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Sample records for alanine completely abolished

  1. Alanine substitution of conserved residues in the cytoplasmic tail of herpes simplex virus gB can enhance or abolish cell fusion activity and viral entry

    SciTech Connect

    Ruel, Nancy . E-mail: n-ruel@northwestern.edu; Zago, Anna . E-mail: anna_zago@acgtinc.com; Spear, Patricia G. . E-mail: p-spear@northwestern.edu

    2006-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoprotein B (gB) is one of the four viral glycoproteins required for viral entry and cell fusion and is highly conserved among herpesviruses. Mutants of HSV type 2 gB were generated by substituting conserved residues in the cytoplasmic tail with alanine or by deleting 41 amino acids from the C-terminus. Some of the mutations abolished cell fusion activity and also prevented transport of gB to the cell surface, identifying residues in the gB cytoplasmic tail that are critical for intracellular transport of this glycoprotein. These mutations also prevented production of infectious virus, possibly because the mutant forms of gB were not transported to the site of envelopment. Other mutations, particularly the deletion, significantly enhanced cell fusion activity. These mutations, as well as others described previously, identify regions of the gB cytoplasmic domain that modulate cell fusion activity.

  2. Targeted disruption of a single sex pheromone receptor gene completely abolishes in vivo pheromone response in the silkmoth

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Takeshi; Mitsuno, Hidefumi; Mikami, Akihisa; Uchino, Keiro; Tabuchi, Masashi; Zhang, Feng; Sezutsu, Hideki; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2015-01-01

    Male moths use species-specific sex pheromones to identify and orientate toward conspecific females. Odorant receptors (ORs) for sex pheromone substances have been identified as sex pheromone receptors in various moth species. However, direct in vivo evidence linking the functional role of these ORs with behavioural responses is lacking. In the silkmoth, Bombyx mori, female moths emit two sex pheromone components, bombykol and bombykal, but only bombykol elicits sexual behaviour in male moths. A sex pheromone receptor BmOR1 is specifically tuned to bombykol and is expressed in specialized olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) in the pheromone sensitive long sensilla trichodea of male silkmoth antennae. Here, we show that disruption of the BmOR1 gene, mediated by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), completely removes ORN sensitivity to bombykol and corresponding pheromone-source searching behaviour in male moths. Furthermore, transgenic rescue of BmOR1 restored normal behavioural responses to bombykol. Our results demonstrate that BmOR1 is required for the physiological and behavioural response to bombykol, demonstrating that it is the receptor that mediates sex pheromone responses in male silkmoths. This study provides the first direct evidence that a member of the sex pheromone receptor family in moth species mediates conspecific sex pheromone information for sexual behaviour. PMID:26047360

  3. Vibrational dynamics of crystalline L-alanine

    SciTech Connect

    Bordallo, H.N.; Eckert, J.; Barthes, M.

    1997-11-01

    The authors report a new, complete vibrational analysis of L-alanine and L-alanine-d{sub 4} which utilizes IINS intensities in addition to frequency information. The use of both isotopomers resulted in a self-consistent force field for and assignment of the molecular vibrations in L-alanine. Some details of the calculation as well as a comparison of calculated and observed IINS spectra are presented. The study clarifies a number of important issues on the vibrational dynamics of this molecule and presents a self-consistent force field for the molecular vibrations in crystalline L-alanine.

  4. Alanine transport across in vitro rabbit vagina.

    PubMed

    Hajjar, J J; Mroueh, A M

    1979-04-01

    Transmural flux of alanine across the vaginal epithelium of the rabbit is a specialized mechanism. There is a net serosal to mucosal translocation of the amino acid in the absence of a concentration gradient. Changes in reproductive cycle do not influence this mechanism but, in castrated animals, it is abolished. Transport properties of vaginal epithelium is important because of increasing utilization of intravaginal contraceptives. PMID:455986

  5. Substitution of conserved cysteine residues in Wheat streak mosaic virus HC-Pro abolishes virus transmission by the wheat curl mite

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Substitutions in the amino-terminal region of Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) HC-Pro were evaluated for effects on transmission by the wheat curl mite (Aceria tosichella Keifer). Alanine substitution at cysteine residues 16, 46 and 49 abolished vector transmission. Although alanine substitution a...

  6. Testosterone abolishes implicit subordination in social anxiety.

    PubMed

    Terburg, David; Syal, Supriya; Rosenberger, Lisa A; Heany, Sarah J; Stein, Dan J; Honk, Jack van

    2016-10-01

    Neuro-evolutionary theories describe social anxiety as habitual subordinate tendencies acquired through a recursive cycle of social defeat and submissive reactions. If so, the steroid hormone testosterone might be of therapeutic value, as testosterone is a main force behind implicit dominance drive in many species including humans. We combined these two theories to investigate whether the tendency to submit to the dominance of others is an implicit mechanism in social anxiety (Study-1), and whether this can be relieved through testosterone administration (Study-2). Using interactive eye-tracking we demonstrate that socially anxious humans more rapidly avert gaze from subliminal angry eye contact (Study-1). We replicate this effect of implicit subordination in social anxiety in an independent sample, which is subsequently completely abolished after a single placebo-controlled sublingual testosterone administration (Study-2). These findings provide crucial evidence for hormonal and behavioral treatment strategies that specifically target mechanisms of dominance and subordination in social anxiety. PMID:27448713

  7. Respiration of [14C]alanine by the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus.

    PubMed

    Chalot, M; Brun, A; Finlay, R D; Söderström, B

    1994-08-01

    The ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus efficiently took up exogenously supplied [14C]alanine and rapidly converted it to pyruvate, citrate, succinate, fumarate and to CO2, thus providing direct evidence for the utilisation of alanine as a respiratory substrate. [14C]alanine was further actively metabolised to glutamate, glutamine and aspartate. Exposure to aminooxyacetate completely suppressed 14CO2 evolution and greatly reduced the flow of carbon from [14C]alanine to tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates and amino acids, suggesting that alanine aminotransferase plays a pivotal role in alanine metabolism in Paxillus involutus. PMID:8082830

  8. Why Grants.gov Should Be Abolished

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolmertern, Carol

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author explains why Grants.gov, a web site for US Federal Government grants, should be abolished. Her recent attempt to submit a grant proposal to the National Institutes of Health is a case in point. She recounts how frustrating her experience was to the grant-submission process of Grants.gov. She points out that Grants.gov…

  9. Radiation abolishes inducer binding to lactose repressor.

    PubMed

    Gillard, Nathalie; Spotheim-Maurizot, Mélanie; Charlier, Michel

    2005-04-01

    The lactose operon functions under the control of the repressor-operator system. Binding of the repressor to the operator prevents the expression of the structural genes. This interaction can be destroyed by the binding of an inducer to the repressor. If ionizing radiations damage the partners, a dramatic dysfunction of the regulation system may be expected. We showed previously that gamma irradiation hinders repressor-operator binding through protein damage. Here we show that irradiation of the repressor abolishes the binding of the gratuitous inducer isopropyl-1-beta-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) to the repressor. The observed lack of release of the repressor from the complex results from the loss of the ability of the inducer to bind to the repressor due to the destruction of the IPTG binding site. Fluorescence measurements show that both tryptophan residues located in or near the IPTG binding site are damaged. Since tryptophan damage is strongly correlated with the loss of IPTG binding ability, we conclude that it plays a critical role in the effect. A model was built that takes into account the kinetic analysis of damage production and the observed protection of its binding site by IPTG. This model satisfactorily accounts for the experimental results and allows us to understand the radiation-induced effects. PMID:15799700

  10. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5118 Alanine. (a) Product. Alanine...

  11. Alteration of substrate specificity of alanine dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Puja; Aldeborgh, Hannah; Carlucci, Lauren; Walsh, Lauren; Wasserman, Jordan; Zhou, Edward; Lefurgy, Scott T.; Mundorff, Emily C.

    2015-01-01

    The l-alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) has a natural history that suggests it would not be a promising candidate for expansion of substrate specificity by protein engineering: it is the only amino acid dehydrogenase in its fold family, it has no sequence or structural similarity to any known amino acid dehydrogenase, and it has a strong preference for l-alanine over all other substrates. By contrast, engineering of the amino acid dehydrogenase superfamily members has produced catalysts with expanded substrate specificity; yet, this enzyme family already contains members that accept a broad range of substrates. To test whether the natural history of an enzyme is a predictor of its innate evolvability, directed evolution was carried out on AlaDH. A single mutation identified through molecular modeling, F94S, introduced into the AlaDH from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtAlaDH) completely alters its substrate specificity pattern, enabling activity toward a range of larger amino acids. Saturation mutagenesis libraries in this mutant background additionally identified a double mutant (F94S/Y117L) showing improved activity toward hydrophobic amino acids. The catalytic efficiencies achieved in AlaDH are comparable with those that resulted from similar efforts in the amino acid dehydrogenase superfamily and demonstrate the evolvability of MtAlaDH specificity toward other amino acid substrates. PMID:25538307

  12. Inhibitors of alanine racemase enzyme: a review.

    PubMed

    Azam, Mohammed Afzal; Jayaram, Unni

    2016-08-01

    Alanine racemase is a fold type III PLP-dependent amino acid racemase enzyme catalysing the conversion of l-alanine to d-alanine utilised by bacterial cell wall for peptidoglycan synthesis. As there are no known homologs in humans, it is considered as an excellent antibacterial drug target. The standard inhibitors of this enzyme include O-carbamyl-d-serine, d-cycloserine, chlorovinyl glycine, alaphosphin, etc. d-Cycloserine is indicated for pulmonary and extra pulmonary tuberculosis but therapeutic use of drug is limited due to its severe toxic effects. Toxic effects due to off-target affinities of cycloserine and other substrate analogs have prompted new research efforts to identify alanine racemase inhibitors that are not substrate analogs. In this review, an updated status of known inhibitors of alanine racemase enzyme has been provided which will serve as a rich source of structural information and will be helpful in generating selective and potent inhibitor of alanine racemase. PMID:26024289

  13. Loss of Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier 2 in the Liver Leads to Defects in Gluconeogenesis and Compensation via Pyruvate-Alanine Cycling.

    PubMed

    McCommis, Kyle S; Chen, Zhouji; Fu, Xiaorong; McDonald, William G; Colca, Jerry R; Kletzien, Rolf F; Burgess, Shawn C; Finck, Brian N

    2015-10-01

    Pyruvate transport across the inner mitochondrial membrane is believed to be a prerequisite for gluconeogenesis in hepatocytes, which is important for the maintenance of normoglycemia during prolonged food deprivation but also contributes to hyperglycemia in diabetes. To determine the requirement for mitochondrial pyruvate import in gluconeogenesis, mice with liver-specific deletion of mitochondrial pyruvate carrier 2 (LS-Mpc2(-/-)) were generated. Loss of MPC2 impaired, but did not completely abolish, hepatocyte conversion of labeled pyruvate to TCA cycle intermediates and glucose. Unbiased metabolomic analyses of livers from fasted LS-Mpc2(-/-) mice suggested that alterations in amino acid metabolism, including pyruvate-alanine cycling, might compensate for the loss of MPC2. Indeed, inhibition of pyruvate-alanine transamination further reduced mitochondrial pyruvate metabolism and glucose production by LS-Mpc2(-/-) hepatocytes. These data demonstrate an important role for MPC2 in controlling hepatic gluconeogenesis and illuminate a compensatory mechanism for circumventing a block in mitochondrial pyruvate import. PMID:26344101

  14. Catalytic Stereoinversion of L-Alanine to Deuterated D-Alanine.

    PubMed

    Moozeh, Kimia; So, Soon Mog; Chin, Jik

    2015-08-01

    A combination of an achiral pyridoxal analogue and a chiral base has been developed for catalytic deuteration of L-alanine with inversion of stereochemistry to give deuterated D-alanine under mild conditions (neutral pD and 25 °C) without the use of any protecting groups. This system can also be used for catalytic deuteration of D-alanine with retention of stereochemistry to give deuterated D-alanine. Thus a racemic mixture of alanine can be catalytically deuterated to give an enantiomeric excess of deuterated D-alanine. While catalytic deracemization of alanine is forbidden by the second law of thermodynamics, this system can be used for catalytic deracemization of alanine with deuteration. Such green and biomimetic approach to catalytic stereocontrol provides insights into efficient amino acid transformations. PMID:26119066

  15. Functional Characterization of Alanine Racemase from Schizosaccharomyces pombe: a Eucaryotic Counterpart to Bacterial Alanine Racemase

    PubMed Central

    Uo, Takuma; Yoshimura, Tohru; Tanaka, Naotaka; Takegawa, Kaoru; Esaki, Nobuyoshi

    2001-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe has an open reading frame, which we named alr1+, encoding a putative protein similar to bacterial alanine racemase. We cloned the alr1+ gene in Escherichia coli and purified the gene product (Alr1p), with an Mr of 41,590, to homogeneity. Alr1p contains pyridoxal 5′-phosphate as a coenzyme and catalyzes the racemization of alanine with apparent Km and Vmax values as follows: for l-alanine, 5.0 mM and 670 μmol/min/mg, respectively, and for d-alanine, 2.4 mM and 350 μmol/min/mg, respectively. The enzyme is almost specific to alanine, but l-serine and l-2-aminobutyrate are racemized slowly at rates 3.7 and 0.37% of that of l-alanine, respectively. S. pombe uses d-alanine as a sole nitrogen source, but deletion of the alr1+ gene resulted in retarded growth on the same medium. This indicates that S. pombe has catabolic pathways for both enantiomers of alanine and that the pathway for l-alanine coupled with racemization plays a major role in the catabolism of d-alanine. Saccharomyces cerevisiae differs markedly from S. pombe: S. cerevisiae uses l-alanine but not d-alanine as a sole nitrogen source. Moreover, d-alanine is toxic to S. cerevisiae. However, heterologous expression of the alr1+ gene enabled S. cerevisiae to grow efficiently on d-alanine as a sole nitrogen source. The recombinant yeast was relieved from the toxicity of d-alanine. PMID:11244061

  16. The unresolved puzzle why alanine extensions cause disease.

    PubMed

    Winter, Reno; Liebold, Jens; Schwarz, Elisabeth

    2013-08-01

    The prospective increase in life expectancy will be accompanied by a rise in the number of elderly people who suffer from ill health caused by old age. Many diseases caused by aging are protein misfolding diseases. The molecular mechanisms underlying these disorders receive constant scientific interest. In addition to old age, mutations also cause congenital protein misfolding disorders. Chorea Huntington, one of the most well-known examples, is caused by triplet extensions that can lead to more than 100 glutamines in the N-terminal region of huntingtin, accompanied by huntingtin aggregation. So far, nine disease-associated triplet extensions have also been described for alanine codons. The extensions lead primarily to skeletal malformations. Eight of these proteins represent transcription factors, while the nuclear poly-adenylate binding protein 1, PABPN1, is an RNA binding protein. Additional alanines in PABPN1 lead to the disease oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). The alanine extension affects the N-terminal domain of the protein, which has been shown to lack tertiary contacts. Biochemical analyses of the N-terminal domain revealed an alanine-dependent fibril formation. However, fibril formation of full-length protein did not recapitulate the findings of the N-terminal domain. Fibril formation of intact PABPN1 was independent of the alanine segment, and the fibrils displayed biochemical properties that were completely different from those of the N-terminal domain. Although intranuclear inclusions have been shown to represent the histochemical hallmark of OPMD, their role in pathogenesis is currently unclear. Several cell culture and animal models have been generated to study the molecular processes involved in OPMD. These studies revealed a number of promising future therapeutic strategies that could one day improve the quality of life for the patients. PMID:23612654

  17. 76 FR 81910 - Abolishment of Privacy Act System of Records

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-29

    ...In accordance with the Privacy Act of 1974, the Department of Agriculture (USDA) is abolishing an existing Forest Service Privacy Act system of records. A review of USDA/FS-9 Employee Assistance Program CONCERN has concluded that the system is no longer in effect and is therefore being...

  18. Formation of simple biomolecules from alanine in ocean by impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Y.; Sekine, T.; Furukawa, Y.; Kakegawa, T.; Kobayashi, T.

    2013-12-01

    The biomolecules on the Earth are thought either to have originated from the extraterrestrial parts carried with flying meteorites or to have been formed from the inorganic materials on the Earth through given energy. From the standpoint to address the importance of impact energy, it is required to simulate experimentally the chemical reactions during impacts, because violent impacts may have occurred 3.8-4.0 Gyr ago to create biomolecules initially. It has been demonstrated that shock reactions among ocean (H2O), atmospheric nitrogen, and meteoritic constitution (Fe) can induce locally reduction environment to form simple bioorganic molecules such as ammonia and amino acid (Nakazawa et al., 2005; Furukawa et al., 2009). We need to know possible processes for alanine how chemical reactions proceed during repeated impacts and how complicated biomolecules are formed. Alanine can be formed from glycine (Umeda et al., in preparation). In this study, we carried out shock recovery experiments at pressures of 4.4-5.7 GPa to investigate the chemical reactions of alanine. Experiments were carried out with a propellant gun. Stainless steel containers (30 mm in diameter, 30 mm long) with 13C-labeled alanine aqueous solution immersed in olivine or hematite powders were used as targets. Air gap was present in the sample room (18 mm in diameter, 2 mm thick) behind the sample. The powder, solution, and air represent meteorite, ocean, and atmosphere on early Earth, respectively. Two powders of olivine and hematite help to keep the oxygen fugacity low and high during experiments, respectively in order to investigate the effect of oxygen fugacity on chemical processes of alanine. The recovered containers, after cleaned completely, were immersed into liquid nitrogen to freeze sample solution and then we drilled on the impact surface to extract water-soluble run products using pure water. Thus obtained products were analyzed by LC/MS for four amino acids (glycine, alanine, valine, and

  19. Diminished but Not Abolished Effect of Two His351 Mutants of Anthrax Edema Factor in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Taoran; Zhao, Xinghui; Liu, Ju; Meng, Yingying; Feng, Yingying; Fang, Ting; Zhang, Jinlong; Yang, Xiuxu; Li, Jianmin; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Edema toxin (ET), which is composed of a potent adenylate cyclase (AC), edema factor (EF), and protective antigen (PA), is one of the major toxicity factors of Bacillus anthracis. In this study, we introduced mutations in full-length EF to generate alanine EF(H351A) and arginine EF(H351R) variants. In vitro activity analysis displayed that the adenylyl cyclase activity of both the mutants was significantly diminished compared with the wild-type EF. When the native and mutant toxins were administered subcutaneously in a mouse footpad edema model, severe acute swelling was evoked by wild-type ET, while the symptoms induced by mutant toxins were very minor. Systemic administration of these EF variants caused non-lethal hepatotoxicity. In addition, EF(H351R) exhibited slightly higher activity in causing more severe edema than EF(H351A). Our findings demonstrate that the toxicity of ET is not abolished by substitution of EF residue His351 by alanine or arginine. These results also indicate the potential of the mouse footpad edema model as a sensitive method for evaluating both ET toxicity and the efficacy of candidate therapeutic agents. PMID:26848687

  20. Diminished but Not Abolished Effect of Two His351 Mutants of Anthrax Edema Factor in a Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Taoran; Zhao, Xinghui; Liu, Ju; Meng, Yingying; Feng, Yingying; Fang, Ting; Zhang, Jinlong; Yang, Xiuxu; Li, Jianmin; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Edema toxin (ET), which is composed of a potent adenylate cyclase (AC), edema factor (EF), and protective antigen (PA), is one of the major toxicity factors of Bacillus anthracis. In this study, we introduced mutations in full-length EF to generate alanine EF(H351A) and arginine EF(H351R) variants. In vitro activity analysis displayed that the adenylyl cyclase activity of both the mutants was significantly diminished compared with the wild-type EF. When the native and mutant toxins were administered subcutaneously in a mouse footpad edema model, severe acute swelling was evoked by wild-type ET, while the symptoms induced by mutant toxins were very minor. Systemic administration of these EF variants caused non-lethal hepatotoxicity. In addition, EF(H351R) exhibited slightly higher activity in causing more severe edema than EF(H351A). Our findings demonstrate that the toxicity of ET is not abolished by substitution of EF residue His351 by alanine or arginine. These results also indicate the potential of the mouse footpad edema model as a sensitive method for evaluating both ET toxicity and the efficacy of candidate therapeutic agents. PMID:26848687

  1. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  2. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  3. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  4. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  5. 6-ketocholestanol abolishes the effect of the most potent uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Starkov, A A; Dedukhova, V I; Skulachev, V P

    1994-12-01

    The effect of a keto-derivative of cholesterol, namely, 6-ketocholestanol (5 alpha-cholestan-3 beta-ol-6-one; kCh) on the uncoupling of oxidation and phosphorylation by various uncouplers was studied in rat heart mitochondria. kCh was found to completely abolish the uncoupling effect (the increase in the respiration rate under the respiratory control conditions and the decrease in the membrane potential) caused of FCCP, CCCP and SF6847 and partially by TTFB at low concentrations of uncouplers. It was without effect on the uncoupling by PCP, DNP and palmitate. Carboxyatractylate, a specific inhibitor of the ADP/ATP-antiporter, was shown to almost completely abolish the uncoupling induced by palmitate and partially by low concentration of TTFB, PCP and DNP. Effects of high concentrations of all these uncouplers as well as of any concentrations of gramicidin proved to be kCh- and carboxyatractilate-insensitive. The data are discussed in terms of the hypothesis on the protein-mediated mechanism of the protonophorous uncoupling. PMID:7988694

  6. Effectiveness of Botulinum Toxin Administered to Abolish Acquired Nystagmus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leigh, R. John; Tomsak, Robert L.; Grant, Michael P.; Remler, Bernd F.; Yaniglos, Stacy S.; Lystad, Lisa; Dell'Osso, Louis F.

    1992-01-01

    We injected botulinum toxin into the horizontal rectus muscles of the right eyes of two patients who had acquired pendular nystagmus with horizontal, vertical, and torsional components. This treatment successfully abolished the horizontal component of the nystagmus in the injected eye in both patients for approximately 2 months. Both patients showed a small but measurable improvement of vision in the injected eye that may have been limited by coexistent disease of the visual pathways. The vertical and torsional components of the nystagmus persisted in both patients. In one patient, the horizontal component of nystagmus in the noninjected eye increased; we ascribe this finding to plastic-adaptive changes in response to paresis caused by the botulinum toxin. Such plastic-adaptive changes and direct side effects of the injections - such as diplopia and ptosis - may limit the effectiveness of botulinum toxin in the treatment of acquired nystagmus. Neither patient elected to repeat the botulinum treatment.

  7. Mediator protein mutations that selectively abolish activated transcription.

    PubMed

    Myers, L C; Gustafsson, C M; Hayashibara, K C; Brown, P O; Kornberg, R D

    1999-01-01

    Deletion of any one of three subunits of the yeast Mediator of transcriptional regulation, Med2, Pgd1 (Hrs1), and Sin4, abolished activation by Gal4-VP16 in vitro. By contrast, other Mediator functions, stimulation of basal transcription and of TFIIH kinase activity, were unaffected. A different but overlapping Mediator subunit dependence was found for activation by Gcn4. The genetic requirements for activation in vivo were closely coincident with those in vitro. A whole genome expression profile of a Deltamed2 strain showed diminished transcription of a subset of inducible genes but only minor effects on "basal" transcription. These findings make an important connection between transcriptional activation in vitro and in vivo, and identify Mediator as a "global" transcriptional coactivator. PMID:9874773

  8. Prolonged inhibition of bacterial protein synthesis abolishes Salmonella invasion.

    PubMed Central

    MacBeth, K J; Lee, C A

    1993-01-01

    We have found that prolonged inhibition of bacterial protein synthesis abolishes the ability of Salmonella typhimurium to enter HEp-2 cells. Our results suggest that an essential invasion factor has a functional half-life that is seen as a gradual loss of invasiveness in the absence of protein synthesis. Therefore, Salmonella invasiveness appears to be a transient phenotype that is lost unless protein synthesis is maintained. This finding may explain why salmonellae grown to stationary phase lose their ability to enter cultured cells. In addition, a short-lived capacity to enter cells may be important during infection so that bacterial invasiveness is limited to certain times and host sites during pathogenesis. PMID:8454361

  9. Earthworms accumulate alanine in response to drought.

    PubMed

    Holmstrup, Martin; Slotsbo, Stine; Henriksen, Per G; Bayley, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Earthworms have ecologically significant functions in tropical and temperate ecosystems and it is therefore important to understand how these animals survive during drought. In order to explore the physiological responses to dry conditions, we simulated a natural drought incident in a laboratory trial exposing worms in slowly drying soil for about one month, and then analyzed the whole-body contents of free amino acids (FAAs). We investigated three species forming estivation chambers when soils dry out (Aporrectodea tuberculata, Aporrectodea icterica and Aporrectodea longa) and one species that does not estivate during drought (Lumbricus rubellus). Worms subjected to drought conditions (< -2MPa) substantially increased the concentration of FAAs and in particular alanine that was significantly upregulated in all tested species. Alanine was the most important FAA reaching 250-650μmolg(-1) dry weight in dehydrated Aporrectodea species and 300μmolg(-1) dry weight in L. rubellus. Proline was only weakly upregulated in some species as were a few other FAAs. Species forming estivation chambers (Aporrectodea spp.) did not show a better ability to conserve body water than the non-estivating species (L. rubellus) at the same drought level. These results suggest that the accumulation of alanine is an important adaptive trait in drought tolerance of earthworms in general. PMID:27107492

  10. Placental Growth Factor Administration Abolishes Placental Ischemia-Induced Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Spradley, Frank T; Tan, Adelene Y; Joo, Woo S; Daniels, Garrett; Kussie, Paul; Karumanchi, S Ananth; Granger, Joey P

    2016-04-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-specific disorder of new-onset hypertension. Unfortunately, the most effective treatment is early delivery of the fetus and placenta. Placental ischemia appears central to the pathogenesis of preeclampsia because placental ischemia/hypoxia induced in animals by reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) or in humans stimulates release of hypertensive placental factors into the maternal circulation. The anti-angiogenic factor soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1), which antagonizes and reduces bioavailable vascular endothelial growth factor and placental growth factor (PlGF), is elevated in RUPP rats and preeclampsia. Although PlGF and vascular endothelial growth factor are both natural ligands for sFlt-1, vascular endothelial growth factor also has high affinity to VEGFR2 (Flk-1) causing side effects like edema. PlGF is specific for sFlt-1. We tested the hypothesis that PlGF treatment reduces placental ischemia-induced hypertension by antagonizing sFlt-1 without adverse consequences to the mother or fetus. On gestational day 14, rats were randomized to 4 groups: normal pregnant or RUPP±infusion of recombinant human PlGF (180 μg/kg per day; AG31, a purified, recombinant human form of PlGF) for 5 days via intraperitoneal osmotic minipumps. On day 19, mean arterial blood pressure and plasma sFlt-1 were higher and glomerular filtration rate lower in RUPP than normal pregnant rats. Infusion of recombinant human PlGF abolished these changes seen with RUPP along with reducing oxidative stress. These data indicate that the increased sFlt-1 and reduced PlGF resulting from placental ischemia contribute to maternal hypertension. Our novel finding that recombinant human PlGF abolishes placental ischemia-induced hypertension, without major adverse consequences, suggests a strong therapeutic potential for this growth factor in preeclampsia. PMID:26831193

  11. Requirement for alanine in the amino acid control of deprivation-induced protein degradation in liver.

    PubMed Central

    Pösö, A R; Mortimore, G E

    1984-01-01

    Protein degradation in liver is actively controlled by a small group of inhibitory amino acids--leucine, tyrosine (or phenylalanine), glutamine, proline, histidine, tryptophan, and methionine. Other evidence, however, suggests that one or more of the remaining 12 noninhibitory amino acids is also required for suppression of proteolysis at normal concentrations. This question was investigated in livers of fed rats perfused in the single-pass mode. The deletion of alanine at normal (1x), but not at 4x or 10x normal, plasma amino acid concentrations evoked a near-maximal acceleration of protein degradation. No other noninhibitory amino acid was effective. Because alanine alone was not directly inhibitory and its omission was not associated with a decrease in inhibitory amino acid pools, alanine was presumed to act as a coregulator in the expression of inhibitory activity. When tested alone, the inhibitory group was as effective as the complete mixture at 0.5x and 4x levels, but it lost its suppressive ability within a narrow zone of concentration centered slightly above 1x. The addition of 1x (0.48 mM) alanine completely restored the inhibition. Pyruvate and lactate could be effectively substituted, but only at concentrations 10-20 times greater than that of alanine. These, together with earlier findings, indicate the existence of a regulatory complex that recognizes specific amino acids and transmits positive and negative signals to proteolytic sites. The results also suggest that alanine can provide an important regulatory link between energy demands and protein degradation. PMID:6589593

  12. Deep brain stimulation abolishes slowing of reactions to unlikely stimuli.

    PubMed

    Antoniades, Chrystalina A; Bogacz, Rafal; Kennard, Christopher; FitzGerald, James J; Aziz, Tipu; Green, Alexander L

    2014-08-13

    The cortico-basal-ganglia circuit plays a critical role in decision making on the basis of probabilistic information. Computational models have suggested how this circuit could compute the probabilities of actions being appropriate according to Bayes' theorem. These models predict that the subthalamic nucleus (STN) provides feedback that normalizes the neural representation of probabilities, such that if the probability of one action increases, the probabilities of all other available actions decrease. Here we report the results of an experiment testing a prediction of this theory that disrupting information processing in the STN with deep brain stimulation should abolish the normalization of the neural representation of probabilities. In our experiment, we asked patients with Parkinson's disease to saccade to a target that could appear in one of two locations, and the probability of the target appearing in each location was periodically changed. When the stimulator was switched off, the target probability affected the reaction times (RT) of patients in a similar way to healthy participants. Specifically, the RTs were shorter for more probable targets and, importantly, they were longer for the unlikely targets. When the stimulator was switched on, the patients were still faster for more probable targets, but critically they did not increase RTs as the target was becoming less likely. This pattern of results is consistent with the prediction of the model that the patients on DBS no longer normalized their neural representation of prior probabilities. We discuss alternative explanations for the data in the context of other published results. PMID:25122887

  13. Medial PFC Damage Abolishes the Self-reference Effect

    PubMed Central

    Philippi, Carissa L.; Duff, Melissa C.; Denburg, Natalie L.; Tranel, Daniel; Rudrauf, David

    2012-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies suggest that the medial PFC (mPFC) is a key component of a large-scale neural system supporting a variety of self-related processes. However, it remains unknown whether the mPFC is critical for such processes. In this study, we used a human lesion approach to examine this question. We administered a standard trait judgment paradigm [Kelley, W. M., Macrae, C. N., Wyland, C. L., Caglar, S., Inati, S., & Heatherton, T. F. Finding the self? An event-related fMRI study. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 14, 785–794, 2002] to patients with focal brain damage to the mPFC. The self-reference effect (SRE), a memory advantage conferred by self-related processing, served as a measure of intact self-processing ability. We found that damage to the mPFC abolished the SRE. The results demonstrate that the mPFC is necessary for the SRE and suggest that this structure is important for self-referential processing and the neural representation of self. PMID:21942762

  14. Short communication: Pasteurization of milk abolishes bovine herpesvirus 4 infectivity.

    PubMed

    Bona, C; Dewals, B; Wiggers, L; Coudijzer, K; Vanderplasschen, A; Gillet, L

    2005-09-01

    Bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) is a gammaherpesvirus highly prevalent in the cattle population that has been isolated from the milk and the serum of healthy infected cows. Several studies reported the sensitivity and the permissiveness of some human cells to BoHV-4 infection. Moreover, our recent study demonstrated that some human cells sensitive but not permissive to BoHV-4 support a persistent infection protecting them from tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced apoptosis. Together, these observations suggested that BoHV-4 could represent a danger for public health. To evaluate the risk of human infection by BoHV-4 through milk or serum derivatives, we investigated the resistance of BoHV-4 to the mildest thermal treatments usually applied to these products. The results demonstrated that milk pasteurization and thermal decomplementation of serum abolish BoHV-4 infectivity by inactivation of its property to enter permissive cells. Consequently, our results demonstrate that these treatments drastically reduce the risk of human infection by BoHV-4 through treated milk or serum derivatives. PMID:16107396

  15. The effect of β-alanine supplementation on cycling time trials of different length.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, Phillip M; Minahan, Clare L

    2016-10-01

    The varying results reported in response to β-alanine supplementation may be related to the duration and nature of the exercise protocol employed. We investigated the effects of β-alanine supplementation on a wide range of cycling performance tests in order to produce a clear concise set of criteria for its efficacy. Fourteen trained cyclists (Age = 24.8 ± 6.7 years; VO2max = 65.4 ± 10.2 mL·kg·min(-1)) participated in this placebo-controlled, double-blind study. Prior to supplementation, subjects completed two (familiarization and baseline) supramaximal cycling bouts until exhaustion (120% pre-supplementation VO2max) and two 1-, 4- and 10-km cycling time trial (TT). Subjects then supplemented orally for 4 weeks with 6.4 g/d placebo or β-alanine and repeated the battery of performance tests. Blood lactate was measured pre-exercise, post-exercise and 5  min post-exercise. β-alanine supplementation elicited significant increases in time to exhaustion (TTE) (17.6 ± 11.5 s; p = 0.013, effect compared with placebo) and was likely to be beneficial to 4-km TT performance time (-7.8 ± 8.1 s; 94% likelihood), despite not being statistically different (p = 0.060). Performance times in the 1- and 10-km TT were not affected by treatment. For the highly trained cyclists in the current study, β-alanine supplementation significantly extended supramaximal cycling TTE and may have provided a worthwhile improvement to 4-km TT performance. However, 1- and 10-km cycling TT performance appears to be unaffected by β-alanine supplementation. PMID:26652037

  16. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from Streptococcus mutans

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yong-Zhi; Sheng, Yu; Li, Lan-Fen; Tang, De-Wei; Liu, Xiang-Yu; Zhao, Xiaojun; Liang, Yu-He Su, Xiao-Dong

    2007-09-01

    A potential target for antibiotic drug design, d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from S. mutans, was expressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution. d-Alanine-d-alanine ligase is encoded by the gene ddl (SMU-599) in Streptococcus mutans. This ligase plays a very important role in cell-wall biosynthesis and may be a potential target for drug design. To study the structure and function of this ligase, the gene ddl was amplified from S. mutans genomic DNA and cloned into the expression vector pET28a. The protein was expressed in soluble form in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3). Homogeneous protein was obtained using a two-step procedure consisting of Ni{sup 2+}-chelating and size-exclusion chromatography. Purified protein was crystallized and the cube-shaped crystal diffracted to 2.4 Å. The crystal belongs to space group P3{sub 1}21 or P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 79.50, c = 108.97 Å. There is one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  17. Racemization of alanine by the alanine racemases from Salmonella typhimurium and Bacillus stearothermophilus: energetic reaction profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Faraci, W.S.; Walsh, C.T.

    1988-05-03

    Alanine racemases are bacterial pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) dependent enzymes providing D-alanine as an essential building block for biosynthesis of the peptidoglycan layer of the cell wall. Two isozymic alanine racemases, encoded by the dadB gene and the alr gene, from the Gram-negative mesophilic Salmonella typhimurium and one from the Gram-positive thermophilic Bacillus stearothermophilus have been examined for the racemization mechanism. Substrate deuterium isotope effects and solvent deuterium isotope effects have been measured in both L ..-->.. D and D..-->.. L directions for all three enzymes to assess the degree to which abstraction of the ..cap alpha..-proton or protonation of substrate PLP carbanion is limiting in catalysis. Additionally, experiments measuring internal return of ..cap alpha..-/sup 3/H from substrate to product and solvent exchange/substrate conversion experiments in /sup 3/H/sub 2/O have been used with each enzyme to examine the partitioning of substrate PLP carbanion intermediates and to obtain the relative heights of kinetically significant energy barriers in alanine racemase catalysis.

  18. International society of sports nutrition position stand: Beta-Alanine.

    PubMed

    Trexler, Eric T; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Stout, Jeffrey R; Hoffman, Jay R; Wilborn, Colin D; Sale, Craig; Kreider, Richard B; Jäger, Ralf; Earnest, Conrad P; Bannock, Laurent; Campbell, Bill; Kalman, Douglas; Ziegenfuss, Tim N; Antonio, Jose

    2015-01-01

    The International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) provides an objective and critical review of the mechanisms and use of beta-alanine supplementation. Based on the current available literature, the conclusions of the ISSN are as follows: 1) Four weeks of beta-alanine supplementation (4-6 g daily) significantly augments muscle carnosine concentrations, thereby acting as an intracellular pH buffer; 2) Beta-alanine supplementation currently appears to be safe in healthy populations at recommended doses; 3) The only reported side effect is paraesthesia (tingling), but studies indicate this can be attenuated by using divided lower doses (1.6 g) or using a sustained-release formula; 4) Daily supplementation with 4 to 6 g of beta-alanine for at least 2 to 4 weeks has been shown to improve exercise performance, with more pronounced effects in open end-point tasks/time trials lasting 1 to 4 min in duration; 5) Beta-alanine attenuates neuromuscular fatigue, particularly in older subjects, and preliminary evidence indicates that beta-alanine may improve tactical performance; 6) Combining beta-alanine with other single or multi-ingredient supplements may be advantageous when supplementation of beta-alanine is high enough (4-6 g daily) and long enough (minimum 4 weeks); 7) More research is needed to determine the effects of beta-alanine on strength, endurance performance beyond 25 min in duration, and other health-related benefits associated with carnosine. PMID:26175657

  19. Alanine aminotransferase controls seed dormancy in barley.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kazuhiro; Yamane, Miki; Yamaji, Nami; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Tagiri, Akemi; Schwerdt, Julian G; Fincher, Geoffrey B; Matsumoto, Takashi; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Komatsuda, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Dormancy allows wild barley grains to survive dry summers in the Near East. After domestication, barley was selected for shorter dormancy periods. Here we isolate the major seed dormancy gene qsd1 from wild barley, which encodes an alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT). The seed dormancy gene is expressed specifically in the embryo. The AlaAT isoenzymes encoded by the long and short dormancy alleles differ in a single amino acid residue. The reduced dormancy allele Qsd1 evolved from barleys that were first domesticated in the southern Levant and had the long dormancy qsd1 allele that can be traced back to wild barleys. The reduced dormancy mutation likely contributed to the enhanced performance of barley in industrial applications such as beer and whisky production, which involve controlled germination. In contrast, the long dormancy allele might be used to control pre-harvest sprouting in higher rainfall areas to enhance global adaptation of barley. PMID:27188711

  20. Alanine aminotransferase controls seed dormancy in barley

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Kazuhiro; Yamane, Miki; Yamaji, Nami; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Tagiri, Akemi; Schwerdt, Julian G.; Fincher, Geoffrey B.; Matsumoto, Takashi; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Komatsuda, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Dormancy allows wild barley grains to survive dry summers in the Near East. After domestication, barley was selected for shorter dormancy periods. Here we isolate the major seed dormancy gene qsd1 from wild barley, which encodes an alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT). The seed dormancy gene is expressed specifically in the embryo. The AlaAT isoenzymes encoded by the long and short dormancy alleles differ in a single amino acid residue. The reduced dormancy allele Qsd1 evolved from barleys that were first domesticated in the southern Levant and had the long dormancy qsd1 allele that can be traced back to wild barleys. The reduced dormancy mutation likely contributed to the enhanced performance of barley in industrial applications such as beer and whisky production, which involve controlled germination. In contrast, the long dormancy allele might be used to control pre-harvest sprouting in higher rainfall areas to enhance global adaptation of barley. PMID:27188711

  1. Dithranol abolishes UCH-L1 immunoreactivity in the nerve fibers of the rat orofacial skin.

    PubMed

    Orojan, Ivan; Szigeti, Csaba; Varszegi, Szilvia; Dobo, Endre; Gulya, Karoly

    2006-11-22

    Dithranol has been used to treat psoriasis for decades. Although its beneficial effect may involve the induction of cutaneous inflammation, and inflammation often leads to damages in nerve fibers, these alterations are not well documented. Therefore, we investigated the effects of dithranol on the immunohistochemical characteristics of the cutaneous nerve fibers in the rat skin. Epidermal nerve fiber staining was achieved with ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) immunohistochemistry in the orofacial skin of control rats, rats treated with (a) dithranol for 5 days, (b) corticosteroid for 5 days following dithranol treatment for 5 days, and (c) corticosteroid for 5 days. The results revealed a complete loss of UCH-L1 immunoreactivity in the dithranol-treated animals. Topical application of corticosteroid onto the inflamed skin for 5 days reversed this effect: the UCH-L1 immunoreactivity was almost completely restored. Steroid treatment for 5 days did not change the appearance of the UCH-L1-immunoreactive nerve fibers. These findings were supported by Western blot analyses. We conclude that dithranol, incidentally similarly to psoriasis, causes inflammation and abolishes UCH-L1 immunoreactivity in the rat orofacial skin in a corticosteroid-reversible manner. This phenomenon may be due to the ability of dithranol to cause oxidative damage to the UCH-L1 protein, and to the antioxidant activity of the corticosteroids countering this effect. PMID:17011532

  2. 76 FR 70321 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Abolishment of Cumberland, ME, as a Nonappropriated Fund Federal Wage...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ... Personnel Management (OPM) issued an interim rule (76 FR 31785) to abolish the Cumberland, Maine.... 5343, the interim rule published on June 2, 2011, amending 5 CFR part 532 (76 FR 31785) is adopted as... RIN 3206--AM38 Prevailing Rate Systems; Abolishment of Cumberland, ME, as a Nonappropriated...

  3. 20 CFR 1.5 - When was the former Bureau of Employees' Compensation abolished?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...' Compensation abolished? 1.5 Section 1.5 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS... various workers' compensation programs enumerated in § 1.2, except the Black Lung Benefits Program and the... Employees' Compensation abolished? By Secretary of Labor's Order issued September 23, 1974 (39 FR...

  4. Comparison of EPR response of alanine and Gd₂O₃-alanine dosimeters exposed to TRIGA Mainz reactor.

    PubMed

    Marrale, M; Schmitz, T; Gallo, S; Hampel, G; Longo, A; Panzeca, S; Tranchina, L

    2015-12-01

    In this work we report some preliminary results regarding the analysis of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) response of alanine pellets and alanine pellets added with gadolinium used for dosimetry at the TRIGA research reactor in Mainz, Germany. Two set-ups were evaluated: irradiation inside PMMA phantom and irradiation inside boric acid phantom. We observed that the presence of Gd2O3 inside alanine pellets increases the EPR signal by a factor of 3.45 and 1.24 in case of PMMA and boric acid phantoms, respectively. We can conclude that in the case of neutron beam with a predominant thermal neutron component the addition of gadolinium oxide can significantly improve neutron sensitivity of alanine pellets. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of both response of alanine and Gd-added alanine pellets with FLUKA code were performed and a good agreement was achieved for pure alanine dosimeters. For Gd2O3-alanine deviations between MC simulations and experimental data were observed and discussed. PMID:26315099

  5. β-alanine supplementation improves isometric endurance of the knee extensor muscles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We examined the effect of four weeks of β-alanine supplementation on isometric endurance of the knee extensors at 45% maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). Methods Thirteen males (age 23 ± 6 y; height 1.80 ± 0.05 m; body mass 81.0 ± 10.5 kg), matched for pre-supplementation isometric endurance, were allocated to either a placebo (n = 6) or β-alanine (n = 7; 6.4 g·d-1 over 4 weeks) supplementation group. Participants completed an isometric knee extension test (IKET) to fatigue, at an intensity of 45% MVIC, before and after supplementation. In addition, two habituation tests were completed in the week prior to the pre-supplementation test and a further practice test was completed in the week prior to the post-supplementation test. MVIC force, IKET hold-time, and impulse generated were recorded. Results IKET hold-time increased by 9.7 ± 9.4 s (13.2%) and impulse by 3.7 ± 1.3 kN·s-1 (13.9%) following β-alanine supplementation. These changes were significantly greater than those in the placebo group (IKET: t(11) = 2.9, p ≤0.05; impulse: t(11) = 3.1, p ≤ 0.05). There were no significant changes in MVIC force in either group. Conclusion Four weeks of β-alanine supplementation at 6.4 g·d-1 improved endurance capacity of the knee extensors at 45% MVIC, which most likely results from improved pH regulation within the muscle cell as a result of elevated muscle carnosine levels. PMID:22697405

  6. Synthesis of beta-hydroxy-alpha-amino acids with a reengineered alanine racemase.

    PubMed

    Fesko, Kateryna; Giger, Lars; Hilvert, Donald

    2008-11-15

    The Y265A mutant of alanine racemase (alrY265A) was evaluated as a catalyst for the synthesis of beta-hydroxy-alpha-amino acids. It promotes the PLP-dependent aldol condensation of glycine with a range of aromatic aldehydes. The desired products were obtained with complete stereocontrol at C(alpha) (ee>99%, D) and moderate to high selectivity at C(beta) (up to 97% de). The designed enzyme is thus similar to natural d-threonine aldolases in its substrate specificity and stereoselectivity. Moreover, its ability to utilize alanine as an alternative donor suggests an expanded scope of potential utility for the production of biologically active compounds. PMID:18760921

  7. REVERSAL OF d-CYCLOSERINE INHIBITION OF BACTERIAL GROWTH BY ALANINE

    PubMed Central

    Zygmunt, Walter A.

    1962-01-01

    Zygmunt, Walter A. (Mead Johnson & Co., Evansville, Ind.). Reversal of d-cycloserine inhibition of bacterial growth by alanine. J. Bacteriol. 84:154–156. 1962.—Reversal of the antibacterial activity of d-4-amino-3-isoxazolidone by alanine in bacterial cultures actively growing on chemically defined media was compared in cultures requiring exogenous alanine and those capable of its synthesis. dl-Alanine was the most effective reversal agent in Pediococcus cerevisiae, an alanine-requiring organism, and d-alanine was effective in Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, organisms synthesizing alanine. With all three cultures, l-alanine was the least effective reversal agent. PMID:16561951

  8. Metabolomics Analysis Identifies D-Alanine-D-alanine Ligase as the Primary Lethal Target of D-cycloserine in Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Halouska, Steven; Fenton, Robert J.; Zinniel, Denise K.; Marshall, Darrell D.; Barletta, Raúl G.; Powers, Robert

    2014-01-01

    D-cycloserine is an effective second line antibiotic used as a last resort to treat multi (MDR)- and extensively (XDR)- drug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. D-cycloserine interferes with the formation of peptidoglycan biosynthesis by competitive inhibition of Alanine racemase (Alr) and D-Alanine-D-alanine ligase (Ddl). Although, the two enzymes are known to be inhibited, the in vivo lethal target is still unknown. Our NMR metabolomics work has revealed that Ddl is the primary target of DCS, as cell growth is inhibited when the production of D-alanyl-D-alanine is halted. It is shown that inhibition of Alr may contribute indirectly by lowering the levels of D-alanine thus allowing DCS to outcompete D-alanine for Ddl binding. The NMR data also supports the possibility of a transamination reaction to produce D-alanine from pyruvate and glutamate, thereby bypassing Alr inhibition. Furthermore, the inhibition of peptidoglycan synthesis results in a cascading effect on cellular metabolism as there is a shift toward the catabolic routes to compensate for accumulation of peptidoglycan precursors. PMID:24303782

  9. Blood-brain barrier permeability to leucine-enkephalin, D-alanine2-D-leucine5-enkephalin and their N-terminal amino acid (tyrosine).

    PubMed

    Zlokovic, B V; Begley, D J; Chain-Eliash, D G

    1985-06-10

    The permeability of the blood-brain barrier to [tyrosyl-3,5-3H]enkephalin-(5-L-leucine) (abbreviated to Leu-Enk) and of its synthetic analogue D-alanine2-[tyrosyl-3,5-3H]enkephalin-(5-D-leucine) (abbreviated to D-Ala2-D-Leu5-Enk) was studied, in the adult rat, by means of Oldendorf's27 intracarotid injection technique. The brain uptake index (BUI) corrected for residual vascular radioactivity was about the same for both peptides, indicating a low extraction from the blood during a 5- or 15-s period of exposure to the peptides. Transport of Leu-Enk was not saturated by unlabelled Enk at a concentration as high as 5 mM but was completely abolished by 5mM tyrosine and by the inhibitor of aminopeptidase activity, bacitracin (2 mM). Also the typical L-transport system substrate, 2-aminobicyclo(2,2,1)heptane-2 carboxylic acid (BCH)9 at 10 mM concentration markedly reduced (by 80%) Leu-Enk uptake by the brain. In contrast, brain uptake of D-Ala2-D-Leu5-Enk was reduced only to about one-half of its control value by bacitracin or by 25% by BCH. Brain uptake for L-tyrosine was typically large and markedly inhibited by BCH but not inhibited by 5 mM unlabelled Leu-Enk. These results show that the measurable but low first-pass extractions for enkephalins are not representative of the uptake of these peptides into the brain, but rather reflect their extreme sensitivity to enzymatic degradation with a release of the N-terminal tyrosine residue. The results also suggest that small amounts of D-Ala2-D-Leu5-Enk might cross the blood-brain barrier in an intact form.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3891014

  10. Postirradiation effects in alanine dosimeter probes of two different suppliers.

    PubMed

    Anton, Mathias

    2008-03-01

    The measurand relevant for the dosimetry for radiation therapy is the absorbed dose to water, DW. The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) is establishing a secondary standard for DW for high-energy photon and electron radiation based on electron spin resonance (ESR) of the amino acid alanine. For practical applications, like, for example, intercomparison measurements using the ESR/alanine dosimetry system, the temporal evolution of the ESR signal of irradiated probes is an important issue. This postirradiation behaviour is investigated for alanine pellets of two different suppliers for different storage conditions. The influence of the storage conditions on the temporal evolution may be dependent on the type of probes used. The measurement and analysis method developed at the PTB is able to circumvent the apparent difficulties in the case of alanine/paraffin probes. Care has to be taken in case this method cannot be applied. PMID:18296760

  11. Incorporation of D-alanine into lipoteichoic acid and wall teichoic acid in Bacillus subtilis. Identification of genes and regulation.

    PubMed

    Perego, M; Glaser, P; Minutello, A; Strauch, M A; Leopold, K; Fischer, W

    1995-06-30

    The Bacillus subtilis dlt operon (D-alanyl-lipoteichoic acid) is responsible for D-alanine esterification of both lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and wall teichoic acid (WTA). The dlt operon contains five genes, dltA-dltE. Insertional inactivation of dltA-dltD results in complete absence of D-alanine from both LTA and WTA. Based on protein sequence similarity with the Lactobacillus casei dlt gene products (Heaton, M. P., and Neuhaus, F. C. (1992) J. Bacteriol. 174, 4707-4717), we propose that dltA encodes the D-alanine-D-alanyl carrier protein ligase (Dcl) and dltC the D-alanyl carrier protein (Dcp). We further hypothesize that the products of dltB and dltD are concerned with the transport of activated D-alanine through the membrane and the final incorporation of D-alanine into LTA. The hydropathy profiles of the dltB and dltD gene products suggest a transmembrane location for the former and an amino-terminal signal peptide for the latter. The incorporation of D-alanine into LTA and WTA did not separate in any of the mutants studied which indicates that either one and the same enzyme is responsible for D-alanine incorporation into both polymers or a separate enzyme, encoded outside the dlt operon, transfers the D-alanyl residues from LTA to WTA (Haas, R., Koch, H.-U., and Fischer, W. (1984) FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 21, 27-31). Inactivation of dltE has no effect on D-alanine ester content of both LTA and WTA, and at present we cannot propose any function for its gene product. Transcription analysis shows that the dlt operon is transcribed from a sigma D-dependent promoter and follows the pattern of transcription of genes belonging to the sigma D regulon. However, the turn off of transcription observed before sporulation starts seems to be dependent on the Spo0A and AbrB sporulation proteins and results in a D-alanine-free purely anionic LTA in the spore membrane. The dlt operon is dispensable for cell growth; its inactivation does not affect cell growth or morphology as

  12. Expression of an L-alanine dehydrogenase gene in Zymomonas mobilis and excretion of L-alanine

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlenbusch, I.; Sahm, H.; Sprenger, G.A. )

    1991-05-01

    Gene alaD for L-alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus sphaericus was cloned and introduced into Z. mobilis. Under the control of the strong promoter of the pyruvate decarboxylase (pdc) gene, the enzyme was expressed up to a specific activity of nearly 1 {mu}mol {center dot} min{sup {minus}1} {center dot} mg of protein{sup {minus}1} in recombinant cells. As a result of this high L-alanine dehydrogenase activity, growing cells excreted up to 10 mmol of alanine per 280 mmol of glucose utilized into a mineral salts medium. By the addition of 85 mM NH{sub 4}{sup +} to the medium, growth of the recombinant cells stopped, and up to 41 mmol of alanine was secreted. As alanine dehydrogenase competed with pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) for the same substrate (pyruvate), PDC activity was reduced by starvation for the essential PDC cofactor thiamine PP{sub i}. A thiamine auxotrophy mutant of Z. mobilis which carried the alaD gene was starved for 40 h in glucose-supplemented mineral salts medium and then shifted to mineral salts medium with 85 mM NH {sub 4}{sup +} and 280 mmol of glucose. The recombinants excreted up to 84 mmol of alanine over 25 h. Alanine excretion proceeded at an initial velocity of 238 nmol {center dot} min{sup {minus}1} {center dot} mg(dry weight){sup {minus}1}. Despite this high activity, the excretion rate seemed to be a limiting factor, as the intracellular concentration of alanine was as high as 260 mM at the beginning of the excretion phase and decreased to 80 to 90 mM over 24 h.

  13. Structure of D-alanine-D-alanine ligase from Yersinia pestis: nucleotide phosphate recognition by the serine loop.

    PubMed

    Tran, Huyen Thi; Hong, Myoung Ki; Ngo, Ho Phuong Thuy; Huynh, Kim Hung; Ahn, Yeh Jin; Wang, Zhong; Kang, Lin Woo

    2016-01-01

    D-Alanyl-D-alanine is an essential precursor of bacterial peptidoglycan and is synthesized by D-alanine-D-alanine ligase (DDL) with hydrolysis of ATP; this reaction makes DDL an important drug target for the development of antibacterial agents. Five crystal structures of DDL from Yersinia pestis (YpDDL) were determined at 1.7-2.5 Å resolution: apo, AMP-bound, ADP-bound, adenosine 5'-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate-bound, and D-alanyl-D-alanine- and ADP-bound structures. YpDDL consists of three domains, in which four loops, loop 1, loop 2 (the serine loop), loop 3 (the ω-loop) and loop 4, constitute the binding sites for two D-alanine molecules and one ATP molecule. Some of them, especially the serine loop and the ω-loop, show flexible conformations, and the serine loop is mainly responsible for the conformational change in substrate nucleotide phosphates. Enzyme-kinetics assays were carried out for both the D-alanine and ATP substrates and a substrate-binding mechanism was proposed for YpDDL involving conformational changes of the loops. PMID:26894530

  14. EPR/alanine dosimetry for two therapeutic proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrale, Maurizio; Carlino, Antonio; Gallo, Salvatore; Longo, Anna; Panzeca, Salvatore; Bolsi, Alessandra; Hrbacek, Jan; Lomax, Tony

    2016-02-01

    In this work the analysis of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) response of alanine pellets exposed to two different clinical proton beams employed for radiotherapy is performed. One beam is characterized by a passive delivery technique and is dedicated to the eyes treatment (OPTIS2 beam line). Alanine pellets were irradiated with a 70 MeV proton beam corresponding to 35 mm range in eye tissue. We investigated how collimators with different sizes and shape used to conform the dose to the planned target volume influence the delivered dose. For this purpose we performed measurements with varying the collimator size (Output Factor) and the results were compared with those obtained with other dosimetric techniques (such as Markus chamber and diode detector). This analysis showed that the dosimeter response is independent of collimator diameter if this is larger than or equal to 10 mm. The other beam is characterized by an active spot-scanning technique, the Gantry1 beam line (maximum energy 230 MeV), and is used to treat deep-seated tumors. The dose linearity of alanine response in the clinical dose range was tested and the alanine dose response at selected locations in depth was measured and compared with the TPS planned dose in a quasi-clinical scenario. The alanine response was found to be linear in the dose in the clinical explored range (from 10 to 70 Gy). Furthermore, a depth dose profile in a quasi-clinical scenario was measured and compared to the dose computed by the Treatment Planning System PSIPLAN. The comparison of calibrated proton alanine measurements and TPS dose shows a difference under 1% in the SOBP and a "quenching" effect up to 4% in the distal part of SOBP. The positive dosimetric characteristics of the alanine pellets confirm the feasibility to use these detectors for "in vivo" dosimetry in clinical proton beams.

  15. Telomerase inhibition abolishes the tumorigenicity of pediatric ependymoma tumor-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Barszczyk, Mark; Buczkowicz, Pawel; Castelo-Branco, Pedro; Mack, Stephen C; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Mangerel, Joshua; Agnihotri, Sameer; Remke, Marc; Golbourn, Brian; Pajovic, Sanja; Elizabeth, Cynthia; Yu, Man; Luu, Betty; Morrison, Andrew; Adamski, Jennifer; Nethery-Brokx, Kathleen; Li, Xiao-Nan; Van Meter, Timothy; Dirks, Peter B; Rutka, James T; Taylor, Michael D; Tabori, Uri; Hawkins, Cynthia

    2014-12-01

    Pediatric ependymomas are highly recurrent tumors resistant to conventional chemotherapy. Telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein critical in permitting limitless replication, has been found to be critically important for the maintenance of tumor-initiating cells (TICs). These TICs are chemoresistant, repopulate the tumor from which they are identified, and are drivers of recurrence in numerous cancers. In this study, telomerase enzymatic activity was directly measured and inhibited to assess the therapeutic potential of targeting telomerase. Telomerase repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) (n = 36) and C-circle assay/telomere FISH/ATRX staining (n = 76) were performed on primary ependymomas to determine the prevalence and prognostic potential of telomerase activity or alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) as telomere maintenance mechanisms, respectively. Imetelstat, a phase 2 telomerase inhibitor, was used to elucidate the effect of telomerase inhibition on proliferation and tumorigenicity in established cell lines (BXD-1425EPN, R254), a primary TIC line (E520) and xenograft models of pediatric ependymoma. Over 60 % of pediatric ependymomas were found to rely on telomerase activity to maintain telomeres, while no ependymomas showed evidence of ALT. Children with telomerase-active tumors had reduced 5-year progression-free survival (29 ± 11 vs 64 ± 18 %; p = 0.03) and overall survival (58 ± 12 vs 83 ± 15 %; p = 0.05) rates compared to those with tumors lacking telomerase activity. Imetelstat inhibited proliferation and self-renewal by shortening telomeres and inducing senescence in vitro. In vivo, Imetelstat significantly reduced subcutaneous xenograft growth by 40 % (p = 0.03) and completely abolished the tumorigenicity of pediatric ependymoma TICs in an orthotopic xenograft model. Telomerase inhibition represents a promising therapeutic approach for telomerase-active pediatric ependymomas found to characterize high-risk ependymomas. PMID

  16. The structure of alanine racemase from Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Emily; Scaletti-Hutchinson, Emma; Opel-Reading, Helen; Nakatani, Yoshio; Krause, Kurt L.

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic Gram-negative bacterium which is a common cause of hospital-acquired infections. Numerous antibiotic-resistant strains exist, emphasizing the need for the development of new antimicrobials. Alanine racemase (Alr) is a pyridoxal 5′-phosphate dependent enzyme that is responsible for racemization between enantiomers of alanine. As d-alanine is an essential component of the bacterial cell wall, its inhibition is lethal to prokaryotes, making it an excellent antibiotic drug target. The crystal structure of A. baumannii alanine racemase (AlrAba) from the highly antibiotic-resistant NCTC13302 strain has been solved to 1.9 Å resolution. Comparison of AlrAba with alanine racemases from closely related bacteria demonstrates a conserved overall fold. The substrate entryway and active site of the enzymes were shown to be highly conserved. The structure of AlrAba will provide the template required for future structure-based drug-design studies. PMID:25195891

  17. Caramelization of maltose solution in presence of alanine.

    PubMed

    Fadel, H H M; Farouk, A

    2002-01-01

    Two solutions of maltose in water were used to prepare caramels. Alanine as a catalyst was added to one of these solutions. The caramelization was conducted at 130 degrees C for total time period 90 minutes. Convenient samples were taken of each caramel solution every 30 min and subjected to sensory analysis and isolation of volatile components. The odour and colour sensory tests were evaluated according to the international standard methods (ISO). The results showed that, the presence of alanine gave rise to a high significant (P < 0.01) decrease in acid attributes and remarkable increase in the sweet and caramel attributes, which are the most important caramel notes. On the other hand the increase in heating time in presence of alanine as a catalyst resulted in a high significant (P < 0.01) increase in the browning rate of caramel solution. The new technique Solid Phase Micro Extraction (SPME) was used for trapping the volatile components in the headspace of each caramel samples followed by thermal desorption and GC and GC - MS analysis. The 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (HMF), the main characteristic caramel product, showed its highest value in sample containing alanine after heating for 60 minutes. The best sensory results of the sample contains alanine were confirmed by the presence of high concentrations of the most potent odorants of caramel besides to the formation of some volatile compounds have caramel like flavours such as 2-acetyl pyrrole, 2-furanones and 1-(2-furanyl)1,2-propandione. PMID:12395187

  18. Abolishing Harrassment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Percy; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Although society is more aware of sexual harassment than it was in the past, the problem is not disappearing. Many school children are afraid to talk about it for fear of reprisal and humiliation. The articles in this issue focus on harassment and the schools in the following papers: (1) "Harassment Revisited" (Percy Bates); (2) "Sexual…

  19. Morphosynthesis of alanine mesocrystals by pH control.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yurong; Cölfen, Helmut; Antonietti, Markus

    2006-06-01

    Crystallization of DL-alanine is studied as a single polymorph model case to analyze the different modes of crystallization of polar organic molecules in absence of any structure directing additives. Depending on supersaturation, which is controlled either by temperature or by pH, and in the absence of additives, crystallization by mesoscale assembly of nanoparticles is found over a wide range of conditions, leading to so-called mesocrystals. This supplements the classical molecule-based crystallization mechanism, which is identified at lower supersaturations and at pH values away from the isoelectric point (IEP). The resulting alanine crystals are characterized by SEM, XRD, and single-crystal analysis. Time-resolved conductivity measurements and dynamic light scattering of the reaction solutions reveal information about precursor structures and reaction kinetics. A formation mechanism is proposed for the alanine mesocrystals. PMID:16771332

  20. First-principles studies of pure and fluorine substituted alanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Sardar; Vaizie, Hamide; Rahnamaye Aliabad, H. A.; Ahmad, Rashid; Khan, Imad; Ali, Zahid; Jalali-Asadabadi, S.; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Khan, Amir Abdullah

    2016-05-01

    This paper communicates the structural, electronic and optical properties of L-alanine, monofluoro and difluoro substituted alanines using density functional calculations. These compounds exist in orthorhombic crystal structure and the calculated structural parameters such as lattice constants, bond angles and bond lengths are in agreement with the experimental results. L-alanine is an indirect band gap insulator, while its fluorine substituted compounds (monofluoroalanine and difluoroalanine) are direct band gap insulators. The substitution causes reduction in the band gap and hence these optically tailored direct wide band gap materials have enhanced optical properties in the ultraviolet (UV) region of electromagnetic spectrum. Therefore, optical properties like dielectric function, refractive index, reflectivity and energy loss function are also investigated. These compounds have almost isotropic nature in the lower frequency range while at higher energies, they have a significant anisotropic nature.

  1. Spinal and locus coeruleus noradrenergic lesions abolish the analgesic effects of 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine.

    PubMed

    Danysz, W; Jonsson, G; Minor, B G; Post, C; Archer, T

    1986-07-01

    Two experiments were performed on Sprague-Dawley rats to study the effects of noradrenaline and 5-hydroxytryptamine depletion upon the antinociceptive effects of acute 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeODMT) administration. 6-Hydroxydopamine-induced lesions following microinjections to either the locus coeruleus or the spinal cord (lumbar) abolished completely 5-MeODMT-induced analgesia in the tail-flick, hot-plate, and shock titration tests whereas 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine-induced lesions of the nucleus raphe magnus and the lumbar spinal cord attenuated 5-MeODMT analgesia in the tail-flick and shock titration tests. Thus, the experiments serve to demonstrate an important interaction between descending noradrenergic and serotonergic pathways, possibly at a spinal locus. PMID:3015120

  2. Atomic Layer Deposition of L-Alanine Polypeptide

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fu, Yaqin; Li, Binsong; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Dunphy, Darren R.; Tsai, Andy; Tam, Siu-Yue; Fan, Hongyou Y.; Zhang, Hongxia; Rogers, David; Rempe, Susan; et al

    2014-10-30

    L-Alanine polypeptide thin films were synthesized via atomic layer deposition (ALD). Rather, instead of using an amino acid monomer as the precursor, an L-alanine amino acid derivatized with a protecting group was used to prevent self-polymerization, increase the vapor pressure, and allow linear cycle-by-cycle growth emblematic of ALD. Moreover, the successful deposition of a conformal polypeptide film has been confirmed by FTIR, TEM, and Mass Spectrometry, and the ALD process has been extended to polyvaline.

  3. Stereoselective aminoacylation of a dinucleoside monophosphate by the imidazolides of DL-alanine and N-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)-DL-alanine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Profy, A. T.; Usher, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The aminoacylation of diinosine monophosphate was studied experimentally. When the acylating agent was the imidazolide of N-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)-DL-alanine, a 40 percent enantiomeric excess of the isomer was incorporated at the 2' site and the positions of equilibrium for the reversible 2'-3' migration reaction differed for the D and L enantiomers. The reactivity of the nucleoside hydroxyl groups was found to decrease on the order 2'(3') less than internal 2' and less than 5', and the extent of the reaction was affected by the concentration of the imidazole buffer. Reaction of IpI with imidazolide of unprotected DL-alanine, by contrast, led to an excess of the D isomer at the internal 2' site. Finally, reaction with the N-carboxy anhydride of DL-alanine occurred without stereoselection. These results are found to be relevant to the study of the evolution of optical chemical activity and the origin of genetically directed protein synthesis.

  4. 77 FR 74347 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Abolishment of the Washington, DC, Special Wage Schedule for Printing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-14

    ....S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) issued an interim rule (77 FR 41247) to abolish the... rule published on July 13, 2012 (77 FR 41427), amending 5 CFR part 532, is adopted as final without... lithographic occupations in the Washington, DC, wage area has declined sharply in recent years, and a...

  5. 20 CFR 1.5 - When was the former Bureau of Employees' Compensation abolished?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true When was the former Bureau of Employees' Compensation abolished? 1.5 Section 1.5 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURES PERFORMANCE OF FUNCTIONS § 1.5 When was the former Bureau...

  6. 77 FR 11383 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Abolishment of Monmouth, NJ, as a Nonappropriated Fund Federal Wage...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-27

    ... INFORMATION: On August 25, 2011, the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) issued an interim rule (76 FR... authority of 5 U.S.C. 5343, the interim rule published on August 25, 2011, amending 5 CFR part 532 (76 FR... RIN 3206-AM49 Prevailing Rate Systems; Abolishment of Monmouth, NJ, as a Nonappropriated Fund...

  7. 77 FR 63205 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Abolishment of Montgomery, Pennsylvania, as a Nonappropriated Fund...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-16

    .... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Madeline Gonzalez, (202) 606-2838; email pay-leave-policy@opm.gov ; or Fax: (202) 606-4264. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On May 15, 2012, the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) issued an interim rule (77 FR 28471) to abolish the Montgomery,...

  8. The Effects of an Abolishing Operation Intervention Component on Play Skills, Challenging Behavior, and Stereotypy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Russell; O'Reilly, Mark; Sigafoos, Jeff; Machalicek, Wendy; Rispoli, Mandy; Lancioni, Giulio E.; Aguilar, Jeannie; Fragale, Christina

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to reduce stereotypy and challenging behavior during play skills instruction by adding an abolishing operation component (AOC) to the intervention strategy. An alternating treatments design compared one condition in which participants were allowed to engage in stereotypy freely before beginning the play skills…

  9. 76 FR 53045 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Abolishment of Monmouth, NJ, as a Nonappropriated Fund Federal Wage...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-25

    ... Personnel Management (OPM) may establish an NAF wage area when there are a minimum of 26 NAF wage employees... 3206-AM49 Prevailing Rate Systems; Abolishment of Monmouth, NJ, as a Nonappropriated Fund Federal Wage System Wage Area AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Interim rule with request...

  10. 76 FR 31785 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Abolishment of Cumberland, ME, as a Nonappropriated Fund Federal Wage...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    ... an NAF wage area when there are a minimum of 26 NAF wage employees in the survey area, the local... Nonappropriated Fund Federal Wage System Wage Area AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Interim... rule ] to abolish the Cumberland, Maine, nonappropriated fund (NAF) Federal Wage System (FWS) wage...

  11. Abolishing School Fees in Malawi: The Impact on Education Access and Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Samarrai, Samer; Zaman, Hassan

    2007-01-01

    In 1994, the newly elected Government in Malawi abolished primary school fees. Using household survey data from 1990/91 and 1997/98, this paper assesses the impact this major policy change, combined with increased Government spending on education, has had on access to schooling by the poor. This paper shows that enrolment rates have increased…

  12. Spectrophotometric readout for an alanine dosimeter for food irradiation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebraheem, S.; Beshir, W. B.; Eid, S.; Sobhy, R.; Kovács, A.

    2003-06-01

    The alanine-electron spin resonance (EPR) readout system is well known as a reference and transfer dosimetry system for the evaluation of high doses in radiation processing. The high cost of an EPR/alanine dosimetry system is a serious handicap for large-scale routine application in irradiation facilities. In this study, the use of a complex produced by dissolving irradiated L-alanine in 1,4-phenyl diammonium dichloride solution was investigated for dosimetry purposes. This complex—having a purple colour—has an increasing absorbance with increasing dose in the range of 1-20 kGy. The applicability of spectrophotometric evaluation was studied by measuring the absorbance intensity of this complex at 360 and 505 nm, respectively. Fluorimetric evaluation was also investigated by measuring the emission of the complex at 435 nm as a function of dose. The present method is easy for routine application. The effect of the dye concentration as well as the suitable amount of irradiated alanine has been studied. With respect to routine application, the stability of the product complex after its formation was also investigated.

  13. Formation of {gamma}-alumina nanorods in presence of alanine

    SciTech Connect

    Dabbagh, Hossein A.; Rasti, Elham; Yalfani, Mohammad S.; Medina, Francesc

    2011-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Nanorod aluminas with a possible hexagonal symmetry, high surface area and relatively narrow pore size distribution were obtained. Research highlights: {yields} Research highlights {yields} Boehmite was prepared using a green sol-gel process in the presence of alanine. {yields} Nanorod aluminas with a high surface area were obtained. {yields} Addition of alanine would shape the size of the holes and crevices. {yields} The morphologies of the nanorods were revealed by transmission electron microscope. -- Abstract: Boehmite and alumina nanostructures were prepared using a simple green sol-gel process in the presence of alanine in water medium at room temperature. The uncalcined (dried at 200 {sup o}C) and the calcined materials (at 500, 600 and 700 {sup o}C for 4 h) were characterized using XRD, TEM, SEM, N{sub 2} physisorption and TGA. Nanorod aluminas with a possible hexagonal symmetry, high surface area and relatively narrow pore size distribution were obtained. The surface area was enhanced and crystallization was retarded as the alanine content increased. The morphologies of the nanoparticles and nanorods were revealed by a transmission electron microscope (TEM).

  14. Beta-alanine supplementation in high-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Harris, Roger C; Sale, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Glycolysis involves the oxidation of two neutral hydroxyl groups on each glycosyl (or glucosyl) unit metabolised, yielding two carboxylic acid groups. During low-intensity exercise these, along with the remainder of the carbon skeleton, are further oxidised to CO(2) and water. But during high-intensity exercise a major portion (and where blood flow is impaired, then most) is accumulated as lactate anions and H(+). The accumulation of H(+) has deleterious effects on muscle function, ultimately impairing force production and contributing to fatigue. Regulation of intracellular pH is achieved over time by export of H(+) out of the muscle, although physicochemical buffers in the muscle provide the first line of defence against H(+) accumulation. In order to be effective during high-intensity exercise, buffers need to be present in high concentrations in muscle and have pK(a)s within the intracellular exercise pH transit range. Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is ideal for this role given that it occurs in millimolar concentrations within the skeletal muscle and has a pK(a) of 6.83. Carnosine is a cytoplasmic dipeptide formed by bonding histidine and β-alanine in a reaction catalysed by carnosine synthase, although it is the availability of β-alanine, obtained in small amounts from hepatic synthesis and potentially in greater amounts from the diet that is limiting to synthesis. Increasing muscle carnosine through increased dietary intake of β-alanine will increase the intracellular buffering capacity, which in turn might be expected to increase high-intensity exercise capacity and performance where this is pH limited. In this study we review the role of muscle carnosine as an H(+) buffer, the regulation of muscle carnosine by β-alanine, and the available evidence relating to the effects of β-alanine supplementation on muscle carnosine synthesis and the subsequent effects of this on high-intensity exercise capacity and performance. PMID:23075550

  15. Effects of Beta-Alanine Supplementation on Brain Homocarnosine/Carnosine Signal and Cognitive Function: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Hobson, Ruth M; Artioli, Guilherme G.; Otaduy, Maria C.; Roschel, Hamilton; Robertson, Jacques; Martin, Daniel; S. Painelli, Vitor; Harris, Roger C.; Gualano, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Two independent studies were conducted to examine the effects of 28 d of beta-alanine supplementation at 6.4 g d-1 on brain homocarnosine/carnosine signal in omnivores and vegetarians (Study 1) and on cognitive function before and after exercise in trained cyclists (Study 2). Methods In Study 1, seven healthy vegetarians (3 women and 4 men) and seven age- and sex-matched omnivores undertook a brain 1H-MRS exam at baseline and after beta-alanine supplementation. In study 2, nineteen trained male cyclists completed four 20-Km cycling time trials (two pre supplementation and two post supplementation), with a battery of cognitive function tests (Stroop test, Sternberg paradigm, Rapid Visual Information Processing task) being performed before and after exercise on each occasion. Results In Study 1, there were no within-group effects of beta-alanine supplementation on brain homocarnosine/carnosine signal in either vegetarians (p = 0.99) or omnivores (p = 0.27); nor was there any effect when data from both groups were pooled (p = 0.19). Similarly, there was no group by time interaction for brain homocarnosine/carnosine signal (p = 0.27). In study 2, exercise improved cognitive function across all tests (P<0.05), although there was no effect (P>0.05) of beta-alanine supplementation on response times or accuracy for the Stroop test, Sternberg paradigm or RVIP task at rest or after exercise. Conclusion 28 d of beta-alanine supplementation at 6.4g d-1 appeared not to influence brain homocarnosine/carnosine signal in either omnivores or vegetarians; nor did it influence cognitive function before or after exercise in trained cyclists. PMID:25875297

  16. Voluntary physical activity abolishes the proliferative tumor growth microenvironment created by adipose tissue in animals fed a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Theriau, Christopher F; Shpilberg, Yaniv; Riddell, Michael C; Connor, Michael K

    2016-07-01

    The molecular mechanisms behind the obesity-breast cancer association may be regulated via adipokine secretion by white adipose tissue. Specifically, adiponectin and leptin are altered with adiposity and exert antagonistic effects on cancer cell proliferation. We set out to determine whether altering adiposity in vivo via high fat diet (HFD) feeding changed the tumor growth supporting nature of adipose tissue and whether voluntary physical activity (PA) could ameliorate these HFD-dependent effects. We show that conditioned media (CM) created from the adipose tissue of HFD fed animals caused an increase in the proliferation of MCF7 cells compared with cells exposed to CM prepared from the adipose of lean chow diet fed counterparts. This increased proliferation was driven within the MCF7 cells by an HFD-dependent antagonism between AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathways, decreasing p27 protein levels via reduced phosphorylation at T198 and downregulation of adiponectin receptor 1 (AdipoR1). PA can ameliorate these proliferative effects of HFD-CM on MCF7 cells, increasing p27(T198) by AMPK, reducing pAkt(T308), and increasing AdipoR1, resulting in cell cycle withdrawal in a manner that depends on the PA intensity. High physical activity (>3 km/day) completely abolished the effects of HFD feeding. In addition, AdipoR1 overexpression mimics the effects of exercise, abolishing the proliferative effects of the HFD-CM on MCF7 cells and further enhancing the antiproliferative effects of PA on the HFD-CM. Thus voluntary PA represents a means to counteract the proliferative effects of adipose tissue on breast cancers in obese patients. PMID:27150834

  17. Structure of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis D-Alanine:D-Alanine Ligase, a Target of the Antituberculosis Drug D-Cycloserine

    SciTech Connect

    Bruning, John B.; Murillo, Ana C.; Chacon, Ofelia; Barletta, Raúl G.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2011-09-28

    D-Alanine:D-alanine ligase (EC 6.3.2.4; Ddl) catalyzes the ATP-driven ligation of two D-alanine (D-Ala) molecules to form the D-alanyl:D-alanine dipeptide. This molecule is a key building block in peptidoglycan biosynthesis, making Ddl an attractive target for drug development. D-Cycloserine (DCS), an analog of D-Ala and a prototype Ddl inhibitor, has shown promise for the treatment of tuberculosis. Here, we report the crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ddl at a resolution of 2.1 {angstrom}. This structure indicates that Ddl is a dimer and consists of three discrete domains; the ligand binding cavity is at the intersection of all three domains and conjoined by several loop regions. The M. tuberculosis apo Ddl structure shows a novel conformation that has not yet been observed in Ddl enzymes from other species. The nucleotide and D-alanine binding pockets are flexible, requiring significant structural rearrangement of the bordering regions for entry and binding of both ATP and D-Ala molecules. Solution affinity and kinetic studies showed that DCS interacts with Ddl in a manner similar to that observed for D-Ala. Each ligand binds to two binding sites that have significant differences in affinity, with the first binding site exhibiting high affinity. DCS inhibits the enzyme, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC{sub 50}) of 0.37 mM under standard assay conditions, implicating a preferential and weak inhibition at the second, lower-affinity binding site. Moreover, DCS binding is tighter at higher ATP concentrations. The crystal structure illustrates potential drugable sites that may result in the development of more-effective Ddl inhibitors.

  18. Blockade of the brachial plexus abolishes activation of specific brain regions by electroacupuncture at LI4: a functional MRI study

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Weidong; Jiang, Wei; He, Jingwei; Liu, Songbin; Wang, Zhaoxin

    2015-01-01

    Objective Our aim was to test the hypothesis that electroacupuncture (EA) at acupuncture point LI4 activates specific brain regions by nerve stimulation that is mediatied through a pathway involving the brachial plexus. Methods Twelve acupuncture naive right-handed volunteers were allocated to receive three sessions of EA at LI4 in a random different order (crossover): (1) EA alone (EA); EA after injection of local anaesthetics into the deltoid muscle (EA+LA); and (3) EA after blockade of the brachial plexus (EA+NB). During each session, participants were imaged in a 3 T MRI scanner. Brain regions showing change in blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal (activation) were identified. Subjective acupuncture sensation was quantified after functional MRI scanning was completed. Results were compared between the three sessions for each individual, and averaged. Results Blockade of the brachial plexus inhibited acupuncture sensation during EA. EA and EA+LA activated the bilateral thalamus, basal ganglia, cerebellum and left putamen, whilst no significant activation was observed during EA+NB. The BOLD signal of the thalamus correlated significantly with acupuncture sensation score during EA. Conclusions Blockade of the brachial plexus completely abolishes patterns of brain activation induced by EA at LI4. The results suggest that EA activates specific brain regions through stimulation of the local nerves supplying the tissues at LI4, which transmit sensory information via the brachial plexus. Trial registration number ChiCTR-OO-13003389. PMID:26464415

  19. Evaluation of alanine as a reference dosimeter for therapy level dose comparisons in megavoltage electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, Malcolm; Sharpe, Peter; Vörös, Sándor

    2015-04-01

    When comparing absorbed dose standards from different laboratories (e.g. National Measurement Institutes, NMIs, for Key or Supplementary comparisons) it is rarely possible to carry out a direct comparison of primary standard instruments, and therefore some form of transfer detector is required. Historically, air-filled, unsealed ionization chambers have been used because of the long history of using these instruments, very good stability over many years, and ease of transport. However, the use of ion chambers for therapy-level comparisons is not without its problems. Findings from recent investigations suggest that ion chambers are prone to non-random variations, they are not completely robust to standard courier practices, and failure at any step in a comparison can render all measurements potentially useless. An alternative approach is to identify a transfer system that is insensitive to some of these concerns—effectively a dosimeter that is inexpensive, simple to use, robust, but with sufficient precision and of a size relevant to the disseminated quantity in question. The alanine dosimetry system has been successfully used in a number of situations as an audit dosimeter and therefore the purpose of this investigation was to determine whether alanine could also be used as the transfer detector for dosimetric comparisons, which require a lower value for the measurement uncertainty. A measurement protocol was developed for comparing primary standards of absorbed dose to water in high-energy electron beams using alanine pellets irradiated in a water-equivalent plastic phantom. A trial comparison has been carried out between three NMIs and has indicated that alanine is a suitable alternative to ion chambers, with the system used achieving a precision of 0.1%. Although the focus of the evaluation was on the performance of the dosimeter, the comparison results are encouraging, showing agreement at the level of the combined uncertainties (~0.6%). Based on this

  20. Degradation of Glycine and Alanine on Irradiated Quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlikowski, Maciej; Benko, Aleksandra; Wróbel, Tomasz P.

    2013-04-01

    Recent researches suggest participation of minerals in the formation of life under primordial conditions. Among all of the minerals, quartz seems to be one of the most probable to take part in such processes. However, an external source of energy is needed, e.g. electric discharge. A device simulating the proposed conditions was designed and was used to simulate prebiotic conditions. Investigation of processes occurring during the stimulation of quartz with electric discharge was studied by means of Ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectroscopy, in order to monitor the generation kinetics of free radicals. Additionally, infrared spectroscopy was applied to identify chemical reaction products created in a solution of alanine or glycine, in the presence of quartz treated with electric discharge. Formation of increased amounts of free radicals, compared to experiments performed without quartz and/or amino acid, is reported, along with identification of possible degradation products of alanine. No synthetic reactions were observed.

  1. Developmental hypothyroidism abolishes bilateral differences in sonic hedgehog gene control in the rat hippocampal dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takeshi; Wang, Liyun; Kimura, Masayuki; Abe, Hajime; Mizukami, Sayaka; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    Both developmental and adult-stage hypothyroidism disrupt rat hippocampal neurogenesis. We previously showed that exposing mouse offspring to manganese permanently disrupts hippocampal neurogenesis and abolishes the asymmetric distribution of cells expressing Mid1, a molecule regulated by sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling. The present study examined the involvement of Shh signaling on the disruption of hippocampal neurogenesis in rats with hypothyroidism. Pregnant rats were treated with methimazole (MMI) at 0 or 200 ppm in the drinking water from gestation day 10-21 days after delivery (developmental hypothyroidism). Adult male rats were treated with MMI in the same manner from postnatal day (PND) 46 to PND 77 (adult-stage hypothyroidism). Developmental hypothyroidism reduced the number of Mid1(+) cells within the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus of offspring on PND 21, and consequently abolished the normal asymmetric predominance of Mid1(+) cells on the right side through the adult stage. In control animals, Shh was expressed in a subpopulation of hilar neurons, showing asymmetric distribution with left side predominance on PND 21; however, this asymmetry did not continue through the adult stage. Developmental hypothyroidism increased Shh(+) neurons bilaterally and abolished the asymmetric distribution pattern on PND 21. Adult hypothyroidism also disrupted the asymmetric distribution of Mid1(+) cells but did not affect the distribution of Shh(+) hilar neurons. The results suggest that the hippocampal neurogenesis disruption seen in hypothyroidism involves changes in asymmetric Shh(+) neuron distribution in developmental hypothyroidism and altered Mid1 expression in both developmental and adult-stage hypothyroidism. PMID:25539664

  2. Physiological hypercortisolemia increases proteolysis, glutamine, and alanine production

    SciTech Connect

    Darmaun, D.; Matthews, D.E.; Bier, D.M. Cornell Univ. Medical College, New York, NY )

    1988-09-01

    Physiological elevations of plasma cortisol levels, as are encountered in stress and severe trauma, were produced in six normal subjects by infusing them with hydrocortisone for 64 h. Amino acid kinetics were measured in the postabsorptive state using three 4-h infusions of L-(1-{sup 13}C)leucine, L-phenyl({sup 2}H{sub 5})phenylalanine, L-(2-{sup 15}N)glutamine, and L-(1-{sup 13}C)alanine tracers (1) before, (2) at 12 h, and (3) at 60 h of cortisol infusion. Before and throughout the study, the subjects ate a normal diet of adequate protein and energy intake. The cortisol infusion raised plasma cortisol levels significantly from 10 {plus minus} 1 to 32 {plus minus} 4 {mu}g/dl, leucine flux from 83 {plus minus} 3 to 97 {plus minus} 3 {mu}mol{center dot}kg{sup {minus}1}{center dot}h{sup {minus}1}, and phenylalanine flux from 34 {plus minus} 1 to 39 {plus minus} 1 (SE) {mu}mol{center dot}kg{sup {minus}1}{center dot}h{sup {minus}1} after 12 h of cortisol infusion. These increases were maintained until the cortisol infusion was terminated. These nearly identical 15% increases in two different essential amino acid appearance rates are reflective of increased whole body protein breakdown. Glutamine flux rose by 12 h of cortisol infusion and remained elevated at the same level at 64 h. The increase in flux was primarily due to a 55% increase in glutamine de novo synthesis. Alanine flux increased with acute hypercortisolemia and increased further at 60 h of cortisol infusion, a result primarily of increased alanine de novo synthesis. Insulin, alanine, and lactate plasma levels responded similarly with significant rises between the acute and chronic periods of cortisol infusion. Thus hypercortisolemia increases both protein breakdown and the turnover of important nonessential amino acids for periods of up to 64 h.

  3. Crystal Structures of Aedes Aegypt Alanine Glyoxylate Aminotransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Han,Q.; Robinson, H.; Gao, Y.; Vogelaar, N.; Wilson, S.; Rizzi, M.; Li, J.

    2006-01-01

    Mosquitoes are unique in having evolved two alanine glyoxylate aminotransferases (AGTs). One is 3-hydroxykynurenine transaminase (HKT), which is primarily responsible for catalyzing the transamination of 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) to xanthurenic acid (XA). Interestingly, XA is used by malaria parasites as a chemical trigger for their development within the mosquito. This 3-HK to XA conversion is considered the major mechanism mosquitoes use to detoxify the chemically reactive and potentially toxic 3-HK. The other AGT is a typical dipteran insect AGT and is specific for converting glyoxylic acid to glycine. Here we report the 1.75{angstrom} high-resolution three-dimensional crystal structure of AGT from the mosquito Aedes aegypti (AeAGT) and structures of its complexes with reactants glyoxylic acid and alanine at 1.75 and 2.1{angstrom} resolution, respectively. This is the first time that the three-dimensional crystal structures of an AGT with its amino acceptor, glyoxylic acid, and amino donor, alanine, have been determined. The protein is dimeric and adopts the type I-fold of pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP)-dependent aminotransferases. The PLP co-factor is covalently bound to the active site in the crystal structure, and its binding site is similar to those of other AGTs. The comparison of the AeAGT-glyoxylic acid structure with other AGT structures revealed that these glyoxylic acid binding residues are conserved in most AGTs. Comparison of the AeAGT-alanine structure with that of the Anopheles HKT-inhibitor complex suggests that a Ser-Asn-Phe motif in the latter may be responsible for the substrate specificity of HKT enzymes for 3-HK.

  4. Characterization of psychrophilic alanine racemase from Bacillus psychrosaccharolyticus.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Y; Yokoigawa, K; Esaki, N; Soda, K; Kawai, H

    1999-03-16

    A psychrophilic alanine racemase gene from Bacillus psychrosaccharolyticus was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli SOLR with a plasmid pYOK3. The gene starting with the unusual initiation codon GTG showed higher preference for codons ending in A or T. The enzyme purified to homogeneity showed the high catalytic activity even at 0 degrees C and was extremely labile over 35 degrees C. The enzyme was found to have a markedly large Km value (5.0 microM) for the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) cofactor in comparison with other reported alanine racemases, and was stabilized up to 50 degrees C in the presence of excess amounts of PLP. The low affinity of the enzyme for PLP may be related to the thermolability, and may be related to the high catalytic activity, initiated by the transaldimination reaction, at low temperature. The enzyme has a distinguishing hydrophilic region around the residue no. 150 in the deduced amino acid sequence (383 residues), whereas the corresponding regions of other Bacillus alanine racemases are hydrophobic. The position of the region in the three dimensional structure of C atoms of the enzyme was predicted to be in a surface loop surrounding the active site. The region may interact with solvent and reduce the compactness of the active site. PMID:10080917

  5. ESR/alanine dosimetry applied to radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosse, D. C.

    The radiation processing of food products is specified in terms of absorbed dose, and processing quality is assessed on the basis of absorbed dose measurements. The validity of process quality control is highly dependent on the quality of the measurements and associated instrumentation; in this respect, dosimetry calibration by an Organization with official status provides an essential guarantee of validity to the quality control steps taken. The Laboratoire de Métrologie des Rayonnements Ionisants (L.M.R.I.) is the primary standards and evaluation laboratory approved by the Bureau National de Métrologie (B.N.M.), which is the French National Bureau of Standards. The LMRI implements correlation procedures in response to the various requirements which arise in connection with high doses and doserates. Such procedures are mainly based on ESR/alanine spectrometry, a dosimetry technique ideally suited to that purpose. Dosemeter geometry and design are tailored to operating conditions. "Photon" dosemeters consist of a detector material in powder or compacted form, and a wall with thickness and chemical composition consistent with the application. "Electron" dosemeters have a detector core of compacted alanine with thickness down to a few tenths of a millimeter. The ESR/alanine dosimetry technique, developed at LMRI is a flexible, reliable and accurate tool which effectively meets the various requirements arising in the field of reference dosimetry, where high doses and doserates are involved.

  6. Pancreatic stellate cells support tumour metabolism through autophagic alanine secretion.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cristovão M; Biancur, Douglas E; Wang, Xiaoxu; Halbrook, Christopher J; Sherman, Mara H; Zhang, Li; Kremer, Daniel; Hwang, Rosa F; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Ying, Haoqiang; Asara, John M; Evans, Ronald M; Cantley, Lewis C; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Kimmelman, Alec C

    2016-08-25

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive disease characterized by an intense fibrotic stromal response and deregulated metabolism. The role of the stroma in PDAC biology is complex and it has been shown to play critical roles that differ depending on the biological context. The stromal reaction also impairs the vasculature, leading to a highly hypoxic, nutrient-poor environment. As such, these tumours must alter how they capture and use nutrients to support their metabolic needs. Here we show that stroma-associated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are critical for PDAC metabolism through the secretion of non-essential amino acids (NEAA). Specifically, we uncover a previously undescribed role for alanine, which outcompetes glucose and glutamine-derived carbon in PDAC to fuel the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and thus NEAA and lipid biosynthesis. This shift in fuel source decreases the tumour’s dependence on glucose and serum-derived nutrients, which are limited in the pancreatic tumour microenvironment. Moreover, we demonstrate that alanine secretion by PSCs is dependent on PSC autophagy, a process that is stimulated by cancer cells. Thus, our results demonstrate a novel metabolic interaction between PSCs and cancer cells, in which PSC-derived alanine acts as an alternative carbon source. This finding highlights a previously unappreciated metabolic network within pancreatic tumours in which diverse fuel sources are used to promote growth in an austere tumour microenvironment. PMID:27509858

  7. Synthesis and sweetness characteristics of L-aspartyl-D-alanine fenchyl esters.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Y; Nagakura, A; Tsuruta, H

    2001-10-01

    Four isomers of the L-aspartyl-D-alanine fenchyl esters were prepared as potential peptide sweeteners. L-Aspartyl-D-alanine (+)-alpha-fenchyl ester and L-aspartyl-D-alanine (-)-beta-fenchyl ester showed sweetness with potencies 250 and 160 times higher than that of sucrose, respectively. In contrast, L-aspartyl-D-alanine (+)-beta-fenchyl ester and L-aspartyl-D-alanine (-)-alpha-fenchyl ester had the highest sweetness potencies at 5700 and 1100 times that of sucrose, respectively. In particular, L-aspartyl-D-alanine (-)-alpha-fenchyl ester had an excellent sweetness quality; but L-aspartyl-D-alanine (+)-beta-fenchyl ester did not have an excellent quality of sweetness because it displayed an aftertaste caused by the strong sweetness. PMID:11600060

  8. Discovery of an L-alanine ester prodrug of the Hsp90 inhibitor, MPC-3100.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Ho; Tangallapally, Rajendra; Kim, In Chul; Trovato, Richard; Parker, Daniel; Patton, J Scott; Reeves, Leslie; Bradford, Chad; Wettstein, Daniel; Baichwal, Vijay; Papac, Damon; Bajji, Ashok; Carlson, Robert; Yager, Kraig M

    2015-11-15

    Various types of Hsp90 inhibitors have been and continue to undergo clinical investigation. One development candidate is the purine-based, synthetic Hsp90 inhibitor 1 (MPC-3100), which successfully completed a phase I clinical study. However, further clinical development of 1 was hindered by poor solubility and consequent formulation issues and promoted development of a more water soluble prodrug. Towards this end, numerous pro-moieties were explored in vitro and in vivo. These studies resulted in identification of L-alanine ester mesylate, 2i (MPC-0767), which exhibited improved aqueous solubility, adequate chemical stability, and rapid bioconversion without the need for solubilizing excipients. Based on improved physical characteristics and favorable PK and PD profiles, 2i mesylate was selected for further development. A convergent, scalable, chromatography-free synthesis for 2i mesylate was developed to support further clinical evaluation. PMID:26483201

  9. The Yeast Prion [SWI(+)] Abolishes Multicellular Growth by Triggering Conformational Changes of Multiple Regulators Required for Flocculin Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Ying; Li, Liming

    2015-12-29

    Although transcription factors are prevalent among yeast prion proteins, the role of prion-mediated transcriptional regulation remains elusive. Here, we show that the yeast prion [SWI(+)] abolishes flocculin (FLO) gene expression and results in a complete loss of multicellularity. Further investigation demonstrates that besides Swi1, multiple other proteins essential for FLO expression, including Mss11, Sap30, and Msn1 also undergo conformational changes and become inactivated in [SWI(+)] cells. Moreover, the asparagine-rich region of Mss11 can exist as prion-like aggregates specifically in [SWI(+)] cells, which are SDS resistant, heritable, and curable, but become metastable after separation from [SWI(+)]. Our findings thus reveal a prion-mediated mechanism through which multiple regulators in a biological pathway can be inactivated. In combination with the partial loss-of-function phenotypes of [SWI(+)] cells on non-glucose sugar utilization, our data therefore demonstrate that a prion can influence distinct traits differently through multi-level regulations, providing insights into the biological roles of prions. PMID:26711350

  10. Inhibition of the pontine Kölliker-Fuse nucleus abolishes eupneic inspiratory hypoglossal motor discharge in rat.

    PubMed

    Bautista, T G; Dutschmann, M

    2014-05-16

    The pontine Kölliker-Fuse nucleus (KF) has established functions in the regulation of inspiratory-expiratory phase transition and the regulation of upper airway patency via laryngeal valving mechanisms. Here we studied the role of the KF in the gating and modulation of eupneic hypoglossal motor activity (HNA) using the in situ perfused brainstem preparation, which displays robust inspiratory HNA. Microinjection of glutamate into the KF area triggered complex and often biphasic modulation (excitation/inhibition or inhibition/excitation) of HNA. Subsequent transient pharmacological inhibition of KF by unilateral microinjection of GABA-A receptor agonist isoguvacine reduced HNA and while bilateral microinjections completely abolished HNA. Our results indicate that mixed and overlapping KF pre-motor neurons provide eupneic drive for inspiratory HNA and postinspiratory vagal nerve activity. Both motor activities have important functions in the regulation of upper airway patency during eupnea but also during various oro-pharyngeal behaviors. These results have potential implications in the contribution of state-dependent modulation of KF hypoglossal pre-motor neurons during sleep-wake cycle to obstructive sleep apnea. PMID:24603053

  11. Abolished thermal and mechanical antinociception but retained visceral chemical antinociception induced by butorphanol in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Ide, Soichiro; Minami, Masabumi; Ishihara, Kumatoshi; Uhl, George R; Satoh, Masamichi; Sora, Ichiro; Ikeda, Kazutaka

    2008-06-01

    Butorphanol is hypothesized to induce analgesia via opioid pathways, although the precise mechanisms for its effects remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of the mu-opioid receptor (MOP) in thermal, mechanical, and visceral chemical antinociception induced by butorphanol using MOP knockout (KO) mice. Butorphanol-induced thermal antinociception, assessed by the hot-plate and tail-flick tests, was significantly reduced in heterozygous and abolished in homozygous MOP-KO mice compared with wildtype mice. The results obtained from our butorphanol-induced mechanical antinociception experiments, assessed by the Randall-Selitto test, were similar to the results obtained from the thermal antinociception experiments in these mice. Interestingly, however, butorphanol retained its ability to induce significant visceral chemical antinociception, assessed by the writhing test, in homozygous MOP-KO mice. The butorphanol-induced visceral chemical antinociception that was retained in homozygous MOP-KO mice was completely blocked by pretreatment with nor-binaltorphimine, a kappa-opioid receptor (KOP) antagonist. In vitro binding and cyclic adenosine monophosphate assays also showed that butorphanol possessed higher affinity for KOPs and MOPs than for delta-opioid receptors. These results molecular pharmacologically confirmed previous studies implicating MOPs, and partially KOPs, in mediating butorphanol-induced analgesia. PMID:18417173

  12. The yeast prion [SWI+] abolishes multicellular growth by triggering conformational changes of multiple regulators required for flocculin gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Ying; Li, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Summary While transcription factors are prevalent among yeast prion proteins, the role of prion-mediated transcriptional regulation remains elusive. We show here that the yeast prion [SWI+] abolishes flocculin (FLO) gene expression and results in a complete loss of multicellularity. Further investigation demonstrates that besides Swi1, multiple other proteins essential for FLO expression, including Mss11, Sap30, and Msn1 also undergo conformational changes, and become inactivated in [SWI+] cells. Moreover, the asparagine-rich region of Mss11 can exist as prion-like aggregates specifically in [SWI+] cells, which are SDS-resistant, heritable, and curable, but become metastable after separation from [SWI+]. Our findings thus reveal a prion-mediated mechanism through which multiple regulators in a biological pathway can be inactivated. In combination with the partial loss-of-function phenotypes of [SWI+] cells on non-glucose sugar utilization, our data therefore demonstrate that a prion can influence differently on distinct traits through multi-level regulations, providing insights into the biological roles of prions. PMID:26711350

  13. Serine substitution for cysteine residues in levansucrase selectively abolishes levan forming activity.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumar, Velusamy; Busby, Stephen J W; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy; Senthikumar, Velusamy; Bushby, Stephen J W

    2003-10-01

    Levansucrase is responsible for levan formation during sucrose fermentation of Zymomonas mobilis, and this decreases the efficiency of ethanol production. As thiol modifying agents decrease levan formation, a role for cysteine residues in levansucrase activity has been examined using derivatives of Z. mobilis levansucrase that carry serine substitutions of cysteine at positions 121, 151 or 244. These substitutions abolished the levan forming activity of levansucrase whilst only halving its activity in sucrose hydrolysis. Thus, polymerase and hydrolase activities of Z. mobilis levansucrase are separate and have different requirements for the enzyme's cysteine residues. PMID:14584923

  14. BLOOMING MECHANISM OF FRESHWATER RED-TIDE IN EUTRORHIC ABOLISHED-RIVER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagabayashi, Hisao; Hirayama, Kazuo; Horikawa, Kunihiko

    This paper analyzes blooming mechanism of freshwater red-tide in an abolished-river which eutrophicated by seventy-years. Outbreaks of red tide of the river is depend on two phenomenon; the first one is the effect of secondary current generated by the wind along with the temperature rise, the second is the flow for the downstream by the release discharge from the power generation-dam in the downstream. Euglena spp. in euglena and Uroglena spp. in yellow-zooxanthellas is clarified to be the dominant species of the freshwater red-tide.

  15. The trials of Hanna Porn: the campaign to abolish midwifery in Massachusetts.

    PubMed Central

    Declercq, E R

    1994-01-01

    The case of Hanna Porn affords an opportunity to examine how the laws that led to the abolition of midwifery in Massachusetts evolved and were applied to the midwife whose case set the state legal precedent. Mrs Porn served primarily a Finnish-Swedish clientele of wives of laborers. The outcomes of the births she attended appear to have been positive, and she maintained a neonatal mortality rate of less than half that of local physicians. She also repeatedly defied court orders to stop practicing. Her case exemplifies the efforts that occurred nationally to abolish midwifery in the United States. PMID:8203670

  16. Parallel β-Sheet Structure of Alanine Tetrapeptide in the Solid State As Studied by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Tetsuo; Horiguchi, Kumiko; Aoki, Akihiro; Tasei, Yugo; Naito, Akira

    2016-09-01

    The structural analysis of alanine oligopeptides is important for understanding the crystalline region in silks from spiders and wild silkworms and also the mechanism of cellular toxicity of human diseases arising from expansion in polyalanine sequences. The atomic-level structures of alanine tripeptide and tetrapeptide with antiparallel β-sheet structures (AP-Ala3 and AP-Ala4, respectively) together with alanine tripeptide with parallel β-sheet structures (P-Ala3) have been determined, but alanine tetrapeptide with a parallel β-sheet structure (P-Ala4) has not been reported yet. In this article, first, we established the preparation protocol of P-Ala4 from more stable AP-Ala4. Second, complete assignments of the (13)C, (15)N, and (1)H solid-state NMR spectra were performed with (13)C- and (15)N-labeled Ala4 samples using several solid-state NMR techniques. Then, the structural constraints were obtained, for example, the amide proton peaks of P-Ala4 in the (1)H double-quantum magic-angle spinning NMR spectrum were heavily overlapped and observed at about 7.4 ppm, which was a much higher field than that of 8.7-9.1 ppm observed for AP-Ala4, indicating that the intermolecular hydrogen-bond lengths across strands (N-H···O═C) were considerably longer for P-Ala4, that is, 2.21-2.34 Å, than those reported for AP-Ala4, that is, 1.8-1.9 Å. The structural model was proposed for P-Ala4 by NMR results and MD calculations. PMID:27482868

  17. Depletion of the transcriptional coactivators megakaryoblastic leukaemia 1 and 2 abolishes hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft growth by inducing oncogene-induced senescence

    PubMed Central

    Hampl, Veronika; Martin, Claudia; Aigner, Achim; Hoebel, Sabrina; Singer, Stephan; Frank, Natalie; Sarikas, Antonio; Ebert, Oliver; Prywes, Ron; Gudermann, Thomas; Muehlich, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Megakaryoblastic leukaemia 1 and 2 (MKL1/2) are coactivators of the transcription factor serum response factor (SRF). Here, we provide evidence that depletion of MKL1 and 2 abolishes hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) xenograft growth. Loss of the tumour suppressor deleted in liver cancer 1 (DLC1) and the subsequent activation of RhoA were prerequisites for MKL1/2 knockdown-mediated growth arrest. We identified oncogene-induced senescence as the molecular mechanism underlying the anti-proliferative effect of MKL1/2 knockdown. MKL1/2 depletion resulted in Ras activation, elevated p16 expression and hypophosphorylation of the retinoblastoma (Rb) protein in DLC1-deficient HCC cells. Interestingly, reconstitution of HuH7 HCC cells with DLC1 also induced senescence. Evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy of MKL1/2 knockdown in vivo revealed that systemic treatment of nude mice bearing HuH7 tumour xenografts with MKL1/2 siRNAs complexed with polyethylenimine (PEI) completely abolished tumour growth. The regression of the xenografts was associated with senescence. Importantly, PEI-complexed MKL1 siRNA alone was sufficient for complete abrogation of HCC xenograft growth. Thus, MKL1/2 represent promising novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of HCCs characterized by DLC1 loss. PMID:23853104

  18. Performance effects of acute β-alanine induced paresthesia in competitive cyclists.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, Phillip M; Minahan, Clare L

    2016-01-01

    β-alanine is a common ingredient in supplements consumed by athletes. Indeed, athletes may believe that the β-alanine induced paresthesia, experienced shortly after ingestion, is associated with its ergogenic effect despite no scientific mechanism supporting this notion. The present study examined changes in cycling performance under conditions of β-alanine induced paresthesia. Eight competitive cyclists (VO2max = 61.8 ± 4.2 mL·kg·min(-1)) performed three practices, one baseline and four experimental trials. The experimental trials comprised a 1-km cycling time trial under four conditions with varying information (i.e., athlete informed β-alanine or placebo) and supplement content (athlete received β-alanine or placebo) delivered to the cyclist: informed β-alanine/received β-alanine, informed placebo/received β-alanine, informed β-alanine/received placebo and informed placebo/received placebo. Questionnaires were undertaken exploring the cyclists' experience of the effects of the experimental conditions. A possibly likely increase in mean power was associated with conditions in which β-alanine was administered (±95% CL: 2.2% ± 4.0%), but these results were inconclusive for performance enhancement (p = 0.32, effect size = 0.18, smallest worthwhile change = 56% beneficial). A possibly harmful effect was observed when cyclists were correctly informed that they had ingested a placebo (-1.0% ± 1.9%). Questionnaire data suggested that β-alanine ingestion resulted in evident sensory side effects and six cyclists reported placebo effects. Acute ingestion of β-alanine is not associated with improved 1-km TT performance in competitive cyclists. These findings are in contrast to the athlete's "belief" as cyclists reported improved energy and the ability to sustain a higher power output under conditions of β-alanine induced paresthesia. PMID:25636080

  19. Intrathecal noradrenaline restores 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine induced antinociception abolished by intrathecal 6-hydroxydopamine.

    PubMed

    Minor, B G; Persson, M L; Post, C; Jonsson, G; Archer, T

    1988-01-01

    Intrathecal administration of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) abolished the antinociceptive effects of acute administration of 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeODMT, 1 mg/kg, s.c.) in the hot-plate, tail-flick and shock titration tests of nociception. The antinociceptive effects of 5-MeODMT, abolished by the prior intrathecal 6-OHDA treatment, were restored by intrathecal administration (2 or 1 microgram) of noradrenaline (NA), immediately prior to 5-MeODMT, in all three tests of nociception. Biochemical analysis confirmed severe NA depletions (95 percent loss) in the lumbar and thoracic regions of the spinal and much lesser dopamine depletions (25-35 percent loss). Intrathecal 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) attenuated 5-MeODMT induced antinociception in the tail-flick test and combined NA + 5-MeODMT induced antinociception in the hot-plate and tail-flick tests. Intrathecal administration of 5,7-DHT caused a severe depletion of 5-hydroxytryptamine in the lumbar region of the spinal cord. The present findings demonstrate further the modulatory role of NA upon serotonergic systems in nociception and indicate the necessity of NA availability for induction of 5-MeODMT analgesia. PMID:3133452

  20. An ACT1 mutation selectively abolishes interleukin-17 responses in humans with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Boisson, Bertrand; Wang, Chenhui; Pedergnana, Vincent; Wu, Ling; Cypowyj, Sophie; Rybojad, Michel; Belkadi, Aziz; Picard, Capucine; Abel, Laurent; Fieschi, Claire; Puel, Anne; Li, Xiaoxia; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2013-10-17

    Patients with inborn errors of interleukin-17F (IL-17F) or IL-17RA display chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC). We report a biallelic missense mutation (T536I) in the adaptor molecule ACT1 in two siblings with CMC. The mutation, located in the SEFIR domain, abolished the homotypic interaction of ACT1 with IL-17 receptors, with no effect on homodimerization. The patients' fibroblasts failed to respond to IL-17A and IL-17F, and their T cells to IL-17E. By contrast, healthy individuals homozygous for the common variant D10N, located in the ACT1 tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor-interacting domain and previously associated with psoriasis, had impaired, but not abolished, responses to IL-17 cytokines. SEFIR-independent interactions of ACT1 with other proteins, such as CD40, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and HSP90, were not affected by the T536I mutation. Overall, human IL-17A and IL-17F depend on ACT1 to mediate protective mucocutaneous immunity. Moreover, other ACT1-dependent IL-17 cytokines seem to be largely redundant in host defense. PMID:24120361

  1. A biallelic ACT1 mutation selectively abolishes interleukin-17 responses in humans with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Boisson, Bertrand; Wang, Chenhui; Pedergnana, Vincent; Wu, Ling; Cypowyj, Sophie; Rybojad, Michel; Belkadi, Aziz; Picard, Capucine; Abel, Laurent; Fieschi, Claire; Puel, Anne; Li, Xiaoxia; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Patients with inborn errors of IL-17F or IL-17RA display chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC). We report a biallelic missense mutation (T536I) in the adaptor molecule ACT1 in two siblings with CMC. The mutation, located in the SEFIR domain, abolished the homotypic interaction of ACT1 with IL-17 receptors, with no effect on homodimerization. The patients’ fibroblasts failed to respond to IL-17A and IL-17F, and their T cells to IL-17E. By contrast, healthy individuals homozygous for the common variant D10N, located in the ACT1 TNF receptor-associated factor (TRAF)-interacting domain and previously associated with psoriasis, had impaired, but not abolished, responses to IL-17 cytokines. SEFIR-independent interactions of ACT1 with other proteins, such as CD40, heat shock protein (HSP)70 and HSP90, were not affected by the T536I mutation. Overall, human IL-17A and IL-17F depend on ACT1 to mediate protective mucocutaneous immunity. Moreover, other ACT1-dependent IL-17 cytokines seem to be largely redundant in host defense. PMID:24120361

  2. Inversion of contrast polarity abolishes spontaneous preferences for face-like stimuli in newborn chicks.

    PubMed

    Rosa Salva, Orsola; Regolin, Lucia; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2012-03-01

    A spontaneous preference for face-like stimuli has been demonstrated in domestic chicks, similar to that shown by human newborns, suggesting evolutionary continuity across species. Inversion of contrast polarity of face-like stimuli abolishes face preferences in human newborns. Here we investigated the effects of contrast polarity inversion and brain lateralization in chicks' preferences for faces. In Experiment 1 face-naïve chicks were tested with a negative face obtained from a stimulus that elicited preferential approach in previous research. As in human newborns, reversal of contrast polarity abolished face-preferences. Experiments 2, 3 and 5 investigated the effect of adding a pupil-like dot within the inner features of the negative and of positive stimuli (a manipulation that re-established face-preference in human newborns). Chicks reacted to this by avoiding the face stimulus. In Experiments 4 and 6 we found that the preference expressed by chicks having only their left eye (right hemisphere) in use changed according to contrast polarity, whereas it remained unaffected in chicks having their right eye in use. Thus, in domestic chicks, as in human beings, a stimulus is perceived as face-like only if it presents the correct luminance pattern expected for a face under natural top-lit illumination and the right hemisphere seems to play a crucial role in this kind of social orienting responses. PMID:22155610

  3. Caffeine–N-phthaloyl-β-alanine (1/1)

    PubMed Central

    Bhatti, Moazzam H.; Yunus, Uzma; Shah, Syed Raza; Flörke, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    The title co-crystal [systematic name: 3-(1,3-dioxoisoindolin-2-yl)propanoic acid–1,3,7-trimethyl-1H-purine-2,6(3H,7H)-dione (1/1)], C8H10N4O2·C11H9NO4, is the combination of 1:1 adduct of N-phthaloyl-β-alanine with caffeine. The phthalimide and purine rings in the N-phthaloyl-β-alanine and caffeine mol­ecules are essentially planar, with r.m.s. deviations of the fitted atoms of 0.0078 and 0.0118 Å, respectively. In the crystal, the two mol­ecules are linked via an O—H⋯N hydrogen bond involving the intact carb­oxy­lic acid (COOH) group. The crystal structure is consolidated by C—H⋯O inter­actions. The H atoms of a methyl group of the caffeine mol­ecule are disordered over two sets of sites of equal occupancy. PMID:22719646

  4. The effect of immunonutrition (glutamine, alanine) on fracture healing

    PubMed Central

    Küçükalp, Abdullah; Durak, Kemal; Bayyurt, Sarp; Sönmez, Gürsel; Bilgen, Muhammed S.

    2014-01-01

    Background There have been various studies related to fracture healing. Glutamine is an amino acid with an important role in many cell and organ functions. This study aimed to make a clinical, radiological, and histopathological evaluation of the effects of glutamine on fracture healing. Methods Twenty rabbits were randomly allocated into two groups of control and immunonutrition. A fracture of the fibula was made to the right hind leg. All rabbits received standard food and water. From post-operative first day for 30 days, the study group received an additional 2 ml/kg/day 20% L-alanine L-glutamine solution via a gastric catheter, and the control group received 2 ml/kg/day isotonic via gastric catheter. At the end of 30 days, the rabbits were sacrificed and the fractures were examined clinically, radiologically, and histopathologically in respect to the degree of union. Results Radiological evaluation of the control group determined a mean score of 2.5 according to the orthopaedists and 2.65 according to the radiologists. In the clinical evaluation, the mean score was 1.875 for the control group and 2.0 for the study group. Histopathological evaluation determined a mean score of 8.5 for the control group and 9.0 for the study group. Conclusion One month after orally administered glutamine–alanine, positive effects were observed on fracture healing radiologically, clinically, and histopathologically, although no statistically significant difference was determined.

  5. Abolished ventilation and perfusion of lung caused by blood clot in the left main bronchus: auto-downregulation of pulmonary arterial blood supply.

    PubMed

    Afzelius, P; Bergmann, A; Henriksen, J H

    2015-01-01

    It is generally assumed that the lungs possess arterial autoregulation associated with bronchial obstruction. A patient with pneumonia and congestive heart failure unexpectedly developed frequent haemoptysis. High-resolution CT and diagnostic CT were performed as well as ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphy with single-photon emission CT (SPECT)/CT. V/Q SPECT/CT demonstrated abolished ventilation due to obstruction of the left main bronchus and markedly reduced perfusion of the entire left lung, a condition that was completely reversed after removal of a blood clot. We present the first pictorially documented case of hypoxia-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction and flow shift in a main pulmonary artery due to a complete intrinsic obstruction of the ipsilateral main bronchus. The condition is reversible, contingent on being relieved within a few days. PMID:26374773

  6. Complete diphallia.

    PubMed

    Acimi, Smail

    2008-01-01

    A case of complete diphallia in a 4-month-old boy is reported. This is the second case to be published from this institution. The embryogenesis and associated anomalies of diphallia are discussed, together with a proposal for a classification based on anatomical, functional and therapeutic aspects of the malformation. PMID:19230173

  7. Effects of β-Alanine on Body Composition and Performance Measures in Collegiate Women.

    PubMed

    Outlaw, Jordan J; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Buckley, Amanda L; Urbina, Stacie L; Hayward, Sara; Wingfield, Hailee L; Campbell, Bill; Foster, Cliffa; Taylor, Lem W; Wilborn, Colin D

    2016-09-01

    Outlaw, JJ, Smith-Ryan, AE, Buckley, AL, Urbina, SL, Hayward, S, Wingfield, HL, Campbell, B, Foster, C, Taylor, LW, and Wilborn, CD. Effects of β-alanine on body composition and performance measures in collegiate women. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2627-2637, 2016-The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of β-alanine (BA) supplementation and resistance training on body composition and performance. In a double-blind placebo-controlled design, 16 untrained collegiate females (mean ± SD: 21.0 ± 2.2 years; 64.8 ± 8.5 kg; 164.5 ± 7.0 cm; 30.1 ± 5.1 percent body fat [%BF]) completed 8 weeks of resistance training while consuming either 3.4 g BA or placebo (PL; 5 g maltodextrin) before training sessions. Training consisted of 4 days per week upper- and lower-body exercises. Lean body mass (LBM), fat mass (FM), and %BF were assessed using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Maximal oxygen consumption (V[Combining Dot Above]O2max), aerobic time to exhaustion, Wingate peak power, bench press and leg press 1RM (BPmax; LPmax), and repetitions at 65% (BPreps; LPreps), vertical jump (VJ), and standing broad jump were assessed using standard National Strength and Conditioning Association guidelines. All measurements were taken at baseline (T1), 4 weeks (T2), and 8 weeks (T3). Repeated-measures analysis of variance and 95% confidence intervals were used to determine significance. Body composition (LBM, FM, and %BF) improved over time (p < 0.01) for both groups. Maximal strength and VJ increased significantly from baseline to T3 (p ≤ 0.05). There was a significant interaction for LPreps (p = 0.040), with only BA group resulting in significantly greater LPreps (p = 0.041) at T2 and T3. Results from this study suggest that 8 weeks, 4 days per week progressive resistance training and BA supplementation may be effective for improving lower-body muscular endurance. β-alanine had no additive effects on body composition or maximal strength in collegiate women. PMID

  8. Decreased alanine aminotransferase activity in serum of man during gamma-acetylenic-GABA treatment.

    PubMed

    Olsen, R; Hørder, M

    1980-06-01

    Decreasing concentrations of alanine aminotransferase were observed in nine patients receiving gamma-acetylenic-GABA, an inhibitor of GABA aminotransferase. In vitro studies showed that preincubation at 37 degrees C of serum with gamma-acetylenic-GABA and with urine from a patient receiving the drug led to inhibition of alanine aminotransferase. This inhibition of alanine aminotransferase by gamma-acetylenic-GABA was neutralized by 1-analine, the natural substrate for the enzyme. The mechanism of inhibition may be a competition between the drug and 1-alanine for the substrate binding site of the enzyme. PMID:7414257

  9. Effect of β-alanine supplementation on high-intensity exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Harris, Roger C; Stellingwerff, Trent

    2013-01-01

    Carnosine is a dipeptide of β-alanine and L-histidine found in high concentrations in skeletal muscle. Combined with β-alanine, the pKa of the histidine imidazole ring is raised to ∼6.8, placing it within the muscle intracellular pH high-intensity exercise transit range. Combination with β-alanine renders the dipeptide inert to intracellular enzymic hydrolysis and blocks the histidinyl residue from participation in proteogenesis, thus making it an ideal, stable intracellular buffer. For vegetarians, synthesis is limited by β-alanine availability; for meat-eaters, hepatic synthesis is supplemented with β-alanine from the hydrolysis of dietary carnosine. Direct oral β-alanine supplementation will compensate for low meat and fish intake, significantly raising the muscle carnosine concentration. This is best achieved with a sustained-release formulation of β-alanine to avoid paresthesia symptoms and decreasing urinary spillover. In humans, increased levels of carnosine through β-alanine supplementation have been shown to increase exercise capacity and performance of several types, particularly where the high-intensity exercise range is 1-4 min. β-Alanine supplementation is used by athletes competing in high-intensity track and field cycling, rowing, swimming events and other competitions. PMID:23899755

  10. Adafenoxate abolishes the amnesia induced by neonatal 6-hydroxydopamine treatment in rats.

    PubMed

    Genkova-Papazova, M G; Stancheva, S L; Alova, L G; Lazarova-Bakarova, M B

    1993-06-01

    The effect of neonatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) treatment on learning and memory and on the levels of biogenic monoamines in some brain structures, as well as the influence of the nootropic drug adafenoxate on 6-OHDA effect was studied in shuttle box and step down trained rats. In mature rats injected with 6-OHDA postnatal, learning and retention were impaired and the noradrenaline (NA) level in the frontal cortex and hippocampus was decreased. Adafenoxate abolished the amnestic effect of 6-OHDA and restored the NA level to normal in the above-mentioned brain structures. This finding suggests the important role of the noradrenergic neurotransmitter system in 6-OHDA-induced amnesia and the favorable effect of adafenoxate on learning and memory impaired by 6-OHDA. PMID:8412411

  11. ROCK inhibitor abolishes the antibody response in experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Li, Heng; Zhang, Min; Wang, Cong-Cong; Li, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Peng; Yue, Long-Tao; Miao, Shuai; Dou, Ying-Chun; Li, Yan-Bin; Duan, Rui-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    The Rho/Rho kinase (ROCK) pathway serves as molecular switches in many biological processes including the immune response. ROCK inhibitors lead to amelioration of some autoimmune diseases. The present study was designed to define whether a selective ROCK inhibitor, fasudil, was effective in experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) and investigate the underlying mechanisms. Here we found fasudil effectively attenuated the development of ongoing EAMG. Fasudil abolished the antibody production and function by decreasing follicular helper T cells and CD19(+) B cells, especially germinal center B cells. Moreover, fasudil reduced the expression of CD80 on lymph node mononuclear cells. These findings suggest the inhibition of ROCK might be a potential therapeutic strategy for antibody-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:27168379

  12. Active-Site-Directed Inhibitors of Prolyl Oligopeptidase Abolish Its Conformational Dynamics.

    PubMed

    López, Abraham; Herranz-Trillo, Fátima; Kotev, Martin; Gairí, Margarida; Guallar, Víctor; Bernadó, Pau; Millet, Oscar; Tarragó, Teresa; Giralt, Ernest

    2016-05-17

    Deciphering conformational dynamics is crucial for understanding the biological functions of proteins and for designing compounds targeting them. In particular, providing an accurate description of microsecond-millisecond motions opens the opportunity for regulating protein-protein interactions (PPIs) by modulating the dynamics of one interacting partner. Here we analyzed the conformational dynamics of prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) and the effects of active-site-directed inhibitors on the dynamics. We used an integrated structural biology approach based on NMR spectroscopy and SAXS experiments complemented by MD simulations. We found that POP is in a slow equilibrium in solution between open and closed conformations, and that inhibitors effectively abolished this equilibrium by stabilizing the enzyme in the closed conformation. PMID:26918396

  13. Balloon catheter injury abolishes phenylephrine-induced relaxation in the rat contralateral carotid

    PubMed Central

    Pernomian, L; Gomes, MS; de Oliveira, AM

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The consequences of compensatory responses to balloon catheter injury in rat carotid artery, on phenylephrine-induced relaxation and contraction in the contralateral carotid artery were studied. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Relaxation and contraction concentration–response curves for phenylephrine were obtained for contralateral carotid arteries in the presence of indomethacin (COX inhibitor), SC560 (COX-1 inhibitor), SC236 (COX-2 inhibitor) or 4-hydroxytetramethyl-L-piperidine-1-oxyl (tempol; superoxide dismutase mimetic). Reactive oxygen species were measured in carotid artery endothelial cells fluorimetrically with dihydroethidium. KEY RESULTS Phenylephrine-induced relaxation was abolished in contralateral carotid arteries from operated rats (Emax= 0.01 ± 0.004 g) in relation to control (Emax= 0.18 ± 0.005 g). Phenylephrine-induced contractions were increased in contralateral arteries (Emax= 0.54 ± 0.009 g) in relation to control (Emax= 0.38 ± 0.014 g). SC236 restored phenylephrine-induced relaxation (Emax= 0.17 ± 0.004 g) and contraction (Emax= 0.34 ± 0.018 g) in contralateral arteries. Tempol restored phenylephrine-induced relaxation (Emax= 0.19 ± 0.012 g) and contraction (Emax= 0.42 ± 0.014 g) in contralateral arteries, while apocynin did not alter either relaxation (Emax= 0.01 ± 0.004 g) or contraction (Emax= 0.54 ± 0.009 g). Dihydroethidium fluorescence was increased in contralateral samples (18 882 ± 435 U) in relation to control (10 455 ± 303 U). SC236 reduced the fluorescence in contralateral samples (8250 ± 365 U). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Balloon catheter injury abolished phenylephrine-induced relaxation and increased phenylephrine-induced contraction in contralateral carotid arteries, through O2− derived from COX-2. PMID:21323906

  14. High frequency stimulation abolishes thalamic network oscillations: an electrophysiological and computational analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kendall H.; Hitti, Frederick L.; Chang, Su-Youne; Lee, Dongchul C.; Roberts, David W.; McIntyre, Cameron C.; Leiter, James C.

    2011-08-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the thalamus has been demonstrated to be effective for the treatment of epilepsy. To investigate the mechanism of action of thalamic DBS, we examined the effects of high frequency stimulation (HFS) on spindle oscillations in thalamic brain slices from ferrets. We recorded intracellular and extracellular electrophysiological activity in the nucleus reticularis thalami (nRt) and in thalamocortical relay (TC) neurons in the lateral geniculate nucleus, stimulated the slice using a concentric bipolar electrode, and recorded the level of glutamate within the slice. HFS (100 Hz) of TC neurons generated excitatory post-synaptic potentials, increased the number of action potentials in both TC and nRt neurons, reduced the input resistance, increased the extracellular glutamate concentration, and abolished spindle wave oscillations. HFS of the nRt also suppressed spindle oscillations. In both locations, HFS was associated with significant and persistent elevation in extracellular glutamate levels and suppressed spindle oscillations for many seconds after the cessation of stimulation. We simulated HFS within a computational model of the thalamic network, and HFS also disrupted spindle wave activity, but the suppression of spindle activity was short-lived. Simulated HFS disrupted spindle activity for prolonged periods of time only after glutamate release and glutamate-mediated activation of a hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih) was incorporated into the model. Our results suggest that the mechanism of action of thalamic DBS as used in epilepsy may involve the prolonged release of glutamate, which in turn modulates specific ion channels such as Ih, decreases neuronal input resistance, and abolishes thalamic network oscillatory activity.

  15. Interleukin 4 reduces expression of inhibitory receptors on B cells and abolishes CD22 and Fc gamma RII-mediated B cell suppression.

    PubMed

    Rudge, Elizabeth U; Cutler, Antony J; Pritchard, Nicholas R; Smith, Kenneth G C

    2002-04-15

    Inhibitory receptors CD22, Fc gamma RII (CD32), CD72, and paired immunoglobulin-like receptor (PIR)-B are critically involved in negatively regulating the B cell immune response and in preventing autoimmunity. Here we show that interleukin 4 (IL-4) reduces expression of all four on activated B cells at the level of messenger RNA and protein. This reduced expression is dependent on continuous exposure to IL-4 and is mediated through Stat6. Coligation of Fc gamma RII to the B cell receptor (BCR) via intact IgG increases the B cell activation threshold and suppresses antigen presentation. IL-4 completely abolishes these negative regulatory effects of Fc gamma RII. CD22 coligation with the BCR also suppresses activation -- this suppression too is abolished by IL-4. Thus, IL-4 is likely to enhance the B cell immune response by releasing B cells from inhibitory receptor suppression. By this coordinate reduction in expression of inhibitory receptors, and release from CD22 and Fc gamma RII-mediated inhibition, IL-4 is likely to play a role in T cell help of B cells and the development of T helper cell type 2 responses. Conversely, B cell activation in the absence of IL-4 would be more difficult to achieve, contributing to the maintenance of B cell tolerance in the absence of T cell help. PMID:11956299

  16. Radiolysis of alanine adsorbed in a clay mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Ovando, Ellen Y.; Negrón-Mendoza, Alicia

    2013-07-01

    Optical activity in molecules is a chemical characteristic of living beings. In this work, we examine the hypothesis of the influence of different mineral surfaces on the development of a specific chirality in organic molecules when subjected to conditions simulating the primitive Earth during the period of chemical evolution. By using X-ray diffraction techniques and HPLC/ELSD to analyze aqueous suspensions of amino acids adsorbed on minerals irradiated in different doses with a cobalt-60 gamma source, the experiments attempt to prove the hypothesis that some solid surfaces (like clays and meteorite rocks) may have a concentration capacity and protective role against external sources of ionizing radiation (specifically γ-ray) for some organic compounds (like some amino acids) adsorbed on them. Preliminary results show a slight difference in the adsorption and radiolysis of the D-and L-alanine.

  17. Radiolysis of alanine adsorbed in a clay mineral

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Ovando, Ellen Y.; Negron-Mendoza, Alicia

    2013-07-03

    Optical activity in molecules is a chemical characteristic of living beings. In this work, we examine the hypothesis of the influence of different mineral surfaces on the development of a specific chirality in organic molecules when subjected to conditions simulating the primitive Earth during the period of chemical evolution. By using X-ray diffraction techniques and HPLC/ELSD to analyze aqueous suspensions of amino acids adsorbed on minerals irradiated in different doses with a cobalt-60 gamma source, the experiments attempt to prove the hypothesis that some solid surfaces (like clays and meteorite rocks) may have a concentration capacity and protective role against external sources of ionizing radiation (specifically {gamma}-ray) for some organic compounds (like some amino acids) adsorbed on them. Preliminary results show a slight difference in the adsorption and radiolysis of the D-and L-alanine.

  18. Efficient L-Alanine Production by a Thermo-Regulated Switch in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Deng, Can; Cui, Wen-Jing; Liu, Zhong-Mei; Zhou, Zhe-Min

    2016-01-01

    L-Alanine has important applications in food, pharmaceutical and veterinary and is used as a substrate for production of engineered thermoplastics. Microbial fermentation could reduce the production cost and promote the application of L-alanine. However, the presence of L-alanine significantly inhibit cell growth rate and cause a decrease in the ultimate L-alanine productivity. For efficient L-alanine production, a thermo-regulated genetic switch was designed to dynamically control the expression of L-alanine dehydrogenase (alaD) from Geobacillus stearothermophilus on the Escherichia coli B0016-060BC chromosome. The optimal cultivation conditions for the genetically switched alanine production using B0016-060BC were the following: an aerobic growth phase at 33 °C with a 1-h thermo-induction at 42 °C followed by an oxygen-limited phase at 42 °C. In a bioreactor experiment using the scaled-up conditions optimized in a shake flask, B0016-060BC accumulated 50.3 g biomass/100 g glucose during the aerobic growth phase and 96 g alanine/100 g glucose during the oxygen-limited phase, respectively. The L-alanine titer reached 120.8 g/l with higher overall and oxygen-limited volumetric productivities of 3.09 and 4.18 g/l h, respectively, using glucose as the sole carbon source. Efficient cell growth and L-alanine production were reached separately, by switching cultivation temperature. The results revealed the application of a thermo-regulated strategy for heterologous metabolic production and pointed to strategies for improving L-alanine production. PMID:26453031

  19. Complete prewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsyshin, P.; Parry, A. O.; Kalliadasis, S.

    2016-07-01

    We study continuous interfacial transitions, analagous to two-dimensional complete wetting, associated with the first-order prewetting line, which can occur on steps, patterned walls, grooves and wedges, and which are sensitive to both the range of the intermolecular forces and interfacial fluctuation effects. These transitions compete with wetting, filling and condensation producing very rich phase diagrams even for relatively simple prototypical geometries. Using microscopic classical density functional theory to model systems with realistic Lennard-Jones fluid–fluid and fluid–substrate intermolecular potentials, we compute mean-field fluid density profiles, adsorption isotherms and phase diagrams for a variety of confining geometries.

  20. Acute Heat-Evoked Temperature Sensation Is Impaired but Not Abolished in Mice Lacking TRPV1 and TRPV3 Channels

    PubMed Central

    Reynders, Ana; Gaillard, Stéphane; Moqrich, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of heat-sensitive Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid ion channels (ThermoTRPVs) greatly advanced our molecular understanding of acute and injury-evoked heat temperature sensation. ThermoTRPV channels are activated by partially overlapping temperatures ranging from warm to supra-threshold noxious heat. TRPV1 is activated by noxious heat temperature whereas TRPV3 can be activated by warm as well as noxious heat temperatures. Loss-of-function studies in single TRPV1 and TRPV3 knock-out mice have shown that heat temperature sensation is not completely abolished suggesting functional redundancies among these two channels and highlighting the need of a detailed analysis of TRPV1::TRPV3 double knock-out mice (V1V3dKO) which is hampered by the close proximity of the loci expressing the two channels. Here we describe the generation of a novel mouse model in which trpv1 and trpv3 genes have been inactivated using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells. In these mice, using classical thermosensory tests such hot plate, tail flick and the thermotaxis gradient paradigms, we confirm that TRPV1 is the master channel for sensing noxious heat temperatures and identify a cooperative role of TRPV1 and TRPV3 for sensing a well-defined window of acute moderate heat temperature. Using the dynamic hot plate assay, we unravel an intriguing and unexpected pronounced escape behavior in TRPV1 knock-out mice that was attenuated in the V1V3dKO. Together, and in agreement with the temperature activation overlap between TRPV1 and TRPV3 channels, our data provide in vivo evidence of a cooperative role between skin-derived TRPV3 and primary sensory neurons-enriched TRPV1 in modulation of moderate and noxious heat temperature sensation and suggest that other mechanisms are required for heat temperature sensation. PMID:24925072

  1. Inactivation of 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)alanine decarboxylase by 2-(fluoromethyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)alanine.

    PubMed

    Maycock, A L; Aster, S D; Patchett, A A

    1980-02-19

    2-(Fluoromethyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)alanine [alpha-FM-Dopa (I)] causes rapid, time-dependent, stereospecific, and irreversible inhibition of hog kidney aromatic amino acid (Dopa) decarboxylase. The inactivation occurs with loss of both the carboxyl carbon and fluoride from I and results in the stoichimetric formation of a covalent enzyme-inhibitor adduct. The data are consistent with I being a suicide inactivator of the enzyme, and a plausible mechanism for the inactivation process is presented. The inactivation is highly efficient in that there is essentially no enzymatic turnover of I to produce the corresponding amine, 1-(fluoromethyl)-2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)ethylamine [alpha-FM-dopamine (II)]. Amine II is also a potent inactivator of the enzyme. In vivo compound I is found to inactivate both brain and peripheral (liver) Dopa decarboxylase activity. The possible significance of these data with respect to the known antihypertensive effect of I is discussed. PMID:7356954

  2. Catalytic properties of Sepharose-bound L-alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Mureşan, L; Vancea, D; Presecan, E; Porumb, H; Lascu, I; Oargă, M; Matinca, D; Abrudan, I; Bârzu, O

    1983-02-15

    (1) L-Alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus cereus was purified by a two-step chromatographic procedure involving Cibacron-Blue 3G-A Sepharose 4B-CL, and Sepharose 6B-CL, and immobilized on CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B. (2) Following immobilization via two of the six subunits, L-alanine dehydrogenase retained 66% of the specific activity of the soluble enzyme. The affinity of the immobilized enzyme for NH4+, pyruvate and L-alanine, was not different to that of the soluble form. The Km of the Sepharose-bound L-alanine dehydrogenase for pyridine coenzymes was 6-8-times higher than in the soluble case. (3) The stability of L-alanine dehydrogenase towards urea or thermal denaturation was increased by immobilization. (4) The incubation at 37 degrees C for 24 h of the immobilized L-alanine dehydrogenase with 3 M NH4Cl/NH4OH buffer (pH 9) released 70% of the enzyme. The specific activity and the affinity of the 'solubilized' L-alanine dehydrogenase for the pyridine coenzymes was the same as that obtained with the original, soluble L-alanine dehydrogenase. PMID:6404304

  3. Polymerization of alanine in the presence of a non-swelling montmorillonite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paecht-Horowitz, M.; Lahav, N.

    1977-01-01

    Alanine, starting from alanine-adenylate, has been polymerized in the presence of non-swelling Al-montmorillonite. The yield of polymerization is much lower than that obtained in the presence of swelling Na-montmorillonite. The possibility that the changing interlayer spacing in Na-montmorillonite might be responsible for its catalytic properties, is discussed.

  4. Initiation of Spore Germination in Bacillus subtilis: Relationship to Inhibition of l-Alanine Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Chandan

    1974-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of anthranilic acid esters (methyl anthranilate and N-methyl anthranilate) on the l-alanine-induced initiation of spore germination was examined in Bacillus subtilis 168. Methyl anthranilate irreversibly inhibited alanine initiation by a competitive mechanism. In its presence, the inhibition could be reversed only by the combined addition of d-glucose, d-fructose, and K+. Both l-alanine dehydrogenase and l-glutamate-pyruvate transaminase, enzymes which catalyze the first reaction in l-alanine metabolism, were competitively inhibited by methyl anthranilate. The Ki values for germination initiation (0.053 mM) and of l-glutamate-pyruvate transaminase (0.068 mM) were similar, whereas that for l-alanine dehydrogenase (0.4 mM) was six to seven times higher. Since a mutant lacking l-alanine dehydrogenase activity germinated normally in l-alanine alone, it is speculated that the major pathway of l-alanine metabolism during initiation may be via transmination reaction. PMID:4212093

  5. Thermal decomposition behavior of potassium and sodium jarosite synthesized in the presence of methylamine and alanine

    SciTech Connect

    J. Michelle Kotler; Nancy W. Hinman; C. Doc Richardson; Jill R. Scott

    2010-10-01

    Biomolecules, methylamine and alanine, found associated with natural jarosite samples peaked the interest of astrobiologists and planetary geologists. How the biomolecules are associated with jarosite remains unclear although the mechanism could be important for detecting biosignatures in the rock record on Earth and other planets. A series of thermal gravimetric experiments using synthetic K-jarosite and Na-jarosite were conducted to determine if thermal analysis could differentiate physical mixtures of alanine and methylamine with jarosite from samples where the methylamine or alanine was incorporated into the synthesis procedure. Physical mixtures and synthetic experiments with methylamine and alanine could be differentiated from one another and from the standards by thermal analysis for both the K-jarosite and Na-jarosite end-member suites. Changes included shifts in on-set temperatures, total temperature changes from on-set to final, and the presence of indicator peaks for methylamine and alanine in the physical mixture experiments.

  6. How similar is the electronic structures of β-lactam and alanine?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Subhojyoti; Ahmed, Marawan; Wang, Feng

    2016-02-01

    The C1s spectra of β-lactam i.e. 2-azetidinone (C3H5NO), a drug and L-alanine (C3H7NO2), an amino acid, exhibit striking similarities, which may be responsible for the competition between 2-azetidinone and the alanyl-alanine moiety in biochemistry. The present study is to reveal the degree of similarities and differences between their electronic structures of the two model molecular pairs. It is found that the similarities in C1s and inner valence binding energy spectra are due to their bonding connections but other properties such as ring structure (in 2-azetidinone) and chiral carbon (alanine) can be very different. Further, the inner valence region of ionization potential greater than 18 eV for 2-azetidinone and alanine is also significantly similar. Finally the strained lactam ring exhibits more chemical reactivity measured at all non-hydrogen atoms by Fukui functions with respect to alanine.

  7. Improvement of cellulose catabolism in Clostridium cellulolyticum by sporulation abolishment and carbon alleviation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yongchao; Xu, Tao; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Engle, Nancy L; Graham, David E; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2014-01-01

    Background Clostridium cellulolyticum can degrade lignocellulosic biomass, and ferment the soluble sugars to produce valuable chemicals such as lactate, acetate, ethanol and hydrogen. However, the cellulose utilization efficiency of C. cellulolyticum still remains very low, impeding its application in consolidated bioprocessing for biofuels production. In this study, two metabolic engineering strategies were exploited to improve cellulose utilization efficiency, including sporulation abolishment and carbon overload alleviation. Results The spo0A gene at locus Ccel_1894, which encodes a master sporulation regulator was inactivated. The spo0A mutant abolished the sporulation ability. In a high concentration of cellulose (50 g/l), the performance of the spo0A mutant increased dramatically in terms of maximum growth, final concentrations of three major metabolic products, and cellulose catabolism. The microarray and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses showed that the valine, leucine and isoleucine biosynthesis pathways were up-regulated in the spo0A mutant. Based on this information, a partial isobutanol producing pathway modified from valine biosynthesis was introduced into C. cellulolyticum strains to further increase cellulose consumption by alleviating excessive carbon load. The introduction of this synthetic pathway to the wild-type strain improved cellulose consumption from 17.6 g/l to 28.7 g/l with a production of 0.42 g/l isobutanol in the 50 g/l cellulose medium. However, the spo0A mutant strain did not appreciably benefit from introduction of this synthetic pathway and the cellulose utilization efficiency did not further increase. A technical highlight in this study was that an in vivo promoter strength evaluation protocol was developed using anaerobic fluorescent protein and flow cytometry for C. cellulolyticum. Conclusions In this study, we inactivated the spo0A gene and introduced a heterologous synthetic pathway to manipulate the stress

  8. Expression, purification, and characterization of alanine racemase from Pseudomonas putida YZ-26.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Lin; Liu, Xiao-Qin; Shi, Ya-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Alanine racemase catalyzes the interconversion of D: - and L: -alanine and plays an important role in supplying D: -alanine, a component of peptidoglycan biosynthesis, to most bacteria. Alanine racemase exists mostly in prokaryotes and is generally absent in higher eukaryotes; this makes it an attractive target for the design of new antibacterial drugs. Here, we present the cloning and characterization of a new gene-encoding alanine racemase from Pseudomonas putida YZ-26. An open reading frame (ORF) of 1,230 bp, encoding a protein of 410 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 44,217.3 Da, was cloned into modified vector pET32M to form the recombinant plasmid pET-alr. After introduction into E.coli BL21, the strain pET-alr/E.coli BL21 expressed His(6)-tagged alanine racemase. The recombinant alanine racemase was efficiently purified to homogeneity using Ni(2+)-NTA and a gel filtration column, with 82.5% activity recovery. The amino acid sequence deduced from the alanine racemase gene revealed identity similarities of 97.0, 93, 23, and 22.0% with from P. putida F1, P. putida200, P. aeruginosa, and Salmonella typhimurium, respectively. The recombinant alanine racemase is a monomeric protein with a molecular mass of 43 kDa. The enzyme exhibited activity with L: -alanine and L: -isoleucine, and showed higher specificity for the former compared with the latter. The enzyme was stable from pH 7.0-11.0; its optimum pH was at 9.0. The optimum temperature for the enzyme was 37°C, and its activity was rapidly lost at temperatures above 40°C. Divalent metals, including Sr(2+), Mn(2+), Co(2+), and Ni(2+) obviously enhanced enzymatic activity, while the Cu(2+) ion showed inhibitory effects. PMID:22806802

  9. Calibration of helical tomotherapy machine using EPR/alanine dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Perichon, Nicolas; Garcia, Tristan; Francois, Pascal; Lourenco, Valerie; Lesven, Caroline; Bordy, Jean-Marc

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: Current codes of practice for clinical reference dosimetry of high-energy photon beams in conventional radiotherapy recommend using a 10x10 cm{sup 2} square field, with the detector at a reference depth of 10 cm in water and 100 cm source to surface distance (SSD) (AAPM TG-51) or 100 cm source-to-axis distance (SAD) (IAEA TRS-398). However, the maximum field size of a helical tomotherapy (HT) machine is 40x5 cm{sup 2} defined at 85 cm SAD. These nonstandard conditions prevent a direct implementation of these protocols. The purpose of this study is twofold: To check the absorbed dose in water and dose rate calibration of a tomotherapy unit as well as the accuracy of the tomotherapy treatment planning system (TPS) calculations for a specific test case. Method: Both topics are based on the use of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) using alanine as transfer dosimeter between the Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNHB) {sup 60}Co-{gamma}-ray reference beam and the Institut Curie's HT beam. Irradiations performed in the LNHB reference {sup 60}Co-{gamma}-ray beam allowed setting up the calibration method, which was then implemented and tested at the LNHB 6 MV linac x-ray beam, resulting in a deviation of 1.6% (at a 1% standard uncertainty) relative to the reference value determined with the standard IAEA TRS-398 protocol. Results: HT beam dose rate estimation shows a difference of 2% with the value stated by the manufacturer at a 2% standard uncertainty. A 4% deviation between measured dose and the calculation from the tomotherapy TPS was found. The latter was originated by an inadequate representation of the phantom CT-scan values and, consequently, mass densities within the phantom. This difference has been explained by the mass density values given by the CT-scan and used by the TPS which were not the true ones. Once corrected using Monte Carlo N-Particle simulations to validate the accuracy of this process, the difference between corrected TPS

  10. A mutation abolishing the ZMPSTE24 cleavage site in prelamin A causes a progeroid disorder.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuexia; Lichter-Konecki, Uta; Anyane-Yeboa, Kwame; Shaw, Jessica E; Lu, Jonathan T; Östlund, Cecilia; Shin, Ji-Yeon; Clark, Lorraine N; Gundersen, Gregg G; Nagy, Peter L; Worman, Howard J

    2016-05-15

    In 1994 in the Journal of Cell Science, Hennekes and Nigg reported that changing valine to arginine at the endoproteolytic cleavage site in chicken prelamin A abolishes its conversion to lamin A. The consequences of this mutation in an organism have remained unknown. We now report that the corresponding mutation in a human subject leads to accumulation of prelamin A and causes a progeroid disorder. Next generation sequencing of the subject and her parents' exomes identified a de novo mutation in the lamin A/C gene (LMNA) that resulted in a leucine to arginine amino acid substitution at residue 647 in prelamin A. The subject's fibroblasts accumulated prelamin A, a farnesylated protein, which led to an increased percentage of cultured cells with morphologically abnormal nuclei. Treatment with a protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor improved abnormal nuclear morphology. This case demonstrates that accumulation of prelamin A, independent of the loss of function of ZMPSTE24 metallopeptidase that catalyzes processing of prelamin A, can cause a progeroid disorder and that a cell biology assay could be used in precision medicine to identify a potential therapy. PMID:27034136

  11. Precise Toxigenic Ablation of Intermediate Cells Abolishes the “Battery” of the Cochlear Duct

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo Jeong; Gratton, Michael Anne; Lee, Jeong-Han; Perez Flores, Maria Cristina; Wang, Wenying; Doyle, Karen J.; Beermann, Friedrich; Crognale, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular potential of excitable and nonexcitable cells with respect to ground is ∼0 mV. One of the known exceptions in mammals is the cochlear duct, where the potential is ∼80–100 mV, called the endocochlear potential (EP). The EP serves as the “battery” for transduction of sound, contributing toward the sensitivity of the auditory system. The stria vascularis (StV) of the cochlear duct is the station where the EP is generated, but the cell-specific roles in the StV are ill defined. Using the intermediate cell (IC)-specific tyrosinase promoter, under the control of diphtheria toxin (DT), we eliminated and/or halted differentiation of neural crest melanocytes after migration to the StV. The ensuing adult transgenic mice are profoundly deaf. Additionally, the EP was abolished. Expression of melanocyte early marker and Kir4.1 in ICs precedes the onset of pigment synthesis. Activation of DT leads to loss of ICs. Finally, in accord with the distinct embryology of retinal pigmented cells, transgenic mice with toxigenic ablation of neural crest-derived melanocytes have intact visual responses. We assert that the tyrosinase promoter is the distinct target for genetic manipulation of IC-specific genes. PMID:24005310

  12. A Ca sup 2+ influx associated with exocytosis is specifically abolished in a Paramecium exocytotic mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Kerboeuf, D.; Cohen, J. )

    1990-12-01

    A Paramecium possesses secretory organelles called trichocysts which are docked beneath the plasma membrane awaiting an external stimulus that triggers their exocytosis. Membrane fusion is the sole event provoked by the stimulation and can therefore be studied per se. Using 3 microM aminoethyl dextran as a vital secretagogue, we analyzed the movements of calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) during the discharge of trichocysts. We showed that (a) external Ca{sup 2+}, at least at 3 X 10(-7) M, is necessary for AED to induce exocytosis; (b) a dramatic and transient influx of Ca{sup 2+} as measured from {sup 45}Ca uptake is induced by AED; (c) this influx is independent of the well-characterized voltage-operated Ca{sup 2+} channels of the ciliary membranes since it persists in a mutant devoid of these channels; and (d) this influx is specifically abolished in one of the mutants unable to undergo exocytosis, nd12. We propose that the Ca{sup 2+} influx induced by AED reflects an increase in membrane permeability through the opening of novel Ca{sup 2+} channel or the activation of other Ca{sup 2+} transport mechanism in the plasma membrane. The resulting rise in cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} concentration would in turn induce membrane fusion. The mutation nd12 would affect a gene product involved in the control of plasma membrane permeability to Ca{sup 2+}, specifically related to membrane fusion.

  13. Tristetraprolin is a tumor suppressor that impairs Myc-induced lymphoma and abolishes the malignant state

    PubMed Central

    Rounbehler, Robert J.; Fallahi, Mohammad; Yang, Chunying; Steeves, Meredith A.; Li, Weimin; Doherty, Joanne R.; Schaub, Franz X.; Sanduja, Sandhya; Dixon, Dan A.; Blackshear, Perry J.; Cleveland, John L.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Myc oncoproteins directly regulate transcription by binding to target genes, yet this only explains a fraction of the genes affected by Myc. mRNA turnover is controlled via AU-binding proteins (AUBPs) that recognize AU-rich elements (AREs) found within many transcripts. Analyses of precancerous and malignant Myc-expressing B cells revealed that Myc regulates hundreds of ARE-containing (ARED) genes and select AUBPs. Notably, Myc directly suppresses transcription of Tristetraprolin (TTP/ZFP36), an mRNA-destabilizing AUBP, and this circuit is also operational during B lymphopoiesis and IL7 signaling. Importantly, TTP suppression is a hallmark of cancers with MYC involvement, and restoring TTP impairs Myc-induced lymphomagenesis and abolishes maintenance of the malignant state. Further, there is a selection for TTP loss in malignancy; thus, TTP functions as a tumor suppressor. Finally, Myc/TTP-directed control of select cancer-associated ARED genes is disabled during lymphomagenesis. Thus, Myc targets AUBPs to regulate ARED genes that control tumorigenesis. PMID:22863009

  14. Digitonin abolishes free 2-deoxy-D-glucose accumulation in isolated rat adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, K.; Kleinzeller, A.

    1986-03-05

    The hypothesis that accumulation against sizable chemical gradients of free (non-phosphorylated) 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2dGlc) in isolated rat adipocytes results from an intracellular compartmentation of free hexose was investigated. Cells exposed to 20 ..mu..g/ml digitonin for 10' demonstrated an increased plasma membrane permeability indexed by increased L-glucose entry rates and cellular (presumably cytosolic) protein and K/sup +/ loss. Functional integrity of intracellular organelles was indicated by the ability of the cells to support ATP-driven /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/-uptake. Equilibrium 3-O-methylglucose (3-O-MG, a non-accumulated hexose) levels were unaffected. These data suggest a specific permeabilizing action of digitonin at the plasma membrane having no effect on intracellular organelles or passively distributed solutes. Upon addition of digitonin, free 2dGlc fell from 66.5 +/- 8.9 to 7.4 +/- 2.3 pmol/10/sup 5/ cells, a value not significantly different from 3-O-MG levels. The gradient of 2dGlc-phosphate was also abolished, as was the increased steady-state free 2dGlc levels induced by insulin. The data argue against a compartmentation model as either the mechanism of adipocyte sugar accumulation or the basis of the steady-state free 2dGlc increase seen with insulin and suggest that an intact plasma membrane is essential to the process.

  15. Cancer Abolishes the Tissue Type-Specific Differences in the Phenotype of Energetic Metabolism1

    PubMed Central

    Acebo, Paloma; Giner, Daniel; Calvo, Piedad; Blanco-Rivero, Amaya; Ortega, Álvaro D; Fernández, Pedro L; Roncador, Giovanna; Fernández-Malavé, Edgar; Chamorro, Margarita; Cuezva, José M

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays, cellular bioenergetics has become a central issue of investigation in cancer biology. Recently, the metabolic activity of the cancer cell has been shown to correlate with a proteomic index that informs of the relative mitochondrial activity of the cell. Within this new field of investigation, we report herein the production and characterization of high-affinity monoclonal antibodies against proteins of the “bioenergetic signature” of the cell. The use of recombinant proteins and antibodies against the mitochondrial β-F1-ATPase and Hsp60 proteins and the enzymes of the glycolytic pathway glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and pyruvate kinase M2 in quantitative assays provide, for the first time, the actual amount of these proteins in normal and tumor surgical specimens of breast, lung, and esophagus. The application of this methodology affords a straightforward proteomic signature that quantifies the variable energetic demand of human tissues. Furthermore, the results show an unanticipated finding: tumors from different tissues and/or histological types have the same proteomic signature of energetic metabolism. Therefore, the results indicate that cancer abolishes the tissue-specific differences in the bioenergetic phenotype of mitochondria. Overall, the results support that energetic metabolism represents an additional hallmark of the phenotype of the cancer cell and a promising target for the treatment of diverse neoplasias. PMID:19701498

  16. Black mamba venom peptides target acid-sensing ion channels to abolish pain.

    PubMed

    Diochot, Sylvie; Baron, Anne; Salinas, Miguel; Douguet, Dominique; Scarzello, Sabine; Dabert-Gay, Anne-Sophie; Debayle, Delphine; Friend, Valérie; Alloui, Abdelkrim; Lazdunski, Michel; Lingueglia, Eric

    2012-10-25

    Polypeptide toxins have played a central part in understanding physiological and physiopathological functions of ion channels. In the field of pain, they led to important advances in basic research and even to clinical applications. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are generally considered principal players in the pain pathway, including in humans. A snake toxin activating peripheral ASICs in nociceptive neurons has been recently shown to evoke pain. Here we show that a new class of three-finger peptides from another snake, the black mamba, is able to abolish pain through inhibition of ASICs expressed either in central or peripheral neurons. These peptides, which we call mambalgins, are not toxic in mice but show a potent analgesic effect upon central and peripheral injection that can be as strong as morphine. This effect is, however, resistant to naloxone, and mambalgins cause much less tolerance than morphine and no respiratory distress. Pharmacological inhibition by mambalgins combined with the use of knockdown and knockout animals indicates that blockade of heteromeric channels made of ASIC1a and ASIC2a subunits in central neurons and of ASIC1b-containing channels in nociceptors is involved in the analgesic effect of mambalgins. These findings identify new potential therapeutic targets for pain and introduce natural peptides that block them to produce a potent analgesia. PMID:23034652

  17. Inhibition of Mitochondrial P53 Abolishes the Detrimental Effects of Social Isolation on Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Venna, Venugopal Reddy; Verma, Rajkumar; O'Keefe, Lena M; Xu, Yan; Crapser, Joshua; Friedler, Brett; McCullough, Louise D.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Social Isolation (SI) increases stroke incidence and delays post-stroke recovery. Women may be at greater risk from the negative consequences of SI, but few studies have examined both sexes in experimental models, and none have evaluated the effects of isolation initiated after stroke. The effects of post-stroke SI in males and females were examined and the role of mitochondrial P53 was evaluated. Methods C57Bl6 mice were pair-housed (male and ovariectomized female) for 2 weeks, subjected to stroke and then assigned to a housing condition (isolated or pair-housed (PH)). The effects of housing on infarct volume and recovery were examined. Changes in Bcl-2 and mitochondrial p53 were assessed by western blot. A mitochondrial p53 inhibitor (PFT-μ) was given to mice of both sexes. Results Compared to PH mice, post-stroke SI significantly increased infarct size in both sexes; SI mice also had worse neurological deficits. The detrimental effects of SI paralleled increases in mitochondrial p53 levels. Pharmacological inhibition of mitochondrial p53 using PFT-μ abolished the detrimental effects of SI and reduced cell death. Conclusions Post-stroke SI results in increased ischemic injury in both sexes. The effect of housing on infarct was more pronounced in females. Targeting the mitochondrial P53 pathway could minimize the detrimental effects of isolation after stroke. PMID:25205311

  18. Identification of a mutation affecting an alanine-alpha-ketoisovalerate transaminase activity in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Falkinham, J O

    1979-10-01

    A mutation affecting alanine-alpha-ketoisovalerate transaminase activity has been shown to be cotransducible with ilv gene cluster. The transaminase deficiency results in conditional isoleucine auxotrophy in the presence of alanine. PMID:396446

  19. Complete Makeover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released July 23, 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth.

    Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms.

    We finish our look at Mars's dynamic atmosphere with an image of the surface that has been completely modified by the wind. Even the small ridges that remain have been ground down to a cliff-face with a 'tail' of eroded material. The crosshatching shows that the wind regime has remained mainly E/W to ENE/WSW.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 8.9, Longitude 221 East (139 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip

  20. Folding simulations of alanine-based peptides with lysine residues.

    PubMed Central

    Sung, S S

    1995-01-01

    The folding of short alanine-based peptides with different numbers of lysine residues is simulated at constant temperature (274 K) using the rigid-element Monte Carlo method. The solvent-referenced potential has prevented the multiple-minima problem in helix folding. From various initial structures, the peptides with three lysine residues fold into helix-dominated conformations with the calculated average helicity in the range of 60-80%. The peptide with six lysine residues shows only 8-14% helicity. These results agree well with experimental observations. The intramolecular electrostatic interaction of the charged lysine side chains and their electrostatic hydration destabilize the helical conformations of the peptide with six lysine residues, whereas these effects on the peptides with three lysine residues are small. The simulations provide insight into the helix-folding mechanism, including the beta-bend intermediate in helix initiation, the (i, i + 3) hydrogen bonds, the asymmetrical helix propagation, and the asymmetrical helicities in the N- and C-terminal regions. These findings are consistent with previous studies. PMID:7756550

  1. Alanine synthesis from glyceraldehyde and ammonium ion in aqueous solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    The formation of alanine (ala) form C(14)-glyceraldehyde and ammonium phosphate in the presence or absence of a thiol is reported. At ambient temperature, ala synthesis was six times more rapid in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid than in its absence (0.6 and 0.1 percent, respectively, after 60 days). Similarly, the presence of another thiol, N-acetylcysteinate, increased the production of ala, as well as of lactate. The reaction pathway of thiol-catalyzed synthesis of ala, with the lactic acid formed in a bypath, is suggested. In this, dehydration of glyceraldehyde is followed by the formation of hemithioacetal. In the presence of ammonia, an imine is formed, which eventually yields ala. This pathway is consistent with the observation that the rate ratio of ala/lactate remains constant throughout the process. The fact that the reaction takes place under anaerobic conditions in the presence of H2O and with the low concentrations of simple substrates and catalysts makes it an attractive model prebiotic reaction in the process of molecular evolution.

  2. Energy landscapes and global thermodynamics for alanine peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somani, Sandeep; Wales, David J.

    2013-09-01

    We compare different approaches for computing the thermodynamics of biomolecular systems. Techniques based on parallel replicas evolving via molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo simulations produce overlapping histograms for the densities of states. In contrast, energy landscape methods employ a superposition partition function constructed from local minima of the potential energy surface. The latter approach is particularly powerful for systems exhibiting broken ergodicity, and it is usually implemented using a harmonic normal mode approximation, which has not been extensively tested for biomolecules. The present contribution compares these alternative approaches for small alanine peptides modelled using the CHARMM and AMBER force fields. Densities of states produced from canonical sampling using multiple temperature replicas provide accurate reference data to evaluate the effect of the harmonic normal mode approximation in the superposition calculations. This benchmarking lays foundations for the application of energy landscape methods to larger biomolecules. It will also provide well characterised model systems for developing enhanced sampling methods, and for the treatment of anharmonicity corresponding to individual local minima.

  3. Alanine-EPR as a transfer standard dosimetry system for low energy X radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoury, H. J.; da Silva, E. J.; Mehta, K.; de Barros, V. S.; Asfora, V. K.; Guzzo, P. L.; Parker, A. G.

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the use of alanine-EPR as a transfer standard dosimetry system for low energy X radiation, such as that in RS-2400, which operates in the range from 25 to 150 kV and 2 to 45 mA. Two types of alanine dosimeters were investigated. One is a commercial alanine pellets from Aérial-Centre de Ressources Technologiques, France and one was prepared in our laboratory (LMRI-DEN/UFPE). The EPR spectra of the irradiated dosimeters were recorded in the Nuclear Energy Department of UFPE, using a Bruker EMX10 EPR spectrometer operating in the X-band. The alanine-EPR dosimetry system was calibrated in the range of 20-220 Gy in this X-ray field, against an ionization chamber calibrated at the relevant X-ray energy with traceability to PTB. The results showed that both alanine dosimeters presented a linear dose response the same sensitivity, when the EPR signal was normalized to alanine mass. The total uncertainty in the measured dose was estimated to be about 3%. The results indicate that it is possible to use the alanine-EPR dosimetry system for validation of a low-energy X ray irradiator, such as RS-2400.

  4. Sodium dependency of L-alanine absorption in canine Thiry-Vella loops.

    PubMed

    Fleshler, B; Nelson, R A

    1970-03-01

    The effect of sodium on the absorption of L-alanine in vivo was tested by measuring the absorption of L-alanine from Thiry-Vella loops in dogs. Solutions containing L-alanine (10 or 50 mM) sodium at concentrations of 0, 74, or 145 m-equiv/1 and mannitol, as needed to maintain isotonicity were instilled into the loops for 10 minutes. Similar studies were done with L-alanine 50 mM and either 0 or 145 m-equiv/1 of sodium for five minutes. Under all conditions absorption of alanine was significantly less from the solution initially free of sodium. Although these differences were statistically significant, the physiological significance was not great since the actual differences in amounts of L-alanine absorbed were small. Insorption of sodium was low from the fluid which initially had no sodium, but exsorption proceeded rapidly and was unaffected by the luminal sodium concentration. This resulted in a rapid rise of intraluminal sodium concentration when no sodium was initially present. This persistent exsorption of sodium was, therefore, adequate to provide sodium in the lumen to activate the sodium-dependent carrier, postulated on the basis of studies in vitro. These data in vivo are consistent with the view that sodium at the intraluminal surface is important in accelerating amino acid transport, but indicate that in the absence of added intraluminal sodium the gut mucosa itself, under normal circumstances, provides the sodium needed for L-alanine absorption. PMID:5423904

  5. Mitochondrial defects associated with β-alanine toxicity: relevance to hyper-beta-alaninemia.

    PubMed

    Shetewy, Aza; Shimada-Takaura, Kayoko; Warner, Danielle; Jong, Chian Ju; Mehdi, Abu-Bakr Al; Alexeyev, Mikhail; Takahashi, Kyoko; Schaffer, Stephen W

    2016-05-01

    Hyper-beta-alaninemia is a rare metabolic condition that results in elevated plasma and urinary β-alanine levels and is characterized by neurotoxicity, hypotonia, and respiratory distress. It has been proposed that at least some of the symptoms are caused by oxidative stress; however, only limited information is available on the mechanism of reactive oxygen species generation. The present study examines the hypothesis that β-alanine reduces cellular levels of taurine, which are required for normal respiratory chain function; cellular taurine depletion is known to reduce respiratory function and elevate mitochondrial superoxide generation. To test the taurine hypothesis, isolated neonatal rat cardiomyocytes and mouse embryonic fibroblasts were incubated with medium lacking or containing β-alanine. β-alanine treatment led to mitochondrial superoxide accumulation in conjunction with a decrease in oxygen consumption. The defect in β-alanine-mediated respiratory function was detected in permeabilized cells exposed to glutamate/malate but not in cells utilizing succinate, suggesting that β-alanine leads to impaired complex I activity. Taurine treatment limited mitochondrial superoxide generation, supporting a role for taurine in maintaining complex I activity. Also affected by taurine is mitochondrial morphology, as β-alanine-treated fibroblasts undergo fragmentation, a sign of unhealthy mitochondria that is reversed by taurine treatment. If left unaltered, β-alanine-treated fibroblasts also undergo mitochondrial apoptosis, as evidenced by activation of caspases 3 and 9 and the initiation of the mitochondrial permeability transition. Together, these data show that β-alanine mediates changes that reduce ATP generation and enhance oxidative stress, factors that contribute to heart failure. PMID:27023909

  6. Enhancing the Effectiveness of a Play Intervention by Abolishing the Reinforcing Value of Stereotypy: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Russell; O'Reilly, Mark; Sigafoos, Jeff; Lancioni, Giulio E.; Machalicek, Wendy; Rispoli, Mandy; White, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    An alternating treatments design compared one condition in which a child with autism was allowed to engage in stereotypy freely prior to the intervention (abolishing operation component) to a second condition without the free-access period. Levels of stereotypy and problem behavior were lower and levels of functional play were higher in the…

  7. Increased adult hippocampal neurogenesis is not necessary for wheel running to abolish conditioned place preference for cocaine in mice.

    PubMed

    Mustroph, M L; Merritt, J R; Holloway, A L; Pinardo, H; Miller, D S; Kilby, C N; Bucko, P; Wyer, A; Rhodes, J S

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that wheel running can abolish conditioned place preference (CPP) for cocaine in mice. Running significantly increases the number of new neurons in the hippocampus, and new neurons have been hypothesised to enhance plasticity and behavioral flexibility. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that increased neurogenesis was necessary for exercise to abolish cocaine CPP. Male nestin-thymidine kinase transgenic mice were conditioned with cocaine, and then housed with or without running wheels for 32 days. Half of the mice were fed chow containing valganciclovir to induce apoptosis in newly divided neurons, and the other half were fed standard chow. For the first 10 days, mice received daily injections of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label dividing cells. On the last 4 days, mice were tested for CPP, and then euthanized for measurement of adult hippocampal neurogenesis by counting the number of BrdU-positive neurons in the dentate gyrus. Levels of running were similar in mice fed valganciclovir-containing chow and normal chow. Valganciclovir significantly reduced the numbers of neurons (BrdU-positive/NeuN-positive) in the dentate gyrus of both sedentary mice and runner mice. Valganciclovir-fed runner mice showed similar levels of neurogenesis as sedentary, normal-fed controls. However, valganciclovir-fed runner mice showed the same abolishment of CPP as runner mice with intact neurogenesis. The results demonstrate that elevated adult hippocampal neurogenesis resulting from running is not necessary for running to abolish cocaine CPP in mice. PMID:25393660

  8. Increased adult hippocampal neurogenesis is not necessary for wheel running to abolish conditioned place preference for cocaine in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mustroph, M.L.; Merritt, J.R.; Holloway, A.L.; Pinardo, H.; Miller, D.S.; Kilby, C.N.; Bucko, P.; Wyer, A.; Rhodes, J.S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests wheel running can abolish conditioned place preference (CPP) for cocaine in mice. Running significantly increases the number of new neurons in the hippocampus, and new neurons have been hypothesized to enhance plasticity and behavioral flexibility. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that increased neurogenesis was necessary for exercise to abolish cocaine CPP. Male nestin thymidine kinase transgenic mice were conditioned with cocaine, and then housed with or without running wheels for 32 days. Half the animals were fed valganciclovir in their chow to induce apoptosis in newly divided neurons and the other half were fed standard chow. The first 10 days, mice received daily injections of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label dividing cells. The last 4 days mice were tested for CPP and then euthanized to measure adult hippocampal neurogenesis by counting the number of BrdU+ neurons in the dentate gyrus. Levels of running were similar in animals fed valganciclovir or normal chow. Valganciclovir significantly reduced numbers of neurons (BrdU+/NeuN+) in the dentate gyrus of both sedentary mice and runners. Valganciclovir-fed runners displayed similar levels of neurogenesis as sedentary normal-fed controls. However, valganciclovir-fed runners displayed the same abolishment of CPP as runners with intact neurogenesis. Results demonstrate that elevated adult hippocampal neurogenesis from running is not necessary for running to abolish cocaine CPP in mice. PMID:25393660

  9. Characterization of the l-alanine exporter AlaE of Escherichia coli and its potential role in protecting cells from a toxic-level accumulation of l-alanine and its derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seryoung; Ihara, Kohei; Katsube, Satoshi; Hori, Hatsuhiro; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Yoneyama, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that the alaE gene of Escherichia coli encodes the l-alanine exporter AlaE. The objective of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of the AlaE exporter. The minimum inhibitory concentration of l-alanine and l-alanyl-l-alanine in alaE-deficient l-alanine-nonmetabolizing cells MLA301ΔalaE was 4- and >4000-fold lower, respectively, than in the alaE-positive parent cells MLA301, suggesting that AlaE functions as an efflux pump to avoid a toxic-level accumulation of intracellular l-alanine and its derivatives. Furthermore, the growth of the alaE-deficient mutant derived from the l-alanine-metabolizing strain was strongly inhibited in the presence of a physiological level of l-alanyl-l-alanine. Intact MLA301ΔalaE and MLA301ΔalaE/pAlaE cells producing plasmid-borne AlaE, accumulated approximately 200% and 50%, respectively, of the [3H]l-alanine detected in MLA301 cells, suggesting that AlaE exports l-alanine. When 200 mmol/L l-alanine-loaded inverted membrane vesicles prepared from MLA301ΔalaE/pAlaE were placed in a solution containing 200 mmol/L or 0.34 μmol/L l-alanine, energy-dependent [3H]l-alanine accumulation occurred under either condition. This energy-dependent uphill accumulation of [3H]l-alanine was strongly inhibited in the presence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone but not by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, suggesting that the AlaE-mediated l-alanine extrusion was driven by proton motive force. Based on these results, physiological roles of the l-alanine exporter are discussed. PMID:26073055

  10. Characterization of the l-alanine exporter AlaE of Escherichia coli and its potential role in protecting cells from a toxic-level accumulation of l-alanine and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seryoung; Ihara, Kohei; Katsube, Satoshi; Hori, Hatsuhiro; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Yoneyama, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    We previously reported that the alaE gene of Escherichia coli encodes the l-alanine exporter AlaE. The objective of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of the AlaE exporter. The minimum inhibitory concentration of l-alanine and l-alanyl-l-alanine in alaE-deficient l-alanine-nonmetabolizing cells MLA301ΔalaE was 4- and >4000-fold lower, respectively, than in the alaE-positive parent cells MLA301, suggesting that AlaE functions as an efflux pump to avoid a toxic-level accumulation of intracellular l-alanine and its derivatives. Furthermore, the growth of the alaE-deficient mutant derived from the l-alanine-metabolizing strain was strongly inhibited in the presence of a physiological level of l-alanyl-l-alanine. Intact MLA301ΔalaE and MLA301ΔalaE/pAlaE cells producing plasmid-borne AlaE, accumulated approximately 200% and 50%, respectively, of the [(3) H]l-alanine detected in MLA301 cells, suggesting that AlaE exports l-alanine. When 200 mmol/L l-alanine-loaded inverted membrane vesicles prepared from MLA301ΔalaE/pAlaE were placed in a solution containing 200 mmol/L or 0.34 μmol/L l-alanine, energy-dependent [(3) H]l-alanine accumulation occurred under either condition. This energy-dependent uphill accumulation of [(3) H]l-alanine was strongly inhibited in the presence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone but not by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, suggesting that the AlaE-mediated l-alanine extrusion was driven by proton motive force. Based on these results, physiological roles of the l-alanine exporter are discussed. PMID:26073055

  11. Chronic Nicotine Exposure Abolishes Maternal Systemic and Renal Adaptations to Pregnancy in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Vanessa Meira; Passos, Clevia Santos; Maquigussa, Edgar; Pontes, Roberto Braz; Bergamaschi, Cassia Toledo; Campos, Ruy Ribeiro; Boim, Mirian Aparecida

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is characterized by maternal systemic and intrarenal vasodilation, leading to increases in the renal plasma flow (RPF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). These responses are mainly mediated by nitric oxide (NO) and relaxin. The impact of cigarette smoking on the maternal adaptations to pregnancy is unclear. Here we evaluated the effects of chronic exposure to nicotine on systemic and intrarenal parameters in virgin (V) and 14-day pregnant (P) Wistar rats. V and P groups received saline or nicotine (6 mg·kg-1·day-1) respectively, via osmotic minipumps for 28 days, starting 14 days before pregnancy induction. Nicotine induced a 10% increase in blood pressure in the V group and minimized the characteristic pregnancy-induced hypotension. Renal sympathetic nerve activity (rSNA) and baroreflex sensitivity were impaired by nicotine mainly in the P group, indicating that the effect of nicotine on blood pressure was not mediated by nervous system stimulation. Nicotine had no effect on GFR in the V rats but reduced GFR of the P group by 30%. Renal expression of sodium and water transporters was downregulated by nicotine, resulting in increased fractional sodium excretion mainly in the P group, suggesting that nicotine compromised the sodium and water retention required for normal gestation. There was a reduction in the expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in both the kidney tissue and renal artery, as well as in the expression of the relaxin receptor (LGR7). These results clearly show that nicotine induced deleterious effects in both virgin and pregnant animals, and abolished the maternal capacity to adapt to pregnancy. PMID:26914675

  12. Inhibiting K63 Polyubiquitination Abolishes No-Go Type Stalled Translation Surveillance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Kazuki; Horikawa, Wataru; Ito, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Incidental ribosome stalling during translation elongation is an aberrant phenomenon during protein synthesis and is subjected to quality control by surveillance systems, in which mRNA and a nascent protein are rapidly degraded. Their detailed molecular mechanisms as well as responsible factors for these processes are beginning to be understood. However, the initial processes for detecting stalled translation that result in degradation remain to be determined. Among the factors identified to date, two E3 ubiquitin ligases have been reported to function in distinct manners. Because ubiquitination is one of the most versatile of cellular signals, these distinct functions of E3 ligases suggested diverse ubiquitination pathways during surveillance for stalled translation. In this study, we report experimental evidences for a unique role of non-proteasomal K63 polyubiquitination during quality control for stalled translation. Inhibiting K63 polyubiquitination by expressing a K63R ubiquitin mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells markedly abolished the quality control responses for stalled translation. More detailed analyses indicated that the effects of K63R mutants were independent of the proteasome and that K63 polyubiquitination is dependent on Hel2, one of the E3 ligases. Moreover, a K63R ubiquitin mutant barely inhibited the quality control pathway for nonstop translation, indicating distinct mechanisms for these highly related quality control pathways. Our results suggest that non-proteasomal K63 polyubiquitination is included in the initial surveillance process of stalled translation and presumably triggers protein degradation steps upon translational stall. These findings provide crucial information regarding the detailed molecular mechanisms for the initial steps involved in quality control systems and their classification. PMID:25909477

  13. Formaldehyde inhalation during pregnancy abolishes the development of acute innate inflammation in offspring.

    PubMed

    Silva Ibrahim, Beatriz; Miranda da Silva, Cristiane; Barioni, Éric Diego; Correa-Costa, Matheus; Drewes, Carine Cristiane; Saraiva Câmara, Niels Olsen; Tavares-de-Lima, Wothan; Poliselli Farsky, Sandra Helena; Lino-dos-Santos-Franco, Adriana

    2015-06-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) is an environmental and occupational pollutant that induces programming mechanisms on the acquired immune host defense in offspring when exposed during the prenatal period. Hence, here we investigated whether the exposure of FA on pregnant rats could affect the development of an innate acute lung injury in offspring induced by lipopolissacaride (LPS) injection. Pregnant Wistar rats were exposed to FA (0.92 mg/m(3)) or vehicle (distillated water), both 1 h/day, 5 days/week, from 1 to 21 days of pregnancy. Non-manipulated rats were used as control. After 30 days of birth, the offspring was submitted to injection of LPS (Salmonella abortus equi, 5 mg/kg, i.p.). Systemic and lung inflammatory parameters were evaluated 24 h later. Exposure to FA during gestation abolished the development of acute lung injury in offspring, as observed by reduced number of leukocytes in the bronchoalveolar fluid (BAL), in the blood and in the bone marrow, and decreased myeloperoxidase activity in the lung. Moreover, phagocytes from BAL presented normal phagocytosis, but reduced oxidative burst. Alterations on the profile of inflammatory cytokines were evidenced by reduced mRNA levels of IL-6 and elevated levels of IL-10 and IFN gamma in the lung tissue. Indeed, mRNA levels of toll-likereceptor-4 and nuclear factor-kappa B translocation into the nucleus were also reduced. Additionally, hyperresponsiveness to methacholine was blunted in the trachea of offspring of FA exposed mothers. Together, our data clearly show that FA exposure in the prenatal period modifies the programming mechanisms of the innate defense in the offspring leading to impaired defense against infections. PMID:25845602

  14. Isoflurane abolishes spontaneous firing of serotonin neurons and masks their pH/CO2 chemosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Iceman, Kimberly E.; Johansen, Sara L.; Wu, Yuanming; Harris, Michael B.; Richerson, George B.

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) neurons from the mouse and rat rostral medulla are stimulated by increased CO2 when studied in culture or brain slices. However, the response of 5-HT neurons has been variable when animals are exposed to hypercapnia in vivo. Here we examined whether halogenated inhalational anesthetics, which activate TWIK-related acid-sensitive K+ (TASK) channels, could mask an effect of CO2 on 5-HT neurons. During in vivo plethysmography in mice, isoflurane (1%) markedly reduced the hypercapnic ventilatory response (HCVR) by 78–96% depending upon mouse strain and ambient temperature. In a perfused rat brain stem preparation, isoflurane (1%) reduced or silenced spontaneous firing of medullary 5-HT neurons in situ and abolished their responses to elevated perfusate Pco2. In dissociated cell cultures, isoflurane (1%) hyperpolarized 5-HT neurons by 6.52 ± 3.94 mV and inhibited spontaneous firing. A subsequent decrease in pH from 7.4 to 7.2 depolarized neurons by 4.07 ± 2.10 mV, but that was insufficient to reach threshold for firing. Depolarizing current restored baseline firing and the firing frequency response to acidosis, indicating that isoflurane did not block the underlying mechanisms mediating chemosensitivity. These results demonstrate that isoflurane masks 5-HT neuron chemosensitivity in vitro and in situ and markedly decreases the HCVR in vivo. The use of this class of anesthetic has a particularly potent inhibitory effect on chemosensitivity of 5-HT neurons. PMID:25695656

  15. Glycopyrrolate abolishes the exercise-induced increase in cerebral perfusion in humans.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Thomas; Fisher, James P; Young, Colin N; Hartwich, Doreen; Ogoh, Shigehiko; Raven, Peter B; Fadel, Paul J; Secher, Niels H

    2010-10-01

    Brain blood vessels contain muscarinic receptors that are important for cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation, but whether a cholinergic receptor mechanism is involved in the exercise-induced increase in cerebral perfusion or affects cerebral metabolism remains unknown. We evaluated CBF and cerebral metabolism (from arterial and internal jugular venous O(2), glucose and lactate differences), as well as the middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA V(mean); transcranial Doppler ultrasound) during a sustained static handgrip contraction at 40% of maximal voluntary contraction (n = 9) and the MCA V(mean) during ergometer cycling (n = 8). Separate, randomized and counterbalanced trials were performed in control (no drug) conditions and following muscarinic cholinergic receptor blockade by glycopyrrolate. Glycopyrrolate increased resting heart rate from approximately 60 to approximately 110 beats min(-1) (P < 0.01) and cardiac output by approximately 40% (P < 0.05), but did not affect mean arterial pressure. The central cardiovascular responses to exercise with glycopyrrolate were similar to the control responses, except that cardiac output did not increase during static handgrip with glycopyrrolate. Glycopyrrolate did not significantly affect cerebral metabolism during static handgrip, but a parallel increase in MCA V(mean) (approximately 16%; P < 0.01) and CBF (approximately 12%; P < 0.01) during static handgrip, as well as the increase in MCA V(mean) during cycling (approximately 15%; P < 0.01), were abolished by glycopyrrolate (P < 0.05). Thus, during both cycling and static handgrip, a cholinergic receptor mechanism is important for the exercise-induced increase in cerebral perfusion without affecting the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen. PMID:20660020

  16. Glycogen overload by postexercise insulin administration abolished the exercise-induced increase in GLUT4 protein.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chia-Hau; Tsai, Yin-Lan; Hou, Chien-Wen; Lee, Hsing-Hao; Chang, Wei-Hsiang; Lin, Tzi-Wen; Hsu, Tung-Hsiung; Huang, Yi-Jen; Kuo, Chia-Hua

    2005-12-01

    To elucidate the role of muscle glycogen storage on regulation of GLUT4 protein expression and whole-body glucose tolerance, muscle glycogen level was manipulated by exercise and insulin administration. Sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were evenly separated into three groups: control (CON), immediately after exercise (EX0), and 16 h after exercise (EX16). Rats from each group were further divided into two groups: saline- and insulin-injected. The 2-day exercise protocol consisted of 2 bouts of 3-h swimming with 45-min rest for each day, which effectively depleted glycogen in both red gastrocnemius (RG) and plantaris muscles. EX0 rats were sacrificed immediately after the last bout of exercise on second day. CON and EX16 rats were intubated with 1 g/kg glucose solution following exercise and recovery for 16 h before muscle tissue collection. Insulin (0.5 microU/kg) or saline was injected daily at the time when glucose was intubated. Insulin injection elevated muscle glycogen levels substantially in both muscles above saline-injected group at CON and EX16. With previous day insulin injection, EX0 preserved greater amount of postexercise glycogen above their saline-injected control. In the saline-injected rats, EX16 significantly increased GLUT4 protein level above CON, concurrent with muscle glycogen supercompensation. Insulin injection for EX16 rats significantly enhanced muscle glycogen level above their saline-injected control, but the increases in muscle GLUT4 protein and whole-body glucose tolerance were attenuated. In conclusion, the new finding of the study was that glycogen overload by postexercise insulin administration significantly abolished the exercise-induced increases in GLUT4 protein and glucose tolerance. PMID:16319996

  17. Chronic non-invasive corticosterone administration abolishes the diurnal pattern of tph2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Donner, Nina C.; Montoya, Christian D.; Lukkes, Jodi L.; Lowry, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    Both hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity and serotonergic systems are commonly dysregulated in stress-related psychiatric disorders. We describe here a non-invasive rat model for hypercortisolism, as observed in major depression, and its effects on physiology, behavior, and the expression of tph2, the gene encoding tryptophan hydroxylase 2, the rate-limiting enzyme for brain serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) synthesis. We delivered corticosterone (40 µg/ml, 100 µg/ml or 400 µg/ml) or vehicle to adrenal-intact adult, male rats via the drinking water for three weeks. On days 15, 16, 17 and 18, respectively, the rats’ emotionality was assessed in the open-field (OF), social interaction (SI), elevated plus-maze (EPM), and forced swim tests (FST). On day 21, half of the rats in each group were killed 2 h into the dark phase of a 12/12 h reversed light/dark cycle; the other half were killed 2 h into the light phase. We then measured indices of HPA axis activity, plasma glucose and interleukin-6 (IL-6) availability, and neuronal tph2 expression at each time point. Chronic corticosterone intake was sufficient to cause increased anxiety- and depressive-like behavior in a dose-dependent manner. It also disrupted the diurnal pattern of plasma adrenocorticotropin (ACTH), corticosterone, and glucose concentrations, caused adrenal atrophy, and prevented regular weight gain. No diurnal or treatment-dependent changes were found for plasma levels of IL-6. Remarkably, all doses of corticosterone treatment abolished the diurnal variation of tph2 mRNA expression in the brainstem dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) by elevating the gene’s expression during the animals’ inactive (light) phase. Our data demonstrate that chronic elevation of corticosterone creates a vulnerability to a depression-like syndrome that is associated with increased tph2 expression, similar to that observed in depressed patients. PMID:21924839

  18. Chronic Nicotine Exposure Abolishes Maternal Systemic and Renal Adaptations to Pregnancy in Rats.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Vanessa Meira; Passos, Clevia Santos; Maquigussa, Edgar; Pontes, Roberto Braz; Bergamaschi, Cassia Toledo; Campos, Ruy Ribeiro; Boim, Mirian Aparecida

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is characterized by maternal systemic and intrarenal vasodilation, leading to increases in the renal plasma flow (RPF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). These responses are mainly mediated by nitric oxide (NO) and relaxin. The impact of cigarette smoking on the maternal adaptations to pregnancy is unclear. Here we evaluated the effects of chronic exposure to nicotine on systemic and intrarenal parameters in virgin (V) and 14-day pregnant (P) Wistar rats. V and P groups received saline or nicotine (6 mg·kg-1·day-1) respectively, via osmotic minipumps for 28 days, starting 14 days before pregnancy induction. Nicotine induced a 10% increase in blood pressure in the V group and minimized the characteristic pregnancy-induced hypotension. Renal sympathetic nerve activity (rSNA) and baroreflex sensitivity were impaired by nicotine mainly in the P group, indicating that the effect of nicotine on blood pressure was not mediated by nervous system stimulation. Nicotine had no effect on GFR in the V rats but reduced GFR of the P group by 30%. Renal expression of sodium and water transporters was downregulated by nicotine, resulting in increased fractional sodium excretion mainly in the P group, suggesting that nicotine compromised the sodium and water retention required for normal gestation. There was a reduction in the expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in both the kidney tissue and renal artery, as well as in the expression of the relaxin receptor (LGR7). These results clearly show that nicotine induced deleterious effects in both virgin and pregnant animals, and abolished the maternal capacity to adapt to pregnancy. PMID:26914675

  19. Role of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on the kinetics of low-affinity high-capacity Na{sup +}-dependent alanine transport in SHR proximal tubular epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Vanda; Pinho, Maria Joao; Jose, Pedro A.; Soares-da-Silva, Patricio

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in excess is required for the presence of a low-affinity high-capacity component for the Na{sup +}-dependent [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake in SHR PTE cells only. {yields} It is suggested that Na{sup +} binding in renal ASCT2 may be regulated by ROS in SHR PTE cells. -- Abstract: The presence of high and low sodium affinity states for the Na{sup +}-dependent [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake in immortalized renal proximal tubular epithelial (PTE) cells was previously reported (Am. J. Physiol. 293 (2007) R538-R547). This study evaluated the role of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on the Na{sup +}-dependent [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake of ASCT2 in immortalized renal PTE cells from Wistar Kyoto rat (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). Na{sup +} dependence of [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake was investigated replacing NaCl with an equimolar concentration of choline chloride in vehicle- and apocynin-treated cells. Na{sup +} removal from the uptake solution abolished transport activity in both WKY and SHR PTE cells. Decreases in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} levels in the extracellular medium significantly reduced Na{sup +}-K{sub m} and V{sub max} values of the low-affinity high-capacity component in SHR PTE cells, with no effect on the high-affinity low-capacity state of the Na{sup +}-dependent [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake. After removal of apocynin from the culture medium, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} levels returned to basal values within 1 to 3 h in both WKY and SHR PTE cells and these were found stable for the next 24 h. Under these experimental conditions, the Na{sup +}-K{sub m} and V{sub max} of the high-affinity low-capacity state were unaffected and the low-affinity high-capacity component remained significantly decreased 1 day but not 4 days after apocynin removal. In conclusion, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in excess is required for the presence of a low-affinity high-capacity component for the Na{sup +}-dependent [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake in SHR PTE cells only

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a D-alanyl-D-alanine ligase (EcDdlB) from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Batson, Sarah; Rea, Dean; Fülöp, Vilmos; Roper, David I

    2010-04-01

    A recombinant form of Escherichia coli DdlB (EcDdlB) has been prepared and cocrystallized with ADP and D-alanyl-D-alanine to represent the ternary complex of EcDdlB. Furthermore, EcDdlB has been cocrystallized under the same conditions with the ligands ATP and D-alanyl-D-alanine, representing the product-inhibited complex. The crystals belonged to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 53.0, b = 97.6, c = 109.5 A and a = 51.2, b = 97.8, c = 110.1 A, respectively, and both contained two molecules in the asymmetric unit. Complete data sets were collected to 1.5 and 1.4 A resolution, respectively, from single crystals under cryogenic conditions using synchrotron radiation. PMID:20383009

  1. Inducible l-Alanine Exporter Encoded by the Novel Gene ygaW (alaE) in Escherichia coli ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Hatsuhiro; Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Tobe, Ryuta; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Katsumata, Ryoichi

    2011-01-01

    We previously isolated a mutant hypersensitive to l-alanyl-l-alanine from a non-l-alanine-metabolizing Escherichia coli strain and found that it lacked an inducible l-alanine export system. Consequently, this mutant showed a significant accumulation of intracellular l-alanine and a reduction in the l-alanine export rate compared to the parent strain. When the mutant was used as a host to clone a gene(s) that complements the dipeptide-hypersensitive phenotype, two uncharacterized genes, ygaW and ytfF, and two characterized genes, yddG and yeaS, were identified. Overexpression of each gene in the mutant resulted in a decrease in the intracellular l-alanine level and enhancement of the l-alanine export rate in the presence of the dipeptide, suggesting that their products function as exporters of l-alanine. Since ygaW exhibited the most striking impact on both the intra- and the extracellular l-alanine levels among the four genes identified, we disrupted the ygaW gene in the non-l-alanine-metabolizing strain. The resulting isogenic mutant showed the same intra- and extracellular l-alanine levels as observed in the dipeptide-hypersensitive mutant obtained by chemical mutagenesis. When each gene was overexpressed in the wild-type strain, which does not intrinsically excrete alanine, only the ygaW gene conferred on the cells the ability to excrete alanine. In addition, expression of the ygaW gene was induced in the presence of the dipeptide. On the basis of these results, we concluded that YgaW is likely to be the physiologically most relevant exporter for l-alanine in E. coli and proposed that the gene be redesignated alaE for alanine export. PMID:21531828

  2. Solvation free energies of alanine peptides: the effect of flexibility.

    PubMed

    Kokubo, Hironori; Harris, Robert C; Asthagiri, Dilipkumar; Pettitt, B Montgomery

    2013-12-27

    The electrostatic (ΔGel), van der Waals cavity-formation (ΔGvdw), and total (ΔG) solvation free energies for 10 alanine peptides ranging in length (n) from 1 to 10 monomers were calculated. The free energies were computed both with fixed, extended conformations of the peptides and again for some of the peptides without constraints. The solvation free energies, ΔGel, and components ΔGvdw, and ΔG, were found to be linear in n, with the slopes of the best-fit lines being γel, γvdw, and γ, respectively. Both γel and γ were negative for fixed and flexible peptides, and γvdw was negative for fixed peptides. That γvdw was negative was surprising, as experimental data on alkanes, theoretical models, and MD computations on small molecules and model systems generally suggest that γvdw should be positive. A negative γvdw seemingly contradicts the notion that ΔGvdw drives the initial collapse of the protein when it folds by favoring conformations with small surface areas. When we computed ΔGvdw for the flexible peptides, thereby allowing the peptides to assume natural ensembles of more compact conformations, γvdw was positive. Because most proteins do not assume extended conformations, a ΔGvdw that increases with increasing surface area may be typical for globular proteins. An alternative hypothesis is that the collapse is driven by intramolecular interactions. We find few intramolecular H-bonds but show that the intramolecular van der Waals interaction energy is more favorable for the flexible than for the extended peptides, seemingly favoring this hypothesis. The large fluctuations in the vdw energy may make attributing the collapse of the peptide to this intramolecular energy difficult. PMID:24328358

  3. Solvation Free Energies of Alanine Peptides: The Effect of Flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Kokubo, Hironori; Harris, Robert C.; Asthigiri, Dilipkumar; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2014-01-01

    The electrostatic (ΔGel), van der Waals cavity-formation (ΔGvdw), and total (ΔG) solvation free energies for 10 alanine peptides ranging in length (n) from 1 to 10 monomers were calculated. The free energies were computed both with fixed, extended conformations of the peptides and again for some of the peptides without constraints. The solvation free energies, ΔGel, and components ΔGvdw, and ΔG, were found to be linear in n, with the slopes of the best-fit lines being γel, γvdw, and γ, respectively. Both γel and γ were negative for fixed and flexible peptides, and γvdw was negative for fixed peptides. That γvdw was negative was surprising, as experimental data on alkanes, theoretical models, and MD computations on small molecules and model systems generally suggest that γvdw should be positive. A negative γvdw seemingly contradicts the notion that ΔGvdw drives the initial collapse of the protein when it folds by favoring conformations with small surface areas. When we computed ΔGvdw for the flexible peptides, thereby allowing the peptides to assume natural ensembles of more compact conformations, γvdw was positive. Because most proteins do not assume extended conformations, a ΔGvdw that increases with increasing surface area may be typical for globular proteins. An alternative hypothesis is that the collapse is driven by intramolecular interactions. We find few intramolecular h-bonds but show that the intramolecular van der Waal’s interaction energy is more favorable for the flexible than for the extended peptides, seemingly favoring this hypothesis. The large fluctuations in the vdw energy may make attributing the collapse of the peptide to this intramolecular energy difficult. PMID:24328358

  4. Solvation Free Energies of Alanine Peptides: The Effect of Flexibility

    SciTech Connect

    Kokubo, Hironori; Harris, Robert C.; Asthagiri, Dilip; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2013-12-03

    The electrostatic (?Gel), cavity-formation (?Gvdw), and total (?G) solvation free energies for 10 alanine peptides ranging in length (n) from 1 to 10 monomers were calculated. The free energies were computed both with xed, extended conformations of the peptides and again for some of the peptides without constraints. The solvation free energies, ?Gel, ?Gvdw, and ?G, were found to be linear in n, with the slopes of the best-fit lines being gamma_el, gamma_vdw, and gamma, respectively. Both gamma_el and gamma were negative for fixed and flexible peptides, and gamma_vdw was negative for fixed peptides. That gamma_vdw was negative was surprising, as experimental data on alkanes, theoretical models, and MD computations on small molecules and model systems generally suggest that gamma_vdw should be positive. A negative gamma_vdw seemingly contradicts the notion that ?Gvdw drives the initial collapse of the protein when it folds by favoring conformations with small surface areas, but when we computed ?Gvdw for the flexible peptides, thereby allowing the peptides to assume natural ensembles of more compact conformations, gamma-vdw was positive. Because most proteins do not assume extended conformations, a ?Gvdw that increases with increasing surface area may be typical for globular proteins. An alternative hypothesis is that the collapse is driven by intramolecular interactions. We show that the intramolecular van der Waal's interaction energy is more favorable for the flexible than for the extended peptides, seemingly favoring this hypothesis, but the large fluctuations in this energy may make attributing the collapse of the peptide to this intramolecular energy difficult.

  5. A novel low molecular weight alanine aminotransferase from fasted rat liver.

    PubMed

    Vedavathi, M; Girish, K S; Kumar, M Karuna

    2006-01-01

    Alanine is the most effective precursor for gluconeogenesis among amino acids, and the initial reaction is catalyzed by alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT). Although the enzyme activity increases during fasting, this effect has not been studied extensively. The present study describes the purification and characterization of an isoform of AlaAT from rat liver under fasting. The molecular mass of the enzyme is 17.7 kD with an isoelectric point of 4.2; glutamine is the N-terminal residue. The enzyme showed narrow substrate specificity for L-alanine with Km values for alanine of 0.51 mM and for 2-oxoglutarate of 0.12 mM. The enzyme is a glycoprotein. Spectroscopic and inhibition studies showed that pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) and free -SH groups are involved in the enzymatic catalysis. PLP activated the enzyme with a Km of 0.057 mM. PMID:16487061

  6. Titration of Alanine Monitored by NMR Spectroscopy: A Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Francis J.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The experiment described here involves simultaneous monitoring of pH and NMR chemical shifts during an aqueous titration of alpha- and beta-alanine. This experiment is designed for use in an undergraduate biochemistry course. (MR)

  7. Growth hormone abolishes the negative effects of everolimus on intestinal wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Küper, Markus Alexander; Trütschel, Sebastian; Weinreich, Jürgen; Königsrainer, Alfred; Beckert, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the simultaneous treatment with human growth hormone (hGH) abolishes the negative effects of everolimus on anastomotic healing. METHODS: Forty-eight male Sprague-Dawley-rats were randomized to three groups of 16 animals each (I: vehicle; II: everolimus 3 mg/kg po; III: everolimus 3 mg/kg po + hGH 2.5 mg/kg sc). Animals were pre-treated with hGH and/or everolimus daily for seven days. Then a standard anastomosis was created in the descending colon and treatment was continued for another seven days. The anastomosis was resected in toto and the bursting pressure was assessed as a mechanical parameter of intestinal healing. Moreover, biochemical (Hydroxyproline, PCNA, MPO, MMP-2 and MMP-9) and histological (cell density, angiogenesis, amount of granulation tissue) parameters of intestinal healing were assessed. RESULTS: Anastomotic bursting pressure was significantly reduced by everolimus and a simultaneous treatment with hGH resulted in considerably higher values (I: 134 ± 19 mmHg, II: 85 ± 25 mmHg, III: 114 ± 25 mmHg; P < 0.05, I vs II; P = 0.09, I vs III and II vs III) Hydroxyproline concentration was significantly increased by hGH compared to everolimus alone (I: 14.9 ± 2.5 μg/mg, II: 8.9 ± 3.6 μg/mg, III: 11.9 ± 2.8 μg/mg; P < 0.05, I vs II/III and II vs III). The number of MPO-positive cells was reduced significantly by hGH compared to everolimus alone (I: 10 ± 1 n/mm², II: 15 ± 3 n/mm², III: 9 ± 2 n/mm²; P < 0.05, I vs II and II vs III), while the number of PCNA-positive cells were increased by hGH (I: 28 ± 3 /mm², II: 12 ± 3 /mm², III: 26 ± 12 /mm²; P < 0.05, I vs II and II vs III). Corresponding to these biochemical findings, HE-histology revealed significantly increased amount of granulation tissue in hGH-treated animals. CONCLUSION: Inhibition of intestinal wound healing by everolimus is partially neutralized by simultaeous treatment with hGH. Both inflammation as well as collagen

  8. Vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein mutations that affect membrane fusion activity and abolish virus infectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Fredericksen, B L; Whitt, M A

    1995-01-01

    We have introduced amino acid substitutions into two regions of the extracellular domain of the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) glycoprotein (G protein) and examined the effect of these mutations on protein transport, low-pH-induced stability of G protein oligomers, and membrane fusion activity. We suggested previously that the region between amino acids 118 and 139 may be important for the membrane fusion activity of G protein, on the basis of the characterization of a fusion-defective G protein mutant (M. A. Whitt, P. Zagouras, B. Crise, and J. K. Rose, J. Virol. 64:4907-4913, 1990). It has also been postulated by others that this region as well as the region between amino acids 181 and 212 may constitute putative internal fusion domains of VSV G protein. In this report, we show that three different amino acids substitutions between residues 118 and 139 (G-124-->E, P-127-->D, and A-133-->K) either altered or abolished low-pH-dependent membrane fusion activity. In contrast, substitutions between residues 192 and 212 resulted either in G proteins that had wild-type fusion activity or in mutant proteins in which the mutation prevented transport of G protein to the cell surface. Two of the substitutions between residues 118 and 139 (G-124-->E and P-127-->D) resulted in G proteins that were fusion defective at pH 5.7, although syncytia were observed after cells were treated with fusion buffer at pH 5.5, albeit at levels significantly less than that induced by wild-type G protein. Interestingly, when either G-124-->E or P-127-->D was incorporated into tsO45 virions, the resulting particles were not infectious, presumably because the viral envelope was not able to fuse with the proper intracellular membrane. These results support the hypothesis that the region between amino acids 118 and 139 is important for the membrane fusion activity of VSV G protein and may constitute an internal fusion domain. PMID:7853475

  9. Repeated Supramaximal Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress: Effect of β-Alanine Plus Creatine Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Belviranli, Muaz; Okudan, Nilsel; Revan, Serkan; Balci, Serdar; Gokbel, Hakki

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carnosine is a dipeptide formed from the β-alanine and histidine amino acids and found in mainly in the brain and muscle, especially fast twitch muscle. Carnosine and creatine has an antioxidant effect and carnosine accounts for about 10% of the muscle's ability to buffer the H+ ions produced by exercise. Objectives: The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of beta alanine and/or creatine supplementation on oxidant and antioxidant status during repeated Wingate tests (WTs). Patients and Methods: Forty four sedentary males participated in the study. Participants performed three 30s WTs with 2 minutes rest between exercise bouts. After the first exercise session, the subjects were assigned to one of four groups: Placebo, Creatine, Beta-alanine and Beta-alanine plus creatine. Participants ingested twice per day for 22 consecutive days, then four times per day for the following 6 days. After the supplementation period the second exercise session was applied. Blood samples were taken before and immediately after the each exercise session for the analysis of oxidative stress and antioxidant markers. Results: Malondialdehyde levels and superoxide dismutase activities were affected by neither supplementation nor exercise. During the pre-supplementation session, protein carbonyl reduced and oxidized glutathione (GSH and GSSG) levels increased immediately after the exercise. However, during the post-supplementation session GSH and GSSG levels increased in beta-alanine and beta-alanine plus creatine groups immediately after the exercise compared to pre-exercise. In addition, during the post-supplementation session total antioxidant capacity increased in beta-alanine group immediately after the exercise. Conclusions: Beta-alanine supplementation has limited antioxidant effect during the repeated WTs. PMID:27217925

  10. Internal bias field in triglycine sulphate crystals with L-, α-alanine grown at negative temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovidova, S. D.; Rogazinskaya, O. V.; Sidorkin, A. S.; Ionova, E. V.; Kirichenko, A. P.; Bavykin, S. A.

    2010-09-01

    The dielectric and pyroelectric properties of triglycine sulphate (TGS) crystals with L, α-alanine impurities grown at negative temperatures have been investigated. It is shown that a lower impurity concentration (2 mol % in solution) in this temperature range leads to the formation of internal bias fields of the same order of magnitude (˜800 V/cm) as for TGS crystals grown at T ⩽ 50°C but with an L, α-alanine concentration of 20 mol % in solution.

  11. IR spectroscopic signatures of solid glycine and alanine in astrophysical ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Lazcano, Y.; Maté, B.; Tanarro, I.; Herrero, V.; Escribano, R.

    2012-09-01

    The conversion from solid neutral to zwitterionic glycine (or alanine) is studied using infrared spectroscopy from the point of view of the interactions of this molecule with polar (water) and non-polar (CO2, CH4) surroundings. Such environments could be found on astrophysical matter. Different spectral features are suggested as suitable probes for the presence of glycine (or alanine) in astrophysical media, depending on their form (normal or zwitterionic), temperature, and composition.

  12. [Alanine solution as enzyme reaction buffer used in A to O blood group conversion].

    PubMed

    Li, Su-Bo; Zhang, Xue; Zhang, Yin-Ze; Tan, Ying-Xia; Bao, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Ying-Li; Ji, Shou-Ping; Gong, Feng; Gao, Hong-Wei

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of alanine solution as α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase enzyme reaction buffer on the enzymatic activity of A antigen. The binding ability of α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase with RBC in different reaction buffer such as alanine solution, glycine solution, normal saline (0.9% NaCl), PBS, PCS was detected by Western blot. The results showed that the efficiency of A to O conversion in alanine solution was similar to that in glycine solution, and Western blot confirmed that most of enzymes blinded with RBC in glycine or alanine solution, but few enzymes blinded with RBC in PBS, PCS or normal saline. The evidences indicated that binding of enzyme with RBC was a key element for A to O blood group conversion, while the binding ability of α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase with RBC in alanine or glycine solution was similar. It is concluded that alanine solution can be used as enzyme reaction buffer in A to O blood group conversion. In this buffer, the α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase is closely blinded with RBC and α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase plays efficient enzymatic activity of A antigen. PMID:24989301

  13. EPR dosimetry of radiotherapy photon beams in inhomogeneous media using alanine films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helge Østerås, Bjørn; Olaug Hole, Eli; Rune Olsen, Dag; Malinen, Eirik

    2006-12-01

    In the current work, EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) dosimetry using alanine films (134 µm thick) was utilized for dose measurements in inhomogeneous phantoms irradiated with radiotherapy photon beams. The main phantom material was PMMA, while either Styrofoam or aluminium was introduced as an inhomogeneity. The phantoms were irradiated to a maximum dose of about 30 Gy with 6 or 15 MV photons. The performance of the alanine film dosimeters was investigated and compared to results from ion chamber dosimetry, Monte Carlo simulations and radiotherapy treatment planning calculations. It was found that the alanine film dosimeters had a linear dose response above approximately 5 Gy, while a background signal obscured the response at lower dose levels. For doses between 5 and 60 Gy, the standard deviation of single alanine film dose estimates was about 2%. The alanine film dose estimates yielded results comparable to those from the Monte Carlo simulations and the ion chamber measurements, with absolute differences between estimates in the order of 1 15%. The treatment planning calculations exhibited limited applicability. The current work shows that alanine film dosimetry is a method suitable for estimating radiotherapeutical doses and for dose measurements in inhomogeneous media.

  14. Association of Alanine Aminotransferase and Periodontitis: A Cross-Sectional Analysis—NHANES 2009–2012

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, R. Constance; Sambamoorthi, Usha; Jurevic, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Alanine Aminotransferase is an enzyme associated with not only liver diseases, liver conditions, and metabolic syndrome, but also inflammation. Periodontitis is associated with increased cytokines and other markers of inflammation. The purpose of this study is to determine if an independent association between Alanine Aminotransferase and periodontitis exists. Methods. Data from the 2009-2010 and 2011-2012 National Health and Nutrition Surveys (NHANES) were combined. Data concerning periodontitis and Alanine Aminotransferase were extracted and analyzed with Rao Scott Chi-square and logistic regressions. Serum Alanine Aminotransferase was dichotomized at 40 units/liter, and periodontitis was dichotomized to the presence or absence of periodontitis. Results. In bivariate Chi-square analyses, periodontitis and Alanine Aminotransferase were associated (p = 0.0360) and remained significant in unadjusted logistic regression (OR = 1.30 [95% CI: 1.02, 1.65]). However, when other known risk factors of periodontitis were included in the analyses, the relationship attenuated and failed to reach significance (adjusted OR = 1.17 [95% CI: 0.85, 1.60]). Conclusion. Our study adds to the literature a positive but attenuated association of serum Alanine Aminotransferase with periodontitis which failed to reach significance when other known, strong risk factors of periodontitis were included in the analysis. PMID:26981311

  15. Complete Mitochondrial Complex I Deficiency Induces an Up-Regulation of Respiratory Fluxes That Is Abolished by Traces of Functional Complex I.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Kristina; Obata, Toshihiro; Feher, Kristen; Bock, Ralph; Fernie, Alisdair R; Meyer, Etienne H

    2015-08-01

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is central to cellular NAD(+) recycling and accounts for approximately 40% of mitochondrial ATP production. To understand how complex I function impacts respiration and plant development, we isolated Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) lines that lack complex I activity due to the absence of the catalytic subunit NDUFV1 (for NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase flavoprotein1) and compared these plants with ndufs4 (for NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase Fe-S protein4) mutants possessing trace amounts of complex I. Unlike ndufs4 plants, ndufv1 lines were largely unable to establish seedlings in the absence of externally supplied sucrose. Measurements of mitochondrial respiration and ATP synthesis revealed that compared with ndufv1, the complex I amounts retained by ndufs4 did not increase mitochondrial respiration and oxidative phosphorylation capacities. No major differences were seen in the mitochondrial proteomes, cellular metabolomes, or transcriptomes between ndufv1 and ndufs4. The analysis of fluxes through the respiratory pathway revealed that in ndufv1, fluxes through glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle were dramatically increased compared with ndufs4, which showed near wild-type-like fluxes. This indicates that the strong growth defects seen for plants lacking complex I originate from a switch in the metabolic mode of mitochondria and an up-regulation of respiratory fluxes. Partial reversion of these phenotypes when traces of active complex I are present suggests that complex I is essential for plant development and likely acts as a negative regulator of respiratory fluxes. PMID:26134164

  16. Complete Mitochondrial Complex I Deficiency Induces an Up-Regulation of Respiratory Fluxes That Is Abolished by Traces of Functional Complex I1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kühn, Kristina; Obata, Toshihiro; Feher, Kristen; Bock, Ralph; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Meyer, Etienne H.

    2015-01-01

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is central to cellular NAD+ recycling and accounts for approximately 40% of mitochondrial ATP production. To understand how complex I function impacts respiration and plant development, we isolated Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) lines that lack complex I activity due to the absence of the catalytic subunit NDUFV1 (for NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase flavoprotein1) and compared these plants with ndufs4 (for NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase Fe-S protein4) mutants possessing trace amounts of complex I. Unlike ndufs4 plants, ndufv1 lines were largely unable to establish seedlings in the absence of externally supplied sucrose. Measurements of mitochondrial respiration and ATP synthesis revealed that compared with ndufv1, the complex I amounts retained by ndufs4 did not increase mitochondrial respiration and oxidative phosphorylation capacities. No major differences were seen in the mitochondrial proteomes, cellular metabolomes, or transcriptomes between ndufv1 and ndufs4. The analysis of fluxes through the respiratory pathway revealed that in ndufv1, fluxes through glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle were dramatically increased compared with ndufs4, which showed near wild-type-like fluxes. This indicates that the strong growth defects seen for plants lacking complex I originate from a switch in the metabolic mode of mitochondria and an up-regulation of respiratory fluxes. Partial reversion of these phenotypes when traces of active complex I are present suggests that complex I is essential for plant development and likely acts as a negative regulator of respiratory fluxes. PMID:26134164

  17. Betaine: New Oxidant in the Stickland Reaction and Methanogenesis from Betaine and l-Alanine by a Clostridium sporogenes-Methanosarcina barkeri Coculture

    PubMed Central

    Naumann, Evelyn; Hippe, Hans; Gottschalk, Gerhard

    1983-01-01

    Growing and nongrowing cells of Clostridium sporogenes fermented betaine with l-alanine, l-valine, l-leucine, and l-isoleucine as electron donors in a coupled oxidation-reduction reaction (Stickland reaction). For the substrate combinations betaine and l-alanine and betaine and l-valine balance studies were performed; the results were in agreement with the following fermentation equation: 1 R- CH(NH2)-COOH + 2 betaine + 2 H2O → 1 R-COOH + 1 CO2 + 1 NH3 + 2 trimethylamine + 2 acetate. Growth and production of trimethylamine were strictly dependent on the presence of selenite in the medium. With cell suspensions it was shown that C. sporogenes was unable to catabolize betaine as a single substrate. Betaine, however, was reduced to trimethylamine and acetate under an atmosphere of molecular hydrogen. For the reduction of betaine by cell extracts of C. sporogenes, dimercaptans such as 1,4-dithiothreitol could serve as electron donors. No betaine reductase activity was detected in cells grown in a complex medium without betaine. The pH optimum of betaine reductase was at pH 7.3. When C. sporogenes was cocultured with Methanosarcina barkeri strain Fusaro on betaine together with l-alanine, an almost complete conversion of the two substrates to CH4, NH3, and presumably CO2 was observed. PMID:16346196

  18. D-Alanine-Controlled Transient Intestinal Mono-Colonization with Non-Laboratory-Adapted Commensal E. coli Strain HS

    PubMed Central

    Buschor, Stefanie; Bayramova, Firuza; Hernandez, Sara B.; Cava, Felipe; Kuru, Erkin; Van Nieuwenhze, Michael S.; Brun, Yves V.; Coelho, Fernanda M.; Hapfelmeier, Siegfried

    2016-01-01

    Soon after birth the mammalian gut microbiota forms a permanent and collectively highly resilient consortium. There is currently no robust method for re-deriving an already microbially colonized individual again-germ-free. We previously developed the in vivo growth-incompetent E. coli K-12 strain HA107 that is auxotrophic for the peptidoglycan components D-alanine (D-Ala) and meso-diaminopimelic acid (Dap) and can be used to transiently associate germ-free animals with live bacteria, without permanent loss of germ-free status. Here we describe the translation of this experimental model from the laboratory-adapted E. coli K-12 prototype to the better gut-adapted commensal strain E. coli HS. In this genetic background it was necessary to complete the D-Ala auxotrophy phenotype by additional knockout of the hypothetical third alanine racemase metC. Cells of the resulting fully auxotrophic strain assembled a peptidoglycan cell wall of normal composition, as long as provided with D-Ala and Dap in the medium, but could not proliferate a single time after D-Ala/Dap removal. Yet, unsupplemented bacteria remained active and were able to complete their cell cycle with fully sustained motility until immediately before autolytic death. Also in vivo, the transiently colonizing bacteria retained their ability to stimulate a live-bacteria-specific intestinal Immunoglobulin (Ig)A response. Full D-Ala auxotrophy enabled rapid recovery to again-germ-free status. E. coli HS has emerged from human studies and genomic analyses as a paradigm of benign intestinal commensal E. coli strains. Its reversibly colonizing derivative may provide a versatile research tool for mucosal bacterial conditioning or compound delivery without permanent colonization. PMID:27002976

  19. D-Alanine-Controlled Transient Intestinal Mono-Colonization with Non-Laboratory-Adapted Commensal E. coli Strain HS.

    PubMed

    Cuenca, Miguelangel; Pfister, Simona P; Buschor, Stefanie; Bayramova, Firuza; Hernandez, Sara B; Cava, Felipe; Kuru, Erkin; Van Nieuwenhze, Michael S; Brun, Yves V; Coelho, Fernanda M; Hapfelmeier, Siegfried

    2016-01-01

    Soon after birth the mammalian gut microbiota forms a permanent and collectively highly resilient consortium. There is currently no robust method for re-deriving an already microbially colonized individual again-germ-free. We previously developed the in vivo growth-incompetent E. coli K-12 strain HA107 that is auxotrophic for the peptidoglycan components D-alanine (D-Ala) and meso-diaminopimelic acid (Dap) and can be used to transiently associate germ-free animals with live bacteria, without permanent loss of germ-free status. Here we describe the translation of this experimental model from the laboratory-adapted E. coli K-12 prototype to the better gut-adapted commensal strain E. coli HS. In this genetic background it was necessary to complete the D-Ala auxotrophy phenotype by additional knockout of the hypothetical third alanine racemase metC. Cells of the resulting fully auxotrophic strain assembled a peptidoglycan cell wall of normal composition, as long as provided with D-Ala and Dap in the medium, but could not proliferate a single time after D-Ala/Dap removal. Yet, unsupplemented bacteria remained active and were able to complete their cell cycle with fully sustained motility until immediately before autolytic death. Also in vivo, the transiently colonizing bacteria retained their ability to stimulate a live-bacteria-specific intestinal Immunoglobulin (Ig)A response. Full D-Ala auxotrophy enabled rapid recovery to again-germ-free status. E. coli HS has emerged from human studies and genomic analyses as a paradigm of benign intestinal commensal E. coli strains. Its reversibly colonizing derivative may provide a versatile research tool for mucosal bacterial conditioning or compound delivery without permanent colonization. PMID:27002976

  20. Effect of protein restriction on (15)N transfer from dietary [(15)N]alanine and [(15)N]Spirulina platensis into urea.

    PubMed

    Hamadeh, M J; Hoffer, L J

    2001-08-01

    Six normal men consumed a mixed test meal while adapted to high (1.5 g. kg(-1) x day(-1)) and low (0.3 g. kg(-1) x day(-1)) protein intakes. They completed this protocol twice: when the test meals included 3 mg/kg of [(15)N]alanine ([(15)N]Ala) and when they included 30 mg/kg of intrinsically labeled [(15)N]Spirulina platensis ([(15)N]SPI). Six subjects with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) receiving conventional insulin therapy consumed the test meal with added [(15)N]Ala while adapted to their customary high-protein diet. Protein restriction increased serum alanine, glycine, glutamine, and methionine concentrations and reduced those of leucine. Whether the previous diet was high or low in protein, there was a similar increase in serum alanine, methionine, and branched-chain amino acid concentrations after the test meal and a similar pattern of (15)N enrichment in serum amino acids for a given tracer. When [(15)N]Ala was included in the test meal, (15)N appeared rapidly in serum alanine and glutamine, to a minor degree in leucine and isoleucine, and not at all in other circulating amino acids. With [(15)N]SPI, there was a slow appearance of the label in all serum amino acids analyzed. Despite the different serum amino acid labeling, protein restriction reduced the postmeal transfer of dietary (15)N in [(15)N]Ala or [(15)N]SPI into [(15)N]urea by similar amounts (38 and 43%, respectively, not significant). The response of the subjects with IDDM was similar to that of the normal subjects. Information about adaptive reductions in dietary amino acid catabolism obtained by adding [(15)N]Ala to a test meal appears to be equivalent to that obtained using an intrinsically labeled protein tracer. PMID:11440912

  1. Glucose and Alanine Metabolism in Children with Maple Syrup Urine Disease

    PubMed Central

    Haymond, Morey W.; Ben-Galim, Ehud; Strobel, Karen E.

    1978-01-01

    In vitro studies have suggested that catabolism of branched chain amino acids is linked with alanine and glutamine formed in, and released from, muscle. To explore this possibility in vivo, static and kinetic studies were performed in three patients with classical, and one patient with partial, branched chain α-ketoacid decarboxylase deficiency (maple syrup urine disease, MSUD) and compared to similar studies in eight age-matched controls. The subjects underwent a 24-30-h fast, and a glucose-alanine flux study using stable isotopes. Basal plasma leucine concentrations were elevated (P <0.001) in patients with MSUD (1,140±125 μM vs. 155±18 μM in controls); and in contrast to the controls, branched chain amino acid concentrations in plasma increased during the fast in the MSUD patients. Basal plasma alanine concentrations were lower (P <0.01) in patients with classical MSUD (153±8 μM vs. 495±27 μM in controls). This discrepancy was maintained throughout the fast despite a decrease in alanine concentrations in both groups. Plasma alanine and leucine concentrations in the patient with partial MSUD were intermediate between those of the controls and the subjects with the classical form of the disease. Circulating ketone bodies and glucoregulatory hormones concentrations were similar in the MSUD and normal subjects during the fast. Alanine flux rates in two patients with classical MSUD (3.76 and 4.00 μmol/Kg per min) and the patient with partial MSUD (5.76 μmol/Kg per min) were clearly lower than those of the controls (11.72±2.53 [SD] μmol/Kg per min). After short-term starvation, glucose flux and fasting concentrations were similar in the MSUD patients and normal subjects. These data indicate that branched chain amino acid catabolism is an important rate limiting event for alanine production in vivo. PMID:670400

  2. Exchange interactions and magnetic dimension in Cu(L-alanine)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, R.; Passeggi, M. C. G.; Novak, M. A.; Symko, O. G.; Oseroff, S. B.; Nascimento, O. R.; Terrile, M. C.

    1991-01-01

    A study of the magnetic properties of the copper (II) complex of the amino acid l-alanine [Cu(l-alanine)2] is reported. The susceptibility of a powder sample has been measured between 0.013 and 240 K. A linear-spin-chain model with antiferromagnetic exchange coupling J=-0.52 K fits well the susceptibility data above 0.3 K. Room-temperature electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of single crystals of Cu(l-alanine)2 at 9 and 35 GHz show a single, exchange-narrowed resonance. The g tensor, with principal values g1=2.0554+/-0.0005, g2=2.1064+/-0.0005, and g3=2.2056+/-0.0005, reflects the crystal structure of Cu(l-alanine)2 and the electronic properties of the copper ions. The observed angular variation of the linewidth is attributed to the magnetic interactions, narrowed by the exchange coupling between copper ions, and shows a contribution characteristic of the dipole-dipole interaction in a spin system with a predominant two-dimensional spin dynamics. Considering the exchange-collapsed resonance corresponding to the two lattice sites for copper in Cu(l-alanine)2, we evaluate an exchange constant ||J(AB1)||=0.47 K between nonequivalent copper neighbors in a spin chain, similar to the value obtained from the susceptibility data. The one-dimensional magnetic behavior suggested by the susceptibility data in Cu(l-alanine)2, where the metal ions are distributed in layers, is explained by proposing that carboxylate bridges provide electronic paths for superexchange interactions between coppers. Considering the characteristics of the molecular structure of Cu(l-alanine)2, the layers seem to be magnetically split off into one-dimensional zigzag ribbons. The apparent disagreement between the one-dimensional behavior suggested by the susceptibility data and the two-dimensional behavior of the spin dynamics suggested by the EPR linewidth is analyzed.

  3. FTIR spectra and conformational structure of deutero-β-alanine isolated in argon matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanian, Stepan G.; Ivanov, Alexander Yu; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2016-02-01

    Low temperature FTIR spectra of β-alanine-d3 isolated in argon matrices are used to determine the conformational composition of this compound. UV irradiation of the matrix samples is found to change the relative populations of the β-alanine-d3 conformers. The populations of conformers I and II with an Nsbnd D⋯O intramolecular H-bond decrease after the UV irradiation while the populations of conformer V with an N⋯Dsbnd O H-bond and conformer IV which has no intramolecular H-bonds increase. This behavior of the β-alanine-d3 conformers are used to separate the bands of the different conformers. The analysis of the experimental FTIR spectra is based on the calculated harmonic B3LYP/6-311++G(df,pd) frequencies and on the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ frequencies calculated with a method that includes anharmonic effects. Polynomial scaling of the calculated frequencies is used to achieve better agreement with the experimental data. The observation of the wide band of the OD stretching vibration at 2201 cm-1 is a direct evidence of the presence of the β-alanine-d3 conformer V in the Ar matrix. In total ten bands of conformer V are detected. The influence of the matrix environment on the structures and the IR spectra of the β-alanine and β-alanine-d3 conformers is investigated. This involves performing calculations of the β-alanine conformers embedded in argon clusters containing from 163 to 166 argon atoms using the M06-2X and B3LYP(GD3BJ) density-functional methods. Good agreement between the calculated and the experimental matrix splitting is demonstrated.

  4. Optimizing human in vivo dosing and delivery of β-alanine supplements for muscle carnosine synthesis.

    PubMed

    Stellingwerff, Trent; Decombaz, Jacques; Harris, Roger C; Boesch, Chris

    2012-07-01

    Interest into the effects of carnosine on cellular metabolism is rapidly expanding. The first study to demonstrate in humans that chronic β-alanine (BA) supplementation (~3-6 g BA/day for ~4 weeks) can result in significantly augmented muscle carnosine concentrations (>50%) was only recently published. BA supplementation is potentially poised for application beyond the niche exercise and performance-enhancement field and into other more clinical populations. When examining all BA supplementation studies that directly measure muscle carnosine (n=8), there is a significant linear correlation between total grams of BA consumed (of daily intake ranges of 1.6-6.4 g BA/day) versus both the relative and absolute increases in muscle carnosine. Supporting this, a recent dose-response study demonstrated a large linear dependency (R2=0.921) based on the total grams of BA consumed over 8 weeks. The pre-supplementation baseline carnosine or individual subjects' body weight (from 65 to 90 kg) does not appear to impact on subsequent carnosine synthesis from BA consumption. Once muscle carnosine is augmented, the washout is very slow (~2%/week). Recently, a slow-release BA tablet supplement has been developed showing a smaller peak plasma BA concentration and delayed time to peak, with no difference in the area under the curve compared to pure BA in solution. Further, this slow-release profile resulted in a reduced urinary BA loss and improved retention, while at the same time, eliciting minimal paraesthesia symptoms. However, our complete understanding of optimizing in vivo delivery and dosing of BA is still in its infancy. Thus, this review will clarify our current knowledge of BA supplementation to augment muscle carnosine as well as highlight future research questions on the regulatory points of control for muscle carnosine synthesis. PMID:22358258

  5. β-Alanine supplementation enhances human skeletal muscle relaxation speed but not force production capacity.

    PubMed

    Hannah, Ricci; Stannard, Rebecca Louise; Minshull, Claire; Artioli, Guilherme Giannini; Harris, Roger Charles; Sale, Craig

    2015-03-01

    β-Alanine (BA) supplementation improves human exercise performance. One possible explanation for this is an enhancement of muscle contractile properties, occurring via elevated intramuscular carnosine resulting in improved calcium sensitivity and handling. This study investigated the effect of BA supplementation on in vivo contractile properties and voluntary neuromuscular performance. Twenty-three men completed two experimental sessions, pre- and post-28 days supplementation with 6.4 g/day of BA (n = 12) or placebo (PLA; n = 11). During each session, force was recorded during a series of knee extensor contractions: resting and potentiated twitches and octet (8 pulses, 300 Hz) contractions elicited via femoral nerve stimulation; tetanic contractions (1 s, 1-100 Hz) via superficial muscle stimulation; and maximum and explosive voluntary contractions. BA supplementation had no effect on the force-frequency relationship, or the force responses (force at 25 and 50 ms from onset, peak force) of resting or potentiated twitches, and octet contractions (P > 0.05). Resting and potentiated twitch electromechanical delay and time-to-peak tension were unaffected by BA supplementation (P > 0.05), although half-relaxation time declined by 7-12% (P < 0.05). Maximum and explosive voluntary forces were unchanged after BA supplementation. BA supplementation had no effect on evoked force responses, implying that altered calcium sensitivity and/or release are not the mechanisms by which BA supplementation influences exercise performance. The reduced half-relaxation time with BA supplementation might, however, be explained by enhanced reuptake of calcium, which has implications for the efficiency of muscle contraction following BA supplementation. PMID:25539942

  6. Isolation and characterization of cytosolic alanine aminotransferase isoforms from starved rat liver.

    PubMed

    Vedavathi, M; Girish, K S; Kumar, M Karuna

    2004-12-01

    Alanine is the most effective precursor for gluconeogenesis among amino acids and the initial reaction is catalyzed by alanine aminotransferases (AlaATs). It is a less extensively studied enzyme under starvation and known to that the enzyme activity increases in liver under starvation. The present study describes the purification and characterization of two isoforms of alanine aminotransferases from starved male rat liver under starvation. The molecular mass of isoforms was found to be 17.7 and 112.2 kDa with isoelectric points of 4.2 and 5.3 respectively for AlaAT I and AlaAT II. Both the enzymes showed narrow substrate specificity for L-alanine with different Km for alanine and 2-oxoglutarate. Both the enzymes were glycoprotein in nature. Inhibition, modification and spectroscopic studies showed that both PLP and free-SH groups are directly involved in the enzymatic catalysis. PLP activated both the enzymes with a Km 0.057 mM and 0.2 mM for AlaAT I and II respectively. PMID:15663181

  7. Purification and characterization of alanine dehydrogenase from a cyanobacterium, Phormidium lapideum.

    PubMed

    Sawa, Y; Tani, M; Murata, K; Shibata, H; Ochiai, H

    1994-11-01

    Alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) was purified to homogeneity from cell-free extracts of a non-N2-fixing filamentous cyanobacterium, Phormidium lapideum. The molecular mass of the native enzyme was 240 kDa, and SDS-PAGE revealed a minimum molecular mass of 41 kDa, suggesting a six-subunit structure. The NH2 terminal amino acid residues of the purified AlaDH revealed marked similarity with that of other AlaDHs. The enzyme was highly specific for L-alanine and NAD+, but showed relatively low amino-acceptor specificity. The pH optimum was 8.4 for reductive amination of pyruvate and 9.2 for oxidative deamination of L-alanine. The Km values were 5.0 mM for L-alanine and 0.04 mM for NAD+, 0.33 mM for pyruvate, 60.6 mM for NH4+ (pH 8.7), and 0.02 mM for NADH. Various L-amino acids including alanine, serine, threonine, and aromatic amino acids, inhibited the aminating reaction. The enzyme was inactivated upon incubation with pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) followed by reduction with sodium borohydride. The copresence of NADH and pyruvate largely protected the enzyme against the inactivation by PLP. PMID:7896761

  8. Role of Alanine Dehydrogenase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during Recovery from Hypoxic Nonreplicating Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Giffin, Michelle M.; Shi, Lanbo; Gennaro, Maria L.; Sohaskey, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis can maintain a nonreplicating persistent state in the host for decades, but must maintain the ability to efficiently reactivate and produce active disease to survive and spread in a population. Among the enzymes expressed during this dormancy is alanine dehydrogenase, which converts pyruvate to alanine, and glyoxylate to glycine concurrent with the oxidation of NADH to NAD. It is involved in the metabolic remodeling of M. tuberculosis through its possible interactions with both the glyoxylate and methylcitrate cycle. Both mRNA levels and enzymatic activities of isocitrate lyase, the first enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, and alanine dehydrogenase increased during entry into nonreplicating persistence, while the gene and activity for the second enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, malate synthase were not. This could suggest a shift in carbon flow away from the glyoxylate cycle and instead through alanine dehydrogenase. Expression of ald was also induced in vitro by other persistence-inducing stresses such as nitric oxide, and was expressed at high levels in vivo during the initial lung infection in mice. Enzyme activity was maintained during extended hypoxia even after transcription levels decreased. An ald knockout mutant of M. tuberculosis showed no reduction in anaerobic survival in vitro, but resulted in a significant lag in the resumption of growth after reoxygenation. During reactivation the ald mutant had an altered NADH/NAD ratio, and alanine dehydrogenase is proposed to maintain the optimal NADH/NAD ratio during anaerobiosis in preparation of eventual regrowth, and during the initial response during reoxygenation. PMID:27203084

  9. Role of Alanine Dehydrogenase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during Recovery from Hypoxic Nonreplicating Persistence.

    PubMed

    Giffin, Michelle M; Shi, Lanbo; Gennaro, Maria L; Sohaskey, Charles D

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis can maintain a nonreplicating persistent state in the host for decades, but must maintain the ability to efficiently reactivate and produce active disease to survive and spread in a population. Among the enzymes expressed during this dormancy is alanine dehydrogenase, which converts pyruvate to alanine, and glyoxylate to glycine concurrent with the oxidation of NADH to NAD. It is involved in the metabolic remodeling of M. tuberculosis through its possible interactions with both the glyoxylate and methylcitrate cycle. Both mRNA levels and enzymatic activities of isocitrate lyase, the first enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, and alanine dehydrogenase increased during entry into nonreplicating persistence, while the gene and activity for the second enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, malate synthase were not. This could suggest a shift in carbon flow away from the glyoxylate cycle and instead through alanine dehydrogenase. Expression of ald was also induced in vitro by other persistence-inducing stresses such as nitric oxide, and was expressed at high levels in vivo during the initial lung infection in mice. Enzyme activity was maintained during extended hypoxia even after transcription levels decreased. An ald knockout mutant of M. tuberculosis showed no reduction in anaerobic survival in vitro, but resulted in a significant lag in the resumption of growth after reoxygenation. During reactivation the ald mutant had an altered NADH/NAD ratio, and alanine dehydrogenase is proposed to maintain the optimal NADH/NAD ratio during anaerobiosis in preparation of eventual regrowth, and during the initial response during reoxygenation. PMID:27203084

  10. L-alanine in a droplet of water: a density-functional molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Degtyarenko, Ivan M; Jalkanen, Karl J; Gurtovenko, Andrey A; Nieminen, Risto M

    2007-04-26

    We report the results of a Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics study on an L-alanine amino acid in neutral aqueous solution. The whole system, the L-alanine zwitterion and 50 water molecules, was treated quantum mechanically. We found that the hydrophobic side chain (R = CH3) defines the trajectory path of the molecule. Initially fully hydrated in an isolated droplet of water, the amino acid moves to the droplet's surface, exposing its hydrophobic methyl group and alpha-hydrogen out of the water. The structure of an L-alanine with the methyl group exposed to the water surface was found to be energetically favorable compared to a fully hydrated molecule. The dynamic behavior of the system suggests that the first hydration shell of the amino acid is localized around carboxylate (CO2-) and ammonium (NH3+) functional groups; it is highly ordered and quite rigid. In contrast, the hydration shell around the side chain is much less structured, suggesting a modest influence of the methyl group on the structure of water. The number of water molecules in the first hydration shell of an alanine molecule is constantly changing; the average number was found to equal 7. The molecular dynamics results show that L-alanine in water does not have a preferred conformation, as all three of the molecule's functional sites (i.e., CH3, NH3+, CO2-) perform rotational movements around the C(alpha)-site bond. PMID:17407339

  11. Perturbation correction for alanine dosimeters in different phantom materials in high-energy photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Voigts-Rhetz, P.; Anton, M.; Vorwerk, H.; Zink, K.

    2016-02-01

    In modern radiotherapy the verification of complex treatments plans is often performed in inhomogeneous or even anthropomorphic phantoms. For dose verification small detectors are necessary and therefore alanine detectors are most suitable. Though the response of alanine for a wide range of clinical photon energies in water is well know, the knowledge about the influence of the surrounding phantom material on the response of alanine is sparse. Therefore we investigated the influence of twenty different surrounding/phantom materials for alanine dosimeters in clinical photon fields via Monte Carlo simulations. The relative electron density of the used materials was in the range {{n}e}/{{n}e,\\text{w}}=0.20 up to 1.69, covering almost all materials appearing in inhomogeneous or anthropomorphic phantoms used in radiotherapy. The investigations were performed for three different clinical photon spectra ranging from 6 to 25 MV-X and Co-60 and as a result a perturbation correction {{k}\\text{env}} depending on the environmental material was established. The Monte Carlo simulation show, that there is only a small dependence of {{k}\\text{env}} on the phantom material and the photon energy, which is below  ±0.6%. The results confirm the good suitability of alanine detectors for in-vivo dosimetry.

  12. Perturbation correction for alanine dosimeters in different phantom materials in high-energy photon beams.

    PubMed

    von Voigts-Rhetz, P; Anton, M; Vorwerk, H; Zink, K

    2016-02-01

    In modern radiotherapy the verification of complex treatments plans is often performed in inhomogeneous or even anthropomorphic phantoms. For dose verification small detectors are necessary and therefore alanine detectors are most suitable. Though the response of alanine for a wide range of clinical photon energies in water is well know, the knowledge about the influence of the surrounding phantom material on the response of alanine is sparse. Therefore we investigated the influence of twenty different surrounding/phantom materials for alanine dosimeters in clinical photon fields via Monte Carlo simulations. The relative electron density of the used materials was in the range [Formula: see text] up to 1.69, covering almost all materials appearing in inhomogeneous or anthropomorphic phantoms used in radiotherapy. The investigations were performed for three different clinical photon spectra ranging from 6 to 25 MV-X and Co-60 and as a result a perturbation correction [Formula: see text] depending on the environmental material was established. The Monte Carlo simulation show, that there is only a small dependence of [Formula: see text] on the phantom material and the photon energy, which is below  ±0.6%. The results confirm the good suitability of alanine detectors for in-vivo dosimetry. PMID:26758810

  13. Substrate Specificity of the Aspartate:Alanine Antiporter (AspT) of Tetragenococcus halophilus in Reconstituted Liposomes*

    PubMed Central

    Sasahara, Ayako; Nanatani, Kei; Enomoto, Masaru; Kuwahara, Shigefumi; Abe, Keietsu

    2011-01-01

    The aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of the lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus is a member of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAEx) transporter family. T. halophilus AspT catalyzes the electrogenic exchange of l-aspartate1− with l-alanine0. Although physiological functions of AspT were well studied, l-aspartate1−:l-alanine0 antiport mechanisms are still unsolved. Here we report that the binding sites of l-aspartate and l-alanine are independently present in AspT by means of the kinetic studies. We purified His6-tagged T. halophilus AspT and characterized its kinetic properties when reconstituted in liposomes (Km = 0.35 ± 0.03 mm for l-aspartate, Km = 0.098 ± 0 mm for d-aspartate, Km = 26 ± 2 mm for l-alanine, Km = 3.3 ± 0.2 mm for d-alanine). Competitive inhibition by various amino acids of l-aspartate or l-alanine in self-exchange reactions revealed that l-cysteine selectively inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange but only weakly inhibited l-alanine self-exchange. Additionally, l-serine selectively inhibited l-alanine self-exchange but barely inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange. The aspartate analogs l-cysteine sulfinic acid, l-cysteic acid, and d-cysteic acid competitively and strongly inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange compared with l-alanine self-exchange. Taken together, these kinetic data suggest that the putative binding sites of l-aspartate and l-alanine are independently located in the substrate translocation pathway of AspT. PMID:21719707

  14. Substrate specificity of the aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of Tetragenococcus halophilus in reconstituted liposomes.

    PubMed

    Sasahara, Ayako; Nanatani, Kei; Enomoto, Masaru; Kuwahara, Shigefumi; Abe, Keietsu

    2011-08-19

    The aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of the lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus is a member of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAEx) transporter family. T. halophilus AspT catalyzes the electrogenic exchange of L-aspartate(1-) with L-alanine(0). Although physiological functions of AspT were well studied, L-aspartate(1-):L-alanine(0) antiport mechanisms are still unsolved. Here we report that the binding sites of L-aspartate and L-alanine are independently present in AspT by means of the kinetic studies. We purified His(6)-tagged T. halophilus AspT and characterized its kinetic properties when reconstituted in liposomes (K(m) = 0.35 ± 0.03 mm for L-aspartate, K(m) = 0.098 ± 0 mm for D-aspartate, K(m) = 26 ± 2 mm for L-alanine, K(m) = 3.3 ± 0.2 mm for D-alanine). Competitive inhibition by various amino acids of L-aspartate or L-alanine in self-exchange reactions revealed that L-cysteine selectively inhibited L-aspartate self-exchange but only weakly inhibited L-alanine self-exchange. Additionally, L-serine selectively inhibited L-alanine self-exchange but barely inhibited L-aspartate self-exchange. The aspartate analogs L-cysteine sulfinic acid, L-cysteic acid, and D-cysteic acid competitively and strongly inhibited L-aspartate self-exchange compared with L-alanine self-exchange. Taken together, these kinetic data suggest that the putative binding sites of L-aspartate and L-alanine are independently located in the substrate translocation pathway of AspT. PMID:21719707

  15. Combined TL and 10B-alanine ESR dosimetry for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Bartolotta, A; D'Oca, M C; Lo Giudice, B; Brai, M; Borio, R; Forini, N; Salvadori, P; Manera, S

    2004-01-01

    The dosimetric technique described in this paper is based on electron spin resonance (ESR) detectors using an alanine-boric compound acid enriched with (10)B, and beryllium oxide thermoluminescent (TL) detectors; with this combined dosimetry, it is possible to discriminate the doses due to thermal neutrons and gamma radiation in a mixed field. Irradiations were carried out inside the thermal column of a TRIGA MARK II water-pool-type research nuclear reactor, also used for Boron Neutron Capture therapy (BNCT) applications, with thermal neutron fluence from 10(9) to 10(14) nth cm(-2). The ESR dosemeters using the alanine-boron compound indicated ESR signals about 30-fold stronger than those using only alanine. Moreover, a negligible correction for the gamma contribution, measured with TL detectors, almost insensitive to thermal neutrons, was necessary. Therefore, a simultaneous analysis of our TL and ESR detectors allows discrimination between thermal neutron and gamma doses, as required in BNCT. PMID:15353720

  16. Applicability of EPR/alanine dosimetry for quality assurance in proton eye radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Michalec, B; Mierzwinska, G; Ptaszkiewicz, M; Sowa, U; Stolarczyk, L; Weber, A

    2014-06-01

    A new quality assurance and quality control method for proton eye radiotherapy based on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)/alanine dosimetry has been developed. It is based on Spread-Out Bragg Peak entrance dose measurement with alanine detectors. The entrance dose is well correlated with the dose at the facility isocenter, where, during the therapeutic irradiation, the tumour is placed. The unique alanine detector features namely keeping the dose record in a form of stable radiation-induced free radicals trapped in the material structure, and the non-destructive read-out makes this type of detector a good candidate for additional documentation of the patient's exposure over the therapy course. PMID:24876341

  17. Chronic Blockade of the Androgen Receptor Abolishes Age-Dependent Increases in Blood Pressure in Female Growth-Restricted Rats.

    PubMed

    Dasinger, John Henry; Intapad, Suttira; Rudsenske, Benjamin R; Davis, Gwendolyn K; Newsome, Ashley D; Alexander, Barbara T

    2016-06-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction induced via placental insufficiency programs a significant increase in blood pressure at 12 months of age in female growth-restricted rats that is associated with early cessation of estrous cyclicity, indicative of premature reproductive senescence. In addition, female growth-restricted rats at 12 months of age exhibit a significant increase in circulating testosterone with no change in circulating estradiol. Testosterone is positively associated with blood pressure after menopause in women. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that androgen receptor blockade would abolish the significant increase in blood pressure that develops with age in female growth-restricted rats. Mean arterial pressure was measured in animals pretreated with and without the androgen receptor antagonist, flutamide (8 mg/kg/day, SC for 2 weeks). Flutamide abolished the significant increase in blood pressure in growth-restricted rats relative to control at 12 months of age. To examine the mechanism(s) by which androgens contribute to increased blood pressure in growth-restricted rats, blood pressure was assessed in rats untreated or treated with enalapril (250 mg/L for 2 weeks). Enalapril eliminated the increase in blood pressure in growth-restricted relative to vehicle- and flutamide-treated controls. Furthermore, the increase in medullary angiotensin type 1 receptor mRNA expression was abolished in flutamide-treated growth-restricted relative to untreated counterparts and controls; cortical angiotensin-converting enzyme mRNA expression was reduced in flutamide-treated growth-restricted versus untreated counterparts. Thus, these data indicate that androgens, via activation of the renin-angiotensin system, are important mediators of increased blood pressure that develops by 12 months of age in female growth-restricted rats. PMID:27113045

  18. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulated Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization in hepatocytes is abolished by phorbol esters, pertussis toxin and partial hepatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.M.; Garrison, J.C.

    1986-05-01

    EGF has been demonstrated to increase free intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ levels in isolated hepatocytes putatively by generation of the second messenger inositol trisphosphate (IP/sub 3/). Pretreatment of cells with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) inhibited the EGF (66 nM) stimulated Ca/sup 2 +/ response as measured by quin2. Inhibition by PMA was maximal within 3 min and was concentration dependent (IC/sub 50/ = 13.5 nM). Four other active phorbol ester analogues blocked the Ca/sup 2 +/ response while inactive analogues did not. EGF was unable to increase intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ levels in hepatocytes isolated from rats treated with pertussis toxin for 72 hrs. Neither PMA nor toxin pretreatment was able to inhibit the Ca/sup 2 +/ response to angiotensin II (Ang II). In hepatocytes isolated 24 hrs after partial hepatectomy, the Ca/sup 2 +/ response to EGF (as measured by phosphorylase activity, EC/sub 50/ = 5 nM) was completely abolished and remained attenuated for 7 days post-hepatectomy. The Ca/sup 2 +/ response to Ang II in this model system was also blunted but required 3 days for development of the full effect and within 7 days full activity is nearly restored. The results suggest that fundamental differences exist in the transduction mechanisms used by these two Ca/sup 2 +/-linked hormones to mobilize intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ (and putatively increase IP/sub 3/ formation).

  19. Monkey׳s short-term auditory memory nearly abolished by combined removal of the rostral superior temporal gyrus and rhinal cortices.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Jonathan B; Malloy, Megan; Mishkin, Mortimer; Saunders, Richard C

    2016-06-01

    While monkeys easily acquire the rules for performing visual and tactile delayed matching-to-sample, a method for testing recognition memory, they have extraordinary difficulty acquiring a similar rule in audition. Another striking difference between the modalities is that whereas bilateral ablation of the rhinal cortex (RhC) leads to profound impairment in visual and tactile recognition, the same lesion has no detectable effect on auditory recognition memory (Fritz et al., 2005). In our previous study, a mild impairment in auditory memory was obtained following bilateral ablation of the entire medial temporal lobe (MTL), including the RhC, and an equally mild effect was observed after bilateral ablation of the auditory cortical areas in the rostral superior temporal gyrus (rSTG). In order to test the hypothesis that each of these mild impairments was due to partial disconnection of acoustic input to a common target (e.g., the ventromedial prefrontal cortex), in the current study we examined the effects of a more complete auditory disconnection of this common target by combining the removals of both the rSTG and the MTL. We found that the combined lesion led to forgetting thresholds (performance at 75% accuracy) that fell precipitously from the normal retention duration of ~30 to 40s to a duration of ~1 to 2s, thus nearly abolishing auditory recognition memory, and leaving behind only a residual echoic memory. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Auditory working memory. PMID:26707975

  20. Inactivation of gltB Abolishes Expression of the Assimilatory Nitrate Reductase Gene (nasB) in Pseudomonas putida KT2442

    PubMed Central

    Eberl, Leo; Ammendola, Aldo; Rothballer, Michael H.; Givskov, Michael; Sternberg, Claus; Kilstrup, Mogens; Schleifer, Karl-Heinz; Molin, Søren

    2000-01-01

    By using mini-Tn5 transposon mutagenesis, random transcriptional fusions of promoterless bacterial luciferase, luxAB, to genes of Pseudomonas putida KT2442 were generated. Insertion mutants that responded to ammonium deficiency by induction of bioluminescence were selected. The mutant that responded most strongly was genetically analyzed and is demonstrated to bear the transposon within the assimilatory nitrate reductase gene (nasB) of P. putida KT2442. Genetic evidence as well as sequence analyses of the DNA regions flanking nasB suggest that the genes required for nitrate assimilation are not clustered. We isolated three second-site mutants in which induction of nasB expression was completely abolished under nitrogen-limiting conditions. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the chromosomal junctions revealed that in all three mutants the secondary transposon had inserted at different sites in the gltB gene of P. putida KT2442 encoding the major subunit of the glutamate synthase. A detailed physiological characterization of the gltB mutants revealed that they are unable to utilize a number of potential nitrogen sources, are defective in the ability to express nitrogen starvation proteins, display an aberrant cell morphology under nitrogen-limiting conditions, and are impaired in the capacity to survive prolonged nitrogen starvation periods. PMID:10852866

  1. Structural and catalytic properties of L-alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Porumb, H; Vancea, D; Mureşan, L; Presecan, E; Lascu, I; Petrescu, I; Porumb, T; Pop, R; Bârzu, O

    1987-04-01

    Alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus cereus, a non-allosteric enzyme composed of six identical subunits, was purified to homogeneity by chromatography on blue-Sepharose and Sepharose 6B-CL. Like other pyridine-linked dehydrogenases, alanine dehydrogenase is inhibited by Cibacron blue, competitively with respect to NADH and noncompetitively with respect to pyruvate. The enzyme was inactivated by 0.1 M glycine/HCl (pH 2) and reactivated by 0.1 M phosphate (pH 8) supplemented with NAD+ or NADH. The reactivation was characterized by sigmoidal kinetics indicating a complex mechanism involving rate-limiting folding and association steps. Cibacron blue interfered with renaturation, presumably by competition with NADH. Chromatography on Sepharose 6B-CL of the partially renatured alanine dehydrogenase led to the separation of several intermediates, but only the hexamer was characterized by enzymatic activity. By immobilization on Sepharose 4B, alanine dehydrogenase from B. cereus retained 66% of the specific activity of the soluble enzyme. After denaturation of immobilized alanine dehydrogenase with 7 M urea, 37% of the initial protein was still bound to Sepharose, indicating that on the average the hexamer was attached to the matrix via, at most, two subunits. The ability of the denatured, immobilized subunits to pick up subunits from solution shows their capacity to fold back to the native conformation after urea treatment. The formation of "hybrids" between subunits of enzyme from B. cereus and Bacillus subtilis demonstrates the close resemblance of the tertiary and quaternary structures of alanine dehydrogenases from these species. PMID:3104322

  2. Relative response of the alanine dosimeter to medium energy x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anton, M.; Büermann, L.

    2015-08-01

    The response of the alanine dosimeter to kilovoltage x-rays with respect to the dose to water was measured, relative to the response to Co-60 radiation. Two series of x-ray qualities were investigated, one ranging from 30 kV to 100 kV tube voltage (TW series), the other one ranging from 70 kV to 280 kV (TH series). Due to the use of the water calorimeter as a primary standard, the uncertainty of the delivered dose is significantly lower than for other published data. The alanine response was measured as described in a previous publication (Anton et al 2013 Phys. Med. Biol. 58 3259-82). The uncertainty component due to the alanine measurement and analysis is ⩽0.4%, the major part of the combined uncertainty of the relative response originates from the uncertainty of the delivered dose. The relative uncertainties of the relative response vary from ⩽2% for the TW series to ⩽1.1% for the TH series. Different from the behaviour of the alanine dosimeter for megavoltage x-rays or electrons, the relative response drops significantly from unity for Co-60 radiation to less than 64% for the TW quality with a tube voltage of 30 kV. In order to reproduce this behaviour through Monte Carlo simulations, not only the ratio of the absorbed dose to alanine to the absorbed dose to water has to be known, but also the intrinsic efficiency, i.e. the dependence of the number of free radicals generated per unit of absorbed dose on the photon energy. This quantity is not yet accessible for the TW series. For a possible use of the alanine dosimeter for kilovoltage x-rays, for example in electronic brachytherapy, users should rely on the measured data for the relative response which have become available with this publication.

  3. Relative response of the alanine dosimeter to medium energy x-rays.

    PubMed

    Anton, M; Büermann, L

    2015-08-01

    The response of the alanine dosimeter to kilovoltage x-rays with respect to the dose to water was measured, relative to the response to Co-60 radiation.Two series of x-ray qualities were investigated, one ranging from 30 kV to 100 kV tube voltage (TW series), the other one ranging from 70 kV to 280 kV (TH series). Due to the use of the water calorimeter as a primary standard, the uncertainty of the delivered dose is significantly lower than for other published data. The alanine response was measured as described in a previous publication (Anton et al 2013 Phys. Med. Biol. 58 3259-82). The uncertainty component due to the alanine measurement and analysis is ⩽0.4%, the major part of the combined uncertainty of the relative response originates from the uncertainty of the delivered dose. The relative uncertainties of the relative response vary from ⩽2% for the TW series to ⩽1.1% for the TH series.Different from the behaviour of the alanine dosimeter for megavoltage x-rays or electrons, the relative response drops significantly from unity for Co-60 radiation to less than 64% for the TW quality with a tube voltage of 30 kV. In order to reproduce this behaviour through Monte Carlo simulations, not only the ratio of the absorbed dose to alanine to the absorbed dose to water has to be known, but also the intrinsic efficiency, i.e. the dependence of the number of free radicals generated per unit of absorbed dose on the photon energy. This quantity is not yet accessible for the TW series.For a possible use of the alanine dosimeter for kilovoltage x-rays, for example in electronic brachytherapy, users should rely on the measured data for the relative response which have become available with this publication. PMID:26216572

  4. The energy dependence of lithium formate and alanine EPR dosimeters for medium energy x rays

    SciTech Connect

    Waldeland, Einar; Hole, Eli Olaug; Sagstuen, Einar; Malinen, Eirik

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To perform a systematic investigation of the energy dependence of alanine and lilthium formate EPR dosimeters for medium energy x rays. Methods: Lithium formate and alanine EPR dosimeters were exposed to eight different x-ray beam qualities, with nominal potentials ranging from 50 to 200 kV. Following ionometry based on standards of absorbed dose to water, the dosimeters were given two different doses of approximately 3 and 6 Gy for each radiation quality, with three dosimeters for each dose. A reference series was also irradiated to three different dose levels at a {sup 60}Co unit. The dose to water energy response, that is, the dosimeter reading per absorbed dose to water relative to that for {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays, was estimated for each beam quality. In addition, the energy response was calculated by Monte Carlo simulations and compared to the experimental energy response. Results: The experimental energy response estimates ranged from 0.89 to 0.94 and from 0.68 to 0.90 for lithium formate and alanine, respectively. The uncertainties in the experimental energy response estimates were typically 3%. The relative effectiveness, that is, the ratio of the experimental energy response to that following Monte Carlo simulations was, on average, 0.96 and 0.94 for lithium formate and alanine, respectively. Conclusions: This work shows that lithium formate dosimeters are less dependent on x-ray energy than alanine. Furthermore, as the relative effectiveness for both lithium formate and alanine were systematically less than unity, the yield of radiation-induced radicals is decreased following x-irradiation compared to irradiation with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays.

  5. Shortening or Abolishing Shift Report as the Effect of ENR and EMR Implementation, and Its Side Effects.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Asami; Nakajima, Anna; Fukuju, Yuri; Mori, Natsumi; Shimoda, Mariko; Kurihara, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the shortening or abolishing shift report as the effect of implementing electronic nursing and medical records and its side effects at 10 Japanese hospitals. The majority of staff nurses accepted this change, but both directors and staff nurses recognized the risk of insufficient collection and communication of patient information, difficulties of understanding the risks and matters of patients not under care and an increase in time to collect information from the computer before starting patient care. Directors should carefully evaluate and reduce the negative influences associated with changing or eliminating the traditional shift report. PMID:27577330

  6. Removal of an N-terminal peptide from mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase abolishes its interactions with mitochondria in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    O'Donovan, K M; Doonan, S; Marra, E; Passarella, S; Quagliariello, E

    1985-01-01

    Treatment of mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase from rat liver with trypsin leads to specific cleavage of the bonds between residues 26 and 27, and residues 31 and 32. The proteolysed enzyme has only a small residual catalytic activity, but retains a conformation similar to that of the native form as judged by accessibility and reactivity of cysteine residues. Proteolysis abolishes the ability of the enzyme either to bind to mitochondria or to be imported into the organelles. This suggests that the N-terminal segment of the native enzyme is essential for both of these functions, at least in the model system used to study the import process. PMID:4026799

  7. Temperature-sensitive mutants of Escherichia coli K-12 with low activities of the L-alanine adding enzyme and the D-alanyl-D-alanine adding enzyme.

    PubMed

    Lugtenberg, E J; v Schijndel-van Dam, A

    1972-04-01

    A number of properties of temperature-sensitive mutants in murein synthesis are described. The mutants grow at 30 C but lyse at 42 C. One mutant possesses a temperature-sensitive d-alanyl-d-alanine adding enzyme, has an impaired rate of murein synthesis in vivo at both 30 and 42 C, and contains elevated levels of uridine diphosphate-N-acetyl-muramyl-tripeptide (UDP-MurNAc-l-Ala-d-Glu-m-diaminopimelic acid) at 42 C. The other mutant possesses an l-alanine adding enzyme with a very low in vitro activity at both 30 and 42 C. Its in vivo rate of murein synthesis is almost normal at 30 C but is much less at 42 C. When the murein precursors were isolated after incubation of the cells in the presence of (14)C-l-alanine, they contained only a fraction of the radioactivity that could be obtained from a wild-type strain. A genetic nomenclature for genes concerned with murein synthesis is proposed. PMID:4552998

  8. Self-assembling chimeric polypeptide-doxorubicin conjugate nanoparticles that abolish tumours after a single injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrew Mackay, J.; Chen, Mingnan; McDaniel, Jonathan R.; Liu, Wenge; Simnick, Andrew J.; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2009-12-01

    New strategies to self-assemble biocompatible materials into nanoscale, drug-loaded packages with improved therapeutic efficacy are needed for nanomedicine. To address this need, we developed artificial recombinant chimeric polypeptides (CPs) that spontaneously self-assemble into sub-100-nm-sized, near-monodisperse nanoparticles on conjugation of diverse hydrophobic molecules, including chemotherapeutics. These CPs consist of a biodegradable polypeptide that is attached to a short Cys-rich segment. Covalent modification of the Cys residues with a structurally diverse set of hydrophobic small molecules, including chemotherapeutics, leads to spontaneous formation of nanoparticles over a range of CP compositions and molecular weights. When used to deliver chemotherapeutics to a murine cancer model, CP nanoparticles have a fourfold higher maximum tolerated dose than free drug, and induce nearly complete tumour regression after a single dose. This simple strategy can promote co-assembly of drugs, imaging agents and targeting moieties into multifunctional nanomedicines.

  9. Anaerobic Accumulation of γ-Aminobutyric Acid and Alanine in Radish Leaves (Raphanus sativus, L.)

    PubMed Central

    Streeter, John G.; Thompson, John F.

    1972-01-01

    In leaves, the anaerobic accumulation of alanine was accompanied by a loss of aspartate, and these changes preceded γ-aminobutyrate accumulation and glutamate loss. Changes in keto acid content did not appear to be the cause of amino acid changes. Accumulation of γ-aminobutyrate was due to acceleration of glutamate decarboxylation and arrest of γ-aminobutyrate transamination. Changes in enzyme content did not explain the changes in reaction rates in vivo. Most of the aspartate may be converted anaerobically to alanine via oxalacetate and pyruvate. PMID:16658004

  10. Steric effect exerted by the proline residue on the antecedent alanine residue.

    PubMed

    Siemión, I Z; Sobczyk, K; Nawrocka, E

    1982-05-01

    Five model tetrapeptides: Ala-Ala-Ala-Ala, Pro-Ala-Ala-Ala, Ala-Pro-Ala-Ala, Ala-Ala-Pro-Ala and Ala-Ala-Ala-Pro, were synthesized and measured in D2O by 13 C-n.m.r. spectroscopy. The spectra analysis led us to the conclusion that for each model (irrespective of pD) in conformational equilibrium, the predominant conformation is the one in which side methyl of alanine preceding proline residue eclipses alanine carbonyl group. The influence of pD changes in cis-trans isomerism of Ala-Pro amide bond was also investigated. PMID:7118413

  11. The reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT) does not abolish the inhibitory nicotinic response recorded from rat dorsolateral septal neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorenson, E. M.; Gallagher, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    Previous intracellular recordings have demonstrated that dorsolateral septal nucleus (DLSN) neurons express a novel nicotinic receptor which produces a direct membrane hyperpolarization when activated by nicotinic agonists. Activation of the classical excitatory nicotinic receptors has been shown to require a disulfide bond involving the cysteines at positions 192 and 193 of the alpha subunits of the receptor. Reduction of this cystine bond with dithiothreitol (DTT) abolishes agonist activation of excitatory nicotinic receptors. We have now examined whether DTT treatment of the inhibitory nicotinic receptor on DLSN neurons also abolishes the inhibitory nicotinic response. We find that the inhibitory response persists after treatment of the neurons with 1 mM DTT, even if the reduction is followed by alkylation of the receptor with bromoacetylcholine to prevent possible reformation of disulfide bonds. This result suggests that the agonist binding site on the inhibitory nicotinic receptor does not require an intact disulfide bond, similar to the bond on the alpha subunit of the excitatory nicotinic receptor, for agonist activation of the receptor. Some of these results have been previously reported in abstract form.

  12. Is total abolishment of great saphenous reflux in the invasive treatment of superficial chronic venous insufficiency always necessary?

    PubMed

    Navarro, T P; Nunes, T A; Ribeiro, A L; Castro-Silva, M

    2009-02-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency ranges from mild telangiectasias to skin ulceration with poor prognosis regarding healing and quality of life. Varicose veins are the most frequent clinical presentation, affecting 75% of such patients and 71% are due to primary reflux of great saphenous vein, which is the most compromised vein in chronic venous insufficiency. However, about 75% of these veins are not dilated. The standard treatment has been stripping of the saphenous vein, because it has 85% of good results at long term. However, saphenous vein is the main arterial substitute and should be spared whenever possible. The development of non-invasive diagnostic methods showed that hemodynamic worsening correlates with clinical severity and that the majority of patients did not have a dilated saphenous vein. Thus, several selective operations proposed to spare the saphenous vein have reported good results. Minimally invasive techniques (eco-guided foam, radiofrequency and laser) have also emerged aiming to obliterate the vein and abolishing reflux and have also reported good results, but they do not spare the vessel. Measurement of saphenous diameter has been shown to correlate with clinical and hemodynamic worsening, thus allowing planning the invasive treatment of chronic venous insufficiency. Dilated diameters (>7.2 mm) correlate with severe disease and poor prognosis, being an indication for total abolishment of saphenous vein reflux. All other presentations must be individualized, sparing saphenous vein whenever possible and and a standardized approach is not indicated for all patients. PMID:19190549

  13. Lesions of the Medial Prefrontal Cortex Abolish Conditioned Aversion Associated with Sexual Behavior in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Jon F.; Loos, Maarten; Di Sebastiano, Andrea R.; Brown, Jennifer L.; Lehman, Michael N.; Coolen, Lique M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND An inability to inhibit behaviors once they become maladaptive is a component of several psychiatric illnesses and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) was identified as a potential mediator of behavioral inhibition. The current study tested if the mPFC is involved in inhibition of sexual behavior when associated with aversive outcomes. METHODS Using male rats, effects of lesions of the infralimbic (IL) and prelimbic (PL) areas of the mPFC on expression of sexual behavior and ability to inhibit mating were tested using a paradigm of copulation-contingent aversion. RESULTS mPFC lesions did not alter expression of sexual behavior. In contrast, mPFC lesions completely blocked the acquisition of sex-aversion conditioning and lesioned animals continued to mate, in contrast to the robust behavioral inhibition towards copulation in mPFC intact males, resulting in only 22% of intact males continuing to mate. However, rats with mPFC lesions were capable of forming a conditioned place preference to sexual reward and conditioned place aversion for lithium chloride, suggesting that these lesions did not alter associative learning or sensitivity for lithium chloride. DISCUSSION The current study indicates that animals with mPFC lesions are likely capable of forming the associations with aversive outcomes of their behavior, but lack the ability to suppress seeking of sexual reward in the face of aversive consequences. These data may contribute to a better understanding of a common pathology underlying impulse control disorders as compulsive sexual behavior has a high prevalence of comorbidity with psychiatric disorders and Parkinson’s Disease. PMID:20346444

  14. 40 CFR 721.520 - Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...)(4), (c)(4) (where N = 100). The requirement of 40 CFR 721.91(a)(4) that the amount of the substance...-, salt. 721.520 Section 721.520 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.520 Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt. (a) Chemical...

  15. 40 CFR 721.520 - Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...)(4), (c)(4) (where N = 100). The requirement of 40 CFR 721.91(a)(4) that the amount of the substance...-, salt. 721.520 Section 721.520 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.520 Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt. (a) Chemical...

  16. Protein Homeostasis Defects of Alanine-Glyoxylate Aminotransferase: New Therapeutic Strategies in Primary Hyperoxaluria Type I

    PubMed Central

    Pey, Angel L.; Albert, Armando; Salido, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase catalyzes the transamination between L-alanine and glyoxylate to produce pyruvate and glycine using pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) as cofactor. Human alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase is a peroxisomal enzyme expressed in the hepatocytes, the main site of glyoxylate detoxification. Its deficit causes primary hyperoxaluria type I, a rare but severe inborn error of metabolism. Single amino acid changes are the main type of mutation causing this disease, and considerable effort has been dedicated to the understanding of the molecular consequences of such missense mutations. In this review, we summarize the role of protein homeostasis in the basic mechanisms of primary hyperoxaluria. Intrinsic physicochemical properties of polypeptide chains such as thermodynamic stability, folding, unfolding, and misfolding rates as well as the interaction of different folding states with protein homeostasis networks are essential to understand this disease. The view presented has important implications for the development of new therapeutic strategies based on targeting specific elements of alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase homeostasis. PMID:23956997

  17. Beta-alanine/alpha-ketoglutarate aminotransferase for 3-hydroxypropionic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Jessen, Holly Jean; Liao, Hans H; Gort, Steven John; Selifonova, Olga V

    2014-11-18

    The present disclosure provides novel beta-alanine/alpha ketoglutarate aminotransferase nucleic acid and protein sequences having increased biological activity. Also provided are cells containing such enzymes, as well as methods of their use, for example to produce malonyl semialdehyde and downstream products thereof, such as 3-hydroxypropionic acid and derivatives thereof.

  18. Growth and characterization of pure and semiorganic nonlinear optical Lithium Sulphate admixtured l-alanine crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vela, T.; Selvarajan, P.; Freeda, T. H.; Balasubramanian, K.

    2013-04-01

    Lithium sulphate admixtured l-alanine (LSLA) salt was synthesized and the solubility of the commercially available l-alanine and the synthesized LSLA sample was determined in de-ionized water at various temperatures. In accordance with the solubility data, the saturated aqueous solutions of l-alanine and lithium admixtured l-alanine were prepared separately and the single crystals of the samples were grown by the solution method with a slow evaporation technique. Studying single x-ray diffraction shows that pure and LSLA crystal belong to the orthorhombic system with a non-centrosymmetric space group P212121. Using the powder x-ray diffraction study, the crystallinity of the grown crystals is confirmed and the diffraction peaks are indexed. The various functional groups present in the pure and LSLA crystal are elucidated from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study. UV-visible transmittance is recorded to study the optical transmittance range for the grown crystals. The powder second harmonic generation test confirms the nonlinear optical property of the grown crystals. From the microhardness test, the hardness of the grown crystals is estimated. The dielectric behaviour, such as the dielectric constant and the loss of the sample, are measured as a function of temperature and frequency. The ac conductivity of the grown crystals is also studied and the activation energy is calculated.

  19. 21 CFR 862.1030 - Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system. 862.1030 Section 862.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1030 - Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system. 862.1030 Section 862.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  1. 21 CFR 862.1030 - Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system. 862.1030 Section 862.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  2. 21 CFR 862.1030 - Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system. 862.1030 Section 862.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  3. 21 CFR 862.1030 - Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system. 862.1030 Section 862.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  4. Synthesis, characterization, and biocompatible properties of alanine-grafted chitosan copolymers.

    PubMed

    Park, Gyu Han; Kang, Min-Sil; Knowles, Jonathan C; Gong, Myoung-Seon

    2016-04-01

    In order to overcome major problems regarding the lack of affinity to solvents and limited reactivity of the free amines of chitosan, introduction of appropriate spacer arms having terminal amine function is considered of interest.L-Alanine-N-carboxyanhydride was grafted onto chitosan via anionic ring-opening polymerization. The chemical and structural characterizations ofL-alanine-grafted chitosan (Ala-g-Cts) were confirmed through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H NMR). In addition, the viscoelastic properties ofAla-g-Cts were examined by means of a rotational viscometer, and thermal analysis was carried out with a thermogravimetric analyzer and differential scanning calorimetry. Morphological changes in the chitosanL-alanine moiety were determined by x-ray diffraction. To determine the feasibility of using these films as biomedical materials, we investigated the effects of theirL-alanine content on physical and mechanical properties. The biodegradation results of crosslinkedAla-g-Cts films were evaluated in phosphate-buffered solution containing lysozyme at 37℃. Proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells on crosslinkedAla-g-Cts films was also investigated with use of the CCK-8 assay. PMID:26767393

  5. AlaScan: A Graphical User Interface for Alanine Scanning Free-Energy Calculations.

    PubMed

    Ramadoss, Vijayaraj; Dehez, François; Chipot, Christophe

    2016-06-27

    Computation of the free-energy changes that underlie molecular recognition and association has gained significant importance due to its considerable potential in drug discovery. The massive increase of computational power in recent years substantiates the application of more accurate theoretical methods for the calculation of binding free energies. The impact of such advances is the application of parent approaches, like computational alanine scanning, to investigate in silico the effect of amino-acid replacement in protein-ligand and protein-protein complexes, or probe the thermostability of individual proteins. Because human effort represents a significant cost that precludes the routine use of this form of free-energy calculations, minimizing manual intervention constitutes a stringent prerequisite for any such systematic computation. With this objective in mind, we propose a new plug-in, referred to as AlaScan, developed within the popular visualization program VMD to automate the major steps in alanine-scanning calculations, employing free-energy perturbation as implemented in the widely used molecular dynamics code NAMD. The AlaScan plug-in can be utilized upstream, to prepare input files for selected alanine mutations. It can also be utilized downstream to perform the analysis of different alanine-scanning calculations and to report the free-energy estimates in a user-friendly graphical user interface, allowing favorable mutations to be identified at a glance. The plug-in also assists the end-user in assessing the reliability of the calculation through rapid visual inspection. PMID:27214306

  6. Mechanism of inactivation of alanine racemase by beta, beta, beta-trifluoroalanine

    SciTech Connect

    Faraci, W.S.; Walsh, C.T.

    1989-01-24

    The alanine racemases are a group of PLP-dependent bacterial enzymes that catalyze the racemization of alanine, providing D-alanine for cell wall synthesis. Inactivation of the alanine racemases from the Gram-negative organism Salmonella typhimurium and Gram-positive organism Bacillus stearothermophilus with beta, beta, beta-trifluoroalanine has been studied. The inactivation occurs with the same rate constant as that for formation of a broad 460-490-nm chromophore. Loss of two fluoride ions per mole of inactivated enzyme and retention of (1-/sup 14/C)trifluoroalanine label accompany inhibition, suggesting a monofluoro enzyme adduct. Partial denaturation (1 M guanidine) leads to rapid return of the initial 420-nm chromophore, followed by a slower (t1/2 approximately 30 min-1 h) loss of the fluoride ion and /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ release. At this point, reduction by NaB/sub 3/H/sub 4/ and tryptic digestion yield a single radiolabeled peptide. Purification and sequencing of the peptide reveals that lysine-38 is covalently attached to the PLP cofactor. A mechanism for enzyme inactivation by trifluoroalanine is proposed and contrasted with earlier results on monohaloalanines, in which nucleophilic attack of released aminoacrylate on the PLP aldimine leads to enzyme inactivation. For trifluoroalanine inactivation, nucleophilic attack of lysine-38 on the electrophilic beta-difluoro-alpha, beta-unsaturated imine provides an alternative mode of inhibition for these enzymes.

  7. Beta-alanine/alpha-ketoglutarate aminotransferase for 3-hydroxypropionic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Jessen, Holly Jean; Liao, Hans H.; Gort, Steven John; Selifonova, Olga V.

    2011-10-04

    The present disclosure provides novel beta-alanine/alpha ketoglutarate aminotransferase nucleic acid and protein sequences having increased biological activity. Also provided are cells containing such enzymes, as well as methods of their use, for example to produce malonyl semialdehyde and downstream products thereof, such as 3-hydroxypropionic acid and derivatives thereof.

  8. 40 CFR 721.520 - Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...)(4), (c)(4) (where N = 100). The requirement of 40 CFR 721.91(a)(4) that the amount of the substance...-, salt. 721.520 Section 721.520 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.520 Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt. (a) Chemical...

  9. 40 CFR 721.520 - Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...)(4), (c)(4) (where N = 100). The requirement of 40 CFR 721.91(a)(4) that the amount of the substance...-, salt. 721.520 Section 721.520 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.520 Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt. (a) Chemical...

  10. 40 CFR 721.520 - Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...)(4), (c)(4) (where N = 100). The requirement of 40 CFR 721.91(a)(4) that the amount of the substance...-, salt. 721.520 Section 721.520 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.520 Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt. (a) Chemical...

  11. The effects of post-exercise glucose and alanine ingestion on plasma carnitine and ketosis in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Carlin, J I; Olson, E B; Peters, H A; Reddan, W G

    1987-01-01

    1. Several studies have hypothesized that alanine decreases plasma ketone body levels by increasing availability of oxaloacetate, thus allowing acetyl groups to enter the tricarboxylic acid cycle and releasing co-enzyme A (CoA). 2. Four, fasted adult males exercised at 50% of their maximal oxygen consumption for 1.5 h, then ingested 100 g of either glucose or alanine 2 h into recovery. 3. Post-exercise ketosis had developed at 2 h into recovery, as shown by a significantly elevated concentration of beta-hydroxybutyrate in the plasma. At this time plasma free fatty acids were elevated above resting levels while plasma free carnitine concentrations had fallen below resting values. 4. After either alanine or glucose ingestion beta-hydroxybutyrate concentrations fell to the same extent. After the alanine load free carnitine increased above that seen in the glucose trial. Following either alanine or glucose ingestion free fatty acid levels fell; they remained at resting levels in the alanine trial but decreased below rest in the glucose trial. 5. We assume that plasma carnitine concentrations largely reflect the hepatic carnitine pools; therefore, elevations in the plasma free carnitine are probably the result of an increased utilization of acetyl CoA. The significant elevation in plasma free carnitine concentration found after alanine ingestion is consistent with the hypothesis that alanine increases the oxidation of acetyl CoA by providing oxaloacetate for the tricarboxylic acid cycle. PMID:3443938

  12. Refuting the hypothesis that a unilateral human parietal lesion abolishes saccade corollary discharge.

    PubMed

    Rath-Wilson, Kate; Guitton, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    This paper questions the prominent role that the parietal lobe is thought to play in the processing of corollary discharges for saccadic eye movements. A corollary discharge copies the motor neurons' signal and sends it to brain areas involved in monitoring eye trajectories. The classic double-step saccade task has been used extensively to study these mechanisms: two targets (T1 and T2) are quickly (40-150 ms) flashed sequentially in the periphery. After the extinction of the fixation point, subjects are to make two saccades (S1 and S2), in the dark, to the remembered locations of the targets in the order they appeared. The success of S2 requires a corollary discharge encoding S1's vector. Patients with a parietal lobe lesion, particularly on the right, are impaired at generating an accurate S2 when S1 is directed contralesionally, but not ipsilesionally, thought due to an impaired contralesional corollary discharge. In contrast, we hypothesize that failure on the classic double-step task is due to visual processing and attentional deficits that commonly result from lesions of the parietal lobe and imperfect data analysis methods. Here, we studied parietal patients who fail in the classic double-step task when tested and data analysed according to previously published methods. We then tested our patients on two modified versions of the double-step task, designed to mitigate deficits other than corollary discharge that may have confounded previous investigations. In our 'exogenous' task, T2 was presented prior to T1 and for longer (T2: 800-1200 ms, T1: 350 ms) than in the classic task. S1 went to T1 and S2 to T2, all in the dark. All patients who completed sufficient trials had a corollary discharge for contralesional and ipsilesional S1s (5/5). In our 'endogenous' task, a single target was presented peripherally for 800-1200 ms. After extinction of target and fixation point, patients made first an 'endogenous' S1, of self-determined amplitude either to the left or

  13. A preliminary optimization of alanine blends for ESR dosimetry in a mixed n–γ field: Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoseininaveh, M.; Ranjbar, A. H.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a preliminary work on the enhancement of ESR response of several arrangements of alanine and boron compounds, exposed to a thermal neutron beam, is presented using FLUKA code. A multi-layer dosimeter consist of consecutive layers of alanine and boron compounds showed that the amount of energy deposited in the alanine layers is maximized when their thickness is 5 μm and the thickness of boron compound layers are between 2 and 3 μm. Furthermore, the optimum number of 10B layers in the dosimeter was found to be 35 layers. Moreover, the alanine samples consisting of small spherical grains of boron compounds, arranged regularly in the middle plane of the dosimeters, exposed to a thermal neutron beam, were modeled. The dependence of energy deposition in the alanine material on the size of grains, and on their composition were also studied, as well.

  14. Biochemical and structural characterization of alanine racemase from Bacillus anthracis (Ames)

    PubMed Central

    Couñago, Rafael M; Davlieva, Milya; Strych, Ulrich; Hill, Ryan E; Krause, Kurt L

    2009-01-01

    Background Bacillus anthracis is the causative agent of anthrax and a potential bioterrorism threat. Here we report the biochemical and structural characterization of B. anthracis (Ames) alanine racemase (AlrBax), an essential enzyme in prokaryotes and a target for antimicrobial drug development. We also compare the native AlrBax structure to a recently reported structure of the same enzyme obtained through reductive lysine methylation. Results B. anthracis has two open reading frames encoding for putative alanine racemases. We show that only one, dal1, is able to complement a D-alanine auxotrophic strain of E. coli. Purified Dal1, which we term AlrBax, is shown to be a dimer in solution by dynamic light scattering and has a Vmax for racemization (L- to D-alanine) of 101 U/mg. The crystal structure of unmodified AlrBax is reported here to 1.95 Å resolution. Despite the overall similarity of the fold to other alanine racemases, AlrBax makes use of a chloride ion to position key active site residues for catalysis, a feature not yet observed for this enzyme in other species. Crystal contacts are more extensive in the methylated structure compared to the unmethylated structure. Conclusion The chloride ion in AlrBax is functioning effectively as a carbamylated lysine making it an integral and unique part of this structure. Despite differences in space group and crystal form, the two AlrBax structures are very similar, supporting the case that reductive methylation is a valid rescue strategy for proteins recalcitrant to crystallization, and does not, in this case, result in artifacts in the tertiary structure. PMID:19695097

  15. Persistent GABAA/C responses to gabazine, taurine and beta-alanine in rat hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Chesnoy-Marchais, D

    2016-08-25

    In hypoglossal motoneurons, a sustained anionic current, sensitive to a blocker of ρ-containing GABA receptors, (1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl)methylphosphinic acid (TPMPA) and insensitive to bicuculline, was previously shown to be activated by gabazine. In order to better characterize the receptors involved, the sensitivity of this atypical response to pentobarbital (30μM), allopregnanolone (0.3μM) and midazolam (0.5μM) was first investigated. Pentobarbital potentiated the response, whereas the steroid and the benzodiazepine were ineffective. The results indicate the involvement of hybrid heteromeric receptors, including at least a GABA receptor ρ subunit and a γ subunit, accounting for the pentobarbital-sensitivity. The effects of the endogenous β amino acids, taurine and β-alanine, which are released under various pathological conditions and show neuroprotective properties, were then studied. In the presence of the glycine receptor blocker strychnine (1μM), both taurine (0.3-1mM) and β-alanine (0.3mM) activated sustained anionic currents, which were partly blocked by TPMPA (100μM). Thus, both β amino acids activated ρ-containing GABA receptors in hypoglossal motoneurons. Bicuculline (20μM) reduced responses to taurine and β-alanine, but small sustained responses persisted in the presence of both strychnine and bicuculline. Responses to β-alanine were slightly increased by allopregnanolone, indicating a contribution of the bicuculline- and neurosteroid-sensitive GABAA receptors underlying tonic inhibition in these motoneurons. Since sustained activation of anionic channels inhibits most mature principal neurons, the ρ-containing GABA receptors permanently activated by taurine and β-alanine might contribute to some of their neuroprotective properties under damaging overexcitatory situations. PMID:27246441

  16. Structural features and kinetic characterization of alanine racemase from Staphylococcus aureus (Mu50)

    PubMed Central

    Scaletti, Emma R.; Luckner, Sylvia R.; Krause, Kurt L.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic Gram-positive bacterium which causes a wide variety of diseases ranging from minor skin infections to potentially fatal conditions such as pneumonia, meningitis and septicaemia. The pathogen is a leading cause of nosocomial acquired infections, a problem that is exacerbated by the existence of methicillin- and glycopeptide antibiotic-resistant strains which can be challenging to treat. Alanine racemase (Alr) is a pyridoxal-5′-phosphate-dependent enzyme which catalyzes reversible racemization between enantiomers of alanine. As d-alanine is an essential component of the bacterial cell-wall peptidoglycan, inhibition of Alr is lethal to prokaryotes. Additionally, while ubiquitous amongst bacteria, this enzyme is absent in humans and most eukaryotes, making it an excellent antibiotic drug target. The crystal structure of S. aureus alanine racemase (AlrSas), the sequence of which corresponds to that from the highly antibiotic-resistant Mu50 strain, has been solved to 2.15 Å resolution. Comparison of the AlrSas structure with those of various alanine racemases demonstrates a conserved overall fold, with the enzyme sharing most similarity to those from other Gram-positive bacteria. Structural examination indicates that the active-site binding pocket, dimer interface and active-site entryway of the enzyme are potential targets for structure-aided inhibitor design. Kinetic constants were calculated in this study and are reported here. The potential for a disulfide bond in this structure is noted. This structural and biochemical information provides a template for future structure-based drug-development efforts targeting AlrSas. PMID:22194336

  17. Characterization of the metabolic effect of β-alanine on markers of oxidative metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sunderland, Kyle L.; Kuennen, Matthew R.; Vaughan, Roger A.

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] β-alanine is a common component of numerous sports supplements purported to improve athletic performance through enhanced carnosine biosynthesis and related intracellular buffering. To date, the effects of β-alanine on oxidative metabolism remain largely unexplored. This work investigated the effects of β-alanine on the expression of proteins which regulate cellular energetics. [Methods] C2C12 myocytes were cultured and differentiated under standard conditions followed by treatment with either β-alanine or isonitrogenous non-metabolizable control D-alanine at 800μM for 24 hours. Metabolic gene and protein expression were quantified by qRT-PCR and immunoblotting, respectively. Glucose uptake and oxygen consumption were measured via fluorescence using commercially available kits. [Results] β-alanine-treated myotubes displayed significantly elevated markers of improved oxidative metabolism including elevated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ (PPARβ/δ) and mitochondrial transcription factor a (TFAM) which led to increased mitochondrial content (evidenced by concurrent increases in cytochrome c content). Additionally, β-alanine-treated cells exhibited significantly increased oxygen consumption compared to control in a PPARβ/δ-dependent manner. β-alanine significantly enhanced expression of myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF-2) leading to increased glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) content. [Conclusion] β-alanine appears to increase cellular oxygen consumption as well as the expression of several cellular proteins associated with improved oxidative metabolism, suggesting β-alanine supplementation may provide additional metabolic benefit (although these observations require in vivo experimental verification). PMID:27508152

  18. The metabolism of histamine in the Drosophila optic lobe involves an ommatidial pathway: β-alanine recycles through the retina

    PubMed Central

    Borycz, Janusz; Borycz, Jolanta A.; Edwards, Tara N.; Boulianne, Gabrielle L.; Meinertzhagen, Ian A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Flies recycle the photoreceptor neurotransmitter histamine by conjugating it to β-alanine to form β-alanyl-histamine (carcinine). The conjugation is regulated by Ebony, while Tan hydrolyses carcinine, releasing histamine and β-alanine. In Drosophila, β-alanine synthesis occurs either from uracil or from the decarboxylation of aspartate but detailed roles for the enzymes responsible remain unclear. Immunohistochemically detected β-alanine is present throughout the fly’s entire brain, and is enhanced in the retina especially in the pseudocone, pigment and photoreceptor cells of the ommatidia. HPLC determinations reveal 10.7 ng of β-alanine in the wild-type head, roughly five times more than histamine. When wild-type flies drink uracil their head β-alanine increases more than after drinking l-aspartic acid, indicating the effectiveness of the uracil pathway. Mutants of black, which lack aspartate decarboxylase, cannot synthesize β-alanine from l-aspartate but can still synthesize it efficiently from uracil. Our findings demonstrate a novel function for pigment cells, which not only screen ommatidia from stray light but also store and transport β-alanine and carcinine. This role is consistent with a β-alanine-dependent histamine recycling pathway occurring not only in the photoreceptor terminals in the lamina neuropile, where carcinine occurs in marginal glia, but vertically via a long pathway that involves the retina. The lamina’s marginal glia are also a hub involved in the storage and/or disposal of carcinine and β-alanine. PMID:22442379

  19. The Nun protein of bacteriophage HK022 inhibits translocation of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase without abolishing its catalytic activities

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Siu Chun; Gottesman, Max E.

    1997-01-01

    Bacteriophage HK022 Nun protein blocks transcription elongation by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase in vitro without dissociating the transcription complex. Nun is active on complexes located at any template site tested. Ultimately, only the 3′-OH terminal nucleotide of the nascent transcript in an arrested complex can turn over; it is removed by pyrophosphate and restored with NTPs. This suggests that Nun inhibits the translocation of RNA polymerase without abolishing its catalytic activities. Unlike spontaneously arrested complexes, Nun-arrested complexes cannot be reactivated by transcription factor GreB. The various complexes show distinct patterns of nucleotide incorporation and pyrophosphorolysis before or after treatment with Nun, suggesting that the configuration of RNAP, transcript, and template DNA is different in each complex. PMID:9334329

  20. Synthesis and evaluation of 18F labeled alanine derivatives as potential tumor imaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; Zha, Zhihao; Qu, Wenchao; Qiao, Hongwen; Lieberman, Brian P.; Plössl, Karl; Kung, Hank F.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction This paper reports the synthesis and labeling of 18F alanine derivatives. We also investigate their biological characteristics as potential tumor imaging agents mediated by alanine-serine-cysteine preferring (ASC) transporter system. Methods Three new 18F alanine derivatives were prepared from corresponding tosylate-precursors through a two-step labelling reaction. In vitro uptake studies to evaluate and to compare these three analogs were carried out in 9L glioma and PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines. Potential transport mechanisms, protein incorporation and stability of 3-(1-[18F]fluoromethyl)-L-alanine (L[18F]FMA) were investigated in 9L glioma cells. Its biodistribution was determined in a rat-bearing 9L tumor model. PET imaging studies were performed on rat bearing 9L glioma tumors and transgenic mouse carrying spontaneous generated M/tomND tumor (mammary gland adenocarcinoma). Results New 18F alanine derivatives were prepared with 7–34% uncorrected radiochemical yields, excellent enantiomeric purity (>99%) and good radiochemical purity (>99%). In vitro uptake of the L-[18F]FMA in 9L glioma and PC-3 prostate cancer cells was higher than those observed for other two alanine derivatives and [18F]FDG in first 1 h. Inhibition of cell uptake studies suggested that L-[18F]FMA uptake in 9L glioma was predominantly via transport system ASC. After entering into cells, L-[18F]FMA remained stable and was not incorporated into protein within 2 h. In vivo biodistribution studies demonstrated that L-[18F]FMA had relatively high uptake in liver and kidney. Tumor uptake was fast, reaching a maximum within 30 min. The tumor-to-muscle, tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-brain ratios at 60 min post injection were 2.2, 1.9 and 3.0, respectively. In PET imaging studies, tumors were visualized with L-[18F]FMA in both 9L rat and transgenic mouse. Conclusion L-[18F]FMA showed promising properties as a PET imaging agent for up-regulated ASC transporter associated with tumor

  1. L-alanine uptake in membrane vesicles from Mytilus edulis gills

    SciTech Connect

    Pajor, A.M.; Wright, S.H.

    1986-03-05

    Previous studies have shown that gills from M. edulis can accumulate L-alanine from seawater by a saturable process specific for ..cap alpha..-neutral amino acids. This uptake occurs against chemical gradients in excess of 10/sup 6/ to 1. To further characterize this uptake, membrane vesicles were prepared from M. edulis gill tissue by differential centrifugation. Enrichments of putative enzyme markers (relative to that in combined initial fractions) were as follows: ..gamma..-Glutamyltranspeptidase, 25-30x; Alkaline Phosphatase, 5-6x; K/sup +/-dependent para-Nitrophenyl Phosphatase, 3-5x; Succinate Dehydrogenase 0.1-0.2x. These results suggest that the preparation is enriched in plasma membranes, although histochemical studies will be needed to verify this. The time course of /sup 14/C-L-alanine uptake in the presence of inwardly-directed Na/sup +/ gradient showed a transient overshoot (3-5 fold) at 10 minutes which decreased to equilibrium after six hours. The size of the overshoot and early uptake rates depended on the size of the inwardly-directed Na/sup +/ gradient. No overshoot was seen in the presence of inwardly-directed gradients of LiCl or choline-Cl, or with equilibrium concentrations NaCl or mannitol. A reduced overshoot was seen with a gradient of NaSCN. A small overshoot was seen with an inwardly-directed gradient of KCl. Transport of L-alanine included saturable and diffusive components. Uptake of 6 ..mu..M L-alanine was inhibited more than 80% by 100 ..mu..M ..cap alpha..-zwitterionic amino acids (alanine, leucine, glycine); by 30 to 75% by proline, aspartate and lysine; and less than 20% by a ..beta..-amino acid, taurine. The results of these experiments agree with those from intact gill studies and support the hypothesis that L-alanine is transported into gill epithelial cells by a secondary active transport process involving Na/sup +/.

  2. The alanine detector in BNCT dosimetry: Dose response in thermal and epithermal neutron fields

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, T.; Bassler, N.; Blaickner, M.; Ziegner, M.; Hsiao, M. C.; Liu, Y. H.; Koivunoro, H.; Auterinen, I.; Serén, T.; Kotiluoto, P.; Palmans, H.; Sharpe, P.; Langguth, P.; Hampel, G.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: The response of alanine solid state dosimeters to ionizing radiation strongly depends on particle type and energy. Due to nuclear interactions, neutron fields usually also consist of secondary particles such as photons and protons of diverse energies. Various experiments have been carried out in three different neutron beams to explore the alanine dose response behavior and to validate model predictions. Additionally, application in medical neutron fields for boron neutron capture therapy is discussed. Methods: Alanine detectors have been irradiated in the thermal neutron field of the research reactor TRIGA Mainz, Germany, in five experimental conditions, generating different secondary particle spectra. Further irradiations have been made in the epithermal neutron beams at the research reactors FiR 1 in Helsinki, Finland, and Tsing Hua open pool reactor in HsinChu, Taiwan ROC. Readout has been performed with electron spin resonance spectrometry with reference to an absorbed dose standard in a {sup 60}Co gamma ray beam. Absorbed doses and dose components have been calculated using the Monte Carlo codes FLUKA and MCNP. The relative effectiveness (RE), linking absorbed dose and detector response, has been calculated using the Hansen and Olsen alanine response model. Results: The measured dose response of the alanine detector in the different experiments has been evaluated and compared to model predictions. Therefore, a relative effectiveness has been calculated for each dose component, accounting for its dependence on particle type and energy. Agreement within 5% between model and measurement has been achieved for most irradiated detectors. Significant differences have been observed in response behavior between thermal and epithermal neutron fields, especially regarding dose composition and depth dose curves. The calculated dose components could be verified with the experimental results in the different primary and secondary particle fields. Conclusions: The

  3. Connexin 30 downregulates Insulin-like growth factor receptor-1, abolishes Erk and potentiates effects of an IGF-R inhibitor in a glioma cell line.

    PubMed

    Arun, Sankaradoss; Vanisree, Arambakkam Janardhanam; Ravisankar, Shantha

    2016-07-15

    Connexins (Cx) play a crucial role in cell communication though regulation of cell growth and proliferation. In recent decades, both suppressive and enhancing roles of gap junction proteins in malignancy have been proposed, though mechanisms remain unclear. We intend to evaluate the impact of Cx30 on dysregulated growth of glioma owing to an aberrant expression of Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R). The study also examined whether Cx30 expression influenced sensitivity of glioma cells to Picropodophyllin (PPP), the potent inhibitor of IGF-1R. C6 cells transfected with full length Cx30 resulted in complete abolition of colony-forming efficiency. Interestingly, PPP-supplemented cells behaved differently with and without exogenous Cx as confirmed by wound closure assay. The expressions of phosphorylated and unphosphorylated IGF-1R along with its key signaling enzymes, pAkt/pErk, were also varied significantly in transfected and non-transfected C6 cells. pIGF-1R and IGF-1R were significantly reduced on Cx30 transfection when compared with that of non-transfected cells. pErk expression was abolished in transfected C6 with no significant difference in the expression of pAkt. The potency of PPP against C6 was more pronounced in the presence of Cx30. We demonstrate that Cx30 has the potential to alter the IGF-1R mediated pathway thereby influencing the growth, proliferation and migration of glioma cells which could further enhance the effect of therapeutic intervention. Though it could not be corroborated that the observations made are due to Cx30-mediated channel-dependent and/or independent impact, we stress the impact of significance of Cx30 on IGF-1R in glioma and also in therapeutic aspects. PMID:27130897

  4. Formation of the peroxisome lumen is abolished by loss of Pichia pastoris Pas7p, a zinc-binding integral membrane protein of the peroxisome.

    PubMed Central

    Kalish, J E; Theda, C; Morrell, J C; Berg, J M; Gould, S J

    1995-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced PAS7, a gene required for peroxisome assembly in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The product of this gene, Pas7p, is a member of the C3HC4 superfamily of zinc-binding proteins. Point mutations that alter conserved residues of the C3HC4 motif abolish PAS7 activity and reduce zinc binding, suggesting that Pas7p binds zinc in vivo and that zinc binding is essential for PAS7 function. As with most pas mutants, pas7 cells exhibit a pronounced deficiency in import of peroxisomal matrix proteins that contain either the type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS1) or the type 2 PTS (PTS2). However, while other yeast and mammalian pas mutants accumulate ovoid, vesicular peroxisomal intermediates, loss of Pas7p leads to accumulation of membrane sheets and vesicles which lack a recognizable lumen. Thus, Pas7p appears to be essential for protein translocation into peroxisomes as well as formation of the lumen of the organelle. Consistent with these data, we find that Pas7p is an integral peroxisomal membrane protein which is entirely resistant to exogenous protease and thus appears to reside completely within the peroxisome. Our observations suggest that the function of Pas7p defines a previously unrecognized step in peroxisome assembly: formation of the peroxisome lumen. Furthermore, because the peroxisomal intermediates in the pas7 delta mutant proliferate in response to peroxisome-inducing environmental conditions, we conclude that Pas7p is not required for peroxisome proliferation. PMID:7565793

  5. Should Astronomy Abolish Magnitudes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, K.

    2001-12-01

    Astronomy is riddled with a number of anachronistic and counterintuitive practices. Among these are: plotting increasing stellar temperature from right to left in the H-R diagram; giving the distances to remote astronomical objects in parsecs; and reporting the brightness of astronomical objects in magnitudes. Historical accident and observational technique, respectively, are the bases for the first two practices, and they will undoubtedly persist in the future. However, the use of magnitudes is especially egregious when essentially linear optical detectors like CCDs are used for measuring brightness, which are then reported in a logarithmic (base 2.512 deg!) scale. The use of magnitudes has its origin in three historical artifacts: Ptolemy's method of reporting the brightness of stars in the "Almagest"; the 19th century need for a photographic photometry scale; and the 19th century studies by psychophysicists E. H. Weber and G. T. Fechner on the response of the human eye to light. The latter work sought to uncover the relationship between the subjective response of the human eye and brain to the objective brightness of external optical stimuli. The resulting Fechner-Weber law states that this response is logarithmic: that is, that the eye essentially takes the logarithm of the incoming optical signal. However, after more than a century of perceptual studies, most intensively by S. S. Stevens, it is now well established that this relation is not logarithmic. For naked eye detection of stars from the first to sixth magnitudes, it can be reasonably well fit by a power law with index of about 0.3. Therefore, the modern experimental studies undermine the physiological basis for the use of magnitudes in astronomy. Should the historical origins of magnitudes alone be reason enough for their continued use? Probably not, since astronomical magnitudes are based on outdated studies of human perception; make little sense in an era of linear optical detection; and provide a barrier to student and public understanding of astronomy. Perhaps it is time to add astronomical magnitudes to the dustbin of scientific history, along with caloric, phlogiston and the ether.

  6. Computational Prediction of Alanine Scanning and Ligand Binding Energetics in G-Protein Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Boukharta, Lars; Gutiérrez-de-Terán, Hugo; Åqvist, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis combined with binding affinity measurements is widely used to probe the nature of ligand interactions with GPCRs. Such experiments, as well as structure-activity relationships for series of ligands, are usually interpreted with computationally derived models of ligand binding modes. However, systematic approaches for accurate calculations of the corresponding binding free energies are still lacking. Here, we report a computational strategy to quantitatively predict the effects of alanine scanning and ligand modifications based on molecular dynamics free energy simulations. A smooth stepwise scheme for free energy perturbation calculations is derived and applied to a series of thirteen alanine mutations of the human neuropeptide Y1 receptor and series of eight analogous antagonists. The robustness and accuracy of the method enables univocal interpretation of existing mutagenesis and binding data. We show how these calculations can be used to validate structural models and demonstrate their ability to discriminate against suboptimal ones. PMID:24743773

  7. Membrane topology of the electrogenic aspartate-alanine antiporter AspT of Tetragenococcus halophilus.

    PubMed

    Nanatani, Kei; Ohonishi, Fumito; Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Tasuku; Abe, Keietsu

    2005-03-01

    AspT is an electrogenic aspartate:alanine exchange protein that represents the vectorial component of a proton-motive metabolic cycle found in some strains of Tetragenococcus halophilus. AspT is the sole member of a new family, the Aspartate: Alanine Exchanger (AAE) family, in secondary transporters, according to the computational classification proposed by Saier et al. (http://www.biology.ucsd.edu/~msaier/transport/). We analyzed the topology of AspT biochemically, by using fusion methods in combination with alkaline phosphatase or beta-lactamase. These results suggested that AspT has a unique topology; 8 TMS, a large cytoplasmic loop (183 amino acids) between TMS5 and TMS6, and N- and C-termini that both face the periplasm. These results demonstrated a unique 2D-structure of AspT as the novel AAE family. PMID:15670744

  8. Chiral effects on helicity studied via the energy landscape of short (d, l)-alanine peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelamraju, Sridhar; Oakley, Mark T.; Johnston, Roy L.

    2015-10-01

    The homochirality of natural amino acids facilitates the formation of regular secondary structures such as α-helices and β-sheets. Here, we study the relationship between chirality and backbone structure for the example of hexa-alanine. The most stable stereoisomers are identified through global optimisation. Further, the energy landscape, a database of connected low-energy local minima and transition points, is constructed for various neutral and zwitterionic stereoisomers of hexa-alanine. Three order parameters for partial helicity are applied and metric disconnectivity graphs are presented with partial helicity as a metric. We also apply the Zimm-Bragg model to derive average partial helicities for Ace-(l-Ala)6-NHMe, Ace-(d-Ala-l-Ala)3-NHMe, and Ace-(l-Ala)3-(d-Ala)3-NHMe from the database of local minima and compare with previous studies.

  9. Unusual hydroxyl migration in the fragmentation of β-alanine dication in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Piekarski, Dariusz Grzegorz; Delaunay, Rudy; Maclot, Sylvain; Adoui, Lamri; Martín, Fernando; Alcamí, Manuel; Huber, Bernd A; Rousseau, Patrick; Domaracka, Alicja; Díaz-Tendero, Sergio

    2015-07-14

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of the fragmentation of doubly positively charged β-alanine molecules in the gas phase. The dissociation of the produced dicationic molecules, induced by low-energy ion collisions, is analysed by coincidence mass spectrometric techniques; the coupling with ab initio molecular dynamics simulations allows rationalisation of the experimental observations. The present strategy gives deeper insights into the chemical mechanisms of multiply charged amino acids in the gas phase. In the case of the β-alanine dication, in addition to the expected Coulomb explosion and hydrogen migration processes, we have found evidence of hydroxyl-group migration, which leads to unusual fragmentation products, such as hydroxymethyl cation, and is necessary to explain some of the observed dominant channels. PMID:26035826

  10. Response of the alanine/ESR dosimeter to radiation from an Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anton, M.; Hackel, T.; Zink, K.; von Voigts-Rhetz, P.; Selbach, H.-J.

    2015-01-01

    The response of the alanine dosimeter to radiation from an Ir-192 source with respect to the absorbed dose to water, relative to Co-60 radiation, was determined experimentally as well as by Monte Carlo simulations. The experimental and Monte Carlo results for the response agree well within the limits of uncertainty. The relative response decreases with an increasing distance between the measurement volume and the source from approximately 98% at a 1 cm distance to 96% at 5 cm. The present data are more accurate, but agree well with data published by Schaeken et al (2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 6625-34). The decrease of the relative response with an increasing distance that had already been observed by these authors is confirmed. In the appendix, the properties of the alanine dosimeter with respect to volume and sensitivity corrections are investigated. The inhomogeneous distribution of the detection probability that was taken into account for the analysis was determined experimentally.

  11. The effects of boron on the electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of alanine irradiated with thermal neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ciesielski, B.; Wielopolski, L.

    1995-10-01

    The effects of boric acid admixture on the intensity and line structure of EPR spectra of free radicals produced in alanine by thermal neutrons are presented. The EPR signal enhancement, up to a factor of 40 depending on the boron concentration, is related to additional energy deposition in alanine crystals by the disintegration products resulting from the capture of a thermal neutron by boron, {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li. The changes in the shape of the EPR spectra observed by changing the microwave power are due to the differences in the microwave power saturation of the free radicals produced by a low-LET radiation and those produced by the high-LET components of the radiation after the neutron capture reaction. 27 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Formation of homochiral glycine/Cu(111) quantum corral array realized using alanine nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Miki; Huang, Hui; Kanazawa, Ken; Taninaka, Atsushi; Yoshida, Shoji; Takeuchi, Osamu; Shigekawa, Hidemi

    2015-08-01

    Glycine has enantiomeric isomers on a Cu(111) surface through the dissociation of hydrogen from the carboxyl group and forms an array of quantum corrals of ∼1.3 nm diameter. Stable homo-chiral glycinate trimers are formed in the first step, which subsequently form a network with a hexagonal arrangement. However, domains with R- or S-chirality coexist with the same probability. On the other hand, α-alanine has D- and L-chirality in nature and forms a similar quantum corral array on Cu(111) with R- and S-chirality, respectively. Here, by using α-alanine molecules as nuclei, the chirality of glycine molecules was controlled and a homochiral quantum corral array was successfully formed, which indicates the possibility that the optical isomers can be separated through a method such as preferential crystallization.

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray data analysis of β-alanine synthase from Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Lundgren, Stina; Andersen, Birgit; Piškur, Jure; Dobritzsch, Doreen

    2007-10-01

    β-Alanine synthase catalyzes the last step in the reductive degradation pathway for uracil and thymine. Crystals of the recombinant enzyme from D. melanogaster belong to space group C2. Diffraction data to 3.3 Å resolution were collected and analyzed. β-Alanine synthase catalyzes the last step in the reductive degradation pathway for uracil and thymine, which represents the main clearance route for the widely used anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil. Crystals of the recombinant enzyme from Drosophila melanogaster, which is closely related to the human enzyme, were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. They diffracted to 3.3 Å at a synchrotron-radiation source, belong to space group C2 (unit-cell parameters a = 278.9, b = 95.0, c = 199.3 Å, β = 125.8°) and contain 8–10 molecules per asymmetric unit.

  14. Role of alanine-valine transaminase in Salmonella typhimurium and analysis of an avtA::Tn5 mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Berg, C M; Whalen, W A; Archambault, L B

    1983-01-01

    In Salmonella typhimurium, as in Escherichia coli, mutations in avtA, the gene encoding the alanine-valine transaminase (transaminase C), are silent unless they are combined with mutations involved in isoleucine-valine biosynthesis. avtA is repressed by leucine or alanine but not by valine. Transaminase C is found at reduced levels upon starvation for any one of several amino acids. We hypothesize that this is due to repression of avtA by the elevated alanine and leucine pools found in amino acid-starved cells. PMID:6309735

  15. Role of alanine-valine transaminase in Salmonella typhimurium and analysis of an avtA::Tn5 mutant.

    PubMed

    Berg, C M; Whalen, W A; Archambault, L B

    1983-09-01

    In Salmonella typhimurium, as in Escherichia coli, mutations in avtA, the gene encoding the alanine-valine transaminase (transaminase C), are silent unless they are combined with mutations involved in isoleucine-valine biosynthesis. avtA is repressed by leucine or alanine but not by valine. Transaminase C is found at reduced levels upon starvation for any one of several amino acids. We hypothesize that this is due to repression of avtA by the elevated alanine and leucine pools found in amino acid-starved cells. PMID:6309735

  16. Weak BMAA toxicity compares with that of the dietary supplement β-alanine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Moonhee; McGeer, Patrick L

    2012-07-01

    β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is routinely described in the literature as a potent neurotoxin and as a possible cause of neurodegenerative disorders of aging such as Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex (ALS-PDC) syndrome of Guam. To test for the toxicity of BMAA against human neurons, we chose 3 standard human neuronal cell lines for examination and compared the toxicity with the muscle-building nutritional supplement β-alanine, glutamic acid, and the established excitotoxins kainic acid, quisqualic acid, ibotenic acid, domoic acid, and quinolinic acid. Neurotoxicity was measured by the standard lactic dehydrogenase release assay after 5-day incubation of NT-2, SK-N-MC, and SH-SY5Y cells with BMAA and the comparative substances. The ED(50) of BMAA, corresponding to 50% death of neurons, varied from 1430 to 1604 μM while that of the nutritional supplement β-alanine was almost as low, varying from 1945 to 2134 μM. The ED(50) for glutamic acid and the 5 established excitotoxins was 200- to 360-fold lower, varying from 44 to 70 μM. These in vitro data are in accord with previously published in vivo data on BMAA toxicity in which mice showed no pathological effects from oral consumption of 500 mg/kg/day for more than 10 weeks. Because there are no known natural sources of BMAA that would make consumption of such amounts possible, and because the toxicity observed was in the same range as the nutritional supplement β-alanine, the hypothesis that BMAA is an environmental hazard and a contributor to degenerative neurological diseases becomes untenable. PMID:21236519

  17. Reduced photoinhibition under low irradiance enhanced Kacip Fatimah (Labisia pumila Benth) secondary metabolites, phenyl alanine lyase and antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohd Hafiz; Jaafar, Hawa Z E

    2012-01-01

    A randomized complete block design experiment was designed to characterize the relationship between production of total flavonoids and phenolics, anthocyanin, photosynthesis, maximum efficiency of photosystem II (Fv/Fm), electron transfer rate (Fm/Fo), phenyl alanine lyase activity (PAL) and antioxidant (DPPH) in Labisia pumila var. alata, under four levels of irradiance (225, 500, 625 and 900 μmol/m(2)/s) for 16 weeks. As irradiance levels increased from 225 to 900 μmol/m(2)/s, the production of plant secondary metabolites (total flavonoids, phenolics and antocyanin) was found to decrease steadily. Production of total flavonoids and phenolics reached their peaks under 225 followed by 500, 625 and 900 μmol/m(2)/s irradiances. Significant positive correlation of production of total phenolics, flavonoids and antocyanin content with Fv/Fm, Fm/Fo and photosynthesis indicated up-regulation of carbon-based secondary metabolites (CBSM) under reduced photoinhibition on the under low light levels condition. At the lowest irradiance levels, Labisia pumila extracts also exhibited a significantly higher antioxidant activity (DPPH) than under high irradiance. The improved antioxidative activity under low light levels might be due to high availability of total flavonoids, phenolics and anthocyanin content in the plant extract. It was also found that an increase in the production of CBSM was due to high PAL activity under low light, probably signifying more availability of phenylalanine (Phe) under this condition. PMID:22754297

  18. Equilibrium Dynamics of β-N-Methylamino-L-Alanine (BMAA) and Its Carbamate Adducts at Physiological Conditions.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, David; Goto, Joy J; Krishnan, Viswanathan V

    2016-01-01

    Elevated incidences of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/Parkinsonism Dementia complex (ALS/PDC) is associated with β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a non-protein amino acid. In particular, the native Chamorro people living in the island of Guam were exposed to BMAA by consuming a diet based on the cycad seeds. Carbamylated forms of BMAA are glutamate analogues. The mechanism of neurotoxicity of the BMAA is not completely understood, and BMAA acting as a glutamate receptor agonist may lead to excitotoxicity that interferes with glutamate transport systems. Though the interaction of BMAA with bicarbonate is known to produce carbamate adducts, here we demonstrate that BMAA and its primary and secondary adducts coexist in solution and undergoes a chemical exchange among them. Furthermore, we determined the rates of formation/cleavage of the carbamate adducts under equilibrium conditions using two-dimensional proton exchange NMR spectroscopy (EXSY). The coexistence of the multiple forms of BMAA at physiological conditions adds to the complexity of the mechanisms by which BMAA functions as a neurotoxin. PMID:27513925

  19. The use of L-serine to prevent β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA)-induced proteotoxic stress in vitro.

    PubMed

    Main, Brendan J; Dunlop, Rachael A; Rodgers, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a non-protein amino acid synthesised by cyanobacteria, has been linked to a complex neurological disorder on Guam and more recently to other cases of sporadic ALS (sALS), however the mechanisms of BMAA toxicity are not completely understood. We have previously demonstrated that BMAA is misincorporated into newly synthesised proteins by human neuroblastoma cells and fibroblasts, resulting in the formation of autofluorescent material and the induction of apoptotic cell death. In the present study we show that BMAA at low levels does not cause an acute toxicity in neuroblastoma cells but increases the expression of the ER stress marker, C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and increases the activity of the pro-apoptotic enzyme caspase-3. We also observed an increase in the activity of the lysosomal cysteine proteases cathepsin B and L, characteristic of the accumulation of proteins in the lysosomal system. We were able to prevent these proteotoxic effects in neuroblastoma cells through co-treatment with l-serine suggesting that they resulted from incorporation of BMAA into proteins. Misincorporation provides a possible mechanism whereby BMAA could initiate misfolding, and the accumulation of aggregate-prone proteins in neurons. This build-up of misfolded proteins could explain the long latency period of the disease previously reported on Guam. PMID:26559613

  20. Equilibrium Dynamics of β-N-Methylamino-L-Alanine (BMAA) and Its Carbamate Adducts at Physiological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, David; Goto, Joy J.; Krishnan, Viswanathan V

    2016-01-01

    Elevated incidences of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/Parkinsonism Dementia complex (ALS/PDC) is associated with β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a non-protein amino acid. In particular, the native Chamorro people living in the island of Guam were exposed to BMAA by consuming a diet based on the cycad seeds. Carbamylated forms of BMAA are glutamate analogues. The mechanism of neurotoxicity of the BMAA is not completely understood, and BMAA acting as a glutamate receptor agonist may lead to excitotoxicity that interferes with glutamate transport systems. Though the interaction of BMAA with bicarbonate is known to produce carbamate adducts, here we demonstrate that BMAA and its primary and secondary adducts coexist in solution and undergoes a chemical exchange among them. Furthermore, we determined the rates of formation/cleavage of the carbamate adducts under equilibrium conditions using two-dimensional proton exchange NMR spectroscopy (EXSY). The coexistence of the multiple forms of BMAA at physiological conditions adds to the complexity of the mechanisms by which BMAA functions as a neurotoxin. PMID:27513925

  1. Reduced Photoinhibition under Low Irradiance Enhanced Kacip Fatimah (Labisia pumila Benth) Secondary Metabolites, Phenyl Alanine Lyase and Antioxidant Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mohd Hafiz; Jaafar, Hawa Z.E.

    2012-01-01

    A randomized complete block design experiment was designed to characterize the relationship between production of total flavonoids and phenolics, anthocyanin, photosynthesis, maximum efficiency of photosystem II (Fv/Fm), electron transfer rate (Fm/Fo), phenyl alanine lyase activity (PAL) and antioxidant (DPPH) in Labisia pumila var. alata, under four levels of irradiance (225, 500, 625 and 900 μmol/m2/s) for 16 weeks. As irradiance levels increased from 225 to 900 μmol/m2/s, the production of plant secondary metabolites (total flavonoids, phenolics and antocyanin) was found to decrease steadily. Production of total flavonoids and phenolics reached their peaks under 225 followed by 500, 625 and 900 μmol/m2/s irradiances. Significant positive correlation of production of total phenolics, flavonoids and antocyanin content with Fv/Fm, Fm/Fo and photosynthesis indicated up-regulation of carbon-based secondary metabolites (CBSM) under reduced photoinhibition on the under low light levels condition. At the lowest irradiance levels, Labisia pumila extracts also exhibited a significantly higher antioxidant activity (DPPH) than under high irradiance. The improved antioxidative activity under low light levels might be due to high availability of total flavonoids, phenolics and anthocyanin content in the plant extract. It was also found that an increase in the production of CBSM was due to high PAL activity under low light, probably signifying more availability of phenylalanine (Phe) under this condition. PMID:22754297

  2. Inhibition of serine palmitoyltransferase in vitro and long-chain base biosynthesis in intact Chinese hamster ovary cells by. beta. -Cl-alanine

    SciTech Connect

    Medlock, K.A.; Merrill, A.H. Jr.

    1987-05-01

    Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) is a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate dependent enzyme that catalyzes the first committed step of long-chain base (LCB) synthesis. Inhibition of SPT activity and de novo biosynthesis of sphinganine and sphingosine was observed in vitro and in intact Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO). In vitro studies revealed that inhibition was irreversible and concentration- and time-dependent, which are characteristics of suicide inhibition. Incubation of intact CHO cells with 5 mM ..beta..-Cl-alanine for 15 min completely inhibited SPT activity and LCB synthesis from (/sup 14/C)serine. The concentration dependences of inhibition of SPT activity and LCB formation were identical. There was no loss of viability of recovery of SPT activity over the 2 hour time course of these experiments. The synthesis of several other lipids was not affected by the same treatment. These results establish the association between the activity of SPT and the cellular rate of LCB formation and indicate that ..beta..-Cl-alanine can be used to study alterations in cellular LCB synthesis.

  3. Conformation-specific pathways of beta-alanine: a vacuum ultraviolet photoionization and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lidong; Pan, Yang; Guo, Huijun; Zhang, Taichang; Sheng, Liusi; Qi, Fei; Lo, Po-Kam; Lau, Kai-Chung

    2009-05-21

    We report a photoionization and dissociative photoionization study of beta-alanine using IR laser desorption combined with synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry. Fragments at m/z = 45, 44, 43, and 30 yielded from photoionization are assigned to NH(3)CH(2)CH(2)(+), NH(2)CHCH(3)(+), NH(2)CHCH(2)(+), and NH(2)CH(2)(+), respectively. Some new conformation-specific dissociation channels and corresponding dissociation energies for the observed fragments are established and determined with the help of ab initio G3B3 calculations and measurements of photoionization efficiency (PIE) spectra. The theoretical values are in fair agreement with the experimental results. Three low-lying conformers of the beta-alanine cation, including two gauche conformers G1+, G2+ and one anti conformer A+ are investigated by G3B3 calculations. The conformer G1+ (intramolecular hydrogen bonding N-H...OC) is found to be another precursor in forming the NH(3)CH(2)CH(2)(+) ion, which is complementary to the previously reported formation pathway that only occurs with the conformer G2+ (intramolecular hydrogen bonding O-H...N). Species NH(2)CHCH(2)(+) may come from the contributions of G1+, G2+, and A+ via different dissociation pathways. The most abundant fragment ion, NH(2)CH(2)(+), is formed from a direct C-C bond cleavage. Intramolecular hydrogen transfer processes dominate most of the fragmentation pathways of the beta-alanine cation. PMID:19400571

  4. Kinetics and mechanism of the beta-alanine + OH gas phase reaction: a quantum mechanical approach.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Torres, Armando; Galano, Annia; Alvarez-Idaboy, J Raúl

    2006-01-14

    The OH hydrogen abstraction reaction from beta-alanine has been studied using the BHandHLYP hybrid HF-density functional and 6-311G(d,p) basis sets. The energies have been improved by single point calculations at the CCSD(T)/6-311G(d,p) level of theory. The structures of the different stationary points are discussed. Reaction profiles are modeled including the formation of pre-reactive and product complexes. Negative net activation energy is obtained for the overall reaction. A complex mechanism is proposed, and the rate coefficients are calculated using transition state theory over the temperature range of 250-400 K. The rate coefficients are proposed for the first time and it was found that in the gas phase the hydrogen abstraction occurs mainly from the CH(2) group next to the amino end. The following expressions, in cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1), are obtained for the overall rate constants, at 250-400 and 290-310 K, respectively: k(250-400)= 2.36 x 10(-12) exp(340/T), and k(290-310)= 1.296 x 10(-12) exp(743/T). The three parameter expression that best describes the studied reaction is k(250-400)= 1.01 x 10(-21)T(3.09) exp(1374/T). The beta-alanine + OH reaction was found to be 1.5 times faster than the alpha-alanine + OH reaction. PMID:16482271

  5. Survivability and reactivity of glycine and alanine in early oceans: effects of meteorite impacts.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Yuhei; Fukunaga, Nao; Sekine, Toshimori; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kakegawa, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Takamichi; Nakazawa, Hiromoto

    2016-01-01

    Prebiotic oceans might have contained abundant amino acids, and were subjected to meteorite impacts, especially during the late heavy bombardment. It is so far unknown how meteorite impacts affected amino acids in the early oceans. Impact experiments were performed under the conditions where glycine was synthesized from carbon, ammonia, and water, using aqueous solutions containing (13)C-labeled glycine and alanine. Selected amino acids and amines in samples were analyzed with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS). In particular, the (13)C-labeled reaction products were analyzed to distinguish between run products and contaminants. The results revealed that both amino acids survived partially in the early ocean through meteorite impacts, that part of glycine changed into alanine, and that large amounts of methylamine and ethylamine were formed. Fast decarboxylation was confirmed to occur during such impact processes. Furthermore, the formation of n-butylamine, detected only in the samples recovered from the solutions with additional nitrogen and carbon sources of ammonia and benzene, suggests that chemical reactions to form new biomolecules can proceed through marine impacts. Methylamine and ethylamine from glycine and alanine increased considerably in the presence of hematite rather than olivine under similar impact conditions. These results also suggest that amino acids present in early oceans can contribute further to impact-induced reactions, implying that impact energy plays a potential role in the prebiotic formation of various biomolecules, although the reactions are complicated and depend upon the chemical environments as well. PMID:26369758

  6. Surface chemistry of alanine on Cu{111}: Adsorption geometry and temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldanza, Silvia; Cornish, Alix; Nicklin, Richard E. J.; Zheleva, Zhasmina V.; Held, Georg

    2014-11-01

    Adsorption of L-alanine on the Cu{111} single crystal surface was investigated as a model system for interactions between small chiral modifier molecules and close-packed metal surfaces. Synchrotron-based X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy are used to determine the chemical state, bond coordination and out-of-plane orientation of the molecule on the surface. Alanine adsorbs in its anionic form at room temperature, whilst at low temperature the overlayer consists of anionic and zwitterionic molecules. NEXAFS spectra exhibit a strong angular dependence of the π* resonance associated with the carboxylate group, which allows determining the tilt angle of this group with respect to the surface plane (48° ± 2°) at room temperature. Low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) shows a p(2√{ 13} × 2√{ 13}) R 13 ° superstructure with only one domain, which breaks the mirror symmetry of the substrate and, thus, induces global chirality to the surface. Temperature-programmed XPS (TP-XPS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiments indicate that the zwitterionic form converts into the anionic species (alaninate) at 293 K. The latter desorbs/decomposes between 435 K and 445 K.

  7. Monte Carlo Simulation of the Irradiation of Alanine Coated Film Dosimeters with Accelerated Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe, R. M.; Salvat, F.; Cleland, M. R.; Berejka, A.

    2009-03-01

    The Monte Carlo code PENELOPE was used to simulate the irradiation of alanine coated film dosimeters with electron beams of energies from 1 to 5 MeV being produced by a high-current industrial electron accelerator. This code includes a geometry package that defines complex quadratic geometries, such as those of the irradiation of products in an irradiation processing facility. In the present case the energy deposited on a water film at the surface of a wood parallelepiped was calculated using the program PENMAIN, which is a generic main program included in the PENELOPE distribution package. The results from the simulation were then compared with measurements performed by irradiating alanine film dosimeters with electrons using a 150 kW Dynamitron™ electron accelerator. The alanine films were placed on top of a set of wooden planks using the same geometrical arrangement as the one used for the simulation. The way the results from the simulation can be correlated with the actual measurements, taking into account the irradiation parameters, is described. An estimation of the percentage difference between measurements and calculations is also presented.

  8. Evaluation of Conformation and Association Behavior of Multivalent Alanine-Rich Polypeptides

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Robin S.; Top, Ayben; Argust, Lindsey M.; Liu, Shuang; Kiick, Kristi L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Helical alanine-rich polypeptides with functional groups displayed along the backbone can display desired molecules such as saccharides or therapeutic molecules at a prescribed spacing. Because these polypeptides have promise for application as biomaterials, the conformation and association of these molecules have been investigated under biologically relevant conditions. Methods Three polypeptide sequences, 17-H-3, 17-H-6, and 35-H-6, have been produced through recombinant techniques. Circular dichroic (CD) spectroscopy was used to monitor the secondary structure of the polypeptides in PBS (phosphate buffered saline, pH 7.4). The aggregation behavior in PBS was monitored via analytical ultracentrifugation and non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results The three polypeptides adopt a highly helical structure at low and ambient temperatures, and when heated, undergo a helix-to-coil transition, typical of other alanine-rich peptide sequences. The melting temperatures and van’t Hoff enthalpies, extracted from the CD data, suggest similar stability of the sequences. Although alanine-rich sequences can be prone to aggregation, there is no indication of aggregation for the three polypeptides at a range of concentrations relevant for possible biological applications. Conclusions The helical polypeptides are monomeric under biologically relevant conditions enabling application of these polypeptides as useful scaffolds for ligand or drug display. PMID:17674161

  9. Theoretical study of alpha/beta-alanine and their protonated/alkali metal cationized complexes.

    PubMed

    Abirami, S; Xing, Y M; Tsang, C W; Ma, N L

    2005-01-27

    Density functional theory has been employed to model the structure and the relative stabilities of alpha/beta-alanine conformers and their protonated and alkali metal cationized complexes. In general, we find that the behavior of the beta-alanine (beta-Ala) system is quite similar to that of alpha-alanine (alpha-Ala). However, the presence of the methylene group (-CH2-) at the beta position in beta-Ala leads to a few key differences. First, the intramolecular hydrogen bonding patterns are different between free alpha- and beta-Ala. Second, the stability of zwitterionic species (in either the free ligand or alkali metal cationized complexes) is often enhanced in beta-Ala. Third, the preferred mode of alkali metal cation (M+) binding may also differ in alpha- and beta-Ala. Natural energy decomposition analysis has been applied here to gain further insight into the effects of the ligand, cation size, and mode of binding on the nature of interaction in these M+-Ala complexes. PMID:16833371

  10. Development of an alanine dosimetry system for radiation dose measurements in the radiotherapy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gago-Arias, A.; González-Castaño, D. M.; Gómez, F.; Peteiro, E.; Lodeiro, C.; Pardo-Montero, J.

    2015-08-01

    Alanine/ESR systems provide an interesting alternative to standard dosimetry systems like solid state or gas ionization chambers for dosimetry in radiotherapy. This is primarily due to the negligible energy dependence, high stability, and the possibility of using small pellets that are especially suitable for the dosimetry of small fields. In order to obtain acceptable dose uncertainties in the radiotherapy dose range, the setup, operational parameters and quantification methods need to be carefully investigated and optimized. In this work we present the development of an alanine/ESR dosimetry system, traced to the secondary standard laboratory of absorbed dose to water at the Radiation Physics Laboratory of the Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (Spain). We focus on the setup, the optimization of the operational parameters of the ESR spectrometer, the quantification of the readout signal and the construction of a calibration curve. The evaluation of the uncertainty budget is also a key component of an alanine/ESR system for radiotherapy dosimetry, and is presented in detail.After the optimization of the procedures, we have achieved a relative uncertainty of 1.7% (k=2) for an absorbed dose of 10 Gy, decreasing to 0.9% for 50 Gy.

  11. Chiral molecule for spin filtering purposes: the study of L- and D-Alanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yitamben, Esmeralda; Rosenberg, Richard; Guisinger, Nathan

    2011-03-01

    The field of molecular electronics has attracted scientists by the great opportunities and versatility it offers as a replacement for standard semiconductor electronics with organic materials, thus bringing down the cost, and opening endless possibilities for chemical synthesis, and scientific breakthrough. Of particular interest is the use of chiral molecules, such as alanine, for spin filtering studies in hope of creating highly spin-polarized charge carriers for spintronics applications. Preliminary studies of both L- and D-alanine on Cu(111) were conducted using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, revealing the formation of a 2-dimensional phase at low coverage, a hexagonal ``flower'' pattern at intermediate coverage, and a chain and ring superstructures at high coverage. A model is proposed to explain the surface chemistry and bonding of the molecules on the metallic surface. Current studies of L- and D-alanine on Fe/W show promises in the intermediate coverage regime. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  12. β-alanine supplementation improves tactical performance but not cognitive function in combat soldiers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There are no known studies that have examined β-alanine supplementation in military personnel. Considering the physiological and potential neurological effects that have been reported during sustained military operations, it appears that β-alanine supplementation may have a potential benefit in maintaining physical and cognitive performance during high-intensity military activity under stressful conditions. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of 28 days of β-alanine ingestion in military personnel while fatigued on physical and cognitive performance. Methods Twenty soldiers (20.1 ± 0.9 years) from an elite combat unit were randomly assigned to either a β-alanine (BA) or placebo (PL) group. Soldiers were involved in advanced military training, including combat skill development, navigational training, self-defense/hand-to-hand combat and conditioning. All participants performed a 4-km run, 5-countermovement jumps using a linear position transducer, 120-m sprint, a 10-shot shooting protocol with assault rifle, including overcoming a misfire, and a 2-min serial subtraction test to assess cognitive function before (Pre) and after (Post) 28 days of supplementation. Results The training routine resulted in significant increases in 4-km run time for both groups, but no between group differences were seen (p = 0.597). Peak jump power at Post was greater for BA than PL (p = 0.034), while mean jump power for BA at Post was 10.2% greater (p = 0.139) than PL. BA had a significantly greater (p = 0.012) number of shots on target at Post (8.2 ± 1.0) than PL (6.5 ± 2.1), and their target engagement speed at Post was also significantly faster (p = 0.039). No difference in serial subtraction performance was seen between the groups (p = 0.844). Conclusion Results of this study indicate that 4-weeks of β-alanine ingestion in young, healthy soldiers did not impact cognitive performance, but did enhance power

  13. Metabolic Syndrome Abolishes Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Receptor Agonist Stimulation of SERCA in Coronary Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Dineen, Stacey L; McKenney, Mikaela L; Bell, Lauren N; Fullenkamp, Allison M; Schultz, Kyle A; Alloosh, Mouhamad; Chalasani, Naga; Sturek, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) doubles the risk of adverse cardiovascular events. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists induce weight loss, increase insulin secretion, and improve glucose tolerance. Studies in healthy animals suggest cardioprotective properties of GLP-1 receptor agonists, perhaps partially mediated by improved sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase (SERCA) activity. We examined the acute effect of GLP-1 receptor agonists on coronary smooth muscle cells (CSM) enzymatically isolated from lean, healthy Ossabaw miniature swine. Intracellular Ca(2+) handling was interrogated with fura-2. The GLP-1 receptor agonist exenatide activated SERCA but did not alter other Ca(2+) transporters. Further, we tested the hypothesis that chronic, in vivo treatment with GLP-1 receptor agonist AC3174 would attenuate coronary artery disease (CAD) in swine with MetS. MetS was induced in 20 swine by 6 months' feeding of a hypercaloric, atherogenic diet. Swine were then randomized (n = 10/group) into placebo or AC3174 treatment groups and continued the diet for an additional 6 months. AC3174 treatment attenuated weight gain, increased insulin secretion, and improved glucose tolerance. Intravascular ultrasound and histology showed no effect of AC3174 on CAD. MetS abolished SERCA activation by GLP-1 receptor agonists. We conclude that MetS confers vascular resistance to GLP-1 receptor agonists, partially through impaired cellular signaling steps involving SERCA. PMID:25845661

  14. Overexpression of the Transcriptional Factor Runx2 in Osteoblasts Abolishes the Anabolic Effect of Parathyroid Hormone in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Merciris, Didier; Marty, Caroline; Collet, Corinne; de Vernejoul, Marie-Christine; Geoffroy, Valerie

    2007-01-01

    There is convincing evidence that Runx2 could be a regulator of the anabolic action of parathyroid hormone (PTH) in bone. We therefore decided to determine how Runx2 overexpression in osteoblasts affects the anabolic response to PTH. Transgenic osteoporotic female mice overexpressing Runx2 (TG) and their wild-type littermates (WT) were treated with PTH (100 μg/kg/day, 7 days a week) or with the vehicle for 6 weeks. Unexpectedly, Runx2 overexpression blunted the increase in the mineral density and volume of bone induced by intermittent PTH in WT mice. Our findings also indicate that PTH failed to increase bone formation in TG mice overexpressing Runx2. This abolition of the effect of PTH by Runx2 overexpression was attributable to a decrease in the differentiation of osteoblastic cells both in vivo and in vitro. Finally, we showed that less cAMP was induced by PTH and that there were fewer PTH binding sites in TG than WT osteoblasts. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that in vivo a high level of Runx2 abolishes the anabolic effect of PTH, probably via a decrease in the sensitivity of TG osteoblasts to PTH, and that the level of expression of Runx2 is critical if PTH is to produce its anabolic effect on bone in vivo. PMID:17456773

  15. Cytosolic Ribosomal Mutations That Abolish Accumulation of Circular Intron in the Mitochondria without Preventing Senescence of Podospora Anserina

    PubMed Central

    Silar, P.; Koll, F.; Rossignol, M.

    1997-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Podospora anserina presents a degeneration syndrome called Senescence associated with mitochondrial DNA modifications. We show that mutations affecting the two different and interacting cytosolic ribosomal proteins (S7 and S19) systematically and specifically prevent the accumulation of senDNAα (a circular double-stranded DNA plasmid derived from the first intron of the mitochondrial cox1 gene or intron α) without abolishing Senescence nor affecting the accumulation of other usually observed mitochondrial DNA rearrangements. One of the mutant proteins is homologous to the Escherichia coli S4 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae S13 ribosomal proteins, known to be involved in accuracy control of cytosolic translation. The lack of accumulation of senDNAα seems to result from a nontrivial ribosomal alteration unrelated to accuracy control, indicating that S7 and S19 proteins have an additional function. The results strongly suggest that modified expression of nucleus-encoded proteins contributes to Senescence in P. anserina. These data do not fit well with some current models, which propose that intron α plays the role of the cytoplasmic and infectious Determinant of Senescence that was defined in early studies. PMID:9055079

  16. Metformin abolishes increased tumor (18)F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake associated with a high energy diet.

    PubMed

    Mashhedi, Haider; Blouin, Marie-José; Zakikhani, Mahvash; David, Stéphanie; Zhao, Yunhua; Bazile, Miguel; Birman, Elena; Algire, Carolyn; Aliaga, Antonio; Bedell, Barry J; Pollak, Michael

    2011-08-15

    Insulin regulates glucose uptake by normal tissues. Although there is evidence that certain cancers are growth-stimulated by insulin, the possibility that insulin influences tumor glucose uptake as assessed by ( 18) F-2-Fluoro-2-Deoxy-d-Glucose Positron Emission Tomography (FDG-PET) has not been studied in detail. We present a model of diet-induced hyperinsulinemia associated with increased insulin receptor activation in neoplastic tissue and with increased tumor FDG-PET image intensity. Metformin abolished the diet-induced increases in serum insulin level, tumor insulin receptor activation and tumor FDG uptake associated with the high energy diet but had no effect on these measurements in mice on a control diet. These findings provide the first functional imaging correlate of the well-known adverse effect of caloric excess on cancer outcome. They demonstrate that, for a subset of neoplasms, diet and insulin are variables that affect tumor FDG uptake and have implications for design of clinical trials of metformin as an antineoplastic agent. PMID:21811094

  17. Effects of social conditions during adolescence on courtship and aggressive behavior are not abolished by adult social experience.

    PubMed

    Ruploh, Tim; Henning, Miriam; Bischof, Hans-Joachim; von Engelhardt, Nikolaus

    2015-01-01

    Social experience during adolescence has long-lasting consequences for adult social behavior in many species. In zebra finches, individuals reared in pairs during adolescence start to court females faster, sing more courtship motifs to females and are more aggressive compared with group-reared males. We investigated whether such differences are stable during adulthood or can be abolished by novel social experience after adolescence by giving all birds extensive experience with group life during adulthood. Courtship and aggressiveness increased in all males, but pair-reared males still had a higher motif rate and were more aggressive than group-reared males. Males no longer differed in courtship latency. In addition to the stable treatment differences, individual differences in behavior remained stable over time. Our results show that differences in behavior acquired during adolescence are preserved into adulthood, although adults still change their social behavior. Adolescence can thus be seen as a sensitive period during which social conditions have a lasting effect on adult behavior. PMID:25545997

  18. Knockout of Slo2.2 enhances itch, abolishes KNa current, and increases action potential firing frequency in DRG neurons

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Espinosa, Pedro L; Wu, Jianping; Yang, Chengtao; Gonzalez-Perez, Vivian; Zhou, Huifang; Liang, Hongwu; Xia, Xiao-Ming; Lingle, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Two mammalian genes, Kcnt1 and Kcnt2, encode pore-forming subunits of Na+-dependent K+ (KNa) channels. Progress in understanding KNa channels has been hampered by the absence of specific tools and methods for rigorous KNa identification in native cells. Here, we report the genetic disruption of both Kcnt1 and Kcnt2, confirm the loss of Slo2.2 and Slo2.1 protein, respectively, in KO animals, and define tissues enriched in Slo2 expression. Noting the prevalence of Slo2.2 in dorsal root ganglion, we find that KO of Slo2.2, but not Slo2.1, results in enhanced itch and pain responses. In dissociated small diameter DRG neurons, KO of Slo2.2, but not Slo2.1, abolishes KNa current. Utilizing isolectin B4+ neurons, the absence of KNa current results in an increase in action potential (AP) firing and a decrease in AP threshold. Activation of KNa acts as a brake to initiation of the first depolarization-elicited AP with no discernible effect on afterhyperpolarizations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10013.001 PMID:26559620

  19. Deletion of the core-H region in mice abolishes the expression of three proximal odorant receptor genes in cis

    PubMed Central

    Nishizumi, Hirofumi; Kumasaka, Kouhei; Inoue, Nobuko; Nakashima, Ai; Sakano, Hitoshi

    2007-01-01

    We have previously reported that a 2.1-kb homology (H) sequence, conserved between mouse and human, regulates the odorant receptor (OR) gene MOR28 in transgenic mice. Here, we narrowed down the essential sequences of the H to a core of 124 bp by using a transient expression system in zebrafish embryos. Transgenic experiments in mice demonstrated that the core-H sequence is sufficient to endow expression of the MOR28 minigene. Deletion and mutation analyses of the core-H region revealed two homeodomain sequences to be essential for the H enhancer activity. Targeted deletion of the core-H abolished expression of three proximal OR genes, MOR28, MOR10, and MOR83, in cis, indicating the presence of another locus control region/enhancer in the downstream region, that regulates four distal OR genes in the same MOR28 cluster. In the heterozygous mice, the H− phenotype of the mutant allele was not rescued by the wild-type H+ allele in trans. PMID:18077433

  20. A novel bacteriophage-encoded RNA polymerase binding protein inhibits transcription initiation and abolishes transcription termination by host RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Nechaev, Sergei; Yuzenkova, Yulia; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Heyduk, Tomasz; Severinov, Konstantin

    2002-06-28

    Xp10 is a lytic bacteriophage of Xanthomonas oryzae, a Gram-negative bacterium that causes rice blight. We purified an Xp10 protein, p7, that binds to and inhibits X. oryzae RNA polymerase (RNAP). P7 is a novel 73 amino acid-long protein; it does not bind to and hence does not affect transcription by Escherichia coli RNAP. Analysis of E. coli/X. oryzae RNAP hybrids locates the p7 binding site to the largest X. oryzae RNAP subunit, beta'. Binding of p7 to X. oryzae RNAP holoenzyme prevents large conformational change that places the sigma subunit region 4 into the correct position for interaction with the -35 promoter element. As a result, open promoter complex formation on the -10/-35 class promoters is inhibited. Inhibition of promoter complex formation on the extended -10 class promoters is less efficient. The p7 protein also abolishes factor-independent transcription termination by X. oryzae RNAP by preventing the release of nascent RNA at terminators. Further physiological and mechanistic studies of this novel transcription factor should provide additional insights into its biological role and the processes of promoter recognition and transcription termination. PMID:12079331

  1. Determination of muscle protein synthesis rates in fish using (2)H2O and (2)H NMR analysis of alanine.

    PubMed

    Marques, Cátia; Viegas, Filipa; Rito, João; Jones, John; Viegas, Ivan

    2016-09-15

    Following administration of deuterated water ((2)H2O), the fractional synthetic rate (FSR) of a given endogenous protein can be estimated by (2)H-enrichment quantification of its alanine residues. Currently, this is measured by mass spectrometry following a derivatization procedure. Muscle FSR was measured by (1)H/(2)H NMR analysis of alanine from seabass kept for 6 days in 5% (2)H-enriched saltwater, following acid hydrolysis and amino acid isolation by cation-exchange chromatography of muscle tissue. The analysis is simple and robust, and provides precise measurements of excess alanine (2)H-enrichment in the 0.1-0.4% range from 50 mmol of alanine recovered from muscle protein. PMID:27418547

  2. Alanine with the Precipitate of Tomato Juice Administered to Rats Enhances the Reduction in Blood Ethanol Levels

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Shunji; Shiiya, Sachie; Tokumaru, Yoshimi; Kanda, Tomomasa

    2015-01-01

    Delay in gastric emptying (GE) lowers the blood ethanol concentration (BEC) after alcohol administration. We previously demonstrated that water-insoluble fractions, mainly comprising dietary fiber derived from many types of botanical foods, possessed the ability to absorb ethanol-containing aqueous solutions. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between the absorption of ethanol and lowering of BEC because of delay in GE. Here we identified dietary nutrients that synergize with the water-insoluble fraction of tomatoes to lower BEC in rats. Consequently, unlike tomato juice without alanine, tomato juice with 5.0% alanine decreased BEC depending on the delay in GE and mediated the ethanol-induced decrease in the spontaneous motor activity (an indicator of drunkenness). Our findings indicate that the synergism between tomato juice and alanine to reduce the absorption of ethanol was attributable to the effect of alanine on precipitates such as the water-insoluble fraction of tomatoes. PMID:26713162

  3. Alanine with the Precipitate of Tomato Juice Administered to Rats Enhances the Reduction in Blood Ethanol Levels.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Shunji; Shiiya, Sachie; Tokumaru, Yoshimi; Kanda, Tomomasa

    2015-01-01

    Delay in gastric emptying (GE) lowers the blood ethanol concentration (BEC) after alcohol administration. We previously demonstrated that water-insoluble fractions, mainly comprising dietary fiber derived from many types of botanical foods, possessed the ability to absorb ethanol-containing aqueous solutions. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between the absorption of ethanol and lowering of BEC because of delay in GE. Here we identified dietary nutrients that synergize with the water-insoluble fraction of tomatoes to lower BEC in rats. Consequently, unlike tomato juice without alanine, tomato juice with 5.0% alanine decreased BEC depending on the delay in GE and mediated the ethanol-induced decrease in the spontaneous motor activity (an indicator of drunkenness). Our findings indicate that the synergism between tomato juice and alanine to reduce the absorption of ethanol was attributable to the effect of alanine on precipitates such as the water-insoluble fraction of tomatoes. PMID:26713162

  4. Effects of high-salinity seawater acclimation on the levels of D-alanine in the muscle and hepatopancreas of kuruma prawn, Marsupenaeus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Naoko; Yokoyama, Masahumi

    2015-12-10

    Changes in D- and L-alanine contents were determined in the muscle and hepatopancreas of kuruma prawn Marsupenaeus japonicus, during acclimation from seawater containing 100% salinity to artificial seawater containing 150% salinity. In the hepatopancreas, contents of both amino acids increased by approximately threefold. The activity of alanine racemase, which catalyzes the interconversion of D- and L-alanine, also increased in the high-salinity seawater. In addition, the expression of the gene encoding alanine racemase increased in the hepatopancreas with an increase in the alanine racemase activity. These data indicate that the biosynthesis of D- and L-alanine is controlled by the gene expression level of alanine racemase, and D-alanine in the hepatopancreas functions as a major osmolyte for isosmotic regulation. In contrast, the content of D-alanine and alanine racemase activity did not change in the muscle during hyper-osmotic acclimation. Therefore, we suggest that D-alanine, which exists in the several tissues of M. japonicus, is considered to be utilized in some different physiological phenomena in different tissues. PMID:26025417

  5. The effect of beta-alanine supplementation on isokinetic force and cycling performance in highly trained cyclists.

    PubMed

    Howe, Samuel T; Bellinger, Phillip M; Driller, Matthew W; Shing, Cecilia M; Fell, James W

    2013-12-01

    Beta-alanine may benefit short-duration, high-intensity exercise performance. The aim of this randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study was to examine the effects of beta-alanine supplementation on aspects of muscular performance in highly trained cyclists. Sixteen highly trained cyclists (mean ± SD; age = 24 ± 7 yr; mass = 70 ± 7 kg; VO2max = 67 ± 4 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1)) supplemented with either beta-alanine (n = 8, 65 mg · kg - 1BM) or a placebo (n = 8; dextrose monohydrate) over 4 weeks. Pre- and postsupplementation cyclists performed a 4-minute maximal cycling test to measure average power and 30 reciprocal maximal isokinetic knee contractions at a fixed angular velocity of 180° · sec(-1) to measure average power/repetition, total work done (TWD), and fatigue index (%). Blood pH, lactate (La-) and bicarbonate (HCO3-) concentrations were measured pre- and postisokinetic testing at baseline and following the supplementation period. Beta-alanine supplementation was 44% likely to increase average power output during the 4-minute cycling time trial when compared with the placebo, although this was not statistically significant (p = .25). Isokinetic average power/repetition was significantly increased post beta-alanine supplementation compared with placebo (beta-alanine: 6.8 ± 9.9 W, placebo: -4.3 ± 9.5 W, p = .04, 85% likely benefit), while fatigue index was significantly reduced (p = .03, 95% likely benefit). TWD was 89% likely to be improved following beta-alanine supplementation; however, this was not statistically significant (p = .09). There were no significant differences in blood pH, lactate, and HCO3- between groups (p > .05). Four weeks of beta-alanine supplementation resulted in worthwhile changes in time-trial performance and short-duration muscular force production in highly trained cyclists. PMID:23630052

  6. Feasibility on using composite gel-alanine dosimetry on the validation of a multiple brain metastasis radiosurgery VMAT technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavoni, J. F.; Neves-Junior, W. F. P.; Silveira, M. A.; Ramos, P. A. M. M.; Haddad, C. M. K.; Baffa, O.

    2015-01-01

    This work presents an end-to-end test using a composite Gel-Alanine phantom, in order to validate 3-dimensionally the dose distribution delivered by a single isocenter VMAT technique on the simultaneous treatment of multiple brain metastases. The results obtained with the gel and alanine dosimeters are consistent with the expected by the treatment planning system, showing the potential of this multidosimetric approach and validating dosimetrically the multiple brain metastases treatment using VMAT.

  7. Amodal Completion in Bonobos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagasaka, Yasuo; Brooks, Daniel I.; Wasserman, Edward A.

    2010-01-01

    We trained two bonobos to discriminate among occluded, complete, and incomplete stimuli. The occluded stimulus comprised a pair of colored shapes, one of which appeared to occlude the other. The complete and incomplete stimuli involved the single shape that appeared to have been partially covered in the occluded stimulus; the complete stimulus…

  8. Oxygen radical-mediated oxidation reactions of an alanine peptide motif - density functional theory and transition state theory study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Oxygen-base (O-base) oxidation in protein backbone is important in the protein backbone fragmentation due to the attack from reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, an alanine peptide was used model system to investigate this O-base oxidation by employing density functional theory (DFT) calculations combining with continuum solvent model. Detailed reaction steps were analyzed along with their reaction rate constants. Results Most of the O-base oxidation reactions for this alanine peptide are exothermic except for the bond-breakage of the Cα-N bond to form hydroperoxy alanine radical. Among the reactions investigated in this study, the activated energy of OH α-H abstraction is the lowest one, while the generation of alkylperoxy peptide radical must overcome the highest energy barrier. The aqueous situation facilitates the oxidation reactions to generate hydroxyl alanine peptide derivatives except for the fragmentations of alkoxyl alanine peptide radical. The Cα-Cβ bond of the alkoxyl alanine peptide radical is more labile than the peptide bond. Conclusion the rate-determining step of oxidation in protein backbone is the generation of hydroperoxy peptide radical via the reaction of alkylperoxy peptide radical with HO2. The stabilities of alkylperoxy peptide radical and complex of alkylperoxy peptide radical with HO2 are crucial in this O-base oxidation reaction. PMID:22524792

  9. Exploration of Sitagliptin as a potential inhibitor for the M1 Alanine aminopeptidase enzyme in Plasmodium falciparum using computational docking

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamoorthy, Mohana; Achary, Anant

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum has limited capacity for de novo amino acid synthesis and rely on degradation of host hemoglobin to maintain protein metabolism and synthesis of proteins. M1 alanine aminopeptidase enzyme of the parasite involved in the terminal degradation of host hemoglobin was subjected to in silico screening with low molecular weight protease inhibitors. The km (avg) of the enzyme M1 alanine aminopeptidase for the substrate DL – Alanine β Napthylamide Hydrochloride was estimated as 322.05µM. The molecular interactions between the enzyme and the substrate and the mechanism of enzyme action were analyzed which paved way for inhibition strategies. Among all the inhibitors screened, Sitagliptin was found to be most potent inhibitor with ki of 0.152 µM in its best orientation whereas the ki(avg) was 2.0055 µM. The ki of Sitagliptin is lower than the km of M1 alanine aminopeptidase for the substrate DL – Alanine β Napthylamide Hydrochloride (322.05 µM) and Ki of the known inhibitor Bestatin. Therefore Sitagliptin may serve as a potent competitive inhibitor of the enzyme M1 alanine aminopeptidase of Plasmodium falciparum. PMID:23559748

  10. Does enriched acoustic environment in humans abolish chronic tinnitus clinically and electrophysiologically? A double blind placebo controlled study.

    PubMed

    Vanneste, Sven; van Dongen, Marijn; De Vree, Bjorn; Hiseni, Senad; van der Velden, Eddy; Strydis, Christos; Joos, Kathleen; Norena, Arnaud; Serdijn, Wouter; De Ridder, Dirk

    2013-02-01

    Animal research has shown that loss of normal acoustic stimulation can increase spontaneous firing in the central auditory system and induce cortical map plasticity. Enriched acoustic environment after noise trauma prevents map plasticity and abolishes neural signs of tinnitus. In humans, the tinnitus spectrum overlaps with the area of hearing loss. Based on these findings it can be hypothesized that stimulating the auditory system by presenting music compensating specifically for the hearing loss might also suppress chronic tinnitus. To verify this hypothesis, a study was conducted in three groups of tinnitus patients. One group listened just to unmodified music (i.e. active control group), one group listened to music spectrally tailored to compensate for their hearing loss, and a third group received music tailored to overcompensate for their hearing loss, associated with one (in presbycusis) or two notches (in audiometric dip) at the edge of hearing loss. Our data indicate that applying overcompensation to the hearing loss worsens the patients' tinnitus loudness, the tinnitus annoyance and their depressive feelings. No significant effects were obtained for the control group or for the compensation group. These clinical findings were associated with an increase in current density within the left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex in the alpha2 frequency band and within the left pregenual anterior cingulate cortex in beta1 and beta2 frequency band. In addition, a region of interest analysis also demonstrated an associated increase in gamma band activity in the auditory cortex after overcompensation in comparison to baseline measurements. This was, however, not the case for the control or the compensation groups. In conclusion, music therapy compensating for hearing loss is not beneficial in suppressing tinnitus, and overcompensating hearing loss actually worsens tinnitus, both clinically and electrophysiologically. PMID:23104014

  11. The response to paired motor cortical stimuli is abolished at a spinal level during human muscle fatigue

    PubMed Central

    McNeil, Chris J; Martin, Peter G; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2009-01-01

    During maximal exercise, supraspinal fatigue contributes significantly to the decline in muscle performance but little is known about intracortical inhibition during such contractions. Long-interval inhibition is produced by a conditioning motor cortical stimulus delivered via transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) 50–200 ms prior to a second test stimulus. We aimed to delineate changes in this inhibition during a sustained maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Eight subjects performed a 2 min MVC of elbow flexors. Single test and paired (conditioning–test interval of 100 ms) stimuli were delivered via TMS over the motor cortex every 7–8 s throughout the effort and during intermittent MVCs in the recovery period. To determine the role of spinal mechanisms, the protocol was repeated but the TMS test stimulus was replaced by cervicomedullary stimulation which activates the corticospinal tract. TMS motor evoked potentials (MEPs) and cervicomedullary motor evoked potentials (CMEPs) were recorded from biceps brachii. Unconditioned MEPs increased progressively with fatigue, whereas CMEPs increased initially but returned to the control value in the final 40 s of contraction. In contrast, both conditioned MEPs and CMEPs decreased rapidly with fatigue and were virtually abolished within 30 s. In recovery, unconditioned responses required <30 s but conditioned MEPs and CMEPs required ∼90 s to return to control levels. Thus, long-interval inhibition increased markedly as fatigue progressed. Contrary to expectations, subcortically evoked CMEPs were inhibited as much as MEPs. This new phenomenon was also observed in the first dorsal interosseous muscle. Tested with a high intensity conditioning stimulus during a fatiguing maximal effort, long-interval inhibition of MEPs was increased primarily by spinal rather than motor cortical mechanisms. The spinal mechanisms exposed here may contribute to the development of central fatigue in human muscles. PMID:19805743

  12. CRISPR-Cas9 Genome Editing of a Single Regulatory Element Nearly Abolishes Target Gene Expression in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yu; Slivano, Orazio J.; Christie, Christine K.; Cheng, Albert W.; Miano, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To ascertain the importance of a single regulatory element in the control of Cnn1 expression using CRISPR/Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9) genome editing. Approach and Results The CRISPR/Cas9 system was used to produce 3/18 founder mice carrying point mutations in an intronic CArG box of the smooth muscle cell (SMC)-restricted Cnn1 gene. Each founder was bred for germ line transmission of the mutant CArG box and littermate interbreeding to generate homozygous mutant (Cnn1ΔCArG/ΔCArG) mice. Quantitative RT-PCR, Western blotting, and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy showed dramatic reductions in Cnn1 mRNA and CNN1 protein expression in Cnn1ΔCArG/ΔCArG mice with no change in other SMC-restricted genes and little evidence of off-target edits elsewhere in the genome. In vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed a sharp decrease in binding of SRF to the mutant CArG box. Loss of CNN1 expression was coincident with an increase in Ki-67 positive cells in the normal vessel wall. Conclusion CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing of a single CArG box nearly abolishes Cnn1 expression in vivo and evokes increases in SMC DNA synthesis. This facile genome editing system paves the way for a new generation of studies designed to test the importance of individual regulatory elements in living animals, including regulatory variants in conserved sequence blocks linked to human disease. PMID:25538209

  13. Activin-β(c) reduces reproductive tumour progression and abolishes cancer-associated cachexia in inhibin-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Gold, Elspeth; Marino, Francesco Elia; Harrison, Craig; Makanji, Yogeshwar; Risbridger, Gail

    2013-03-01

    Activins are involved in the regulation of a diverse range of physiological processes including development, reproduction, and fertility, and have been implicated in the progression of cancers. Bioactivity is regulated by the inhibin α-subunit and by an activin-binding protein, follistatin. The activin-β(C) subunit was not considered functionally significant in this regard due to an absence of phenotype in knockout mice. However, activin-β(C) forms heterodimers with activin-β(A) and activin-C antagonizes activin-A in vitro. Thus, it is proposed that overexpression, rather than loss of activin-β(C) , regulates activin-A bioactivity. In order to prove biological efficacy, inhibin α-subunit knockout mice (α-KO) were crossed with mice overexpressing activin-β(C) (ActC++). Deletion of inhibin leads to Sertoli and granulosa cell tumours, increased activin-A, and cancer-associated cachexia. Therefore, cachexia and reproductive tumour development should be modulated in α-KO/ActC++ mice, where excessive activin-A is the underlying cause. Accordingly, a reduction in activin-A, no significant weight loss, and reduced incidence of reproductive tumours were evident in α-KO/ActC++ mice. Overexpression of activin-β(C) antagonized the activin signalling cascade; thus, the tumourigenic effects of activin-A were abrogated. This study provides proof of the biological relevance of activin-β(C) . Being a regulator of activin-A, it is able to abolish cachexia and modulate reproductive tumour development in α-KO mice. PMID:23180294

  14. The antiestrogens tamoxifen and fulvestrant abolish estrogenic impacts of 17α-ethinylestradiol on male calling behavior of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Frauke; Kloas, Werner

    2012-01-01

    Various synthetic chemicals released to the environment can interfere with the endocrine system of vertebrates. Many of these endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) exhibit estrogenic activity and can interfere with sexual development and reproductive physiology. More recently, also chemicals with different modes of action (MOAs), such as antiestrogenic, androgenic and antiandrogenic EDCs, have been shown to be present in the environment. However, to date EDC-research primarily focuses on exposure to EDCs with just one MOA, while studies examining the effects of simultaneous exposure to EDCs with different MOAs are rare, although they would reflect more real, natural exposure situations. In the present study the combined effects of estrogenic and antiestrogenic EDCs were assessed by analyzing the calling behavior of short-term exposed male Xenopus laevis. The estrogenic 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), and the antiestrogenic EDCs tamoxifen (TAM) and fulvestrant (ICI) were used as model substances. As previously demonstrated, sole EE2 exposure (10-10 M) resulted in significant alterations of the male calling behavior, including altered temporal and spectral parameters of the advertisement calls. Sole TAM (10-7 M, 10-8 M, 10-10 M) or ICI (10-7 M) exposure, on the other hand, did not affect any of the measured parameters. If frogs were co-exposed to EE2 (10-10 M) and TAM (10-7 M) the effects of EE2 on some parameters were abolished, but co-exposure to EE2 and ICI (10-7 M) neutralized all estrogenic effects. Thus, although EDCs with antiestrogenic MOA might not exhibit any effects per se, they can alter the estrogenic effects of EE2. Our observations demonstrate that there is need to further investigate the combined effects of EDCs with various, not only opposing, MOAs as this would reflect realistic wildlife situations. PMID:23028589

  15. GMXPBSA 2.0: A GROMACS tool to perform MM/PBSA and computational alanine scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paissoni, C.; Spiliotopoulos, D.; Musco, G.; Spitaleri, A.

    2014-11-01

    GMXPBSA 2.0 is a user-friendly suite of Bash/Perl scripts for streamlining MM/PBSA calculations on structural ensembles derived from GROMACS trajectories, to automatically calculate binding free energies for protein-protein or ligand-protein complexes. GMXPBSA 2.0 is flexible and can easily be customized to specific needs. Additionally, it performs computational alanine scanning (CAS) to study the effects of ligand and/or receptor alanine mutations on the free energy of binding. Calculations require only for protein-protein or protein-ligand MD simulations. GMXPBSA 2.0 performs different comparative analysis, including a posteriori generation of alanine mutants of the wild-type complex, calculation of the binding free energy values of the mutant complexes and comparison of the results with the wild-type system. Moreover, it compares the binding free energy of different complexes trajectories, allowing the study the effects of non-alanine mutations, post-translational modifications or unnatural amino acids on the binding free energy of the system under investigation. Finally, it can calculate and rank relative affinity to the same receptor utilizing MD simulations of proteins in complex with different ligands. In order to dissect the different MM/PBSA energy contributions, including molecular mechanic (MM), electrostatic contribution to solvation (PB) and nonpolar contribution to solvation (SA), the tool combines two freely available programs: the MD simulations software GROMACS and the Poisson-Boltzmann equation solver APBS. All the calculations can be performed in single or distributed automatic fashion on a cluster facility in order to increase the calculation by dividing frames across the available processors. The program is freely available under the GPL license. Catalogue identifier: AETQ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETQ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing

  16. The effects of 10 weeks of resistance training combined with beta-alanine supplementation on whole body strength, force production, muscular endurance and body composition.

    PubMed

    Kendrick, Iain P; Harris, Roger C; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Kim, Chang Keun; Dang, Viet H; Lam, Thanh Q; Bui, Toai T; Smith, Marcus; Wise, John A

    2008-05-01

    Carnosine (Carn) occurs in high concentrations in skeletal muscle is a potent physico-chemical buffer of H+ over the physiological range. Recent research has demonstrated that 6.4 g x day(-1) of beta-alanine (beta-ala) can significantly increase skeletal muscle Carn concentrations (M-[Carn]) whilst the resultant change in buffering capacity has been shown to be paralleled by significant improvements in anaerobic and aerobic measures of exercise performance. Muscle carnosine increase has also been linked to increased work done during resistance training. Prior research has suggested that strength training may also increase M-[Carn] although this is disputed by other studies. The aim of this investigation is to assess the effect of 10 weeks resistance training on M-[Carn], and, secondly, to investigate if increased M-[Carn] brought about through beta-ala supplementation had a positive effect on training responses. Twenty-six Vietnamese sports science students completed the study. The subjects completed a 10-week resistance-training program whilst consuming 6.4 g x day(-1) of beta-ala (beta-ALG) or a matched dose of a placebo (PLG). Subjects were assessed prior to and after training for whole body strength, isokinetic force production, muscular endurance, body composition. beta-Alanine supplemented subjects increased M-[Carn] by 12.81 +/- 7.97 mmol x kg(-1) dry muscle whilst there was no change in PLG subjects. There was no significant effect of beta-ala supplementation on any of the exercise parameters measured, mass or % body fat. In conclusion, 10 weeks of resistance training alone did not change M-[Carn]. PMID:18175046

  17. Selection of tRNA(Asp) amber suppressor mutants having alanine, arginine, glutamine, and lysine identity.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, F; Reinbolt, J; Dirheimer, G; Gangloff, J; Eriani, G

    1996-01-01

    Elements that confer identity to a tRNA in the cellular environment, where all aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are competing for substrates, may be delineated by in vivo experiments using suppressor tRNAs. Here we describe the selection of active Escherichia coli tRNAAsp amber mutants and analyze their identity. Starting from a library containing randomly mutated tRNA(CUA)Asp genes, we isolated four amber suppressors presenting either lysine, alanine, or glutamine activity. Two of them, presenting mainly alanine or lysine activity, were further submitted to a second round of mutagenesis selection in order to improve their efficiency of suppression. Eleven suppressors were isolated, each containing two or three mutations. Ten presented identities of the two parental mutants, whereas one had switched from lysine to arginine identity. Analysis of the different mutants revealed (or confirmed for some nucleotides) their role as positive and/or negative determinants in AlaRS, LysRS, and ArgRS recognition. More generally, it appears that tRNAAsp presents identity characteristics closely related to those of tRNALys, as well as a structural basis for acquiring alanine or arginine identity upon moderate mutational changes; these consist of addition or suppression of the corresponding positive or negative determinants, as well as tertiary interactions. Failure to isolate aspartic acid-inserting suppressors is probably due to elimination of the important G34 identity element and its replacement by an antideterminant when changing the anticodon of the tRNAAsp to the CUA triplet. PMID:8809018

  18. Concerted modulation of alanine and glutamate metabolism in young Medicago truncatula seedlings under hypoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Limami, Anis M.; Glévarec, Gaëlle; Ricoult, Claudie; Cliquet, Jean-Bernard; Planchet, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    The modulation of primary nitrogen metabolism by hypoxic stress was studied in young Medicago truncatula seedlings. Hypoxic seedlings were characterized by the up-regulation of glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GDH1) and mitochondrial alanine aminotransferase (mAlaAT), and down-regulation of glutamine synthetase 1b (GS1b), NADH-glutamate synthase (NADH-GOGAT), glutamate dehydrogenase 3 (GDH3), and isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) gene expression. Hypoxic stress severely inhibited GS activity and stimulated NADH-GOGAT activity. GDH activity was lower in hypoxic seedlings than in the control, however, under either normoxia or hypoxia, the in vivo activity was directed towards glutamate deamination. 15NH4 labelling showed for the first time that the adaptive reaction of the plant to hypoxia consisted of a concerted modulation of nitrogen flux through the pathways of both alanine and glutamate synthesis. In hypoxic seedlings, newly synthesized 15N-alanine increased and accumulated as the major amino acid, asparagine synthesis was inhibited, while 15N-glutamate was synthesized at a similar rate to that in the control. A discrepancy between the up-regulation of GDH1 expression and the down-regulation of GDH activity by hypoxic stress highlighted for the first time the complex regulation of this enzyme by hypoxia. Higher rates of glycolysis and ethanol fermentation are known to cause the fast depletion of sugar stores and carbon stress. It is proposed that the expression of GDH1 was stimulated by hypoxia-induced carbon stress, while the enzyme protein might be involved during post-hypoxic stress contributing to the regeneration of 2-oxoglutarate via the GDH shunt. PMID:18508812

  19. Comparative study of glycine, alanine or casein as inert nitrogen sources in endotoxemic rats.

    PubMed

    Chambon-Savanovitch, C; Felgines, C; Farges, M C; Raul, F; Cézard, J P; Davot, P; Vasson, M P; Cynober, L A

    1999-10-01

    Pharmacological effects of dietary amino acids (AA) and peptides must be compared to an isonitrogenous control that is as inert as possible. To establish a rationale for the choice of such a control, potential metabolic and nutritional effects of three currently used nitrogenous controls (glycine, alanine, and casein) were evaluated in an endotoxemic rat model that has well-defined alterations in AA and protein metabolism. Five-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats (113 +/- 1 g) were randomly assigned to four groups and received at d 0 an intraperitoneal injection of endotoxin (3 mg/kg). After withdrawal of food for 24 h, the rats were enterally refed for 48 h with a liquid diet (Osmolite((R))) supplemented with 0.19 g N. kg(-1). d(-1) in the form of glycine [lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-GLY group], alanine (LPS-ALA group) or casein (LPS-CAS group). One group (LPS group) received only Osmolite((R)). Plasma, two skeletal muscles, the liver and the intestine were then removed. Body and tissue weights and tissue protein contents did not differ among the four groups. Intestine histomorphometry showed no significant difference among groups. Jejunal hydrolase activities were significantly affected by the nitrogenous supplementations, but no effect was observed in the ileum. Only limited significant effects were observed on plasma and tissue-free AA concentrations, except for an accumulation of glycine in the plasma and tissues from the LPS-GLY group, compared to other groups. Overall, whereas glycine as a nitrogenous control should be used with care, either alanine or casein may be used as the "placebo," with the choice depending on the study to be performed. PMID:10498760

  20. Alanine scan of core positions in ubiquitin reveals links between dynamics, stability, and function.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shirley Y; Pullen, Lester; Virgil, Daniel J; Castañeda, Carlos A; Abeykoon, Dulith; Bolon, Daniel N A; Fushman, David

    2014-04-01

    Mutations at solvent-inaccessible core positions in proteins can impact function through many biophysical mechanisms including alterations to thermodynamic stability and protein dynamics. As these properties of proteins are difficult to investigate, the impacts of core mutations on protein function are poorly understood for most systems. Here, we determined the effects of alanine mutations at all 15 core positions in ubiquitin on function in yeast. The majority (13 of 15) of alanine substitutions supported yeast growth as the sole ubiquitin. Both the two null mutants (I30A and L43A) were less stable to temperature-induced unfolding in vitro than wild type (WT) but were well folded at physiological temperatures. Heteronuclear NMR studies indicated that the L43A mutation reduces temperature stability while retaining a ground-state structure similar to WT. This structure enables L43A to bind to common ubiquitin receptors in vitro. Many of the core alanine ubiquitin mutants, including one of the null variants (I30A), exhibited an increased accumulation of high-molecular-weight species, suggesting that these mutants caused a defect in the processing of ubiquitin-substrate conjugates. In contrast, L43A exhibited a unique accumulation pattern with reduced levels of high-molecular-weight species and undetectable levels of free ubiquitin. When conjugation to other proteins was blocked, L43A ubiquitin accumulated as free ubiquitin in yeast. Based on these findings, we speculate that ubiquitin's stability to unfolding may be required for efficient recycling during proteasome-mediated substrate degradation. PMID:24361330

  1. Structural and biochemical analyses of alanine racemase from the multidrug-resistant Clostridium difficile strain 630

    PubMed Central

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.; Nelson, Sarah K.; Mootien, Sara; Lee, Yashang; Rezende, Wanderson C.; Hyman, Daniel A.; Matsumoto, Monica M.; Reiling, Scott; Kelleher, Alan; Ledizet, Michel; Koski, Raymond A.; Anthony, Karen G.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile, a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium, is the leading cause of infectious diarrhea among hospitalized patients. C. difficile is frequently associated with antibiotic treatment, and causes diseases ranging from antibiotic-associated diarrhea to life-threatening pseudo­membranous colitis. The severity of C. difficile infections is exacerbated by the emergence of hypervirulent and multidrug-resistant strains, which are difficult to treat and are often associated with increased mortality rates. Alanine racemase (Alr) is a pyridoxal-5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the reversible racemization of l- and d-alanine. Since d-alanine is an essential component of the bacterial cell-wall peptidoglycan, and there are no known Alr homologs in humans, this enzyme is being tested as an antibiotic target. Cycloserine is an antibiotic that inhibits Alr. In this study, the catalytic properties and crystal structures of recombinant Alr from the virulent and multidrug-resistant C. difficile strain 630 are presented. Three crystal structures of C. difficile Alr (CdAlr), corresponding to the complex with PLP, the complex with cycloserine and a K271T mutant form of the enzyme with bound PLP, are presented. The structures are prototypical Alr homodimers with two active sites in which the cofactor PLP and cycloserine are localized. Kinetic analyses reveal that the K271T mutant CdAlr has the highest catalytic constants reported to date for any Alr. Additional studies are needed to identify the basis for the high catalytic activity. The structural and activity data presented are first steps towards using CdAlr for the development of structure-based therapeutics for C. difficile infections. PMID:25004969

  2. Aspartate Aminotransferase (AST/GOT) and Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT/GPT) Detection Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xing-Jiu; Choi, Yang-Kyu; Im, Hyung-Soon; Yarimaga, Oktay; Yoon, Euisik; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2006-01-01

    The levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST/GOT) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT/GPT) in serum can help people diagnose body tissues especially the heart and the liver are injured or not. This article provides a comprehensive review of research activities that concentrate on AST/GOT and ALT/GPT detection techniques due to their clinical importance. The detection techniques include colorimetric, spectrophotometric, chemiluminescence, chromatography, fluorescence and UV absorbance, radiochemical, and electrochemical techniques. We devote the most attention on experimental principle. In some methods a few representative devices and important conclusions are presented.

  3. GMXPBSA 2.1: A GROMACS tool to perform MM/PBSA and computational alanine scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paissoni, C.; Spiliotopoulos, D.; Musco, G.; Spitaleri, A.

    2015-01-01

    GMXPBSA 2.1 is a user-friendly suite of Bash/Perl scripts for streamlining MM/PBSA calculations on structural ensembles derived from GROMACS trajectories, to automatically calculate binding free energies for protein-protein or ligand-protein complexes [R.T. Bradshaw et al., Protein Eng. Des. Sel. 24 (2011) 197-207]. GMXPBSA 2.1 is flexible and can easily be customized to specific needs and it is an improvement of the previous GMXPBSA 2.0 [C. Paissoni et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. (2014), 185, 2920-2929]. Additionally, it performs computational alanine scanning (CAS) to study the effects of ligand and/or receptor alanine mutations on the free energy of binding. Calculations require only for protein-protein or protein-ligand MD simulations. GMXPBSA 2.1 performs different comparative analyses, including a posteriori generation of alanine mutants of the wild-type complex, calculation of the binding free energy values of the mutant complexes and comparison of the results with the wild-type system. Moreover, it compares the binding free energy of different complex trajectories, allowing the study of the effects of non-alanine mutations, post-translational modifications or unnatural amino acids on the binding free energy of the system under investigation. Finally, it can calculate and rank relative affinity to the same receptor utilizing MD simulations of proteins in complex with different ligands. In order to dissect the different MM/PBSA energy contributions, including molecular mechanic (MM), electrostatic contribution to solvation (PB) and nonpolar contribution to solvation (SA), the tool combines two freely available programs: the MD simulations software GROMACS [S. Pronk et al., Bioinformatics 29 (2013) 845-854] and the Poisson-Boltzmann equation solver APBS [N.A. Baker et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A 98 (2001) 10037-10041]. All the calculations can be performed in single or distributed automatic fashion on a cluster facility in order to increase the

  4. Functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with uracil, guanine, thymine and L-alanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silambarasan, D.; Iyakutti, K.; Vasu, V.

    2014-06-01

    Experimental investigation of functionalization of oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (OSWCNTs) with three nucleic acid bases such as uracil, guanine, thymine and one amino acid, L-alanine is carried out. Initially, the SWCNTs are oxidized by acid treatment. Further, the oxidized SWCNTs are effectively functionalized with aforementioned biological compounds by ultrasonication. The diameter of OSWCNTs has increased after the adsorption of biological compounds. The cumulative Π-Π stacking, hydrogen bond and polar interaction are the key factors to realize the adsorption. The amount of adsorption of each biological compound is estimated. The adsorption of guanine is more among all the four biological compounds.

  5. Is there an influence of the surrounding material on the response of the alanine dosimetry system?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anton, Mathias; Kapsch, Ralf-Peter; Hackel, Thomas

    2009-04-01

    In a combined experimental and Monte Carlo study the possible influence of the surrounding material on the response of the alanine dosimetry system was investigated. The aim of this work was to estimate the uncertainties induced by the surroundings with respect to quality assurance measurements for radiotherapy, for example in humanoid phantoms. Six different materials were tested. The electron density range covered comprises the range present in human tissue. No significant influence of the surrounding material could be found for irradiations in the 60Co reference field of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB).

  6. (L)-(Trimethylsilyl)alanine synthesis exploiting hydroxypinanone-induced diastereoselective alkylation.

    PubMed

    René, A; Vanthuyne, N; Martinez, J; Cavelier, F

    2013-08-01

    A new and efficient synthesis of (L)-(trimethylsilyl)alanine (TMSAla) with suitable protection for use in Solid Phase Peptide Synthesis (SPPS) has been accomplished starting from glycine tert-butyl ester and using hydroxypinanone as chiral inductor. The silylated side chain was introduced by alkylation of the Schiff base intermediate with iodomethyl(trimethylsilane) at -78 °C. Among the different synthetic routes that were tested including several chiral inductors and different Schiff bases, this strategy was selected and afforded (L)-TMSAla in good chemical overall yield with 98 % ee. PMID:23620077

  7. Biosynthesis of d-Alanyl-Lipoteichoic Acid: Characterization of Ester-Linked d-Alanine in the In Vitro-Synthesized Product

    PubMed Central

    Childs, Warren C.; Neuhaus, Francis C.

    1980-01-01

    d-Alanyl-lipoteichoic acid (d-alanyl-LTA) contains d-alanine ester residues which control the ability of this polyer to chelate Mg2+. In Lactobacillus casei a two-step in vitro reaction sequence catalyzed by the d-alanine-activating enzyme and d-alanine:membrane acceptor ligase incorporates d-alanine into membrane acceptor. In this paper we provide additional evidence that the in vitro system catalyzes the covalent incorporation of d-[14C]alanine into membrane acceptor which is the poly([3H]glycerol phosphate) moiety of d-alanyl-LTA. This conclusion was supported by the observation that the d-[14C]alanine and [3H]glycerol labels of the partially purified product were co-precipitated by antiserum containing globulins specific for poly(glycerol phosphate). The isolation of d-[14C]alanyl-[3H]glycerol from d-[14C]alanine·[3H]glycerol-labeled d-alanyl-LTA synthesized in the in vitro system indicated that the d-alanine was linked to the poly(glycerol phosphate) chain of the LTA. A comparison of the reactivities of the d-alanine residues of d-alanyl-glycerol and d-alanyl-LTA supported the conclusion that the incorporated residue of d-alanine was attached by an ester linkage. Thus, the data indicated that the in vitro system catalyzes the incorporation of d-alanine covalently linked by ester linkages to the glycerol moieties of the poly(glycerol phosphate) chains of d-alanyl-LTA. New procedures are presented for the partial purification of d-alanyl-LTA with a high yield of ester-linked d-alanine and for the sequential degradation of the poly(glycerol phosphate) moiety substituted with d-alanine of d-alanyl-LTA with phosphodiesterase II/phosphatase from Aspergillus niger. PMID:6772629

  8. Complete analyticity for 2D Ising completed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schonmann, Roberto H.; Shlosman, Senya B.

    1995-06-01

    We study the behavior of the two-dimensional nearest neighbor ferromagnetic Ising model under an external magnetic field h. We extend to every subcritical value of the temperature a result previously proven by Martirosyan at low enough temperature, and which roughly states that for finite systems with — boundary conditions under a positive external field, the boundary effect dominates in the bulk if the linear size of the system is of order B/h with B small enough, while if B is large enough, then the external field dominates in the bulk. As a consequence we are able to complete the proof that “complete analyticity for nice sets” holds for every value of the temperature and external field in the interior of the uniqueness region in the phase diagram of the model. The main tools used are the results and techniques developed to study large deviations for the block magnetization in the absence of the magnetic field, and recently extended to all temperatures below the critical one by Ioffe.

  9. Verification of the pure alanine in PMMA tube dosimeter applicability for dosimetry of radiotherapy photon beams: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Al-Karmi, Anan M; Ayaz, Ali Asghar H; Al-Enezi, Mamdouh S; Abdel-Rahman, Wamied; Dwaikat, Nidal

    2015-09-01

    Alanine dosimeters in the form of pure alanine powder in PMMA plastic tubes were investigated for dosimetry in a clinical application. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to measure absorbed radiation doses by detection of signals from radicals generated in irradiated alanine. The measurements were performed for low-dose ranges typical for single-fraction doses often used in external photon beam radiotherapy. First, the dosimeters were irradiated in a solid water phantom to establish calibration curves in the dose range from 0.3 to 3 Gy for 6 and 18 MV X-ray beams from a clinical linear accelerator. Next, the dosimeters were placed at various locations in an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom to measure the dose delivery of a conventional four-field box technique treatment plan to the pelvis. Finally, the doses measured with alanine dosimeters were compared against the doses calculated with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS). The results showed that the alanine dosimeters have a highly sensitive dose response with good linearity and no energy dependence in the dose range and photon beams used in this work. Also, a fairly good agreement was found between the in-phantom dose measurements with alanine dosimeters and the TPS dose calculations. The mean value of the ratios of measured to calculated dose values was found to be near unity. The measured points in the in-field region passed dose-difference acceptance criterion of 3% and those in the penumbral region passed distance-to-agreement acceptance criterion of 3 mm. These findings suggest that the pure alanine powder in PMMA tube dosimeter is a suitable option for dosimetry of radiotherapy photon beams. PMID:26138456

  10. Latino College Completion: Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  11. Latino College Completion: Washington

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  12. Latino College Completion: Wisconsin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  13. Latino College Completion: Wyoming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  14. Latino College Completion: Utah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  15. Latino College Completion: Massachusetts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  16. Latino College Completion: Kansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  17. Latino College Completion: Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  18. Latino College Completion: Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  19. Latino College Completion: Arizona

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  20. Latino College Completion: Michigan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  1. Latino College Completion: Illinois

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  2. Latino College Completion: Minnesota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  3. Latino College Completion: Maine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  4. Latino College Completion: Connecticut

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  5. Latino College Completion: Indiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  6. Latino College Completion: Maryland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  7. Latino College Completion: Arkansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  8. Latino College Completion: Delaware

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  9. Latino College Completion: Alaska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  10. Latino College Completion: Kentucky

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  11. Latino College Completion: Mississippi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  12. Latino College Completion: Nevada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  13. Latino College Completion: California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  14. Latino College Completion: Missouri

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  15. Latino College Completion: Nebraska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  16. Latino College Completion: Vermont

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  17. Latino College Completion: Montana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  18. Latino College Completion: Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  19. Latino College Completion: Oregon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  20. Latino College Completion: Louisiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  1. Latino College Completion: Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  2. Latino College Completion: Hawaii

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  3. Latino College Completion: Idaho

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  4. Latino College Completion: Iowa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  5. Latino College Completion: Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  6. Latino College Completion: Pennsylvania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  7. Latino College Completion: Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  8. Latino College Completion: Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  9. Latino College Completion: Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  10. Classical versus quantum completeness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Stefan; Schneider, Marc

    2015-06-01

    The notion of quantum-mechanical completeness is adapted to situations where the only adequate description is in terms of quantum field theory in curved space-times. It is then shown that Schwarzschild black holes, although geodesically incomplete, are quantum complete.

  11. Improving production of malonyl coenzyme A-derived metabolites by abolishing Snf1-dependent regulation of Acc1.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shuobo; Chen, Yun; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) carboxylase (ACCase) plays a central role in carbon metabolism and has been the site of action for the development of therapeutics or herbicides, as its product, malonyl-CoA, is a precursor for production of fatty acids and other compounds. Control of Acc1 activity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae occurs mainly at two levels, i.e., regulation of transcription and repression by Snf1 protein kinase at the protein level. Here, we demonstrate a strategy for improving the activity of ACCase in S. cerevisiae by abolishing posttranslational regulation of Acc1 via site-directed mutagenesis. It was found that introduction of two site mutations in Acc1, Ser659 and Ser1157, resulted in an enhanced activity of Acc1 and increased total fatty acid content. As Snf1 regulation of Acc1 is particularly active under glucose-limited conditions, we evaluated the effect of the two site mutations in chemostat cultures. Finally, we showed that our modifications of Acc1 could enhance the supply of malonyl-CoA and therefore successfully increase the production of two industrially important products derived from malonyl-CoA, fatty acid ethyl esters and 3-hydroxypropionic acid. IMPORTANCE ACCase is responsible for carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to produce malonyl-CoA, which is a crucial step in the control of fatty acid metabolism. ACCase opened the door for pharmaceutical treatments of obesity and diabetes as well as the development of new herbicides. ACCase is also recognized as a promising target for developing cell factories, as its malonyl-CoA product serves as a universal precursor for a variety of high-value compounds in white biotechnology. Yeast ACCase is a good model in understanding the enzyme's catalysis, regulation, and inhibition. The present study describes the importance of protein phosphorylation in regulation of yeast ACCase and identifies potential regulation sites. This study led to the generation of a more efficient ACCase, which

  12. Disposition and metabolism of 2-fluoro-beta-alanine conjugates of bile acids following secretion into bile.

    PubMed

    Zhang, R W; Barnes, S; Diasio, R B

    1991-04-15

    Since 2-fluoro-beta-alanine (FBAL) conjugates of bile acids (BA), the primary biliary metabolites of fluoropyrimidine (FP) drugs, have been suggested to be related to the hepatotoxicity which develops in patients receiving FP chemotherapy by intrahepatic arterial infusion (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84, 5439-5443, 1987), it was important to determine whether they undergo enterohepatic circulation and hence accumulate in the liver and biliary system. In initial studies, sensitivity of FBAL-BA conjugates to hydrolysis by pancreatic enzymes was examined. In subsequent in vivo studies, a model FBAL-BA conjugate, FBAL-chenodeoxycholate (FBAL-CDC), was introduced into the lumen of the small intestine of anesthetized rats with biliary fistulas to quantitate the intestinal absorption, metabolism and tissue distribution of the conjugate. The results indicated that: (1) FBAL-BA conjugates were resistant to hydrolysis by pancreatic enzymes (carboxypeptidase A, carboxypeptidase B and trypsin) and by human pancreatic juice, but were completely hydrolyzed by cholyglycine hydrolase. (2) At least one-half of the administered FBAL-CDC was deconjugated during the process of intestinal absorption, as shown by HPLC analysis of the radioactivity in portal venous blood. (3) Deconjugated FBAL or CDC was reconjugated in liver with other bile acids or amino acids (glycine and taurine), respectively, as shown by radiochromatography of bile. (4) FBAL, formed as a result of hydrolysis of FBAL-CDC, had a wide tissue distribution. In conclusion, FBAL-CDC has a rapid turnover during its enterohepatic circulation due to deconjugation in the intestine and reconjugation in the liver. PMID:1902118

  13. Synthesis of a molecularly imprinted sorbent for selective solid-phase extraction of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine.

    PubMed

    Svoboda, Pavel; Combes, Audrey; Petit, Julia; Nováková, Lucie; Pichon, Valérie

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the work was to synthesize a molecularly imprinted material for the selective solid-phase extraction (SPE) of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-2-amino-3-methylpropionic acid; BMAA) from cyanobacterial extracts. BMAA and its structural analogs that can be used as template are small, polar and hydrophilic molecules. These molecules are poorly soluble in organic solvents that are commonly used for the synthesis of acrylic-based polymers. Therefore, a sol gel approach was chosen to carry out the synthesis and the resulting sorbents were evaluated with different extraction procedures in order to determine their ability to selectively retain BMAA. The presence of imprinted cavities in the sorbent was demonstrated by comparing elution profiles obtained by using molecularly imprinted silica (MIS) and non-imprinted silica (NIS) as a control. The molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction (MISPE) procedure was first developed in a pure medium (acetonitrile) and further optimized for the treatment of cyanobacterial samples. It was characterized by high elution recoveries (89% and 77% respectively in pure and in real media).The repeatability of the extraction procedure in pure medium, in real medium and the reproducibility of MIS synthesis all expressed as RSD values of extraction recovery of BMAA were equal to 3%, 12% and 5%, respectively. A MIS capacity of 0.34 µmol/g was measured. The matrix effects, which affected the quantification of BMAA when employing a mixed mode sorbent, were completely removed by adding a clean-up step of the mixed-mode sorbent extract on the MIS. PMID:26452922

  14. Effects of 28-Day Beta-Alanine Supplementation on Isokinetic Exercise Performance and Body Composition in Female Masters Athletes.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Jordan M; Gray, Michelle; Stewart, Rodger W; Moyen, Nicole E; Kavouras, Stavros A; DiBrezzo, Ro; Turner, Ronna; Baum, Jamie I; Stone, Matthew S

    2016-01-01

    Beta-alanine (BA) supplementation increases exercise performance due to increases in the intramuscular lactate buffer, carnosine. Females are more sensitive to these increases and results are further pronounced in trained individuals. Baseline intramuscular carnosine levels also naturally decrease with age; therefore, trained older females may experience augmented benefits from BA supplementation. However, the ability of BA to increase lower-body isokinetic strength (ISO) in female masters athletes (MA) is unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the longitudinal effects of BA supplementation on ISO, handgrip strength (HG), and body composition in female MA cyclists. Twenty-two subjects participated in this double-blind randomized study. Subjects were randomized into 2 groups (placebo [PLA] = 8 g dextrose; BA = 800 mg + 8 g dextrose) and supplemented 4 times per day for 28 days. ISO, HG, and body composition were evaluated at baseline and at the same day/time each week over the 28-day intervention. No differences existed between groups at baseline or at the 7, 14, and 21 days time points for any variables (p > 0.05). When evaluating ISO (isokinetic) after 28 days, total work performed during the final third of the assessment (24.0 vs. -16.8% change) in flexion and average peak torque (5.4 vs. 2.9% change) in extension were significantly increased from baseline in BA compared with PLA (p ≤ 0.05). No differences existed for HG or body composition after supplementation. Twenty-eight days of BA supplementation increased peak torque and work completed, indicating BA improves lower-body exercise performance in female MA. PMID:26110349

  15. Alanine aminotransferase as a predictor of adverse perinatal outcomes in women with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ekiz, Ali; Kaya, Basak; Avci, Muhittin Eftal; Polat, Ibrahim; Dikmen, Selin; Yildirim, Gokhan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the associations between adverse perinatal outcomes and serum transaminase levels at the time of diagnosis in patients with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of patients hospitalized for evaluation of intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy from January 2013 to June 2014 in a tertiary center. Seventy-one patients were divided into two groups according to the presence (Group I) or absence of adverse perinatal outcomes (Group II). Results: The mean aminotransferase levels and conjugated bilirubin levels at the time of diagnosis were significantly higher in Group I than in Group II. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that the alanine aminotransferase level could predict adverse perinatal outcomes with 76.47% sensitivity and 78.38% specificity, and the cut-off value was 95 IU/L. Among patients with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, those with adverse perinatal outcomes were significantly older, had an earlier diagnosis, and had higher alanine aminotransferase levels. Using the 95-IU/L cut-off value, patients with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy had a 3.54-fold increased risk for adverse perinatal outcomes. Conclusions: Patients with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy and high alanineaminotransferase levels should be followed up for possible adverse perinatal outcomes.

  16. A single glycine-alanine exchange directs ligand specificity of the elephant progestin receptor.

    PubMed

    Wierer, Michael; Schrey, Anna K; Kühne, Ronald; Ulbrich, Susanne E; Meyer, Heinrich H D

    2012-01-01

    The primary gestagen of elephants is 5α-dihydroprogesterone (DHP), which is unlike all other mammals studied until now. The level of DHP in elephants equals that of progesterone in other mammals, and elephants are able to bind DHP with similar affinity to progesterone indicating a unique ligand-binding specificity of the elephant progestin receptor (PR). Using site-directed mutagenesis in combination with in vitro binding studies we here report that this change in specificity is due to a single glycine to alanine exchange at position 722 (G722A) of PR, which specifically increases DHP affinity while not affecting binding of progesterone. By conducting molecular dynamics simulations comparing human and elephant PR ligand-binding domains (LBD), we observed that the alanine methyl group at position 722 is able to push the DHP A-ring into a position similar to progesterone. In the human PR, the DHP A-ring position is twisted towards helix 3 of PR thereby disturbing the hydrogen bond pattern around the C3-keto group, resulting in a lower binding affinity. Furthermore, we observed that the elephant PR ligand-binding pocket is more rigid than the human analogue, which probably explains the higher affinity towards both progesterone and DHP. Interestingly, the G722A substitution is not elephant-specific, rather it is also present in five independent lineages of mammalian evolution, suggesting a special role of the substitution for the development of distinct mammalian gestagen systems. PMID:23209719

  17. A novel N(alpha)-acetyl alanine aminopeptidase from Allomyces arbuscula.

    PubMed

    Beti, Raniera; Cattaneo, Arlette; Gabriel, Jean Marc; Ojha, Mukti

    2002-04-01

    An N(alpha)-acetyl alanine aminopeptidase has been purified from the aquatic fungus Allomyces arbuscula. The apparent molecular mass of the enzyme was estimated to be 280 kDa by gel filtration through calibrated Sephacryl S300 column. In SDS-PAGE, the purified enzyme appeared as a single band of M(r) 80 kDa. Catalytic activity of the enzyme was inhibited by specific serine protease inhibitors, 3,4-DCI and APMSF, as well as SH reacting compounds, HgCl(2) and iodoacetate, indicating that the enzyme is a serine protease with some functional SH group(s) involved in the catalytic reaction. 3H-DFP was used to label the reactive serine of the enzyme. When the labeled protein was analyzed in SDS-PAGE, most of the label appeared in the M(r) 80 kDa band, however, a few additional faster migrating minor bands were also seen, probably representing a minor degradation product of the enzyme. The enzyme cleaved mainly N(alpha)-acetlylated alanine, although a small but negligible activity was also obtained with acetylated leucine and phenylalanine. The role of the enzyme in N-end rule proteolysis is discussed. PMID:12106909

  18. In vivo dose evaluation during gynaecological radiotherapy using L-alanine/ESR dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Rech, Amanda Burg; Barbi, Gustavo Lazzaro; Ventura, Luiz Henrique Almeida; Guimarães, Flavio Silva; Oliveira, Harley Francisco; Baffa, Oswaldo

    2014-06-01

    The dose delivered by in vivo 3-D external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) was verified with L-alanine/electron spin resonance (ESR) dosimetry for patients diagnosed with gynaecological cancer. Measurements were performed with an X-band ESR spectrometer. Dosemeters were positioned inside the vaginal cavity with the assistance of an apparatus specially designed for this study. Previous phantom studies were performed using the same conditions as in the in vivo treatment. Four patients participated in this study during 20-irradiation sessions, giving 220 dosemeters to be analysed. The doses were determined with the treatment planning system, providing dose confirmation. The phantom study resulted in a deviation between -2.5 and 2.1 %, and for the in vivo study a deviation between -9.2 and 14.2 % was observed. In all cases, the use of alanine with ESR was effective for dose assessment, yielding results consistent with the values set forth in the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) reports. PMID:24751984

  19. Rapid Crystallization of L-Alanine on Engineered Surfaces using Metal-Assisted and Microwave-Accelerated Evaporative Crystallization.

    PubMed

    Alabanza, Anginelle M; Pozharski, Edwin; Aslan, Kadir

    2012-01-01

    This study demonstrates the application of metal-assisted and microwave-accelerated evaporative crystallization (MA-MAEC) technique to rapid crystallization of L-alanine on surface engineered silver nanostructures. In this regard, silver island films (SIFs) were modified with hexamethylenediamine (HMA), 1-undecanethiol (UDET), and 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUDA), which introduced -NH(2), -CH(3) and -COOH functional groups to SIFs, respectively. L-Alanine was crystallized on these engineered surfaces and blank SIFs at room temperature and using MA-MAEC technique. Significant improvements in crystal size, shape, and quality were observed on HMA-, MUDA- and UDET-modified SIFs at room temperature (crystallization time = 144, 40 and 147 min, respectively) as compared to those crystals grown on blank SIFs. Using the MA-MAEC technique, the crystallization time of L-alanine on engineered surfaces were reduced to 17 sec for microwave power level 10 (i.e., duty cycle 100%) and 7 min for microwave power level 1 (duty cycle 10%). Raman spectroscopy and powder x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements showed that L-Alanine crystals grown on engineered surfaces using MA-MAEC technique had identical characteristic peaks of L-alanine crystals grown using traditional evaporative crystallization. PMID:22267957

  20. Monopeptide versus Monopeptoid: Insights on Structure and Hydration of Aqueous Alanine and Sarcosine via X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Uejio, Janel S.; Schwartz, Craig P.; Duffin, Andrew M.; England, Alice; Prendergast, David; Saykally, Richard J.

    2009-11-19

    Despite the obvious significance, the aqueous interactions of peptides remain incompletely understood. Their synthetic analogues called peptoids (poly-N-substituted glycines), have recently emerged as a promising biomimetic material, particularly due to their robust secondary structure and resistance to denaturation. We describe comparative near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy studies of aqueous sarcosine, the simplest peptoid, and alanine, its peptide isomer, interpreted by density functional theory calculations. The sarcosine nitrogen K-edge spectrum is blue-shifted with respect to that of alanine, in agreement with our calculations; we conclude that this shift results primarily from the methyl group substitution on the nitrogen of sarcosine. Our calculations indicate that the nitrogen K-edge spectrum of alanine differs significantly between dehydrated and hydrated scenarios, while that of the sarcosine zwitterion is less affected by hydration. In contrast, the computed sarcosine spectrum is greatly impacted by conformational variations, while the alanine spectrum is not. This relates to a predicted solvent dependence for alanine, as compared to sarcosine. Additionally, we show the theoretical nitrogen K-edge spectra to be sensitive to the degree of hydration, indicating that experimental X-ray spectroscopy may be able to distinguish between bulk and partial hydration, such as found in confined environments near proteins and in reverse micelles.

  1. Ultraviolet radiation induces stress in etiolated Landoltia punctata, as evidenced by the presence of alanine, a universal stress signal: a ¹⁵N NMR study.

    PubMed

    Monselise, E B-I; Levkovitz, A; Kost, D

    2015-01-01

    Analysis with (15) N NMR revealed that alanine, a universal cellular stress signal, accumulates in etiolated duckweed plants exposed to 15-min pulsed UV light, but not in the absence of UV irradiation. The addition of 10 mm vitamin C, a radical scavenger, reduced alanine levels to zero, indicating the involvement of free radicals. Free D-alanine was detected in (15) N NMR analysis of the chiral amino acid content, using D-tartaric acid as solvent. The accumulation of D-alanine under stress conditions presents a new perspective on the biochemical processes taking place in prokaryote and eukaryote cells. PMID:24889211

  2. Contribution of proteolysis and de novo synthesis to alanine production in diabetic rat skeletal muscle: a 15N/1H nuclear magnetic resonance study.

    PubMed

    Meynial-Denis, D; Chavaroux, A; Foucat, L; Mignon, M; Prugnaud, J; Bayle, G; Renou, J P; Arnal, M

    1997-10-01

    To assess the role of leucine as a precursor of alanine alpha-amino nitrogen in skeletal muscle during diabetes, extensor digitorum longus muscles from control (n = 7 experiments) and streptozotocin-diabetic rats (n = 8 experiments) were isolated and superfused with [15N]leucine (3 mmol/l) in the presence of glucose (10 mmol/l) for 2 h. Muscle perchloric acid extraction was performed at the end of superfusion in order to quantify newly synthesized alanine by 15N/1H nuclear magnetic resonance. Release of [15N]alanine in the superfusion medium was also measured. The pool of newly synthesized [15N]alanine was significantly increased (approximately 40%) in extensor digitorum longus muscles from streptozotocin-diabetic rats. Whereas a significant enhancement of total alanine release from muscle was induced by diabetes (20%), only a slight increase in [15N]alanine release was detectable under our experimental conditions. Consequently, we conclude that streptozotocin-diabetes in growing rats induces in skeletal muscle: 1) an increase in nitrogen exchange between leucine and alanine leading to newly synthesized [15N]alanine; and 2) an increase of total alanine release from muscle originating from both proteolysis and de novo synthesis. PMID:9349596

  3. Comparative Physiological Evidence that β-Alanine Betaine and Choline-O-Sulfate Act as Compatible Osmolytes in Halophytic Limonium Species 1

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Andrew D.; Rathinasabapathi, Bala; Chamberlin, Beverly; Gage, Douglas A.

    1991-01-01

    The quaternary ammonium compounds accumulated in saline conditions by five salt-tolerant species of Limonium (Plumbaginaceae) were analyzed by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. Three species accumulated β-alanine betaine and choline-O-sulfate; the others accumulated glycine betaine and choline-O-sulfate. Three lines of evidence indicated that β-alanine betaine and choline-O-sulfate replace glycine betaine as osmo-regulatory solutes. First, tests with bacteria showed that β-alanine betaine and choline-O-sulfate have osmoprotective properties comparable to glycine betaine. Second, when β-alanine betaine and glycine betaine accumulators were salinized, the levels of their respective betaines, plus that of choline-O-sulfate, were closely correlated with leaf solute potential. Third, substitution of sulfate for chloride salinity caused an increase in the level of choline-O-sulfate and a matching decrease in glycine betaine level. Experiments with 14C-labeled precursors established that β-alanine betaine accumulators did not synthesize glycine betaine and vice versa. These experiments also showed that β-alanine betaine synthesis occurs in roots as well as leaves of β-alanine betaine accumulators and that choline-O-sulfate and glycine betaine share choline as a precursor. Unlike glycine betaine, β-alanine betaine synthesis cannot interfere with conjugation of sulfate to choline by competing for choline and does not require oxygen. These features of β-alanine betaine may be advantageous in sulfate-rich salt marsh environments. PMID:16668509

  4. Crystal growth, structure and characterizations of a new semiorganic nonlinear optical material-{beta}-Alanine zinc chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Anbuchezhiyan, M.; Ponnusamy, S.; Muthamizhchelvan, C.; Sivakumar, K.

    2010-08-15

    The title compound, {beta}-alanine zinc chloride-a new semiorganic nonlinear optical crystal was grown by slow evaporation technique. Single crystals of {beta}-alanine zinc chloride have been subjected to X-ray diffraction analysis to determine the crystal structure. The powder X-ray diffractogram of the crystal has also been recorded. The amount of carbon, nitrogen and hydrogen in the crystals was also estimated. Fourier Transform Infrared and Raman spectral measurements have been carried out on the grown crystals in order to identify the functional groups. The presence of hydrogen and carbon in the {beta}-alanine zinc chloride was confirmed by using proton and carbon nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analyses. The percentage of zinc in the crystal was determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Optical behavior such as ultraviolet-vis-near infrared transmittance spectrum and second harmonic generation has been investigated. The mechanical strength and thermal behavior of the grown crystal have been analyzed.

  5. Amino acid residues in the GerAB protein important in the function and assembly of the alanine spore germination receptor of Bacillus subtilis 168.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Gareth R; Moir, Anne

    2011-05-01

    The paradigm gerA operon is required for endospore germination in response to c-alanine as the sole germinant, and the three protein products, GerAA, GerAB, and GerAC are predicted to form a receptor complex in the spore inner membrane. GerAB shows homology to the amino acid-polyamine-organocation (APC) family of single-component transporters and is predicted to be an integral membrane protein with 10 membrane-spanning helices. Site-directed mutations were introduced into the gerAB gene at its natural location on the chromosome. Alterations to some charged or potential helix-breaking residues within membrane spans affected receptor function dramatically. In some cases, this is likely to reflect the complete loss of the GerA receptor complex, as judged by the absence of the germinant receptor protein GerAC, which suggests that the altered GerAB protein itself may be unstable or that the altered structure destabilizes the complex. Mutants that have a null phenotype for Instituto de Biotecnología de León, INBIOTEC, Parque Científico de León, Av. Real, 1, 24006 León, Spain-alanine germination but retain GerAC protein at near-normal levels are more likely to define amino acid residues of functional, rather than structural, importance. Single-amino-acid substitutions in each of the GerAB and GerAA proteins can prevent incorporation of GerAC protein into the spore; this provides strong evidence that the proteins within a specific receptor interact and that these interactions are required for receptor assembly. The lipoprotein nature of the GerAC receptor subunit is also important; an amino acid change in the prelipoprotein signal sequence in the gerAC1 mutant results in the absence of GerAC protein from the spore. PMID:21378181

  6. Native and non-native structure in a protein-folding intermediate: spectroscopic studies of partially reduced IGF-I and an engineered alanine model.

    PubMed

    Hua, Q X; Narhi, L; Jia, W; Arakawa, T; Rosenfeld, R; Hawkins, N; Miller, J A; Weiss, M A

    1996-06-01

    The structure of a metastable folding intermediate of human insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and an engineered model are investigated by circular dichroism and two-dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy. The intermediate, which contains two of three native disulfide bonds, was trapped by acid quenching and isolated by reverse-phase HPLC. The reduced cysteine residues were mapped to residues 47 and 52 (corresponding to A6-A11 in insulin). In the native state this disulfide bridge anchors an adjoining amphipathic alpha-helix (helix 2; residues 42 to 49) against the hydrophobic core. Comparison of CD and 1H-NMR spectra demonstrates that the acid-quenched intermediate is partially folded and contains elements of native secondary and tertiary structure. Spectra are similar to those of an equilibrium model in which the reduced cysteine residues are replaced by alanine. Complete 1H-NMR sequential assignment of the alanine model has been obtained and demonstrates that removal of the disulfide bond is associated with local unfolding of the adjoining alpha-helix. Native secondary structure (including helices 1 and 3) is otherwise retained and defines a folded subdomain. Long-range nuclear Overhauser effects (NOE) within this subdomain are similar to those of native IGF-I; no non-native NOE is observed. Our results support the hypothesis that folding of the insulin motif is directed by a subset of native structural elements and that these elements form at an early step in the pathway. Formation of helix 2, despite its prominence in the native state, is likely to represent a late step. Hydrophobic collapse of this segment appears to precede helix formation. PMID:8656430

  7. High-temperature Raman study of L-alanine, L-threonine and taurine crystals related to thermal decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaignac, A. L. O.; Lima, R. J. C.; Façanha Filho, P. F.; Moreno, A. J. D.; Freire, P. T. C.

    2016-03-01

    In this work high-temperature Raman spectra are used to compare temperature dependence of the lattice mode wavenumber of L-alanine, L-threonine and taurine crystals. Anharmonic effects observed are associated with intermolecular N-H· · ·O hydrogen bond that plays an important role in thermal decomposition process of these materials. Short and strong hydrogen bonds in L-alanine crystal were associated with anharmonic effects in lattice modes leading to low thermal stability compared to taurine crystals. Connection between thermal decomposition process and anharmonic effects is furnished for the first time.

  8. Growth, Structural And Optical Studies On Bis L-alanine Lithium Chloride (BLALC) Single Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, A. S. J. Lucia; Selvarajan, P.; Perumal, S.

    2011-10-01

    Bis L-alanine Lithium Chloride (BLALC) single crystals were grown successfully by solution method with slow evaporation technique at room temperature. Crystals of size 15 x 9 x 4 mm3 have been obtained in 28 days. The grown crystals were colourless and transparent. Single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) study showed that BLALC belongs to orthorhombic system with a non-centro-symmetric space group P212121. The crystallinity of BLALC crystal was confirmed by the powder X-ray diffraction study and diffraction peaks were indexed. The functional groups of the grown crystals have been identified by FTIR studies. UV-visible transmittance spectrum was recorded to study the optical transparency of BLALC crystal. The nonlinear optical (NLO) property of the grown crystal was confirmed by Kurtz-Perry powder technique.

  9. The influence of various cations on the catalytic properties of clays. [polymerization of alanine adenylate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paecht-Horowitz, M.

    1978-01-01

    The polymerization of alanine adenylate in the presence of the sodium form of various clays was studied, and hectorite was found to cause more polymerization than nontronite and montmorillonite (in that order) although the differences were not great. The effect on polymerization of presaturating montmorillonite with different cations was determined. Hectorite, with increased basicity of the interspatial planes, allows polymerization of lysine, which montmorillonite does not. The general trend is that, for the same amino acid, higher degrees of polymerization are obtained when the cation in the octahedral lattice of the clay is divalent rather than trivalent. With the exchangeable cations the order is reversed, for a reason that is explained. The main role of clays in the polymerization mechanism of amino acids is concentration and neutralization of charges.

  10. Experimental and DFT computational studies of L-alanine cadmium chloride crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatius, I. Cicili; Dheivamalar, S.; Kirubavathi, K.; Selvaraju, K.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we report the combined experimental and theoretical study on molecular structure and vibrational spectra of nonlinear optical crystal L-alanine cadmium chloride (LACC). The single X-ray diffraction studies have revealed that the compound crystallizes in monoclinic system C2 space group with cell parameters a = 16.270, b = 7.358, c = 7.887 and Z = 4. FTIR and Raman spectra of the nonlinear optical materials LACC have been recorded and analyzed. The optimized geometric bond length and bond angles are obtained with the help of density functional theory (DFT) (B3LYP) calculation. The optimized geometric bond lengths and bond angles obtained by using DFT show good agreement with the experimental data. Using the natural bond orbital analysis the electronic effect and hydrogen bonding were confirmed. The HOMO-LUMO energy gap and the first order hyperpolarizability were calculated and it supports the nonlinear optical activity of LACC crystal.

  11. Free energy surfaces from an extended harmonic superposition approach and kinetics for alanine dipeptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strodel, Birgit; Wales, David J.

    2008-12-01

    Approximate free energy surfaces and transition rates are presented for alanine dipeptide for a variety of force fields and implicit solvent models. Our calculations are based upon local minima, transition states and pathways characterised for each potential energy surface using geometry optimisation. The superposition approach employing only local minima and harmonic densities of states provides a representation of low-lying regions of the free energy surfaces. However, including contributions from the transition states of the potential energy surface and selected points obtained from displacements along the corresponding reaction vectors produces surfaces that compare quite well with results from replica exchange molecular dynamics. Characterising the local minima, transition states, normal modes, pathways, rate constants and free energy surfaces for each force field within this framework typically requires between one and five minutes cpu time on a single processor.

  12. Gliotoxicity of the cyanotoxin, β-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA)

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Alexander S.; Gehringer, Michelle M.; Braidy, Nady; Guillemin, Gilles J.; Welch, Jeffrey H.; Neilan, Brett A.

    2013-01-01

    The amino acid variant β-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA) has long been associated with the increased incidence and progression of the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS/PDC). Previous studies have indicated that BMAA damages neurons via excitotoxic mechanisms. We have challenged rat olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) with exogenous BMAA and found it to be cytotoxic. BMAA also induces a significant increase in Ca2+ influx, enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and disrupts mitochondrial activity in OECs. This is the first study investigating BMAA toxicity using pure glial cells. These findings align BMAA with the three proposed mechanisms of degeneration in ALS, those being non-cell autonomous death, excitotoxicity and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:23508043

  13. Linking β-methylamino-L-alanine exposure to sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in Annapolis, MD.

    PubMed

    Field, Nicholas C; Metcalf, James S; Caller, Tracie A; Banack, Sandra A; Cox, Paul A; Stommel, Elijah W

    2013-08-01

    Most amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases occur sporadically. Some environmental triggers have been implicated, including beta-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a cyanobacteria produced neurotoxin. This study aimed to identify environmental risk factors common to three sporadic ALS patients who lived in Annapolis, Maryland, USA and developed the disease within a relatively short time and within close proximity to each other. A questionnaire was used to identify potential risk factors for ALS among the cohort of patients. One common factor among the ALS patients was the frequent consumption of blue crab. Samples of blue crab from the patients' local fish market were tested for BMAA using LC-MS/MS. BMAA was identified in these Chesapeake Bay blue crabs. We conclude that the presence of BMAA in the Chesapeake Bay food web and the lifetime consumption of blue crab contaminated with BMAA may be a common risk factor for sporadic ALS in all three patients. PMID:23660330

  14. The fate of the cyanobacterial toxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine in freshwater mussels.

    PubMed

    Downing, Simoné; Contardo-Jara, Valeska; Pflugmacher, Stephan; Downing, Timothy Grant

    2014-03-01

    The cyanobacterial neurotoxin, β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) has been suggested as a causative agent for certain neurodegenerative diseases. This cyanotoxin bioaccumulates in an array of aquatic organisms, in which it occurs as both a free amino acid and in a protein-associated form. This study was intended to investigate the environmental fate of BMAA by examining the metabolism of isotopically labeled BMAA in four freshwater mussel species. All species showed substantial uptake of BMAA from the culture media. Data showed no significant evidence for BMAA catabolism in any of the animals but did suggest metabolism via the reversible covalent modification of BMAA in freshwater mussels, a process that appears to be variable in different species. PMID:24507126

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray study of alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jinjin; Li, Zhenzhen; He, Guangzheng; Xu, Shujing; Zhao, Baohua; Zhu, Xianming; Dong, Hui; Ju, Jiansong

    2013-01-01

    Alanine dehydrogenase (OF4Ald) from the alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4 was expressed and purified with a His6 tag in a form suitable for X-ray crystallographic analysis. Crystals were grown by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 289 K using a solution consisting of 0.1 M Tris–HCl pH 8.0, 0.2 M LiSO4, 22%(w/v) PEG 3350. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.8 Å resolution. The crystal belonged to the triclinic space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 88.04, b = 105.59, c = 120.53 Å, α = 88.37, β = 78.77, γ = 82.65°. PMID:24192355

  16. Controlled radical polymerization of an acrylamide containing L-alanine moiety via ATRP.

    PubMed

    Rafiee, Zahra

    2016-02-01

    Homopolymerization of an optically active acrylamide having an amino acid moiety in the side chain, N-acryloyl-L-alanine (AAla) was carried out via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) at room temperature using 2-hydroxyethyl-2'-methyl-2'-bromopropionate (HMB) or sodium-4-(bromomethyl)benzoate (SBB) as initiator in pure water, methanol/water mixture and pure methanol solvents. The polymerization reaction resulted in the optically active biocompatible amino acid-based homopolymer in good yield with narrow molecular weight distribution. The number average molecular weight increased with conversion and polydispersity was low. The structure and molecular weight of synthesized polymer were characterized by (1)H NMR, FT-IR spectroscopic techniques and size-exclusion chromatography. PMID:26385362

  17. Alanine-Scanning Mutational Analysis of Durancin GL Reveals Residues Important for Its Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xingrong; Chen, Xinquan; Du, Lihui; Wu, Xueyou; Liu, Fang; Yuan, Jian

    2015-07-22

    Durancin GL is a novel class IIa bacteriocin with 43 residues produced by Enterococcus durans 41D. This bacteriocin demonstrates narrow inhibition spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against several Listeria monocytogenes strains, including nisin-resistant L. monocytogenes NR30. A systematic alanine-scanning mutational analysis with site-directed mutagenesis was performed to analyze durancin GL residues important for antimicrobial activity and specificity. Results showed that three mutations lost their antimicrobial activity, ten mutations demonstrated a decreased effect on the activity, and seven mutations exhibited relatively high activity. With regard to inhibitory spectrum, four mutants demonstrated a narrower antimicrobial spectrum than wild-type durancin GL. Another four mutants displayed a broader target cell spectrum and increased potency relative to wild-type durancin GL. These findings broaden our understanding of durancin GL residues important for its antimicrobial activity and contribute to future rational design of variants with increased potency. PMID:26168032

  18. Evaluation of drug-induced tissue injury by measuring alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity in silkworm hemolymph

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Our previous studies suggest silkworms can be used as model animals instead of mammals in pharmacologic studies to develop novel therapeutic medicines. We examined the usefulness of the silkworm larvae Bombyx mori as an animal model for evaluating tissue injury induced by various cytotoxic drugs. Drugs that induce hepatotoxic effects in mammals were injected into the silkworm hemocoel, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity was measured in the hemolymph 1 day later. Results Injection of CCl4 into the hemocoel led to an increase in ALT activity. The increase in ALT activity was attenuated by pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine. Injection of benzoic acid derivatives, ferric sulfate, sodium valproate, tetracycline, amiodarone hydrochloride, methyldopa, ketoconazole, pemoline (Betanamin), N-nitroso-fenfluramine, and D-galactosamine also increased ALT activity. Conclusions These findings indicate that silkworms are useful for evaluating the effects of chemicals that induce tissue injury in mammals. PMID:23137391

  19. EPR/alanine pellets with low Gd content for neutron dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Marrale, M; Brai, M; Longo, A; Panzeca, S; Carlino, A; Tranchina, L; Tomarchio, E; Parlato, A; Buttafava, A; Dondi, D; Zeffiro, A

    2014-10-01

    This paper reports on results obtained by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements and Monte Carlo (MC) simulation on a blend of alanine added with low content of gadolinium oxide (5 % by weight) to improve the sensitivity to thermal neutron without excessively affecting tissue equivalence. The sensitivity is enhanced by this doping procedure of more an order of magnitude. The results are compared with those obtained with the addition of boric acid (50 % by weight) where boron is in its natural isotopic composition in order to produce low-cost EPR dosemeters. The gadolinium addition influences neutron sensitivity more than the boron addition. The presence of additives does not substantially change the fading of the EPR signal induced by neutrons. The MC simulations agree the experimental results in case of gadolinium addition. PMID:24262924

  20. Gliotoxicity of the cyanotoxin, β-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA).

    PubMed

    Chiu, Alexander S; Gehringer, Michelle M; Braidy, Nady; Guillemin, Gilles J; Welch, Jeffrey H; Neilan, Brett A

    2013-01-01

    The amino acid variant β-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA) has long been associated with the increased incidence and progression of the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS/PDC). Previous studies have indicated that BMAA damages neurons via excitotoxic mechanisms. We have challenged rat olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) with exogenous BMAA and found it to be cytotoxic. BMAA also induces a significant increase in Ca2+ influx, enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and disrupts mitochondrial activity in OECs. This is the first study investigating BMAA toxicity using pure glial cells. These findings align BMAA with the three proposed mechanisms of degeneration in ALS, those being non-cell autonomous death, excitotoxicity and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:23508043

  1. Terahertz and far infrared spectroscopy of alanine-rich peptides having variable ellipticity.

    PubMed

    Ding, Tao; Li, Ruoyu; Zeitler, J Axel; Huber, Thomas L; Gladden, Lynn F; Middelberg, Anton P J; Falconer, Robert J

    2010-12-20

    Terahertz spectra of four alanine-rich peptides with known secondary structures were studied by terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) and by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) using a synchrotron light source and a liquid-helium cooled bolometer. At ambient temperatures the usable bandwidth was restricted to 0.2-1.5 THz by the absorbance of water. The existence of a solvation shell around the peptide in solution was observed and its size estimated to be between 11 and 17 Å. By cooling the peptide solution to 80 K in order to reduce the water absorbance the bandwidth was increased to 0.1-3.0 THz for both THz-TDS and FTIR. Spectra were consistent with monotonic absorbance of the peptide and the existence of a solid amorphous low density solvation shell. PMID:21197019

  2. Multiple adaptive losses of alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase mitochondrial targeting in fruit-eating bats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Xu, Huihui; Yuan, Xinpu; Rossiter, Stephen J; Zhang, Shuyi

    2012-06-01

    The enzyme alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase 1 (AGT) functions to detoxify glyoxylate before it is converted into harmful oxalate. In mammals, mitochondrial targeting of AGT in carnivorous species versus peroxisomal targeting in herbivores is controlled by two signal peptides that correspond to these respective organelles. Differential expression of the mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS) is considered an adaptation to diet-specific subcellular localization of glyoxylate precursors. Bats are an excellent group in which to study adaptive changes in dietary enzymes; they show unparalleled mammalian dietary diversification as well as independent origins of carnivory, frugivory, and nectarivory. We studied the AGT gene in bats and other mammals with diverse diets and found that the MTS has been lost in unrelated lineages of frugivorous bats. Conversely, species exhibiting piscivory, carnivory, insectivory, and sanguinivory possessed intact MTSs. Detected positive selection in the AGT of ancestral fruit bats further supports adaptations related to evolutionary changes in diet. PMID:22319153

  3. Synthesis and Characterization in Vitro and in Vivo of (l)-(Trimethylsilyl)alanine Containing Neurotensin Analogues.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, Roberto; Besserer-Offroy, Élie; René, Adeline; Côté, Jérôme; Tétreault, Pascal; Collerette-Tremblay, Jasmin; Longpré, Jean-Michel; Leduc, Richard; Martinez, Jean; Sarret, Philippe; Cavelier, Florine

    2015-10-01

    The silylated amino acid (l)-(trimethylsilyl)alanine (TMSAla) was incorporated at the C-terminal end of the minimal biologically active neurotensin (NT) fragment, leading to the synthesis of new hexapeptide NT[8-13] analogues. Here, we assessed the ability of these new silylated NT compounds to bind to NTS1 and NTS2 receptors, promote regulation of multiple signaling pathways, induce inhibition of the ileal smooth muscle contractions, and affect distinct physiological variables, including blood pressure and pain sensation. Among the C-terminal modified analogues, compound 6 (JMV2007) carrying a TMSAla residue in position 13 exhibits a higher affinity toward NT receptors than the NT native peptide. We also found that compound 6 is effective in reversing carbachol-induced contraction in the isolated strip preparation assay and at inducing a drop in blood pressure. Finally, compound 6 produces potent analgesia in experimental models of acute and persistent pain. PMID:26348111

  4. Dosimetry for electron Intra-Operative RadioTherapy: Comparison of output factors obtained through alanine/EPR pellets, ionization chamber and Monte Carlo-GEANT4 simulations for IORT mobile dedicate accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrale, Maurizio; Longo, Anna; Russo, Giorgio; Casarino, Carlo; Candiano, Giuliana; Gallo, Salvatore; Carlino, Antonio; Brai, Maria

    2015-09-01

    In this work a comparison between the response of alanine and Markus ionization chamber was carried out for measurements of the output factors (OF) of electron beams produced by a linear accelerator used for Intra-Operative Radiation Therapy (IORT). Output factors (OF) for conventional high-energy electron beams are normally measured using ionization chamber according to international dosimetry protocols. However, the electron beams used in IORT have characteristics of dose per pulse, energy spectrum and angular distribution quite different from beams usually used in external radiotherapy, so the direct application of international dosimetry protocols may introduce additional uncertainties in dosimetric determinations. The high dose per pulse could lead to an inaccuracy in dose measurements with ionization chamber, due to overestimation of ks recombination factor. Furthermore, the electron fields obtained with IORT-dedicated applicators have a wider energy spectrum and a wider angular distribution than the conventional fields, due to the presence of electrons scattered by the applicator's wall. For this reason, a dosimetry system should be characterized by a minimum dependence from the beam energy and from angle of incidence of electrons. This become particularly critical for small and bevelled applicators. All of these reasons lead to investigate the use of detectors different from the ionization chamber for measuring the OFs. Furthermore, the complete characterization of the radiation field could be accomplished also by the use of Monte Carlo simulations which allows to obtain detailed information on dose distributions. In this work we compare the output factors obtained by means of alanine dosimeters and Markus ionization chamber. The comparison is completed by the Monte Carlo calculations of OFs determined through the use of the Geant4 application "iort _ therapy" . The results are characterized by a good agreement of response of alanine pellets and Markus

  5. Effective disposal of nitrogen waste in blood-fed Aedes aegypti mosquitoes requires alanine aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Mazzalupo, Stacy; Isoe, Jun; Belloni, Virginia; Scaraffia, Patricia Y

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the mechanisms responsible for the success of female mosquitoes in their disposal of excess nitrogen, we investigated the role of alanine aminotransferase (ALAT) in blood-fed Aedes aegypti. Transcript and protein levels from the 2 ALAT genes were analyzed in sucrose- and blood-fed A. aegypti tissues. ALAT1 and ALAT2 exhibit distinct expression patterns in tissues during the first gonotrophic cycle. Injection of female mosquitoes with either double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-ALAT1 or dsRNA ALAT2 significantly decreased mRNA and protein levels of ALAT1 or ALAT2 in fat body, thorax, and Malpighian tubules compared with dsRNA firefly luciferase-injected control mosquitoes. The silencing of either A. aegypti ALAT1 or ALAT2 caused unexpected phenotypes such as a delay in blood digestion, a massive accumulation of uric acid in the midgut posterior region, and a significant decrease of nitrogen waste excretion during the first 48 h after blood feeding. Concurrently, the expression of genes encoding xanthine dehydrogenase and ammonia transporter (Rhesus 50 glycoprotein) were significantly increased in tissues of both ALAT1- and ALAT2-deficient females. Moreover, perturbation of ALAT1 and ALAT2 in the female mosquitoes delayed oviposition and reduced egg production. These novel findings underscore the efficient mechanisms that blood-fed mosquitoes use to avoid ammonia toxicity and free radical damage.-Mazzalupo, S., Isoe, J., Belloni, V., Scaraffia, P. Y. Effective disposal of nitrogen waste in blood-fed Aedes aegypti mosquitoes requires alanine aminotransferase. PMID:26310269

  6. Screening for genetic haemochromatosis in blood samples with raised alanine aminotransferase

    PubMed Central

    Bhavnani, M; Lloyd, D; Bhattacharyya, A; Marples, J; Elton, P; Worwood, M

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—In the UK approximately 1 in 140 people are homozygous for the C282Y mutation of the HFE gene and are at risk from iron overload caused by genetic haemochromatosis (GH). Early detection can prevent organ damage secondary to iron deposition and increase life expectancy.
AIM—To screen for GH in all blood samples sent to the laboratory for routine liver function tests in which raised serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity was detected.
METHODS—ALT was measured in sera sent to the laboratory for routine liver function tests. In those samples found to have raised activity, transferrin saturation and ferritin were measured followed by genetic testing when transferrin saturation was increased.
RESULTS—Of the 35 069 serum samples assayed for routine liver function tests, 1490 (4.2%) had raised ALT levels (>50 u/l). Transferrin saturation and serum ferritin concentrations were measured in these patient samples, and in 56 transferrin saturation was >60%. Further blood samples were requested from these patients for genetic testing: 33 samples were obtained. There were nine patients homozygous for the C282Y mutation of the HFE gene and three compound heterozygotes (heterozygous for both C282Y and H63D mutations).
CONCLUSIONS—The association of raised ALT activity and transferrin saturation of >60% could provide a simple, cost effective method for detecting individuals with clinical haemochromatosis. Although many patients with GH may have been missed, this study suggests that the clinical penetrance of the disorder may be much lower than is generally supposed and that genetic screening will identify many people who may never develop clinical haemochromatosis.


Keywords: haemochromatosis; alanine aminotransferase PMID:10764716

  7. Alanine screening mutagenesis establishes the critical inactivating damage of irradiated E. coli lactose repressor.

    PubMed

    Goffinont, Stephane; Villette, Sandrine; Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie

    2012-06-01

    The function of the E. coli lactose operon requires the binding of lactose repressor to operator DNA. We have previously shown that γ rradiation destabilizes the repressor-operator complex because the repressor loses its DNA-binding ability. It was suggested that the observed oxidation of the four tyrosines (Y7, Y12, Y17, Y47) and the concomitant structural changes of the irradiated DNA-binding domains (headpieces) could be responsible for the inactivation. To pinpoint the tyrosine whose oxidation has the strongest effect, four headpieces containing the product of tyrosine oxidation, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), were simulated by molecular dynamics. We have observed that replacing Y47 by DOPA triggers the largest change of structure and stability of the headpiece and have concluded that Y47 oxidation is the greatest contributor to the decrease of repressor binding to DNA. To experimentally verify this conclusion, we applied the alanine screening mutagenesis approach. Tetrameric mutated repressors bearing an alanine instead of each one of the tyrosines were prepared and their binding to operator DNA was checked. Their binding ability is quite similar to that of the wild-type repressor, except for the Y47A mutant whose binding is strongly reduced. Circular dichroism determinations revealed small reductions of the proportion of α helices and of the melting temperature for Y7A, Y12A and Y17A headpieces, but much larger ones were revealed for Y47A headpiece. These results established the critical role of Y47 oxidation in modifying the structure and stability of the headpiece, and in reduction of the binding ability of the whole lactose repressor. PMID:22551504

  8. Active Sites of Spinoxin, a Potassium Channel Scorpion Toxin, Elucidated by Systematic Alanine Scanning.

    PubMed

    Peigneur, Steve; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Kawano, Chihiro; Nose, Takeru; Nirthanan, Selvanayagam; Gopalakrishnakone, Ponnampalam; Tytgat, Jan; Sato, Kazuki

    2016-05-31

    Peptide toxins from scorpion venoms constitute the largest group of toxins that target the voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv). Spinoxin (SPX) isolated from the venom of scorpion Heterometrus spinifer is a 34-residue peptide neurotoxin cross-linked by four disulfide bridges. SPX is a potent inhibitor of Kv1.3 potassium channels (IC50 = 63 nM), which are considered to be valid molecular targets in the diagnostics and therapy of various autoimmune disorders and cancers. Here we synthesized 25 analogues of SPX and analyzed the role of each amino acid in SPX using alanine scanning to study its structure-function relationships. All synthetic analogues showed similar disulfide bond pairings and secondary structures as native SPX. Alanine replacements at Lys(23), Asn(26), and Lys(30) resulted in loss of activity against Kv1.3 potassium channels, whereas replacements at Arg(7), Met(14), Lys(27), and Tyr(32) also largely reduced inhibitory activity. These results suggest that the side chains of these amino acids in SPX play an important role in its interaction with Kv1.3 channels. In particular, Lys(23) appears to be a key residue that underpins Kv1.3 channel inhibition. Of these seven amino acid residues, four are basic amino acids, suggesting that the positive electrostatic potential on the surface of SPX is likely required for high affinity interaction with Kv1.3 channels. This study provides insight into the structure-function relationships of SPX with implications for the rational design of new lead compounds targeting potassium channels with high potency. PMID:27159046

  9. Conformational Changes of the Alanine Dipeptide in Water-Ethanol Binary Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Glauco G; Cordeiro, João M M; Martín, M Elena; Aguilar, Manuel A

    2016-04-12

    Experimental work developed in the last years has evidenced the capacity of alcohols and polyalcohols to modify the energy landscape of peptides and proteins. However, the mechanism underlying this effect is not clear. Taking as a model system the alanine dipeptide (AD) we perform a QM/MM study in water, ethanol, and a 40-60% in volume water-ethanol mixture. The AD molecule was described at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level. In polar solution, only αR and PPII conformers contribute in an appreciable way to the conformational equilibrium. The final in solution αR-PPII free energy difference is determined from the interplay between the internal energy of the dipeptide and the solute-solvent interaction free energy. Internal energy favors the formation of PPII, whereas, on the contrary, solute-solvent interaction is favorable to αR, so any factor that decreases the solute-solvent interaction free energy will increase the PPII population. The addition of ethanol increases the stability of the PPII conformer. Our results point to the presence of preferential solvation in this system, the composition of the first solvation shell in the binary mixture being dominated by water molecules. Remarkably, this fact does not affect the differential conformational stability that is controlled by long-range interactions. From the analysis of solvent density maps it is concluded that, in the water-ethanol mixture, ethanol molecules are more likely found around the alanine side chain and the carbonyl group, but while in PPII ethanol molecules interact mainly with the carbonyl group of the N-terminal end, in C5 the interaction is with the carbonyl group of the C-terminal end. In αR, ethanol interacts with both carbonyl groups. PMID:26910305

  10. Fibrous biodegradable l-alanine-based scaffolds for vascular tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Srinath, Deepta; Lin, Shigang; Knight, Darryl K; Rizkalla, Amin S; Mequanint, Kibret

    2014-07-01

    In vascular tissue engineering, three-dimensional (3D) biodegradable scaffolds play an important role in guiding seeded cells to produce matrix components by providing both mechanical and biological cues. The objective of this work was to fabricate fibrous biodegradable scaffolds from novel poly(ester amide)s (PEAs) derived from l-alanine by electrospinning, and to study the degradation profiles and its suitability for vascular tissue-engineering applications. In view of this, l-alanine-derived PEAs (dissolved in chloroform) were electrospun together with 18-30% w/w polycaprolactone (PCL) to improve spinnability. A minimum of 18% was required to effectively electrospin the solution while the upper value was set in order to limit the influence of PCL on the electrospun PEA fibres. Electrospun fibre mats with average fibre diameters of ~0.4 µm were obtained. Both fibre diameter and porosity increased with increasing PEA content and solution concentration. The degradation of a PEA fibre mat over a period of 28 days indicated that mass loss kinetics was linear, and no change in molecular weight was found, suggesting a surface erosion mechanism. Human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs) cultured for 7 days on the fibre mats showed significantly higher viability (p < 0.0001), suggesting that PEA scaffolds provided a better microenvironment for seeded cells compared with control PCL fibre mats of similar fibre diameter and porosity. Furthermore, elastin expression on the PEA fibre mats was significantly higher than the pure PEA discs and pure PCL fibre mat controls (p < 0.0001). These novel biodegradable PEA fibrous scaffolds could be strong candidates for vascular tissue-engineering applications. PMID:22899439

  11. Determination of Ammonium Ion Using a Reagentless Amperometric Biosensor Based on Immobilized Alanine Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Ling Ling; Musa, Ahmad; Lee, Yook Heng

    2011-01-01

    The use of the enzyme alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) for the determination of ammonium ion (NH4+) usually requires the addition of pyruvate substrate and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) simultaneously to effect the reaction. This addition of reagents is inconvenient when an enzyme biosensor based on AlaDH is used. To resolve the problem, a novel reagentless amperometric biosensor using a stacked methacrylic membrane system coated onto a screen-printed carbon paste electrode (SPE) for NH4+ ion determination is described. A mixture of pyruvate and NADH was immobilized in low molecular weight poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) membrane, which was then deposited over a photocured pHEMA membrane (photoHEMA) containing alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) enzyme. Due to the enzymatic reaction of AlaDH and the pyruvate substrate, NH4+ was consumed in the process and thus the signal from the electrocatalytic oxidation of NADH at an applied potential of +0.55 V was proportional to the NH4+ ion concentration under optimal conditions. The stacked methacrylate membranes responded rapidly and linearly to changes in NH4+ ion concentrations between 10–100 mM, with a detection limit of 0.18 mM NH4+ ion. The reproducibility of the amperometrical NH4+ biosensor yielded low relative standard deviations between 1.4–4.9%. The stacked membrane biosensor has been successfully applied to the determination of NH4+ ion in spiked river water samples without pretreatment. A good correlation was found between the analytical results for NH4+ obtained from the biosensor and the Nessler spectrophotometric method. PMID:22163699

  12. Chiral selectivity of amino acid adsorption on chiral surfaces—The case of alanine on Pt

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, J.-H.; Kosov, D. S.

    2015-02-07

    We study the binding pattern of the amino acid alanine on the naturally chiral Pt surfaces Pt(531), Pt(321), and Pt(643). These surfaces are all vicinal to the (111) direction but have different local environments of their kink sites and are thus a model for realistic roughened Pt surfaces. Alanine has only a single methyl group attached to its chiral center, which makes the number of possible binding conformations computationally tractable. Additionally, only the amine and carboxyl group are expected to interact strongly with the Pt substrate. On Pt(531), we study the molecule in its pristine as well as its deprotonated form and find that the deprotonated one is more stable by 0.47 eV. Therefore, we study the molecule in its deprotonated form on Pt(321) and Pt(643). As expected, the oxygen and nitrogen atoms of the deprotonated molecule provide a local binding “tripod” and the most stable adsorption configurations optimize the interaction of this “tripod” with undercoordinated surface atoms. However, the interaction of the methyl group plays an important role: it induces significant chiral selectivity of about 60 meV on all surfaces. Hereby, the L-enantiomer adsorbs preferentially to the Pt(321){sup S} and Pt(643){sup S} surfaces, while the D-enantiomer is more stable on Pt(531){sup S}. The binding energies increase with increasing surface density of kink sites, i.e., they are largest for Pt(531){sup S} and smallest for Pt(643){sup S}.

  13. Oral administration of D-alanine in monkeys robustly increases plasma and cerebrospinal fluid levels but experimental D-amino acid oxidase inhibitors had minimal effect.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Camilo; Alt, Jesse; Ator, Nancy A; Wilmoth, Heather; Rais, Rana; Hin, Niyada; DeVivo, Michael; Popiolek, Michael; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Slusher, Barbara S

    2016-09-01

    Hypofunction of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is thought to exacerbate psychosis in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. Consistent with this hypothesis, D-alanine, a co-agonist at the glycine site of the NMDA receptor, was shown to improve positive and cognitive symptoms when used as add-on therapy for schizophrenia treatment. However, D-alanine had to be administered at high doses (~7 g) to observe clinical effects. One possible reason for the high dose is that D-alanine could be undergoing oxidation by D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) before it reaches the brain. If this is the case, the dose could be reduced by co-administration of D-alanine with a DAAO inhibitor (DAAOi). Early studies with rodents showed that co-administration of D-alanine with 5-chloro-benzo[d]isoxazol-3-ol (CBIO), a prototype DAAOi, significantly enhanced the levels of extracellular D-alanine in the frontal cortex compared with D-alanine alone. Further, the use of CBIO reduced the dose of D-alanine needed to attenuate prepulse inhibition deficits induced by dizocilpine. The objective of the work reported herein was to confirm the hypothesis that DAAO inhibition can enhance D-alanine exposure in a species closer to humans: non-human primates. We report that while oral D-alanine administration to baboons (10 mg/kg) enhanced D-alanine plasma and CSF levels over 20-fold versus endogenous levels, addition of experimental DAAOi to the regimen exhibited a 2.2-fold enhancement in plasma and no measurable effect on CSF levels. The results provide caution regarding the utility of DAAO inhibition to increase D-amino acid levels as treatment for patients with schizophrenia. PMID:27287825

  14. Determination of β-Cyano-L-alanine, γ-Glutamyl-β-cyano-L-alanine, and Common Free Amino Acids in Vicia sativa (Fabaceae) Seeds by Reversed-Phase High-Performance Liquid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Megías, Cristina; Cortés-Giraldo, Isabel; Girón-Calle, Julio; Vioque, Javier; Alaiz, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    A method for determination of β-cyano-L-alanine, γ-glutamyl-β-cyano-L-alanine and other free amino acids in Vicia sativa is presented. Seed extracts were derivatized by reaction with diethyl ethoxymethylenemalonate and analyzed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Calibration curves showed very good linearity of the response. The limit of detection and quantification was 0.15 and 0.50 μM, respectively. The method has high intra- (RSD = 0.28–0.31%) and interrepeatability (RSD = 2.76–3.08%) and remarkable accuracy with a 99% recovery in spiked samples. The method is very easy to carry out and allows for ready analysis of large number of samples using very basic HPLC equipment because the derivatized samples are very stable and have very good chromatographic properties. The method has been applied to the determination of γ-glutamyl-β-cyano-L-alanine, β-cyano-L-alanine, and common free amino acids in eight wild populations of V. sativa from southwestern Spain. PMID:25587488

  15. GMXPBSA 2.0: A GROMACS tool to perform MM/PBSA and computational alanine scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paissoni, C.; Spiliotopoulos, D.; Musco, G.; Spitaleri, A.

    2014-11-01

    GMXPBSA 2.0 is a user-friendly suite of Bash/Perl scripts for streamlining MM/PBSA calculations on structural ensembles derived from GROMACS trajectories, to automatically calculate binding free energies for protein-protein or ligand-protein complexes. GMXPBSA 2.0 is flexible and can easily be customized to specific needs. Additionally, it performs computational alanine scanning (CAS) to study the effects of ligand and/or receptor alanine mutations on the free energy of binding. Calculations require only for protein-protein or protein-ligand MD simulations. GMXPBSA 2.0 performs different comparative analysis, including a posteriori generation of alanine mutants of the wild-type complex, calculation of the binding free energy values of the mutant complexes and comparison of the results with the wild-type system. Moreover, it compares the binding free energy of different complexes trajectories, allowing the study the effects of non-alanine mutations, post-translational modifications or unnatural amino acids on the binding free energy of the system under investigation. Finally, it can calculate and rank relative affinity to the same receptor utilizing MD simulations of proteins in complex with different ligands. In order to dissect the different MM/PBSA energy contributions, including molecular mechanic (MM), electrostatic contribution to solvation (PB) and nonpolar contribution to solvation (SA), the tool combines two freely available programs: the MD simulations software GROMACS and the Poisson-Boltzmann equation solver APBS. All the calculations can be performed in single or distributed automatic fashion on a cluster facility in order to increase the calculation by dividing frames across the available processors. The program is freely available under the GPL license. Catalogue identifier: AETQ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETQ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing

  16. Making College Completion Personal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Heather

    2011-01-01

    There are countless justifications for why young adults, faced with so many distractions, do not complete their educations. Many students fail to finish college because of a lack of information and understanding about healthy relationships and sex education. The author's own struggles and eventual successes as a student and mother compelled her to…

  17. Beyond FASFA Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castleman, Ben; Page, Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)--which students must complete to qualify for most federal, state, and institutional financial aid--is a gateway to college through which many students must pass, particularly those from low- to moderate-income households (King, 2004; Kofoed, 2013). Yet given the complexity of the…

  18. Completing a Simple Circuit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Timothy F.; Adams, Jeffrey P.; Brown, Thomas R.

    2000-01-01

    Students have problems successfully arranging an electric circuit to make the bulb produce light. Investigates the percentage of students able to complete a circuit with a given apparatus, and the effects of prior experience on student success. Recommends hands-on activities at the elementary and secondary school levels. (Contains 14 references.)…

  19. The amidating enzyme in pituitary will accept a peptide with C-terminal D-alanine as substrate.

    PubMed

    Landymore-Lim, A E; Bradbury, A F; Smyth, D G

    1983-11-30

    A series of tripeptides which terminated in d-alanine, d-serine, d-leucine or l-alanine was synthesized and the peptides tested for their ability to act as substrates for an amidating enzyme present in porcine pituitary. The peptides were allowed to compete with a radiolabelled substrate 125I d-Tyr Phe Gly in the presence of a rate limiting concentration of amidating enzyme and the degree of conversion to 125I d-Tyr Phe amide was determined by ion exchange chromatography. An accelerated procedure was developed for investigating the rates of reaction. The results showed that d-Tyr Phe d-Ala has a significant affinity for the amidating enzyme; no affinity could be demonstrated with d-Tyr Phe 1-Ala, d-Tyr Phe d-Ser or d-Tyr Phe d-Leu. Direct evidence that d-Tyr Phe d-Ala can undergo amidation was obtained by incubating the 125I labelled tripeptide with the pituitary enzyme. Amidation took place readily with d-Tyr Phe d-Ala but not with the other tripeptides; thus, while the enzyme is unable to catalyse the conversion of a peptide terminating in 1-alanine, it can accept a peptide terminating in d-alanine. The results indicate that the amidating enzyme has a highly compact substrate binding site. PMID:6661225

  20. Helix propensities of conformationally restricted amino acids. Non-natural substitutes for helix breaking proline and helix forming alanine.

    PubMed

    Alías, Miriam; Ayuso-Tejedor, Sara; Fernández-Recio, Juan; Cativiela, Carlos; Sancho, Javier

    2010-02-21

    Alpha helices are useful scaffolds to build biologically active peptides. The intrinsic stability of an alpha-helix is a key feature that can be successfully designed, and it is governed by the constituting amino acid residues. Their individual contributions to helix stability are given, according to Lifson-Roig theory, by their w parameters, which are known for all proteinogenic amino acids, but not for non-natural ones. On the other hand, non-natural, conformationally-restricted amino acids can be used to impart biochemical stability to peptides intended for in vivo administration. Efficient design of peptides based on these amino acids requires the previous determination of their w parameters. We begin here this task by determining the w parameters of two restricted analogs of alanine: (alpha-methyl)alanine and 1-aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid. According to their w values (alpha-methyl)alanine is almost as good a helix forming residue as alanine, while 1-aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid is, similarly to proline, a helix breaker. PMID:20135035

  1. Streptomyces beta-alanine:alpha-ketoglutarate aminotransferase, a novel omega-amino acid transaminase. Purification, crystallization, and enzymologic properties.

    PubMed

    Yonaha, K; Suzuki, K; Toyama, S

    1985-03-25

    An enzyme which catalyzes the transamination of beta-alanine with alpha-ketoglutarate was purified to homogeneity from Streptomyces griseus IFO 3102 and crystallized. Molecular weight of the enzyme was found to be 185,000 +/- 10,000 by a gel-filtration method. The enzyme consists of four subunits identical in molecular weight (51,000 +/- 1,000). The transaminase is composed of 483 amino acids/subunit containing 7 and 8 residues of half-cystine and methionine, respectively. The enzyme exhibits absorption maxima at 278 and 415 nm. The pyridoxal 5'-phosphate content was determined to be 4 mol/mol of enzyme. The enzyme catalyzes transamination of omega-amino acids including taurine and hypotaurine. beta-Alanine and DL-beta-aminoisobutyrate served as a good amino donor; the Michaelis constants are 8.0 and 12.5 mM, respectively. alpha-Ketoglutarate is the only amino acceptor (Km = 4.0 mM); pyruvate and oxalacetate are inactive. Based on the substrate specificity, the terminology of beta-alanine:alpha-ketoglutarate transaminase is proposed for the enzyme. Carbonyl reagents, HgCl2,DL-gabaculine, and alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine strongly inhibited the enzyme. PMID:3972825

  2. Translocation of Radioactive Carbon after the Application of 14C-Alanine and 14CO2 to Sunflower Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Chopowick, R. E.; Forward, D. F.

    1974-01-01

    14C-(UL)-l-Alanine was applied to the surface of mature leaves at the second node of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. cv Commander) plants, under illumination. The alanine was absorbed during a 4-hour period, and some of it was metabolized by the absorbing tissue. After a lag period of about 15 minutes from first application, distribution of 14C through the plant proceeded in much the same pattern as when 14CO2 is assimilated by similar leaves. Most, if not all, of the 14C exported from the absorbing regions was in sucrose. Only minute amounts appeared in alanine or other amino acids in surrounding parts of the leaf blade or in the petiole, although these were strongly labeled in the tissue absorbing 14C-alanine. When 14CO2 was supplied for 15 minutes to leaves of different ages, amino acids were lightly labeled in the leaf blade. Mature green leaves exported only sucrose. Yellowing leaves on 60-day-old plants exported a variety of substances including amino acids. PMID:16658645

  3. Complete scanpaths analysis toolbox.

    PubMed

    Augustyniak, Piotr; Mikrut, Zbigniew

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a complete open software environment for control, data processing and assessment of visual experiments. Visual experiments are widely used in research on human perception physiology and the results are applicable to various visual information-based man-machine interfacing, human-emulated automatic visual systems or scanpath-based learning of perceptual habits. The toolbox is designed for Matlab platform and supports infra-red reflection-based eyetracker in calibration and scanpath analysis modes. Toolbox procedures are organized in three layers: the lower one, communicating with the eyetracker output file, the middle detecting scanpath events on a physiological background and the one upper consisting of experiment schedule scripts, statistics and summaries. Several examples of visual experiments carried out with use of the presented toolbox complete the paper. PMID:17945877

  4. Image Zoom Completion.

    PubMed

    Hidane, Moncef; El Gheche, Mireille; Aujol, Jean-Francois; Berthoumieu, Yannick; Deledalle, Charles-Alban

    2016-08-01

    We consider the problem of recovering a high-resolution image from a pair consisting of a complete low-resolution image and a high-resolution but incomplete one. We refer to this task as the image zoom completion problem. After discussing possible contexts in which this setting may arise, we introduce a nonlocal regularization strategy, giving full details concerning the numerical optimization of the corresponding energy and discussing its benefits and shortcomings. We also derive two total variation-based algorithms and evaluate the performance of the proposed methods on a set of natural and textured images. We compare the results and get with those obtained with two recent state-of-the-art single-image super-resolution algorithms. PMID:27249829

  5. Glycolysis and the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Are Linked by Alanine Aminotransferase during Hypoxia Induced by Waterlogging of Lotus japonicus1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Marcio; Licausi, Francesco; Araújo, Wagner L.; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Sodek, Ladaslav; Fernie, Alisdair R.; van Dongen, Joost T.

    2010-01-01

    The role of nitrogen metabolism in the survival of prolonged periods of waterlogging was investigated in highly flood-tolerant, nodulated Lotus japonicus plants. Alanine production revealed to be a critical hypoxic pathway. Alanine is the only amino acid whose biosynthesis is not inhibited by nitrogen deficiency resulting from RNA interference silencing of nodular leghemoglobin. The metabolic changes that were induced following waterlogging can be best explained by the activation of alanine metabolism in combination with the modular operation of a split tricarboxylic acid pathway. The sum result of this metabolic scenario is the accumulation of alanine and succinate and the production of extra ATP under hypoxia. The importance of alanine metabolism is discussed with respect to its ability to regulate the level of pyruvate, and this and all other changes are discussed in the context of current models concerning the regulation of plant metabolism. PMID:20089769

  6. Reconfiguration of N Metabolism upon Hypoxia Stress and Recovery: Roles of Alanine Aminotransferase (AlaAT) and Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH)

    PubMed Central

    Diab, Houssein; Limami, Anis M.

    2016-01-01

    In the context of climatic change, more heavy precipitation and more frequent flooding and waterlogging events threaten the productivity of arable farmland. Furthermore, crops were not selected to cope with flooding- and waterlogging-induced oxygen limitation. In general, low oxygen stress, unlike other abiotic stresses (e.g., cold, high temperature, drought and saline stress), received little interest from the scientific community and less financial support from stakeholders. Accordingly, breeding programs should be developed and agronomical practices should be adapted in order to save plants’ growth and yield—even under conditions of low oxygen availability (e.g., submergence and waterlogging). The prerequisite to the success of such breeding programs and changes in agronomical practices is a good knowledge of how plants adapt to low oxygen stress at the cellular and the whole plant level. In the present paper, we summarized the recent knowledge on metabolic adjustment in general under low oxygen stress and highlighted thereafter the major changes pertaining to the reconfiguration of amino acids syntheses. We propose a model showing (i) how pyruvate derived from active glycolysis upon hypoxia is competitively used by the alanine aminotransferase/glutamate synthase cycle, leading to alanine accumulation and NAD+ regeneration. Carbon is then saved in a nitrogen store instead of being lost through ethanol fermentative pathway. (ii) During the post-hypoxia recovery period, the alanine aminotransferase/glutamate dehydrogenase cycle mobilizes this carbon from alanine store. Pyruvate produced by the reverse reaction of alanine aminotransferase is funneled to the TCA cycle, while deaminating glutamate dehydrogenase regenerates, reducing equivalent (NADH) and 2-oxoglutarate to maintain the cycle function. PMID:27258319

  7. Characterization of Lactobacillus salivarius alanine racemase: short-chain carboxylate-activation and the role of A131.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Jyumpei; Yukimoto, Jotaro; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Ohmori, Taketo; Suzuki, Hirokazu; Doi, Katsumi; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Many strains of lactic acid bacteria produce high concentrations of d-amino acids. Among them, Lactobacillus salivarius UCC 118 produces d-alanine at a relative concentration much greater than 50 % of the total d, l-alanine (100d/d, l-alanine). We characterized the L. salivarius alanine racemase (ALR) likely responsible for this d-alanine production and found that the enzyme was activated by carboxylates, which is an unique characteristic among ALRs. In addition, alignment of the amino acid sequences of several ALRs revealed that A131 of L. salivarius ALR is likely involved in the activation. To confirm that finding, an L. salivarius ALR variant with an A131K (ALR(A131K)) substitution was prepared, and its properties were compared with those of ALR. The activity of ALR(A131K) was about three times greater than that of ALR. In addition, whereas L. salivarius ALR was strongly activated by low concentrations (e.g., 1 mM) of short chain carboxylates, and was inhibited at higher concentrations (e.g., 10 mM), ALR(A131K) was clearly inhibited at all carboxylate concentrations tested (1-40 mM). Acetate also increased the stability of ALR such that maximum activity was observed at 35 °C and pH 8.0 without acetate, but at 50 °C in the presence of 1 mM acetate. On the other hand, maximum ALR(A131K) activity was observed at 45 °C and around pH 9.0 with or without acetate. It thus appears that A131 mediates the activation and stabilization of L. salivarius ALR by short chain carboxylates. PMID:26543773

  8. Reconfiguration of N Metabolism upon Hypoxia Stress and Recovery: Roles of Alanine Aminotransferase (AlaAT) and Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH).

    PubMed

    Diab, Houssein; Limami, Anis M

    2016-01-01

    In the context of climatic change, more heavy precipitation and more frequent flooding and waterlogging events threaten the productivity of arable farmland. Furthermore, crops were not selected to cope with flooding- and waterlogging-induced oxygen limitation. In general, low oxygen stress, unlike other abiotic stresses (e.g., cold, high temperature, drought and saline stress), received little interest from the scientific community and less financial support from stakeholders. Accordingly, breeding programs should be developed and agronomical practices should be adapted in order to save plants' growth and yield-even under conditions of low oxygen availability (e.g., submergence and waterlogging). The prerequisite to the success of such breeding programs and changes in agronomical practices is a good knowledge of how plants adapt to low oxygen stress at the cellular and the whole plant level. In the present paper, we summarized the recent knowledge on metabolic adjustment in general under low oxygen stress and highlighted thereafter the major changes pertaining to the reconfiguration of amino acids syntheses. We propose a model showing (i) how pyruvate derived from active glycolysis upon hypoxia is competitively used by the alanine aminotransferase/glutamate synthase cycle, leading to alanine accumulation and NAD⁺ regeneration. Carbon is then saved in a nitrogen store instead of being lost through ethanol fermentative pathway. (ii) During the post-hypoxia recovery period, the alanine aminotransferase/glutamate dehydrogenase cycle mobilizes this carbon from alanine store. Pyruvate produced by the reverse reaction of alanine aminotransferase is funneled to the TCA cycle, while deaminating glutamate dehydrogenase regenerates, reducing equivalent (NADH) and 2-oxoglutarate to maintain the cycle function. PMID:27258319

  9. Metabolic consequences of β-alanine supplementation during exhaustive supramaximal cycling and 4000-m time-trial performance.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, Phillip M; Minahan, Clare L

    2016-08-01

    The present study investigated the effects of β-alanine supplementation on the resultant blood acidosis, lactate accumulation, and energy provision during supramaximal-intensity cycling, as well as the aerobic and anaerobic contribution to power output during a 4000-m cycling time trial (TT). Seventeen trained cyclists (maximal oxygen uptake = 4.47 ± 0.55 L·min(-1)) were administered 6.4 g of β-alanine (n = 9) or placebo (n = 8) daily for 4 weeks. Participants performed a supramaximal cycling test to exhaustion (equivalent to 120% maximal oxygen uptake) before (PreExh) and after (PostExh) the 4-week supplementation period, as well as an additional postsupplementation supramaximal cycling test identical in duration and power output to PreExh (PostMatch). Anaerobic capacity was quantified and blood pH, lactate, and bicarbonate concentrations were measured pre-, immediately post-, and 5 min postexercise. Subjects also performed a 4000-m cycling TT before and after supplementation while the aerobic and anaerobic contributions to power output were quantified. β-Alanine supplementation increased time to exhaustion (+12.8 ± 8.2 s; P = 0.041) and anaerobic capacity (+1.1 ± 0.7 kJ; P = 0.048) in PostExh compared with PreExh. Performance time in the 4000-m TT was reduced following β-alanine supplementation (-6.3 ± 4.6 s; P = 0.034) and the mean anaerobic power output was likely to be greater (+6.2 ± 4.5 W; P = 0.035). β-Alanine supplementation increased time to exhaustion concomitant with an augmented anaerobic capacity during supramaximal intensity cycling, which was also mirrored by a meaningful increase in the anaerobic contribution to power output during a 4000-m cycling TT, resulting in an enhanced overall performance. PMID:27467218

  10. Effects of ruminally degradable nitrogen intake and in vitro addition of ammonia and propionate on the metabolic fate of L-[1-14C]alanine and L-[15N]alanine in isolated sheep hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Mutsvangwa, T; Buchanan-Smith, J G; McBride, B W

    1997-04-01

    Isolated hepatocytes prepared from sheep fed a basal diet (bromegrass hay-corn, 50:50 wt/ wt, as-fed basis) with or without urea were used to determine the effects of added ammonia (as NH4Cl) and propionate on the partitioning of C from 1.25 mM L-[1-14C]alanine between oxidation and gluconeogenesis, and the flux of 15N from 1.25 mM L-[15N]alanine to [14N15N]urea and [15N15N]urea. Hepatocyte suspensions were incubated with NH4Cl (0, .31, .63, and 1.25 mM) and (or) propionate (0, .31, .63, and 1.25 mM) in the presence of either 1.25 mM L-[15N]alanine or 1.25 mM L-alanine plus 18.5 kBq of L-[1-14C]alanine. Feeding dietary urea did not affect [1-14C]alanine oxidation to 14CO2 (P = .601), or its conversion to [14C]glucose (P = .576) by isolated hepatocytes. Increasing in vitro concentrations of NH4Cl and propionate between 0 and 1.25 mM reduced [1-14C]alanine oxidation to 14CO2 (P < .001). Increasing NH4Cl concentration between 0 and 1.25 mM reduced [1-14C]alanine conversion to [14C]glucose in isolated hepatocytes (P < .001), whereas addition of propionate between 0 and 1.25 mM stimulated production of [14C]glucose from [1-14C]alanine (P < .001). Feeding urea did not affect in vitro rates of total urea production (P = .655) but increased the production of [14N15N]urea and [15N15N]urea (P < .05). Addition of NH4Cl increased total urea, [14N15N]urea, and [15N15N]urea production (P < .001), but reduced 15N isotopic enrichments of [14N15N]urea and [15N15N]urea (P < .001). Increasing propionate concentration between 0 and 1.25 mM reduced total urea production (P < .001), but [14N15N]urea and [15N15N]urea production was reduced only at 1.25 mM propionate (P < .001). We conclude that NH3 detoxification by isolated sheep hepatocytes increases amino acid deamination and this might have implications for nitrogen retention in ruminants consuming diets that promote considerable NH3 absorption from the digestive tract. PMID:9110231

  11. Insert tree completion system

    SciTech Connect

    Brands, K.W.; Ball, I.G.; Cegielski, E.J.; Gresham, J.S.; Saunders, D.N.

    1982-09-01

    This paper outlines the overall project for development and installation of a low-profile, caisson-installed subsea Christmas tree. After various design studies and laboratory and field tests of key components, a system for installation inside a 30-in. conductor was ordered in July 1978 from Cameron Iron Works Inc. The system is designed to have all critical-pressure-containing components below the mudline and, with the reduced profile (height) above seabed, provides for improved safety of satellite underwater wells from damage by anchors, trawl boards, and even icebergs. In addition to the innovative nature of the tree design, the completion includes improved 3 1/2-in. through flowline (TFL) pumpdown completion equipment with deep set safety valves and a dual detachable packer head for simplified workover capability. The all-hydraulic control system incorporates a new design of sequencing valve for both Christmas tree control and remote flowline connection. A semisubmersible drilling rig was used to initiate the first end flowline connection at the wellhead for subsequent tie-in to the prelaid, surface-towed, all-welded subsea pipeline bundle.

  12. PPAR{gamma} activation abolishes LDL-induced proliferation of human aortic smooth muscle cells via SOD-mediated down-regulation of superoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, Kyung-Sun; Kim, Dong-Uk; Ryoo, Sungwoo; Nam, Miyoung; Baek, Seung Tae; Kim, Lila; Park, Song-Kyu; Myung, Chang-Seon; Hoe, Kwang-Lae . E-mail: kwanghoe@kribb.re.kr

    2007-08-10

    Native LDL would be a mitogenic and chemotactic stimulus of VSMC proliferation and differentiation in the atherosclerotic lesion where endothelial disruption occurred. In previous studies, our group investigated the molecular mechanisms by which LDL induces IL-8 production and by which PPAR{alpha} activation abolishes LDL effects in human aortic SMCs (hAoSMCs). Herein is the first report of PPAR{gamma} activation by troglitazone (TG) exerting its inhibitory effects on LDL-induced cell proliferation via generation not of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, but of O2?-, and the subsequent activation of Erk1/2 in hAoSMCs. Moreover, in this study TG abolished the LDL-accelerated G{sub 1}-S progression to control levels via down-regulation of active cyclinD1/CDK4 and cyclinE/CDK2 complexes and up-regulation of p21{sup Cip1} expression. TG exerted its anti-proliferative effects through the up-regulation of basal superoxide dismutase (SOD) expression. This data suggests that the regulation of O2?- is located at the crossroads between LDL signaling and cell proliferation.

  13. Predicting Three-Dimensional Conformations of Peptides Constructed of Only Glycine, Alanine, Aspartic Acid, and Valine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Akifumi; Fukuyoshi, Shuichi

    2015-06-01

    The GADV hypothesis is a form of the protein world hypothesis, which suggests that life originated from proteins (Lacey et al. 1999; Ikehara 2002; Andras 2006). In the GADV hypothesis, life is thought to have originated from primitive proteins constructed of only glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and valine ([GADV]-proteins). In this study, the three-dimensional (3D) conformations of randomly generated short [GADV]-peptides were computationally investigated using replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations (Sugita and Okamoto 1999). Because the peptides used in this study consisted of only 20 residues each, they could not form certain 3D structures. However, the conformational tendencies of the peptides were elucidated by analyzing the conformational ensembles generated by REMD simulations. The results indicate that secondary structures can be formed in several randomly generated [GADV]-peptides. A long helical structure was found in one of the hydrophobic peptides, supporting the conjecture of the GADV hypothesis that many peptides aggregated to form peptide multimers with enzymatic activity in the primordial soup. In addition, these results indicate that REMD simulations can be used for the structural investigation of short peptides.

  14. Anisotropy-Guided Enantiomeric Enhancement in Alanine Using Far-UV Circularly Polarized Light.

    PubMed

    Meinert, Cornelia; Cassam-Chenaï, Patrick; Jones, Nykola C; Nahon, Laurent; Hoffmann, Søren V; Meierhenrich, Uwe J

    2015-06-01

    All life on Earth is characterized by its asymmetry - both the genetic material and proteins are composed of homochiral monomers. Understanding how this molecular asymmetry initially arose is a key question related to the origins of life. Cometary ice simulations, L-enantiomeric enriched amino acids in meteorites and the detection of circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation in star-forming regions point to a possible interstellar/protostellar generation of stereochemical asymmetry. Based upon our recently recorded anisotropy spectra g(λ) of amino acids in the vacuum-UV range, we subjected amorphous films of racemic (13)C-alanine to far-UV circularly polarized synchrotron radiation to probe the asymmetric photon-molecule interaction under interstellar conditions. Optical purities of up to 4% were reached, which correlate with our theoretical predictions. Importantly, we show that chiral symmetry breaking using circularly polarized light is dependent on both the helicity and the wavelength of incident light. In order to predict such stereocontrol, time-dependent density functional theory was used to calculate anisotropy spectra. The calculated anisotropy spectra show good agreement with the experimental ones. The European Space Agency's Rosetta mission, which successfully landed Philae on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on 12 November 2014, will investigate the configuration of chiral compounds and thereby obtain data that are to be interpreted in the context of the results presented here. PMID:25773582

  15. A Micro-Platinum Wire Biosensor for Fast and Selective Detection of Alanine Aminotransferase

    PubMed Central

    Thuy, Tran Nguyen Thanh; Tseng, Tina T.-C.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a miniaturized biosensor based on permselective polymer layers (overoxidized polypyrrole (Ppy) and Nafion®) modified and enzyme (glutamate oxidase (GlutOx)) immobilized micro-platinum wire electrode for the detection of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was fabricated. The proposed ALT biosensor was measured electrochemically by constant potential amperometry at +0.7 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The ALT biosensor provides fast response time (~5 s) and superior selectivity towards ALT against both negatively and positively charged species (e.g., ascorbic acid (AA) and dopamine (DA), respectively). The detection range of the ALT biosensor is found to be 10–900 U/L which covers the range of normal ALT levels presented in the serum and the detection limit and sensitivity are found to be 8.48 U/L and 0.059 nA/(U/L·mm2) (N = 10), respectively. We also found that one-day storage of the ALT biosensor at −20 °C right after the sensor being fabricated can enhance the sensor sensitivity (1.74 times higher than that of the sensor stored at 4 °C). The ALT biosensor is stable after eight weeks of storage at −20 °C. The sensor was tested in spiked ALT samples (ALT activities: 20, 200, 400, and 900 U/L) and reasonable recoveries (70%~107%) were obtained. PMID:27240366

  16. Design and development of new class of Mycobacterium tuberculosisl-alanine dehydrogenase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Reshma, Rudraraju Srilakshmi; Saxena, Shalini; Bobesh, Karyakulam Andrews; Jeankumar, Variam Ullas; Gunda, Saritha; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Sriram, Dharmarajan

    2016-09-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosisl-alanine dehydrogenase (MTB l-AlaDH) is one of the important drug targets for treating latent/persistent tuberculosis. In this study we used crystal structure of the MTB l-AlaDH bound with cofactor NAD(+) as a structural framework for virtual screening of our in-house database to identified new classes of l-AlaDH inhibitor. We identified azetidine-2,4-dicarboxamide derivative as one of the potent inhibitor with IC50 of 9.22±0.72μM. Further lead optimization by synthesis leads to compound 1-(isonicotinamido)-N(2),N(4)-bis(benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)azetidine-2,4-dicarboxamide (18) with l-AlaDH IC50 of 3.83±0.12μM, 2.0log reduction in nutrient starved dormant MTB model and MIC of 11.81μM in actively replicative MTB. PMID:27477207

  17. Bidirectional Interaction of Alanine with Sulfuric Acid in the Presence of Water and the Atmospheric Implication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Yu; Ma, Yan; Chen, Jiao; Jiang, Shuai; Liu, Yi-Rong; Wen, Hui; Feng, Ya-Juan; Hong, Yu; Huang, Teng; Huang, Wei

    2016-04-21

    Amino acids are recognized as important components of atmospheric aerosols, which impact on the Earth's climate directly and indirectly. However, much remains unknown about the initial events of nucleation. In this work, the interaction of alanine [NH2CH(CH3)COOH or Ala], one of the most abundant amino acids in the atmosphere, with sulfuric acid (SA) and water (W) has been investigated at the M06-2X/6-311++G(3df, 3pd) level of theory. We have studied thermodynamics of the hydrated (Ala)(SA) core system with up to four water molecules. We found that Ala, with one amino group and one carboxyl group, can interact with H2SO4 and H2O in two directions and that it has a high cluster stabilizing effect similar to that of ammonia, which is one of the key nucleation precursor. The corresponding Gibbs free energies of the (Ala)(SA)(W)n (n = 0-4) clusters formation at 298.15 K predicted that Ala can contribute to the stabilization of small binary clusters. Our results showed that the hydrate distribution is temperature-dependent and that a higher humidity and temperature can contribute to the formation of hydrated clusters. PMID:26997115

  18. Quantification of neurotoxin BMAA (β-N-methylamino-L-alanine) in seafood from Swedish markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Liying; Kiselova, Nadezda; Rosén, Johan; Ilag, Leopold L.

    2014-11-01

    The neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) produced naturally by cyanobacteria, diatoms and dinoflagellates can be transferred and accumulated up the food chain, and may be a risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases. This study provides the first systematic screening of BMAA exposure of a large population through the consumption of seafood sold in metropolitan markets. BMAA was distinguished from known isomers by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry after acidic hydrolysis and derivatization. Using deuterium-labeled internal standard, BMAA was quantified as 0.01-0.90 μg/g wet weight of tissues in blue mussel, oyster, shrimp, plaice, char and herring, but was undetectable (<0.01 μg/g) in other samples (salmon, cod, perch and crayfish). Provided that the content of BMAA detected is relevant for intake calculations, the data presented may be used for a first estimation of BMAA exposure through seafood from Swedish markets, and to refine the design of future toxicological experiments and assessments.

  19. Biotransfer of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in a eutrophicated freshwater lake.

    PubMed

    Lage, Sandra; Annadotter, Heléne; Rasmussen, Ulla; Rydberg, Sara

    2015-03-01

    β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a neurotoxic non-protein amino acid, plays a significant role as an environmental risk factor in neurodegenerative diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. BMAA producers occur globally, colonizing almost all habitats and represent species from distinct phytoplanktonic groups, i.e., cyanobacteria, diatoms, and dinoflagellates. Bioaccumulation of BMAA in invertebrate and vertebrate organisms has also been registered around the globe. In the Baltic Sea, BMAA has been detected in several commercial fish species, raising the question of the bioaccumulation of BMAA in Swedish limnic systems. Here we find the presence of BMAA in water samples from Lake Finjasjön and identify its bioaccumulation patterns in both plankti-benthivorous and piscivorous fish, according to fish species, total weight, gender, and season of collection. For the first time, a large number of fish individuals were used in order to draw conclusions on BMAA bioaccumulation in a closed ecological community based on a statistical approach. We may, therefore, conclude that feeding patterns (plankti-benthivorous) and increased age of fish may lead to a higher tissue concentration of BMAA. PMID:25738330

  20. β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) metabolism in the aquatic macrophyte Ceratophyllum demersum.

    PubMed

    Downing, Simoné; Esterhuizen-Londt, Maranda; Grant Downing, Timothy

    2015-10-01

    The cyanobacterial neurotoxin, β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) bioaccumulates and biomagnifies within the environment. However, most reports on the environmental presence of BMAA focus on the presence of BMAA in animals rather than in plants. Various laboratory studies have reported that this neurotoxin, implicated in neurodegenerative disease, is rapidly taken up by various aquatic and terrestrial plants, including crop plants. In this study the metabolism of BMAA in the aquatic macrophyte, Ceratophyllum demersum, was investigated using stable isotopically labelled BMAA. Data show that the toxin is rapidly removed from the environment by the plant. However, during depuration cellular BMAA concentrations decrease considerably, without excretion of the toxin back into the environment and without catabolism of BMAA, evidenced by the absence of label transfer to other amino acids. This strongly suggests that BMAA is metabolised via covalent modification and sequestered inside the plant as a BMAA-derivative. This modification may be reversed in humans following consumption of BMAA-containing plant material. These data therefore impact on the assessment of the risk of human exposure to this neurotoxin. PMID:26036420

  1. Bacteria do not incorporate β-N-methylamino-L-alanine into their proteins.

    PubMed

    van Onselen, Rianita; Cook, Niall A; Phelan, Richard R; Downing, Tim G

    2015-08-01

    β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), is commonly found in both a free and proteinassociated form in various organisms exposed to the toxin. The long latency of development of neurodegeneration attributed to BMAA, is hypothesized to be the result of excitotoxicity following slow release of the toxin from protein reservoirs. It was recently suggested that these BMAA-protein associations may reflect misincorporation of BMAA in place of serine, as occurs, for example, when canavanine misincorporates in place of arginine. We therefore compared BMAA and canavanine toxicty in various bacterial species, and misincorporation of these amino acids into proteins in a bacterial protein expression system. None of the bacterial species showed any physiological stress responses to BMAA in contrast to the growth reduction observed when cultures were incubated in media containing canavanine. LC-MS analysis confirmed uptake of BMAA from growth media. However, after immobilized metal affinity chromatography and SDS-PAGE purification of proteins produced in an E scherichia coli expression system, no BMAA was detected by either LC-MS or LC-MS/MS analysis using two derivatization methods, or by orbitrap MS of trypsin digests of the protein. We therefore conclude that BMAA is not misincorporated into proteins in bacteria and that the observed BMAA-protein association in bacteria is superficial. PMID:26051985

  2. Acute β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine Toxicity in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Al-Sammak, Maitham Ahmed; Rogers, Douglas G; Hoagland, Kyle D

    2015-01-01

    The cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is considered to be an "excitotoxin," and its suggested mechanism of action is killing neurons. Long-term exposure to L-BMAA is believed to lead to neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease). Objectives of this study were to determine the presumptive median lethal dose (LD50), the Lowest-Observed-Adverse-Effect Level (LOAEL), and histopathologic lesions caused by the naturally occurring BMAA isomer, L-BMAA, in mice. Seventy NIH Swiss Outbred mice (35 male and 35 female) were used. Treatment group mice were injected intraperitoneally with 0.03, 0.3, 1, 2, and 3 mg/g body weight L-BMAA, respectively, and control mice were sham-injected. The presumptive LD50 of L-BMAA was 3 mg/g BW and the LOAEL was 2 mg/g BW. There were no histopathologic lesions in brain, liver, heart, kidney, lung, or spleen in any of the mice during the 14-day study. L-BMAA was detected in brains and livers in all of treated mice but not in control mice. Males injected with 0.03 mg/g BW, 0.3 mg/g BW, and 3.0 mg/g BW L-BMAA showed consistently higher concentrations (P < 0.01) in brain and liver samples as compared to females in those respective groups. PMID:26604922

  3. Quantification of neurotoxin BMAA (β-N-methylamino-L-alanine) in seafood from Swedish markets.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liying; Kiselova, Nadezda; Rosén, Johan; Ilag, Leopold L

    2014-01-01

    The neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) produced naturally by cyanobacteria, diatoms and dinoflagellates can be transferred and accumulated up the food chain, and may be a risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases. This study provides the first systematic screening of BMAA exposure of a large population through the consumption of seafood sold in metropolitan markets. BMAA was distinguished from known isomers by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry after acidic hydrolysis and derivatization. Using deuterium-labeled internal standard, BMAA was quantified as 0.01-0.90 μg/g wet weight of tissues in blue mussel, oyster, shrimp, plaice, char and herring, but was undetectable (<0.01 μg/g) in other samples (salmon, cod, perch and crayfish). Provided that the content of BMAA detected is relevant for intake calculations, the data presented may be used for a first estimation of BMAA exposure through seafood from Swedish markets, and to refine the design of future toxicological experiments and assessments. PMID:25373604

  4. Membrane topology of aspartate:alanine antiporter AspT from Comamonas testosteroni.

    PubMed

    Fujiki, Takashi; Nanatani, Kei; Nishitani, Kei; Yagi, Kyoko; Ohnishi, Fumito; Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Uchida, Takafumi; Nakajima, Tasuku; Abea, Keietsu

    2007-01-01

    We cloned the aspT gene encoding the L-aspartate:L-alanine antiporter AspTCt in Comamonas testosteroni genomic DNA. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence revealed that C. testosteroni has an asp operon containing aspT upstream of the l-aspartate 4-decarboxylase gene, and that the gene order of the asp operon of C. testosteroni is the inverse of that of Tetragenococcus halophilus. We used proteoliposomes to confirm the transport processes of AspTCt. To elucidate the two-dimensional structure of AspTCt, we analysed its membrane topology by means of alkaline phosphatase (PhoA) and beta-lactamase (BlaM) fusion methods. The fusion analyses revealed that AspTCt has seven transmembrane segments (TMs), a large cytoplasmic loop containing approximately 200 amino acid residues between TM4 and TM5, a cytoplasmic N-terminus, and a periplasmic C-terminus. These results suggest that the orientation of the N-terminus of AspTCt differs from that of tetragenococcal AspT, even though these two AspT orthologues catalyse the same transport reactions. PMID:17158863

  5. Anisotropy-Guided Enantiomeric Enhancement in AlanineUsing Far-UV Circularly Polarized Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinert, Cornelia; Cassam-Chenaï, Patrick; Jones, Nykola C.; Nahon, Laurent; Hoffmann, Søren V.; Meierhenrich, Uwe J.

    2015-06-01

    All life on Earth is characterized by its asymmetry - both the genetic material and proteins are composed of homochiral monomers. Understanding how this molecular asymmetry initially arose is a key question related to the origins of life. Cometary ice simulations, l-enantiomeric enriched amino acids in meteorites and the detection of circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation in star-forming regions point to a possible interstellar/protostellar generation of stereochemical asymmetry. Based upon our recently recorded anisotropy spectra g( λ) of amino acids in the vacuum-UV range, we subjected amorphous films of racemic 13C-alanine to far-UV circularly polarized synchrotron radiation to probe the asymmetric photon-molecule interaction under interstellar conditions. Optical purities of up to 4 % were reached, which correlate with our theoretical predictions. Importantly, we show that chiral symmetry breaking using circularly polarized light is dependent on both the helicity and the wavelength of incident light. In order to predict such stereocontrol, time-dependent density functional theory was used to calculate anisotropy spectra. The calculated anisotropy spectra show good agreement with the experimental ones. The European Space Agency's Rosetta mission, which successfully landed Philae on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on 12 November 2014, will investigate the configuration of chiral compounds and thereby obtain data that are to be interpreted in the context of the results presented here.

  6. Growth and characterization of L-alanine cadmium bromide a semiorganic nonlinear optical crystals.

    PubMed

    Ilayabarathi, P; Chandrasekaran, J

    2012-10-01

    A new semiorganic nonlinear optical crystal, l-alanine cadmium bromide (LACB) was grown from aqueous solution by slow solvent evaporation method at room temperature. As grown crystals were characterized for its spectral, thermal, linear and second order nonlinear optical properties. LACB crystallizes in orthorhombic system and unit cell parameters a=5.771(2)Å, b=6.014(4)Å, c=12.298(2)Å, α=β=γ=90° and volume=426.8(3)Å(3). The mode of vibrations of different molecular groups present in the crystal was identified by FTIR study. The grown crystals were found to be transparent in the entire visible region. The thermal strength and the decomposition of the grown crystals were studied using TG/DTA and DSC analysis. Dielectric measurement revealed that the crystals had very low dielectric constant at higher frequency in room temperature. The mechanical behavior was studied by Vicker's microhardness tester. The grown crystal has negative photoconductivity nature. The fluorescence spectrum of the crystal was recorded and its optical band gap is about 3.356 eV. The NLO property of crystal using modified Kurtz-Perry powder technique with Nd:YAG laser light of wavelength 1064nm indicated that their second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency was half that of pure KDP. PMID:22885081

  7. Two alanine aminotranferases link mitochondrial glycolate oxidation to the major photorespiratory pathway in Arabidopsis and rice.

    PubMed

    Niessen, Markus; Krause, Katrin; Horst, Ina; Staebler, Norma; Klaus, Stephanie; Gaertner, Stefanie; Kebeish, Rashad; Araujo, Wagner L; Fernie, Alisdair R; Peterhansel, Christoph

    2012-04-01

    The major photorespiratory pathway in higher plants is distributed over chloroplasts, mitochondria, and peroxisomes. In this pathway, glycolate oxidation takes place in peroxisomes. It was previously suggested that a mitochondrial glycolate dehydrogenase (GlcDH) that was conserved from green algae lacking leaf-type peroxisomes contributes to photorespiration in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, the identification of two Arabidopsis mitochondrial alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferases (ALAATs) that link glycolate oxidation to glycine formation are described. By this reaction, the mitochondrial side pathway produces glycine from glyoxylate that can be used in the glycine decarboxylase (GCD) reaction of the major pathway. RNA interference (RNAi) suppression of mitochondrial ALAAT did not result in major changes in metabolite pools under standard conditions or enhanced photorespiratroy flux, respectively. However, RNAi lines showed reduced photorespiratory CO(2) release and a lower CO(2) compensation point. Mitochondria isolated from RNAi lines are incapable of converting glycolate to CO(2), whereas simultaneous overexpression of GlcDH and ALAATs in transiently transformed tobacco leaves enhances glycolate conversion. Furthermore, analyses of rice mitochondria suggest that the side pathway for glycolate oxidation and glycine formation is conserved in monocotyledoneous plants. It is concluded that the photorespiratory pathway from green algae has been functionally conserved in higher plants. PMID:22268146

  8. Biotransfer of β-N-Methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) in a Eutrophicated Freshwater Lake

    PubMed Central

    Lage, Sandra; Annadotter, Heléne; Rasmussen, Ulla; Rydberg, Sara

    2015-01-01

    β-N-Methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), a neurotoxic non-protein amino acid, plays a significant role as an environmental risk factor in neurodegenerative diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. BMAA producers occur globally, colonizing almost all habitats and represent species from distinct phytoplanktonic groups, i.e., cyanobacteria, diatoms, and dinoflagellates. Bioaccumulation of BMAA in invertebrate and vertebrate organisms has also been registered around the globe. In the Baltic Sea, BMAA has been detected in several commercial fish species, raising the question of the bioaccumulation of BMAA in Swedish limnic systems. Here we find the presence of BMAA in water samples from Lake Finjasjön and identify its bioaccumulation patterns in both plankti-benthivorous and piscivorous fish, according to fish species, total weight, gender, and season of collection. For the first time, a large number of fish individuals were used in order to draw conclusions on BMAA bioaccumulation in a closed ecological community based on a statistical approach. We may, therefore, conclude that feeding patterns (plankti-benthivorous) and increased age of fish may lead to a higher tissue concentration of BMAA. PMID:25738330

  9. Analysis of parameters that influence the amplitude of the ESR/alanine signal after irradiation.

    PubMed

    Dolo, J M; Feaugas, V

    2005-02-01

    When ESR/alanine dosimetry is used for comparison, the time elapsed between irradiation and measurement is critical. Several publications have already mentioned the need for monitoring some of the parameters before, during and after irradiation for accurate normalization of ESR measurements. Nevertheless, neither classification nor coupling effects have yet been mentioned. By application of an experimental design approach, some parameters such as temperature and humidity during storage, before and after irradiation, have been studied. Results are given about the way the signal tends to evolve, ranking the parameters according to their influence and the effects of parameter coupling. A comparison with a conventional approach (study of one parameter at a time) is made. It is proposed to use a normalized ESR measurement that better accounts for the chemical aspect. A better fit of the results (amplitude versus time) is observed when amplitude is corrected taking into account the water content of the dosimeter for a given relative humidity of the surrounding atmosphere during storage. PMID:15607461

  10. Transcription and genetic analyses of a putative N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanine amidase in Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu; Li, Chunhao

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a putative N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanine amidase gene (bb0666) was identified in the genome of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. This protein shares c. 30% identity with its counterparts from other bacteria. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis showed that bb0666 along with two other genes (bb0665 and bb0667) are cotranscribed with the motility and chemotaxis genes. This newly identified operon is termed as pami. Sequence and primer extension analyses showed that pami was regulated by a σ70-like promoter, which is designated as Pami. Transcriptional analysis using a gene encoding green fluorescence protein as a reporter demonstrated that Pami functions in both Escherichia coli and B. burgdorferi. Genetic studies showed that the Δbb0666 mutant grows in long chains of unseparated cells, whose phenotype is similar to its counterparts in E. coli. Taken together, these results demonstrate that bb0666 is a homolog of MurNac-LAAs that contributes to the cell division of B. burgdorferi. PMID:19025570

  11. A Micro-Platinum Wire Biosensor for Fast and Selective Detection of Alanine Aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Thuy, Tran Nguyen Thanh; Tseng, Tina T-C

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a miniaturized biosensor based on permselective polymer layers (overoxidized polypyrrole (Ppy) and Nafion(®)) modified and enzyme (glutamate oxidase (GlutOx)) immobilized micro-platinum wire electrode for the detection of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was fabricated. The proposed ALT biosensor was measured electrochemically by constant potential amperometry at +0.7 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The ALT biosensor provides fast response time (~5 s) and superior selectivity towards ALT against both negatively and positively charged species (e.g., ascorbic acid (AA) and dopamine (DA), respectively). The detection range of the ALT biosensor is found to be 10-900 U/L which covers the range of normal ALT levels presented in the serum and the detection limit and sensitivity are found to be 8.48 U/L and 0.059 nA/(U/L·mm²) (N = 10), respectively. We also found that one-day storage of the ALT biosensor at -20 °C right after the sensor being fabricated can enhance the sensor sensitivity (1.74 times higher than that of the sensor stored at 4 °C). The ALT biosensor is stable after eight weeks of storage at -20 °C. The sensor was tested in spiked ALT samples (ALT activities: 20, 200, 400, and 900 U/L) and reasonable recoveries (70%~107%) were obtained. PMID:27240366

  12. Development of an alanine dosimeter for gamma dosimetry in mixed environments

    SciTech Connect

    Vehar, D.W.; Griffin, P.J.

    1992-12-31

    L-{alpha}a-Alanine, a nontoxic polycrystalline amino acid, has been investigated for use in high-precision, high-level absorbed-dose measurements in mixed neutron/photon environments such as research and test reactors. The technique is based on the use of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to determine the extent of free radical production in a sample exposed to ionizing radiation, and has been successfully used for photon absorbed-dose measurements at levels exceeding 10{sup 5} Gy with high measurement precision. Application of the technique to mixed environments requires knowledge of the energy-dependent response of the dosimeter for both photons and neutrons. Determination of the dosimeter response to photons is accomplished by irradiations in {sup 60}Co and bremsstrahlung sources and by calculations of energy-dependent photon kerma. Neutron response is determined by calculations in conjunction with CaF{sub 2}:Mn thermoluminescence dosimeters and by calculations of energy-dependent neutron kerma. Several neutron environments are used, including the ACRR and SPR-III reactors.

  13. Development of an alanine dosimeter for gamma dosimetry in mixed environments -- Summary of research

    SciTech Connect

    Vehar, D.W.; Griffin, P.J.

    1994-02-01

    L-{alpha}-alanine, a nontoxic polycrystalline amino acid, has been investigated for use in high-precision, high-level absorbed-dose measurements in mixed neutron/photon environments such as research and test reactors. The technique is based on the use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to determine the extent of free radical production in a sample exposed to ionizing radiation, and has been successfully used for photon absorbed-dose measurements at levels exceeding 10{sup 5} Gy with high measurement precision. Application of the technique to mixed environments requires knowledge of the energy-dependent response of the dosimeter for both photons and neutrons. Determination of the dosimeter response to photons is accomplished by irradiations in {sup 60}Co and bremsstrahlung sources and by calculations of energy-dependent photon kerma. Neutron response is determined by irradiations in conjunction with CaF{sub 2}:Mn thermoluminescence dosimeters and by calculations of energy-dependent neutron kerma. Several neutron environments are used, including those provided by the Annular Core Research Reactor and Sandia Pulsed Reactor.

  14. Moments and distribution functions for polypeptide chains. Poly-L-alanine.

    PubMed

    Conrad, J C; Flory, P J

    1976-01-01

    Statistical mechanical averages of vectors and tensors characterizing the configurations of polypeptides have been calculated for poly-L-alanines (PLA) of xu = 2-400 peptide units. These quantities are expressed in the reference frame of the first peptide unit, the X axis being situated along the virtual bond, the Y axis in the plane of the peptide unit. The persistence vector a identical to (r) converges rapidly with chain length to its limit a infinity which lies virtually in the XZ plane. Configurational averages of Cartesian tensors up to the sixth rank formed from the displacement vector p = r-a have been computed. For xu greater than 50 the even moments of fourth and sixth rank formed from the reduced vector p for the real chain are well repreented by the freely jointed chain with 21.7 virtual bonds equivalent to one of the model. The moments of p display assymmetry for xu less than 50. Density distribution functions Wa(p), evaluated from the three-dimensional Hermite series truncated at the term in the polynomial involving the tensors of p of sixth rank, display no obvious symmetry for xu less than 50. Approximate spherical symmetry of the distribution of p about a is observed only for xu greater than or equal to 100. PMID:1249990

  15. PPAR{alpha} regulates the hepatotoxic biomarker alanine aminotransferase (ALT1) gene expression in human hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Thulin, Petra; Rafter, Ingalill; Stockling, Kenneth; Tomkiewicz, Celine; Norjavaara, Ensio; Aggerbeck, Martine; Hellmold, Heike; Ehrenborg, Ewa; Andersson, Ulf; Cotgreave, Ian; Glinghammar, Bjoern

    2008-08-15

    In this work, we investigated a potential mechanism behind the observation of increased aminotransferase levels in a phase I clinical trial using a lipid-lowering drug, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) {alpha} agonist, AZD4619. In healthy volunteers treated with AZD4619, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities were elevated without an increase in other markers for liver injury. These increases in serum aminotransferases have previously been reported in some patients receiving another PPAR{alpha} agonist, fenofibrate. In subsequent in vitro studies, we observed increased expression of ALT1 protein and mRNA in human hepatocytes after treatment with fenofibric acid. The PPAR effect on ALT1 expression was shown to act through a direct transcriptional mechanism involving at least one PPAR response element (PPRE) in the proximal ALT1 promoter, while no effect of fenofibrate and AZD4619 was observed on the ALT2 promoter. Binding of PPARs to the PPRE located at - 574 bp from the transcriptional start site was confirmed on both synthetic oligonucleotides and DNA in hepatocytes. These data show that intracellular ALT expression is regulated by PPAR agonists and that this mechanism might contribute to increased ALT activity in serum.

  16. Overexpression of Ste20-related proline/alanine-rich kinase exacerbates experimental colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yutao; Laroui, Hamed; Ingersoll, Sarah A; Ayyadurai, Saravanan; Charania, Moiz; Yang, Stephen; Dalmasso, Guillaume; Obertone, Tracy S; Nguyen, Hang; Sitaraman, Shanthi V; Merlin, Didier

    2011-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease, mainly Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, are characterized by epithelial barrier disruption and altered immune regulation. Colonic Ste20-like proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) plays a role in intestinal inflammation, but its underlying mechanisms need to be defined. Both SPAK-transfected Caco2-BBE cells and villin-SPAK transgenic (TG) FVB/6 mice exhibited loss of intestinal barrier function. Further studies demonstrated that SPAK significantly increased paracellular intestinal permeability to FITC-dextran. In vivo studies using the mouse models of colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) and trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid showed that TG FVB/6 mice were more susceptible to DSS and trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid treatment than wild-type FVB/6 mice, as demonstrated by clinical and histological characteristics and enzymatic activities. Consistent with this notion, we found that SPAK increased intestinal epithelial permeability, which likely facilitated the production of inflammatory cytokines in vitro and in vivo, aggravated bacterial translocation in TG mice under DSS treatment, and consequently established a context favorable for the triggering of intestinal inflammation cascades. In conclusion, overexpression of SPAK inhibits maintenance of intestinal mucosal innate immune homeostasis, which makes regulation of SPAK important to attenuate pathological responses in inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:21705622

  17. Enantioselective hydrogenation of pyruvic acid oxime to alanine on Pd/Alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Borszeky, K.; Mallat, T.; Aeschiman, R.

    1996-06-01

    The chemo- and enantioselective hydrogenation of pyruvic acid oxime have been studied on Pd/alumina, the latter in the presence of the 1,2-amino alcohol type alkaloids ephedrine, cinchonidine, and cinchonine. High yields of racemic alanine (90-98%) were obtained in the absence of alkaloids in polar solvents at 0-45{degrees}C and 10 bar. Enantioselection increased with higher temperature and alkalid: oxime molar ratio. A 1:1 ephedrine: oxime molar ratio afforded the best enantiomeric excess (26%). The presence of alkaloid resulted in a decrease of reaction rate by a factor of up to 140, compared to the racemic hydrogenation. Based on X-ray crystal structure analysis of the alkaloid-pyruvic acid oxime adduct, a mechanism is proposed for the steric course of the reaction. Extended interactions by multiple H bonds between the adsorbed alkaloid-oxime salt units on the Pd surface is assumed to be at the origin of the moderate enantioselectivity and the very low enantioselective hydrogenation rate. 28 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Uptake of a cyanotoxin, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine, by wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    PubMed

    Contardo-Jara, Valeska; Schwanemann, Torsten; Pflugmacher, Stephan

    2014-06-01

    In order to study the uptake of the cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) into the crop plant Triticum aestivum during germination and primary growth imbibed grains and 7-day-old seedlings were irrigated with 100 and 1000µg l(-1) BMAA for 4 days and 100µg l(-1) BMAA for 28 days. Content of derivatized free and protein-associated BMAA in seedlings, root and shoot tissue, respectively, were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Free BMAA was only detected in seedlings exposed to 1000µg l(-1) BMAA, whereas protein-associated BMAA was found at both exposure concentrations. Irrigation with 100µgl(-1) BMAA led to an uptake of the neurotoxin into roots and shoots and to immediate protein-association. In roots, protein-associated BMAA was detectable after 5 days with peaking amounts after 14 days. Longer exposure did not cause further accumulation in roots. In contrast, protein-associated BMAA was detected in shoot samples after only 1 day. In shoots the highest amounts of protein-associated BMAA were found after 28 days. In turn, in both plant compartments free BMAA was below the measurable concentration. PMID:24675440

  19. Cyclic side-chain-linked opioid analogs utilizing cis- and trans-4-aminocyclohexyl-D-alanine.

    PubMed

    Piekielna, Justyna; Gentilucci, Luca; De Marco, Rossella; Perlikowska, Renata; Adamska, Anna; Olczak, Jacek; Mazur, Marzena; Artali, Roberto; Modranka, Jakub; Janecki, Tomasz; Tömböly, Csaba; Janecka, Anna

    2014-12-01

    Cyclization of linear sequences is a well recognized tool in opioid peptide chemistry for generating analogs with improved bioactivities. Cyclization can be achieved through various bridging bonds between peptide ends or side-chains. In our earlier paper we have reported the synthesis and biological activity of a cyclic peptide, Tyr-c[D-Lys-Phe-Phe-Asp]NH2 (1), which can be viewed as an analog of endomorphin-2 (EM-2, Tyr-Pro-Phe-Phe-NH2). Cyclization was achieved through an amide bond between side-chains of D-Lys and Asp residues. Here, to increase rigidity of the cyclic structure, we replaced d-Lys with cis- or trans-4-aminocyclohexyl-D-alanine (D-ACAla). Two sets of analogs incorporating either Tyr or Dmt (2',6'-dimethyltyrosine) residues in position 1 were synthesized. In the binding studies the analog incorporating Dmt and trans-D-ACAla showed high affinity for both, μ- and δ-opioid receptors (MOR and DOR, respectively) and moderate affinity for the κ-opioid receptor (KOR), while analog with Dmt and cis-D-ACAla was exceptionally MOR-selective. Conformational analyses by NMR and molecular docking studies have been performed to investigate the molecular structural features responsible for the noteworthy MOR selectivity. PMID:25456075

  20. Peptide conformational preferences in osmolyte solutions: Transfer free energies of deca-alanine

    PubMed Central

    Kokubo, Hironori; Hu, Char Y.; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2011-01-01

    The nature in which the protecting osmolyte trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) and the denaturing osmolyte urea affect protein stability is investigated simulating a deca-alanine peptide model in multiple conformations of the denatured ensemble. Binary solutions of both osmolytes and mixed osmolyte solutions at physiologically-relevant concentrations of 2:1 (urea:TMAO) are studied using standard molecular dynamics simulations and solvation free energy calculations. Component analysis reveals the differences in the importance of the van der Waals (vdW) and electrostatic interactions for protecting and denaturing osmolytes. We find that urea denaturation governed by transfer free energy differences is dominated by vdW attractions, whereas TMAO exerts its effect by causing unfavorable electrostatic interactions both in the binary solution and mixed osmolyte solution. Analysis of the results showed no evidence in the ternary solution of disruption of the correlations among the peptide and osmolytes, nor of significant changes in the strength of the water hydrogen bond network. PMID:21250690

  1. Sodium Perchlorate Effects on the Helical Stability of a Mainly Alanine Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Asciutto, Eliana K.; General, Ignacio J.; Xiong, Kang; Asher, Sanford A.; Madura, Jeffry D.

    2010-01-01

    Sodium perchlorate salt (NaClO4) is commonly used as an internal intensity standard in ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy experiments. It is well known that NaClO4 can have profound effects on peptide stability. The impact of NaClO4 on protein stability in UVRR experiments has not yet been fully investigated. It is well known from experiment that protein stability is strongly affected by the solution composition (water, salts, osmolytes, etc.). Therefore, it is of the utmost importance to understand the physical basis on which the presence of salts and osmolytes in the solution impact protein structure and stability. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of NaClO4, on the helical stability of an alanine peptide in water. Based upon replica-exchange molecular dynamics data, it was found that NaClO4 solution strongly stabilizes the helical state and that the number of pure helical conformations found at room temperature is greater than in pure water. A thorough investigation of the anion effects on the first and second solvation shells of the peptide, along with the Kirkwood-Buff theory for solutions, allows us to explain the physical mechanisms involved in the observed specific ion effects. A direct mechanism was found in which ClO4− ions are strongly attracted to the folded backbone. PMID:20338840

  2. Determination of free L- and D-alanine in hydrolysed protein fertilisers by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Cavani, Luciano; Ciavatta, Claudio; Gessa, Carlo

    2003-01-24

    of racemisation of hydrolysed protein fertilisers (HPFs) using an The objective of this study was to determine the degree inexpensive and easy to handle analytical method for qualitative control of the products. Using a polyacrylamide coated capillary and a run buffer containing 0.1 M Tris-borate+2.5 mM EDTA-Na2+0.1% sodium dodecylsulfate+10 mM beta-cyclodextrin a quantitative separation of D- and L-alanine (Ala) was made from an not treated HPF sample derivatised with dansyl chlorine by capillary electrophoresis. The D-Ala:[D-Ala+L-Ala] ratio, called degree of racemisation (RD), was calculated. The analysis of ten commercial HPFs has shown that more than 60% of HPFs have an RD > or = 40%. while only one product has shown an RD <5%. These results showed that most of the HPFs on the market are obtained with strong hydrolytic processes and high contents of D-amino acids are probably less effective as plant nutrients or even potentially dangerous to plants. PMID:12580515

  3. The role of herpes simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase alanine 168 in substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Candice L, Willmon; Django, Sussman; Margaret E, Black

    2008-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV) thymidine kinase (TK) has been widely used in suicide gene therapy for the treatment of cancer due to its broad substrate specificity and the inability of the endogenous human TK to phosphorylate guanosine analogs such as ganciclovir (GCV). The basis of suicide gene therapy is the introduction of a gene that encodes a prodrug-activating enzyme into tumor cells. After administration, the prodrug is selectively converted to a toxic drug by the suicide gene product thereby bringing about the eradication of the cancer cells. A major drawback to this therapy is the low activity the enzyme displays towards the prodrugs, requiring high prodrug doses that result in adverse side effects. Earlier studies revealed two HSV TK variants (SR39 and mutant 30) derived by random mutagenesis with enhanced activities towards GCV in vitro and in vivo. While these mutants contain multiple amino acid substitutions, molecular modeling suggests that substitutions at alanine 168 (A168) may be responsible for the observed increase in prodrug sensitivity. To evaluate this, site-directed mutagenesis was used to individually substitute A168 with phenylalanine or tyrosine to reflect the mutations found in SR39 and mutant 30, respectively. Additionally, kinetic parameters and the ability of these mutants to sensitize tumor cells to GCV in comparison to wild-type thymidine kinase were determined. PMID:18949076

  4. Mapping protein-protein interactions with phage-displayed combinatorial peptide libraries and alanine scanning.

    PubMed

    Kokoszka, Malgorzata E; Kay, Brian K

    2015-01-01

    One avenue for inferring the function of a protein is to learn what proteins it may bind to in the cell. Among the various methodologies, one way for doing so is to affinity select peptide ligands from a phage-displayed combinatorial peptide library and then to examine if the proteins that carry such peptide sequences interact with the target protein in the cell. With the protocols described in this chapter, a laboratory with skills in microbiology, molecular biology, and protein biochemistry can readily identify peptides in the library that bind selectively, and with micromolar affinity, to a given target protein on the time scale of 2 months. To illustrate this approach, we use a library of bacteriophage M13 particles, which display 12-mer combinatorial peptides, to affinity select different peptide ligands for two different targets, the SH3 domain of the human Lyn protein tyrosine kinase and a segment of the yeast serine/threonine protein kinase Cbk1. The binding properties of the selected peptide ligands are then dissected by sequence alignment, Kunkel mutagenesis, and alanine scanning. Finally, the peptide ligands can be used to predict cellular interacting proteins and serve as the starting point for drug discovery. PMID:25616333

  5. Associations of functional alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase 2 gene variants with atrial fibrillation and ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Seppälä, Ilkka; Kleber, Marcus E; Bevan, Steve; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Oksala, Niku; Hernesniemi, Jussi A; Mäkelä, Kari-Matti; Rothwell, Peter M; Sudlow, Cathie; Dichgans, Martin; Mononen, Nina; Vlachopoulou, Efthymia; Sinisalo, Juha; Delgado, Graciela E; Laaksonen, Reijo; Koskinen, Tuomas; Scharnagl, Hubert; Kähönen, Mika; Markus, Hugh S; März, Winfried; Lehtimäki, Terho

    2016-01-01

    Asymmetric and symmetric dimethylarginines (ADMA and SDMA) impair nitric oxide bioavailability and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation (AF). Alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase 2 (AGXT2) is the only enzyme capable of metabolizing both of the dimethylarginines. We hypothesized that two functional AGXT2 missense variants (rs37369, V140I; rs16899974, V498L) are associated with AF and its cardioembolic complications. Association analyses were conducted using 1,834 individulas with AF and 7,159 unaffected individuals from two coronary angiography cohorts and a cohort comprising patients undergoing clinical exercise testing. In coronary angiography patients without structural heart disease, the minor A allele of rs16899974 was associated with any AF (OR = 2.07, 95% CI 1.59-2.68), and with paroxysmal AF (OR = 1.98, 95% CI 1.44-2.74) and chronic AF (OR = 2.03, 95% CI 1.35-3.06) separately. We could not replicate the association with AF in the other two cohorts. However, the A allele of rs16899974 was nominally associated with ischemic stroke risk in the meta-analysis of WTCCC2 ischemic stroke cohorts (3,548 cases, 5,972 controls) and with earlier onset of first-ever ischemic stroke (360 cases) in the cohort of clinical exercise test patients. In conclusion, AGXT2 variations may be involved in the pathogenesis of AF and its age-related thromboembolic complications. PMID:26984639

  6. Cyanobacterial Neurotoxin β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in Shark Fins

    PubMed Central

    Mondo, Kiyo; Hammerschlag, Neil; Basile, Margaret; Pablo, John; Banack, Sandra A.; Mash, Deborah C.

    2012-01-01

    Sharks are among the most threatened groups of marine species. Populations are declining globally to support the growing demand for shark fin soup. Sharks are known to bioaccumulate toxins that may pose health risks to consumers of shark products. The feeding habits of sharks are varied, including fish, mammals, crustaceans and plankton. The cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been detected in species of free-living marine cyanobacteria and may bioaccumulate in the marine food web. In this study, we sampled fin clips from seven different species of sharks in South Florida to survey the occurrence of BMAA using HPLC-FD and Triple Quadrupole LC/MS/MS methods. BMAA was detected in the fins of all species examined with concentrations ranging from 144 to 1836 ng/mg wet weight. Since BMAA has been linked to neurodegenerative diseases, these results may have important relevance to human health. We suggest that consumption of shark fins may increase the risk for human exposure to the cyanobacterial neurotoxin BMAA. PMID:22412816

  7. Cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in shark fins.

    PubMed

    Mondo, Kiyo; Hammerschlag, Neil; Basile, Margaret; Pablo, John; Banack, Sandra A; Mash, Deborah C

    2012-02-01

    Sharks are among the most threatened groups of marine species. Populations are declining globally to support the growing demand for shark fin soup. Sharks are known to bioaccumulate toxins that may pose health risks to consumers of shark products. The feeding habits of sharks are varied, including fish, mammals, crustaceans and plankton. The cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been detected in species of free-living marine cyanobacteria and may bioaccumulate in the marine food web. In this study, we sampled fin clips from seven different species of sharks in South Florida to survey the occurrence of BMAA using HPLC-FD and Triple Quadrupole LC/MS/MS methods. BMAA was detected in the fins of all species examined with concentrations ranging from 144 to 1836 ng/mg wet weight. Since BMAA has been linked to neurodegenerative diseases, these results may have important relevance to human health. We suggest that consumption of shark fins may increase the risk for human exposure to the cyanobacterial neurotoxin BMAA. PMID:22412816

  8. Alanine Scanning Mutagenesis of Anti-TRAP (AT) Reveals Residues Involved in Binding to TRAP

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yanling; Gollnick, Paul

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) regulates expression of the tryptophan biosynthetic (trp) genes in response to changes in intracellular levels of free L-tryptophan in many gram positive bacteria. When activated by binding tryptophan, TRAP binds to the mRNAs of several genes involved in tryptophan metabolism, and down-regulates transcription or translation of these genes. Anti-TRAP (AT) is an antagonist of TRAP that binds to tryptophan-activated TRAP and prevents it from binding to its RNA targets, and thereby up-regulates trp gene expression. The crystal structure shows that AT is a cone-shaped trimer (AT3) with the N-terminal residues of the three subunits assembled at the apex of the cone and that these trimers can further assemble into a dodecameric (AT12) structure. Using alanine-scanning mutagenesis we found four residues, all located on the “top” region of AT3, which are essential for binding to TRAP. Fluorescent labeling experiments further suggest that the top region of AT is in close juxtaposition to TRAP in the AT-TRAP complex. In vivo studies confirmed the importance of these residues on the top of AT in regulating TRAP mediated gene regulation. PMID:18334255

  9. Knockout of Ste20-like proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) attenuates intestinal inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuchen; Viennois, Emilie; Xiao, Bo; Baker, Mark T; Yang, Stephen; Okoro, Ijeoma; Yan, Yutao

    2013-05-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are characterized by epithelial barrier disruption and alterations in immune regulation. Ste20-like proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) plays a role in intestinal inflammation, but the underlying mechanisms need to be defined. Herein, SPAK knockout (KO) C57BL/6 mice exhibited significant increases in intestinal transepithelial resistance, a marked decrease in paracellular permeability to fluorescence isothiocyanate-dextran, and altered apical side tight junction sodium ion selectivity, compared with wild-type mice. Furthermore, the expression of junction protein, claudin-2, decreased. In contrast, expressions of occludin, E-cadherin, β-catenin, and claudin-5 increased significantly, whereas no obvious change of claudin-1, claudin-4, zonula occludens protein 1, and zonula occludens protein 2 expressions was observed. In murine models of colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium and trinitrobenzene sulfuric acid, KO mice were more tolerant than wild-type mice, as demonstrated by colonoscopy features, histological characteristics, and myeloperoxidase activities. Consistent with these findings, KO mice showed increased IL-10 levels and decreased proinflammatory cytokine secretion, ameliorated bacterial translocation on treatment with dextran sulfate sodium, and regulation of with no lysine (WNK) kinase activity. Together, these features may reduce epithelial permeability. In conclusion, SPAK deficiency increases intestinal innate immune homeostasis, which is important for control or attenuation of pathological responses in inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:23499375

  10. Inhibition of alanine racemase by alanine phosphonate: detection of an imine linkage to pyridoxal 5'-phosphate in the enzyme-inhibitor complex by solid-state /sup 15/N nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Copie, V.; Faraci, W.S.; Walsh, C.T.; Griffin, R.G.

    1988-07-12

    Inhibition of alanine racemase from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus by (1-aminoethyl)phosphonic acid (Ala-P) proceeds via a two-step reaction pathway in which reactivation occurs very slowly. In order to determine the mechanism of inhibition, the authors have recorded low-temperature, solid-state /sup 15/N NMR spectra from microcrystals of the (/sup 15/N)Ala-P-enzyme complex, together with spectra of a series of model compounds that provide the requisite database for the interpretation of the /sup 15/N chemical shifts. Proton-decoupled spectra of the microcrystals exhibit a line at approx. 150 ppm, which conclusively demonstrates the presence of a protonated Ala-P-PLP aldimine and thus clarifies the structure of the enzyme-inhibitor complex. They also report the pH dependence of Ala-P binding to alanine racemase.

  11. Beyond complete positivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominy, Jason M.; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2016-04-01

    We provide a general and consistent formulation for linear subsystem quantum dynamical maps, developed from a minimal set of postulates, primary among which is a relaxation of the usual, restrictive assumption of uncorrelated initial system-bath states. We describe the space of possibilities admitted by this formulation, namely that, far from being limited to only completely positive (CP) maps, essentially any C-linear, Hermiticity-preserving, trace-preserving map can arise as a legitimate subsystem dynamical map from a joint unitary evolution of a system coupled to a bath. The price paid for this added generality is a trade-off between the set of admissible initial states and the allowed set of joint system-bath unitary evolutions. As an application, we present a simple example of a non-CP map constructed as a subsystem dynamical map that violates some fundamental inequalities in quantum information theory, such as the quantum data processing inequality.

  12. Completely bootstrapped tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Weening, R.H. ); Boozer, A.H. )

    1992-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the evolution of large-scale magnetic fields have been developed using a mean-field Ohm's law. The Ohm's law is coupled to a {Delta}{prime} stabilty analysis and a magnetic island growth equation in order to simulate the behavior of tokamak plasmas that are subject to tearing modes. In one set of calculations, the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)-stable regime of the tokamak is examined via the construction of an {ital l}{sub {ital i}} -{ital q}{sub {ital a}} diagram. The results confirm previous calculations that show that tearing modes introduce a stability boundary into the {ital l}{sub {ital i}} -{ital q}{sub {ital a}} space. In another series of simulations, the interaction between tearing modes and the bootstrap current is investigated. The results indicate that a completely bootstrapped tokamak may be possible, even in the absence of any externally applied loop voltage or current drive.

  13. Structures of an alanine racemase from Bacillus anthracis (BA0252) in the presence and absence of (R)-1-aminoethylphosphonic acid (l-Ala-P)

    SciTech Connect

    Au, Kinfai; Ren, Jingshan; Walter, Thomas S.; Harlos, Karl; Nettleship, Joanne E.; Owens, Raymond J.; Stuart, David I.; Esnouf, Robert M.

    2008-05-01

    Structures of BA0252, an alanine racemase from B. anthracis, in the presence and absence of the inhibitor (R)-1-aminoethylphosphonic acid (l-Ala-P) and determined by X-ray crystallography to resolutions of 2.1 and 1.47 Å, respectively, are described. Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, has been targeted by the Oxford Protein Production Facility to validate high-throughput protocols within the Structural Proteomics in Europe project. As part of this work, the structures of an alanine racemase (BA0252) in the presence and absence of the inhibitor (R)-1-aminoethylphosphonic acid (l-Ala-P) have determined by X-ray crystallo@@graphy to resolutions of 2.1 and 1.47 Å, respectively. Difficulties in crystallizing this protein were overcome by the use of reductive methylation. Alanine racemase has attracted much interest as a possible target for anti-anthrax drugs: not only is d-alanine a vital component of the bacterial cell wall, but recent studies also indicate that alanine racemase, which is accessible in the exosporium, plays a key role in inhibition of germination in B. anthracis. These structures confirm the binding mode of l-Ala-P but suggest an unexpected mechanism of inhibition of alanine racemase by this compound and could provide a basis for the design of improved alanine racemase inhibitors with potential as anti-anthrax therapies.

  14. Incremental effects of 28 days of beta-alanine supplementation on high-intensity cycling performance and blood lactate in masters female cyclists.

    PubMed

    Glenn, J M; Gray, M; Stewart, R; Moyen, N E; Kavouras, S A; DiBrezzo, R; Turner, R; Baum, J

    2015-12-01

    Within the aging population, there exists a subset of individuals termed masters athletes (MA). As masters-level competition increases in popularity, MA must find methods to enhance individual athletic performance. Longitudinal beta-alanine (BA) supplementation is suggested to enhance physical capability during exercise; however, these effects have not been evaluated in MA. To examine the longitudinal effects of BA on time to exhaustion (TTE), total work completed (TWC), and lactate clearance in female MA cyclists. Twenty-two female MA (age = 53.3 ± 1.0) participated in this double-blind design. Subjects were randomly assigned to BA (n = 11; 800 mg BA + 8 g dextrose) or placebo (PLA; n = 11; 8 g dextrose) groups and supplemented 4 doses/day over 28 days. Every 7 days, subjects completed a cycling TTE at 120% VO2max, and TWC was calculated. Blood lactate was measured at baseline, immediate post, and 20-min post each TTE. No significant differences existed between groups for any variable at baseline (p > 0.05). After 28 days supplementation, BA had greater TTE (23 vs 1% change) and TWC (21 vs 2% change) than PLA (p < 0.05). Following the 20-min TTE recovery, lactate was 24% lower in BA compared to PLA (4.35 vs. 5.76 mmol/L, respectively). No differences existed for variables during intermittent weeks. 28 days of BA supplementation increased cycling performance via an enhanced time to exhaustion and total work completed with associated lactate clearance during passive rest in female MA. PMID:26255281

  15. An Optical Overview of Poly[μ2-L-alanine-μ3-nitrato-sodium(I)] Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Gallegos-Loya, E.; Orrantia-Borunda, E.; Duarte-Moller, A.

    2012-01-01

    Single crystals of the semiorganic materials, L-alanine sodium nitrate (LASN) and D-alanine sodium nitrate (DASN), were grown from an aqueous solution by slow-evaporation technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were carried for the doped grown crystals. The absorption of these grown crystals was analyzed using UV-Vis-NIR studies, and it was found that these crystals possess minimum absorption from 200 to 1100 nm. An infrared (FTIR) spectrum of single crystal has been measured in the 4000–400 cm−1 range. The assignment of the observed vibrational modes to corresponding symmetry type has been performed. A thermogravimetric study was carried out to determine the thermal properties of the grown crystal. The efficiency of second harmonic generation was obtained by a variant of the Kurtz-Perry method. PMID:22566774

  16. Molecular dynamics of glycine ions in alanine doped TGS single crystal as probed by polarized laser raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajpai, P. K.; Verma, A. L.

    2012-10-01

    Polarized Raman spectra of pure and alanine doped tri-glycine sulfate (TGS) single crystals at 12 K in different scattering geometries are analyzed. Sub species modes due to three crystallographically distinguishable glycine ions G (I), G (II) and G (III) are assigned. It is observed that alanine doping does not change the crystalline field and acts as local perturbation only. The major changes due to doping are observed in the relative intensities of different modes; most of the modes associated with G (I) and SO42- ions show reversal behavior in relative intensity at high doping concentration. The observed spectral changes are analyzed in terms of reorientation of G (I) ions with sub species modes of G (II)/ G (III) following the reorientation due to complex hydrogen bonding network.

  17. New Poly(amide-imide)/Nanocomposites Reinforced Silicate Nanoparticles Based on N-pyromellitimido-L-phenyl Alanine Containing Ether Moieties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faghihi, Khalil; Shabanian, Meisam; Dadfar, Ehsan

    2012-02-01

    A series of Poly(amide-imide)/montmorillonite nanocomposites containing N-pyromellitimido-L-phenyl alanine moiety in the main chain were synthesized by a convenient solution intercalation technique. Poly(amide-imide) (PAI) 5 as a source of polymer matrix was synthesized by the direct polycondensation reaction of N-pyromellitimido-L-phenyl alanine 3 with 4,4'-diamino diphenyl ether 4 in the presence of triphenyl phosphite (TPP), CaCl2, pyridine and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP). The resulting nanocomposite films were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results showed that organo-modified clay was dispersed homogeneously in PAI matrix. TGA indicated an enhancement of thermal stability of new nanocomposites compared with the pure polymer.

  18. R76 in transmembrane domain 3 of the aspartate:alanine transporter AspT is involved in substrate transport.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Satomi; Nanatani, Kei; Abe, Keietsu

    2016-01-01

    The L-aspartate:L-alanine antiporter of Tetragenococcus halophilus (AspT) possesses an arginine residue (R76) within the GxxxG motif in the central part of transmembrane domain 3 (TM3)-a residue that has been estimated to transport function. In this study, we carried out amino acid substitutions of R76 and used proteoliposome reconstitution for analyzing the transport function of each substitution. Both l-aspartate and l-alanine transport assays showed that R76K has higher activity than the AspT-WT (R76), whereas R76D and R76E have lower activity than the AspT-WT. These results suggest that R76 is involved in AspT substrate transport. PMID:26849958

  19. Effect of taurine on the concentrations of glutamate, GABA, glutamine and alanine in the rat striatum and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Molchanova, Svetlana M; Oja, Simos S; Saransaari, Pirjo

    2007-01-01

    Taurine, a non-protein amino acid, acts as an osmoregulator and inhibitory neuromodulator in the brain. Here we studied the effects of intraperitoneal injections of taurine on the concentrations of glutamate and GABA, and their precursors, glutamine and alanine, in the rat striatum and hippocampus. Injections of 0.25, 0.5 and 1 g/kg taurine led to a gradual increase in taurine tissue concentrations in both hippocampus and striatum. Glutamate and GABA also increased in the hippocampus, but not in the striatum. Glutamine increased and alanine decreased markedly in both brain structures. The results corroborate the neuromodulatory role of taurine in the brain. Taurine administration results in an imbalance in inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission in the glutamatergic (hippocampus) and GABAergic (striatum) brain structures, affecting more markedly the neurotransmitter precursors. PMID:18605241

  20. A Comparison of Harwell & FWT Alanine Temperature Coefficients from 25 °C to 80 °C

    PubMed Central

    Desrosiers, M. F.; Forney, A. M.; Puhl, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    The dosimeters used to monitor industrial irradiation processing commonly experience significant temperature rises that must be considered in the dose analysis stage. The irradiation-temperature coefficient for a dosimetry system is derived from the dosimeter’s radiation response to the absorbed dose and the irradiation temperature. This temperature coefficient is typically expressed in percent change per degree. The temperature rise in dosimeters irradiated with high-intensity ionizing radiation sources can be appreciable. This is especially true for electron-beam processing in which dosimeter temperatures can approach 80 °C. A recent National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) study revealed modest (0.5 % to 1.0 %) deviations from the predicted value at temperatures above 70 °C for absorbed doses of 1 kGy and 20 kGy. However, these data were inconsistent with a concurrent manuscript published by National Physical Laboratory (NPL) researchers that found a significant dose-dependent non-linear alanine response but used dosimeters from a different manufacturer and a different experimental design. The current work was undertaken to reconcile the two studies. Alanine dosimeters from each manufacturer used by NIST and NPL were co-irradiated over a wide range of absorbed dose and irradiation temperature. It was found that though there was a slight variation in the temperature coefficient between the two alanine dosimeter sources both systems were linear with irradiation temperature up to 70 °C and the NPL observations of non-linearity were not reproduced. These data confirmed that there is no fundamental difference in the two commercial alanine dosimeter sources and that temperature corrections could be made on industrial irradiations at the extremes of irradiation temperature and absorbed dose. PMID:26900519

  1. Helix Stability of Oligoglycine, Oligoalanine and Oligo-β-alanine Dodecamers Reflected by Hydrogen-Bond Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chengyu; Ponder, Jay W.; Marshall, Garland R.

    2014-01-01

    Helices are important structural/recognition elements in proteins and peptides. Stability and conformational differences between helices composed of α- and β-amino acids as scaffolds for mimicry of helix recognition has become a theme in medicinal chemistry. Furthermore, helices formed by β-amino acids are experimentally more stable than those formed by α-amino acids. This is paradoxical because the larger sizes of the hydrogen-bonding rings required by the extra methylene groups should lead to entropic destabilization. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations using the second-generation force field, AMOEBA [1], explored the stability and hydrogen-bonding patterns of capped oligo-β-alanine, oligoalanine and oligoglycine dodecamers in water. The MD simulations showed that oligo-β-alanine has strong acceptor+2 hydrogen bonds, but surprisingly did not contain a large content of 312-helical structures, possibly due to the sparse distribution of the 312-helical structure and other structures with acceptor+2 hydrogen bonds. On the other hand, despite its backbone flexibility, the β-alanine dodecamer had more stable and persistent <3.0 Å hydrogen bonds. Its structure was dominated more by multicentered hydrogen bonds than either oligoglycine and oligoalanine helices. The 31 (PII) helical structure, prevalent in oligoglycine and oligoalanine, does not appear to be stable in oligo-β-alanine indicating its competition with other structures (stacking structure as indicated by MD analyses). These differences are among the factors that shape helical structural preferences and the relative stabilities of these three oligopeptides. PMID:25116421

  2. Correlation between liver cell necrosis and circulating alanine aminotransferase after ischaemia/reperfusion injuries in the rat liver.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Anders R; Andersen, Kasper J; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen; Nyengaard, Jens R; Mortensen, Frank V

    2016-04-01

    Circulating liver enzymes such as alanine transaminase are often used as markers of hepatocellular damage. Ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is an inevitable consequence of prolonged liver ischaemia. The aim of this study was to examine the correlation between liver enzymes and volume of liver cell necrosis after ischaemia/reperfusion injuries, using design-unbiased stereological methods. Forty-seven male Wistar rats were subjected to 1 h of partial liver ischaemia, followed by either 4 or 24 h of reperfusion. Within each group, one-third of animals were subjected to ischaemic preconditioning and one-third to ischaemic postconditioning. At the end of reperfusion, blood and liver samples were collected for analysis. The volume of necrotic liver tissue was subsequently correlated to circulating markers of I/R injury. Correlation between histological findings and circulating markers was performed using Pearson's correlation coefficient. Alanine transferase peaked after 4 h of reperfusion; however, at this time-point, only mild necrosis was observed, with a Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.663 (P = 0.001). After 24 h of reperfusion, alanine aminotransferase was found to be highly correlated to the degree of hepatocellular necrosis R = 0.836 (P = 0.000). Furthermore, alkaline phosphatase (R = 0.806) and α-2-macroglobulin (R = 0.655) levels were also correlated with the degree of necrosis. We show for the first time that there is a close correlation between the volume of hepatocellular necrosis and alanine aminotransferase levels in a model of I/R injury. This is especially apparent after 24 h of reperfusion. Similarly, increased levels of alkaline phosphatase and α-2-macroglobulin are correlated to the volume of liver necrosis. PMID:27292534

  3. Characterization of lipoteichoic acid structures from three probiotic Bacillus strains: involvement of D-alanine in their biological activity.

    PubMed

    Villéger, Romain; Saad, Naima; Grenier, Karine; Falourd, Xavier; Foucat, Loïc; Urdaci, Maria C; Bressollier, Philippe; Ouk, Tan-Sothea

    2014-10-01

    Probiotics represent a potential strategy to influence the host's immune system thereby modulating immune response. Lipoteichoic Acid (LTA) is a major immune-stimulating component of Gram-positive cell envelopes. This amphiphilic polymer, anchored in the cytoplasmic membrane by means of its glycolipid component, typically consists of a poly (glycerol-phosphate) chain with D-alanine and/or glycosyl substitutions. LTA is known to stimulate macrophages in vitro, leading to secretion of inflammatory mediators such as Nitric Oxide (NO). This study investigates the structure-activity relationship of purified LTA from three probiotic Bacillus strains (Bacillus cereus CH, Bacillus subtilis CU1 and Bacillus clausii O/C). LTAs were extracted from bacterial cultures and purified. Chemical modification by means of hydrolysis at pH 8.5 was performed to remove D-alanine. The molecular structure of native and modified LTAs was determined by (1)H NMR and GC-MS, and their inflammatory potential investigated by measuring NO production by RAW 264.7 macrophages. Structural analysis revealed several differences between the newly characterized LTAs, mainly relating to their D-alanylation rates and poly (glycerol-phosphate) chain length. We observed induction of NO production by LTAs from B. subtilis and B. clausii, whereas weaker NO production was observed with B. cereus. LTA dealanylation abrogated NO production independently of the glycolipid component, suggesting that immunomodulatory potential depends on D-alanine substitutions. D-alanine may control the spatial configuration of LTAs and their recognition by cell receptors. Knowledge of molecular mechanisms behind the immunomodulatory abilities of probiotics is essential to optimize their use. PMID:25090957

  4. Risk factors associated with hepatitis B or C markers or elevated alanine aminotransferase level among blood donors on a tropical island: the Guadeloupe experience.

    PubMed

    Fest, T; Viel, J F; Agis, F; Coffe, C; Dupond, J L; Hervé, P

    1992-10-01

    Donated blood is currently screened for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc), antibody to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels to prevent posttransfusion hepatitis. A prospective study of 2368 blood donors was carried out in Guadeloupe (French West Indies) with a view to determining the risk factors associated with serologic abnormalities. Blood donors included in the study had to complete a questionnaire. Statistical analysis was performed on the data thus obtained: 571 donations (24%) were positive for at least one of the four analyzed markers. The results were that 3.2 percent were positive for HBsAg, 22 percent for anti-HBc, and 0.8 percent for anti-HCV, and 1.4 percent had ALT > or = 45 IU per L. A good correlation was found between anti-HCV and elevated ALT. Transfusion history and two socioeconomic categories (working class, military personnel) were found to be risk factors. Other risk factors were lifelong residence in Guadeloupe (with risk increasing with the number of years), birthplace and current residence in the southern part of the island, and the existence of gastrointestinal discomfort unrelated to viral hepatitis (odds ratio = 2.98). The results of this study illustrate the difficulty of implementing a preventive policy against posttransfusion hepatitis in a tropical area. The unique epidemiologic situation of Guadeloupe as regards hepatitis B virus has led to more restrictive criteria for the acceptance of blood donors. PMID:1412685

  5. Model Studies on the Antioxidative Effect of Polyphenols in Thermally Treated D-Glucose/L-Alanine Solutions with Added Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Wilker, Daniel; Heinrich, Anna B; Kroh, Lothar W

    2015-12-30

    The influence of different polyphenolic compounds (PPs) on the Maillard reaction in a d-glucose/l-alanine model system with or without metal ions was studied under various reaction conditions. At temperatures up to 100 °C the PPs showed pro-oxidative effects due to their reducing effects on metal ions. This can be explained by a combined redox cycling mechanism of metals and PPs that promotes oxidation in the Maillard reaction. The antioxidative capacities of the PPs were measured with three different assays and correlated directly with their pro-oxidative effects on d-glucosone formation. The degree of the pro-oxidative effect depended not only on the PPs' reducing potential and their antioxidative ability but also on their concentration, the temperature, and the pH value of the model system. At low pH values and temperatures, the PPs were more stable and therefore showed an increased pro-oxidative tendency. In contrast, some of the used PPs were almost completely degraded at temperatures of 130 °C, and the formed polymers were able to complex metal ions. In the absence of these catalyzing ions, the oxidation ratio of d-glucose to d-glucosone was decreased. PMID:26634406

  6. Membrane Potential and Proton Cotransport of Alanine and Phosphate as Affected by Permeant Weak Acids in Lemna gibba1

    PubMed Central

    Basso, Barbara; Ullrich-Eberius, Cornelia I.

    1987-01-01

    The treatment of Lemna gibba plants with the weak acids (trimethylacetic acid and butyric acid), used as tools to decrease intracellular pH, induced a hyperpolarization of membrane potential, dependent on the concentration of the undissociated permeant form of the weak acid and on the value of the resting potential. Measurements were carried out both with `high potential' and `low potential' plants and the maximum values af acid induced hyperpolarizations were about 35 and 71 millivolts, respectively. Weak acids influenced also the transient light-dark membrane potential changes, typical for photosynthesizing material, suggesting a dependence of these changes on an acidification of cytoplasm. In the presence of the weak acids, the membrane depolarization induced by the cotransport of alanine and phosphate with protons was reduced; the maximum reduction (about 90%) was obtained with alanine during 2 millimolar trimethylacetic acid perfusion at pH 5. A strong inhibition of the uptake rates (up to 48% for [14C]alanine and 68% for 32P-phosphate) was obtained in the presence of the weak acids, both by decreasing the pH of the medium and by increasing the concentration of the acid. In these experimental conditions, the ATP level and O2 uptake rates did not change significantly. These results constitute good evidence that H+/solute cotransport in Lemna, already known to be dependent on the electrochemical potential difference for protons, is also strongly regulated by the cytoplasmic pH value. PMID:16665758

  7. An Anhydro-N-Acetylmuramyl-l-Alanine Amidase with Broad Specificity Tethered to the Outer Membrane of Escherichia coli▿

    PubMed Central

    Uehara, Tsuyoshi; Park, James T.

    2007-01-01

    From its amino acid sequence homology with AmpD, we recognized YbjR, now renamed AmiD, as a possible second 1,6-anhydro-N-acetylmuramic acid (anhMurNAc)-l-alanine amidase in Escherichia coli. We have now confirmed that AmiD is an anhMurNAc-l-Ala amidase and demonstrated that AmpD and AmiD are the only enzymes present in E. coli that are able to cleave the anhMurNAc-l-Ala bond. The activity was present only in the outer membrane fraction obtained from an ampD mutant. In contrast to AmpD, which is specific for the anhMurNAc-l-alanine bond, AmiD also cleaved the bond between MurNAc and l-alanine in both muropeptides and murein sacculi. Unlike the periplasmic murein amidases, AmiD did not participate in cell separation. ampG mutants, which are unable to import GlcNAc-anhMurNAc-peptides into the cytoplasm, released mainly peptides into the medium due to AmiD activity, whereas an ampG amiD double mutant released a large amount of intact GlcNAc-anhMurNAc-peptides into the medium. PMID:17526703

  8. Maghemite and poly-DL-alanine based core-shell multifunctional nanohybrids for environmental protection and biomedicine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covaliu, Cristina Ileana; Paraschiv, Gigel; Biriş, Sorin-Ştefan; Jitaru, Ioana; Vasile, Eugeniu; Diamandescu, Lucian; Velickovic, Tanja Cirkovic; Krstic, Maja; Ionita, Valentin; Iovu, Horia; Matei, Ecaterina

    2013-11-01

    This paper deals with the synthesis of two nanohybrid materials based on maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) and poly-DL-alanine using a two-step procedure consisting of maghemite nanoparticles synthesis by microemulsion method and nanohybrids obtaining by coating of maghemite nanoparticles with poly-DL-alanine biopolymer in two different molar ratios (H1:5 and H1:15). The maghemite and their corresponding nanohybrids were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, Mössbauer spectroscopy, Transmission electron microscopy, High resolution transmission electron microscopy with selected area electron diffraction and Atomic absorption spectroscopy. The two nanohybrids under the investigation have the average particle sizes of 22 nm and 23 nm. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy data indicate the existence of some interactions between the maghemite nanoparticles and poly-DL-alanine shell. The saturation magnetization values for maghemite and the two nanohybrids determined by a Vibrating Sample Magnetometer correspond to a typical superparamagnetic behavior suitable for applying in biomedical field. Also, with respect of biomedical application the biological activity of maghemite and its corresponding nanohybrids was investigated on healthy human cells (PBMC) and cancerous cells (HeLa). Furthermore, in order to support the multifunctionality of the γ-Fe2O3 sample and nanohybrids we also investigated their wastewater treatment properties by measuring the removal efficiency of heavy metal Cd (II) ions.

  9. [Activity of alanine aminopeptidase in blood and in urine of smoking and non-smoking smelters].

    PubMed

    Bizoń, Anna; Stasiak, Karolina; Milnerowicz, Halina

    2010-01-01

    The human body is constantly exposed to xenobiotics. This will include exogenous substances from environmental pollution such as heavy metals and lifestyle such as smoking, which may lead to impaired functioning of many organs. The liver and kidney are the critical organs in the case of a long-term occupational or environmental exposure to heavy metals and tobacco smoke. In diagnostics of liver and kidney damage useful are the methods which determine the activity of enzymes such as alanine aminopeptidase (AAP). AAP is a marker for early detection of acute kidney damage, and presence of AAP derive mainly from proximal tubular brush-border. Activity of AAP in urine allows to assess the damage resulting from the nephrotoxic exposure to heavy metals. In the serum AAP is mainly from hepatic. Activity of AAP may be useful to identify liver cancer. The investigation was shown, that AAP activity in the blood is used to detect hepatic cholestasis and congestive jaundice. The aim of present study was to assess the influence of occupational exposure of copper-foundry workers to heavy metals (arsenic, cadmium, lead) on activity of alanine aminopeptidase in blood and urine. The investigations were performed in blood and urine of 166 subjects: 101 male copper smelters and 65 non-exposed male subjects. The study protocol was approved by Local Bioethics Committee of Wroclaw Medical University (KB No: 469/2008). The data on smoking which had been obtained from a direct personal interview were verified by determination of serum cotinine concentrations. Biological material collected from the control group and smelters was divided into subgroups of nonsmokers and smokers. The concentrations of lead and cadmium were determined in whole blood, whilst the level of arsenic and cadmium were determined in urine using FAAS method (Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry) in the acetylate flame on the SOLAAR M6. The activity of AA was determined in blood and in urine. The results showed a 9-fold

  10. Ir-192 HDR transit dose and radial dose function determination using alanine/EPR dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Calcina, Carmen S Guzmán; de Almeida, Adelaide; Rocha, José R Oliveira; Abrego, Felipe Chen; Baffa, Oswaldo

    2005-03-21

    Source positioning close to the tumour in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is not instantaneous. An increment of dose will be delivered during the movement of the source in the trajectory to its static position. This increment is the transit dose, often not taken into account in brachytherapeutic treatment planning. The transit dose depends on the prescribed dose, number of treatment fractions, velocity and activity of the source. Combining all these factors, the transit dose can be 5% higher than the prescribed absorbed dose value (Sang-Hyun and Muller-Runkel, 1994 Phys. Med. Biol. 39 1181-8, Nath et al 1995 Med. Phys. 22 209-34). However, it cannot exceed this percentage (Nath et al 1995). In this work, we use the alanine-EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) dosimetric system using analysis of the first derivative of the signal. The transit dose was evaluated for an HDR system and is consistent with that already presented for TLD dosimeters (Bastin et al 1993 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 26 695-702). Also using the same dosimetric system, the radial dose function, used to evaluate the geometric dose degradation around the source, was determined and its behaviour agrees better with those obtained by Monte Carlo simulations (Nath et al 1995, Williamson and Nath 1991 Med. Phys. 18 434-48, Ballester et al 1997 Med. Phys. 24 1221-8, Ballester et al 2001 Phys. Med. Biol. 46 N79-90) than with TLD measurements (Nath et al 1990 Med. Phys. 17 1032-40). PMID:15798311

  11. Acute β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine Toxicity in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sammak, Maitham Ahmed; Rogers, Douglas G.; Hoagland, Kyle D.

    2015-01-01

    The cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is considered to be an “excitotoxin,” and its suggested mechanism of action is killing neurons. Long-term exposure to L-BMAA is believed to lead to neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease). Objectives of this study were to determine the presumptive median lethal dose (LD50), the Lowest-Observed-Adverse-Effect Level (LOAEL), and histopathologic lesions caused by the naturally occurring BMAA isomer, L-BMAA, in mice. Seventy NIH Swiss Outbred mice (35 male and 35 female) were used. Treatment group mice were injected intraperitoneally with 0.03, 0.3, 1, 2, and 3 mg/g body weight L-BMAA, respectively, and control mice were sham-injected. The presumptive LD50 of L-BMAA was 3 mg/g BW and the LOAEL was 2 mg/g BW. There were no histopathologic lesions in brain, liver, heart, kidney, lung, or spleen in any of the mice during the 14-day study. L-BMAA was detected in brains and livers in all of treated mice but not in control mice. Males injected with 0.03 mg/g BW, 0.3 mg/g BW, and 3.0 mg/g BW L-BMAA showed consistently higher concentrations (P < 0.01) in brain and liver samples as compared to females in those respective groups. PMID:26604922

  12. Structural Characterization and Epitope Mapping of the Glutamic Acid/Alanine-rich Protein from Trypanosoma congolense

    PubMed Central

    Loveless, Bianca C.; Mason, Jeremy W.; Sakurai, Tatsuya; Inoue, Noboru; Razavi, Morteza; Pearson, Terry W.; Boulanger, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Trypanosoma congolense is an African trypanosome that causes serious disease in cattle in Sub-Saharan Africa. The four major life cycle stages of T. congolense can be grown in vitro, which has led to the identification of several cell-surface molecules expressed on the parasite during its transit through the tsetse vector. One of these, glutamic acid/alanine-rich protein (GARP), is the first expressed on procyclic forms in the tsetse midgut and is of particular interest because it replaces the major surface coat molecule of bloodstream forms, the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) that protects the parasite membrane, and is involved in antigenic variation. Unlike VSG, however, the function of GARP is not known, which necessarily limits our understanding of parasite survival in the tsetse. Toward establishing the function of GARP, we report its three-dimensional structure solved by iodide phasing to a resolution of 1.65 Å. An extended helical bundle structure displays an unexpected and significant degree of homology to the core structure of VSG, the only other major surface molecule of trypanosomes to be structurally characterized. Immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoaffinity-tandem mass spectrometry were used in conjunction with monoclonal antibodies to map both non-surface-disposed and surface epitopes. Collectively, these studies enabled us to derive a model describing the orientation and assembly of GARP on the surface of trypanosomes. The data presented here suggest the possible structure-function relationships involved in replacement of the bloodstream form VSG by GARP as trypanosomes differentiate in the tsetse vector after a blood meal. PMID:21471223

  13. Effects of maternal ethanol ingestion on uptake of glucose alanine analogs in fetal rats

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, A.K.; Singh, S.P.; Pullen, G.L.

    1986-05-01

    The distribution of maternally-derived glucose and alanine has been studied in selected tissues of fetuses from ethanol-fed (EF) rats (30% of caloric intake throughout gestation). Controls received diet without ethanol by pair-feeding (PF) or ad libitum (AF). On the 22nd day of gestation, 2 ..mu..Ci /sup 3/H 2-deoxyglucose (DG) and 1 ..mu..Ci /sup 14/C ..cap alpha..-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) were administered i.v. to each rat. One hour later, maternal blood, placenta, and fetal blood, liver, lung and brain were sampled for /sup 3/H and /sup 14/C activities. When compared to either control group, the mean /sup 14/C AIB activities of tissues from EF animals were reduced from 19 to 46%, with the greatest effect seen in the brain (3.7 +/- 0.1, 7.2 +/- 0.3 and 6.9 +/- 1.3 dpm/mg in EF, PF and AF fetuses respectively). In addition, the ratios of tissue:plasma /sup 14/C were reduced (p < 0.01 or lower) in the EF fetal tissues and placenta. Maternal ethanol ingestion reduced the /sup 3/H 2-DG content of placenta (p < 0.05) and of brain (38.6 + 1.2, 48.1 +/- 1.2 and 47.2 +/- 1.2 in EF, PF and AF, p < 0.001). Brain weight showed significant positive correlations with AIB content (r = 0.466, p < 0.001) and with 2-DG content (r = 0.267, p < 0.01). Impaired uptake of maternally-derived nutrients may play a significant role in the effects of ethanol in utero.

  14. Cerebral uptake and protein incorporation of cyanobacterial toxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaobin; Basile, Margaret; Mash, Deborah C

    2013-10-01

    β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a nonprotein amino acid produced by diverse species of free-living cyanobacteria found in terrestrial and aquatic environments worldwide. BMAA has been detected as a soluble (free) and insoluble protein-bound (bound) amino acid in brains of Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Guamanian amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinsonism dementia complex patients. A toxic reservoir of BMAA in the brain may be excitotoxic to neurons or serve to disrupt cerebral protein homeostasis. Here, we report tracer uptake kinetics and a time course for protein incorporation of [C]-L-BMAA into the brain of C57/BL6 mice. BMAA pharmacokinetic parameters measured in plasma show a rapid distribution phase and a terminal elimination half-life of 1.7 days following bolus intravenous administration. Total [C]-L-BMAA uptake to the brain reached a maximum at 1.5 h. Ex-vivo autoradiography of [C]-labeled BMAA showed dense labeling within the ventricles, choroid plexus, and whole-brain gray matter structures. Radioactivity measured in soluble and trichloroacetic acid precipitates was compared to determine the incorporation of [C]-L-BMAA into total brain protein. The maximal concentration of [C]-L-BMAA was measured in protein-bound fractions of brain at 4 h, followed by a corresponding decrease in the free pool of this nonprotein amino acid. The time-dependent association of [C]-L-BMAA in the protein-bound fraction suggests that BMAA may be trapped in new proteins by protein synthesis-dependent processes. BMAA may accumulate into growing polypeptide chains and recycle to the free pool with protein turnover. PMID:23979257

  15. Cytokeratin 18, Alanine Aminotransferase, Platelets and Triglycerides Predict the Presence of Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Wei; Zhao, Caiyan; Shen, Chuan; Wang, Yadong

    2013-01-01

    Background Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the critical public health problems in China. The full spectrum of the disease ranges from simple steatosis and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC). The infiltration of inflammatory cells characterizes NASH. This characteristic contributes to the progression of hepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and HCC. Therefore, distinguishing NASH from NAFLD is crucial. Objective and Methods Ninety-five patients with NAFLD, 44 with NASH, and 51 with non-NASH were included in the study to develop a new scoring system for differentiating NASH from NAFLD. Data on clinical and biological characteristics, as well as blood information, were obtained. Cytokeratin-18 (CK-18) fragments levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay. Results Several indexes show significant differences between the two groups, which include body mass index (BMI), waist-on-hip ratio (WHR), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GT), platelets, uric acid (UA), hs-C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), triglycerides (TG), albumin (ALB), and CK-18 fragments (all P < 0.05). The CK-18 fragment levels showed a significant positive correlation with steatosis severity, ballooning, lobular inflammation, and fibrosis stage (all P < 0.05). Therefore, a new model that combines ALT, platelets, CK-18 fragments, and TG was established by logistic regression among NAFLD patients. The AUROC curve in predicting NASH was 0.920 (95% CI: 0.866 - 0.974, cutoff value = 0.361, sensitivity = 89%, specificity = 86%, positive predictive value = 89%, negative predictive value = 89%). Conclusion The novel scoring system may be considered as a useful model in predicting the presence of NASH in NAFLD patients. PMID:24324749

  16. Anthropometric Indices in Adults: Which Is the Best Indicator to Identify Alanine Aminotransferase Levels?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuang; Guo, Xiaofan; Yu, Shasha; Zhou, Ying; Li, Zhao; Sun, Yingxian

    2016-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the correlations between serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels and anthropometric indices including body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (HC), waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), and a new body index, the A Body Shape Index (ABSI) in Chinese adults. Methods: A multicenter, cross-sectional study was conducted in rural areas of China in 2012–2013, and 11,331 adults were included in our final analysis. Results: BMI, WC, HC, WHtR, WHR and ABSI were significantly positively correlated with ALT levels. Spearman rank test showed that WHtR (r = 0.346 for men, r = 0.282 for women, both p < 0.001) had the highest correlation coefficient for ALT level, whereas ABSI showed the lowest, and the correlation coefficient of each measure was higher in men than that in women. Comparing the lowest with the highest quintile of each anthropometric measure, the multivariate logistic model presented that WHtR had the superiority of identifying the presence of elevated ALT (OR 4.38; 95% CI 3.15–6.08 for men, OR 4.29; 95% CI 2.91–6.33 for women, both p < 0.001), and the ABSI was the poorest predictor in men (OR 2.51; 95% CI 1.93–3.27, p < 0.001). No association was observed for ABSI in women. Conclusions: Our results indicated that BMI, WC, HC, WHtR and WHR were able to determine elevated ALT presence, while ABSI was not capable. WHtR and to some extent BMI were the best body indices, for predicting the ALT levels in this population. Nevertheless, the predictive ability of ABSI as a novel body index was not superior compared to established anthropometric indices. PMID:26901214

  17. Solvated states of poly-L-alanine α-helix explored by Raman optical activity.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shigeki; Furukawa, Tatsuya; Bouř, Petr; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2014-05-22

    Raman optical activity (ROA) reveals surprising details of the secondary structure of polypeptides and proteins in solution phase. Yet specific spectral features, such as in the extended amide III region of hydrated α-helix, did not seem explicable by the generally accepted sensitivity of ROA to the local conformation. This is reconciled in the present study by simulations of ROA spectra for model α-helical structures. Two positive ROA peaks often observed at around 1340 and 1300 cm(-1) for polypeptides and proteins have been assigned to two types of solvated α-helices; one is stable in hydrophilic environment where amide groups make hydrogen bonds to solvent molecules or polar side chains (∼1340 cm(-1)), and the other is supported by a hydrophobic environment without the possibility of external hydrogen bonds (∼1300 cm(-1)). For poly-L-alanine (PLA), regarded as a good model of α-helical structure, the experimentally observed relative intensity ratio of the two ROA bands has been explained by a conformational equilibrium depending on the solvent polarity. The intensities of the bands reflect solvated and unsolvated α-helical geometries, with peptide backbone torsional angles (ϕi+1, ψi) of (-66°, -41°) and (-59°, -44°), respectively. Quantum-mechanical simulations of the ROA spectra utilizing the normal mode optimization and Cartesian tensor transfer methods indicate, however, that the change in dielectric constant of the solvent is the main factor for the spectral intensity change, whereas the influence of the conformational change is minor. PMID:24758541

  18. The associations of physical activity and adiposity with alanine aminotransferase and gamma-glutamyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Debbie A; Sattar, Naveed; Smith, George Davey; Ebrahim, Shah

    2005-06-01

    The mechanisms linking obesity and inactivity to diabetes mellitus are unclear. Recent studies have shown associations of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) with diabetes. In a random sample of 3,789 British women aged 60-79 years, the authors examined the associations of obesity and physical activity with ALT and GGT (1999-2001). Both body mass index and waist:hip ratio were independently (of each other, physical activity, alcohol consumption, smoking, and childhood and adulthood social class) positively and linearly associated with ALT and GGT. In adjusted models, a one-standard-deviation increase in body mass index was associated with a 0.46-units/liter (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.16, 0.75) increase in ALT and a 2.14-units/liter (95% CI: 0.99, 3.30) increase in GGT. Similar results for a one-standard-deviation increase in waist:hip ratio were 13.96 (95% CI: 10.44, 17.48) for ALT and 39.44 (95% CI: 25.89, 52.98) for GGT. Frequency of physical activity was inversely and linearly associated with GGT in fully adjusted models, but the inverse association with ALT was attenuated towards the null after adjustment for body mass index and waist:hip ratio. Adjustment for ALT and GGT resulted in some attenuation of the strong linear associations of body mass index and waist:hip ratio with diabetes. These findings provide some support for the suggestion that the relation between obesity and diabetes is, at least in part, mediated by liver pathology. PMID:15901629

  19. Environmental neurotoxins β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) and mercury in shark cartilage dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Mondo, Kiyo; Broc Glover, W; Murch, Susan J; Liu, Guangliang; Cai, Yong; Davis, David A; Mash, Deborah C

    2014-08-01

    Shark cartilage products are marketed as dietary supplements with claimed health benefits for animal and human use. Shark fin and cartilage products sold as extracts, dry powders and in capsules are marketed based on traditional Chinese medicine claims that it nourishes the blood, enhances appetite, and energizes multiple internal organs. Shark cartilage contains a mixture of chondroitin and glucosamine, a popular nutritional supplement ingested to improve cartilage function. Sharks are long-lived apex predators, that bioaccumulate environmental marine toxins and methylmercury from dietary exposures. We recently reported detection of the cyanobacterial toxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) in the fins of seven different species of sharks from South Florida coastal waters. Since BMAA has been linked to degenerative brain diseases, the consumption of shark products may pose a human risk for BMAA exposures. In this report, we tested sixteen commercial shark cartilage supplements for BMAA by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-FD) with fluorescence detection and ultra performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). Total mercury (Hg) levels were measured in the same shark cartilage products by cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVAFS). We report here that BMAA was detected in fifteen out of sixteen products with concentrations ranging from 86 to 265μg/g (dry weight). All of the shark fin products contained low concentrations of Hg. While Hg contamination is a known risk, the results of the present study demonstrate that shark cartilage products also may contain the neurotoxin BMAA. Although the neurotoxic potential of dietary exposure to BMAA is currently unknown, the results demonstrate that shark cartilage products may contain two environmental neurotoxins that have synergistic toxicities. PMID:24755394

  20. Irritable Bowel Syndrome May Be Associated with Elevated Alanine Aminotransferase and Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Hwa; Kim, Kwang-Min; Joo, Nam-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies have revealed close relationships between hepatic injury, metabolic pathways, and gut microbiota. The microorganisms in the intestine also cause irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The aim of this study was to examine whether IBS was associated with elevated hepatic enzyme [alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST)], gamma-glutamyl transferase (γ-GT) levels, and metabolic syndrome (MS). Materials and Methods This was a retrospective, cross-sectional, case-control study. The case and control groups comprised subjects who visited our health promotion center for general check-ups from June 2010 to December 2010. Of the 1127 initially screened subjects, 83 had IBS according to the Rome III criteria. The control group consisted of 260 age- and sex-matched subjects without IBS who visited our health promotion center during the same period. Results Compared to control subjects, patients with IBS showed significantly higher values of anthropometric parameters (body mass index, waist circumference), liver enzymes, γ-GT, and lipid levels. The prevalences of elevated ALT (16.9% vs. 7.7%; p=0.015) and γ-GT (24.1% vs. 11.5%; p=0.037) levels were significantly higher in patients with IBS than in control subjects. A statistically significant difference was observed in the prevalence of MS between controls and IBS patients (12.7% vs. 32.5%; p<0.001). The relationships between elevated ALT levels, MS, and IBS remained statistically significant after controlling for potential confounding factors. Conclusion On the basis of our study results, IBS may be an important condition in certain patients with elevated ALT levels and MS. PMID:26632395

  1. Association between Elevated Alanine Aminotransferase and Urosepsis in Children with Acute Pyelonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dongwan; Lee, Sung Hyun; Ryoo, Eell; Cho, Hye Kyung; Kim, Yun Mi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to investigate the association between elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and urosepsis in children with acute pyelonephritis (APN). Methods We retrospectively identified all children who were managed in our hospital with APN during a decade period. In our study a diagnosis of APN was defined as having a positive urine culture and a positive (99m)Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid scintigraphy. We compared those with elevated ALT and those with normal ALT according to the following variables: age, gender, duration of fever prior to admission, presence of hypotension, C-reactive protein (CRP), creatinine, presence of anemia, white blood cells count, platelet count, blood culture result, and grades of vesicoureteral reflux. In addition, the correlation between elevated ALT and positive blood culture was analyzed in detail. Results A total of 996 children were diagnosed with APN, of which 883 were included in the study. ALT was elevated in 81 children (9.2%). In the analysis of demographic characteristics, the number of children with elevated ALT was higher in children between 0 to 3 months, boys, and in those with positive blood culture (p=0.002, 0.036, and 0.010, respectively). In multivariate analysis of variables associated with positive blood culture, age younger than 3 months, elevated ALT, elevated CRP, and elevated creatinine showed statistical significance (p=0.004, 0.030, 0.043, and 0.044, respectively). Conclusion Our study demonstrates the association between elevated ALT and increased prevalence of urosepsis in addition to elevated CRP, elevated creatinine, and age younger than 3 months in children with APN. PMID:27066449

  2. Monoclonal antibodies produced against sporozoites of the human parasite Plasmodium malariae abolish infectivity of sporozoites of the simian parasite Plasmodium brasilianum.

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, A H; Barnwell, J W; Collins, W E; Nussenzweig, R S

    1985-01-01

    We have used a sporozoite neutralization assay to define the biological relevance of the cross-reactivity of two monoclonal antibodies, raised against sporozoites of the human parasite Plasmodium malariae (Uganda 1/CDC), with sporozoites of the simian parasite Plasmodium brasilianum (Colombian). In vitro incubation of each of these two monoclonal antibodies with sporozoites of P. brasilianum totally abolished the infectivity of these parasites for Saimiri sciureus. Using Western blot analysis and one of the P. malariae monoclonal antibodies, we identified two sporozoite proteins characteristic of the Colombian isolate of P. brasilianum with apparent molecular weights of 56,000 and 66,000. The same monoclonal antibody identified two proteins in an extract of the Peruvian isolate of P. brasilianum with apparent molecular weights of 59,000 and 69,000. Images PMID:3899939

  3. 7-Fluoro-1,3-diphenylisoquinoline-1-amine abolishes depressive-like behavior and prefrontal cortical oxidative damage induced by acute restraint stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Pesarico, Ana Paula; Stangherlin, Eluza Curte; Mantovani, Anderson C; Zeni, Gilson; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne

    2015-10-01

    There is a complex relationship between stressful situations and the onset of depression. 7-Fluoro-1,3-diphenylisoquinoline-1-amine (FDPI) has been reported to have an antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test (FST). The aim of this study was to investigate the antidepressant-like effect of FDPI administered to mice before or after the acute restraint stress (ARS). The mice were submitted to the ARS for 7 h. Two treatments with FDPI (10 mg/kg) were performed: in the first treatment, the mice received FDPI 30 min before ARS (pre-treatment) and in the second treatment mice received FDPI 10 min after the ARS (post-treatment). Thirty minutes after FDPI administration, the FST and locomotor activity were carried out. ARS induced depressive-like behavior in the FST. Both treatments with FDPI were effective against the increase in immobility time in the FST.Moreover, ARS increased lipid peroxidation and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels as well as decreased catalase activity in prefrontal cortical samples of mice. Pre- and post-treatments with FDPI reduced lipid peroxidation and ROS, and post-treatment restored catalase activity. Superoxide dismutase was not altered by stress and/or FDPI. Monoamine oxidase (MAO) activities increased in the prefrontal-cortices of mice submitted to the ARS protocol and treatments with FDPI abolished this increase. Hepatic MAO activities were not altered in the livers of mice submitted to ARS and FDPI treatments. The serotonin uptake was increased in the prefrontal-cortices of mice submitted to the ARS protocol and both treatments with FDPI abolished this increase. The antidepressant-like effect of FDPI appears to involve the modulation of oxidative stress and the monoaminergic system, without inhibiting hepatic MAO activity. PMID:26074205

  4. The thermochemistry of solution of L-α-alanyl-L-α-alanine in water-alcohol mixtures at 298.15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, V. I.; Badelin, V. G.

    2008-07-01

    The integral enthalpies of solution of L-α-alanyl-L-α-alanine in water-ethanol, water- n-propanol, and water-isopropanol mixtures were measured calorimetrically at alcohol concentrations x 2 ranging from 0 to 0.4 mole fractions. The standard enthalpy of peptide solution Δsol H o and transfer Δtr H o from water into a mixed solvent were calculated. The effect of the structure and properties of peptides and mixture composition on the enthalpy characteristics is discussed. The enthalpy coefficients of pair interactions h xy between L-α-alanyl-L-α-alanine and alcohol molecules were calculated; these coefficients were positive and increased in the series ethanol, n-propanol, isopropanol. The analysis performed allowed the differences in the thermodynamic characteristics of solution of L-α-alanyl-L-α-alanine and DL-α-alanyl-DL-α-alanine in water-alcohol mixtures to be determined.

  5. Influence of alanine uptake on Staphylococcus aureus surface charge and its susceptibility to two cationic antibacterial agents, nisin and low molecular weight chitosan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Chen; Chiang, Wen-Dee; Chen, Wei-Chiuan; Chen, Hui-Huang; Huang, Yao-Wen; Chen, Wei-Jung; Lin, Shih-Bin

    2012-12-15

    Low molecular weight chitosan (LMWC) and nisin, recognized as cationic antibacterial agents (CAAs), inhibit bacterial growth by interacting with the anionically charged cell wall. In this study, alanine uptake significantly reduced the anionic cell surface charge, as determined by the zeta potential (ZP) measurements, of Staphylococcus aureus, resulting from the incorporation of d-alanine into the cell wall. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) tests and growth inhibition curves revealed that LMWC and nisin possessed inverse antibacterial activity against three strains of S. aureus, depending on the strains' net charge. A twofold reduction in the MIC value of nisin was obtained against S. aureus, inoculated in a 1.0% d- or l-alanine-augmented trypticase soy broth medium. A flocculation test demonstrated that neutralizing the anionic surface charge using d-alanine reduced the adsorption of S. aureus onto LMWC. Furthermore, the reduced surface net charge could enhance the colonization capacity of S. aureus on glass. PMID:22980819

  6. Effect of the composition of a water-alcohol solvent on the thermodynamics of dissolution of DL-α-alanyl-β-alanine at 298.15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, V. I.; Badelin, V. G.

    2014-12-01

    Enthalpies of solution for DL-α-alanyl-β-alanine in H2O-ethanol, H2O-1-propanol, and H2O-2-propanol mixed solvents with the alcohol mole fraction x 2 = 0-0.3 are measured at 298.15 K. Standard enthalpies of solution (Δsol H ∘), standard enthalpies of transfer of DL-α-alanyl-β-alanine from water to binary solvent (Δtr H ∘), and coefficients of enthalpies of pair interactions with alcohol molecules ( h xy) are calculated. The effect the structure and properties of alcohols and the composition of a water-alcohol mixture have on the enthalpy of dissolution for DL-α-alanyl-β-alanine are discussed. The h xy values for dipeptides of the alanine series in water-alcohol binary solvents are compared.

  7. Effects of β-alanine administration on selected parameters of oxidative stress and phosphoryltransfer network in cerebral cortex and cerebellum of rats.

    PubMed

    Gemelli, Tanise; de Andrade, Rodrigo Binkowski; Rojas, Denise Bertin; Bonorino, Nariélle Ferner; Mazzola, Priscila Nicolao; Tortorelli, Lucas Silva; Funchal, Cláudia; Filho, Carlos Severo Dutra; Wannmacher, Clovis Milton Duval

    2013-08-01

    β-Alanine is a β-amino acid derivative of the degradation of pyrimidine uracil and precursor of the oxidative substrate acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA). The accumulation of β-alanine occurs in β-alaninemia, an inborn error of metabolism. Patients with β-alaninemia may develop neurological abnormalities whose mechanisms are far from being understood. In this study we evaluated the effects of β-alanine administration on some parameters of oxidative stress and on creatine kinase, pyruvate kinase, and adenylate kinase in cerebral cortex and cerebellum of 21-day-old rats. The animals received three peritoneal injections of β-alanine (0.3 mg /g of body weight) and the controls received the same volume (10 μL/g of body weight) of saline solution (NaCl 0.85 %) at 3 h intervals. CSF levels of β-alanine increased five times, achieving 80 μM in the rats receiving the amino acid. The results of β-alanine administration in the parameters of oxidative stress were similar in both tissues studied: reduction of superoxide dismutase activity, increased oxidation of 2',7'-dihydrodichlorofluorescein, total content of sulfhydryl and catalase activity. However, the results of the phosphoryltransfer network enzymes were similar in all enzymes, but different in the tissues studied: the β-alanine administration was able to inhibit the enzyme pyruvate kinase, cytosolic creatine kinase, and adenylate kinase activities in cerebral cortex, and increase in cerebellum. In case this also occurs in the patients, these results suggest that oxidative stress and alteration of the phosphoryltransfer network may be involved in the pathophysiology of β-alaninemia. Moreover, the ingestion of β-alanine to improve muscular performance deserves more attention in respect to possible side-effects. PMID:23620342

  8. Enzymological and mutational analysis of a complex primary hyperoxaluria type I phenotype involving alanine: Glyoxylate aminotransferase peroxisome-to-mitochondrion mistargeting and intraperoxisomal aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Danpure, C.J.; Purdue, P.E.; Allsop, J.; Lumb, M.J.; Jennings, P.R. ); Scheinman, J.I. ); Mauer, S.M. ); Davidson, N.O. )

    1993-08-01

    Primary hyperoxaluri type 1 (PH1) is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by a deficiency of the liver-specific peroxisomal enzyme alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT). Three unrelated PH1 patients, who possess a novel complex phenotype, are described. At the enzymological level, this phenotype is characterized by a complete, or nearly complete, absence of AGT catalytic activity and reduced AGT immunoreactivity. Unlike normal individuals in whom the AGT is confined to the peroxisomal matrix, the immunoreactive AGT in these three patients was distributed approximately equally between the peroxisomes and mitochondria. The peroxisomal AGT appeared to be aggregated into amorphous core-like structures in which no other peroxisomal enzymes could be identified. Mutational analysis of the AGT gene showed that two of the three patients were compound heterozygotes for two previously unrecognized point mutations which caused Gly41[yields]Arg and Phe152[yields]Iso amino acid substitutions. The third patient was shown to be a compound heterozygote for the Gly41[yields]Arg mutation and a previously recognized Gly170[yields]Arg mutation. All three patients were homozygous for the Pro11[yields]Leu polymorphism that had been found previously with a high allelic frequency in normal populations. It is suggested the the Phe152[yields]Iso and Gly170[yields]Arg substitutions, which are only eighteen residues apart and located in the same highly conserved internal region of 58 amino acids, might be involved in the inhibition of peroxisomal targeting and/or import of AGT and, in combination with the Pro11[yields]Leu polymorphism, be responsible for its aberrant mitochondrial compartmentalization. On the other hand, the Gly41[yields]Arg substitution, either in combination with the Pro11[yields]Leu polymorphism or by itself, is predicted to be responsible for the intraperoxisomal aggregation of the AGT protein. 50 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Autolysis of Lactococcus lactis Is Increased upon d-Alanine Depletion of Peptidoglycan and Lipoteichoic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Steen, Anton; Palumbo, Emmanuelle; Deghorain, Marie; Cocconcelli, Pier Sandro; Delcour, Jean; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Kok, Jan; Buist, Girbe; Hols, Pascal

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding enzymes responsible for the incorporation of d-Ala into the cell wall of Lactococcus lactis affect autolysis. An L. lactis alanine racemase (alr) mutant is strictly dependent on an external supply of d-Ala to be able to synthesize peptidoglycan and to incorporate d-Ala in the lipoteichoic acids (LTA). The mutant lyses rapidly when d-Ala is removed at mid-exponential growth. AcmA, the major lactococcal autolysin, is partially involved in the increased lysis since an alr acmA double mutant still lyses, albeit to a lesser extent. To investigate the role of d-Ala on LTA in the increased cell lysis, a dltD mutant of L. lactis was investigated, since this mutant is only affected in the d-alanylation of LTA and not the synthesis of peptidoglycan. Mutation of dltD results in increased lysis, showing that d-alanylation of LTA also influences autolysis. Since a dltD acmA double mutant does not lyse, the lysis of the dltD mutant is totally AcmA dependent. Zymographic analysis shows that no degradation of AcmA takes place in the dltD mutant, whereas AcmA is degraded by the extracellular protease HtrA in the wild-type strain. In L. lactis, LTA has been shown to be involved in controlled (directed) binding of AcmA. LTA lacking d-Ala has been reported in other bacterial species to have an improved capacity for autolysin binding. Mutation of dltD in L. lactis, however, does not affect peptidoglycan binding of AcmA; neither the amount of AcmA binding to the cells nor the binding to specific loci is altered. In conclusion, d-Ala depletion of the cell wall causes lysis by two distinct mechanisms. First, it results in an altered peptidoglycan that is more susceptible to lysis by AcmA and also by other factors, e.g., one or more of the other (putative) cell wall hydrolases expressed by L. lactis. Second, reduced amounts of d-Ala on LTA result in decreased degradation of AcmA by HtrA, which results in increased lytic activity. PMID:15601695

  10. Upper Limits of Normal for Serum Alanine Aminotransferase Levels in Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ming-Hua; Shi, Ke-Qing; Fan, Yu-Chen; Liu, Wen-Yue; Lin, Xian-Feng; Li, Ling-Fei; Chen, Yong-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity is the most common tool for the assessment of liver diseases. However, it is not clear whether the current normal ALT range really discriminate patients with or without liver diseases. The present study was to establish a new normal range of ALT and examine its ability to identify patients with hepatitis B or nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in Chinese Han population. Methods 53037 adults were included in this study from January 1st 2008 to August 31st 2010. The 95th percentile of ALT in population with relative low risk factors for liver diseases was set as the new upper limits of normal ALT in gender-specific manner. Results The 95th percentile levels at low risk factors for liver diseases were achieved at 35 U/L for men and 23 U/L for women. The concordance statistics for detection were 0.873 (95%CI: 0.865–0.881) for HBV and 0.932 (95%CI: 0.927–0.937) for NAFLD in men while 0.857 (95%CI: 0.850–0.864) for HBV and 0.909 (95%CI: 0.903–0.915) for NAFLD in women. The median sensitivity of the current used ALT upper limit (40 U/L) was 6.6% for HBV and 29.7% for NAFLD and median specificity was 98.7% for men and 99.4% for women. Using our new-derived thresholds, the sensitivities ranged from 35.3% to 61.1% and the specificities were 94.8% for men and 94.6% for women. Conclusions Our results suggest that upper limits of ALT 35 U/L for men and 23 U/L for women in Chinese Han population. Re-consideration of normal limits of ALT should be recommended. Trial Registration ChiCTR.org ChiCTR-OCS-11001173 PMID:22962588

  11. Validation of dose painting of lung tumours using alanine/EPR dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Knudtsen, Ingerid Skjei; Svestad, Jørund Graadal; Skaug Sande, Erlend Peter; Rekstad, Bernt Louni; Rødal, Jan; van Elmpt, Wouter; Öllers, Michel; Hole, Eli Olaug; Malinen, Eirik

    2016-03-21

    Biologic image guided radiotherapy (RT) with escalated doses to tumour sub volumes challenges today's RT dose planning and delivery systems. In this phantom study, we verify the capability of a clinical dose planning and delivery system to deliver an 18F-FDG-PET based dose painted treatment plan to a lung tumour. Furthermore, we estimate the uncertainties of the dose painted treatment compared to conventional RT plans. An anthropomorphic thorax phantom of polystyrene and polyurethane was constructed based on CT images of a lung cancer patient. 101 EPR/alanine dosimeters were placed in separate cavities within the phantom. IMRT and VMAT plans were generated in Eclipse (version 10.0, Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm version 10.2.28, Varian Medical Systems, Inc.) for 6 and 15 MV photons, based on 18F-FDG-PET/CT images of the patient. A boost dose of 3.8 Gy/fraction was given to the 18F-FDG-avid region (biological planning volume; BTV), whereas 3.1 Gy/fraction was planned to the planning target volume (PTV, excluding the BTV). For the homogenous plans, 3.2 Gy/fraction was given to the PTV. Irradiation of the phantom was carried out at a Varian Trilogy linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, Inc.). Uncertainties involved in treatment planning and delivery were estimated from portal dosimetry gamma evaluation. Measured and calculated doses were compared by Bland-Altmann analysis. For all treatment plans, all dose-volume objectives could be achieved in the treatment planning system. The mean absolute differences between calculated and measured doses were small (<0.1 Gy) for BTV, PTV-BTV, lung and soft tissue. The estimated uncertainty of the planned doses was less than 3% for all plans, whereas the estimated uncertainty in the measured doses was less 2.3%. Our results show that planning and delivery of dose escalated lung cancer treatment on a clinical dose planning and delivery system has high dosimetric accuracy. The uncertainties associated with the dose escalated

  12. The value of aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase in cardiovascular disease risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Stephen F; Kai, Joe; Guha, Indra Neil; Qureshi, Nadeem

    2015-01-01

    Objective Aspartate aminotransferase to alanine aminotransferase (AST/ALT) ratio, reflecting liver disease severity, has been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the AST/ALT ratio improves established risk prediction tools in a primary care population. Methods Data were analysed from a prospective cohort of 29 316 UK primary care patients, aged 25–84 years with no history of CVD at baseline. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to derive 10-year multivariate risk models for the first occurrence of CVD based on two established risk prediction tools (Framingham and QRISK2), with and without including the AST/ALT ratio. Overall, model performance was assessed by discriminatory accuracy (AUC c-statistic). Results During a total follow-up of 120 462 person-years, 782 patients (59% men) experienced their first CVD event. Multivariate models showed that elevated AST/ALT ratios were significantly associated with CVD in men (Framingham: HR 1.37, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.79; QRISK2: HR 1.40, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.89) but not in women (Framingham: HR 1.06, 95% CI 0.78 to 1.43; QRISK2: HR 0.97, 95% CI 0.70 to 1.35). Including the AST/ALT ratio with all Framingham risk factors (AUC c-statistic: 0.72, 95% CI 0.71 to 0.74) or QRISK2 risk factors (AUC c-statistic: 0.73, 95% CI 0.71 to 0.74) resulted in no change in discrimination from the established risk prediction tools. Limiting analysis to those individuals with raised ALT showed that discrimination could improve by 5% and 4% with Framingham and QRISK2 risk factors, respectively. Conclusions Elevated AST/ALT ratio is significantly associated with increased risk of developing CVD in men but not women. However, the ratio does not confer any additional benefits over established CVD risk prediction tools in the general population, but may have clinical utility in certain subgroups. PMID:26322236

  13. Photoacoustic spectroscopy study of neodymium complexes with alanine, valine, phenylalanine and tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuetao; Zhang, Shuyi

    2003-04-01

    Neodymium complexes with amino acids: Nd(Ala)(3)Cl(3).3H(2)O, Nd(Val)(3)Cl(3).3H(2)O, Nd(Phe)Cl(3).5H(2)O and Nd(Trp)(3)Cl(3).3H(2)O (Ala: L-alanine, Val: L-valine, Phe: L-phenylalanine, Trp: L-tryptophan) are synthesized and their photoacoustic (PA) spectra are reported. The nephelauxetic ratio beta, bonding parameter b(1/2) and Sinha parameter delta are calculated based on their PA spectra. The variation of these parameters and correlation of them with the nature of metal-ligand bonding are discussed. The PA intensity analysis of the f-f transitions of neodymium ion is carried out by calculating the intensity branching vector. The environmental effect on the f-f transitions of neodymium ion is also studied. The branching vectors of the f-f transitions of Nd(Ala)(3)Cl(3).3H(2)O and Nd(Val)(3)Cl(3).3H(2)O are similar, which indicates the perturbation of the two ligand fields is similar. The branching vectors of energy levels 4G(5/2)+(2)G(7/2) of Nd(Phe)Cl(3).5H(2)O and Nd(Trp)(3)Cl(3).3H(2)O increase remarkably compared with those of Nd(Ala)(3)Cl(3).3H(2)O and Nd(Val)(3)Cl(3).3H(2)O. As the degree of covalency increases, the oscillator strength of the hypersensitive transition exhibits a corresponding increase. The relaxation process of Nd(Ala)(3)Cl(3).3H(2)O is established through its PA and electron absorption spectroscopy (EAS). A method used to resolve the PA amplitude spectrum is suggested. With the phase spectrum, PA absorption bands of Nd(Trp)(3)Cl(3).3H(2)O are resolved well in the region of ligand absorption. PMID:12659889

  14. Structure of Penta-Alanine Investigated by Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuan; Huang, Jing; Kim, Seongheun; Shim, Ji Hyun; MacKerell, Alexander D; Ge, Nien-Hui

    2016-06-23

    with the previous results on alanine based oligopeptides, the dihedral angles of our fitted structure, and the most populated ppII structure from the C36 simulation are in good agreement with those suggesting a major ppII population. Our results provide further support for the importance of ppII conformation in the ensemble of unfolded peptides. PMID:27299801

  15. Why We Must Abolish Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illich, Ivan

    1970-01-01

    Argues that obligatory schooling inevitably polarizes society, and that alienation of modern society in a pedagogical sense is even worse than economic alienation. Concludes that the belief that one can distinguish between what is necessary education for others and what is not is a delusion shared in one and all. (RJ)

  16. Selection and Characterization of Conditionally Active Promoters in Lactobacillus plantarum, Using Alanine Racemase as a Promoter Probe

    PubMed Central

    Bron, Peter A.; Hoffer, Sally M.; Van Swam, Iris I.; De Vos, Willem M.; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the use of the alr gene, encoding alanine racemase, as a promoter-screening tool for the identification of conditional promoters in Lactobacillus plantarum. Random fragments of the L. plantarum WCFS1 genome were cloned upstream of the promoterless alr gene of Lactococcus lactis in a low-copy-number plasmid vector. The resulting plasmid library was introduced into an L. plantarum Δalr strain (MD007), and 40,000 clones were selected. The genome coverage of the library was estimated to be 98%, based on nucleotide insert sequence and restriction analyses of the inserts of randomly selected clones. The library was screened for clones that were capable of complementing the d-alanine auxotroph phenotype of MD007 in media containing up to 10, 100, or 300 μg of the competitive Alr inhibitor d-cycloserine per ml. Western blot analysis with polyclonal antibodies raised against lactococcal Alr revealed that the Alr production level required for growth increased in the presence of increasing concentrations of d-cycloserine, adding a quantitative factor to the primarily qualitative nature of the alr complementation screen. Screening of the alr complementation library for clones that could grow only in the presence of 0.8 M NaCl resulted in the identification of eight clones that upon Western blot analysis showed significantly higher Alr production under high-salt conditions than under low-salt conditions. These results established the effectiveness of the alanine racemase complementation screening method for the identification of promoters on their conditional or constitutive activity. PMID:14711657

  17. Topology of AspT, the aspartate:alanine antiporter of Tetragenococcus halophilus, determined by site-directed fluorescence labeling.

    PubMed

    Nanatani, Kei; Fujiki, Takashi; Kanou, Kazuhiko; Takeda-Shitaka, Mayuko; Umeyama, Hideaki; Ye, Liwen; Wang, Xicheng; Nakajima, Tasuku; Uchida, Takafumi; Maloney, Peter C; Abe, Keietsu

    2007-10-01

    The gram-positive lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus catalyzes the decarboxylation of L-aspartate (Asp) with release of L-alanine (Ala) and CO(2). The decarboxylation reaction consists of two steps: electrogenic exchange of Asp for Ala catalyzed by an aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) and intracellular decarboxylation of the transported Asp catalyzed by an L-aspartate-beta-decarboxylase (AspD). AspT belongs to the newly classified aspartate:alanine exchanger family (transporter classification no. 2.A.81) of transporters. In this study, we were interested in the relationship between the structure and function of AspT and thus analyzed the topology by means of the substituted-cysteine accessibility method using the impermeant, fluorescent, thiol-specific probe Oregon Green 488 maleimide (OGM) and the impermeant, nonfluorescent, thiol-specific probe [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl]methanethiosulfonate bromide. We generated 23 single-cysteine variants from a six-histidine-tagged cysteineless AspT template. A cysteine position was assigned an external location if the corresponding single-cysteine variant reacted with OGM added to intact cells, and a position was assigned an internal location if OGM labeling required cell lysis. The topology analyses revealed that AspT has a unique topology; the protein has 10 transmembrane helices (TMs), a large hydrophilic cytoplasmic loop (about 180 amino acids) between TM5 and TM6, N and C termini that face the periplasm, and a positively charged residue (arginine 76) within TM3. Moreover, the three-dimensional structure constructed by means of the full automatic modeling system indicates that the large hydrophilic cytoplasmic loop of AspT possesses a TrkA_C domain and a TrkA_C-like domain and that the three-dimensional structures of these domains are similar to each other even though their amino acid sequences show low similarity. PMID:17660287

  18. Characterization of serine hydroxymethyltransferase GlyA as a potential source of D-alanine in Chlamydia pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    De Benedetti, Stefania; Bühl, Henrike; Gaballah, Ahmed; Klöckner, Anna; Otten, Christian; Schneider, Tanja; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Henrichfreise, Beate

    2014-01-01

    For intracellular Chlamydiaceae, there is no need to withstand osmotic challenges, and a functional cell wall has not been detected in these pathogens so far. Nevertheless, penicillin inhibits cell division in Chlamydiaceae resulting in enlarged aberrant bodies, a phenomenon known as chlamydial anomaly. D-alanine is a unique and essential component in the biosynthesis of bacterial cell walls. In free-living bacteria like Escherichia coli, penicillin-binding proteins such as monofunctional transpeptidases PBP2 and PBP3, the putative targets of penicillin in Chlamydiaceae, cross-link adjacent peptidoglycan strands via meso-diaminopimelic acid and D-Ala-D-Ala moieties of pentapeptide side chains. In the absence of genes coding for alanine racemase Alr and DadX homologs, the source of D-Ala and thus the presence of substrates for PBP2 and PBP3 activity in Chlamydiaceae has puzzled researchers for years. Interestingly, Chlamydiaceae genomes encode GlyA, a serine hydroxymethyltransferase that has been shown to exhibit slow racemization of D- and L-alanine as a side reaction in E. coli. We show that GlyA from Chlamydia pneumoniae can serve as a source of D-Ala. GlyA partially reversed the D-Ala auxotrophic phenotype of an E. coli racemase double mutant. Moreover, purified chlamydial GlyA had racemase activity on L-Ala in vitro and was inhibited by D-cycloserine, identifying GlyA, besides D-Ala ligase MurC/Ddl, as an additional target of this competitive inhibitor in Chlamydiaceae. Proof of D-Ala biosynthesis in Chlamydiaceae helps to clarify the structure of cell wall precursor lipid II and the role of chlamydial penicillin-binding proteins in the development of non-dividing aberrant chlamydial bodies and persistence in the presence of penicillin. PMID:24616885

  19. Synthesis, growth and optical properties of an efficient nonlinear optical single crystal: L-alanine DL-malic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirubagaran, R.; Madhavan, J.

    2015-02-01

    Single crystals of L-alanine DL-malic acid (LADLMA) have been grown from aqueous solution by slow-cooling technique. Powder X-ray diffraction studies reveal the structure of the crystal to be orthorhombic. The nonlinear optical conversion efficiency test was carried out for the grown crystals using the Kurtz powder technique. The third order nonlinear refractive index and the nonlinear absorption coefficient where evaluated by Z-scan measurements. As the material have a negative refractive index it could be used in the protection of optical sensors such as night vision devices.

  20. Crystal Engineering of l-Alanine with l-Leucine Additive using Metal-Assisted and Microwave-Accelerated Evaporative Crystallization

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrated that the change in the morphology of l-alanine crystals can be controlled with the addition of l-leucine using the metal-assisted and microwave accelerated evaporative crystallization (MA-MAEC) technique. Crystallization experiments, where an increasing stoichiometric amount of l-leucine is added to initial l-alanine solutions, were carried out on circular poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) disks modified with a 21-well capacity silicon isolator and silver nanoparticle films using microwave heating (MA-MAEC) and at room temperature (control experiments). The use of the MA-MAEC technique afforded for the growth of l-alanine crystals with different morphologies up to ∼10-fold faster than those grown at room temperature. In addition, the length of l-alanine crystals was systematically increased from ∼380 to ∼2000 μm using the MA-MAEC technique. Optical microscope images revealed that the shape of l-alanine crystals was changed from tetragonal shape (without l-leucine additive) to more elongated and wire-like structures with the addition of the l-leucine additive. Further characterization of l-alanine crystals was undertaken by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) measurements. In order to elucidate the growth mechanism of l-alanine crystals, theoretical simulations of l-alanine’s morphology with and without l-leucine additive were carried out using Materials Studio software in conjunction with our experimental data. Theoretical simulations revealed that the growth of l-alanine’s {011} and {120} crystal faces were inhibited due to the incorporation of l-leucine into these crystal faces in selected positions. PMID:24839404