Science.gov

Sample records for alanine aspartic acid

  1. Conserved aspartic acid 233 and alanine 231 are not required for poliovirus polymerase function in replicons

    PubMed Central

    Freistadt, Marion S; Eberle, Karen E

    2007-01-01

    Nucleic acid polymerases have similar structures and motifs. The function of an aspartic acid (conserved in all classes of nucleic acid polymerases) in motif A remains poorly understood in RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. We mutated this residue to alanine in a poliovirus replicon. The resulting mutant could still replicate, although at a reduced level. In addition, mutation A231C (also in motif A) yielded high levels of replication. Taken together these results show that poliovirus polymerase conserved residues D233 and A231 are not essential to poliovirus replicon function. PMID:17352827

  2. Predicting three-dimensional conformations of peptides constructed of only glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and valine.

    PubMed

    Oda, Akifumi; Fukuyoshi, Shuichi

    2015-06-01

    The GADV hypothesis is a form of the protein world hypothesis, which suggests that life originated from proteins (Lacey et al. 1999; Ikehara 2002; Andras 2006). In the GADV hypothesis, life is thought to have originated from primitive proteins constructed of only glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and valine ([GADV]-proteins). In this study, the three-dimensional (3D) conformations of randomly generated short [GADV]-peptides were computationally investigated using replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations (Sugita and Okamoto 1999). Because the peptides used in this study consisted of only 20 residues each, they could not form certain 3D structures. However, the conformational tendencies of the peptides were elucidated by analyzing the conformational ensembles generated by REMD simulations. The results indicate that secondary structures can be formed in several randomly generated [GADV]-peptides. A long helical structure was found in one of the hydrophobic peptides, supporting the conjecture of the GADV hypothesis that many peptides aggregated to form peptide multimers with enzymatic activity in the primordial soup. In addition, these results indicate that REMD simulations can be used for the structural investigation of short peptides.

  3. Predicting Three-Dimensional Conformations of Peptides Constructed of Only Glycine, Alanine, Aspartic Acid, and Valine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Akifumi; Fukuyoshi, Shuichi

    2015-06-01

    The GADV hypothesis is a form of the protein world hypothesis, which suggests that life originated from proteins (Lacey et al. 1999; Ikehara 2002; Andras 2006). In the GADV hypothesis, life is thought to have originated from primitive proteins constructed of only glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and valine ([GADV]-proteins). In this study, the three-dimensional (3D) conformations of randomly generated short [GADV]-peptides were computationally investigated using replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations (Sugita and Okamoto 1999). Because the peptides used in this study consisted of only 20 residues each, they could not form certain 3D structures. However, the conformational tendencies of the peptides were elucidated by analyzing the conformational ensembles generated by REMD simulations. The results indicate that secondary structures can be formed in several randomly generated [GADV]-peptides. A long helical structure was found in one of the hydrophobic peptides, supporting the conjecture of the GADV hypothesis that many peptides aggregated to form peptide multimers with enzymatic activity in the primordial soup. In addition, these results indicate that REMD simulations can be used for the structural investigation of short peptides.

  4. Aspartic acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... also called asparaginic acid. Aspartic acid helps every cell in the body work. It plays a role in: Hormone production and release Normal nervous system function Plant sources of aspartic acid include: Legumes such as ...

  5. Substrate Specificity of the Aspartate:Alanine Antiporter (AspT) of Tetragenococcus halophilus in Reconstituted Liposomes*

    PubMed Central

    Sasahara, Ayako; Nanatani, Kei; Enomoto, Masaru; Kuwahara, Shigefumi; Abe, Keietsu

    2011-01-01

    The aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of the lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus is a member of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAEx) transporter family. T. halophilus AspT catalyzes the electrogenic exchange of l-aspartate1− with l-alanine0. Although physiological functions of AspT were well studied, l-aspartate1−:l-alanine0 antiport mechanisms are still unsolved. Here we report that the binding sites of l-aspartate and l-alanine are independently present in AspT by means of the kinetic studies. We purified His6-tagged T. halophilus AspT and characterized its kinetic properties when reconstituted in liposomes (Km = 0.35 ± 0.03 mm for l-aspartate, Km = 0.098 ± 0 mm for d-aspartate, Km = 26 ± 2 mm for l-alanine, Km = 3.3 ± 0.2 mm for d-alanine). Competitive inhibition by various amino acids of l-aspartate or l-alanine in self-exchange reactions revealed that l-cysteine selectively inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange but only weakly inhibited l-alanine self-exchange. Additionally, l-serine selectively inhibited l-alanine self-exchange but barely inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange. The aspartate analogs l-cysteine sulfinic acid, l-cysteic acid, and d-cysteic acid competitively and strongly inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange compared with l-alanine self-exchange. Taken together, these kinetic data suggest that the putative binding sites of l-aspartate and l-alanine are independently located in the substrate translocation pathway of AspT. PMID:21719707

  6. Substrate specificity of the aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of Tetragenococcus halophilus in reconstituted liposomes.

    PubMed

    Sasahara, Ayako; Nanatani, Kei; Enomoto, Masaru; Kuwahara, Shigefumi; Abe, Keietsu

    2011-08-19

    The aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of the lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus is a member of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAEx) transporter family. T. halophilus AspT catalyzes the electrogenic exchange of L-aspartate(1-) with L-alanine(0). Although physiological functions of AspT were well studied, L-aspartate(1-):L-alanine(0) antiport mechanisms are still unsolved. Here we report that the binding sites of L-aspartate and L-alanine are independently present in AspT by means of the kinetic studies. We purified His(6)-tagged T. halophilus AspT and characterized its kinetic properties when reconstituted in liposomes (K(m) = 0.35 ± 0.03 mm for L-aspartate, K(m) = 0.098 ± 0 mm for D-aspartate, K(m) = 26 ± 2 mm for L-alanine, K(m) = 3.3 ± 0.2 mm for D-alanine). Competitive inhibition by various amino acids of L-aspartate or L-alanine in self-exchange reactions revealed that L-cysteine selectively inhibited L-aspartate self-exchange but only weakly inhibited L-alanine self-exchange. Additionally, L-serine selectively inhibited L-alanine self-exchange but barely inhibited L-aspartate self-exchange. The aspartate analogs L-cysteine sulfinic acid, L-cysteic acid, and D-cysteic acid competitively and strongly inhibited L-aspartate self-exchange compared with L-alanine self-exchange. Taken together, these kinetic data suggest that the putative binding sites of L-aspartate and L-alanine are independently located in the substrate translocation pathway of AspT.

  7. Un-catalyzed peptide bond formation between two monomers of glycine, alanine, serine, threonine, and aspartic acid in gas phase: a density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhunia, Snehasis; Singh, Ajeet; Ojha, Animesh K.

    2016-05-01

    In the present report, un-catalyzed peptide bond formation between two monomers of glycine (Gly), alanine (Ala), serine (Ser), threonine (Thr), and aspartic acid (Asp) has been investigated in gas phase via two steps reaction mechanism and concerted mechanism at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) and M062X/6-31G(d,p) level of theories. The peptide bond is formed through a nucleophilic reaction via transition states, TS1 and TS2 in stepwise mechanism. The TS1 reveals formation of a new C-N bond while TS2 illustrate the formation of C=O bond. In case of concerted mechanism, C-N bond is formed by a single four-centre transition state (TS3). The energy barrier is used to explain the involvement of energy at each step of the reaction. The energy barrier (20-48 kcal/mol) is required for the transformation of reactant state R1 to TS1 state and intermediate state I1 to TS2 state. The large value of energy barrier is explained in terms of distortion and interaction energies for stepwise mechanism. The energy barrier of TS3 in concerted mechanism is very close to the energy barrier of the first transition state (TS1) of the stepwise mechanism for the formation of Gly-Gly and Ala-Ala di- peptide. However, in case of Ser-Ser, Thr-Thr and Asp-Asp di-peptide, the energy barrier of TS3 is relatively high than that of the energy barrier of TS1 calculated at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) and M062X/6-31G(d,p) level of theories. In both the mechanisms, the value of energy barrier calculated at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory is greater than that of the value calculated at M062X/6-31G(d,p) level of theory.

  8. Plasmid-Encoded asp Operon Confers a Proton Motive Metabolic Cycle Catalyzed by an Aspartate-Alanine Exchange Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Keietsu; Ohnishi, Fumito; Yagi, Kyoko; Nakajima, Tasuku; Higuchi, Takeshi; Sano, Motoaki; Machida, Masayuki; Sarker, Rafiquel I.; Maloney, Peter C.

    2002-01-01

    Tetragenococcus halophila D10 catalyzes the decarboxylation of l-aspartate with nearly stoichiometric release of l-alanine and CO2. This trait is encoded on a 25-kb plasmid, pD1. We found in this plasmid a putative asp operon consisting of two genes, which we designated aspD and aspT, encoding an l-aspartate-β-decarboxylase (AspD) and an aspartate-alanine antiporter (AspT), respectively, and determined the nucleotide sequences. The sequence analysis revealed that the genes of the asp operon in pD1 were in the following order: promoter → aspD → aspT. The deduced amino acid sequence of AspD showed similarity to the sequences of two known l-aspartate-β-decarboxylases from Pseudomonas dacunhae and Alcaligenes faecalis. Hydropathy analyses suggested that the aspT gene product encodes a hydrophobic protein with multiple membrane-spanning regions. The operon was subcloned into the Escherichia coli expression vector pTrc99A, and the two genes were cotranscribed in the resulting plasmid, pTrcAsp. Expression of the asp operon in E. coli coincided with appearance of the capacity to catalyze the decarboxylation of aspartate to alanine. Histidine-tagged AspD (AspDHis) was also expressed in E. coli and purified from cell extracts. The purified AspDHis clearly exhibited activity of l-aspartate-β-decarboxylase. Recombinant AspT was solubilized from E. coli membranes and reconstituted in proteoliposomes. The reconstituted AspT catalyzed self-exchange of aspartate and electrogenic heterologous exchange of aspartate with alanine. Thus, the asp operon confers a proton motive metabolic cycle consisting of the electrogenic aspartate-alanine antiporter and the aspartate decarboxylase, which keeps intracellular levels of alanine, the countersubstrate for aspartate, high. PMID:12003930

  9. Plasmid-encoded asp operon confers a proton motive metabolic cycle catalyzed by an aspartate-alanine exchange reaction.

    PubMed

    Abe, Keietsu; Ohnishi, Fumito; Yagi, Kyoko; Nakajima, Tasuku; Higuchi, Takeshi; Sano, Motoaki; Machida, Masayuki; Sarker, Rafiquel I; Maloney, Peter C

    2002-06-01

    Tetragenococcus halophila D10 catalyzes the decarboxylation of L-aspartate with nearly stoichiometric release of L-alanine and CO(2). This trait is encoded on a 25-kb plasmid, pD1. We found in this plasmid a putative asp operon consisting of two genes, which we designated aspD and aspT, encoding an L-aspartate-beta-decarboxylase (AspD) and an aspartate-alanine antiporter (AspT), respectively, and determined the nucleotide sequences. The sequence analysis revealed that the genes of the asp operon in pD1 were in the following order: promoter --> aspD --> aspT. The deduced amino acid sequence of AspD showed similarity to the sequences of two known L-aspartate-beta-decarboxylases from Pseudomonas dacunhae and Alcaligenes faecalis. Hydropathy analyses suggested that the aspT gene product encodes a hydrophobic protein with multiple membrane-spanning regions. The operon was subcloned into the Escherichia coli expression vector pTrc99A, and the two genes were cotranscribed in the resulting plasmid, pTrcAsp. Expression of the asp operon in E. coli coincided with appearance of the capacity to catalyze the decarboxylation of aspartate to alanine. Histidine-tagged AspD (AspDHis) was also expressed in E. coli and purified from cell extracts. The purified AspDHis clearly exhibited activity of L-aspartate-beta-decarboxylase. Recombinant AspT was solubilized from E. coli membranes and reconstituted in proteoliposomes. The reconstituted AspT catalyzed self-exchange of aspartate and electrogenic heterologous exchange of aspartate with alanine. Thus, the asp operon confers a proton motive metabolic cycle consisting of the electrogenic aspartate-alanine antiporter and the aspartate decarboxylase, which keeps intracellular levels of alanine, the countersubstrate for aspartate, high.

  10. Simultaneous analysis of D-alanine, D-aspartic acid, and D-serine using chiral high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and its application to the rat plasma and tissues.

    PubMed

    Karakawa, Sachise; Shimbo, Kazutaka; Yamada, Naoyuki; Mizukoshi, Toshimi; Miyano, Hiroshi; Mita, Masashi; Lindner, Wolfgang; Hamase, Kenji

    2015-11-10

    A highly sensitive and selective chiral LC-MS/MS method for D-alanine, D-aspartic acid and D-serine has been developed using the precolumn derivatization reagents, 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate (AccQ-Tag) or p-N,N,N-trimethylammonioanilyl N'-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate iodide (TAHS). The thus N-tagged enantiomers of the derivatized amino acids were nicely separated within 20min using the cinchona alkaloid-based zwittterionic ion-exchange type enantioselective column, Chiralpak ZWIX(+). The selected reaction monitoring was applied for detecting the target d-amino acids in biological matrices. By using the present chiral LC-MS/MS method, the three d-amino acids and their l-forms could be simultaneously determined in the range of 0.1-500nmol/mL. Finally, the technique was successfully applied to rat plasma and tissue samples.

  11. Membrane topology of the electrogenic aspartate-alanine antiporter AspT of Tetragenococcus halophilus.

    PubMed

    Nanatani, Kei; Ohonishi, Fumito; Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Tasuku; Abe, Keietsu

    2005-03-04

    AspT is an electrogenic aspartate:alanine exchange protein that represents the vectorial component of a proton-motive metabolic cycle found in some strains of Tetragenococcus halophilus. AspT is the sole member of a new family, the Aspartate: Alanine Exchanger (AAE) family, in secondary transporters, according to the computational classification proposed by Saier et al. (http://www.biology.ucsd.edu/~msaier/transport/). We analyzed the topology of AspT biochemically, by using fusion methods in combination with alkaline phosphatase or beta-lactamase. These results suggested that AspT has a unique topology; 8 TMS, a large cytoplasmic loop (183 amino acids) between TMS5 and TMS6, and N- and C-termini that both face the periplasm. These results demonstrated a unique 2D-structure of AspT as the novel AAE family.

  12. Non-enzymic beta-decarboxylation of aspartic acid.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doctor, V. M.; Oro, J.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the mechanism of nonenzymic beta-decarboxylation of aspartic acid in the presence of metal ions and pyridoxal. The results suggest that aspartic acid is first converted to oxalacetic acid by transamination with pyridoxal which in turn is converted to pyridoxamine. This is followed by decarboxylation of oxalacetic acid to form pyruvic acid which transaminates with pyridoxamine to form alanine. The possible significance of these results to prebiotic molecular evolution is briefly discussed.

  13. THE EFFECT OF THE HYDROGEN ION CONCENTRATION ON THE RATE OF HYDROLYSIS OF GLYCYL GLYCINE, GLYCYL LEUCINE, GLYCYL ALANINE, GLYCYL ASPARAGINE, GLYCYL ASPARTIC ACID, AND BIURET BASE BY EREPSIN.

    PubMed

    Northrop, J H; Simms, H S

    1928-11-20

    1. The rate of hydrolysis at different pH values of glycyl glycine, glycyl leucine, glycyl alanine, glycyl asparagine, glycyl aspartic acid and biuret base has been determined. 2. The pH-activity curves obtained in this way differ for the different substrates. 3. The curves can be satisfactorily predicted by the assumption that erepsin is a weak acid or base with a dissociation constant of 10(-7.6) and that the reaction takes place between a particular ionic species of the enzyme and of the substrate. There are several possible arrangements which will predict the experimental results. 4. The rate of inactivation of erepsin at various pH values has been determined and found to agree with the assumption used above, that the enzyme is a weak acid or base with a dissociation constant of about 10(-7.6). 5. It is pointed out that if the mechanism assumed is correct, the determination of a significant value for the relative rate of hydrolysis of various peptides is a very uncertain procedure.

  14. Exchange of aspartate and alanine. Mechanism for development of a proton-motive force in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Abe, K; Hayashi, H; Maloney, P C; Malone, P C

    1996-02-09

    We examined the idea that aspartate metabolism by Lactobacillus subsp. M3 is organized as a proton-motive metabolic cycle by using reconstitution to monitor the activity of the carrier, termed AspT, expected to carry out the electrogenic exchange of precursor (aspartate) and product (alanine). Membranes of Lactobacillus subsp. M3 were extracted with 1.25% octyl glucoside in the presence of 0. 4% Escherichia coli phospholipid and 20% glycerol. The extracts were then used to prepare proteoliposomes loaded with either aspartate or alanine. Aspartate-loaded proteoliposomes accumulated external [3H]aspartate by exchange with internal substrate; this homologous self-exchange (Kt = 0.4 mm) was insensitive to potassium or proton ionophores and was unaffected by the presence or absence of Na+, K+, or Mg2+. Alanine-loaded proteoliposomes also took up [3H]aspartate in a heterologous antiport reaction that was stimulated or inhibited by an inside-positive or inside-negative membrane potential, respectively. Several lines of evidence suggest that these homologous and heterologous exchange reactions were catalyzed by the same functional unit. Thus, [3H]aspartate taken up by AspT during self-exchange was released by a delayed addition of alanine. In addition, the spontaneous loss of AspT activity that occurs when a detergent extract is held at 37 degrees C prior to reconstitution was prevented by the presence of either aspartate (KD(aspartate) = 0.3 mm) or alanine (KD(alanine) > or = 10 mm), indicating that both substrates interact directly with AspT. These findings are consistent with operation of a proton-motive metabolic cycle during aspartate metabolism by Lactobacillus subsp. M3.

  15. Intramitochondrial localization of alanine aminotransferase in rat-liver mitochondria: comparison with glutaminase and aspartate aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Masola, B; Devlin, T M

    1995-12-01

    The removal of the outer mitochondrial membrane and hence of constituents of the intermembrane space in rat-liver mitochondria using digitonin showed that phosphate-dependent glutaminase, alanine and aspartate aminotransferase were localized in the mitoplasts. Further fractionation of mitoplasts following their sonication resulted in 90% of glutaminase, 98% of alanine aminotransferase and 48% of aspartate aminotransferase being recovered in the soluble fraction while the remainder of each enzyme was recovered in the sonicated vesicles fraction. These results indicated that glutaminase and alanine aminotransferase were soluble matrix enzymes, the little of each enzyme recovered in the sonicated vesicles fraction being probably due to entrapment in the vesicles. Aspartate aminotransferase had dual localization, in the inner membrane and matrix with the high specific activity in sonicated vesicles confirming its association with the membrane. Activation experiments suggested that the membrane-bound enzyme was localized on the inner side of the inner mitochondrial membrane.

  16. R76 in transmembrane domain 3 of the aspartate:alanine transporter AspT is involved in substrate transport.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Satomi; Nanatani, Kei; Abe, Keietsu

    2016-01-01

    The L-aspartate:L-alanine antiporter of Tetragenococcus halophilus (AspT) possesses an arginine residue (R76) within the GxxxG motif in the central part of transmembrane domain 3 (TM3)-a residue that has been estimated to transport function. In this study, we carried out amino acid substitutions of R76 and used proteoliposome reconstitution for analyzing the transport function of each substitution. Both l-aspartate and l-alanine transport assays showed that R76K has higher activity than the AspT-WT (R76), whereas R76D and R76E have lower activity than the AspT-WT. These results suggest that R76 is involved in AspT substrate transport.

  17. 21 CFR 582.5017 - Aspartic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aspartic acid. 582.5017 Section 582.5017 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5017 Aspartic acid. (a) Product. Aspartic acid (L- and DL-forms). (b) Conditions of...

  18. 21 CFR 582.5017 - Aspartic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aspartic acid. 582.5017 Section 582.5017 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5017 Aspartic acid. (a) Product. Aspartic acid (L- and DL-forms). (b) Conditions of...

  19. 21 CFR 582.5017 - Aspartic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aspartic acid. 582.5017 Section 582.5017 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5017 Aspartic acid. (a) Product. Aspartic acid (L- and DL-forms). (b) Conditions of...

  20. 21 CFR 582.5017 - Aspartic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aspartic acid. 582.5017 Section 582.5017 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5017 Aspartic acid. (a) Product. Aspartic acid (L- and DL-forms). (b) Conditions of...

  1. 21 CFR 582.5017 - Aspartic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aspartic acid. 582.5017 Section 582.5017 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5017 Aspartic acid. (a) Product. Aspartic acid (L- and DL-forms). (b) Conditions of...

  2. Membrane topology of aspartate:alanine antiporter AspT from Comamonas testosteroni.

    PubMed

    Fujiki, Takashi; Nanatani, Kei; Nishitani, Kei; Yagi, Kyoko; Ohnishi, Fumito; Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Uchida, Takafumi; Nakajima, Tasuku; Abea, Keietsu

    2007-01-01

    We cloned the aspT gene encoding the L-aspartate:L-alanine antiporter AspTCt in Comamonas testosteroni genomic DNA. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence revealed that C. testosteroni has an asp operon containing aspT upstream of the l-aspartate 4-decarboxylase gene, and that the gene order of the asp operon of C. testosteroni is the inverse of that of Tetragenococcus halophilus. We used proteoliposomes to confirm the transport processes of AspTCt. To elucidate the two-dimensional structure of AspTCt, we analysed its membrane topology by means of alkaline phosphatase (PhoA) and beta-lactamase (BlaM) fusion methods. The fusion analyses revealed that AspTCt has seven transmembrane segments (TMs), a large cytoplasmic loop containing approximately 200 amino acid residues between TM4 and TM5, a cytoplasmic N-terminus, and a periplasmic C-terminus. These results suggest that the orientation of the N-terminus of AspTCt differs from that of tetragenococcal AspT, even though these two AspT orthologues catalyse the same transport reactions.

  3. Topology of AspT, the aspartate:alanine antiporter of Tetragenococcus halophilus, determined by site-directed fluorescence labeling.

    PubMed

    Nanatani, Kei; Fujiki, Takashi; Kanou, Kazuhiko; Takeda-Shitaka, Mayuko; Umeyama, Hideaki; Ye, Liwen; Wang, Xicheng; Nakajima, Tasuku; Uchida, Takafumi; Maloney, Peter C; Abe, Keietsu

    2007-10-01

    The gram-positive lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus catalyzes the decarboxylation of L-aspartate (Asp) with release of L-alanine (Ala) and CO(2). The decarboxylation reaction consists of two steps: electrogenic exchange of Asp for Ala catalyzed by an aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) and intracellular decarboxylation of the transported Asp catalyzed by an L-aspartate-beta-decarboxylase (AspD). AspT belongs to the newly classified aspartate:alanine exchanger family (transporter classification no. 2.A.81) of transporters. In this study, we were interested in the relationship between the structure and function of AspT and thus analyzed the topology by means of the substituted-cysteine accessibility method using the impermeant, fluorescent, thiol-specific probe Oregon Green 488 maleimide (OGM) and the impermeant, nonfluorescent, thiol-specific probe [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl]methanethiosulfonate bromide. We generated 23 single-cysteine variants from a six-histidine-tagged cysteineless AspT template. A cysteine position was assigned an external location if the corresponding single-cysteine variant reacted with OGM added to intact cells, and a position was assigned an internal location if OGM labeling required cell lysis. The topology analyses revealed that AspT has a unique topology; the protein has 10 transmembrane helices (TMs), a large hydrophilic cytoplasmic loop (about 180 amino acids) between TM5 and TM6, N and C termini that face the periplasm, and a positively charged residue (arginine 76) within TM3. Moreover, the three-dimensional structure constructed by means of the full automatic modeling system indicates that the large hydrophilic cytoplasmic loop of AspT possesses a TrkA_C domain and a TrkA_C-like domain and that the three-dimensional structures of these domains are similar to each other even though their amino acid sequences show low similarity.

  4. β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) perturbs alanine, aspartate and glutamate metabolism pathways in human neuroblastoma cells as determined by metabolic profiling.

    PubMed

    Engskog, Mikael K R; Ersson, Lisa; Haglöf, Jakob; Arvidsson, Torbjörn; Pettersson, Curt; Brittebo, Eva

    2017-02-04

    β-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a non-proteinogenic amino acid that induces long-term cognitive deficits, as well as an increased neurodegeneration and intracellular fibril formation in the hippocampus of adult rodents following short-time neonatal exposure and in vervet monkey brain following long-term exposure. It has also been proposed to be involved in the etiology of neurodegenerative disease in humans. The aim of this study was to identify metabolic effects not related to excitotoxicity or oxidative stress in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. The effects of BMAA (50, 250, 1000 µM) for 24 h on cells differentiated with retinoic acid were studied. Samples were analyzed using LC-MS and NMR spectroscopy to detect altered intracellular polar metabolites. The analysis performed, followed by multivariate pattern recognition techniques, revealed significant perturbations in protein biosynthesis, amino acid metabolism pathways and citrate cycle. Of specific interest were the BMAA-induced alterations in alanine, aspartate and glutamate metabolism and as well as alterations in various neurotransmitters/neuromodulators such as GABA and taurine. The results indicate that BMAA can interfere with metabolic pathways involved in neurotransmission in human neuroblastoma cells.

  5. The hydrothermal reaction kinetics of aspartic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Jenny S.; Seward, Terry M.

    2007-02-01

    Experimental data on the hydrothermal reaction kinetics of aspartic acid were acquired using a custom-built spectrophotometric reaction cell which permits in situ observation under hydrothermal conditions. The results of this study indicate that the reaction kinetics of dilute aspartic acid solutions are significantly different depending on the presence or absence of catalytic surfaces such as standard metal alloys. The spectroscopic data presented here represent the first direct observations, in situ and in real time, of an amino acid reacting in a hydrothermal solution. Quantitative kinetic information, including rate constants, concentration versus time profiles, and calculations of the individual component spectra, was obtained from the data using a chemometric approach based on factor analysis/principle component analysis which treats the rate expressions simultaneously as a system of differential algebraic equations (DAE) of index 1. Identification of the products was confirmed where possible by high pressure anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD). The reaction kinetics of aspartic acid under hydrothermal conditions was observed to be highly complex, in contrast to previous studies which indicated almost exclusively deamination. At lower temperatures (120-170 °C), several different reaction pathways were observed, including decarboxylation and polymerization, and the catalytic effects of reactor surfaces on the aspartic acid system were clearly demonstrated. At higher temperatures (above 170 °C), aspartic acid exhibited highly complex behaviour, with evidence indicating that it can simultaneously dimerize and cyclize, deaminate (by up to two pathways), and decarboxylate (by up to two pathways). These higher temperature kinetics were not fully resolvable in a quantitative manner due to the complexity of the system and the constraints of UV spectroscopy. The results of this study provide strong evidence that the reaction

  6. Computation of energy interaction parameters as well as electric dipole intensity parameters for the absorption spectral study of the interaction of Pr(III) with L-phenylalanine, L-glycine, L-alanine and L-aspartic acid in the presence and absence of Ca 2+ in organic solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moaienla, T.; Singh, Th. David; Singh, N. Rajmuhon; Devi, M. Indira

    2009-10-01

    Studying the absorption difference and comparative absorption spectra of the interaction of Pr(III) and Nd(III) with L-phenylalanine, L-glycine, L-alanine and L-aspartic acid in the presence and absence of Ca 2+ in organic solvents, various energy interaction parameters like Slater-Condon ( FK), Racah ( Ek), Lande factor ( ξ4f), nephelauxetic ratio ( β), bonding ( b1/2), percentage-covalency ( δ) have been evaluated applying partial and multiple regression analysis. The values of oscillator strength ( P) and Judd-Ofelt electric dipole intensity parameter Tλ ( λ = 2, 4, 6) for different 4f-4f transitions have been computed. On analysis of the variation of the various energy interaction parameters as well as the changes in the oscillator strength ( P) and Tλ values reveal the mode of binding with different ligands.

  7. Topology of AspT, the Aspartate:Alanine Antiporter of Tetragenococcus halophilus, Determined by Site-Directed Fluorescence Labeling▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Nanatani, Kei; Fujiki, Takashi; Kanou, Kazuhiko; Takeda-Shitaka, Mayuko; Umeyama, Hideaki; Ye, Liwen; Wang, Xicheng; Nakajima, Tasuku; Uchida, Takafumi; Maloney, Peter C.; Abe, Keietsu

    2007-01-01

    The gram-positive lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus catalyzes the decarboxylation of l-aspartate (Asp) with release of l-alanine (Ala) and CO2. The decarboxylation reaction consists of two steps: electrogenic exchange of Asp for Ala catalyzed by an aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) and intracellular decarboxylation of the transported Asp catalyzed by an l-aspartate-β-decarboxylase (AspD). AspT belongs to the newly classified aspartate:alanine exchanger family (transporter classification no. 2.A.81) of transporters. In this study, we were interested in the relationship between the structure and function of AspT and thus analyzed the topology by means of the substituted-cysteine accessibility method using the impermeant, fluorescent, thiol-specific probe Oregon Green 488 maleimide (OGM) and the impermeant, nonfluorescent, thiol-specific probe [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl]methanethiosulfonate bromide. We generated 23 single-cysteine variants from a six-histidine-tagged cysteineless AspT template. A cysteine position was assigned an external location if the corresponding single-cysteine variant reacted with OGM added to intact cells, and a position was assigned an internal location if OGM labeling required cell lysis. The topology analyses revealed that AspT has a unique topology; the protein has 10 transmembrane helices (TMs), a large hydrophilic cytoplasmic loop (about 180 amino acids) between TM5 and TM6, N and C termini that face the periplasm, and a positively charged residue (arginine 76) within TM3. Moreover, the three-dimensional structure constructed by means of the full automatic modeling system indicates that the large hydrophilic cytoplasmic loop of AspT possesses a TrkA_C domain and a TrkA_C-like domain and that the three-dimensional structures of these domains are similar to each other even though their amino acid sequences show low similarity. PMID:17660287

  8. Aspartic acid substitutions affect proton translocation by bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Mogi, T; Stern, L J; Marti, T; Chao, B H; Khorana, H G

    1988-01-01

    We have substituted each of the aspartic acid residues in bacteriorhodopsin to determine their possible role in proton translocation by this protein. The aspartic acid residues were replaced by asparagines; in addition, Asp-85, -96, -115, and -112 were changed to glutamic acid and Asp-212 was also replaced by alanine. The mutant bacteriorhodopsin genes were expressed in Escherichia coli and the proteins were purified. The mutant proteins all regenerated bacteriorhodopsin-like chromophores when treated with a detergent-phospholipid mixture and retinal. However, the rates of regeneration of the chromophores and their lambda max varied widely. No support was obtained for the external point charge model for the opsin shift. The Asp-85----Asn mutant showed not detectable proton pumping, the Asp-96----Asn and Asp-212----Glu mutants showed less than 10% and the Asp-115----Glu mutant showed approximately equal to 30% of the normal proton pumping. The implications of these findings for possible mechanisms of proton translocation by bacteriorhodopsin are discussed. PMID:3288985

  9. Observations of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase in THRIVE studies treated orally with ximelagatran.

    PubMed

    Harenberg, Job; Jörg, Ingrid; Weiss, Christel

    2006-01-01

    Treatment of acute venous thromboembolism (VTE) and prophylaxis of recurrent events has been investigated in the THRIVE (THRombin Inhibitor in Venous Thrombe Embolism) Treatment and the THRIVE III trial using the oral direct thrombin inhibitor ximelagatran. Alanine aminotransferase (ALAT) increased in 9.6% and 6.4% of patients in the THRIVE Treatment and THRIVE III trials, respectively. The authors analysed the time course of the ALAT and in additionally of aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT) in blood from 52 and 23 patients participating in the THRIVE Treatment and the THRIVE III trials in Germany. Analysis of variance for repeated measures and t test were performed. In the THRIVE Treatment trial, ALAT was significantly higher at week 2 for enoxaparin/warfarin (p => .0039, t test) and at months 3 and 6 for ximelagatran (p = .0453, p = .0014, respectively). ASAT and ASAT/ALAT ratio values did not increase and not differ for both groups. In the THRIVE III trial, ALAT and ASAT did not increase and did not differ compared to the comparator placebo. 2 x 36 mg Ximelagatran, induced higher ALAT values at months 3 and 6 compared to 2 x 24 mg ximelagatran (p = .0105, p = .0063, respectively). ASAT did not differ between the two doses of ximelagatran. The ASAT/ALAT ratios were lower at week 2 for enoxaparin/warfarin (t-test, p = .0032) and at month 3 and 6 for 2 x 36 mg versus warfarin or 2 x 24 mg Ximelagatran (p between .0187 and .0002). The authors conclude that ALAT increases dose dependently during therapy with ximelagatran. The less frequent and lower increase of ASAT values compared to ALAT values indicates a nontoxic effect of ximelagatran on liver cells.

  10. Correlation of serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase with coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jianying; Zhang, Jingying; Wen, Jing; Ming, Qiang; Zhang, Ji; Xu, Yawei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to explore the relationship between different risk factors (especially serum alanine aminotransferase [ALT] and aspartate aminotransferase [AST]) and coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods: A total of 610 inpatients were recruited. Initial coronary angiography (CAG) was performed to evaluate the severity of coronary lesions. On the basis of findings from CAG, patients were divided into control group (n=260) and CHD group (n=350). Logistic regression analysis was employed for the evaluation of clinical characteristics and biochemical parameters, aiming to explore the relationship between risk factors (including AST and ALT) and CHD. Results: Results showed type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, smoking and family history of CHD were clinical risk factors of CHD. Laboratory examinations showed the serum levels of triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein, AST and ALT in CHD group were significantly higher than those in control group (P<0.05). Of these parameters, the AST was 50.98±8.12 U/L in CHD group and 20.14±3.94 U/L in control group (P<0.01); the ALT was 42.31±8.34 U/L in CHD group and 18.25±6.38 U/L in control group (P<0.01). Conclusion: The serum levels of AST and ALT in CHD patients are higher than those in controls. High serum AST and ALT are biochemical markers which can be used to predict the severity of CHD and are also independent risk factors of CHD. PMID:26064360

  11. Elevated Aspartate and Alanine Aminotransferase Levels and Natural Death among Patients with Methamphetamine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chian-Jue; Tsai, Shang-Ying; Liao, Ya-Tang; Conwell, Yeates; Lee, Wen-Chung; Huang, Ming-Chyi; Lin, Shih-Ku; Chen, Chiao-Chicy; Chen, Wei J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Methamphetamine is one of the fastest growing illicit drugs worldwide, causing multiple organ damage and excessive natural deaths. The authors aimed to identify potential laboratory indices and clinical characteristics associated with natural death through a two-phase study. Methods Methamphetamine-dependent patients (n = 1,254) admitted to a psychiatric center in Taiwan between 1990 and 2007 were linked with a national mortality database for causes of death. Forty-eight subjects died of natural causes, and were defined as the case subjects. A time-efficient sex- and age-matched nested case-control study derived from the cohort was conducted first to explore the potential factors associated with natural death through a time-consuming standardized review of medical records. Then the identified potential factors were evaluated in the whole cohort to validate the findings. Results In phase I, several potential factors associated with natural death were identified, including aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), comorbid alcohol use disorder, and the prescription of antipsychotic drugs. In phase II, these factors were confirmed in the whole cohort using survival analysis. For the characteristics at the latest hospital admission, Cox proportional hazards models showed that the adjusted hazard ratios for natural death were 6.75 (p<0.001) in the group with markedly elevated AST (>80 U/L) and 2.66 (p<0.05) in the group with mildly elevated AST (40–80 U/L), with reference to the control group (<40 U/L). As for ALT, the adjusted hazard ratios were 5.41 (p<0.001), and 1.44 (p>0.05). Comorbid alcohol use disorder was associated with an increased risk of natural death, whereas administration of antipsychotic drugs was not associated with lowered risk. Conclusions This study highlights the necessity of intensive follow-up for those with elevated AST and ALT levels and comorbid alcohol use disorder for preventing excessive natural

  12. Amino acid oxidation and alanine production in rat hemidiaphragm in vitro. Effects of dichloroacetate.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, T N; Caldecourt, M A; Sugden, M C

    1984-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (an activator of pyruvate dehydrogenase) stimulates 14CO2 production from [U-14C]glucose, but not from [U-14C]glutamate, [U-14C]aspartate, [U-14C]- and [1-14C]-valine and [U-14C]- and [1-14C]-leucine. It is concluded (1) that pyruvate dehydrogenase is not rate-limiting in the oxidation to CO2 of amino acids that are metabolized to tricarboxylic acid-cycle intermediates, and (2) that carbohydrate (and not amino acids) is the main carbon precursor in alanine formation in muscle. PMID:6149743

  13. Homoserine as an Aspartic Acid Precursor for Synthesis of Proteoglycan Glycopeptide Containing Aspartic Acid and a Sulfated Glycan Chain.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weizhun; Ramadan, Sherif; Yang, Bo; Yoshida, Keisuke; Huang, Xuefei

    2016-12-02

    Among many hurdles in synthesizing proteoglycan glycopeptides, one challenge is the incorporation of aspartic acid in the peptide backbone and acid sensitive O-sulfated glycan chains. To overcome this, a new strategy was developed utilizing homoserine as an aspartic acid precursor. The conversion of homoserine to aspartic acid in the glycopeptide was successfully accomplished by late stage oxidation using (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidin-1-yl)oxyl (TEMPO) and bis(acetoxy)iodobenzene (BAIB). This is the first time that a glycopeptide containing aspartic acid and an O-sulfated glycan was synthesized.

  14. Impact of charged amino acid substitution in the transmembrane domain of L-alanine exporter, AlaE, of Escherichia coli on the L-alanine export.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seryoung; Ihara, Kohei; Katsube, Satoshi; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Yoneyama, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    The Escherichia coli alaE gene encodes the L-alanine exporter, AlaE, that catalyzes active export of L-alanine using proton electrochemical potential. The transporter comprises only 149 amino acid residues and four predicted transmembrane domains (TMs), which contain three charged amino acid residues. The AlaE-deficient L-alanine non-metabolizing cells (ΔalaE cells) appeared hypersusceptible to L-alanyl-L-alanine showing a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 2.5 µg/ml for the dipeptide due to a toxic accumulation of L-alanine. To elucidate the mechanism by which AlaE exports L-alanine, we replaced charged amino acid residues in the TMs, glutamic acid-30 (TM-I), arginine-45 (TM-II), and aspartic acid-84 (TM-III) with their respective charge-conserved amino acid or a net neutral cysteine. The ΔalaE cells producing R45K or R45C appeared hypersusceptible to the dipeptide, indicating that arginine-45 is essential for AlaE activity. MIC of the dipeptide in the ΔalaE cells expressing E30D and E30C was 156 µg/ml and >10,000 µg/ml, respectively, thereby suggesting that a negative charge at this position is not essential. The ΔalaE cells expressing D84E or D84C showed an MIC >10,000 and 78 µg/ml, respectively, implying that a negative charge is required at this position. These results were generally consistent with that of the L-alanine accumulation experiments in intact cells. We therefore concluded that charged amino acid residues (R45 and D84) in the AlaE transmembrane domain play a pivotal role in L-alanine export. Replacement of three cysteine residues at C22, C28 (both in TM-I), and C135 (C-terminal region) with alanine showed only a marginal effect on L-alanine export.

  15. Stimulation of [3H] GABA and beta-[3H] alanine release from rat brain slices by cis-4-aminocrotonic acid.

    PubMed

    Chebib, M; Johnston, G A

    1997-02-01

    cis-4-Aminocrotonic acid (CACA; 100 microM), an analogue of GABA in a folded conformation, stimulated the passive release of [3H] GABA from slices of rat cerebellum, cerebral cortex, retina, and spinal cord and of beta-[3H]alanine from slices of cerebellum and spinal cord without influencing potassium-evoked release. In contrast, CACA (100 microM) did not stimulate the passive release of [3H]taurine from slices of cerebellum and spinal cord or of D-[3H]aspartate from slices of cerebellum and did not influence potassium-evoked release of [3H]-taurine from the cerebellum and spinal cord and D-[3H]-aspartate from the cerebellum. These results suggest that the effects of CACA on GABA and beta-alanine release are due to CACA acting as a substrate for a beta-alanine-sensitive GABA transport system, consistent with CACA inhibiting the uptake of beta-[3H]alanine into slices of rat cerebellum and cerebral cortex. The observed Ki for CACA against beta-[3H]alanine uptake in the cerebellum was 750 +/- 60 microM. CACA appears to be 10-fold weaker as a substrate for the transporter system than as an agonist for the GABAc receptor. The effects of CACA on GABA and beta-alanine release provide indirect evidence for a GABA transporter in cerebellum, cerebral cortex, retina, and spinal cord that transports GABA, beta-alanine, CACA, and nipecotic acid that has a similar pharmacological profile to that of the GABA transporter, GAT-3, cloned from rat CNS. The structural similarities of GABA, beta-alanine, CACA, and nipecotic acid are demonstrated by computer-aided molecular modeling, providing information on the possible conformations of these substances being transported by a common carrier protein.

  16. Fragmentation reactions of deprotonated peptides containing aspartic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Alex G.; Young, Alex B.

    2006-09-01

    The fragmentation reactions of deprotonated peptides containing aspartic acid have been elucidated using MS2 and MS3 experiments and accurate mass measurements where necessary. The disposition of labile (N and O bonded) hydrogens in the fragmentation products has been studied by exchanging the labile hydrogens for deuterium whereby the [MD]- ion is formed on electrospray ionization. [alpha]-Aspartyl and [beta]-aspartyl dipeptides give very similar fragment ion spectra on collisional activation, involving for both species primarily formation of the y1 ion and loss of H2O from [MH]- followed by further fragmentation, thus precluding the distinction of the isomeric species by negative ion tandem mass spectrometry. Dipeptides of sequence HXxxAspOH give characteristic spectra different from the [alpha]- and [beta]-isomers. For larger peptides containing aspartic acid a common fragmentation reaction involves nominal cleavage of the NC bond N-terminal to the aspartic acid residue to form a c ion (deprotonated amino acid amide (c1) or peptide amide (cn)) and the complimentary product involving elimination of a neutral amino acid amide or peptide amide. When aspartic acid is in the C-terminal position this fragmentation reaction occurs from the [MH]- ion while when the aspartic acid is not in the C-terminal position the fragmentation reaction occurs mainly from the [MHH2O]- ion. The products of this NC bond cleavage reaction serve to identify the position of the aspartic acid residue in the peptide.

  17. Gas-phase acidities of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, and their amino acid amides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhong; Matus, Myrna H.; Velazquez, Hector Adam; Dixon, David A.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2007-09-01

    Gas-phase acidities (GA or [Delta]Gacid) for the two most acidic common amino acids, aspartic acid and glutamic acid, have been determined for the first time. Because of the amide linkage's importance in peptides and as an aid in studying side chain versus main chain deprotonation, aspartic acid amide and glutamic acid amide were also studied. Experimental GA values were measured by proton transfer reactions in an electrospray ionization/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. Calculated GAs were obtained by density functional and molecular orbital theory approaches. The best agreement with experiment was found at the G3MP2 level; the MP2/CBS and B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ results are 3-4 kcal/mol more acidic than the G3MP2 results. Experiment shows that aspartic acid is more acidic than glutamic acid by ca. 3 kcal/mol whereas the G3MP2 results show a smaller acidity difference of 0.2 kcal/mol. Similarly, aspartic acid amide is experimentally observed to be ca. 2 kcal/mol more acidic than glutamic acid amide whereas the G3MP2 results show a correspondingly smaller energy difference of 0.7 kcal/mol. The computational results clearly show that the anions are all ring-like structures with strong hydrogen bonds between the OH or NH2 groups and the CO2- group from which the proton is removed. The two amino acids are main-chain deprotonated. In addition, use of the COSMO model for the prediction of the free energy differences in aqueous solution gave values in excellent agreement with the most recent experimental values for pKa. Glutamic acid is predicted to be more acidic than aspartic acid in aqueous solution due to differential solvation effects.

  18. Serum γ-Glutamyltransferase, Alanine Aminotransferase and Aspartate Aminotransferase Activity in Healthy Blood Donor of Different Ethnic Groups in Gorgan

    PubMed Central

    Mehrpouya, Masoumeh; Pourhashem, Zeinab

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Measure of liver enzymes may help to increase safety of blood donation for both blood donor and recipient. Determination of liver enzymes may prepare valuable clinical information. Aim To assess serum γ-Glutamyltransferase (GGT), Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT), and Aspartate Aminotransferase (AST) activities in healthy blood donors in different ethnic groups in Gorgan. Materials and Methods This study was performed in 450 healthy male blood donors, in three ethnic groups (Fars, Sistanee and Turkman) who attended Gorgan blood transfusion center. Liver enzymes (GGT, ALT and AST) were determined. Results Serum AST and ALT in three ethnic groups were significant except for serum GGT levels. There was significant correlation between family histories of liver disease and systolic blood pressure and AST in Fars, and GGT in Sistanee ethnic groups. Conclusion Several factors, such as age, family history of diabetes mellitus, family history of liver disease and smoking habit had no effect on some liver enzymes in different ethnic groups in this area. Variation of AST, ALT, and GGT enzyme activities in healthy subjects was associated with some subjects in our study groups. According to our study, it suggests that screening of AST and GGT enzymes in subjects with family history of liver disease is necessary in different ethnic groups. PMID:27630834

  19. L-aspartic acid transport by cat erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.W.; Preston, R.L.

    1986-03-01

    Cat and dog red cells are unusual in that they have no Na/K ATPase and contain low K and high Na intracellularly. They also show significant Na dependent L-aspartate (L-asp) transport. The authors have characterized this system in cat RBCs. The influx of /sup 3/H-L-asp (typically 2..mu..M) was measured in washed RBCs incubated for 60 s at 37/sup 0/C in medium containing 140 mM NaCl, 5 mM Kcl, 2 mM CaCl/sub 2/, 15 mM MOPS pH 7.4, 5 mM glucose, and /sup 14/C-PEG as a space marker. The cells were washed 3 times in the medium immediately before incubation which was terminated by centrifuging the RBCs through a layer of dibutylphthalate. Over an L-asp concentration range of 0.5-1000..mu..M, influx obeyed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a small added linear diffusion component. The Kt and Jmax of the saturable component were 5.40 +/- 0.34 ..mu..M and 148.8 +/- 7.2 ..mu..mol 1. cell/sup -1/h/sup -1/ respectively. Replacement of Na with Li, K, Rb, Cs or choline reduce influx to diffusion. With the addition of asp analogues (4/sup +/M L-asp, 40/sup +/M inhibitor), the following sequence of inhibition was observed (range 80% to 40% inhib.): L-glutamate > L-cysteine sulfonate > D-asp > L-cysteic acid > D-glutamate. Other amino acids such as L-alanine, L-proline, L-lysine, L-cysteine, and taurine showed no inhibition (<5%). These data suggest that cat red cells contain a high-affinity Na dependent transport system for L-asp, glutamate, and closely related analogues which resembles that found in the RBCs of other carnivores and in neural tissues.

  20. D-Amino acid dipeptide production utilizing D-alanine-D-alanine ligases with novel substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masaru; Kirimura, Kohtaro; Kino, Kuniki

    2005-06-01

    D-Alanine-D-alanine ligase (Ddl) is an important enzyme in the synthesis of bacterial peptidoglycan. The genes encoding Ddls from Escherichia coli K12 (EcDdlB), Oceanobacillus iheyensis JCM 11309 (OiDdl), Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (SsDdl) and Thermotoga maritima ATCC 43589 (TmDdl), the genomic DNA sequences of which have been determined, were cloned and the substrate specificities of these recombinant Ddls were investigated. Although OiDdl had a high substrate specificity for D-alanine; EcDdlB, SsDdl and TmDdl showed broad substrate specificities for D-serine, D-threonine, D-cysteine and glycine, in addition to D-alanine. Four D-amino acid dipeptides were produced using EcDdlB, and D-amino acid homo-dipeptides were successfully produced at high yields except for D-threonyl-D-threonine.

  1. Properties of Copolymers of Aspartic Acid and Aliphatic Dicarboxylic Acids Prepared by Reactive Extrusion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspartic acid may be prepared chemically or by the fermentation of carbohydrates. Currently, low molecular weight polyaspartic acids are prepared commercially by heating aspartic acid at high temperatures (greater than 220 degrees C) for several hours in the solid state. In an effort to develop a ...

  2. The effects of the stress caused by experimental procedures on alanine aspartate, glutamate and glutamine in rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Heath, D. F.; George, D. R.; Rose, J. G.

    1971-01-01

    Rats were stressed by intravenous injection, tail-warming or moderate restraint for 30s, i.e. by stresses imposed by normal handling during experiment. Liver glutamate concentrations were greatly affected. The results were substantially the same in two varieties of rat (Wistar and Sprague–Dawley), in two laboratories, in experiments carried out by two sets of workers, and after all three stresses. The following detailed results refer to Wistar rats. 1. In starved rats at 20°C and 30°C and in post-absorptive rats at 20°C stress by injection raised liver glutamate concentrations from 1.54, 1.57 and 1.88μmol/g wet wt. 30s after injection to 3.4, 2.7 and 3.6μmol/g wet wt. respectively a few minutes later. In starved rats at 20°C the concentration then fell slowly to 2.3μmol/g wet wt., in starved rats at 30°C it remained steady, and in post-absorptive rats at 20°C it rose slowly to about 4.3μmol/g wet wt. The final values seemed fairly steady and corresponded to an `alert' state. 2. In starved rats at 20°C anaesthesia, with or without injection or cannulation during it, raised glutamate concentrations to the `alert' values, which were maintained for 2–3h. 3. Liver alanine concentration in post-absorptive rats initially fell from 1.5 to 0.8μmol/g, and then stayed fairly constant. 4. Aspartate and glutamine concentrations altered only in starved rats, and proportionately much less than those of glutamate. 5. The necessity for knowing the time-dependence of glutamate concentrations after experimental handling is emphasized. 6. There is no wholly satisfactory explanation of the observations. PMID:5145894

  3. Microwave-assisted reaction of glycosylamine with aspartic acid.

    PubMed

    Real-Fernández, Feliciana; Nuti, Francesca; Bonache, M Angeles; Boccalini, Marco; Chimichi, Stefano; Chelli, Mario; Papini, Anna Maria

    2010-07-01

    The synthesis of N-protected glycosyl amino acids from amines has been investigated and it was found that, under microwave conditions, glycosylamines could be hydrolyzed leading to new products containing a glycosyl ester linkage. The efficiency of the microwave-induced glycosylation of aspartic acid was studied comparing the microwave activity between amide and ester bond formation. Different sugar moieties have been employed to demonstrate the simple and reproducible coupling methodology. New glycosyl ester compounds were further characterized by NMR spectroscopy.

  4. Synthesis of 6-phosphofructose aspartic acid and some related Amadori compounds.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Alexandar L; Behrman, Edward J

    2016-08-05

    We describe the synthesis and characterization of 6-phosphofructose-aspartic acid, an intermediate in the metabolism of fructose-asparagine by Salmonella. We also report improved syntheses of fructose-asparagine itself and of fructose-aspartic acid.

  5. Structural and Functional Importance of Transmembrane Domain 3 (TM3) in the Aspartate:Alanine Antiporter AspT: Topology and Function of the Residues of TM3 and Oligomerization of AspT▿

    PubMed Central

    Nanatani, Kei; Maloney, Peter C.; Abe, Keietsu

    2009-01-01

    AspT, the aspartate:alanine antiporter of Tetragenococcus halophilus, a membrane protein of 543 amino acids with 10 putative transmembrane (TM) helices, is the prototype of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAE) family of transporters. Because TM3 (isoleucine 64 to methionine 85) has many amino acid residues that are conserved among members of the AAE family and because TM3 contains two charged residues and four polar residues, it is thought to be located near (or to form part of) the substrate translocation pathway that includes the binding site for the substrates. To elucidate the role of TM3 in the transport process, we carried out cysteine-scanning mutagenesis. The substitutions of tyrosine 75 and serine 84 had the strongest inhibitory effects on transport (initial rates of l-aspartate transport were below 15% of the rate for cysteine-less AspT). Considerable but less-marked effects were observed upon the replacement of methionine 70, phenylalanine 71, glycine 74, arginine 76, serine 83, and methionine 85 (initial rates between 15% and 30% of the rate for cysteine-less AspT). Introduced cysteine residues at the cytoplasmic half of TM3 could be labeled with Oregon green maleimide (OGM), whereas cysteines close to the periplasmic half (residues 64 to 75) were not labeled. These results suggest that TM3 has a hydrophobic core on the periplasmic half and that hydrophilic residues on the cytoplasmic half of TM3 participate in the formation of an aqueous cavity in membranes. Furthermore, the presence of l-aspartate protected the cysteine introduced at glycine 62 against a reaction with OGM. In contrast, l-aspartate stimulated the reactivity of the cysteine introduced at proline 79 with OGM. These results demonstrate that TM3 undergoes l-aspartate-induced conformational alterations. In addition, nonreducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analyses and a glutaraldehyde cross-linking assay suggest that functional AspT forms homo-oligomers as a

  6. Structural and functional importance of transmembrane domain 3 (TM3) in the aspartate:alanine antiporter AspT: topology and function of the residues of TM3 and oligomerization of AspT.

    PubMed

    Nanatani, Kei; Maloney, Peter C; Abe, Keietsu

    2009-04-01

    AspT, the aspartate:alanine antiporter of Tetragenococcus halophilus, a membrane protein of 543 amino acids with 10 putative transmembrane (TM) helices, is the prototype of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAE) family of transporters. Because TM3 (isoleucine 64 to methionine 85) has many amino acid residues that are conserved among members of the AAE family and because TM3 contains two charged residues and four polar residues, it is thought to be located near (or to form part of) the substrate translocation pathway that includes the binding site for the substrates. To elucidate the role of TM3 in the transport process, we carried out cysteine-scanning mutagenesis. The substitutions of tyrosine 75 and serine 84 had the strongest inhibitory effects on transport (initial rates of l-aspartate transport were below 15% of the rate for cysteine-less AspT). Considerable but less-marked effects were observed upon the replacement of methionine 70, phenylalanine 71, glycine 74, arginine 76, serine 83, and methionine 85 (initial rates between 15% and 30% of the rate for cysteine-less AspT). Introduced cysteine residues at the cytoplasmic half of TM3 could be labeled with Oregon green maleimide (OGM), whereas cysteines close to the periplasmic half (residues 64 to 75) were not labeled. These results suggest that TM3 has a hydrophobic core on the periplasmic half and that hydrophilic residues on the cytoplasmic half of TM3 participate in the formation of an aqueous cavity in membranes. Furthermore, the presence of l-aspartate protected the cysteine introduced at glycine 62 against a reaction with OGM. In contrast, l-aspartate stimulated the reactivity of the cysteine introduced at proline 79 with OGM. These results demonstrate that TM3 undergoes l-aspartate-induced conformational alterations. In addition, nonreducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analyses and a glutaraldehyde cross-linking assay suggest that functional AspT forms homo-oligomers as a

  7. Bioproduction of L-Aspartic Acid and Cinnamic Acid by L-Aspartate Ammonia Lyase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Patel, Arti T; Akhani, Rekha C; Patel, Manisha J; Dedania, Samir R; Patel, Darshan H

    2016-12-17

    Aspartase (L-aspartate ammonia lyase, EC 4.3.1.1) catalyses the reversible amination and deamination of L-aspartic acid to fumaric acid which can be used to produce important biochemical. In this study, we have explored the characteristics of aspartase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (PA-AspA). To overproduce PA-AspA, the 1425-bp gene was introduced in Escherichia coli BL21 and purified. A 51.0-kDa protein was observed as a homogenous purified protein on SDS-PAGE. The enzyme was optimally active at pH 8.0 and 35 °C. PA-AspA has retained 56% activity after 7 days of incubation at 35 °C, which displays the hyperthermostablility characteristics of the enzyme. PA-AspA is activated in the presence of metal ions and Mg2+ is found to be most effective. Among the substrates tested for specificity of PA-AspA, L-phenylalanine (38.35 ± 2.68) showed the highest specific activity followed by L-aspartic acid (31.21 ± 3.31) and fumarate (5.42 ± 2.94). K m values for L-phenylalanine, L-aspartic acid and fumarate were 1.71 mM, 0.346 μM and 2 M, respectively. The catalytic efficiency (k cat/K m) for L-aspartic acid (14.18 s(-1) mM(-1)) was higher than that for L-phenylalanine (4.65 s(-1) mM(-1)). For bioconversion, from an initial concentration of 1000 mM of fumarate and 30 mM of L-phenylalanine, PA-AspA was found to convert 395.31 μM L-aspartic acid and 3.47 mM cinnamic acid, respectively.

  8. Explosive enantiospecific decomposition of aspartic acid on Cu surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mhatre, B S; Dutta, S; Reinicker, A; Karagoz, B; Gellman, A J

    2016-12-01

    Aspartic acid adsorbed on Cu surfaces is doubly deprotonated. On chiral Cu(643)(R&S) its enantiomers undergo enantiospecific decomposition via an autocatalytic explosion. Once initiated, the decomposition mechanism proceeds via sequential cleavage of the C3-C4 and C1-C2 bonds each yielding CO2, followed by conversion of the remaining species into N[triple bond, length as m-dash]CCH3.

  9. On the solvation of L-aspartic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxton, A. T.; Harper, J. B.

    2004-01-01

    We use molecular statics and dynamics to study the stability of L-aspartic acid both in vacuo and solvated by polar and non-polar molecules using density functional theory in the generalized gradient approximation. We find that structures stable in vacuo are unstable in aqueous solution and vice versa. From our simulations we are able to come to some conclusions about the mechanism of stabilisation of zwitterions by polar protic solvents, water and methanol.

  10. Age estimation based on aspartic acid racemization in human sclera.

    PubMed

    Klumb, Karolin; Matzenauer, Christian; Reckert, Alexandra; Lehmann, Klaus; Ritz-Timme, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    Age estimation based on racemization of aspartic acid residues (AAR) in permanent proteins has been established in forensic medicine for years. While dentine is the tissue of choice for this molecular method of age estimation, teeth are not always available which leads to the need to identify other suitable tissues. We examined the suitability of total tissue samples of human sclera for the estimation of age at death. Sixty-five samples of scleral tissue were analyzed. The samples were hydrolyzed and after derivatization, the extent of aspartic acid racemization was determined by gas chromatography. The degree of AAR increased with age. In samples from younger individuals, the correlation of age and D-aspartic acid content was closer than in samples from older individuals. The age-dependent racemization in total tissue samples proves that permanent or at least long-living proteins are present in scleral tissue. The correlation of AAR in human sclera and age at death is close enough to serve as basis for age estimation. However, the precision of age estimation by this method is lower than that of age estimation based on the analysis of dentine which is due to molecular inhomogeneities of total tissue samples of sclera. Nevertheless, the approach may serve as a valuable alternative or addition in exceptional cases.

  11. An archaeal glutamate decarboxylase homolog functions as an aspartate decarboxylase and is involved in β-alanine and coenzyme A biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Hiroya; Yokooji, Yuusuke; Ishibashi, Takuya; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Atomi, Haruyuki

    2014-03-01

    β-Alanine is a precursor for coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis and is a substrate for the bacterial/eukaryotic pantothenate synthetase and archaeal phosphopantothenate synthetase. β-Alanine is synthesized through various enzymes/pathways in bacteria and eukaryotes, including the direct decarboxylation of Asp by aspartate 1-decarboxylase (ADC), the degradation of pyrimidine, or the oxidation of polyamines. However, in most archaea, homologs of these enzymes are not present; thus, the mechanisms of β-alanine biosynthesis remain unclear. Here, we performed a biochemical and genetic study on a glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) homolog encoded by TK1814 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis. GADs are distributed in all three domains of life, generally catalyzing the decarboxylation of Glu to γ-aminobutyrate (GABA). The recombinant TK1814 protein displayed not only GAD activity but also ADC activity using pyridoxal 5'-phosphate as a cofactor. Kinetic studies revealed that the TK1814 protein prefers Asp as its substrate rather than Glu, with nearly a 20-fold difference in catalytic efficiency. Gene disruption of TK1814 resulted in a strain that could not grow in standard medium. Addition of β-alanine, 4'-phosphopantothenate, or CoA complemented the growth defect, whereas GABA could not. Our results provide genetic evidence that TK1814 functions as an ADC in T. kodakarensis, providing the β-alanine necessary for CoA biosynthesis. The results also suggest that the GAD activity of TK1814 is not necessary for growth, at least under the conditions applied in this study. TK1814 homologs are distributed in a wide range of archaea and may be responsible for β-alanine biosynthesis in these organisms.

  12. An Archaeal Glutamate Decarboxylase Homolog Functions as an Aspartate Decarboxylase and Is Involved in β-Alanine and Coenzyme A Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Hiroya; Yokooji, Yuusuke; Ishibashi, Takuya; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2014-01-01

    β-Alanine is a precursor for coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis and is a substrate for the bacterial/eukaryotic pantothenate synthetase and archaeal phosphopantothenate synthetase. β-Alanine is synthesized through various enzymes/pathways in bacteria and eukaryotes, including the direct decarboxylation of Asp by aspartate 1-decarboxylase (ADC), the degradation of pyrimidine, or the oxidation of polyamines. However, in most archaea, homologs of these enzymes are not present; thus, the mechanisms of β-alanine biosynthesis remain unclear. Here, we performed a biochemical and genetic study on a glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) homolog encoded by TK1814 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis. GADs are distributed in all three domains of life, generally catalyzing the decarboxylation of Glu to γ-aminobutyrate (GABA). The recombinant TK1814 protein displayed not only GAD activity but also ADC activity using pyridoxal 5′-phosphate as a cofactor. Kinetic studies revealed that the TK1814 protein prefers Asp as its substrate rather than Glu, with nearly a 20-fold difference in catalytic efficiency. Gene disruption of TK1814 resulted in a strain that could not grow in standard medium. Addition of β-alanine, 4′-phosphopantothenate, or CoA complemented the growth defect, whereas GABA could not. Our results provide genetic evidence that TK1814 functions as an ADC in T. kodakarensis, providing the β-alanine necessary for CoA biosynthesis. The results also suggest that the GAD activity of TK1814 is not necessary for growth, at least under the conditions applied in this study. TK1814 homologs are distributed in a wide range of archaea and may be responsible for β-alanine biosynthesis in these organisms. PMID:24415726

  13. Effect of abomasal infusion of aspartate on nitrogen balance and plasma amino acids in Holstein steers.

    PubMed

    Wessels, R H; Titgemeyer, E C

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the effect of abomasally infused aspartate (Asp) on N balance and plasma amino acids in steers. Four ruminally cannulated Holstein steers (180 kg) housed in metabolism crates were used in an experiment designed as a 4 x 3 Youden square. Steers received continuous abomasal infusions of water or water containing 40 or 80 g Asp/d. Steers were fed twice daily a diet containing 473 g/kg corn, 463 g/kg alfalfa hay and 52 g/kg soybean meal at levels near ad libitum intake. Abomasally infused Asp had no effect on N balance. Infusion of 80 g Asp/d increased (P < 0.05) plasma concentrations of Asp, glutamate and alanine. Metabolism of Asp by gut tissues probably prevented the large change in plasma concentration of Asp that seems necessary to trigger hormonal responses. We conclude that abomasal supplementation of steers with up to 80 g/d of Asp does not enhance performance.

  14. Juxtamembranous aspartic acid in Insig-1 and Insig-2 is required for cholesterol homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yi; Lee, Joon No; Brown, Michael S.; Goldstein, Joseph L.; Ye, Jin

    2006-01-01

    Insig-1 and Insig-2 are closely related proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that mediate feedback control of cholesterol synthesis by sterol-dependent binding to the following two membrane proteins: the escort protein Scap, thus preventing proteolytic processing of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins; and the cholesterol biosynthetic enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase, thus inducing the ubiquitination and ER-associated degradation of the enzyme. Here, we report that the conserved Asp-205 in Insig-1, which abuts the fourth transmembrane helix at the cytosolic side of the ER membrane, is essential for its dual function. When Asp-205 was mutated to alanine, the mutant Insig-1 lost the ability to bind to Scap and, thus, was unable to suppress the cleavage of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins. The mutant Insig-1 was ineffective also in accelerating sterol-stimulated degradation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase. Alanine substitution of the corresponding aspartic acid in Insig-2 produced the same dual defects. These studies identify a single amino acid residue that is crucial for the function of Insig proteins in regulating cholesterol homeostasis in mammalian cells. PMID:16606821

  15. The highly conserved aspartic acid residue between hypervariable regions 1 and 2 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 is important for early stages of virus replication.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, W K; Essex, M; Lee, T H

    1995-01-01

    Between hypervariable regions V1 and V2 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp120 lies a cluster of relatively conserved residues. The contribution of nine charged residues in this region to virus infectivity was evaluated by single-amino-acid substitutions in an infectious provirus clone. Three of the HIV-1 mutants studied had slower growth kinetics than the wild-type virus. The delay was most pronounced in a mutant with an alanine substituted for an aspartic acid residue at position 180. This aspartic acid is conserved by all HIV-1 isolates with known nucleotide sequences. Substitutions with three other residues at this position, including a negatively charged glutamic acid, all affected virus infectivity. The defect identified in these mutants suggests that this aspartic acid residue is involved in the early stages of HIV-1 replication. PMID:7983752

  16. Origins of hydration differences in homochiral and racemic crystals of aspartic acid.

    PubMed

    Juliano, Thomas R; Korter, Timothy M

    2015-02-26

    The propensity for crystalline hydrates of organic molecules to form is related to the strength of the interactions between molecules, including the chiral composition of the molecular solids. Specifically, homochiral versus racemic crystalline samples can exhibit distinct differences in their ability to form energetically stable hydrates. The focus of the current study is a comparison of the crystal structures and intermolecular forces found in solid-state L-aspartic acid, DL-aspartic acid, and L-aspartic acid monohydrate. The absence of experimental evidence for the DL-aspartic acid monohydrate is considered here in terms of the enhanced thermodynamic stability of the DL-aspartic acid anhydrate crystal as compared to the L-aspartic acid anhydrate as revealed through solid-state density functional theory calculations and terahertz spectroscopic measurements. The results indicate that anhydrous DL-aspartic acid is the more stable solid, not due to intermolecular forces alone but also due to the improved conformations of the molecules within the racemic solid. Hemihydrated and monohydrated forms of DL-aspartic acid have been computationally evaluated, and in each case, the hydrates produce destabilized aspartic acid conformations that prevent DL-aspartic acid hydrate formation from occurring.

  17. The bioactive acidic serine- and aspartate-rich motif peptide.

    PubMed

    Minamizaki, Tomoko; Yoshiko, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    The organic component of the bone matrix comprises 40% dry weight of bone. The organic component is mostly composed of type I collagen and small amounts of non-collagenous proteins (NCPs) (10-15% of the total bone protein content). The small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoprotein (SIBLING) family, a NCP, is considered to play a key role in bone mineralization. SIBLING family of proteins share common structural features and includes the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif and acidic serine- and aspartic acid-rich motif (ASARM). Clinical manifestations of gene mutations and/or genetically modified mice indicate that SIBLINGs play diverse roles in bone and extraskeletal tissues. ASARM peptides might not be primary responsible for the functional diversity of SIBLINGs, but this motif is suggested to be a key domain of SIBLINGs. However, the exact function of ASARM peptides is poorly understood. In this article, we discuss the considerable progress made in understanding the role of ASARM as a bioactive peptide.

  18. Interaction Between Some Monosaccharides and Aspartic Acid in Dilute Aqueous Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kulikova, Galina A.

    2008-01-01

    Interaction between aspartic acid and d-glucose, d-galactose, and d-fructose has been studied by isothermal titration calorimetry, calorimetry of dissolution, and densimetry. It has been found that d-glucose and d-fructose form thermodynamically stable associates with aspartic acid, in contrast to d-galactose. The selectivity in the interaction of aspartic acid with monosaccharides is affected by their stereochemical structures. PMID:19669542

  19. Analysis of the aspartic acid metabolic pathway using mutant genes.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, R A

    2002-01-01

    Amino acid metabolism is a fundamental process for plant growth and development. Although a considerable amount of information is available, little is known about the genetic control of enzymatic steps or regulation of several pathways. Much of the information about biochemical pathways has arisen from the use of mutants lacking key enzymes. Although mutants were largely used already in the 60's, by bacterial and fungal geneticists, it took plant research a long time to catch up. The advance in this area was rapid in the 80's, which was followed in the 90's by the development of techniques of plant transformation. In this review we present an overview of the aspartic acid metabolic pathway, the key regulatory enzymes and the mutants and transgenic plants produced for lysine and threonine metabolism. We also discuss and propose a new study of high-lysine mutants.

  20. Growth and characterization of KDP crystals doped with L-aspartic acid.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, R; Rajasekaran, R; Samuel, Bincy Susan

    2013-03-01

    Potassium Dihydrogen Phosphate (KDP) doped with L-aspartic acid has been grown by solvent slow evaporation technique from a mixture of aqueous solution of KDP and 0.7% of L-aspartic acid at room temperature. The grown crystals were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, UV-visible, FTIR analysis. The doping of aspartic acid was confirmed by FTIR spectrum. The Nonlinear optical property (SHG) of L-aspartic acid doped KDP has been confirmed. Microhardness studies were carried out on the grown crystal.

  1. Growth and characterization of KDP crystals doped with L-aspartic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, R.; Rajasekaran, R.; Samuel, Bincy Susan

    2013-03-01

    Potassium Dihydrogen Phosphate (KDP) doped with L-aspartic acid has been grown by solvent slow evaporation technique from a mixture of aqueous solution of KDP and 0.7% of L-aspartic acid at room temperature. The grown crystals were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, UV-visible, FTIR analysis. The doping of aspartic acid was confirmed by FTIR spectrum. The Nonlinear optical property (SHG) of L-aspartic acid doped KDP has been confirmed. Microhardness studies were carried out on the grown crystal.

  2. Determination of aqueous acid-dissociation constants of aspartic acid using PCM/DFT method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang-Aroon, Wichien; Ruangpornvisuti, Vithaya

    Determination of acid-dissociation constants, pKa, of aspartic acid in aqueous solution, using density functional theory calculations combined with the conductor-like polarizable continuum model (CPCM) and with integral-equation-formalism polarizable continuum model (IEFPCM) based on the UAKS and UAHF radii, was carried out. The computed pKa values derived from the CPCM and IEFPCM with UAKS cavity model of bare structures of the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p)-optimized tetrahydrated structures of aspartic acid species are mostly close to the experimental pKa values.0

  3. Determination of D- and L-alanine concentrations using a pyruvic acid sensor.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Yohei; Hamada-Sato, Naoko; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Imada, Chiaki; Watanabe, Etsuo

    2003-08-01

    The concentrations of D- and L-alanine in bivalves are useful as indicators of environmental pollution. Amino acid oxidase with a low substrate specificity catalyzes the oxidation of various amino acids. Among the various amino acids, pyruvic acid can be generated from alanine only by the catalytic oxidative reaction of this oxidase. Therefore, in this study, the concentrations of D- and L-alanine were determined from the concentration of pyruvic acid, which was determined from the consumption of oxygen based on the oxidative reaction of pyruvate oxidase. From this point of view, there is a very strong possibility that biosensors utilizing enzymes with a low substrate specificity can be developed. The results obtained were as follows. (1) The optimum conditions for the use of pyruvic acid sensor were as follows: temperature of 25 degrees C, pH of 6.8, flow rate of 0.1 ml/min, thiamin diphosphate concentration of 1.5 mM, and injection volume of 50 microl. (2) D-Alanine and L-alanine optimally reacted with D- and L-amino acid oxidase at 30 degrees C, pH 8.2, for 30 min and at 37 degrees C, pH 7.8, for 90 min, respectively. (3) The linear relationships between the concentrations of D- and L-alanine and the output of the sensor were obtained at 3.56-106.8 microg of D-alanine and 5.34-71.3 microg of L-alanine. (4) The concentrations of D- and L-alanine in Meretrix iusoria, Patinopecten yessonsi, and Corbicula leana obtained by the proposed assay were in good agreement with those determined by a conventional method.

  4. A Potent, Versatile Disulfide-Reducing Agent from Aspartic Acid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Dithiothreitol (DTT) is the standard reagent for reducing disulfide bonds between and within biological molecules. At neutral pH, however, >99% of DTT thiol groups are protonated and thus unreactive. Herein, we report on (2S)-2-amino-1,4-dimercaptobutane (dithiobutylamine or DTBA), a dithiol that can be synthesized from l-aspartic acid in a few high-yielding steps that are amenable to a large-scale process. DTBA has thiol pKa values that are ∼1 unit lower than those of DTT and forms a disulfide with a similar E°′ value. DTBA reduces disulfide bonds in both small molecules and proteins faster than does DTT. The amino group of DTBA enables its isolation by cation-exchange and facilitates its conjugation. These attributes indicate that DTBA is a superior reagent for reducing disulfide bonds in aqueous solution. PMID:22353145

  5. Aspartic acid 413 is important for the normal allosteric functioning of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase.

    PubMed Central

    Greene, T W; Woodbury, R L; Okita, T W

    1996-01-01

    As part of a structure-function analysis of the higher-plant ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGP), we used a random mutagenesis approach in combination with a novel bacterial complementation system to isolate over 100 mutants that were defective in glycogen production (T.W. Greene, S.E. Chantler, M.L. Khan, G.F. Barry, J. Preiss, T.W. Okita [1996] Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 93: 1509-1513). One mutant of the large subunit M27 was identified by its capacity to only partially complement a mutation in the structural gene for the bacterial AGP (glg C), as determined by its light-staining phenotype when cells were exposed to l3 vapors. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and enzymatic pyrophosphorylysis assays of M27 cell extracts showed that the level of expression and AGP activity was comparable to those of cells that expressed the wild-type recombinant enzyme. Kinetic analysis indicated that the M27 AGP displays normal Michaelis constant values for the substrates glucose-1-phosphate and ATP but requires 6- to 10-fold greater levels of 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PGA) than the wild-type recombinant enzyme for maximum activation. DNA sequence analysis showed that M27 contains a single point mutation that resulted in the replacement of aspartic acid 413 to alanine. Substitution of a lysine residue at this site almost completely abolished activation by 3-PGA. Aspartic acid 413 is adjacent to a lysine residue that was previously identified by chemical modification studies to be important in the binding of 3-PGA (K. Ball, J. Preiss [1994] J Biol Chem 269: 24706-24711). The kinetic properties of M27 corroborate the importance of this region in the allosteric regulation of a higher-plant AGP. PMID:8938421

  6. Ontogenetic trends in aspartic acid racemization and amino acid composition within modern and fossil shells of the bivalve Arctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodfriend, Glenn A.; Weidman, Christopher R.

    2001-06-01

    Ontogenetic trends (umbo to growth edge of shell) in aspartic acid (Asp) racemization and amino acid composition and their evolution over time are examined in serial samples of annual growth bands from a time-series of three live-collected and two fossil (ca. 500 and 1000 y BP) shells of the long-lived bivalve Arctica islandica. The rate of Asp racemization is shown to be higher in the umbonal portion of the shells (laid down when the clams are young) but constant from a biological age of 10 to 20 y to more than 100 y. Corresponding changes are also seen in amino acid composition and concentration: with increasing biological age of the clam: total amino acid concentration increases substantially, the acidic amino acids Asp, glutamic acid, and alanine decrease in relative concentration (mole-percent) and more basic amino acids including tyrosine, phenylalanine, and lysine increase in relative concentration. These ontogenetic trends are generally retained in the fossil shells. These trends may reflect changing protein composition related to changes in growth rate. Clams grow considerably faster in their youth than when they are older, as indicated by changes in the annual growth increments. Production of more acidic proteins, which play a role in crystal growth, may be favored during the phase of faster growth, whereas more structural proteins, perhaps enhancing structural strength of the shell, may be favored during later growth. These ontogenetic differences in protein composition affect the observed rates of racemization of the protein pool. Some weak diagenetic trends in amino acid composition and abundance may be represented in the time series of shells. These results emphasize the importance of standardization of the location from which samples are taken from shells for dating by amino acid racemization analysis.

  7. Plastidic aspartate aminotransferases and the biosynthesis of essential amino acids in plants.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, Fernando; Cañas, Rafael A; Pascual, M Belén; Avila, Concepción; Cánovas, Francisco M

    2014-10-01

    In the chloroplasts and in non-green plastids of plants, aspartate is the precursor for the biosynthesis of different amino acids and derived metabolites that play distinct and important roles in plant growth, reproduction, development or defence. Aspartate biosynthesis is mediated by the enzyme aspartate aminotransferase (EC 2.6.1.1), which catalyses the reversible transamination between glutamate and oxaloacetate to generate aspartate and 2-oxoglutarate. Plastids contain two aspartate aminotransferases: a eukaryotic-type and a prokaryotic-type bifunctional enzyme displaying aspartate and prephenate aminotransferase activities. A general overview of the biochemistry, regulation, functional significance, and phylogenetic origin of both enzymes is presented. The roles of these plastidic aminotransferases in the biosynthesis of essential amino acids are discussed.

  8. Adsorption of Aspartic Acid onto Rutile: Implications for Biochirality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, C. F.; Jonsson, C. M.; Jonsson, C. L.; Sverjensky, D. A.; Hazen, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    Mineral surfaces may have facilitated the concentration and polymerization of simple biomolecules into macromolecules while promoting the development of biochirality. In this study, rutile and aspartic acid (Asp) were investigated as a possible system in this scenario. Batch adsorption experiments were performed to examine the adsorption of Asp as a function of total concentration and pH. A constant background electrolyte of 0.1 M NaCl was applied to the system, and all solutions were purged with argon gas to eliminate carbon dioxide contamination. Asp adsorbs onto rutile to the highest extent over the pH range 3-5.5 suggesting that an acidic environment is required for the adsorption between Asp and rutile to occur in significant amounts. This pH range of maximum adsorption is constrained between the isoelectric point of Asp and the point of zero charge of rutile, which indicates that electrostatic effects are influencing Asp adsorption. Both the L- and D- enantiomers of Asp were individually adsorbed onto the rutile surface to determine the potential of the system for chiral selection. Preliminary results indicate that D-Asp may possibly adsorb in greater amounts than L-Asp at higher Asp total concentrations. This trend is unexpected as the growth planes dominating the rutile are achiral, and a more thorough study is required to validate this difference in adsorption. Nevertheless, this result may provide insight on the emergence of chiral selection in macromolecules within what might be a predominantly achiral prebiotic system.

  9. Anionic substitutes for catalytic aspartic acids in phosphoribulokinase.

    PubMed

    Runquist, Jennifer A; Miziorko, Henry M

    2002-09-15

    Mutagenic substitution of the invariant D42 and D169 residues in phosphoribulokinase (PRK) with amino acids that contain neutral side chains (e.g., alanine or asparagine) results in large decreases in catalytic efficiency (10(5)- and 10(4)-fold for replacement of D42 and D169, respectively). To further evaluate the importance of anionic side chains at residues 42 and 169, substitutions of glutamic acid (D42E, D169E) and cysteine (D42C and D169C in an otherwise cysteine-free protein) have been engineered. All purified mutant enzymes bind the fluorescent alternative substrate trinitrophenyl-ATP and the allosteric effector NADH similarly to wild-type PRK. For D42E and D42C, V(max) exhibits substantial decreases of 135- and 220-fold, respectively. Comparable substitutions for D169 result in smaller effects; D169E and D169C exhibit decreases in V(max) of 39- and 26-fold, respectively. Thus, regardless of the type of substitution, changes at D42 more profoundly affect catalytic rate than do comparable changes at D169. Precedent with enzymes in which cysteine replaces an acidic residue suggests that oxidation of the thiolate to a sulfinate can convert low-activity cysteine mutants into enzymes with improved activity. Periodate oxidation of cysteine-free PRK results in a slight decrease in activity. In contrast, comparable treatment of D42C and D169C proteins increases activity by 5- and 7-fold, respectively. Thus, for reasonably efficient catalysis, PRK requires anionic character in the side chains of residues 42 and 169. The enzyme can, however, tolerate substantial structural and chemical variability at these residues.

  10. Differential effect of beta-N-oxalylamino-L-alanine, the Lathyrus sativus neurotoxin, and (+/-)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate on the excitatory amino acid and taurine levels in the brain of freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    La Bella, V; Piccoli, F

    2000-05-01

    We studied the effect of beta-oxalylamino-L-alanine, a glutamate analog present in Lathyrus sativus seeds and implicated in the etiopathogenesis of neurolathyrism, and (+/-)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate on the extracellular levels of aspartate, glutamate and taurine in the primary motor cortex of freely moving rats. We found that while both neurotoxins increase the level of aspartate and glutamate, only (+/-)-alpha(-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate is able to modulate the level of taurine. GYKI-52466, a non-competitive non-NMDA antagonist, inhibited beta-oxalylamino-L-alanine-induced increase of aspartate, but not that of glutamate. Conversely, this antagonist proved to be very efficient in blocking the stimulating effect of (+/-)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate on all three amino acids. We suggest that beta-oxalylamino-L-alanine increases the level of glutamate in vivo by a mechanism not connected to its effect on the non-NMDA receptors, which might involve the inhibition of glutamate transport. This would allow the excitatory neurotransmitter to reach a concentration sufficient to stimulate the non-NMDA receptors, which in their turn mediate the specific release of aspartate. Although the role of aspartate as a neurotransmitter is still under discussion, it might indeed amplify the excitotoxic cascade through its action on NMDA receptors. We speculate that this sequence of events might represent an important step in the molecular cascade leading to the appearance of the selective motoneuron degeneration in neurolathyrism.

  11. Supermacroporous chemically cross-linked poly(aspartic acid) hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Gyarmati, Benjámin; Mészár, E Zsuzsanna; Kiss, Lóránd; Deli, Mária A; László, Krisztina; Szilágyi, András

    2015-08-01

    Chemically cross-linked poly(aspartic acid) (PASP) gels were prepared by a solid-liquid phase separation technique, cryogelation, to achieve a supermacroporous interconnected pore structure. The precursor polymer of PASP, polysuccinimide (PSI) was cross-linked below the freezing point of the solvent and the forming crystals acted as templates for the pores. Dimethyl sulfoxide was chosen as solvent instead of the more commonly used water. Thus larger temperatures could be utilized for the preparation and the drawback of increase in specific volume of water upon freezing could be eliminated. The morphology of the hydrogels was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and interconnectivity of the pores was proven by the small flow resistance of the gels. Compression tests also confirmed the interconnected porous structure and the complete re-swelling and shape recovery of the supermacroporous PASP hydrogels. The prepared hydrogels are of interest for several biomedical applications as scaffolding materials because of their cytocompatibility, controllable morphology and pH-responsive character.

  12. Combination of aspartic acid and glutamic acid inhibits tumor cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yoshie; Yamamoto, Katsunori; Sato, Yoshinori; Inoue, Shinjiro; Morinaga, Tetsuo; Hirano, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    Placental extract contains several biologically active compounds, and pharmacological induction of placental extract has therapeutic effects, such as improving liver function in patients with hepatitis or cirrhosis. Here, we searched for novel molecules with an anti-tumor activity in placental extracts. Active molecules were separated by chromatographic analysis, and their antiproliferative activities were determined by a colorimetric assay. We identified aspartic acid and glutamic acid to possess the antiproliferative activity against human hepatoma cells. Furthermore, we showed that the combination of aspartic acid and glutamic acid exhibited enhanced antiproliferative activity, and inhibited Akt phosphorylation. We also examined in vivo tumor inhibition activity using the rabbit VX2 liver tumor model. The treatment mixture (emulsion of the amino acids with Lipiodol) administered by hepatic artery injection inhibited tumor cell growth of the rabbit VX2 liver. These results suggest that the combination of aspartic acid and glutamic acid may be useful for induction of tumor cell death, and has the potential for clinical use as a cancer therapeutic agent.

  13. Selective fluorescent detection of aspartic acid and glutamic acid employing dansyl hydrazine dextran conjugate.

    PubMed

    Nasomphan, Weerachai; Tangboriboonrat, Pramuan; Tanapongpipat, Sutipa; Smanmoo, Srung

    2014-01-01

    Highly water soluble polymer (DD) was prepared and evaluated for its fluorescence response towards various amino acids. The polymer consists of dansyl hydrazine unit conjugated into dextran template. The conjugation enhances higher water solubility of dansyl hydrazine moiety. Of screened amino acids, DD exhibited selective fluorescence quenching in the presence of aspartic acid (Asp) and glutamic acid (Glu). A plot of fluorescence intensity change of DD against the concentration of corresponding amino acids gave a good linear relationship in the range of 1 × 10(-4) M to 25 × 10(-3) M. This establishes DD as a potential polymeric sensor for selective sensing of Asp and Glu.

  14. A photoactivable amino acid based on a novel functional coumarin-6-yl-alanine.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Andrea S C; Gonçalves, M Sameiro T; Costa, Susana P G

    2012-12-01

    A novel fluorescent amino acid, L-4-chloromethylcoumarin-6-yl-alanine, was obtained from tyrosine by a Pechmann reaction. The assembly of the heterocyclic ring at the tyrosine side chain could be achieved before or after incorporation of tyrosine into a dipeptide, and amino acid and dipeptide ester conjugates were obtained by coupling to a model N-protected alanine. The behaviour of one of the fluorescent conjugates towards irradiation was studied in a photochemical reactor at different wavelengths (254, 300, 350 and 419 nm). The photoreaction course in methanol/HEPES buffer solution (80:20) was followed by HPLC/UV monitoring. It was found that the novel unnatural amino acid could act as a fluorescent label, due to its fluorescence properties, and, more importantly, as a photoactivable unit, due to the short irradiation times necessary to cleave the ester bond between the model amino acid and the coumarin-6-yl-alanine.

  15. Acid-Base Titration of (S)-Aspartic Acid: A Circular Dichroism Spectrophotometry Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaleiro, Ana M. V.; Pedrosa de Jesus, Júlio D.

    2000-09-01

    The magnitude of the circular dichroism of (S)-aspartic acid in aqueous solutions at a fixed wavelength varies with the addition of strong base. This laboratory experiment consists of the circular dichroism spectrophotometric acid-base titration of (S)-aspartic acid in dilute aqueous solutions, and the use of the resulting data to determine the ionization constant of the protonated amino group. The work familiarizes students with circular dichroism and illustrates the possibility of performing titrations using a less usual instrumental method of following the course of a reaction. It shows the use of a chiroptical property in the determination of the concentration in solution of an optically active molecule, and exemplifies the use of a spectrophotometric titration in the determination of an ionization constant.

  16. Beta-alanine/alpha-ketoglutarate aminotransferase for 3-hydroxypropionic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Jessen, Holly Jean [Chanhassen, MN; Liao, Hans H [Eden Prairie, MN; Gort, Steven John [Apple Valley, MN; Selifonova, Olga V [Plymouth, MN

    2011-10-04

    The present disclosure provides novel beta-alanine/alpha ketoglutarate aminotransferase nucleic acid and protein sequences having increased biological activity. Also provided are cells containing such enzymes, as well as methods of their use, for example to produce malonyl semialdehyde and downstream products thereof, such as 3-hydroxypropionic acid and derivatives thereof.

  17. Beta-alanine/alpha-ketoglutarate aminotransferase for 3-hydroxypropionic acid production

    SciTech Connect

    Jessen, Holly Jean; Liao, Hans H; Gort, Steven John; Selifonova, Olga V

    2014-11-18

    The present disclosure provides novel beta-alanine/alpha ketoglutarate aminotransferase nucleic acid and protein sequences having increased biological activity. Also provided are cells containing such enzymes, as well as methods of their use, for example to produce malonyl semialdehyde and downstream products thereof, such as 3-hydroxypropionic acid and derivatives thereof.

  18. New evidence for the antiquity of man in North America deduced from aspartic acid racemization.

    PubMed

    Bada, J L; Schroeder, R A; Carter, G F

    1974-05-17

    Ages of several Californzia Paleo-Indlian skeletons have been deduced from the extent of aspartic acid racemization. These dates suggest that man was present in North America at least 50,000 years before the present.

  19. Chiral Asymmetric Structures in Aspartic Acid and Valine Crystals Assessed by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Teschke, Omar; Soares, David Mendez

    2016-03-29

    Structures of crystallized deposits formed by the molecular self-assembly of aspartic acid and valine on silicon substrates were imaged by atomic force microscopy. Images of d- and l-aspartic acid crystal surfaces showing extended molecularly flat sheets or regions separated by single molecule thick steps are presented. Distinct orientation surfaces were imaged, which, combined with the single molecule step size, defines the geometry of the crystal. However, single molecule step growth also reveals the crystal chirality, i.e., growth orientations. The imaged ordered lattice of aspartic acid (asp) and valine (val) mostly revealed periodicities corresponding to bulk terminations, but a previously unreported molecular hexagonal lattice configuration was observed for both l-asp and l-val but not for d-asp or d-val. Atomic force microscopy can then be used to identify the different chiral forms of aspartic acid and valine crystals.

  20. Aspartic Acid Racemization and Age-Depth Relationships for Organic Carbon in Siberian Permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinton, Karen L. F.; Tsapin, Alexandre I.; Gilichinsky, David; McDonald, Gene D.

    2002-03-01

    We have analyzed the degree of racemization of aspartic acid in permafrost samples from Northern Siberia, an area from which microorganisms of apparent ages up to a few million years have previously been isolated and cultured. We find that the extent of aspartic acid racemization in permafrost cores increases very slowly up to an age of ~25,000 years (around 5 m in depth). The apparent temperature of racemization over the age range of 0-25,000 years, determined using measured aspartic acid racemization rate constants, is -19°C. This apparent racemization temperature is significantly lower than the measured environmental temperature (-11 to -13°C) and suggests active recycling of D-aspartic acid in Siberian permafrost up to an age of around 25,000 years. This indicates that permafrost organisms are capable of repairing some molecular damage incurred while in a "dormant" state over geologic time.

  1. The standard enthalpies of formation of crystalline N-(carboxymethyl)aspartic acid and its aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytkin, A. I.; Chernyavskaya, N. V.; Volkov, A. V.; Nikol'Skii, V. M.

    2007-07-01

    The energy of combustion of N-(carboxymethyl)aspartic acid (CMAA) was determined by bomb calorimetry in oxygen. The standard enthalpies of combustion and formation of crystalline N-(carboxymethyl)aspartic acid were calculated. The heat effects of solution of crystalline CMAA in water and a solution of sodium hydroxide were measured at 298.15 K by direct calorimetry. The standard enthalpies of formation of CMAA and its dissociation products in aqueous solution were determined.

  2. Infrared and Raman spectra of DL-aspartic acid nitrate monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajkumar, B. J. M.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Rajaram, R. K.

    1998-09-01

    Infrared and Raman spectral studies of DL-aspartic acid nitrate monohydrate help to determine the influence of extensive intermolecular hydrogen bonding in the aspartic acid crystal. The presence of the carbonyl rather than the carboxylic group indicates that the molecule is ionic. The shifting of several group frequencies in the molecule confirms extensive hydrogen bonding. The anion fundamentals however continue to be degenerate. This indicates that its symmetry is unaffected in the molecule.

  3. Efficient aspartic acid production by a psychrophile-based simple biocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Takahisa; Hamada, Mai; Nakashimada, Yutaka; Kato, Junichi

    2015-10-01

    We previously constructed a Psychrophile-based Simple bioCatalyst (PSCat) reaction system, in which psychrophilic metabolic enzymes are inactivated by heat treatment, and used it here to study the conversion of aspartic acid from fumaric acid mediated by the activity of aspartate ammonia-lyase (aspartase). In Escherichia coli, the biosynthesis of aspartic acid competes with that of L-malic acid produced from fumaric acid by fumarase. In this study, E. coli aspartase was expressed in psychrophilic Shewanella livingstonensis Ac10 heat treated at 50 °C for 15 min. The resultant PSCat could convert fumaric acid to aspartic acid without the formation of L-malic acid because of heat inactivation of psychrophilic fumarase activity. Furthermore, alginate-immobilized PSCat produced high yields of aspartic acid and could be re-used nine times. The results of our study suggest that PSCat can be applied in biotechnological production as a new approach to increase the yield of target compounds.

  4. Hydrolysis of aspartic acid phosphoramidate nucleotides: a comparative quantum chemical study.

    PubMed

    Michielssens, Servaas; Tien Trung, Nguyen; Froeyen, Matheus; Herdewijn, Piet; Tho Nguyen, Minh; Ceulemans, Arnout

    2009-09-07

    L-Aspartic acid has recently been found to be a good leaving group during HIV reverse transcriptase catalyzed incorporation of deoxyadenosine monophosphate (dAMP) in DNA. This showed that L-Asp is a good mimic for the pyrophosphate moiety of deoxyadenosine triphosphate. The present work explores the thermochemistry and mechanism for hydrolysis of several models for L-aspartic-dAMP using B3LYP/DGDZVP, MP2/6-311++G** and G3MP2 level of theory. The effect of the new compound is gradually investigated: starting from a simple methyl amine leaving group up to the aspartic acid leaving group. The enzymatic environment was mimicked by involving two Mg(2+) ions and some important active site residues in the reaction. All reactions are compared to the corresponding O-coupled leaving group, which is methanol for methyl amine and malic acid for aspartic acid. With methyl amine as a leaving group a tautomeric associative or tautomeric dissociative mechanism is preferred and the barrier is lower than the comparable mechanism with methanol as a leaving group. The calculations on the aspartic acid in the enzymatic environment show that qualitatively the mechanism is the same as for triphosphate but the barrier for hydrolysis by the associative mechanism is higher for L-aspartic-dAMP than for L-malic-dAMP and pyrophosphate.

  5. The aspartate aminotransferase-to-alanine aminotransferase ratio predicts all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zoppini, Giacomo; Cacciatori, Vittorio; Negri, Carlo; Stoico, Vincenzo; Lippi, Giuseppe; Targher, Giovanni; Bonora, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract An increased aspartate aminotransferase-to-alanine aminotransferase ratio (AAR) has been widely used as a marker of advanced hepatic fibrosis. Increased AAR was also shown to be significantly associated with the risk of developing cardiovascular (CV) disease. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between the AAR and mortality risk in a well-characterized cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes. A cohort of 2529 type 2 diabetic outpatients was followed-up for 6 years to collect cause-specific mortality. Cox regression analyses were modeled to estimate the independent association between AAR and the risk of all-cause and CV mortality. Over the 6-year follow-up period, 12.1% of patients died, 47.5% of whom from CV causes. An increased AAR, but not its individual components, was significantly associated with an increased risk of all-cause (adjusted-hazard risk 1.83, confidence interval [CI] 95% 1.14–2.93, P = 0.012) and CV (adjusted-hazard risk 2.60, CI 95% 1.38–4.90, P < 0.003) mortality after adjustment for multiple clinical risk factors and potential confounding variables. The AAR was independently associated with an increased risk of both all-cause and CV mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes. These findings suggest that an increased AAR may reflect more systemic derangements that are not simply limited to liver damage. Further studies are needed to elucidate the pathophysiological implications of an increased AAR. PMID:27787357

  6. Transforming growth factor alpha: mutation of aspartic acid 47 and leucine 48 results in different biological activities.

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, E; Watanabe, S; Dalton, S; Sporn, M B

    1988-01-01

    To study the relationship between the primary structure of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) and some of its functional properties (competition with epidermal growth factor (EGF) for binding to the EGF receptor and induction of anchorage-independent growth), we introduced single amino acid mutations into the sequence for the fully processed, 50-amino-acid human TGF-alpha. The wild-type and mutant proteins were expressed in a vector by using a yeast alpha mating pheromone promoter. Mutations of two amino acids that are conserved in the family of the EGF-like peptides and are located in the carboxy-terminal part of TGF-alpha resulted in different biological effects. When aspartic acid 47 was mutated to alanine or asparagine, biological activity was retained; in contrast, substitutions of this residue with serine or glutamic acid generated mutants with reduced binding and colony-forming capacities. When leucine 48 was mutated to alanine, a complete loss of binding and colony-forming abilities resulted; mutation of leucine 48 to isoleucine or methionine resulted in very low activities. Our data suggest that these two adjacent conserved amino acids in positions 47 and 48 play different roles in defining the structure and/or biological activity of TGF-alpha and that the carboxy terminus of TGF-alpha is involved in interactions with cellular TGF-alpha receptors. The side chain of leucine 48 appears to be crucial either indirectly in determining the biologically active conformation of TGF-alpha or directly in the molecular recognition of TGF-alpha by its receptor. PMID:3285178

  7. The substituted aspartate analogue L-beta-threo-benzyl-aspartate preferentially inhibits the neuronal excitatory amino acid transporter EAAT3.

    PubMed

    Esslinger, C Sean; Agarwal, Shailesh; Gerdes, John; Wilson, Paul A; Davis, Erin S; Awes, Alicia N; O'Brien, Erin; Mavencamp, Teri; Koch, Hans P; Poulsen, David J; Rhoderick, Joseph F; Chamberlin, A Richard; Kavanaugh, Michael P; Bridges, Richard J

    2005-11-01

    The excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) play key roles in the regulation of CNS L-glutamate, especially related to synthesis, signal termination, synaptic spillover, and excitotoxic protection. Inhibitors available to delineate EAAT pharmacology and function are essentially limited to those that non-selectively block all EAATs or those that exhibit a substantial preference for EAAT2. Thus, it is difficult to selectively study the other subtypes, particularly EAAT1 and EAAT3. Structure activity studies on a series of beta-substituted aspartate analogues identify L-beta-benzyl-aspartate (L-beta-BA) as among the first blockers that potently and preferentially inhibits the neuronal EAAT3 subtype. Kinetic analysis of D-[(3)H]aspartate uptake into C17.2 cells expressing the hEAATs demonstrate that L-beta-threo-BA is the more potent diastereomer, acts competitively, and exhibits a 10-fold preference for EAAT3 compared to EAAT1 and EAAT2. Electrophysiological recordings of EAAT-mediated currents in Xenopus oocytes identify L-beta-BA as a non-substrate inhibitor. Analyzing L-beta-threo-BA within the context of a novel EAAT2 pharmacophore model suggests: (1) a highly conserved positioning of the electrostatic carboxyl and amino groups; (2) nearby regions that accommodate select structural modifications (cyclopropyl rings, methyl groups, oxygen atoms); and (3) a unique region L-beta-threo-BA occupied by the benzyl moieties of L-TBOA, L-beta-threo-BA and related analogues. It is plausible that the preference of L-beta-threo-BA and L-TBOA for EAAT3 and EAAT2, respectively, could reside in the latter two pharmacophore regions.

  8. A New Pathway to Aspartic Acid from Urea and Maleic Acid Affected by Ultraviolet Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasaki, Masanori; Nomoto, Shinya; Mita, Hajime; Shimoyama, Akira

    2002-04-01

    The photochemistry of a mixture of urea and maleic acid, which are thought to have been widely present on the primitive Earth, was studied in order to examine a possibility of the formation of amino acids. When an aqueous solution of urea and maleic acid was irradiated with an ultraviolet light of wavelength 172 nm, urea was revealed to be rather resistant to photochemical decomposition. In contrast, maleic acid was completely decomposed within 4 h, reflecting the reactivity of a C-C double bond in the molecule. In the reaction mixture, 2-isoureidosuccinic acid was detected. The acid was considered to be formed by addition of an isoureido radical which had been produced from urea by the action of a hydroxyl radical, to a C-C double bond of maleic acid. The isoureido group of the product was revealed to undergo thermal rearrangement to afford 2-ureidosuccinic acid (N-carbamoylaspartic acid). The result suggested a novel pathway leading to the formation of aspartic acid from non-amino acid precursors, possibly effected by UV-light on the primitive Earth. The formation of ureidocarboxylic acids is of another significance, since they are capable of undergoing thermal polymerization, resulting in formation of polyamino acids.

  9. Equine endurance exercise alters serum branched-chain amino acid and alanine concentrations.

    PubMed

    Trottier, N L; Nielsen, B D; Lang, K J; Ku, P K; Schott, H C

    2002-09-01

    Six 2-year-old Arabian horses were used to determine whether 60 km prolonged endurance exercise (approximately 4 h) alters amino acid concentrations in serum and muscle, and the time required for serum amino acid concentrations to return to basal resting values. Blood and muscle samples were collected throughout exercise and during a 3 day recovery period. Isoleucine concentration in muscle tended to increase and leucine and valine did not change due to exercise. Serum alanine concentrations did not increase immediately after exercise, but increased at 24, 48 and 72 h postexercise. Serum isoleucine, leucine, and valine concentrations decreased after exercise and time required to reach pre-exercising concentrations was 48 h. In conclusion, endurance exercise in the horse decreases serum isoleucine, leucine, and valine concentrations, and increases serum alanine concentration. The decrease in serum branched-chain amino acid concentrations did not correspond to a measurable increase in total muscle branched-chain amino acid concentrations.

  10. Distinguishing Aspartic and Isoaspartic Acids in Peptides by Several Mass Spectrometric Fragmentation Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGraan-Weber, Nick; Zhang, Jun; Reilly, James P.

    2016-12-01

    Six ion fragmentation techniques that can distinguish aspartic acid from its isomer, isoaspartic acid, were compared. MALDI post-source decay (PSD), MALDI 157 nm photodissociation, tris(2,4,6-trimethoxyphenyl)phosphonium bromide (TMPP) charge tagging in PSD and photodissociation, ESI collision-induced dissociation (CID), electron transfer dissociation (ETD), and free-radical initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS) with CID were applied to peptides containing either aspartic or isoaspartic acid. Diagnostic ions, such as the y-46 and b+H2O, are present in PSD, photodissociation, and charge tagging. c•+57 and z-57 ions are observed in ETD and FRIPS experiments. For some molecules, aspartic and isoaspartic acid yield ion fragments with significantly different intensities. ETD and charge tagging appear to be most effective at distinguishing these residues.

  11. A comparative study on the growth and characterization of nonlinear optical amino acid crystals: L-alanine (LA) and L-alanine alaninium nitrate (LAAN).

    PubMed

    Aravindan, A; Srinivasan, P; Vijayan, N; Gopalakrishnan, R; Ramasamy, P

    2008-11-15

    A comparative study on the properties of L-alanine and LAAN crystals has been made and discussed. It may be concluded that the protonation of the amino group in the L-alanine molecule is the key factor in increasing the relative SHG efficiency of LAAN. The protonation is justified by the crystal structure analysis, FTIR and photoluminescence studies. The factor group vibrations are compared and found that there is an increase in vibrational modes of LA when reacted with nitric acid forming LAAN.

  12. Biodegradation and Osteosarcoma Cell Cultivation on Poly(aspartic acid) Based Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Juriga, Dávid; Nagy, Krisztina; Jedlovszky-Hajdú, Angéla; Perczel-Kovách, Katalin; Chen, Yong Mei; Varga, Gábor; Zrínyi, Miklós

    2016-09-14

    Development of novel biodegradable and biocompatible scaffold materials with optimal characteristics is important for both preclinical and clinical applications. The aim of the present study was to analyze the biodegradability of poly(aspartic acid)-based hydrogels, and to test their usability as scaffolds for MG-63 osteoblast-like cells. Poly(aspartic acid) was fabricated from poly(succinimide) and hydrogels were prepared using natural amines as cross-linkers (diaminobutane and cystamine). Disulfide bridges were cleaved to thiol groups and the polymer backbone was further modified with RGD sequence. Biodegradability of the hydrogels was evaluated by experiments on the base of enzymes and cell culture medium. Poly(aspartic acid) hydrogels possessing only disulfide bridges as cross-links proved to be degradable by collagenase I. The MG-63 cells showed healthy, fibroblast-like morphology on the double cross-linked and RGD modified hydrogels. Thiolated poly(aspartic acid) based hydrogels provide ideal conditions for adhesion, survival, proliferation, and migration of osteoblast-like cells. The highest viability was found on the thiolated PASP gels while the RGD motif had influence on compacted cluster formation of the cells. These biodegradable and biocompatible poly(aspartic acid)-based hydrogels are promising scaffolds for cell cultivation.

  13. Reversible receptor methylation is essential for normal chemotaxis of Escherichia coli in gradients of aspartic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Weis, R M; Koshland, D E

    1988-01-01

    The chemotaxis of wild-type cells of Escherichia coli and double mutants lacking the methyltransferase and the methylesterase activities of the receptor modification system has been compared in spatial gradients of aspartic acid. Previous studies showing that a chemotactic response can be observed for the mutant raised questions about the role of methylation in the bacterial memory. To clarify the role of methylation, the redistribution of bacteria in stabilized defined gradients of aspartic acid was monitored by light scattering. There was no redistribution of the mutant cells in nonsaturating gradients of aspartic acid, but over the same range these mutant bacteria were observed to respond and to adapt during tethering experiments. In large saturating gradients of aspartate, slight movement of the mutant up the gradient was observed. These results show that dynamic receptor methylation is required for the chemotactic response to gentle gradients of aspartic acid and that methylation resets to zero and is part of the normal wild-type memory. There are certain gradients, however, in which the methylation-deficient mutants show chemotactic ability, thus explaining the apparent anomaly. Images PMID:2829179

  14. Aspartic acid in the hippocampus: a biomarker for postoperative cognitive dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Rong; Huang, Dong; Tong, Jianbin; Liao, Qin; Hu, Zhonghua; Ouyang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    This study established an aged rat model of cognitive dysfunction using anesthesia with 2% isoflurane and 80% oxygen for 2 hours. Twenty-four hours later, Y-maze test results showed that isoflurane significantly impaired cognitive function in aged rats. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry results showed that isoflurane also significantly increased the levels of N,N-diethylacetamide, n-ethylacetamide, aspartic acid, malic acid and arabinonic acid in the hippocampus of isoflurane-treated rats. Moreover, aspartic acid, N,N-diethylacetamide, n-ethylacetamide and malic acid concentration was positively correlated with the degree of cognitive dysfunction in the isoflurane-treated rats. It is evident that hippocampal metabolite changes are involved in the formation of cognitive dysfunction after isoflurane anesthesia. To further verify these results, this study cultured hippocampal neurons in vitro, which were then treated with aspartic acid (100 μmol/L). Results suggested that aspartic acid concentration in the hippocampus may be a biomarker for predicting the occurrence and disease progress of cognitive dysfunction. PMID:25206795

  15. Distinguishing the cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) from other diamino acids.

    PubMed

    Banack, S A; Metcalf, J S; Spáčil, Z; Downing, T G; Downing, S; Long, A; Nunn, P B; Cox, P A

    2011-04-01

    β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is produced by diverse taxa of cyanobacteria, and has been detected by many investigators who have searched for it in cyanobacterial blooms, cultures and collections. Although BMAA is distinguishable from proteinogenic amino acids and its isomer 2,4-DAB using standard chromatographic and mass spectroscopy techniques routinely used for the analysis of amino acids, we studied whether BMAA could be reliably distinguished from other diamino acids, particularly 2,6-diaminopimelic acid which has been isolated from the cell walls of many bacterial species. We used HPLC-FD, UHPLC-UV, UHPLC-MS, and triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) to differentiate BMAA from the diamino acids 2,6-diaminopimelic acid, N-2(amino)ethylglycine, lysine, ornithine, 2,4-diaminosuccinic acid, homocystine, cystine, tryptophan, as well as other amino acids including asparagine, glutamine, and methionine methylsulfonium.

  16. Probing the interaction of the amino acid alanine with the surface of ZnO(1010).

    PubMed

    Gao, Y K; Traeger, F; Shekhah, O; Idriss, H; Wöll, C

    2009-10-01

    The adsorption modes and stability of the amino acid alanine (NH(2)-CH(CH(3))-COOH) have been studied on the nonpolar single crystal surface of zinc oxide, ZnO(1010), experimentally by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and computationally using density functional theory (DFT). Deposition at 200 K was found to lead to the formation of multilayers identified by an XPS N1s peak at 401.7 eV assigned to the NH(3)(+) group, a fingerprint of the zwitterionic structure of alanine in the solid state. Heating to 300 K resulted in the removal of most of the multilayers with the remaining surface coverage estimated to 0.4 with respect to Zn cations. At this temperature most of the alanine molecules are found to be deprotonated (dissociated), yielding a carboxylate species (NH(2)-CH(CH(3))-COO(-) (a) + OH (s); where O is surface oxygen, (a) for adsorbed and (s) for surface species). Further heating of the surface resulted in a gradual decrease of the surface coverage and by 500 K a large fraction of adsorbed alanine molecules have desorbed from the surface. Total energy DFT computations of different adsorbate species identified two stable dissociative adsorption modes: bidentate and monodentate. The bidentate species with adsorption energy of 1.75 eV was found to be more stable than the monodentate species by about 0.7 eV.

  17. Beta-alanine and beta-aminoisobutyric acid levels in two siblings with dihydropyrimidinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    van Kuilenburg, A B P; Stroomer, A E M; Bosch, A M; Duran, M

    2008-06-01

    Dihydropyrimidinase (DHP) deficiency is an inborn error of the pyrimidine degradation pathway, affecting the hydrolytic ring opening of the dihydropyrimidines. In two siblings with a complete DHP deficiency and a variable clinical presentation, a normal concentration of beta-alanine and strongly decreased levels of beta-aminoisobutyric acid were observed in plasma, urine and CSF. No major differences were observed for the concentrations of the beta-amino acids in plasma and urine between the symptomatic and asymptomatic sibling. Thus, the relevance of the shortage of beta-aminoisobutyric acid for the onset of a clinical phenotype in patients with DHP deficiency remains to be established.

  18. Preservation of homochirality of aspartic acid films irradiated with 8.5 eV vacuum ultraviolet light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Yudai; Matsui, Takahiro; Koketsu, Toshiyuki; Nakagawa, Kazumichi

    2008-10-01

    Enantiomeric excess was reported for amino acids detected from some meteorites. These results imply that these amino acids might escape from racemization processes in space. Here, in an attempt to examine whether non-polarized vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light was one of racemization factors, we irradiated solid films of homochiral L- or D-aspartic acid ( L- or D-Asp) with a 146 nm excimer lamp in vacuum at 290 K. After irradiation for L-Asp films, L-alanine ( L-Ala) and β-Ala were observed, but D-Asp or D-Ala was not observed. On the contrast, for irradiation to D-Asp films, D-Ala and β-Ala were observed, but L-Asp or L-Ala was not observed. Therefore, we concluded that the chirality was preserved through the photolysis of Asp to Ala. It is of interest to carry out the similar experiments using high-energy particles and/or γ-ray irradiation.

  19. Carbonyl-carbonyl interactions stabilize the partially allowed Ramachandran conformations of asparagine and aspartic acid.

    PubMed

    Deane, C M; Allen, F H; Taylor, R; Blundell, T L

    1999-12-01

    Asparagine and aspartate are known to adopt conformations in the left-handed alpha-helical region and other partially allowed regions of the Ramachandran plot more readily than any other non-glycyl amino acids. The reason for this preference has not been established. An examination of the local environments of asparagine and aspartic acid in protein structures with a resolution better than 1.5 A revealed that their side-chain carbonyls are frequently within 4 A of their own backbone carbonyl or the backbone carbonyl of the previous residue. Calculations using protein structures with a resolution better than 1.8 A reveal that this close contact occurs in more than 80% of cases. This carbonyl-carbonyl interaction offers an energetic sabilization for the partially allowed conformations of asparagine and aspartic acid with respect to all other non-glycyl amino acids. The non-covalent attractive interactions between the dipoles of two carbonyls has recently been calculated to have an energy comparable to that of a hydrogen bond. The preponderance of asparagine in the left-handed alpha-helical region, and in general of aspartic acid and asparagine in the partially allowed regions of the Ramachandran plot, may be a consequence of this carbonyl-carbonyl stacking interaction.

  20. Does aspartic acid racemization constrain the depth limit of the subsurface biosphere?

    PubMed

    Onstott, T C; Magnabosco, C; Aubrey, A D; Burton, A S; Dworkin, J P; Elsila, J E; Grunsfeld, S; Cao, B H; Hein, J E; Glavin, D P; Kieft, T L; Silver, B J; Phelps, T J; van Heerden, E; Opperman, D J; Bada, J L

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies of the subsurface biosphere have deduced average cellular doubling times of hundreds to thousands of years based upon geochemical models. We have directly constrained the in situ average cellular protein turnover or doubling times for metabolically active micro-organisms based on cellular amino acid abundances, D/L values of cellular aspartic acid, and the in vivo aspartic acid racemization rate. Application of this method to planktonic microbial communities collected from deep fractures in South Africa yielded maximum cellular amino acid turnover times of ~89 years for 1 km depth and 27 °C and 1-2 years for 3 km depth and 54 °C. The latter turnover times are much shorter than previously estimated cellular turnover times based upon geochemical arguments. The aspartic acid racemization rate at higher temperatures yields cellular protein doubling times that are consistent with the survival times of hyperthermophilic strains and predicts that at temperatures of 85 °C, cells must replace proteins every couple of days to maintain enzymatic activity. Such a high maintenance requirement may be the principal limit on the abundance of living micro-organisms in the deep, hot subsurface biosphere, as well as a potential limit on their activity. The measurement of the D/L of aspartic acid in biological samples is a potentially powerful tool for deep, fractured continental and oceanic crustal settings where geochemical models of carbon turnover times are poorly constrained. Experimental observations on the racemization rates of aspartic acid in living thermophiles and hyperthermophiles could test this hypothesis. The development of corrections for cell wall peptides and spores will be required, however, to improve the accuracy of these estimates for environmental samples.

  1. Does aspartic acid racemization constrain the depth limit of the subsurface biosphere?

    SciTech Connect

    Onstott, T. C.; Aubrey, A.D.; Kieft, T L; Silver, B J; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Van Heerden, E.; Opperman, D. J.; Bada, J L.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies of the subsurface biosphere have deduced average cellular doubling times of hundreds to thousands of years based upon geochemical models. We have directly constrained the in situ average cellular protein turnover or doubling times for metabolically active micro-organisms based on cellular amino acid abundances, D/L values of cellular aspartic acid, and the in vivo aspartic acid racemization rate. Application of this method to planktonic microbial communities collected from deep fractures in South Africa yielded maximum cellular amino acid turnover times of ~89 years for 1 km depth and 27 C and 1 2 years for 3 km depth and 54 C. The latter turnover times are much shorter than previously estimated cellular turnover times based upon geochemical arguments. The aspartic acid racemization rate at higher temperatures yields cellular protein doubling times that are consistent with the survival times of hyperthermophilic strains and predicts that at temperatures of 85 C, cells must replace proteins every couple of days to maintain enzymatic activity. Such a high maintenance requirement may be the principal limit on the abundance of living micro-organisms in the deep, hot subsurface biosphere, as well as a potential limit on their activity. The measurement of the D/L of aspartic acid in biological samples is a potentially powerful tool for deep, fractured continental and oceanic crustal settings where geochemical models of carbon turnover times are poorly constrained. Experimental observations on the racemization rates of aspartic acid in living thermophiles and hyperthermophiles could test this hypothesis. The development of corrections for cell wall peptides and spores will be required, however, to improve the accuracy of these estimates for environmental samples.

  2. Does Aspartic Acid Racemization Constrain the Depth Limit of the Subsurface Biosphere?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onstott, T C.; Magnabosco, C.; Aubrey, A. D.; Burton, A. S.; Dworkin, J. P.; Elsila, J. E.; Grunsfeld, S.; Cao, B. H.; Hein, J. E.; Glavin, D. P.; Kieft, T. L.; Silver, B. J.; Phelps, T. J.; Heerden, E. Van; Opperman, D. J.; Bada, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies of the subsurface biosphere have deduced average cellular doubling times of hundreds to thousands of years based upon geochemical models. We have directly constrained the in situ average cellular protein turnover or doubling times for metabolically active micro-organisms based on cellular amino acid abundances, D/L values of cellular aspartic acid, and the in vivo aspartic acid racemization rate. Application of this method to planktonic microbial communities collected from deep fractures in South Africa yielded maximum cellular amino acid turnover times of approximately 89 years for 1 km depth and 27 C and 1-2 years for 3 km depth and 54 C. The latter turnover times are much shorter than previously estimated cellular turnover times based upon geochemical arguments. The aspartic acid racemization rate at higher temperatures yields cellular protein doubling times that are consistent with the survival times of hyperthermophilic strains and predicts that at temperatures of 85 C, cells must replace proteins every couple of days to maintain enzymatic activity. Such a high maintenance requirement may be the principal limit on the abundance of living micro-organisms in the deep, hot subsurface biosphere, as well as a potential limit on their activity. The measurement of the D/L of aspartic acid in biological samples is a potentially powerful tool for deep, fractured continental and oceanic crustal settings where geochemical models of carbon turnover times are poorly constrained. Experimental observations on the racemization rates of aspartic acid in living thermophiles and hyperthermophiles could test this hypothesis. The development of corrections for cell wall peptides and spores will be required, however, to improve the accuracy of these estimates for environmental samples.

  3. Changes in D-aspartic acid and D-glutamic acid levels in the tissues and physiological fluids of mice with various D-aspartate oxidase activities.

    PubMed

    Han, Hai; Miyoshi, Yurika; Koga, Reiko; Mita, Masashi; Konno, Ryuichi; Hamase, Kenji

    2015-12-10

    D-Aspartic acid (D-Asp) and D-glutamic acid (D-Glu) are currently paid attention as modulators of neuronal transmission and hormonal secretion. These two D-amino acids are metabolized only by D-aspartate oxidase (DDO) in mammals. Therefore, in order to design and develop new drugs controlling the D-Asp and D-Glu amounts via regulation of the DDO activities, changes in these acidic D-amino acid amounts in various tissues are expected to be clarified in model animals having various DDO activities. In the present study, the amounts of Asp and Glu enantiomers in 6 brain tissues, 11 peripheral tissues and 2 physiological fluids of DDO(+/+), DDO(+/-) and DDO(-/-) mice were determined using a sensitive and selective two-dimensional HPLC system. As a result, the amounts of D-Asp were drastically increased with the decrease in the DDO activity in all the tested tissues and physiological fluids. On the other hand, the amounts of D-Glu were almost the same among the 3 strains of mice. The present results are useful for designing new drug candidates, such as DDO inhibitors, and further studies are expected.

  4. Racemization of aspartic acid and phenylalanine in the sweetener aspartame at 100 degrees C.

    PubMed Central

    Boehm, M F; Bada, J L

    1984-01-01

    The racemization half-lives (i.e., the time required to reach a D/L = 0.33) at pH 6.8 for aspartic acid and phenylalanine in the sweetener aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) were determined to be 13 and 23 hours, respectively, at 100 degrees C. Racemization at this pH does not occur in aspartame but rather in its diketopiperazine decomposition product. Our results indicate that the use of aspartame to sweeten neutral pH foods and beverages that are then heated at elevated temperature could generate D-aspartic acid and D-phenylalanine. The nutritive consequences of these D-amino acids in the human diet are not well established, and thus aspartame should probably not be used as a sweetener when the exposure of neutral pH foods and beverages to elevated temperatures is required. At pH 4, a typical pH of most foods and beverages that might be sweetened with aspartame, the half-lives are 47 hours for aspartic acid and 1200 hours for phenylalanine at 100 degrees C. Racemization at pH 4 takes place in aspartame itself. Although the racemization rates at pH 4 are slow and no appreciable racemization of aspartic acid and phenylalanine should occur during the normal use of aspartame, some food and beverage components could conceivably act as catalysts. Additional studies are required to evaluate whether the use of aspartame as a sugar substitute might not in turn result in an increased human consumption of D-aspartic acid and D-phenylalanine. PMID:6591191

  5. Concordance of Collagen-Based Radiocarbon and Aspartic-Acid Racemization Ages

    PubMed Central

    Bada, Jeffrey L.; Schroeder, Roy A.; Protsch, Reiner; Berger, Rainer

    1974-01-01

    By determining the extent of racemization of aspartic acid in a well-dated bone, it is possible to calculate the in situ first-order rate constant for the interconversion of the L and D enantiomers of aspartic acid. Collagen-based radiocarbon-dated bones are shown to be suitable samples for use in “calibrating” the racemization reaction. Once the aspartic-acid racemization reaction has been “calibrated” for a site, the reaction can be used to date other bones from the deposit. Ages deduced by this method are in good agreement with radiocarbon ages. These results provide evidence that the aspartic-acid racemization reaction is an important chronological tool for dating bones either too old or too small for radiocarbon dating. As an example of the potential application of the technique for dating fossil man, a piece of Rhodesian Man from Broken Hill, Zambia, was analyzed and tentatively assigned an age of about 110,000 years. PMID:4522802

  6. A Green Polymerization of Aspartic Acid for the Undergraduate Organic Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, George D.

    2005-01-01

    The green polymerization of aspartic acid carried out during an organic-inorganic synthesis laboratory course for undergraduate students is described. The procedure is based on work by Donlar Corporation, a Peru, Illinois-based company that won a Green Chemistry Challenge Award in 1996 in the Small Business category for preparing thermal…

  7. The heat effects of dissociation of N-(carboxymethyl)aspartic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytkin, A. I.; Chernyavskaya, N. V.; Orlova, T. D.; Nikol'Skii, V. M.

    2009-07-01

    The heat effects of dissociation of N-(carboxymethyl)aspartic acid were determined calorimetrically at 298.15 K and various ionic strength values. The standard thermodynamic characteristics of dissociation of the complexone at fixed and zero ionic strengths were calculated.

  8. Estimation of paleotemperature from racemization of aspartic acid in combination with radiocarbon age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, Masayo; Takeyama, Masami; Mimura, Koichi; Nakamura, Toshio

    2007-06-01

    We tried to estimate paleotemperatures from two chosen fossils by measuring D/L aspartic acid ratios and radiocarbon ages of the XAD-2-treated hydrolysate fractions in the fossils. The D/L aspartic acid ratio was measured with a gas chromatograph and radiocarbon dating was performed using a Tandetron AMS system at Nagoya University. The radiocarbon age of a fossil mammoth molar collected from Bykovsky Peninsula, eastern Siberia, was found to be 35,170 ± 300 BP as an average value for the XAD-treated hydrolysate fractions. The aspartic acid in the mammoth molar showed a little evidence of racemization, which might be due to in vivo racemization during the lifetime and then suggests negligible or no postmortem racemization during burial in permafrost. From four animal bone fossils collected from a shell mound excavated at the Awazu submarine archeological site in Lake Biwa, Shiga, Japan, the racemization-based effective mean temperature was calculated to be 15-16 °C using the D/L aspartic acid ratio of about 0.11 and the 14C age of 4500 BP for the XAD-2-treated hydrolysate fractions in the fossils. The average annual temperature was estimated to be 11-12 °C, which approximates to the temperature that the fossils experienced during burial at the site. Although the application of racemization ratios in fossils as paleotemperature indicators is surrounded with many difficulties, the results obtained in this study suggest its feasibility.

  9. DNA interaction with octahedral and square planar Ni(II) complexes of aspartic-acid Schiff-bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallam, S. A.; Orabi, A. S.; Abbas, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    Ni(II) complexes of (S,E)-2-(2-OHbenzilydene)aspartic acid; (S,E)-2-(2,3-diOHbenzilydene)aspartic acid-; (S,E)-2-(2,4-diOH-benzilydene)aspartic acid; (S,E)-2-(2,5-diOHbenzilydene)aspartic acid and (S,E)-2-((2-OHnaphthalene-1-yl)methylene)aspartic acid Schiff-bases have been synthesized by template method in ethanol or ammonia media. They were characterized by elemental analyses, conductivity measurements, magnetic moment, UV, IR and 1H nmr spectra as well as thermal analysis (TG, DTG, DTA). The Schiff-bases are dibasic tridentate or tetradentate donors and the complexes have square planar and octahedral structures. The complexes decompose in two or three steps where kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the decomposition steps were computed. The interactions of the formed complexes with FM-DNA were monitored by UV and fluorescence spectroscopy.

  10. Transport of Arginine and Aspartic Acid into Isolated Barley Mesophyll Vacuoles 1

    PubMed Central

    Martinoia, Enrico; Thume, Monika; Vogt, Esther; Rentsch, Doris; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    1991-01-01

    The transport of arginine into isolated barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) mesophyll vacuoles was investigated. In the absence of ATP, arginine uptake was saturable with a Km of 0.3 to 0.4 millimolar. Positively charged amino acids inhibited arginine uptake, lysine being most potent with a Ki of 1.2 millimolar. In the presence of free ATP, but not of its Mg-complex, uptake of arginine was drastically enhanced and a linear function of its concentration up to 16 millimolar. The nonhydrolyzable adenylyl imidodiphosphate, but no other nucleotide tested, could substitute for ATP. Therefore, it is suggested that this process does not require energy and does not involve the tonoplast ATPase. The ATP-dependent arginine uptake was strongly inhibited by p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid. Furthermore, hydrophobic amino acids were inhibitory (I50 phenylalanine 1 millimolar). Similar characteristics were observed for the uptake of aspartic acid. However, rates of ATP-stimulated aspartic acid transport were 10-fold lower as compared to arginine transport. Uptake of aspartate in the absence of ATP was negligible. PMID:16668447

  11. Proteins with β-(thienopyrrolyl)alanines as alternative chromophores and pharmaceutically active amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Budisa, Nediljko; Alefelder, Stefan; Bae, Jae Hyun; Golbik, Ralph; Minks, Caroline; Huber, Robert; Moroder, Luis

    2001-01-01

    L-β-(Thieno[3,2-b]pyrrolyl)alanine and L-β-(thieno[2,3-b]pyrrolyl)alanine are mutually isosteric and pharmaceutically active amino acids that mimic tryptophan with the benzene ring in the indole moiety replaced by thiophene. Sulfur as a heteroatom causes physicochemical changes in these tryptophan surrogates that bring about completely new properties not found in the indole moiety. These synthetic amino acids were incorporated into recombinant proteins in response to the Trp UGG codons by fermentation in a Trp-auxotrophic Escherichia coli host strain using the selective pressure incorporation method. Related protein mutants expectedly retain the secondary structure of the native proteins but show significantly changed optical and thermodynamic properties. In this way, new spectral windows, fluorescence, polarity, thermodynamics, or pharmacological properties are inserted into proteins. Such an engineering approach by translational integration of synthetic amino acids with a priori defined properties, as shown in this study, proved to be a novel and useful tool for protein rational design. PMID:11420430

  12. Poly(L-aspartic acid) derivative soluble in a volatile organic solvent for biomedical application.

    PubMed

    Oh, Nam Muk; Oh, Kyung Taek; Youn, Yu Seok; Lee, Eun Seong

    2012-09-01

    In order to develop a novel functional poly(L-amino acid) that can dissolve in volatile organic solvents, we prepared poly[L-aspartic acid-g-(3-diethylaminopropyl)]-b-poly(ethylene glycol) [poly(L-Asp-g-DEAP)-b-PEG] via the conjugation of 3-diethylaminopropyl (DEAP) to carboxylate groups of poly(L-Asp) (M(n) 4 K)-b-PEG (M(n) 2 K). This poly(L-aspartic acid) derivative evidenced a relatively high solubility in volatile organic solvents such as dichloromethane, chloroform, and acetone. We fabricated a model nanostructure (i.e., polymeric micelle) using poly(L-Asp-g-DEAP)-b-PEG by the film rehydration method, which involves the simple removal of the volatile organic solvent (dichloromethane) used to dissolve polymer, reducing concerns about organic solvents remaining in a nano-sized particle. Interestingly, this micelle showed the pH-stimulated release of encapsulated model drug [i.e., doxorubicin (DOX)] due to the protonation of DEAP according to the pH of the solution. We expect that this poly(L-aspartic acid) derivative promises to provide pharmaceutical potential for constituting a new stimuli-sensitive drug carrier for various drug molecules.

  13. Proteaselike sequence in hepatitis B virus core antigen is not required for e antigen generation and may not be part of an aspartic acid-type protease.

    PubMed Central

    Nassal, M; Galle, P R; Schaller, H

    1989-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) C gene directs the synthesis of two major gene products: HBV core antigen (HBcAg[p21c]), which forms the nucleocapsid, and HBV e antigen (HBeAg [p17e]), a secreted antigen that is produced by several processing events during its maturation. These proteins contain an amino acid sequence similar to the active-site residues of aspartic acid and retroviral proteases. On the basis of this sequence similarity, which is highly conserved among mammalian hepadnaviruses, a model has been put forward according to which processing to HBeAg is due to self-cleavage of p21c involving the proteaselike sequence. Using site-directed mutagenesis in conjunction with transient expression of HBV proteins in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2, we tested this hypothesis. Our results with HBV mutants in which one or two of the conserved amino acids have been replaced by others suggest strongly that processing to HBeAg does not depend on the presence of an intact proteaselike sequence in the core protein. Attempts to detect an influence of this sequence on the processing of HBV P gene products into enzymatically active viral polymerase also gave no conclusive evidence for the existence of an HBV protease. Mutations replacing the putatively essential aspartic acid showed little effect on polymerase activity. Additional substitution of the likewise conserved threonine residue by alanine, in contrast, almost abolished the activity of the polymerase. We conclude that an HBV protease, if it exists, is functionally different from aspartic acid and retroviral proteases. Images PMID:2657101

  14. Surface proton transport of fully protonated poly(aspartic acid) thin films on quartz substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Yuki; Kubo, Takahiro

    2014-12-01

    Thin film structure and the proton transport property of fully protonated poly(aspartic acid) (P-Asp100) have been investigated. An earlier study assessed partially protonated poly(aspartic acid), highly oriented thin film structure and enhancement of the internal proton transport. In this study of P-Asp100, IR p-polarized multiple-angle incidence resolution (P-MAIR) spectra were measured to investigate the thin film structure. The obtained thin films, with thicknesses of 120-670 nm, had no oriented structure. Relative humidity dependence of the resistance, proton conductivity, and normalized resistance were examined to ascertain the proton transport property of P-Asp100 thin films. The obtained data showed that the proton transport of P-Asp100 thin films might occur on the surface, not inside of the thin film. This phenomenon might be related with the proton transport of the biological system.

  15. Anharmonic vibrational studies of L-aspartic acid using HF and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Mohammad Jane; Ahmad, Shabbir

    2012-10-01

    The experimental and theoretical studies on the structure, molecular properties and vibrational spectra of L-aspartic acid are presented. The molecular structure, harmonic and anharmonic vibrational frequencies, molecular properties, MEP mapping, NBO analysis and electronic spectra of L-aspartic acid have been reported. Computed geometrical parameters and anharmonic frequencies of fundamental, combination and overtone transitions were found in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data. The UV-Vis spectrum of present molecule has been recorded and the electronic properties such as HOMO and LUMO energies and few low lying excited states were carried out by using time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) approach. Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis has been performed for analyzing charge delocalization throughout the molecule. Molecular electrostatic potential map has also been used for quantitative measure of the chemical activities of various sites of the molecule.

  16. Age estimation in forensic sciences: Application of combined aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Alkass, K; Buchholz, B A; Ohtani, S; Yamamoto, T; Druid, H; Spalding, S L

    2009-11-02

    Age determination of unknown human bodies is important in the setting of a crime investigation or a mass disaster, since the age at death, birth date and year of death, as well as gender, can guide investigators to the correct identity among a large number of possible matches. Traditional morphological methods used by anthropologists to determine age are often imprecise, whereas chemical analysis of tooth dentin, such as aspartic acid racemization has shown reproducible and more precise results. In this paper we analyze teeth from Swedish individuals using both aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon methodologies. The rationale behind using radiocarbon analysis is that above-ground testing of nuclear weapons during the cold war (1955-1963) caused an extreme increase in global levels of carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) which have been carefully recorded over time. Forty-four teeth from 41 individuals were analyzed using aspartic acid racemization analysis of tooth crown dentin or radiocarbon analysis of enamel and ten of these were split and subjected to both radiocarbon and racemization analysis. Combined analysis showed that the two methods correlated well (R2=0.66, p < 0.05). Radiocarbon analysis showed an excellent precision with an overall absolute error of 0.6 {+-} 04 years. Aspartic acid racemization also showed a good precision with an overall absolute error of 5.4 {+-} 4.2 years. Whereas radiocarbon analysis gives an estimated year of birth, racemization analysis indicates the chronological age of the individual at the time of death. We show how these methods in combination can also assist in the estimation of date of death of an unidentified victim. This strategy can be of significant assistance in forensic casework involving dead victim identification.

  17. Age estimation in forensic sciences: application of combined aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon analysis.

    PubMed

    Alkass, Kanar; Buchholz, Bruce A; Ohtani, Susumu; Yamamoto, Toshiharu; Druid, Henrik; Spalding, Kirsty L

    2010-05-01

    Age determination of unknown human bodies is important in the setting of a crime investigation or a mass disaster because the age at death, birth date, and year of death as well as gender can guide investigators to the correct identity among a large number of possible matches. Traditional morphological methods used by anthropologists to determine age are often imprecise, whereas chemical analysis of tooth dentin, such as aspartic acid racemization, has shown reproducible and more precise results. In this study, we analyzed teeth from Swedish individuals using both aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon methodologies. The rationale behind using radiocarbon analysis is that aboveground testing of nuclear weapons during the cold war (1955-1963) caused an extreme increase in global levels of carbon-14 ((14)C), which has been carefully recorded over time. Forty-four teeth from 41 individuals were analyzed using aspartic acid racemization analysis of tooth crown dentin or radiocarbon analysis of enamel, and 10 of these were split and subjected to both radiocarbon and racemization analysis. Combined analysis showed that the two methods correlated well (R(2) = 0.66, p < 0.05). Radiocarbon analysis showed an excellent precision with an overall absolute error of 1.0 +/- 0.6 years. Aspartic acid racemization also showed a good precision with an overall absolute error of 5.4 +/- 4.2 years. Whereas radiocarbon analysis gives an estimated year of birth, racemization analysis indicates the chronological age of the individual at the time of death. We show how these methods in combination can also assist in the estimation of date of death of an unidentified victim. This strategy can be of significant assistance in forensic casework involving dead victim identification.

  18. EPR Studies of Cu2+ in dl-Aspartic Acid Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabulut, B.; Tapramaz, R.; Bulut, A.

    1999-04-01

    EPR studies of Cu2+ doped dl-Aspartic Acid [NH2CH(CH2COOH)COO] powder and single crystal have been carried out at 113 and 300 K. The principal hyperfine and g values, covalancy parameter, mixing coefficients and Fermi-contact term of the complex were obtained, and the ground-state wavefuntion of the Cu2+ ion in the lattice has been constructed.

  19. Platinum-Incorporating Poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone)-poly(aspartic acid) Pseudoblock Copolymer Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xikuang; Xie, Chen; Chen, Weizhi; Yang, Chenchen; Wu, Wei; Jiang, Xiqun

    2015-07-13

    Cisplatin-incorporating pseudoblock copolymer nanoparticles with high drug loading efficiency (ca. 50%) were prepared built on host-guest inclusion complexation between β-cyclodextrin end-capped poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) block and admantyl end-capped poly(aspartic acid) block, followed by the coordination between cisplatin and carboxyl groups in poly(aspartic acid). The host-guest interaction between the two polymer blocks was examined by two-dimensional nuclear overhauser effect spectroscopy. The size and morphology of nanoparticles formed were characterized by dynamic light scattering, zeta potential, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The size control of nanoparticles was carried out by varying the ratio of poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) to poly(aspartic acid). The nanoparticles were stable in the aqueous medium with different pH values but disintegrated in the medium containing Cl(-) ions. The in vitro and in vivo antitumor effects of cisplatin-loaded nanoparticles were evaluated. The biodistribution of the nanoparticles in vivo was studied by noninvasive near-infrared fluorescence imaging and ion-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. It was found that cisplatin-loaded nanoparticles could effectively accumulate in the tumor site and exhibited significant superior in vivo antitumor activity to the commercially available free cisplatin by combining the tumor volume, body weight, and survival rate measurements.

  20. Annual Variations in Aspartic Acid Content of Coral Skeleton: A new Proxy for Changes in Biological Activity of Coral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, L. P.; Suzuki, A.; Kawahata, H.

    2004-12-01

    Biological or metabolic effects have often been invoked to explain abnormal changes in the annual pattern of the stable isotope record of the coral skeleton. However, it is not possible to isolate and quantify the magnitude of these effects from environmental effects controlling the stable isotopes record. Therefore, there is a need to develop a proxy which could be independently linked with the changes in biological activity of the corals. It is well known that amino acids are closely associated with biomineralization of coral skeleton. We examined variations in amino acid composition of coral skeleton by conducting high resolution micro-sampling along the coral growth axis. The samples (ca. 1 mg each) were collected at about 1 mm interval, which corresponded to about 1 month of coral skeletal growth, and hydrolyzed with 6N HCl at 110 deg.C for 22 hours. The results show that relative molar concentration of aspartic acid (Asp) shows the most pronounced annual variation, in comparison to other amino acids, over a wide range of 20 - 35 mole percent. The comparison of Asp mole content with stable oxygen isotope data shows that Asp content is the highest in summers while lowest in winters. The absence of non-protein amino acids in the samples suggests that the amino acids in the skeleton are neither degraded nor of extraneous origin, because in both the cases some amount of non-protein amino acids like beta-alanine and gama-amino butyric acid must be present in samples. Lack of correlation between Asp and stable isotope of carbon is probably due to the fact that isotope data are average values for all carbon-based compounds including carbonate carbon. In contrast, Asp relative mole content is based on only one compound and closely related with the secretion of polypeptides and amino acids by coral. Therefore, variations in Asp content is likely to reflect change in biological activity more directly than carbon isotope. Out of about 8 consecutive years record examined

  1. N- Trichloro- and dichloroacetyl amino acids and compounds of amino acids with halogeno acetic acids: 35Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance spectroscopy; crystal structure of N- trichloroacetyl- glycine, - DL-alanine, and - L-alanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Shi-qi; Kehrer, Armin; Ofial, Armin R.; Weiss, Alarich

    1995-02-01

    The crystal structures of N- trichloroacetyl- glycine ( N- TCA- G), N-trichloroacetyl-dl-alanine ( N-TCA- dl-A ), and N-trichloroacetyl- l-alanine ( N-TCA- l-A ) were determined. In addition, the 35Cl NQR spectra of these N-trichloroacetyl amino acids, of N-trichloroacetyl- l-valine ( N-TCA- l-V ), and of N- dichloroacetyl- glycine and - L-alanine were measured, mostly as a function of temperature. Compounds of glycine and L-alanine with chlorodifluoroacetic acid, of glycine and L-leucine with monochloroacetic acid, of glycine and L-leucine with dichloroacetic acid, and of glycine and L-leucine with trichloroacetic acid were also studied using 35Cl NQR. The structures (in picometres and degrees) were found to be as follows. N- TCA- G: Pna2 1, Z = 8, a = 1641, b = 1002, c = 1018. N-TCA- dl-A : {C2}/{c}, Z = 8, a = 3280, b = 556, c = 1031, β = 96.68. N-TCA- l-A: P1 , Z = 2, a = 967, b = 949, c = 619, α = 74.97, β = 74.20, γ = 61.20. The 35Cl NQR frequencies (ν) were observed in the range 35-41 MHz, and decrease with increasing temperature. Some of the resonances bleach out at a temperature ( Tb) far below the melting temperature; this provides information about the crystal structures at 77 K. No phase transitions were observed by differential thermal analysis between 77 and 295 K. The crystal structures are discussed in connection with the NQR results, and conclusions are drawn about the structures of the compounds for which only 35Cl NQR data are available.

  2. Solvent-Free Polymerization of L-Aspartic Acid in the Presence of D-Sorbitol to Obtain Water Soluble or Network Copolymers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    L-aspartic acid was thermally polymerized in the presence of D-sorbitol with the goal of synthesizing new, higher molecular weight water soluble and absorbent copolymers. No reaction occurred when aspartic acid alone was heated at 170 or 200 degrees C. In contrast, heating sorbitol and aspartic ac...

  3. Vibrational Spectroscopy and Phonon-Related Properties of the L-Aspartic Acid Anhydrous Monoclinic Crystal.

    PubMed

    Silva, A M; Costa, S N; Sales, F A M; Freire, V N; Bezerra, E M; Santos, R P; Fulco, U L; Albuquerque, E L; Caetano, E W S

    2015-12-10

    The infrared absorption and Raman scattering spectra of the monoclinic P21 l-aspartic acid anhydrous crystal were recorded and interpreted with the help of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The effect of dispersive forces was taken into account, and the optimized unit cells allowed us to obtain the vibrational normal modes. The computed data exhibits good agreement with the measurements for low wavenumbers, allowing for a very good assignment of the infrared and Raman spectral features. The vibrational spectra of the two lowest energy conformers of the l-aspartic molecule were also evaluated using the hybrid B3LYP functional for the sake of comparison, showing that the molecular calculations give a limited description of the measured IR and Raman spectra of the l-aspartic acid crystal for wavenumbers below 1000 cm(-1). The results obtained reinforce the need to use solid-state calculations to describe the vibrational properties of molecular crystals instead of calculations for a single isolated molecule picture even for wavenumbers beyond the range usually associated with lattice modes (200 cm(-1) < ω < 1000 cm(-1)).

  4. The (unusual) aspartic acid in the metal coordination sphere of the prokaryotic zinc finger domain.

    PubMed

    D'Abrosca, Gianluca; Russo, Luigi; Palmieri, Maddalena; Baglivo, Ilaria; Netti, Fortuna; de Paola, Ivan; Zaccaro, Laura; Farina, Biancamaria; Iacovino, Rosa; Pedone, Paolo Vincenzo; Isernia, Carla; Fattorusso, Roberto; Malgieri, Gaetano

    2016-08-01

    The possibility of choices of protein ligands and coordination geometries leads to diverse Zn(II) binding sites in zinc-proteins, allowing a range of important biological roles. The prokaryotic Cys2His2 zinc finger domain (originally found in the Ros protein from Agrobacterium tumefaciens) tetrahedrally coordinates zinc through two cysteine and two histidine residues and it does not adopt a correct fold in the absence of the metal ion. Ros is the first structurally characterized member of a family of bacterial proteins that presents several amino acid changes in the positions occupied in Ros by the zinc coordinating residues. In particular, the second position is very often occupied by an aspartic acid although the coordination of structural zinc by an aspartate in eukaryotic zinc fingers is very unusual. Here, by appropriately mutating the protein Ros, we characterize the aspartate role within the coordination sphere of this family of proteins demonstrating how the presence of this residue only slightly perturbs the functional structure of the prokaryotic zinc finger domain while it greatly influences its thermodynamic properties.

  5. Beta-methylthio-aspartic acid: identification of a novel posttranslational modification in ribosomal protein S12 from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kowalak, J. A.; Walsh, K. A.

    1996-01-01

    Utilizing microscale chemical derivatization reactions and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, we have identified a novel posttranslational modification of aspartic acid, beta-methylthio-aspartic acid. The modified residue is located at position 88 in ribosomal protein S12 from Escherichia coli, a phylogenetically conserved protein that has been implicated in maintaining translational accuracy of the ribosome. PMID:8844851

  6. Facile synthesis of (R)-4-mercaptopyrrolidine-2-thione from L-aspartic acid.

    PubMed

    Seki, M; Shimizu, T

    2001-04-01

    An SN2-type of substitution of (S)-bromide 4, which had been prepared from L-aspartic acid, with potassium thiobenzoate provided (R)-benzoylthio derivative 5 with complete inversion of the configuration. Compound 5 was converted, via iodide 6c, to (R)-4-amino-3-benzoylthiobutyric acid 8b. (R)-4-Mercapto pyrrolidine-2-thione 1 was readily obtained from 8b through cyclization with acetic anhydride, thionation with Lawesson's reagent and facile removal of the S-benzoyl group with sodium methoxide.

  7. Catalysis of the Oligomerization of O-Phospho-Serine, Aspartic Acid, or Glutamic Acid by Cationic Micelles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohler, Christof; Hill, Aubrey R., Jr.; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1996-01-01

    Treatment of relatively concentrated aqueous solutions of 0-phospho-serine (50 mM), aspartic acid (100 mM) or glutamic acid (100 mM) with carbonyldiimidazole leads to the formation of an activated intermediate that oligomerizes efficiently. When the concentration of amino acid is reduced tenfold, few long oligomers can be detected. Positively-charged cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide micelles concentrate the negatively-charged activated intermediates of the amino acids at their surfaces and catalyze efficient oligomerization even from dilute solutions.

  8. Catalysis of the Oligomerization of O-Phospho-Serine, Aspartic Acid, or Glutamic Acid by Cationic Micelles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehler, Christof; Hill, Aubrey R., Jr.; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1996-01-01

    Treatment of relatively concentrated aqueous solutions of O-phospho-serine (50 mM), aspartic acid (100 mM) or glutamic acid (100 mM) with carbonyldiimidazole leads to the formation of an activated intermediate that oligomerizes efficiently. When the concentration of amino acid is reduced tenfold, few long oligomers can be detected. Positively-charged cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide micelles concentrate the negatively-charged activated intermediates of the amino acids at their surfaces and catalyze efficient oligomerization even from dilute solutions.

  9. Atypical cleavage of protonated N-fatty acyl amino acids derived from aspartic acid evidenced by sequential MS(3) experiments.

    PubMed

    Boukerche, Toufik Taalibi; Alves, Sandra; Le Faouder, Pauline; Warnet, Anna; Bertrand-Michel, Justine; Bouchekara, Mohamed; Belbachir, Mohammed; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2016-12-01

    Lipidomics calls for information on detected lipids and conjugates whose structural elucidation by mass spectrometry requires to rationalization of their gas phase dissociations toward collision-induced dissociation (CID) processes. This study focused on activated dissociations of two lipoamino acid (LAA) systems composed of N-palmitoyl acyl coupled with aspartic and glutamic acid mono ethyl esters (as LAA(*D) and LAA(*E)). Although in MS/MS, their CID spectra show similar trends, e.g., release of water and ethanol, the [(LAA(*D/*E)+H)-C2H5OH](+) product ions dissociate via distinct pathways in sequential MS(3) experiments. The formation of all the product ions is rationalized by charge-promoted cleavages often involving stepwise processes with ion isomerization into ion-dipole prior to dissociation. The latter explains the maleic anhydride or ketene neutral losses from N-palmitoyl acyl aspartate and glutamate anhydride fragment ions, respectively. Consequently, protonated palmitoyl acid amide is generated from LAA(*D), whereas LAA(*E) leads to the [*E+H-H2O](+) anhydride. The former releases ammonia to provide acylium, which gives the C n H(2n-1) and C n H(2n-3) carbenium series. This should offer structural information, e.g., to locate either unsaturation(s) or alkyl group branching present on the various fatty acyl moieties of lipo-aspartic acid in further studies based on MS (n) experiments.

  10. [Aspartic Acid Generated in the Process of Chlorination Disinfection By-product Dichloroacetonitrile].

    PubMed

    Ding, Chun-sheng; Li, Nai-jun; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Meng-qing

    2016-05-15

    In this study, a method was developed for the determination of dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) in drinking water by liquid- liquid micro-extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry ( LLE-GC/MS), which used 1,2-dibromopropane as the internal standard and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) as the extractant for high accuracy. The aspartic acid was used as the precursor of the DCAN formation during chlorination and the influencing factors were evaluated. The formation mechanism of DCAN was also discussed. The results showed that the DCAN amount increased with the increase of pH value under the neutral and acidic conditions, however, the amount of DCAN decreased with the increase of pH value under the alkali condition. And the final amount of DCAN under the alkali condition was much less than that under the neutral and acidic conditions. It was also found that the DCAN amount increased with the increase of chlorine addition, while the temperature in the range of 10-30°C had little influence on the DCAN formation. The formation process of the DCAN from aspartic acid by chlorination included seven steps, such as substitution, decarboxylation, oxidation, etc and ultimately formed DCAN.

  11. A versatile proline/alanine transporter in the unicellular pathogen Leishmania donovani regulates amino acid homoeostasis and osmotic stress responses.

    PubMed

    Inbar, Ehud; Schlisselberg, Doreen; Suter Grotemeyer, Marianne; Rentsch, Doris; Zilberstein, Dan

    2013-01-15

    Unlike all other organisms, parasitic protozoa of the family Trypanosomatidae maintain a large cellular pool of proline that, together with the alanine pool, serve as alternative carbon sources as well as reservoirs of organic osmolytes. These reflect adaptation to their insect vectors whose haemolymphs are exceptionally rich in the two amino acids. In the present study we identify and characterize a new neutral amino acid transporter, LdAAP24, that translocates proline and alanine across the Leishmania donovani plasma membrane. This transporter fulfils multiple functions: it is the sole supplier for the intracellular pool of proline and contributes to the alanine pool; it is essential for cell volume regulation after osmotic stress; and it regulates the transport and homoeostasis of glutamate and arginine, none of which are its substrates. Notably, we provide evidence that proline and alanine exhibit different roles in the parasitic response to hypotonic shock; alanine affects swelling, whereas proline influences the rate of volume recovery. On the basis of our data we suggest that LdAAP24 plays a key role in parasite adaptation to its varying environments in host and vector, a phenomenon essential for successful parasitism.

  12. The non-protein amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine in Portuguese cyanobacterial isolates.

    PubMed

    Cervantes Cianca, Rosa C; Baptista, Mafalda S; Lopes, Viviana R; Vasconcelos, Vitor M

    2012-06-01

    The tailor made amino acid β-N-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a neurotoxin produced by cyanobacteria. It has been associated with certain forms of progressive neurodegenerative disease, including sporadic Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. Some different reports of BMAA in cyanobacterial blooms from lakes, reservoirs, and other water resources have been made by different investigators. We here report the detection of BMAA of both free and protein-bound produced by cyanobacteria, belonging to the Chroococcales, Oscillatoriales and Nostocales ordered. We use a rapid and sensitive HPLC-FD method that utilizes methanol elution and the Waters AQC Tag chemistry. On other hand, we have used three different assay procedures for BMAA extraction from cyanobacteria: Trichloroacetic acid (TCA), Methanol/Acetone and hydrochloric acid (HCl). All assays let successfully detect BMAA in all cyanobacteria samples analyzed. Nevertheless, with TCA and HCl extraction procedures the highest BMAA values, for free as well as protein-bound BMAA were detected. BMAA content could not be related to the taxonomy of the isolates or to their geographical origin, and no correlation between free and protein-bound BMAA concentrations were observed within or between taxonomic groups. These data offer confirmation of the taxonomic and geographic ubiquity of BMAA from naturally occurring populations of cyanobacteria, for the first time reported for estuaries.

  13. Aspartic acid-96 is the internal proton donor in the reprotonation of the Schiff base of bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Otto, H; Marti, T; Holz, M; Mogi, T; Lindau, M; Khorana, H G; Heyn, M P

    1989-01-01

    Above pH 8 the decay of the photocycle intermediate M of bacteriorhodopsin splits into two components: the usual millisecond pH-independent component and an additional slower component with a rate constant proportional to the molar concentration of H+, [H+]. In parallel, the charge translocation signal associated with the reprotonation of the Schiff base develops a similar slow component. These observations are explained by a two-step reprotonation mechanism. An internal donor first reprotonates the Schiff base in the decay of M to N and is then reprotonated from the cytoplasm in the N----O transition. The decay rate of N is proportional to [H+]. By postulating a back reaction from N to M, the M decay splits up into two components, with the slower one having the same pH dependence as the decay of N. Photocycle, photovoltage, and pH-indicator experiments with mutants in which aspartic acid-96 is replaced by asparagine or alanine, which we call D96N and D96A, suggest that Asp-96 is the internal proton donor involved in the re-uptake pathway. In both mutants the stoichiometry of proton pumping is the same as in wild type. However, the M decay is monophasic, with the logarithm of the decay time [log (tau)] linearly dependent on pH, suggesting that the internal donor is absent and that the Schiff base is directly reprotonated from the cytoplasm. Like H+, azide increases the M decay rate in D96N. The rate constant is proportional to the azide concentration and can become greater than 100 times greater than in wild type. Thus, azide functions as a mobile proton donor directly reprotonating the Schiff base in a bimolecular reaction. Both the proton and azide effects, which are absent in wild type, indicate that the internal donor is removed and that the reprotonation pathway is different from wild type in these mutants. PMID:2556706

  14. Chiral selectivity of amino acid adsorption on chiral surfaces—The case of alanine on Pt

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, J.-H.; Kosov, D. S.

    2015-02-07

    We study the binding pattern of the amino acid alanine on the naturally chiral Pt surfaces Pt(531), Pt(321), and Pt(643). These surfaces are all vicinal to the (111) direction but have different local environments of their kink sites and are thus a model for realistic roughened Pt surfaces. Alanine has only a single methyl group attached to its chiral center, which makes the number of possible binding conformations computationally tractable. Additionally, only the amine and carboxyl group are expected to interact strongly with the Pt substrate. On Pt(531), we study the molecule in its pristine as well as its deprotonated form and find that the deprotonated one is more stable by 0.47 eV. Therefore, we study the molecule in its deprotonated form on Pt(321) and Pt(643). As expected, the oxygen and nitrogen atoms of the deprotonated molecule provide a local binding “tripod” and the most stable adsorption configurations optimize the interaction of this “tripod” with undercoordinated surface atoms. However, the interaction of the methyl group plays an important role: it induces significant chiral selectivity of about 60 meV on all surfaces. Hereby, the L-enantiomer adsorbs preferentially to the Pt(321){sup S} and Pt(643){sup S} surfaces, while the D-enantiomer is more stable on Pt(531){sup S}. The binding energies increase with increasing surface density of kink sites, i.e., they are largest for Pt(531){sup S} and smallest for Pt(643){sup S}.

  15. Aspartic acid racemization in dentin of the third molar for age estimation of the Chaoshan population in South China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shisheng; Lv, Yanyi; Wang, Dian; Yu, Xiaojun

    2016-09-01

    Aspartic acid racemization in teeth has been increasingly used to estimate chronological age with a considerably high accuracy in forensic practice. The Chaoshan population in South China is relatively isolated in geography, and has specific lifestyle and dietary inhibits. It is still unknown whether this method is suitable for this population. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between chronological age and the d/l aspartic acid ratio in dentin in the third molar tooth of the Chaoshan population. Fifty-eight non-carious third molar teeth (31 mandibles and 27 maxillae), from 58 living individuals of known age (24 males and 34 females), were retrieved. Dentin was extracted from these teeth. The d- and l-aspartic acids in dentins were separated and detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Linear regression was performed between the d/l aspartic acid ratio of dentins and chronological age. Results showed that the correlation coefficient (r) was 0.969, and the mean absolute error (MAE) was 2.19 years, its standard deviation (SD) was ±1.53 years, indicating excellent correlation. There was no significant difference in racemization rates of dentin between sexes (P=0.113, F=2.6), or between mandibles and maxillae (P=0.964, F=0.000). Results indicate that the ratio of the d and l forms of aspartic acid of dentins, in the third molar, is closely correlated with chronological age, special lifestyle do no obviously affect the accuracy of the age estimations by aspartic acid racemization of the dentin in the third molar and that aspartic acid racemization in the third molar dentin can be used as an accurate method to estimate chronological age in the Chaoshan population in South China.

  16. Stereochemistry of amino acids in surface samples of a marine sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollock, G.E.; Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1978-01-01

    In two surface samples of marine sediment, the percentages of d-alanine and d-aspartic acid are significantly higher than the other d-amino acids and are similar to the range found in soils. The percentage of d-glutamic acid is also higher than the other amino acids but less than d-alanine and d-aspartic acid. These d-amino acids may come mainly from bacteria. ?? 1978.

  17. Stereochemistry of amino acids in surface samples of a marine sediment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, G. E.; Kvenvolden, K. A.

    1978-01-01

    In two surface samples of marine sediment, the percentages of D-alanine and D-aspartic acid are significantly higher than the other D-amino acids and are similar to the range found in soils. The percentage of D-glutamic acid is also higher than the other amino acids but less than D-alanine and D-aspartic acid. These D-amino acids may come mainly from bacteria.

  18. Alanine water complexes.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, Vanesa; Sanz, M Eugenia; Peña, Isabel; Mata, Santiago; Cabezas, Carlos; López, Juan C; Alonso, José L

    2014-04-10

    Two complexes of alanine with water, alanine-(H2O)n (n = 1,2), have been generated by laser ablation of the amino acid in a supersonic jet containing water vapor and characterized using Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. In the observed complexes, water molecules bind to the carboxylic group of alanine acting as both proton donors and acceptors. In alanine-H2O, the water molecule establishes two intermolecular hydrogen bonds forming a six-membered cycle, while in alanine-(H2O)2 the two water molecules establish three hydrogen bonds forming an eight-membered ring. In both complexes, the amino acid moiety is in its neutral form and shows the conformation observed to be the most stable for the bare molecule. The microsolvation study of alanine-(H2O)n (n = 1,2) can be taken as a first step toward understanding bulk properties at a microscopic level.

  19. Enantioselective hydrogenation of pyruvic acid oxime to alanine on Pd/Alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Borszeky, K.; Mallat, T.; Aeschiman, R.

    1996-06-01

    The chemo- and enantioselective hydrogenation of pyruvic acid oxime have been studied on Pd/alumina, the latter in the presence of the 1,2-amino alcohol type alkaloids ephedrine, cinchonidine, and cinchonine. High yields of racemic alanine (90-98%) were obtained in the absence of alkaloids in polar solvents at 0-45{degrees}C and 10 bar. Enantioselection increased with higher temperature and alkalid: oxime molar ratio. A 1:1 ephedrine: oxime molar ratio afforded the best enantiomeric excess (26%). The presence of alkaloid resulted in a decrease of reaction rate by a factor of up to 140, compared to the racemic hydrogenation. Based on X-ray crystal structure analysis of the alkaloid-pyruvic acid oxime adduct, a mechanism is proposed for the steric course of the reaction. Extended interactions by multiple H bonds between the adsorbed alkaloid-oxime salt units on the Pd surface is assumed to be at the origin of the moderate enantioselectivity and the very low enantioselective hydrogenation rate. 28 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Beta-alanine-oxalic acid (1:1) hemihydrate crystal: structure, 13C NMR and vibrational properties, protonation character.

    PubMed

    Godzisz, D; Ilczyszyn, M; Ilczyszyn, M M

    2003-03-01

    The crystal structure of beta-alanine-oxalic acid (1:1) hemihydrate complex has been reinvestigated by X-ray diffraction method at 293 K. Formation of monoclinic crystal system belonging to C2/c space group and consisting of semi-oxalate chains, diprotonated beta-alanine dimers and water molecules bonded to both these units is confirmed. New results are obtained for distances in the carboxylic groups and hydrogen bonds. These structural observations are used for protonation degree monitoring on the carboxylic oxygen atoms. They are in accordance with our vibrational study. The 13C NMR spectra provide insights into the solid structure of this complex, character of its hydrogen bonds and the beta-alanine protonation.

  1. The effects of alanine-substituted conantokin-G and ifenprodil on the human spermine-activated N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor.

    PubMed

    Tsai, V W-W; Dodd, P R; Lewis, R J

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of Ala-7-conantokin-G (Con-G(A7)) and ifenprodil on the modulation by spermine of [(3)H]MK801 binding to human cortical membranes. Human cortical tissue was obtained at autopsy and stored at -80 degrees C until assay. Both Con-G(A7) and ifenprodil inhibited [(3)H]MK801 binding, but spermine affected these inhibitions differently. Con-G(A7) IC(50) changed little with spermine concentration, indicative of a non-competitive interaction, whereas the rightward shift in ifenprodil IC(50) with increasing spermine concentration suggested partial competition. When the two agents were tested against the biphasic activation of [(3)H]MK801 binding by spermine, they again differed in their effects. In the activation phase Con-G(A7) was a non-competitive inhibitor of spermine activation, and may even enhance the spermine EC(50), while the ifenprodil data indicated a partially competitive interaction. Both agents were non-competitive in the inhibitory phase. Overall, the data suggest that Con-G(A7) and ifenprodil interact differently with the polyamine modulation of the glutamate-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor.

  2. The amino acid sequence of the aspartate aminotransferase from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, V B; Maras, B; Barra, D; Doonan, S

    1991-01-01

    1. The single (cytosolic) aspartate aminotransferase was purified in high yield from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). 2. Amino-acid-sequence analysis was carried out by digestion of the protein with trypsin and with CNBr; some of the peptides produced were further subdigested with Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase or with pepsin. Peptides were sequenced by the dansyl-Edman method and/or by automated gas-phase methods. The amino acid sequence obtained was complete except for a probable gap of two residues as indicated by comparison with the structures of counterpart proteins in other species. 3. The N-terminus of the enzyme is blocked. Fast-atom-bombardment m.s. was used to identify the blocking group as an acetyl one. 4. Alignment of the sequence of the enzyme with those of vertebrate cytosolic and mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferases and with the enzyme from Escherichia coli showed that about 25% of residues are conserved between these distantly related forms. 5. Experimental details and confirmatory data for the results presented here are given in a Supplementary Publication (SUP 50164, 25 pages) that has been deposited at the British Library Document Supply Centre, Boston Spa. Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7 BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1991) 273, 5. PMID:1859361

  3. Syntheses, Characterization, Resolution, and Biological Studies of Coordination Compounds of Aspartic Acid and Glycine

    PubMed Central

    Akinkunmi, Ezekiel; Ojo, Isaac; Adebajo, Clement; Isabirye, David

    2017-01-01

    Enantiomerically enriched coordination compounds of aspartic acid and racemic mixtures of coordination compounds of glycine metal-ligand ratio 1 : 3 were synthesized and characterized using infrared and UV-Vis spectrophotometric techniques and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Five of the complexes were resolved using (+)-cis-dichlorobis(ethylenediamine)cobalt(III) chloride, (+)-bis(glycinato)(1,10-phenanthroline)cobalt(III) chloride, and (+)-tris(1,10-phenanthroline)nickel(II) chloride as resolving agents. The antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities of these complexes were then determined. The results obtained indicated that aspartic acid and glycine coordinated in a bidentate fashion. The enantiomeric purity of the compounds was in the range of 22.10–32.10%, with (+)-cis-dichlorobis(ethylenediamine)cobalt(III) complex as the more efficient resolving agent. The resolved complexes exhibited better activity in some cases compared to the parent complexes for both biological activities. It was therefore inferred that although the increase in the lipophilicity of the complexes may assist in the permeability of the complexes through the cell membrane of the pathogens, the enantiomeric purity of the complexes is also of importance in their activity as antimicrobial and cytotoxic agents. PMID:28293149

  4. Syntheses, Characterization, Resolution, and Biological Studies of Coordination Compounds of Aspartic Acid and Glycine.

    PubMed

    Aiyelabola, Temitayo; Akinkunmi, Ezekiel; Ojo, Isaac; Obuotor, Efere; Adebajo, Clement; Isabirye, David

    2017-01-01

    Enantiomerically enriched coordination compounds of aspartic acid and racemic mixtures of coordination compounds of glycine metal-ligand ratio 1 : 3 were synthesized and characterized using infrared and UV-Vis spectrophotometric techniques and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Five of the complexes were resolved using (+)-cis-dichlorobis(ethylenediamine)cobalt(III) chloride, (+)-bis(glycinato)(1,10-phenanthroline)cobalt(III) chloride, and (+)-tris(1,10-phenanthroline)nickel(II) chloride as resolving agents. The antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities of these complexes were then determined. The results obtained indicated that aspartic acid and glycine coordinated in a bidentate fashion. The enantiomeric purity of the compounds was in the range of 22.10-32.10%, with (+)-cis-dichlorobis(ethylenediamine)cobalt(III) complex as the more efficient resolving agent. The resolved complexes exhibited better activity in some cases compared to the parent complexes for both biological activities. It was therefore inferred that although the increase in the lipophilicity of the complexes may assist in the permeability of the complexes through the cell membrane of the pathogens, the enantiomeric purity of the complexes is also of importance in their activity as antimicrobial and cytotoxic agents.

  5. Multifunctional Environmental Smart Fertilizer Based on l-Aspartic Acid for Sustained Nutrient Release.

    PubMed

    Lü, Shaoyu; Feng, Chen; Gao, Chunmei; Wang, Xinggang; Xu, Xiubin; Bai, Xiao; Gao, Nannan; Liu, Mingzhu

    2016-06-22

    Fertilizer is one of the most important elements of modern agriculture. However, conventional fertilizer, when applied to crops, is vulnerable to losses through volatilization, leaching, nitrification, or other means. Such a loss limits crop yields and pollutes the environment. In an effort to enhance nutrient use efficiency and reduce environmental pollution, an environmental smart fertilizer was reported in the current study. Poly(aspartic acid) and a degradable macro-cross-linker based on l-aspartic acid were synthesized and introduced into the fertilizer as a superabsorbent to improve the fertilizer degradability and soil moisture-retention capacity. Sustained release behavior of the fertilizer was achieved in soil. Cumulative release of nitrogen and phosphorus was 79.8% and 64.4% after 30 days, respectively. The water-holding and water-retention capacities of soil with the superabsorbent are obviously higher than those of the control soil without superabsorbent. For the sample of 200 g of soil with 1.5 g of superabsorbent, the water-holding capacity is 81.8%, and the water-retention capacity remains 22.6% after 23 days. All of the current results in this study indicated that the as-prepared fertilizer has a promising application in sustainable modern agriculture.

  6. Negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy of the copper-aspartic acid anion and its hydrated complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Wang, Haopeng; Bowen, Kit H.; Martínez, Ana; Salpin, Jean-Yves; Schermann, Jean-Pierre

    2010-08-01

    Negative ions of copper-aspartic acid Cu(Asp)- and its hydrated complexes have been produced in the gas phase and studied by anion photoelectron spectroscopy. The vertical detachment energies (VDE) of Cu(Asp)- and Cu(Asp)-(H2O)1,2 were determined to be 1.6, 1.95, and 2.20 eV, respectively. The spectral profiles of Cu(Asp)-(H2O)1 and Cu(Asp)-(H2O)2 closely resembled that of Cu(Asp)-, indicating that hydration had not changed the structure of Cu(Asp)- significantly. The successive shifts to higher electron binding energies by the spectra of the hydrated species provided measures of their stepwise solvation energies. Density functional calculations were performed on anionic Cu(Asp)- and on its corresponding neutral. The agreement between the calculated and measured VDE values implied that the structure of the Cu(Asp)- complex originated with a zwitterionic form of aspartic acid in which a copper atom had inserted into the N-H bond.

  7. Poly(aspartic acid) (PAA) hydrolases and PAA biodegradation: current knowledge and impact on applications.

    PubMed

    Hiraishi, Tomohiro

    2016-02-01

    Thermally synthesized poly(aspartic acid) (tPAA) is a bio-based, biocompatible, biodegradable, and water-soluble polymer that has a high proportion of β-Asp units and equivalent moles of D- and L-Asp units. Poly(aspartic acid) (PAA) hydrolase-1 and hydrolase-2 are tPAA biodegradation enzymes purified from Gram-negative bacteria. PAA hydrolase-1 selectively cleaves amide bonds between β-Asp units via an endo-type process, whereas PAA hydrolase-2 catalyzes the exo-type hydrolysis of the products of tPAA hydrolysis by PAA hydrolase-1. The novel reactivity of PAA hydrolase-1 makes it a good candidate for a biocatalyst in β-peptide synthesis. This mini-review gives an overview of PAA hydrolases with emphasis on their biochemical and functional properties, in particular, PAA hydrolase-1. Functionally related enzymes, such as poly(R-3-hydroxybutyrate) depolymerases and β-aminopeptidases, are compared to PAA hydrolases. This mini-review also provides findings that offer an insight into the catalytic mechanisms of PAA hydrolase-1 from Pedobacter sp. KP-2.

  8. An NMR study of structure and dynamics of hydrated poly (aspartic acid) sodium salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pixin; Ando, Isao

    1998-06-01

    High-resolution 13C CP/MAS NMR and pulse 1H NMR experiments were carried out for hydrated poly(aspartic acid) sodium salt, in order to investigate the conformation and molecular motion of the polymer. From these experimental results, it is found that the main-chain conformation of poly(aspartic acid) sodium salt which takes an α-helix form in the dry state is not drastically affected by an addition of water. In the 13C CP/MAS NMR spectrum, a new peak at ca. 184 ppm appears, which comes from the formation of hydrogen bond between the carbonyl carbon of the side chains and water, and the intensity of the peak is associated with the water content. The 13C spin-lattice relaxation time ( T1) experiments show that the T1 values for the individual carbons of the polymer are decreased with an increase in the water content. This shows that the mobility of the polymer is increased with an increase in the water content. Further, the 1H spin-spin relaxation time ( T2) experiments show that the polymer has the two or three components with different molecular motion. With an increase in the water content or temperature, the T2 values of hydrated PAANa are increased. This shows that the molecular motion is increased. In the high water content, the polymer has a signal component in the molecular motion. This shows that the polymer is uniformly hydrated.

  9. Molecularly imprinted polymer-matrix nanocomposite for enantioselective electrochemical sensing of D- and L-aspartic acid.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Bhim Bali; Srivastava, Amrita; Tiwari, Mahavir Prasad

    2013-10-01

    A new molecularly imprinted polymer-matrix (titanium dioxide nanoparticle/multiwalled carbon nanotubes) nanocomposite was developed for the modification of pencil graphite electrode as an enantioselective sensing probe for aspartic acid isomers, prevalent at ultra trace level in aqueous and real samples. The nanocomposite having many shape complementary cavities was synthesized adopting surface initiated-activators regenerated by electron transfer for atom transfer radical polymerization. The proposed sensor has high stability, nanocomposite uniformity, good reproducibility, and enhanced electrocatalytic activity to respond oxidative peak current of L-aspartic acid quantitatively by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry, without any cross-reactivity in real samples. Under the optimized operating conditions, the L-aspartic acid imprinted modified electrode showed a wide linear response for L-aspartic acid within the concentration range 9.98-532.72 ng mL(-1), with the minimum detection limit of 1.73-1.79 ng mL(-1) (S/N=3) in aqueous and real samples. Almost similar stringent limit (1.79 ng mL(-1)) was obtained with cerebrospinal fluid which is typical for the primitive diagnosis of neurological disorders, caused by an acute depletion of L-aspartic acid biomarker, in clinical settings.

  10. Aspartic acid aminotransferase activity is increased in actively spiking compared with non-spiking human epileptic cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Kish, S J; Dixon, L M; Sherwin, A L

    1988-01-01

    Increased concentration of the excitatory neurotransmitter aspartic acid in actively spiking human epileptic cerebral cortex was recently described. In order to further characterise changes in the aspartergic system in epileptic brain, the behaviour of aspartic acid aminotransferase (AAT), a key enzyme involved in aspartic acid metabolism has now been examined. Electrocorticography performed during surgery was employed to identify cortical epileptic spike foci in 16 patients undergoing temporal lobectomy for intractable seizures. Patients with spontaneously spiking lateral temporal cortex (n = 8) were compared with a non-spiking control group (n = 8) of patients in whom the epileptic lesions were confined to the hippocampus sparing the temporal convexity. Mean activity of AAT in spiking cortex was significantly elevated by 16-18%, with aspartic acid concentration increased by 28%. Possible explanations for the enhanced AAT activity include increased proliferation of cortical AAT-containing astrocytes at the spiking focus and/or a generalised increase in neuronal or extraneuronal metabolism consequent to the ongoing epileptic discharge. It is suggested that the data provide additional support for a disturbance of central excitatory aspartic acid mechanisms in human epileptic brain. PMID:2898010

  11. Development of poly(aspartic acid-co-malic acid) composites for calcium carbonate and sulphate scale inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mithil Kumar, N; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Jagadeesh, Dani; Kanny, K; Bux, F

    2015-01-01

    Polyaspartic acid (PSI) is suitable for the inhibition of inorganic scale deposition. To enhance its scale inhibition efficiency, PSI was modified by reacting aspartic acid with malic acid (MA) using thermal polycondensation polymerization. This reaction resulted in poly(aspartic acid-co-malic acid) (PSI-co-MA) dual polymer. The structural, chemical and thermal properties of the dual polymers were analysed by using scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and gel permeation chromatography. The effectiveness of six different molar ratios of PSI-co-MA dual polymer for calcium carbonate and calcium sulphate scale inhibition at laboratory scale batch experiments was evaluated with synthetic brine solution at selected doses of polymer at 65-70°C by the static scale test method. The performance of PSI-co-MA dual polymer for the inhibition of calcium carbonate and calcium sulphate precipitation was compared with that of a PSI single polymer. The PSI-co-MA exhibited excellent ability to control inorganic minerals, with approximately 85.36% calcium carbonate inhibition and 100% calcium sulphate inhibition at a level of 10 mg/L PSI-co-MA, respectively. Therefore, it may be reasonably concluded that PSI-co-MA is a highly effective scale inhibitor for cooling water treatment applications.

  12. In vitro testing of thiolated poly(aspartic acid) from ophthalmic formulation aspects.

    PubMed

    Budai-Szű Cs, Mária; Horvát, Gabriella; Gyarmati, Benjámin; Szilágyi, Barnabás Áron; Szilágyi, András; Csihi, Tímea; Berkó, Szilvia; Szabó-Révész, Piroska; Mori, Michela; Sandri, Giuseppina; Bonferoni, Maria Cristina; Caramella, Carla; Csányi, Erzsébet

    2016-08-01

    Ocular drug delivery formulations must meet anatomical, biopharmaceutical, patient-driven and regulatory requirements. Mucoadhesive polymers can serve as a better alternative to currently available ophthalmic formulations by providing improved bioavailability. If all requirements are addressed, a polymeric formulation resembling the tear film of the eye might be the best solution. The optimum formulation must not have high osmotic activity, should provide appropriate surface tension, pH and refractive index, must be non-toxic and should be transparent and mucoadhesive. We would like to highlight the importance of in vitro polymer testing from a pharmaceutical aspect. We, therefore, carried out physical-chemical investigations to verify the suitability of certain systems for ophthalmic formulations. In this work, in situ gelling, mucoadhesive thiolated poly(aspartic acid)s were tested from ophthalmic formulation aspects. The results of preformulation measurements indicate that these polymers can be used as potential carriers in ophthalmic drug delivery.

  13. Molecular alteration and carbonization of aspartic acid upon N + ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, F. Z.; Sun, S. Q.; Zhang, D. M.; Ma, Z. L.; Chen, G. Q.

    2000-06-01

    Structural changes of aspartic acid (Asp) irradiated by nitrogen ions of 30 keV were studied using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Significant decreases of the intensities of COO -, NH 3+, COOH and CH 2 vibrations in the FTIR spectra, compared with those of unirradiated Asp, were observed for the sample irradiated at the fluence of 1×10 16 ions/cm 2. The decrease rates of the intensities of COO -, NH 3+, COOH and CH 2 vibrations with respect to the increasing irradiation fluences up to 4×10 16 ions/cm 2 were different. The results were attributable to the nonstoichiometrical desorption of corresponding volatile species such as H 2, NH 3+ and CO 2. The radiolysis residue of Asp after irradiation at a high fluence of 1×10 17 ions/cm 2 was analyzed and fatty acid was detected.

  14. Endolithic aspartic acid as a proxy of fluctuations in coral growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Lallan P.; Suzuki, Atsushi; Kawahata, Hodaka

    2007-03-01

    Coral skeleton has been widely studied for monitoring past fluctuations in marine environment. Although stable carbon isotope (δ13C) data appear to reflect coral metabolism, their interpretations differ from place to place and are sometimes controversial, because they are also affected by carbon isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon in seawater. Association of an organic matrix with biological carbonates has been reported in many previous studies. With the help of high-resolution microsampling of coral skeleton and advanced technique for amino acid (AA) quantification in low-volume sample, we show that aspartic acid (Asp) in coral skeleton varies with distinct seasonal pattern, and is useful in understanding why corals calcify faster in summer than in winter. Since Asp containing organic matrix in the skeleton is synthesized by the coral, changes in mole concentration of Asp relative to other AAs of the skeleton make it a potential indicator for monitoring fluctuations in coral physiology in the past.

  15. Effects of L-Aspartic acid on the step retreat kinetics of calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, Toru; Kagi, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Effects of L-Aspartic acid (L-Asp) on step retreat kinetics in the dissolution of calcite were investigated. The step retreat velocities under surface-controlled kinetics were determined from in-situ atomic force microscopic observations using an improved flow-through system. Comparison of the present results with those obtained under a mixed kinetics condition revealed that the addition of L-Asp promotes the transport process in the calcite dissolution through acid-base and/or complex forming reactions in the diffusion boundary layer. Additionally, promotion of the acute and obtuse step retreats by the L-Asp additive was observed under surface-controlled kinetics. This report is the first to clarify that L-Asp promotes surface processes in the dissolution of calcite.

  16. Amino Acid Mixture Enriched With Arginine, Alanine, and Phenylalanine Stimulates Fat Metabolism During Exercise.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Keisuke; Nakamura, Yutaka; Yamaguchi, Makoto; Mori, Takeshi; Uchida, Masayuki; Fujita, Satoshi

    2016-02-01

    Although there have been many investigations of the beneficial effects of both exercise and amino acids (AAs), little is known about their combined effects on the single-dose ingestion of AAs for lipid metabolism during exercise. We hypothesize that taking a specific combination of AAs implicated in glucagon secretion during exercise may increase fat metabolism. We recently developed a new mixture, d-AA mixture (D-mix), that contains arginine, alanine, and phenylalanine to investigate fat oxidation. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, 10 healthy male volunteers were randomized to ingest either D-mix (3 g/dose) or placebo. Subjects in each condition subsequently performed a physical task that included workload trials on a cycle ergometer at 50% of maximal oxygen consumption for 1 hr. After oral intake of D-mix, maximum serum concentrations of glycerol (9.32 ± 6.29 mg/L and 5.22 ± 2.22 mg/L, respectively; p = .028), free fatty acid level (0.77 ± 0.26 mEq/L and 0.63 ± 0.28 mEq/L, respectively; p = .022), and acetoacetic acid levels (37.9 ± 17.7 μmol/L and 30.3 ± 13.9 μmol/L, respectively; p = .040) were significantly higher than in the placebo groups. The area under the curve for glucagon during recovery was numerically higher than placebo (6.61 ± 1.33 μg/L · min and 6.06 ± 1.23 μg/L · min, respectively; p = .099). These results suggest that preexercise ingestion of D-mix may stimulate fat metabolism. Combined with exercise, the administration of AA mixtures could prove to be a useful nutritional strategy to maximize fat metabolism.

  17. Solution structure of the squash aspartic acid proteinase inhibitor (SQAPI) and mutational analysis of pepsin inhibition.

    PubMed

    Headey, Stephen J; Macaskill, Ursula K; Wright, Michele A; Claridge, Jolyon K; Edwards, Patrick J B; Farley, Peter C; Christeller, John T; Laing, William A; Pascal, Steven M

    2010-08-27

    The squash aspartic acid proteinase inhibitor (SQAPI), a proteinaceous proteinase inhibitor from squash, is an effective inhibitor of a range of aspartic proteinases. Proteinaceous aspartic proteinase inhibitors are rare in nature. The only other example in plants probably evolved from a precursor serine proteinase inhibitor. Earlier work based on sequence homology modeling suggested SQAPI evolved from an ancestral cystatin. In this work, we determined the solution structure of SQAPI using NMR and show that SQAPI shares the same fold as a plant cystatin. The structure is characterized by a four-strand anti-parallel beta-sheet gripping an alpha-helix in an analogous manner to fingers of a hand gripping a tennis racquet. Truncation and site-specific mutagenesis revealed that the unstructured N terminus and the loop connecting beta-strands 1 and 2 are important for pepsin inhibition, but the loop connecting strands 3 and 4 is not. Using ambiguous restraints based on the mutagenesis results, SQAPI was then docked computationally to pepsin. The resulting model places the N-terminal strand of SQAPI in the S' side of the substrate binding cleft, whereas the first SQAPI loop binds on the S side of the cleft. The backbone of SQAPI does not interact with the pepsin catalytic Asp(32)-Asp(215) diad, thus avoiding cleavage. The data show that SQAPI does share homologous structural elements with cystatin and appears to retain a similar protease inhibitory mechanism despite its different target. This strongly supports our hypothesis that SQAPI evolved from an ancestral cystatin.

  18. Solution Structure of the Squash Aspartic Acid Proteinase Inhibitor (SQAPI) and Mutational Analysis of Pepsin Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Headey, Stephen J.; MacAskill, Ursula K.; Wright, Michele A.; Claridge, Jolyon K.; Edwards, Patrick J. B.; Farley, Peter C.; Christeller, John T.; Laing, William A.; Pascal, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    The squash aspartic acid proteinase inhibitor (SQAPI), a proteinaceous proteinase inhibitor from squash, is an effective inhibitor of a range of aspartic proteinases. Proteinaceous aspartic proteinase inhibitors are rare in nature. The only other example in plants probably evolved from a precursor serine proteinase inhibitor. Earlier work based on sequence homology modeling suggested SQAPI evolved from an ancestral cystatin. In this work, we determined the solution structure of SQAPI using NMR and show that SQAPI shares the same fold as a plant cystatin. The structure is characterized by a four-strand anti-parallel β-sheet gripping an α-helix in an analogous manner to fingers of a hand gripping a tennis racquet. Truncation and site-specific mutagenesis revealed that the unstructured N terminus and the loop connecting β-strands 1 and 2 are important for pepsin inhibition, but the loop connecting strands 3 and 4 is not. Using ambiguous restraints based on the mutagenesis results, SQAPI was then docked computationally to pepsin. The resulting model places the N-terminal strand of SQAPI in the S′ side of the substrate binding cleft, whereas the first SQAPI loop binds on the S side of the cleft. The backbone of SQAPI does not interact with the pepsin catalytic Asp32–Asp215 diad, thus avoiding cleavage. The data show that SQAPI does share homologous structural elements with cystatin and appears to retain a similar protease inhibitory mechanism despite its different target. This strongly supports our hypothesis that SQAPI evolved from an ancestral cystatin. PMID:20538608

  19. Mutation of aspartic acid-351, lysine-352, and lysine-515 alters the Ca2+ transport activity of the Ca2+-ATPase expressed in COS-1 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, K; MacLennan, D H

    1988-01-01

    Full-length cDNAs encoding neonatal and adult isoforms of the Ca2+-ATPase of rabbit fast-twitch skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum were expressed transiently in COS-1 cells. The microsomal fraction isolated from transfected COS-1 cells contained immunoreactive Ca2+-ATPase and catalyzed Ca2+ transport at rates at least 15-fold above controls. No differences were observed in either the rates or Ca2+ dependency of Ca2+ transport catalyzed by the two isoforms. Aspartic acid-351, the site of formation of the catalytic acyl phosphate in the enzyme, was mutated to asparagine, glutamic acid, serine, threonine, histidine, or alanine. In every case, Ca2+ transport activity and Ca2+-dependent phosphorylation were eliminated. Ca2+ transport was also eliminated by mutation of lysine-352 to arginine, glutamine, or glutamic acid or by mutation of Asp351-Lys352 to Lys351-Asp352. Mutation of lysine-515, the site of fluorescein isothiocyanate modification in the enzyme, resulted in diminished Ca2+ transport activity as follows: arginine, 60%; glutamine, 25%; glutamic acid, 5%. These results demonstrate the absolute requirement of acylphosphate formation for the Ca2+ transport function and define a residue important for ATP binding. They also demonstrate the feasibility of a thorough analysis of active sites in the Ca2+-ATPase by expression and site-specific mutagenesis. Images PMID:2966962

  20. Determination of the non protein amino acid β-N-methylamino-l-alanine in estuarine cyanobacteria by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Mafalda S; Cianca, Rosa C C; Lopes, Viviana R; Almeida, C Marisa R; Vasconcelos, Vitor M

    2011-10-01

    A capillary electrophoretic method for the determination of the amino acid β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) was achieved using a fused-silica capillary column (50 cm × 75 μm I.D.) filled with 5 mM sodium tetraborate solution (pH 9), with an applied voltage of 25 kV, at 25 °C. The method was then applied in quantifying BMAA in eighteen strains of lyophilized estuarine cyanobacteria, following amino acid extraction using 0.1 M trichloroacetic acid and 6 M hydrochloric acid, sequentially.

  1. Substitution of a single amino acid (aspartic acid for histidine) converts the functional activity of human complement C4B to C4A.

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, M C; Fathallah, D M; Bergamaschini, L; Alicot, E M; Isenman, D E

    1990-01-01

    The C4B isotype of the fourth component of human complement (C4) displays 3- to 4-fold greater hemolytic activity than does its other isotype C4A. This correlates with differences in their covalent binding efficiencies to erythrocytes coated with antibody and complement C1. C4A binds to a greater extent when C1 is on IgG immune aggregates. The differences in covalent binding properties correlate only with amino acid changes between residues 1101 and 1106 (pro-C4 numbering)--namely, Pro-1101, Cys-1102, Leu-1105, and Asp-1106 in C4A and Leu-1101, Ser-1102, Ile-1105, and His-1106 in C4B, which are located in the C4d region of the alpha chain. To more precisely identify the residues that are important for the functional differences, C4A-C4B hybrid proteins were constructed by using recombinant DNA techniques. Comparison of these by hemolytic assay and binding to IgG aggregates showed that the single substitution of aspartic acid for histidine at position 1106 largely accounted for the change in functional activity and nature of the chemical bond formed (ester vs. amide). Surprisingly, substitution of a neutral residue, alanine, for histidine at position 1106 resulted in an increase in binding to immune aggregates without subsequent reduction in the hemolytic activity. This result strongly suggests that position 1106 is not "catalytic" as previously proposed but interacts sterically/electrostatically with potential acceptor sites and serves to "select" binding sites on potential acceptor molecules. Images PMID:2395880

  2. Chlorogenic acid increased 5-hydroxymethylfurfural formation when heating fructose alone or with aspartic acid at two pH levels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenhua; Zou, Yueyu; Wu, Taigang; Huang, Caihuan; Pei, Kehan; Zhang, Guangwen; Lin, Xiaohua; Bai, Weibin; Ou, Shiyi

    2016-01-01

    Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is a phenolic acid that ubiquitously exists in fruits. This work aims to investigate whether and how CGA influences HMF formation during heating fructose alone, or with an amino acid. The results showed that that CGA increased 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) formation. At pH 5.5 and 7.0, the addition of 5.0 μmol/ml CGA increased HMF formation by 49.4% and 25.2%, respectively when heating fructose alone, and by 9.0% and 16.7%, respectively when heating fructose with aspartic acid. CGA significantly increased HMF formation by promoting 3-deoxosone formation, and its conversion to HMF by inhibiting HMF elimination, especially in the Maillard reaction system. A comparison of the catalytic capacity of CGA with its six analogous compounds showed that both its di-hydroxyphenyl and carboxyl groups function in increasing HMF formation.

  3. In Vitro antioxidative activity of pumpkin seed (Cucurbita pepo) protein isolate and its In Vivo effect on alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase in acetaminophen-induced liver injury in low protein fed rats.

    PubMed

    Nkosi, C Z; Opoku, A R; Terblanche, S E

    2006-09-01

    The antioxidative effects of pumpkin seed protein isolate (Cucurbita pepo) were investigated in vitro. The isolate exhibited about 80% radical scavenging activity, chelating activity of approximately 64% on Fe2+ ions and an inhibition of approximately 10% of xanthine oxidase. Subsequently the effects of the isolate on the plasma activity levels of alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase against acetaminophen induced acute liver injury in low-protein fed male Sprague-Dawley rats were ascertained. The rats were maintained on a low-protein diet for 5 days and divided into three subgroups. Two subgroups were injected with acetaminophen and the other with an equivalent amount of polyethylene glycol 400. Two hours after intoxication one of the two subgroups was administered with the protein isolate. Rats from the different subgroups were killed at 24, 48 and 72 h after treatment. After 5 days on the low-protein diet the activity levels of the enzymes were significantly higher than their counterparts on a normal balanced diet. The administration of protein isolate after acetaminophen intoxication resulted in significantly reduced activity levels. It is concluded that the protein isolate has promising antioxidative properties. Furthermore, the isolate administration was effective in alleviating the detrimental effects associated with protein malnutrition and acetaminophen intoxication.

  4. Late Holocene radiocarbon and aspartic acid racemization dating of deep-sea octocorals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, Owen A.; Scott, David B.; Risk, Michael J.

    2006-06-01

    Primnoa resedaeformis is a deep-sea gorgonian coral with a two-part skeleton of calcite and gorgonin (a fibrillar protein), potentially containing long-term records of valuable paleo-environmental information. For various reasons, both radiocarbon and U/Th dating of these corals is problematic over the last few centuries. This paper explores aspartic acid racemization dating of the gorgonin fraction in modern and fossil specimens collected from the NW Atlantic Ocean. Radiocarbon dating of the fossil specimen indicates a lifespan of 700 ± 100 years, the longest yet documented for any octocoral. Gorgonin amino acid compositions were identical in the fossil and modern specimens, indicating resistance to organic diagenesis. Similar to bone collagen, the fibrillar protein of gorgonin may impose conformational constraints on the racemization of Asp at low temperatures. The rate of racemization of aspartic acid ( D/ L-Asp) was similar to previously published results from an 1800 year old anemone ( Gerardia). The age equation was: age (years BP 2000 AD) = [( D/ L - 0.020 (±.002))/.0011 (±.0001)] 2 ( r2 = 0.97, p < .001). The error in an age estimate calculated by D/ L-Asp was marginally better than that for 14C dating over the most recent 50-200 years, although the dating error may be improved by inclusion of more samples over a broader time range. These results suggest that D/ L-Asp dating may be useful in augmenting 14C dating in cases where 14C calibrations yield two or more intercept ages, or in screening samples for further 14C or U/Th dating.

  5. Ab initio studies of aspartic acid conformers in gas phase and in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mingliang; Lin, Zijing

    2007-10-01

    Systematic and extensive conformational searches of aspartic acid in gas phase and in solution have been performed. For the gaseous aspartic acid, a total of 1296 trial canonical structures and 216 trial zwitterionic structures were generated by allowing for all combinations of internal single-bond rotamers. All the trial structures were optimized at the B3LYP /6-311G* level and then subjected to further optimization at the B3LYP /6-311++G** level. A total of 139 canonical conformers were found, but no stable zwitterionic structure was found. The rotational constants, dipole moments, zero-point vibrational energies, harmonic frequencies, and vertical ionization energies of the canonical conformers were determined. Single-point energies were also calculated at the MP2/6-311++G** and CCSD /6-311++G** levels. The equilibrium distributions of the gaseous conformers at various temperatures were calculated. The proton affinity and gas phase basicity were calculated and the results are in excellent agreement with the experiments. The conformations in the solution were studied with different solvation models. The 216 trial zwitterionic structures were first optimized at the B3LYP /6-311G* level using the Onsager self-consistent reaction field model (SCRF) and then optimized at the B3LYP /6-311++G** level using the conductorlike polarized continuum model (CPCM) SCRF theory. A total of 22 zwitterions conformers were found. The gaseous canonical conformers were combined with the CPCM model and optimized at the B3LYP /6-311++G** level. The solvated zwitterionic and canonical structures were further examined by the discrete/SCRF model with one and two water molecules. The incremental solvation of the canonical and zwitterionic structures with up to six water molecules in gas phase was systematically examined. The studies show that combining aspartic acid with at least six water molecules in the gas phase or two water molecules and a SCRF solution model is required to provide

  6. Neuroprotective Effect of Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid on N-Methyl-D-Aspartate-Induced Retinal Ganglion Cell Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Rondón, Netxibeth; Esquiva, Gema; Germain, Francisco; de la Villa, Pedro; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell degeneration underlies the pathophysiology of diseases affecting the retina and optic nerve. Several studies have previously evidenced the anti-apoptotic properties of the bile constituent, tauroursodeoxycholic acid, in diverse models of photoreceptor degeneration. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of systemic administration of tauroursodeoxycholic acid on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced damage in the rat retina using a functional and morphological approach. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid was administered intraperitoneally before and after intravitreal injection of NMDA. Three days after insult, full-field electroretinograms showed reductions in the amplitudes of the positive and negative-scotopic threshold responses, scotopic a- and b-waves and oscillatory potentials. Quantitative morphological evaluation of whole-mount retinas demonstrated a reduction in the density of retinal ganglion cells. Systemic administration of tauroursodeoxycholic acid attenuated the functional impairment induced by NMDA, which correlated with a higher retinal ganglion cell density. Our findings sustain the efficacy of tauroursodeoxycholic acid administration in vivo, suggesting it would be a good candidate for the pharmacological treatment of degenerative diseases coursing with retinal ganglion cell loss. PMID:26379056

  7. Neuroprotective Effect of Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid on N-Methyl-D-Aspartate-Induced Retinal Ganglion Cell Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Vicente, Violeta; Lax, Pedro; Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Rondón, Netxibeth; Esquiva, Gema; Germain, Francisco; de la Villa, Pedro; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell degeneration underlies the pathophysiology of diseases affecting the retina and optic nerve. Several studies have previously evidenced the anti-apoptotic properties of the bile constituent, tauroursodeoxycholic acid, in diverse models of photoreceptor degeneration. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of systemic administration of tauroursodeoxycholic acid on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced damage in the rat retina using a functional and morphological approach. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid was administered intraperitoneally before and after intravitreal injection of NMDA. Three days after insult, full-field electroretinograms showed reductions in the amplitudes of the positive and negative-scotopic threshold responses, scotopic a- and b-waves and oscillatory potentials. Quantitative morphological evaluation of whole-mount retinas demonstrated a reduction in the density of retinal ganglion cells. Systemic administration of tauroursodeoxycholic acid attenuated the functional impairment induced by NMDA, which correlated with a higher retinal ganglion cell density. Our findings sustain the efficacy of tauroursodeoxycholic acid administration in vivo, suggesting it would be a good candidate for the pharmacological treatment of degenerative diseases coursing with retinal ganglion cell loss.

  8. Structural evidence for solvent-stabilisation by aspartic acid as a mechanism for halophilic protein stability in high salt concentrations.

    PubMed

    Lenton, Samuel; Walsh, Danielle L; Rhys, Natasha H; Soper, Alan K; Dougan, Lorna

    2016-07-21

    Halophilic organisms have adapted to survive in high salt environments, where mesophilic organisms would perish. One of the biggest challenges faced by halophilic proteins is the ability to maintain both the structure and function at molar concentrations of salt. A distinct adaptation of halophilic proteins, compared to mesophilic homologues, is the abundance of aspartic acid on the protein surface. Mutagenesis and crystallographic studies of halophilic proteins suggest an important role for solvent interactions with the surface aspartic acid residues. This interaction, between the regions of the acidic protein surface and the solvent, is thought to maintain a hydration layer around the protein at molar salt concentrations thereby allowing halophilic proteins to retain their functional state. Here we present neutron diffraction data of the monomeric zwitterionic form of aspartic acid solutions at physiological pH in 0.25 M and 2.5 M concentration of potassium chloride, to mimic mesophilic and halophilic-like environmental conditions. We have used isotopic substitution in combination with empirical potential structure refinement to extract atomic-scale information from the data. Our study provides structural insights that support the hypothesis that carboxyl groups on acidic residues bind water more tightly under high salt conditions, in support of the residue-ion interaction model of halophilic protein stabilisation. Furthermore our data show that in the presence of high salt the self-association between the zwitterionic form of aspartic acid molecules is reduced, suggesting a possible mechanism through which protein aggregation is prevented.

  9. Quantum Computational Calculations of the Ionization Energies of Acidic and Basic Amino Acids: Aspartate, Glutamate, Arginine, Lysine, and Histidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Guzman, C. P.; Andrianarijaona, M.; Lee, Y. S.; Andrianarijaona, V.

    An extensive knowledge of the ionization energies of amino acids can provide vital information on protein sequencing, structure, and function. Acidic and basic amino acids are unique because they have three ionizable groups: the C-terminus, the N-terminus, and the side chain. The effects of multiple ionizable groups can be seen in how Aspartate's ionizable side chain heavily influences its preferred conformation (J Phys Chem A. 2011 April 7; 115(13): 2900-2912). Theoretical and experimental data on the ionization energies of many of these molecules is sparse. Considering each atom of the amino acid as a potential departing site for the electron gives insight on how the three ionizable groups affect the ionization process of the molecule and the dynamic coupling between the vibrational modes. In the following study, we optimized the structure of each acidic and basic amino acid then exported the three dimensional coordinates of the amino acids. We used ORCA to calculate single point energies for a region near the optimized coordinates and systematically went through the x, y, and z coordinates of each atom in the neutral and ionized forms of the amino acid. With the calculations, we were able to graph energy potential curves to better understand the quantum dynamic properties of the amino acids. The authors thank Pacific Union College Student Association for providing funds.

  10. Site-Specific Pyrolysis Induced Cleavage at Aspartic Acid Residue in Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaofeng; Basile, Franco

    2011-01-01

    A simple and site-specific non-enzymatic method based on pyrolysis has been developed to cleave peptides and proteins. Pyrolytic cleavage was found to be specific and rapid as it induced a cleavage at the C-terminal side of aspartic acid in the temperature range of 220–250 °C in 10 seconds. Electrospray Ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem-MS (MS/MS) were used to characterize and identify pyrolysis cleavage products, confirming that sequence information is conserved after the pyrolysis process in both peptides and protein tested. This suggests that pyrolysis-induced cleavage at aspartyl residues can be used as a rapid protein digestion procedure for the generation of sequence specific protein biomarkers. PMID:17388620

  11. Self-assembling of poly(aspartic acid) with bovine serum albumin in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Nita, L E; Chiriac, A P; Bercea, M; Asandulesa, M; Wolf, Bernhard A

    2017-02-01

    Macromolecular co-assemblies built up in aqueous solutions, by using a linear polypeptide, poly(aspartic acid) (PAS), and a globular protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA), have been studied. The main interest was to identify the optimum conditions for an interpenetrated complex formation in order to design materials suitable for biomedical applications, such as drug delivery systems. BSA surface possesses several amino- and carboxylic groups available for covalent modification, and/or bioactive substances attachment. In the present study, mixtures between PAS and BSA were investigated at 37°C in dilute aqueous solution by viscometry, dynamic light scattering and zeta potential determination, as well as in solid state by AFM microscopy and dielectric spectroscopy. The experimental data have shown that the interpolymer complex formation occurs for a PAS/BSA molar ratio around 0.541.

  12. Infrared and laser Raman spectral studies of bis( DL-aspartic acid) sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mary, M. Briget; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2005-11-01

    The infrared and Raman spectra of bis( DL-aspartic acid) sulfate in the crystalline state are recorded at room temperature and the vibrational assignments of the observed wavenumbers are made. The presence of two carbonyl (C dbnd O) groups has been identified in the title complex and the two carbonyl groups are in different environment. The extensive intermolecular hydrogen bonding in the crystal has been identified by the shifting of bands due to the stretching and bending modes of the various functional groups. The sulfate group forms the anion. Its fundamentals continue to be degenerate except for the asymmetric bending mode and it suggests that the Td symmetry of SO 42- group has not been affected in the crystal.

  13. Identification and Validation of Aspartic Acid Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase as a New Anti-Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Target

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jianzhou; Yang, Yanhui; Xiao, Chunling; Guan, Yan; Hao, Xueqin; Deng, Qi; Lu, Zhongyang

    2015-01-01

    Aspartic acid semialdehyde dehydrogenase (ASADH) lies at the first branch point in the essential aspartic acid biosynthetic pathway that is found in bacteria and plants but is absent from animals. Mutations in the asadh gene encoding ASADH produce an inactive enzyme, which is lethal. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the hypothesis that ASADH represents a new anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) target. An asadh promoter-replacement mutant MTB, designated MTB::asadh, in which asadh gene expression is regulated by pristinamycin, was constructed to investigate the physiological functions of ASADH in the host bacteria. Bacterial growth was evaluated by monitoring OD600 and ASADH expression was analyzed by Western blotting. The results showed that the growth and survival of MTB::asadh was completely inhibited in the absence of the inducer pristinamycin. Furthermore, the growth of the mutant was rigorously dependent on the presence of the inducer in the medium. The starved mutant exhibited a marked reduction (approximately 80%) in the cell wall materials compared to the wild-type, in addition to obvious morphological differences that were apparent in scanning electron microscopy studies; however, with the addition of pristinamycin, the cell wall contents and morphology similar to those of the wild-type strain were recovered. The starved mutant also exhibited almost no pathogenicity in an in vitro model of infection using mouse macrophage J774A.1 cells. The mutant showed a concentration-dependent recovery of pathogenicity with the addition of the inducer. These findings implicate ASADH as a promising target for the development of novel anti-MTB drugs. PMID:26437401

  14. Identification and Validation of Aspartic Acid Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase as a New Anti-Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Target.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jianzhou; Yang, Yanhui; Xiao, Chunling; Guan, Yan; Hao, Xueqin; Deng, Qi; Lu, Zhongyang

    2015-09-30

    Aspartic acid semialdehyde dehydrogenase (ASADH) lies at the first branch point in the essential aspartic acid biosynthetic pathway that is found in bacteria and plants but is absent from animals. Mutations in the asadh gene encoding ASADH produce an inactive enzyme, which is lethal. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the hypothesis that ASADH represents a new anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) target. An asadh promoter-replacement mutant MTB, designated MTB::asadh, in which asadh gene expression is regulated by pristinamycin, was constructed to investigate the physiological functions of ASADH in the host bacteria. Bacterial growth was evaluated by monitoring OD600 and ASADH expression was analyzed by Western blotting. The results showed that the growth and survival of MTB::asadh was completely inhibited in the absence of the inducer pristinamycin. Furthermore, the growth of the mutant was rigorously dependent on the presence of the inducer in the medium. The starved mutant exhibited a marked reduction (approximately 80%) in the cell wall materials compared to the wild-type, in addition to obvious morphological differences that were apparent in scanning electron microscopy studies; however, with the addition of pristinamycin, the cell wall contents and morphology similar to those of the wild-type strain were recovered. The starved mutant also exhibited almost no pathogenicity in an in vitro model of infection using mouse macrophage J774A.1 cells. The mutant showed a concentration-dependent recovery of pathogenicity with the addition of the inducer. These findings implicate ASADH as a promising target for the development of novel anti-MTB drugs.

  15. Optical absorption and DFT calculations in L-aspartic acid anhydrous crystals: Charge carrier effective masses point to semiconducting behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, A. M.; Silva, B. P.; Sales, F. A. M.; Freire, V. N.; Moreira, E.; Fulco, U. L.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Maia, F. F., Jr.; Caetano, E. W. S.

    2012-11-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) computations within the local-density approximation and generalized gradient approximation in pure form and with dispersion correction (GGA+D) were carried out to investigate the structural, electronic, and optical properties of L-aspartic acid anhydrous crystals. The electronic (band structure and density of states) and optical absorption properties were used to interpret the light absorption measurements we have performed in L-aspartic acid anhydrous crystalline powder at room temperature. We show the important role of the layered spatial disposition of L-aspartic acid molecules in anhydrous L-aspartic crystals to explain the observed electronic and optical properties. There is good agreement between the GGA+D calculated and experimental lattice parameters, with (Δa, Δb, Δc) deviations of (0.029,-0.023,-0.024) (units in Å). Mulliken [J. Chem. Phys.JCPSA60021-960610.1063/1.1740588 23, 1833 (1955)] and Hirshfeld [Theor. Chim. ActaTCHAAM0040-574410.1007/BF00549096 44, 129 (1977)] population analyses were also performed to assess the degree of charge polarization in the zwitterion state of the L-aspartic acid molecules in the DFT converged crystal. The lowest-energy optical absorption peaks related to transitions between the top of the valence band and the bottom of the conduction band involve O 2p valence states and C 1p and O 2p conduction states, with the carboxyl and COOH lateral chain group contributing significantly to the energy band gap. Among the calculated band gaps, the lowest GGA+D (4.49-eV) gap is smaller than the experimental estimate of 5.02 eV, as obtained by optical absorption. Such a wide-band-gap energy together with the small carrier effective masses estimated from band curvatures allows us to suggest that an L-aspartic acid anhydrous crystal can behave as a wide-gap semiconductor. A comparison of effective masses among directions parallel and perpendicular to the L-aspartic molecules layers reveals that charge

  16. Association between Serum Uric Acid and Elevated Alanine Aminotransferase in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuang; Guo, Xiaofan; Yu, Shasha; Sun, Guozhe; Yang, Hongmei; Li, Zhao; Sun, Yingxian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Both the serum uric acid (SUA) level and elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT) are related to metabolic syndrome. However, the association between SUA and elevated ALT has not been elucidated in the general population. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between SUA and elevated ALT in the general population of China; Methods: A total of 11,572 adults (≥35 years of age) participated in this survey. Elevated ALT was defined as >40 U/L. SUA ≥ 7.0 mg/dL in males or ≥6.0 mg/dL in females was defined as hyperuricemia. SUA within the reference range was divided into quartiles, and its associations with elevated ALT were evaluated by logistic regressions; Results: A total of 7.4% participants had elevated ALT. The prevalence of hyperuricemia was 14.9% in males and 7.3% in females. There was a significantly positive dose-response association between SUA levels and the prevalence of elevated ALT. After adjusting for potential confounders, a positive relationship for elevated ALT was observed in subjects with hyperuricemia (odds ratio [OR]: 2.032, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.443–2.861 for men; OR: 2.045, 95% CI: 1.221–3.425 for women, both p < 0.05). Within the reference range, the association between SUA and elevated ALT persisted in the fourth quartile (OR: 1.467, 95% CI: 1.063–2.025 for men; OR: 1.721, 95% CI: 1.146–2.585 for women, both p < 0.05); Conclusions: Our results indicated that an increased SUA level, even within the reference range, was independently associated with elevated ALT in Chinese adults. PMID:27563918

  17. Theoretical and experimental study of valence photoelectron spectrum of D,L-alanine amino acid.

    PubMed

    Farrokhpour, H; Fathi, F; De Brito, A Naves

    2012-07-05

    In this work, the He-I (21.218 eV) photoelectron spectrum of D,L-alanine in the gas phase is revisited experimentally and theoretically. To support the experiment, the high level ab initio calculations were used to calculate and assign the photoelectron spectra of the four most stable conformers of gaseous alanine, carefully. The symmetry adapted cluster/configuration interaction (SAC-CI) method based on single and double excitation operators (SD-R) and its more accurate version, termed general-R, was used to separately calculate the energies and intensities of the ionization bands of the L- and D-alanine conformers. The intensities of ionization bands were calculated based on the monopole approximation. Also, natural bonding orbital (NBO) calculations were employed for better spectral band assignment. The relative electronic energy, Gibbs free energy, and Boltzmann population ratio of the conformers were calculated at the experimental temperature (403 K) using several theoretical methods. The theoretical photoelectron spectrum of alanine was calculated by summing over the spectra of individual D and L conformers weighted by different population ratios. Finally, the population ratio of the four most stable conformers of alanine was estimated from the experimental photoelectron spectrum using theoretical calculations for the first time.

  18. Metabolic Engineering of Escherichia coli for the Production of 3-Hydroxypropionic Acid and Malonic Acid through β-Alanine Route.

    PubMed

    Song, Chan Woo; Kim, Je Woong; Cho, In Jin; Lee, Sang Yup

    2016-11-18

    Escherichia coli was metabolically engineered to produce industrially important platform chemicals, 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP) and malonic acid (MA), through the β-alanine (BA) route. First, various combinations of downstream enzymes were screened and BA pyruvate transaminase (encoded by pa0132) from P. aeruginosa was selected to generate malonic semialdehyde (MSA) from BA. This platform strain was engineered by introducing E. coli MSA reductase (encoded by ydfG) to reduce MSA to 3-HP. Replacement of native promoter of the sdhC gene with the strong trc promoter in the genome increased 3-HP production to 3.69 g/L in flask culture. Introduction of E. coli semialdehyde dehydrogenase (encoded by yneI) into the platform strain resulted in the production of MA, and additional deletion of the ydfG gene increased MA production to 0.450 g/L in flask culture. Fed-batch cultures of final engineered strains resulted in the production of 31.1 g/L 3-HP or 3.60 g/L MA from glucose.

  19. Inhibition of calcium oxalate crystal growth in vitro by uropontin: another member of the aspartic acid-rich protein superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Shiraga, H; Min, W; VanDusen, W J; Clayman, M D; Miner, D; Terrell, C H; Sherbotie, J R; Foreman, J W; Przysiecki, C; Neilson, E G

    1992-01-01

    The majority of human urinary stones are primarily composed of calcium salts. Although normal urine is frequently supersaturated with respect to calcium oxalate, most humans do not form stones. Inhibitors are among the multiple factors that may influence the complex process of urinary stone formation. We have isolated an inhibitor of calcium oxalate crystal growth from human urine by monoclonal antibody immunoaffinity chromatography. The N-terminal amino acid sequence and acidic amino acid content of this aspartic acid-rich protein, uropontin, are similar to those of other pontin proteins from bone, plasma, breast milk, and cells. The inhibitory effect of uropontin on calcium oxalate crystal growth in vitro supports the concept that pontins may have a regulatory role. This function would be analogous to that of other members of the aspartic acid-rich protein superfamily, which stereospecifically regulate the mineralization fronts of calcium-containing crystals. Images PMID:1729712

  20. Antagonizing Effects of Aspartic Acid against Ultraviolet A-Induced Downregulation of the Stemness of Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwangseon; Cho, Jae Youl; Soh, Young-Jin; Lee, Jienny; Shin, Seoung Woo; Jang, Sunghee; Jung, Eunsun; Kim, Min Hee; Lee, Jongsung

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation is responsible for a variety of changes in cell biology. The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of aspartic acid on UVA irradiation-induced damages in the stemness properties of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs). Furthermore, we elucidated the UVA-antagonizing mechanisms of aspartic acid. The results of this study showed that aspartic acid attenuated the UVA-induced reduction of the proliferative potential and stemness of hAMSCs, as evidenced by increased proliferative activity in the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and upregulation of stemness-related genes OCT4, NANOG, and SOX2 in response to the aspartic acid treatment. UVA-induced reduction in the mRNA level of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α was also significantly recovered by aspartic acid. In addition, the antagonizing effects of aspartic acid against the UVA effects were found to be mediated by reduced production of PGE2 through the inhibition of JNK and p42/44 MAPK. Taken together, these findings show that aspartic acid improves reduced stemness of hAMSCs induced by UVA and its effects are mediated by upregulation of HIF-1α via the inhibition of PGE2-cAMP signaling. In addition, aspartic acid may be used as an antagonizing agent to mitigate the effects of UVA.

  1. Antagonizing Effects of Aspartic Acid against Ultraviolet A-Induced Downregulation of the Stemness of Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jienny; Shin, Seoung Woo; Jang, Sunghee; Jung, Eunsun; Kim, Min Hee; Lee, Jongsung

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation is responsible for a variety of changes in cell biology. The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of aspartic acid on UVA irradiation-induced damages in the stemness properties of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs). Furthermore, we elucidated the UVA-antagonizing mechanisms of aspartic acid. The results of this study showed that aspartic acid attenuated the UVA-induced reduction of the proliferative potential and stemness of hAMSCs, as evidenced by increased proliferative activity in the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and upregulation of stemness-related genes OCT4, NANOG, and SOX2 in response to the aspartic acid treatment. UVA-induced reduction in the mRNA level of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α was also significantly recovered by aspartic acid. In addition, the antagonizing effects of aspartic acid against the UVA effects were found to be mediated by reduced production of PGE2 through the inhibition of JNK and p42/44 MAPK. Taken together, these findings show that aspartic acid improves reduced stemness of hAMSCs induced by UVA and its effects are mediated by upregulation of HIF-1α via the inhibition of PGE2-cAMP signaling. In addition, aspartic acid may be used as an antagonizing agent to mitigate the effects of UVA. PMID:25909857

  2. Influence of step faceting on the enantiospecific decomposition of aspartic acid on chiral Cu surfaces vicinal to Cu{111}.

    PubMed

    Reinicker, A D; Therrien, A J; Lawton, T J; Ali, R; Sykes, E C H; Gellman, A J

    2016-09-13

    On surfaces vicinal to Cu{111}, l-aspartic acid (l-Asp) adsorption causes steps to facet enantiospecifically into {310}(R) and {320}(S) steps. l-Asp has its highest heat of adsortion on surfaces that naturally expose the {310}(R) or {320}(S) steps but decomposes preferentially on the {310}(R) steps.

  3. Metabolic pathways and fermentative production of L-aspartate family amino acids.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Hwan; Lee, Sang Yup

    2010-06-01

    The L-aspartate family amino acids (AFAAs), L-threonine, L-lysine, L-methionine and L-isoleucine have recently been of much interest due to their wide spectrum of applications including food additives, components of cosmetics and therapeutic agents, and animal feed additives. Among them, L-threonine, L-lysine and L-methionine are three major amino acids produced currently throughout the world. Recent advances in systems metabolic engineering, which combine various high-throughput omics technologies and computational analysis, are now facilitating development of microbial strains efficiently producing AFAAs. Thus, a thorough understanding of the metabolic and regulatory mechanisms of the biosynthesis of these amino acids is urgently needed for designing system-wide metabolic engineering strategies. Here we review the details of AFAA biosynthetic pathways, regulations involved, and export and transport systems, and provide general strategies for successful metabolic engineering along with relevant examples. Finally, perspectives of systems metabolic engineering for developing AFAA overproducers are suggested with selected exemplary studies.

  4. Aspartic acid based nucleoside phosphoramidate prodrugs as potent inhibitors of hepatitis C virus replication.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Munmun; Maiti, Mohitosh; Rozenski, Jef; De Jonghe, Steven; Herdewijn, Piet

    2015-05-14

    In view of a persistent threat to mankind, the development of nucleotide-based prodrugs against hepatitis C virus (HCV) is considered as a constant effort in many medicinal chemistry groups. In an attempt to identify novel nucleoside phosphoramidate analogues for improving the anti-HCV activity, we have explored, for the first time, aspartic acid (Asp) and iminodiacetic acid (IDA) esters as amidate counterparts by considering three 2'-C-methyl containing nucleosides, 2'-C-Me-cytidine, 2'-C-Me-uridine and 2'-C-Me-2'-fluoro-uridine. Synthesis of these analogues required protection for the vicinal diol functionality of the sugar moiety and the amino group of the cytidine nucleoside to regioselectively perform phosphorylation reaction at the 5'-hydroxyl group. Anti-HCV data demonstrate that the Asp-based phosphoramidates are ∼550 fold more potent than the parent nucleosides. The inhibitory activity of the Asp-ProTides was higher than the Ala-ProTides, suggesting that Asp would be a potential amino acid candidate to be considered for developing novel antiviral prodrugs.

  5. Aspartic acid concentrations in coral skeletons as recorders of past disturbances of metabolic rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Lallan P.; Suzuki, Atsushi; Kawahata, Hodaka

    2006-11-01

    The composition of total hydrolysable amino acids (THAAs) in a skeleton of the coral Porites australiensis, collected from Ishigaki Island, Japan, was examined in order to determine whether amino acids (AA) can be used as biomarkers of past changes in coral physiology (metabolism). Micro-samples, corresponding to a time resolution of 1 month, were collected along the growth axis of the coral. Of the 20 AAs analyzed, aspartic acid (Asp) was the most abundant, and its mole concentration relative to the sum of all other AAs (mole%Asp) showed a clear seasonal pattern of low content during winters and high during summers. A growth disturbance in the coral skeleton during 1988 1990, shown by X-ray scans and oxygen and carbon stable isotope data, was marked by a high mole%Asp ratio. Variability in carbon isotope data has often been attributed to metabolic effects, or changes in the isotopic composition of seawater, or both. The changes in mole%Asp shown here suggest that metabolic effects are mainly responsible for sharp changes in carbon isotope profiles during periods of growth disturbance.

  6. Aspartic acid interaction with cobalt(II) in dilute aqueous solution: A 57Co emission Mössbauer spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamnev, Alexander A.; Tugarova, Anna V.; Kovács, Krisztina; Homonnay, Zoltan; Kuzmann, Erno; Vértes, Attila

    2012-03-01

    Emission (57Co) Mössbauer spectra of the aspartic acid—57CoCl2 system were measured at T = 80 K in frozen aqueous solution and in the form of a dried residue of this solution. The Mössbauer spectra, besides a weak contribution from after-effects, showed two Fe2 + /Co2 + components which were ascribed to octahedrally and tetrahedrally coordinated 57CoII microenvironments in the Asp-cobalt(II) complex. This dual coordination mode may be due to the involvement of the second terminal carboxylic group of aspartic acid in the coordination sphere of Co.

  7. Immunocytoma effect upon circadian variation in murine urinary excretion of beta-aminoisobutyric acid, beta-alanine, phenylalanine and tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Halberg, F; Gehrke, C W; Kuo, K; Nelson, W L; Sothern, R B; Cadotte, L M; Haus, E; Scheving, L E

    1978-01-01

    Under the conditions of disynchronization by the manipulation of both the alternation of light and darkness and the availability and unavailability of food, circadian rhythms characterize the excretion of several amino acids by inbred LOU rats bearing an immunocytoma. Large amplitude rhythms can be demonstrated for urinary beta-aminoisobutyric acid, beta-alanine, phenylalanine and tyrosine. Under the same conditions of disynchronization, control animals excrete the same compounds also with a marked circadian variation but at an invariably lower average rate. These excretory rhythms, along with those demonstrated earlier for polyamines and light-chains, are of interest as potential markers for the chronotherapy of cancer.

  8. Amino acid racemization dating of fossil bones, I. inter-laboratory comparison of racemization measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bada, J.L.; Hoopes, E.; Darling, D.; Dungworth, G.; Kessels, H.J.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Blunt, D.J.

    1979-01-01

    Enantiomeric measurements for aspartic acid, glutamic acid, and alanine in twenty-one different fossil bone samples have been carried out by three different laboratories using different analytical methods. These inter-laboratory comparisons demonstrate that D/L aspartic acid measurements are highly reproducible, whereas the enantiomeric measurements for the other amino acids show a wide variation between the three laboratories. At present, aspartic acid measurements are the most suitable for racemization dating of bone because of their superior analytical precision. ?? 1979.

  9. Endocrine roles of D-aspartic acid in the testis of lizard Podarcis s. sicula.

    PubMed

    Raucci, F; D'Aniello, S; Di Fiore, M M

    2005-12-01

    In the lizard Podarcis s. sicula, a substantial amount of D-aspartate (D-Asp) is endogenous to the testis and shows cyclic changes of activity connected with sex hormone profiles during the annual reproductive phases. Testicular D-Asp content shows a direct correlation with testosterone titres and a reverse correlation with 17beta-estradiol titres. In vivo experiments, consisting of i.p. injections of 2.0 micromol/g body weight of D-Asp or other amino acids, in lizards collected during the three main phases of the reproductive cycle (pre-reproductive, reproductive and post-reproductive period), revealed that the testis can specifically take up and accumulate D-Asp alone. Moreover, this amino acid influences the synthesis of testosterone and 17beta-estradiol in all phases of the cycle. This phenomenon is particularly evident during the pre- and post-reproductive period, when endogenous testosterone levels observed in both testis and plasma were the lowest and 17beta-estradiol concentrations were the highest. D-Asp rapidly induces a fall in 17beta-estradiol and a rise in testosterone at 3 h post-injection in the testis and at 6 h post-injection in the blood. In vitro experiments show that testicular tissue converted L-Asp into D-Asp through an aspartate racemase. D-Asp synthesis was measured in all phases of the cycle, but was significantly higher during the reproductive period with a peak at pH 6.0. The exogenous D-Asp also induces a significant increase in the mitotic activity of the testis at 3 h (P < 0.05) and at 6 h (P < 0.01). Induction of spermatogenesis by D-Asp is recognized by an intense immunoreactivity of the germinal epithelium (spermatogonia and spermatids) for proliferation cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). The effects of D-Asp on the testis appear to be specific since they were not seen in lizards injected with other D- or L-forms of amino acids with known excitatory effects on neurosecretion. Our results suggest a regulatory role for D-Asp in the steroido

  10. Gender differences in D-aspartic acid content in skull bone.

    PubMed

    Torikoshi-Hatano, Aiko; Namera, Akira; Shiraishi, Hiroaki; Arima, Yousuke; Toubou, Hirokazu; Ezaki, Jiro; Morikawa, Masami; Nagao, Masataka

    2012-12-01

    In forensic medicine, the personal identification of cadavers is one of the most important tasks. One method of estimating age at death relies on the high correlation between racemization rates in teeth and actual age, and this method has been applied successfully in forensic odontology for several years. In this study, we attempt to facilitate the analysis of racemized amino acids and examine the determination of age at death on the basis of the extent of aspartic acid (Asp) racemization in skull bones. The specimens were obtained from 61 human skull bones (19 females and 42 males) that underwent judicial autopsy from October 2010 to May 2012. The amount of D-Asp and L-Asp, total protein, osteocalcin, and collagen I in the skull bones was measured. Logistic regression analysis was performed for age, sex, and each measured protein. The amount of D-Asp in the female skull bones was significantly different from that in the male skull bones (p = 0.021), whereas the amount of L-Asp was similar. Thus, our study indicates that the amount of D-Asp in skull bones is different between the sexes.

  11. Neutralizing aspartate 83 modifies substrate translocation of excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3) glutamate transporters.

    PubMed

    Hotzy, Jasmin; Machtens, Jan-Philipp; Fahlke, Christoph

    2012-06-08

    Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) terminate glutamatergic synaptic transmission by removing glutamate from the synaptic cleft into neuronal and glial cells. EAATs are not only secondary active glutamate transporters but also function as anion channels. Gating of EAAT anion channels is tightly coupled to transitions within the glutamate uptake cycle, resulting in Na(+)- and glutamate-dependent anion currents. A point mutation neutralizing a conserved aspartic acid within the intracellular loop close to the end of transmembrane domain 2 was recently shown to modify the substrate dependence of EAAT anion currents. To distinguish whether this mutation affects transitions within the uptake cycle or directly modifies the opening/closing of the anion channel, we used voltage clamp fluorometry. Using three different sites for fluorophore attachment, V120C, M205C, and A430C, we observed time-, voltage-, and substrate-dependent alterations of EAAT3 fluorescence intensities. The voltage and substrate dependence of fluorescence intensities can be described by a 15-state model of the transport cycle in which several states are connected to branching anion channel states. D83A-mediated changes of fluorescence intensities, anion currents, and secondary active transport can be explained by exclusive modifications of substrate translocation rates. In contrast, sole modification of anion channel opening and closing is insufficient to account for all experimental data. We conclude that D83A has direct effects on the glutamate transport cycle and that these effects result in changed anion channel function.

  12. Immunohistochemical localization of D-β-aspartic acid-containing proteins in pterygium.

    PubMed

    Kaji, Yuichi; Oshika, Tetsuro; Nejima, Ryouhei; Mori, Saiyo; Miyata, Kazunori; Fujii, Noriko

    2015-12-10

    Biologically uncommon D-β-aspartic acid (D-β-Asp) residues have been reported to accumulate in organs affected by age-related disorders. In the present study, we investigated the localization of D-β-Asp-containing proteins in cases of pterygium, one of the most prominent age-related ocular conditions. Immunohistochemical localization of D-β-Asp-containing proteins was investigated in surgical specimens of pterygium from 20 patients and control specimens from 10 patients. Strong immunoreactivity to D-β-Asp-containing proteins was observed in subepithelial elastotic lesions and surrounding collagenous lesions from all surgical specimens with pterygia. In contrast, no immunoreactivity to D-β-Asp-containing proteins was seen in pterygium-free specimens. D-β-Asp-containing proteins are produced in organs as they are affected by the aging process. In addition, conversion of L- to D-aspartyl residues is accelerated by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Since pterygia can form due to aging or UV exposure, it is reasonable to find D-β-Asp-containing proteins in specimens with pterygia. Furthermore, since D-β-Asp is a non-native amino acid, D-β-Asp-containing proteins may be recognized as allogeneic antigens. Therefore, D-β-Asp-containing proteins in pterygia may responsible for the fibrovascular changes seen in the disorder.

  13. Characterization of lipoteichoic acid structures from three probiotic Bacillus strains: involvement of D-alanine in their biological activity.

    PubMed

    Villéger, Romain; Saad, Naima; Grenier, Karine; Falourd, Xavier; Foucat, Loïc; Urdaci, Maria C; Bressollier, Philippe; Ouk, Tan-Sothea

    2014-10-01

    Probiotics represent a potential strategy to influence the host's immune system thereby modulating immune response. Lipoteichoic Acid (LTA) is a major immune-stimulating component of Gram-positive cell envelopes. This amphiphilic polymer, anchored in the cytoplasmic membrane by means of its glycolipid component, typically consists of a poly (glycerol-phosphate) chain with D-alanine and/or glycosyl substitutions. LTA is known to stimulate macrophages in vitro, leading to secretion of inflammatory mediators such as Nitric Oxide (NO). This study investigates the structure-activity relationship of purified LTA from three probiotic Bacillus strains (Bacillus cereus CH, Bacillus subtilis CU1 and Bacillus clausii O/C). LTAs were extracted from bacterial cultures and purified. Chemical modification by means of hydrolysis at pH 8.5 was performed to remove D-alanine. The molecular structure of native and modified LTAs was determined by (1)H NMR and GC-MS, and their inflammatory potential investigated by measuring NO production by RAW 264.7 macrophages. Structural analysis revealed several differences between the newly characterized LTAs, mainly relating to their D-alanylation rates and poly (glycerol-phosphate) chain length. We observed induction of NO production by LTAs from B. subtilis and B. clausii, whereas weaker NO production was observed with B. cereus. LTA dealanylation abrogated NO production independently of the glycolipid component, suggesting that immunomodulatory potential depends on D-alanine substitutions. D-alanine may control the spatial configuration of LTAs and their recognition by cell receptors. Knowledge of molecular mechanisms behind the immunomodulatory abilities of probiotics is essential to optimize their use.

  14. Comparison of dissolution and surface reactions between calcite and aragonite in L-glutamic and L-aspartic acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Miyoung; Kim, Hwan; Lim, Mihee; You, Kwangsuk; Ahn, Jiwhan

    2010-01-11

    We have investigated dissolution and surface reaction of calcite and aragonite in amino acid solutions of L-glutamic (L-glu) and L-aspartic acid (L-asp) at weak acidity of above pH 3. The surface reactions of calcite and aragonite were related with the dissolution. Calcite was dissolved in both solutions but the dissolution was limited by an adsorption of Ca-carboxylate salt. Aragonite was neither dissolved nor reacted in amino acid solutions because the crystal surface consisted of a hard to dissolve structure.

  15. Acetic Acid Can Catalyze Succinimide Formation from Aspartic Acid Residues by a Concerted Bond Reorganization Mechanism: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota; Manabe, Noriyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Succinimide formation from aspartic acid (Asp) residues is a concern in the formulation of protein drugs. Based on density functional theory calculations using Ace-Asp-Nme (Ace = acetyl, Nme = NHMe) as a model compound, we propose the possibility that acetic acid (AA), which is often used in protein drug formulation for mildly acidic buffer solutions, catalyzes the succinimide formation from Asp residues by acting as a proton-transfer mediator. The proposed mechanism comprises two steps: cyclization (intramolecular addition) to form a gem-diol tetrahedral intermediate and dehydration of the intermediate. Both steps are catalyzed by an AA molecule, and the first step was predicted to be rate-determining. The cyclization results from a bond formation between the amide nitrogen on the C-terminal side and the side-chain carboxyl carbon, which is part of an extensive bond reorganization (formation and breaking of single bonds and the interchange of single and double bonds) occurring concertedly in a cyclic structure formed by the amide NH bond, the AA molecule and the side-chain C=O group and involving a double proton transfer. The second step also involves an AA-mediated bond reorganization. Carboxylic acids other than AA are also expected to catalyze the succinimide formation by a similar mechanism. PMID:25588215

  16. Characterization, Genome Sequence, and Analysis of Escherichia Phage CICC 80001, a Bacteriophage Infecting an Efficient L-Aspartic Acid Producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Xu, Youqiang; Ma, Yuyue; Yao, Su; Jiang, Zengyan; Pei, Jiangsen; Cheng, Chi

    2016-03-01

    Escherichia phage CICC 80001 was isolated from the bacteriophage contaminated medium of an Escherichia coli strain HY-05C (CICC 11022S) which could produce L-aspartic acid. The phage had a head diameter of 45-50 nm and a tail of about 10 nm. The one-step growth curve showed a latent period of 10 min and a rise period of about 20 min. The average burst size was about 198 phage particles per infected cell. Tests were conducted on the plaques, multiplicity of infection, and host range. The genome of CICC 80001 was sequenced with a length of 38,810 bp, and annotated. The key proteins leading to host-cell lysis were phylogenetically analyzed. One protein belonged to class II holin, and the other two belonged to the endopeptidase family and N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase family, respectively. The genome showed the sequence identity of 82.7% with that of Enterobacteria phage T7, and carried ten unique open reading frames. The bacteriophage resistant E. coli strain designated CICC 11021S was breeding and its L-aspartase activity was 84.4% of that of CICC 11022S.

  17. The natural non-protein amino acid N-β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is incorporated into protein during synthesis.

    PubMed

    Glover, W Broc; Mash, Deborah C; Murch, Susan J

    2014-11-01

    N-β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is an amino acid produced by cyanobacteria and accumulated through trophic levels in the environment and natural food webs. Human exposure to BMAA has been linked to progressive neurodegenerative diseases, potentially due to incorporation of BMAA into protein. The insertion of BMAA and other non-protein amino acids into proteins may trigger protein misfunction, misfolding and/or aggregation. However, the specific mechanism by which BMAA is associated with proteins remained unidentified. Such studies are challenging because of the complexity of biological systems and samples. A cell-free in vitro protein synthesis system offers an excellent approach for investigation of changing amino acid composition in protein. In this study, we report that BMAA incorporates into protein as an error in synthesis when a template DNA sequence is used. Bicinchoninic acid assay of total protein synthesis determined that BMAA effectively substituted for alanine and serine in protein product. LC-MS/MS confirmed that BMAA was selectively inserted into proteins in place of other amino acids, but isomers N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine (AEG) and 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) did not share this characteristic. Incorporation of BMAA into proteins was significantly higher when genomic DNA from post-mortem brain was the template. About half of BMAA in the synthetic proteins was released with denaturation with sodium dodecylsulfonate and dithiothreitol, but the remaining BMAA could only be released by acid hydrolysis. Together these data demonstrate that BMAA is incorporated into the amino acid backbone of proteins during synthesis and also associated with proteins through non-covalent bonding.

  18. Inactivation of cystein-aspartic acid protease (caspase)-1 by saikosaponin A.

    PubMed

    Han, Na-Ra; Kim, Hyung-Min; Jeong, Hyun-Ja

    2011-01-01

    This work investigates the anti-inflammatory mechanism of saikosaponin A (SA), a major component of Bupleurum falcatum LINNE. SA significantly inhibited phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) plus A23187-induced the production and expression of interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in human mast cell (HMC)-1 cells. SA suppressed PMA plus A23187-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and p38. When HMC-1 cells were treated with SA, translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB/Rel A into nucleus and degradation of inhibitor of NF-κB (IκB) in cytoplasm were inhibited. SA decreased PMA plus A23187-induced cysteine-aspartic acid protease (caspase)-1 activity. IL-1β production was also inhibited by SA. Finally, SA significantly decreased the number of nasal rubs and serum TNF-α level in the ovalbumin-sensitized allergic rhinitis mouse model. The underlying mechanism involves, at least in part, inactivation of caspase-1, which provides new evidence for therapeutic application of SA to target inflammatory processes.

  19. Terbium-Aspartic Acid Nanocrystals with Chirality-Dependent Tunable Fluorescent Properties.

    PubMed

    Ma, Baojin; Wu, Yu; Zhang, Shan; Wang, Shicai; Qiu, Jichuan; Zhao, Lili; Guo, Daidong; Duan, Jiazhi; Sang, Yuanhua; Li, Linlin; Jiang, Huaidong; Liu, Hong

    2017-02-28

    Terbium-aspartic acid (Tb-Asp) nanocrystals with chirality-dependent tunable fluorescent properties can be synthesized through a facile synthesis method through the coordination between Tb and Asp. Asp with different chirality (dextrorotation/d and levogyration/l) changes the stability of the coordination center following fluorescent absorption/emission ability differences. Compared with l-Asp, d-Asp can coordinate Tb to form a more stable center, following the higher quantum yield and longer fluorescence life. Fluorescence intensity of Tb-Asp linearly increases with increase ratio of d-Asp in the mixed chirality Tb-Asp system, and the fluorescent properties of Tb-Asp nanocrystals can be tuned by adjusting the chirality ratio. Tb-Asp nanocrystals possess many advantage, such as high biocompatibility, without any color in visible light irradiation, monodispersion with very small size, and long fluorescent life. Those characteristics will give them great potential in many application fields, such as low-cost antifake markers and advertisements using inkjet printers or for molds when dispersed in polydimethylsiloxane. In addition, europium can also be used to synthesize Eu-Asp nanoparticles. Importantly, the facile, low-cost, high-yield, mass-productive "green" process provides enormous advantages for synthesis and application of fluorescent nanocrystals, which will have great impact in nanomaterial technology.

  20. The putative effects of D-Aspartic acid on blood testosterone levels: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Roshanzamir, Farzad; Safavi, Seyyed Morteza

    2017-01-01

    Background: D-Aspartic acid (D-Asp) is in invertebrate and vertebrate neuroendocrine tissues, where it carries out important physiological functions. Recently, it has been reported that D-Asp is involved in the synthesis and release of testosterone and is assumed can be used as a testosterone booster for infertile men, and by athletes to increase muscle mass and strength. Objective: The aim of this review is to summarize available evidence related to the effects of D-Asp on serum testosterone levels. Materials and Methods: We conducted a systematic review of all type studies, which evaluated the effect of the D-Asp on blood testosterone including published papers until October 2015, using PubMed, ISI Web of Science, ProQuest and Scopus database. Results: With 396 retrieved records, 23 animal studies and 4 human studies were included. In vivo and in vitro animal studies revealed the effect of D-Asp depending on species, sex and organ-specific. Our results showed that exogenous D-Asp enhances testosterone levels in male animal’s studies, whereas studies in human yielded inconsistent results. The evidence for this association in man is still sparse, mostly because of limited number and poor quality studies. Conclusion: There is an urgent need for more and well-designed human clinical trials with larger sample sizes and longer duration to investigate putative effects of D-Asp on testosterone concentrations. PMID:28280794

  1. N-Methyl D-Aspartate Receptor Antagonist Kynurenic Acid Affects Human Cortical Development

    PubMed Central

    Bagasrawala, Inseyah; Zecevic, Nada; Radonjić, Nevena V.

    2016-01-01

    Kynurenic acid (KYNA), a neuroactive metabolite of tryptophan degradation, acts as an endogenous N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist. Elevated levels of KYNA have been observed in pregnant women after viral infections and are considered to play a role in neurodevelopmental disorders. However, the consequences of KYNA-induced NMDAR blockade in human cortical development still remain elusive. To study the potential impact of KYNA on human neurodevelopment, we used an in vitro system of multipotent cortical progenitors, i.e., radial glia cells (RGCs), enriched from human cerebral cortex at mid-gestation (16–19 gestational weeks). KYNA treatment significantly decreased RGCs proliferation and survival by antagonizing NMDAR. This alteration resulted in a reduced number of cortical progenitors and neurons while number and activation of astrocytes increased. KYNA treatment reduced differentiation of RGCs into GABAergic neurons, while differentiation into glutamatergic neurons was relatively spared. Furthermore, in mixed cortical cultures KYNA triggered an inflammatory response as evidenced by increased levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. In conclusion, elevated levels of KYNA play a significant role in human RGC fate determination by antagonizing NMDARs and by activating an inflammatory response. The altered cell composition observed in cell culture following exposure to elevated KYNA levels suggests a mechanism for impairment of cortical circuitry formation in the fetal brain after viral infection, as seen in neurodevelopmental disorders such as schizophrenia. PMID:27746712

  2. N-Methyl-d-aspartate Receptor Antagonists Have Variable Affect in 3-Nitropropionic Acid Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Carbery, Timothy; Geddes, James W.

    2013-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that excitotoxicity and oxidative stress resulting from excessive activation of glutamate (N-methyl-d-aspartate) NMDA receptors are major participants in striatal degeneration associated with 3-nitropropionic acid (3NP) administration. Although excitotoxic and oxidative mechanisms are implicated in 3NP toxicity, there are conflicting reports as to whether NMDA receptor antagonists attenuate or exacerbate the 3NP-induced neurodegeneration. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of NMDA receptors in striatal degeneration, protein oxidation and motor impairment following systemic 3NP administration. We examined whether NMDA receptor antagonists, memantine and ifenprodil, influence the neurotoxicity of 3NP. The development of striatal lesion and protein oxidation following 3NP administration is delayed by memantine but not affected by ifenprodil. However, in behavioral experiments, memantine failed to improve and ifenprodil exacerbated the motor deficits associated with 3NP toxicity. Together, these findings suggest caution in the application of NMDA receptor antagonists as a neuroprotective agent in neurodegenerative disorders associated with metabolic impairment. PMID:18688711

  3. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists have variable affect in 3-nitropropionic acid toxicity.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Payman; Carbery, Timothy; Geddes, James W

    2009-03-01

    There is accumulating evidence that excitotoxicity and oxidative stress resulting from excessive activation of glutamate (N-methyl-D-aspartate) NMDA receptors are major participants in striatal degeneration associated with 3-nitropropionic acid (3NP) administration. Although excitotoxic and oxidative mechanisms are implicated in 3NP toxicity, there are conflicting reports as to whether NMDA receptor antagonists attenuate or exacerbate the 3NP-induced neurodegeneration. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of NMDA receptors in striatal degeneration, protein oxidation and motor impairment following systemic 3NP administration. We examined whether NMDA receptor antagonists, memantine and ifenprodil, influence the neurotoxicity of 3NP. The development of striatal lesion and protein oxidation following 3NP administration is delayed by memantine but not affected by ifenprodil. However, in behavioral experiments, memantine failed to improve and ifenprodil exacerbated the motor deficits associated with 3NP toxicity. Together, these findings suggest caution in the application of NMDA receptor antagonists as a neuroprotective agent in neurodegenerative disorders associated with metabolic impairment.

  4. Evaluation of poly (aspartic acid sodium salt) as a draw solute for forward osmosis.

    PubMed

    Gwak, Gimun; Jung, Bokyung; Han, Sungsoo; Hong, Seungkwan

    2015-09-01

    Poly (aspartic acid sodium salt) (PAspNa) was evaluated for its potential as a novel draw solute in forward osmosis (FO). The inherent advantages of PAspNa, such as good water solubility, high osmotic pressure, and nontoxicity, were first examined through a series of physicochemical analyses and atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations. Then, lab-scale FO tests were performed to evaluate its suitability in practical processes. Compared to other conventional inorganic solutes, PAspNa showed comparable water flux but significantly lower reverse solute flux, demonstrating its suitability as a draw solute. Moreover, fouling experiments using synthetic wastewater as a feed solution demonstrated that PAspNa reversely flowed to the feed side reduced inorganic scaling on the membrane active layer. The recyclability of PAspNa was studied using both nanofiltration (NF) and membrane distillation (MD) processes, and the results exhibited its ease of recovery. This research reported the feasibility and applicability of FO-NF or FO-MD processes using PAspNa for wastewater reclamation and brackish water desalination.

  5. Intramolecular cyclization of aspartic acid residues assisted by three water molecules: a density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota

    2014-01-01

    Aspartic acid (Asp) residues in peptides and proteins (l-Asp) are known to undergo spontaneous nonenzymatic reactions to form l-β-Asp, d-Asp, and d-β-Asp residues. The formation of these abnormal Asp residues in proteins may affect their three-dimensional structures and hence their properties and functions. Indeed, the reactions have been thought to contribute to aging and pathologies. Most of the above reactions of the l-Asp residues proceed via a cyclic succinimide intermediate. In this paper, a novel three-water-assisted mechanism is proposed for cyclization of an Asp residue (forming a gem-diol precursor of the succinimide) by the B3LYP/6-31 + G(d,p) density functional theory calculations carried out for an Asp-containing model compound (Ace-Asp-Nme, where Ace = acetyl and Nme = NHCH3). The three water molecules act as catalysts by mediating ‘long-range’ proton transfers. In the proposed mechanism, the amide group on the C-terminal side of the Asp residue is first converted to the tautomeric iminol form (iminolization). Then, reorientation of a water molecule and a conformational change occur successively, followed by the nucleophilic attack of the iminol nitrogen on the carboxyl carbon of the Asp side chain to form the gem-diol species. A satisfactory agreement was obtained between the calculated and experimental energetics.

  6. Poly(aspartic acid) with adjustable pH-dependent solubility.

    PubMed

    Németh, Csaba; Gyarmati, Benjámin; Abdullin, Timur; László, Krisztina; Szilágyi, András

    2017-02-01

    Poly(aspartic acid) (PASP) derivatives with adjustable pH-dependent solubility were synthesized and characterized to establish the relationship between their structure and solubility in order to predict their applicability as a basic material for enteric coatings. Polysuccinimide, the precursor of PASP, was modified with short chain alkylamines, and the residual succinimide rings were subsequently opened to prepare the corresponding PASP derivatives. Study of the effect of the type and concentration of the side groups on the pH-dependent solubility of PASP showed that solubility can be adjusted by proper selection of the chemical structure. The Henderson-Hasselbalch (HH) and the extended HH equations were used to describe the pH-dependent solubility of the polymers quantitatively. The estimate provided by the HH equation is poor, but an accurate description of the pH-dependent solubility can be found with the extended HH equation. The dissolution rate of a polymer film prepared from a selected PASP derivative was determined by fluorescence marking. The film dissolved rapidly when the pH was increased above its pKa. Cellular viability tests show that PASP derivatives are non-toxic to a human cell line. These polymers are thus of great interest as starting materials for enteric coatings.

  7. Aspartic acid racemization dating of Holocene brachiopods and bivalves from the southern Brazilian shelf, South Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour Wood, Susan L.; Krause, Richard A.; Kowalewski, Michał; Wehmiller, John; Simões, Marcello G.

    2006-09-01

    The extent of racemization of aspartic acid (Asp) has been used to estimate the ages of 9 shells of the epifaunal calcitic brachiopod Bouchardia rosea and 9 shells of the infaunal aragonitic bivalve Semele casali. Both taxa were collected concurrently from the same sites at depths of 10 m and 30 m off the coast of Brazil. Asp D/L values show an excellent correlation with radiocarbon age at both sites and for both taxa ( r2Site 9 B. rosea = 0.97, r2Site 1 B. rosea = 0.997, r2Site 9 S. casali = 0.9998, r2Site 1 S. casali = 0.93). The Asp ratios plotted against reservoir-corrected AMS radiocarbon ages over the time span of multiple millennia can thus be used to develop reliable and precise geochronologies not only for aragonitic mollusks (widely used for dating previously), but also for calcitic brachiopods. At each collection site, Bouchardia specimens display consistently higher D/L values than specimens of Semele. Thermal differences between sites are also notable and in agreement with theoretical expectations, as extents of racemization for both taxa are greater at the warmer, shallower site than at the cooler, deeper one. In late Holocene marine settings, concurrent time series of aragonitic and calcitic shells can be assembled using Asp racemization dating, and parallel multi-centennial to multi-millennial records can be developed simultaneously for multiple biomineral systems.

  8. Structures of an alanine racemase from Bacillus anthracis (BA0252) in the presence and absence of (R)-1-aminoethylphosphonic acid (l-Ala-P)

    SciTech Connect

    Au, Kinfai; Ren, Jingshan; Walter, Thomas S.; Harlos, Karl; Nettleship, Joanne E.; Owens, Raymond J.; Stuart, David I.; Esnouf, Robert M.

    2008-05-01

    Structures of BA0252, an alanine racemase from B. anthracis, in the presence and absence of the inhibitor (R)-1-aminoethylphosphonic acid (l-Ala-P) and determined by X-ray crystallography to resolutions of 2.1 and 1.47 Å, respectively, are described. Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, has been targeted by the Oxford Protein Production Facility to validate high-throughput protocols within the Structural Proteomics in Europe project. As part of this work, the structures of an alanine racemase (BA0252) in the presence and absence of the inhibitor (R)-1-aminoethylphosphonic acid (l-Ala-P) have determined by X-ray crystallo@@graphy to resolutions of 2.1 and 1.47 Å, respectively. Difficulties in crystallizing this protein were overcome by the use of reductive methylation. Alanine racemase has attracted much interest as a possible target for anti-anthrax drugs: not only is d-alanine a vital component of the bacterial cell wall, but recent studies also indicate that alanine racemase, which is accessible in the exosporium, plays a key role in inhibition of germination in B. anthracis. These structures confirm the binding mode of l-Ala-P but suggest an unexpected mechanism of inhibition of alanine racemase by this compound and could provide a basis for the design of improved alanine racemase inhibitors with potential as anti-anthrax therapies.

  9. Synthesis, growth and optical properties of an efficient nonlinear optical single crystal: L-alanine DL-malic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirubagaran, R.; Madhavan, J.

    2015-02-01

    Single crystals of L-alanine DL-malic acid (LADLMA) have been grown from aqueous solution by slow-cooling technique. Powder X-ray diffraction studies reveal the structure of the crystal to be orthorhombic. The nonlinear optical conversion efficiency test was carried out for the grown crystals using the Kurtz powder technique. The third order nonlinear refractive index and the nonlinear absorption coefficient where evaluated by Z-scan measurements. As the material have a negative refractive index it could be used in the protection of optical sensors such as night vision devices.

  10. Determination of β -Cyano-L-alanine, γ -Glutamyl- β -cyano-L-alanine, and Common Free Amino Acids in Vicia sativa (Fabaceae) Seeds by Reversed-Phase High-Performance Liquid Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Megías, Cristina; Cortés-Giraldo, Isabel; Girón-Calle, Julio; Vioque, Javier; Alaiz, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    A method for determination of β-cyano-L-alanine, γ-glutamyl-β-cyano-L-alanine and other free amino acids in Vicia sativa is presented. Seed extracts were derivatized by reaction with diethyl ethoxymethylenemalonate and analyzed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Calibration curves showed very good linearity of the response. The limit of detection and quantification was 0.15 and 0.50 μM, respectively. The method has high intra- (RSD = 0.28-0.31%) and interrepeatability (RSD = 2.76-3.08%) and remarkable accuracy with a 99% recovery in spiked samples. The method is very easy to carry out and allows for ready analysis of large number of samples using very basic HPLC equipment because the derivatized samples are very stable and have very good chromatographic properties. The method has been applied to the determination of γ-glutamyl-β-cyano-L-alanine, β-cyano-L-alanine, and common free amino acids in eight wild populations of V. sativa from southwestern Spain.

  11. Measurement of aspartic acid in oilseed rape leaves under herbicide stress using near infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chu; Kong, Wenwen; Liu, Fei; He, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Oilseed rape is used as both food and a renewable energy resource. Physiological parameters, such as the amino acid aspartic acid, can indicate the growth status of oilseed rape. Traditional detection methods are laborious, time consuming, costly, and not usable in the field. Here, we investigate near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) as a fast and non-destructive detection method of aspartic acid in oilseed rape leaves under herbicide stress. Different spectral pre-processing methods were compared for optimal prediction performance. The variable selection methods were applied for relevant variable selection, including successive projections algorithm (SPA), Monte Carlo-uninformative variable elimination (MC-UVE) and random frog (RF). The selected effective wavelengths (EWs) were used as input by multiple linear regression (MLR), partial least squares (PLS) and least-square support vector machine (LS-SVM). The best predictive performance was achieved by SPA-LS-SVM (Raw) model using 22 EWs, and the prediction results were Rp = 0.9962 and RMSEP = 0.0339 for the prediction set. The result indicated that NIR combined with LS-SVM is a powerful new method to detect aspartic acid in oilseed rape leaves under herbicide stress.

  12. Fermentation of L-aspartate by a saccharolytic strain of Bacteroides melaninogenicus.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, J C; Dyer, J K; Tribble, J L

    1977-01-01

    Resting cells of Bacteroides melaninogenicus fermented L-[14C]aspartate as a single substrate. The 14C-labeled products included succinate, acetate, CO2, oxaloacetate, formate, malate, glycine, alanine, and fumarate in the relative percentages 68, 15, 9.9, 2.7, 1.8, 1.0, 0.7, 0.5, and 0.06, respectively, based on the total counts per minute of the L-[14C]aspartate fermented. Ammonia was produced in high amounts, indicating that 96% of the L-aspartate fermented was deaminated. These data suggest that L-aspartate is mainly being reduced through a number of intermediate reactions involving enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle to succinate. L-[14C]asparagine was also fermented by resting cells of B. melaninogenicus to form L-aspartate, which was subsequently, but less actively, fermented. PMID:13713

  13. Adsorption of L-glutamic acid and L-aspartic acid to γ-Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, Edward; Kumar, Kartik; Sumit, Madhuresh; Giuffre, Anthony; Zhao, Weilong; Pedersen, Joel; Sahai, Nita

    2014-05-01

    The interactions of amino acids with mineral surfaces have potential relevance for processes ranging from pre-biotic chemistry to biomineralization to protein adsorption on biomedical implants in vivo. Here, we report the results of experiments investigating the adsorption of L-glutamic (Glu) and L-aspartic (Asp) acids to γ-Al2O3. We examined the extent of Glu and Asp coverage as a function of pH and solution concentration (pH edges and isotherms) in solution-depletion experiments and used in situ Attenuated Total Refkectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy to estimate the molecular conformations of the adsorbed molecules. Glu and Asp exhibited similar adsorption behavior on γ-Al2O3 with respect to pH and solution concentration. In general, adsorption decreased as pH increased. At low and high amino acid concentrations, the isotherms exhibited two apparent saturation coverages, which could be interpreted as 1:4 or 1:2 ratios of adsorbed molecule/surface Al sites. Tetradentate tetranuclear and bidentate binuclear species were the dominant conformations inferred independently from FTIR spectra. In these conformations, both carboxylate groups are involved in bonding to either four or to two Al surface atoms, through direct covalent bonds or via H-bonds. An outer sphere species, in which one carboxylate group interacts with a surface Al atom, could not be ruled out based on the FTIR spectra.

  14. Neurotoxic Non-proteinogenic Amino Acid β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine and Its Role in Biological Systems.

    PubMed

    Popova, A A; Koksharova, O A

    2016-08-01

    Secondary metabolites of photoautotrophic organisms have attracted considerable interest in recent years. In particular, molecules of non-proteinogenic amino acids participating in various physiological processes and capable of producing adverse ecological effects have been actively investigated. For example, the non-proteinogenic amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is neurotoxic to animals including humans. It is known that BMAA accumulation via the food chain can lead to development of neurodegenerative diseases in humans such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases as well as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Moreover, BMAA can be mistakenly incorporated into a protein molecule instead of serine. Natural sources of BMAA and methods for its detection are discussed in this review, as well as the role of BMAA in metabolism of its producers and possible mechanisms of toxicity of this amino acid in different living organisms.

  15. Substitution of aspartic acid with glutamic acid increases the unfolding transition temperature of a protein.

    PubMed

    Lee, Duck Yeon; Kim, Kyeong-Ae; Yu, Yeon Gyu; Kim, Key-Sun

    2004-07-30

    Proteins from thermophiles are more stable than those from mesophiles. Several factors have been suggested as causes for this greater stability, but no general rule has been found. The amino acid composition of thermophile proteins indicates that the content of polar amino acids such as Asn, Gln, Ser, and Thr is lower, and that of charged amino acids such as Arg, Glu, and Lys is higher than in mesophile proteins. Among charged amino acids, however, the content of Asp is even lower in thermophile proteins than in mesophile proteins. To investigate the reasons for the lower occurrence of Asp compared to Glu in thermophile proteins, Glu was substituted with Asp in a hyperthermophile protein, MjTRX, and Asp was substituted with Glu in a mesophile protein, ETRX. Each substitution of Glu with Asp decreased the Tm of MjTRX by about 2 degrees C, while each substitution of Asp with Glu increased the Tm of ETRX by about 1.5 degrees C. The change of Tm destabilizes the MjTRX by 0.55 kcal/mol and stabilizes the ETRX by 0.45 kcal/mol in free energy.

  16. Dual-column cation-exchange chromatographic method for beta-aminoisobutyric acid and beta-alanine in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Kuo, K C; Cole, T F; Gehrke, C W; Waalkes, T P; Borek, E

    1978-08-01

    A rapid, automated chromatographic method has been developed for the quantitation of the nucleic acid catabolites beta-aminoisobutyric acid and beta-alanine in urine, serum, and other physiological fluids. The analyses were performed on a modified Beckman 121M amino acid analyzer with dual ion-exchange columns and the use of a single sodium citrate buffer (pH 4.38, 0.20 mol/liter). By carefully matching the elution pattern for the two ion-exchange columns and alternating use of these columns, analyses are completed every 40 min. The chromatography, regeneration, and equilibration of the two columns are precisely programmed, thus the detector sees only the elution of beta-aminoisobutyric acid and beta-alanine alternately from each column. Long-term precision and analytical recovery for the two metabolites in urine were 1.9 and 102%, and 3.3 and 101%, respectively. Their normal physiological values were determined in human serum and urine. Their excretion in the urine was also studied as a function of collection time, to validate a more convenient, less costly method of sampling. This study shows that randomly collected samples are acceptable when the concentration of the two metabolites are expressed in terms of creatinine excretion. In addition, the distribution of the free and conjugated forms of the two metabolites in urine and serum was studied. A preparative method was also developed for the quantitative isolation of beta-amino-isobutyric acid from urine samples. The alternating dual-column technique may be applied to any ion-exchange chromatographic method where many analyses must be performed. This method is currently used in our laboratories for measuring these beta-amino acids in urine and serum of patients with various types of cancers.

  17. Nature of interactions of tryptophan with zinc oxide nanoparticles and L-aspartic acid: A spectroscopic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Gopa; Bhattacharya, Sudeshna; Ganguly, Tapan

    2009-04-01

    The interaction between an essential amino acid L-tryptophan (TRP) with semiconductor zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles and amino acid L-aspartic acid (ASP) is investigated by steady state and time resolved spectroscopic techniques. In both the cases static mode of fluorescence quenching occurs indicating the formation of ground-state complex. Binding constants and the number of binding sites were determined for both the complexes. The observed thermodynamic parameters suggest that the key interacting forces involved are van der Waals interaction and hydrogen bonding in case of TRP and ZnO nanoparticles whereas hydrophobic interaction is responsible in formations of TRP-ASP complex.

  18. 13C-NMR spectroscopic evaluation of the citric acid cycle flux in conditions of high aspartate transaminase activity in glucose-perfused rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Tran-Dinh, S; Hoerter, J A; Mateo, P; Gyppaz, F; Herve, M

    1998-12-01

    A new mathematical model, based on the observation of 13C-NMR spectra of two principal metabolites (glutamate and aspartate), was constructed to determine the citric acid cycle flux in the case of high aspartate transaminase activity leading to the formation of large amounts of labeled aspartate and glutamate. In this model, the labeling of glutamate and aspartate carbons by chemical and isotopic exchange with the citric acid cycle are considered to be interdependent. With [U-13C]Glc or [1,2-(13)C]acetate as a substrate, all glutamate and aspartate carbons can be labeled. The isotopic transformations of 32 glutamate isotopomers into 16 aspartate isotopomers or vice versa were studied using matrix operations; the results were compiled in two matrices. We showed how the flux constants of the citric acid cycle and the 13C-enrichment of acetyl-CoA can be deduced from 13C-NMR spectra of glutamate and/or aspartate. The citric acid cycle flux in beating Wistar rat hearts, aerobically perfused with [U-13C]glucose in the absence of insulin, was investigated by 13C-NMR spectroscopy. Surprisingly, aspartate instead of glutamate was found to be the most abundantly-labeled metabolite, indicating that aspartate transaminase (which catalyses the reversible reaction: (glutamate + oxaloacetate <--> 2-oxoglutarate + aspartate) is highly active in the absence of insulin. The amount of aspartate was about two times larger than glutamate. The quantities of glutamate (G0) or aspartate (A0) were approximately the same for all hearts and remained constant during perfusion: G0 = (0.74 +/- 0.03) micromol/g; A0 = (1.49 +/- 0.05) micromol/g. The flux constants, i.e., the fraction of glutamate and aspartate in exchange with the citric acid cycle, were about 1.45 min(-1) and 0.72 min(-1), respectively; the flux of this cycle is about (1.07 +/- 0.02) micromol min(-1) g(-1). Excellent agreement between the computed and experimental data was obtained, showing that: i) in the absence of insulin

  19. Synthesis, growth, thermal, optical and mechanical properties of new organic NLO crystal: L-alanine DL-malic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaikumar, D.; Kalainathan, S.; Bhagavanarayana, G.

    2009-12-01

    A new organic nonlinear optical crystal, L-alanine DL-malic acid (LADLMA), has been grown from aqueous solution by the slow cooling technique. L-alanine and DL-malic acid were used in the ratio 2:1 for synthesis. Crystals of size 24×13×8 mm 3 have been obtained in 26 days. Characterizations were carried out to study the structural, optical and mechanical properties of the grown crystals. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis shows that they belong to the orthorhombic system. To study the crystalline perfection of the grown crystals, high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HR-XRD) study was carried out. The vibrational frequencies of various functional groups have been derived from FTIR spectrum. Thermal behaviour of the crystal was investigated by TG-DTA analyses. Transmission spectrum has been recorded in the solution state and the cut-off frequency has been determined. Nonlinear optical property of the crystal has been confirmed using the Kurtz powder technique and a study of its second harmonic generation efficiency in comparison with KDP has been made. Knoop hardness test was carried out and its Young's modulus was calculated.

  20. Repositioning the catalytic triad aspartic acid of haloalkane dehalogenase: effects on stability, kinetics, and structure.

    PubMed

    Krooshof, G H; Kwant, E M; Damborský, J; Koca, J; Janssen, D B

    1997-08-05

    Haloalkane dehalogenase (DhlA) catalyzes the hydrolysis of haloalkanes via an alkyl-enzyme intermediate. The covalent intermediate, which is formed by nucleophilic substitution with Asp124, is hydrolyzed by a water molecule that is activated by His289. The role of Asp260, which is the third member of the catalytic triad, was studied by site-directed mutagenesis. Mutation of Asp260 to asparagine resulted in a catalytically inactive D260N mutant, which demonstrates that the triad acid Asp260 is essential for dehalogenase activity. Furthermore, Asp260 has an important structural role, since the D260N enzyme accumulated mainly in inclusion bodies during expression, and neither substrate nor product could bind in the active-site cavity. Activity for brominated substrates was restored to D260N by replacing Asn148 with an aspartic or glutamic acid. Both double mutants D260N+N148D and D260N+N148E had a 10-fold reduced kcat and 40-fold higher Km values for 1,2-dibromoethane compared to the wild-type enzyme. Pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of the D260N+N148E double mutant showed that the decrease in kcat was mainly caused by a 220-fold reduction of the rate of carbon-bromine bond cleavage and a 10-fold decrease in the rate of hydrolysis of the alkyl-enzyme intermediate. On the other hand, bromide was released 12-fold faster and via a different pathway than in the wild-type enzyme. Molecular modeling of the mutant showed that Glu148 indeed could take over the interaction with His289 and that there was a change in charge distribution in the tunnel region that connects the active site with the solvent. On the basis of primary structure similarity between DhlA and other alpha/beta-hydrolase fold dehalogenases, we propose that a conserved acidic residue at the equivalent position of Asn148 in DhlA is the third catalytic triad residue in the latter enzymes.

  1. Predicting protein decomposition: the case of aspartic-acid racemization kinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, M J; Waite, E R; van Duin, A C

    1999-01-01

    The increase in proportion of the non-biological (D-) isomer of aspartic acid (Asp) relative to the L-isomer has been widely used in archaeology and geochemistry as a tool for dating. the method has proved controversial, particularly when used for bones. The non-linear kinetics of Asp racemization have prompted a number of suggestions as to the underlying mechanism(s) and have led to the use of mathematical transformations which linearize the increase in D-Asp with respect to time. Using one example, a suggestion that the initial rapid phase of Asp racemization is due to a contribution from asparagine (Asn), we demonstrate how a simple model of the degradation and racemization of Asn can be used to predict the observed kinetics. A more complex model of peptide bound Asx (Asn + Asp) racemization, which occurs via the formation of a cyclic succinimide (Asu), can be used to correctly predict Asx racemization kinetics in proteins at high temperatures (95-140 degrees C). The model fails to predict racemization kinetics in dentine collagen at 37 degrees C. The reason for this is that Asu formation is highly conformation dependent and is predicted to occur extremely slowly in triple helical collagen. As conformation strongly influences the rate of Asu formation and hence Asx racemization, the use of extrapolation from high temperatures to estimate racemization kinetics of Asx in proteins below their denaturation temperature is called into question. In the case of archaeological bone, we argue that the D:L ratio of Asx reflects the proportion of non-helical to helical collagen, overlain by the effects of leaching of more soluble (and conformationally unconstrained) peptides. Thus, racemization kinetics in bone are potentially unpredictable, and the proposed use of Asx racemization to estimate the extent of DNA depurination in archaeological bones is challenged. PMID:10091247

  2. Mutation in aspartic acid residues modifies catalytic and haemolytic activities of Bacillus cereus sphingomyelinase.

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, H; Tameishi, K; Yamada, A; Tomita, M; Matsuo, Y; Nishikawa, K; Ikezawa, H

    1995-01-01

    Four aspartic acid residues (Asp126, Asp156, Asp233 and Asp295) of Bacillus cereus sphingomyelinase (SMase) in the conservative regions were changed to glycine by in vitro mutagenesis, and the mutant SMases [D126G (Asp126-->Gly etc.), D156G, D233G and D295G] were produced in Bacillus brevis 47, a protein-producing strain. The sphingomyelin (SM)-hydrolysing activity of D295G was completely abolished and those of D126G and D156G were reduced by more than 80%, whereas that of D233G was not so profoundly affected. Two mutant enzymes (D126G and D156G) were purified and characterized further. The hydrolytic activities of D126G and D156G toward four phosphocholine-containing substrates with different hydrophobicities, SM, 2-hexadecanoylamino-4-nitrophenylphosphocholine(HNP), lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC) and p-nitro-phenylphosphocholine (p-NPPC), were compared with those of the wild-type. The activity of D126G toward water-soluble p-NPPC was comparable with that of the wild-type. On the other hand, D156G catalysed the hydrolysis of hydrophilic substrates such as HNP and p-NPPC more efficiently (> 4-fold) than the wild-type. These results suggested that Asp126 and Asp156, located in the highly conserved region, may well be involved in a substrate recognition process rather than catalytic action. Haemolytic activities of the mutant enzymes were found to be parallel with their SM-hydrolysing activities. Two regions, including the C-terminal region containing Asp295, were found to show considerable sequence identity with the corresponding regions of bovine pancreatic DNase I. Structural predictions indicated structural similarity between SMase and DNase I. An evolutionary relationship based on the catalytic function was suggested between the structures of these two phosphodiesterases. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:7639690

  3. Redox potentials of dopamine and its supramolecular complex with aspartic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao; Han, Ling-Li; Du, Chun-Mei; Yu, Zhang-Yu

    2014-07-01

    Dopamine (DA) can be oxidized to dopamine quinone (DAquinone) through a one-step, two-electron redox reaction. The electron transfer property of DA and its supramolecular complex with aspartic acid (Asp) has been investigated by the theoretical calculations. We calculated the standard redox potentials ( E o) of DA/DAquinone at the MP2/6-31G( d,p)//B3LYP/6-31G( d,p), MP2/6-31+G( d,p)//B3LYP/6-31+G( d,p), MP2/6-31G( d,p)//B3LYP/6-311G( d,p), and MP2/6-311+G( d,p)//B3LYP/6-311+G( d,p) levels. Comparing the experimental value, the redox potentials of DA/DAquinone obtained at MP2//B3LYP/6-311G( d,p) and MP2//B3LYP/6-311+G( d,p) levels can be considered as the upper and lower estimates. DA can form supramolecular complex (DA-Asp) with Asp through hydrogen bond (H-bond). Therefore, the values of 0.631 and 0.628 V obtained at MP2//B3LYP/6-311G( d,p) and MP2//B3LYP/6-311+G( d,p) levels for DA-Asp/DAquinone-Asp can be proposed as the upper and lower estimates of a probable (about 0.630 V) value of the corresponding redox potential. The calculated E o values of DA-Asp/DAquinone-Asp at the four theoretical levels are upper than those of DA/DAquinone, which indicates that the formation of H-bonds weaken the electron-donating ability of DA.

  4. Intramolecular vibrations in low-frequency normal modes of amino acids: L-alanine in the neat solid state.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Wang, Houng-Wei; Tominaga, Keisuke; Hayashi, Michitoshi

    2015-03-26

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis of the low-frequency phonons of L-alanine by using the solid-state density functional theory at the Γ point. We are particularly interested in the intramolecular vibrations accessing low-frequency phonons via harmonic coupling with intermolecular vibrations. A new mode-analysis method is introduced to quantify the vibrational characteristics of such intramolecular vibrations. We find that the torsional motions of COO(-) are involved in low-frequency phonons, although COO(-) is conventionally assumed to undergo localized torsion. We also find the broad distributions of intramolecular vibrations relevant to important functional groups of amino acids, e.g., the COO(-) and NH3(+) torsions, in the low-frequency phonons. The latter finding is illustrated by the concept of frequency distribution of vibrations. These findings may lead to immediate implications in other amino acid systems.

  5. Comments on the paper: 'Optical reflectance, optical refractive index and optical conductivity measurements of nonlinear optics for L-aspartic acid nickel chloride single crystal'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Bikshandarkoil R.; Naik, Suvidha G.; Dhavskar, Kiran T.

    2016-02-01

    We argue that the 'L-aspartic acid nickel chloride' crystal reported by the authors of the title paper (Optics Communications, 291 (2013) 304-308) is actually the well-known diaqua(L-aspartato)nickel(II) hydrate crystal.

  6. A novel aspartic acid protease gene from pineapple fruit (Ananas comosus): cloning, characterization and relation to postharvest chilling stress resistance.

    PubMed

    Raimbault, Astrid-Kim; Zuily-Fodil, Yasmine; Soler, Alain; Cruz de Carvalho, Maria H

    2013-11-15

    A full-length cDNA encoding a putative aspartic acid protease (AcAP1) was isolated for the first time from the flesh of pineapple (Ananas comosus) fruit. The deduced sequence of AcAP1 showed all the common features of a typical plant aspartic protease phytepsin precursor. Analysis of AcAP1 gene expression under postharvest chilling treatment in two pineapple varieties differing in their resistance to blackheart development revealed opposite trends. The resistant variety showed an up-regulation of AcAP1 precursor gene expression whereas the susceptible showed a down-regulation in response to postharvest chilling treatment. The same trend was observed regarding specific AP enzyme activity in both varieties. Taken together our results support the involvement of AcAP1 in postharvest chilling stress resistance in pineapple fruits.

  7. Mutational analysis of the three cysteines and active-site aspartic acid 103 of ketosteroid isomerase from Pseudomonas putida biotype B.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S W; Joo, S; Choi, G; Cho, H S; Oh, B H; Choi, K Y

    1997-01-01

    In order to clarify the roles of three cysteines in ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) from Pseudomonas putida biotype B, each of the cysteine residues has been changed to a serine residue (C69S, C81S, and C97S) by site-directed mutagenesis. All cysteine mutations caused only a slight decrease in the k(cat) value, with no significant change of Km for the substrate. Even modification of the sulfhydryl group with 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) has almost no effect on enzyme activity. These results demonstrate that none of the cysteines in the KSI from P. putida is critical for catalytic activity, contrary to the previous identification of a cysteine in an active-site-directed photoinactivation study of KSI. Based on the three-dimensional structures of KSIs with and without dienolate intermediate analog equilenin, as determined by X-ray crystallography at high resolution, Asp-103 was found to be located within the range of the hydrogen bond to the equilenin. To assess the role of Asp-103 in catalysis, Asp-103 has been replaced with either asparagine (D103N) or alanine (D103A) by site-directed mutagenesis. For D103A mutant KSI there was a significant decrease in the k(cat) value: the k(cat) of the mutant was 85-fold lower than that of the wild-type enzyme; however, for the D103N mutant, which retained some hydrogen bonding capability, there was a minor decrease in the k(cat) value. These findings support the idea that aspartic acid 103 in the active site is an essential catalytic residue involved in catalysis by hydrogen bonding to the dienolate intermediate. PMID:9401033

  8. Formation of [b3 - 1 + cat]+ ions from metal-cationized tetrapeptides containing beta-alanine, gamma-aminobutyric acid or epsilon-aminocaproic acid residues.

    PubMed

    Osburn, Sandra M; Ochola, Sila O; Talaty, Erach R; Van Stipdonk, Michael J

    2008-11-01

    The presence and position of a single beta-alanine (betaA), gamma-aminobutyric acid (gammaABu) or epsilon-aminocaproic acid (Cap) residue has been shown to have a significant influence on the formation of b(n)+ and y(n)+ product ions from a series of model, protonated peptides. In this study, we examined the effect of the same residues on the formation of analogous [b3 - 1 + cat]+ products from metal (Li+, Na+ and Ag+)-cationized peptides. The larger amino acids suppress formation of b3+ from protonated peptides with general sequence AAXG (where X = beta-alanine, gamma-aminobutyric acid or epsilon-aminocaproic acid), presumably because of the prohibitive effect of larger cyclic intermediates in the 'oxazolone' pathway. However, abundant [b3 - 1 + cat]+ products are generated from metal-cationized versions of AAXG. Using a group of deuterium-labeled and exchanged peptides, we found that formation of [b3 - 1 + cat]+ involves transfer of either amide or alpha-carbon position H atoms, and the tendency to transfer the atom from the alpha-carbon position increases with the size of the amino acid in position X. To account for the transfer of the H atom, a mechanism involving formation of a ketene product as [b3 - 1 + cat]+ is proposed.

  9. Control over the crystal phase, shape, size and aggregation of calcium carbonate via a L-aspartic acid inducing process.

    PubMed

    Tong, Hua; Ma, Wentao; Wang, Leilei; Wan, Peng; Hu, Jiming; Cao, Lianxin

    2004-08-01

    The acidic amino acid, such as aspartic acid (l-Asp), and glutamic acid are the primary active molecules of the glycoprotein on the organic/inorganic interface of biomineralized tissue. In this study, aspartic acid was used as the organic template in inducing the nucleation and growth of calcium carbonate. With the analysis of X-ray diffraction we investigated the relationship between the l-Asp concentration and the precipitation phase crystal structure of calcium carbonate. SEM and TEM were employed in the analysis of the morphological characteristic of the precipitation and the aggregation of the nanoscale porous phase. In order to get the direct evidence of the interaction between Ca2+ and l-Asp, the technique of QCM was used in the investigation of the coordinate interaction of Ca2+/l-Asp. As the results have shown, l-Asp alone is adequate to switch the transformation between calcite and vaterite, and neither soluble organic additions nor metal ions are needed. Meanwhile, the morphology, size and aggregative way of the deposition are also mediated with change of l-Asp concentration. To interpret the cause of the hierarchic structure range from nanoscale to micron-scale and the formation of the porous spheres of vaterite, an assumption of limited-fusion was proposed from the view of the small biomolecules polarity that can control over the growth of the crystals and the aggregation of the micro crystals. The conclusion also provide a new material synthesize strategy.

  10. Genome-enabled determination of amino acid biosynthesis in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris and identification of biosynthetic pathways for alanine, glycine, and isoleucine by 13C-isotopologue profiling.

    PubMed

    Schatschneider, Sarah; Vorhölter, Frank-Jörg; Rückert, Christian; Becker, Anke; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Pühler, Alfred; Niehaus, Karsten

    2011-10-01

    To elucidate the biosynthetic pathways for all proteinogenic amino acids in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, this study combines results obtained by in silico genome analysis and by (13)C-NMR-based isotopologue profiling to provide a panoramic view on a substantial section of bacterial metabolism. Initially, biosynthesis pathways were reconstructed from an improved annotation of the complete genome of X. campestris pv. campestris B100. This metabolic reconstruction resulted in the unequivocal identification of biosynthesis routes for 17 amino acids in total: arginine, asparagine, aspartate, cysteine, glutamate, glutamine, histidine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, proline, serine, threonine, tryptophan, tyrosine, and valine. Ambiguous pathways were reconstructed from the genome data for alanine, glycine, and isoleucine biosynthesis. (13)C-NMR analyses supported the identification of the metabolically active pathways. The biosynthetic routes for these amino acids were derived from the precursor molecules pyruvate, serine, and pyruvate, respectively. By combining genome analysis and isotopologue profiling, a comprehensive set of biosynthetic pathways covering all proteinogenic amino acids was unraveled for this plant pathogenic bacterium, which plays an important role in biotechnology as a producer of the exopolysaccharide xanthan. The data obtained lay ground for subsequent functional analyses in post-genomics and biotechnology, while the innovative combination of in silico and wet lab technology described here is promising as a general approach to elucidate metabolic pathways.

  11. First principles DFT study of weak C-H…O bonds in crystalline amino acids under pressure-alanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaniah, Lavanya M.; Kamal, C.; Sikka, S. K.

    2013-02-01

    Many crystalline solids containing C-H…O hydrogen bonds display blue shifting of the C-H stretching frequency under pressure. No agreed explanation is available for this. Here, we use first principles density functional theory, to determine the hydrogen atom positions to understand the cause of this blue shift. No neutron diffraction is feasible due to flux limitations for this purpose. As a first case, we have taken up the study of the amino acid, alanine. We find that the C_H_…O bond in it no longer remain isolated under compression as is case at ambient pressure. The hydrogen atom in the bond has now repulsive contacts with other atoms. This results in contraction of the C-H bond length and consequently to blue shifting as is found experimentally.

  12. Molecular dynamics study of Ca(2+) binding loop variants of silver hake parvalbumin with aspartic acid at the "gateway" position.

    PubMed

    Fahie, Kamau; Pitts, Rebecca; Elkins, Kelly; Nelson, Donald J

    2002-04-01

    The helix-loop-helix (i.e., EF-hand) Ca(2+) ion binding motif is characteristic of a large family of high-affinity calcium ion binding proteins, including the parvalbumins, oncomodulins and calmodulins. In this work we describe a set of molecular dynamics computations on the major parvalbumin from the silver hake (SHPV-B) and on functional fragments of this protein, consisting of the first four helical regions (the ABCD fragment), and the internal helix-loop- helix region (the CD fragment). In both whole protein and protein fragments (i.e., ABCD and CD fragments), the 9th loop residue in the calcium ion binding site in the CD helix-loop-helix region (the so-called "gateway" position) has been mutated from glutamic acid to aspartic acid. Aspartic acid is one of the most common residues found at the gateway position in other (non-parvalbumin) EF- hand proteins, but has never been found at the gateway position of any parvalbumin. (Interestingly, aspartic acid does occur at the gateway position in the closely related rat and human oncomodulins.) Consistent with experimental observations, the results of our molecular dynamics simulations show that incorporation of aspartic acid at the gateway position is very disruptive to the structural integrity of the calcium ion coordination site in the whole protein. The aspartic acid mutation is somewhat less disruptive to the calcium ion coordination sites in the two parvalbumin fragments (i.e., the ABCD and CD fragments), presumably due to the higher degree of motional freedom allowable in these protein fragments. One problem associated with the E59D whole protein variant is a prohibitively close approach of the aspartate carboxyl group to the CD calcium ion observed in the energy-minimized (pre-molecular dynamics) structure. This steric situation does not emerge during energy-minimization of the wild-type protein. The damage to the structural integrity of the calcium ion coordination site in the whole protein E59D variant is

  13. Microbial production of amino acids in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, H

    2000-01-01

    The microbial biotechnology of amino acids production which was developed and industrialized in Japan have been summarized. The amino acids include L-glutamic acid, L-lysine, L-threonine, L-aspartic acid, L-alanine, L-cysteine, L-dihydroxyphenylalanine, D-p-hydroxyphenyl-glycine, and hydroxy-L-proline.

  14. A case of hemoglobin Hiroshima (β146 histidine to aspartic acid) with compensatory erythremia and undetectable HbA₁c.

    PubMed

    Nishimori, Hisakazu; Harano, Keiko; Wada, Hideho; Takano, Satoshi; Fukuda, Shinji; Takehara, Yukihito; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Kumagai, Isao; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Takeda, Sho

    2012-06-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) Hiroshima is an Hb variant that travels rapidly on electrophoresis and shows a fourfold increase in oxygen affinity and a decreased Bohr effect. We encountered a 40-year-old male patient with erythremia and an undetectable HbA(1c) level. The presence of an abnormal hemoglobin molecule was suggested by the results of high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. Subsequent gene analysis by direct sequencing confirmed Hb Hiroshima (β146 histidine → aspartic acid). Caution should be exercised when diagnosing erythremia.

  15. Efficient optical resolution of amino acid by alanine racemaze chiral analogue supported on mesoporous carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, D.; Kim, K.; Park, D.; Kim, G.

    2012-09-01

    Optically pure D-amino acids are industrially important chiral building blocks for the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, food ingredients, and drug intermediates. Chemoenzymatic dynamic kinetic-resolution processes have recently been developed for deracemization of amino acids. S-ARCA would be a good candidate for the selective adsorption of D amino acid through the imine formation reaction. The organic phase containing S-ARCA adsorbent, TPPC or Ionic Liquid (as a phase transfer catalyst) in MC were coated on the surfaces of mesoporous carbon C-SBA-15(CMK). The aqueous solution of racemic D/L-amino acid and NaOH were added to the carbon support coated with ARCA. The D/L ratios on ARCA and in solution were determined with increasing reaction time. S-ARCA has a unique property for the selective adsorption of D- amino acid (up to 90% selcetivity) in the racemic mixture. The fixed bed reactor containing ARCA/carbon support was also adopted successfully for the selective separation of amino acid.

  16. Molecular cloning and enzymological characterization of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate independent aspartate racemase from hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus litoralis DSM 5473.

    PubMed

    Washio, Tsubasa; Kato, Shiro; Oikawa, Tadao

    2016-09-01

    We succeeded in expressing the aspartate racemase homolog gene from Thermococcus litoralis DSM 5473 in Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3) and found that the gene encodes aspartate racemase. The aspartate racemase gene consisted of 687 bp and encoded 228 amino acid residues. The purified enzyme showed aspartate racemase activity with a specific activity of 1590 U/mg. The enzyme was a homodimer with a molecular mass of 56 kDa and did not require pyridoxal 5'-phosphate as a coenzyme. The enzyme showed aspartate racemase activity even at 95 °C, and the activation energy of the enzyme was calculated to be 51.8 kJ/mol. The enzyme was highly thermostable, and approximately 50 % of its initial activity remained even after incubation at 90 °C for 11 h. The enzyme showed a maximum activity at a pH of 7.5 and was stable between pH 6.0 and 7.0. The enzyme acted on L-cysteic acid and L-cysteine sulfinic acid in addition to D- and L-aspartic acids, and was strongly inhibited by iodoacetic acid. The site-directed mutagenesis of the enzyme showed that the essential cysteine residues were conserved as Cys83 and Cys194. D-Forms of aspartic acid, serine, alanine, and valine were contained in T. litoralis DSM 5473 cells.

  17. Conformation of the phosphate D-alanine zwitterion in bacterial teichoic acid from nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Garimella, Ravindranath; Halye, Jeffrey L; Harrison, William; Klebba, Phillip E; Rice, Charles V

    2009-10-06

    The conformation of d-alanine (d-Ala) groups of bacterial teichoic acid is a central, yet untested, paradigm of microbiology. The d-Ala binds via the C-terminus, thereby allowing the amine to exist as a free cationic NH(3)(+) group with the ability to form a contact ion pair with the nearby anionic phosphate group. This conformation hinders metal chelation by the phosphate because the zwitterion pair is charge neutral. To the contrary, the repulsion of cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) is attributed to the presence of the d-Ala cation; thus the ion pair does not form in this model. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been used to measure the distance between amine and phosphate groups within cell wall fragments of Bacillus subtilis. The bacteria were grown on media containing (15)N d-Ala and beta-chloroalanine racemase inhibitor. The rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) pulse sequence was used to measure the internuclear dipolar coupling, and the results demonstrate (1) the metal-free amine-to-phosphate distance is 4.4 A and (2) the amine-to-phosphate distance increases to 5.4 A in the presence of Mg(2+) ions. As a result, the zwitterion exists in a nitrogen-oxygen ion pair configuration providing teichoic acid with a positive charge to repel CAMPs. Additionally, the amine of d-Ala does not prevent magnesium chelation in contradiction to the prevailing view of teichoic acids in metal binding. Thus, the NMR-based description of teichoic acid structure resolves the contradictory models, advances the basic understanding of cell wall biochemistry, and provides possible insight into the creation of new antibiotic therapies.

  18. Oxidation of 3,4-dehydro-D-proline and other D-amino acid analogues by D-alanine dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Deutch, Charles E

    2004-09-15

    3,4-Dehydro-DL-proline is a toxic analogue of L-proline which has been useful in studying the uptake and metabolism of this key amino acid. When membrane fractions from Escherichia coli strain UMM5 (putA1::Tn5 proC24) lacking both L-proline dehydrogenase and L-Delta(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase were incubated with 3,4-dehydro-DL-proline, pyrrole-2-carboxylate was formed. There was no enzyme activity with 3,4-dehydro-L-proline, but activity was restored after racemization of the substrate. Oxidation of 3,4-dehydro-DL-proline by membrane fractions from strain UMM5 was induced by growth in minimal medium containing D- or L-alanine, had a pH optimum of 9, and was competitively inhibited by D-alanine. An E. coli strain with no D-alanine dehydrogenase activity due to the dadA237 mutation was unable to oxidize either 3,4-dehydro-D-proline or D-alanine, as were spontaneous Dad(-) mutants of E. coli strain UMM5. Membrane fractions containing D-alanine dehydrogenase also catalyzed the oxidation of D-2-aminobutyrate, D-norvaline, D-norleucine, cis-4-hydroxy-D-proline, and DL-ethionine. These results indicate that d-alanine dehydrogenase is responsible for the residual 3,4-dehydro-DL-proline oxidation activity in putA proC mutants of E. coli and provide further evidence that this enzyme plays a general role in the metabolism of D-amino acids and their analogues.

  19. Acetate stimulates flux through the tricarboxylic acid cycle in rabbit renal proximal tubules synthesizing glutamine from alanine: a 13C NMR study.

    PubMed Central

    Dugelay, S; Chauvin, M F; Megnin-Chanet, F; Martin, G; Laréal, M C; Lhoste, J M; Baverel, G

    1999-01-01

    Although glutamine synthesis has a major role in the control of acid-base balance and ammonia detoxification in the kidney of herbivorous species, very little is known about the regulation of this process. We therefore studied the influence of acetate, which is readily metabolized by the kidney and whose metabolism is accompanied by the production of bicarbonate, on glutamine synthesis from variously labelled [(13)C]alanine and [(14)C]alanine molecules in isolated rabbit renal proximal tubules. With alanine as sole exogenous substrate, glutamine and, to a smaller extent, glutamate and CO(2), were the only significant products of the metabolism of this amino acid, which was removed at high rates. Absolute fluxes through the enzymes involved in alanine conversion into glutamine were assessed by using a novel model describing the corresponding reactions in conjunction with the (13)C NMR, and to a smaller extent, the radioactive and enzymic data. The presence of acetate (5 mM) led to a large stimulation of fluxes through citrate synthase and alpha-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase. These effects were accompanied by increases in the removal of alanine, in the accumulation of glutamate and in flux through the anaplerotic enzyme pyruvate carboxylase. Acetate did not alter fluxes through glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase; as a result, acetate did not change the accumulation of ammonia, which was negligible under both experimental conditions. We conclude that acetate, which seems to be an important energy-provider to the rabbit renal proximal tubule, simultaneously traps as glutamate the extra nitrogen removed as alanine, thus preventing the release of additional ammonia by the glutamate dehydrogenase reaction. PMID:10477267

  20. Amino Acid Racemization and the Preservation of Ancient DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poinar, Hendrik N.; Hoss, Matthias

    1996-01-01

    The extent of racemization of aspartic acid, alanine, and leucine provides criteria for assessing whether ancient tissue samples contain endogenous DNA. In samples in which the D/L ratio of aspartic acid exceeds 0.08, ancient DNA sequences could not be retrieved. Paleontological finds from which DNA sequences purportedly millions of years old have been reported show extensive racemization, and the amino acids present are mainly contaminates. An exception is the amino acids in some insects preserved in amber.

  1. Recognition of the folded conformation of plant hormone (auxin, IAA) conjugates with glutamic and aspartic acids and their amides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolić, S.; Kveder, M.; Klaić, B.; Magnus, V.; Kojić-Prodić, B.

    2001-01-01

    The molecular structure of the endogenous plant hormone (auxin) conjugate, N-(indol-3-ylacetyl)- L-glutamic acid, is deduced by comparison with N2-(indol-3-ylacetyl)glutamine (IAA-Gln), N2-(indol-3-ylacetyl)asparagine (IAA-Asn) and N-(indol-3-ylacetyl)- L-aspartic acid using X-ray structure analysis, 1H-NMR spectroscopy (NOE measurements) and molecular modelling. The significance of the overall molecular shape, and of the resulting amphiphilic properties, of the compounds studied are discussed in terms of possible implications for trafficking between cell compartments. Both in the solid state and in solution, the molecules are in the hair-pin (folded) conformation in which the side chain is folded over the indole ring. While extended conformations can be detected by molecular dynamics simulations, they are so short-lived that any major influence on the biological properties of the compounds studied is unlikely.

  2. Dipeptide Nanotubes Containing Unnatural Fluorine-Substituted β(2,3)-Diarylamino Acid and L-Alanine as Candidates for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Andrea; Pellegrino, Sara; Das, Priyadip; Yuran, Sivan; Bucci, Raffaella; Ferri, Nicola; Meneghetti, Fiorella; Castellano, Carlo; Reches, Meital; Gelmi, Maria Luisa

    2015-09-18

    The synthesis and the structural characterization of dipeptides composed of unnatural fluorine-substituted β(2,3)-diarylamino acid and L-alanine are reported. Depending on the stereochemistry of the β amino acid, these dipeptides are able to self-assemble into proteolytic stable nanotubes. These architectures were able to enter the cell and locate in the cytoplasmic/perinuclear region and represent interesting candidates for biomedical applications.

  3. Independent highly sensitive characterization of asparagine deamidation and aspartic acid isomerization by sheathless CZE-ESI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Gahoual, Rabah; Beck, Alain; François, Yannis-Nicolas; Leize-Wagner, Emmanuelle

    2016-02-01

    Amino acids residues are commonly submitted to various physicochemical modifications occurring at physiological pH and temperature. Post-translational modifications (PTMs) require comprehensive characterization because of their major influence on protein structure and involvement in numerous in vivo process or signaling. Mass spectrometry (MS) has gradually become an analytical tool of choice to characterize PTMs; however, some modifications are still challenging because of sample faint modification levels or difficulty to separate an intact peptide from modified counterparts before their transfer to the ionization source. Here, we report the implementation of capillary zone electrophoresis coupled to electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (CZE-ESI-MS/MS) by the intermediate of a sheathless interfacing for independent and highly sensitive characterization of asparagine deamidation (deaN) and aspartic acid isomerization (isoD). CZE selectivity regarding deaN and isoD was studied extensively using different sets of synthetic peptides based on actual tryptic peptides. Results demonstrated CZE ability to separate the unmodified peptide from modified homologous exhibiting deaN, isoD or both independently with a resolution systematically superior to 1.29. Developed CZE-ESI-MS/MS method was applied for the characterization of monoclonal antibodies and complex protein mixture. Conserved CZE selectivity could be demonstrated even for complex samples, and foremost results obtained showed that CZE selectivity is similar regardless of the composition of the peptide. Separation of modified peptides prior to the MS analysis allowed to characterize and estimate modification levels of the sample independently for deaN and isoD even for peptides affected by both modifications and, as a consequence, enables to distinguish the formation of l-aspartic acid or d-aspartic acid generated from deaN. Separation based on peptide modification allowed, as supported by the ESI

  4. Distribution of messenger RNAs encoding the enzymes glutaminase, aspartate aminotransferase and glutamic acid decarboxylase in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Najlerahim, A; Harrison, P J; Barton, A J; Heffernan, J; Pearson, R C

    1990-05-01

    In situ hybridization histochemistry (ISHH) using synthetic oligonucleotide probes has been used to identify cells containing the mRNAs coding for glutaminase (GluT), aspartate aminotransferase (AspT) and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD). The distribution of GAD mRNA confirms previous descriptions and matches the distribution of GAD detected using specific antibodies. AspT mRNA is widely distributed in the brain, but is present at high levels in GABAergic neuronal populations, some that may be glutamatergic, and in a subset of neurons which do not contain significant levels of either GAD or GluT mRNA. Particularly prominent are the neurons of the magnocellular division of the red nucleus, the large cells in the deep cerebellar nuclei and the vestibular nuclei and neurons of the lateral superior olivary nucleus. GluT mRNA does not appear to be present at high levels in all GAD-containing neurons, but is seen prominently in many neuronal populations that may use glutamate as a neurotransmitter, such as neocortical and hippocampal pyramidal cells, the granule cells of the cerebellum and neurons of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. The heaviest labelling of GluT mRNA is seen in the lateral reticular nucleus of the medulla. ISHH using probes directed against the mRNAs encoding these enzymes may be an important technique for identifying glutamate and aspartate using neuronal populations and for examining their regulation in a variety of experimental and pathological circumstances.

  5. Identification and functional analysis of a prokaryotic-type aspartate aminotransferase: implications for plant amino acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, Fernando; De Santis, Laura; Suárez, María Fernanda; Crespillo, Remedios; Cánovas, Francisco M

    2006-05-01

    In this paper, we report the identification of genes from pine (PpAAT), Arabidopsis (AtAAT) and rice (OsAAT) encoding a novel class of aspartate aminotransferase (AAT, EC 2.6.1.1) in plants. The enzyme is unrelated to other eukaryotic AATs from plants and animals but similar to bacterial enzymes. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that this prokaryotic-type AAT is closely related to cyanobacterial enzymes, suggesting it might have an endosymbiotic origin. Interestingly, most of the essential residues involved in the interaction with the substrate and the attachment of pyridoxal phosphate cofactor in the active site of the enzyme were conserved in the deduced polypeptide. The polypeptide is processed in planta to a mature subunit of 45 kDa that is immunologically distinct from the cytosolic, mitochondrial and chloroplastic isoforms of AAT previously characterized in plants. Functional expression of PpAAT sequences in Escherichia coli showed that the processed precursor is assembled into a catalytically active homodimeric holoenzyme that is strictly specific for aspartate. These atypical genes are predominantly expressed in green tissues of pine, Arabidopsis and rice, suggesting a key role of this AAT in nitrogen metabolism associated with photosynthetic activity. Moreover, immunological analyses revealed that the plant prokaryotic-type AAT is a nuclear-encoded chloroplast protein. This implies that two plastidic AAT co-exist in plants: a eukaryotic type previously characterized and the prokaryotic type described here. The respective roles of these two enzymes in plant amino acid metabolism are discussed.

  6. Intramembrane aspartic acid in SCAP protein governs cholesterol-induced conformational change

    PubMed Central

    Feramisco, Jamison D.; Radhakrishnan, Arun; Ikeda, Yukio; Reitz, Julian; Brown, Michael S.; Goldstein, Joseph L.

    2005-01-01

    The polytopic membrane protein SCAP transports sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi, thereby activating cholesterol synthesis. Cholesterol accumulation in the ER membranes changes SCAP to an alternate conformation in which it binds ER retention proteins called Insigs, thereby terminating cholesterol synthesis. Here, we show that the conserved Asp-428 in the sixth transmembrane helix of SCAP is essential for SCAP's dissociation from Insigs. In transfected hamster cells, mutant SCAP in which Asp-428 is replaced by alanine (D428A) remained in an Insig-binding conformation when cells were depleted of sterols. As a result, mutant SCAP failed to dissociate from Insigs, and it failed to carry SREBPs to the Golgi. These data identify an important functional residue in SCAP, and they provide genetic evidence that the conformation of SCAP dictates the rate of cholesterol synthesis in animal cells. PMID:15728349

  7. Structural characterization of hydrated poly(aspartic acid) sodium and poly(aspartic acid) sodium/poly(vinyl alcohol) blends by high-resolution solid-state 23Na NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Ando, I.

    1999-09-01

    The structure of hydrated poly(aspartic acid) sodium (PAANa) and in blended PAANa, which was blended with poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), is characterized by means of high-resolution solid-state 23Na NMR. There are two peaks in dried pure PAANa, which are assigned to associated ions (about -16 ppm) and isolated ions or end group ions of PAANa (7.2 ppm), respectively. With an increase in hydration, the 23Na chemical shifts of these two peaks are changed to tend toward 0 ppm, and the line width at half the height of the 23Na resonance decreases. In contrast, in the blended samples, the 23Na resonance shapes and chemical shift values are significantly changed depending on the ratio of the PAANa/PVA blends and the temperature. On the basis of these experimental results, the structure of the blends was elucidated.

  8. Novel emissive bio-inspired non-proteinogenic coumarin-alanine amino acid: fluorescent probe for polyfunctional systems.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Elisabete; Capelo, José Luis; Lima, João Carlos; Lodeiro, Carlos

    2012-10-01

    Two new bio-inspired non-proteinogenic compounds L1 and L2, containing coumarin and/or acridine chromophores and bearing as spacer an alanine amino acid were successfully synthesized and fully characterized by elemental analysis, (1)H and (13)C NMR, infrared spectroscopy (KBr discs), melting point, ESI-TOF (electrospray ionization-time of flight-mass), UV-vis absorption and emission spectroscopy, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetime measurements. A relative fluorescence quantum yield of 0.02 was determined for both compounds. In L2 the presence of an intramolecular energy transfer from the coumarin to the acridine unit was observed. L1 and L2 are quite sensitive to the basicity of the environment. At alkaline values both compounds show a strong quenching in the fluorescence emission, attributed to the photoinduced electron transfer (PET). However, both deprotonated forms recover the emission with the addition of Zn(2+), Cd(2+) and Al(3+) metal ions. As multifunctional emissive probes, the titration of L1 and L2 with lanthanides (III), Eu(3+) and Tb(3+) was also explored as new visible bio-probes in the absence and in the presence of liposomes. In a liposomal environment a lower energy transfer was observed.

  9. Growth, structural, spectral, mechanical, thermal and dielectric characterization of phosphoric acid admixtured L-alanine (PLA) single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, A. S. J. Lucia; Selvarajan, P.; Perumal, S.

    2011-10-01

    Phosphoric acid admixtured L-alanine (PLA) single crystals were grown successfully by solution method with slow evaporation technique at room temperature. Crystals of size 18 mm × 12 mm × 8 mm have been obtained in 28 days. The grown crystals were colorless and transparent. The solubility of the grown samples has been found out at various temperatures. The lattice parameters of the grown crystals were determined by X-ray diffraction technique. The reflection planes of the sample were confirmed by the powder X-ray diffraction study and diffraction peaks were indexed. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) studies were used to confirm the presence of various functional groups in the crystals. UV-visible transmittance spectrum was recorded to study the optical transparency of grown crystal. The nonlinear optical (NLO) property of the grown crystal was confirmed by Kurtz-Perry powder technique and a study of its second harmonic generation efficiency in comparison with potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) has been made. The mechanical strength of the crystal was estimated by Vickers hardness test. The grown crystals were subjected to thermo gravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA). The dielectric behavior of the sample was also studied.

  10. Growth, structural, spectral, mechanical, thermal and dielectric characterization of phosphoric acid admixtured L-alanine (PLA) single crystals.

    PubMed

    Rose, A S J Lucia; Selvarajan, P; Perumal, S

    2011-10-15

    Phosphoric acid admixtured L-alanine (PLA) single crystals were grown successfully by solution method with slow evaporation technique at room temperature. Crystals of size 18 mm×12 mm×8 mm have been obtained in 28 days. The grown crystals were colorless and transparent. The solubility of the grown samples has been found out at various temperatures. The lattice parameters of the grown crystals were determined by X-ray diffraction technique. The reflection planes of the sample were confirmed by the powder X-ray diffraction study and diffraction peaks were indexed. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) studies were used to confirm the presence of various functional groups in the crystals. UV-visible transmittance spectrum was recorded to study the optical transparency of grown crystal. The nonlinear optical (NLO) property of the grown crystal was confirmed by Kurtz-Perry powder technique and a study of its second harmonic generation efficiency in comparison with potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) has been made. The mechanical strength of the crystal was estimated by Vickers hardness test. The grown crystals were subjected to thermo gravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA). The dielectric behavior of the sample was also studied.

  11. Phospho-N-Acetyl-Muramyl-Pentapeptide Translocase from Escherichia coli: Catalytic Role of Conserved Aspartic Acid Residues

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Adrian J.; Brandish, Philip E.; Gilbey, Andrea M.; Bugg, Timothy D. H.

    2004-01-01

    Phospho-N-acetyl-muramyl-pentapeptide translocase (translocase 1) catalyzes the first of a sequence of lipid-linked steps that ultimately assemble the peptidoglycan layer of the bacterial cell wall. This essential enzyme is the target of several natural product antibiotics and has recently been the focus of antimicrobial drug discovery programs. The catalytic mechanism of translocase 1 is believed to proceed via a covalent intermediate formed between phospho-N-acetyl-muramyl-pentapeptide and a nucleophilic amino acid residue. Amino acid sequence alignments of the translocase 1 family and members of the related transmembrane phosphosugar transferase superfamily revealed only three conserved residues that possess nucleophilic side chains: the aspartic acid residues D115, D116, and D267. Here we report the expression and partial purification of Escherichia coli translocase 1 as a C-terminal hexahistidine (C-His6) fusion protein. Three enzymes with the site-directed mutations D115N, D116N, and D267N were constructed, expressed, and purified as C-His6 fusions. Enzymatic analysis established that all three mutations eliminated translocase 1 activity, and this finding verified the essential role of these residues. By analogy with the structural environment of the double aspartate motif found in prenyl transferases, we propose a model whereby D115 and D116 chelate a magnesium ion that coordinates with the pyrophosphate bridge of the UDP-N-acetyl-muramyl-pentapeptide substrate and in which D267 therefore fulfills the role of the translocase 1 active-site nucleophile. PMID:14996806

  12. Enzymatic resolution for the preparation of enantiomerically enriched D-beta-heterocyclic alanine derivatives using Escherichia coli aromatic L-amino acid transaminase.

    PubMed

    Cho, Byung-Kwan; Park, Hyung-Yeon; Seo, Joo-Hyun; Kinnera, Koteshwar; Lee, Bon-Su; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2004-11-20

    An enzymatic resolution was carried out for the preparation of enriched beta-heterocyclic D-alanine derivatives using Escherichia coli aromatic L-amino acid transaminase. The excess of pyrazole, imidazole, or 1,2,4-triazole reacted with methyl-2-acetamidoacrylate in acetonitrile in the presence of potassium carbonate at 60 degrees C, directly leading to make the potassium salt of the corresponding N-acetyl-beta-heterocyclic alanine derivatives. After the acidic deprotection of the N-acetyl group, 10 mM of racemic pyrazolylalanine, triazolylalanine, and imidazolylalanine were resolved to D-pyrazolylalanine, D-triazolylalanine, and D-imidazolylalanine with 46% (85% ee), 42% (72% ee), and 48% (95% ee) conversion yield in 18 h, respectively, using E. coli aromatic L-amino acid transaminase (EC 2.6.1.5). Although the three beta-heterocyclic L-alanine derivatives have similar molecular structures, they showed different reaction rates and enantioselectivities. The relative reactivities of the transaminase toward the beta-heterocyclic L-alanine derivatives could be explained by the relationship between the substrate binding energy (E, kcal/mol) to the enzyme active site and the distance (delta, A) from the nitrogen of alpha-amino group of the substrates to the C4' carbon of PLP-Lys258 Schiff base. As the ratio of the substrate binding energy (E) to the distance (delta) becomes indicative value of k(cat)/K(M) of the enzyme to the substrate, the relative reactivities of the beta-heterocyclic L-alanine derivatives were successfully correlated with E/delta, and the relationship was confirmed by our experiments.

  13. Heat-initiated prebiotic formation of peptides from glycine/aspartic acid and glycine/valine in aqueous environment and clay suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, Chandra Kala; Lata, Hem; Pathak, Hari Datt; Mehata, Mohan Singh

    2009-04-01

    The effect of heat on the reaction system of glycine/aspartic acid and glycine/valine in the aqueous environment as well as in montmorillonite clay suspension with or without divalent cations (Ca2+, Mg2+ and Ni2+) has been investigated at 85°C±5°C for varying periods under prebiotic drying and wetting conditions. The resulting products were analysed and characterized by chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. Peptide formation appears to depend on the duration of heat effect, nature of reactant amino acids and, to some extent, on montmorillonite clay incorporated with divalent cations. In the glycine/aspartic acid system, oligomerization of glycine was limited up to trimer level (Gly)3 along with the formation of glycyl-aspartic acid, while linear and cyclic peptides of aspartic acid were not formed, whereas the glycine/valine system preferentially elongated homo-oligopeptide of glycine up to pentamer level (Gly)5 along with formation of hetero-peptides (Gly-Val and Val-Gly). These studies are relevant in the context of the prebiotic origin of proteins and the role of clay and metal ions in condensation and oligomerization of amino acids. The length of the bio-oligomer chain depends upon the reaction conditions. However, condensation into even a small length seems significant, as the same process would have taken millions of years in the primitive era of the Earth, leading to the first proteins.

  14. Preparation of γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane cross-linked poly(aspartic acid) superabsorbent hydrogels without organic solvent.

    PubMed

    Meng, Hongyu; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Shenyu; Tan, Tianwei; Cao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Poly(aspartic acid) (PASP) hydrogel is a type of biodegradable and biocompatible polymer with high water absorbing ability. Traditionally, the production of PASP hydrogel is expensive, complex, environmentally unfriendly, and consumes a large amount of organic solvents, e.g. dimethylformamide or dimethylsulfoxide. This study introduces a one-step synthesis of PASP resin, in which the organic phase was replaced by distilled water and γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane was used as the cross-linker. Absorbent ability and characteristics were determined by swelling ratio, FTIR, (13)C SSNMR, and SEM. In vitro cytotoxicity evaluation and animal skin irritation tests showed the hydrogel has body-friendly properties. Preparing PASP hydrogel in aqueous solution is promising and finds its use in many applications.

  15. In vitro effects of zinc, D-aspartic acid, and coenzyme-Q10 on sperm function.

    PubMed

    Giacone, Filippo; Condorelli, Rosita A; Mongioì, Laura M; Bullara, Valentina; La Vignera, Sandro; Calogero, Aldo E

    2016-07-15

    Reactive oxygen species favor reproductive processes at low concentrations, but damage spermatozoa and decrease their fertilizing capacity at high concentrations. During infection and/or inflammation of the accessory sex glands reactive oxygen species overproduction may occur which, in turn, may negatively impact on sperm motility, sperm DNA fragmentation, and lipid peroxidation. A number of nutraceutical formulations containing antioxidant molecules have been developed to counteract the deleterious effects of the oxidative stress. A recent formulation containing zinc, D-aspartic acid, and coenzyme-Q10 is present in the pharmaceutical market. Based on these premises, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of this combination on spermatozoa in vitro. The study was conducted on 24 men (32.2 ± 5.5 years): 12 normozoospermic men and 12 asthenozoospermic patients. Spermatozoa from each sample were divided into two control aliquots (aliquot A and B) and an aliquot incubated with zinc, D-aspartic acid, and coenzyme-Q10 (aliquot C). After 3 h of incubation, the following parameters were evaluated: progressive motility, number of spermatozoa with progressive motility recovered after swim-up, lipid peroxidation, and DNA fragmentation. Incubation with zinc, D-aspartic acid, and coenzyme-Q10 maintained sperm motility in normozoospermic men (37.7 ± 1.2 % vs. 35.8 ± 2.3 % at time zero) and improved it significantly in asthenozoospermic patients (26.5 ± 1.9 % vs. 18.8 ± 2.0 % at time zero) (p < 0.01). This resulted in a significantly higher (p < 0.01) number of spermatozoa with progressive motility recovered after swim-up in both normozospermic men (4.1 ± 0.9 vs. 3.3 ± 1.0 millions) and asthenozooseprmic patients (3.2 ± 0.8 vs. 1.6 ± 0.5 millions). Finally, a statistically significant lower sperm lipid peroxidation was found after incubation with zinc, D-aspartic acid, and coenzyme-Q10 (p < 0

  16. High-performance liquid chromatographic determination of beta-alanine, beta-aminoisobutyric acid and gamma-aminobutyric acid in tissue extracts and urine of normal and (aminooxy)acetate-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Abe, T; Kurozumi, Y; Yao, W B; Ubuka, T

    1998-08-07

    A method is described for the simultaneous determination of beta-alanine, beta-aminoisobutyric acid and gamma-aminobutyric acid in biological materials. Amino acids including these beta- and gamma-amino acids were derivatized with 4-dimethylaminoazobenzene-4'-sulfonyl (dabsyl) chloride and dabsyl amino acids formed were separated by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Dabsyl derivatives of these beta- and gamma-amino acids were well separated from other dabsyl-amino acids. The method was applied to the determination of these beta- and gamma-amino acids in trichloroacetic acid extracts of various tissues and to the urine of normal rats and those injected with (aminooxy)acetate (AOA). AOA injection (15 mg per kg of body mass) produced remarkable increase in beta-alanine contents in liver, kidney and urine (10.2, 4.6 and 25.7 times, respectively).

  17. Injectable dopamine-modified poly(α,β-aspartic acid) nanocomposite hydrogel as bioadhesive drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chu; Lu, Caicai; Li, Bingqiang; Shan, Meng; Wu, Guolin

    2017-04-01

    Hydrogel systems based on cross-linked polymeric materials with adhesive properties in wet environments have been considered as promising candidates for tissue adhesives. The 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) is believed to be responsible for the water-resistant adhesive characteristics of mussel adhesive proteins. Under the inspiration of DOPA containing adhesive proteins, a dopamine-modified poly(α,β-aspartic acid) derivative (PDAEA) was successfully synthesized by successive ring-opening reactions of polysuccinimide (PSI) with dopamine and ethanolamine, and an injectable bioadhesive hydrogel was prepared via simply mixing PDAEA and FeCl3 solutions. The formation mechanism of the hydrogel was investigated by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopic, Fourier transformation infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic, visual colorimetric measurements and EDTA immersion methods. The study demonstrated that the PDAEA-Fe(3+) hydrogel is a dual cross-linking system composed of covalent and coordination crosslinks. The PDAEA-Fe(3+) hydrogel is suitable to serve as a bioadhesive agent according to the rheological behaviors and the observed significant shear adhesive strength. The slow and sustained release of the model drug curcumin from the hydrogel in vitro demonstrated the hydrogel could also be potentially used for drug delivery. Moreover, the cytotoxicity tests in vitro suggested the prepared polymer and hydrogel possessed excellent cytocompatibility. All the results indicated that the dopamine modified poly(α,β-aspartic acid) derivative based hydrogel was a promising candidate for bioadhesive drug delivery system. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1000-1008, 2017.

  18. Chiral analysis of UV nonabsorbing compounds by capillary electrophoresis using macrocyclic antibiotics: 1. Separation of aspartic and glutamic acid enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Bednar, P; Aturki, Z; Stransky, Z; Fanali, S

    2001-07-01

    Glycopeptide antibiotics, namely vancomycin or teicoplanin, were evaluated in capillary electrophoresis for the analysis of UV nonabsorbing compounds such as aspartic and glutamic acid enantiomers. Electrophoretic runs were performed in laboratory-made polyacrylamide-coated capillaries using the partial filling-counter current method in order to avoid the presence on the detector path of the absorbing chiral selector. The background electrolyte consisted of an aqueous or aqueous-organic buffer in the pH range of 4.5-6.5 of sorbic acid/histidine and the appropriate concentration of chiral selector. Several experimental parameters such as antibiotic concentration and type, buffer pH, organic modifier, type and concentration of absorbing co-ion (for the indirect UV detection) were studied in order to find the optimum conditions for the chiral resolution of the two underivatized amino acids in their enantiomers. Among the two investigated chiral selectors, vancomycin resulted to be the most useful chiral selector allowing relatively high chiral resolution of the studied compounds even at low concentration. The optimized method (10 mM sorbic acid/histidine, pH 5, and 10 mM of vancomycin) was used for the analysis of real samples such as teeth dentine and beer.

  19. IgE binding to peanut allergens is inhibited by combined D-aspartic and D-glutamic acids.

    PubMed

    Chung, Si-Yin; Reed, Shawndrika

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if D-amino acids (D-aas) bind and inhibit immunoglobulin E (IgE) binding to peanut allergens. D-aas such as D-Asp (aspartic acid), D-Glu (glutamic acid), combined D-[Asp/Glu] and others were each prepared in a cocktail of 9 other D-aas, along with L-amino acids (L-aas) and controls. Each sample was mixed with a pooled plasma from peanut-allergic donors, and tested by ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and Western blots for IgE binding to peanut allergens. Results showed that D-[Asp/Glu] (4 mg/ml) inhibited IgE binding (75%) while D-Glu, D-Asp and other D-aas had no inhibitory effect. A higher inhibition was seen with D-[Asp/Glu] than with L-[Asp/Glu]. We concluded that IgE was specific for D-[Asp/Glu], not D-Asp or D-Glu, and that D-[Asp/Glu] was more reactive than was L-[Asp/Glu] in IgE inhibition. The finding indicates that D-[Asp/Glu] may have the potential for removing IgE or reducing IgE binding to peanut allergens in vitro.

  20. Co-expression of bacterial aspartate kinase and adenylylsulfate reductase genes substantially increases sulfur amino acid levels in transgenic alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Tong, Zongyong; Xie, Can; Ma, Lei; Liu, Liping; Jin, Yongsheng; Dong, Jiangli; Wang, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is one of the most important forage crops used to feed livestock, such as cattle and sheep, and the sulfur amino acid (SAA) content of alfalfa is used as an index of its nutritional value. Aspartate kinase (AK) catalyzes the phosphorylation of aspartate to Asp-phosphate, the first step in the aspartate family biosynthesis pathway, and adenylylsulfate reductase (APR) catalyzes the conversion of activated sulfate to sulfite, providing reduced sulfur for the synthesis of cysteine, methionine, and other essential metabolites and secondary compounds. To reduce the feedback inhibition of other metabolites, we cloned bacterial AK and APR genes, modified AK, and introduced them into alfalfa. Compared to the wild-type alfalfa, the content of cysteine increased by 30% and that of methionine increased substantially by 60%. In addition, a substantial increase in the abundance of essential amino acids (EAAs), such as aspartate and lysine, was found. The results also indicated a close connection between amino acid metabolism and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. The total amino acid content and the forage biomass tested showed no significant changes in the transgenic plants. This approach provides a new method for increasing SAAs and allows for the development of new genetically modified crops with enhanced nutritional value.

  1. Neuraminidase Receptor Binding Variants of Human Influenza A(H3N2) Viruses Resulting from Substitution of Aspartic Acid 151 in the Catalytic Site: a Role in Virus Attachment?▿

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi Pu; Gregory, Victoria; Collins, Patrick; Kloess, Johannes; Wharton, Stephen; Cattle, Nicholas; Lackenby, Angie; Daniels, Rodney; Hay, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Changes in the receptor binding characteristics of human H3N2 viruses have been evident from changes in the agglutination of different red blood cells (RBCs) and the reduced growth capacity of recently isolated viruses, particularly in embryonated eggs. An additional peculiarity of viruses circulating in 2005 to 2009 has been the poor inhibition of hemagglutination by postinfection ferret antisera for many viruses isolated in MDCK cells, including homologous reference viruses. This was shown not to be due to an antigenic change in hemagglutinin (HA) but was shown to be the result of a mutation in aspartic acid 151 of neuraminidase (NA) to glycine, asparagine, or alanine, which caused an oseltamivir-sensitive agglutination of RBCs. The D151G substitution was shown to cause a change in the specificity of NA such that it acquired the capacity to bind receptors, which were refractory to enzymatic cleavage, without altering its ability to remove receptors for HA. Thus, the inhibition of NA-dependent agglutination by the inclusion of oseltamivir carboxylate in the assay was effective in restoring the anti-HA specificity of the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay for monitoring antigenic changes in HA. Since the NA-dependent binding activity did not affect virus neutralization, and virus populations in clinical specimens possessed, at most, low levels of the “151 mutant,” the biological significance of this feature of NA in, for example, immune evasion is unclear. It is apparent, however, that an important role of aspartic acid 151 in the activity of NA may be to restrict the specificity of the NA interaction and its receptor-destroying activity to complement that of HA receptor binding. PMID:20410266

  2. Mutagenesis of aspartic acid-116 enhances the ribonucleolytic activity and angiogenic potency of angiogenin.

    PubMed Central

    Harper, J W; Vallee, B L

    1988-01-01

    Site-specific mutagenesis of the blood vessel-inducing protein angiogenin has been used to further explore both its homology to pancreatic ribonuclease and the functional roles of particular residues. Replacement of Asp-116 in angiogenin by either asparagine (D116N), alanine (D116A), or histidine (D116H) markedly enhances both its ribonucleolytic activity and angiogenic potency. Activity toward tRNA is 8-, 15-, and 18-fold greater than native angiogenin for D116N-, D116A-, and D116H-angiogenin, respectively. The enzymatic specificity of angiogenin, however, has been maintained. Thus, cleavage of 18S and 28S rRNA by the most active His-116 mutant yields the same pattern of polynucleotide products as from angiogenin, whereas there are only minor alterations in activity with cytidylyl(3',5')adenosine and uridylyl(3',5')-adenosine. Extensive biological assays on the chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane demonstrate that D116H-angiogenin is one to two orders of magnitude more potent in inducing neovascularization than native angiogenin, which correlates well with enhanced enzymatic action. These results support the proposition that the enzymatic and angiogenic activities on angiogenin are interrelated. PMID:2459697

  3. Excess of L-alanine in amino acids synthesized in a plasma torch generated by a hypervelocity meteorite impact reproduced in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Managadze, George G.; Engel, Michael H.; Getty, Stephanie; Wurz, Peter; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Shokolov, Anatoly G.; Sholin, Gennady V.; Terent'ev, Sergey A.; Chumikov, Alexander E.; Skalkin, Alexander S.; Blank, Vladimir D.; Prokhorov, Vyacheslav M.; Managadze, Nina G.; Luchnikov, Konstantin A.

    2016-10-01

    We present a laboratory reproduction of hypervelocity impacts of a carbon containing meteorite on a mineral substance representative of planetary surfaces. The physical conditions of the resulting impact plasma torch provide favorable conditions for abiogenic synthesis of protein amino acids: We identified glycine and alanine, and in smaller quantities serine, in the produced material. Moreover, we observe breaking of alanine mirror symmetry with L excess, which coincides with the bioorganic world. Therefore the selection of L-amino acids for the formation of proteins for living matter could have been the result from plasma processes occurring during the impact meteorites on the surface. This indicates that the plasma torch from meteorite impacts could play an important role in the formation of biomolecular homochirality. Thus, meteorite impacts possibly were the initial stage of this process and promoted conditions for the emergence of a living matter.

  4. Is Aspartate an Excitatory Neurotransmitter?

    PubMed Central

    Herring, Bruce E.; Silm, Katlin

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has resurrected the idea that the amino acid aspartate, a selective NMDA receptor agonist, is a neurotransmitter. Using a mouse that lacks the glutamate-selective vesicular transporter VGLUT1, we find that glutamate alone fully accounts for the activation of NMDA receptors at excitatory synapses in the hippocampus. This excludes a role for aspartate and, by extension, a recently proposed role for the sialic acid transporter sialin in excitatory transmission. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT It has been proposed that the amino acid aspartate serves as a neurotransmitter. Although aspartate is a selective agonist for NMDA receptors, we find that glutamate alone fully accounts for neurotransmission at excitatory synapses in the hippocampus, excluding a role for aspartate. PMID:26180193

  5. Ligand-functionalized degradable polyplexes formed by cationic poly(aspartic acid)-grafted chitosan-cyclodextrin conjugates.

    PubMed

    Song, Hai-Qing; Li, Rui-Quan; Duan, Shun; Yu, Bingran; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Da-Fu; Xu, Fu-Jian

    2015-03-19

    Polypeptide-based degradable polyplexes attracted considerable attention in drug delivery systems. Polysaccharides including cyclodextrin (CD), dextran, and chitosan (CS) were readily grafted with cationic poly(aspartic acid)s (PAsps). To further enhance the transfection performances of PAsp-based polyplexes, herein, different types of ligand (folic acid, FA)-functionalized degradable polyplexes were proposed based on the PAsp-grafted chitosan-cyclodextrin conjugate (CCPE), where multiple β-CDs were tied on a CS chain. The FA-functionalized CCPE (i.e., CCPE-FA) was obtained via a host-guest interaction between the CD units of CCPE and the adamantane (Ad) species of Ad-modified FA (Ad-FA). The resulting CCPE/pDNA, CCPE-FA/pDNA, and ternary CCPE-FA/CCPE/pDNA (prepared by layer-by-layer assembly) polyplexes were investigated in detail using different cell lines. The CCPE-based polyplexes displayed much higher transfection efficiencies than the CS-based polyplexes reported earlier by us. The ternary polyplexes of CCPE-FA/CCPE/pDNA produced excellent gene transfection abilities in the folate receptor (FR)-positive tumor cells. This work would provide a promising means to produce highly efficient polyplexes for future gene therapy applications.

  6. Aspartic Acid Racemization Reveals a High Turnover State in Knee Compared with Hip Osteoarthritic Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Catterall, Jonathan B; Zura, Robert D; Bolognesi, Michael P; Kraus, Virginia Byers

    2016-01-01

    Objective We investigated tissue turnover in healthy and osteoarthritic cartilage. We challenge long held views that osteoarthritis (OA) is dominated by a similar turnover process in all joints and present evidence that hip and knee cartilage respond very differently to OA. Methods D- and L-Aspartate (Asp) were quantified for whole cartilage, collagen and non-collagenous components of cartilage obtained at the time of joint replacement. We computed the Asp racemization ratio (Asp-RR=D/D+L Asp), reflecting the proportion of old to total protein, for each component. Results Compared with hip OA, knee OA collagen fibrils (P<0.0001), collagen (p=0.007), and non-collagenous proteins (p=0.0003) had significantly lower age-adjusted mean Asp-RRs consistent with elevated protein synthesis in knee OA. Knee OA collagen had a mean hydroxyproline/proline (H/P) ratio of 1.2 consistent with the presence of type III collagen whereas hip OA collagen had a mean H/P ratio of 0.99 consistent with type II collagen. Based on Asp-RR, the relative age was significantly different in knee and hip OA (p<0.0005); on average OA knees were estimated to be 30yrs ‘younger’, and OA hips 10yrs ‘older’ than non-OA. Conclusions The metabolic response to OA was strikingly different by joint site. Knee OA cartilage evinced an anabolic response that appeared to be absent in hip OA cartilage. These results challenge the long held view that OA cartilage is capable of only minimal repair and that collagen loss is irreversible. PMID:26417696

  7. Response of amino acids in hindlimb muscles to recovery from hypogravity and unloading by tail-cast suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.; Henriksen, E. J.; Jacob, S.; Cook, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    Concentrations of glutamine, glutamate, aspartate (+ asparagine) and alanine were compared in hindlimb muscles of SL-3 and ground control rats. Alanine was lower in the soleus of flown rats but not of suspended animals, with no response in other muscles except a slight increase in the unloaded plantaris. With recovery, alanine in the soleus was elevated. Since no differences in alanine metabolism were found by isolated muscle, changes in muscle alanine are probably due to altered body use of this amino acid leading to varied plasma levels.

  8. The antiallodynic action target of intrathecal gabapentin: Ca2+ channels, KATP channels or N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptors?

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jen-Kun; Chen, Chien-Chuan; Yang, Jia-Rung; Chiou, Lih-Chu

    2006-01-01

    Gabapentin is a novel analgesic whose mechanism of action is not known. We investigated in a postoperative pain model whether adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive K+ (K(ATP)) channels, N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors, and Ca2+ channels are involved in the antiallodynic effect of intrathecal gabapentin. Mechanical allodynia was induced by a paw incision in isoflurane-anesthetized rats. Withdrawal thresholds to von Frey filament stimulation near the incision site were measured before and after incision and after intrathecal drug administration. The antiallodynic effect of gabapentin (100 mug) was not affected by intrathecal pretreatment with antagonists of K(ATP) channels, NMDA receptors or gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)(A) receptors. K(ATP) channel openers and GABA(A) receptor agonist, per se, had little effect on the postincision allodynic response. The Ca2+ channel blocker of N-type (omega-conotoxin GVIA, 0.1-3 microg), but not of P/Q-type (omega-agatoxin IVA), L-type (verapamil, diltiazem or nimodipine), or T-type (mibefradil), attenuated the incision-induced allodynia, as did gabapentin. Both the antiallodynic effects of gabapentin and omega-conotoxin GVIA were attenuated by Bay K 8644, an L-type Ca2+ channel activator. These results provide correlative evidence to support the contention that N-type Ca2+ channels, but not K(ATP) channels or NMDA or GABA(A) receptors, might be involved in the antiallodynic effect of intrathecal gabapentin.

  9. Isolation, amino acid sequence and biological characterization of an "aspartic-49" phospholipase A₂ from Bothrops (Rhinocerophis) ammodytoides venom.

    PubMed

    Clement, Herlinda; Costa de Oliveira, Vanessa; Zamudio, Fernando Z; Lago, Néstor R; Valdez-Cruz, Norma A; Bérnard Valle, Melisa; Hajos, Silvia E; Alagón, Alejandro; Possani, Lourival D; de Roodt, Adolfo R

    2012-12-01

    A phospholipase enzyme was separated by chromatography from the venom of the snake Bothrops (Rhinocerophis) ammodytoides and characterized. The experimentally determined molecular weight was 13,853.65 Da, and the full primary structure was determined by Edman degradation and mass spectrometry analysis. The enzyme contains 122 amino acids residues closely stabilized by 7 disulfide bridges with an isoelectric point of 6.13. Sequence comparison with other known secretory PLA2 shows that the enzyme isolated belongs to the group II, presenting an aspartic acid residue at position 48 (numbered by convention as Asp49) of the active site, and accordingly displaying enzymatic activity. The enzyme corresponds to 3% of the total mass of the venom. The enzyme is mildly toxic to mice. The intravenous LD₅₀ of this phospholipase in CD-1 mice was around 6 μg/g of mouse body weight (more exactly 117 μg/mouse of 20 g) and the minimal mortal dose (MMD) was estimated to be close to 10 μg/g. In contrast, the LD₅₀ of the venom was circa 2 μg/g mouse body weight. Toxicological analyses of the purified enzyme were performed in vitro and in vivo using experimental animals (mice and rats). The enzyme at high doses caused pulmonary congestion, intraperitoneal bleeding, inhibition of clot retraction and muscle tissue alterations with increasing of creatine kinase levels.

  10. Synthesis, spectra, and electron-transfer reaction of aspartic acid-functionalized water-soluble perylene bisimide in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Lina; Xing, Feifei; Shi, Wei; Yan, Liuming; Xie, Liqing; Zhu, Shourong

    2013-04-24

    An aspartic acid-functionalized water-soluble perylene bisimide, N,N'-di(2-succinic acid)-perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic bisimide (PASP) was synthesized and characterized. It has absorbance maximum A(0-0) and A(0-1) at 527 and 498 nm (ε ≈ 1.7 × 10(4) L cm(-1) mol(-1)) respectively in pH 7.20 HEPES buffer. Two quasi-reversible redox processes with E1/2 at -0.17 and -0.71 V (vs Ag/AgCl) respectively in pH 7-12.5 aqueous solutions. PASP can react with Na2S in pure aqueous solution to form monoanion radical and dianion species consecutively. PASP(-•) has EPR signal with g = 1.998 in aqueous solution, whereas PASP(2-) is EPR silent. The monoanion radical formation is a first-order reaction with k = 8.9 × 10(-2) s(-1). Dianion species formation is a zero-order reaction and the rate constant is 4.3 × 10(-8) mol L(-1) s(-1). The presence of H2O2 greatly increases the radical formation rate constant. PASP as a two-electron transfer reagent is expected to be used in the water photolysis.

  11. How to find a leucine in a haystack? Structure, ligand recognition and regulation of leucine-aspartic acid (LD) motifs.

    PubMed

    Alam, Tanvir; Alazmi, Meshari; Gao, Xin; Arold, Stefan T

    2014-06-15

    LD motifs (leucine-aspartic acid motifs) are short helical protein-protein interaction motifs that have emerged as key players in connecting cell adhesion with cell motility and survival. LD motifs are required for embryogenesis, wound healing and the evolution of multicellularity. LD motifs also play roles in disease, such as in cancer metastasis or viral infection. First described in the paxillin family of scaffolding proteins, LD motifs and similar acidic LXXLL interaction motifs have been discovered in several other proteins, whereas 16 proteins have been reported to contain LDBDs (LD motif-binding domains). Collectively, structural and functional analyses have revealed a surprising multivalency in LD motif interactions and a wide diversity in LDBD architectures. In the present review, we summarize the molecular basis for function, regulation and selectivity of LD motif interactions that has emerged from more than a decade of research. This overview highlights the intricate multi-level regulation and the inherently noisy and heterogeneous nature of signalling through short protein-protein interaction motifs.

  12. Aspartic acid-based modified PLGA-PEG nanoparticles for bone targeting: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yin-Chih; Fu, Tzu-Fun; Wang, Hung-Jen; Lin, Che-Wei; Lee, Gang-Hui; Wu, Shun-Cheng; Wang, Chih-Kuang

    2014-11-01

    Nanoparticles (NP) that target bone tissue were developed using PLGA-PEG (poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-polyethylene glycol) diblock copolymers and bone-targeting moieties based on aspartic acid, (Asp)(n(1,3)). These NP are expected to enable the transport of hydrophobic drugs. The molecular structures were examined by (1)H NMR or identified using mass spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra. The NP were prepared using the water miscible solvent displacement method, and their size characteristics were evaluated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering. The bone targeting potential of the NP was evaluated in vitro using hydroxyapatite affinity assays and in vivo using fluorescent imaging in zebrafish and rats. It was confirmed that the average particle size of the NP was <200 nm and that the dendritic Asp3 moiety of the PLGA-PEG-Asp3 NP exhibited the best apatite mineral binding ability. Preliminary findings in vivo bone affinity assays in zebrafish and rats indicated that the PLGA-PEG-ASP3 NP may display increased bone-targeting efficiency compared with other PLGA-PEG-based NP that lack a dendritic Asp3 moiety. These NP may act as a delivery system for hydrophobic drugs, warranting further evaluation of the treatment of bone disease.

  13. The structure of the O-polysaccharide from the lipopolysaccharide of Providencia stuartii O57 containing an amide of D-galacturonic acid with L-alanine.

    PubMed

    Kocharova, Nina A; Ovchinnikova, Olga G; Bushmarinov, Ivan S; Toukach, Filip V; Torzewska, Agnieszka; Shashkov, Alexander S; Knirel, Yuriy A; Rozalski, Antoni

    2005-03-21

    The O-polysaccharide (O-antigen) was obtained by mild acid degradation of the lipopolysaccharide of Providencia stuartii O57:H29. Studies by sugar and methylation analyses along with (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, including two-dimensional (1)H,(1)H COSY, TOCSY, ROESY, H-detected (1)H,(13)C HSQC, and HMBC experiments, showed that the polysaccharide contains an amide of D-galacturonic acid with L-alanine and has the following pentasaccharide repeating unit: [formula: see text

  14. Light activates the reaction of bacteriorhodopsin aspartic acid-115 with dicyclohexylcarbodiimide

    SciTech Connect

    Renthal, R.; Cothran, M.; Espinoza, B.; Wall, K.A.; Bernard, M.

    1985-07-30

    Conditions for a light-induced reaction between the carboxyl-modifying reagent N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) and bacteriorhodopsin in Triton X-100 micelles were previously reported. The authors have now located the DCCD site in the bacteriorhodopsin amino acid sequence. ( UC)DCCD-bacteriorhodopsin was cleaved with CNBr. The resulting peptides were purified by gel filtration and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). One major UC peptide (50%) and two minor fractions were obtained. Amino acid analysis and sequence analysis showed that the major fraction contained residues 69-118. This region includes six carboxyl side chains. The major UC peptide was also subjected to pepsin hydrolysis. HPLC analysis of the product gave only a single major radioactive subfragment. Amino acid analysis of the peptic peptide showed that it contained residues 110-118. The only carboxyl side chain in this region is Asp-115. Thus, the authors conclude that Asp-115 is the major DCCD site. The light sensitivity of this reaction suggests that Asp-115 becomes more exposed or that its environment becomes more acidic during proton pumping. The DCCD reaction blue-shifts the retinal chromophore. Such a result would be expected if Asp-115 is the negative point charge predicted to be near the cyclohexene ring of retinal.

  15. EXTENDED FEAR CONDITIONING REVEALS A ROLE FOR BOTH N-METHYL-d-ASPARTIC ACID AND NON-N-METHYL-d-ASPARTIC ACID RECEPTORS IN THE AMYGDALA IN THE ACQUISITION OF CONDITIONED FEAR

    PubMed Central

    PISTELL, P. J.; FALLS, W. A.

    2009-01-01

    Pavlovian conditioning is a useful tool for elucidating the neural mechanisms involved with learning and memory, especially in regard to the stimuli associated with aversive events. The amygdala has been repeatedly implicated as playing a significant role in the acquisition and expression of fear. If the amygdala is critical for the acquisition of fear, then it should contribute to this processes regardless of the parameters used to induce or evaluate conditioned fear. A series of experiments using reversible inactivation techniques evaluated the role of the amygdala in the acquisition of conditioned fear when training was conducted over several days in rats. Fear-potentiated startle was used to evaluate the acquisition of conditioned fear. Pretraining infusions of N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) or non-NMDA receptor antagonists alone into the amygdala interfered with the acquisition of fear early in training, but not later. Pretraining infusions of a cocktail consisting of both an NMDA and non-NMDA antagonist interfered with the acquisition of conditioned fear across all days of training. Taken together these results suggest the amygdala may potentially be critical for the acquisition of conditioned fear regardless of the parameters utilized. PMID:18675886

  16. Simultaneous determination of D-aspartic acid and D-glutamic acid in rat tissues and physiological fluids using a multi-loop two-dimensional HPLC procedure.

    PubMed

    Han, Hai; Miyoshi, Yurika; Ueno, Kyoko; Okamura, Chieko; Tojo, Yosuke; Mita, Masashi; Lindner, Wolfgang; Zaitsu, Kiyoshi; Hamase, Kenji

    2011-11-01

    For a metabolomics study focusing on the analysis of aspartic and glutamic acid enantiomers, a fully automated two-dimensional HPLC system employing a microbore-ODS column and a narrowbore-enantioselective column was developed. By using this system, a detailed distribution of D-Asp and D-Glu besides L-Asp and L-Glu in mammals was elucidated. For the total analysis concept, the amino acids were first pre-column derivatized with 4-fluoro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NBD-F) to be sensitively and fluorometrically detected. For the non-stereoselective separation of the analytes in the first dimension a monolithic ODS column (750 mm × 0.53 mm i.d.) was adopted, and a self-packed narrowbore-Pirkle type enantioselective column (Sumichiral OA-2500S, 250 mm × 1.5 mm i.d.) was selected for the second dimension. In the rat plasma, RSD values for intra-day and inter-day precision were less than 6.8%, and the accuracy ranged between 96.1% and 105.8%. The values of LOQ of D-Asp and D-Glu were 5 fmol/injection (0.625 nmol/g tissue). The present method was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of free aspartic acid and glutamic acid enantiomers in 7 brain areas, 11 peripheral tissues, plasma and urine of Wistar rats. Biologically significant D-Asp values were found in various tissue samples whereas for D-Glu the values were very low possibly indicating less significance.

  17. Ligand-functionalized degradable polyplexes formed by cationic poly(aspartic acid)-grafted chitosan-cyclodextrin conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hai-Qing; Li, Rui-Quan; Duan, Shun; Yu, Bingran; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Da-Fu; Xu, Fu-Jian

    2015-03-01

    Polypeptide-based degradable polyplexes attracted considerable attention in drug delivery systems. Polysaccharides including cyclodextrin (CD), dextran, and chitosan (CS) were readily grafted with cationic poly(aspartic acid)s (PAsps). To further enhance the transfection performances of PAsp-based polyplexes, herein, different types of ligand (folic acid, FA)-functionalized degradable polyplexes were proposed based on the PAsp-grafted chitosan-cyclodextrin conjugate (CCPE), where multiple β-CDs were tied on a CS chain. The FA-functionalized CCPE (i.e., CCPE-FA) was obtained via a host-guest interaction between the CD units of CCPE and the adamantane (Ad) species of Ad-modified FA (Ad-FA). The resulting CCPE/pDNA, CCPE-FA/pDNA, and ternary CCPE-FA/CCPE/pDNA (prepared by layer-by-layer assembly) polyplexes were investigated in detail using different cell lines. The CCPE-based polyplexes displayed much higher transfection efficiencies than the CS-based polyplexes reported earlier by us. The ternary polyplexes of CCPE-FA/CCPE/pDNA produced excellent gene transfection abilities in the folate receptor (FR)-positive tumor cells. This work would provide a promising means to produce highly efficient polyplexes for future gene therapy applications.Polypeptide-based degradable polyplexes attracted considerable attention in drug delivery systems. Polysaccharides including cyclodextrin (CD), dextran, and chitosan (CS) were readily grafted with cationic poly(aspartic acid)s (PAsps). To further enhance the transfection performances of PAsp-based polyplexes, herein, different types of ligand (folic acid, FA)-functionalized degradable polyplexes were proposed based on the PAsp-grafted chitosan-cyclodextrin conjugate (CCPE), where multiple β-CDs were tied on a CS chain. The FA-functionalized CCPE (i.e., CCPE-FA) was obtained via a host-guest interaction between the CD units of CCPE and the adamantane (Ad) species of Ad-modified FA (Ad-FA). The resulting CCPE/pDNA, CCPE

  18. Aspartic acid-484 of nascent placental alkaline phosphatase condenses with a phosphatidylinositol glycan to become the carboxyl terminus of the mature enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Micanovic, R; Bailey, C A; Brink, L; Gerber, L; Pan, Y C; Hulmes, J D; Udenfriend, S

    1988-01-01

    A carboxyl-terminal chymotryptic peptide from mature human placental alkaline phosphatase was purified by HPLC and monitored by a specific RIA. Sequencing and amino acid assay showed that the carboxyl terminus of the peptide was aspartic acid, representing residue 484 of the proenzyme as deduced from the corresponding cDNA. Further analysis of the peptide showed it to be a peptidoglycan containing one residue of ethanolamine, one residue of glucosamine, and two residues of neutral hexose. The inositol glycan is apparently linked to the alpha carboxyl group of the aspartic acid through the ethanolamine. Location of the inositol glycan on Asp-484 of the proenzyme indicates that a 29-residue peptide is cleaved from the nascent protein during the post-translational condensation with the phosphatidylinositol-glycan. PMID:3422741

  19. Study of L-aspartic acid for its possible use as a dosimeter in the interval of 3.4-20 kGy at different irradiation temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meléndez-López, Adriana; Negrón-Mendoza, Alicia; Gómez-Vidales, Virginia; Uribe, Roberto M.; Ramos-Bernal, Sergio

    2014-11-01

    Certain commercial applications of radiation processing increase the efficiency of chemical reactions at low temperatures to decrease the free radicals in the bulk material and avoid the synergistic effects of heat. Such applications have motivated the search for a reliable, low-temperature dosimeter for use under the conditions of the irradiation process. For this purpose, polycrystalline samples of L-aspartic acid (2-aminobutanedioic acid) were irradiated with gamma rays at low temperatures and doses in the kiloGray range (3.4-64 kGy). The potential use of the aspartic acid system as a chemical dosimeter is based on the formation of stable free radicals when the amino acid is exposed to ionizing radiation. These radicals can be studied and quantified using electron spin resonance (ESR). The response curves at different temperatures show that the intensity of the ESR spectra (the five characteristic lines) depends on the dose received. The response of the dosimeter increases with increasing temperature, and this relationship is linear up to 20 kGy at 298 K. The decay characteristics show that the change in the ESR signal over time is low and reproducible. In addition, the L-aspartic acid dosimeter is easy to handle and has low cost.

  20. Site-Directed Mutagenesis and Structural Studies Suggest that the Germination Protease, GPR, in Spores of Bacillus Species Is an Atypical Aspartic Acid Protease

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Thomas M.; Setlow, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Germination protease (GPR) initiates the degradation of small, acid-soluble spore proteins (SASP) during germination of spores of Bacillus and Clostridium species. The GPR amino acid sequence is not homologous to members of the major protease families, and previous work has not identified residues involved in GPR catalysis. The current work has focused on identifying catalytically essential amino acids by mutagenesis of Bacillus megaterium gpr. A residue was selected for alteration if it (i) was conserved among spore-forming bacteria, (ii) was a potential nucleophile, and (iii) had not been ruled out as inessential for catalysis. GPR variants were overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the active form (P41) was assayed for activity against SASP and the zymogen form (P46) was assayed for the ability to autoprocess to P41. Variants inactive against SASP and unable to autoprocess were analyzed by circular dichroism spectroscopy and multiangle laser light scattering to determine whether the variant's inactivity was due to loss of secondary or quaternary structure, respectively. Variation of D127 and D193, but no other residues, resulted in inactive P46 and P41, while variants of each form were well structured and tetrameric, suggesting that D127 and D193 are essential for activity and autoprocessing. Mapping these two aspartate residues and a highly conserved lysine onto the B. megaterium P46 crystal structure revealed a striking similarity to the catalytic residues and propeptide lysine of aspartic acid proteases. These data indicate that GPR is an atypical aspartic acid protease. PMID:16199582

  1. An aspartate and a water molecule mediate efficient acid-base catalysis in a tailored antibody pocket.

    PubMed

    Debler, Erik W; Müller, Roger; Hilvert, Donald; Wilson, Ian A

    2009-11-03

    Design of catalysts featuring multiple functional groups is a desirable, yet formidable goal. Antibody 13G5, which accelerates the cleavage of unactivated benzisoxazoles, is one of few artificial enzymes that harness an acid and a base to achieve efficient proton transfer. X-ray structures of the Fab-hapten complexes of wild-type 13G5 and active-site variants now afford detailed insights into its mechanism. The parent antibody preorganizes Asp(H35) and Glu(L34) to abstract a proton from substrate and to orient a water molecule for leaving group stabilization, respectively. Remodeling the environment of the hydrogen bond donor with a compensatory network of ordered waters, as seen in the Glu(L34) to alanine mutant, leads to an impressive 10(9)-fold rate acceleration over the nonenzymatic reaction with acetate, illustrating the utility of buried water molecules in bifunctional catalysis. Generalization of these design principles may aid in creation of catalysts for other important chemical transformations.

  2. An aspartate and a water molecule mediate efficient acid-base catalysis in a tailored antibody pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Debler, Erik W.; Müller, Roger; Hilvert, Donald; Wilson, Ian A.

    2009-12-01

    Design of catalysts featuring multiple functional groups is a desirable, yet formidable goal. Antibody 13G5, which accelerates the cleavage of unactivated benzisoxazoles, is one of few artificial enzymes that harness an acid and a base to achieve efficient proton transfer. X-ray structures of the Fab-hapten complexes of wild-type 13G5 and active-site variants now afford detailed insights into its mechanism. The parent antibody preorganizes Asp{sup H35} and Glu{sup L34} to abstract a proton from substrate and to orient a water molecule for leaving group stabilization, respectively. Remodeling the environment of the hydrogen bond donor with a compensatory network of ordered waters, as seen in the Glu{sup L34} to alanine mutant, leads to an impressive 10{sup 9}-fold rate acceleration over the nonenzymatic reaction with acetate, illustrating the utility of buried water molecules in bifunctional catalysis. Generalization of these design principles may aid in creation of catalysts for other important chemical transformations.

  3. Identification of the roles of individual amino acid residues of the helix E of the major antenna of photosystem II (LHCII) by alanine scanning mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng; Rao, Yan; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Chunhong

    2014-10-01

    The functions of the helix E (W97-F105), an amphiphilic lumenal 310 helix of the major antenna of photosystem II (LHCII), are still unidentified. To elucidate the roles of individual amino acid residue of the helix E, alanine scanning mutagenesis has been performed to mutate every residue of this domain to alanine. The influence of every alanine substitution on the structure and function of LHCII has been investigated biochemically and spectroscopically. The results show that all mutations have little impact on the pigment binding and configuration. However, many mutants presented decreased thermo- or photo-stability compared with the wild type, highlighting the significance of this helix to the stability of LHCII. The most critical residue for stability is W97. The mutant W97A yielded very fragile trimeric pigment protein complexes. The structural analysis revealed that the hydrogen bonding and aromatic interactions between W97, F195, F194 and a water molecule contributed greatly to the stability of LHCII. Moreover, Q103A and F105A have been identified to be able to reinforce the tendency of aggregation in vitro. The structural analysis suggested that the enhancement in aggregation formation for Q103A and F105A might be attributed to the changing hydrophobicity of the region.

  4. Amino acids (L-arginine and L-alanine) passivated CdS nanoparticles: Synthesis of spherical hierarchical structure and nonlinear optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talwatkar, S. S.; Tamgadge, Y. S.; Sunatkari, A. L.; Gambhire, A. B.; Muley, G. G.

    2014-12-01

    CdS nanoparticles (NPs) passivated with amino acids (L-alanine and L-arginine) having spherical hierarchical morphology were synthesized by room temperature wet chemical method. Synthesized NPs were characterized by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy to study the variation of band gaps with concentration of surface modifying agents. Increase in band gap has been observed with the increase in concentration of surface modifying agents and was found more prominent for CdS NPs passivated with L-alanine. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis were carried out for the study of crystal structure and morphology of CdS NPs. The average particle size of CdS NPs calculated from Debye-Scherer formula was found to less than 5 nm and agrees well with those determined from UV-vis spectra and TEM data. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was performed to know the functional groups of the grown NPs. Peaks in FT-IR spectra indicate the formation of CdS NPs and capping with L-alanine and L-arginine. Photoluminescence spectra of these NPs were also studied. Finally, colloidal solution of CdS-PVAc was subjected to Z-scan experiment under low power cw laser illumination to characterize them for third order nonlinear optical properties. CdS-PVAc colloidal solution shows enhanced nonlinear absorption due to RSA and weak FCA on account of two photon absorption processes triggered by thermal effect.

  5. Enantioselective micro-2D-HPLC determination of aspartic acid in the pineal glands of rodents with various melatonin contents.

    PubMed

    Han, Hai; Miyoshi, Yurika; Oyama, Tsubasa; Konishi, Ryoko; Mita, Masashi; Hamase, Kenji

    2011-10-01

    Enantioselective determination of aspartic acid (Asp) in the pineal gland of rodents with various melatonin contents was performed using a highly sensitive and selective two-dimensional HPLC system. After derivatization of the amino group with 4-fluoro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NBD-F), NBD-Asp was separated using a capillary monolithic ODS column in the first dimension. The fraction of NBD-Asp was automatically collected and transferred to the second dimension, and the D- and L-Asp were separated and determined using a narrowbore enantioselective column. Large amounts of D-Asp were observed in the pineal gland of the rats and specific strains of mice (C3H and CBA) possessing a high concentration of melatonin in their pineal gland. On the other hand, the amounts of D-Asp were small in the pineal gland of mice possessing a trace or no melatonin in their pineal gland (ddY, ICR, C57BL and BALB/c). In other tissues and physiological fluids, no significant strain-dependent changes of the D-Asp amounts were observed. These results indicate that large amounts of D-Asp are present only in the pineal gland containing large amounts of melatonin, and special care should be taken when selecting mouse strains for the investigation of D-Asp.

  6. Effect of poly(aspartic acid) on calcium phosphate removal from stainless steel tubing under turbulent flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littlejohn, Felicia

    Calcium phosphate deposition causes cleaning problems in a number of situations including water treatment, dairy processing, and dental applications. This problem is exacerbated by the limited choices of cleaning chemicals that meet environmental regulations. To promote the development of biodegradable, non-toxic alternatives, this research examines the removal of calcium phosphate deposits consisting of brushite (dicalcium phosphate dihydrate; DCPD) and a mixture of hydroxyapatite (HAP) and DCPD from stainless steel in the presence of poly(aspartic acid) and its sodium salt (PASP). The effects of solvent pH, PASP concentration, and flow rate on the calcium phosphate removal rates are measured from stainless steel tubing under turbulent flow conditions using a solid scintillation detection technique. A mechanistic evaluation of the cleaning data in the absence of PASP indicates that DCPD removal is dominated by shear while HAP/DCPD deposit removal is limited by a combination of mass transfer and interfacial processes. Although the removal mechanisms differ, the results conclusively show that PASP promotes calcium phosphate removal under conditions that favor calcium sequestration in both cases. An in-depth study of DCPD removal in the presence of PASP reveals that this additive is most effective under conditions where calcium sequestration and phosphate protonation occur simultaneously.

  7. Recovery from severe frontotemporal dysfunction at 3years after N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antibody encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Leypoldt, Frank; Gelderblom, Mathias; Schöttle, Daniel; Hoffmann, Sascha; Wandinger, Klaus-Peter

    2013-04-01

    Encephalitis associated with antibodies against N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor is characterized by severe memory deficits, decreased consciousness, epileptic seizures and movement disorders and occurs most commonly in young women. Recovery is mostly good but little is known about the disease course in patients whose treatment has been delayed severely. We present a 16-year-old girl with a 36-month follow-up. A single course of methylprednisolone attenuated some symptoms but severe and incapacitating frontotemporal syndrome remained. Second-line treatment with rituximab was initiated 12months after the onset of symptoms. A surprising recovery occurred 18months after treatment and 30months after onset. Recovery in NMDA receptor antibody-associated encephalitis can be severely delayed and does not have to be linear. Whether delayed therapy contributed to recovery in this patient cannot be answered with certainty. Spontaneous recovery independent of therapy is possible, as it has been observed previously as late as 3years after onset. Although serum antibodies disappeared with recovery in this patient, previous cases have shown serum antibodies to be unreliable markers of disease activity. Second-line treatment, especially with substances as well tolerated as rituximab, should at least be considered in NMDA receptor encephalitis with persistent neuropsychiatric syndromes after first-line therapy.

  8. Face-selective crystal growth behavior of L-aspartic acid in the presence of L-asparagine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hiroyasu; Doki, Norihito; Yoshida, Saki; Yokota, Masaaki; Shimizu, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    The kinetic mechanism of L-asparagine (L-Asn) action on L-aspartic acid (L-Asp) crystal growth, namely the face-selective effect of L-Asn on the L-Asp crystal growth rate in each direction, was examined. In the a-axis direction, the effect of L-Asn on the L-Asp crystal growth rate was small. Enhancement and inhibition of L-Asp crystal growth, and interestingly the dissolution of the L-Asp crystal face, were observed in the b-axis direction, depending on the amount of L-Asn added. In the c-axis direction, the L-Asp crystal growth rate decreased with the increase in the amount of L-Asn added, and the experimental results were well fitted with a Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The study showed that there were crystal growth conditions where enhancement and inhibition, as well as inhibition and dissolution, coexisted in the presence of an additive with a structure similar to the growing crystal.

  9. Aspartic acid at position 57 of the HLA-DQ beta chain protects against type I diabetes: a family study.

    PubMed Central

    Morel, P A; Dorman, J S; Todd, J A; McDevitt, H O; Trucco, M

    1988-01-01

    One hundred seventy-two members from 27 randomly selected multiple case Caucasian families of patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) were studied at the DNA level to ascertain the reliability of codon 57 of the HLA-DQ beta-chain gene as a disease protection/susceptibility marker. The analysis was carried out by polymerase chain reaction amplification of DNA encoding the first domain of the DQ beta chain and by dot blot analysis of the amplified material with allele-specific oligonucleotide probes. One hundred twenty-three randomly selected healthy Caucasian donors were also tested. The results demonstrated that haplotypes carrying an aspartic acid in position 57 (Asp-57) of their DQ beta chain were significantly increased in frequency among nondiabetic haplotypes (23/38), while non-Asp-57 haplotypes were significantly increased in frequency among diabetic haplotypes (65/69). Ninety-six percent of the diabetic probands in our study were homozygous non-Asp/non-Asp as compared to 19.5% of healthy unrelated controls. This conferred a relative risk of 107 (chi 2 = 54.97; P = 0.00003) for non-Asp-57 homozygous individuals. Even though the inheritance and genetic features of IDDM are complex and are not necessarily fully explained by DQ beta chain polymorphism, this approach is much more sensitive than HLA serolog in assessing risk for IDDM. PMID:3186714

  10. Protective effects of PF-4708671 against N-methyl-d-aspartic acid-induced retinal damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Ikumi; Aoki, Yuto; Ushikubo, Hiroko; Asano, Daiki; Mori, Asami; Sakamoto, Kenji; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2016-12-01

    We previously demonstrated that rapamycin, an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), protects against N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA)-induced retinal damage in rats. Rapamycin inhibits mTOR activity, thereby preventing the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6, which is a downstream target of S6 kinase. Therefore, we aimed to determine whether PF-4708671, an inhibitor of S6 kinase, protects against NMDA-induced retinal injury. Intravitreal injection of NMDA (200 nmol/eye) caused cell loss in the ganglion cell layer and neuroinflammatory responses, such as an increase in the number of CD45-positive leukocytes and Iba1-positive microglia. Surprisingly, simultaneous injection of PF-4708671 (50 nmol/eye) with NMDA significantly attenuated these responses without affecting phosphorylated S6 levels. These results suggest that PF-4708671 and rapamycin likely protect against NMDA-induced retinal damage via distinct pathways. The neuroprotective effect of PF-4708671 is unlikely to be associated with inhibition of the S6 kinase, even though PF-4708671 is reported to be a S6 kinase inhibitor.

  11. A highly Conserved Aspartic Acid Residue of the Chitosanase from Bacillus Sp. TS Is Involved in the Substrate Binding.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhanping; Zhao, Shuangzhi; Liu, Yang; Chang, Zhengying; Ma, Yanhe; Li, Jian; Song, Jiangning

    2016-11-01

    The chitosanase from Bacillus sp. TS (CsnTS) is an enzyme belonging to the glycoside hydrolase family 8. The sequence of CsnTS shares 98 % identity with the chitosanase from Bacillus sp. K17. Crystallography analysis and site-direct mutagenesis of the chitosanase from Bacillus sp. K17 identified the important residues involved in the catalytic interaction and substrate binding. However, despite progress in understanding the catalytic mechanism of the chitosanase from the family GH8, the functional roles of some residues that are highly conserved throughout this family have not been fully elucidated. This study focused on one of these residues, i.e., the aspartic acid residue at position 318. We found that apart from asparagine, mutation of Asp318 resulted in significant loss of enzyme activity. In-depth investigations showed that mutation of this residue not only impaired enzymatic activity but also affected substrate binding. Taken together, our results showed that Asp318 plays an important role in CsnTS activity.

  12. Cyclen Grafted with poly[(Aspartic acid)-co-Lysine]: Preparation, Assembly with Plasmid DNA, and in Vitro Transfection Studies.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chunying; Zhang, Jin; Guo, Liwen; Du, Changguo; Song, Ping; Zhao, Baojing; Li, Ling; Li, Chao; Qiao, Renzhong

    2016-01-04

    Development of safe and effective gene carriers is the key to the success of gene therapy. Nowadays, it is still required to develop new methods to improve nonviral gene delivery efficiency. Herein, copolymers of poly[(aspartic acid)-co-lysine] grafted with cyclen (cyclen-pAL) were designed and evaluated for efficient gene delivery. Two copolymers with different Asp/Lys block ratios were prepared and characterized by NMR and gel permeation chromatography analysis. Agarose gel retardation, circular dichroism, and fluorescent quenching assays showed the strong DNA-binding and protection ability for the title compounds. Atomic force microscopy studies clearly delineated uniform DNA globules with a diameter around 100 nm, induced by cyclen-pAL. By grafting cyclen on Asp, relatively high gene delivery efficiency and low cytotoxicity of the modified copolymers were achieved compared with their parent compounds. The present work might help to develop strategies for design and modification of polypeptide copolymers, which may also be applied to favorable gene expression and delivery.

  13. The effect of the antioxidant on the properties of thiolated poly(aspartic acid) polymers in aqueous ocular formulations.

    PubMed

    Budai-Szűcs, Mária; Horvát, Gabriella; Gyarmati, Benjámin; Szilágyi, Barnabás Áron; Szilágyi, András; Berkó, Szilvia; Ambrus, Rita; Szabó-Révész, Piroska; Sandri, Giuseppina; Bonferoni, Maria Cristina; Caramella, Carla; Csányi, Erzsébet

    2017-04-01

    Thiolated polymers are a promising new group of excipients, but their stability against atmospheric oxidation has not been investigated in detail, and only a few efforts have been made to improve their stability. The oxidation of the thiol groups in solutions of thiolated polymers may result in a decrease of mucoadhesion and unpredictable in situ gelation. The aims of our work were to study the stability of aqueous solutions of thiolated polymers and the effects of stabilizing agents. We investigated thiolated poly(aspartic acid) polymers stabilized with dithiothreitol, glutathione or acetylcysteine. The effects of these antioxidants on the gel structure, mucoadhesion and drug release were determined by means of scanning electron microscopy, swelling, rheology, adhesion and drug release tests. It was concluded that the stability of polymer solutions containing antioxidants is sufficient for one day. Polymers stabilized with dithiotreitol demonstrated fast swelling and drug release, but weaker mucoadhesion as compared with the other samples. Polymers stabilized with glutathione displayed the weakest cohesive properties, resulting in fast and uncontrolled drug release and moderate mucoadhesion. Acetylcysteine-stabilized polymers exhibited an optimum cross-linked structure, with free thiol groups ensuring polymer-mucin interactions, resulting in the best mucoadhesive properties.

  14. Relation between etch-pit morphology and step retreat velocity on a calcite surface in aspartic acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, Toru; Kagi, Hiroyuki; Kamiya, Natsumi; Kokawa, Ryohei

    2010-04-01

    Effects of L-aspartic acid ( L-Asp) on dissolution of calcite were investigated. The step retreat velocity and dissolution rate of calcite were measured simultaneously using an AFM flow-through system. The etch-pit morphology of calcite was observed using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results show that the etch-pit morphologies changed drastically depending on the L-Asp concentration ([ L-Asp]) in the order of rhomboidal, pentagonal, and triangular (not perfectly, but retaining an extra step). The change in obtuse step directions and appearance of the [0 1 0] step triggered these morphological changes. Addition of L-Asp accelerated all step retreats at [ L-Asp]<0.01 M, which implied the effect of L-Asp on the diffusive barrier. In contrast, at [ L-Asp]>0.01 M, L-Asp inhibited the retreats of obtuse steps and [0 1 0] step, although the retreat velocities of acute steps were constant irrespective of [ L-Asp]. These results suggest that the directional changes and the inhibition of retreat velocities of obtuse steps were attributed to the generation of [ 4 1 1] and [4 5 1] steps caused by L-Asp. Moreover, we confirmed the preferential effects of L-Asp on the [4 8 1] + to [ 4 4 1] ± step edge, and proposed the preferential effects of L-Asp on the [ 4 1 1] to [4 5 1] step edge.

  15. Observation of the side chain O-methylation of glutamic acid or aspartic acid containing model peptides by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Atik, A Emin; Guray, Melda Z; Yalcin, Talat

    2017-03-15

    O-methylation of the side chains of glutamic acid (E) and aspartic acid (D) residues is generally observed modification when an acidified methanol/water (MeOH/dH2O) mixture is used as a solvent system during sample preparation for proteomic research. This chemical modification may result misidentification with endogenous protein methylation; therefore, a special care should be taken during sample handling prior to mass spectrometric analysis. In the current study, we systematically examined the extent of E/D methylation and C-terminus carboxyl group of synthetic model peptides in terms of different incubation temperatures, storage times, and added acid types as well as its percentages. To monitor these effects, C-terminus amidated and free acid forms of synthetic model peptides comprised of E or D residue(s) have been analyzed by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Additionally, LC-MS/MS experiments were performed to confirm the formation of methylated peptide product. The results showed that the rate of methylation was increased as the temperature increases along with prolong incubation times. Moreover, the extent of methylation was remarkably high when formic acid (FA) used as a protonation agent instead of acetic acid (AA). In addition, it was found that the degree of methylation was significantly decreased by lowering acid percentages in ESI solution. More than one acidic residue containing model peptides have been also used to explore the extent of multiple methylation reaction. Lastly, the ethanol (EtOH) and isopropanol (iPrOH) have been substituted separately with MeOH in sample preparation step to investigate the extent of esterification reaction under the same experimental conditions. However, in the positive perspective of view, this method can be used as a simple, rapid and cheap method for methylation of acidic residues under normal laboratory conditions.

  16. Catalytic Stereoinversion of L-Alanine to Deuterated D-Alanine.

    PubMed

    Moozeh, Kimia; So, Soon Mog; Chin, Jik

    2015-08-03

    A combination of an achiral pyridoxal analogue and a chiral base has been developed for catalytic deuteration of L-alanine with inversion of stereochemistry to give deuterated D-alanine under mild conditions (neutral pD and 25 °C) without the use of any protecting groups. This system can also be used for catalytic deuteration of D-alanine with retention of stereochemistry to give deuterated D-alanine. Thus a racemic mixture of alanine can be catalytically deuterated to give an enantiomeric excess of deuterated D-alanine. While catalytic deracemization of alanine is forbidden by the second law of thermodynamics, this system can be used for catalytic deracemization of alanine with deuteration. Such green and biomimetic approach to catalytic stereocontrol provides insights into efficient amino acid transformations.

  17. A One-Bead-One-Catalyst Approach to Aspartic Acid-Based Oxidation Catalyst Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Lichtor, Phillip A.; Miller, Scott J.

    2011-01-01

    We report an approach to the high-throughput screening of asymmetric oxidation catalysts. The strategy is based on application of the one-bead-one-compound library approach, wherein each of our catalyst candidates is based on a peptide scaffold. For this purpose we rely on a recently developed catalytic cycle that employs an acid-peracid shuttle. In order to implement our approach, we developed a compatible linker and demonstrated that the library format is amenable to screening and sequencing of catalysts employing partial Edman degradation and MALDI mass spectrometry analysis. The system was applied to the discovery (and re-discovery) of catalysts for the enantioselective oxidation of a cyclohexene derivative. The system is now poised for application to unprecedented substrate classes for asymmetric oxidation reactions. PMID:21417485

  18. Dynamics of dilute solutions of poly(aspartic acid) and its sodium salt elucidated from atomistic molecular dynamics simulations with explicit water.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Sanoop; Katha, Anki Reddy; Kolake, Subramanya Mayya; Jung, Bokyung; Han, Sungsoo

    2013-11-07

    The use of forward osmosis (FO) process for seawater desalination has attracted tremendous interest in recent years. Besides the manufacture of suitable membranes, the major technical challenge in the efficient deployment of the FO technology lies in the development of a suitable "draw solute". Owing to its inherent advantages, poly(aspartic acid) has arisen to be an attractive candidate for this purpose. However, an investigation of its molecular level properties has not been studied in detail. In this paper, the dynamics of poly(aspartic acid) and its sodium salt in the dilute concentration regime have been reported. The quantification of the polymer conformational properties, its solvation behavior, and the counterion dynamics are studied. The neutral polymer shows a preferentially coiled structure whereas the fully ionized polymer has an extended structure. Upon comparing with poly(acrylic acid) polymer, another polymer which has been used as a draw solute, poly(aspartic acid) forms more number of hydrogen bonds as well as fewer ion pairs.

  19. Aspartic Acid Residue D3 Critically Determines Cx50 Gap Junction Channel Transjunctional Voltage-Dependent Gating and Unitary Conductance

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Li; Nakagawa, So; Tsukihara, Tomitake; Bai, Donglin

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the aspartic acid residue (D) at the third position is critical in determining the voltage polarity of fast Vj-gating of Cx50 channels. To test whether another negatively charged residue (a glutamic acid residue, E) could fulfill the role of the D3 residue, we generated the mutant Cx50D3E. Vj-dependent gating properties of this mutant channel were characterized by double-patch-clamp recordings in N2A cells. Macroscopically, the D3E substitution reduced the residual conductance (Gmin) to near zero and outwardly shifted the half-inactivation voltage (V0), which is a result of both a reduced aggregate gating charge (z) and a reduced free-energy difference between the open and closed states. Single Cx50D3E gap junction channels showed reduced unitary conductance (γj) of the main open state, reduced open dwell time at ±40 mV, and absence of a long-lived substate. In contrast, a G8E substitution tested to compare the effects of the E residue at the third and eighth positions did not modify the Vj-dependent gating profile or γj. In summary, this study is the first that we know of to suggest that the D3 residue plays an essential role, in addition to serving as a negative-charge provider, as a critical determinant of the Vj-dependent gating sensitivity, open-closed stability, and unitary conductance of Cx50 gap junction channels. PMID:22404924

  20. Mutation of aspartic acid residues in the fructosyltransferase of Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 25975.

    PubMed Central

    Song, D D; Jacques, N A

    1999-01-01

    The site-directed mutated fructosyltransferases (Ftfs) of Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 25975, D312E, D312S, D312N and D312K were all active at 37 degrees C, indicating that Asp-312 present in the 'sucrose box' was not the nucleophilic Asp residue responsible for the formation of a covalent fructosyl-enzyme intermediate required for enzyme activity. Analysis of the kinetic constants of the purified mutated forms of the enzyme showed that Asp-312 was most likely an essential amino acid involved in determining acceptor recognition and/or stabilizing a beta-turn in the protein. In contrast, when the Asp-397 of the Ftf present in the conserved triplet RDP motif of all 60 bacterial and plant family-32 glycosylhydrolases was mutated to a Ser residue, both sucrose hydrolysis and polymerization ceased. Tryptophan emission spectra confirmed that this mutation did not alter protein structure. Comparison of published data from other site-directed mutated enzymes implicated the Asp residue in the RDP motif as the one that may form a transient covalent fructosyl intermediate during the catalysis of sucrose by the Ftf of S. salivarius. PMID:10548559

  1. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies of gamma-irradiated DL-alanine ethyl ester hydrochloride, L-theanine and L-glutamic acid dimethyl ester hydrochloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Başkan, M. Halim; Aydın, Murat

    2013-08-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of gamma irradiated powders of DL-alanine ethyl ester hydrochloride, L-theanine and L-glutamic acid dimethyl ester hydrochloride were investigated at room temperature. The observed paramagnetic species were attributed to the CH3ĊHCOOC2H5, -CH2ĊHCOOH and -CH2ĊHCOOCH3 radicals, respectively. Hyperfine structure constants and g-values were determined for these three radicals. Some spectroscopic properties and suggestions concerning the possible structure of the radicals were also discussed.

  2. Effect of L-aspartic acid on the growth, structure and spectral studies of Zinc (tris) Thiourea Sulphate (ZTS) single crystals.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Bincy Susan; Krishnamurthy, R; Rajasekaran, R

    2014-11-11

    Single crystals of pure and L-aspartic acid doped Zinc (Tris) Thiourea Sulphate (ZTS) were grown from aqueous solution by solution growth method. The cell parameters and structure of the grown crystals were determined by X-ray diffraction studies. The presence of functional group in the compound has been confirmed by FTIR and FT-Raman analysis. The optical transparency range has been studied through UV-Vis spectroscopy. TGA/DTA studies show thermal stability of the grown crystals. Microhardness study reveals that the hardness number (Hv) increases with load for pure and doped ZTS crystals. Dielectric studies have been carried out and the results are discussed. The second harmonic generation was confirmed for l-aspartic acid doped ZTS which is greater than pure ZTS.

  3. Effect of L-aspartic acid on the growth, structure and spectral studies of Zinc (tris) Thiourea Sulphate (ZTS) single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel, Bincy Susan; Krishnamurthy, R.; Rajasekaran, R.

    2014-11-01

    Single crystals of pure and L-aspartic acid doped Zinc (Tris) Thiourea Sulphate (ZTS) were grown from aqueous solution by solution growth method. The cell parameters and structure of the grown crystals were determined by X-ray diffraction studies. The presence of functional group in the compound has been confirmed by FTIR and FT-Raman analysis. The optical transparency range has been studied through UV-Vis spectroscopy. TGA/DTA studies show thermal stability of the grown crystals. Microhardness study reveals that the hardness number (Hv) increases with load for pure and doped ZTS crystals. Dielectric studies have been carried out and the results are discussed. The second harmonic generation was confirmed for L-aspartic acid doped ZTS which is greater than pure ZTS.

  4. Crystal growth of calcium carbonate on the cellulose acetate/pyrrolidon blend films in the presence of L-aspartic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiuzhen; Xie, Anjian; Huang, Fangzhi; Shen, Yuhua

    2014-03-01

    The morphogenesis and growth process of calcium carbonate on the cellulose acetate/polyvinyl pyrrolidone (CA/PVP) blend films in the presence of L-aspartic acid was carefully investigated. The results showed that the concentration of L-aspartic acid, the initial pH value of reaction solution and temperature turned out to be important factors for the control of morphologies and polymorphs of calcium carbonate. Complex morphologies of CaCO3 particles, such as cubes, rose-like spheres, twinborn-spheres, cone-like, bouquet-like, etc. could be obtained under the different experimental conditions. The dynamic process of formation of rose-like sphere crystals was analyzed by monitoring the continuous morphological and structural evolution and components of crystals in different crystal stages. This research may provide a promising method to prepare other inorganic materials with complex morphologies.

  5. The thermodynamic characteristics of complex formation of Cd2+ with N,N-Bis(carboxymethyl)aspartic acid in aqueous solutions at 298.15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytkin, A. I.; Chernyavskaya, N. V.; Litvinenko, V. E.

    2011-01-01

    The equilibrium constants and heats of formation of complexes of N,N-bis(carboxymethyl)aspartic acid (H4Y) with Cd2+ ions at 298.15 K and ionic strengths of 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 (KNO3) were determined by potentiometric titration and calorimetrically. The thermodynamic characteristics of formation of the CdY2- complex at fixed and zero ionic strength values were calculated. The values obtained were interpreted.

  6. The Clinical Spectrum of Missense Mutations of the First Aspartic Acid of cbEGF-like Domains in Fibrillin-1 Including a Recessive Family

    PubMed Central

    Hilhorst-Hofstee, Yvonne; Rijlaarsdam, Marry EB; Scholte, Arthur JHA; Swart-van den Berg, Marietta; Versteegh, Michel IM; van der Schoot-van Velzen, Iris; Schäbitz, Hans-Joachim; Bijlsma, Emilia K; Baars, Marieke J; Kerstjens-Frederikse, Wilhelmina S; Giltay, Jacques C; Hamel, Ben C; Breuning, Martijn H; Pals, Gerard

    2010-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a dominant disorder with a recognizable phenotype. In most patients with the classical phenotype mutations are found in the fibrillin-1 gene (FBN1) on chromosome 15q21. It is thought that most mutations act in a dominant negative way or through haploinsufficiency. In 9 index cases referred for MFS we detected heterozygous missense mutations in FBN1 predicted to substitute the first aspartic acid of different calcium-binding Epidermal Growth Factor-like (cbEGF) fibrillin-1 domains. A similar mutation was found in homozygous state in 3 cases in a large consanguineous family. Heterozygous carriers of this mutation had no major skeletal, cardiovascular or ophthalmological features of MFS. In the literature 14 other heterozygous missense mutations are described leading to the substitution of the first aspartic acid of a cbEGF domain and resulting in a Marfan phenotype. Our data show that the phenotypic effect of aspartic acid substitutions in the first position of a cbEGF domain can range from asymptomatic to a severe neonatal phenotype. The recessive nature with reduced expression of FBN1 in one of the families suggests a threshold model combined with a mild functional defect of this specific mutation. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20886638

  7. The metabolism of the non-proteinogenic amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803.

    PubMed

    Downing, Simoné; Downing, Timothy Grant

    2016-06-01

    The neurotoxic amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is produced by cyanobacteria under nitrogen starvation conditions and its metabolism is closely associated with cellular nitrogen control. Very little is known regarding the metabolism or biosynthesis of this amino acid in the producing organisms and current knowledge is limited to the spontaneous formation of carbamate adducts in the presence of aqueous carbon dioxide, the rapid removal of free cellular BMAA upon the addition of ammonia to nitrogen-starved cyanobacterial cultures, and the link between cellular nitrogen status and BMAA synthesis. Data presented here show that exogenous BMAA is readily metabolised by cyanobacteria during which, the primary amino group is rapidly transferred to other cellular amino acids. Furthermore, data suggest that BMAA is metabolised in cyanobacteria via a reversible transamination reaction. This study presents novel data on BMAA metabolism in cyanobacteria and provides the first proposed biosynthetic precursor to BMAA biosynthesis in cyanobacteria.

  8. Alanine or aspartic acid substitutions at serine23/24 of cardiac troponin I decrease thin filament activation, with no effect on crossbridge detachment kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Mamidi, Ranganath; Gollapudi, Sampath K.; Mallampalli, Sri Lakshmi; Chandra, Murali

    2012-01-01

    Ala/Asp substitutions at Ser23/24 have been employed to investigate the functional impact of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA). Some limitations of previous studies include the use of heterologous proteins and confounding effects arising from phosphorylation of cardiac myosin binding protein-C. Our goal was to probe the effects of cTnI phosphorylation using a homologous assay, so that altered function could be solely attributed to changes in cTnI. We reconstituted detergent-skinned rat cardiac papillary fibers with homologous rat cardiac troponin subunits to study the impact of Ala and Asp substitutions at Ser23/24 of rat cTnI (RcTnI S23A/24A and RcTnI S23D/24D). Both RcTnI S23A/24A and RcTnI S23D/24D showed a ~36% decrease in Ca2+-activated maximal tension. Both RcTnI S23A/24A and RcTnI S23D/24D showed a ~18% decrease in ATPase activity. Muscle fiber stiffness measurements suggested that the decrease in thin filament activation observed in RcTnI S23A/24A and RcTnI S23D/24D was due to a decrease in the number of strongly-bound crossbridges. Another major finding was that Ala and Asp substitutions in cTnI did not affect crossbridge detachment kinetics. PMID:22684024

  9. Aspartic acid functions as carbonyl trapper to inhibit the formation of advanced glycation end products by chemical chaperone activity.

    PubMed

    Prasanna, Govindarajan; Saraswathi, N T

    2016-05-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) were implicated in pathology of numerous diseases. In this study, we present the bioactivity of aspartic acid (Asp) to inhibit the AGEs. Hemoglobin and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were glycated with glucose, fructose, and ribose in the presence and absence of Asp (100-200 μM). HbA1c inhibition was investigated using human blood and characterized by micro-column ion exchange chromatography. The effect of methyl glyoxal (MG) on hemoglobin and BSA was evaluated by fluorescence spectroscopy and gel electrophoresis. The effect of MG on red blood cells morphology was characterized by scanning electron micrographs. Molecular docking was performed on BSA with Asp. Asp is capable of inhibiting the formation of fluorescent AGEs by reacting with the reducing sugars. The presence of Asp as supplement in whole blood reduced the HbA1c% from 8.8 to 6.1. The presence of MG showed an increase in fluorescence and the presence of Asp inhibited the glycation thereby the fluorescence was quenched. MG also affected the electrophoretic mobility of hemoglobin and BSA by forming high molecular weight aggregates. Normal RBCs showed typical biconcave shape. MG modified RBCs showed twisted and elongated shape whereas the presence of ASP tends to protect RBC from twisting. Asp interacted with arginine residues of bovine serum albumin particularly ARG 194, ARG 198, and ARG 217 thereby stabilized the protein complex. We conclude that Asp has dual functions as a chemical chaperone to stabilize protein and as a dicarbonyl trapper, and thereby it can prevent the complications caused by glycation.

  10. Adolescent social defeat alters N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor expression and impairs fear learning in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Novick, Andrew M; Mears, Mackenzie; Forster, Gina L; Lei, Yanlin; Tejani-Butt, Shanaz M; Watt, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Repeated social defeat of adolescent male rats results in adult mesocortical dopamine hypofunction, impaired working memory, and increased contextual anxiety-like behavior. Given the role of glutamate in dopamine regulation, cognition, and fear and anxiety, we investigated potential changes to N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors following adolescent social defeat. As both NMDA receptors and mesocortical dopamine are implicated in the expression and extinction of conditioned fear, a separate cohort of rats was challenged with a classical fear conditioning paradigm to investigate whether fear learning is altered by adolescent defeat. Quantitative autoradiography was used to measure 3H-MK-801 binding to NMDA receptors in regions of the medial prefrontal cortex, caudate putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala and hippocampus. Assessment of fear learning was achieved using an auditory fear conditioning paradigm, with freezing toward the auditory tone used as a measure of conditioned fear. Compared to controls, adolescent social defeat decreased adult NMDA receptor expression in the infralimbic region of the prefrontal cortex and central amygdala, while increasing expression in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. Previously defeated rats also displayed decreased conditioned freezing during the recall and first extinction periods, which may be related to the observed decreases and increases in NMDA receptors within the central amygdala and CA3, respectively. The alteration in NMDA receptors seen following adolescent social defeat suggests that dysfunction of glutamatergic systems, combined with mesocortical dopamine deficits, likely plays a role in the some of the long-term behavioral consequences of social stressors in adolescence seen in both preclinical and clinical studies.

  11. Intein-Promoted Cyclization of Aspartic Acid Flanking the Intein Leads to Atypical N-Terminal Cleavage.

    PubMed

    Minteer, Christopher J; Siegart, Nicolle M; Colelli, Kathryn M; Liu, Xinyue; Linhardt, Robert J; Wang, Chunyu; Gomez, Alvin V; Reitter, Julie N; Mills, Kenneth V

    2017-02-28

    Protein splicing is a post-translational reaction facilitated by an intein, or intervening protein, which involves the removal of the intein and the ligation of the flanking polypeptides, or exteins. A DNA polymerase II intein from Pyrococcus abyssi (Pab PolII intein) can promote protein splicing in vitro on incubation at high temperature. Mutation of active site residues Cys1, Gln185, and Cys+1 to Ala results in an inactive intein precursor, which cannot promote the steps of splicing, including cleavage of the peptide bond linking the N-extein and intein (N-terminal cleavage). Surprisingly, coupling the inactivating mutations to a change of the residue at the C-terminus of the N-extein (N-1 residue) from the native Asn to Asp reactivates N-terminal cleavage at pH 5. Similar "aspartic acid effects" have been observed in other proteins and peptides but usually only occur at lower pH values. In this case, however, the unusual N-terminal cleavage is abolished by mutations to catalytic active site residues and unfolding of the intein, indicating that this cleavage effect is mediated by the intein active site and the intein fold. We show via mass spectrometry that the reaction proceeds through cyclization of Asp resulting in anhydride formation coupled to peptide bond cleavage. Our results add to the richness of the understanding of the mechanism of protein splicing and provide insight into the stability of proteins at moderately low pH. The results also explain, and may help practitioners avoid, a side reaction that may complicate intein applications in biotechnology.

  12. Side-chain conformational thermodynamics of aspartic acid residue in the peptides and achatin-I in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tomohiro; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki; Nakahara, Masaru

    2004-02-01

    Sequence-position dependence of the side-chain conformational equilibrium of aspartic acid (Asp) residue is investigated for both model Asp peptides (di- to tetra-) and neuropeptide achatin-I (Gly--Phe-Ala-Asp) in aqueous solution. The trans-to-gauche conformational changes on the dihedral angle of C-C(alpha)-C(beta)-C are analyzed in terms of the standard free energy DeltaG(0), enthalpy DeltaH(0), and entropy -TDeltaS(0). The thermodynamic quantities are obtained by measuring the dihedral-angle-dependent vicinal (1)H-(1)H coupling constants in nuclear magnetic resonance over a wide temperature range. When the carboxyl groups of Asp are ionized, DeltaG(0) in the aqueous phase depends by approximately 1-2 kJ mol(-1) on the sequence position, whereas the energy change in the gas phase (absence of solvent) depends by tens of kJ mol(-1). Therefore, the weak position dependence of DeltaG(0) is a result of the compensation for the intramolecular effect by the hydration (= DeltaG(0)-). The DeltaH(0) and -TDeltaS(0) components, on the other hand, exhibit a notable trend at the C-terminus. The C-terminal DeltaH(0) is larger than the N- and nonterminal DeltaH(0) values due to the intramolecular repulsion between alpha- and beta-. The C-terminal -TDeltaS(0) is negative and larger in magnitude than the others, and an attractive solute-solvent interaction at the C-terminus serves as a structure breaker of the water solvent.

  13. Improvement of post-thawed sperm quality and fertility of Arian rooster by oral administration of d-aspartic acid.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Mahdi; Zhandi, Mahdi; Kohram, Hamid; Zaghari, Mojtaba; Sadeghi, Mostafa; Sharafi, Mohsen

    2017-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of d-Aspartic acid (D-Asp) on post-thawed sperm quality, fertility and hatchability outcomes in male broiler breeders. Twenty 55-week-old roosters were selected and equally split into four groups (n = 5 rooster/group). Different daily D-Asp doses including 0 (D-0), 100 (D-100), 200 (D-200) or 300 (D-300) mg/kg BW were capsulated and individually administered for 12 weeks to roosters in each group. Semen samples were weekly collected from 7th to 12th week of experiment. Sperm quality from 7th to 11th week was evaluated in both fresh (total and forward motility and plasma membrane functionality) and post-thawed (total and forward motility, plasma membrane functionality, apoptosis status and mitochondrial activity) conditions. Also, collected semen samples on the 12th week were frozen and artificially inseminated to evaluate fertility and hatchability. The results from fresh condition showed that total and forward motility and plasma membrane functionality were significantly higher in D-200 compared to other groups. Also, interaction effect of time and treatment was not significant for all assessed parameters in fresh condition. In post-thawed condition, D-200 showed significantly higher total and forward motility, fertility and hatchability compared to other groups. The higher value for plasma membrane functionality and mitochondrial activity was observed in D-200 compared to D-0 and D300 groups. However, the percentage of live, early apoptotic and dead spermatozoa were not significantly affected by applied treatment in the current study. No significant difference for time and treat interaction effect was observed for all assessed parameters except forward motility. In conclusion, it seems that D-Asp administration could improve fresh and post-thawed sperm quality and post-thawed sperm fertility in male broiler breeders.

  14. A rapid and sensitive detection of D-Aspartic acid in Crystallin by chiral derivatized liquid chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Hajime; Miyazaki, Yasuto; Ito, Keisuke; Todoroki, Kenichiro; Min, Jun Zhe; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa

    2016-10-07

    A method for the determination of D-Aspartic acid (D-Asp) and its D/L ratio in peptides and proteins has been developed. This method was carried out with good separation of the D/L chiral peptide pairs by combination of a chiral derivatization and an ADME column separation. Furthermore, a cationic derivatization reagent, DBD-Py-NCS, increased the sensitivity of the ESI-MS/MS detection. To confirm the comprehensive peptide analysis, synthesized α-Crystallin tryptic peptides, which included D-Asp residues, were analyzed. The 5 pairs of D/L-Asp that included peptide diastereomers were well separated. Their peak resolutions were more than 1.5 and the results were reproducible (RSD<0.05, n=5). As an application of this method, we analyzed the α-Crystallin standard and UV irradiated α-Crystallin. After trypsin digestion and DBD-Py-NCS derivatization, the tryptic peptide derivatives were applied to LC-MS/MS. Based on the results of peptide sequence identification, almost all the tryptic peptides of the αA- and αB-Crystallin homologous subunits of α-Crystallin were detected as DBD-Py NCS derivatives. However, there was no D-Asp residue in the standard proteins. In the case of the UV irradiated α-Crystallin, Asp(76) and Asp(84) in the αA-Crystallin and Asp(96) in αB-Crystallin were racemized to D-Asp. These results show that this proposed chiral peptide LC-MS/MS method using chiral derivatization provides a rapid and sensitive analysis for post translational Asp racemization sites in aging proteins.

  15. Aspartic Acid Racemization and Collagen Degradation Markers Reveal an Accumulation of Damage in Tendon Collagen That Is Enhanced with Aging*

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T.; Streeter, Ian; Pinchbeck, Gina L.; Goodship, Allen E.; Clegg, Peter D.; Birch, Helen L.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the rate at which protein turnover occurs in living tendon and whether the rate differs between tendons with different physiological roles. In this study, we have quantified the racemization of aspartic acid to calculate the age of the collagenous and non-collagenous components of the high strain injury-prone superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) and low strain rarely injured common digital extensor tendon (CDET) in a group of horses with a wide age range. In addition, the turnover of collagen was assessed indirectly by measuring the levels of collagen degradation markers (collagenase-generated neoepitope and cross-linked telopeptide of type I collagen). The fractional increase in d-Asp was similar (p = 0.7) in the SDFT (5.87 × 10−4/year) and CDET (5.82 × 10−4/year) tissue, and d/l-Asp ratios showed a good correlation with pentosidine levels. We calculated a mean (±S.E.) collagen half-life of 197.53 (±18.23) years for the SDFT, which increased significantly with horse age (p = 0.03) and was significantly (p < 0.001) higher than that for the CDET (34.03 (±3.39) years). Using similar calculations, the half-life of non-collagenous protein was 2.18 (±0.41) years in the SDFT and was significantly (p = 0.04) lower than the value of 3.51 (±0.51) years for the CDET. Collagen degradation markers were higher in the CDET and suggested an accumulation of partially degraded collagen within the matrix with aging in the SDFT. We propose that increased susceptibility to injury in older individuals results from an inability to remove partially degraded collagen from the matrix leading to reduced mechanical competence. PMID:20308077

  16. Factors affecting the formation of nitrogenous disinfection by-products during chlorination of aspartic acid in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Liu, Zhigang; Tao, Hui; Xu, Hang; Gu, Yanmei; Chen, Zhaolin; Yu, Jingjing

    2017-01-01

    The formation of emerging nitrogenous disinfection by-products (N-DBPs) from the chlorination of aspartic acid (Asp) was investigated. The yield of dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) was higher than other N-DBPs, such as dichloroacetamide(DCAcAm) and chloropicrin (TCNM) during the chlorination of Asp. The formation of DCAN, DCAcAm, and TCNM all showed a trend of first increasing and then decreasing during the chlorination of Asp with increasing contact time. The dosage of chlorine had an impact on the formation of DCAN, DCAcAm, and TCNM. The highest yields of DCAN and DCAcAm appeared when the Cl2/Asp molar ratio was about 20, the yield of TCNM increased with increasing the Cl2/Asp molar ratio from 5 to 30 and TCNM was not produced when the ratio was less than 5. Cyanogen chloride (CNCl) was detected when the Cl2/Asp molar ratio was lower than 5. N-DBPs formation was influenced by pH. DCAN formation increased with increasing pH from 5 to 6 and then decreased with increasing pH from 6 to 9, but DCAcAm and TCNM increased with increasing pH from 5 to 8 and then decreased. Higher temperatures reduced the formation of DCAN and DCAcAm, but increased TCNM formation. DCAN and DCAcAm formation decreased, and relatively stable TCNM formation increased, with increasing free chlorine contact time during chloramination. N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) was produced during chloramination of Asp and increased with prolonged chloramination contact time. The presence of bromide ions enhanced the yields of haloacetonitriles and shifted N-DBPs to more brominated species.

  17. Proton transport by a bacteriorhodopsin mutant, aspartic acid-85-->asparagine, initiated in the unprotonated Schiff base state.

    PubMed Central

    Dickopf, S; Alexiev, U; Krebs, M P; Otto, H; Mollaaghababa, R; Khorana, H G; Heyn, M P

    1995-01-01

    At alkaline pH the bacteriorhodopsin mutant D85N, with aspartic acid-85 replaced by asparagine, is in a yellow form (lambda max approximately 405 nm) with a deprotonated Schiff base. This state resembles the M intermediate of the wild-type photocycle. We used time-resolved methods to show that this yellow form of D85N, which has an initially unprotonated Schiff base and which lacks the proton acceptor Asp-85, transports protons in the same direction as wild type when excited by 400-nm flashes. Photoexcitation leads in several milliseconds to the formation of blue (630 nm) and purple (580 nm) intermediates with a protonated Schiff base, which decay in tens of seconds to the initial state (400 nm). Experiments with pH indicator dyes show that at pH 7, 8, and 9, proton uptake occurs in about 5-10 ms and precedes the slow release (seconds). Photovoltage measurements reveal that the direction of proton movement is from the cytoplasmic to the extracellular side with major components on the millisecond and second time scales. The slowest electrical component could be observed in the presence of azide, which accelerates the return of the blue intermediate to the initial yellow state. Transport thus occurs in two steps. In the first step (milliseconds), the Schiff base is protonated by proton uptake from the cytoplasmic side, thereby forming the blue state. From the pH dependence of the amplitudes of the electrical and photocycle signals, we conclude that this reaction proceeds in a similar way as in wild type--i.e., via the internal proton donor Asp-96. In the second step (seconds) the Schiff base deprotonates, releasing the proton to the extracellular side. PMID:8524795

  18. Aggrecan turnover in human articular cartilage: use of aspartic acid racemization as a marker of molecular age.

    PubMed

    Maroudas, A; Bayliss, M T; Uchitel-Kaushansky, N; Schneiderman, R; Gilav, E

    1998-02-01

    Aggrecan is a key component of the cartilage matrix. During aging, many changes occur in its composition and structure; in particular, there is an increase in the proportion of lower molecular weight monomers and of the "free" binding region. An important question has been whether these changes represent alterations in biosynthesis or whether they are due to the accumulation with age of the partially degraded fragments of the originally synthesized large monomer. In the present work we have used an independent tool, viz., the extent of racemization of aspartic acid to study the molecular "age" of different buoyant density fractions of the aggrecan of human articular cartilage, as well as of isolated free binding region and link protein. By measuring the D/LAsp ratio of the different aggrecan species, we were able to establish directly the relative residence times of these molecules in the cartilage matrix and, in combination with compositional and structural analyses, to define their "history" and calculate some of the kinetics constants characterizing their turnover. The value of the turnover constant for the large monomer in fraction A1D1 is 0.206 per year, which corresponds to a half-life of 3.4 years, while the turnover constant for the free binding region is 0.027 per year, which corresponds to a half-life of 25 years. It is thus clear that the rate of formation and turnover of the large monomer is much more rapid than the final degradation of the free binding region fragments, which explains the accumulation of the latter in cartilage during aging.

  19. Biosynthesis of D-alanyl-lipoteichoic acid: cloning, nucleotide sequence, and expression of the Lactobacillus casei gene for the D-alanine-activating enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, M P; Neuhaus, F C

    1992-01-01

    The D-alanine-activating enzyme (Dae; EC 6.3.2.4) encoded by the dae gene from Lactobacillus casei ATCC 7469 is a cytosolic protein essential for the formation of the D-alanyl esters of membrane-bound lipoteichoic acid. The gene has been cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli, an organism which does not possess Dae activity. The open reading frame is 1,518 nucleotides and codes for a protein of 55.867 kDa, a value in agreement with the 56 kDa obtained by electrophoresis. A putative promoter and ribosome-binding site immediately precede the dae gene. A second open reading frame contiguous with the dae gene has also been partially sequenced. The organization of these genetic elements suggests that more than one enzyme necessary for the biosynthesis of D-alanyl-lipoteichoic acid may be present in this operon. Analysis of the amino acid sequence deduced from the dae gene identified three regions with significant homology to proteins in the following groups of ATP-utilizing enzymes: (i) the acid-thiol ligases, (ii) the activating enzymes for the biosynthesis of enterobactin, and (iii) the synthetases for tyrocidine, gramicidin S, and penicillin. From these comparisons, a common motif (GXXGXPK) has been identified that is conserved in the 19 protein domains analyzed. This motif may represent the phosphate-binding loop of an ATP-binding site for this class of enzymes. A DNA fragment (1,568 nucleotides) containing the dae gene and its putative ribosome-binding site has been subcloned and expressed in E. coli. Approximately 0.5% of the total cell protein is active Dae, whereas 21% is in the form of inclusion bodies. The isolation of this minimal fragment without a native promoter sequence provides the basis for designing a genetic system for modulating the D-alanine ester content of lipoteichoic acid. PMID:1385594

  20. Inhibitors of alanine racemase enzyme: a review.

    PubMed

    Azam, Mohammed Afzal; Jayaram, Unni

    2016-08-01

    Alanine racemase is a fold type III PLP-dependent amino acid racemase enzyme catalysing the conversion of l-alanine to d-alanine utilised by bacterial cell wall for peptidoglycan synthesis. As there are no known homologs in humans, it is considered as an excellent antibacterial drug target. The standard inhibitors of this enzyme include O-carbamyl-d-serine, d-cycloserine, chlorovinyl glycine, alaphosphin, etc. d-Cycloserine is indicated for pulmonary and extra pulmonary tuberculosis but therapeutic use of drug is limited due to its severe toxic effects. Toxic effects due to off-target affinities of cycloserine and other substrate analogs have prompted new research efforts to identify alanine racemase inhibitors that are not substrate analogs. In this review, an updated status of known inhibitors of alanine racemase enzyme has been provided which will serve as a rich source of structural information and will be helpful in generating selective and potent inhibitor of alanine racemase.

  1. Poly(ornithine-co-arginine-co-glycine-co-aspartic Acid): Preparation via NCA Polymerization and its Potential as a Polymeric Tumor-Penetrating Agent.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haiyang; Tang, Zhaohui; Zhang, Dawei; Song, Wantong; Duan, Taicheng; Gu, Jingkai; Chen, Xuesi

    2015-06-01

    A novel random copolypeptide of ornithine, arginine, glycine, and aspartic acid [Poly(ornithine-co-arginine-co-glycine-co-aspartic acid), Poly(O,R,G,D)] has been prepared through ring-opening polymerization of N-δ-carbobenzoxy-l-ornithine N-carboxyanhydride [Orn(Cbz)-NCA)], l-glycine N-carboxyanhydride (Gly-NCA) and β-benzyl l-aspartate N-carboxyanhydride [Asp(Bn)-NCA], following by subsequent deprotection and guanidization. The structure of Poly(O,R,G,D) was confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Low cytotoxicity of Poly(O,R,G,D) was confirmed from MTT assay. The Poly(O,R,G,D) contain some internal sequences of RXXR (X = O, R, G, or D) that could be proteolytically cleaved to expose the cryptic CendR element and bind to Neuropilin-1. This would lead to vascular and tissue permeabilization. Therefore trypsin-cleaved Poly(O,R,G,D) increase the vascular leakage of Evans blue from dermal microvessels at the injection site in vivo skin permeability assay. The intratumoral injection of the Poly(O,R,G,D) significantly enhanced the concentration of cisplatin-loaded nanoparticles in MCF-7 solid tumors. These results show that Poly(O,R,G,D) could increase the vascular leakage and tissue penetration of nanoparticles in a solid tumor and can be used as a potential polymeric tumor-penetrating agent.

  2. Apelin-36 is protective against N-methyl-D-aspartic-acid-induced retinal ganglion cell death in the mice.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kenji; Murakami, Yuta; Sawada, Shohei; Ushikubo, Hiroko; Mori, Asami; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2016-11-15

    Retinal ganglion cell death in glaucoma is caused at least in part by a large Ca(2+) influx through N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors. Apelin is a peptide originally found in the tissue extracts of bovine stomach. Recent studies have been shown that apelin protects against the ischemic-reperfused injury in the brain. We examined whether apelin had protective effects on the NMDA-induced retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death using B6.Cg-TgN(Thy1-CFP)23Jrs/J transgenic mice, which express the enhanced cyan fluorescent protein in RGCs in the retina, in vivo. The mice were anesthetized by ketamine and xylazine, and NMDA (40 nmol/eye) was intravitreally injected. We evaluated the effects of apelin-13, [Glp(1)]-apelin-13, a potent agonist of apelin receptor, and apelin-36 on the NMDA-induced retinal ganglion cell death. NMDA-induced retinal ganglion cell loss was clearly seen 7 days after NMDA injection. Intravitreal apelin-36 (0.33 nmol/eye), but not apelin-13 (1 nmol/eye) nor [Glp(1)]-apelin-13 (1 nmol/eye), simultaneously injected with NMDA significantly reduced the cell loss. The protective effect of apelin-36 was not reduced by ML221 (0.1 nmol/eye; 5-[(4-Nitrobenzoyl)oxy]-2-[(2-pyrimidinylthio)methyl]-4H-pyran-4-one), an apelin receptor antagonist, GF109203X (0.03 nmol/eye), a protein kinase C inhibitor, U0126 (0.2 nmol/eye), a MAPK/ERK kinase inhibitor, LY294002 (0.1 nmol/eye), a phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor, Akti 1/2 (0.05 nmol/eye), an Akt inhibitor, or 4,5,6,7-tetrabromobenzotriazole (0.2 nmol/eye), a casein kinase-2 inhibitor. In addition, human apelin-36 did not affect the kainic-acid (20 nmol/eye)-induced ganglion cell death. The present study suggests that apelin-36 protects against the NMDA-induced ganglion cell death independently of the activation of apelin receptor in the murine retina in vivo.

  3. Simultaneous determination of basal and evoked output levels of aspartate, glutamate, taurine and 4-aminobutyric acid during microdialysis and from superfused brain slices.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, L; Della Corte, L; Tipton, K F

    1999-02-19

    A HPLC method, involving pre-column derivatisation with o-phthalaldehyde and fluorescence detection, is described. It allows the resolution of aspartate, glutamate, taurine and GABA, in a single run with detection limits of 3.2, 1.7, 1.4 and 2 fmol/microl of perfusate, respectively. It is sufficiently sensitive and rapid (15 min) for the determination "on line" of the four amino acids in perfusates obtained during in vivo microdialysis experiments. The procedure has been used to determine basal, K+ - or veratridine-stimulated release of these amino acids in different brain areas during microdialysis and from perfused tissue slices.

  4. Mutation of the aspartic acid residues of the GDD sequence motif of poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase results in enzymes with altered metal ion requirements for activity.

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski, S A; Morrow, C D

    1995-01-01

    The poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, 3Dpol, is known to share a region of sequence homology with all RNA polymerases centered at the GDD amino acid motif. The two aspartic acids have been postulated to be involved in the catalytic activity and metal ion coordination of the enzyme. To test this hypothesis, we have utilized oligonucleotide site-directed mutagenesis to generate defined mutations in the aspartic acids of the GDD motif of the 3Dpol gene. The codon for the first aspartate (3D-D-328 [D refers to the single amino acid change, and the number refers to its position in the polymerase]) was changed to that for glutamic acid, histidine, asparagine, or glutamine; the codons for both aspartic acids were simultaneously changed to those for glutamic acids; and the codon for the second aspartic acid (3D-D-329) was changed to that for glutamic acid or asparagine. The mutant enzymes were expressed in Escherichia coli, and the in vitro poly(U) polymerase activity was characterized. All of the mutant 3Dpol enzymes were enzymatically inactive in vitro when tested over a range of Mg2+ concentrations. However, when Mn2+ was substituted for Mg2+ in the in vitro assays, the mutant that substituted the second aspartic acid for asparagine (3D-N-329) was active. To further substantiate this finding, a series of different transition metal ions were substituted for Mg2+ in the poly(U) polymerase assay. The wild-type enzyme was active with all metals except Ca2+, while the 3D-N-329 mutant was active only when FeC6H7O5 was used in the reaction. To determine the effects of the mutations on poliovirus replication, the mutant 3Dpol genes were subcloned into an infectious cDNA of poliovirus. The cDNAs containing the mutant 3Dpol genes did not produce infectious virus when transfected into tissue culture cells under standard conditions. Because of the activity of the 3D-N-329 mutant in the presence of Fe2+ and Mn2+, transfections were also performed in the presence of the

  5. Photon Atomic Parameters of Nonessential Amino Acids for Radiotherapy and Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Bursalıoğlu, Ertuğrul O.; İçelli, Orhan; Balkan, Begüm; Kavanoz, H. Birtan; Okutan, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    The total mass attenuation coefficients (μt) (cm2/g) and atomic, molecular, and electronic effective cross sections have been calculated for nonessential amino acids that contain H, C, N, and O such as tyrosine, aspartate, glutamine, alanine, asparagine, aspartic acid, cysteine, and glycine in the wide energy region 0.015–15 MeV. The variations with energy of total mass attenuation coefficients and atomic, molecular, and electronic cross sections are shown for all photon interactions. PMID:25548658

  6. Amino acid residues in the GerAB protein important in the function and assembly of the alanine spore germination receptor of Bacillus subtilis 168.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Gareth R; Moir, Anne

    2011-05-01

    The paradigm gerA operon is required for endospore germination in response to c-alanine as the sole germinant, and the three protein products, GerAA, GerAB, and GerAC are predicted to form a receptor complex in the spore inner membrane. GerAB shows homology to the amino acid-polyamine-organocation (APC) family of single-component transporters and is predicted to be an integral membrane protein with 10 membrane-spanning helices. Site-directed mutations were introduced into the gerAB gene at its natural location on the chromosome. Alterations to some charged or potential helix-breaking residues within membrane spans affected receptor function dramatically. In some cases, this is likely to reflect the complete loss of the GerA receptor complex, as judged by the absence of the germinant receptor protein GerAC, which suggests that the altered GerAB protein itself may be unstable or that the altered structure destabilizes the complex. Mutants that have a null phenotype for Instituto de Biotecnología de León, INBIOTEC, Parque Científico de León, Av. Real, 1, 24006 León, Spain-alanine germination but retain GerAC protein at near-normal levels are more likely to define amino acid residues of functional, rather than structural, importance. Single-amino-acid substitutions in each of the GerAB and GerAA proteins can prevent incorporation of GerAC protein into the spore; this provides strong evidence that the proteins within a specific receptor interact and that these interactions are required for receptor assembly. The lipoprotein nature of the GerAC receptor subunit is also important; an amino acid change in the prelipoprotein signal sequence in the gerAC1 mutant results in the absence of GerAC protein from the spore.

  7. Composite poly-L-lactic acid/poly-(α,β)-DL-aspartic acid/collagen nanofibrous scaffolds for dermal tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, Rajeswari; Venugopal, Jayarama Reddy; Sundarrajan, Subramanian; Mukherjee, Shayanti; Sridhar, Radhakrishnan; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2012-08-01

    Tissue engineering scaffolds for skin tissue regeneration is an ever expounding area of research, as the products that meet the necessary requirements are far and elite. The nanofibrous poly-L-lactic acid/poly-(α,β)-DL-aspartic acid/Collagen (PLLA/PAA/Col I&III) scaffolds were fabricated by electrospinning and characterized by SEM, contact angle and FTIR analysis for skin tissue regeneration. The cell-scaffold interactions were analyzed by cell proliferation and their morphology observed in SEM. The results showed that the cell proliferation was significantly increased (p≤0.05) in PLLA/PAA/Col I&III scaffolds compared to PLLA and PLLA/PAA nanofibrous scaffolds. The abundance and accessibility of adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) may prove to be novel cell therapeutics for dermal tissue regeneration. The differentiation of ADSCs was confirmed using collagen expression and their morphology by CMFDA dye extrusion technique. The current study focuses on the application of PLLA/PAA/Col I&III nanofibrous scaffolds for skin tissue engineering and their potential use as substrate for the culture and differentiation of ADSCs. The objective for inclusion of a novel cell binding moiety like PAA was to replace damaged extracellular matrix and to guide new cells directly into the wound bed with enhanced proliferation and overall organization. This combinatorial epitome of PLLA/PAA/Col I&III nanofibrous scaffold with stem cell therapy to induce the necessary paracrine signalling effect would favour faster regeneration of the damaged skin tissues.

  8. Aspartic acid racemization and amino acid composition of the organic endoskeleton of the deep-water colonial anemone Gerardia : Determination of longevity from kinetic experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodfriend, Glenn A.

    1997-05-01

    An age of 250 (±70) yr is estimated for a specimen of the colonial anemone Gerardia collected alive from 630 m depth off the Bahamas. This age is calculated from (1) the difference in aspartic acid (Asp) racemization measured in the outermost (youngest) and innermost (oldest) layers of the trunk of the organic endoskeleton of the specimen and (2) the estimated rate of Asp racenlization, as extrapolated from heating experiments. A progressive increase in D/L Asp values was observed from the outermost (0.052) to the innermost (0.099) layer of the trunk. Asp racemization rates determined at 60, 80, and 100°C in the laboratory were used to determine the Arrhenius parameters, from which the rate at present ambient temperature (12.5°C) was calculated. The activation energy of Asp racemization was estimated to be 29.1 kcal/mol. The estimated age (250 yr) is much younger than that suggested by radiocarbon measurements of the specimen (ca. 1800 yr). The amino acid composition of the endoskeleton of Gerardia is unusual, with histidine comprising 30% of the total. The composition resembles proteins of the endoskeleton of antipatharians (black corals).

  9. The First Aspartic Acid of the DQxD Motif for Human UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase 1A10 Interacts with UDP-Glucuronic Acid during Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yan; Patana, Anne-Sisko; Miley, Michael J.; Zielinska, Agnieszka K.; Bratton, Stacie M.; Miller, Grover P.; Goldman, Adrian; Finel, Moshe; Redinbo, Matt R.; Radominska-Pandya, Anna

    2008-01-01

    All UDP-glucuronosyltransferase enzymes (UGTs) share a common cofactor, UDP-glucuronic acid (UDP-GlcUA). The binding site for UDP-GlcUA is localized to the C-terminal domain of UGTs on the basis of amino acid sequence homology analysis and crystal structures of glycosyltransferases, including the C-terminal domain of human UGT2B7. We hypothesized that the 393DQMD-NAK399 region of human UGT1A10 interacts with the glucuronic acid moiety of UDP-GlcUA. Using site-directed mutagenesis and enzymatic analysis, we demonstrated that the D393A mutation abolished the glucuronidation activity of UGT1A10 toward all substrates. The effects of the alanine mutation at Q394, D396, and K399 on glucuronidation activities were substrate-dependent. Previously, we examined the importance of these residues in UGT2B7. Although D393 (D398 in UGT2B7) is similarly critical for UDP-GlcUA binding in both enzymes, the effects of Q394 (Q399 in UGT2B7) to Ala mutation on activity were significant but different between UGT1A10 and UGT2B7. A model of the UDP-GlcUA binding site suggests that the contribution of other residues to cosubstrate binding may explain these differences between UGT1A10 and UGT2B7. We thus postulate that D393 is critical for the binding of glucuronic acid and that proximal residues, e.g., Q394 (Q399 in UGT2B7), play a subtle role in cosubstrate binding in UGT1A10 and UGT2B7. Hence, this study provides important new information needed for the identification and understanding of the binding sites of UGTs, a major step forward in elucidating their molecular mechanism. PMID:18048489

  10. Synthesis of aqueous suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles with the co-precipitation of iron ions in the presence of aspartic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pušnik, Klementina; Goršak, Tanja; Drofenik, Miha; Makovec, Darko

    2016-09-01

    There is increasing demand for the production of large quantities of aqueous suspensions of magnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles. Amino acids are one possible type of inexpensive, nontoxic, and biocompatible molecules that can be used as the surfactants for the preparation of stable suspensions. This preparation can be conducted in a simple, one-step process based on the co-precipitation of Fe3+/Fe2+ ions in the presence of the amino acid. However, the presence of this amino acid changes the mechanism of the magnetic nanoparticles' formation. In this investigation we analyzed the influence of aspartic amino acid (Asp) on the formation of magnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles during the co-precipitation. The process of the nanoparticles' formation was followed using a combination of TEM, x-ray diffractometry, magnetic measurements, in-situ FT-IR spectroscopy, and chemical analysis, and compared with the formation of nanoparticles without the Asp. The Asp forms a coordination complex with the Fe3+ ions, which impedes the formation of the intermediate iron oxyhydroxide phase and suppresses the growth of the final magnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles. Slower reaction kinetics can lead to the formation of nonmagnetic secondary phases. The aspartic-acid-absorbed nanoparticles can be dispersed to form relatively concentrated aqueous suspensions displaying a good colloidal stability at an increased pH.

  11. Hydroxylation of aspartic acid in domains homologous to the epidermal growth factor precursor is catalyzed by a 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase.

    PubMed Central

    Stenflo, J; Holme, E; Lindstedt, S; Chandramouli, N; Huang, L H; Tam, J P; Merrifield, R B

    1989-01-01

    3-Hydroxyaspartic acid and 3-hydroxyasparagine are two rare amino acids that are present in domains homologous to the epidermal growth factor precursor in vitamin K-dependent plasma proteins as well as in proteins that do not require vitamin K for normal biosynthesis. They are formed by posttranslational hydroxylation of aspartic acid and asparagine, respectively. The first epidermal growth factor-like domain in factor IX (residues 45-87) was synthesized with aspartic acid in position 64, replacing 3-hydroxyaspartic acid. It was used as substrate in a hydroxylase assay with rat liver microsomes as the source of enzyme and reaction conditions that satisfy the requirements of 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases. The synthetic peptide stimulated the 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylation in contrast to synthetic, modified epidermal growth factor (Met-21 and His-22 deleted and Glu-24 replaced by Asp) and synthetic peptides corresponding to residues 60-71 in human factor IX. This indicates that the hydroxylase is a 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase with a selective substrate requirement. Images PMID:2492106

  12. N-Linked Glycosyl Auxiliary-Mediated Native Chemical Ligation on Aspartic Acid: Application towards N-Glycopeptide Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Chai, Hua; Le Mai Hoang, Kim; Vu, Minh Duy; Pasunooti, Kalyan; Liu, Chuan-Fa; Liu, Xue-Wei

    2016-08-22

    A practical approach towards N-glycopeptide synthesis using an auxiliary-mediated dual native chemical ligation (NCL) has been developed. The first NCL connects an N-linked glycosyl auxiliary to the thioester side chain of an N-terminal aspartate oligopeptide. This intermediate undergoes a second NCL with a C-terminal thioester oligopeptide. Mild cleavage provides the desired N-glycopeptide.

  13. The influence of manufacture on the free D-amino acid content of Cheddar cheese.

    PubMed

    Csapó, J; Varga-Visi, E; Lóki, K; Albert, Cs

    2006-06-01

    The changes in the concentration and those of composition of alanine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid enantiomers were investigated during manufacture of Cheddar cheese. The amount of D-alanine increased continuously during ripening following the liberation of L-alanine originated from the proteolysis of milk proteins. There was slightly more D-aspartic and D-glutamic acid in the dry matter of curd after pressing than before pressurization. The D-amino acid content and the ratio of the D-enantiomers related to the total amount of free amino acids differed significantly among cheeses produced with different single-strain starters. The D-amino acid composition changed during manufacture, but the influence of the strain selection was not significant on the D-amino acid pattern.

  14. Glutamate and aspartate are decreased in the skin in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, S.; Yamauchi, M.

    1992-01-01

    We measured the levels of amino acids in biopsied skin from eight patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and seven controls. The most conspicuous changes in ALS patients were as follows. First, the contents of the acidic amino acids glutamate and aspartate were significantly decreased in ALS, and were negatively and significantly associated with the duration of illness. Second, the levels of the collagen-associated amino acids hydroxyproline, proline, glycine, alanine, and hydroxylysine were significantly decreased in ALS, and correlated inversely with the duration of illness. These results suggest that there are abnormalities of acidic amino acids and collagen-associated amino acids in the skin of patients with ALS. These changes may underlie the pathogenesis of ALS.

  15. Exotoxin A of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: substitution of glutamic acid 553 with aspartic acid drastically reduces toxicity and enzymatic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, C M; Collier, R J

    1987-01-01

    Glutamic acid 553 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A (ETA) has been identified by photoaffinity labeling as a residue within the NAD binding site (S.F. Carroll and R.J. Collier, J. Biol. Chem. 262:8707-8711, 1987). To explore the function of Glu-553 we used oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis to replace this residue with Asp in cloned ETA and expressed the mutant gene in Escherichia coli K-12. ADP-ribosylation activity of Asp-553 ETA in cell extracts was about 1,800-fold lower and toxicity for mouse L-M929 fibroblasts was at least 10,000-fold lower than that of the wild-type toxin. Extracts containing Asp-553 ETA inhibited the cytotoxicity of authentic ETA on L-M929 fibroblasts, suggesting that the mutant toxin competes for ETA receptors. The results indicate that Glu-553 is crucial for ADP-ribosylation activity and, consequently, cytotoxicity of ETA. Substitution or deletion of this residue may be a route to new ETA vaccines. Images PMID:2889718

  16. A structural insight into the P1S1 binding mode of diaminoethylphosphonic and phosphinic acids, selective inhibitors of alanine aminopeptidases

    SciTech Connect

    Węglarz-Tomczak, Ewelina; Berlicki, Łukasz; Pawełczak, Małgorzata; Nocek, Bogusław; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Mucha, Artur

    2016-07-01

    N0 -substituted 1,2-diaminoethylphosphonic acids and 1,2-diaminoethylphosphinic dipeptides were explored to unveil the structural context of the unexpected selectivity of these inhibitors of M1 alanine aminopeptidases (APNs) versus M17 leucine aminopeptidase (LAP). The diaminophosphonic acids were obtained via aziridines in an improved synthetic procedure that was further expanded for the phosphinic pseudodipeptide system. The inhibitory activity, measured for three M1 and one M17 metalloaminopeptidases of different sources (bacterial, human and porcine), revealed several potent compounds (e.g., Ki ¼ 65 nM of 1u for HsAPN). Two structures of an M1 representative (APN from Neisseria meningitidis) in complex with N-benzyl-1,2-diaminoethylphosphonic acid and N-cyclohexyl-1,2- diaminoethylphosphonic acid were determined by the X-ray crystallography. The analysis of these structures and the models of the phosphonic acid complexes of the human ortholog provided an insight into the role of the additional amino group and the hydrophobic substituents of the ligands within the S1 active site region.

  17. Conversion of citrate synthase into citryl-CoA lyase as a result of mutation of the active-site aspartic acid residue to glutamic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Man, W J; Li, Y; O'Connor, C D; Wilton, D C

    1991-01-01

    The active-site aspartic acid residue, Asp-362, of Escherichia coli citrate synthase was changed by site-directed mutagenesis to Glu-362, Asn-362 or Gly-362. Only very low catalytic activity could be detected with the Asp----Asn and Asp----Gly mutations. The Asp----Glu mutation produced an enzyme that expressed about 0.8% of the overall catalytic rate, and the hydrolysis step in the reaction, monitored as citryl-CoA hydrolysis, was inhibited to a similar extent. However, the condensation reaction, measured in the reverse direction as citryl-CoA cleavage to oxaloacetate and acetyl-CoA, was not affected by the mutation, and this citryl-CoA lyase activity was the major catalytic activity of the mutant enzyme. This high condensation activity in an enzyme in which the subsequent hydrolysis step was about 98% inhibited permitted considerable exchange of the methyl protons of acetyl-CoA during catalysis by the mutant enzyme. The Km for oxaloacetate was not significantly altered in the D362E mutant enzyme, whereas the Km for acetyl-CoA was about 5 times lower. A mechanism is proposed in which Asp-362 is involved in the hydrolysis reaction of this enzyme, and not as a base in the deprotonation of acetyl-CoA as recently suggested by others. [Karpusas, Branchaud & Remington (1990) Biochemistry 29, 2213-2219; Alter, Casazza, Zhi, Nemeth, Srere & Evans, (1990) Biochemistry 29, 7557-7563]. PMID:1684105

  18. An invariant aspartic acid in the DNA glycosylase domain of DEMETER is necessary for transcriptional activation of the imprinted MEDEA gene

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yeonhee; Harada, John J.; Goldberg, Robert B.; Fischer, Robert L.

    2004-01-01

    Helix-hairpin-helix DNA glycosylases are typically small proteins that initiate repair of DNA by excising damaged or mispaired bases. An invariant aspartic acid in the active site is involved in catalyzing the excision reaction. Replacement of this critical residue with an asparagine severely reduces catalytic activity but preserves enzyme stability and structure. The Arabidopsis DEMETER (DME) gene encodes a large 1,729-aa polypeptide with a 200-aa DNA glycosylase domain. DME is expressed primarily in the central cell of the female gametophyte. DME activates maternal allele expression of the imprinted MEDEA (MEA) gene in the central cell and is required for seed viability. We mutated the invariant aspartic acid at position 1304 in DME to asparagine (D1304N) to determine whether the catalytic activity of the DNA glycosylase domain is required for DME function in vivo. Transgenes expressing wild-type DME in the central cell rescue seed abortion caused by a mutation in the endogenous DME gene and activate maternal MEA:GFP transcription. However, transgenes expressing the D1304N mutant DME do not rescue seed abortion or activate maternal MEA:GFP transcription. Whereas ectopic expression of the wild-type DME polypeptide in pollen is sufficient to activate ectopic paternal MEA and MEA:GUS expression, equivalent expression of the D1304N mutant DME in pollen failed to do so. These results show that the conserved aspartic acid residue is necessary for DME to function in vivo and suggest that an active DNA glycosylase domain, normally associated with DNA repair, promotes gene transcription that is essential for gene imprinting. PMID:15128940

  19. Role of four conserved aspartic acid residues of EF-loops in the metal ion binding and in the self-assembly of ciliate Euplotes octocarinatus centrin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen; Duan, Lian; Sun, Tijian; Yang, Binsheng

    2016-12-01

    Ciliate Euplotes octocarinatus centrin (EoCen) is an EF-hand calcium-binding protein closely related to the prototypical calcium sensor protein calmodulin. Four mutants (D37K, D73K, D110K and D146K) were created firstly to elucidate the importance of the first aspartic acid residues (Asp37, Asp73, Asp110 and Asp146) in the beginning of the four EF-loops of EoCen. Aromatic-sensitized Tb(3+) fluorescence indicates that the aspartic acid residues are very important for the metal-binding of EoCen, except for Asp73 (in EF-loop II). Resonance light scattering (RLS) measurements for different metal ions (Ca(2+) and Tb(3+)) binding proteins suggest that the order of four conserved aspartic acid residues for contributing to the self-assembly of EoCen is Asp37 > Asp146 > Asp110 > Asp73. Cross-linking experiment also exhibits that Asp37 and Asp146 play critical role in the self-assembly of EoCen. Asp37, in site I, which is located in the N-terminal domain, plays the most important role in the metal ion-dependent self-assembly of EoCen, and there is cooperativity between N-terminal and C-terminal domain (especially the site IV). In addition, the dependence of Tb(3+) induced self-assembly of EoCen and the mutants on various factors, including ionic strength and pH, were characterized using RLS. Finally, 2-p-toluidinylnaphthalene-6-sulfonate (TNS) binding, ionic strength and pH control experiments indicate that in the process of EoCen self-assembly, molecular interactions are mediated by both electrostatic and hydrophobic forces, and the hydrophobic interaction has the important status.

  20. Lack of association of a variable number of aspartic acid residues in the asporin gene with osteoarthritis susceptibility: case-control studies in Spanish Caucasians

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Lopez, Julio; Pombo-Suarez, Manuel; Liz, Myriam; Gomez-Reino, Juan J; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    A recent genetic association study has identified a microsatellite in the coding sequence of the asporin gene as a susceptibility factor for osteoarthritis (OA). Alleles of this microsatellite determine the variable number of aspartic acid residues in the amino-terminal end of the asporin protein. Asporin binds directly to the growth factor transforming growth factor beta and inhibits its anabolic effects in cartilage, which include stimulation of collagen and aggrecan synthesis. The OA-associated allele, with 14 aspartic acid residues, inhibits the anabolic effects of transforming growth factor beta more strongly than other asporin alleles, leading to increased OA liability. We have explored whether the association found in several cohorts of Japanese hip OA and knee OA patients was also present in Spanish Caucasians. We studied patients that had undergone total joint replacement for primary OA in the hip (n = 303) or the knee (n = 188) and patients with hand OA (n = 233), and we compared their results with controls (n = 294) lacking overt OA clinical symptoms. No significant differences were observed in any of the multiple comparisons performed, which included global tests of allele frequency distributions and specific comparisons as well as stratification by affected joint and by sex. Our results, together with reports from the United Kingdom and Greece, indicate that the stretch of aspartic acid residues in asporin is not an important factor in OA susceptibility among European Caucasians. It remains possible that lifestyle, environmental or genetic differences allow for an important effect of asporin variants in other ethnic groups as has been reported in the Japanese, but this should be supported by additional studies. PMID:16542493

  1. Inhibition of glutamine synthesis induces glutamate dehydrogenase-dependent ammonia fixation into alanine in co-cultures of astrocytes and neurons.

    PubMed

    Dadsetan, Sherry; Bak, Lasse K; Sørensen, Michael; Keiding, Susanne; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Ott, Peter; Leke, Renata; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2011-09-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that ammonia exposure of neurons and astrocytes in co-culture leads to net synthesis not only of glutamine but also of alanine. The latter process involves the concerted action of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and alanine aminotransferase (ALAT). In the present study it was investigated if the glutamine synthetase (GS) inhibitor methionine sulfoximine (MSO) would enhance alanine synthesis by blocking the GS-dependent ammonia scavenging process. Hence, co-cultures of neurons and astrocytes were incubated for 2.5h with [U-(13)C]glucose to monitor de novo synthesis of alanine and glutamine in the absence and presence of 5.0 mM NH(4)Cl and 10 mM MSO. Ammonia exposure led to increased incorporation of label but not to a significant increase in the amount of these amino acids. However, in the presence of MSO, glutamine synthesis was blocked and synthesis of alanine increased leading to an elevated content intra- as well as extracellularly of this amino acid. Treatment with MSO led to a dramatic decrease in glutamine content and increased the intracellular contents of glutamate and aspartate. The large increase in alanine during exposure to MSO underlines the importance of the GDH and ALAT biosynthetic pathway for ammonia fixation, and it points to the use of a GS inhibitor to ameliorate the brain toxicity and edema induced by hyperammonemia, events likely related to glutamine synthesis.

  2. [Present possibilities of age determination in forensic medicine with emphasis on the importance of measurement of D- and L- forms of aspartic acid. I. An overview].

    PubMed

    Pilin, A; Pudil, F; Gross, R; Herrmannová, M

    1997-02-01

    Evaluation of age of unknown deceased persons belongs to the most important ways to identification. For the time being, morphological methods are used, namely evaluation of age according to Gustafson's method from tooth grindings or by macroscopical estimation of abrasion, transparency of root dentine, alveolar atrophy and number of missing teeth. Evaluation of the data can be influenced by an individual failure and experience showed an age related decrease of precision. Recently, some papers occurred estimating a relation of D, L-forms of aspartic acid which depends on the age with a significant precision.

  3. Crystal structure of Clostridium acetobutylicum Aspartate kinase (CaAK): An important allosteric enzyme for amino acids production.

    PubMed

    Manjasetty, Babu A; Chance, Mark R; Burley, Stephen K; Panjikar, Santosh; Almo, Steven C

    2014-09-01

    Aspartate kinase (AK) is an enzyme which is tightly regulated through feedback control and responsible for the synthesis of 4-phospho-L-aspartate from L-aspartate. This intermediate step is at an important branch point where one path leads to the synthesis of lysine and the other to threonine, methionine and isoleucine. Concerted feedback inhibition of AK is mediated by threonine and lysine and varies between the species. The crystal structure of biotechnologically important Clostridium acetobutylicum aspartate kinase (CaAK; E.C. 2.7.2.4; Mw=48,030Da; 437aa; SwissProt: Q97MC0) has been determined to 3Å resolution. CaAK acquires a protein fold similar to the other known structures of AKs despite the low sequence identity (<30%). It is composed of two domains: an N-terminal catalytic domain (kinase) domain and a C-terminal regulatory domain further comprised of two small domains belonging to the ACT domain family. Pairwise comparison of 12 molecules in the asymmetric unit helped to identify the bending regions which are in the vicinity of ATP binding site involved in domain movements between the catalytic and regulatory domains. All 12 CaAK molecules adopt fully open T-state conformation leading to the formation of three tetramers unique among other similar AK structures. On the basis of comparative structural analysis, we discuss tetramer formation based on the large conformational changes in the catalytic domain associated with the lysine binding at the regulatory domains. The structure described herein is homologous to a target in wide-spread pathogenic (toxin producing) bacteria such as Clostridium tetani (64% sequence identity) suggesting the potential of the structure solved here to be applied for modeling drug interactions. CaAK structure may serve as a guide to better understand and engineer lysine biosynthesis for the biotechnology industry.

  4. Rhodotorulic Acid from Species of Leucosporidium, Rhodosporidium, Rhodotorula, Sporidiobolus, and Sporobolomyces, and a New Alanine-Containing Ferrichrome from Cryptococcus melibiosum

    PubMed Central

    Atkin, C. L.; Neilands, J. B.; Phaff, H. J.

    1970-01-01

    An examination of 142 strains within 19 genera of yeasts and yeastlike organisms for formation of hydroxamic acids in low-iron culture showed production of hydroxamates by two unclassified strains and by 52 strains among the genera Aessosporon (3 of 3 strains), Cryptococcus (1 of 43), Leucosporidium (3 of 11), Rhodosporidium (4 of 4), Rhodotorula (27 of 39), Sporidiobolus (2 of 2), and Sporobolomyces (12 of 13). Crystalline rhodotorulic acid was isolated in amounts sufficient to account for most or all of the measured hydroxamate in culture supernatants of 16 strains representative of the five last-mentioned hydroxamate-producing genera. A new alanine-containing ferrichrome was isolated from one strain of Cryptococcus melibiosum. Rhodotorulic acid was a major metabolic product of many of the positive strains when grown in low-iron media, and iron was shown to repress its synthesis and excretion into the culture medium. The taxonomic significance of production of hydroxamic acids is described in connection with the position of these yeast species in the subclass Heterobasidiomycetidae. PMID:5529038

  5. Adaptation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 to cells expressing a binding-deficient CD4 mutant (lysine 46 to aspartic acid).

    PubMed Central

    Choe, H R; Sodroski, J

    1995-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) was adapted to replicate efficiently in cells expressing an altered form of the CD4 viral receptor. The mutant CD4 (46 K/D) contained a single amino acid change (lysine 46 to aspartic acid) in the CDR2 loop of domain 1, which results in a 15-fold reduction in affinity for the viral gp120 glycoprotein. The ability of the adapted virus to replicate in CD4 46 K/D-expressing cells was independently enhanced by single amino acid changes in the V2 variable loop, the V3 variable loop, and the fourth conserved (C4) region of the gp120 glycoprotein. Combinations of these amino acids in the same envelope glycoprotein resulted in additive enhancement of virus replication in cells expressing the CD4 46 K/D molecule. In cells expressing the wild-type CD4 glycoproteins, the same V2 and V3 residue changes also increased the efficiency of replication of a virus exhibiting decreased receptor-binding ability due to an amino acid change (aspartic acid 368 to glutamic acid) in the gp120 glycoprotein. In neither instance did the adaptive changes restore the binding ability of the monomeric gp120 glycoprotein or the oligomeric envelope glycoprotein complex for the mutant or wild-type CD4 glycoproteins, respectively. Thus, particular conformations of the gp120 V2 and V3 variable loops and of the C4 region allow postreceptor binding events in the membrane fusion process to occur in the context of less than optimal receptor binding. These results suggest that the fusion-related functions of the V2, V3, and C4 regions of gp120 are modulated by CD4 binding. PMID:7707502

  6. Possible modulation of N-methyl-D,L-aspartic acid induced prolactin release by testicular steroids in the adult male rhesus monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Arslan, M.; Rizvi, S.S.R.; Jahan, S.; Zaidi, P.; Shahab, M. )

    1991-01-01

    N-methyl-D,L-aspartic acid (NMA), an agonist of the neurotransmitter glutamate has been shown to acutely stimulate the release of prolactin (PRL) in intact rats and monkeys. To further investigate the role of neuroexcitatory amino acids in PRL secretion, the effects of NMA administration were examined on PRL release in long term orchidectomized adult rhesus monkeys, in both the absence and presence of testosterone. Intact and long term castrated adult male monkeys weighing between 8-13 kg, were implanted with a catheter via the saphenous vein for blood withdrawal and drug infusion. Blood samples were collected at 10 min intervals for 50 min before and 70 min after administration of the drug or vehicle. Plasma PRL concentrations were estimated using radioimmunoassay. Whereas a single iv injection of NMA induced a prompt discharge of PRL in intact monkeys, an identical dose had surprisingly no effect on PRL secretion in orchidectomized animals. On the other hand, plasma PRL increases in response to a challenge dose of thyrotropin releasing hormone were similar in magnitude in the two groups of monkeys. Testosterone replacement in orchidectomized animals by parenteral administration of testosterone enanthate reinitiated the PRL responsiveness to acute NMA stimulation. These results indicate that N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) dependent drive to PRL release in the adult male rhesus monkey may be overtly influenced by the sex steroid milieu.

  7. Synthesis and Properties of pH-, Thermo-, and Salt-Sensitive Modified Poly(aspartic acid)/Poly(vinyl alcohol) IPN Hydrogel and Its Drug Controlled Release

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jingqiong; Li, Yinhui; Hu, Deng; Chen, Xiaoling; Liu, Yongmei; Wang, Liping; Zhao, Yansheng

    2015-01-01

    Modified poly(aspartic acid)/poly(vinyl alcohol) interpenetrating polymer network (KPAsp/PVA IPN) hydrogel for drug controlled release was synthesized by a simple one-step method in aqueous system using poly(aspartic acid) grafting 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (KH-550) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) as materials. The hydrogel surface morphology and composition were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The thermal stability was analyzed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The swelling properties and pH, temperature, and salt sensitivities of KPAsp, KPAsp/PVA semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN), and KPAsp/PVA IPN hydrogels were also investigated. All of the three hydrogels showed ampholytic pH-responsive properties, and swelling behavior was also extremely sensitive to the temperature, ionic strength, and cationic species. Finally, the drug controlled release properties of the three hydrogels were evaluated and results indicated that three hydrogels could control drug release by external surroundings stimuli. The drug controlled release properties of KPAsp/PVA IPN hydrogel are the most outstanding, and the correlative measured release profiles of salicylic acid at 37°C were 32.6 wt% at pH = 1.2 (simulated gastric fluid) and 62.5 wt% at pH = 7.4 (simulated intestinal fluid), respectively. These results indicated that KPAsp/PVA IPN hydrogels are a promising carrier system for controlled drug delivery. PMID:26351630

  8. Chirality sensing and size recognition of N-Boc-amino acids by cage-type dimeric lanthanide complexes: chirality detection of N-Boc-aspartate anions via luminescence colour change.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiroshi; Shinoda, Satoshi

    2015-03-04

    Chiral luminescent lanthanide complexes, characterized by covalently-linked face-to-face octadentate cyclen (tetraaza-12-crown-4) ligands, specifically bound a chiral N-Boc-aspartate among various N-Boc amino acid anions to enhance Eu(III) luminescence intensity at 615 nm. The combination of Tb(III) and Eu(III) complexes enabled naked-eye discrimination of N-Boc-D- and L-aspartates via the luminescence colour change.

  9. Probing the segmental mobility and energy of the active zones of a protein chain (aspartic acid protease) by a coarse-grained bond-fluctuation Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Ras; Farmer, Barry

    2008-03-01

    A protein chain such as aspartic acid protease is described by a specific sequence of 99 residues each with its own specific characteristics. In a coarse-grained description, the backbone of a protein chain is described by nodes tethered together by peptide bonds where each node (the amino acid group) is characterized by molecular weight and hydrophobicity. A well-developed and somewhat mature computational modeling tool for the polymer chain such as the bond-fluctuation model is used to study such a specific protein chain with its constitutive amino groups and their sequence. The relative magnitude of hydrophobicity is used to develop appropriate interaction potentials for these amino acid groups in explicit solvent. The Metropolis algorithm is used to move each node and solvent constituent. Local energy and mobility of each amino group are analyzed along with global energy, mobility, and conformation of the protein chain. Effect of the solvent interaction and its concentration on these quantities will be presented.

  10. Peptidyl prolyl isomerase Pin1-inhibitory activity of D-glutamic and D-aspartic acid derivatives bearing a cyclic aliphatic amine moiety.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Hidehiko; Seike, Suguru; Sugimoto, Masatoshi; Ieda, Naoya; Kawaguchi, Mitsuyasu; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Miyata, Naoki

    2015-12-01

    Pin1 is a peptidyl prolyl isomerase that specifically catalyzes cis-trans isomerization of phosphorylated Thr/Ser-Pro peptide bonds in substrate proteins and peptides. Pin1 is involved in many important cellular processes, including cancer progression, so it is a potential target of cancer therapy. We designed and synthesized a novel series of Pin1 inhibitors based on a glutamic acid or aspartic acid scaffold bearing an aromatic moiety to provide a hydrophobic surface and a cyclic aliphatic amine moiety with affinity for the proline-binding site of Pin1. Glutamic acid derivatives bearing cycloalkylamino and phenylthiazole groups showed potent Pin1-inhibitory activity comparable with that of known inhibitor VER-1. The results indicate that steric interaction of the cyclic alkyl amine moiety with binding site residues plays a key role in enhancing Pin1-inhibitory activity.

  11. Side-Chain Conformational Thermodynamics of Aspartic Acid Residue in the Peptides and Achatin-I in Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Tomohiro; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki; Nakahara, Masaru

    2004-01-01

    Sequence-position dependence of the side-chain conformational equilibrium of aspartic acid (Asp) residue is investigated for both model Asp peptides (di- to tetra-) and neuropeptide achatin-I (Gly-𝒟-Phe-Ala-Asp) in aqueous solution. The trans-to-gauche conformational changes on the dihedral angle of C–Cα–Cβ–C are analyzed in terms of the standard free energy ΔG0, enthalpy ΔH0, and entropy −TΔS0. The thermodynamic quantities are obtained by measuring the dihedral-angle-dependent vicinal 1H-1H coupling constants in nuclear magnetic resonance over a wide temperature range. When the carboxyl groups of Asp are ionized, ΔG0 in the aqueous phase depends by ∼1–2 kJ mol−1 on the sequence position, whereas the energy change \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\Delta}E_{{\\mathrm{gas}}}^{0}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} in the gas phase (absence of solvent) depends by tens of kJ mol−1. Therefore, the weak position dependence of ΔG0 is a result of the compensation for the intramolecular effect \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\Delta}E_{{\\mathrm{gas}}}^{0}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} by the hydration \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\Delta}G_{{\\mathrm{hyd}}}^{0}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} (= ΔG0–\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage

  12. The role of aspartic acid residues 405 and 416 of the kidney isotype of sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter 1 in its targeting to the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Kucher, Volodymyr; Li, Emily Y.; Conforti, Laura; Zahedi, Kamyar A.

    2012-01-01

    The NH2 terminus of the sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter 1 (NBCe1) plays an important role in its targeting to the plasma membrane. To identify the amino acid residues that contribute to the targeting of NBCe1 to the plasma membrane, polarized MDCK cells were transfected with expression constructs coding for green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged NBCe1 NH2-terminal deletion mutants, and the localization of GFP-tagged proteins was analyzed by confocal microscopy. Our results indicate that the amino acids between residues 399 and 424 of NBCe1A contain important sequences that contribute to its localization to the plasma membrane. Site-directed mutagenesis studies showed that GFP-NBCe1A mutants D405A and D416A are retained in the cytoplasm of the polarized MDCK epithelial cells. Examination of functional activities of D405A and D416A reveals that their activities are reduced compared with the wild-type NBCe1A. Similarly, aspartic acid residues 449 and 460 of pancreatic NBCe1 (NBCe1B), which correspond to residues 405 and 416 of NBCe1A, are also required for its full functional activity and accurate targeting to the plasma membrane. In addition, while replacement of D416 with glutamic acid did not affect the targeting or functional activity of NBCe1A, substitution of D405 with glutamic acid led to the retention of the mutated protein in the intracellular compartment and impaired functional activity. These studies demonstrate that aspartic acid residues 405 and 416 in the NH2 terminus of NBCe1A are important in its accurate targeting to the plasma membrane. PMID:22442137

  13. Protein association of the neurotoxin and non-protein amino acid BMAA (β-N-methylamino-L-alanine) in the liver and brain following neonatal administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Oskar; Jiang, Liying; Andersson, Marie; Ilag, Leopold L; Brittebo, Eva B

    2014-04-07

    The environmental neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is not an amino acid that is normally found in proteins. Our previous autoradiographic study of (3)H-labeled BMAA in adult mice unexpectedly revealed a tissue distribution similar to that of protein amino acids. The aim of this study was to characterize the distribution of free and protein-bound BMAA in neonatal rat tissues following a short exposure using autoradiographic imaging and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). The autoradiographic imaging of (14)C-L-BMAA demonstrated a distinct uptake of radioactivity that was retained following acid extraction in tissues with a high rate of cell turnover and/or protein synthesis. The UHPLC-MS/MS analysis conclusively demonstrated a dose-dependent increase of protein-associated BMAA in neonatal rat tissues. The level of protein-associated BMAA in the liver was more than 10 times higher than that in brain regions not fully protected by the blood-brain barrier which may be due to the higher rate of protein synthesis in the liver. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that BMAA was associated with rat proteins suggesting that BMAA may be misincorporated into proteins. However, protein-associated BMAA seemed to be cleared over time, as none of the samples from adult rats had any detectable free or protein-associated BMAA.

  14. Limiting values of diffusion coefficients of glycine, alanine, [Formula: see text]-amino butyric acid, norvaline and norleucine in a relevant physiological aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Diana M; Verissimo, Luis M P; Barros, Marisa C F; Rodrigues, Daniela F S L; Rodrigo, Maria Melia; Esteso, Miguel A; Romero, Carmen M; Ribeiro, Ana C F

    2017-02-01

    The side chain effect on transport in ionic aqueous salt solutions was investigated for [Formula: see text]-amino acids glycine, alanine, [Formula: see text]-amino butyric acid, norvaline, and norleucine --that together define a chemical homologous series based on the length of the characteristic side chain which increases from zero to four carbons, respectively. Binary mutual diffusion coefficients at infinitesimal concentration in aqueous solutions of NaCl (0.15 mol kg (-1)) are measured by means of Taylor dispersion technique for this series and significant differences were found against previous published results for identical systems in pure water. In this way, NaCl effect on the transport of each amino acid is thus assessed and discussed in terms of salting-out effects. Also, solvated Stokes hydrodynamic radii were computed for the series showing comparable results in water and NaCl solution. The new information should prove useful in the design and characterization of transport-controlled systems in physiological and pharmacological studies.

  15. Corticosterone, cortisol, triglycerides, aspartate aminotransferase and uric acid plasma concentrations during foie gras production in male mule ducks (Anas platyrhynchos × Cairina moschata).

    PubMed

    Flament, A; Delleur, V; Poulipoulis, A; Marlier, D

    2012-01-01

    1. Corticosterone, cortisol, triglycerides, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and uric acid (UA) plasma concentration were measured at 8 (7 days after group housing), 12 (after 7 days of force feeding) and 13 weeks of age (at slaughter after 12 days of force feeding), and 45 min after an adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) stimulation test at 8 weeks of age in 12 male mule ducks in an on-farm experiment. 2. No significant increase of corticosterone was found during the force-feeding period compared with the concentration after housing. 3. Comparison of corticosterone and cortisol values indicates that cortisol can be considered as a reliable acute stress indicator in future routine examinations. 4. Plasma concentrations of triglycerides and aspartate aminotransferase increased progressively from pre-force feeding period to slaughtering. 5. Plasma concentrations of uric acid increased from the start at 8 weeks of age to the mid-force feeding period but no difference was noticed between the mid-force feeding period and slaughtering. 6. It is concluded that acute stress induced by force-feeding is similar at the beginning and end of the commercial production of foie gras.

  16. Self-healing Li-Al layered double hydroxide conversion coating modified with aspartic acid for 6N01 Al alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Caixia; Luo, Xiaohu; Pan, Xinyu; Liao, Liying; Wu, Xiaosong; Liu, Yali

    2017-02-01

    A self-healing Li-Al layered double hydroxide conversion coating (LCC) modified with aspartic acid (ALCC) was prepared on 6N01 Al alloy for corrosion protection. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that a compact thin film has been successfully formed on the alloy. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FT-IR spectra proved that species of aspartic acid anions were successfully intercalated into LCC. Potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and neutral salt spray (NSS) testing showed that the resultant ALCC could provide effective corrosion protection for the Al alloy. During immersion of the ALCC-coated alloy in 3.5% NaCl solution, new film was formed in the area of artificially introduced scratch, indicating its self-healing capability. XPS results demonstrated that Cl- anions exchange partial Asp anions according to the change content of element on conversion coating. From the above results, the possible mechanism via exchange/self-assembly was proposed to illustrate the phenomenon of self-healing.

  17. A replacement of the active-site aspartic acid residue 293 in mouse cathepsin D affects its intracellular stability, processing and transport in HEK-293 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Partanen, Sanna; Storch, Stephan; Löffler, Hans-Gerhard; Hasilik, Andrej; Tyynelä, Jaana; Braulke, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    The substitution of an active-site aspartic acid residue by asparagine in the lysosomal protease cathepsin D (CTSD) results in a loss of enzyme activity and severe cerebrocortical atrophy in a novel form of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis in sheep [Tyynelä, Sohar, Sleat, Gin, Donnelly, Baumann, Haltia and Lobel (2000) EMBO J. 19, 2786-2792]. In the present study we have introduced the corresponding mutation by replacing aspartic acid residue 293 with asparagine (D293N) into the mouse CTSD cDNA to analyse its effect on synthesis, transport and stability in transfected HEK-293 cells. The complete inactivation of mutant D293N mouse CTSD was confirmed by a newly developed fluorimetric quantification system. Moreover, in the heterologous overexpression systems used, mutant D293N mouse CTSD was apparently unstable and proteolytically modified during early steps of the secretory pathway, resulting in a loss of mass by about 1 kDa. In the affected sheep, the endogenous mutant enzyme was stable but also showed the shift in its molecular mass. In HEK-293 cells, the transport of the mutant D293N mouse CTSD to the lysosome was delayed and associated with a low secretion rate compared with wild-type CTSD. These data suggest that the mutation may result in a conformational change which affects stability, processing and transport of the enzyme. PMID:12350228

  18. 3T3 fibroblasts transfected with a cDNA for mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase express plasma membrane fatty acid-binding protein and saturable fatty acid uptake.

    PubMed Central

    Isola, L M; Zhou, S L; Kiang, C L; Stump, D D; Bradbury, M W; Berk, P D

    1995-01-01

    To explore the relationship between mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase (mAspAT; EC 2.6.1.1) and plasma membrane fatty acid-binding protein (FABPpm) and their role in cellular fatty acid uptake, 3T3 fibroblasts were cotransfected with plasmid pMAAT2, containing a full-length mAspAT cDNA downstream of a Zn(2+)-inducible metallothionein promoter, and pFR400, which conveys methotrexate resistance. Transfectants were selected in methotrexate, cloned, and exposed to increasing methotrexate concentrations to induce gene amplification. Stably transfected clones were characterized by Southern blotting; those with highest copy numbers of pFR400 alone (pFR400) or pFR400 and pMAAT2 (pFR400/pMAAT2) were expanded for further study. [3H]Oleate uptake was measured in medium containing 500 microM bovine serum albumin and 125-1000 microM total oleate (unbound oleate, 18-420 nM) and consisted of saturable and nonsaturable components. pFR400/pMAAT2 cells exhibited no increase in the rate constant for nonsaturable oleate uptake or in the uptake rate of [14C]octanoate under any conditions. By contrast, Vmax (fmol/sec per 50,000 cells) of the saturable oleate uptake component increased 3.5-fold in pFR400/pMAAT2 cells compared to pFR400, with a further 3.2-fold increase in the presence of Zn2+. Zn2+ had no effect in pFR400 controls (P > 0.5). The overall increase in Vmax between pFR400 and pFR400/pMAAT2 in the presence of Zn2+ was 10.4-fold (P < 0.01) and was highly correlated (r = 0.99) with expression of FABPpm in plasma membranes as determined by Western blotting. Neither untransfected 3T3 nor pFR400 cells expressed cell surface FABPpm detectable by immunofluorescence. By contrast, plasma membrane immunofluorescence was detected in pFR400/pMAAT2 cells, especially if cultured in 100 microM Zn2+. The data support the dual hypotheses that mAspAT and FABPpm are identical and mediate saturable long-chain free fatty acid uptake. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7568234

  19. Synthesis and Anchoring of Antineoplastic Ferrocene and Phthalocyanine Derivatives on Water-Soluble Polymeric Drug Carriers Derived from Lysine and Aspartic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Maree, M. David; Neuse, Eberhard W.; Erasmus, Elizabeth; Swarts, Jannie C.

    2008-01-01

    The general synthetic strategy towards water-soluble biodegradable drug carriers and the properties that they must have are discussed. The syntheses of water-soluble biodegradable copolymers of lysine and aspartic acid as potential drug-delivering devices, having amine-functionalised side chains are then described. Covalent anchoring of carboxylic acid derivatives of the antineoplastic ferrocene and photodynamically active phthalocyanine moieties to the amine-containing drug carrier copolymers under mild coupling conditions has been achieved utilising the coupling reagent O-benzotriazolyl-N,N,N′,N′-tetramethyluronium hexafluorophosphate to promote formation of the biodegradable amide bond. Even though the parent antineoplastic ferrocene and phthalocyanine derivatives are themselves insoluble in water at pH < 7, the new carrier-drug conjugates that were obtained are well water-soluble. PMID:18288243

  20. Cholinesterase-like domains in enzymes and structural proteins: functional and evolutionary relationships and identification of a catalytically essential aspartic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Krejci, E; Duval, N; Chatonnet, A; Vincens, P; Massoulié, J

    1991-01-01

    Primary sequences of cholinesterases and related proteins have been systematically compared. The cholinesterase-like domain of these proteins, about 500 amino acids, may fulfill a catalytic and a structural function. We identified an aspartic acid residue that is conserved among esterases and lipases (Asp-397 in Torpedo acetylcholinesterase) but that had not been considered to be involved in the catalytic mechanism. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that this residue is necessary for activity. Analysis of evolutionary relationships shows that the noncatalytic members of the family do not constitute a separate subgroup, suggesting that loss of catalytic activity occurred independently on several occasions, probably from bifunctional molecules. Cholinesterases may thus be involved in cell-cell interactions in addition to the hydrolysis of acetylcholine. This would explain their specific expression in well-defined territories during embryogenesis before the formation of cholinergic synapses and their presence in noncholinergic tissues. Images PMID:1862088

  1. Distinguishing the cyanobacterial neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) from its structural isomer 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (2,4-DAB).

    PubMed

    Banack, S A; Downing, T G; Spácil, Z; Purdie, E L; Metcalf, J S; Downing, S; Esterhuizen, M; Codd, G A; Cox, P A

    2010-11-01

    The cyanobacterial neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been associated with certain forms of progressive neurodegenerative disease, including sporadic Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. Reports of BMAA in cyanobacterial blooms from lakes, reservoirs, and other water resources continue to be made by investigators in a variety of laboratories. Recently it was suggested that during analysis BMAA may be confused with its structural isomer 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (2,4-DAB), or that current detection methods may mistake other compounds for BMAA. We here review the evidence that BMAA can be consistently and reliably separated from 2,4-DAB during reversed-phase HPLC, and that BMAA can be confidently distinguished from 2,4-DAB during triple quadrupole LC-MS/MS analysis by i) different retention times, ii) diagnostic product ions resulting from collision-induced dissociation, and iii) consistent ratios between selected reaction monitoring (SRM) transitions. Furthermore, underivatized BMAA can be separated from 2,4-DAB with an amino acid analyzer with post-column visualization using ninhydrin. Other compounds that may be theoretically confused with BMAA during chloroformate derivatization during GC analysis are distinguished due to their different retention times.

  2. Enrichment of Non-Terrestrial L-Proteinogenic Amino Acids by Aqueous Alteration on the Tagish Lake Meteorite Parent Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Burton, Aaron S.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Herd, Christopher D. K.

    2012-01-01

    The distribution and isotopic and enantiomeric compositions of amino acids found in three distinct fragments of the Tagish Lake C2-type carbonaceous chondrite were investigated via liquid chromatography fluorescence detection time-of-flight mass spectrometry and gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Large L-enantiomeric excesses (L(sub ee) approx. 43 to 59%) of the a-hydrogen aspartic and glutamic amino acids were measured in Tagish Lake, whereas alanine, another alpha-hydrogen protein amino acid, was found to be nearly racemic (D approx. L) using both techniques. Carbon isotope measurements of D- and L-aspartic acid and D- and L-alanine in Tagish Lake fall well outside of the terrestrial range and indicate that the measured aspartic acid enantioenrichment is indigenous to the meteorite. Alternate explanations for the Lexcesses of aspartic acid such as interference from other compounds present in the sample, analytical biases, or terrestrial amino acid contamination were investigated and rejected. These results can be explained by differences in the solid-solution phase behavior of aspartic acid, which can form conglomerate enantiopure solids during crystallization, and alanine, which can only form racemic crystals.

  3. Production of Alanine by Fusarium moniliforme

    PubMed Central

    Carito, Sebastian L.; Pisano, Michael A.

    1966-01-01

    Fusarium moniliforme grown in a chemically defined medium in submerged culture accumulated amino acids extracellularly. Alanine and glutamic acid were present in greatest amounts, with traces of glycine, lysine, threonine, and valine detectable. Increasing the glucose and urea concentrations of the medium increased yields of alanine. Further increases in alanine production occurred with elevated levels of mineral salts in the medium, whereas the addition of a vitamin mixture proved to be inhibitory. Chemical changes resulting from the growth of F. moniliforme in the final fermentation medium disclosed maximal alanine production, mycelial weight, and glucose consumption after 72 hr of incubation at 28.5 C. Total soluble nitrogen, by contrast, was minimal at the same time period. The pH remained in the alkaline range throughout the fermentation. PMID:5914495

  4. Different types of degradable vectors from low-molecular-weight polycation-functionalized poly(aspartic acid) for efficient gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Dou, X B; Hu, Y; Zhao, N N; Xu, F J

    2014-03-01

    Poly(aspartic acid) (PAsp) has been employed as the potential backbone for the preparation of efficient gene carriers, due to its low cytotoxicity, good biodegradability and excellent biocompatibility. In this work, the degradable linear or star-shaped PBLA was first prepared via ring-opining polymerization of β-benzyl-L-aspartate N-carboxy anhydride (BLA-NCA) initiated by ethylenediamine (ED) or ED-functionalized cyclodextrin cores. Then, PBLA was functionalized via aminolysis reaction with low-molecular-weight poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) with one terminal primary amine group (PDMAEMA-NH2), followed by addition of excess ED or ethanolamine (EA) to complete the aminolysis process. The obtained different types of cationic PAsp-based vectors including linear or star PAsp-PDM-NH2 and PAsp-PDM-OH exhibited good condensation capability and degradability, benefiting gene delivery process. In comparison with gold standard polyethylenimine (PEI, ∼ 25 kDa), the cationic PAsp-based vectors, particularly star-shaped ones, exhibited much better transfection performances.

  5. Size dependent electrical and magnetic properties of ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles synthesized by the combustion method: Comparison between aspartic acid and glycine as fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugavani, A.; Kalai Selvan, R.; Layek, Samar; Sanjeeviraja, C.

    2014-03-01

    Using two different fuels such as aspartic acid and glycine, the spinel zinc ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by the combustion method at different pH values. The thermochemical calculations for both the fuel assisted materials and its adiabatic flame temperature were calculated. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern revealed the formation of single phase ZnFe2O4 with high crystallinity. The characteristic functional groups of Fe3O and Zn3O were identified through FTIR analysis. Uniform size distribution of spherical particle in the average size range of 35-100 nm was inferred from SEM images. The room temperature DC conductivities of ZnFe2O4 particles prepared by using aspartic and glycine are in the order of 10-7 and 10-8 respectively. The dielectric spectral analysis inferred that the obtained dielectric constant is high at low frequency and decreases with increase in frequency. This dielectric behavior is in accordance with the Maxwell-Wagner interfacial polarization. VSM and Mössbauer analysis revealed that the prepared material exhibits paramagnetic behavior and Fe3+ state of iron content in ZnFe2O4 at room temperature.

  6. Aspartate release from rat hippocampal synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Bradford, S E; Nadler, J V

    2004-01-01

    Certain excitatory pathways in the rat hippocampus can release aspartate along with glutamate. This study utilized rat hippocampal synaptosomes to characterize the mechanism of aspartate release and to compare it with glutamate release. Releases of aspartate and glutamate from the same tissue samples were quantitated simultaneously. Both amino acids were released by 25 mM K(+), 300 microM 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) and 0.5 and 1 microM ionomycin in a predominantly Ca(2+)-dependent manner. For a roughly equivalent quantity of glutamate released, aspartate release was significantly greater during exposure to elevated [K(+)] than to 4-AP and during exposure to 0.5 than to 1 microM ionomycin. Aspartate release was inefficiently coupled to P/Q-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels and was reduced by KB-R7943, an inhibitor of reversed Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange. In contrast, glutamate release depended primarily on Ca(2+) influx through P/Q-type channels and was not significantly affected by KB-R7943. Pretreatment of the synaptosomes with tetanus toxin and botulinum neurotoxins C and F reduced glutamate release, but not aspartate release. Aspartate release was also resistant to bafilomycin A(1), an inhibitor of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase, whereas glutamate release was markedly reduced. (+/-) -Threo-3-methylglutamate, a non-transportable competitive inhibitor of excitatory amino acid transport, did not reduce aspartate release. Niflumic acid, a blocker of Ca(2+)-dependent anion channels, did not alter the release of either amino acid. Exogenous aspartate and aspartate recently synthesized from glutamate accessed the releasable pool of aspartate as readily as exogenous glutamate and glutamate recently synthesized from aspartate accessed the releasable glutamate pool. These results are compatible with release of aspartate from either a vesicular pool by a "non-classical" form of exocytosis or directly from the cytoplasm by an as-yet-undescribed Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism. In either case

  7. Tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolites during ischemia in isolated perfused rat heart.

    PubMed

    Peuhkurinen, K J; Takala, T E; Nuutinen, E M; Hassinen, I E

    1983-02-01

    Isolated rat hearts were, after a retrograde perfusion by the Langendorff procedure, rendered ischemic by lowering the aortic pressure to zero. The rate of proteolysis and temporal patterns of the changes in the concentrations of the metabolites of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, related amino acids, ammonia, and breakdown products of the adenine nucleotides were determined. The most significant change in the amino acid metabolism was a decrease of the proteolysis to one-tenth and a large accumulation of alanine, which was almost stoichiometric to the degradation of aspartate plus asparagine. The accumulation of malate and succinate was small compared with the metabolic net fluxes of aspartate and alanine. The metabolic balance sheet suggests that aspartate was converted to alanine. A prerequisite for this would be a feed in of carbon of aspartate to the tricarboxylic acid cycle as oxalacetate, reversal of the malate dehydrogenase, and production of pyruvate by the malic enzyme reaction. Alanine accumulating during ischemia is not glycolytic in origin but occurs through a concerted operation of anaplerotic reactions and tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolite disposal. The data also suggest that the potentially energy-yielding reduction of fumarate to succinate is not significant in the ischemic myocardium.

  8. Synthesis and carbonic anhydrase inhibitory properties of amino acid - coumarin/quinolinone conjugates incorporating glycine, alanine and phenylalanine moieties.

    PubMed

    Küçükbay, F Zehra; Küçükbay, Hasan; Tanc, Muhammet; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-12-01

    N-Protected amino acids (Gly, Ala and Phe) were reacted with amino substituted coumarin and quinolinone derivatives, leading to the corresponding N-protected amino acid-coumarin/quinolinone conjugates. The carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) inhibitory activity of the new compounds was assessed against various human (h) isoforms, such as hCA I, hCA II, hCA IV and hCA XII. The quinolinone conjugates were inactive as enzyme inhibitors, whereas the coumarins were ineffective hCA I/II inhibitors (KIs > 50 μM) but were submicromolar hCA IV and XII inhibitors, with inhibition constants ranging between 92 nM and 1.19 μM for hCA IV, and between 0.11 and 0.79 μM for hCA XII. These coumarin derivatives, as many others reported earlier, thus show an interesting selective inhibitory profile for the membrane-bound over the cytosolic CA isoforms.

  9. Rationally Developed Organic Salts of Tolfenamic Acid and Its β-Alanine Derivatives for Dual Purposes as an Anti-Inflammatory Topical Gel and Anticancer Agent.

    PubMed

    Parveen, Rumana; Sravanthi, Bommagani; Dastidar, Parthasarathi

    2017-04-04

    A new series of primary ammonium monocarboxylate (PAM) salts of a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), namely, tolfenamic acid (TA), and its β-alanine derivatives were generated. Nearly 67 % of the salts in the series showed gelling abilities with various solvents, including water (biogenic solvent) and methyl salicylate (typically used for topical gel formulations). Gels were characterized by rheology, electron microscopy, and so forth. Structure-property correlations based on single-crystal and powder XRD data of several gelator and nongelator salts revealed intriguing insights. Studies (in vitro) on an aggressive human breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231) with the l-tyrosine methyl ester salt of TA (S7) revealed that the hydrogelator salt was more effective at killing cancer cells than the mother drug TA (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay); displayed better anti-inflammatory activity compared with that of TA (prostaglandin E2 assay); could be internalized within the cancer cells, as revealed by fluorescence microscopy; and inhibited effectively migration of the cancer cells. Thus, the easily accessible ambidextrous gelator salt S7 can be used for two purposes: as an anti-inflammatory topical gel and as an anticancer agent.

  10. Diabetes-linked transcription factor HNF4α regulates metabolism of endogenous methylarginines and β-aminoisobutyric acid by controlling expression of alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase 2

    PubMed Central

    Burdin, Dmitry V.; Kolobov, Alexey A.; Brocker, Chad; Soshnev, Alexey A.; Samusik, Nikolay; Demyanov, Anton V.; Brilloff, Silke; Jarzebska, Natalia; Martens-Lobenhoffer, Jens; Mieth, Maren; Maas, Renke; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Bode-Böger, Stefanie M.; Gonzalez, Frank; Weiss, Norbert; Rodionov, Roman N.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated levels of circulating asymmetric and symmetric dimethylarginines (ADMA and SDMA) predict and potentially contribute to end organ damage in cardiovascular diseases. Alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase 2 (AGXT2) regulates systemic levels of ADMA and SDMA, and also of beta-aminoisobutyric acid (BAIB)-a modulator of lipid metabolism. We identified a putative binding site for hepatic nuclear factor 4 α (HNF4α) in AGXT2 promoter sequence. In a luciferase reporter assay we found a 75% decrease in activity of Agxt2 core promoter after disruption of the HNF4α binding site. Direct binding of HNF4α to Agxt2 promoter was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Hnf4a led to an almost 50% reduction in Agxt2 mRNA levels in Hepa 1–6 cells. Liver-specific Hnf4a knockout mice exhibited a 90% decrease in liver Agxt2 expression and activity, and elevated plasma levels of ADMA, SDMA and BAIB, compared to wild-type littermates. Thus we identified HNF4α as a major regulator of Agxt2 expression. Considering a strong association between human HNF4A polymorphisms and increased risk of type 2 diabetes our current findings suggest that downregulation of AGXT2 and subsequent impairment in metabolism of dimethylarginines and BAIB caused by HNF4α deficiency might contribute to development of cardiovascular complications in diabetic patients. PMID:27752141

  11. Diabetes-linked transcription factor HNF4α regulates metabolism of endogenous methylarginines and β-aminoisobutyric acid by controlling expression of alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase 2.

    PubMed

    Burdin, Dmitry V; Kolobov, Alexey A; Brocker, Chad; Soshnev, Alexey A; Samusik, Nikolay; Demyanov, Anton V; Brilloff, Silke; Jarzebska, Natalia; Martens-Lobenhoffer, Jens; Mieth, Maren; Maas, Renke; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bode-Böger, Stefanie M; Gonzalez, Frank; Weiss, Norbert; Rodionov, Roman N

    2016-10-18

    Elevated levels of circulating asymmetric and symmetric dimethylarginines (ADMA and SDMA) predict and potentially contribute to end organ damage in cardiovascular diseases. Alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase 2 (AGXT2) regulates systemic levels of ADMA and SDMA, and also of beta-aminoisobutyric acid (BAIB)-a modulator of lipid metabolism. We identified a putative binding site for hepatic nuclear factor 4 α (HNF4α) in AGXT2 promoter sequence. In a luciferase reporter assay we found a 75% decrease in activity of Agxt2 core promoter after disruption of the HNF4α binding site. Direct binding of HNF4α to Agxt2 promoter was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Hnf4a led to an almost 50% reduction in Agxt2 mRNA levels in Hepa 1-6 cells. Liver-specific Hnf4a knockout mice exhibited a 90% decrease in liver Agxt2 expression and activity, and elevated plasma levels of ADMA, SDMA and BAIB, compared to wild-type littermates. Thus we identified HNF4α as a major regulator of Agxt2 expression. Considering a strong association between human HNF4A polymorphisms and increased risk of type 2 diabetes our current findings suggest that downregulation of AGXT2 and subsequent impairment in metabolism of dimethylarginines and BAIB caused by HNF4α deficiency might contribute to development of cardiovascular complications in diabetic patients.

  12. Changes in the striatal extracellular levels of dopamine and dihydroxyphenylacetic acid evoked by ammonia and N-methyl-D-aspartate: modulation by taurine.

    PubMed

    Anderzhanova, Elmira; Oja, Simo S; Saransaari, Pirjo; Albrecht, Jan

    2003-07-11

    Acute hyperammonemia is associated with motor disturbances that are thought to involve striatal dopaminergic dysfunction. Discharge of striatal dopaminergic neurons is controlled by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, the excessive activation of which contributes to ammonia neurotoxicity. Here we show that ammonium chloride ("ammonia", extracellular concentration 5 mM) or NMDA (1 mM), when directly administered to the rat striatum via a microdialysis probe, evoke a prompt accumulation of dopamine (DA) in the microdialysates. However, while ammonia increases, NMDA decreases, the extracellular dihydroxyphenylacetate (DOPAC) level. The results point to the NMDA receptor-mediated enhancement of DA release and increased DA metabolism as two independent ways by which ammonia affects the striatal dopaminergic system. Taurine (extracellular concentration 10 mM) attenuated the NMDA- and ammonia-evoked DA release and ammonia-induced accumulation of DOPAC, reflecting two different neuroprotective mechanisms of this amino acid.

  13. An improved sample preparation for an LC method used in the age estimation based on aspartic acid racemization from human dentin.

    PubMed

    Yekkala, Raja; Meers, Carine; Hoogmartens, Jos; Lambrichts, Ivo; Willems, Guy; Van Schepdael, Ann

    2007-01-01

    The determination of age on the basis of aspartic acid (Asp) racemization in teeth is one of the most reliable and accurate methods to date. In this paper, the usefulness of HPLC coupled with fluorescence detection for determination of Asp racemization was evaluated. A modified sample preparation is proposed for better stability of o-phthaldialdehyde-N-acetyl-L-cysteine derivatives of D/L-Asp (due to the instability below pH 7). To ensure the accuracy of the method, the validation parameters' specificity, precision, linearity, and LOD were determined. Three dentin samples of premolar teeth, extracted from living individuals (bucco-lingual longitudinal sections of 1 mm thickness), were analyzed and quantitative results are discussed.

  14. Arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-polyethylene glycol-polyamidoamine dendrimer conjugate improves liver-cell aggregation and function in 3-D spheroid culture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhanfei; Lian, Fen; Wang, Xiaoqian; Chen, Yanling; Tang, Nanhong

    The polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer, a type of macromolecule material, has been used in spheroidal cell culture and drug delivery in recent years. However, PAMAM is not involved in the study of hepatic cell-spheroid culture or its biological activity, particularly in detoxification function. Here, we constructed a PAMAM-dendrimer conjugate decorated by an integrin ligand: arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide. Our studies demonstrate that RGD-polyethylene glycol (PEG)-PAMAM conjugates can promote singly floating hepatic cells to aggregate together in a sphere-like growth with a weak reactive oxygen species. Moreover, RGD-PEG-PAMAM conjugates can activate the AKT-MAPK pathway in hepatic cells to promote cell proliferation and improve basic function and ammonia metabolism. Together, our data support the hepatocyte sphere treated by RGD-PEG-PAMAM conjugates as a potential source of hepatic cells for a biological artificial liver system.

  15. A study of structure and dynamics of poly(aspartic acid) sodium/poly(vinyl alcohol) blends by 13C CP/MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Ando, I.

    1999-09-01

    Solid state 13C CP/MAS NMR measurements have been carried out on poly(aspartic acid) sodium (PAANa)/poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) blends over a wide range of temperatures. From these experimental results, it is found that the main-chain conformations of PAANa in PAANa/PVA blends take the α-helix form over a wide range of blend ratios, and, in contrast, the conformation and dynamics of the side chains of PAANa are strongly influenced by the formation of an intermolecular hydrogen bond between the carboxyl group of the side chains and the hydroxyl group of PVA. The behavior of the proton spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame ( T1 ρ(H)) and the laboratory frame ( T1(H)) indicates that when the blend ratio of PAANa and PVA is 1:1, they are miscible.

  16. Partial diversion of a mutant proinsulin (B10 aspartic acid) from the regulated to the constitutive secretory pathway in transfected AtT-20 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gross, D J; Halban, P A; Kahn, C R; Weir, G C; Villa-Komaroff, L

    1989-01-01

    A patient with type II diabetes associated with hyperproinsulinemia has been shown to have a point mutation in one insulin gene allele, resulting in replacement of histidine with aspartic acid at position 10 of the B-chain. To investigate the basis of the proinsulin processing defect, we introduced an identical mutation in the rat insulin II gene and expressed both the normal and the mutant genes in the AtT-20 pituitary corticotroph cell line. Cells expressing the mutant gene showed increased secretion of proinsulin relative to insulin and rapid release of newly synthesized proinsulin. Moreover, the mutant cell lines did not store the prohormone nor did they release it upon stimulation with secretagogues. These data indicate that a significant fraction of the mutant prohormone is released via the constitutive secretory pathway rather than the regulated pathway, thereby bypassing granule-related processing and regulated release. PMID:2657740

  17. Optical reflectance, optical refractive index and optical conductivity measurements of nonlinear optics for L-aspartic acid nickel chloride single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbazhagan, G.; Joseph, P. S.; Shankar, G.

    2013-03-01

    Single crystals of L-aspartic acid nickel chloride (LANC) were grown by the slow evaporation technique at room temperature. The grown crystals were subjected to Powder X-ray diffraction studies to confirm the crystal structure. The modes of vibration of different molecular groups present in LANC have been identified by FTIR spectral analysis. Optical transferency of the grown crystal was investigated by UV-Vis-NIR spectrum. The lower optical cut off wavelength for this crystal is observed at 240 nm and energy band gap 5.179 eV. The optical reflectance and optical refractive index studies have been carried out in this crystal. Finally, the optical conductivity and electrical conductivity studies have been carried out on LANC single crystal.

  18. Potential transfer of neurotoxic amino acid β-N-methylamino-alanine (BMAA) from mother to infant during breast-feeding: Predictions from human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Marie; Ersson, Lisa; Brandt, Ingvar; Bergström, Ulrika

    2017-04-01

    β-N-methylamino-alanine (BMAA) is a non-protein amino acid produced by cyanobacteria, diatoms and dinoflagellates. BMAA has potential to biomagnify in a terrestrial food chain, and to bioaccumulate in fish and shellfish. We have reported that administration of [(14)C]l-BMAA to lactating mice and rats results in a mother to off-spring transfer via the milk. A preferential enantiomer-specific uptake of [(14)C]l-BMAA has also been demonstrated in differentiated murine mammary epithelium HC11 cells. These findings, together with neurotoxic effects of BMAA demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo, highlight the need to determine whether such transfer could also occur in humans. Here, we used four cell lines of human origin to examine and compare the transport of the two BMAA enantiomers in vitro. The uptake patterns of [(14)C]l- and [(14)C]d-BMAA in the human mammary MCF7 cell line were in agreement with the results in murine HC11 cells, suggesting a potential secretion of BMAA into human breast milk. The permeability coefficients for both [(14)C]l- and [(14)C]d-BMAA over monolayers of human intestinal Caco2 cells supported an efficient absorption from the human intestine. As a final step, transport experiments confirmed that [(14)C]l-and [(14)C]d-BMAA can be taken up by human SHSY5Y neuroblastoma cells and even more efficiently by human U343 glioblastoma cells. In competition experiments with various amino acids, the ASCT2 specific inhibitor benzylserine was the most effective inhibitor of [(14)C]l-BMAA uptake tested here. Altogether, our results suggest that BMAA can be transferred from an exposed mother, via the milk, to the brain of the nursed infant.

  19. Synthesis, CMC Determination, Antimicrobial Activity and Nucleic Acid Binding of A Surfactant Copper(II) Complex Containing Phenanthroline and Alanine Schiff-Base.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Karuppiah; Sakthinathan, Subramanian; Arunachalam, Sankaralingam

    2014-03-01

    A new water-soluble surfactant copper(II) complex [Cu(sal-ala)(phen)(DA)] (sal-ala = salicylalanine, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, DA = dodecylamine), has been synthesized and characterized by physico-chemical and spectroscopic methods. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) values of this surfactant-copper(II) complex in aqueous solution were obtained from conductance measurements. Specific conductivity data (at 303, 308, 313. 318 and 323 K) served for the evaluation of the temperature-dependent CMC and the thermodynamics of micellization (ΔG(0)m, ΔH(0)m and ΔS(0)m). The interaction of this complex with nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) has been explored by using electronic absorption spectral titration, competitive binding experiment, cyclic voltammetry, circular dichroism (CD) spectra, and viscosity measurements. Electronic absorption studies have revealed that the complex can bind to nucleic acids by the intercalative binding mode which has been verified by viscosity measurements. The DNA binding constants have also been calculated (Kb = 1.2 × 10(5) M(-1) for DNA and Kb = 1.6 × 10(5) M(-1) for RNA). Competitive binding study with ethidium bromide (EB) showed that the complex exhibits the ability to displace the DNA-bound-EB indicating that the complex binds to DNA in strong competition with EB for the intercalative binding site. The presence of hydrophobic ligands, alanine Schiff-base, phenanthroline and long aliphatic chain amine in the complex were responsible for this strong intercalative binding. The surfactant-copper (II) complex was screened for its antibacterial and antifungal activities against various microorganisms. The results were compared with the standard drugs, amikacin(antibacterial) and ketokonazole(antifungal).

  20. Growth, spectral and optical characterization of a novel nonlinear optical organic material: D-Alanine DL-Mandelic acid single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaprakash, P.; Mohamed, M. Peer; Caroline, M. Lydia

    2017-04-01

    An organic nonlinear optical single crystal, D-alanine DL-mandelic acid was synthesized and successfully grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique at ambient temperature using solvent of aqueous solution. The unit cell parameters were assessed from single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The presence of diverse functional groups and vibrational modes were identified using Fourier Transform Infra Red and Fourier Transform Raman spectral analyses. The chemical structure of grown crystal has been identified by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopic study. Ultraviolet-visible spectral analysis reveal that the crystal has lower cut-off wavelength down to 259 nm, is a key factor to exhibit second harmonic generation signal. The electronic optical band gap and Urbach energy is calculated as 5.31 eV and 0.2425 eV respectively from the UV absorption profile. The diverse optical properties such as, extinction coefficient, reflectance, linear refractive index, optical conductivity was calculated using UV-visible data. The relative second harmonic efficiency of the compound is found to be 0.81 times greater than that of KH2PO4 (KDP). The thermal stability of the grown crystal was studied by thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis techniques. The luminescence spectrum exhibited two peaks (520 nm, 564 nm) due to the donation of protons from carboxylic acid to amino group. The Vickers microhardness test was carried out employing one of the as-grown hard crystal and there by hardness number (Hv), Meyer's index (n), yield strength (σy), elastic stiffness constant (C11) and Knoop hardness number (HK) were assessed. The dielectric behaviour of the as-grown crystal was analyzed for different temperatures (313 K, 333 K, 353 K, and 373 K) at different frequencies.

  1. Identification of two conserved aspartic acid residues required for DNA digestion by a novel thermophilic Exonuclease VII in Thermotoga maritima

    PubMed Central

    Larrea, Andres A.; Pedroso, Ilene M.; Malhotra, Arun; Myers, Richard S.

    2008-01-01

    Exonuclease VII was first identified in 1974 as a DNA exonuclease that did not require any divalent cations for activity. Indeed, Escherichia coli ExoVII was identified in partially purified extracts in the presence of EDTA. ExoVII is comprised of two subunits (XseA and XseB) that are highly conserved and present in most sequenced prokaryotic genomes, but are not seen in eukaryotes. To better understand this exonuclease family, we have characterized an ExoVII homolog from Thermotoga maritima. Thermotoga maritima XseA/B homologs TM1768 and TM1769 were co-expressed and purified, and show robust nuclease activity at 80°C. This activity is magnesium dependent and is inhibited by phosphate ions, which distinguish it from E. coli ExoVII. Nevertheless, both E. coli and T. maritima ExoVII share a similar putative active site motif with two conserved aspartate residues in the large (XseA/TM1768) subunit. We show that these residues, Asp235 and Asp240, are essential for the nuclease activity of T. maritima ExoVII. We hypothesize that the ExoVII family of nucleases can be sub-divided into two sub-families based on EDTA resistance and that T. maritima ExoVII is the first member of the branch that is characterized by EDTA sensitivity and inhibition by phosphate. PMID:18812402

  2. Isolation and characterization of recombinant Drosophila Copia aspartic proteinase

    PubMed Central

    Athauda, Senarath B. P.; Yoshioka, Katsuji; Shiba, Tadayoshi; Takahashi, Kenji

    2006-01-01

    The wild type Copia Gag precursor protein of Drosophila melanogaster expressed in Escherichia coli was shown to be processed autocatalytically to generate two daughter proteins with molecular masses of 33 and 23 kDa on SDS/PAGE. The active-site motif of aspartic proteinases, Asp-Ser-Gly, was present in the 23 kDa protein corresponding to the C-terminal half of the precursor protein. The coding region of this daughter protein (152 residues) in the copia gag gene was expressed in E. coli to produce the recombinant enzyme protein as inclusion bodies, which was then purified and refolded to create the active enzyme. Using the peptide substrate His-Gly-Ile-Ala-Phe-Met-Val-Lys-Glu-Val-Asn (cleavage site: Phe–Met) designed on the basis of the sequence of the cleavage-site region of the precursor protein, the enzymatic properties of the proteinase were investigated. The optimum pH and temperature of the proteinase toward the synthetic peptide were 4.0 and 70 °C respectively. The proteolytic activity was increased with increasing NaCl concentration in the reaction mixture, the optimum concentration being 2 M. Pepstatin A strongly inhibited the enzyme, with a Ki value of 15 nM at pH 4.0. On the other hand, the active-site residue mutant, in which the putative catalytic aspartic acid residue was mutated to an alanine residue, had no activity. These results show that the Copia proteinase belongs to the family of aspartic proteinases including HIV proteinase. The B-chain of oxidized bovine insulin was hydrolysed at the Leu15−–Tyr16 bond fairly selectively. Thus the recombinant Copia proteinase partially resembles HIV proteinase, but is significantly different from it in certain aspects. PMID:16813567

  3. Effect of solvent on the conformation and dynamics of Aspartic Acid Protease by a coarse-grained bond-fluctuating Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Ras; Farmer, Barry

    2007-03-01

    In a coarse-grained description of a protein chain, all of the 20 amino acid residues can be broadly divided into three groups, hydrophobic (H), polar (P), and electrostatic (E). A protein can be described by tethered nodes in a chain with a node representing the amino acid group. Aspartic acid protease consists of 99 residues in a well-defined sequence. The specific sequence of H, P and E nodes tethered together by fluctuating bonds is placed on a cubic lattice where empty lattice sites constitute an effective solvent medium. The amino groups (nodes) interact with the solvent (S) sites with appropriate attractive (HS) and repulsive (PS) interactions with the solvent. Each node executes its stochastic movement with the Metropolis algorithm. Variations of the root mean square displacements of the center of mass and that of its center node of the protease chain, and its gyration radius with the time steps are examined for different solvent strength. The structure of the protease swells on increasing the solvent interaction strength which tends to enhance the relaxation time to reach diffusive behavior of the chain.

  4. Conformation of a coarse-grained protein chain (an aspartic acid protease) model in effective solvent by a bond-fluctuating Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, R. B.; Farmer, B. L.

    2008-03-01

    In a coarse-grained description of a protein chain, all of the 20 amino acid residues can be broadly divided into three groups: Hydrophobic (H) , polar (P) , and electrostatic (E) . A protein can be described by nodes tethered in a chain with a node representing an amino acid group. Aspartic acid protease consists of 99 residues in a well-defined sequence of H , P , and E nodes tethered together by fluctuating bonds. The protein chain is placed on a cubic lattice where empty lattice sites constitute an effective solvent medium. The amino groups (nodes) interact with the solvent (S) sites with appropriate attractive (PS) and repulsive (HS) interactions with the solvent and execute their stochastic movement with the Metropolis algorithm. Variations of the root mean square displacements of the center of mass and that of its center node of the protease chain and its gyration radius with the time steps are examined for different solvent strength. The structure of the protease swells on increasing the solvent interaction strength which tends to enhance the relaxation time to reach the diffusive behavior of the chain. Equilibrium radius of gyration increases linearly on increasing the solvent strength: A slow rate of increase in weak solvent regime is followed by a faster swelling in stronger solvent. Variation of the gyration radius with the time steps suggests that the protein chain moves via contraction and expansion in a somewhat quasiperiodic pattern particularly in strong solvent.

  5. In vitro characterization of pH-sensitive azithromycin-loaded methoxy poly (ethylene glycol)-block-poly (aspartic acid-graft-imidazole) micelles.

    PubMed

    Teng, Fangfang; Deng, Peizong; Song, Zhimei; Zhou, Feilong; Feng, Runliang; Liu, Na

    2017-02-09

    In order to improve azithromycin's antibacterial activity in acidic medium, monomethoxy poly (ethylene glycol)-block-poly (aspartic acid-graft-imidazole) copolymer was synthesized through allylation, free radical addition, ring-opening polymerization and amidation reactions with methoxy poly (ethylene glycol) as raw material. Drug loading capacity and encapsulation efficiency of azithromycin-loaded micelles prepared via thin film hydration method were 11.58±0.86% and 96.06±1.93%, respectively. The drug-loaded micelles showed pH-dependent property in the respects of particle size, zeta potential at the range of pH 5.5-7.8. It could control drug in vitro release and demonstrate higher release rate at pH 6.0 than that at pH 7.4. In vitro antibacterial experiment indicated that the activity of azithromycin-loaded micelles against S. aureus was superior to free azithromycin in medium at both pH 6.0 and pH 7.4. Using fluorescein as substitute with pH-dependent fluorescence decrease property, laser confocal fluorescence microscopy analysis confirmed that cellular uptake of micelles was improved due to protonation of copolymer's imidazole groups at pH 6.0. The enhanced cellular uptake and release of drug caused its activity enhancement in acidic medium when compared with free drug. The micellar drug delivery system should be potential application in the field of bacterial infection treatment.

  6. Unusual nonterrestrial L-proteinogenic amino acid excesses in the Tagish Lake meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Burton, Aaron S.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Hilts, Robert W.; Herd, Christopher D. K.

    2012-08-01

    The distribution and isotopic and enantiomeric compositions of amino acids found in three distinct fragments of the Tagish Lake C2-type carbonaceous chondrite were investigated via liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry and gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Large L-enantiomeric excesses (Lee ˜ 43-59%) of the α-hydrogen aspartic and glutamic amino acids were measured in Tagish Lake, whereas alanine, another α-hydrogen protein amino acid, was found to be nearly racemic (D ≈ L) using both techniques. Carbon isotope measurements of D- and L-aspartic acid and D- and L-alanine in Tagish Lake fall well outside of the terrestrial range and indicate that the measured aspartic acid enantioenrichment is indigenous to the meteorite. Alternate explanations for the L-excesses of aspartic acid such as interference from other compounds present in the sample, analytical biases, or terrestrial amino acid contamination were investigated and rejected. These results can be explained by differences in the solid-solution phase behavior of aspartic acid, which can form conglomerate enantiopure solids during crystallization, and alanine, which can only form racemic crystals. Amplification of a small initial L-enantiomer excess during aqueous alteration on the meteorite parent body could have led to the large L-enrichments observed for aspartic acid and other conglomerate amino acids in Tagish Lake. The detection of nonterrestrial L-proteinogenic amino acid excesses in the Tagish Lake meteorite provides support for the hypothesis that significant enantiomeric enrichments for some amino acids could form by abiotic processes prior to the emergence of life.

  7. Unusual Nonterrestrial L-proteinogenic Amino Acid excesses in the Tagish Lake Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Burton, Aaron S.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Hilts, Robert W.; Herd, D. K.

    2012-01-01

    The distribution and isotopic and enantiomeric compositions of amino acids found in three distinct fragments of the Tagish Lake C2-type carbonaceous chondrite were investigated via liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry and gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Large L-enantiomeric excesses (L(sub ee) approximately 43-59%) of the alpha-hydrogen aspartic and glutamic amino acids were measured in Tagish Lake, whereas alanine, another alpha hydrogen protein amino acid, was found to be nearly racemic (D much approximately L) using both techniques. Carbon isotope measurements of D- and L-aspartic acid and 1)- and L-alanine in Tagish Lake fall well outside of the terrestrial range and indicate that the measured aspartic acid enantioenrichment is indigenous to the meteorite. Alternate explanations for the L-excesses of aspartic acid such as interference from other compounds present in the sample, analytical biases, or terrestrial amino acid contamination were investigated and rejected. These results can be explained by differences in the solid-solution phase behavior of aspartic acid, which can form conglomerate enantiopure solids during crystallization, and alanine, which can only form racemic crystals. Amplification of a small initial L-enantiomer excess during aqueous alteration on the meteorite parent body could have led to the large L-enrichments observed for aspartic acid and other conglomerate amino acids in Tagish Lake. The detection of non terrestrial L-proteinogenic amino acid excesses in the Tagish Lake meteorite provides support for the hypothesis that significant enantiomeric enrichments for some amino acids could form by abiotic processes prior to the emergence of life.

  8. Structural characterization and epitope mapping of the glutamic acid/alanine-rich protein from Trypanosoma congolense: defining assembly on the parasite cell surface.

    PubMed

    Loveless, Bianca C; Mason, Jeremy W; Sakurai, Tatsuya; Inoue, Noboru; Razavi, Morteza; Pearson, Terry W; Boulanger, Martin J

    2011-06-10

    Trypanosoma congolense is an African trypanosome that causes serious disease in cattle in Sub-Saharan Africa. The four major life cycle stages of T. congolense can be grown in vitro, which has led to the identification of several cell-surface molecules expressed on the parasite during its transit through the tsetse vector. One of these, glutamic acid/alanine-rich protein (GARP), is the first expressed on procyclic forms in the tsetse midgut and is of particular interest because it replaces the major surface coat molecule of bloodstream forms, the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) that protects the parasite membrane, and is involved in antigenic variation. Unlike VSG, however, the function of GARP is not known, which necessarily limits our understanding of parasite survival in the tsetse. Toward establishing the function of GARP, we report its three-dimensional structure solved by iodide phasing to a resolution of 1.65 Å. An extended helical bundle structure displays an unexpected and significant degree of homology to the core structure of VSG, the only other major surface molecule of trypanosomes to be structurally characterized. Immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoaffinity-tandem mass spectrometry were used in conjunction with monoclonal antibodies to map both non-surface-disposed and surface epitopes. Collectively, these studies enabled us to derive a model describing the orientation and assembly of GARP on the surface of trypanosomes. The data presented here suggest the possible structure-function relationships involved in replacement of the bloodstream form VSG by GARP as trypanosomes differentiate in the tsetse vector after a blood meal.

  9. IgE binding to peanut allergens is inhibited by combined D-aspartic and D-glutamic acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    D-amino acids (D-aas) are reported to bind to IgE antibodies from people with allergy and asthma. The objectives of this study were to determine if D-aas bind or inhibit IgE binding to peanut allergens, and if they are more effective than L-amino acids (L-aas) in this respect. Several D-aa cocktails...

  10. Effect of Exogenous Indole-3-Acetic Acid and Indole-3-Butyric Acid on Internal Levels of the Respective Auxins and Their Conjugation with Aspartic Acid during Adventitious Root Formation in Pea Cuttings

    PubMed Central

    Nordström, Ann-Caroline; Jacobs, Fernando Alvarado; Eliasson, Lennart

    1991-01-01

    The influence of exogenous indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) on the internal levels of these auxins was studied during the first 4 days of adventitious root formation in cuttings of Pisum sativum L. The quantitations were done by high performance liquid chromatography with spectrofluorometric detection. IBA, identified by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), was found to naturally occur in this plant material. The root inducing ability of exogenous IBA was superior to that of IAA. The IAA level in the tissue increased considerably on the first day after application of IAA, but rapidly decreased again, returning to a level twice the control by day 3. The predominant metabolic route was conjugation with aspartic acid, as reflected by the increase in the level of indole-3-acetylaspartic acid. The IBA treatment resulted in increases in the levels of IBA, IAA, and indole-3-acetylaspartic acid. The IAA content rapidly returned to control levels, whereas the IBA level remained high throughout the experimental period. High amounts of indole-3-butyrylaspartic acid were found in the tissue after feeding with IBA. The identity of the conjugate was confirmed by 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance and GC-MS. IBA was much more stable in solution than IAA. No IAA was detected after 48 hours, whereas 70% IBA was still recovered after this time. The relatively higher root inducing ability of IBA is ascribed to the fact that its level remained elevated longer than that of IAA, even though IBA was metabolized in the tissue. Adventitious root formation is discussed on the basis of these findings. PMID:16668265

  11. Just three water molecules can trigger the undesired nonenzymatic reactions of aspartic acid residues: new insight from a quantum-chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, O.

    2014-03-01

    Aspartic acid (Asp) residues in peptides and proteins (L-Asp) can undergo spontaneous, nonenzymatic reactions under physiological conditions by which abnormal L-β-Asp, D-Asp, and/or D-β-Asp residues are formed. These altered Asp residues may affect the three-dimensional structures of the peptides and proteins and hence their properties and functions. In fact, the altered Asp residues are relevant to age-related diseases such as cataract and Alzheimer's disease. Most of the above reactions of the L-Asp residue proceed via a cyclic succinimide intermediate. In this paper, I propose a detailed mechanism of cyclization of an Asp residue (forming a precursor of the succinimide) by the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) density functional theory calculations carried out for a small Asp-containing model compound complexed with three water molecules which act as general acid-base catalysts in proton transfers. In the proposed mechanism, the amide group on the C-terminal side of the Asp residue is first converted to the tautomeric iminol form. Then, successive reorientation of a water molecule and conformational change occur followed by the nucleophilic attack of the iminol nitrogen atom on the carboxyl carbon atom of the Asp side chain to form a five-membered ring. A satisfactory agreement was obtained between the calculated and experimental energetics.

  12. Effect of 1-aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid on N-methyl-D-aspartate-stimulated [3H]-noradrenaline release in rat hippocampal synaptosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Clos, M. V.; Garcia Sanz, A.; Trullas, R.; Badia, A.

    1996-01-01

    1. The effect of 1-aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid (ACPC), a partial agonist at the glycine site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor complex that exhibits neuroprotective, anxiolytic and antidepressant-like actions, was investigated in a functional assay for presynaptic NMDA receptors. 2. NMDA (100 microM) produced a 36% increase of tritium efflux above basal efflux in rat hippocampal synaptosomes preincubated with [3H]-noradrenaline ([3H]-NA), reflecting a release of tritiated noradrenaline. This effect was prevented by 10 microM 7-chlorokynurenic acid, an antagonist of the glycine site of the NMDA receptor. 3. Glycine enhanced the effect of NMDA with Emax and EC50 values of 84 +/- 11% and 1.82 +/- 0.04 microM, respectively. ACPC potentiated the effect of NMDA on tritium overflow with a lower EC50 (43 +/- 6 nM) and a lower maximal effect (Emax = 40 +/- 9%) than glycine. Furthermore, ACPC (0.1 microM) shifted the EC50 of glycine from 1.82 microM to > or = 3 mM. 4. These results show that ACPC can reduce the potentiation by glycine of NMDA-evoked [3H]-NA release and hence, may act as an antagonist at the glycine site of presynaptic hippocampal NMDA receptors when the concentration of glycine is high. PMID:8799560

  13. Centrally mediated ejaculatory response via sympathetic outflow in rats: role of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptors in paraventricular nucleus.

    PubMed

    Xia, J-D; Chen, J; Sun, H-J; Zhou, L-H; Zhu, G-Q; Chen, Y; Dai, Y-T

    2017-01-01

    Ejaculation is mediated by a spinal generator, which integrates inputs related to the sexual activity and coordinates sympathetic, parasympathetic, and motor outflow. Previous clinical studies indicate that primary premature ejaculation is related to the hyperactivity of the sympathetic nervous system. In this study, we explored the roles of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors in paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) on ejaculatory responses and its potential mechanism in the rats. We found that microinjection of 0.20 nmol NMDA into the PVN reduced the latency of intromission and facilitated ejaculation during copulation. Moreover, delayed ejaculation and intromission were observed after the rats were microinjected with NMDA receptor antagonist D (-)-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP-5). However, we discovered that microinjection of NMDA into PVN significantly increased baseline lumbar splanchnic nerve activity (LSNA), and the NMDA dose was positively correlated with the increased LSNA (r = 0.875, p = 0.04). Meanwhile, the plasma norepinephrine level in rats injected with NMDA was much higher than that in rats injected with saline (1453.4 ± 136.4 pg/mL vs. 492.3 ± 36.8 pg/mL, p < 0.01). Additionally, AP-5 reduced the baseline LSNA and abrogated the enhancing activity of NMDA in LSNA. Thus, we propose that NMDA receptors in PVN may facilitate ejaculation through enhancing the activity of sympathetic system.

  14. Chemical modification of Penicillium 1,2-alpha-D-mannosidase by water-soluble carbodi-imide: identification of a catalytically important aspartic acid residue.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, T; Maeda, K; Kobayashi, M; Ichishima, E

    1994-01-01

    1,2-alpha-D-Mannosidase from Penicillium citrinum was inactivated by chemical modification with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylamino-propyl)carbodi-imide (EDC). Most of the activity was lost after modification in the absence of a nucleophile, glycine ethyl ester. 1-Deoxymannojirimycin (dMM), a competitive inhibitor of the enzyme, showed partial protection against the inactivation. After the modification by EDC without the presence of a nucleophile, proteolytic digests of the enzyme were analysed by reversed-phase h.p.l.c. and a unique peptide was shown to decrease when dMM was present during the modification. The peptide was absent from the digests of unmodified enzyme. The amino acid sequence of the peptide (A; Ile-Gly-Pro) was identical in part with that of the adjacent peptide (B; Ile-Gly-Pro-Asp-Ser-Trp-Gly-Trp-Asp-Pro-Lys). When cholecystokinin tetrapeptide (Trp-Met-Asp-Phe-NH2) was modified by EDC alone, the modified peptide could be separated from unmodified peptide by reversed-phase h.p.i.c., and Edman degradation was stopped before the modified aspartic acid residue. This suggested that, in the enzyme, peptide A was derived from peptide B by the modification. Consequently, Asp-4 in peptide B was assumed to be masked by dMM during the modification, and to be involved in the interaction of the enzyme with its substrate. PMID:7945271

  15. Strategy for the estimation of chronological age using the aspartic acid racemization method with special reference to coefficient of correlation between D/L ratios and ages.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Susumu; Yamamoto, Toshiharu

    2005-09-01

    The estimation of chronological age has been performed by various methods in forensic science. Among these, racemization methods, which are based on the age-dependent non-enzymatic changes of L-form amino acids to D-form mainly using aspartic acid, are one of the most reliable and accurate methods to date. Separation of enantiomers is generally performed by gas chromatography or high performance liquid chromatography. Various tissues with low metabolic rates have been applied for this purpose. In addition, single proteins purified from these target tissues are also applicable. In this brief review we describe this method in detail, noting points of caution, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of the different target tissues. In addition, special attention is given to the correlation rates obtained between chronological age and enantiomer ratios. Currently, based on accuracy of estimated age, simplicity of the method, time required, and reproducibility, tooth dentin is considered one of the best target tissues. Alternatively, analysis of osteocalcin and elastin have also provided accurate and reproducible results.

  16. Endocytosis of the Aspartic Acid/Glutamic Acid Transporter Dip5 Is Triggered by Substrate-Dependent Recruitment of the Rsp5 Ubiquitin Ligase via the Arrestin-Like Protein Aly2 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hatakeyama, Riko; Kamiya, Masao; Takahara, Terunao; Maeda, Tatsuya

    2010-01-01

    Endocytosis of nutrient transporters is stimulated under various conditions, such as elevated nutrient availability. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, endocytosis is triggered by ubiquitination of transporters catalyzed by the E3 ubiquitin ligase Rsp5. However, how the ubiquitination is accelerated under certain conditions remains obscure. Here we demonstrate that closely related proteins Aly2/Art3 and Aly1/Art6, which are poorly characterized members of the arrestin-like protein family, mediate endocytosis of the aspartic acid/glutamic acid transporter Dip5. In aly2Δ cells, Dip5 is stabilized at the plasma membrane and is not endocytosed efficiently. Efficient ubiquitination of Dip5 is dependent on Aly2. aly1Δ cells also show deficiency in Dip5 endocytosis, although less remarkably than aly2Δ cells. Aly2 physically interacts in vivo with Rsp5 at its PY motif and also with Dip5, thus serving as an adaptor linking Rsp5 with Dip5 to achieve Dip5 ubiquitination. Importantly, the interaction between Aly2 and Dip5 is accelerated in response to elevated aspartic acid availability. This result indicates that the regulation of Dip5 endocytosis is accomplished by dynamic recruitment of Rsp5 via Aly2. PMID:20956561

  17. Induction of α-Amylase in Barley Endosperm by Substrate Levels of Glutamate and Aspartate 1

    PubMed Central

    Galsky, Alan G.; Lippincott, James A.

    1971-01-01

    Incubation of embryoless barley (Hordeum vulgare) half-seeds for 24 hours with 0.1 m glutamate or aspartate resulted in the release of 17 to 48% as much α-amylase as did incubation with 260 mμm gibberellin. With incubation periods of 48 to 51 hours these amino acids were on the average about half as active as response-saturating concentrations of gibberellin, and in some experiments they were essentially as active. Citric acid cycle intermediates, glycolytic pathway intermediates, and cofactors of these pathways failed to induce α-amylase synthesis, while the following compounds were active: asparagine, homoserine, diaminopimelate, isoleucine, methionine, glutamine, ornithine, citrulline, argininosuccinate, and δ-aminolevulinate. However, threonine, lysine, β-alanine, alanine, γ-aminobutyrate, α-ketobutyrate, proline, arginine, glycine, leucine, and putrescine were inactive. Two patterns were noted in the list of active and inactive compounds: (a) all of the active compounds contain an amino group and are biosynthetically derived from citric acid cycle intermediates; and (b) biosynthetic precursors of the amino acids arginine, proline, threonine, and lysine were active whereas these amino acids were not. PMID:16657658

  18. Structures of aspartic acid-96 in the L and N intermediates of bacteriorhodopsin: analysis by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maeda, A.; Sasaki, J.; Shichida, Y.; Yoshizawa, T.; Chang, M.; Ni, B.; Needleman, R.; Lanyi, J. K.

    1992-01-01

    The light-induced difference Fourier transform infrared spectrum between the L or N intermediate minus light-adapted bacteriorhodopsin (BR) was measured in order to examine the protonated states and the changes in the interactions of carboxylic acids of Asp-96 and Asp-115 in these intermediates. Vibrational bands due to the protonated and unprotonated carboxylic acid were identified by isotope shift and band depletion upon substitution of Asp-96 or -115 by asparagine. While the signal due to the deprotonation of Asp-96 was clearly observed in the N intermediate, this residue remained protonated in L. Asp-115 was partially deprotonated in L. The C = O stretching vibration of protonated Asp-96 of L showed almost no shift upon 2H2O substitution, in contrast to the corresponding band of Asp-96 or Asp-115 of BR, which shifted by 9-12 cm-1 under the same conditions. In the model system of acetic acid in organic solvents, such an absence of the shift of the C = O stretching vibration of the protonated carboxylic acid upon 2H2O substitution was seen only when the O-H of acetic acid is hydrogen-bonded. The non-hydrogen-bonded monomer showed the 2H2O-dependent shift. Thus, the O-H bond of Asp-96 enters into hydrogen bonding upon conversion of BR to L. Its increased hydrogen bonding in L is consistent with the observed downshift of the O-H stretching vibration of the carboxylic acid of Asp-96.

  19. Prebiotic Synthesis of Hydrophobic and Protein Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Ring, David; Wolman, Yecheskel; Friedmann, Nadav; Miller, Stanley L.

    1972-01-01

    The formation of amino acids by the action of electric discharges on a mixture of methane, nitrogen, and water with traces of ammonia was studied in detail. The presence of glycine, alanine, α-amino-n-butyric acid, α-aminoisobutyric acid, valine, norvaline, isovaline, leucine, isoleucine, alloisoleucine, norleucine, proline, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, threonine, allothreonine, α-hydroxy-γ-aminobutyric acid, and α,γ-diaminobutyric acid was confirmed by ion-exchange chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. All of the primary α-amino acids found in the Murchison Meteorite have been synthesized by this electric discharge experiment. PMID:4501592

  20. The aspartate-family pathway of plants: linking production of essential amino acids with energy and stress regulation.

    PubMed

    Galili, Gad

    2011-02-01

    The Asp family pathway of plants is highly important from a nutritional standpoint because it leads to the synthesis of the four essential amino acids Lys, Thr, Met and Ile. These amino acids are not synthesized by human and its monogastric livestock and should be supplemented in their diets. Among the Asp-family amino acids, Lys is considered as the nutritionally most important essential amino acid because its level is most limiting in cereal grains, representing the largest source of plant foods and feeds worldwide. Metabolic engineering approaches led to significant increase in Lys level in seeds by enhancing its synthesis and reducing its catabolism. However, results from the model plant Arabidopsis showed that this approach may retard seed germination due to a major negative effect on the levels of a number of TCA cycle metabolites that associate with cellular energy. In the present review, we discuss the regulatory metabolic link of the Asp-family pathway with the TCA cycle and its biological significance upon exposure to stress conditions that cause energy deprivation. In addition, we also discuss how deep understanding of the regulatory metabolic link of the Asp-family pathway with energy and stress regulation can be used to improve Lys level in seeds of important crop species, minimizing the interference with the cellular energy status and plant-stress interaction. This review thus provides an example showing how deep understanding the inter-regulation of metabolism with plant stress physiology can lead to successful nutritional improvements with minimal negative effect on plant growth and response to stressful environments.

  1. Identification of protein SUMOylation sites by mass spectrometry using combined microwave-assisted aspartic acid cleavage and tryptic digestion

    PubMed Central

    Osula, Omoruyi; Swatkoski, Stephen; Cotter, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    SUMO (Small-Ubiquitin-like MOdifier) is a post-translational modifier of protein substrates at lysine residues that conjugates to proteins in response to various changes in the cell. As a result of SUMO modification, marked changes in transcription regulation, DNA repair, subcellular localization, and mitosis, among other cellular processes, are known to occur. However, while the identification of ubiquitylation sites by mass spectrometry is aided in part by the presence of a small di-amino acid GlyGly “tag” that remains on lysine residues following tryptic digestion, SUMOylation poses a particular challenge as the absence of a basic residue near to the SUMO C-terminus results in a significant 27 or 32 amino acid sequence branch conjugated to the substrate peptide. MS/MS analyses of these branch peptides generally reveal abundant fragment ions resulting from cleavage of the SUMO tail, but which obscure those needed for characterizing the target peptide sequence. Other approaches for identifying SUMO substrates exist and include overexpression of the SUMO isoforms using an N-terminal histidine tag, as well as site-directed mutagenesis of the C-terminal end of the SUMO sequence. Here, we employ combined enzymatic/chemical approaches which serve to shorten the SUMO tag, and thus help to simplify SUMO spectra, making interpretation of mass spectra and location of the SUMOylation site easier. As described in this report, we demonstrate a method for identifying SUMOylation sites using three commercially available SUMO- modified isoforms, and by employing acid-only and acid/trypsin cleavage strategies. These approaches were carried out using MALDI-TOF and LC/MS instrumentation, along with CID and ETD fragmentation. PMID:22576878

  2. Identification of a vesicular aspartate transporter

    PubMed Central

    Miyaji, Takaaki; Echigo, Noriko; Hiasa, Miki; Senoh, Shigenori; Omote, Hiroshi; Moriyama, Yoshinori

    2008-01-01

    Aspartate is an excitatory amino acid that is costored with glutamate in synaptic vesicles of hippocampal neurons and synaptic-like microvesicles (SLMVs) of pinealocytes and is exocytosed and stimulates neighboring cells by binding to specific cell receptors. Although evidence increasingly supports the occurrence of aspartergic neurotransmission, this process is still debated because the mechanism for the vesicular storage of aspartate is unknown. Here, we show that sialin, a lysosomal H+/sialic acid cotransporter, is present in hippocampal synaptic vesicles and pineal SLMVs. RNA interference of sialin expression decreased exocytosis of aspartate and glutamate in pinealocytes. Proteoliposomes containing purified sialin actively accumulated aspartate and glutamate to a similar extent when inside positive membrane potential is imposed as the driving force. Sialin carrying a mutation found in people suffering from Salla disease (R39C) was completely devoid of aspartate and glutamate transport activity, although it retained appreciable H+/sialic acid cotransport activity. These results strongly suggest that sialin possesses dual physiological functions and acts as a vesicular aspartate/glutamate transporter. It is possible that people with Salla disease lose aspartergic (and also the associated glutamatergic) neurotransmission, and this could provide an explanation for why Salla disease causes severe neurological defects. PMID:18695252

  3. An aspartic acid at amino acid 108 is required to rescue infectious virus after transfection of a poliovirus cDNA containing a CGDD but not SGDD amino acid motif in 3Dpol.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, D E; McPherson, D; Jablonski, S A; McPherson, S; Morrow, C D

    1995-01-01

    The poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (3Dpol) contains a region of homology centered around the amino acid motif YGDD (amino acids 326 to 329), which has been postulated to be involved in the catalytic activity of the enzyme. Previous studies from this laboratory have used oligonucleotide site-directed mutagenesis to substitute the tyrosine amino acid at this motif with other amino acids (S. A. Jablonski and C. D. Morrow, J. Virol. 67:373-381, 1993). The viruses recovered with 3Dpol genes with a methionine mutation also contained a second mutation at amino acid 108 resulting in a glutamic acid-to-aspartic acid change (3D-E-108 to 3D-D-108) in the poliovirus RNA polymerase. On the basis of these results, we suggested that the amino acid at position 108 might interact with the YGDD region of the poliovirus polymerase. To further investigate this possibility, we have constructed a series of constructs in which the poliovirus RNA polymerases contained a mutation at amino acid 108 (3D-E-108 to 3D-D-108) as well as a mutation in which the tyrosine amino acid (3D-Y-326) was substituted with cysteine (3D-C-326) or serine (3D-S-326). The mutant 3Dpol polymerases were expressed in Escherichia coli, and in vitro enzyme activity was analyzed. Enzymes containing the 3D-D-108 mutation with the wild-type amino acid (3D-Y-326) demonstrated in vitro enzyme activity similar to that of the wild-type enzyme containing 3D-E-108. In contrast, enzymes with the 3D-C-326 or 3D-S-326 mutation had less in vitro activity than the wild type. The inclusion of the second mutation at amino acid 3D-D-108 did not significantly affect the in vitro activity of the polymerases containing 3D-C-326 or 3D-S-326 mutation. Transfections of poliovirus cDNAs containing the substitution at amino acid 326 with or without the second mutation at amino acid 108 were performed. Consistent with previous findings, we found that transfection of poliovirus cDNAs containing the 3D-C-326 or 3D-S-326 mutation in 3

  4. Aspartic acid functionalized water-soluble perylene diimide as “Off-On” fluorescent sensor for selective detection Cu2+ and ATP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Lina; Xing, Feifei; Bai, Yueling; Zhao, Yongmei; Zhu, Shourong

    2013-11-01

    Aspartic functionalized water-soluble perylene diimide, N,N‧-di(2-succinic acid)-perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic diimide (PASP) has two absorbance maximums at 527 and 498 nm (ε ≈ 1.7 × 104 L cm-1 mol-1) and two emission peaks at 547 and 587 nm respectively. Emission intensities decrease with the increase of PASP concentrations in 20-100 μM ranges. Spectral titrations demonstrate that each PASP can coordinate to two Cu2+ ions in the absence of HEPES buffer. Its stability constant is estimated to be about 1.0 × 1012 L2 mol-2 at pH 7.20 and its coordinate stoichiometry increased to 7.5 in the same pH in the presence of HEPES buffer. The emission of PASP will be completely quenched upon formation of Cu2+ complex. The lowest "turn-off" fluorescence detection limit was calculated to be 0.3 μM Cu2+. PASP-Cu solution was used as a "turn-on" fluorescence biosensor to detect ATP. The sensitivity towards ATP is 0.3 μM in 50 mM HEPES buffer at pH 7.20, which is one of the most sensitive fluorescence sensors.

  5. Surface aggregation of urinary proteins and aspartic acid-rich peptides on the faces of calcium oxalate monohydrate investigated by in situ force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, M L; Qiu, S R; Hoyer, J R; Casey, W H; Nancollas, G H; De Yoreo, J J

    2008-05-28

    The growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate in the presence of Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP), osteopontin (OPN), and the 27-residue synthetic peptides (DDDS){sub 6}DDD and (DDDG){sub 6}DDD [where D = aspartic acid and X = S (serine) or G (glycine)] was investigated via in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that these three growth modulators create extensive deposits on the crystal faces. Depending on the modulator and crystal face, these deposits can occur as discrete aggregates, filamentary structures, or uniform coatings. These proteinaceous films can lead to either the inhibition or increase of the step speeds (with respect to the impurity-free system) depending on a range of factors that include peptide or protein concentration, supersaturation and ionic strength. While THP and the linear peptides act, respectively, to exclusively increase and inhibit growth on the (-101) face, both exhibit dual functionality on the (010) face, inhibiting growth at low supersaturation or high modulator concentration and accelerating growth at high supersaturation or low modulator concentration. Based on analyses of growth morphologies and dependencies of step speeds on supersaturation and protein or peptide concentration, we argue for a picture of growth modulation that accounts for the observations in terms of the strength of binding to the surfaces and steps and the interplay of electrostatic and solvent-induced forces at crystal surface.

  6. Repeated ketamine administration alters N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor subunit gene expression: implication of genetic vulnerability for ketamine abuse and ketamine psychosis in humans.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ke; Lipsky, Robert H

    2015-02-01

    For more than 40 years following its approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as an anesthetic, ketamine, a non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist, has been used as a tool of psychiatric research. As a psychedelic drug, ketamine induces psychotic symptoms, cognitive impairment, and mood elevation, which resemble some symptoms of schizophrenia. Recreational use of ketamine has been increasing in recent years. However, little is known of the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for ketamine-associated psychosis. Recent animal studies have shown that repeated ketamine administration significantly increases NMDA receptor subunit gene expression, in particular subunit 1 (NR1 or GluN1) levels. This results in neurodegeneration, supporting a potential mechanism where up-regulation of NMDA receptors could produce cognitive deficits in chronic ketamine abuse patients. In other studies, NMDA receptor gene variants are associated with addictive behavior. Here, we focus on the roles of NMDA receptor gene subunits in ketamine abuse and ketamine psychosis and propose that full sequencing of NMDA receptor genes may help explain individual vulnerability to ketamine abuse and ketamine-associated psychosis.

  7. Application of L-Aspartic Acid-Capped ZnS:Mn Colloidal Nanocrystals as a Photosensor for the Detection of Copper (II) Ions in Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Jungho; Hwang, Cheong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Water-dispersible ZnS:Mn nanocrystals (NCs) were synthesized by capping the surface with polar L-aspartic acid (Asp) molecules. The obtained ZnS:Mn-Asp NC product was optically and physically characterized using the corresponding spectroscopic methods. The ultra violet-visible (UV-VIS) absorption spectrum and photoluminescence (PL) emission spectrum of the NCs showed broad peaks at 320 and 590 nm, respectively. The average particle size measured from the obtained high resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) image was 5.25 nm, which was also in accordance with the Debye-Scherrer calculations using the X-ray diffraction (XRD) data. Moreover, the surface charge and degree of aggregation of the ZnS:Mn-Asp NCs were determined by electrophoretic and hydrodynamic light scattering methods, respectively. These results indicated the formation of agglomerates in water with an average size of 19.8 nm, and a negative surface charge (−4.58 mV) in water at ambient temperature. The negatively-charged NCs were applied as a photosensor for the detection of specific cations in aqueous solution. Accordingly, the ZnS:Mn-Asp NCs showed an exclusive luminescence quenching upon addition of copper (II) cations. The kinetic mechanism study on the luminescence quenching of the NCs by the addition of the Cu2+ ions proposed an energy transfer through the ionic binding between the two oppositely-charged ZnS:Mn-Asp NCs and Cu2+ ions. PMID:28335210

  8. Malate-Aspartate Shuttle Inhibitor Aminooxyacetate Acid Induces Apoptosis and Impairs Energy Metabolism of Both Resting Microglia and LPS-Activated Microglia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Heyu; Wang, Caixia; Wei, Xunbin; Ding, Xianting; Ying, Weihai

    2015-06-01

    NADH shuttles mediate the transfer of the reducing equivalents of cytosolic NADH into mitochondria. Cumulating evidence has suggested that malate-aspartate shuttle (MAS), one of the two types of NADH shuttles, plays significant roles in such biological processes as glutamate synthesis in neurons. However, there has been no information regarding the roles of NADH shuttle in the survival and energy metabolism of microglia. In current study, using microglial BV2 cells as a cellular model, we determined the roles of MAS in the survival and energy metabolism of microglia by using aminooxyacetate acid (AOAA)-a widely used MAS inhibitor. Our study has suggested that AOAA can effectively inhibit the MAS activity of the cells. We also found that AOAA can induce both early- and late-stage apoptosis of resting microglia and lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-activated microglia. AOAA also induced mitochondrial depolarization, increases in the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentrations, and decreases in the intracellular ATP levels. Moreover, our study has excluded the possibility that the major nonspecific effect of AOAA-inhibition of GABA transaminase-is involved in theses effects of AOAA. Collectively, our study has provided first information suggesting significant roles of MAS in the survival and energy metabolism in both resting microglia and LPS-activated microglia.

  9. Aspartic acid functionalized water-soluble perylene diimide as "Off-On" fluorescent sensor for selective detection Cu(2+) and ATP.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Lina; Xing, Feifei; Bai, Yueling; Zhao, Yongmei; Zhu, Shourong

    2013-11-01

    Aspartic functionalized water-soluble perylene diimide, N,N'-di(2-succinic acid)-perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic diimide (PASP) has two absorbance maximums at 527 and 498nm (ε≈1.7×10(4)Lcm(-1)mol(-1)) and two emission peaks at 547 and 587nm respectively. Emission intensities decrease with the increase of PASP concentrations in 20-100μM ranges. Spectral titrations demonstrate that each PASP can coordinate to two Cu(2+) ions in the absence of HEPES buffer. Its stability constant is estimated to be about 1.0×10(12)L(2)mol(-2) at pH 7.20 and its coordinate stoichiometry increased to 7.5 in the same pH in the presence of HEPES buffer. The emission of PASP will be completely quenched upon formation of Cu(2+) complex. The lowest "turn-off" fluorescence detection limit was calculated to be 0.3μM Cu(2+). PASP-Cu solution was used as a "turn-on" fluorescence biosensor to detect ATP. The sensitivity towards ATP is 0.3μM in 50mM HEPES buffer at pH 7.20, which is one of the most sensitive fluorescence sensors.

  10. Interactions of L-Aspartic Acid with Aqueous Solution of 1,2-Propanediol at Different Temperatures: A Volumetric, Compressibility and Viscometric Approach.

    PubMed

    Rani, Ruby; Kumar, Ashwani; Sharma, Tanu; Saini, Balwinder; Bamezai, Rajinder Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The volumetric, acoustic and viscometric methods are used for investigating the interactions of L-aspartic acid (Asp) in aqueous solution of 1,2-propanediol (PD) over a temperature of (298.15, 303.15 and 308.15) K at atmospheric pressure. Using the experimental results, the apparent molar volume, Vφ, limiting apparent molar volume, V0φ, the slope, Sv, and partial molar volume of transfer, V0φ,tr, have been calculated from density data. The apparent molar isentropic compressibility, K φ,s, limiting apparent molar isentropic compressibility, K0φ,s, its slope, Sk, and partial molar compressibility of transfer, K0φ,s, tr, have been calculated from speed of sound data. These values are also used for calculating the number of water molecules hydrated, nH, to the Asp. The viscosity data has also been used to determine relative viscosity ηr, viscosity B-coefficients, temperature derivative of B-coefficients, dB/dT and viscosity B-coefficients of transfer, Btr. The calculated parameters have been discussed in terms of various solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions prevailing in these solutions. Further, a detailed insight into the physicochemical interactions between Asp and aqueous PD, e.g., ion-hydrophilic and hydrophilic-hydrophilic interactions along with the structure-making tendency have been retrieved through the perusal of these calculated parameters.

  11. Histidine and Aspartic Acid Residues Important for Immunoglobulin G Endopeptidase Activity of the Group A Streptococcus Opsonophagocytosis-Inhibiting Mac Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Benfang; Liu, Mengyao; Meyers, Elishia G.; Manning, Heather M.; Nagiec, Michael J.; Musser, James M.

    2003-01-01

    The secreted Mac protein made by serotype M1 group A Streptococcus (GAS) (designated Mac5005) inhibits opsonophagocytosis and killing of GAS by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils. This protein also has cysteine endopeptidase activity against human immunoglobulin G (IgG). Site-directed mutagenesis was used to identify histidine and aspartic acid residues important for Mac IgG endopeptidase activity. Replacement of His262 with Ala abolished Mac5005 IgG endopeptidase activity. Asp284Ala and Asp286Ala mutant proteins had compromised enzymatic activity, whereas 21 other Asp-to-Ala mutant proteins cleaved human IgG at the apparent wild-type level. The results suggest that His262 is an active-site residue and that Asp284 and Asp286 are important for the enzymatic activity or structure of Mac protein. These Mac mutants provide new information about structure-activity relationships in this protein and will assist study of the mechanism of inhibition of opsonophagocytosis and killing of GAS by Mac. PMID:12704162

  12. Static and dynamic investigations of poly(aspartic acid) and Pluronic F127 complex prepared by self-assembling in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nita, Loredana E.; Chiriac, Aurica P.; Bercea, Maria; Nistor, Manuela T.

    2015-12-01

    The present investigation is focused on evaluation of self-assembling ability in aqueous solutions of two water soluble polymers: poly(aspartic acid) (PAS) and Pluronic F127 (PL). The intermolecular complexes, realized between polyacid and neutral copolymer surfactant in different ratios, have been studied by combining various characterization techniques as rheology, DLS, spectroscopy, microscopy, chemical imaging, and zeta potential determination, measurements performed in static and/or dynamic conditions. In static conditions, when the equilibrium state between PAS/PL polymeric pair was reached, and depending on the polymers mixture composition, and of experimental rheological conditions, positive or negative deviations from the additive rule are registered. Conformational changes of the macromolecular chains and correspondingly physical interactions are generated between PL and PAS for self-assembly and the formation of interpolymer complex as suprastructure with micellar configuration. The phenomenon was better evidenced in case of 1/1 wt ratio between the two polymers. In dynamic conditions of determination, during "in situ" evaluation of the hydrodynamic diameter, zeta potential and conductivity, when the equilibrium state is not reached and as result either the intermolecular bonds are not achieved, the self-assembling process is not so obvious evidenced.

  13. Mutagenesis of the aspartic acid ligands in human serum transferrin: lobe-lobe interaction and conformation as revealed by antibody, receptor-binding and iron-release studies.

    PubMed Central

    Mason, A; He, Q Y; Tam, B; MacGillivray, R A; Woodworth, R

    1998-01-01

    Recombinant non-glycosylated human serum transferrin and mutants in which the liganding aspartic acid (D) in one or both lobes was changed to a serine residue (S) were produced in a mammalian cell system and purified from the tissue culture media. Significant downfield shifts of 20, 30, and 45 nm in the absorption maxima were found for the D63S-hTF, D392S-hTF and the double mutant, D63S/D392S-hTF when compared to wild-type hTF. A monoclonal antibody to a sequential epitope in the C-lobe of hTF reported affinity differences between the apo- and iron-forms of each mutant and the control. Cell-binding studies performed under the same buffer conditions used for the antibody work clearly showed that the mutated lobe(s) had an open cleft. It is not clear whether the receptor itself may play a role in promoting the open conformation or whether the iron remains in the cleft. PMID:9461487

  14. Cell-free production of integral membrane aspartic acid proteases reveals zinc-dependent methyltransferase activity of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa prepilin peptidase PilD

    PubMed Central

    Aly, Khaled A; Beebe, Emily T; Chan, Chi H; Goren, Michael A; Sepúlveda, Carolina; Makino, Shin-ichi; Fox, Brian G; Forest, Katrina T

    2013-01-01

    Integral membrane aspartic acid proteases are receiving growing recognition for their fundamental roles in cellular physiology of eukaryotes and prokaryotes, and may be medically important pharmaceutical targets. The Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa PilD and the archaeal Methanococcus voltae FlaK were synthesized in the presence of unilamellar liposomes in a cell-free translation system. Cosynthesis of PilD with its full-length substrate, PilA, or of FlaK with its full-length substrate, FlaB2, led to complete cleavage of the substrate signal peptides. Scaled-up synthesis of PilD, followed by solubilization in dodecyl-β-d-maltoside and chromatography, led to a pure enzyme that retained both of its known biochemical activities: cleavage of the PilA signal peptide and S-adenosyl methionine-dependent methylation of the mature pilin. X-ray fluorescence scans show for the first time that PilD is a zinc-binding protein. Zinc is required for the N-terminal methylation of the mature pilin, but not for signal peptide cleavage. Taken together, our work identifies the P. aeruginosa prepilin peptidase PilD as a zinc-dependent N-methyltransferase and provides a new platform for large-scale synthesis of PilD and other integral membrane proteases important for basic microbial physiology and virulence. PMID:23255525

  15. Tracer studies on the biosynthesis of amino acids from lactate by Peptostreptococcus elsdenii

    PubMed Central

    Somerville, H. J.; Peel, J. L.

    1967-01-01

    Peptostreptococcus elsdenii, a strict anaerobe from the rumen, was grown on a medium containing yeast extract and [1-14C]- or [2-14C]-lactate. Radioisotope from lactate was found in all cell fractions, but mainly in the protein. The label in the protein fraction was largely confined to a few amino acids: alanine, serine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid and diaminopimelic acid. The alanine, serine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid were separated, purified and degraded to establish the distribution of 14C from lactate within the amino acid molecules. The labelling patterns in alanine and serine suggested their formation from lactate without cleavage of the carbon chain. The pattern in aspartic acid suggested formation by condensation of a C3 unit derived directly from lactate with a C1 unit, probably carbon dioxide. The distribution in glutamic acid was consistent with two possible pathways of formation: (a) by the reactions of the tricarboxylic acid cycle leading from oxaloacetate to 2-oxoglutarate, followed by transamination; (b) by a pathway involving the reaction sequence 2 acetyl-CoA→crotonyl-CoA→glutaconate→glutamate. PMID:6069834

  16. Leukotriene A4 hydrolase: Selective abrogation of leukotriene B4 formation by mutation of aspartic acid 375

    PubMed Central

    Rudberg, Peter C.; Tholander, Fredrik; Thunnissen, Marjolein M. G. M.; Samuelsson, Bengt; Haeggström, Jesper Z.

    2002-01-01

    Leukotriene A4 (LTA4, 5S-trans-5,6-oxido-7,9-trans-11,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid) hydrolase (LTA4H)/aminopeptidase is a bifunctional zinc metalloenzyme that catalyzes the final and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of leukotriene B4 (LTB4, 5S,12R-dihydroxy-6,14-cis-8,10-trans-eicosatetraenoic acid), a classical chemoattractant and immune modulating lipid mediator. Two chemical features are key to the bioactivity of LTB4, namely, the chirality of the 12R-hydroxyl group and the cis-trans-trans geometry of the conjugated triene structure. From the crystal structure of LTA4H, a hydrophilic patch composed of Gln-134, Tyr-267, and Asp-375 was identified in a narrow and otherwise hydrophobic pocket, believed to bind LTA4. In addition, Asp-375 belongs to peptide K21, a previously characterized 21-residue active site-peptide to which LTA4 binds during suicide inactivation. In the present report we used site-directed mutagenesis and x-ray crystallography to show that Asp-375, but none of the other candidate residues, is specifically required for the epoxide hydrolase activity of LTA4H. Thus, mutation of Asp-375 leads to a selective loss of the enzyme's ability to generate LTB4 whereas the aminopeptidase activity is preserved. We propose that Asp-375, possibly assisted by Gln-134, acts as a critical determinant for the stereoselective introduction of the 12R-hydroxyl group and thus the biological activity of LTB4. PMID:11917124

  17. Dizocilpine (MK-801) induces distinct changes of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor subunits in parvalbumin-containing interneurons in young adult rat prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Xi, Dong; Zhang, Wentong; Wang, Huai-Xing; Stradtman, George G; Gao, Wen-Jun

    2009-11-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR) hypofunction has long been implicated in schizophrenia and NMDARs on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons are proposed to play an essential role in the pathogenesis. However, controversial results have been reported regarding the regulation of NMDAR expression, and direct evidence of how NMDAR antagonists act on specific subpopulations of prefrontal interneurons is missing. We investigated the effects of the NMDAR antagonist dizocilpine (MK-801) on the expression of NMDAR subtypes in the identified interneurons in young adult rat prefrontal cortex (PFC) by using laser microdissection and real-time polymerase chain reaction, combined with Western blotting and immunofluorescent staining. We found that MK-801 induced distinct changes of NMDAR subunits in the parvalbumin-immunoreactive (PV-ir) interneurons vs. pyramidal neurons in the PFC circuitry. The messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of all NMDAR subtypes, including NR1 and NR2A to 2D, exhibited inverted-U dose-dependent changes in response to MK-801 treatment in the PFC. In contrast, subunit mRNAs of NMDARs in PV-ir interneurons were significantly down-regulated at low doses, unaltered at medium doses, and significantly decreased again at high doses, suggesting a biphasic dose response to MK-801. The differential effects of MK-801 in mRNA expression of NMDAR subunits were consistent with the protein expression of NR2A and NR2B subunits revealed with Western blotting and double immunofluorescent staining. These results suggest that PV-containing interneurons in the PFC exhibit a distinct responsiveness to NMDAR antagonism and that NMDA antagonist can differentially and dose-dependently regulate the functions of pyramidal neurons and GABAergic interneurons in the prefrontal cortical circuitry.

  18. Replacement of aspartic acid-96 by asparagine in bacteriorhodopsin slows both the decay of the M intermediate and the associated proton movement.

    PubMed Central

    Holz, M; Drachev, L A; Mogi, T; Otto, H; Kaulen, A D; Heyn, M P; Skulachev, V P; Khorana, H G

    1989-01-01

    The photocycle, electrical charge translocation, and release and uptake of protons from the aqueous phase and release and uptake of protons from the aqueous phase were investigated for bacteriorhodopsin mutants with aspartic acid-96 replaced by asparagine or glutamic acid. At neutral pH the main effect of the Asp-96----Asn mutation is to slow by 2 orders of magnitude the decay of the M intermediate and the concomitant charge displacement associated with the reprotonation of the Schiff base from the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. The proton uptake measured with the indicator dye pyranine is likewise slowed without affecting the stoichiometry of proton pumping. The corresponding results for the Asp-96----Glu mutant, on the other hand, are very close to those for the wild-type protein. These results provide a kinetic explanation for the fact that at pH 7 and saturating light intensities the steady-state proton pumping is almost abolished in the Asp-96----Asn mutant but is close to normal in the Asp-96----Glu mutant. Thus, the pump is simply turning over much more slowly in the Asp-96----Asn mutant. The time constants of the decay of M and the associated charge translocation increase strongly with increasing pH for the Asp-96----Asn mutant but are virtually pH-independent for the Asp-96----Glu mutant and wild-type bacteriorhodopsin. At pH 5 the M decay of the Asp-96----Asn mutant is as fast as for wild type. These results suggest that Asp-96 serves as an internal proton donor in the proton-uptake pathway from the cytoplasm to the Schiff base. PMID:2648392

  19. Stabilization Effect of Amino Acid Side Chains in Peptide Assemblies on Graphite Studied by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuanyuan; Hou, Jingfei; Zhang, Xuemei; Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen

    2017-02-03

    An analysis is presented of the effects of amino acid side chains on peptide assemblies in ambient conditions on a graphite surface. The molecularly resolved assemblies of binary peptides are examined with scanning tunneling microscopy. A comparative analysis of the assembly structures reveals that the lamellae width has an appreciable dependence on the peptide sequence, which could be considered as a manifestation of a stabilizing effect of side-chain moieties of amino acids with high (phenylalanine) and low (alanine, asparagine, histidine and aspartic acid) propensities for aggregation. These amino acids are representative for the chemical structures involving the side chains of charged (histidine and aspartic acid), aromatic (phenylalanine), hydrophobic (alanine), and hydrophilic (asparagine) amino acids. These results might provide useful insight for understanding the effects of sequence on the assembly of surface-bound peptides.

  20. Pharmacological characterization of LY233053: A structurally novel tetrazole-substituted competitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid antagonist with a short duration of action

    SciTech Connect

    Schoepp, D.D.; Ornstein, P.L.; Leander, J.D.; Lodge, D.; Salhoff, C.R.; Zeman, S.; Zimmerman, D.M. )

    1990-12-01

    This study reports the activity of a structurally novel excitatory amino acid receptor antagonist, LY233053 (cis-(+-)-4-((2H-tetrazol-5-yl)methyl)piperidine-2-carboxylic acid), the first tetrazole-containing competitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) antagonist. LY233053 potently inhibited NMDA receptor binding to rat brain membranes as shown by the in vitro displacement of (3H) CGS19755 (IC50 = 107 +/- 7 nM). No appreciable affinity in (3H)alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) or (3H)kainate binding assays was observed (IC50 values greater than 10,000 nM). In vitro NMDA receptor antagonist activity was further demonstrated by selective inhibition of NMDA-induced depolarization in cortical wedges (IC50 = 4.2 +/- 0.4 microM vs. 40 microM NMDA). LY233053 was effective after in vivo systemic administration in a number of animal models. In neonatal rats, LY233053 selectively blocked NMDA-induced convulsions (ED50 = 14.5 mg/kg i.p.) with a relatively short duration of action (2-4 hr). In pigeons, LY233053 potently antagonized (ED50 = 1.3 mg/kg i.m.) the behavioral suppressant effects of 10 mg/kg of NMDA. However, a dose of 160 mg/kg, i.m., was required to produce phencyclidine-like catalepsy in pigeons. In mice, LY233053 protected against maximal electroshock-induced seizures at lower doses (ED50 = 19.9 mg/kg i.p.) than those that impaired horizontal screen performance (ED50 = 40.9 mg/kg i.p.). Cholinergic and GABAergic neuronal degenerations after striatal infusion of NMDA were prevented by single or multiple i.p. doses of LY233053. In summary, the antagonist activity of LY233053 after systemic administration demonstrates potential therapeutic value in conditions of neuronal cell loss due to NMDA receptor excitotoxicity.

  1. D-Amino Acids in the Nervous and Endocrine Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kiriyama, Yoshimitsu

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids are important components for peptides and proteins and act as signal transmitters. Only L-amino acids have been considered necessary in mammals, including humans. However, diverse D-amino acids, such as D-serine, D-aspartate, D-alanine, and D-cysteine, are found in mammals. Physiological roles of these D-amino acids not only in the nervous system but also in the endocrine system are being gradually revealed. N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are associated with learning and memory. D-Serine, D-aspartate, and D-alanine can all bind to NMDA receptors. H2S generated from D-cysteine reduces disulfide bonds in receptors and potentiates their activity. Aberrant receptor activity is related to diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), such as Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and schizophrenia. Furthermore, D-amino acids are detected in parts of the endocrine system, such as the pineal gland, hypothalamus, pituitary gland, pancreas, adrenal gland, and testis. D-Aspartate is being investigated for the regulation of hormone release from various endocrine organs. Here we focused on recent findings regarding the synthesis and physiological functions of D-amino acids in the nervous and endocrine systems. PMID:28053803

  2. In Vivo-Selected Pyrazinoic Acid-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains Harbor Missense Mutations in the Aspartate Decarboxylase PanD and the Unfoldase ClpC1.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Pooja; Tasneen, Rokeya; Yee, Michelle; Lanoix, Jean-Philippe; Sarathy, Jansy; Rasic, George; Li, Liping; Dartois, Véronique; Nuermberger, Eric; Dick, Thomas

    2017-03-16

    Through mutant selection on agar containing pyrazinoic acid (POA), the bioactive form of the prodrug pyrazinamide (PZA), we recently showed that missense mutations in the aspartate decarboxylase PanD and the unfoldase ClpC1, and loss-of-function mutation of polyketide synthases Mas and PpsA-E involved in phthiocerol dimycocerosate synthesis, cause resistance to POA and PZA in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Here we first asked whether these in vitro-selected POA/PZA-resistant mutants are attenuated in vivo, to potentially explain the lack of evidence of these mutations among PZA-resistant clinical isolates. Infection of mice with panD, clpC1, and mas/ppsA-E mutants showed that whereas growth of clpC1 and mas/ppsA-E mutants was attenuated, the panD mutant grew as well as the wild-type. To determine whether these resistance mechanisms can emerge within the host, mice infected with wild-type M. tuberculosis were treated with POA, and POA-resistant colonies were confirmed for PZA and POA resistance. Genome sequencing revealed that 82 and 18% of the strains contained missense mutations in panD and clpC1, respectively. Consistent with their lower fitness and POA resistance level, independent mas/ppsA-E mutants were not found. In conclusion, we show that the POA/PZA resistance mechanisms due to panD and clpC1 missense mutations are recapitulated in vivo. Whereas the representative clpC1 mutant was attenuated for growth in the mouse infection model, providing a possible explanation for their absence among clinical isolates, the growth kinetics of the representative panD mutant was unaffected. Why POA/PZA resistance-conferring panD mutations are observed in POA-treated mice but not yet among clinical strains isolated from PZA-treated patients remains to be determined.

  3. Prazosin blocks the glutamatergic effects of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid on lordosis behavior and luteinizing hormone secretion in the estrogen-primed female rat.

    PubMed

    Landa, A I; Cabrera, R J; Gargiulo, P A

    2006-03-01

    We have observed that intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of selective N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA)-type glutamatergic receptor antagonists inhibits lordosis in ovariectomized (OVX), estrogen-primed rats receiving progesterone or luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH). When NMDA was injected into OVX estrogen-primed rats, it induced a significant increase in lordosis. The interaction between LHRH and glutamate was previously explored by us and another groups. The noradrenergic systems have a functional role in the regulation of LHRH release. The purpose of the present study was to explore the interaction between glutamatergic and noradrenergic transmission. The action of prazosin, an alpha1- and alpha2b-noradrenergic antagonist, was studied here by injecting it icv (1.75 and 3.5 microg/6 microL) prior to NMDA administration (1 microg/2 microL) in OVX estrogen-primed Sprague-Dawley rats (240-270 g). Rats manually restrained were injected over a period of 2 min, and tested 1.5 h later. The enhancing effect induced by NMDA on the lordosis/mount ratio at high doses (67.06 +/- 3.28, N = 28) when compared to saline controls (6 and 2 microL, 16.59 +/- 3.20, N = 27) was abolished by prazosin administration (17.04 +/- 5.52, N = 17, and 9.33 +/- 3.21, N = 20, P < 0.001 for both doses). Plasma LH levels decreased significantly only with the higher dose of prazosin (1.99 +/- 0.24 ng/mL, N = 18, compared to saline-NMDA effect, 5.96 +/- 2.01 ng/mL, N = 13, P < 0.05). Behavioral effects seem to be more sensitive to the alpha-blockade than hormonal effects. These findings strongly suggest that the facilitatory effects of NMDA on both lordosis and LH secretion in this model are mediated by alpha-noradrenergic transmission.

  4. Microsecond Deprotonation of Aspartic Acid and Response of the α/β Subdomain Precede C-Terminal Signaling in the Blue Light Sensor Plant Cryptochrome.

    PubMed

    Thöing, Christian; Oldemeyer, Sabine; Kottke, Tilman

    2015-05-13

    Plant cryptochromes are photosensory receptors that regulate various central aspects of plant growth and development. These receptors consist of a photolyase homology region (PHR) carrying the oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor, and a cryptochrome C-terminal extension (CCT), which is essential for signaling. Absorption of blue/UVA light leads to formation of the FAD neutral radical as the likely signaling state, and ultimately activates the CCT. Little is known about the signal transfer from the flavin to the CCT. Here, we investigated the photoreaction of the PHR by time-resolved step-scan FT-IR spectroscopy complemented by UV-vis spectroscopy. The first spectrum at 500 ns shows major contributions from the FAD anion radical, which is demonstrated to then be protonated by aspartic acid 396 to the neutral radical within 3.5 μs. The analysis revealed the existence of three intermediates characterized by changes in secondary structure. A marked loss of β-sheet structure is observed in the second intermediate evolving with a time constant of 500 μs. This change is accompanied by a conversion of a tyrosine residue, which is identified as the formation of a tyrosine radical in the UV-vis. The only β-sheet in the PHR is located within the α/β subdomain, ∼25 Å away from the flavin. This subdomain has been previously attributed a role as a putative antenna binding site, but is now suggested to have evolved to a component in the signaling of plant cryptochromes by mediating the interaction with the CCT.

  5. P2X7 receptor antagonists protect against N-methyl-D-aspartic acid-induced neuronal injury in the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kenji; Endo, Kanako; Suzuki, Taishi; Fujimura, Kyosuke; Kurauchi, Yuki; Mori, Asami; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2015-06-05

    Activation of N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors followed by a large Ca(2+) influx is thought to be a mechanism of glaucoma-induced neuronal cell death. It is possible that damage-associated molecular patterns leak from injured cells, such as adenosine triphosphate, causing retinal ganglion cell death in glaucoma. In the present study, we histologically investigated whether antagonists of the P2X7 receptor protected against NMDA-induced retinal injury in the rat in vivo. Under ketamine/xylazine anesthesia, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to intravitreal injection of NMDA. We used A438079 (3-(5-(2,3-dichlorophenyl)-1H-tetrazol-1-yl)methyl pyridine) and brilliant blue G as P2X7 receptor antagonists. Upon morphometric evaluation 7 days after an intravitreal injection (200 nmol/eye), NMDA-induced cell loss was apparent in the ganglion cell layer. Intravitreal A438079 (50 pmol/eye) simultaneously injected with NMDA and intraperitoneal brilliant blue G (50 mg/kg) administered just before the NMDA injection as well as 24 and 48h after significantly reduced cell loss. In addition, A438079 decreased the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling-positive cells 12h after NMDA injection. P2X7 receptors were immunolocalized in the ganglion cell layer and the inner and outer plexiform layers, whereas the immunopositive P2X7 receptor signal was not detected on the Iba1-positive microglial cells that infiltrated the retina 12h after NMDA injection. The present study shows that stimulation of the P2X7 receptor is involved in NMDA-induced histological damage in the rat retina in vivo. P2X7 receptor antagonists may be effective in preventing retinal diseases caused by glutamate excitotoxicity, such as glaucoma and retinal artery occlusion.

  6. Agmatine protects Müller cells from high-concentration glucose-induced cell damage via N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Han, Ning; Yu, Li; Song, Zhidu; Luo, Lifu; Wu, Yazhen

    2015-07-01

    Neural injury is associated with the development of diabetic retinopathy. Müller cells provide structural and metabolic support for retinal neurons. High glucose concentrations are known to induce Müller cell activity. Agmatine is an endogenous polyamine, which is enzymatically formed in the mammalian brain and has exhibited neuroprotective effects in a number of experimental models. The aims of the present study were to investigate whether agmatine protects Müller cells from glucose-induced damage and to explore the mechanisms underlying this process. Lactate dehydrogenase activity and tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA expression were significantly reduced in Müller cells exposed to a high glucose concentration, following agmatine treatment, compared with cells not treated with agmatine. In addition, agmatine treatment inhibited glucose-induced Müller cell apoptosis, which was associated with the regulation of Bax and Bcl-2 expression. Agmatine treatment suppressed glucose-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) protein in Müller cells. The present study demonstrated that the protective effects of agmatine on Müller cells were inhibited by N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA). The results of the present study suggested that agmatine treatment protects Müller cells from high-concentration glucose-induced cell damage. The underlying mechanisms may relate to the anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic effects of agmatine, as well as to the inhibition of the MAPK pathway, via NMDA receptor suppression. Agmatine may be of use in the development of novel therapeutic approaches for patients with diabetic retinopathy.

  7. MicroRNA-217 suppresses homocysteine-induced proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells via N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hongyan; Li, Yongqiang; Yan, Lijie; Yang, Haitao; Wu, Jintao; Qian, Peng; Li, Bing; Wang, Shanling

    2016-10-01

    Hyperhomocysteine has become a critical risk for atherosclerosis and can stimulate proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR) is a receptor of homocysteine and mediates the effects of homocysteine on VSMCs. Bioinformatics analysis has shown NMDAR is a potential target of microRNA-217 (miR-217), which exerts multiple functions in cancer tumorigenesis and carotid plaque progression. In this study, we sought to investigate the role of miR-217 in VSMCs phenotype transition under homocysteine exposure and elucidate its effect on atherosclerotic plaque formation. After treating with several doses of homocysteine (0-8 × 10(-4)  mol/L) for 24 hours, the expression of miR-217 in HA-VSMCs and rat aortic VSMCs was not altered. Intriguingly, the expression of NMDAR mRNA and protein was reduced by homocysteine in a dose-dependent manner. Transfection of miR-217 mimic significantly inhibited the proliferation and migration of VSMCs with homocysteine treatment, while transfection of miR-217 inhibitor promoted VSMCs migration. Moreover, miR-217 mimic down-regulated while miR-217 inhibitor up-regulated NMDAR protein expression but not NMDAR mRNA expression. Through luciferase reporter assay, we showed that miR-217 could directly bind to the 3'-UTR of NMDAR. MiR-217 mimic transfection also released the inhibition of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB)-PGC-1α signalling induced by homocysteine. Additionally, restoration of PGC-1α expression via AdPGC-1α infection markedly suppressed VSMCs proliferation through the degradation of NADPH oxidase (NOX1) and reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Collectively, our study identified the role of miR-217 in regulating VSMCs proliferation and migration, which might serve as a target for atherosclerosis therapy.

  8. Detection of non-protein amino acids in the presence of protein amino acids. II.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapshak, P.; Okaji, M.

    1972-01-01

    Studies conducted with the JEOL 5AH amino acid analyzer are described. This instrument makes possible the programming of the chromatographic process. Data are presented showing the separations of seventeen non-protein amino acids in the presence of eighteen protein amino acids. It is pointed out that distinct separations could be obtained in the case of a number of chemically similar compounds, such as ornithine and lysine, N-amidino alanine and arginine, and iminodiacetic acid and S-carboxymethyl cysteine and aspartic acid.

  9. Accumulated analyses of amino acid precursors in returned lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Harada, K.; Hare, P. E.

    1973-01-01

    Six amino acids (glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, and threonine) obtained by hydrolysis of extracts have been quantitatively determined in ten collections of fines from five Apollo missions. Although the amounts found, 7-45 ng/g, are small, the lunar amino acid/carbon ratios are comparable to those of the carbonaceous chondrites, Murchison and Murray, as analyzed by the same procedures. Since both the ratios of amino acid to carbon, and the four or five most common types of proteinous amino acid found, are comparable for the two extraterrestrial sources despite different cosmophysical histories of the moon and meteorites, common cosmochemical processes are suggested.

  10. Comparison of EPR response of alanine and Gd₂O₃-alanine dosimeters exposed to TRIGA Mainz reactor.

    PubMed

    Marrale, M; Schmitz, T; Gallo, S; Hampel, G; Longo, A; Panzeca, S; Tranchina, L

    2015-12-01

    In this work we report some preliminary results regarding the analysis of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) response of alanine pellets and alanine pellets added with gadolinium used for dosimetry at the TRIGA research reactor in Mainz, Germany. Two set-ups were evaluated: irradiation inside PMMA phantom and irradiation inside boric acid phantom. We observed that the presence of Gd2O3 inside alanine pellets increases the EPR signal by a factor of 3.45 and 1.24 in case of PMMA and boric acid phantoms, respectively. We can conclude that in the case of neutron beam with a predominant thermal neutron component the addition of gadolinium oxide can significantly improve neutron sensitivity of alanine pellets. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of both response of alanine and Gd-added alanine pellets with FLUKA code were performed and a good agreement was achieved for pure alanine dosimeters. For Gd2O3-alanine deviations between MC simulations and experimental data were observed and discussed.

  11. Preparation of arginine–glycine–aspartic acid-modified biopolymeric nanoparticles containing epigalloccatechin-3-gallate for targeting vascular endothelial cells to inhibit corneal neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Che-Yi; Wang, Ming-Chen; Miyagawa, Takuya; Chen, Zhi-Yu; Lin, Feng-Huei; Chen, Ko-Hua; Liu, Guei-Sheung; Tseng, Ching-Li

    2017-01-01

    Neovascularization (NV) of the cornea can disrupt visual function, causing ocular diseases, including blindness. Therefore, treatment of corneal NV has a high public health impact. Epigalloccatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), presenting antiangiogenesis effects, was chosen as an inhibitor to treat human vascular endothelial cells for corneal NV treatment. An arginine–glycine–aspartic acid (RGD) peptide–hyaluronic acid (HA)-conjugated complex coating on the gelatin/EGCG self-assembly nanoparticles (GEH-RGD NPs) was synthesized for targeting the αvβ3 integrin on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in this study, and a corneal NV mouse model was used to evaluate the therapeutic effect of this nanomedicine used as eyedrops. HA-RGD conjugation via COOH and amine groups was confirmed by 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The average diameter of GEH-RGD NPs was 168.87±22.5 nm with positive charge (19.7±2 mV), with an EGCG-loading efficiency up to 95%. Images of GEH-RGD NPs acquired from transmission electron microscopy showed a spherical shape and shell structure of about 200 nm. A slow-release pattern was observed in the nanoformulation at about 30% after 30 hours. Surface plasmon resonance confirmed that GEH-RGD NPs specifically bound to the integrin αvβ3. In vitro cell-viability assay showed that GEH-RGD efficiently inhibited HUVEC proliferation at low EGCG concentrations (20 μg/mL) when compared with EGCG or non-RGD-modified NPs. Furthermore, GEH-RGD NPs significantly inhibited HUVEC migration down to 58%, lasting for 24 hours. In the corneal NV mouse model, fewer and thinner vessels were observed in the alkali-burned cornea after treatment with GEH-RGD NP eyedrops. Overall, this study indicates that GEH-RGD NPs were successfully developed and synthesized as an inhibitor of vascular endothelial cells with specific targeting capacity. Moreover, they can be used in eyedrops to inhibit angiogenesis in corneal NV

  12. Preparation of arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-modified biopolymeric nanoparticles containing epigalloccatechin-3-gallate for targeting vascular endothelial cells to inhibit corneal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Chang, Che-Yi; Wang, Ming-Chen; Miyagawa, Takuya; Chen, Zhi-Yu; Lin, Feng-Huei; Chen, Ko-Hua; Liu, Guei-Sheung; Tseng, Ching-Li

    2017-01-01

    Neovascularization (NV) of the cornea can disrupt visual function, causing ocular diseases, including blindness. Therefore, treatment of corneal NV has a high public health impact. Epigalloccatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), presenting antiangiogenesis effects, was chosen as an inhibitor to treat human vascular endothelial cells for corneal NV treatment. An arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide-hyaluronic acid (HA)-conjugated complex coating on the gelatin/EGCG self-assembly nanoparticles (GEH-RGD NPs) was synthesized for targeting the αvβ3 integrin on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in this study, and a corneal NV mouse model was used to evaluate the therapeutic effect of this nanomedicine used as eyedrops. HA-RGD conjugation via COOH and amine groups was confirmed by (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The average diameter of GEH-RGD NPs was 168.87±22.5 nm with positive charge (19.7±2 mV), with an EGCG-loading efficiency up to 95%. Images of GEH-RGD NPs acquired from transmission electron microscopy showed a spherical shape and shell structure of about 200 nm. A slow-release pattern was observed in the nanoformulation at about 30% after 30 hours. Surface plasmon resonance confirmed that GEH-RGD NPs specifically bound to the integrin αvβ3. In vitro cell-viability assay showed that GEH-RGD efficiently inhibited HUVEC proliferation at low EGCG concentrations (20 μg/mL) when compared with EGCG or non-RGD-modified NPs. Furthermore, GEH-RGD NPs significantly inhibited HUVEC migration down to 58%, lasting for 24 hours. In the corneal NV mouse model, fewer and thinner vessels were observed in the alkali-burned cornea after treatment with GEH-RGD NP eyedrops. Overall, this study indicates that GEH-RGD NPs were successfully developed and synthesized as an inhibitor of vascular endothelial cells with specific targeting capacity. Moreover, they can be used in eyedrops to inhibit angiogenesis in corneal NV mice.

  13. The Role of Glutamic or Aspartic Acid in Position Four of the Epitope Binding Motif and Thyrotropin Receptor-Extracellular Domain Epitope Selection in Graves' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Hidefumi; Martin, William; Ardito, Matt; De Groot, Anne Searls; De Groot, Leslie J.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Development of Graves' disease (GD) is related to HLA-DRB1*0301 (DR3),and more specifically to arginine at position 74 of the DRB1 molecule. The extracellular domain (ECD) of human TSH receptor (hTSH-R) contains the target antigen. Objective and Design: We analyzed the relation between hTSH-R-ECD peptides and DR molecules to determine whether aspartic acid (D) or glutamic acid (E) at position four in the binding motif influenced selection of functional epitopes. Results: Peptide epitopes from TSH-R-ECD with D or E in position four (D/E+) had higher affinity for binding to DR3 than peptides without D/E (D/E−) (IC50 29.3 vs. 61.4, P = 0.0024). HLA-DR7, negatively correlated with GD, and DRB1*0302 (HLA-DR18), not associated with GD, had different profiles of epitope binding. Toxic GD patients who are DR3+ had higher responses to D/E+ peptides than D/E− peptides (stimulation index 1.42 vs. 1.22, P = 0.028). All DR3+ GD patients (toxic + euthyroid) had higher responses, with borderline significance (Sl; 1.32 vs. 1.18, P = 0.051). Splenocytes of DR3 transgenic mice immunized to TSH-R-ECD responded to D/E+ peptides more than D/E− peptides (stimulation index 1.95 vs. 1.69, P = 0.036). Seven of nine hTSH-R-ECD peptide epitopes reported to be reactive with GD patients' peripheral blood mononuclear cells contain binding motifs with D/E at position four. Conclusions: TSH-R-ECD epitopes with D/E in position four of the binding motif bind more strongly to DRB1*0301 than epitopes that are D/E− and are more stimulatory to GD patients' peripheral blood mononuclear cells and to splenocytes from mice immunized to hTSH-R. These epitopes appear important in immunogenicity to TSH-R due to their favored binding to HLA-DR3, thus increasing presentation to T cells. PMID:20392871

  14. On the abiotic formation of amino acids. I - HCN as a precursor of amino acids detected in extracts of lunar samples. II - Formation of HCN and amino acids from simulated mixtures of gases released from lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuasa, S.; Flory, D.; Basile, B.; Oro, J.

    1984-01-01

    Two studies on the abiotic formation of amino acids are presented. The first study demonstrates the role of hydrogen cyanide as a precursor of amino acids detected in extracts of lunar samples. The formation of several amino acids, including glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid, under conditions similar to those used for the analysis of lunar samples is demonstrated. The second study investigates the formation of hydrogen cyanide as well as amino acids from lunar-sample gas mixtures under electrical discharge conditions. These results extend the possibility of synthesis of amino acids to planetary bodies with primordial atmospheres less reducing than a mixture of methane, ammonia, hydrogen and water.

  15. Secreted fungal aspartic proteases: A review.

    PubMed

    Mandujano-González, Virginia; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes; Anducho-Reyes, Miguel Angel; Mercado-Flores, Yuridia

    2016-01-01

    The aspartic proteases, also called aspartyl and aspartate proteases or acid proteases (E.C.3.4.23), belong to the endopeptidase family and are characterized by the conserved sequence Asp-Gly-Thr at the active site. These enzymes are found in a wide variety of microorganisms in which they perform important functions related to nutrition and pathogenesis. In addition, their high activity and stability at acid pH make them attractive for industrial application in the food industry; specifically, they are used as milk-coagulating agents in cheese production or serve to improve the taste of some foods. This review presents an analysis of the characteristics and properties of secreted microbial aspartic proteases and their potential for commercial application.

  16. Production of D-Alanine by Corynebacterium fascians

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Shigeki; Maeshima, Haruko; Wada, Mitsuru; Chibata, Ichiro

    1973-01-01

    A strain identified as Corynebacterium fascians was found to accumulate extracellular D-alanine from glycerol. Cultural conditions for the accumulation of D-alanine were investigated and, as a result, a yield of 7 g of D-alanine per liter was obtained after a 96-h incubation in a medium containing 5% glycerol, 4% (NH4)2HPO4, and 0.3% corn steep liquor. Optical purity of D-alanine was dependent upon the concentration of corn steep liquor. At the optimal condition, almost optically pure D-alanine was formed and readily isolated (5 g/liter) from the fermentation broth. The product was not contaminated with any detectable amount of other amino acids, except for glycine which was present at a concentration of less than 1 percent. PMID:4699220

  17. Substitution at aspartic acid 1128 in the SARS coronavirus spike glycoprotein mediates escape from a S2 domain-targeting neutralizing monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Ng, Oi-Wing; Keng, Choong-Tat; Leung, Cynthia Sau-Wai; Peiris, J S Malik; Poon, Leo Lit Man; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2014-01-01

    The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is the etiological agent for the infectious disease, SARS, which first emerged 10 years ago. SARS-CoV is a zoonotic virus that has crossed the species barriers to infect humans. Bats, which harbour a diverse pool of SARS-like CoVs (SL-CoVs), are believed to be the natural reservoir. The SARS-CoV surface Spike (S) protein is a major antigenic determinant in eliciting neutralizing antibody production during SARS-CoV infection. In our previous work, we showed that a panel of murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target the S2 subunit of the S protein are capable of neutralizing SARS-CoV infection in vitro (Lip KM et al, J Virol. 2006 Jan; 80(2): 941-50). In this study, we report our findings on the characterization of one of these mAbs, known as 1A9, which binds to the S protein at a novel epitope within the S2 subunit at amino acids 1111-1130. MAb 1A9 is a broadly neutralizing mAb that prevents viral entry mediated by the S proteins of human and civet SARS-CoVs as well as bat SL-CoVs. By generating mutant SARS-CoV that escapes the neutralization by mAb 1A9, the residue D1128 in S was found to be crucial for its interaction with mAb 1A9. S protein containing the substitution of D1128 with alanine (D1128A) exhibited a significant decrease in binding capability to mAb 1A9 compared to wild-type S protein. By using a pseudotyped viral entry assay, it was shown that the D1128A substitution in the escape virus allows it to overcome the viral entry blockage by mAb 1A9. In addition, the D1128A mutation was found to exert no effects on the S protein cell surface expression and incorporation into virion particles, suggesting that the escape virus retains the same viral entry property as the wild-type virus.

  18. Substitution at Aspartic Acid 1128 in the SARS Coronavirus Spike Glycoprotein Mediates Escape from a S2 Domain-Targeting Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Oi-Wing; Keng, Choong-Tat; Leung, Cynthia Sau-Wai; Peiris, J. S. Malik; Poon, Leo Lit Man; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2014-01-01

    The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is the etiological agent for the infectious disease, SARS, which first emerged 10 years ago. SARS-CoV is a zoonotic virus that has crossed the species barriers to infect humans. Bats, which harbour a diverse pool of SARS-like CoVs (SL-CoVs), are believed to be the natural reservoir. The SARS-CoV surface Spike (S) protein is a major antigenic determinant in eliciting neutralizing antibody production during SARS-CoV infection. In our previous work, we showed that a panel of murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target the S2 subunit of the S protein are capable of neutralizing SARS-CoV infection in vitro (Lip KM et al, J Virol. 2006 Jan; 80(2): 941–50). In this study, we report our findings on the characterization of one of these mAbs, known as 1A9, which binds to the S protein at a novel epitope within the S2 subunit at amino acids 1111–1130. MAb 1A9 is a broadly neutralizing mAb that prevents viral entry mediated by the S proteins of human and civet SARS-CoVs as well as bat SL-CoVs. By generating mutant SARS-CoV that escapes the neutralization by mAb 1A9, the residue D1128 in S was found to be crucial for its interaction with mAb 1A9. S protein containing the substitution of D1128 with alanine (D1128A) exhibited a significant decrease in binding capability to mAb 1A9 compared to wild-type S protein. By using a pseudotyped viral entry assay, it was shown that the D1128A substitution in the escape virus allows it to overcome the viral entry blockage by mAb 1A9. In addition, the D1128A mutation was found to exert no effects on the S protein cell surface expression and incorporation into virion particles, suggesting that the escape virus retains the same viral entry property as the wild-type virus. PMID:25019613

  19. [Review of the psychiatric aspects of anti-NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartic acid) receptor encephalitis, case report, and our plans for a future study].

    PubMed

    Herman, Levente; Zsigmond, Ildiko Reka; Peter, Laszlo; Rethelyi, Janos M

    2016-12-01

    Anti-NMDAR (N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor) encephalitis, first described in 2007, is a rare, autoimmune limbic encephalitis. In half of the cases anti-NMDAR antibodies are paraneoplastic manifestations of an underlying tumor (mostly ovarian teratoma). In the early stage of the disease psychiatric symptoms are prominent, therefore 60-70% of the patients are first treated in a psychiatric department. In most of the cases, typical neurological symptoms appear later. Besides the clinical picture and typical symptoms, verifying presence of IgG antibodies in the serum or CSF is necessary to set up the diagnosis. Other diagnostic tools, including laboratory tests, MRI, lumbar puncture or EEG are neither specific, nor sensitive enough. Therapy is based on supportive care, plasma exchange and immune suppression, intensive care administration can be necessary. If there is an underlying tumor, tumor removal is the first-line treatment. The disease can cause fatal complications in the acute phase but with adequate therapy long-term prognosis is good, although rehabilitation can last for months. In the past few years besides the typical clinical picture and illness course an increasing number of case reports described no typical neurological symptoms, only psychiatric symptoms, including psychosis, disorganized behavior, and catatonic symptoms. Immune suppressive treatment was still effective in most of these cases. Such cases present a difficult diagnostic challenge. These patients may receive unnecessary antipsychotic treatment because of the suspected schizophrenia, although they often suffer from serious extrapyramidal side effects. A few years ago there was a hypothesis that a small part of the patients who are treated with therapy-resistant schizophrenia may suffer from anti-NMDAR encephalitis, so they require a different kind of medication. Evidence from the latest publications did not confirm this hypothesis, although the connection between anti-NMDAR antibodies and

  20. A multi-matrix HILIC-MS/MS method for the quantitation of endogenous small molecule neurological biomarker N-acetyl aspartic acid (NAA).

    PubMed

    Sangaraju, Dewakar; Shahidi-Latham, Sheerin K; Burgess, Braydon L; Dean, Brian; Ding, Xiao

    2017-03-14

    A multi-matrix hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometric method (HILIC-MS/MS) was developed for the quantitation of N-Acetyl Aspartic acid (NAA) using stable isotope labeled internal standard, D3-NAA in various biological matrices such as human plasma, human CSF, mouse plasma, brain and spinal cord. A high throughput 96-well plate format supported liquid extraction (SLE) procedure was developed and used for sample preparation. Mass spectrometric analysis of NAA was performed using selected reaction monitoring transitions in positive electrospray ionization mode. As NAA is endogenously present, a surrogate matrix approach was used for quantitation of NAA and the method was qualified over linear calibration curve range of 0.01-10μg/mL. Intra and inter assay precision indicated by percent relative standard deviation (%RSD) was less than 7.1% for low, medium, medium high and high QCs. The accuracy of the method ranged from 92.6-107.0% of nominal concentration for within-run and between-run for the same QCs. Extraction recovery of NAA and D3-NAA was greater than 76%. Stability of NAA was established in the above biological matrices under bench top (RT, 5h), freeze thaw (-20±10°C, 3 cycles) and moues/human plasma sample collection (Wet ice, RT) conditions. HILIC-MS/MS method was then used to quantify and compare the NAA levels in human plasma and CSF of ALS patients versus control human subjects. NAA CSF levels in control human subjects (73.3±31.0ng/mL,N=10) were found to be slightly higher than ALS patients (46.1±22.6ng/mL, N=10) (P=0.04). No differences were observed in NAA plasma levels in human control subjects (49.7±13.8ng/mL,N=9) as compared to ALS patients (49.6±8.1ng/mL, N=10) (P=0.983). NAA endogenous concentrations in mouse plasma, brain and spinal cord were found to be 243.8±56.8ng/mL (N=6), 1029.8±115.2μg/g tissue weight (N=5) and 487.6±178.4μg/g tissue weight (N=5) respectively.

  1. The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis II. Amino Acids

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Stepka, W.; Benson, A. A.; Calvin, M.

    1948-05-25

    The radioactive amino acid's synthesized from C{sup 14}O{sub 2} by green algae both in the light and in the dark after CO{sub 2}-free preillumination have been separated and identified using paper chromatography and radioautography. The radioactive amino acids identified were aspartic acid, alanine and smaller amounts of 3- and 4-carbon amino acids. This finding as well as the total absence of radioactive glutamic acid substantiates the mechanism for reduction of CO{sub 2} previously postulated by members of this laboratory.

  2. Similarities between cysteinesulphinate transaminase and aspartate aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Recasens, M; Mandel, P

    1979-01-01

    A method for the purification of two cysteinesulphinate transaminases, A and B (EC 2.6.1), is described. These enzymes catalyse the conversion of cysteinesulphinic acid to beta-sulphinyl pyruvate. The final preparations are homogeneous by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectrofocusing. The molecular weight of the subunits is 41 000 for cysteinesulphinate transaminase A and 43 400 for B. Both enzymes are unspecific, as L-asparate, L-glutamate and L-cysteic acid serve as substrates in addition to L-cysteinesulphinic acid. Cysteinesulphinate transaminase A has a Km of 9.8 mM for cysteinesulphinic acid and 0.25 mM for aspartic acid, whereas the B enzyme has a Km of 6.5 mM for cysteinesulphinic acid and 1.4 mM for aspartic acid. The Vmax values of the A and B enzymes are respectively 7.1 and 6.2 mmol h-1 mg-1 protein for aspartic acid and 45 and 9.3 mmol h-1 mg-1 protein for cysteinesulphinic acid. Both enzymes exhibit maximum activity at pH 8.6. A high specific activity is found in optimal conditions for these two transaminases, the pI values being 9.06 and 5.70 for cysteinesulphinate transaminase A and B respectively. These results have been compared with those already obtained for purified aspartate aminotransferase. Similarities in the pathways of taurine and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) metabolism are discussed.

  3. Role of arginine 180 and glutamic acid 177 of ricin toxin A chain in enzymatic inactivation of ribosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, A; Welsh, P; Richardson, J; Robertus, J D

    1990-01-01

    The gene for ricin toxin A chain was modified by site-specific mutagenesis to change arginine 180 to alanine, glutamine, methionine, lysine, or histidine. Separately, glutamic acid 177 was changed to alanine and glutamic acid 208 was changed to aspartic acid. Both the wild-type and mutant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and, when soluble, purified and tested quantitatively for enzyme activity. A positive charge at position 180 was found necessary for solubility of the protein and for enzyme activity. Similarly, a negative charge with a proper geometry in the vicinity of position 177 was critical for ricin toxin A chain catalysis. When glutamic acid 177 was converted to alanine, nearby glutamic acid 208 could largely substitute for it. This observation provided valuable structural information concerning the nature of second-site mutations. Images PMID:1978925

  4. Synthesis of various 3-substituted 1,2,4-oxadiazole-containing chiral beta 3- and alpha-amino acids from Fmoc-protected aspartic acid.

    PubMed

    Hamzé, Abdallah; Hernandez, Jean-François; Fulcrand, Pierre; Martinez, Jean

    2003-09-19

    Various 3-substituted chiral 1,2,4-oxadiazole-containing Fmoc-beta(3)- and -alpha-amino acids were synthesized from Fmoc-(l or d)-Asp(OtBu)-OH and Fmoc-l-Asp-OtBu, respectively, in three steps (i.e., condensation of an aspartyl derivative with differentially substituted amidoximes, formation of the 1,2,4-oxadiazole, and cleavage of the tert-butyl ester). These compounds represent new series of nonnatural amino acids, which could be used in combinatorial synthesis. A simple protocol has been developed to generate the 1,2,4-oxadiazole ring. Indeed, common methods resulted in cleavage of the Fmoc group or required long reaction times. We found that sodium acetate in refluxing ethanol/water (86 degrees C) was a convenient and efficient catalyst to promote conversion of Fmoc-amino acyl amidoximes to 1,2,4-oxadiazoles, and this procedure proved to be compatible with Fmoc protection. It is shown that these compounds can be prepared without significant loss of enantiomerical purity. Furthermore, the alkaline conditions used to cleave the Fmoc protecting group from these compounds did not induce epimerization of their chiral center.

  5. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of a Copper-Binding Mutant of the Organomercurial Lyase MerB: Insight into the Key Role of the Active Site Aspartic Acid in Hg-Carbon Bond Cleavage and Metal Binding Specificity.

    PubMed

    Wahba, Haytham M; Lecoq, Lauriane; Stevenson, Michael; Mansour, Ahmed; Cappadocia, Laurent; Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien; Wilkinson, Kevin J; Sygusch, Jurgen; Wilcox, Dean E; Omichinski, James G

    2016-02-23

    In bacterial resistance to mercury, the organomercurial lyase (MerB) plays a key role in the detoxification pathway through its ability to cleave Hg-carbon bonds. Two cysteines (C96 and C159; Escherichia coli MerB numbering) and an aspartic acid (D99) have been identified as the key catalytic residues, and these three residues are conserved in all but four known MerB variants, where the aspartic acid is replaced with a serine. To understand the role of the active site serine, we characterized the structure and metal binding properties of an E. coli MerB mutant with a serine substituted for D99 (MerB D99S) as well as one of the native MerB variants containing a serine residue in the active site (Bacillus megaterium MerB2). Surprisingly, the MerB D99S protein copurified with a bound metal that was determined to be Cu(II) from UV-vis absorption, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, and electron paramagnetic resonance studies. X-ray structural studies revealed that the Cu(II) is bound to the active site cysteine residues of MerB D99S, but that it is displaced following the addition of either an organomercurial substrate or an ionic mercury product. In contrast, the B. megaterium MerB2 protein does not copurify with copper, but the structure of the B. megaterium MerB2-Hg complex is highly similar to the structure of the MerB D99S-Hg complexes. These results demonstrate that the active site aspartic acid is crucial for both the enzymatic activity and metal binding specificity of MerB proteins and suggest a possible functional relationship between MerB and its only known structural homologue, the copper-binding protein NosL.

  6. Administration of thimerosal to infant rats increases overflow of glutamate and aspartate in the prefrontal cortex: protective role of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate.

    PubMed

    Duszczyk-Budhathoki, Michalina; Olczak, Mieszko; Lehner, Malgorzata; Majewska, Maria Dorota

    2012-02-01

    Thimerosal, a mercury-containing vaccine preservative, is a suspected factor in the etiology of neurodevelopmental disorders. We previously showed that its administration to infant rats causes behavioral, neurochemical and neuropathological abnormalities similar to those present in autism. Here we examined, using microdialysis, the effect of thimerosal on extracellular levels of neuroactive amino acids in the rat prefrontal cortex (PFC). Thimerosal administration (4 injections, i.m., 240 μg Hg/kg on postnatal days 7, 9, 11, 15) induced lasting changes in amino acid overflow: an increase of glutamate and aspartate accompanied by a decrease of glycine and alanine; measured 10-14 weeks after the injections. Four injections of thimerosal at a dose of 12.5 μg Hg/kg did not alter glutamate and aspartate concentrations at microdialysis time (but based on thimerosal pharmacokinetics, could have been effective soon after its injection). Application of thimerosal to the PFC in perfusion fluid evoked a rapid increase of glutamate overflow. Coadministration of the neurosteroid, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS; 80 mg/kg; i.p.) prevented the thimerosal effect on glutamate and aspartate; the steroid alone had no influence on these amino acids. Coapplication of DHEAS with thimerosal in perfusion fluid also blocked the acute action of thimerosal on glutamate. In contrast, DHEAS alone reduced overflow of glycine and alanine, somewhat potentiating the thimerosal effect on these amino acids. Since excessive accumulation of extracellular glutamate is linked with excitotoxicity, our data imply that neonatal exposure to thimerosal-containing vaccines might induce excitotoxic brain injuries, leading to neurodevelopmental disorders. DHEAS may partially protect against mercurials-induced neurotoxicity.

  7. Oligo-aspartic acid conjugates with benzo[c][2,6]naphthyridine-8-carboxylic acid scaffold as picomolar inhibitors of CK2.

    PubMed

    Vahter, Jürgen; Viht, Kaido; Uri, Asko; Enkvist, Erki

    2017-02-28

    Structurally diverse inhibitors of the protein kinase CK2 are required for regulation of this ubiquitous protein to establish biological roles of the enzyme which catalyzes the phosphorylation of a vast number of substrate proteins. In this article we disclose a series of new bisubstrate inhibitors of CK2 that are structurally represented by the oligo(l-Asp) peptide conjugates of benzo[c][2,6]naphthyridine-8-carboxylic acid. This fragment originated from CX-4945, the first in class inhibitor taken to clinical trials. The most potent conjugates possessed two-digit picomolar affinity and clear selectivity for CK2α in a panel of 140 protein kinases. Labeling of the inhibitors with a fluorescent dye yielded probes for a fluorescence anisotropy-based binding/displacement assay which can be used for analysis of CK2 and precise determination of affinity of the highly potent (tight-binding) CK2-targeting inhibitors.

  8. Aspartic Acid 397 in Subunit B of the Na+-pumping NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase from Vibrio cholerae Forms Part of a Sodium-binding Site, Is Involved in Cation Selectivity, and Affects Cation-binding Site Cooperativity

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Michael E.; Juárez, Oscar; Cho, Jonathan; Barquera, Blanca

    2013-01-01

    The Na+-pumping NADH:quinone complex is found in Vibrio cholerae and other marine and pathogenic bacteria. NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase oxidizes NADH and reduces ubiquinone, using the free energy released by this reaction to pump sodium ions across the cell membrane. In a previous report, a conserved aspartic acid residue in the NqrB subunit at position 397, located in the cytosolic face of this protein, was proposed to be involved in the capture of sodium. Here, we studied the role of this residue through the characterization of mutant enzymes in which this aspartic acid was substituted by other residues that change charge and size, such as arginine, serine, lysine, glutamic acid, and cysteine. Our results indicate that NqrB-Asp-397 forms part of one of the at least two sodium-binding sites and that both size and charge at this position are critical for the function of the enzyme. Moreover, we demonstrate that this residue is involved in cation selectivity, has a critical role in the communication between sodium-binding sites, by promoting cooperativity, and controls the electron transfer step involved in sodium uptake (2Fe-2S → FMNC). PMID:24030824

  9. Structure of the O-polysaccharide of Proteus vulgaris O44: a new O-antigen that contains an amide of D-glucuronic acid with L-alanine.

    PubMed

    Toukach, Filip V; Perepelov, Andrei V; Bartodziejska, Beata; Shashkov, Alexander S; Blaszczyk, Aleksandra; Arbatsky, Nikolay P; Rozalski, Antoni; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2003-06-23

    The O-polysaccharide of Proteus vulgaris O44, strain PrK 67/57 was studied by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, including 2D COSY, TOCSY, ROESY, H-detected 1H, 13C HMQC, HMQC-TOCSY and HMBC experiments. The polysaccharide was found to contain an amide of D-glucuronic acid with L-alanine [D-GlcA6(L-Ala)], and the following structure of the linear pentasaccharide repeating unit was established: [structure: see text]. The structural data of the O-polysaccharide and the results of serological studies with P. vulgaris O44 O-antiserum showed that the strain studied is unique among Proteus bacteria, which is in agreement with its classification in a separate Proteus serogroup, O44.

  10. The sodium effect of Bacillus subtilis growth on aspartate.

    PubMed

    Whiteman, P; Marks, C; Freese, E

    1980-08-01

    aspH mutants of Bacillus subtilis have a constitutive aspartase activity and grow well on aspartate as sole carbon source. aspH aspT mutants, which are deficient in high affinity aspartate transport as a result of the aspT mutation, grow as well as aspH mutants in medium containing high concentrations of aspartate and Na+. This Na+ effect is not due to an enhancement of aspartate transport but is the result of increased cellular metabolism. The ability to grow rapidly in sodium aspartate is induced by prior growth in the presence of Na+. In potassium aspartate, the addition of arginine, citrulline, ornithine, delta 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylase or proline instead of Na+ also allows rapid growth; but in a mutant deficient in ornithine--oxo-acid aminotransferase, only pyrroline-carboxylate or proline can replace Na+. The amino acid pool of cells growing slowly in potassium aspartate contains proline at a low concentration which increases upon addition of proline (but not Na+) to the medium. Thus, Na+ addition does not increase the synthesis of proline, but proline or pyrroline-carboxylate acts similarly to Na+ either in preventing some inhibitory effect (by aspartate or the accumulating NH4+) or in overcoming some deficiency (e.g. in further proline metabolism.

  11. Systematic detection of BMAA (β-N-methylamino-l-alanine) and DAB (2,4-diaminobutyric acid) in mollusks collected in shellfish production areas along the French coasts.

    PubMed

    Réveillon, Damien; Séchet, Véronique; Hess, Philipp; Amzil, Zouher

    2016-02-01

    The neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) is naturally present in some microalgal species in the marine environment. The accumulation of BMAA has widely been observed in filter-feeding bivalves that are known to consume primary producers constituting the base of complex aquatic food webs. This study was performed to assess the occurrence of BMAA and isomers in mollusks collected from nine representative shellfish production areas located on the three French coasts (Channel, Atlantic and Mediterranean sites). The use of a highly selective and sensitive HILIC-MS/MS method, with D5DAB as internal standard, revealed the systematic detection of BMAA and DAB, in concentrations ranging from 0.20 to 6.7 μg g(-1) dry weight of digestive gland tissues of mollusks. While we detected BMAA in four strains of diatoms in a previous study, here BMAA was only detected in one diatom species previously not investigated out of the 23 microalgal species examined (belonging to seven classes). The concentrations of BMAA and DAB in mussels and oysters were similar at different sampling locations and despite the high diversity of phytoplankton populations that mollusks feed on at these locations. Only small variations of BMAA and DAB levels were observed and these were not correlated to any of the phytoplankton species reported. Therefore, extensive research should be performed on both origin and metabolism of BMAA in shellfish. The levels observed in this study are similar to those found in other studies in France or elsewhere. A previous study had related such levels to a cluster of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in the South of France; hence the widespread occurrence of BMAA in shellfish from all coasts in France found in this study suggests the need for further epidemiological and toxicological studies to establish the levels that are relevant for a link between the consumption of BMAA-containing foodstuffs and neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Improved detection of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine using N-hydroxysuccinimide ester of N-butylnicotinic acid for the localization of BMAA in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis).

    PubMed

    Andrýs, Rudolf; Zurita, Javier; Zguna, Nadezda; Verschueren, Klaas; De Borggraeve, Wim M; Ilag, Leopold L

    2015-05-01

    β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is an important non-protein amino acid linked to neurodegenerative diseases, specifically amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Because it can be transferred and bioaccumulated higher up the food chain, it poses significant public health concerns; thus, improved detection methods are of prime importance for the identification and management of these toxins. Here, we report the successful use of N-hydroxysuccinimide ester of N-butylnicotinic acid (C4-NA-NHS) for the efficient separation of BMAA from its isomers and higher sensitivity in detecting BMAA compared to the current method of choice using 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate (AQC) derivatization. Implementation of this efficient method allowed localization of BMAA in the non-visceral tissues of blue mussels, suggesting that more efficient depuration may be required to remove this toxin prior to consumption. This is a crucial method in establishing the absence or presence of the neurotoxic amino acid BMAA in food, environmental or biomedical samples.

  13. LC-MS/MS determination of the isomeric neurotoxins BMAA (beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine) and DAB (2,4-diaminobutyric acid) in cyanobacteria and seeds of Cycas revoluta and Lathyrus latifolius.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Thomas; Mönch, Bettina; Oppenhäuser, Steven; Luckas, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    Since diverse taxa of cyanobacteria has been linked to biosynthesis of BMAA, a controversy has arisen about the detection of neurotoxic amino acids in cyanobacteria. In this context, a novel LC-MS/MS method was developed for the unambiguous determination of beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) and 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) in cyanobacteria and selected plant seeds. Both neurotoxic and non-proteinogenic amino acids were analyzed without derivatization considering the total concentration of the free and protein-bound form. The investigation of overall 62 cyanobacterial samples of worldwide origin by application of this method revealed the absence of BMAA, whereas seeds of Cycas revoluta contained 6.96 microg g(-1) of free BMAA. In contrast, the isomer DAB was confirmed in 16 cyanobacterial samples in concentrations of 0.07-0.83 microg g(-1),whereof one sample is distributed as nutritional supplement. In addition, seeds of Lathyrus latifolius contained 4.21 microg g(-1) of free DAB. Limits of detection were for BMAA<1.0 microg g(-1) in the cyanobacterial matrix and<0.14 microg g(-1) in angiosperm seeds. DAB exhibits higher sensitivities of <0.06 microg g(-1) in cyanobacteria and <0.008 microg g(-1) in angiosperm seeds. The highly specific analysis method with increased detection sensitivity eliminates the disadvantages of derivatization-based methods to be discussed.

  14. Nanoparticle carriers based on copolymers of poly( l-aspartic acid co- l-lactide)-1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Siyuan; Wang, Huan; Liang, Xingjie; Hu, Liming; Li, Min; Wu, Yan

    2011-09-01

    A novel poly( l-aspartic) derivative (PAL-DPPE) containing polylactide and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DPPE) segments has been successfully synthesized. The chemical structures of the copolymers were confirmed by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), NMR (1H NMR, 13C NMR, 31P NMR), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed the formation of micelles of the PAL-DPPE copolymers. In order to estimate the feasibility as novel drug carriers, an anti-tumor model drug doxorubicin (DOX) was incorporated into polymeric micelles by double emulsion and nanoprecipitation method. The DOX-loaded micelle size, size distribution, and encapsulation efficiency (EE) were influenced by the feed weight ratio of the copolymer to DOX. In addition, in vitro release experiments of the DOX-loaded PAL-DPPE micelles exhibited that faster release in pH 5.0 than their release in pH 7.4 buffer. The poly( l-aspartic) derivative copolymer was proved to be an available carrier for the preparation of micelles for anti-tumor drug delivery.

  15. Analytical continuation in coupling constant method; application to the calculation of resonance energies and widths for organic molecules: Glycine, alanine and valine and dimer of formic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, P.; Matejčík, Š.; Mach, P.; Urban, J.; Paidarová, I.; Horáček, J.

    2013-06-01

    The method of analytic continuation in the coupling constant (ACCC) in combination with use of the statistical Padé approximation is applied to the determination of resonance energy and width of some amino acids and formic acid dimer. Standard quantum chemistry codes provide accurate data which can be used for analytic continuation in the coupling constant to obtain the resonance energy and width of organic molecules with a good accuracy. The obtained results are compared with the existing experimental ones.

  16. Prebiotic formation of polyamino acids in molten urea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mita, H.; Nomoto, S.; Terasaki, M.; Shimoyama, A.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2005-04-01

    It is important for research into the origins of life to elucidate polyamino acid formation under prebiotic conditions. Only a limited set of amino acids has been reported to polymerize thermally. In this paper we demonstrate a novel thermal polymerization mechanism in a molten urea of alkylamino acids (i.e. glycine, alanine, β-alanine, α-aminobutyric acid, valine, norvaline, leucine and norleucine), which had been thought to be incapable of undergoing thermal polymerization. Also, aspartic acid was found to polymerize in molten urea at a lower temperature than that at which aspartic acid alone had previously been thermally polymerized. Individual oligomers produced in heating experiments on urea-amino acid mixtures were analysed using a liquid chromatograph mass spectrometer. Major products in the reaction mixture were three different types of polyamino acid derivatives: N-carbamoylpolyamino acids, polyamino acids containing a hydantoin ring at the N-terminal position and unidentified derivatives with molecular weights that were greater by 78 than those of the corresponding peptide forms. The polymerization reaction occurred by taking advantage of the high polarity of molten urea as well as its dehydrating ability. Under the presumed prebiotic conditions employed here, many types of amino acids were thus revealed to undergo thermal polymerization.

  17. Amino acids in the Yamato carbonaceous chrondrite from Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimoyama, A.; Ponnamperuma, C.; Yanai, K.

    1979-01-01

    Evidence for the presence of amino acids of extraterrestrial origin in the Antarctic Yamato carbonaceous chrondrite is presented. Hydrolyzed and nonhydrolyzed water-extracted amino acid samples from exterior, middle and interior portions of the meteorite were analyzed by an amino acid analyzer and by gas chromatography of N-TFA-isopropyl amino acid derivatives. Nine protein and six nonprotein amino acids were detected in the meteorite at abundances between 34 and less than one nmole/g, with equal amounts in interior and exterior portions. Nearly equal abundances of the D and L enantiomers of alanine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid were found, indicating the abiotic, therefore extraterrestrial, origin of the amino acids. The Antarctic environment and the uniformity of protein amino acid abundances are discussed as evidence against the racemization of terrestrially acquired amino acids, and similarities between Yamato amino acid compositions and the amino acid compositions of the Murchison and Murray type II carbonaceous chrondrites are indicated.

  18. Determination of the neurotoxins BMAA (beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine) and DAB (alpha-,gamma-diaminobutyric acid) by LC-MSMS in Dutch urban waters with cyanobacterial blooms.

    PubMed

    Faassen, Elisabeth J; Gillissen, Frits; Zweers, Hans A J; Lürling, Miquel

    2009-01-01

    We aimed to determine concentrations of the neurotoxic amino acids beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) and alpha-,gamma-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) in mixed species scum material from Dutch urban waters that suffer from cyanobacterial blooms. BMAA and DAB were analysed in scum material without derivatization by LC-MSMS (liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry) using hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC). Our method showed high selectivity, good recovery of added compounds after sample extraction (86% for BMAA and 85% for DAB), acceptable recovery after sample hydrolysation (70% for BMAA and 56% for DAB) and acceptable precision. BMAA and DAB could be detected at an injected amount of 0.34 pmol. Free BMAA was detected in nine of the 21 sampled locations with a maximum concentration of 42 microg/g DW. Free DAB was detected in two locations with a maximum concentration of 4 microg/g DW. No protein-associated forms were detected. This study is the first to detect underivatized BMAA in cyanobacterial scum material using LC-MSMS. Ubiquity of BMAA in cyanobacteria scums of Dutch urban waters could not be confirmed, where BMAA and DAB concentrations were relatively low; however, co-occurrence with other cyanobacterial neurotoxins might pose a serious health risk including chronic effects from low-level doses.

  19. Neutral penta- and hexacoordinate silicon(IV) complexes containing two bidentate ligands derived from the alpha-amino acids (S)-alanine, (S)-phenylalanine, and (S)-tert-leucine.

    PubMed

    Cota, Smaranda; Beyer, Matthias; Bertermann, Rüdiger; Burschka, Christian; Götz, Kathrin; Kaupp, Martin; Tacke, Reinhold

    2010-06-11

    The neutral hexacoordinate silicon(IV) complex 6 (SiO(2)N(4) skeleton) and the neutral pentacoordinate silicon(IV) complexes 7-11 (SiO(2)N(2)C skeletons) were synthesized from Si(NCO)(4) and RSi(NCO)(3) (R = Me, Ph), respectively. The compounds were structurally characterized by solid-state NMR spectroscopy (6-11), solution NMR spectroscopy (6 and 10), and single-crystal X-ray diffraction (8 and 11 were studied as the solvates 8 x CH(3)CN and 11 x C(5)H(12) x 0.5 CH(3)CN, respectively). The silicon(IV) complexes 6 (octahedral Si-coordination polyhedron) and 7-11 (trigonal-bipyramidal Si-coordination polyhedra) each contain two bidentate ligands derived from an alpha-amino acid: (S)-alanine, (S)-phenylalanine, or (S)-tert-leucine. The deprotonated amino acids act as monoanionic (6) or as mono- and dianionic ligands (7-11). The experimental investigations were complemented by computational studies of the stereoisomers of 6 and 7.

  20. The role of helix 1 aspartates and salt bridges in the stability and conversion of prion protein.

    PubMed

    Speare, Jonathan O; Rush, Thomas S; Bloom, Marshall E; Caughey, Byron

    2003-04-04

    A key event in the pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies is the conversion of PrP-sen to PrP-res. Morrissey and Shakhnovich (Morrissey, M. P., and Shakhnovich, E. I. (1999) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 96, 11293-11298) proposed that the conversion mechanism involves critical interactions at helix 1 (residues 144-153) and that the helix is stabilized on PrP-sen by intra-helix salt bridges between two aspartic acid-arginine ion pairs at positions 144 and 148 and at 147 and 151, respectively. Mutants of the hamster prion protein were constructed by replacing the aspartic acids with either asparagines or alanines to destabilize the proposed helix 1 salt bridges. Thermal and chemical denaturation experiments using circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated the overall structures of the mutants are not substantially destabilized but appear to unfold differently. Cell-free conversion reactions performed using ionic denaturants, detergents, and salts (conditions unfavorable to salt bridge formation) showed no significant differences between conversion efficiencies of mutant and wild type proteins. Using conditions more favorable to salt bridge formation, the mutant proteins converted with up to 4-fold higher efficiency than the wild type protein. Thus, although spectroscopic data indicate the salt bridges do not substantially stabilize PrP-sen, the cell-free conversion data suggest that Asp-144 and Asp-147 and their respective salt bridges stabilize PrP-sen from converting to PrP-res.

  1. Atomic Layer Deposition of L-Alanine Polypeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yaqin; Li, Binsong; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Dunphy, Darren R.; Tsai, Andy; Tam, Siu-Yue; Fan, Hongyou Y.; Zhang, Hongxia; Rogers, David; Rempe, Susan; Atanassov, Plamen; Cecchi, Joseph L.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2014-10-30

    L-Alanine polypeptide thin films were synthesized via atomic layer deposition (ALD). Rather, instead of using an amino acid monomer as the precursor, an L-alanine amino acid derivatized with a protecting group was used to prevent self-polymerization, increase the vapor pressure, and allow linear cycle-by-cycle growth emblematic of ALD. Moreover, the successful deposition of a conformal polypeptide film has been confirmed by FTIR, TEM, and Mass Spectrometry, and the ALD process has been extended to polyvaline.

  2. The TadV Protein of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Is a Novel Aspartic Acid Prepilin Peptidase Required for Maturation of the Flp1 Pilin and TadE and TadF Pseudopilins†

    PubMed Central

    Tomich, Mladen; Fine, Daniel H.; Figurski, David H.

    2006-01-01

    The tad locus of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans encodes genes for the biogenesis of Flp pili, which allow the bacterium to adhere tenaciously to surfaces and form strong biofilms. Although tad (tight adherence) loci are widespread among bacterial and archaeal species, very little is known about the functions of the individual components of the Tad secretion apparatus. Here we characterize the mechanism by which the pre-Flp1 prepilin is processed to the mature pilus subunit. We demonstrate that the tadV gene encodes a prepilin peptidase that is both necessary and sufficient for proteolytic maturation of Flp1. TadV was also found to be required for maturation of the TadE and TadF pilin-like proteins, which we term pseudopilins. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we show that processing of pre-Flp1, pre-TadE, and pre-TadF is required for biofilm formation. Mutation of a highly conserved glutamic acid residue at position +5 of Flp1, relative to the cleavage site, resulted in a processed pilin that was blocked in assembly. In contrast, identical mutations in TadE or TadF had no effect on biofilm formation, indicating that the mechanisms by which Flp1 pilin and the pseudopilins function are distinct. We also determined that two conserved aspartic acid residues in TadV are critical for function of the prepilin peptidase. Together, our results indicate that the A. actinomycetemcomitans TadV protein is a member of a novel subclass of nonmethylating aspartic acid prepilin peptidases. PMID:16980493

  3. The Origin of Amino Acids in Lunar Regolith Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Glavin, Daniel P.; McLain, Hannah L.; Noble, Sarah K.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the amino acid content of seven lunar regolith samples returned by the Apollo 16 and Apollo 17 missions and stored under NASA curation since collection using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Consistent with results from initial analyses shortly after collection in the 1970s, we observed amino acids at low concentrations in all of the curated samples, ranging from 0.2 parts-per-billion (ppb) to 42.7 ppb in hot-water extracts and 14.5 ppb to 651.1 ppb in 6M HCl acid-vapor-hydrolyzed, hot-water extracts. Amino acids identified in the Apollo soil extracts include glycine, D- and L-alanine, D- and L-aspartic acid, D- and L-glutamic acid, D- and L-serine, L-threonine, and L-valine, all of which had previously been detected in lunar samples, as well as several compounds not previously identified in lunar regoliths: -aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), D-and L-amino-n-butyric acid (-ABA), DL-amino-n-butyric acid, -amino-n-butyric acid, -alanine, and -amino-n-caproic acid. We observed an excess of the L enantiomer in most of the detected proteinogenic amino acids, but racemic alanine and racemic -ABA were present in some samples.

  4. Prediction of binding modes between protein L-isoaspartyl (D-aspartyl) O-methyltransferase and peptide substrates including isomerized aspartic acid residues using in silico analytic methods for the substrate screening.

    PubMed

    Oda, Akifumi; Noji, Ikuhiko; Fukuyoshi, Shuichi; Takahashi, Ohgi

    2015-12-10

    Because the aspartic acid (Asp) residues in proteins are occasionally isomerized in the human body, not only l-α-Asp but also l-β-Asp, D-α-Asp and D-β-Asp are found in human proteins. In these isomerized aspartic acids, the proportion of D-β-Asp is the largest and the proportions of l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp found in human proteins are comparatively small. To explain the proportions of aspartic acid isomers, the possibility of an enzyme able to repair l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp is frequently considered. The protein L-isoaspartyl (D-aspartyl) O-methyltransferase (PIMT) is considered one of the possible repair enzymes for l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp. Human PIMT is an enzyme that recognizes both l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp, and catalyzes the methylation of their side chains. In this study, the binding modes between PIMT and peptide substrates containing l-β-Asp or D-α-Asp residues were investigated using computational protein-ligand docking and molecular dynamics simulations. The results indicate that carboxyl groups of both l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp were recognized in similar modes by PIMT and that the C-terminal regions of substrate peptides were located in similar positions on PIMT for both the l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp peptides. In contrast, for peptides containing l-α-Asp or D-β-Asp residues, which are not substrates of PIMT, the computationally constructed binding modes between PIMT and peptides greatly differed from those between PIMT and substrates. In the nonsubstrate peptides, not inter- but intra-molecular hydrogen bonds were observed, and the conformations of peptides were more rigid than those of substrates. Thus, the in silico analytical methods were able to distinguish substrates from nonsubstrates and the computational methods are expected to complement experimental analytical methods.

  5. Histidine-40 of ribonuclease T1 acts as base catalyst when the true catalytic base, glutamic acid-58, is replaced by alanine.

    PubMed

    Steyaert, J; Hallenga, K; Wyns, L; Stanssens, P

    1990-09-25

    Mechanisms for the ribonuclease T1 (RNase T1; EC 3.1.27.3) catalyzed transesterification reaction generally include the proposal that Glu58 and His92 provide general base and general acid assistance, respectively [Heinemann, U., & Saenger, W. (1982) Nature (London) 299, 27-31]. This view was recently challenged by the observation that mutants substituted at position 58 retain high residual activity; a revised mechanism was proposed in which His40, and not Glu58, is engaged in catalysis as general base [Nishikawa, S., Morioka, H., Kim, H., Fuchimura, K., Tanaka, T., Uesugi, S., Hakoshima, T., Tomita, K., Ohtsuka, E., & Ikehara, M. (1987) Biochemistry 26, 8620-8624]. To clarify the functional roles of His40, Glu58, and His92, we analyzed the consequences of several amino acid substitutions (His40Ala, His40Lys, His40Asp, Glu58Ala, Glu58Gln, and His92Gln) on the kinetics of GpC transesterification. The dominant effect of all mutations is on Kcat, implicating His40, Glu58, and His92 in catalysis rather than in substrate binding. Plots of log (Kcat/Km) vs pH for wild-type, His40Lys, and Glu58Ala RNase T1, together with the NMR-determined pKa values of the histidines of these enzymes, strongly support the view that Glu58-His92 acts as the base-acid couple. The curves also show that His40 is required in its protonated form for optimal activity of wild-type enzyme. We propose that the charged His40 participates in electrostatic stabilization of the transition state; the magnitude of the catalytic defect (a factor of 2000) from the His40 to Ala replacement suggests that electrostatic catalysis contributes considerably to the overall rate acceleration. For Glu58Ala RNase T1, the pH dependence of the catalytic parameters suggests an altered mechanism in which His40 and His92 act as base and acid catalyst, respectively. The ability of His40 to adopt the function of general base must account for the significant activity remaining in Glu58-mutated enzymes.

  6. N-acetyl-L-aspartic acid-N'-methylamide with side-chain orientation capable of external hydrogen bonding . Backbone and side-chain folding, studied at the DFT level of quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, J. C. P.; Chass, G. A.; Perczel, A.; Farkas, Ö.; Varro, A.; Torday, L. L.; Papp, J. Gy.; Csizmadia, I. G.

    2002-09-01

    In this study, we generated and analyzed the side-chain conformational potential energy hypersurfaces for each of the nine possible backbone conformers for N-acetyl-L-aspartic acid-N' methylamide. We found a total of 27 out of the 81 possible conformers optimized at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory. The relative energies, as well as the stabilization energies exerted by the side-chain on the backbone, have been calculated for each of the 27 optimized conformers at this level of theory. Various backbone-backbone (N H{\\cdot}{\\cdot}{\\cdot}O=C) and backbone-side-chain (N H{\\cdot}{\\cdot}{\\cdot}O=C; N H{\\cdot}{\\cdot}{\\cdot}OH) hydrogen bonds were analyzed. The appearance of the notoriously absent \\varepsilon_L backbone conformer may be attributed to such side-chain-backbone (SC/BB) and backbone-backbone (BB/BB) hydrogen bonds.

  7. Site-directed mutagenesis of human beta-adrenergic receptors: substitution of aspartic acid-130 by asparagine produces a receptor with high-affinity agonist binding that is uncoupled from adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, C M; Chung, F Z; Wang, C D; Venter, J C

    1988-01-01

    By using oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis, we have produced a point mutation (guanine to adenine) at nucleotide 388 of the gene for human beta-adrenergic receptor (beta AR) that results in a substitution of asparagine for the highly conserved aspartic acid at position 130 in the putative third transmembrane domain of the human beta AR ([Asn130]beta AR). We have examined the functional significance of this mutation in B-82 cells continuously expressing the mutant [Asn130]beta AR. The mutant [Asn130]beta AR displayed normal antagonist binding but unusually high-affinity agonist binding (5- to 10-fold higher than wild-type beta AR), consistent with a single class of high-affinity binding sites. The mutant beta AR displayed guanine nucleotide-sensitive changes in agonist affinity (3- to 5-fold shift) implying an interaction between the beta AR and the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein; however, the ability of guanine nucleotides to alter agonist affinity was attenuated. Addition of saturating concentrations of isoproterenol to cell cultures expressing mutant [Asn130]-beta ARs had no effect on intracellular levels of cAMP, indicating that the mutant beta AR is unable to affect stimulation of adenylate cyclase. These results indicate that substitution of the aspartic acid with asparagine at residue 130 of the human beta AR dissociates the well-characterized guanine nucleotide effects on agonist affinity from those on activation of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein and adenylate cyclase and suggests the existence of two distinct counterions for the amine portion of catecholamines that are associated with high- and low-affinity agonist binding states of beta AR. Images PMID:2840663

  8. Synthesis and characterization of bis-thiourea having amino acid derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhar, Imran; Yamin, Bohari M.; Hasbullah, Siti Aishah

    2016-11-01

    In this article four new symmetric bis-thiourea derivatives having amino acid linkers were reported with good yield. Isophthaloyl dichloride was used as spacer and L-alanine, L-aspartic acid, L-phenylalanine and L-glutamic acid were used as linkers. Bis-thiourea derivatives were prepared from relatively stable isophthaloyl isothiocyanate intermediate. Newly synthesized bis-thiourea derivatives were characterized by FTIR, H-NMR, 13C-NMR and CHNS-O elemental analysis techniques. Characterization data was in good agreement with the expected derivatives, hence confirmed the synthesis of four new derivatives of bis-thiourea having amino acids.

  9. Elucidation of matrix effects and performance of solid-phase extraction for LC-MS/MS analysis of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) and 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) neurotoxins in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Li, Aifeng; Fan, Hua; Ma, Feifei; McCarron, Pearse; Thomas, Krista; Tang, Xianghai; Quilliam, Michael A

    2012-03-07

    A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) was developed for the analysis of neurotoxins β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) and 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB), using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) scan mode. Oasis-MCX and Strata-X-C polymeric cation-exchange cartridges were used to clean extracts of cyanobacterial cultures, including two strains of Microcystis aeruginosa and one strain of Nostoc sp. The performance of the solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges for BMAA and DAB were evaluated using mixed standards and spiked cyanobacterial extracts, which demonstrated recoveries of BMAA and DAB ranging from 66% to 91%. Matrix effects in LC-MS/MS were evaluated, and while there was no effect on BMAA quantitation, suppression of DAB was found. Full scan (Q1) and enhanced product ion (EPI) monitoring showed that the DAB suppression may be due to closely eluting compounds, including lysine, histidine, arginine and three other compounds with [M + H](+) m/z of 88, 164 and 191. The procedures developed allow the sensitive and effective analysis of trace BMAA and DAB levels in cyanobacteria. While DAB was confirmed to be present, no BMAA was found in the cyanobacterial samples tested in the present study.

  10. Specificity of a wheat gluten aspartic proteinase.

    PubMed

    Bleukx, W; Brijs, K; Torrekens, S; Van Leuven, F; Delcour, J A

    1998-09-08

    The substrate and peptide bond specificities of a purified wheat gluten aspartic proteinase (GlAP) are studied. GlAP shows maximum gluten hydrolysing activity at pH 3.0. At this pH, especially the wheat high molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS) and to a lesser extent the low molecular weight glutenin subunits and gliadins are hydrolysed. GlAP has no obvious effect on albumins and globulins. In its action on oxidised insulin B-chain, GlAP forms eight peptides and has high specificity for peptide bonds located between amino acid residues with large hydrophobic side chains (Leu, Phe, Tyr) but the peptide bond Glu13-Ala14 is also hydrolysed. Although structurally quite similar to a barley aspartic proteinase, the peptide bond specificity of GlAP towards oxidised insulin B-chain resembles slightly more that of a cardoon aspartic proteinase, cardosin B. HMW-GS 7, purified from cultivar Galahad-77, is rapidly hydrolysed by GlAP. N-Terminal amino acid sequence data show that GlAP cleaves at least one Met-Ile peptide bond at the end of the N-terminal domain and two Val-Leu peptide bonds in the repetitive domain of HMW-GS 7.

  11. Replacement of glycine 232 by aspartic acid in the KdpA subunit broadens the ion specificity of the K(+)-translocating KdpFABC complex.

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, M; Fendler, K; Bamberg, E; Gassel, M; Epstein, W; Altendorf, K; Dröse, S

    2000-01-01

    Replacement of glycine residue 232 with aspartate in the KdpA subunit of the K(+)-translocating KdpFABC complex of Escherichia coli leads to a transport complex that has reduced affinity for K(+) and has lost the ability to discriminate Rb(+) ions (, J. Biol. Chem. 270:6678-6685). This glycine residue is the first in a highly conserved GGG motif that was aligned with the GYG sequence of the selectivity filter (P- or H5-loop) of K(+) channels (, Nature. 371:119-122). Investigations with the purified and reconstituted KdpFABC complex using the potential sensitive fluorescent dye DiSC(3)(5) and the "caged-ATP/planar bilayer method" confirm the altered ion specificity observed in uptake measurements with whole cells. In the absence of cations a transient current was observed in the planar bilayer measurements, a phenomenon that was previously observed with the wild-type enzyme and with another kdpA mutant (A:Q116R) and most likely represents the movement of a protein-fixed charge during a conformational transition. After addition of K(+) or Rb(+), a stationary current could be observed, representing the continuous pumping activity of the KdpFABC complex. In addition, DiSC(3)(5) and planar bilayer measurements indicate that the A:G232D Kdp-ATPase also transports Na(+), Li(+), and H(+) with a reduced rate. Similarities to mutations in the GYG motif of K(+) channels are discussed. PMID:10920013

  12. Differentiation of green, white, black, Oolong, and Pu-erh teas according to their free amino acids content.

    PubMed

    Alcázar, A; Ballesteros, O; Jurado, J M; Pablos, F; Martín, M J; Vilches, J L; Navalón, A

    2007-07-25

    In this paper, the differentiation of green, black, Oolong, white, and Pu-erh teas has been carried out according to their free amino acid contents. Alanine, arginine, asparagine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, isoleucine, histidine, leucine, phenylalanine, serine, theanine, threonine, and tyrosine have been determined by liquid chromatography with derivatization with o-phthalaldehyde and fluorescence detection. The chromatographic separation was achieved with a Hypersil ODS column and gradient elution. The amino acid contents were used as chemometric descriptors for classification purposes of different tea varieties. Principal component analysis, k-nearest neighbors, linear discriminant analysis, and artificial neural networks were applied to differentiate tea varieties. Using back-propagation multilayer perceptron artificial neural networks, 100% success in the classification was obtained. The most differentiating amino acids were glutamic acid, asparagine, serine, alanine, leucine, and isoleucine.

  13. PPAR{alpha} regulates the hepatotoxic biomarker alanine aminotransferase (ALT1) gene expression in human hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Thulin, Petra; Rafter, Ingalill; Stockling, Kenneth; Tomkiewicz, Celine; Norjavaara, Ensio; Aggerbeck, Martine; Hellmold, Heike; Ehrenborg, Ewa; Andersson, Ulf; Cotgreave, Ian; Glinghammar, Bjoern

    2008-08-15

    In this work, we investigated a potential mechanism behind the observation of increased aminotransferase levels in a phase I clinical trial using a lipid-lowering drug, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) {alpha} agonist, AZD4619. In healthy volunteers treated with AZD4619, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities were elevated without an increase in other markers for liver injury. These increases in serum aminotransferases have previously been reported in some patients receiving another PPAR{alpha} agonist, fenofibrate. In subsequent in vitro studies, we observed increased expression of ALT1 protein and mRNA in human hepatocytes after treatment with fenofibric acid. The PPAR effect on ALT1 expression was shown to act through a direct transcriptional mechanism involving at least one PPAR response element (PPRE) in the proximal ALT1 promoter, while no effect of fenofibrate and AZD4619 was observed on the ALT2 promoter. Binding of PPARs to the PPRE located at - 574 bp from the transcriptional start site was confirmed on both synthetic oligonucleotides and DNA in hepatocytes. These data show that intracellular ALT expression is regulated by PPAR agonists and that this mechanism might contribute to increased ALT activity in serum.

  14. N-methyl-D-aspartate, hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih) and gamma-aminobutyric acid conductances govern the risk of epileptogenesis following febrile seizures in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ouardouz, Mohamed; Lema, Pablo; Awad, Patricia N; Di Cristo, Graziella; Carmant, Lionel

    2010-04-01

    Febrile seizures are the most common types of seizure in children, and are generally considered to be benign. However, febrile seizures in children with dysgenesis have been associated with the development of temporal lobe epilepsy. We have previously shown in a rat model of dysgenesis (cortical freeze lesion) and hyperthermia-induced seizures that 86% of these animals developed recurrent seizures in adulthood. The cellular changes underlying the increased risk of epileptogenesis in this model are not known. Using whole cell patch-clamp recordings from CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells, we found a more pronounced increase in excitability in rats with both hyperthermic seizures and dysgenesis than in rats with hyperthermic seizures alone or dysgenesis alone. The change was found to be secondary to an increase in N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). Inversely, hyperpolarization-activated cation current was more pronounced in naïve rats with hyperthermic seizures than in rats with dysgenesis and hyperthermic seizures or with dysgenesis alone. The increase in GABAA-mediated inhibition observed was comparable in rats with or without dysgenesis after hyperthermic seizures, whereas no changes were observed in rats with dysgenesis alone. Our work indicates that in this two-hit model, changes in NMDA receptor-mediated EPSCs may facilitate epileptogenesis following febrile seizures. Changes in the hyperpolarization-activated cation currents may represent a protective reaction and act by damping the NMDA receptor-mediated hyperexcitability, rather than converting inhibition into excitation. These findings provide a new hypothesis of cellular changes following hyperthermic seizures in predisposed individuals, and may help in the design of therapeutic strategies to prevent epileptogenesis following prolonged febrile seizures.

  15. Pharmacokinetics, metabolism and excretion of [(14)C]-lanicemine (AZD6765), a novel low-trapping N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor channel blocker, in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jian; Zhou, Diansong; Grimm, Scott W; Bui, Khanh H

    2015-03-01

    1.(1S)-1-phenyl-2-(pyridin-2-yl)ethanamine (lanicemine; AZD6765) is a low-trapping N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) channel blocker that has been studied as an adjunctive treatment in major depressive disorder. The metabolism and disposition of lanicemine was determined in six healthy male subjects after a single intravenous infusion dose of 150 mg [(14)C]-lanicemine. 2.Blood, urine and feces were collected from all subjects. The ratios of Cmax and AUC(0-∞) of lanicemine to plasma total radioactivity were 84 and 66%, respectively, indicating that lanicemine was the major circulating component with T1/2 at 16 h. The plasma clearance of lanicemine was 8.3 L/h, revealing that lanicemine is a low-clearance compound. The mean recovery of radioactivity from urine was 93.8% of radioactive dose. 3.In urine samples, 10 metabolites of lanicemine were identified. Among which, an O-glucuronide conjugate (M1) was the most abundant metabolite (∼11% of the dose in excreta). In plasma, the circulatory metabolites were identified as a para-hydroxylated metabolite (M1), an O-glucuronide (M2), an N-carbamoyl glucuronide (M3) and an N-acetylated metabolite (M6). The average amount of each of metabolite was less than 4% of total radioactivity detected in plasma or urine. 4.In conclusion, lanicemine is a low-clearance compound. The unchanged drug and metabolites are predominantly eliminated via urinary excretion.

  16. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2016:chap 73. Read More Acute kidney failure Acute pancreatitis Alanine transaminase (ALT) blood test ALP - blood test B