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Sample records for alanine dehydrogenase activity

  1. E. coli histidine triad nucleotide binding protein 1 (ecHinT) is a catalytic regulator of D-alanine dehydrogenase (DadA) activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bardaweel, Sanaa; Ghosh, Brahma; Chou, Tsui-Fen; Sadowsky, Michael J; Wagner, Carston R

    2011-01-01

    Histidine triad nucleotide binding proteins (Hints) are highly conserved members of the histidine triad (HIT) protein superfamily. Hints comprise the most ancient branch of this superfamily and can be found in Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukaryota. Prokaryotic genomes, including a wide diversity of both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, typically have one Hint gene encoded by hinT (ycfF in E. coli). Despite their ubiquity, the foundational reason for the wide-spread conservation of Hints across all kingdoms of life remains a mystery. In this study, we used a combination of phenotypic screening and complementation analyses with wild-type and hinT knock-out Escherichia coli strains to show that catalytically active ecHinT is required in E. coli for growth on D-alanine as a sole carbon source. We demonstrate that the expression of catalytically active ecHinT is essential for the activity of the enzyme D-alanine dehydrogenase (DadA) (equivalent to D-amino acid oxidase in eukaryotes), a necessary component of the D-alanine catabolic pathway. Site-directed mutagenesis studies revealed that catalytically active C-terminal mutants of ecHinT are unable to activate DadA activity. In addition, we have designed and synthesized the first cell-permeable inhibitor of ecHinT and demonstrated that the wild-type E. coli treated with the inhibitor exhibited the same phenotype observed for the hinT knock-out strain. These results reveal that the catalytic activity and structure of ecHinT is essential for DadA function and therefore alanine metabolism in E. coli. Moreover, they provide the first biochemical evidence linking the catalytic activity of this ubiquitous protein to the biological function of Hints in Escherichia coli.

  2. Role of Alanine Dehydrogenase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during Recovery from Hypoxic Nonreplicating Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Giffin, Michelle M.; Shi, Lanbo; Gennaro, Maria L.; Sohaskey, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis can maintain a nonreplicating persistent state in the host for decades, but must maintain the ability to efficiently reactivate and produce active disease to survive and spread in a population. Among the enzymes expressed during this dormancy is alanine dehydrogenase, which converts pyruvate to alanine, and glyoxylate to glycine concurrent with the oxidation of NADH to NAD. It is involved in the metabolic remodeling of M. tuberculosis through its possible interactions with both the glyoxylate and methylcitrate cycle. Both mRNA levels and enzymatic activities of isocitrate lyase, the first enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, and alanine dehydrogenase increased during entry into nonreplicating persistence, while the gene and activity for the second enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, malate synthase were not. This could suggest a shift in carbon flow away from the glyoxylate cycle and instead through alanine dehydrogenase. Expression of ald was also induced in vitro by other persistence-inducing stresses such as nitric oxide, and was expressed at high levels in vivo during the initial lung infection in mice. Enzyme activity was maintained during extended hypoxia even after transcription levels decreased. An ald knockout mutant of M. tuberculosis showed no reduction in anaerobic survival in vitro, but resulted in a significant lag in the resumption of growth after reoxygenation. During reactivation the ald mutant had an altered NADH/NAD ratio, and alanine dehydrogenase is proposed to maintain the optimal NADH/NAD ratio during anaerobiosis in preparation of eventual regrowth, and during the initial response during reoxygenation. PMID:27203084

  3. Regulation of the ald gene encoding alanine dehydrogenase by AldR in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ji-A; Baek, Eun-Young; Kim, Si Wouk; Choi, Jong-Soon; Oh, Jeong-Il

    2013-08-01

    The regulatory gene aldR was identified 95 bp upstream of the ald gene encoding L-alanine dehydrogenase in Mycobacterium smegmatis. The AldR protein shows sequence similarity to the regulatory proteins of the Lrp/AsnC family. Using an aldR deletion mutant, we demonstrated that AldR serves as both activator and repressor for the regulation of ald gene expression, depending on the presence or absence of L-alanine. The purified AldR protein exists as a homodimer in the absence of L-alanine, while it adopts the quaternary structure of a homohexamer in the presence of L-alanine. The binding affinity of AldR for the ald control region was shown to be increased significantly by L-alanine. Two AldR binding sites (O1 and O2) with the consensus sequence GA-N₂-ATC-N₂-TC and one putative AldR binding site with the sequence GA-N₂-GTT-N₂-TC were identified upstream of the ald gene. Alanine and cysteine were demonstrated to be the effector molecules directly involved in the induction of ald expression. The cellular level of L-alanine was shown to be increased in M. smegmatis cells grown under hypoxic conditions, and the hypoxic induction of ald expression appears to be mediated by AldR, which senses the intracellular level of alanine.

  4. Isotopic effects in mechanistic studies of biotransformations of fluorine derivatives of L-alanine catalysed by L-alanine dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Szymańska-Majchrzak, Jolanta; Pałka, Katarzyna; Kańska, Marianna

    2017-05-01

    Synthesis of 3-fluoro-[2-(2)H]-L-alanine (3-F-[(2)H]-L-Ala) in reductive amination of 3-fluoropyruvic acid catalysed by L-alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) was described. Fluorine derivative was used to study oxidative deamination catalysed by AlaDH applied kinetic (for 3-F-L-Ala in H2O - KIE's on Vmax: 1.1; on Vmax/KM: 1.2; for 3-F-L-Ala in (2)H2O - on Vmax: 1.4; on Vmax/KM: 2.1) and solvent isotope effect methods (for 3-F-L-Ala - SIE's on Vmax: 1.0; on Vmax/KM: 0.87; for 3-F-[2-(2)H]-L-Ala - on Vmax: 1.4; on Vmax/KM: 1.5). Studies explain some details of reaction mechanism.

  5. Reconfiguration of N Metabolism upon Hypoxia Stress and Recovery: Roles of Alanine Aminotransferase (AlaAT) and Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH)

    PubMed Central

    Diab, Houssein; Limami, Anis M.

    2016-01-01

    In the context of climatic change, more heavy precipitation and more frequent flooding and waterlogging events threaten the productivity of arable farmland. Furthermore, crops were not selected to cope with flooding- and waterlogging-induced oxygen limitation. In general, low oxygen stress, unlike other abiotic stresses (e.g., cold, high temperature, drought and saline stress), received little interest from the scientific community and less financial support from stakeholders. Accordingly, breeding programs should be developed and agronomical practices should be adapted in order to save plants’ growth and yield—even under conditions of low oxygen availability (e.g., submergence and waterlogging). The prerequisite to the success of such breeding programs and changes in agronomical practices is a good knowledge of how plants adapt to low oxygen stress at the cellular and the whole plant level. In the present paper, we summarized the recent knowledge on metabolic adjustment in general under low oxygen stress and highlighted thereafter the major changes pertaining to the reconfiguration of amino acids syntheses. We propose a model showing (i) how pyruvate derived from active glycolysis upon hypoxia is competitively used by the alanine aminotransferase/glutamate synthase cycle, leading to alanine accumulation and NAD+ regeneration. Carbon is then saved in a nitrogen store instead of being lost through ethanol fermentative pathway. (ii) During the post-hypoxia recovery period, the alanine aminotransferase/glutamate dehydrogenase cycle mobilizes this carbon from alanine store. Pyruvate produced by the reverse reaction of alanine aminotransferase is funneled to the TCA cycle, while deaminating glutamate dehydrogenase regenerates, reducing equivalent (NADH) and 2-oxoglutarate to maintain the cycle function. PMID:27258319

  6. Oxidation of 3,4-dehydro-D-proline and other D-amino acid analogues by D-alanine dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Deutch, Charles E

    2004-09-15

    3,4-Dehydro-DL-proline is a toxic analogue of L-proline which has been useful in studying the uptake and metabolism of this key amino acid. When membrane fractions from Escherichia coli strain UMM5 (putA1::Tn5 proC24) lacking both L-proline dehydrogenase and L-Delta(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase were incubated with 3,4-dehydro-DL-proline, pyrrole-2-carboxylate was formed. There was no enzyme activity with 3,4-dehydro-L-proline, but activity was restored after racemization of the substrate. Oxidation of 3,4-dehydro-DL-proline by membrane fractions from strain UMM5 was induced by growth in minimal medium containing D- or L-alanine, had a pH optimum of 9, and was competitively inhibited by D-alanine. An E. coli strain with no D-alanine dehydrogenase activity due to the dadA237 mutation was unable to oxidize either 3,4-dehydro-D-proline or D-alanine, as were spontaneous Dad(-) mutants of E. coli strain UMM5. Membrane fractions containing D-alanine dehydrogenase also catalyzed the oxidation of D-2-aminobutyrate, D-norvaline, D-norleucine, cis-4-hydroxy-D-proline, and DL-ethionine. These results indicate that d-alanine dehydrogenase is responsible for the residual 3,4-dehydro-DL-proline oxidation activity in putA proC mutants of E. coli and provide further evidence that this enzyme plays a general role in the metabolism of D-amino acids and their analogues.

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of an alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus megaterium WSH-002.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaoyun; Yi, Qiufen; Zhang, Guofang; Zhu, Xianming; Zhou, Honggang; Dong, Hui

    2013-08-01

    Alanine dehydrogenase (L-AlaDH) from Bacillus megaterium WSH-002 catalyses the NAD⁺-dependent interconversion of L-alanine and pyruvate. The enzyme was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells and purified with a His6 tag by Ni²⁺-chelating affinity chromatography for X-ray crystallographic analysis. Crystals were grown in a solution consisting of 0.1 M HEPES pH 8.0, 12%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 8000, 8%(v/v) ethylene glycol at a concentration of 15 mg ml⁻¹ purified protein. The crystal diffracted to 2.35 Å resolution and belonged to the trigonal space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 125.918, c = 144.698 Å.

  8. Engineering of alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus subtilis for novel cofactor specificity.

    PubMed

    Lerchner, Alexandra; Jarasch, Alexander; Skerra, Arne

    2016-09-01

    The l-alanine dehydrogenase of Bacillus subtilis (BasAlaDH), which is strictly dependent on NADH as redox cofactor, efficiently catalyzes the reductive amination of pyruvate to l-alanine using ammonia as amino group donor. To enable application of BasAlaDH as regenerating enzyme in coupled reactions with NADPH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases, we alterated its cofactor specificity from NADH to NADPH via protein engineering. By introducing two amino acid exchanges, D196A and L197R, high catalytic efficiency for NADPH was achieved, with kcat /KM  = 54.1 µM(-1)  Min(-1) (KM  = 32 ± 3 µM; kcat  = 1,730 ± 39 Min(-1) ), almost the same as the wild-type enzyme for NADH (kcat /KM  = 59.9 µM(-1)  Min(-1) ; KM  = 14 ± 2 µM; kcat  = 838 ± 21 Min(-1) ). Conversely, recognition of NADH was much diminished in the mutated enzyme (kcat /KM  = 3 µM(-1)  Min(-1) ). BasAlaDH(D196A/L197R) was applied in a coupled oxidation/transamination reaction of the chiral dicyclic dialcohol isosorbide to its diamines, catalyzed by Ralstonia sp. alcohol dehydrogenase and Paracoccus denitrificans ω-aminotransferase, thus allowing recycling of the two cosubstrates NADP(+) and l-Ala. An excellent cofactor regeneration with recycling factors of 33 for NADP(+) and 13 for l-Ala was observed with the engineered BasAlaDH in a small-scale biocatalysis experiment. This opens a biocatalytic route to novel building blocks for industrial high-performance polymers.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of mutated Mycobacterium tuberculosis L-alanine dehydrogenase to illuminate the role of key residues.

    PubMed

    Ling, Baoping; Bi, Siwei; Sun, Min; Jing, Zhihong; Li, Xiaoping; Zhang, Rui

    2014-05-01

    L-Alanine dehydrogenase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (L-MtAlaDH) catalyzes the NADH-dependent interconversion of l-alanine and pyruvate, and it is considered to be a potential target for the treatment of tuberculosis. The experiment has verified that amino acid replacement of the conserved active-site residues which have strong stability and no great changes in biological evolutionary process, such as His96 and Asp270, could lead to inactive mutants [Ågren et al., J. Mol. Biol. 377 (2008) 1161-1173]. However, the role of these conserved residues in catalytic reaction still remains unclear. Based on the crystal structures, a series of mutant structures were constructed to investigate the role of the conserved residues in enzymatic reaction by using molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that whatever the conserved residues were mutated, the protein can still convert its conformation from open state to closed state as long as NADH is present in active site. Asp270 maintains the stability of nicotinamide ring and ribose of NADH through hydrogen bond interactions, and His96 is helpful to convert the protein conformation by interactions with Gln271, whereas, they would lead to the structural rearrangement in active site and lose the catalytic activity when they were mutated. Additionally, we deduce that Met301 plays a major role in catalytic reaction due to fixing the nicotinamide ring of NADH to prevent its rotation, and we propose that Met301 would be mutated to the hydrophobic residue with large steric hindrance in side chain to test the activity of the protein in future experiment.

  10. Inhibition of glutamine synthesis induces glutamate dehydrogenase-dependent ammonia fixation into alanine in co-cultures of astrocytes and neurons.

    PubMed

    Dadsetan, Sherry; Bak, Lasse K; Sørensen, Michael; Keiding, Susanne; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Ott, Peter; Leke, Renata; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2011-09-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that ammonia exposure of neurons and astrocytes in co-culture leads to net synthesis not only of glutamine but also of alanine. The latter process involves the concerted action of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and alanine aminotransferase (ALAT). In the present study it was investigated if the glutamine synthetase (GS) inhibitor methionine sulfoximine (MSO) would enhance alanine synthesis by blocking the GS-dependent ammonia scavenging process. Hence, co-cultures of neurons and astrocytes were incubated for 2.5h with [U-(13)C]glucose to monitor de novo synthesis of alanine and glutamine in the absence and presence of 5.0 mM NH(4)Cl and 10 mM MSO. Ammonia exposure led to increased incorporation of label but not to a significant increase in the amount of these amino acids. However, in the presence of MSO, glutamine synthesis was blocked and synthesis of alanine increased leading to an elevated content intra- as well as extracellularly of this amino acid. Treatment with MSO led to a dramatic decrease in glutamine content and increased the intracellular contents of glutamate and aspartate. The large increase in alanine during exposure to MSO underlines the importance of the GDH and ALAT biosynthetic pathway for ammonia fixation, and it points to the use of a GS inhibitor to ameliorate the brain toxicity and edema induced by hyperammonemia, events likely related to glutamine synthesis.

  11. Charge dependent photodynamic activity of alanine based zinc phthalocyanines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ao; Li, Yejing; Zhou, Lin; Yuan, Linxin; Lu, Shan; Lin, Yun; Zhou, Jiahong; Wei, Shaohua

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, to minimize the effects of different structure, three alanine-based zinc phthalocyanines (Pcs) of differing charges were engineered and synthesized with the same basic structure. On this premise, the relationship between nature of charge and photodynamic activity was studied. Besides, further verification and explanation of some inconsistent results were also carried out. The results showed that charge can influence the aggregation state, singlet oxygen generation ability and cellular uptake of Pcs, thereby affecting their photodynamic activity. In addition, the biomolecules inside cells may interact with Pcs of differing charges, which can also influence the aggregation state and singlet oxygen generation of the Pcs, and then influence the relationship between nature of charge and photodynamic activity.

  12. Antibacterial Activity of Alanine-Derived Gemini Quaternary Ammonium Compounds.

    PubMed

    Piecuch, Agata; Obłąk, Ewa; Guz-Regner, Katarzyna

    The antibacterial activity of alanine-derived gemini quaternary ammonium salts (chlorides and bromides) with various spacer and alkyl chain lengths was investigated. The studied compounds exhibited a strong bactericidal effect, especially bromides with 10 and 12 carbon alkyl chains and 3 carbon spacer groups (TMPAL-10 Br and TMPAL-12 Br), with a short contact time. Both salts dislodged biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus epidermidis, and were lethal to adherent cells of S. epidermidis. Bromide with 2 carbon spacer groups and 12 carbon alkyl chains (TMEAL-12 Br) effectively reduced microbial adhesion by coating polystyrene and silicone surfaces. The results obtained suggest that, after further studies, gemini QAS might be considered as antimicrobial agents in medicine or industry.

  13. Regulation Mechanism of the ald Gene Encoding Alanine Dehydrogenase in Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis by the Lrp/AsnC Family Regulator AldR

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ji-A; Hyun, Jaekyung

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the presence of alanine, AldR, which belongs to the Lrp/AsnC family of transcriptional regulators and regulates ald encoding alanine dehydrogenase in Mycobacterium smegmatis, changes its quaternary structure from a homodimer to an octamer with an open-ring conformation. Four AldR-binding sites (O2, O1, O4, and O3) with a consensus sequence of GA/T-N2-NWW/WWN-N2-A/TC were identified upstream of the M. smegmatis ald gene by means of DNase I footprinting analysis. O2, O1, and O4 are required for the induction of ald expression by alanine, while O3 is directly involved in the repression of ald expression. In addition to O3, both O1 and O4 are also necessary for full repression of ald expression in the absence of alanine, due to cooperative binding of AldR dimers to O1, O4, and O3. Binding of a molecule of the AldR octamer to the ald control region was demonstrated to require two AldR-binding sites separated by three helical turns between their centers and one additional binding site that is in phase with the two AldR-binding sites. The cooperative binding of AldR dimers to DNA requires three AldR-binding sites that are aligned with a periodicity of three helical turns. The aldR gene is negatively autoregulated independently of alanine. Comparative analysis of ald expression of M. smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in conjunction with sequence analysis of both ald control regions led us to suggest that the expression of the ald genes in both mycobacterial species is regulated by the same mechanism. IMPORTANCE In mycobacteria, alanine dehydrogenase (Ald) is the enzyme required both to utilize alanine as a nitrogen source and to grow under hypoxic conditions by maintaining the redox state of the NADH/NAD+ pool. Expression of the ald gene was reported to be regulated by the AldR regulator that belongs to the Lrp/AsnC (feast/famine) family, but the underlying mechanism was unknown. This study revealed the regulation mechanism of ald in Mycobacterium

  14. Mechanism of activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase by dichloroacetate and other halogenated carboxylic acids

    PubMed Central

    Whitehouse, Sue; Cooper, Ronald H.; Randle, Philip J.

    1974-01-01

    dichloroacetate inhibited incorporation of 14C from [U-14C]glucose, [U-14C]fructose and from [U-14C]lactate into CO2 and glyceride fatty acid. 8. It is concluded that the inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase by dichloroacetate may account for the activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase and pyruvate oxidation which it induces in isolated rat heart and diaphragm muscles, subject to certain assumptions as to the distribution of dichloroacetate across the plasma membrane and the mitochondrial membrane. 9. It is suggested that activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase by dichloroacetate could contribute to its hypoglycaemic effect by interruption of the Cori and alanine cycles. 10. It is suggested that the inhibitory effect of dichloroacetate on fatty acid synthesis in adipose tissue may involve an additional effect or effects of the compound. PMID:4478069

  15. Dehydrogenase and Oxoreductase Activities of Porcine Placental 11Beta-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    dehydrogenase (IIB-HSD) were measured in tissue fragment cultures on day 75 of gestation. Dehydrogenase activity was over fivefold greater than oxoreductase...oxoreductase activities in porcine placentae under physiological conditions using placental explant culture and endogenous concentrations of coenzymes and...f!M range). In human placental tissue fragments at midterm and late pregnancy ( 12, 18) and in trophoblast cell cultures from term placentae ( 41

  16. Synthesis and GGCT Inhibitory Activity of N-Glutaryl-L-alanine Analogues.

    PubMed

    Ii, Hiromi; Yoshiki, Tatsuhiro; Hoshiya, Naoyuki; Uenishi, Jun'ichi

    2016-01-01

    γ-Glutamylcyclotransferase (GGCT) is an important enzyme that cleaves γ-glutamyl-amino acid in the γ-glutamyl cycle to release 5-oxoproline and amino acid. Eighteen N-acyl-L-alanine analogues including eleven new compounds have been synthesized and examined for their inhibitory activity against recombinant human GGCT protein. Simple N-glutaryl-L-alanine was found to be the most potent inhibitor for GGCT. Other N-glutaryl-L-alanine analogues having methyl and dimethyl substituents at the 2-position were moderately effective, while N-(3R-aminoglutary)-L-alanine, the substrate having an (R)-amino group at the 3-position or N-(N-methyl-3-azaglutaryl)-L-alanine, the substrate having an N-methyl substituent on the 3-azaglutaryl carbon, in constract, exhibited excellent inhibition properties.

  17. Inhibitory effect of disulfiram (Antabuse) on alcohol dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Carper, W R; Dorey, R C; Beber, J H

    1987-10-01

    We investigated the effect of disulfiram (Antabuse) on the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.1) in vitro. We observed a time-dependent inhibition of this dehydrogenase by disulfiram and diethyldithiocarbamate similar to that obtained for aldehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.3). These results suggest a possible explanation for various side effects observed in the clinical use of Antabuse.

  18. Herbicidal Activity of an Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase Inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Wittenbach, V. A.; Teaney, P. W.; Hanna, W. S.; Rayner, D. R.; Schloss, J. V.

    1994-01-01

    Isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (IPMDH) is the third enzyme specific to leucine biosynthesis. It catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of 3-isopropylmalate (3-IPM) to 2-ketoisocaproic acid. The partially purified enzyme from pea (Pisum sativum L.) shows a broad pH optimum of 7.8 to 9.1 and has Km values for 3-IPM and NAD of 18 and 40 [mu]M, respectively. O-Isobutenyl oxalylhydroxamate (O-IbOHA) has been discovered to be an excellent inhibitor of the pea IPMDH, with an apparent inhibitor constant of 5 nM. As an herbicide, O-IbOHA showed only moderate activity on a variety of broadleaf and grass species. We characterized the herbicidal activity of O-IbOHA on corn (Zea mays L.), a sensitive species; giant foxtail (Setaria faberi) and morning glory (Ipomoea purpurea [L.] Roth), moderately tolerant species; and soybean [Glycine max L. Merr.), a tolerant species. Differences in tolerance among the species were not due to differences in the sensitivity of IPMDH. Studies with [14C]O-IbOHA suggested that uptake and translocation were not major limitations for herbicidal activity, nor were they determinants of tolerance. Moreover, metabolism could not account for the difference in tolerance of corn, foxtail, and morning glory, although it might account for the tolerance of soybean. Herbicidal activity on all four species was correlated with the accumulation of 3-IPM in the plants. PMID:12232331

  19. Identification of novel inhibitors against Mycobacterium tuberculosis L-alanine dehydrogenase (MTB-AlaDH) through structure-based virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Shalini; Devi, Parthiban Brindha; Soni, Vijay; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Sriram, Dharmarajan

    2014-02-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) the etiological agent of tuberculosis (TB) survives in the human host for decades evading the immune system in a latent or persistent state. The Rv2780 (ald) gene that codes for L-alanine dehydrogenase (L-AlaDH) enzyme catalyzes reversible oxidative deamination of L-alanine to pyruvate and is overexpressed under hypoxic and nutrient starvation conditions in MTB. At present, as there is no suitable drug available to treat dormant tuberculosis; it is essential to identify drug candidates that could potentially treat dormant TB. Availability of crystal structure of MTB L-AlaDH bound with co-factor NAD+ facilitated us to employ structure-based virtual screening approach to obtain new hits from a commercial library of Asinex database using energy-optimized pharmacophore modeling. The resulting pharmacophore consisted of three hydrogen bond donor sites (D) and two hydrogen bond acceptor sites (A). The database compounds with a fitness score more than 1.0 were further subjected to Glide high-throughput virtual screening and docking. Thus, we report the identification of best five hits based on structure-based design and their in vitro enzymatic inhibition studies revealed IC₅₀ values in the range of 35-80 μM.

  20. Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase Activity in Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Lorite, María J.; Tachil, Jörg; Sanjuán, Juán; Meyer, Ortwin; Bedmar, Eulogio J.

    2000-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain 110spc4 was capable of chemolithoautotrophic growth with carbon monoxide (CO) as a sole energy and carbon source under aerobic conditions. The enzyme carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH; EC 1.2.99.2) has been purified 21-fold, with a yield of 16% and a specific activity of 58 nmol of CO oxidized/min/mg of protein, by a procedure that involved differential ultracentrifugation, anion-exchange chromatography, hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and gel filtration. The purified enzyme gave a single protein and activity band on nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and had a molecular mass of 230,000 Da. The 230-kDa enzyme was composed of large (L; 75-kDa), medium (M; 28.4-kDa), and small (S; 17.2-kDa) subunits occurring in heterohexameric (LMS)2 subunit composition. The 75-kDa polypeptide exhibited immunological cross-reactivity with the large subunit of the CODH of Oligotropha carboxidovorans. The B. japonicum enzyme contained, per mole, 2.29 atoms of Mo, 7.96 atoms of Fe, 7.60 atoms of labile S, and 1.99 mol of flavin. Treatment of the enzyme with iodoacetamide yielded di(carboxamidomethyl)molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide, identifying molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide as the organic portion of the B. japonicum CODH molybdenum cofactor. The absorption spectrum of the purified enzyme was characteristic of a molybdenum-containing iron-sulfur flavoprotein. PMID:10788353

  1. Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase activity in Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Lorite, M J; Tachil, J; Sanjuán, J; Meyer, O; Bedmar, E J

    2000-05-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain 110spc4 was capable of chemolithoautotrophic growth with carbon monoxide (CO) as a sole energy and carbon source under aerobic conditions. The enzyme carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH; EC 1.2.99.2) has been purified 21-fold, with a yield of 16% and a specific activity of 58 nmol of CO oxidized/min/mg of protein, by a procedure that involved differential ultracentrifugation, anion-exchange chromatography, hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and gel filtration. The purified enzyme gave a single protein and activity band on nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and had a molecular mass of 230,000 Da. The 230-kDa enzyme was composed of large (L; 75-kDa), medium (M; 28.4-kDa), and small (S; 17.2-kDa) subunits occurring in heterohexameric (LMS)(2) subunit composition. The 75-kDa polypeptide exhibited immunological cross-reactivity with the large subunit of the CODH of Oligotropha carboxidovorans. The B. japonicum enzyme contained, per mole, 2.29 atoms of Mo, 7.96 atoms of Fe, 7.60 atoms of labile S, and 1.99 mol of flavin. Treatment of the enzyme with iodoacetamide yielded di(carboxamidomethyl)molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide, identifying molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide as the organic portion of the B. japonicum CODH molybdenum cofactor. The absorption spectrum of the purified enzyme was characteristic of a molybdenum-containing iron-sulfur flavoprotein.

  2. Antimicrobial activity of antihypertensive food-derived peptides and selected alanine analogues.

    PubMed

    McClean, Stephen; Beggs, Louise B; Welch, Robert W

    2014-03-01

    This study evaluated four food-derived peptides with known antihypertensive activities for antimicrobial activity against pathogenic microorganisms, and assessed structure-function relationships using alanine analogues. The peptides (EVSLNSGYY, barley; PGTAVFK, soybean; TTMPLW, α-casein; VHLPP, α-zein) and the six alanine substitution peptides of PGTAVFK were synthesised, characterised and evaluated for antimicrobial activity using the bacteria, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Micrococcus luteus and the yeast, Candida albicans. The peptides TTMPLW and PGTAVFK inhibited growth of all four microorganisms tested, with activities of a similar order of magnitude to ampicillin and ethanol controls. EVSLNSGYY inhibited the growth of the bacteria, but VHLPP showed no antimicrobial activity. The alanine analogue, PGAAVFK showed the highest overall antimicrobial activity and PGTAVFA showed no activity; overall, the activities of the analogues were consistent with their structures. Some peptides with antihypertensive activity also show antimicrobial activity, suggesting that food-derived peptides may exert beneficial effects via a number of mechanisms.

  3. [Temperature-dependent optical activity and birefringence study of D-alanine single crystal].

    PubMed

    Li, Zong-Sheng; Gong, Yan; Wang, Wen-Qing; Du, Wei-Min

    2006-02-01

    The measurement of the anisotropy of optical acitivity and birefringence is one of the most important clues to studying physical properties of a biaxial crystal of D-alanine. In order to investigate a second-order phase transition predicted by A. Salam between two states of D-alanine, the behavior of birefringence and optical activity is useful for the phenomenological approach to the transition mechanism. The optical activity as a peculiar quantity can respond to the modulation of the crystal lattice and to the change in the bonding nature of constituent atoms. In the present paper, the authors use the PEM-90 photoelastic modulator to study the conformation change of D-alanine at the temperature ranging from 220 to 290 K. The temperature dependence of I(2f)/I(dc) showed that the conformation of D-alanine molecule in single crystal changed around 250 K. The obtained results provide an obvious evidence of optical rotation phase transition predicted by Salam.

  4. Spatial variability of the dehydrogenase activity in forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błońska, Ewa; Lasota, Jarosław

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the spatial variability of the dehydrogenase activity (DH) in forest soils using geostatistics. We have studied variability soil dehydrogenase and their relationship with variability of some physic-chemical properties. Two study areas (A and B) were set up in southern Poland in the Zlotoryja Forest District. Study areas were covered by different types of vegetation (A- broadleaf forest with beech, ash and sycamore), B- coniferous forest with Norway spruce). The soils were classified as Dystric Cambisols (WRB 2006). The samples for laboratory testing were collected from 49 places on each areas. 15 cm of surface horizon of soil were taken (with previously removed litter). Dehydrogenase activity was marked with Lenhard's method according to the Casida procedure. Soil pH, nitrogen (N) and soil organic carbon (C) content (by LECO CNS 2000 carbon analyzer) was marked. C/N ratio was calculated. Particle size composition was determined using laser diffraction. Statistical analysis were performed using STATISTICA 10 software. Geostatistical analysis and mapping were done by application of GS 9+ (Gamma Design) and Surfer 11 (Golden Software). The activity of DH ranged between 5,02 and 71,20 mg TPP• kg-1 •24 h-1 on the A area and between 0,94 and 16,47 mg TPP• kg-1 •24 h-1. Differences in spatial variability of the analised features were noted. The variability of dehydrogenase activity on the A study area was described by an exponential model, whereas on the B study area the spatial correlation has not been noted. The relationship of dehydrogenase activity with the remaining parameters of soil was noted only in the case of A study area. The variability of organic carbon content on the A and B study areas were described by an exponential model. The variability of nitrogen content on both areas were described by an spherical model.

  5. Structure-function relationship in the antifreeze activity of synthetic alanine-lysine antifreeze polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Wierzbicki, A; Knight, C A; Rutland, T J; Muccio, D D; Pybus, B S; Sikes, C S

    2000-01-01

    Recently antifreeze proteins (AFP) have been the subject of many structure-function relationship studies regarding their antifreeze activity. Attempts have been made to elucidate the structure-function relationship by various amino acid substitutions, but to our knowledge there has been no successful from first principles design of a polypeptide that would bind to designated ice planes along a specific direction. In this paper we show the results of our first attempt on an entirely de novo design of an alanine-lysine-rich antifreeze polypeptide. This 43 residue alanine-lysine peptide exhibits characteristic nonequilibrium freezing point depression and binds to the designated (210) planes of ice along the [122] vector. The structural and thermodynamic properties of this polypeptide were determined using circular dichroism spectroscopy and its nonequilibrium antifreeze properties were investigated using an ice-etching method and nanoliter osmometry.

  6. Peripartal changes in serum alkaline phosphatase activity and lactate dehydrogenase activity in dairy cows.

    PubMed Central

    Peter, A T; Bosu, W T; MacWilliams, P; Gallagher, S

    1987-01-01

    Peripartal serum alkaline phosphatase activity and lactate dehydrogenase activity were measured in 30 dairy cows in order to examine the association between retained fetal membranes and enzyme activity. Daily blood samples were obtained from pregnant cows, starting 15 days before the expected day of calving until eight days after parturition. Sera from 15 cows which retained fetal membranes longer than 24 hours and 15 cows which shed fetal membranes within six hours after parturition were analyzed for alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activities. Mean alkaline phosphatase enzyme activities ranged from 15.93 to 32.6 U/L in retained and nonretained placenta cows. There was a trend towards higher serum alkaline phosphatase activities in retained placenta cows but the differences were not significant among the groups (P greater than 0.05). Mean lactate dehydrogenase activities ranged from 307.2 to 438.86 U/L in nonretained and retained placenta cows. Lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activities in nonretained and retained placenta cows were similar (P greater than 0.05). The alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activities peaked at the time of parturition in both groups. However, the differences in alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase activities on different days within non-retained and retained placenta cows were significant (P less than 0.05). Results indicate that prepartal changes in alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activities are not predictive of placental retention postpartum. PMID:3453274

  7. Alanine-Scanning Mutational Analysis of Durancin GL Reveals Residues Important for Its Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xingrong; Chen, Xinquan; Du, Lihui; Wu, Xueyou; Liu, Fang; Yuan, Jian

    2015-07-22

    Durancin GL is a novel class IIa bacteriocin with 43 residues produced by Enterococcus durans 41D. This bacteriocin demonstrates narrow inhibition spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against several Listeria monocytogenes strains, including nisin-resistant L. monocytogenes NR30. A systematic alanine-scanning mutational analysis with site-directed mutagenesis was performed to analyze durancin GL residues important for antimicrobial activity and specificity. Results showed that three mutations lost their antimicrobial activity, ten mutations demonstrated a decreased effect on the activity, and seven mutations exhibited relatively high activity. With regard to inhibitory spectrum, four mutants demonstrated a narrower antimicrobial spectrum than wild-type durancin GL. Another four mutants displayed a broader target cell spectrum and increased potency relative to wild-type durancin GL. These findings broaden our understanding of durancin GL residues important for its antimicrobial activity and contribute to future rational design of variants with increased potency.

  8. [Effects of H2-blockers on alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity].

    PubMed

    Jelski, Wojciech; Orywal, Karolina; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2008-12-01

    First-pass metabolism (FPM) of alcohol is demonstrated by lower blood alcohol concentrations after oral than intravenous administration of the same dose. FPM occurs predominantly in the stomach and has been attributed to class IV of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzyme localizated in the gastric mucosa. A number of factors that influence on gastric ADH activity and thereby modulate FPM have been identified. These include age, sex, ethnicity, concentrations and amounts of alcohol consumed and drugs. Several H2-receptor antagonists, including cimetidine and ranitidine, inhibit gastric ADH activity and reduce FPM, resulting in higher blood alcohol concentrations after H2-blockers administration.

  9. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Activity in Normal and Deficient Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Kwan-Fu Rex; Hu, Chii-Whei C.; Utter, Merton F.

    1981-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) activity in human skin fibroblasts appears to be regulated by a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation mechanism, as is the case with other animal cells. The enzyme can be activated by pretreating the cells with dichloroacetate (DCA), an inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, before they are disrupted for measurement of PDC activity. With such treatment, the activity reaches 5-6 nmol/min per mg of protein at 37°C with fibroblasts from infants. Such values represent an activation of about 5-20-fold over those observed with untreated cells. That this assay, based on [1-14C]pyruvate decarboxylation, represents a valid measurement of the overall PDC reaction is shown by the dependence of 14CO2 production on the presence of thiamin-PP, coenzyme A (CoA), Mg++, and NAD+. Also, it has been shown that acetyl-CoA and 14CO2 are formed in a 1:1 ratio. A similar degree of activation of PDC can also be achieved by adding purified pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase and high concentrations of Mg++ and Ca++, or in some cases by adding the metal ions alone to the cell homogenate after disruption. These results strongly suggest that activation is due to dephosphorylation. Addition of NaF, which inhibits dephosphorylation, leads to almost complete loss of PDC activity. Assays of completely activated PDC were performed on two cell lines originating from patients reported to be deficient in this enzyme (Blass, J. P., J. Avigan, and B. W. Ublendorf. 1970. J. Clin. Invest. 49: 423-432; Blass, J. P., J. D. Schuman, D. S. Young, and E. Ham. 1972. J. Clin. Invest. 51: 1545-1551). Even after activation with DCA, fibroblasts from the patients showed values of only 0.1 and 0.3 nmol/min per mg of protein. A familial study of one of these patients showed that both parents exhibited activity in fully activated cells about half that of normal values, whereas cells from a sibling appeared normal. These results demonstrate the inheritance nature of PDC deficiency

  10. Effect of lysine to alanine mutations on the phosphate activation and BPTES inhibition of glutaminase.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Charles J; Acheff, Eric; Kennedy, Ryan; Taylor, Lynn; Curthoys, Norman P

    2015-09-01

    The GLS1 gene encodes a mitochondrial glutaminase that is highly expressed in brain, kidney, small intestine and many transformed cells. Recent studies have identified multiple lysine residues in glutaminase that are sites of N-acetylation. Interestingly, these sites are located within either a loop segment that regulates access of glutamine to the active site or the dimer:dimer interface that participates in the phosphate-dependent oligomerization and activation of the enzyme. These two segments also contain the binding sites for bis-2[5-phenylacetamido-1,2,4-thiadiazol-2-yl]ethylsulfide (BPTES), a highly specific and potent uncompetitive inhibitor of this glutaminase. BPTES is also the lead compound for development of novel cancer chemotherapeutic agents. To provide a preliminary assessment of the potential effects of N-acetylation, the corresponding lysine to alanine mutations were constructed in the hGACΔ1 plasmid. The wild type and mutated proteins were purified by Ni(+)-affinity chromatography and their phosphate activation and BPTES inhibition profiles were analyzed. Two of the alanine substitutions in the loop segment (K311A and K328A) and the one in the dimer:dimer interface (K396A) form enzymes that require greater concentrations of phosphate to produce half-maximal activation and exhibit greater sensitivity to BPTES inhibition. By contrast, the K320A mutation results in a glutaminase that exhibits near maximal activity in the absence of phosphate and is not inhibited by BPTES. Thus, lysine N-acetylation may contribute to the acute regulation of glutaminase activity in various tissues and alter the efficacy of BPTES-type inhibitors.

  11. Proteins with β-(thienopyrrolyl)alanines as alternative chromophores and pharmaceutically active amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Budisa, Nediljko; Alefelder, Stefan; Bae, Jae Hyun; Golbik, Ralph; Minks, Caroline; Huber, Robert; Moroder, Luis

    2001-01-01

    L-β-(Thieno[3,2-b]pyrrolyl)alanine and L-β-(thieno[2,3-b]pyrrolyl)alanine are mutually isosteric and pharmaceutically active amino acids that mimic tryptophan with the benzene ring in the indole moiety replaced by thiophene. Sulfur as a heteroatom causes physicochemical changes in these tryptophan surrogates that bring about completely new properties not found in the indole moiety. These synthetic amino acids were incorporated into recombinant proteins in response to the Trp UGG codons by fermentation in a Trp-auxotrophic Escherichia coli host strain using the selective pressure incorporation method. Related protein mutants expectedly retain the secondary structure of the native proteins but show significantly changed optical and thermodynamic properties. In this way, new spectral windows, fluorescence, polarity, thermodynamics, or pharmacological properties are inserted into proteins. Such an engineering approach by translational integration of synthetic amino acids with a priori defined properties, as shown in this study, proved to be a novel and useful tool for protein rational design. PMID:11420430

  12. Methodological problems in the histochemical demonstration of succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Bernocchi, G; Barni, S

    1983-12-01

    Methodological aspects of the histochemical technique for the demonstration of succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity (EC 1.2.1.24) (indicative of the degradative step of gamma-aminobutyric acid catabolism) have been analysed in rat Purkinje neurons, where gamma-aminobutyric acid has been shown to be a neurotransmitter, and in hepatocytes, where it is metabolized. During a histochemical incubation for the enzyme, artefacts of succinate dehydrogenase activity and the 'nothing dehydrogenase' reaction are produced. Inhibition of these artefacts by the addition of two inhibitors, malonate and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, revealed specific reaction products. Formazan granules, which can be ascribed only to specific succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity, are obtained by adding malonate to the incubation medium in order to inhibit both succinate dehydrogenase activity and nothing dehydrogenase. The formation of these granules is completely inhibited by p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, an inhibitor of succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity. Different levels of succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity were noted in Purkinje neurons. This activity was also found in hepatocytes, mostly in the portal area, but with a lesser degree of intensity and specificity. Indeed, non-specific formazan granules were still produced, because of the 'nothing dehydrogenase' reaction, even in the presence of malonate. Thus, a malonate-insensitive 'nothing dehydrogenase' reaction seems to be present in neural and hepatic tissues.

  13. De novo alanine synthesis by bacteroids of Mesorhizobium loti is not required for nitrogen transfer in the determinate nodules of Lotus corniculatus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shalini; Bourdès, Alexandre; Poole, Philip

    2005-08-01

    Deletion of both alanine dehydrogenase genes (aldA) in Mesorhizobium loti resulted in the loss of AldA enzyme activity from cultured bacteria and bacteroids but had no effect on the symbiotic performance of Lotus corniculatus plants. Thus, neither indeterminate pea nodules nor determinate L. corniculatus nodules export alanine as the sole nitrogen secretion product.

  14. Xanthine dehydrogenase-1 silencing in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes promotes a blood feeding-induced adulticidal activity.

    PubMed

    Isoe, Jun; Petchampai, Natthida; Isoe, Yurika E; Co, Katrina; Mazzalupo, Stacy; Scaraffia, Patricia Y

    2017-02-08

    Aedesaegypti has 2 genes encoding xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH). We analyzed XDH1 and XDH2 gene expression by real-time quantitative PCR in tissues from sugar- and blood-fed females. Differential XDH1 and XDH2 gene expression was observed in tissues dissected throughout a time course. We next exposed females to blood meals supplemented with allopurinol, a well-characterized XDH inhibitor. We also tested the effects of injecting double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) against XDH1, XDH2, or both. Disruption of XDH by allopurinol or XDH1 by RNA interference significantly affected mosquito survival, causing a disruption in blood digestion, excretion, oviposition, and reproduction. XDH1-deficient mosquitoes showed a persistence of serine proteases in the midgut at 48 h after blood feeding and a reduction in the uptake of vitellogenin by the ovaries. Surprisingly, analysis of the fat body from dsRNA-XDH1-injected mosquitoes fell into 2 groups: one group was characterized by a reduction of the XDH1 transcript, whereas the other group was characterized by an up-regulation of several transcripts including XDH1, glutamine synthetase, alanine aminotransferase, catalase, superoxide dismutase, ornithine decarboxylase, glutamate receptor, and ammonia transporter. Our data demonstrate that XDH1 plays an essential role and that XDH1 has the potential to be used as a metabolic target for Ae.aegypti vector control.-Isoe, J., Petchampai, N., Isoe, Y. E., Co, K., Mazzalupo, S., Scaraffia, P. Y. Xanthine dehydrogenase-1 silencing in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes promotes a blood feeding-induced adulticidal activity.

  15. Microbial metabolic activity in soil as measured by dehydrogenase determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The dehydrogenase technique for measuring the metabolic activity of microorganisms in soil was modified to use a 6-h, 37 C incubation with either glucose or yeast extract as the electron-donating substrate. The rate of formazan production remained constant during this time interval, and cellular multiplication apparently did not occur. The technique was used to follow changes in the overall metabolic activities of microorganisms in soil undergoing incubation with a limiting concentration of added nutrient. The sequence of events was similar to that obtained by using the Warburg respirometer to measure O2 consumption. However, the major peaks of activity occurred earlier with the respirometer. This possibly is due to the lack of atmospheric CO2 during the O2 consumption measurements.

  16. Group III alcohol dehydrogenase from Pectobacterium atrosepticum: insights into enzymatic activity and organization of the metal ion-containing region.

    PubMed

    Elleuche, Skander; Fodor, Krisztian; von der Heyde, Amélie; Klippel, Barbara; Wilmanns, Matthias; Antranikian, Garabed

    2014-05-01

    NAD(P)(+)-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH) are widely distributed in all phyla. These proteins can be assigned to three nonhomologous groups of isozymes, with group III being highly diverse with regards to catalytic activity and primary structure. Members of group III ADHs share a conserved stretch of amino acid residues important for cofactor binding and metal ion coordination, while sequence identities for complete proteins are highly diverse (<20 to >90 %). A putative group III ADH PaYqhD has been identified in BLAST analysis from the plant pathogenic enterobacterium Pectobacterium atrosepticum. The PaYqhD gene was expressed in the heterologous host Escherichia coli, and the recombinant protein was purified in a two-step purification procedure to homogeneity indicating an obligate dimerization of monomers. Four conserved amino acid residues involved in metal ion coordination were substituted with alanine, and their importance for catalytic activity was confirmed by circular dichroism spectrum determination, in vitro, and growth experiments. PaYqhD exhibits optimal activity at 40 °C with short carbon chain aldehyde compounds and NADPH as cofactor indicating the enzyme to be an aldehyde reductase. No oxidative activities towards alcoholic compounds were detectable. EDTA completely inhibited catalytic activity and was fully restored by the addition of Co(2+). Activity measurements together with sequence alignments and structure analysis confirmed that PaYqhD belongs to the butanol dehydrogenase-like enzymes within group III of ADHs.

  17. Inducible UDP-glucose dehydrogenase from French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) locates to vascular tissue and has alcohol dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Robertson, D; Smith, C; Bolwell, G P

    1996-01-01

    UDP-glucose dehydrogenase is responsible for channelling UDP-glucose into the pool of UDP-sugars utilized in the synthesis of wall matrix polysaccharides and glycoproteins. It has been purified to homogeneity from suspension-cultured cells of French bean by a combination of hydrophobic-interaction chromatography, gel filtration and dye-ligand chromatography. The enzyme had a subunit of Mr 40,000. Km values were measured for UDP-glucose as 5.5 +/- 1.4 mM and for NAD+ as 20 +/- 3 microM. It was subject to inhibition by UDP-xylose. UDP-glucose dehydrogenase activity co-purified with alcohol dehydrogenase activity from suspension-cultured cells, elicitor-treated cells and elongating hypocotyls, even when many additional chromatographic steps were employed subsequently. The protein from each source was resolved into virtually identical patterns of isoforms on two-dimensional isoelectric focusing/PAGE. However, a combination of peptide mapping and sequence analysis, gel analysis using activity staining and kinetic analysis suggests that both activities are a function of the same protein. An antibody was raised and used to immunolocalize UDP-glucose dehydrogenase to developing xylem and phloem of French bean hypocotyl. Together with data published previously, these results are consistent with an important role in the regulation of carbon flux into wall matrix polysaccharides.

  18. Active Sites of Spinoxin, a Potassium Channel Scorpion Toxin, Elucidated by Systematic Alanine Scanning.

    PubMed

    Peigneur, Steve; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Kawano, Chihiro; Nose, Takeru; Nirthanan, Selvanayagam; Gopalakrishnakone, Ponnampalam; Tytgat, Jan; Sato, Kazuki

    2016-05-31

    Peptide toxins from scorpion venoms constitute the largest group of toxins that target the voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv). Spinoxin (SPX) isolated from the venom of scorpion Heterometrus spinifer is a 34-residue peptide neurotoxin cross-linked by four disulfide bridges. SPX is a potent inhibitor of Kv1.3 potassium channels (IC50 = 63 nM), which are considered to be valid molecular targets in the diagnostics and therapy of various autoimmune disorders and cancers. Here we synthesized 25 analogues of SPX and analyzed the role of each amino acid in SPX using alanine scanning to study its structure-function relationships. All synthetic analogues showed similar disulfide bond pairings and secondary structures as native SPX. Alanine replacements at Lys(23), Asn(26), and Lys(30) resulted in loss of activity against Kv1.3 potassium channels, whereas replacements at Arg(7), Met(14), Lys(27), and Tyr(32) also largely reduced inhibitory activity. These results suggest that the side chains of these amino acids in SPX play an important role in its interaction with Kv1.3 channels. In particular, Lys(23) appears to be a key residue that underpins Kv1.3 channel inhibition. Of these seven amino acid residues, four are basic amino acids, suggesting that the positive electrostatic potential on the surface of SPX is likely required for high affinity interaction with Kv1.3 channels. This study provides insight into the structure-function relationships of SPX with implications for the rational design of new lead compounds targeting potassium channels with high potency.

  19. Microwave-assisted synthesis and characterization of optically active poly (ester-imide)s incorporating L-alanine.

    PubMed

    Zahmatkesh, Saeed; Hajipour, Abdol R

    2010-04-01

    Pyromellitic dianhydride (1) was reacted with L-alanine (2) to result [N,N'-(pyromellitoyl)-bis-L-alanine diacid] (3). This compound (3) was converted to N,N'-(pyromellitoyl)-bis-L-alanine diacyl chloride (4) by reaction with thionyl chloride. The microwave-assisted polycondensation of this diacyl chloride (4) with polyethyleneglycol-diol (PEG-200) and/or three synthetic aromatic diols furnish a series of new PEIs and Co-PEIs in a laboratory microwave oven (Milestone). The resulting polymers and copolymers have inherent viscosities in the range of 0.31-0.53 dl g(-1). These polymers are optically active, thermally stable and soluble in polar aprotic solvents such as DMF, DMSO, NMP, DMAc, and sulfuric acid. All of the above polymers were fully characterized by IR spectroscopy, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, elemental analyses, specific rotation and thermal analyses. Some structural characterizations and physical properties of these optically active PEIs and Co-PEIs have been reported.

  20. Mutation of Arg-115 of human class III alcohol dehydrogenase: a binding site required for formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity and fatty acid activation.

    PubMed Central

    Engeland, K; Höög, J O; Holmquist, B; Estonius, M; Jörnvall, H; Vallee, B L

    1993-01-01

    The origin of the fatty acid activation and formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity that distinguishes human class III alcohol dehydrogenase (alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) from all other alcohol dehydrogenases has been examined by site-directed mutagenesis of its Arg-115 residue. The Ala- and Asp-115 mutant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography and ion-exchange HPLC. The activities of the recombinant native and mutant enzymes toward ethanol are essentially identical, but mutagenesis greatly decreases the kcat/Km values for glutathione-dependent formaldehyde oxidation. The catalytic efficiency for the Asp variant is < 0.1% that of the unmutated enzyme, due to both a higher Km and a lower kcat value. As with the native enzyme, neither mutant can oxidize methanol, be saturated by ethanol, or be inhibited by 4-methylpyrazole; i.e., they retain these class III characteristics. In contrast, however, their activation by fatty acids, another characteristic unique to class III alcohol dehydrogenase, is markedly attenuated. The Ala mutant is activated only slightly, but the Asp mutant is not activated at all. The results strongly indicate that Arg-115 in class III alcohol dehydrogenase is a component of the binding site for activating fatty acids and is critical for the binding of S-hydroxymethylglutathione in glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity. PMID:8460164

  1. 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in canine pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza-Hernandez, G.; Lopez-Solache, I.; Rendon, J.L.; Diaz-Sanchez, V.; Diaz-Zagoya, J.C.

    1988-04-15

    The mitochondrial fraction of the dog pancreas showed NAD(H)-dependent enzyme activity of 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. The enzyme catalyzes oxidoreduction between androstenedione and testosterone. The apparent Km value of the enzyme for androstenedione was 9.5 +/- 0.9 microM, the apparent Vmax was determined as 0.4 nmol mg-1 min-1, and the optimal pH was 6.5. In phosphate buffer, pH 7.0, maximal rate of androstenedione reduction was observed at 37 degrees C. The oxidation of testosterone by the enzyme proceeded at the same rate as the reduction of the androstenedione at a pH of 6.8-7.0. The apparent Km value and the optimal pH of the enzyme for testosterone were 3.5 +/- 0.5 microM and 7.5, respectively.

  2. [Effect Of Polyelectrolytes on Catalytic Activity of Alcohol Dehydrogenase].

    PubMed

    Dubrovsky, A V; Musina, E V; Kim, A L; Tikhonenko, S A

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent and optical spectroscopy were used to study the interaction of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) with negatively charged polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) and dextran sulfate (DS), as well as positively charged poly(diallyldimethylammonium) (PDADMA). As found, DS and PDADMA did not affect the structural and catalytic enzyme properties. In contrast, PSS slightly decreased the protein self-fluorescence over 1 h of incubation, which is associated with partial destruction of its quaternary (globular) structure. Investigation of the ADH activity with and without PSS showed its dependency on the incubation time and the PSS presence. Sodium chloride (2.0 M and 0.2 M) or ammonium sulfate (0.1 M) added to the reaction mixture did not completely protect the enzyme quaternary structure from the PSS action. However ammonium sulfate or 0.2 M sodium chloride stabilized the enzyme and partially inhibited the negative PSS effect.

  3. Sirtuin 4 is a lipoamidase regulating pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, Rommel A.; Greco, Todd M.; Oberstein, Adam; Budayeva, Hanna G.; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Rowland, Elizabeth A.; Kang, Yibin; Shenk, Thomas; Cristea, Ileana M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Sirtuins (SIRTs) are critical enzymes that govern genome regulation, metabolism, and aging. Despite conserved deacetylase domains, mitochondrial SIRT4 and SIRT5 have little to no deacetylase activity, and a robust catalytic activity for SIRT4 has been elusive. Here, we establish SIRT4 as a cellular lipoamidase that regulates the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH). Importantly, SIRT4 catalytic efficiency for lipoyl- and biotinyl-lysine modifications is superior to its deacetylation activity. PDH, which converts pyruvate to acetyl-CoA, has been known to be primarily regulated by phosphorylation of its E1 component. We determine that SIRT4 enzymatically hydrolyzes the lipoamide cofactors from the E2 component dihydrolipoyllysine acetyltransferase (DLAT), diminishing PDH activity. We demonstrate SIRT4-mediated regulation of DLAT lipoyl levels and PDH activity in cells and in vivo, in mouse liver. Furthermore, metabolic flux switching via glutamine stimulation induces SIRT4 lipoamidase activity to inhibit PDH, highlighting SIRT4 as a guardian of cellular metabolism. PMID:25525879

  4. RECIPIENT PRETRANSPLANT INOSINE MONOPHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE ACTIVITY IN NONMYELOABLATIVE HCT

    PubMed Central

    Bemer, Meagan J.; Risler, Linda J.; Phillips, Brian R.; Wang, Joanne; Storer, Barry E.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Duan, Haichuan; Raccor, Brianne S.; Boeckh, Michael J.; McCune, Jeannine S.

    2014-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid, the active metabolite of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity. IMPDH is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in de novo synthesis of guanosine nucleotides and catalyzes the oxidation of inosine 5’- monophosphate (IMP) to xanthosine 5’-monophosphate (XMP). We developed a highly sensitive liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry method to quantitate XMP concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNC) isolated from the recipient pretransplant and used this method to determine IMPDH activity in 86 nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) patients. The incubation procedure and analytical method yielded acceptable within-sample and within-individual variability. Considerable between-individual variability was observed (12.2-fold). Low recipient pretransplant IMPDH activity was associated with increased day +28 donor T-cell chimerism, more acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), lower neutrophil nadirs, and more cytomegalovirus reactivation, but not with chronic GVHD, relapse, non-relapse mortality, or overall mortality. We conclude that quantitation of the recipient’s pretransplant IMPDH activity in PMNC lysate could provide a useful biomarker to evaluate a recipient’s sensitivity to MMF, but confirmatory studies are needed. Further trials should be conducted to confirm our findings and to optimize postgrafting immunosuppression in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. PMID:24923537

  5. Accelerated Lactate Dehydrogenase Activity Potentiates Osteoclastogenesis via NFATc1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Man; Kwon, So Hyun; Lee, Seoung Hoon; Lee, Soo Young; Jeong, Daewon

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclasts seem to be metabolic active during their differentiation and bone-resorptive activation. However, the functional role of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a tetrameric enzyme consisting of an A and/or B subunit that catalyzes interconversion of pyruvate to lactate, in RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation is not known. In this study, RANKL treatment induced gradual gene expression and activation of the LDH A2B2 isotype during osteoclast differentiation as well as the LDH A1B3 and B4 isotypes during osteoclast maturation after pre-osteoclast formation. Glucose consumption and lactate production in growth media were accelerated during osteoclast differentiation, together with enhanced expression of H+-lactate co-transporter and increased extracellular acidification, demonstrating that glycolytic metabolism was stimulated during differentiation. Further, oxygen consumption via mitochondria was stimulated during osteoclast differentiation. On the contrary, depletion of LDH-A or LDH-B subunit suppressed both glycolytic and mitochondrial metabolism, resulting in reduced mature osteoclast formation via decreased osteoclast precursor fusion and down-regulation of the osteoclastogenic critical transcription factor NFATc1 and its target genes. Collectively, our findings suggest that RANKL-induced LDH activation stimulates glycolytic and mitochondrial respiratory metabolism, facilitating mature osteoclast formation via osteoclast precursor fusion and NFATc1 signaling. PMID:27077737

  6. Mechanism of pyruvate dehydrogenase activation by increased cardiac work.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, K; Neely, J R

    1983-06-01

    The effects of increased cardiac work, pyruvate and insulin on the state of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activation and rate of pyruvate decarboxylation was studied in the isolated perfused rat heart. At low levels of cardiac work, 61% of PDH was present in the active form when glucose was the only substrate provided. The actual rate of pyruvate decarboxylation was only 5% of the available capacity calculated from the percent of active PDH. Under this condition, the rate of pyruvate decarboxylation was restricted by the slow rate of pyruvate production from glycolysis. Increasing cardiac work accelerated glycolysis, but production of pyruvate remained rate limiting for pyruvate oxidation and only 40% of the maximal active PDH capacity was used. Addition of insulin along with glucose reduced the percent of active PDH to 16% of the total at low cardiac work. This effect of insulin was associated with increased mitochondria NADH/NAD and acetyl CoA/CoA ratios. With both glucose and insulin the calculated maximum capacity of active PDH was about the same as measured rates of pyruvate oxidation indicating that pyruvate oxidation was limited by the activation state of PDH. In this case, raising the level of cardiac work increased the active PDH to 85% and although pyruvate oxidation was accelerated, measured flux through PDH was only 73% of the maximal activity of active PDH. With pyruvate as added exogenous substrate, PDH was 82% of active at low cardiac work probably due to pyruvate inhibition of PDH kinase. In this case, the measured rate of pyruvate oxidation was 64% of the capacity of active PDH. However, increased cardiac work still caused further activation of PDH to 96% active. Thus, actual rates of pyruvate oxidation in the intact tissue were determined by (1) the supply of pyruvate in hearts receiving glucose alone, (2) by the percent of active PDH in hearts receiving both glucose and insulin at low work and (3) by end-product inhibition in hearts receiving

  7. A ketogenic diet increases succinic dehydrogenase activity in aging cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Balietti, Marta; Fattoretti, Patrizia; Giorgetti, Belinda; Casoli, Tiziana; Di Stefano, Giuseppina; Solazzi, Moreno; Platano, Daniela; Aicardi, Giorgio; Bertoni-Freddari, Carlo

    2009-08-01

    Impairment of energy metabolism and an increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production seem to play a major role in age-related apoptotic loss of cardiomyocytes. Succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) is an important marker of the mitochondrial capability to provide an adequate amount of ATP. Moreover, because of its unique redox properties, SDH activity contributes to maintain the reduced state of the ubiquinone pool. Recent reports have shown that ketone body intake improves cardiac metabolic efficiency and exerts a cardioprotective antioxidant action, we therefore performed a cytochemical investigation of SDH activity in cardiomyocytes of late-adult (19-month-old) rats fed for 8 weeks with a medium-chain triglycerides ketogenic diet (MCT-KD). Young, age-matched and old animals fed with a standard chow were used as controls. The overall area of the precipitates (PA) from SDH activity and the area of the SDH-positive mitochondria (MA) were measured. The percent ratios PA/MA and MA/total myocardial tissue area (MA/TA) were the parameters taken into account. We found that PA/MA was significantly higher in young control rats and in MCT-KD-fed rats versus late-adult and old control rats and in young control versus MCT-KD-fed rats. MA/TA of MCT-KD-fed rats was significantly higher versus age-matched and old control rats and tended to be higher versus young control rats; this parameter was significantly higher in young versus old control rats. Thus, MCT-KD intake partially recovers age-related decrease of SDH activity and increases the myocardial area occupied by metabolically active mitochondria. These effects might counteract metabolic alterations leading to apoptosis-induced myocardial atrophy and failure during aging.

  8. Activity of the lactate-alanine shuttle is independent of glutamate-glutamine cycle activity in cerebellar neuronal-astrocytic cultures.

    PubMed

    Bak, Lasse K; Sickmann, Helle M; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    The glutamate-glutamine cycle describes the neuronal release of glutamate into the synaptic cleft, astrocytic uptake, and conversion into glutamine, followed by release for use as a neuronal glutamate precursor. This only explains the fate of the carbon atoms, however, and not that of the ammonia. Recently, a role for alanine has been proposed in transfer of ammonia between glutamatergic neurons and astrocytes, denoted the lactate-alanine shuttle (Waagepetersen et al. [ 2000] J. Neurochem. 75:471-479). The role of alanine in this context has been studied further using cerebellar neuronal cultures and corresponding neuronal-astrocytic cocultures. A superfusion paradigm was used to induce repetitively vesicular glutamate release by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) in the neurons, allowing the relative activity dependency of the lactate-alanine shuttle to be assessed. [(15)N]Alanine (0.2 mM), [2-(15)N]/[5-(15)N]glutamine (0.25 mM), and [(15)N]ammonia (0.3 mM) were used as precursors and cell extracts were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Labeling from [(15)N]alanine in glutamine, aspartate, and glutamate in cerebellar cocultures was independent of depolarization of the neurons. Employing glutamine with the amino group labeled ([2-(15)N]glutamine) as the precursor, an activity-dependent increase in the labeling of both glutamate and aspartate (but not alanine) was observed in the cerebellar neurons. When the amide group of glutamine was labeled ([5-(15)N]glutamine), no labeling could be detected in the analyzed metabolites. Altogether, the results of this study support the existence of the lactate-alanine shuttle and the associated glutamate-glutamine cycle. No direct coupling of the two shuttles was observed, however, and only the glutamate-glutamine cycle seemed activity dependent.

  9. Activity of select dehydrogenases with Sepharose-immobilized N6-carboxymethyl-NAD

    PubMed Central

    Beauchamp, Justin; Vieille, Claire

    2015-01-01

    N6-carboxymethyl-NAD (N6-CM-NAD) can be used to immobilize NAD onto a substrate containing terminal primary amines. We previously immobilized N6-CM-NAD onto sepharose beads and showed that Thermotoga maritima glycerol dehydrogenase could use the immobilized cofactor with cofactor recycling. We now show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcohol dehydrogenase, rabbit muscle L-lactate dehydrogenase (type XI), bovine liver L-glutamic dehydrogenase (type III), Leuconostoc mesenteroides glucose-6-phosphate dehydro-genase, and Thermotoga maritima mannitol dehydrogenase are active with soluble N6-CM-NAD. The products of all enzymes but 6-phospho-D-glucono-1,5-lactone were formed when sepharose-immobilized N6-CM-NAD was recycled by T. maritima glycerol dehydrogenase, indicating that N6-immobilized NAD is suitable for use by a variety of different dehydrogenases. Observations of the enzyme active sites suggest that steric hindrance plays a greater role in limiting or allowing activity with the modified cofactor than do polarity and charge of the residues surrounding the N6-amine group on NAD. PMID:25611453

  10. Activity of select dehydrogenases with sepharose-immobilized N(6)-carboxymethyl-NAD.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, Justin; Vieille, Claire

    2015-01-01

    N(6)-carboxymethyl-NAD (N(6)-CM-NAD) can be used to immobilize NAD onto a substrate containing terminal primary amines. We previously immobilized N(6)-CM-NAD onto sepharose beads and showed that Thermotoga maritima glycerol dehydrogenase could use the immobilized cofactor with cofactor recycling. We now show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcohol dehydrogenase, rabbit muscle L-lactate dehydrogenase (type XI), bovine liver L-glutamic dehydrogenase (type III), Leuconostoc mesenteroides glucose-6-phosphate dehydro-genase, and Thermotoga maritima mannitol dehydrogenase are active with soluble N(6)-CM-NAD. The products of all enzymes but 6-phospho-D-glucono-1,5-lactone were formed when sepharose-immobilized N(6)-CM-NAD was recycled by T. maritima glycerol dehydrogenase, indicating that N(6)-immobilized NAD is suitable for use by a variety of different dehydrogenases. Observations of the enzyme active sites suggest that steric hindrance plays a greater role in limiting or allowing activity with the modified cofactor than do polarity and charge of the residues surrounding the N(6)-amine group on NAD.

  11. Acute and chronic ethanol exposure differentially alters alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity in the zebrafish liver.

    PubMed

    Tran, Steven; Nowicki, Magda; Chatterjee, Diptendu; Gerlai, Robert

    2015-01-02

    Chronic ethanol exposure paradigms have been successfully used in the past to induce behavioral and central nervous system related changes in zebrafish. However, it is currently unknown whether chronic ethanol exposure alters ethanol metabolism in adult zebrafish. In the current study we examine the effect of acute ethanol exposure on adult zebrafish behavioral responses, as well as alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity in the liver. We then examine how two different chronic ethanol exposure paradigms (continuous and repeated ethanol exposure) alter behavioral responses and liver enzyme activity during a subsequent acute ethanol challenge. Acute ethanol exposure increased locomotor activity in a dose-dependent manner. ADH activity was shown to exhibit an inverted U-shaped curve and ALDH activity was decreased by ethanol exposure at all doses. During the acute ethanol challenge, animals that were continuously housed in ethanol exhibited a significantly reduced locomotor response and increased ADH activity, however, ALDH activity did not change. Zebrafish that were repeatedly exposed to ethanol demonstrated a small but significant attenuation of the locomotor response during the acute ethanol challenge but ADH and ALDH activity was similar to controls. Overall, we identified two different chronic ethanol exposure paradigms that differentially alter behavioral and physiological responses in zebrafish. We speculate that these two paradigms may allow dissociation of central nervous system-related and liver enzyme-dependent ethanol induced changes in zebrafish.

  12. Structural features and activity of Brazzein and its mutants upon substitution of a surfaced exposed alanine.

    PubMed

    Ghanavatian, Parisa; Khalifeh, Khosrow; Jafarian, Vahab

    2016-12-01

    Brazzein (Brz) is a member of sweet-tasting protein containing four disulfide bonds. It was reported as a compact and heat-resistant protein. Here, we have used site-directed mutagenesis and replaced a surface-exposed alanine with aspartic acid (A19D mutant), lysine (A19K mutant) and glycine (A19G mutant). Activity comparisons of wild-type (WT) and mutants using taste panel test procedure showed that A19G variant has the same activity as WT protein. However, introduction of a positive charge in A19K mutant led to significant increase in Brz's sweetness, while A19D has reduced sweetness compared to WT protein. Docking studies showed that mutation at position 19 results in slight chain mobility of protein at the binding surface and changing the patterns of interactions toward more effective binding of E9K variant in the concave surface of sweet taste receptor. Far-UV CD data spectra have a characteristic shape of beta structure for all variants, however different magnitudes of spectra suggest that beta-sheet structure in WT and A19G is more stable than that of A19D and A19K. Equilibrium unfolding studies with fluorescence spectroscopy and using urea and dithiothritol (DTT) as chemical denaturants indicates that A19G mutant gains more stability against urea denaturation; while conformational stability of A19D and A19K decreases when compared with WT and A19G variants. We concluded that the positive charge at the surface of protein is important factor responsible for the interaction of protein with the human sweet receptor and Ala(19) can be considered as a key region for investigating the mechanism of the interaction of Brz with corresponding receptor.

  13. Regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase activity from pig kidney cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Pawelczyk, T; Olson, M S

    1992-01-01

    The activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) kinase in the purified PDH complex from pig kidney is sensitive to changes in ionic strength. The enzyme has optimum activity within a small range of ionic strength (0.03-0.05 M). An increase in ionic strength from 0.04 M to 0.2 M lowers the activity of PDH kinase by 32% and decreases the Km for ATP from 25 microM to 10 microM. At constant ionic strength (0.15 M) the enzyme has optimum activity over a broad pH range (7.2-8.0). The PDH kinase is stimulated 2.2-fold by 20 mM-K+, whereas Na+ even at high concentration (80 mM) has no effect on the enzyme activity. The stimulation of PDH kinase by K+ is not dependent on pH and ionic strength. PDH kinase is inhibited by HPO4(2-) in the presence of K+, whereas HPO4(2-) has no effect on the activity of this enzyme in the absence of K+. HPO4(2-) at concentrations of 2 and 10 mM inhibits PDH kinase by 28% and 55% respectively. The magnitude of this inhibition is not dependent on the ATP/ADP ratio. Inhibition by HPO4(2-) in the concentration range 0-10 mM is non-competitive with respect to ATP, and becomes mixed-type at concentrations over 10 mM. The Ki for HPO4(2-) is 10 mM. When HPO4(2-) is replaced by SO4(2-), the same effects on the activity of PDH kinase are observed. PDH kinase is also inhibited by Cl-. In the presence of 80 mM-Cl- the PDH kinase is inhibited by 40%. The inhibition by Cl- is not dependent on K+. In conclusion, we postulate that changes in phosphate concentrations may play a significant role in the regulation of PDH kinase activity in vivo. PMID:1463442

  14. [Glutamate dehydrogenase activity of Bradyrhizobium japonicum in the presence of phytoregulators].

    PubMed

    Leonova, N O; Tytova, L V; Tantsiurenko, O V; Antypchuk, A F

    2006-01-01

    Influence of plant growth regulators ivin and emistim C, and flavonoids daidzein and quercetin on the glutamate dehydrogenase activity of soybean nodule bacteria, with contrasting symbiotic properties, were studied. It was shown that all used phytoregulators stimulated glutamate dehydrogenase activity of Bradyrhizobium japonicum 71t (the strain with highly efficient symbiotic properties) 1.2-4.9 times. Bradyrhizobium japonicum 21110 (the strain with inefficient symbiotic properties) diminished the enzyme activity in the presence of all phythoregulators except for ivin.

  15. Evolution of D-lactate dehydrogenase activity from glycerol dehydrogenase and its utility for D-lactate production from lignocellulose

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingzhao; Ingram, Lonnie O.; Shanmugam, K. T.

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid, an attractive, renewable chemical for production of biobased plastics (polylactic acid, PLA), is currently commercially produced from food-based sources of sugar. Pure optical isomers of lactate needed for PLA are typically produced by microbial fermentation of sugars at temperatures below 40 °C. Bacillus coagulans produces L(+)-lactate as a primary fermentation product and grows optimally at 50 °C and pH 5, conditions that are optimal for activity of commercial fungal cellulases. This strain was engineered to produce D(−)-lactate by deleting the native ldh (L-lactate dehydrogenase) and alsS (acetolactate synthase) genes to impede anaerobic growth, followed by growth-based selection to isolate suppressor mutants that restored growth. One of these, strain QZ19, produced about 90 g L-1 of optically pure D(−)-lactic acid from glucose in < 48 h. The new source of D-lactate dehydrogenase (D-LDH) activity was identified as a mutated form of glycerol dehydrogenase (GlyDH; D121N and F245S) that was produced at high levels as a result of a third mutation (insertion sequence). Although the native GlyDH had no detectable activity with pyruvate, the mutated GlyDH had a D-LDH specific activity of 0.8 μmoles min-1 (mg protein)-1. By using QZ19 for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of cellulose to D-lactate (50 °C and pH 5.0), the cellulase usage could be reduced to 1/3 that required for equivalent fermentations by mesophilic lactic acid bacteria. Together, the native B. coagulans and the QZ19 derivative can be used to produce either L(+) or D(−) optical isomers of lactic acid (respectively) at high titers and yields from nonfood carbohydrates. PMID:22065761

  16. Evolution of D-lactate dehydrogenase activity from glycerol dehydrogenase and its utility for D-lactate production from lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingzhao; Ingram, Lonnie O; Shanmugam, K T

    2011-11-22

    Lactic acid, an attractive, renewable chemical for production of biobased plastics (polylactic acid, PLA), is currently commercially produced from food-based sources of sugar. Pure optical isomers of lactate needed for PLA are typically produced by microbial fermentation of sugars at temperatures below 40 °C. Bacillus coagulans produces L(+)-lactate as a primary fermentation product and grows optimally at 50 °C and pH 5, conditions that are optimal for activity of commercial fungal cellulases. This strain was engineered to produce D(-)-lactate by deleting the native ldh (L-lactate dehydrogenase) and alsS (acetolactate synthase) genes to impede anaerobic growth, followed by growth-based selection to isolate suppressor mutants that restored growth. One of these, strain QZ19, produced about 90 g L(-1) of optically pure D(-)-lactic acid from glucose in < 48 h. The new source of D-lactate dehydrogenase (D-LDH) activity was identified as a mutated form of glycerol dehydrogenase (GlyDH; D121N and F245S) that was produced at high levels as a result of a third mutation (insertion sequence). Although the native GlyDH had no detectable activity with pyruvate, the mutated GlyDH had a D-LDH specific activity of 0.8 μmoles min(-1) (mg protein)(-1). By using QZ19 for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of cellulose to D-lactate (50 °C and pH 5.0), the cellulase usage could be reduced to 1/3 that required for equivalent fermentations by mesophilic lactic acid bacteria. Together, the native B. coagulans and the QZ19 derivative can be used to produce either L(+) or D(-) optical isomers of lactic acid (respectively) at high titers and yields from nonfood carbohydrates.

  17. Lactate dehydrogenase activity is inhibited by methylmalonate in vitro.

    PubMed

    Saad, Laura O; Mirandola, Sandra R; Maciel, Evelise N; Castilho, Roger F

    2006-04-01

    Methylmalonic acidemia (MMAemia) is an inherited metabolic disorder of branched amino acid and odd-chain fatty acid metabolism, involving a defect in the conversion of methylmalonyl-coenzyme A to succinyl-coenzyme A. Systemic and neurological manifestations in this disease are thought to be associated with the accumulation of methylmalonate (MMA) in tissues and biological fluids with consequent impairment of energy metabolism and oxidative stress. In the present work we studied the effect of MMA and two other inhibitors of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex II (malonate and 3-nitropropionate) on the activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in tissue homogenates from adult rats. MMA potently inhibited LDH-catalyzed conversion of lactate to pyruvate in liver and brain homogenates as well as in a purified bovine heart LDH preparation. LDH was about one order of magnitude less sensitive to inhibition by MMA when catalyzing the conversion of pyruvate to lactate. Kinetic studies on the inhibition of brain LDH indicated that MMA inhibits this enzyme competitively with lactate as a substrate (K (i)=3.02+/-0.59 mM). Malonate and 3-nitropropionate also strongly inhibited LDH-catalyzed conversion of lactate to pyruvate in brain homogenates, while no inhibition was observed by succinate or propionate, when present in concentrations of up to 25 mM. We propose that inhibition of the lactate/pyruvate conversion by MMA contributes to lactate accumulation in blood, metabolic acidemia and inhibition of gluconeogenesis observed in patients with MMAemia. Moreover, the inhibition of LDH in the central nervous system may also impair the lactate shuttle between astrocytes and neurons, compromising neuronal energy metabolism.

  18. Detection of amount and activity of living algae in fresh water by dehydrogenase activity (DHA).

    PubMed

    Xie, Jun; Hu, Wenrong; Pei, Haiyan; Dun, Mina; Qi, Feng

    2008-11-01

    A study was performed to determine the amount and activity of living algae in fresh water by measuring the dehydrogenase activity (DHA) of algae in order to provide a method to assess the effect of algicide treatment. The conditions of measurement were researched with respect to incubating temperature and duration, and selection of extractants. The comparison between this method and an alternative method, chlorophyll a, shows that this method is simple and easy to practice, and can determine the effect of algicide treatment.

  19. Hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase activity in alcoholic subjects with and without liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, F; Perez, J; Morancho, J; Pinto, B; Richart, C

    1990-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase activity was measured in samples of liver tissue from a group of alcoholic and non-alcoholic subjects to determine whether decreased liver alcohol dehydrogenase activity is a consequence of ethanol consumption or liver damage. The alcoholic patients were classified further into the following groups: control subjects with no liver disease (group 1), subjects with non-cirrhotic liver disease (group 2), and subjects with cirrhotic liver disease (group 3). The non-alcoholic subjects were also divided, using the same criteria, into groups 4, 5, and 6, respectively. The analysis of the results showed no significant differences when mean alcohol dehydrogenase activities of alcoholic and non-alcoholic patients with similar degrees of liver pathology were compared (groups 1 v 4, 2 v 5, and 3 v 6. Alcohol dehydrogenase activity was, however, severely reduced in patients with liver disease compared with control subjects. Our findings suggest that alcohol consumption does not modify hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase activity. The reduction in specific alcohol dehydrogenase activity in alcoholic liver disease is a consequence of liver damage. PMID:2379876

  20. Characterization of lipoteichoic acid structures from three probiotic Bacillus strains: involvement of D-alanine in their biological activity.

    PubMed

    Villéger, Romain; Saad, Naima; Grenier, Karine; Falourd, Xavier; Foucat, Loïc; Urdaci, Maria C; Bressollier, Philippe; Ouk, Tan-Sothea

    2014-10-01

    Probiotics represent a potential strategy to influence the host's immune system thereby modulating immune response. Lipoteichoic Acid (LTA) is a major immune-stimulating component of Gram-positive cell envelopes. This amphiphilic polymer, anchored in the cytoplasmic membrane by means of its glycolipid component, typically consists of a poly (glycerol-phosphate) chain with D-alanine and/or glycosyl substitutions. LTA is known to stimulate macrophages in vitro, leading to secretion of inflammatory mediators such as Nitric Oxide (NO). This study investigates the structure-activity relationship of purified LTA from three probiotic Bacillus strains (Bacillus cereus CH, Bacillus subtilis CU1 and Bacillus clausii O/C). LTAs were extracted from bacterial cultures and purified. Chemical modification by means of hydrolysis at pH 8.5 was performed to remove D-alanine. The molecular structure of native and modified LTAs was determined by (1)H NMR and GC-MS, and their inflammatory potential investigated by measuring NO production by RAW 264.7 macrophages. Structural analysis revealed several differences between the newly characterized LTAs, mainly relating to their D-alanylation rates and poly (glycerol-phosphate) chain length. We observed induction of NO production by LTAs from B. subtilis and B. clausii, whereas weaker NO production was observed with B. cereus. LTA dealanylation abrogated NO production independently of the glycolipid component, suggesting that immunomodulatory potential depends on D-alanine substitutions. D-alanine may control the spatial configuration of LTAs and their recognition by cell receptors. Knowledge of molecular mechanisms behind the immunomodulatory abilities of probiotics is essential to optimize their use.

  1. Control of glycolytic flux in Zymomonas mobilis by glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Snoep, J.L. |; Arfman, N.; Yomano, L.P.; Ingram, L.O.; Westerhoff, H.V.; Conway, T.

    1996-07-20

    Alycolytic genes in Zymomonas mobilis are highly expressed and constitute half of the cytoplasmic protein. The first four genes (glf, zwf, edd, glk) in this pathway form an operon encoding a glucose permease, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6-P dehydrogenase), 6-phosphogluconate dehydratase, and glucokinase, respectively. Each gene was overexpressed from a tac promoter to investigate the control of glycolysis during the early stages of batch fermentation when flux (qCO{sub 2}) is highest. Almost half of flux control appears to reside with G6-P dehydrogenase (C{sub G6-P dehydrogenase}{sup J} = 0.4). Although Z. mobilis exhibits one of the highest rates of glycolysis known, recombinants with elevated G6-P dehydrogenase had a 10% to 13% higher glycolytic flux than the native organism. A small increase in flux was also observed for recombinants expressing glf. Results obtained did not allow a critical evaluation of glucokinase and this enzyme may also represent an important control point. 6-Phosphogluconate dehydratase appears to be saturating at native levels. With constructs containing the full operon, growth rate and flux were both reduced, complicating interpretations. However, results obtained were also consistent with G6-P dehydrogenase as a primary site of control. Flux was 17% higher in operon constructs which exhibited a 17% increase in G6-P dehydrogenase specific activity, relative to the average of other operon constructs which contain a frameshift mutation in zwf.

  2. Biorhythms of activities of liver and blood dehydrogenases and changes in body weight of the rats feeding normal diet or excess of sugar substitutes.

    PubMed

    Petrovich, Yu A; Volozhin, A I; Zubtsov, V A; Kichenko, S M

    2007-12-01

    Biorhythms with higher levels of activity of sorbitol dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase in blood plasma, specific activity of sorbitol dehydrogenase, lactate dehydrogenase, and malate dehydrogenase in the liver, and body weight of rats were more pronounced in the spring-summer period than in the autumn-winter period. These specific features were revealed in animals feeding a normal diet or food with 54 and 27% sugar substitute sorbitol. However, specific activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the liver was higher in the autumn-winter period. Activity of sorbitol dehydrogenase in blood plasma increased by tens of times due to induction of sorbitol synthesis (substrate) in the liver. Sugar substitute xylitol is structurally similar to sorbitol, but is not the substrate for sorbitol dehydrogenase. However, the effect of xylitol on activities of lactate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the spring-summer period was similar to that of sorbitol.

  3. Tandem orientation of duplicated xanthine dehydrogenase genes from Arabidopsis thaliana: differential gene expression and enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Hesberg, Christine; Hänsch, Robert; Mendel, Ralf R; Bittner, Florian

    2004-04-02

    Xanthine dehydrogenase from the plant Arabidopsis thaliana was analyzed on molecular and biochemical levels. Whereas most other organisms appear to own only one gene for xanthine dehydrogenase A. thaliana possesses two genes in tandem orientation spaced by 704 base pairs. The cDNAs as well as the proteins AtXDH1 and AtXDH2 share an overall identity of 93% and show high homologies to xanthine dehydrogenases from other organisms. Whereas AtXDH2 mRNA is expressed constitutively, alterations of AtXDH1 transcript levels were observed at various stresses like drought, salinity, cold, and natural senescence, but also after abscisic acid treatment. Transcript alteration did not mandatorily result in changes of xanthine dehydrogenase activities. Whereas salt treatment had no effect on xanthine dehydrogenase activities, cold stress caused a decrease, but desiccation and senescence caused a strong increase of activities in leaves. Because AtXDH1 presumably is the more important isoenzyme in A. thaliana it was expressed in Pichia pastoris, purified, and used for biochemical studies. AtXDH1 protein is a homodimer of about 300 kDa consisting of identical subunits of 150 kDa. Like xanthine dehydrogenases from other organisms AtXDH1 uses hypoxanthine and xanthine as main substrates and is strongly inhibited by allopurinol. AtXDH1 could be activated by the purified molybdenum cofactor sulfurase ABA3 that converts inactive desulfo-into active sulfoenzymes. Finally it was found that AtXDH1 is a strict dehydrogenase and not an oxidase, but is able to produce superoxide radicals indicating that besides purine catabolism it might also be involved in response to various stresses that require reactive oxygen species.

  4. Cytosolic malate dehydrogenase activity helps support glycolysis in actively proliferating cells and cancer.

    PubMed

    Hanse, E A; Ruan, C; Kachman, M; Wang, D; Lowman, X H; Kelekar, A

    2017-03-06

    Increased glucose consumption is a hallmark of cancer cells. The increased consumption and subsequent metabolism of glucose during proliferation creates the need for a constant supply of NAD, a co-factor in glycolysis. Regeneration of the NAD required to support enhanced glycolysis has been attributed to the terminal glycolytic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). However, loss of glucose carbons to biosynthetic pathways early in glycolysis reduces the carbon supply to LDH. Thus, alternative routes for NAD regeneration must exist to support the increased glycolytic rate while allowing for the diversion of glucose to generate biomass and support proliferation. Here we demonstrate, using a variety of cancer cell lines as well as activated primary T cells, that cytosolic malate dehydrogenase 1 (MDH1) is an alternative to LDH as a supplier of NAD. Moreover, our results indicate that MDH1 generates malate with carbons derived from glutamine, thus enabling utilization of glucose carbons for glycolysis and for biomass. Amplification of MDH1 occurs at an impressive frequency in human tumors and correlates with poor prognosis. Together, our findings suggest that proliferating cells rely on both MDH1 and LDH to replenish cytosolic NAD, and that therapies designed at targeting glycolysis must consider both dehydrogenases.Oncogene advance online publication, 6 March 2017; doi:10.1038/onc.2017.36.

  5. Dimerization and enzymatic activity of fungal 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Kristan, Katja; Deluca, Dominga; Adamski, Jerzy; Stojan, Jure; Rižner, Tea Lanišnik

    2005-01-01

    Background 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the fungus Cochliobolus lunatus (17β-HSDcl) is a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. SDR proteins usually function as dimers or tetramers and 17β-HSDcl is also a homodimer under native conditions. Results We have investigated here which secondary structure elements are involved in the dimerization of 17β-HSDcl and examined the importance of dimerization for the enzyme activity. Sequence similarity with trihydroxynaphthalene reductase from Magnaporthe grisea indicated that Arg129 and His111 from the αE-helices interact with the Asp121, Glu117 and Asp187 residues from the αE and αF-helices of the neighbouring subunit. The Arg129Asp and His111Leu mutations both rendered 17β-HSDcl monomeric, while the mutant 17β-HSDcl-His111Ala was dimeric. Circular dichroism spectroscopy analysis confirmed the conservation of the secondary structure in both monomers. The three mutant proteins all bound coenzyme, as shown by fluorescence quenching in the presence of NADP+, but both monomers showed no enzymatic activity. Conclusion We have shown by site-directed mutagenesis and structure/function analysis that 17β-HSDcl dimerization involves the αE and αF helices of both subunits. Neighbouring subunits are connected through hydrophobic interactions, H-bonds and salt bridges involving amino acid residues His111 and Arg129. Since the substitutions of these two amino acid residues lead to inactive monomers with conserved secondary structure, we suggest dimerization is a prerequisite for catalysis. A detailed understanding of this dimerization could lead to the development of compounds that will specifically prevent dimerization, thereby serving as a new type of inhibitor. PMID:16359545

  6. INFLUENCE OF MODERATE TEMPERATURE ON GROWTH AND MALIC DEHYDROGENASE ACTIVITY OF A MARINE PSYCHROPHILE.

    PubMed

    MORITA, R Y; BURTON, S D

    1963-11-01

    Morita, Richard Y. (Oregon State University, Corvallis), and Sheril D. Burton. Influence of moderate temperature on growth and malic dehydrogenase activity of a marine psychrophile. J. Bacteriol. 86:1025-1029. 1963.-The maximal and optimal growth temperatures for a marine psychrophilic vibrio (PS 207) were determined to be 30 and 24.5 C, respectively. Malic dehydrogenase was found to be functioning in whole cells at about 1/20 of its observed maximum. Incubation of the cells, prior to or during the assay, at temperatures above the maximal growth temperature permitted the malic dehydrogenase to operate nearer its maximum, but this also inactivated the intracellular enzyme. The heating of whole cells gave an apparent effect of increasing malic dehydrogenase activity. Lysis of the cells permitted the enzyme to function at its full potential but rendered the enzyme more sensitive to heat denaturation. Lysis of the cells also caused the enzyme to lose approximately one-half of its malic dehydrogenase activity with each 10 C drop in temperature, whereas whole cells only lose approximately 1/5 of their enzyme activity at low temperatures with each 10 C drop.

  7. Selection and Characterization of Conditionally Active Promoters in Lactobacillus plantarum, Using Alanine Racemase as a Promoter Probe

    PubMed Central

    Bron, Peter A.; Hoffer, Sally M.; Van Swam, Iris I.; De Vos, Willem M.; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the use of the alr gene, encoding alanine racemase, as a promoter-screening tool for the identification of conditional promoters in Lactobacillus plantarum. Random fragments of the L. plantarum WCFS1 genome were cloned upstream of the promoterless alr gene of Lactococcus lactis in a low-copy-number plasmid vector. The resulting plasmid library was introduced into an L. plantarum Δalr strain (MD007), and 40,000 clones were selected. The genome coverage of the library was estimated to be 98%, based on nucleotide insert sequence and restriction analyses of the inserts of randomly selected clones. The library was screened for clones that were capable of complementing the d-alanine auxotroph phenotype of MD007 in media containing up to 10, 100, or 300 μg of the competitive Alr inhibitor d-cycloserine per ml. Western blot analysis with polyclonal antibodies raised against lactococcal Alr revealed that the Alr production level required for growth increased in the presence of increasing concentrations of d-cycloserine, adding a quantitative factor to the primarily qualitative nature of the alr complementation screen. Screening of the alr complementation library for clones that could grow only in the presence of 0.8 M NaCl resulted in the identification of eight clones that upon Western blot analysis showed significantly higher Alr production under high-salt conditions than under low-salt conditions. These results established the effectiveness of the alanine racemase complementation screening method for the identification of promoters on their conditional or constitutive activity. PMID:14711657

  8. Relationship of lactate dehydrogenase activity with body measeurements of Angus x Charolais cows and calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Angus x Charolais cows (n = 87) and their Angus-sired, spring-born calves (n = 86) were utilized to examine relationships between lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and body measurements of beef cows; and the relationship between maternal LDH activity in late gestation and subsequent calf birth we...

  9. [Lipid peroxidation processes and activity of brain succinate dehydrogenase in experimental craniocerebral trauma].

    PubMed

    Demchuk, M L; Medvedev, A E; Promyslov, M Sh; Gorkin, V Z

    1993-01-01

    A statistically significant decrease in the activity of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) was found in the rabbit brain after craniocerebral injury. The decrease in the activity of brain SDH was not shown to result from "competitive inhibition" by malonate accumulated after activation of lipid peroxidation. The activity of brain SDH was normalized by directed modification of the function of the central nervous system via administration of phenamine (amphetamine) into the injured animals.

  10. INT-dehydrogenase activity test for assessing anaerobic biodegradability of organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Hongwei, Yang; Zhanpeng, Jiang; Shaoqi, Shi; Tang, W Z

    2002-11-01

    This study assessed anaerobic biodegradability of organic compounds from microorganism activity. Dehydrogenase activity can be a good parameter characterizing the microorganism activity. A modified method of 2-(p-iodophenyl-3-(p-nitrophenyl)-5-pheny tetrazolium chloride-dehydrogenase activity determination was proposed in anaerobic biodegradability assessment. Cubic spline curves were adopted to link the data points. This curve was integrated twice to calculate areas. The microorganism activity index in anaerobic biodegradability assessment was calculated by standardizing the integral. According to the results of the activity index, 14 kinds of organic compounds were classified into readily, partially, and poorly biodegradable under anaerobic conditions, respectively. As a result, some conclusions for anaerobic biodegradability of organic compounds were reached, based on the activity index value.

  11. ACTIVITY AND ISOZYME CONTENT OF LACTATE DEHYDROGENASE UNDER LONG-TERM ORAL TAURINE ADMINISTRATION TO RATS.

    PubMed

    Ostapiv, R D; Humenyuk, S L; Manko, V V

    2015-01-01

    The effect of long-term oral taurine administration to rats on activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), its isozyme content and activity in the whole blood, liver, thigh muscle, brain and testes tissues were studied in the present work. For this purpose male Wistar rats with body weight 190-220 g were randomly divided into three groups, they were orally administered drinking water (control group) or taurine solution 40 and 100 mg per kg of body weight ( groups I and II, respectively). The total lactate dehydrogenase activity was measured spectrophotometrically, the percentage content of isozymes was determined by electrophoresis in 7.5% poliacrylamide gel withfurther staining according to J. Garbus. It was found that the total lactate dehydrogenase activity increased in all studied tissues. In testes of animals of both groups and in brain of group I animals, the total percentage contents of isozymes that are responsible for lactate production (LDH4+LDH5) increased. In liver of animals of both groups and in whole blood of group II animals, the total percentage content of isozymes that produce pyruvate (LDH1+LDH2) increased. In thigh muscle of both groups and in brain of group II animals the balance between LDH1+LDH2 and LDH4+LDH5 content did not differ from control values, though total lactate dehydrogenase activity was significantly higher, than that in the control group. Thus, the increase in the lactate dehydrogenase activity under long-term oral taurine administration in different rat tissues was found to be tissue- and dose-dependent and was caused by the increase in the content of different isozymes. Such increase in group I animals might be explained by adaptive mechanisms to hypoxia caused by high doses of taurine. For group II animals high doses of taurine were toxic and directly affected metabolic processes in the animal bodies.

  12. Amino acid oxidation and alanine production in rat hemidiaphragm in vitro. Effects of dichloroacetate.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, T N; Caldecourt, M A; Sugden, M C

    1984-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (an activator of pyruvate dehydrogenase) stimulates 14CO2 production from [U-14C]glucose, but not from [U-14C]glutamate, [U-14C]aspartate, [U-14C]- and [1-14C]-valine and [U-14C]- and [1-14C]-leucine. It is concluded (1) that pyruvate dehydrogenase is not rate-limiting in the oxidation to CO2 of amino acids that are metabolized to tricarboxylic acid-cycle intermediates, and (2) that carbohydrate (and not amino acids) is the main carbon precursor in alanine formation in muscle. PMID:6149743

  13. Depression of alcohol dehydrogenase activity in rat hepatocyte culture by dihydrotestosterone.

    PubMed

    Mezey, E; Potter, J J; Diehl, A M

    1986-01-15

    Hepatocytes harvested from castrated rats retained a higher alcohol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.1) activity than hepatocytes harvested from normal rats during 7 days of culture. Dihydrotestosterone (1 microM) decreased the enzyme activity, after 2 and 5 days of culture, in hepatocytes from castrated and control animals respectively. Dihydrotestosterone decreased the enzyme activity to similar values in both groups of hepatocytes by the end of 7 days of culture. Testosterone (1 microM) had no effect on the enzyme activity in normal hepatocytes and only a transitory effect in decreasing the enzyme activity in hepatocytes from castrated animals. The increases in alcohol dehydrogenase activity after castration and their suppression by dihydrotestosterone were associated with parallel changes in the rate of ethanol elimination. Additions of substrates of the malate-aspartate shuttle or dinitrophenol did not modify ethanol elimination. These observations indicate that dihydrotestosterone has a direct suppressant effect on hepatocyte alcohol dehydrogenase and that the enzyme activity is a major determinant of the rate of ethanol elimination.

  14. Geldanamycin Prevents Hemorrhage-Induced ATP Loss by Overexpressing Inducible HSP70 and Activating Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-24

    levels were determined using the ATP Bioluminescence Assay Kit HS II (Roche; Mannheim, Germany). Luminescence was measured with a TD-20/20...Geldanamycin prevents hemorrhage-induced ATP loss by overexpressing inducible HSP70 and activating pyruvate dehydrogenase Juliann G. Kiang,1,2,3...Geldanamycin prevents hemorrhage-induced ATP loss by overexpressing inducible HSP70 and activating pyruvate dehy- drogenase. Am J Physiol Gastrointest

  15. Enhancement of the activity of enzyme immobilized on polydopamine-coated iron oxide nanoparticles by rational orientation of formate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin; Ni, Kefeng; Zhao, Chengcheng; Ren, Yuhong; Wei, Dongzhi

    2014-10-20

    Immobilization of enzymes onto nanoparticles and retention of their structure and activity, which may be related to the orientation of enzymes on nanoparticles, remain a challenge. Here, we developed a novel enzyme-orientation strategy to enhance the activity of formate dehydrogenase immobilized on polydopamine-coated iron oxide nanoparticles via site-directed mutation. Seven mutants were constructed based on homology modeling of formate dehydrogenase and immobilized on polydopamine-coated iron oxide nanoparticles to investigate the influence of these mutations on immobilization. The immobilized mutant C242A/C275V/C363V/K389C demonstrated the highest immobilization yield and retained 90% of its initial activity, which was about 3-fold higher than that of wild-type formate dehydrogenase. Moreover, co-immobilization of formate dehydrogenase and leucine dehydrogenase was performed for the synthesis of l-tert-leucine. The catalytic efficiency of the co-immobilized mutant C242A/C275V/C363V/K389C and leucine dehydrogenase increased by more than 4-fold compared to that of co-immobilized wild-type formate dehydrogenase and leucine dehydrogenase.

  16. Multichannel Simultaneous Determination of Activities of Lactate Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Lianjia

    2000-09-12

    It is very important to find the best conditions for some enzymes to do the best catalysis in current pharmaceutical industries. Based on the results above, we could say that this set-up could be widely used in finding the optimal condition for best enzyme activity of a certain enzyme. Instead of looking for the best condition for enzyme activity by doing many similar reactions repeatedly, we can complete this assignment with just one run if we could apply enough conditions.

  17. Succinate dehydrogenase activity and soma size of motoneurons innervating different portions of the rat tibialis anterior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishihara, A.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1995-01-01

    The spatial distribution, soma size and oxidative enzyme activity of gamma and alpha motoneurons innervating muscle fibres in the deep (away from the surface of the muscle) and superficial (close to the surface of the muscle) portions of the tibialis anterior in normal rats were determined. The deep portion had a higher percentage of high oxidative fibres than the superficial portion of the muscle. Motoneurons were labelled by retrograde neuronal transport of fluorescent tracers: Fast Blue and Nuclear Yellow were injected into the deep portion and Nuclear Yellow into the superficial portion of the muscle. Therefore, motoneurons innervating the deep portion were identified by both a blue fluorescent cytoplasm and a golden-yellow fluorescent nucleus, while motoneurons innervating the superficial portion were identified by only a golden-yellow fluorescent nucleus. After staining for succinate dehydrogenase activity on the same section used for the identification of the motoneurons, soma size and succinate dehydrogenase activity of the motoneurons were measured. The gamma and alpha motoneurons innervating both the deep and superficial portions were located primarily at L4 and were intermingled within the same region of the dorsolateral portion of the ventral horn in the spinal cord. Mean soma size was similar for either gamma or alpha motoneurons in the two portions of the muscle. The alpha motoneurons innervating the superficial portion had a lower mean succinate dehydrogenase activity than those innervating the deep portion of the muscle. An inverse relationship between soma size and succinate dehydrogenase activity of alpha, but not gamma, motoneurons innervating both the deep and superficial portions was observed. Based on three-dimensional reconstructions within the spinal cord, there were no apparent differences in the spatial distribution of the motoneurons, either gamma or alpha, associated with the deep and superficial compartments of the muscle. The data

  18. Active site cysteine-null glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) rescues nitric oxide-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Takeya; Nakajima, Hidemitsu; Nakatsuji, Masatoshi; Itakura, Masanori; Kaneshige, Akihiro; Azuma, Yasu-Taka; Inui, Takashi; Takeuchi, Tadayoshi

    2016-02-29

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), a homotetrameric enzyme involved in a key step of glycolysis, also has a role in mediating cell death under nitrosative stress. Our previous reports suggest that nitric oxide-induced intramolecular disulfide-bonding GAPDH aggregation, which occurs through oxidation of the active site cysteine (Cys-152), participates in a mechanism to account for nitric oxide-induced death signaling in some neurodegenerative/neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, we demonstrate a rescue strategy for nitric oxide-induced cell death accompanied by GAPDH aggregation in a mutant with a substitution of Cys-152 to alanine (C152A-GAPDH). Pre-incubation of purified wild-type GAPDH with C152A-GAPDH under exposure to nitric oxide inhibited wild-type GAPDH aggregation in a concentration-dependent manner in vitro. Several lines of structural analysis revealed that C152A-GAPDH extensively interfered with nitric oxide-induced GAPDH-amyloidogenesis. Overexpression of doxycycline-inducible C152A-GAPDH in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma significantly rescued nitric oxide-induced death, concomitant with the decreased formation of GAPDH aggregates. Further, both co-immunoprecipitation assays and simulation models revealed a heterotetramer composed of one dimer each of wild-type GAPDH and C152A-GAPDH. These results suggest that the C152A-GAPDH mutant acts as a dominant-negative molecule against GAPDH aggregation via the formation of this GAPDH heterotetramer. This study may contribute to a new therapeutic approach utilizing C152A-GAPDH against brain damage in nitrosative stress-related disorders.

  19. Determination of Dehydrogenase Activities Involved in D-Glucose Oxidation in Gluconobacter and Acetobacter Strains

    PubMed Central

    Sainz, Florencia; Jesús Torija, María; Matsutani, Minenosuke; Kataoka, Naoya; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Mas, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are known for rapid and incomplete oxidation of an extensively variety of alcohols and carbohydrates, resulting in the accumulation of organic acids as the final products. These oxidative fermentations in AAB are catalyzed by PQQ- or FAD- dependent membrane-bound dehydrogenases. In the present study, the enzyme activity of the membrane-bound dehydrogenases [membrane-bound PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase (mGDH), D-gluconate dehydrogenase (GADH) and membrane-bound glycerol dehydrogenase (GLDH)] involved in the oxidation of D-glucose and D-gluconic acid (GA) was determined in six strains of three different species of AAB (three natural and three type strains). Moreover, the effect of these activities on the production of related metabolites [GA, 2-keto-D-gluconic acid (2KGA) and 5-keto-D-gluconic acid (5KGA)] was analyzed. The natural strains belonging to Gluconobacter showed a high mGDH activity and low activity in GADH and GLDH, whereas the Acetobacter malorum strain presented low activity in the three enzymes. Nevertheless, no correlation was observed between the activity of these enzymes and the concentration of the corresponding metabolites. In fact, all the tested strains were able to oxidize D-glucose to GA, being maximal at the late exponential phase of the AAB growth (24 h), which coincided with D-glucose exhaustion and the maximum mGDH activity. Instead, only some of the tested strains were capable of producing 2KGA and/or 5KGA. In the case of Gluconobacter oxydans strains, no 2KGA production was detected which is related to the absence of GADH activity after 24 h, while in the remaining strains, detection of GADH activity after 24 h resulted in a high accumulation of 2KGA. Therefore, it is possible to choose the best strain depending on the desired product composition. Moreover, the sequences of these genes were used to construct phylogenetic trees. According to the sequence of gcd, gene coding for mGDH, Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter

  20. Serum γ-Glutamyltransferase, Alanine Aminotransferase and Aspartate Aminotransferase Activity in Healthy Blood Donor of Different Ethnic Groups in Gorgan

    PubMed Central

    Mehrpouya, Masoumeh; Pourhashem, Zeinab

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Measure of liver enzymes may help to increase safety of blood donation for both blood donor and recipient. Determination of liver enzymes may prepare valuable clinical information. Aim To assess serum γ-Glutamyltransferase (GGT), Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT), and Aspartate Aminotransferase (AST) activities in healthy blood donors in different ethnic groups in Gorgan. Materials and Methods This study was performed in 450 healthy male blood donors, in three ethnic groups (Fars, Sistanee and Turkman) who attended Gorgan blood transfusion center. Liver enzymes (GGT, ALT and AST) were determined. Results Serum AST and ALT in three ethnic groups were significant except for serum GGT levels. There was significant correlation between family histories of liver disease and systolic blood pressure and AST in Fars, and GGT in Sistanee ethnic groups. Conclusion Several factors, such as age, family history of diabetes mellitus, family history of liver disease and smoking habit had no effect on some liver enzymes in different ethnic groups in this area. Variation of AST, ALT, and GGT enzyme activities in healthy subjects was associated with some subjects in our study groups. According to our study, it suggests that screening of AST and GGT enzymes in subjects with family history of liver disease is necessary in different ethnic groups. PMID:27630834

  1. Cell Active Hydroxylactam Inhibitors of Human Lactate Dehydrogenase with Oral Bioavailability in Mice.

    PubMed

    Purkey, Hans E; Robarge, Kirk; Chen, Jinhua; Chen, Zhongguo; Corson, Laura B; Ding, Charles Z; DiPasquale, Antonio G; Dragovich, Peter S; Eigenbrot, Charles; Evangelista, Marie; Fauber, Benjamin P; Gao, Zhenting; Ge, Hongxiu; Hitz, Anna; Ho, Qunh; Labadie, Sharada S; Lai, Kwong Wah; Liu, Wenfeng; Liu, Yajing; Li, Chiho; Ma, Shuguang; Malek, Shiva; O'Brien, Thomas; Pang, Jodie; Peterson, David; Salphati, Laurent; Sideris, Steve; Ultsch, Mark; Wei, BinQing; Yen, Ivana; Yue, Qin; Zhang, Huihui; Zhou, Aihe

    2016-10-13

    A series of trisubstituted hydroxylactams was identified as potent enzymatic and cellular inhibitors of human lactate dehydrogenase A. Utilizing structure-based design and physical property optimization, multiple inhibitors were discovered with <10 μM lactate IC50 in a MiaPaca2 cell line. Optimization of the series led to 29, a potent cell active molecule (MiaPaca2 IC50 = 0.67 μM) that also possessed good exposure when dosed orally to mice.

  2. Changes in cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase activities from sugarcane cultivars inoculated with Sporisorium scitamineum sporidia.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Rocío; Alarcón, Borja; de Armas, Roberto; Vicente, Carlos; Legaz, María Estrella

    2012-06-01

    This study describes a method for determining cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase activity in sugarcane stems using reverse phase (RP) high-performance liquid chromatography to elucidate their possible lignin origin. Activity is assayed using the reverse mode, the oxidation of hydroxycinnamyl alcohols into hydroxycinnamyl aldehydes. Appearance of the reaction products, coniferaldehyde and sinapaldehyde is determined by measuring absorbance at 340 and 345 nm, respectively. Disappearance of substrates, coniferyl alcohol and sinapyl alcohol is measured at 263 and 273 nm, respectively. Isocratic elution with acetonitrile:acetic acid through an RP Mediterranea sea C18 column is performed. As case examples, we have examined two different cultivars of sugarcane; My 5514 is resistant to smut, whereas B 42231 is susceptible to the pathogen. Inoculation of sugarcane stems elicits lignification and produces significant increases of coniferyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) and sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase (SAD). Production of lignin increases about 29% in the resistant cultivar and only 13% in the susceptible cultivar after inoculation compared to uninoculated plants. Our results show that the resistance of My 5514 to smut is likely derived, at least in part, to a marked increase of lignin concentration by the activation of CAD and SAD.

  3. Cytophotometric analysis of reaction rates of succinate and lactate dehydrogenase activity in rat liver, heart muscle and tracheal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Van Noorden, C J; Vogels, I M

    1989-01-01

    Reaction rates of succinate and lactate dehydrogenase activity in cryostat sections of rat liver, tracheal epithelium and heart muscle were monitored by continuous measurement of formazan formation by cytophotometry at room temperature. Incubation media contained polyvinyl alcohol as tissue protectant and Tetranitro BT as final electron acceptor. Control media lacked either substrate or substrate and coenzyme. Controls were also performed by adding malonate (a competitive inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase), pyruvate (a non-competitive inhibitor of lactate dehydrogenase), oxalate (a competitive inhibitor of lactate dehydrogenase) or N-ethylmaleimide (a blocker of SH groups). A specific malonate-sensitive linear test minus control response for succinate dehydrogenase activity was obtained in liver (1.6 mumol H2cm-3 min-1) and tracheal epithelium (0.8 mumol H2cm-3 min-1) but not in heart muscle. All variations in the incubation conditions tested did not result in a linear test minus control response in the latter tissue. Because the reaction was sensitive to malonate, it was concluded that the initial reaction rate was the specific rate of succinate dehydrogenase activity in heart muscle (9.1 mumol H2 cm-3 min-1). Test minus control reactions for lactate dehydrogenase activity were distinctly non-linear for all tissues tested. This appeared to be due to product inhibition by pyruvate generated during the reaction and therefore it was concluded that the appropriate control reaction was the test reaction in the presence of 20 mM pyruvate. The initial rate of the test minus this control was the true rate of lactate dehydrogenase activity. The lactate dehydrogenase activity thus found in liver parenchyma was 5.0 mumol of H2 generated per cm3 liver tissue per min.

  4. A new PEG-beta-alanine active derivative for releasable protein conjugation.

    PubMed

    Pasut, Gianfranco; Mero, Anna; Caboi, Francesca; Scaramuzza, Silvia; Sollai, Luigi; Veronese, Francesco M

    2008-12-01

    A new PEGylating agent, PEG-betaAla-NHCO-OSu, has been studied for protein amino conjugation using human growth hormone (hGH) and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) as model therapeutic proteins. This new activated PEG possesses a convenient property for protein modification when compared to other activated carboxylate PEGs, namely, lower reactivity. When this polymer reacts with a protein, its features lead to fewer PEG-protein conjugate isomers because it preferentially binds the most nucleophilic and exposed amines. Furthermore, the conjugates obtained with PEG-betaAla-NHCO-OSu showed an interesting slow release of polymer chains upon incubation under physiological conditions. Further investigations determined that the PEG chains released are those coupled to histidine residues, and this finally yields less PEGylated species as well as free protein. This release allows a partial recovery of protein activity that is often remarkably and permanently reduced after stable PEGylation, and it occurs in water or blood without the involvement of enzymes. On the other hand, the rate of PEG release, tuned by the chemical structure of this new PEGylating agent, is not too high, and therefore, the achievement of a desired prolongation of protein half-life in vivo is still feasible. The pharmacokinetics of hGH-PEG6k-betaAla conjugate was compared to that of native hGH in rats and monkeys, and the blood residence times were increased by 10- and 7-fold, respectively. The conjugate potency was evaluated in hypophysectomized rats demonstrating a superior pharmacodynamic profile with respect to native hGH.

  5. Alpha-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase activity in sex-linked muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Johnston, H A; Wilkinson, J H; Withycombe, W A; Raymond, S

    1966-05-01

    In two families with severe sex-linked muscular dystrophy, high levels of alpha-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (HBD), lactate dehydrogenase (LD), aspartate transaminase (AspT), aldolase, and creatine phosphokinase (CPK) were found in the sera of three young affected males. In both families the mother had a raised level of HBD activity. Four sisters of the three affected boys had raised serum enzyme levels, and they are regarded as presumptive carriers of the disease. Biopsy specimens of dystrophic muscle had LD and HBD contents which were significantly lower than those of control specimens, while the HBD/LD ratios were markedly greater. Muscle from two unaffected members of the same family also exhibited high ratios, indicating the presence of the electrophoretically fast LD isoenzymes, and this was confirmed by acrylamide-gel electrophoresis.

  6. SDR-type human hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases involved in steroid hormone activation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoqiu; Lukacik, Petra; Kavanagh, Kathryn L; Oppermann, Udo

    2007-02-01

    Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases catalyze the NAD(P)(H)-dependent oxidoreduction of hydroxyl and oxo-functions at distinct positions of steroid hormones. This reversible reaction constitutes an important pre-receptor control mechanism for nuclear receptor ligands of the androgen, estrogen and glucocorticoid classes, since the conversion "switches" between receptor ligands and their inactive metabolites. The major reversible activities found in mammals acting on steroid hormones comprise 3alpha-, 11beta- and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases, and for each group several distinct isozymes have been described. The enzymes differ in their expression pattern, nucleotide cofactor preference, steroid substrate specificity and subcellular localization, and thus constitute a complex system ensuring cell-specific adaptation and regulation of steroid hormone levels. Several isoforms constitute promising drug targets, of particular importance in cancer, metabolic diseases, neurodegeneration and immunity.

  7. Overexpression of genes encoding glycolytic enzymes in Corynebacterium glutamicum enhances glucose metabolism and alanine production under oxygen deprivation conditions.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shogo; Gunji, Wataru; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Toda, Hiroshi; Suda, Masako; Jojima, Toru; Inui, Masayuki; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2012-06-01

    We previously reported that Corynebacterium glutamicum strain ΔldhAΔppc+alaD+gapA, overexpressing glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase-encoding gapA, shows significantly improved glucose consumption and alanine formation under oxygen deprivation conditions (T. Jojima, M. Fujii, E. Mori, M. Inui, and H. Yukawa, Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 87:159-165, 2010). In this study, we employ stepwise overexpression and chromosomal integration of a total of four genes encoding glycolytic enzymes (herein referred to as glycolytic genes) to demonstrate further successive improvements in C. glutamicum glucose metabolism under oxygen deprivation. In addition to gapA, overexpressing pyruvate kinase-encoding pyk and phosphofructokinase-encoding pfk enabled strain GLY2/pCRD500 to realize respective 13% and 20% improved rates of glucose consumption and alanine formation compared to GLY1/pCRD500. Subsequent overexpression of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase-encoding gpi in strain GLY3/pCRD500 further improved its glucose metabolism. Notably, both alanine productivity and yield increased after each overexpression step. After 48 h of incubation, GLY3/pCRD500 produced 2,430 mM alanine at a yield of 91.8%. This was 6.4-fold higher productivity than that of the wild-type strain. Intracellular metabolite analysis showed that gapA overexpression led to a decreased concentration of metabolites upstream of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, suggesting that the overexpression resolved a bottleneck in glycolysis. Changing ratios of the extracellular metabolites by overexpression of glycolytic genes resulted in reduction of the intracellular NADH/NAD(+) ratio, which also plays an important role on the improvement of glucose consumption. Enhanced alanine dehydrogenase activity using a high-copy-number plasmid further accelerated the overall alanine productivity. Increase in glycolytic enzyme activities is a promising approach to make drastic progress in growth-arrested bioprocesses.

  8. Histochemical modification of the active site of succinate dehydrogenase with N-acetylimidazole.

    PubMed

    Nakae, Y; Shono, M

    1986-04-01

    The kinetics of acetylation of mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase [EC 1.3.99.1] in the two fibre types (A and C) of rat gastrocnemius with N-acetylimidazole was studied by a newly modified histochemical technique. Acetylimidazole partially inactivated the enzyme, but subsequent deacetylation with hydroxylamine restored the enzyme activity completely. Inactivation of the enzyme by acetylimidazole was prevented by malonate, which is a competitive inhibitor of the enzyme. The value of the inhibition constant (Ki = 34 microM) for malonate, obtained from the dependence of the pseudo-first order rate constant of acetylation of the enzyme with acetylimidazole on the malonate concentration, was in good agreement with the Ki value (33 microM) obtained by a different method, the dependence of the initial velocity of succinate oxidation by the dehydrogenase on the substrate concentration in the presence of malonate. These findings suggest that a tyrosyl residue is located in the malonate binding site (the active site) of succinate dehydrogenase in the gastrocnemius and plays a role in substrate binding, but is not a catalytic group.

  9. Ramachandran Plot for Alanine Dipeptide as Determined from Raman Optical Activity.

    PubMed

    Parchaňský, Václav; Kapitán, Josef; Kaminský, Jakub; Šebestík, Jaroslav; Bouř, Petr

    2013-08-15

    Accessible values of the φ and ψ torsional angles determining peptide main chain conformation are traditionally displayed in the form of Ramachandran plots. The number of experimental methods making it possible to determine such conformational distribution is limited. In the present study, Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of Ac-Ala-NHMe were measured and fit by theoretical curves. This revealed the most favored conformers and a large part of the potential energy surface (PES) of this model dipeptide. Such experimental PES compares well to quantum chemical computations, whereas molecular dynamics (MD) modeling reproduces it less faithfully. The surface shape is consistent with the temperature dependence of the spectra, as observed experimentally and predicted by MD. Despite errors associated with spectral modeling and the measurement, the results are likely to facilitate future applications of ROA spectroscopy.

  10. Effect of dehydrogenase, phosphatase and urease activity in cotton soil after applying thiamethoxam as seed treatment.

    PubMed

    Jyot, Gagan; Mandal, Kousik; Singh, Balwinder

    2015-05-01

    Soil enzymes are indicators of microbial activities in soil and are often considered as an indicator of soil health and fertility. They are very sensitive to the agricultural practices, pH of the soil, nutrients, inhibitors and weather conditions. To understand the effect of an insecticide, thiamethoxam, on different soil enzyme activities, the experiments were conducted at cotton experimental fields of Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana. The results here were presented to understand the impact of thiamethoxam on soil enzyme activities. Thiamethoxam was applied as seed treatment to control the pest. Soil from three localities, i.e. soil in which seed was treated with recommended dose at 2.1 g a.i. kg(-1), soil in which seed was treated with four times recommended dose at 8.4 g a.i. kg(-1) and from the control field, were tested for different enzyme activities. Phosphatase and dehydrogenase activities were high in control soil in comparison to control soil while no effect of this insecticide on urease activity. Thiamethoxam had inhibitory effects on dehydrogenase and phosphatase activities. Therefore, it can be attributed that agricultural practices, weather conditions and use of thiamethoxam might be responsible for the different level of enzyme activities in soil.

  11. Structures of the G81A mutant form of the active chimera of (S)-mandelate dehydrogenase and its complex with two of its substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Sukumar, Narayanasami; Dewanti, Asteriani; Merli, Angelo; Rossi, Gian Luigi; Mitra, Bharati; Mathews, F. Scott

    2009-06-12

    (S)-Mandelate dehydrogenase (MDH) from Pseudomonas putida, a membrane-associated flavoenzyme, catalyzes the oxidation of (S)-mandelate to benzoylformate. Previously, the structure of a catalytically similar chimera, MDH-GOX2, rendered soluble by the replacement of its membrane-binding segment with the corresponding segment of glycolate oxidase (GOX), was determined and found to be highly similar to that of GOX except within the substituted segments. Subsequent attempts to cocrystallize MDH-GOX2 with substrate proved unsuccessful. However, the G81A mutants of MDH and of MDH-GOX2 displayed {approx}100-fold lower reactivity with substrate and a modestly higher reactivity towards molecular oxygen. In order to understand the effect of the mutation and to identify the mode of substrate binding in MDH-GOX2, a crystallographic investigation of the G81A mutant of the MDH-GOX2 enzyme was initiated. The structures of ligand-free G81A mutant MDH-GOX2 and of its complexes with the substrates 2-hydroxyoctanoate and 2-hydroxy-3-indolelactate were determined at 1.6, 2.5 and 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. In the ligand-free G81A mutant protein, a sulfate anion previously found at the active site is displaced by the alanine side chain introduced by the mutation. 2-Hydroxyoctanoate binds in an apparently productive mode for subsequent reaction, while 2-hydroxy-3-indolelactate is bound to the enzyme in an apparently unproductive mode. The results of this investigation suggest that a lowering of the polarity of the flavin environment resulting from the displacement of nearby water molecules caused by the glycine-to-alanine mutation may account for the lowered catalytic activity of the mutant enzyme, which is consistent with the 30 mV lower flavin redox potential. Furthermore, the altered binding mode of the indolelactate substrate may account for its reduced activity compared with octanoate, as observed in the crystalline state.

  12. Structures of the G81A mutant form of the active chimera of (S)-mandelate dehydrogenase and its complex with two of its substrates.

    PubMed

    Sukumar, Narayanasami; Dewanti, Asteriani; Merli, Angelo; Rossi, Gian Luigi; Mitra, Bharati; Mathews, F Scott

    2009-06-01

    (S)-Mandelate dehydrogenase (MDH) from Pseudomonas putida, a membrane-associated flavoenzyme, catalyzes the oxidation of (S)-mandelate to benzoylformate. Previously, the structure of a catalytically similar chimera, MDH-GOX2, rendered soluble by the replacement of its membrane-binding segment with the corresponding segment of glycolate oxidase (GOX), was determined and found to be highly similar to that of GOX except within the substituted segments. Subsequent attempts to cocrystallize MDH-GOX2 with substrate proved unsuccessful. However, the G81A mutants of MDH and of MDH-GOX2 displayed approximately 100-fold lower reactivity with substrate and a modestly higher reactivity towards molecular oxygen. In order to understand the effect of the mutation and to identify the mode of substrate binding in MDH-GOX2, a crystallographic investigation of the G81A mutant of the MDH-GOX2 enzyme was initiated. The structures of ligand-free G81A mutant MDH-GOX2 and of its complexes with the substrates 2-hydroxyoctanoate and 2-hydroxy-3-indolelactate were determined at 1.6, 2.5 and 2.2 A resolution, respectively. In the ligand-free G81A mutant protein, a sulfate anion previously found at the active site is displaced by the alanine side chain introduced by the mutation. 2-Hydroxyoctanoate binds in an apparently productive mode for subsequent reaction, while 2-hydroxy-3-indolelactate is bound to the enzyme in an apparently unproductive mode. The results of this investigation suggest that a lowering of the polarity of the flavin environment resulting from the displacement of nearby water molecules caused by the glycine-to-alanine mutation may account for the lowered catalytic activity of the mutant enzyme, which is consistent with the 30 mV lower flavin redox potential. Furthermore, the altered binding mode of the indolelactate substrate may account for its reduced activity compared with octanoate, as observed in the crystalline state.

  13. Effect of substituting arginine and lysine with alanine on antimicrobial activity and the mechanism of action of a cationic dodecapeptide (CL(14-25)), a partial sequence of cyanate lyase from rice.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masayuki; Takahashi, Nobuteru; Takayanagi, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Atsuo; Ishiyama, Yohei; Saitoh, Eiichi; Kato, Tetsuo; Ochiai, Akihito; Tanaka, Takaaki

    2014-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of analogs obtained by substituting arginine and lysine in CL(14-25), a cationic α-helical dodecapeptide, with alanine against Porphyromonas gingivalis, a periodontal pathogen, varied significantly depending on the number and position of cationic amino acids. The alanine-substituted analogs had no hemolytic activity, even at a concentration of 1 mM. The antimicrobial activities of CL(K20A) and CL(K20A, K25A) were 3.8-fold and 9.1-fold higher, respectively, than that of CL(14-25). The antimicrobial activity of CL(R15A) was slightly lower than that of CL(14-25), suggesting that arginine at position 15 is not essential but is important for the antimicrobial activity. The experiments in which the alanine-substituted analogs bearing the replacement of arginine at position 24 and/or lysine at position 25 were used showed that arginine at position 24 was crucial for the antimicrobial activity whenever lysine at position 25 was substituted with alanine. Helical wheel projections of the alanine-substituted analogs indicate that the hydrophobicity in the vicinity of leucine at position 16 and alanines at positions 18 and/or 21 increased by substituting lysine at positions 20 and 25 with alanine, respectively. The degrees of diSC3 -5 release from P. gingivalis cells and disruption of GUVs induced by the alanine-substituted analogs with different positive charges were not closely related to their antimicrobial activities. The enhanced antimicrobial activities of the alanine-substituted analogs appear to be mainly attributable to the changes in properties such as hydrophobicity and amphipathic propensity due to alanine substitution and not to their extents of positive charge (cationicity).

  14. The retinaldehyde reductase activity of DHRS3 is reciprocally activated by retinol dehydrogenase 10 to control retinoid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Adams, Mark K; Belyaeva, Olga V; Wu, Lizhi; Kedishvili, Natalia Y

    2014-05-23

    The retinoic acid-inducible dehydrogenase reductase 3 (DHRS3) is thought to function as a retinaldehyde reductase that controls the levels of all-trans-retinaldehyde, the immediate precursor for bioactive all-trans-retinoic acid. However, the weak catalytic activity of DHRS3 and the lack of changes in retinaldehyde conversion to retinol and retinoic acid in the cells overexpressing DHRS3 undermine its role as a physiologically important all-trans-retinaldehyde reductase. This study demonstrates that DHRS3 requires the presence of retinol dehydrogenase 10 (RDH10) to display its full catalytic activity. The RDH10-activated DHRS3 acts as a robust high affinity all-trans-retinaldehyde-specific reductase that effectively converts retinaldehyde back to retinol, decreasing the rate of retinoic acid biosynthesis. In turn, the retinol dehydrogenase activity of RDH10 is reciprocally activated by DHRS3. At E13.5, DHRS3-null embryos have ∼4-fold lower levels of retinol and retinyl esters, but only slightly elevated levels of retinoic acid. The membrane-associated retinaldehyde reductase and retinol dehydrogenase activities are decreased by ∼4- and ∼2-fold, respectively, in Dhrs3(-/-) embryos, and Dhrs3(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibit reduced metabolism of both retinaldehyde and retinol. Neither RDH10 nor DHRS3 has to be itself catalytically active to activate each other. The transcripts encoding DHRS3 and RDH10 are co-localized at least in some tissues during development. The mutually activating interaction between the two related proteins may represent a highly sensitive and conserved mechanism for precise control over the rate of retinoic acid biosynthesis.

  15. A bifunctional enzyme from Rhodococcus erythropolis exhibiting secondary alcohol dehydrogenase-catalase activities.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Rojas, Enriqueta; Kurt, Tutku; Schmidt, Udo; Meyer, Vera; Garbe, Leif-Alexander

    2014-11-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenases have long been recognized as potential biocatalyst for production of chiral fine and bulk chemicals. They are relevant for industry in enantiospecific production of chiral compounds. In this study, we identified and purified a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (SdcA) from Rhodococcus erythropolis oxidizing γ-lactols into γ-lactones. SdcA showed broad substrate specificity on γ-lactols; secondary aliphatic alcohols with 8 and 10 carbon atoms were also substrates and oxidized with (2S)-stereospecificity. The enzyme exhibited moderate stability with a half-life of 5 h at 40 °C and 20 days at 4 °C. Mass spectrometric identification revealed high sequence coverage of SdcA amino acid sequence to a highly conserved catalase from R. erythropolis. The corresponding encoding gene was isolated from genomic DNA and subsequently overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 DE3 cells. In addition, the recombinant SdcA was purified and characterized in order to confirm that the secondary alcohol dehydrogenase and catalase activity correspond to the same enzyme.

  16. Genistein inhibits activities of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and lactate dehydrogenase, enzymes which use NADH as a substrate.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Michał; Banecki, Bogdan; Kadziński, Leszek; Jakóbkiewicz-Banecka, Joanna; Kaźmierkiewicz, Rajmund; Gabig-Cimińska, Magdalena; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Banecka-Majkutewicz, Zyta

    2015-09-25

    Genistein (5, 7-dihydroxy-3- (4-hydroxyphenyl)-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one) is a natural isoflavone revealing many biological activities. Thus, it is considered as a therapeutic compound in as various disorders as cancer, infections and genetic diseases. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that genistein inhibits activities of bacterial methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MetF) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Both enzymes use NADH as a substrate, and results of biochemical as well as molecular modeling studies with MetF suggest that genistein may interfere with binding of this dinucleotide to the enzyme. These results have implications for our understanding of biological functions of genistein and its effects on cellular metabolism.

  17. The separate roles of PQQ and apo-enzyme syntheses in the regulation of glucose dehydrogenase activity in Klebsiella pneumoniae NCTC 418.

    PubMed

    Hommes, R W; Herman, P T; Postma, P W; Tempest, D W; Neijssel, O M

    1989-01-01

    No holoenzyme pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent glucose dehydrogenase and only very low apoenzyme levels could be detected in cells of Klebsiella pneumoniae, growing anaerobically, or carrying out a fumarate or nitrate respiration. Low glucose dehydrogenase activity in some aerobic glucose-excess cultures of K. pneumoniae (ammonia or sulphate limitation) was increased significantly by addition of PQQ, whereas in cells already possessing a high glucose dehydrogenase activity (phosphate or potassium limitation) extra PQQ had almost no effect. These observations indicate that the glucose dehydrogenase activity in K. pneumoniae is modulated by both PQQ synthesis and synthesis of the glucose dehydrogenase apo-enzyme.

  18. Nutrient deprivation induces the Warburg effect through ROS/AMPK-dependent activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-An; Chao, Yee; Shiah, Shine-Gwo; Lin, Wan-Wan

    2013-05-01

    The Warburg effect is known to be crucial for cancer cells to acquire energy. Nutrient deficiencies are an important phenomenon in solid tumors, but the effect on cancer cell metabolism is not yet clear. In this study, we demonstrate that starvation of HeLa cells by incubation with Hank's buffered salt solution (HBSS) induced cell apoptosis, which was accompanied by the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation. Notably, HBSS starvation increased lactate production, cytoplasmic pyruvate content and decreased oxygen consumption, but failed to change the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity or the glucose uptake. We found that HBSS starvation rapidly induced pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) activation and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) phosphorylation, both of which were inhibited by compound C (an AMPK inhibitor), NAC (a ROS scavenger), and the dominant negative mutant of AMPK. Our data further revealed the involvement of ROS production in AMPK activation. Moreover, DCA (a PDK inhibitor), NAC, and compound C all significantly decreased HBSS starvation-induced lactate production accompanied by enhancement of HBSS starvation-induced cell apoptosis. Not only in HeLa cells, HBSS-induced lactate production and PDH phosphorylation were also observed in CL1.5, A431 and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Taken together, we for the first time demonstrated that a low-nutrient condition drives cancer cells to utilize glycolysis to produce ATP, and this increases the Warburg effect through a novel mechanism involving ROS/AMPK-dependent activation of PDK. Such an event contributes to protecting cells from apoptosis upon nutrient deprivation.

  19. Physiological and fermentation properties of Bacillus coagulans and a mutant lacking fermentative lactate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Su, Yue; Rhee, Mun Su; Ingram, Lonnie O; Shanmugam, K T

    2011-03-01

    Bacillus coagulans, a sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, grows optimally at 50-55 °C and produces lactic acid as the primary fermentation product from both hexoses and pentoses. The amount of fungal cellulases required for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) at 55 °C was previously reported to be three to four times lower than for SSF at the optimum growth temperature for Saccharomyces cerevisiae of 35 °C. An ethanologenic B. coagulans is expected to lower the cellulase loading and production cost of cellulosic ethanol due to SSF at 55 °C. As a first step towards developing B. coagulans as an ethanologenic microbial biocatalyst, activity of the primary fermentation enzyme L-lactate dehydrogenase was removed by mutation (strain Suy27). Strain Suy27 produced ethanol as the main fermentation product from glucose during growth at pH 7.0 (0.33 g ethanol per g glucose fermented). Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) acting in series contributed to about 55% of the ethanol produced by this mutant while pyruvate formate lyase and ADH were responsible for the remainder. Due to the absence of PDH activity in B. coagulans during fermentative growth at pH 5.0, the l-ldh mutant failed to grow anaerobically at pH 5.0. Strain Suy27-13, a derivative of the l-ldh mutant strain Suy27, that produced PDH activity during anaerobic growth at pH 5.0 grew at this pH and also produced ethanol as the fermentation product (0.39 g per g glucose). These results show that construction of an ethanologenic B. coagulans requires optimal expression of PDH activity in addition to the removal of the LDH activity to support growth and ethanol production.

  20. Structures of the G81A mutant form of the active chimera of (S)-mandelate dehydrogenase and its complex with two of its substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Sukumar, Narayanasami; Dewanti, Asteriani; Merli, Angelo; Rossi, Gian Luigi; Mitra, Bharati; Mathews, F. Scott

    2009-06-01

    The crystal structure of the G81A mutant form of the chimera of (S)-mandelate dehydrogenase and of its complexes with two of its substrates reveal productive and non-productive modes of binding for the catalytic reaction. The structure also indicates the role of G81A in lowering the redox potential of the flavin co-factor leading to an ∼200-fold slower catalytic rate of substrate oxidation. (S)-Mandelate dehydrogenase (MDH) from Pseudomonas putida, a membrane-associated flavoenzyme, catalyzes the oxidation of (S)-mandelate to benzoylformate. Previously, the structure of a catalytically similar chimera, MDH-GOX2, rendered soluble by the replacement of its membrane-binding segment with the corresponding segment of glycolate oxidase (GOX), was determined and found to be highly similar to that of GOX except within the substituted segments. Subsequent attempts to cocrystallize MDH-GOX2 with substrate proved unsuccessful. However, the G81A mutants of MDH and of MDH-GOX2 displayed ∼100-fold lower reactivity with substrate and a modestly higher reactivity towards molecular oxygen. In order to understand the effect of the mutation and to identify the mode of substrate binding in MDH-GOX2, a crystallographic investigation of the G81A mutant of the MDH-GOX2 enzyme was initiated. The structures of ligand-free G81A mutant MDH-GOX2 and of its complexes with the substrates 2-hydroxyoctanoate and 2-hydroxy-3-indolelactate were determined at 1.6, 2.5 and 2.2 Å resolution, respectively. In the ligand-free G81A mutant protein, a sulfate anion previously found at the active site is displaced by the alanine side chain introduced by the mutation. 2-Hydroxyoctanoate binds in an apparently productive mode for subsequent reaction, while 2-hydroxy-3-indolelactate is bound to the enzyme in an apparently unproductive mode. The results of this investigation suggest that a lowering of the polarity of the flavin environment resulting from the displacement of nearby water molecules caused by

  1. Alanine water complexes.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, Vanesa; Sanz, M Eugenia; Peña, Isabel; Mata, Santiago; Cabezas, Carlos; López, Juan C; Alonso, José L

    2014-04-10

    Two complexes of alanine with water, alanine-(H2O)n (n = 1,2), have been generated by laser ablation of the amino acid in a supersonic jet containing water vapor and characterized using Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. In the observed complexes, water molecules bind to the carboxylic group of alanine acting as both proton donors and acceptors. In alanine-H2O, the water molecule establishes two intermolecular hydrogen bonds forming a six-membered cycle, while in alanine-(H2O)2 the two water molecules establish three hydrogen bonds forming an eight-membered ring. In both complexes, the amino acid moiety is in its neutral form and shows the conformation observed to be the most stable for the bare molecule. The microsolvation study of alanine-(H2O)n (n = 1,2) can be taken as a first step toward understanding bulk properties at a microscopic level.

  2. Human placental glucose dehydrogenase: IEF polymorphism in two Italian populations and enzyme activity in the six common phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Scacchi, R; Corbo, R M; Calzolari, E; Laconi, G; Palmarino, R; Lucarelli, P

    1985-01-01

    Glucose dehydrogenase (hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) has been assayed qualitatively and quantitatively in more than 600 human placentae collected in two Italian populations. The gene frequencies for GDH1, GDH2 and GDH3 were, respectively, 0.66, 0.21 and 0.12 in Continental Italy and 0.65, 0.23 and 0.12 in Sardinia. Among the six common phenotypes there was no difference in catalytic activity.

  3. Novel biohybrids of layered double hydroxide and lactate dehydrogenase enzyme: Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djebbi, Mohamed Amine; Braiek, Mohamed; Hidouri, Slah; Namour, Philippe; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Ben Haj Amara, Abdesslem

    2016-02-01

    The present work introduces new biohybrid materials involving layered double hydroxides (LDH) and biomolecule such as enzyme to produce bioinorganic system. Lactate dehydrogenase (Lac Deh) has been chosen as a model enzyme, being immobilized onto MgAl and ZnAl LDH materials via direct ion-exchange (adsorption) and co-precipitation methods. The immobilization efficiency was largely dependent upon the immobilization methods. A comparative study shows that the co-precipitation method favors the immobilization of great and tunable amount of enzyme. The structural behavior, chemical bonding composition and morphology of the resulting biohybrids were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) study, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. The free and immobilized enzyme activity and kinetic parameters were also reported using UV-Visible spectroscopy. However, the modified LDH materials showed a decrease in crystallinity as compared to the unmodified LDH. The change in activity of the immobilized lactate dehydrogenase was considered to be due, to the reduced accessibility of substrate molecules to the active sites of the enzyme and the partial conformational change of the Lac Deh molecules as a result of the immobilization way. Finally, it was proven that there is a correlation between structure/microstructure and enzyme activity dependent on the immobilization process.

  4. Xanthine Dehydrogenase (XDH) cross-reacting material in mutants of Drosophila melanogaster deficient in XDH activity.

    PubMed

    Browder, L W; Tucker, L; Wilkes, J

    1982-02-01

    Rocket immunoelectrophoresis was used to estimate xanthine dehydrogenase cross-reacting material (XDH-CRM) in strains containing the cin and cin mutant genes, which are deficient in XDH enzymatic activity. CRM levels were determined as percentages of CRM in the Oregon-R wild-type strain. The mutant strains contain 72 and 76% of Oregon-R CRM, respectively. CRM levels in strains containing the XDH-deficient mutant genes lxd and mal are 93 and 105%, respectively. The high levels of CRM in these four mutant strains indicate that the primary effects of the mutant genes are on the function of XDH protein rather than its accumulation.

  5. Effects of Al(III) and nano-Al13 species on malate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaodi; Cai, Ling; Peng, Yu; Li, Huihui; Chen, Rong Fu; Shen, Ren Fang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of different aluminum species on malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity were investigated by monitoring amperometric i-t curves for the oxidation of NADH at low overpotential using a functionalized multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) modified glass carbon electrode (GCE). The results showed that Al(III) and Al(13) can activate the enzymatic activity of MDH, and the activation reaches maximum levels as the Al(III) and Al(13) concentration increase. Our study also found that the effects of Al(III) and Al(13) on the activity of MDH depended on the pH value and aluminum speciation. Electrochemical and circular dichroism spectra methods were applied to study the effects of nano-sized aluminum compounds on biomolecules.

  6. Effects of Al(III) and Nano-Al13 Species on Malate Dehydrogenase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaodi; Cai, Ling; Peng, Yu; Li, Huihui; Chen, Rong Fu; Shen, Ren Fang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of different aluminum species on malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity were investigated by monitoring amperometric i-t curves for the oxidation of NADH at low overpotential using a functionalized multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) modified glass carbon electrode (GCE). The results showed that Al(III) and Al13 can activate the enzymatic activity of MDH, and the activation reaches maximum levels as the Al(III) and Al13 concentration increase. Our study also found that the effects of Al(III) and Al13 on the activity of MDH depended on the pH value and aluminum speciation. Electrochemical and circular dichroism spectra methods were applied to study the effects of nano-sized aluminum compounds on biomolecules. PMID:22163924

  7. NADP+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase activity is impaired in mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that lack aconitase.

    PubMed

    González, A; Rodríguez, L; Olivera, H; Soberón, M

    1985-10-01

    A mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking aconitase did not grow on minimal medium (MM) and had five- to tenfold less NADP+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) activity than the wild-type, although its glutamine synthetase (GS) activity was still inducible. When this mutant was incubated with glutamate as the sole nitrogen source, the 2-oxoglutarate content rose, and the NADP+-dependent GDH activity increased. Furthermore, carbon-limited cultures showed a direct relation between NADP+-dependent GDH activity and the intracellular 2-oxoglutarate content. We propose that the low NADP+-dependent GDH activity found in the mutant was due to the lack of 2-oxoglutarate or some other intermediate of the tricarboxylic acid cycle.

  8. [Effects of Light Near-Infrared Radiation on Rats Assessed by Succinate Dehydrogenase Activity in Lymphocytes on Blood Smears].

    PubMed

    Khunderyakova, N V; Zakharchenko, A V; Zakharchenko, M V; Muller, H; Fedotcheva, I; Kondrashova, M N

    2015-01-01

    Biological effects of light near infrared radiation (850 nm), with modulation acoustic frequency of 101 Hz, was studied. The study was conducted on rats, the effect was recorded by succinate dehydrogenase activity in lymphocytes on the blood smear after administration of the activating dose of adrenaline, which simulates the state of the organism in the early stages of the pathogenic effects (stress). A pronounced regulating effect of infrared radiation on the activity of succinate dehydrogenase in animals activated by adrenaline was shown. Infrared radiation has a normalizing effect reducing the degree of inhibition or activation of the enzyme induced by adrenaline and had no effect on the control animals. Thus, by modulating the activity of succinate dehydrogenase infrared radiation regulates energy production in the mitochondria supported by the most powerful oxidation substrate--succinic acid, which is especially pronounced under stress.

  9. [Activity of liver mitochondrial NAD+-dependent dehydrogenases of the krebs cycle in rats with acetaminophen-induced hepatitis developed under conditions of alimentary protein deficiency].

    PubMed

    Voloshchuk, O N; Kopylchuk, G P

    2016-01-01

    Activity of isocitrate dehydrogenase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, and the NAD(+)/NADН ratio were studied in the liver mitochondrial fraction of rats with toxic hepatitis induced by acetaminophen under conditions of alimentary protein deprivation. Acetaminophen-induced hepatitis was characterized by a decrease of isocitrate dehydrogenase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase activities, while the mitochondrial NAD(+)/NADН ratio remained at the control level. Modeling of acetaminophen-induced hepatitis in rats with alimentary protein caused a more pronounced decrease in the activity of NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenases studied and a 2.2-fold increase of the mitochondrial NAD(+)/NADН ratio. This suggests that alimentary protein deprivation potentiated drug-induced liver damage.

  10. Regulation of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase and hydrogenase in Rhodospirillum rubrum: effects of CO and oxygen on synthesis and activity.

    PubMed Central

    Bonam, D; Lehman, L; Roberts, G P; Ludden, P W

    1989-01-01

    Exposure of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum to carbon monoxide led to increased carbon monoxide dehydrogenase and hydrogenase activities due to de novo protein synthesis of both enzymes. Two-dimensional gels of [35S]methionine-pulse-labeled cells showed that induction of CO dehydrogenase synthesis was rapidly initiated (less than 5 min upon exposure to CO) and was inhibited by oxygen. Both CO dehydrogenase and the CO-induced hydrogenase were inactivated by oxygen in vivo and in vitro. In contrast to CO dehydrogenase, the CO-induced hydrogenase was 95% inactivated by heating at 70 degrees C for 5 min. Unlike other hydrogenases, this CO-induced hydrogenase was inhibited only 60% by a 100% CO gas phase. Images PMID:2498285

  11. Glutathion peroxidase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities in bovine blood and liver.

    PubMed

    Abd Ellah, Mahmoud Rushdi; Niishimori, Kazuhiro; Goryo, Masanobu; Okada, Keiji; Yasuda, Jun

    2004-10-01

    A total of 46 cattle, including 25 as control, 16 with glycogen degeneration and 5 with severe fatty degeneration were studied. Whole blood and liver tissue specimens were used to measure glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) activities. The present study determined the value of these parameters in diagnosing glycogen and fatty degeneration in cattle from the point of the status of antioxidation and lipid peroxidation. The results showed a significant decrease in hepatic GSH-Px activity and a significant increase in hepatic G6PD activity in cases of fatty degeneration. On the other hand, there were no significant changes in erythrocytic and hepatic GSH-Px and G6PD activities in cases of glycogen degeneration. The results indicated lipoperoxidation process in the liver tissues increased in cases of fatty degeneration. Therefore, supplying animals suffering from fatty liver with sufficient quantities of nutrient antioxidants may be valuable when treatment is considered.

  12. Brain regional development of the activity of alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex in the rat.

    PubMed

    Buerstatte, C R; Behar, K L; Novotny, E J; Lai, J C

    2000-12-29

    This study was initiated to test the hypothesis that the development of alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) activity, like that of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, is one of the late developers of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes. The postnatal development of KGDHC in rat brain exhibits four distinct region-specific patterns. The age-dependent increases in olfactory bulb (OB) and hypothalamus (HYP) form one pattern: low in postnatal days (P) 2 and 4, KGDHC activity rose linearly to attain adult level at P30. The increases in mid-brain (MB) and striatum (ST) constitute a second pattern: being <40% of adult level at P2 and P4, KGDHC activity rose steeply between P10 and P17 and attained adult level by P30. The increases in cerebellum (CB), cerebral cortex (CC), and hippocampus (HIP) form a third pattern: being 25-30% of adult level at P2 and P4, KGDHC activity doubled between P10 and P17 and rose to adult level by P30. KGDHC activity development is unique in pons and medulla (PM): being >60% of the adult level at P2, it rose rapidly to adult level by P10. Thus, KGDHC activity develops earlier in phylogenetically older regions (PM) than in phylogenetically younger regions (CB, CC, HIP). Being lowest in activity among all TCA cycle enzymes, KGDHC activity in any region at any age will exert a limit on the maximum TCA cycle flux therein. The results may have functional and pathophysiological implications in control of brain glucose oxidative metabolism, energy metabolism, and neurotransmitter syntheses.

  13. Cytoplasm-to-myonucleus ratios and succinate dehydrogenase activities in adult rat slow and fast muscle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, B. S.; Kasper, C. E.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between myonuclear number, cellular size, succinate dehydrogenase activity, and myosin type was examined in single fiber segments (n = 54; 9 +/- 3 mm long) mechanically dissected from soleus and plantaris muscles of adult rats. One end of each fiber segment was stained for DNA before quantitative photometric analysis of succinate dehydrogenase activity; the other end was double immunolabeled with fast and slow myosin heavy chain monoclonal antibodies. Mean +/- S.D. cytoplasmic volume/myonucleus ratio was higher in fast and slow plantaris fibers (112 +/- 69 vs. 34 +/- 21 x 10(3) microns3) than fast and slow soleus fibers (40 +/- 20 vs. 30 +/- 14 x 10(3) microns3), respectively. Slow fibers always had small volumes/myonucleus, regardless of fiber diameter, succinate dehydrogenase activity, or muscle of origin. In contrast, smaller diameter (< 70 microns) fast soleus and plantaris fibers with high succinate dehydrogenase activity appeared to have low volumes/myonucleus while larger diameter (> 70 microns) fast fibers with low succinate dehydrogenase activity always had large volume/myonucleus. Slow soleus fibers had significantly greater numbers of myonuclei/mm than did either fast soleus or fast plantaris fibers (116 +/- 51 vs. 55 +/- 22 and 44 +/- 23), respectively. These data suggest that the myonuclear domain is more limited in slow than fast fibers and in the fibers with a high, compared to a low, oxidative metabolic capability.

  14. E4F1 controls a transcriptional program essential for pyruvate dehydrogenase activity

    PubMed Central

    Lacroix, Matthieu; Rodier, Geneviève; Houles, Thibault; Delpech, Hélène; Seyran, Berfin; Gayte, Laurie; Casas, Francois; Pessemesse, Laurence; Heuillet, Maud; Bellvert, Floriant; Portais, Jean-Charles; Berthet, Charlene; Brivet, Michele; Boutron, Audrey; Le Cam, Laurent; Sardet, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex (PDC) acts as a central metabolic node that mediates pyruvate oxidation and fuels the tricarboxylic acid cycle to meet energy demand. Here, we reveal another level of regulation of the pyruvate oxidation pathway in mammals implicating the E4 transcription factor 1 (E4F1). E4F1 controls a set of four genes [dihydrolipoamide acetlytransferase (Dlat), dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (Dld), mitochondrial pyruvate carrier 1 (Mpc1), and solute carrier family 25 member 19 (Slc25a19)] involved in pyruvate oxidation and reported to be individually mutated in human metabolic syndromes. E4F1 dysfunction results in 80% decrease of PDH activity and alterations of pyruvate metabolism. Genetic inactivation of murine E4f1 in striated muscles results in viable animals that show low muscle PDH activity, severe endurance defects, and chronic lactic acidemia, recapitulating some clinical symptoms described in PDC-deficient patients. These phenotypes were attenuated by pharmacological stimulation of PDH or by a ketogenic diet, two treatments used for PDH deficiencies. Taken together, these data identify E4F1 as a master regulator of the PDC. PMID:27621446

  15. SIRT3 DEACETYLATES AND INCREASES PYRUVATE DEHYDROGENASE ACTIVITY IN CANCER CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Brett A.; Song, Ha Yong; Zhu, Yueming; Vassilopoulos, Athanassios; Jung, Barbara; Buettner, Garry R.; Gius, David

    2015-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 alpha (PDHE1α or PDHA1) is the first component enzyme of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex (PDC) that transforms pyruvate, via pyruvate decarboxylation, into acetyl-CoA that is subsequently used by both the citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation to generate ATP. As such, PDH links glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in normal as well as cancer cells. Herein we report that SIRT3 interacts with PDHA1 and directs its enzymatic activity via changes in protein acetylation. SIRT3 deacetylates PDHA1 lysine 321 (K321) and a PDHA1 mutant, mimicking a deacetylated lysine (PDHA1K321R) increases in PDH activity, as compared to the K321 acetylation mimic (PDHA1K321Q) or wild-type PDHA1. Finally, PDHA1K321Q exhibited a more transformed in vitro cellular phenotype as compared to PDHA1K321R. These results suggest that the acetylation of PDHA1 provides another layer of enzymatic regulation, in addition to phosphorylation, involving a reversible acetyl-lysine suggesting that the acetylome, as well as the kinome, links glycolysis to respiration. PMID:25152236

  16. SIRT3 deacetylates and increases pyruvate dehydrogenase activity in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ozden, Ozkan; Park, Seong-Hoon; Wagner, Brett A; Yong Song, Ha; Zhu, Yueming; Vassilopoulos, Athanassios; Jung, Barbara; Buettner, Garry R; Gius, David

    2014-11-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α (PDHA1) is the first component enzyme of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex that transforms pyruvate, via pyruvate decarboxylation, into acetyl-CoA that is subsequently used by both the citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation to generate ATP. As such, PDH links glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in normal as well as cancer cells. Herein we report that SIRT3 interacts with PDHA1 and directs its enzymatic activity via changes in protein acetylation. SIRT3 deacetylates PDHA1 lysine 321 (K321), and a PDHA1 mutant mimicking a deacetylated lysine (PDHA1(K321R)) increases PDH activity, compared to the K321 acetylation mimic (PDHA1(K321Q)) or wild-type PDHA1. Finally, PDHA1(K321Q) exhibited a more transformed in vitro cellular phenotype compared to PDHA1(K321R). These results suggest that the acetylation of PDHA1 provides another layer of enzymatic regulation, in addition to phosphorylation, involving a reversible acetyllysine, suggesting that the acetylome, as well as the kinome, links glycolysis to respiration.

  17. E4F1 controls a transcriptional program essential for pyruvate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Matthieu; Rodier, Geneviève; Kirsh, Olivier; Houles, Thibault; Delpech, Hélène; Seyran, Berfin; Gayte, Laurie; Casas, Francois; Pessemesse, Laurence; Heuillet, Maud; Bellvert, Floriant; Portais, Jean-Charles; Berthet, Charlene; Bernex, Florence; Brivet, Michele; Boutron, Audrey; Le Cam, Laurent; Sardet, Claude

    2016-09-27

    The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex (PDC) acts as a central metabolic node that mediates pyruvate oxidation and fuels the tricarboxylic acid cycle to meet energy demand. Here, we reveal another level of regulation of the pyruvate oxidation pathway in mammals implicating the E4 transcription factor 1 (E4F1). E4F1 controls a set of four genes [dihydrolipoamide acetlytransferase (Dlat), dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (Dld), mitochondrial pyruvate carrier 1 (Mpc1), and solute carrier family 25 member 19 (Slc25a19)] involved in pyruvate oxidation and reported to be individually mutated in human metabolic syndromes. E4F1 dysfunction results in 80% decrease of PDH activity and alterations of pyruvate metabolism. Genetic inactivation of murine E4f1 in striated muscles results in viable animals that show low muscle PDH activity, severe endurance defects, and chronic lactic acidemia, recapitulating some clinical symptoms described in PDC-deficient patients. These phenotypes were attenuated by pharmacological stimulation of PDH or by a ketogenic diet, two treatments used for PDH deficiencies. Taken together, these data identify E4F1 as a master regulator of the PDC.

  18. Distribution of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Activities between Chloroplasts and Mitochondria from Leaves of Different Species.

    PubMed Central

    Lernmark, U.; Gardestrom, P.

    1994-01-01

    Protoplasts from barley (Hordeum vulgare), pea (Pisum sativum), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaves were fractionated into chloroplast- and mitochondrion-enriched fractions. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex capacities in mitochondria (mtPDC) and chloroplasts (cpPDC) were measured in appropriate fractions under conditions optimal for each isozyme. The total cellular capacity of PDC was similar in barley and pea but about 50% lower in wheat and spinach. In pea a distribution of 87% mtPDC and 13% cpPDC was found on a cellular basis. In barley, wheat, and spinach the subcellular distribution was the opposite, with about 15% mtPDC and 85% cpPDC. cpPDC activity was constant at about 0.1 nmol cell-1 h-1 in cells from different regions along the developing barley leaf and showed no correlation with developmental patterns of photosynthetic parameters, such as increasing Chl and NADP-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity. Similarly, the capacity of the mitochondrial isoform did not change during barley leaf development and had a developmental pattern similar to that of citrate synthase and fumarase. Differences in subcellular distribution of PDCs in barley and pea are proposed to be due to differences in regulation, not to changes in isozyme proportions during leaf development or to species-specific differences in phosphorylation state of mtPDC after organelle separation. PMID:12232437

  19. Characterization and evolution of an activator-independent methanol dehydrogenase from Cupriavidus necator N-1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tung-Yun; Chen, Chang-Ting; Liu, Jessica Tse-Jin; Bogorad, Igor W; Damoiseaux, Robert; Liao, James C

    2016-06-01

    Methanol utilization by methylotrophic or non-methylotrophic organisms is the first step toward methanol bioconversion to higher carbon-chain chemicals. Methanol oxidation using NAD-dependent methanol dehydrogenase (Mdh) is of particular interest because it uses NAD(+) as the electron carrier. To our knowledge, only a limited number of NAD-dependent Mdhs have been reported. The most studied is the Bacillus methanolicus Mdh, which exhibits low enzyme specificity to methanol and is dependent on an endogenous activator protein (ACT). In this work, we characterized and engineered a group III NAD-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (Mdh2) from Cupriavidus necator N-1 (previously designated as Ralstonia eutropha). This enzyme is the first NAD-dependent Mdh characterized from a Gram-negative, mesophilic, non-methylotrophic organism with a significant activity towards methanol. Interestingly, unlike previously reported Mdhs, Mdh2 does not require activation by known activators such as B. methanolicus ACT and Escherichia coli Nudix hydrolase NudF, or putative native C. necator activators in the Nudix family under mesophilic conditions. This enzyme exhibited higher or comparable activity and affinity toward methanol relative to the B. methanolicus Mdh with or without ACT in a wide range of temperatures. Furthermore, using directed molecular evolution, we engineered a variant (CT4-1) of Mdh2 that showed a 6-fold higher K cat/K m for methanol and 10-fold lower K cat/K m for n-butanol. Thus, CT4-1 represents an NAD-dependent Mdh with much improved catalytic efficiency and specificity toward methanol compared with the existing NAD-dependent Mdhs with or without ACT activation.

  20. Plasma lactic dehydrogenase activities in men during bed rest with exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Juhos, L. T.; Young, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    Peak oxygen uptake and the activity of lactic dehydrogenase (LDH-T) and its five isoenzymes were measured by spectrophotometer in seven men before, during, and after bed rest and exercise training. Exercise training consisted of isometric leg exercises of 250 kcal/hr for a period of one hour per day. It is found that LDH-T was reduced by 0.05 percent in all three regimens by day 10 of bed rest, and that the decrease occurred at different rates. The earliest reduction in LDH-T activity in the no-exercise regimen was associated with a decrease in peak oxygen uptake of 12.3 percent. It is concluded that isometric (aerobic) muscular strength training appear to maintain skeletal muscle integrity better during bed rest than isotonic exercise training. Reduced hydrostatic pressure during bed rest, however, ultimately counteracts the effects of both moderate isometric and isotonic exercise training, and may result in decreased LDH-T activity.

  1. Regulation of insulin release by factors that also modify glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Fahien, L A; MacDonald, M J; Kmiotek, E H; Mertz, R J; Fahien, C M

    1988-09-25

    Leucine and monomethyl succinate initiate insulin release, and glutamine potentiates leucine-induced insulin release. Alanine enhances and malate inhibits leucine plus glutamine-induced insulin release. The insulinotropic effect of leucine is at least in part secondary to its ability to activate glutamate oxidation by glutamate dehydrogenase (Sener, A., Malaisse-Lagae, F., and Malaisse, W. J. (1981) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 78, 5460-5464). The effect of these other amino acids or Krebs cycle intermediates on insulin release also correlates with their effects on glutamate dehydrogenase and their ability to regulate inhibition of this enzyme by alpha-ketoglutarate. For example, glutamine enhances insulin release and islet glutamate dehydrogenase activity only in the presence of leucine. This could be because leucine, especially in the presence of alpha-ketoglutarate, increases the Km of glutamate and converts alpha-ketoglutarate from a noncompetitive to a competitive inhibitor of glutamate. Thus, in the presence of leucine, this enzyme is more responsive to high levels of glutamate and less responsive to inhibition by alpha-ketoglutarate. Malate could decrease and alanine could increase insulin release because malate increases the generation of alpha-ketoglutarate in islet mitochondria via the combined malate dehydrogenase-aspartate aminotransferase reaction, and alanine could decrease the level of alpha-ketoglutarate via the alanine transaminase reaction. Monomethyl succinate alone is as stimulatory of insulin release as leucine alone, and glutamine enhances the action of both. Succinyl coenzyme A, leucine, and GTP are all bound in the same region on glutamate dehydrogenase, where GTP is a potent inhibitor and succinyl coenzyme A and leucine are comparable activators. Thus, the insulinotropic properties of monomethyl succinate could result from it increasing the level of succinyl coenzyme A and decreasing the level of GTP via the succinate thiokinase reaction.

  2. Effect of different mulch materials on the soil dehydrogenase activity (DHA) in an organic pepper crop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Marta M.; Peco, Jesús; Campos, Juan; Villena, Jaime; González, Sara; Moreno, Carmen

    2016-04-01

    The use biodegradable materials (biopolymers of different composition and papers) as an alternative to conventional mulches has increased considerably during the last years mainly for environmental reason. In order to assess the effect of these materials on the soil microbial activity during the season of a pepper crop organically grown in Central Spain, the soil dehydrogenase activity (DHA) was measured in laboratory. The mulch materials tested were: 1) black polyethylene (PE, 15 μm); black biopolymers (15 μm): 2) Mater-Bi® (corn starch based), 3) Sphere 4® (potato starch based), 4) Sphere 6® (potato starch based), 5) Bioflex® (polylactic acid based), 6) Ecovio® (polylactic acid based), 7) Mimgreen® (black paper, 85 g/m2). A randomized complete block design with four replications was adopted. The crop was drip irrigated following the water demand of each treatment. Soil samples (5-10 cm depth) under the different mulches were taken at different dates (at the beginning of the crop cycle and at different dates throughout the crop season). Additionally, samples of bare soil in a manual weeding and in an untreated control were taken. The results obtained show the negative effect of black PE on the DHA activity, mainly as result of the higher temperature reached under the mulch and the reduction in the gas interchange between the soil and the atmosphere. The values corresponding to the biodegradable materials were variable, although highlighting the low DHA activity observed under Bioflex®. In general, the uncovered treatments showed higher values than those reached under mulches, especially in the untreated control. Keywords: mulch, biodegradable, biopolymer, paper, dehydrogenase activity (DHA). Acknowledgements: the research was funded by Project RTA2011-00104-C04-03 from the INIA (Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness).

  3. Concerted modulation of alanine and glutamate metabolism in young Medicago truncatula seedlings under hypoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Limami, Anis M; Glévarec, Gaëlle; Ricoult, Claudie; Cliquet, Jean-Bernard; Planchet, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    The modulation of primary nitrogen metabolism by hypoxic stress was studied in young Medicago truncatula seedlings. Hypoxic seedlings were characterized by the up-regulation of glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GDH1) and mitochondrial alanine aminotransferase (mAlaAT), and down-regulation of glutamine synthetase 1b (GS1b), NADH-glutamate synthase (NADH-GOGAT), glutamate dehydrogenase 3 (GDH3), and isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) gene expression. Hypoxic stress severely inhibited GS activity and stimulated NADH-GOGAT activity. GDH activity was lower in hypoxic seedlings than in the control, however, under either normoxia or hypoxia, the in vivo activity was directed towards glutamate deamination. (15)NH(4) labelling showed for the first time that the adaptive reaction of the plant to hypoxia consisted of a concerted modulation of nitrogen flux through the pathways of both alanine and glutamate synthesis. In hypoxic seedlings, newly synthesized (15)N-alanine increased and accumulated as the major amino acid, asparagine synthesis was inhibited, while (15)N-glutamate was synthesized at a similar rate to that in the control. A discrepancy between the up-regulation of GDH1 expression and the down-regulation of GDH activity by hypoxic stress highlighted for the first time the complex regulation of this enzyme by hypoxia. Higher rates of glycolysis and ethanol fermentation are known to cause the fast depletion of sugar stores and carbon stress. It is proposed that the expression of GDH1 was stimulated by hypoxia-induced carbon stress, while the enzyme protein might be involved during post-hypoxic stress contributing to the regeneration of 2-oxoglutarate via the GDH shunt.

  4. Influence of fermentation conditions on specific activity of the enzymes alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase from yeasts.

    PubMed

    Mauricio, J C; Ortega, J M

    1993-01-01

    The effects of anaerobic, semi-aerobic and short aeration fermentation conditions and the addition of ergosterol and oleic acid to musts on the specific activity of alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ADH and ALDH) from two yeast species, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Torulaspora delbrueckii, were studied. ADH I biosynthesis only occurred during the first few hours of fermentation. ADH II from S. cerevisiae and ALDH-NADP+ from the two yeast species behaved as constitutive enzymes under all fermentation conditions. ADH II from T. delbrueckii was only synthesized in small amounts, and its activity was always lower than in S. cerevisiae, where it was responsible for the termination of alcoholic fermentation during the steady growth phase.

  5. Aldehyde dehydrogenase activity in cancer stem cells from canine mammary carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Michishita, M; Akiyoshi, R; Suemizu, H; Nakagawa, T; Sasaki, N; Takemitsu, H; Arai, T; Takahashi, K

    2012-08-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that diverse solid tumours arise from a small population of cells known as cancer stem cells or tumour-initiating cells. Cancer stem cells in several solid tumours are enriched for aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity. High levels of ALDH activity (ALDH(high)) were detected in four cell lines derived from canine mammary carcinomas. ALDH(high) cells were enriched in a CD44(+)CD24(-) population having self-renewal capacity. Xenotransplantation into immunodeficient mice demonstrated that 1×10(4) ALDH(high) cells were sufficient for tumour formation in all injected mice, whereas 1×10(4) ALDH(low) cells failed to initiate any tumours. ALDH(high)-derived tumours contained both ALDH(+) and ALDH(-) cells, indicating that these cells had cancer stem cell-like properties.

  6. Deletion of hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activates the unfolded protein response pathway and induces skeletal myopathy.

    PubMed

    Lavery, Gareth G; Walker, Elizabeth A; Turan, Nil; Rogoff, Daniela; Ryder, Jeffery W; Shelton, John M; Richardson, James A; Falciani, Francesco; White, Perrin C; Stewart, Paul M; Parker, Keith L; McMillan, Daniel R

    2008-03-28

    Hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (H6PD) is the initial component of a pentose phosphate pathway inside the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that generates NADPH for ER enzymes. In liver H6PD is required for the 11-oxoreductase activity of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, which converts inactive 11-oxo-glucocorticoids to their active 11-hydroxyl counterparts; consequently, H6PD null mice are relatively insensitive to glucocorticoids, exhibiting fasting hypoglycemia, increased insulin sensitivity despite elevated circulating levels of corticosterone, and increased basal and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in muscles normally enriched in type II (fast) fibers, which have increased glycogen content. Here, we show that H6PD null mice develop a severe skeletal myopathy characterized by switching of type II to type I (slow) fibers. Running wheel activity and electrically stimulated force generation in isolated skeletal muscle are both markedly reduced. Affected muscles have normal sarcomeric structure at the electron microscopy level but contain large intrafibrillar membranous vacuoles and abnormal triads indicative of defects in structure and function of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). SR proteins involved in calcium metabolism, including the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA), calreticulin, and calsequestrin, show dysregulated expression. Microarray analysis and real-time PCR demonstrate overexpression of genes encoding proteins in the unfolded protein response pathway. We propose that the absence of H6PD induces a progressive myopathy by altering the SR redox state, thereby impairing protein folding and activating the unfolded protein response pathway. These studies thus define a novel metabolic pathway that links ER stress to skeletal muscle integrity and function.

  7. Potato tuber cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase genes: biochemical properties, activity, and expression during tuber dormancy progression.

    PubMed

    Suttle, Jeffrey C; Huckle, Linda L; Lu, Shunwen; Knauber, Donna C

    2014-03-15

    The enzymatic and biochemical properties of the proteins encoded by five potato cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase (CKX)-like genes functionally expressed in yeast and the effects of tuber dormancy progression on StCKX expression and cytokinin metabolism were examined in lateral buds isolated from field-grown tubers. All five putative StCKX genes encoded proteins with in vitro CKX activity. All five enzymes were maximally active at neutral to slightly alkaline pH with 2,6-dichloro-indophenol as the electron acceptor. In silico analyses indicated that four proteins were likely secreted. Substrate dependence of two of the most active enzymes varied; one exhibiting greater activity with isopentenyl-type cytokinins while the other was maximally active with cis-zeatin as a substrate. [(3)H]-isopentenyl-adenosine was readily metabolized by excised tuber buds to adenine/adenosine demonstrating that CKX was active in planta. There was no change in apparent in planta CKX activity during either natural or chemically forced dormancy progression. Similarly although expression of individual StCKX genes varied modestly during tuber dormancy, there was no clear correlation between StCKX gene expression and tuber dormancy status. Thus although CKX gene expression and enzyme activity are present in potato tuber buds throughout dormancy, they do not appear to play a significant role in the regulation of cytokinin content during tuber dormancy progression.

  8. Succinate dehydrogenase activity in cultured human skin fibroblasts and amniotic fluid cells. A methodological study.

    PubMed

    Hansen, T L; Andersen, H

    1983-01-01

    Through a methodological evaluation, reliable histochemical and biochemical methods for succinate dehydrogenase activity in cultured human skin fibroblasts and amniotic fluid cells were developed. The histochemical method includes a cleaning of the cultured cells in 1 mM malonate in 0.9% NaCl, air-drying and fixation in acetone (5 min at -20 degrees C), coating of cells with CoQ10 (0.2 mg/ml in ether/acetone) and incubation for 1 h at 37 degrees C in 50 mM succinate and 0.5 mg/ml Nitro BT in 200 mM phosphate buffer, pH 7.6 PMS as an intermediate electron carrier was found inferior to exogenous CoQ10. Both types of cells exhibit equal activity. In the biochemical method homogenizing was performed in 50 mM Tris-HCl buffer, pH 7.5, and 200 mM sucrose. The standard incubation was 2.0 mM INT and 10 mM succinate in 10 mM Tris-HCl buffer, pH 7.5 for 1 h at 37 degrees C. The apparent Km values for INT and succinate were estimated to 0.39 mM and 0.13 mM, respectively, while I0.5 for malonate was 0.46 mM. Activity in amniotic fluid cells was 18.1 pkat/mg protein and in human skin fibroblasts 20.3 pkat/mg protein. Specificity of the methods was tested by use of a Chinese hamster fibroblast strain B9 known to be succinate dehydrogenase deficient in addition to various control experiments. Congruent results were obtained with the two methods.

  9. Increased activity of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in purified cell suspensions and single cells from the uterine cervix in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, S. K.; Benedetto, C.; Flatman, A.; Hammond, R. H.; Micheletti, L.; Riley, C.; Riley, P. A.; Spargo, D. J.; Zonca, M.; Slater, T. F.

    1992-01-01

    The activities of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase have been measured in squamous epithelial cells of the uterine cervix from normal patients and cases of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). A biochemical cycling method, which uses only simple equipment and is suited to routine use and to automation, was applied to cells separated by gradient centrifugation. In addition, cells were examined cytochemically, and the intensity of staining in the cytoplasm of single whole cells was measured using computerised microcytospectrophotometry. Twenty per cent of cells in samples from normal patients (n=61) showed staining intensities above an extinction of 0.15 at 540 nm, compared to 71% of cases of CIN 1 (n=14), 91% of cases of CIN 2 (n=11) and 67% of cases of CIN 3 (n=15). The cytochemical data do not allow definitive distinctions to be made between different grades of CIN whereas the biochemical assay applied to cell lysates shows convincing differences between normal samples and cases of CIN. There are no false negatives for CIN 3 (n=14) and CIN 2 (n=10) and 11% false negatives for CIN 1 (n=9) and 14% of false positives for normal cases (n=21). The results of this preliminary study with reference to automation are discussed [corrected]. Images Figure 1 PMID:1637668

  10. Changes in pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity during and following severe insulin-induced hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Cardell, M; Siesjö, B K; Wieloch, T

    1991-01-01

    The effect of severe insulin-induced hypoglycemia on the activity of the pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme complex (PDHC) was investigated in homogenates of frozen rat cerebral cortex during burst suppression EEG, after 10, 30, and 60 min of isoelectric EEG, and after 30 and 180 min and 24 h of recovery following 30 min of hypoglycemic coma. Changes in PDHC activity were correlated to levels of labile organic phosphates and glycolytic metabolites. In cortex from control animals, the rate of [1-14C]pyruvate decarboxylation was 7.1 +/- 1.3 U/mg of protein, or 35% of the total PDHC activity. The activity was unchanged during burst suppression EEG whereas the active fraction increased to 81-87% during hypoglycemic coma. Thirty minutes after glucose-induced recovery, the PDHC activity had decreased by 33% compared to control levels, and remained significantly depressed after 3 h of recovery. This decrease in activity was not due to a decrease in the total PDHC activity. At 24 h of recovery, PDHC activity had returned to control levels. We conclude that the activation of PDHC during hypoglycemic coma is probably the result of an increased PDH phosphatase activity following depolarization and calcium influx, and allosteric inhibition of PDH kinase due to increased ADP/ATP ratio. The depression of PDHC activity following hypoglycemic coma is probably due to an increased phosphorylation of the enzyme, as a consequence of an imbalance between PDH phosphatase and kinase activities. Since some reduction of the ATP/ADP ratio persisted and since the lactate/pyruvate ratio had normalized by 3 h of recovery, the depression of PDHC most likely reflects a decrease in PDH phosphatase activity, probably due to a decrease in intramitochondrial Ca2+.

  11. Loss of succinate dehydrogenase activity results in dependency on pyruvate carboxylation for cellular anabolism.

    PubMed

    Lussey-Lepoutre, Charlotte; Hollinshead, Kate E R; Ludwig, Christian; Menara, Mélanie; Morin, Aurélie; Castro-Vega, Luis-Jaime; Parker, Seth J; Janin, Maxime; Martinelli, Cosimo; Ottolenghi, Chris; Metallo, Christian; Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne-Paule; Favier, Judith; Tennant, Daniel A

    2015-11-02

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is a central metabolic pathway responsible for supplying reducing potential for oxidative phosphorylation and anabolic substrates for cell growth, repair and proliferation. As such it thought to be essential for cell proliferation and tissue homeostasis. However, since the initial report of an inactivating mutation in the TCA cycle enzyme complex, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) in paraganglioma (PGL), it has become clear that some cells and tissues are not only able to survive with a truncated TCA cycle, but that they are also able of supporting proliferative phenotype observed in tumours. Here, we show that loss of SDH activity leads to changes in the metabolism of non-essential amino acids. In particular, we demonstrate that pyruvate carboxylase is essential to re-supply the depleted pool of aspartate in SDH-deficient cells. Our results demonstrate that the loss of SDH reduces the metabolic plasticity of cells, suggesting vulnerabilities that can be targeted therapeutically.

  12. Dual coenzyme activities of high-Km aldehyde dehydrogenase from rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Tsai, C S; Senior, D J

    1990-04-01

    Various kinetic approaches were carried out to investigate kinetic attributes for the dual coenzyme activities of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase from rat liver. The enzyme catalyses NAD(+)- and NADP(+)-dependent oxidations of ethanal by an ordered bi-bi mechanism with NAD(P)+ as the first reactant bound and NAD(P)H as the last product released. The two coenzymes presumably interact with the kinetically identical site. NAD+ forms the dynamic binary complex with the enzyme, while the enzyme-NAD(P)H complex formation is associated with conformation change(s). A stopped-flow burst of NAD(P)H formation, followed by a slower steady-state turnover, suggests that either the deacylation or the release of NAD(P)H is rate limiting. Although NADP+ is reduced by a faster burst rate, NAD+ is slightly favored as the coenzyme by virtue of its marginally faster turnover rate.

  13. Structure of Cryptosporidium IMP dehydrogenase bound to an inhibitor with in vivo antiparasitic activity

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Youngchang; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; ...

    2015-04-21

    Inosine 5´-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is a promising target for the treatment of Cryptosporidium infections. Here, the structure of C. parvum IMPDH (CpIMPDH) in complex with inosine 5´-monophosphate (IMP) and P131, an inhibitor with in vivo anticryptosporidial activity, is reported. P131 contains two aromatic groups, one of which interacts with the hypoxanthine ring of IMP, while the second interacts with the aromatic ring of a tyrosine in the adjacent subunit. In addition, the amine and NO2 moieties bind in hydrated cavities, forming water-mediated hydrogen bonds to the protein. The design of compounds to replace these water molecules is a new strategymore » for the further optimization of C. parvum inhibitors for both antiparasitic and antibacterial applications.« less

  14. FT-IR and Raman spectroscopic and DFT studies of anti-cancer active molecule N-{(meta-ferrocenyl) Benzoyl} - L-Alanine - Glycine ethyl ester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xavier, T. S.; Kenny, Peter T. M.; Manimaran, D.; Joe, I. Hubert

    2015-06-01

    FT-Raman and FT-IR spectra of N-{(meta-ferrocenyl) Benzoyl} - L-alanine - glycine ethyl ester were recorded in solid phase. The optimized molecular geometry, the vibrational wavenumbers, the infrared intensities and the Raman scattering intensities were calculated by using density functional method(B3LYP) with 6-31G(d, p) basis set. Vibrational assignment of the molecule was done by using potential energy distribution analysis. Natural bond orbital analysis, Mulliken charge analysis and HOMO-LUMO energy were used to elucidate the reasons for intra molecular charge transfer. Docking studies were conducted to predict its anticancer activity.

  15. Rotenone decreases intracellular aldehyde dehydrogenase activity: implications for the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, David S; Sullivan, Patti; Cooney, Adele; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Kopin, Irwin J; Sharabi, Yehonatan

    2015-04-01

    Repeated systemic administration of the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone produces a rodent model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Mechanisms of relatively selective rotenone-induced damage to nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons remain incompletely understood. According to the 'catecholaldehyde hypothesis,' buildup of the autotoxic dopamine metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL) contributes to PD pathogenesis. Vesicular uptake blockade increases DOPAL levels, and DOPAL is detoxified mainly by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). We tested whether rotenone interferes with vesicular uptake and intracellular ALDH activity. Endogenous and F-labeled catechols were measured in PC12 cells incubated with rotenone (0-1000 nM, 180 min), without or with F-dopamine (2 μM) to track vesicular uptake and catecholamine metabolism. Rotenone dose dependently increased DOPAL, F-DOPAL, and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethanol (DOPET) levels while decreasing dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) levels and the ratio of dopamine to the sum of its deaminated metabolites. In test tubes, rotenone did not affect conversion of DOPAL to DOPAC by ALDH when NAD(+) was supplied, whereas the direct-acting ALDH inhibitor benomyl markedly increased DOPAL and decreased DOPAC concentrations in the reaction mixtures. We propose that rotenone builds up intracellular DOPAL by decreasing ALDH activity and attenuating vesicular sequestration of cytoplasmic catecholamines. The results provide a novel mechanism for selective rotenone-induced toxicity in dopaminergic neurons. We report that rotenone, a mitochondrial complex I inhibitor that produces an animal model of Parkinson's disease, increases intracellular levels of the toxic dopamine metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-acetaldehyde (DOPAL), via decreased DOPAL metabolism by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and decreased vesicular sequestration of cytoplasmic dopamine by the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT). The results provide a novel

  16. Nutritional status affects branched-chain oxoacid dehydrogenase activity during exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Jackman, M L; Gibala, M J; Hultman, E; Graham, T E

    1997-02-01

    We examined the effect of glycogen availability and branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) supplementation on branched-chain oxoacid dehydrogenase (BCOAD) activity during exercise. Six subjects cycled at approximately 75% of their maximal oxygen uptake to exhaustion on three occasions under different preexercise conditions: 1) low muscle glycogen (LOW), 2) low muscle glycogen plus BCAA supplementation (LOW+BCAA), and 3) high muscle glycogen (CON). The LOW trial was performed first, followed by the other two conditions in random order, and biopsies for all trials were obtained at rest, after 15 min of exercise (15 min), and at the point of exhaustion during the LOW trial (49 min). BCOAD activity was not different among the three conditions at rest; however, at 15 min BCOAD activity was higher (P < or = 0.05) for the LOW (31 +/- 5%) and LOW+BCAA (43 +/- 11%) conditions compared with CON (12 +/- 1%). BCOAD activity at 49 min was not different from respective values at 15 min for any condition. These data indicate that BCOAD is rapidly activated during submaximal exercise under conditions associated with low carbohydrate availability. However, there was no relationship between BCOAD activity and glycogen concentration or net glycogenolysis, which suggests that factors other than glycogen availability are important for BCOAD regulation during exercise in humans.

  17. Reduced activity of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in patients with cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Quattropani, Cristiana; Vogt, Bruno; Odermatt, Alex; Dick, Bernhard; Frey, Brigitte M.; Frey, Felix J.

    2001-01-01

    Enhanced renal sodium retention and potassium loss in patients with cirrhosis is due to activation of mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs). Increased aldosterone concentrations, however, do not entirely explain the activation of MR in cirrhosis. Here, we hypothesize that cortisol activates MRs in patients with cholestasis. We present evidence that access of cortisol to MRs is a result of bile acid−mediated inhibition of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11β-HSD2), an MR-protecting enzyme that converts cortisol to cortisone. Twelve patients with biliary obstruction and high plasma bile acid levels were studied before and after removal of the obstruction. The urinary ratio of (tetrahydrocortisol + 5α-tetrahydrocortisol)/tetrahydrocortisone, a measure of 11β-HSD2 activity, decreased from a median of 1.91 during biliary obstruction to 0.78 at 4 and 8 weeks after removal of the obstruction and normalization of plasma bile acid concentrations. In order to demonstrate that bile acids facilitate access of cortisol to the MR by inhibiting 11β-HSD2, an MR translocation assay was performed in HEK-293 cells transfected with human 11β-HSD2 and tagged MR. Increasing concentrations of chenodeoxycholic acid led to cortisol-induced nuclear translocation of MR. In conclusion, 11β-HSD2 activity is reduced in cholestasis, which results in MR activation by cortisol. PMID:11696574

  18. A mutational analysis of the active site of human type II inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Futer, Olga; Sintchak, Michael D; Caron, Paul R; Nimmesgern, Elmar; DeCenzo, Maureen T; Livingston, David J; Raybuck, Scott A

    2002-01-31

    The oxidation of IMP to XMP is the rate-limiting step in the de novo synthesis of guanine ribonucleotides. This NAD-dependent reaction is catalyzed by the enzyme inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH). Based upon the recent structural determination of IMPDH complexed to oxidized IMP (XMP*) and the potent uncompetitive inhibitor mycophenolic acid (MPA), we have selected active site residues and prepared mutants of human type II IMPDH. The catalytic parameters of these mutants were determined. Mutations G326A, D364A, and the active site nucleophile C331A all abolish enzyme activity to less than 0.1% of wild type. These residues line the IMP binding pocket and are necessary for correct positioning of the substrate, Asp364 serving to anchor the ribose ring of the nucleotide. In the MPA/NAD binding site, significant loss of activity was seen by mutation of any residue of the triad Arg322, Asn303, Asp274 which form a hydrogen bonding network lining one side of this pocket. From a model of NAD bound to the active site consistent with the mutational data, we propose that these resides are important in binding the ribose ring of the nicotinamide substrate. Additionally, mutations in the pair Thr333, Gln441, which lies close to the xanthine ring, cause a significant drop in the catalytic activity of IMPDH. It is proposed that these residues serve to deliver the catalytic water molecule required for hydrolysis of the cysteine-bound XMP* intermediate formed after oxidation by NAD.

  19. Muscular cholinesterase and lactate dehydrogenase activities in deep-sea fish from the NW Mediterranean.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Samuel; Solé, Montserrat

    2014-03-01

    Organisms inhabiting submarine canyons can be potentially exposed to higher inputs of anthropogenic chemicals than their counterparts from the adjacent areas. To find out to what extend this observation applies to a NW Mediterranean canyon (i.e. Blanes canyon) off the Catalan coast, four deep-sea fish species were collected from inside the canyon (BC) and the adjacent open slope (OS). The selected species were: Alepocephalus rostratus, Lepidion lepidion, Coelorinchus mediterraneus and Bathypterois mediterraneus. Prior to the choice of an adequate sentinel species, the natural variation of the selected parameters (biomarkers) in relation to factors such as size, sex, sampling depth and seasonality need to be characterised. In this study, the activities of cholinesterases (ChEs) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) enzymes were determined in the muscle of the four deep-sea fish. Of all ChEs, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was dominant and selected for further monitoring. Overall, AChE activity exhibited a significant relationship with fish size whereas LDH activity was mostly dependent on the sex and gonadal development status, although in a species-dependent manner. The seasonal variability of LDH activity was more marked than for AChE activity, and inside-outside canyon (BC-OS) differences were not consistent in all contrasted fish species, and in fact they were more dependent on biological traits. Thus, they did not suggest a differential stress condition between sites inside and outside the canyon.

  20. The relationship between human skeletal muscle pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase activity and muscle aerobic capacity.

    PubMed

    Love, Lorenzo K; LeBlanc, Paul J; Inglis, J Greig; Bradley, Nicolette S; Choptiany, Jon; Heigenhauser, George J F; Peters, Sandra J

    2011-08-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) is a mitochondrial enzyme responsible for regulating the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA for use in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. PDH is regulated through phosphorylation and inactivation by PDH kinase (PDK) and dephosphorylation and activation by PDH phosphatase (PDP). The effect of endurance training on PDK in humans has been investigated; however, to date no study has examined the effect of endurance training on PDP in humans. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine differences in PDP activity and PDP1 protein content in human skeletal muscle across a range of muscle aerobic capacities. This association is important as higher PDP activity and protein content will allow for increased activation of PDH, and carbohydrate oxidation. The main findings of this study were that 1) PDP activity (r(2) = 0.399, P = 0.001) and PDP1 protein expression (r(2) = 0.153, P = 0.039) were positively correlated with citrate synthase (CS) activity as a marker for muscle aerobic capacity; 2) E1α (r(2) = 0.310, P = 0.002) and PDK2 protein (r(2) = 0.229, P =0.012) are positively correlated with muscle CS activity; and 3) although it is the most abundant isoform, PDP1 protein content only explained ∼ 18% of the variance in PDP activity (r(2) = 0.184, P = 0.033). In addition, PDP1 in combination with E1α explained ∼ 38% of the variance in PDP activity (r(2) = 0.383, P = 0.005), suggesting that there may be alternative regulatory mechanisms of this enzyme other than protein content. These data suggest that with higher muscle aerobic capacity (CS activity) there is a greater capacity for carbohydrate oxidation (E1α), in concert with higher potential for PDH activation (PDP activity).

  1. Glutamate dehydrogenase activator BCH stimulating reductive amination prevents high fat/high fructose diet-induced steatohepatitis and hyperglycemia in C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seung Jin; Choi, Sung-E; Yi, Sang-A; Jung, Jong Gab; Jung, Ik-Rak; Shin, Maureen; Kang, Seok; Oh, Hyunhee; Kim, Hae Jin; Kim, Dae Jung; Kwon, Ji Eun; Choi, Cheol Soo; Lee, Kwan Woo; Kang, Yup

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) induced by high calorie western diet are characterized by enhanced lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis in the liver. Stimulation of reductive amination may shift tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolism for lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis toward glutamate synthesis with increase of NAD+/NADH ratio and thus, ameliorate high calorie diet-induced fatty liver and hyperglycemia. Stimulation of reductive amination through glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) activator 2-aminobicyclo-(2,2,1)-heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH) reduced both de novo lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis but increased the activities of sirtuins and AMP-activated kinase in primary hepatocytes. Long-term BCH treatment improved most metabolic alterations induced by high fat/high fructose (HF/HFr) diet in C57BL/6J mice. BCH prevented HF/HFr-induced fat accumulation and activation of stress/inflammation signals such as phospho-JNK, phospho-PERK, phospho-p38, and phospho-NFκB in liver tissues. Furthermore, BCH treatment reduced the expression levels of inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1β in HF/HFr-fed mouse liver. BCH also reduced liver collagen and plasma levels of alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase. On the other hand, BCH significantly improved fasting hyperglycemia and glucose tolerance in HF/HFr-fed mice. In conclusion, stimulation of reductive amination through GDH activation can be used as a strategy to prevent high calorie western diet-induced NAFLD and T2D. PMID:27874078

  2. Nicotine promotes Streptococcus mutans extracellular polysaccharide synthesis, cell aggregation and overall lactate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, R; Li, M; Gregory, R L

    2015-08-01

    Several epidemiology studies have reported a positive relationship between smoking and dental caries. Nicotine, an alkaloid component of tobacco, has been demonstrated to stimulate biofilm formation and metabolic activity of Streptococcus mutans, one of the most important pathogens of dental caries. The first aim of the present study was to explore the possible mechanisms leading to increased biofilm by nicotine treatment from three aspects, extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) synthesis, glucosyltransferase (Gtf) synthesis and glucan-binding protein (Gbp) synthesis at the mRNA and protein levels. The second aim was to investigate how nicotine affects S. mutans virulence, particular in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity. Confocal laser scanning microscopy results demonstrated that both biofilm bacterial cell numbers and EPS were increased by nicotine. Gtf and GbpA protein expression of S. mutans planktonic cells were upregulated while GbpB protein expression of biofilm cells were downregulated by nicotine. The mRNA expression trends of those genes were mostly consistent with results on protein level but not statistically significant, and gtfD and gbpD of biofilm cells were inhibited. Nicotine was not directly involved in S. mutans LDH activity. However, since it increases the total number of bacterial cells in biofilm, the overall LDH activity of S. mutans biofilm is increased. In conclusion, nicotine stimulates S. mutans planktonic cell Gtf and Gbp expression. This leads to more planktonic cells attaching to the dental biofilm. Increased cell numbers within biofilm results in higher overall LDH activity. This contributes to caries development in smokers.

  3. Alcohol dehydrogenase activity in Lactococcus chungangensis: application in cream cheese to moderate alcohol uptake.

    PubMed

    Konkit, Maytiya; Choi, Woo Jin; Kim, Wonyong

    2015-09-01

    Many human gastrointestinal facultative anaerobic and aerobic bacteria possess alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity and are therefore capable of oxidizing ethanol to acetaldehyde. However, the ADH activity of Lactococcus spp., except Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis, has not been widely determined, though they play an important role as the starter for most cheesemaking technologies. Cheese is a functional food recognized as an aid to digestion. In the current study, the ADH activity of Lactococcus chungangensis CAU 28(T) and 11 reference strains from the genus Lactococcus was determined. Only 5 strains, 3 of dairy origin, L. lactis ssp. lactis KCTC 3769(T), L. lactis ssp. cremoris KCCM 40699(T), and Lactococcus raffinolactis DSM 20443(T), and 2 of nondairy origin, Lactococcus fujiensis NJ317(T) and Lactococcus chungangensis CAU 28(T) KCTC 13185(T), showed ADH activity and possessed the ADH gene. All these strains were capable of making cheese, but the highest level of ADH activity was found in L. chungangensis, with 45.9nmol/min per gram in tryptic soy broth and 65.8nmol/min per gram in cream cheese. The extent that consumption of cheese, following imbibing alcohol, reduced alcohol uptake was observed by following the level of alcohol in the serum of mice. The results show a potential novel benefit of cheese as a dairy functional food.

  4. Recipient pretransplant inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase activity in nonmyeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Meagan J; Risler, Linda J; Phillips, Brian R; Wang, Joanne; Storer, Barry E; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Duan, Haichuan; Raccor, Brianne S; Boeckh, Michael J; McCune, Jeannine S

    2014-10-01

    Mycophenolic acid, the active metabolite of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity. IMPDH is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in de novo synthesis of guanosine nucleotides and catalyzes the oxidation of inosine 5'-monophosphate to xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP). We developed a highly sensitive liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method to quantitate XMP concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNCs) isolated from the recipient pretransplant and used this method to determine IMPDH activity in 86 nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) patients. The incubation procedure and analytical method yielded acceptable within-sample and within-individual variability. Considerable between-individual variability was observed (12.2-fold). Low recipient pretransplant IMPDH activity was associated with increased day +28 donor T cell chimerism, more acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), lower neutrophil nadirs, and more cytomegalovirus reactivation but not with chronic GVHD, relapse, nonrelapse mortality, or overall mortality. We conclude that quantitation of the recipient's pretransplant IMPDH activity in PMNC lysate could provide a useful biomarker to evaluate a recipient's sensitivity to MMF. Further trials should be conducted to confirm our findings and to optimize postgrafting immunosuppression in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients.

  5. PHARMACOKINETIC AND PHARMACODYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF INOSINE MONOPHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE (IMPDH) ACTIVITY IN MMF-TREATED HCT RECIPIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Mager, Donald E.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Storer, Barry E.; Boeckh, Michael J.; Bemer, Meagan J.; Phillips, Brian R.; Risler, Linda J.; McCune, Jeannine S.

    2014-01-01

    A novel approach to personalizing postgrafting immunosuppression in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients is evaluating inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity as a drug-specific biomarker of mycophenolic acid (MPA)-induced immunosuppression. This prospective study evaluated total MPA, unbound MPA, and total MPA glucuronide plasma concentrations and IMPDH activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNC) at five time points after the morning dose of oral mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) on day +21 in 56 nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. Substantial interpatient variability in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics was observed and accurately characterized by the population pharmacokinetic/dynamic model. IMPDH activity decreased with increasing MPA plasma concentration, with maximum inhibition coinciding with maximum MPA concentration in most patients. The overall relationship between MPA concentration and IMPDH activity was described by a direct inhibitory Emax model with an IC50 = 3.23 mg/L total MPA and 57.3 ng/mL unbound MPA. The day +21 IMPDH area under the effect curve (AUEC) was associated with cytomegalovirus reactivation, non-relapse mortality, and overall mortality. In conclusion, a pharmacokinetic/dynamic model was developed that relates plasma MPA concentrations with PMNC IMPDH activity after an MMF dose in HCT recipients. Future studies should validate this model and confirm that day +21 IMPDH AUEC is a predictive biomarker. PMID:24727337

  6. A Sulfurtransferase Is Essential for Activity of Formate Dehydrogenases in Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Thomé, Rémi; Gust, Alexander; Toci, René; Mendel, Ralf; Bittner, Florian; Magalon, Axel; Walburger, Anne

    2012-01-01

    l-Cysteine desulfurases provide sulfur to several metabolic pathways in the form of persulfides on specific cysteine residues of an acceptor protein for the eventual incorporation of sulfur into an end product. IscS is one of the three Escherichia coli l-cysteine desulfurases. It interacts with FdhD, a protein essential for the activity of formate dehydrogenases (FDHs), which are iron/molybdenum/selenium-containing enzymes. Here, we address the role played by this interaction in the activity of FDH-H (FdhF) in E. coli. The interaction of IscS with FdhD results in a sulfur transfer between IscS and FdhD in the form of persulfides. Substitution of the strictly conserved residue Cys-121 of FdhD impairs both sulfur transfer from IscS to FdhD and FdhF activity. Furthermore, inactive FdhF produced in the absence of FdhD contains both metal centers, albeit the molybdenum cofactor is at a reduced level. Finally, FdhF activity is sulfur-dependent, as it shows reversible sensitivity to cyanide treatment. Conclusively, FdhD is a sulfurtransferase between IscS and FdhF and is thereby essential to yield FDH activity. PMID:22194618

  7. Influence of spaceflight on succinate dehydrogenase activity and soma size of rat ventral horn neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishihara, A.; Ohira, Y.; Roy, R. R.; Nagaoka, S.; Sekiguchi, C.; Hinds, W. E.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1996-01-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activities and soma cross-sectional areas (CSA) of neurons in the dorsolateral region of the ventral horn at the L5 segmental level of the spinal cord in the rat were determined after 14 days of spaceflight and after 9 days of recovery on earth. The results were compared to those in age-matched ground-based control rats. Spinal cords were quick-frozen, and the SDH activity and CSA of a sample of neurons with a visible nucleus were determined using a digitizer and a computer-assisted image analysis system. An inverse relationship between CSA and SDH activity of neurons was observed in all groups of rats. No change in mean CSA or mean SDH activity or in the size distribution of neurons was observed following spaceflight or recovery. However, there was a selective decrease in the SDH activity of neurons with soma CSA between 500 and 800 microns2 in the flight rats, and this effect persisted for at least 9 days following return to 1 g. It remains to be determined whether the selected population of motoneurons or the specific motor pools affected by spaceflight may be restricted to specific muscles.

  8. Effect of feeding and of DDT on the activity of hepatic glucose 6- phosphate dehydrogenase in two salmonids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buhler, Donald R.; Benville, P.

    1969-01-01

    The specific activity of liver glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase in yearling rainbow trout remained unchanged when the fish were starved for periods as long as 8 weeks and when starved animals were fed diets of various compositions. Injection of insulin concurrently with refeeding also failed to alter the specific activity of the enzyme in trout. The absence of a dietary or insulin influence on the teleost enzyme system is to be contrasted with studies in mammals in which the activity of hepatic glucose 6-P dehydrogenase was markedly stimulated after refeeding starved animals or injection of insulin.Ingestion of the pesticide DDT by juvenile coho salmon or adult rainbow trout also had no effect on the specific activity of liver glucose 6-P dehydrogenase and DDT failed to inhibit the rainbow trout enzyme in vitro. These results also differ considerably from those found in higher animals.These results suggest that the glucose 6-P dehydrogenase enzyme in teleosts may be under a different type of regulatory control from that found in mammals.

  9. [Dopamine content in blood and activity of alcohol-transforming enzymes in alcoholism].

    PubMed

    Kharchenko, N K

    1997-01-01

    An increase of alcohol dehydrogenase activity is observed in patients with chronic alcoholism at the first stage of the disease under normal indices of activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase, aspartate- and alanine aminotransferase and thymol sample that evidences for the induction of alcohol dehydrogenase synthesis in the liver. At the second stage of alcoholism the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase, aspartate- and alanine aminotransferase, the index of thymol sample increase while activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase decreases that indicates to organic destructive changes in the liver. At the third stage of alcoholism one can observe the decrease in activity of alcohol dehydrogenase, aldehyde dehydrogenase and alanine aminotransferase relative to activity of these enzymes at the second stage, that can evidence for the increase of the possibility of the processes of synthesis of the liver. The correlation of alcohol dehydrogenase activity to that of aldehyde dehydrogenase in the process of formation and development of alcoholism is shifted towards the progressive accumulation of acetaldehyde. Parallel increase of dopamine concentration in blood creates conditions for formation of morphine-like alcaloides--products of condensation of acetaldehide with dopamine.

  10. Purification and characterization of xylitol dehydrogenase with l-arabitol dehydrogenase activity from the newly isolated pentose-fermenting yeast Meyerozyma caribbica 5XY2.

    PubMed

    Sukpipat, Wiphat; Komeda, Hidenobu; Prasertsan, Poonsuk; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2017-01-01

    Meyerozyma caribbica strain 5XY2, which was isolated from an alcohol fermentation starter in Thailand, was found to catabolize l-arabinose as well as d-glucose and d-xylose. The highest production amounts of ethanol from d-glucose, xylitol from d-xylose, and l-arabitol from l-arabinose were 0.45 g/g d-glucose, 0.60 g/g d-xylose, and 0.61 g/g l-arabinose with 21.7 g/L ethanol, 20.2 g/L xylitol, and 30.3 g/l l-arabitol, respectively. The enzyme with l-arabitol dehydrogenase (LAD) activity was purified from the strain and found to exhibit broad specificity to polyols, such as xylitol, d-sorbitol, ribitol, and l-arabitol. Xylitol was the preferred substrate with Km=16.1 mM and kcat/Km=67.0 min(-1)mM(-1), while l-arabitol was also a substrate for the enzyme with Km=31.1 mM and kcat/Km=6.5 min(-1) mM(-1). Therefore, this enzyme from M. caribbica was named xylitol dehydrogenase (McXDH). McXDH had an optimum temperature and pH at 40°C and 9.5, respectively. The McXDH gene included a coding sequence of 1086 bp encoding a putative 362 amino acid protein of 39 kDa with an apparent homopentamer structure. Native McXDH and recombinant McXDH exhibited relative activities toward l-arabitol of approximately 20% that toward xylitol, suggesting the applicability of this enzyme with the functions of XDH and LAD to the development of pentose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  11. Short-term hypothermia activates hepatic mitochondrial sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and thermogenic systems.

    PubMed

    Bobyleva, V; Pazienza, L; Muscatello, U; Kneer, N; Lardy, H

    2000-08-15

    The contribution of the sn-glycerol-3-phosphate (G-3-P) shuttle in the control of energy metabolism is well established. It is also known that its activity may be modulated by hormones involved in thermogenesis, such as thyroid hormones or dehydroepiandrosterone and its metabolites, that act by inducing de novo synthesis of mitochondrial G-3-P dehydrogenase (mGPDH). However, little is known as to the factors that may influence the activity without enzyme induction. In the present study we investigated the possible role of the G-3-P shuttle in the thermogenic response to different hypothermic stresses. It was found that a decrease of body temperature causes the liver rapidly to enhance mGPDH activity and G-3-P-dependent respiration. The enhancement, which does not result from de novo synthesis of enzymes, has the potential of increasing heat production both by decreased ATP synthesis during the oxidation of G-3-P and by activation of the glycolytic pathway.

  12. Dehydrogenase activity in association with poised potential during biohydrogen production in single chamber microbial electrolysis cell.

    PubMed

    Venkata Mohan, S; Lenin Babu, M

    2011-09-01

    Variation in the dehydrogenase (DH) activity and its simultaneous influence on hydrogen (H2) production, substrate degradation rate (SDR) and volatile fatty acid (VFA) generation was investigated with respect to varying poised potential in single chambered membrane-less microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) using anaerobic consortia as biocatalyst. Poised potential showed significant influence on H2 production and DH activity. Maximum H2 production was observed at 1.0V whereas the control system showed least H2 production among the experimental variations studied. DH activity was observed maximum at 0.6V followed by 0.8, 0.9 and 1.0V, suggests the influence of poised potential on the microbial metabolism. Almost complete degradation of substrate was observed in all the experimental conditions studied irrespective of the applied potential. Experimental data was also analysed employing multiple regression analysis and 3D-surface plots to find out the best theoretical poised potential for maximum H2 production and DH activity.

  13. NADH-dependent decavanadate reductase, an alternative activity of NADP-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase protein.

    PubMed

    Rao, A V; Ramasarma, T

    2000-05-01

    The well known NADP-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) obtained from pig heart was found to oxidize NADH with accompanying consumption of oxygen (NADH:O(2)=1:1) in presence of polyvanadate. This activity of the soluble IDH-protein has the following features common with the previously described membrane-enzymes: heat-sensitive, active only with NADH but not NADPH, increased rates in acidic pH, dependence on concentrations of the enzyme, NADH, decavanadate and metavanadate (the two constituents of polyvanadate), and sensitivity to SOD and EDTA. Utilizing NADH as the electron source the IDH protein was able to reduce decavanadate but not metavanadate. This reduced form of vanadyl (V(IV)) was similar in its eight-band electron spin resonance spectrum to vanadyl sulfate but had a 20-fold higher absorbance at its 700 nm peak. This decavanadate reductase activity of the protein was sensitive to heat and was not inhibited by SOD and EDTA. The IDH protein has the additional enzymic activity of NADH-dependent decavanadate reductase and is an example of "one protein--many functions".

  14. Pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and quantity decreases after coronary artery bypass grafting: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Lars W.; Liu, Xiaowen; Peng, Teng J.; Giberson, Tyler A.; Khabbaz, Kamal R.; Donnino, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) is a key gatekeeper enzyme in aerobic metabolism. The main purpose of this study was to determine if PDH activity is affected by major stress in the form of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) which has previously been used as a model of critical illness. Methods We conducted a prospective, observational study of patients undergoing CABG at an urban, tertiary care hospital. We included adult patients undergoing CABG with or without concomitant valve surgery. Measurements of PDH activity and quantity and thiamine were obtained prior to surgery, at the completion of surgery, and 6 hours post-surgery. Results Fourteen patients were enrolled (age: 67 ± 10 years, 21 % female). Study subjects had a mean 41.7 % (SD: 27.7) reduction in PDH activity after surgery and a mean 32.0% (SD: 31.4) reduction 6 hours after surgery (p < 0.001). Eight patients were thiamine deficient (≤ 7 nmol/L) after surgery compared to none prior to surgery (p = 0.002). Thiamine level was a significantly associated with PDH quantity at all time points (p = 0.01). Post-surgery lactate levels were inversely correlated with post-surgery thiamine levels (r = −0.58 and p = 0.04). Conclusion The stress of major surgery causes decreased PDH activity and quantity, and depletion of thiamine levels. PMID:25526377

  15. Two mitochondrial alcohol dehydrogenase activities of Kluyveromyces lactis are differently expressed during respiration and fermentation.

    PubMed

    Saliola, M; Falcone, C

    1995-12-20

    The lactose-utilizing yeast Kluyveromyces lactis is an essentially aerobic organism in which both respiration and fermentation can coexist depending on the sugar concentration. Despite a low fermentative capacity as compared to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, four structural genes encoding alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activities are present in this yeast. Two of these activities, namely K1ADH III and K1ADH IV, are located within mitochondria and their presence is dependent on the carbon sources in the medium. In this paper we demonstrate by transcription and activity analysis that KlADH3 is expressed in the presence of low glucose concentrations and in the presence of respiratory carbon sources other than ethanol. Indeed ethanol acts as a strong repressor of this gene. On the other hand, KlADH4 is induced by the presence of ethanol and not by other respiratory carbon sources. We also demonstrate that the presence of KLADH III and KLADH IV in K. lactis cells is dependent on glucose concentration, glucose uptake and the amount of ethanol produced. As a consequence, these activities can be used as markers for the onset of respiratory and fermentative metabolism in this yeast.

  16. Thermal activation of 'allosteric-like' large-scale motions in a eukaryotic Lactate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Katava, Marina; Maccarini, Marco; Villain, Guillaume; Paciaroni, Alessandro; Sztucki, Michael; Ivanova, Oxana; Madern, Dominique; Sterpone, Fabio

    2017-01-23

    Conformational changes occurring during the enzymatic turnover are essential for the regulation of protein functionality. Individuating the protein regions involved in these changes and the associated mechanical modes is still a challenge at both experimental and theoretical levels. We present here a detailed investigation of the thermal activation of the functional modes and conformational changes in a eukaryotic Lactate Dehydrogenase enzyme (LDH). Neutron Spin Echo spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics simulations were used to uncover the characteristic length- and timescales of the LDH nanoscale motions in the apo state. The modes involving the catalytic loop and the mobile region around the binding site are activated at room temperature, and match the allosteric reorganisation of bacterial LDHs. In a temperature window of about 15 degrees, these modes render the protein flexible enough and capable of reorganising the active site toward reactive configurations. On the other hand an excess of thermal excitation leads to the distortion of the protein matrix with a possible anti-catalytic effect. Thus, the temperature activates eukaryotic LDHs via the same conformational changes observed in the allosteric bacterial LDHs. Our investigation provides an extended molecular picture of eukaryotic LDH's conformational landscape that enriches the static view based on crystallographic studies alone.

  17. First Description of Reduced Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Enzyme Activity Following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage (SAH)

    PubMed Central

    Lilla, Nadine; Füllgraf, Hannah; Stetter, Christian; Köhler, Stefan; Ernestus, Ralf-Ingo; Westermaier, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Object: Several previous studies reported metabolic derangements and an accumulation of metabolic products in the early phase of experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), which may contribute to secondary brain damage. This may be a result of deranged oxygen utilization due to enzymatic dysfunction in aerobic glucose metabolism. This study was performed to investigate, if pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme (PDH) is affected in its activity giving further hints for a derangement of oxidative metabolism. Methods: Eighteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to one of two experimental groups (n = 9): (1) SAH induced by the endovascular filament model and (2) sham-operated controls. Mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), intracranial pressure (ICP), and local cerebral blood flow (LCBF; laser-Doppler flowmetry) were continuously monitored from 30 min before until 3 h after SAH. Thereafter, the animals were sacrificed and PDH activity was measured by ELISA. Results: PDH activity was significantly reduced in animals subjected to SAH compared to controls. Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrate for the first time a reduction of PDH activity following SAH, independent of supply of substrates and may be an independent factor contributing to a derangement of oxidative metabolism, failure of oxygen utilization, and secondary brain damage. PMID:28261039

  18. Thermal activation of ‘allosteric-like’ large-scale motions in a eukaryotic Lactate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Katava, Marina; Maccarini, Marco; Villain, Guillaume; Paciaroni, Alessandro; Sztucki, Michael; Ivanova, Oxana; Madern, Dominique; Sterpone, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Conformational changes occurring during the enzymatic turnover are essential for the regulation of protein functionality. Individuating the protein regions involved in these changes and the associated mechanical modes is still a challenge at both experimental and theoretical levels. We present here a detailed investigation of the thermal activation of the functional modes and conformational changes in a eukaryotic Lactate Dehydrogenase enzyme (LDH). Neutron Spin Echo spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics simulations were used to uncover the characteristic length- and timescales of the LDH nanoscale motions in the apo state. The modes involving the catalytic loop and the mobile region around the binding site are activated at room temperature, and match the allosteric reorganisation of bacterial LDHs. In a temperature window of about 15 degrees, these modes render the protein flexible enough and capable of reorganising the active site toward reactive configurations. On the other hand an excess of thermal excitation leads to the distortion of the protein matrix with a possible anti-catalytic effect. Thus, the temperature activates eukaryotic LDHs via the same conformational changes observed in the allosteric bacterial LDHs. Our investigation provides an extended molecular picture of eukaryotic LDH’s conformational landscape that enriches the static view based on crystallographic studies alone. PMID:28112231

  19. Reduced 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in patients with the nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vogt, B; Dick, B; N'Gankam, V; Frey, F J; Frey, B M

    1999-02-01

    Patients with the nephrotic syndrome (NS) exhibit abnormal renal sodium retention which cannot completely explained by a secondary hyperaldosteronism due to reduced renal perfusion. As an alternative mechanism to explain this phenomenon we postulate a cortisol-mediated mineralocorticoid effect as a consequence of a reduced activity of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11beta-HSD). A down-regulation of 11beta-HSD, i.e. of the shuttle of active to inactive glucocorticosteroids, has been shown to cause mineralocorticoid effects. Therefore we investigated the activity of 11beta-HSD by measuring the urinary ratio of (tetrahydrocortisol + 5alpha-tetrahydrocortisol)/tetrahydrocortisone [(THF+5alpha-THF)/THE] by gas-chromatography in 29 NS patients with biopsy-proven glomerulonephritis and 29 healthy control subjects. The ratio of (THF+5alpha-THF)/THE was higher in NS patients (median 1.49, range 0.45-4.07) than in the control subjects (0.98, 0.60-1.36; p<0.01). This ratio was increased as a consequence of a decreased urinary excretion rate of the cortisone metabolite, THE. The present data indicate that a reduced activity of 11beta-HSD is a new mechanism contributing to the exaggerated sodium retention in patients with the NS.

  20. Dengue Virus NS1 Protein Modulates Cellular Energy Metabolism by Increasing Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Allonso, Diego; Andrade, Iamara S.; Conde, Jonas N.; Coelho, Diego R.; Rocha, Daniele C. P.; da Silva, Manuela L.; Ventura, Gustavo T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue is one of the main public health concerns worldwide. Recent estimates indicate that over 390 million people are infected annually with the dengue virus (DENV), resulting in thousands of deaths. Among the DENV nonstructural proteins, the NS1 protein is the only one whose function during replication is still unknown. NS1 is a 46- to 55-kDa glycoprotein commonly found as both a membrane-associated homodimer and a soluble hexameric barrel-shaped lipoprotein. Despite its role in the pathogenic process, NS1 is essential for proper RNA accumulation and virus production. In the present study, we identified that glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) interacts with intracellular NS1. Molecular docking revealed that this interaction occurs through the hydrophobic protrusion of NS1 and the hydrophobic residues located at the opposite side of the catalytic site. Moreover, addition of purified recombinant NS1 enhanced the glycolytic activity of GAPDH in vitro. Interestingly, we observed that DENV infection promoted the relocalization of GAPDH to the perinuclear region, where NS1 is commonly found. Both DENV infection and expression of NS1 itself resulted in increased GAPDH activity. Our findings indicate that the NS1 protein acts to increase glycolytic flux and, consequently, energy production, which is consistent with the recent finding that DENV induces and requires glycolysis for proper replication. This is the first report to propose that NS1 is an important modulator of cellular energy metabolism. The data presented here provide new insights that may be useful for further drug design and the development of alternative antiviral therapies against DENV. IMPORTANCE Dengue represents a serious public health problem worldwide and is caused by infection with dengue virus (DENV). Estimates indicate that half of the global population is at risk of infection, with almost 400 million cases occurring per year. The NS1 glycoprotein is found in both the

  1. Effects of low molecular-weight organic acids and dehydrogenase activity in rhizosphere sediments of mangrove plants on phytoremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Fang, Ling; Lin, Li; Luan, Tiangang; Tam, Nora F Y

    2014-03-01

    This work evaluated the roles of the low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs) from root exudates and the dehydrogenase activity in the rhizosphere sediments of three mangrove plant species on the removal of mixed PAHs. The results showed that the concentrations of LMWOAs and dehydrogenase activity changed species-specifically with the levels of PAH contamination. In all plant species, the concentration of citric acid was the highest, followed by succinic acid. For these acids, succinic acid was positively related to the removal of all the PAHs except Chr. Positive correlations were also found between the removal percentages of 4-and 5-ring PAHs and all LMWOAs, except citric acid. LMWOAs enhanced dehydrogenase activity, which positively related to PAH removal percentages. These findings suggested that LMWOAs and dehydrogenase activity promoted the removal of PAHs. Among three mangrove plants, Bruguiera gymnorrhiza, the plant with the highest root biomass, dehydrogenase activity and concentrations of LMWOAs, was most efficient in removing PAHs.

  2. Exploring the evolutionary route of the acquisition of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase activity by plant ALDH10 enzymes: implications for the synthesis of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Plant ALDH10 enzymes are aminoaldehyde dehydrogenases (AMADHs) that oxidize different ω-amino or trimethylammonium aldehydes, but only some of them have betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) activity and produce the osmoprotectant glycine betaine (GB). The latter enzymes possess alanine or cysteine at position 441 (numbering of the spinach enzyme, SoBADH), while those ALDH10s that cannot oxidize betaine aldehyde (BAL) have isoleucine at this position. Only the plants that contain A441- or C441-type ALDH10 isoenzymes accumulate GB in response to osmotic stress. In this work we explored the evolutionary history of the acquisition of BAL specificity by plant ALDH10s. Results We performed extensive phylogenetic analyses and constructed and characterized, kinetically and structurally, four SoBADH variants that simulate the parsimonious intermediates in the evolutionary pathway from I441-type to A441- or C441-type enzymes. All mutants had a correct folding, average thermal stabilities and similar activity with aminopropionaldehyde, but whereas A441S and A441T exhibited significant activity with BAL, A441V and A441F did not. The kinetics of the mutants were consistent with their predicted structural features obtained by modeling, and confirmed the importance of position 441 for BAL specificity. The acquisition of BADH activity could have happened through any of these intermediates without detriment of the original function or protein stability. Phylogenetic studies showed that this event occurred independently several times during angiosperms evolution when an ALDH10 gene duplicate changed the critical Ile residue for Ala or Cys in two consecutive single mutations. ALDH10 isoenzymes frequently group in two clades within a plant family: one includes peroxisomal I441-type, the other peroxisomal and non-peroxisomal I441-, A441- or C441-type. Interestingly, high GB-accumulators plants have non-peroxisomal A441- or C441-type isoenzymes, while low-GB accumulators

  3. Synthesis, structural characterization, antiradical and antidiabetic activities of copper(II) and zinc(II) Schiff base complexes derived from salicylaldehyde and beta-alanine.

    PubMed

    Vanco, Ján; Marek, Jaromír; Trávnícek, Zdenek; Racanská, Eva; Muselík, Jan; Svajlenová, Ol'ga

    2008-04-01

    A series of copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes involving a tridentate O,N,O'-donor Schiff base derived from salicylaldehyde and beta-alanine {i.e. N-salicylidene-beta-alanine(2-), (L)}, having the composition [Cu(2)(L)(2)(H(2)O)].H(2)O (1), [Cu(L)(H(2)O)](n) (2), and [Zn(L)(H(2)O)](n) (3), have been prepared and characterized by elemental analyses, UV-visible (UV-VIS), FT-IR and ESI-MS spectra, and thermal analyses. Complexes 1 and 2 have been investigated by single crystal X-ray analysis and also by temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility measurements (294-80K). All prepared complexes have been evaluated by the antiperoxynitrite activity assay and alloxan-induced diabetes model. The significant antioxidant and antidiabetic activities have been found in the case of both copper(II) complexes 1 and 2. In spite of first two complexes, the zinc(II) complex 3, as well as the potassium salt of the ligand (KHL) showed only insignificant protective effect against the tyrosine nitration in vitro.

  4. Enzyme-dependent fluorescence recovery of NADH after photobleaching to assess dehydrogenase activity of isolated perfused hearts

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Angel; Kuzmiak-Glancy, Sarah; Jaimes, Rafael; Kay, Matthew W.

    2017-01-01

    Reduction of NAD+ by dehydrogenase enzymes to form NADH is a key component of cellular metabolism. In cellular preparations and isolated mitochondria suspensions, enzyme-dependent fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (ED-FRAP) of NADH has been shown to be an effective approach for measuring the rate of NADH production to assess dehydrogenase enzyme activity. Our objective was to demonstrate how dehydrogenase activity could be assessed within the myocardium of perfused hearts using NADH ED-FRAP. This was accomplished using a combination of high intensity UV pulses to photobleach epicardial NADH. Replenishment of epicardial NADH fluorescence was then imaged using low intensity UV illumination. NADH ED-FRAP parameters were optimized to deliver 23.8 mJ of photobleaching light energy at a pulse width of 6 msec and a duty cycle of 50%. These parameters provided repeatable measurements of NADH production rate during multiple metabolic perturbations, including changes in perfusate temperature, electromechanical uncoupling, and acute ischemia/reperfusion injury. NADH production rate was significantly higher in every perturbation where the energy demand was either higher or uncompromised. We also found that NADH production rate remained significantly impaired after 10 min of reperfusion after global ischemia. Overall, our results indicate that myocardial NADH ED-FRAP is a useful optical non-destructive approach for assessing dehydrogenase activity. PMID:28361886

  5. Regulation of Human Mitochondrial Aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ALDH-2) Activity by Electrophiles in Vitro*

    PubMed Central

    Oelze, Matthias; Knorr, Maike; Schell, Richard; Kamuf, Jens; Pautz, Andrea; Art, Julia; Wenzel, Philip; Münzel, Thomas; Kleinert, Hartmut; Daiber, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Recently, mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-2) was reported to reduce ischemic damage in an experimental myocardial infarction model. ALDH-2 activity is redox-sensitive. Therefore, we here compared effects of various electrophiles (organic nitrates, reactive fatty acid metabolites, or oxidants) on the activity of ALDH-2 with special emphasis on organic nitrate-induced inactivation of the enzyme, the biochemical correlate of nitrate tolerance. Recombinant human ALDH-2 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli; activity was determined with an HPLC-based assay, and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species formation was determined by chemiluminescence, fluorescence, protein tyrosine nitration, and diaminonaphthalene nitrosation. The organic nitrate glyceryl trinitrate caused a severe concentration-dependent decrease in enzyme activity, whereas incubation with pentaerythritol tetranitrate had only minor effects. 4-Hydroxynonenal, an oxidized prostaglandin J2, and 9- or 10-nitrooleate caused a significant inhibition of ALDH-2 activity, which was improved in the presence of Mg2+ and Ca2+. Hydrogen peroxide and NO generation caused only minor inhibition of ALDH-2 activity, whereas peroxynitrite generation or bolus additions lead to severe impairment of the enzymatic activity, which was prevented by the thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase (Trx/TrxR) system. In the presence of glyceryl trinitrate and to a lesser extent pentaerythritol tetranitrate, ALDH-2 may be switched to a peroxynitrite synthase. Electrophiles of different nature potently regulate the enzymatic activity of ALDH-2 and thereby may influence the resistance to ischemic damage in response to myocardial infarction. The Trx/TrxR system may play an important role in this process because it not only prevents inhibition of ALDH-2 but is also inhibited by the ALDH-2 substrate 4-hydroxynonenal. PMID:21252222

  6. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 activation in heart failure restores mitochondrial function and improves ventricular function and remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Katia M.S.; Campos, Juliane C.; Bechara, Luiz R.G.; Queliconi, Bruno; Lima, Vanessa M.; Disatnik, Marie-Helene; Magno, Paulo; Chen, Che-Hong; Brum, Patricia C.; Kowaltowski, Alicia J.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Ferreira, Julio C.B.

    2014-01-01

    Aims We previously demonstrated that pharmacological activation of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) protects the heart against acute ischaemia/reperfusion injury. Here, we determined the benefits of chronic activation of ALDH2 on the progression of heart failure (HF) using a post-myocardial infarction model. Methods and results We showed that a 6-week treatment of myocardial infarction-induced HF rats with a selective ALDH2 activator (Alda-1), starting 4 weeks after myocardial infarction at a time when ventricular remodelling and cardiac dysfunction were present, improved cardiomyocyte shortening, cardiac function, left ventricular compliance and diastolic function under basal conditions, and after isoproterenol stimulation. Importantly, sustained Alda-1 treatment showed no toxicity and promoted a cardiac anti-remodelling effect by suppressing myocardial hypertrophy and fibrosis. Moreover, accumulation of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE)-protein adducts and protein carbonyls seen in HF was not observed in Alda-1-treated rats, suggesting that increasing the activity of ALDH2 contributes to the reduction of aldehydic load in failing hearts. ALDH2 activation was associated with improved mitochondrial function, including elevated mitochondrial respiratory control ratios and reduced H2O2 release. Importantly, selective ALDH2 activation decreased mitochondrial Ca2+-induced permeability transition and cytochrome c release in failing hearts. Further supporting a mitochondrial mechanism for ALDH2, Alda-1 treatment preserved mitochondrial function upon in vitro aldehydic load. Conclusions Selective activation of mitochondrial ALDH2 is sufficient to improve the HF outcome by reducing the toxic effects of aldehydic overload on mitochondrial bioenergetics and reactive oxygen species generation, suggesting that ALDH2 activators, such as Alda-1, have a potential therapeutic value for treating HF patients. PMID:24817685

  7. Pyruvate dehydrogenase activity in the rat cerebral cortex following cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Cardell, M; Koide, T; Wieloch, T

    1989-06-01

    The effect of cerebral ischemia on the activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) enzyme complex (PDHC) was investigated in homogenates of frozen rat cerebral cortex following 15 min of bilateral common carotid occlusion ischemia and following 15 min, 60 min, and 6 h of recirculation after 15 min of ischemia. In frozen cortical tissue from the same animals, the levels of labile phosphate compounds, glucose, glycogen, lactate, and pyruvate was determined. In cortex from control animals, the rate of [1(-14)C]pyruvate decarboxylation was 9.6 +/- 0.5 nmol CO2/(min-mg protein) or 40% of the total PDHC activity. This fraction increased to 89% at the end of 15 min of ischemia. At 15 min of recirculation following 15 min of ischemia, the PDHC activity decreased to 50% of control levels and was depressed for up to 6 h post ischemia. This decrease in activity was not due to a decrease in total PDHC activity. Apart from a reduction in ATP levels, the acute changes in the levels of energy metabolites were essentially normalized at 6 h of recovery. Dichloroacetate (DCA), an inhibitor of PDH kinase, given to rats at 250 mg/kg i.p. four times over 2 h, significantly decreased blood glucose levels from 7.4 +/- 0.6 to 5.1 +/- 0.3 mmol/L and fully activated PDHC. In animals in which the plasma glucose level was maintained at control levels of 8.3 +/- 0.5 mumol/g by intravenous infusion of glucose, the active portion of PDHC increased to 95 +/- 4%. In contrast, the depressed PDHC activity at 15 min following ischemia was not affected by the DCA treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Aldehyde dehydrogenase activity in Lactococcus chungangensis: Application in cream cheese to reduce aldehyde in alcohol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Konkit, Maytiya; Choi, Woo Jin; Kim, Wonyong

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that the metabolic capability of colonic microflora may be at least as high as that of the liver or higher than that of the whole human body. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) is an enzyme produced by these bacteria that can metabolize acetaldehyde, produce from ethanol to acetate. Lactococcus species, which is commonly used as a starter in dairy products, was recently found to possess the ALDH gene, and the activity of this enzyme was determined. In this study, the ALDH activity of Lactococcus chungangensis CAU 28(T) and 11 other type strains in the genus Lactococcus was studied. Only 5 species, 3 of dairy origin (Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis KCTC 3769(T), Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris KCCM 40699(T), and Lactococcus raffinolactis DSM 20443(T)) and 2 of nondairy origin (Lactococcus fujiensis NJ317(T) and L. chungangensis CAU 28(T)), showed ALDH activity and possessed a gene encoding ALDH. All of these strains were capable of making cream cheese. Among the strains, L. chungangensis produced cream cheese that contained the highest level of ALDH and was found to reduce the level of acetaldehyde in the serum of mice. These results predict a promising role for L. chungangensis CAU28(T) to be used in cheese that can be developed as functional food.

  9. E4F1-mediated control of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity is essential for skin homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Goguet-Rubio, Perrine; Seyran, Berfin; Gayte, Laurie; Bernex, Florence; Sutter, Anne; Delpech, Hélène; Linares, Laetitia Karine; Riscal, Romain; Repond, Cendrine; Rodier, Geneviève; Kirsh, Olivier; Touhami, Jawida; Noel, Jean; Vincent, Charles; Pirot, Nelly; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Herault, Yann; Sitbon, Marc; Pellerin, Luc; Sardet, Claude; Lacroix, Matthieu; Le Cam, Laurent

    2016-09-27

    The multifunctional protein E4 transcription factor 1 (E4F1) is an essential regulator of epidermal stem cell (ESC) maintenance. Here, we found that E4F1 transcriptionally regulates a metabolic program involved in pyruvate metabolism that is required to maintain skin homeostasis. E4F1 deficiency in basal keratinocytes resulted in deregulated expression of dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase (Dlat), a gene encoding the E2 subunit of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex. Accordingly, E4f1 knock-out (KO) keratinocytes exhibited impaired PDH activity and a redirection of the glycolytic flux toward lactate production. The metabolic reprogramming of E4f1 KO keratinocytes associated with remodeling of their microenvironment and alterations of the basement membrane, led to ESC mislocalization and exhaustion of the ESC pool. ShRNA-mediated depletion of Dlat in primary keratinocytes recapitulated defects observed upon E4f1 inactivation, including increased lactate secretion, enhanced activity of extracellular matrix remodeling enzymes, and impaired clonogenic potential. Altogether, our data reveal a central role for Dlat in the metabolic program regulated by E4F1 in basal keratinocytes and illustrate the importance of PDH activity in skin homeostasis.

  10. Immunocapture and microplate-based activity measurement of mammalian pyruvate dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    Lib, Margarita; Rodriguez-Mari, Adriana; Marusich, Michael F; Capaldi, Roderick A

    2003-03-01

    Altered pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) functioning occurs in primary PDH deficiencies and in diabetes, starvation, sepsis, and possibly Alzheimer's disease. Currently, the activity of the enzyme complex is difficult to measure in a rapid high-throughput format. Here we describe the use of a monoclonal antibody raised against the E2 subunit to immunocapture the intact PDH complex still active when bound to 96-well plates. Enzyme turnover was measured by following NADH production spectrophotometrically or by a fluorescence assay on mitochondrial protein preparations in the range of 0.4 to 5.0 micro g per well. Activity is sensitive to known PDH inhibitors and remains regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation after immunopurification because of the presence of bound PDH kinase(s) and phosphatase(s). It is shown that the immunocapture assay can be used to detect PDH deficiency in cell extracts of cultured fibroblasts from patients, making it useful in patient screens, as well as in the high-throughput format for discovery of new modulators of PDH functioning.

  11. Aldosterone impairs vascular reactivity by decreasing glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Jane A.; Dam, Aamir; Maron, Bradley A.; Scribner, Anne W.; Liao, Ronglih; Handy, Diane E.; Stanton, Robert C.; Pitt, Bertram; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Hyperaldosteronism is associated with impaired vascular reactivity; however, the mechanism by which aldosterone promotes endothelial dysfunction remains unknown. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6pd), the principal source of Nadph, modulates vascular function by limiting oxidant stress to preserve bioavailable nitric oxide (NO•). In these studies, we show that aldosterone (10−9-10−7 mol/l) decreases endothelial G6pd expression and activity in vitro resulting in increased oxidant stress and decreased cGMP levels similar to what is observed in G6pd-deficient cells. Aldosterone decreases G6pd expression by protein kinase A activation to increase expression of Crem, which interferes with Creb binding to the G6pd promoter. In vivo, infusion of aldosterone decreases vascular G6pd expression and impairs vascular reactivity. These effects are abrogated by spironolactone or vascular gene transfer of G6pd. These studies demonstrate that aldosterone induces a G6pd-deficient phenotype to impair endothelial function; aldosterone antagonism or gene transfer of G6pd improves vascular reactivity by restoring G6pd activity. PMID:17273168

  12. Conformational and activity changes during guanidine denaturation of D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Xie, G F; Tsou, C L

    1987-01-05

    Changes in intrinsic protein fluorescence of lobster muscle D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate: NAD+ oxidoreductase (phosphorylating), EC 1.2.1.12) have been compared with inactivation of the enzyme during denaturation in guanidine solutions. The holoenzyme is completely inactivated at guanidine concentrations less than 0.5 M and this is accompanied by a red shift of the emission maximum at 335 nm and a marked decrease in intensity of the intrinsic fluorescence. At 0.5 M guanidine, the inactivation is a slow process, with a first-order rate constant of 2.4 X 10(-3) s-1. A further red shift in the emission maximum and a decrease in intensity occur at guanidine concentrations higher than 1.5 M. The emission peak at 410 nm of the fluorescent NAD derivative introduced at the active site of this enzyme (Tsou, C.L. et al. (1983) Biochem. Soc. Trans. 11, 425-429) shows both a red shift and a marked decrease in intensity at the same guanidine concentration required to bring about the inactivation and the initial changes in the intrinsic fluorescence of the holoenzyme. It appears that treatment by low guanidine concentrations leads to both complete inactivation and perturbation of the active site conformation and that a tryptophan residue is situated at or near the active site.

  13. E4F1-mediated control of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity is essential for skin homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Goguet-Rubio, Perrine; Seyran, Berfin; Gayte, Laurie; Sutter, Anne; Delpech, Hélène; Linares, Laetitia Karine; Riscal, Romain; Repond, Cendrine; Rodier, Geneviève; Touhami, Jawida; Noel, Jean; Vincent, Charles; Pirot, Nelly; Herault, Yann; Pellerin, Luc; Sardet, Claude; Lacroix, Matthieu; Le Cam, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    The multifunctional protein E4 transcription factor 1 (E4F1) is an essential regulator of epidermal stem cell (ESC) maintenance. Here, we found that E4F1 transcriptionally regulates a metabolic program involved in pyruvate metabolism that is required to maintain skin homeostasis. E4F1 deficiency in basal keratinocytes resulted in deregulated expression of dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase (Dlat), a gene encoding the E2 subunit of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex. Accordingly, E4f1 knock-out (KO) keratinocytes exhibited impaired PDH activity and a redirection of the glycolytic flux toward lactate production. The metabolic reprogramming of E4f1 KO keratinocytes associated with remodeling of their microenvironment and alterations of the basement membrane, led to ESC mislocalization and exhaustion of the ESC pool. ShRNA-mediated depletion of Dlat in primary keratinocytes recapitulated defects observed upon E4f1 inactivation, including increased lactate secretion, enhanced activity of extracellular matrix remodeling enzymes, and impaired clonogenic potential. Altogether, our data reveal a central role for Dlat in the metabolic program regulated by E4F1 in basal keratinocytes and illustrate the importance of PDH activity in skin homeostasis. PMID:27621431

  14. Myricetin is a novel inhibitor of human inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase with anti-leukemia activity.

    PubMed

    Pan, Huiling; Hu, Qian; Wang, Jingyuan; Liu, Zehui; Wu, Dang; Lu, Weiqiang; Huang, Jin

    2016-09-02

    Human inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (hIMPDH) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo biosynthetic pathway of purine nucleotides, playing crucial roles in cellular proliferation, differentiation, and transformation. Dysregulation of hIMPDH expression and activity have been found in a variety of human cancers including leukemia. In this study, we found that myricetin, a naturally occurring phytochemical existed in berries, wine and tea, was a novel inhibitor of human type 1 and type 2 IMPDH (hIMPDH1/2) with IC50 values of 6.98 ± 0.22 μM and 4.10 ± 0.14 μM, respectively. Enzyme kinetic analysis using Lineweaver-Burk plot revealed that myricetin is a mix-type inhibitor for hIMPDH1/2. Differential scanning fluorimetry and molecular docking simulation data demonstrate that myricetin is capable of binding with hIMPDH1/2. Myricetin treatment exerts potent anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on K562 human leukemia cells in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, cytotoxicity of myricetin on K562 cells were markedly attenuated by exogenous addition of guanosine, a salvage pathway of maintaining intracellular pool of guanine nucleotides. Taking together, these results indicate that natural product myricetin exhibits potent anti-leukemia activity by interfering with purine nucleotides biosynthetic pathway through the suppression of hIMPDH1/2 catalytic activity.

  15. Probing the promiscuous active site of myo-inositol dehydrogenase using synthetic substrates, homology modeling, and active site modification.

    PubMed

    Daniellou, Richard; Zheng, Hongyan; Langill, David M; Sanders, David A R; Palmer, David R J

    2007-06-26

    The active site of myo-inositol dehydrogenase (IDH, EC 1.1.1.18) from Bacillus subtilis recognizes a variety of mono- and disaccharides, as well as 1l-4-O-substituted inositol derivatives. It catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of the axial alcohol of these substrates with comparable kinetic constants. We have found that 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol does not act as a substrate for IDH, in contrast to structurally similar compounds such as those bearing substituted benzyl substituents in the same position. X-ray crystallographic analysis of 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol and 4-O-(2-naphthyl)methyl-myo-inositol, which is a substrate for IDH, shows a distinct difference in the preferred conformation of the aryl substituent. Conformational analysis of known substrates of IDH suggests that this conformational difference may account for the difference in reactivity of 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol in the presence of IDH. A sequence alignment of IDH with the homologous glucose-fructose oxidoreductase allowed the construction of an homology model of inositol dehydrogenase, to which NADH and 4-O-benzyl-scyllo-inosose were docked and the active site energy minimized. The active site model is consistent with all experimental results and suggests that a conserved tyrosine-glycine-tyrosine motif forms the hydrophobic pocket adjoining the site of inositol recognition. Y233F and Y235F retain activity, while Y233R and Y235R do not. A histidine-aspartate pair, H176 and D172, are proposed to act as a dyad in which H176 is the active site acid/base. The enzyme is inactivated by diethyl pyrocarbonate, and the mutants H176A and D172N show a marked loss of activity. Kinetic isotope effect experiments with D172N indicate that chemistry is rate-determining for this mutant.

  16. Alanine substitution of conserved residues in the cytoplasmic tail of herpes simplex virus gB can enhance or abolish cell fusion activity and viral entry

    SciTech Connect

    Ruel, Nancy . E-mail: n-ruel@northwestern.edu; Zago, Anna . E-mail: anna_zago@acgtinc.com; Spear, Patricia G. . E-mail: p-spear@northwestern.edu

    2006-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoprotein B (gB) is one of the four viral glycoproteins required for viral entry and cell fusion and is highly conserved among herpesviruses. Mutants of HSV type 2 gB were generated by substituting conserved residues in the cytoplasmic tail with alanine or by deleting 41 amino acids from the C-terminus. Some of the mutations abolished cell fusion activity and also prevented transport of gB to the cell surface, identifying residues in the gB cytoplasmic tail that are critical for intracellular transport of this glycoprotein. These mutations also prevented production of infectious virus, possibly because the mutant forms of gB were not transported to the site of envelopment. Other mutations, particularly the deletion, significantly enhanced cell fusion activity. These mutations, as well as others described previously, identify regions of the gB cytoplasmic domain that modulate cell fusion activity.

  17. Asp295 stabilizes the active-site loop structure of pyruvate dehydrogenase, facilitating phosphorylation of Ser292 by pyruvate dehydrogenase-kinase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have developed an invitro system for detailed analysis of reversible phosphorylation of the plant mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, comprising recombinant Arabidopsis thaliana a2b2-hetero tetrameric pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) plus A.thaliana E1-kinase (AtPDK). Upon addition of MgATP...

  18. Global view of cognate kinase activation by the human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Elena L; Yang, Luying; Birkaya, Barbara; Zhou, Jieyu; Nemeria, Natalia S; Patel, Mulchand S; Jordan, Frank

    2017-02-23

    The human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) comprises four multidomain components, E1, E3, E2 and an E3-binding protein (E3BP), the latter two forming the core as E2·E3BP sub-complex. Pyruvate flux through PDC is regulated via phosphorylation (inactivation) at E1 by four PDC kinases (PDKs), and reactivation by two PDC phosphatases. Up-regulation of PDK isoform gene expression is reported in several forms of cancer, while PDKs may be further activated by PDC by binding to the E2·E3BP core. Hence, the PDK: E2·E3BP interaction provides new therapeutic targets. We carried out both functional kinetic and thermodynamic studies to demonstrate significant differences in the activation of PDK isoforms by binding to the E2·E3BP core: (i) PDK2 needs no activation by E2·E3BP for efficient functioning, while PDK4 was the least effective of the four isoforms, and could not be activated by E2·E3BP. Hence, development of inhibitors to the interaction of PDK2 and PDK4 with E2·E3BP is not promising; (ii) Design of inhibitors to interfere with interaction of E2·E3BP with PDK1 and PDK3 is promising. PDK3 needs E2·E3BP core for activation, an activation best achieved by synergistic combination of E2-derived catalytic domain and tridomain.

  19. Global view of cognate kinase activation by the human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, Elena L.; Yang, Luying; Birkaya, Barbara; Zhou, Jieyu; Nemeria, Natalia S.; Patel, Mulchand S.; Jordan, Frank

    2017-01-01

    The human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) comprises four multidomain components, E1, E3, E2 and an E3-binding protein (E3BP), the latter two forming the core as E2·E3BP sub-complex. Pyruvate flux through PDC is regulated via phosphorylation (inactivation) at E1 by four PDC kinases (PDKs), and reactivation by two PDC phosphatases. Up-regulation of PDK isoform gene expression is reported in several forms of cancer, while PDKs may be further activated by PDC by binding to the E2·E3BP core. Hence, the PDK: E2·E3BP interaction provides new therapeutic targets. We carried out both functional kinetic and thermodynamic studies to demonstrate significant differences in the activation of PDK isoforms by binding to the E2·E3BP core: (i) PDK2 needs no activation by E2·E3BP for efficient functioning, while PDK4 was the least effective of the four isoforms, and could not be activated by E2·E3BP. Hence, development of inhibitors to the interaction of PDK2 and PDK4 with E2·E3BP is not promising; (ii) Design of inhibitors to interfere with interaction of E2·E3BP with PDK1 and PDK3 is promising. PDK3 needs E2·E3BP core for activation, an activation best achieved by synergistic combination of E2-derived catalytic domain and tridomain. PMID:28230160

  20. Communication between Thiamin Cofactors in the Escherichia coli Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex E1 Component Active Centers

    PubMed Central

    Nemeria, Natalia S.; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Mossad, Madouna; Tittmann, Kai; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Kinetic, spectroscopic, and structural analysis tested the hypothesis that a chain of residues connecting the 4′-aminopyrimidine N1′ atoms of thiamin diphosphates (ThDPs) in the two active centers of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1 component provides a signal transduction pathway. Substitution of the three acidic residues (Glu571, Glu235, and Glu237) and Arg606 resulted in impaired binding of the second ThDP, once the first active center was filled, suggesting a pathway for communication between the two ThDPs. 1) Steady-state kinetic and fluorescence quenching studies revealed that upon E571A, E235A, E237A, and R606A substitutions, ThDP binding in the second active center was affected. 2) Analysis of the kinetics of thiazolium C2 hydrogen/deuterium exchange of enzyme-bound ThDP suggests half-of-the-sites reactivity for the E1 component, with fast (activated site) and slow exchanging sites (dormant site). The E235A and E571A variants gave no evidence for the slow exchanging site, indicating that only one of two active sites is filled with ThDP. 3) Titration of the E235A and E237A variants with methyl acetylphosphonate monitored by circular dichroism suggested that only half of the active sites were filled with a covalent predecarboxylation intermediate analog. 4) Crystal structures of E235A and E571A in complex with ThDP revealed the structural basis for the spectroscopic and kinetic observations and showed that either substitution affects cofactor binding, despite the fact that Glu235 makes no direct contact with the cofactor. The role of the conserved Glu571 residue in both catalysis and cofactor orientation is revealed by the combined results for the first time. PMID:20106967

  1. Identification of Tumor Endothelial Cells with High Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity and a Highly Angiogenic Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Maishi, Nako; Ohga, Noritaka; Hida, Yasuhiro; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Iida, Junichiro; Shindoh, Masanobu; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Shinohara, Nobuo; Hida, Kyoko

    2014-01-01

    Tumor blood vessels play an important role in tumor progression and metastasis. It has been reported that tumor endothelial cells (TECs) exhibit highly angiogenic phenotypes compared with those of normal endothelial cells (NECs). TECs show higher proliferative and migratory abilities than those NECs, together with upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2). Furthermore, compared with NECs, stem cell markers such as Sca-1, CD90, and multidrug resistance 1 are upregulated in TECs, suggesting that stem-like cells exist in tumor blood vessels. In this study, to reveal the biological role of stem-like TECs, we analyzed expression of the stem cell marker aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) in TECs and characterized ALDHhigh TECs. TECs and NECs were isolated from melanoma-xenografted nude mice and normal dermis, respectively. ALDH mRNA expression and activity were higher in TECs than those in NECs. Next, ALDHhigh/low TECs were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting to compare their characteristics. Compared with ALDHlow TECs, ALDHhigh TECs formed more tubes on Matrigel-coated plates and sustained the tubular networks longer. Furthermore, VEGFR2 expression was higher in ALDHhigh TECs than that in ALDHlow TECs. In addition, ALDH was expressed in the tumor blood vessels of in vivo mouse models of melanoma and oral carcinoma, but not in normal blood vessels. These findings indicate that ALDHhigh TECs exhibit an angiogenic phenotype. Stem-like TECs may have an essential role in tumor angiogenesis. PMID:25437864

  2. Evaluation on the inhibition of pyrrol-2-yl ethanone derivatives to lactate dehydrogenase and anticancer activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Na-Na; Weng, Zhao-Yue; Chen, Qiu-Yun; Boison, Daniel; Xiao, Xin-Xin; Gao, Jing

    2016-08-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase A (LDH-A) is a potentially important metabolic target for the inhibition of the highly activated glycolysis pathway in cancer cells. In order to develop bifunctional compounds as inhibitor of LDH-A and anticancer agents, two pyrrol-2-yl methanone (or ethanone) derivatives (PM1 and PM2) were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of LDH-A based on the enzyme assay and cell assay by spectroscopy analysis. Fluorescence and CD spectra results demonstrated that both the change of second structure of LDH-A and the affinity interaction for compounds to LDH-A gave great effect on the activity of LDH-A. In particular, low concentration of compounds (1 μμ-25 μμ) could change the level of pyruvate in cancer cells. Moreover, the in vitro assay results demonstrated that pyrrol-2-yl ethanone derivatives can inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells. Therefore, pyrrol-2-yl ethanone derivatives (PM2) can be both LDH-A inhibitor and anticancer agents.

  3. Hypoxic repression of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity is necessary for metabolic reprogramming and growth of model tumours

    PubMed Central

    Golias, Tereza; Papandreou, Ioanna; Sun, Ramon; Kumar, Bhavna; Brown, Nicole V.; Swanson, Benjamin J.; Pai, Reetesh; Jaitin, Diego; Le, Quynh-Thu; Teknos, Theodoros N.; Denko, Nicholas C.

    2016-01-01

    Tumour cells fulfil the bioenergetic and biosynthetic needs of proliferation using the available environmental metabolites. Metabolic adaptation to hypoxia causes decreased mitochondrial function and increased lactate production. This work examines the biological importance of the hypoxia-inducible inhibitory phosphorylations on the pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α subunit. Pancreatic cancer cell lines were genetically manipulated to alter the net phosphorylation of PDH E1α through reduced kinase expression or enhanced phosphatase expression. The modified cells were tested for hypoxic changes in phosphorylated E1α, mitochondrial metabolism and growth as xenografted tumours. Even though there are four PDHK genes, PDHK1 is essential for inhibitory PDH phosphorylation of E1α at serine 232, is partially responsible for modification of serines 293 and 300, and these phosphorylations are necessary for model tumour growth. In order to determine the clinical relevance, a cohort of head and neck cancer patient biopsies was examined for phosphorylated E1α and expression of PDHK1. Patients with detectable 232 phosphorylation or expression of PDHK1 tend to have worse clinical outcome. These data show that PDHK1 activity is unique and non-redundant in the family of PHDK enzymes and a PDHK1 specific inhibitor would therefore have anti-cancer activity with reduced chance of side effects from inhibition of other PDHKs. PMID:27498883

  4. Mitochondrial Dihydrolipoyl Dehydrogenase Activity Shapes Photosynthesis and Photorespiration of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Timm, Stefan; Wittmiß, Maria; Gamlien, Sabine; Ewald, Ralph; Florian, Alexandra; Frank, Marcus; Wirtz, Markus; Hell, Rüdiger; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Bauwe, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (mtLPD; L-protein) is an integral component of several multienzyme systems involved in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, photorespiration, and the degradation of branched-chain α-ketoacids. The majority of the mtLPD present in photosynthesizing tissue is used for glycine decarboxylase (GDC), necessary for the high-flux photorespiratory glycine-into-serine conversion. We previously suggested that GDC activity could be a signal in a regulatory network that adjusts carbon flux through the Calvin-Benson cycle in response to photorespiration. Here, we show that elevated GDC L-protein activity significantly alters several diagnostic parameters of cellular metabolism and leaf gas exchange in Arabidopsis thaliana. Overexpressor lines displayed markedly decreased steady state contents of TCA cycle and photorespiratory intermediates as well as elevated NAD(P)+-to-NAD(P)H ratios. Additionally, increased rates of CO2 assimilation, photorespiration, and plant growth were observed. Intriguingly, however, day respiration rates remained unaffected. By contrast, respiration was enhanced in the first half of the dark phase but depressed in the second. We also observed enhanced sucrose biosynthesis in the light in combination with a lower diel magnitude of starch accumulation and breakdown. These data thus substantiate our prior hypothesis that facilitating flux through the photorespiratory pathway stimulates photosynthetic CO2 assimilation in the Calvin-Benson cycle. They furthermore suggest that this regulation is, at least in part, dependent on increased light-capture/use efficiency. PMID:26116608

  5. Characterization of 10-Hydroxygeraniol Dehydrogenase from Catharanthus roseus Reveals Cascaded Enzymatic Activity in Iridoid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Krithika, Ramakrishnan; Srivastava, Prabhakar Lal; Rani, Bajaj; Kolet, Swati P.; Chopade, Manojkumar; Soniya, Mantri; Thulasiram, Hirekodathakallu V.

    2015-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus [L.] is a major source of the monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs), which are of significant interest due to their therapeutic value. These molecules are formed through an intermediate, cis-trans-nepetalactol, a cyclized product of 10-oxogeranial. One of the key enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of MIAs is an NAD(P)+ dependent oxidoreductase system, 10-hydroxygeraniol dehydrogenase (Cr10HGO), which catalyses the formation of 10-oxogeranial from 10-hydroxygeraniol via 10-oxogeraniol or 10-hydroxygeranial. This work describes the cloning and functional characterization of Cr10HGO from C. roseus and its role in the iridoid biosynthesis. Substrate specificity studies indicated that, Cr10HGO has good activity on substrates such as 10-hydroxygeraniol, 10-oxogeraniol or 10-hydroxygeranial over monohydroxy linear terpene derivatives. Further it was observed that incubation of 10-hydroxygeraniol with Cr10HGO and iridoid synthase (CrIDS) in the presence of NADP+ yielded a major metabolite, which was characterized as (1R, 4aS, 7S, 7aR)-nepetalactol by comparing its retention time, mass fragmentation pattern, and co-injection studies with that of the synthesized compound. These results indicate that there is concerted activity of Cr10HGO with iridoid synthase in the formation of (1R, 4aS, 7S, 7aR)-nepetalactol, an important intermediate in iridoid biosynthesis. PMID:25651761

  6. Mitochondrial Dihydrolipoyl Dehydrogenase Activity Shapes Photosynthesis and Photorespiration of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Timm, Stefan; Wittmiß, Maria; Gamlien, Sabine; Ewald, Ralph; Florian, Alexandra; Frank, Marcus; Wirtz, Markus; Hell, Rüdiger; Fernie, Alisdair R; Bauwe, Hermann

    2015-07-01

    Mitochondrial dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (mtLPD; L-protein) is an integral component of several multienzyme systems involved in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, photorespiration, and the degradation of branched-chain α-ketoacids. The majority of the mtLPD present in photosynthesizing tissue is used for glycine decarboxylase (GDC), necessary for the high-flux photorespiratory glycine-into-serine conversion. We previously suggested that GDC activity could be a signal in a regulatory network that adjusts carbon flux through the Calvin-Benson cycle in response to photorespiration. Here, we show that elevated GDC L-protein activity significantly alters several diagnostic parameters of cellular metabolism and leaf gas exchange in Arabidopsis thaliana. Overexpressor lines displayed markedly decreased steady state contents of TCA cycle and photorespiratory intermediates as well as elevated NAD(P)(+)-to-NAD(P)H ratios. Additionally, increased rates of CO2 assimilation, photorespiration, and plant growth were observed. Intriguingly, however, day respiration rates remained unaffected. By contrast, respiration was enhanced in the first half of the dark phase but depressed in the second. We also observed enhanced sucrose biosynthesis in the light in combination with a lower diel magnitude of starch accumulation and breakdown. These data thus substantiate our prior hypothesis that facilitating flux through the photorespiratory pathway stimulates photosynthetic CO2 assimilation in the Calvin-Benson cycle. They furthermore suggest that this regulation is, at least in part, dependent on increased light-capture/use efficiency.

  7. Gossypol enantiomers potently inhibit human placental 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 and aromatase activities.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yaoyao; Mao, Baiping; Li, Linxi; Guan, Hongguo; Su, Ying; Li, Xiaoheng; Lian, Qingquan; Huang, Ping; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2016-03-01

    Gossypol is a chemical isolated from cotton seeds. It exists as (+) or (-) enantiomer and has been tested for anticancer, abortion-inducing, and male contraception. Progesterone formed from pregnenolone by 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (HSD3B1) and estradiol from androgen by aromatase (CYP19A1) are critical for the maintenance of pregnancy or associated with some cancers. In this study we compared the potencies of (+)- and (-)-gossypol enantiomers in the inhibition of HSD3B1 and aromatase activities as well as progesterone and estradiol production in human placental JEG-3 cells. (+) Gossypol showed potent inhibition on human placental HSD3B1 with IC50 value of 2.3 μM, while (-) gossypol weakly inhibited it with IC50 over 100 μM. In contrast, (-) gossypol moderately inhibited CYP19A1 activity with IC50 of 23 μM, while (+) gossypol had no inhibition when the highest concentration (100 μM) was tested. (+) Gossypol enantiomer competitively inhibited HSD3B1 against substrate pregnenolone and showed mixed mode against NAD(+). (-) Gossypol competitively inhibited CYP19A1 against substrate testosterone. Gossypol enantiomers showed different potency related to their inhibition on human HSD3B1 and CYP19A1. Whether gossypol enantiomer is used alone or in combination relies on its application and beneficial effects.

  8. Rotenone Decreases Intracellular Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity: Implications for the Pathogenesis of Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, David S.; Sullivan, Patti; Cooney, Adele; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Kopin, Irwin J.; Sharabi, Yehonatan

    2015-01-01

    Repeated systemic administration of the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone produces a rodent model of Parkinson disease (PD). Mechanisms of relatively selective rotenone-induced damage to nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons remain incompletely understood. According to the “catecholaldehyde hypothesis,” buildup of the autotoxic dopamine metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL) contributes to PD pathogenesis. Vesicular uptake blockade increases DOPAL levels, and DOPAL is detoxified mainly by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). We tested whether rotenone interferes with vesicular uptake and intracellular ALDH activity. Endogenous and F-labeled catechols were measured in PC12 cells incubated with rotenone (0-1000 nM, 180 minutes), without or with F-dopamine (2 μM) to track vesicular uptake and catecholamine metabolism. Rotenone dose-dependently increased DOPAL, F-DOPAL, and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethanol (DOPET) levels while decreasing dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) levels and the ratio of dopamine to the sum of its deaminated metabolites. In test tubes, rotenone did not affect conversion of DOPAL to DOPAC by ALDH when NAD+ was supplied, whereas the direct-acting ALDH inhibitor benomyl markedly increased DOPAL and decreased DOPAC concentrations in the reaction mixtures. We propose that rotenone builds up intracellular DOPAL by decreasing ALDH activity and attenuating vesicular sequestration of cytoplasmic catecholamines. The results provide a novel mechanism for selective rotenone-induced toxicity in dopaminergic neurons. PMID:25645689

  9. Effects of DNA on immunoglobulin production stimulating activity of alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, T; Furutani, H; Sasaki, T; Sugahara, T

    1999-09-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase-I (ADH-I) derived from horse liver stimulated IgM production by human-human hybridoma, HB4C5 cells and lymphocytes. The IPSF activity of ADH-I was suppressed by coexistence of short DNA whose chain length is less than 200 base pairs (bp) and fibrous DNA in a dose-dependent manner. These DNA preparations completely inhibited the IPSF activity at the concentration of 250 mug/ml and 1.0 mg/ml, respectively. DNA sample termed long DNA whose average chain length is 400-7000 bp slightly stimulated IPSF activity at 0.06 mug/ml. However, long DNA suppressed IPSF activity by half at 1.0 mg/ml. The laser confocal microscopic analysis had revealed that ADH-I was incorporated by HB4C5 cells. The uptake of ADH-I was strongly inhibited by short DNA and fibrous DNA. However, long DNA did not suppress the internalization of ADH-I into HB4C5 cells. These findings indicate that short DNA and fibrous DNA depress IPSF activity of ADH-I by inhibiting the internalization of this enzyme. According to the gel-filtration analysis using HPLC, ADH-I did not directly interact with short DNA. It is expected from these findings that short DNA influences HB4C5 cells to suppress the internalization of ADH-I. Moreover, these facts also strongly suggest that ADH-I acts as IPSF after internalization into the cell.

  10. Functional response of the isolated, perfused normoxic heart to pyruvate dehydrogenase activation by dichloroacetate and pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Jaimes, Rafael; Kuzmiak-Glancy, Sarah; Brooks, Daina M; Swift, Luther M; Posnack, Nikki G; Kay, Matthew W

    2016-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) and pyruvate activate pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), a key enzyme that modulates glucose oxidation and mitochondrial NADH production. Both compounds improve recovery after ischemia in isolated hearts. However, the action of DCA and pyruvate in normoxic myocardium is incompletely understood. We measured the effect of DCA and pyruvate on contraction, mitochondrial redox state, and intracellular calcium cycling in isolated rat hearts during normoxic perfusion. Normalized epicardial NADH fluorescence (nNADH) and left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) were measured before and after administering DCA (5 mM) or pyruvate (5 mM). Optical mapping of Rhod-2AM was used to measure cytosolic calcium kinetics. DCA maximally activated PDH, increasing the ratio of active to total PDH from 0.48 ± 0.03 to 1.03 ± 0.03. Pyruvate sub-maximally activated PDH to a ratio of 0.75 ± 0.02. DCA and pyruvate increased LVDP. When glucose was the only exogenous fuel, pyruvate increased nNADH by 21.4 ± 2.9 % while DCA reduced nNADH by 21.4 ± 6.1 % and elevated the incidence of premature ventricular contractions (PVCs). When lactate, pyruvate, and glucose were provided together as exogenous fuels, nNADH increased with DCA, indicating that PDH activation with glucose as the only exogenous fuel depletes PDH substrate. Calcium transient time-to-peak was shortened by DCA and pyruvate and SR calcium re-uptake was 30 % longer. DCA and pyruvate increased SR calcium load in myocyte monolayers. Overall, during normoxia when glucose is the only exogenous fuel, DCA elevates SR calcium, increases LVDP and contractility, and diminishes mitochondrial NADH. Administering DCA with plasma levels of lactate and pyruvate mitigates the drop in mitochondrial NADH and prevents PVCs.

  11. Expanded Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells Reselected for High Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity Demonstrate Islet Regenerative Functions.

    PubMed

    Seneviratne, Ayesh K; Bell, Gillian I; Sherman, Stephen E; Cooper, Tyler T; Putman, David M; Hess, David A

    2016-04-01

    Human umbilical cord blood (UCB) hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) purified for high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity (ALDH(hi) ) stimulate islet regeneration after transplantation into mice with streptozotocin-induced β cell deletion. However, ALDH(hi) cells represent a rare progenitor subset and widespread use of UCB ALDH(hi) cells to stimulate islet regeneration will require progenitor cell expansion without loss of islet regenerative functions. Here we demonstrate that prospectively purified UCB ALDH(hi) cells expand efficiently under serum-free, xeno-free conditions with minimal growth factor supplementation. Consistent with the concept that ALDH-activity is decreased as progenitor cells differentiate, kinetic analyses over 9 days revealed the frequency of ALDH(hi) cells diminished as culture time progressed such that total ALDH(hi) cell number was maximal (increased 3-fold) at day 6. Subsequently, day 6 expanded cells (bulk cells) were sorted after culture to reselect differentiated progeny with low ALDH-activity (ALDH(lo) subset) from less differentiated progeny with high ALDH-activity (ALDH(hi) subset). The ALDH(hi) subset retained primitive cell surface marker coexpression (32.0% ± 7.0% CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells, 37.0% ± 6.9% CD34(+) /CD133(+) cells), and demonstrated increased hematopoietic colony forming cell function compared with the ALDH(lo) subset. Notably, bulk cells or ALDH(lo) cells did not possess the functional capacity to lower hyperglycemia after transplantation into streptozotocin-treated NOD/SCID mice. However, transplantation of the repurified ALDH(hi) subset significantly reduced hyperglycemia, improved glucose tolerance, and increased islet-associated cell proliferation and capillary formation. Thus, expansion and delivery of reselected UCB cells that retain high ALDH-activity after short-term culture represents an improved strategy for the development of cellular therapies to enhance islet regeneration in situ.

  12. Cellular recovery of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity and thiol status after exposure to hydroperoxides

    SciTech Connect

    Brodie, A.E.; Reed, D.J. )

    1990-01-01

    The activity of the thiol-dependent enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD), in vertebrate cells, was modulated by a change in the intracellular thiol:disulfide redox status. Human lung carcinoma cells (A549) were incubated with 1-120 mM H2O2, 1-120 mM t-butyl hydroperoxide, 1-6 mM ethacrynic acid, or 0.1-10 mM N-ethylmaleimide for 5 min. Loss of reduced protein thiols, as measured by binding of the thiol reagent iodoacetic acid to GPD, and loss of GPD enzymatic activity occurred in a dose-dependent manner. Incubation of the cells, following oxidative treatment, in saline for 30 min or with 20 mM dithiothreitol (DTT) partially reversed both changes in GPD. The enzymatic recovery of GPD activity was observed either without addition of thiols to the medium or by incubation of a sonicated cell mixture with 2 mM cysteine, cystine, cysteamine, or glutathione (GSH); GSSG had no effect. Treatment of cells with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) to decrease cellular GSH by varying amounts caused a dose-related increase in sensitivity of GPD activity to inactivation by H2O2 and decreased cellular ability for subsequent recovery. GPD responded in a similar fashion with oxidative treatment of another lung carcinoma cell line (A427) as well as normal lung tissue from human and rat. These findings indicate that the cellular thiol redox status can be important in determining GPD enzymatic activity.

  13. Urinary Lactate Dehydrogenase Activity and Its Isozyme Patterns in Kawasaki Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Yoichi; Kanai, Takashi; Takizawa, Mari; Yoshida, Yusuke; Tsujita, Yuki; Nonoyama, Shigeaki

    2017-01-01

    Abnormal urinary findings, such as sterile pyuria, proteinuria, and microscopic hematuria, are often seen in the acute phase of Kawasaki disease (KD). We investigated the potential significance of urinary lactate dehydrogenase (U-LDH) activity and its isozyme patterns in KD. Total U-LDH activity and its isozymes (U-LDH1-5) levels were compared among 120 patients with KD, 18 patients with viral infection (VI), and 43 patients with upper urinary tract infection (UTI) and additionally compared between intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) responders (n = 89) and nonresponders (n = 31) with KD. Total U-LDH activity was higher in KD (35.4 ± 4.8 IU/L, P < 0.05) and UTI patients (66.0 ± 8.0 IU/L, P < 0.01) than in VI patients (17.0 ± 6.2 IU/L). In the isozyme pattern analysis, KD patients had high levels of U-LDH1 and U-LDH2, while UTI patients had high levels of U-LDH3, U-LDH4, and U-LDH5. Furthermore, IVIG nonresponders of KD had significantly higher levels of total U-LDH activity (45.1 ± 4.7 IU/L, P < 0.05), especially U-LDH1 and U-LDH2 (P < 0.05), than IVIG responders (32.0 ± 2.8 IU/L). KD patients have increased levels of total U-LDH activity, especially U-LDH-1 and U-LDH2, indicating a unique pattern of U-LDH isozymes different from that in UTI patients. PMID:28348604

  14. Effect of malonate and p-chlorophenoxy acetic acid on hepatic succinic dehydrogenase activity of ageing lizards.

    PubMed

    Jena, B S; Patnaik, B K

    1990-01-01

    The degree of inhibition of hepatic succinic dehydrogenase activity by malonate, a competitive inhibitor, did not differ between young and middle-aged lizards. On the other hand, the same parameter increased significantly between middle-aged and old lizards. The percent inhibition of enzyme activity by p-chlorophenoxy acetic acid was also age-dependent, being higher in middle-aged and old than in young lizards.

  15. Biosynthesis of D-alanyl-lipoteichoic acid: cloning, nucleotide sequence, and expression of the Lactobacillus casei gene for the D-alanine-activating enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, M P; Neuhaus, F C

    1992-01-01

    The D-alanine-activating enzyme (Dae; EC 6.3.2.4) encoded by the dae gene from Lactobacillus casei ATCC 7469 is a cytosolic protein essential for the formation of the D-alanyl esters of membrane-bound lipoteichoic acid. The gene has been cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli, an organism which does not possess Dae activity. The open reading frame is 1,518 nucleotides and codes for a protein of 55.867 kDa, a value in agreement with the 56 kDa obtained by electrophoresis. A putative promoter and ribosome-binding site immediately precede the dae gene. A second open reading frame contiguous with the dae gene has also been partially sequenced. The organization of these genetic elements suggests that more than one enzyme necessary for the biosynthesis of D-alanyl-lipoteichoic acid may be present in this operon. Analysis of the amino acid sequence deduced from the dae gene identified three regions with significant homology to proteins in the following groups of ATP-utilizing enzymes: (i) the acid-thiol ligases, (ii) the activating enzymes for the biosynthesis of enterobactin, and (iii) the synthetases for tyrocidine, gramicidin S, and penicillin. From these comparisons, a common motif (GXXGXPK) has been identified that is conserved in the 19 protein domains analyzed. This motif may represent the phosphate-binding loop of an ATP-binding site for this class of enzymes. A DNA fragment (1,568 nucleotides) containing the dae gene and its putative ribosome-binding site has been subcloned and expressed in E. coli. Approximately 0.5% of the total cell protein is active Dae, whereas 21% is in the form of inclusion bodies. The isolation of this minimal fragment without a native promoter sequence provides the basis for designing a genetic system for modulating the D-alanine ester content of lipoteichoic acid. PMID:1385594

  16. Regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and citric acid cycle intermediates during high cardiac power generation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Naveen; Okere, Isidore C; Brunengraber, Daniel Z; McElfresh, Tracy A; King, Kristen L; Sterk, Joseph P; Huang, Hazel; Chandler, Margaret P; Stanley, William C

    2005-01-15

    A high rate of cardiac work increases citric acid cycle (CAC) turnover and flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH); however, the mechanisms for these effects are poorly understood. We tested the hypotheses that an increase in cardiac energy expenditure: (1) activates PDH and reduces the product/substrate ratios ([NADH]/[NAD(+)] and [acetyl-CoA]/[CoA-SH]); and (2) increases the content of CAC intermediates. Measurements were made in anaesthetized pigs under control conditions and during 15 min of a high cardiac workload induced by dobutamine (Dob). A third group was made hyperglycaemic (14 mm) to stimulate flux through PDH during the high work state (Dob + Glu). Glucose and fatty acid oxidation were measured with (14)C-glucose and (3)H-oleate. Compared with control, the high workload groups had a similar increase in myocardial oxygen consumption ( and cardiac power. Dob increased PDH activity and glucose oxidation above control, but did not reduce the [NADH]/[NAD(+)] and [acetyl-CoA]/[CoA-SH] ratios, and there were no differences between the Dob and Dob + Glu groups. An additional group was treated with Dob + Glu and oxfenicine (Oxf) to inhibit fatty acid oxidation: this increased [CoA-SH] and glucose oxidation compared with Dob; however, there was no further activation of PDH or decrease in the [NADH]/[NAD(+)] ratio. Content of the 4-carbon CAC intermediates succinate, fumarate and malate increased 3-fold with Dob, but there was no change in citrate content, and the Dob + Glu and Dob + Glu + Oxf groups were not different from Dob. In conclusion, compared with normal conditions, at high myocardial energy expenditure (1) the increase in flux through PDH is regulated by activation of the enzyme complex and continues to be partially controlled through inhibition by fatty acid oxidation, and (2) there is expansion of the CAC pool size at the level of 4-carbon intermediates that is largely independent of myocardial fatty acid oxidation.

  17. Postnatal Chick Choroids Exhibit Increased Retinaldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity During Recovery From Form Deprivation Induced Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Angelica R.; Wang, Xiang; Moiseyev, Gennadiy; Ma, Jian-Xing; Summers, Jody A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Increases in retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (RALDH2) transcript in the chick choroid suggest that RALDH2 may be responsible for increases observed in all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) synthesis during recovery from myopic defocus. The purpose of the present study was to examine RALDH2 protein expression, RALDH activity, and distribution of RALDH2 cells in control and recovering chick ocular tissues. Methods Myopia was induced in White Leghorn chicks for 10 days, followed by up to 15 days of unrestricted vision (recovery). Expression of RALDH isoforms in chick ocular tissues was evaluated by Western blot. Catalytic activity of RALDH was measured in choroidal cytosol fractions using an in vitro atRA synthesis assay together with HPLC quantification of synthesized atRA. Distribution of RALDH2 cells throughout the choroid was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Results RALDH2 was expressed predominately in the chick choroid (P < 0.001) and increased after 24 hours and 4 days of recovery (76%, 74%, and 165%, respectively; P < 0.05). Activity of RALDH was detected solely in the choroid and was elevated at 3 and 7 days of recovery compared to controls (70% and 48%, respectively; P < 0.05). The number of RALDH2 immunopositive cells in recovering choroids was increased at 24 hours and 4 to 15 days of recovery (P < 0.05) and were concentrated toward the RPE side compared to controls. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that RALDH2 is the major RALDH isoform in the chick choroid and is responsible for the increased RALDH activity seen during recovery. PMID:27654415

  18. Effect of chronologic age on induction of cystathionine synthase, uroporphyrinogen I synthase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities in lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Gartler, S M; Hornung, S K; Motulsky, A G

    1981-01-01

    The activities of cystathionine synthase [L-serine hydro-lyase (adding homocysteine), EC 4.2.1.22], uroporphyrinogen I synthase [porphobilinogen ammonia-lyase (polymerizing), EC 4.3.1.8], and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (D-glucose-6-phosphate:NADP+ 1-oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.49) have been measured in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes of young and old human subjects. A significant decrease in activity with age was observed for cystathionine synthase and uroporphyrinogen I synthase but not for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. These changes could not be related to declining phytohemagglutinin response with aging. Age-related decreases in activity of some enzymes may be relevant for an understanding of the biology of aging. False assignment of heterozygosity, and even homozygosity, for certain genetic disorders, such as homocystinuria, may result when low enzyme levels are detected in the lymphocytes of older people. PMID:6940198

  19. Activation of Human Salivary Aldehyde Dehydrogenase by Sulforaphane: Mechanism and Significance

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Md. Fazle; Laskar, Amaj Ahmed; Maryam, Lubna

    2016-01-01

    Cruciferous vegetables contain the bio-active compound sulforaphane (SF) which has been reported to protect individuals against various diseases by a number of mechanisms, including activation of the phase II detoxification enzymes. In this study, we show that the extracts of five cruciferous vegetables that we commonly consume and SF activate human salivary aldehyde dehydrogenase (hsALDH), which is a very important detoxifying enzyme in the mouth. Maximum activation was observed at 1 μg/ml of cabbage extract with 2.6 fold increase in the activity. There was a ~1.9 fold increase in the activity of hsALDH at SF concentration of ≥ 100 nM. The concentration of SF at half the maximum response (EC50 value) was determined to be 52 ± 2 nM. There was an increase in the Vmax and a decrease in the Km of the enzyme in the presence of SF. Hence, SF interacts with the enzyme and increases its affinity for the substrate. UV absorbance, fluorescence and CD studies revealed that SF binds to hsALDH and does not disrupt its native structure. SF binds with the enzyme with a binding constant of 1.23 x 107 M-1. There is one binding site on hsALDH for SF, and the thermodynamic parameters indicate the formation of a spontaneous strong complex between the two. Molecular docking analysis depicted that SF fits into the active site of ALDH3A1, and facilitates the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme. SF being an antioxidant, is very likely to protect the catalytic Cys 243 residue from oxidation, which leads to the increase in the catalytic efficiency and hence the activation of the enzyme. Further, hsALDH which is virtually inactive towards acetaldehyde exhibited significant activity towards it in the presence of SF. It is therefore very likely that consumption of large quantities of cruciferous vegetables or SF supplements, through their activating effect on hsALDH can protect individuals who are alcohol intolerant against acetaldehyde toxicity and also lower the risk of oral cancer

  20. Preventing microbial colonisation of catheters: antimicrobial and antibiofilm activities of cellobiose dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Thallinger, Barbara; Argirova, Maya; Lesseva, Magdalena; Ludwig, Roland; Sygmund, Christoph; Schlick, Angelika; Nyanhongo, Gibson S; Guebitz, Georg M

    2014-11-01

    The ability of cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) to produce hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) for antimicrobial and antibiofilm functionalisation of urinary catheters was investigated. A recombinantly produced CDH from Myriococcum thermophilum was shown to completely inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus both in liquid and solid media when supplemented with either 0.8 mM or 2 mM cellobiose as substrate. Biofilm formation on silicone films was prevented by CDH when supplemented with 1mM cellobiose. The CDH/cellobiose system also successfully inhibited many common urinary catheter-colonising micro-organisms, including multidrug-resistant S. aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Proteus mirabilis, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Interestingly, CDH was also able to produce H(2)O(2) during oxidation of extracellular polysaccharides (exPS) formed by micro-organisms in the absence of cellobiose. The H(2)O(2) production and consequently antimicrobial and antibiofilm activities on these exPS were enhanced by incorporation of glycoside hydrolases such as amylases. Hydrolysis of polysaccharides by these enzymes increases the number of terminal reducing sugars as substrates for CDH as well as destabilises the biofilm. Furthermore, CDH suspended in catheter lubricants killed bacteria in biofilms colonising catheters. Incorporation of the CDH/cellobiose system in the lubricant therefore makes it an easy strategy for preventing microbial colonisation of catheters.

  1. Not only osmoprotectant: betaine increased lactate dehydrogenase activity and L-lactate production in lactobacilli.

    PubMed

    Zou, Huibin; Wu, Zaiqiang; Xian, Mo; Liu, Hui; Cheng, Tao; Cao, Yujin

    2013-11-01

    Lactobacilli are commonly used for industrial production of polymer-grade L-lactic acid. The present study tested the Tween 80 alternative betaine in L-lactate production by several industrial lactobacilli. In flask fermentation of Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus buchneri, Lactobacillus lactis and Lactobacillus rhamnosus, the betaine addition (2g/l) had similar osmoprotectant effect with Tween 80 but had increased the lactate dehydrogenase activities and L-lactate production than Tween 80 control. In fed-batch fermentation of L. casei, betaine supplementation improved the L-lactic acid titer to 190 g/l, the yield to 95.5% (g L-lactic acid/g glucose), the productivity to 2.6g/lh, and the optical purity to 97.0%. The results demonstrated that supplementation of Tween 80 alternative - betaine in the fermentation medium is feasible for industrial l-lactic acid fermentation by lactobacilli, which will improve the lactate production but will not increase the process costs and modify any process conditions.

  2. Reactive oxygen species are involved in arsenic trioxide inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Samikkannu, Thangavel; Chen, Chien-Hung; Yih, Ling-Huei; Wang, Alexander S S; Lin, Shu-Yu; Chen, Tsen-Chien; Jan, Kun-Yan

    2003-03-01

    Arsenite was shown to inhibit pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity through binding to vicinal dithiols in pure enzyme and tissue extract. However, no data are available on how arsenite inhibits PDH activity in human cells. The IC(50) values for arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) to inhibit the PDH activity in porcine heart pure enzyme preparation and in human leukemia cell line HL60 cells were estimated to be 182 and 2 microM, respectively. Thus, As(2)O(3) inactivation of PDH activity was about 90 times more potent in HL60 cells than in purified enzyme preparation. The IC(50) values for As(2)O(3) and phenylarsine oxide to reduce the vicinal thiol content in HL60 cells were estimated to be 81.7 and 1.9 microM, respectively. Thus, As(2)O(3) is a potent PDH inhibitor but a weak vicinal thiol reacting agent in HL60 cells. Antioxidants but not dithiol compounds suppressed As(2)O(3) inhibition of PDH activity in HL60 cells. Conversely, dithiol compounds but not antioxidants suppressed the inhibition of PDH activity by phenylarsine oxide. As(2)O(3) increased H(2)O(2) level in HL60 cells, but this was not observed for phenylarsine oxide. Mitochondrial respiration inhibitors suppressed the As(2)O(3)-induced H(2)O(2) production and As(2)O(3) inhibition of PDH activity. Moreover, metal chelators ameliorated whereas Fenton metals aggravated As(2)O(3) inhibition of PDH activity. Treatment with H(2)O(2) plus Fenton metals also decreased the PDH activity in HL60 cells. Therefore, it seems that As(2)O(3) elevates H(2)O(2) production in mitochondria and this may produce hydroxyl through the Fenton reaction and result in oxidative damage to the protein of PDH. The present results suggest that arsenite may cause protein oxidation to inactivate an enzyme and this can occur at a much lower concentration than arsenite binding directly to the critical thiols.

  3. Regulation of the activity of lactate dehydrogenases from four lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Feldman-Salit, Anna; Hering, Silvio; Messiha, Hanan L; Veith, Nadine; Cojocaru, Vlad; Sieg, Antje; Westerhoff, Hans V; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Wade, Rebecca C; Fiedler, Tomas

    2013-07-19

    Despite high similarity in sequence and catalytic properties, the l-lactate dehydrogenases (LDHs) in lactic acid bacteria (LAB) display differences in their regulation that may arise from their adaptation to different habitats. We combined experimental and computational approaches to investigate the effects of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), phosphate (Pi), and ionic strength (NaCl concentration) on six LDHs from four LABs studied at pH 6 and pH 7. We found that 1) the extent of activation by FBP (Kact) differs. Lactobacillus plantarum LDH is not regulated by FBP, but the other LDHs are activated with increasing sensitivity in the following order: Enterococcus faecalis LDH2 ≤ Lactococcus lactis LDH2 < E. faecalis LDH1 < L. lactis LDH1 ≤ Streptococcus pyogenes LDH. This trend reflects the electrostatic properties in the allosteric binding site of the LDH enzymes. 2) For L. plantarum, S. pyogenes, and E. faecalis, the effects of Pi are distinguishable from the effect of changing ionic strength by adding NaCl. 3) Addition of Pi inhibits E. faecalis LDH2, whereas in the absence of FBP, Pi is an activator of S. pyogenes LDH, E. faecalis LDH1, and L. lactis LDH1 and LDH2 at pH 6. These effects can be interpreted by considering the computed binding affinities of Pi to the catalytic and allosteric binding sites of the enzymes modeled in protonation states corresponding to pH 6 and pH 7. Overall, the results show a subtle interplay among the effects of Pi, FBP, and pH that results in different regulatory effects on the LDHs of different LABs.

  4. Adrenaline increases skeletal muscle glycogenolysis, pyruvate dehydrogenase activation and carbohydrate oxidation during moderate exercise in humans

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Matthew J; Howlett, Kirsten F; Febbraio, Mark A; Spriet, Lawrence L; Hargreaves, Mark

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the role of adrenaline in regulating carbohydrate metabolism during moderate exercise, 10 moderately trained men completed two 20 min exercise bouts at 58 ± 2 % peak pulmonary oxygen uptake (V̇O2,peak). On one occasion saline was infused (CON), and on the other adrenaline was infused intravenously for 5 min prior to and throughout exercise (ADR). Glucose kinetics were measured by a primed, continuous infusion of 6,6-[2H]glucose and muscle samples were obtained prior to and at 1 and 20 min of exercise. The infusion of adrenaline elevated (P < 0.01) plasma adrenaline concentrations at rest (pre-infusion, 0.28 ± 0.09; post-infusion, 1.70 ± 0.45 nmol l−1; means ±s.e.m.) and this effect was maintained throughout exercise. Total carbohydrate oxidation increased by 18 % and this effect was due to greater skeletal muscle glycogenolysis (P < 0.05) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activation (P < 0.05, treatment effect). Glucose rate of appearance was not different between trials, but the infusion of adrenaline decreased (P < 0.05, treatment effect) skeletal muscle glucose uptake in ADR. During exercise muscle glucose 6-phosphate (G-6-P) (P = 0.055, treatment effect) and lactate (P < 0.05) were elevated in ADR compared with CON and no changes were observed for pyruvate, creatine, phosphocreatine, ATP and the calculated free concentrations of ADP and AMP. The data demonstrate that elevated plasma adrenaline levels during moderate exercise in untrained men increase skeletal muscle glycogen breakdown and PDH activation, which results in greater carbohydrate oxidation. The greater muscle glycogenolysis appears to be due to increased glycogen phosphorylase transformation whilst the increased PDH activity cannot be readily explained. Finally, the decreased glucose uptake observed during exercise in ADR is likely to be due to the increased intracellular G-6-P and a subsequent decrease in glucose phosphorylation. PMID:11433007

  5. Lowering effect of firefly squid powder on triacylglycerol content and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hiroyuki; Morita, Ritsuko; Shirai, Yoko; Nakagawa, Yoshihisa; Terashima, Teruya; Ushikubo, Shun; Matsuo, Tatsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Effects of dietary firefly squid on serum and liver lipid levels were investigated. Male Wistar rats were fed a diet containing 5% freeze-dried firefly squid or Japanese flying squid for 2 weeks. There was no significant difference in the liver triacylglycerol level between the control and Japanese flying squid groups, but the rats fed the firefly squid diet had a significantly lower liver triacylglycerol content than those fed the control diet. No significant difference was observed in serum triacylglycerol levels between the control and firefly squid groups. The rats fed the firefly squid had a significantly lower activity of liver glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase compared to the rats fed the control diet. There was no significant difference in liver fatty acid synthetase activity among the three groups. Hepatic gene expression and lipogenic enzyme activity were investigated; a DNA microarray showed that the significantly enriched gene ontology category of down-regulated genes in the firefly squid group was "lipid metabolic process". The firefly squid group had lower mRNA level of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase compared to the controls. These results suggest that an intake of firefly squid decreases hepatic triacylglycerol in rats, and the reduction of mRNA level and enzyme activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase might be related to the mechanisms.

  6. Induction of Xylose Reductase and Xylitol Dehydrogenase Activities in Pachysolen tannophilus and Pichia stipitis on Mixed Sugars

    PubMed Central

    Bicho, Paul A.; Runnals, P. Lynn; Cunningham, J. Douglas; Lee, Hung

    1988-01-01

    The induction of xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase activities on mixed sugars was investigated in the yeasts Pachysolen tannophilus and Pichia stipitis. Enzyme activities induced on d-xylose served as the controls. In both yeasts, d-glucose, d-mannose, and 2-deoxyglucose inhibited enzyme induction by d-xylose to various degrees. Cellobiose, l-arabinose, and d-galactose were not inhibitory. In liquid batch culture, P. tannophilus utilized d-glucose and d-mannose rapidly and preferentially over d-xylose, while d-galactose consumption was poor and lagged behind that of the pentose sugar. In P. stipitis, all three hexoses were used preferentially over d-xylose. The results showed that the repressibility of xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase may limit the potential of yeast fermentation of pentose sugars in hydrolysates of lignocellulosic substrates. PMID:16347538

  7. Aldehyde dehydrogenase activity selects for lung adenocarcinoma stem cells dependent on notch signaling.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, James P; Spinola, Monica; Dodge, Michael; Raso, Maria G; Behrens, Carmen; Gao, Boning; Schuster, Katja; Shao, Chunli; Larsen, Jill E; Sullivan, Laura A; Honorio, Sofia; Xie, Yang; Scaglioni, Pier P; DiMaio, J Michael; Gazdar, Adi F; Shay, Jerry W; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Minna, John D

    2010-12-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) is a candidate marker for lung cancer cells with stem cell-like properties. Immunohistochemical staining of a large panel of primary non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) samples for ALDH1A1, ALDH3A1, and CD133 revealed a significant correlation between ALDH1A1 (but not ALDH3A1 or CD133) expression and poor prognosis in patients including those with stage I and N0 disease. Flow cytometric analysis of a panel of lung cancer cell lines and patient tumors revealed that most NSCLCs contain a subpopulation of cells with elevated ALDH activity, and that this activity is associated with ALDH1A1 expression. Isolated ALDH(+) lung cancer cells were observed to be highly tumorigenic and clonogenic as well as capable of self-renewal compared with their ALDH(-) counterparts. Expression analysis of sorted cells revealed elevated Notch pathway transcript expression in ALDH(+) cells. Suppression of the Notch pathway by treatment with either a γ-secretase inhibitor or stable expression of shRNA against NOTCH3 resulted in a significant decrease in ALDH(+) lung cancer cells, commensurate with a reduction in tumor cell proliferation and clonogenicity. Taken together, these findings indicate that ALDH selects for a subpopulation of self-renewing NSCLC stem-like cells with increased tumorigenic potential, that NSCLCs harboring tumor cells with ALDH1A1 expression have inferior prognosis, and that ALDH1A1 and CD133 identify different tumor subpopulations. Therapeutic targeting of the Notch pathway reduces this ALDH(+) component, implicating Notch signaling in lung cancer stem cell maintenance.

  8. Characterization of Cardiac-Resident Progenitor Cells Expressing High Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Roehrich, Marc-Estienne; Spicher, Albert; Milano, Giuseppina; Vassalli, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    High aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity has been associated with stem and progenitor cells in various tissues. Human cord blood and bone marrow ALDH-bright (ALDHbr) cells have displayed angiogenic activity in preclinical studies and have been shown to be safe in clinical trials in patients with ischemic cardiovascular disease. The presence of ALDHbr cells in the heart has not been evaluated so far. We have characterized ALDHbr cells isolated from mouse hearts. One percent of nonmyocytic cells from neonatal and adult hearts were ALDHbr. ALDHvery-br cells were more frequent in neonatal hearts than adult. ALDHbr cells were more frequent in atria than ventricles. Expression of ALDH1A1 isozyme transcripts was highest in ALDHvery-br cells, intermediate in ALDHbr cells, and lowest in ALDHdim cells. ALDH1A2 expression was highest in ALDHvery-br cells, intermediate in ALDHdim cells, and lowest in ALDHbr cells. ALDH1A3 and ALDH2 expression was detectable in ALDHvery-br and ALDHbr cells, unlike ALDHdim cells, albeit at lower levels compared with ALDH1A1 and ALDH1A2. Freshly isolated ALDHbr cells were enriched for cells expressing stem cell antigen-1, CD34, CD90, CD44, and CD106. ALDHbr cells, unlike ALDHdim cells, could be grown in culture for more than 40 passages. They expressed sarcomeric α-actinin and could be differentiated along multiple mesenchymal lineages. However, the proportion of ALDHbr cells declined with cell passage. In conclusion, the cardiac-derived ALDHbr population is enriched for progenitor cells that exhibit mesenchymal progenitor-like characteristics and can be expanded in culture. The regenerative potential of cardiac-derived ALDHbr cells remains to be evaluated. PMID:23484127

  9. Luteal 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and 20alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities in the rat corpus luteum of pseudopregnancy: Effect of the deciduoma reaction

    PubMed Central

    Clementi, Marisa A; Deis, Ricardo P; Telleria, Carlos M

    2004-01-01

    Background In the rat, the maintenance of gestation is dependent on progesterone production from the corpora lutea (CL), which are under the control of pituitary, decidual and placental hormones. The luteal metabolism of progesterone during gestation has been amply studied. However, the regulation of progesterone synthesis and degradation during pseudopregnancy (PSP), in which the CL are mainly under the control of pituitary prolactin (PRL), is not well known. The objectives of this investigation were: i) to study the luteal metabolism of progesterone during PSP by measuring the activities of the enzymes 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3betaHSD), involved in progesterone biosynthesis, and that of 20alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (20alphaHSD), involved in progesterone catabolism; and ii) to determine the role of decidualization on progesterone metabolism in PSP. Methods PSP was induced mechanically at 10:00 h on the estrus of 4-day cycling Wistar rats, and the stimulus for decidualization was provided by scratching the uterus on day 4 of PSP. 3betaHSD and 20alphaHSD activities were measured in the CL isolated from ovaries of PSP rats using a spectrophotometric method. Serum concentrations of progesterone, PRL, androstenedione, and estradiol were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Results The PSP stage induced mechanically in cycling rats lasted 11.3 ± 0.09 days (n = 14). Serum progesterone concentration was high until day 10 of PSP, and declined thereafter. Serum PRL concentration was high on the first days of PSP but decreased significantly from days 6 to 9, having minimal values on days 10 and 11. Luteal 3betaHSD activities were elevated until day 6 of PSP, after which they progressively declined, reaching minimal values at the end of PSP. Luteal 20alphaHSD activities were very low until day 9, but abruptly increased at the end of PSP. When the deciduoma was induced by scratching the uterus of pseudopregnant animals on day 4 (PSP+D), PSP was extended to

  10. Lactate dehydrogenase activity of rat epididymis and spermatozoa: effect of constant light.

    PubMed

    Ponc, R H; Carriazo, C S; Vermouth, N T

    2001-01-01

    During its passage through the epididymis, the gamete undergoes a process of "maturation" leading to the acquisition of its fertilizing ability. The epididymis displays regional variations in the morphology and metabolic properties of its epithelium which are relevant for the progressive development of mature sperm characteristics. The epididymis has spontaneous peristaltic contractions and receives sympathetic innervation that is modulated by melatonin, a hormone synthesized and released by the pineal gland. Constant lighting disrupts melatonin synthesis and secretion. We have studied the effect of constant light on lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; EC 1.1.1.27) and its isozyme C4 activities and protein content in whole epididymis, epididymal tissue and in spermatozoa from caput and cauda segments. Animals were exposed from birth to an illumination schedule of 14 h light:10 h dark (group L:D). At 60 days of age one group of animals was submitted to constant light over 50 days (group L:L). In order to test the fertilizing ability, the rats of each group were mated with soliciting estrous females. The percentage of pregnancies in females mated with males maintained in L:L was remarkably lower than those in females mated with males maintained in the L:D photoperiod (44% and 88% respectively). Constant light increased protein concentration and LDH activity in caput as well as in cauda of total epididymis. On the contrary, in epididymal tissue, the protein content decreased in both epididymal sections compared with controls. When enzymatic activity was expressed in Units per spermatozoa, constant light induced a significant reduction of total LDH and LDHC4 in caput and cauda spermatozoa while LDH activity of epididymal tissue was not affected. In spite of the decrease in LDH per sperm cell when rats were exposed to constant light, in total epididymis (epididymis tissue plus sperm cells content) and in spermatozoa, values of enzyme activities expressed per weight unit were

  11. [Effect of adrenaline on the succinate dehydrogenase activity of peripheral blood lymphocytes of rats following exposure to ionizing radiation].

    PubMed

    Koroleva, L V; Vasin, M V

    1988-01-01

    In experiments with albino mongrel female rats, the influence of adrenaline on succinate dehydrogenase (SDG) activity in the peripheral blood lymphocytes of irradiated and intact animals has been investigated. Two minutes after the intraperitoneal administration of adrenaline (1 mg/kg) to intact rats SDG activity sharply rises and 3-4 min it drastically falls. In 6 to 8 min the second peak in the enzyme activity is registered. Twenty minutes after irradiation of rats in the cranio-caudal direction with a dose of 75 Gy delivered to head, the reaction to adrenaline, manifested by the rise in SDG activity, is absent.

  12. L-Malate dehydrogenase activity in the reductive arm of the incomplete citric acid cycle of Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Deutch, Charles E

    2013-11-01

    The autotrophic nitrifying bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea does not synthesize 2-oxoglutarate (α-ketoglutarate) dehydrogenase under aerobic conditions and so has an incomplete citric acid cycle. L-malate (S-malate) dehydrogenase (MDH) from N. europaea was predicted to show similarity to the NADP(+)-dependent enzymes from chloroplasts and was separated from the NAD(+)-dependent proteins from most other bacteria or mitochondria. MDH activity in a soluble fraction from N. europaea ATCC 19718 was measured spectrophotometrically and exhibited simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics. In the reductive direction, activity with NADH increased from pH 6.0 to 8.5 but activity with NADPH was consistently lower and decreased with pH. At pH 7.0, the K m for oxaloacetate was 20 μM; the K m for NADH was 22 μM but that for NADPH was at least 10 times higher. In the oxidative direction, activity with NAD(+) increased with pH but there was very little activity with NADP(+). At pH 7.0, the K m for L-malate was 5 mM and the K m for NAD(+) was 24 μM. The reductive activity was quite insensitive to inhibition by L-malate but the oxidative activity was very sensitive to oxaloacetate. MDH activity was not strongly activated or inhibited by glycolytic or citric acid cycle metabolites, adenine nucleotides, NaCl concentrations, or most metal ions, but increased with temperature up to about 55 °C. The reductive activity was consistently 10-20 times higher than the oxidative activity. These results indicate that the L-malate dehydrogenase in N. europaea is similar to other NAD(+)-dependent MDHs (EC 1.1.1.37) but physiologically adapted for its role in a reductive biosynthetic sequence.

  13. Highly selective anti-Prelog synthesis of optically active aryl alcohols by recombinant Escherichia coli expressing stereospecific alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Nie, Yao; Mu, Xiao Qing; Zhang, Rongzhen; Xu, Yan

    2016-07-03

    Biocatalytic asymmetric synthesis has been widely used for preparation of optically active chiral alcohols as the important intermediates and precursors of active pharmaceutical ingredients. However, the available whole-cell system involving anti-Prelog specific alcohol dehydrogenase is yet limited. A recombinant Escherichia coli system expressing anti-Prelog stereospecific alcohol dehydrogenase from Candida parapsilosis was established as a whole-cell system for catalyzing asymmetric reduction of aryl ketones to anti-Prelog configured alcohols. Using 2-hydroxyacetophenone as the substrate, reaction factors including pH, cell status, and substrate concentration had obvious impacts on the outcome of whole-cell biocatalysis, and xylose was found to be an available auxiliary substrate for intracellular cofactor regeneration, by which (S)-1-phenyl-1,2-ethanediol was achieved with an optical purity of 97%e.e. and yield of 89% under the substrate concentration of 5 g/L. Additionally, the feasibility of the recombinant cells toward different aryl ketones was investigated, and most of the corresponding chiral alcohol products were obtained with an optical purity over 95%e.e. Therefore, the whole-cell system involving recombinant stereospecific alcohol dehydrogenase was constructed as an efficient biocatalyst for highly enantioselective anti-Prelog synthesis of optically active aryl alcohols and would be promising in the pharmaceutical industry.

  14. Estrogen modification of human glutamate dehydrogenases is linked to enzyme activation state.

    PubMed

    Borompokas, Nikolas; Papachatzaki, Maria-Martha; Kanavouras, Konstantinos; Mastorodemos, Vasileios; Zaganas, Ioannis; Spanaki, Cleanthe; Plaitakis, Andreas

    2010-10-08

    Mammalian glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a housekeeping enzyme central to the metabolism of glutamate. Its activity is potently inhibited by GTP (IC(50) = 0.1-0.3 μM) and thought to be controlled by the need of the cell in ATP. Estrogens are also known to inhibit mammalian GDH, but at relatively high concentrations. Because, in addition to this housekeeping human (h) GDH1, humans have acquired via a duplication event an hGDH2 isoform expressed in human cortical astrocytes, we tested here the interaction of estrogens with the two human isoenzymes. The results showed that, under base-line conditions, diethylstilbestrol potently inhibited hGDH2 (IC(50) = 0.08 ± 0.01 μM) and with ∼18-fold lower affinity hGDH1 (IC(50) = 1.67 ± 0.06 μM; p < 0.001). Similarly, 17β-estradiol showed a ∼18-fold higher affinity for hGDH2 (IC(50) = 1.53 ± 0.24 μM) than for hGDH1 (IC(50) = 26.94 ± 1.07 μM; p < 0.001). Also, estriol and progesterone were more potent inhibitors of hGDH2 than hGDH1. Structure/function analyses revealed that the evolutionary R443S substitution, which confers low basal activity, was largely responsible for sensitivity of hGDH2 to estrogens. Inhibition of both human GDHs by estrogens was inversely related to their state of activation induced by ADP, with the slope of this correlation being steeper for hGDH2 than for hGDH1. Also, the study of hGDH1 and hGDH2 mutants displaying different states of activation revealed that the affinity of estrogen for these enzymes correlated inversely (R = 0.99; p = 0.0001) with basal catalytic activity. Because astrocytes are known to synthesize estrogens, these hormones, by interacting potently with hGDH2 in its closed state, may contribute to regulation of glutamate metabolism in brain.

  15. Inhibition of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 activity enhances antimycin-induced rat cardiomyocytes apoptosis through activation of MAPK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Xu, Danling; Wang, Shijun; Fu, Han; Wang, Keqiang; Zou, Yunzeng; Sun, Aijun; Ge, Junbo

    2011-12-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), a mitochondrial-specific enzyme, has been proved to be involved in oxidative stress-induced cell apoptosis, while little is known in cardiomyocytes. This study was aimed at investigating the role of ALDH2 in antimycin A-induced cardiomyocytes apoptosis by suppressing ALDH2 activity with a specific ALDH2 inhibitor Daidzin. Antimycin A (40μg/ml) was used to induce neonatal cardiomyocytes apoptosis. Daidzin (60μM) effectively inhibited ALDH2 activity by 50% without own effect on cell apoptosis, and significantly enhanced antimycin A-induced cardiomyocytes apoptosis from 33.5±4.4 to 56.5±6.4% (Hochest method, p<0.05), and from 57.9±1.9 to 74.0±11.9% (FACS, p<0.05). Phosphorylation of activated MAPK signaling pathway, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 was also increased in antimycin A and daidzin treated cardiomyocytes compared to the cells treated with antimycin A alone. These findings indicated that modifying mitochondrial ALDH2 activity/expression might be a potential therapeutic option on reducing oxidative insults induced cardiomyocytes apoptosis.

  16. Decreased Vesicular Storage and Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity in Multiple System Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, David S.; Sullivan, Patricia; Holmes, Courtney; Kopin, Irwin J.; Sharabi, Yehonatan; Mash, Deborah C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Parkinson disease (PD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA) share some neuropathologic findings (nigrostriatal dopaminergic lesion, alpha-synuclein deposition) but not others (Lewy bodies in PD, glial cytoplasmic inclusions in MSA). In PD evidence has accrued for a vesicular storage defect and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) inhibition in residual dopaminergic terminals, resulting in accumulation of the toxic dopamine (DA) metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL). In this study we asked whether MSA entails a similar abnormal neurochemical pattern. Methods DA and its main neuronal metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), norepinephrine (NE) and its main neuronal metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG), the catecholamine precursor DOPA, and DOPAL were measured in striatal and frontal cortical tissue from patients with pathologically proven end-stage MSA (N=15), sporadic PD (N=17), and control subjects (N=18). Results Compared to the control group, the MSA and PD groups had similarly decreased putamen DA (by 96% and 93%, p<0.0001), DOPAC (97% and 95%, p<0.0001), NE (91% and 74%, p<0.0001), and DHPG (81% and 74%, p<0.0001). In the MSA and PD groups, ratios of DOPAL:DA were 2.3 and 3.5 times control and DHPG:NE 3.1 and 2.6 times control, while DOPAC:DOPAL ratios were decreased by 61% and 74%. In both diseases cortical NE and DHPG were decreased, while DA and DOPAC were not. Conclusions MSA and PD entail a catecholamine metabolic profile indicating impaired vesicular storage, decreased ALDH activity, and DOPAL buildup, which may be part of a common pathway in catecholamine neuronal death. Targeting this pathway by interfering with catecholaldehyde production or effects constitutes a novel treatment approach. PMID:25829070

  17. High Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity Identifies a Subset of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells with Vascular Regenerative Potential.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Stephen E; Kuljanin, Miljan; Cooper, Tyler T; Putman, David M; Lajoie, Gilles A; Hess, David A

    2017-03-15

    During culture expansion, multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) differentially express aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), an intracellular detoxification enzyme that protects long-lived cells against oxidative stress. Thus, MSC selection based on ALDH-activity may be used to reduce heterogeneity and distinguish MSC subsets with improved regenerative potency. After expansion of human bone marrow-derived MSCs, cell progeny was purified based on low versus high ALDH-activity (ALDH(hi) ) by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and each subset was compared for multipotent stromal and provascular regenerative functions. Both ALDH(l) ° and ALDH(hi) MSC subsets demonstrated similar expression of stromal cell (>95% CD73(+) , CD90(+) , CD105(+) ) and pericyte (>95% CD146(+) ) surface markers and showed multipotent differentiation into bone, cartilage, and adipose cells in vitro. Conditioned media (CDM) generated by ALDH(hi) MSCs demonstrated a potent proliferative and prosurvival effect on human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) under serum-free conditions and augmented HMVEC tube-forming capacity in growth factor-reduced matrices. After subcutaneous transplantation within directed in vivo angiogenesis assay implants into immunodeficient mice, ALDH(hi) MSC or CDM produced by ALDH(hi) MSC significantly augmented murine vascular cell recruitment and perfused vessel infiltration compared with ALDH(l) ° MSC. Although both subsets demonstrated strikingly similar mRNA expression patterns, quantitative proteomic analyses performed on subset-specific CDM revealed the ALDH(hi) MSC subset uniquely secreted multiple proangiogenic cytokines (vascular endothelial growth factor beta, platelet derived growth factor alpha, and angiogenin) and actively produced multiple factors with chemoattractant (transforming growth factor-β, C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 1, 2, and 3 (GRO), C-C motif chemokine ligand 5 (RANTES), monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), interleukin [IL]-6, IL-8

  18. The oxidation state of active site thiols determines activity of saccharopine dehydrogenase at low pH.

    PubMed

    Bobyk, Kostyantyn D; Kim, Sang Gon; Kumar, Vidya Prasanna; Kim, Sung-Kun; West, Ann H; Cook, Paul F

    2011-09-15

    Saccharopine dehydrogenase catalyzes the NAD-dependent conversion of saccharopine to generate L-lysine and α-ketoglutarate. A disulfide bond between cysteine 205 and cysteine 249, in the vicinity of the dinucleotide-binding site, is observed in structures of the apoenzyme, while a dithiol is observed in a structure with AMP bound, suggesting preferential binding of the dinucleotide to reduced enzyme. Mutation of C205 to S gave increased values of V/E(t) and V/KE(t) at pH 7 compared to wild type. Primary deuterium and solvent deuterium kinetic isotope effects suggest the catalytic pathway, which includes the hydride transfer and hydrolysis steps, contributes more to rate limitation in C205S, but the rates of the two steps relative to one another remain the same. There is a large increase in the rate constants V₁/E(t) and V₁/K(NAD)Et at pH values below 7 compared to WT. Data indicate the low pH increase in activity results from a decreased sensitivity of the C205S mutant enzyme to the protonation state of an enzyme group with a pK(a) of about 7, likely responsible for a pH-dependent conformational change. Reduction of WT and C205S mutant enzymes with TCEP gives equal activities at pH 6, consistent with the increased activity observed for the C205S mutant enzyme.

  19. Threonine-Insensitive Homoserine Dehydrogenase From Soybean: Genomic Organization, Kinetic Mechanism, and In vivo Activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspartate kinase (AK) and homoserine dehydrogenase (HSD) functions as key regulatory enzymes at branch points in the aspartate amino acid pathway and are feedback inhibited by threonine. In plants, the biochemical properties of AK and bifunctional AK-HSD enzymes have been characterized, but the mol...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure the activity of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of...

  1. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure the activity of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of...

  2. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure the activity of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of...

  3. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure the activity of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of...

  4. Aldehyde dehydrogenase activity selects for the holoclone phenotype in prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Doherty, R.E.; Haywood-Small, S.L.; Sisley, K.; Cross, N.A.

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isolated ALDH{sup Hi} PC3 cells preferentially form primitive holoclone-type colonies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Primitive holoclone colonies are predominantly ALDH{sup Lo} but contain rare ALDH{sup Hi} cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Holoclone-forming cells are not restricted to the ALDH{sup Hi} population. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ALDH phenotypic plasticity occurs in PC3 cells (ALDH{sup Lo} to ALDH{sup Hi} and vice versa). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ALDH{sup Hi} cells are observed but very rare in PC3 spheroids grown in stem cell medium. -- Abstract: Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH) activity is considered to be a marker of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in many tumour models, since these cells are more proliferative and tumourigenic than ALDH{sup Lo} cells in experimental models. However it is unclear whether all CSC-like cells are within the ALDH{sup Hi} population, or whether all ALDH{sup Hi} cells are highly proliferative and tumourigenic. The ability to establish a stem cell hierarchy in vitro, whereby sub-populations of cells have differing proliferative and differentiation capacities, is an alternate indication of the presence of stem cell-like populations within cell lines. In this study, we have examined the interaction between ALDH status and the ability to establish a stem cell hierarchy in PC3 prostate cancer cells. We demonstrate that PC3 cells contain a stem cell hierarchy, and isolation of ALDH{sup Hi} cells enriches for the most primitive holoclone population, however holoclone formation is not restricted to ALDH{sup Hi} cells. In addition, we show that ALDH activity undergoes phenotypic plasticity, since the ALDH{sup Lo} population can develop ALDH{sup Hi} populations comparable to parental cells within 2 weeks in culture. Furthermore, we show that the majority of ALDH{sup Hi} cells are found within the least primitive paraclone population, which is circumvented by culturing PC3 cells as spheroids in

  5. Lactic acid production by Rhizopus oryzae transformants with modified lactate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Skory, C D

    2004-04-01

    Rhizopus oryzae is capable of producing high levels of lactic acid by the fermentation of glucose. Yields typically vary over 60-80%, with the remaining glucose diverted primarily into ethanol fermentation. The goal of this work was to increase lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, so lactic acid fermentation could more effectively compete for available pyruvate. Three different constructs, pLdhA71X, pLdhA48XI, and pLdhA89VII, containing various lengths of the ldhA gene fragment, were transformed into R. oryzae. This fungus rarely integrates DNA used for transformation, but instead relies on extra-chromosomal replication in a high-copy number. Plasmid pLdhA48XI was linearized prior to transformation in order to facilitate integration into the pyrG gene used for selection. Isolates transformed with ldhA containing plasmid were compared with both the wild-type parent strain and the auxotrophic recipient strain containing vector only. All isolates transformed with pLdhA71X or pLdhA48XI had multiple copies of the ldhA gene that resulted in ldhA transcript accumulation, LDH specific activity, and lactic acid production higher than the controls. Integration of plasmid pLdhA48XI increased the stability of the strain, but did not seem to offer any benefit for increasing lactic acid production. Since lactic acid fermentation competes with ethanol and fumaric acid production, it was not unexpected that increased lactic acid production was always concomitant with decreased ethanol and fumaric acid. Plasmid pLdhA71X, containing a large ldhA fragment (6.1 kb), routinely yielded higher levels of lactic acid than the smaller region (3.3 kb) used to construct plasmid pLdhA48XI. The greatest levels of ldhA transcript and enzyme production occurred with isolates transformed with plasmid pLdhA89VII. However, these transformants always produced less lactic acid and higher amounts of ethanol, fumaric, and glycerol compared with the control.

  6. Alanine 310 is important for the activity of 1,4-α-glucan branching enzyme from Geobacillus thermoglucosidans STB02.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiting; Li, Caiming; Gu, Zhengbiao; Xin, Chenhao; Cheng, Li; Hong, Yan; Li, Zhaofeng

    2017-04-01

    1,4-α-Glucan branching enzyme (GBE) catalyzes the formation of α-1,6 branch points in starch or glycogen by hydrolyzing α-1,4-glucosidic linkages and then synthesizing α-1,6-glucosidic linkages. In the GBE from Geobacillus thermoglucosidans STB02, alanine 310 (Ala310) is located in conserved region II. An analysis of the amino acid sequence shows that Ala310 is highly conserved in the prokaryotic GBE subfamily. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to determine the function of Ala310 in GBE. Replacement of Ala310 with glycine, aspartate, asparagine, isoleucine, glutamate, or glutamine resulted in mutant enzymes with less than 10% to 25% of wild-type activity when amylopectin or amylose was used as substrate. Studies using high-performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD) showed that A310G mutant had no effect on the transfer pattern, but the branching activity had been repressed to a large extent. Kinetic analysis also showed that mutations of Ala310 had an effect on the KM value that changed the preferred substrate from amylopectin to amylose. These results show that Ala310 is important for the catalytic activity of the GBE from G. thermoglucosidans STB02.

  7. Direct imaging of dehydrogenase activity within living cells using enzyme-dependent fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (ED-FRAP).

    PubMed Central

    Combs, C A; Balaban, R S

    2001-01-01

    Reduced nicotine adenine dinucleotide (NADH) is a key metabolite involved in cellular energy conversion and many redox reactions. We describe the use of confocal microscopy in conjunction with enzyme-dependent fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (ED-FRAP) of NADH as a topological assay of NADH generation capacity within living cardiac myocytes. Quantitative validation of this approach was performed using a dehydrogenase system, in vitro. In intact cells the NADH ED-FRAP was sensitive to temperature (Q(10) of 2.5) and to dehydrogenase activation by dichloroacetate or cAMP (twofold increase for each). In addition, NADH ED-FRAP was correlated with flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD(+)) fluorescence. These data, coupled with the cellular patterns of NADH ED-FRAP changes with dehydrogenase stimulation, suggest that NADH ED-FRAP is localized to the mitochondria. These results suggest that ED-FRAP enables measurement of regional dynamics of mitochondrial NADH production in intact cells, thus providing information regarding region-specific intracellular redox reactions and energy metabolism. PMID:11259315

  8. [Comparison of changes in succinate dehydrogenase activity in blood lymphocytes and modification of radiosensitivity by exogenous hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Gaĭdamakin, A N; Abramov, M M

    1987-01-01

    Radioprotective efficiency of gas hypoxic mixtures (GHM) containing 5-12% of oxygen and the rate of the reaction of succinate dehydrogenase (VSDG) activity in peripheral blood lymphocytes upon breathing GHM were comparatively studied in rats and dogs. VSDG was 4393.5 (%O2)-2.58 and 130.76 (%O2)-1.42 in dogs and rats respectively. Taking into account that DMF in rats is a function of oxygen concentration in the mixture one can obtain a formula for determining a dose modifying factor (DMF) as a function of the rate of SDG activity reaction.

  9. Polarized electric field effects on the regulation of succinate dehydrogenase activity in amphibian muscle and liver: kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Subrahamanyam, K; Reddy, G R; Babu, G R; Chetty, C S

    1989-04-01

    Electropolarity treatment (0.8 V/DC/Cm) was given to the gastrocnemius muscle of Bufo melanostictus every day for 5 min. for 5 days, and kinetic study of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) in muscle and liver was conducted with different effectors - sodium malonate, ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA), calcium chloride (CACl2) and sodium citrate. Of the four modulators tested, the malonate and EDTA inhibited while sodium citrate and CACl2 activated the enzyme. The significance of the modulation in SDH activity to different extents was discussed.

  10. Inhibition by N'-nitrosonornicotine of the catalytic activity of glutamate dehydrogenase in alpha-ketoglutarate amination.

    PubMed

    Mao, You-An; Zhong, Ke-Jun; Wei, Wan-Zhi; Wei, Xin-Liang; Lu, Hong-Bing

    2005-02-01

    The effect of N'-nitrosonornicotine (NNN), one of the tobacco-specific nitrosamines, on the catalytic activity of glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH) in the alpha-ketoglutarate amination, using reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide as coenzyme, was studied by a chronoamperometric method. The maximum reaction rate of the enzyme-catalyzed reaction and the Michaelis-Menten constant, or the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant, were determined in the absence and presence of NNN. NNN remarkably inhibited the bio-catalysis activity of GLDH, and was a reversible competitive inhibitior with K(i), estimated as 199 micromol l(-1) at 25 degrees C and pH 8.0.

  11. Loss of Mitochondrial Malate Dehydrogenase Activity Alters Seed Metabolism Impairing Seed Maturation and Post-Germination Growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sew, Yun Shin; Ströher, Elke; Fenske, Ricarda; Millar, A Harvey

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH; EC 1.1.1.37) has multiple roles; the most commonly described is its catalysis of the interconversion of malate and oxaloacetate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The roles of mMDH in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seed development and germination were investigated in mMDH1 and mMDH2 double knockout plants. A significant proportion of mmdh1mmdh2 seeds were nonviable and developed only to torpedo-shaped embryos, indicative of arrested seed embryo growth during embryogenesis. The viable mmdh1mmdh2 seeds had an impaired maturation process that led to slow germination rates as well as retarded post-germination growth, shorter root length, and decreased root biomass. During seed development, mmdh1mmdh2 showed a paler green phenotype than the wild type and exhibited deficiencies in reserve accumulation and reduced final seed biomass. The respiration rate of mmdh1mmdh2 seeds was significantly elevated throughout their maturation, consistent with the previously reported higher respiration rate in mmdh1mmdh2 leaves. Mutant seeds showed a consistently higher content of free amino acids (branched-chain amino acids, alanine, serine, glycine, proline, and threonine), differences in sugar and sugar phosphate levels, and lower content of 2-oxoglutarate. Seed-aging assays showed that quiescent mmdh1mmdh2 seeds lost viability more than 3 times faster than wild-type seeds. Together, these data show the important role of mMDH in the earliest phases of the life cycle of Arabidopsis.

  12. The effect of active-site isoleucine to alanine mutation on the DHFR catalyzed hydride-transfer

    PubMed Central

    Stojković, Vanja; Perissinotti, Laura L.; Lee, Jeeyeon; Benkovic, Stephen J.; Kohen, Amnon

    2015-01-01

    Comparison of the nature of hydride transfer in wild-type and active site mutant (I14A) of dihydrofolate reductase suggests that the size of this side chain at position 14 modulates H-tunneling. PMID:20972508

  13. A novel C-S lyase from the latex-producing plant Taraxacum brevicorniculatum displays alanine aminotransferase and l-cystine lyase activity.

    PubMed

    Munt, Oliver; Prüfer, Dirk; Schulze Gronover, Christian

    2013-01-01

    We isolated a novel pyridoxal-5-phosphate-dependent l-cystine lyase from the dandelion Taraxacum brevicorniculatum. Real time qPCR analysis showed that C-S lyase from Taraxacum brevicorniculatum (TbCSL) mRNA is expressed in all plant tissues, although at relatively low levels in the latex and pedicel. The 1251 bp TbCSL cDNA encodes a protein with a calculated molecular mass of 46,127 kDa. It is homologous to tyrosine and alanine aminotransferases (AlaATs) as well as to an Arabidopsis thaliana carbon-sulfur lyase (C-S lyase) (SUR1), which has a role in glucosinolate metabolism. TbCSL displayed in vitrol-cystine lyase and AlaAT activities of 4 and 19nkatmg(-1) protein, respectively. However, we detected no in vitro tyrosine aminotransferase (TyrAT) activity and RNAi knockdown of the enzyme had no effect on phenotype, showing that TbCSL substrates might be channeled into redundant pathways. TbCSL is in vivo localized in the cytosol and functions as a C-S lyase or an aminotransferase in planta, but the purified enzyme converts at least two substrates specifically, and can thus be utilized for further in vitro applications.

  14. Biological activity of pyrazole and imidazole-dehydroepiandrosterone derivatives on the activity of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Marisa; Posada, Alejandro; Sánchez-Márquez, Araceli; Heuze, Yvonne; Moreno, Isabel; Soriano, Juan; Garrido, Mariana; Cortés, Francisco; Bratoeff, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    The enzyme type 5 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 5 (17β-HSD5) catalyzes the transformation of androstenedione (4-dione) to testosterone (T) in the prostate. This metabolic pathway remains active in cancer patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy. Since physicians seek to develop advantageous and better new treatments to increase the average survival of these patients, we synthesized several different dehydroepiandrosterone derivatives. These compounds have a pyrazole or imidazole function at C-17 and an ester moiety at C-3 and were studied as inhibitors of 17β-HSD5. The kinetic parameters of this enzyme were determined for use in inhibition assays. Their pharmacological effect was also determined on gonadectomized hamsters treated with Δ(4)-androstenedione (4-dione) or testosterone (T) and/or the novel compounds. The results indicated that the incorporation of a heterocycle at C-17 induced strong 17β-HSD5 inhibition. These derivatives decreased flank organ diameter and prostate weight in castrated hamsters treated with T or 4-dione. Inhibition of 17β-HSD5 by these compounds could have therapeutic potential for the treatment of prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  15. Random mutagenesis improves the low-temperature activity of the tetrameric 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase from the hyperthermophile Sulfolobus tokodaii.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Michika; Uno, Mayumi; Akanuma, Satoshi; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2008-12-01

    In general, the enzymes of thermophilic organisms are more resistant to thermal denaturation than are those of mesophilic or psychrophilic organisms. Further, as is true for their mesophilic and psychrophilic counterparts, the activities of thermophilic enzymes are smaller at temperatures that are less than the optimal temperature. In an effort to characterize the properties that would improve its activity at temperatures less than the optimal, we subjected the thermostable Sulfolobus tokodaii (S. tokodaii) 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase to two rounds of random mutagenesis and selected for improved low-temperature activity using an in vivo recombinant Escherichia coli system. Five dehydrogenase mutants were purified and their catalytic properties and thermostabilities characterized. The mutations favorably affect the K(m) values for NAD (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) and/or the k(cat) values. The results of thermal stability measurements show that, although the mutations somewhat decrease the stability of the enzyme, the mutants are still very resistant to heat. The locations and properties of the mutations found for the S. tokodaii enzyme are compared with those found for the previously isolated low-temperature adapted mutants of the homologous Thermus thermophilus enzyme. However, there are few, if any, common properties that enhance the low-temperature activities of both enzymes; therefore, there may be many ways to improve the low-temperature catalytic activity of a thermostable enzyme.

  16. A comprehensive alanine-scanning mutagenesis study reveals roles for salt bridges in the structure and activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase.

    PubMed

    Bian, Fei; Yue, Shousong; Peng, Zhenying; Zhang, Xiaowei; Chen, Gao; Yu, Jinhui; Xuan, Ning; Bi, Yuping

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between salt bridges and stability/enzymatic activity is unclear. We studied this relationship by systematic alanine-scanning mutation analysis using the typical M4 family metalloprotease Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase (PAE, also known as pseudolysin) as a model. Structural analysis revealed seven salt bridges in the PAE structure. We constructed ten mutants for six salt bridges. Among these mutants, six (Asp189Ala, Arg179Ala, Asp201Ala, Arg205Ala, Arg245Ala and Glu249Ala) were active and four (Asp168Ala, Arg198Ala, Arg253Ala, and Arg279Ala) were inactive. Five mutants were purified, and their catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km), half-lives (t1/2) and thermal unfolding curves were compared with those of PAE. Mutants Asp189Ala and Arg179Ala both showed decreased thermal stabilities and increased activities, suggesting that the salt bridge Asp189-Arg179 stabilizes the protein at the expense of catalytic efficiency. In contrast, mutants Asp201Ala and Arg205Ala both showed slightly increased thermal stability and slightly decreased activity, suggesting that the salt bridge Asp201-Arg205 destabilizes the protein. Mutant Glu249Ala is related to a C-terminal salt bridge network and showed both decreased thermal stability and decreased activity. Furthermore, Glu249Ala showed a thermal unfolding curve with three discernable states [the native state (N), the partially unfolded state (I) and the unfolded state (U)]. In comparison, there were only two discernable states (N and U) in the thermal unfolding curve of PAE. These results suggest that Glu249 is important for catalytic efficiency, stability and unfolding cooperativity. This study represents a systematic mutational analyses of salt bridges in the model metalloprotease PAE and provides important insights into the structure-function relationship of enzymes.

  17. Regulation of Pyrroloquinoline Quinone-Dependent Glucose Dehydrogenase Activity in the Model Rhizosphere-Dwelling Bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    PubMed Central

    An, Ran

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Soil-dwelling microbes solubilize mineral phosphates by secreting gluconic acid, which is produced from glucose by a periplasmic glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) that requires pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) as a redox coenzyme. While GDH-dependent phosphate solubilization has been observed in numerous bacteria, little is known concerning the mechanism by which this process is regulated. Here we use the model rhizosphere-dwelling bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440 to explore GDH activity and PQQ synthesis, as well as gene expression of the GDH-encoding gene (gcd) and PQQ biosynthesis genes (pqq operon) while under different growth conditions. We also use reverse transcription-PCR to identify transcripts from the pqq operon to more accurately map the operon structure. GDH specific activity and PQQ levels vary according to growth condition, with the highest levels of both occurring when glucose is used as the sole carbon source and under conditions of low soluble phosphate. Under these conditions, however, PQQ levels limit in vitro phosphate solubilization. GDH specific activity data correlate well with gcd gene expression data, and the levels of expression of the pqqF and pqqB genes mirror the levels of PQQ synthesized, suggesting that one or both of these genes may serve to modulate PQQ levels according to the growth conditions. The pqq gene cluster (pqqFABCDEG) encodes at least two independent transcripts, and expression of the pqqF gene appears to be under the control of an independent promoter and terminator. IMPORTANCE Plant growth promotion can be enhanced by soil- and rhizosphere-dwelling bacteria by a number of different methods. One method is by promoting nutrient acquisition from soil. Phosphorus is an essential nutrient that plants obtain through soil, but in many cases it is locked up in forms that are not available for plant uptake. Bacteria such as the model bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440 can solubilize insoluble soil phosphates by secreting

  18. Enantioselective Collision-Activated Dissociation of Gas-Phase Tryptophan Induced by Chiral Recognition of Protonated uc(l)-Alanine Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujihara, Akimasa; Matsuyama, Hiroki; Tajiri, Michiko; Wada, Yoshinao; Hayakawa, Shigeo

    2016-06-01

    Enantioselective dissociation in the gas phase is important for enantiomeric enrichment and chiral transmission processes in molecular clouds regarding the origin of homochirality in biomolecules. Enantioselective collision-activated dissociation (CAD) of tryptophan (Trp) and the chiral recognition ability of uc(l)-alanine peptides (uc(l)-Ala n ; n = 2-4) were examined using a linear ion trap mass spectrometer. CAD spectra of gas-phase heterochiral H+(uc(d)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala n ) and homochiral H+(uc(l)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala n ) noncovalent complexes were obtained as a function of the peptide size n. The H2O-elimination product was observed in CAD spectra of both heterochiral and homochiral complexes for n = 2 and 4, and in homochiral H+(uc(l)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3), indicating that the proton is attached to the uc(l)-alanine peptide, and H2O loss occurs from H+(uc(l)-Ala n ) in the noncovalent complexes. H2O loss did not occur in heterochiral H+(uc(d)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3), where NH3 loss and (H2O + CO) loss were the primary dissociation pathways. In heterochiral H+(uc(d)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3), the protonation site is the amino group of uc(d)-Trp, and NH3 loss and (H2O + CO) loss occur from H+(uc(d)-Trp). uc(l)-Ala peptides recognize uc(d)-Trp through protonation of the amino group for peptide size n = 3. NH3 loss and (H2O + CO) loss from H+(uc(d)-Trp) proceeds via enantioselective CAD in gas-phase heterochiral H+(uc(d)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3) at room temperature, whereas uc(l)-Trp dissociation was not observed in homochiral H+(uc(l)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3). These results suggest that enantioselective dissociation induced by chiral recognition of uc(l)-Ala peptides through protonation could play an important role in enantiomeric enrichment and chiral transmission processes of amino acids.

  19. [Regulation of key enzymes of L-alanine biosynthesis by Brevibacterium flavum producer strains].

    PubMed

    Melkonian, L O; Avetisova, G E; Ambartsumian, A A; Chakhalian, A Kh; Sagian, A S

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms of L-alanine overproduction by Brevibacterium flavum producer strains were studied. It was shown that beta-CI-L-alanine is an inhibitor of some key enzymes involved in the synthesis of L-alanine, including alanine transaminase and valine-pyruvate transaminase. Two highly active B. flavum GL1 and GL1 8 producer strains, which are resistant to the inhibitory effect of beta-Cl-L-alanine, were obtained using a parental B. flavum AA5 producer strain, characterized by a reduced activity of alanine racemase (>or=98%). It was demonstrated that the increased L-alanine synthesis efficiency observed in the producer strains developed in this work is associated with the absence of inhibition of alanine transaminase by the end product of the biosynthesis reaction, as well as with the effect of derepression of both alanine transaminase and valine-pyruvate transaminase synthesis by the studied compound.

  20. Regulation of Enzyme Activities in Drosophila: Genetic Variation Affecting Induction of Glucose 6-Phosphate and 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenases in Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, Bruce J.; Lucchesi, John C.; Laurie-Ahlberg, C. C.

    1983-01-01

    The genetic basis of modulation by dietary sucrose of the enzyme activities glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) activities in third instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster was investigated, using isogenic lines derived from wild populations. Considerable genetically determined variation in response was detected among lines that differed only in their third chromosome constitution. Comparison of crossreacting material between a responding and a nonresponding line showed that the G6PD activity variation is due to changes in G6PD protein level. These differences in responses are localized in the fat body, with 300 m m sucrose in the diet resulting in a sixfold stimulation of G6PD activity and a fourfold one of 6PGD in the line showing the strongest response. In this tissue, the responses of the two enzymes are closely correlated with one another. Using recombinant lines, we obtained data that suggested the existence of more than one gene on chromosome III involved in the regulation of G6PD in the fat body, and at least one of these genes affects the level of 6PGD as well. PMID:6416921

  1. Effect of sex and age on the activities of lactate dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase in the lungs of rats.

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, A; Yong, S; Sharma, A; Morwood-Clark, M; Lillie, L E; Albassam, M

    1986-01-01

    Since toxicity studies among different laboratories generally involve rats of different sex and age, this study was conducted to investigate the effect of sex, age and animal to animal variation in the activities of lactate dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, bronchoalveolar cell lysate and lung homogenate. Correlation between numbers of bronchoalveolar cells recovered from lungs and enzyme activity in bronchoalveolar cell lysate or lung homogenate supernatant were also investigated. Male rats showed significantly (p less than 0.05) higher activities of alkaline phosphatase in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung homogenate. Animal to animal variation for lactate dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase was higher in lungs than in serum. The number of bronchoalveolar cells recovered from lungs revealed a significant (p less than 0.01) positive correlation with the activities of both enzymes in the supernatant of cell lysates but not in the bronchoalveolar fluid. These results indicated that in an inhalation study interindividual variation in the levels of pulmonary enzymes should be considered in order to minimize the numerous possible sources of experimental error. PMID:3742377

  2. Effect of cinnamon, clove and some of their constituents on the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity and alanine absorption in the rat jejunum.

    PubMed

    Kreydiyyeh, S I; Usta, J; Copti, R

    2000-09-01

    The effect of a water extract of some spices on the in vitro activity of the rat jejunal Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase was investigated. Extracts of nutmeg, cinnamon, clove, cumin, coriander, turmeric and caraway all inhibited the ATPase, while anise seed and white pepper exerted no significant effects. The extracts of clove and cinnamon had the most potent inhibitory effect on the intestinal ATPase as compared to extracts of other spices. They also inhibited the in vitro Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity in a crude kidney homogenate and the activity of an isolated dog kidney Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase. The alcoholic extract of cinnamon, compared to the aqueous extract, had a stronger inhibitory action on the jejunal enzyme and a lower IC(50) value, which was not significantly different from the one observed with cinnamaldehyde, the major volatile oil present cinnamon, suggesting that in alcoholic extracts cinnamaldehyde is the major inhibitory component. The IC(50) values of eugenol, aqueous clove extract and ethanolic clove extract all fell within the same range and were not significantly different from each other, suggesting that eugenol is the major inhibitory component in both alcoholic and aqueous extracts. Based on the IC(50) values, the order of sensitivity of the enzyme to the spices extracts is as follows: isolated dog kidney ATPase>rat kidney ATPase>rat intestine ATPase. The aqueous extracts of clove and cinnamon also significantly lowered the absorption of alanine from the rat intestine. It was concluded that the active principle(s) in clove and cinnamon can permeate the membrane of the enterocytes and inhibit the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase that provides the driving force for many transport processes.

  3. Fluoride-containing bioactive glasses inhibit pentose phosphate oxidative pathway and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in human osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Bergandi, Loredana; Aina, Valentina; Garetto, Stefano; Malavasi, Gianluca; Aldieri, Elisabetta; Laurenti, Enzo; Matera, Lina; Morterra, Claudio; Ghigo, Dario

    2010-02-12

    Bioactive glasses such as Hench's 45S5 (Bioglass) have applications to tissue engineering as well as bone repair, and the insertion of fluoride in their composition has been proposed to enhance their bioactivity. In view of a potential clinical application, we investigated whether fluoride-containing glasses exert toxic effects on human MG-63 osteoblasts, and whether and how fluoride, which is released in the cell culture medium, might play a role in such cytotoxicity. A 24h incubation with 50 microg/ml (12.5 microg/cm(2)) of fluoride-containing bioactive glasses termed HCaCaF(2) (F content: 5, 10 and 15 mol.%) caused the release of lactate dehydrogenase in the extracellular medium (index of cytotoxicity), the accumulation of intracellular malonyldialdehyde (index of lipoperoxidation), and the increase of glutathione consumption. Furthermore, fluoride-containing glasses inhibited the pentose phosphate oxidative pathway and the glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity. These effects are ascribable to the fluoride content/release of glass powders, since they were mimicked by NaF solutions and were prevented by dimethyl sulfoxide and tempol (two radical scavengers), by superoxide dismutase (a superoxide scavenger), and by glutathione (the most important intracellular antioxidant molecule), but not by apocynin (an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase). The presence of fluoride-containing glasses and NaF caused also the generation of reactive oxygen species, which was prevented by superoxide dismutase and catalase. The data suggest that fluoride released from glasses is the cause of MG-63 cell oxidative damage and is independent of NADPH oxidase activation. Our data provide a new mechanism to explain F(-) ions toxicity: fluoride could trigger, at least in part, an oxidative stress via inhibition of the pentose phosphate oxidative pathway and, in particular, through the oxidative inhibition of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase.

  4. Carbon Dioxide Effects on Ethanol Production, Pyruvate Decarboxylase, and Alcohol Dehydrogenase Activities in Anaerobic Sweet Potato Roots 1

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ling A.; Hammett, Larry K.; Pharr, David M.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of varied anaerobic atmospheres on the metabolism of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas [L.] Lam.) roots was studied. The internal gas atmospheres of storage roots changed rapidly when the roots were submerged under water. O2 and N2 gases disappeared quickly and were replaced by CO2. There were no appreciable differences in gas composition among the four cultivars that were studied. Under different anaerobic conditions, ethanol concentration in the roots was highest in a CO2 environment, followed by submergence and a N2 environment in all the cultivars except one. A positive relationship was found between ethanol production and pyruvate decarboxylase activity from both 100% CO2-treated and 100% N2-treated roots. CO2 atmospheres also resulted in higher pyruvate decarboxylase activity than did N2 atmospheres. Concentrations of CO2 were higher within anaerobic roots than those in the ambient anaerobic atmosphere. The level of pyruvate decarboxylase and ethanol in anaerobic roots was proportional to the ambient CO2 concentration. The measurable activity of pyruvate decarboxylase that was present in the roots was about 100 times less than that of alcohol dehydrogenase. Considering these observations, it is suggested that the rate-limiting enzyme for ethanol biosynthesis in sweet potato storage roots under anoxia is likely to be pyruvate decarboxylase rather than alcohol dehydrogenase. PMID:16662798

  5. Iron-induced epigenetic abnormalities of mouse bone marrow through aberrant activation of aconitase and isocitrate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Masayo; Tanaka, Hiroki; Toki, Yasumichi; Hatayama, Mayumi; Ito, Satoshi; Addo, Lynda; Shindo, Motohiro; Sasaki, Katsunori; Ikuta, Katsuya; Ohtake, Takaaki; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Torimoto, Yoshihiro; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2016-10-01

    Iron overload remains a concern in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients. Iron chelation therapy (ICT) thus plays an integral role in the management of these patients. Moreover, ICT has been shown to prolong leukemia-free survival in MDS patients; however, the mechanisms responsible for this effect are unclear. Iron is a key molecule for regulating cytosolic aconitase 1 (ACO1). Additionally, the mutation of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH), the enzyme downstream of ACO1 in the TCA cycle, is associated with epigenetic abnormalities secondary to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) and DNA methylation. However, epigenetic abnormalities observed in many MDS patients occur without IDH mutation. We hypothesized that iron itself activates the ACO1-IDH pathway, which may increase 2-HG and DNA methylation, and eventually contribute to leukemogenesis without IDH mutation. Using whole RNA sequencing of bone marrow cells in iron-overloaded mice, we observed that the enzymes, phosphoglucomutase 1, glycogen debranching enzyme, and isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (Idh1), which are involved in glycogen and glucose metabolism, were increased. Digital PCR further showed that Idh1 and Aco1, enzymes involved in the TCA cycle, were also elevated. Additionally, enzymatic activities of TCA cycle and methylated DNA were increased. Iron chelation reversed these phenomena. In conclusion, iron activation of glucose metabolism causes an increase of 2-HG and DNA methylation.

  6. Aspartate 46, a second sphere ligand to the catalytic zinc, is essential for activity of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Ganzhorn, A.J.; Plapp, B.V.

    1987-05-01

    The crystal structure of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) shows a hydrogen bond between the imidazole of His-67, a ligand to the active site zinc, and the carboxylate of Asp-49. Both residues are conserved in alcohol dehydrogenases. Directed mutagenesis was used to replace the homologous Asp-46 in ADH I from S. cerevisiae with asparagine. The substitution did not alter the overall structure of the enzyme, as judged by CD measurements, but the removal of a negative charge was evident in electrophoresis, and in the absorption and fluorescence spectra. The mutant and wild-type enzymes had similar zinc contents as determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Active site titration and steady state kinetics indicated that binding of coenzymes, substrates and substrate analogs is 4-24 fold weaker in the asparagine enzyme. The turnover numbers were reduced by a factor of 70 for ethanol oxidation and 30 for acetaldehyde reduction at pH 7.3, 30/sup 0/C. Dead end inhibition studies and the kinetic isotope effect showed that NAD and ethanol binding follow a rapid equilibrium random mechanism as opposed to the ordered mechanism found for ADH I. They conclude that the carboxyl group of Asp-46 is essential for the electrostatic environment near the active site zinc. Amidation may affect the geometry and/or coordination of the metal complex.

  7. Solution structure and alanine scan of a spider toxin that affects the activation of mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Corzo, Gerardo; Sabo, Jennifer K; Bosmans, Frank; Billen, Bert; Villegas, Elba; Tytgat, Jan; Norton, Raymond S

    2007-02-16

    Magi 5, from the hexathelid spider Macrothele gigas, is a 29-residue polypeptide containing three disulfide bridges. It binds specifically to receptor site 4 on mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels and competes with scorpion beta-toxins, such as Css IV from Centruroides suffusus suffusus. As a consequence, Magi 5 shifts the activation voltage of the mammalian rNav1.2a channel to more hyperpolarized voltages, whereas the insect channel, DmNav1, is not affected. To gain insight into toxin-channel interactions, Magi 5 and 23 analogues were synthesized. The three-dimensional structure of Magi 5 in aqueous solution was determined, and its voltage-gated sodium channel-binding surfaces were mapped onto this structure using data from electrophysiological measurements on a series of Ala-substituted analogues. The structure clearly resembles the inhibitor cystine knot structural motif, although the triple-stranded beta-sheet typically found in that motif is partially distorted in Magi 5. The interactive surface of Magi 5 toward voltage-gated sodium channels resembles in some respects the Janus-faced atracotoxins, with functionally important charged residues on one face of the toxin and hydrophobic residues on the other. Magi 5 also resembles the scorpion beta-toxin Css IV, which has distinct nonpolar and charged surfaces that are critical for channel binding and has a key Glu involved in voltage sensor trapping. These two distinct classes of toxin, with different amino acid sequences and different structures, may utilize similar groups of residues on their surface to achieve the common end of modifying voltage-gated sodium channel function.

  8. 3D-QSAR Studies on a Series of Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Inhibitors: Analogues of the Active Metabolite of Leflunomide

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shun-Lai; He, Mao-Yu; Du, Hong-Guang

    2011-01-01

    The active metabolite of the novel immunosuppressive agent leflunomide has been shown to inhibit the enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH). This enzyme catalyzes the fourth step in de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis. Self-organizing molecular field analysis (SOMFA), a simple three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) method is used to study the correlation between the molecular properties and the biological activities of a series of analogues of the active metabolite. The statistical results, cross-validated rCV2 (0.664) and non cross-validated r2 (0.687), show a good predictive ability. The final SOMFA model provides a better understanding of DHODH inhibitor-enzyme interactions, and may be useful for further modification and improvement of inhibitors of this important enzyme. PMID:21686163

  9. Alanine repeats influence protein localization in splicing speckles and paraspeckles.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shuo-Hsiu; Chang, Wei-Lun; Lu, Chia-Chen; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2014-12-16

    Mammalian splicing regulatory protein RNA-binding motif protein 4 (RBM4) has an alanine repeat-containing C-terminal domain (CAD) that confers both nuclear- and splicing speckle-targeting activities. Alanine-repeat expansion has pathological potential. Here we show that the alanine-repeat tracts influence the subnuclear targeting properties of the RBM4 CAD in cultured human cells. Notably, truncation of the alanine tracts redistributed a portion of RBM4 to paraspeckles. The alanine-deficient CAD was sufficient for paraspeckle targeting. On the other hand, alanine-repeat expansion reduced the mobility of RBM4 and impaired its splicing activity. We further took advantage of the putative coactivator activator (CoAA)-RBM4 conjoined splicing factor, CoAZ, to investigate the function of the CAD in subnuclear targeting. Transiently expressed CoAZ formed discrete nuclear foci that emerged and subsequently separated-fully or partially-from paraspeckles. Alanine-repeat expansion appeared to prevent CoAZ separation from paraspeckles, resulting in their complete colocalization. CoAZ foci were dynamic but, unlike paraspeckles, were resistant to RNase treatment. Our results indicate that the alanine-rich CAD, in conjunction with its conjoined RNA-binding domain(s), differentially influences the subnuclear localization and biogenesis of RBM4 and CoAZ.

  10. The ribavirin analog ICN 17261 demonstrates reduced toxicity and antiviral effects with retention of both immunomodulatory activity and reduction of hepatitis-induced serum alanine aminotransferase levels.

    PubMed

    Tam, R C; Ramasamy, K; Bard, J; Pai, B; Lim, C; Averett, D R

    2000-05-01

    The demonstrated utility of the nucleoside analog ribavirin in the treatment of certain viral diseases can be ascribed to its multiple distinct properties. These properties may vary in relative importance in differing viral disease conditions and include the direct inhibition of viral replication, the promotion of T-cell-mediated immune responses via an enhanced type 1 cytokine response, and a reduction of circulating alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels associated with hepatic injury. Ribavirin also has certain known toxicities, including the induction of anemia upon chronic administration. To determine if all these properties are linked, we compared the D-nucleoside ribavirin to its L-enantiomer (ICN 17261) with regard to these properties. Strong similarities were seen for these two compounds with respect to induction of type 1 cytokine bias in vitro, enhancement of type 1 cytokine responses in vivo, and the reduction of serum ALT levels in a murine hepatitis model. In contrast, ICN 17261 had no in vitro antiviral activity against a panel of RNA and DNA viruses, while ribavirin exhibited its characteristic activity profile. Importantly, the preliminary in vivo toxicology profile of ICN 17261 is significantly more favorable than that of ribavirin. Administration of 180 mg of ICN 17261 per kg of body weight to rats by oral gavage for 4 weeks generated substantial serum levels of drug but no observable clinical pathology, whereas equivalent doses of ribavirin induced a significant anemia and leukopenia. Thus, structural modification of ribavirin can dissociate its immunomodulatory properties from its antiviral and toxicologic properties, resulting in a compound (ICN 17261) with interesting therapeutic potential.

  11. Misfolding caused by the pathogenic mutation G47R on the minor allele of alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase and chaperoning activity of pyridoxine.

    PubMed

    Montioli, Riccardo; Oppici, Elisa; Dindo, Mirco; Roncador, Alessandro; Gotte, Giovanni; Cellini, Barbara; Borri Voltattorni, Carla

    2015-10-01

    Liver peroxisomal alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT), a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) enzyme, exists as two polymorphic forms, the major (AGT-Ma) and the minor (AGT-Mi) haplotype. Deficit of AGT causes Primary Hyperoxaluria Type 1 (PH1), an autosomal recessive rare disease. Although ~one-third of the 79 disease-causing missense mutations segregates on AGT-Mi, only few of them are well characterized. Here for the first time the molecular and cellular defects of G47R-Mi are reported. When expressed in Escherichia coli, the recombinant purified G47R-Mi variant exhibits only a 2.5-fold reduction of its kcat, and its apo form displays a remarkably decreased PLP binding affinity, increased dimer-monomer equilibrium dissociation constant value, susceptibility to thermal denaturation and to N-terminal region proteolytic cleavage, and aggregation propensity. When stably expressed in a mammalian cell line, we found ~95% of the intact form of the variant in the insoluble fraction, and proteolyzed (within the N-terminal region) and aggregated forms both in the soluble and insoluble fractions. Moreover, the intact and nicked forms have a peroxisomal and a mitochondrial localization, respectively. Unlike what already seen for G41R-Mi, exposure of G47R-Mi expressing cells to pyridoxine (PN) remarkably increases the expression level and the specific activity in a dose-dependent manner, reroutes all the protein to peroxisomes, and rescues its functionality. Although the mechanism of the different effect of PN on the variants G47R-Mi and G41R-Mi remains elusive, the chaperoning activity of PN may be of value in the therapy of patients bearing the G47R mutation.

  12. Uridine diphosphoglucose dehydrogenase activity in normal and rheumatoid synovium: the description of a specialized synovial lining cell.

    PubMed

    Pitsillides, A A; Wilkinson, L S; Mehdizadeh, S; Bayliss, M T; Edwards, J C

    1993-02-01

    Although synovial lining cells (SLC) have been implicated in the production of hyaluronan (HA), which is found at particularly high concentrations in synovial fluid, the degree to which individual cells within the synovium are adapted to this particular function remains to be elucidated. Uridine diphosphoglucose dehydrogenase (UDPGD) activity is the irreversible, rate-limiting step in the production of UDP-glucuronate, an essential monosaccharide in the synthesis of HA. We have assessed the UDPGD activity, microdensitometrically, in individual lining cells of normal and rheumatoid (RA) synovium, using a modified quantitative cytochemical method. In normal synovium, high activity was confined to the cells of the lining with negligible activity in the deeper subintima. The mean UDPGD activity/cell in lining cells of rheumatoid synovium was significantly lower than the activity in normal SLC. In some samples of RA and normal synovium, a bimodal distribution of cells was evident in the lining on the basis of UDPGD activity, a zone of cells in the basal layers with high UDPGD activity and a separate population of cells in more superficial layers with relatively low UDPGD activity. The results suggest that a particular population of cells is present, consistently in normal and more variably in RA synovial lining, which have high UDPGD activity/cell and may be involved in the production of HA. Furthermore, in RA synovium both the UDPGD activity/cell and the relative proportion of these cells within the lining appear to be decreased.

  13. Synthesis, CMC Determination, Antimicrobial Activity and Nucleic Acid Binding of A Surfactant Copper(II) Complex Containing Phenanthroline and Alanine Schiff-Base.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Karuppiah; Sakthinathan, Subramanian; Arunachalam, Sankaralingam

    2014-03-01

    A new water-soluble surfactant copper(II) complex [Cu(sal-ala)(phen)(DA)] (sal-ala = salicylalanine, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, DA = dodecylamine), has been synthesized and characterized by physico-chemical and spectroscopic methods. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) values of this surfactant-copper(II) complex in aqueous solution were obtained from conductance measurements. Specific conductivity data (at 303, 308, 313. 318 and 323 K) served for the evaluation of the temperature-dependent CMC and the thermodynamics of micellization (ΔG(0)m, ΔH(0)m and ΔS(0)m). The interaction of this complex with nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) has been explored by using electronic absorption spectral titration, competitive binding experiment, cyclic voltammetry, circular dichroism (CD) spectra, and viscosity measurements. Electronic absorption studies have revealed that the complex can bind to nucleic acids by the intercalative binding mode which has been verified by viscosity measurements. The DNA binding constants have also been calculated (Kb = 1.2 × 10(5) M(-1) for DNA and Kb = 1.6 × 10(5) M(-1) for RNA). Competitive binding study with ethidium bromide (EB) showed that the complex exhibits the ability to displace the DNA-bound-EB indicating that the complex binds to DNA in strong competition with EB for the intercalative binding site. The presence of hydrophobic ligands, alanine Schiff-base, phenanthroline and long aliphatic chain amine in the complex were responsible for this strong intercalative binding. The surfactant-copper (II) complex was screened for its antibacterial and antifungal activities against various microorganisms. The results were compared with the standard drugs, amikacin(antibacterial) and ketokonazole(antifungal).

  14. Succinate dehydrogenase activity regulates PCB3-quinone induced metabolic oxidative stress and toxicity in HaCaT human keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Wusheng; Sarsour, Ehab H.; Wagner, Brett A.; Doskey, Claire M.; Buettner, Garry R.; Domann, Frederick E.; Goswami, Prabhat C.

    2015-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and their metabolites are environmental pollutants that are known to have adverse health effects. 1-(4-Chlorophenyl)-benzo-2,5-quinone (4-ClBQ), a quinone-metabolite of 4-Monochlorobiphenyl (PCB3, present in the environment and human blood) is toxic to human skin keratinocytes, and breast and prostate epithelial cells. This study investigates the hypothesis that 4-ClBQ-induced metabolic oxidative stress regulates toxicity in human keratinocytes. Results from Seahorse XF96 Analyzer showed that the 4-ClBQ treatment increased extracellular acidification rate, proton production rate, oxygen consumption rate and ATP content, indicative of metabolic oxidative stress. Results from a q-RT-PCR assay showed significant increases in the mRNA levels of hexokinase 2 (hk2), pyruvate kinase M2 (pkm2) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (g6pd), and decreases in the mRNA levels of succinate dehydrogenase (complex II) subunit C and D (sdhc and sdhd). Pharmacological inhibition of G6PD-activity enhanced the toxicity of 4-ClBQ, suggesting that the protective function of the pentose phosphate pathway is functional in 4-ClBQ treated cells. The decrease in sdhc and sdhd expression was associated with a significant decrease in complex II activity and increase in mitochondrial levels of ROS. Overexpression of sdhc and sdhd suppressed 4-ClBQ-induced inhibition of complex II activity, increase in mitochondrial levels of ROS, and toxicity. These results suggest that the 4-ClBQ treatment induces metabolic oxidative stress in HaCaT cells, and while the protective function of the pentose phosphate pathway is active, inhibition of complex II activity sensitizes HaCaT cells to 4-ClBQ induced toxicity. PMID:25417049

  15. Inhibition of 3beta- and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities in rat Leydig cells by perfluorooctane acid.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Binghai; Chu, Yanhui; Hardy, Dianne O; Li, Xiao-kun; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2010-01-01

    Perfluorooctane acid (PFOA) is classified as a persistent organic pollutant and as an endocrine disruptor. The mechanism by which PFOA causes reduced testosterone production in males is not known. We tested our hypothesis that PFOA interferes with Leydig cell steroidogenic enzymes by measuring its effect on 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3beta-HSD) and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 (17beta-HSD3) activities in rat testis microsomes and Leydig cells. The IC(50)s of PFOA and mode of inhibition were assayed. PFOA inhibited microsomal 3beta-HSD with an IC(50) of 53.2+/-25.9 microM and 17beta-HSD3 with an IC(50) 17.7+/-6.8 microM. PFOA inhibited intact Leydig cell 3beta-HSD with an IC(50) of 146.1+/-0.9 microM and 17beta-HSD3 with an IC(50) of 194.8+/-1.0 microM. The inhibitions of 3beta-HSD and 17beta-HSD3 by PFOA were competitive for the substrates. In conclusion, PFOA inhibits 3beta-HSD and 17beta-HSD3 in rat Leydig cells.

  16. Enzyme:nanoparticle bioconjugates with two sequential enzymes: stoichiometry and activity of malate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase on Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Keighron, Jacqueline D; Keating, Christine D

    2010-12-21

    We report the synthesis and characterization of bioconjugates in which the enzymes malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and/or citrate synthase (CS) were adsorbed to 30 nm diameter Au nanoparticles. Enzyme:Au stoichiometry and kinetic parameters (specific activity, k(cat), K(M), and activity per particle) were determined for MDH:Au, CS:Au, and three types of dual-activity MDH/CS:Au bioconjugates. For single-activity bioconjugates (MDH:Au and CS:Au), the number of enzyme molecules adsorbed per particle was dependent upon the enzyme concentration in solution, with multilayers forming at high enzyme:Au solution ratios. The specific activity of adsorbed enzyme increased with increasing number adsorbed per particle for CS:Au, but was less sensitive to stoichiometry for MDH:Au. Dual activity bioconjugates were prepared in three ways: (1) by adsorption of MDH followed by CS, (2) by adsorption of CS followed by MDH, and (3) by coadsorption of both enzymes from the same solution. The resulting bioconjugates differed substantially in the number of enzyme molecules adsorbed per particle, the specific activity of the adsorbed enzymes, and also the enzymatic activity per particle. Bioconjugates formed by adding CS to the Au nanoparticles before MDH was added exhibited higher specific activities for both enzymes than those formed by adding the enzymes in the reverse order. These bioconjugates also had 3-fold higher per-particle sequential activity for conversion of malate to citrate, despite substantially fewer copies of both enzymes present.

  17. Electron transfer from NADH bound to horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (NAD+ dependent dehydrogenase): visualisation of the activity in the enzyme crystals and adsorption of formazan derivatives by these crystals.

    PubMed

    Pacaud-Mercier, Karine; Blaghen, Mohamed; Lee, Kang Min; Tritsch, Denis; Biellmann, Jean-François

    2007-02-01

    The crystals of holoenzyme from native and cross-linked alcohol dehydrogenase exhibit electron transfer from NADH to phenazinium methosulfate (PMS), and then to the tetrazolium salt sodium 3,3'-{1-[(phenylamino)carbonyl]-3,4-tetrazolium}-bis(4-methoxy-6-nitro)benzenesulfonate (XXT). The slow dissociation of the cofactor and/or the conformational change associated can now be bypassed. The reduction product, formazan, did not diffuse out of the crystals in buffer and the crystals turned colored. In the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide or dimethoxyethane, the formazan diffused out to the solution. The reaction rates were found to be, respectively, 18% and 15% of the redox reaction rate of ethanol with cinnamaldehyde, close to the activity determined for the enzyme in solution in the presence of dimethoxyethane. The use of system PMS-tetrazolium salt is a useful tool to visualize the activity of dehydrogenases and other electron transferring systems in the crystalline state. The adsorption of formazan by the alcohol dehydrogenase crystals occurs in solution.

  18. The Reduction of Glyceraldehyde by Human Erythrocytes L-HEXONATE DEHYDROGENASE ACTIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Beutler, E.; Guinto, E.

    1974-01-01

    Incubation of red cell suspensions with D-glyceraldehyde resulted in disappearance of glyceraldehyde and appearance of glycerol. Concomitantly, there was an increase of CO2 formation from glucose. This indicated that the reduction of glyceraldehyde to glycerol occurred through a NADPH-linked system. Studies in hemolysates revealed the presence of an enzyme with the capacity to catalyze the reduction of glyceraldehyde to glycerol by NADPH. This enzyme was partially purified by DEAE chromatography. The elution pattern of the enzyme and its kinetic characteristics indicated that the enzyme was L-hexonate dehydrogenase (L-gulonate: NADP oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.19), not aldose reductase (Alditol: NADP oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.21), which had previously been thought present in erythrocytes. The reduction of glyceraldehyde to glycerol is one of a number of pathways for the metabolism of glyceraldehyde that have been found in red cells and/or other mammalian tissues. PMID:4825223

  19. Re-evaluation of the glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase/L-lactate dehydrogenase enzyme system. Evidence against the direct transfer of NADH between active sites.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, S P; Storey, K B

    1991-01-01

    An investigation of the direct transfer of metabolites from rabbit muscle L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, EC 1.1.1.27) to glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH, EC 1.1.1.8) revealed discrepancies between theoretical predictions and experimental results. Measurements of the GPDH reaction rate at a fixed NADH concentration and in the presence of increasing LDH concentrations gave experimental results similar to those previously obtained by Srivastava, Smolen, Betts, Fukushima, Spivey & Bernhard [(1989) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 86, 6464-6468]. However, a mathematical solution of the direct-transfer-mechanism equations as described by Srivastava et al. (1989) showed that the direct-transfer model did not adequately describe the experimental behaviour of the reaction rate at increasing LDH concentrations. In addition, experiments designed to measure the formation of an LDH4.NADH.GPDH2 complex, predicted by the direct-transfer model, indicated that no significant formation of tertiary complex occurred. An examination of other kinetic models, developed to describe the LDH/GPDH/NADH system better, revealed that the experimental results may be best explained by assuming that free NADH, and not E1.NADH, is the sole substrate for GPDH. These results suggest that direct transfer of NADH between rabbit muscle LDH and GPDH does not occur in vitro. PMID:1898374

  20. Effect of Butanedioic Acid Mono (2,2-Dimethylhydrazide) on the Activity of Membrane-Bound Succinate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    See, Raymond M.; Foy, Chester L.

    1982-01-01

    Mitochondria isolated from hypocotyls of five-day-old bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. `Black Valentine') seedlings rapidly oxidized succinate, malate, and NADH. Oxidation rates, respiratory control, and ADP:O ratios obtained with saturating concentrations of all three substrates indicated that the mitochondria were tightly coupled. The mitochondrial preparation was then employed to investigate the respiration-inhibiting effects of butanedioic acid mono (2,2-dimethyl-hydrazide) (daminozide) a plant growth retardant having structural similarity to an endogenous respiratory substrate (succinate). Daminozide markedly inhibited the activity of membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase. Inhibition was of the competitive type (apparent Ki, 20.2 millimolar) with respect to succinate. Although not excluding other hypotheses, the results support an active role for daminozide in the suppression of respiration as an important metabolic site of its action as a plant growth regulator. PMID:16662493

  1. Bioinformatics based structural characterization of glucose dehydrogenase (gdh) gene and growth promoting activity of Leclercia sp. QAU-66.

    PubMed

    Naveed, Muhammad; Ahmed, Iftikhar; Khalid, Nauman; Mumtaz, Abdul Samad

    2014-01-01

    Glucose dehydrogenase (GDH; EC 1.1. 5.2) is the member of quinoproteins group that use the redox cofactor pyrroloquinoline quinoine, calcium ions and glucose as substrate for its activity. In present study, Leclercia sp. QAU-66, isolated from rhizosphere of Vigna mungo, was characterized for phosphate solubilization and the role of GDH in plant growth promotion of Phaseolus vulgaris. The strain QAU-66 had ability to solubilize phosphorus and significantly (p ≤ 0.05) promoted the shoot and root lengths of Phaseolus vulgaris. The structural determination of GDH protein was carried out using bioinformatics tools like Pfam, InterProScan, I-TASSER and COFACTOR. These tools predicted the structural based functional homology of pyrroloquinoline quinone domains in GDH. GDH of Leclercia sp. QAU-66 is one of the main factor that involved in plant growth promotion and provides a solid background for further research in plant growth promoting activities.

  2. NADP(+)-dependent dehydrogenase activity of carbonyl reductase on glutathionylhydroxynonanal as a new pathway for hydroxynonenal detoxification.

    PubMed

    Moschini, Roberta; Peroni, Eleonora; Rotondo, Rossella; Renzone, Giovanni; Melck, Dominique; Cappiello, Mario; Srebot, Massimo; Napolitano, Elio; Motta, Andrea; Scaloni, Andrea; Mura, Umberto; Del-Corso, Antonella

    2015-06-01

    An NADP(+)-dependent dehydrogenase activity on 3-glutathionyl-4-hydroxynonanal (GSHNE) was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from a line of human astrocytoma cells (ADF). Proteomic analysis identified this enzymatic activity as associated with carbonyl reductase 1 (EC 1.1.1.184). The enzyme is highly efficient at catalyzing the oxidation of GSHNE (KM 33 µM, kcat 405 min(-1)), as it is practically inactive toward trans-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) and other HNE-adducted thiol-containing amino acid derivatives. Combined mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analysis of the reaction products revealed that carbonyl reductase oxidizes the hydroxyl group of GSHNE in its hemiacetal form, with the formation of the corresponding 3-glutathionylnonanoic-δ-lactone. The relevance of this new reaction catalyzed by carbonyl reductase 1 is discussed in terms of HNE detoxification and the recovery of reducing power.

  3. Effects of synthetic detergents on in vivo activity of tissue phosphatases and succinic dehydrogenase from Mystus vittatus.

    PubMed

    Mohan, D; Verma, S R

    1981-05-01

    African catfish (Mystus vittatus) were exposed to three sub-lethal concentrations of Swascofix E45 (13.8, 9.2 and 4.6 mg/l) and Swascol 3L (69.3, 46.2 and 23.1 mg/l) for 15 and 30 days, and their effects on alkaline and acid phosphatase, and succinic dehydrogenase in liver, kidney and intestine were measured. The enzymes were found to be inhibited in all the tissues. Maximum inhibition (38.44%) was observed in liver alkaline phosphatase activity after 30 days with the highest concentration of Swascofix E45 and the lowest inhibition (0.118%) was found in kidney acid phosphatase activity with the lowest concentration of Swascol 3L after 15 days. Insignificant enzyme stimulation in some cases was also observed.

  4. The structure of alanine racemase from Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Davis, Emily; Scaletti-Hutchinson, Emma; Opel-Reading, Helen; Nakatani, Yoshio; Krause, Kurt L

    2014-09-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic Gram-negative bacterium which is a common cause of hospital-acquired infections. Numerous antibiotic-resistant strains exist, emphasizing the need for the development of new antimicrobials. Alanine racemase (Alr) is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate dependent enzyme that is responsible for racemization between enantiomers of alanine. As D-alanine is an essential component of the bacterial cell wall, its inhibition is lethal to prokaryotes, making it an excellent antibiotic drug target. The crystal structure of A. baumannii alanine racemase (AlrAba) from the highly antibiotic-resistant NCTC13302 strain has been solved to 1.9 Å resolution. Comparison of AlrAba with alanine racemases from closely related bacteria demonstrates a conserved overall fold. The substrate entryway and active site of the enzymes were shown to be highly conserved. The structure of AlrAba will provide the template required for future structure-based drug-design studies.

  5. Total lactate dehydrogenase activity of tail muscle is not cold-adapted in nocturnal lizards from cool-temperate habitats.

    PubMed

    Hare, K M; Miller, J H; Clark, A G; Daugherty, C H

    2005-12-01

    The dependence of metabolic processes on temperature constrains the behavior, physiology and ecology of many ectothermic animals. The evolution of nocturnality in lizards, especially in temperate regions, requires adaptations for activity at low temperatures when optimal body temperatures are unlikely to be obtained. We examined whether nocturnal lizards have cold-adapted lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). LDH was chosen as a representative metabolic enzyme. We measured LDH activity of tail muscle in six lizard species (n=123: three nocturnal, two diurnal and one crepuscular) between 5 and 35 degrees C and found no differences in LDH-specific activity or thermal sensitivity among the species. Similarly, the specific activity and thermal sensitivity of LDH were similar between skinks and geckos. Similar enzyme activities among nocturnal and diurnal lizards indicate that there is no selection of temperature specific LDH enzyme activity at any temperature. As many nocturnal lizards actively thermoregulate during the day, LDH may be adapted for a broad range of temperatures rather than adapted specifically for the low temperatures encountered when the animals are active. The total activity of LDH in tropical and temperate lizards is not cold-adapted. More data are required on biochemical adaptations and whole animal thermal preferences before trends can be established.

  6. Autosomal factors with correlated effects on the activities of the glucose 6-phosphate and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenases in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Laurie-Ahlberg, C C; Williamson, J H; Cochrane, B J; Wilton, A N; Chasalow, F I

    1981-09-01

    Isogenic lines, in which chromosomes sampled from natural populations of C. melanogaster are substituted into a common genetic background, were used to detect and partially characterize autosomal factors that affect the activities of the two pentose phosphate pathway enzymes, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD). The chromosome 3 effects on G6PD and 6PGD are clearly correlated; the chromosome 2 effects, which are not so great, also appear to be correlated, but the evidence in this case is not so strong. Examination of activity variation of ten other enzymes revealed that G6PD and 6PGD are not the only pair of enzymes showing a high positive correlation, but it is among the highest in both sets of lines. In addition, there was some evidence that the factor(s) affecting G6PD and 6PGD may also affect two other metabolically related enzymes, transaldolase and phosphoglucose isomerase.--Rocket immunoelectrophoresis was used to estimate specific CRM levels for three of the enzymes studied: G6PD, 6PGD and ME. This experiment shows that a large part of the activity variation is accounted for by variation in CRM level (especially for chromosome 3 lines), but there remains a significant fraction of the genetic component of activity variation that is not explained by CRM level.--These results suggest that the autosomal factors are modifiers involved in regulation of the expression of the X-linked structural genes for G6PD and 6PGD, but a role in determining part of the enzymes' primary structure cannot be excluded with the present evidence.

  7. Autosomal Factors with Correlated Effects on the Activities of the Glucose 6-Phosphate and 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenases in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Laurie-Ahlberg, C. C.; Williamson, J. H.; Cochrane, B. J.; Wilton, A. N.; Chasalow, F. I.

    1981-01-01

    Isogenic lines, in which chromosomes sampled from natural populations of D. melanogaster are substituted into a common genetic background, were used to detect and partially characterize autosomal factors that affect the activities of the two pentose phosphate pathway enzymes, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD). The chromosome 3 effects on G6PD and 6PGD are clearly correlated; the chromosome 2 effects, which are not so great, also appear to be correlated, but the evidence in this case is not so strong. Examination of activity variation of ten other enzymes revealed that G6PD and 6PGD are not the only pair of enzymes showing a high positive correlation, but it is among the highest in both sets of lines. In addition, there was some evidence that the factor(s) affecting G6PD and 6PGD may also affect two other metabolically related enzymes, transaldolase and phosphoglucose isomerase.—Rocket immunoelectrophoresis was used to estimate specific CRM levels for three of the enzymes studied: G6PD, 6PGD and ME. This experiment shows that a large part of the activity variation is accounted for by variation in CRM level (especially for chromosome 3 lines), but there remains a significant fraction of the genetic component of activity variation that is not explained by CRM level.—These results suggest that the autosomal factors are modifiers involved in regulation of the expression of the X-linked structural genes for G6PD and 6PGD, but a role in determining part of the enzymes' primary structure cannot be excluded with the present evidence. PMID:6804300

  8. ACTION OF A HISTIDINE ANALOGUE, 1,2,4-TRIAZOLE-3-ALANINE, IN SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Alfred P.; Hartman, Philip E.

    1963-01-01

    Levin, Alfred P. (The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md.), and Philip E. Hartman. Action of a histidine analogue, 1,2,4-triazole-3-alanine, in Salmonella typhimurium. J. Bacteriol. 86:820–828. 1963.—The effect of the histidine analogue, 1,2,4-triazole-3-alanine (TRA), on growth and enzyme synthesis in histidine auxotrophs of Salmonella typhimurium has been studied. TRA allows an increase of approximately 50% in the amount of protein in a culture but does not allow concomitant synthesis of ribonucleic acid and deoxyribonucleic acid. Although the analogue prevents the formation of active bacteriophage and of enzymatically active inosine 5′-phosphate dehydrogenase, it does not prevent the formation of enzymatically active l-histidinol phosphate phosphatase or of imidazoleacetol phosphate transaminase, two enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of histidine. Of the three known functions of histidine in the cell, TRA mimics two: it is incorporated into protein, and it acts as a repressor material for synthesis of enzymes involved in the formation of histidine. TRA fails to act as a feedback inhibitor of the first step in the formation of histidine. Images PMID:14066480

  9. LACTIC DEHYDROGENASES OF PSEUDOMONAS NATRIEGENS.

    PubMed

    WALKER, H; EAGON, R G

    1964-07-01

    Walker, Hazel (University of Georgia, Athens), and R. G. Eagon. Lactic dehydrogenases of Pseudomonas natriegens. J. Bacteriol. 88:25-30. 1964.-Lactic dehydrogenases specific for d- and l-lactate were demonstrated in Pseudomonas natriegens. The l-lactic dehydrogenase showed considerable heat stability, and 40% of the activity remained in extracts after heating at 60 C for 10 min. An essential thiol group for enzyme activity was noted. The results of these experiments were consistent with the view that lactate was dehydrogenated initially by a flavin cofactor and that electrons were transported through a complete terminal oxidase system to oxygen. The intracellular site of these lactic dehydrogenases was shown to be the cell membrane. It was suggested that the main physiological role of these lactic dehydrogenases is that of lactate utilization.

  10. Effect of stress on hepatic 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity and its influence on carbohydrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Altuna, María Eugenia; Lelli, Sandra Marcela; San Martín de Viale, Leonor C; Damasco, María Cristina

    2006-10-01

    Stress activates the synthesis and secretion of catecholamines and adrenal glucocorticoids, increasing their circulating levels. In vivo, hepatic 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (HSD1) stimulates the shift of 11-dehydrocorticosterone to corticosterone, enhancing active glucocorticoids at tissue level. We studied the effect of 3 types of stress, 1 induced by bucogastric overload with 200 mmol/L HCl causing metabolic acidosis (HCl), the second induced by bucogastric overload with 0.45% NaCl (NaCl), and the third induced by simulated overload (cannula), on the kinetics of hepatic HSD1 of rats and their influence on the activity of the gluconeogenic enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, glycemia, and glycogen deposition. Compared with unstressed controls, all types of stress significantly increased HSD1 activity (146% cannula, 130% NaCl, and 253% HCl), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity (51% cannula, 48% NaCl, and 86% HCl), and glycemia (29% cannula, 30% NaCl, and 41% HCl), but decreased hepatic glycogen (68% cannula, 68% NaCl, and 78% HCl). Owing to these results, we suggest the following events occur when stress is induced: an increase in hepatic HSD1 activity, augmented active glucocorticoid levels, increased gluconeogenesis, and glycemia. Also involved are the multiple events indirectly related to glucocorticoids, which lead to the depletion of hepatic glycogen deposits, thereby contributing to increased glycemia. This new approach shows that stress increments the activity of hepatic HSD1 and suggests that this enzyme could be involved in the development of the Metabolic Syndrome.

  11. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 activation in aged heart improves the autophagy by reducing the carbonyl modification on SIRT1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bing; Yu, Lu; Wang, Yishi; Wang, Hongtao; Li, Chen; Yin, Yue; Yang, Jingrun; Wang, Zhifa; Zheng, Qiangsun; Ma, Heng

    2016-01-19

    Cardiac aging is characterized by accumulation of damaged proteins and decline of autophagic efficiency. Here, by forestalling SIRT1 carbonylated inactivation in aged heart, we determined the benefits of activation of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) on the autophagy. In this study, the ALDH2 KO mice progressively developed age-related heart dysfunction and showed reduction in the life span, which strongly suggests that ALDH2 ablation leads to cardiac aging. What's more, aged hearts displayed a significant decrease ALDH2 activity, resulting in accumulation of 4-HNE-protein adducts and protein carbonyls, impairment in the autophagy flux, and, consequently, deteriorated cardiac function after starvation. Sustained Alda-1 (selective ALDH2 activator) treatment increased cardiac ALDH2 activity and abrogated these effects. Using SIRT1 deficient heterozygous (Sirt1+/-) mice, we found that SIRT1 was necessary for ALDH2 activation-induced autophagy. We further demonstrated that ALDH2 activation attenuated SIRT1 carbonylation and improved SIRT1 activity, thereby increasing the deacetylation of nuclear LC3 and FoxO1. Sequentially, ALDH2 enhanced SIRT1 regulates LC3-Atg7 interaction and FoxO1 increased Rab7 expression, which were both necessary and sufficient for restoring autophagy flux. These results highlight that both accumulation of proteotoxic carbonyl stress linkage with autophagy decline contribute to heart senescence. ALDH2 activation is adequate to improve the autophagy flux by reducing the carbonyl modification on SIRT1, which in turn plays an important role in maintaining cardiac health during aging.

  12. Palladium alpha-lipoic acid complex formulation enhances activities of Krebs cycle dehydrogenases and respiratory complexes I-IV in the heart of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Sudheesh, N P; Ajith, T A; Janardhanan, K K; Krishnan, C V

    2009-08-01

    Age-related decline in the capacity to withstand stress, such as ischemia and reperfusion, results in congestive heart failure. Though the mechanisms underlying cardiac decay are not clear, age dependent somatic damages to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), loss of mitochondrial function, and a resultant increase in oxidative stress in heart muscle cells may be responsible for the increased risk for cardiovascular diseases. The effect of a safe nutritional supplement, POLY-MVA, containing the active ingredient palladium alpha-lipoic acid complex, was evaluated on the activities of the Krebs cycle enzymes such as isocitrate dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, and malate dehydrogenase as well as mitochondrial complexes I, II, III, and IV in heart mitochondria of aged male albino rats of Wistar strain. Administration of 0.05 ml/kg of POLY-MVA (which is equivalent to 0.38 mg complexed alpha-lipoic acid/kg, p.o), once daily for 30 days, was significantly (p<0.05) effective to enhance the Krebs cycle dehydrogenases, and mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes. The unique electronic and redox properties of palladium alpha-lipoic acid complex appear to be a key to this physiological effectiveness. The results strongly suggest that this formulation might be effective to protect the aging associated risk of cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. Metabolic flux control at the pyruvate node in an anaerobic Escherichia coli strain with an active pyruvate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingzhao; Ou, Mark S; Kim, Y; Ingram, L O; Shanmugam, K T

    2010-04-01

    During anaerobic growth of Escherichia coli, pyruvate formate-lyase (PFL) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) channel pyruvate toward a mixture of fermentation products. We have introduced a third branch at the pyruvate node in a mutant of E. coli with a mutation in pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH*) that renders the enzyme less sensitive to inhibition by NADH. The key starting enzymes of the three branches at the pyruvate node in such a mutant, PDH*, PFL, and LDH, have different metabolic potentials and kinetic properties. In such a mutant (strain QZ2), pyruvate flux through LDH was about 30%, with the remainder of the flux occurring through PFL, indicating that LDH is a preferred route of pyruvate conversion over PDH*. In a pfl mutant (strain YK167) with both PDH* and LDH activities, flux through PDH* was about 33% of the total, confirming the ability of LDH to outcompete the PDH pathway for pyruvate in vivo. Only in the absence of LDH (strain QZ3) was pyruvate carbon equally distributed between the PDH* and PFL pathways. A pfl mutant with LDH and PDH* activities, as well as a pfl ldh double mutant with PDH* activity, had a surprisingly low cell yield per mole of ATP (Y(ATP)) (about 7.0 g of cells per mol of ATP) compared to 10.9 g of cells per mol of ATP for the wild type. The lower Y(ATP) suggests the operation of a futile energy cycle in the absence of PFL in this strain. An understanding of the controls at the pyruvate node during anaerobic growth is expected to provide unique insights into rational metabolic engineering of E. coli and related bacteria for the production of various biobased products at high rates and yields.

  14. Determination of Glutamate Dehydrogenase Activity and Its Kinetics in Mouse Tissues using Metabolic Mapping (Quantitative Enzyme Histochemistry)

    PubMed Central

    Botman, Dennis; Tigchelaar, Wikky

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyses the reversible conversion of glutamate into α-ketoglutarate with the concomitant reduction of NAD(P)+ to NAD(P)H or vice versa. GDH activity is subject to complex allosteric regulation including substrate inhibition. To determine GDH kinetics in situ, we assessed the effects of various glutamate concentrations in combination with either the coenzyme NAD+ or NADP+ on GDH activity in mouse liver cryostat sections using metabolic mapping. NAD+-dependent GDH Vmax was 2.5-fold higher than NADP+-dependent Vmax, whereas the Km was similar, 1.92 mM versus 1.66 mM, when NAD+ or NADP+ was used, respectively. With either coenzyme, Vmax was determined at 10 mM glutamate and substrate inhibition was observed at higher glutamate concentrations with a Ki of 12.2 and 3.95 for NAD+ and NADP+ used as coenzyme, respectively. NAD+- and NADP+-dependent GDH activities were examined in various mouse tissues. GDH activity was highest in liver and much lower in other tissues. In all tissues, the highest activity was found when NAD+ was used as a coenzyme. In conclusion, GDH activity in mice is highest in the liver with NAD+ as a coenzyme and highest GDH activity was determined at a glutamate concentration of 10 mM. PMID:25124006

  15. Towards a systematic analysis of human short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR): Ligand identification and structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Chitra; Oerum, Stephanie; Bray, James; Kavanagh, Kathryn L; Shafqat, Naeem; Yue, Wyatt; Oppermann, Udo

    2015-06-05

    Short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) constitute a large, functionally diverse branch of enzymes within the class of NAD(P)(H) dependent oxidoreductases. In humans, over 80 genes have been identified with distinct metabolic roles in carbohydrate, amino acid, lipid, retinoid and steroid hormone metabolism, frequently associated with inherited genetic defects. Besides metabolic functions, a subset of atypical SDR proteins appears to play critical roles in adapting to redox status or RNA processing, and thereby controlling metabolic pathways. Here we present an update on the human SDR superfamily and a ligand identification strategy using differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF) with a focused library of oxidoreductase and metabolic ligands to identify substrate classes and inhibitor chemotypes. This method is applicable to investigate structure-activity relationships of oxidoreductases and ultimately to better understand their physiological roles.

  16. Pyrroloquinoline quinone-dependent carbohydrate dehydrogenase: activity enhancement and the role of artificial electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Kulys, Juozas; Tetianec, Lidija; Bratkovskaja, Irina

    2010-08-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent glucose dehydrogenase (PQQ-GDH) offers a variety of opportunities for applications, e.g. in highly sensitive biosensors and electrosynthetic reactions. Here we report on the acceleration (up to 4.9 x 10(4)-fold) of enzymatic ferricyanide reduction by artificial redox mediators (enhancers). The reaction mechanism includes reduction of the PQQ-GDH by glucose followed by oxidation of the reduced PQQ cofactor with either ferricyanide or a redox mediator. A synergistic effect occurs through the oxidation of a reduced mediator by ferricyanide. Using kinetic description of the coupled reaction, the second order rate constant for the reaction of an oxidized mediator with the reduced enzyme cofactor (k(ox)) can be calculated. For different mediators this value is 2.2 x 10(6)-1.6 x 10(8) M(-1)s(-1) at pH 7.2 and 25 degrees C. However, no correlation of the rate constant with the midpoint redox potential of the mediator could be established. For low-potential mediators the synergistic effect is proportional to the ratio of k(ox(med))/k(ox(ferricyanide)), whereas for the high-potential mediators the effect depends on both this ratio and the concentration of the oxidized mediator, which can be calculated from the Nernst equation. The described effect can be applied in various ways, e.g. for substrate reactivity determination, electrosynthetic PQQ cofactor regeneration or building of new highly sensitive biosensors.

  17. Novel Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase with Anti-malarial Activity in the Mouse Model

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, Michael L.; Bastos, Cecilia M.; Kramer, Martin L.; Barker, Jr., Robert H.; Skerlj, Renato; Sidhu, Amar Bir; Deng, Xiaoyi; Celatka, Cassandra; Cortese, Joseph F.; Guerrero Bravo, Jose E.; Crespo Llado, Keila N.; Serrano, Adelfa E.; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Viera, Sara; Garuti, Helen; Wittlin, Sergio; Papastogiannidis, Petros; Lin, Jing-wen; Janse, Chris J.; Khan, Shahid M.; Duraisingh, Manoj; Coleman, Bradley; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J.; Phillips, Margaret A.; Munoz, Benito; Wirth, Dyann F.; Klinger, Jeffrey D.; Wiegand, Roger; Sybertz, Edmund

    2010-11-22

    Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the most deadly form of human malaria, is unable to salvage pyrimidines and must rely on de novo biosynthesis for survival. Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway and represents a potential target for anti-malarial therapy. A high throughput screen and subsequent medicinal chemistry program identified a series of N-alkyl-5-(1H-benzimidazol-1-yl)thiophene-2-carboxamides with low nanomolar in vitro potency against DHODH from P. falciparum, P. vivax, and P. berghei. The compounds were selective for the parasite enzymes over human DHODH, and x-ray structural data on the analog Genz-667348, demonstrated that species selectivity could be attributed to amino acid differences in the inhibitor-binding site. Compounds from this series demonstrated in vitro potency against the 3D7 and Dd2 strains of P. falciparum, good tolerability and oral exposure in the mouse, and ED{sub 50} values in the 4-day murine P. berghei efficacy model of 13-21 mg/kg/day with oral twice-daily dosing. In particular, treatment with Genz-667348 at 100 mg/kg/day resulted in sterile cure. Two recent analogs of Genz-667348 are currently undergoing pilot toxicity testing to determine suitability as clinical development candidates.

  18. Alcohol dehydrogenase gene ADH3 activates glucose alcoholic fermentation in genetically engineered Dekkera bruxellensis yeast.

    PubMed

    Schifferdecker, Anna Judith; Siurkus, Juozas; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Joerck-Ramberg, Dorte; Ling, Zhihao; Zhou, Nerve; Blevins, James E; Sibirny, Andriy A; Piškur, Jure; Ishchuk, Olena P

    2016-04-01

    Dekkera bruxellensis is a non-conventional Crabtree-positive yeast with a good ethanol production capability. Compared to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, its tolerance to acidic pH and its utilization of alternative carbon sources make it a promising organism for producing biofuel. In this study, we developed an auxotrophic transformation system and an expression vector, which enabled the manipulation of D. bruxellensis, thereby improving its fermentative performance. Its gene ADH3, coding for alcohol dehydrogenase, was cloned and overexpressed under the control of the strong and constitutive promoter TEF1. Our recombinant D. bruxellensis strain displayed 1.4 and 1.7 times faster specific glucose consumption rate during aerobic and anaerobic glucose fermentations, respectively; it yielded 1.2 times and 1.5 times more ethanol than did the parental strain under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. The overexpression of ADH3 in D. bruxellensis also reduced the inhibition of fermentation by anaerobiosis, the "Custer effect". Thus, the fermentative capacity of D. bruxellensis could be further improved by metabolic engineering.

  19. Succinate-dependent energy generation and pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity in isolated Ascaris suum mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    Body wall muscle from the parasitic nematode, Ascaris suum, contain unique anaerobic mitochondria that preferentially utilize fumarate and branched-chain enoyl CoA's as terminal electron acceptors instead of oxygen. While electron transport in these organelles is well characterized, the role of oxygen in succinate-dependent phosphorylation is still not clearly defined. Therefore, the present study was designed to more fully characterize succinate metabolism in these organelles as well as the in vitro regulation of a key mitochondrial enzyme, the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC). In the absence of added adenine nucleotides, incubations in succinate resulted in substantial elevations in intramitochrondrial ATP levels, but ATP/ADP ratios were considerably higher in incubations with malate. The stimulation of phosphorylation in aerobic incubations with succinate was rotenone sensitive and appears to be Site I dependent. Increase substrate level phosphorylation, coupled to propionate formation, or additional sites of electron-transport associated ATP synthesis were not significant. Under aerobic conditions, {sup 14}CO{sub 2} evolution from 1,4-({sup 14}C)succinate was stimulated and NADH/NAD{sup +} ratios were elevated, but the formation of {sup 14}C propionate was unchanged.

  20. Green Tea Polyphenols Control Dysregulated Glutamate Dehydrogenase in Transgenic Mice by Hijacking the ADP Activation Site

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Changhong; Li, Ming; Chen, Pan; Narayan, Srinivas; Matschinsky, Franz M.; Bennett, Michael J.; Stanley, Charles A.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2012-05-09

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of L-glutamate and, in animals, is extensively regulated by a number of metabolites. Gain of function mutations in GDH that abrogate GTP inhibition cause the hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia syndrome (HHS), resulting in increased pancreatic {beta}-cell responsiveness to leucine and susceptibility to hypoglycemia following high protein meals. We have previously shown that two of the polyphenols from green tea (epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and epicatechin gallate (ECG)) inhibit GDH in vitro and that EGCG blocks GDH-mediated insulin secretion in wild type rat islets. Using structural and site-directed mutagenesis studies, we demonstrate that ECG binds to the same site as the allosteric regulator, ADP. Perifusion assays using pancreatic islets from transgenic mice expressing a human HHS form of GDH demonstrate that the hyperresponse to glutamine caused by dysregulated GDH is blocked by the addition of EGCG. As observed in HHS patients, these transgenic mice are hypersensitive to amino acid feeding, and this is abrogated by oral administration of EGCG prior to challenge. Finally, the low basal blood glucose level in the HHS mouse model is improved upon chronic administration of EGCG. These results suggest that this common natural product or some derivative thereof may prove useful in controlling this genetic disorder. Of broader clinical implication is that other groups have shown that restriction of glutamine catabolism via these GDH inhibitors can be useful in treating various tumors. This HHS transgenic mouse model offers a highly useful means to test these agents in vivo.

  1. Activity of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in the adrenal glands, liver, and kidneys of rats with experimental diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cherkasova, O P; Selyatitskaya, V G; Pal'chikova, N A; Kuznetsova, N V

    2014-12-01

    We studied activity of the key enzyme of the pre-receptor metabolism of glucocorticoid hormones, 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, in rat adrenal glands, renal cortex and liver in the course of development of alloxan diabetes (9, 20, and 28 day). The enzyme activity was increased 3-4 fold in the adrenal glands throughout the experiment. At the same time, according to the adrenal gland level of corticosterone, its precursor 11-deoxycorticosterone and reversible metabolite 11-dehydrocorticosterone, activity of the second isoform of the enzyme dominated at the early stages of diabetes, and that of the first isoform, at later stages. In long-term diabetes (28 days), along with reduced synthesis of corticosterone and production of 11-dehydrocorticosterone in the adrenal glands, the extra-adrenal formation of corticosterone was activated as indicated by enhanced activity of the first isoform in the liver and that of the second isoform in the kidneys. These changes in activity of the enzyme isoforms promote local formation of corticosterone from its reversible metabolite in the liver and persisting hyperglycemia in diabetes.

  2. Function of the D-alanine:D-alanine ligase lid loop: a molecular modeling and bioactivity study.

    PubMed

    Hrast, Martina; Vehar, Blaž; Turk, Samo; Konc, Janez; Gobec, Stanislav; Janežič, Dušanka

    2012-08-09

    D-Alanine:D-alanine ligase (Ddl) is an essential ATP-dependent bacterial enzyme involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis. Discovery of Ddl inhibitors not competitive with ATP has proven to be difficult because the Ddl bimolecular d-alanine binding pocket is very restricted, as is accessibility to the active site for larger molecules in the catalytically active closed conformation of Ddl. A molecular dynamics study of the opening and closing of the Ddl lid loop informs future structure-based design efforts that allow for the flexibility of Ddl. A virtual screen on generated enzyme conformations yielded some hit inhibitors whose bioactivity was determined.

  3. Phosphorylation of serine 264 impedes active site accessibility in the E1 component of the human pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Franziska; Ciszak, Ewa; Korotchkina, Lioubov; Golbik, Ralph; Spinka, Michael; Dominiak, Paulina; Sidhu, Sukhdeep; Brauer, Johanna; Patel, Mulchand S; Tittmann, Kai

    2007-05-29

    At the junction of glycolysis and the Krebs cycle in cellular metabolism, the pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex (PDHc) catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. In mammals, PDHc is tightly regulated by phosphorylation-dephosphorylation of three serine residues in the thiamin-dependent pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) component. In vivo, inactivation of human PDHc correlates mostly with phosphorylation of serine 264, which is located at the entrance of the substrate channel leading to the active site of E1. Despite intense investigations, the molecular mechanism of this inactivation has remained enigmatic. Here, a detailed analysis of microscopic steps of catalysis in human wild-type PDHc-E1 and pseudophosphorylation variant Ser264Glu elucidates how phosphorylation of Ser264 affects catalysis. Whereas the intrinsic reactivity of the active site in catalysis of pyruvate decarboxylation remains nearly unaltered, the preceding binding of substrate to the enzyme's active site via the substrate channel and the subsequent reductive acetylation of the E2 component are severely slowed in the phosphorylation variant. The structure of pseudophosphorylation variant Ser264Glu determined by X-ray crystallography reveals no differences in the three-dimensional architecture of the phosphorylation loop or of the active site, when compared to those of the wild-type enzyme. However, the channel leading to the active site is partially obstructed by the side chain of residue 264 in the variant. By analogy, a similar obstruction of the substrate channel can be anticipated to result from a phosphorylation of Ser264. The kinetic and thermodynamic results in conjunction with the structure of Ser264Glu suggest that phosphorylation blocks access to the active site by imposing a steric and electrostatic barrier for substrate binding and active site coupling with the E2 component. As a Ser264Gln variant, which carries no charge at position 264, is also selectively

  4. DFT study of the active site of the XoxF-type natural, cerium-dependent methanol dehydrogenase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Bogart, Justin A; Lewis, Andrew J; Schelter, Eric J

    2015-01-19

    Rare-earth metal cations have recently been demonstrated to be essential co-factors for the growth of the methanotrophic bacterium Methylacidiphilum fumariolicum SolV. A crystal structure of the rare-earth-dependent methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) includes a cerium cation in the active site. Herein, the Ce-MDH active site has been analyzed through DFT calculations. The results show the stability of the Ce(III)-pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) semiquinone configuration. Calculations on the active oxidized form of this complex indicate a 0.81 eV stabilization of the PQQ(0) LUMO at cerium versus calcium, supporting the observation that the cerium cation in the active site confers a competitive advantage to Methylacidiphilum fumariolicum SolV. Using reported aqueous electrochemical data, a semi-empirical correlation was established based on cerium(IV/III) redox potentials. The correlation allowed estimation of the cerium oxidation potential of +1.35 V versus saturated calomel electrode (SCE) in the active site. The results are expected to guide the design of functional model complexes and alcohol-oxidation catalysts based on lanthanide complexes of biologically relevant quinones.

  5. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analysis of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase activity in hematopoietic cell transplantation recipients treated with mycophenolate mofetil.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Mager, Donald E; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Storer, Barry E; Boeckh, Michael J; Bemer, Meagan J; Phillips, Brian R; Risler, Linda J; McCune, Jeannine S

    2014-08-01

    A novel approach to personalizing postgrafting immunosuppression in hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients is evaluating inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity as a drug-specific biomarker of mycophenolic acid (MPA)-induced immunosuppression. This prospective study evaluated total MPA, unbound MPA, and total MPA glucuronide plasma concentrations and IMPDH activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNCs) at 5 time points after the morning dose of oral mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) on day +21 in 56 nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. Substantial interpatient variability in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics was observed and accurately characterized by the population pharmacokinetic-dynamic model. IMPDH activity decreased with increasing MPA plasma concentration, with maximum inhibition coinciding with maximum MPA concentration in most patients. The overall relationship between MPA concentration and IMPDH activity was described by a direct inhibitory maximum effect model with an IC50 of 3.23 mg/L total MPA and 57.3 ng/mL unbound MPA. The day +21 IMPDH area under the effect curve (AUEC) was associated with cytomegalovirus reactivation, nonrelapse mortality, and overall mortality. In conclusion, a pharmacokinetic-dynamic model was developed that relates plasma MPA concentrations with PMNC IMPDH activity after an MMF dose in HCT recipients. Future studies should validate this model and confirm that day +21 IMPDH AUEC is a predictive biomarker.

  6. Effects of 14 days of spaceflight and nine days of recovery on cell body size and succinate dehydrogenase activity of rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishihara, A.; Ohira, Y.; Roy, R. R.; Nagaoka, S.; Sekiguchi, C.; Hinds, W. E.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1997-01-01

    The cross-sectional areas and succinate dehydrogenase activities of L5 dorsal root ganglion neurons in rats were determined after 14 days of spaceflight and after nine days of recovery. The mean and distribution of the cross-sectional areas were similar to age-matched, ground-based controls for both the spaceflight and for the spaceflight plus recovery groups. The mean succinate dehydrogenase activity was significantly lower in spaceflight compared to aged-matched control rats, whereas the mean succinate dehydrogenase activity was similar in age-matched control and spaceflight plus recovery rats. The mean succinate dehydrogenase activity of neurons with cross-sectional areas between 1000 and 2000 microns2 was lower (between 7 and 10%) in both the spaceflight and the spaceflight plus recovery groups compared to the appropriate control groups. The reduction in the oxidative capacity of a subpopulation of sensory neurons having relatively large cross-sectional areas immediately following spaceflight and the sustained depression for nine days after returning to 1 g suggest that the 0 g environment induced significant alterations in proprioceptive function.

  7. A Conserved Active Site Tyrosine Residue of Proline Dehydrogenase Helps Enforce the Preference for Proline over Hydroxyproline as the Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrander, E.L.; Larson, J.D.; Schuermann, J.P.; Tanner, J.J.

    2009-03-02

    Proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) catalyzes the oxidation of L-proline to {Delta}-1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate. PRODHs exhibit a pronounced preference for proline over hydroxyproline (trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline) as the substrate, but the basis for specificity is unknown. The goal of this study, therefore, is to gain insight into the structural determinants of substrate specificity of this class of enzyme, with a focus on understanding how PRODHs discriminate between the two closely related molecules, proline and hydroxyproline. Two site-directed mutants of the PRODH domain of Escherichia coli PutA were created: Y540A and Y540S. Kinetics measurements were performed with both mutants. Crystal structures of Y540S complexed with hydroxyproline, proline, and the proline analogue L-tetrahydro-2-furoic acid were determined at resolutions of 1.75, 1.90, and 1.85 {angstrom}, respectively. Mutation of Tyr540 increases the catalytic efficiency for hydroxyproline 3-fold and decreases the specificity for proline by factors of 20 (Y540S) and 50 (Y540A). The structures show that removal of the large phenol side chain increases the volume of the substrate-binding pocket, allowing sufficient room for the 4-hydroxyl of hydroxyproline. Furthermore, the introduced serine residue participates in recognition of hydroxyproline by forming a hydrogen bond with the 4-hydroxyl. This result has implications for understanding the substrate specificity of the related enzyme human hydroxyproline dehydrogenase, which has serine in place of tyrosine at this key active site position. The kinetic and structural results suggest that Tyr540 is an important determinant of specificity. Structurally, it serves as a negative filter for hydroxyproline by clashing with the 4-hydroxyl group of this potential substrate.

  8. Effect of Vitamin D on basal and Luteinizing Hormone (LH) induced testosterone production and mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity in cultured Leydig cells from immature and mature rams.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yang; Jin, Hui; Chen, Jianwei; Jiang, Xiaolong; Li, Pengfei; Ren, Youshe; Liu, Wenzhong; Yao, Jianbo; Folger, Joseph K; Smith, George W; Lv, Lihua

    2015-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the potential effects of 1α,25-(OH)2VD3 (biologically active form of Vitamin D) on basal and LH-induced testosterone production and mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity in Leydig cells from immature and mature rams cultured in vitro. Leydig cells were isolated from testes of immature and mature rams, treated without (control) or with increasing concentrations of LH (1, 10, 100ng/ml) and/or 1α,25-(OH)2VD3 (1, 10, 100nM). After 24h, concentrations of testosterone in culture media were measured. After 96h, mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity in Leydig cells were measured. In immature and mature ram Leydig cells, treatment with 10 and 100ng/ml LH increased testosterone production and mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity. Treatment with 1α,25-(OH)2VD3 in the absence of LH did not increase testosterone production, but 10 and 100nM 1α,25-(OH)2VD3 increased LH induced testosterone production for both immature and mature ram Leydig cells. Treatment with all doses of 1α,25-(OH)2VD3 in the absence of LH and 10 and 100ng/ml LH in the absence of 1α,25-(OH)2VD3 increased mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity for cultured Leydig cells from immature and mature rams and 1 and 10nM 1α,25-(OH)2VD3 treatment enhanced the LH induced increase in mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity. Result demonstrate Vitamin D3 induced regulation of function of Leydig cells from immature and mature rams cultured in the presence or absence of LH and support a potential role for Vitamin D3 in regulation of gonadal function in rams.

  9. Effect of acetic acid present in bagasse hydrolysate on the activities of xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase in Candida guilliermondii.

    PubMed

    Lima, Luanne Helena Augusto; das Graças de Almeida Felipe, Maria; Vitolo, Michele; Torres, Fernando Araripe Gonçalves

    2004-11-01

    The first two steps in xylose metabolism are catalyzed by NAD(P)H-dependent xylose reductase (XR) (EC 1.1.1.21) and NAD(P)-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) (EC 1.1.1.9), which lead to xylose-->xylitol-->xylulose conversion. Xylitol has high commercial value, due to its sweetening and anticariogenic properties, as well as several clinical applications. The acid hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse allows the separation of a xylose-rich hemicellulosic fraction that can be used as a substrate for Candida guilliermondii to produce xylitol. However, the hydrolysate contains acetic acid, an inhibitor of microbial metabolism. In this study, the effect of acetic acid on the activities of XR and XDH and on xylitol formation by C. guilliermondii were studied. For this purpose, fermentations were carried out in bagasse hydrolysate and in synthetic medium. The activities of XR and XDH were higher in the medium containing acetic acid than in control medium. Moreover, none of the fermentative parameters were significantly altered during cell culture. It was concluded that acetic acid does not interfere with xylitol formation since the increase in XR activity is proportional to XDH activity, leading to a greater production of xylitol and its subsequent conversion to xylulose.

  10. Chaperone activities of bovine and camel beta-caseins: Importance of their surface hydrophobicity in protection against alcohol dehydrogenase aggregation.

    PubMed

    Barzegar, Abolfazl; Yousefi, Reza; Sharifzadeh, Ahmad; Dalgalarrondo, Michèle; Chobert, Jean-Marc; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Norouzi, Parviz; Ehsani, Mohammad Reza; Niasari-Naslaji, Amir; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Haertlé, Thomas; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2008-05-01

    Beta-casein (beta-CN) showing properties of intrinsically unstructured proteins (IUP) displays many similarities with molecular chaperones and shows anti-aggregation activity in vitro. Chaperone activities of bovine and camel beta-CN were studied using alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) as a substrate. To obtain an adequate relevant information about the chaperone capacities of studied caseins, three different physical parameters including chaperone constant (k(c), microM(-1)), thermal aggregation constant (k(T), degrees C(-1)) and aggregation rate constant (k(t), min(-1)) were measured. Bovine beta-CN displays greater chaperone activity than camel beta-CN. Fluorescence studies of 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS) binding demonstrated that bovine beta-CN is doted with larger effective hydrophobic surfaces at all studied temperatures than camel beta-CN. Greater relative hydrophobicity of bovine beta-CN than camel beta-CN may be a factor responsible for stronger interactions of bovine beta-CN with the aggregation-prone pre denatured molecular species of the substrate ADH, which resulted in greater chaperone activity of bovine beta-CN.

  11. Evidence for sulfatase and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 activities in equine epididymis and uterus.

    PubMed

    Lemazurier, Emmanuel; Séralini, Gilles-Eric

    2002-07-01

    Our previous work showed that stallion testis produces high amounts of estrogens which are subsequently found in the ejaculate. These estrogens are mainly synthesized by testicular aromatase, and the major estrogen produced is estrone sulfate (E1S). The objective of this study was to investigate the potential role of E1S as a source of estrogens in the male and female horse reproductive tracts by determining whether both estrone sulfatase (Sulf) and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type I (17beta-HSD1) activities were present in equine testes, epididymis and uterus. We assessed E1S bioconversion into estrone (E1) and estradiol (E2) in these tissues. Both Sulf and 17beta-HSD1 activities were well detected in the cauda epididymis and uterus. Additionally, Sulf activity was present in the distal corpus of the epididymis, and 17beta-HSDI in the proximal corpus. In contrast, aromatase gene expression, measured as an internal control of endogenous estrogen production, had high activity only in the testis. We found that seminal E1S of testicular origin can be metabolized to E2, especially in the cauda epididymis and uterus. Because E2 appears to play a major role in male and female reproduction, we propose that the bioconversion of seminal E1S could affect male and female fertility.

  12. Inhibition of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase activity in rabbit gastric antral mucosa by panaxynol isolated from oriental medicines.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Y; Sakuma, S; Komatsu, S; Sato, D; Nishida, H; Xiao, Y Q; Baba, K; Fujita, T

    1998-09-01

    Panaxynol is a polyacetylene compound with anti-inflammatory and anti-platelet-aggregatory effects isolated from commonly used oriental medicines. The effects of panaxynol on the activity of prostaglandin-synthesizing and catabolizing enzymes in the rabbit gastric antral mucosa have been examined. At concentrations ranging from 25 to 200 microM panaxynol had no effect on the synthesis of prostaglandins E2, F2alpha and D2 from exogenous arachidonic acid in the microsomal fraction of the gastric mucosa whereas at 25-200 microM it dose-dependently inhibited the activity of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (PGDH), which catalyses the initial step of prostaglandin catabolism, in the cytosolic fraction. The concentration required for 50% inhibition (IC50) was approximately 25 microM. Inhibition of PGDH by panaxynol was non-competitive with regard to NAD+ and prostaglandin E2. These results suggest that panaxynol has the potential to inhibit PGDH activity in gastric mucosa, possibly as a result of pharmacological activity.

  13. Efficient L-Alanine Production by a Thermo-Regulated Switch in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Deng, Can; Cui, Wen-Jing; Liu, Zhong-Mei; Zhou, Zhe-Min

    2016-01-01

    L-Alanine has important applications in food, pharmaceutical and veterinary and is used as a substrate for production of engineered thermoplastics. Microbial fermentation could reduce the production cost and promote the application of L-alanine. However, the presence of L-alanine significantly inhibit cell growth rate and cause a decrease in the ultimate L-alanine productivity. For efficient L-alanine production, a thermo-regulated genetic switch was designed to dynamically control the expression of L-alanine dehydrogenase (alaD) from Geobacillus stearothermophilus on the Escherichia coli B0016-060BC chromosome. The optimal cultivation conditions for the genetically switched alanine production using B0016-060BC were the following: an aerobic growth phase at 33 °C with a 1-h thermo-induction at 42 °C followed by an oxygen-limited phase at 42 °C. In a bioreactor experiment using the scaled-up conditions optimized in a shake flask, B0016-060BC accumulated 50.3 g biomass/100 g glucose during the aerobic growth phase and 96 g alanine/100 g glucose during the oxygen-limited phase, respectively. The L-alanine titer reached 120.8 g/l with higher overall and oxygen-limited volumetric productivities of 3.09 and 4.18 g/l h, respectively, using glucose as the sole carbon source. Efficient cell growth and L-alanine production were reached separately, by switching cultivation temperature. The results revealed the application of a thermo-regulated strategy for heterologous metabolic production and pointed to strategies for improving L-alanine production.

  14. Salivary aldehyde dehydrogenase - temporal and population variability, correlations with drinking and smoking habits and activity towards aldehydes contained in food.

    PubMed

    Giebułtowicz, Joanna; Dziadek, Marta; Wroczyński, Piotr; Woźnicka, Katarzyna; Wojno, Barbara; Pietrzak, Monika; Wierzchowski, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    Fluorimetric method based on oxidation of the fluorogenic 6-methoxy-2-naphthaldehyde was applied to evaluate temporal and population variability of the specific activity of salivary aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and the degree of its inactivation in healthy human population. Analyzed was also its dependence on drinking and smoking habits, coffee consumption, and its sensitivity to N-acetylcysteine. Both the specific activity of salivary ALDH and the degree of its inactivation were highly variable during the day, with the highest activities recorded in the morning hours. The activities were also highly variable both intra- and interpersonally, and negatively correlated with age, and this correlation was stronger for the subgroup of volunteers declaring abstinence from alcohol and tobacco. Moderately positive correlations of salivary ALDH specific activity with alcohol consumption and tobacco smoking were also recorded (r(s) ~0.27; p=0.004 and r(s) =0.30; p=0.001, respectively). Moderate coffee consumption correlated positively with the inactivation of salivary ALDH, particularly in the subgroup of non-drinking and non-smoking volunteers. It was found that mechanical stimulation of the saliva flow increases the specific activity of salivary ALDH. The specific activity of the salivary ALDH was strongly and positively correlated with that of superoxide dismutase, and somewhat less with salivary peroxidase. The antioxidant-containing drug N-acetylcysteine increased activity of salivary ALDH presumably by preventing its inactivation in the oral cavity. Some food-related aldehydes, mainly cinnamic aldehyde and anisaldehyde, were excellent substrates of the salivary ALDH3A1 enzyme, while alkenals, particularly those with short chain, were characterized by lower affinity towards this enzyme but high catalytic constants. The protective role of salivary ALDH against aldehydes in food and those found in the cigarette smoke is discussed, as well as its participation in

  15. Changes in lactate dehydrogenase and 3-hydroxyacetyl-CoA dehydrogenase activities in rat skeletal muscle by the administration of Eucommia ulmoides OLIVER leaf with spontaneous running-training.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Koike, K; Che, Q; Yamaguchi, M; Takahashi, S

    1999-09-01

    We examined the effect of Eucommia ulmoides OLIVER leaf on rat skeletal muscles together with spontaneous running-training in terms of the isozyme profile and specific activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; EC 1.1.1.27) and 3-hydroxyacetyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HAD; EC 1.1.1.35). On the twenty-ninth day of the experimental period, a mandatory endurance running exercise (treadmill, 7 degrees grade) was conducted. Twenty-four hours later, the rats were sacrificed and the skeletal muscles and other organs were dissected. Due to the training, the HAD specific activity in the skeletal muscles had increased and a more oxidative metabolism had developed, which was further enhanced by the administration of the leaf. In soleus (SOL) muscle in the Eucommia leaf treated running-training group (ET), the LDH specific activity in the skeletal muscle was significantly higher than in the sedentary control group (SC). The isozyme profile of the group ET was significantly different when compared with the group SC. The changes in the LDH isozyme profile were larger in the SOL than that in extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle. The results show that mechanical training and the use of the leaf cooperatively increase the ability to avoid lactate accumulation in skeletal muscle. This effect is supported by the group where 67% of rats accomplished the endurance running exercise. Theses results suggest that the administration of Eucommia ulmoides OLIVER leaf along with light intensity training enhances the ability of a muscle to resist fatigue.

  16. Simvastatin increases liver branched-chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase activity in rats fed with low protein diet.

    PubMed

    Knapik-Czajka, Malgorzata

    2014-11-05

    The rate-limiting step in branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) disposal is catalyzed by the mitochondrial branched-chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase complex (BCKDH). BCKDH activity is regulated mainly by a reversible dephosphorylation (activation)/phosphorylation (inactivation) cycle catalyzed by a specific phosphatase (BDP) and kinase (BDK). Current catalytic activity of BCKDH, described as BCKDH activity state, and thus also BCAAs catabolic rate depend directly on the portion of BCKDH occurring in its active dephosphorylated form. Liver BCKDH activity state alters in response to different nutritional factors. Feeding rats a low-protein diet decreases BCKDH activity. It has been previously shown that lipid lowering drugs, fibrates upregulate liver BCKDH activity and stimulate BCAAs catabolism, especially under the condition of dietary protein deprivation. Effect of statins on liver BCKDH activity has not been studied yet. The present study was aimed at investigating the in vivo effect of simvastatin on liver BCKDH activity, as well as E1, E2 and BDP and BDK mRNA levels in rats fed with either a standard (23% protein) or a low protein (8% protein) diet. For 14 days, simvastatin (80 mg/kg b wt/day) or the vehicle (0.3% methylcellulose) were administrated orally by gavage to the treated and control groups, respectively. The actual BCKDH and total BCKDH activities were assayed spectrophotometrically prior to and following incubation with lambda phosphatase, respectively. The mRNA levels of the selected genes were quantified by means of a semi-quantitative RT-PCR. In rats fed with the low protein diet simvastatin administration reversed physiological adaptation of liver BCKDH to protein restriction and increased liver BCKDH activity state by 39% (p<0.05). Changes in BCKDH activity did not correspond to any changes in mRNA levels for BCKDH catalytic and regulatory enzymes. On the contrary, in rats fed with standard diet liver BCKDH activity state did not alter substantially

  17. Spaceflight exposure effects on transcription, activity, and localization of alcohol dehydrogenase in the roots of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porterfield, D. M.; Matthews, S. W.; Daugherty, C. J.; Musgrave, M. E.

    1997-01-01

    Although considerable research and speculation have been directed toward understanding a plant's perception of gravity and the resulting gravitropic responses, little is known about the role of gravity-dependent physical processes in normal physiological function. These studies were conducted to determine whether the roots of plants exposed to spaceflight conditions may be experiencing hypoxia. Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. plants were grown in agar medium during 6 or 11 d of spaceflight exposure on shuttle missions STS-54 (CHROMEX-03) and STS-68 (CHROMEX-05), respectively. The analysis included measurement of agar redox potential and root alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity, localization, and expression. ADH activity increased by 89% as a result of spaceflight exposure for both CHROMEX-03 and -05 experiments, and ADH RNase protection assays revealed a 136% increase in ADH mRNA. The increase in ADH activity associated with the spaceflight roots was realized by a 28% decrease in oxygen availability in a ground-based study; however, no reduction in redox potential was observed in measurements of the spaceflight bulk agar. Spaceflight exposure appears to effect a hypoxic response in the roots of agar-grown plants that may be caused by changes in gravity-mediated fluid and/or gas behavior.

  18. Alcohol dehydrogenase activities and ethanol tolerance in Anastrepha (Diptera, Tephritidae) fruit-fly species and their hybrids

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The ADH (alcohol dehydrogenase) system is one of the earliest known models of molecular evolution, and is still the most studied in Drosophila. Herein, we studied this model in the genus Anastrepha (Diptera, Tephritidae). Due to the remarkable advantages it presents, it is possible to cross species with different Adh genotypes and with different phenotype traits related to ethanol tolerance. The two species studied here each have a different number of Adh gene copies, whereby crosses generate polymorphisms in gene number and in composition of the genetic background. We measured certain traits related to ethanol metabolism and tolerance. ADH specific enzyme activity presented gene by environment interactions, and the larval protein content showed an additive pattern of inheritance, whilst ADH enzyme activity per larva presented a complex behavior that may be explained by epistatic effects. Regression models suggest that there are heritable factors acting on ethanol tolerance, which may be related to enzymatic activity of the ADHs and to larval mass, although a pronounced environmental effect on ethanol tolerance was also observed. By using these data, we speculated on the mechanisms of ethanol tolerance and its inheritance as well as of associated traits. PMID:21637665

  19. Spaceflight exposure effects on transcription, activity, and localization of alcohol dehydrogenase in the roots of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Porterfield, D M; Matthews, S W; Daugherty, C J; Musgrave, M E

    1997-01-01

    Although considerable research and speculation have been directed toward understanding a plant's perception of gravity and the resulting gravitropic responses, little is known about the role of gravity-dependent physical processes in normal physiological function. These studies were conducted to determine whether the roots of plants exposed to spaceflight conditions may be experiencing hypoxia. Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. plants were grown in agar medium during 6 or 11 d of spaceflight exposure on shuttle missions STS-54 (CHROMEX-03) and STS-68 (CHROMEX-05), respectively. The analysis included measurement of agar redox potential and root alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity, localization, and expression. ADH activity increased by 89% as a result of spaceflight exposure for both CHROMEX-03 and -05 experiments, and ADH RNase protection assays revealed a 136% increase in ADH mRNA. The increase in ADH activity associated with the spaceflight roots was realized by a 28% decrease in oxygen availability in a ground-based study; however, no reduction in redox potential was observed in measurements of the spaceflight bulk agar. Spaceflight exposure appears to effect a hypoxic response in the roots of agar-grown plants that may be caused by changes in gravity-mediated fluid and/or gas behavior. PMID:9085569

  20. Application of capillary enzyme micro-reactor in enzyme activity and inhibitors studies of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Camara, Mohamed Amara; Tian, Miaomiao; Guo, Liping; Yang, Li

    2015-05-15

    In this study, we present an on-line measurement of enzyme activity and inhibition of Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) enzyme using capillary electrophoresis based immobilized enzyme micro-reactor (CE-based IMER). The IMER was prepared using a two-step protocol based on electrostatic assembly. The micro-reactor exhibited good stability and reproducibility for on-line assay of G6PDH enzyme. Both the activity as well as the inhibition of the G6PDH enzyme by six inhibitors, including three metals (Cu(2+), Pb(2+), Cd(2+)), vancomycin, urea and KMnO4, were investigated using on-line assay of the CE-based IMERs. The enzyme activity and inhibition kinetic constants were measured using the IMERs which were found to be consistent with those using traditional off-line enzyme assays. The kinetic mechanism of each inhibitor was also determined. The present study demonstrates the feasibility of using CE-based IMERs for rapid and efficient on-line assay of G6PDH, an important enzyme in the pentosephosphate pathway of human metabolism.

  1. Human liver mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase: three-dimensional structure and the restoration of solubility and activity of chimeric forms.

    PubMed Central

    Ni, L.; Zhou, J.; Hurley, T. D.; Weiner, H.

    1999-01-01

    Human liver cytosolic and mitochondrial isozymes of aldehyde dehydrogenase share 70% sequence identity. However, the first 21 residues are not conserved between the human isozymes (15% identity). The three-dimensional structures of the beef mitochondrial and sheep cytosolic forms have virtually identical three-dimensional structures. Here, we solved the structure of the human mitochondrial enzyme and found it to be identical to the beef enzyme. The first 21 residues are found on the surface of the enzyme and make no contact with other subunits in the tetramer. A pair of chimeric enzymes between the human isozymes was made. Each chimera had the first 21 residues from one isozyme and the remaining 479 from the other. When the first 21 residues were from the mitochondrial isozyme, an enzyme with cytosolic-like properties was produced. The other was expressed but was insoluble. It was possible to restore solubility and activity to the chimera that had the first 21 cytosolic residues fused to the mitochondrial ones by making point mutations to residues at the N-terminal end. When residue 19 was changed from tyrosine to a cysteine, the residue found in the mitochondrial form, an active enzyme could be made though the Km for NAD+ was 35 times higher than the native mitochondrial isozyme and the specific activity was reduced by 75%. This residue interacts with residue 203, a nonconserved, nonactive site residue. A mutation of residue 18, which also interacts with 203, restored solubility, but not activity. Mutation to residue 15, which interacts with 104, also restored solubility but not activity. It appears that to have a soluble or active enzyme a favorable interaction must occur between a residue in a surface loop and a residue elsewhere in the molecule even though neither make contact with the active site region of the enzyme. PMID:10631996

  2. Alpha-ketoglutarate reduces ethanol toxicity in Drosophila melanogaster by enhancing alcohol dehydrogenase activity and antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Bayliak, Maria M; Shmihel, Halyna V; Lylyk, Maria P; Storey, Kenneth B; Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2016-09-01

    Ethanol at low concentrations (<4%) can serve as a food source for fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, whereas at higher concentrations it may be toxic. In this work, protective effects of dietary alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG) against ethanol toxicity were studied. Food supplementation with 10-mM AKG alleviated toxic effects of 8% ethanol added to food, and improved fly development. Two-day-old adult flies, reared on diet containing both AKG and ethanol, possessed higher alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity as compared with those reared on control diet or diet with ethanol only. Native gel electrophoresis data suggested that this combination diet might promote post-translational modifications of ADH protein with the formation of a highly active ADH form. The ethanol-containing diet led to significantly higher levels of triacylglycerides stored in adult flies, and this parameter was not altered by AKG supplement. The influence of diet on antioxidant defenses was also assessed. In ethanol-fed flies, catalase activity was higher in males and the levels of low molecular mass thiols were unchanged in both sexes compared to control values. Feeding on a mixture of AKG and ethanol did not affect catalase activity but caused a higher level of low molecular mass thiols compared to ethanol-fed flies. It can be concluded that both a stimulation of some components of antioxidant defense and the increase in ADH activity may be responsible for the protective effects of AKG diet supplementation in combination with ethanol. The results suggest that AKG might be useful as a treatment option to neutralize toxic effects of excessive ethanol intake and to improve the physiological state of D. melanogaster and other animals, potentially including humans.

  3. The level of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity strongly influences xylose fermentation and inhibitor sensitivity in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Jeppsson, Marie; Johansson, Björn; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Hahn-Hägerdal, Bärbel; Gorwa-Grauslund, Marie F

    2003-11-01

    Disruption of the ZWF1 gene encoding glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) has been shown to reduce the xylitol yield and the xylose consumption in the xylose-utilizing recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain TMB3255. In the present investigation we have studied the influence of different production levels of G6PDH on xylose fermentation. We used a synthetic promoter library and the copper-regulated CUP1 promoter to generate G6PDH-activities between 0% and 179% of the wild-type level. G6PDH-activities of 1% and 6% of the wild-type level resulted in 2.8- and 5.1-fold increase in specific xylose consumption, respectively, compared with the ZWF1-disrupted strain. Both strains exhibited decreased xylitol yields (0.13 and 0.19 g/g xylose) and enhanced ethanol yields (0.36 and 0.34 g/g xylose) compared with the control strain TMB3001 (0.29 g xylitol/g xylose, 0.31 g ethanol/g xylose). Cytoplasmic transhydrogenase (TH) from Azotobacter vinelandii has previously been shown to transfer NADPH and NAD(+) into NADP(+) and NADH, and TH-overproduction resulted in lower xylitol yield and enhanced glycerol yield during xylose utilization. Strains with low G6PDH-activity grew slower in a lignocellulose hydrolysate than the strain with wild-type G6PDH-activity, which suggested that the availability of intracellular NADPH correlated with tolerance towards lignocellulose-derived inhibitors. Low G6PDH-activity strains were also more sensitive to H(2)O(2) than the control strain TMB3001.

  4. Mixed Disulfide Formation at Cys141 Leads to Apparent Unidirectional Attenuation of Aspergillus niger NADP-Glutamate Dehydrogenase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Walvekar, Adhish S.; Choudhury, Rajarshi; Punekar, Narayan S.

    2014-01-01

    NADP-Glutamate dehydrogenase from Aspergillus niger (AnGDH) exhibits sigmoid 2-oxoglutarate saturation. Incubation with 2-hydroxyethyl disulfide (2-HED, the disulfide of 2-mercaptoethanol) resulted in preferential attenuation of AnGDH reductive amination (forward) activity but with a negligible effect on oxidative deamination (reverse) activity, when monitored in the described standard assay. Such a disulfide modified AnGDH displaying less than 1.0% forward reaction rate could be isolated after 2-HED treatment. This unique forward inhibited GDH form (FIGDH), resembling a hypothetical ‘one-way’ active enzyme, was characterized. Kinetics of 2-HED mediated inhibition and protein thiol titrations suggested that a single thiol group is modified in FIGDH. Two site-directed cysteine mutants, C141S and C415S, were constructed to identify the relevant thiol in FIGDH. The forward activity of C141S alone was insensitive to 2-HED, implicating Cys141 in FIGDH formation. It was observed that FIGDH displayed maximal reaction rate only after a pre-incubation with 2-oxoglutarate and NADPH. In addition, compared to the native enzyme, FIGDH showed a four fold increase in K0.5 for 2-oxoglutarate and a two fold increase in the Michaelis constants for ammonium and NADPH. With no change in the GDH reaction equilibrium constant, the FIGDH catalyzed rate of approach to equilibrium from reductive amination side was sluggish. Altered kinetic properties of FIGDH at least partly account for the observed apparent loss of forward activity when monitored under defined assay conditions. In sum, although Cys141 is catalytically not essential, its covalent modification provides a striking example of converting the biosynthetic AnGDH into a catabolic enzyme. PMID:24987966

  5. Alcohol Dehydrogenase from Methylobacterium organophilum

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, H. J.; Hanson, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase from Methylobacterium organophilum, a facultative methane-oxidizing bacterium, has been purified to homogeneity as indicated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis. It has several properties in common with the alcohol dehydrogenases from other methylotrophic bacteria. The active enzyme is a dimeric protein, both subunits having molecular weights of about 62,000. The enzyme exhibits broad substrate specificity for primary alcohols and catalyzes the two-step oxidation of methanol to formate. The apparent Michaelis constants of the enzyme are 2.9 × 10−5 M for methanol and 8.2 × 10−5 M for formaldehyde. Activity of the purified enzyme is dependent on phenazine methosulfate. Certain characteristics of this enzyme distinguish it from the other alcohol dehydrogenases of other methylotrophic bacteria. Ammonia is not required for, but stimulates the activity of newly purified enzyme. An absolute dependence on ammonia develops after storage of the purified enzyme. Activity is not inhibited by phosphate. The fluorescence spectrum of the enzyme indicates that it and the cofactor associated with it may be chemically different from the alcohol dehydrogenases from other methylotrophic bacteria. The alcohol dehydrogenases of Hyphomicrobium WC-65, Pseudomonas methanica, Methylosinus trichosporium, and several facultative methylotrophs are serologically related to the enzyme purified in this study. The enzymes of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila and of organisms of the Methylococcus group did not cross-react with the antiserum prepared against the alcohol dehydrogenase of M. organophilum. Images PMID:80974

  6. Binding region of alanopine dehydrogenase predicted by unbiased molecular dynamics simulations of ligand diffusion.

    PubMed

    Gohlke, Holger; Hergert, Ulrike; Meyer, Tatu; Mulnaes, Daniel; Grieshaber, Manfred K; Smits, Sander H J; Schmitt, Lutz

    2013-10-28

    Opine dehydrogenases catalyze the reductive condensation of pyruvate with L-amino acids. Biochemical characterization of alanopine dehydrogenase from Arenicola marina revealed that this enzyme is highly specific for L-alanine. Unbiased molecular dynamics simulations with a homology model of alanopine dehydrogenase captured the binding of L-alanine diffusing from solvent to a putative binding region near a distinct helix-kink-helix motif. These results and sequence comparisons reveal how mutations and insertions within this motif dictate the L-amino acid specificity.

  7. Cardiac Mitochondrial Respiratory Dysfunction and Tissue Damage in Chronic Hyperglycemia Correlate with Reduced Aldehyde Dehydrogenase-2 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Mandar; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A.; Xu, Jiang; Yang, Xiao-Ping; Palaniyandi, Suresh S.

    2016-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) 2 is a mitochondrial isozyme of the heart involved in the metabolism of toxic aldehydes produced from oxidative stress. We hypothesized that hyperglycemia-mediated decrease in ALDH2 activity may impair mitochondrial respiration and ultimately result in cardiac damage. A single dose (65 mg/kg; i.p.) streptozotocin injection to rats resulted in hyperglycemia with blood glucose levels of 443 ± 9 mg/dl versus 121 ± 7 mg/dl in control animals, p<0.0001, N = 7–11. After 6 months of diabetes mellitus (DM) induction, the rats were sacrificed after recording the functionality of their hearts. Increase in the cardiomyocyte cross sectional area (446 ± 32 μm2 Vs 221 ± 10 μm2; p<0.0001) indicated cardiac hypertrophy in DM rats. Both diastolic and systolic dysfunctions were observed with DM rats compared to controls. Most importantly, myocardial ALDH2 activity and levels were reduced, and immunostaining for 4HNE protein adducts was increased in DM hearts compared to controls. The mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate (OCR), an index of mitochondrial respiration, was decreased in mitochondria isolated from DM hearts compared to controls (p<0.0001). Furthermore, the rate of mitochondrial respiration and the increase in carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP)-induced maximal respiration were also decreased with chronic hyperglycemia. Chronic hyperglycemia reduced mitochondrial OXPHOS proteins. Reduced ALDH2 activity was correlated with mitochondrial dysfunction, pathological remodeling and cardiac dysfunction, respectively. Our results suggest that chronic hyperglycemia reduces ALDH2 activity, leading to mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction and consequently cardiac damage and dysfunction. PMID:27736868

  8. Cadmium reduces 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 activity and expression in human placental trophoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kaiping; Julan, Laura; Rubio, Fran; Sharma, Anju; Guan, Haiyan

    2006-01-01

    Cadmium, a common environmental pollutant and a major constituent of tobacco smoke, has been identified as a new class of endocrine disruptors with a wide range of detrimental effects on mammalian reproduction. During human pregnancy, maternal cadmium exposure, via the environment and/or cigarette smoking, leads to fetal growth restriction (FGR), but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Although a substantial amount of evidence suggests that cadmium may affect fetal growth indirectly via the placenta, the molecular targets remain to be identified. Given that reduced placental 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11 beta-HSD2, encoded by HSD11B2 gene) is causally linked to FGR, the present study was undertaken to examine the hypothesis that cadmium induces FGR in part by targeting placental HSD11B2. Using cultured human trophoblast cells as a model system, we showed that cadmium exposure resulted in a time- and concentration-dependent decrease in 11 beta-HSD2 activity, such that an 80% reduction was observed after 24-h treatment at 1 microM. It also led to a similar decrease in levels of 11 beta-HSD2 protein and mRNA, suggesting that cadmium reduced 11 beta-HSD2 expression. Furthermore, cadmium diminished HSD11B2 promoter activity, indicative of repression of HSD11B2 gene transcription. In addition, the effect of cadmium was highly specific, in that other divalent metals (Zn(2+), Mg(2+), and Mn(2+)) as well as nicotine and cotinine (a major metabolite of nicotine) did not alter 11 beta-HSD2 activity. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that cadmium reduces human placental 11 beta-HSD2 expression and activity by suppressing HSD11B2 gene transcription. Thus the present study identifies placental 11 beta-HSD2 as a novel molecular target of cadmium. It also reveals a molecular mechanism by which this endocrine disruptor may affect human placental function and, consequently, fetal growth and development.

  9. Interaction of potassium cyanide with the [Ni-4Fe-5S] active site cluster of CO dehydrogenase from Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans.

    PubMed

    Ha, Seung-Wook; Korbas, Malgorzata; Klepsch, Mirjam; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Meyer, Ortwin; Svetlitchnyi, Vitali

    2007-04-06

    The Ni-Fe carbon monoxide (CO) dehydrogenase II (CODHII(Ch)) from the anaerobic CO-utilizing hydrogenogenic bacterium Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans catalyzes the oxidation of CO, presumably at the Ni-(micro(2)S)-Fe1 subsite of the [Ni-4S-5S] cluster in the active site. The CO oxidation mechanism proposed on the basis of several CODHII(Ch) crystal structures involved the apical binding of CO at the nickel ion and the activation of water at the Fe1 ion of the cluster. To understand how CO interacts with the active site, we have studied the reactivity of the cluster with potassium cyanide and analyzed the resulting type of nickel coordination by x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Cyanide acts as a competitive inhibitor of reduced CODHII(Ch) with respect to the substrate CO and is therefore expected to mimic the substrate. It inhibits the enzyme reversibly, forming a nickel cyanide. In this reaction, one of the four square-planar sulfur ligands of nickel is replaced by the carbon atom of cyanide, suggesting removal of the micro(2)S from the Ni-(micro(2)S)-Fe1 subsite. Upon reactivation of the inhibited enzyme, cyanide is released, and the square-planar coordination of nickel by 4S ligands is recovered, which includes the reformation of the Ni-(micro(2)S)-Fe1 bridge. The results are summarized in a model of the CO oxidation mechanism at the [Ni-4Fe-5S] active site cluster of CODHII(Ch) from C. hydrogenoformans.

  10. Comparison of endogenous cytokinins and cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase activity in germinating and thermoinhibited Tagetes minuta achenes.

    PubMed

    Stirk, Wendy A; Novák, Ondřej; Zižková, Eva; Motyka, Vaclav; Strnad, Miroslav; van Staden, Johannes

    2012-05-01

    Tagetes minuta L. achenes are thermoinhibited at temperatures above 35°C and have accelerated radicle emergence (germination) when subsequently transferred to an optimal temperature (25°C). Endogenous cytokinins and cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase (CKX) activity were compared in normally germinating (25°C) and thermoinhibited (72h at 36°C then transferred to 25°C) T. minuta achenes. Following imbibition, endogenous cytokinin concentrations changed in normally germinating T. minuta achenes, with a gradual decrease in dihydrozeatin-type (DHZ) cytokinins, a large increase in cis-zeatin-type (cZ) cytokinins, a smaller increase in N⁶-(2-isopentenyl)adenine-type (iP) cytokinins and a peak of trans-zeatin-type (tZ) cytokinins at 13 h. These changes in the isoprenoid cytokinin profile were similar in the thermoinhibited achenes imbibed at 36°C, despite the thermal block preventing radicle emergence. The exception was the iP-type cytokinins that only increased when transferred to 25°C. Profiles of the physiologically active free bases showed an increase in tZ prior to radical emergence in both normally germinating (13 h) and thermoinhibited achenes. A large transient peak in aromatic cytokinins [N⁶-benzyladenine-type (BA)] occurred during early seedling establishment in normally germinating achenes (40 h) while a transient maximum in BA-type cytokinins was found prior to radicle emergence in the thermoinhibited achenes (24 h). The CKX activity was enhanced in normally germinating achenes as the cytokinin concentration increased following imbibition. In thermoinhibited achenes, an elevated temperature negatively affected the CKX activity that only increased when the achenes were transferred to 25°C, corresponding to an increase in iP-type cytokinins. However, the favored cytokinin deactivation pathway in T. minuta appears to be 9-glycosylation, as 9-glucosides accounted for over 50% of the total cytokinin pool in both normal and thermoinhibited achenes.

  11. In vivo ethanol elimination in man, monkey and rat: A lack of relationship between the ethanol metabolism and the hepatic activities of alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Zorzano, A. ); Herrera, E. )

    1990-01-01

    The in vivo ethanol elimination in human subjects, monkeys and rats was investigated after an oral ethanol dosage. After 0.4 g. ethanol/kg of body weight, ethanol elimination was much slower in human subjects than in monkeys. In order to detect a rise in monkey plasma ethanol concentrations as early as observed in human subjects, ethanol had to be administered at a dose of 3 g/kg body weight. Ethanol metabolism in rats was also much faster than in human subjects. However, human liver showed higher alcohol dehydrogenase activity and higher low Km aldehyde dehydrogenase activity than rat liver. Thus, our data suggest a lack of relationship between hepatic ethanol-metabolizing activities and the in vivo ethanol elimination rate.

  12. High activity of mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase and glycerophosphate-dependent ROS production in prostate cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Subir K.R.; Gemin, Adam; Singh, Gurmit; E-mail: gurmit.singh@hrcc.on.ca

    2005-08-12

    Most malignant cells are highly glycolytic and produce high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) compared to normal cells. Mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (mGPDH) participates in the reoxidation of cytosolic NADH by delivering reducing equivalents from this molecule into the electron transport chain, thus sustaining glycolysis. Here, we investigate the role of mGPDH in maintaining an increased rate of glycolysis and evaluate glycerophosphate-dependent ROS production in prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, DU145, PC3, and CL1). Immunoblot, polarographic, and spectrophotometric analyses revealed that mGPDH abundance and activity was significantly elevated in prostate cancer cell lines when compared to the normal prostate epithelial cell line PNT1A. Furthermore, both the glycolytic capacity and glycerophosphate-dependent ROS production was increased 1.68- to 4.44-fold and 5- to 7-fold, respectively, in prostate cancer cell lines when compared to PNT1A cells. Overall, these data demonstrate that mGPDH is involved in maintaining a high rate of glycolysis and is an important site of electron leakage leading to ROS production in prostate cancer cells.

  13. High activity of mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase and glycerophosphate-dependent ROS production in prostate cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Subir K R; Gemin, Adam; Singh, Gurmit

    2005-08-12

    Most malignant cells are highly glycolytic and produce high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) compared to normal cells. Mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (mGPDH) participates in the reoxidation of cytosolic NADH by delivering reducing equivalents from this molecule into the electron transport chain, thus sustaining glycolysis. Here, we investigate the role of mGPDH in maintaining an increased rate of glycolysis and evaluate glycerophosphate-dependent ROS production in prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, DU145, PC3, and CL1). Immunoblot, polarographic, and spectrophotometric analyses revealed that mGPDH abundance and activity was significantly elevated in prostate cancer cell lines when compared to the normal prostate epithelial cell line PNT1A. Furthermore, both the glycolytic capacity and glycerophosphate-dependent ROS production was increased 1.68- to 4.44-fold and 5- to 7-fold, respectively, in prostate cancer cell lines when compared to PNT1A cells. Overall, these data demonstrate that mGPDH is involved in maintaining a high rate of glycolysis and is an important site of electron leakage leading to ROS production in prostate cancer cells.

  14. High yields of active Thermus thermophilus proline dehydrogenase are obtained using maltose-binding protein as a solubility tag.

    PubMed

    Huijbers, Mieke M E; van Berkel, Willem J H

    2015-03-01

    Proline dehydrogenase (ProDH) catalyzes the FAD-dependent oxidation of proline to Δ(1) -pyrroline-5-carboxylate, the first step of proline catabolism in many organisms. Next to being involved in a number of physiological processes, ProDH is of interest for practical applications because the proline imino acid can serve as a building block for a wide range of peptides and antibiotics. ProDH is a membrane-associated protein and recombinant soluble forms of the enzyme have only been obtained in limited amounts. We here report on the heterologous production of ProDH from Thermus thermophilus (TtProDH) in Escherichia coli. Using maltose-binding protein as solubility tag, high yields of active holoenzyme are obtained. Native TtProDH can be produced from cleaving the purified fusion protein with trypsin. Size-exclusion chromatography shows that fused and clipped TtProDH form oligomers. Thermal stability and co-solvent tolerance indicate the conformational robustness of TtProDH. These properties together with the high yield make TtProDH attractive for industrial applications.

  15. Inhibition of snowshoe hare succinate dehydrogenase activity as a mechanism of deterrence for papyriferic acid in birch.

    PubMed

    Forbey, Jennifer Sorensen; Pu, Xinzhu; Xu, Dong; Kielland, Knut; Bryant, John

    2011-12-01

    The plant secondary metabolite papyriferic acid (PA) deters browsing by snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus) on the juvenile developmental stage of the Alaska paper birch (Betula neoalaskana). However, the physiological mechanism that reduces browsing remains unknown. We used pharmacological assays and molecular modeling to test the hypothesis that inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) is a mode of action (MOA) of toxicity of PA in snowshoe hares. We tested this hypothesis by measuring the effect of PA on the activity of SDH in liver mitochondria isolated from wild hares. In addition, we used molecular modeling to determine the specific binding site of PA on SDH. We found that PA inhibits SDH from hares by an uncompetitive mechanism in a dose-dependent manner. Molecular modeling suggests that inhibition of SDH is a result of binding of PA at the ubiquinone binding sites in complex II. Our results provide a MOA for toxicity that may be responsible for the concentration-dependent anti-feedant effects of PA. We propose that snowshoe hares reduce the dose-dependent toxic consequences of PA by relying on efflux transporters and metabolizing enzymes that lower systemic exposure to dietary PA.

  16. L-alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase II of rat kidney and liver mitochondria possesses cysteine S-conjugate beta-lyase activity: a contributing factor to the nephrotoxicity/hepatotoxicity of halogenated alkenes?

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Arthur J L; Krasnikov, Boris F; Okuno, Etsuo; Jeitner, Thomas M

    2003-01-01

    Several halogenated alkenes are metabolized in part to cysteine S-conjugates, which are mitochondrial toxicants of kidney and, to a lesser extent, other organs. Toxicity is due to cysteine S-conjugate beta-lyases, which convert the cysteine S-conjugate into pyruvate, ammonia and a reactive sulphur-containing fragment. A section of the human population is exposed to halogenated alkenes. To understand the health effects of such exposure, it is important to identify cysteine S-conjugate beta-lyases that contribute to mitochondrial damage. Mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase [Cooper, Bruschi, Iriarte and Martinez-Carrion (2002) Biochem. J. 368, 253-261] and mitochondrial branched-chain aminotransferase [Cooper, Bruschi, Conway and Hutson (2003) Biochem. Pharmacol. 65, 181-192] exhibit beta-lyase activity toward S -(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (the cysteine S-conjugate of trichloroethylene) and S -(1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethyl)-L-cysteine (the cysteine S-conjugate of tetrafluoroethylene). Turnover leads to eventual inactivation of these enzymes. Here we report that mitochondrial L-alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase II, which, in the rat, is most active in kidney, catalyses cysteine S-conjugate beta-lyase reactions with S -(1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethyl)-L-cysteine, S -(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine and S -(benzothiazolyl-L-cysteine); turnover leads to inactivation. Previous workers showed that the reactive-sulphur-containing fragment released from S -(1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethyl)-L-cysteine and S -(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine is toxic by acting as a thioacylating agent - particularly of lysine residues in nearby proteins. Toxicity, however, may also involve 'self-inactivation' of key enzymes. The present findings suggest that alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase II may be an important factor in the well-established targeting of rat kidney mitochondria by toxic halogenated cysteine S-conjugates. Previous reports suggest that alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase II is absent

  17. High fat fed heart failure animals have enhanced mitochondrial function and acyl-coa dehydrogenase activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have previously shown that administration of high fat in heart failure (HF) increased mitochondrial respiration and did not alter left ventricular (LV) function. PPARalpha is a nuclear transcription factor that activates expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake and utilization. We hypoth...

  18. Reduced mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase activity has a strong effect on photorespiratory metabolism as revealed by 13C labelling

    PubMed Central

    Lindén, Pernilla; Keech, Olivier; Stenlund, Hans; Gardeström, Per; Moritz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH) catalyses the interconversion of malate and oxaloacetate (OAA) in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Its activity is important for redox control of the mitochondrial matrix, through which it may participate in regulation of TCA cycle turnover. In Arabidopsis, there are two isoforms of mMDH. Here, we investigated to which extent the lack of the major isoform, mMDH1 accounting for about 60% of the activity, affected leaf metabolism. In air, rosettes of mmdh1 plants were only slightly smaller than wild type plants although the fresh weight was decreased by about 50%. In low CO2 the difference was much bigger, with mutant plants accumulating only 14% of fresh weight as compared to wild type. To investigate the metabolic background to the differences in growth, we developed a 13CO2 labelling method, using a custom-built chamber that enabled simultaneous treatment of sets of plants under controlled conditions. The metabolic profiles were analysed by gas- and liquid- chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry to investigate the metabolic adjustments between wild type and mmdh1. The genotypes responded similarly to high CO2 treatment both with respect to metabolite pools and 13C incorporation during a 2-h treatment. However, under low CO2 several metabolites differed between the two genotypes and, interestingly most of these were closely associated with photorespiration. We found that while the glycine/serine ratio increased, a concomitant altered glutamine/glutamate/α-ketoglutarate relation occurred. Taken together, our results indicate that adequate mMDH activity is essential to shuttle reductants out from the mitochondria to support the photorespiratory flux, and strengthen the idea that photorespiration is tightly intertwined with peripheral metabolic reactions. PMID:26889011

  19. Studies on optical, mechanical and transport properties of NLO active L-alanine formate single crystal grown by modified Sankaranarayanan Ramasamy (SR) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justin Raj, C.; Dinakaran, S.; Krishnan, S.; Milton Boaz, B.; Robert, R.; Jerome Das, S.

    2008-04-01

    Bulk single crystals of L-alanine formate of 10 mm diameter and 50 mm length have been grown with an aid of modified Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR) uniaxial crystal growth method within a period of ten days. The optical properties of the grown crystal were calculated from UV transmission spectral analysis. The second harmonic generation efficiency of the grown crystal was confirmed by Kurtz powder test. In order to determine the mechanical strength of the crystal, Vicker's microhardness test was carried along the growth plane (0 0 1). Dielectric studies reveal that both dielectric constant and dielectric loss decreases with increase in frequency. Photoconductivity study confirms the negative photoconducting nature of the crystal.

  20. Characterization of interactions of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase with its binding protein in the human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Yun-Hee; Patel, Mulchand S.

    2010-05-07

    Unlike pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes (PDCs) from prokaryotes, PDCs from higher eukaryotes have an additional structural component, E3-binding protein (BP), for binding of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3) in the complex. Based on the 3D structure of the subcomplex of human (h) E3 with the di-domain (L3S1) of hBP, the amino acid residues (H348, D413, Y438, and R447) of hE3 for binding to hBP were substituted singly by alanine or other residues. These substitutions did not have large effects on hE3 activity when measured in its free form. However, when these hE3 mutants were reconstituted in the complex, the PDC activity was significantly reduced to 9% for Y438A, 20% for Y438H, and 18% for D413A. The binding of hE3 mutants with L3S1 determined by isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that the binding affinities of the Y438A, Y438H, and D413A mutants to L3S1 were severely reduced (1019-, 607-, and 402-fold, respectively). Unlike wild-type hE3 the binding of the Y438A mutant to L3S1 was accompanied by an unfavorable enthalpy change and a large positive entropy change. These results indicate that hE3-Y438 and hE3-D413 play important roles in binding of hE3 to hBP.

  1. Dehydrogenase activity and quality of leachates in Technosols with gossan and sulfide materials from the São Domingos mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Erika; Abreu, Manuela; Macías, Felipe; de Varennes, Amarílis

    2014-05-01

    Wastes produced by mining activity in São Domingos (Portuguese Iberian Pyrite Belt) were disposed over a large area. To speed up the ecological rehabilitation in this mine, an integrative strategy using different amendments+mine wastes was used to produce Technosols with enhanced soil functions. To evaluate the efficiency of these Technosols the dehydrogenase activity and chemical quality of leachates were monitored. Technosols were composed of different mine wastes (gossan and sulfide materials), collected at the São Domingos mine, and mixtures of amendments applied at 30 and 75 Mg/ha (rockwool+agriculture wastes+wastes from liquors distillation of strawberry tree fruits (Arbutus unedo L.) and/or carobs (Ceratonia siliqua L. fruits)). Three assays, under controlled conditions, were carried out: (1 and 2) Sulfide or gossan materials with/without amendments; (3) Sulfide wastes, with/without amendments, incubated during four months and then with application of an overlayer of gossan (~3 cm thick) with/without the same amendments. Dehydrogenase activity (DHA) and chemical characteristics of leachates (multielemental concentration, pH, and electric conductivity) were determined after four/seven/thirteen months of incubation. Sulfide wastes had more hazardous characteristics (pH~2 and total concentrations (g/kg) of Al (58.1), As (1.1), Cu (2.1), Fe (107.3), Pb (11.7), S (65.3) and Zn (1.1) than the gossan materials (pH=4.3; g/kg, Al: 24.8, As: 3.0, Cu: 0.2, Fe: 129, Pb: 9.2, S: 13.7, Zn: 0.04). Amendments application to gossan (assay 2) enhanced DHA in both sampling periods (µg TPF g dry weight 16 h-1, Control: 0,72-1,78; Amended treatments: 2.49-16.36 depending on mixture/application rate/sampling period). Greater application rates stimulated DHA (more than 1.5-fold with 75 Mg/ha). No differences were observed in DHA in the gossan layer with/without amendments (assay 3) suggesting a negative impact on gossan microrganisms from sulfide materials located below. In

  2. Effects of high-fat diet and physical activity on pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-4 in mouse skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The expression of PDK4 is elevated by diabetes, fasting and other conditions associated with the switch from the utilization of glucose to fatty acids as an energy source. It is previously shown that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), a master regulator of energy metabolism, coactivates in cell lines pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-4 (PDK4) gene expression via the estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα). We investigated the effects of long-term high-fat diet and physical activity on the expression of PDK4, PGC-1α and ERRα and the amount and function of mitochondria in skeletal muscle. Methods Insulin resistance was induced by a high-fat (HF) diet for 19 weeks in C57BL/6 J mice, which were either sedentary or with access to running wheels. The skeletal muscle expression levels of PDK4, PGC-1α and ERRα were measured and the quality and quantity of mitochondrial function was assessed. Results The HF mice were more insulin-resistant than the low-fat (LF) -fed mice. Upregulation of PDK4 and ERRα mRNA and protein levels were seen after the HF diet, and when combined with running even more profound effects on the mRNA expression levels were observed. Chronic HF feeding and voluntary running did not have significant effects on PGC-1α mRNA or protein levels. No remarkable difference was found in the amount or function of mitochondria. Conclusions Our results support the view that insulin resistance is not mediated by the decreased qualitative or quantitative properties of mitochondria. Instead, the role of PDK4 should be contemplated as a possible contributor to high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance. PMID:22682013

  3. Inhibition of telomerase activity preferentially targets aldehyde dehydrogenase-positive cancer stem-like cells in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mortality rates for advanced lung cancer have not declined for decades, even with the implementation of novel chemotherapeutic regimens or the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs) are thought to be responsible for resistance to chemo/radiotherapy. Therefore, targeting CSCs with novel compounds may be an effective approach to reduce lung tumor growth and metastasis. We have isolated and characterized CSCs from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines and measured their telomerase activity, telomere length, and sensitivity to the novel telomerase inhibitor MST312. Results The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) positive lung cancer cell fraction is enriched in markers of stemness and endowed with stem cell properties. ALDH+ CSCs display longer telomeres than the non-CSC population. Interestingly, MST312 has a strong antiproliferative effect on lung CSCs and induces p21, p27 and apoptosis in the whole tumor population. MST312 acts through activation of the ATM/pH2AX DNA damage pathway (short-term effect) and through decrease in telomere length (long-term effect). Administration of this telomerase inhibitor (40 mg/kg) in the H460 xenograft model results in significant tumor shrinkage (70% reduction, compared to controls). Combination therapy consisting of irradiation (10Gy) plus administration of MST312 did not improve the therapeutic efficacy of the telomerase inhibitor alone. Treatment with MST312 reduces significantly the number of ALDH+ CSCs and their telomeric length in vivo. Conclusions We conclude that antitelomeric therapy using MST312 mainly targets lung CSCs and may represent a novel approach for effective treatment of lung cancer. PMID:21827695

  4. 11 beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type II in the human endometrium: localization and activity during the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Smith, R E; Salamonsen, L A; Komesaroff, P A; Li, K X; Myles, K M; Lawrence, M; Krozowski, Z

    1997-12-01

    The 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type II enzyme (11 beta HSD2) is a potent inactivator of glucocorticoids and is present in high amounts in the placental syncytiotrophoblast and sodium-transporting epithelia. Placental 11 beta HSD2 is thought to protect the fetus from high circulating levels of maternal glucocorticoids, whereas the renal enzyme is important in conferring aldosterone specificity on the mineralocorticoid receptor. An isoform of 11 beta HSD (11 beta HSD1) is also present in a wide range of tissues, but usually acts as an oxoreductase, converting the biologically inactive cortisone to cortisol. In the present study we have used an immunopurified antibody to the carboxy-terminus of human 11 beta HSD2 (HUH23) to demonstrate localization of the enzyme in luminal and glandular epithelia of human endometrium. In some specimens staining was uniformly distributed, but in others there was clear evidence of heterogeneity both between and within epithelia. Although 11 beta HSD2 was found mainly in the cytoplasm, some cells showed evidence of nuclear staining only. Western blot analysis showed a band at 41 kDa in endometrium and myometrium, confirming the presence of 11 beta HSD2. Measurement of activity throughout the menstrual cycle showed that mean levels (+/- SEM) of activity were 156 +/- 17 and 6.1 +/- 1.1 pmol product/min.g homogenate protein for 11 beta HSD2 and 11 beta HSD1, respectively. Patients taking combined estrogen/progesterone contraceptives had significantly lower activities of both enzymes (76 +/- 19 and 1.9 +/- 0.4; both P < 0.01) compared with the control group. 11 beta HSD2 activity was significantly higher in the secretory than in the proliferative phase of the cycle in controls (193 +/- 22 vs. 120 +/- 23; P < 0.05). All groups contained outliers with elevated enzyme activities, with some patients displaying 11 beta HSD2 levels comparable to those observed in human kidney (> 1000 pmol/min.g). Further analysis showed that there was a

  5. Mild reductions in cytosolic NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity result in lower amino acid contents and pigmentation without impacting growth

    PubMed Central

    Sulpice, Ronan; Sienkiewicz-Porzucek, Agata; Osorio, Sonia; Krahnert, Ina; Stitt, Mark; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano

    2010-01-01

    Transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants were generated targeting the cytosolic NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase gene (SlICDH1) via the RNA interference approach. The resultant transformants displayed a relatively mild reduction in the expression and activity of the target enzyme in the leaves. However, biochemical analyses revealed that the transgenic lines displayed a considerable shift in metabolism, being characterized by decreases in the levels of the TCA cycle intermediates, total amino acids, photosynthetic pigments, starch and NAD(P)H. The plants showed little change in photosynthesis with the exception of a minor decrease in maximum photosynthetic efficiency (Fv/Fm), and a small decrease in growth compared to the wild type. These results reveal that even small changes in cytosolic NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity lead to noticeable alterations in the activities of enzymes involved in primary nitrate assimilation and in the synthesis of 2-oxoglutarate derived amino acids. These data are discussed within the context of current models for the role of the various isoforms of isocitrate dehydrogenase within plant amino acid metabolism. PMID:20473773

  6. Mild reductions in cytosolic NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity result in lower amino acid contents and pigmentation without impacting growth.

    PubMed

    Sulpice, Ronan; Sienkiewicz-Porzucek, Agata; Osorio, Sonia; Krahnert, Ina; Stitt, Mark; Fernie, Alisdair R; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano

    2010-10-01

    Transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants were generated targeting the cytosolic NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase gene (SlICDH1) via the RNA interference approach. The resultant transformants displayed a relatively mild reduction in the expression and activity of the target enzyme in the leaves. However, biochemical analyses revealed that the transgenic lines displayed a considerable shift in metabolism, being characterized by decreases in the levels of the TCA cycle intermediates, total amino acids, photosynthetic pigments, starch and NAD(P)H. The plants showed little change in photosynthesis with the exception of a minor decrease in maximum photosynthetic efficiency (F (v)/F (m)), and a small decrease in growth compared to the wild type. These results reveal that even small changes in cytosolic NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity lead to noticeable alterations in the activities of enzymes involved in primary nitrate assimilation and in the synthesis of 2-oxoglutarate derived amino acids. These data are discussed within the context of current models for the role of the various isoforms of isocitrate dehydrogenase within plant amino acid metabolism.

  7. Pea formaldehyde-active class III alcohol dehydrogenase: common derivation of the plant and animal forms but not of the corresponding ethanol-active forms (classes I and P).

    PubMed Central

    Shafqat, J; El-Ahmad, M; Danielsson, O; Martínez, M C; Persson, B; Parés, X; Jornvall, H

    1996-01-01

    A plant class III alcohol dehydrogenase (or glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase) has been characterized. The enzyme is a typical class III member with enzymatic parameters and substrate specificity closely related to those of already established animal forms. Km values with the pea enzyme are 6.5 microM for NAD+, 2 microM for S-hydroxymethylglutathione, and 840 microM for octanol versus 9, 4, and 1200 microM, respectively, with the human enzyme. Structurally, the pea/human class III enzymes are closely related, exhibiting a residue identity of 69% and with only 3 of 23 residues differing among those often considered in substrate and coenzyme binding. In contrast, the corresponding ethanol-active enzymes, the long-known human liver and pea alcohol dehydrogenases, differ more (47% residue identities) and are also in functionally important active site segments, with 12 of the 23 positions exchanged, including no less than 7 at the usually much conserved coenzyme-binding segment. These differences affect functionally important residues that are often class-distinguishing, such as those at positions 48, 51, and 115, where the plant ethanol-active forms resemble class III (Thr, Tyr, and Arg, respectively) rather than the animal ethanol-active class I forms (typically Ser, His, and Asp, respectively). Calculations of phylogenetic trees support the conclusions from functional residues in subgrouping plant ethanol-active dehydrogenases and the animal ethanol-active enzymes (class I) as separate descendants from the class III line. It appears that the classical plant alcohol dehydrogenases (now called class P) have a duplicatory origin separate from that of the animal class I enzymes and therefore a paralogous relationship with functional convergence of their alcohol substrate specificity. Combined, the results establish the conserved nature of class III also in plants, and contribute to the molecular and functional understanding of alcohol dehydrogenases by

  8. Enhanced enzymatic activity of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from the cryophilic Saccharomyces kudriavzevii.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Bruno M; Barrio, Eladio; Querol, Amparo; Pérez-Torrado, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    During the evolution of the different species classified within the Saccharomyces genus, each one has adapted to live in different environments. One of the most important parameters that have influenced the evolution of Saccharomyces species is the temperature. Here we have focused on the study of the ability of certain species as Saccharomyces kudriavzevii to grow at low temperatures, in contrast to Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We observed that S. kudriavzevii strains isolated from several regions are able to synthesize higher amounts of glycerol, a molecule that has been shown to accumulate in response to freeze and cold stress. To explain this observation at the molecular level we studied the expression of glycerol biosynthetic pathway genes and we observed a higher expression of GPD1 gene in S. kudriavzevii compared to S. cerevisiae in micro-vinification conditions. We observed higher enzymatic activity of Gpd1p in S. kudriavzevii in response to osmotic and cold stress. Also, we determined that S. kudriavzevii Gpd1p enzyme presents increased catalytic properties that will contribute to increase glycerol production. Finally, we evaluated the glycerol production with S. cerevisiae, S. kudriavzevii or a recombinant Gpd1p variant in the same background and observed that the S. kudriavzevii enzyme produced increased glycerol levels at 12 or 28°C. This suggests that glycerol is increased in S. kudriavzevii mainly due to increased V max of the Gpd1p enzyme. All these differences indicate that S. kudriavzevii has changed the metabolism to promote the branch of the glycolytic pathway involved in glycerol production to adapt to low temperature environments and maintain the NAD(+)/NADH ratio in alcoholic fermentations. This knowledge is industrially relevant due to the potential use, for example, of S. cerevisiae-S. kudriavzevii hybrids in the wine industry where glycerol content is an important quality parameter.

  9. Elevated lactate dehydrogenase activity and increased cardiovascular mortality in the arsenic-endemic areas of southwestern Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Ya-Tang; Chen, Chien-Jen; Li, Wan-Fen; Hsu, Ling-I; Tsai, Li-Yu; Huang, Yeou-Lih; Sun, Chien-Wen; Chen, Wei J.; Wang, Shu-Li

    2012-08-01

    Arsenic ingestion has been linked to increasing global prevalence of and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD); arsenic can be removed from drinking water to reduce related health effects. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is used for the evaluation of acute arsenic toxicity in vivo and in vitro, but it is not validated for the evaluation of long-term, chronic arsenic exposure. The present study examined the long-term effect of chronic arsenic exposure on CVD and serum LDH levels, after consideration of arsenic metabolism capacity. A total of 380 subjects from an arseniasis-endemic area and 303 from a non-endemic area of southwestern Taiwan were recruited in 2002. Various urinary arsenic species were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and hydride generation systems. Fasting serum was used for quantitative determination of the total LDH activity. A significant dose–response relationship was observed between arsenic exposure and LDH elevation, independent of urinary arsenic profiles (P < 0.001). Furthermore, abnormal LDH elevation was associated with CVD mortality after adjustment for Framingham risk scores for 10-year CVD and arsenic exposure (hazard ratio, 3.98; 95% confidence interval, 1.07–14.81). LDH was elevated in subjects with arsenic exposure in a dose-dependent manner. LDH is a marker of arsenic toxicity associated with CVD mortality. Results of this study have important implications for use in ascertaining long-term arsenic exposure risk of CVD. -- Highlights: ► We showed that arsenic exposure was correlated with LDH elevation. ► LDH elevation was related to arsenic methylation capacity. ► Abnormal LDH elevation can be a marker of susceptibility to CVD mortality.

  10. High Ca2+ load promotes hydrogen peroxide generation via activation of α-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase in brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Tretter, Laszlo; Adam-Vizi, Vera

    2012-12-01

    H(2)O(2) generation associated with α-glycerophosphate (α-GP) oxidation was addressed in guinea pig brain mitochondria challenged with high Ca(2+) load (10 μM). Exposure to 10 μM Ca(2+) induced an abrupt 2.5-fold increase in H(2)O(2) release compared to that measured in the presence of a physiological cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration (100 nM) from mitochondria respiring on 5 mM α-GP in the presence of ADP (2 mM). The Ca(2+)-induced stimulation of H(2)O(2) generation was reversible and unaltered by the uniporter blocker Ru 360, indicating that it did not require Ca(2+) uptake into mitochondria. Enhanced H(2)O(2) generation by Ca(2+) was also observed in the absence of ADP when mitochondria exhibited permeability transition pore opening with a decrease in the NAD(P)H level, dissipation of membrane potential, and mitochondrial swelling. Furthermore, mitochondria treated with the pore-forming peptide alamethicin also responded with an elevated H(2)O(2) generation to a challenge with 10 μM Ca(2+). Ca(2+)-induced promotion of H(2)O(2) formation was further enhanced by the complex III inhibitor myxothiazol. With 20 mM α-GP concentration, stimulation of H(2)O(2) formation by Ca(2+) was detected only in the presence, not in the absence, of ADP. It is concluded that α-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase, which is accessible to and could be activated by a rise in the level of cytosolic Ca(2+), makes a major contribution to Ca(2+)-stimulated H(2)O(2) generation. This work highlights a unique high-Ca(2+)-stimulated reactive oxygen species-forming mechanism in association with oxidation of α-GP, which is largely independent of the bioenergetic state and can proceed even in damaged, functionally incompetent mitochondria.

  11. Peptide aromatic interactions modulated by fluorinated residues: Synthesis, structure and biological activity of Somatostatin analogs containing 3-(3′,5′difluorophenyl)-alanine

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Gago, Pablo; Rol, Álvaro; Todorovski, Toni; Aragón, Eric; Martin-Malpartida, Pau; Verdaguer, Xavier; Vallès Miret, Mariona; Fernández-Carneado, Jimena; Ponsati, Berta; Macias, Maria J.; Riera, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Somatostatin is a 14-residue peptide hormone that regulates the endocrine system by binding to five G-protein-coupled receptors (SSTR1–5). We have designed six new Somatostatin analogs with L-3-(3′,5′-difluorophenyl)-alanine (Dfp) as a substitute of Phe and studied the effect of an electron-poor aromatic ring in the network of aromatic interactions present in Somatostatin. Replacement of each of the Phe residues (positions 6, 7 and 11) by Dfp and use of a D-Trp8 yielded peptides whose main conformations could be characterized in aqueous solution by NMR. Receptor binding studies revealed that the analog with Dfp at position 7 displayed a remarkable affinity to SSTR2 and SSTR3. Analogs with Dfp at positions 6 or 11 displayed a π-π interaction with the Phe present at 11 or 6, respectively. Interestingly, these analogs, particularly [D-Trp8,L-Dfp11]-SRIF, showed high selectivity towards SSTR2, with a higher value than that of Octreotide and a similar one to that of native Somatostatin. PMID:27271737

  12. Chemical modification of lysine and arginine residues of bovine heart 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase: effect on the enzyme activity and regulation.

    PubMed

    Ostrovtsova, S A

    1998-01-01

    Chemical modification of arginine and lysine residues of bovine heart 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase with phenylglyoxal and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate inactivated the enzyme, indicating the importance of these residues for the catalysis. Inactivation caused by pyridoxal 5'-phosphate was prevented in the presence of thiamine pyrophosphate and Mg2+ allowing the assumption that lysine residues participate in binding of the cofactor.

  13. Human placental estradiol 17. beta. -dehydrogenase: evidence for inverted substrate orientation (wrong-way binding) at the active site

    SciTech Connect

    Murdock, G.L.; Warren, J.C.; Sweet, F.

    1988-06-14

    Human placental estradiol 17..beta..-dehydrogenase was affinity labeled with 17lambda-estradiol 17-(bromo(2-/sup 14/C)acetate) (10 ..mu..M) or 17..beta..-estradiol 17-(bromo(2-/sup 14/C)acetate) (10 ..mu..M). The steroid bromoacetates competitively inhibit the enzyme (against 17..beta..-estradiol) with K/sub i/ values of 90 ..mu..M (17..cap alpha.. bromoacetate) and 134 ..mu..M(17..beta.. bromoacetate). Inactivation of the enzyme followed pseudo-first-order kinetics with t/sub 1/2/ = 110 min (17..cap alpha.. bromoacetate) and t/sub 1/2/ = 220 min (17..beta.. bromoacetate). Amino acid analysis of the affinity radioalkylated enzyme samples from the two bromoacetates revealed that N/sup ..pi../-(carboxy(/sup 14/C)methyl histidine was the modified amino acid labeled in each case. Digestion with trypsin produced peptides that were isolated by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and found to contain N/sup ..pi../-(carboxy(/sup 14/C)methyl)histidine. Both the 17..cap alpha.. bromoacetate and also the 17..beta.. bromoacetate modified the same histidine in the peptide Phe-Tyr-Gln-Tyr-Leu-Ala-His(..pi..CM)-Ser-Lys. Previously, the same histidine had been exclusively labeled by estrone 3-(bromoacetate) and shown not to be directly involve in catalytic hydrogen transfer at the D-ring of estradiol. Therefore, this histidine was presumed to proximate the A-ring of the bound steroid substrate. The present results suggest that the 17..cap alpha.. bromoacetate and 17..beta.. bromoacetate D-ring analogue of estradiol react with the same active site histidine residue as estrone 3-(bromoacetate), the A-ring analogue of estrone. Moreover, as each of the estradiol 17-(bromoacetates) undergoes the reversible binding step at the enzyme active site, its D-ring is in a reversed binding position relative to that of the natural substrate 17..beta..-estradiol as it undergoes catalytic hydrogen transfer at the same active site.

  14. Protein Conformational Landscapes and Catalysis. Influence of Active Site Conformations in the Reaction Catalyzed by L-Lactate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Świderek, Katarzyna; Tuñón, Iñaki; Martí, Sergio; Moliner, Vicent

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade L-Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) has become an extremely useful marker in both clinical diagnosis and in monitoring the course of many human diseases. It has been assumed from the 80s that the full catalytic process of LDH starts with the binding of the cofactor and the substrate followed by the enclosure of the active site by a mobile loop of the protein before the reaction to take place. In this paper we show that the chemical step of the LDH catalyzed reaction can proceed within the open loop conformation, and the different reactivity of the different protein conformations would be in agreement with the broad range of rate constants measured in single molecule spectrometry studies. Starting from a recently solved X-ray diffraction structure that presented an open loop conformation in two of the four chains of the tetramer, QM/MM free energy surfaces have been obtained at different levels of theory. Depending on the level of theory used to describe the electronic structure, the free energy barrier for the transformation of pyruvate into lactate with the open conformation of the protein varies between 12.9 and 16.3 kcal/mol, after quantizing the vibrations and adding the contributions of recrossing and tunneling effects. These values are very close to the experimentally deduced one (14.2 kcal·mol−1) and ~2 kcal·mol−1 smaller than the ones obtained with the closed loop conformer. Calculation of primary KIEs and IR spectra in both protein conformations are also consistent with our hypothesis and in agreement with experimental data. Our calculations suggest that the closure of the active site is mainly required for the inverse process; the oxidation of lactate to pyruvate. According to this hypothesis H4 type LDH enzyme molecules, where it has been propose that lactate is transformed into pyruvate, should have a better ability to close the mobile loop than the M4 type LDH molecules. PMID:25705562

  15. EPR/alanine dosimetry for two therapeutic proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrale, Maurizio; Carlino, Antonio; Gallo, Salvatore; Longo, Anna; Panzeca, Salvatore; Bolsi, Alessandra; Hrbacek, Jan; Lomax, Tony

    2016-02-01

    In this work the analysis of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) response of alanine pellets exposed to two different clinical proton beams employed for radiotherapy is performed. One beam is characterized by a passive delivery technique and is dedicated to the eyes treatment (OPTIS2 beam line). Alanine pellets were irradiated with a 70 MeV proton beam corresponding to 35 mm range in eye tissue. We investigated how collimators with different sizes and shape used to conform the dose to the planned target volume influence the delivered dose. For this purpose we performed measurements with varying the collimator size (Output Factor) and the results were compared with those obtained with other dosimetric techniques (such as Markus chamber and diode detector). This analysis showed that the dosimeter response is independent of collimator diameter if this is larger than or equal to 10 mm. The other beam is characterized by an active spot-scanning technique, the Gantry1 beam line (maximum energy 230 MeV), and is used to treat deep-seated tumors. The dose linearity of alanine response in the clinical dose range was tested and the alanine dose response at selected locations in depth was measured and compared with the TPS planned dose in a quasi-clinical scenario. The alanine response was found to be linear in the dose in the clinical explored range (from 10 to 70 Gy). Furthermore, a depth dose profile in a quasi-clinical scenario was measured and compared to the dose computed by the Treatment Planning System PSIPLAN. The comparison of calibrated proton alanine measurements and TPS dose shows a difference under 1% in the SOBP and a "quenching" effect up to 4% in the distal part of SOBP. The positive dosimetric characteristics of the alanine pellets confirm the feasibility to use these detectors for "in vivo" dosimetry in clinical proton beams.

  16. Lactate dehydrogenase test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003471.htm Lactate dehydrogenase test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is a protein that helps produce energy ...

  17. Enzymatic activities of Ura2 and Ura1 proteins (aspartate carbamoyltransferase and dihydro-orotate dehydrogenase) are present in both isolated membranes and cytoplasm of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Vorísek, J; Techniková, Z; Schwippel, J; Benoist, P

    2002-03-30

    Computational analysis predicted three potential hydrophobic transmembrane alpha-helices within the Ura2 multidomain protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the C-terminal subdomain of which catalyses the second step of uridine-monophosphate biosynthesis by its L-aspartate carbamoyltransferase activity (EC 2.1.3.2). The fourth step of pyrimidine biosynthesis is catalysed by dihydro-orotate dehydrogenase (Ura1 protein; EC 1.3.99.11), which was similarly characterized as a peripheral membrane protein. Ex situ, the activities of the investigated enzymes were associated both with isolated yeast membranes, fractionated by differential centrifugation to remove intact nuclei, and with soluble cytoplasmic proteins.

  18. Loss of Mitochondrial Malate Dehydrogenase Activity Alters Seed Metabolism Impairing Seed Maturation and Post-Germination Growth in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH; EC 1.1.1.37) has multiple roles; the most commonly described is its catalysis of the interconversion of malate and oxaloacetate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The roles of mMDH in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seed development and germination were investigated in mMDH1 and mMDH2 double knockout plants. A significant proportion of mmdh1mmdh2 seeds were nonviable and developed only to torpedo-shaped embryos, indicative of arrested seed embryo growth during embryogenesis. The viable mmdh1mmdh2 seeds had an impaired maturation process that led to slow germination rates as well as retarded post-germination growth, shorter root length, and decreased root biomass. During seed development, mmdh1mmdh2 showed a paler green phenotype than the wild type and exhibited deficiencies in reserve accumulation and reduced final seed biomass. The respiration rate of mmdh1mmdh2 seeds was significantly elevated throughout their maturation, consistent with the previously reported higher respiration rate in mmdh1mmdh2 leaves. Mutant seeds showed a consistently higher content of free amino acids (branched-chain amino acids, alanine, serine, glycine, proline, and threonine), differences in sugar and sugar phosphate levels, and lower content of 2-oxoglutarate. Seed-aging assays showed that quiescent mmdh1mmdh2 seeds lost viability more than 3 times faster than wild-type seeds. Together, these data show the important role of mMDH in the earliest phases of the life cycle of Arabidopsis. PMID:27208265

  19. Involvement of alanine racemase in germination of Bacillus cereus spores lacking an intact exosporium.

    PubMed

    Venir, Elena; Del Torre, Manuela; Cunsolo, Vincenzo; Saletti, Rosaria; Musetti, Rita; Stecchini, Mara Lucia

    2014-02-01

    The L-alanine mediated germination of food isolated Bacillus cereus DSA 1 spores, which lacked an intact exosporium, increased in the presence of D-cycloserine (DCS), which is an alanine racemase (Alr) inhibitor, reflecting the activity of the Alr enzyme, capable of converting L-alanine to the germination inhibitor D-alanine. Proteomic analysis of the alkaline extracts of the spore proteins, which include exosporium and coat proteins, confirmed that Alr was present in the B. cereus DSA 1 spores and matched to that encoded by B. cereus ATCC 14579, whose spore germination was strongly affected by the block of conversion of L- to D-alanine. Unlike ATCC 14579 spores, L-alanine germination of B. cereus DSA 1 spores was not affected by the preincubation with DCS, suggesting a lack of restriction in the reactant accessibility.

  20. Michael hydratase alcohol dehydrogenase or just alcohol dehydrogenase?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Michael hydratase – alcohol dehydrogenase (MhyADH) from Alicycliphilus denitrificans was previously identified as a bi-functional enzyme performing a hydration of α,β-unsaturated ketones and subsequent oxidation of the formed alcohols. The investigations of the bi-functionality were based on a spectrophotometric assay and an activity staining in a native gel of the dehydrogenase. New insights in the recently discovered organocatalytic Michael addition of water led to the conclusion that the previously performed experiments to identify MhyADH as a bi-functional enzyme and their results need to be reconsidered and the reliability of the methodology used needs to be critically evaluated. PMID:24949265

  1. Fluoxetine elevates allopregnanolone in female rat brain but inhibits a steroid microsomal dehydrogenase rather than activating an aldo-keto reductase

    PubMed Central

    Fry, J P; Li, K Y; Devall, A J; Cockcroft, S; Honour, J W; Lovick, T A

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, elevates brain concentrations of the neuroactive progesterone metabolite allopregnanolone, an effect suggested to underlie its use in the treatment of premenstrual dysphoria. One report showed fluoxetine to activate the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) component of 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3α-HSD), which catalyses production of allopregnanolone from 5α-dihydroprogesterone. However, this action was not observed by others. The present study sought to clarify the site of action for fluoxetine in elevating brain allopregnanolone. Experimental Approach Adult male rats and female rats in dioestrus were treated with fluoxetine and their brains assayed for allopregnanolone and its precursors, progesterone and 5α-dihydroprogesterone. Subcellular fractions of rat brain were also used to investigate the actions of fluoxetine on 3α-HSD activity in both the reductive direction, producing allopregnanolone from 5α-dihydroprogesterone, and the reverse oxidative direction. Fluoxetine was also tested on these recombinant enzyme activities expressed in HEK cells. Key Results Short-term treatment with fluoxetine increased brain allopregnanolone concentrations in female, but not male, rats. Enzyme assays on native rat brain fractions and on activities expressed in HEK cells showed fluoxetine did not affect the AKR producing allopregnanolone from 5α-dihydroprogesterone but did inhibit the microsomal dehydrogenase oxidizing allopregnanolone to 5α-dihydroprogesterone. Conclusions and Implications Fluoxetine elevated allopregnanolone in female rat brain by inhibiting its oxidation to 5α-dihydroprogesterone by a microsomal dehydrogenase. This is a novel site of action for fluoxetine, with implications for the development of new agents and/or dosing regimens to raise brain allopregnanolone. PMID:25161074

  2. Aqueous soluble tetrazolium/formazan MTS as an indicator of NADH- and NADPH-dependent dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Dunigan, D D; Waters, S B; Owen, T C

    1995-10-01

    Recently a new tetrazolium was described for the use of monitoring cell viability in culture. This tetrazolium, commonly referred to as MTS [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)- 5-(3-carboxymethonyphenol)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt], has the unusual property that it can be reduced to a water-soluble formazan. beta-Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide/reduced (NADH) and beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate/reduced (NADPH) are examples of physiologically important reducing agents. In cell-free studies, MTS was reduce to the soluble formazan in the presence of NADH and NADPH, and reaction were compared to those with dithiothreitol (DTT) or 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME). The efficiency of these reactions was enhanced 1000-fold by the presence of phenazine methosulfate. Selectivity in the electron transfer from NADPH was slightly greater than NADH, and NADPH or NADH was much greater than the thiols DTT or 2-ME. Generation of either NADH or NADPH in solution by malate dehydrogenase or isocitrate dehydrogenase, respectively, was monitored by the MTS reduction reaction. The rate of formazan formation was comparable to the formation of NADH or NADPH. This system represents a useful tool for evaluating reaction kinetics in solutions of NAD- or NADP-dependent dehydrogenase enzymes, and these reactions can be performed in typical biological buffers containing reducing agents without significant interference to the MTS/formazan system.

  3. The activity of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 enzyme and cortisol secretion in patients with adrenal incidentalomas.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Valentina; Polledri, Elisa; Mercadante, Rosa; Zhukouskaya, Volha; Palmieri, Serena; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Spada, Anna; Fustinoni, Silvia; Chiodini, Iacopo

    2016-09-01

    In adrenal incidentaloma (AI) patients, beside the cortisol secretion, a different 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (HSD11B2) activity, measurable by 24-h urinary cortisol/cortisone ratio (R-UFF/UFE) (the higher R-UFF/UFE the lower HSD11B2 activity), could influence the occurrence of the subclinical hypercortisolism (SH)-related complications (hypertension, type 2 diabetes, obesity). We evaluated whether in AI patients, UFF levels are associated to UFE levels, and the HSD11B2 activity to the complications presence. In 156 AI patients (93F, age 65.2 ± 9.5 years), the following were measured: serum cortisol after 1 mg-dexamethasone test (1 mg-DST), ACTH, UFF, UFE levels, and R-UFF/UFE (by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry), the latter was also evaluated in 63 matched-controls. We diagnosed SH (n = 22) in the presence of ≥2 among ACTH <2.2 pmol/L, increased UFF levels, and 1 mg-DST >83 nmol/L. Patients showed higher UFF levels and R-UFF/UFE than controls (75.9 ± 43.1 vs 54.4 ± 22.9 nmol/24 h and 0.26 ± 0.12 vs 0.20 ± 0.07, p < 0.005, respectively) but comparable UFE levels (291 ± 91.1 vs 268 ± 61.5, p = 0.069). The R-UFF/UFE was higher in patients with high (h-UFF, n = 28, 0.41 ± 0.20) than in those with normal (n-UFF, 0.22 ± 0.10, p < 0.005) UFF levels and in patients with SH than in those without SH (0.30 ± 0.12 vs 0.25 ± 0.12, p = 0.04). UFF levels were associated with R-UFF/UFE (r = 0.849, p < 0.001) in n-UFF, but not in h-UFF patients. Among h-UFF patients, the complications prevalence was not associated with R-UFF/UFE values. In AI patients, the UFF increase is not associated with a UFE increase. The HSD11B2 activity is inversely associated with UFF levels in n-UFF patients but not in h-UFF patients, and it is not associated with the SH complications.

  4. Inhibitors of alanine racemase enzyme: a review.

    PubMed

    Azam, Mohammed Afzal; Jayaram, Unni

    2016-08-01

    Alanine racemase is a fold type III PLP-dependent amino acid racemase enzyme catalysing the conversion of l-alanine to d-alanine utilised by bacterial cell wall for peptidoglycan synthesis. As there are no known homologs in humans, it is considered as an excellent antibacterial drug target. The standard inhibitors of this enzyme include O-carbamyl-d-serine, d-cycloserine, chlorovinyl glycine, alaphosphin, etc. d-Cycloserine is indicated for pulmonary and extra pulmonary tuberculosis but therapeutic use of drug is limited due to its severe toxic effects. Toxic effects due to off-target affinities of cycloserine and other substrate analogs have prompted new research efforts to identify alanine racemase inhibitors that are not substrate analogs. In this review, an updated status of known inhibitors of alanine racemase enzyme has been provided which will serve as a rich source of structural information and will be helpful in generating selective and potent inhibitor of alanine racemase.

  5. [Raman scattering study of DL-alanine].

    PubMed

    Gong, Yan; Wang, Wen-qing

    2006-01-01

    Studies of Raman vibration spectra are useful to obtaining information on biomolecular crystals. The cell dimensions of the L- and DL-alanine crystals are nearly identical, and both structures belong to the orthorhombic system, but the space group is P2(1) 2(1) 2(1) for the L-isomer, and Pna2(1) for the racemate crystal. The Raman spectrum of L-alanine has been measured by many authors. The present work is focusing on the Raman scattering study of DL-alanine powder. Based on the analysis of the differences between DL-alanine and L-alanine Raman spectra, the authors obtained indispensable information on hydrogen bond and the motion of the molecular conformation in alanine crystals.

  6. Vibrational dynamics of crystalline L-alanine

    SciTech Connect

    Bordallo, H.N.; Eckert, J.; Barthes, M.

    1997-11-01

    The authors report a new, complete vibrational analysis of L-alanine and L-alanine-d{sub 4} which utilizes IINS intensities in addition to frequency information. The use of both isotopomers resulted in a self-consistent force field for and assignment of the molecular vibrations in L-alanine. Some details of the calculation as well as a comparison of calculated and observed IINS spectra are presented. The study clarifies a number of important issues on the vibrational dynamics of this molecule and presents a self-consistent force field for the molecular vibrations in crystalline L-alanine.

  7. In Vitro antioxidative activity of pumpkin seed (Cucurbita pepo) protein isolate and its In Vivo effect on alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase in acetaminophen-induced liver injury in low protein fed rats.

    PubMed

    Nkosi, C Z; Opoku, A R; Terblanche, S E

    2006-09-01

    The antioxidative effects of pumpkin seed protein isolate (Cucurbita pepo) were investigated in vitro. The isolate exhibited about 80% radical scavenging activity, chelating activity of approximately 64% on Fe2+ ions and an inhibition of approximately 10% of xanthine oxidase. Subsequently the effects of the isolate on the plasma activity levels of alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase against acetaminophen induced acute liver injury in low-protein fed male Sprague-Dawley rats were ascertained. The rats were maintained on a low-protein diet for 5 days and divided into three subgroups. Two subgroups were injected with acetaminophen and the other with an equivalent amount of polyethylene glycol 400. Two hours after intoxication one of the two subgroups was administered with the protein isolate. Rats from the different subgroups were killed at 24, 48 and 72 h after treatment. After 5 days on the low-protein diet the activity levels of the enzymes were significantly higher than their counterparts on a normal balanced diet. The administration of protein isolate after acetaminophen intoxication resulted in significantly reduced activity levels. It is concluded that the protein isolate has promising antioxidative properties. Furthermore, the isolate administration was effective in alleviating the detrimental effects associated with protein malnutrition and acetaminophen intoxication.

  8. Characterization of succinate dehydrogenase and alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase in pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Lenzen, S; Panten, U

    1983-12-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase activities in homogenates of rat and ob/ob mouse pancreatic islets were only 13% of the activities in homogenates of liver and were also several times lower than in homogenates of pancreatic acinar tissue. This indicates that the content of mitochondria in pancreatic islet cells is very low. The very low activity of succinate dehydrogenase is in agreement with the low mitochondrial volume in the cytoplasmic ground substance of pancreatic islet cells as observed in morphometric studies. This may represent the poor equipment of pancreatic islet cells with electron transport chains and thus provide a regulatory role for the generation of reducing equivalents and chemical energy for the regulation of insulin secretion. The activities of succinate dehydrogenase in tissue homogenates of pancreatic islets, pancreatic acinar tissue, and liver were significantly inhibited by malonate and diazoxide but not by glucose, mannoheptulose, streptozotocin, or verapamil. Tolbutamide inhibited only pancreatic islet succinate dehydrogenase significantly, providing evidence for a different behavior of pancreatic islet cell mitochondria. Therefore diazoxide and tolbutamide may affect pancreatic islet function through their effects on succinate dehydrogenase activity. The activities of alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase in homogenates of pancreatic islets and liver from rats and ob/ob mice were in the same range, while activities in homogenates of pancreatic acinar tissue were lower. None of the test agents affected alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase activity. Thus the results provide no support for the recent contention that alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase activity may be critical for the regulation of insulin secretion.

  9. Effect of sinusoidal modulated currents and acute hypoxia on corticosterone content and activity of certain dehydrogenases in tissues of different rat organs during hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melik-Aslanova, L. L.; Frenkel, I. D.

    1980-01-01

    The state of hypokinesia in rats was reproduced by keeping them for 30 days in special box cages that restricted their mobility in all directions. Results show the resistance to acute hypoxic hypoxia is increased. This is linked to the considerable rise in the reduced level of corticosterone in different organs and the succinate dehydrogenase activity in the liver and brain. The letter indicated the primary oxidation of succinate, which has great importance in the adaptation of the oxidative metabolism to acute oxygen insufficiency. The use of sinusoidal modulated currents in the period of hypokinesia promotes normalization of the indices for resistance of the rats to acute hypoxia.

  10. Stereoselective aminoacylation of a dinucleoside monophosphate by the imidazolides of DL-alanine and N-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)-DL-alanine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Profy, A. T.; Usher, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The aminoacylation of diinosine monophosphate was studied experimentally. When the acylating agent was the imidazolide of N-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)-DL-alanine, a 40 percent enantiomeric excess of the isomer was incorporated at the 2' site and the positions of equilibrium for the reversible 2'-3' migration reaction differed for the D and L enantiomers. The reactivity of the nucleoside hydroxyl groups was found to decrease on the order 2'(3') less than internal 2' and less than 5', and the extent of the reaction was affected by the concentration of the imidazole buffer. Reaction of IpI with imidazolide of unprotected DL-alanine, by contrast, led to an excess of the D isomer at the internal 2' site. Finally, reaction with the N-carboxy anhydride of DL-alanine occurred without stereoselection. These results are found to be relevant to the study of the evolution of optical chemical activity and the origin of genetically directed protein synthesis.

  11. Catalytic Stereoinversion of L-Alanine to Deuterated D-Alanine.

    PubMed

    Moozeh, Kimia; So, Soon Mog; Chin, Jik

    2015-08-03

    A combination of an achiral pyridoxal analogue and a chiral base has been developed for catalytic deuteration of L-alanine with inversion of stereochemistry to give deuterated D-alanine under mild conditions (neutral pD and 25 °C) without the use of any protecting groups. This system can also be used for catalytic deuteration of D-alanine with retention of stereochemistry to give deuterated D-alanine. Thus a racemic mixture of alanine can be catalytically deuterated to give an enantiomeric excess of deuterated D-alanine. While catalytic deracemization of alanine is forbidden by the second law of thermodynamics, this system can be used for catalytic deracemization of alanine with deuteration. Such green and biomimetic approach to catalytic stereocontrol provides insights into efficient amino acid transformations.

  12. The Molybdenum Active Site of Formate Dehydrogenase Is Capable of Catalyzing C-H Bond Cleavage and Oxygen Atom Transfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Tobias; Schrapers, Peer; Utesch, Tillmann; Nimtz, Manfred; Rippers, Yvonne; Dau, Holger; Mroginski, Maria Andrea; Haumann, Michael; Leimkühler, Silke

    2016-04-26

    Formate dehydrogenases (FDHs) are capable of performing the reversible oxidation of formate and are enzymes of great interest for fuel cell applications and for the production of reduced carbon compounds as energy sources from CO2. Metal-containing FDHs in general contain a highly conserved active site, comprising a molybdenum (or tungsten) center coordinated by two molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide molecules, a sulfido and a (seleno-)cysteine ligand, in addition to a histidine and arginine residue in the second coordination sphere. So far, the role of these amino acids in catalysis has not been studied in detail, because of the lack of suitable expression systems and the lability or oxygen sensitivity of the enzymes. Here, the roles of these active site residues is revealed using the Mo-containing FDH from Rhodobacter capsulatus. Our results show that the cysteine ligand at the Mo ion is displaced by the formate substrate during the reaction, the arginine has a direct role in substrate binding and stabilization, and the histidine elevates the pKa of the active site cysteine. We further found that in addition to reversible formate oxidation, the enzyme is further capable of reducing nitrate to nitrite. We propose a mechanistic scheme that combines both functionalities and provides important insights into the distinct mechanisms of C-H bond cleavage and oxygen atom transfer catalyzed by formate dehydrogenase.

  13. Probing stereoselectivity and pro-chirality of hydride transfer during short-chain alcohol dehydrogenase activity: a combined quantitative 2H NMR and computational approach.

    PubMed

    Kwiecień, Renata A; Ayadi, Farouk; Nemmaoui, Youssef; Silvestre, Virginie; Zhang, Ben-Li; Robins, Richard J

    2009-02-01

    Different members of the alcohol oxidoreductase family can transfer the hydride of NAD(P)H to either the re- or the si-face of the substrate. The enantioselectivity of transfer is very variable, even for a range of substrates reduced by the same enzyme. Exploiting quantitative isotopic (2)H NMR to measure the transfer of (2)H from NAD(P)(2)H to ethanol, a range of enantiomeric excess between 0.38 and 0.98, depending on the origin of the enzyme and the nature of the cofactor, has been determined. Critically, in no case was only (R)-[1-(2)H]ethanol or (S)-[1-(2)H]ethanol obtained. By calculating the relative energies of the active site models for hydride transfer to the re- or si-face of short-chain aldehydes by alcohol dehydrogenase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Lactobacillus brevis, it is shown that the differences in the energy of the systems when the substrate is positioned with the alkyl group in one or the other pocket of the active site could play a role in determining stereoselectivity. These experiments help to provide insight into structural features that influence the potential catalytic flexibility of different alcohol dehydrogenase activities.

  14. Inhibitory effects of the dietary flavonoid quercetin on the enzyme activity of zinc(II)-dependent yeast alcohol dehydrogenase: Spectroscopic and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Bhuiya, Sutanwi; Haque, Lucy; Pradhan, Ankur Bikash; Das, Suman

    2017-02-01

    A multispectroscopic exploration was employed to investigate the interaction between the metallo-enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from yeast with bioflavonoid quercetin (QTN). Here, we have characterized the complex formation between QTN and Zn(2+) in aqueous solution and then examined the effect of such complex formation on the enzymatic activity of a zinc(II)-dependent enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase from yeast. We have observed an inhibition of enzymatic activity of ADH in presence of QTN. Enzyme inhibition kinetic experiments revealed QTN as a non-competitive inhibitor of yeast ADH. Perturbation of Circular dichroic (CD) spectrum of ADH in presence of QTN is observed due to the structural changes of ADH on complexation with the above flavonoid. Our results indicate a conformational change of ADH due to removal of Zn(2+) present in the enzyme by QTN. This was further established by molecular modeling study which shows that the flavonoid binds to the Zn(2+) ion which maintains the tertiary structure of the metallo-enzyme. So, QTN abstracts only half of the Zn(2+) ions present in the enzyme i.e. one Zn(2+) ion per monomer. From the present study, the structural alteration and loss of enzymatic activity of ADH are attributed to the complex formation between QTN and Zn(2+).

  15. Effects of high fat and high carbohydrate diets on liver pyruvate dehydrogenase and its activation by a chemical mediator released from insulin-treated liver particulate fraction: effect of neuraminidase treatment on the chemical mediator activity.

    PubMed

    Begum, N; Tepperman, H M; Tepperman, J

    1983-01-01

    Rats were fed a high fat diet or a high glucose diet for 5-7 days. Basal pyruvate dehydrogenase activity (both the active form and the total enzyme activity) was decreased in liver homogenates from fat diet-adapted rats as compared to those fed the glucose diet. Supernatants from insulin-exposed liver particulate fractions from fat-fed rats showed decreased stimulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity as compared to those from glucose-fed rats. There was no difference in the response of the mitochondria from the two groups when they were stimulated by supernatants from insulin-treated liver particulate fractions from stock diet-fed rats. Liver particulate fractions from fat-fed rats showed decreased generation of the chemical activator in response to Concanavalin A and trypsin stimulation. This suggests that fat feeding results in a decrease in membrane protease substrate availability. Treatment of the insulin mediator with neuraminidase and beta-D-galactosidase resulted in inactivation of the mediator. Presence of exogenous enzyme substrates during enzyme digestion protected the mediator from inactivation, suggesting that carbohydrate residues are important in the action of the insulin mediator. This fat diet-induced decrease in the generation of a chemical mediator of insulin action may result from 1) a decrease in insulin binding, shown earlier; 2) a decrease in the amount of protease substrate; and 3) an alteration in its carbohydrate composition, which is important in its ability to activate pyruvate dehydrogenase.

  16. Mild reductions in mitochondrial NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity result in altered nitrate assimilation and pigmentation but do not impact growth.

    PubMed

    Sienkiewicz-Porzucek, Agata; Sulpice, Ronan; Osorio, Sonia; Krahnert, Ina; Leisse, Andrea; Urbanczyk-Wochniak, Ewa; Hodges, Michael; Fernie, Alisdair R; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano

    2010-01-01

    Transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants were generated expressing a fragment of the mitochondrial NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase gene (SlIDH1) in the antisense orientation. The transgenic plants displayed a mild reduction in the activity of the target enzyme in the leaves but essentially no visible alteration in growth from the wild-type. Fruit size and yield were, however, reduced. These plants were characterized by relatively few changes in photosynthetic parameters, but they displayed a minor decrease in maximum photosynthetic efficiency (Fv/Fm). Furthermore, a clear reduction in flux through the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was observed in the transformants. Additionally, biochemical analyses revealed that the transgenic lines exhibited considerably altered metabolism, being characterized by slight decreases in the levels of amino acids, intermediates of the TCA cycle, photosynthetic pigments, starch, and NAD(P)H levels, but increased levels of nitrate and protein. Results from these studies show that even small changes in mitochondrial NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity lead to noticeable alterations in nitrate assimilation and suggest the presence of different strategies by which metabolism is reprogrammed to compensate for this deficiency.

  17. Conformational Change Near the Redox Center of Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase Induced by NAD(+) to Regulate the Enzyme Activity.

    PubMed

    Fukamichi, Tomoe; Nishimoto, Etsuko

    2015-05-01

    Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (LipDH) transfers two electrons from dihydrolipoamide (DHL) to NAD(+) mediated by FAD. Since this reaction is the final step of a series of catalytic reaction of pyruvate dehydrogenase multi-enzyme complex (PDC), LipDH is a key enzyme to maintain the fluent metabolic flow. We reported here the conformational change near the redox center of LipDH induced by NAD(+) promoting the access of the DHL to FAD. The increase in the affinity of DHL to redox center was evidenced by the decrease in K M responding to the increase in the concentration of NAD(+) in Lineweaver-Burk plots. The fluorescence intensity of FAD transiently reduced by the addition of DHL was not recovered but rather reduced by the binding of NAD(+) with LipDH. The fluorescence decay lifetimes of FAD and Trp were prolonged in the presence of NAD(+) to show that FAD would be free from the electron transfer from the neighboring Tyrs and the resonance energy transfer efficiency between Trp and FAD lowered. These results consistently reveal that the conformation near the FAD and the surroundings would be so rearranged by NAD(+) to allow the easier access of DHL to the redox center of LipDH.

  18. Yeast and horse liver alcohol dehydrogenases: potential problems in target size analysis and evidence for a monomer active unit

    SciTech Connect

    Suarez, M.D.; Ferguson-Miller, S.

    1987-06-16

    Yeast and horse alcohol dehydrogenases are commonly used as standards for radiation inactivation analysis of proteins, usually assuming that the minimal functional unit corresponds to the physical size in solution, a tetramer (M/sub r/ = 148,000) and a dimer (M/sub r/ = 80,000), respectively. Results described in this paper demonstrate that molecular weight overestimates may be obtained for the yeast protein as a result of its unusual sensitivity to secondary radiation products. Irradiation in the presence of sulhydryl reagents results in a smaller functional size estimate (67,000 +/- 3000) than that obtained in their absence (128,000 +/- 5000), indicating that some sulfhydryl groups in the enzyme may be particularly susceptible to attack by radiolytic species. Analysis of the horse liver enzyme reveals that although it has structural and functional similarities to the yeast protein, it is not as prone to secondary radiation damage and gives a minimal functional size estimate (33,000 +/= 1000) that most closely corresponds to a monomer. Quantitation of disappearance of the protein from a sodium dodecyl sulfate gel as a function of radiation dose also gives a target size (48,000 +/- 3000) in reasonable agreement with the monomer molecular weight. These results indicate that the individual subunits of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase have independent catalytic capacity and imply that the same may be true for the yeast enzyme.

  19. Pharmacological activation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex reduces statin-mediated upregulation of FOXO gene targets and protects against statin myopathy in rodents.

    PubMed

    Mallinson, Joanne E; Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Glaves, Philip D; Martin, Elizabeth A; Davies, Wendy J; Westwood, F Russell; Sidaway, James E; Greenhaff, Paul L

    2012-12-15

    We previously reported that statin myopathy is associated with impaired carbohydrate (CHO) oxidation in fast-twitch rodent skeletal muscle, which we hypothesised occurred as a result of forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) mediated upregulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-4 (PDK4) gene transcription. Upregulation of FOXO gene targets known to regulate proteasomal and lysosomal muscle protein breakdown was also evident. We hypothesised that increasing CHO oxidation in vivo, using the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) activator, dichloroacetate (DCA), would blunt activation of FOXO gene targets and reduce statin myopathy. Female Wistar Hanover rats were dosed daily for 12 days (oral gavage) with either vehicle (control, 0.5% w/v hydroxypropyl-methylcellulose 0.1% w/v polysorbate-80; n = 9), 88 mg( )kg(-1) day(-1) simvastatin (n = 8), 88 mg( )kg(-1) day(-1) simvastatin + 30 mg kg(-1) day(-1) DCA (n = 9) or 88 mg kg(-1) day(-1) simvastatin + 40 mg kg(-1) day(-1) DCA (n = 9). Compared with control, simvastatin reduced body mass gain and food intake, increased muscle fibre necrosis, plasma creatine kinase levels, muscle PDK4, muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx) and cathepsin-L mRNA expression, increased PDK4 protein expression, and proteasome and cathepsin-L activity, and reduced muscle PDC activity. Simvastatin with DCA maintained body mass gain and food intake, abrogated the myopathy, decreased muscle PDK4 mRNA and protein, MAFbx and cathepsin-L mRNA, increased activity of PDC and reduced proteasome activity compared with simvastatin. PDC activation abolished statin myopathy in rodent skeletal muscle, which occurred at least in part via inhibition of FOXO-mediated transcription of genes regulating muscle CHO utilisation and protein breakdown.

  20. Enhanced activity of galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase and ascorbate-glutathione cycle in mitochondria from complex III deficient Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zsigmond, Laura; Tomasskovics, Bálint; Deák, Veronika; Rigó, Gábor; Szabados, László; Bánhegyi, Gábor; Szarka, András

    2011-08-01

    The mitochondrial antioxidant homeostasis was investigated in Arabidopsis ppr40-1 mutant, which presents a block of electron flow at complex III. The activity of the ascorbate biosynthetic enzyme, L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (EC 1.3.2.3) (GLDH) was elevated in mitochondria isolated from mutant plants. In addition increased activities of the enzymes of Foyer-Halliwell-Asada cycle and elevated glutathione (GSH) level were observed in the mutant mitochondria. Lower ascorbate and ascorbate plus dehydroascorbate contents were detected at both cellular and mitochondrial level. Moreover, the more oxidized mitochondrial redox status of ascorbate in the ppr40-1 mutant indicated that neither the enhanced activity of GLDH nor Foyer-Halliwell-Asada cycle could compensate for the enhanced ascorbate consumption in the absence of a functional respiratory chain.

  1. Substrate specificity, substrate channeling, and allostery in BphJ: an acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase associated with the pyruvate aldolase BphI.

    PubMed

    Baker, Perrin; Carere, Jason; Seah, Stephen Y K

    2012-06-05

    BphJ, a nonphosphorylating acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase, catalyzes the conversion of aldehydes to form acyl-coenzyme A in the presence of NAD(+) and coenzyme A (CoA). The enzyme is structurally related to the nonacylating aldehyde dehydrogenases, aspartate-β-semialdehyde dehydrogenase and phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Cys-131 was identified as the catalytic thiol in BphJ, and pH profiles together with site-specific mutagenesis data demonstrated that the catalytic thiol is not activated by an aspartate residue, as previously proposed. In contrast to the wild-type enzyme that had similar specificities for two- or three-carbon aldehydes, an I195A variant was observed to have a 20-fold higher catalytic efficiency for butyraldehyde and pentaldehyde compared to the catalytic efficiency of the wild type toward its natural substrate, acetaldehyde. BphJ forms a heterotetrameric complex with the class II aldolase BphI that channels aldehydes produced in the aldol cleavage reaction to the dehydrogenase via a molecular tunnel. Replacement of Ile-171 and Ile-195 with bulkier amino acid residues resulted in no more than a 35% reduction in acetaldehyde channeling efficiency, showing that these residues are not critical in gating the exit of the channel. Likewise, the replacement of Asn-170 in BphJ with alanine and aspartate did not substantially alter aldehyde channeling efficiencies. Levels of activation of BphI by BphJ N170A, N170D, and I171A were reduced by ≥3-fold in the presence of NADH and ≥4.5-fold when BphJ was undergoing turnover, indicating that allosteric activation of the aldolase has been compromised in these variants. The results demonstrate that the dehydrogenase coordinates the catalytic activity of BphI through allostery rather than through aldehyde channeling.

  2. Data in the activities of caspases and the levels of reactive oxygen species and cytochrome c in the •OH-induced fish erythrocytes treated with alanine, citrulline, proline and their combination

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huatao; Jiang, Weidan; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Zhang, Yongan; Wu, Pei; Zhao, Juan; Duan, Xudong; Zhou, Xiaoqiu; Feng, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The present study explored the effects of alanine (Ala), citrulline (Cit), proline (Pro) and their combination (Ala10Pro4Cit1) on the activities of caspases and levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cytochrome c in hydroxyl radicals (•OH)-induced carp erythrocytes. The data displayed that •OH induced the increases in the activities of caspase−3, caspase−8 and caspase−9 and the levels of ROS and cytochrome c in carp erythrocytes. However, Ala, Cit, Pro and Ala10Pro4Cit1 effectively suppressed the •OH-induced increases in the activities of caspase−3, caspase−8 and caspase−9 and the levels of ROS and cytochrome c in carp erythrocytes. Furthermore, the activities of caspase−3, caspase−8 and caspase−9 and the levels of ROS and cytochrome c were gradually decreased with increasing concentrations of Ala, Cit, Pro and Ala10Pro4Cit1 (0.175−1.400 mM) in the •OH-induced carp erythrocytes. These data demonstrated that the 50% inhibitory doses (ID50) of Ala10Pro4Cit1 on the activities of caspase−8, caspase−9 and caspase−3 and levels of ROS and cytochrome c were respectively estimated to be the minimum values among amino acids examined so far. The 5% inhibitory doses (ID5) of Ala, Cit, Pro and Ala10Pro4Cit1 on the activities of caspase−8, caspase−9 and caspase−3 and levels of ROS and cytochrome c were estimated to be at their physiological concentrations in mammalian. Our research article for further interpretation and discussion from these data in Li et al. (2016) [1]. PMID:26952131

  3. 7α-hydroxylation of dehydroepiandrosterone does not interfere with the activation of glucocorticoids by 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in E(t)C cerebellar neurons.

    PubMed

    Gottfried-Blackmore, Andres; Jellinck, Peter H; Vecchiarelli, Haley A; Masheeb, Zahrah; Kaufmann, Martin; McEwen, Bruce S; Bulloch, Karen

    2013-11-01

    The neuroprotective action of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in the absence of a known specific receptor has been attributed to its metabolism by different cell types in the brain to various steroids, with a preference to its 7-hydroxylated products. The E(t)C cerebellar granule cell line converts DHEA almost exclusively to 7α-hydroxy-DHEA (7α-OH-DHEA). It has been postulated that DHEA's 7-OH and 7-oxo metabolites can decrease glucocorticoid levels by an interactive mechanism involving 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD). In order to study the relationship of 7-hydroxylation of DHEA and glucocorticoid metabolism in intact brain cells, we examined whether E(t)C cerebellar neurons, which are avid producers of 7α-OH-DHEA, could also metabolize glucocorticoids. We report that E(t)C neuronal cells exhibit 11β-HSD1 reductase activity, and are able to convert 11-dehydrocorticosterone into corticosterone, whereas they do not demonstrate 11β-HSD2 dehydrogenase activity. Consequently, E(t)C cells incubated with DHEA did not yield 7-oxo- or 7β-OH-DHEA. Our findings are supported by the reductive environment of E(t)C cells through expression of hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (H6PDH), which fosters 11β-HSD1 reductase activity. To further explore the role of 7α-OH-DHEA in E(t)C neuronal cells, we examined the effect of preventing its formation using the CYP450 inhibitor ketoconazole. Treatment of the cells with this drug decreased the yield of 7α-OH-DHEA by about 75% without the formation of alternate DHEA metabolites, and had minimal effects on glucocorticoid conversion. Likewise, elevated levels of corticosterone, the product of 11β-HSD1, had no effect on the metabolic profile of DHEA. This study shows that in a single population of whole-cells, with a highly reductive environment, 7α-OH-DHEA is unable to block the reducing activity of 11β-HSD1, and that 7-hydroxylation of DHEA does not interfere with the activation of glucocorticoids. Our investigation

  4. Crystal structures of d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae alone and in complex with nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Doan, Thanh Thi Ngoc; Kim, Jin-Kwang; Ngo, Ho-Phuong-Thuy; Tran, Huyen-Thi; Cha, Sun-Shin; Min Chung, Kyung; Huynh, Kim-Hung; Ahn, Yeh-Jin; Kang, Lin-Woo

    2014-03-01

    D-Alanine-D-alanine ligase (DDL) catalyzes the biosynthesis of d-alanyl-d-alanine, an essential bacterial peptidoglycan precursor, and is an important drug target for the development of antibacterials. We determined four different crystal structures of DDL from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) causing Bacteria Blight (BB), which include apo, ADP-bound, ATP-bound, and AMPPNP-bound structures at the resolution between 2.3 and 2.0 Å. Similarly with other DDLs, the active site of XoDDL is formed by three loops from three domains at the center of enzyme. Compared with d-alanyl-d-alanine and ATP-bound TtDDL structure, the γ-phosphate of ATP in XoDDL structure was shifted outside toward solution. We swapped the ω-loop (loop3) of XoDDL with those of Escherichia coli and Helicobacter pylori DDLs, and measured the enzymatic kinetics of wild-type XoDDL and two mutant XoDDLs with the swapped ω-loops. Results showed that the direct interactions between ω-loop and other two loops are essential for the active ATP conformation for D-ala-phosphate formation.

  5. Kinetic characterization of recombinant Bacillus coagulans FDP-activated l-lactate dehydrogenase expressed in Escherichia coli and its substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ting; Xu, Yanbing; Sun, Xiucheng; Zheng, Zhaojuan; Ouyang, Jia

    2014-03-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a homofermentative, acid-tolerant and thermophilic sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, which is capable of producing high yields of optically pure lactic acid. The l-(+)-lactate dehydrogenase (l-LDH) from B. coagulans is considered as an ideal biocatalyst for industrial production. In this study, the gene ldhL encoding a thermostable l-LDH was amplified from B. coagulans NL01 genomic DNA and successfully expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The recombinant enzyme was partially purified and its enzymatic properties were characterized. Sequence analysis demonstrated that the l-LDH was a fructose 1,6-diphosphate-activated NAD-dependent lactate dehydrogenase (l-nLDH). Its molecular weight was approximately 34-36kDa. The Km and Vmax values of the purified l-nLDH for pyruvate were 1.91±0.28mM and 2613.57±6.43μmol(minmg)(-1), respectively. The biochemical properties of l-nLDH showed that the specific activity were up to 2323.29U/mg with optimum temperature of 55°C and pH of 6.5 in the pyruvate reduction and 351.01U/mg with temperature of 55°C and pH of 11.5 in the lactate oxidation. The enzyme also showed some activity in the absence of FDP, with a pH optimum of 4.0. Compared to other lactic acid bacterial l-nLDHs, the enzyme was found to be relatively stable at 50°C. Ca(2+), Ba(2+), Mg(2+) and Mn(2+) ions had activated effects on the enzyme activity, and the enzyme was greatly inhibited by Ni(2+) ion. Besides these, l-nLDH showed the higher specificity towards pyruvate esters, such as methyl pyruvate and ethyl pyruvate.

  6. Orally-effective, long-acting sorbitol dehydrogenase inhibitors: synthesis, structure-activity relationships, and in vivo evaluations of novel heterocycle-substituted piperazino-pyrimidines.

    PubMed

    Chu-Moyer, Margaret Y; Ballinger, William E; Beebe, David A; Berger, Richard; Coutcher, James B; Day, Wesley W; Li, Jiancheng; Mylari, Banavara L; Oates, Peter J; Weekly, R Matthew

    2002-01-17

    Optimization of a previously disclosed sorbitol dehydrogenase inhibitor (SDI, II) for potency and duration of action was achieved by replacing the metabolically labile N,N-dimethylsulfamoyl group with a variety of heterocycles. Specifically, this effort led to a series of novel, in vitro potent SDIs with longer serum half-lives and acceptable in vivo activity in acutely diabetic rats (e.g., 62, 67, and 69). However, the desired in vivo potency in chronically diabetic rats, ED(90) < or = 5 mg/kg/day, was achieved only through further modification of the piperazine linker. Several members of this family, including 86, showed better than the targeted potency with ED(90) values of 1-2 mg/kg/day. Compound 86 was further profiled and found to be a selective inhibitor of sorbitol dehydrogenase, with excellent pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic properties, demonstrating normalization of sciatic nerve fructose in a chronically diabetic rat model for approximately 17 h, when administered orally at a single dose of 2 mg/kg/day.

  7. Ethylene-Regulated Glutamate Dehydrogenase Fine-Tunes Metabolism during Anoxia-Reoxygenation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Kuen-Jin; Lin, Chih-Yu; Ting, Chen-Yun; Shih, Ming-Che

    2016-11-01

    Ethylene is an essential hormone in plants that is involved in low-oxygen and reoxygenation responses. As a key transcription factor in ethylene signaling, ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE3 (EIN3) activates targets that trigger various responses. However, most of these targets are still poorly characterized. Through analyses of our microarray data and the published Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) EIN3 chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing data set, we inferred the putative targets of EIN3 during anoxia-reoxygenation. Among them, GDH2, which encodes one subunit of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), was chosen for further studies for its role in tricarboxylic acid cycle replenishment. We demonstrated that both GDH1 and GDH2 are induced during anoxia and reoxygenation and that this induction is mediated via ethylene signaling. In addition, the results of enzymatic assays showed that the level of GDH during anoxia-reoxygenation decreased in the ethylene-insensitive mutants ein2-5 and ein3eil1 Global metabolite analysis indicated that the deamination activity of GDH might regenerate 2-oxoglutarate, which is a cosubstrate that facilitates the breakdown of alanine by alanine aminotransferase when reoxygenation occurs. Moreover, ineffective tricarboxylic acid cycle replenishment, disturbed carbohydrate metabolism, reduced phytosterol biosynthesis, and delayed energy regeneration were found in gdh1gdh2 and ethylene mutants during reoxygenation. Taken together, these data illustrate the essential role of EIN3-regulated GDH activity in metabolic adjustment during anoxia-reoxygenation.

  8. Effect of coumarin and xanthotoxin on mitochondrial structure, oxygen uptake, and succinate dehydrogenase activity in onion root cells.

    PubMed

    Kupidlowska, E; Dobrzynska, K; Parys, E; Zobel, A M

    1994-10-01

    At concentrations in which they occur on the plant surface and retard mitosis, coumarin and xanthotoxin lowered uptake of oxygen (by 60 and 30%, respectively) by meristematic cells ofAllium cepa root tips. They caused changes in the structure of the mitochondrial matrix to become dense, and protrusions of mitochondrial membranes were visible parallelling their hypertrophy, indicating alteration in the structure and physiology of these organelles. Coumarin and, to a lesser extent, xanthotoxin increased succinate dehydrogenase production in mitochondria and also in the cytoplasm, indicating changes in membrane permeability. Changes in oxygen uptake and mitochondrial structure, in addition to the retardation of mitosis, may be the reason these compounds act as allelochemicals after they have been removed from the plant surface and reach the root meristem.

  9. High-Affinity Inhibitors of Human NAD+-Dependent 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin Dehydrogenase: Mechanisms of Inhibition and Structure-Activity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Niesen, Frank H.; Schultz, Lena; Jadhav, Ajit; Bhatia, Chitra; Guo, Kunde; Maloney, David J.; Pilka, Ewa S.; Wang, Minghua; Oppermann, Udo; Heightman, Tom D.; Simeonov, Anton

    2010-01-01

    Background 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH, EC 1.1.1.141) is the key enzyme for the inactivation of prostaglandins, regulating processes such as inflammation or proliferation. The anabolic pathways of prostaglandins, especially with respect to regulation of the cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes have been studied in detail; however, little is known about downstream events including functional interaction of prostaglandin-processing and -metabolizing enzymes. High-affinity probes for 15-PGDH will, therefore, represent important tools for further studies. Principal Findings To identify novel high-affinity inhibitors of 15-PGDH we performed a quantitative high-throughput screen (qHTS) by testing >160 thousand compounds in a concentration-response format and identified compounds that act as noncompetitive inhibitors as well as a competitive inhibitor, with nanomolar affinity. Both types of inhibitors caused strong thermal stabilization of the enzyme, with cofactor dependencies correlating with their mechanism of action. We solved the structure of human 15-PGDH and explored the binding modes of the inhibitors to the enzyme in silico. We found binding modes that are consistent with the observed mechanisms of action. Conclusions Low cross-reactivity in screens of over 320 targets, including three other human dehydrogenases/reductases, suggest selectivity of the present inhibitors for 15-PGDH. The high potencies and different mechanisms of action of these chemotypes make them a useful set of complementary chemical probes for functional studies of prostaglandin-signaling pathways. Enhanced version This article can also be viewed as an enhanced version in which the text of the article is integrated with interactive 3D representations and animated transitions. Please note that a web plugin is required to access this enhanced functionality. Instructions for the installation and use of the web plugin are available in Text S2. PMID:21072165

  10. Loss of Nardilysin, a Mitochondrial Co-chaperone for α-Ketoglutarate Dehydrogenase, Promotes mTORC1 Activation and Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Wan Hee; Sandoval, Hector; Nagarkar-Jaiswal, Sonal; Jaiswal, Manish; Yamamoto, Shinya; Haelterman, Nele A; Putluri, Nagireddy; Putluri, Vasanta; Sreekumar, Arun; Tos, Tulay; Aksoy, Ayse; Donti, Taraka; Graham, Brett H; Ohno, Mikiko; Nishi, Eiichiro; Hunter, Jill; Muzny, Donna M; Carmichael, Jason; Shen, Joseph; Arboleda, Valerie A; Nelson, Stanley F; Wangler, Michael F; Karaca, Ender; Lupski, James R; Bellen, Hugo J

    2017-01-04

    We previously identified mutations in Nardilysin (dNrd1) in a forward genetic screen designed to isolate genes whose loss causes neurodegeneration in Drosophila photoreceptor neurons. Here we show that NRD1 is localized to mitochondria, where it recruits mitochondrial chaperones and assists in the folding of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (OGDH), a rate-limiting enzyme in the Krebs cycle. Loss of Nrd1 or Ogdh leads to an increase in α-ketoglutarate, a substrate for OGDH, which in turn leads to mTORC1 activation and a subsequent reduction in autophagy. Inhibition of mTOR activity by rapamycin or partially restoring autophagy delays neurodegeneration in dNrd1 mutant flies. In summary, this study reveals a novel role for NRD1 as a mitochondrial co-chaperone for OGDH and provides a mechanistic link between mitochondrial metabolic dysfunction, mTORC1 signaling, and impaired autophagy in neurodegeneration.

  11. The effects of alanine-substituted conantokin-G and ifenprodil on the human spermine-activated N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor.

    PubMed

    Tsai, V W-W; Dodd, P R; Lewis, R J

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of Ala-7-conantokin-G (Con-G(A7)) and ifenprodil on the modulation by spermine of [(3)H]MK801 binding to human cortical membranes. Human cortical tissue was obtained at autopsy and stored at -80 degrees C until assay. Both Con-G(A7) and ifenprodil inhibited [(3)H]MK801 binding, but spermine affected these inhibitions differently. Con-G(A7) IC(50) changed little with spermine concentration, indicative of a non-competitive interaction, whereas the rightward shift in ifenprodil IC(50) with increasing spermine concentration suggested partial competition. When the two agents were tested against the biphasic activation of [(3)H]MK801 binding by spermine, they again differed in their effects. In the activation phase Con-G(A7) was a non-competitive inhibitor of spermine activation, and may even enhance the spermine EC(50), while the ifenprodil data indicated a partially competitive interaction. Both agents were non-competitive in the inhibitory phase. Overall, the data suggest that Con-G(A7) and ifenprodil interact differently with the polyamine modulation of the glutamate-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor.

  12. NADP-Malate Dehydrogenase in the C4 Plant Flaveria bidentis (Cosense Suppression of Activity in Mesophyll and Bundle-Sheath Cells and Consequences for Photosynthesis).

    PubMed Central

    Trevanion, S. J.; Furbank, R. T.; Ashton, A. R.

    1997-01-01

    Flaveria bidentis, a C4 dicot, was transformed with sorghum (a monocot) cDNA clones encoding NADP-malate dehydrogenase (NADP-MDH; EC 1.1.1.82) driven by the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Although these constructs were designed for over-expression, many transformants contained between 5 and 50% of normal NADP-MDH activity, presumably by cosense suppression of the native gene. The activities of a range of other photosynthetic enzymes were unaffected. Rates of photosynthesis in plants with less than about 10% of normal activity were reduced at high light and at high [CO2], but were unaffected at low light or at [CO2] below about 150 [mu]L L-1. The large decrease in maximum activity of NADP-MDH was accompanied by an increase in the activation state of the enzyme. However, the activation state was unaffected in plants with 50% of normal activity. Metabolic flux control analysis of plants with a range of activities demonstrates that this enzyme is not important in regulating the steady-state flux through C4 photosynthesis in F. bidentis. Cosense suppression of gene expression was similarly effective in both the mesophyll and bundle-sheath cells. Photosynthesis of plants with very low activity of NADP-MDH in the bundle-sheath cells was only slightly inhibited, suggesting that the presence of the enzyme in this compartment is not essential for supporting maximum rates of photosynthesis. PMID:12223666

  13. Dependence of Ethanolic Fermentation, Cytoplasmic pH Regulation, and Viability on the Activity of Alcohol Dehydrogenase in Hypoxic Maize Root Tips 1

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Justin K. M.; Chang, Keejong; Webster, Cecelia; Callis, Judy; Walbot, Virginia

    1989-01-01

    We examined the role of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) in the metabolism and survival of hypoxic maize (Zea mays L.) root tips. The dependence of the rate of ethanolic fermentation, cytoplasmic pH, and viability on the activity of ADH in maize root tips during extreme hypoxia was determined. Maize lines with ADH activities differing over about a 200-fold range were studied. Effects of genetic background were controlled by comparing pairs of F4 progeny of crosses between mutant (low ADH activity) and reference inbred lines. The capacity of hypoxic root tips to perform ethanolic fermentation exhibited a dependence on ADH activity only at activities found in Adh 1 nulls. The ability of maize root tips to withstand prolonged and extreme hypoxia was like-wise independent of ADH activity, except at the lowest activities. Root tips that exhibited lower tolerance of hypoxia had more acidic cytoplasm during extreme hypoxia. We conclude that the activity of ADH in normal maize root tips does not limit the capacity for energy production via fermentation, and does not determine viability under extreme hypoxia. The significance of the induction of ADH activity in plants by hypoxia is discussed. PMID:16666696

  14. Dependence of ethanolic fermentation, cytoplasmic pH regulation, and viability on the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase in hypoxic maize root tips

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J.; Chang, Keejong; Webster, C.; Callis, J.; Walbot, V. Stanford Univ., CA )

    1989-04-01

    We examined the role of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) in the metabolism and survival of hypoxic maize (Zea mays L.) root tips. The dependence of the rate of ethanolic fermentation, cytoplasmic pH, and viability on the activity of ADH in maize root tips during extreme hypoxia was determined. Maize lines with ADH activities differing over about a 200-fold range were studied. Effects of genetic background were controlled by comparing pairs of F4 progeny of crosses between mutant (low ADH activity) and reference inbred lines. The capacity of hypoxic root tips to perform ethanolic fermentation exhibited a dependence on ADH activity only at activities found in Adh 1 nulls. The ability of maize root tips to withstand prolonged and extreme hypoxia was likewise independent of ADH activity, except at the lowest activities. Root tips that exhibited lower tolerance of hypoxia had more acidic cytoplasm during extreme hypoxia. We conclude that the activity of ADH in normal maize root tips does not limit the capacity for energy production via fermentation, and does not determine viability under extreme hypoxia. The significance of the induction of ADH activity in plants by hypoxia is discussed.

  15. Increased 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 and 17α-hydroxylase activities in a virilized adolescent female with adrenal adenoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YANG, GUOQING; DOU, JINGTAO; ZHANG, XIAOLIN; GU, WEIJUN; LV, ZHAOHUI; DU, JIN; BA, JIANMING; MU, YIMING; LU, JUMING

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the case of a female patient with pseudo-hermaphrodism caused by an androgen-producing adrenocortical tumor is presented, and the possible mechanism is investigated. The expression of the luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotrophin (LH/hCG) receptor in tumor tissues and normal adrenal tissues was analyzed using immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, the activities of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (HSD2), cytochrome P450 17α-hydroxylase (CYP17) and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 (HSD3) enzymes were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the expression levels of 3β-HSD2, 17β-HSD3, CYP17 and LH/hCG receptor mRNA were determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Immunohistochemical staining for the LH/hCG receptor was negative in the tumor tissue and positive in the normal adrenal tissue. The activities of 3β-HSD2 and CYP17 in the tumor tissue were higher than those in the normal tissue (P<0.01), whereas the activity of 17β-HSD3 was lower (P<0.01). The mRNA levels of 3β-HSD2 and CYP17 were higher (P<0.01) and the levels of 17β-HSD3 and LH/hCG receptor were lower (P<0.01) in the tumor tissue compared with those of the normal tissue. In conclusion, in the present study, a rare case of virilization by an androgen-producing adrenocortical tumor is present. The results indicate that it may be associated with increased activities of 3β-HSD2 and CYP17 but not with the expression of the LH/hCG receptor. PMID:26893641

  16. Effects of thyroid hormone (thyroxine) and testosterone on hepatic 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase mRNA and activity in pubertal hypothyroid male rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y J; Nakagawa, Y; Toya, K; Saegusa, H; Nasuda, K; Endoh, A; Ohzeki, T

    1998-04-01

    To investigate the effects of thyroid hormone and testosterone on 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11beta-HSD1), we measured changes in hepatic 11beta-dehydrogenase activity and its mRNA levels in pubertal methimazole (MMI)-induced hypothyroid male rats following treatment with thyroxine ([T4] 50 microg/kg/d) or testosterone (250 microg/d) for 14 days. Hypothyroidism in male rats markedly reduced hepatic 11beta-HSD1 mRNA levels and serum testosterone concentrations (P < .01). Subcutaneous injection of T4 in the hypothyroid rats significantly (P < .01) increased hepatic 11beta-HSD1 mRNA to approximately normal levels and simultaneously increased serum testosterone levels. However, the same daily dose of T4 administered to castrated male hypothyroid rats for 14 days did not elevate hepatic 11beta-HSD1 activity. Treatment with testosterone for 14 days in castrated hypothyroid male rats and rats without gonadectomy significantly (P < .01) increased the enzyme activity without administration of T4. Variations in hepatic 11beta-HSD1 activity were demonstrated to be accompanied by changes in serum testosterone levels in the rats following alteration of the thyroid hormone state. These results suggest that the effect of T4 in increasing the subnormal 11beta-HSD1 gene expression in hypothyroid male rats is mediated by its ability to increase testosterone production in these rats, because in castrated hypothyroid rats, T4 does not elevate 11beta-HSD1 gene expression.

  17. Alanine increases blood pressure during hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlay, L. A.; Maher, T. J.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of L-alanine administration on blood pressure (BP) during haemorrhagic shock was investigated using anesthetized rats whose left carotid arteries were cannulated for BP measurement, blood removal, and drug administration. It was found that L-alanine, in doses of 10, 25, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, increased the systolic BP of hypotensive rats by 38 to 80 percent (while 100 mg/kg pyruvate increased BP by only 9.4 mmhg, not significantly different from saline). The results suggest that L-alanine might influence cardiovascular function.

  18. Alanine or aspartic acid substitutions at serine23/24 of cardiac troponin I decrease thin filament activation, with no effect on crossbridge detachment kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Mamidi, Ranganath; Gollapudi, Sampath K.; Mallampalli, Sri Lakshmi; Chandra, Murali

    2012-01-01

    Ala/Asp substitutions at Ser23/24 have been employed to investigate the functional impact of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA). Some limitations of previous studies include the use of heterologous proteins and confounding effects arising from phosphorylation of cardiac myosin binding protein-C. Our goal was to probe the effects of cTnI phosphorylation using a homologous assay, so that altered function could be solely attributed to changes in cTnI. We reconstituted detergent-skinned rat cardiac papillary fibers with homologous rat cardiac troponin subunits to study the impact of Ala and Asp substitutions at Ser23/24 of rat cTnI (RcTnI S23A/24A and RcTnI S23D/24D). Both RcTnI S23A/24A and RcTnI S23D/24D showed a ~36% decrease in Ca2+-activated maximal tension. Both RcTnI S23A/24A and RcTnI S23D/24D showed a ~18% decrease in ATPase activity. Muscle fiber stiffness measurements suggested that the decrease in thin filament activation observed in RcTnI S23A/24A and RcTnI S23D/24D was due to a decrease in the number of strongly-bound crossbridges. Another major finding was that Ala and Asp substitutions in cTnI did not affect crossbridge detachment kinetics. PMID:22684024

  19. Alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: specific activity and influence on the production of acetic acid, ethanol and higher alcohols in the first 48 h of fermentation of grape must.

    PubMed

    Millán, C; Mauricio, J C; Ortega, J M

    1990-01-01

    The changes in the specific activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-I and ADH-II) and aldehyde dehydrogenases [AIDH-NADP+ and AIDH-NAD(P)+] from Saccharomyces cerevisiae during the first 48 h of fermentation of grape must were investigated. The biosynthesis of ADH-I and AIDH-NADP+ took place basically during the adaptation of the yeasts to the must (first 4 h), while that of ADH-II occurred immediately after exponential growth (after 12 h). From the products produced by the yeast, only the specific rate of production of ethanol was found to be directly related to the specific activity of ADH-I.

  20. Alcohol Dehydrogenase and Pyruvate Decarboxylase Activity in Leaves and Roots of Eastern Cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr.) and Soybean (Glycine max L.) 1

    PubMed Central

    Kimmerer, Thomas W.

    1987-01-01

    Pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC, EC 4.1.1.1) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH, EC 1.1.1.1) are responsible for the anaerobic production of acetaldehyde and ethanol in higher plants. In developing soybean embryos, ADH activity increased upon imbibition and then declined exponentially with development, and was undetectable in leaves by 30 days after imbibition. PDC was not detectable in soybean leaves. In contrast, ADH activity remained high in developing cottonwood seedlings, with no decline in activity during development. ADH activity in the first fully expanded leaf of cottonwood was 230 micromoles NADH oxidized per minute per gram dry weight, and increased with leaf age. Maximal PDC activity of cottonwood leaves was 10 micromoles NADH oxidized per minute per gram dry weight. ADH activity in cottonwood roots was induced by anaerobic stress, increasing from 58 to 205 micromoles NADH oxidized per minute per gram dry weight in intact plants in 48 hours, and from 38 to 246 micromoles NADH oxidized per minute per gram dry weight in detached roots in 48 hours. Leaf ADH activity increased by 10 to 20% on exposure to anaerobic conditions. Crude leaf enzyme extracts with high ADH activity reduced little or no NADH when other aldehydes, such as trans-2-hexenal, were provided as substrate. ADH and PDC are constitutive enzyme in cottonwood leaves, but their metabolic role is not known. PMID:16665586

  1. Kinetic mechanism and inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis D-alanine:D-alanine ligase by the antibiotic D-cycloserine.

    PubMed

    Prosser, Gareth A; de Carvalho, Luiz Pedro S

    2013-02-01

    D-cycloserine (DCS) is an antibiotic that is currently used in second-line treatment of tuberculosis. DCS is a structural analogue of D-alanine, and targets two enzymes involved in the cytosolic stages of peptidoglycan synthesis: alanine racemase (Alr) and D-alanine:D-alanine ligase (Ddl). The mechanisms of inhibition of DCS have been well-assessed using Alr and Ddl enzymes from various bacterial species, but little is known regarding the interactions of DCS with the mycobacterial orthologues of these enzymes. We have over-expressed and purified recombinant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ddl (MtDdl; Rv2981c), and report a kinetic examination of the enzyme with both its native substrate and DCS. MtDdl is activated by K(+), follows an ordered ter ter mechanism and displays distinct affinities for D-Ala at each D-Ala binding site (K(m,D-Ala1) = 0.075 mm, K(m,D-Ala2) = 3.6 mm). ATP is the first substrate to bind and is necessary for subsequent binding of D-alanine or DCS. The pH dependence of MtDdl kinetic parameters indicate that general base chemistry is involved in the catalytic step. DCS was found to competitively inhibit D-Ala binding at both MtDdl D-Ala sites with equal affinity (K(i,DCS1) = 14 μm, K(i,DCS2) = 25 μm); however, each enzyme active site can only accommodate a single DCS molecule at a given time. The pH dependence of K(i,DCS2) revealed a loss of DCS binding affinity at high pH (pK(a) = 7.5), suggesting that DCS binds optimally in the zwitterionic form. The results of this study may assist in the design and development of novel Ddl-specific inhibitors for use as anti-mycobacterial agents.

  2. Modulation in the activity of lactate dehydrogenase and level of c-Myc and c-Fos by modified base queuine in cancer.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Chandramani; Jaiswal, Yogesh K; Vinayak, Manjula

    2008-01-01

    Cancer is characterized by uncontrolled cell growth, which results from unlimited proliferation and disturbs various cellular activities. Queuine is a highly modified base analogue of guanine found at first anti-codon position of specific tRNAs i.e. tRNA(Tyr), tRNA(His), tRNA(Asp) and tRNA(Asn). These tRNAs are known as Q-family of tRNA. The tRNAs of Q-family are completely modified to Q-tRNAs in terminally differentiated somatic cells, however hypomodification of Q-tRNA is closely associated with cell proliferation and malignancy. Queuosine modification of tRNAs may be essential for normal development, differentiation and cellular functions. Physiological role of queuine remains ill defined but direct or indirect evidences suggest that queuine or Q-tRNA participates in many cellular functions such as regulation of cell proliferation, control of glycolytic metabolism, alteration in expression of proto-oncogenes, modulation of signal transduction pathways but the mechanism is not well known. Increase in LDH-A expression regulated by c-myc is well documented in a variety of tumor cells. Overexpression of proto-oncogenes cause deregulated cellular responses which may lead to development of cancer. The cellular proto-oncogenes like c-myc and c-fos have important role in cell growth, proliferation and differentiation. The present study is aimed to investigate queuine mediated modulation in the activity of lactate dehydrogenase and expression of proto-oncogenes like c-myc and c-fos in T-cell lymphoma (DLAT) induced cancerous mouse. The results indicate that elevated lactate dehydrogenase activity is brought down by queuine treatments and the elevated levels of c-Myc and c-Fos in DLAT cancerous mouse are down-regulated, suggesting that queuine inhibits anaerobic metabolism and cell proliferation.

  3. Production of Alanine by Fusarium moniliforme

    PubMed Central

    Carito, Sebastian L.; Pisano, Michael A.

    1966-01-01

    Fusarium moniliforme grown in a chemically defined medium in submerged culture accumulated amino acids extracellularly. Alanine and glutamic acid were present in greatest amounts, with traces of glycine, lysine, threonine, and valine detectable. Increasing the glucose and urea concentrations of the medium increased yields of alanine. Further increases in alanine production occurred with elevated levels of mineral salts in the medium, whereas the addition of a vitamin mixture proved to be inhibitory. Chemical changes resulting from the growth of F. moniliforme in the final fermentation medium disclosed maximal alanine production, mycelial weight, and glucose consumption after 72 hr of incubation at 28.5 C. Total soluble nitrogen, by contrast, was minimal at the same time period. The pH remained in the alkaline range throughout the fermentation. PMID:5914495

  4. Annotated compound data for modulators of detergent-solubilised or lipid-reconstituted respiratory type II NADH dehydrogenase activity obtained by compound library screening

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Elyse A.; Cook, Gregory M.; Heikal, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The energy-generating membrane protein NADH dehydrogenase (NDH-2), a proposed antibacterial drug target (see “Inhibitors of type II NADH:menaquinone oxidoreductase represent a class of antitubercular drugs” Weinstein et al. 2005 [1]), was screened for modulators of activity in either detergent-solublised or lipid reconstituted (proteolipsome) form. Here we present an annotated list of compounds identified in a small-scale screen against NDH-2. The dataset contains information regarding the libraries screened, the identities of hit compounds and the physicochemical properties governing solubility and permeability. The implications of these data for future antibiotic discovery are discussed in our associated report, “Comparison of lipid and detergent enzyme environments for identifying inhibitors of membrane-bound energy-transducing proteins” [2]. PMID:26862571

  5. Structure of Cryptosporidium IMP dehydrogenase bound to an inhibitor with in vivo antiparasitic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Youngchang; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2015-04-21

    Inosine 5´-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is a promising target for the treatment of Cryptosporidium infections. Here, the structure of C. parvum IMPDH (CpIMPDH) in complex with inosine 5´-monophosphate (IMP) and P131, an inhibitor with in vivo anticryptosporidial activity, is reported. P131 contains two aromatic groups, one of which interacts with the hypoxanthine ring of IMP, while the second interacts with the aromatic ring of a tyrosine in the adjacent subunit. In addition, the amine and NO2 moieties bind in hydrated cavities, forming water-mediated hydrogen bonds to the protein. The design of compounds to replace these water molecules is a new strategy for the further optimization of C. parvum inhibitors for both antiparasitic and antibacterial applications.

  6. Promiscuous activity of (S,S)-butanediol dehydrogenase is responsible for glycerol production from 1,3-dihydroxyacetone in Corynebacterium glutamicum under oxygen-deprived conditions.

    PubMed

    Jojima, Toru; Igari, Takafumi; Moteki, Yasuhiro; Suda, Masako; Yukawa, Hideaki; Inui, Masayuki

    2015-02-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum can consume glucose to excrete glycerol under oxygen deprivation. Although glycerol synthesis from 1,3-dihydroxyacetone (DHA) has been speculated, no direct evidence has yet been provided in C. glutamicum. Enzymatic and genetic investigations here indicate that the glycerol is largely produced from DHA and, unexpectedly, the reaction is catalyzed by (S,S)-butanediol dehydrogenase (ButA) that inherently catalyzes the interconversion between S-acetoin and (S,S)-2,3-butanediol. Consequently, the following pathway for glycerol biosynthesis in the bacterium emerges: dihydroxyacetone phosphate is dephosphorylated by HdpA to DHA, which is subsequently reduced to glycerol by ButA. This study emphasizes the importance of promiscuous activity of the enzyme in vivo.

  7. Annotated compound data for modulators of detergent-solubilised or lipid-reconstituted respiratory type II NADH dehydrogenase activity obtained by compound library screening.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Elyse A; Cook, Gregory M; Heikal, Adam

    2016-03-01

    The energy-generating membrane protein NADH dehydrogenase (NDH-2), a proposed antibacterial drug target (see "Inhibitors of type II NADH:menaquinone oxidoreductase represent a class of antitubercular drugs" Weinstein et al. 2005 [1]), was screened for modulators of activity in either detergent-solublised or lipid reconstituted (proteolipsome) form. Here we present an annotated list of compounds identified in a small-scale screen against NDH-2. The dataset contains information regarding the libraries screened, the identities of hit compounds and the physicochemical properties governing solubility and permeability. The implications of these data for future antibiotic discovery are discussed in our associated report, "Comparison of lipid and detergent enzyme environments for identifying inhibitors of membrane-bound energy-transducing proteins" [2].

  8. Salt-induction of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase mRNA, protein, and enzymatic activity in sugar beet. [Beta vulgaris L

    SciTech Connect

    McCue, K.F.; Hanson, A.D. )

    1991-05-01

    In Chenopodiaceae such as sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.), glycine betaine (betaine) accumulates in response to drought or salinity stress and functions in the cytoplasm as a compatible osmolyte. The last enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway, betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH), increases as much as 4-fold in response to rising salinity in the external medium. This increase is accompanied by an increase in both protein and mRNA levels. The steady state increases in BADH were examined at a series of NaCl concentrations from 100 to 500 mM NaCl. BADH protein levels were examined by native PAGE, and by western blot analysis using antibodies raised against BADH purified from spinach. mRNA levels were examined by northern plot analysis of total RNA isolated from the leaves and hybridized with a sugar beet BADH cDNA clone. The time course for BADH mRNA induction was determined in a salt shock experiment utilizing 400 mM NaCl added to the external growth medium. Disappearance of BADH was examined in a salt relief experiment using plants step-wise salinized to 500 mM NaCl and then returned to 0 mM NaCl.

  9. Tetrahydro-2-naphthyl and 2-Indanyl Triazolopyrimidines Targeting Plasmodium falciparum Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Display Potent and Selective Antimalarial Activity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Malaria persists as one of the most devastating global infectious diseases. The pyrimidine biosynthetic enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) has been identified as a new malaria drug target, and a triazolopyrimidine-based DHODH inhibitor 1 (DSM265) is in clinical development. We sought to identify compounds with higher potency against Plasmodium DHODH while showing greater selectivity toward animal DHODHs. Herein we describe a series of novel triazolopyrimidines wherein the p-SF5-aniline was replaced with substituted 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2-naphthyl or 2-indanyl amines. These compounds showed strong species selectivity, and several highly potent tetrahydro-2-naphthyl derivatives were identified. Compounds with halogen substitutions displayed sustained plasma levels after oral dosing in rodents leading to efficacy in the P. falciparum SCID mouse malaria model. These data suggest that tetrahydro-2-naphthyl derivatives have the potential to be efficacious for the treatment of malaria, but due to higher metabolic clearance than 1, they most likely would need to be part of a multidose regimen. PMID:27127993

  10. Solved? The reductive radiation chemistry of alanine.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Ewald; De Cooman, Hendrik; Waroquier, Michel; Hole, Eli O; Sagstuen, Einar

    2014-02-14

    The structural changes throughout the entire reductive radiation-induced pathway of l-α-alanine are solved on an atomistic level with the aid of periodic DFT and nudged elastic band (NEB) simulations. This yields unprecedented information on the conformational changes taking place, including the protonation state of the carboxyl group in the "unstable" and "stable" alanine radicals and the internal transformation converting these two radical variants at temperatures above 220 K. The structures of all stable radicals were verified by calculating EPR properties and comparing those with experimental data. The variation of the energy throughout the full radiochemical process provides crucial insight into the reason why these structural changes and rearrangements occur. Starting from electron capture, the excess electron quickly localizes on the carbon of a carboxyl group, which pyramidalizes and receives a proton from the amino group of a neighboring alanine molecule, forming a first stable radical species (up to 150 K). In the temperature interval 150-220 K, this radical deaminates and deprotonates at the carboxyl group, the detached amino group undergoes inversion and its methyl group sustains an internal rotation. This yields the so-called "unstable alanine radical". Above 220 K, triggered by the attachment of an additional proton on the detached amino group, the radical then undergoes an internal rotation in the reverse direction, giving rise to the "stable alanine radical", which is the final stage in the reductive radiation-induced decay of alanine.

  11. 5'-AMP activated protein kinase α2 controls substrate metabolism during post-exercise recovery via regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4.

    PubMed

    Fritzen, Andreas Maechel; Lundsgaard, Anne-Marie; Jeppesen, Jacob; Christiansen, Mette Landau Brabaek; Biensø, Rasmus; Dyck, Jason R B; Pilegaard, Henriette; Kiens, Bente

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that exercise has a major impact on substrate metabolism for many hours after exercise. However, the regulatory mechanisms increasing lipid oxidation and facilitating glycogen resynthesis in the post-exercise period are unknown. To address this, substrate oxidation was measured after prolonged exercise and during the following 6 h post-exercise in 5´-AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) α2 and α1 knock-out (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice with free access to food. Substrate oxidation was similar during exercise at the same relative intensity between genotypes. During post-exercise recovery, a lower lipid oxidation (P < 0.05) and higher glucose oxidation were observed in AMPKα2 KO (respiratory exchange ratio (RER) = 0.84 ± 0.02) than in WT and AMPKα1 KO (average RER = 0.80 ± 0.01) without genotype differences in muscle malonyl-CoA or free-carnitine concentrations. A similar increase in muscle pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) mRNA expression in WT and AMPKα2 KO was observed following exercise, which is consistent with AMPKα2 deficiency not affecting the exercise-induced activation of the PDK4 transcriptional regulators HDAC4 and SIRT1. Interestingly, PDK4 protein content increased (63%, P < 0.001) in WT but remained unchanged in AMPKα2 KO. In accordance with the lack of increase in PDK4 protein content, lower (P < 0.01) inhibitory pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH)-E1α Ser(293) phosphorylation was observed in AMPKα2 KO muscle compared to WT. These findings indicate that AMPKα2 regulates muscle metabolism post-exercise through inhibition of the PDH complex and hence glucose oxidation, subsequently creating conditions for increased fatty acid oxidation.

  12. Effects of dehydroepiandrosterone on obesity and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in the lethal yellow mouse (strain 129/Sv-Ay/Aw).

    PubMed

    Granholm, N H; Staber, L D; Wilkin, P J

    1987-04-01

    We investigated the anti-obesity effects of the adrenal androgen, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), on genetically predisposed obese lethal yellow mice (Ay/Aw). Secondly, we tested the hypothesis that DHEA promotes its anti-obesity effects by decreasing the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH). We subjected four genotype-sex combinations of yellow and agouti (control) mice to four dietary treatments and determined weight changes, food consumption, and G6PDH activity. Although G6PDH activities of yellow mice were considerably decreased in the 0.4% DHEA treatment group, they were elevated in the 0.0 and 0.1% DHEA treatment groups. In contrast, G6PDH activities of DHEA-treated control agouti mice remained relatively constant. These studies confirm that DHEA prevents the Ay gene from promoting excess fat deposition via some mechanism(s) other than reduced dietary intake. However, the overall absence of agreement between weight change (gain or loss) and G6PDH activity suggests that the anti-obesity activity of DHEA is not mediated via G6PDH. Since yellow obese (Ay/Aw) mice were found to be more susceptible to DHEA's effects than their agouti (Aw/Aw) littermates, Ay appears to induce an altered metabolism in Ay/Aw mice which is more susceptible to the effects of DHEA than the normal metabolism of Aw/Aw mice.

  13. Characterization of psychrophilic alanine racemase from Bacillus psychrosaccharolyticus.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Y; Yokoigawa, K; Esaki, N; Soda, K; Kawai, H

    1999-03-16

    A psychrophilic alanine racemase gene from Bacillus psychrosaccharolyticus was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli SOLR with a plasmid pYOK3. The gene starting with the unusual initiation codon GTG showed higher preference for codons ending in A or T. The enzyme purified to homogeneity showed the high catalytic activity even at 0 degrees C and was extremely labile over 35 degrees C. The enzyme was found to have a markedly large Km value (5.0 microM) for the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) cofactor in comparison with other reported alanine racemases, and was stabilized up to 50 degrees C in the presence of excess amounts of PLP. The low affinity of the enzyme for PLP may be related to the thermolability, and may be related to the high catalytic activity, initiated by the transaldimination reaction, at low temperature. The enzyme has a distinguishing hydrophilic region around the residue no. 150 in the deduced amino acid sequence (383 residues), whereas the corresponding regions of other Bacillus alanine racemases are hydrophobic. The position of the region in the three dimensional structure of C atoms of the enzyme was predicted to be in a surface loop surrounding the active site. The region may interact with solvent and reduce the compactness of the active site.

  14. 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 1(11β-HSD1) mediates insulin resistance through JNK activation in adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Kesong; Pan, Yong; Li, Jieli; Khan, Zia; Fan, Mendi; Yin, Haimin; Tong, Chao; Zhao, Yunjie; Liang, Guang; Zheng, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are used to treat a number of human diseases but often lead to insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) is a key enzyme that catalyzes the intracellular conversion of cortisone to physiologically active cortisol. Despite the known role of 11β-HSD1 and active glucocorticoid in causing insulin resistance, the molecular mechanisms by which insulin resistance is induced remain elusive. The aim of this study is to identify these mechanisms in high fat diet (HFD) experimental models. Mice on a HFD were treated with 11β-HSD1 inhibitor as well as a JNK inhibitor. We then treated 3T3-L1-derived adipocytes with prednisone, a synthetic glucocorticoid, and cells with 11β-HSD1 overexpression to study insulin resistance. Our results show that 11β-HSD1 and JNK inhibition mitigated insulin resistance in HFD mice. Prednisone stimulation or overexpression of 11β-HSD1 also caused JNK activation in cultured adipocytes. Inhibition of 11β-HSD1 blocked the activation of JNK in adipose tissue of HFD mice as well as in cultured adipocytes. Furthermore, prednisone significantly impaired the insulin signaling pathway, and these effects were reversed by 11β-HSD1 and JNK inhibition. Our study demonstrates that glucocorticoid-induced insulin resistance was dependent on 11β-HSD1, resulting in the critical activation of JNK signaling in adipocytes. PMID:27841334

  15. Crystal structure of the ternary complex of the catalytic domain of human phenylalanine hydroxylase with tetrahydrobiopterin and 3-(2-thienyl)-L-alanine, and its implications for the mechanism of catalysis and substrate activation.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Ole Andreas; Flatmark, Torgeir; Hough, Edward

    2002-07-26

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase catalyzes the stereospecific hydroxylation of L-phenylalanine, the committed step in the degradation of this amino acid. We have solved the crystal structure of the ternary complex (hPheOH-Fe(II).BH(4).THA) of the catalytically active Fe(II) form of a truncated form (DeltaN1-102/DeltaC428-452) of human phenylalanine hydroxylase (hPheOH), using the catalytically active reduced cofactor 6(R)-L-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) and 3-(2-thienyl)-L-alanine (THA) as a substrate analogue. The analogue is bound in the second coordination sphere of the catalytic iron atom with the thiophene ring stacking against the imidazole group of His285 (average interplanar distance 3.8A) and with a network of hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts. Binding of the analogue to the binary complex hPheOH-Fe(II).BH(4) triggers structural changes throughout the entire molecule, which adopts a slightly more compact structure. The largest change occurs in the loop region comprising residues 131-155, where the maximum r.m.s. displacement (9.6A) is at Tyr138. This loop is refolded, bringing the hydroxyl oxygen atom of Tyr138 18.5A closer to the iron atom and into the active site. The iron geometry is highly distorted square pyramidal, and Glu330 adopts a conformation different from that observed in the hPheOH-Fe(II).BH(4) structure, with bidentate iron coordination. BH(4) binds in the second coordination sphere of the catalytic iron atom, and is displaced 2.6A in the direction of Glu286 and the iron atom, relative to the hPheOH-Fe(II).BH(4) structure, thus changing its hydrogen bonding network. The active-site structure of the ternary complex gives new insight into the substrate specificity of the enzyme, notably the low affinity for L-tyrosine. Furthermore, the structure has implications both for the catalytic mechanism and the molecular basis for the activation of the full-length tetrameric enzyme by its substrate. The large conformational change, moving

  16. Determination of the anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective effects of l-glutamine and l-alanine, or dipeptide, supplementation in rats submitted to resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Raizel, Raquel; Leite, Jaqueline Santos Moreira; Hypólito, Thaís Menezes; Coqueiro, Audrey Yule; Newsholme, Philip; Cruzat, Vinicius Fernandes; Tirapegui, Julio

    2016-08-01

    We evaluated the effects of chronic oral supplementation with l-glutamine and l-alanine in their free form or as the dipeptide l-alanyl-l-glutamine (DIP) on muscle damage, inflammation and cytoprotection, in rats submitted to progressive resistance exercise (RE). Wistar rats (n 8/group) were submitted to 8-week RE, which consisted of climbing a ladder with progressive loads. In the final 21 d before euthanasia, supplements were delivered in a 4 % solution in drinking water. Glutamine, creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), TNF-α, specific IL (IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-10) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels were evaluated in plasma. The concentrations of glutamine, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10, as well as NF-κB activation, were determined in extensor digitorum longus (EDL) skeletal muscle. HSP70 level was assayed in EDL and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). RE reduced glutamine concentration in plasma and EDL (P<0·05 v. sedentary group). However, l-glutamine supplements (l-alanine plus l-glutamine (GLN+ALA) and DIP groups) restored glutamine levels in plasma (by 40 and 58 %, respectively) and muscle (by 93 and 105 %, respectively). GLN+ALA and DIP groups also exhibited increased level of HSP70 in EDL and PBMC, consistent with the reduction of NF-κB p65 activation and cytokines in EDL. Muscle protection was also indicated by attenuation in plasma levels of CK, LDH, TNF-α and IL-1β, as well as an increase in IL-6, IL-10 and MCP-1. Our study demonstrates that chronic oral l-glutamine treatment (given with l-alanine or as dipeptide) following progressive RE induces cyprotective effects mediated by HSP70-associated responses to muscle damage and inflammation.

  17. Inactivation of the Kluyveromyces lactis KlPDA1 gene leads to loss of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity, impairs growth on glucose and triggers aerobic alcoholic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Zeeman, A M; Luttik, M A; Thiele, C; van Dijken, J P; Pronk, J T; Steensma, H Y

    1998-12-01

    The KlPDA1 gene, encoding the E1alpha subunit of the mitochondrial pyruvate-dehydrogenase (PDH) complex was isolated from a Kluyveromyces lactis genomic library by screening with a 1.1 kb internal fragment of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PDA1 gene. The predicted amino acid sequence encoded by KlPDA1 showed 87% similarity and 79% identity to its S. cerevisiae counterpart. Disruption of KIPDA1 resulted in complete absence of PDH activity in cell extracts. The maximum specific growth rate on glucose of null mutants was 3.5-fold lower than that of the wild-type, whereas growth on ethanol was unaffected. Wild-type K. lactis CBS 2359 exhibits a Crabtree-negative phenotype, i.e. no ethanol was produced in aerobic batch cultures grown on glucose. In contrast, substantial amounts of ethanol and acetaldehyde were produced in aerobic cultures of an isogenic Klpda1 null mutant. A wild-type specific growth rate was restored after introduction of an intact KlPDA1 gene but not, as previously found for S. cerevisiae pda1 mutants, by cultivation in the presence of leucine. The occurrence of aerobic fermentation and slow growth of the Klpda1 null mutant indicate that, although present, the enzymes of the PDH bypass (pyruvate decarboxylase, acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and acetyl-CoA synthetase) could not efficiently replace the PDH complex during batch cultivation on glucose. Only at relatively low growth rates (D = 0.10 h(-1)) in aerobic, glucose-limited chemostat cultures, could the PDH bypass completely replace the PDH complex, thus allowing fully respiratory growth. This resulted in a lower biomass yield [g biomass (g glucose)-1] than in the wild-type due to a higher consumption of ATP in the PDH bypass compared to the formation of acetyl-CoA via the PDH complex.

  18. ApoSOD1 lacking dismutase activity neuroprotects motor neurons exposed to beta-methylamino-L-alanine through the Ca2+/Akt/ERK1/2 prosurvival pathway

    PubMed Central

    Petrozziello, Tiziana; Secondo, Agnese; Tedeschi, Valentina; Esposito, Alba; Sisalli, MariaJosè; Scorziello, Antonella; Di Renzo, Gianfranco; Annunziato, Lucio

    2017-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a severe human adult-onset neurodegenerative disease affecting lower and upper motor neurons. In >20% of cases, the familial form of ALS is caused by mutations in the gene encoding Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1). Interestingly, administration of wild-type SOD1 to SOD1G93A transgenic rats ameliorates motor symptoms through an unknown mechanism. Here we investigated whether the neuroprotective effects of SOD1 are due to the Ca2+-dependent activation of such prosurvival signaling pathway and not to its catalytic activity. To this aim, we also examined the mechanism of neuroprotective action of ApoSOD1, the metal-depleted state of SOD1 that lacks dismutase activity, in differentiated motor neuron-like NSC-34 cells and in primary motor neurons exposed to the cycad neurotoxin beta-methylamino-L-alanine (L-BMAA). Preincubation of ApoSOD1 and SOD1, but not of human recombinant SOD1G93A, prevented cell death in motor neurons exposed to L-BMAA. Moreover, ApoSOD1 elicited ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation in motor neurons through an early increase of intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). Accordingly, inhibition of ERK1/2 by siMEK1 and PD98059 counteracted ApoSOD1- and SOD1-induced neuroprotection. Similarly, transfection of the dominant-negative form of Akt in NSC-34 motor neurons and treatment with the selective PI3K inhibitor LY294002 prevented ApoSOD1- and SOD1-mediated neuroprotective effects in L-BMAA-treated motor neurons. Furthermore, ApoSOD1 and SOD1 prevented the expression of the two markers of L-BMAA-induced ER stress GRP78 and caspase-12. Collectively, our data indicate that ApoSOD1, which is devoid of any catalytic dismutase activity, exerts a neuroprotective effect through an early activation of Ca2+/Akt/ERK1/2 pro-survival pathway that, in turn, prevents ER stress in a neurotoxic model of ALS. PMID:28085149

  19. Inhibition of membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase by disulfiram.

    PubMed

    Jay, D

    1991-04-01

    The effect of disulfiram on succinate oxidase and succinate dehydrogenase activities of beef heart submitochondrial particles was studied. Results show that disulfiram inhibits both functions. Succinate and malonate suppress the inhibitory action of disulfiram when succinate dehydrogenase is stabilized in an active conformation. Disulfiram is not able to inhibit the enzyme when succinate dehydrogenase is inactivated by oxaloacetate. The inhibitory effect of disulfiram is reverted by the addition of dithiothreitol. From these results, it is proposed that disulfiram inhibits the utilization of succinate by a direct modification of an -SH group located in the catalytically active site of succinate dehydrogenase.

  20. Effect of high fat and high carbohydrate diets on adipose tissue pyruvate dehydrogenase and its activation by a plasma membrane-enriched fraction and insulin.

    PubMed

    Begum, N; Tepperman, H M; Tepperman, J

    1982-06-01

    Rats were fed a high lard diet or a high glucose diet for 5--7 days. Basal and insulin-stimulated epididymal fat pad pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activities were decreased in fat diet-adapted rats compared to those fed the glucose diet. When adipocyte plasma membranes and mitochondria were incubated together with and without insulin, it was found that the insulin stimulation of PDH activity was lower in preparations from fat-fed rats on both an absolute and percentage basis. Supernatant fractions from insulin-stimulated glucose-fed rat plasma membranes activated mitochondrial PDH to a greater extent than those from lard-fed rat preparations. There was no difference in the response of mitochondria from the two groups when they were stimulated by insulin-treated plasma membranes from stock diet-fed rat adipose tissue. These experiments suggest that fat feeding results in adaptive changes in adipocyte plasma membranes which are involved in the generation of the insulin-stimulated chemical activator of PDH. This adaptive change is in addition to those described earlier.

  1. Plant Formate Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    John Markwell

    2005-01-10

    The research in this study identified formate dehydrogenase, an enzyme that plays a metabolic role on the periphery of one-carbon metabolism, has an unusual localization in Arabidopsis thaliana and that the enzyme has an unusual kinetic plasticity. These properties make it possible that this enzyme could be engineered to attempt to engineer plants with an improved photosynthetic efficiency. We have produced transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants with increased expression of the formate dehydrogenase enzyme to initiate further studies.

  2. Structural characterization of a β-hydroxyacid dehydrogenase from Geobacter sulfurreducens and Geobacter metallireducens with succinic semialdehyde reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Zheng, Yi; Qin, Ling; Wang, Shihua; Buchko, Garry W; Garavito, R Michael

    2014-09-01

    Beta-hydroxyacid dehydrogenase (β-HAD) genes have been identified in all sequenced genomes of eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Their gene products catalyze the NAD(+)- or NADP(+)-dependent oxidation of various β-hydroxy acid substrates into their corresponding semialdehyde. In many fungal and bacterial genomes, multiple β-HAD genes are observed leading to the hypothesis that these gene products may have unique, uncharacterized metabolic roles specific to their species. The genomes of Geobacter sulfurreducens and Geobacter metallireducens each contain two potential β-HAD genes. The protein sequences of one pair of these genes, Gs-βHAD (Q74DE4) and Gm-βHAD (Q39R98), have 65% sequence identity and 77% sequence similarity with each other. Both proteins are observed to reduce succinic semialdehyde, a 4-carbon substrate instead of the typical β-HAD 3-carbon substrate, to γ-hydroxybutyric acid. To further explore the structural and functional characteristics of these two β-HADs with a less frequently observed substrate specificity, crystal structures for Gs-βHAD and Gm-βHAD in complex with NADP(+) were determined to a resolution of 1.89 Å and 2.07 Å, respectively. The structures of both proteins are similar, composed of 14 α-helices and nine β-strands organized into two domains. Domain 1 (1-165) adopts a typical Rossmann fold composed of two α/β units: a six-strand parallel β-sheet surrounded by six α-helices (α1-α6) followed by a mixed three-strand β-sheet surrounded by two α-helices (α7 and α8). Domain 2 (166-287) is composed of a bundle of seven α-helices (α9-α14). Four functional regions conserved in all β-HADs are spatially located near each other, with a buried molecule of NADP(+), at the interdomain cleft. Comparison of these Geobacter structures to a closely related β-HAD from Arabidopsis thaliana in the apo-NADP(+) and apo-substrate bound state suggests that NADP(+) binding effects a rigid body rotation between Domains 1 and 2. Bound

  3. Structural characterization of a β-hydroxyacid dehydrogenase from Geobacter sulfurreducens and Geobacter metallireducens with succinic semialdehyde reductase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Zheng, Yi; Qin, Ling; Wang, Shihua; Buchko, Garry W.; Garavito, Michael R.

    2014-07-30

    Beta-hydroxyacid dehydrogenase (β-HAD) genes have been identified in all sequenced genomes of eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Their gene products catalyze the NAD+- or NADP+-dependent oxidation of various β-hydroxy acid substrates into their corresponding semialdehyde. In many fungal and bacterial genomes, multiple β-HAD genes are observed leading to the hypothesis that these gene products may have unique, uncharacterized metabolic roles specific to their species. The genomes of Geobacter sulfurreducens and Geobacter metallireducens each contain two potential β-HAD genes. The protein sequences of one pair of these genes, Gs-βHAD (Q74DE4) and Gm-βHAD (Q39R98), have 65% sequence identity and 77% sequence similarity with each other. Both proteins reduce succinic semialdehyde, a metabolite of the GABA shunt. To further explore the structural and functional characteristics of these two β-HADs with a potentially unique substrate specificity, crystal structures for Gs-βHAD and Gm-βHAD in complex with NADP+ were determined to a resolution of 1.89 Å and 2.07 Å, respectively. The structure of both proteins are similar, composed of 14 α-helices and nine β-strands organized into two domains. Domain One (1-165) adopts a typical Rossmann fold composed of two α/β units: a six-strand parallel β-sheet surrounded by six α-helices (α1 – α6) followed by a mixed three-strand β-sheet surrounded by two α-helices (α7 and α8). Domain Two (166-287) is composed of a bundle of seven α-helices (α9 – α14). Four functional regions conserved in all β-HADs are spatially located near each other at the interdomain cleft in both Gs-βHAD and Gm-βHAD with a buried molecule of NADP+. The structural features of Gs-βHAD and Gm-βHAD are described in relation to the four conserved consensus sequences characteristic of β-HADs and the potential biochemical importance of these enzymes as an alternative pathway for the degradation of succinic semialdehyde.

  4. Histamine H4-Receptors Inhibit Mast Cell Renin Release in Ischemia/Reperfusion via Protein Kinase Cε-Dependent Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Type-2 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Aldi, Silvia; Takano, Ken-ichi; Tomita, Kengo; Koda, Kenichiro; Chan, Noel Y.-K.; Marino, Alice; Salazar-Rodriguez, Mariselis; Thurmond, Robin L.

    2014-01-01

    Renin released by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) from cardiac mast cells (MCs) activates a local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) causing arrhythmic dysfunction. Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) inhibits MC renin release and consequent activation of this local RAS. We postulated that MC histamine H4-receptors (H4Rs), being Gαi/o-coupled, might activate a protein kinase C isotype–ε (PKCε)–aldehyde dehydrogenase type-2 (ALDH2) cascade, ultimately eliminating MC-degranulating and renin-releasing effects of aldehydes formed in I/R and associated arrhythmias. We tested this hypothesis in ex vivo hearts, human mastocytoma cells, and bone marrow–derived MCs from wild-type and H4R knockout mice. We found that activation of MC H4Rs mimics the cardioprotective anti-RAS effects of IPC and that protection depends on the sequential activation of PKCε and ALDH2 in MCs, reducing aldehyde-induced MC degranulation and renin release and alleviating reperfusion arrhythmias. These cardioprotective effects are mimicked by selective H4R agonists and disappear when H4Rs are pharmacologically blocked or genetically deleted. Our results uncover a novel cardioprotective pathway in I/R, whereby activation of H4Rs on the MC membrane, possibly by MC-derived histamine, leads sequentially to PKCε and ALDH2 activation, reduction of toxic aldehyde-induced MC renin release, prevention of RAS activation, reduction of norepinephrine release, and ultimately to alleviation of reperfusion arrhythmias. This newly discovered protective pathway suggests that MC H4Rs may represent a new pharmacologic and therapeutic target for the direct alleviation of RAS-induced cardiac dysfunctions, including ischemic heart disease and congestive heart failure. PMID:24696042

  5. Leucine-induced activation of translational initiation is partly regulated by the branched-chain {alpha}-keto acid dehydrogenase complex in C2C12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakai, Naoya . E-mail: nakai@hss.osaka-u.ac.jp; Shimomura, Yoshiharu; Tamura, Tomohiro; Tamura, Noriko; Hamada, Koichiro; Kawano, Fuminori; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2006-05-19

    Branched-chain amino acid leucine has been shown to activate the translational regulators through the mammalian target of rapamycin. However, the leucine's effects are self-limiting because leucine promotes its own disposal by an oxidative pathway. The irreversible and rate-limiting step in the leucine oxidation pathway is catalyzed by the branched-chain {alpha}-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKDH) complex. The complex contains E1 ({alpha}2{beta}2), E2, and E3 subunits, and its activity is abolished by phosphorylation of the E1{alpha} subunit by BCKDH kinase. The relationship between the activity of BCKDH complex and leucine-mediated activation of the protein translation was investigated using the technique of RNA interference. The activity of BCKDH complex in C2C12 cell was modulated by transfection of small interfering RNA (siRNA) for BCKDH E2 subunit or BCKDH kinase. Transfection of siRNAs decreased the mRNA expression and protein amount of corresponding gene. Suppression of either E2 subunit or kinase produced opposite effects on the cell proliferation and the activation of translational regulators by leucine. Suppression of BCKDH kinase for 48 h resulted in decreasing cell proliferation. In contrast, E2 suppression led to increased amount of total cellular protein. The phosphorylation of p70 S6 kinase by leucine was increased in E2-siRNA transfected C2C12 cells, whereas the leucine's effect was diminished in kinase-siRNA transfected cells. These results suggest that the activation of the translational regulators by leucine was partly regulated by the activity of BCKDH complex.

  6. 17Beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase Type 1 and Type 2: association between mRNA expression and activity in cell lines.

    PubMed

    Day, Joanna M; Tutill, Helena J; Newman, Simon P; Purohit, Atul; Lawrence, Harshani R; Vicker, Nigel; Potter, Barry V L; Reed, Michael J

    2006-03-27

    17Beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17beta-HSDs) are a family of enzymes that regulate steroid availability within a tissue by catalysing the interconversion of active and inactive forms. Type 1 is up-regulated in many breast tumours, and is responsible for the reduction of oestrone to active oestradiol which stimulates cell proliferation within the tumour. Type 2 oxidises many active steroids to their inactive forms, including oestradiol to oestrone. In this study, we have compared the mRNA expression and enzyme activities of Type 1 and Type 2 in MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, T47D, JEG3 and 293-EBNA cell lines. Also studied were two cell lines stably expressing transfected Type 1 cDNA. RT-PCR indicated that little Type 1 mRNA is expressed in two of the breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and in 293-EBNA cells, but that expression is much higher in the T47D breast cancer cell line, and in the choriocarcinoma cell line, JEG3. However, a higher level of expression of Type 1 is seen in the transfected cell lines MCF-7.8H and 293-EBNA[His617beta-HSD1]. Activity assays show that there is high association between mRNA expression and enzyme activity. Assays indicate that, with the exception of MDA-MB-231 cells, Type 2 activity is low in these lines. The study of the basal activities of these enzymes will be used in future studies investigating the regulation of the enzymes by endogenous and exogenous factors. An understanding of their regulation in both healthy and malignant tissues may lead to future therapeutic intervention at the regulatory level.

  7. Stress-induced changes in glutamate dehydrogenase activity imply its role in adaptation to C and N metabolism in lupine embryos.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Teresa; Skrok, Albert; Dabert, Mirosława

    2010-01-01

    The modifying effect of sucrose on glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) activity and isoenzyme pattern was investigated in isolated embryos of lupine (Lupinus luteus L.), cultured in vitro in a medium with sucrose (+S) or without sucrose (-S) and exposed to cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) stress. Sucrose starvation of lupine embryos led to a rapid increase in the specific activity of GDH, immunoreactive beta-polypeptide and it was accompanied by appearance of new cathodal isoforms of enzyme. This suggests that isoenzymes induced in lupine embryos by sucrose starvation combine into GDH hexamers with the predominance of beta-GDH subunits synthetized under GDH1 gene control. The addition of sucrose to the medium caused an opposite effect. Along with upregulation of catabolic activity of GDH by sucrose starvation, activity of proteolytic enzymes was also induced. These data can point to regulatory mechanism implying a sucrose dependent repression of the GDH1 gene according to the mechanism of catabolic repression. Treatment of embryos with Cd(2+) or Pb(2+) resulted in ammonium accumulation in the tissues, accompanied by an increase in anabolic activity of GDH and activity of anodal isoenzymes, in both (+S) and (-S) embryos without new de novo synthesis of alpha subunit proteins. Thus, GDH isoenzyme profiles may reflect the physiological function of GDH, which appears to be an important link of metabolic adaptation in cells, aimed at using carbon sources other than sugar during carbohydrate starvation (catabolic activity of GDH) and protecting plant tissues against ammonium accumulated because of heavy metal stress (anabolic activity of GDH).

  8. In vivo measurement of aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 activity in rat liver ethanol model using dynamic MRSI of hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Josan, Sonal; Xu, Tao; Yen, Yi-Fen; Hurd, Ralph; Ferreira, Julio; Chen, Che-Hong; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Mayer, Dirk; Spielman, Daniel

    2013-06-01

    To date, measurements of the activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2), a critical mitochondrial enzyme for the elimination of certain cytotoxic aldehydes in the body and a promising target for drug development, have been largely limited to in vitro methods. Recent advancements in MRS of hyperpolarized (13) C-labeled substrates have provided a method to detect and image in vivo metabolic pathways with signal-to-noise ratio gains greater than 10 000-fold over conventional MRS techniques. However aldehydes, because of their toxicity and short T1 relaxation times, are generally poor targets for such (13) C-labeled studies. In this work, we show that dynamic MRSI of hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]pyruvate and its conversion to [1-(13) C]lactate can provide an indirect in vivo measurement of ALDH2 activity via the concentration of NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, reduced form), a co-factor common to both the reduction of pyruvate to lactate and the oxidation of acetaldehyde to acetate. Results from a rat liver ethanol model (n = 9) show that changes in (13) C-lactate labeling following the bolus injection of hyperpolarized pyruvate are highly correlated with changes in ALDH2 activity (R(2) = 0.76).

  9. The significance of matrix effects on the measurement of lactate dehydrogenase (LD) activity using Kodak dry slide technology in the Ontario Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program.

    PubMed

    Hill, S A; Heathcote, J C; McQueen, M J

    1990-04-01

    A recent lactate dehydrogenase (LD) survey of the Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program (LPTP) of Ontario showed interlaboratory coefficients of variation ranging from 6.5% to 40% for five lyophilized vials on the 12 Kodak analyzers. All the LPTP survey samples had similar protein and LD isoenzyme electrophoretic patterns which remained unchanged after reconstitution and storage for 5 days at 4 degrees C, although the total LD activities fell. Four Ektachem 700 analyzers were subsequently tested using LPTP material and no difference in LD activity between instruments or between two LD slide lot numbers was shown. Generation 9 slides gave higher LD activities than generation 10 on all the reconstituted lyophilized proficiency testing samples. There was no significant difference between slide generations when 19 liquid human sera were analyzed, indicating that the variability on LPTP samples was due to a matrix effect. Definition of the matrix effect of lyophilized proficiency testing material is essential before any proficiency testing program can use such material to reflect analytical performance on patient specimens.

  10. A β-Alanine Catabolism Pathway Containing a Highly Promiscuous ω-Transaminase in the 12-Aminododecanate-Degrading Pseudomonas sp. Strain AAC

    PubMed Central

    Wilding, Matthew; Peat, Thomas S.; Newman, Janet

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We previously isolated the transaminase KES23458 from Pseudomonas sp. strain AAC as a promising biocatalyst for the production of 12-aminododecanoic acid, a constituent building block of nylon-12. Here, we report the subsequent characterization of this transaminase. It exhibits activity with a broad substrate range which includes α-, β-, and ω-amino acids, as well as α,ω-diamines and a number of other industrially relevant compounds. It is therefore a prospective candidate for the biosynthesis of a range of polyamide monomers. The crystal structure of KES23458 revealed that the protein forms a dimer containing a large active site pocket and unusual phosphorylated histidine residues. To infer the physiological role of the transaminase, we expressed, purified, and characterized a dehydrogenase from the same operon, KES23460. Unlike the transaminase, the dehydrogenase was shown to be quite selective, catalyzing the oxidation of malonic acid semialdehyde, formed from β-alanine transamination via KES23458. In keeping with previous reports, the dehydrogenase was shown to catalyze both a coenzyme A (CoA)-dependent reaction to form acetyl-CoA and a significantly slower CoA-independent reaction to form acetate. These findings support the original functional assignment of KES23458 as a β-alanine transaminase. However, a seemingly well-adapted active site and promiscuity toward unnatural compounds, such as 12-aminododecanoic acid, suggest that this enzyme could perform multiple functions for Pseudomonas sp. strain AAC. IMPORTANCE We describe the characterization of an industrially relevant transaminase able to metabolize 12-aminododecanoic acid, a constituent building block of the widely used polymer nylon-12, and we report the biochemical and structural characterization of the transaminase protein. A physiological role for this highly promiscuous enzyme is proposed based on the characterization of a related gene from the host organism. Molecular dynamics

  11. Regulation of heart muscle pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Ronald H.; Randle, Philip J.; Denton, Richard M.

    1974-01-01

    1. The activity of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase was assayed by the incorporation of [32P]phosphate from [γ-32P]ATP into the dehydrogenase complex. There was a very close correlation between this incorporation and the loss of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity with all preparations studied. 2. Nucleoside triphosphates other than ATP (at 100μm) and cyclic 3′:5′-nucleotides (at 10μm) had no significant effect on kinase activity. 3. The Km for thiamin pyrophosphate in the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction was 0.76μm. Sodium pyrophosphate, adenylyl imidodiphosphate, ADP and GTP were competitive inhibitors against thiamin pyrophosphate in the dehydrogenase reaction. 4. The Km for ATP of the intrinsic kinase assayed in three preparations of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase was in the range 13.9–25.4μm. Inhibition by ADP and adenylyl imidodiphosphate was predominantly competitive, but there was nevertheless a definite non-competitive element. Thiamin pyrophosphate and sodium pyrophosphate were uncompetitive inhibitors against ATP. It is suggested that ADP and adenylyl imidodiphosphate inhibit the kinase mainly by binding to the ATP site and that the adenosine moiety may be involved in this binding. It is suggested that thiamin pyrophosphate, sodium pyrophosphate, adenylyl imidodiphosphate and ADP may inhibit the kinase by binding through pyrophosphate or imidodiphosphate moieties at some site other than the ATP site. It is not known whether this is the coenzyme-binding site in the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction. 5. The Km for pyruvate in the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction was 35.5μm. 2-Oxobutyrate and 3-hydroxypyruvate but not glyoxylate were also substrates; all three compounds inhibited pyruvate oxidation. 6. In preparations of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase free of thiamin pyrophosphate, pyruvate inhibited the kinase reaction at all concentrations in the range 25–500μm. The inhibition was uncompetitive. In the presence of thiamin pyrophosphate

  12. Elimination of a Free Cysteine by Creation of a Disulfide Bond Increases the Activity and Stability of Candida boidinii Formate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Junxian; Yang, Taowei; Zhou, Junping; Xu, Meijuan; Zhang, Xian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT NAD+-dependent formate dehydrogenase (FDH; EC 1.2.1.2) is an industrial enzyme widely used for NADH regeneration. However, enzyme inactivation caused by the oxidation of cysteine residues is a flaw of native FDH. In this study, we relieved the oxidation of the free cysteine of FDH from Candida boidinii (CboFDH) through the construction of disulfide bonds between A10 and C23 as well as I239 and C262. Variants A10C, I239C, and A10C/I239C were obtained by the site-directed mutagenesis and their properties were studied. Results showed that there were no significant changes in the optimum temperature and pH between variants and wild-type CboFDH. However, the stabilities of all variant enzymes were improved. Specifically, the CboFDH variant A10C (A10Cfdh) showed a significant increase in copper ion resistance and acid resistance, a 6.7-fold increase in half-life at 60°C, and a 1.4-fold increase in catalytic efficiency compared with the wild type. Asymmetric synthesis of l-tert-leucine indicated that the process time was reduced by 40% with variant A10Cfdh, which benefited from the increase in catalytic efficiency. Circular dichroism analysis and molecular dynamics simulation indicated that variants that contained disulfide bonds lowered the overall root mean square deviation (RMSD) and consequently increased the protein rigidity without affecting the secondary structure of enzyme. This work is expected to provide a viable strategy to avoid the microbial enzyme inactivation caused by the oxidation of the free cysteine residues and improving their performances. IMPORTANCE FDH is widely used for NADH regeneration in dehydrogenase-based synthesis of optically active compounds to decrease the cost of production. This study highlighted a viable strategy that was used to eliminate the oxidation of free cysteine residues of FDH from Candida boidinii by the introduction of disulfide bonds. Using this strategy, we obtained a variant FDH with improved activity and

  13. Targeting Tumor Metabolism for Cancer Treatment: Is Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinases (PDKs) a Viable Anticancer Target?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Shao-Lin; Hu, Xiaohui; Tam, Kin Yip

    2015-01-01

    Cancer remains a lethal threat to global lives. Development of novel anticancer therapeutics is still a challenge to scientists in the field of biomedicine. In cancer cells, the metabolic features are significantly different from those of normal ones, which are hallmarks of several malignancies. Recent studies brought atypical cellular metabolism, such as aerobic glycolysis or the Warburg effect, into the scientific limelight. Targeting these altered metabolic pathways in cancer cells presents a promising therapeutic strategy. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs), key enzymes in the pathway of glucose metabolism, could inactivate the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) by phosphorylating it and preserving the substrates pyruvate, lactate and alanine for gluconeogenesis. Overexpression of PDKs could block the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to satisfy high oxygen demand in cancer cells, while inhibition of PDKs could upregulate the activity of PDC and rectify the balance between the demand and supply of oxygen, which could lead to cancer cell death. Thus, inhibitors targeting PDKs represent a promising strategy for cancer treatment by acting on glycolytic tumors while showing minimal side effects on the oxidative healthy organs. This review considers the role of PDKs as regulator of PDC that catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate in mitochondrion. It is concluded that PDKs are solid therapeutic targets. Inhibition of PDKs could be an attractive therapeutic approach for the development of anti-cancer drugs. PMID:26681918

  14. Thermostability of lactate dehydrogenase LDH-A4 isoenzyme: effect of heat shock protein DnaK on the enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Zietara, M S; Skorkowski, E F

    1995-11-01

    Cells exposed to temperature a few degrees higher than their growth temperature synthesize heat shock proteins (hsp) which may then compose even 20% of total protein content. This paper examined the in vitro protective effect of heat shock protein DnaK (70 kDa) from Escherichia coli against the heat inactivation of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme LDH-A4. The LDH-A4 isoenzyme was purified from fish skeletal muscle using the affinity chromatography on Oxamate-agarose. The enzyme was then heated in the absence and the presence of DnaK protein in a water bath at either 51 or 55 degrees C. The LDH activity was determined by measuring the change in absorbency at 340 nm min-1 at 30 degrees C. The addition of DnaK protein to the LDH-A4 isoenzyme before heat treatment can protect enzyme activity against mild thermal inactivation. Incubation of the LDH-A4 isoenzyme at 51 degrees C in the presence of DnaK protein stimulates its activity by about 30%. The presence of 2 mM ATP can raise LDH activity by another 10%. No significant recovery was observed when DnaK protein was added to LDH at 25 degrees C following earlier inactivation. The maximal activities (Vmax) in the presence of DnaK protein are almost twice those without DnaK protein in the case of heat-treated LDH-A4 isoenzyme at 51 degrees C. The observed protection of LDH-A4 activity increased with the increasing DnaK protein concentration in the incubation medium. Results suggested that the presence of DnaK protein can protect LDH-A4 from heat inactivation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Communication between thiamin cofactors in the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1 component active centers: evidence for a "direct pathway" between the 4'-aminopyrimidine N1' atoms.

    PubMed

    Nemeria, Natalia S; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Mossad, Madouna; Tittmann, Kai; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2010-04-09

    Kinetic, spectroscopic, and structural analysis tested the hypothesis that a chain of residues connecting the 4'-aminopyrimidine N1' atoms of thiamin diphosphates (ThDPs) in the two active centers of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1 component provides a signal transduction pathway. Substitution of the three acidic residues (Glu(571), Glu(235), and Glu(237)) and Arg(606) resulted in impaired binding of the second ThDP, once the first active center was filled, suggesting a pathway for communication between the two ThDPs. 1) Steady-state kinetic and fluorescence quenching studies revealed that upon E571A, E235A, E237A, and R606A substitutions, ThDP binding in the second active center was affected. 2) Analysis of the kinetics of thiazolium C2 hydrogen/deuterium exchange of enzyme-bound ThDP suggests half-of-the-sites reactivity for the E1 component, with fast (activated site) and slow exchanging sites (dormant site). The E235A and E571A variants gave no evidence for the slow exchanging site, indicating that only one of two active sites is filled with ThDP. 3) Titration of the E235A and E237A variants with methyl acetylphosphonate monitored by circular dichroism suggested that only half of the active sites were filled with a covalent predecarboxylation intermediate analog. 4) Crystal structures of E235A and E571A in complex with ThDP revealed the structural basis for the spectroscopic and kinetic observations and showed that either substitution affects cofactor binding, despite the fact that Glu(235) makes no direct contact with the cofactor. The role of the conserved Glu(571) residue in both catalysis and cofactor orientation is revealed by the combined results for the first time.

  16. Effects of high-salinity seawater acclimation on the levels of D-alanine in the muscle and hepatopancreas of kuruma prawn, Marsupenaeus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Naoko; Yokoyama, Masahumi

    2015-12-10

    Changes in D- and L-alanine contents were determined in the muscle and hepatopancreas of kuruma prawn Marsupenaeus japonicus, during acclimation from seawater containing 100% salinity to artificial seawater containing 150% salinity. In the hepatopancreas, contents of both amino acids increased by approximately threefold. The activity of alanine racemase, which catalyzes the interconversion of D- and L-alanine, also increased in the high-salinity seawater. In addition, the expression of the gene encoding alanine racemase increased in the hepatopancreas with an increase in the alanine racemase activity. These data indicate that the biosynthesis of D- and L-alanine is controlled by the gene expression level of alanine racemase, and D-alanine in the hepatopancreas functions as a major osmolyte for isosmotic regulation. In contrast, the content of D-alanine and alanine racemase activity did not change in the muscle during hyper-osmotic acclimation. Therefore, we suggest that D-alanine, which exists in the several tissues of M. japonicus, is considered to be utilized in some different physiological phenomena in different tissues.

  17. Impact of charged amino acid substitution in the transmembrane domain of L-alanine exporter, AlaE, of Escherichia coli on the L-alanine export.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seryoung; Ihara, Kohei; Katsube, Satoshi; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Yoneyama, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    The Escherichia coli alaE gene encodes the L-alanine exporter, AlaE, that catalyzes active export of L-alanine using proton electrochemical potential. The transporter comprises only 149 amino acid residues and four predicted transmembrane domains (TMs), which contain three charged amino acid residues. The AlaE-deficient L-alanine non-metabolizing cells (ΔalaE cells) appeared hypersusceptible to L-alanyl-L-alanine showing a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 2.5 µg/ml for the dipeptide due to a toxic accumulation of L-alanine. To elucidate the mechanism by which AlaE exports L-alanine, we replaced charged amino acid residues in the TMs, glutamic acid-30 (TM-I), arginine-45 (TM-II), and aspartic acid-84 (TM-III) with their respective charge-conserved amino acid or a net neutral cysteine. The ΔalaE cells producing R45K or R45C appeared hypersusceptible to the dipeptide, indicating that arginine-45 is essential for AlaE activity. MIC of the dipeptide in the ΔalaE cells expressing E30D and E30C was 156 µg/ml and >10,000 µg/ml, respectively, thereby suggesting that a negative charge at this position is not essential. The ΔalaE cells expressing D84E or D84C showed an MIC >10,000 and 78 µg/ml, respectively, implying that a negative charge is required at this position. These results were generally consistent with that of the L-alanine accumulation experiments in intact cells. We therefore concluded that charged amino acid residues (R45 and D84) in the AlaE transmembrane domain play a pivotal role in L-alanine export. Replacement of three cysteine residues at C22, C28 (both in TM-I), and C135 (C-terminal region) with alanine showed only a marginal effect on L-alanine export.

  18. Xanthine dehydrogenase and 2-furoyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas putida Fu1: two molybdenum-containing dehydrogenases of novel structural composition.

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, K; Andreesen, J R

    1990-01-01

    The constitutive xanthine dehydrogenase and the inducible 2-furoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) dehydrogenase could be labeled with [185W]tungstate. This labeling was used as a reporter to purify both labile proteins. The radioactivity cochromatographed predominantly with the residual enzymatic activity of both enzymes during the first purification steps. Both radioactive proteins were separated and purified to homogeneity. Antibodies raised against the larger protein also exhibited cross-reactivity toward the second smaller protein and removed xanthine dehydrogenase and 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity up to 80 and 60% from the supernatant of cell extracts, respectively. With use of cell extract, Western immunoblots showed only two bands which correlated exactly with the activity stains for both enzymes after native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Molybdate was absolutely required for incorporation of 185W, formation of cross-reacting material, and enzymatic activity. The latter parameters showed a perfect correlation. This evidence proves that the radioactive proteins were actually xanthine dehydrogenase and 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase. The apparent molecular weight of the native xanthine dehydrogenase was about 300,000, and that of 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase was 150,000. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of both enzymes revealed two protein bands corresponding to molecular weights of 55,000 and 25,000. The xanthine dehydrogenase contained at least 1.6 mol of molybdenum, 0.9 ml of cytochrome b, 5.8 mol of iron, and 2.4 mol of labile sulfur per mol of enzyme. The composition of the 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase seemed to be similar, although the stoichiometry was not determined. The oxidation of furfuryl alcohol to furfural and further to 2-furoic acid by Pseudomonas putida Fu1 was catalyzed by two different dehydrogenases. Images PMID:2170335

  19. Probing alanine transaminase catalysis with hyperpolarized 13CD3-pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Barb, A.W.; Hekmatyar, S.K.; Glushka, J.N.; Prestegard, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Hyperpolarized metabolites offer a tremendous sensitivity advantage (>104 fold) when measuring flux and enzyme activity in living tissues by magnetic resonance methods. These sensitivity gains can also be applied to mechanistic studies that impose time and metabolite concentration limitations. Here we explore the use of hyperpolarization by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in mechanistic studies of alanine transaminase (ALT), a well-established biomarker of liver disease and cancer that converts pyruvate to alanine using glutamate as a nitrogen donor. A specific deuterated, 13C-enriched analog of pyruvic acid, 13C3D3-pyruvic acid, is demonstrated to have advantages in terms of detection by both direct 13C observation and indirect observation through methyl protons introduced by ALT-catalyzed H–D exchange. Exchange on injecting hyperpolarized 13C3D3-pyruvate into ALT dissolved in buffered 1H2O, combined with an experimental approach to measure proton incorporation, provided information on mechanistic details of transaminase action on a 1.5 s timescale. ALT introduced, on average, 0.8 new protons into the methyl group of the alanine produced, indicating the presence of an off-pathway enamine intermediate. The opportunities for exploiting mechanism-dependent molecular signatures as well as indirect detection of hyperpolarized 13C3-pyruvate and products in imaging applications are discussed. PMID:23357427

  20. Human Salivary Aldehyde Dehydrogenase: Purification, Kinetic Characterization and Effect of Ethanol, Hydrogen Peroxide and Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate on the Activity of the Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Fazle; Laskar, Amaj Ahmed; Choudhary, Hadi Hasan; Younus, Hina

    2016-09-01

    Human salivary aldehyde dehydrogenase (hsALDH) enzyme appears to be the first line of defense in the body against exogenous toxic aldehydes. However till date much work has not been done on this important member of the ALDH family. In this study, we have purified hsALDH to homogeneity by diethylaminoethyl-cellulose (DEAE-cellulose) ion-exchange chromatography in a single step. The molecular mass of the homodimeric enzyme was determined to be approximately 108 kDa. Four aromatic substrates; benzaldehyde, cinnamaldehyde, 2-naphthaldehyde and 6-methoxy-2-naphthaldehyde were used for determining the activity of pure hsALDH. K m values for these substrates were calculated to be 147.7, 5.31, 0.71 and 3.31 μM, respectively. The best substrates were found to be cinnamaldehyde and 2-naphthaldehyde since they exhibited high V max /K m values. 6-methoxy-2-naphthaldehyde substrate was used for further kinetic characterization of pure hsALDH. The pH and temperature optima of hsALDH were measured to be pH 8 and 45 °C, respectively. The pure enzyme is highly unstable at high temperatures. Ethanol, hydrogen peroxide and SDS activate hsALDH, therefore it is safe and beneficial to include them in mouthwashes and toothpastes in low concentrations.

  1. Lead-optimization of aryl and aralkyl amine based triazolopyrimidine inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase with antimalarial activity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Gujjar, Ramesh; Mazouni, Farah El; White, Karen L.; White, John; Creason, Sharon; Shackleford, David M.; Deng, Xiaoyi; Charman, William N.; Bathurst, Ian; Burrows, Jeremy; Floyd, David M.; Matthews, David; Buckner, Frederick S.; Charman, Susan A.; Phillips, Margaret A.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.

    2011-01-01

    Malaria is one of the leading causes of severe infectious disease worldwide, yet our ability to maintain effective therapy to combat the illness is continually challenged by the emergence of drug resistance. We previously reported identification of a new class of triazolopyrimidine based P. falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (PfDHODH) inhibitors with antimalarial activity, leading to the discovery of a new lead series and novel target for drug development. Active compounds from the series contained a triazolopyrimidine ring attached to an aromatic group through a bridging nitrogen atom. Herein we describe systematic efforts to optimize the aromatic functionality with the goal of improving potency and in vivo properties of compounds from the series. These studies led to the identification of two new substituted aniline moieties (4-SF5-Ph and 3,5-Di-F-4-CF3-Ph) which, when coupled to the triazolopyrimidine ring showed good plasma exposure and better efficacy in the P. berghei mouse model of the disease, than previously reported compounds from the series. PMID:21517059

  2. α-(Substituted-phenoxyacetoxy)-α-heterocyclylmethylphosphonates: synthesis, herbicidal activity, inhibition on pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc), and application as postemergent herbicide against broadleaf weeds.

    PubMed

    He, Hong-Wu; Peng, Hao; Wang, Tao; Wang, Chubei; Yuan, Jun-Lin; Chen, Ting; He, Junbo; Tan, Xiaosong

    2013-03-13

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc) is the site of action of a new class of herbicides. On the basis of the previous work for O,O'-dimethyl α-(substituted-phenoxyacetoxy)alkylphosphonates (I), further synthetic modifications were made by introducing a fural and a thienyl group to structure I. A series of α-(substituted-phenoxyacetoxy)-α-heterocyclylmethylphosphonate derivatives (II) were synthesized as potential inhibitors of PDHc. The postemergent activity of the title compounds II was evaluated in greenhouse experiments. The in vitro efficacy of II against PDHc was also examined. Compounds II with fural as R(3) and 2,4-dichloro as X and Y showed significant herbicidal activity and effective inhibition against PDHc from plants. O,O'-Dimethyl α-(2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetoxy)-α-(furan-2-yl)methylphosphonate II-17 had higher inhibitory potency against PDHc from Pisum sativum than against PDHc from Oryza sativa in vitro and was most effective against broadleaf weeds at 50 and 300 ai g/ha. II-17 was safe for maize and rice even at the dose of 900-1200 ai g/ha. Field trials at different regions in China showed that II-17 (HWS) could control a broad spectrum of broad-leaved and sedge weeds at the rate of 225-375 ai g/ha for postemergent applications in maize fields. II-17 (HWS) displayed potential utility as a selective herbicide.

  3. Macromolecular crowding effect upon in vitro enzyme kinetics: mixed activation-diffusion control of the oxidation of NADH by pyruvate catalyzed by lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Balcells, Cristina; Pastor, Isabel; Vilaseca, Eudald; Madurga, Sergio; Cascante, Marta; Mas, Francesc

    2014-04-17

    Enzyme kinetics studies have been usually designed as dilute solution experiments, which differ substantially from in vivo conditions. However, cell cytosol is crowded with a high concentration of molecules having different shapes and sizes. The consequences of such crowding in enzymatic reactions remain unclear. The aim of the present study is to understand the effect of macromolecular crowding produced by dextran of different sizes and at diverse concentrations in the well-known reaction of oxidation of NADH by pyruvate catalyzed by L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Our results indicate that the reaction rate is determined by both the occupied volume and the relative size of dextran obstacles with respect to the enzyme present in the reaction. Moreover, we analyzed the influence of macromolecular crowding on the Michaelis-Menten constants, vmax and Km. The obtained results show that only high concentrations and large sizes of dextran reduce both constants suggesting a mixed activation-diffusion control of this enzymatic reaction due to the dextran crowding action. From our knowledge, this is the first experimental study that depicts mixed activation-diffusion control in an enzymatic reaction due to the effect of crowding.

  4. A study on the stability and enzymatic activity of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase in presence of the self-assembling block copolymer Poloxamer 407.

    PubMed

    Pucciarelli, Stefania; Bonacucina, Giulia; Bernabucci, Franco; Cespi, Marco; Mencarelli, Giovanna; De Fronzo, Giusi Serena; Natalini, Paolo; Palmieri, Giovanni Filippo

    2012-05-01

    Yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) is an enzyme widely studied for biotechnological applications due to its involvement in fermentation industry, and various attempts to improve its catalytic properties and its thermal stability have been carried out. In this paper, the influence of a block copolymer (Poloxamer 407) on ADH enzymatic activity and thermal behaviour has been studied in order to get new insights about the use of poloxamers in formulation of sustained release systems for therapeutic proteins. Poloxamer 407 has the ability to form micelles and gel due to its self-assembling and thermoresponsive properties. The effect of the copolymer towards thermal stress and pH changes, which often reduce enzymes activity it has been investigated by means of enzymatic assays and differential scanning calorimetry. Results showed that at pH 9.1 and 7.3, the Poloxamer in the form of unimeric, micellar and gel state is able to effectively preserve the enzyme from thermoinactivation. In addition by calorimetric data Poloxamer 407 has showed an effect in preserving ADH from aggregation at pH 7.3. In conclusion, Poloxamer 407 seems to be very effective in protecting ADH from stress related events, like alkaline inactivation and aggregation.

  5. Effects of Metmyoglobin Reducing Activity and Thermal Stability of NADH-Dependent Reductase and Lactate Dehydrogenase on Premature Browning in Ground Beef.

    PubMed

    Djimsa, Blanchefort A; Abraham, Anupam; Mafi, Gretchen G; VanOverbeke, Deborah L; Ramanathan, Ranjith

    2017-02-01

    Premature browning is a condition wherein ground beef exhibits a well-done appearance before reaching the USDA recommended internal cooked meat temperature of 71.1 °C; however, the mechanism is unclear. The objectives of this study were: (1) to determine the effects of packaging and temperature on metmyoglobin reducing activity (MRA) of cooked ground beef patties and (2) to assess the effects of temperature and pH on thermal stability of NADH-dependent reductase, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and oxymyoglobin (OxyMb) in-vitro. Beef patties (lean: fat = 85:15) were packaged in high-oxygen modified atmosphere (HiOX-MAP) or vacuum (VP) and cooked to either 65 or 71 °C. Internal meat color and MRA of both raw and cooked patties were determined. Purified NADH-dependent reductase and LDH were used to determine the effects of pH and temperature on enzyme activity. MRA of cooked patties was temperature and packaging dependent (P < 0.05). Vacuum packaged patties cooked to 71 °C had greater (P < 0.05) MRA than HiOX-MAP counterparts. Thermal stability of OxyMb, NADH-dependent reductase, and LDH were different and pH-dependent. LDH was able to generate NADH at 84 °C; whereas NADH-dependent reductase was least stable to heat. The results suggest that patties have MRA at cooking temperatures, which can influence cooked meat color.

  6. Crystal Structures of Aedes Aegypt Alanine Glyoxylate Aminotransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Han,Q.; Robinson, H.; Gao, Y.; Vogelaar, N.; Wilson, S.; Rizzi, M.; Li, J.

    2006-01-01

    Mosquitoes are unique in having evolved two alanine glyoxylate aminotransferases (AGTs). One is 3-hydroxykynurenine transaminase (HKT), which is primarily responsible for catalyzing the transamination of 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) to xanthurenic acid (XA). Interestingly, XA is used by malaria parasites as a chemical trigger for their development within the mosquito. This 3-HK to XA conversion is considered the major mechanism mosquitoes use to detoxify the chemically reactive and potentially toxic 3-HK. The other AGT is a typical dipteran insect AGT and is specific for converting glyoxylic acid to glycine. Here we report the 1.75{angstrom} high-resolution three-dimensional crystal structure of AGT from the mosquito Aedes aegypti (AeAGT) and structures of its complexes with reactants glyoxylic acid and alanine at 1.75 and 2.1{angstrom} resolution, respectively. This is the first time that the three-dimensional crystal structures of an AGT with its amino acceptor, glyoxylic acid, and amino donor, alanine, have been determined. The protein is dimeric and adopts the type I-fold of pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP)-dependent aminotransferases. The PLP co-factor is covalently bound to the active site in the crystal structure, and its binding site is similar to those of other AGTs. The comparison of the AeAGT-glyoxylic acid structure with other AGT structures revealed that these glyoxylic acid binding residues are conserved in most AGTs. Comparison of the AeAGT-alanine structure with that of the Anopheles HKT-inhibitor complex suggests that a Ser-Asn-Phe motif in the latter may be responsible for the substrate specificity of HKT enzymes for 3-HK.

  7. Crystal structures of Aedes aegypti alanine glyoxylate aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Han, Qian; Robinson, Howard; Gao, Yi Gui; Vogelaar, Nancy; Wilson, Scott R; Rizzi, Menico; Li, Jianyong

    2006-12-01

    Mosquitoes are unique in having evolved two alanine glyoxylate aminotransferases (AGTs). One is 3-hydroxykynurenine transaminase (HKT), which is primarily responsible for catalyzing the transamination of 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) to xanthurenic acid (XA). Interestingly, XA is used by malaria parasites as a chemical trigger for their development within the mosquito. This 3-HK to XA conversion is considered the major mechanism mosquitoes use to detoxify the chemically reactive and potentially toxic 3-HK. The other AGT is a typical dipteran insect AGT and is specific for converting glyoxylic acid to glycine. Here we report the 1.75A high-resolution three-dimensional crystal structure of AGT from the mosquito Aedes aegypti (AeAGT) and structures of its complexes with reactants glyoxylic acid and alanine at 1.75 and 2.1A resolution, respectively. This is the first time that the three-dimensional crystal structures of an AGT with its amino acceptor, glyoxylic acid, and amino donor, alanine, have been determined. The protein is dimeric and adopts the type I-fold of pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP)-dependent aminotransferases. The PLP co-factor is covalently bound to the active site in the crystal structure, and its binding site is similar to those of other AGTs. The comparison of the AeAGT-glyoxylic acid structure with other AGT structures revealed that these glyoxylic acid binding residues are conserved in most AGTs. Comparison of the AeAGT-alanine structure with that of the Anopheles HKT-inhibitor complex suggests that a Ser-Asn-Phe motif in the latter may be responsible for the substrate specificity of HKT enzymes for 3-HK.

  8. Common catabolic enzyme patterns in a microplankton community of the Humboldt Current System off northern and central-south Chile: Malate dehydrogenase activity as an index of water-column metabolism in an oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, R. R.; Quiñones, R. A.

    2009-07-01

    An extensive subsurface oxygen minimum zone off northern and central-south Chile, associated with the Peru-Chile undercurrent, has important effects on the metabolism of the organisms inhabiting therein. Planktonic species deal with the hypoxic and anoxic environments by relying on biochemical as well as physiological processes related to their anaerobic metabolisms. Here we characterize, for the first time, the potential enzymatic activities involved in the aerobic and anaerobic energy production pathways of microplanktonic organisms (<100 μm), their relationship, and this relationship's association with the oxygen concentration and microplanktonic biomass in the oxygen minimum zone and adjacent areas of the Humboldt Current System water column. Our results demonstrate significant potential enzymatic activity of catabolic pathways in the oxygen minimum zone. Malate dehydrogenase had the highest oxidizing activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (reduced form) in the batch of catabolic enzymatic activities assayed, including potential pyruvate oxidoreductases activity, the electron transport system, and dissimilatory nitrate reductase. Malate dehydrogenase correlated significantly with almost all the enzymes analyzed within and above the oxygen minimum zone, and also with the oxygen concentration and microplankton biomass in the water column of the Humboldt Current System, especially in the oxygen minimum zone off Iquique. These results suggest a possible specific pattern for the catabolic activity of the microplanktonic realm associated with the oxygen minimum zone spread along the Humboldt Current System off Chile. We hypothesize that malate dehydrogenase activity could be an appropriate indicator of microplankton catabolism in the oxygen minimum zone and adjacent areas.

  9. Benzene toxicity: emphasis on cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Bolcsak, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    Blood dyscrasias such as leukopenia and anemia have been clearly identified as consequences of chronic benzene exposure. The metabolites, phenol, catechol, and hydroquinone produced inhibition of /sup 59/Fe uptake in mice which followed the same time course as that produced by benzene. The inhibitor of benzene oxidation, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, mitigated the inhibitory effects of benzene and phenol only. These data support the contention that benzene toxicity is mediated by a metabolite and suggest that the toxicity of phenol is a consequence of its metabolism to hydroquinone and that the route of metabolism to catechol may also contribute to the production of toxic metabolite(s). The properties of mouse liver cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases were examined. These enzymes catalyze the NADP/sup +/-dependent oxidation of trans-1,2-dihydro-1,2-dihydroxybenzene (BDD) to catechol, a possible toxic metabolite of benzene produced via this metabolic route. Four distinct dihydrodiol dehydrogenases (DD1, DD2, DD3, and DD4) were purified to apparent homogeneity as judged by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing. DD1 appeared to be identical to the major ketone reductase and 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in the liver. DD2 exhibited aldehyde reductase activity. DD3 and DD4 oxidized 17..beta..-hydroxysteroids, but no carbonyl reductase activity was detected. These relationships between BDD dehydrogenases and carbonyl reductase and/or 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities were supported by several lines of evidence.

  10. Novel chiral tool, (R)-2-octanol dehydrogenase, from Pichia finlandica: purification, gene cloning, and application for optically active α-haloalcohols.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Kudoh, Masatake

    2013-09-01

    A novel enantioselective alcohol dehydrogenase, (R)-2-octanol dehydrogenase (PfODH), was discovered among methylotrophic microorganisms. The enzyme was purified from Pichia finlandica and characterized. The molecular mass of the enzyme was estimated to be 83,000 and 30,000 by gel filtration and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, respectively. The enzyme was an NAD(+)-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase and showed a strict enantioselectivity, very broad substrate specificity, and high tolerance to SH reagents. A gene-encoding PfODH was cloned and sequenced. The gene consisted of 765 nucleotides, coding polypeptides of 254 amino acids. The gene was singly expressed and coexpressed together with a formate dehydrogenase as an NADH regenerator in an Escherichia coli. Ethyl (S)-4-chloro-3-hydroxybutanoate and (S)-2-chloro-1-phenylethanol were synthesized using a whole-cell biocatalyst in more than 99 % optical purity.

  11. A membrane-associated adenylate cyclase modulates lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase activities required for bull sperm capacitation induced by hyaluronic acid.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Silvina; Córdoba, Mariana

    2017-04-01

    Hyaluronic acid, as well as heparin, is a glycosaminoglycan present in the female genital tract of cattle. The aim of this study was to evaluate oxidative metabolism and intracellular signals mediated by a membrane-associated adenylate cyclase (mAC), in sperm capacitation with hyaluronic acid and heparin, in cryopreserved bull sperm. The mAC inhibitor, 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine, was used in the present study. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) activities and lactate concentration were determined spectrophotometrically in the incubation medium. Capacitation and acrosome reaction were evaluated by chlortetracycline technique, while plasma membrane and acrosome integrity were determined by trypan blue stain/differential interference contrast microscopy. Heparin capacitated samples had a significant decrease in LDH and CK activities, while in hyaluronic acid capacitated samples LDH and CK activities both increased compared to control samples, in heparin and hyaluronic acid capacitation conditions, respectively. A significant increase in lactate concentration in the incubation medium occurred in hyaluronic acid-treated sperm samples compared to heparin treatment, indicating this energetic metabolite is produced during capacitation. The LDH and CK enzyme activities and lactate concentrations in the incubation medium were decreased with 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine treatment in hyaluronic acid samples. The mAC inhibitor significantly inhibited heparin-induced capacitation of sperm cells, but did not completely inhibit hyaluronic acid capacitation. Therefore, hyaluronic acid and heparin are physiological glycosaminoglycans capable of inducing in vitro capacitation in cryopreserved bull sperm, stimulating different enzymatic pathways and intracellular signals modulated by a mAC. Hyaluronic acid induces sperm capacitation involving LDH and CK activities, thereby reducing oxidative metabolism, and this process is mediated by mAC.

  12. Decreased 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase 1 Level and Activity in Murine Pancreatic Islets Caused by Insulin-Like Growth Factor I Overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Subrata; Grimm, Larson; Gong, Ying Jia Kate; Wang, Beixi; Li, Bing; Srikant, Coimbatore B.; Gao, Zu-hua; Liu, Jun-Li

    2015-01-01

    We have reported a high expression of IGF-I in pancreatic islet β-cells of transgenic mice under the metallothionein promoter. cDNA microarray analysis of the islets revealed that the expression of 82 genes was significantly altered compared to wild-type mice. Of these, 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (11β-HSD1), which is responsible for the conversion of inert cortisone (11-dehydrocorticosterone, DHC in rodents) to active cortisol (corticosterone) in the liver and adipose tissues, has not been identified previously as an IGF-I target in pancreatic islets. We characterized the changes in its protein level, enzyme activity and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In freshly isolated islets, the level of 11β-HSD1 protein was significantly lower in MT-IGF mice. Using dual-labeled immunofluorescence, 11β-HSD1 was observed exclusively in glucagon-producing, islet α-cells but at a lower level in transgenic vs. wild-type animals. MT-IGF islets also exhibited reduced enzymatic activities. Dexamethasone (DEX) and DHC inhibited glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from freshly isolated islets of wild-type mice. In the islets of MT-IGF mice, 48-h pre-incubation of DEX caused a significant decrease in insulin release, while the effect of DHC was largely blunted consistent with diminished 11β-HSD1 activity. In order to establish the function of intracrine glucocorticoids, we overexpressed 11β-HSD1 cDNA in MIN6 insulinoma cells, which together with DHC caused apoptosis and a significant decrease in proliferation. Both effects were abolished with the treatment of an 11β-HSD1 inhibitor. Our results demonstrate an inhibitory effect of IGF-I on 11β-HSD1 expression and activity within the pancreatic islets, which may mediate part of the IGF-I effects on cell proliferation, survival and insulin secretion. PMID:26305481

  13. Elevation of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 activity in Holocaust survivor offspring: evidence for an intergenerational effect of maternal trauma exposure

    PubMed Central

    Bierer, Linda M.; Bader, Heather N.; Daskalakis, Nikolaos P.; Lehrner, Amy; Makotkine, Iouri; Seckl, Jonathan R.; Yehuda, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Background Adult offspring of Holocaust survivors comprise an informative cohort in which to study intergenerational transmission of the effects of trauma exposure. Lower cortisol and enhanced glucocorticoid sensitivity have been previously demonstrated in Holocaust survivors with PTSD, and in offspring of Holocaust survivors in association with maternal PTSD. In other work, reduction in the activity of the enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11β-HSD-2), which inactivates cortisol, was identified in Holocaust survivors in comparison to age-matched, unexposed Jewish controls. Therefore, we investigated glucocorticoid metabolism in offspring of Holocaust survivors to evaluate if similar enzymatic decrements would be observed that might help to explain glucocorticoid alterations previously shown for Holocaust offspring. Methods Holocaust offspring (n=85) and comparison subjects (n=27) were evaluated with clinical diagnostic interview and self-rating scales, and asked to collect a 24-hr urine sample from which concentrations of cortisol and glucocorticoid metabolites were assayed by GCMS. 11β-HSD-2 activity was determined as the ratio of urinary cortisone to cortisol. Results Significantly reduced cortisol excretion was observed in Holocaust offspring compared to controls (p=.046), as had been shown for Holocaust survivors. However, 11β-HSD-2 activity was elevated for offspring compared to controls (p=.008), particularly among those whose mothers had been children, rather than adolescents or adults, during World War II (p=.032). The effect of paternal Holocaust exposure could not be reliably investigated in the current sample. Conclusions The association of offspring 11β-HSD-2 activity with maternal age at Holocaust exposure is consistent with the influence of glucocorticoid programming. Whereas a long standing reduction in 11β-HSD-2 activity among survivors is readily interpreted in the context of Holocaust related deprivation, understanding the

  14. [Effect of electric fields on the living organism. III. Activity of fructose-1,6-diphosphate aldolase and malate dehydrogenase in whole liver homogenate and in subcellular liver fractions in guinea pigs].

    PubMed

    Kula, B; Wardas, M

    1990-01-01

    Guinea pigs were exposed to electric field of 50 Hz in different times of day. Activity of aldolase and malate dehydrogenase in whole liver homogenate as well as in nuclear, mitochondrial and supernatant liver fractions of guinea pigs was examined. A remarkable increase in enzyme activity in all studied groups was observed which may prove that a relevant electric stimulus can result in certain disorders in carbohydrate changes in liver cells.

  15. Regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase during infusion of fatty acids of varying chain lengths in the perfused rat heart.

    PubMed

    Latipää, P M; Peuhkurinen, K J; Hiltunen, J K; Hassinen, I E

    1985-12-01

    The effects of a homologous series of fatty acids with a chain length of two to eight on the rate of pyruvate oxidation and covalent interconversions of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH) were studied in isolated perfused rat hearts. In the Langendorff-perfused heart beating at 5 Hz against an aortic pressure of 59 mmHg (7.85 kPa), a positive linear correlation was found between the fraction of PDH existing in the active non-phosphorylated form of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHa) and the pyruvate oxidation rate until the PDHa fraction increased to 48%. This value resulted in a saturation of the citric acid cycle and further activation did not increase the metabolic flux. The PDHa content of the tissue was higher during infusion of odd carbon number fatty acids than during infusion of even carbon number fatty acids. Propionate caused an almost maximal (93%) activation of PDH. A negative correlation was found between the mitochondrial NADH/NAD+ ratio and the PDHa content. A negative correlation was also found between the acetyl-CoA/CoA ratio and the tissue PDHa content. The rate of labelled CO2 production, the specific radioactivity of tissue alanine and the metabolic balance sheet demonstrated that the alanine aminotransferase reaction in the total tissue does not reach equilibrium with the mitochondrial pyruvate pool during propionate oxidation, but the equilibrium is reached during the oxidation of even-number carbon fatty acids. This suggests that pyruvate is formed from propionate-derived metabolites also in the cytosol, although the primary metabolism of propionate occurs in the mitochondria. The results indicate that the rate of pyruvate oxidation in the myocardium is mainly regulated by covalent interconversion of PDH. During propionate oxidation the PDHa content in the tissue can increase beyond the point of saturation of the citric acid cycle and this indicates that feedback inhibition of the enzyme is rate-determining under these conditions.

  16. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  17. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  18. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  19. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  20. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  1. [Alanine solution as enzyme reaction buffer used in A to O blood group conversion].

    PubMed

    Li, Su-Bo; Zhang, Xue; Zhang, Yin-Ze; Tan, Ying-Xia; Bao, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Ying-Li; Ji, Shou-Ping; Gong, Feng; Gao, Hong-Wei

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of alanine solution as α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase enzyme reaction buffer on the enzymatic activity of A antigen. The binding ability of α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase with RBC in different reaction buffer such as alanine solution, glycine solution, normal saline (0.9% NaCl), PBS, PCS was detected by Western blot. The results showed that the efficiency of A to O conversion in alanine solution was similar to that in glycine solution, and Western blot confirmed that most of enzymes blinded with RBC in glycine or alanine solution, but few enzymes blinded with RBC in PBS, PCS or normal saline. The evidences indicated that binding of enzyme with RBC was a key element for A to O blood group conversion, while the binding ability of α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase with RBC in alanine or glycine solution was similar. It is concluded that alanine solution can be used as enzyme reaction buffer in A to O blood group conversion. In this buffer, the α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase is closely blinded with RBC and α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase plays efficient enzymatic activity of A antigen.

  2. Stable Suppression of Lactate Dehydrogenase Activity during Anoxia in the Foot Muscle of Littorina littorea and the Potential Role of Acetylation as a Novel Posttranslational Regulatory Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, Ali; Dawson, Neal J; Bell, Ryan A V; Storey, Kenneth B

    2013-01-01

    The intertidal marine snail, Littorina littorea, has evolved to withstand extended bouts of oxygen deprivation brought about by changing tides or other potentially harmful environmental conditions. Survival is dependent on a strong suppression of its metabolic rate and a drastic reorganization of its cellular biochemistry in order to maintain energy balance under fixed fuel reserves. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is a crucial enzyme of anaerobic metabolism as it is typically responsible for the regeneration of NAD(+), which allows for the continued functioning of glycolysis in the absence of oxygen. This study compared the kinetic and structural characteristics of the D-lactate specific LDH (E.C. 1.1.1.28) from foot muscle of aerobic control versus 24 h anoxia-exposed L. littorea. Anoxic LDH displayed a near 50% decrease in V max (pyruvate-reducing direction) as compared to control LDH. These kinetic differences suggest that there may be a stable modification and regulation of LDH during anoxia, and indeed, subsequent dot-blot analyses identified anoxic LDH as being significantly less acetylated than the corresponding control enzyme. Therefore, acetylation may be the regulatory mechanism that is responsible for the suppression of LDH activity during anoxia, which could allow for the production of alternative glycolytic end products that in turn would increase the ATP yield under fixed fuel reserves.

  3. Stable Suppression of Lactate Dehydrogenase Activity during Anoxia in the Foot Muscle of Littorina littorea and the Potential Role of Acetylation as a Novel Posttranslational Regulatory Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Shahriari, Ali; Dawson, Neal J.; Bell, Ryan A. V.; Storey, Kenneth B.

    2013-01-01

    The intertidal marine snail, Littorina littorea, has evolved to withstand extended bouts of oxygen deprivation brought about by changing tides or other potentially harmful environmental conditions. Survival is dependent on a strong suppression of its metabolic rate and a drastic reorganization of its cellular biochemistry in order to maintain energy balance under fixed fuel reserves. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is a crucial enzyme of anaerobic metabolism as it is typically responsible for the regeneration of NAD+, which allows for the continued functioning of glycolysis in the absence of oxygen. This study compared the kinetic and structural characteristics of the D-lactate specific LDH (E.C. 1.1.1.28) from foot muscle of aerobic control versus 24 h anoxia-exposed L. littorea. Anoxic LDH displayed a near 50% decrease in Vmax (pyruvate-reducing direction) as compared to control LDH. These kinetic differences suggest that there may be a stable modification and regulation of LDH during anoxia, and indeed, subsequent dot-blot analyses identified anoxic LDH as being significantly less acetylated than the corresponding control enzyme. Therefore, acetylation may be the regulatory mechanism that is responsible for the suppression of LDH activity during anoxia, which could allow for the production of alternative glycolytic end products that in turn would increase the ATP yield under fixed fuel reserves. PMID:24233354

  4. "Enzymogenesis": classical liver alcohol dehydrogenase origin from the glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase line.

    PubMed Central

    Danielsson, O; Jörnvall, H

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of the activity and structure of lower vertebrate alcohol dehydrogenases reveals that relationships between the classical liver and yeast enzymes need not be continuous. Both the ethanol activity of class I-type alcohol dehydrogenase (alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) and the glutathione-dependent formaldehyde activity of the class III-type enzyme [formaldehyde:NAD+ oxidoreductase (glutathione-formylating), EC 1.2.1.1] are present in liver down to at least the stage of bony fishes (cod liver: ethanol activity, 3.4 units/mg of protein in one enzyme; formaldehyde activity, 4.5 units/mg in the major form of another enzyme). Structural analysis of the latter protein reveals it to be a typical class III enzyme, with limited variation from the mammalian form and therefore with stable activity and structure throughout much of the vertebrate lineage. In contrast, the classical alcohol dehydrogenase (the class I enzyme) appears to be the emerging form, first in activity and later also in structure. The class I activity is present already in the piscine line, whereas the overall structural-type enzyme is not observed until amphibians and still more recent vertebrates. Consequently, the class I/III duplicatory origin appears to have arisen from a functional class III form, not a class I form. Therefore, ethanol dehydrogenases from organisms existing before this duplication have origins separate from those leading to the "classical" liver alcohol dehydrogenases. The latter now often occur in isozyme forms from further gene duplications and have a high rate of evolutionary change. The pattern is, however, not simple and we presently find in cod the first evidence for isozymes also within a class III alcohol dehydrogenase. Overall, the results indicate that both of these classes of vertebrate alcohol dehydrogenase are important and suggest a protective metabolic function for the whole enzyme system. Images PMID:1409630

  5. Mutation of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 induces glioma cell proliferation via nuclear factor-κB activation in a hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoliang; Sai, Ke; Gong, Fanghe; Yang, Qunying; Chen, Furong; Lin, Jian

    2014-05-01

    Recently, mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 gene, which specifically occur in the majority of low-grade and secondary high-grade gliomas, have drawn particular attention of neuro-oncologists. Mutations of the IDH1 gene have been proposed to have significant roles in the tumorigenesis, progression and prognosis of gliomas. However, the molecular mechanism of the role of IDH1 mutants in gliomagenesis remains to be elucidated. The present study, showed that forced expression of an IDH1 mutant, of which the 132th amino acid residue arginine is substituted by histidine (IDH1R132H), promoted cell proliferation in cultured cells, while wild-type IDH1 overexpression had no effect on cell proliferation. Consistent with previous studies, it was also observed that expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF1-α) was upregulated in IDH1R132H expressing cells with the induction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. However, knockdown of VEGF via small RNA interference had no significant influence on the cell proliferation induced by overexpression of IDH1R132H, implying that another signaling pathway may be involved. Next, forced expression of IDH1R132H was found to activate nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), since the inhibitory IκB protein (IκBα) was highly phosphorylated and the NF-κB p65 subunit was translocated into the nucleus. Notably, knockdown of HIF1-α significantly blocked NF-κB activation, which was induced by the overexpression of IDH1 mutants. In addition, expression of IDH1 mutants markedly induced the NF-κB target gene expression, including cyclin D1 and E and c-myc, which were involved in the regulation of cell proliferation. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that the IDH1 mutant activated NF-κB in a HIF1-α‑dependent manner and was involved in the regulation of cell proliferation.

  6. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase activities in three mammalian species: aquatic (Mirounga angustirostris), semi-aquatic (Lontra longicaudis annectens) and terrestrial (Sus scrofa).

    PubMed

    Barjau Pérez-Milicua, Myrna; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Crocker, Daniel E; Gallo-Reynoso, Juan P

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have the capacity of breath hold (apnea) diving. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) have the ability to perform deep and long duration dives; during a routine dive, adults can hold their breath for 25 min. Neotropical river otters (Lontra longicaudis annectens) can hold their breath for about 30 s. Such periods of apnea may result in reduced oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and reduced blood supply (ischemia) to tissues. Production of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) requires oxygen, and most mammalian species, like the domestic pig (Sus scrofa), are not adapted to tolerate hypoxia and ischemia, conditions that result in ATP degradation. The objective of this study was to explore the differences in purine synthesis and recycling in erythrocytes and plasma of three mammalian species adapted to different environments: aquatic (northern elephant seal) (n = 11), semiaquatic (neotropical river otter) (n = 4), and terrestrial (domestic pig) (n = 11). Enzymatic activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) was determined by spectrophotometry, and activity of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and the concentration of hypoxanthine (HX), inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP), guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP), and xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The activities of HGPRT and IMPDH and the concentration of HX, IMP, AMP, ADP, ATP, GTP, and XMP in erythrocytes of domestic pigs were higher than in erythrocytes of northern elephant seals and river otters. These results suggest that under basal conditions (no diving, sleep apnea or exercise), aquatic, and semiaquatic mammals have less purine mobilization than their terrestrial counterparts.

  7. Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenases in the mesocarp of ripening fruit of Prunus persica genotypes with different flesh characteristics: changes in activity and protein and transcript levels.

    PubMed

    Gabotti, Damiano; Negrini, Noemi; Morgutti, Silvia; Nocito, Fabio F; Cocucci, Maurizio

    2015-07-01

    Development of fruit flesh texture quality traits may involve the metabolism of phenolic compounds. This study presents molecular and biochemical results on the possible role played by cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD; EC 1.1.1.195) during ripening [S3, S4 I (pre-climacteric) and S4 III (climacteric) stages] of peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] fruit with different flesh firmness [non-melting flesh (NMF) 'Oro A'/melting flesh (MF) 'Springcrest' and 'Sanguinella'] and color (blood-flesh Sanguinella). A total of 24 putative full-length PRUPE_CAD genes were identified (in silico analysis) in the peach genome. The most abundant CAD isoforms, encoded by genes located on scaffolds 8 and 6, were probed by specifically developed anti-PRUPE_CAD sc8 and by anti-FaCAD (PRUPE_CAD sc6) polyclonal antibodies, respectively. PRUPE_CAD sc8 proteins (SDS-PAGE and native-PAGE/western blot) appeared responsible for the CAD activity (in vitro/in-gel assays) that increased with ripening (parallel to PRUPE_ACO1 transcripts accumulation and ethylene evolution) only in the mesocarp of Oro A and blood-flesh Sanguinella. Accumulation of PRUPE_CAD sc8 transcripts (semi-quantitative RT-PCR) occurred in all three cultivars, but in Oro A and Springcrest it was not always accompanied by that of the related proteins, suggesting possible post-transcriptional regulation. Flesh firmness, as well as levels of lignin, total phenolics and, where present (Sanguinella), anthocyanins, declined with ripening, suggesting that, at least in the studied peach cultivars, CAD activity is related to neither lignification nor differences in flesh firmness (NMF/MF). Further studies are necessary to clarify whether the high levels of CAD activity/expression in Sanguinella play a role in determining the characteristics of this blood-flesh fruit.

  8. Salivary lactate dehydrogenase and aminotransferases in diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Malicka, Barbara; Skoskiewicz-Malinowska, Katarzyna; Kaczmarek, Urszula

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a group of metabolic diseases resulting from impaired insulin secretion and/or action. DM is characterized by hyperglycemia that can lead to the dysfunction or damage of organs, including the salivary glands. The aim of this study was to compare the levels of salivary lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in diabetic patients. The study was approved by the Bioethics Committee of Wroclaw Medical University (Poland). The study comprised 90 adults of both sexes, aged 21 to 57 years. The patients were divided into 3 groups: type 1 diabetics (D1), type 2 diabetics (D2), and a healthy control group (C). Each group consisted of 30 age- and sex-matched subjects. Total protein (P, by Lowry method), LDH, AST, ALT (with Alpha Diagnostics kits), and salivary flow rate were measured in unstimulated mixed saliva. The level of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) was measured with DCA 2000 Reagent Kit. The obtained data were analyzed using the Mann–Whitney U test and the Spearman rank at a significance level of P < 0.05 with the use of STATISTICA 9.0 software. In comparison with C, D1 presented a significantly higher activity of LDH (P < 0.001), AST (P < 0.001), and ALT (P < 0.01), whereas D2 indicated higher levels of LDH (P < 0.001) and ALT (P < 0.05) compared with C. Comparing D1 to D2, approximately 3-fold higher activity of AST (P < 0.01) and approximately 4.5-fold higher activity of ALT (P < 0.01) was observed. Higher levels of salivary LDH, AST, and ALT in D1 compared with D2 and C confirm that salivary glands of D1 might be attributed to autoimmunological damage associated with the pathomechanism of DM. PMID:27893660

  9. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    MedlinePlus

    ... Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 42. Read More Enzyme Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency Hemoglobin Review Date 2/11/2016 Updated by: ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics G6PD Deficiency Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  10. Repeated Supramaximal Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress: Effect of β-Alanine Plus Creatine Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Belviranli, Muaz; Okudan, Nilsel; Revan, Serkan; Balci, Serdar; Gokbel, Hakki

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carnosine is a dipeptide formed from the β-alanine and hi