pressure. Using the experimental results, the apparent molar volume, Vφ, limiting apparent molar volume, V0φ, the slope, Sv, and partial molar volume of transfer, V0φ,tr, have been calculated from density data. The apparent molar isentropic compressibility, K φ,s, limiting apparent molar isentropic compressibility, K0φ,s, its slope, Sk, and partial molar compressibility of transfer, K0φ,s, tr, have been calculated from speed of sound data. These values are also used for calculating the number of water molecules hydrated, nH, to the Asp. The viscosity data has also been used to determine relative viscosity ηr, viscosity B-coefficients, temperature derivative of B-coefficients, dB/dT and viscosity B-coefficients of transfer, Btr. The calculated parameters have been discussed in terms of various solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions prevailing in these solutions. Further, a detailed insight into the physicochemical interactions between Asp and aqueous PD, e.g., ion-hydrophilic and hydrophilic-hydrophilic interactions along with the structure-making tendency have been retrieved through the perusal of these calculated parameters. PMID:27640386

  1. Diabetes-linked transcription factor HNF4α regulates metabolism of endogenous methylarginines and β-aminoisobutyric acid by controlling expression of alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase 2

    PubMed Central

    Burdin, Dmitry V.; Kolobov, Alexey A.; Brocker, Chad; Soshnev, Alexey A.; Samusik, Nikolay; Demyanov, Anton V.; Brilloff, Silke; Jarzebska, Natalia; Martens-Lobenhoffer, Jens; Mieth, Maren; Maas, Renke; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Bode-Böger, Stefanie M.; Gonzalez, Frank; Weiss, Norbert; Rodionov, Roman N.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated levels of circulating asymmetric and symmetric dimethylarginines (ADMA and SDMA) predict and potentially contribute to end organ damage in cardiovascular diseases. Alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase 2 (AGXT2) regulates systemic levels of ADMA and SDMA, and also of beta-aminoisobutyric acid (BAIB)-a modulator of lipid metabolism. We identified a putative binding site for hepatic nuclear factor 4 α (HNF4α) in AGXT2 promoter sequence. In a luciferase reporter assay we found a 75% decrease in activity of Agxt2 core promoter after disruption of the HNF4α binding site. Direct binding of HNF4α to Agxt2 promoter was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Hnf4a led to an almost 50% reduction in Agxt2 mRNA levels in Hepa 1–6 cells. Liver-specific Hnf4a knockout mice exhibited a 90% decrease in liver Agxt2 expression and activity, and elevated plasma levels of ADMA, SDMA and BAIB, compared to wild-type littermates. Thus we identified HNF4α as a major regulator of Agxt2 expression. Considering a strong association between human HNF4A polymorphisms and increased risk of type 2 diabetes our current findings suggest that downregulation of AGXT2 and subsequent impairment in metabolism of dimethylarginines and BAIB caused by HNF4α deficiency might contribute to development of cardiovascular complications in diabetic patients. PMID:27752141

  2. Alanine racemase from the acidophile Acetobacter aceti.

    PubMed

    Francois, Julie A; Kappock, T Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Acetobacter aceti converts ethanol to acetic acid, and survives acetic acid exposure by tolerating cytoplasmic acidification. Alanine racemase (Alr) is a pyridoxal 5' phosphate (PLP) -dependent enzyme that catalyzes the interconversion of the d- and l-isomers of alanine and has a basic pH optimum. Since d-alanine is essential for peptidoglycan biosynthesis, Alr must somehow function in the acidic cytoplasm of A. aceti. We report the partial purification of native A. aceti Alr (AaAlr) and evidence that it is a rather stable enzyme. The C-terminus of AaAlr has a strong resemblance to the ssrA-encoded protein degradation signal, which thwarted initial protein expression experiments. High-activity AaAlr forms lacking a protease recognition sequence were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Biophysical and enzymological experiments confirm that AaAlr is intrinsically acid-resistant, yet has the catalytic properties of an ordinary Alr.

  3. Secretion of d-alanine by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Katsube, Satoshi; Sato, Kazuki; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Yoneyama, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Escherichia coli has an l-alanine export system that protects the cells from toxic accumulation of intracellular l-alanine in the presence of l-alanyl-l-alanine (l-Ala-l-Ala). When a DadA-deficient strain was incubated with 6.0 mM l-Ala-l-Ala, we detected l-alanine and d-alanine using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis at a level of 7.0 mM and 3.0 mM, respectively, after 48 h incubation. Treatment of the culture supernatant with d-amino acid oxidase resulted in the disappearance of a signal corresponding to d-alanine. Additionally, the culture supernatant enabled a d-alanine auxotroph to grow without d-alanine supplementation, confirming that the signal detected by HPLC was authentic d-alanine. Upon introduction of an expression vector harbouring the alanine racemase genes, alr or dadX, the extracellular level of d-alanine increased to 11.5 mM and 8.5 mM, respectively, under similar conditions, suggesting that increased metabolic flow from l-alanine to d-alanine enhanced d-alanine secretion. When high-density DadA-deficient cells preloaded with l-Ala-l-Ala were treated with 20 µM carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP), secretion of both l-alanine and d-alanine was enhanced ~twofold compared with that in cells without CCCP treatment. In contrast, the ATPase inhibitor dicyclohexylcarbodiimide did not exert such an effect on the l-alanine and d-alanine secretion. Furthermore, inverted membrane vesicles prepared from DadA-deficient cells lacking the l-alanine exporter AlaE accumulated [3H]D-alanine in an energy-dependent manner. This energy-dependent accumulation of [3H]D-alanine was strongly inhibited by CCCP. These results indicate that E. coli has a transport system(s) that exports d-alanine and that this function is most likely modulated by proton electrochemical potential. PMID:27166225

  4. C-terminal Domains of N-Methyl-d-aspartic Acid Receptor Modulate Unitary Channel Conductance and Gating*

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Bruce A.; Aman, Teresa K.; Amico-Ruvio, Stacy A.; Kussius, Cassandra L.; Popescu, Gabriela K.

    2012-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NRs) are glutamate-gated calcium-permeable channels that are essential for normal synaptic transmssion and contribute to neurodegeneration. Tetrameric proteins consist of two obligatory GluN1 (N1) and two GluN2 (N2) subunits, of which GluN2A (2A) and GluN2B (2B) are prevalent in adult brain. The intracellularly located C-terminal domains (CTDs) make a significant portion of mass of the receptors and are essential for plasticity and excitotoxicity, but their functions are incompletely defined. Recent evidence shows that truncation of the N2 CTD alters channel kinetics; however, the mechanism by which this occurs is unclear. Here we recorded activity from individual NRs lacking the CTDs of N1, 2A, or 2B and determined the gating mechanisms of these receptors. Receptors lacking the N1 CTDs had larger unitary conductance and faster deactivation kinetics, receptors lacking the 2A or 2B CTDs had longer openings and longer desensitized intervals, and the first 100 amino acids of the N2 CTD were essential for these changes. In addition, receptors lacking the CTDs of either 2A or 2B maintained isoform-specific kinetic differences and swapping CTDs between 2A and 2B had no effect on single-channel properties. Based on these results, we suggest that perturbations in the CTD can modify the NR-mediated signal in a subunit-dependent manner, in 2A these effects are most likely mediated by membrane-proximal residues, and the isoform-specific biophysical properties conferred by 2A and 2B are CTD-independent. The kinetic mechanisms we developed afford a quantitative approach to understanding how the intracellular domains of NR subunits can modulate the responses of the receptor. PMID:22948148

  5. Aspartate-containing neurons of the brainstem and rostral spinal cord of the sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus: distribution and comparison with γ-aminobutyric acid.

    PubMed

    Villar-Cerviño, Verona; Fernández-López, Blanca; Rodicio, María Celina; Anadón, Ramón

    2014-04-15

    The amino acid L-aspartate (ASP) is one of the most abundant excitatory neurotransmitters in the mammalian brain, but its distribution in other vertebrates has not yet been well characterized. We investigated the distribution of ASP in the brainstem and rostral spinal cord of the adult sea lamprey by using ASP immunohistochemistry. Our results indicate that ASP is accumulated in specific neurons, but not in glia (tanycytes). ASP-immunoreactive neuronal populations were rather similar as the glutamatergic populations reported in the adult sea lamprey (Villar-Cerviño et al. [2013] J Comp Neurol 521:522-557), although some important differences were noted. Characteristically, the largest reticular neurons of the lamprey brainstem (Müller cells) showed ASP immunoreactivity in perikarya and processes, in contrast to the absence or faint glutamate immunoreactivity reported in these perikarya. We also compared the distribution of ASP and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in brainstem neurons by using double immunofluorescence methods. In regions such as the midbrain tectum, dorsal isthmus, and motor nuclei, ASP and GABA immunoreactivity was mostly located in different neurons, whereas in other nuclei (torus semicircularis, octavolateralis area, parvocellular reticular formation), many of the ASP-immunonegative neurons displayed colocalization with GABA. These results, together with those of our previous studies of colocalization of glutamate and GABA, suggest that some lamprey neurons may co-release both excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters. Further investigation is needed to elucidate the pathways of uptake and release of ASP by ASP-immunoreactive neurons. Our results indicate that ASP is a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system representative of agnathans, the earliest vertebrate group.

  6. Unusual Nonterrestrial L-proteinogenic Amino Acid excesses in the Tagish Lake Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Burton, Aaron S.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Hilts, Robert W.; Herd, D. K.

    2012-01-01

    The distribution and isotopic and enantiomeric compositions of amino acids found in three distinct fragments of the Tagish Lake C2-type carbonaceous chondrite were investigated via liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry and gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Large L-enantiomeric excesses (L(sub ee) approximately 43-59%) of the alpha-hydrogen aspartic and glutamic amino acids were measured in Tagish Lake, whereas alanine, another alpha hydrogen protein amino acid, was found to be nearly racemic (D much approximately L) using both techniques. Carbon isotope measurements of D- and L-aspartic acid and 1)- and L-alanine in Tagish Lake fall well outside of the terrestrial range and indicate that the measured aspartic acid enantioenrichment is indigenous to the meteorite. Alternate explanations for the L-excesses of aspartic acid such as interference from other compounds present in the sample, analytical biases, or terrestrial amino acid contamination were investigated and rejected. These results can be explained by differences in the solid-solution phase behavior of aspartic acid, which can form conglomerate enantiopure solids during crystallization, and alanine, which can only form racemic crystals. Amplification of a small initial L-enantiomer excess during aqueous alteration on the meteorite parent body could have led to the large L-enrichments observed for aspartic acid and other conglomerate amino acids in Tagish Lake. The detection of non terrestrial L-proteinogenic amino acid excesses in the Tagish Lake meteorite provides support for the hypothesis that significant enantiomeric enrichments for some amino acids could form by abiotic processes prior to the emergence of life.

  7. Knockdown of a putative alanine aminotransferase gene affects amino acid content and flight capacity in the Colorado potato beetle Leptinotarsa decemlineata.

    PubMed

    Wan, Pin-Jun; Fu, Kai-Yun; Lü, Feng-Gong; Guo, Wen-Chao; Li, Guo-Qing

    2015-07-01

    Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) plays important physiological and biochemical roles in insect. In this study, a full-length Ldalt cDNA was cloned from Leptinotarsa decemlineata. It was ubiquitously expressed in the eggs, larvae, pupae and adults. In the adults, Ldalt mRNA was widely distributed in thorax muscles, fat body, midgut, foregut, hindgut, Malpighian tubules, ventral ganglion and epidermis, with the expression levels from the highest to the lowest. Two double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) (dsLdalt1 and dsLdalt2) targeting Ldalt were constructed and bacterially expressed. After adults fed on dsLdalt1- and dsLdalt2-immersed foliage for 3 day, Ldalt mRNA abundance was significantly decreased by 79.5 and 71.1 %, and ALT activities were significantly reduced by 64.5 and 67.6 %, respectively. Moreover, silencing Ldalt affected free amino acid contents. Lysine was decreased by 100.0 and 100.0 %, and arginine was reduced by 87.5 and 89.4 %, respectively, in the hemolymph from dsLdalt1- and dsLdalt2-ingested beetles, compared with control ones. In contrast, proline was increased by 88.7 and 96.4 %. Furthermore, ingestion of dsLdalt1 and dsLdalt2 significantly decreased flight speed, shortened flight duration time and flight distance. In addition, knocking down Ldalt significantly increased adult mortality. These data imply that LdALT plays important roles in amino acid metabolism and in flight in L. decemlineata.

  8. Knockdown of a putative alanine aminotransferase gene affects amino acid content and flight capacity in the Colorado potato beetle Leptinotarsa decemlineata.

    PubMed

    Wan, Pin-Jun; Fu, Kai-Yun; Lü, Feng-Gong; Guo, Wen-Chao; Li, Guo-Qing

    2015-07-01

    Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) plays important physiological and biochemical roles in insect. In this study, a full-length Ldalt cDNA was cloned from Leptinotarsa decemlineata. It was ubiquitously expressed in the eggs, larvae, pupae and adults. In the adults, Ldalt mRNA was widely distributed in thorax muscles, fat body, midgut, foregut, hindgut, Malpighian tubules, ventral ganglion and epidermis, with the expression levels from the highest to the lowest. Two double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) (dsLdalt1 and dsLdalt2) targeting Ldalt were constructed and bacterially expressed. After adults fed on dsLdalt1- and dsLdalt2-immersed foliage for 3 day, Ldalt mRNA abundance was significantly decreased by 79.5 and 71.1 %, and ALT activities were significantly reduced by 64.5 and 67.6 %, respectively. Moreover, silencing Ldalt affected free amino acid contents. Lysine was decreased by 100.0 and 100.0 %, and arginine was reduced by 87.5 and 89.4 %, respectively, in the hemolymph from dsLdalt1- and dsLdalt2-ingested beetles, compared with control ones. In contrast, proline was increased by 88.7 and 96.4 %. Furthermore, ingestion of dsLdalt1 and dsLdalt2 significantly decreased flight speed, shortened flight duration time and flight distance. In addition, knocking down Ldalt significantly increased adult mortality. These data imply that LdALT plays important roles in amino acid metabolism and in flight in L. decemlineata. PMID:25868655

  9. Synthesis, CMC Determination, Antimicrobial Activity and Nucleic Acid Binding of A Surfactant Copper(II) Complex Containing Phenanthroline and Alanine Schiff-Base.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Karuppiah; Sakthinathan, Subramanian; Arunachalam, Sankaralingam

    2014-03-01

    A new water-soluble surfactant copper(II) complex [Cu(sal-ala)(phen)(DA)] (sal-ala = salicylalanine, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, DA = dodecylamine), has been synthesized and characterized by physico-chemical and spectroscopic methods. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) values of this surfactant-copper(II) complex in aqueous solution were obtained from conductance measurements. Specific conductivity data (at 303, 308, 313. 318 and 323 K) served for the evaluation of the temperature-dependent CMC and the thermodynamics of micellization (ΔG(0)m, ΔH(0)m and ΔS(0)m). The interaction of this complex with nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) has been explored by using electronic absorption spectral titration, competitive binding experiment, cyclic voltammetry, circular dichroism (CD) spectra, and viscosity measurements. Electronic absorption studies have revealed that the complex can bind to nucleic acids by the intercalative binding mode which has been verified by viscosity measurements. The DNA binding constants have also been calculated (Kb = 1.2 × 10(5) M(-1) for DNA and Kb = 1.6 × 10(5) M(-1) for RNA). Competitive binding study with ethidium bromide (EB) showed that the complex exhibits the ability to displace the DNA-bound-EB indicating that the complex binds to DNA in strong competition with EB for the intercalative binding site. The presence of hydrophobic ligands, alanine Schiff-base, phenanthroline and long aliphatic chain amine in the complex were responsible for this strong intercalative binding. The surfactant-copper (II) complex was screened for its antibacterial and antifungal activities against various microorganisms. The results were compared with the standard drugs, amikacin(antibacterial) and ketokonazole(antifungal).

  10. Asymmetric Synthesis of Chiral α-Methyl-α,β-diamino Acid Derivatives via Group-Assisted Purification Chemistry Using N-Phosphonyl Imines and a Ni(II)-Complexed Alanine Schiff Base.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haowei; Yang, Bing; Yang, Zhen; Lu, Hongjian; Li, Guigen

    2016-09-01

    The Mannich reaction between chiral N-phosphonyl imines and a Ni(II)-complexed alanine Schiff base (Ala-Ni) is reported. With a chiral phosphonyl auxiliary, a single isomer of α-methyl-α,β-diamino acid derivative containing vicinal chiral centers, including a chiral quaternary carbon center, can be obtained simply by washing the crude mixture with cosolvents. The absolute stereochemistry of the enantiomerically pure product has been unambiguously determined by X-ray crystallographic analysis. PMID:27459278

  11. Microsecond Deprotonation of Aspartic Acid and Response of the α/β Subdomain Precede C-Terminal Signaling in the Blue Light Sensor Plant Cryptochrome.

    PubMed

    Thöing, Christian; Oldemeyer, Sabine; Kottke, Tilman

    2015-05-13

    Plant cryptochromes are photosensory receptors that regulate various central aspects of plant growth and development. These receptors consist of a photolyase homology region (PHR) carrying the oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor, and a cryptochrome C-terminal extension (CCT), which is essential for signaling. Absorption of blue/UVA light leads to formation of the FAD neutral radical as the likely signaling state, and ultimately activates the CCT. Little is known about the signal transfer from the flavin to the CCT. Here, we investigated the photoreaction of the PHR by time-resolved step-scan FT-IR spectroscopy complemented by UV-vis spectroscopy. The first spectrum at 500 ns shows major contributions from the FAD anion radical, which is demonstrated to then be protonated by aspartic acid 396 to the neutral radical within 3.5 μs. The analysis revealed the existence of three intermediates characterized by changes in secondary structure. A marked loss of β-sheet structure is observed in the second intermediate evolving with a time constant of 500 μs. This change is accompanied by a conversion of a tyrosine residue, which is identified as the formation of a tyrosine radical in the UV-vis. The only β-sheet in the PHR is located within the α/β subdomain, ∼25 Å away from the flavin. This subdomain has been previously attributed a role as a putative antenna binding site, but is now suggested to have evolved to a component in the signaling of plant cryptochromes by mediating the interaction with the CCT.

  12. Prazosin blocks the glutamatergic effects of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid on lordosis behavior and luteinizing hormone secretion in the estrogen-primed female rat.

    PubMed

    Landa, A I; Cabrera, R J; Gargiulo, P A

    2006-03-01

    We have observed that intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of selective N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA)-type glutamatergic receptor antagonists inhibits lordosis in ovariectomized (OVX), estrogen-primed rats receiving progesterone or luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH). When NMDA was injected into OVX estrogen-primed rats, it induced a significant increase in lordosis. The interaction between LHRH and glutamate was previously explored by us and another groups. The noradrenergic systems have a functional role in the regulation of LHRH release. The purpose of the present study was to explore the interaction between glutamatergic and noradrenergic transmission. The action of prazosin, an alpha1- and alpha2b-noradrenergic antagonist, was studied here by injecting it icv (1.75 and 3.5 microg/6 microL) prior to NMDA administration (1 microg/2 microL) in OVX estrogen-primed Sprague-Dawley rats (240-270 g). Rats manually restrained were injected over a period of 2 min, and tested 1.5 h later. The enhancing effect induced by NMDA on the lordosis/mount ratio at high doses (67.06 +/- 3.28, N = 28) when compared to saline controls (6 and 2 microL, 16.59 +/- 3.20, N = 27) was abolished by prazosin administration (17.04 +/- 5.52, N = 17, and 9.33 +/- 3.21, N = 20, P < 0.001 for both doses). Plasma LH levels decreased significantly only with the higher dose of prazosin (1.99 +/- 0.24 ng/mL, N = 18, compared to saline-NMDA effect, 5.96 +/- 2.01 ng/mL, N = 13, P < 0.05). Behavioral effects seem to be more sensitive to the alpha-blockade than hormonal effects. These findings strongly suggest that the facilitatory effects of NMDA on both lordosis and LH secretion in this model are mediated by alpha-noradrenergic transmission.

  13. L-alanine uptake in membrane vesicles from Mytilus edulis gills

    SciTech Connect

    Pajor, A.M.; Wright, S.H.

    1986-03-05

    Previous studies have shown that gills from M. edulis can accumulate L-alanine from seawater by a saturable process specific for ..cap alpha..-neutral amino acids. This uptake occurs against chemical gradients in excess of 10/sup 6/ to 1. To further characterize this uptake, membrane vesicles were prepared from M. edulis gill tissue by differential centrifugation. Enrichments of putative enzyme markers (relative to that in combined initial fractions) were as follows: ..gamma..-Glutamyltranspeptidase, 25-30x; Alkaline Phosphatase, 5-6x; K/sup +/-dependent para-Nitrophenyl Phosphatase, 3-5x; Succinate Dehydrogenase 0.1-0.2x. These results suggest that the preparation is enriched in plasma membranes, although histochemical studies will be needed to verify this. The time course of /sup 14/C-L-alanine uptake in the presence of inwardly-directed Na/sup +/ gradient showed a transient overshoot (3-5 fold) at 10 minutes which decreased to equilibrium after six hours. The size of the overshoot and early uptake rates depended on the size of the inwardly-directed Na/sup +/ gradient. No overshoot was seen in the presence of inwardly-directed gradients of LiCl or choline-Cl, or with equilibrium concentrations NaCl or mannitol. A reduced overshoot was seen with a gradient of NaSCN. A small overshoot was seen with an inwardly-directed gradient of KCl. Transport of L-alanine included saturable and diffusive components. Uptake of 6 ..mu..M L-alanine was inhibited more than 80% by 100 ..mu..M ..cap alpha..-zwitterionic amino acids (alanine, leucine, glycine); by 30 to 75% by proline, aspartate and lysine; and less than 20% by a ..beta..-amino acid, taurine. The results of these experiments agree with those from intact gill studies and support the hypothesis that L-alanine is transported into gill epithelial cells by a secondary active transport process involving Na/sup +/.

  14. β-Alanine does not act through branched-chain amino acid catabolism in carp, a species with low muscular carnosine storage.

    PubMed

    Geda, F; Declercq, A; Decostere, A; Lauwaerts, A; Wuyts, B; Derave, W; Janssens, G P J

    2015-02-01

    This study was executed to investigate the effect of dietary β-alanine (BA) on amino acid (AA) metabolism and voluntary feed intake in carp (Cyprinus carpio) at mildly elevated temperature to exert AA catabolism. Twenty-four fish in 12 aquaria were randomly assigned to either a control diet or the same diet with 500 mg BA/kg. A 14-day period at an ideal temperature (23 °C) was followed by 15 days at chronic mildly elevated temperature (27 °C). After the 15 days, all fish were euthanised for muscle analysis on histidine-containing dipeptides (HCD), whole blood on free AA and carnitine esters. The carnosine and anserine analysis indicated that all analyses were below the detection limit of 5 µmol/L, confirming that carp belongs to a species that does not store HCD. The increases in free AA concentrations due to BA supplementation failed to reach the level of significance. The effects of dietary BA on selected whole blood carnitine esters and their ratios were also not significant. The supplementation of BA tended to increase body weight gain (P = 0.081) and feed intake (P = 0.092). The lack of differences in the selected nutrient metabolites in combination with tendencies of improved growth performance warrants further investigation to unravel the mechanism of BA affecting feed intake. This first trial on the effect of BA supplementation on AA catabolism showed that its metabolic effect in carp at chronic mildly elevated temperature was very limited. Further studies need to evaluate which conditions are able to exert an effect of BA on AA metabolism.

  15. The Chaperoning Activity of Amino-oxyacetic Acid on Folding-Defective Variants of Human Alanine:Glyoxylate Aminotransferase Causing Primary Hyperoxaluria Type I.

    PubMed

    Oppici, Elisa; Montioli, Riccardo; Dindo, Mirco; Maccari, Laura; Porcari, Valentina; Lorenzetto, Antonio; Chellini, Sara; Voltattorni, Carla Borri; Cellini, Barbara

    2015-10-16

    The rare disease Primary Hyperoxaluria Type I (PH1) results from the deficit of liver peroxisomal alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT), as a consequence of inherited mutations on the AGXT gene frequently leading to protein misfolding. Pharmacological chaperone (PC) therapy is a newly developed approach for misfolding diseases based on the use of small molecule ligands able to promote the correct folding of a mutant enzyme. In this report, we describe the interaction of amino-oxyacetic acid (AOA) with the recombinant purified form of two polymorphic species of AGT, AGT-Ma and AGT-Mi, and with three pathogenic variants bearing previously identified folding defects: G41R-Ma, G170R-Mi, and I244T-Mi. We found that for all these enzyme AOA (i) forms an oxime at the active site, (ii) behaves as a slow, tight-binding inhibitor with KI values in the nanomolar range, and (iii) increases the thermal stability. Furthermore, experiments performed in mammalian cells revealed that AOA acts as a PC by partly preventing the intracellular aggregation of G41R-Ma and by promoting the correct peroxisomal import of G170R-Mi and I244T-Mi. Based on these data, we carried out a small-scale screening campaign. We identified four AOA analogues acting as AGT inhibitors, even if only one was found to act as a PC. The possible relationship between the structure and the PC activity of these compounds is discussed. Altogether, these results provide the proof-of-principle for the feasibility of a therapy with PCs for PH1-causing variants bearing folding defects and provide the scaffold for the identification of more specific ligands. PMID:26161999

  16. β-Alanine does not act through branched-chain amino acid catabolism in carp, a species with low muscular carnosine storage.

    PubMed

    Geda, F; Declercq, A; Decostere, A; Lauwaerts, A; Wuyts, B; Derave, W; Janssens, G P J

    2015-02-01

    This study was executed to investigate the effect of dietary β-alanine (BA) on amino acid (AA) metabolism and voluntary feed intake in carp (Cyprinus carpio) at mildly elevated temperature to exert AA catabolism. Twenty-four fish in 12 aquaria were randomly assigned to either a control diet or the same diet with 500 mg BA/kg. A 14-day period at an ideal temperature (23 °C) was followed by 15 days at chronic mildly elevated temperature (27 °C). After the 15 days, all fish were euthanised for muscle analysis on histidine-containing dipeptides (HCD), whole blood on free AA and carnitine esters. The carnosine and anserine analysis indicated that all analyses were below the detection limit of 5 µmol/L, confirming that carp belongs to a species that does not store HCD. The increases in free AA concentrations due to BA supplementation failed to reach the level of significance. The effects of dietary BA on selected whole blood carnitine esters and their ratios were also not significant. The supplementation of BA tended to increase body weight gain (P = 0.081) and feed intake (P = 0.092). The lack of differences in the selected nutrient metabolites in combination with tendencies of improved growth performance warrants further investigation to unravel the mechanism of BA affecting feed intake. This first trial on the effect of BA supplementation on AA catabolism showed that its metabolic effect in carp at chronic mildly elevated temperature was very limited. Further studies need to evaluate which conditions are able to exert an effect of BA on AA metabolism. PMID:25549626

  17. Secreted fungal aspartic proteases: A review.

    PubMed

    Mandujano-González, Virginia; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes; Anducho-Reyes, Miguel Angel; Mercado-Flores, Yuridia

    2016-01-01

    The aspartic proteases, also called aspartyl and aspartate proteases or acid proteases (E.C.3.4.23), belong to the endopeptidase family and are characterized by the conserved sequence Asp-Gly-Thr at the active site. These enzymes are found in a wide variety of microorganisms in which they perform important functions related to nutrition and pathogenesis. In addition, their high activity and stability at acid pH make them attractive for industrial application in the food industry; specifically, they are used as milk-coagulating agents in cheese production or serve to improve the taste of some foods. This review presents an analysis of the characteristics and properties of secreted microbial aspartic proteases and their potential for commercial application. PMID:27137097

  18. Secreted fungal aspartic proteases: A review.

    PubMed

    Mandujano-González, Virginia; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes; Anducho-Reyes, Miguel Angel; Mercado-Flores, Yuridia

    2016-01-01

    The aspartic proteases, also called aspartyl and aspartate proteases or acid proteases (E.C.3.4.23), belong to the endopeptidase family and are characterized by the conserved sequence Asp-Gly-Thr at the active site. These enzymes are found in a wide variety of microorganisms in which they perform important functions related to nutrition and pathogenesis. In addition, their high activity and stability at acid pH make them attractive for industrial application in the food industry; specifically, they are used as milk-coagulating agents in cheese production or serve to improve the taste of some foods. This review presents an analysis of the characteristics and properties of secreted microbial aspartic proteases and their potential for commercial application.

  19. Dataset of cocoa aspartic protease cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Janek, Katharina; Niewienda, Agathe; Wöstemeyer, Johannes; Voigt, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    The data provide information in support of the research article, "The cleavage specificity of the aspartic protease of cocoa beans involved in the generation of the cocoa-specific aroma precursors" (Janek et al., 2016) [1]. Three different protein substrates were partially digested with the aspartic protease isolated from cocoa beans and commercial pepsin, respectively. The obtained peptide fragments were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS) and identified using the MASCOT server. The N- and C-terminal ends of the peptide fragments were used to identify the corresponding in-vitro cleavage sites by comparison with the amino acid sequences of the substrate proteins. The same procedure was applied to identify the cleavage sites used by the cocoa aspartic protease during cocoa fermentation starting from the published amino acid sequences of oligopeptides isolated from fermented cocoa beans. PMID:27508221

  20. Prebiotic Synthesis of Hydrophobic and Protein Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Ring, David; Wolman, Yecheskel; Friedmann, Nadav; Miller, Stanley L.

    1972-01-01

    The formation of amino acids by the action of electric discharges on a mixture of methane, nitrogen, and water with traces of ammonia was studied in detail. The presence of glycine, alanine, α-amino-n-butyric acid, α-aminoisobutyric acid, valine, norvaline, isovaline, leucine, isoleucine, alloisoleucine, norleucine, proline, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, threonine, allothreonine, α-hydroxy-γ-aminobutyric acid, and α,γ-diaminobutyric acid was confirmed by ion-exchange chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. All of the primary α-amino acids found in the Murchison Meteorite have been synthesized by this electric discharge experiment. PMID:4501592

  1. Cysteine Substitution of Transmembrane Domain Amino Acids Alters the Ethanol Inhibition of GluN1/GluN2A N-Methyl-d-Aspartate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Minfu; Smothers, C. Thetford

    2015-01-01

    N-Methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are inhibited by behaviorally relevant concentrations of ethanol, and residues within transmembrane (TM) domains of NMDARs, including TM3 GluN1 phenylalanine 639 (F639), regulate this sensitivity. In the present study, we used cysteine (C) mutagenesis to determine whether there are additional residues within nearby TM domains that regulate ethanol inhibition on NMDARs. GluN1(F639C)/GluN2A receptors were less inhibited by ethanol than wild-type receptors, and inhibition was restored to wild-type levels following treatment with ethanol-like methanethiosulfonate reagents. Molecular modeling identified six residues in the GluN1 TM1 domain (valine V566; serine S569) and the GluN2A TM4 domain (methionine, M817; V820, F821, and leucine, L824) that were in close vicinity to the TM3 F639 residue, and these were individually mutated to cysteine and tested for ethanol inhibition and receptor function. The F639C-induced decrease in ethanol inhibition was blunted by coexpression of GluN1 TM1 mutants V566C and S569C, and statistically significant interactions were observed for ethanol inhibition among V566C, F639C, and GluN2A TM4 mutants V820C and F821C and S569C, F639C, and GluN2A TM4 mutants F821C and L824C. Ethanol inhibition was also reduced when either GluN1 TM1 mutant V566C or S569C was combined with GluN2A V820C, suggesting a novel TM1:TM4 intrasubunit site of action for ethanol. Cysteines substituted at TM3 and TM4 sites previously suggested to interact with ethanol had less dramatic effects on ethanol inhibition. Overall, the results from these studies suggest that interactions among TM1, TM3, and TM4 amino acids in NMDARs are important determinants of ethanol action at these receptors. PMID:25635140

  2. Vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) transports β-alanine.

    PubMed

    Juge, Narinobu; Omote, Hiroshi; Moriyama, Yoshinori

    2013-11-01

    Vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) is expressed in GABAergic and glycinergic neurons, and is responsible for vesicular storage and subsequent exocytosis of these inhibitory amino acids. In this study, we show that VGAT recognizes β-alanine as a substrate. Proteoliposomes containing purified VGAT transport β-alanine using Δψ but not ΔpH as a driving force. The Δψ-driven β-alanine uptake requires Cl(-). VGAT also facilitates Cl(-) uptake in the presence of β-alanine. A previously described VGAT mutant (Glu213Ala) that disrupts GABA and glycine transport similarly abrogates β-alanine uptake. These findings indicated that VGAT transports β-alanine through a mechanism similar to those for GABA and glycine, and functions as a vesicular β-alanine transporter. Vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) is expressed in GABAergic and glycinergic neurons, and is responsible for vesicular storage and subsequent exocytosis of these inhibitory amino acids. In the present study, we showed that proteoliposomes containing purified VGAT transport β-alanine using Δψ as a driving force. VGAT also facilitates Cl(-) uptake. Our findings indicated that VGAT functions as a vesicular β-alanine transporter.

  3. Identification of glutamic acid 204 and aspartic acid 200 in chitinase A1 of Bacillus circulans WL-12 as essential residues for chitinase activity.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Kobori, K; Miyashita, K; Fujii, T; Sakai, H; Uchida, M; Tanaka, H

    1993-09-01

    Prokaryotic chitinases, class III plant chitinases, yeast chitinases, and endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidases share weak amino acid sequence similarities at the certain region of each enzyme. These regions have been assumed to be important for catalytic activities of the enzymes. To verify this assumption, three amino acid residues (Ser-160, Asp-200, Glu-204) in chitinase A1 of Bacillus circulans WL-12 were chosen, based on the amino acid sequence alignment of the regions sharing sequence similarity, and were replaced by site-directed mutagenesis. Kinetic parameters for 4-methylumbelliferyl-N,N',N"-triacetylchitotriose hydrolysis were determined with wild-type and seven mutant chitinases. Chitinases with Glu-204-->Gln mutation and Glu-204-->Asp mutation were essentially inactive and kcat values of these chitinases were approximately 1/5,000 and 1/17,000 of that of wild-type chitinase, respectively. Asp-200-->Asn mutation decreased the kcat value to approximately 1/350 of that of the wild-type enzyme, while the Km value decreased only slightly. On the other hand, neither the kcat value nor the Km value was affected by Asp-200-->Glu mutation. Thus, it appeared that Glu-204 and Asp-200 are directly involved in the catalytic events of chitinase A1. The role of the carboxyl group of Asp-200 can be fully substituted by that of Glu residue. The Ser-160-->Ala mutant retained 10% activity of the wild-type chitinase indicating that the hydroxyl group of Ser-160 is not absolutely required for the catalytic activity. These results indicate a lysozyme-type catalytic mechanism of the chitinase.

  4. Aspartate carbamoyltransferase from rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Bresnick, E.; Mossé, Helena

    1966-01-01

    1. Aspartate-carbamoyltransferase activity was concentrated from rat-liver preparations. Only l-aspartate, β-benzyl-l-aspartate and β-erythro-hydroxy-dl-aspartate were carbamoylated enzymically. The Km for l-aspartate and carbamoyl phosphate have been determined by three methods: colorimetric procedure, radioactive assay with [14C]aspartate and an assay with [14C]carbamoyl phosphate. 2. The Km for aspartate has been determined as a function of the pH; the pK of the functional group at the active site of the enzyme, pKe, was at pH9·0. Enzymic activity was diminished in the presence of N-ethylmaleimide, p-hydroxymercuribenzoate and the heavy metals Ag+, Hg2+, or Zn2+. The inhibitions could be prevented by mercaptoethanol. These findings suggested the association of a thiol group with the enzymic activity. 3. Enzymic activity was also decreased by sodium lauryl sulphate, urea and dioxan. Competitive inhibition (with l-aspartate) was manifested by maleate, succinate, oxaloacetate, β-erythro-hydroxy-dl-aspartate and β-benzyl-l-aspartate. The Ki for most of these inhibitions has been determined. 4. The properties of the liver enzyme are compared with those of Escherichia coli aspartate carbamoyltransferase and the implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:5339547

  5. Infrared Spectroscopy of Alanine in Solid Parahydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toh, Shin Yi; Wong, Ying-Tung Angel; Djuricanin, Pavle; Momose, Takamasa

    2014-06-01

    Amino acids are the building blocks of biological molecules, and thus the investigation of their physical and chemical properties would allow for further understanding of their functions in biological systems. In addition, the existence of amino acids in interstellar space has been discussed for many years, but it is still under intense debate. The effect of UV radiation on amino acids is one of the keys for their search in interstellar space, where strong UV radiation exists. In this experiment, conformational compositions of alpha and beta alanine and their UV photolysis were investigated via matrix-isolation FTIR spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. Solid parahydrogen was used as the matrix, which provides higher resolution spectra than other noble gas matrices. We have identified several stable conformers for both alpha and beta alanine in solid parahydrogen. A clear correlation between conformational ratio and sublimation temperature was found for beta alanine. Furthermore, it was found that UV photolysis of alanine yields not only its conformational changes, but also photodissociation into a CO2 molecule and fragments. Observed spectra and their analysis will be discussed in relation to interstellar chemistry.

  6. Beta-alanine as a small molecule neurotransmitter.

    PubMed

    Tiedje, K E; Stevens, K; Barnes, S; Weaver, D F

    2010-10-01

    This review discusses the role of beta-alanine as a neurotransmitter. Beta-alanine is structurally intermediate between alpha-amino acid (glycine, glutamate) and gamma-amino acid (GABA) neurotransmitters. In general, beta-alanine satisfies a number of the prerequisite classical criteria for being a neurotransmitter: beta-alanine occurs naturally in the CNS, is released by electrical stimulation through a Ca(2+) dependent process, has binding sites, and inhibits neuronal excitability. beta-Alanine has 5 recognized receptor sites: glycine co-agonist site on the NMDA complex (strychnine-insensitive); glycine receptor site (strychnine sensitive); GABA-A receptor; GABA-C receptor; and blockade of GAT protein-mediated glial GABA uptake. Although beta-alanine binding has been identified throughout the hippocampus, limbic structures, and neocortex, unique beta-alaninergic neurons with no GABAergic properties remain unidentified, and it is impossible to discriminate between beta-alaninergic and GABAergic properties in the CNS. Nevertheless, a variety of data suggest that beta-alanine should be considered as a small molecule neurotransmitter and should join the ranks of the other amino acid neurotransmitters. These realizations open the door for a more comprehensive evaluation of beta-alanine's neurochemistry and for its exploitation as a platform for drug design.

  7. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of a Copper-Binding Mutant of the Organomercurial Lyase MerB: Insight into the Key Role of the Active Site Aspartic Acid in Hg-Carbon Bond Cleavage and Metal Binding Specificity.

    PubMed

    Wahba, Haytham M; Lecoq, Lauriane; Stevenson, Michael; Mansour, Ahmed; Cappadocia, Laurent; Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien; Wilkinson, Kevin J; Sygusch, Jurgen; Wilcox, Dean E; Omichinski, James G

    2016-02-23

    In bacterial resistance to mercury, the organomercurial lyase (MerB) plays a key role in the detoxification pathway through its ability to cleave Hg-carbon bonds. Two cysteines (C96 and C159; Escherichia coli MerB numbering) and an aspartic acid (D99) have been identified as the key catalytic residues, and these three residues are conserved in all but four known MerB variants, where the aspartic acid is replaced with a serine. To understand the role of the active site serine, we characterized the structure and metal binding properties of an E. coli MerB mutant with a serine substituted for D99 (MerB D99S) as well as one of the native MerB variants containing a serine residue in the active site (Bacillus megaterium MerB2). Surprisingly, the MerB D99S protein copurified with a bound metal that was determined to be Cu(II) from UV-vis absorption, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, and electron paramagnetic resonance studies. X-ray structural studies revealed that the Cu(II) is bound to the active site cysteine residues of MerB D99S, but that it is displaced following the addition of either an organomercurial substrate or an ionic mercury product. In contrast, the B. megaterium MerB2 protein does not copurify with copper, but the structure of the B. megaterium MerB2-Hg complex is highly similar to the structure of the MerB D99S-Hg complexes. These results demonstrate that the active site aspartic acid is crucial for both the enzymatic activity and metal binding specificity of MerB proteins and suggest a possible functional relationship between MerB and its only known structural homologue, the copper-binding protein NosL. PMID:26820485

  8. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of a Copper-Binding Mutant of the Organomercurial Lyase MerB: Insight into the Key Role of the Active Site Aspartic Acid in Hg-Carbon Bond Cleavage and Metal Binding Specificity.

    PubMed

    Wahba, Haytham M; Lecoq, Lauriane; Stevenson, Michael; Mansour, Ahmed; Cappadocia, Laurent; Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien; Wilkinson, Kevin J; Sygusch, Jurgen; Wilcox, Dean E; Omichinski, James G

    2016-02-23

    In bacterial resistance to mercury, the organomercurial lyase (MerB) plays a key role in the detoxification pathway through its ability to cleave Hg-carbon bonds. Two cysteines (C96 and C159; Escherichia coli MerB numbering) and an aspartic acid (D99) have been identified as the key catalytic residues, and these three residues are conserved in all but four known MerB variants, where the aspartic acid is replaced with a serine. To understand the role of the active site serine, we characterized the structure and metal binding properties of an E. coli MerB mutant with a serine substituted for D99 (MerB D99S) as well as one of the native MerB variants containing a serine residue in the active site (Bacillus megaterium MerB2). Surprisingly, the MerB D99S protein copurified with a bound metal that was determined to be Cu(II) from UV-vis absorption, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, and electron paramagnetic resonance studies. X-ray structural studies revealed that the Cu(II) is bound to the active site cysteine residues of MerB D99S, but that it is displaced following the addition of either an organomercurial substrate or an ionic mercury product. In contrast, the B. megaterium MerB2 protein does not copurify with copper, but the structure of the B. megaterium MerB2-Hg complex is highly similar to the structure of the MerB D99S-Hg complexes. These results demonstrate that the active site aspartic acid is crucial for both the enzymatic activity and metal binding specificity of MerB proteins and suggest a possible functional relationship between MerB and its only known structural homologue, the copper-binding protein NosL.

  9. Detection of non-protein amino acids in the presence of protein amino acids. II.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapshak, P.; Okaji, M.

    1972-01-01

    Studies conducted with the JEOL 5AH amino acid analyzer are described. This instrument makes possible the programming of the chromatographic process. Data are presented showing the separations of seventeen non-protein amino acids in the presence of eighteen protein amino acids. It is pointed out that distinct separations could be obtained in the case of a number of chemically similar compounds, such as ornithine and lysine, N-amidino alanine and arginine, and iminodiacetic acid and S-carboxymethyl cysteine and aspartic acid.

  10. Experimental and computational thermochemical study of α-alanine (DL) and β-alanine.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Manuel A V Ribeiro; da Silva, Maria das Dores M C Ribeiro; Santos, Ana Filipa L O M; Roux, Maria Victoria; Foces-Foces, Concepción; Notario, Rafael; Guzmán-Mejía, Ramón; Juaristi, Eusebio

    2010-12-16

    This paper reports an experimental and theoretical study of the gas phase standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpies of formation, at T = 298.15 K, of α-alanine (DL) and β-alanine. The standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpies of formation of crystalline α-alanine (DL) and β-alanine were calculated from the standard molar energies of combustion, in oxygen, to yield CO2(g), N2(g), and H2O(l), measured by static-bomb combustion calorimetry at T = 298.15 K. The vapor pressures of both amino acids were measured as function of temperature by the Knudsen effusion mass-loss technique. The standard molar enthalpies of sublimation at T = 298.15 K was derived from the Clausius−Clapeyron equation. The experimental values were used to calculate the standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) enthalpy of formation of α-alanine (DL) and β-alanine in the gaseous phase, Δ(f)H(m)°(g), as −426.3 ± 2.9 and −421.2 ± 1.9 kJ·mol(−1), respectively. Standard ab initio molecular orbital calculations at the G3 level were performed. Enthalpies of formation, using atomization reactions, were calculated and compared with experimental data. Detailed inspections of the molecular and electronic structures of the compounds studied were carried out.

  11. On the abiotic formation of amino acids. I - HCN as a precursor of amino acids detected in extracts of lunar samples. II - Formation of HCN and amino acids from simulated mixtures of gases released from lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuasa, S.; Flory, D.; Basile, B.; Oro, J.

    1984-01-01

    Two studies on the abiotic formation of amino acids are presented. The first study demonstrates the role of hydrogen cyanide as a precursor of amino acids detected in extracts of lunar samples. The formation of several amino acids, including glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid, under conditions similar to those used for the analysis of lunar samples is demonstrated. The second study investigates the formation of hydrogen cyanide as well as amino acids from lunar-sample gas mixtures under electrical discharge conditions. These results extend the possibility of synthesis of amino acids to planetary bodies with primordial atmospheres less reducing than a mixture of methane, ammonia, hydrogen and water.

  12. Administration of thimerosal to infant rats increases overflow of glutamate and aspartate in the prefrontal cortex: protective role of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate.

    PubMed

    Duszczyk-Budhathoki, Michalina; Olczak, Mieszko; Lehner, Malgorzata; Majewska, Maria Dorota

    2012-02-01

    Thimerosal, a mercury-containing vaccine preservative, is a suspected factor in the etiology of neurodevelopmental disorders. We previously showed that its administration to infant rats causes behavioral, neurochemical and neuropathological abnormalities similar to those present in autism. Here we examined, using microdialysis, the effect of thimerosal on extracellular levels of neuroactive amino acids in the rat prefrontal cortex (PFC). Thimerosal administration (4 injections, i.m., 240 μg Hg/kg on postnatal days 7, 9, 11, 15) induced lasting changes in amino acid overflow: an increase of glutamate and aspartate accompanied by a decrease of glycine and alanine; measured 10-14 weeks after the injections. Four injections of thimerosal at a dose of 12.5 μg Hg/kg did not alter glutamate and aspartate concentrations at microdialysis time (but based on thimerosal pharmacokinetics, could have been effective soon after its injection). Application of thimerosal to the PFC in perfusion fluid evoked a rapid increase of glutamate overflow. Coadministration of the neurosteroid, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS; 80 mg/kg; i.p.) prevented the thimerosal effect on glutamate and aspartate; the steroid alone had no influence on these amino acids. Coapplication of DHEAS with thimerosal in perfusion fluid also blocked the acute action of thimerosal on glutamate. In contrast, DHEAS alone reduced overflow of glycine and alanine, somewhat potentiating the thimerosal effect on these amino acids. Since excessive accumulation of extracellular glutamate is linked with excitotoxicity, our data imply that neonatal exposure to thimerosal-containing vaccines might induce excitotoxic brain injuries, leading to neurodevelopmental disorders. DHEAS may partially protect against mercurials-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:22015977

  13. Comparison of EPR response of alanine and Gd₂O₃-alanine dosimeters exposed to TRIGA Mainz reactor.

    PubMed

    Marrale, M; Schmitz, T; Gallo, S; Hampel, G; Longo, A; Panzeca, S; Tranchina, L

    2015-12-01

    In this work we report some preliminary results regarding the analysis of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) response of alanine pellets and alanine pellets added with gadolinium used for dosimetry at the TRIGA research reactor in Mainz, Germany. Two set-ups were evaluated: irradiation inside PMMA phantom and irradiation inside boric acid phantom. We observed that the presence of Gd2O3 inside alanine pellets increases the EPR signal by a factor of 3.45 and 1.24 in case of PMMA and boric acid phantoms, respectively. We can conclude that in the case of neutron beam with a predominant thermal neutron component the addition of gadolinium oxide can significantly improve neutron sensitivity of alanine pellets. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of both response of alanine and Gd-added alanine pellets with FLUKA code were performed and a good agreement was achieved for pure alanine dosimeters. For Gd2O3-alanine deviations between MC simulations and experimental data were observed and discussed. PMID:26315099

  14. Comparison of EPR response of alanine and Gd₂O₃-alanine dosimeters exposed to TRIGA Mainz reactor.

    PubMed

    Marrale, M; Schmitz, T; Gallo, S; Hampel, G; Longo, A; Panzeca, S; Tranchina, L

    2015-12-01

    In this work we report some preliminary results regarding the analysis of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) response of alanine pellets and alanine pellets added with gadolinium used for dosimetry at the TRIGA research reactor in Mainz, Germany. Two set-ups were evaluated: irradiation inside PMMA phantom and irradiation inside boric acid phantom. We observed that the presence of Gd2O3 inside alanine pellets increases the EPR signal by a factor of 3.45 and 1.24 in case of PMMA and boric acid phantoms, respectively. We can conclude that in the case of neutron beam with a predominant thermal neutron component the addition of gadolinium oxide can significantly improve neutron sensitivity of alanine pellets. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of both response of alanine and Gd-added alanine pellets with FLUKA code were performed and a good agreement was achieved for pure alanine dosimeters. For Gd2O3-alanine deviations between MC simulations and experimental data were observed and discussed.

  15. A Functional dlt Operon, Encoding Proteins Required for Incorporation of d-Alanine in Teichoic Acids in Gram-Positive Bacteria, Confers Resistance to Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Márta; Halfmann, Alexander; Fedtke, Iris; Heintz, Manuel; Peschel, Andreas; Vollmer, Waldemar; Hakenbeck, Regine; Brückner, Reinhold

    2006-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the few species within the group of low-G +C gram-positive bacteria reported to contain no d-alanine in teichoic acids, although the dltABCD operon encoding proteins responsible for d-alanylation is present in the genomes of two S. pneumoniae strains, the laboratory strain R6 and the clinical isolate TIGR4. The annotation of dltA in R6 predicts a protein, d-alanine-d-alanyl carrier protein ligase (Dcl), that is shorter at the amino terminus than all other Dcl proteins. Translation of dltA could also start upstream of the annotated TTG start codon at a GTG, resulting in the premature termination of dltA translation at a stop codon. Applying a novel integrative translation probe plasmid with Escherichia coli ′lacZ as a reporter, we could demonstrate that dltA translation starts at the upstream GTG. Consequently, S. pneumoniae R6 is a dltA mutant, whereas S. pneumoniae D39, the parental strain of R6, and Rx, another derivative of D39, contained intact dltA genes. Repair of the stop codon in dltA of R6 and insertional inactivation of dltA in D39 and Rx yielded pairs of dltA-deficient and dltA-proficient strains. Subsequent phenotypic analysis showed that dltA inactivation resulted in enhanced sensitivity to the cationic antimicrobial peptides nisin and gallidermin, a phenotype fully consistent with those of dltA mutants of other gram-positive bacteria. In addition, mild alkaline hydrolysis of heat-inactivated whole cells released d-alanine from dltA-proficient strains, but not from dltA mutants. The results of our study suggest that, as in many other low-G+C gram-positive bacteria, teichoic acids of S. pneumoniae contain d-alanine residues in order to protect this human pathogen against the actions of cationic antimicrobial peptides. PMID:16885447

  16. The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis II. Amino Acids

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Stepka, W.; Benson, A. A.; Calvin, M.

    1948-05-25

    The radioactive amino acid's synthesized from C{sup 14}O{sub 2} by green algae both in the light and in the dark after CO{sub 2}-free preillumination have been separated and identified using paper chromatography and radioautography. The radioactive amino acids identified were aspartic acid, alanine and smaller amounts of 3- and 4-carbon amino acids. This finding as well as the total absence of radioactive glutamic acid substantiates the mechanism for reduction of CO{sub 2} previously postulated by members of this laboratory.

  17. Prediction of binding modes between protein L-isoaspartyl (D-aspartyl) O-methyltransferase and peptide substrates including isomerized aspartic acid residues using in silico analytic methods for the substrate screening.

    PubMed

    Oda, Akifumi; Noji, Ikuhiko; Fukuyoshi, Shuichi; Takahashi, Ohgi

    2015-12-10

    Because the aspartic acid (Asp) residues in proteins are occasionally isomerized in the human body, not only l-α-Asp but also l-β-Asp, D-α-Asp and D-β-Asp are found in human proteins. In these isomerized aspartic acids, the proportion of D-β-Asp is the largest and the proportions of l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp found in human proteins are comparatively small. To explain the proportions of aspartic acid isomers, the possibility of an enzyme able to repair l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp is frequently considered. The protein L-isoaspartyl (D-aspartyl) O-methyltransferase (PIMT) is considered one of the possible repair enzymes for l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp. Human PIMT is an enzyme that recognizes both l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp, and catalyzes the methylation of their side chains. In this study, the binding modes between PIMT and peptide substrates containing l-β-Asp or D-α-Asp residues were investigated using computational protein-ligand docking and molecular dynamics simulations. The results indicate that carboxyl groups of both l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp were recognized in similar modes by PIMT and that the C-terminal regions of substrate peptides were located in similar positions on PIMT for both the l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp peptides. In contrast, for peptides containing l-α-Asp or D-β-Asp residues, which are not substrates of PIMT, the computationally constructed binding modes between PIMT and peptides greatly differed from those between PIMT and substrates. In the nonsubstrate peptides, not inter- but intra-molecular hydrogen bonds were observed, and the conformations of peptides were more rigid than those of substrates. Thus, the in silico analytical methods were able to distinguish substrates from nonsubstrates and the computational methods are expected to complement experimental analytical methods.

  18. Alteration of substrate specificity of alanine dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Puja; Aldeborgh, Hannah; Carlucci, Lauren; Walsh, Lauren; Wasserman, Jordan; Zhou, Edward; Lefurgy, Scott T.; Mundorff, Emily C.

    2015-01-01

    The l-alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) has a natural history that suggests it would not be a promising candidate for expansion of substrate specificity by protein engineering: it is the only amino acid dehydrogenase in its fold family, it has no sequence or structural similarity to any known amino acid dehydrogenase, and it has a strong preference for l-alanine over all other substrates. By contrast, engineering of the amino acid dehydrogenase superfamily members has produced catalysts with expanded substrate specificity; yet, this enzyme family already contains members that accept a broad range of substrates. To test whether the natural history of an enzyme is a predictor of its innate evolvability, directed evolution was carried out on AlaDH. A single mutation identified through molecular modeling, F94S, introduced into the AlaDH from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtAlaDH) completely alters its substrate specificity pattern, enabling activity toward a range of larger amino acids. Saturation mutagenesis libraries in this mutant background additionally identified a double mutant (F94S/Y117L) showing improved activity toward hydrophobic amino acids. The catalytic efficiencies achieved in AlaDH are comparable with those that resulted from similar efforts in the amino acid dehydrogenase superfamily and demonstrate the evolvability of MtAlaDH specificity toward other amino acid substrates. PMID:25538307

  19. Characterization of a broad-scope amino acid transport system in sand dollars

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.P.; Bellis, S.; Stephens, G.C. )

    1988-03-01

    Both echinoderm embryos and adults take up {sup 14}C-labelled-{alpha}-amino acids by an apparent broad-scope transport system. This transporter can be characterized as follows: alanine transport is not blocked by {alpha}-(methylamino)isobutyric acid. Leucine and other lipophilic neutral amino acids are preferentially transported. Transport is sodium dependent and blocked by 2-aminobicyclo-(2,2,1)heptane-2-carboxyclic acid. Lysine and aspartate transport is inhibited by lipophilic neutral amino acids. Taurine, a {beta}-neutral amino acid is translocated via a second and independent carrier.

  20. Tb(3+)-triggered luminescence in a supramolecular gel and its use as a fluorescent chemoprobe for proteins containing alanine.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sung Ho; Kim, Ka Young; Woo, Dong Kyun; Lee, Shim Sung; Jung, Jong Hwa

    2014-11-01

    A tetracarboxylic acid-appended thiacalix[4]arene-based ligand with Tb(3+) formed a supramolecular gel which showed novel fluorogenic sensor capability for probing alanine and proteins containing alanine.

  1. [Ulysses retrotransposon aspartate proteinase (Drosophila virilis)].

    PubMed

    Volkov, D A; Savvateeva, L V; Dergousova, N I; Rumsh, L D

    2002-01-01

    Retrotransposones are mobile genetic elements occurring in genomes of bacteria, plants or animals. Retrotransposones were found to contain nucleotide sequences encoding proteins which are homological to retroviral aspartic proteinases. Our research has been focused on Ulysses which is mobile genetic element found in Drosophila virilis. We suggested a primary structure of Ulysses proteinase using comparative analysis of amino acid sequences of retroviral proteinases and proteinases from retrotransposones. The appropriate cDNA fragment has been cloned and expressed in E. coli. The purification of recombinant protein (12 kD) has been carried out by affinity chromatography using pepstatine-agarose. The obtained protein has proteolytic activity at optimum pH 5.5 like the majority of aspartic proteinases.

  2. A new amino acid, 3-(2,5-SS-dicysteinyl-3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)alanine, from the tapetum lucidum of the gar (Lepisosteidae) and its enzymic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ito, S; Nicol, J A

    1977-03-01

    The tapetum lucidum of the alligator gar Lepisosteus was shown by t.l.c. to contain a new phenolic amino acid, which is apparently a major constituent of the reflecting material. It was isolated in a yield of 0.5 mg/eye and its physical and chemical characteristics, especially reductive hydrolysis with hydriodic acid giving dopa (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) and cysteine, suggested that it might to SS-dicysteinyldopa. Tyrosinase oxidation of L-dopa in the presence of an excess of L-cysteine yielded, in addition to known 5- and 2-S-cysteinyldopa, the same amino acid as that isolated from the eye of the gar, thus confirming the gross structure. The position of the two cysteine residues was established by the fact that tyrosinase oxidation of catechol and cyteine gave 3-S-cysteinylcatechol and 3,6-SS-dicysteinylcatechol. The natural amino acid is therefore formulated as 3-(2,5-SS-dicysteinyl-3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)alanine (2,5-SS-dicysteinyldopa), which may be formed by two consecutive additions of cysteine, first to dopaquinone and then to 5-S-cysteinyldopaquinone. The enzymic synthesis of 2,5-SS-dicysteinyldopa in vitro suggests that it may also be involved in the biosynthesis of phaeomelanin. PMID:403909

  3. A new amino acid, 3-(2,5-SS-dicysteinyl-3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)alanine, from the tapetum lucidum of the gar (Lepisosteidae) and its enzymic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ito, S; Nicol, J A

    1977-03-01

    The tapetum lucidum of the alligator gar Lepisosteus was shown by t.l.c. to contain a new phenolic amino acid, which is apparently a major constituent of the reflecting material. It was isolated in a yield of 0.5 mg/eye and its physical and chemical characteristics, especially reductive hydrolysis with hydriodic acid giving dopa (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) and cysteine, suggested that it might to SS-dicysteinyldopa. Tyrosinase oxidation of L-dopa in the presence of an excess of L-cysteine yielded, in addition to known 5- and 2-S-cysteinyldopa, the same amino acid as that isolated from the eye of the gar, thus confirming the gross structure. The position of the two cysteine residues was established by the fact that tyrosinase oxidation of catechol and cyteine gave 3-S-cysteinylcatechol and 3,6-SS-dicysteinylcatechol. The natural amino acid is therefore formulated as 3-(2,5-SS-dicysteinyl-3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)alanine (2,5-SS-dicysteinyldopa), which may be formed by two consecutive additions of cysteine, first to dopaquinone and then to 5-S-cysteinyldopaquinone. The enzymic synthesis of 2,5-SS-dicysteinyldopa in vitro suggests that it may also be involved in the biosynthesis of phaeomelanin.

  4. A new amino acid, 3-(2,5-SS-dicysteinyl-3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)alanine, from the tapetum lucidum of the gar (Lepisosteidae) and its enzymic synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, S; Nicol, J A

    1977-01-01

    The tapetum lucidum of the alligator gar Lepisosteus was shown by t.l.c. to contain a new phenolic amino acid, which is apparently a major constituent of the reflecting material. It was isolated in a yield of 0.5 mg/eye and its physical and chemical characteristics, especially reductive hydrolysis with hydriodic acid giving dopa (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) and cysteine, suggested that it might to SS-dicysteinyldopa. Tyrosinase oxidation of L-dopa in the presence of an excess of L-cysteine yielded, in addition to known 5- and 2-S-cysteinyldopa, the same amino acid as that isolated from the eye of the gar, thus confirming the gross structure. The position of the two cysteine residues was established by the fact that tyrosinase oxidation of catechol and cyteine gave 3-S-cysteinylcatechol and 3,6-SS-dicysteinylcatechol. The natural amino acid is therefore formulated as 3-(2,5-SS-dicysteinyl-3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)alanine (2,5-SS-dicysteinyldopa), which may be formed by two consecutive additions of cysteine, first to dopaquinone and then to 5-S-cysteinyldopaquinone. The enzymic synthesis of 2,5-SS-dicysteinyldopa in vitro suggests that it may also be involved in the biosynthesis of phaeomelanin. PMID:403909

  5. Amino acid profile during exercise and training in Standardbreds.

    PubMed

    Westermann, C M; Dorland, L; Wijnberg, I D; de Sain-van der Velden, M G M; van Breda, E; Barneveld, A; de Graaf-Roelfsema, E; Keizer, H A; van der Kolk, J H

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the influence of acute exercise, training and intensified training on the plasma amino acid profile. In a 32-week longitudinal study using 10 Standardbred horses, training was divided into four phases, including a phase of intensified training for five horses. At the end of each phase, a standardized exercise test, SET, was performed. Plasma amino acid concentrations before and after each SET were measured. Training significantly reduced mean plasma aspartic acid concentration, whereas exercise significantly increased the plasma concentrations of alanine, taurine, methionine, leucine, tyrosine and phenylalanine and reduced the plasma concentrations of glycine, ornithine, glutamine, citrulline and serine. Normally and intensified trained horses differed not significantly. It is concluded that amino acids should not be regarded as limiting training performance in Standardbreds except for aspartic acid which is the most likely candidate for supplementation. PMID:20863542

  6. In vivo simultaneous monitoring of gamma-aminobutyric acid, glutamate, and L-aspartate using brain microdialysis and capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection: Analytical developments and in vitro/in vivo validations.

    PubMed

    Sauvinet, Valérie; Parrot, Sandrine; Benturquia, Nadia; Bravo-Moratón, Eva; Renaud, Bernard; Denoroy, Luc

    2003-09-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate (Glu), and L-aspartate (L-Asp) are three major amino acid neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. In this work, a method for the separation of these three neurotransmitters in brain microdialysis samples using a commercially available capillary electrophoresis (CE) system has been developed. Molecules were tagged on their primary amine function with the fluorogene agent naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde (NDA), and, after separation by micellar electrokinetic chromatography, were detected by laser-induced fluorescence using a 442 nm helium-cadmium laser. The separation conditions for the analysis of derivatized neurotransmitters in standard solutions and microdialysates have been optimized, and this method has been validated on both pharmacological and analytical basis. The separation of GABA, Glu, and L-Asp takes less than 10 min by using a 75 mmol/L borate buffer, pH 9.2, containing 70 mmol/L SDS and 10 mmol/L hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin and + 25 kV voltage. The detection limits were 3, 15 nmol/L and, 5 nmol/L for GABA, Glu, and L-Asp, respectively. Moreover, submicroliter samples can be analyzed. This method allows a simple, rapid and accurate measurement of the three amino acid neurotransmitters for the in vivo brain monitoring using microdialysis sampling.

  7. Prebiotic formation of polyamino acids in molten urea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mita, H.; Nomoto, S.; Terasaki, M.; Shimoyama, A.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2005-04-01

    It is important for research into the origins of life to elucidate polyamino acid formation under prebiotic conditions. Only a limited set of amino acids has been reported to polymerize thermally. In this paper we demonstrate a novel thermal polymerization mechanism in a molten urea of alkylamino acids (i.e. glycine, alanine, β-alanine, α-aminobutyric acid, valine, norvaline, leucine and norleucine), which had been thought to be incapable of undergoing thermal polymerization. Also, aspartic acid was found to polymerize in molten urea at a lower temperature than that at which aspartic acid alone had previously been thermally polymerized. Individual oligomers produced in heating experiments on urea-amino acid mixtures were analysed using a liquid chromatograph mass spectrometer. Major products in the reaction mixture were three different types of polyamino acid derivatives: N-carbamoylpolyamino acids, polyamino acids containing a hydantoin ring at the N-terminal position and unidentified derivatives with molecular weights that were greater by 78 than those of the corresponding peptide forms. The polymerization reaction occurred by taking advantage of the high polarity of molten urea as well as its dehydrating ability. Under the presumed prebiotic conditions employed here, many types of amino acids were thus revealed to undergo thermal polymerization.

  8. Ionization constants of aqueous amino acids at temperatures up to 250°C using hydrothermal pH indicators and UV-visible spectroscopy: Glycine, α-alanine, and proline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Rodney G. F.; Collins, Christopher M.; Roberts, Jenene C.; Trevani, Liliana N.; Bartholomew, Richard J.; Tremaine, Peter R.

    2005-06-01

    Ionization constants for several simple amino acids have been measured for the first time under hydrothermal conditions, using visible spectroscopy with a high-temperature, high-pressure flow cell and thermally stable colorimetric pH indicators. This method minimizes amino acid decomposition at high temperatures because the data can be collected rapidly with short equilibration times. The first ionization constant for proline and α-alanine, K a,COOH, and the first and second ionization constants for glycine, K a,COOH and K a,NH4+, have been determined at temperatures as high as 250°C. Values for the standard partial molar heat capacity of ionization, Δ rC po, COOH and Δ rC po, NH4+, have been determined from the temperature dependence of ln (K a,COOH) and ln (K a,NH4+). The methodology has been validated by measuring the ionization constant of acetic acid up to 250°C, with results that agree with literature values obtained by potentiometric measurements to within the combined experimental uncertainty. We dedicate this paper to the memory of Dr. Donald Irish (1932-2002) of the University of Waterloo—friend and former supervisor of two of the authors (R.J.B. and P.R.T.).

  9. Earthworms accumulate alanine in response to drought.

    PubMed

    Holmstrup, Martin; Slotsbo, Stine; Henriksen, Per G; Bayley, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Earthworms have ecologically significant functions in tropical and temperate ecosystems and it is therefore important to understand how these animals survive during drought. In order to explore the physiological responses to dry conditions, we simulated a natural drought incident in a laboratory trial exposing worms in slowly drying soil for about one month, and then analyzed the whole-body contents of free amino acids (FAAs). We investigated three species forming estivation chambers when soils dry out (Aporrectodea tuberculata, Aporrectodea icterica and Aporrectodea longa) and one species that does not estivate during drought (Lumbricus rubellus). Worms subjected to drought conditions (< -2MPa) substantially increased the concentration of FAAs and in particular alanine that was significantly upregulated in all tested species. Alanine was the most important FAA reaching 250-650μmolg(-1) dry weight in dehydrated Aporrectodea species and 300μmolg(-1) dry weight in L. rubellus. Proline was only weakly upregulated in some species as were a few other FAAs. Species forming estivation chambers (Aporrectodea spp.) did not show a better ability to conserve body water than the non-estivating species (L. rubellus) at the same drought level. These results suggest that the accumulation of alanine is an important adaptive trait in drought tolerance of earthworms in general. PMID:27107492

  10. D-aspartic acid supplementation combined with 28 days of heavy resistance training has no effect on body composition, muscle strength, and serum hormones associated with the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis in resistance-trained men.

    PubMed

    Willoughby, Darryn S; Leutholtz, Brian

    2013-10-01

    It was hypothesized that D-aspartic acid (D-ASP) supplementation would not increase endogenous testosterone levels or improve muscular performance associated with resistance training. Therefore, body composition, muscle strength, and serum hormone levels associated with the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis were studied after 28 days of resistance training and D-ASP supplementation. Resistance-trained men resistance trained 4 times/wk for 28 days while orally ingesting either 3 g of placebo or 3 g of D-ASP. Data were analyzed with 2 × 2 analysis of variance (P < .05). Before and after resistance training and supplementation, body composition and muscle strength, serum gonadal hormones, and serum D-ASP and d-aspartate oxidase (DDO) were determined. Body composition and muscle strength were significantly increased in both groups in response to resistance training (P < .05) but not different from one another (P > .05). Total and free testosterone, luteinizing hormone, gonadotropin-releasing hormone, and estradiol were unchanged with resistance training and D-ASP supplementation (P > .05). For serum D-ASP and DDO, D-ASP resulted in a slight increase compared with baseline levels (P > .05). For the D-ASP group, the levels of serum DDO were significantly increased compared with placebo (P < .05). The gonadal hormones were unaffected by 28 days of D-ASP supplementation and not associated with the observed increases in muscle strength and mass. Therefore, at the dose provided, D-ASP supplementation is ineffective in up-regulating the activity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis and has no anabolic or ergogenic effects in skeletal muscle.

  11. The competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist (-)-6-phosphonomethyl-deca-hydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid (LY235959) potentiates the antinociceptive effects of opioids that vary in efficacy at the mu-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Allen, Richard M; Granger, Arthur L; Dykstra, Linda A

    2003-11-01

    (-)-6-Phosphonomethyl-deca-hydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid (LY235959) is a competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist shown to prevent the development of tolerance to the antinociceptive effects of morphine in rodents. Although administration of LY235959 alone generally does not produce antinociception, LY235959 potentiates the antinociceptive effects of morphine in squirrel monkeys. The present study was designed to determine whether LY235959 would potentiate the acute antinociceptive effects of morphine as well those of the opioid receptor agonists l-methadone, levorphanol, butorphanol, and buprenorphine. A squirrel monkey titration procedure was used in which shock (delivered to the tail) increased in intensity every 15 s (0.01-2.0 mA) in 30 increments. Five lever presses during any given 15-s shock period (fixed ratio 5) produced a 15-s shock-free period after which shock resumed at the next lower intensity. Morphine (0.3-3.0 mg/kg i.m.), l-methadone (0.1-0.56 mg/kg i.m.), levorphanol (0.1-1.0 mg/kg i.m.), butorphanol (1.0-10 mg/kg i.m.), and buprenorphine (0.01-0.03 mg/kg i.m.), but not LY235959 (0.1-1.0 mg/kg i.m.), dose and time dependently increased the intensity below which monkeys maintained shock 50% of the time (median shock level, MSL). LY235959 dose dependently potentiated the effect of each opioid agonist on MSL when concurrently administered to monkeys. Although LY235959 potentiated the antinociceptive effect of each opioid examined in a statistically significant manner, LY235959 seemed more potent and effective when combined with higher efficacy opioids. The present data suggest that the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist, LY235959, can potentiate the antinociceptive effects of a range of opioid receptor agonists independently of nonspecific motor effects. PMID:12975489

  12. Amino acids in the Yamato carbonaceous chrondrite from Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimoyama, A.; Ponnamperuma, C.; Yanai, K.

    1979-01-01

    Evidence for the presence of amino acids of extraterrestrial origin in the Antarctic Yamato carbonaceous chrondrite is presented. Hydrolyzed and nonhydrolyzed water-extracted amino acid samples from exterior, middle and interior portions of the meteorite were analyzed by an amino acid analyzer and by gas chromatography of N-TFA-isopropyl amino acid derivatives. Nine protein and six nonprotein amino acids were detected in the meteorite at abundances between 34 and less than one nmole/g, with equal amounts in interior and exterior portions. Nearly equal abundances of the D and L enantiomers of alanine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid were found, indicating the abiotic, therefore extraterrestrial, origin of the amino acids. The Antarctic environment and the uniformity of protein amino acid abundances are discussed as evidence against the racemization of terrestrially acquired amino acids, and similarities between Yamato amino acid compositions and the amino acid compositions of the Murchison and Murray type II carbonaceous chrondrites are indicated.

  13. Analytical continuation in coupling constant method; application to the calculation of resonance energies and widths for organic molecules: Glycine, alanine and valine and dimer of formic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, P.; Matejčík, Š.; Mach, P.; Urban, J.; Paidarová, I.; Horáček, J.

    2013-06-01

    The method of analytic continuation in the coupling constant (ACCC) in combination with use of the statistical Padé approximation is applied to the determination of resonance energy and width of some amino acids and formic acid dimer. Standard quantum chemistry codes provide accurate data which can be used for analytic continuation in the coupling constant to obtain the resonance energy and width of organic molecules with a good accuracy. The obtained results are compared with the existing experimental ones.

  14. Vesicular uptake and exocytosis of l-aspartate is independent of sialin

    PubMed Central

    Morland, Cecilie; Nordengen, Kaja; Larsson, Max; Prolo, Laura M.; Farzampour, Zoya; Reimer, Richard J.; Gundersen, Vidar

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of release and the role of l-aspartate as a central neurotransmitter are controversial. A vesicular release mechanism for l-aspartate has been difficult to prove, as no vesicular l-aspartate transporter was identified until it was found that sialin could transport l-aspartate and l-glutamate when reconstituted into liposomes. We sought to clarify the release mechanism of l-aspartate and the role of sialin in this process by combining l-aspartate uptake studies in isolated synaptic vesicles with immunocyotchemical investigations of hippocampal slices. We found that radiolabeled l-aspartate was taken up into synaptic vesicles. The vesicular l-aspartate uptake, relative to the l-glutamate uptake, was twice as high in the hippocampus as in the whole brain, the striatum, and the entorhinal and frontal cortices and was not inhibited by l-glutamate. We further show that sialin is not essential for exocytosis of l-aspartate, as there was no difference in ATP-dependent l-aspartate uptake in synaptic vesicles from sialin-knockout and wild-type mice. In addition, expression of sialin in PC12 cells did not result in significant vesicle uptake of l-aspartate, and depolarization-induced depletion of l-aspartate from hippocampal nerve terminals was similar in hippocampal slices from sialin-knockout and wild-type mice. Further, there was no evidence for nonvesicular release of l-aspartate via volume-regulated anion channels or plasma membrane excitatory amino acid transporters. This suggests that l-aspartate is exocytotically released from nerve terminals after vesicular accumulation by a transporter other than sialin.—Morland, C., Nordengen, K., Larsson, M., Prolo, L. M., Farzampour, Z., Reimer, R. J., Gundersen, V. Vesicular uptake and exocytosis of l-aspartate is independent of sialin. PMID:23221336

  15. The Origin of Amino Acids in Lunar Regolith Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Glavin, Daniel P.; McLain, Hannah L.; Noble, Sarah K.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the amino acid content of seven lunar regolith samples returned by the Apollo 16 and Apollo 17 missions and stored under NASA curation since collection using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Consistent with results from initial analyses shortly after collection in the 1970s, we observed amino acids at low concentrations in all of the curated samples, ranging from 0.2 parts-per-billion (ppb) to 42.7 ppb in hot-water extracts and 14.5 ppb to 651.1 ppb in 6M HCl acid-vapor-hydrolyzed, hot-water extracts. Amino acids identified in the Apollo soil extracts include glycine, D- and L-alanine, D- and L-aspartic acid, D- and L-glutamic acid, D- and L-serine, L-threonine, and L-valine, all of which had previously been detected in lunar samples, as well as several compounds not previously identified in lunar regoliths: -aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), D-and L-amino-n-butyric acid (-ABA), DL-amino-n-butyric acid, -amino-n-butyric acid, -alanine, and -amino-n-caproic acid. We observed an excess of the L enantiomer in most of the detected proteinogenic amino acids, but racemic alanine and racemic -ABA were present in some samples.

  16. Reversible B/Z-DNA transition under the low salt condition and non-B-form polydApolydT selectivity by a cubane-like europium-L-aspartic acid complex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiyuan; Yu, Haijia; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2006-05-01

    We report here that a cubane-like europium-L-aspartic acid complex at physiological pH can discriminate between DNA structures as judged by the comparison of thermal denaturation, binding stoichiometry, temperature-dependent fluorescence enhancement, and circular dichroism and gel electrophoresis studies. This complex can selectively stabilize non-B-form DNA polydApolydT but destabilize polydGdCpolydGdC and polydAdTpolydAdT. Further studies show that this complex can convert B-form polydGdCpolydGdC to Z-form under the low salt condition at physiological temperature 37 degrees C, and the transition is reversible, similar to RNA polymerase, which turns unwound DNA into Z-DNA and converts it back to B-DNA after transcription. The potential uses of a left-handed helix-selective probe in biology are obvious. Z-DNA is a transient structure and does not exist as a stable feature of the double helix. Therefore, probing this transient structure with a metal-amino acid complex under the low salt condition at physiological temperature would provide insights into their transitions in vivo and are of great interest.

  17. Amyloid Aggregates Arise from Amino Acid Condensations under Prebiotic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, Jason; Friedmann, Michael P; Riek, Roland

    2016-09-12

    Current theories on the origin of life reveal significant gaps in our understanding of the mechanisms that allowed simple chemical precursors to coalesce into the complex polymers that are needed to sustain life. The volcanic gas carbonyl sulfide (COS) is known to catalyze the condensation of amino acids under aqueous conditions, but the reported di-, tri-, and tetra-peptides are too short to support a regular tertiary structure. Here, we demonstrate that alanine and valine, two of the proteinogenic amino acids believed to have been among the most abundant on a prebiotic earth, can polymerize into peptides and subsequently assemble into ordered amyloid fibers comprising a cross-β-sheet quaternary structure following COS-activated continuous polymerization of as little as 1 mm amino acid. Furthermore, this spontaneous assembly is not limited to pure amino acids, since mixtures of glycine, alanine, aspartate, and valine yield similar structures. PMID:27511635

  18. Neutral penta- and hexacoordinate silicon(IV) complexes containing two bidentate ligands derived from the alpha-amino acids (S)-alanine, (S)-phenylalanine, and (S)-tert-leucine.

    PubMed

    Cota, Smaranda; Beyer, Matthias; Bertermann, Rüdiger; Burschka, Christian; Götz, Kathrin; Kaupp, Martin; Tacke, Reinhold

    2010-06-11

    The neutral hexacoordinate silicon(IV) complex 6 (SiO(2)N(4) skeleton) and the neutral pentacoordinate silicon(IV) complexes 7-11 (SiO(2)N(2)C skeletons) were synthesized from Si(NCO)(4) and RSi(NCO)(3) (R = Me, Ph), respectively. The compounds were structurally characterized by solid-state NMR spectroscopy (6-11), solution NMR spectroscopy (6 and 10), and single-crystal X-ray diffraction (8 and 11 were studied as the solvates 8 x CH(3)CN and 11 x C(5)H(12) x 0.5 CH(3)CN, respectively). The silicon(IV) complexes 6 (octahedral Si-coordination polyhedron) and 7-11 (trigonal-bipyramidal Si-coordination polyhedra) each contain two bidentate ligands derived from an alpha-amino acid: (S)-alanine, (S)-phenylalanine, or (S)-tert-leucine. The deprotonated amino acids act as monoanionic (6) or as mono- and dianionic ligands (7-11). The experimental investigations were complemented by computational studies of the stereoisomers of 6 and 7.

  19. Synthesis and In Vitro Evaluation of Aspartate Transcarbamoylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Coudray, Laëtitia; Pennebaker, Anne F.; Montchamp, Jean-Luc

    2009-01-01

    The design, synthesis, and evaluation of a series of novel inhibitors of aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) are reported. Several submicromolar phosphorus-containing inhibitors are described, but all-carboxylate compounds are inactive. Compounds were synthesized to probe the postulated cyclic transition-state of the enzyme-catalyzed reaction. In addition, the associated role of the protonation state at the phosphorus acid moiety was evaluated using phosphinic and carboxylic acids. Although none of the synthesized inhibitors is more potent than N-phosphonacetyl-L-aspartate (PALA), the compounds provide useful mechanistic information, as well as the basis for the design of future inhibitors and/or prodrugs. PMID:19828320

  20. Influence of exercise on plasma and muscle free amino acids in trained rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Marín, J F; Mendiola, P; Hernández, M D; De Costa, J; Zamora, S

    1999-12-01

    Variations in the concentration of free amino acids in the muscle and plasma of trout submitted to 5 minutes of intense exercise have been studied. The responses of untrained fish and those trained performing the same type of exercise twice daily for 28 days are compared. Total amino acid concentrations in muscle tend to diminish after intense exercise. Significant decreases are observed in muscle content of alanine, beta-alanine, isoleucine and ornithine. Plasma amino acids tend to increase after exercise with significant differences in glutamate, GABA, methionine and NH4+. The small variations due to intense exercise suggest that the amino acids are mobilised. Training led to a decrease in total amino acid concentration in plasma but not in muscle, where levels of aspartate and ornithine increased. This suggests a metabolic adaptation to exercise, with amino acid level retention in the muscle.

  1. GluN2B N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor and excitatory amino acid transporter 3 are upregulated in primary sensory neurons after 7 days of morphine administration in rats: implication for opiate-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Gong, Kerui; Bhargava, Aditi; Jasmin, Luc

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of the peripheral nervous system to opiate-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) is not well understood. In this study, we determined the changes in excitability of primary sensory neurons after sustained morphine administration for 7 days. Changes in the expression of glutamate receptors and glutamate transporters after morphine administration were ascertained in dorsal root ganglions. Patch clamp recordings from intact dorsal root ganglions (ex vivo preparation) of morphine-treated rats showed increased excitability of small diameter (≤30 μm) neurons with respect to rheobase and membrane threshold, whereas the excitability of large diameter (>30 μm) neurons remained unchanged. Small diameter neurons also displayed increased responses to glutamate, which were mediated mainly by GluN2B containing N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, and to a lesser degree by the neuronal excitatory amino acid transporter 3/excitatory amino acid carrier 1. Coadministration in vivo of the GluN2B selective antagonist Ro 25-6981 with morphine for 7 days prevented the appearance of OIH and increased morphine-induced analgesia. Administration of morphine for 7 days led to an increased expression of GluN2B and excitatory amino acid transporter 3/excitatory amino acid carrier 1, but not of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate, kainate, or group I metabotropic glutamate receptors, or of the vesicular glutamate transporter 2. These results suggest that peripheral glutamatergic neurotransmission contributes to OIH and that GluN2B subunit of NMDA receptors in the periphery may be a target for therapy.

  2. Atomic Layer Deposition of L-Alanine Polypeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yaqin; Li, Binsong; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Dunphy, Darren R.; Tsai, Andy; Tam, Siu-Yue; Fan, Hongyou Y.; Zhang, Hongxia; Rogers, David; Rempe, Susan; Atanassov, Plamen; Cecchi, Joseph L.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2014-10-30

    L-Alanine polypeptide thin films were synthesized via atomic layer deposition (ALD). Rather, instead of using an amino acid monomer as the precursor, an L-alanine amino acid derivatized with a protecting group was used to prevent self-polymerization, increase the vapor pressure, and allow linear cycle-by-cycle growth emblematic of ALD. Moreover, the successful deposition of a conformal polypeptide film has been confirmed by FTIR, TEM, and Mass Spectrometry, and the ALD process has been extended to polyvaline.

  3. Determination of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine, N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine, and 2,4-diaminobutyric acid in Food Products Containing Cyanobacteria by Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography and Tandem Mass Spectrometry: Single-Laboratory Validation.

    PubMed

    Glover, W Broc; Baker, Teesha C; Murch, Susan J; Brown, Paula N

    2015-01-01

    A single-laboratory validation study was completed for the determination of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine (AEG), and 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) in bulk natural health product supplements purchased from a health food store in Canada. BMAA and its isomers were extracted with acid hydrolysis to free analytes from protein association. Acid was removed with the residue evaporated to dryness and reconstituted with derivatization using 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate (AccQ-Fluor). Chromatographic separation and detection were achieved using RP ultra-performance LC coupled to a tandem mass spectrometer operated in multiple reaction monitoring mode. Data from biological samples were evaluated for precision and accuracy across different days to ensure repeatability. Accuracy was assessed by spike recovery of biological samples using varying amino acid concentrations, with an average recovery across all samples of 108.6%. The analytical range was found to be 764-0.746 ng/mL prior to derivatization, thereby providing a linear range compatible with potentially widely varying analyte concentrations in commercial health food products. Both the U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and U. S. Pharmacopeia definitions were evaluated for determining method limits, with the FDA approach found to be most suitable having an LOD of 0.187 ng/mL and LLOQ of 0.746 ng/mL. BMAA in the collected specimens was detected at concentrations lower than 1 μg/g, while AEG and DAB were found at concentrations as high as 100 μg/g. Finding these analytes, even at low concentrations, has potential public health significance and suggests a need to screen such products prior to distribution. The method described provides a rapid, accurate, and precise method to facilitate that screening process. PMID:26651568

  4. Histidine-40 of ribonuclease T1 acts as base catalyst when the true catalytic base, glutamic acid-58, is replaced by alanine.

    PubMed

    Steyaert, J; Hallenga, K; Wyns, L; Stanssens, P

    1990-09-25

    Mechanisms for the ribonuclease T1 (RNase T1; EC 3.1.27.3) catalyzed transesterification reaction generally include the proposal that Glu58 and His92 provide general base and general acid assistance, respectively [Heinemann, U., & Saenger, W. (1982) Nature (London) 299, 27-31]. This view was recently challenged by the observation that mutants substituted at position 58 retain high residual activity; a revised mechanism was proposed in which His40, and not Glu58, is engaged in catalysis as general base [Nishikawa, S., Morioka, H., Kim, H., Fuchimura, K., Tanaka, T., Uesugi, S., Hakoshima, T., Tomita, K., Ohtsuka, E., & Ikehara, M. (1987) Biochemistry 26, 8620-8624]. To clarify the functional roles of His40, Glu58, and His92, we analyzed the consequences of several amino acid substitutions (His40Ala, His40Lys, His40Asp, Glu58Ala, Glu58Gln, and His92Gln) on the kinetics of GpC transesterification. The dominant effect of all mutations is on Kcat, implicating His40, Glu58, and His92 in catalysis rather than in substrate binding. Plots of log (Kcat/Km) vs pH for wild-type, His40Lys, and Glu58Ala RNase T1, together with the NMR-determined pKa values of the histidines of these enzymes, strongly support the view that Glu58-His92 acts as the base-acid couple. The curves also show that His40 is required in its protonated form for optimal activity of wild-type enzyme. We propose that the charged His40 participates in electrostatic stabilization of the transition state; the magnitude of the catalytic defect (a factor of 2000) from the His40 to Ala replacement suggests that electrostatic catalysis contributes considerably to the overall rate acceleration. For Glu58Ala RNase T1, the pH dependence of the catalytic parameters suggests an altered mechanism in which His40 and His92 act as base and acid catalyst, respectively. The ability of His40 to adopt the function of general base must account for the significant activity remaining in Glu58-mutated enzymes.

  5. Integrin αvβ3 as a Promising Target to Image Neoangiogenesis Using In-House Generator-Produced Positron Emitter (68)Ga-Labeled DOTA-Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic Acid (RGD) Ligand.

    PubMed

    Vatsa, Rakhee; Bhusari, Priya; Kumar, Sunil; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Dash, Ashutosh; Singh, Gurpreet; Dhawan, Devinder Kumar; Shukla, Jaya; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2015-06-01

    For the growth and spread of a tumor beyond 2 mm, angiogenesis plays a crucial role, and association of various integrins with angiogenesis is evidential. The aim of the study was radiolabeling of DOTA-chelated RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) peptide with (68)Ga for PET imaging in locally advanced breast carcinoma. DOTA-RGD was incubated with (68)GaCl3, eluted in 0.05 m HCl. Elution volume, peptide amount, and reaction pH were studied. Radio-ITLC, gas chromatography, endotoxin, and sterility testing were performed. Serial (n=3) and whole-body (n=2) PET/CT imaging was done on patients post i.v. injection of 111-185 MBq of (68)Ga-DOTA-RGD. Maximum radiolabeling yield was achieved with 3 mL elution volume of 15-20 μg peptide at pH 3.5-4.0 with 10 minutes of incubation at 95°C. Product samples were sterile having 99.5% radiochemical purity with residual ethanol content and endotoxins in injectable limits. Intense radiotracer uptake was noticed in the tumor with SUVmax 15.3 at 45 minutes in serial images. Physiological radiotracer uptake was seen in the liver, spleen, ventricles, and thyroid with excretion through the kidneys. The authors concluded that (68)Ga-DOTA-RGD has the potential for imaging α,vβ3 integrin-expressing tumors. PMID:26083951

  6. Integrin αvβ3 as a Promising Target to Image Neoangiogenesis Using In-House Generator-Produced Positron Emitter (68)Ga-Labeled DOTA-Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic Acid (RGD) Ligand.

    PubMed

    Vatsa, Rakhee; Bhusari, Priya; Kumar, Sunil; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Dash, Ashutosh; Singh, Gurpreet; Dhawan, Devinder Kumar; Shukla, Jaya; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2015-06-01

    For the growth and spread of a tumor beyond 2 mm, angiogenesis plays a crucial role, and association of various integrins with angiogenesis is evidential. The aim of the study was radiolabeling of DOTA-chelated RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) peptide with (68)Ga for PET imaging in locally advanced breast carcinoma. DOTA-RGD was incubated with (68)GaCl3, eluted in 0.05 m HCl. Elution volume, peptide amount, and reaction pH were studied. Radio-ITLC, gas chromatography, endotoxin, and sterility testing were performed. Serial (n=3) and whole-body (n=2) PET/CT imaging was done on patients post i.v. injection of 111-185 MBq of (68)Ga-DOTA-RGD. Maximum radiolabeling yield was achieved with 3 mL elution volume of 15-20 μg peptide at pH 3.5-4.0 with 10 minutes of incubation at 95°C. Product samples were sterile having 99.5% radiochemical purity with residual ethanol content and endotoxins in injectable limits. Intense radiotracer uptake was noticed in the tumor with SUVmax 15.3 at 45 minutes in serial images. Physiological radiotracer uptake was seen in the liver, spleen, ventricles, and thyroid with excretion through the kidneys. The authors concluded that (68)Ga-DOTA-RGD has the potential for imaging α,vβ3 integrin-expressing tumors.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of fac-Re(CO)3-aspartic-N-monoacetic acid, a structural analogue of a potential new renal tracer, fac-(99m)Tc(CO)3(ASMA).

    PubMed

    Klenc, Jeffrey; Lipowska, Malgorzata; Taylor, Andrew T; Marzilli, Luigi G

    2012-09-01

    The reaction of an aminopolycarboxylate ligand, aspartic-N-monoacetic acid (ASMA), with [Re(CO)3(H2O)3](+) was examined. The tridentate coordination of ASMA to this Re(I) tricarbonyl precursor yielded fac-Re(CO)3(ASMA) as a mixture of diastereomers. The chemistry is analogous to that of the Tc(I) tricarbonyl complex, which yields fac-(99m)Tc(CO)3(ASMA) under similar conditions. The formation, structure, and isomerization of fac-Re(CO)3(ASMA) products were characterized by HPLC, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, and X-ray crystallography. The two major fac-Re(CO)3(ASMA) diastereomeric products each have a linear ONO coordination mode with two adjacent five-membered chelate rings, but they differ in the endo or exo orientation of the uncoordinated acetate group, in agreement with expectations based on previous studies. Conditions have been identified for the expedient isomerization of fac-Re(CO)3(ASMA) to a mixture consisting primarily of one major product. Because different isomeric species typically have different pharmacokinetic characteristics, these conditions may provide for the practical isolation of a single (99m)Tc(CO)3(ASMA) species, thus allowing the isolation of the isomer that has optimal imaging and pharmacokinetic characteristics. This information will aid in the design of future (99m)Tc radiopharmaceuticals.

  8. Mutagenesis and biochemical studies on AuaA confirmed the importance of the two conserved aspartate-rich motifs and suggested difference in the amino acids for substrate binding in membrane-bound prenyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Stec, Edyta; Li, Shu-Ming

    2012-07-01

    AuaA is a membrane-bound farnesyltransferase from the myxobacterium Stigmatella aurantiaca involved in the biosynthesis of aurachins. Like other known membrane-bound aromatic prenyltransferases, AuaA contains two conserved aspartate-rich motifs. Several amino acids in the first motif NXxxDxxxD were proposed to be responsible for prenyl diphosphate binding via metal ions like Mg(2+). Site-directed mutagenesis experiments demonstrated in this study that asparagine, but not the arginine residue in NRxxDxxxD, is important for the enzyme activity of AuaA, differing from the importance of NQ or ND residues in the NQxxDxxxD or NDxxDxxxD motifs observed in some membrane-bound prenyltransferases. The second motif of known membrane-bound prenyltransferases was proposed to be involved in the binding of their aromatic substrates. KDIxDxEGD, also found in AuaA, had been previously speculated to be characteristic for binding of flavonoids or homogenisate. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments with AuaA showed that KDIxDxEGD was critical for the enzyme activity. However, this motif is very likely not specific for flavonoid or homogenisate prenyltransferases, because none of the tested flavonoids was accepted by AuaA or its mutant R53A in the presence of farnesyl, geranyl or dimethylallyl diphosphate.

  9. Functional N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in O-2A glial precursor cells: a critical role in regulating polysialic acid-neural cell adhesion molecule expression and cell migration

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The capacity for long-distance migration of the oligodendrocyte precursor cell, oligodendrocyte-type 2 astrocyte (O-2A), is essential for myelin formation. To study the molecular mechanisms that control this process, we used an in vitro migration assay that uses neurohypophysial explants. We provide evidence that O-2A cells in these preparations express functional N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, most likely as homomeric complexes of the NR1 subunit. We show that NMDA evokes an increase in cytosolic Ca2+ that can be blocked by the NMDA receptor antagonist AP-5 and by Mg2+. Blocking the activity of these receptors dramatically diminished O-2A cell migration from explants. We also show that NMDA receptor activity is necessary for the expression by O-2A cells of the highly sialylated polysialic acid- neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) that is required for their migration. Thus, glutamate or glutamate receptor ligands may regulate O- 2A cell migration by modulating expression of PSA-NCAM. These studies demonstrate how interactions between ionotropic receptors, intracellular signaling, and cell adhesion molecule expression influence cell surface properties, which in turn are critical determinants of cell migration. PMID:8978823

  10. C4-Dicarboxylic acid metabolism in bundle-sheath chloroplasts, mitochondria and strands of Eriochloa borumensis Hack., a phosphoenolpyruvate-carboxykinase type C4 species.

    PubMed

    Rathnam, C K; Edwards, G E

    1977-01-01

    C4-acid metabolism by isolated bundlesheath chloroplasts, mitochondria and strands of Eriochloa borumensis Hack., a phosphoennolpyruvate-carboxykinase (PEP-CK) species, was investigated. Aspartate, oxaloacetate (OAA) and malate were decarboxylated by strands with several-fold stimulation upon illumination. There was strictly light-dependent decarboxylation of OAA and malate by the chloroplasts, but the chloroplasts did not decarboxylate aspartate in light or dark. PEP was a primary product of OAA or malate decarboxylation by the chloroplasts and its formation was inhibited by 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1, 1-dimethylurea or NH4Cl. There was very little conversion of PEP to pyruvate by bundle-sheath chloroplasts, mitochondria or strands. Decarboxylation of the three C4-acids by mitochondria was light-independent. Pyruvate was the only product of mitochondrial metabolism of C4-acids, and was apparently transaminated in the cytoplasm since PEP and alanine were primarily exported out of the bundle-sheath strands. Light-dependent C4-acid decarboxylation by the chloroplasts is suggested to be through the PEP-CK, while the mitochondrial C4-acid decarboxylation may proceed through the NAD-malic enzyme (NAD-ME) system. In vivo both aspartate and malate are considered as transport metobolites from mesophyll to bundle-sheath cells in PEP-CK species. Aspartate would be metabolized by the mitochondria to OAA. Part of the OAA may be converted to malate and decarboxylated through NAD-ME, and part may be transported to the chloroplasts for decarboxylation through PEP-CK localized in the chloroplasts. Malate transported from mesophyll cells may serve as carboxyl donor to chloroplasts through the chloroplastic NAD-malate dehydrogenase and PEP-CK. Bundle-sheath strands and chloroplasts fixed (14)CO2 at high rates and exhibited C4-acid-dependent O2 evolution in the light. Studies with 3-mercaptopicolinic acid, a specific inhibitor of PEP-CK, have indicated that most (about 70%) of the OAA

  11. Ergogenic effects of β-alanine and carnosine: proposed future research to quantify their efficacy.

    PubMed

    Caruso, John; Charles, Jessica; Unruh, Kayla; Giebel, Rachel; Learmonth, Lexis; Potter, William

    2012-07-01

    β-alanine is an amino acid that, when combined with histidine, forms the dipeptide carnosine within skeletal muscle. Carnosine and β-alanine each have multiple purposes within the human body; this review focuses on their roles as ergogenic aids to exercise performance and suggests how to best quantify the former's merits as a buffer. Carnosine normally makes a small contribution to a cell's total buffer capacity; yet β-alanine supplementation raises intracellular carnosine concentrations that in turn improve a muscle's ability to buffer protons. Numerous studies assessed the impact of oral β-alanine intake on muscle carnosine levels and exercise performance. β-alanine may best act as an ergogenic aid when metabolic acidosis is the primary factor for compromised exercise performance. Blood lactate kinetics, whereby the concentration of the metabolite is measured as it enters and leaves the vasculature over time, affords the best opportunity to assess the merits of β-alanine supplementation's ergogenic effect. Optimal β-alanine dosages have not been determined for persons of different ages, genders and nutritional/health conditions. Doses as high as 6.4 g day(-1), for ten weeks have been administered to healthy subjects. Paraesthesia is to date the only side effect from oral β-alanine ingestion. The severity and duration of paraesthesia episodes are dose-dependent. It may be unwise for persons with a history of paraesthesia to ingest β-alanine. As for any supplement, caution should be exercised with β-alanine supplementation.

  12. PPAR{alpha} regulates the hepatotoxic biomarker alanine aminotransferase (ALT1) gene expression in human hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Thulin, Petra; Rafter, Ingalill; Stockling, Kenneth; Tomkiewicz, Celine; Norjavaara, Ensio; Aggerbeck, Martine; Hellmold, Heike; Ehrenborg, Ewa; Andersson, Ulf; Cotgreave, Ian; Glinghammar, Bjoern

    2008-08-15

    In this work, we investigated a potential mechanism behind the observation of increased aminotransferase levels in a phase I clinical trial using a lipid-lowering drug, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) {alpha} agonist, AZD4619. In healthy volunteers treated with AZD4619, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities were elevated without an increase in other markers for liver injury. These increases in serum aminotransferases have previously been reported in some patients receiving another PPAR{alpha} agonist, fenofibrate. In subsequent in vitro studies, we observed increased expression of ALT1 protein and mRNA in human hepatocytes after treatment with fenofibric acid. The PPAR effect on ALT1 expression was shown to act through a direct transcriptional mechanism involving at least one PPAR response element (PPRE) in the proximal ALT1 promoter, while no effect of fenofibrate and AZD4619 was observed on the ALT2 promoter. Binding of PPARs to the PPRE located at - 574 bp from the transcriptional start site was confirmed on both synthetic oligonucleotides and DNA in hepatocytes. These data show that intracellular ALT expression is regulated by PPAR agonists and that this mechanism might contribute to increased ALT activity in serum.

  13. On the mechanism of enhanced ATP formation in hypoxic myocardium caused by glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Pisarenko, O I; Solomatina, E S; Ivanov, V E; Studneva, I M; Kapelko, V I; Smirnov, V N

    1985-01-01

    The effect of glutamic acid on the cardiac contractile function and sources of anaerobic ATP formation in hypoxic myocardium was studied in isovolumic rat hearts. The presence of glutamic acid (5 mM) in the perfusate significantly diminished an increment in diastolic pressure caused by 60 min hypoxia, and facilitated its complete recovery during 30 min reoxygenation. This effect was combined with the maintenance of a higher ATP level during hypoxia and reoxygenation. The total content of lactate in the heart-perfusate system rose exactly as during hypoxia without glutamic acid, while pyruvate content decreased due to increased alanine formation. Restoration of tissue content of glutamate and aspartate in the presence of exogenous glutamic acid was accompanied by a more than 2-fold increase in succinate formation, the end-product of the Krebs' cycle under anaerobic conditions. The products of glutamic acid transamination with oxaloacetic acid, aspartic and alpha-ketoglutaric acids (5mM each), induced the same functional and metabolic alterations as glutamic acid. Amino-oxyacetic acid, a tramsaminase inhibitor, eliminated the effects caused by glutamic acid. Moreover, the inhibition of transamination was accompanied by a decreased succinate and alanine synthesis as well as insignificantly increased lactate formation compared to hypoxia without additives. The results suggest that the beneficial effect of glutamic acid is due to the activation of anaerobic ATP formation in the mitochondria rather than stimulation of glycolysis.

  14. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa antimetabolite L -2-amino-4-methoxy-trans-3-butenoic acid (AMB) is made from glutamate and two alanine residues via a thiotemplate-linked tripeptide precursor

    PubMed Central

    Rojas Murcia, Nelson; Lee, Xiaoyun; Waridel, Patrice; Maspoli, Alessandro; Imker, Heidi J.; Chai, Tiancong; Walsh, Christopher T.; Reimmann, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa toxin L-2-amino-4-methoxy-trans-3-butenoic acid (AMB) is a non-proteinogenic amino acid which is toxic for prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Production of AMB requires a five-gene cluster encoding a putative LysE-type transporter (AmbA), two non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (AmbB and AmbE), and two iron(II)/α-ketoglutarate-dependent oxygenases (AmbC and AmbD). Bioinformatics analysis predicts one thiolation (T) domain for AmbB and two T domains (T1 and T2) for AmbE, suggesting that AMB is generated by a processing step from a precursor tripeptide assembled on a thiotemplate. Using a combination of ATP-PPi exchange assays, aminoacylation assays, and mass spectrometry-based analysis of enzyme-bound substrates and pathway intermediates, the AmbB substrate was identified to be L-alanine (L-Ala), while the T1 and T2 domains of AmbE were loaded with L-glutamate (L-Glu) and L-Ala, respectively. Loading of L-Ala at T2 of AmbE occurred only in the presence of AmbB, indicative of a trans loading mechanism. In vitro assays performed with AmbB and AmbE revealed the dipeptide L-Glu-L-Ala at T1 and the tripeptide L-Ala-L-Glu-L-Ala attached at T2. When AmbC and AmbD were included in the assay, these peptides were no longer detected. Instead, an L-Ala-AMB-L-Ala tripeptide was found at T2. These data are in agreement with a biosynthetic model in which L-Glu is converted into AMB by the action of AmbC, AmbD, and tailoring domains of AmbE. The importance of the flanking L-Ala residues in the precursor tripeptide is discussed. PMID:25814981

  15. Polymerization of amino acids under primitive earth conditions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, J. J.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1972-01-01

    Small amounts of peptides were obtained when equal amounts of methane and ammonia were reacted with vaporized aqueous solutions of C14-labeled glycine, L-alanine, L-aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid and L-threonine in the presence of a continuous spark discharge in a 24-hr cyclic process. The experiment was designed to demonstrate the possibility of peptide synthesis under simulated primeval earth conditions. It is theorized that some dehydration-condensation processes may have taken place, with ammonium cyanide, the hydrogencyanide tetramer or aminonitriles as intermediate products, during the early chemical evolution of the earth.

  16. [Aspartate aminotransferase--key enzyme in the human systemic metabolism].

    PubMed

    Otto-Ślusarczyk, Dagmara; Graboń, Wojciech; Mielczarek-Puta, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Aspartate aminotransferase is an organ-nonspecific enzyme located in many tissues of the human body where it catalyzes reversible reaction of transamination. There are two aspartate aminotransferase isoforms--cytoplasmic (AST1) and mitochondrial (AST2), that usually occur together and interact with each other metabolically. Both isoforms are homodimers containing highly conservative regions responsible for catalytic properties of enzyme. The common feature of all aspartate aminotransfeses is Lys - 259 residue covalent binding with prosthetic group - pyridoxal phosphate. The differences in the primary structure of AST isoforms determine their physico-chemical, kinetic and immunological properties. Because of the low concentration of L-aspartate (L-Asp) in the blood, AST is the only enzyme, which supply of this amino acid as a substrate for many metabolic processes, such as urea cycle or purine and pyrimidine nucleotides in the liver, synthesis of L-arginine in the kidney and purine nucleotide cycle in the brain and the skeletal muscle. AST is also involved in D-aspartate production that regulates the metabolic activity at the auto-, para- and endocrine level. Aspartate aminotransferase is a part of the malate-aspartate shuttle in the myocardium, is involved in gluconeogenesis in the liver and kidney, glyceroneogenesis in the adipose tissue, and synthesis of neurotransmitters and neuro-glial pathway in the brain. Recently, the significant role of AST in glutaminolysis - normal metabolic pathway in tumor cells, was demonstrated. The article is devoted the role of AST, known primarily as a diagnostic liver enzyme, in metabolism of various human tissues and organs. PMID:27117097

  17. In Vivo d-Serine Hetero-Exchange through Alanine-Serine-Cysteine (ASC) Transporters Detected by Microelectrode Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    d-Serine, a co-agonist of N-methyl d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, has been implicated in neurological and psychiatric disorders such as cerebral ischemia, lateral amyotrophic sclerosis, or schizophrenia. d-Serine signaling represents an important pharmacological target for treating these diseases; however, the biochemical mechanisms controlling extracellular d-serine levels in vivo are still unclear. d-Serine heteroexchange through small neutral amino acid transporters has been shown in cell cultures and brain slices and could provide a biochemical mechanism for the control of d-serine extracellular concentration in vivo. Alternatively, exocytotic d-serine release has also been proposed. In this study, the dynamics of d-serine release and clearance were explored in vivo on a second-by-second time scale using microelectrode biosensors. The rate of d-serine clearance in the rat frontal cortex after a microionophoretic injection revealed a transporter-mediated uptake mechanism. d-Serine uptake was blocked by small neutral l-amino acids, implicating alanine-serine-cysteine (ASC) transporters, in particular high affinity Asc-1 and low affinity ASCT2 transporters. Interestingly, changes in alanine, serine, or threonine levels resulted in d-serine release through ASC transporters. Asc-1, but not ASCT2, appeared to release d-serine in response to changes in amino acid concentrations. Finally, neuronal silencing by tetrodotoxin increased d-serine extracellular concentration by an ASC-transporter-dependent mechanism. Together, these results indicate that d-serine heteroexchange through ASC transporters is present in vivo and may constitute a key component in the regulation of d-serine extracellular concentration. PMID:23581544

  18. Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of amino acids and nucleotide bases for target bacterial vibrational mode identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guicheteau, Jason; Argue, Leanne; Hyre, Aaron; Jacobson, Michele; Christesen, Steven D.

    2006-05-01

    Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) studies of bacteria have reported a wide range of vibrational mode assignments associated with biological material. We present Raman and SER spectra of the amino acids phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan, glutamine, cysteine, alanine, proline, methionine, asparagine, threonine, valine, glycine, serine, leucine, isoleucine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid and the nucleic acid bases adenosine, guanosine, thymidine, and uridine to better characterize biological vibrational mode assignments for bacterial target identification. We also report spectra of the bacteria Bacillus globigii, Pantoea agglomerans, and Yersinia rhodei along with band assignments determined from the reference spectra obtained.

  19. A Deficiency in Aspartate Biosynthesis in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis C2 Causes Slow Milk Coagulation†

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua; Yu, Weizhu; Coolbear, Tim; O’Sullivan, Dan; McKay, Larry L.

    1998-01-01

    A mutant of fast milk-coagulating (Fmc+) Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis C2, designated L. lactis KB4, was identified. Although possessing the known components essential for utilizing casein as a nitrogen source, which include functional proteinase (PrtP) activity and oligopeptide, di- and tripeptide, and amino acid transport systems, KB4 exhibited a slow milk coagulation (Fmc−) phenotype. When the amino acid requirements of L. lactis C2 were compared with those of KB4 by use of a chemically defined medium, it was found that KB4 was unable to grow in the absence of aspartic acid. This aspartic acid requirement could also be met by aspartate-containing peptides. The addition of aspartic acid to milk restored the Fmc+ phenotype of KB4. KB4 was found to be defective in pyruvate carboxylase and thus was deficient in the ability to form oxaloacetate and hence aspartic acid from pyruvate and carbon dioxide. The results suggest that when lactococci are propagated in milk, aspartate derived from casein is unable to meet fully the nutritional demands of the lactococci, and they become dependent upon aspartate biosynthesis. PMID:9572935

  20. Aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase activities in plasma: statistical distributions, individual variations, and reference values.

    PubMed

    Siest, G; Schiele, F; Galteau, M M; Panek, E; Steinmetz, J; Fagnani, F; Gueguen, R

    1975-07-01

    The determination of frequency value (percentile limits) and the classification of the different variation factors allow us to define more and more homogeneous subpopulations as we use these factors for sorting. Using as our study population those persons coming to the Centre for Preventive Medicine, we were able to: (a) Describe and measure the significance and importance of physiological variations or of variations attributed to age--the latter largely related only to excessive weight, which it seems to us is often the case. (b) Establish a classification for variation factors; the recapitulatory table should be useful to clinical chemists in helping physicians interpret a laboratory test result that falls within the zone of incertitude. (c) Suggest a preliminary group of reference values for healthy subjects, to be used in interpreting a laboratory test in this way.

  1. [Effects of ß-alanine supplementation on athletic performance].

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Raúl; Hernández Lougedo, Juan; Maté-Muñoz, José Luis; Garnacho-Castaño, Manuel Vicente

    2014-10-06

    Carnosine, dipeptide formed by amino acids ß-alanine and L-histidine, has important physiological functions among which its antioxidant and related memory and learning. However, in connection with the exercise, the most important functions would be associated with muscle contractility, improving calcium sensitivity in muscle fibers, and the regulatory function of pH. Thus, it is proposed that carnosine is the major intracellular buffer, but could contribute to 7-10% in buffer or buffer capacity. Since carnosine synthesis seems to be limited by the availability of ß-alanine supplementation with this compound has been gaining increasing popularity among the athlete population. Therefore, the objective of this study literature review was to examine all those research works have shown the effect of ß-alanine supplementation on athletic performance. Moreover, it also has attempted to establish a specific dosage that maximizing the potential benefits, minimize paresthesia, the main side effect presented in response to supplementation.

  2. Structure-function relationships in the Na,K-ATPase. cap alpha. subunit: site-directed mutagenesis of glutamine-111 to arginine and asparagine-122 to aspartic acid generates a ouabain-resistant enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Price, E.M.; Lingrel, J.B.

    1988-11-01

    Na,K-ATPases from various species differ greatly in their sensitivity to cardiac glycosides such as ouabain. The sheep and human enzymes are a thousand times more sensitive than the corresponding ones from rat and mouse. To define the region of the ..cap alpha..1 subunit responsible for this differential sensitivity, chimeric cDNAs of sheep and rat were constructed and expressed in ouabain-sensitive HeLa cells. The construct containing the amino-terminal half of the rat ..cap alpha..1 subunit coding region and carboxyl-terminal half of the sheep conferred the ouabain-resistant phenotype to HeLa cells while the reverse construct did not. This indicates that the determinants involved in ouabain sensitivity are located in the amino-terminal half of the Na,K-ATPase ..cap alpha.. subunit. By use of site-directed mutagenesis, the amino acid sequence of the first extracellular domain (H1-H2) of the sheep ..cap alpha..1 subunit was changed to that of the rat. When expressed in HeLa cells, this mutated sheep ..cap alpha..1 construct, like the rat/sheep chimera, was able to confer ouabain resistance to these cells. Furthermore, similar results were observed when HeLa cells were transfected with a sheep ..cap alpha..1 cDNA containing only two amino acid substitutions. The resistant cells, whether transfected with the rat ..cap alpha..1 cDNA, the rat/sheep chimera, or the mutant sheep ..cap alpha..1 cDNAs, exhibited identical biochemical characteristics including ouabain-inhibitable cell growth, /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ uptake, and Na,K-ATPase activity. These results demonstrate that the presence of arginine and aspartic acid on the amino end and carboxyl end, respectively, of the H1-H2 extracellular domain of the Na,K-ATPase ..cap alpha.. subunit together is responsible for the ouabain-resistant character of the rat enzyme and the corresponding residues in the sheep ..cap alpha..1 subunit (glutamine and asparagine) are somehow involved in ouabain binding.

  3. Role of the NR2A/2B subunits of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor in glutamate-induced glutamic acid decarboxylase alteration in cortical GABAergic neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Monnerie, H; Hsu, F-C; Coulter, D A; Le Roux, P D

    2010-12-29

    The vulnerability of brain neuronal cell subpopulations to neurologic insults varies greatly. Among cells that survive a pathological insult, for example ischemia or brain trauma, some may undergo morphological and/or biochemical changes that may compromise brain function. The present study is a follow-up of our previous studies that investigated the effect of glutamate-induced excitotoxicity on the GABA synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65/67)'s expression in surviving DIV 11 cortical GABAergic neurons in vitro [Monnerie and Le Roux, (2007) Exp Neurol 205:367-382, (2008) Exp Neurol 213:145-153]. An N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated decrease in GAD expression was found following glutamate exposure. Here we examined which NMDAR subtype(s) mediated the glutamate-induced change in GAD protein levels. Western blotting techniques on cortical neuron cultures showed that glutamate's effect on GAD proteins was not altered by NR2B-containing diheteromeric (NR1/NR2B) receptor blockade. By contrast, blockade of triheteromeric (NR1/NR2A/NR2B) receptors fully protected against a decrease in GAD protein levels following glutamate exposure. When receptor location on the postsynaptic membrane was examined, extrasynaptic NMDAR stimulation was observed to be sufficient to decrease GAD protein levels similar to that observed after glutamate bath application. Blocking diheteromeric receptors prevented glutamate's effect on GAD proteins after extrasynaptic NMDAR stimulation. Finally, NR2B subunit examination with site-specific antibodies demonstrated a glutamate-induced, calpain-mediated alteration in NR2B expression. These results suggest that glutamate-induced excitotoxic NMDAR stimulation in cultured GABAergic cortical neurons depends upon subunit composition and receptor location (synaptic vs. extrasynaptic) on the neuronal membrane. Biochemical alterations in surviving cortical GABAergic neurons in various disease states may contribute to the altered

  4. Characterization of amino acid aminotransferases of Methanococcus aeolicus.

    PubMed Central

    Xing, R Y; Whitman, W B

    1992-01-01

    Four aminotransferases were identified and characterized from Methanococcus aeolicus. Branched-chain aminotransferase (BcAT, EC 2.6.1.42), aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT, EC 2.6.1.1), and two aromatic aminotransferases (EC 2.6.1.57) were partially purified 175-, 84-, 600-, and 30-fold, respectively. The apparent molecular weight, substrate specificity, and kinetic properties of the BcAT were similar to those of other microbial BcATs. The AspAT had an apparent molecular weight of 162,000, which was unusually high. It had also a broad substrate specificity, which included activity towards alanine, a property which resembled the enzyme from Sulfolobus solfataricus. An additional alanine aminotransferase was not found in M. aeolicus, and this activity of AspAT could be physiologically significant. The apparent molecular weights of the aromatic aminotransferases (ArAT-I and ArAT-II) were 150,000 and 90,000, respectively. The methanococcal ArATs also had different pIs and kinetic constants. ArAT-I may be the major ArAT in methanococci. High concentrations of 2-ketoglutarate strongly inhibited valine, isoleucine, and alanine transaminations but were less inhibitory for leucine and aspartate transaminations. Aromatic amino acid transaminations were not inhibited by 2-ketoglutarate. 2-Ketoglutarate may play an important role in the regulation of amino acid biosynthesis in methanococci. PMID:1729242

  5. Alanine aminotransferase controls seed dormancy in barley

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Kazuhiro; Yamane, Miki; Yamaji, Nami; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Tagiri, Akemi; Schwerdt, Julian G.; Fincher, Geoffrey B.; Matsumoto, Takashi; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Komatsuda, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Dormancy allows wild barley grains to survive dry summers in the Near East. After domestication, barley was selected for shorter dormancy periods. Here we isolate the major seed dormancy gene qsd1 from wild barley, which encodes an alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT). The seed dormancy gene is expressed specifically in the embryo. The AlaAT isoenzymes encoded by the long and short dormancy alleles differ in a single amino acid residue. The reduced dormancy allele Qsd1 evolved from barleys that were first domesticated in the southern Levant and had the long dormancy qsd1 allele that can be traced back to wild barleys. The reduced dormancy mutation likely contributed to the enhanced performance of barley in industrial applications such as beer and whisky production, which involve controlled germination. In contrast, the long dormancy allele might be used to control pre-harvest sprouting in higher rainfall areas to enhance global adaptation of barley. PMID:27188711

  6. Alanine aminotransferase controls seed dormancy in barley.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kazuhiro; Yamane, Miki; Yamaji, Nami; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Tagiri, Akemi; Schwerdt, Julian G; Fincher, Geoffrey B; Matsumoto, Takashi; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Komatsuda, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Dormancy allows wild barley grains to survive dry summers in the Near East. After domestication, barley was selected for shorter dormancy periods. Here we isolate the major seed dormancy gene qsd1 from wild barley, which encodes an alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT). The seed dormancy gene is expressed specifically in the embryo. The AlaAT isoenzymes encoded by the long and short dormancy alleles differ in a single amino acid residue. The reduced dormancy allele Qsd1 evolved from barleys that were first domesticated in the southern Levant and had the long dormancy qsd1 allele that can be traced back to wild barleys. The reduced dormancy mutation likely contributed to the enhanced performance of barley in industrial applications such as beer and whisky production, which involve controlled germination. In contrast, the long dormancy allele might be used to control pre-harvest sprouting in higher rainfall areas to enhance global adaptation of barley. PMID:27188711

  7. Dinuclear complexes of copper and zinc with m-xylene/cyclohexane-linked bis-aspartic acids: synthesis, characterization, dioxygen activation, and catalytic oxidation of nitrobenzene in pure aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shourong; Qiu, Zhixiang; Ni, Tianjun; Zhao, Xiujuan; Yan, Shikai; Xing, Feifei; Zhao, Yongmei; Bai, Yueling; Li, Mingxing

    2013-08-14

    Two new m-xylene/cyclohexane-linked bis-aspartic acid ligands, L(b) and L(c), were synthesized via Michael addition in basic aqueous solution. Their structures were characterized by elemental analysis, NMR and MS spectrometry. Both ligands react with Cu(II) and Zn(II) to form dinuclear complexes, with M2L(OH)(-) the major species in neutral/weak basic aqueous solution. To quantify the relative interaction strength between a Lewis acid and base, a new parameter σ = log K/14 was proposed which compares the stability constant with the binding constant between H(+) and OH(-). The dinuclear copper complexes (L(b)-2Cu and L(c)-2Cu) react with H2O2 in aqueous solution. The reaction in 0.020 M phosphate buffer at pH 7.5 is first-order for [L(c)-2Cu], but second-order for [L(b)-2Cu]. The oxidation products are oxygenated and/or dehydrogenated species. Radical trapping tests indicate that both complexes slightly scavenge the OH˙ radical, but generate the H˙ radical. L(c)-2Cu generates the H˙ radical much more effectively than that of L(b)-2Cu when reacted with H2O2. Both complexes are excellent catalysts for the oxidation of nitrobenzene in the presence of H2O2 in weakly basic aqueous solution. The oxidation follows the rate-law v = k[complex][nitrobenzene][H2O2]. The k values in pH 8.0 phosphate buffer at 25 °C are 211.2 ± 0.3 and 607.9 ± 1.7 mol(-2) L(2) s(-1) for L(b)-2Cu and L(c)-2Cu, respectively. The Arrhenius activation energies are 69.4 ± 2.2 and 70.0 ± 4.3 kJ mol(-1) for L(b)-2Cu and L(c)-2Cu, respectively, while the Arrhenius pre-exponential factors are 2.62 × 10(14) and 1.06 × 10(15), respectively. The larger pre-exponential factor makes L(c)-2Cu more catalytically active than L(b)-2Cu. These complexes are some of the most effective oxidation catalysts known for the oxidation of nitrobenzene.

  8. Distribution and enantiomeric composition of amino acids in the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, M. H.; Nagy, B.

    1982-01-01

    Studies of the amino acid contents and enantiomeric compositions of a single stone from the Murchison meteorite are reported. Water-extracted and 6M HCl-extracted samples from the meteorite interior of meteorite fragments were analyzed by gas chromatography and combined gas chromatography-chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Examination of the D/L ratios of glutamic acid, aspartic acid, proline, leucine and alanine reveals those amino acids extractable by water to be partially racemized, whereas the acid-extracted amino acids were less racemized. The amino acid composition of the stone is similar to those previously reported, including the absence of serine, threonine, tyrosine phenylalanine and methionine and the presence of unusual amino acids including such as isovaline, alpha-aminoisobutyric acid and pseudoleucine. It is concluded that the most likely mechanism accounting for the occurrence of nonracemic amino acid mixtures in the Murchison meteorite is by extraterrestrial stereoselective synthesis or decomposition reactions.

  9. Effects of Glutamate and Aspartate on Serum Antioxidative Enzyme, Sex Hormones, and Genital Inflammation in Boars Challenged with Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Hengjia; Lu, Lu; Deng, Jinpin; Fan, Wenjun

    2016-01-01

    Background. Oxidative stress is associated with infertility. This study was conducted to determine the effects of glutamate and aspartate on serum antioxidative enzymes, sex hormones, and genital inflammation in boars suffering from oxidative stress. Methods. Boars were randomly divided into 4 groups: the nonchallenged control (CON) and H2O2-challenged control (BD) groups were fed a basal diet supplemented with 2% alanine; the other two groups were fed the basal diet supplemented with 2% glutamate (GLU) or 2% aspartate (ASP). The BD, GLU, and ASP groups were injected with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on day 15. The CON group was injected with 0.9% sodium chloride solution on the same day. Results. Dietary aspartate decreased the malondialdehyde (MDA) level in serum (P < 0.05) compared with the BD group. Additionally, aspartate maintained serum luteinizing hormone (LH) at a relatively stable level. Moreover, glutamate and aspartate increased transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels in the epididymis and testis (P < 0.05) compared with the BD group. Conclusion. Both glutamate and aspartate promoted genital mRNA expressions of anti-inflammatory factors after oxidative stress. Aspartate more effectively decreased serum MDA and prevented fluctuations in serum sex hormones after H2O2 challenge than did glutamate. PMID:27777497

  10. Crystal Structures of Aedes Aegypt Alanine Glyoxylate Aminotransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Han,Q.; Robinson, H.; Gao, Y.; Vogelaar, N.; Wilson, S.; Rizzi, M.; Li, J.

    2006-01-01

    Mosquitoes are unique in having evolved two alanine glyoxylate aminotransferases (AGTs). One is 3-hydroxykynurenine transaminase (HKT), which is primarily responsible for catalyzing the transamination of 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) to xanthurenic acid (XA). Interestingly, XA is used by malaria parasites as a chemical trigger for their development within the mosquito. This 3-HK to XA conversion is considered the major mechanism mosquitoes use to detoxify the chemically reactive and potentially toxic 3-HK. The other AGT is a typical dipteran insect AGT and is specific for converting glyoxylic acid to glycine. Here we report the 1.75{angstrom} high-resolution three-dimensional crystal structure of AGT from the mosquito Aedes aegypti (AeAGT) and structures of its complexes with reactants glyoxylic acid and alanine at 1.75 and 2.1{angstrom} resolution, respectively. This is the first time that the three-dimensional crystal structures of an AGT with its amino acceptor, glyoxylic acid, and amino donor, alanine, have been determined. The protein is dimeric and adopts the type I-fold of pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP)-dependent aminotransferases. The PLP co-factor is covalently bound to the active site in the crystal structure, and its binding site is similar to those of other AGTs. The comparison of the AeAGT-glyoxylic acid structure with other AGT structures revealed that these glyoxylic acid binding residues are conserved in most AGTs. Comparison of the AeAGT-alanine structure with that of the Anopheles HKT-inhibitor complex suggests that a Ser-Asn-Phe motif in the latter may be responsible for the substrate specificity of HKT enzymes for 3-HK.

  11. Optical and Spectral Studies on β Alanine Metal Halide Hybrid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweetlin, M. Daniel; Selvarajan, P.; Perumal, S.; Ramalingom, S.

    2011-10-01

    We have synthesized and grown β alanine metal halide hybrid crystals viz. β alanine cadmium chloride (BACC), an amino acid transition metal halide complex crystal and β alanine potassium chloride (BAPC), an amino acid alkali metal halide complex crystal by slow evaporation method. The grown crystals were found to be transparent and have well defined morphology. The optical characteristics of the grown crystals were carried out with the help of UV-Vis Spectroscopy. The optical transmittances of the spectrums show that BAPC is more transparent than BACC. The Photoluminescence of the materials were determined by the Photoluminescent Spectroscopy

  12. Elevational Variation in Soil Amino Acid and Inorganic Nitrogen Concentrations in Taibai Mountain, China.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaochuang; Ma, Qingxu; Zhong, Chu; Yang, Xin; Zhu, Lianfeng; Zhang, Junhua; Jin, Qianyu; Wu, Lianghuan

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids are important sources of soil organic nitrogen (N), which is essential for plant nutrition, but detailed information about which amino acids predominant and whether amino acid composition varies with elevation is lacking. In this study, we hypothesized that the concentrations of amino acids in soil would increase and their composition would vary along the elevational gradient of Taibai Mountain, as plant-derived organic matter accumulated and N mineralization and microbial immobilization of amino acids slowed with reduced soil temperature. Results showed that the concentrations of soil extractable total N, extractable organic N and amino acids significantly increased with elevation due to the accumulation of soil organic matter and the greater N content. Soil extractable organic N concentration was significantly greater than that of the extractable inorganic N (NO3--N + NH4+-N). On average, soil adsorbed amino acid concentration was approximately 5-fold greater than that of the free amino acids, which indicates that adsorbed amino acids extracted with the strong salt solution likely represent a potential source for the replenishment of free amino acids. We found no appreciable evidence to suggest that amino acids with simple molecular structure were dominant at low elevations, whereas amino acids with high molecular weight and complex aromatic structure dominated the high elevations. Across the elevational gradient, the amino acid pool was dominated by alanine, aspartic acid, glycine, glutamic acid, histidine, serine and threonine. These seven amino acids accounted for approximately 68.9% of the total hydrolyzable amino acid pool. The proportions of isoleucine, tyrosine and methionine varied with elevation, while soil major amino acid composition (including alanine, arginine, aspartic acid, glycine, histidine, leucine, phenylalanine, serine, threonine and valine) did not vary appreciably with elevation (p>0.10). The compositional similarity of many

  13. Elevational Variation in Soil Amino Acid and Inorganic Nitrogen Concentrations in Taibai Mountain, China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xin; Zhu, Lianfeng; Zhang, Junhua; Jin, Qianyu; Wu, Lianghuan

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids are important sources of soil organic nitrogen (N), which is essential for plant nutrition, but detailed information about which amino acids predominant and whether amino acid composition varies with elevation is lacking. In this study, we hypothesized that the concentrations of amino acids in soil would increase and their composition would vary along the elevational gradient of Taibai Mountain, as plant-derived organic matter accumulated and N mineralization and microbial immobilization of amino acids slowed with reduced soil temperature. Results showed that the concentrations of soil extractable total N, extractable organic N and amino acids significantly increased with elevation due to the accumulation of soil organic matter and the greater N content. Soil extractable organic N concentration was significantly greater than that of the extractable inorganic N (NO3−-N + NH4+-N). On average, soil adsorbed amino acid concentration was approximately 5-fold greater than that of the free amino acids, which indicates that adsorbed amino acids extracted with the strong salt solution likely represent a potential source for the replenishment of free amino acids. We found no appreciable evidence to suggest that amino acids with simple molecular structure were dominant at low elevations, whereas amino acids with high molecular weight and complex aromatic structure dominated the high elevations. Across the elevational gradient, the amino acid pool was dominated by alanine, aspartic acid, glycine, glutamic acid, histidine, serine and threonine. These seven amino acids accounted for approximately 68.9% of the total hydrolyzable amino acid pool. The proportions of isoleucine, tyrosine and methionine varied with elevation, while soil major amino acid composition (including alanine, arginine, aspartic acid, glycine, histidine, leucine, phenylalanine, serine, threonine and valine) did not vary appreciably with elevation (p>0.10). The compositional similarity of many

  14. Elevational Variation in Soil Amino Acid and Inorganic Nitrogen Concentrations in Taibai Mountain, China.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaochuang; Ma, Qingxu; Zhong, Chu; Yang, Xin; Zhu, Lianfeng; Zhang, Junhua; Jin, Qianyu; Wu, Lianghuan

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids are important sources of soil organic nitrogen (N), which is essential for plant nutrition, but detailed information about which amino acids predominant and whether amino acid composition varies with elevation is lacking. In this study, we hypothesized that the concentrations of amino acids in soil would increase and their composition would vary along the elevational gradient of Taibai Mountain, as plant-derived organic matter accumulated and N mineralization and microbial immobilization of amino acids slowed with reduced soil temperature. Results showed that the concentrations of soil extractable total N, extractable organic N and amino acids significantly increased with elevation due to the accumulation of soil organic matter and the greater N content. Soil extractable organic N concentration was significantly greater than that of the extractable inorganic N (NO3--N + NH4+-N). On average, soil adsorbed amino acid concentration was approximately 5-fold greater than that of the free amino acids, which indicates that adsorbed amino acids extracted with the strong salt solution likely represent a potential source for the replenishment of free amino acids. We found no appreciable evidence to suggest that amino acids with simple molecular structure were dominant at low elevations, whereas amino acids with high molecular weight and complex aromatic structure dominated the high elevations. Across the elevational gradient, the amino acid pool was dominated by alanine, aspartic acid, glycine, glutamic acid, histidine, serine and threonine. These seven amino acids accounted for approximately 68.9% of the total hydrolyzable amino acid pool. The proportions of isoleucine, tyrosine and methionine varied with elevation, while soil major amino acid composition (including alanine, arginine, aspartic acid, glycine, histidine, leucine, phenylalanine, serine, threonine and valine) did not vary appreciably with elevation (p>0.10). The compositional similarity of many

  15. Determination of the D and L isomers of some protein amino acids present in soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, G. E.; Cheng, C.-N.; Cronin, S. E.

    1977-01-01

    The D and L isomers of some protein amino acids present in soils were measured by using a gas chromatographic technique. The results of two processing procedures were compared to determine the better method. Results of the comparison indicated that the determination of D and L percentages requires amino acid purification if one is to obtain accurate data. It was found that very significant amounts of D-alanine, D-aspartic acid, and D-glutamic acid were present in the contemporary soils studied. Valine, isoleucine, leucine, proline, and phenylalanine generally contained only a trace to very small amounts of the D isomer. It is probable that the D-amino acids from the alanine, aspartic, and glutamic acids are contributed to the soil primarily via microorganisms. The finding of very significant quantities of some D-amino acids (about 5-16%) in present-day soils may alert some investigators of geological sediments to a possible problem in using amino acid racemization as an age-dating technique.

  16. Amino acids in the Martian meteorite Nakhla

    PubMed Central

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Brinton, Karen L. F.; McDonald, Gene D.

    1999-01-01

    A suite of protein and nonprotein amino acids were detected with high-performance liquid chromatography in the water- and acid-soluble components of an interior fragment of the Martian meteorite Nakhla, which fell in Egypt in 1911. Aspartic and glutamic acids, glycine, alanine, β-alanine, and γ-amino-n-butyric acid (γ-ABA) were the most abundant amino acids detected and were found primarily in the 6 M HCl-hydrolyzed, hot water extract. The concentrations ranged from 20 to 330 parts per billion of bulk meteorite. The amino acid distribution in Nakhla, including the d/l ratios (values range from <0.1 to 0.5), is similar to what is found in bacterially degraded organic matter. The amino acids in Nakhla appear to be derived from terrestrial organic matter that infiltrated the meteorite soon after its fall to Earth, although it is possible that some of the amino acids are endogenous to the meteorite. The rapid amino acid contamination of Martian meteorites after direct exposure to the terrestrial environment has important implications for Mars sample-return missions and the curation of the samples from the time of their delivery to Earth. PMID:10430856

  17. Amino acids in the Martian meteorite Nakhla

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. L.; Brinton, K. L.; McDonald, G. D.

    1999-01-01

    A suite of protein and nonprotein amino acids were detected with high-performance liquid chromatography in the water- and acid-soluble components of an interior fragment of the Martian meteorite Nakhla, which fell in Egypt in 1911. Aspartic and glutamic acids, glycine, alanine, beta-alanine, and gamma-amino-n-butyric acid (gamma-ABA) were the most abundant amino acids detected and were found primarily in the 6 M HCl-hydrolyzed, hot water extract. The concentrations ranged from 20 to 330 parts per billion of bulk meteorite. The amino acid distribution in Nakhla, including the D/L ratios (values range from <0.1 to 0.5), is similar to what is found in bacterially degraded organic matter. The amino acids in Nakhla appear to be derived from terrestrial organic matter that infiltrated the meteorite soon after its fall to Earth, although it is possible that some of the amino acids are endogenous to the meteorite. The rapid amino acid contamination of Martian meteorites after direct exposure to the terrestrial environment has important implications for Mars sample-return missions and the curation of the samples from the time of their delivery to Earth.

  18. Aspartate-90 and arginine-269 of hamster aspartate transcarbamylase affect the oligomeric state of a chimaeric protein with an Escherichia coli maltose-binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Y; Davidson, J N

    1998-01-01

    Residues Asp-90 and Arg-269 of Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamylase seem to interact at the interface of adjacent catalytic subunits. Alanine substitutions at the analogous positions in the hamster aspartate transcarbamylase of a chimaeric protein carrying an E. coli maltose-binding domain lead to changes in both the kinetics of the enzyme and the quaternary structure of the protein. The Vmax for the Asp-90-->Ala and Arg-269-->Ala substitutions is decreased to 1/21 and 1/50 respectively, the [S]0.5 for aspartate is increased 540-fold and 826-fold respectively, and the [S]0.5 for carbamoyl phosphate is increased 60-fold for both. These substitutions decrease the oligomeric size of the protein. Whereas the native chimaeric protein behaves as a pentamer, the Asp-90 variant is a trimer and the Arg-269 variant is a dimer. The altered enzymes also exhibit marked decreases in thermal stability and are inactivated at much lower concentrations of urea than is the unaltered enzyme. Taken together, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that both Asp-90 and Arg-269 have a role in the enzymic function and structural integrity of hamster aspartate transcarbamylase. PMID:9425105

  19. Forced swimming and imipramine modify plasma and brain amino acid concentrations in mice.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tatsuro; Yamane, Haruka; Tomonaga, Shozo; Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2009-01-01

    The relationships between monoamine metabolism and forced swimming or antidepressants have been well studied, however information is lacking regarding amino acid metabolism under these conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of forced swimming and imipramine on amino acid concentrations in plasma, the cerebral cortex and the hypothalamus in mice. Forced swimming caused cerebral cortex concentrations of L-glutamine, L-alanine, and taurine to be increased, while imipramine treatment caused decreased concentrations of L-glutamate, L-alanine, L-tyrosine, L-methionine, and L-ornithine. In the hypothalamus, forced swimming decreased the concentration of L-serine while imipramine treatment caused increased concentration of beta-alanine. Forced swimming caused increased plasma concentration of taurine, while concentrations of L-serine, L-asparagine, L-glutamine and beta-alanine were decreased. Imipramine treatment caused increased plasma concentration of all amino acid, except for L-aspartate and taurine. In conclusion, forced swimming and imipramine treatment modify central and peripheral amino acid metabolism. These results may aid in the identification of amino acids that have antidepressant-like effects, or may help to refine the dosages of antidepressant drugs. PMID:19010319

  20. Acquisition of Raman spectra of amino acids using portable instruments: Outdoor measurements and comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culka, A.; Jehlička, J.; Edwards, H. G. M.

    2010-12-01

    Raman spectra of 13 amino acids: L-alanine, β-alanine, L-asparagine, L-aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid, L-glutamine, glycine, L-methionine, L-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, L-tryptophan and L-tyrosine were acquired outdoors using two portable Raman instruments from the Ahura and Delta Nu manufacturers, both with 785 nm laser excitation. Both instruments provide quality Raman spectra with nevertheless a variable dependence upon the prevailing experimental conditions. The data acquired in these experiments will inform the selection of suitable Raman spectrometers for the in-field detection of biomolecules of relevance to the search for life signatures spectroscopically in terrestrial extreme environments and in extraterrestrial exploration, especially of planetary surfaces and subsurfaces using robotic instrumentation.

  1. Vibrational dynamics of crystalline L-alanine

    SciTech Connect

    Bordallo, H.N.; Eckert, J.; Barthes, M.

    1997-11-01

    The authors report a new, complete vibrational analysis of L-alanine and L-alanine-d{sub 4} which utilizes IINS intensities in addition to frequency information. The use of both isotopomers resulted in a self-consistent force field for and assignment of the molecular vibrations in L-alanine. Some details of the calculation as well as a comparison of calculated and observed IINS spectra are presented. The study clarifies a number of important issues on the vibrational dynamics of this molecule and presents a self-consistent force field for the molecular vibrations in crystalline L-alanine.

  2. How similar is the electronic structures of β-lactam and alanine?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Subhojyoti; Ahmed, Marawan; Wang, Feng

    2016-02-01

    The C1s spectra of β-lactam i.e. 2-azetidinone (C3H5NO), a drug and L-alanine (C3H7NO2), an amino acid, exhibit striking similarities, which may be responsible for the competition between 2-azetidinone and the alanyl-alanine moiety in biochemistry. The present study is to reveal the degree of similarities and differences between their electronic structures of the two model molecular pairs. It is found that the similarities in C1s and inner valence binding energy spectra are due to their bonding connections but other properties such as ring structure (in 2-azetidinone) and chiral carbon (alanine) can be very different. Further, the inner valence region of ionization potential greater than 18 eV for 2-azetidinone and alanine is also significantly similar. Finally the strained lactam ring exhibits more chemical reactivity measured at all non-hydrogen atoms by Fukui functions with respect to alanine.

  3. Revised mechanism of D-alanine incorporation into cell wall polymers in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Reichmann, Nathalie T; Cassona, Carolina Picarra; Gründling, Angelika

    2013-09-01

    Teichoic acids (TAs) are important for growth, biofilm formation, adhesion and virulence of Gram-positive bacterial pathogens. The chemical structures of the TAs vary between bacteria, though they typically consist of zwitterionic polymers that are anchored to either the peptidoglycan layer as in the case of wall teichoic acid (WTA) or the cell membrane and named lipoteichoic acid (LTA). The polymers are modified with D-alanines and a lack of this decoration leads to increased susceptibility to cationic antimicrobial peptides. Four proteins, DltA-D, are essential for the incorporation of d-alanines into cell wall polymers and it has been established that DltA transfers D-alanines in the cytoplasm of the cell onto the carrier protein DltC. However, two conflicting models have been proposed for the remainder of the mechanism. Using a cellular protein localization and membrane topology analysis, we show here that DltC does not traverse the membrane and that DltD is anchored to the outside of the cell. These data are in agreement with the originally proposed model for D-alanine incorporation through a process that has been proposed to proceed via a D-alanine undecaprenyl phosphate membrane intermediate. Furthermore, we found that WTA isolated from a Staphylococcus aureus strain lacking LTA contains only a small amount of D-alanine, indicating that LTA has a role, either direct or indirect, in the efficient D-alanine incorporation into WTA in living cells.

  4. Radiochemical microassay for aspartate aminotransferase activity in the nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, D.; Beattie, J.; Namboodiri, M.A.

    1988-07-01

    A radiochemical procedure for measuring aspartate aminotransferase activity in the nervous system is described. The method is based on the exchange of tritium atoms at positions 2 and 3 of L-2,3-(/sup 3/H)aspartate with water when this amino acid is transaminated in the presence of alpha-ketoglutarate to form oxaloacetate. The tritiated water is separated from the radiolabeled aspartate by passing the reaction mixture over a cation exchange column. Confirmation that the radioactivity in the product is associated with water was obtained by separating it by anion exchange HPLC and by evaporation. The product formation is linear with time up to 120 min and with tissue in the 0.05- to 10-micrograms range. The apparent Km for aspartate in the rat brain homogenate is found to be 0.83 mM and that for alpha-ketoglutarate to be 0.12 mM. Methods that further improve the sensitivity of the assay are also discussed.

  5. Activity of the lactate-alanine shuttle is independent of glutamate-glutamine cycle activity in cerebellar neuronal-astrocytic cultures.

    PubMed

    Bak, Lasse K; Sickmann, Helle M; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    The glutamate-glutamine cycle describes the neuronal release of glutamate into the synaptic cleft, astrocytic uptake, and conversion into glutamine, followed by release for use as a neuronal glutamate precursor. This only explains the fate of the carbon atoms, however, and not that of the ammonia. Recently, a role for alanine has been proposed in transfer of ammonia between glutamatergic neurons and astrocytes, denoted the lactate-alanine shuttle (Waagepetersen et al. [ 2000] J. Neurochem. 75:471-479). The role of alanine in this context has been studied further using cerebellar neuronal cultures and corresponding neuronal-astrocytic cocultures. A superfusion paradigm was used to induce repetitively vesicular glutamate release by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) in the neurons, allowing the relative activity dependency of the lactate-alanine shuttle to be assessed. [(15)N]Alanine (0.2 mM), [2-(15)N]/[5-(15)N]glutamine (0.25 mM), and [(15)N]ammonia (0.3 mM) were used as precursors and cell extracts were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Labeling from [(15)N]alanine in glutamine, aspartate, and glutamate in cerebellar cocultures was independent of depolarization of the neurons. Employing glutamine with the amino group labeled ([2-(15)N]glutamine) as the precursor, an activity-dependent increase in the labeling of both glutamate and aspartate (but not alanine) was observed in the cerebellar neurons. When the amide group of glutamine was labeled ([5-(15)N]glutamine), no labeling could be detected in the analyzed metabolites. Altogether, the results of this study support the existence of the lactate-alanine shuttle and the associated glutamate-glutamine cycle. No direct coupling of the two shuttles was observed, however, and only the glutamate-glutamine cycle seemed activity dependent.

  6. Role of host cell-derived amino acids in nutrition of intracellular Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Popp, Jasmin; Noster, Janina; Busch, Kim; Kehl, Alexander; Zur Hellen, Gero; Hensel, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The facultative intracellular pathogen Salmonella enterica resides in a specific membrane-bound compartment termed the Salmonella-containing vacuole (SCV). Despite being segregated from access to metabolites in the host cell cytosol, Salmonella is able to efficiently proliferate within the SCV. We set out to unravel the nutritional supply of Salmonella in the SCV with focus on amino acids. We studied the availability of amino acids by the generation of auxotrophic strains for alanine, asparagine, aspartate, glutamine, and proline in a macrophage cell line (RAW264.7) and an epithelial cell line (HeLa) and examined access to extracellular nutrients for nutrition. Auxotrophies for alanine, asparagine, or proline attenuated intracellular replication in HeLa cells, while aspartate, asparagine, or proline auxotrophies attenuated intracellular replication in RAW264.7 macrophages. The different patterns of intracellular attenuation of alanine- or aspartate-auxotrophic strains support distinct nutritional conditions in HeLa cells and RAW264.7 macrophages. Supplementation of medium with individual amino acids restored the intracellular replication of mutant strains auxotrophic for asparagine, proline, or glutamine. Similarly, a mutant strain deficient in succinate dehydrogenase was complemented by the extracellular addition of succinate. Complementation of the intracellular replication of auxotrophic Salmonella by external amino acids was possible if bacteria were proficient in the induction of Salmonella-induced filaments (SIFs) but failed in a SIF-deficient background. We propose that the ability of intracellular Salmonella to redirect host cell vesicular transport provides access of amino acids to auxotrophic strains and, more generally, is essential to continuously supply bacteria within the SCV with nutrients.

  7. Accurate determination of the amino acid content of selected feedstuffs.

    PubMed

    Rutherfurd, Shane M

    2009-01-01

    The accurate determination of the amino acid content is important. In the present study, a least-squares non-linear regression model of the amino acid content determined over multiple hydrolysis times was used to accurately determine the content of amino acids in five different feedstuffs. These values were compared with 24-h hydrolysis values determined for the same feedstuffs. Overall, approximately two-thirds of the amino acids determined in this study (aspartic acid, threonine, glutamic acid, proline, glycine, alanine, leucine, tyrosine, phenylalanine and arginine) using 24-h hydrolysis were in good agreement (<3% difference). When examined across feedstuffs, the concentration of serine was underestimated by the 24-h hydrolysis method by 4.8%, while the concentrations of histidine and lysine were overestimated by 3.9% and 3.1%, respectively.

  8. Alanine radicals, part 3: properties of the components contributing to the EPR spectrum of X-irradiated alanine dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Malinen, Eirik; Heydari, Mojgan Z; Sagstuen, Einar; Hole, Eli O

    2003-01-01

    The amino acid l-alpha-alanine has attracted considerable interest for use in radiation dosimetry and has been formally accepted as a secondary standard for high-dose and transfer dosimetry. Recent results have shown that the alanine EPR spectrum consists of contributions from three different radicals. A set of benchmark spectra describing the essential spectral features of these three radical components was used for reconstructions of the experimental spectra. In the present work, these basis spectra have been used to investigate the differential effects of variations in radiation doses and microwave power, as well as the dependence upon temperature annealing and UV illumination. The results presented here, based solely on relatively low-energy (60-80 keV) X rays, indicate that the three components behave very similarly with respect to radiation dose at room temperature. However, with respect to the thermal annealing/fading behavior and microwave power saturation properties, the three species behave significantly differently. It is concluded that even if it is now realized that three different radicals contribute to the composite EPR alanine spectrum, this has a minor impact on the established protocols for present-day applications (high-dose) of EPR/alanine dosimetry. However, some care should be exercised when e.g. constructing calibration curves, since fading and power saturation behavior may vary over the dose range in question. New results from UV-illumination experiments suggest a possible procedure for experimental spectral separation of the EPR signals due to the three radicals.

  9. Functional Characterization of Alanine Racemase from Schizosaccharomyces pombe: a Eucaryotic Counterpart to Bacterial Alanine Racemase

    PubMed Central

    Uo, Takuma; Yoshimura, Tohru; Tanaka, Naotaka; Takegawa, Kaoru; Esaki, Nobuyoshi

    2001-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe has an open reading frame, which we named alr1+, encoding a putative protein similar to bacterial alanine racemase. We cloned the alr1+ gene in Escherichia coli and purified the gene product (Alr1p), with an Mr of 41,590, to homogeneity. Alr1p contains pyridoxal 5′-phosphate as a coenzyme and catalyzes the racemization of alanine with apparent Km and Vmax values as follows: for l-alanine, 5.0 mM and 670 μmol/min/mg, respectively, and for d-alanine, 2.4 mM and 350 μmol/min/mg, respectively. The enzyme is almost specific to alanine, but l-serine and l-2-aminobutyrate are racemized slowly at rates 3.7 and 0.37% of that of l-alanine, respectively. S. pombe uses d-alanine as a sole nitrogen source, but deletion of the alr1+ gene resulted in retarded growth on the same medium. This indicates that S. pombe has catabolic pathways for both enantiomers of alanine and that the pathway for l-alanine coupled with racemization plays a major role in the catabolism of d-alanine. Saccharomyces cerevisiae differs markedly from S. pombe: S. cerevisiae uses l-alanine but not d-alanine as a sole nitrogen source. Moreover, d-alanine is toxic to S. cerevisiae. However, heterologous expression of the alr1+ gene enabled S. cerevisiae to grow efficiently on d-alanine as a sole nitrogen source. The recombinant yeast was relieved from the toxicity of d-alanine. PMID:11244061

  10. Identification and metabolic role of the mitochondrial aspartate-glutamate transporter in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cavero, S; Vozza, A; del Arco, A; Palmieri, L; Villa, A; Blanco, E; Runswick, M J; Walker, J E; Cerdán, S; Palmieri, F; Satrústegui, J

    2003-11-01

    The malate-aspartate NADH shuttle in mammalian cells requires the activity of the mitochondrial aspartate-glutamate carrier (AGC). Recently, we identified in man two AGC isoforms, aralar1 and citrin, which are regulated by calcium on the external face of the inner mitochondrial membrane. We have now identified Agc1p as the yeast counterpart of the human AGC. The corresponding gene was overexpressed in bacteria and yeast mitochondria, and the protein was reconstituted in liposomes where it was identified as an aspartate-glutamate transporter from its transport properties. Furthermore, yeast cells lacking Agc1p were unable to grow on acetate and oleic acid, and had reduced levels of valine, ornithine and citrulline; in contrast they grew on ethanol. Expression of the human AGC isoforms can replace the function of Agc1p. However, unlike its human orthologues, yeast Agc1p catalyses both aspartate-glutamate exchange and substrate uniport activities. We conclude that Agc1p performs two metabolic roles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. On the one hand, it functions as a uniporter to supply the mitochondria with glutamate for nitrogen metabolism and ornithine synthesis. On the other, the Agc1p, as an aspartate-glutamate exchanger, plays a role within the malate-aspartate NADH shuttle which is critical for the growth of yeast on acetate and fatty acids as carbon sources. These results provide strong evidence of the existence of a malate-aspartate NADH shuttle in yeast. PMID:14622413

  11. Photolysis of copper(II)-amino acid complexes in water

    SciTech Connect

    Hayase, K.; Zepp, R.G. )

    1991-07-01

    Kinetics of the photolysis of Cu{sup 2+}-amino acid complexes were investigated under sunlight or monochromatic radiation. Under sunlight (latitude 40{degree}N) in the absence of dioxygen, the mean half-lives estimated for the photoreduction of the bis-Cu{sup 2+} complexes (CuL{sub 2}) at pH 8.0 and 25C were 0.55, 1.6, 8.6, 8.8, 45. and 71 days for L = tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris), {beta}-alanine, L-aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid, glycine, and histidine, respectively. Under monochromatic UV irradiation (310 nm) with dioxygen absent, quantum yields for the photoproduction of Cu(I) from CuL{sub 2} were found to be 0.071, 0.098, 0.063, 0.066, 0.025, and 0.0011 for L = Tris, {beta}-alanine, L-aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid, glycine, and L-histidine, respectively. The effects of pH on the quantum yields were determined for Cu{sup 2+}-{beta}-alanine and Cu{sup 2+}-Tris complexes. Decreases in quantum yields observed with increasing acidity were attributed to changes in speciation from predominantly CuL{sub 2} to less photoreactive complexes, mainly CuL and Cu{sup 2+}. In air-saturated solutions, rates and quantum yields for Cu(I) formation were sharply reduced and hydrogen peroxide was formed. Results of the study suggest that photoreactions of Cu{sup 2+} coordination complexes may contribute to its toxicity to aquatic biota.

  12. Beta-alanine supplementation in high-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Harris, Roger C; Sale, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Glycolysis involves the oxidation of two neutral hydroxyl groups on each glycosyl (or glucosyl) unit metabolised, yielding two carboxylic acid groups. During low-intensity exercise these, along with the remainder of the carbon skeleton, are further oxidised to CO(2) and water. But during high-intensity exercise a major portion (and where blood flow is impaired, then most) is accumulated as lactate anions and H(+). The accumulation of H(+) has deleterious effects on muscle function, ultimately impairing force production and contributing to fatigue. Regulation of intracellular pH is achieved over time by export of H(+) out of the muscle, although physicochemical buffers in the muscle provide the first line of defence against H(+) accumulation. In order to be effective during high-intensity exercise, buffers need to be present in high concentrations in muscle and have pK(a)s within the intracellular exercise pH transit range. Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is ideal for this role given that it occurs in millimolar concentrations within the skeletal muscle and has a pK(a) of 6.83. Carnosine is a cytoplasmic dipeptide formed by bonding histidine and β-alanine in a reaction catalysed by carnosine synthase, although it is the availability of β-alanine, obtained in small amounts from hepatic synthesis and potentially in greater amounts from the diet that is limiting to synthesis. Increasing muscle carnosine through increased dietary intake of β-alanine will increase the intracellular buffering capacity, which in turn might be expected to increase high-intensity exercise capacity and performance where this is pH limited. In this study we review the role of muscle carnosine as an H(+) buffer, the regulation of muscle carnosine by β-alanine, and the available evidence relating to the effects of β-alanine supplementation on muscle carnosine synthesis and the subsequent effects of this on high-intensity exercise capacity and performance.

  13. Stable nitrogen isotopes in essential versus non-essential amino acids of different plankton size fractions.

    PubMed

    Loick, Natalie; Gehre, Matthias; Voss, Maren

    2007-12-01

    The stable nitrogen isotope values (delta(15)N) of the essential amino acid (EAA) leucine and the delta(15)N values of six non-essential amino acids (NEAAs) from plankton size fractions from the South China Sea (SCS) were analysed. Data from the SCS were collected during two cruises in July 2003 and 2004 onboard of RV Nghien Cuu Bien. The delta(15)N values of alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid and leucine increased with size at all sites. The delta(15)N of glycine did not increase with size, the delta(15)N of tyrosine increased with size only at offshore stations and the delta(15)N of proline increased with size only at inshore stations. We found highly significant correlations between the delta(15)N ratios of leucine to the delta(15)N ratios of glutamic acid, proline, alanine, tyrosine and aspartic acid at oligotrophic sites of enhanced nitrogen fixation. In contrast thereto these correlations were less distinct or absent at more eutrophic sites of low nitrogen fixation. A comparison with an independent data set from the tropical North Atlantic revealed intriguing similar patterns. We interpret these patterns as result of the connected metabolism of EAA and NEAA in zooplankton at sites of nitrogen limitation.

  14. Free amino acid profiling in the giant puffball mushroom (Calvatia gigantea) using UPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Kıvrak, İbrahim; Kıvrak, Şeyda; Harmandar, Mansur

    2014-09-01

    Wild edible and medicinal mushroom, Calvatia gigantea, was quantitatively analyzed for the determination of its free amino acids using ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). The concentrations of total free amino acids, essential and non-essential amino acids were 199.65 mg/100 g, 113.69 mg/100 g, and 85.96 mg/100 g in C. gigantea, respectively. This study showed that C. gigantea, so called a giant puffball mushroom, has free amino acids content. The essential amino acids: tryptophan, isoleucine, valine, phenylalanine, leucine, threonine, lysine, histidine, methionine, and the non-essential amino acids: tyrosine, 4-hyrdroxy proline, arginine, proline, glycine, serine, alanine, glutamine, glutamic acid, aspargine, aspartic acid were detected.

  15. Compound-specific nitrogen isotope analysis of D-alanine, L-alanine, and valine: application of diastereomer separation to delta15N and microbial peptidoglycan studies.

    PubMed

    Takano, Yoshinori; Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Ogawa, Nanako O; Kitazato, Hiroshi; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2009-01-01

    We have developed an analytical method to determine the compound-specific nitrogen isotope compositions of individual amino acid enantiomers using gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry. A novel derivatization of amino acid diastereomers by optically active (R)-(-)-2-butanol or (S)-(+)-2-butanol offers two advantages for nitrogen isotope analysis. First, chromatographic chiral separation can be achieved without the use of chiral stationary-phase columns. Second, the elution order of these compounds on the chromatogram can be switched by a designated esterification reaction. We applied the method to the compound-specific nitrogen isotope analysis of D- and L-alanine in a peptidoglycan derived from the cell walls of cultured bacteria (Firmicutes and Actinobacteria; Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus staphylolyticus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus, and Streptomyces sp.), natural whole bacterial cells (Bacillus subtilis var. natto), (pseudo)-peptidoglycan from archaea (Methanobacterium sp.), and cell wall from eukaryota (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). We observed statistically significant differences in nitrogen isotopic compositions; e.g., delta15N ( per thousand vs air) in Staphylococcus staphylolyticus for d-alanine (19.2 +/- 0.5 per thousand, n = 4) and L-alanine (21.3 +/- 0.8 per thousand, n = 4) and in Bacillus subtilis for D-alanine (6.2 +/- 0.2 per thousand, n = 3) and L-alanine (8.2 +/- 0.4 per thousand, n = 3). These results suggest that enzymatic reaction pathways, including the alanine racemase reaction, produce a nitrogen isotopic difference in amino acid enantiomers, resulting in 15N-depleted D-alanine. This method is expected to facilitate compound-specific nitrogen isotope studies of amino acid stereoisomers.

  16. Formation of simple biomolecules from alanine in ocean by impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Y.; Sekine, T.; Furukawa, Y.; Kakegawa, T.; Kobayashi, T.

    2013-12-01

    The biomolecules on the Earth are thought either to have originated from the extraterrestrial parts carried with flying meteorites or to have been formed from the inorganic materials on the Earth through given energy. From the standpoint to address the importance of impact energy, it is required to simulate experimentally the chemical reactions during impacts, because violent impacts may have occurred 3.8-4.0 Gyr ago to create biomolecules initially. It has been demonstrated that shock reactions among ocean (H2O), atmospheric nitrogen, and meteoritic constitution (Fe) can induce locally reduction environment to form simple bioorganic molecules such as ammonia and amino acid (Nakazawa et al., 2005; Furukawa et al., 2009). We need to know possible processes for alanine how chemical reactions proceed during repeated impacts and how complicated biomolecules are formed. Alanine can be formed from glycine (Umeda et al., in preparation). In this study, we carried out shock recovery experiments at pressures of 4.4-5.7 GPa to investigate the chemical reactions of alanine. Experiments were carried out with a propellant gun. Stainless steel containers (30 mm in diameter, 30 mm long) with 13C-labeled alanine aqueous solution immersed in olivine or hematite powders were used as targets. Air gap was present in the sample room (18 mm in diameter, 2 mm thick) behind the sample. The powder, solution, and air represent meteorite, ocean, and atmosphere on early Earth, respectively. Two powders of olivine and hematite help to keep the oxygen fugacity low and high during experiments, respectively in order to investigate the effect of oxygen fugacity on chemical processes of alanine. The recovered containers, after cleaned completely, were immersed into liquid nitrogen to freeze sample solution and then we drilled on the impact surface to extract water-soluble run products using pure water. Thus obtained products were analyzed by LC/MS for four amino acids (glycine, alanine, valine, and

  17. Enzymatic determination of carbon-14 labeled L-alanine in biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Serra, F.; Palou, A.; Pons, A.

    1987-07-15

    A method for determination of L-alanine-specific radioactivity in biological samples is presented. This method is based on the specific enzymatic transformation of L-alanine to pyruvic acid hydrazone catalyzed by the enzyme L-alanine dehydrogenase, formation of the pyruvic acid 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone derivative, and quantitative trapping in Amberlite XAD-7 columns, followed by radioactivity counting of the lipophilic eluate. No interferences from other UC-labeled materials such as D-glucose, glycerol, L-lactate, L-serine, L-glutamate, L-phenylalanine, glycine, L-leucine, and L-arginine were observed. This inexpensive and high-speed method is applicable to the simultaneous determination of L-alanine-specific radioactivity for a large number of samples.

  18. Aspartate inhibits Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hang; Wang, Mengyue; Yu, Junping; Wei, Hongping

    2015-04-01

    Biofilm formation renders Staphylococcus aureus highly resistant to conventional antibiotics and host defenses. Four D-amino acids (D-Leu, D-Met, D-Trp and D-Tyr) have been reported to be able to inhibit biofilm formation and disassemble established S. aureus biofilms. We report here for the first time that both D- and L-isoforms of aspartate (Asp) inhibited S. aureus biofilm formation on tissue culture plates. Similar biofilm inhibition effects were also observed against other staphylococcal strains, including S. saprophyticus, S. equorum, S. chromogenes and S. haemolyticus. It was found that Asp at high concentrations (>10 mM) inhibited the growth of planktonic N315 cells, but at subinhibitory concentrations decreased the cellular metabolic activity without influencing cell growth. The decreased cellular metabolic activity might be the reason for the production of less protein and DNA in the matrix of the biofilms formed in the presence of Asp. However, varied inhibition efficacies of Asp were observed for biofilms formed by clinical staphylococcal isolates. There might be mechanisms other than decreasing the metabolic activity, e.g. the biofilm phenotypes, affecting biofilm formation in the presence of Asp.

  19. Aspartate inhibits Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hang; Wang, Mengyue; Yu, Junping; Wei, Hongping

    2015-04-01

    Biofilm formation renders Staphylococcus aureus highly resistant to conventional antibiotics and host defenses. Four D-amino acids (D-Leu, D-Met, D-Trp and D-Tyr) have been reported to be able to inhibit biofilm formation and disassemble established S. aureus biofilms. We report here for the first time that both D- and L-isoforms of aspartate (Asp) inhibited S. aureus biofilm formation on tissue culture plates. Similar biofilm inhibition effects were also observed against other staphylococcal strains, including S. saprophyticus, S. equorum, S. chromogenes and S. haemolyticus. It was found that Asp at high concentrations (>10 mM) inhibited the growth of planktonic N315 cells, but at subinhibitory concentrations decreased the cellular metabolic activity without influencing cell growth. The decreased cellular metabolic activity might be the reason for the production of less protein and DNA in the matrix of the biofilms formed in the presence of Asp. However, varied inhibition efficacies of Asp were observed for biofilms formed by clinical staphylococcal isolates. There might be mechanisms other than decreasing the metabolic activity, e.g. the biofilm phenotypes, affecting biofilm formation in the presence of Asp. PMID:25687923

  20. New aspartic proteinase of Ulysses retrotransposon from Drosophila virilis.

    PubMed

    Volkov, D A; Dergousova, N I; Rumsh, L D

    2004-06-01

    This work is focused on the investigation of a proteinase of Ulysses mobile genetic element from Drosophila virilis. The primary structure of this proteinase is suggested based on comparative analysis of amino acid sequences of aspartic proteinases from retroviruses and retrotransposons. The corresponding cDNA fragment has been cloned and expressed in E. coli. The protein accumulated in inclusion bodies. The recombinant protein (12 kD) was subjected to refolding and purified by affinity chromatography on pepstatin-agarose. Proteolytic activity of the protein was determined using oligopeptide substrates melittin and insulin B-chain. It was found that the maximum of the proteolytic activity is displayed at pH 5.5 as for the majority of aspartic proteinases. We observed that hydrolysis of B-chain of insulin was totally inhibited by pepstatin A in the micromolar concentration range. The molecular weight of the monomer of the Ulysses proteinase was determined by MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometry.

  1. Biological activities of indoleacetylamino acids and their use as auxins in tissue culture

    SciTech Connect

    Hangarter, R.P.; Peterson, M.D.; Good, N.E.

    1980-05-01

    The auxin activities of a number of indoleacetylamino acid conjugates have been determined in three test systems: growth of tomato hypocotyl explants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Marglobe); growth of tobacco callus cultures (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Wisconsin 38); and ethylene production from pea stems (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska). The activities of the conjugates differ greatly depending on the amino acid moiety. Indoleacetyl-L-alanine supports rapid callus growth from the tomato hypocotyls while inhibiting growth of shoots and roots. Indoleacetlyglycine behaves in a similar manner but is somewhat less effective in supporting callus growth and in inhibiting growth of shoots and roots. Indoleacetylglycine behaves in a similar manner but is somewhat less effective in supporting callus growth and in inhibiting shoot formation. The other amino acid conjugates tested (valine, leucine, aspartic acid, threonine, methionine, phenylalanine, and proline) support shoot formation without supporting root formation or much callus growth. The tobacco callus system, which forms abundant shoots in the presence or absence of free indoleacetic acid, produces only rapid undifferentiated growth in the presence of indoleacetyl-L-alanine and indoleacetylglycine. The other conjugates inhibit shoot formatin weakly if at all. Most of the conjugates induce sustained ethylene production from the pea stems but at rates well below the initial rates observed with free indoleacetic acid. Many, but not all of the effects of conjugates such as indoleacetyl-L-alanine can be mimicked by frequent renewals of the supply of free indoleacetic acid.

  2. Pancreatic stellate cells support tumour metabolism through autophagic alanine secretion.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cristovão M; Biancur, Douglas E; Wang, Xiaoxu; Halbrook, Christopher J; Sherman, Mara H; Zhang, Li; Kremer, Daniel; Hwang, Rosa F; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Ying, Haoqiang; Asara, John M; Evans, Ronald M; Cantley, Lewis C; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Kimmelman, Alec C

    2016-08-25

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive disease characterized by an intense fibrotic stromal response and deregulated metabolism. The role of the stroma in PDAC biology is complex and it has been shown to play critical roles that differ depending on the biological context. The stromal reaction also impairs the vasculature, leading to a highly hypoxic, nutrient-poor environment. As such, these tumours must alter how they capture and use nutrients to support their metabolic needs. Here we show that stroma-associated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are critical for PDAC metabolism through the secretion of non-essential amino acids (NEAA). Specifically, we uncover a previously undescribed role for alanine, which outcompetes glucose and glutamine-derived carbon in PDAC to fuel the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and thus NEAA and lipid biosynthesis. This shift in fuel source decreases the tumour’s dependence on glucose and serum-derived nutrients, which are limited in the pancreatic tumour microenvironment. Moreover, we demonstrate that alanine secretion by PSCs is dependent on PSC autophagy, a process that is stimulated by cancer cells. Thus, our results demonstrate a novel metabolic interaction between PSCs and cancer cells, in which PSC-derived alanine acts as an alternative carbon source. This finding highlights a previously unappreciated metabolic network within pancreatic tumours in which diverse fuel sources are used to promote growth in an austere tumour microenvironment. PMID:27509858

  3. Pancreatic stellate cells support tumour metabolism through autophagic alanine secretion.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cristovão M; Biancur, Douglas E; Wang, Xiaoxu; Halbrook, Christopher J; Sherman, Mara H; Zhang, Li; Kremer, Daniel; Hwang, Rosa F; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Ying, Haoqiang; Asara, John M; Evans, Ronald M; Cantley, Lewis C; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Kimmelman, Alec C

    2016-08-25

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive disease characterized by an intense fibrotic stromal response and deregulated metabolism. The role of the stroma in PDAC biology is complex and it has been shown to play critical roles that differ depending on the biological context. The stromal reaction also impairs the vasculature, leading to a highly hypoxic, nutrient-poor environment. As such, these tumours must alter how they capture and use nutrients to support their metabolic needs. Here we show that stroma-associated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are critical for PDAC metabolism through the secretion of non-essential amino acids (NEAA). Specifically, we uncover a previously undescribed role for alanine, which outcompetes glucose and glutamine-derived carbon in PDAC to fuel the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and thus NEAA and lipid biosynthesis. This shift in fuel source decreases the tumour’s dependence on glucose and serum-derived nutrients, which are limited in the pancreatic tumour microenvironment. Moreover, we demonstrate that alanine secretion by PSCs is dependent on PSC autophagy, a process that is stimulated by cancer cells. Thus, our results demonstrate a novel metabolic interaction between PSCs and cancer cells, in which PSC-derived alanine acts as an alternative carbon source. This finding highlights a previously unappreciated metabolic network within pancreatic tumours in which diverse fuel sources are used to promote growth in an austere tumour microenvironment.

  4. Probing alanine transaminase catalysis with hyperpolarized 13CD3-pyruvate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barb, A. W.; Hekmatyar, S. K.; Glushka, J. N.; Prestegard, J. H.

    2013-03-01

    Hyperpolarized metabolites offer a tremendous sensitivity advantage (>104 fold) when measuring flux and enzyme activity in living tissues by magnetic resonance methods. These sensitivity gains can also be applied to mechanistic studies that impose time and metabolite concentration limitations. Here we explore the use of hyperpolarization by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in mechanistic studies of alanine transaminase (ALT), a well-established biomarker of liver disease and cancer that converts pyruvate to alanine using glutamate as a nitrogen donor. A specific deuterated, 13C-enriched analog of pyruvic acid, 13C3D3-pyruvic acid, is demonstrated to have advantages in terms of detection by both direct 13C observation and indirect observation through methyl protons introduced by ALT-catalyzed H-D exchange. Exchange on injecting hyperpolarized 13C3D3-pyruvate into ALT dissolved in buffered 1H2O, combined with an experimental approach to measure proton incorporation, provided information on mechanistic details of transaminase action on a 1.5 s timescale. ALT introduced, on average, 0.8 new protons into the methyl group of the alanine produced, indicating the presence of an off-pathway enamine intermediate. The opportunities for exploiting mechanism-dependent molecular signatures as well as indirect detection of hyperpolarized 13C3-pyruvate and products in imaging applications are discussed.

  5. Abiotic racemization kinetics of amino acids in marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Steen, Andrew D; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Lomstein, Bente Aa

    2013-01-01

    The ratios of d- versus l-amino acids can be used to infer the sources and composition of sedimentary organic matter. Such inferences, however, rely on knowing the rates at which amino acids in sedimentary organic matter racemize abiotically between the d- and the l-forms. Based on a heating experiment, we report kinetic parameters for racemization of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, and alanine in bulk sediment from Aarhus Bay, Denmark, taken from the surface, 30 cm, and 340 cm depth below seafloor. Extrapolation to a typical cold deep sea sediment temperature of 3°C suggests racemization rate constants of 0.50×10(-5)-11×10(-5) yr(-1). These results can be used in conjunction with measurements of sediment age to predict the ratio of d:l amino acids due solely to abiotic racemization of the source material, deviations from which can indicate the abundance and turnover of active microbial populations.

  6. Degradation of glycine and alanine on irradiated quartz.

    PubMed

    Pawlikowski, Maciej; Benko, Aleksandra; Wróbel, Tomasz P

    2013-04-01

    Recent researches suggest participation of minerals in the formation of life under primordial conditions. Among all of the minerals, quartz seems to be one of the most probable to take part in such processes. However, an external source of energy is needed, e.g. electric discharge. A device simulating the proposed conditions was designed and was used to simulate prebiotic conditions. Investigation of processes occurring during the stimulation of quartz with electric discharge was studied by means of Ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectroscopy, in order to monitor the generation kinetics of free radicals. Additionally, infrared spectroscopy was applied to identify chemical reaction products created in a solution of alanine or glycine, in the presence of quartz treated with electric discharge. Formation of increased amounts of free radicals, compared to experiments performed without quartz and/or amino acid, is reported, along with identification of possible degradation products of alanine. No synthetic reactions were observed.

  7. Alanine increases blood pressure during hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlay, L. A.; Maher, T. J.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of L-alanine administration on blood pressure (BP) during haemorrhagic shock was investigated using anesthetized rats whose left carotid arteries were cannulated for BP measurement, blood removal, and drug administration. It was found that L-alanine, in doses of 10, 25, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, increased the systolic BP of hypotensive rats by 38 to 80 percent (while 100 mg/kg pyruvate increased BP by only 9.4 mmhg, not significantly different from saline). The results suggest that L-alanine might influence cardiovascular function.

  8. Hydrogen production using amino acids obtained by protein degradation in waste biomass by combined dark- and photo-fermentation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jun; Ding, Lingkan; Xia, Ao; Lin, Richen; Li, Yuyou; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2015-03-01

    The biological hydrogen production from amino acids obtained by protein degradation was comprehensively investigated to increase heating value conversion efficiency. The five amino acids (i.e., alanine, serine, aspartic acid, arginine, and leucine) produced limited hydrogen (0.2-16.2 mL/g) but abundant soluble metabolic products (40.1-84.0 mM) during dark-fermentation. The carbon conversion efficiencies of alanine (85.3%) and serine (94.1%) during dark-fermentation were significantly higher than those of other amino acids. Residual dark-fermentation solutions treated with zeolite for NH4(+) removal were inoculated with photosynthetic bacteria to further produce hydrogen during photo-fermentation. The hydrogen yields of alanine and serine through combined dark- and photo-fermentation were 418.6 and 270.2 mL/g, respectively. The heating value conversion efficiency of alanine to hydrogen was 25.1%, which was higher than that of serine (21.2%).

  9. Substitution of aspartic acid for glycine at position 310 in type II collagen produces achondrogenesis II, and substitution of serine at position 805 produces hypochondrogenesis: analysis of genotype-phenotype relationships.

    PubMed Central

    Bonaventure, J; Cohen-Solal, L; Ritvaniemi, P; Van Maldergem, L; Kadhom, N; Delezoide, A L; Maroteaux, P; Prockop, D J; Ala-Kokko, L

    1995-01-01

    Two different mutations were found in two unrelated probands with lethal chondrodysplasias, one with achondrogenesis type II and the other with the less severe phenotype of hypochondrogenesis. The mutations in the COL2A1 gene were identified by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of genomic DNA followed by dideoxynucleotide sequencing and restriction site analysis. The proband with achondrogenesis type II had a heterozygous single-base mutation that substituted aspartate for glycine at position 310 of the alpha 1(II) chain of type II procollagen. The proband with hypochondrogenesis had a heterozygous single-base mutation that substituted serine for glycine at position 805. Type II collagen extracted from cartilage from the probands demonstrated the presence of type I collagen and a delayed electrophoretic mobility, indicating post-translational overmodifications. Analysis of CNBr peptides showed that, in proband 1, the entire peptides were overmodified. Examination of chondrocytes cultured in agarose or alginate indicated that there was a delayed secretion of type II procollagen. In addition, type II collagen synthesized by cartilage fragments from the probands demonstrated a decreased thermal stability. The melting temperature of the type II collagen containing the aspartate-for-glycine substitution was reduced by 4 degrees C, and that of the collagen containing the serine-for-glycine substitution was reduced by 2 degrees C. Electron microscopy of the extracellular matrix from the chondrocyte cultures showed a decreased density of matrix and the presence of unusually short and thin fibrils. Our results indicate that glycine substitutions in the N-terminal region of the type II collagen molecule can produce more severe phenotypes than mutations in the C-terminal region. The aspartate-for-glycine substitution at position 310, which was associated with defective secretion and a probable increased degradation of collagen, is the most destabilizing

  10. Substitution of aspartic acid for glycine at position 310 in type II collagen produces achondrogenesis II, and substitution of serine at position 805 produces hypochondrogenesis: analysis of genotype-phenotype relationships.

    PubMed

    Bonaventure, J; Cohen-Solal, L; Ritvaniemi, P; Van Maldergem, L; Kadhom, N; Delezoide, A L; Maroteaux, P; Prockop, D J; Ala-Kokko, L

    1995-05-01

    Two different mutations were found in two unrelated probands with lethal chondrodysplasias, one with achondrogenesis type II and the other with the less severe phenotype of hypochondrogenesis. The mutations in the COL2A1 gene were identified by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of genomic DNA followed by dideoxynucleotide sequencing and restriction site analysis. The proband with achondrogenesis type II had a heterozygous single-base mutation that substituted aspartate for glycine at position 310 of the alpha 1(II) chain of type II procollagen. The proband with hypochondrogenesis had a heterozygous single-base mutation that substituted serine for glycine at position 805. Type II collagen extracted from cartilage from the probands demonstrated the presence of type I collagen and a delayed electrophoretic mobility, indicating post-translational overmodifications. Analysis of CNBr peptides showed that, in proband 1, the entire peptides were overmodified. Examination of chondrocytes cultured in agarose or alginate indicated that there was a delayed secretion of type II procollagen. In addition, type II collagen synthesized by cartilage fragments from the probands demonstrated a decreased thermal stability. The melting temperature of the type II collagen containing the aspartate-for-glycine substitution was reduced by 4 degrees C, and that of the collagen containing the serine-for-glycine substitution was reduced by 2 degrees C. Electron microscopy of the extracellular matrix from the chondrocyte cultures showed a decreased density of matrix and the presence of unusually short and thin fibrils. Our results indicate that glycine substitutions in the N-terminal region of the type II collagen molecule can produce more severe phenotypes than mutations in the C-terminal region. The aspartate-for-glycine substitution at position 310, which was associated with defective secretion and a probable increased degradation of collagen, is the most destabilizing

  11. Aspartic proteinases in the digestive tract of marine decapod crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Navarrete del Toro, María de Los Angeles; García-Carreño, Fernando; López, Manuel Díaz; Celis-Guerrero, Laura; Saborowski, Reinhard

    2006-08-01

    Decapod crustaceans synthesize highly active proteolytic enzymes in the midgut gland and release at least a part of them into the stomach where they facilitate the first step in peptide hydrolysis. The most common proteinases in the gastric fluid characterized so far are serine proteinases, that is, trypsin and chymotrypsin. These enzymes show highest activities at neutral or slightly alkaline conditions. The presence of acid proteinases, as they prevail in vertebrates, has been discussed contradictorily yet in invertebrates. In this study, we show that acid aspartic proteinases appear in the gastric fluid of several decapods. Lobsters Homarus gammarus showed the highest activity with a maximum at pH 3. These activities were almost entirely inhibited by pepstatin A, which indicates a high share of aspartic proteinases. In other species (Panulirus interruptus, Cancer pagurus, Callinectes arcuatus and Callinectes bellicosus), proteolytic activities were present at acid conditions but were distinctly lower than in H. gammarus. Zymograms at pH 3 showed in each of the studied species at least one, but mostly two-four bands of activity. The apparent molecular weight of the enzymes ranged from 17.8 to 38.6 kDa. Two distinct bands were identified which were inhibited by pepstatin A. Acid aspartic proteinases may play an important role in the process of extracellular digestion in decapod crustaceans. Activities were significantly higher in clawed lobster than in spiny lobster and three species of brachyurans. Therefore, it may be suggested that the expression of acid proteinases is favored in certain groups and reduced in others. PMID:16788916

  12. N-methyl-D-aspartate promotes the survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Balázs, R; Jørgensen, O S; Hack, N

    1988-11-01

    Our previous studies on the survival-promoting influence of elevated concentrations of extracellular K+ ([K+]e) on cultured cerebellar granule cells led to the proposal that depolarization in vitro mimics the effect of the earliest afferent inputs received by the granule cells in vivo. This, in turn, might be mediated through the stimulation of excitatory amino acid receptors, in particular the N-methyl-D-aspartate-preferring subtype gating ion channels which are also permeable to Ca2+. Here we report that N-methyl-D-aspartate indeed has a dramatic effect on the survival in culture of cells derived from dissociated cerebella of 7-8-day-old rats and cultured in media containing 'low' [K+]e (5-15 mM). In addition to the visual inspection of the cultures, the effect of N-methyl-D-aspartate was quantitatively evaluated, using estimates related to the number of viable cells (determination of DNA and of reduction rate of a tetrazolium salt). Furthermore, proteins which are relatively enriched in either nerve cells (neuronal cell adhesion molecule, D3-protein and synaptin) or in glia (glutamine synthetase) were also measured. The findings showed that the rescue of cells by N-methyl-D-aspartate involved primarily nerve cells and that the survival requirement for N-methyl-D-aspartate, as for high K+, developed between 2 and 4 days in vitro. The effect depended on both the concentration of N-methyl-D-aspartate and the degree of depolarization of the cells: both the potency and the efficacy of N-methyl-D-aspartate were increased as [K+]e was raised from 5 to 15 mM, at which range K+ on its own has little if any influence on granule cell survival. These characteristics are consistent with the voltage-dependence of ion conductance through the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-linked channel. The most pronounced effect of N-methyl-D-aspartate was obtained in the presence of 15 mM K+, when cell survival approached that obtained in 'control' cultures (grown in 25 mM K

  13. Functional characterization of six aspartate (D) recombinant mojastin mutants (r-Moj): A second aspartate amino acid carboxyl to the RGD in r-Moj-D_ peptides is not sufficient to induce apoptosis of SK-Mel-28 cells.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Carla J; Gutierrez, Daniel A; Aranda, Ana S; Koshlaychuk, Melissa A; Carrillo, David A; Medrano, Rafael; McBride, Terri D; U, Andrew; Medina, Stephanie M; Lombardo, Melissa C; Lucena, Sara E; Sanchez, Elda E; Soto, Julio G

    2016-08-01

    Disintegrins are small peptides produced in viper venom that act as integrin antagonists. When bound to integrins, disintegrins induce altered cellular behaviors, such as apoptotic induction. Disintegrins with RGDDL or RGDDM motifs induce apoptosis of normal and cancer cells. We hypothesized that a second aspartate (D) carboxyl to the RGD is sufficient to induce apoptosis. Five recombinant mojastin D mutants were produced by site-directed mutagenesis (r-Moj-DA, r-Moj-DG, r-Moj-DL, r-Moj-DN, and r-Moj-DV). Stable αv integrin knockdown and shRNA scrambled control SK-Mel-28 cell lines were produced to test a second hypothesis: r-Moj-D_ peptides bind to αv integrin. Only r-Moj-DL, r-Moj-DM, and r-Moj-DN induced apoptosis of SK-Mel-28 cells (at 29.4%, 25.6%, and 36.2%, respectively). Apoptotic induction was significantly reduced in SK-Mel-28 cells with a stable αv integrin knockdown (to 2%, 17%, and 2%, respectively), but not in SK-Mel-28 cells with a stable scrambled shRNA. All six r-Moj-D_ peptides inhibited cell proliferation; ranging from 49.56% (r-Moj-DN) to 75.6% (r-Moj-DA). Cell proliferation inhibition by r-Moj-D_ peptides was significantly reduced in SK-Mel-28 cells with a stable αv integrin knockdown. All six r-Moj-D_ peptides inhibited SK-Mel-28 cell migration at high levels (69%-100%). As a consequence, rac-1 mRNA expression levels were significantly reduced as early as 1 h after treatment, suggesting that rac-1 is involved in the cell migration activity of SK-Mel-28.

  14. Solved? The reductive radiation chemistry of alanine.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Ewald; De Cooman, Hendrik; Waroquier, Michel; Hole, Eli O; Sagstuen, Einar

    2014-02-14

    The structural changes throughout the entire reductive radiation-induced pathway of l-α-alanine are solved on an atomistic level with the aid of periodic DFT and nudged elastic band (NEB) simulations. This yields unprecedented information on the conformational changes taking place, including the protonation state of the carboxyl group in the "unstable" and "stable" alanine radicals and the internal transformation converting these two radical variants at temperatures above 220 K. The structures of all stable radicals were verified by calculating EPR properties and comparing those with experimental data. The variation of the energy throughout the full radiochemical process provides crucial insight into the reason why these structural changes and rearrangements occur. Starting from electron capture, the excess electron quickly localizes on the carbon of a carboxyl group, which pyramidalizes and receives a proton from the amino group of a neighboring alanine molecule, forming a first stable radical species (up to 150 K). In the temperature interval 150-220 K, this radical deaminates and deprotonates at the carboxyl group, the detached amino group undergoes inversion and its methyl group sustains an internal rotation. This yields the so-called "unstable alanine radical". Above 220 K, triggered by the attachment of an additional proton on the detached amino group, the radical then undergoes an internal rotation in the reverse direction, giving rise to the "stable alanine radical", which is the final stage in the reductive radiation-induced decay of alanine.

  15. β-Alanine supplementation and military performance.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Jay R; Stout, Jeffrey R; Harris, Roger C; Moran, Daniel S

    2015-12-01

    During sustained high-intensity military training or simulated combat exercises, significant decreases in physical performance measures are often seen. The use of dietary supplements is becoming increasingly popular among military personnel, with more than half of the US soldiers deployed or garrisoned reported to using dietary supplements. β-Alanine is a popular supplement used primarily by strength and power athletes to enhance performance, as well as training aimed at improving muscle growth, strength and power. However, there is limited research examining the efficacy of β-alanine in soldiers conducting operationally relevant tasks. The gains brought about by β-alanine use by selected competitive athletes appears to be relevant also for certain physiological demands common to military personnel during part of their training program. Medical and health personnel within the military are expected to extrapolate and implement relevant knowledge and doctrine from research performed on other population groups. The evidence supporting the use of β-alanine in competitive and recreational athletic populations suggests that similar benefits would also be observed among tactical athletes. However, recent studies in military personnel have provided direct evidence supporting the use of β-alanine supplementation for enhancing combat-specific performance. This appears to be most relevant for high-intensity activities lasting 60-300 s. Further, limited evidence has recently been presented suggesting that β-alanine supplementation may enhance cognitive function and promote resiliency during highly stressful situations.

  16. Alanine racemase mutants of Mycobacterium tuberculosis require D-alanine for growth and are defective for survival in macrophages and mice.

    PubMed

    Awasthy, Disha; Bharath, Sowmya; Subbulakshmi, Venkita; Sharma, Umender

    2012-02-01

    Alanine racemase (Alr) is an essential enzyme in most bacteria; however, some species (e.g. Listeria monocytogenes) can utilize d-amino acid transaminase (Dat) to generate d-alanine, which renders Alr non-essential. In addition to the conflicting reports on gene knockout of alr in Mycobacterium smegmatis, a recent study concluded that depletion of Alr does not affect the growth of M. smegmatis. In order to get an unambiguous answer on the essentiality of Alr in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and validate it as a drug target in vitro and in vivo, we have inactivated the alr gene of M. tuberculosis and found that it was not possible to generate an alr knockout in the absence of a complementing gene copy or d-alanine in the growth medium. The growth kinetics of the alr mutant revealed that M. tuberculosis requires very low amounts of d-alanine (5-10 µg ml(-1)) for optimum growth. Survival kinetics of the mutant in the absence of d-alanine indicated that depletion of this amino acid results in rapid loss of viability. The alr mutant was found to be defective for growth in macrophages. Analysis of phenotype in mice suggested that non-availability of d-alanine in mice leads to clearance of bacteria followed by stabilization of bacterial number in lungs and spleen. Additionally, reversal of d-cycloserine inhibition in the presence of d-alanine in M. tuberculosis suggested that Alr is the primary target of d-cycloserine. Thus, Alr of M. tuberculosis is a valid drug target and inhibition of Alr alone should result in loss of viability in vitro and in vivo.

  17. Importance of intrahepatic mechanisms to gluconeogenesis from alanine during exercise and recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, D.H.; Williams, P.E.; Lacy, D.B.; Green, D.R.; Cherrington, A.D.

    1988-04-01

    These studies were performed to assess the importance of intrahepatic mechanisms to gluconeogenesis in the dog during 150 min of treadmill exercise and 90 min of recovery. Sampling catheters were implanted in an artery and portal and hepatic veins 16 days before experimentation. Infusions of (U-/sup 14/C)alanine, (3-/sup 3/H)glucose, and indocyanine green were used to assess gluconeogenesis. During exercise, a decline in arterial and portal vein plasma alanine and in hepatic blood flow led to a decrease in hepatic alanine delivery. During recovery, hepatic blood flow was restored to basal, causing an increase in hepatic alanine delivery beyond exercise rates but still below resting rates. Hepatic fractional alanine extraction increased from 0.26 +/- 0.02 at rest to 0.64 +/- 0.03 during exercise and remained elevated during recovery. Net hepatic alanine uptake was 2.5 +/- 0.2 mumol.kg-1.min-1 at rest and remained unchanged during exercise but was increased during recovery. The conversion rate of (/sup 14/C)alanine to glucose had increased by 248 +/- 38% by 150 min of exercise and had increased further during recovery. The efficiency with which alanine was channeled into glucose in the liver was accelerated to a rate of 338 +/- 55% above basal by 150 min of exercise but declined slightly during recovery. In conclusion, 1) gluconeogenesis from alanine is accelerated during exercise, due to an increase in the hepatic fractional extraction of the amino acid and through intrahepatic mechanisms that more efficiently channel it into glucose.

  18. Characterization of psychrophilic alanine racemase from Bacillus psychrosaccharolyticus.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Y; Yokoigawa, K; Esaki, N; Soda, K; Kawai, H

    1999-03-16

    A psychrophilic alanine racemase gene from Bacillus psychrosaccharolyticus was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli SOLR with a plasmid pYOK3. The gene starting with the unusual initiation codon GTG showed higher preference for codons ending in A or T. The enzyme purified to homogeneity showed the high catalytic activity even at 0 degrees C and was extremely labile over 35 degrees C. The enzyme was found to have a markedly large Km value (5.0 microM) for the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) cofactor in comparison with other reported alanine racemases, and was stabilized up to 50 degrees C in the presence of excess amounts of PLP. The low affinity of the enzyme for PLP may be related to the thermolability, and may be related to the high catalytic activity, initiated by the transaldimination reaction, at low temperature. The enzyme has a distinguishing hydrophilic region around the residue no. 150 in the deduced amino acid sequence (383 residues), whereas the corresponding regions of other Bacillus alanine racemases are hydrophobic. The position of the region in the three dimensional structure of C atoms of the enzyme was predicted to be in a surface loop surrounding the active site. The region may interact with solvent and reduce the compactness of the active site. PMID:10080917

  19. A novel low molecular weight alanine aminotransferase from fasted rat liver.

    PubMed

    Vedavathi, M; Girish, K S; Kumar, M Karuna

    2006-01-01

    Alanine is the most effective precursor for gluconeogenesis among amino acids, and the initial reaction is catalyzed by alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT). Although the enzyme activity increases during fasting, this effect has not been studied extensively. The present study describes the purification and characterization of an isoform of AlaAT from rat liver under fasting. The molecular mass of the enzyme is 17.7 kD with an isoelectric point of 4.2; glutamine is the N-terminal residue. The enzyme showed narrow substrate specificity for L-alanine with Km values for alanine of 0.51 mM and for 2-oxoglutarate of 0.12 mM. The enzyme is a glycoprotein. Spectroscopic and inhibition studies showed that pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) and free -SH groups are involved in the enzymatic catalysis. PLP activated the enzyme with a Km of 0.057 mM. PMID:16487061

  20. Alanine blends for ESR measurements of thermal neutron fluence in a mixed radiation field.

    PubMed

    Marrale, M; Brai, M; Gennaro, G; Triolo, A; Bartolotta, A; D'Oca, M C; Rosi, G

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the results of a study on the electron spin resonance (ESR) dosimetry to measure thermal neutron fluence in a mixed radiation field (neutron and photons) are presented. The ESR responses of alanine dosemeters with different additives are compared. In particular, the (10)B-acid boric and the Gd-oxide were chosen to enhance the sensitivity of alanine dosemeters to thermal neutrons. Irradiations were carried out inside the thermal column of the TAPIRO reactor of the ENEA center, Casaccia Rome. The main results are a greater neutron sensitivity and a smaller lowest detectable fluence for the dosemeters with gadolinium than for dosemeters of alanine with (10)B, which is well known to be much more sensitive to thermal neutrons than simple alanine.

  1. Formation of amino acids by cobalt-60 irradiation of hydrogen cyanide solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweeney, M. A.; Toste, A. P.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the pathway for the prebiotic origin of amino acids from hydrogen cyanide (HCN) under the action of ionizing radiation considered as an effective source of energy on the primitive earth. The irradiations were performed in a cobalt-60 source with a dose rate of 200,000 rad/hr. Seven naturally occurring amino acids are identified among the products formed by the hydrolysis of gamma-irradiated solutions of HCN: glycine, alanine, valine, serine, threonine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid. The identity of these amino acids is established by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Control experiments provided evidence that the amino acids are not the result of contamination.

  2. 21 CFR 172.540 - DL-Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false DL-Alanine. 172.540 Section 172.540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES....540 DL-Alanine. DL-Alanine (a racemic mixture of D- and L-alanine; CAS Reg. No. 302-72-7) may...

  3. Adsorption of L-aspartate to rutile (α-TiO 2): Experimental and theoretical surface complexation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, Caroline M.; Jonsson, Christopher L.; Estrada, Charlene; Sverjensky, Dimitri A.; Cleaves, H. James, II; Hazen, Robert M.

    2010-04-01

    Interactions between aqueous amino acids and mineral surfaces influence many geochemical processes from biomineralization to the origin of life. However, the specific reactions involved and the attachment mechanisms are mostly unknown. We have studied the adsorption of L-aspartate on the surface of rutile (α-TiO 2, pH PPZC = 5.4) in NaCl(aq) over a wide range of pH, ligand-to-solid ratio and ionic strength, using potentiometric titrations and batch adsorption experiments. The adsorption is favored below pH 6 with a maximum of 1.2 μmol of adsorbed aspartate per m 2 of rutile at pH 4 in our experiments. The adsorption decreases at higher pH because the negatively charged aspartate molecule is repelled by the negatively charged rutile surface above pH PPZC. At pH values of 3-5, aspartate adsorption increases with decreasing ionic strength. The adsorption of aspartate on rutile is very similar to that previously published for glutamate ( Jonsson et al., 2009). An extended triple-layer model was used to provide a quantitative thermodynamic characterization of the aspartate adsorption data. Two reaction stoichiometries identical in reaction stoichiometry to those for glutamate were needed. At low surface coverages, aspartate, like glutamate, may form a bridging-bidentate surface species binding through both carboxyl groups, i.e. "lying down" on the rutile surface. At high surface coverages, the reaction stoichiometry for aspartate was interpreted differently compared to glutamate: it likely involves an outer-sphere or hydrogen bonded aspartate surface species, as opposed to a partly inner-sphere complex for glutamate. Both the proposed aspartate species are qualitatively consistent with previously published ATR-FTIR spectroscopic results for aspartate on amorphous titanium dioxide. The surface complexation model for aspartate was tested against experimental data for the potentiometric titration of aspartate in the presence of rutile. In addition, the model correctly

  4. SdrI, a serine-aspartate repeat protein identified in Staphylococcus saprophyticus strain 7108, is a collagen-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Sakinc, Türkan; Kleine, Britta; Gatermann, Sören G

    2006-08-01

    A gene encoding a serine-aspartate repeat protein of Staphylococcus saprophyticus, an important cause of urinary tract infections in young women, has been cloned and sequenced. In contrast to other SD repeat proteins, SdrI carries 21 additional N-terminal repeats with a consensus sequence of (P/A)ATKE(K/E)A(A/V)(T/I)(A/T/S)EE and has the longest SD(AD)(1-5) repetitive region (854 amino acids) described so far. This highly repetitive sequence contains only the amino acids serine, asparagine, and a distinctly greater amount of alanine (37%) than all other known SD repeat proteins (2.3 to 4.4%). In addition, it is a collagen-binding protein of S. saprophyticus and the second example in this organism of a surface protein carrying the LPXTG motif. We constructed an isogenic sdrI knockout mutant that showed decreased binding to immobilized collagen compared with wild-type S. saprophyticus strain 7108. Binding could be reconstituted by complementation. Collagen binding is specifically caused by SdrI, and the recently described UafA protein, the only LPXTG-containing protein in the genome sequence of the type strain, is not involved in this trait. Our experiments suggest that, as in other staphylococci, the presence of different LPXTG-anchored cell wall proteins is common in S. saprophyticus and support the notion that the presence of matrix-binding surface proteins is common in staphylococci.

  5. Age-Related Changes in D-Aspartate Oxidase Promoter Methylation Control Extracellular D-Aspartate Levels and Prevent Precocious Cell Death during Brain Aging.

    PubMed

    Punzo, Daniela; Errico, Francesco; Cristino, Luigia; Sacchi, Silvia; Keller, Simona; Belardo, Carmela; Luongo, Livio; Nuzzo, Tommaso; Imperatore, Roberta; Florio, Ermanno; De Novellis, Vito; Affinito, Ornella; Migliarini, Sara; Maddaloni, Giacomo; Sisalli, Maria Josè; Pasqualetti, Massimo; Pollegioni, Loredano; Maione, Sabatino; Chiariotti, Lorenzo; Usiello, Alessandro

    2016-03-01

    The endogenous NMDA receptor (NMDAR) agonist D-aspartate occurs transiently in the mammalian brain because it is abundant during embryonic and perinatal phases before drastically decreasing during adulthood. It is well established that postnatal reduction of cerebral D-aspartate levels is due to the concomitant onset of D-aspartate oxidase (DDO) activity, a flavoenzyme that selectively degrades bicarboxylic D-amino acids. In the present work, we show that d-aspartate content in the mouse brain drastically decreases after birth, whereas Ddo mRNA levels concomitantly increase. Interestingly, postnatal Ddo gene expression is paralleled by progressive demethylation within its putative promoter region. Consistent with an epigenetic control on Ddo expression, treatment with the DNA-demethylating agent, azacitidine, causes increased mRNA levels in embryonic cortical neurons. To indirectly evaluate the effect of a putative persistent Ddo gene hypermethylation in the brain, we used Ddo knock-out mice (Ddo(-/-)), which show constitutively suppressed Ddo expression. In these mice, we found for the first time substantially increased extracellular content of d-aspartate in the brain. In line with detrimental effects produced by NMDAR overstimulation, persistent elevation of D-aspartate levels in Ddo(-/-) brains is associated with appearance of dystrophic microglia, precocious caspase-3 activation, and cell death in cortical pyramidal neurons and dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta. This evidence, along with the early accumulation of lipufuscin granules in Ddo(-/-) brains, highlights an unexpected importance of Ddo demethylation in preventing neurodegenerative processes produced by nonphysiological extracellular levels of free D-aspartate. PMID:26961959

  6. Ultraviolet radiation induces stress in etiolated Landoltia punctata, as evidenced by the presence of alanine, a universal stress signal: a ¹⁵N NMR study.

    PubMed

    Monselise, E B-I; Levkovitz, A; Kost, D

    2015-01-01

    Analysis with (15) N NMR revealed that alanine, a universal cellular stress signal, accumulates in etiolated duckweed plants exposed to 15-min pulsed UV light, but not in the absence of UV irradiation. The addition of 10 mm vitamin C, a radical scavenger, reduced alanine levels to zero, indicating the involvement of free radicals. Free D-alanine was detected in (15) N NMR analysis of the chiral amino acid content, using D-tartaric acid as solvent. The accumulation of D-alanine under stress conditions presents a new perspective on the biochemical processes taking place in prokaryote and eukaryote cells.

  7. Effects of high-salinity seawater acclimation on the levels of D-alanine in the muscle and hepatopancreas of kuruma prawn, Marsupenaeus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Naoko; Yokoyama, Masahumi

    2015-12-10

    Changes in D- and L-alanine contents were determined in the muscle and hepatopancreas of kuruma prawn Marsupenaeus japonicus, during acclimation from seawater containing 100% salinity to artificial seawater containing 150% salinity. In the hepatopancreas, contents of both amino acids increased by approximately threefold. The activity of alanine racemase, which catalyzes the interconversion of D- and L-alanine, also increased in the high-salinity seawater. In addition, the expression of the gene encoding alanine racemase increased in the hepatopancreas with an increase in the alanine racemase activity. These data indicate that the biosynthesis of D- and L-alanine is controlled by the gene expression level of alanine racemase, and D-alanine in the hepatopancreas functions as a major osmolyte for isosmotic regulation. In contrast, the content of D-alanine and alanine racemase activity did not change in the muscle during hyper-osmotic acclimation. Therefore, we suggest that D-alanine, which exists in the several tissues of M. japonicus, is considered to be utilized in some different physiological phenomena in different tissues.

  8. Insights into the behaviour of biomolecules on the early Earth: The concentration of aspartate by layered double hydroxide minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grégoire, Brian; Erastova, Valentina; Geatches, Dawn L.; Clark, Stewart J.; Greenwell, H. Christopher; Fraser, Donald G.

    2016-03-01

    The role of mineral surfaces in concentrating and facilitating the polymerisation of simple protobiomolecules during the Hadean and Archean has been the subject of much research in order to constrain the conditions that may have led to the origin of life on early Earth. Here we examine the adsorption of the amino acid aspartate on layered double hydroxide minerals, and use a combined computer simulation - experimental spectroscopy approach to gain insight into the resulting structures of the host-aspartate material. We show that the uptake of aspartate occurs in alkaline solution by anion exchange of the dianion form of aspartate, rather than by surface adsorption. Anion exchange only occurs at values of pH where a significant population of aspartate has the amino group deprotonated, and is then highly efficient up to the mineral anion exchange capacity.

  9. Induced synthesis of P450 aromatase and 17β-estradiol by D-aspartate in frog brain.

    PubMed

    Burrone, Lavinia; Santillo, Alessandra; Pinelli, Claudia; Baccari, Gabriella Chieffi; Di Fiore, Maria Maddalena

    2012-10-15

    D-Aspartic acid is an endogenous amino acid occurring in the endocrine glands as well as in the nervous system of various animal phyla. Our previous studies have provided evidence that D-aspartate plays a role in the induction of estradiol synthesis in gonads. Recently, we have also demonstrated that D-aspartic acid induces P450 aromatase mRNA expression in the frog (Pelophylax esculentus) testis. P450 aromatase is the key enzyme in the estrogen synthetic pathway and irreversibly converts testosterone into 17β-estradiol. In this study, we firstly investigated the immunolocalisation of P450 aromatase in the brain of P. esculentus, which has never previously been described in amphibians. Therefore, to test the hypothesis that d-aspartate mediates a local synthesis of P450 aromatase in the frog brain, we administered D-aspartate in vivo to male frogs and then assessed brain aromatase expression, sex hormone levels and sex hormone receptor expression. We found that D-aspartate enhances brain aromatase expression (mRNA and protein) through the CREB pathway. Then, P450 aromatase induces 17β-estradiol production from testosterone, with a consequent increase of its receptor. Therefore, the regulation of d-aspartate-mediated P450 aromatase expression could be an important step in the control of neuroendocrine regulation of the reproductive axis. Accordingly, we found that the sites of P450 aromatase immunoreactivity in the frog brain correspond to the areas known to be involved in neurosteroid synthesis. PMID:22771744

  10. Purification and characterization of alanine dehydrogenase from a cyanobacterium, Phormidium lapideum.

    PubMed

    Sawa, Y; Tani, M; Murata, K; Shibata, H; Ochiai, H

    1994-11-01

    Alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) was purified to homogeneity from cell-free extracts of a non-N2-fixing filamentous cyanobacterium, Phormidium lapideum. The molecular mass of the native enzyme was 240 kDa, and SDS-PAGE revealed a minimum molecular mass of 41 kDa, suggesting a six-subunit structure. The NH2 terminal amino acid residues of the purified AlaDH revealed marked similarity with that of other AlaDHs. The enzyme was highly specific for L-alanine and NAD+, but showed relatively low amino-acceptor specificity. The pH optimum was 8.4 for reductive amination of pyruvate and 9.2 for oxidative deamination of L-alanine. The Km values were 5.0 mM for L-alanine and 0.04 mM for NAD+, 0.33 mM for pyruvate, 60.6 mM for NH4+ (pH 8.7), and 0.02 mM for NADH. Various L-amino acids including alanine, serine, threonine, and aromatic amino acids, inhibited the aminating reaction. The enzyme was inactivated upon incubation with pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) followed by reduction with sodium borohydride. The copresence of NADH and pyruvate largely protected the enzyme against the inactivation by PLP. PMID:7896761

  11. Prolonged L-alanine exposure induces changes in metabolism, Ca(2+) handling and desensitization of insulin secretion in clonal pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    McClenaghan, Neville H; Scullion, Siobhan M; Mion, Brian; Hewage, Chandralal; Malthouse, J Paul G; Flatt, Peter R; Newsholme, Philip; Brennan, Lorraine

    2009-02-01

    Acute insulin-releasing actions of amino acids have been studied in detail, but comparatively little is known about the beta-cell effects of long-term exposure to amino acids. The present study examined the effects of prolonged exposure of beta-cells to the metabolizable amino acid L-alanine. Basal insulin release or cellular insulin content were not significantly altered by alanine culture, but acute alanine-induced insulin secretion was suppressed by 74% (P<0.001). Acute stimulation of insulin secretion with glucose, KCl or KIC (2-oxoisocaproic acid) following alanine culture was not affected. Acute alanine exposure evoked strong cellular depolarization after control culture, whereas AUC (area under the curve) analysis revealed significant (P<0.01) suppression of this action after culture with alanine. Compared with control cells, prior exposure to alanine also markedly decreased (P<0.01) the acute elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) (intracellular [Ca(2+)]) induced by acute alanine exposure. These diminished stimulatory responses were partially restored after 18 h of culture in the absence of alanine, indicating reversible amino-acid-induced desensitization. (13)C NMR spectra revealed that alanine culture increased glutamate labelling at position C4 (by 60%; P<0.01), as a result of an increase in the singlet peak, indicating increased flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase. Consistent with this, protein expression of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases PDK2 and PDK4 was significantly reduced. This was accompanied by a decrease in cellular ATP (P<0.05), consistent with diminished insulin-releasing actions of this amino acid. Collectively, these results illustrate the phenomenon of beta-cell desensitization by amino acids, indicating that prolonged exposure to alanine can induce reversible alterations to metabolic flux, Ca(2+) handling and insulin secretion. PMID:18702613

  12. Expression of rat liver Na+/L-alanine co-transport in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Effect of glucagon in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Palacin, M; Werner, A; Dittmer, J; Murer, H; Biber, J

    1990-01-01

    Poly(A)+ RNA (mRNA) isolated from rat liver was injected into Xenopus laevis oocytes, and expression of Na+/L-alanine transport was assayed by measuring Na(+)-dependent uptake of L-[3H]alanine. Expression of Na+/L-alanine transport was detected 3-7 days after mRNA injection, and was due to an increment of the Na(+)-dependent component. After injection of 40 ng of total mRNA, Na(+)-dependent uptake of L-alanine was 2.5-fold higher than in water-injected oocytes. In contrast with Na+/L-alanine transport by water-injected oocytes, expressed Na+/L-alanine transport was inhibited by N-methylaminoisobutyric acid, was inhibited by an extracellular pH of 6.5 and was saturated at approx. 1 mM-L-alanine. After sucrose-density-gradient fractionation, highest expression of Na+/L-alanine uptake was observed with mRNA of 1.9-2.5 kb in length. Compared with mRNA isolated from control rats, mRNA isolated from glucagon-treated rats showed a approx. 2-fold higher expression of Na+/L-alanine transport. The results demonstrate that both liver Na+/L-alanine transport systems (A and ASC) can be expressed in X. laevis oocytes. Furthermore, the data obtained with mRNA isolated from glucagon-treated rats suggest that glucagon regulates liver Na+/L-alanine transport (at least in part) via the availability of the corresponding mRNA. Images Fig. 6. PMID:2396979

  13. Repeated Supramaximal Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress: Effect of β-Alanine Plus Creatine Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Belviranli, Muaz; Okudan, Nilsel; Revan, Serkan; Balci, Serdar; Gokbel, Hakki

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carnosine is a dipeptide formed from the β-alanine and histidine amino acids and found in mainly in the brain and muscle, especially fast twitch muscle. Carnosine and creatine has an antioxidant effect and carnosine accounts for about 10% of the muscle's ability to buffer the H+ ions produced by exercise. Objectives: The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of beta alanine and/or creatine supplementation on oxidant and antioxidant status during repeated Wingate tests (WTs). Patients and Methods: Forty four sedentary males participated in the study. Participants performed three 30s WTs with 2 minutes rest between exercise bouts. After the first exercise session, the subjects were assigned to one of four groups: Placebo, Creatine, Beta-alanine and Beta-alanine plus creatine. Participants ingested twice per day for 22 consecutive days, then four times per day for the following 6 days. After the supplementation period the second exercise session was applied. Blood samples were taken before and immediately after the each exercise session for the analysis of oxidative stress and antioxidant markers. Results: Malondialdehyde levels and superoxide dismutase activities were affected by neither supplementation nor exercise. During the pre-supplementation session, protein carbonyl reduced and oxidized glutathione (GSH and GSSG) levels increased immediately after the exercise. However, during the post-supplementation session GSH and GSSG levels increased in beta-alanine and beta-alanine plus creatine groups immediately after the exercise compared to pre-exercise. In addition, during the post-supplementation session total antioxidant capacity increased in beta-alanine group immediately after the exercise. Conclusions: Beta-alanine supplementation has limited antioxidant effect during the repeated WTs. PMID:27217925

  14. Effect of nerve growth factor on the synthesis of amino acids in PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zielke, H.R.; Tildon, J.T.; Kauffman, F.C.; Baab, P.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Radioactive short-chain fatty acids preferentially label glutamine relative to glutamate in brain due to compartmentation of glutamine and glutamate. To determine whether this phenomenon occurs in a single cell culture model, we examined the effect of fatty acid chain length on the synthesis as well as pool size of selected amino acids in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells, a cell culture model of the large glutamate compartment in neurons. Intracellular 14C-amino acids were quantitated by HPLC, and the incorporation of (U-14C)-glucose, (1-14C)-butyrate, (1-14C)-octanoate, and (1-14C)-palmitate into five amino acids was measured in native and NGF-treated PC12 cells. NGF pretreatment decreased the intracellular concentration of amino acids as did addition of fatty acids but these effects were not additive. Specific activities of amino acids in native cells labelled by 14C-octanoate were 1,300 DPM/nmol, 490 DPM/nmol, 200 DPM/nmol, and 110 DPM/nmol for glutamate, aspartate, glutamine, and serine, respectively. No radioactivity was detected in alanine. Similar specific activities were noted when 14C-butyrate was the precursor; however, there was at least 5-fold less if 14C-palmitate was the precursor. Pretreatment of cells with NGF decreased the specific activity of amino acids by 25-65%. Specific activities of amino acids synthesized from 14C-glucose decreased in the following order: glutamate, 1,640 DPM/nmol; aspartate, 1,210 DPM/nmol; alanine, 580 DPM/nmol; glutamine, 275 DPM/nmol; and serine, 80 DPM/nmol for native cells. NGF pretreatment decreased the specific activities of glutamate and glutamine, but not of the other 3 amino acids. The preferred precursor for glutamate synthesis in native PC12 cells was glucose followed by octanoate, butyrate and palmitate (16:6:3:1).

  15. The effect of sugar, amino acid, metal ion, and NaCl on model Maillard reaction under pH control.

    PubMed

    Kwak, E-J; Lim, S-I

    2004-08-01

    The color intensities was determined of Maillard reaction products (MRPs) prepared by heating each of five sugars (maltose, fructose, glucose, arabinose, and xylose) with each of 12 amino acids (aspartic acid, glutamic acid, alanine, leucine, isoleucine, valine, proline, serine, cysteine, phenylalanine, arginine, and lysine). The remaining percentages of glucose and rate of change of color intensity due to the addition of a metal ion and NaCl were monitored for nine MRPs that had been formed between glucose and each of nine amino acids (aspartic acid, glutamic acid, alanine, valine, serine, cysteine, phenylalanine, arginine, and lysine). Model MRPs were prepared in a block heater at 100 degrees C for 1-12 h with the pH value controlled at 6.5. The resulting color intensity of each MRPs formed from the basic amino acids was greater due to the higher reactivity than those from the acidic amino acids. The remaining percentage of glucose in each MRPs from the basic amino acids was lower than those from the acidic amino acids. The MRPs from the nonpolar amino acids showed an intermediate color intensity and remaining percentages of glucose between those formed from the basic and acidic amino acids. Browning tended to be accelerated in the presence of metal ions, especially Fe2+ and Cu2+, although it was affected by the property of the amino acid and heating time as well as by the type of metal ion. On the other hand, browning was greatly inhibited by a high concentration of NaCl.

  16. Effect alteration of methamphetamine by amino acids or their salts on ambulatory activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Kuribara, H; Tadokoro, S

    1983-02-01

    Effect alterations of methamphetamine by pretreatment of amino acids or their salts on ambulatory activity in mice were investigated to confirm a fact that certain amino acids, particularly monosodium L-glutamate, are added to methamphetamine by the street users, and that the amino acids augment the effect of methamphetamine. The ambulatory activity of mouse was measured by a tilting-type round activity cage of 25 cm in diameter. The amino acids or their salts tested were monosodium L-glutamate, monosodium L-aspartate, gamma-amino-butyric acid, L-alanine, L-lysine hydrochloride and L-arginine hydrochloride. A single administration of each chemical at doses of 1 and 2 g/kg i.p. did not induce a marked change in the ambulatory activity in mice. Methamphetamine 2 mg/kg s.c. induced an increase in the ambulatory activity with a peak at 40 min after the administration, and the increased ambulatory activity persisted for 3 hr. The ambulation-increasing effect of methamphetamine was augmented by the pretreatment of monosodium L-glutamate and monosodium L-aspartate at 30 min before the methamphetamine administration, while attenuated by the pretreatment of L-lysine hydrochloride and L-arginine hydrochloride in a dose-dependent manner. Gamma-aminobutyric acid and L-alanine did not affect the effect of methamphetamine. Similar augmentation and attenuation in the ambulation-increasing effect of methamphetamine were induced by the pretreatment of sodium bicarbonate 0.9 g/kg i.p. (urinary alkalizer) and ammonium chloride 0.07 g/kg i.p. (urinary acidifier), respectively. The urinary pH level was elevated by the administration of monosodium L-glutamate, monosodium L-aspartate and sodium bicarbonate, and decreased by L-lysine hydrochloride, L-arginine hydrochloride and ammonium chloride. Gamma-aminobutyric acid and L-alanine did not elicit a marked change in the urinary pH level. The present experiment confirms the fact in human that monosodium L-glutamate augments the effect of

  17. Influence of yeast strain and aging time on free amino acid changes in sparkling ciders.

    PubMed

    Suárez Valles, Belén; Palacios García, Noemí; Rodríguez Madrera, Roberto; Picinelli Lobo, Anna

    2005-08-10

    An analytical method for the determination of free amino acids in ciders is reported. It is based on high-performance liquid chromatography with an automatic precolumn derivatization with o-phthaldehyde and 3-mercaptopropionic acid and diode array detection. The method was applied to monitor the amino acids during second fermentation of sparkling ciders. This paper reports the influence of yeast strains and aging time on the amino acid composition of sparkling ciders. The application of principal component analysis enables the ciders to be differentiated on the basis of the two factors considered (yeast strain and aging time). The first principal component, which accounts for 58% of the total variance, achieved the separation according to aging time with serine, glycine, alanine, valine, ornithine, leucine, and lysine as the most important variables. The second principal component, accounting for 28% of the explained variance, is closely related to aspartic acid and asparagine and separates the samples according to the yeast strain. PMID:16076126

  18. [Effects of NaCl stress on leaf photosynthesis characteristics and free amino acid metabolism of Heyedysarum scoparium].

    PubMed

    Yan, Hui; Peng, Xiao-Bang; Xue, Jian-Jie

    2012-07-01

    This paper studied the variations of leaf photosynthesis gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, and free amino acid contents of Heyedysarum scoparium under the stress of different concentration NaCl, aimed to understand the effects of salt stress on the leaf physiological characteristics and free amino acid metabolism of the plant. Under mild salt stress, the photo-damage of the leaf photosystem II was avoided via the dissipation of excess excitation energy, and stomatal limitation was the main factor reducing the photosynthesis rate. With the increase of salt stress, the leaf photoprotection was not sufficient to avoid oxidative damage, and thus, the damage to photosystem II happened. Under the stress of 200 mmol NaCl x L(-1), non-stomatal limitation was the main factor responsible for the inhibition of photosynthesis. The accumulation and metabolism of major free amino acids in H. scoparium leaves varied under salt stress. Under mild salt stress, the major free amino acids such as proline, glutamate, aspartate, and alanine had a significant accumulation, but with the further increase of salt stress, the aspartate and alanine contents in H. scoparium leaves decreased, while the synthesis and accumulation of praline increased.

  19. Early Growth Response 1 (Egr-1) Regulates N-Methyl-d-aspartate Receptor (NMDAR)-dependent Transcription of PSD-95 and α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole Propionic Acid Receptor (AMPAR) Trafficking in Hippocampal Primary Neurons.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xike; Jiang, Yongjun; Tse, Yiu Chung; Wang, Yunling; Wong, Tak Pan; Paudel, Hemant K

    2015-12-01

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) controls synaptic plasticity and memory function and is one of the major inducers of transcription factor Egr-1 in the hippocampus. However, how Egr-1 mediates the NMDAR signal in neurons has remained unclear. Here, we show that the hippocampus of mice lacking Egr-1 displays electrophysiology properties and ultrastructure that are similar to mice overexpressing PSD-95, a major scaffolding protein of postsynaptic density involved in synapse formation, synaptic plasticity, and synaptic targeting of AMPA receptors (AMPARs), which mediate the vast majority of excitatory transmission in the CNS. We demonstrate that Egr-1 is a transcription repressor of the PSD-95 gene and is recruited to the PSD-95 promoter in response to NMDAR activation. Knockdown of Egr-1 in rat hippocampal primary neurons blocks NMDAR-induced PSD-95 down-regulation and AMPAR endocytosis. Likewise, overexpression of Egr-1 in rat hippocampal primary neurons causes reduction in PSD-95 protein level and promotes AMPAR endocytosis. Our data indicate that Egr-1 is involved in NMDAR-mediated PSD-95 down-regulation and AMPAR endocytosis, a process important in the expression of long term depression. PMID:26475861

  20. A radiochemical assay for argininosuccinate synthetase with [U-14C]aspartate.

    PubMed

    Ratner, S

    1983-12-01

    A simple and sensitive radiochemical procedure to assay argininosuccinate synthetase activity in crude tissue homogenates and lysates of cultured cells is described. The new method depends on the location of 14C, uniformly, in the four carbons of aspartate. On incubation in the presence of excess of L-[U-14C]aspartate, L-citrulline, ATP, and an ATP-generating system, argininosuccinase and arginase, the [14C]fumarate formed is measured as the sum of malate and fumarate. After acidification the latter two acids are separated from [14C]aspartate on a small Dowex-50 column by elution with a few milliliters of water; the unutilized amino acid substrates remain on the column. With a specific radioactivity of 9 X 10(4) cpm, 1 to 2 nmol of product can be accurately measured under kinetically optimum conditions. PMID:6660522

  1. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  2. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  3. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  4. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  5. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  6. A GC-ECD method for estimation of free and bound amino acids, gamma-aminobutyric acid, salicylic acid, and acetyl salicylic acid from Solanum lycopersicum (L.).

    PubMed

    Meher, Hari Charan; Gajbhiye, Vijay T; Singh, Ghanendra

    2011-01-01

    A gas chromatograph with electron capture detection method for estimation of selected metabolites--amino acids (free and bound), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), salicylic acid (SA), and acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) from tomato--is reported. The method is based on nitrophenylation of the metabolites by 1-fluoro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene under aqueous alkaline conditions to form dinitophenyl derivatives. The derivatives were stable under the operating conditions of GC. Analysis of bound amino acids comprised perchloric acid precipitation of protein, alkylation (carboxymethylation) with iodoacetic acid, vapor-phase hydrolysis, and derivatization with 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene in that order. The metabolites were resolved in 35 min, using a temperature-programmed run. The method is rapid, sensitive, and precise. It easily measured the typical amino acids (aspartate, asparagine, glutamate, glutamine, alanine, leucine, lysine, and phenylalanine) used for identification and quantification of a protein, resolved amino acids of the same mass (leucine and isoleucine), satisfactorily measured sulfur amino acid (methionine, cystine, and cysteine), and quantified GABA, SA, and ASA, as well. The developed method was validated for specificity, linearity, and precision. It has been applied and recommended for estimation of 25 metabolites from Solanum lycopersicum (L.).

  7. A GC-ECD method for estimation of free and bound amino acids, gamma-aminobutyric acid, salicylic acid, and acetyl salicylic acid from Solanum lycopersicum (L.).

    PubMed

    Meher, Hari Charan; Gajbhiye, Vijay T; Singh, Ghanendra

    2011-01-01

    A gas chromatograph with electron capture detection method for estimation of selected metabolites--amino acids (free and bound), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), salicylic acid (SA), and acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) from tomato--is reported. The method is based on nitrophenylation of the metabolites by 1-fluoro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene under aqueous alkaline conditions to form dinitophenyl derivatives. The derivatives were stable under the operating conditions of GC. Analysis of bound amino acids comprised perchloric acid precipitation of protein, alkylation (carboxymethylation) with iodoacetic acid, vapor-phase hydrolysis, and derivatization with 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene in that order. The metabolites were resolved in 35 min, using a temperature-programmed run. The method is rapid, sensitive, and precise. It easily measured the typical amino acids (aspartate, asparagine, glutamate, glutamine, alanine, leucine, lysine, and phenylalanine) used for identification and quantification of a protein, resolved amino acids of the same mass (leucine and isoleucine), satisfactorily measured sulfur amino acid (methionine, cystine, and cysteine), and quantified GABA, SA, and ASA, as well. The developed method was validated for specificity, linearity, and precision. It has been applied and recommended for estimation of 25 metabolites from Solanum lycopersicum (L.). PMID:21391500

  8. [Influence of exogenous gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on GABA metabolism and amino acid contents in roots of melon seedling under hypoxia stress].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Yan; Li, Jing-Rui; Xia, Qing-Ping; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Gao, Hong-Bo

    2014-07-01

    This paper investigated the influence of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on GABA metabolism and amino acid content under hypoxia stress by accurately controlling the level of dissolved oxygen in hydroponics, using the roots of melon 'Xiyu 1' seedlings as the test material. The results showed that compared with the control, the growth of roots was inhibited seriously under hypoxia stress. Meanwhile, the hypoxia-treated roots had significantly higher activities of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), glutamate synthase (GOGAT), glutamine synthetase (GS), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) as well as the contents of GABA, pyruvic acid, alanine (Ala) and aspartic acid (Asp). But the contents of glutamic acid (Glu) and alpha-keto glutaric acid in roots under hypoxia stress was obviously lower than those of the control. Exogenous treatment with GABA alleviated the inhibition effect of hypoxia stress on root growth, which was accompanied by an increase in the contents of endogenous GABA, Glu, alpha-keto glutaric acid and Asp. Furthermore, under hypoxia stress, the activities of GAD, GDH, GOGAT, GS, ALT, AST as well as the contents of pyruvic acid and Ala significantly decreased in roots treated with GABA. However, adding GABA and viny-gamma-aminobutyric acid (VGB) reduced the alleviation effect of GABA on melon seedlings under hypoxia stress. The results suggested that absorption of GABA by roots could alleviate the injury of hypoxia stress to melon seedlings. This meant that GABA treatment allows the normal physiological metabolism under hypoxia by inhibiting the GAD activity through feedback and maintaining higher Glu content as well as the bal- ance of carbon and nitrogen.

  9. [Influence of exogenous gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on GABA metabolism and amino acid contents in roots of melon seedling under hypoxia stress].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Yan; Li, Jing-Rui; Xia, Qing-Ping; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Gao, Hong-Bo

    2014-07-01

    This paper investigated the influence of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on GABA metabolism and amino acid content under hypoxia stress by accurately controlling the level of dissolved oxygen in hydroponics, using the roots of melon 'Xiyu 1' seedlings as the test material. The results showed that compared with the control, the growth of roots was inhibited seriously under hypoxia stress. Meanwhile, the hypoxia-treated roots had significantly higher activities of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), glutamate synthase (GOGAT), glutamine synthetase (GS), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) as well as the contents of GABA, pyruvic acid, alanine (Ala) and aspartic acid (Asp). But the contents of glutamic acid (Glu) and alpha-keto glutaric acid in roots under hypoxia stress was obviously lower than those of the control. Exogenous treatment with GABA alleviated the inhibition effect of hypoxia stress on root growth, which was accompanied by an increase in the contents of endogenous GABA, Glu, alpha-keto glutaric acid and Asp. Furthermore, under hypoxia stress, the activities of GAD, GDH, GOGAT, GS, ALT, AST as well as the contents of pyruvic acid and Ala significantly decreased in roots treated with GABA. However, adding GABA and viny-gamma-aminobutyric acid (VGB) reduced the alleviation effect of GABA on melon seedlings under hypoxia stress. The results suggested that absorption of GABA by roots could alleviate the injury of hypoxia stress to melon seedlings. This meant that GABA treatment allows the normal physiological metabolism under hypoxia by inhibiting the GAD activity through feedback and maintaining higher Glu content as well as the bal- ance of carbon and nitrogen. PMID:25345052

  10. Gustatory responsiveness to the 20 proteinogenic amino acids in the spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi).

    PubMed

    Larsson, Jenny; Maitz, Anna; Hernandez Salazar, Laura Teresa; Laska, Matthias

    2014-03-29

    The gustatory responsiveness of four adult spider monkeys to the 20 proteinogenic amino acids was assessed in two-bottle preference tests of brief duration (1min). We found that Ateles geoffroyi responded with significant preferences for seven amino acids (glycine, l-proline, l-alanine, l-serine, l-glutamic acid, l-aspartic acid, and l-lysine) when presented at a concentration of 100mM and/or 200mM and tested against water. At the same concentrations, the animals significantly rejected five amino acids (l-tryptophan, l-tyrosine, l-valine, l-cysteine, and l-isoleucine) and were indifferent to the remaining tastants. Further, the results show that the spider monkeys discriminated concentrations as low as 0.2mM l-lysine, 2mM l-glutamic acid, 10mM l-proline, 20mM l-valine, 40mM glycine, l-serine, and l-aspartic acid, and 80mM l-alanine from the alternative stimulus, with individual animals even scoring lower threshold values. A comparison between the taste qualities of the proteinogenic amino acids as described by humans and the preferences and aversions observed in the spider monkeys suggests a fairly high degree of agreement in the taste quality perception of these tastants between the two species. A comparison between the taste preference thresholds obtained with the spider monkeys and taste detection thresholds reported in human subjects suggests that the taste sensitivity of A. geoffroyi for the amino acids tested here might match that of Homo sapiens. The results support the assumption that the taste responses of spider monkeys to proteinogenic amino acids might reflect an evolutionary adaptation to their frugivorous and thus protein-poor diet. PMID:24480073

  11. Ligand Discovery for the Alanine-Serine-Cysteine Transporter (ASCT2, SLC1A5) from Homology Modeling and Virtual Screening

    PubMed Central

    Gameiro, Armanda; Albers, Thomas; Singh, Kurnvir; Shere, Helen; Bonomi, Massimiliano; Holst, Jeff; Schlessinger, Avner

    2015-01-01

    The Alanine-Serine-Cysteine transporter ASCT2 (SLC1A5) is a membrane protein that transports neutral amino acids into cells in exchange for outward movement of intracellular amino acids. ASCT2 is highly expressed in peripheral tissues such as the lung and intestines where it contributes to the homeostasis of intracellular concentrations of neutral amino acids. ASCT2 also plays an important role in the development of a variety of cancers such as melanoma by transporting amino acid nutrients such as glutamine into the proliferating tumors. Therefore, ASCT2 is a key drug target with potentially great pharmacological importance. Here, we identify seven ASCT2 ligands by computational modeling and experimental testing. In particular, we construct homology models based on crystallographic structures of the aspartate transporter GltPh in two different conformations. Optimization of the models’ binding sites for protein-ligand complementarity reveals new putative pockets that can be targeted via structure-based drug design. Virtual screening of drugs, metabolites, fragments-like, and lead-like molecules from the ZINC database, followed by experimental testing of 14 top hits with functional measurements using electrophysiological methods reveals seven ligands, including five activators and two inhibitors. For example, aminooxetane-3-carboxylate is a more efficient activator than any other known ASCT2 natural or unnatural substrate. Furthermore, two of the hits inhibited ASCT2 mediated glutamine uptake and proliferation of a melanoma cancer cell line. Our results improve our understanding of how substrate specificity is determined in amino acid transporters, as well as provide novel scaffolds for developing chemical tools targeting ASCT2, an emerging therapeutic target for cancer and neurological disorders. PMID:26444490

  12. Ligand Discovery for the Alanine-Serine-Cysteine Transporter (ASCT2, SLC1A5) from Homology Modeling and Virtual Screening.

    PubMed

    Colas, Claire; Grewer, Christof; Otte, Nicholas James; Gameiro, Armanda; Albers, Thomas; Singh, Kurnvir; Shere, Helen; Bonomi, Massimiliano; Holst, Jeff; Schlessinger, Avner

    2015-10-01

    The Alanine-Serine-Cysteine transporter ASCT2 (SLC1A5) is a membrane protein that transports neutral amino acids into cells in exchange for outward movement of intracellular amino acids. ASCT2 is highly expressed in peripheral tissues such as the lung and intestines where it contributes to the homeostasis of intracellular concentrations of neutral amino acids. ASCT2 also plays an important role in the development of a variety of cancers such as melanoma by transporting amino acid nutrients such as glutamine into the proliferating tumors. Therefore, ASCT2 is a key drug target with potentially great pharmacological importance. Here, we identify seven ASCT2 ligands by computational modeling and experimental testing. In particular, we construct homology models based on crystallographic structures of the aspartate transporter GltPh in two different conformations. Optimization of the models' binding sites for protein-ligand complementarity reveals new putative pockets that can be targeted via structure-based drug design. Virtual screening of drugs, metabolites, fragments-like, and lead-like molecules from the ZINC database, followed by experimental testing of 14 top hits with functional measurements using electrophysiological methods reveals seven ligands, including five activators and two inhibitors. For example, aminooxetane-3-carboxylate is a more efficient activator than any other known ASCT2 natural or unnatural substrate. Furthermore, two of the hits inhibited ASCT2 mediated glutamine uptake and proliferation of a melanoma cancer cell line. Our results improve our understanding of how substrate specificity is determined in amino acid transporters, as well as provide novel scaffolds for developing chemical tools targeting ASCT2, an emerging therapeutic target for cancer and neurological disorders.

  13. Exogenous γ-aminobutyric acid treatment affects citrate and amino acid accumulation to improve fruit quality and storage performance of postharvest citrus fruit.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Ling; Shen, Dandan; Luo, Yi; Sun, Xiaohua; Wang, Jinqiu; Luo, Tao; Zeng, Yunliu; Xu, Juan; Deng, Xiuxin; Cheng, Yunjiang

    2017-02-01

    The loss of organic acids during postharvest storage is one of the major factors that reduces the fruit quality and economic value of citrus. Citrate is the most important organic acid in citrus fruits. Molecular evidence has proved that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shunt plays a key role in citrate metabolism. Here, we investigated the effects of exogenous GABA treatment on citrate metabolism and storage quality of postharvest citrus fruit. The content of citrate was significantly increased, which was primarily attributed to the inhibition of the expression of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD). Amino acids, including glutamate, alanine, serine, aspartate and proline, were also increased. Moreover, GABA treatment decreased the fruit rot rate. The activities of antioxidant enzymes and the content of energy source ATP were affected by the treatment. Our results indicate that GABA treatment is a very effective approach for postharvest quality maintenance and improvement of storage performance in citrus production. PMID:27596402

  14. The effect of arsenic contamination on amino acids metabolism in Spinacia oleracea L.

    PubMed

    Pavlík, Milan; Pavlíková, Daniela; Staszková, Ludmila; Neuberg, Marek; Kaliszová, Regina; Száková, Jirina; Tlustos, Pavel

    2010-09-01

    Changes of amino acid concentrations (proline, glutamate, asparagine, aspartate, alanine) and glutamate kinase activity (GKA) in plants under arsenic chronic stress reported here reveal their role in plant arsenic stress adaptation. Results of the pot experiment confirmed the toxic effect of arsenic at tested levels (As1=25 mg As kg(-1) soil, As2=50 mg As kg(-1) soil, As3=75 mg As kg(-1) soil) for spinach. Growing available arsenic contents in soil were associated with the strong inhibition of above-ground biomass and with the enhancement of As plant content. The changes of glutamate, asparagine, aspartate and proline levels in the plants showed strong linear dependences on arsenic concentration in plants (R2=0.60-0.90). Compared to the untreated control, concentrations of free proline and aspartate of As3 treatment were enhanced up to 381% and 162%, respectively. The significant changes of glutamate were observed on As2 and As3 treatments (increased level up to 188, i.e. 617%). Arsenic in plants was shown to be an inhibitor of glutamase kinase activity (R2=0.91). Inhibition of GKA resulted in an increase in the content of glutamate that is used in synthesis of phytochelatins in plant cells. Concentration of alanine did not have a confirmed linear dependence on arsenic concentration in plant (R2=0.05). The changes of its concentrations could be affected by changes of pH in plant cell or induction of alanine aminotransferase by hypoxia.

  15. Radiolysis of alanine adsorbed in a clay mineral

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Ovando, Ellen Y.; Negron-Mendoza, Alicia

    2013-07-03

    Optical activity in molecules is a chemical characteristic of living beings. In this work, we examine the hypothesis of the influence of different mineral surfaces on the development of a specific chirality in organic molecules when subjected to conditions simulating the primitive Earth during the period of chemical evolution. By using X-ray diffraction techniques and HPLC/ELSD to analyze aqueous suspensions of amino acids adsorbed on minerals irradiated in different doses with a cobalt-60 gamma source, the experiments attempt to prove the hypothesis that some solid surfaces (like clays and meteorite rocks) may have a concentration capacity and protective role against external sources of ionizing radiation (specifically {gamma}-ray) for some organic compounds (like some amino acids) adsorbed on them. Preliminary results show a slight difference in the adsorption and radiolysis of the D-and L-alanine.

  16. The Crystal Structure of the Pseudomonas dacunhae Aspartate-[beta]-Decarboxylase Dodecamer Reveals an Unknown Oligomeric Assembly for a Pyridoxal-5′-Phosphate-Dependent Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, Santiago; Sundararaju, Bakthavatsalam; Huang, Christina; Khristoforov, Roman; Momany, Cory; Phillips, Robert S.

    2010-09-01

    The Pseudomonas dacunhae L-aspartate-{beta}-decarboxylase (ABDC, aspartate 4-decarboxylase, aspartate 4-carboxylyase, E.C. 4.1.1.12) is a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the {beta}-decarboxylation of L-aspartate to produce L-alanine and CO{sub 2}. This catalytically versatile enzyme is known to form functional dodecamers at its optimal pH and is thought to work in conjunction with an L-Asp/L-Ala antiporter to establish a proton gradient across the membrane that can be used for ATP biosynthesis. We have solved the atomic structure of ABDC to 2.35 {angstrom} resolution using single-wavelength anomalous dispersion phasing. The structure reveals that ABDC oligomerizes as a homododecamer in an unknown mode among PLP-dependent enzymes and has highest structural homology with members of the PLP-dependent aspartate aminotransferase subfamily. The structure shows that the ABDC active site is very similar to that of aspartate aminotransferase. However, an additional arginine side chain (Arg37) was observed flanking the re-side of the PLP ring in the ABDC active site. The mutagenesis results show that although Arg37 is not required for activity, it appears to be involved in the ABDC catalytic cycle.

  17. Amino acid transport in the intestine of the caiman.

    PubMed

    Coulson, R A; Hernandez, T

    1983-01-01

    Seventeen amino acids were fed singly to small caimans and the rates of their disappearance from the gut lumen, and of their appearance in intestinal mucosa, whole intestine, whole stomach, and plasma were determined. The results were compared with those in which massive amounts of protein were fed. When single amino acids were fed, only traces of arginine, ornithine, lysine, aspartate and asparagine were absorbed intact. Glycine, alanine and serine were absorbed rapidly reaching mucosal concentrations as high as 40 mM. The others were not concentrated as highly and most were absorbed by the mucosa more slowly than the glycine group. Protein feeding did not result in high amino acid concentrations in the mucosa. Whether amino acids were ingested as protein or in the free state, glycine, alanine and glutamine increased in the mucosa, suggesting these three incorporate nitrogen released from the others. It appeared that several transport systems operate if amino acids are given singly, and that a different more efficient transport system operates during protein digestion.

  18. Position of the Third Na+ Site in the Aspartate Transporter GltPh and the Human Glutamate Transporter, EAAT1

    PubMed Central

    Bastug, Turgut; Heinzelmann, Germano; Kuyucak, Serdar; Salim, Marietta; Vandenberg, Robert J.; Ryan, Renae M.

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate transport via the human excitatory amino acid transporters is coupled to the co-transport of three Na+ ions, one H+ and the counter-transport of one K+ ion. Transport by an archaeal homologue of the human glutamate transporters, GltPh, whose three dimensional structure is known is also coupled to three Na+ ions but only two Na+ ion binding sites have been observed in the crystal structure of GltPh. In order to fully utilize the GltPh structure in functional studies of the human glutamate transporters, it is essential to understand the transport mechanism of GltPh and accurately determine the number and location of Na+ ions coupled to transport. Several sites have been proposed for the binding of a third Na+ ion from electrostatic calculations and molecular dynamics simulations. In this study, we have performed detailed free energy simulations for GltPh and reveal a new site for the third Na+ ion involving the side chains of Threonine 92, Serine 93, Asparagine 310, Aspartate 312, and the backbone of Tyrosine 89. We have also studied the transport properties of alanine mutants of the coordinating residues Threonine 92 and Serine 93 in GltPh, and the corresponding residues in a human glutamate transporter, EAAT1. The mutant transporters have reduced affinity for Na+ compared to their wild type counterparts. These results confirm that Threonine 92 and Serine 93 are involved in the coordination of the third Na+ ion in GltPh and EAAT1. PMID:22427946

  19. Transport of L-glutamine, L-alanine, L-arginine and L-histidine by the neuron-specific Slc38a8 (SNAT8) in CNS.

    PubMed

    Hägglund, Maria G A; Hellsten, Sofie V; Bagchi, Sonchita; Philippot, Gaëtan; Löfqvist, Erik; Nilsson, Victor C O; Almkvist, Ingrid; Karlsson, Edvin; Sreedharan, Smitha; Tafreshiha, Atieh; Fredriksson, Robert

    2015-03-27

    Glutamine transporters are important for regulating levels of glutamate and GABA in the brain. To date, six members of the SLC38 family (SNATs) have been characterized and functionally subdivided them into System A (SNAT1, SNAT2 and SNAT4) and System N (SNAT3, SNAT5 and SNAT7). Here we present the first functional characterization of SLC38A8, one of the previous orphan transporters from the family, and we suggest that the encoded protein should be named SNAT8 to adhere with the SNAT nomenclature. We show that SLC38A8 has preference for transporting L-glutamine, L-alanine, L-arginine, L-histidine and L-aspartate using a Na+-dependent transport mechanism and that the functional characteristics of SNAT8 have highest similarity to the known System A transporters. We also provide a comprehensive central nervous system expression profile in mouse brain for the Slc38a8 gene and the SNAT8 protein. We show that Slc38a8 (SNAT8) is expressed in all neurons, both excitatory and inhibitory, in mouse brain using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, proximity ligation assay shows highly similar subcellular expression of SNAT7 and SNAT8. In conclusion, the neuronal SLC38A8 has a broad amino acid transport profile and is the first identified neuronal System A transporter. This suggests a key role of SNAT8 in the glutamine/glutamate (GABA) cycle in the brain.

  20. Isotope labeling studies on the formation of multiple addition products of alanine in the pyrolysis residue of glucose/alanine mixtures by high-resolution ESI-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Chu, Fong Lam; Sleno, Lekha; Yaylayan, Varoujan A

    2011-11-01

    Pyrolysis was used as a microscale sample preparation tool to generate glucose/alanine reaction products to minimize the use of expensive labeled precursors in isotope labeling studies. The residue remaining after the pyrolysis at 250 °C was analyzed by electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF-MS). It was observed that a peak at m/z 199.1445 in the ESI-TOF-MS spectrum appeared only when the model system contained at least 2-fold excess alanine. The accurate mass determination indeed indicated the presence of two nitrogen atoms in the molecular formula (C(10)H(18)N(2)O(2)). To verify the origin of the carbon atoms in this unknown compound, model studies with [(13)U(6)]glucose, [(13)C-1]alanine, [(13)C-2]alanine, [(13)C-3]alanine, and [(15)N]alanine were also performed. Glucose furnished six carbon atoms, and alanine provides four carbon (2 × C-2 and 2 × C-3) and two nitrogen atoms. When commercially available fructosylalanine (N-attached to C-1) was reacted with only 1 mol of alanine, a peak at m/z 199.1445 was once again observed. In addition, when 3-deoxyglucosone (3-DG) was reacted with a 2-fold excess of alanine, a peak at m/z 199.1433 was also generated, confirming the points of attachment of the two amino acids at C-1 and C-2 atoms of 3-DG. These studies have indicated that amino acids can undergo multiple addition reactions with 1,2-dicarbonyl compounds such as 3-deoxyglucosone and eventually form a tetrahydropyrazine moiety.

  1. The Apollo program and amino acids. [precursors significance in molecular evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.

    1973-01-01

    Apollo lunar sample analyses designed to detect the presence of organic compounds are reviewed, and the results are discussed from the viewpoint of relevance to laboratory experiments on the synthesis of amino acids and to theoretical models of cosmochemical processes resulting in the formation of organic compounds. Glycine, alanine, glutamic acid, aspartic acid, serine, and threonine have been found repeatedly in the hydrolyzates of hot aqueous extracts of lunar dust. These compounds represent an early step in the sequence of events leading to the rise of living material and were probably deposited by the solar wind. The results of the Apollo program so far suggest that the pathway from cosmic organic matter to life as it evolved on earth could have been pursued on the moon to the stage of amino acid precursors and then may have been terminated for lack of sufficient water.

  2. Light-activated amino acid transport in Halobacterium halobium envelope vesicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, R. E.; Lanyi, J. K.

    1977-01-01

    Vesicles prepared from Halobacterium halobium cell envelopes accumulate amino acids in response to light-induced electrical and chemical gradients. Nineteen of 20 commonly occurring amino acids have been shown to be actively accumulated by these vesicles in response to illumination or in response to an artificially created Na+ gradient. On the basis of shared common carriers the transport systems can be divided into eight classes, each responsible for the transport of one or several amino acids: arginine, lysine, histidine; asparagine, glutamine; alanine, glycine, threonine, serine; leucine, valine, isoleucine, methionine; phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan; aspartate; glutamate; proline. Available evidence suggests that these carriers are symmetrical in that amino acids can be transported equally well in both directions across the vesicle membranes. A tentative working model to account for these observations is presented.

  3. Study of Stationary Phase Metabolism Via Isotopomer Analysis of Amino Acids from an Isolated Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikh, AfshanS.; Tang, YinjieJ.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Martin, Hector Garcia; Gin, Jennifer; Benke, Peter; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-09-14

    Microbial production of many commercially important secondary metabolites occurs during stationary phase, and methods to measure metabolic flux during this growth phase would be valuable. Metabolic flux analysis is often based on isotopomer information from proteinogenic amino acids. As such, flux analysis primarily reflects the metabolism pertinent to the growth phase during which most proteins are synthesized. To investigate central metabolism and amino acids synthesis activity during stationary phase, addition of fully 13C-labeled glucose followed by induction of green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression during stationary phase was used. Our results indicate that Escherichia coli was able to produce new proteins (i.e., GFP) in the stationary phase, and the amino acids in GFP were mostly from degraded proteins synthesized during the exponential growth phase. Among amino acid biosynthetic pathways, only those for serine, alanine, glutamate/glutamine, and aspartate/asparagine had significant activity during the stationary phase.

  4. Stabilization of the second oxyanion intermediate by 1,4-dihydroxy-2-naphthoyl-coenzyme A synthase of the menaquinone pathway: spectroscopic evidence of the involvement of a conserved aspartic acid.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minjiao; Jiang, Ming; Sun, Yueru; Guo, Zu-Feng; Guo, Zhihong

    2011-07-01

    1,4-Dihydroxy-2-naphthoyl-coenzyme A (DHNA-CoA) synthase, or MenB, catalyzes an intramolecular Claisen condensation involving two oxyanion intermediates in the biosynthetic pathway of menaquinone, an essential respiration electron transporter in many microorganisms. Here we report the finding that the DHNA-CoA product and its analogues bind and inhibit the synthase from Escherichia coli with significant ultraviolet--visible spectral changes, which are similar to the changes induced by deprotonation of the free inhibitors in a basic solution. Dissection of the structure--affinity relationships of the inhibitors identifies the hydroxyl groups at positions 1 (C1-OH) and 4 (C4-OH) of DHNA-CoA or their equivalents as the dominant and minor sites, respectively, for the enzyme--ligand interaction that polarizes or deprotonates the bound ligands to cause the observed spectral changes. In the meantime, spectroscopic studies with active site mutants indicate that C4-OH of the enzyme-bound DHNA-CoA interacts with conserved polar residues Arg-91, Tyr-97, and Tyr-258 likely through a hydrogen bonding network that also includes Ser-161. In addition, site-directed mutation of the conserved Asp-163 to alanine causes a complete loss of the ligand binding ability of the protein, suggesting that the Asp-163 side chain is most likely hydrogen-bonded to C1-OH of DHNA-CoA to provide the dominant polarizing effect. Moreover, this mutation also completely eliminates the enzyme activity, strongly supporting the possibility that the Asp-163 side chain provides a strong stabilizing hydrogen bond to the tetrahedral oxyanion, which takes a position similar to that of C1-OH of the enzyme-bound DHNA-CoA and is the second high-energy intermediate in the intracellular Claisen condensation reaction. Interestingly, both Arg-91 and Tyr-97 are located in a disordered loop forming part of the active site of all available DHNA-CoA synthase structures. Their involvement in the interaction with the small

  5. Retrograde transport of (/sup 3/H)-D-aspartate label by cochlear and vestibular efferent neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, D.W.; Schwarz, I.E.

    1988-01-01

    (/sup 3/H)-D-aspartic acid was injected into the inner ear of rats. After a six hour survival time, labeled cells were found at all locations known to contain efferent cochlear or vestibular neurons. Most labeled neurons were found in the ipsilateral lateral superior olivary nucleus (LSO), although both ventral nuclei of the trapezoid body (VTB), group E, and the caudal pontine reticular nucleus (CPR) just adjacent to the ascending limb of the facial nerve also contained labeled cells. Because not all efferent neurons in the rat could be previously shown to be cholinergic, aspartate and glutamate are efferent transmitter candidates.

  6. 21 CFR 172.540 - DL-Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true DL-Alanine. 172.540 Section 172.540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents and Related Substances § 172.540 DL-Alanine. DL-Alanine (a racemic mixture of D- and...

  7. 21 CFR 172.540 - DL-Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false DL-Alanine. 172.540 Section 172.540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents and Related Substances § 172.540 DL-Alanine. DL-Alanine (a racemic mixture of D- and...

  8. On the existence of 'L-alanine cadmium bromide'.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Bikshandarkoil R

    2013-12-01

    It is argued that the recently reported nonlinear optical crystal L-alanine cadmium bromide, grown by slow solvent evaporation method at room temperature [P. Ilayabarathi, J. Chandrasekaran, Spectrochim. Acta 96A (2012) 684-689] is the well-known L-alanine crystal. The isolation of L-alanine crystal is explained due to fractional crystallization.

  9. 21 CFR 172.540 - DL-Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false DL-Alanine. 172.540 Section 172.540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents and Related Substances § 172.540 DL-Alanine. DL-Alanine (a racemic mixture of D- and...

  10. 21 CFR 172.540 - DL-Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false DL-Alanine. 172.540 Section 172.540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents and Related Substances § 172.540 DL-Alanine. DL-Alanine (a racemic mixture of D- and...

  11. Compartmentalization of amino acids in surfactant aggregates - Partitioning between water and aqueous micellar sodium dodecanoate and between hexane and dodecylammonium propionate trapped water in hexane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fendler, J. H.; Nome, F.; Nagyvary, J.

    1975-01-01

    The partitioning of amino acids (glycine, alanine, leucine, phenylalanine, histidine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, lysine, isoleucine, threonine, serine, valine, proline, arginine) in aqueous and nonaqueous micellar systems was studied experimentally. Partitioning from neat hexane into dodecylammonium propionate trapped water in hexane was found to be dependent on both electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, which implies that the interior of dodecylammonium propionate aggregates is negatively charged and is capable of hydrogen bonding in addition to providing a hydrophobic environment. Unitary free energies of transfer of amino acid side chains from hexane to water were determined and solubilities of amino acids in neat hexane substantiated the amino acid hydrophobicity scale. The relevance of the experiments to prebiotic chemistry was examined.

  12. On the fragmentation of biomolecules: Fragmentation of alanine dipeptide along the polypeptide chain

    SciTech Connect

    Solov'yov, I. A. Yakubovich, A. V.; Solov'yov, A. V.; Greiner, W.

    2006-09-15

    The interaction potential between amino acids in alanine dipeptide has been studied for the first time taking into account exact molecular geometry. Ab initio calculation has been performed in the framework of density functional theory taking into account all electrons in the system. The fragmentation of dipeptide along the polypeptide chain, as well as the interaction between alanines, has been considered. The energy of the system has been analyzed as a function of the distance between fragments for all possible dipeptide fragmentation channels. Analysis of the energy barriers makes it possible to estimate the characteristic fragmentation times and to determine the degree of applicability of classical electrodynamics for describing the system energy.

  13. Use of the entire spectrum of irradiated alanine for dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Dolo, J M; Moignau, F

    2005-02-01

    Alanine is an amino acid commonly used in ESR dosimetry as a reference detector. The classic approach for the measurement of irradiated samples is to determine the amplitude of the central peak of the first derivative spectrum. It is generally considered that this technique represents the best and most reproducible solution for achieving an accurate proportionality between the concentration of free radicals inside the resonant cavity, characterized by the amplitude, and the dose. It is also accepted that this central peak corresponds to the free radical CH3CHCOO-. The hyperfine structure of this radical in the spectrum shows five main peaks with the approximate ratios 1:4:6:4:1 as regards coupling. This paper presents another approach featuring analysis of the entire spectrum: (i) ratios of identified peaks, (ii) ratio variation vs time with regard to several parameters affecting fading. These variations in the alanine spectrum are probably correlated with the variation of the concentrations of different free radical species. These variations and their positions in the spectrum are very important constraints that increase the uncertainty of this type of measurement.

  14. The effect of immunonutrition (glutamine, alanine) on fracture healing

    PubMed Central

    Küçükalp, Abdullah; Durak, Kemal; Bayyurt, Sarp; Sönmez, Gürsel; Bilgen, Muhammed S.

    2014-01-01

    Background There have been various studies related to fracture healing. Glutamine is an amino acid with an important role in many cell and organ functions. This study aimed to make a clinical, radiological, and histopathological evaluation of the effects of glutamine on fracture healing. Methods Twenty rabbits were randomly allocated into two groups of control and immunonutrition. A fracture of the fibula was made to the right hind leg. All rabbits received standard food and water. From post-operative first day for 30 days, the study group received an additional 2 ml/kg/day 20% L-alanine L-glutamine solution via a gastric catheter, and the control group received 2 ml/kg/day isotonic via gastric catheter. At the end of 30 days, the rabbits were sacrificed and the fractures were examined clinically, radiologically, and histopathologically in respect to the degree of union. Results Radiological evaluation of the control group determined a mean score of 2.5 according to the orthopaedists and 2.65 according to the radiologists. In the clinical evaluation, the mean score was 1.875 for the control group and 2.0 for the study group. Histopathological evaluation determined a mean score of 8.5 for the control group and 9.0 for the study group. Conclusion One month after orally administered glutamine–alanine, positive effects were observed on fracture healing radiologically, clinically, and histopathologically, although no statistically significant difference was determined.

  15. Formation of chloroform during chlorination of alanine in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wen-Hai; Gao, Nai-Yun; Deng, Yang; Dong, Bing-Zhi

    2009-11-01

    Currently, dissolved nitrogenous organic matters in water, important precursors of disinfection by-products (DBPs), are of significant concern. This study was to explore the formation of chloroform (CF) during chlorination of alanine (Ala), an important nitrogenous organic compound commonly present in water sources. Our results indicated that the CF yield reached a maximum value of 0.143% at the molar ratio of chlorine atom to nitrogen atom (Cl/N)=1.0 over a Cl/N range of 0.2-5.0 (pH=7.0, reaction time=5d, and initial Ala=0.1mM). At an acidic-neutral condition (pH 4-7), the formation of CF was suppressed. However, the highest CF yield (0.227%) occurred at weakly alkaline condition (pH 8.0) (initial Ala=0.1mM, and Cl/N=1.0). The increase of Br(-) in water can increase total trihalomethanes (THMs) and bromo-THMs. However, the bromo-THMs level reached a plateau at Br(-)/Cl>0.04. Finally, based on the computation of frontier electron density and identification and measurement of key intermediates during Ala chlorination, we proposed a formation pathway of CF from Ala chlorination: Ala-->monochloro-N-alanine (MC-N-Ala)-->acetaldehyde (AAld)-->monochloroacetaldehyde acetaldehyde (MCAld)-->dichloroacetaldehyde (DCAld)-->trichloroacetaldehyde (TCAld)-->CF.

  16. Thermodynamical characteristics of the reaction of pyridoxal-5'-phosphate with L-amino acids in aqueous buffer solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barannikov, V. P.; Badelin, V. G.; Venediktov, E. A.; Mezhevoi, I. N.; Guseinov, S. S.

    2011-01-01

    The reaction of pyridoxal-5'-phosphate with L-isomers of alanine, lysine, arginine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, and glycine in phosphate buffer solution was studied by absorption spectroscopy and the calorimetry of dissolution at physiological acidity of the medium (pH 7.35). The formation constants of Schiff bases during reactions and changes in Gibbs energy, enthalpy, and entropy were determined. It was shown that the formation constant of the Schiff base and its spectral properties depend on the nature of the bound amino acid. The progress of the reaction with a majority of amino acids is governed by the entropy factor due to the predominant role of the dehydration effect of the reaction center of amino acids during chemical reactions. The intramolecular electrostatic interaction of an ionized phosphate group with the positively charged amino group on the end of the chain of amino acid residue stabilizes the Schiff bases formed by lysine and arginine. The extinction coefficient of the base, equilibrium constant, and the exothermic effect of the reaction then increase. The excess negative charge on the end of the chain of amino acid residues of aspartic and glutamic acids destabilizes the molecule of the Schiff base. In this case, the equilibrium constant decreases and the endothermic effect of the reaction increases.

  17. Molecular and functional analyses of amino acid decarboxylases involved in cuticle tanning in Tribolium castaneum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspartate 1-decarboxylase (ADC) and dopa decarboxylase (DDC) provide b–alanine and dopamine used in insect cuticle tanning. Beta-alanine is conjugated with dopamine to yield N-b-alanyldopamine (NBAD), a substrate for the phenoloxidase laccase that catalyzes the synthesis of cuticle protein cross-li...

  18. The Effect of Artichoke Leaf Extract on Alanine Aminotransferase and Aspartate Aminotransferase in the Patients with Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Rangboo, Vajiheh; Noroozi, Mostafa; Zavoshy, Roza; Rezadoost, Seyed Amirmansoor; Mohammadpoorasl, Asghar

    2016-01-01

    Background. Based on recent basic and clinical investigations, the extract of artichoke (Cynara scolymus) leaf has been revealed to be used for hepatoprotective and cholesterol reducing purposes. We aimed to assess the therapeutic effects of artichoke on biochemical and liver biomarkers in patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods. In a randomized double blind clinical trial, 60 consecutive patients suffering NASH were randomly assigned to receive Cynara scolymus extract (as 6 tablets per day consisting of 2700 mg extract of the herb) as the intervention group or placebo as the control group for two months. Results. Comparing changes in study markers following interventions showed improvement in liver enzymes. The levels of triglycerides and cholesterol were significantly reduced in the group treated with Cynara scolymus when compared to placebo group. To compare the role of Cynara scolymus use with placebo in changes in study parameters, multivariate linear regression models were employed indicating higher improvement in liver enzymes and also lipid profile particularly triglycerides and total cholesterol following administration of Cynara scolymus in comparison with placebo use. Conclusion. This study sheds light on the potential hepatoprotective activity and hypolipidemic effect of Cynara scolymus in management of NASH. This clinical trial is registered in the IRCT, Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials, by number IRCT2014070218321N1. PMID:27293900

  19. The Effect of Artichoke Leaf Extract on Alanine Aminotransferase and Aspartate Aminotransferase in the Patients with Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Rangboo, Vajiheh; Noroozi, Mostafa; Zavoshy, Roza; Rezadoost, Seyed Amirmansoor; Mohammadpoorasl, Asghar

    2016-01-01

    Background. Based on recent basic and clinical investigations, the extract of artichoke (Cynara scolymus) leaf has been revealed to be used for hepatoprotective and cholesterol reducing purposes. We aimed to assess the therapeutic effects of artichoke on biochemical and liver biomarkers in patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods. In a randomized double blind clinical trial, 60 consecutive patients suffering NASH were randomly assigned to receive Cynara scolymus extract (as 6 tablets per day consisting of 2700 mg extract of the herb) as the intervention group or placebo as the control group for two months. Results. Comparing changes in study markers following interventions showed improvement in liver enzymes. The levels of triglycerides and cholesterol were significantly reduced in the group treated with Cynara scolymus when compared to placebo group. To compare the role of Cynara scolymus use with placebo in changes in study parameters, multivariate linear regression models were employed indicating higher improvement in liver enzymes and also lipid profile particularly triglycerides and total cholesterol following administration of Cynara scolymus in comparison with placebo use. Conclusion. This study sheds light on the potential hepatoprotective activity and hypolipidemic effect of Cynara scolymus in management of NASH. This clinical trial is registered in the IRCT, Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials, by number IRCT2014070218321N1. PMID:27293900

  20. The Effect of Artichoke Leaf Extract on Alanine Aminotransferase and Aspartate Aminotransferase in the Patients with Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Rangboo, Vajiheh; Noroozi, Mostafa; Zavoshy, Roza; Rezadoost, Seyed Amirmansoor; Mohammadpoorasl, Asghar

    2016-01-01

    Background. Based on recent basic and clinical investigations, the extract of artichoke (Cynara scolymus) leaf has been revealed to be used for hepatoprotective and cholesterol reducing purposes. We aimed to assess the therapeutic effects of artichoke on biochemical and liver biomarkers in patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods. In a randomized double blind clinical trial, 60 consecutive patients suffering NASH were randomly assigned to receive Cynara scolymus extract (as 6 tablets per day consisting of 2700 mg extract of the herb) as the intervention group or placebo as the control group for two months. Results. Comparing changes in study markers following interventions showed improvement in liver enzymes. The levels of triglycerides and cholesterol were significantly reduced in the group treated with Cynara scolymus when compared to placebo group. To compare the role of Cynara scolymus use with placebo in changes in study parameters, multivariate linear regression models were employed indicating higher improvement in liver enzymes and also lipid profile particularly triglycerides and total cholesterol following administration of Cynara scolymus in comparison with placebo use. Conclusion. This study sheds light on the potential hepatoprotective activity and hypolipidemic effect of Cynara scolymus in management of NASH. This clinical trial is registered in the IRCT, Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials, by number IRCT2014070218321N1.

  1. Combined TL and 10B-alanine ESR dosimetry for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Bartolotta, A; D'Oca, M C; Lo Giudice, B; Brai, M; Borio, R; Forini, N; Salvadori, P; Manera, S

    2004-01-01

    The dosimetric technique described in this paper is based on electron spin resonance (ESR) detectors using an alanine-boric compound acid enriched with (10)B, and beryllium oxide thermoluminescent (TL) detectors; with this combined dosimetry, it is possible to discriminate the doses due to thermal neutrons and gamma radiation in a mixed field. Irradiations were carried out inside the thermal column of a TRIGA MARK II water-pool-type research nuclear reactor, also used for Boron Neutron Capture therapy (BNCT) applications, with thermal neutron fluence from 10(9) to 10(14) nth cm(-2). The ESR dosemeters using the alanine-boron compound indicated ESR signals about 30-fold stronger than those using only alanine. Moreover, a negligible correction for the gamma contribution, measured with TL detectors, almost insensitive to thermal neutrons, was necessary. Therefore, a simultaneous analysis of our TL and ESR detectors allows discrimination between thermal neutron and gamma doses, as required in BNCT.

  2. Combined TL and 10B-alanine ESR dosimetry for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Bartolotta, A; D'Oca, M C; Lo Giudice, B; Brai, M; Borio, R; Forini, N; Salvadori, P; Manera, S

    2004-01-01

    The dosimetric technique described in this paper is based on electron spin resonance (ESR) detectors using an alanine-boric compound acid enriched with (10)B, and beryllium oxide thermoluminescent (TL) detectors; with this combined dosimetry, it is possible to discriminate the doses due to thermal neutrons and gamma radiation in a mixed field. Irradiations were carried out inside the thermal column of a TRIGA MARK II water-pool-type research nuclear reactor, also used for Boron Neutron Capture therapy (BNCT) applications, with thermal neutron fluence from 10(9) to 10(14) nth cm(-2). The ESR dosemeters using the alanine-boron compound indicated ESR signals about 30-fold stronger than those using only alanine. Moreover, a negligible correction for the gamma contribution, measured with TL detectors, almost insensitive to thermal neutrons, was necessary. Therefore, a simultaneous analysis of our TL and ESR detectors allows discrimination between thermal neutron and gamma doses, as required in BNCT. PMID:15353720

  3. A thermostable L-aspartate oxidase: a new tool for biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Bifulco, Davide; Pollegioni, Loredano; Tessaro, Davide; Servi, Stefano; Molla, Gianluca

    2013-08-01

    L-Amino acid oxidases (LAAOs) are homodimeric flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-containing flavoproteins that catalyze the stereospecific oxidative deamination of L-amino acids to α-keto acids, ammonia, and hydrogen peroxide. Unlike the D-selective counterpart, the biotechnological application of LAAOs has not been thoroughly advanced because of the difficulties in their expression as recombinant protein in prokaryotic hosts. In this work, L-aspartate oxidase from the thermophilic archea Sulfolobus tokodaii (StLASPO, specific for L-aspartate and L-asparagine only) was efficiently produced as recombinant protein in E. coli in the active form as holoenzyme. This recombinant flavoenzyme shows the classical properties of FAD-containing oxidases. Indeed, StLASPO shows distinctive features that makes it attractive for biotechnological applications: high thermal stability (it is fully stable up to 80 °C) and high temperature optimum, stable activity in a broad range of pH (7.0-10.0), weak inhibition by the product oxaloacetate and by D-aspartate, and tight binding of the FAD cofactor. This latter property significantly distinguishes StLASPO from the E. coli counterpart. StLASPO represents an appropriate novel biocatalyst for the production of D-aspartate and a well-suited protein scaffold to evolve a LAAO activity by protein engineering.

  4. Isolation and characterization of cytosolic alanine aminotransferase isoforms from starved rat liver.

    PubMed

    Vedavathi, M; Girish, K S; Kumar, M Karuna

    2004-12-01

    Alanine is the most effective precursor for gluconeogenesis among amino acids and the initial reaction is catalyzed by alanine aminotransferases (AlaATs). It is a less extensively studied enzyme under starvation and known to that the enzyme activity increases in liver under starvation. The present study describes the purification and characterization of two isoforms of alanine aminotransferases from starved male rat liver under starvation. The molecular mass of isoforms was found to be 17.7 and 112.2 kDa with isoelectric points of 4.2 and 5.3 respectively for AlaAT I and AlaAT II. Both the enzymes showed narrow substrate specificity for L-alanine with different Km for alanine and 2-oxoglutarate. Both the enzymes were glycoprotein in nature. Inhibition, modification and spectroscopic studies showed that both PLP and free-SH groups are directly involved in the enzymatic catalysis. PLP activated both the enzymes with a Km 0.057 mM and 0.2 mM for AlaAT I and II respectively. PMID:15663181

  5. Conformational composition and population analysis of β-alanine isolated in solid parahydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel Wong, Y. T.; Toh, Shin Y.; Djuricanin, Pavle; Momose, Takamasa

    2015-04-01

    The conformational composition and the change in conformational ratio induced by UV irradiation of β-alanine have been investigated using solid parahydrogen FT-IR matrix isolation spectroscopy for the first time. In order to assign the observed spectra, the vibrational wavenumbers and intensities of the eleven lowest energy β-alanine conformers were calculated at the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory. In-situ UV photo-irradiation of β-alanine in solid parahydrogen was used to assist the spectral assignment. Out of the eleven lowest energy conformers, conformers I, II, III, IV, and VII were identified in the solid parahydrogen matrix, with conformer III observed in a matrix environment for the first time. Argon matrix FT-IR spectra of β-alanine were also recorded for comparison and only four conformers, conformers I, II, IV and VII, were found, as reported previously. Conformational changes to higher energy structures were observed when β-alanine was irradiated with UV radiation. These changes were more pronounced in parahydrogen matrices than in argon matrices, indicating the usefulness of solid parahydrogen matrix isolation spectroscopy for the conformational study of amino acids.

  6. UV-induced isomerization of β-alanine isolated in argon matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanian, Stepan G.; Ivanov, Alexander Yu.; Smyrnova, Daryna A.; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2012-10-01

    We have employed low-temperature matrix-isolation FTIR spectroscopy, the density functional theory and ab initio calculations at the MP2 and CCSD(T) levels of theory to determine the conformational composition of the simplest β-amino acid, β-alanine. UV irradiation and thermal annealing of the samples together with the FTIR spectra of deuterated β-alanine were used to separate bands of different conformers. A detailed study of the potential energy surface of β-alanine obtained at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory reveals twenty β-alanine conformers, but only five of them may exist in matrices due to their sufficiently high relative stabilities and low energy barriers separating them from each other. An analysis of the FTIR spectra allows us to confirm the presence of four β-alanine conformers in argon matrices with certainty. Two of them, conformers I and II, have an Nsbnd H⋯O intramolecular H-bond, the third, conformer V, has an N⋯Hsbnd O H-bond, and the fourth, conformer IV, has no intramolecular H-bonds. The relative populations of the conformers determined using the relative Gibbs free energies calculated at the CCSD(T)/CBS level of theory at 420 K are 48.1%, 23.7%, 16.8% and 3.2% for the conformers I, II, IV, and V, respectively. Some trace amount of conformer VII was also detected.

  7. Aspartate embedding depth affects pHLIP's insertion pKa.

    PubMed

    Fendos, Justin; Barrera, Francisco N; Engelman, Donald M

    2013-07-01

    We have used the pHlow insertion peptide (pHLIP) family to study the role of aspartate embedding depth in pH-dependent transmembrane peptide insertion. pHLIP binds to the surface of a lipid bilayer as a largely unstructured monomer at neutral pH. When the pH is lowered, pHLIP inserts spontaneously across the membrane as a spanning α-helix. pHLIP insertion is reversible when the pH is adjusted back to a neutral value. One of the critical events facilitating pHLIP insertion is the protonation of aspartates in the spanning domain of the peptide: the negative side chains of these residues convert to uncharged, polar forms, facilitating insertion by altering the hydrophobicity of the spanning domain. To examine this protonation mechanism further, we created pHLIP sequence variants in which the two spanning aspartates (D14 and D25) were moved up or down in the sequence. We hypothesized that the aspartate depth in the inserted state would directly affect the proton affinity of the acidic side chains, altering the pKa of pH-dependent insertion. To this end, we also mutated the arginine at position 11 to determine whether arginine snorkeling modulates the insertion pKa by affecting the aspartate depth. Our results indicate that both types of mutations change the insertion pKa, supporting the idea that the aspartate depth is a participating parameter in determining the pH dependence. We also show that pHLIP's resistance to aggregation can be altered with our mutations, identifying a new criterion for improving the performance of pHLIP in vivo when targeting acidic disease tissues such as cancer and inflammation. PMID:23721379

  8. Amino acid consumption by the parasitic, amoeboid protists Entamoeba histolytica and E. invadens.

    PubMed

    Zuo, X; Coombs, G H

    1995-08-01

    Amino acid consumption by Entamoeba histolytica and E. invadens has been measured in order to assess the possible roles of amino acids as energy substrates. Mixtures of amino acids enhanced the growth of the parasites in complex medium and their survival in simple medium. The consumption of several amino acids by the parasites suspended in simple media was greater when glucose was absent, suggesting that they may act as alternative energy sources. Under these conditions, asparagine was consumed extremely rapidly by E. histolytica in particular, and arginine, leucine and threonine were used greatly by both species. There was also a marked consumption of aspartate, but this occurred even when glucose was present. These five amino acids and phenylalanine were the ones consumed in greatest amounts during growth of E. histolytica in complex medium. Under the same growth conditions, E. invadens also used asparagine, arginine, leucine and threonine and in addition there was a large consumption of serine and especially glutamate. In contrast, the aspartate concentration in the complex medium increased and there was also a net increase in the concentration of some other amino acids. Alanine was produced by both species when the parasites were incubated in simple medium with glucose, and in greater amounts during growth in complex media, suggesting that it is an end product of energy metabolism. The findings provide support for the suggestion that energy generation through amino acid catabolism may be a characteristic feature of anaerobic parasitic protists.

  9. Innovative effect of illite on improved microbiological conversion of L-tyrosine to 3,4 dihydroxy phenyl L-alanine (L-DOPA) by Aspergillus oryzae ME2 under acidic reaction conditions.

    PubMed

    Sikander, Ali; Ikram-ul-Haq

    2006-11-01

    In the present investigation, the previous ultraviolet irradiated mutant strain of Aspergillus oryzae UV-7 was further improved in terms of 3,4 dihydroxy phenyl L-alanine (L-DOPA) activity after chemical mutagenesis through 1-methyl 3-nitro 1-nitroso guanidine (MNNG = 250-1500 microg/ml) treatment (0-30 min). Among several mutant variants, the one that produced a larger amount of L-DOPA from L-tyrosine was designated to as ME2 and it was made 2-deoxy-D-glucose-resistant by growing it at various concentrations of 2 dg (0.01-0.025 %, w/v) in Vogel's agar medium. Relatively better production of L-DOPA (> 0.60 mg/ml) was obtained when 2.0% (w/v) glucose was used as a carbon source in the mycelium production medium and the tyrosinase activity increased constitutively (1.08 mg/ml), which resulted in a greater production of L-DOPA. At optimum pH0 (pH 6.0) and reaction time (60 min), more than 65% sugar was utilized for cell mass formation. The maximum conversion of L-tyrosine to L-DOPA (0.428 mg/ml) was achieved 60 min after the biochemical reaction. Mould mycelium was used for microbiological conversion of L-tyrosine to L-DOPA because tyrosinases, beta-carboxylases, and tyrosine hydroxylases are intracellular enzymes. The effect of illite (1.0 x 10(6)-6.0 x 10(6) M) on biochemical conversion of L-tyrosine to L-DOPA by Aspergillus oryzae ME(2 )was also carried out. Best results of L-DOPA biosynthesis were observed when the concentration of illite was 3.5 x 10(-6) M (1.686 mg/ml L-DOPA produced with 1.525 mg/ml consumption of L-tyrosine). It was noted that the addition of illite not only increased enzyme activity but also enhanced the permeability of cell membrane to facilitate the secretion of enzymes into the reaction broth. The comparison of kinetic parameters showed the ability of mutant to yield L-DOPA (i.e., Yp/x 7.360 +/- 0.04 mg/mg). When the culture grown on various illite concentrations was monitored for Qp, Qs, and qp, there was significant enhancement (p < 0

  10. Carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism of Spironucleus vortens.

    PubMed

    Millet, Coralie O M; Lloyd, David; Coogan, Michael P; Rumsey, Joanna; Cable, Joanne

    2011-09-01

    The metabolism of Spironucleus vortens, a parasitic, diplomonad flagellate related to Giardia intestinalis, was investigated using a combination of membrane inlet mass spectrometry, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, bioscreen continuous growth monitoring, and ion exchange chromatography. The products of glucose-fuelled and endogenous metabolism were identified by (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR as ethanol, acetate, alanine and lactate. Mass spectrometric monitoring of gas metabolism in buffered cell suspensions showed that glucose and ethanol could be used by S. vortens as energy-generating substrates, but bioscreen automated monitoring of growth in culture medium, as well as NMR analyses, suggested that neither of these compounds are the substrates of choice for this organism. Ion-exchange chromatographic analyses of free amino-acid and amino-acid hydrolysate of growth medium revealed that, despite the availability of large pools of free amino-acids in the medium, S. vortens hydrolysed large amounts of proteins during growth. The organism produced alanine and aspartate, and utilised lysine, arginine, leucine, cysteine and urea. However, mass spectrometric and bioscreen investigations showed that addition of the utilised amino acids to diluted culture medium did not induce any significant increase in metabolic or growth rates. Moreover, as no significant amounts of ornithine were produced, and addition of arginine under aerobic conditions did not generate NO production, there was no evidence of the presence of an energy-generating, arginine dihydrolase pathway in S. vortens under in vitro conditions.

  11. A mutational analysis of the Abetaz/Aalphad major histocompatibility complex class II molecule that restricts autoreactive T cells in (NZBxNZW)F1 mice. The critical influence of alanine at position 69 in the Aalphad chain.

    PubMed

    Sai, T; Mine, M; Fukuoka, M; Koarada, S; Kimoto, M

    1999-03-01

    Autoimmune symptoms of (NZBxNZW)F1 (H-2d/z) mice are reported to be critically related to the heterozygosity at the H-2 complex of the murine major histocompatibility complex (MHC). We previously showed that several Abetaz/Aalphad MHC class II molecule-restricted autoreactive T-cell clones from B/WF1 mice were pathogenic upon transfer to preautoimmune B/WF1 mice. In this study, to identify the crucial amino acid residues in Abetaz/Aalphad molecules for T-cell activation, we generated a panel of transfectant cell lines. These transfectant cell lines express the Abetaz/Aalphad MHC molecules with a mutation at each residue alpha11, alpha28, alpha57, alpha69, alpha70, alpha76 of Aalphad chain and beta86 of Abetaz chain. Replacing alpha69 alanine with threonine, valine or serine completely eliminated the ability to stimulate autoreactive T-cell clones without affecting the ability to present foreign antigen keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH) or L-plastin peptide to specific T-cell clones. Replacing beta86 valine with aspartic acid resulted in a decrease in the stimulation for antigen-reactive as well as autoreactive T-cell clones. Substitutions at other residues had minimal or no effect on the stimulation of either auto- or antigen-reactive T-cell clones. These results suggest that alanine at residue 69 of the Aalphad chain is critical for the activation of autoreactive Abetaz/Aalphad-restricted T-cell clones. Possible explanations for this are discussed. PMID:10233712

  12. Subcritical Water Extraction of Amino Acids from Atacama Desert Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amashukeli, Xenia; Pelletier, Christine C.; Kirby, James P.; Grunthaner, Frank J.

    2007-01-01

    Amino acids are considered organic molecular indicators in the search for extant and extinct life in the Solar System. Extraction of these molecules from a particulate solid matrix, such as Martian regolith, will be critical to their in situ detection and analysis. The goals of this study were to optimize a laboratory amino acid extraction protocol by quantitatively measuring the yields of extracted amino acids as a function of liquid water temperature and sample extraction time and to compare the results to the standard HCl vapor- phase hydrolysis yields for the same soil samples. Soil samples from the Yungay region of the Atacama Desert ( Martian regolith analog) were collected during a field study in the summer of 2005. The amino acids ( alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycine, serine, and valine) chosen for analysis were present in the samples at concentrations of 1 - 70 parts- per- billion. Subcritical water extraction efficiency was examined over the temperature range of 30 - 325 degrees C, at pressures of 17.2 or 20.0 MPa, and for water- sample contact equilibration times of 0 - 30 min. None of the amino acids were extracted in detectable amounts at 30 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), suggesting that amino acids are too strongly bound by the soil matrix to be extracted at such a low temperature. Between 150 degrees C and 250 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), the extraction efficiencies of glycine, alanine, and valine were observed to increase with increasing water temperature, consistent with higher solubility at higher temperatures, perhaps due to the decreasing dielectric constant of water. Amino acids were not detected in extracts collected at 325 degrees C ( at 20.0 MPa), probably due to amino acid decomposition at this temperature. The optimal subcritical water extraction conditions for these amino acids from Atacama Desert soils were achieved at 200 degrees C, 17.2 MPa, and a water- sample contact equilibration time of 10 min.

  13. The development and amino acid binding ability of nano-materials based on azo derivatives: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Shang, Xuefang; Du, Jinge; Yang, Wancai; Liu, Yun; Fu, Zhiyuan; Wei, Xiaofang; Yan, Ruifang; Yao, Ningcong; Guo, Yaping; Zhang, Jinlian; Xu, Xiufang

    2014-05-01

    Two nano-material-containing azo groups have been designed and developed, and the binding ability of nano-materials with various amino acids has been characterized by UV-vis and fluorescence titrations. Results indicated that two nano-materials showed the strongest binding ability for homocysteine among twenty normal kinds of amino acids (alanine, valine, leucine, isoleucine, methionine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, arginine, glycine, serine, threonine, asparagine, phenylalanine, histidine, tryptophan, proline, lysine, glutamine, tyrosine and homocysteine). The reason for the high sensitivity for homocysteine was that two nano-materials containing an aldehyde group reacted with SH in homocysteine and afforded very stable thiazolidine derivatives. Theoretical investigation further illustrated the possible binding mode in host-guest interaction and the roles of molecular frontier orbitals in molecular interplay. Thus, the two nano-materials can be used as optical sensors for the detection of homocysteine.

  14. Neutron diffraction investigations of L- and D-alanine at different temperatures: The search for structural evidence for parity violation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Chick C.; Ghosh, Minakshi; Johnson, Louise N.; Wang, Wenging

    2005-09-01

    Single crystal neutron diffraction has been used in an investigation of the structures of the amino acids L- and D-alanine. The aim of the study was to look for proposed phase transitions around T{sub c} {approx} 270 K. Measurements of both structures at 295 K and 60 K - the neutron structure of D-alanine being determined for the first time - show no significant structural basis for this phase transition in alanine. Further, confirmatory, investigation of the structure of D-alanine at temperatures of 240, 250, 260 and 300 K also showed no significant changes in bond lengths or angles. We can thus offer no structural support to other physical measurements, which are indicative of the observable effect of parity violation of the electroweak force in these phase transitions.

  15. AMINO ACIDS AND HEMOGLOBIN PRODUCTION IN ANEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Whipple, G. H.; Robscheit-Robbins, F. S.

    1940-01-01

    Certain individual amino acids when given to standard anemic dogs cause an increase in new hemoglobin production. Occasional negative experiments are recorded. Glycine, glutamic acid, aspartic acid, cystine, histidine, phenylalanine, and proline when given in 1 gm. doses daily for 2 weeks, increase hemoglobin output on the average 23 to 25 gm. above the control level. This reaction amounts to 25 to 30 per cent of the new hemoglobin produced by the feeding of 300 gm. liver daily for 2 weeks—a standard liver test. Alanine, valine, isoleucine, and arginine in the same dosage increase the hemoglobin output on the average 13 to 17 gm. per 2 weeks over the control level. Leucine, methionine, lysine, tryptophane, and tyrosine fall in a middle group with hemoglobin output of about 20 gm. Isovaleric acid, β-hydroxybutyric acid, glutaric acid, and asparagine have shown positive effects and the butyrate is unusually potent for hemoglobin production (Table 2). The isomeric and dl-synthetic forms of the amino acids are as effectively utilized in this reaction as are the natural forms. PMID:19870982

  16. Weak BMAA toxicity compares with that of the dietary supplement β-alanine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Moonhee; McGeer, Patrick L

    2012-07-01

    β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is routinely described in the literature as a potent neurotoxin and as a possible cause of neurodegenerative disorders of aging such as Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex (ALS-PDC) syndrome of Guam. To test for the toxicity of BMAA against human neurons, we chose 3 standard human neuronal cell lines for examination and compared the toxicity with the muscle-building nutritional supplement β-alanine, glutamic acid, and the established excitotoxins kainic acid, quisqualic acid, ibotenic acid, domoic acid, and quinolinic acid. Neurotoxicity was measured by the standard lactic dehydrogenase release assay after 5-day incubation of NT-2, SK-N-MC, and SH-SY5Y cells with BMAA and the comparative substances. The ED(50) of BMAA, corresponding to 50% death of neurons, varied from 1430 to 1604 μM while that of the nutritional supplement β-alanine was almost as low, varying from 1945 to 2134 μM. The ED(50) for glutamic acid and the 5 established excitotoxins was 200- to 360-fold lower, varying from 44 to 70 μM. These in vitro data are in accord with previously published in vivo data on BMAA toxicity in which mice showed no pathological effects from oral consumption of 500 mg/kg/day for more than 10 weeks. Because there are no known natural sources of BMAA that would make consumption of such amounts possible, and because the toxicity observed was in the same range as the nutritional supplement β-alanine, the hypothesis that BMAA is an environmental hazard and a contributor to degenerative neurological diseases becomes untenable.

  17. Analysis of neurotransmitter amino acids by CE-LIF detection in biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Zinellu, Angelo; Sotgia, Salvatore; Deiana, Luca; Carru, Ciriaco

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitter amino acids like Alanine (Ala), Glutamic acid (Glu), Aspartic acid (Asp), Serine (Ser), Taurine (Tau), and Glycine (Gly) are widely distributed in biological fluids and tissues and they have important physiological functions, so that the evaluation of their levels in organisms plays an essential role in physiology. We here report a new capillary electrophoresis (CE) method with laser-induced fluorescence detection by which analytes are resolved and detected in less than 12 min both in human plasma and in other samples types, such as red blood cells, urine, cultured cells, cerebrospinal fluid, saliva, and vitreous humor, thus avoiding the typical limitations of the other methods normally suitable only in one or two matrix types.

  18. Release of brain amino acids during hyposmolar stress and energy deprivation.

    PubMed

    Haugstad, T S; Langmoen, I A

    1996-04-01

    The release of 10 amino acids from rat hippocampal slices during exposure to hyposmotic stress or energy deprivation was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Exposing the slices to hyposmotic stress by lowering extracellular NaCl caused a 10-fold release of taurine (p < 0.01) and over a twofold increase of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate (p < 0.01). These changes were reversed by mannitol. Exposure to combined glucose and oxygen deprivation (energy deprivation) caused a 50-fold increase in the release of GABA, a 40-fold increase in glutamate release (p < 0.01), and a twofold to sixfold increase in taurine, aspartate, glycine, asparagine, serine, and alanine release (p < 0.05) but no change in glutamine. Energy deprivation increased the water content by 21%. Mannitol blocked this increase and further enhanced the release of glutamate and aspartate (p < 0.01) but not of GABA. The permissivity of the amino acids was plotted against the pI (pH at isoelectric point) and hydropathy indexes. Energy deprivation increased the permissivity in the following order: acidic > neutral > basic. Among neutral amino acids, permissivity increased with increasing hydrophobicity. These results indicate that the mechanisms of amino acid release are different during cerebral ischemia and hyposmotic stress. PMID:8829565

  19. Enantiomeric Excesses of Acid Labile Amino Acid Precursors of the Murchison Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzarello, Sandra

    1998-01-01

    Amino acids present in carbonaceous chondrite are extracted in water in part as free compounds and in approximately equal part as acid labile precursors. On the assumption that they would be free of contamination, the precursors of two Murchison amino acids that have terrestrial occurrence, alanine and glutamic acid, have been targeted for analysis of their enantiomeric ratios. Pyroglutamic acid, the precursor of glutamic acid, was found with an L-enantiomeric excess comparable to that of the free acid, while alanine's precursor, N-acetyl alanine, appears approximately racemic. Also alpha-imino propioacetic acid, a proposed end product of alanine synthesis in the meteorite, was analyzed and found racemic.

  20. Amino acid biogeo- and stereochemistry in coastal Chilean sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomstein, Bente Aa.; Jørgensen, Bo B.; Schubert, Carsten J.; Niggemann, Jutta

    2006-06-01

    The spatial distribution of total hydrolysable amino acids (THAA) and amino acid enantiomers ( D- and L-forms) was investigated in sediments underlying two contrasting Chilean upwelling regions: at ˜23 °S off Antofagasta and at ˜36 °S off Concepción. The contribution of amino acids to total organic carbon (%T AAC: 7-14%) and total nitrogen (%T AAN: 23-38%) in surface sediments decreased with increasing water depth (from 126 to 1350 m) indicating that organic matter becomes increasingly decomposed in surface sediments at greater water depth. Changes in the ratio between the protein amino acid aspartate and its non-protein degradation product β-alanine confirmed this observation. Furthermore, estimates of THAA mineralization showed that sedimentary amino acid reactivity decreased with both increasing water depth as well as progressive degradation status of the organic matter that was incorporated into the sediment. Reactivity of organic matter in the sediment was also assessed using the Degradation Index (DI) developed by [Dauwe, B., Middelburg, J.J., 1998. Amino acids and hexosamines as indicators of organic matter degradation state in North Sea sediments. Limnol. Oceanogr.43, pp. 782-798.]. Off Concepción, DI was successfully applied to examine the degradation status of sedimentary organic matter at different water depths. However, unexpected results were obtained at the Antofagasta stations as DI increased with sediment depth, suggesting more degraded organic matter at the surface than deeper in the cores. The contribution of peptidoglycan amino acids to THAA was estimated from the concentrations of D-aspartate, D-glutamic acid, D-serine, and D-alanine. Peptidoglycan amino acids accounted for >18% of THAA in all investigated samples. In surface sediments peptidoglycan amino acids accounted for a progressively larger fraction of THAA at increasing water depths (up to >26%). Further, the contribution of peptidoglycan amino acids to THAA increased with

  1. Aspartate Decarboxylase is Required for a Normal Pupa Pigmentation Pattern in the Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Fangyin; Qiao, Liang; Cao, Cun; Liu, Xiaofan; Tong, Xiaoling; He, Songzhen; Hu, Hai; Zhang, Li; Wu, Songyuan; Tan, Duan; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Lu, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The pigmentation pattern of Lepidoptera varies greatly in different development stages. To date, the effects of key genes in the melanin metabolism pathway on larval and adult body color are distinct, yet the effects on pupal pigmentation remains unclear. In the silkworm, Bombyx mori, the black pupa (bp) mutant is only specifically melanized at the pupal stage. Using positional cloning, we found that a mutation in the Aspartate decarboxylase gene (BmADC) is causative in the bp mutant. In the bp mutant, a SINE-like transposon with a length of 493 bp was detected ~2.2 kb upstream of the transcriptional start site of BmADC. This insertion causes a sharp reduction in BmADC transcript levels in bp mutants, leading to deficiency of β-alanine and N-β-alanyl dopamine (NBAD), but accumulation of dopamine. Following injection of β-alanine into bp mutants, the color pattern was reverted that of the wild-type silkworms. Additionally, melanic pupae resulting from knock-down of BmADC in the wild-type strain were obtained. These findings show that BmADC plays a crucial role in melanin metabolism and in the pigmentation pattern of the silkworm pupal stage. Finally, this study contributes to a better understanding of pupa pigmentation patterns in Lepidoptera. PMID:26077025

  2. Aspartate Decarboxylase is Required for a Normal Pupa Pigmentation Pattern in the Silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Dai, Fangyin; Qiao, Liang; Cao, Cun; Liu, Xiaofan; Tong, Xiaoling; He, Songzhen; Hu, Hai; Zhang, Li; Wu, Songyuan; Tan, Duan; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Lu, Cheng

    2015-06-16

    The pigmentation pattern of Lepidoptera varies greatly in different development stages. To date, the effects of key genes in the melanin metabolism pathway on larval and adult body color are distinct, yet the effects on pupal pigmentation remains unclear. In the silkworm, Bombyx mori, the black pupa (bp) mutant is only specifically melanized at the pupal stage. Using positional cloning, we found that a mutation in the Aspartate decarboxylase gene (BmADC) is causative in the bp mutant. In the bp mutant, a SINE-like transposon with a length of 493 bp was detected ~2.2 kb upstream of the transcriptional start site of BmADC. This insertion causes a sharp reduction in BmADC transcript levels in bp mutants, leading to deficiency of β-alanine and N-β-alanyl dopamine (NBAD), but accumulation of dopamine. Following injection of β-alanine into bp mutants, the color pattern was reverted that of the wild-type silkworms. Additionally, melanic pupae resulting from knock-down of BmADC in the wild-type strain were obtained. These findings show that BmADC plays a crucial role in melanin metabolism and in the pigmentation pattern of the silkworm pupal stage. Finally, this study contributes to a better understanding of pupa pigmentation patterns in Lepidoptera.

  3. Barrier-Free Intermolecular Proton Transfer Induced by Excess Electron Attachment to the Complex of Alanine with Uracil

    SciTech Connect

    Dabkowska, Iwona; Rak, Janusz; Gutowski, Maciej S.; Nilles, J.M.; Stokes, Sarah; Bowen, Kit H.

    2004-04-01

    The photoelectron spectrum of the uracil-alanine anionic complex (UA)- has been recorded with 2.540 eV photons. This spectrum reveals a broad feature with a maximum between 1.6-2.1 eV. The vertical electron detachment energy is too large to be attributed to an (UA)- anionic complex in which an intact uracil anion is solvated by alanine, or vice versa. The neutral and anionic complexes of uracil and alanine were studied at the B3LYP and second order Moeller-Plesset level of theory with 6-31++G** basis sets. The neutral complexes form cyclic hydrogen bonds and the three most stable neutral complexes are bound by 0.72, 0.61 and 0.57 eV. The electron hole in complexes of uracil with alaninie is localized on uracil, but the formation of a complex with alanine strongly modulates the vertical ionization energy of uracil. The theoretical results indicate that the excess electron in (UA)- occupies a p* orbital localized on uracil. The excess electron attachment to the complex can induce a barrier-free proton transfer (BFPT) from the carboxylic group of alanine to the O8 atom of uracil. As a result, the four most stable structures of the uracil-alanine anionic complex can be characterized as the neutral radical of hydrogenated uracil solvated by the anion of deprotonated alanine. Our current results for the anionic complex of uracil with alanine are similar to our previous results for the anion of uracil with glycine [Eur. Phys. J. D 20, 431 (2002)], and together they indicate that the BFPT process is not very sensitive to the nature of the amino acid's hydrophobic residual group. The BFPT to the O8 atom of uracil may be relevant to the damage suffered by nucleic acid bases due to exposure to low energy electrons.

  4. Persistent GABAA/C responses to gabazine, taurine and beta-alanine in rat hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Chesnoy-Marchais, D

    2016-08-25

    In hypoglossal motoneurons, a sustained anionic current, sensitive to a blocker of ρ-containing GABA receptors, (1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyr