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Sample records for alanine dipeptide model

  1. Free energy surfaces from an extended harmonic superposition approach and kinetics for alanine dipeptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strodel, Birgit; Wales, David J.

    2008-12-01

    Approximate free energy surfaces and transition rates are presented for alanine dipeptide for a variety of force fields and implicit solvent models. Our calculations are based upon local minima, transition states and pathways characterised for each potential energy surface using geometry optimisation. The superposition approach employing only local minima and harmonic densities of states provides a representation of low-lying regions of the free energy surfaces. However, including contributions from the transition states of the potential energy surface and selected points obtained from displacements along the corresponding reaction vectors produces surfaces that compare quite well with results from replica exchange molecular dynamics. Characterising the local minima, transition states, normal modes, pathways, rate constants and free energy surfaces for each force field within this framework typically requires between one and five minutes cpu time on a single processor.

  2. Conformational Changes of the Alanine Dipeptide in Water-Ethanol Binary Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Glauco G; Cordeiro, João M M; Martín, M Elena; Aguilar, Manuel A

    2016-04-12

    Experimental work developed in the last years has evidenced the capacity of alcohols and polyalcohols to modify the energy landscape of peptides and proteins. However, the mechanism underlying this effect is not clear. Taking as a model system the alanine dipeptide (AD) we perform a QM/MM study in water, ethanol, and a 40-60% in volume water-ethanol mixture. The AD molecule was described at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level. In polar solution, only αR and PPII conformers contribute in an appreciable way to the conformational equilibrium. The final in solution αR-PPII free energy difference is determined from the interplay between the internal energy of the dipeptide and the solute-solvent interaction free energy. Internal energy favors the formation of PPII, whereas, on the contrary, solute-solvent interaction is favorable to αR, so any factor that decreases the solute-solvent interaction free energy will increase the PPII population. The addition of ethanol increases the stability of the PPII conformer. Our results point to the presence of preferential solvation in this system, the composition of the first solvation shell in the binary mixture being dominated by water molecules. Remarkably, this fact does not affect the differential conformational stability that is controlled by long-range interactions. From the analysis of solvent density maps it is concluded that, in the water-ethanol mixture, ethanol molecules are more likely found around the alanine side chain and the carbonyl group, but while in PPII ethanol molecules interact mainly with the carbonyl group of the N-terminal end, in C5 the interaction is with the carbonyl group of the C-terminal end. In αR, ethanol interacts with both carbonyl groups. PMID:26910305

  3. Instantaneous normal mode analysis of the vibrational relaxation of the amide I mode of alanine dipeptide in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farag, Marwa H.; Zúñiga, José; Requena, Alberto; Bastida, Adolfo

    2013-05-01

    Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations coupled to instantaneous normal modes (INMs) analysis are used to study the vibrational relaxation of the acetyl and amino-end amide I modes of the alanine dipeptide (AlaD) molecule dissolved in water (D2O). The INMs are assigned in terms of the equilibrium normal modes using the Effective Atomic Min-Cost algorithm as adapted to make use of the outputs of standard MD packages, a method which is well suited for the description of flexible molecules. The relaxation energy curves of both amide I modes show multiexponential decays, in good agreement with the experimental findings. It is found that ˜85%-90% of the energy relaxes through intramolecular vibrational redistribution. The main relaxation pathways are also identified. The rate at which energy is transferred into the solvent is similar for the acetyl-end and amino-end amide I modes. The conformational changes occurring during relaxation are investigated, showing that the populations of the alpha and beta region conformers are altered by energy transfer in such a way that it takes 15 ps for the equilibrium conformational populations to be recovered after the initial excitation of the AlaD molecule.

  4. ON THE FORMATION OF DIPEPTIDES IN INTERSTELLAR MODEL ICES

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, R. I.; Kim, Y. S.; Stockton, A. M.; Jensen, E. C.; Mathies, R. A.

    2013-03-10

    The hypothesis of an exogenous origin and delivery of biologically important molecules to early Earth presents an alternative route to their terrestrial in situ formation. Dipeptides like Gly-Gly detected in the Murchison meteorite are considered as key molecules in prebiotic chemistry because biofunctional dipeptides present the vital link in the evolutionary transition from prebiotic amino acids to early proteins. However, the processes that could lead to the exogenous abiotic synthesis of dipeptides are unknown. Here, we report the identification of two proteinogenic dipeptides-Gly-Gly and Leu-Ala-formed via electron-irradiation of interstellar model ices followed by annealing the irradiated samples to 300 K. Our results indicate that the radiation-induced, non-enzymatic formation of proteinogenic dipeptides in interstellar ice analogs is facile. Once synthesized and incorporated into the ''building material'' of solar systems, biomolecules at least as complex as dipeptides could have been delivered to habitable planets such as early Earth by meteorites and comets, thus seeding the beginning of life as we know it.

  5. XPS investigation on the structure of two dipeptides studied as models of self-assembling oligopeptides: comparison between experiments and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battocchio, C.; Iucci, G.; Dettin, M.; Monti, S.; Carravetta, V.; Polzonetti, G.

    2008-03-01

    The adsorption on TiO2 surface of two dipeptides AE (L-alanine-L-glutamic acid) and AK (L-alanine-L-lysine), that are 'building blocks' of the more complex self-complementary amphiphilic oligopeptides and are therefore a good model in the interpretation of the complex peptide spectra, has been investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The chemical structure and composition of thin films of both dipeptides on TiO2 were investigated by XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy). Theoretical ab-initio calculations (ΔSCF) were also performed to simulate the spectra allowing a direct comparison between experiment and theory.

  6. Molecular mechanics studies on dipeptide models of diphenylalanine and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Rao, S N; Chan, M F; Profeta, S S; Balaji, V N

    1997-02-01

    As a part of our studies on the structure and conformations of peptidomimetics, we present conformational energy calculations on model peptides with (a) diphenyl alanine and its tricyclic derivatives and (b) triphenyl alanine residues using molecular mechanics and conformational analysis methods. The energies are calculated as a function of the backbone torsions (phi and psi), and the results are presented in terms of isoenergy contours in the phi-psi space. The low-energy models adopt conformations characteristic of a variety of regular structures such as the alpha-helix, gamma-turn and polyproline-II-type three- and four-fold helices. The conformational preferences in the model peptides with diphenyl alanine and its tricyclic derivatives are sensitive to the side-chain torsion, with some similarities to the corresponding preferences of L-Ala dipeptide. The energy profile of the model peptide with triphenyl alanine is similar to that of the model peptide with Tle (tert-leucine) residue. The results of our studies have implications in the design of conformationally constrained peptidomimetics with structures in the beta- and alpha-helical regions. PMID:9147310

  7. Determination of the anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective effects of l-glutamine and l-alanine, or dipeptide, supplementation in rats submitted to resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Raizel, Raquel; Leite, Jaqueline Santos Moreira; Hypólito, Thaís Menezes; Coqueiro, Audrey Yule; Newsholme, Philip; Cruzat, Vinicius Fernandes; Tirapegui, Julio

    2016-08-01

    We evaluated the effects of chronic oral supplementation with l-glutamine and l-alanine in their free form or as the dipeptide l-alanyl-l-glutamine (DIP) on muscle damage, inflammation and cytoprotection, in rats submitted to progressive resistance exercise (RE). Wistar rats (n 8/group) were submitted to 8-week RE, which consisted of climbing a ladder with progressive loads. In the final 21 d before euthanasia, supplements were delivered in a 4 % solution in drinking water. Glutamine, creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), TNF-α, specific IL (IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-10) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels were evaluated in plasma. The concentrations of glutamine, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10, as well as NF-κB activation, were determined in extensor digitorum longus (EDL) skeletal muscle. HSP70 level was assayed in EDL and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). RE reduced glutamine concentration in plasma and EDL (P<0·05 v. sedentary group). However, l-glutamine supplements (l-alanine plus l-glutamine (GLN+ALA) and DIP groups) restored glutamine levels in plasma (by 40 and 58 %, respectively) and muscle (by 93 and 105 %, respectively). GLN+ALA and DIP groups also exhibited increased level of HSP70 in EDL and PBMC, consistent with the reduction of NF-κB p65 activation and cytokines in EDL. Muscle protection was also indicated by attenuation in plasma levels of CK, LDH, TNF-α and IL-1β, as well as an increase in IL-6, IL-10 and MCP-1. Our study demonstrates that chronic oral l-glutamine treatment (given with l-alanine or as dipeptide) following progressive RE induces cyprotective effects mediated by HSP70-associated responses to muscle damage and inflammation. PMID:27215379

  8. Solid state stability studies of model dipeptides: aspartame and aspartylphenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Leung, S S; Grant, D J

    1997-01-01

    Some solid-state pharmaceutical properties and the solid-state thermal stability of the model dipeptides aspartame (APM) and aspartylphenylalanine (AP), have been investigated. Studies by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), high-performance liquid chromatography, powder X-ray diffraction, and optical microscopy have shown that the dipeptides undergo solid state intramolecular aminolysis of the type, solid --> solid + gas. This reaction was observed for APM at 167-180 degrees C with the liberation of methanol and for AP at 186-202 degrees C with the liberation of water. The exclusive solid product of the degradation reaction of both dipeptides is the cyclic compound 3-(carboxymethyl)-6-benzyl-2,5-dioxopiperazine. The rates of the degradation reactions were monitored by isothermal TGA and by temperature-ramp DSC and were found to follow kinetics based on nucleation control with activation energies of about 266 kJ mol(-1) for APM and 234 kJ mol(-1) for AP. PMID:9002461

  9. Experimental studies of peptide bonds: Identification of the C7eq conformation of the alanine dipeptide analog N-acetyl-alanine N'-methylamide from torsion-rotation interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrich, R. J.; Plusquellic, D. F.; Suenram, R. D.; Fraser, G. T.; Walker, A. R. Hight; Tubergen, M. J.

    2003-01-01

    Rotational spectra of the biomimetic molecule, alanine dipeptide and the double 15N(15N2) isotopomer have been observed using a pulsed-molecular-beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. The spectra reveal tunneling splittings from the torsional mode structure of two of its three methyl rotors. The torsional states assigned include one AA-state and two AE-states (i.e., AE and EA) for each isotopomer. The AA-states are well-fit to A-reduction asymmetricrotor Hamiltonians. The "infinite-barrier-limit" rotational constants of the 14N2 isotopomer are A=1710.97(8) MHz, B=991.89(9) MHz, and C=716.12(6) MHz. The AE-states are analyzed independently using "high-barrier" torsion-rotation Hamiltonians, yielding observedminus-calculated standard deviations of <400 kHz. The fits improve substantially (>100-fold for the 15N2 isotopomer) when analyzed in a ρ-axis frame where ρb=ρc=0. The best-fit torsion-rotation parameters provide accurate V3 barriers and C3 rotor axis angles for both methyl groups. The observed angles are shown to uniquely correlate with those calculated for the acetyl and amide methyl groups in the C7eq conformational form. The V3 barriers of the amide and acetyl methyl groups are 84.0(3) cm-1 and 98.4(2) cm-1 for the 14N2 and 84.1(1) cm-1 and 98.65(8) cm-1 for the 15N2 isotopomers, respectively. These results are in good agreement with prior geometry optimizations and with current V3 barrier calculations which predict the C7eq conformation as the lowest energy form in the gas phase. Under certain conditions, the spectrum is dominated by transitions from a thermal decomposition product formed by dehydration of alanine dipeptide. This molecule is tentatively identified as 3,5-dihydro-2,3,5-trimethyl-(9CI) 4H imidazole-4-one (CAS registry #32023-93-1).

  10. Mass spectrometry study of the sublimation of aliphatic dipeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badelin, V. G.; Tyunina, E. Yu.; Krasnov, A. V.; Tyunina, V. V.; Giricheva, N. I.; Girichev, A. V.

    2012-03-01

    The sublimation of glycyl-L-α-alanine (Gly-Ala), L-α-alanyl-L-α-alanine (Ala-Ala), and DL-α-alanyl-DL-α-valine (Ala-Val) aliphatic dipeptides is studied by electron ionization mass spectrometry in combination with Knudsen effusion. The temperature range in which substances sublime as monomer molecular forms is determined. Enthalpies of sublimation Δs H°( T) are determined for Gly-Ala, Ala-Ala, and Ala-Val. It is shown that the enthalpy of sublimation of dipeptides increases with an increase in the side hydrocarbon radical. The unknown Δs H°(298) values for 17 amino acids and nine dipeptides are estimated using the proposed "structure-property" correlation model, in which the geometry and electron characteristics of molecules are used as structural descriptors.

  11. Extended solvent-contact model for protein solvation: test cases for dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hwanho; Kang, Hongsuk; Park, Hwangseo

    2013-05-01

    Solvation effects are critically important in the structural stabilization and functional optimization of proteins. Here, we propose a new solvation free energy function for proteins, and test its applicability in predicting the solvation free energies of dipeptides. The present solvation model involves the improvement of the previous solvent-contact model assuming that the molecular solvation free energy could be given by the sum over the individual atomic contributions. In addition to the existing solvent-contact term, the modified solvation free energy function includes the self-solvation term that reflects the effects of intramolecular interactions in the solute molecule on solute-solvent interactions. Four kinds of atomic parameters should be determined in this solvation model: atomic fragmental volume, maximum atomic occupancy, atomic solvation, and atomic self-solvation parameters. All of these parameters for 16 atom types are optimized with a standard genetic algorithm in such a way to minimize the difference between the solvation free energies of dipeptides obtained from high-level quantum chemical calculations and those predicted by the solvation free energy function. The solvation free energies of dipeptides estimated from the new solvation model are in good agreement with the quantum chemical results. Therefore, the optimized solvation free energy function is expected to be useful for examining the structural and energetic features of proteins in aqueous solution. PMID:23548585

  12. An integrated approach to the ligand binding specificity of Neisseria meningitidis M1 alanine aminopeptidase by fluorogenic substrate profiling, inhibitory studies and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Węglarz-Tomczak, Ewelina; Poręba, Marcin; Byzia, Anna; Berlicki, Łukasz; Nocek, Bogusław; Mulligan, Rory; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Drąg, Marcin; Mucha, Artur

    2013-02-01

    Neisseria meningitides is a gram-negative diplococcus bacterium and is the main causative agent of meningitis and other meningococcal diseases. Alanine aminopeptidase from N. meningitides (NmAPN) belongs to the family of metallo-exopeptidase enzymes, which catalyze the removal of amino acids from the N-terminus of peptides and proteins, and are found among all the kingdoms of life. NmAPN is suggested to be mostly responsible for proteolysis and nutrition delivery, similar to the orthologs from other bacteria. To explore the possibility of NmAPN being a potential drug target for inhibition and development of novel therapeutic agents, the specificity of the S1 and S1' binding sites was explored using an integrated approach. Initially, an extensive library consisting of almost 100 fluorogenic substrates derived from both natural and unnatural amino acids, were used to obtain a detailed substrate fingerprint of the S1 pocket of NmAPN. A broad substrate tolerance of NmAPN was revealed, with bulky basic and hydrophobic ligands being the most favored substrates. Additionally, the potency of a set of organophosphorus inhibitors of neutral aminopeptidases, amino acid and dipeptide analogs was determined. Inhibition constants in the nanomolar range, determined for phosphinic dipeptides, proves the positive increase in inhibition impact of the P1' ligand elongation. The results were further verified via molecular modeling and docking of canonical aminopeptidase phosphinic dipeptide inhibitors in the NmAPN active site. These studies present comprehensive characterization of interactions responsible for specific ligand binding. This knowledge provides invaluable insight into understanding of the enzyme and development of novel NmAPN inhibitors. PMID:23131591

  13. Muramyl dipeptide

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, VK

    2014-01-01

    The robust expression of microbial pattern recognition receptors such as TLR4 and Nod2 in intestinal stem cells reflects an active communication dynamic between the host and the gut microbiota. A new study reveals that muramyl dipeptide, the bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan motif, activates Nod2 within crypt base columnar Lgr5-positive stem cells and promotes their survival. Apart from the immediate relevance to the growth of organoids for in vitro experiments, the study raises new questions about the molecular mechanisms whereby gut microbes influence intestinal physiology. PMID:25068259

  14. Formation of Peptide Bound Pyrraline in the Maillard Model Systems with Different Lys-Containing Dipeptides and Tripeptides.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhili; Li, Lin; Qi, Haiping; Wan, Liting; Cai, Panfu; Xu, Zhenbo; Li, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Peptide-bound advanced glycation end-products (peptide-bound AGEs) can be formed when peptides are heated with reducing saccharides. Pyrraline is the one of most commonly studied AGEs in foods, but the relative importance of the precursor peptide structure is uncertain. In the present study, model systems were prepared by heating peptides with glucose from 60 °C to 220 °C for up to 65 min, and the amounts of peptide-bound pyrraline formed were monitored to evaluate the effect of the neighboring amino acids on the peptide-bound pyrraline formation. The physico-chemical properties were introduced to explore the quantitative structure-reactivity relationships between physicochemical properties and peptide bound formation. 3-DG content in dipeptide-glucose model system was higher than that in the corresponding tripeptide-glucose model systems. Dipeptides produced higher amounts of peptide-bound pyrraline than the corresponding tripeptides. The peptide-bound pyrraline and 3-DG production were influenced by the physico-chemical properties of the side chain of amino acids adjacent to Lys in the following order: Lys-Leu/glucose > Lys-Ile/glucose > Lys-Val/ glucose > Lys-Thr/glucose > Lys-Ser/glucose > Lys-Ala/ glucose > Lys-Gly/glucose; Lys-Leu-Gly/glucose > Lys-Ile-Gly/glucose > Lys-Val-Gly/glucose > Lys-Thr-Gly/glucose > Lys-Ser-Gly/glucose > Lys-Ala-Gly/glucose > Lys-Gly-Gly/glucose. For the side chain of amino acids adjacent to Lys in dipeptides, residue volume, polarizability, molecular volume and localized electrical effect were positively related to the yield of peptide bound pyrraline, while hydrophobicity and pKb were negatively related to the yield of peptide bound pyrraline. In terms of side chain of amino acid adjacent to Lys in tripeptides, a similar result was observed, except hydrophobicity was positively related to the yield of peptide bound pyrraline. PMID:27070556

  15. Topological and spectroscopic study of three-electron bonded compounds as models of radical cations of methionine-containing dipeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourré, Isabelle; Bergès, Jacqueline; Braïda, Benoît; Houée-Levin, Chantal

    2008-12-01

    Small models of radical cations of methionine-containing dipeptides, which are stabilized by formation of two-centre three-electron (2c-3e) S∴X bonds (X = S, N and O), were investigated at the BH&HLYP/6-31G(d) level and by means of topological tools. The SX distance is not so important for stability but the relative orientation of both fragments is. The AIM and ELF topological analyses shows that the nature of the S∴X bond varies with X, from purely 2c-3e in S∴S + entities to electrostatic in S∴O + ones. The σSX → σSX∗ wavelengths, obtained at the TD-BH&HLYP/cc-pVTZ level, strongly depend on X and on conformation.

  16. Dipeptide absorption in man

    PubMed Central

    Hellier, M. D.; Holdsworth, C. D.; McColl, I.; Perrett, D.

    1972-01-01

    A quantitative perfusion method has been used to study intestinal absorption of two dipeptides—glycyl-glycine and glycyl-l-alanine—in normal subjects. In each case, the constituent amino acids were absorbed faster when presented as dipeptides than as free amino acids, suggesting intact dipeptide transport. During absorption constituent amino acids were measured within the lumen and it is suggested that these represent amino acids which have diffused back to the lumen after absorption as dipeptide. Portal blood analyses during absorption of a third dipeptide, glycyl-l-lysine, have shown that this dipeptide, known to be transported intact from the intestinal lumen, is hydrolysed to its constitutent amino acids before it reaches portal venous blood. PMID:4652039

  17. Glutamyl cysteine dipeptide suppresses ferritin expression and alleviates liver injury in iron-overload rat model.

    PubMed

    Salama, Samir A; Al-Harbi, Mohammad S; Abdel-Bakky, Mohamed S; Omar, Hany A

    2015-08-01

    Despite its biological importance, iron is a pro-oxidant element and its accumulation results in tissue injury. Iron overload diseases such as thalassemia and hereditary hemochromatosis are commonly associated with liver tissue injury. Glutamyl cysteine (GC) is a dipeptide with antioxidant properties owing to its cysteine residue. The aim of the current work was to investigate the hepatoprotective effect of GC against iron overload-induced liver injury. Rats were distributed into five groups; normal control, GC control, iron-treated (150 mg/kg ip injection) and both iron and GC-treated (total iron: 150 mg/kg ip and GC: 50 mg or 100 mg/kg/day ip for 30 days). Our results showed that treatment with GC at the two-dose levels attenuated iron-induced liver tissue injury as evidenced by significant reduction in serum activity of liver enzymes ALT and AST, amelioration of iron-induced histopathological alteration, suppression of iron-induced oxidative stress as demonstrated by significant reduction of malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl content beside elevation of total antioxidant capacity, reduced glutathione and the antioxidant enzymes GPx and SOD in liver tissue. In addition, GC significantly reduced levels of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β and activity of the apoptotic marker caspase-3 in liver tissues. To our surprise, GC reduced liver iron content and ferritin expression, denoting the possible iron chelation competency. Collectively our results highlight evidence for the hepatoprotective effect of GC against iron overload-induced liver injury that is potentially mediated through suppression of oxidative tissue injury, attenuation of inflammatory response, amelioration of hepatocellular apoptosis and possibly through iron chelation. PMID:26093100

  18. Morphological Versatility in the Self-Assembly of Val-Ala and Ala-Val Dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, Hakan; Babur, Esra; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Candas, Elif; Gordesel, Merve; Dede, Yavuz; Oren, Ersin Emre; Demirel, Gokcen Birlik; Ozturk, Mustafa Kemal; Yavuz, Mustafa Selman; Demirel, Gokhan

    2015-07-01

    Since the discovery of dipeptide self-assembly, diphenylalanine (Phe-Phe)-based dipeptides have been widely investigated in a variety of fields. Although various supramolecular Phe-Phe-based structures including tubes, vesicles, fibrils, sheets, necklaces, flakes, ribbons, and wires have been demonstrated by manipulating the external physical or chemical conditions applied, studies of the morphological diversity of dipeptides other than Phe-Phe are still required to understand both how these small molecules respond to external conditions such as the type of solvent and how the peptide sequence affects self-assembly and the corresponding molecular structures. In this work, we investigated the self-assembly of valine-alanine (Val-Ala) and alanine-valine (Ala-Val) dipeptides by varying the solvent medium. It was observed that Val-Ala dipeptide molecules may generate unique self-assembly-based morphologies in response to the solvent medium used. Interestingly, when Ala-Val dipeptides were utilized as a peptide source instead of Val-Ala, we observed distinct differences in the final dipeptide structures. We believe that such manipulation may not only provide us with a better understanding of the fundamentals of the dipeptide self-assembly process but also may enable us to generate novel peptide-based materials for various applications. PMID:26086903

  19. Chiral HPLC Separation and Modeling of Four Stereomers of DL-Leucine-DL-Tryptophan Dipeptide on Amylose Chiral Column.

    PubMed

    Alajmi, Mohammed F; Hussain, Afzal; Suhail, Mohd; Mukhtar, Sofi Danish; Sahoo, Dibya Ranjan; Asnin, Leonid; Ali, Imran

    2016-09-01

    Chiral high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation and modeling of four stereomers of DL-leucine-tryptophan DL-dipeptide on AmyCoat-RP column are described. The mobile phase applied was ammonium acetate (10 mM)-methanol-acetonitrile (50:5:45, v/v). The flow rate of the mobile phases was 0.8 mL/min with UV detection at 230 nm. The values of retention factors for LL-, DD-, DL-, and LD- stereomers were 2.25, 3.60, 5.00, and 6.50, respectively. The values of separation and resolution factors were 1.60, 1.39, and 1.30 and 7.76, 8.05, and 7.19. The limits of detection and quantitation were ranging from 1.0-2.3 and 5.6-14.0 μg/mL. The simulation studies established the elution orders and the mechanism of chiral recognition. It was seen that π-π connections and hydrogen bondings were the main forces for enantiomeric resolution. The reported chiral HPLC method may be applied for the enantiomeric separation of DL-leucine-DL-tryptophan in unknown matrices. Chirality 28:642-648, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27474783

  20. Novel dipeptide nanoparticles for effective curcumin delivery

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Shadab; Panda, Jiban J; Chauhan, Virander S

    2012-01-01

    Background: Curcumin, the principal curcuminoid of the popular Indian spice turmeric, has a wide spectrum of pharmaceutical properties such as antitumor, antioxidant, antiamyloid, and anti-inflammatory activity. However, poor aqueous solubility and low bioavailability of curcumin is a major challenge in its development as a useful drug. To enhance the aqueous solubility and bioavailability of curcumin, attempts have been made to encapsulate it in liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles (NPs), lipid-based NPs, biodegradable microspheres, cyclodextrin, and hydrogels. Methods: In this work, we attempted to entrap curcumin in novel self-assembled dipeptide NPs containing a nonprotein amino acid, α, β-dehydrophenylalanine, and investigated the biological activity of dipeptide-curcumin NPs in cancer models both in vitro and in vivo. Results: Of the several dehydrodipeptides tested, methionine-dehydrophenylalanine was the most suitable one for loading and release of curcumin. Loading of curcumin in the dipeptide NPs increased its solubility, improved cellular availability, enhanced its toxicity towards different cancerous cell lines, and enhanced curcumin’s efficacy towards inhibiting tumor growth in Balb/c mice bearing a B6F10 melanoma tumor. Conclusion: These novel, highly biocompatible, and easy to construct dipeptide NPs with a capacity to load and release curcumin in a sustained manner significantly improved curcumin’s cellular uptake without altering its anticancer or other therapeutic properties. Curcumin-dipeptide NPs also showed improved in vitro and in vivo chemotherapeutic efficacy compared to curcumin alone. Such dipeptide-NPs may also improve the delivery of other potent hydrophobic drug molecules that show poor cellular uptake, bioavailability, and efficacy. PMID:22915849

  1. Distribution of dipeptide repeat proteins in cellular models and C9orf72 mutation cases suggests link to transcriptional silencing.

    PubMed

    Schludi, Martin H; May, Stephanie; Grässer, Friedrich A; Rentzsch, Kristin; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Küpper, Clemens; Klopstock, Thomas; Arzberger, Thomas; Edbauer, Dieter

    2015-10-01

    A massive expansion of a GGGGCC repeat upstream of the C9orf72 coding region is the most common known cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. Despite its intronic localization and lack of a canonical start codon, both strands are translated into aggregating dipeptide repeat (DPR) proteins: poly-GA, poly-GP, poly-GR, poly-PR and poly-PA. To address conflicting findings on the predominant toxicity of the different DPR species in model systems, we compared the expression pattern of the DPR proteins in rat primary neurons and postmortem brain and spinal cord of C9orf72 mutation patients. Only poly-GA overexpression closely mimicked the p62-positive neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions commonly observed for all DPR proteins in patients. In contrast, overexpressed poly-GR and poly-PR formed nucleolar p62-negative inclusions. In patients, most of the less common neuronal intranuclear DPR inclusions were para-nucleolar and p62 positive. Neuronal nucleoli in C9orf72 cases showed normal size and morphology regardless of the presence of poly-GR and poly-PR inclusions arguing against widespread nucleolar stress, reported in cellular models. Colocalization of para-nucleolar DPR inclusions with heterochromatin and a marker of transcriptional repression (H3K9me2) indicates a link to gene transcription. In contrast, we detected numerous intranuclear DPR inclusions not associated with nucleolar structures in ependymal and subependymal cells. In patients, neuronal inclusions of poly-GR, poly-GP and the poly-GA interacting protein Unc119 were less abundant than poly-GA inclusions, but showed similar regional and subcellular distribution. Regardless of neurodegeneration, all inclusions were most abundant in neocortex, hippocampus and thalamus, with few inclusions in brain stem and spinal cord. In the granular cell layer of the cerebellum, poly-GA and Unc119 inclusions were significantly more abundant in cases with FTLD than in cases with MND and FTLD/MND. Poly

  2. Discovery of a Dipeptide Epimerase Enzymatic Function Guided by Homology Modeling and Virtual Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyanaraman, C.; Imker, H; Fedorov, A; Fedorov, E; Glasner, M; Babbitt, P; Almo, S; Gerlt, J; Jacobson, M

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a computational approach to aid the assignment of enzymatic function for uncharacterized proteins that uses homology modeling to predict the structure of the binding site and in silico docking to identify potential substrates. We apply this method to proteins in the functionally diverse enolase superfamily that are homologous to the characterized L-Ala-D/L-Glu epimerase from Bacillus subtilis. In particular, a protein from Thermotoga martima was predicted to have different substrate specificity, which suggests that it has a different, but as yet unknown, biological function. This prediction was experimentally confirmed, resulting in the assignment of epimerase activity for L-Ala-D/L-Phe, L-Ala-D/L-Tyr, and L-Ala-D/L-His, whereas the enzyme is annotated incorrectly in GenBank as muconate cycloisomerase. Subsequently, crystal structures of the enzyme were determined in complex with three substrates, showing close agreement with the computational models and revealing the structural basis for the observed substrate selectivity.

  3. [Effect of the novel nootropic and neuroprotective dipeptide noopept on the streptozotocin-induced model of sporadic Alzheimer disease in rats].

    PubMed

    Ostrovskaia, R U; Tsaplina, A P; Vakhitova, Iu V; Salimgareeva, M Kh; Iamidanov, R S

    2010-01-01

    Streptozotocin-intracerebroventricularly treated rats are proposed as an experimental model of sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD). Diabetogenic toxin streptozotocin (STZ) administered in both cerebral ventricles in a dose of 3 mg/kg decreases the expression of NGF and BDNF mainly in the hippocampus and increases the content of malonic dialdehyde (MDA)--a product of lipid peroxidation--in the brain tissues. These metabolic changes are accompanied by a pronounced cognitive deficiency, which is manifested by long-term memory deterioration in the passive avoidance test. These manifestations of pathology are not accompanied by hyperglycemia in the case of intraventricular STZ administration, in contrast to the systemic (in particular, intraperitoneal) route of introduction that causes a pronounced increase in the blood glucose level. These results are consistent with the existing notions that (i) STZ administered intraventricularly provokes a complex of changes imitating the sporadic AD and (ii) this disease can be considered as a manifestation of type-III diabetes. The new original cognition enhancing and neuroprotective dipeptide noopept decreases the aforementioned metabolic changes and the accompanying long-term deterioration of the memory. Previously, this systemically active dipeptide was shown to be capable of increasing expression of NGF and BDNF in the hippocampus, stimulating the antibody production to beta-amyloid, inhibiting the lipid peroxidation, activating the endogenous antioxidant systems, and decreasing the rate of glutamate release (cholinopositive effect). Taken together, these data indicate that noopept can be considered as a multipotent substance acting upon several important pathogenic chainsof the sporadic AD. PMID:20184279

  4. Inducible l-Alanine Exporter Encoded by the Novel Gene ygaW (alaE) in Escherichia coli ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Hatsuhiro; Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Tobe, Ryuta; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Katsumata, Ryoichi

    2011-01-01

    We previously isolated a mutant hypersensitive to l-alanyl-l-alanine from a non-l-alanine-metabolizing Escherichia coli strain and found that it lacked an inducible l-alanine export system. Consequently, this mutant showed a significant accumulation of intracellular l-alanine and a reduction in the l-alanine export rate compared to the parent strain. When the mutant was used as a host to clone a gene(s) that complements the dipeptide-hypersensitive phenotype, two uncharacterized genes, ygaW and ytfF, and two characterized genes, yddG and yeaS, were identified. Overexpression of each gene in the mutant resulted in a decrease in the intracellular l-alanine level and enhancement of the l-alanine export rate in the presence of the dipeptide, suggesting that their products function as exporters of l-alanine. Since ygaW exhibited the most striking impact on both the intra- and the extracellular l-alanine levels among the four genes identified, we disrupted the ygaW gene in the non-l-alanine-metabolizing strain. The resulting isogenic mutant showed the same intra- and extracellular l-alanine levels as observed in the dipeptide-hypersensitive mutant obtained by chemical mutagenesis. When each gene was overexpressed in the wild-type strain, which does not intrinsically excrete alanine, only the ygaW gene conferred on the cells the ability to excrete alanine. In addition, expression of the ygaW gene was induced in the presence of the dipeptide. On the basis of these results, we concluded that YgaW is likely to be the physiologically most relevant exporter for l-alanine in E. coli and proposed that the gene be redesignated alaE for alanine export. PMID:21531828

  5. Hydrolysis of protein and model dipeptide substrated by attached and nonattached marine Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIMB 2021

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, P.C.; Fletcher, M. )

    1991-08-01

    Rates of substrate hydrolysis by nonattached bacteria and by bacteria attached to particles derived from marine diatom frustules were estimated by using two substrates, a dipeptide analog and a protein. Adsorption of the two substrates onto the particles was also evaluated. Methyl-coumarinyl-amide-leucine (MCA-leucine) was used to estimate hydrolysis of dipeptides by measuring an increase in fluorescence as MCA-leucine was hydrolyzed to leucine and the fluorochrome methylcoumarin. To examine hydrolysis of a larger molecule, was prepared a radiolabeled protein by {sup 14}C-methylation of bovine serum albumin. The rate of protein hydrolysis in samples of particle-attached or nonattached bacteria was estimated by precipitating all nonhydrolyzed protein with cold trichloroacetic acid and then determining the trichloroacetic acid-soluble radiolabeled material, which represented methyl-{sup 14}C-peptides and -amino acids. About 25% of the MCA-leucine adsorbed to the particles. MCA-leucine was hydrolyzed faster by nonattached than attached bacteria, which was probably related to its tendency to remain dissolved in the liquid phase. In contrast, almost 100% of the labeled protein adsorbed to the particles. Accordingly, protein was much less available to nonattached bacteria but was rapidly hydrolyzed by attached bacteria.

  6. Addition of amino acids and dipeptides to fullerene C{sub 60} giving rise to monoadducts

    SciTech Connect

    Romanova, V.S.; Tsyryapkin, V.A.; Vol`pin, M.E.

    1994-12-01

    The authors have developed a general method for the direct addition of amino acids and dipeptides of various structures to fullerene C{sub 60}. In all cases the addition involves the amino group. The reaction proceeds when the solutions of fullerene and an amino acid (or dipeptide) are mixed at 50-100 {degrees}C. The fullerene derivatives of the following amino acids and dipeptides have been obtained: glycine, p-aminobenzoic acid, {omega}-aminocaproic acid, L-proline, L-alanine, L-alanyl-Lalanine, D,L-alanyl-D,L-alanine, glycyl-L-valine. The adduct of methyl L-ananinate with C{sub 60} was also prepared.

  7. Quaternary α,α-2-oxoazepane α-amino acids: synthesis from ornithine-derived β-lactams and incorporation into model dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Villanueva, Diego; Bonache, M Ángeles; Infantes, Lourdes; García-López, M Teresa; Martín-Martínez, Mercedes; González-Muñiz, Rosario

    2011-08-19

    To explore further the chemistry of amino acid-derived β-lactams, their conversion to α,α-heterocyclic quaternary amino acid derivatives is investigated. The latter derivatives, containing 2-oxoazepane as the α,α-substituent, are synthesized by a simple Pd-C-catalyzed hydrogenolysis of Orn(Z)-derived 2-azetidinones. The rearrangement from four- to seven-membered lactam ring is driven by the key intramolecular opening of the 1-Boc-β-lactam, initiated by 7-exotrig ring closure from the NH(2) of the Orn side chain. The synthetic route is applied to the stereoselective preparation of enantiomerically pure 4-amino-3-methyl-2-oxoazepane-4-carboxylate derivatives, for which the structure and configuration is confirmed by X-ray diffraction. Molecular modeling and NMR experiments indicate that these quaternary amino acids are able to drive the adoption of β-turn secondary structures when incorporated in model dipeptide derivatives. PMID:21718065

  8. Illicit Transport via Dipeptide Transporter Dpp is Irrelevant to the Efficacy of Negamycin in Mouse Thigh Models of Escherichia coli Infection.

    PubMed

    McKinney, David C; Bezdenejnih-Snyder, Natascha; Farrington, Krista; Guo, Jian; McLaughlin, Robert E; Ruvinsky, Anatoly M; Singh, Renu; Basarab, Gregory S; Narayan, Sridhar; Buurman, Ed T

    2015-05-01

    Negamycin is a hydrophilic antimicrobial translation inhibitor that crosses the lipophilic inner membrane of Escherichia coli via at least two transport routes to reach its intracellular target. In a minimal salts medium, negamycin's peptidic nature allows illicit entry via a high-affinity route by hijacking the Dpp dipeptide transporter. Transport via a second, low-affinity route is energetically driven by the membrane potential, seemingly without the direct involvement of a transport protein. In mouse thigh models of E. coli infection, no evidence for Dpp-mediated transport of negamycin was found. The implication is that for the design of new negamycin-based analogs, the physicochemical properties required for cell entry via the low-affinity route need to be retained to achieve clinical success in the treatment of infectious diseases. Furthermore, clinical resistance to such analogs due to mutations affecting their ribosomal target or transport is expected to be rare and similar to that of aminoglycosides. PMID:27622650

  9. The study on the interaction between seryl-histidine dipeptide and proteins by circular dichroism and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qing; Yin, Qiang; Zhao, Yufen

    2005-04-01

    The selective cleavage of proteins is very important in key biological processes. Chemical (nonenzymatic) reagents such as cyanogen bromide and transition metal complexes are used extensively with great defects. In this paper, the binding of seryl-histidine dipeptide (abbreviated as SH) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lysozyme were investigated by the circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) at 298K, molecular docking studies and quantum chemical calculations based on the previous results of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). From the studies of CD, it showed that SH interacted strongly with BSA and lysozyme. The change percentages of the secondary structures of BSA and lysozyme were calculated. The contents of the beta-sheets decreased remarkably. It indicated that the interactions between SH and proteins could break the hydrogen bonds of beta-sheets selectively. The docking studies between SH and BSA showed that the position of the oxygen atom of the hydroxyl group of SH (O(12)) was in favor of a nucleophilic attack on carbon atom of the amide bond of a beta-sheet (C(34)) because the distance between O(12) and C(34) was 3.37A. Natural charges, natural atomic hybrid percentages and square sums of HOMO coefficients calculated by the NBO and population analysis at HF/6-31G* supported the suggested mechanism. And so SH may be an interesting agent for the therapeutic use. PMID:15755667

  10. Domain Motions and Functionally-Key Residues of L-Alanine Dehydrogenase Revealed by an Elastic Network Model.

    PubMed

    Li, Xing-Yuan; Zhang, Jing-Chao; Zhu, Yan-Ying; Su, Ji-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis L-alanine dehydrogenase (L-MtAlaDH) plays an important role in catalyzing L-alanine to ammonia and pyruvate, which has been considered to be a potential target for tuberculosis treatment. In the present work, the functional domain motions encoded in the structure of L-MtAlaDH were investigated by using the Gaussian network model (GNM) and the anisotropy network model (ANM). The slowest modes for the open-apo and closed-holo structures of the enzyme show that the domain motions have a common hinge axis centered in residues Met133 and Met301. Accompanying the conformational transition, both the 1,4-dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-binding domain (NBD) and the substrate-binding domain (SBD) move in a highly coupled way. The first three slowest modes of ANM exhibit the open-closed, rotation and twist motions of L-MtAlaDH, respectively. The calculation of the fast modes reveals the residues responsible for the stability of the protein, and some of them are involved in the interaction with the ligand. Then, the functionally-important residues relevant to the binding of the ligand were identified by using a thermodynamic method. Our computational results are consistent with the experimental data, which will help us to understand the physical mechanism for the function of L-MtAlaDH. PMID:26690143

  11. Effect of β-alanine supplementation on high-intensity exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Harris, Roger C; Stellingwerff, Trent

    2013-01-01

    Carnosine is a dipeptide of β-alanine and L-histidine found in high concentrations in skeletal muscle. Combined with β-alanine, the pKa of the histidine imidazole ring is raised to ∼6.8, placing it within the muscle intracellular pH high-intensity exercise transit range. Combination with β-alanine renders the dipeptide inert to intracellular enzymic hydrolysis and blocks the histidinyl residue from participation in proteogenesis, thus making it an ideal, stable intracellular buffer. For vegetarians, synthesis is limited by β-alanine availability; for meat-eaters, hepatic synthesis is supplemented with β-alanine from the hydrolysis of dietary carnosine. Direct oral β-alanine supplementation will compensate for low meat and fish intake, significantly raising the muscle carnosine concentration. This is best achieved with a sustained-release formulation of β-alanine to avoid paresthesia symptoms and decreasing urinary spillover. In humans, increased levels of carnosine through β-alanine supplementation have been shown to increase exercise capacity and performance of several types, particularly where the high-intensity exercise range is 1-4 min. β-Alanine supplementation is used by athletes competing in high-intensity track and field cycling, rowing, swimming events and other competitions. PMID:23899755

  12. Acute β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine Toxicity in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Al-Sammak, Maitham Ahmed; Rogers, Douglas G; Hoagland, Kyle D

    2015-01-01

    The cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is considered to be an "excitotoxin," and its suggested mechanism of action is killing neurons. Long-term exposure to L-BMAA is believed to lead to neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease). Objectives of this study were to determine the presumptive median lethal dose (LD50), the Lowest-Observed-Adverse-Effect Level (LOAEL), and histopathologic lesions caused by the naturally occurring BMAA isomer, L-BMAA, in mice. Seventy NIH Swiss Outbred mice (35 male and 35 female) were used. Treatment group mice were injected intraperitoneally with 0.03, 0.3, 1, 2, and 3 mg/g body weight L-BMAA, respectively, and control mice were sham-injected. The presumptive LD50 of L-BMAA was 3 mg/g BW and the LOAEL was 2 mg/g BW. There were no histopathologic lesions in brain, liver, heart, kidney, lung, or spleen in any of the mice during the 14-day study. L-BMAA was detected in brains and livers in all of treated mice but not in control mice. Males injected with 0.03 mg/g BW, 0.3 mg/g BW, and 3.0 mg/g BW L-BMAA showed consistently higher concentrations (P < 0.01) in brain and liver samples as compared to females in those respective groups. PMID:26604922

  13. Probing micro-solvation in "numbers": the case of neutral dipeptides in water.

    PubMed

    Takis, Panteleimon G; Papavasileiou, Konstantinos D; Peristeras, Loukas D; Melissas, Vasilios S; Troganis, Anastassios N

    2013-05-21

    How many solvent molecules and in what way do they interact directly with biomolecules? This is one of the most challenging questions regarding a deep understanding of biomolecular functionalism and solvation. We herein present a novel NMR spectroscopic study, achieving for the first time the quantification of the directly interacting water molecules with several neutral dipeptides. Our proposed method is supported by both molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory calculations, advanced analysis of which allowed the identification of the direct interactions between solute-solvent molecules in the zwitterionic L-alanyl-L-alanine dipeptide-water system. Beyond the quantification of dipeptide-water molecule direct interactions, this NMR technique could be useful for the determination and elucidation of small to moderate bio-organic molecular groups' direct interactions with various polar solvent molecules, shedding light on the biomolecular micro-solvation processes and behaviour in various solvents. PMID:23579285

  14. Comparative activity of proline-containing dipeptide noopept and inhibitor of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 sitagliptin in a rat model of developing diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ostrovskaya, R U; Ozerova, I V; Gudascheva, T A; Kapitsa, I G; Ivanova, E A; Voronina, T A; Seredenin, S B

    2014-01-01

    Developing diabetes was modeled on adult male Wistar rats by repeated intraperitoneal injections of streptozotocin in a subdiabetogenic dose of 30 mg/kg for 3 days. Proline-containing dipeptide drug Noopept or a standard diabetic drug dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor sitagliptin was administered per os in a dose of 5 mg/kg before each injection of the toxin and then for 16 days after streptozotocin course. In active control group, spontaneously increase glucose level and reduced tolerance to glucose load (1000 mg/kg intraperitoneally) were observed on the next day after the third administration of toxin. Basal glucose level decreased by day 16, but glucose tolerance remained impaired. Noopept normalized the basal blood glucose level and tolerance to glucose load on the next day after administration of streptozotocin. The effect of Noopept persisted to the end of the experiment. At early terms of the experiment, sitagliptin was somewhat superior to Noopept by the effect on baseline glucose level, but was inferior by the influence on glucose tolerance.. By the end of the experiment, Noopept significantly (by 2 times) surpassed sitagliptin by its effect on glucose tolerance. PMID:24771372

  15. The Role of a Dipeptide Outer-Coordination Sphere on H2 -Production Catalysts: Influence on Catalytic Rates and Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Reback, Matthew L.; Ginovska-Pangovska, Bojana; Ho, Ming-Hsun; Jain, Avijita; Squier, Thomas C.; Raugei, Simone; Roberts, John A.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2013-02-04

    The outer-coordination sphere of enzymes acts to fine-tune the active site reactivity and control catalytic rates, suggesting that incorporation of analogous structural elements into molecular catalysts may be necessary to achieve rates comparable to those observed in enzyme systems at low overpotentials. In this work, we evaluate the effect of an amino acid and dipeptide outer-coordination sphere on [Ni(PPh2NPh-R2)2]2+ hydrogen production catalysts. A series of 12 new complexes containing non-natural amino acids or dipeptides were prepared to test the effects of positioning, size, polarity and aromaticity on catalytic activity. The non-natural amino acid was either 3-(meta- or para-aminophenyl)propionic acid terminated as an acid, an ester or an amide. Dipeptides consisted of one of the non-natural amino acids coupled to one of four amino acid esters: alanine, serine, phenylalanine or tyrosine. All of the catalysts are active for hydrogen production, with rates averaging ~1000 s-1, 40% faster than the unmodified catalyst. Structure and polarity of the aliphatic or aromatic side chains of the C-terminal peptide do not strongly influence rates. However, the presence of an amide bond increases rates, suggesting a role for the amide in assisting catalysis. Overpotentials were lower with substituents at the N-phenyl meta position. This is consistent with slower electron transfer in the less compact, para-substituted complexes, as shown in digital simulations of catalyst cyclic voltammograms and computational modeling of the complexes. Combining the current results with insights from previous results, we propose a mechanism for the role of the amino acid and dipeptide based outer-coordination sphere in molecular hydrogen production catalysts.

  16. Synthesis and Conformational Analysis of Bicyclic Extended Dipeptide Surrogates

    PubMed Central

    Ranatunga, Sujeewa; Liyanage, Wathsala; Del Valle, Juan R.

    2010-01-01

    Regio- and diastereoselective reactions of a homoproline enolate enable the synthesis of novel extended dipeptide surrogates. Bicyclic carbamate 9 and fused β-lactam scaffold 11 were prepared from L-pyroglutamic acid via substrate-controlled electrophilic azidation. Synthesis of orthogonally-protected hexahydropyrrolizine, hexahydropyrrolizinone, and hexahydropyrroloazepinone dipeptide surrogates relied on allylation of proline derivative 5, followed by Curtius rearrangement to introduce the N-terminal carbamate group. A total of six azabicycloalkane derivatives were evaluated for conformational mimicry of extended dipeptides by a combination of x-ray diffraction and molecular modeling. Analysis of putative backbone dihedral angles and N- to C-terminal dipeptide distances indicate that compounds (α′S)-14b and 21 approximate the conformation of dipeptides found in β-sheets, while tripeptide mimic 28 is also highly extended in the solid state. Structural data suggest that ring size and relative stereochemistry have a profound effect on the ability of these scaffolds to act as β-strand mimetics and should inform the design of related conformational probes. PMID:20593836

  17. Acute β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine Toxicity in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sammak, Maitham Ahmed; Rogers, Douglas G.; Hoagland, Kyle D.

    2015-01-01

    The cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is considered to be an “excitotoxin,” and its suggested mechanism of action is killing neurons. Long-term exposure to L-BMAA is believed to lead to neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease). Objectives of this study were to determine the presumptive median lethal dose (LD50), the Lowest-Observed-Adverse-Effect Level (LOAEL), and histopathologic lesions caused by the naturally occurring BMAA isomer, L-BMAA, in mice. Seventy NIH Swiss Outbred mice (35 male and 35 female) were used. Treatment group mice were injected intraperitoneally with 0.03, 0.3, 1, 2, and 3 mg/g body weight L-BMAA, respectively, and control mice were sham-injected. The presumptive LD50 of L-BMAA was 3 mg/g BW and the LOAEL was 2 mg/g BW. There were no histopathologic lesions in brain, liver, heart, kidney, lung, or spleen in any of the mice during the 14-day study. L-BMAA was detected in brains and livers in all of treated mice but not in control mice. Males injected with 0.03 mg/g BW, 0.3 mg/g BW, and 3.0 mg/g BW L-BMAA showed consistently higher concentrations (P < 0.01) in brain and liver samples as compared to females in those respective groups. PMID:26604922

  18. Tracking dipeptides at work-uptake and intracellular fate in CHO culture.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Kopper, Andres; Becker, Max; Pfizenmaier, Jennifer; Kessler, Christian; Karau, Andreas; Takors, Ralf

    2016-12-01

    Market demands for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are steadily increasing worldwide. As a result, production processes using Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) are in the focus of ongoing intensification studies for maximizing cell-specific and volumetric productivities. This includes the optimization of animal-derived component free (ADCF) cultivation media as part of good cell culture practice. Dipeptides are known to improve CHO culture performance. However, little or even conflicting assumptions exist about their putative import and functionality inside the cells. A set of well-known performance boosters and new dipeptide prospects was evaluated. The present study revealed that dipeptides are indeed imported in the cells, where they are decomposed to the amino acids building blocks. Subsequently, they are metabolized or, unexpectedly, secreted to the medium. Monoclonal antibody production boosting additives like L-alanine-L-glutamine (AQ) or glycyl-L-glutamine (GQ) can be assigned to fast or slow dipeptide uptake, respectively, thus pinpointing to the need to study dipeptide kinetics and to adjust their feeding individually for optimizing mAb production. PMID:27447702

  19. The preferred conformation of dipeptides in the context of biosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bywater, Robert P.; Veryazov, Valera

    2013-09-01

    Globular proteins are folded polypeptide structures comprising stretches of secondary structures (helical (α- or 310 helix type), polyproline helix or β-strands) interspersed by regions of less well-ordered structure ("random coil"). Protein fold prediction is a very active field impacting inte alia on protein engineering and misfolding studies. Apart from the many studies of protein refolding from the denatured state, there has been considerable interest in studying the initial formation of peptides during biosynthesis, when there are at the outset only a few residues in the emerging polypeptide. Although there have been many studies employing quantum chemical methods of the conformation of dipeptides, these have mostly been carried out in the gas phase or simulated water. None of these conditions really apply in the interior confines of the ribosome. In the present work, we are concerned with the conformation of dipeptides in this low dielectric environment. Furthermore, only the residue types glycine and alanine have been studied by previous authors, but we extend this repertoire to include leucine and isoleucine, position isomers which have very different structural propensities.

  20. β-Alanine supplemented diets enhance behavioral resilience to stress exposure in an animal model of PTSD.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Jay R; Ostfeld, Ishay; Stout, Jeffrey R; Harris, Roger C; Kaplan, Zeev; Cohen, Hagit

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated the effects of β-alanine (BA) ingestion on the behavioral and neuroendocrine response of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a murine model. Animals were fed a normal diet with or without (PL) BA supplementation (100 mg kg(-1)) for 30 days. Animals were then exposed to a predator-scent stress (PSS) or a sham (UNEX). Behaviors were evaluated using an elevated plus maze (EPM) and acoustic startle response (ASR) 7 days following exposure to the PSS. Corticosterone concentrations (CS), expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and brain carnosine concentrations were analyzed a day later. Animals in PSS+PL spent significantly less time in the open arms and in the number of entries in the EPM than PSS+BA, UNEX+BA, or UNEX+PL. Animals in PSS+BA had comparable scores to UNEX+BA. Anxiety index was higher (p < 0.05) in PSS+PL compared to PSS+BA or animals that were unexposed. ASR and freezing were greater (p < 0.05) in animals exposed to PSS compared to animals unexposed. CS expression was higher (p < 0.05) in animals exposed to PSS compared to unexposed animals. Brain carnosine concentrations in the hippocampus and other brain sections were significantly greater in animals supplemented with BA compared to PL. BDNF expression in the CA1 and DG subregions of the hippocampus was lower (p < 0.05) in animals exposed and fed a normal diet compared to animals exposed and supplemented with BA, or animals unexposed. In conclusion, BA supplementation in rats increased brain carnosine concentrations and resulted in a reduction in PTSD-like behavior, which may be mediated in part by maintaining BDNF expression in the hippocampus. PMID:25758106

  1. Biomimetic Catalysis of Diketopiperazine and Dipeptide Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zheng-Zheng; Leman, Luke J.; Ghadiri, M. Reza

    2008-01-01

    Entry for the Table of Contents Modular, supramolecular catalysts based on the coiled coil peptide scaffold and designed to mimic nonribosomal peptide synthetases are demonstrated to catalyze the formation of diketopiperazine and linear dipeptides for several aminoacyl substrates. We further demonstrate that the nature of the active site residues in the peptide catalysts can be used to effect directed intermodular aminoacyl transfer processes and govern the relative yields of diketopiperazine, linear dipeptide, and hydrolyzed substrate. PMID:18213666

  2. The nootropic and neuroprotective proline-containing dipeptide noopept restores spatial memory and increases immunoreactivity to amyloid in an Alzheimer's disease model.

    PubMed

    Ostrovskaya, Rita U; Gruden, Marina A; Bobkova, Natalya A; Sewell, Robert D E; Gudasheva, Tatyana A; Samokhin, Alexander N; Seredinin, Sergey B; Noppe, Wim; Sherstnev, Vladimir V; Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla A

    2007-08-01

    The effects of the novel proline-containing nootropic and neuroprotective dipeptide, noopept (GVS-111, N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine ethyl ester) were investigated in NMRI mice following olfactory bulbectomy. We have shown previously that these animals developed Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like behaviour, morphology and biochemistry including impairment of spatial memory, regional neuronal degeneration and elevated Abeta peptide brain levels. In the current investigation, spatial memory was assessed using the Morris water maze and serum antibodies to in vitro morphologically characterized amyloid structures of both Abeta((25-35)) peptide and equine lysozyme, as well as to neurotrophic glial factor S100b, were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Noopept (administered at a dose of 0.01 mg/kg for a period of 21 days and during a further 5 days training) restored spatial memory and increased serum antibody levels to oligomers of Abeta((25-35)) peptide but not to equine lysozyme amyloid or S100b protein in bulbectomized animals. The positive immunotropic effect of noopept to Abeta((25-35)) peptide prefibrillar aggregates was more marked in sham-operated compared to the bulbectomized subjects which were characterized by an overall suppression of immunoreactivity. Enhancement of the immune response to Abeta((25-35)) peptide prefibrils caused by noopept may attenuate the neurotoxic consequences of amyloid fibrillization and also be associated with an improvement in spatial memory in bulbectomized mice. These actions of noopept, combined with its previously reported neuroprotective and cholinomimetic properties, suggests that this dipeptide may well be useful for improving cognitive deficits induced by neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:17092975

  3. Proton Affinity of Isomeric Dipeptides Containing Lysine and Non-Proteinogenic Lysine Homologues.

    PubMed

    Batoon, Patrick; Ren, Jianhua

    2016-08-18

    Conformational effects on the proton affinity of oligopeptides have been studied using six alanine (A)-based acetylated dipeptides containing a basic probe that is placed closest to either the C- or the N-terminus. The basic probe includes Lysine (Lys) and two nonproteinogenic Lys-homologues, ornithine (Orn) and 2,3-diaminopropionic acid (Dap). The proton affinities of the peptides have been determined using the extended Cooks kinetic method in a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. Computational studies have been carried out to search for the lowest energy conformers and to calculate theoretical proton affinities as well as various molecular properties using the density functional theory. The dipeptides containing a C-terminal probe, ALys, AOrn, and ADap, were determined to have a higher proton affinity by 1-4 kcal/mol than the corresponding dipeptides containing an N-terminal probe, LysA, OrnA, and DapA. For either the C-probe peptides or the N-probe peptides, the proton affinity reduces systematically as the side-chain of the probe residue is shortened. The difference in the proton affinities between isomeric peptides is largely associated with the variation of the conformations. The peptides with higher values of the proton affinity adopt a relatively compact conformation such that the protonated peptides can be stabilized through more efficient internal solvation. PMID:27459294

  4. [Strategy for the development of dipeptide drugs].

    PubMed

    Gudasheva, T A

    2011-01-01

    The author describes an original approach to the development of dipeptide drugs based on the concept of the leading role of the beta-bend in the interaction of biologically active endogenous peptides with their receptors. The approach called "peptide-based drug design" includes both developments from the structure of a known psychotropic agent toward its topological peptide analog and developments from the active dipeptide site of a neuropeptide toward its mimetic. This strategy has been worked out at the V.V. Zakusov Research Institute of Pharmacology for 25 years. Results of investigations that discovered endogenous peptide prototypes of the known non-peptidic drugs (piracetam and sulpiride) are presented. They provided a basis for the creation of highly active non-toxic oral dipeptide preparations, such as nootrop Noopept, potential anti psychotic Dilept, and potential selective anxiolytic GB-115. PMID:21899085

  5. Beta-alanine supplementation in high-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Harris, Roger C; Sale, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Glycolysis involves the oxidation of two neutral hydroxyl groups on each glycosyl (or glucosyl) unit metabolised, yielding two carboxylic acid groups. During low-intensity exercise these, along with the remainder of the carbon skeleton, are further oxidised to CO(2) and water. But during high-intensity exercise a major portion (and where blood flow is impaired, then most) is accumulated as lactate anions and H(+). The accumulation of H(+) has deleterious effects on muscle function, ultimately impairing force production and contributing to fatigue. Regulation of intracellular pH is achieved over time by export of H(+) out of the muscle, although physicochemical buffers in the muscle provide the first line of defence against H(+) accumulation. In order to be effective during high-intensity exercise, buffers need to be present in high concentrations in muscle and have pK(a)s within the intracellular exercise pH transit range. Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is ideal for this role given that it occurs in millimolar concentrations within the skeletal muscle and has a pK(a) of 6.83. Carnosine is a cytoplasmic dipeptide formed by bonding histidine and β-alanine in a reaction catalysed by carnosine synthase, although it is the availability of β-alanine, obtained in small amounts from hepatic synthesis and potentially in greater amounts from the diet that is limiting to synthesis. Increasing muscle carnosine through increased dietary intake of β-alanine will increase the intracellular buffering capacity, which in turn might be expected to increase high-intensity exercise capacity and performance where this is pH limited. In this study we review the role of muscle carnosine as an H(+) buffer, the regulation of muscle carnosine by β-alanine, and the available evidence relating to the effects of β-alanine supplementation on muscle carnosine synthesis and the subsequent effects of this on high-intensity exercise capacity and performance. PMID:23075550

  6. β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) uptake by the animal model, Daphnia magna and subsequent oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Esterhuizen-Londt, Maranda; Wiegand, Claudia; Downing, Tim G

    2015-06-15

    β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), produced by cyanobacteria, is a neurotoxin implicated in Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS/PDC). BMAA concentrations in cyanobacteria are lower than those thought to be necessary to result in neurological damage thus bioaccumulation or biomagnification is required to achieve concentrations able to cause neurodegeneration. Many cyanobacteria produce BMAA and uptake routes into the food web require examination. In this study we investigate the uptake of BMAA by adult phytoplanktivorus Daphnia magna via exposure to dissolved pure BMAA and BMAA containing cyanobacteria, as well as the subsequent oxidative stress response in the daphnia. Free BMAA and protein-associated BMAA were quantified by LC-MS/MS. Dissolved BMAA was taken up and was found as free BMAA in D. magna. No protein-associated BMAA was detected in D. magna after a 24-h exposure period. No BMAA was detectable in D. magna after exposure to BMAA containing cyanobacteria. BMAA inhibited the oxidative stress defence and biotransformation enzymes within 24-h exposure in the tested Daphnia and could therefore impair the oxidant status and the capability of detoxifying other substances in D. magna. PMID:25841344

  7. Alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase-deficient mice, a model for primary hyperoxaluria that responds to adenoviral gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Salido, Eduardo C; Li, Xiao M; Lu, Yang; Wang, Xia; Santana, Alfredo; Roy-Chowdhury, Namita; Torres, Armando; Shapiro, Larry J; Roy-Chowdhury, Jayanta

    2006-11-28

    Mutations in the alanine-glyoxylate amino transferase gene (AGXT) are responsible for primary hyperoxaluria type I, a rare disease characterized by excessive hepatic oxalate production that leads to renal failure. We generated a null mutant mouse by targeted mutagenesis of the homologous gene, Agxt, in embryonic stem cells. Mutant mice developed normally, and they exhibited hyperoxaluria and crystalluria. Approximately half of the male mice in mixed genetic background developed calcium oxalate urinary stones. Severe nephrocalcinosis and renal failure developed after enhancement of oxalate production by ethylene glycol administration. Hepatic expression of human AGT1, the protein encoded by AGXT, by adenoviral vector-mediated gene transfer in Agxt(-/-) mice normalized urinary oxalate excretion and prevented oxalate crystalluria. Subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence studies revealed that, as in the human liver, the expressed wild-type human AGT1 was predominantly localized in mouse hepatocellular peroxisomes, whereas the most common mutant form of AGT1 (G170R) was localized predominantly in the mitochondria. PMID:17110443

  8. Structure of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis D-Alanine:D-Alanine Ligase, a Target of the Antituberculosis Drug D-Cycloserine

    SciTech Connect

    Bruning, John B.; Murillo, Ana C.; Chacon, Ofelia; Barletta, Raúl G.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2011-09-28

    D-Alanine:D-alanine ligase (EC 6.3.2.4; Ddl) catalyzes the ATP-driven ligation of two D-alanine (D-Ala) molecules to form the D-alanyl:D-alanine dipeptide. This molecule is a key building block in peptidoglycan biosynthesis, making Ddl an attractive target for drug development. D-Cycloserine (DCS), an analog of D-Ala and a prototype Ddl inhibitor, has shown promise for the treatment of tuberculosis. Here, we report the crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ddl at a resolution of 2.1 {angstrom}. This structure indicates that Ddl is a dimer and consists of three discrete domains; the ligand binding cavity is at the intersection of all three domains and conjoined by several loop regions. The M. tuberculosis apo Ddl structure shows a novel conformation that has not yet been observed in Ddl enzymes from other species. The nucleotide and D-alanine binding pockets are flexible, requiring significant structural rearrangement of the bordering regions for entry and binding of both ATP and D-Ala molecules. Solution affinity and kinetic studies showed that DCS interacts with Ddl in a manner similar to that observed for D-Ala. Each ligand binds to two binding sites that have significant differences in affinity, with the first binding site exhibiting high affinity. DCS inhibits the enzyme, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC{sub 50}) of 0.37 mM under standard assay conditions, implicating a preferential and weak inhibition at the second, lower-affinity binding site. Moreover, DCS binding is tighter at higher ATP concentrations. The crystal structure illustrates potential drugable sites that may result in the development of more-effective Ddl inhibitors.

  9. Native and non-native structure in a protein-folding intermediate: spectroscopic studies of partially reduced IGF-I and an engineered alanine model.

    PubMed

    Hua, Q X; Narhi, L; Jia, W; Arakawa, T; Rosenfeld, R; Hawkins, N; Miller, J A; Weiss, M A

    1996-06-01

    The structure of a metastable folding intermediate of human insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and an engineered model are investigated by circular dichroism and two-dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy. The intermediate, which contains two of three native disulfide bonds, was trapped by acid quenching and isolated by reverse-phase HPLC. The reduced cysteine residues were mapped to residues 47 and 52 (corresponding to A6-A11 in insulin). In the native state this disulfide bridge anchors an adjoining amphipathic alpha-helix (helix 2; residues 42 to 49) against the hydrophobic core. Comparison of CD and 1H-NMR spectra demonstrates that the acid-quenched intermediate is partially folded and contains elements of native secondary and tertiary structure. Spectra are similar to those of an equilibrium model in which the reduced cysteine residues are replaced by alanine. Complete 1H-NMR sequential assignment of the alanine model has been obtained and demonstrates that removal of the disulfide bond is associated with local unfolding of the adjoining alpha-helix. Native secondary structure (including helices 1 and 3) is otherwise retained and defines a folded subdomain. Long-range nuclear Overhauser effects (NOE) within this subdomain are similar to those of native IGF-I; no non-native NOE is observed. Our results support the hypothesis that folding of the insulin motif is directed by a subset of native structural elements and that these elements form at an early step in the pathway. Formation of helix 2, despite its prominence in the native state, is likely to represent a late step. Hydrophobic collapse of this segment appears to precede helix formation. PMID:8656430

  10. Self-assembled dipeptide-gold nanoparticle hybrid spheres for highly sensitive amperometric hydrogen peroxide biosensors.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yufei; Chen, Xu; Lu, Yanluo; Yang, Wensheng

    2015-04-15

    Novel self-assembled dipeptide-gold nanoparticle (DP-AuNP) hybrid microspheres with a hollow structure have been prepared in aqueous solution by a simple one-step method. Diphenylalanine (FF) dipeptide was used as a precursor to form simultaneously peptide spheres and a reducing agent to reduce gold ions to gold nanoparticles in water at 60°C. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that formed AuNPs were localized both inside and on the surface of the dipeptide spheres. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as a model enzyme was further immobilized on the dipeptide-AuNP hybrid spheres to construct a mediate H2O2 amperometric biosensor. UV-vis spectroscopy showed that the immobilized HRP retained its original structure. Cyclic voltammetry characterization demonstrated that the HRP/dipeptide-AuNP hybrid spheres modified glassy carbon electrode showed high electrocatalytic activity to H2O2. The proposed biosensor exhibited a wide linear response in the range from 5.0×10(-7) to 9.7×10(-4)M with a high sensitivity of 28.3µAmM(-1). A low detection limit of 1.0×10(-7)M was estimated at S/N=3. In addition, the biosensor possessed satisfactory reproducibility and long-term stability. These results indicated that the dipeptide-AuNP hybrid sphere is a promising matrix for application in the fabrication of electrochemical biosensors due to its excellent biocompatibility and good charge-transfer ability. PMID:25483915

  11. Model Studies on the Antioxidative Effect of Polyphenols in Thermally Treated D-Glucose/L-Alanine Solutions with Added Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Wilker, Daniel; Heinrich, Anna B; Kroh, Lothar W

    2015-12-30

    The influence of different polyphenolic compounds (PPs) on the Maillard reaction in a d-glucose/l-alanine model system with or without metal ions was studied under various reaction conditions. At temperatures up to 100 °C the PPs showed pro-oxidative effects due to their reducing effects on metal ions. This can be explained by a combined redox cycling mechanism of metals and PPs that promotes oxidation in the Maillard reaction. The antioxidative capacities of the PPs were measured with three different assays and correlated directly with their pro-oxidative effects on d-glucosone formation. The degree of the pro-oxidative effect depended not only on the PPs' reducing potential and their antioxidative ability but also on their concentration, the temperature, and the pH value of the model system. At low pH values and temperatures, the PPs were more stable and therefore showed an increased pro-oxidative tendency. In contrast, some of the used PPs were almost completely degraded at temperatures of 130 °C, and the formed polymers were able to complex metal ions. In the absence of these catalyzing ions, the oxidation ratio of d-glucose to d-glucosone was decreased. PMID:26634406

  12. Modeling of human M1 aminopeptidases for in silico screening of potential Plasmodium falciparum alanine aminopeptidase (PfA-M1) specific inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Sahi, Shakti; Rai, Sneha; Chaudhary, Meenakshi; Nain, Vikrant

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum alanine M1-aminopeptidase (PfA-M1) is a validated target for anti-malarial drug development. Presence of significant similarity between PfA-M1 and human M1-aminopeptidases, particularly within regions of enzyme active site leads to problem of non-specificity and off-target binding for known aminopeptidase inhibitors. Molecular docking based in silico screening approach for off-target binding has high potential but requires 3D-structure of all human M1-aminopeptidaes. Therefore, in the present study 3D structural models of seven human M1-aminopeptidases were developed. The robustness of docking parameters and quality of predicted human M1-aminopeptidases structural models was evaluated by stereochemical analysis and docking of their respective known inhibitors. The docking scores were in agreement with the inhibitory concentrations elucidated in enzyme assays of respective inhibitor enzyme combinations (r2≈0.70). Further docking analysis of fifteen potential PfA-M1 inhibitors (virtual screening identified) showed that three compounds had less docking affinity for human M1-aminopeptidases as compared to PfA-M1. These three identified potential lead compounds can be validated with enzyme assays and used as a scaffold for designing of new compounds with increased specificity towards PfA-M1. PMID:25258488

  13. Repeated Supramaximal Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress: Effect of β-Alanine Plus Creatine Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Belviranli, Muaz; Okudan, Nilsel; Revan, Serkan; Balci, Serdar; Gokbel, Hakki

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carnosine is a dipeptide formed from the β-alanine and histidine amino acids and found in mainly in the brain and muscle, especially fast twitch muscle. Carnosine and creatine has an antioxidant effect and carnosine accounts for about 10% of the muscle's ability to buffer the H+ ions produced by exercise. Objectives: The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of beta alanine and/or creatine supplementation on oxidant and antioxidant status during repeated Wingate tests (WTs). Patients and Methods: Forty four sedentary males participated in the study. Participants performed three 30s WTs with 2 minutes rest between exercise bouts. After the first exercise session, the subjects were assigned to one of four groups: Placebo, Creatine, Beta-alanine and Beta-alanine plus creatine. Participants ingested twice per day for 22 consecutive days, then four times per day for the following 6 days. After the supplementation period the second exercise session was applied. Blood samples were taken before and immediately after the each exercise session for the analysis of oxidative stress and antioxidant markers. Results: Malondialdehyde levels and superoxide dismutase activities were affected by neither supplementation nor exercise. During the pre-supplementation session, protein carbonyl reduced and oxidized glutathione (GSH and GSSG) levels increased immediately after the exercise. However, during the post-supplementation session GSH and GSSG levels increased in beta-alanine and beta-alanine plus creatine groups immediately after the exercise compared to pre-exercise. In addition, during the post-supplementation session total antioxidant capacity increased in beta-alanine group immediately after the exercise. Conclusions: Beta-alanine supplementation has limited antioxidant effect during the repeated WTs. PMID:27217925

  14. Dipeptides Increase Functional Activity of Human Skin Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Malinin, V V; Durnova, A O; Polyakova, V O; Kvetnoi, I M

    2015-05-01

    We analyzed the effect of dipeptide Glu-Trp and isovaleroyl-Glu-Trp in concentrations of 0.2, 2 and 20 μg/ml and Actovegin preparation on functional activity of human skin fibroblasts. Dipeptides, especially Glu-Trp, produce a stimulating effect on human skin fibroblasts and their effect is equivalent to that of Actovegin. Dipeptides stimulate cell renewal processes by activating synthesis of Ki-67 and reducing expression of caspase-9 and enhance antioxidant function of the cells by stimulating the expression of Hsp-90 and inducible NO-synthase. These findings suggest that dipeptides are promising candidates for preparations stimulating reparative processes. PMID:26033609

  15. Dietary cyclic dipeptides, apoptosis and psychiatric disorders: a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Semon, Bruce A

    2014-06-01

    Cyclic dipeptides from food and intestinal yeast cyclic dipeptides may play a role in causing psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. From cancer research, cyclic dipeptides such as cyclo (proline-phenylalanine) have been found to activate the pathways of apoptosis and to cause programmed cell death. Activation of such pathways is also thought to be important in causing the neurodevelopmental abnormalities seen in disorders such as schizophrenia and autistic disorder, and also may be important in Alzheimer's. Cyclic dipeptides are found in foods such as malt and cocoa and beer. The intestinal yeast Candida albicans also synthesizes cyclic dipeptides. These dipeptides may be activating apoptosis pathways throughout fetal development and postnatal development, leading to some of the changes seen in brain in schizophrenia and in other psychiatric disorders. These compounds should be researched further to see if they play a role in causing these brain changes. In addition, these cyclic dipeptides are considered within the larger context of research on amino acids and other cyclic dipeptides in neurotransmission and neurophysiology. A better understanding of the role of these cyclic dipeptides in psychiatric disorders could lead to strategies for prevention and treatment of these disorders. PMID:24717821

  16. Insight into the Intermolecular Recognition Mechanism between Keap1 and IKKβ Combining Homology Modelling, Protein-Protein Docking, Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Virtual Alanine Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zheng-Yu; Chu, Hong-Xi; Xi, Mei-Yang; Yang, Ting-Ting; Jia, Jian-Min; Huang, Jing-Jie; Guo, Xiao-Ke; Zhang, Xiao-Jin; You, Qi-Dong; Sun, Hao-Peng

    2013-01-01

    Degradation of certain proteins through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is a common strategy taken by the key modulators responsible for stress responses. Kelch-like ECH-associated protein-1(Keap1), a substrate adaptor component of the Cullin3 (Cul3)-based ubiquitin E3 ligase complex, mediates the ubiquitination of two key modulators, NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and IκB kinase β (IKKβ), which are involved in the redox control of gene transcription. However, compared to the Keap1-Nrf2 protein-protein interaction (PPI), the intermolecular recognition mechanism of Keap1 and IKKβ has been poorly investigated. In order to explore the binding pattern between Keap1 and IKKβ, the PPI model of Keap1 and IKKβ was investigated. The structure of human IKKβ was constructed by means of the homology modeling method and using reported crystal structure of Xenopus laevis IKKβ as the template. A protein-protein docking method was applied to develop the Keap1-IKKβ complex model. After the refinement and visual analysis of docked proteins, the chosen pose was further optimized through molecular dynamics simulations. The resulting structure was utilized to conduct the virtual alanine mutation for the exploration of hot-spots significant for the intermolecular interaction. Overall, our results provided structural insights into the PPI model of Keap1-IKKβ and suggest that the substrate specificity of Keap1 depend on the interaction with the key tyrosines, namely Tyr525, Tyr574 and Tyr334. The study presented in the current project may be useful to design molecules that selectively modulate Keap1. The selective recognition mechanism of Keap1 with IKKβ or Nrf2 will be helpful to further know the crosstalk between NF-κB and Nrf2 signaling. PMID:24066166

  17. Transepithelial transport and stability in blood serum of angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibitory dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Pentzien, Anne-Kathrin; Meisel, Hans

    2008-01-01

    The dipeptides Ala-Trp, Val-Phe, and Val-Tyr inhibit the angiotensin-I-converting enzyme. They are encrypted within the primary sequences of different food proteins, e.g. milk proteins. The angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibitory potency of these synthetic dipeptides was quantified using a spectrophotometric assay. The dipeptides showed no adverse effects on differentiated Caco-2 cells (model for human intestinal epithelium), as confirmed by transepithelial electrical resistance, microscopy and the activity of the brush-border enzyme dipeptidyl aminopeptidase IV. Furthermore, the transport of these bioactive dipeptides through intact Caco-2 monolayers and their stability to incubation in human blood serum has been demonstrated for the first time. Low molecular mass peptides represent the minimal structures required for angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibition which have a high potential bioavailability. Therefore, they may act as target peptides in enriched hydrolysates for the preparation of an angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibitory peptide and for the use in special formulations as functional foods/foods of specified health use. PMID:18669035

  18. Engineered polymer nanoparticles containing hydrophobic dipeptide for inhibition of amyloid-β fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Skaat, Hadas; Chen, Ravit; Grinberg, Igor; Margel, Shlomo

    2012-09-10

    Protein aggregation into amyloid fibrils is implicated in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases. Engineered nanoparticles have emerged as a potential approach to alter the kinetics of protein fibrillation process. Yet, there are only a few reports describing the use of nanoparticles for inhibition of amyloid-β 40 (Aβ(40)) peptide aggregation, involved in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, we designed new uniform biocompatible amino-acid-based polymer nanoparticles containing hydrophobic dipeptides in the polymer side chains. The dipeptide residues were designed similarly to the hydrophobic core sequence of Aβ. Poly(N-acryloyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) (polyA-FF-ME) nanoparticles of 57 ± 6 nm were synthesized by dispersion polymerization of the monomer A-FF-ME in 2-methoxy ethanol, followed by precipitation of the obtained polymer in aqueous solution. Cell viability assay confirmed that no significant cytotoxic effect of the polyA-FF-ME nanoparticles on different human cell lines, e.g., PC-12 and SH-SY5Y, was observed. A significantly slow secondary structure transition from random coil to β-sheets during Aβ(40) fibril formation was observed in the presence of these nanoparticles, resulting in significant inhibition of Aβ(40) fibrillation kinetics. However, the polyA-FF-ME analogous nanoparticles containing the L-alanyl-L-alanine (AA) dipeptide in the polymer side groups, polyA-AA-ME nanoparticles, accelerate the Aβ(40) fibrillation kinetics. The polyA-FF-ME nanoparticles and the polyA-AA-ME nanoparticles may therefore contribute to a mechanistic understanding of the fibrillation process, leading to the development of therapeutic strategies against amyloid-related diseases. PMID:22897679

  19. Alahopcin, a new dipeptide antibiotic produced by Streptomyces albulus subsp. ochragerus subsp. nov.

    PubMed

    Higashide, E; Horii, S; Ono, H; Mizokami, N; Yamazaki, T; Shibata, M; Yoneda, M

    1985-03-01

    An actinomycete strain No. B-52653 was found to produce an antibiotic selectively active against the in vitro antibiotic resistant mutant of Staphylococcus aureus. Based on taxonomic studies, the name Streptomyces albulus subsp. ochragerus subsp. nov. is proposed for the strain. The microorganism produced two kinds of antibiotics; one identical with gougerotin, the other an amphoteric water soluble dipeptide containing L-alanine. The latter has the molecular formula C9H15N3O6 and is named alahopcin. It has a broad antibacterial spectrum and a synergistic effect with some other antibiotics against some antibiotic resistant staphylococci. Alahopcin has a low toxicity and was effective against experimental infections in mice caused by Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:3839222

  20. Radiation-induced destruction of hydroxyl-containing amino acids and dipeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sladkova, А. А.; Sosnovskaya, А. А.; Edimecheva, I. P.; Shadyro, О. I.

    2012-12-01

    The yields of molecular products resulting from radiolysis of hydroxyl-containing amino acids and dipeptides under various conditions were determined. The possibility of a new radiation-induced destruction pathway has been shown for serine and threonine, as well as for the dipeptides having residues of these amino acids at the N-terminal part of the respective molecule. This process includes formation of N-centered radicals from the starting molecules followed by their decomposition with elimination of side substituents. On radiolysis, serine and threonine were also shown to undergo free-radical destruction to form acetaldehyde and acetone, respectively. A mechanism has been proposed including consecutive stages of fragmentation of α-hydroxyl-containing carbon-centered radicals with elimination of ammonia and decomposition of the secondary radicals with elimination of CO2. The yields of CO2 obtained on radiolysis of serine and threonine were significantly higher (except for solutions at pH 12) than those for alanine and valine, which have no hydroxyl groups in their structures. The obtained data indicate that the hydroxyl-containing amino acids occupy a special place among other amino acids as regards the variety of radiation-induced reactions which they may undergo due to their structural features.

  1. Ligand Discovery for the Alanine-Serine-Cysteine Transporter (ASCT2, SLC1A5) from Homology Modeling and Virtual Screening

    PubMed Central

    Gameiro, Armanda; Albers, Thomas; Singh, Kurnvir; Shere, Helen; Bonomi, Massimiliano; Holst, Jeff; Schlessinger, Avner

    2015-01-01

    The Alanine-Serine-Cysteine transporter ASCT2 (SLC1A5) is a membrane protein that transports neutral amino acids into cells in exchange for outward movement of intracellular amino acids. ASCT2 is highly expressed in peripheral tissues such as the lung and intestines where it contributes to the homeostasis of intracellular concentrations of neutral amino acids. ASCT2 also plays an important role in the development of a variety of cancers such as melanoma by transporting amino acid nutrients such as glutamine into the proliferating tumors. Therefore, ASCT2 is a key drug target with potentially great pharmacological importance. Here, we identify seven ASCT2 ligands by computational modeling and experimental testing. In particular, we construct homology models based on crystallographic structures of the aspartate transporter GltPh in two different conformations. Optimization of the models’ binding sites for protein-ligand complementarity reveals new putative pockets that can be targeted via structure-based drug design. Virtual screening of drugs, metabolites, fragments-like, and lead-like molecules from the ZINC database, followed by experimental testing of 14 top hits with functional measurements using electrophysiological methods reveals seven ligands, including five activators and two inhibitors. For example, aminooxetane-3-carboxylate is a more efficient activator than any other known ASCT2 natural or unnatural substrate. Furthermore, two of the hits inhibited ASCT2 mediated glutamine uptake and proliferation of a melanoma cancer cell line. Our results improve our understanding of how substrate specificity is determined in amino acid transporters, as well as provide novel scaffolds for developing chemical tools targeting ASCT2, an emerging therapeutic target for cancer and neurological disorders. PMID:26444490

  2. An osmoregulated dipeptide in stressed Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, L T; Smith, G M

    1989-01-01

    One common mechanism of cellular adaptation to osmotic stress is the accumulation of organic solutes in the cytosol. We have used natural-abundance 13C nuclear magnetic resonance to identify all organic solutes that accumulate to significant levels in Rhizobium meliloti. Our studies led to the discovery of a new dipeptide, N-acetylglutaminylglutamine amide (NAGGN), which is accumulated during osmotic stress. Only rarely have peptides been shown to function in bacteria, and furthermore, this is the first example of a peptide playing a role in osmoregulation. Evidence for the biological role of NAGGN in osmotic-stress protection is presented. PMID:2768187

  3. Mechanisms of action of chloroalanyl antibacterial peptides. Identification of the intracellular enzymes inactivated on treatment of Escherichia coli JSR-O with the dipeptide beta Cl-LAla-beta Cl-LAla.

    PubMed

    Boisvert, W; Cheung, K S; Lerner, S A; Johnston, M

    1986-06-15

    The dipeptide beta Cl-LAla-beta Cl-LAla is an antibacterial agent designed to utilize bacterial peptide transport for intracellular delivery of the alanine racemase inactivator beta Cl-LAla. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for the peptide against Gram-negative species grown on enriched agar medium range from 1.56 to 12.5 micrograms/ml; MICs are increased to greater than 100 micrograms/ml when D-alanine is included in the medium, indicating that alanine racemase is, in fact, inhibited in sensitive species. When susceptible Gram-negative cells are grown on a minimal medium, D-alanine supplementation alone does not increase the MICs for beta Cl-LAla-beta Cl-LAla, but complete protection is afforded by supplementation with D-alanine, L-valine, L-leucine, and L-isoleucine. In liquid culture, the peptide is: bactericidal and lytic against Escherichia coli JSR-O growing in enriched medium or in minimal medium supplemented with the branched-chain amino acids; only inhibitory against these cells growing in minimal medium supplemented with D-alanine; and ineffective against these cells in minimal medium containing the branched-chain amino acids plus D-alanine. Cells exposed to beta Cl-LAla-beta Cl-LAla (with the protection of the four amino acids) have specific activities of both alanine racemase and transaminase B that are lower than those of cultures not treated with the peptide. Finally, E. coli JSR-O alanine racemase experiences time-dependent loss of activity when exposed to the dipeptide in the presence of aminopeptidases; the dipeptide alone is not an inactivator of the racemase in vitro. These results suggest the following mechanism of action for beta Cl-LAla-beta Cl-LAla: transport of the dipeptide into the cell; intracellular hydrolysis to give accumulation of beta Cl-LAla; and subsequent inactivation of targeted enzymes. Whether inactivation of the racemase or of the transaminase determines the pathophysiologic effects of the peptide depends on the

  4. β-N-methylamino-l-alanine causes neurological and pathological phenotypes mimicking Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS): the first step towards an experimental model for sporadic ALS.

    PubMed

    de Munck, Estefanía; Muñoz-Sáez, Emma; Miguel, Begoña G; Solas, M Teresa; Ojeda, Irene; Martínez, Ana; Gil, Carmen; Arahuetes, Rosa Ma

    2013-09-01

    β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (L-BMAA) is a neurotoxic amino acid that has been related to various neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of this work was to analyze the biotoxicity produced by L-BMAA in vivo in rats, trying to elucidate its physiopathological mechanisms and to search for analogies between the found effects and pathologies like Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Our data demonstrated that the neurotoxic effects in vivo were dosage-dependent. For evaluating the state of the animals, a neurological evaluation scale was developed as well as a set of functional tests. Ultrastructural cell analysis of spinal motoneurons has revealed alterations both in endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Since GSK3β could play a role in some neuropathological processes, we analyzed the alterations occurring in GSK3β levels in L-BMAA treated rats, we have observed an increase in the active form of GSK3β levels in lumbar spinal cord and motor cerebral cortex. On the other hand, (TAR)-DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) increased in L-BMAA treated animals. Our results indicated that N-acetylaspartate (NAA) declined in animals treated with L-BMAA, and the ratio of N-acetylaspartate/choline (NAA/Cho), N-acetylaspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr) and N-acetylaspartate/choline+creatine (NAA/Cho+Cr) tended to decrease in lumbar spinal cord and motor cortex. This project offers some encouraging results that could help establishing the progress in the development of an animal model of sporadic ALS and L-BMAA could be a useful tool for this purpose. PMID:23688553

  5. Effects of glycyl-glutamine dipeptide supplementation on myocardial damage and cardiac function in rats after severe burn injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Yan, Hong; Lv, Shang-Gun; Wang, Lin; Liang, Guang-Ping; Wan, Qian-Xue; Peng, Xi

    2013-01-01

    Glutamine decreases myocardial damage in ischemia/reperfusion injury. However, the cardioprotective effect of glutamine after burn injury remains unclear. Present study was to explore the protective effect of glycyl-glutamine dipeptide on myocardial damage in severe burn rats. Seventy-two Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: normal control (C), burned control (B) and glycyl-glutamine dipeptide-treated (GG) groups. B and GG groups were inflicted with 30% total body surface area of full thickness burn. The GG group was given 1.5 g/kg glycyl-glutamine dipeptide per day and the B group was given the same dose of alanine via intraperitoneal injection for 3 days. The serum CK, LDH, AST, and, blood lactic acid levels, as well as the myocardium ATP and GSH contents, were measured. The indices of cardiac contractile function and histopathological change were analyzed at 12, 24, 48, and 72 post-burn hours (PBH). The serum CK, LDH, AST and blood lactic acid levels increased, and the myocardium ATP and GSH content decreased in both burned groups. Compared with B group, the CK, LDH, AST and blood lactic acid levels reduced, myocardium ATP and GSH content increased in GG group. Moreover, the inhibition of cardiac contractile function and myocardial histopathological damage were reduced significantly in GG group. We conclude that myocardial histological structure and function were damaged significantly after burn injury, glycyl-glutamine dipeptide supplementation is beneficial to myocardial preservation by improving cardiocyte energy metabolism, increasing ATP and glutathione synthesis. PMID:23638213

  6. A Capped Dipeptide Which Simultaneously Exhibits Gelation and Crystallization Behavior.

    PubMed

    Martin, Adam D; Wojciechowski, Jonathan P; Bhadbhade, Mohan M; Thordarson, Pall

    2016-03-01

    Short peptides capped at their N-terminus are often highly efficient gelators, yet notoriously difficult to crystallize. This is due to strong unidirectional interactions within fibers, resulting in structure propagation only along one direction. Here, we synthesize the N-capped dipeptide, benzimidazole-diphenylalanine, which forms both hydrogels and single crystals. Even more remarkably, we show using atomic force microscopy the coexistence of these two distinct phases. We then use powder X-ray diffraction to investigate whether the single crystal structure can be extrapolated to the molecular arrangement within the hydrogel. The results suggest parallel β-sheet arrangement as the dominant structural motif, challenging existing models for gelation of short peptides, and providing new directions for the future rational design of short peptide gelators. PMID:26890360

  7. Effect of the composition of a water-alcohol solvent on the thermodynamics of dissolution of DL-α-alanyl-β-alanine at 298.15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, V. I.; Badelin, V. G.

    2014-12-01

    Enthalpies of solution for DL-α-alanyl-β-alanine in H2O-ethanol, H2O-1-propanol, and H2O-2-propanol mixed solvents with the alcohol mole fraction x 2 = 0-0.3 are measured at 298.15 K. Standard enthalpies of solution (Δsol H ∘), standard enthalpies of transfer of DL-α-alanyl-β-alanine from water to binary solvent (Δtr H ∘), and coefficients of enthalpies of pair interactions with alcohol molecules ( h xy) are calculated. The effect the structure and properties of alcohols and the composition of a water-alcohol mixture have on the enthalpy of dissolution for DL-α-alanyl-β-alanine are discussed. The h xy values for dipeptides of the alanine series in water-alcohol binary solvents are compared.

  8. [Neuroprotective activity of the proline-containing dipeptide noopept on the model of brain ischemia induced by the middle cerebral artery occlusion].

    PubMed

    Gavrilova, S A; Us, K S; Ostrovskaia, R U; Koshelev, V B

    2006-01-01

    The influence of noopept (N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine ethyl ester, GVS-111) on the extent of ischemic cortical stroke was investigated in experiments on white mongrel male rats with ischemia induced by a combination of the middle cerebral artery occlusion with ipsilateral common carotid artery ligation. Animals were treated with noopept (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) according to the following schedule: 15 min and 2, 24, and 48 h after the occlusion. Test rats were decapitated 72 h after occlusion, brains were extracted and frozen, and thin brain slices were stained with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride. The slices were scanned and processed using Auc 1 computer program, which estimates the percentage of damaged area relative to that of the whole ipsilateral hemisphere. The conditions of coagulation the distal segment of middle cerebral artery were selected, which caused necrosis localized in the fronto-parietal and dorso-lateral regions of the brain cortex without any damage of subcortical structures. The extent of the brain damage in control group (treated by saline) was 18.6%, while that in the group treated with noopept was 12.2%, thus demonstrating a decrease in the infarction area by 34.5% (p < 05). The data on noopept efficacy on the model of the extensive ischemic injury of brain cortex show that this drug has good prospects for use in the neuroprotective treatment of stroke. PMID:16995431

  9. Differential mobility spectrometry of isomeric protonated dipeptides: modifier and field effects on ion mobility and stability.

    PubMed

    Blagojevic, Voislav; Chramow, Alexander; Schneider, Bradley B; Covey, Thomas R; Bohme, Diethard K

    2011-05-01

    The ability to resolve isomeric protonated dipeptides was investigated with the new technique of differential ion mobility mass spectrometry that uses "modifier" molecules to enhance differential mobility. Two pairs of protonated peptides [glycine-alanine (GlyAla) and alanine-glycine (AlaGly), glycine-serine (GlySer) and serine-glycine (SerGly)] and eight different modifiers (water, 2-propanol, 1,5-hexadiene, 2-chloropropane, chlorobenzene, dichloromethane, acetonitrile, and cyclohexane) were used in the initial study. Separation of the protonated peptides was found to be dependent on the mass and proton affinity of the modifier and combinations of functionalities present in the modifier and the analyte ion. Six of the eight modifiers (water, 2-propanol, chlorobenzene, cyclohexane, dichloromethane, and acetonitrile) were able to separate the protonated isomeric peptide pairs, and generally, modifiers with electron-rich groups performed the best. In the presence of some modifiers, a reduction of ion current was observed under the highest field conditions (>115 Td). Dopant-catalyzed isomerization, likely by proton-transport catalysis, and field-induced fragmentation may have contributed to these losses. Two high vapor pressure modifiers, 1,5-hexadiene and 2-chloropropane, significantly influenced ion formation leading to the formation of stable cluster populations that could be observed in the mass spectrometer. Although not a major concern, both fragmentation and influence of modifier evaporation warrant further studies in order to fully understand and possibly eliminate them. PMID:21504141

  10. Catabolic effects of muramyl dipeptide on rabbit chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ikebe, T.; Iribe, H.; Hirata, M.; Yanaga, F.; Koga, T. )

    1990-12-01

    Muramyl dipeptide, an essential structure for the diverse biologic activities of bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan, inhibited the synthesis of glycosaminoglycan/proteoglycan in cultured rabbit costal chondrocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Muramyl dipeptide, as well as lipopolysaccharide and interleukin-1 alpha, also enhanced the release of 35S-sulfate-prelabeled glycosaminoglycan/proteoglycan from the cell layer, which seems to reflect, at least partially, the increasing degradation of glycosaminoglycan/proteoglycan. Five synthetic analogs of muramyl dipeptide known to be adjuvant active or adjuvant inactive were tested for their potential to inhibit synthesis of glycosaminoglycan/proteoglycan and to enhance the release of glycosaminoglycan/proteoglycan in chondrocytes. The structural dependence of these synthetic analogs on chondrocytes was found to parallel that of immunoadjuvant activity. These results suggest that muramyl dipeptide is a potent mediator of catabolism in chondrocytes.

  11. Virtual Screening for Dipeptide Aggregation: Toward Predictive Tools for Peptide Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Frederix, Pim W J M; Ulijn, Rein V; Hunt, Neil T; Tuttle, Tell

    2011-10-01

    Several short peptide sequences are known to self-assemble into supramolecular nanostructures with interesting properties. In this study, coarse-grained molecular dynamics is employed to rapidly screen all 400 dipeptide combinations and predict their ability to aggregate as a potential precursor to their self-assembly. The simulation protocol and scoring method proposed allows a rapid determination of whether a given peptide sequence is likely to aggregate (an indicator for the ability to self-assemble) under aqueous conditions. Systems that show strong aggregation tendencies in the initial screening are selected for longer simulations, which result in good agreement with the known self-assembly or aggregation of dipeptides reported in the literature. Our extended simulations of the diphenylalanine system show that the coarse-grain model is able to reproduce salient features of nanoscale systems and provide insight into the self-assembly process for this system. PMID:23795243

  12. Virtual Screening for Dipeptide Aggregation: Toward Predictive Tools for Peptide Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Several short peptide sequences are known to self-assemble into supramolecular nanostructures with interesting properties. In this study, coarse-grained molecular dynamics is employed to rapidly screen all 400 dipeptide combinations and predict their ability to aggregate as a potential precursor to their self-assembly. The simulation protocol and scoring method proposed allows a rapid determination of whether a given peptide sequence is likely to aggregate (an indicator for the ability to self-assemble) under aqueous conditions. Systems that show strong aggregation tendencies in the initial screening are selected for longer simulations, which result in good agreement with the known self-assembly or aggregation of dipeptides reported in the literature. Our extended simulations of the diphenylalanine system show that the coarse-grain model is able to reproduce salient features of nanoscale systems and provide insight into the self-assembly process for this system. PMID:23795243

  13. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5118 Alanine. (a) Product. Alanine...

  14. Dipeptides delay the onset of morphine withdrawal in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Kovács, G L; Szontágh, L; Baláspiri, L; Telegdy, G

    1984-01-01

    The effect of dipeptides was studied on naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal in the mouse. In accordance with previous data, s.c. treatment with Z-prolyl-D-leucine delayed the onset of withdrawal jumpings . Replacement of L-proline by L-glutamate or L-pyroglutamate resulted in dipeptides which were more potent in morphine withdrawal than was Z-prolyl-D-leucine. PMID:6540034

  15. Bradykinin antagonists modified with dipeptide mimetic beta-turn inducers.

    PubMed

    Alcaro, Maria C; Vinci, Valerio; D'Ursi, Anna M; Scrima, Mario; Chelli, Mario; Giuliani, Sandro; Meini, Stefania; Di Giacomo, Marcello; Colombo, Lino; Papini, Anna Maria

    2006-05-01

    Bradykinin (BK) is involved in a wide variety of pathophysiological processes. Potent BK peptide antagonists can be developed introducing constrained unnatural amino acids, necessary to force the secondary structure of the molecule. In this paper, we report a structure-activity relationship study of two peptide analogues of the potent B2 antagonist HOE 140 by replacing the D-Tic-Oic dipeptide with conformationally constrained dipeptide mimetic beta-turn inducers. PMID:16504505

  16. Detoxification of aldehydes by histidine-containing dipeptides: from chemistry to clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhengzhi; Baba, Shahid P.; Sweeney, Brooke R.; Barski, Oleg A.

    2015-01-01

    Aldehydes are generated by oxidized lipids and carbohydrates at increased levels under conditions of metabolic imbalance and oxidative stress during atherosclerosis, myocardial and cerebral ischemia, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases and trauma. In most tissues, aldehydes are detoxified by oxidoreductases that catalyze the oxidation or the reduction of aldehydes or enzymatic and nonenzymatic conjugation with low molecular weight thiols and amines, such as glutathione and histidine dipeptides. Histidine dipeptides are present in micromolar to millimolar range in the tissues of vertebrates, where they are involved in a variety of physiological functions such as pH buffering, metal chelation, oxidant and aldehyde scavenging. Histidine dipeptides such as carnosine form Michael adducts with lipid-derived unsaturated aldehydes, and react with carbohydrate-derived oxo- and hydroxy- aldehydes forming products of unknown structure. Although these peptides react with electrophilic molecules at lower rate than glutathione, they can protect glutathione from modification by oxidant and they may be important for aldehyde quenching in glutathione-depleted cells or extracellular space where glutathione is scarce. Consistent with in vitro findings, treatment with carnosine has been shown to diminish ischemic injury, improve glucose control, ameliorate the development of complications in animal models of diabetes and obesity, promote wound healing and decrease atherosclerosis. The protective effects of carnosine have been linked to its anti-oxidant properties, it ability to promote glycolysis, detoxify reactive aldehydes and enhance histamine levels. Thus, treatment with carnosine and related histidine dipeptides may be a promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of diseases associated with high carbonyl load. PMID:23313711

  17. Muramyl dipeptide enhances thermal injury-induced inflammatory cytokine production and organ function injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hui; Song, Xue-Min; Wu, Xiao-Jing; Li, Jian-Guo; Han, Yi; Wang, Yan-Lin; Li, Hui; Zhang, Zong-Ze; Le, Lin-Li; Xu, Yang

    2014-08-01

    The bacterial infection following thermal injury is a very important factor of excessive inflammatory response and multiple organ damage. Muramyl dipeptide (MDP) is the key structure of gram-positive bacteria and gram-negative bacteria triggering the innate immune system. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of MDP on thermal injury-induced inflammatory responses, organ function injury, and mortality in rats. Fifty male Sprague-Dawlay rats were randomly divided into three groups: normal control group, scald group, and MDP group. Scald group only suffered 20% total body surface area third-degree thermal injury. Muramyl dipeptide 5 mg·kg was administered through the femoral vein at 24 h after thermal injury in the MDP group. Plasma inflammatory cytokine levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. An additional 90 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups to observe the survival rate in 72 h. Plasma levels of interleukin-6, interleukin-10, interferon-γ, and high-mobility group box 1; the white blood cell counts; the serum concentrations of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, total bilirubin, creatine kinase isoenzyme-MB, blood urea nitrogen, and creatinine; and the activity of lung tissue myeloperoxidase significantly increased after thermal injury alone. Compared with the scald group, MDP led to more serious inflammatory responses and organ function damage and higher mortality (P < 0.05, respectively). These data indicate that MDP exacerbates thermal injury-induced inflammatory cytokine production, accompanied by multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and high mortality in rats. PMID:24667616

  18. [Design of the novel dipeptide neuropsychotropic drug preparations].

    PubMed

    Gudasheva, T A; Skoldinov, A P

    2003-01-01

    The paper considers a new strategy in the field of neuropsychotropic dipeptide drug design, the main points being as follows: (i) determination of the structural elements of dipeptides, such as fragments of amino acid side radicals and peptide bonds, in nonpeptide drugs; (ii) design of peptide analogs topologically close to the drug; (iii) synthesis and activity testing of these analogs; (iv) determination of the corresponding endogenous neuropeptide among the known neuropeptides or identification of the new neuropeptides in the brain of experimental animals. Using this approach, new pyroglutamyl- and prolyl-containing dipeptides were obtained based on the structure of the well-known classical nootropic drug piracetam. The new drugs exhibit nootropic activity in doses 100-10,000 times lower than those of piracetam. The structure of most active pyroglutamyl dipeptide pGlu-Asn-NH2 coincides with that of the N-end fragment of the endogenous memory peptide AVP(4-9). Noopept (N-phenylacetylprolylglycine ethyl ester), patented in Russia and USA as a new nootropic drug, is currently under stage 2 of successful clinical trials. The main metabolite of noopept, cyclo-Pro-Gly, is identical to the endogenous dipeptide designed in this work and is most close analog of piracetam with respect to pharmacological activity. The universal character of the proposed strategy is demonstrated by the design of active dipeptide analogs of an atypical neuroleptic drug sulpiride. As a result, a potential dipeptide neuroleptic dilept was obtained, which has been patented in Russia and now passes broad preclinical trials. PMID:12962042

  19. Functional architectures based on self-assembly of bio-inspired dipeptides: Structure modulation and its photoelectronic applications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chengjun; Liu, Kai; Li, Junbai; Yan, Xuehai

    2015-11-01

    Getting inspiration from nature and further developing functional architectures provides an effective way to design innovative materials and systems. Among bio-inspired materials, dipeptides and its self-assembled architectures with functionalities have recently been the subject of intensive studies. However, there is still a great challenge to explore its applications likely due to the lack of effective adaptation of their self-assembled structures as well as a lack of understanding of the self-assembly mechanisms. In this context, taking diphenylalanine (FF, a core recognition motif for molecular self-assembly of the Alzheimer's β-amyloid polypeptides) as a model of bio-inspired dipeptides, recent strategies on modulation of dipeptide-based architectures were introduced with regard to both covalent (architectures modulation by coupling functional groups) and non-covalent ways (controlled architectures by different assembly pathways). Then, applications are highlighted in some newly emerging fields of innovative photoelectronic devices and materials, such as artificial photosynthetic systems for renewable solar energy storage and renewable optical waveguiding materials for optoelectronic devices. At last, the challenges and future perspectives of these bio-inspired dipeptides are also addressed. PMID:26365127

  20. Photoelectron spectra and structures of three cyclic dipeptides: PhePhe, TyrPro, and HisGly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickrama Arachchilage, Anoja P.; Wang, Feng; Feyer, Vitaliy; Plekan, Oksana; Prince, Kevin C.

    2012-03-01

    We have investigated the electronic structure of three cyclic dipeptides: cyclo(Histidyl-Glycyl) (cHisGly), cyclo(Tyrosyl-Prolyl) (cTyrPro), and cyclo(Phenylalanyl-Phenylalanyl) (cPhePhe) in the vapor phase, by means of photoemission spectroscopy and theoretical modeling. The last compound was evaporated from the solid linear dipeptide, but cyclised, losing water to form cPhePhe in the gas phase. The results are compared with our previous studies of three other cyclopeptides. Experimental valence and core level spectra have been interpreted in the light of calculations to identify the basic chemical properties associated with the central diketopiperazine ring, and with the additional functional groups. The valence spectra are generally characterized by a restricted set of outer valence orbitals separated by a gap from most other valence orbitals. The theoretically simulated core and valence spectra of all three cyclic dipeptides agree reasonably well with the experimental spectra. The central ring and the side chains act as independent chromophores whose spectra do not influence one another, except for prolyl dipeptides, where the pyrrole ring is fused with the central ring. In this case, significant changes in the valence and core level spectra were observed, and explained by stronger hybridization of the valence orbitals.

  1. Role of histidyl dipeptides in contractile function of fast and slow motor units in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarek, Dominik; Łochyński, Dawid; Everaert, Inge; Pawlak, Maciej; Derave, Wim; Celichowski, Jan

    2016-07-01

    The physiological role of the muscle histidyl dipeptides carnosine and anserine in contractile function of various types of muscle fibers in vivo is poorly understood. Ten adult male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to two groups: control and supplemented for 10 wk with beta-alanine, the precursor of carnosine (∼640 mg·kg body wt(-1)·day(-1)). Thereafter, contractile properties and fatigability of isolated fast fatigable (FF), fast resistant to fatigue (FR), and slow motor units (MUs) from the medial gastrocnemius were determined in deeply anaesthetized animals. The fatigue resistance was tested with a 40-Hz fatigue protocol followed by a second protocol at 40 Hz in fast and 20 Hz in slow units. In the supplemented rats, histidyl dipeptide concentrations significantly increased (P < 0.05) by 25% in the red portion of the gastrocnemius, and carnosine increased by 94% in the white portion. The twitch force of FF units and maximum tetanic force of FR units were significantly increased (P < 0.05), and the half-relaxation time was prolonged in slow units (P < 0.05). FF units showed less fatigue during the first 10 s, and FR units showed higher forces between 10 and 60 s during the 40-Hz fatigue test. In slow units, forces declined less during the first 60 s of the 20-Hz test. In conclusion, this in vivo experiment demonstrates that an elevation in muscle histidyl dipeptide content elicits beneficial changes in MU contractile characteristics and fatigue resistance. Carnosine and anserine seem to play an important yet divergent role in various MUs. PMID:27197862

  2. Selectivity for d-Lactate Incorporation into the Peptidoglycan Precursors of Lactobacillus plantarum: Role of Aad, a VanX-Like d-Alanyl-d-Alanine Dipeptidase▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Deghorain, Marie; Goffin, Philippe; Fontaine, Laetitia; Mainardi, Jean-Luc; Daniel, Richard; Errington, Jeff; Hallet, Bernard; Hols, Pascal

    2007-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum produces peptidoglycan precursors ending in d-lactate instead of d-alanine, making the bacterium intrinsically resistant to vancomycin. The ligase Ddl of L. plantarum plays a central role in this specificity by synthesizing d-alanyl-d-lactate depsipeptides that are added to the precursor peptide chain by the enzyme MurF. Here we show that L. plantarum also encodes a d-Ala-d-Ala dipeptidase, Aad, which eliminates d-alanyl-d-alanine dipeptides that are produced by the Ddl ligase, thereby preventing their incorporation into the precursors. Although d-alanine-ended precursors can be incorporated into the cell wall, inactivation of Aad failed to suppress growth defects of L. plantarum mutants deficient in d-lactate-ended precursor synthesis. PMID:17400741

  3. Alteration of substrate specificity of alanine dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Puja; Aldeborgh, Hannah; Carlucci, Lauren; Walsh, Lauren; Wasserman, Jordan; Zhou, Edward; Lefurgy, Scott T.; Mundorff, Emily C.

    2015-01-01

    The l-alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) has a natural history that suggests it would not be a promising candidate for expansion of substrate specificity by protein engineering: it is the only amino acid dehydrogenase in its fold family, it has no sequence or structural similarity to any known amino acid dehydrogenase, and it has a strong preference for l-alanine over all other substrates. By contrast, engineering of the amino acid dehydrogenase superfamily members has produced catalysts with expanded substrate specificity; yet, this enzyme family already contains members that accept a broad range of substrates. To test whether the natural history of an enzyme is a predictor of its innate evolvability, directed evolution was carried out on AlaDH. A single mutation identified through molecular modeling, F94S, introduced into the AlaDH from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtAlaDH) completely alters its substrate specificity pattern, enabling activity toward a range of larger amino acids. Saturation mutagenesis libraries in this mutant background additionally identified a double mutant (F94S/Y117L) showing improved activity toward hydrophobic amino acids. The catalytic efficiencies achieved in AlaDH are comparable with those that resulted from similar efforts in the amino acid dehydrogenase superfamily and demonstrate the evolvability of MtAlaDH specificity toward other amino acid substrates. PMID:25538307

  4. Tuning the self-assembly of the bioactive dipeptide L-carnosine by incorporation of a bulky aromatic substituent.

    PubMed

    Castelletto, V; Cheng, G; Greenland, B W; Hamley, I W; Harris, P J F

    2011-03-15

    The dipeptide L-carnosine has a number of important biological properties. Here, we explore the effect of attachment of a bulky hydrophobic aromatic unit, Fmoc [N-(fluorenyl-9-methoxycarbonyl)] on the self-assembly of Fmoc-L-carnosine, i.e., Fmoc-β-alanine-histidine (Fmoc-βAH). It is shown that Fmoc-βAH forms well-defined amyloid fibrils containing β sheets above a critical aggregation concentration, which is determined from pyrene and ThT fluorescence experiments. Twisted fibrils were imaged by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy. The zinc-binding properties of Fmoc-βAH were investigated by FTIR and Raman spectroscopy since the formation of metal ion complexes with the histidine residue in carnosine is well-known, and important to its biological roles. Observed changes in the spectra may reflect differences in the packing of the Fmoc-dipeptides due to electrostatic interactions. Cryo-TEM shows that this leads to changes in the fibril morphology. Hydrogelation is also induced by addition of an appropriate concentration of zinc ions. Our work shows that the Fmoc motif can be employed to drive the self-assembly of carnosine into amyloid fibrils. PMID:21338121

  5. Purification and characterization of a novel imidazole dipeptide synthase from the muscle of the Japanese eel Anguilla japonica.

    PubMed

    Tsubone, Shiori; Yoshikawa, Naoko; Okada, Shigeru; Abe, Hiroki

    2007-04-01

    We have purified a novel enzyme from eel white muscle which catalyzes the syntheses of imidazole dipeptides, such as carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine), anserine (beta-alanyl-pi-methyl-L-histidine), and balenine (ophidine; beta-alanyl-tau-methyl-L-histidine), directly from their precursors. The enzyme was purified 1130-fold from eel muscle by a series of column chromatographies. Although eel muscle contains a large amount of carnosine and only trace amounts of anserine and balenine, the anserine synthesizing activity was by far the highest. From gel permeation chromatography, the molecular mass of the enzyme was calculated to be 275kDa. SDS-PAGE of the purified enzyme represented a band around 43kDa, suggesting that the native enzyme is a hexamer or heptamer. The optimal pH and temperature were around 9.5 and 60 degrees C, respectively. K(m) values for beta-alanine and pi-methyl-L-histidine were 44 and 89mM, respectively. The enzyme was greatly activated by Zn(2+) and inhibited by EDTA. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of 25 residues of the purified enzyme showed 52% amino acid identity to 38-62 residues of zebrafish haptoglobin precursor. The purified enzyme also exhibited hydrolytic activity against these imidazole dipeptides. PMID:17261377

  6. Inhibitors of alanine racemase enzyme: a review.

    PubMed

    Azam, Mohammed Afzal; Jayaram, Unni

    2016-08-01

    Alanine racemase is a fold type III PLP-dependent amino acid racemase enzyme catalysing the conversion of l-alanine to d-alanine utilised by bacterial cell wall for peptidoglycan synthesis. As there are no known homologs in humans, it is considered as an excellent antibacterial drug target. The standard inhibitors of this enzyme include O-carbamyl-d-serine, d-cycloserine, chlorovinyl glycine, alaphosphin, etc. d-Cycloserine is indicated for pulmonary and extra pulmonary tuberculosis but therapeutic use of drug is limited due to its severe toxic effects. Toxic effects due to off-target affinities of cycloserine and other substrate analogs have prompted new research efforts to identify alanine racemase inhibitors that are not substrate analogs. In this review, an updated status of known inhibitors of alanine racemase enzyme has been provided which will serve as a rich source of structural information and will be helpful in generating selective and potent inhibitor of alanine racemase. PMID:26024289

  7. Morphosynthesis of alanine mesocrystals by pH control.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yurong; Cölfen, Helmut; Antonietti, Markus

    2006-06-01

    Crystallization of DL-alanine is studied as a single polymorph model case to analyze the different modes of crystallization of polar organic molecules in absence of any structure directing additives. Depending on supersaturation, which is controlled either by temperature or by pH, and in the absence of additives, crystallization by mesoscale assembly of nanoparticles is found over a wide range of conditions, leading to so-called mesocrystals. This supplements the classical molecule-based crystallization mechanism, which is identified at lower supersaturations and at pH values away from the isoelectric point (IEP). The resulting alanine crystals are characterized by SEM, XRD, and single-crystal analysis. Time-resolved conductivity measurements and dynamic light scattering of the reaction solutions reveal information about precursor structures and reaction kinetics. A formation mechanism is proposed for the alanine mesocrystals. PMID:16771332

  8. Vibrational dynamics of crystalline L-alanine

    SciTech Connect

    Bordallo, H.N.; Eckert, J.; Barthes, M.

    1997-11-01

    The authors report a new, complete vibrational analysis of L-alanine and L-alanine-d{sub 4} which utilizes IINS intensities in addition to frequency information. The use of both isotopomers resulted in a self-consistent force field for and assignment of the molecular vibrations in L-alanine. Some details of the calculation as well as a comparison of calculated and observed IINS spectra are presented. The study clarifies a number of important issues on the vibrational dynamics of this molecule and presents a self-consistent force field for the molecular vibrations in crystalline L-alanine.

  9. A structural insight into the P1S1 binding mode of diaminoethylphosphonic and phosphinic acids, selective inhibitors of alanine aminopeptidases.

    PubMed

    Węglarz-Tomczak, Ewelina; Berlicki, Łukasz; Pawełczak, Małgorzata; Nocek, Bogusław; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Mucha, Artur

    2016-07-19

    N'-substituted 1,2-diaminoethylphosphonic acids and 1,2-diaminoethylphosphinic dipeptides were explored to unveil the structural context of the unexpected selectivity of these inhibitors of M1 alanine aminopeptidases (APNs) versus M17 leucine aminopeptidase (LAP). The diaminophosphonic acids were obtained via aziridines in an improved synthetic procedure that was further expanded for the phosphinic pseudodipeptide system. The inhibitory activity, measured for three M1 and one M17 metalloaminopeptidases of different sources (bacterial, human and porcine), revealed several potent compounds (e.g., Ki = 65 nM of 1u for HsAPN). Two structures of an M1 representative (APN from Neisseria meningitidis) in complex with N-benzyl-1,2-diaminoethylphosphonic acid and N-cyclohexyl-1,2-diaminoethylphosphonic acid were determined by the X-ray crystallography. The analysis of these structures and the models of the phosphonic acid complexes of the human ortholog provided an insight into the role of the additional amino group and the hydrophobic substituents of the ligands within the S1 active site region. PMID:27100031

  10. Synthesis and antiproliferative activity of glutamic acid-based dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Silveira-Dorta, Gastón; Martín, Víctor S; Padrón, José M

    2015-08-01

    A small and focused library of 22 dipeptides derived from N,N-dibenzylglutamic acid α- and γ-benzyl esters was prepared in a straightforward manner. The evaluation of the antiproliferative activity in the human solid tumor cell lines HBL-100 (breast), HeLa (cervix), SW1573 (non-small cell lung), T-47D (breast), and WiDr (colon) provided γ-glutamyl methionine (GI50 = 6.0-41 μM) and α-glutamyl proline (GI50 = 7.5-18 μM) as lead compounds. In particular, glutamyl serine and glutamyl proline dipeptides were more active in the resistant cancer cell line WiDr than the conventional anticancer drugs cisplatin and etoposide. Glutamyl tryptophan dipeptides did not affect cell growth of HBL-100, while in T-47D cells, proliferation was inhibited. This result might be attributed to the inhibition of the ATB(0,+) transporter. PMID:25900811

  11. Catalytic Stereoinversion of L-Alanine to Deuterated D-Alanine.

    PubMed

    Moozeh, Kimia; So, Soon Mog; Chin, Jik

    2015-08-01

    A combination of an achiral pyridoxal analogue and a chiral base has been developed for catalytic deuteration of L-alanine with inversion of stereochemistry to give deuterated D-alanine under mild conditions (neutral pD and 25 °C) without the use of any protecting groups. This system can also be used for catalytic deuteration of D-alanine with retention of stereochemistry to give deuterated D-alanine. Thus a racemic mixture of alanine can be catalytically deuterated to give an enantiomeric excess of deuterated D-alanine. While catalytic deracemization of alanine is forbidden by the second law of thermodynamics, this system can be used for catalytic deracemization of alanine with deuteration. Such green and biomimetic approach to catalytic stereocontrol provides insights into efficient amino acid transformations. PMID:26119066

  12. Self-assembly of azide containing dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Yuran, Sivan; Razvag, Yair; Das, Priyadip; Reches, Meital

    2014-07-01

    Functional structures and materials are formed spontaneously in nature through the process of self-assembly. Mimicking this process in vitro will lead to the formation of new substances that would impact many areas including energy production and storage, biomaterials and implants, and drug delivery. The considerable structural diversity of peptides makes them appealing building blocks for self-assembly in vitro. This paper describes the self-assembly of three aromatic dipeptides containing an azide moiety: H-Phe(4-azido)-Phe(4-azido)-OH, H-Phe(4-azido)-Phe-OH, and H-Phe-Phe(4-azido)-OH. The peptide H-Phe(4-azido)-Phe(4-azido)-OH self-assembled into porous spherical structures, whereas the peptides H-Phe(4-azido)-Phe-OH and H-Phe-Phe(4-azido)-OH did not form any ordered structures under the examined experimental conditions. The azido group of the peptide can serve as a photo cross-linking agent upon irradiation with UV light. To examine the effect of this group and its activity on the self-assembled structures, we irradiated the assemblies in solution for different time periods. Using electron microscopy, we determined that the porous spherical assemblies formed by the peptide H-Phe(4-azido)-Phe(4-azido)-OH underwent a structural change upon irradiation. In addition, using FT-IR, we detected the chemical change of the peptide azido group. Moreover, using indentation experiments with atomic force microscopy, we showed that the Young's modulus of the spherical assemblies increased after 20 min of irradiation with UV light. Overall, irradiating the solution of the peptide assemblies containing the azido group resulted in a change both in the morphology and mechanical properties of the peptide-based structures. These ordered assemblies or their peptide monomer building blocks can potentially be incorporated into other peptide assemblies to generate stiffer and more stable materials. PMID:24889029

  13. Doxorubicin immunoconjugates containing bivalent, lysosomally-cleavable dipeptide linkages.

    PubMed

    Dubowchik, Gene M; Radia, Shilpa; Mastalerz, Harold; Walker, Michael A; Firestone, Raymond A; Dalton King, H; Hofstead, Sandra J; Willner, David; Lasch, Shirley J; Trail, Pamela A

    2002-06-01

    Bivalent doxorubicin (DOX)-dipeptides (16a-c) were prepared and conjugated to the monoclonal antibody BR96. The dipeptides are cleaved by lysosomal proteases following internalization of the resulting immunoconjugates. Conjugate 18b demonstrated antigen-specific in vitro tumor cell killing activity (IC(50)=0.2 microM) that was equipotent to DOX with a near doubling of drug molecules/MAb. Size exclusion chromatography showed 18b to be a noncovalent dimer that was formed immediately upon conjugation. PMID:12031335

  14. Decision tree for the binding of dipeptides to the thermally fluctuating surface of cathepsin K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko

    2016-03-01

    The behavior of 15 dipeptides on thermally fluctuating cathepsin K was investigated by molecular dynamics and docking simulations. Four dipeptides were distributed on sites near the active center, and the variations were small. Eleven dipeptides were distributed on sites far from the active center, and the variations were large for nine dipeptides and very large for the other two. The decision tree was constructed using genetic programming, and it accurately classified the 15 dipeptides. The decision tree would accurately estimate the behavior of various peptides, and should significantly contribute to the design of useful peptides.

  15. Functional Characterization of Alanine Racemase from Schizosaccharomyces pombe: a Eucaryotic Counterpart to Bacterial Alanine Racemase

    PubMed Central

    Uo, Takuma; Yoshimura, Tohru; Tanaka, Naotaka; Takegawa, Kaoru; Esaki, Nobuyoshi

    2001-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe has an open reading frame, which we named alr1+, encoding a putative protein similar to bacterial alanine racemase. We cloned the alr1+ gene in Escherichia coli and purified the gene product (Alr1p), with an Mr of 41,590, to homogeneity. Alr1p contains pyridoxal 5′-phosphate as a coenzyme and catalyzes the racemization of alanine with apparent Km and Vmax values as follows: for l-alanine, 5.0 mM and 670 μmol/min/mg, respectively, and for d-alanine, 2.4 mM and 350 μmol/min/mg, respectively. The enzyme is almost specific to alanine, but l-serine and l-2-aminobutyrate are racemized slowly at rates 3.7 and 0.37% of that of l-alanine, respectively. S. pombe uses d-alanine as a sole nitrogen source, but deletion of the alr1+ gene resulted in retarded growth on the same medium. This indicates that S. pombe has catabolic pathways for both enantiomers of alanine and that the pathway for l-alanine coupled with racemization plays a major role in the catabolism of d-alanine. Saccharomyces cerevisiae differs markedly from S. pombe: S. cerevisiae uses l-alanine but not d-alanine as a sole nitrogen source. Moreover, d-alanine is toxic to S. cerevisiae. However, heterologous expression of the alr1+ gene enabled S. cerevisiae to grow efficiently on d-alanine as a sole nitrogen source. The recombinant yeast was relieved from the toxicity of d-alanine. PMID:11244061

  16. Synthesis and activity study of phosphonamidate dipeptides as potential inhibitors of VanX.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ke-Wu; Cheng, Xu; Zhao, Chuan; Liu, Cheng-Cheng; Jia, Chao; Feng, Lei; Xiao, Jian-Min; Zhou, Li-Sheng; Gao, Hui-Zhou; Yang, Xia; Zhai, Le

    2011-12-01

    In an effort to develop inhibitors of VanX, the phosphonamidate analogs of D-Ala-D-Ala dipeptides, N-[(1-aminoethyl) hydroxyphosphinyl]-glycine (1a), -alanine (1b), -valine (1c), -leucine (1d) and -phenylalanine (1e) were synthesized, characterized and evaluated using recombinant VanX. The crystal structure of the intermediate 6d was obtained (Deposition number: CCDC 839134), and structural analysis revealed that it is orthorhombic with a space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), the bond length of P-N is 1.62Å and angle of C-N-P is 123.6°. Phosphonamidate 1(a-e) showed to be inhibitors of VanX with IC(50) values of 0.39, 0.70, 1.12, 2.82, and 4.13mM, respectively, which revealed that the inhibition activities of the phosphonamidates were dependent on the size of R-substituent of them, with the best inhibitor 1a having the smallest substituent. Also, 1a showed antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) with a MIC value of 0.25 μg/ml. PMID:22001030

  17. Cathepsin B Inhibitors: Combining Dipeptide Nitriles with an Occluding Loop Recognition Element by Click Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Janina; Li, Tianwei; Bartz, Ulrike; Gütschow, Michael

    2016-03-10

    An active site mapping of human cathepsin B with dipeptide nitrile inhibitors was performed for a combinatorial approach by introducing several points of diversity and stepwise optimizing the inhibitor structure. To address the occluding loop of cathepsin B by a carboxylate moiety, click chemistry to generate linker-connected molecules was applied. Inhibitor 17 exhibited K i values of 41.3 nM, 27.3 nM, or 19.2 nM, depending on the substrate and pH of the assay. Kinetic data were discussed with respect to the conformational selection and induced fit models. PMID:26985300

  18. Probing the role of aromaticity in the design of dipeptide based nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Aseem; Chauhan, Virander Singh

    2011-03-01

    Self-assembly of peptide into nanostructures is believed to be stabilized primarily by aromatic interactions. Using a minimalistic approach, we probed the importance of aromatic interactions in the self-assembly of simple model dipeptides. Our results suggest that aromaticity may not be absolutely essential for self-assembly, even though it tends to provide directionality to the assembly. We found that peptides containing cyclic/linear side chain hydrophobic residues were also capable of forming stable self-assemblies that are stabilized by hydrophobic interactions. Our observations will find relevance in the design of small peptide based nanoparticles. PMID:21221462

  19. Formation of RNA phosphodiester bond by histidine-containing dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Rafał; Dörr, Mark; Chotera, Agata; Luisi, Pier Luigi; Monnard, Pierre-Alain

    2013-01-21

    A new scenario for prebiotic formation of nucleic acid oligomers is presented. Peptide catalysis is applied to achieve condensation of activated RNA monomers into short RNA chains. As catalysts, L-dipeptides containing a histidine residue, primarily Ser-His, were used. Reactions were carried out in self-organised environment, a water-ice eutectic phase, with low concentrations of reactants. Incubation periods up to 30 days resulted in the formation of short oligomers of RNA. During the oligomerisation, an active intermediate (dipeptide-mononucleotide) is produced, which is the reactive species. Details of the mechanism and kinetics, which were elucidated with a set of control experiments, further establish that the imidazole side chain of a histidine at the carboxyl end of the dipeptide plays a crucial role in the catalysis. These results suggest that this oligomerisation catalysis occurs by a transamination mechanism. Because peptides are much more likely products of spontaneous condensation than nucleotide chains, their potential as catalysts for the formation of RNA is interesting from the origin-of-life perspective. Finally, the formation of the dipeptide-mononucleotide intermediate and its significance for catalysis might also be viewed as the tell-tale signs of a new example of organocatalysis. PMID:23255284

  20. Functional Characterization of Dipeptide Transport System in Human Jejunum

    PubMed Central

    Adibi, Siamak A.; Soleimanpour, Mohammad R.

    1974-01-01

    The present studies were performed to determine whether dipeptide absorption in human jejunum exhibits the characteristics of carrier-mediated transport. 15-cm jejunal segments from human volunteers were perfused with test solutions containing varying amounts of either glycylglycine, glycylleucine, glycine, leucine, glycylglycine with leucine or glycine, glycylglycine with glycylleucine, or glycylleucine with an equimolar mixture of free glycine and leucine. Jejunal absorption rates of both glycylglycine and glycylleucine followed the kinetics of a saturable process. The Km value in millimoles/liter of glycylglycine was significantly greater than the Km value of glycylleucine (43.3±2.6 vs. 26.8±5.9, P < 0.05); and the Km value of glycine was also significantly greater than the Km value of leucine (42.7±7.5 vs. 20.4±5.4, P < 0.05). While overlapping occurred among the Km values of free amino acids and dipeptides, the transport kinetics of dipeptides were characterized by higher Vmax values (in micromoles per minute per 15 centimeters) than those of free amino acids. For example, the Vmax values for glycylglycine and glycine were 837±62 and 590±56, respectively (P < 0.02). While jejunal absorption rates of glycylglycine were not significantly affected by free leucine or free glycine, they were competitively inhibited by glycylleucine. The jejunal absorption rate of glycylleucine was not significantly altered by an equimolar mixture of free glycine and leucine. The selective absorption of dipeptides was investigated by infusing three equimolar mixtures, each containing two different dipeptides. Among the three dipeptides examined, glycylglycine was the least absorbed. There was no significant difference between the absorption of glycylleucine and leucylglycine. The above studies suggest that absorption of both glycylglycine and glycylleucine is mediated by a carrier which is not shared with free neutral amino acids; and that both COOH- and NH2-terminal amino

  1. Self-assembling dipeptides: conformational sampling in solvent-free coarse-grained simulation.

    PubMed

    Villa, Alessandra; Peter, Christine; van der Vegt, Nico F A

    2009-03-28

    We discuss the development of a coarse-grained (CG) model for molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of a hydrophobic dipeptide, diphenylalanine, in aqueous solution. The peptide backbone is described with two CG beads per amino acid, the side groups and charged end groups are each described with one CG bead. In the derivation of interaction functions between CG beads we follow a bottom-up strategy where we devise potentials such that the resulting CG simulation reproduces the conformational sampling and the intermolecular interactions observed in an atomistic simulation of the same peptide. In the CG model, conformational flexibility of the peptide is accounted for through a set of intra-molecular (bonded) potentials. The approach followed to obtain the bonded potentials is discussed in detail. The CG potentials for nonbonded interactions are based on potentials of mean force obtained by atomistic simulations in aqueous solution. Following this approach, solvent mediation effects are included in the effective bead-bead nonbonded interactions and computationally very efficient (solvent-free) simulations of self-assembly processes can be performed. We show that the conformational properties of the all-atom dipeptide in explicit solvent can be accurately reproduced with the CG model. Moreover, preliminary simulations of peptide self-assembly performed with the CG model illustrate good agreement with results obtained from all-atom, explicit solvent simulations. PMID:19280018

  2. How similar is the electronic structures of β-lactam and alanine?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Subhojyoti; Ahmed, Marawan; Wang, Feng

    2016-02-01

    The C1s spectra of β-lactam i.e. 2-azetidinone (C3H5NO), a drug and L-alanine (C3H7NO2), an amino acid, exhibit striking similarities, which may be responsible for the competition between 2-azetidinone and the alanyl-alanine moiety in biochemistry. The present study is to reveal the degree of similarities and differences between their electronic structures of the two model molecular pairs. It is found that the similarities in C1s and inner valence binding energy spectra are due to their bonding connections but other properties such as ring structure (in 2-azetidinone) and chiral carbon (alanine) can be very different. Further, the inner valence region of ionization potential greater than 18 eV for 2-azetidinone and alanine is also significantly similar. Finally the strained lactam ring exhibits more chemical reactivity measured at all non-hydrogen atoms by Fukui functions with respect to alanine.

  3. Designed aromatic homo-dipeptides: formation of ordered nanostructures and potential nanotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Reches, Meital; Gazit, Ehud

    2006-03-01

    Molecular self-assembly offers new routes for the fabrication of novel materials at the nano-scale. Peptide-based nanostructures represent nano-objects of particular interest, as they are biocompatible, can be easily synthesized in large amounts, can be decorated with functional elements and can be used in various biological and non-biological applications. We had previously revealed the formation of highly ordered tubular structures by the diphenylalanine peptide, the core recognition motif of Alzheimer's beta-amyloid polypeptide, due to specific aromatic interactions. We further confirmed this model and demonstrated that a non-charged peptide analogue, Ac-Phe-Phe-NH2, self-assembled into similar tubular structures. We later explored other amine and carboxyl modified diphenylalanine peptide analogues and revealed that these dipeptides can form ordered tubular structures at the nanometric scale. Moreover, a very similar peptide, the diphenylglycine, self-assembled into ordered nano-spherical assemblies. Here we extend our research and explore the self-assembly of other homo-aromatic dipeptides in which their phenyl side-chains are modified with halogen atoms (di-para-fluoro-Phe, di-pentafluoro-Phe, di-para-iodo-Phe), additional phenyl groups (di-4-phenyl-Phe), or with nitro substitutions (di-para-nitro-Phe). We also probed the effect of the alteration of the phenyl groups with naphtyl groups (di-D-1-Nal and di-D-2-Nal). In all cases, well-ordered nanostructures were obtained and studied by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and vibrational spectroscopy. Taken together, the current work and previous ones define the homo-aromatic dipeptide as a central motif for the formation of ordered self-assembled tubular, spherical and two-dimensional structures at the nano-scale. PMID:16582461

  4. Self-assembly of chiral trans-cyclobutane-containing β-dipeptides into ordered aggregates.

    PubMed

    Gorrea, Esther; Nolis, Pau; Torres, Elisabeth; Da Silva, Eric; Amabilino, David B; Branchadell, Vicenç; Ortuño, Rosa M

    2011-04-11

    Two chiral synthetic β-dipeptides have been constructed, one with two trans-cyclobutane residues and the other with one trans and one cis fragment, 1 and 2, respectively, and investigated to get insight into the non-covalent interactions responsible for their self-assembly to form ordered aggregates, as well into parameters such as their morphology and size. Experimental evidence of the formation of these assemblies was provided by spectroscopy, microscopy and X-ray diffraction experiments that suggest the formation of nanoscale helical aggregates. This process involves a conformational change in the molecules of each dipeptide with respect to the preferred conformation of the isolated molecules in solution. A high-resolution NMR spectroscopy study allowed the determination of the dynamics of the gelation process in [D(8)]toluene and the sol-gel transition temperature, which was around 270 K in this solvent at a concentration of 15 mM. NMR spectroscopy experiments also provided some information about conformational changes involved in the sol-gel transition and also suggested a different gel packing for each dipeptide. These observations have been nicely explained by computational studies. The self-assembly of the molecules has been modelled and suggested a head-to-head molecular arrangement for 1 and a head-to-tail arrangement for 2 to give helical structures corresponding to hydrogen-bonded single chains. These chains interact with one another in an antiparallel way to afford bundles, the significant geometry parameters of which fit well to the main peaks observed in wide-angle X-ray diffraction spectra of the aggregates in the solid state. PMID:21404341

  5. Designed aromatic homo-dipeptides: formation of ordered nanostructures and potential nanotechnological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reches, Meital; Gazit, Ehud

    2006-03-01

    Molecular self-assembly offers new routes for the fabrication of novel materials at the nano-scale. Peptide-based nanostructures represent nano-objects of particular interest, as they are biocompatible, can be easily synthesized in large amounts, can be decorated with functional elements and can be used in various biological and non-biological applications. We had previously revealed the formation of highly ordered tubular structures by the diphenylalanine peptide, the core recognition motif of Alzheimer's β-amyloid polypeptide, due to specific aromatic interactions. We further confirmed this model and demonstrated that a non-charged peptide analogue, Ac-Phe-Phe-NH2, self-assembled into similar tubular structures. We later explored other amine and carboxyl modified diphenylalanine peptide analogues and revealed that these dipeptides can form ordered tubular structures at the nanometric scale. Moreover, a very similar peptide, the diphenylglycine, self-assembled into ordered nano-spherical assemblies. Here we extend our research and explore the self-assembly of other homo-aromatic dipeptides in which their phenyl side-chains are modified with halogen atoms (di-para-fluoro-Phe, di-pentafluoro-Phe, di-para-iodo-Phe), additional phenyl groups (di-4-phenyl-Phe), or with nitro substitutions (di-para-nitro-Phe). We also probed the effect of the alteration of the phenyl groups with naphtyl groups (di-D-1-Nal and di-D-2-Nal). In all cases, well-ordered nanostructures were obtained and studied by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and vibrational spectroscopy. Taken together, the current work and previous ones define the homo-aromatic dipeptide as a central motif for the formation of ordered self-assembled tubular, spherical and two-dimensional structures at the nano-scale.

  6. Differentiation of some positional and diastereomeric isomers of Boc-carbo-[beta]3 dipeptides containing galactose, xylose and mannose sugars by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI MS/MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, P. Nagi; Ramesh, V.; Srinivas, R.; Sharma, G. V. M.; Nagendar, Pendem; Subash, V.

    2006-02-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry has been used to distinguish the positional and diastereomeric isomers of Boc-C-linked carbo-[beta]3 dipeptides (1-38) synthesized from glycine (Gly), [beta]-h-glycine ([beta]-hGly), [beta]-h-alanine ([beta]-hAla) and C-linked carbo-[beta]3-amino acid (Caa) that contain galactose, xylose and mannose sugars as side chains with "R" and "S" configurations at the amine center. The major fragmentation of [M + H]+ of the dipeptides (1-38) yields mainly two ions: (i) [M + H-C(CH3)3 + H]+ ([`]a') and (ii) [M + H-Boc + H]+ ([`]b') corresponding to losses of 2-methyl-prop-1-ene and -Boc moiety from [M + H]+ ions, respectively. The diastereomeric dipeptide isomers with Caa (R) and (S) configurations at the N-terminus can easily be distinguished by the difference in the abundance of ion [`]a' and [`]b'. The isomeric peptides with Caa (R) at the N-terminus gives prominent [M + H-C(CH3)3 + H]+ ([`]a') where as it is insignificant or totally absent for peptides which have Caa (S) at the N-terminus. This is presumably due to the different steric crowdings around the Boc-group in the different diastereomers. The positional isomers of dipeptides can also be differentiated by the difference in the abundance of ion [`]a' and [`]b' in the CID of [M + H]+ ions. The CID of [M + H-Boc + H]+ ions of the isomeric peptides also show y1+ ions at different m/z values. All these results suggest that the CID of [M + H]+ ions is highly useful for distinguishing the Boc-NH-Caa-[beta]3 dipeptide isomers with Caa of "S" configuration from the isomers with Caa of "R" configuration and the positional isomers.

  7. Discovery of Potent Cysteine-Containing Dipeptide Inhibitors against Tyrosinase: A Comprehensive Investigation of 20 × 20 Dipeptides in Inhibiting Dopachrome Formation.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Tien-Sheng; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Chen, Wang-Chuan; Wang, Yeng-Tseng; Lee, Yu-Ching; Lu, Chung-Kuang; Don, Ming-Jaw; Chang, Chang-Yu; Lee, Ching-Hsiao; Lin, Hui-Hsiung; Hsu, Hung-Ju; Hsiao, Nai-Wan

    2015-07-15

    Tyrosinase is an essential copper-containing enzyme required for melanin synthesis. The overproduction and abnormal accumulation of melanin cause hyperpigmentation and neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, tyrosinase is promising for use in medicine and cosmetics. Our previous study identified a natural product, A5, resembling the structure of the dipeptide WY and apparently inhibiting tyrosinase. Here, we comprehensively estimated the inhibitory capability of 20 × 20 dipeptides against mushroom tyrosinase. We found that cysteine-containing dipeptides, directly blocking the active site of tyrosinase, are highly potent in inhibition; in particular, N-terminal cysteine-containing dipeptides markedly outperform the C-terminal-containing ones. The cysteine-containing dipeptides, CE, CS, CY, and CW, show comparative bioactivities, and tyrosine-containing dipeptides are substrate-like inhibitors. The dipeptide PD attenuates 16.5% melanin content without any significant cytotoxicity. This study reveals the functional role of cysteine residue positional preference and the selectivity of specific amino acids in cysteine-containing dipeptides against tyrosinase, aiding in developing skin-whitening products. PMID:26083974

  8. The unresolved puzzle why alanine extensions cause disease.

    PubMed

    Winter, Reno; Liebold, Jens; Schwarz, Elisabeth

    2013-08-01

    The prospective increase in life expectancy will be accompanied by a rise in the number of elderly people who suffer from ill health caused by old age. Many diseases caused by aging are protein misfolding diseases. The molecular mechanisms underlying these disorders receive constant scientific interest. In addition to old age, mutations also cause congenital protein misfolding disorders. Chorea Huntington, one of the most well-known examples, is caused by triplet extensions that can lead to more than 100 glutamines in the N-terminal region of huntingtin, accompanied by huntingtin aggregation. So far, nine disease-associated triplet extensions have also been described for alanine codons. The extensions lead primarily to skeletal malformations. Eight of these proteins represent transcription factors, while the nuclear poly-adenylate binding protein 1, PABPN1, is an RNA binding protein. Additional alanines in PABPN1 lead to the disease oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). The alanine extension affects the N-terminal domain of the protein, which has been shown to lack tertiary contacts. Biochemical analyses of the N-terminal domain revealed an alanine-dependent fibril formation. However, fibril formation of full-length protein did not recapitulate the findings of the N-terminal domain. Fibril formation of intact PABPN1 was independent of the alanine segment, and the fibrils displayed biochemical properties that were completely different from those of the N-terminal domain. Although intranuclear inclusions have been shown to represent the histochemical hallmark of OPMD, their role in pathogenesis is currently unclear. Several cell culture and animal models have been generated to study the molecular processes involved in OPMD. These studies revealed a number of promising future therapeutic strategies that could one day improve the quality of life for the patients. PMID:23612654

  9. Β-alanine and l-histidine transport across the inner blood-retinal barrier: potential involvement in L-carnosine supply.

    PubMed

    Usui, Takuya; Kubo, Yoshiyuki; Akanuma, Shin-Ichi; Hosoya, Ken-Ichi

    2013-08-01

    The supply of L-carnosine, a bioactive dipeptide of β-alanine and l-histidine, to the retina across the blood-retinal barrier (BRB) was studied. The in vivo and in vitro studies revealed low uptake activities for [(3)H]Gly-Sar, a representative dipeptide, suggesting that l-carnosine transport plays only a minor role at the BRB. The in vivo study using rats showed approximately 18- and 23-fold greater retinal uptake indexes (RUI) for [(3)H]β-alanine and [(3)H]l-histidine compared with that of a paracellular marker, respectively. The RUI of [(3)H]β-alanine was taurine- and γ-aminobutyric acid-sensitive, and the in vitro uptake by TR-iBRB2 cells showed time- concentration- and temperature-dependent [(3)H]β-alanine uptake, suggesting that a carrier-mediated process was involved in β-alanine transport across the inner BRB. [(3)H]β-Alanine uptake was inhibited by taurine and β-guanidinopropionic acid, suggesting that taurine transporter (TAUT/SLC6A6) is responsible for the influx transport of β-alanine across the inner BRB. Regarding l-histidine, the l-leucine-sensitive RUI of [(3)H]l-histidine was identified, and the in vitro [(3)H]l-histidine uptake by TR-iBRB2 cells suggested that a carrier-mediated process was involved in l-histidine transport across the inner BRB. The inhibition profile suggested that L-type amino acid transporter (LAT1/SLC7A5) is responsible for the influx transport of l-histidine across the inner BRB. These results show that the influx transports of β-alanine and l-histidine across the inner BRB is carried out by TAUT and LAT1, respectively, suggesting that the retinal l-carnosine is supplied by enzymatic synthesis from two kinds of amino acids transported across the inner BRB. PMID:23773890

  10. A Bacillus subtilis dipeptide transport system expressed early during sporulation.

    PubMed

    Mathiopoulos, C; Mueller, J P; Slack, F J; Murphy, C G; Patankar, S; Bukusoglu, G; Sonenshein, A L

    1991-08-01

    Two previously identified Bacillus subtilis DNA segments, dciA and dciB, whose transcripts accumulate very rapidly after induction of sporulation, were found in the same 6.2 kb transcription unit, now known as the dciA operon. Analysis of the sequence of the dciA operon showed that its putative products are homologous to bacterial peptide transport systems. The product of the fifth gene, DciAE, is similar to peptide-binding proteins from Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium (DppA and OppA) and B. subtilis (OppA). A null mutation in dciAE abolished the ability of a proline auxotroph to grow in a medium containing the dipeptide Pro-Gly as sole proline source, suggesting that the dciA operon encodes a dipeptide transport system. PMID:1766370

  11. Inhibition of metalloendopeptidases by 2-mercaptoacetyl-dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Blumberg, S; Tauber, Z

    1983-10-17

    A series of 2-mercaptoacetyl-dipeptides, a potential group of metalloendopeptidase inhibitors, has been synthesized by coupling the N-hydroxysuccinimide ester of S-acetyl-2-mercaptoacetic acid with hydrophobic dipeptide methyl ester hydrochlorides, followed by hydrolysis with NaOH in aqueous methanol and acidification with HCl. Thus, the 2-mercaptoacetyl derivatives of L-phenylalanyl-L-leucine, L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine and L-leucyl-D-phenylalanine were prepared. The first two compounds inhibit effectively thermolysin from Bacillus thermoproteolyticus and a metalloendopeptidase isolated from Streptomyces griseus, with Ki values in the micromolar range or below. The third compound inhibits the two enzymes only poorly, showing the stereospecificity of the inhibition process. These inhibitors should provide a useful tool for the study of bacterial and mammalian metalloendopeptidases (or dipeptidyl carboxypeptidases) and for the assessment of their physiological role. PMID:6413206

  12. Inhibition of polyphenol oxidases activity by various dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Girelli, Anna M; Mattei, Enrico; Messina, Antonella; Tarola, Anna M

    2004-05-19

    In an effort to develop natural and nontoxic inhibitors on the activity of mushroom polyphenol oxidase (PPO) the effect of various glycyl-dipeptides (GlyAsp, GlyGly, GlyHis, GlyLeu, GlyLys, GlyPhe, GlyPro, GlyTyr) was investigated. The inhibition study with dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) as substrate is based on separation of the enzymatic reaction components by reversed phase HPLC and the UV detection of the dopachrome formed. The results have evidenced that several of tested dipeptides inhibited PPO activity in the range of 20-40% while GlyPro and GlyLeu had no effect. The study has also permitted the characterization of the following kinetic pattern: a linear-mixed-type mechanism for GlyAsp, GlyGly, GlyLys, and GlyPhe and a hyperbolic-mixed-type for GlyTyr. It was not possible to identify the inhibition mechanism for GlyHis, although it affects PPO activity. In addition the effects of GlyAsp, GlyLys and GlyHis were evaluated for lessening the browning of fresh Golden Delicious apple and Irish White Skinned potato. The effectiveness of such inhibitors was determined by the difference between the colors observed in the dipeptide-treated sample and the controls using the color space CIE-Lab system. The % browning inhibition on potato (20-50%) was greater than of apple (20-30%) by the all tested dipeptides. Only GlyLys presented the significant value of 50%. PMID:15137808

  13. Synthesis and characterization of novel dipeptide ester prodrugs of acyclovir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nashed, Yasser E.; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2003-07-01

    Four dipeptide (Gly-Gly, Gly-Val, Val-Val, Val-Gly) ester prodrugs of 9-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl]guanine (acyclovir, ACV) were synthesized. LC/MS was used to characterize the new prodrugs. Both 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectra of the four prodrugs of ACV were measured and assigned based on spectral comparison with compounds of similar structures.

  14. Mimosine Dipeptide Enantiomsers: Improved Inhibitors against Melanogenesis and Cyclooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Binh Cao Quan; Tawata, Shinkichi

    2015-01-01

    Melanogenesis plays an important role in the protection of skin against UV through production of melanin pigments, but abnormal accumulation of this pigment causes unaesthetic hyperpigmentation. Much effort is being made to develop effective depigmenting agents. Here, we show for the first time that a small library of mimosine dipeptide enantiomers (Mi-L/D-amino acid) inhibit the melanogenesis in B16F10 melanoma cells by down-regulating the cellular tyrosinase with little effect on their growth or viability. Two of them, Mi-D-Trp and Mi-D-Val, turned out to be the most potent inhibitors on melanin content and cellular tyrosinase in B16F10 melanoma cells. In addition, most of the mimosine dipeptides were more potent than mimosine for inhibiting cyclooxygenase 1 (COX-1) with IC50 of 18-26 μM. Among them, Mi-L-Val and Mi-L-Trp inhibited cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) more potently than indomethacin, with IC50 values of 22 and 19 μM, respectively. Taken together, our results suggest the possibility that mimosine dipeptides could be better candidates (than mimosine) for anti-melanogenic (skin hyperpigmentation treatment) and cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition. PMID:26287130

  15. MX1013, a dipeptide caspase inhibitor with potent in vivo antiapoptotic activity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wu; Guastella, John; Huang, Jin-Cheng; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Li; Xue, Dong; Tran, Minhtam; Woodward, Richard; Kasibhatla, Shailaja; Tseng, Ben; Drewe, John; Cai, Sui Xiong

    2003-01-01

    Caspases play a critical role in apoptosis, and are considered to be key targets for the design of cytoprotective drugs. As part of our antiapoptotic drug-discovery effort, we have synthesized and characterized Z-VD-fmk, MX1013, as a potent, irreversible dipeptide caspase inhibitor. MX1013 inhibits caspases 1, 3, 6, 7, 8, and 9, with IC50 values ranging from 5 to 20 nM. MX1013 is selective for caspases, and is a poor inhibitor of noncaspase proteases, such as cathepsin B, calpain I, or Factor Xa (IC50 values >10 μM). In several cell culture models of apoptosis, including caspase 3 processing, PARP cleavage, and DNA fragmentation, MX1013 is more active than tetrapeptide- and tripeptide-based caspase inhibitors, and blocked apoptosis at concentrations as low as 0.5 μM. MX1013 is more aqueous soluble than tripeptide-based caspase inhibitors such as Z-VAD-fmk. At a dose of 1 mg kg−1 i.v., MX1013 prevented liver damage and the lethality caused by Fas death receptor activation in the anti-Fas mouse-liver apoptosis model, a widely used model of liver failure. At a dose of 20 mg kg−1 (i.v. bolus) followed by i.v. infusion for 6 or 12 h, MX1013 reduced cortical damage by approximately 50% in a model of brain ischemia/reperfusion injury. At a dose of 20 mg kg−1 (i.v. bolus) followed by i.v. infusion for 12 h, MX1013 reduced heart damage by approximately 50% in a model of acute myocardial infarction. Based on these studies, we conclude that MX1013, a dipeptide pan-caspase inhibitor, has a good combination of in vitro and in vivo properties. It has the ability to protect cells from a variety of apoptotic insults, and is systemically active in three animal models of apoptosis, including brain ischemia. PMID:12970077

  16. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  17. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  18. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  19. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  20. Probing Selection Mechanism of the Most Favorable Conformation of a Dipeptide in Chaotropic and Kosmotropic Solution.

    PubMed

    Jas, Gouri S; Middaugh, C Russell; Kuczera, Krzysztof

    2016-07-21

    Chaotropes like urea and guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) tend to destabilize, and kosmotropes like proline tend to stabilize folded structures of peptides and proteins. Here, we combine fluorescence anisotropy decay measurements and molecular dynamics simulations to gain a microscopic understanding of the molecular mechanism for shifting conformational preferences in aqueous, GdmCl, urea, and proline solutions of a simple model dipeptide, N-acetyl-tryptophan-amide (NATA). Measured anisotropy decay of NATA as a function of temperature, pH, and cosolvent concentrations showed reorientations moderately slower in GdmCl and urea and substantially slower in proline compared to those of aqueous environment. A small change in pH significantly slows orientation time in water and GdmCl and less markedly in urea. Computationally, we use molecular dynamics with dihedral restraints to separately analyze the motions and interactions of the representative NATA conformers in the four different solvent environments. This novel analysis provides a dissection of the observed overall diffusion rates into contributions from individual dipeptide conformations. The variation of rotational diffusion rates with conformation are quite large. Population-weighted averaging or using properties of the major cluster reproduces the dynamical features of the full unrestrained dynamics. Additionally, we correlate the observable diffusion rates with microscopic features of conformer size, shape, and solvation. This analysis uncovered underlying differences in detailed atomistic behavior of the three cosolvents-urea, GdmCl, and proline. For both urea and the pure water system we find good agreement with hydrodynamic theory, with diffusion rates primarily correlated with conformer size and shape. In contrast, for GdmCl and proline solutions, the variation in conformer diffusion rates was mostly determined by specific interactions with the cosolvents. We also find preferences for different molecular

  1. Molecular interactions between dipeptides, drugs and the human intestinal H+ -oligopeptide cotransporter hPEPT1.

    PubMed

    Sala-Rabanal, Monica; Loo, Donald D F; Hirayama, Bruce A; Turk, Eric; Wright, Ernest M

    2006-07-01

    The human intestinal proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter hPEPT1 has been implicated in the absorption of pharmacologically active compounds. We have investigated the interactions between a comprehensive selection of drugs, and wild-type and variant hPEPT1s expressed in Xenopus oocytes, using radiotracer uptake and electrophysiological methods. The beta-lactam antibiotics ampicillin, amoxicillin, cephalexin and cefadroxil, the antineoplastics delta-aminolevulinic acid (delta-ALA) and bestatin, and the neuropeptide N-acetyl-Asp-Glu (NAAG), were transported, as judged by their ability to evoke inward currents. When the drugs were added in the presence of the typical substrate glycylsarcosine (Gly-Sar), the inward currents were equal or less than that induced by Gly-Sar alone. This suggests that the drugs are transported at a lower turnover rate than Gly-Sar, but may also point towards complex interactions between dipeptides, drugs and the transporter. Gly-Sar and the drugs also modified the kinetics of hPEPT1 presteady-state charge movement, by causing a reduction in maximum charge (Qmax) and a shift of the midpoint voltage (V0.5) to more negative potentials. Our results indicate that the substrate selectivity of hPEPT1 is: Gly-Sar > NAAG, delta-ALA, bestatin > cefadroxil, cephalexin > ampicillin, amoxicillin. Based on steady-state and presteady-state analysis of Gly-Sar and cefadroxil transport, we proposed an extension of the 6-state kinetic model for hPEPT1 function that globally accounts for the observed presteady-state and steady-state kinetics of neutral dipeptide and drug transport. Our model suggests that, under saturating conditions, the rate-limiting step of the hPEPT1 transport cycle is the reorientation of the empty carrier within the membrane. Variations in rates of drug cotransport are predicted to be due to differences in affinity and turnover rate. Oral availability of drugs may be reduced in the presence of physiological concentrations of dietary

  2. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) toxicity and permeability assessment after L-(4-¹⁰Boronophenyl)alanine, a conventional B-containing drug for boron neutron capture therapy, using an in vitro BBB model.

    PubMed

    Roda, E; Nion, S; Bernocchi, G; Coccini, T

    2014-10-01

    Since brain tumours are the primary candidates for treatment by Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, one major challenge in the selective drug delivery to CNS is the crossing of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The present pilot study investigated (i) the transport of a conventional B-containing product (i.e., L-(4-(10)Boronophenyl)alanine, L-(10)BPA), already used in medicine but still not fully characterized regarding its CNS interactions, as well as (ii) the effects of the L-(10)BPA on the BBB integrity using an in vitro model, consisting of brain capillary endothelial cells co-cultured with glial cells, closely mimicking the in vivo conditions. The multi-step experimental strategy (i.e. Integrity test, Filter study, Transport assay) checked L-(10)BPA toxicity at 80 µg Boron equivalent/ml, and its ability to cross the BBB, additionally by characterizing the cytoskeletal and TJ's proteins by immunocytochemistry and immunoblotting. In conclusion, a lack of toxic effects of L-(10)BPA was demonstrated, nevertheless accompanied by cellular stress phenomena (e.g. vimentin expression modification), paralleled by a low permeability coefficient (0.39 ± 0.01 × 10(-3)cm min(-1)), corroborating the scarce probability that L-(10)BPA would reach therapeutically effective cerebral concentration. These findings emphasized the need for novel strategies aimed at optimizing boron delivery to brain tumours, trying to ameliorate the compound uptake or developing new targeted products suitable to safely and effectively treat head cancer. Thus, the use of in vitro BBB model for screening studies may provide a useful early safety assessment for new effective compounds. PMID:25128598

  3. Enzymatical and microbial degradation of cyclic dipeptides (diketopiperazines)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Diketopiperazines (DKPs) are cyclic dipeptides, representing an abundant class of biologically active natural compounds. Despite their widespread occurrence in nature, little is known about their degradation. In this study, the enzymatical and microbial cleavage of DKPs was investigated. Peptidase catalyzed hydrolysis of certain DKPs was formerly reported, but could not be confirmed in this study. While testing additional peptidases and DKPs no degradation was detected, indicating peptidase stability of the peptide bond in cyclic dipeptides. Besides confirmation of the reported degradation of cyclo(l-Asp-l-Phe) by Paenibacillus chibensis (DSM 329) and Streptomyces flavovirens (DSM 40062), cleavage of cyclo(l-Asp-l-Asp) by DSM 329 was detected. Other DKPs were not hydrolyzed by both strains, demonstrating high substrate specificity. The degradation of cyclo(l-Asp-l-Phe) by DSM 40062 was shown to be inducible. Three strains, which are able to hydrolyze hydantoins and dihydropyrimidines, were identified for the degradation of DKPs: Leifsonia sp. K3 (DSM 27212) and Bacillus sp. A16 (DSM 25052) cleaved cyclo(dl-Ala-dl-Ala) and cyclo(l-Gly-l-Phe), and Rhizobium sp. NA04-01 (DSM 24917) degraded cyclo(l-Asp-l-Phe), cyclo(l-Gly-l-Phe) and cyclo(l-Asp-l-Asp). The first enantioselective cleavage of cyclo(dl-Ala-dl-Ala) was detected with the newly isolated strains Paenibacillus sp. 32A (DSM 27214) and Microbacterium sp. 40A (DSM 27211). Cyclo(l-Ala-d-Ala) and cyclo(l-Ala-l-Ala) were completely degraded, whereas the enantiomer cyclo(d-Ala-d-Ala) was not attacked. Altogether, five bacterial strains were newly identified for the cleavage of DKPs. These bacteria may be of value for industrial purposes, such as degradation of undesirable DKPs in food and drugs and production of (enantiopure) dipeptides and amino acids. PMID:24001323

  4. Ocular Sustained Release Nanoparticles Containing Stereoisomeric Dipeptide Prodrugs of Acyclovir

    PubMed Central

    Jwala, Jwala; Boddu, Sai H.S.; Shah, Sujay; Sirimulla, Suman; Pal, Dhananjay

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Purpose The objective of this study was to develop and characterize polymeric nanoparticles of appropriate stereoisomeric dipeptide prodrugs of acyclovir (L-valine-L-valine-ACV, L-valine-D-valine-ACV, D-valine-L-valine-ACV, and D-valine-D-valine-ACV) for the treatment of ocular herpes keratitis. Methods Stereoisomeric dipeptide prodrugs of acyclovir (ACV) were screened for bioreversion in various ocular tissues, cell proliferation, and uptake across the rabbit primary corneal epithelial cell line. Docking studies were carried out to examine the affinity of prodrugs to the peptide transporter protein. Prodrugs with optimum characteristics were selected for the preparation of nanoparticles using various grades of poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). Nanoparticles were characterized for the entrapment efficiency, surface morphology, size distribution, and in vitro release. Further, the effect of thermosensitive gels on the release of prodrugs from nanoparticles was also studied. Results L-valine-L-valine-ACV and L-valine-D-valine-ACV were considered to be optimum in terms of enzymatic stability, uptake, and cytotoxicity. Docking results indicated that L-valine in the terminal position increases the affinity of the prodrugs to the peptide transporter protein. Entrapment efficiency values of L-valine-L-valine-ACV and L-valine-D-valine-ACV were found to be optimal with PLGA 75:25 and PLGA 65:35 polymers, respectively. In vitro release of prodrugs from nanoparticles exhibited a biphasic release behavior with initial burst phase followed by sustained release. Dispersion of nanoparticles in thermosensitive gels completely eliminated the burst release phase. Conclusion Novel nanoparticulate systems of dipeptide prodrugs of ACV suspended in thermosensitive gels may provide sustained delivery after topical administration. PMID:21500985

  5. A self-assembling fluorescent dipeptide conjugate for cell labelling.

    PubMed

    Kirkham, Steven; Hamley, Ian W; Smith, Andrew M; Gouveia, Ricardo M; Connon, Che J; Reza, Mehedi; Ruokolainen, Janne

    2016-01-01

    Derivatives of fluorophore FITC (fluorescein isothiocyanate) are widely used in bioassays to label proteins and cells. An N-terminal leucine dipeptide is attached to FITC, and we show that this simple conjugate molecule is cytocompatible and is uptaken by cells (human dermal and corneal fibroblasts) in contrast to FITC itself. Co-localisation shows that FITC-LL segregates in peri-nuclear and intracellular vesicle regions. Above a critical aggregation concentration, the conjugate is shown to self-assemble into beta-sheet nanostructures comprising molecular bilayers. PMID:25990811

  6. Principles of self-assembly of helical pores from dendritic dipeptides

    PubMed Central

    Percec, Virgil; Dulcey, Andrés E.; Peterca, Mihai; Ilies, Monica; Nummelin, Sami; Sienkowska, Monika J.; Heiney, Paul A.

    2006-01-01

    The self-assembly of the dendritic dipeptides (4-3,4-3,5)nG2-CH2-Boc-l-Tyr-l-Ala-OMe and their achiral dendritic alcohol (4-3,4-3,5)nG2-CH2OH precursors, both with n = 1–16, where n represents the number of methylenic units in the alkyl groups of the dendron, are reported. All chiral dendritic dipeptides and achiral dendritic alcohols self-assemble into helical porous columns that are stable in both solution and solid state. The pore diameter (Dpore) of the columns self-assembled from dendritic dipeptides is ≈10 Å larger than that of structures assembled from dendritic alcohols. The increase of the Dpore at the transition from dendritic alcohol to dendritic dipeptide is accompanied by a decreased solid angle of the building block. This trend is in agreement with previous pore size-solid angle dependences observed with different protective groups of the dipeptide and primary structures of the dendron. However, within the series of dendritic alcohols and dendritic dipeptides with various n, the Dpore increases when the solid angle increases. The results of these investigations together with those of previous studies on the role of dipeptide stereochemistry and protective groups on this self-assembly process provide the molecular principles required to program the construction of supramolecular helical pores with diameter controlled at the Å level from a single dendritic dipeptide architecture. These principles are expected to be valid for libraries of dendritic dipeptides based on dendrons and dipeptides with various primary structures. PMID:16469843

  7. The molecular recognition of dipeptide by oligoglycyl head group of amphiphile: a quantum chemical study.

    PubMed

    Thirumoorthy, Krishnan; Soni, Kiran; Nandi, Nilashis

    2009-01-01

    In the present work, we presented an analysis of the unusual recognition specificity exhibited by marked difference in the binding behavior of dipeptide with amphiphilic head group when subtle relative change of N-terminal and C-terminal of the dipeptide are made. Recently, in a series of detailed experiments, binding of aqueous dipeptides, GlyX and X/Gly (X = Leu, Phe, Pro, Ala; X/ = Leu, Phe) with dialkyl oligoglycyl amphiphiles is studied [X. Cha, K. Ariga, M. Onda, and T. Kunitake, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 117, 11833 (1995)]. It is observed that GlyX are specifically bound to 2C18BGly2NH2 while X/Gly are insignificantly bound. We first studied the conformational energy variation of GlyPhe, PheGly and model of 2C18BGly2NH2 amphiphile using semi-empirical and ab-initio methods in vacuum. Using the individual energy optimized monomer structure of amphiphile and peptide, we studied the binding energy of optimized GlyPhe: amphiphile pair and PheGly: amphiphile pair structures at 1:1 and 1:2 ratio at the same level of theory using a population of structures. Binding of GlyPhe is favorable over the binding of PheGly at various levels of theory (semi-empirical and ab-initio). It is noted that the hydrogen bonding pattern in the GlyPhe binding is more effective than that in the PheGly binding. In the population of low energy structures, PheGly: amphiphile structures have more exposed area around the hydrophobic Phe group than the GlyPhe: amphiphile structures. Relatively more PheGly: amphiphile structures have intermolecular orientation unsuitable to contribute to the population of head group structures relevant in aqueous interface. Summarizing, significantly better binding capacity of GlyPhe over the PheGly with amphiphile, is due to the difference in hydrogen bonding interaction pattern, hydrophobic effect and possible orientations of the amphiphile and peptide at interface, relevant to the condensed phase monolayer structure. All the three factors cooperatively lead to

  8. Structure-Functional Study of Tyrosine and Methionine Dipeptides: An Approach to Antioxidant Activity Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Torkova, Anna; Koroleva, Olga; Khrameeva, Ekaterina; Fedorova, Tatyana; Tsentalovich, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    Quantum chemical methods allow screening and prediction of peptide antioxidant activity on the basis of known experimental data. It can be used to design the selective proteolysis of protein sources in order to obtain products with antioxidant activity. Molecular geometry and electronic descriptors of redox-active amino acids, as well as tyrosine and methionine-containing dipeptides, were studied by Density Functional Theory method. The calculated data was used to reveal several descriptors responsible for the antioxidant capacities of the model compounds based on their experimentally obtained antioxidant capacities against ABTS (2,2′-Azino-bis-(3-ethyl-benzothiazoline-6-sulfonate)) and peroxyl radical. A formula to predict antioxidant activity of peptides was proposed. PMID:26512651

  9. Structure-Functional Study of Tyrosine and Methionine Dipeptides: An Approach to Antioxidant Activity Prediction.

    PubMed

    Torkova, Anna; Koroleva, Olga; Khrameeva, Ekaterina; Fedorova, Tatyana; Tsentalovich, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    Quantum chemical methods allow screening and prediction of peptide antioxidant activity on the basis of known experimental data. It can be used to design the selective proteolysis of protein sources in order to obtain products with antioxidant activity. Molecular geometry and electronic descriptors of redox-active amino acids, as well as tyrosine and methionine-containing dipeptides, were studied by Density Functional Theory method. The calculated data was used to reveal several descriptors responsible for the antioxidant capacities of the model compounds based on their experimentally obtained antioxidant capacities against ABTS (2,2'-Azino-bis-(3-ethyl-benzothiazoline-6-sulfonate)) and peroxyl radical. A formula to predict antioxidant activity of peptides was proposed. PMID:26512651

  10. Bayesian comparison of Markov models of molecular dynamics with detailed balance constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacallado, Sergio; Chodera, John D.; Pande, Vijay

    2009-07-01

    Discrete-space Markov models are a convenient way of describing the kinetics of biomolecules. The most common strategies used to validate these models employ statistics from simulation data, such as the eigenvalue spectrum of the inferred rate matrix, which are often associated with large uncertainties. Here, we propose a Bayesian approach, which makes it possible to differentiate between models at a fixed lag time making use of short trajectories. The hierarchical definition of the models allows one to compare instances with any number of states. We apply a conjugate prior for reversible Markov chains, which was recently introduced in the statistics literature. The method is tested in two different systems, a Monte Carlo dynamics simulation of a two-dimensional model system and molecular dynamics simulations of the terminally blocked alanine dipeptide.

  11. A preliminary optimization of alanine blends for ESR dosimetry in a mixed n–γ field: Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoseininaveh, M.; Ranjbar, A. H.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a preliminary work on the enhancement of ESR response of several arrangements of alanine and boron compounds, exposed to a thermal neutron beam, is presented using FLUKA code. A multi-layer dosimeter consist of consecutive layers of alanine and boron compounds showed that the amount of energy deposited in the alanine layers is maximized when their thickness is 5 μm and the thickness of boron compound layers are between 2 and 3 μm. Furthermore, the optimum number of 10B layers in the dosimeter was found to be 35 layers. Moreover, the alanine samples consisting of small spherical grains of boron compounds, arranged regularly in the middle plane of the dosimeters, exposed to a thermal neutron beam, were modeled. The dependence of energy deposition in the alanine material on the size of grains, and on their composition were also studied, as well.

  12. Coassembly of aromatic dipeptides into biomolecular necklaces.

    PubMed

    Yuran, Sivan; Razvag, Yair; Reches, Meital

    2012-11-27

    This paper describes the formation of complex peptide-based structures by the coassembly of two simple peptides, the diphenylalanine peptide and its tert-butyl dicarbonate (Boc) protected analogue. Each of these peptides can self-assemble into a distinct architecture: the diphenylalanine peptide into tubular structures and its analogue into spheres. Integrated together, these peptides coassemble into a construction of beaded strings, where spherical assemblies are connected by elongated elements. Electron and scanning force microscopy demonstrated the morphology of these structures, which we termed "biomolecular necklaces". Additional experiments indicated the reversibility of the coassembly process and the stability of the structures. Furthermore, we suggest a possible mechanism of formation for the biomolecular necklaces. Our suggestion is based on the necklace model for polyelectrolyte chains, which proposes that a necklace structure appears as a result of counterion condensation on the backbone of a polyelectrolyte. Overall, the approach of coassembly, demonstrated using aromatic peptides, can be adapted to any peptides and may lead to the development and discovery of new self-assembled architectures formed by peptides and other biomolecules. PMID:23061818

  13. Cyclo-Gly-Pro, a cyclic dipeptide, attenuates nociceptive behaviour and inflammatory response in mice.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Jamylle Nunes de Souza; de Aquino, Fernanda Lima Torres; de Brito, Renan Guedes; dos Santos, Priscila Laíse; Quintans, Jullyana de Souza Siqueira; de Souza, Lucas Costa; de Araújo, Almair Ferreira; Diaz, Bruno Lourenço; Lucca-Júnior, Waldecy; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo José; Barreto, Emiliano

    2015-12-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of the cyclic dipeptide cyclo-Gly-Pro (CGP) in mice. Antinociceptive activity was assessed by employing different pain models, such as formalin test, acetic acid-induced writhing, hot plate test, and carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia, in mice. The number of c-Fos-immunoreactive cells in the periaqueductal gray (PAG) was evaluated in CGP-treated mice. Anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated using paw oedema induced by carrageenan, compound 48/80, serotonin, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and analyzed by plethysmometry. Quantitation of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the paw was carried out to analyze the presence of neutrophils in the tissue. Intraperitoneal injection of CGP produced a significant inhibition in both neurogenic and inflammatory phases of formalin-induced pain. The antinociceptive effect of CGP, evaluated in the acetic acid-induced writhing test, was detected for up to 6 h after treatment. Further, in the hot plate test, antinociceptive behaviour was evoked by CGP, and this response was inhibited by naloxone. Animals treated with CGP did not present changes in motor performance. In CGP-treated mice there was an increase in the number of c-Fos-positive neurons in the periaqueductal gray. In another set of experiments, CGP attenuated the hyperalgesic response induced by carrageenan. Furthermore, CGP also reduced the carrageenan-increased MPO activity in paws. In addition, CGP also reduced the paw oedema evoked by compound 48/80, serotonin, and PGE2 . Taken together, these results may support a possible therapeutic application of the cyclic dipeptide cyclo-Gly-Pro toward alleviating nociception and damage caused by inflammation conditions. PMID:26277051

  14. Alanine transport across in vitro rabbit vagina.

    PubMed

    Hajjar, J J; Mroueh, A M

    1979-04-01

    Transmural flux of alanine across the vaginal epithelium of the rabbit is a specialized mechanism. There is a net serosal to mucosal translocation of the amino acid in the absence of a concentration gradient. Changes in reproductive cycle do not influence this mechanism but, in castrated animals, it is abolished. Transport properties of vaginal epithelium is important because of increasing utilization of intravaginal contraceptives. PMID:455986

  15. Earthworms accumulate alanine in response to drought.

    PubMed

    Holmstrup, Martin; Slotsbo, Stine; Henriksen, Per G; Bayley, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Earthworms have ecologically significant functions in tropical and temperate ecosystems and it is therefore important to understand how these animals survive during drought. In order to explore the physiological responses to dry conditions, we simulated a natural drought incident in a laboratory trial exposing worms in slowly drying soil for about one month, and then analyzed the whole-body contents of free amino acids (FAAs). We investigated three species forming estivation chambers when soils dry out (Aporrectodea tuberculata, Aporrectodea icterica and Aporrectodea longa) and one species that does not estivate during drought (Lumbricus rubellus). Worms subjected to drought conditions (< -2MPa) substantially increased the concentration of FAAs and in particular alanine that was significantly upregulated in all tested species. Alanine was the most important FAA reaching 250-650μmolg(-1) dry weight in dehydrated Aporrectodea species and 300μmolg(-1) dry weight in L. rubellus. Proline was only weakly upregulated in some species as were a few other FAAs. Species forming estivation chambers (Aporrectodea spp.) did not show a better ability to conserve body water than the non-estivating species (L. rubellus) at the same drought level. These results suggest that the accumulation of alanine is an important adaptive trait in drought tolerance of earthworms in general. PMID:27107492

  16. Evaluation of the Ser-His Dipeptide, a Putative Catalyst of Amide and Ester Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Melissa J; Lavis, Luke D; Hilvert, Donald; Gellman, Samuel H

    2016-08-01

    Efficient hydrolysis of amide bonds has long been a reaction of interest for organic chemists. The rate constants of proteases are unmatched by those of any synthetic catalyst. It has been proposed that a dipeptide containing serine and histidine is an effective catalyst of amide hydrolysis, based on an apparent ability to degrade a protein. The capacity of the Ser-His dipeptide to catalyze the hydrolysis of several discrete ester and amide substrates is investigated using previously described conditions. This dipeptide does not catalyze the hydrolysis of amide or unactivated ester groups in any of the substrates under the conditions evaluated. PMID:27400366

  17. Evaluation of toxicity on epithelial and tumor cells of biaryl dipeptide tyrosines.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Stanley N S; Drewes, Carine C; de Vinci Kanda Kupa, Leonard; Farsky, Sandra H P; Stefani, Hélio A

    2016-05-23

    We report a method to obtain biaryl dipeptide tyrosine via Suzuki-Miyaura and alkynyl dipeptide tyrosine by Sonogashira cross-coupling reactions. Analysis of the biological action of biaryl dipeptide tyrosine 4d compound showed its ability to impair the metabolism and proliferation of SK-Mel-28 human melanoma lineage cells, independently of mitochondrial membrane depolarization, apoptosis and necrosis. Moreover, 4d compound did not cause toxicity to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), suggesting its toxic specificity to cancer cells. PMID:26974369

  18. Dipeptides Inhibit Melanin Synthesis in Mel-Ab Cells through Down-Regulation of Tyrosinase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-e; Kim, Eun-Hyun; Choi, Hye-Ryung; Sohn, Uy Dong; Yun, Hye-Young; Baek, Kwang Jin; Kwon, Nyoun Soo; Park, Kyoung-Chan

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of proline-serine (PS) and valine-serine (VS) dipeptides on melanogenesis in Mel-Ab cells. Proline-serine and VS significantly inhibited melanin synthesis in a concentration-dependent manner, though neither dipeptide directly inhibited tyrosinase activity in a cell-free system. Both PS and VS down-regulated the expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) and tyrosinase. In a follow-up study also described here, the effects of these dipeptides on melanogenesis-related signal transduction were quantified. Specifically, PS and VS induced ERK phosphorylation, though they had no effect on phosphorylation of the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). These data suggest that PS and VS inhibit melanogenesis through ERK phosphorylation and subsequent down-regulation of MITF and tyrosinase. Properties of these dipeptides are compatible with application as skin-whitening agents. PMID:22915995

  19. Exchange interactions and magnetic dimension in Cu(L-alanine)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, R.; Passeggi, M. C. G.; Novak, M. A.; Symko, O. G.; Oseroff, S. B.; Nascimento, O. R.; Terrile, M. C.

    1991-01-01

    A study of the magnetic properties of the copper (II) complex of the amino acid l-alanine [Cu(l-alanine)2] is reported. The susceptibility of a powder sample has been measured between 0.013 and 240 K. A linear-spin-chain model with antiferromagnetic exchange coupling J=-0.52 K fits well the susceptibility data above 0.3 K. Room-temperature electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of single crystals of Cu(l-alanine)2 at 9 and 35 GHz show a single, exchange-narrowed resonance. The g tensor, with principal values g1=2.0554+/-0.0005, g2=2.1064+/-0.0005, and g3=2.2056+/-0.0005, reflects the crystal structure of Cu(l-alanine)2 and the electronic properties of the copper ions. The observed angular variation of the linewidth is attributed to the magnetic interactions, narrowed by the exchange coupling between copper ions, and shows a contribution characteristic of the dipole-dipole interaction in a spin system with a predominant two-dimensional spin dynamics. Considering the exchange-collapsed resonance corresponding to the two lattice sites for copper in Cu(l-alanine)2, we evaluate an exchange constant ||J(AB1)||=0.47 K between nonequivalent copper neighbors in a spin chain, similar to the value obtained from the susceptibility data. The one-dimensional magnetic behavior suggested by the susceptibility data in Cu(l-alanine)2, where the metal ions are distributed in layers, is explained by proposing that carboxylate bridges provide electronic paths for superexchange interactions between coppers. Considering the characteristics of the molecular structure of Cu(l-alanine)2, the layers seem to be magnetically split off into one-dimensional zigzag ribbons. The apparent disagreement between the one-dimensional behavior suggested by the susceptibility data and the two-dimensional behavior of the spin dynamics suggested by the EPR linewidth is analyzed.

  20. Interaction of a Model Peptide with a Water--Bilayer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, A.; Wilson, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    We discuss a molecular dynamics study of the alanine dipeptide at the interface between water and a glycerol-1-monooleate (GMO) bilayer. The dipeptide is interfacially active and incorporates into the bilayer without disrupting its structure. The interfacial region that is readily penetrated by the dipeptide spans the entire head group portion of the bilayer. The polar groups of the alanine dipeptide mostly remain well solvated by water and the oxygen atoms of GMO, and conformations of the dipeptide are characterized by (phi, psi) angles typical of alpha-helix and beta-sheet structures. When the molecule is deeper in the bilayer, the C(sub 7eq) state also becomes stable. The barrier to the isomerization reaction at the interface is lower than in bulk phases. After 7 ns of trajectories, the system is not fully equilibrated, due to slow collective motions involving GMO head groups. These result in decreased mobility and lower rates of isomerization of the dipeptide at the interface.

  1. Synthesis of polyetherurethanes containing L-serine dipeptide and their use as materials for biomedical films.

    PubMed

    Sosa, K; Mori, A; Sisido, M; Imanishi, Y

    1985-09-01

    Prepolymers, which were produced by the polyaddition reaction of polytetramethylene glycol (PTMG) or polyethylene glycol (PEG) and 4,4'-diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI) or hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI), were chain-extended with a linear dipeptide of L-serine (Z-Ser-Ser-OMe) or a cyclic dipeptide of L-serine [c-(Ser)2] to yield novel polyetherurethanes containing dipeptide segments. The relationship between the surface morphology and the biomedical properties of the film of the novel polyetherurethanes was investigated. The surface of PU(PTMG,Z-Ser-Ser-OMe,MDI) film was smooth, but fibrous structures were developed in the bulk of the film with increasing molecular weight of the PTMG segment. The antithrombogenicity of the film containing the low molecular weight PTMG segment was better than that of the usual polyetherurethane film without the dipeptide segments. The partial hydrolysis of the ester groups involved in the dipeptide segment improved the antithrombogenicity. In the surface and the bulk of PU[PTMG,c-(Ser)2,MDI] film, spherulite structures were developed when the molecular weight of the PTMG segment was high, while single crystals with a length of 3-4 microns were produced when the molecular weight of the PTMG segment was low. The antithrombogenicity of the film containing the high molecular weight PTMG segment was better than that of the usual polyetherurethane film without the dipeptide segments. PU(PTMG/PEG,Z-Ser-Ser-OMe,MDI) film and PU[PTMG/PEG,c-(Ser)2,MDI] film were permeated by uraemic toxins. The permeation was accelerated with increasing water content of the film and decreasing molecular weight of the solute. The oxygen permeability of the film of the polyetherurethane containing the linear or cyclic dipeptide segments was greater than that of polyetherurethane film which does not contain the dipeptide segments. PMID:3931715

  2. Steric effect exerted by the proline residue on the antecedent alanine residue.

    PubMed

    Siemión, I Z; Sobczyk, K; Nawrocka, E

    1982-05-01

    Five model tetrapeptides: Ala-Ala-Ala-Ala, Pro-Ala-Ala-Ala, Ala-Pro-Ala-Ala, Ala-Ala-Pro-Ala and Ala-Ala-Ala-Pro, were synthesized and measured in D2O by 13 C-n.m.r. spectroscopy. The spectra analysis led us to the conclusion that for each model (irrespective of pD) in conformational equilibrium, the predominant conformation is the one in which side methyl of alanine preceding proline residue eclipses alanine carbonyl group. The influence of pD changes in cis-trans isomerism of Ala-Pro amide bond was also investigated. PMID:7118413

  3. Crystal structure of N-(tert-but-oxy-carbon-yl)phenyl-alanylde-hydro-alanine isopropyl ester (Boc-Phe-ΔAla-OiPr).

    PubMed

    Lenartowicz, Paweł; Makowski, Maciej; Zarychta, Bartosz; Ejsmont, Krzysztof

    2014-12-01

    In the title compound, the de-hydro-dipeptide (Boc-Phe-ΔAla-OiPr, C20H28N2O5), the mol-ecule has a trans conformation of the N-methyl-amide group. The geometry of the de-hydro-alanine moiety is to some extent different from those usually found in simple peptides, indicating conjugation between the H2C=C group and the peptide bond. The bond angles around de-hydro-alanine have unusually high values due to the steric hindrance, the same inter-action influencing the slight distortion from planarity of the de-hydro-alanine. The mol-ecule is stabilized by intra-molecular inter-actions between the isopropyl group and the N atoms of the peptide main chain. In the crystal, an N-H⋯O hydrogen bond links the mol-ecules into ribbons, giving a herringbone head-to-head packing arrangement extending along the [100] direction. In the stacks, the mol-ecules are linked by weak C-H⋯O hydrogen-bonding associations. PMID:25553003

  4. Exploring the binding conformations of bulkier dipeptide amide inhibitors in constitutive nitric oxide synthases.

    PubMed

    Li, Huiying; Flinspach, Mack L; Igarashi, Jotaro; Jamal, Joumana; Yang, Weiping; Gómez-Vidal, José Antonio; Litzinger, Elizabeth A; Huang, Hui; Erdal, Erik P; Silverman, Richard B; Poulos, Thomas L

    2005-11-22

    A series of L-nitroarginine-based dipeptide inhibitors are highly selective for neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) over the endothelial isoform (eNOS). Crystal structures of these dipeptides bound to both isoforms revealed two different conformations, curled in nNOS and extended in eNOS, corresponding to higher and lower binding affinity to the two isoforms, respectively. In previous studies we found that the primary reason for selectivity is that Asp597 in nNOS, which is Asn368 in eNOS, provides greater electrostatic stabilization in the inhibitor complex. While this is the case for smaller dipeptide inhibitors, electrostatic stabilization may no longer be the sole determinant for isoform selectivity with bulkier dipeptide inhibitors. Another residue farther away from the active site, Met336 in nNOS (Val106 in eNOS), is in contact with bulkier dipeptide inhibitors. Double mutants were made to exchange the D597/M336 pair in nNOS with N368/V106 in eNOS. Here we report crystal structures and inhibition constants for bulkier dipeptide inhibitors bound to nNOS and eNOS that illustrate the important role played by residues near the entry to the active site in isoform selective inhibition. PMID:16285725

  5. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from Streptococcus mutans

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yong-Zhi; Sheng, Yu; Li, Lan-Fen; Tang, De-Wei; Liu, Xiang-Yu; Zhao, Xiaojun; Liang, Yu-He Su, Xiao-Dong

    2007-09-01

    A potential target for antibiotic drug design, d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from S. mutans, was expressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution. d-Alanine-d-alanine ligase is encoded by the gene ddl (SMU-599) in Streptococcus mutans. This ligase plays a very important role in cell-wall biosynthesis and may be a potential target for drug design. To study the structure and function of this ligase, the gene ddl was amplified from S. mutans genomic DNA and cloned into the expression vector pET28a. The protein was expressed in soluble form in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3). Homogeneous protein was obtained using a two-step procedure consisting of Ni{sup 2+}-chelating and size-exclusion chromatography. Purified protein was crystallized and the cube-shaped crystal diffracted to 2.4 Å. The crystal belongs to space group P3{sub 1}21 or P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 79.50, c = 108.97 Å. There is one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  6. Racemization of alanine by the alanine racemases from Salmonella typhimurium and Bacillus stearothermophilus: energetic reaction profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Faraci, W.S.; Walsh, C.T.

    1988-05-03

    Alanine racemases are bacterial pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) dependent enzymes providing D-alanine as an essential building block for biosynthesis of the peptidoglycan layer of the cell wall. Two isozymic alanine racemases, encoded by the dadB gene and the alr gene, from the Gram-negative mesophilic Salmonella typhimurium and one from the Gram-positive thermophilic Bacillus stearothermophilus have been examined for the racemization mechanism. Substrate deuterium isotope effects and solvent deuterium isotope effects have been measured in both L ..-->.. D and D..-->.. L directions for all three enzymes to assess the degree to which abstraction of the ..cap alpha..-proton or protonation of substrate PLP carbanion is limiting in catalysis. Additionally, experiments measuring internal return of ..cap alpha..-/sup 3/H from substrate to product and solvent exchange/substrate conversion experiments in /sup 3/H/sub 2/O have been used with each enzyme to examine the partitioning of substrate PLP carbanion intermediates and to obtain the relative heights of kinetically significant energy barriers in alanine racemase catalysis.

  7. Prediction of Protein Submitochondrial Locations by Incorporating Dipeptide Composition into Chou's General Pseudo Amino Acid Composition.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Khurshid; Waris, Muhammad; Hayat, Maqsood

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrion is the key organelle of eukaryotic cell, which provides energy for cellular activities. Submitochondrial locations of proteins play crucial role in understanding different biological processes such as energy metabolism, program cell death, and ionic homeostasis. Prediction of submitochondrial locations through conventional methods are expensive and time consuming because of the large number of protein sequences generated in the last few decades. Therefore, it is intensively desired to establish an automated model for identification of submitochondrial locations of proteins. In this regard, the current study is initiated to develop a fast, reliable, and accurate computational model. Various feature extraction methods such as dipeptide composition (DPC), Split Amino Acid Composition, and Composition and Translation were utilized. In order to overcome the issue of biasness, oversampling technique SMOTE was applied to balance the datasets. Several classification learners including K-Nearest Neighbor, Probabilistic Neural Network, and support vector machine (SVM) are used. Jackknife test is applied to assess the performance of classification algorithms using two benchmark datasets. Among various classification algorithms, SVM achieved the highest success rates in conjunction with the condensed feature space of DPC, which are 95.20 % accuracy on dataset SML3-317 and 95.11 % on dataset SML3-983. The empirical results revealed that our proposed model obtained the highest results so far in the literatures. It is anticipated that our proposed model might be useful for future studies. PMID:26746980

  8. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy of L-alanyl-L-tryptophan dipeptide adsorbed on Si substrate decorated with triangular silver nanoplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanauskaite, Lina; Snitka, Valentinas

    2015-03-01

    Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopies have been used to investigate interaction of L-alanyl-L-tryptophan (Ala-Trp) dipeptide with nanostructured silver surface. A highly sensitive surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based biosensor has been employed for label-free dipeptide detection and its orientation on the nanostructured surface. The synthesis of SERS substrate was based on direct silver ions reduction on hydrofluoric acid etched silicon wafer. Raman and SERS spectra of Ala-Trp were recorded in liquid to keep native environment for dipeptide. To the best of our knowledge, this work is a first attempt to analyze the structure of Ala-Trp dipeptide by Raman spectroscopy.

  9. International society of sports nutrition position stand: Beta-Alanine.

    PubMed

    Trexler, Eric T; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Stout, Jeffrey R; Hoffman, Jay R; Wilborn, Colin D; Sale, Craig; Kreider, Richard B; Jäger, Ralf; Earnest, Conrad P; Bannock, Laurent; Campbell, Bill; Kalman, Douglas; Ziegenfuss, Tim N; Antonio, Jose

    2015-01-01

    The International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) provides an objective and critical review of the mechanisms and use of beta-alanine supplementation. Based on the current available literature, the conclusions of the ISSN are as follows: 1) Four weeks of beta-alanine supplementation (4-6 g daily) significantly augments muscle carnosine concentrations, thereby acting as an intracellular pH buffer; 2) Beta-alanine supplementation currently appears to be safe in healthy populations at recommended doses; 3) The only reported side effect is paraesthesia (tingling), but studies indicate this can be attenuated by using divided lower doses (1.6 g) or using a sustained-release formula; 4) Daily supplementation with 4 to 6 g of beta-alanine for at least 2 to 4 weeks has been shown to improve exercise performance, with more pronounced effects in open end-point tasks/time trials lasting 1 to 4 min in duration; 5) Beta-alanine attenuates neuromuscular fatigue, particularly in older subjects, and preliminary evidence indicates that beta-alanine may improve tactical performance; 6) Combining beta-alanine with other single or multi-ingredient supplements may be advantageous when supplementation of beta-alanine is high enough (4-6 g daily) and long enough (minimum 4 weeks); 7) More research is needed to determine the effects of beta-alanine on strength, endurance performance beyond 25 min in duration, and other health-related benefits associated with carnosine. PMID:26175657

  10. Alanine aminotransferase controls seed dormancy in barley.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kazuhiro; Yamane, Miki; Yamaji, Nami; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Tagiri, Akemi; Schwerdt, Julian G; Fincher, Geoffrey B; Matsumoto, Takashi; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Komatsuda, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Dormancy allows wild barley grains to survive dry summers in the Near East. After domestication, barley was selected for shorter dormancy periods. Here we isolate the major seed dormancy gene qsd1 from wild barley, which encodes an alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT). The seed dormancy gene is expressed specifically in the embryo. The AlaAT isoenzymes encoded by the long and short dormancy alleles differ in a single amino acid residue. The reduced dormancy allele Qsd1 evolved from barleys that were first domesticated in the southern Levant and had the long dormancy qsd1 allele that can be traced back to wild barleys. The reduced dormancy mutation likely contributed to the enhanced performance of barley in industrial applications such as beer and whisky production, which involve controlled germination. In contrast, the long dormancy allele might be used to control pre-harvest sprouting in higher rainfall areas to enhance global adaptation of barley. PMID:27188711

  11. Alanine aminotransferase controls seed dormancy in barley

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Kazuhiro; Yamane, Miki; Yamaji, Nami; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Tagiri, Akemi; Schwerdt, Julian G.; Fincher, Geoffrey B.; Matsumoto, Takashi; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Komatsuda, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Dormancy allows wild barley grains to survive dry summers in the Near East. After domestication, barley was selected for shorter dormancy periods. Here we isolate the major seed dormancy gene qsd1 from wild barley, which encodes an alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT). The seed dormancy gene is expressed specifically in the embryo. The AlaAT isoenzymes encoded by the long and short dormancy alleles differ in a single amino acid residue. The reduced dormancy allele Qsd1 evolved from barleys that were first domesticated in the southern Levant and had the long dormancy qsd1 allele that can be traced back to wild barleys. The reduced dormancy mutation likely contributed to the enhanced performance of barley in industrial applications such as beer and whisky production, which involve controlled germination. In contrast, the long dormancy allele might be used to control pre-harvest sprouting in higher rainfall areas to enhance global adaptation of barley. PMID:27188711

  12. Identifying Antioxidant Proteins by Using Optimal Dipeptide Compositions.

    PubMed

    Feng, Pengmian; Chen, Wei; Lin, Hao

    2016-06-01

    Antioxidant proteins are a kind of molecules that can terminate cellular and DNA damages caused by free radical intermediates. The use of antioxidant proteins for prevention of diseases has been intensively studied in recent years. Thus, accurate identification of antioxidant proteins is essential for understanding their roles in pharmacology. In this study, a support vector machine-based predictor called AodPred was developed for identifying antioxidant proteins. In this predictor, the sequence was formulated by using the optimal 3-gap dipeptides obtained by using feature selection method. It was observed by jackknife cross-validation test that AodPred can achieve an overall accuracy of 74.79 % in identifying antioxidant proteins. As a user-friendly tool, AodPred is freely accessible at http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/AntioxiPred . To maximize the convenience of the vast majority of experimental scientists, a step-by-step guide is provided on how to use the web server to obtain the desired results. PMID:26345449

  13. Predicting cancerlectins by the optimal g-gap dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hao; Liu, Wei-Xin; He, Jiao; Liu, Xin-Hui; Ding, Hui; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The cancerlectin plays a key role in the process of tumor cell differentiation. Thus, to fully understand the function of cancerlectin is significant because it sheds light on the future direction for the cancer therapy. However, the traditional wet-experimental methods were money- and time-consuming. It is highly desirable to develop an effective and efficient computational tool to identify cancerlectins. In this study, we developed a sequence-based method to discriminate between cancerlectins and non-cancerlectins. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to choose the optimal feature set derived from the g-gap dipeptide composition. The jackknife cross-validated results showed that the proposed method achieved the accuracy of 75.19%, which is superior to other published methods. For the convenience of other researchers, an online web-server CaLecPred was established and can be freely accessed from the website http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/CalecPred. We believe that the CaLecPred is a powerful tool to study cancerlectins and to guide the related experimental validations. PMID:26648527

  14. Sterically allowed configuration space for amino acid dipeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, Diego; Maatta, Jukka; Sammalkorpi, Maria; O'Hern, Corey; Regan, Lynne

    2014-03-01

    Despite recent improvements in computational methods for protein design, we still lack a quantitative, predictive understanding of the intrinsic propensities for amino acids to be in particular backbone or side-chain conformations. This question has remained unsettled for years because of the discrepancies between different experimental approaches. To address it, I performed all-atom hard-sphere simulations of hydrophobic residues with stereo-chemical constraints and non-attractive steric interactions between non-bonded atoms for ALA, ILE, LEU and VAL dipeptide mimetics. For these hard-sphere MD simulations, I show that transitions between α-helix and β-sheet structures only occur when the bond angle τ(N -Cα - C) >110° , and the probability distribution of bond angles for structures in the `bridge' region of ϕ- ψ space is shifted to larger angles compared to that in other regions. In contrast, the relevant bond-angle distributions obtained from most molecular dynamics packages are broader and shifter to larger values. I encounter similar correlations between bond angles and side-chain dihedral angles. The success of these studies is an argument for re-incorporating local stereochemical constraints into computational protein design methodology.

  15. Predicting cancerlectins by the optimal g-gap dipeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hao; Liu, Wei-Xin; He, Jiao; Liu, Xin-Hui; Ding, Hui; Chen, Wei

    2015-12-01

    The cancerlectin plays a key role in the process of tumor cell differentiation. Thus, to fully understand the function of cancerlectin is significant because it sheds light on the future direction for the cancer therapy. However, the traditional wet-experimental methods were money- and time-consuming. It is highly desirable to develop an effective and efficient computational tool to identify cancerlectins. In this study, we developed a sequence-based method to discriminate between cancerlectins and non-cancerlectins. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to choose the optimal feature set derived from the g-gap dipeptide composition. The jackknife cross-validated results showed that the proposed method achieved the accuracy of 75.19%, which is superior to other published methods. For the convenience of other researchers, an online web-server CaLecPred was established and can be freely accessed from the website http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/CalecPred. We believe that the CaLecPred is a powerful tool to study cancerlectins and to guide the related experimental validations.

  16. Rational and combinatorial tailoring of bioactive cyclic dipeptides

    PubMed Central

    Giessen, Tobias W.; Marahiel, Mohamed A.

    2015-01-01

    Modified cyclic dipeptides represent a diverse family of microbial secondary metabolites. They display a broad variety of biological and pharmacological activities and have long been recognized as privileged structures with the ability to bind to a wide range of receptors. This is due to their conformationally constrained 2, 5-diketopiperazine (DKP) scaffold and the diverse set of DKP tailoring enzymes present in nature. After initial DKP assembly through different biosynthetic systems modifying enzymes are responsible for installing functional groups crucial for the biological activities of the resulting modified DKPs. They represent a vast and largely untapped enzyme repository very useful for synthetic biology approaches aiming at introducing structural variations into DKP scaffolds. In this review we focus on these DKP modification enzymes found in various microbial secondary metabolite gene clusters. We will give a brief overview of their distribution and highlight a select number of characterized DKP tailoring enzymes before turning to their application potential in combinatorial biosynthesis with the aim of producing molecules with improved or entirely new biological and medicinally relevant properties. PMID:26284060

  17. Transcriptional regulation of a Bacillus subtilis dipeptide transport operon.

    PubMed

    Slack, F J; Mueller, J P; Strauch, M A; Mathiopoulos, C; Sonenshein, A L

    1991-08-01

    The Bacillus subtilis dciA operon, which encodes a dipeptide transport system, was induced rapidly by several conditions that caused the cells to enter stationary phase and initiate sporulation. The in vivo start point of transcription was mapped precisely and shown to correspond to a site of transcription initiation in vitro by the major vegetative form of RNA polymerase. Post-exponential expression was prevented by a mutation in the spo0A gene (whose product is a known regulator of early sporulation genes) but was restored in a spo0A abrB double mutant. This implicated AbrB, another known regulator, as a repressor of dciA. In fact, purified AbrB protein bound to a portion of the dciA promoter region, protecting it against DNase I digestion. Expression of dciA in growing cells was also repressed independently by glucose and by a mixture of amino acids; neither of these effects was mediated by AbrB. PMID:1766371

  18. Predicting cancerlectins by the optimal g-gap dipeptides

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hao; Liu, Wei-Xin; He, Jiao; Liu, Xin-Hui; Ding, Hui; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The cancerlectin plays a key role in the process of tumor cell differentiation. Thus, to fully understand the function of cancerlectin is significant because it sheds light on the future direction for the cancer therapy. However, the traditional wet-experimental methods were money- and time-consuming. It is highly desirable to develop an effective and efficient computational tool to identify cancerlectins. In this study, we developed a sequence-based method to discriminate between cancerlectins and non-cancerlectins. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to choose the optimal feature set derived from the g-gap dipeptide composition. The jackknife cross-validated results showed that the proposed method achieved the accuracy of 75.19%, which is superior to other published methods. For the convenience of other researchers, an online web-server CaLecPred was established and can be freely accessed from the website http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/CalecPred. We believe that the CaLecPred is a powerful tool to study cancerlectins and to guide the related experimental validations. PMID:26648527

  19. [Anti-inflammatory properties of noopept (dipeptide nootropic agent GVS-111)].

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, L P; Miramedova, M G; Alekseeva, S V; Gudasheva, T A; Ostrovskaia, R U; Seredenin, S B

    2002-01-01

    It is established that single intravenous (0.5 and 5 mg/kg, p.o.) or single peroral (10, 50, 100 mg/kg) and prolonged peroral (5 mg/kg, over 10 days) administration of noopept produces a dose-dependent inhibition of the model inflammatory response to concanavaline A in CBA mice. Intravenously injected (5 mg/kg) noopept suppressed the acute nonimmune carrageenan-induced foot inflammation in rats by 62.2% within 3 h. The most pronounced antiinflammatory effect of dipeptide was observed on the model of adjuvant arthritis in rats, where the drug administered over 25 days in a daily dose of 0.5 mg/kg (i.m.) or 5 mg/kg (p.o.) significantly reduced the chronic immune inflammation (on the 12th day, by 94.0 and 74.1%, respectively). The in vitro experiments with neutrophilic leukocytes of F1(CBA.C57BL/6) mice treated with noopept in a single dose of 5 mg/kg (i.v.) showed a 5- to 6-fold suppression of the hemiluminescence stimulated by opsoinized zymosan or phorbolmyristate acetate. It is suggested that the antiinflammatory activity of noopept is probably related to its antioxidant properties. PMID:12109295

  20. Effects of supplementation with free glutamine and the dipeptide alanyl-glutamine on parameters of muscle damage and inflammation in rats submitted to prolonged exercise.

    PubMed

    Cruzat, Vinicius Fernandes; Rogero, Marcelo Macedo; Tirapegui, Julio

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of the supplementation with the dipeptide L-alanyl-L-glutamine (DIP) and a solution containing L-glutamine and L-alanine on plasma levels markers of muscle damage and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and glutamine metabolism in rats submitted to prolonged exercise. Rats were submitted to sessions of swim training for 6 weeks. Twenty-one days prior to euthanasia, the animals were supplemented with DIP (n = 8) (1.5 g.kg(-1)), a solution of free L-glutamine (1 g.kg(-1)) and free L-alanine (0.61 g.kg(-1)) (G&A, n = 8) or water (control (CON), n = 8). Animals were killed at rest before (R), after prolonged exercise (PE-2 h of exercise). Plasma concentrations of glutamine, glutamate, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and activity of creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and muscle concentrations of glutamine and glutamate were measured. The concentrations of plasma TNF-alpha, PGE2 and the activity of CK were lower in the G&A-R and DIP-R groups, compared to the CON-R. Glutamine in plasma (p < 0.04) and soleus muscle (p < 0.001) was higher in the DIP-R and G&A-R groups relative to the CON-R group. G&A-PE and DIP-PE groups exhibited lower concentrations of plasma PGE2 (p < 0.05) and TNF-alpha (p < 0.05), and higher concentrations of glutamine and glutamate in soleus (p < 0.001) and gastrocnemius muscles (p < 0.05) relative to the CON-PE group. We concluded that supplementation with free L-glutamine and the dipeptide LL-alanyl-LL-glutamine represents an effective source of glutamine, which may attenuate inflammation biomarkers after periods of training and plasma levels of CK and the inflammatory response induced by prolonged exercise. PMID:19885855

  1. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa antimetabolite L -2-amino-4-methoxy-trans-3-butenoic acid (AMB) is made from glutamate and two alanine residues via a thiotemplate-linked tripeptide precursor

    PubMed Central

    Rojas Murcia, Nelson; Lee, Xiaoyun; Waridel, Patrice; Maspoli, Alessandro; Imker, Heidi J.; Chai, Tiancong; Walsh, Christopher T.; Reimmann, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa toxin L-2-amino-4-methoxy-trans-3-butenoic acid (AMB) is a non-proteinogenic amino acid which is toxic for prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Production of AMB requires a five-gene cluster encoding a putative LysE-type transporter (AmbA), two non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (AmbB and AmbE), and two iron(II)/α-ketoglutarate-dependent oxygenases (AmbC and AmbD). Bioinformatics analysis predicts one thiolation (T) domain for AmbB and two T domains (T1 and T2) for AmbE, suggesting that AMB is generated by a processing step from a precursor tripeptide assembled on a thiotemplate. Using a combination of ATP-PPi exchange assays, aminoacylation assays, and mass spectrometry-based analysis of enzyme-bound substrates and pathway intermediates, the AmbB substrate was identified to be L-alanine (L-Ala), while the T1 and T2 domains of AmbE were loaded with L-glutamate (L-Glu) and L-Ala, respectively. Loading of L-Ala at T2 of AmbE occurred only in the presence of AmbB, indicative of a trans loading mechanism. In vitro assays performed with AmbB and AmbE revealed the dipeptide L-Glu-L-Ala at T1 and the tripeptide L-Ala-L-Glu-L-Ala attached at T2. When AmbC and AmbD were included in the assay, these peptides were no longer detected. Instead, an L-Ala-AMB-L-Ala tripeptide was found at T2. These data are in agreement with a biosynthetic model in which L-Glu is converted into AMB by the action of AmbC, AmbD, and tailoring domains of AmbE. The importance of the flanking L-Ala residues in the precursor tripeptide is discussed. PMID:25814981

  2. Changing serine-485 to alanine in the opossum parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH-related peptide receptor enhances PTH stimulation of phospholipase C in a stably transfected human kidney cell line: a useful model for PTH-analog screening?

    PubMed

    John, M R; Bösel, J; Breit, S; Wickert, H; Ziegler, R; Blind, E

    2001-02-01

    Using site-directed mutagenesis, we have introduced a serine-485-to-alanine mutation in the opossum parathyroid hormone (PTH) receptor. This amino acid is considered to be phosphorylated by protein kinase A upon ligand binding. Both wild-type (WT) and mutant receptor were stably expressed in 293-EBNA HEK cells. The mutant receptor showed comparable binding characteristics and only a slight increase in cAMP production compared with WT. However, the PTH dose-dependent increase in inositol phosphate production was 24-fold for the mutant receptor vs. 6-fold for the WT receptor. This mutant might prove useful in the sensitive detection of phospholipase C activation through various ligands, as the PTH receptor becomes a target of therapeutic intervention in osteoporosis. PMID:11182376

  3. Oxygen radical-mediated oxidation reactions of an alanine peptide motif - density functional theory and transition state theory study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Oxygen-base (O-base) oxidation in protein backbone is important in the protein backbone fragmentation due to the attack from reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, an alanine peptide was used model system to investigate this O-base oxidation by employing density functional theory (DFT) calculations combining with continuum solvent model. Detailed reaction steps were analyzed along with their reaction rate constants. Results Most of the O-base oxidation reactions for this alanine peptide are exothermic except for the bond-breakage of the Cα-N bond to form hydroperoxy alanine radical. Among the reactions investigated in this study, the activated energy of OH α-H abstraction is the lowest one, while the generation of alkylperoxy peptide radical must overcome the highest energy barrier. The aqueous situation facilitates the oxidation reactions to generate hydroxyl alanine peptide derivatives except for the fragmentations of alkoxyl alanine peptide radical. The Cα-Cβ bond of the alkoxyl alanine peptide radical is more labile than the peptide bond. Conclusion the rate-determining step of oxidation in protein backbone is the generation of hydroperoxy peptide radical via the reaction of alkylperoxy peptide radical with HO2. The stabilities of alkylperoxy peptide radical and complex of alkylperoxy peptide radical with HO2 are crucial in this O-base oxidation reaction. PMID:22524792

  4. A comparison of weighted ensemble and Markov state model methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Haoyun; Costaouec, Ronan; Darve, Eric; Izaguirre, Jesús A.

    2015-06-01

    Computation of reaction rates and elucidation of reaction mechanisms are two of the main goals of molecular dynamics (MD) and related simulation methods. Since it is time consuming to study reaction mechanisms over long time scales using brute force MD simulations, two ensemble methods, Markov State Models (MSMs) and Weighted Ensemble (WE), have been proposed to accelerate the procedure. Both approaches require clustering of microscopic configurations into networks of "macro-states" for different purposes. MSMs model a discretization of the original dynamics on the macro-states. Accuracy of the model significantly relies on the boundaries of macro-states. On the other hand, WE uses macro-states to formulate a resampling procedure that kills and splits MD simulations for achieving better efficiency of sampling. Comparing to MSMs, accuracy of WE rate predictions is less sensitive to the definition of macro-states. Rigorous numerical experiments using alanine dipeptide and penta-alanine support our analyses. It is shown that MSMs introduce significant biases in the computation of reaction rates, which depend on the boundaries of macro-states, and Accelerated Weighted Ensemble (AWE), a formulation of weighted ensemble that uses the notion of colors to compute fluxes, has reliable flux estimation on varying definitions of macro-states. Our results suggest that whereas MSMs provide a good idea of the metastable sets and visualization of overall dynamics, AWE provides reliable rate estimations requiring less efforts on defining macro-states on the high dimensional conformational space.

  5. The Synthesis of a Dipeptide from its Component Amino Acids: Protecting Groups in the Elementary Organic Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Paul E.; Campbell, Andrew

    1982-01-01

    A simple, three-step procedure for synthesizing a dipeptide from its component amino acids is described. The dipeptide synthesized uses inexpensive amino acids having hydrocarbon side-chains and can be observed in E/Z forms by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Each step in the synthesis produces white crystalline products using standard…

  6. Antiamnesic effect of acyl-prolyl-containing dipeptide (GVS-111) in compression-induced damage to frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Romanova, G A; Mirzoev, T K; Barskov, I V; Victorov, I V; Gudasheva, T A; Ostrovskaya, R U

    2000-09-01

    Antiamnestic effect of acyl-prolyl-containing dipeptide GVS-111 was demonstrated in rats with bilateral compression-induced damage to the frontal cortex. Both intraperitoneal and oral administration of the dipeptide improved retrieval of passive avoidance responses in rats with compression-induced cerebral ischemia compared to untreated controls. PMID:11177261

  7. Comparison of EPR response of alanine and Gd₂O₃-alanine dosimeters exposed to TRIGA Mainz reactor.

    PubMed

    Marrale, M; Schmitz, T; Gallo, S; Hampel, G; Longo, A; Panzeca, S; Tranchina, L

    2015-12-01

    In this work we report some preliminary results regarding the analysis of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) response of alanine pellets and alanine pellets added with gadolinium used for dosimetry at the TRIGA research reactor in Mainz, Germany. Two set-ups were evaluated: irradiation inside PMMA phantom and irradiation inside boric acid phantom. We observed that the presence of Gd2O3 inside alanine pellets increases the EPR signal by a factor of 3.45 and 1.24 in case of PMMA and boric acid phantoms, respectively. We can conclude that in the case of neutron beam with a predominant thermal neutron component the addition of gadolinium oxide can significantly improve neutron sensitivity of alanine pellets. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of both response of alanine and Gd-added alanine pellets with FLUKA code were performed and a good agreement was achieved for pure alanine dosimeters. For Gd2O3-alanine deviations between MC simulations and experimental data were observed and discussed. PMID:26315099

  8. Increased NOD2-mediated recognition of N-glycolyl muramyl dipeptide

    PubMed Central

    Coulombe, François; Divangahi, Maziar; Veyrier, Frédéric; de Léséleuc, Louis; Gleason, James L.; Yang, Yibin; Kelliher, Michelle A.; Pandey, Amit K.; Sassetti, Christopher M.; Reed, Michael B.

    2009-01-01

    Peptidoglycan-derived muramyl dipeptide (MDP) activates innate immunity via the host sensor NOD2. Although MDP is N-acetylated in most bacteria, mycobacteria and related Actinomycetes convert their MDP to an N-glycolylated form through the action of N-acetyl muramic acid hydroxylase (NamH). We used a combination of bacterial genetics and synthetic chemistry to investigate whether N-glycolylation of MDP alters NOD2-mediated immunity. Upon infecting macrophages with 12 bacteria, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α secretion was NOD2 dependent only with mycobacteria and other Actinomycetes (Nocardia and Rhodococcus). Disruption of namH in Mycobacterium smegmatis obrogated NOD2-mediated TNF secretion, which could be restored upon gene complementation. In mouse macrophages, N-glycolyl MDP was more potent than N-acetyl MDP at activating RIP2, nuclear factor κB, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and proinflammatory cytokine secretion. In mice challenged intraperitoneally with live or killed mycobacteria, NOD2-dependent immune responses depended on the presence of bacterial namH. Finally, N-glycolyl MDP was more efficacious than N-acetyl MDP at inducing ovalbumin-specific T cell immunity in a model of adjuvancy. Our findings indicate that N-glycolyl MDP has a greater NOD2-stimulating activity than N-acetyl MDP, consistent with the historical observation attributing exceptional immunogenic activity to the mycobacterial cell wall. PMID:19581406

  9. Increased NOD2-mediated recognition of N-glycolyl muramyl dipeptide.

    PubMed

    Coulombe, François; Divangahi, Maziar; Veyrier, Frédéric; de Léséleuc, Louis; Gleason, James L; Yang, Yibin; Kelliher, Michelle A; Pandey, Amit K; Sassetti, Christopher M; Reed, Michael B; Behr, Marcel A

    2009-08-01

    Peptidoglycan-derived muramyl dipeptide (MDP) activates innate immunity via the host sensor NOD2. Although MDP is N-acetylated in most bacteria, mycobacteria and related Actinomycetes convert their MDP to an N-glycolylated form through the action of N-acetyl muramic acid hydroxylase (NamH). We used a combination of bacterial genetics and synthetic chemistry to investigate whether N-glycolylation of MDP alters NOD2-mediated immunity. Upon infecting macrophages with 12 bacteria, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha secretion was NOD2 dependent only with mycobacteria and other Actinomycetes (Nocardia and Rhodococcus). Disruption of namH in Mycobacterium smegmatis obrogated NOD2-mediated TNF secretion, which could be restored upon gene complementation. In mouse macrophages, N-glycolyl MDP was more potent than N-acetyl MDP at activating RIP2, nuclear factor kappaB, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and proinflammatory cytokine secretion. In mice challenged intraperitoneally with live or killed mycobacteria, NOD2-dependent immune responses depended on the presence of bacterial namH. Finally, N-glycolyl MDP was more efficacious than N-acetyl MDP at inducing ovalbumin-specific T cell immunity in a model of adjuvancy. Our findings indicate that N-glycolyl MDP has a greater NOD2-stimulating activity than N-acetyl MDP, consistent with the historical observation attributing exceptional immunogenic activity to the mycobacterial cell wall. PMID:19581406

  10. [Behavioral and electrophysiological analysis of the choline-positive effect of nootropic dipeptide acylproline (GVS-111)].

    PubMed

    Ostrovskaia, R U; Mirzoev, T Kh; Firova, F A; Trofimof, S S; Gudasheva, T A; Grechenko, T N; Gutyrchik, E F; Barkova, E B

    2001-01-01

    The behavioral experiments using a passive avoidance learning model showed that the new cognition-enhancing acyl-prolyn containing dipeptide GVS-111 promotes recovery of the test performance in animals with a long-term memory deficit caused by the M-cholinolytic scopolamine (1 mg/kg/day scopolamine for 20 days, followed by 0.5 mg/kg/day GVS-111 for 10 days). At the same time, GVS-111 increased the duration of tremor induced by the M-cholinomimetic arecoline. The results of electrophysicological experiments showed that GVS-111 in a concentration range from 10(-11) to 10(-9) M increased amplitude of the neural response to acetylcholine (Ach) microappications in 75% of the isolated neurons of Helix Pomatum and produced a predominantly facilitating effect upon the endoneuronal pacemaker activity. The effect of GVS-111 upon the Ach response in a part of neurons was attenuated or even blocked by scopolamine, and in the other neurons--by the N-cholinolytic d-tubocurarine. This fact indicates that both muscarinic and nicotinic receptors are involved in the mechanism of the cholino-sensitizing action of GVS-111 upon the neuronal activity. PMID:11548439

  11. Protective effect of muramyl dipeptide analogs against infections of Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Candida albicans in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Fraser-Smith, E B; Matthews, T R

    1981-01-01

    Two analogs of N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine (muramyl dipeptide) were found to give better protection than muramyl dipeptide against intraperitoneal Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection or intravenous Candida albicans infection in mice. The analogs tested were N-acetyl-nor-muramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine and N-acetylmuramyl-L-alpha-amino-butyryl-D-isoglutamine. The optimum treatment was 80 mg/kg per day given once daily for 4 consecutive days before infection by the intraperitoneal, intravenous, or subcutaneous route. Dose response was limited. The compounds were not orally active. Synergism was seen between N-acetyl-nor-muramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine and gentamicin. No postinfection protection was observed. A nonspecific stimulation of macrophage cells by muramyl dipeptide analogs may contribute to the protection because antiinfective activity against Listeria monocytogenes given intraperitoneally was achieved with CBA mice. PMID:7333666

  12. Spectroscopic and structural elucidation of alanyl-containing dipeptides and their hydrogensquarates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koleva, Bojidarka B.; Kolev, Tsonko M.; Spiteller, Michael

    2008-04-01

    The hydrogensquarates of alanyl-containing dipeptides glycylalanine ( H-Gly-Ala-OH) and alanylalanine ( H-Ala-Ala-OH) are characterized structurally by means of quantum chemical ab initio calculations, solid-state linear-dichroic infrared (IR-LD) spectroscopy, 1H and 13C NMR data, ESI-MS, HPLC-MS/MS, TGV and DSC methods. The structures consist in positive charged peptide moiety and negative hydrogensquarate anion (HSq -), stabilizing by strong intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The theoretical and IR-LD spectroscopic data are compared with corresponding ones of zwitterion dipeptides with a view to understanding the structural and conformational changes as well as the IR-spectroscopic ones as a result of hydrogensquarates formation. The strong overlapped and complicated IR-spectroscopic bands typical for hydrogensquarates in solid-state are assigned supporting with the presented vibrational analysis of the dipeptides and of the hydrogensqauarate anion.

  13. Synthesis of a bicyclic delta-amino acid as a constrained Gly-Asn dipeptide isostere.

    PubMed

    Trabocchi, A; Menchi, G; Danieli, E; Guarna, A

    2008-06-01

    Delta-amino acids are very attractive in drug discovery, especially in the peptidomimetic area, because of their capability to act as dipeptide isosteres and reverse turn mimetics. Herein we report the synthesis of a rigid delta-amino acid constrained by a 3-aza-6,8-dioxabicyclo[3.2.1]octane-based scaffold, which can be considered as a Gly-Asn dipeptide mimetic. Key steps are the condensation of glycidol and tartaric acid derivatives, and the intramolecular trans-acetalization of the oxidized adduct to give the bicyclic delta-amino acid. Starting from L-tartaric acid derivative, it was achieved the corresponding Gly-D-Asn isostere, whereas from the enantiomeric D-tartaric acid derivative the corresponding Gly-L-Asn isostere could be obtained, thus giving access to both enantiomeric dipeptide sequences. PMID:18235990

  14. Uveitis induction in the rabbit by muramyl dipeptides.

    PubMed Central

    Waters, R V; Terrell, T G; Jones, G H

    1986-01-01

    Intraocular inflammation (uveitis) was produced in rabbits by intravenous or subcutaneous treatment with N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine and several of its synthetic analogs at doses of greater than or equal to 0.2 mg/kg in saline. A dose-dependent increase in permeability of the ocular blood-aqueous barrier as measured by leakage of protein or fluoresceinated dextran from the serum into the eye was observed from 2 to 14 h after glycopeptide treatment. Peak response occurred at approximately 3 h postdose. The lowest dose found to produce maximal vascular leakage for the most active glycopeptide analogs was 1 mg/kg. The adjuvant-inactive L-L stereoisomer of N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine was inactive, even at doses as high as 10 mg/kg. Analogs of N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine which were homologous in the lactyl side chain were found to cause less uveitis. Chronic biweekly intravenous treatment of rabbits for 1 month with either N-acetyl-L-alpha-aminobutyryl-D-isoglutamine or its lipophilic 6-O-stearoyl derivative at 1 mg/kg, but not with murabutide, resulted in leukocytic inflammatory lesions unique to the uveal tract of the eye. The uveitis was potentially reversible and occurred with decreased severity as long as 2 months after cessation of chronic treatment. Vascular leakage but not cellular infiltrate in the choroid could be modulated by pharmacologic means. Pyrogenicity but not adjuvanticity correlated with ability of glycopeptides to induce vascular leakage. Several adjuvant-active muramyl dipeptide analogs with minimal ability to cause acute vascular leakage or chronic inflammation in the rabbit eye have been identified. Images PMID:3949381

  15. Muscle Histidine-Containing Dipeptides Are Elevated by Glucose Intolerance in Both Rodents and Men

    PubMed Central

    Stegen, Sanne; Everaert, Inge; Deldicque, Louise; Vallova, Silvia; de Courten, Barbora; Ukropcova, Barbara; Ukropec, Jozef; Derave, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Objective Muscle carnosine and its methylated form anserine are histidine-containing dipeptides. Both dipeptides have the ability to quench reactive carbonyl species and previous studies have shown that endogenous tissue levels are decreased in chronic diseases, such as diabetes. Design and Methods Rodent study: Skeletal muscles of rats and mice were collected from 4 different diet-intervention studies, aiming to induce various degrees of glucose intolerance: 45% high-fat feeding (male rats), 60% high-fat feeding (male rats), cafeteria feeding (male rats), 70% high-fat feeding (female mice). Body weight, glucose-tolerance and muscle histidine-containing dipeptides were assessed. Human study: Muscle biopsies were taken from m. vastus lateralis in 35 males (9 lean, 8 obese, 9 prediabetic and 9 newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients) and muscle carnosine and gene expression of muscle fiber type markers were measured. Results Diet interventions in rodents (cafeteria and 70% high-fat feeding) induced increases in body weight, glucose intolerance and levels of histidine-containing dipeptides in muscle. In humans, obese, prediabetic and diabetic men had increased muscle carnosine content compared to the lean (+21% (p>0.1), +30% (p<0.05) and +39% (p<0.05), respectively). The gene expression of fast-oxidative type 2A myosin heavy chain was increased in the prediabetic (1.8-fold, p<0.05) and tended to increase in the diabetic men (1.6-fold, p = 0.07), compared to healthy lean subjects. Conclusion Muscle histidine-containing dipeptides increases with progressive glucose intolerance, in male individuals (cross-sectional). In addition, high-fat diet-induced glucose intolerance was associated with increased muscle histidine-containing dipeptides in female mice (interventional). Increased muscle carnosine content might reflect fiber type composition and/or act as a compensatory mechanism aimed at preventing cell damage in states of impaired glucose tolerance. PMID:25803044

  16. Current topics in the biotechnological production of essential amino acids, functional amino acids, and dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Satoshi

    2014-04-01

    Amino acids play important roles in both human and animal nutrition and in the maintenance of health. Here, amino acids are classified into three groups: first, essential amino acids, which are essential to nutrition; second, functional amino acids, recently found to be important in the promotion of physiological functions; and third, dipeptides, which are used to resolve problematic features of specific free amino acids, such as their instability or insolubility. This review focusses on recent researches concerning the microbial production of essential amino acids (lysine and methionine), functional amino acids (histidine and ornithine), and a dipeptide (L-alanyl-L-glutamine). PMID:24679256

  17. Electroactive organic dye incorporating dipeptides in the formation of self-assembled nanofibrous hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Hao; Hsu, Shu-Min; Wu, Fang-Yi; Cheng, Hsun; Yeh, Mei-Yu; Lin, Hsin-Chieh

    2014-10-15

    In this study, we examined the self-assembly of four dipeptides conjugated with the electroactive dye naphthalenediimide (NDI). The presence of the NDI group at the N-terminus of Phe-Phe and Phe-Gly promoted the formation of one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructures and three-dimensional (3-D) colored hydrogels under both acidic and physiological conditions. The 1-D nanostructures of these gels were stabilized through intermolecular π-π interactions of the conjugated systems and extended hydrogen bonding of the dipeptide units. PMID:25229206

  18. In vitro transport and satiety of a beta-lactoglobulin dipeptide and beta-casomorphin-7 and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Simone; Chen, Wei; Addepalli, Rama; Colgrave, Michelle; Singh, Tanoj; Tran, Cuong; Day, Li

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the digestive behaviour and biological activities of dairy proteins may help to develop model dairy products with targeted health outcomes including increased satiety and healthy weight maintenance. Caseins and whey proteins constitute over 95% of milk proteins with consumption of these proteins associated with increased satiety and a decreased prevalence of metabolic disorders. To investigate the in vitro digestive behaviour and satiety of dairy proteins at the intestinal epithelium, the in vitro transport and hydrolysis of 500-2000 μM β-casomorphin-7 (YPFPGPI or β-CM7) and a β-lactoglobulin (β-Lg) dipeptide (YL) was measured using Caco-2 cell monolayers grown on transwells as a model of the intestinal epithelium. Transport of YL was concentration dependent and ranged from 0.37-5.26 × 10(-6) cm s(-1), whereas transport of β-CM7 was only detected at 2000 μM and was significantly lower at 0.13 × 10(-6) cm s(-1). Rapid hydrolysis of β-CM7 in the apical chamber by the Caco-2 cells produced three peptide metabolites: YP, GPI and FPGPI. All of these metabolites were detected in the basolateral chamber after 30 min with both the YP and GPI peptides transporting at a higher rate than intact β-CM7. In vitro satiety was indicated by the secretion of cholecystokinin [26-33] (CCK-8) and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-17-36NH2) in the STC-1 enteroendocrine cell model. CCK-8 secretion was highest in response to β-CM7 followed by the β-CM7 metabolite FPGPI. CCK-8 secretion however was not significantly stimulated by the tri- or dipeptides. Secretion of GLP-1 was not significantly stimulated by β-CM7 or YL. These in vitro results suggest that dairy peptide size enhances CCK-8 secretion, whilst limiting transport across Caco-2 monolayers. PMID:24892772

  19. Glycolysis and the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Are Linked by Alanine Aminotransferase during Hypoxia Induced by Waterlogging of Lotus japonicus1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Marcio; Licausi, Francesco; Araújo, Wagner L.; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Sodek, Ladaslav; Fernie, Alisdair R.; van Dongen, Joost T.

    2010-01-01

    The role of nitrogen metabolism in the survival of prolonged periods of waterlogging was investigated in highly flood-tolerant, nodulated Lotus japonicus plants. Alanine production revealed to be a critical hypoxic pathway. Alanine is the only amino acid whose biosynthesis is not inhibited by nitrogen deficiency resulting from RNA interference silencing of nodular leghemoglobin. The metabolic changes that were induced following waterlogging can be best explained by the activation of alanine metabolism in combination with the modular operation of a split tricarboxylic acid pathway. The sum result of this metabolic scenario is the accumulation of alanine and succinate and the production of extra ATP under hypoxia. The importance of alanine metabolism is discussed with respect to its ability to regulate the level of pyruvate, and this and all other changes are discussed in the context of current models concerning the regulation of plant metabolism. PMID:20089769

  20. REVERSAL OF d-CYCLOSERINE INHIBITION OF BACTERIAL GROWTH BY ALANINE

    PubMed Central

    Zygmunt, Walter A.

    1962-01-01

    Zygmunt, Walter A. (Mead Johnson & Co., Evansville, Ind.). Reversal of d-cycloserine inhibition of bacterial growth by alanine. J. Bacteriol. 84:154–156. 1962.—Reversal of the antibacterial activity of d-4-amino-3-isoxazolidone by alanine in bacterial cultures actively growing on chemically defined media was compared in cultures requiring exogenous alanine and those capable of its synthesis. dl-Alanine was the most effective reversal agent in Pediococcus cerevisiae, an alanine-requiring organism, and d-alanine was effective in Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, organisms synthesizing alanine. With all three cultures, l-alanine was the least effective reversal agent. PMID:16561951

  1. Metabolomics Analysis Identifies D-Alanine-D-alanine Ligase as the Primary Lethal Target of D-cycloserine in Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Halouska, Steven; Fenton, Robert J.; Zinniel, Denise K.; Marshall, Darrell D.; Barletta, Raúl G.; Powers, Robert

    2014-01-01

    D-cycloserine is an effective second line antibiotic used as a last resort to treat multi (MDR)- and extensively (XDR)- drug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. D-cycloserine interferes with the formation of peptidoglycan biosynthesis by competitive inhibition of Alanine racemase (Alr) and D-Alanine-D-alanine ligase (Ddl). Although, the two enzymes are known to be inhibited, the in vivo lethal target is still unknown. Our NMR metabolomics work has revealed that Ddl is the primary target of DCS, as cell growth is inhibited when the production of D-alanyl-D-alanine is halted. It is shown that inhibition of Alr may contribute indirectly by lowering the levels of D-alanine thus allowing DCS to outcompete D-alanine for Ddl binding. The NMR data also supports the possibility of a transamination reaction to produce D-alanine from pyruvate and glutamate, thereby bypassing Alr inhibition. Furthermore, the inhibition of peptidoglycan synthesis results in a cascading effect on cellular metabolism as there is a shift toward the catabolic routes to compensate for accumulation of peptidoglycan precursors. PMID:24303782

  2. Formation of Diastereoisomeric Piperazine-2,5-dione from uc(dl)-Alanine in the Presence of Olivine and Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchida, Shigeshi; Naraoka, Hiroshi; Masuda, Harue

    2016-04-01

    uc(dl)-Alanine (Ala) was heated with/without powdered olivine and water at 120 °C for 8 days to investigate the formation of the diastereoisomers of piperazine-2,5-dione (diketopiperazine, DKP). When only uc(dl)-Ala was heated with a small amount of water, 3.0 % of uc(dl)-Ala changed to cis- and trans-DKP after 8 days. DKPs were not detected after heating when no water was added. The presence of a small amount of water is important factor controlling peptide production rates under thermal conditions. When DL-Ala was heated with olivine powder for 8 days, the yields of cis- and trans-DKP were 6.8 and 4.9 %, respectively. The high yield of cis-DKP compared with trans-DKP was attributed to greater thermal stability of cis-DKP. After heating for 8 days, the diastereoisomeric excess of cis-DKP without olivine was 7.3 %, whereas a much higher value of 16.3 % was obtained in the presence of olivine. Taken together, these results show that olivine is not only an efficient catalyst for the formation of DKPs but that it also play a significant role in determining the diastereoisomer selectivity of these cyclic dipeptides.

  3. Postirradiation effects in alanine dosimeter probes of two different suppliers.

    PubMed

    Anton, Mathias

    2008-03-01

    The measurand relevant for the dosimetry for radiation therapy is the absorbed dose to water, DW. The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) is establishing a secondary standard for DW for high-energy photon and electron radiation based on electron spin resonance (ESR) of the amino acid alanine. For practical applications, like, for example, intercomparison measurements using the ESR/alanine dosimetry system, the temporal evolution of the ESR signal of irradiated probes is an important issue. This postirradiation behaviour is investigated for alanine pellets of two different suppliers for different storage conditions. The influence of the storage conditions on the temporal evolution may be dependent on the type of probes used. The measurement and analysis method developed at the PTB is able to circumvent the apparent difficulties in the case of alanine/paraffin probes. Care has to be taken in case this method cannot be applied. PMID:18296760

  4. The alanine detector in BNCT dosimetry: Dose response in thermal and epithermal neutron fields

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, T.; Bassler, N.; Blaickner, M.; Ziegner, M.; Hsiao, M. C.; Liu, Y. H.; Koivunoro, H.; Auterinen, I.; Serén, T.; Kotiluoto, P.; Palmans, H.; Sharpe, P.; Langguth, P.; Hampel, G.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: The response of alanine solid state dosimeters to ionizing radiation strongly depends on particle type and energy. Due to nuclear interactions, neutron fields usually also consist of secondary particles such as photons and protons of diverse energies. Various experiments have been carried out in three different neutron beams to explore the alanine dose response behavior and to validate model predictions. Additionally, application in medical neutron fields for boron neutron capture therapy is discussed. Methods: Alanine detectors have been irradiated in the thermal neutron field of the research reactor TRIGA Mainz, Germany, in five experimental conditions, generating different secondary particle spectra. Further irradiations have been made in the epithermal neutron beams at the research reactors FiR 1 in Helsinki, Finland, and Tsing Hua open pool reactor in HsinChu, Taiwan ROC. Readout has been performed with electron spin resonance spectrometry with reference to an absorbed dose standard in a {sup 60}Co gamma ray beam. Absorbed doses and dose components have been calculated using the Monte Carlo codes FLUKA and MCNP. The relative effectiveness (RE), linking absorbed dose and detector response, has been calculated using the Hansen and Olsen alanine response model. Results: The measured dose response of the alanine detector in the different experiments has been evaluated and compared to model predictions. Therefore, a relative effectiveness has been calculated for each dose component, accounting for its dependence on particle type and energy. Agreement within 5% between model and measurement has been achieved for most irradiated detectors. Significant differences have been observed in response behavior between thermal and epithermal neutron fields, especially regarding dose composition and depth dose curves. The calculated dose components could be verified with the experimental results in the different primary and secondary particle fields. Conclusions: The

  5. Mechanism of action of anticandidal dipeptides containing inhibitors of glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Milewski, S; Andruszkiewicz, R; Kasprzak, L; Mazerski, J; Mignini, F; Borowski, E

    1991-01-01

    The mechanism of anticandidal action of novel synthetic dipeptides containing N3-(4-methoxyfumaroyl)-L-2,3-diaminopropanoic acid (FMDP) residues was shown to be consistent with the "warhead delivery" concept. FMDP dipeptides were shown to be transported into Candida albicans cells by the di-tripeptide permease and subsequently hydrolyzed by intracellular peptidases, especially aminopeptidase. The anticandidal activity of the particular FMDP dipeptide was influenced by the rate of its transport and, to a lower extent, by the intracellular cleavage rate. A high transport rate accompanied by a high cleavage rate resulted in the high anticandidal activity of L-norvalyl-FMDP. The strong growth-inhibitory effect of this compound was the consequence of inhibition of the enzyme glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase by the released FMDP. The action of L-norvalyl-FMDP on exponentially growing C. albicans cells resulted in a sharp decrease of incorporation of 14C label from [14C]glucose into chitin, mannoprotein, and glucan. This effect, as well as the growth-inhibitory effect, was fully reversed by exogenous N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. Glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase was proved to be the only essential target for FMDP dipeptides. Scanning electron microscopy of C. albicans cells treated with L-norvalyl-FMDP revealed highly distorted, wrinkled, and collapsed forms. Cells formed long, bulbous chains, and partial lysis occurred. Images PMID:1901701

  6. Mechanism of action of anticandidal dipeptides containing inhibitors of glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase.

    PubMed

    Milewski, S; Andruszkiewicz, R; Kasprzak, L; Mazerski, J; Mignini, F; Borowski, E

    1991-01-01

    The mechanism of anticandidal action of novel synthetic dipeptides containing N3-(4-methoxyfumaroyl)-L-2,3-diaminopropanoic acid (FMDP) residues was shown to be consistent with the "warhead delivery" concept. FMDP dipeptides were shown to be transported into Candida albicans cells by the di-tripeptide permease and subsequently hydrolyzed by intracellular peptidases, especially aminopeptidase. The anticandidal activity of the particular FMDP dipeptide was influenced by the rate of its transport and, to a lower extent, by the intracellular cleavage rate. A high transport rate accompanied by a high cleavage rate resulted in the high anticandidal activity of L-norvalyl-FMDP. The strong growth-inhibitory effect of this compound was the consequence of inhibition of the enzyme glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase by the released FMDP. The action of L-norvalyl-FMDP on exponentially growing C. albicans cells resulted in a sharp decrease of incorporation of 14C label from [14C]glucose into chitin, mannoprotein, and glucan. This effect, as well as the growth-inhibitory effect, was fully reversed by exogenous N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. Glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase was proved to be the only essential target for FMDP dipeptides. Scanning electron microscopy of C. albicans cells treated with L-norvalyl-FMDP revealed highly distorted, wrinkled, and collapsed forms. Cells formed long, bulbous chains, and partial lysis occurred. PMID:1901701

  7. Profiling histidine dipeptides in plasma and urine after ingesting beef, chicken or chicken broth in humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reactive carbonyl species (RCS), oxidation products of polyunsaturated fatty acids, protein & sugars, play a role in the etiology of certain chronic diseases. Our previous studies revealed that histidine-dipeptides such as carnosine and anserine detoxify cytotoxic carbonyls such as 4-hydroxy-trans-...

  8. Comparison of Intramolecular Forces in Dipeptides with Two Aromatic Rings: does Dispersion Dominate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Jessica A.

    2015-06-01

    IR/UV double resonance spectroscopy has shown that the structure of the capped dipeptide Ac-Trp-Tyr-NH2 is dominated by a hydrophobic interaction between the aromatic rings on the side chains. Using the same method, a similar molecule, Ac-Phe-Phe-NH2, had three experimentally observed conformers including one similar to that of Ac-Trp-Tyr-NH2. In this work, calculations were performed on additional dipeptides containing two aromatic rings to determine if the dispersion-dominated structure was among the lowest energy structures in all such cases. The B3LYP-DCP method developed by DiLabio and Torres was used to calculate the conformations of each dipeptide. Appending dispersion correction potentials (DCP) to B3LYP input files improves results for systems containing dispersion interactions without significantly increasing the calculation time. This method was used first on Ac-Trp-Tyr-NH2 and Ac-Phe-Phe-NH2 to confirm that it successfully identified the experimentally observed structures among the lowest energy results and was then applied to other capped dipeptides containing two aromatic rings including Ac-Phe-Tyr-NH2 and Ac-Tyr-Phe-NH2.

  9. Enantiomeric Interactions between Liquid Crystals and Organized Monolayers of Tyrosine-Containing Dipeptides

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yiqun; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2011-01-01

    We have examined the orientational ordering of nematic liquid crystals (LCs) supported on organized monolayers of dipeptides with the goal of understanding how peptide-based interfaces encode intermolecular interactions that are amplified into supramolecular ordering. By characterizing the orientations of nematic LCs (4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl (5CB) and TL205 (a mixture of mesogens containing cyclohexane-fluorinated biphenyls and fluorinated terphenyls)) on monolayers of either L-cysteine-L-tyrosine, L-cysteine-L-phenylalanine or L-cysteine-L-phosphotyrosine formed on crystallographically textured films of gold, we conclude that patterns of hydrogen bonds generated by the organized monolayers of dipeptides are transduced via macroscopic orientational ordering of the LCs. This conclusion is supported by the observation that the ordering exhibited by the achiral LCs is specific to the enantiomers used to form the dipeptide-based monolayers. The dominate role of the –OH group of tyrosine in dictating the patterns of hydrogen bonds that orient the LCs was also evidenced by the effects of phosphorylation of the tyrosine on the ordering of the LCs. Overall, these results reveal that crystallographic texturing of gold films can direct the formation of monolayers of dipeptides with long-range order, thus unmasking the influence of hydrogen bonding, chirality and phosphorylation on the macroscopic orientational ordering of LCs supported on these surfaces. These results suggest new approaches based on supramolecular assembly for reporting the chemical functionality and stereochemistry of synthetic and biological peptide-based molecules displayed at surfaces. PMID:22091988

  10. Energy landscapes and global thermodynamics for alanine peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somani, Sandeep; Wales, David J.

    2013-09-01

    We compare different approaches for computing the thermodynamics of biomolecular systems. Techniques based on parallel replicas evolving via molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo simulations produce overlapping histograms for the densities of states. In contrast, energy landscape methods employ a superposition partition function constructed from local minima of the potential energy surface. The latter approach is particularly powerful for systems exhibiting broken ergodicity, and it is usually implemented using a harmonic normal mode approximation, which has not been extensively tested for biomolecules. The present contribution compares these alternative approaches for small alanine peptides modelled using the CHARMM and AMBER force fields. Densities of states produced from canonical sampling using multiple temperature replicas provide accurate reference data to evaluate the effect of the harmonic normal mode approximation in the superposition calculations. This benchmarking lays foundations for the application of energy landscape methods to larger biomolecules. It will also provide well characterised model systems for developing enhanced sampling methods, and for the treatment of anharmonicity corresponding to individual local minima.

  11. Expression of an L-alanine dehydrogenase gene in Zymomonas mobilis and excretion of L-alanine

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlenbusch, I.; Sahm, H.; Sprenger, G.A. )

    1991-05-01

    Gene alaD for L-alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus sphaericus was cloned and introduced into Z. mobilis. Under the control of the strong promoter of the pyruvate decarboxylase (pdc) gene, the enzyme was expressed up to a specific activity of nearly 1 {mu}mol {center dot} min{sup {minus}1} {center dot} mg of protein{sup {minus}1} in recombinant cells. As a result of this high L-alanine dehydrogenase activity, growing cells excreted up to 10 mmol of alanine per 280 mmol of glucose utilized into a mineral salts medium. By the addition of 85 mM NH{sub 4}{sup +} to the medium, growth of the recombinant cells stopped, and up to 41 mmol of alanine was secreted. As alanine dehydrogenase competed with pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) for the same substrate (pyruvate), PDC activity was reduced by starvation for the essential PDC cofactor thiamine PP{sub i}. A thiamine auxotrophy mutant of Z. mobilis which carried the alaD gene was starved for 40 h in glucose-supplemented mineral salts medium and then shifted to mineral salts medium with 85 mM NH {sub 4}{sup +} and 280 mmol of glucose. The recombinants excreted up to 84 mmol of alanine over 25 h. Alanine excretion proceeded at an initial velocity of 238 nmol {center dot} min{sup {minus}1} {center dot} mg(dry weight){sup {minus}1}. Despite this high activity, the excretion rate seemed to be a limiting factor, as the intracellular concentration of alanine was as high as 260 mM at the beginning of the excretion phase and decreased to 80 to 90 mM over 24 h.

  12. Computational Prediction of Alanine Scanning and Ligand Binding Energetics in G-Protein Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Boukharta, Lars; Gutiérrez-de-Terán, Hugo; Åqvist, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis combined with binding affinity measurements is widely used to probe the nature of ligand interactions with GPCRs. Such experiments, as well as structure-activity relationships for series of ligands, are usually interpreted with computationally derived models of ligand binding modes. However, systematic approaches for accurate calculations of the corresponding binding free energies are still lacking. Here, we report a computational strategy to quantitatively predict the effects of alanine scanning and ligand modifications based on molecular dynamics free energy simulations. A smooth stepwise scheme for free energy perturbation calculations is derived and applied to a series of thirteen alanine mutations of the human neuropeptide Y1 receptor and series of eight analogous antagonists. The robustness and accuracy of the method enables univocal interpretation of existing mutagenesis and binding data. We show how these calculations can be used to validate structural models and demonstrate their ability to discriminate against suboptimal ones. PMID:24743773

  13. Structure of D-alanine-D-alanine ligase from Yersinia pestis: nucleotide phosphate recognition by the serine loop.

    PubMed

    Tran, Huyen Thi; Hong, Myoung Ki; Ngo, Ho Phuong Thuy; Huynh, Kim Hung; Ahn, Yeh Jin; Wang, Zhong; Kang, Lin Woo

    2016-01-01

    D-Alanyl-D-alanine is an essential precursor of bacterial peptidoglycan and is synthesized by D-alanine-D-alanine ligase (DDL) with hydrolysis of ATP; this reaction makes DDL an important drug target for the development of antibacterial agents. Five crystal structures of DDL from Yersinia pestis (YpDDL) were determined at 1.7-2.5 Å resolution: apo, AMP-bound, ADP-bound, adenosine 5'-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate-bound, and D-alanyl-D-alanine- and ADP-bound structures. YpDDL consists of three domains, in which four loops, loop 1, loop 2 (the serine loop), loop 3 (the ω-loop) and loop 4, constitute the binding sites for two D-alanine molecules and one ATP molecule. Some of them, especially the serine loop and the ω-loop, show flexible conformations, and the serine loop is mainly responsible for the conformational change in substrate nucleotide phosphates. Enzyme-kinetics assays were carried out for both the D-alanine and ATP substrates and a substrate-binding mechanism was proposed for YpDDL involving conformational changes of the loops. PMID:26894530

  14. Substrate Inhibition of VanA by d-Alanine Reduces Vancomycin Resistance in a VanX-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    van der Aart, Lizah T; Lemmens, Nicole; van Wamel, Willem J; van Wezel, Gilles P

    2016-08-01

    The increasing resistance of clinical pathogens against the glycopeptide antibiotic vancomycin, a last-resort drug against infections with Gram-positive pathogens, is a major problem in the nosocomial environment. Vancomycin inhibits peptidoglycan synthesis by binding to the d-Ala-d-Ala terminal dipeptide moiety of the cell wall precursor lipid II. Plasmid-transferable resistance is conferred by modification of the terminal dipeptide into the vancomycin-insensitive variant d-Ala-d-Lac, which is produced by VanA. Here we show that exogenous d-Ala competes with d-Lac as a substrate for VanA, increasing the ratio of wild-type to mutant dipeptide, an effect that was augmented by several orders of magnitude in the absence of the d-Ala-d-Ala peptidase VanX. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis showed that high concentrations of d-Ala led to the production of a significant amount of wild-type cell wall precursors, while vanX-null mutants produced primarily wild-type precursors. This enhanced the efficacy of vancomycin in the vancomycin-resistant model organism Streptomyces coelicolor, and the susceptibility of vancomycin-resistant clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecium (VRE) increased by up to 100-fold. The enhanced vancomycin sensitivity of S. coelicolor cells correlated directly to increased binding of the antibiotic to the cell wall. Our work offers new perspectives for the treatment of diseases associated with vancomycin-resistant pathogens and for the development of drugs that target vancomycin resistance. PMID:27270282

  15. Permeation of the three aromatic dipeptides through lipid bilayers: Experimental and computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Brent L.; Kuczera, Krzysztof; Middaugh, C. Russell; Jas, Gouri S.

    2016-06-01

    The time-resolved parallel artificial membrane permeability assay with fluorescence detection and comprehensive computer simulations are used to study the passive permeation of three aromatic dipeptides - N-acetyl-phenylalanineamide (NAFA), N-acetyltyrosineamide (NAYA), and N-acetyl-tryptophanamide (NATA) through a 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospocholine (DOPC) lipid bilayer. Measured permeation times and permeability coefficients show fastest translocation for NAFA, slowest for NAYA, and intermediate for NATA under physiological temperature and pH. Computationally, we perform umbrella sampling simulations to model the structure, dynamics, and interactions of the peptides as a function of z, the distance from lipid bilayer. The calculated profiles of the potential of mean force show two strong effects - preferential binding of each of the three peptides to the lipid interface and large free energy barriers in the membrane center. We use several approaches to calculate the position-dependent translational diffusion coefficients D(z), including one based on numerical solution the Smoluchowski equation. Surprisingly, computed D(z) values change very little with reaction coordinate and are also quite similar for the three peptides studied. In contrast, calculated values of sidechain rotational correlation times τrot(z) show extremely large changes with peptide membrane insertion - values become 100 times larger in the headgroup region and 10 times larger at interface and in membrane center, relative to solution. The peptides' conformational freedom becomes systematically more restricted as they enter the membrane, sampling α and β and C7eq basins in solution, α and C7eq at the interface, and C7eq only in the center. Residual waters of solvation remain around the peptides even in the membrane center. Overall, our study provides an improved microscopic understanding of passive peptide permeation through membranes, especially on the sensitivity of rotational diffusion

  16. Permeation of the three aromatic dipeptides through lipid bilayers: Experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Brent L; Kuczera, Krzysztof; Middaugh, C Russell; Jas, Gouri S

    2016-06-28

    The time-resolved parallel artificial membrane permeability assay with fluorescence detection and comprehensive computer simulations are used to study the passive permeation of three aromatic dipeptides-N-acetyl-phenylalanineamide (NAFA), N-acetyltyrosineamide (NAYA), and N-acetyl-tryptophanamide (NATA) through a 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospocholine (DOPC) lipid bilayer. Measured permeation times and permeability coefficients show fastest translocation for NAFA, slowest for NAYA, and intermediate for NATA under physiological temperature and pH. Computationally, we perform umbrella sampling simulations to model the structure, dynamics, and interactions of the peptides as a function of z, the distance from lipid bilayer. The calculated profiles of the potential of mean force show two strong effects-preferential binding of each of the three peptides to the lipid interface and large free energy barriers in the membrane center. We use several approaches to calculate the position-dependent translational diffusion coefficients D(z), including one based on numerical solution the Smoluchowski equation. Surprisingly, computed D(z) values change very little with reaction coordinate and are also quite similar for the three peptides studied. In contrast, calculated values of sidechain rotational correlation times τrot(z) show extremely large changes with peptide membrane insertion-values become 100 times larger in the headgroup region and 10 times larger at interface and in membrane center, relative to solution. The peptides' conformational freedom becomes systematically more restricted as they enter the membrane, sampling α and β and C7eq basins in solution, α and C7eq at the interface, and C7eq only in the center. Residual waters of solvation remain around the peptides even in the membrane center. Overall, our study provides an improved microscopic understanding of passive peptide permeation through membranes, especially on the sensitivity of rotational diffusion to

  17. Solvent-induced helical assembly and reversible chiroptical switching of chiral cyclic-dipeptide-functionalized naphthalenediimides.

    PubMed

    Manchineella, Shivaprasad; Prathyusha, V; Priyakumar, U Deva; Govindaraju, T

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the roles of various parameters in orchestrating the preferential chiral molecular organization in supramolecular self-assembly processes is of great significance in designing novel molecular functional systems. Cyclic dipeptide (CDP) chiral auxiliary-functionalized naphthalenediimides (NCDPs 1-6) have been prepared and their chiral self-assembly properties have been investigated. Detailed photophysical and circular dichroism (CD) studies have unveiled the crucial role of the solvent in the chiral aggregation of these NCDPs. NCDPs 1-3 form supramolecular helical assemblies and exhibit remarkable chiroptical switching behaviour (M- to P-type) depending on the solvent composition of HFIP and DMSO. The strong influence of solvent composition on the supramolecular chirality of NCDPs has been further corroborated by concentration and solid-state thin-film CD studies. The chiroptical switching between supramolecular aggregates of opposite helicity (M and P) has been found to be reversible, and can be achieved through cycles of solvent removal and redissolution in solvent mixtures of specific composition. The control molecular systems (NCDPs 4-6), with an achiral or D-isomer second amino acid in the CDP auxiliary, did not show chiral aggregation properties. The substantial roles of hydrogen bonding and π-π interactions in the assembly of the NCDPs have been validated through nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), photophysical, and computational studies. Quantum chemical calculations at the ab initio, semiempirical, and density functional theory levels have been performed on model systems to understand the stabilities of the right (P-) and left (M-) handed helical supramolecular assemblies and the nature of the intermolecular interactions. This study emphasizes the role of CDP chiral auxiliaries on the solvent-induced helical assembly and reversible chiroptical switching of naphthalenediimides. PMID:24281809

  18. EPR/alanine dosimetry for two therapeutic proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrale, Maurizio; Carlino, Antonio; Gallo, Salvatore; Longo, Anna; Panzeca, Salvatore; Bolsi, Alessandra; Hrbacek, Jan; Lomax, Tony

    2016-02-01

    In this work the analysis of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) response of alanine pellets exposed to two different clinical proton beams employed for radiotherapy is performed. One beam is characterized by a passive delivery technique and is dedicated to the eyes treatment (OPTIS2 beam line). Alanine pellets were irradiated with a 70 MeV proton beam corresponding to 35 mm range in eye tissue. We investigated how collimators with different sizes and shape used to conform the dose to the planned target volume influence the delivered dose. For this purpose we performed measurements with varying the collimator size (Output Factor) and the results were compared with those obtained with other dosimetric techniques (such as Markus chamber and diode detector). This analysis showed that the dosimeter response is independent of collimator diameter if this is larger than or equal to 10 mm. The other beam is characterized by an active spot-scanning technique, the Gantry1 beam line (maximum energy 230 MeV), and is used to treat deep-seated tumors. The dose linearity of alanine response in the clinical dose range was tested and the alanine dose response at selected locations in depth was measured and compared with the TPS planned dose in a quasi-clinical scenario. The alanine response was found to be linear in the dose in the clinical explored range (from 10 to 70 Gy). Furthermore, a depth dose profile in a quasi-clinical scenario was measured and compared to the dose computed by the Treatment Planning System PSIPLAN. The comparison of calibrated proton alanine measurements and TPS dose shows a difference under 1% in the SOBP and a "quenching" effect up to 4% in the distal part of SOBP. The positive dosimetric characteristics of the alanine pellets confirm the feasibility to use these detectors for "in vivo" dosimetry in clinical proton beams.

  19. Alanine synthesis from glyceraldehyde and ammonium ion in aqueous solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    The formation of alanine (ala) form C(14)-glyceraldehyde and ammonium phosphate in the presence or absence of a thiol is reported. At ambient temperature, ala synthesis was six times more rapid in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid than in its absence (0.6 and 0.1 percent, respectively, after 60 days). Similarly, the presence of another thiol, N-acetylcysteinate, increased the production of ala, as well as of lactate. The reaction pathway of thiol-catalyzed synthesis of ala, with the lactic acid formed in a bypath, is suggested. In this, dehydration of glyceraldehyde is followed by the formation of hemithioacetal. In the presence of ammonia, an imine is formed, which eventually yields ala. This pathway is consistent with the observation that the rate ratio of ala/lactate remains constant throughout the process. The fact that the reaction takes place under anaerobic conditions in the presence of H2O and with the low concentrations of simple substrates and catalysts makes it an attractive model prebiotic reaction in the process of molecular evolution.

  20. Dipeptide species regulate p38MAPK–Smad3 signalling to maintain chronic myelogenous leukaemia stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Naka, Kazuhito; Jomen, Yoshie; Ishihara, Kaori; Kim, Junil; Ishimoto, Takahiro; Bae, Eun-Jin; Mohney, Robert P.; Stirdivant, Steven M.; Oshima, Hiroko; Oshima, Masanobu; Kim, Dong-Wook; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Takihara, Yoshihiro; Kato, Yukio; Ooshima, Akira; Kim, Seong-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the specific survival of the rare chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) stem cell population could provide a target for therapeutics aimed at eradicating these cells. However, little is known about how survival signalling is regulated in CML stem cells. In this study, we survey global metabolic differences between murine normal haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and CML stem cells using metabolomics techniques. Strikingly, we show that CML stem cells accumulate significantly higher levels of certain dipeptide species than normal HSCs. Once internalized, these dipeptide species activate amino-acid signalling via a pathway involving p38MAPK and the stemness transcription factor Smad3, which promotes CML stem cell maintenance. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of dipeptide uptake inhibits CML stem cell activity in vivo. Our results demonstrate that dipeptide species support CML stem cell maintenance by activating p38MAPK–Smad3 signalling in vivo, and thus point towards a potential therapeutic target for CML treatment. PMID:26289811

  1. The structure of alanine racemase from Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Emily; Scaletti-Hutchinson, Emma; Opel-Reading, Helen; Nakatani, Yoshio; Krause, Kurt L.

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic Gram-negative bacterium which is a common cause of hospital-acquired infections. Numerous antibiotic-resistant strains exist, emphasizing the need for the development of new antimicrobials. Alanine racemase (Alr) is a pyridoxal 5′-phosphate dependent enzyme that is responsible for racemization between enantiomers of alanine. As d-alanine is an essential component of the bacterial cell wall, its inhibition is lethal to prokaryotes, making it an excellent antibiotic drug target. The crystal structure of A. baumannii alanine racemase (AlrAba) from the highly antibiotic-resistant NCTC13302 strain has been solved to 1.9 Å resolution. Comparison of AlrAba with alanine racemases from closely related bacteria demonstrates a conserved overall fold. The substrate entryway and active site of the enzymes were shown to be highly conserved. The structure of AlrAba will provide the template required for future structure-based drug-design studies. PMID:25195891

  2. Caramelization of maltose solution in presence of alanine.

    PubMed

    Fadel, H H M; Farouk, A

    2002-01-01

    Two solutions of maltose in water were used to prepare caramels. Alanine as a catalyst was added to one of these solutions. The caramelization was conducted at 130 degrees C for total time period 90 minutes. Convenient samples were taken of each caramel solution every 30 min and subjected to sensory analysis and isolation of volatile components. The odour and colour sensory tests were evaluated according to the international standard methods (ISO). The results showed that, the presence of alanine gave rise to a high significant (P < 0.01) decrease in acid attributes and remarkable increase in the sweet and caramel attributes, which are the most important caramel notes. On the other hand the increase in heating time in presence of alanine as a catalyst resulted in a high significant (P < 0.01) increase in the browning rate of caramel solution. The new technique Solid Phase Micro Extraction (SPME) was used for trapping the volatile components in the headspace of each caramel samples followed by thermal desorption and GC and GC - MS analysis. The 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (HMF), the main characteristic caramel product, showed its highest value in sample containing alanine after heating for 60 minutes. The best sensory results of the sample contains alanine were confirmed by the presence of high concentrations of the most potent odorants of caramel besides to the formation of some volatile compounds have caramel like flavours such as 2-acetyl pyrrole, 2-furanones and 1-(2-furanyl)1,2-propandione. PMID:12395187

  3. Chiral effects on helicity studied via the energy landscape of short (d, l)-alanine peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelamraju, Sridhar; Oakley, Mark T.; Johnston, Roy L.

    2015-10-01

    The homochirality of natural amino acids facilitates the formation of regular secondary structures such as α-helices and β-sheets. Here, we study the relationship between chirality and backbone structure for the example of hexa-alanine. The most stable stereoisomers are identified through global optimisation. Further, the energy landscape, a database of connected low-energy local minima and transition points, is constructed for various neutral and zwitterionic stereoisomers of hexa-alanine. Three order parameters for partial helicity are applied and metric disconnectivity graphs are presented with partial helicity as a metric. We also apply the Zimm-Bragg model to derive average partial helicities for Ace-(l-Ala)6-NHMe, Ace-(d-Ala-l-Ala)3-NHMe, and Ace-(l-Ala)3-(d-Ala)3-NHMe from the database of local minima and compare with previous studies.

  4. Synthesis and evaluation of 18F labeled alanine derivatives as potential tumor imaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; Zha, Zhihao; Qu, Wenchao; Qiao, Hongwen; Lieberman, Brian P.; Plössl, Karl; Kung, Hank F.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction This paper reports the synthesis and labeling of 18F alanine derivatives. We also investigate their biological characteristics as potential tumor imaging agents mediated by alanine-serine-cysteine preferring (ASC) transporter system. Methods Three new 18F alanine derivatives were prepared from corresponding tosylate-precursors through a two-step labelling reaction. In vitro uptake studies to evaluate and to compare these three analogs were carried out in 9L glioma and PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines. Potential transport mechanisms, protein incorporation and stability of 3-(1-[18F]fluoromethyl)-L-alanine (L[18F]FMA) were investigated in 9L glioma cells. Its biodistribution was determined in a rat-bearing 9L tumor model. PET imaging studies were performed on rat bearing 9L glioma tumors and transgenic mouse carrying spontaneous generated M/tomND tumor (mammary gland adenocarcinoma). Results New 18F alanine derivatives were prepared with 7–34% uncorrected radiochemical yields, excellent enantiomeric purity (>99%) and good radiochemical purity (>99%). In vitro uptake of the L-[18F]FMA in 9L glioma and PC-3 prostate cancer cells was higher than those observed for other two alanine derivatives and [18F]FDG in first 1 h. Inhibition of cell uptake studies suggested that L-[18F]FMA uptake in 9L glioma was predominantly via transport system ASC. After entering into cells, L-[18F]FMA remained stable and was not incorporated into protein within 2 h. In vivo biodistribution studies demonstrated that L-[18F]FMA had relatively high uptake in liver and kidney. Tumor uptake was fast, reaching a maximum within 30 min. The tumor-to-muscle, tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-brain ratios at 60 min post injection were 2.2, 1.9 and 3.0, respectively. In PET imaging studies, tumors were visualized with L-[18F]FMA in both 9L rat and transgenic mouse. Conclusion L-[18F]FMA showed promising properties as a PET imaging agent for up-regulated ASC transporter associated with tumor

  5. Effect of thermal treatment on the structure and the biomedical properties of polyetherurethane film containing dipeptides of L-serine.

    PubMed

    Mori, A; Imanishi, Y; Ito, T; Sakaoku, K

    1985-09-01

    Prepolymers which were obtained by the reaction of 4,4'-diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI) with polytetramethylene glycol (PTMG) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) were chain-extended by the reaction with the linear or cyclic dipeptide of L-serine to yield a novel polyetherurethane containing dipeptide segments. In these polyetherurethanes, spherulites, fibrous structures, and needle-like crystals were formed according to the conditions used. Polyetherurethanes containing the cyclic dipeptide segments exhibit a thermally stable conformation when cast from solution at room temperature. On the other hand, polyetherurethanes containing the linear dipeptide segments exhibit a thermally stable conformation only after annealing. The properties of polyetherurethanes were elucidated by investigation of their morphology by electron microscopy, surface composition by electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, hydrogen-bonding properties by i.r. spectroscopy, and degree of crystallinity by differential scanning calorimetry. The antithrombogenicity of polyetherurethane films containing linear dipeptides was increased by annealing. Their oxygen permeability was controlled by the linear or cyclic dipeptide segments or by annealing. The urea permeability of hydrophilic polyetherurethane film was easily controlled by the casting conditions and molecular weight of the polyether component. The relationship between the morphology and biomedical properties of these polyetherurethane films is discussed. PMID:3931716

  6. Mononuclear and dinuclear peroxotungsten complexes with co-ordinated dipeptides as potent inhibitors of alkaline phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Hazarika, Pankaj; Kalita, Diganta; Islam, Nashreen S

    2008-08-01

    New molecular peroxotungstate(VI) complexes with dipeptides as ancillary ligands of the type, [WO(O(2))(2)(dipeptide)(H(2)O)].3H(2)O, dipeptide = glycyl-glycine or glycyl-leucine, have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, spectral and physico-chemical methods including thermal analysis. The complexes contain side-on bound peroxo groups and a peptide zwitterion bonded to the metal centre unidentately through an O(carboxylate) atom. Investigations on certain biologically important key properties of these compounds and a set of dimeric compounds in analogous co-ligand environment, Na(2)[W(2)O(3)(O(2))(4)(dipeptide)(2)].3H(2)O, dipeptide = glycyl-glycine and glycyl-leucine, reported previously by us revealed interesting features of the compounds. Each of the compounds despite having a 7 co-ordinated metal centre exerts a strong inhibitory effect on alkaline phosphatase activity with a potency higher than that of the free dipeptide, tungstate or peroxotungstate. The compounds exhibit remarkable stability in solutions of acidic as well as physiological pH and are weaker as substrate to the enzyme catalase, compared to H(2)O(2). The mononuclear and dinuclear peroxotungsten compounds are efficient oxidants of reduced glutathione (GSH), a reaction in which only one of the peroxo groups of a diperoxotungsten moiety of the complexes was found to be active. PMID:18665997

  7. First-principles studies of pure and fluorine substituted alanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Sardar; Vaizie, Hamide; Rahnamaye Aliabad, H. A.; Ahmad, Rashid; Khan, Imad; Ali, Zahid; Jalali-Asadabadi, S.; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Khan, Amir Abdullah

    2016-05-01

    This paper communicates the structural, electronic and optical properties of L-alanine, monofluoro and difluoro substituted alanines using density functional calculations. These compounds exist in orthorhombic crystal structure and the calculated structural parameters such as lattice constants, bond angles and bond lengths are in agreement with the experimental results. L-alanine is an indirect band gap insulator, while its fluorine substituted compounds (monofluoroalanine and difluoroalanine) are direct band gap insulators. The substitution causes reduction in the band gap and hence these optically tailored direct wide band gap materials have enhanced optical properties in the ultraviolet (UV) region of electromagnetic spectrum. Therefore, optical properties like dielectric function, refractive index, reflectivity and energy loss function are also investigated. These compounds have almost isotropic nature in the lower frequency range while at higher energies, they have a significant anisotropic nature.

  8. Atomic Layer Deposition of L-Alanine Polypeptide

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fu, Yaqin; Li, Binsong; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Dunphy, Darren R.; Tsai, Andy; Tam, Siu-Yue; Fan, Hongyou Y.; Zhang, Hongxia; Rogers, David; Rempe, Susan; et al

    2014-10-30

    L-Alanine polypeptide thin films were synthesized via atomic layer deposition (ALD). Rather, instead of using an amino acid monomer as the precursor, an L-alanine amino acid derivatized with a protecting group was used to prevent self-polymerization, increase the vapor pressure, and allow linear cycle-by-cycle growth emblematic of ALD. Moreover, the successful deposition of a conformal polypeptide film has been confirmed by FTIR, TEM, and Mass Spectrometry, and the ALD process has been extended to polyvaline.

  9. Ile-Phe Dipeptide Self-Assembly: Clues to Amyloid Formation

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, Natalia Sánchez; Parella, Teodor; Aviles, Francesc X.; Vendrell, Josep; Ventura, Salvador

    2007-01-01

    Peptidic self-assembled nanostructures are said to have a wide range of applications in nanotechnology, yet the mechanistic details of hierarchical self-assembly are still poorly understood. The Phe-Phe recognition motif of the Alzheimer's Aβ peptide is the smallest peptide able to assemble into higher-order structures. Here, we show that the Ile-Phe dipeptide analog is also able to self-associate in aqueous solution as a transparent, thermoreversible gel formed by a network of fibrillar nanostructures that exhibit strong birefringence upon Congo red binding. Besides, a second dipeptide Val-Phe, differing only in a methyl group from the former, is unable to self-assemble. The detailed analysis of the differential polymeric behavior of these closely related molecules provides insight into the forces triggering the first steps in self-assembly processes such as amyloid formation. PMID:17172307

  10. Ile-phe dipeptide self-assembly: clues to amyloid formation.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Natalia Sánchez; Parella, Teodor; Aviles, Francesc X; Vendrell, Josep; Ventura, Salvador

    2007-03-01

    Peptidic self-assembled nanostructures are said to have a wide range of applications in nanotechnology, yet the mechanistic details of hierarchical self-assembly are still poorly understood. The Phe-Phe recognition motif of the Alzheimer's Abeta peptide is the smallest peptide able to assemble into higher-order structures. Here, we show that the Ile-Phe dipeptide analog is also able to self-associate in aqueous solution as a transparent, thermoreversible gel formed by a network of fibrillar nanostructures that exhibit strong birefringence upon Congo red binding. Besides, a second dipeptide Val-Phe, differing only in a methyl group from the former, is unable to self-assemble. The detailed analysis of the differential polymeric behavior of these closely related molecules provides insight into the forces triggering the first steps in self-assembly processes such as amyloid formation. PMID:17172307

  11. Synthesis and characterization of novel polyurethane cationomers with dipeptide sequences and alkylammonium groups.

    PubMed

    Buruiana, Emil C; Buruiana, Tinca

    2004-01-01

    A synthetic approach to polyurethane cationomers containing S-pyroglutamyl-S-glutamic acid dipeptide (S-PyGlu-S-Glu) and alkylammonium groups is presented. Two segmented polycations, based on polycaprolactone diol, isophorone diisocyanate and dipeptide together with N-methyldiethanolamine, subsequently quaternized with dodecylbromide, were synthesized and characterized by IR spectroscopy, GPC, DSC and reduced viscosity measurements. Such polycations exhibited excellent film forming properties and their soft elastomeric nature provides adequate physical properties. Optical rotation varying from +10 (monomer) to -15 (polycation) could be associated with a configuration pertubation through the asymmetric carbon atoms of glutamic residues. Susceptibility of the cationic surface to heparinization and then to blood-polymer interaction suggested an anticoagulant activity of the heparinized polymeric films. PMID:15255526

  12. Surface Chirality of Gly-Pro Dipeptide Adsorbed on a Cu(110) Surface.

    PubMed

    Cruguel, Hervé; Méthivier, Christophe; Pradier, Claire-Marie; Humblot, Vincent

    2015-07-01

    The adsorption of chiral Gly-Pro dipeptide on Cu(110) has been characterized by combining in situ polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-RAIRS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The chemical state of the dipeptide, and its anchoring points and adsorption geometry, were determined at various coverage values. Gly-Pro molecules are present on Cu(110) in their anionic form (NH2 /COO(-)) and adsorb under a 3-point binding via both oxygen atoms of the carboxylate group and via the nitrogen atom of the amine group. Low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) have shown the presence of an extended 2D chiral array, sustained via intermolecular H-bonds interactions. Furthermore, due to the particular shape of the molecule, only one homochiral domain is formed, creating thus a truly chiral surface. PMID:25847844

  13. Solvation free energies of alanine peptides: the effect of flexibility.

    PubMed

    Kokubo, Hironori; Harris, Robert C; Asthagiri, Dilipkumar; Pettitt, B Montgomery

    2013-12-27

    The electrostatic (ΔGel), van der Waals cavity-formation (ΔGvdw), and total (ΔG) solvation free energies for 10 alanine peptides ranging in length (n) from 1 to 10 monomers were calculated. The free energies were computed both with fixed, extended conformations of the peptides and again for some of the peptides without constraints. The solvation free energies, ΔGel, and components ΔGvdw, and ΔG, were found to be linear in n, with the slopes of the best-fit lines being γel, γvdw, and γ, respectively. Both γel and γ were negative for fixed and flexible peptides, and γvdw was negative for fixed peptides. That γvdw was negative was surprising, as experimental data on alkanes, theoretical models, and MD computations on small molecules and model systems generally suggest that γvdw should be positive. A negative γvdw seemingly contradicts the notion that ΔGvdw drives the initial collapse of the protein when it folds by favoring conformations with small surface areas. When we computed ΔGvdw for the flexible peptides, thereby allowing the peptides to assume natural ensembles of more compact conformations, γvdw was positive. Because most proteins do not assume extended conformations, a ΔGvdw that increases with increasing surface area may be typical for globular proteins. An alternative hypothesis is that the collapse is driven by intramolecular interactions. We find few intramolecular H-bonds but show that the intramolecular van der Waals interaction energy is more favorable for the flexible than for the extended peptides, seemingly favoring this hypothesis. The large fluctuations in the vdw energy may make attributing the collapse of the peptide to this intramolecular energy difficult. PMID:24328358

  14. Solvation Free Energies of Alanine Peptides: The Effect of Flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Kokubo, Hironori; Harris, Robert C.; Asthigiri, Dilipkumar; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2014-01-01

    The electrostatic (ΔGel), van der Waals cavity-formation (ΔGvdw), and total (ΔG) solvation free energies for 10 alanine peptides ranging in length (n) from 1 to 10 monomers were calculated. The free energies were computed both with fixed, extended conformations of the peptides and again for some of the peptides without constraints. The solvation free energies, ΔGel, and components ΔGvdw, and ΔG, were found to be linear in n, with the slopes of the best-fit lines being γel, γvdw, and γ, respectively. Both γel and γ were negative for fixed and flexible peptides, and γvdw was negative for fixed peptides. That γvdw was negative was surprising, as experimental data on alkanes, theoretical models, and MD computations on small molecules and model systems generally suggest that γvdw should be positive. A negative γvdw seemingly contradicts the notion that ΔGvdw drives the initial collapse of the protein when it folds by favoring conformations with small surface areas. When we computed ΔGvdw for the flexible peptides, thereby allowing the peptides to assume natural ensembles of more compact conformations, γvdw was positive. Because most proteins do not assume extended conformations, a ΔGvdw that increases with increasing surface area may be typical for globular proteins. An alternative hypothesis is that the collapse is driven by intramolecular interactions. We find few intramolecular h-bonds but show that the intramolecular van der Waal’s interaction energy is more favorable for the flexible than for the extended peptides, seemingly favoring this hypothesis. The large fluctuations in the vdw energy may make attributing the collapse of the peptide to this intramolecular energy difficult. PMID:24328358

  15. Solvation Free Energies of Alanine Peptides: The Effect of Flexibility

    SciTech Connect

    Kokubo, Hironori; Harris, Robert C.; Asthagiri, Dilip; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2013-12-03

    The electrostatic (?Gel), cavity-formation (?Gvdw), and total (?G) solvation free energies for 10 alanine peptides ranging in length (n) from 1 to 10 monomers were calculated. The free energies were computed both with xed, extended conformations of the peptides and again for some of the peptides without constraints. The solvation free energies, ?Gel, ?Gvdw, and ?G, were found to be linear in n, with the slopes of the best-fit lines being gamma_el, gamma_vdw, and gamma, respectively. Both gamma_el and gamma were negative for fixed and flexible peptides, and gamma_vdw was negative for fixed peptides. That gamma_vdw was negative was surprising, as experimental data on alkanes, theoretical models, and MD computations on small molecules and model systems generally suggest that gamma_vdw should be positive. A negative gamma_vdw seemingly contradicts the notion that ?Gvdw drives the initial collapse of the protein when it folds by favoring conformations with small surface areas, but when we computed ?Gvdw for the flexible peptides, thereby allowing the peptides to assume natural ensembles of more compact conformations, gamma-vdw was positive. Because most proteins do not assume extended conformations, a ?Gvdw that increases with increasing surface area may be typical for globular proteins. An alternative hypothesis is that the collapse is driven by intramolecular interactions. We show that the intramolecular van der Waal's interaction energy is more favorable for the flexible than for the extended peptides, seemingly favoring this hypothesis, but the large fluctuations in this energy may make attributing the collapse of the peptide to this intramolecular energy difficult.

  16. Stereoselective aminoacylation of a dinucleoside monophosphate by the imidazolides of DL-alanine and N-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)-DL-alanine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Profy, A. T.; Usher, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The aminoacylation of diinosine monophosphate was studied experimentally. When the acylating agent was the imidazolide of N-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)-DL-alanine, a 40 percent enantiomeric excess of the isomer was incorporated at the 2' site and the positions of equilibrium for the reversible 2'-3' migration reaction differed for the D and L enantiomers. The reactivity of the nucleoside hydroxyl groups was found to decrease on the order 2'(3') less than internal 2' and less than 5', and the extent of the reaction was affected by the concentration of the imidazole buffer. Reaction of IpI with imidazolide of unprotected DL-alanine, by contrast, led to an excess of the D isomer at the internal 2' site. Finally, reaction with the N-carboxy anhydride of DL-alanine occurred without stereoselection. These results are found to be relevant to the study of the evolution of optical chemical activity and the origin of genetically directed protein synthesis.

  17. Kinetics and mechanism of the beta-alanine + OH gas phase reaction: a quantum mechanical approach.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Torres, Armando; Galano, Annia; Alvarez-Idaboy, J Raúl

    2006-01-14

    The OH hydrogen abstraction reaction from beta-alanine has been studied using the BHandHLYP hybrid HF-density functional and 6-311G(d,p) basis sets. The energies have been improved by single point calculations at the CCSD(T)/6-311G(d,p) level of theory. The structures of the different stationary points are discussed. Reaction profiles are modeled including the formation of pre-reactive and product complexes. Negative net activation energy is obtained for the overall reaction. A complex mechanism is proposed, and the rate coefficients are calculated using transition state theory over the temperature range of 250-400 K. The rate coefficients are proposed for the first time and it was found that in the gas phase the hydrogen abstraction occurs mainly from the CH(2) group next to the amino end. The following expressions, in cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1), are obtained for the overall rate constants, at 250-400 and 290-310 K, respectively: k(250-400)= 2.36 x 10(-12) exp(340/T), and k(290-310)= 1.296 x 10(-12) exp(743/T). The three parameter expression that best describes the studied reaction is k(250-400)= 1.01 x 10(-21)T(3.09) exp(1374/T). The beta-alanine + OH reaction was found to be 1.5 times faster than the alpha-alanine + OH reaction. PMID:16482271

  18. Surface chemistry of alanine on Cu{111}: Adsorption geometry and temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldanza, Silvia; Cornish, Alix; Nicklin, Richard E. J.; Zheleva, Zhasmina V.; Held, Georg

    2014-11-01

    Adsorption of L-alanine on the Cu{111} single crystal surface was investigated as a model system for interactions between small chiral modifier molecules and close-packed metal surfaces. Synchrotron-based X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy are used to determine the chemical state, bond coordination and out-of-plane orientation of the molecule on the surface. Alanine adsorbs in its anionic form at room temperature, whilst at low temperature the overlayer consists of anionic and zwitterionic molecules. NEXAFS spectra exhibit a strong angular dependence of the π* resonance associated with the carboxylate group, which allows determining the tilt angle of this group with respect to the surface plane (48° ± 2°) at room temperature. Low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) shows a p(2√{ 13} × 2√{ 13}) R 13 ° superstructure with only one domain, which breaks the mirror symmetry of the substrate and, thus, induces global chirality to the surface. Temperature-programmed XPS (TP-XPS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiments indicate that the zwitterionic form converts into the anionic species (alaninate) at 293 K. The latter desorbs/decomposes between 435 K and 445 K.

  19. Theoretical study of alpha/beta-alanine and their protonated/alkali metal cationized complexes.

    PubMed

    Abirami, S; Xing, Y M; Tsang, C W; Ma, N L

    2005-01-27

    Density functional theory has been employed to model the structure and the relative stabilities of alpha/beta-alanine conformers and their protonated and alkali metal cationized complexes. In general, we find that the behavior of the beta-alanine (beta-Ala) system is quite similar to that of alpha-alanine (alpha-Ala). However, the presence of the methylene group (-CH2-) at the beta position in beta-Ala leads to a few key differences. First, the intramolecular hydrogen bonding patterns are different between free alpha- and beta-Ala. Second, the stability of zwitterionic species (in either the free ligand or alkali metal cationized complexes) is often enhanced in beta-Ala. Third, the preferred mode of alkali metal cation (M+) binding may also differ in alpha- and beta-Ala. Natural energy decomposition analysis has been applied here to gain further insight into the effects of the ligand, cation size, and mode of binding on the nature of interaction in these M+-Ala complexes. PMID:16833371

  20. Chiral molecule for spin filtering purposes: the study of L- and D-Alanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yitamben, Esmeralda; Rosenberg, Richard; Guisinger, Nathan

    2011-03-01

    The field of molecular electronics has attracted scientists by the great opportunities and versatility it offers as a replacement for standard semiconductor electronics with organic materials, thus bringing down the cost, and opening endless possibilities for chemical synthesis, and scientific breakthrough. Of particular interest is the use of chiral molecules, such as alanine, for spin filtering studies in hope of creating highly spin-polarized charge carriers for spintronics applications. Preliminary studies of both L- and D-alanine on Cu(111) were conducted using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, revealing the formation of a 2-dimensional phase at low coverage, a hexagonal ``flower'' pattern at intermediate coverage, and a chain and ring superstructures at high coverage. A model is proposed to explain the surface chemistry and bonding of the molecules on the metallic surface. Current studies of L- and D-alanine on Fe/W show promises in the intermediate coverage regime. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  1. A multi-stimuli responive, self-assembling, boronic acid dipeptide

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jones, Brad Howard; Martinez, Alina Marissa; Wheeler, Jill S.; McKenzie, Bonnie B.; Miller, Lance Lee; Wheeler, David R.; Spoerke, Erik David

    2015-08-11

    Modification of the dipeptide of phenylalanine, FF, with a boronic acid (BA) functionality imparts unique aqueous self-assembly behavior that responds to multiple stimuli. Changes in pH and ionic strength are used to trigger hydrogelation via the formation of nanoribbon networks. Thus, we show for the first time that the binding of polyols to the BA functionality can modulate a peptide between its assembled and disassembled states.

  2. Covalently Assembled Dipeptide Nanospheres as Intrinsic Photosensitizers for Efficient Photodynamic Therapy in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoke; Fei, Jinbo; Li, Qi; Li, Junbai

    2016-05-01

    Monodispersed diphenylalanine-based nanospheres with excellent biocompatibility are fabricated through a facile covalent reaction-induced assembly. Interestingly, the nanospheres exhibit red autofluorescence. Most importantly, such assembled dipeptide nanospheres can serve as intrinsic photosensitizer to convert O2 to singlet oxygen ((1) O2 ). Thus, photodynamic therapy in vitro can be achieved effectively. The versatile strategy could be extended to other biomolecules containing a primary amine group for the fabrication of potential intrinsic photosensitizers. PMID:26934079

  3. Antisense Proline-Arginine RAN dipeptides linked to C9ORF72-ALS/FTD form toxic nuclear aggregates that initiate in vitro and in vivo neuronal death

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xinmei; Tan, Wenzhi; Westergard, Thomas; Krishnamurthy, Karthik; ShamamandriMarkandaiah, Shashirekha; Shi, Yingxiao; Lin, Shaoyu; Shneider, Neil A.; Monaghan, John; Pandey, Udai B.; Pasinelli, Piera; Ichida, Justin K.; Trotti, Davide

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Expanded GGGGCC nucleotide repeats within the C9ORF72 gene are the most common genetic mutation associated with both amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Sense and antisense transcripts of these expansions are translated to form five dipeptide repeat proteins (DRPs). We employed primary cortical and motor neuron cultures, live-cell imaging, and transgenic fly models and found that the arginine-rich dipeptides, in particular Proline-Arginine (PR), are potently neurotoxic. Factors that anticipated their neurotoxicity included aggregation in nucleoli, decreased number of processing bodies, and stress granules formation, implying global translational dysregulation as path accountable for toxicity. Nuclear PR aggregates were also found in human-induced motor neurons and postmortem spinal cord tissues from C9ORF72 ALS and ALS/FTD patients. Intronic G4C2 transcripts, but not loss of C9ORF72 protein, are also toxic to motor and cortical neurons. Interestingly, G4C2 transcript-mediated neurotoxicity synergizes with that of PR aggregates, suggesting convergence of mechanisms. PMID:25521377

  4. Surface-induced self-assembly of dipeptides onto nanotextured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Demirel, Gokhan; Buyukserin, Fatih

    2011-10-18

    There is an increasing interest for the utilization of biomolecules for fabricating novel nanostructures due to their ability for specific molecular recognition, biocompatibility, and ease of availability. Among these molecules, diphenylalanine (Phe-Phe) dipeptide is considered as one of the simplest molecules that can generate a family of self-assembly based nanostructures. The properties of the substrate surface, on which the self-assembly process of these peptides occurs, play a critical role. Herein, we demonstrated the influence of surface texture and functionality on the self-assembly of Phe-Phe dipeptides using smooth silicon surfaces, anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes, and poly(chloro-p-xylylene) (PPX) films having columnar and helical morphologies. We found that helical PPX films, AAO, and silicon surfaces induce similar self-assembly processes and the surface hydrophobicity has a direct influence for the final dipeptide structure whether being in an aggregated tubular form or creating a thin film that covers the substrate surface. Moreover, the dye staining data indicates that the surface charge properties and hence the mechanism of the self-assembly process are different for tubular structures as opposed to the peptidic film. We believe that our results may contribute to the control of surface-induced self-assembly of peptide molecules and this control can potentially allow the fabrication of novel peptide based materials with desired morphologies and unique functionalities for different technological applications. PMID:21879773

  5. The Dipeptide Monoester Prodrugs of Floxuridine and Gemcitabine—Feasibility of Orally Administrable Nucleoside Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Tsume, Yasuhiro; Bermejo, Blanca Borras; Amidon, Gordon L.

    2014-01-01

    Dipeptide monoester prodrugs of floxuridine and gemcitabine were synthesized. Their chemical stability in buffers, enzymatic stability in cell homogenates, permeability in mouse intestinal membrane along with drug concentration in mouse plasma, and anti-proliferative activity in cancer cells were determined and compared to their parent drugs. Floxuridine prodrug was more enzymatically stable than floxuridine and the degradation from prodrug to parent drug works as the rate-limiting step. On the other hand, gemcitabine prodrug was less enzymatically stable than gemcitabine. Those dipeptide monoester prodrugs exhibited 2.4- to 48.7-fold higher uptake than their parent drugs in Caco-2, Panc-1, and AsPC-1 cells. Floxuridine and gemcitabine prodrugs showed superior permeability in mouse jejunum to their parent drugs and exhibited the higher drug concentration in plasma after in situ mouse perfusion. Cell proliferation assays in ductal pancreatic cancer cells, AsPC-1 and Panc-1, indicated that dipeptide prodrugs of floxuridine and gemcitabine were more potent than their parent drugs. The enhanced potency of nucleoside analogs was attributed to their improved membrane permeability. The prodrug forms of 5′-l-phenylalanyl-l-tyrosyl-floxuridine and 5′-l-phenylalanyl-l-tyrosyl-gemcitabine appeared in mouse plasma after the permeation of intestinal membrane and the first-pass effect, suggesting their potential for the development of oral dosage form for anti-cancer agents. PMID:24473270

  6. [Dipeptide nootropic agent GVS-111 prevents accumulation of the lipid peroxidation products during immobilization].

    PubMed

    Lysenko, A V; Uskova, N I; Ostrovskaia, R U; Gudasheva, T A; Voronina, T A

    1997-01-01

    Immobilization of rats in a narrow plastic chamber for 24 h caused a sharp increase in the level of diene conjugates and the content of schiff bases in the synaptosomes of the brain cortex as well as accumulation of extraerythrocytic hemoglobin in blood serum. The dipeptide nootropic agent GVS-111 (ethyl ether of phenylacetylprolylglycine), when administered 15 and particularly 60 min before immobilization reduced the accumulation of these products of lipid peroxidation in the brain and blood. GVS-111 demonstrated these signs of its antioxidant effect after a single i.p. injection in doses of 0.12 and 0.5 mg/kg. Pyracetam produced a similar effect on the listed parameters in injection in a dose of 300 mg/kg for three successive days. The protective effect of the new pyracetam dipeptide analog GVS-111 in relation to activation of free-radical processes induced by immobilization is additional proof of the antistress action of this dipeptide. PMID:9483398

  7. A new cyclic dipeptide penicimutide: the activated production of cyclic dipeptides by introduction of neomycin-resistance in the marine-derived fungus Penicillium purpurogenum G59.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; Cui, Cheng-Bin; Li, Chang-Wei

    2016-06-01

    A novel cyclic dipeptide, named penicimutide (1), and four known cyclic dipeptides, cyclo(L-Val-L-Pro) (2), cyclo(L-Ile-L-Pro) (3), cyclo(L-Leu-L-Pro) (4) and cyclo(L-Phe-L-Pro) (5), were isolated from a neomycin-resistant mutant of the marine-derived fungus Penicillium purpurogenum G59. The structure of 1, including the absolute configuration, was determined by spectroscopic and chemical methods, especially NMR and Marfey's analysis. An unusual amino acid in 1, 4,5-didehydro-L-leucine, was found for the first time occurring in nature. HPLC-ESI-MS analysis evidenced that 1-3 were produced only in the mutant strain, but 4 and 5 were produced in both the mutant and parental strains, indicating that the introduction of neomycin-resistance in the mutant activated pathways of 1-3 biosynthesis that were silent in the parental strain. Compound 1 selectively inhibited HeLa cells (among five tested human cancer cell lines) with an inhibition rate (IR %) of 39.4 % at 100 µg/mL, a similar inhibition intensity to that of the positive control 5-fluorouracil (IR % of 41.4 % at 100 µg/mL against HeLa cells). The present work exemplifies the effectiveness of our previous DMSO-mediated method for introducing drug-resistance in fungi to activate silent biosynthetic pathways to obtain new bioactive compounds. PMID:27129688

  8. Respiration of [14C]alanine by the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus.

    PubMed

    Chalot, M; Brun, A; Finlay, R D; Söderström, B

    1994-08-01

    The ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus efficiently took up exogenously supplied [14C]alanine and rapidly converted it to pyruvate, citrate, succinate, fumarate and to CO2, thus providing direct evidence for the utilisation of alanine as a respiratory substrate. [14C]alanine was further actively metabolised to glutamate, glutamine and aspartate. Exposure to aminooxyacetate completely suppressed 14CO2 evolution and greatly reduced the flow of carbon from [14C]alanine to tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates and amino acids, suggesting that alanine aminotransferase plays a pivotal role in alanine metabolism in Paxillus involutus. PMID:8082830

  9. Spectrophotometric readout for an alanine dosimeter for food irradiation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebraheem, S.; Beshir, W. B.; Eid, S.; Sobhy, R.; Kovács, A.

    2003-06-01

    The alanine-electron spin resonance (EPR) readout system is well known as a reference and transfer dosimetry system for the evaluation of high doses in radiation processing. The high cost of an EPR/alanine dosimetry system is a serious handicap for large-scale routine application in irradiation facilities. In this study, the use of a complex produced by dissolving irradiated L-alanine in 1,4-phenyl diammonium dichloride solution was investigated for dosimetry purposes. This complex—having a purple colour—has an increasing absorbance with increasing dose in the range of 1-20 kGy. The applicability of spectrophotometric evaluation was studied by measuring the absorbance intensity of this complex at 360 and 505 nm, respectively. Fluorimetric evaluation was also investigated by measuring the emission of the complex at 435 nm as a function of dose. The present method is easy for routine application. The effect of the dye concentration as well as the suitable amount of irradiated alanine has been studied. With respect to routine application, the stability of the product complex after its formation was also investigated.

  10. Formation of {gamma}-alumina nanorods in presence of alanine

    SciTech Connect

    Dabbagh, Hossein A.; Rasti, Elham; Yalfani, Mohammad S.; Medina, Francesc

    2011-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Nanorod aluminas with a possible hexagonal symmetry, high surface area and relatively narrow pore size distribution were obtained. Research highlights: {yields} Research highlights {yields} Boehmite was prepared using a green sol-gel process in the presence of alanine. {yields} Nanorod aluminas with a high surface area were obtained. {yields} Addition of alanine would shape the size of the holes and crevices. {yields} The morphologies of the nanorods were revealed by transmission electron microscope. -- Abstract: Boehmite and alumina nanostructures were prepared using a simple green sol-gel process in the presence of alanine in water medium at room temperature. The uncalcined (dried at 200 {sup o}C) and the calcined materials (at 500, 600 and 700 {sup o}C for 4 h) were characterized using XRD, TEM, SEM, N{sub 2} physisorption and TGA. Nanorod aluminas with a possible hexagonal symmetry, high surface area and relatively narrow pore size distribution were obtained. The surface area was enhanced and crystallization was retarded as the alanine content increased. The morphologies of the nanoparticles and nanorods were revealed by a transmission electron microscope (TEM).

  11. Evaluation of a thiodipeptide, L-phenylalanyl-Ψ[CS-N]-L-alanine, as a novel probe for peptide transporter 1.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Hiroshi; Saito, Sachi; Kanagawa, Masahiko; Kamioka, Hiroki; Yano, Kentaro; Morimoto, Kaori; Ogihara, Takuo

    2014-01-01

    L-Phenylalanyl-Ψ[CS-N]-l-alanine (Phe-Ψ-Ala), a thiourea dipeptide, was evaluated as a probe for peptide transporter 1 (PEPT1). Uptake of Phe-Ψ-Ala in PEPT1-overexpressing HeLa cells was significantly higher than that in vector-transfected HeLa cells and the Km value was 275 ± 32 µM. The uptake was pH-dependent, being highest at pH 6.0, and was significantly decreased in the presence of PEPT1 inhibitors [glycylsarcosine (Gly-Sar), cephalexin, valaciclovir, glycylglycine, and glycylproline]. In metabolism assay using rat intestinal mucosa, rat hepatic microsomes, and human hepatocytes, the amount of Phe-Ψ-Ala was unchanged, whereas phenylalanylalanine was extensively decomposed. The clearance, distribution volume, and half-life of intravenously administered Phe-Ψ-Ala in rats were 0.151 ± 0.008 L/h/kg, 0.235 ± 0.012 L/kg, and 1.14 ± 0.07 h, respectively. The maximum plasma concentration of orally administered Phe-Ψ-Ala (2.31 ± 0.60 µg/mL) in the presence of Gly-Sar was significantly decreased compared with that in the absence of glycylsarcosine (3.74 ± 0.44 µg/mL), suggesting that the intestinal absorption of Phe-Ψ-Ala is mediated by intestinal PEPT1. In conclusion, our results indicate that Phe-Ψ-Ala is a high-affinity, metabolically stable, non-radioactive probe for PEPT1, and it should prove useful in studies of PEPT1, e.g., for predicting drug-drug interactions mediated by PEPT1 in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25008848

  12. Formation of simple biomolecules from alanine in ocean by impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Y.; Sekine, T.; Furukawa, Y.; Kakegawa, T.; Kobayashi, T.

    2013-12-01

    The biomolecules on the Earth are thought either to have originated from the extraterrestrial parts carried with flying meteorites or to have been formed from the inorganic materials on the Earth through given energy. From the standpoint to address the importance of impact energy, it is required to simulate experimentally the chemical reactions during impacts, because violent impacts may have occurred 3.8-4.0 Gyr ago to create biomolecules initially. It has been demonstrated that shock reactions among ocean (H2O), atmospheric nitrogen, and meteoritic constitution (Fe) can induce locally reduction environment to form simple bioorganic molecules such as ammonia and amino acid (Nakazawa et al., 2005; Furukawa et al., 2009). We need to know possible processes for alanine how chemical reactions proceed during repeated impacts and how complicated biomolecules are formed. Alanine can be formed from glycine (Umeda et al., in preparation). In this study, we carried out shock recovery experiments at pressures of 4.4-5.7 GPa to investigate the chemical reactions of alanine. Experiments were carried out with a propellant gun. Stainless steel containers (30 mm in diameter, 30 mm long) with 13C-labeled alanine aqueous solution immersed in olivine or hematite powders were used as targets. Air gap was present in the sample room (18 mm in diameter, 2 mm thick) behind the sample. The powder, solution, and air represent meteorite, ocean, and atmosphere on early Earth, respectively. Two powders of olivine and hematite help to keep the oxygen fugacity low and high during experiments, respectively in order to investigate the effect of oxygen fugacity on chemical processes of alanine. The recovered containers, after cleaned completely, were immersed into liquid nitrogen to freeze sample solution and then we drilled on the impact surface to extract water-soluble run products using pure water. Thus obtained products were analyzed by LC/MS for four amino acids (glycine, alanine, valine, and

  13. Crystal structure of the leucine-rich repeat domain of the NOD-like receptor NLRP1: implications for binding of muramyl dipeptide.

    PubMed

    Reubold, Thomas F; Hahne, Gernot; Wohlgemuth, Sabine; Eschenburg, Susanne

    2014-09-17

    The NOD-like receptor NLRP1 (NLR family, pyrin domain containing 1) senses the presence of the bacterial cell wall component l-muramyl dipeptide (MDP) inside the cell. We determined the crystal structure of the LRR domain of human NLRP1 in the absence of MDP to a resolution of 1.65Å. The fold of the structure can be assigned to the ribonuclease inhibitor-like class of LRR proteins. We compared our structure with X-ray models of the LRR domains of NLRX1 and NLRC4 and a homology model of the LRR domain of NOD2. We conclude that the MDP binding site of NLRP1 is not located in the LRR domain. PMID:25064844

  14. Reduced hnRNPA3 increases C9orf72 repeat RNA levels and dipeptide-repeat protein deposition.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kohji; Nihei, Yoshihiro; Arzberger, Thomas; Zhou, Qihui; Mackenzie, Ian R; Hermann, Andreas; Hanisch, Frank; Kamp, Frits; Nuscher, Brigitte; Orozco, Denise; Edbauer, Dieter; Haass, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Intronic hexanucleotide (G4C2) repeat expansions in C9orf72 are genetically associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The repeat RNA accumulates within RNA foci but is also translated into disease characterizing dipeptide repeat proteins (DPR). Repeat-dependent toxicity may affect nuclear import. hnRNPA3 is a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein, which specifically binds to the G4C2 repeat RNA We now report that a reduction of nuclear hnRNPA3 leads to an increase of the repeat RNA as well as DPR production and deposition in primary neurons and a novel tissue culture model that reproduces features of the C9orf72 pathology. In fibroblasts derived from patients carrying extended C9orf72 repeats, nuclear RNA foci accumulated upon reduction of hnRNPA3. Neurons in the hippocampus of C9orf72 patients are frequently devoid of hnRNPA3. Reduced nuclear hnRNPA3 in the hippocampus of patients with extended C9orf72 repeats correlates with increased DPR deposition. Thus, reduced hnRNPA3 expression in C9orf72 cases leads to increased levels of the repeat RNA as well as enhanced production and deposition of DPR proteins and RNA foci. PMID:27461252

  15. Muramyl dipeptide and anti-CD10 monoclonal antibody immunoconjugate enhances anti-leukemia immunity of T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling-Zhen; Zhang, Li; Wang, Ling-Li; Lu, Yuan; Chen, Lei; Sun, Yan; Zhao, Hong-Guo; Song, Liang; Sun, Li-Rong

    2016-09-01

    It is necessary to completely eliminate minimal residual disease (MRD) to cure acute leukemia. Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) have been shown to be effective to eliminate MRD. In this study we aimed to investigate the effect of anti-CD10 MAb conjugated to muramyl dipeptide immunoconjugate (MDP-Ab) on the function of lymphocytes and activated lymphocytes using leukemia xenografts in nude mice as a model. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and induced into dendritic cells (DCs) and lymphocytes. Cytotoxic activity of lymphocytes was detected by LDH release assay. Leukemia xenografts in nude mice were established to assess tumor growth. We found that the killing rate was significantly higher in MDP-Ab group, LPS group and MDP-Ab+LPS group than in control group, and was the highest in MDP-Ab+LPS group. Tumor-bearing mice in MDP-Ab group showed obvious coagulation necrosis. In conclusion, our data suggest that MDP-Ab could effectively prime DCs to improve the anti-tumor immunity of T lymphocytes and inhibit the tumor growth. MDP-Ab may be used as suitable candidate for eliminating residual leukemia cells to prevent relapse. PMID:27307219

  16. Degradation of Glycine and Alanine on Irradiated Quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlikowski, Maciej; Benko, Aleksandra; Wróbel, Tomasz P.

    2013-04-01

    Recent researches suggest participation of minerals in the formation of life under primordial conditions. Among all of the minerals, quartz seems to be one of the most probable to take part in such processes. However, an external source of energy is needed, e.g. electric discharge. A device simulating the proposed conditions was designed and was used to simulate prebiotic conditions. Investigation of processes occurring during the stimulation of quartz with electric discharge was studied by means of Ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectroscopy, in order to monitor the generation kinetics of free radicals. Additionally, infrared spectroscopy was applied to identify chemical reaction products created in a solution of alanine or glycine, in the presence of quartz treated with electric discharge. Formation of increased amounts of free radicals, compared to experiments performed without quartz and/or amino acid, is reported, along with identification of possible degradation products of alanine. No synthetic reactions were observed.

  17. Physiological hypercortisolemia increases proteolysis, glutamine, and alanine production

    SciTech Connect

    Darmaun, D.; Matthews, D.E.; Bier, D.M. Cornell Univ. Medical College, New York, NY )

    1988-09-01

    Physiological elevations of plasma cortisol levels, as are encountered in stress and severe trauma, were produced in six normal subjects by infusing them with hydrocortisone for 64 h. Amino acid kinetics were measured in the postabsorptive state using three 4-h infusions of L-(1-{sup 13}C)leucine, L-phenyl({sup 2}H{sub 5})phenylalanine, L-(2-{sup 15}N)glutamine, and L-(1-{sup 13}C)alanine tracers (1) before, (2) at 12 h, and (3) at 60 h of cortisol infusion. Before and throughout the study, the subjects ate a normal diet of adequate protein and energy intake. The cortisol infusion raised plasma cortisol levels significantly from 10 {plus minus} 1 to 32 {plus minus} 4 {mu}g/dl, leucine flux from 83 {plus minus} 3 to 97 {plus minus} 3 {mu}mol{center dot}kg{sup {minus}1}{center dot}h{sup {minus}1}, and phenylalanine flux from 34 {plus minus} 1 to 39 {plus minus} 1 (SE) {mu}mol{center dot}kg{sup {minus}1}{center dot}h{sup {minus}1} after 12 h of cortisol infusion. These increases were maintained until the cortisol infusion was terminated. These nearly identical 15% increases in two different essential amino acid appearance rates are reflective of increased whole body protein breakdown. Glutamine flux rose by 12 h of cortisol infusion and remained elevated at the same level at 64 h. The increase in flux was primarily due to a 55% increase in glutamine de novo synthesis. Alanine flux increased with acute hypercortisolemia and increased further at 60 h of cortisol infusion, a result primarily of increased alanine de novo synthesis. Insulin, alanine, and lactate plasma levels responded similarly with significant rises between the acute and chronic periods of cortisol infusion. Thus hypercortisolemia increases both protein breakdown and the turnover of important nonessential amino acids for periods of up to 64 h.

  18. Crystal Structures of Aedes Aegypt Alanine Glyoxylate Aminotransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Han,Q.; Robinson, H.; Gao, Y.; Vogelaar, N.; Wilson, S.; Rizzi, M.; Li, J.

    2006-01-01

    Mosquitoes are unique in having evolved two alanine glyoxylate aminotransferases (AGTs). One is 3-hydroxykynurenine transaminase (HKT), which is primarily responsible for catalyzing the transamination of 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) to xanthurenic acid (XA). Interestingly, XA is used by malaria parasites as a chemical trigger for their development within the mosquito. This 3-HK to XA conversion is considered the major mechanism mosquitoes use to detoxify the chemically reactive and potentially toxic 3-HK. The other AGT is a typical dipteran insect AGT and is specific for converting glyoxylic acid to glycine. Here we report the 1.75{angstrom} high-resolution three-dimensional crystal structure of AGT from the mosquito Aedes aegypti (AeAGT) and structures of its complexes with reactants glyoxylic acid and alanine at 1.75 and 2.1{angstrom} resolution, respectively. This is the first time that the three-dimensional crystal structures of an AGT with its amino acceptor, glyoxylic acid, and amino donor, alanine, have been determined. The protein is dimeric and adopts the type I-fold of pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP)-dependent aminotransferases. The PLP co-factor is covalently bound to the active site in the crystal structure, and its binding site is similar to those of other AGTs. The comparison of the AeAGT-glyoxylic acid structure with other AGT structures revealed that these glyoxylic acid binding residues are conserved in most AGTs. Comparison of the AeAGT-alanine structure with that of the Anopheles HKT-inhibitor complex suggests that a Ser-Asn-Phe motif in the latter may be responsible for the substrate specificity of HKT enzymes for 3-HK.

  19. The Dipeptides Ile-Tyr and Ser-Tyr Exert Distinct Effects on Catecholamine Metabolism in the Mouse Brainstem

    PubMed Central

    Moriyasu, Kazuki; Ichinose, Takashi; Nakahata, Akane; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Matsui, Toshiro; Furuya, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    Catecholamine synthesis and transmission in the brain are influenced by the availability of Tyr in the body. In this study, we compared the effects of oral administration of Tyr-containing dipeptides Ile-Tyr, Ser-Tyr, and Tyr-Pro with Tyr alone on catecholamine metabolism in the mouse brainstem. Among these dipeptides, Ile-Tyr administration led to increases in dopamine, the dopamine metabolites homovanillic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, compared to administration of Ser-Tyr, Tyr-Pro, or Tyr alone. In comparison, administration of Ser-Tyr induced significantly increasing noradrenaline turnover, while Tyr-Pro administration suppressed dopamine turnover. Therefore, oral administration of Ile-Tyr, Ser-Tyr, and Tyr-Pro differentially affected metabolism of dopamine and noradrenaline. These observations strongly suggest that Tyr-containing dipeptides exert distinct effects on catecholamine metabolism in the brainstem when ingested orally. PMID:26981137

  20. Characterization of psychrophilic alanine racemase from Bacillus psychrosaccharolyticus.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Y; Yokoigawa, K; Esaki, N; Soda, K; Kawai, H

    1999-03-16

    A psychrophilic alanine racemase gene from Bacillus psychrosaccharolyticus was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli SOLR with a plasmid pYOK3. The gene starting with the unusual initiation codon GTG showed higher preference for codons ending in A or T. The enzyme purified to homogeneity showed the high catalytic activity even at 0 degrees C and was extremely labile over 35 degrees C. The enzyme was found to have a markedly large Km value (5.0 microM) for the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) cofactor in comparison with other reported alanine racemases, and was stabilized up to 50 degrees C in the presence of excess amounts of PLP. The low affinity of the enzyme for PLP may be related to the thermolability, and may be related to the high catalytic activity, initiated by the transaldimination reaction, at low temperature. The enzyme has a distinguishing hydrophilic region around the residue no. 150 in the deduced amino acid sequence (383 residues), whereas the corresponding regions of other Bacillus alanine racemases are hydrophobic. The position of the region in the three dimensional structure of C atoms of the enzyme was predicted to be in a surface loop surrounding the active site. The region may interact with solvent and reduce the compactness of the active site. PMID:10080917

  1. ESR/alanine dosimetry applied to radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosse, D. C.

    The radiation processing of food products is specified in terms of absorbed dose, and processing quality is assessed on the basis of absorbed dose measurements. The validity of process quality control is highly dependent on the quality of the measurements and associated instrumentation; in this respect, dosimetry calibration by an Organization with official status provides an essential guarantee of validity to the quality control steps taken. The Laboratoire de Métrologie des Rayonnements Ionisants (L.M.R.I.) is the primary standards and evaluation laboratory approved by the Bureau National de Métrologie (B.N.M.), which is the French National Bureau of Standards. The LMRI implements correlation procedures in response to the various requirements which arise in connection with high doses and doserates. Such procedures are mainly based on ESR/alanine spectrometry, a dosimetry technique ideally suited to that purpose. Dosemeter geometry and design are tailored to operating conditions. "Photon" dosemeters consist of a detector material in powder or compacted form, and a wall with thickness and chemical composition consistent with the application. "Electron" dosemeters have a detector core of compacted alanine with thickness down to a few tenths of a millimeter. The ESR/alanine dosimetry technique, developed at LMRI is a flexible, reliable and accurate tool which effectively meets the various requirements arising in the field of reference dosimetry, where high doses and doserates are involved.

  2. Pancreatic stellate cells support tumour metabolism through autophagic alanine secretion.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cristovão M; Biancur, Douglas E; Wang, Xiaoxu; Halbrook, Christopher J; Sherman, Mara H; Zhang, Li; Kremer, Daniel; Hwang, Rosa F; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Ying, Haoqiang; Asara, John M; Evans, Ronald M; Cantley, Lewis C; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Kimmelman, Alec C

    2016-08-25

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive disease characterized by an intense fibrotic stromal response and deregulated metabolism. The role of the stroma in PDAC biology is complex and it has been shown to play critical roles that differ depending on the biological context. The stromal reaction also impairs the vasculature, leading to a highly hypoxic, nutrient-poor environment. As such, these tumours must alter how they capture and use nutrients to support their metabolic needs. Here we show that stroma-associated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are critical for PDAC metabolism through the secretion of non-essential amino acids (NEAA). Specifically, we uncover a previously undescribed role for alanine, which outcompetes glucose and glutamine-derived carbon in PDAC to fuel the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and thus NEAA and lipid biosynthesis. This shift in fuel source decreases the tumour’s dependence on glucose and serum-derived nutrients, which are limited in the pancreatic tumour microenvironment. Moreover, we demonstrate that alanine secretion by PSCs is dependent on PSC autophagy, a process that is stimulated by cancer cells. Thus, our results demonstrate a novel metabolic interaction between PSCs and cancer cells, in which PSC-derived alanine acts as an alternative carbon source. This finding highlights a previously unappreciated metabolic network within pancreatic tumours in which diverse fuel sources are used to promote growth in an austere tumour microenvironment. PMID:27509858

  3. SCMMTP: identifying and characterizing membrane transport proteins using propensity scores of dipeptides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Identifying putative membrane transport proteins (MTPs) and understanding the transport mechanisms involved remain important challenges for the advancement of structural and functional genomics. However, the transporter characters are mainly acquired from MTP crystal structures which are hard to crystalize. Therefore, it is desirable to develop bioinformatics tools for the effective large-scale analysis of available sequences to identify novel transporters and characterize such transporters. Results This work proposes a novel method (SCMMTP) based on the scoring card method (SCM) using dipeptide composition to identify and characterize MTPs from an existing dataset containing 900 MTPs and 660 non-MTPs which are separated into a training dataset consisting 1,380 proteins and an independent dataset consisting 180 proteins. The SCMMTP produced estimating propensity scores for amino acids and dipeptides as MTPs. The SCMMTP training and test accuracy levels respectively reached 83.81% and 76.11%. The test accuracy of support vector machine (SVM) using a complicated classification method with a low possibility for biological interpretation and position-specific substitution matrix (PSSM) as a protein feature is 80.56%, thus SCMMTP is comparable to SVM-PSSM. To identify MTPs, SCMMTP is applied to three datasets including: 1) human transmembrane proteins, 2) a photosynthetic protein dataset, and 3) a human protein database. MTPs showing α-helix rich structure is agreed with previous studies. The MTPs used residues with low hydration energy. It is hypothesized that, after filtering substrates, the hydrated water molecules need to be released from the pore regions. Conclusions SCMMTP yields estimating propensity scores for amino acids and dipeptides as MTPs, which can be used to identify novel MTPs and characterize transport mechanisms for use in further experiments. Availability http://iclab.life.nctu.edu.tw/iclab_webtools/SCMMTP/ PMID:26677931

  4. Unimolecular chemistry of metal ion-coordinated [alpha]-dipeptide radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pingitore, Francesco; Bleiholder, Christian; Paizs, Béla; Wesdemiotis, Chrys

    2007-09-01

    The Li+ complexes of the isomeric [alpha]-dipeptide radicals H2NCHC(O)NHCH2COOH (GlyGly) and H2NCH2C(O)NHCHCOOH (GlyGly) are formed in the gas phase from the isomeric complexes [PheGly + Li]+ and [GlyPhe + Li]+, respectively, via homolytic cleavage of the corresponding benzyl side chains. The isomers undergo distinctively different reactions upon collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) and, hence, represent unique, non-interconverting species. The investigation of deuterated isotopomers and of dipeptide radicals with Ala residues permits complete elucidation of the dissociation pathways of the radical complexes. The majority of reactions observed are promoted by the radical site, with the location of the unpaired electron playing an important role in the types of reactions taking place. Analogous differences are found for dilithiated complexes of GlyGly and GlyGly, in which the COOH termini are derivatized to COO-Li+ salt bridges. Density functional theory calculations confirm that the lithiated and dilithiated [alpha]-dipeptide radicals have distonic character; the radical is largely localized on the N- or C-terminal [alpha]-C atom and the charge is largely localized on the metal ions. In the most stable conformers, the Li+ ion(s) are bound between the amide carbonyl and C-terminal carbonyl (or carboxylate) groups. Theory predicts a higher thermodynamic stability for the complexes of the N-terminal radical GlyGly, as reflected by the significantly higher yield, with which these complexes are formed (from their PheGly precursors), compared to the GlyGly complexes.

  5. 4-Substituted boro-proline dipeptides: synthesis, characterization, and dipeptidyl peptidase IV, 8, and 9 activities.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wengen; Liu, Yuxin; Milo, Lawrence J; Shu, Ying; Zhao, Peng; Li, Youhua; Woznica, Iwona; Yu, Gengli; Sanford, David G; Zhou, Yuhong; Poplawski, Sarah E; Connolly, Beth A; Sudmeier, James L; Bachovchin, William W; Lai, Jack H

    2012-09-01

    The boroProline-based dipeptidyl boronic acids were among the first DPP-IV inhibitors identified, and remain the most potent known. We introduced various substitutions at the 4-position of the boroProline ring regioselectively and stereoselectively, and incorporated these aminoboronic acids into a series of 4-substituted boroPro-based dipeptides. Among these dipeptidyl boronic acids, Arg-(4S)-boroHyp (4q) was the most potent inhibitor of DPP-IV, DPP8 and DPP9, while (4S)-Hyp-(4R)-boroHyp (4o) exhibited the most selectivity for DPP-IV over DPP8 and DPP9. PMID:22853995

  6. Isomeric control of protein recognition with amino acid- and dipeptide-functionalized gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    You, Chang-Cheng; Agasti, Sarit S; Rotello, Vincent M

    2008-01-01

    Amino acid and dipeptide-functionalized gold nanoparticles (NPs) possessing L/D-leucine and/or L/D-phenylalanine residues have been constructed in order to target the surfaces of alpha-chymotrypsin (ChT) and cytochrome c (CytC). Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) was conducted to evaluate the binding thermodynamics and selectivity of these NP-protein interactions. The chirality of the NP end-groups substantially affects the resultant complex stability, with up to 20-fold differences seen between particles of identical hydrophobicity, demonstrating that structural information from the ligands can be used to control protein recognition. PMID:17972262

  7. Dipeptide preparation Noopept prevents scopolamine-induced deficit of spatial memory in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Belnik, A P; Ostrovskaya, R U; Poletaeva, I I

    2007-04-01

    The effect of original nootropic preparation Noopept on learning and long-term memory was studied with BALB/c mice. Scopolamine (1 mg/kg) impaired long-term memory trace, while Noopept (0.5 mg/kg) had no significant effect. Noopept completely prevented the development of cognitive disorders induced by scopolamine (blockade of muscarinic cholinergic receptors). Our results confirmed the presence of choline-positive effect in dipeptide piracetam analogue Noopept on retrieval of learned skill of finding a submerged platform (spatial memory). We conclude that the effectiveness of this drug should be evaluated in patients with Alzheimer's disease. PMID:18214292

  8. Novel nootropic dipeptide Noopept increases inhibitory synaptic transmission in CA1 pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Kondratenko, Rodion V; Derevyagin, Vladimir I; Skrebitsky, Vladimir G

    2010-05-31

    Effects of newly synthesized nootropic and anxiolytic dipeptide Noopept on inhibitory synaptic transmission in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells were investigated using patch-clamp technique in whole-cell configuration. Bath application of Noopept (1 microM) significantly increased the frequency of spike-dependant spontaneous IPSCs whereas spike-independent mIPSCs remained unchanged. It was suggested that Noopept mediates its effect due to the activation of inhibitory interneurons terminating on CA1 pyramidal cells. Results of current clamp recording of inhibitory interneurons residing in stratum radiatum confirmed this suggestion. PMID:20382202

  9. Serine dipeptide lipids of Porphyromonas gingivalis inhibit osteoblast differentiation: Relationship to Toll-like receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Hsiung; Nemati, Reza; Anstadt, Emily; Liu, Yaling; Son, Young; Zhu, Qiang; Yao, Xudong; Clark, Robert B; Rowe, David W; Nichols, Frank C

    2015-12-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a periodontal pathogen strongly associated with loss of attachment and supporting bone for teeth. We have previously shown that the total lipid extract of P. gingivalis inhibits osteoblast differentiation through engagement of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and that serine dipeptide lipids of P. gingivalis engage both mouse and human TLR2. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine whether these serine lipids inhibit osteoblast differentiation in vitro and in vivo and whether TLR2 engagement is involved. Osteoblasts were obtained from calvaria of wild type or TLR2 knockout mouse pups that also express the Col2.3GFP transgene. Two classes of serine dipeptide lipids, termed Lipid 654 and Lipid 430, were tested. Osteoblast differentiation was monitored by cell GFP fluorescence and osteoblast gene expression and osteoblast function was monitored as von Kossa stained mineral deposits. Osteoblast differentiation and function were evaluated in calvarial cell cultures maintained for 21 days. Lipid 654 significantly inhibited GFP expression, osteoblast gene expression and mineral nodule formation and this inhibition was dependent on TLR2 engagement. Lipid 430 also significantly inhibited GFP expression, osteoblast gene expression and mineral nodule formation but these effects were only partially attributed to engagement of TLR2. More importantly, Lipid 430 stimulated TNF-α and RANKL gene expression in wild type cells but not in TLR2 knockout cells. Finally, osteoblast cultures were observed to hydrolyze Lipid 654 to Lipid 430 and this likely occurs through elevated PLA2 activity in the cultured cells. In conclusion, our results show that serine dipeptide lipids of P. gingivalis inhibit osteoblast differentiation and function at least in part through engagement of TLR2. The Lipid 430 serine class also increased the expression of genes that could increase osteoclast activity. We conclude that Lipid 654 and Lipid 430 have the potential

  10. Dependence of anxiolytic effects of the dipeptide TSPO ligand GD-23 on neurosteroid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Gudasheva, T A; Deeva, O A; Yarkova, M A; Seredenin, S B

    2016-07-01

    The elevated plus maze test showed that GD-23 (N-carbobenzoxy-L-tryptophanyl-L-isoleucine amide), an original dipeptide ligand of TSPO, exerted anxiolytic effect when injected intraperitoneally at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg. This effect was completely blocked by the selective neurosteroid synthesis inhibitors, enzymes trilostane and finasteride. The same inhibitors do not prevent the anxiolytic effects of the benzodiazepine tranquillizer diazepam. The results of the study indicate the selective neurosteroidogenic mechanism of the anxiolytic action of GD-23. PMID:27599516

  11. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis of the predicted rRNA-binding domain of ErmC' redefines the substrate-binding site and suggests a model for protein-RNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Maravić, Gordana; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Feder, Marcin; Pongor, Sándor; Flögel, Mirna

    2003-08-15

    The Erm family of adenine-N(6) methyltransferases (MTases) is responsible for the development of resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B antibiotics through the methylation of 23S ribosomal RNA. Hence, these proteins are important potential drug targets. Despite the availability of the NMR and crystal structures of two members of the family (ErmAM and ErmC', respectively) and extensive studies on the RNA substrate, the substrate-binding site and the amino acids involved in RNA recognition by the Erm MTases remain unknown. It has been proposed that the small C-terminal domain functions as a target-binding module, but this prediction has not been tested experimentally. We have undertaken structure-based mutational analysis of 13 charged or polar residues located on the predicted rRNA-binding surface of ErmC' with the aim to identify the area of protein-RNA interactions. The results of in vivo and in vitro analyses of mutant protein suggest that the key RNA-binding residues are located not in the small domain, but in the large catalytic domain, facing the cleft between the two domains. Based on the mutagenesis data, a preliminary three-dimensional model of ErmC' complexed with the minimal substrate was constructed. The identification of the RNA-binding site of ErmC' may be useful for structure-based design of novel drugs that do not necessarily bind to the cofactor-binding site common to many S-adenosyl-L- methionine-dependent MTases, but specifically block the substrate-binding site of MTases from the Erm family. PMID:12907737

  12. The self-assembly of anticancer camptothecin-dipeptide nanotubes: a minimalistic and high drug loading approach to increased efficacy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se Hye; Kaplan, Jonah A; Sun, Yuan; Shieh, Aileen; Sun, Hui-Lung; Croce, Carlo M; Grinstaff, Mark W; Parquette, Jon R

    2015-01-01

    20-(S)-Camptothecin (CPT)-conjugated dipeptides are reported that preassemble into nanotubes with diameters ranging from 80-120 nm. These nanoassemblies maintain a high (∼47 %) drug loading and exhibit greater drug stability (i.e., resistance to lactone hydrolysis), and consequently greater efficacy against several human cancer cells (HT-29, A549, H460, and H23) in vitro compared with the clinically used prodrug irinotecan. A key and defining feature of this system is the use of the CPT-conjugated dipeptide as both the drug and precursor to the nanostructured carrier, which simplifies the overall fabrication process. PMID:25384556

  13. Reconfiguration of N Metabolism upon Hypoxia Stress and Recovery: Roles of Alanine Aminotransferase (AlaAT) and Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH)

    PubMed Central

    Diab, Houssein; Limami, Anis M.

    2016-01-01

    In the context of climatic change, more heavy precipitation and more frequent flooding and waterlogging events threaten the productivity of arable farmland. Furthermore, crops were not selected to cope with flooding- and waterlogging-induced oxygen limitation. In general, low oxygen stress, unlike other abiotic stresses (e.g., cold, high temperature, drought and saline stress), received little interest from the scientific community and less financial support from stakeholders. Accordingly, breeding programs should be developed and agronomical practices should be adapted in order to save plants’ growth and yield—even under conditions of low oxygen availability (e.g., submergence and waterlogging). The prerequisite to the success of such breeding programs and changes in agronomical practices is a good knowledge of how plants adapt to low oxygen stress at the cellular and the whole plant level. In the present paper, we summarized the recent knowledge on metabolic adjustment in general under low oxygen stress and highlighted thereafter the major changes pertaining to the reconfiguration of amino acids syntheses. We propose a model showing (i) how pyruvate derived from active glycolysis upon hypoxia is competitively used by the alanine aminotransferase/glutamate synthase cycle, leading to alanine accumulation and NAD+ regeneration. Carbon is then saved in a nitrogen store instead of being lost through ethanol fermentative pathway. (ii) During the post-hypoxia recovery period, the alanine aminotransferase/glutamate dehydrogenase cycle mobilizes this carbon from alanine store. Pyruvate produced by the reverse reaction of alanine aminotransferase is funneled to the TCA cycle, while deaminating glutamate dehydrogenase regenerates, reducing equivalent (NADH) and 2-oxoglutarate to maintain the cycle function. PMID:27258319

  14. Reconfiguration of N Metabolism upon Hypoxia Stress and Recovery: Roles of Alanine Aminotransferase (AlaAT) and Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH).

    PubMed

    Diab, Houssein; Limami, Anis M

    2016-01-01

    In the context of climatic change, more heavy precipitation and more frequent flooding and waterlogging events threaten the productivity of arable farmland. Furthermore, crops were not selected to cope with flooding- and waterlogging-induced oxygen limitation. In general, low oxygen stress, unlike other abiotic stresses (e.g., cold, high temperature, drought and saline stress), received little interest from the scientific community and less financial support from stakeholders. Accordingly, breeding programs should be developed and agronomical practices should be adapted in order to save plants' growth and yield-even under conditions of low oxygen availability (e.g., submergence and waterlogging). The prerequisite to the success of such breeding programs and changes in agronomical practices is a good knowledge of how plants adapt to low oxygen stress at the cellular and the whole plant level. In the present paper, we summarized the recent knowledge on metabolic adjustment in general under low oxygen stress and highlighted thereafter the major changes pertaining to the reconfiguration of amino acids syntheses. We propose a model showing (i) how pyruvate derived from active glycolysis upon hypoxia is competitively used by the alanine aminotransferase/glutamate synthase cycle, leading to alanine accumulation and NAD⁺ regeneration. Carbon is then saved in a nitrogen store instead of being lost through ethanol fermentative pathway. (ii) During the post-hypoxia recovery period, the alanine aminotransferase/glutamate dehydrogenase cycle mobilizes this carbon from alanine store. Pyruvate produced by the reverse reaction of alanine aminotransferase is funneled to the TCA cycle, while deaminating glutamate dehydrogenase regenerates, reducing equivalent (NADH) and 2-oxoglutarate to maintain the cycle function. PMID:27258319

  15. Modeling and enhanced sampling of molecular systems with smooth and nonlinear data-driven collective variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemian, Behrooz; Millán, Daniel; Arroyo, Marino

    2013-12-01

    Collective variables (CVs) are low-dimensional representations of the state of a complex system, which help us rationalize molecular conformations and sample free energy landscapes with molecular dynamics simulations. Given their importance, there is need for systematic methods that effectively identify CVs for complex systems. In recent years, nonlinear manifold learning has shown its ability to automatically characterize molecular collective behavior. Unfortunately, these methods fail to provide a differentiable function mapping high-dimensional configurations to their low-dimensional representation, as required in enhanced sampling methods. We introduce a methodology that, starting from an ensemble representative of molecular flexibility, builds smooth and nonlinear data-driven collective variables (SandCV) from the output of nonlinear manifold learning algorithms. We demonstrate the method with a standard benchmark molecule, alanine dipeptide, and show how it can be non-intrusively combined with off-the-shelf enhanced sampling methods, here the adaptive biasing force method. We illustrate how enhanced sampling simulations with SandCV can explore regions that were poorly sampled in the original molecular ensemble. We further explore the transferability of SandCV from a simpler system, alanine dipeptide in vacuum, to a more complex system, alanine dipeptide in explicit water.

  16. Modeling and enhanced sampling of molecular systems with smooth and nonlinear data-driven collective variables.

    PubMed

    Hashemian, Behrooz; Millán, Daniel; Arroyo, Marino

    2013-12-01

    Collective variables (CVs) are low-dimensional representations of the state of a complex system, which help us rationalize molecular conformations and sample free energy landscapes with molecular dynamics simulations. Given their importance, there is need for systematic methods that effectively identify CVs for complex systems. In recent years, nonlinear manifold learning has shown its ability to automatically characterize molecular collective behavior. Unfortunately, these methods fail to provide a differentiable function mapping high-dimensional configurations to their low-dimensional representation, as required in enhanced sampling methods. We introduce a methodology that, starting from an ensemble representative of molecular flexibility, builds smooth and nonlinear data-driven collective variables (SandCV) from the output of nonlinear manifold learning algorithms. We demonstrate the method with a standard benchmark molecule, alanine dipeptide, and show how it can be non-intrusively combined with off-the-shelf enhanced sampling methods, here the adaptive biasing force method. We illustrate how enhanced sampling simulations with SandCV can explore regions that were poorly sampled in the original molecular ensemble. We further explore the transferability of SandCV from a simpler system, alanine dipeptide in vacuum, to a more complex system, alanine dipeptide in explicit water. PMID:24320358

  17. Synthesis and sweetness characteristics of L-aspartyl-D-alanine fenchyl esters.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Y; Nagakura, A; Tsuruta, H

    2001-10-01

    Four isomers of the L-aspartyl-D-alanine fenchyl esters were prepared as potential peptide sweeteners. L-Aspartyl-D-alanine (+)-alpha-fenchyl ester and L-aspartyl-D-alanine (-)-beta-fenchyl ester showed sweetness with potencies 250 and 160 times higher than that of sucrose, respectively. In contrast, L-aspartyl-D-alanine (+)-beta-fenchyl ester and L-aspartyl-D-alanine (-)-alpha-fenchyl ester had the highest sweetness potencies at 5700 and 1100 times that of sucrose, respectively. In particular, L-aspartyl-D-alanine (-)-alpha-fenchyl ester had an excellent sweetness quality; but L-aspartyl-D-alanine (+)-beta-fenchyl ester did not have an excellent quality of sweetness because it displayed an aftertaste caused by the strong sweetness. PMID:11600060

  18. Comparative study of glycine, alanine or casein as inert nitrogen sources in endotoxemic rats.

    PubMed

    Chambon-Savanovitch, C; Felgines, C; Farges, M C; Raul, F; Cézard, J P; Davot, P; Vasson, M P; Cynober, L A

    1999-10-01

    Pharmacological effects of dietary amino acids (AA) and peptides must be compared to an isonitrogenous control that is as inert as possible. To establish a rationale for the choice of such a control, potential metabolic and nutritional effects of three currently used nitrogenous controls (glycine, alanine, and casein) were evaluated in an endotoxemic rat model that has well-defined alterations in AA and protein metabolism. Five-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats (113 +/- 1 g) were randomly assigned to four groups and received at d 0 an intraperitoneal injection of endotoxin (3 mg/kg). After withdrawal of food for 24 h, the rats were enterally refed for 48 h with a liquid diet (Osmolite((R))) supplemented with 0.19 g N. kg(-1). d(-1) in the form of glycine [lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-GLY group], alanine (LPS-ALA group) or casein (LPS-CAS group). One group (LPS group) received only Osmolite((R)). Plasma, two skeletal muscles, the liver and the intestine were then removed. Body and tissue weights and tissue protein contents did not differ among the four groups. Intestine histomorphometry showed no significant difference among groups. Jejunal hydrolase activities were significantly affected by the nitrogenous supplementations, but no effect was observed in the ileum. Only limited significant effects were observed on plasma and tissue-free AA concentrations, except for an accumulation of glycine in the plasma and tissues from the LPS-GLY group, compared to other groups. Overall, whereas glycine as a nitrogenous control should be used with care, either alanine or casein may be used as the "placebo," with the choice depending on the study to be performed. PMID:10498760

  19. GMXPBSA 2.0: A GROMACS tool to perform MM/PBSA and computational alanine scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paissoni, C.; Spiliotopoulos, D.; Musco, G.; Spitaleri, A.

    2014-11-01

    provisions: GNU General Public License, version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 185 937 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 7 074 217 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Bash, Perl. Computer: Any computer. Operating system: Linux, Unix OS. RAM: ˜2 GB Classification: 3. External routines: APBS (http://www.Poissonboltzmann.org/apbs/) and GROMACS installations (http://www.gromacs.org). Optionally LaTeX. Nature of problem: Calculates the Molecular Mechanics (MM) data (Lennard-Jones and Coulomb terms) and the solvation energy terms (polar and nonpolar terms respectively) from an ensemble of structures derived from GROMACS molecular dynamics simulation trajectory. These calculations are performed for each single component of the simulated complex, including protein and ligand. In order to cancel out artefacts an identical grid setup for each component, including complex, protein and ligand, is required. Performs statistical analysis on the extracted data and comparison with wild-type complex in case of either computational alanine scanning or calculations on a set of simulations. Evaluates possible outliers in the frames extracted from the simulations during the binding free energy calculations. Solution method: extract frames from a single or multiple complex molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, allowing comparison between multiple trajectories; split the complex frames in the single components including complex, protein and ligand; calculate the Lennard-Jones and Coulomb energy values (MM terms); calculate the polar solvation energy values using the implicit solvation Poisson-Boltzmann model (PB); calculate the nonpolar solvation energy value based on the solvent accessible surface area (SASA); combine all the calculated terms into the final binding free energy value; repeat the same procedure from point 1 to 6 for each simulation in case of computational alanine scanning (CAS) or simultaneous comparison

  20. Nutritional value and safety of methionine derivatives, isomeric dipeptides and hydroxy analogs in mice.

    PubMed

    Friedman, M; Gumbmann, M R

    1988-03-01

    Weight gains in mice fed amino acid diets containing methionine and 16 methionine derivatives and analogs were compared at graded dietary concentrations. Linear response was closely approximated for concentrations below those yielding maximum growth. Derivatization of L-methionine generally lowered potency, calculated as the ratio of the slopes of the two dose-response curves. However, the three isomeric dipeptides L-L-, L-D- and D-L-methionylmethionine, N-acetyl- and N-formyl-L-methionine, L-methionine sulfoxide and D-methionine were well utilized. The double derivative N-acetyl-L-methionine sulfoxide reduced potency below 60%. D-Methionine sulfoxide, N-acetyl-D-methionine and D-methionyl-D-methionine had potencies between 4 and 40%. The calcium salts of L- and D-alpha-hydroxy analogs of methionine had potencies of 55.4 and 85.7%, respectively. Several of the analogs were less growth-inhibiting or toxic at high concentrations in the diet than was L-methionine. These results imply that some methionine dipeptides or analogs may be better candidates for fortifying foods than L-methionine. Possible biochemical pathways for the utilization of methionine derivatives and analogs are also described. PMID:3351635

  1. Adsorption and Transport of Methane Molecules through One-Dimensional Channels in Dipeptide-Based Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradiso, Daniele; Perelli Cippo, Enrico; Gorini, Giuseppe; Rossi, Giorgio; Larese, John Z.

    The development of new materials for use in energy and environmental applications is of great interest, in particular in the areas of gas separation and carbon capture, where molecular transport plays a significant role. The dipeptides are organic molecules that offer an attractive possibility in such areas, because they form open hexagonal crystalline structures (space group P61) with quasi one-dimensional channels of tunable pore diameters in the range 3-6 Å. These molecular crystals exhibit selective adsorption, as well as, water and gas transport properties: these are believed to result from collective vibrations of the crystal structure that are coupled to the motions of the guest molecules within the channels. Current studies focus on characterizing the system methane and L-Isoleucyl-L-Valine (IV): this was initially done with high-resolution adsorption isotherms; then, high-resolution Inelastic Neutron Scattering measurements at the Spallation Neutron Source (BASIS spectrometer) revealed clear rotational tunneling peaks, offering details to unravel the potential energy surface of the system, as well as, evidences that channels flexibility and dynamical motion of the molecules have influence on the dipeptides adsorption properties.

  2. Effects of exercise on leukocyte death: prevention by hydrolyzed whey protein enriched with glutamine dipeptide.

    PubMed

    Cury-Boaventura, Maria Fernanda; Levada-Pires, Adriana C; Folador, Alessandra; Gorjão, Renata; Alba-Loureiro, Tatiana C; Hirabara, Sandro M; Peres, Fabiano P; Silva, Paulo R S; Curi, Rui; Pithon-Curi, Tania C

    2008-06-01

    Lymphocyte and neutrophil death induced by exercise and the role of hydrolyzed whey protein enriched with glutamine dipeptide (Gln) supplementation was investigated. Nine triathletes performed two exhaustive exercise trials with a 1-week interval in a randomized, double blind, crossover protocol. Thirty minutes before treadmill exhaustive exercise at variable speeds in an inclination of 1% the subjects ingested 50 g of maltodextrin (placebo) or 50 g of maltodextrin plus 4 tablets of 700 mg of hydrolyzed whey protein enriched with 175 mg of glutamine dipeptide dissolved in 250 mL water. Cell viability, DNA fragmentation, mitochondrial transmembrane potential and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were determined in lymphocytes and neutrophils. Exhaustive exercise decreased viable lymphocytes but had no effect on neutrophils. A 2.2-fold increase in the proportion of lymphocytes and neutrophils with depolarized mitochondria was observed after exhaustive exercise. Supplementation of maltodextrin plus Gln (MGln) prevented the loss of lymphocyte membrane integrity and the mitochondrial membrane depolarization induced by exercise. Exercise caused an increase in ROS production by neutrophils, whereas supplementation of MGln had no additional effect. MGln supplementation partially prevented lymphocyte apoptosis induced by exhaustive exercise possibly by a protective effect on mitochondrial function. PMID:18320208

  3. The Activation of Free Dipeptides Promoted by Strong Activating Agents in Water Does not Yield Diketopiperazines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaufils, Damien; Jepaul, Sandra; Liu, Ziwei; Boiteau, Laurent; Pascal, Robert

    2016-03-01

    The activation of dipeptides was studied in the perspective of the abiotic formation of oligopeptides of significant length as a requirement for secondary structure formation. The formation of piperazin-2,5-diones (DKP), previously considered as a dead end when activating free dipeptides, was shown in this work to be efficiently suppressed when using strong activating agents (e.g., carbodiimides). This behaviour was explained by the fast formation of a 5(4 H)-oxazolone intermediate at a rate that exceeds the time scale of the rotation of the peptide bond from the predominant trans-conformation into the cis-isomer required for DKP formation. No DKP was observed when using strong activating agents whereas phosphate mixed anhydrides or moderately activated esters were observed to predominantly yield DKP. The DKP side-reaction no longer constitutes a drawback for the C-terminus elongation of peptides. These results are considered as additional evidence that pathways involving strong activation are required to drive the emergence of living entities rather than close to equilibrium processes.

  4. Solvent-induced structural transition of self-assembled dipeptide: from organogels to microcrystals.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Pengli; Yan, Xuehai; Su, Ying; Yang, Yang; Li, Junbai

    2010-03-01

    Organogels that are self-assembled from simple peptide molecules are an interesting class of nano- and mesoscale soft matter with simplicity and functionality. Investigating the precise roles of the organic solvents and their effects on stabilization of the formed organogel is an important topic for the development of low-molecular-weight gelators. We report the structural transition of an organogel self-assembled from a single dipeptide building block, diphenylalanine (L-Phe-L-Phe, FF), in toluene into a flower-like microcrystal merely by introducing ethanol as a co-solvent; this provides deeper insights into the phase transition between mesostable gels and thermodynamically stable microcrystals. Multiple characterization techniques were used to reveal the transitions. The results indicate that there are different molecular-packing modes formed in the gels and in the microcrystals. Further studies show that the co-solvent, ethanol, which has a higher polarity than toluene, might be involved in the formation of hydrogen bonds during molecular self-assembly of the dipeptide in mixed solvents, thus leading to the transition of organogels into microcrystals. The structural transformation modulated by the co-solvent might have a potential implication in controllable molecular self-assembly. PMID:20119986

  5. Fluorescence kinetics of Trp-Trp dipeptide and its derivatives in water via ultrafast fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jia, Menghui; Yi, Hua; Chang, Mengfang; Cao, Xiaodan; Li, Lei; Zhou, Zhongneng; Pan, Haifeng; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Sanjun; Xu, Jianhua

    2015-08-01

    Ultrafast fluorescence dynamics of Tryptophan-Tryptophan (Trp-Trp/Trp2) dipeptide and its derivatives in water have been investigated using a picosecond resolved time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) apparatus together with a femtosecond resolved upconversion spectrophotofluorometer. The fluorescence decay profiles at multiple wavelengths were fitted by a global analysis technique. Nanosecond fluorescence kinetics of Trp2, N-tert-butyl carbonyl oxygen-N'-aldehyde group-l-tryptophan-l-tryptophan (NBTrp2), l-tryptophan-l-tryptophan methyl ester (Trp2Me), and N-acetyl-l-tryptophan-l-tryptophan methyl ester (NATrp2Me) exhibit multi-exponential decays with the average lifetimes of 1.99, 3.04, 0.72 and 1.22ns, respectively. Due to the intramolecular interaction between two Trp residues, the "water relaxation" lifetime was observed around 4ps, and it is noticed that Trp2 and its derivatives also exhibit a new decay with a lifetime of ∼100ps, while single-Trp fluorescence decay in dipeptides/proteins shows 20-30ps. The intramolecular interaction lifetime constants of Trp2, NBTrp2, Trp2Me and NATrp2Me were then calculated to be 3.64, 0.93, 11.52 and 2.40ns, respectively. Candidate mechanisms (including heterogeneity, solvent relaxation, quasi static self-quenching or ET/PT quenching) have been discussed. PMID:26111991

  6. Dipeptide Prodrug Approach to Evade Efflux Pumps and CYP3A4 Metabolism of Lopinavir

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mitesh; Sheng, Ye; Mandava, Nanda K.; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2014-01-01

    Oral absorption of lopinavir (LPV) is limited due to P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance-associated protein2 (MRP2) mediated efflux by intestinal epithelial cells. Moreover, LPV is extensively metabolized by CYP3A4 enzymes. In the present study, dipeptide prodrug approach was employed to circumvent efflux pumps (P-gp and MRP2) and CYP3A4 mediated metabolism of LPV. Valine-isoleucine-LPV (Val-Ile-LPV) was synthesized and identified by LCMS and NMR techniques. The extent of LPV and Val-Ile-LPV interactions with P-gp and MRP2 was studied by uptake and transport studies across MDCK-MDR1 and MDCK-MRP2 cells. To determine the metabolic stability, time and concentration dependent degradation study was performed in liver microsomes. Val-Ile-LPV exhibited significantly higher aqueous solubility relative to LPV. This prodrug generated higher stability under acidic pH. Val-Ile-LPV demonstrated significantly lower affinity towards P-gp and MRP2 relative to LPV. Transepithelial transport of Val-Ile-LPV was significantly higher in the absorptive direction (apical to basolateral) relative to LPV. Importantly, Val-Ile-LPV was recognized as an excellent substrate by peptide transporter. Moreover, Val-Ile-LPV displayed significantly higher metabolic stability relative to LPV. Results obtained from this study suggested that dipeptide prodrug approach is a viable option to elevate systemic levels of LPV following oral administration PMID:25261710

  7. Electrocatalytic Oxidation of Formate with Nickel Diphosphane Dipeptide Complexes. Effect of Ligands Modified with Amino Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Galan, Brandon R.; Reback, Matthew L.; Jain, Avijita; Appel, Aaron M.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2013-09-03

    A series of nickel bis-diphosphine complexes with dipeptides appended to the ligands were investigated for the catalytic oxidation of formate. Typical rates of ~7 s-1 were found, similar to the parent complex (~8 s-1), with amino acid size and positioning contributing very little to rate or operating potential. Hydroxyl functionalities did result in lower rates, which were recovered by protecting the hydroxyl group. The results suggest that the overall dielectric introduced by the dipeptides does not play an important role in catalysis, but free hydroxyl groups do influence activity suggesting contributions from intra- or intermolecular interactions. These observations are important in developing a fundamental understanding of the affect that an enzyme-like outer coordination sphere can have upon molecular catalysts. This work was funded by the US DOE Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geoscience and Biosciences Division (BRG, AJ, AMA, WJS), the US DOE Basic Energy Sciences, Physical Bioscience program (MLR). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  8. The novel dipeptide Tyr-Ala (TA) significantly enhances the lifespan and healthspan of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Zhao, Y; Wang, X; Lin, R; Zhang, Y; Ma, H; Guo, Y; Xu, L; Zhao, B

    2016-04-20

    Food-derived bioactive peptides may have various physiological modulatory and regulatory functions and are now being studied extensively. Recently, the novel dipeptide Tyr-Ala was isolated from hydrolyzed maize protein. Tyr-Ala significantly prolonged the lifespan of wild-type Caenorhabditis elegans and extended the nematode healthspan and lifespan during heat/oxidative stress. Compared with its constituent amino acids, Tyr-Ala was more efficient in enhancing stress resistance. Further studies demonstrated that the significant longevity-extending effects of Tyr-Ala on Caenorhabditis elegans were attributed to its in vitro and in vivo free radical-scavenging effects, in addition to its ability to up-regulate stress resistance-related proteins, such as SOD (Superoxide Dismutase)-3 and HSP (Heat Shock Protein)-16.2. Real-time PCR results showed that the up-regulation of aging-associated genes, such as daf-16, sod-3, hsp-16.2 and skn-1, also contributed to the stress-resistance effect of Tyr-Ala. These results indicate that the novel dipeptide Tyr-Ala can protect against external stress and thus extend the lifespan and healthspan of Caenorhabditis elegans. Thereby, Tyr-Ala could be used as a potential medicine in anti-aging research. PMID:26987062

  9. Molecular modeling of conformational properties of oligodepsipeptides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiajing; King, Michael; Suggs, Laura; Ren, Pengyu

    2007-10-01

    A depsipeptide is a chemical structure consisting of both ester and amide bonds. Quantum mechanics calculations have been performed to investigate the conformational properties of a depsidipeptide in the gas and solution phases. Similar to an alanine dipeptide, the depsidipeptide exhibits a strong preference for the polyproline II (PPII) helical conformation. Meanwhile, due to the changes in the intramolecular interaction, the propensity for beta-sheets and alpha-helices diminishes while an unusual inclination for the (phi,psi) = (-150 degrees ,0 degrees ) conformation was observed. A molecular mechanics model has been developed for polydepsipeptides based on the quantum mechanical study. Both simulated annealing and replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out on oligodepsipeptide sequences with alternating depsi and natural residues in solution. Novel helical structures have been indicated from the simulations. When glycine is used as the alternating natural amino acid residue, the PPII conformation of a depsi residue stabilizes the peptide into a right-handed helical structure while the alpha-helical conformation of the depsi residue favors an overall left-handed helical structure. The free energy analysis indicates that both the left- and the right-handed helices are equally likely to exist. When charged lysine is introduced as the alternating natural residue, however, it is found that the depsipeptide sequence prefers an extended conformation as in PPII. Our results indicate that the depsipeptide is potentially useful in designing protein mimetics with controllable structure, function, and chemistry. PMID:17877396

  10. Performance effects of acute β-alanine induced paresthesia in competitive cyclists.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, Phillip M; Minahan, Clare L

    2016-01-01

    β-alanine is a common ingredient in supplements consumed by athletes. Indeed, athletes may believe that the β-alanine induced paresthesia, experienced shortly after ingestion, is associated with its ergogenic effect despite no scientific mechanism supporting this notion. The present study examined changes in cycling performance under conditions of β-alanine induced paresthesia. Eight competitive cyclists (VO2max = 61.8 ± 4.2 mL·kg·min(-1)) performed three practices, one baseline and four experimental trials. The experimental trials comprised a 1-km cycling time trial under four conditions with varying information (i.e., athlete informed β-alanine or placebo) and supplement content (athlete received β-alanine or placebo) delivered to the cyclist: informed β-alanine/received β-alanine, informed placebo/received β-alanine, informed β-alanine/received placebo and informed placebo/received placebo. Questionnaires were undertaken exploring the cyclists' experience of the effects of the experimental conditions. A possibly likely increase in mean power was associated with conditions in which β-alanine was administered (±95% CL: 2.2% ± 4.0%), but these results were inconclusive for performance enhancement (p = 0.32, effect size = 0.18, smallest worthwhile change = 56% beneficial). A possibly harmful effect was observed when cyclists were correctly informed that they had ingested a placebo (-1.0% ± 1.9%). Questionnaire data suggested that β-alanine ingestion resulted in evident sensory side effects and six cyclists reported placebo effects. Acute ingestion of β-alanine is not associated with improved 1-km TT performance in competitive cyclists. These findings are in contrast to the athlete's "belief" as cyclists reported improved energy and the ability to sustain a higher power output under conditions of β-alanine induced paresthesia. PMID:25636080

  11. Solution-Phase Synthesis of Dipeptides: A Capstone Project That Employs Key Techniques in an Organic Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchetti, Louis; DeBoef, Brenton

    2015-01-01

    A contemporary approach to the synthesis and purification of several UV-active dipeptides has been developed for the second-year organic laboratory. This experiment exposes students to the important technique of solution-phase peptide synthesis and allows an instructor to highlight the parallel between what they are accomplishing in the laboratory…

  12. A General and Selective Rhodium-Catalyzed Reduction of Amides, N-Acyl Amino Esters, and Dipeptides Using Phenylsilane.

    PubMed

    Das, Shoubhik; Li, Yuehui; Lu, Liang-Qiu; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias

    2016-05-17

    This article describes a selective reduction of functionalized amides, including N-acyl amino esters and dipeptides, to the corresponding amines using simple [Rh(acac)(cod)]. The catalyst shows excellent chemoselectivity in the presence of different sensitive functional moieties. PMID:26991132

  13. Computational Study of Environmental Effects on Torsional Free Energy Surface of N-Acetyl-N'-methyl-L-alanylamide Dipeptide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlotto, Silvia; Zerbetto, Mirco

    2014-01-01

    We propose an articulated computational experiment in which both quantum mechanics (QM) and molecular mechanics (MM) methods are employed to investigate environment effects on the free energy surface for the backbone dihedral angles rotation of the small dipeptide N-Acetyl-N'-methyl-L-alanylamide. This computation exercise is appropriate for an…

  14. Self-assembling DNA-peptide hybrids: morphological consequences of oligonucleotide grafting to a pathogenic amyloid fibrils forming dipeptide.

    PubMed

    Gour, Nidhi; Kedracki, Dawid; Safir, Ilyès; Ngo, Kien Xuan; Vebert-Nardin, Corinne

    2012-06-01

    For the very first time, highly efficient synthesis of DNA-peptide hybrids to scaffold self-assembled nanostructures is described. Oligonucleotide conjugation to the diphenylalanine dipeptide triggers a morphological transition from fibrillar to vesicular structures which may potentially be used as delivery vehicles, since they exhibit pH triggered release. PMID:22534735

  15. Pharmacokinetic studies and LC-MS/MS method development of ganciclovir and dipeptide monoester prodrugs in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Gunda, Sriram; Earla, Ravinder; Cholkar, Kishore; Mitra, Ashim K

    2015-09-01

    Ganciclovir (GCV) is utilized as an anti-herpetic agent. Reports from our laboratory have suggested that dipeptide ester prodrugs of GCV exhibit high affinity towards the oligopeptide transporter hPEPT1 and therefore seem to be promising candidates for the treatment of oral herpes virus infections. In this study, we have examined the bio-availability of a dipeptide prodrug of GCV after oral administration in jugular cannulated Sprague-Dawley rats. A new bio-analytical method was developed with Q-TRAP liquid chromatography tandem mass spectroscopy (LC-MS/MS) for simultaneous analysis of GCV, Valine-GCV (VGCV) and Tyrosine-Valine-GCV (YVGCV). Acyclovir (ACV) was used as an internal standard in the analysis. Area under plasma-concentration time curves for total concentration of GCV after oral administration of YVGCV was found to be approximately 200 % more than that of GCV following intestinal absorption. A complete conversion of the dipeptide prodrug (YVGCV) to parent compound, GCV, by hepatic first-pass metabolism was evident due to the absence of intermediate metabolite VGCV and administered prodrug YVGCV. The dipeptide prodrugs of GCV exhibit higher systemic availability of regenerated GCV upon oral administration and thus seem to be promising drug candidate in the treatment of systemic herpes infections. PMID:24943988

  16. Molecular and mesoscale mechanism for hierarchical self-assembly of dipeptide and porphyrin light-harvesting system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Kang, Yu; Ma, Guanghui; Möhwald, Helmuth; Yan, Xuehai

    2016-06-22

    A multi-scale theoretical investigation of dipeptide-porphyrin co-assembly systems has been carried out to establish such understanding, where two different types of the dipeptides, dilysine (KK(3+)) and diphenylalanine (FF(+)) are compared on tuning the porphyrin organization. Density functional theory results reveal that the electrostatic attraction between different functional groups has significantly strengthened the hydrogen bonds between them, which are considered as the driving force of the self-assembly at the molecular level. All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation further indicates that the formation of the core-shell nanorods is driven and stabilized by the hydrophobic interaction between dipeptides and negatively charged porphyrin (H2TPPS(2-)), where the packed porphyrins stay inside as the core of the nanorods and the hydrophilic groups (amino- and carboxyl-groups) as the shell. With stronger hydrophobicity, FF(+) is more likely to insert into the porphyrin aggregates and build crosslinks than KK(3+). Moreover, dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulation suggests equilibrium morphologies with different dipeptides, where KK(3+)-H2TPPS(2-) assembled in fiber bundles, whereas FF(+)-H2TPPS(2-) assembled as microspheres, corresponding to the different packing behavior in MD simulations. The consistency of these results at different scales is discussed. The method used in this work could be extended for studying similar issues in hierarchical self-assembly of building blocks such biomaterials. PMID:27270974

  17. Inhibition of alanine racemase by alanine phosphonate: detection of an imine linkage to pyridoxal 5'-phosphate in the enzyme-inhibitor complex by solid-state /sup 15/N nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Copie, V.; Faraci, W.S.; Walsh, C.T.; Griffin, R.G.

    1988-07-12

    Inhibition of alanine racemase from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus by (1-aminoethyl)phosphonic acid (Ala-P) proceeds via a two-step reaction pathway in which reactivation occurs very slowly. In order to determine the mechanism of inhibition, the authors have recorded low-temperature, solid-state /sup 15/N NMR spectra from microcrystals of the (/sup 15/N)Ala-P-enzyme complex, together with spectra of a series of model compounds that provide the requisite database for the interpretation of the /sup 15/N chemical shifts. Proton-decoupled spectra of the microcrystals exhibit a line at approx. 150 ppm, which conclusively demonstrates the presence of a protonated Ala-P-PLP aldimine and thus clarifies the structure of the enzyme-inhibitor complex. They also report the pH dependence of Ala-P binding to alanine racemase.

  18. Competition between model protocells driven by an encapsulated catalyst.

    PubMed

    Adamala, Katarzyna; Szostak, Jack W

    2013-06-01

    The advent of Darwinian evolution required the emergence of molecular mechanisms for the heritable variation of fitness. One model for such a system involves competing protocell populations, each consisting of a replicating genetic polymer within a replicating vesicle. In this model, each genetic polymer imparts a selective advantage to its protocell by, for example, coding for a catalyst that generates a useful metabolite. Here, we report a partial model of such nascent evolutionary traits in a system that consists of fatty-acid vesicles containing a dipeptide catalyst, which catalyses the formation of a second dipeptide. The newly formed dipeptide binds to vesicle membranes, which imparts enhanced affinity for fatty acids and thus promotes vesicle growth. The catalysed dipeptide synthesis proceeds with higher efficiency in vesicles than in free solution, which further enhances fitness. Our observations suggest that, in a replicating protocell with an RNA genome, ribozyme-catalysed peptide synthesis might have been sufficient to initiate Darwinian evolution. PMID:23695631

  19. Competition between model protocells driven by an encapsulated catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamala, Katarzyna; Szostak, Jack W.

    2013-06-01

    The advent of Darwinian evolution required the emergence of molecular mechanisms for the heritable variation of fitness. One model for such a system involves competing protocell populations, each consisting of a replicating genetic polymer within a replicating vesicle. In this model, each genetic polymer imparts a selective advantage to its protocell by, for example, coding for a catalyst that generates a useful metabolite. Here, we report a partial model of such nascent evolutionary traits in a system that consists of fatty-acid vesicles containing a dipeptide catalyst, which catalyses the formation of a second dipeptide. The newly formed dipeptide binds to vesicle membranes, which imparts enhanced affinity for fatty acids and thus promotes vesicle growth. The catalysed dipeptide synthesis proceeds with higher efficiency in vesicles than in free solution, which further enhances fitness. Our observations suggest that, in a replicating protocell with an RNA genome, ribozyme-catalysed peptide synthesis might have been sufficient to initiate Darwinian evolution.

  20. Competition between model protocells driven by an encapsulated catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Adamala, Katarzyna; Szostak, Jack W.

    2014-01-01

    The advent of Darwinian evolution required the emergence of molecular mechanisms for heritable variation of fitness. One model for such a system involves competing protocell populations, each consisting of a replicating genetic polymer within a replicating vesicle. In this model, each genetic polymer imparts a selective advantage to its protocell by, for example, coding for a catalyst that generates a useful metabolite. Here, we report a partial model of such nascent evolutionary traits in a system consisting of fatty acid vesicles containing a dipeptide catalyst, which catalyzes the formation of a second dipeptide. The newly-formed dipeptide binds to vesicle membranes, imparting enhanced affinity for fatty acids, thus promoting vesicle growth. The catalyzed dipeptide synthesis proceeds with higher efficiency in vesicles than in free solution, further enhancing fitness. Our observations suggest that, in a replicating protocell with an RNA genome, ribozyme-catalyzed peptide synthesis might have been sufficient to initiate Darwinian evolution. PMID:23695631

  1. Caffeine–N-phthaloyl-β-alanine (1/1)

    PubMed Central

    Bhatti, Moazzam H.; Yunus, Uzma; Shah, Syed Raza; Flörke, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    The title co-crystal [systematic name: 3-(1,3-dioxoisoindolin-2-yl)propanoic acid–1,3,7-trimethyl-1H-purine-2,6(3H,7H)-dione (1/1)], C8H10N4O2·C11H9NO4, is the combination of 1:1 adduct of N-phthaloyl-β-alanine with caffeine. The phthalimide and purine rings in the N-phthaloyl-β-alanine and caffeine mol­ecules are essentially planar, with r.m.s. deviations of the fitted atoms of 0.0078 and 0.0118 Å, respectively. In the crystal, the two mol­ecules are linked via an O—H⋯N hydrogen bond involving the intact carb­oxy­lic acid (COOH) group. The crystal structure is consolidated by C—H⋯O inter­actions. The H atoms of a methyl group of the caffeine mol­ecule are disordered over two sets of sites of equal occupancy. PMID:22719646

  2. The effect of immunonutrition (glutamine, alanine) on fracture healing

    PubMed Central

    Küçükalp, Abdullah; Durak, Kemal; Bayyurt, Sarp; Sönmez, Gürsel; Bilgen, Muhammed S.

    2014-01-01

    Background There have been various studies related to fracture healing. Glutamine is an amino acid with an important role in many cell and organ functions. This study aimed to make a clinical, radiological, and histopathological evaluation of the effects of glutamine on fracture healing. Methods Twenty rabbits were randomly allocated into two groups of control and immunonutrition. A fracture of the fibula was made to the right hind leg. All rabbits received standard food and water. From post-operative first day for 30 days, the study group received an additional 2 ml/kg/day 20% L-alanine L-glutamine solution via a gastric catheter, and the control group received 2 ml/kg/day isotonic via gastric catheter. At the end of 30 days, the rabbits were sacrificed and the fractures were examined clinically, radiologically, and histopathologically in respect to the degree of union. Results Radiological evaluation of the control group determined a mean score of 2.5 according to the orthopaedists and 2.65 according to the radiologists. In the clinical evaluation, the mean score was 1.875 for the control group and 2.0 for the study group. Histopathological evaluation determined a mean score of 8.5 for the control group and 9.0 for the study group. Conclusion One month after orally administered glutamine–alanine, positive effects were observed on fracture healing radiologically, clinically, and histopathologically, although no statistically significant difference was determined.

  3. Convergent Synthesis of Novel Muramyl Dipeptide Analogues: Inhibition of Porphyromonas gingivalis-Induced Pro-inflammatory Effects by High Doses of Muramyl Dipeptide.

    PubMed

    Cai, Bin; Panek, James S; Amar, Salomon

    2016-07-28

    Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g.)-induced TNF-α can be affected by muramyl dipeptide (MDP) in a biphasic concentration-dependent manner. We found that in P.g.-exposed macrophages, treatment with 10 μg/mL of MDP (MDP-low) up-regulated TNF-α by 29%, while 100 μg/mL or higher (MDP-high) significantly decreased it (16% to 38%). MDP-high was found to affect the ubiquitin-editing enzyme A20 and activator protein 1 (AP1). An AP1 binding site was found in the promoter region of A20. A20 promoter activity was up-regulated after transfection of AP1 cDNA in cells. Four analogues of MDP (3-6) were prepared through a convergent strategy involving the synthesis of two unique carbohydrate fragments, 7a and 7b, using the peptide coupling reagents, EDCI and HOAt. Analogue 4 improved MDP function and P.g.-induced activities. We propose a new signaling pathway for TNF-α induction activated after exposing macrophages to both P.g. and MDP-high or analogue 4. PMID:27353235

  4. Selective inhibition of human inducible nitric oxide synthase by S-alkyl-L-isothiocitrulline-containing dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Park, J M; Higuchi, T; Kikuchi, K; Urano, Y; Hori, H; Nishino, T; Aoki, J; Inoue, K; Nagano, T

    2001-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the structure-activity relationship of S-alkyl-L-isothiocitrulline-containing dipeptides towards three partially purified recombinant human nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isozymes, as well as the effects of these compounds on cytokine-induced NO production by human DLD-1 cells. In an in vitro assay, S-methyl-L-isothiocitrulline (L-MIT) was slightly selective for human neuronal NOS (nNOS) over the inducible (iNOS) or endothelial (eNOS) isozyme, but the combination of a hydrophobic L-amino acid (L-Phe, L-Leu or L-Trp) with L-MIT dramatically altered the inhibition pattern to give selective iNOS inhibitors. Introduction of a hydroxy, nitro, amino or methoxy group at the para position of the aromatic ring of L-MIT-L-Phe (MILF) decreased the selectivity and inhibitory potency. A longer or larger S-alkyl group also decreased the selectivity and potency. Dixon analysis showed that all of the dipeptides were competitive inhibitors of the three isoforms of human NOS. The enzymatic time course curves indicated that MILF was a slow binding inhibitor of human iNOS. These results suggest that the human NOS isozymes have different-sized cavities in the binding site near the position to which the C-terminal of L-arginine binds, and the cavity of iNOS is hydrophobic. Interestingly, L-MIT-D-Phe (MIDF) showed little inhibitory activity or selectivity, suggesting that the cavity of human iNOS is located in a well-defined direction from the alpha carbon atom. NO production in cytokine-stimulated human DLD-1 cells was measured with a fluorescent indicator, DAF-FM. MILF, L-MIT-L-Trp(-CHO) (MILW) and L-MIT-L-Tyr (MILY) showed more potent activity than L-MIT in this whole-cell assay. Thus, S-alkyl-L-isothiocitrulline-containing dipeptides are selective inhibitors of human iNOS, and work efficiently in cell-based assay. PMID:11309260

  5. Selective inhibition of human inducible nitric oxide synthase by S-alkyl-L-isothiocitrulline-containing dipeptides

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung-Min; Higuchi, Tsunehiko; Kikuchi, Kazuya; Urano, Yasuteru; Hori, Hiroyuki; Nishino, Takeshi; Aoki, Junken; Inoue, Keizo; Nagano, Tetsuo

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the structure-activity relationship of S-alkyl-L-isothiocitrulline-containing dipeptides towards three partially purified recombinant human nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isozymes, as well as the effects of these compounds on cytokine-induced NO production by human DLD-1 cells.In an in vitro assay, S-methyl-L-isothiocitrulline (L-MIT) was slightly selective for human neuronal NOS (nNOS) over the inducible (iNOS) or endothelial (eNOS) isozyme, but the combination of a hydrophobic L-amino acid (L-Phe, L-Leu or L-Trp) with L-MIT dramatically altered the inhibition pattern to give selective iNOS inhibitors. Introduction of a hydroxy, nitro, amino or methoxy group at the para position of the aromatic ring of L-MIT-L-Phe (MILF) decreased the selectivity and inhibitory potency. A longer or larger S-alkyl group also decreased the selectivity and potency. Dixon analysis showed that all of the dipeptides were competitive inhibitors of the three isoforms of human NOS. The enzymatic time course curves indicated that MILF was a slow binding inhibitor of human iNOS.These results suggest that the human NOS isozymes have different-sized cavities in the binding site near the position to which the C-terminal of L-arginine binds, and the cavity of iNOS is hydrophobic. Interestingly, L-MIT-D-Phe (MIDF) showed little inhibitory activity or selectivity, suggesting that the cavity of human iNOS is located in a well-defined direction from the α carbon atom.NO production in cytokine-stimulated human DLD-1 cells was measured with a fluorescent indicator, DAF-FM. MILF, L-MIT-L-Trp(-CHO) (MILW) and L-MIT-L-Tyr (MILY) showed more potent activity than L-MIT in this whole-cell assay.Thus, S-alkyl-L-isothiocitrulline-containing dipeptides are selective inhibitors of human iNOS, and work efficiently in cell-based assay. PMID:11309260

  6. Beta-aminopeptidase-catalyzed biotransformations of beta(2)-dipeptides: kinetic resolution and enzymatic coupling.

    PubMed

    Heck, Tobias; Reimer, Artur; Seebach, Dieter; Gardiner, James; Deniau, Gildas; Lukaszuk, Aneta; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Geueke, Birgit

    2010-05-17

    We have previously shown that the beta-aminopeptidases BapA from Sphingosinicella xenopeptidilytica and DmpA from Ochrobactrum anthropi can catalyze reactions with non-natural beta(3)-peptides and beta(3)-amino acid amides. Here we report that these exceptional enzymes are also able to utilize synthetic dipeptides with N-terminal beta(2)-amino acid residues as substrates under aqueous conditions. The suitability of a beta(2)-peptide as a substrate for BapA or DmpA was strongly dependent on the size of the C(alpha) substituent of the N-terminal beta(2)-amino acid. BapA was shown to convert a diastereomeric mixture of the beta(2)-peptide H-beta(2)hPhe-beta(2)hAla-OH, but did not act on diastereomerically pure beta(2),beta(3)-dipeptides containing an N-terminal beta(2)-homoalanine. In contrast, DmpA was only active with the latter dipeptides as substrates. BapA-catalyzed transformation of the diastereomeric mixture of H-beta(2)hPhe-beta(2)hAla-OH proceeded along two highly S-enantioselective reaction routes, one leading to substrate hydrolysis and the other to the synthesis of coupling products. The synthetic route predominated even at neutral pH. A rise in pH of three log units shifted the synthesis-to-hydrolysis ratio (v(S)/v(H)) further towards peptide formation. Because the equilibrium of the reaction lies on the side of hydrolysis, prolonged incubation resulted in the cleavage of all peptides that carried an N-terminal beta-amino acid of S configuration. After completion of the enzymatic reaction, only the S enantiomer of beta(2)-homophenylalanine was detected (ee>99 % for H-(S)-beta(2)-hPhe-OH, E>500); this confirmed the high enantioselectivity of the reaction. Our findings suggest interesting new applications of the enzymes BapA and DmpA for the production of enantiopure beta(2)-amino acids and the enantioselective coupling of N-terminal beta(2)-amino acids to peptides. PMID:20340152

  7. Human lactoferricin derived di-peptides deploying loop structures induce apoptosis specifically in cancer cells through targeting membranous phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Sabrina; Leber, Regina; Rinner, Beate; Schaider, Helmut; Lohner, Karl; Zweytick, Dagmar

    2015-11-01

    Host defense-derived peptides have emerged as a novel strategy for the development of alternative anticancer therapies. In this study we report on characteristic features of human lactoferricin (hLFcin) derivatives which facilitate specific killing of cancer cells of melanoma, glioblastoma and rhabdomyosarcoma compared with non-specific derivatives and the synthetic peptide RW-AH. Changes in amino acid sequence of hLFcin providing 9-11 amino acids stretched derivatives LF11-316, -318 and -322 only yielded low antitumor activity. However, the addition of the repeat (di-peptide) and the retro-repeat (di-retro-peptide) sequences highly improved cancer cell toxicity up to 100% at 20 μM peptide concentration. Compared to the complete parent sequence hLFcin the derivatives showed toxicity on the melanoma cell line A375 increased by 10-fold and on the glioblastoma cell line U-87mg by 2-3-fold. Reduced killing velocity, apoptotic blebbing, activation of caspase 3/7 and formation of apoptotic DNA fragments proved that the active and cancer selective peptides, e.g. R-DIM-P-LF11-322, trigger apoptosis, whereas highly active, though non-selective peptides, such as DIM-LF11-318 and RW-AH seem to kill rapidly via necrosis inducing membrane lyses. Structural studies revealed specific toxicity on cancer cells by peptide derivatives with loop structures, whereas non-specific peptides comprised α-helical structures without loop. Model studies with the cancer membrane mimic phosphatidylserine (PS) gave strong evidence that PS only exposed by cancer cells is an important target for specific hLFcin derivatives. Other negatively charged membrane exposed molecules as sialic acid, heparan and chondroitin sulfate were shown to have minor impact on peptide activity. PMID:26239537

  8. Evaluation of drug-induced tissue injury by measuring alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity in silkworm hemolymph

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Our previous studies suggest silkworms can be used as model animals instead of mammals in pharmacologic studies to develop novel therapeutic medicines. We examined the usefulness of the silkworm larvae Bombyx mori as an animal model for evaluating tissue injury induced by various cytotoxic drugs. Drugs that induce hepatotoxic effects in mammals were injected into the silkworm hemocoel, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity was measured in the hemolymph 1 day later. Results Injection of CCl4 into the hemocoel led to an increase in ALT activity. The increase in ALT activity was attenuated by pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine. Injection of benzoic acid derivatives, ferric sulfate, sodium valproate, tetracycline, amiodarone hydrochloride, methyldopa, ketoconazole, pemoline (Betanamin), N-nitroso-fenfluramine, and D-galactosamine also increased ALT activity. Conclusions These findings indicate that silkworms are useful for evaluating the effects of chemicals that induce tissue injury in mammals. PMID:23137391

  9. Decreased alanine aminotransferase activity in serum of man during gamma-acetylenic-GABA treatment.

    PubMed

    Olsen, R; Hørder, M

    1980-06-01

    Decreasing concentrations of alanine aminotransferase were observed in nine patients receiving gamma-acetylenic-GABA, an inhibitor of GABA aminotransferase. In vitro studies showed that preincubation at 37 degrees C of serum with gamma-acetylenic-GABA and with urine from a patient receiving the drug led to inhibition of alanine aminotransferase. This inhibition of alanine aminotransferase by gamma-acetylenic-GABA was neutralized by 1-analine, the natural substrate for the enzyme. The mechanism of inhibition may be a competition between the drug and 1-alanine for the substrate binding site of the enzyme. PMID:7414257

  10. A novel cyclic dipeptide from deep marine-derived fungus Aspergillus sp. SCSIOW2.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiang; Fang, Pingyan; Tang, Jianqiang; Wu, Zhiqin; Li, Xiaofan; Li, Shuiming; Wang, Yong; Liu, Gang; He, Zhendan; Gou, Deming; Yao, Xinsheng; Wang, Liyan

    2016-01-01

    A novel cyclic dipeptide, 14-hydroxy-cyclopeptine (1), was purified from a deep sea derived fungal isolate identified as an Aspergillus sp. The structure was elucidated by detailed spectroscopic analyses using 1D and 2D NMR experiments and high resolution mass spectrometry. The absolute configuration of the amino acid was determined by Marfey's method. Two conformational isomers of 1 were established by ROE analyses. 1 inhibited nitric oxide production with IC50 values at 40.3 μg/mL in a lipopolysaccharide and recombinant mouse interferon-γ -activated macrophage-like cell line, RAW 264.7 and showed no cytotoxic effect in the tested dose range up to 100 μg/mL. PMID:25906695

  11. The first dipeptide ligand of translocator protein: Design and anxiolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Gudasheva, T A; Deeva, O A; Mokrov, G V; Yarkov, S A; Yarkova, M A; Seredenin, S B

    2015-01-01

    On the basis of the structure of Alpidem, a pyrazolopyrimidine ligand of the translocator protein (TSPO), a dipeptide TSPO ligand, N-carbobenzoxy-L-tryptophanyl-L-isoleucine amide (GD-23), was designed and synthesized using our own original peptide design strategy. This compound exhibited anxiolytic activity in BALB/cAnN mice in the "open-field" test and in outbred CD1 mice in the "elevated plus maze" test. The stereoselectivity of the anxiolytic effect of GD-23 is demonstrated. The results of this study suggest that GD-23 is a ligand of the translocator protein, and its structure can become the basis for creating anxiolytics with a fundamentally new mechanism of action. PMID:26518550

  12. The Novel Dipeptide Translocator Protein Ligand, Referred to As GD-23, Exerts Anxiolytic and Nootropic Activities

    PubMed Central

    Povarnina, P. Yu.; Yarkov, S. A.; Gudasheva, T. A.; Yarkova, M. A.; Seredenin, S. B.

    2015-01-01

    The translocator protein (TSPO) promotes the translocation of cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane and mediates steroid formation. In this study, we first report on a biological evaluation of the dipeptide GD-23 (N-carbobenzoxy-L tryptophanyl-L isoleucine amide), a structural analogue of Alpidem, the principal TSPO ligand. We show that GD-23 in a dose range of 0.05 to 0.5 mg/kg (i.p.) exhibits anxiolytic activity in the elevated plus maze test and nootropic activity in the object recognition test in scopolamine-induced amnesia in rodents. It was shown that GD-23 did not affect spontaneous locomotor activity, holding promise as a nonsedative anxiolytic agent. The anxiolytic and nootropic activities of GD-23 were abrogated by the TSPO specific ligand PK11195, which thus suggests a role for TSPO in mediating the pharmacological activity of GD-23. PMID:26483966

  13. Solvent-tunable morphology and emission of pyrene-dipeptide organogels.

    PubMed

    Bartocci, S; Morbioli, I; Maggini, M; Mba, M

    2015-12-01

    Two pyrene based organogelators in which the pyrene moiety has been linked to the diphenylalanine dipeptide have been synthesized. We show how the solvent can tune both the morphology and the optical properties of the organogels: spherical aggregates with quenched emission were obtained in acetonitrile, whereas an entangled fibrillar network with enhanced emission was formed in o-dichlorobenzene. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments suggest that both π-π stacking and hydrogen bonding contribute to the formation of the supramolecular networks. Ultraviolet-visible and steady state emission studies demonstrated the formation of I-aggregates in acetonitrile. In contrast, in o-dichlorobenzene, the formation of J-type aggregates leads to assemblies with enhanced emission. These results give some insight into the important role of the gelling solvent in the morphology of the supramolecular gels and may help in the design of new soft-materials. PMID:26767742

  14. Soft structure formation and cancer cell transport mechanisms of a folic acid-dipeptide conjugate.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Shukla, Akansha; Sivakumar, Sri; Verma, Sandeep

    2015-03-01

    Folic acid (FA) is a low-molecular-weight micronutrient, which plays a critical role in the prevention of birth defects and cancers. It is also essential for biochemical pathways responsible for DNA synthesis and maintenance and for the generation of new red blood cells. Cellular trafficking of FA and folate is based on its high-affinity binding to cognate folate receptor, a protein commonly expressed in several human cancers. Thus, folate conjugates of drugs, plasmids, biosensors, contrast, and radiodiagnostic imaging agents have been used for assisted delivery in folate receptor-positive cancer cells, via endocytosis pathways. This report describes morphologies of soft structures from a fully characterized FA-dipeptide conjugate and detailed mechanistic studies of its cancer cell uptake, as tracked by the inherent fluorescence of the conjugate. PMID:25645907

  15. Conducting nanofibers and organogels derived from the self-assembly of tetrathiafulvalene-appended dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Nalluri, Siva Krishna Mohan; Shivarova, Nadezhda; Kanibolotsky, Alexander L; Zelzer, Mischa; Gupta, Swati; Frederix, Pim W J M; Skabara, Peter J; Gleskova, Helena; Ulijn, Rein V

    2014-10-21

    We demonstrate the nonaqueous self-assembly of a low-molecular-mass organic gelator based on an electroactive p-type tetrathiafulvalene (TTF)-dipeptide bioconjugate. We show that a TTF moiety appended with diphenylalanine amide derivative (TTF-FF-NH2) self-assembles into one-dimensional nanofibers that further lead to the formation of self-supporting organogels in chloroform and ethyl acetate. Upon doping of the gels with electron acceptors (TCNQ/iodine vapor), stable two-component charge transfer gels are produced in chloroform and ethyl acetate. These gels are characterized by various spectroscopy (UV-vis-NIR, FTIR, and CD), microscopy (AFM and TEM), rheology, and cyclic voltammetry techniques. Furthermore, conductivity measurements performed on TTF-FF-NH2 xerogel nanofiber networks formed between gold electrodes on a glass surface indicate that these nanofibers show a remarkable enhancement in the conductivity after doping with TCNQ. PMID:25259412

  16. Biphasic effects of muramyl dipeptide or lipopolysaccharide on superoxide anion-generating activities of macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Yagawa, K; Kaku, M; Ichinose, Y; Nagao, S; Tanaka, A; Tomoda, A

    1984-01-01

    The superoxide anion (O2-)-generating activity of guinea pig macrophages stimulated by wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), immune complexes, or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) was studied after short- and long-term exposures of the cells to muramyl dipeptide (MDP) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Neither MDP nor LPS alone induced O2- release in macrophages. Short-term (30 min) exposure to these agents caused the enhanced release of O2- in response to WGA or immune complexes, though the PMA-induced O2- generation was not affected. On the other hand, long-term exposure (more than 24 h) to MDP or LPS progressively enhanced O2- generation of the cells induced by WGA, immune complexes, or even PMA. These results suggest that the mechanism for O2- generation of macrophages stimulated by WGA or immune complexes differs from that stimulated by PMA and that the differences also exist between short- and long-term exposure to MDP or LPS. PMID:6329960

  17. The Novel Dipeptide Translocator Protein Ligand, Referred to As GD-23, Exerts Anxiolytic and Nootropic Activities.

    PubMed

    Povarnina, P Yu; Yarkov, S A; Gudasheva, T A; Yarkova, M A; Seredenin, S B

    2015-01-01

    The translocator protein (TSPO) promotes the translocation of cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane and mediates steroid formation. In this study, we first report on a biological evaluation of the dipeptide GD-23 (N-carbobenzoxy-L tryptophanyl-L isoleucine amide), a structural analogue of Alpidem, the principal TSPO ligand. We show that GD-23 in a dose range of 0.05 to 0.5 mg/kg (i.p.) exhibits anxiolytic activity in the elevated plus maze test and nootropic activity in the object recognition test in scopolamine-induced amnesia in rodents. It was shown that GD-23 did not affect spontaneous locomotor activity, holding promise as a nonsedative anxiolytic agent. The anxiolytic and nootropic activities of GD-23 were abrogated by the TSPO specific ligand PK11195, which thus suggests a role for TSPO in mediating the pharmacological activity of GD-23. PMID:26483966

  18. A robust synthesis of N-glycolyl muramyl dipeptide via azidonitration/reduction.

    PubMed

    Xing, Shuo; Gleason, James L

    2015-02-01

    A novel synthetic route leading to N-glycolyl muramyl dipeptide (MDP), a bacterial glycopeptide of particular interest in studies of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2), is described. The synthetic strategy hinges on the alkylation of benzylidene-protected glucal with 2-bromopropionic acid and thus circumvents a challenging and non-reproducible SN2 step at the C-3 position of glucosamine derivatives. The subsequent sequence includes an azidonitration and an unusual azide reduction/acylation step via an aza ylide/oxaphospholidine intermediate. This approach generates a protected N-glycolyl MDP that can be either subjected to a one-step global deprotection or differentially deprotected to obtain further derivatives. PMID:25476476

  19. Muramyl-dipeptide and its synthetic analog as possible inducers of interleukin-2 production

    SciTech Connect

    Malaitsev, V.V.; Andronova, T.M.; Bogdanova, I.M.; Sukhikh, G.T.

    1986-01-01

    This paper studies the action of muramyl-dipeptide (MDP) and its synthetic derivative N-acetylglucosaminyl-N-acetyl-muramyl-alanyl-D-isoglutamine (GMDP) on IL2 production in a population of BALB/c mouse spleen cells. Tritium-thymidine was added to the wells in the flat-bottomed culture panes and the radioactivity of the samples was measured on a scintillation beta-counter after deposition of material was precipitated with TCA on the filters. The supernatant of the culture of activated spleen cells, stimulated by MDP or GMDP induced a proliferative response of the con A blast cells. The effectiveness of the stimulating action of MDP and GMDP, and of the classical IL2 inducer, con A, was compared.

  20. Dipeptide-Based Metabolic Labeling of Bacterial Cells for Endogenous Antibody Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The number of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections has increased dramatically over the past decade. To combat these pathogens, novel antimicrobial strategies must be explored and developed. We previously reported a strategy based on hapten-modified cell wall analogues to induce recruitment of endogenous antibodies to bacterial cell surfaces. Cell surface remodeling using unnatural single d-amino acid cell wall analogues led to modification at the C-terminus of the peptidoglycan stem peptide. During peptidoglycan processing, installed hapten-displaying amino acids can be subsequently removed by cell wall enzymes. Herein, we disclose a two-step dipeptide peptidoglycan remodeling strategy aimed at introducing haptens at an alternative site within the stem peptide to improve retention and diminish removal by cell wall enzymes. Through this redesigned strategy, we determined size constraints of peptidoglycan remodeling and applied these constraints to attain hapten–linker conjugates that produced high levels of antibody recruitment to bacterial cell surfaces. PMID:27294199

  1. A novel nanostructured supramolecular hydrogel self-assembled from tetraphenylethylene-capped dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Mei-Yu; Huang, Chen-Wei; Chang, Jui-Wen; Huang, Yu-Tang; Lin, Jhong-Hua; Hsu, Shu-Min; Hung, Shih-Chieh; Lin, Hsin-Chieh

    2016-08-14

    Herein, we report a tetraphenylethylene-diglycine (TPE-GG) hydrogelator from a systematic study of TPE-capped dipeptides with various amphiphilic properties. From a chemical design, we found that the hydrogelation of TPE-GG molecules can be utilized to generate supramolecular nanostructures with a large TPE-based nanobelt width (∼300 nm) and lateral dimension ratio (>30 fold). In addition, TPE-GG has the lowest molecular weight and minimum number of atoms compared to any TPE-capped peptide hydrogelator reported to date. This minimal self-assembled hydrogelator can fundamentally achieve the gel features compared with other TPE-capped peptides. A combined experimental and computational study indicates the π-π interactions, electrostatic interactions and hydrogen-bonding interactions are the major driving forces behind the formation of self-assembled nanobelts. This study demonstrates the importance of structure-property relationships and provides new insights into the design of supramolecular nanomaterials. PMID:27381445

  2. Depressed chemiluminescence response by influenza virus is enhanced after conjugation of viral subunits to muramyl dipeptide.

    PubMed Central

    Masihi, K N; Lange, W; Rohde-Schulz, B; Chedid, L; Jolivet, M

    1985-01-01

    The effect on respiratory burst of murine spleen cells after in vitro exposure to influenza virus, subunits, or subunits conjugated to muramyl dipeptide (MDP) was studied by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) in response to stimulation by zymosan. CL induced by infectious influenza A virus was depressed but could be elevated to normal levels when MDP was added together with a low, but not with a high, dose of the virus. Profound depression of CL was induced by high doses of influenza A/Brazil, A/Bangkok, and B/Singapore subunits. The same amounts of viral subunits conjugated to MDP restored or even enhanced the CL responses of spleen cells from BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. Splenic cells from BALB/c mice generated higher levels of CL than did cells from C57BL/6 mice. PMID:4044031

  3. One-bead-one-compound library of end-capped dipeptides and deconvolution by microflow NMR.

    PubMed

    Simon, Rozalyn A; Schuresko, Laura; Dendukuri, Nagamani; Goers, Emily; Murphy, Brent; Lokey, R Scott

    2005-01-01

    As part of our program to identify novel small molecules with interesting biological activity, we have designed and synthesized a library of end-capped dipeptides with an emphasis on compound diversity, complexity, and membrane permeability. An approximately 1500-member library was synthesized manually on large polystyrene beads using the mix-and-split method. The final compounds were cleaved into 384-well plates to generate individual stock solutions for input into high-throughput biological screens. Individual compounds were decoded using a combination of mass spectrometry and microflow NMR spectroscopy. In principle, this approach to deconvolution obviates the need for complicated binary encoding-decoding strategies for one-bead-one-compound libraries. PMID:16153064

  4. Asymmetric cyanation of imines via dipeptide-derived organophosphine dual-reagent catalysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Yu; Zheng, Chang-Wu; Chai, Zhuo; Zhang, Jia-Xing; Zhao, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, enantioselective phosphine organocatalysis has evolved rapidly into a highly efficient catalytic strategy for a range of useful reactions. However, as restricted by the traditional catalytic modes, some important reactions, such as asymmetric Strecker-type reactions, have thus far been out of reach of this strategy. Reported herein is an application of enantioselective phosphine organocatalysis for asymmetric Strecker-type reactions, enabled by a dual-reagent catalyst system in which the key organophosphorus zwitterion intermediate, generated in situ by mixing a chiral dipeptide-derived multifunctional organophosphine with methyl acrylate, is used as a highly efficient chiral Lewis base catalyst. The high efficiency of this catalytic system is demonstrated in the asymmetric cyanation of isatin-derived ketimines and azomethine aldimines as well as in the kinetic resolution of racemic 3-substituted azomethines. Mechanistic studies provide experimental evidence for the intermediacy of the putative zwitterion and its role as a catalytically active Lewis base. PMID:27625043

  5. SCMHBP: prediction and analysis of heme binding proteins using propensity scores of dipeptides

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Heme binding proteins (HBPs) are metalloproteins that contain a heme ligand (an iron-porphyrin complex) as the prosthetic group. Several computational methods have been proposed to predict heme binding residues and thereby to understand the interactions between heme and its host proteins. However, few in silico methods for identifying HBPs have been proposed. Results This work proposes a scoring card method (SCM) based method (named SCMHBP) for predicting and analyzing HBPs from sequences. A balanced dataset of 747 HBPs (selected using a Gene Ontology term GO:0020037) and 747 non-HBPs (selected from 91,414 putative non-HBPs) with an identity of 25% was firstly established. Consequently, a set of scores that quantified the propensity of amino acids and dipeptides to be HBPs is estimated using SCM to maximize the predictive accuracy of SCMHBP. Finally, the informative physicochemical properties of 20 amino acids are identified by utilizing the estimated propensity scores to be used to categorize HBPs. The training and mean test accuracies of SCMHBP applied to three independent test datasets are 85.90% and 71.57%, respectively. SCMHBP performs well relative to comparison with such methods as support vector machine (SVM), decision tree J48, and Bayes classifiers. The putative non-HBPs with high sequence propensity scores are potential HBPs, which can be further validated by experimental confirmation. The propensity scores of individual amino acids and dipeptides are examined to elucidate the interactions between heme and its host proteins. The following characteristics of HBPs are derived from the propensity scores: 1) aromatic side chains are important to the effectiveness of specific HBP functions; 2) a hydrophobic environment is important in the interaction between heme and binding sites; and 3) the whole HBP has low flexibility whereas the heme binding residues are relatively flexible. Conclusions SCMHBP yields knowledge that improves our understanding

  6. Radiolysis of alanine adsorbed in a clay mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Ovando, Ellen Y.; Negrón-Mendoza, Alicia

    2013-07-01

    Optical activity in molecules is a chemical characteristic of living beings. In this work, we examine the hypothesis of the influence of different mineral surfaces on the development of a specific chirality in organic molecules when subjected to conditions simulating the primitive Earth during the period of chemical evolution. By using X-ray diffraction techniques and HPLC/ELSD to analyze aqueous suspensions of amino acids adsorbed on minerals irradiated in different doses with a cobalt-60 gamma source, the experiments attempt to prove the hypothesis that some solid surfaces (like clays and meteorite rocks) may have a concentration capacity and protective role against external sources of ionizing radiation (specifically γ-ray) for some organic compounds (like some amino acids) adsorbed on them. Preliminary results show a slight difference in the adsorption and radiolysis of the D-and L-alanine.

  7. Radiolysis of alanine adsorbed in a clay mineral

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Ovando, Ellen Y.; Negron-Mendoza, Alicia

    2013-07-03

    Optical activity in molecules is a chemical characteristic of living beings. In this work, we examine the hypothesis of the influence of different mineral surfaces on the development of a specific chirality in organic molecules when subjected to conditions simulating the primitive Earth during the period of chemical evolution. By using X-ray diffraction techniques and HPLC/ELSD to analyze aqueous suspensions of amino acids adsorbed on minerals irradiated in different doses with a cobalt-60 gamma source, the experiments attempt to prove the hypothesis that some solid surfaces (like clays and meteorite rocks) may have a concentration capacity and protective role against external sources of ionizing radiation (specifically {gamma}-ray) for some organic compounds (like some amino acids) adsorbed on them. Preliminary results show a slight difference in the adsorption and radiolysis of the D-and L-alanine.

  8. Correlation between liver cell necrosis and circulating alanine aminotransferase after ischaemia/reperfusion injuries in the rat liver.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Anders R; Andersen, Kasper J; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen; Nyengaard, Jens R; Mortensen, Frank V

    2016-04-01

    Circulating liver enzymes such as alanine transaminase are often used as markers of hepatocellular damage. Ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is an inevitable consequence of prolonged liver ischaemia. The aim of this study was to examine the correlation between liver enzymes and volume of liver cell necrosis after ischaemia/reperfusion injuries, using design-unbiased stereological methods. Forty-seven male Wistar rats were subjected to 1 h of partial liver ischaemia, followed by either 4 or 24 h of reperfusion. Within each group, one-third of animals were subjected to ischaemic preconditioning and one-third to ischaemic postconditioning. At the end of reperfusion, blood and liver samples were collected for analysis. The volume of necrotic liver tissue was subsequently correlated to circulating markers of I/R injury. Correlation between histological findings and circulating markers was performed using Pearson's correlation coefficient. Alanine transferase peaked after 4 h of reperfusion; however, at this time-point, only mild necrosis was observed, with a Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.663 (P = 0.001). After 24 h of reperfusion, alanine aminotransferase was found to be highly correlated to the degree of hepatocellular necrosis R = 0.836 (P = 0.000). Furthermore, alkaline phosphatase (R = 0.806) and α-2-macroglobulin (R = 0.655) levels were also correlated with the degree of necrosis. We show for the first time that there is a close correlation between the volume of hepatocellular necrosis and alanine aminotransferase levels in a model of I/R injury. This is especially apparent after 24 h of reperfusion. Similarly, increased levels of alkaline phosphatase and α-2-macroglobulin are correlated to the volume of liver necrosis. PMID:27292534

  9. Parallel β-Sheet Structure of Alanine Tetrapeptide in the Solid State As Studied by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Tetsuo; Horiguchi, Kumiko; Aoki, Akihiro; Tasei, Yugo; Naito, Akira

    2016-09-01

    The structural analysis of alanine oligopeptides is important for understanding the crystalline region in silks from spiders and wild silkworms and also the mechanism of cellular toxicity of human diseases arising from expansion in polyalanine sequences. The atomic-level structures of alanine tripeptide and tetrapeptide with antiparallel β-sheet structures (AP-Ala3 and AP-Ala4, respectively) together with alanine tripeptide with parallel β-sheet structures (P-Ala3) have been determined, but alanine tetrapeptide with a parallel β-sheet structure (P-Ala4) has not been reported yet. In this article, first, we established the preparation protocol of P-Ala4 from more stable AP-Ala4. Second, complete assignments of the (13)C, (15)N, and (1)H solid-state NMR spectra were performed with (13)C- and (15)N-labeled Ala4 samples using several solid-state NMR techniques. Then, the structural constraints were obtained, for example, the amide proton peaks of P-Ala4 in the (1)H double-quantum magic-angle spinning NMR spectrum were heavily overlapped and observed at about 7.4 ppm, which was a much higher field than that of 8.7-9.1 ppm observed for AP-Ala4, indicating that the intermolecular hydrogen-bond lengths across strands (N-H···O═C) were considerably longer for P-Ala4, that is, 2.21-2.34 Å, than those reported for AP-Ala4, that is, 1.8-1.9 Å. The structural model was proposed for P-Ala4 by NMR results and MD calculations. PMID:27482868

  10. Elution profile of di-peptides on a sulfonated ethylstyrene-divinylbenzene copolymer resin column by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jian; Saiki, Tomomi; Thanutchaporn, Kumrungsee; Liu, Wanying; Shimura, Akihiro; Matsui, Toshiro

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the characteristics of a partially sulfonated ethylstyrene-divinylbenzene copolymer for the separation of di-peptides by high-performance liquid chromatography. Di-peptides (VE, VA, VH, VK, and VR) with different isoelectric points (pI, 4.0 to 9.7) and log P values (-1.63 to -0.72) were used to optimize the separation conditions of the columns packed with sulfonated copolymer resin. The retention factor (k) of the di-peptides on the column with a 0.81 wt% sulfo group content decreased with increasing concentrations of phosphate salts (2.5 - 20 mmol L(-1)) in the mobile phase. The complete separation of the five di-peptides was obtained with a gradient of 10% methanol containing 5 mmol L(-1) NaH2PO4 (pH 4.8) to 50% methanol containing 5 mmol L(-1) Na2HPO4 (pH 8.9) for 60 min at 0.5 mL min(-1) at 50°C. Under the optimal conditions, a good relationship between the k and pI values of the di-peptides, with the exception of VE (pI 4.0), was observed, suggesting that the retention of the di-peptides on the column packed with sulfonated copolymer resin was dependent on the pI value, when it was greater than 5. The log P value also influenced the separation characteristics of the column; peptides possessing the same pI value (6.4 for GH, VH, IH, and FH) showed a higher retention on the column with increasing log P values. In conclusion, the prototype sulfonated ethylstyrene-divinylbenzene copolymer column was applicable for the separation of basic di-peptides, and the separation depended on the pI and hydrophobicity of the di-peptides. PMID:25792273

  11. Evaluating the Reduced Hydrophobic Taste Sensor Response of Dipeptides by Theasinensin A by Using NMR and Quantum Mechanical Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jian; Hirasaki, Naoto; Miyata, Yuji; Tanaka, Kazunari; Tanaka, Takashi; Wu, Xiao; Tahara, Yusuke; Toko, Kiyoshi; Matsui, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    The current study demonstrated that theasinensin A (TSA) had a potential to form the complex with hydrophobic Trp-containing dipeptides, and to reduce their membrane potential by artificial-lipid membrane taste sensor. At a 1:3 molar ratio of the 6 Trp-containing dipeptides together with TSA, we observed a significant chemical shift of the protons of the dipeptides (Δδ) to a high magnetic field, when analyzed using 1H-nuclear-magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The Δδ values were correlated with the hydrophobicity (log P) of the dipeptides and significant correlations were obtained (P = 0.022, R2 = 0.77); e.g., Trp-Leu with the highest log P value of 1.623 among the tested dipeptides showed the highest Δδ value of 0.105 ppm for the H7 proton of Trp-Leu, while less chemical shifts were observed in theasinensin B and epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate. Diffusion-ordered NMR spectroscopy revealed that the diffusion coefficient of 3 mM of Trp-Leu (7.6 × 10−11 m2/s) at a pulse field gradient in the range 0.05–0.3 T/m decreased in the presence of 3 mM TSA (6.6 × 10−11 m2/s), suggesting that Trp-Leu forms a complex with TSA. Quantum mechanical calculations and rotating frame nuclear Overhauser effect-NMR spectroscopy provided configuration information on the geometry of the complex that Trp-Leu formed with TSA (1:1 complex) with a ΔG energy of –8.7 kJ/mol. A sensor analysis using artificial-lipid membranes demonstrated that the changes in membrane potential of 1 mM Trp-Leu (21.8 ± 1.3 mV) and Leu-Trp (5.3 ± 0.9 mV) were significantly (P < 0.001) reduced by 1 mM TSA (Trp-Leu, 13.1 ± 2.4 mV; Leu-Trp, 3.5 ± 0.5 mV; TSA alone, 0.2 ± 0.01 mV), indicating the effective suppression of hydrophobicity of dipeptides by TSA-formed complex. PMID:27309380

  12. Efficient L-Alanine Production by a Thermo-Regulated Switch in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Deng, Can; Cui, Wen-Jing; Liu, Zhong-Mei; Zhou, Zhe-Min

    2016-01-01

    L-Alanine has important applications in food, pharmaceutical and veterinary and is used as a substrate for production of engineered thermoplastics. Microbial fermentation could reduce the production cost and promote the application of L-alanine. However, the presence of L-alanine significantly inhibit cell growth rate and cause a decrease in the ultimate L-alanine productivity. For efficient L-alanine production, a thermo-regulated genetic switch was designed to dynamically control the expression of L-alanine dehydrogenase (alaD) from Geobacillus stearothermophilus on the Escherichia coli B0016-060BC chromosome. The optimal cultivation conditions for the genetically switched alanine production using B0016-060BC were the following: an aerobic growth phase at 33 °C with a 1-h thermo-induction at 42 °C followed by an oxygen-limited phase at 42 °C. In a bioreactor experiment using the scaled-up conditions optimized in a shake flask, B0016-060BC accumulated 50.3 g biomass/100 g glucose during the aerobic growth phase and 96 g alanine/100 g glucose during the oxygen-limited phase, respectively. The L-alanine titer reached 120.8 g/l with higher overall and oxygen-limited volumetric productivities of 3.09 and 4.18 g/l h, respectively, using glucose as the sole carbon source. Efficient cell growth and L-alanine production were reached separately, by switching cultivation temperature. The results revealed the application of a thermo-regulated strategy for heterologous metabolic production and pointed to strategies for improving L-alanine production. PMID:26453031

  13. Synthesis and Characterization in Vitro and in Vivo of (l)-(Trimethylsilyl)alanine Containing Neurotensin Analogues.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, Roberto; Besserer-Offroy, Élie; René, Adeline; Côté, Jérôme; Tétreault, Pascal; Collerette-Tremblay, Jasmin; Longpré, Jean-Michel; Leduc, Richard; Martinez, Jean; Sarret, Philippe; Cavelier, Florine

    2015-10-01

    The silylated amino acid (l)-(trimethylsilyl)alanine (TMSAla) was incorporated at the C-terminal end of the minimal biologically active neurotensin (NT) fragment, leading to the synthesis of new hexapeptide NT[8-13] analogues. Here, we assessed the ability of these new silylated NT compounds to bind to NTS1 and NTS2 receptors, promote regulation of multiple signaling pathways, induce inhibition of the ileal smooth muscle contractions, and affect distinct physiological variables, including blood pressure and pain sensation. Among the C-terminal modified analogues, compound 6 (JMV2007) carrying a TMSAla residue in position 13 exhibits a higher affinity toward NT receptors than the NT native peptide. We also found that compound 6 is effective in reversing carbachol-induced contraction in the isolated strip preparation assay and at inducing a drop in blood pressure. Finally, compound 6 produces potent analgesia in experimental models of acute and persistent pain. PMID:26348111

  14. Inactivation of 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)alanine decarboxylase by 2-(fluoromethyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)alanine.

    PubMed

    Maycock, A L; Aster, S D; Patchett, A A

    1980-02-19

    2-(Fluoromethyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)alanine [alpha-FM-Dopa (I)] causes rapid, time-dependent, stereospecific, and irreversible inhibition of hog kidney aromatic amino acid (Dopa) decarboxylase. The inactivation occurs with loss of both the carboxyl carbon and fluoride from I and results in the stoichimetric formation of a covalent enzyme-inhibitor adduct. The data are consistent with I being a suicide inactivator of the enzyme, and a plausible mechanism for the inactivation process is presented. The inactivation is highly efficient in that there is essentially no enzymatic turnover of I to produce the corresponding amine, 1-(fluoromethyl)-2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)ethylamine [alpha-FM-dopamine (II)]. Amine II is also a potent inactivator of the enzyme. In vivo compound I is found to inactivate both brain and peripheral (liver) Dopa decarboxylase activity. The possible significance of these data with respect to the known antihypertensive effect of I is discussed. PMID:7356954

  15. Catalytic properties of Sepharose-bound L-alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Mureşan, L; Vancea, D; Presecan, E; Porumb, H; Lascu, I; Oargă, M; Matinca, D; Abrudan, I; Bârzu, O

    1983-02-15

    (1) L-Alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus cereus was purified by a two-step chromatographic procedure involving Cibacron-Blue 3G-A Sepharose 4B-CL, and Sepharose 6B-CL, and immobilized on CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B. (2) Following immobilization via two of the six subunits, L-alanine dehydrogenase retained 66% of the specific activity of the soluble enzyme. The affinity of the immobilized enzyme for NH4+, pyruvate and L-alanine, was not different to that of the soluble form. The Km of the Sepharose-bound L-alanine dehydrogenase for pyridine coenzymes was 6-8-times higher than in the soluble case. (3) The stability of L-alanine dehydrogenase towards urea or thermal denaturation was increased by immobilization. (4) The incubation at 37 degrees C for 24 h of the immobilized L-alanine dehydrogenase with 3 M NH4Cl/NH4OH buffer (pH 9) released 70% of the enzyme. The specific activity and the affinity of the 'solubilized' L-alanine dehydrogenase for the pyridine coenzymes was the same as that obtained with the original, soluble L-alanine dehydrogenase. PMID:6404304

  16. Polymerization of alanine in the presence of a non-swelling montmorillonite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paecht-Horowitz, M.; Lahav, N.

    1977-01-01

    Alanine, starting from alanine-adenylate, has been polymerized in the presence of non-swelling Al-montmorillonite. The yield of polymerization is much lower than that obtained in the presence of swelling Na-montmorillonite. The possibility that the changing interlayer spacing in Na-montmorillonite might be responsible for its catalytic properties, is discussed.

  17. Initiation of Spore Germination in Bacillus subtilis: Relationship to Inhibition of l-Alanine Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Chandan

    1974-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of anthranilic acid esters (methyl anthranilate and N-methyl anthranilate) on the l-alanine-induced initiation of spore germination was examined in Bacillus subtilis 168. Methyl anthranilate irreversibly inhibited alanine initiation by a competitive mechanism. In its presence, the inhibition could be reversed only by the combined addition of d-glucose, d-fructose, and K+. Both l-alanine dehydrogenase and l-glutamate-pyruvate transaminase, enzymes which catalyze the first reaction in l-alanine metabolism, were competitively inhibited by methyl anthranilate. The Ki values for germination initiation (0.053 mM) and of l-glutamate-pyruvate transaminase (0.068 mM) were similar, whereas that for l-alanine dehydrogenase (0.4 mM) was six to seven times higher. Since a mutant lacking l-alanine dehydrogenase activity germinated normally in l-alanine alone, it is speculated that the major pathway of l-alanine metabolism during initiation may be via transmination reaction. PMID:4212093

  18. Structure-based design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of Leu-Arg dipeptide analogs as novel hepsin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hongmok; Kim, YunHye; Park, Kieung; Choi, Soo An; Son, Sang-Hyun; Byun, Youngjoo

    2016-01-15

    Hepsin, a type II transmembrane serine protease, is an attractive protein as a potential therapeutic and diagnostic biomarker for prostate cancer because it is highly up-regulated in prostate cancer and promotes both progression and metastasis. Starting from the reported tetrapeptide hepsin inhibitor Ac-KQLR-ketothiazole (kt) (1), we investigated the minimal structural requirements for hepsin inhibitory activity by truncating amino acids at the N-terminus. The kt and ketobenzothiazole (kbt) dipeptide analogs Ac-LR-kt (3) and Ac-LR-kbt (15) were found to be potent hepsin inhibitors, exhibiting Ki values of 22nM and 3nM, respectively. The present work suggests that LR-containing dipeptide molecules could be useful as lead compounds for the development of novel hepsin inhibitors. PMID:26711145

  19. Thermal decomposition behavior of potassium and sodium jarosite synthesized in the presence of methylamine and alanine

    SciTech Connect

    J. Michelle Kotler; Nancy W. Hinman; C. Doc Richardson; Jill R. Scott

    2010-10-01

    Biomolecules, methylamine and alanine, found associated with natural jarosite samples peaked the interest of astrobiologists and planetary geologists. How the biomolecules are associated with jarosite remains unclear although the mechanism could be important for detecting biosignatures in the rock record on Earth and other planets. A series of thermal gravimetric experiments using synthetic K-jarosite and Na-jarosite were conducted to determine if thermal analysis could differentiate physical mixtures of alanine and methylamine with jarosite from samples where the methylamine or alanine was incorporated into the synthesis procedure. Physical mixtures and synthetic experiments with methylamine and alanine could be differentiated from one another and from the standards by thermal analysis for both the K-jarosite and Na-jarosite end-member suites. Changes included shifts in on-set temperatures, total temperature changes from on-set to final, and the presence of indicator peaks for methylamine and alanine in the physical mixture experiments.

  20. Excited state electron distribution and role of the terminal amine in acidic and basic tryptophan dipeptide fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenberg, Azaria S.; Nathan, Moshe; Juszczak, Laura J.

    2016-08-01

    The results of quantum yield (QY) study of tryptophanyl glutamate (Trp-Glu), tryptophanyl lysine (Trp-Lys) and lysinyl tryptophan (Lys-Trp) dipeptides over the pH range, 1.5-13, show that the charge state of the N-terminal amine, and not the nominal molecular charge determines the QY. When the terminal amine is protonated, QY is low (10-2) for all three dipeptides. As the terminal amine cation is found proximal to the indole ring in Trp-Glu and Trp-Lys conformers but not in those for Lys-Trp, its effect may lie only in the partitioning of energy between nonradiative processes, not on QY reduction. QY is also low when both the N-terminal amine and indole amine are deprotonated. These two low QY states can be distinguished by fluorescence lifetime measurement. Molecular dynamics simulation shows that the Chi 1 conformers persist for tens of nanoseconds such that 100-101 ns lifetimes may be associated with individual Chi 1 conformers. The ground state electron density or isosurface of high QY (0.30) 3-methyindole has a uniform electron density over the indole ring as do the higher QY Trp dipeptide conformers. This validates the association of ground state isosurfaces with QY. Excited state orbitals from calculated high intensity, low energy absorption transitions are typically centered over the indole ring for higher QY dipeptide species and off the ring in lower QY species. Thus excited state orbitals substantiate the earlier finding that the ground state isosurface charge density pattern on the indole ring can be predictive of QY.

  1. Expression, purification, and characterization of alanine racemase from Pseudomonas putida YZ-26.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Lin; Liu, Xiao-Qin; Shi, Ya-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Alanine racemase catalyzes the interconversion of D: - and L: -alanine and plays an important role in supplying D: -alanine, a component of peptidoglycan biosynthesis, to most bacteria. Alanine racemase exists mostly in prokaryotes and is generally absent in higher eukaryotes; this makes it an attractive target for the design of new antibacterial drugs. Here, we present the cloning and characterization of a new gene-encoding alanine racemase from Pseudomonas putida YZ-26. An open reading frame (ORF) of 1,230 bp, encoding a protein of 410 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 44,217.3 Da, was cloned into modified vector pET32M to form the recombinant plasmid pET-alr. After introduction into E.coli BL21, the strain pET-alr/E.coli BL21 expressed His(6)-tagged alanine racemase. The recombinant alanine racemase was efficiently purified to homogeneity using Ni(2+)-NTA and a gel filtration column, with 82.5% activity recovery. The amino acid sequence deduced from the alanine racemase gene revealed identity similarities of 97.0, 93, 23, and 22.0% with from P. putida F1, P. putida200, P. aeruginosa, and Salmonella typhimurium, respectively. The recombinant alanine racemase is a monomeric protein with a molecular mass of 43 kDa. The enzyme exhibited activity with L: -alanine and L: -isoleucine, and showed higher specificity for the former compared with the latter. The enzyme was stable from pH 7.0-11.0; its optimum pH was at 9.0. The optimum temperature for the enzyme was 37°C, and its activity was rapidly lost at temperatures above 40°C. Divalent metals, including Sr(2+), Mn(2+), Co(2+), and Ni(2+) obviously enhanced enzymatic activity, while the Cu(2+) ion showed inhibitory effects. PMID:22806802

  2. Alanylglutamine dipeptide and growth hormone maintain PepT1-mediated transport in oxidatively stressed Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Alteheld, B; Evans, M E; Gu, L H; Ganapathy, V; Leibach, F H; Jones, D P; Ziegler, T R

    2005-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by gut mucosal cells during conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may impair mucosal repair and nutrient transport/absorptive function. Absorption of di- and tripeptides in the small intestine and colon is mediated by the H(+)-dependent transporter PepT1, but effects of oxidative stress on di- and tripeptide transport are unknown. We assessed whether exposure to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) influences dipeptide transport in human colonic epithelial (Caco-2) cells. Uptake of [(14)C]glycylsarcosine (Gly-Sar) was used to evaluate PepT1-mediated dipeptide transport. Exposure to 1-5 mmol/L H(2)O(2) for 24 h caused a dose-dependent decrease in Gly-Sar transport, which was associated with decreased PepT1 transport velocity (V(max)). Treatment with alanylglutamine (Ala-Gln) or growth hormone (GH) did not alter Caco-2 Gly-Sar transport in the absence of H(2)O(2). However, both Ala-Gln and GH prevented the decrease in dipeptide transport observed with 1 mmol/L H(2)O(2) treatment. Ala-Gln, but not GH, maintained cellular glutathione and prevented the decrease in PepT1 protein expression. Thus, these agents should be further investigated as potential therapies to improve absorption of small peptides in disorders associated with oxidative injury to the gut mucosa. PMID:15623827

  3. [THE REGULATING EFFECT OF DIPEPTIDES ON CELL PROLIFERATION IN NERVE TISSUE CULTURE IN MAMMALS AND ON ASSOCIATIVE LEARNING IN INSECTS].

    PubMed

    Chalisova, N I; Zachepilo, T G; Kamyshev, N G; Lopatina, N G

    2015-01-01

    The effect of dipeptides AspPro and AspSer and of their composing amino acids (asparagine acid--Asp, proline--Pro, serin--Ser) on the proliferative activity in the explants of cortex and subcortical structures of the rat brain and on the functional activity of CNS of the honeybee was studied. The square index defined as a proportion of the whole explant square to the square of its central zone was determined. The number of bees responded with the conditional reaction (proboscis extension in the direction to aromatized solution) after 1 min (short-term memory) and 180 min (long-term memory) was detected after single learning procedure. Both dipeptides, as well as the asparagine acid, stimulated an increase of the growth zone of the subcortical structure explants in rats and of the number of honeybees with retention of conditional reaction in the short-term/long-term memory independently of the effect of the second member of the dipeptide. The unidirectionality of the effect suggests the existence of common mechanisms of reception and signal transduction established during evolution that require the further study. PMID:26983279

  4. Quantitative mass spectrometric analysis of dipeptides in protein hydrolysate by a TNBS derivatization-aided standard addition method.

    PubMed

    Hanh, Vu Thi; Kobayashi, Yutaro; Maebuchi, Motohiro; Nakamori, Toshihiro; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Matsui, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish, through a standard addition method, a convenient quantification assay for dipeptides (GY, YG, SY, YS, and IY) in soybean hydrolysate using 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonate (TNBS) derivatization-aided LC-TOF-MS. Soybean hydrolysate samples (25.0 mg mL(-1)) spiked with target standards were subjected to TNBS derivatization. Under the optimal LC-MS conditions, five target dipeptides derivatized with TNBS were successfully detected. Examination of the standard addition curves, with a correlation coefficient of r(2) > 0.979, provided a reliable quantification of the target dipeptides, GY, YG, SY, YS, and IY, in soybean hydrolysate to be 424 ± 20, 184 ± 9, 2188 ± 199, 327 ± 16, and 2211 ± 133 μg g(-1) of hydrolysate, respectively. The proposed LC-MS assay is a reliable and convenient assay method, with no interference from matrix effects in hydrolysate, and with no requirement for the use of an isotope labeled internal standard. PMID:26212980

  5. Calibration of helical tomotherapy machine using EPR/alanine dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Perichon, Nicolas; Garcia, Tristan; Francois, Pascal; Lourenco, Valerie; Lesven, Caroline; Bordy, Jean-Marc

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: Current codes of practice for clinical reference dosimetry of high-energy photon beams in conventional radiotherapy recommend using a 10x10 cm{sup 2} square field, with the detector at a reference depth of 10 cm in water and 100 cm source to surface distance (SSD) (AAPM TG-51) or 100 cm source-to-axis distance (SAD) (IAEA TRS-398). However, the maximum field size of a helical tomotherapy (HT) machine is 40x5 cm{sup 2} defined at 85 cm SAD. These nonstandard conditions prevent a direct implementation of these protocols. The purpose of this study is twofold: To check the absorbed dose in water and dose rate calibration of a tomotherapy unit as well as the accuracy of the tomotherapy treatment planning system (TPS) calculations for a specific test case. Method: Both topics are based on the use of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) using alanine as transfer dosimeter between the Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNHB) {sup 60}Co-{gamma}-ray reference beam and the Institut Curie's HT beam. Irradiations performed in the LNHB reference {sup 60}Co-{gamma}-ray beam allowed setting up the calibration method, which was then implemented and tested at the LNHB 6 MV linac x-ray beam, resulting in a deviation of 1.6% (at a 1% standard uncertainty) relative to the reference value determined with the standard IAEA TRS-398 protocol. Results: HT beam dose rate estimation shows a difference of 2% with the value stated by the manufacturer at a 2% standard uncertainty. A 4% deviation between measured dose and the calculation from the tomotherapy TPS was found. The latter was originated by an inadequate representation of the phantom CT-scan values and, consequently, mass densities within the phantom. This difference has been explained by the mass density values given by the CT-scan and used by the TPS which were not the true ones. Once corrected using Monte Carlo N-Particle simulations to validate the accuracy of this process, the difference between corrected TPS

  6. Chiral selectivity of amino acid adsorption on chiral surfaces—The case of alanine on Pt

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, J.-H.; Kosov, D. S.

    2015-02-07

    We study the binding pattern of the amino acid alanine on the naturally chiral Pt surfaces Pt(531), Pt(321), and Pt(643). These surfaces are all vicinal to the (111) direction but have different local environments of their kink sites and are thus a model for realistic roughened Pt surfaces. Alanine has only a single methyl group attached to its chiral center, which makes the number of possible binding conformations computationally tractable. Additionally, only the amine and carboxyl group are expected to interact strongly with the Pt substrate. On Pt(531), we study the molecule in its pristine as well as its deprotonated form and find that the deprotonated one is more stable by 0.47 eV. Therefore, we study the molecule in its deprotonated form on Pt(321) and Pt(643). As expected, the oxygen and nitrogen atoms of the deprotonated molecule provide a local binding “tripod” and the most stable adsorption configurations optimize the interaction of this “tripod” with undercoordinated surface atoms. However, the interaction of the methyl group plays an important role: it induces significant chiral selectivity of about 60 meV on all surfaces. Hereby, the L-enantiomer adsorbs preferentially to the Pt(321){sup S} and Pt(643){sup S} surfaces, while the D-enantiomer is more stable on Pt(531){sup S}. The binding energies increase with increasing surface density of kink sites, i.e., they are largest for Pt(531){sup S} and smallest for Pt(643){sup S}.

  7. Identification of a mutation affecting an alanine-alpha-ketoisovalerate transaminase activity in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Falkinham, J O

    1979-10-01

    A mutation affecting alanine-alpha-ketoisovalerate transaminase activity has been shown to be cotransducible with ilv gene cluster. The transaminase deficiency results in conditional isoleucine auxotrophy in the presence of alanine. PMID:396446

  8. Epimerization of Alanyl-Alanine Induced by γ-Rays Irradiation in Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munegumi, Toratane

    2016-05-01

    Living organisms have homochiral L-amino acids in proteins and homochiral D-mononucleotides in nucleic acids. The chemical evolutionary process to protein homochirality has been discussed for many years. Although many scenarios have been proposed for homochirality in the monomeric compounds, homochirality in amino acids and mononucleotides does not always guarantee homochirality in polypeptides and polynucleotides. Integrated scenarios containing the pathways from monomer to polymer should be proposed because in the pathways oligomers and polymers as well as monomers racemize (or epimerize), degrade, and condense. This research addresses epimerization and degradation of dipeptides under γ-rays irradiation by a cobalt-60 (60Co) radiation source. The different rate constants of epimerization between diastereomeric dipeptides in the research suggest that the potential pathway toward homochirality could be much more complex.

  9. Competing Noncovalent Host-guest Interactions and H/D Exchange: Reactions of Benzyloxycarbonyl-Proline Glycine Dipeptide Variants with ND3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miladi, Mahsan; Olaitan, Abayomi D.; Zekavat, Behrooz; Solouki, Touradj

    2015-11-01

    A combination of density functional theory calculations, hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) reactions, ion mobility-mass spectrometry, and isotope labeling tandem mass spectrometry was used to study gas-phase "host-guest" type interactions of a benzyloxycarbonyl (Z)-capped proline (P) glycine (G) model dipeptide (i.e., Z-PG) and its various structural analogues with ND3. It is shown that in a solvent-free environment, structural differences between protonated and alkali metal ion (Na+, K+, or Cs+)-complexed species of Z-PG affect ND3 adduct formation. Specifically, [Z-PG + H]+ and [Z-PG-OCH3 + H]+ formed gas-phase ND3 adducts ([Z-PG (or Z-PG-OCH3) + H + ND3]+) but no ND3 adducts were observed for [Z-PG + alkali metal]+ or [Z-PG + H - CO2]+. Experimentally measured and theoretically calculated collision cross sections (CCSs) of protonated and alkali metal ion-complexed Z-PG species showed similar trends that agreed with the observed structural differences from molecular modeling results. Moreover, results from theoretical ND3 affinity calculations were consistent with experimental HDX observations, indicating a more stable ND3 adduct for [Z-PG + H]+ compared to [Z-PG + alkali metal]+ species. Molecular modeling and experimental MS results for [Z-PG + H]+ and [Z-PG + alkali metal]+ suggest that optimized cation-π and hydrogen bonding interactions of carbonyl groups in final products are important for ND3 adduct formation.

  10. Folding simulations of alanine-based peptides with lysine residues.

    PubMed Central

    Sung, S S

    1995-01-01

    The folding of short alanine-based peptides with different numbers of lysine residues is simulated at constant temperature (274 K) using the rigid-element Monte Carlo method. The solvent-referenced potential has prevented the multiple-minima problem in helix folding. From various initial structures, the peptides with three lysine residues fold into helix-dominated conformations with the calculated average helicity in the range of 60-80%. The peptide with six lysine residues shows only 8-14% helicity. These results agree well with experimental observations. The intramolecular electrostatic interaction of the charged lysine side chains and their electrostatic hydration destabilize the helical conformations of the peptide with six lysine residues, whereas these effects on the peptides with three lysine residues are small. The simulations provide insight into the helix-folding mechanism, including the beta-bend intermediate in helix initiation, the (i, i + 3) hydrogen bonds, the asymmetrical helix propagation, and the asymmetrical helicities in the N- and C-terminal regions. These findings are consistent with previous studies. PMID:7756550

  11. Alanine-EPR as a transfer standard dosimetry system for low energy X radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoury, H. J.; da Silva, E. J.; Mehta, K.; de Barros, V. S.; Asfora, V. K.; Guzzo, P. L.; Parker, A. G.

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the use of alanine-EPR as a transfer standard dosimetry system for low energy X radiation, such as that in RS-2400, which operates in the range from 25 to 150 kV and 2 to 45 mA. Two types of alanine dosimeters were investigated. One is a commercial alanine pellets from Aérial-Centre de Ressources Technologiques, France and one was prepared in our laboratory (LMRI-DEN/UFPE). The EPR spectra of the irradiated dosimeters were recorded in the Nuclear Energy Department of UFPE, using a Bruker EMX10 EPR spectrometer operating in the X-band. The alanine-EPR dosimetry system was calibrated in the range of 20-220 Gy in this X-ray field, against an ionization chamber calibrated at the relevant X-ray energy with traceability to PTB. The results showed that both alanine dosimeters presented a linear dose response the same sensitivity, when the EPR signal was normalized to alanine mass. The total uncertainty in the measured dose was estimated to be about 3%. The results indicate that it is possible to use the alanine-EPR dosimetry system for validation of a low-energy X ray irradiator, such as RS-2400.

  12. Sodium dependency of L-alanine absorption in canine Thiry-Vella loops.

    PubMed

    Fleshler, B; Nelson, R A

    1970-03-01

    The effect of sodium on the absorption of L-alanine in vivo was tested by measuring the absorption of L-alanine from Thiry-Vella loops in dogs. Solutions containing L-alanine (10 or 50 mM) sodium at concentrations of 0, 74, or 145 m-equiv/1 and mannitol, as needed to maintain isotonicity were instilled into the loops for 10 minutes. Similar studies were done with L-alanine 50 mM and either 0 or 145 m-equiv/1 of sodium for five minutes. Under all conditions absorption of alanine was significantly less from the solution initially free of sodium. Although these differences were statistically significant, the physiological significance was not great since the actual differences in amounts of L-alanine absorbed were small. Insorption of sodium was low from the fluid which initially had no sodium, but exsorption proceeded rapidly and was unaffected by the luminal sodium concentration. This resulted in a rapid rise of intraluminal sodium concentration when no sodium was initially present. This persistent exsorption of sodium was, therefore, adequate to provide sodium in the lumen to activate the sodium-dependent carrier, postulated on the basis of studies in vitro. These data in vivo are consistent with the view that sodium at the intraluminal surface is important in accelerating amino acid transport, but indicate that in the absence of added intraluminal sodium the gut mucosa itself, under normal circumstances, provides the sodium needed for L-alanine absorption. PMID:5423904

  13. Mitochondrial defects associated with β-alanine toxicity: relevance to hyper-beta-alaninemia.

    PubMed

    Shetewy, Aza; Shimada-Takaura, Kayoko; Warner, Danielle; Jong, Chian Ju; Mehdi, Abu-Bakr Al; Alexeyev, Mikhail; Takahashi, Kyoko; Schaffer, Stephen W

    2016-05-01

    Hyper-beta-alaninemia is a rare metabolic condition that results in elevated plasma and urinary β-alanine levels and is characterized by neurotoxicity, hypotonia, and respiratory distress. It has been proposed that at least some of the symptoms are caused by oxidative stress; however, only limited information is available on the mechanism of reactive oxygen species generation. The present study examines the hypothesis that β-alanine reduces cellular levels of taurine, which are required for normal respiratory chain function; cellular taurine depletion is known to reduce respiratory function and elevate mitochondrial superoxide generation. To test the taurine hypothesis, isolated neonatal rat cardiomyocytes and mouse embryonic fibroblasts were incubated with medium lacking or containing β-alanine. β-alanine treatment led to mitochondrial superoxide accumulation in conjunction with a decrease in oxygen consumption. The defect in β-alanine-mediated respiratory function was detected in permeabilized cells exposed to glutamate/malate but not in cells utilizing succinate, suggesting that β-alanine leads to impaired complex I activity. Taurine treatment limited mitochondrial superoxide generation, supporting a role for taurine in maintaining complex I activity. Also affected by taurine is mitochondrial morphology, as β-alanine-treated fibroblasts undergo fragmentation, a sign of unhealthy mitochondria that is reversed by taurine treatment. If left unaltered, β-alanine-treated fibroblasts also undergo mitochondrial apoptosis, as evidenced by activation of caspases 3 and 9 and the initiation of the mitochondrial permeability transition. Together, these data show that β-alanine mediates changes that reduce ATP generation and enhance oxidative stress, factors that contribute to heart failure. PMID:27023909

  14. Characterization of the l-alanine exporter AlaE of Escherichia coli and its potential role in protecting cells from a toxic-level accumulation of l-alanine and its derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seryoung; Ihara, Kohei; Katsube, Satoshi; Hori, Hatsuhiro; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Yoneyama, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that the alaE gene of Escherichia coli encodes the l-alanine exporter AlaE. The objective of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of the AlaE exporter. The minimum inhibitory concentration of l-alanine and l-alanyl-l-alanine in alaE-deficient l-alanine-nonmetabolizing cells MLA301ΔalaE was 4- and >4000-fold lower, respectively, than in the alaE-positive parent cells MLA301, suggesting that AlaE functions as an efflux pump to avoid a toxic-level accumulation of intracellular l-alanine and its derivatives. Furthermore, the growth of the alaE-deficient mutant derived from the l-alanine-metabolizing strain was strongly inhibited in the presence of a physiological level of l-alanyl-l-alanine. Intact MLA301ΔalaE and MLA301ΔalaE/pAlaE cells producing plasmid-borne AlaE, accumulated approximately 200% and 50%, respectively, of the [3H]l-alanine detected in MLA301 cells, suggesting that AlaE exports l-alanine. When 200 mmol/L l-alanine-loaded inverted membrane vesicles prepared from MLA301ΔalaE/pAlaE were placed in a solution containing 200 mmol/L or 0.34 μmol/L l-alanine, energy-dependent [3H]l-alanine accumulation occurred under either condition. This energy-dependent uphill accumulation of [3H]l-alanine was strongly inhibited in the presence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone but not by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, suggesting that the AlaE-mediated l-alanine extrusion was driven by proton motive force. Based on these results, physiological roles of the l-alanine exporter are discussed. PMID:26073055

  15. Characterization of the l-alanine exporter AlaE of Escherichia coli and its potential role in protecting cells from a toxic-level accumulation of l-alanine and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seryoung; Ihara, Kohei; Katsube, Satoshi; Hori, Hatsuhiro; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Yoneyama, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    We previously reported that the alaE gene of Escherichia coli encodes the l-alanine exporter AlaE. The objective of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of the AlaE exporter. The minimum inhibitory concentration of l-alanine and l-alanyl-l-alanine in alaE-deficient l-alanine-nonmetabolizing cells MLA301ΔalaE was 4- and >4000-fold lower, respectively, than in the alaE-positive parent cells MLA301, suggesting that AlaE functions as an efflux pump to avoid a toxic-level accumulation of intracellular l-alanine and its derivatives. Furthermore, the growth of the alaE-deficient mutant derived from the l-alanine-metabolizing strain was strongly inhibited in the presence of a physiological level of l-alanyl-l-alanine. Intact MLA301ΔalaE and MLA301ΔalaE/pAlaE cells producing plasmid-borne AlaE, accumulated approximately 200% and 50%, respectively, of the [(3) H]l-alanine detected in MLA301 cells, suggesting that AlaE exports l-alanine. When 200 mmol/L l-alanine-loaded inverted membrane vesicles prepared from MLA301ΔalaE/pAlaE were placed in a solution containing 200 mmol/L or 0.34 μmol/L l-alanine, energy-dependent [(3) H]l-alanine accumulation occurred under either condition. This energy-dependent uphill accumulation of [(3) H]l-alanine was strongly inhibited in the presence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone but not by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, suggesting that the AlaE-mediated l-alanine extrusion was driven by proton motive force. Based on these results, physiological roles of the l-alanine exporter are discussed. PMID:26073055

  16. Quantitative analysis and clinico-pathological correlations of different dipeptide repeat protein pathologies in C9ORF72 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Ian R A; Frick, Petra; Grässer, Friedrich A; Gendron, Tania F; Petrucelli, Leonard; Cashman, Neil R; Edbauer, Dieter; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Prudlo, Johannes; Troost, Dirk; Neumann, Manuela

    2015-12-01

    Hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9ORF72 is the most common genetic cause of frontotemporal dementia and motor neuron disease. One consequence of the mutation is the formation of different potentially toxic polypeptides composed of dipeptide repeats (DPR) (poly-GA, -GP, -GR, -PA, -PR) generated by repeat-associated non-ATG (RAN) translation. While previous studies focusing on poly-GA pathology have failed to detect any clinico-pathological correlations in C9ORF72 mutation cases, recent data from animal and cell culture models suggested that it may be only specific DPR species that are toxic and only when accumulated in certain intracellular compartments. Therefore, we performed a systematic clinico-pathological correlative analysis with counting of actual numbers of distinct types of inclusion (neuronal cytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusions, dystrophic neurites) for each DPR protein in relevant brain regions (premotor cortex, lower motor neurons) in a cohort of 35 C9ORF72 mutation cases covering the clinical spectrum from those with pure MND, mixed FTD/MND and pure FTD. While each DPR protein pathology had a similar pattern of anatomical distribution, the total amount of inclusions for each DPR protein varied remarkably (poly-GA > GP > GR > PR/PA), indicating that RAN translation seems to be more effective from sense than from antisense transcripts. Importantly, with the exception of moderate associations for the amount of poly-GA-positive dystrophic neurites with degeneration in the frontal cortex and total burden of poly-GA pathology with disease onset, no relationship was identified for any other DPR protein pathology with degeneration or phenotype. Biochemical analysis revealed a close correlation between insoluble DPR protein species and numbers of visible inclusions, while we did not find any evidence for the presence of soluble DPR protein species. Thus, overall our findings strongly argue against a role of DPR protein aggregation as major and

  17. Stimulatory effects of muramyl dipeptide upon neutrophils isolated from a local bacterial infection.

    PubMed Central

    Lamont, P. M.; Maier, K. G.; Melton, L.; Polk, H. C.

    1987-01-01

    This study examined the effects of muramyl dipeptide (MDP) in vivo upon the local inflammatory response to a bacterial challenge. In addition to quantitative bacteriology of the tissues surrounding an infected suture, polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) involved in the local inflammatory response were extracted and estimations made of their number, viability and phagocytic activity. Fewer bacteria were recovered from the muscle around the suture in MDP-treated animals compared to placebo-treated controls (P less than 0.02), although there was no difference in the number of bacteria on the suture itself. Polymorphonuclear leucocytes were present in greater numbers (P less than 0.01), more PMNs were viable (P less than 0.01) and more PMNs had visibly phagocytosed bacteria (P less than 0.01) in the MDP group compared to the placebo group. These data indicate that MDP enhances the local inflammatory response to infection with increased influx, viability and phagocytic activity of PMNs, resulting in improved local control of a test bacterial challenge. PMID:3318904

  18. Circulating muramyl dipeptide is negatively associated with interleukin-10 in the frail elderly.

    PubMed

    Verschoor, Chris P; Naidoo, Avee; Wallace, Jessica G; Johnstone, Jennie; Loeb, Mark; Bramson, Jonathan L; Bowdish, Dawn Me

    2015-02-01

    Elevated levels of serum cytokines, a marker of immune activation and chronic inflammation, are commonly associated with age and are a significant risk factor for all-cause mortality in the elderly. This phenomenon is very similar to that exhibited by individuals with diseases of inflammatory etiology and chronic viral infections such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Although the origin of chronically elevated cytokines with age is unknown, for chronic diseases and viral infections, a role for circulating bacterial products and other pattern recognition receptor (PRR) ligands has been suggested. Given this, we sought to examine whether the levels of circulating cytokines (tumour necrosis factor (TNF), interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12) in the advanced-age, frail elderly (n = 135) correlated with plasma levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), muramyl dipeptide (MDP), 16S ribosomal DNA, total cell-free DNA and host-derived mitochondrial DNA. After adjusting for multiple testing, no associations between circulating products and donor age, sex or comorbidities were observed. However, a significant negative correlation between MDP and IL-10 was identified. Given the anti-inflammatory nature of IL-10, a negative relationship with a potent inflammatory agonist such as MDP is not surprising and suggests a potential role for circulating MDP in the propagation of age-related immune activation. PMID:25278013

  19. Trace Solvent as a Predominant Factor To Tune Dipeptide Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Liu, Kai; Yan, Linyin; Wang, Anhe; Bai, Shuo; Yan, Xuehai

    2016-02-23

    Solvent molecules such as water are of key importance for tuning self-assembly in biological systems. However, it remains a great challenge to detect the role of different types of noncovalent interactions between trace solvents and biomolecules such as peptides. In this work, we discover a dominant role of trace amounts of solvents for mediation of dipeptide self-assembly, in which solvent-bridged hydrogen bonding is demonstrated as a crucial force in directing fiber formation. Hydrogen-bond-forming solvents (including ethanol, N,N-dimethylformamide, and acetone) can affect the hydrogen bonding of C═O and N-H in diphenylalanine (FF) molecules with themselves, but this does not induce π-π stacking between FF molecules. The directional hydrogen bonding promotes a long-range-ordered arrangement of FF molecules, preferentially along one dimension to form nanofibers or nanobelts. Furthermore, we demonstrate that water with strong hydrogen-bond-forming capability can notably speed up structure formation with long-range order, revealing the importance of water as a trace solvent for regulation of persistent and robust fiber formation. PMID:26756339

  20. Human NOD2 Recognizes Structurally Unique Muramyl Dipeptides from Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Mirjam; Mahapatra, Sebabrata; Le, Phuonganh; Kim, Hee Jin; Choi, Aaron W; Brennan, Patrick J; Belisle, John T; Modlin, Robert L

    2016-09-01

    The innate immune system recognizes microbial pathogens via pattern recognition receptors. One such receptor, NOD2, via recognition of muramyl dipeptide (MDP), triggers a distinct network of innate immune responses, including the production of interleukin-32 (IL-32), which leads to the differentiation of monocytes into dendritic cells (DC). NOD2 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of human leprosy, yet it is not clear whether Mycobacterium leprae, which has a distinct MDP structure, can activate this pathway. We investigated the effect of MDP structure on the innate immune response, finding that infection of monocytes with M. leprae induces IL-32 and DC differentiation in a NOD2-dependent manner. The presence of the proximal l-Ala instead of Gly in the common configuration of the peptide side chain of M. leprae did not affect recognition by NOD2 or cytokine production. Furthermore, amidation of the d-Glu residue did not alter NOD2 activation. These data provide experimental evidence that NOD2 recognizes naturally occurring structural variants of MDP. PMID:27297389

  1. The dipeptide alanylphenylalanine ( H-Ala-Phe-OH) - protonation and coordination ability with Au(III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koleva, B. B.; Kolev, Ts.; Zareva, S. Y.; Spiteller, M.

    2007-04-01

    The dipeptide alanylphenylalanine ( H-Ala-Phe-OH), its hydrochloride ( HCl × H-Ala-Phe-OH) and Au(III)-complex have been characterized structurally. Quantum chemical DFT and ab initio calculations, solid-state linear-dichroic infrared (IR-LD) spectroscopy and 1H and 13C NMR data were employed. The results are confirmed by a single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of HCl × H-Ala-Phe-OH. The coordination with Au(III) is supported by data from MS, TGV, DSC methods and by elemental analysis. The H-Ala-Phe-OH coordinates in a bidentate manner via an O-atom of the COO --group and N-amide nitrogen, after a previous deprotonation of the NH-group has taken place. Two Cl - ions are attached to the metal center as terminal ligands, yielding a completely planar geometry for the AuNOCl 2 chromophor in the mononuclear [Au(( H-Ala-Phe-OH)H -1)Cl 2] complex.

  2. Antihypertensive effects of silk fibroin hydrolysate by alcalase and purification of an ACE inhibitory dipeptide.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fengjuan; Xue, Zhaohui; Wang, Jiehua

    2010-06-01

    Silk fibroin, which is normally discarded as an industrial byproduct in clothing plants, was hydrolyzed with alcalase. Angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities of the silk fibroin hydrolysates (SFH) were investigated, and the hydrolysate with hydrolysis degree of 17% exhibited the highest ACE inhibitory activity. At the tested 600 mg/kg.d and 1200 mg/kg x d doses, SFH significantly lowered blood pressure of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) after chronic oral administration. SFH was further purified using consecutive chromatographic methods on Sephadex G-15 column and reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) on an octadecylsilane column. After its purity was confirmed by analytical RP-HPLC and capillary electrophoresis, one ACE inhibitory dipeptide was isolated, and its molecular mass and amino acid sequence were determined as 238.2 Da and Gly-Tyr, respectively, by LC-ESI/MS. The results of this study suggest that silk fibroin byproducts have the possibility to become an effective source for ACE inhibitory peptides. PMID:20481470

  3. Bacterial Muramyl Dipeptide (MDP) Restricts Human Cytomegalovirus Replication via an IFN-β-Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Arun; Fan, Yi-Hsin; Arav-Boger, Ravit

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported that induction of NOD2 by human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) resulted in virus inhibition and upregulation of antiviral and inflammatory cytokines. Here we investigated the effects of muramyl dipeptide (MDP), a bacterial cell wall component that activates NOD2, on HCMV replication and antiviral responses. HCMV infection of human foreskin fibroblasts induced NOD2, the downstream receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 2 (RIPK2), resulting in phosphorylation of TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) and interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). MDP treatment following infection at low multiplicity (MOI = 0.1 PFU/cell) inhibited HCMV in a dose-dependent manner and further induced phosphorylation of TBK1, IRF3 and expression of IFN-β. None of these effects of MDP were observed following infection at multiplicity of 1. In infected NOD2 knocked-down cells MDP did not induce IFN-β, irrespective of MOI. Treatment with MDP before infection also inhibited HCMV, an effect augmented with treatment duration. Treatment with an IFN-β receptor blocking antibody or knockdown of IFN-β significantly attenuated the inhibitory effect of MDP on HCMV. MDP treatment before or after infection with herpesvirus 1 did not inhibit its replication. Summarized, NOD2 activation exerts anti-HCMV activities predominantly via IFN-β. Since MDP is a bacterial cell wall component, ongoing microbial exposure may influence HCMV replication. PMID:26830977

  4. Rational Design of Chiral Nanostructures from Self-Assembly of a Ferrocene-Modified Dipeptide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuefei; Qi, Wei; Huang, Renliang; Yang, Xuejiao; Wang, Mengfan; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2015-06-24

    We report a new paradigm for the rational design of chiral nanostructures that is based on the hierarchical self-assembly of a ferrocene (Fc)-modified dipeptide, ferrocene-L-Phe-L-Phe-OH (Fc-FF). Compared to other chiral self-assembling systems, Fc-FF is unique because of its smaller size, biocompatibility, multiple functions (a redox center), and environmental responsiveness. X-ray and spectroscopic analyses showed that the incorporation of counterions during the hierarchical self-assembly of Fc-FF changed the conformations of the secondary structures from flat β sheets into twisted β sheets. This approach enables chiral self-assembly and the formation of well-defined chiral nanostructures composed of helical twisted β sheets. We identified two elementary forms for the helical twist of the β sheets, which allowed us to create a rich variety of rigid chiral nanostructures over a wide range of scales. Furthermore, through subtle modulations in the counterions, temperature, and solvent, we are able to precisely control the helical pitch, diameter, and handedness of the self-assembled chiral nanostructures. This unprecedented level of control not only offers insights into how rationally designed chiral nanostructures can be formed from simple molecular building blocks but also is of significant practical value for the use in chiroptics, templates, chiral sensing, and separations. PMID:26018930

  5. Human NOD2 Recognizes Structurally Unique Muramyl Dipeptides from Mycobacterium leprae

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, Mirjam; Mahapatra, Sebabrata; Le, Phuonganh; Kim, Hee Jin; Choi, Aaron W.; Brennan, Patrick J.; Belisle, John T.

    2016-01-01

    The innate immune system recognizes microbial pathogens via pattern recognition receptors. One such receptor, NOD2, via recognition of muramyl dipeptide (MDP), triggers a distinct network of innate immune responses, including the production of interleukin-32 (IL-32), which leads to the differentiation of monocytes into dendritic cells (DC). NOD2 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of human leprosy, yet it is not clear whether Mycobacterium leprae, which has a distinct MDP structure, can activate this pathway. We investigated the effect of MDP structure on the innate immune response, finding that infection of monocytes with M. leprae induces IL-32 and DC differentiation in a NOD2-dependent manner. The presence of the proximal l-Ala instead of Gly in the common configuration of the peptide side chain of M. leprae did not affect recognition by NOD2 or cytokine production. Furthermore, amidation of the d-Glu residue did not alter NOD2 activation. These data provide experimental evidence that NOD2 recognizes naturally occurring structural variants of MDP. PMID:27297389

  6. Immunostimulant activities of a lipophilic muramyl dipeptide derivative and of desmuramyl peptidolipid analogs.

    PubMed Central

    Parant, M A; Audibert, F M; Chedid, L A; Level, M R; Lefrancier, P L; Choay, J P; Lederer, E

    1980-01-01

    The immunostimulant properties of a new muramyl dipeptide (MDP) derivative bearing a lipophilic moiety on the C-terminal end of the peptide chain are described. It is shown, in particular, that 1,O-(acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine-L-alanyl)-glycerol-3-mycolate had increased immunostimulant activity in comparison with MDP. It induced hypersensitivity even when administered with an antigen in saline, and it gave higher protection against bacterial infections than did MDP. A quite unexpected finding was obtained with the corresponding desmuramyl compound 1,O-(L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine-L-alanyl)-glycerol-3-mycolate, which had no activity in producing humoral antibodies but was just as active as the muramic acid-containing compound in stimulating nonspecific resistance to bacterial infections. It was not pyrogenic. Modifications of the peptide moiety or the lipid moiety of this peptidolipid led to decrease, or even loss, of activity. These results show the importance of the N-acetylmuramyl moiety in MDP for humoral antibody production. The peptidolipid 1,O-(L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine-L-alanyl)-glycerol-3-mycolate is the first member of a new category of nonspecific immunostimulants. PMID:7380554

  7. GMXPBSA 2.0: A GROMACS tool to perform MM/PBSA and computational alanine scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paissoni, C.; Spiliotopoulos, D.; Musco, G.; Spitaleri, A.

    2014-11-01

    provisions: GNU General Public License, version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 185 937 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 7 074 217 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Bash, Perl. Computer: Any computer. Operating system: Linux, Unix OS. RAM: ˜2 GB Classification: 3. External routines: APBS (http://www.Poissonboltzmann.org/apbs/) and GROMACS installations (http://www.gromacs.org). Optionally LaTeX. Nature of problem: Calculates the Molecular Mechanics (MM) data (Lennard-Jones and Coulomb terms) and the solvation energy terms (polar and nonpolar terms respectively) from an ensemble of structures derived from GROMACS molecular dynamics simulation trajectory. These calculations are performed for each single component of the simulated complex, including protein and ligand. In order to cancel out artefacts an identical grid setup for each component, including complex, protein and ligand, is required. Performs statistical analysis on the extracted data and comparison with wild-type complex in case of either computational alanine scanning or calculations on a set of simulations. Evaluates possible outliers in the frames extracted from the simulations during the binding free energy calculations. Solution method: extract frames from a single or multiple complex molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, allowing comparison between multiple trajectories; split the complex frames in the single components including complex, protein and ligand; calculate the Lennard-Jones and Coulomb energy values (MM terms); calculate the polar solvation energy values using the implicit solvation Poisson-Boltzmann model (PB); calculate the nonpolar solvation energy value based on the solvent accessible surface area (SASA); combine all the calculated terms into the final binding free energy value; repeat the same procedure from point 1 to 6 for each simulation in case of computational alanine scanning (CAS) or simultaneous comparison

  8. Corynebacterium glutamicum ggtB encodes a functional γ-glutamyl transpeptidase with γ-glutamyl dipeptide synthetic and hydrolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Walter, Frederik; Grenz, Sebastian; Ortseifen, Vera; Persicke, Marcus; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2016-08-20

    In this work the role of γ-glutamyl transpeptidase in the metabolism of γ-glutamyl dipeptides produced by Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 was studied. The enzyme is encoded by the gene ggtB (cg1090) and synthesized as a 657 amino acids long preprotein. Gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase activity was found to be associated with intact cells of C. glutamicum and was abolished upon deletion of ggtB. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that the enzyme is a lipoprotein and is attached to the outer side of the cytoplasmic membrane. Biochemical parameters of recombinant GgtB were determined using the chromogenic substrate γ-glutamyl-p-nitroanilide. Highest activity of the enzyme was measured in sodium bicarbonate buffer at pH 9.6 and 45°C. The KM value was 123μM. GgtB catalyzed the concentration-dependent synthesis and hydrolysis of γ-glutamyl dipeptides and showed strong glutaminase activity. The intracellular concentrations of five γ-glutamyl dipeptides (γ-Glu-Glu, γ-Glu-Gln, γ-Glu-Val, γ-Glu-Leu, γ-Glu-Met) were determined by HPLC-MS and ranged from 0.15 to 0.4mg/g CDW after exponential growth in minimal media. Although deletion and overexpression of ggtB had significant effects on intracellular dipeptide concentrations, it was neither essential for biosynthesis nor catabolism of these dipeptides in vivo. PMID:26528625

  9. Cellular and Physiological Effects of Dietary Supplementation with β-Hydroxy-β-Methylbutyrate (HMB) and β-Alanine in Late Middle-Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vallejo, Julian; Spence, Madoka; Cheng, An-Lin; Brotto, Leticia; Edens, Neile K.; Garvey, Sean M.; Brotto, Marco

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that severe decline of skeletal muscle mass and function with age may be mitigated by exercise and dietary supplementation with protein and amino acid ingredient technologies. The purposes of this study were to examine the effects of the leucine catabolite, beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB), in C2C12 myoblasts and myotubes, and to investigate the effects of dietary supplementation with HMB, the amino acid β-alanine and the combination thereof, on muscle contractility in a preclinical model of pre-sarcopenia. In C2C12 myotubes, HMB enhanced sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium release beyond vehicle control in the presence of all SR agonists tested (KCl, P<0.01; caffeine, P = 0.03; ionomycin, P = 0.03). HMB also improved C2C12 myoblast viability (25 μM HMB, P = 0.03) and increased proliferation (25 μM HMB, P = 0.04; 125 μM HMB, P<0.01). Furthermore, an ex vivo muscle contractility study was performed on EDL and soleus muscle from 19 month old, male C57BL/6nTac mice. For 8 weeks, mice were fed control AIN-93M diet, diet with HMB, diet with β-alanine, or diet with HMB and β-alanine. In β-alanine fed mice, EDL muscle showed a 7% increase in maximum absolute force compared to the control diet (202 ± 3vs. 188± 5 mN, P = 0.02). At submaximal frequency of stimulation (20 Hz), EDL from mice fed HMB plus β-alanine showed an 11% increase in absolute force (88.6 ± 2.2 vs. 79.8 ± 2.4 mN, P = 0.025) and a 13% increase in specific force (12.2 ± 0.4 vs. 10.8 ± 0.4 N/cm2, P = 0.021). Also in EDL muscle, β-alanine increased the rate of force development at all frequencies tested (P<0.025), while HMB reduced the time to reach peak contractile force (TTP), with a significant effect at 80 Hz (P = 0.0156). In soleus muscle, all experimental diets were associated with a decrease in TTP, compared to control diet. Our findings highlight beneficial effects of HMB and β-alanine supplementation on skeletal muscle function in aging mice. PMID

  10. Cellular and Physiological Effects of Dietary Supplementation with β-Hydroxy-β-Methylbutyrate (HMB) and β-Alanine in Late Middle-Aged Mice.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Julian; Spence, Madoka; Cheng, An-Lin; Brotto, Leticia; Edens, Neile K; Garvey, Sean M; Brotto, Marco

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that severe decline of skeletal muscle mass and function with age may be mitigated by exercise and dietary supplementation with protein and amino acid ingredient technologies. The purposes of this study were to examine the effects of the leucine catabolite, beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB), in C2C12 myoblasts and myotubes, and to investigate the effects of dietary supplementation with HMB, the amino acid β-alanine and the combination thereof, on muscle contractility in a preclinical model of pre-sarcopenia. In C2C12 myotubes, HMB enhanced sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium release beyond vehicle control in the presence of all SR agonists tested (KCl, P<0.01; caffeine, P = 0.03; ionomycin, P = 0.03). HMB also improved C2C12 myoblast viability (25 μM HMB, P = 0.03) and increased proliferation (25 μM HMB, P = 0.04; 125 μM HMB, P<0.01). Furthermore, an ex vivo muscle contractility study was performed on EDL and soleus muscle from 19 month old, male C57BL/6nTac mice. For 8 weeks, mice were fed control AIN-93M diet, diet with HMB, diet with β-alanine, or diet with HMB and β-alanine. In β-alanine fed mice, EDL muscle showed a 7% increase in maximum absolute force compared to the control diet (202 ± 3vs. 188± 5 mN, P = 0.02). At submaximal frequency of stimulation (20 Hz), EDL from mice fed HMB plus β-alanine showed an 11% increase in absolute force (88.6 ± 2.2 vs. 79.8 ± 2.4 mN, P = 0.025) and a 13% increase in specific force (12.2 ± 0.4 vs. 10.8 ± 0.4 N/cm2, P = 0.021). Also in EDL muscle, β-alanine increased the rate of force development at all frequencies tested (P<0.025), while HMB reduced the time to reach peak contractile force (TTP), with a significant effect at 80 Hz (P = 0.0156). In soleus muscle, all experimental diets were associated with a decrease in TTP, compared to control diet. Our findings highlight beneficial effects of HMB and β-alanine supplementation on skeletal muscle function in aging mice. PMID

  11. A novel low molecular weight alanine aminotransferase from fasted rat liver.

    PubMed

    Vedavathi, M; Girish, K S; Kumar, M Karuna

    2006-01-01

    Alanine is the most effective precursor for gluconeogenesis among amino acids, and the initial reaction is catalyzed by alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT). Although the enzyme activity increases during fasting, this effect has not been studied extensively. The present study describes the purification and characterization of an isoform of AlaAT from rat liver under fasting. The molecular mass of the enzyme is 17.7 kD with an isoelectric point of 4.2; glutamine is the N-terminal residue. The enzyme showed narrow substrate specificity for L-alanine with Km values for alanine of 0.51 mM and for 2-oxoglutarate of 0.12 mM. The enzyme is a glycoprotein. Spectroscopic and inhibition studies showed that pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) and free -SH groups are involved in the enzymatic catalysis. PLP activated the enzyme with a Km of 0.057 mM. PMID:16487061

  12. Titration of Alanine Monitored by NMR Spectroscopy: A Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Francis J.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The experiment described here involves simultaneous monitoring of pH and NMR chemical shifts during an aqueous titration of alpha- and beta-alanine. This experiment is designed for use in an undergraduate biochemistry course. (MR)

  13. Internal bias field in triglycine sulphate crystals with L-, α-alanine grown at negative temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovidova, S. D.; Rogazinskaya, O. V.; Sidorkin, A. S.; Ionova, E. V.; Kirichenko, A. P.; Bavykin, S. A.

    2010-09-01

    The dielectric and pyroelectric properties of triglycine sulphate (TGS) crystals with L, α-alanine impurities grown at negative temperatures have been investigated. It is shown that a lower impurity concentration (2 mol % in solution) in this temperature range leads to the formation of internal bias fields of the same order of magnitude (˜800 V/cm) as for TGS crystals grown at T ⩽ 50°C but with an L, α-alanine concentration of 20 mol % in solution.

  14. IR spectroscopic signatures of solid glycine and alanine in astrophysical ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Lazcano, Y.; Maté, B.; Tanarro, I.; Herrero, V.; Escribano, R.

    2012-09-01

    The conversion from solid neutral to zwitterionic glycine (or alanine) is studied using infrared spectroscopy from the point of view of the interactions of this molecule with polar (water) and non-polar (CO2, CH4) surroundings. Such environments could be found on astrophysical matter. Different spectral features are suggested as suitable probes for the presence of glycine (or alanine) in astrophysical media, depending on their form (normal or zwitterionic), temperature, and composition.

  15. Reactions of 1,3-Diketones with a Dipeptide Isothiazolidin-3-one: Toward Agents That Covalently Capture Oxidized Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Ruddraraju, Kasi Viswanatharaju; Parsons, Zachary D; Llufrio, Elizabeth M; Frost, Natasha L; Gates, Kent S

    2015-12-18

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a validated therapeutic target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes; however, the enzyme has been classified by some as an "undruggable target". Here we describe studies directed toward the development of agents that covalently capture the sulfenyl amide "oxoform" of PTP1B generated during insulin signaling events. The sulfenyl amide residue found in oxidized PTP1B presents a unique electrophilic sulfur center that may be exploited in drug and probe design. Covalent capture of oxidized PTP1B could permanently disable the intracellular pool of enzyme involved in regulation of insulin signaling. Here, we employed a dipeptide model of oxidized PTP1B to investigate the nucleophilic capture of the sulfenyl amide residue by structurally diverse 1,3-diketones. All of the 1,3-diketones examined here reacted readily with the electrophilic sulfur center in the sulfenyl amide residue to generate stable covalent attachments. Several different types of products were observed, depending upon the substituents present on the 1,3-diketone. The results provide a chemical foundation for the development of agents that covalently capture the oxidized form of PTP1B generated in cells during insulin signaling events. PMID:26517018

  16. Chelation behavior of various flavonols and transfer of flavonol-chelated zinc(II) to alanylaspartic dipeptide: A PCM/DFT investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasarawan, Nuttawisit; Thipyapong, Khajadpai; Ruangpornvisuti, Vithaya

    2016-03-01

    Alanylaspartic dipeptide (AlaAsp) and zinc(II)-flavonol complex could represent a metal-binding site in proteins and a metal-ion releasing agent, respectively. Chelation of zinc(II) by either AlaAsp or flavonol ligands in aqueous solution has been examined using DFT methods with polarizable continuum model (PCM/DFT). Coordination geometry, complexation stoichiometry, coordination bond strength, preferable metal-binding site on ligands and effect of water coordination on the stability of complexes have been addressed. In several cases, the long-range corrected density functional CAM-B3LYP allows the most accurate prediction of both structural and spectroscopic data. The preferential transfer of flavonol-chelated zinc(II) to AlaAsp under solvation is attainable through the ligand-exchange reaction. The energy barrier of such reaction is significantly dependent on the degree of hydrogen bonding within the transition state. In summary, either hydroxylation or methoxylation at particular positions on the 3-hydroxyflavone backbone significantly affects the reactivity of flavonol chelates in the metal-ion transfer.

  17. [Alanine solution as enzyme reaction buffer used in A to O blood group conversion].

    PubMed

    Li, Su-Bo; Zhang, Xue; Zhang, Yin-Ze; Tan, Ying-Xia; Bao, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Ying-Li; Ji, Shou-Ping; Gong, Feng; Gao, Hong-Wei

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of alanine solution as α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase enzyme reaction buffer on the enzymatic activity of A antigen. The binding ability of α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase with RBC in different reaction buffer such as alanine solution, glycine solution, normal saline (0.9% NaCl), PBS, PCS was detected by Western blot. The results showed that the efficiency of A to O conversion in alanine solution was similar to that in glycine solution, and Western blot confirmed that most of enzymes blinded with RBC in glycine or alanine solution, but few enzymes blinded with RBC in PBS, PCS or normal saline. The evidences indicated that binding of enzyme with RBC was a key element for A to O blood group conversion, while the binding ability of α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase with RBC in alanine or glycine solution was similar. It is concluded that alanine solution can be used as enzyme reaction buffer in A to O blood group conversion. In this buffer, the α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase is closely blinded with RBC and α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase plays efficient enzymatic activity of A antigen. PMID:24989301

  18. EPR dosimetry of radiotherapy photon beams in inhomogeneous media using alanine films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helge Østerås, Bjørn; Olaug Hole, Eli; Rune Olsen, Dag; Malinen, Eirik

    2006-12-01

    In the current work, EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) dosimetry using alanine films (134 µm thick) was utilized for dose measurements in inhomogeneous phantoms irradiated with radiotherapy photon beams. The main phantom material was PMMA, while either Styrofoam or aluminium was introduced as an inhomogeneity. The phantoms were irradiated to a maximum dose of about 30 Gy with 6 or 15 MV photons. The performance of the alanine film dosimeters was investigated and compared to results from ion chamber dosimetry, Monte Carlo simulations and radiotherapy treatment planning calculations. It was found that the alanine film dosimeters had a linear dose response above approximately 5 Gy, while a background signal obscured the response at lower dose levels. For doses between 5 and 60 Gy, the standard deviation of single alanine film dose estimates was about 2%. The alanine film dose estimates yielded results comparable to those from the Monte Carlo simulations and the ion chamber measurements, with absolute differences between estimates in the order of 1 15%. The treatment planning calculations exhibited limited applicability. The current work shows that alanine film dosimetry is a method suitable for estimating radiotherapeutical doses and for dose measurements in inhomogeneous media.

  19. Association of Alanine Aminotransferase and Periodontitis: A Cross-Sectional Analysis—NHANES 2009–2012

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, R. Constance; Sambamoorthi, Usha; Jurevic, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Alanine Aminotransferase is an enzyme associated with not only liver diseases, liver conditions, and metabolic syndrome, but also inflammation. Periodontitis is associated with increased cytokines and other markers of inflammation. The purpose of this study is to determine if an independent association between Alanine Aminotransferase and periodontitis exists. Methods. Data from the 2009-2010 and 2011-2012 National Health and Nutrition Surveys (NHANES) were combined. Data concerning periodontitis and Alanine Aminotransferase were extracted and analyzed with Rao Scott Chi-square and logistic regressions. Serum Alanine Aminotransferase was dichotomized at 40 units/liter, and periodontitis was dichotomized to the presence or absence of periodontitis. Results. In bivariate Chi-square analyses, periodontitis and Alanine Aminotransferase were associated (p = 0.0360) and remained significant in unadjusted logistic regression (OR = 1.30 [95% CI: 1.02, 1.65]). However, when other known risk factors of periodontitis were included in the analyses, the relationship attenuated and failed to reach significance (adjusted OR = 1.17 [95% CI: 0.85, 1.60]). Conclusion. Our study adds to the literature a positive but attenuated association of serum Alanine Aminotransferase with periodontitis which failed to reach significance when other known, strong risk factors of periodontitis were included in the analysis. PMID:26981311

  20. Topology of AspT, the aspartate:alanine antiporter of Tetragenococcus halophilus, determined by site-directed fluorescence labeling.

    PubMed

    Nanatani, Kei; Fujiki, Takashi; Kanou, Kazuhiko; Takeda-Shitaka, Mayuko; Umeyama, Hideaki; Ye, Liwen; Wang, Xicheng; Nakajima, Tasuku; Uchida, Takafumi; Maloney, Peter C; Abe, Keietsu

    2007-10-01

    The gram-positive lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus catalyzes the decarboxylation of L-aspartate (Asp) with release of L-alanine (Ala) and CO(2). The decarboxylation reaction consists of two steps: electrogenic exchange of Asp for Ala catalyzed by an aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) and intracellular decarboxylation of the transported Asp catalyzed by an L-aspartate-beta-decarboxylase (AspD). AspT belongs to the newly classified aspartate:alanine exchanger family (transporter classification no. 2.A.81) of transporters. In this study, we were interested in the relationship between the structure and function of AspT and thus analyzed the topology by means of the substituted-cysteine accessibility method using the impermeant, fluorescent, thiol-specific probe Oregon Green 488 maleimide (OGM) and the impermeant, nonfluorescent, thiol-specific probe [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl]methanethiosulfonate bromide. We generated 23 single-cysteine variants from a six-histidine-tagged cysteineless AspT template. A cysteine position was assigned an external location if the corresponding single-cysteine variant reacted with OGM added to intact cells, and a position was assigned an internal location if OGM labeling required cell lysis. The topology analyses revealed that AspT has a unique topology; the protein has 10 transmembrane helices (TMs), a large hydrophilic cytoplasmic loop (about 180 amino acids) between TM5 and TM6, N and C termini that face the periplasm, and a positively charged residue (arginine 76) within TM3. Moreover, the three-dimensional structure constructed by means of the full automatic modeling system indicates that the large hydrophilic cytoplasmic loop of AspT possesses a TrkA_C domain and a TrkA_C-like domain and that the three-dimensional structures of these domains are similar to each other even though their amino acid sequences show low similarity. PMID:17660287

  1. Expanding the solvent chemical space for self-assembly of dipeptide nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Mason, Thomas O; Chirgadze, Dimitri Y; Levin, Aviad; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Gazit, Ehud; Knowles, Tuomas P J; Buell, Alexander K

    2014-02-25

    Nanostructures composed of short, noncyclic peptides represent a growing field of research in nanotechnology due to their ease of production, often remarkable material properties, and biocompatibility. Such structures have so far been almost exclusively obtained through self-assembly from aqueous solution, and their morphologies are determined by the interactions between building blocks as well as interactions between building blocks and water. Using the diphenylalanine system, we demonstrate here that, in order to achieve structural and morphological control, a change in the solvent environment represents a simple and convenient alternative strategy to the chemical modification of the building blocks. Diphenylalanine (FF) is a dipeptide capable of self-assembly in aqueous solution into needle-like hollow micro- and nanocrystals with continuous nanoscale channels that possess advantageous properties such as high stiffness and piezoelectricity and have so emerged as attractive candidates for functional nanomaterials. We investigate systematically the solubility of diphenylalanine in a range of organic solvents and probe the role of the solvent in the kinetics of self-assembly and the structures of the final materials. Finally, we report the crystal structure of the FF peptide in microcrystalline form grown from MeOH solution at 1 Å resolution and discuss the structural changes relative to the conventional materials self-assembled in aqueous solution. These findings provide a significant expansion of the structures and morphologies that are accessible through FF self-assembly for existing and future nanotechnological applications of this peptide. Solvent mediation of molecular recognition and self-association processes represents an important route to the design of new supramolecular architectures deriving their functionality from the nanoscale ordering of their components. PMID:24422499

  2. CovR activation of the dipeptide permease promoter (PdppA) in Group A Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Gusa, Asiya A; Froehlich, Barbara J; Desai, Devak; Stringer, Virginia; Scott, June R

    2007-02-01

    CovR, the two-component response regulator of Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus [GAS]) directly or indirectly represses about 15% of the genome, including genes encoding many virulence factors and itself. Transcriptome analyses also showed that some genes are activated by CovR. We asked whether the regulation by CovR of one of these genes, dppA, the first gene in an operon encoding a dipeptide permease, is direct or indirect. Direct regulation by CovR was suggested by the presence of five CovR consensus binding sequences (CBs) near the putative promoter. In this study, we identified the 5' end of the dppA transcript synthesized in vivo and showed that the start of dppA transcription in vitro is the same. We found that CovR binds specifically to the dppA promoter region (PdppA) in vitro with an affinity similar to that at which it binds to other CovR-regulated promoters. Disruption of any of the five CBs by a substitution of GG for TT inhibited CovR binding to that site in vitro, and binding at two of the CBs appeared cooperative. In vivo, CovR activation of transcription was not affected by individual mutations of any of the four CBs that we could study. This suggests that the binding sites are redundant in vivo. In vitro, CovR did not activate transcription from PdppA in experiments using purified GAS RNA polymerase and either linear or supercoiled DNA template. Therefore, we propose that in vivo, CovR may interfere with the binding of a repressor of PdppA. PMID:16997962

  3. Molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of cytokine production by muramyl dipeptide

    PubMed Central

    Windheim, Mark; Lang, Christine; Peggie, Mark; Plater, Lorna A.; Cohen, Philip

    2007-01-01

    MDP (muramyl dipeptide), a component of peptidoglycan, interacts with NOD2 (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2) stimulating the NOD2–RIP2 (receptor-interacting protein 2) complex to activate signalling pathways important for antibacterial defence. Here we demonstrate that the protein kinase activity of RIP2 has two functions, namely to limit the strength of downstream signalling and to stabilize the active enzyme. Thus pharmacological inhibition of RIP2 kinase with either SB 203580 [a p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) inhibitor] or the Src family kinase inhibitor PP2 induces a rapid and drastic decrease in the level of the RIP2 protein, which may explain why these RIP2 inhibitors block MDP-stimulated downstream signalling and the production of IL-1β (interleukin-1β) and TNFα (tumour necrosis factor-α). We also show that RIP2 induces the activation of the protein kinase TAK1 (transforming-growth-factor-β-activated kinase-1), that a dominant-negative mutant of TAK1 inhibits RIP2-induced activation of JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase) and p38α MAPK, and that signalling downstream of NOD2 or RIP2 is reduced by the TAK1 inhibitor (5Z)-7-oxozeaenol or in TAK1-deficient cells. We also show that MDP activates ERK1 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1)/ERK2 and p38α MAPK in human peripheral-blood mononuclear cells and that the activity of both MAPKs and TAK1 are required for MDP-induced signalling and production of IL-1β and TNFα in these cells. Taken together, our results indicate that the MDP–NOD2/RIP2 and LPS (lipopolysaccharide)–TLR4 (Toll-like receptor 4) signalling pathways converge at the level of TAK1 and that many subsequent events that lead to the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines are common to both pathways. PMID:17348859

  4. Magnetic Resonance Characterization of One-Electron Oxidized Cyclic Dipeptides with Thioether Groups.

    PubMed

    Köchling, Talea; Morozova, Olga B; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V; Vieth, Hans-Martin

    2016-09-01

    Photo-oxidation of seven cyclic dipeptides containing methionine, Met, and/or S-methylcysteine, Cys(Me) by electron transfer from the sulfur atom was studied in aqueous solution by time-resolved and field dependent CIDNP (chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization). Hyperpolarized high resolution NMR spectral patterns of the starting peptides detected immediately after pulsed laser excitation show signals of all protons that are bound to carbons neighboring the sulfur atom, thus proving the involvement of sulfur-centered cation radicals. The magnetic field dependence of CIDNP shows a pronounced maximum that is determined by the g-factors and hyperfine coupling constants of the transient radical species. From simulation of the experimental data obtained for the magnetic field dependences of CIDNP, three types of radical structures were characterized: (1) a linear sulfur-centered cation radical of the methionine (Met) residue (g = 2.0107 ± 0.0010) for cyclo-(d-Met-l-Met) (trans-configuration), cyclo-(d-Met-l-Cys(Me)) (trans-configuration), and cyclo-(Gly-Met); (2) a cyclic radical (S∴O)(+) (g = 2.0088 ± 0.0010) with a two-center three-electron bond (2c-3e) structure between the sulfur atom of the Cys(Me) residue and the oxygen atom of cyclo-(d-Met-l-Cys(Me)) and cyclo-(Gly-Cys(Me)); (3) a cyclic radical (S∴S)(+) (g = 2.013 ± 0.0020) with a two-center three-electron bond structure between the two sulfur atoms of the peptides cyclo-(l-Met-l-Met), cyclo-(l-Met-l-Cys(Me)), and cyclo-(l-Cys(Me)-l-Cys(Me)). In contrast, no indication of any type of cyclic radicals with a two-center three-electron bond between sulfur and nitrogen atoms was found. In addition, the hyperfine coupling constants (HFCCs) were determined. PMID:27518876

  5. Molecular Mechanism Underlying the Action of Substituted Pro-Gly Dipeptide Noopept

    PubMed Central

    Vakhitova, Y. V.; Sadovnikov, S. V.; Borisevich, S. S.; Ostrovskaya, R. U.; A.Gudasheva, T.; Seredenin, S. B.

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed in order to reveal the effect of Noopept (ethyl ester of N-phenylacetyl-Lprolylglycine, GVS-111) on the DNA-binding activity of transcriptional factors (TF) in HEK293 cells transiently transfected with luciferase reporter constructs containing sequences for CREB, NFAT, NF-κB, p53, STAT1, GAS, VDR, HSF1, and HIF-1. Noopept (10 μM) was shown to increase the DNA-binding activity of HIF-1 only, while lacking the ability to affect that of CREB, NFAT, NF-κB, p53, STAT1, GAS, VDR, and HSF1. Noopept provoked an additional increase in the DNA-binding activity of HIF-1 when applied in conditions of CoCl2-induced HIF- 1 stabilization. The degree of this HIF-positive effect of Noopept was shown to be concentration-dependent. Piracetam (1 mM) failed to affect significantly any of the TF under study. The results of molecular docking showed that Noopept (L-isomer), as well as its metabolite, L-isomer of N-phenyl-acetylprolyl, unlike its pharmacologically ineffective D-isomer, is able to bind to the active site of prolyl hydroxylase 2. Taking into account the important role of the genes activated by HIF-1 in the formation of an adaptive response to hypoxia, data on the ability of Noopept to provoke a selective increase in the DNA-binding activity of HIF-1 explain the wide spectrum of neurochemical and pharmacological effects of Noopept revealed before. The obtained data allow one to propose the HIF-positive effect as the primary mechanism of the activity of this Pro-Gly-containing dipeptide. PMID:27099787

  6. Molecular Mechanism Underlying the Action of Substituted Pro-Gly Dipeptide Noopept.

    PubMed

    Vakhitova, Y V; Sadovnikov, S V; Borisevich, S S; Ostrovskaya, R U; A Gudasheva, T; Seredenin, S B

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed in order to reveal the effect of Noopept (ethyl ester of N-phenylacetyl-Lprolylglycine, GVS-111) on the DNA-binding activity of transcriptional factors (TF) in HEK293 cells transiently transfected with luciferase reporter constructs containing sequences for CREB, NFAT, NF-κB, p53, STAT1, GAS, VDR, HSF1, and HIF-1. Noopept (10 μM) was shown to increase the DNA-binding activity of HIF-1 only, while lacking the ability to affect that of CREB, NFAT, NF-κB, p53, STAT1, GAS, VDR, and HSF1. Noopept provoked an additional increase in the DNA-binding activity of HIF-1 when applied in conditions of CoCl2-induced HIF- 1 stabilization. The degree of this HIF-positive effect of Noopept was shown to be concentration-dependent. Piracetam (1 mM) failed to affect significantly any of the TF under study. The results of molecular docking showed that Noopept (L-isomer), as well as its metabolite, L-isomer of N-phenyl-acetylprolyl, unlike its pharmacologically ineffective D-isomer, is able to bind to the active site of prolyl hydroxylase 2. Taking into account the important role of the genes activated by HIF-1 in the formation of an adaptive response to hypoxia, data on the ability of Noopept to provoke a selective increase in the DNA-binding activity of HIF-1 explain the wide spectrum of neurochemical and pharmacological effects of Noopept revealed before. The obtained data allow one to propose the HIF-positive effect as the primary mechanism of the activity of this Pro-Gly-containing dipeptide. PMID:27099787

  7. Mutations that relieve nutritional repression of the Bacillus subtilis dipeptide permease operon.

    PubMed Central

    Slack, F J; Mueller, J P; Sonenshein, A L

    1993-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis dciA operon encodes a dipeptide transport complex that is induced rapidly as cells enter stationary phase and initiate sporulation. Expression of this operon in growing cells is repressed by glucose, by a mixture of amino acids, and by the AbrB protein. A genetic screen was devised to identify mutations that allow inappropriate expression from the dciA promoter during growth. These mutations resulted in increased dciA transcription during growth in nutrient broth, in minimal amino acids medium, and in minimal glucose medium. Some of the mutations, called dcs (dciA control site), were cloned and shown by sequence analysis to cluster near the start site of dciA transcription. Primer extension and in vitro transcription analysis revealed that the dcs mutations did not create a new promoter. These mutations may therefore disrupt an operator site necessary for the binding of a negative regulator responsive to the nutritional state of the cell. The dcs mutant promoters were still subject to AbrB control, suggesting that the dciA operon is regulated by at least two proteins, AbrB and a nutritionally responsive regulator. The gene(s) for the putative nutritional regulator may be defined by the cod (control of dciA) mutations, which appeared to relieve amino acid and glucose repression of dciA by altering a diffusible factor. An abrB cod double mutant exhibited high-level expression of dciA during exponential growth phase. Images PMID:8335620

  8. Mutations that relieve nutritional repression of the Bacillus subtilis dipeptide permease operon.

    PubMed

    Slack, F J; Mueller, J P; Sonenshein, A L

    1993-08-01

    The Bacillus subtilis dciA operon encodes a dipeptide transport complex that is induced rapidly as cells enter stationary phase and initiate sporulation. Expression of this operon in growing cells is repressed by glucose, by a mixture of amino acids, and by the AbrB protein. A genetic screen was devised to identify mutations that allow inappropriate expression from the dciA promoter during growth. These mutations resulted in increased dciA transcription during growth in nutrient broth, in minimal amino acids medium, and in minimal glucose medium. Some of the mutations, called dcs (dciA control site), were cloned and shown by sequence analysis to cluster near the start site of dciA transcription. Primer extension and in vitro transcription analysis revealed that the dcs mutations did not create a new promoter. These mutations may therefore disrupt an operator site necessary for the binding of a negative regulator responsive to the nutritional state of the cell. The dcs mutant promoters were still subject to AbrB control, suggesting that the dciA operon is regulated by at least two proteins, AbrB and a nutritionally responsive regulator. The gene(s) for the putative nutritional regulator may be defined by the cod (control of dciA) mutations, which appeared to relieve amino acid and glucose repression of dciA by altering a diffusible factor. An abrB cod double mutant exhibited high-level expression of dciA during exponential growth phase. PMID:8335620

  9. Defective small intestinal anion secretion, dipeptide absorption, and intestinal failure in suckling NBCe1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qin; Liu, Xuemei; Liu, Yongjian; Riederer, Brigitte; Li, Taolang; Tian, De-An; Tuo, Biguang; Shull, Gary; Seidler, Ursula

    2016-08-01

    The electrogenic Na(+)HCO3 (-) cotransporter NBCe1 (Slc4a4) is strongly expressed in the basolateral enterocyte membrane in a villous/surface predominant fashion. In order to better understand its physiological function in the intestine, isolated mucosae in miniaturized Ussing chambers and microdissected intestinal villi or crypts loaded with the fluorescent pH-indicator BCECF were studied from the duodenum, jejunum, and colon of 14- to 17-days-old slc4a4-deficient (KO) and WT mice. NBCe1 was active in the basal state in all intestinal segments under study, most likely to compensate for acid loads imposed upon the enterocytes. Upregulation of other basolateral base uptake mechanism occurs, but in a segment-specific fashion. Loss of NBCe1 resulted in severely impaired Cl(-) and fluid secretory response, but not HCO3 (-) secretory response to agonist stimulation. In addition, NBCe1 was found to be active during transport processes that load the surface enterocytes with acid, such as Slc26a3 (DRA)-mediated luminal Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange or PEPT1-mediated H(+)/dipeptide uptake. Possibly because of the high energy demand for hyperventilation in conjunction with the fluid secretory and nutrient absorptive defects and the relative scarcity of compensatory mechanisms, NBCe1-deficient mice developed progressive jejunal failure, worsening of metabolic acidosis, and death in the third week of life. Our data suggest that the electrogenic influx of base via NBCe1 maintains enterocyte anion homeostasis and pHi control. Its loss impairs small intestinal Cl(-) and fluid secretion as well as the neutralization of acid loads imposed on the enterocytes during nutrient and electrolyte absorption. PMID:27228994

  10. Therapeutic efficacy of natural dipeptide carnosine against human cervical carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Pandurangan, Muthuraman; Enkhtaivan, Gansukh; Kim, Doo Hwan

    2016-09-01

    Natural substances have been attracted several researchers in the recent years, because of its potential antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. We have investigated the effect of carnosine on cell viability, apoptosis, DNA damage, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and caspase 3 enzyme expression in human cervical carcinoma and Madin-Darby Kidney Cells (MDCK) cells. Carnosine inhibited cancer cell growth up to 23%. ROS level was increased up to 30 and 31% in MDCK and HeLa cells respectively. Tunnel assay showed 42 and 14% of positive apoptotic cells in cancer and normal cells respectively. The alteration in mitochondrial and nuclear morphology was determined. The extended lace-like network of normal mitochondria found in control cells. Carnosine treatment significantly altered the mitochondrial morphology of normal cervical carcinoma cell. Mitochondria were condensed clump structures in carnosine treated cancer cells. Carnosine reduced the number of colonies of cervical carcinoma cells. Caspase 3 expression was corresponded to the appearance of immunofluorescence in the cytoplasm. Caspase 3 expression was gradually increased in cervical carcinoma cells. In Silico, docking study was performed to recognize the binding activity of carnosine against a subunit of the caspase 3, and carnosine was able to bind to the drug binding pocket of caspase 3. The glide energy is -5.2 kcal/mol, suggesting the high binding affinity of carnosine to caspase 3. Taking all these data together, the natural dipeptide L-carnosine could be a suitable antiproliferative agent in cervical carcinoma cells. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27000946

  11. Impact of the N-terminal amino acid on the formation of pyrazines from peptides in Maillard model systems.

    PubMed

    Van Lancker, Fien; Adams, An; De Kimpe, Norbert

    2012-05-01

    Only a minor part of Maillard reaction studies in the literature focused on the reaction between carbohydrates and peptides. Therefore, in continuation of a previous study in which the influence of the peptide C-terminal amino acid was investigated, this study focused on the influence of the peptide N-terminal amino acid on the production of pyrazines in model reactions of glucose, methylglyoxal, or glyoxal. Nine different dipeptides and three tripeptides were selected. It was shown that the structure of the N-terminal amino acid is determinative for the overall pyrazine production. Especially, the production of 2,5(6)-dimethylpyrazine and trimethylpyrazine was low in the case of proline, valine, or leucine at the N-terminus, whereas it was very high for glycine, alanine, or serine. In contrast to the alkyl-substituted pyrazines, unsubstituted pyrazine was always produced more in the case of experiments with free amino acids. It is clear that different mechanisms must be responsible for this observation. This study clearly illustrates the capability of peptides to produce flavor compounds such as pyrazines. PMID:22463717

  12. Synthesis and antimycobacterial activity of N-(2-aminopurin-6-yl) and N-(purin-6-yl) amino acids and dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Krasnov, Victor P; Vigorov, Alexey Yu; Musiyak, Vera V; Nizova, Irina A; Gruzdev, Dmitry A; Matveeva, Tatyana V; Levit, Galina L; Kravchenko, Marionella A; Skornyakov, Sergey N; Bekker, Olga B; Danilenko, Valery N; Charushin, Valery N

    2016-06-01

    Synthetic routes to novel N-(purin-6-yl)- and N-(2-aminopurin-6-yl) conjugates with amino acids and glycine-containing dipeptides were developed. In vitro testing of 42 new and known compounds made it possible to reveal a series of N-(purin-6-yl)- and N-(2-aminopurin-6-yl) conjugates exhibiting significant antimycobacterial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium terrae, and multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis strain isolated from tuberculosis patients in the Ural region (Russia). N-(2-Aminopurin-6-yl)- and N-(purin-6-yl)-glycyl-(S)-glutamic acids were the most active compounds. PMID:27107949

  13. [The pharmacokinetics of the dipeptide analog of piracetam with nootropic activity GVS-111 and of its basic metabolites].

    PubMed

    Boĭko, S S; Zherdev, V P; Dvorianinov, A A; Gudasheva, T A; Ostrovskaia, R U; Voronina, T A; Rozantsev, G G; Seredenin, S B

    1997-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of a new nootropic dipeptide analog of piracetam-N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine (GWS-111) and its main metabolites were studied in rats by means of high performance liquid chromatography and gas-liquid chromatography. The compound under study showed a greater resistance to an enzymatic effect than natural neuropeptides. In addition to an unchanged compound three of its metabolites were found in the blood plasma of the rats. One of them, cyclo-Pro-Gly was an active metabolite of GWS-111. PMID:9206571

  14. Inhibitory effect of a copper-dipeptide complex on the establishment of a Clostridium perenne strain in the intestinal tract of gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Dubos, F; Pelissier, J P; Andrieux, C; Ducluzeau, R; Raibaud, P

    1985-01-01

    A semisynthetic diet fed to axenic mice was found to prevent the establishment of a Clostridium perenne strain in their intestinal tract. This inhibitory effect did not occur when axenic mice were preinoculated with a strain of Clostridium difficile. The inhibitory effect was related to the presence in the intestinal contents of axenic mice of both dietary copper and a dipeptide, aspartic-epsilon-lysine. When C. difficile was inoculated into axenic mice, the dipeptide disappeared from the digesta, and C. perenne became established even in the presence of high concentrations of copper. PMID:4091557

  15. Oral supplementations with L-glutamine or L-alanyl-L-glutamine do not change metabolic alterations induced by long-term high-fat diet in the B6.129F2/J mouse model of insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Bock, Patricia Martins; Krause, Mauricio; Schroeder, Helena Trevisan; Hahn, Gabriela Fernandes; Takahashi, Hilton Kenji; Schöler, Cinthia Maria; Nicoletti, Graziella; Neto, Luiz Domingos Zavarize; Rodrigues, Maria Inês Lavina; Bruxel, Maciel Alencar; Homem de Bittencourt, Paulo Ivo

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we aimed to investigate the effects of long-term supplementations with L-glutamine or L-alanyl-L-glutamine in the high-fat diet (HFD)-fed B6.129SF2/J mouse model over insulin sensitivity response and signaling, oxidative stress markers, metabolism and HSP70 expression. Mice were fed in a standard low-fat diet (STA) or a HFD for 20 weeks. In the 21th week, mice from the HFD group were allocated in five groups and supplemented for additional 8 weeks with different amino acids: HFD control group (HFD-Con), HFD + dipeptide L-alanyl-L-glutamine group (HFD-Dip), HFD + L-alanine group (HFD-Ala), HFD + L-glutamine group (HFD-Gln), or the HFD + L-alanine + L-glutamine (in their free forms) group (HFD-Ala + Gln). HFD induced higher body weight, fat pad, fasted glucose, and total cholesterol in comparison with STA group. Amino acid supplementations did not induce any modifications in these parameters. Although insulin tolerance tests indicated insulin resistance in all HFD groups, amino acid supplementations did not improve insulin sensitivity in the present model. There were also no significant differences in the immunocontents of insulin receptor, Akt, and Toll-like receptor-4. Notably, total 70 kDa heat shock protein (HSP72 + HSP73) contents in the liver was markedly increased in HFD-Con group as compared to STA group, which might suggest that insulin resistance is only in the beginning. Apparently, B6.129SF2/J mice are more resistant to the harmful effects of HFD through a mechanism that may include gut adaptation, reducing the absorption of nutrients, including amino acids, which may explain the lack of improvements in our intervention. PMID:26530165

  16. Dipeptide Piracetam Analogue Noopept Improves Viability of Hippocampal HT-22 Neurons in the Glutamate Toxicity Model.

    PubMed

    Antipova, T A; Nikolaev, S V; Ostrovskaya, P U; Gudasheva, T A; Seredenin, S B

    2016-05-01

    Effect of noopept (N-phenylacetyl-prolylglycine ethyl ester) on viability of neurons exposed to neurotoxic action of glutamic acid (5 mM) was studied in vitro in immortalized mouse hippocampal HT-22 neurons. Noopept added to the medium before or after glutamic acid improved neuronal survival in a concentration range of 10-11-10-5 M. Comparison of the effective noopept concentrations determined in previous studies on cultured cortical and cerebellar neurons showed that hippocampal neurons are more sensitive to the protective effect of noopept. PMID:27265136

  17. Glucose and Alanine Metabolism in Children with Maple Syrup Urine Disease

    PubMed Central

    Haymond, Morey W.; Ben-Galim, Ehud; Strobel, Karen E.

    1978-01-01

    In vitro studies have suggested that catabolism of branched chain amino acids is linked with alanine and glutamine formed in, and released from, muscle. To explore this possibility in vivo, static and kinetic studies were performed in three patients with classical, and one patient with partial, branched chain α-ketoacid decarboxylase deficiency (maple syrup urine disease, MSUD) and compared to similar studies in eight age-matched controls. The subjects underwent a 24-30-h fast, and a glucose-alanine flux study using stable isotopes. Basal plasma leucine concentrations were elevated (P <0.001) in patients with MSUD (1,140±125 μM vs. 155±18 μM in controls); and in contrast to the controls, branched chain amino acid concentrations in plasma increased during the fast in the MSUD patients. Basal plasma alanine concentrations were lower (P <0.01) in patients with classical MSUD (153±8 μM vs. 495±27 μM in controls). This discrepancy was maintained throughout the fast despite a decrease in alanine concentrations in both groups. Plasma alanine and leucine concentrations in the patient with partial MSUD were intermediate between those of the controls and the subjects with the classical form of the disease. Circulating ketone bodies and glucoregulatory hormones concentrations were similar in the MSUD and normal subjects during the fast. Alanine flux rates in two patients with classical MSUD (3.76 and 4.00 μmol/Kg per min) and the patient with partial MSUD (5.76 μmol/Kg per min) were clearly lower than those of the controls (11.72±2.53 [SD] μmol/Kg per min). After short-term starvation, glucose flux and fasting concentrations were similar in the MSUD patients and normal subjects. These data indicate that branched chain amino acid catabolism is an important rate limiting event for alanine production in vivo. PMID:670400

  18. FTIR spectra and conformational structure of deutero-β-alanine isolated in argon matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanian, Stepan G.; Ivanov, Alexander Yu; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2016-02-01

    Low temperature FTIR spectra of β-alanine-d3 isolated in argon matrices are used to determine the conformational composition of this compound. UV irradiation of the matrix samples is found to change the relative populations of the β-alanine-d3 conformers. The populations of conformers I and II with an Nsbnd D⋯O intramolecular H-bond decrease after the UV irradiation while the populations of conformer V with an N⋯Dsbnd O H-bond and conformer IV which has no intramolecular H-bonds increase. This behavior of the β-alanine-d3 conformers are used to separate the bands of the different conformers. The analysis of the experimental FTIR spectra is based on the calculated harmonic B3LYP/6-311++G(df,pd) frequencies and on the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ frequencies calculated with a method that includes anharmonic effects. Polynomial scaling of the calculated frequencies is used to achieve better agreement with the experimental data. The observation of the wide band of the OD stretching vibration at 2201 cm-1 is a direct evidence of the presence of the β-alanine-d3 conformer V in the Ar matrix. In total ten bands of conformer V are detected. The influence of the matrix environment on the structures and the IR spectra of the β-alanine and β-alanine-d3 conformers is investigated. This involves performing calculations of the β-alanine conformers embedded in argon clusters containing from 163 to 166 argon atoms using the M06-2X and B3LYP(GD3BJ) density-functional methods. Good agreement between the calculated and the experimental matrix splitting is demonstrated.

  19. Design and development of new class of Mycobacterium tuberculosisl-alanine dehydrogenase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Reshma, Rudraraju Srilakshmi; Saxena, Shalini; Bobesh, Karyakulam Andrews; Jeankumar, Variam Ullas; Gunda, Saritha; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Sriram, Dharmarajan

    2016-09-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosisl-alanine dehydrogenase (MTB l-AlaDH) is one of the important drug targets for treating latent/persistent tuberculosis. In this study we used crystal structure of the MTB l-AlaDH bound with cofactor NAD(+) as a structural framework for virtual screening of our in-house database to identified new classes of l-AlaDH inhibitor. We identified azetidine-2,4-dicarboxamide derivative as one of the potent inhibitor with IC50 of 9.22±0.72μM. Further lead optimization by synthesis leads to compound 1-(isonicotinamido)-N(2),N(4)-bis(benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)azetidine-2,4-dicarboxamide (18) with l-AlaDH IC50 of 3.83±0.12μM, 2.0log reduction in nutrient starved dormant MTB model and MIC of 11.81μM in actively replicative MTB. PMID:27477207

  20. Moments and distribution functions for polypeptide chains. Poly-L-alanine.

    PubMed

    Conrad, J C; Flory, P J

    1976-01-01

    Statistical mechanical averages of vectors and tensors characterizing the configurations of polypeptides have been calculated for poly-L-alanines (PLA) of xu = 2-400 peptide units. These quantities are expressed in the reference frame of the first peptide unit, the X axis being situated along the virtual bond, the Y axis in the plane of the peptide unit. The persistence vector a identical to (r) converges rapidly with chain length to its limit a infinity which lies virtually in the XZ plane. Configurational averages of Cartesian tensors up to the sixth rank formed from the displacement vector p = r-a have been computed. For xu greater than 50 the even moments of fourth and sixth rank formed from the reduced vector p for the real chain are well repreented by the freely jointed chain with 21.7 virtual bonds equivalent to one of the model. The moments of p display assymmetry for xu less than 50. Density distribution functions Wa(p), evaluated from the three-dimensional Hermite series truncated at the term in the polynomial involving the tensors of p of sixth rank, display no obvious symmetry for xu less than 50. Approximate spherical symmetry of the distribution of p about a is observed only for xu greater than or equal to 100. PMID:1249990

  1. Overexpression of Ste20-related proline/alanine-rich kinase exacerbates experimental colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yutao; Laroui, Hamed; Ingersoll, Sarah A; Ayyadurai, Saravanan; Charania, Moiz; Yang, Stephen; Dalmasso, Guillaume; Obertone, Tracy S; Nguyen, Hang; Sitaraman, Shanthi V; Merlin, Didier

    2011-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease, mainly Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, are characterized by epithelial barrier disruption and altered immune regulation. Colonic Ste20-like proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) plays a role in intestinal inflammation, but its underlying mechanisms need to be defined. Both SPAK-transfected Caco2-BBE cells and villin-SPAK transgenic (TG) FVB/6 mice exhibited loss of intestinal barrier function. Further studies demonstrated that SPAK significantly increased paracellular intestinal permeability to FITC-dextran. In vivo studies using the mouse models of colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) and trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid showed that TG FVB/6 mice were more susceptible to DSS and trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid treatment than wild-type FVB/6 mice, as demonstrated by clinical and histological characteristics and enzymatic activities. Consistent with this notion, we found that SPAK increased intestinal epithelial permeability, which likely facilitated the production of inflammatory cytokines in vitro and in vivo, aggravated bacterial translocation in TG mice under DSS treatment, and consequently established a context favorable for the triggering of intestinal inflammation cascades. In conclusion, overexpression of SPAK inhibits maintenance of intestinal mucosal innate immune homeostasis, which makes regulation of SPAK important to attenuate pathological responses in inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:21705622

  2. Peptide conformational preferences in osmolyte solutions: Transfer free energies of deca-alanine

    PubMed Central

    Kokubo, Hironori; Hu, Char Y.; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2011-01-01

    The nature in which the protecting osmolyte trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) and the denaturing osmolyte urea affect protein stability is investigated simulating a deca-alanine peptide model in multiple conformations of the denatured ensemble. Binary solutions of both osmolytes and mixed osmolyte solutions at physiologically-relevant concentrations of 2:1 (urea:TMAO) are studied using standard molecular dynamics simulations and solvation free energy calculations. Component analysis reveals the differences in the importance of the van der Waals (vdW) and electrostatic interactions for protecting and denaturing osmolytes. We find that urea denaturation governed by transfer free energy differences is dominated by vdW attractions, whereas TMAO exerts its effect by causing unfavorable electrostatic interactions both in the binary solution and mixed osmolyte solution. Analysis of the results showed no evidence in the ternary solution of disruption of the correlations among the peptide and osmolytes, nor of significant changes in the strength of the water hydrogen bond network. PMID:21250690

  3. The role of herpes simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase alanine 168 in substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Candice L, Willmon; Django, Sussman; Margaret E, Black

    2008-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV) thymidine kinase (TK) has been widely used in suicide gene therapy for the treatment of cancer due to its broad substrate specificity and the inability of the endogenous human TK to phosphorylate guanosine analogs such as ganciclovir (GCV). The basis of suicide gene therapy is the introduction of a gene that encodes a prodrug-activating enzyme into tumor cells. After administration, the prodrug is selectively converted to a toxic drug by the suicide gene product thereby bringing about the eradication of the cancer cells. A major drawback to this therapy is the low activity the enzyme displays towards the prodrugs, requiring high prodrug doses that result in adverse side effects. Earlier studies revealed two HSV TK variants (SR39 and mutant 30) derived by random mutagenesis with enhanced activities towards GCV in vitro and in vivo. While these mutants contain multiple amino acid substitutions, molecular modeling suggests that substitutions at alanine 168 (A168) may be responsible for the observed increase in prodrug sensitivity. To evaluate this, site-directed mutagenesis was used to individually substitute A168 with phenylalanine or tyrosine to reflect the mutations found in SR39 and mutant 30, respectively. Additionally, kinetic parameters and the ability of these mutants to sensitize tumor cells to GCV in comparison to wild-type thymidine kinase were determined. PMID:18949076

  4. Knockout of Ste20-like proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) attenuates intestinal inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuchen; Viennois, Emilie; Xiao, Bo; Baker, Mark T; Yang, Stephen; Okoro, Ijeoma; Yan, Yutao

    2013-05-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are characterized by epithelial barrier disruption and alterations in immune regulation. Ste20-like proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) plays a role in intestinal inflammation, but the underlying mechanisms need to be defined. Herein, SPAK knockout (KO) C57BL/6 mice exhibited significant increases in intestinal transepithelial resistance, a marked decrease in paracellular permeability to fluorescence isothiocyanate-dextran, and altered apical side tight junction sodium ion selectivity, compared with wild-type mice. Furthermore, the expression of junction protein, claudin-2, decreased. In contrast, expressions of occludin, E-cadherin, β-catenin, and claudin-5 increased significantly, whereas no obvious change of claudin-1, claudin-4, zonula occludens protein 1, and zonula occludens protein 2 expressions was observed. In murine models of colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium and trinitrobenzene sulfuric acid, KO mice were more tolerant than wild-type mice, as demonstrated by colonoscopy features, histological characteristics, and myeloperoxidase activities. Consistent with these findings, KO mice showed increased IL-10 levels and decreased proinflammatory cytokine secretion, ameliorated bacterial translocation on treatment with dextran sulfate sodium, and regulation of with no lysine (WNK) kinase activity. Together, these features may reduce epithelial permeability. In conclusion, SPAK deficiency increases intestinal innate immune homeostasis, which is important for control or attenuation of pathological responses in inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:23499375

  5. Self-assembly, structural, and retrostructural analysis of dendritic dipeptide pores undergoing reversible circular to elliptical shape change.

    PubMed

    Peterca, Mihai; Percec, Virgil; Dulcey, Andrés E; Nummelin, Sami; Korey, Stephanie; Ilies, Monica; Heiney, Paul A

    2006-05-24

    The synthesis of dendritic dipeptides (4-3,4-3,5-4)12G2-CH(2)-Boc-L-Tyr-L-Ala-OMe and (4-3, 4-3,5-4)12G2-CH(2)-Boc-D-Tyr-D-Ala-OMe is described. These dendritic dipeptides self-assemble into porous elliptical and circular columns that in turn self-organize into centered rectangular columnar and hexagonal columnar periodic arrays. The transition from porous elliptical to porous circular columns is mediated in a reversible or irreversible way by the thermal history of the sample. A method to determine the dimensions of hollow elliptical and circular columns by the reconstruction of the small-angle powder X-ray diffractograms of the centered rectangular or hexagonal columnar lattices was elaborated. This technique together with wide-angle X-ray experiments performed on aligned fibers provided access to the structural and retrostructural analysis of elliptical supramolecular pores. This procedure is general and can be adapted for the determination of the dimensions of pores of any columnar shape. PMID:16704274

  6. Dipeptide boronic acid inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase IV: determinants of potency and in vivo efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Beth A; Sanford, David G; Chiluwal, Amrita K; Healey, Sarah E; Peters, Diane E; Dimare, Matthew T; Wu, Wengen; Liu, Yuxin; Maw, Hlaing; Zhou, Yuhong; Li, Youhua; Jin, Zhiping; Sudmeier, James L; Lai, Jack H; Bachovchin, William W

    2008-10-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV; E.C. 3.4.14.5), a serine protease that degrades the incretin hormones GLP-1 and GIP, is now a validated target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Dipeptide boronic acids, among the first, and still among the most potent DPP-IV inhibitors known, suffer from a concern over their safety. Here we evaluate the potency, in vivo efficacy, and safety of a selected set of these inhibitors. The adverse effects induced by boronic acid-based DPP-IV inhibitors are essentially limited to what has been observed previously for non-boronic acid inhibitors and attributed to cross-reactivity with DPP8/9. While consistent with the DPP8/9 hypothesis, they are also consistent with cross-reactivity with some other intracellular target. The results further show that the potency of simple dipeptide boronic acid-based inhibitors can be combined with selectivity against DPP8/9 in vivo to produce agents with a relatively wide therapeutic index (>500) in rodents. PMID:18783201

  7. Molecular-Level Thermodynamic Switch Controls Chemical Equilibrium in Sequence-Specific Hydrophobic Interaction of 35 Dipeptide Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Paul W.

    2003-01-01

    Applying the Planck-Benzinger methodology, the sequence-specific hydrophobic interactions of 35 dipeptide pairs were examined over a temperature range of 273–333 K, based on data reported by Nemethy and Scheraga in 1962. The hydrophobic interaction in these sequence-specific dipeptide pairs is highly similar in its thermodynamic behavior to that of other biological systems. The results imply that the negative Gibbs free energy change minimum at a well-defined stable temperature, 〈Ts〉, where the bound unavailable energy, TΔSo = 0, has its origin in the sequence-specific hydrophobic interactions, are highly dependent on details of molecular structure. Each case confirms the existence of a thermodynamic molecular switch wherein a change of sign in ΔCpo(T)reaction (change in specific heat capacity of reaction at constant pressure) leads to true negative minimum in the Gibbs free energy change of reaction, ΔGo(T)reaction, and hence a maximum in the related equilibrium constant, Keq. Indeed, all interacting biological systems examined to date by Chun using the Planck-Benzinger methodology have shown such a thermodynamic switch at the molecular level, suggesting its existence may be universal. PMID:12547816

  8. Ligand binding analyses of the putative peptide transporter YjdL from E. coli display a significant selectivity towards dipeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, Heidi A.; Pham, Antony; Hald, Helle; Kastrup, Jette S.; Rahman, Moazur; Mirza, Osman

    2009-11-06

    Proton-dependent oligopeptide transporters (POTs) are secondary active transporters that couple the inwards translocation of di- and tripeptides to inwards proton translocation. Escherichia coli contains four genes encoding the putative POT proteins YhiP, YdgR, YjdL and YbgH. We have over-expressed the previously uncharacterized YjdL and investigated the peptide specificity by means of uptake inhibition. The IC{sub 50} value for the dipeptide Ala-Ala was measured to 22 mM while Ala-Ala-Ala was not able to inhibit uptake. In addition, IC{sub 50} values of 0.3 mM and 1.5 mM were observed for Ala-Lys and Tyr-Ala, respectively, while the alanyl-extended tripeptides Ala-Lys-Ala, Ala-Ala-Lys, Ala-Tyr-Ala and Tyr-Ala-Ala displayed values of 8, >50, 31 and 31 mM, respectively. These results clearly indicate that unlike most POT members characterized to date, including YdgR and YhiP, YjdL shows significantly higher specificity towards dipeptides.

  9. A genetic algorithm encoded with the structural information of amino acids and dipeptides for efficient conformational searches of oligopeptides.

    PubMed

    Ru, Xiao; Song, Ce; Lin, Zijing

    2016-05-15

    The genetic algorithm (GA) is an intelligent approach for finding minima in a highly dimensional parametric space. However, the success of GA searches for low energy conformations of biomolecules is rather limited so far. Herein an improved GA scheme is proposed for the conformational search of oligopeptides. A systematic analysis of the backbone dihedral angles of conformations of amino acids (AAs) and dipeptides is performed. The structural information is used to design a new encoding scheme to improve the efficiency of GA search. Local geometry optimizations based on the energy calculations by the density functional theory are employed to safeguard the quality and reliability of the GA structures. The GA scheme is applied to the conformational searches of Lys, Arg, Met-Gly, Lys-Gly, and Phe-Gly-Gly representative of AAs, dipeptides, and tripeptides with complicated side chains. Comparison with the best literature results shows that the new GA method is both highly efficient and reliable by providing the most complete set of the low energy conformations. Moreover, the computational cost of the GA method increases only moderately with the complexity of the molecule. The GA scheme is valuable for the study of the conformations and properties of oligopeptides. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26833761

  10. Microbial transformations of free versus sorbed alanine analyzed by position-specific 13C and 14C labeling and 13C-PLFA analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostel, Carolin; Dippold, Michaela; Bore, Ezekiel; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Sorption of charged or partially charged low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS) to soil mineral surfaces delays microbial uptake and therefore mineralization of LMWOS to CO2, as well as all other biochemical transformations. We used position-specific labeling, a tool of isotope applications novel to soil sciences, to compare the transformation mechanisms of sorbed and non-sorbed alanine in soil. Alanine as an amino acid links C- and N-cycles in soil and therefore is a model representative for the pool of LMWOS. To assess transformations of sorbed alanine, we combined position-specifically and uniformly 13C and 14C labeled alanine tracer solution with a loamy haplic luvisol that had previously been sterilized by γ-radiation. After shaking the mixtures, the supernatant was removed, as was all non-sorbed alanine by repeated shaking with millipore water. The labeled soil was added to non-sterilized soil from the same site. To compare the effect of sorption, soil labeled with the same position-specifically labeled tracers without previous sorption was prepared and incubated as well. We captured the respired CO2 and determined its 14C-activity at increasing time steps. The incorporation of 14C into microbial biomass was determined by CFE, and utilization of individual C positions by distinct microbial groups was evaluated by 13C-PLFA analysis. A dual peak in the respired CO2 revealed the influence of two sorption mechanisms. Microbial uptake and transformation of the sorbed alanine was 3 times slower compared to non-sorbed alanine. To compare the fate of individual C atoms independent of their concentration and pool size in soil, we introduced the divergence index (DI). The DI reveals the convergent or divergent behaviour of C from individual molecule positions during microbial utilization. The DI revealed, that alanines C-1 position was mainly oxidized to CO2, while its C-2 and C-3 were preferentially incorporated in microbial biomass and PLFAs. This indicates

  11. An "enigmatic" L-carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine)? Cell proliferative activity as a fundamental property of a natural dipeptide inherent to traditional antioxidant, anti-aging biological activities: balancing and a hormonally correct agent, novel patented oral therapy dosage formulation for mobility, skeletal muscle power and functional performance, hypothalamic-pituitary- brain relationship in health, aging and stress studies.

    PubMed

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2015-01-01

    Hypothalamic releasing and inhibiting hormones are major neuroendocrine regulators of human body metabolism being driven directly to the anterior pituitary gland via hypothalamic-hypophyseal portal veins. The alternative physiological or therapeutic interventions utilizing the pharmaco-nutritional boost of imidazole-containing dipeptides (non-hydrolized oral form of carnosine, carcinine, N-acetylcarnosine lubricant eye drops) can maintain health, enhance physical exercise performance and prevent ageing. Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is synthesized in mammalian skeletal muscle. There is an evidence that the release of carnosine from the skeletal muscle sarcomeres moieties during physical exercise affects autonomic neurotransmission and physiological functions. Carnosine released from skeletal muscle during exercise acts as a powerful afferent physiological signaling stimulus for hypothalamus, may be transported into the hypothalamic tuberomammillary nucleus (TMN), specifically to TMN-histamine neurons and hydrolyzed herewith via activities of carnosine-degrading enzyme (carnosinase 2) localized in situ. Through the colocalized enzymatic activity of Histidine decarboxylase in the histaminergic neurons, the resulting L-histidine may subsequently be converted into histamine, which could be responsible for the effects of carnosine on neurotransmission and physiological function. Carnosine and its imidazole-containing dipeptide derivatives are renowned for their anti-aging, antioxidant, membrane protective, metal ion chelating, buffering, anti-glycation/ transglycating activities used to prevent and treat a spectrum of age-related and metabolic diseases, such as neurodegenerative disease, sight threatening eye diseases, Diabetes mellitus and its complications, cancers and other disorders due to their wide spectrum biological activities. The precursor of carnosine (and related imidazole containing compounds) synthesis in skeletal muscles beta-alanine is used as the

  12. Isolation and characterization of cytosolic alanine aminotransferase isoforms from starved rat liver.

    PubMed

    Vedavathi, M; Girish, K S; Kumar, M Karuna

    2004-12-01

    Alanine is the most effective precursor for gluconeogenesis among amino acids and the initial reaction is catalyzed by alanine aminotransferases (AlaATs). It is a less extensively studied enzyme under starvation and known to that the enzyme activity increases in liver under starvation. The present study describes the purification and characterization of two isoforms of alanine aminotransferases from starved male rat liver under starvation. The molecular mass of isoforms was found to be 17.7 and 112.2 kDa with isoelectric points of 4.2 and 5.3 respectively for AlaAT I and AlaAT II. Both the enzymes showed narrow substrate specificity for L-alanine with different Km for alanine and 2-oxoglutarate. Both the enzymes were glycoprotein in nature. Inhibition, modification and spectroscopic studies showed that both PLP and free-SH groups are directly involved in the enzymatic catalysis. PLP activated both the enzymes with a Km 0.057 mM and 0.2 mM for AlaAT I and II respectively. PMID:15663181

  13. Purification and characterization of alanine dehydrogenase from a cyanobacterium, Phormidium lapideum.

    PubMed

    Sawa, Y; Tani, M; Murata, K; Shibata, H; Ochiai, H

    1994-11-01

    Alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) was purified to homogeneity from cell-free extracts of a non-N2-fixing filamentous cyanobacterium, Phormidium lapideum. The molecular mass of the native enzyme was 240 kDa, and SDS-PAGE revealed a minimum molecular mass of 41 kDa, suggesting a six-subunit structure. The NH2 terminal amino acid residues of the purified AlaDH revealed marked similarity with that of other AlaDHs. The enzyme was highly specific for L-alanine and NAD+, but showed relatively low amino-acceptor specificity. The pH optimum was 8.4 for reductive amination of pyruvate and 9.2 for oxidative deamination of L-alanine. The Km values were 5.0 mM for L-alanine and 0.04 mM for NAD+, 0.33 mM for pyruvate, 60.6 mM for NH4+ (pH 8.7), and 0.02 mM for NADH. Various L-amino acids including alanine, serine, threonine, and aromatic amino acids, inhibited the aminating reaction. The enzyme was inactivated upon incubation with pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) followed by reduction with sodium borohydride. The copresence of NADH and pyruvate largely protected the enzyme against the inactivation by PLP. PMID:7896761

  14. Role of Alanine Dehydrogenase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during Recovery from Hypoxic Nonreplicating Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Giffin, Michelle M.; Shi, Lanbo; Gennaro, Maria L.; Sohaskey, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis can maintain a nonreplicating persistent state in the host for decades, but must maintain the ability to efficiently reactivate and produce active disease to survive and spread in a population. Among the enzymes expressed during this dormancy is alanine dehydrogenase, which converts pyruvate to alanine, and glyoxylate to glycine concurrent with the oxidation of NADH to NAD. It is involved in the metabolic remodeling of M. tuberculosis through its possible interactions with both the glyoxylate and methylcitrate cycle. Both mRNA levels and enzymatic activities of isocitrate lyase, the first enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, and alanine dehydrogenase increased during entry into nonreplicating persistence, while the gene and activity for the second enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, malate synthase were not. This could suggest a shift in carbon flow away from the glyoxylate cycle and instead through alanine dehydrogenase. Expression of ald was also induced in vitro by other persistence-inducing stresses such as nitric oxide, and was expressed at high levels in vivo during the initial lung infection in mice. Enzyme activity was maintained during extended hypoxia even after transcription levels decreased. An ald knockout mutant of M. tuberculosis showed no reduction in anaerobic survival in vitro, but resulted in a significant lag in the resumption of growth after reoxygenation. During reactivation the ald mutant had an altered NADH/NAD ratio, and alanine dehydrogenase is proposed to maintain the optimal NADH/NAD ratio during anaerobiosis in preparation of eventual regrowth, and during the initial response during reoxygenation. PMID:27203084

  15. Role of Alanine Dehydrogenase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during Recovery from Hypoxic Nonreplicating Persistence.

    PubMed

    Giffin, Michelle M; Shi, Lanbo; Gennaro, Maria L; Sohaskey, Charles D

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis can maintain a nonreplicating persistent state in the host for decades, but must maintain the ability to efficiently reactivate and produce active disease to survive and spread in a population. Among the enzymes expressed during this dormancy is alanine dehydrogenase, which converts pyruvate to alanine, and glyoxylate to glycine concurrent with the oxidation of NADH to NAD. It is involved in the metabolic remodeling of M. tuberculosis through its possible interactions with both the glyoxylate and methylcitrate cycle. Both mRNA levels and enzymatic activities of isocitrate lyase, the first enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, and alanine dehydrogenase increased during entry into nonreplicating persistence, while the gene and activity for the second enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, malate synthase were not. This could suggest a shift in carbon flow away from the glyoxylate cycle and instead through alanine dehydrogenase. Expression of ald was also induced in vitro by other persistence-inducing stresses such as nitric oxide, and was expressed at high levels in vivo during the initial lung infection in mice. Enzyme activity was maintained during extended hypoxia even after transcription levels decreased. An ald knockout mutant of M. tuberculosis showed no reduction in anaerobic survival in vitro, but resulted in a significant lag in the resumption of growth after reoxygenation. During reactivation the ald mutant had an altered NADH/NAD ratio, and alanine dehydrogenase is proposed to maintain the optimal NADH/NAD ratio during anaerobiosis in preparation of eventual regrowth, and during the initial response during reoxygenation. PMID:27203084

  16. L-alanine in a droplet of water: a density-functional molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Degtyarenko, Ivan M; Jalkanen, Karl J; Gurtovenko, Andrey A; Nieminen, Risto M

    2007-04-26

    We report the results of a Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics study on an L-alanine amino acid in neutral aqueous solution. The whole system, the L-alanine zwitterion and 50 water molecules, was treated quantum mechanically. We found that the hydrophobic side chain (R = CH3) defines the trajectory path of the molecule. Initially fully hydrated in an isolated droplet of water, the amino acid moves to the droplet's surface, exposing its hydrophobic methyl group and alpha-hydrogen out of the water. The structure of an L-alanine with the methyl group exposed to the water surface was found to be energetically favorable compared to a fully hydrated molecule. The dynamic behavior of the system suggests that the first hydration shell of the amino acid is localized around carboxylate (CO2-) and ammonium (NH3+) functional groups; it is highly ordered and quite rigid. In contrast, the hydration shell around the side chain is much less structured, suggesting a modest influence of the methyl group on the structure of water. The number of water molecules in the first hydration shell of an alanine molecule is constantly changing; the average number was found to equal 7. The molecular dynamics results show that L-alanine in water does not have a preferred conformation, as all three of the molecule's functional sites (i.e., CH3, NH3+, CO2-) perform rotational movements around the C(alpha)-site bond. PMID:17407339

  17. Perturbation correction for alanine dosimeters in different phantom materials in high-energy photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Voigts-Rhetz, P.; Anton, M.; Vorwerk, H.; Zink, K.

    2016-02-01

    In modern radiotherapy the verification of complex treatments plans is often performed in inhomogeneous or even anthropomorphic phantoms. For dose verification small detectors are necessary and therefore alanine detectors are most suitable. Though the response of alanine for a wide range of clinical photon energies in water is well know, the knowledge about the influence of the surrounding phantom material on the response of alanine is sparse. Therefore we investigated the influence of twenty different surrounding/phantom materials for alanine dosimeters in clinical photon fields via Monte Carlo simulations. The relative electron density of the used materials was in the range {{n}e}/{{n}e,\\text{w}}=0.20 up to 1.69, covering almost all materials appearing in inhomogeneous or anthropomorphic phantoms used in radiotherapy. The investigations were performed for three different clinical photon spectra ranging from 6 to 25 MV-X and Co-60 and as a result a perturbation correction {{k}\\text{env}} depending on the environmental material was established. The Monte Carlo simulation show, that there is only a small dependence of {{k}\\text{env}} on the phantom material and the photon energy, which is below  ±0.6%. The results confirm the good suitability of alanine detectors for in-vivo dosimetry.

  18. Perturbation correction for alanine dosimeters in different phantom materials in high-energy photon beams.

    PubMed

    von Voigts-Rhetz, P; Anton, M; Vorwerk, H; Zink, K

    2016-02-01

    In modern radiotherapy the verification of complex treatments plans is often performed in inhomogeneous or even anthropomorphic phantoms. For dose verification small detectors are necessary and therefore alanine detectors are most suitable. Though the response of alanine for a wide range of clinical photon energies in water is well know, the knowledge about the influence of the surrounding phantom material on the response of alanine is sparse. Therefore we investigated the influence of twenty different surrounding/phantom materials for alanine dosimeters in clinical photon fields via Monte Carlo simulations. The relative electron density of the used materials was in the range [Formula: see text] up to 1.69, covering almost all materials appearing in inhomogeneous or anthropomorphic phantoms used in radiotherapy. The investigations were performed for three different clinical photon spectra ranging from 6 to 25 MV-X and Co-60 and as a result a perturbation correction [Formula: see text] depending on the environmental material was established. The Monte Carlo simulation show, that there is only a small dependence of [Formula: see text] on the phantom material and the photon energy, which is below  ±0.6%. The results confirm the good suitability of alanine detectors for in-vivo dosimetry. PMID:26758810

  19. Competing noncovalent host-guest interactions and H/D exchange: reactions of benzyloxycarbonyl-proline glycine dipeptide variants with ND3.

    PubMed

    Miladi, Mahsan; Olaitan, Abayomi D; Zekavat, Behrooz; Solouki, Touradj

    2015-11-01

    A combination of density functional theory calculations, hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) reactions, ion mobility-mass spectrometry, and isotope labeling tandem mass spectrometry was used to study gas-phase "host-guest" type interactions of a benzyloxycarbonyl (Z)-capped proline (P) glycine (G) model dipeptide (i.e., Z-PG) and its various structural analogues with ND3. It is shown that in a solvent-free environment, structural differences between protonated and alkali metal ion (Na(+), K(+), or Cs(+))-complexed species of Z-PG affect ND3 adduct formation. Specifically, [Z-PG + H](+) and [Z-PG-OCH3 + H](+) formed gas-phase ND3 adducts ([Z-PG (or Z-PG-OCH3) + H + ND3](+)) but no ND3 adducts were observed for [Z-PG + alkali metal](+) or [Z-PG + H - CO2](+). Experimentally measured and theoretically calculated collision cross sections (CCSs) of protonated and alkali metal ion-complexed Z-PG species showed similar trends that agreed with the observed structural differences from molecular modeling results. Moreover, results from theoretical ND3 affinity calculations were consistent with experimental HDX observations, indicating a more stable ND3 adduct for [Z-PG + H](+) compared to [Z-PG + alkali metal](+) species. Molecular modeling and experimental MS results for [Z-PG + H](+) and [Z-PG + alkali metal](+) suggest that optimized cation-π and hydrogen bonding interactions of carbonyl groups in final products are important for ND3 adduct formation. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26289383

  20. Using Position-Specific 13C and 14C Labeling and 13C-PLFA Analysis to Assess Microbial Transformations of Free Versus Sorbed Alanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostel, C.; Herschbach, J.; Bore, E. K.; Kuzyakov, Y.; Dippold, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Sorption of charged or partially charged low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS) to soil mineral surfaces delays microbial uptake and therefore mineralization of LMWOS to CO2, as well as all other biochemical transformations. We used position-specific labeling, a tool of isotope applications novel to soil sciences, to compare the transformation mechanisms of sorbed and non-sorbed alanine in soil. Alanine as an amino acid links C- and N-cycles in soil and therefore is a model substance for the pool of LMWOS. To assess transformations of sorbed alanine, we added position-specific and uniformly 13C and 14C labeled alanine tracer to soil that had previously been sterilized by γ-radiation. The labeled soil was added to non-sterilized soil from the same site and incubated. Soil labeled with the same tracers without previous sorption was prepared and incubated as well. We captured the respired CO2 and determined its 14C-activity at increasing time intervals. The incorporation of 14C into microbial biomass was determined by chloroform fumigation extraction (CFE), and utilization of individual C positions by distinct microbial groups was evaluated by 13C-phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA). A dual peak in the respired CO2 revealed two sorption mechanisms. To compare the fate of individual C atoms independent of their concentration and pool size in soil, we applied the divergence index (DI). The DI reveals the convergent or divergent behavior of C from individual molecule positions during microbial utilization. Alanine C-1 position was mainly oxidized to CO2, while its C-2 and C-3 were preferentially incorporated in microbial biomass and PLFA. This indicates that sorption by the COOH group does not protect this group from preferential oxidation. Microbial metabolism was determinative for the preferential oxidation of individual molecule positions. The use of position-specific labeling revealed mechanisms and kinetics of microbial utilization of sorbed and non

  1. Substrate Specificity of the Aspartate:Alanine Antiporter (AspT) of Tetragenococcus halophilus in Reconstituted Liposomes*

    PubMed Central

    Sasahara, Ayako; Nanatani, Kei; Enomoto, Masaru; Kuwahara, Shigefumi; Abe, Keietsu

    2011-01-01

    The aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of the lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus is a member of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAEx) transporter family. T. halophilus AspT catalyzes the electrogenic exchange of l-aspartate1− with l-alanine0. Although physiological functions of AspT were well studied, l-aspartate1−:l-alanine0 antiport mechanisms are still unsolved. Here we report that the binding sites of l-aspartate and l-alanine are independently present in AspT by means of the kinetic studies. We purified His6-tagged T. halophilus AspT and characterized its kinetic properties when reconstituted in liposomes (Km = 0.35 ± 0.03 mm for l-aspartate, Km = 0.098 ± 0 mm for d-aspartate, Km = 26 ± 2 mm for l-alanine, Km = 3.3 ± 0.2 mm for d-alanine). Competitive inhibition by various amino acids of l-aspartate or l-alanine in self-exchange reactions revealed that l-cysteine selectively inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange but only weakly inhibited l-alanine self-exchange. Additionally, l-serine selectively inhibited l-alanine self-exchange but barely inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange. The aspartate analogs l-cysteine sulfinic acid, l-cysteic acid, and d-cysteic acid competitively and strongly inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange compared with l-alanine self-exchange. Taken together, these kinetic data suggest that the putative binding sites of l-aspartate and l-alanine are independently located in the substrate translocation pathway of AspT. PMID:21719707

  2. Substrate specificity of the aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of Tetragenococcus halophilus in reconstituted liposomes.

    PubMed

    Sasahara, Ayako; Nanatani, Kei; Enomoto, Masaru; Kuwahara, Shigefumi; Abe, Keietsu

    2011-08-19

    The aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of the lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus is a member of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAEx) transporter family. T. halophilus AspT catalyzes the electrogenic exchange of L-aspartate(1-) with L-alanine(0). Although physiological functions of AspT were well studied, L-aspartate(1-):L-alanine(0) antiport mechanisms are still unsolved. Here we report that the binding sites of L-aspartate and L-alanine are independently present in AspT by means of the kinetic studies. We purified His(6)-tagged T. halophilus AspT and characterized its kinetic properties when reconstituted in liposomes (K(m) = 0.35 ± 0.03 mm for L-aspartate, K(m) = 0.098 ± 0 mm for D-aspartate, K(m) = 26 ± 2 mm for L-alanine, K(m) = 3.3 ± 0.2 mm for D-alanine). Competitive inhibition by various amino acids of L-aspartate or L-alanine in self-exchange reactions revealed that L-cysteine selectively inhibited L-aspartate self-exchange but only weakly inhibited L-alanine self-exchange. Additionally, L-serine selectively inhibited L-alanine self-exchange but barely inhibited L-aspartate self-exchange. The aspartate analogs L-cysteine sulfinic acid, L-cysteic acid, and D-cysteic acid competitively and strongly inhibited L-aspartate self-exchange compared with L-alanine self-exchange. Taken together, these kinetic data suggest that the putative binding sites of L-aspartate and L-alanine are independently located in the substrate translocation pathway of AspT. PMID:21719707

  3. Enantioselective [3 + 2] annulation of α-substituted allenoates with β,γ-unsaturated N-sulfonylimines catalyzed by a bifunctional dipeptide phosphine

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Huanzhen; Yao, Weijun

    2016-01-01

    Summary The first enantioselective [3 + 2] annulation of α-substituted allenoates with β,γ-unsaturated N-sulfonylimines is described. In the presence of a dipeptide phosphine catalyst, a wide range of highly functionalized cyclopentenes bearing an all-carbon quaternary center were obtained in moderate to good yields and with good to excellent enantioselectivities. PMID:26977194

  4. N,C-capped dipeptides with selectivity for mycobacterial proteasome over human proteasomes: Role of S3 and S1 binding pockets

    PubMed Central

    Chidawanyika, Tamutenda; Tsu, Christopher; Warrier, Thulasi; Vaubourgeix, Julien; Blackburn, Christopher; Gigstad, Kenneth; Sintchak, Michael; Dick, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    We identified N,C-capped dipeptides that are selective for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteasome over human constitutive and immunoproteasomes. Differences in S3 and S1 binding pockets appeared to account for species-selectivity. The inhibitors are able to penetrate mycobacteria and kill non-replicating M. tuberculosis under nitrosative stress. PMID:23782398

  5. Combined TL and 10B-alanine ESR dosimetry for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Bartolotta, A; D'Oca, M C; Lo Giudice, B; Brai, M; Borio, R; Forini, N; Salvadori, P; Manera, S

    2004-01-01

    The dosimetric technique described in this paper is based on electron spin resonance (ESR) detectors using an alanine-boric compound acid enriched with (10)B, and beryllium oxide thermoluminescent (TL) detectors; with this combined dosimetry, it is possible to discriminate the doses due to thermal neutrons and gamma radiation in a mixed field. Irradiations were carried out inside the thermal column of a TRIGA MARK II water-pool-type research nuclear reactor, also used for Boron Neutron Capture therapy (BNCT) applications, with thermal neutron fluence from 10(9) to 10(14) nth cm(-2). The ESR dosemeters using the alanine-boron compound indicated ESR signals about 30-fold stronger than those using only alanine. Moreover, a negligible correction for the gamma contribution, measured with TL detectors, almost insensitive to thermal neutrons, was necessary. Therefore, a simultaneous analysis of our TL and ESR detectors allows discrimination between thermal neutron and gamma doses, as required in BNCT. PMID:15353720

  6. Applicability of EPR/alanine dosimetry for quality assurance in proton eye radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Michalec, B; Mierzwinska, G; Ptaszkiewicz, M; Sowa, U; Stolarczyk, L; Weber, A

    2014-06-01

    A new quality assurance and quality control method for proton eye radiotherapy based on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)/alanine dosimetry has been developed. It is based on Spread-Out Bragg Peak entrance dose measurement with alanine detectors. The entrance dose is well correlated with the dose at the facility isocenter, where, during the therapeutic irradiation, the tumour is placed. The unique alanine detector features namely keeping the dose record in a form of stable radiation-induced free radicals trapped in the material structure, and the non-destructive read-out makes this type of detector a good candidate for additional documentation of the patient's exposure over the therapy course. PMID:24876341

  7. Requirement for alanine in the amino acid control of deprivation-induced protein degradation in liver.

    PubMed Central

    Pösö, A R; Mortimore, G E

    1984-01-01

    Protein degradation in liver is actively controlled by a small group of inhibitory amino acids--leucine, tyrosine (or phenylalanine), glutamine, proline, histidine, tryptophan, and methionine. Other evidence, however, suggests that one or more of the remaining 12 noninhibitory amino acids is also required for suppression of proteolysis at normal concentrations. This question was investigated in livers of fed rats perfused in the single-pass mode. The deletion of alanine at normal (1x), but not at 4x or 10x normal, plasma amino acid concentrations evoked a near-maximal acceleration of protein degradation. No other noninhibitory amino acid was effective. Because alanine alone was not directly inhibitory and its omission was not associated with a decrease in inhibitory amino acid pools, alanine was presumed to act as a coregulator in the expression of inhibitory activity. When tested alone, the inhibitory group was as effective as the complete mixture at 0.5x and 4x levels, but it lost its suppressive ability within a narrow zone of concentration centered slightly above 1x. The addition of 1x (0.48 mM) alanine completely restored the inhibition. Pyruvate and lactate could be effectively substituted, but only at concentrations 10-20 times greater than that of alanine. These, together with earlier findings, indicate the existence of a regulatory complex that recognizes specific amino acids and transmits positive and negative signals to proteolytic sites. The results also suggest that alanine can provide an important regulatory link between energy demands and protein degradation. PMID:6589593

  8. Structural and catalytic properties of L-alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Porumb, H; Vancea, D; Mureşan, L; Presecan, E; Lascu, I; Petrescu, I; Porumb, T; Pop, R; Bârzu, O

    1987-04-01

    Alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus cereus, a non-allosteric enzyme composed of six identical subunits, was purified to homogeneity by chromatography on blue-Sepharose and Sepharose 6B-CL. Like other pyridine-linked dehydrogenases, alanine dehydrogenase is inhibited by Cibacron blue, competitively with respect to NADH and noncompetitively with respect to pyruvate. The enzyme was inactivated by 0.1 M glycine/HCl (pH 2) and reactivated by 0.1 M phosphate (pH 8) supplemented with NAD+ or NADH. The reactivation was characterized by sigmoidal kinetics indicating a complex mechanism involving rate-limiting folding and association steps. Cibacron blue interfered with renaturation, presumably by competition with NADH. Chromatography on Sepharose 6B-CL of the partially renatured alanine dehydrogenase led to the separation of several intermediates, but only the hexamer was characterized by enzymatic activity. By immobilization on Sepharose 4B, alanine dehydrogenase from B. cereus retained 66% of the specific activity of the soluble enzyme. After denaturation of immobilized alanine dehydrogenase with 7 M urea, 37% of the initial protein was still bound to Sepharose, indicating that on the average the hexamer was attached to the matrix via, at most, two subunits. The ability of the denatured, immobilized subunits to pick up subunits from solution shows their capacity to fold back to the native conformation after urea treatment. The formation of "hybrids" between subunits of enzyme from B. cereus and Bacillus subtilis demonstrates the close resemblance of the tertiary and quaternary structures of alanine dehydrogenases from these species. PMID:3104322

  9. Relative response of the alanine dosimeter to medium energy x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anton, M.; Büermann, L.

    2015-08-01

    The response of the alanine dosimeter to kilovoltage x-rays with respect to the dose to water was measured, relative to the response to Co-60 radiation. Two series of x-ray qualities were investigated, one ranging from 30 kV to 100 kV tube voltage (TW series), the other one ranging from 70 kV to 280 kV (TH series). Due to the use of the water calorimeter as a primary standard, the uncertainty of the delivered dose is significantly lower than for other published data. The alanine response was measured as described in a previous publication (Anton et al 2013 Phys. Med. Biol. 58 3259-82). The uncertainty component due to the alanine measurement and analysis is ⩽0.4%, the major part of the combined uncertainty of the relative response originates from the uncertainty of the delivered dose. The relative uncertainties of the relative response vary from ⩽2% for the TW series to ⩽1.1% for the TH series. Different from the behaviour of the alanine dosimeter for megavoltage x-rays or electrons, the relative response drops significantly from unity for Co-60 radiation to less than 64% for the TW quality with a tube voltage of 30 kV. In order to reproduce this behaviour through Monte Carlo simulations, not only the ratio of the absorbed dose to alanine to the absorbed dose to water has to be known, but also the intrinsic efficiency, i.e. the dependence of the number of free radicals generated per unit of absorbed dose on the photon energy. This quantity is not yet accessible for the TW series. For a possible use of the alanine dosimeter for kilovoltage x-rays, for example in electronic brachytherapy, users should rely on the measured data for the relative response which have become available with this publication.

  10. Relative response of the alanine dosimeter to medium energy x-rays.

    PubMed

    Anton, M; Büermann, L

    2015-08-01

    The response of the alanine dosimeter to kilovoltage x-rays with respect to the dose to water was measured, relative to the response to Co-60 radiation.Two series of x-ray qualities were investigated, one ranging from 30 kV to 100 kV tube voltage (TW series), the other one ranging from 70 kV to 280 kV (TH series). Due to the use of the water calorimeter as a primary standard, the uncertainty of the delivered dose is significantly lower than for other published data. The alanine response was measured as described in a previous publication (Anton et al 2013 Phys. Med. Biol. 58 3259-82). The uncertainty component due to the alanine measurement and analysis is ⩽0.4%, the major part of the combined uncertainty of the relative response originates from the uncertainty of the delivered dose. The relative uncertainties of the relative response vary from ⩽2% for the TW series to ⩽1.1% for the TH series.Different from the behaviour of the alanine dosimeter for megavoltage x-rays or electrons, the relative response drops significantly from unity for Co-60 radiation to less than 64% for the TW quality with a tube voltage of 30 kV. In order to reproduce this behaviour through Monte Carlo simulations, not only the ratio of the absorbed dose to alanine to the absorbed dose to water has to be known, but also the intrinsic efficiency, i.e. the dependence of the number of free radicals generated per unit of absorbed dose on the photon energy. This quantity is not yet accessible for the TW series.For a possible use of the alanine dosimeter for kilovoltage x-rays, for example in electronic brachytherapy, users should rely on the measured data for the relative response which have become available with this publication. PMID:26216572

  11. The effect of β-alanine supplementation on cycling time trials of different length.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, Phillip M; Minahan, Clare L

    2016-10-01

    The varying results reported in response to β-alanine supplementation may be related to the duration and nature of the exercise protocol employed. We investigated the effects of β-alanine supplementation on a wide range of cycling performance tests in order to produce a clear concise set of criteria for its efficacy. Fourteen trained cyclists (Age = 24.8 ± 6.7 years; VO2max = 65.4 ± 10.2 mL·kg·min(-1)) participated in this placebo-controlled, double-blind study. Prior to supplementation, subjects completed two (familiarization and baseline) supramaximal cycling bouts until exhaustion (120% pre-supplementation VO2max) and two 1-, 4- and 10-km cycling time trial (TT). Subjects then supplemented orally for 4 weeks with 6.4 g/d placebo or β-alanine and repeated the battery of performance tests. Blood lactate was measured pre-exercise, post-exercise and 5  min post-exercise. β-alanine supplementation elicited significant increases in time to exhaustion (TTE) (17.6 ± 11.5 s; p = 0.013, effect compared with placebo) and was likely to be beneficial to 4-km TT performance time (-7.8 ± 8.1 s; 94% likelihood), despite not being statistically different (p = 0.060). Performance times in the 1- and 10-km TT were not affected by treatment. For the highly trained cyclists in the current study, β-alanine supplementation significantly extended supramaximal cycling TTE and may have provided a worthwhile improvement to 4-km TT performance. However, 1- and 10-km cycling TT performance appears to be unaffected by β-alanine supplementation. PMID:26652037

  12. The energy dependence of lithium formate and alanine EPR dosimeters for medium energy x rays

    SciTech Connect

    Waldeland, Einar; Hole, Eli Olaug; Sagstuen, Einar; Malinen, Eirik

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To perform a systematic investigation of the energy dependence of alanine and lilthium formate EPR dosimeters for medium energy x rays. Methods: Lithium formate and alanine EPR dosimeters were exposed to eight different x-ray beam qualities, with nominal potentials ranging from 50 to 200 kV. Following ionometry based on standards of absorbed dose to water, the dosimeters were given two different doses of approximately 3 and 6 Gy for each radiation quality, with three dosimeters for each dose. A reference series was also irradiated to three different dose levels at a {sup 60}Co unit. The dose to water energy response, that is, the dosimeter reading per absorbed dose to water relative to that for {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays, was estimated for each beam quality. In addition, the energy response was calculated by Monte Carlo simulations and compared to the experimental energy response. Results: The experimental energy response estimates ranged from 0.89 to 0.94 and from 0.68 to 0.90 for lithium formate and alanine, respectively. The uncertainties in the experimental energy response estimates were typically 3%. The relative effectiveness, that is, the ratio of the experimental energy response to that following Monte Carlo simulations was, on average, 0.96 and 0.94 for lithium formate and alanine, respectively. Conclusions: This work shows that lithium formate dosimeters are less dependent on x-ray energy than alanine. Furthermore, as the relative effectiveness for both lithium formate and alanine were systematically less than unity, the yield of radiation-induced radicals is decreased following x-irradiation compared to irradiation with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays.

  13. Temperature-sensitive mutants of Escherichia coli K-12 with low activities of the L-alanine adding enzyme and the D-alanyl-D-alanine adding enzyme.

    PubMed

    Lugtenberg, E J; v Schijndel-van Dam, A

    1972-04-01

    A number of properties of temperature-sensitive mutants in murein synthesis are described. The mutants grow at 30 C but lyse at 42 C. One mutant possesses a temperature-sensitive d-alanyl-d-alanine adding enzyme, has an impaired rate of murein synthesis in vivo at both 30 and 42 C, and contains elevated levels of uridine diphosphate-N-acetyl-muramyl-tripeptide (UDP-MurNAc-l-Ala-d-Glu-m-diaminopimelic acid) at 42 C. The other mutant possesses an l-alanine adding enzyme with a very low in vitro activity at both 30 and 42 C. Its in vivo rate of murein synthesis is almost normal at 30 C but is much less at 42 C. When the murein precursors were isolated after incubation of the cells in the presence of (14)C-l-alanine, they contained only a fraction of the radioactivity that could be obtained from a wild-type strain. A genetic nomenclature for genes concerned with murein synthesis is proposed. PMID:4552998

  14. Anaerobic Accumulation of γ-Aminobutyric Acid and Alanine in Radish Leaves (Raphanus sativus, L.)

    PubMed Central

    Streeter, John G.; Thompson, John F.

    1972-01-01

    In leaves, the anaerobic accumulation of alanine was accompanied by a loss of aspartate, and these changes preceded γ-aminobutyrate accumulation and glutamate loss. Changes in keto acid content did not appear to be the cause of amino acid changes. Accumulation of γ-aminobutyrate was due to acceleration of glutamate decarboxylation and arrest of γ-aminobutyrate transamination. Changes in enzyme content did not explain the changes in reaction rates in vivo. Most of the aspartate may be converted anaerobically to alanine via oxalacetate and pyruvate. PMID:16658004

  15. Altered Strand Transfer Activity of a Multi-drug-resistant Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Reverse Transcriptase Mutant with a Dipeptide Fingers Domain Insertion

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Laura A.; Daddacha, Waaqo; Rigby, Sean; Bambara, Robert A.; Kim, Baek

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) with multiple nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infected patients can induce the development of an HIV-1 RT harboring a dipeptide insertion at the RT fingers domain with a background thymidine analog mutation (TAM). This mutation renders viral resistance to multiple NRTIs. We investigated the effect of the dipeptide fingers domain insertion mutation on strand transfer activity using two clinical RT variants isolated during pre- and post-treatment of an infected patient, termed pre-drug RT without the dipeptide insertion and post-drug RT with the Ser-Gly insertion mutation, respectively. First, the post-drug RT displayed elevated strand transfer activity, compared to the pre-drug RT, with two different RNA templates. Second, the post-drug RT exhibited less RNA template degradation than the pre-drug RT, but higher polymerization-dependent RNase H activity. Third, the post-drug RT had a faster association rate for template binding (kon) and lower equilibrium binding constant KD to template, leading to the tighter template binding affinity than the pre-drug RT. The koff rates for pre-drug RT and post-drug RTs were similar. Finally, the removal of the dipeptide insertion from the post-drug RT abolished the elevated strand transfer activity and RNase H activity in addition to the loss of AZT resistance. These biochemical data suggests that the dipeptide insertion mutation elevates strand transfer activity by increasing the interaction of the RT with RNA donor template, promoting cleavage that generates more invasion site for the acceptor template during DNA synthesis. PMID:22100453

  16. Un-catalyzed peptide bond formation between two monomers of glycine, alanine, serine, threonine, and aspartic acid in gas phase: a density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhunia, Snehasis; Singh, Ajeet; Ojha, Animesh K.

    2016-05-01

    In the present report, un-catalyzed peptide bond formation between two monomers of glycine (Gly), alanine (Ala), serine (Ser), threonine (Thr), and aspartic acid (Asp) has been investigated in gas phase via two steps reaction mechanism and concerted mechanism at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) and M062X/6-31G(d,p) level of theories. The peptide bond is formed through a nucleophilic reaction via transition states, TS1 and TS2 in stepwise mechanism. The TS1 reveals formation of a new C-N bond while TS2 illustrate the formation of C=O bond. In case of concerted mechanism, C-N bond is formed by a single four-centre transition state (TS3). The energy barrier is used to explain the involvement of energy at each step of the reaction. The energy barrier (20-48 kcal/mol) is required for the transformation of reactant state R1 to TS1 state and intermediate state I1 to TS2 state. The large value of energy barrier is explained in terms of distortion and interaction energies for stepwise mechanism. The energy barrier of TS3 in concerted mechanism is very close to the energy barrier of the first transition state (TS1) of the stepwise mechanism for the formation of Gly-Gly and Ala-Ala di- peptide. However, in case of Ser-Ser, Thr-Thr and Asp-Asp di-peptide, the energy barrier of TS3 is relatively high than that of the energy barrier of TS1 calculated at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) and M062X/6-31G(d,p) level of theories. In both the mechanisms, the value of energy barrier calculated at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory is greater than that of the value calculated at M062X/6-31G(d,p) level of theory.

  17. Cytokeratin 18, Alanine Aminotransferase, Platelets and Triglycerides Predict the Presence of Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Wei; Zhao, Caiyan; Shen, Chuan; Wang, Yadong

    2013-01-01

    Background Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the critical public health problems in China. The full spectrum of the disease ranges from simple steatosis and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC). The infiltration of inflammatory cells characterizes NASH. This characteristic contributes to the progression of hepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and HCC. Therefore, distinguishing NASH from NAFLD is crucial. Objective and Methods Ninety-five patients with NAFLD, 44 with NASH, and 51 with non-NASH were included in the study to develop a new scoring system for differentiating NASH from NAFLD. Data on clinical and biological characteristics, as well as blood information, were obtained. Cytokeratin-18 (CK-18) fragments levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay. Results Several indexes show significant differences between the two groups, which include body mass index (BMI), waist-on-hip ratio (WHR), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GT), platelets, uric acid (UA), hs-C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), triglycerides (TG), albumin (ALB), and CK-18 fragments (all P < 0.05). The CK-18 fragment levels showed a significant positive correlation with steatosis severity, ballooning, lobular inflammation, and fibrosis stage (all P < 0.05). Therefore, a new model that combines ALT, platelets, CK-18 fragments, and TG was established by logistic regression among NAFLD patients. The AUROC curve in predicting NASH was 0.920 (95% CI: 0.866 - 0.974, cutoff value = 0.361, sensitivity = 89%, specificity = 86%, positive predictive value = 89%, negative predictive value = 89%). Conclusion The novel scoring system may be considered as a useful model in predicting the presence of NASH in NAFLD patients. PMID:24324749

  18. Solvated states of poly-L-alanine α-helix explored by Raman optical activity.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shigeki; Furukawa, Tatsuya; Bouř, Petr; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2014-05-22

    Raman optical activity (ROA) reveals surprising details of the secondary structure of polypeptides and proteins in solution phase. Yet specific spectral features, such as in the extended amide III region of hydrated α-helix, did not seem explicable by the generally accepted sensitivity of ROA to the local conformation. This is reconciled in the present study by simulations of ROA spectra for model α-helical structures. Two positive ROA peaks often observed at around 1340 and 1300 cm(-1) for polypeptides and proteins have been assigned to two types of solvated α-helices; one is stable in hydrophilic environment where amide groups make hydrogen bonds to solvent molecules or polar side chains (∼1340 cm(-1)), and the other is supported by a hydrophobic environment without the possibility of external hydrogen bonds (∼1300 cm(-1)). For poly-L-alanine (PLA), regarded as a good model of α-helical structure, the experimentally observed relative intensity ratio of the two ROA bands has been explained by a conformational equilibrium depending on the solvent polarity. The intensities of the bands reflect solvated and unsolvated α-helical geometries, with peptide backbone torsional angles (ϕi+1, ψi) of (-66°, -41°) and (-59°, -44°), respectively. Quantum-mechanical simulations of the ROA spectra utilizing the normal mode optimization and Cartesian tensor transfer methods indicate, however, that the change in dielectric constant of the solvent is the main factor for the spectral intensity change, whereas the influence of the conformational change is minor. PMID:24758541

  19. The associations of physical activity and adiposity with alanine aminotransferase and gamma-glutamyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Debbie A; Sattar, Naveed; Smith, George Davey; Ebrahim, Shah

    2005-06-01

    The mechanisms linking obesity and inactivity to diabetes mellitus are unclear. Recent studies have shown associations of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) with diabetes. In a random sample of 3,789 British women aged 60-79 years, the authors examined the associations of obesity and physical activity with ALT and GGT (1999-2001). Both body mass index and waist:hip ratio were independently (of each other, physical activity, alcohol consumption, smoking, and childhood and adulthood social class) positively and linearly associated with ALT and GGT. In adjusted models, a one-standard-deviation increase in body mass index was associated with a 0.46-units/liter (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.16, 0.75) increase in ALT and a 2.14-units/liter (95% CI: 0.99, 3.30) increase in GGT. Similar results for a one-standard-deviation increase in waist:hip ratio were 13.96 (95% CI: 10.44, 17.48) for ALT and 39.44 (95% CI: 25.89, 52.98) for GGT. Frequency of physical activity was inversely and linearly associated with GGT in fully adjusted models, but the inverse association with ALT was attenuated towards the null after adjustment for body mass index and waist:hip ratio. Adjustment for ALT and GGT resulted in some attenuation of the strong linear associations of body mass index and waist:hip ratio with diabetes. These findings provide some support for the suggestion that the relation between obesity and diabetes is, at least in part, mediated by liver pathology. PMID:15901629

  20. hPEPT1 affinity and translocation of selected Gln-Sar and Glu-Sar dipeptide derivatives.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, André Huss; Elm, Peter L; Begtrup, Mikael; Nielsen, Robert; Steffansen, Bente; Brodin, Birger

    2005-01-01

    The intestinal di- and tripeptide transporter hPEPT1 is considered responsible for the absorption of di- and tripeptides arising from digestion, along with several drugs and prodrugs. In order to gather information on the binding site of the protein, several structure-affinity relationships have been suggested. However, these are not necessarily predictive of compounds that are actually translocated by hPEPT1. More information on affinity to and translocation via hPEPT1 of side-chain-modified dipeptides may be gained by conducting a study of selected dipeptide derivatives with variety in size, hydrophobicity, and bond type. The aim of the present study was to synthesize new esters and amides based on L-Glu-Sar and investigate the effects that bond type and size of modification of the N-terminal side chain of sarcosine-containing dipeptides have on the affinity to and translocation via hPEPT1. The esters L-Glu(O-i-Bu)-Sar and L-Glu(OCH(2)Ada)-Sar and the amides L-Gln(N,N-dimethyl)-Sar and L-Gln(N-piperidinyl)-Sar were synthesized, and affinity to and translocation via hPEPT1 were investigated in mature Caco-2 cell monolayers, grown on permeable supports. Affinity was estimated in a competition assay using (14)C-labeled Gly-Sar. Translocation was measured as fluorescence ratios induced by the substrates using the fluorescent probe BCECF and an epifluorescence microscope setup. All compounds showed high affinity to hPEPT1, but only the amides L-Gln(N,N-dimethyl)-Sar and L-Gln(N-piperidinyl)-Sar were translocated by hPEPT1. hPEPT1 is very susceptible to modifications of the N-terminal amino acid side chain of dipeptidomimetic substrates, in terms of achieving compounds with high affinity for the transporter. However, as affinity is not predictive of translocation, derivatization in this position must be performed with great caution since some of the compounds investigated turn out not to be translocated by the transporter. PMID:15934785

  1. Control of the Handedness of Self-assemblies of Dipeptides by the Chirality of Phenylalanine and Steric Hindrance of Phenylglycine.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuwei; Li, Yi; Li, Baozong; Yang, Yonggang

    2016-07-26

    Eight dipeptides, composed of phenylalanine and phenylglycine, that are able to self-assemble into twisted nanoribbons in deionized water are synthesized. The handedness of the nanoribbons is controlled by the chirality of the phenylalanine and the steric hindrance owing to the phenyl group of the phenylglycine. When the phenylalanine is at the C-terminal, π-π stacking by the phenyl groups, hydrogen bonding by the NH group of the phenylalanine, and hydrophobic associations of the alkyl chains control the stacking of the molecules. When phenylglycine is at the C-terminal, the chiral π-π stacking by the phenyl groups of the phenylalanines is suppressed. The hydrogen bonds formed by the NH groups of the phenylalanines had a greater contribution on forming organic self-assemblies than those formed by the NH groups of the phenylglycines. PMID:27389603

  2. [Aspartame--the sweet-tasting dipeptide--does not affect the pancreatic insulin-secreting function].

    PubMed

    Sadovnikova, N V; Fedotov, V P; Aleshina, L V; Shvachkin, Iu P; Girin, S K

    1984-01-01

    The action of a synthetic dipeptide aspartam (150 to 180 times as sweet as glucose) on pancreatic insulin-secretory function of rats was studied in vivo and in vitro. The drug was given orally while drinking (300 mg/kg body weight) or was added to the incubation medium of cultivated pancreatic cells (20 mM). It was shown that insulin content in the rat blood serum remained unchanged 10 and 35 minutes after aspartam administration. The drug did not exert any stimulating effect upon insulin secretion following the addition to the pancreatic cell culture medium. It is concluded that aspartam exhibits no direct or mediated action on pancreatic insulin-secretory function. PMID:6382247

  3. Bioinspired fluorescent dipeptide nanoparticles for targeted cancer cell imaging and real-time monitoring of drug release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhen; Sun, Leming; Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Zhang, Mingjun

    2016-04-01

    Peptide nanostructures are biodegradable and are suitable for many biomedical applications. However, to be useful imaging probes, the limited intrinsic optical properties of peptides must be overcome. Here we show the formation of tryptophan–phenylalanine dipeptide nanoparticles (DNPs) that can shift the peptide's intrinsic fluorescent signal from the ultraviolet to the visible range. The visible emission signal allows the DNPs to act as imaging and sensing probes. The peptide design is inspired by the red shift seen in the yellow fluorescent protein that results from π–π stacking and by the enhanced fluorescence intensity seen in the green fluorescent protein mutant, BFPms1, which results from the structure rigidification by Zn(II). We show that DNPs are photostable, biocompatible and have a narrow emission bandwidth and visible fluorescence properties. DNPs functionalized with the MUC1 aptamer and doxorubicin can target cancer cells and can be used to image and monitor drug release in real time.

  4. Macrophages are stimulated by muramyl dipeptide to induce polymorphonuclear leukocyte accumulation in the peritoneal cavities of guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Nagao, S; Nakanishi, M; Kutsukake, H; Yagawa, K; Kusumoto, S; Shiba, T; Tanaka, A; Kotani, S

    1990-02-01

    N-Acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine (muramyl dipeptide [MDP]) injected intraperitoneally significantly increased the number of cells entering the peritoneal cavity of guinea pigs primed with liquid paraffin or thioglycollate. There was a close relationship between peritoneal polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) accumulation and the uptake of glucosamine by macrophages in guinea pigs treated with a variety of bacterial cell surface components such as cell wall peptidoglycan subunits and bacterial or synthetic lipid A. The PMN accumulation was also facilitated by the intraperitoneal transfer of the peritoneal macrophages that had been stimulated by MDP in vitro. Furthermore, cell-free lavage fluids taken from the peritoneum of MDP-treated guinea pigs also initiated the influx of PMNs when introduced into the peritoneal cavities of liquid paraffin-pretreated guinea pigs. These results suggest that a soluble factor which attracts neutrophils is produced by MDP-treated macrophages. Partial characterization of the factor is described. PMID:2298491

  5. 40 CFR 721.520 - Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...)(4), (c)(4) (where N = 100). The requirement of 40 CFR 721.91(a)(4) that the amount of the substance...-, salt. 721.520 Section 721.520 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.520 Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt. (a) Chemical...

  6. 40 CFR 721.520 - Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...)(4), (c)(4) (where N = 100). The requirement of 40 CFR 721.91(a)(4) that the amount of the substance...-, salt. 721.520 Section 721.520 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.520 Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt. (a) Chemical...

  7. Protein Homeostasis Defects of Alanine-Glyoxylate Aminotransferase: New Therapeutic Strategies in Primary Hyperoxaluria Type I

    PubMed Central

    Pey, Angel L.; Albert, Armando; Salido, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase catalyzes the transamination between L-alanine and glyoxylate to produce pyruvate and glycine using pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) as cofactor. Human alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase is a peroxisomal enzyme expressed in the hepatocytes, the main site of glyoxylate detoxification. Its deficit causes primary hyperoxaluria type I, a rare but severe inborn error of metabolism. Single amino acid changes are the main type of mutation causing this disease, and considerable effort has been dedicated to the understanding of the molecular consequences of such missense mutations. In this review, we summarize the role of protein homeostasis in the basic mechanisms of primary hyperoxaluria. Intrinsic physicochemical properties of polypeptide chains such as thermodynamic stability, folding, unfolding, and misfolding rates as well as the interaction of different folding states with protein homeostasis networks are essential to understand this disease. The view presented has important implications for the development of new therapeutic strategies based on targeting specific elements of alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase homeostasis. PMID:23956997

  8. Beta-alanine/alpha-ketoglutarate aminotransferase for 3-hydroxypropionic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Jessen, Holly Jean; Liao, Hans H; Gort, Steven John; Selifonova, Olga V

    2014-11-18

    The present disclosure provides novel beta-alanine/alpha ketoglutarate aminotransferase nucleic acid and protein sequences having increased biological activity. Also provided are cells containing such enzymes, as well as methods of their use, for example to produce malonyl semialdehyde and downstream products thereof, such as 3-hydroxypropionic acid and derivatives thereof.

  9. Growth and characterization of pure and semiorganic nonlinear optical Lithium Sulphate admixtured l-alanine crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vela, T.; Selvarajan, P.; Freeda, T. H.; Balasubramanian, K.

    2013-04-01

    Lithium sulphate admixtured l-alanine (LSLA) salt was synthesized and the solubility of the commercially available l-alanine and the synthesized LSLA sample was determined in de-ionized water at various temperatures. In accordance with the solubility data, the saturated aqueous solutions of l-alanine and lithium admixtured l-alanine were prepared separately and the single crystals of the samples were grown by the solution method with a slow evaporation technique. Studying single x-ray diffraction shows that pure and LSLA crystal belong to the orthorhombic system with a non-centrosymmetric space group P212121. Using the powder x-ray diffraction study, the crystallinity of the grown crystals is confirmed and the diffraction peaks are indexed. The various functional groups present in the pure and LSLA crystal are elucidated from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study. UV-visible transmittance is recorded to study the optical transmittance range for the grown crystals. The powder second harmonic generation test confirms the nonlinear optical property of the grown crystals. From the microhardness test, the hardness of the grown crystals is estimated. The dielectric behaviour, such as the dielectric constant and the loss of the sample, are measured as a function of temperature and frequency. The ac conductivity of the grown crystals is also studied and the activation energy is calculated.

  10. 21 CFR 862.1030 - Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system. 862.1030 Section 862.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  11. 21 CFR 862.1030 - Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system. 862.1030 Section 862.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  12. 21 CFR 862.1030 - Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system. 862.1030 Section 862.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  13. 21 CFR 862.1030 - Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system. 862.1030 Section 862.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1030 - Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system. 862.1030 Section 862.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  15. Synthesis, characterization, and biocompatible properties of alanine-grafted chitosan copolymers.

    PubMed

    Park, Gyu Han; Kang, Min-Sil; Knowles, Jonathan C; Gong, Myoung-Seon

    2016-04-01

    In order to overcome major problems regarding the lack of affinity to solvents and limited reactivity of the free amines of chitosan, introduction of appropriate spacer arms having terminal amine function is considered of interest.L-Alanine-N-carboxyanhydride was grafted onto chitosan via anionic ring-opening polymerization. The chemical and structural characterizations ofL-alanine-grafted chitosan (Ala-g-Cts) were confirmed through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H NMR). In addition, the viscoelastic properties ofAla-g-Cts were examined by means of a rotational viscometer, and thermal analysis was carried out with a thermogravimetric analyzer and differential scanning calorimetry. Morphological changes in the chitosanL-alanine moiety were determined by x-ray diffraction. To determine the feasibility of using these films as biomedical materials, we investigated the effects of theirL-alanine content on physical and mechanical properties. The biodegradation results of crosslinkedAla-g-Cts films were evaluated in phosphate-buffered solution containing lysozyme at 37℃. Proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells on crosslinkedAla-g-Cts films was also investigated with use of the CCK-8 assay. PMID:26767393

  16. AlaScan: A Graphical User Interface for Alanine Scanning Free-Energy Calculations.

    PubMed

    Ramadoss, Vijayaraj; Dehez, François; Chipot, Christophe

    2016-06-27

    Computation of the free-energy changes that underlie molecular recognition and association has gained significant importance due to its considerable potential in drug discovery. The massive increase of computational power in recent years substantiates the application of more accurate theoretical methods for the calculation of binding free energies. The impact of such advances is the application of parent approaches, like computational alanine scanning, to investigate in silico the effect of amino-acid replacement in protein-ligand and protein-protein complexes, or probe the thermostability of individual proteins. Because human effort represents a significant cost that precludes the routine use of this form of free-energy calculations, minimizing manual intervention constitutes a stringent prerequisite for any such systematic computation. With this objective in mind, we propose a new plug-in, referred to as AlaScan, developed within the popular visualization program VMD to automate the major steps in alanine-scanning calculations, employing free-energy perturbation as implemented in the widely used molecular dynamics code NAMD. The AlaScan plug-in can be utilized upstream, to prepare input files for selected alanine mutations. It can also be utilized downstream to perform the analysis of different alanine-scanning calculations and to report the free-energy estimates in a user-friendly graphical user interface, allowing favorable mutations to be identified at a glance. The plug-in also assists the end-user in assessing the reliability of the calculation through rapid visual inspection. PMID:27214306

  17. Mechanism of inactivation of alanine racemase by beta, beta, beta-trifluoroalanine

    SciTech Connect

    Faraci, W.S.; Walsh, C.T.

    1989-01-24

    The alanine racemases are a group of PLP-dependent bacterial enzymes that catalyze the racemization of alanine, providing D-alanine for cell wall synthesis. Inactivation of the alanine racemases from the Gram-negative organism Salmonella typhimurium and Gram-positive organism Bacillus stearothermophilus with beta, beta, beta-trifluoroalanine has been studied. The inactivation occurs with the same rate constant as that for formation of a broad 460-490-nm chromophore. Loss of two fluoride ions per mole of inactivated enzyme and retention of (1-/sup 14/C)trifluoroalanine label accompany inhibition, suggesting a monofluoro enzyme adduct. Partial denaturation (1 M guanidine) leads to rapid return of the initial 420-nm chromophore, followed by a slower (t1/2 approximately 30 min-1 h) loss of the fluoride ion and /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ release. At this point, reduction by NaB/sub 3/H/sub 4/ and tryptic digestion yield a single radiolabeled peptide. Purification and sequencing of the peptide reveals that lysine-38 is covalently attached to the PLP cofactor. A mechanism for enzyme inactivation by trifluoroalanine is proposed and contrasted with earlier results on monohaloalanines, in which nucleophilic attack of released aminoacrylate on the PLP aldimine leads to enzyme inactivation. For trifluoroalanine inactivation, nucleophilic attack of lysine-38 on the electrophilic beta-difluoro-alpha, beta-unsaturated imine provides an alternative mode of inhibition for these enzymes.

  18. Beta-alanine/alpha-ketoglutarate aminotransferase for 3-hydroxypropionic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Jessen, Holly Jean; Liao, Hans H.; Gort, Steven John; Selifonova, Olga V.

    2011-10-04

    The present disclosure provides novel beta-alanine/alpha ketoglutarate aminotransferase nucleic acid and protein sequences having increased biological activity. Also provided are cells containing such enzymes, as well as methods of their use, for example to produce malonyl semialdehyde and downstream products thereof, such as 3-hydroxypropionic acid and derivatives thereof.

  19. 40 CFR 721.520 - Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...)(4), (c)(4) (where N = 100). The requirement of 40 CFR 721.91(a)(4) that the amount of the substance...-, salt. 721.520 Section 721.520 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.520 Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt. (a) Chemical...

  20. 40 CFR 721.520 - Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...)(4), (c)(4) (where N = 100). The requirement of 40 CFR 721.91(a)(4) that the amount of the substance...-, salt. 721.520 Section 721.520 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.520 Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt. (a) Chemical...

  1. 40 CFR 721.520 - Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...)(4), (c)(4) (where N = 100). The requirement of 40 CFR 721.91(a)(4) that the amount of the substance...-, salt. 721.520 Section 721.520 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.520 Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt. (a) Chemical...

  2. Structural Characterization and Epitope Mapping of the Glutamic Acid/Alanine-rich Protein from Trypanosoma congolense

    PubMed Central

    Loveless, Bianca C.; Mason, Jeremy W.; Sakurai, Tatsuya; Inoue, Noboru; Razavi, Morteza; Pearson, Terry W.; Boulanger, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Trypanosoma congolense is an African trypanosome that causes serious disease in cattle in Sub-Saharan Africa. The four major life cycle stages of T. congolense can be grown in vitro, which has led to the identification of several cell-surface molecules expressed on the parasite during its transit through the tsetse vector. One of these, glutamic acid/alanine-rich protein (GARP), is the first expressed on procyclic forms in the tsetse midgut and is of particular interest because it replaces the major surface coat molecule of bloodstream forms, the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) that protects the parasite membrane, and is involved in antigenic variation. Unlike VSG, however, the function of GARP is not known, which necessarily limits our understanding of parasite survival in the tsetse. Toward establishing the function of GARP, we report its three-dimensional structure solved by iodide phasing to a resolution of 1.65 Å. An extended helical bundle structure displays an unexpected and significant degree of homology to the core structure of VSG, the only other major surface molecule of trypanosomes to be structurally characterized. Immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoaffinity-tandem mass spectrometry were used in conjunction with monoclonal antibodies to map both non-surface-disposed and surface epitopes. Collectively, these studies enabled us to derive a model describing the orientation and assembly of GARP on the surface of trypanosomes. The data presented here suggest the possible structure-function relationships involved in replacement of the bloodstream form VSG by GARP as trypanosomes differentiate in the tsetse vector after a blood meal. PMID:21471223

  3. Anthropometric Indices in Adults: Which Is the Best Indicator to Identify Alanine Aminotransferase Levels?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuang; Guo, Xiaofan; Yu, Shasha; Zhou, Ying; Li, Zhao; Sun, Yingxian

    2016-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the correlations between serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels and anthropometric indices including body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (HC), waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), and a new body index, the A Body Shape Index (ABSI) in Chinese adults. Methods: A multicenter, cross-sectional study was conducted in rural areas of China in 2012–2013, and 11,331 adults were included in our final analysis. Results: BMI, WC, HC, WHtR, WHR and ABSI were significantly positively correlated with ALT levels. Spearman rank test showed that WHtR (r = 0.346 for men, r = 0.282 for women, both p < 0.001) had the highest correlation coefficient for ALT level, whereas ABSI showed the lowest, and the correlation coefficient of each measure was higher in men than that in women. Comparing the lowest with the highest quintile of each anthropometric measure, the multivariate logistic model presented that WHtR had the superiority of identifying the presence of elevated ALT (OR 4.38; 95% CI 3.15–6.08 for men, OR 4.29; 95% CI 2.91–6.33 for women, both p < 0.001), and the ABSI was the poorest predictor in men (OR 2.51; 95% CI 1.93–3.27, p < 0.001). No association was observed for ABSI in women. Conclusions: Our results indicated that BMI, WC, HC, WHtR and WHR were able to determine elevated ALT presence, while ABSI was not capable. WHtR and to some extent BMI were the best body indices, for predicting the ALT levels in this population. Nevertheless, the predictive ability of ABSI as a novel body index was not superior compared to established anthropometric indices. PMID:26901214

  4. Osmotically induced synthesis of the dipeptide N-acetylglutaminylglutamine amide is mediated by a new pathway conserved among bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sagot, Brice; Gaysinski, Marc; Mehiri, Mohamed; Guigonis, Jean-Marie; Le Rudulier, Daniel; Alloing, Geneviève

    2010-01-01

    The dipeptide N-acetylglutaminylglutamine amide (NAGGN) was discovered in the bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti grown at high osmolarity, and subsequently shown to be synthesized and accumulated by a few osmotically challenged bacteria. However, its biosynthetic pathway remained unknown. Recently, two genes, which putatively encode a glutamine amidotransferase and an acetyltransferase and are up-regulated by osmotic stress, were identified in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this work, a locus carrying the orthologous genes in S. meliloti, asnO and ngg, was identified, and the genetic and molecular characterization of the NAGGN biosynthetic pathway is reported. By using NMR experiments, it was found that strains inactivated in asnO and ngg were unable to produce the dipeptide. Such inability has a deleterious effect on S. meliloti growth at high osmolarity, demonstrating the key role of NAGGN biosynthesis in cell osmoprotection. β-Glucuronidase activity from transcriptional fusion revealed strong induction of asnO expression in cells grown in increased NaCl concentration, in good agreement with the NAGGN accumulation. The asnO–ngg cluster encodes a unique enzymatic machinery mediating nonribosomal peptide synthesis. This pathway first involves Ngg, a bifunctional enzyme that catalyzes the formation of the intermediate N-acetylglutaminylglutamine, and second AsnO, required for subsequent addition of an amide group and the conversion of N-acetylglutaminylglutamine into NAGGN. Interestingly, a strong conservation of the asnO–ngg cluster is observed in a large number of bacteria with different lifestyles, such as marine, symbiotic, and pathogenic bacteria, highlighting the ecological importance of NAGGN synthesis capability in osmoprotection and also potentially in bacteria host–cell interactions. PMID:20571117

  5. Boronated dipeptide borotrimethylglycylphenylalanine as a potential boron carrier in boron neutron capture therapy for malignant brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Takagaki, M; Powell, W; Sood, A; Spielvogel, B F; Hosmane, N S; Kirihata, M; Ono, K; Masunaga, S I; Kinashi, Y; Miyatake, S I; Hashimoto, N

    2001-07-01

    Takagaki, M., Ono, K., Masunaga, S-I., Kinashi, Y., Oda, Y., Miyatake, S-I., Hashimoto, N., Powell, W., Sood, A. and Spielvogel, B. F. Boronated Dipeptide Borotrimethylglycylphenylalanine as a Potential Boron Carrier in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors. Radiat. Res. 156, 118-122 (2001).A boronated dipeptide, borotrimethylglycylphenylalanine (BGPA), was synthesized as a possible boron carrier for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant brain tumors. In vitro, at equal concentrations of (10)B in the extracellular medium, BGPA had the same effect in BNCT as p-boronophenylalanine (BPA). Boron analysis was carried out using prompt gamma-ray spectrometry and track-etch autoradiography. The tumor:blood and tumor:normal brain (10)B concentration ratios were 8.9 +/- 2.1 and 3.0 +/- 1.2, respectively, in rats bearing intracranial C6 gliosarcomas using alpha-particle track autoradiography. The IC(50), i.e. the dose capable of inhibiting the growth of C6 gliosarcoma cells by 50% after 3 days of incubation, was 5.9 x 10(-3) M BGPA, which is similar to that of 6.4 x 10(-3) M for BPA. The amide bond of BGPA is free from enzymatic attack, since it is protected from hydrolysis by the presence of a boron atom at the alpha-carbon position of glycine. These results suggest promise for the use of this agent for BNCT of malignant brain tumors. Further preclinical studies of BGPA are warranted, since BGPA has advantages over both BPA and BSH. PMID:11418080

  6. The effects of post-exercise glucose and alanine ingestion on plasma carnitine and ketosis in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Carlin, J I; Olson, E B; Peters, H A; Reddan, W G

    1987-01-01

    1. Several studies have hypothesized that alanine decreases plasma ketone body levels by increasing availability of oxaloacetate, thus allowing acetyl groups to enter the tricarboxylic acid cycle and releasing co-enzyme A (CoA). 2. Four, fasted adult males exercised at 50% of their maximal oxygen consumption for 1.5 h, then ingested 100 g of either glucose or alanine 2 h into recovery. 3. Post-exercise ketosis had developed at 2 h into recovery, as shown by a significantly elevated concentration of beta-hydroxybutyrate in the plasma. At this time plasma free fatty acids were elevated above resting levels while plasma free carnitine concentrations had fallen below resting values. 4. After either alanine or glucose ingestion beta-hydroxybutyrate concentrations fell to the same extent. After the alanine load free carnitine increased above that seen in the glucose trial. Following either alanine or glucose ingestion free fatty acid levels fell; they remained at resting levels in the alanine trial but decreased below rest in the glucose trial. 5. We assume that plasma carnitine concentrations largely reflect the hepatic carnitine pools; therefore, elevations in the plasma free carnitine are probably the result of an increased utilization of acetyl CoA. The significant elevation in plasma free carnitine concentration found after alanine ingestion is consistent with the hypothesis that alanine increases the oxidation of acetyl CoA by providing oxaloacetate for the tricarboxylic acid cycle. PMID:3443938

  7. Saturation mutagenesis on Arg244 of the tryptophan C4-prenyltransferase FgaPT2 leads to enhanced catalytic ability and different preferences for tryptophan-containing cyclic dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Fan, Aili; Li, Shu-Ming

    2016-06-01

    FgaPT2 from Aspergillus fumigatus catalyzes a Friedel-Crafts alkylation at C-4 of L-tryptophan and is involved in the biosynthesis of the ergot alkaloids fumigaclavines. Several tryptophan-containing cyclic dipeptides had also been prenylated by FgaPT2, but the turnover rate (k cat) was low. Here, we report the generation of FgaPT2 mutants by saturation mutagenesis at the amino acid residue Arg244 to improve its catalytic efficiency toward cyclic dipeptides. Thirteen mutated enzymes demonstrated up to 76-fold higher turnover number toward seven cyclic dipeptides than the non-mutated FgaPT2. More importantly, the mutated enzymes exhibited different preferences toward these substrates. This study provides a convenient approach for creation of new biocatalysts for production of C4-prenylated cyclic dipeptides. PMID:26875876

  8. Biochemical and structural characterization of alanine racemase from Bacillus anthracis (Ames)

    PubMed Central

    Couñago, Rafael M; Davlieva, Milya; Strych, Ulrich; Hill, Ryan E; Krause, Kurt L

    2009-01-01

    Background Bacillus anthracis is the causative agent of anthrax and a potential bioterrorism threat. Here we report the biochemical and structural characterization of B. anthracis (Ames) alanine racemase (AlrBax), an essential enzyme in prokaryotes and a target for antimicrobial drug development. We also compare the native AlrBax structure to a recently reported structure of the same enzyme obtained through reductive lysine methylation. Results B. anthracis has two open reading frames encoding for putative alanine racemases. We show that only one, dal1, is able to complement a D-alanine auxotrophic strain of E. coli. Purified Dal1, which we term AlrBax, is shown to be a dimer in solution by dynamic light scattering and has a Vmax for racemization (L- to D-alanine) of 101 U/mg. The crystal structure of unmodified AlrBax is reported here to 1.95 Å resolution. Despite the overall similarity of the fold to other alanine racemases, AlrBax makes use of a chloride ion to position key active site residues for catalysis, a feature not yet observed for this enzyme in other species. Crystal contacts are more extensive in the methylated structure compared to the unmethylated structure. Conclusion The chloride ion in AlrBax is functioning effectively as a carbamylated lysine making it an integral and unique part of this structure. Despite differences in space group and crystal form, the two AlrBax structures are very similar, supporting the case that reductive methylation is a valid rescue strategy for proteins recalcitrant to crystallization, and does not, in this case, result in artifacts in the tertiary structure. PMID:19695097

  9. Persistent GABAA/C responses to gabazine, taurine and beta-alanine in rat hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Chesnoy-Marchais, D

    2016-08-25

    In hypoglossal motoneurons, a sustained anionic current, sensitive to a blocker of ρ-containing GABA receptors, (1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl)methylphosphinic acid (TPMPA) and insensitive to bicuculline, was previously shown to be activated by gabazine. In order to better characterize the receptors involved, the sensitivity of this atypical response to pentobarbital (30μM), allopregnanolone (0.3μM) and midazolam (0.5μM) was first investigated. Pentobarbital potentiated the response, whereas the steroid and the benzodiazepine were ineffective. The results indicate the involvement of hybrid heteromeric receptors, including at least a GABA receptor ρ subunit and a γ subunit, accounting for the pentobarbital-sensitivity. The effects of the endogenous β amino acids, taurine and β-alanine, which are released under various pathological conditions and show neuroprotective properties, were then studied. In the presence of the glycine receptor blocker strychnine (1μM), both taurine (0.3-1mM) and β-alanine (0.3mM) activated sustained anionic currents, which were partly blocked by TPMPA (100μM). Thus, both β amino acids activated ρ-containing GABA receptors in hypoglossal motoneurons. Bicuculline (20μM) reduced responses to taurine and β-alanine, but small sustained responses persisted in the presence of both strychnine and bicuculline. Responses to β-alanine were slightly increased by allopregnanolone, indicating a contribution of the bicuculline- and neurosteroid-sensitive GABAA receptors underlying tonic inhibition in these motoneurons. Since sustained activation of anionic channels inhibits most mature principal neurons, the ρ-containing GABA receptors permanently activated by taurine and β-alanine might contribute to some of their neuroprotective properties under damaging overexcitatory situations. PMID:27246441

  10. Structural features and kinetic characterization of alanine racemase from Staphylococcus aureus (Mu50)

    PubMed Central

    Scaletti, Emma R.; Luckner, Sylvia R.; Krause, Kurt L.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic Gram-positive bacterium which causes a wide variety of diseases ranging from minor skin infections to potentially fatal conditions such as pneumonia, meningitis and septicaemia. The pathogen is a leading cause of nosocomial acquired infections, a problem that is exacerbated by the existence of methicillin- and glycopeptide antibiotic-resistant strains which can be challenging to treat. Alanine racemase (Alr) is a pyridoxal-5′-phosphate-dependent enzyme which catalyzes reversible racemization between enantiomers of alanine. As d-alanine is an essential component of the bacterial cell-wall peptidoglycan, inhibition of Alr is lethal to prokaryotes. Additionally, while ubiquitous amongst bacteria, this enzyme is absent in humans and most eukaryotes, making it an excellent antibiotic drug target. The crystal structure of S. aureus alanine racemase (AlrSas), the sequence of which corresponds to that from the highly antibiotic-resistant Mu50 strain, has been solved to 2.15 Å resolution. Comparison of the AlrSas structure with those of various alanine racemases demonstrates a conserved overall fold, with the enzyme sharing most similarity to those from other Gram-positive bacteria. Structural examination indicates that the active-site binding pocket, dimer interface and active-site entryway of the enzyme are potential targets for structure-aided inhibitor design. Kinetic constants were calculated in this study and are reported here. The potential for a disulfide bond in this structure is noted. This structural and biochemical information provides a template for future structure-based drug-development efforts targeting AlrSas. PMID:22194336

  11. Characterization of the metabolic effect of β-alanine on markers of oxidative metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sunderland, Kyle L.; Kuennen, Matthew R.; Vaughan, Roger A.

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] β-alanine is a common component of numerous sports supplements purported to improve athletic performance through enhanced carnosine biosynthesis and related intracellular buffering. To date, the effects of β-alanine on oxidative metabolism remain largely unexplored. This work investigated the effects of β-alanine on the expression of proteins which regulate cellular energetics. [Methods] C2C12 myocytes were cultured and differentiated under standard conditions followed by treatment with either β-alanine or isonitrogenous non-metabolizable control D-alanine at 800μM for 24 hours. Metabolic gene and protein expression were quantified by qRT-PCR and immunoblotting, respectively. Glucose uptake and oxygen consumption were measured via fluorescence using commercially available kits. [Results] β-alanine-treated myotubes displayed significantly elevated markers of improved oxidative metabolism including elevated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ (PPARβ/δ) and mitochondrial transcription factor a (TFAM) which led to increased mitochondrial content (evidenced by concurrent increases in cytochrome c content). Additionally, β-alanine-treated cells exhibited significantly increased oxygen consumption compared to control in a PPARβ/δ-dependent manner. β-alanine significantly enhanced expression of myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF-2) leading to increased glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) content. [Conclusion] β-alanine appears to increase cellular oxygen consumption as well as the expression of several cellular proteins associated with improved oxidative metabolism, suggesting β-alanine supplementation may provide additional metabolic benefit (although these observations require in vivo experimental verification). PMID:27508152

  12. The metabolism of histamine in the Drosophila optic lobe involves an ommatidial pathway: β-alanine recycles through the retina

    PubMed Central

    Borycz, Janusz; Borycz, Jolanta A.; Edwards, Tara N.; Boulianne, Gabrielle L.; Meinertzhagen, Ian A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Flies recycle the photoreceptor neurotransmitter histamine by conjugating it to β-alanine to form β-alanyl-histamine (carcinine). The conjugation is regulated by Ebony, while Tan hydrolyses carcinine, releasing histamine and β-alanine. In Drosophila, β-alanine synthesis occurs either from uracil or from the decarboxylation of aspartate but detailed roles for the enzymes responsible remain unclear. Immunohistochemically detected β-alanine is present throughout the fly’s entire brain, and is enhanced in the retina especially in the pseudocone, pigment and photoreceptor cells of the ommatidia. HPLC determinations reveal 10.7 ng of β-alanine in the wild-type head, roughly five times more than histamine. When wild-type flies drink uracil their head β-alanine increases more than after drinking l-aspartic acid, indicating the effectiveness of the uracil pathway. Mutants of black, which lack aspartate decarboxylase, cannot synthesize β-alanine from l-aspartate but can still synthesize it efficiently from uracil. Our findings demonstrate a novel function for pigment cells, which not only screen ommatidia from stray light but also store and transport β-alanine and carcinine. This role is consistent with a β-alanine-dependent histamine recycling pathway occurring not only in the photoreceptor terminals in the lamina neuropile, where carcinine occurs in marginal glia, but vertically via a long pathway that involves the retina. The lamina’s marginal glia are also a hub involved in the storage and/or disposal of carcinine and β-alanine. PMID:22442379

  13. Propylene glycol-linked amino acid/dipeptide diester prodrugs of oleanolic acid for PepT1-mediated transport: synthesis, intestinal permeability, and pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Cao, Feng; Gao, Yahan; Wang, Meng; Fang, Lei; Ping, Qineng

    2013-04-01

    In our previous studies, ethylene glycol-linked amino acid diester prodrugs of oleanolic acid (OA), a Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) class IV drug, designed to target peptide transporter 1 (PepT1) have been synthesized and evaluated. Unlike ethylene glycol, propylene glycol is of very low toxicity in vivo. In this study, propylene glycol was used as a linker to further compare the effect of the type of linker on the stability, permeability, affinity, and bioavailability of the prodrugs of OA. Seven diester prodrugs with amino acid/dipeptide promoieties containing L-Val ester (7a), L-Phe ester (7b), L-Ile ester (7c), D-Val-L-Val ester (9a), L-Val-L-Val ester (9b), L-Ala-L-Val ester (9c), and L-Ala-L-Ile ester (9d) were designed and successfully synthesized. In situ rat single-pass intestinal perfusion (SPIP) model was performed to screen the effective permeability (P(eff)) of the prodrugs. P(eff) of 7a, 7b, 7c, 9a, 9b, 9c, and 9d (6.7-fold, 2.4-fold, 1.24-fold, 1.22-fold, 4.15-fold, 2.2-fold, and 1.4-fold, respectively) in 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid buffer (MES) with pH 6.0 showed significant increase compared to that of OA (p < 0.01). In hydroxyethyl piperazine ethanesulfonic acid buffer (HEPES) of pH 7.4, except for 7c, 9a, and 9d, P(eff) of the other prodrugs containing 7a (5.2-fold), 7b (2.0-fold), 9b (3.1-fold), and 9c (1.7-fold) exhibited significantly higher values than that of OA (p < 0.01). In inhibition studies with glycyl-sarcosine (Gly-Sar, a typical substrate of PepT1), P(eff) of 7a (5.2-fold), 7b (2.0-fold), 9b (3.1-fold), and 9c (2.3-fold) had significantly reduced values (p < 0.01). Compared to the apparent permeability coefficient (P(app)) of OA with Caco-2 cell monolayer, significant enhancement of the P(app) of 7a (5.27-fold), 9b (3.31-fold), 9a (2.26-fold), 7b (2.10-fold), 7c (2.03-fold), 9c (1.87-fold), and 9d (1.39-fold) was also observed (p < 0.01). Inhibition studies with Gly-Sar (1 mM) showed that P(app) of 7a, 9b, and

  14. D-Alanine-Controlled Transient Intestinal Mono-Colonization with Non-Laboratory-Adapted Commensal E. coli Strain HS

    PubMed Central

    Buschor, Stefanie; Bayramova, Firuza; Hernandez, Sara B.; Cava, Felipe; Kuru, Erkin; Van Nieuwenhze, Michael S.; Brun, Yves V.; Coelho, Fernanda M.; Hapfelmeier, Siegfried

    2016-01-01

    Soon after birth the mammalian gut microbiota forms a permanent and collectively highly resilient consortium. There is currently no robust method for re-deriving an already microbially colonized individual again-germ-free. We previously developed the in vivo growth-incompetent E. coli K-12 strain HA107 that is auxotrophic for the peptidoglycan components D-alanine (D-Ala) and meso-diaminopimelic acid (Dap) and can be used to transiently associate germ-free animals with live bacteria, without permanent loss of germ-free status. Here we describe the translation of this experimental model from the laboratory-adapted E. coli K-12 prototype to the better gut-adapted commensal strain E. coli HS. In this genetic background it was necessary to complete the D-Ala auxotrophy phenotype by additional knockout of the hypothetical third alanine racemase metC. Cells of the resulting fully auxotrophic strain assembled a peptidoglycan cell wall of normal composition, as long as provided with D-Ala and Dap in the medium, but could not proliferate a single time after D-Ala/Dap removal. Yet, unsupplemented bacteria remained active and were able to complete their cell cycle with fully sustained motility until immediately before autolytic death. Also in vivo, the transiently colonizing bacteria retained their ability to stimulate a live-bacteria-specific intestinal Immunoglobulin (Ig)A response. Full D-Ala auxotrophy enabled rapid recovery to again-germ-free status. E. coli HS has emerged from human studies and genomic analyses as a paradigm of benign intestinal commensal E. coli strains. Its reversibly colonizing derivative may provide a versatile research tool for mucosal bacterial conditioning or compound delivery without permanent colonization. PMID:27002976

  15. D-Alanine-Controlled Transient Intestinal Mono-Colonization with Non-Laboratory-Adapted Commensal E. coli Strain HS.

    PubMed

    Cuenca, Miguelangel; Pfister, Simona P; Buschor, Stefanie; Bayramova, Firuza; Hernandez, Sara B; Cava, Felipe; Kuru, Erkin; Van Nieuwenhze, Michael S; Brun, Yves V; Coelho, Fernanda M; Hapfelmeier, Siegfried

    2016-01-01

    Soon after birth the mammalian gut microbiota forms a permanent and collectively highly resilient consortium. There is currently no robust method for re-deriving an already microbially colonized individual again-germ-free. We previously developed the in vivo growth-incompetent E. coli K-12 strain HA107 that is auxotrophic for the peptidoglycan components D-alanine (D-Ala) and meso-diaminopimelic acid (Dap) and can be used to transiently associate germ-free animals with live bacteria, without permanent loss of germ-free status. Here we describe the translation of this experimental model from the laboratory-adapted E. coli K-12 prototype to the better gut-adapted commensal strain E. coli HS. In this genetic background it was necessary to complete the D-Ala auxotrophy phenotype by additional knockout of the hypothetical third alanine racemase metC. Cells of the resulting fully auxotrophic strain assembled a peptidoglycan cell wall of normal composition, as long as provided with D-Ala and Dap in the medium, but could not proliferate a single time after D-Ala/Dap removal. Yet, unsupplemented bacteria remained active and were able to complete their cell cycle with fully sustained motility until immediately before autolytic death. Also in vivo, the transiently colonizing bacteria retained their ability to stimulate a live-bacteria-specific intestinal Immunoglobulin (Ig)A response. Full D-Ala auxotrophy enabled rapid recovery to again-germ-free status. E. coli HS has emerged from human studies and genomic analyses as a paradigm of benign intestinal commensal E. coli strains. Its reversibly colonizing derivative may provide a versatile research tool for mucosal bacterial conditioning or compound delivery without permanent colonization. PMID:27002976

  16. The value of aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase in cardiovascular disease risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Stephen F; Kai, Joe; Guha, Indra Neil; Qureshi, Nadeem

    2015-01-01

    Objective Aspartate aminotransferase to alanine aminotransferase (AST/ALT) ratio, reflecting liver disease severity, has been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the AST/ALT ratio improves established risk prediction tools in a primary care population. Methods Data were analysed from a prospective cohort of 29 316 UK primary care patients, aged 25–84 years with no history of CVD at baseline. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to derive 10-year multivariate risk models for the first occurrence of CVD based on two established risk prediction tools (Framingham and QRISK2), with and without including the AST/ALT ratio. Overall, model performance was assessed by discriminatory accuracy (AUC c-statistic). Results During a total follow-up of 120 462 person-years, 782 patients (59% men) experienced their first CVD event. Multivariate models showed that elevated AST/ALT ratios were significantly associated with CVD in men (Framingham: HR 1.37, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.79; QRISK2: HR 1.40, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.89) but not in women (Framingham: HR 1.06, 95% CI 0.78 to 1.43; QRISK2: HR 0.97, 95% CI 0.70 to 1.35). Including the AST/ALT ratio with all Framingham risk factors (AUC c-statistic: 0.72, 95% CI 0.71 to 0.74) or QRISK2 risk factors (AUC c-statistic: 0.73, 95% CI 0.71 to 0.74) resulted in no change in discrimination from the established risk prediction tools. Limiting analysis to those individuals with raised ALT showed that discrimination could improve by 5% and 4% with Framingham and QRISK2 risk factors, respectively. Conclusions Elevated AST/ALT ratio is significantly associated with increased risk of developing CVD in men but not women. However, the ratio does not confer any additional benefits over established CVD risk prediction tools in the general population, but may have clinical utility in certain subgroups. PMID:26322236

  17. L-alanine uptake in membrane vesicles from Mytilus edulis gills

    SciTech Connect

    Pajor, A.M.; Wright, S.H.

    1986-03-05

    Previous studies have shown that gills from M. edulis can accumulate L-alanine from seawater by a saturable process specific for ..cap alpha..-neutral amino acids. This uptake occurs against chemical gradients in excess of 10/sup 6/ to 1. To further characterize this uptake, membrane vesicles were prepared from M. edulis gill tissue by differential centrifugation. Enrichments of putative enzyme markers (relative to that in combined initial fractions) were as follows: ..gamma..-Glutamyltranspeptidase, 25-30x; Alkaline Phosphatase, 5-6x; K/sup +/-dependent para-Nitrophenyl Phosphatase, 3-5x; Succinate Dehydrogenase 0.1-0.2x. These results suggest that the preparation is enriched in plasma membranes, although histochemical studies will be needed to verify this. The time course of /sup 14/C-L-alanine uptake in the presence of inwardly-directed Na/sup +/ gradient showed a transient overshoot (3-5 fold) at 10 minutes which decreased to equilibrium after six hours. The size of the overshoot and early uptake rates depended on the size of the inwardly-directed Na/sup +/ gradient. No overshoot was seen in the presence of inwardly-directed gradients of LiCl or choline-Cl, or with equilibrium concentrations NaCl or mannitol. A reduced overshoot was seen with a gradient of NaSCN. A small overshoot was seen with an inwardly-directed gradient of KCl. Transport of L-alanine included saturable and diffusive components. Uptake of 6 ..mu..M L-alanine was inhibited more than 80% by 100 ..mu..M ..cap alpha..-zwitterionic amino acids (alanine, leucine, glycine); by 30 to 75% by proline, aspartate and lysine; and less than 20% by a ..beta..-amino acid, taurine. The results of these experiments agree with those from intact gill studies and support the hypothesis that L-alanine is transported into gill epithelial cells by a secondary active transport process involving Na/sup +/.

  18. Structure-activity relationships of boronic acid inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase IV. 1. Variation of the P2 position of Xaa-boroPro dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Coutts, S J; Kelly, T A; Snow, R J; Kennedy, C A; Barton, R W; Adams, J; Krolikowski, D A; Freeman, D M; Campbell, S J; Ksiazek, J F; Bachovchin, W W

    1996-05-10

    A series of prolineboronic acid (boroPro) containing dipeptides were synthesized and assayed for their ability to inhibit the serine protease dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV). Inhibitory activity, which requires the (R)-stereoisomer of boroPro in the P1 position, appears to tolerate a variety of L-amino acids in the P2 position. Substitution at the P2 position which is not tolerated include the D-amino acids, alpha,alpha-disubstituted amino acids, and glycine. Specificity against DPPII and proline specific endopeptidase is reported. A correlation between the ability to inhibit DPPIV in cell culture and in the human mixed lymphocyte reaction is demonstrated. A synthesis of prolineboronic acid is reported as well as conditions for generating the fully unprotected boronic acid dipeptides in either their cyclic or acyclic forms. PMID:8642568

  19. Analysis of products of animal origin in feeds by determination of carnosine and related dipeptides by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Schönherr, Jens

    2002-03-27

    Products of animal origin such as meat meal were commonly used as sources of protein and amino acids for the production of compound feeds. Because the feeding of such products is prohibited in Germany, the official feedstuff control of the government must evaluate feeds for the forbidden use of products of animal origin. Microscope examination is the official method to prove animal-originated adulterations of feeds. This paper proposes a high-performance liquid chromatography method for the determination of the dipeptide carnosine and related dipeptides (anserine and balenine) and shows the dependence of the contents of anserine, balenine, and carnosine in compound feeds on the content of meat meal in feeds. The presented method can complete and confirm the result of the microscopic method for evidence of components of animal origin in feeds. PMID:11902938

  20. Transamidase Reactions Involved in the Enzymic Coagulation of Semen: Isolation of γ-Glutamyl-ε-Lysine Dipeptide from Clotted Secretion Protein of Guinea Pig Seminal Vesicle

    PubMed Central

    Williams-Ashman, H. G.; Notides, A. C.; Pabalan, S. S.; Lorand, L.

    1972-01-01

    New supportive evidence is advanced in favor of the hypothesis that the enzymic coagulation of guinea pig semen involves transamidase reactions that result in the formation of γ-glutamyl-ε-lysine intermolecular cross linkages between molecules of a basic protein in seminal vesicle secretion. The dipeptide γ-glutamyl-ε-lysine was isolated in large quantities from proteolytic digests of the coagulated basic vesicular secretion protein that comprises the seminal clot. Images PMID:4506101

  1. Transamidase reactions involved in the enzymic coagulation of semen: isolation of -glutamyl- -lysine dipeptide from clotted secretion protein of guinea pig seminal vesicle.

    PubMed

    Williams-Ashman, H G; Notides, A C; Pabalan, S S; Lorand, L

    1972-08-01

    New supportive evidence is advanced in favor of the hypothesis that the enzymic coagulation of guinea pig semen involves transamidase reactions that result in the formation of gamma-glutamyl-epsilon-lysine intermolecular cross linkages between molecules of a basic protein in seminal vesicle secretion. The dipeptide gamma-glutamyl-epsilon-lysine was isolated in large quantities from proteolytic digests of the coagulated basic vesicular secretion protein that comprises the seminal clot. PMID:4506101

  2. Structure of Penta-Alanine Investigated by Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuan; Huang, Jing; Kim, Seongheun; Shim, Ji Hyun; MacKerell, Alexander D; Ge, Nien-Hui

    2016-06-23

    We have studied the structure of (Ala)5, a model unfolded peptide, using a combination of 2D IR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Two different isotopomers, each bis-labeled with (13)C═O and (13)C═(18)O, were strategically designed to shift individual site frequencies and uncouple neighboring amide-I' modes. 2D IR spectra taken under the double-crossed ⟨π/4, -π/4, Y, Z⟩ polarization show that the labeled four-oscillator systems can be approximated by three two-oscillator systems. By utilizing the different polarization dependence of diagonal and cross peaks, we extracted the coupling constants and angles between three pairs of amide-I' transition dipoles through spectral fitting. These parameters were related to the peptide backbone dihedral angles through DFT calculated maps. The derived dihedral angles are all located in the polyproline-II (ppII) region of the Ramachandran plot. These results were compared to the conformations sampled by Hamiltonian replica-exchange MD simulations with three different CHARMM force fields. The C36 force field predicted that ppII is the dominant conformation, consistent with the experimental findings, whereas C22/CMAP predicted similar population for α+, β, and ppII, and the polarizable Drude-2013 predicted dominating β structure. Spectral simulation based on MD representative conformations and structure ensembles demonstrated the need to include multiple 2D spectral features, especially the cross-peak intensity ratio and shape, in structure determination. Using 2D reference spectra defined by the C36 structure ensemble, the best spectral simulation is achieved with nearly 100% ppII population, although the agreement with the experimental cross-peak intensity ratio is still insufficient. The dependence of population determination on the choice of reference structures/spectra and the current limitations on theoretical modeling relating peptide structures to spectral parameters are discussed. Compared

  3. Structure-Guided, Single-Point Modifications in the Phosphinic Dipeptide Structure Yield Highly Potent and Selective Inhibitors of Neutral Aminopeptidases

    SciTech Connect

    Vassiliou, Stamatia; Węglarz-Tomczak, Ewelina; Berlicki, Łukasz; Pawełczak, Małgorzata; Nocek, Bogusław; Mulligan, Rory; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Mucha, Artur

    2014-10-09

    Seven crystal structures of alanyl aminopeptidase from Neisseria meningitides (the etiological agent of meningitis, NmAPN) complexed with organophosphorus compounds were resolved to determine the optimal inhibitor–enzyme interactions. The enantiomeric phosphonic acid analogs of Leu and hPhe, which correspond to the P1 amino acid residues of well-processed substrates, were used to assess the impact of the absolute configuration and the stereospecific hydrogen bond network formed between the aminophosphonate polar head and the active site residues on the binding affinity. For the hPhe analog, an imperfect stereochemical complementarity could be overcome by incorporating an appropriate P1 side chain. The constitution of P1'-extended structures was rationally designed and the lead, phosphinic dipeptide hPhePψ[CH2]Phe, was modified in a single position. Introducing a heteroatom/heteroatom-based fragment to either the P1 or P1' residue required new synthetic pathways. The compounds in the refined structure were low nanomolar and subnanomolar inhibitors of N. meningitides, porcine and human APNs, and the reference leucine aminopeptidase (LAP). The unnatural phosphinic dipeptide analogs exhibited a high affinity for monozinc APNs associated with a reasonable selectivity versus dizinc LAP. In conclusion, another set of crystal structures containing the NmAPN dipeptide ligand were used to verify and to confirm the predicted binding modes; furthermore, novel contacts, which were promising for inhibitor development, were identified, including a π–π stacking interaction between a pyridine ring and Tyr372.

  4. Structure-guided, single-point modifications in the phosphinic dipeptide structure yield highly potent and selective inhibitors of neutral aminopeptidases.

    PubMed

    Vassiliou, Stamatia; Węglarz-Tomczak, Ewelina; Berlicki, Łukasz; Pawełczak, Małgorzata; Nocek, Bogusław; Mulligan, Rory; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Mucha, Artur

    2014-10-01

    Seven crystal structures of alanyl aminopeptidase from Neisseria meningitides (the etiological agent of meningitis, NmAPN) complexed with organophosphorus compounds were resolved to determine the optimal inhibitor-enzyme interactions. The enantiomeric phosphonic acid analogs of Leu and hPhe, which correspond to the P1 amino acid residues of well-processed substrates, were used to assess the impact of the absolute configuration and the stereospecific hydrogen bond network formed between the aminophosphonate polar head and the active site residues on the binding affinity. For the hPhe analog, an imperfect stereochemical complementarity could be overcome by incorporating an appropriate P1 side chain. The constitution of P1'-extended structures was rationally designed and the lead, phosphinic dipeptide hPhePψ[CH2]Phe, was modified in a single position. Introducing a heteroatom/heteroatom-based fragment to either the P1 or P1' residue required new synthetic pathways. The compounds in the refined structure were low nanomolar and subnanomolar inhibitors of N. meningitides, porcine and human APNs, and the reference leucine aminopeptidase (LAP). The unnatural phosphinic dipeptide analogs exhibited a high affinity for monozinc APNs associated with a reasonable selectivity versus dizinc LAP. Another set of crystal structures containing the NmAPN dipeptide ligand were used to verify and to confirm the predicted binding modes; furthermore, novel contacts, which were promising for inhibitor development, were identified, including a π-π stacking interaction between a pyridine ring and Tyr372. PMID:25192493

  5. Membrane topology of the electrogenic aspartate-alanine antiporter AspT of Tetragenococcus halophilus.

    PubMed

    Nanatani, Kei; Ohonishi, Fumito; Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Tasuku; Abe, Keietsu

    2005-03-01

    AspT is an electrogenic aspartate:alanine exchange protein that represents the vectorial component of a proton-motive metabolic cycle found in some strains of Tetragenococcus halophilus. AspT is the sole member of a new family, the Aspartate: Alanine Exchanger (AAE) family, in secondary transporters, according to the computational classification proposed by Saier et al. (http://www.biology.ucsd.edu/~msaier/transport/). We analyzed the topology of AspT biochemically, by using fusion methods in combination with alkaline phosphatase or beta-lactamase. These results suggested that AspT has a unique topology; 8 TMS, a large cytoplasmic loop (183 amino acids) between TMS5 and TMS6, and N- and C-termini that both face the periplasm. These results demonstrated a unique 2D-structure of AspT as the novel AAE family. PMID:15670744

  6. Synthesis of beta-hydroxy-alpha-amino acids with a reengineered alanine racemase.

    PubMed

    Fesko, Kateryna; Giger, Lars; Hilvert, Donald

    2008-11-15

    The Y265A mutant of alanine racemase (alrY265A) was evaluated as a catalyst for the synthesis of beta-hydroxy-alpha-amino acids. It promotes the PLP-dependent aldol condensation of glycine with a range of aromatic aldehydes. The desired products were obtained with complete stereocontrol at C(alpha) (ee>99%, D) and moderate to high selectivity at C(beta) (up to 97% de). The designed enzyme is thus similar to natural d-threonine aldolases in its substrate specificity and stereoselectivity. Moreover, its ability to utilize alanine as an alternative donor suggests an expanded scope of potential utility for the production of biologically active compounds. PMID:18760921

  7. Unusual hydroxyl migration in the fragmentation of β-alanine dication in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Piekarski, Dariusz Grzegorz; Delaunay, Rudy; Maclot, Sylvain; Adoui, Lamri; Martín, Fernando; Alcamí, Manuel; Huber, Bernd A; Rousseau, Patrick; Domaracka, Alicja; Díaz-Tendero, Sergio

    2015-07-14

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of the fragmentation of doubly positively charged β-alanine molecules in the gas phase. The dissociation of the produced dicationic molecules, induced by low-energy ion collisions, is analysed by coincidence mass spectrometric techniques; the coupling with ab initio molecular dynamics simulations allows rationalisation of the experimental observations. The present strategy gives deeper insights into the chemical mechanisms of multiply charged amino acids in the gas phase. In the case of the β-alanine dication, in addition to the expected Coulomb explosion and hydrogen migration processes, we have found evidence of hydroxyl-group migration, which leads to unusual fragmentation products, such as hydroxymethyl cation, and is necessary to explain some of the observed dominant channels. PMID:26035826

  8. Response of the alanine/ESR dosimeter to radiation from an Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anton, M.; Hackel, T.; Zink, K.; von Voigts-Rhetz, P.; Selbach, H.-J.

    2015-01-01

    The response of the alanine dosimeter to radiation from an Ir-192 source with respect to the absorbed dose to water, relative to Co-60 radiation, was determined experimentally as well as by Monte Carlo simulations. The experimental and Monte Carlo results for the response agree well within the limits of uncertainty. The relative response decreases with an increasing distance between the measurement volume and the source from approximately 98% at a 1 cm distance to 96% at 5 cm. The present data are more accurate, but agree well with data published by Schaeken et al (2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 6625-34). The decrease of the relative response with an increasing distance that had already been observed by these authors is confirmed. In the appendix, the properties of the alanine dosimeter with respect to volume and sensitivity corrections are investigated. The inhomogeneous distribution of the detection probability that was taken into account for the analysis was determined experimentally.

  9. The effects of boron on the electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of alanine irradiated with thermal neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ciesielski, B.; Wielopolski, L.

    1995-10-01

    The effects of boric acid admixture on the intensity and line structure of EPR spectra of free radicals produced in alanine by thermal neutrons are presented. The EPR signal enhancement, up to a factor of 40 depending on the boron concentration, is related to additional energy deposition in alanine crystals by the disintegration products resulting from the capture of a thermal neutron by boron, {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li. The changes in the shape of the EPR spectra observed by changing the microwave power are due to the differences in the microwave power saturation of the free radicals produced by a low-LET radiation and those produced by the high-LET components of the radiation after the neutron capture reaction. 27 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Formation of homochiral glycine/Cu(111) quantum corral array realized using alanine nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Miki; Huang, Hui; Kanazawa, Ken; Taninaka, Atsushi; Yoshida, Shoji; Takeuchi, Osamu; Shigekawa, Hidemi

    2015-08-01

    Glycine has enantiomeric isomers on a Cu(111) surface through the dissociation of hydrogen from the carboxyl group and forms an array of quantum corrals of ∼1.3 nm diameter. Stable homo-chiral glycinate trimers are formed in the first step, which subsequently form a network with a hexagonal arrangement. However, domains with R- or S-chirality coexist with the same probability. On the other hand, α-alanine has D- and L-chirality in nature and forms a similar quantum corral array on Cu(111) with R- and S-chirality, respectively. Here, by using α-alanine molecules as nuclei, the chirality of glycine molecules was controlled and a homochiral quantum corral array was successfully formed, which indicates the possibility that the optical isomers can be separated through a method such as preferential crystallization.

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray data analysis of β-alanine synthase from Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Lundgren, Stina; Andersen, Birgit; Piškur, Jure; Dobritzsch, Doreen

    2007-10-01

    β-Alanine synthase catalyzes the last step in the reductive degradation pathway for uracil and thymine. Crystals of the recombinant enzyme from D. melanogaster belong to space group C2. Diffraction data to 3.3 Å resolution were collected and analyzed. β-Alanine synthase catalyzes the last step in the reductive degradation pathway for uracil and thymine, which represents the main clearance route for the widely used anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil. Crystals of the recombinant enzyme from Drosophila melanogaster, which is closely related to the human enzyme, were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. They diffracted to 3.3 Å at a synchrotron-radiation source, belong to space group C2 (unit-cell parameters a = 278.9, b = 95.0, c = 199.3 Å, β = 125.8°) and contain 8–10 molecules per asymmetric unit.

  12. Role of alanine-valine transaminase in Salmonella typhimurium and analysis of an avtA::Tn5 mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Berg, C M; Whalen, W A; Archambault, L B

    1983-01-01

    In Salmonella typhimurium, as in Escherichia coli, mutations in avtA, the gene encoding the alanine-valine transaminase (transaminase C), are silent unless they are combined with mutations involved in isoleucine-valine biosynthesis. avtA is repressed by leucine or alanine but not by valine. Transaminase C is found at reduced levels upon starvation for any one of several amino acids. We hypothesize that this is due to repression of avtA by the elevated alanine and leucine pools found in amino acid-starved cells. PMID:6309735

  13. Role of alanine-valine transaminase in Salmonella typhimurium and analysis of an avtA::Tn5 mutant.

    PubMed

    Berg, C M; Whalen, W A; Archambault, L B

    1983-09-01

    In Salmonella typhimurium, as in Escherichia coli, mutations in avtA, the gene encoding the alanine-valine transaminase (transaminase C), are silent unless they are combined with mutations involved in isoleucine-valine biosynthesis. avtA is repressed by leucine or alanine but not by valine. Transaminase C is found at reduced levels upon starvation for any one of several amino acids. We hypothesize that this is due to repression of avtA by the elevated alanine and leucine pools found in amino acid-starved cells. PMID:6309735

  14. Weak BMAA toxicity compares with that of the dietary supplement β-alanine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Moonhee; McGeer, Patrick L

    2012-07-01

    β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is routinely described in the literature as a potent neurotoxin and as a possible cause of neurodegenerative disorders of aging such as Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex (ALS-PDC) syndrome of Guam. To test for the toxicity of BMAA against human neurons, we chose 3 standard human neuronal cell lines for examination and compared the toxicity with the muscle-building nutritional supplement β-alanine, glutamic acid, and the established excitotoxins kainic acid, quisqualic acid, ibotenic acid, domoic acid, and quinolinic acid. Neurotoxicity was measured by the standard lactic dehydrogenase release assay after 5-day incubation of NT-2, SK-N-MC, and SH-SY5Y cells with BMAA and the comparative substances. The ED(50) of BMAA, corresponding to 50% death of neurons, varied from 1430 to 1604 μM while that of the nutritional supplement β-alanine was almost as low, varying from 1945 to 2134 μM. The ED(50) for glutamic acid and the 5 established excitotoxins was 200- to 360-fold lower, varying from 44 to 70 μM. These in vitro data are in accord with previously published in vivo data on BMAA toxicity in which mice showed no pathological effects from oral consumption of 500 mg/kg/day for more than 10 weeks. Because there are no known natural sources of BMAA that would make consumption of such amounts possible, and because the toxicity observed was in the same range as the nutritional supplement β-alanine, the hypothesis that BMAA is an environmental hazard and a contributor to degenerative neurological diseases becomes untenable. PMID:21236519

  15. β-alanine supplementation improves isometric endurance of the knee extensor muscles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We examined the effect of four weeks of β-alanine supplementation on isometric endurance of the knee extensors at 45% maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). Methods Thirteen males (age 23 ± 6 y; height 1.80 ± 0.05 m; body mass 81.0 ± 10.5 kg), matched for pre-supplementation isometric endurance, were allocated to either a placebo (n = 6) or β-alanine (n = 7; 6.4 g·d-1 over 4 weeks) supplementation group. Participants completed an isometric knee extension test (IKET) to fatigue, at an intensity of 45% MVIC, before and after supplementation. In addition, two habituation tests were completed in the week prior to the pre-supplementation test and a further practice test was completed in the week prior to the post-supplementation test. MVIC force, IKET hold-time, and impulse generated were recorded. Results IKET hold-time increased by 9.7 ± 9.4 s (13.2%) and impulse by 3.7 ± 1.3 kN·s-1 (13.9%) following β-alanine supplementation. These changes were significantly greater than those in the placebo group (IKET: t(11) = 2.9, p ≤0.05; impulse: t(11) = 3.1, p ≤ 0.05). There were no significant changes in MVIC force in either group. Conclusion Four weeks of β-alanine supplementation at 6.4 g·d-1 improved endurance capacity of the knee extensors at 45% MVIC, which most likely results from improved pH regulation within the muscle cell as a result of elevated muscle carnosine levels. PMID:22697405

  16. Conformation-specific pathways of beta-alanine: a vacuum ultraviolet photoionization and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lidong; Pan, Yang; Guo, Huijun; Zhang, Taichang; Sheng, Liusi; Qi, Fei; Lo, Po-Kam; Lau, Kai-Chung

    2009-05-21

    We report a photoionization and dissociative photoionization study of beta-alanine using IR laser desorption combined with synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry. Fragments at m/z = 45, 44, 43, and 30 yielded from photoionization are assigned to NH(3)CH(2)CH(2)(+), NH(2)CHCH(3)(+), NH(2)CHCH(2)(+), and NH(2)CH(2)(+), respectively. Some new conformation-specific dissociation channels and corresponding dissociation energies for the observed fragments are established and determined with the help of ab initio G3B3 calculations and measurements of photoionization efficiency (PIE) spectra. The theoretical values are in fair agreement with the experimental results. Three low-lying conformers of the beta-alanine cation, including two gauche conformers G1+, G2+ and one anti conformer A+ are investigated by G3B3 calculations. The conformer G1+ (intramolecular hydrogen bonding N-H...OC) is found to be another precursor in forming the NH(3)CH(2)CH(2)(+) ion, which is complementary to the previously reported formation pathway that only occurs with the conformer G2+ (intramolecular hydrogen bonding O-H...N). Species NH(2)CHCH(2)(+) may come from the contributions of G1+, G2+, and A+ via different dissociation pathways. The most abundant fragment ion, NH(2)CH(2)(+), is formed from a direct C-C bond cleavage. Intramolecular hydrogen transfer processes dominate most of the fragmentation pathways of the beta-alanine cation. PMID:19400571

  17. Survivability and reactivity of glycine and alanine in early oceans: effects of meteorite impacts.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Yuhei; Fukunaga, Nao; Sekine, Toshimori; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kakegawa, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Takamichi; Nakazawa, Hiromoto

    2016-01-01

    Prebiotic oceans might have contained abundant amino acids, and were subjected to meteorite impacts, especially during the late heavy bombardment. It is so far unknown how meteorite impacts affected amino acids in the early oceans. Impact experiments were performed under the conditions where glycine was synthesized from carbon, ammonia, and water, using aqueous solutions containing (13)C-labeled glycine and alanine. Selected amino acids and amines in samples were analyzed with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS). In particular, the (13)C-labeled reaction products were analyzed to distinguish between run products and contaminants. The results revealed that both amino acids survived partially in the early ocean through meteorite impacts, that part of glycine changed into alanine, and that large amounts of methylamine and ethylamine were formed. Fast decarboxylation was confirmed to occur during such impact processes. Furthermore, the formation of n-butylamine, detected only in the samples recovered from the solutions with additional nitrogen and carbon sources of ammonia and benzene, suggests that chemical reactions to form new biomolecules can proceed through marine impacts. Methylamine and ethylamine from glycine and alanine increased considerably in the presence of hematite rather than olivine under similar impact conditions. These results also suggest that amino acids present in early oceans can contribute further to impact-induced reactions, implying that impact energy plays a potential role in the prebiotic formation of various biomolecules, although the reactions are complicated and depend upon the chemical environments as well. PMID:26369758

  18. Monte Carlo Simulation of the Irradiation of Alanine Coated Film Dosimeters with Accelerated Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe, R. M.; Salvat, F.; Cleland, M. R.; Berejka, A.

    2009-03-01

    The Monte Carlo code PENELOPE was used to simulate the irradiation of alanine coated film dosimeters with electron beams of energies from 1 to 5 MeV being produced by a high-current industrial electron accelerator. This code includes a geometry package that defines complex quadratic geometries, such as those of the irradiation of products in an irradiation processing facility. In the present case the energy deposited on a water film at the surface of a wood parallelepiped was calculated using the program PENMAIN, which is a generic main program included in the PENELOPE distribution package. The results from the simulation were then compared with measurements performed by irradiating alanine film dosimeters with electrons using a 150 kW Dynamitron™ electron accelerator. The alanine films were placed on top of a set of wooden planks using the same geometrical arrangement as the one used for the simulation. The way the results from the simulation can be correlated with the actual measurements, taking into account the irradiation parameters, is described. An estimation of the percentage difference between measurements and calculations is also presented.

  19. Evaluation of Conformation and Association Behavior of Multivalent Alanine-Rich Polypeptides

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Robin S.; Top, Ayben; Argust, Lindsey M.; Liu, Shuang; Kiick, Kristi L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Helical alanine-rich polypeptides with functional groups displayed along the backbone can display desired molecules such as saccharides or therapeutic molecules at a prescribed spacing. Because these polypeptides have promise for application as biomaterials, the conformation and association of these molecules have been investigated under biologically relevant conditions. Methods Three polypeptide sequences, 17-H-3, 17-H-6, and 35-H-6, have been produced through recombinant techniques. Circular dichroic (CD) spectroscopy was used to monitor the secondary structure of the polypeptides in PBS (phosphate buffered saline, pH 7.4). The aggregation behavior in PBS was monitored via analytical ultracentrifugation and non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results The three polypeptides adopt a highly helical structure at low and ambient temperatures, and when heated, undergo a helix-to-coil transition, typical of other alanine-rich peptide sequences. The melting temperatures and van’t Hoff enthalpies, extracted from the CD data, suggest similar stability of the sequences. Although alanine-rich sequences can be prone to aggregation, there is no indication of aggregation for the three polypeptides at a range of concentrations relevant for possible biological applications. Conclusions The helical polypeptides are monomeric under biologically relevant conditions enabling application of these polypeptides as useful scaffolds for ligand or drug display. PMID:17674161

  20. Development of an alanine dosimetry system for radiation dose measurements in the radiotherapy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gago-Arias, A.; González-Castaño, D. M.; Gómez, F.; Peteiro, E.; Lodeiro, C.; Pardo-Montero, J.

    2015-08-01

    Alanine/ESR systems provide an interesting alternative to standard dosimetry systems like solid state or gas ionization chambers for dosimetry in radiotherapy. This is primarily due to the negligible energy dependence, high stability, and the possibility of using small pellets that are especially suitable for the dosimetry of small fields. In order to obtain acceptable dose uncertainties in the radiotherapy dose range, the setup, operational parameters and quantification methods need to be carefully investigated and optimized. In this work we present the development of an alanine/ESR dosimetry system, traced to the secondary standard laboratory of absorbed dose to water at the Radiation Physics Laboratory of the Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (Spain). We focus on the setup, the optimization of the operational parameters of the ESR spectrometer, the quantification of the readout signal and the construction of a calibration curve. The evaluation of the uncertainty budget is also a key component of an alanine/ESR system for radiotherapy dosimetry, and is presented in detail.After the optimization of the procedures, we have achieved a relative uncertainty of 1.7% (k=2) for an absorbed dose of 10 Gy, decreasing to 0.9% for 50 Gy.

  1. Solvation free energies from a coupled reference interaction site model/simulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Holly

    2005-12-01

    Accounting for solvation in thermodynamic studies is one issue requiring further work so that computational models may be more advantageously applied to studies of systems in solution, especially studies of large systems such as aqueous biosystems. In the area of applied molecular biology, this capability is very significant, since computational thermodynamic studies can supply valuable information to assist in the design of molecules with specific desired binding or conformational properties, such as inhibitors. This dissertation addresses the issue by suggesting a new approach for the calculation of solvation free energies using a modified reference interaction site model (RISM) integral equation approach in which molecular simulations are used to provide the solvent structure around a solute at infinite dilution in the form of radial distribution functions. The intent is to compensate for insufficiencies arising in the standard RISM approach, and in this way to establish an alternative to the very time consuming free energy simulations, which are usually depended upon for high accuracy and have seen some recent applications, although falling somewhat short as far as practicality. Chapter 2 of this dissertation investigates how it is possible to implement such a scheme, with consideration given to the inherent errors associated with such an approach. In Chapter 3, the resulting coupled RISM simulation methodology is first tested by its application to determine absolute solvation free energies of some small molecules. Applications of relative solvation free energy determination by the coupled RISM/simulation methodology to the conformational analysis of the alanine dipeptide, and to the tautomeric equilibria of the DNA base cytosine and one of its analogues, are then described in Chapters 4 and 5, respectively. Chapter 6 is concerned with the determination of a potential of mean force profile for a simple atom transfer reaction in aqueous solution. By means of

  2. Alanine/EPR dosimetry applied to the verification of a total body irradiation protocol and treatment planning dose calculation using a humanoid phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Schaeken, B.; Lelie, S.; Meijnders, P.; Van den Weyngaert, D.; Janssens, H.; Verellen, D.

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: To avoid complications in total body irradiation (TBI), it is important to achieve a homogeneous dose distribution throughout the body and to deliver a correct dose to the lung which is an organ at risk. The purpose of this work was to validate the TBI dose protocol and to check the accuracy of the 3D dose calculations of the treatment planning system. Methods: Dosimetry based on alanine/electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) was used to measure dose at numerous locations within an anthropomorphic phantom (Alderson) that was irradiated in a clinical TBI beam setup. The alanine EPR dosimetry system was calibrated against water calorimetry in a Co-60 beam and the absorbed dose was determined by the use of ''dose-normalized amplitudes'' A{sub D}. The dose rate of the TBI beam was checked against a Farmer ionization chamber. The phantom measurements were compared to 3D dose calculations from a treatment planning system (Pinnacle) modeled for standard dose calculations. Results: Alanine dosimetry allowed accurate measurements which were in accordance with ionization chamber measurements. The combined relative standard measurement uncertainty in the Alderson phantom was U{sub r}(A{sub D})=0.6%. The humanoid phantom was irradiated to a reference dose of 10 Gy, limiting the lung dose to 7.5 Gy. The ratio of the average measured dose midplane in the craniocaudal direction to the reference dose was 1.001 with a spread of {+-}4.7% (1 sd). Dose to the lung was measured in 26 locations and found, in average, 1.8% lower than expected. Lung dose was homogeneous in the ventral-dorsal direction but a dose gradient of 0.10 Gy cm{sup -1} was observed in the craniocaudal direction midline within the lung lobe. 3D dose calculations (Pinnacle) were found, in average, 2% lower compared to dose measurements on the body axis and 3% lower for the lungs. Conclusions: The alanine/EPR dosimetry system allowed accurate dose measurements which enabled the authors to validate their TBI

  3. β-alanine supplementation improves tactical performance but not cognitive function in combat soldiers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There are no known studies that have examined β-alanine supplementation in military personnel. Considering the physiological and potential neurological effects that have been reported during sustained military operations, it appears that β-alanine supplementation may have a potential benefit in maintaining physical and cognitive performance during high-intensity military activity under stressful conditions. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of 28 days of β-alanine ingestion in military personnel while fatigued on physical and cognitive performance. Methods Twenty soldiers (20.1 ± 0.9 years) from an elite combat unit were randomly assigned to either a β-alanine (BA) or placebo (PL) group. Soldiers were involved in advanced military training, including combat skill development, navigational training, self-defense/hand-to-hand combat and conditioning. All participants performed a 4-km run, 5-countermovement jumps using a linear position transducer, 120-m sprint, a 10-shot shooting protocol with assault rifle, including overcoming a misfire, and a 2-min serial subtraction test to assess cognitive function before (Pre) and after (Post) 28 days of supplementation. Results The training routine resulted in significant increases in 4-km run time for both groups, but no between group differences were seen (p = 0.597). Peak jump power at Post was greater for BA than PL (p = 0.034), while mean jump power for BA at Post was 10.2% greater (p = 0.139) than PL. BA had a significantly greater (p = 0.012) number of shots on target at Post (8.2 ± 1.0) than PL (6.5 ± 2.1), and their target engagement speed at Post was also significantly faster (p = 0.039). No difference in serial subtraction performance was seen between the groups (p = 0.844). Conclusion Results of this study indicate that 4-weeks of β-alanine ingestion in young, healthy soldiers did not impact cognitive performance, but did enhance power

  4. Determination of muscle protein synthesis rates in fish using (2)H2O and (2)H NMR analysis of alanine.

    PubMed

    Marques, Cátia; Viegas, Filipa; Rito, João; Jones, John; Viegas, Ivan

    2016-09-15

    Following administration of deuterated water ((2)H2O), the fractional synthetic rate (FSR) of a given endogenous protein can be estimated by (2)H-enrichment quantification of its alanine residues. Currently, this is measured by mass spectrometry following a derivatization procedure. Muscle FSR was measured by (1)H/(2)H NMR analysis of alanine from seabass kept for 6 days in 5% (2)H-enriched saltwater, following acid hydrolysis and amino acid isolation by cation-exchange chromatography of muscle tissue. The analysis is simple and robust, and provides precise measurements of excess alanine (2)H-enrichment in the 0.1-0.4% range from 50 mmol of alanine recovered from muscle protein. PMID:27418547

  5. Alanine with the Precipitate of Tomato Juice Administered to Rats Enhances the Reduction in Blood Ethanol Levels

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Shunji; Shiiya, Sachie; Tokumaru, Yoshimi; Kanda, Tomomasa

    2015-01-01

    Delay in gastric emptying (GE) lowers the blood ethanol concentration (BEC) after alcohol administration. We previously demonstrated that water-insoluble fractions, mainly comprising dietary fiber derived from many types of botanical foods, possessed the ability to absorb ethanol-containing aqueous solutions. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between the absorption of ethanol and lowering of BEC because of delay in GE. Here we identified dietary nutrients that synergize with the water-insoluble fraction of tomatoes to lower BEC in rats. Consequently, unlike tomato juice without alanine, tomato juice with 5.0% alanine decreased BEC depending on the delay in GE and mediated the ethanol-induced decrease in the spontaneous motor activity (an indicator of drunkenness). Our findings indicate that the synergism between tomato juice and alanine to reduce the absorption of ethanol was attributable to the effect of alanine on precipitates such as the water-insoluble fraction of tomatoes. PMID:26713162

  6. Alanine with the Precipitate of Tomato Juice Administered to Rats Enhances the Reduction in Blood Ethanol Levels.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Shunji; Shiiya, Sachie; Tokumaru, Yoshimi; Kanda, Tomomasa

    2015-01-01

    Delay in gastric emptying (GE) lowers the blood ethanol concentration (BEC) after alcohol administration. We previously demonstrated that water-insoluble fractions, mainly comprising dietary fiber derived from many types of botanical foods, possessed the ability to absorb ethanol-containing aqueous solutions. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between the absorption of ethanol and lowering of BEC because of delay in GE. Here we identified dietary nutrients that synergize with the water-insoluble fraction of tomatoes to lower BEC in rats. Consequently, unlike tomato juice without alanine, tomato juice with 5.0% alanine decreased BEC depending on the delay in GE and mediated the ethanol-induced decrease in the spontaneous motor activity (an indicator of drunkenness). Our findings indicate that the synergism between tomato juice and alanine to reduce the absorption of ethanol was attributable to the effect of alanine on precipitates such as the water-insoluble fraction of tomatoes. PMID:26713162

  7. Effects of high-salinity seawater acclimation on the levels of D-alanine in the muscle and hepatopancreas of kuruma prawn, Marsupenaeus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Naoko; Yokoyama, Masahumi

    2015-12-10

    Changes in D- and L-alanine contents were determined in the muscle and hepatopancreas of kuruma prawn Marsupenaeus japonicus, during acclimation from seawater containing 100% salinity to artificial seawater containing 150% salinity. In the hepatopancreas, contents of both amino acids increased by approximately threefold. The activity of alanine racemase, which catalyzes the interconversion of D- and L-alanine, also increased in the high-salinity seawater. In addition, the expression of the gene encoding alanine racemase increased in the hepatopancreas with an increase in the alanine racemase activity. These data indicate that the biosynthesis of D- and L-alanine is controlled by the gene expression level of alanine racemase, and D-alanine in the hepatopancreas functions as a major osmolyte for isosmotic regulation. In contrast, the content of D-alanine and alanine racemase activity did not change in the muscle during hyper-osmotic acclimation. Therefore, we suggest that D-alanine, which exists in the several tissues of M. japonicus, is considered to be utilized in some different physiological phenomena in different tissues. PMID:26025417

  8. The effect of beta-alanine supplementation on isokinetic force and cycling performance in highly trained cyclists.

    PubMed

    Howe, Samuel T; Bellinger, Phillip M; Driller, Matthew W; Shing, Cecilia M; Fell, James W

    2013-12-01

    Beta-alanine may benefit short-duration, high-intensity exercise performance. The aim of this randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study was to examine the effects of beta-alanine supplementation on aspects of muscular performance in highly trained cyclists. Sixteen highly trained cyclists (mean ± SD; age = 24 ± 7 yr; mass = 70 ± 7 kg; VO2max = 67 ± 4 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1)) supplemented with either beta-alanine (n = 8, 65 mg · kg - 1BM) or a placebo (n = 8; dextrose monohydrate) over 4 weeks. Pre- and postsupplementation cyclists performed a 4-minute maximal cycling test to measure average power and 30 reciprocal maximal isokinetic knee contractions at a fixed angular velocity of 180° · sec(-1) to measure average power/repetition, total work done (TWD), and fatigue index (%). Blood pH, lactate (La-) and bicarbonate (HCO3-) concentrations were measured pre- and postisokinetic testing at baseline and following the supplementation period. Beta-alanine supplementation was 44% likely to increase average power output during the 4-minute cycling time trial when compared with the placebo, although this was not statistically significant (p = .25). Isokinetic average power/repetition was significantly increased post beta-alanine supplementation compared with placebo (beta-alanine: 6.8 ± 9.9 W, placebo: -4.3 ± 9.5 W, p = .04, 85% likely benefit), while fatigue index was significantly reduced (p = .03, 95% likely benefit). TWD was 89% likely to be improved following beta-alanine supplementation; however, this was not statistically significant (p = .09). There were no significant differences in blood pH, lactate, and HCO3- between groups (p > .05). Four weeks of beta-alanine supplementation resulted in worthwhile changes in time-trial performance and short-duration muscular force production in highly trained cyclists. PMID:23630052

  9. Feasibility on using composite gel-alanine dosimetry on the validation of a multiple brain metastasis radiosurgery VMAT technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavoni, J. F.; Neves-Junior, W. F. P.; Silveira, M. A.; Ramos, P. A. M. M.; Haddad, C. M. K.; Baffa, O.

    2015-01-01

    This work presents an end-to-end test using a composite Gel-Alanine phantom, in order to validate 3-dimensionally the dose distribution delivered by a single isocenter VMAT technique on the simultaneous treatment of multiple brain metastases. The results obtained with the gel and alanine dosimeters are consistent with the expected by the treatment planning system, showing the potential of this multidosimetric approach and validating dosimetrically the multiple brain metastases treatment using VMAT.

  10. Discovery of salt taste enhancing arginyl dipeptides in protein digests and fermented fish sauces by means of a sensomics approach.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Alexander; Dunkel, Andreas; Stähler, Frauke; Backes, Michael; Ley, Jakob; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Hofmann, Thomas

    2011-12-14

    As enzymatic digests of fish proteins were recently reported to enhance salt taste, the fish protein protamine was digested by chymotrypsin and trypsin and subsequently screened for candidate salt taste modulating (STM) peptides. To achieve this, first, a two-step sensory assay was developed and demonstrated to be a rather suitable tool for the detection of salt taste enhancers and the "quantitation" of their salt taste enhancing activity on the basis of isointensities with reference solutions. By means of activity-guided fractionation using ultrafiltration, gel permeation chromatography, and hydrophilic liquid interaction chromatography in combination with the sensory assay for STM activity assessment, a series of arginyl dipeptides, with RP, RA, AR, RG, RS, RV, VR, and RM being the most active, as well as l-arginine were found as salt taste enhancing molecules in fish protamine digests. For the first time, HPLC-MS/MS analysis on a PFP and a HILIC stationary phase, respectively, enabled the quantitative analysis of the arginyl peptides in a series of commercial and laboratory-made protein hydrolysates as well as fermented fish sauces. PMID:22044387

  11. Early dipeptide repeat pathology in a frontotemporal dementia kindred with C9ORF72 mutation and intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, Malcolm; Gutowski, Nick J; Edbauer, Dieter; Hilton, David A; Stephens, Mark; Rankin, Julia; Mackenzie, Ian R A

    2014-03-01

    Familial cases of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) provide an opportunity to study the pathophysiology of this clinically diverse condition. The C9ORF72 mutation is the most common cause of familial FTD, recent pathological descriptions challenge existing TDP-43 based hypotheses of sporadic FTD pathogenesis. Non-ATG dependent translation of the hexanucleotide expansion into aggregating dipeptide repeat (DPR) proteins may represent a novel pathomechanism. We report detection of the DPR aggregates very early in C9ORF72 FTD development and also describe childhood intellectual disability as a clinical feature preceding dementia. The index case presented with psychiatric symptoms, progressing into typical FTD. Autopsy revealed extensive neuronal DPR aggregates but only minimal TDP-43 pathology. Her intellectually disabled elder son, also carrying the C9ORF72 mutation, died aged 26 years and at autopsy only DPR aggregates without TDP-43 were found. A second son also has intellectual disability, his C9ORF72 status is unknown, but chromosomal microarray revealed no other cause of disability. These cases both extend the existing phenotype of C9ORF72 mutation and highlight the potential significance of DPR translation early in disease development. PMID:24445903

  12. A New Analogue of Echinomycin and a New Cyclic Dipeptide from a Marine-Derived Streptomyces sp. LS298.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Xin; Gong, Ting; Liu, Fu; Zhang, Pei-Cheng; Zhou, Wan-Qi; Li, Yan; Zhu, Ping

    2015-11-01

    Quinomycin G (1), a new analogue of echinomycin, together with a new cyclic dipeptide, cyclo-(l-Pro-4-OH-l-Leu) (2), as well as three known antibiotic compounds tirandamycin A (3), tirandamycin B (4) and staurosporine (5), were isolated from Streptomyces sp. LS298 obtained from a marine sponge Gelliodes carnosa. The planar and absolute configurations of compounds 1 and 2 were established by MS, NMR spectral data analysis and Marfey's method. Furthermore, the differences in NMR data of keto-enol tautomers in tirandamycins were discussed for the first time. Antibacterial and anti-tumor activities of compound 1 were measured against 15 drug-sensitive/resistant strains and 12 tumor cell lines. Compound 1 exhibited moderate antibacterial activities against Staphylococcuse pidermidis, S. aureus, Enterococcus faecium, and E. faecalis with the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranged from 16 to 64 μg/mL. Moreover, it displayed remarkable anti-tumor activities; the highest activity was observed against the Jurkat cell line (human T-cell leukemia) with an IC50 value of 0.414 μM. PMID:26593927

  13. Collagen-derived dipeptide prolyl-hydroxyproline promotes differentiation of MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kimira, Yoshifumi; Ogura, Kana; Taniuchi, Yuri; Kataoka, Aya; Inoue, Naoki; Sugihara, Fumihito; Nakatani, Sachie; Shimizu, Jun; Wada, Masahiro; Mano, Hiroshi

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • Pro-Hyp did not affect MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation and matrix mineralization. • Pro-Hyp significantly increased alkaline phosphatase activity. • Pro-Hyp significantly upregulated gene expression of Runx2, Osterix, and Col1α1. - Abstract: Prolyl-hydroxyproline (Pro-Hyp) is one of the major constituents of collagen-derived dipeptides. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of Pro-Hyp on the proliferation and differentiation of MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells. Addition of Pro-Hyp did not affect MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation and matrix mineralization but alkaline phosphatase activity was significantly increased. Furthermore, cells treated with Pro-Hyp significantly upregulated gene expression of Runx2, Osterix, and Col1α1. These results indicate that Pro-Hyp promotes osteoblast differentiation. This study demonstrates for the first time that Pro-Hyp has a positive effect on osteoblast differentiation with upregulation of Runx2, Osterix, and Collα1 gene expression.

  14. [The effect of the new nootropic dipeptide GVS-111 in different functional disorders of the escape reaction].

    PubMed

    Inozemtsev, A N; Trofimov, S S; Borlikova, G G; Firova, F A; Pragina, L L; Gudasheva, T A; Ostrovskaia, R U; Tushmalova, N A; Voronina, T A

    1998-01-01

    The authors studied the effect of a new nootropic agent with anxiolytic properties GVS-111 (ethyl ether N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine) on formation of the avoidance reaction (AR) in rats and its functional disorders which were induced by two methods. In one case the stereotype of the relations between the stimulus, reaction and its consequence which developed during the experiment were urgently disturbed: the change of the animal to the other half of the chamber in response to a conditioned stimulus did not lead to its cutting off and prevention of the electropain stimulation for three successive combinations (AR error). In another case the spatial stereotype of the experiment was altered by changing the place of the opening through which the animal avoided the stimulus (spatial remodeling). Intraperitoneal injection of GVS-111 (0.1 mg/kg/day) improved the learning, but the effect differed from experiment to experiment. Along with this, the dipeptide prevented AR disturbance during the error and quickened restoration of the habit in spatial remodeling. It was shown earlier that AR disorders during an error are prevented by anxiolytics and nootropic agents but during spatial remodeling only by nootropic agents. It may be assumed that the positive effect of GSV-111 on AR in functional disorders is due to its nootropic effect. PMID:9690067

  15. A New Analogue of Echinomycin and a New Cyclic Dipeptide from a Marine-Derived Streptomyces sp. LS298

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Xin; Gong, Ting; Liu, Fu; Zhang, Pei-Cheng; Zhou, Wan-Qi; Li, Yan; Zhu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Quinomycin G (1), a new analogue of echinomycin, together with a new cyclic dipeptide, cyclo-(l-Pro-4-OH-l-Leu) (2), as well as three known antibiotic compounds tirandamycin A (3), tirandamycin B (4) and staurosporine (5), were isolated from Streptomyces sp. LS298 obtained from a marine sponge Gelliodes carnosa. The planar and absolute configurations of compounds 1 and 2 were established by MS, NMR spectral data analysis and Marfey’s method. Furthermore, the differences in NMR data of keto-enol tautomers in tirandamycins were discussed for the first time. Antibacterial and anti-tumor activities of compound 1 were measured against 15 drug-sensitive/resistant strains and 12 tumor cell lines. Compound 1 exhibited moderate antibacterial activities against Staphylococcuse pidermidis, S. aureus, Enterococcus faecium, and E. faecalis with the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranged from 16 to 64 μg/mL. Moreover, it displayed remarkable anti-tumor activities; the highest activity was observed against the Jurkat cell line (human T-cell leukemia) with an IC50 value of 0.414 μM. PMID:26593927

  16. Cyclic dipeptide cyclo(l-leucyl-l-prolyl) from marine Bacillus amyloliquefaciens mitigates biofilm formation and virulence in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Gowrishankar, Shanmugaraj; Sivaranjani, Murugesan; Kamaladevi, Arumugam; Ravi, Arumugam Veera; Balamurugan, Krishnaswamy; Karutha Pandian, Shunmugiah

    2016-06-01

    This study was intentionally focused on cyclo(l-leucyl-l-prolyl) (CLP), a cyclic dipeptide with myriad pharmaceutical significance, to explore its antivirulence efficacy against the predominant foodborne pathogen,Listeria monocytogenes(LM). Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of CLP against LM ATCC 19111 was found to be 512 μg mL(-1) CLP at sub-MICs (64 128, 256 μg mL(-1)) demonstrated a profound non-bactericidal dose-dependent antibiofilm efficacy (on polystyrene and glass) against LM, which was further confirmed through confocal and scanning electron microscopic analysis (on stainless steel surface).In vitrobioassays divulged the phenomenal inhibitory efficacy of CLP towards various virulence traits of LM, specifically its overwhelming suppression of swimming and swarming motility. Data ofin vivoassay usingCaenorhabditis eleganssignified that the plausible mechanism of CLP could be by impeding the pathogen's initial adhesion and thereby attenuating the biofilm assemblage and its associated virulence. This was further confirmed by significant decrease in extracellular polymeric substance, autoaggregation, hydrophobicity index and extracellular DNA of the CLP-treated LM cells. Collectively, this study unveils the antivirulence efficacy of CLP against the Gram-positive foodborne pathogen and the strainBacillus amyloliquefaciensaugurs well to be a promising probiotic in controlling infections associated with LM. PMID:26945590

  17. Mechanism of 4-carboxybenzophenone-sensitized photooxidation of methionine-containing dipeptides and tripeptides in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Marciniak, B. |; Hug, G.L.; Bobrowski, K.; Kozubek, H.

    1995-09-07

    The mechanism of 4-carboxybenzophenone (CB)-sensitized photooxidation of methionine-containing dipeptides (Met-Gly and Gly-Met) and tripeptides (Met-Gly-Gly, Gly-Met-Gly, and Gly-Gly-Met) was investigated using nanosecond flash photolysis and steady-state photolysis. The rate constants for quenching of the CB triplet by sulfur-containing peptides were determined to be in the range (1.8-2.3) x 10{sup 9} M{sup -1} S{sup -1} for neutral and alkaline solutions. The presence of the various electron-transfer intermediates accompanying the CB triplet quenching events was identified through the use of a multiple-regression procedure that was used to resolve the experimental transient spectra into components. The intermediates identified were the CB ketyl radical anion, the CB ketyl radical, intermolecularly (S.{sup {center_dot}}.S)-bonded radical cations, and intramolecularly (S.{sup {center_dot}}.N)-bonded radical cations derived from peptides. The types of intermediates were found to depend on the pH of the solution and on the location of the methionine unit with respect to the terminal functions. The quantum yields of all the transients and the kinetics of their formation and decay were measured by flash photolysis, and quantum yields of CO{sub 2} formation were measured by steady-state photolysis. 50 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Tritiation of delta opioid-receptor selective antagonist dipeptide ligands with extraordinary affinity containing 2', 6'dimethyltyrosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertész, I.; Tóth, G.; Balboni, G.; Guerrini, R.; Salvadori, S.

    1999-01-01

    Recently a new class of δ opioid antagonists has been discovered by using Tyr-Tic sequence. The substitution of Tyr1 by Dmt resulted in a new analogue (H-Dmt-Tic-OH) with enhanced affinity and selectivity. Because of its excellent property we chose it for labelling with tritium. At the same time peptides containing Tic at position 2 undergo spontaneous diketopiperazine formation in some solvents, and they lose some of their binding ability. To avoid this unwanted side-reaction we synthetized the N-methylated analogue (N,N(Me)2-Dmt-Tic-OH), and it was more stable under storage condition, but δ affinity declined moderately. On the basis of this information we prepared diiodinated analogues of these dipeptides. Catalytic dehalotritiation of precursors resulted in tritiated peptides. High specific radioactivity, 44.67 Ci/mmol with [3H]Dmt-Tic-OH and 59.88 Ci/mmol with N,N(Me)2-[3H]Dmt-Tic-OH were achieved.

  19. Tritiation of delta opioid-receptor selective antagonist dipeptide ligands with extraordinary affinity containing 2‧, 6‧dimethyltyrosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertész, I.; Tóth, G.; Balboni, G.; Guerrini, R.; Salvadori, S.

    1999-01-01

    Recently a new class of δ opioid antagonists has been discovered by using Tyr-Tic sequence. The substitution of Tyr1 by Dmt resulted in a new analogue (H-Dmt-Tic-OH) with enhanced affinity and selectivity. Because of its excellent property we chose it for labelling with tritium. At the same time peptides containing Tic at position 2 undergo spontaneous diketopiperazine formation in some solvents, and they lose some of their binding ability. To avoid this unwanted side-reaction we synthetized the N-methylated analogue (N,N(Me)2-Dmt-Tic-OH), and it was more stable under storage condition, but δ affinity declined moderately. On the basis of this information we prepared diiodinated analogues of these dipeptides. Catalytic dehalotritiation of precursors resulted in tritiated peptides. High specific radioactivity, 44.67 Ci/mmol with [3H]Dmt-Tic-OH and 59.88 Ci/mmol with N,N(Me)2-[3H]Dmt-Tic-OH were achieved.

  20. Exploration of Sitagliptin as a potential inhibitor for the M1 Alanine aminopeptidase enzyme in Plasmodium falciparum using computational docking

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamoorthy, Mohana; Achary, Anant

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum has limited capacity for de novo amino acid synthesis and rely on degradation of host hemoglobin to maintain protein metabolism and synthesis of proteins. M1 alanine aminopeptidase enzyme of the parasite involved in the terminal degradation of host hemoglobin was subjected to in silico screening with low molecular weight protease inhibitors. The km (avg) of the enzyme M1 alanine aminopeptidase for the substrate DL – Alanine β Napthylamide Hydrochloride was estimated as 322.05µM. The molecular interactions between the enzyme and the substrate and the mechanism of enzyme action were analyzed which paved way for inhibition strategies. Among all the inhibitors screened, Sitagliptin was found to be most potent inhibitor with ki of 0.152 µM in its best orientation whereas the ki(avg) was 2.0055 µM. The ki of Sitagliptin is lower than the km of M1 alanine aminopeptidase for the substrate DL – Alanine β Napthylamide Hydrochloride (322.05 µM) and Ki of the known inhibitor Bestatin. Therefore Sitagliptin may serve as a potent competitive inhibitor of the enzyme M1 alanine aminopeptidase of Plasmodium falciparum. PMID:23559748