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Sample records for alanine glycine lysine

  1. Folding simulations of alanine-based peptides with lysine residues.

    PubMed Central

    Sung, S S

    1995-01-01

    The folding of short alanine-based peptides with different numbers of lysine residues is simulated at constant temperature (274 K) using the rigid-element Monte Carlo method. The solvent-referenced potential has prevented the multiple-minima problem in helix folding. From various initial structures, the peptides with three lysine residues fold into helix-dominated conformations with the calculated average helicity in the range of 60-80%. The peptide with six lysine residues shows only 8-14% helicity. These results agree well with experimental observations. The intramolecular electrostatic interaction of the charged lysine side chains and their electrostatic hydration destabilize the helical conformations of the peptide with six lysine residues, whereas these effects on the peptides with three lysine residues are small. The simulations provide insight into the helix-folding mechanism, including the beta-bend intermediate in helix initiation, the (i, i + 3) hydrogen bonds, the asymmetrical helix propagation, and the asymmetrical helicities in the N- and C-terminal regions. These findings are consistent with previous studies. PMID:7756550

  2. Degradation of Glycine and Alanine on Irradiated Quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlikowski, Maciej; Benko, Aleksandra; Wróbel, Tomasz P.

    2013-04-01

    Recent researches suggest participation of minerals in the formation of life under primordial conditions. Among all of the minerals, quartz seems to be one of the most probable to take part in such processes. However, an external source of energy is needed, e.g. electric discharge. A device simulating the proposed conditions was designed and was used to simulate prebiotic conditions. Investigation of processes occurring during the stimulation of quartz with electric discharge was studied by means of Ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectroscopy, in order to monitor the generation kinetics of free radicals. Additionally, infrared spectroscopy was applied to identify chemical reaction products created in a solution of alanine or glycine, in the presence of quartz treated with electric discharge. Formation of increased amounts of free radicals, compared to experiments performed without quartz and/or amino acid, is reported, along with identification of possible degradation products of alanine. No synthetic reactions were observed.

  3. IR spectroscopic signatures of solid glycine and alanine in astrophysical ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Lazcano, Y.; Maté, B.; Tanarro, I.; Herrero, V.; Escribano, R.

    2012-09-01

    The conversion from solid neutral to zwitterionic glycine (or alanine) is studied using infrared spectroscopy from the point of view of the interactions of this molecule with polar (water) and non-polar (CO2, CH4) surroundings. Such environments could be found on astrophysical matter. Different spectral features are suggested as suitable probes for the presence of glycine (or alanine) in astrophysical media, depending on their form (normal or zwitterionic), temperature, and composition.

  4. Formation of homochiral glycine/Cu(111) quantum corral array realized using alanine nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Miki; Huang, Hui; Kanazawa, Ken; Taninaka, Atsushi; Yoshida, Shoji; Takeuchi, Osamu; Shigekawa, Hidemi

    2015-08-01

    Glycine has enantiomeric isomers on a Cu(111) surface through the dissociation of hydrogen from the carboxyl group and forms an array of quantum corrals of ∼1.3 nm diameter. Stable homo-chiral glycinate trimers are formed in the first step, which subsequently form a network with a hexagonal arrangement. However, domains with R- or S-chirality coexist with the same probability. On the other hand, α-alanine has D- and L-chirality in nature and forms a similar quantum corral array on Cu(111) with R- and S-chirality, respectively. Here, by using α-alanine molecules as nuclei, the chirality of glycine molecules was controlled and a homochiral quantum corral array was successfully formed, which indicates the possibility that the optical isomers can be separated through a method such as preferential crystallization.

  5. Survivability and reactivity of glycine and alanine in early oceans: effects of meteorite impacts.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Yuhei; Fukunaga, Nao; Sekine, Toshimori; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kakegawa, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Takamichi; Nakazawa, Hiromoto

    2016-01-01

    Prebiotic oceans might have contained abundant amino acids, and were subjected to meteorite impacts, especially during the late heavy bombardment. It is so far unknown how meteorite impacts affected amino acids in the early oceans. Impact experiments were performed under the conditions where glycine was synthesized from carbon, ammonia, and water, using aqueous solutions containing (13)C-labeled glycine and alanine. Selected amino acids and amines in samples were analyzed with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS). In particular, the (13)C-labeled reaction products were analyzed to distinguish between run products and contaminants. The results revealed that both amino acids survived partially in the early ocean through meteorite impacts, that part of glycine changed into alanine, and that large amounts of methylamine and ethylamine were formed. Fast decarboxylation was confirmed to occur during such impact processes. Furthermore, the formation of n-butylamine, detected only in the samples recovered from the solutions with additional nitrogen and carbon sources of ammonia and benzene, suggests that chemical reactions to form new biomolecules can proceed through marine impacts. Methylamine and ethylamine from glycine and alanine increased considerably in the presence of hematite rather than olivine under similar impact conditions. These results also suggest that amino acids present in early oceans can contribute further to impact-induced reactions, implying that impact energy plays a potential role in the prebiotic formation of various biomolecules, although the reactions are complicated and depend upon the chemical environments as well. PMID:26369758

  6. Comparative study of glycine, alanine or casein as inert nitrogen sources in endotoxemic rats.

    PubMed

    Chambon-Savanovitch, C; Felgines, C; Farges, M C; Raul, F; Cézard, J P; Davot, P; Vasson, M P; Cynober, L A

    1999-10-01

    Pharmacological effects of dietary amino acids (AA) and peptides must be compared to an isonitrogenous control that is as inert as possible. To establish a rationale for the choice of such a control, potential metabolic and nutritional effects of three currently used nitrogenous controls (glycine, alanine, and casein) were evaluated in an endotoxemic rat model that has well-defined alterations in AA and protein metabolism. Five-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats (113 +/- 1 g) were randomly assigned to four groups and received at d 0 an intraperitoneal injection of endotoxin (3 mg/kg). After withdrawal of food for 24 h, the rats were enterally refed for 48 h with a liquid diet (Osmolite((R))) supplemented with 0.19 g N. kg(-1). d(-1) in the form of glycine [lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-GLY group], alanine (LPS-ALA group) or casein (LPS-CAS group). One group (LPS group) received only Osmolite((R)). Plasma, two skeletal muscles, the liver and the intestine were then removed. Body and tissue weights and tissue protein contents did not differ among the four groups. Intestine histomorphometry showed no significant difference among groups. Jejunal hydrolase activities were significantly affected by the nitrogenous supplementations, but no effect was observed in the ileum. Only limited significant effects were observed on plasma and tissue-free AA concentrations, except for an accumulation of glycine in the plasma and tissues from the LPS-GLY group, compared to other groups. Overall, whereas glycine as a nitrogenous control should be used with care, either alanine or casein may be used as the "placebo," with the choice depending on the study to be performed. PMID:10498760

  7. An overlooked effect of glycine betaine on fermentation: prevents caramelization and increases the L-lysine production.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianzhong; Xia, Xiuhua; Zhang, Junlan; Guo, Yanfeng; Zhang, Weiguo

    2014-10-01

    This article focuses on the effects of glycine betaine on preventing caramelization, and increasing DCW and L-lysine production. The additional glycine betaine not only decreased the browning intensity (decreased 4 times), and the concentrations of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (decreased 7.8 times) and furfural (decreased 12 times), but also increased the availability of glucose (increased 17.5%) for L-lysine production. The DCW and L-lysine production were increased by adding no more than 20 mM glycine betaine, whereas the DCW and L-lysine production were decreased with the reduction of pH values, although pH had a better response to prevent caramelization than did glycine betaine. For L-lysine production, the highest increase (40%) was observed on the media with 20 mM glycine betaine. The crucial enzymes in glycolysis and L-lysine biosynthesis pathway were investigated. The results indicated that additional glycine betaine increases the activity of enzymes in glycolysis, in contrast to the effect of pH. All the results indicated that glycine betaine can be used to prevent caramelization and increase the L-lysine production. By applying this strategy, glucose would not be have to be separated from the culture media during autoclaving so that factories can save production costs and shorten the fermentation period. PMID:25022526

  8. Selection of tRNA(Asp) amber suppressor mutants having alanine, arginine, glutamine, and lysine identity.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, F; Reinbolt, J; Dirheimer, G; Gangloff, J; Eriani, G

    1996-01-01

    Elements that confer identity to a tRNA in the cellular environment, where all aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are competing for substrates, may be delineated by in vivo experiments using suppressor tRNAs. Here we describe the selection of active Escherichia coli tRNAAsp amber mutants and analyze their identity. Starting from a library containing randomly mutated tRNA(CUA)Asp genes, we isolated four amber suppressors presenting either lysine, alanine, or glutamine activity. Two of them, presenting mainly alanine or lysine activity, were further submitted to a second round of mutagenesis selection in order to improve their efficiency of suppression. Eleven suppressors were isolated, each containing two or three mutations. Ten presented identities of the two parental mutants, whereas one had switched from lysine to arginine identity. Analysis of the different mutants revealed (or confirmed for some nucleotides) their role as positive and/or negative determinants in AlaRS, LysRS, and ArgRS recognition. More generally, it appears that tRNAAsp presents identity characteristics closely related to those of tRNALys, as well as a structural basis for acquiring alanine or arginine identity upon moderate mutational changes; these consist of addition or suppression of the corresponding positive or negative determinants, as well as tertiary interactions. Failure to isolate aspartic acid-inserting suppressors is probably due to elimination of the important G34 identity element and its replacement by an antideterminant when changing the anticodon of the tRNAAsp to the CUA triplet. PMID:8809018

  9. A single glycine-alanine exchange directs ligand specificity of the elephant progestin receptor.

    PubMed

    Wierer, Michael; Schrey, Anna K; Kühne, Ronald; Ulbrich, Susanne E; Meyer, Heinrich H D

    2012-01-01

    The primary gestagen of elephants is 5α-dihydroprogesterone (DHP), which is unlike all other mammals studied until now. The level of DHP in elephants equals that of progesterone in other mammals, and elephants are able to bind DHP with similar affinity to progesterone indicating a unique ligand-binding specificity of the elephant progestin receptor (PR). Using site-directed mutagenesis in combination with in vitro binding studies we here report that this change in specificity is due to a single glycine to alanine exchange at position 722 (G722A) of PR, which specifically increases DHP affinity while not affecting binding of progesterone. By conducting molecular dynamics simulations comparing human and elephant PR ligand-binding domains (LBD), we observed that the alanine methyl group at position 722 is able to push the DHP A-ring into a position similar to progesterone. In the human PR, the DHP A-ring position is twisted towards helix 3 of PR thereby disturbing the hydrogen bond pattern around the C3-keto group, resulting in a lower binding affinity. Furthermore, we observed that the elephant PR ligand-binding pocket is more rigid than the human analogue, which probably explains the higher affinity towards both progesterone and DHP. Interestingly, the G722A substitution is not elephant-specific, rather it is also present in five independent lineages of mammalian evolution, suggesting a special role of the substitution for the development of distinct mammalian gestagen systems. PMID:23209719

  10. Template-nucleated alanine-lysine helices are stabilized by position-dependent interactions between the lysine side chain and the helix barrel.

    PubMed

    Groebke, K; Renold, P; Tsang, K Y; Allen, T J; McClure, K F; Kemp, D S

    1996-04-30

    The helicity in water has been determined for several series of alanine-rich peptides that contain single lysine residues and that are N-terminally linked to a helix-inducing and reporting template termed Ac-Hel1. The helix-propagating constant for alanine (sAla value) that best fits the properties of these peptides lies in the range of 1.01-1.02, close to the value reported by Scheraga and coworkers [Wojcik, J., Altmann, K.-H. & Scheraga, H.A. (1990) Biopolymers 30, 121-134], but significantly lower than the value assigned by Baldwin and coworkers [Chakrabartty, A., Kortemme, T. & Baldwin, R.L. (1994) Protein Sci. 3,843-852]. From a study of conjugates Ac-Hel1-Ala(n)-Lys-Ala(m)-NH2 and analogs in which the methylene portion of the lysine side chain is truncated, we find that the unusual helical stability of Ala(n)Lys peptides is controlled primarily by interactions of the lysine side chain with the helix barrel, and only passively by the alanine matrix. Using 1H NMR spectroscopy, we observe nuclear Overhauser effect crosspeaks consistent with proton-proton contacts expected for these interactions. PMID:8633010

  11. Predicting Three-Dimensional Conformations of Peptides Constructed of Only Glycine, Alanine, Aspartic Acid, and Valine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Akifumi; Fukuyoshi, Shuichi

    2015-06-01

    The GADV hypothesis is a form of the protein world hypothesis, which suggests that life originated from proteins (Lacey et al. 1999; Ikehara 2002; Andras 2006). In the GADV hypothesis, life is thought to have originated from primitive proteins constructed of only glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and valine ([GADV]-proteins). In this study, the three-dimensional (3D) conformations of randomly generated short [GADV]-peptides were computationally investigated using replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations (Sugita and Okamoto 1999). Because the peptides used in this study consisted of only 20 residues each, they could not form certain 3D structures. However, the conformational tendencies of the peptides were elucidated by analyzing the conformational ensembles generated by REMD simulations. The results indicate that secondary structures can be formed in several randomly generated [GADV]-peptides. A long helical structure was found in one of the hydrophobic peptides, supporting the conjecture of the GADV hypothesis that many peptides aggregated to form peptide multimers with enzymatic activity in the primordial soup. In addition, these results indicate that REMD simulations can be used for the structural investigation of short peptides.

  12. Molecular dynamics of glycine ions in alanine doped TGS single crystal as probed by polarized laser raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajpai, P. K.; Verma, A. L.

    2012-10-01

    Polarized Raman spectra of pure and alanine doped tri-glycine sulfate (TGS) single crystals at 12 K in different scattering geometries are analyzed. Sub species modes due to three crystallographically distinguishable glycine ions G (I), G (II) and G (III) are assigned. It is observed that alanine doping does not change the crystalline field and acts as local perturbation only. The major changes due to doping are observed in the relative intensities of different modes; most of the modes associated with G (I) and SO42- ions show reversal behavior in relative intensity at high doping concentration. The observed spectral changes are analyzed in terms of reorientation of G (I) ions with sub species modes of G (II)/ G (III) following the reorientation due to complex hydrogen bonding network.

  13. Functional characterization of a member of alanine or glycine: cation symporter family in halotolerant cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica.

    PubMed

    Bualuang, Aporn; Kageyama, Hakuto; Tanaka, Yoshito; Incharoensakdi, Aran; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins of amino acid-polyamine-organocation (APC) superfamily transport amino acids and amines across membranes and play important roles in the regulation of cellular processes. The alanine or glycine: cation symporter (AGCS) family belongs to APC superfamily and is found in prokaryotes, but its substrate specificity remains to be clarified. In this study, we found that a halotolerant cyanobacterium, Aphanothece halophytica has two putative ApagcS genes. The deduced amino acid sequence of one of genes, ApagcS1, exhibited high homology to Pseudomonas AgcS. The ApagcS1 gene was expressed in Escherichia coli JW4166 which is deficient in glycine uptake. Kinetics studies in JW4166 revealed that ApAgcS1 is a sodium-dependent glycine transporter. Competition experiments showed the significant inhibition by glutamine, asparagine, and glycine. The level of mRNA for ApagcS1 was induced by NaCl and nitrogen-deficient stresses. Uptake of glutamine by ApAgcS1 was also observed. Based on these data, the physiological role of ApAgcS1 was discussed. PMID:25421789

  14. Simultaneous Determination of Glutamate, Glycine, and Alanine in Human Plasma Using Precolumn Derivatization with 6-Aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl Carbamate and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qing Xian; Li, Shu Cui; Yang, Mei Zi; Rao, Bin

    2012-01-01

    A simple, sensitive and reproducible high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method has been validated for determining concentrations of glutamate, glycine, and alanine in human plasma. Proteins in plasma were precipitated with perchloric acid, followed by derivatization with 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate (AQC). Simultaneous analysis of glutamate, glycine, and alanine is achieved using reversed-phase HPLC conditions and ultraviolet detection. Excellent linearity was observed for these three amino acids over their concentration ranges with correlation coefficients (r)>0.999. The intra- and inter-day precision were below 10%. This method utilizes quality control samples and demonstrates excellent plasma recovery and accuracy. The developed method has been successfully applied to measure plasma glutamate, glycine, and alanine in twenty volunteers. PMID:23118561

  15. COMPARISON OF ALANINE AMINOPEPTIDASE ACTIVITIES IN HETERODERA GLYCINES AND CAENORHABDITIS ELEGANS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aminopeptidase activities in the cytosolic fraction of whole body homogenates of Caenorhabditis elegans and Heterodera glycines were examined. Activities were detected using a colorimetric assay based upon hydrolysis of aminoacyl p-nitroanilides (Xxx-pNA). Properties including substrate preference...

  16. FT-IR and Raman spectroscopic and DFT studies of anti-cancer active molecule N-{(meta-ferrocenyl) Benzoyl} - L-Alanine - Glycine ethyl ester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xavier, T. S.; Kenny, Peter T. M.; Manimaran, D.; Joe, I. Hubert

    2015-06-01

    FT-Raman and FT-IR spectra of N-{(meta-ferrocenyl) Benzoyl} - L-alanine - glycine ethyl ester were recorded in solid phase. The optimized molecular geometry, the vibrational wavenumbers, the infrared intensities and the Raman scattering intensities were calculated by using density functional method(B3LYP) with 6-31G(d, p) basis set. Vibrational assignment of the molecule was done by using potential energy distribution analysis. Natural bond orbital analysis, Mulliken charge analysis and HOMO-LUMO energy were used to elucidate the reasons for intra molecular charge transfer. Docking studies were conducted to predict its anticancer activity.

  17. Enhanced trophic factor secretion by mesenchymal stem/stromal cells with Glycine-Histidine-Lysine (GHK)-modified alginate hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Soumia; Hughbanks, Marissa L.; Binder, Bernard Y.K.; Ingavle, Ganesh C.; Leach, J. Kent

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant proteins and cytokines are under broad preclinical and clinical investigation to promote angiogenesis, but their success is limited by ineffective delivery, lack of long-term stability, and excessive cost. Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) secrete bioactive trophic factors, and thus, may provide an effective alternative to address these challenges. Glycine-Histidine-Lysine (GHK) is a peptide fragment of osteonectin (SPARC), a matricellular protein with reported proangiogenic potential. We examined the capacity of GHK to upregulate secretion of proangiogenic factors from human MSC in culture and when covalently coupled to alginate hydrogels. GHK had no apparent cytotoxic effects on MSC in culture over a wide range of concentrations. We detected a dose-dependent increase in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentration in media conditioned by GHK-treated MSC, which increased endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and tubule formation. We covalently coupled GHK to alginate using carbodiimide chemistry, and human MSC were entrapped in alginate hydrogels to assess VEGF secretion. Similar to monolayer culture, MSC responded to GHK-modified gels by secreting increased concentrations of VEGF and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) compared to unmodified gels. The pre-treatment of MSC with antibodies to α6 and β1 integrins prior to entrapment in GHK-modified gels abrogated VEGF secretion, suggesting that the proangiogenic response of MSC was integrin-mediated. These data demonstrate that the proangiogenic potential of MSC can be significantly increased by the presentation of GHK with a biodegradable carrier, therefore increasing their clinical potential when used for tissue repair. PMID:24468583

  18. Enzymatic properties of the glycine D-alanine [corrected] aminopeptidase of Aspergillus oryzae and its activity profiles in liquid-cultured mycelia and solid-state rice culture (rice koji).

    PubMed

    Marui, Junichiro; Matsushita-Morita, Mayumi; Tada, Sawaki; Hattori, Ryota; Suzuki, Satoshi; Amano, Hitoshi; Ishida, Hiroki; Yamagata, Youhei; Takeuchi, Michio; Kusumoto, Ken-Ichi

    2012-01-01

    The gdaA gene encoding S12 family glycine-D-alanine aminopeptidase (GdaA) was found in the industrial fungus Aspergillus oryzae. GdaA shares 43% amino acid sequence identity with the D-aminopeptidase of the Gram-negative bacterium Ochrobactrum anthropi. GdaA purified from an A. oryzae gdaA-overexpressing strain exhibited high D-stereospecificity and efficiently released N-terminal glycine and D-alanine of substrates in a highly specific manner. The optimum pH and temperature were 8 to 9 and 40°C, respectively. This enzyme was stable under alkaline conditions at pH 8 to 11 and relatively resistant to acidic conditions until pH 5.0. The chelating reagent EDTA, serine protease inhibitors such as AEBSF, benzamidine, TPCK, and TLCK, and the thiol enzyme inhibitor PCMB inhibited the enzyme. The aminopeptidase inhibitor bestatin did not affect the activity. GdaA was largely responsible for intracellular glycine and D-alanine aminopeptidase activities in A. oryzae during stationary-phase growth in liquid media. In addition, the activity increased in response to the depletion of nitrogen or carbon sources in the growth media, although the GdaA-independent glycine aminopeptidase activity highly increased simultaneously. Aminopeptidases of A. oryzae attract attention because the enzymatic release of a variety of amino acids and peptides is important for the enhancement of the palatability of fermented foods. GdaA activity was found in extracts of a solid-state rice culture of A. oryzae (rice koji), which is widely used as a starter culture for Japanese traditional fermented foods, and was largely responsible for the glycine and D-alanine aminopeptidase activity detected at a pH range of 6 to 9. PMID:22005737

  19. NMR studies of protonation and hydrogen bond states of internal aldimines of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate acid-base in alanine racemase, aspartate aminotransferase, and poly-L-lysine.

    PubMed

    Chan-Huot, Monique; Dos, Alexandra; Zander, Reinhard; Sharif, Shasad; Tolstoy, Peter M; Compton, Shara; Fogle, Emily; Toney, Michael D; Shenderovich, Ilya; Denisov, Gleb S; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2013-12-01

    Using (15)N solid-state NMR, we have studied protonation and H-bonded states of the cofactor pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) linked as an internal aldimine in alanine racemase (AlaR), aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT), and poly-L-lysine. Protonation of the pyridine nitrogen of PLP and the coupled proton transfer from the phenolic oxygen (enolimine form) to the aldimine nitrogen (ketoenamine form) is often considered to be a prerequisite to the initial step (transimination) of the enzyme-catalyzed reaction. Indeed, using (15)N NMR and H-bond correlations in AspAT, we observe a strong aspartate-pyridine nitrogen H-bond with H located on nitrogen. After hydration, this hydrogen bond is maintained. By contrast, in the case of solid lyophilized AlaR, we find that the pyridine nitrogen is neither protonated nor hydrogen bonded to the proximal arginine side chain. However, hydration establishes a weak hydrogen bond to pyridine. To clarify how AlaR is activated, we performed (13)C and (15)N solid-state NMR experiments on isotopically labeled PLP aldimines formed by lyophilization with poly-L-lysine. In the dry solid, only the enolimine tautomer is observed. However, a fast reversible proton transfer involving the ketoenamine tautomer is observed after treatment with either gaseous water or gaseous dry HCl. Hydrolysis requires the action of both water and HCl. The formation of an external aldimine with aspartic acid at pH 9 also produces the ketoenamine form stabilized by interaction with a second aspartic acid, probably via a H-bond to the phenolic oxygen. We postulate that O-protonation is an effectual mechanism for the activation of PLP, as is N-protonation, and that enzymes that are incapable of N-protonation employ this mechanism. PMID:24147985

  20. Osteogenesis Imperfecta Missense Mutations in Collagen: Structural consequences of a glycine to alanine replacement at a highly charged site

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jianxi; Cheng, Haiming; Silva, Teresita; Baum, Jean; Brodsky, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Glycine is required as every third residue in the collagen triple-helix, and a missense mutation leading to the replacement of even one Gly in the repeating (Gly-Xaa-Yaa)n sequence by a larger residue leads to a pathological condition. Gly to Ala missense mutations are highly underrepresented in osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and other collagen diseases, suggesting that the smallest replacement residue Ala might cause the least structural perturbation and mildest clinical consequences. The relatively small number of Gly to Ala mutation sites that do lead to OI must have some unusual features, such as greater structural disruption due to local sequence environment or location at a biologically important site. Here, peptides are used to model a severe OI case where a Gly to Ala mutation is found within a highly stabilizing Lys-Gly-Asp sequence environment. NMR, CD and DSC studies indicate this Gly to Ala replacement leads to a substantial loss in triple-helix stability and non-equivalence of the Ala residues in the three chains such that only one of the three Ala residues is capable of form a good backbone hydrogen bond. Examination of reported OI Gly to Ala mutations suggests preferential location at known collagen binding sites, and we propose that structural defects due to Ala replacements may lead to pathology when interfering with interactions. PMID:22054507

  1. Osteocompatibility evaluation of poly(glycine ethyl ester-co-alanine ethyl ester)phosphazene with honeycomb-patterned surface topography.

    PubMed

    Duan, Shun; Yang, Xiaoping; Mao, Jifu; Qi, Bing; Cai, Qing; Shen, Hong; Yang, Fei; Deng, Xuliang; Wang, Shenguo

    2013-02-01

    Biodegradable amino acid ester-substituted polyphosphazenes are unique biomaterials for tissue engineering. Considering the surface properties as topography and chemical composition having vital roles in regulating cellular response, in this study, a kind of micropatterned polyphosphazene films were prepared and subjected to osteoblasts culture. Briefly, poly(glycine ethyl ester-co-alanine ethyl ester)phosphazene (PGAP) was synthesized, and its solution in chloroform was cast under high (80%) or low (20%) environmental humidity. Honeycomb-patterned or flat PGAP films were resulted. By analyzing with scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscope, and water contact angle measurement, the honeycomb-patterned PGAP films demonstrated higher surface roughness, phosphorous and nitrogen content, and hydrophilicity than the flat one. Although the initial cell attachment and proliferation on PGAP films were inferior to those on conventional poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) films, P-containing PGAP was a sort of bone-binding bioactive polymer. With these alternations, honeycomb-patterned PGAP films had accordingly enhanced protein adsorption and apatite deposition in simulated body fluid and showed great advantages in promoting osteogenous differentiation. The results suggested a potential way to make polyphosphazenes as good choices for bone tissue regeneration by increasing their surface roughness and phosphorous content. PMID:22733644

  2. Structures of two bacterial resistance factors mediating tRNA-dependent aminoacylation of phosphatidylglycerol with lysine or alanine

    PubMed Central

    Hebecker, Stefanie; Krausze, Joern; Hasenkampf, Tatjana; Schneider, Julia; Groenewold, Maike; Reichelt, Joachim; Jahn, Dieter; Heinz, Dirk W.; Moser, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The cytoplasmic membrane is probably the most important physical barrier between microbes and the surrounding habitat. Aminoacylation of the polar head group of the phospholipid phosphatidylglycerol (PG) catalyzed by Ala-tRNAAla–dependent alanyl-phosphatidylglycerol synthase (A-PGS) or by Lys-tRNALys–dependent lysyl-phosphatidylglycerol synthase (L-PGS) enables bacteria to cope with cationic peptides that are harmful to the integrity of the cell membrane. Accordingly, these synthases also have been designated as multiple peptide resistance factors (MprF). They consist of a separable C-terminal catalytic domain and an N-terminal transmembrane flippase domain. Here we present the X-ray crystallographic structure of the catalytic domain of A-PGS from the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In parallel, the structure of the related lysyl-phosphatidylglycerol–specific L-PGS domain from Bacillus licheniformis in complex with the substrate analog L-lysine amide is presented. Both proteins reveal a continuous tunnel that allows the hydrophobic lipid substrate PG and the polar aminoacyl-tRNA substrate to access the catalytic site from opposite directions. Substrate recognition of A-PGS versus L-PGS was investigated using misacylated tRNA variants. The structural work presented here in combination with biochemical experiments using artificial tRNA or artificial lipid substrates reveals the tRNA acceptor stem, the aminoacyl moiety, and the polar head group of PG as the main determinants for substrate recognition. A mutagenesis approach yielded the complementary amino acid determinants of tRNA interaction. These results have broad implications for the design of L-PGS and A-PGS inhibitors that could render microbial pathogens more susceptible to antimicrobial compounds. PMID:26261323

  3. Pore Diameter Dependence and Segmental Dynamics of Poly-Z-L-lysine and Poly-L-alanine Confined in 1D Nanocylindrical Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuncel, Eylul; Suzuki, Yasuhito; Iossifidis, Agathaggelos; Steinhart, Martin; Butt, Hans-Jurgen; Floudas, George; Duran, Hatice

    Structure formation, thermodynamic stability, phase and dynamic behaviors of polypeptides are strongly affected by confinement. Since understanding the changes in these behaviors will allow their rational design as functional devices with tunable properties, herein we investigated Poly-Z-L-lysine (PZLL) and Poly-L-alanine (PAla) homopolypeptides confined in nanoporous alumina containing aligned cylindrical nanopores as a function of pore size by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Solid-state NMR, X-ray diffraction, Dielectric spectroscopy(DS). Bulk PZLL exhibits a glass transition temperature (Tg) at about 301K while PZLL nanorods showed slightly lower Tg (294K). The dynamic investigation by DS also revealed a decrease (4K) in Tg between bulk and PZLL nanorods. DS is a very sensitive probe of the local and global secondary structure relaxation through the large dipole to study effect of confinement. The results revealed that the local segmental dynamics, associated with broken hydrogen bonds, and segmental dynamics speed-up on confinement.

  4. Halotolerance in Methanosarcina spp.: Role of N(sup(epsilon))-Acetyl-(beta)-Lysine, (alpha)-Glutamate, Glycine Betaine, and K(sup+) as Compatible Solutes for Osmotic Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Sowers, K. R.; Gunsalus, R. P.

    1995-01-01

    The methanogenic Archaea, like the Bacteria and Eucarya, possess several osmoregulatory strategies that enable them to adapt to osmotic changes in their environment. The physiological responses of Methanosarcina species to different osmotic pressures were studied in extracellular osmolalities ranging from 0.3 to 2.0 osmol/kg. Regardless of the isolation source, the maximum rate of growth for species from freshwater, sewage, and marine sources occurred in extracellular osmolalities between 0.62 and 1.0 osmol/kg and decreased to minimal detectable growth as the solute concentration approached 2.0 osmol/kg. The steady-state water-accessible volume of Methanosarcina thermophila showed a disproportionate decrease of 30% between 0.3 and 0.6 osmol/kg and then a linear decrease of 22% as the solute concentration in the media increased from 0.6 to 2.0 osmol/kg. The total intracellular K(sup+) ion concentration in M. thermophila increased from 0.12 to 0.5 mol/kg as the medium osmolality was raised from 0.3 to 1.0 osmol/kg and then remained above 0.4 mol/kg as extracellular osmolality was increased to 2.0 osmol/kg. Concurrent with K(sup+) accumulation, M. thermophila synthesized and accumulated (alpha)-glutamate as the predominant intracellular osmoprotectant in media containing up to 1.0 osmol of solute per kg. At medium osmolalities greater than 1.0 osmol/kg, the (alpha)-glutamate concentration leveled off and the zwitterionic (beta)-amino acid N(sup(epsilon))-acetyl-(beta)-lysine was synthesized, accumulating to an intracellular concentration exceeding 1.1 osmol/kg at an osmolality of 2.0 osmol/kg. When glycine betaine was added to culture medium, it caused partial repression of de novo (alpha)-glutamate and N(sup(epsilon))-acetyl-(beta)-lysine synthesis and was accumulated by the cell as the predominant compatible solute. The distribution and concentration of compatible solutes in eight strains representing five Methanosarcina spp. were similar to those found in M

  5. Un-catalyzed peptide bond formation between two monomers of glycine, alanine, serine, threonine, and aspartic acid in gas phase: a density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhunia, Snehasis; Singh, Ajeet; Ojha, Animesh K.

    2016-05-01

    In the present report, un-catalyzed peptide bond formation between two monomers of glycine (Gly), alanine (Ala), serine (Ser), threonine (Thr), and aspartic acid (Asp) has been investigated in gas phase via two steps reaction mechanism and concerted mechanism at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) and M062X/6-31G(d,p) level of theories. The peptide bond is formed through a nucleophilic reaction via transition states, TS1 and TS2 in stepwise mechanism. The TS1 reveals formation of a new C-N bond while TS2 illustrate the formation of C=O bond. In case of concerted mechanism, C-N bond is formed by a single four-centre transition state (TS3). The energy barrier is used to explain the involvement of energy at each step of the reaction. The energy barrier (20-48 kcal/mol) is required for the transformation of reactant state R1 to TS1 state and intermediate state I1 to TS2 state. The large value of energy barrier is explained in terms of distortion and interaction energies for stepwise mechanism. The energy barrier of TS3 in concerted mechanism is very close to the energy barrier of the first transition state (TS1) of the stepwise mechanism for the formation of Gly-Gly and Ala-Ala di- peptide. However, in case of Ser-Ser, Thr-Thr and Asp-Asp di-peptide, the energy barrier of TS3 is relatively high than that of the energy barrier of TS1 calculated at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) and M062X/6-31G(d,p) level of theories. In both the mechanisms, the value of energy barrier calculated at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory is greater than that of the value calculated at M062X/6-31G(d,p) level of theory.

  6. The effect of protonation site and conformation on surface-induced dissociation in a small, lysine containing peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Kulsum; Blackwood, Jacob; Barnes, George L.

    2015-09-01

    Simulations of surface induced dissociation (SID) of protonated peptides have provided significant insight into the energy transfer and mechanism of SID; however, they have been limited to glycine and alanine containing peptides. The chemical simplicity of these systems forces N-terminus protonation. Here we present results from simulations involving a lysine containing peptide that allowed for multiple protonation sites and conformations. We found that when the excess proton is located on the basic lysine side chain, fragmentation dynamics are typically slower and occur through a 'charge-remote' pathway. Additionally, conformation alone has a significant effect on the observed proton transfer pathways.

  7. Functional interaction of transmembrane helices 3 and 6 in rhodopsin. Replacement of phenylalanine 261 by alanine causes reversion of phenotype of a glycine 121 replacement mutant.

    PubMed

    Han, M; Lin, S W; Minkova, M; Smith, S O; Sakmar, T P

    1996-12-13

    Replacement of a highly conserved glycine residue on transmembrane (TM) helix 3 of bovine rhodopsin (Gly121) by amino acid residues with larger side chains causes a progressive blue-shift in the lambdamax value of the pigment, a decrease in thermal stability, and an increase in reactivity with hydroxylamine. In addition, mutation of Gly121 causes a relative reversal in the selectivity of opsin for 11-cis-retinal over all-trans-retinal. It was suggested that Gly121 plays an important role in defining the 11-cis-retinal binding pocket of rhodopsin (Han, M., Lin, S. W., Smith, S. O., and Sakmar, T. P. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 32330-32336). Here, we combined the mutant opsin G121L with second site replacements of four different amino acid residues on TM helix 6: Met257, Val258, Phe261, or Trp265. We show that the loss of function phenotypes of the G121L mutant described above can be partially reverted specifically by the mutation of Phe261, a residue highly conserved in all G protein-coupled receptors. For example, the double-replacement mutant G121L/F261A has spectral, chromophore-binding, and transducin-activating properties intermediate between those of G121L and rhodopsin. This rescue of the G121L defects did not occur with the other second site mutations tested. We conclude that specific portions of TM helices 3 and 6, which include Gly121 and Phe261, respectively, define the chromophore-binding pocket in rhodopsin. Finally, the results are placed in the context of a molecular graphics model of the TM domain of rhodopsin, which includes the retinal-binding pocket. PMID:8943296

  8. Ionization constants of aqueous amino acids at temperatures up to 250°C using hydrothermal pH indicators and UV-visible spectroscopy: Glycine, α-alanine, and proline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Rodney G. F.; Collins, Christopher M.; Roberts, Jenene C.; Trevani, Liliana N.; Bartholomew, Richard J.; Tremaine, Peter R.

    2005-06-01

    Ionization constants for several simple amino acids have been measured for the first time under hydrothermal conditions, using visible spectroscopy with a high-temperature, high-pressure flow cell and thermally stable colorimetric pH indicators. This method minimizes amino acid decomposition at high temperatures because the data can be collected rapidly with short equilibration times. The first ionization constant for proline and α-alanine, K a,COOH, and the first and second ionization constants for glycine, K a,COOH and K a,NH4+, have been determined at temperatures as high as 250°C. Values for the standard partial molar heat capacity of ionization, Δ rC po, COOH and Δ rC po, NH4+, have been determined from the temperature dependence of ln (K a,COOH) and ln (K a,NH4+). The methodology has been validated by measuring the ionization constant of acetic acid up to 250°C, with results that agree with literature values obtained by potentiometric measurements to within the combined experimental uncertainty. We dedicate this paper to the memory of Dr. Donald Irish (1932-2002) of the University of Waterloo—friend and former supervisor of two of the authors (R.J.B. and P.R.T.).

  9. Determination of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine, N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine, and 2,4-diaminobutyric acid in Food Products Containing Cyanobacteria by Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography and Tandem Mass Spectrometry: Single-Laboratory Validation.

    PubMed

    Glover, W Broc; Baker, Teesha C; Murch, Susan J; Brown, Paula N

    2015-01-01

    A single-laboratory validation study was completed for the determination of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine (AEG), and 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) in bulk natural health product supplements purchased from a health food store in Canada. BMAA and its isomers were extracted with acid hydrolysis to free analytes from protein association. Acid was removed with the residue evaporated to dryness and reconstituted with derivatization using 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate (AccQ-Fluor). Chromatographic separation and detection were achieved using RP ultra-performance LC coupled to a tandem mass spectrometer operated in multiple reaction monitoring mode. Data from biological samples were evaluated for precision and accuracy across different days to ensure repeatability. Accuracy was assessed by spike recovery of biological samples using varying amino acid concentrations, with an average recovery across all samples of 108.6%. The analytical range was found to be 764-0.746 ng/mL prior to derivatization, thereby providing a linear range compatible with potentially widely varying analyte concentrations in commercial health food products. Both the U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and U. S. Pharmacopeia definitions were evaluated for determining method limits, with the FDA approach found to be most suitable having an LOD of 0.187 ng/mL and LLOQ of 0.746 ng/mL. BMAA in the collected specimens was detected at concentrations lower than 1 μg/g, while AEG and DAB were found at concentrations as high as 100 μg/g. Finding these analytes, even at low concentrations, has potential public health significance and suggests a need to screen such products prior to distribution. The method described provides a rapid, accurate, and precise method to facilitate that screening process. PMID:26651568

  10. Inhibitors of alanine racemase enzyme: a review.

    PubMed

    Azam, Mohammed Afzal; Jayaram, Unni

    2016-08-01

    Alanine racemase is a fold type III PLP-dependent amino acid racemase enzyme catalysing the conversion of l-alanine to d-alanine utilised by bacterial cell wall for peptidoglycan synthesis. As there are no known homologs in humans, it is considered as an excellent antibacterial drug target. The standard inhibitors of this enzyme include O-carbamyl-d-serine, d-cycloserine, chlorovinyl glycine, alaphosphin, etc. d-Cycloserine is indicated for pulmonary and extra pulmonary tuberculosis but therapeutic use of drug is limited due to its severe toxic effects. Toxic effects due to off-target affinities of cycloserine and other substrate analogs have prompted new research efforts to identify alanine racemase inhibitors that are not substrate analogs. In this review, an updated status of known inhibitors of alanine racemase enzyme has been provided which will serve as a rich source of structural information and will be helpful in generating selective and potent inhibitor of alanine racemase. PMID:26024289

  11. Comparative Physiological Evidence that β-Alanine Betaine and Choline-O-Sulfate Act as Compatible Osmolytes in Halophytic Limonium Species 1

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Andrew D.; Rathinasabapathi, Bala; Chamberlin, Beverly; Gage, Douglas A.

    1991-01-01

    The quaternary ammonium compounds accumulated in saline conditions by five salt-tolerant species of Limonium (Plumbaginaceae) were analyzed by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. Three species accumulated β-alanine betaine and choline-O-sulfate; the others accumulated glycine betaine and choline-O-sulfate. Three lines of evidence indicated that β-alanine betaine and choline-O-sulfate replace glycine betaine as osmo-regulatory solutes. First, tests with bacteria showed that β-alanine betaine and choline-O-sulfate have osmoprotective properties comparable to glycine betaine. Second, when β-alanine betaine and glycine betaine accumulators were salinized, the levels of their respective betaines, plus that of choline-O-sulfate, were closely correlated with leaf solute potential. Third, substitution of sulfate for chloride salinity caused an increase in the level of choline-O-sulfate and a matching decrease in glycine betaine level. Experiments with 14C-labeled precursors established that β-alanine betaine accumulators did not synthesize glycine betaine and vice versa. These experiments also showed that β-alanine betaine synthesis occurs in roots as well as leaves of β-alanine betaine accumulators and that choline-O-sulfate and glycine betaine share choline as a precursor. Unlike glycine betaine, β-alanine betaine synthesis cannot interfere with conjugation of sulfate to choline by competing for choline and does not require oxygen. These features of β-alanine betaine may be advantageous in sulfate-rich salt marsh environments. PMID:16668509

  12. L-alanine uptake in membrane vesicles from Mytilus edulis gills

    SciTech Connect

    Pajor, A.M.; Wright, S.H.

    1986-03-05

    Previous studies have shown that gills from M. edulis can accumulate L-alanine from seawater by a saturable process specific for ..cap alpha..-neutral amino acids. This uptake occurs against chemical gradients in excess of 10/sup 6/ to 1. To further characterize this uptake, membrane vesicles were prepared from M. edulis gill tissue by differential centrifugation. Enrichments of putative enzyme markers (relative to that in combined initial fractions) were as follows: ..gamma..-Glutamyltranspeptidase, 25-30x; Alkaline Phosphatase, 5-6x; K/sup +/-dependent para-Nitrophenyl Phosphatase, 3-5x; Succinate Dehydrogenase 0.1-0.2x. These results suggest that the preparation is enriched in plasma membranes, although histochemical studies will be needed to verify this. The time course of /sup 14/C-L-alanine uptake in the presence of inwardly-directed Na/sup +/ gradient showed a transient overshoot (3-5 fold) at 10 minutes which decreased to equilibrium after six hours. The size of the overshoot and early uptake rates depended on the size of the inwardly-directed Na/sup +/ gradient. No overshoot was seen in the presence of inwardly-directed gradients of LiCl or choline-Cl, or with equilibrium concentrations NaCl or mannitol. A reduced overshoot was seen with a gradient of NaSCN. A small overshoot was seen with an inwardly-directed gradient of KCl. Transport of L-alanine included saturable and diffusive components. Uptake of 6 ..mu..M L-alanine was inhibited more than 80% by 100 ..mu..M ..cap alpha..-zwitterionic amino acids (alanine, leucine, glycine); by 30 to 75% by proline, aspartate and lysine; and less than 20% by a ..beta..-amino acid, taurine. The results of these experiments agree with those from intact gill studies and support the hypothesis that L-alanine is transported into gill epithelial cells by a secondary active transport process involving Na/sup +/.

  13. Pathways of Amino Acid Degradation in Nilaparvata lugens (Stål) with Special Reference to Lysine-Ketoglutarate Reductase/Saccharopine Dehydrogenase (LKR/SDH)

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Pin-Jun; Yuan, San-Yue; Tang, Yao-Hua; Li, Kai-Long; Yang, Lu; Fu, Qiang; Li, Guo-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Nilaparvata lugens harbors yeast-like symbionts (YLSs). In present paper, a genome-wide analysis found 115 genes from Ni. lugens and 90 genes from YLSs that were involved in the metabolic degradation of 20 proteinogenic amino acids. These 205 genes encoded for 77 enzymes. Accordingly, the degradation pathways for the 20 amino acids were manually constructed. It is postulated that Ni. lugens can independently degrade fourteen amino acids (threonine, alanine, glycine, serine, aspartate, asparagine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, glutamate, glutamine, proline, histidine, leucine and lysine). Ni. lugens and YLSs enzymes may work collaboratively to break down tryptophan, cysteine, arginine, isoleucine, methionine and valine. We cloned a lysine-ketoglutarate reductase/saccharopine dehydrogenase gene (Nllkr/sdh) that encoded a bifunctional enzyme catalyzing the first two steps of lysine catabolism. Nllkr/sdh is widely expressed in the first through fifth instar nymphs and adults, and is highly expressed in the fat body, ovary and gut in adults. Ingestion of dsNllkr/sdh by nymphs successfully knocked down the target gene, and caused nymphal/adult mortality, shortened nymphal development stage and reduced adult fresh weight. Moreover, Nllkr/sdh knockdown resulted in three defects: wings were shortened and thickened; cuticles were stretched and thinned; and old nymphal cuticles remained on the tips of legs and abdomen and were not completely shed. These data indicate that impaired lysine degradation negatively affects the survival and development of Ni. lugens. PMID:26000452

  14. Mode of Action of Glycine on the Biosynthesis of Peptidoglycan

    PubMed Central

    Hammes, W.; Schleifer, K. H.; Kandler, O.

    1973-01-01

    The mechanism of glycine action in growth inhibition was studied on eight different species of bacteria of various genera representing the four most common peptidoglycan types. To inhibit the growth of the different organisms to 80%, glycine concentrations from 0.05 to 1.33 M had to be applied. The inhibited cells showed morphological aberrations. It has been demonstrated that glycine is incorporated into the nucleotide-activated peptidoglycan precursors. The amount of incorporated glycine was equivalent to the decrease in the amount of alanine. With one exception glycine is also incorporated into the peptidoglycan. Studies on the primary structure of both the peptidoglycan precursors and the corresponding peptidoglycan have revealed that glycine can replace l-alanine in position 1 and d-alanine residues in positions 4 and 5 of the peptide subunit. Replacement of l-alanine in position 1 of the peptide subunit together with an accumulation of uridine diphosphate-muramic acid (UDP-MurNAc), indicating an inhibition of the UDP-MurNAc:l-Ala ligase, has been found in three bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Lactobacillus cellobiosus and L. plantarum). However, discrimination against precursors with glycine in position 1 in peptidoglycan synthesis has been observed only in S. aureus. Replacement of d-alanine residues was most common. It occurred in the peptidoglycan with one exception in all strains studied. In Corynebacterium sp., C. callunae, L. plantarum, and L. cellobiosus most of the d-alanine replacing glycine occurs C-terminal in position 4, and in C. insidiosum and S. aureus glycine is found C-terminal in position 5. It is suggested that the modified peptidoglycan precursors are accumulated by being poor substrates for some of the enzymes involved in peptidoglycan synthesis. Two mechanisms leading to a more loosely cross-linked peptidoglycan and to morphological changes of the cells are considered. First, the accumulation of glycine-containing precursors may lead to

  15. Ruthenium-nitrosyl complexes with glycine, L-alanine, L-valine, L-proline, D-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, and L-tyrosine: synthesis, X-ray diffraction structures, spectroscopic and electrochemical properties, and antiproliferative activity.

    PubMed

    Rathgeb, Anna; Böhm, Andreas; Novak, Maria S; Gavriluta, Anatolie; Dömötör, Orsolya; Tommasino, Jean Bernard; Enyedy, Eva A; Shova, Sergiu; Meier, Samuel; Jakupec, Michael A; Luneau, Dominique; Arion, Vladimir B

    2014-03-01

    The reactions of [Ru(NO)Cl5](2-) with glycine (Gly), L-alanine (L-Ala), L-valine (L-Val), L-proline (L-Pro), D-proline (D-Pro), L-serine (L-Ser), L-threonine (L-Thr), and L-tyrosine (L-Tyr) in n-butanol or n-propanol afforded eight new complexes (1-8) of the general formula [RuCl3(AA-H)(NO)](-), where AA = Gly, L-Ala, L-Val, L-Pro, D-Pro, L-Ser, L-Thr, and L-Tyr, respectively. The compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), (1)H NMR, UV-visible and ATR IR spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and X-ray crystallography. X-ray crystallography studies have revealed that in all cases the same isomer type (from three theoretically possible) was isolated, namely mer(Cl),trans(NO,O)-[RuCl3(AA-H)(NO)], as was also recently reported for osmium analogues with Gly, L-Pro, and D-Pro (see Z. Anorg. Allg. Chem. 2013, 639, 1590-1597). Compounds 1, 4, 5, and 8 were investigated by ESI-MS with regard to their stability in aqueous solution and reactivity toward sodium ascorbate. In addition, cell culture experiments in three human cancer cell lines, namely, A549 (nonsmall cell lung carcinoma), CH1 (ovarian carcinoma), and SW480 (colon carcinoma), were performed, and the results are discussed in conjunction with the lipophilicity of compounds. PMID:24555845

  16. Ruthenium-Nitrosyl Complexes with Glycine, l-Alanine, l-Valine, l-Proline, d-Proline, l-Serine, l-Threonine, and l-Tyrosine: Synthesis, X-ray Diffraction Structures, Spectroscopic and Electrochemical Properties, and Antiproliferative Activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The reactions of [Ru(NO)Cl5]2– with glycine (Gly), l-alanine (l-Ala), l-valine (l-Val), l-proline (l-Pro), d-proline (d-Pro), l-serine (l-Ser), l-threonine (l-Thr), and l-tyrosine (l-Tyr) in n-butanol or n-propanol afforded eight new complexes (1–8) of the general formula [RuCl3(AA–H)(NO)]−, where AA = Gly, l-Ala, l-Val, l-Pro, d-Pro, l-Ser, l-Thr, and l-Tyr, respectively. The compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), 1H NMR, UV–visible and ATR IR spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and X-ray crystallography. X-ray crystallography studies have revealed that in all cases the same isomer type (from three theoretically possible) was isolated, namely mer(Cl),trans(NO,O)-[RuCl3(AA–H)(NO)], as was also recently reported for osmium analogues with Gly, l-Pro, and d-Pro (see Z. Anorg. Allg. Chem.2013, 639, 1590–1597). Compounds 1, 4, 5, and 8 were investigated by ESI-MS with regard to their stability in aqueous solution and reactivity toward sodium ascorbate. In addition, cell culture experiments in three human cancer cell lines, namely, A549 (nonsmall cell lung carcinoma), CH1 (ovarian carcinoma), and SW480 (colon carcinoma), were performed, and the results are discussed in conjunction with the lipophilicity of compounds. PMID:24555845

  17. [Alanine solution as enzyme reaction buffer used in A to O blood group conversion].

    PubMed

    Li, Su-Bo; Zhang, Xue; Zhang, Yin-Ze; Tan, Ying-Xia; Bao, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Ying-Li; Ji, Shou-Ping; Gong, Feng; Gao, Hong-Wei

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of alanine solution as α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase enzyme reaction buffer on the enzymatic activity of A antigen. The binding ability of α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase with RBC in different reaction buffer such as alanine solution, glycine solution, normal saline (0.9% NaCl), PBS, PCS was detected by Western blot. The results showed that the efficiency of A to O conversion in alanine solution was similar to that in glycine solution, and Western blot confirmed that most of enzymes blinded with RBC in glycine or alanine solution, but few enzymes blinded with RBC in PBS, PCS or normal saline. The evidences indicated that binding of enzyme with RBC was a key element for A to O blood group conversion, while the binding ability of α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase with RBC in alanine or glycine solution was similar. It is concluded that alanine solution can be used as enzyme reaction buffer in A to O blood group conversion. In this buffer, the α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase is closely blinded with RBC and α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase plays efficient enzymatic activity of A antigen. PMID:24989301

  18. Alkylamine-Dependent Amino-Acid Oxidation by Lysine Monooxygenase—Fragmented Substrate of Oxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Shozo; Yamauchi, Takashi; Hayaishi, Osamu

    1972-01-01

    Lysine monooxygenase catalyzes the oxygenative decarboxylation of L-lysine and produces a corresponding acid amide. L-Alanine was inactive as substrate. However, when propylamine was present, oxidation, but not oxygenation, of alanine was demonstrated with the oxygenase. Alanine was converted to pyruvate, with the liberation of ammonia and hydrogen peroxide, but propylamine remained unchanged. Other α-monoamino acids were also oxidized in the presence of alkylamines with various carbon chain lengths. The highest oxidase activity was observed when the total chain length of both amino acid and amine was nearly identical with that of lysine. Available evidence indicates that the amine-dependent amino-acid oxidase activity is associated with the lysine oxygenase activity. PMID:4509334

  19. Formation of simple biomolecules from alanine in ocean by impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Y.; Sekine, T.; Furukawa, Y.; Kakegawa, T.; Kobayashi, T.

    2013-12-01

    The biomolecules on the Earth are thought either to have originated from the extraterrestrial parts carried with flying meteorites or to have been formed from the inorganic materials on the Earth through given energy. From the standpoint to address the importance of impact energy, it is required to simulate experimentally the chemical reactions during impacts, because violent impacts may have occurred 3.8-4.0 Gyr ago to create biomolecules initially. It has been demonstrated that shock reactions among ocean (H2O), atmospheric nitrogen, and meteoritic constitution (Fe) can induce locally reduction environment to form simple bioorganic molecules such as ammonia and amino acid (Nakazawa et al., 2005; Furukawa et al., 2009). We need to know possible processes for alanine how chemical reactions proceed during repeated impacts and how complicated biomolecules are formed. Alanine can be formed from glycine (Umeda et al., in preparation). In this study, we carried out shock recovery experiments at pressures of 4.4-5.7 GPa to investigate the chemical reactions of alanine. Experiments were carried out with a propellant gun. Stainless steel containers (30 mm in diameter, 30 mm long) with 13C-labeled alanine aqueous solution immersed in olivine or hematite powders were used as targets. Air gap was present in the sample room (18 mm in diameter, 2 mm thick) behind the sample. The powder, solution, and air represent meteorite, ocean, and atmosphere on early Earth, respectively. Two powders of olivine and hematite help to keep the oxygen fugacity low and high during experiments, respectively in order to investigate the effect of oxygen fugacity on chemical processes of alanine. The recovered containers, after cleaned completely, were immersed into liquid nitrogen to freeze sample solution and then we drilled on the impact surface to extract water-soluble run products using pure water. Thus obtained products were analyzed by LC/MS for four amino acids (glycine, alanine, valine, and

  20. Modulation of inhibitory glycine receptors in cultured embryonic mouse hippocampal neurons by zinc, thiol containing redox agents and carnosine.

    PubMed

    Thio, L L; Zhang, H X

    2006-01-01

    Modulation of inhibitory glycine receptors by zinc (Zn(2+)) and endogenous redox agents such as glutathione may alter inhibition in the mammalian brain. Despite the abundance of Zn(2+) in the hippocampus and its ability to modulate glycine receptors, few studies have examined Zn(2+) modulation of hippocampal glycine receptors. Whether redox agents modulate hippocampal glycine receptors also remains unknown. This study examined Zn(2+) and redox modulation of glycine receptor-mediated currents in cultured embryonic mouse hippocampal neurons using whole-cell recordings. Zn(2+) concentrations below 10 microM potentiated currents elicited by low glycine, beta-alanine, and taurine concentrations by 300-400%. Zn(2+) concentrations above 300 microM produced nearly complete inhibition. Potentiating Zn(2+) concentrations shifted the dose-response curves for the three agonists to the left and decreased the Hill coefficient for glycine and beta-alanine but not taurine. Inhibiting Zn(2+) concentrations shifted the dose-response curves for glycine and beta-alanine to the right but reduced the maximum taurine response. Histidine residues may participate in potentiation because diethyl pyrocarbonate and pH 5.4 diminished Zn(2+) enhancement of glycine currents. pH 5.4 diminished Zn(2+) block of glycine currents, but diethyl pyrocarbonate did not. These findings indicate that separate sites mediate Zn(2+) potentiation and inhibition. The redox agents glutathione, dithiothreitol, tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine, and 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) did not alter glycine currents by a redox mechanism. However, glutathione and dithiothreitol interfered with the effects of Zn(2+) on glycine currents by chelating it. Carnosine had similar effects. Thus, Zn(2+) and thiol containing redox agents that chelate Zn(2+) modulate hippocampal glycine receptors with the mechanism of Zn(2+) modulation being agonist dependent. PMID:16515845

  1. In vitro degradation of lysine by ruminal fluid-based fermentations and by Fusobacterium necrophorum.

    PubMed

    Elwakeel, E A; Amachawadi, R G; Nour, A M; Nasser, M E A; Nagaraja, T G; Titgemeyer, E C

    2013-01-01

    The objective of these studies was to characterize some factors affecting lysine degradation by mixed ruminal bacteria and by ruminal Fusobacterium necrophorum. Mixed ruminal bacteria degraded lysine, and addition of pure cultures of F. necrophorum did not increase lysine degradation. Addition of acetic or propionic acid strikingly reduced NH(3) production from lysine by mixed ruminal bacteria at pH 6, but not at pH 7. Although typical ruminal environments with acidic pH and normal concentrations of volatile fatty acids might inhibit lysine degradation by F. necrophorum, ruminal fluid contained enough bacteria with a lysine-degrading capacity to ferment 50 mM lysine in vitro. Of 7 strains of ruminal F. necrophorum tested, all grew on both lactate and lysine as the primary energy source. Both subspecies of ruminal F. necrophorum (necrophorum and funduliforme) used lysine as a primary C and energy source. Lysine and glutamic acid were effectively fermented by F. necrophorum, but alanine and tryptophan were not, and histidine and methionine were fermented only to a minor extent. The end products of lactate fermentation by F. necrophorum were propionate and acetate, and those of lysine degradation were butyrate and acetate. Fermentation of glutamic acid by F. necrophorum yielded acetate and butyrate in a ratio near to 2:1. The minimum inhibitory concentration of tylosin for F. necrophorum was not dependent on whether bacteria were grown with lactate or lysine, but F. necrophorum was more susceptible to monensin when grown on lysine than on lactate. Although F. necrophorum is generally resistant to monensin, the ionophore may reduce lysine degradation by F. necrophorum in the rumen. The essential oil components limonene, at 20 or 100 μg/mL, and thymol, at 100 μg/mL, inhibited F. necrophorum growth, whereas eugenol, guaiacol, and vanillin had no effect. Our findings may lead to ways to minimize ruminal lysine degradation and thus increase its availability to the animal

  2. Kinetic determinants of agonist action at the recombinant human glycine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Trevor M; Schofield, Peter R; McClellan, Annette M L

    2003-01-01

    The amino acids glycine, β-alanine and taurine are all endogenous agonists of the glycine receptor. In this study, a combination of rapid agonist application onto macropatches and steady-state single-channel recordings was used to compare the actions of glycine, β-alanine and taurine upon homomeric α1 human glycine receptors transiently expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) cells. The 10–90 % rise times determined from rapid application of 100 μm of each agonist were indistinguishable, indicating each agonist has a similar association rate. At saturating concentrations (30 mm) the rise time for glycine (0.26 ms) was 1.8-fold faster than that for β-alanine (0.47 ms) and 3.9-fold faster than that for taurine (1.01 ms), indicating clear differences in the maximum opening rate between agonists. The relaxation following rapid removal of agonist was fitted with a single exponential for β-alanine (3.0 ms) and taurine (2.2 ms), and two exponential components for glycine with a weighted mean time constant of 27.1 ms. This was consistent with differences in dissociation rates estimated from analysis of bursts, with taurine > β-alanine > glycine. Exponential fits to the open period distributions gave time constants that did not differ between agonists and the geometric distribution for the number of openings per burst indicated that all three agonists had a significant component of single-opening bursts. Based upon these data, we propose a kinetic scheme with three independent open states, where the opening rates are dependent upon the activating agonist, while the closing rates are an intrinsic characteristic of the receptor. PMID:12679369

  3. Regulation of Serine, Glycine, and One-Carbon Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Stauffer, George V

    2004-12-01

    The biosynthesis of serine, glycine, and one-carbon (C1) units constitutes a major metabolic pathway in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. C1 units derived from serine and glycine are used in the synthesis of purines, histidine, thymine, pantothenate, and methionine and in the formylation of the aminoacylated initiator fMet-TRNAfMet used to start translation in E. coli and serovar Typhimurium. The need for serine, glycine, and C1 units in many cellular functions makes it necessary for the genes encoding enzymes for their synthesis to be carefully regulated to meet the changing demands of the cell for these intermediates. This review discusses the regulation of the following genes: serA, serB, and serC; gly gene; gcvTHP operon; lpdA; gcvA and gcvR; and gcvB genes. Threonine utilization (the Tut cycle) constitutes a secondary pathway for serine and glycine biosynthesis. L-Serine inhibits the growth of E. coli cells in GM medium, and isoleucine releases this growth inhibition. The E. coli glycine transport system (Cyc) has been shown to transport glycine, D-alanine, D-serine, and the antibiotic D-cycloserine. Transport systems often play roles in the regulation of gene expression, by transporting effector molecules into the cell, where they are sensed by soluble or membrane-bound regulatory proteins. PMID:26443363

  4. Synthesis of Lysine Methyltransferase Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Tao; Hui, Chunngai

    2015-07-01

    Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting Lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: glycine encephalopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... a molecule called glycine. This molecule is an amino acid , which is a building block of proteins. Glycine ... Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (3 links) Health Topic: Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders Health Topic: Genetic Brain Disorders Health ...

  6. Zinc Modulation of Glycine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Trombley, Paul Q.; Blakemore, Laura J.; Hill, Brook J.

    2011-01-01

    Glycine receptors are widely expressed in the mammalian central nervous system, and previous studies have demonstrated that glycine receptors are modulated by endogenous zinc. Zinc is concentrated in synaptic vesicles in several brain regions but is particularly abundant in the hippocampus and olfactory bulb. In the present study, we used patch-clamp electrophysiology of rat hippocampal and olfactory bulb neurons in primary culture to examine the effects of zinc on glycine receptors. Although glycine has been reported to reach millimolar concentrations during synaptic transmission, most previous studies on the effects of zinc on glycine receptors have used relatively low concentrations of glycine. High concentrations of glycine cause receptor desensitization. Our current results extend our previous demonstration that the modulatory actions of zinc are largely prevented when co-applied with desensitizing concentrations of glycine (300 μM), suggesting that the effects of zinc are dependent on the state of the receptor. In contrast, pre-application of 300 μM zinc, prior to glycine (300 μM) application, causes a slowly developing inhibition with a slow rate of recovery, suggesting that the timing of zinc and glycine release also influences the effects of zinc. Furthermore, previous evidence suggests that synaptically released zinc can gain intracellular access, and we provide the first demonstration that low concentrations of intracellular zinc can potentiate glycine receptors. These results support the notion that zinc has complex effects on glycine receptors and multiple factors may interact to influence the efficacy of glycinergic transmission. PMID:21530619

  7. L-lysine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Anastassiadis, Savas

    2007-01-01

    Amino acids are the basic bioelements of proteins, which are the most important macromolecules for the functions of humans and animals. Out of the 20 L-amino acids, ecumenically found in most of living organisms, L-lysine is one of the 9 amino acids which are essential for human and animal nutrition. L-lysine is useful as medicament, chemical agent, food material (food industry) and feed additive (animal food). Its demand has been steadily increasing in recent years and several hundred thousands tones of L-lysine (about 800,000 tones/year) are annually produced worldwide almost by microbial fermentation. The stereospecificity of amino acids (the L isomer) makes the fermentation advantageous compared with synthetic processes. Mutant auxotrophic or resistant to certain chemicals strains of so-called gram positive coryneform bacteria are generally used, including the genera Brevibacterium and Corynebacterium, united to the genus. The significance of Research and Development increased rapidly since the discovery of fermentative amino acid production in the fifties (S. Kinoshita et al., Proceedings of the International Symposium on Enzyme Chemistry 2:464-468 (1957)), leading to innovative fermentation processes which replaced the classical manufacturing methods of L-lysine like acid hydrolysis. L-Lysine is separated and purified by suitable downstream processes involving classical separation or extraction methods (ultrafiltration or centrifugation, separation or ion exchange extraction, crystallization, drying) and is sold as a powder. Alternatively, spray dried pellets or liquid fermentation broth can be used as animal feed supplement. On behalf of today's strong competition in amino acid industry, Biotechnology companies are continuously aiming in innovative research developments and use complex management concepts and business strategies, towards gaining market leadership in the field of amino acid production. PMID:19075830

  8. Growth enhancing effect of exogenous glycine and characterization of its uptake in halotolerant cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica.

    PubMed

    Bualuang, Aporn; Incharoensakdi, Aran

    2015-02-01

    Alkaliphilic halotolerant cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica showed optimal growth in the medium containing 0.5 M NaCl. The increase of exogenously added glycine to the medium up to 10 mM significantly promoted cell growth under both normal (0.5 M NaCl) and salt stress (2.0 M NaCl) conditions. Salt stress imposed by either 2.0 or 3.0 M NaCl retarded cell growth; however, exogenously added glycine at 10 mM concentration to salt-stress medium resulted in the reduction of growth inhibition particularly under 3.0 M NaCl condition. The uptake of glycine by intact A. halophytica was shown to exhibit saturation kinetics with an apparent K s of 160 μM and V max of 3.9 nmol/min/mg protein. The optimal pH for glycine uptake was at pH 8.0. The uptake activity was decreased in the presence of high concentration of NaCl. Both metabolic inhibitors and ionophores decreased glycine uptake in A. halophytica suggesting an energy-dependent glycine uptake. Several neutral amino acids showed considerable inhibition of glycine uptake with higher than 50 % inhibition observed with serine, cysteine and alanine whereas acidic, basic and aromatic amino acids showed only slight inhibition of glycine uptake. PMID:25536900

  9. Crystal Structures of Aedes Aegypt Alanine Glyoxylate Aminotransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Han,Q.; Robinson, H.; Gao, Y.; Vogelaar, N.; Wilson, S.; Rizzi, M.; Li, J.

    2006-01-01

    Mosquitoes are unique in having evolved two alanine glyoxylate aminotransferases (AGTs). One is 3-hydroxykynurenine transaminase (HKT), which is primarily responsible for catalyzing the transamination of 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) to xanthurenic acid (XA). Interestingly, XA is used by malaria parasites as a chemical trigger for their development within the mosquito. This 3-HK to XA conversion is considered the major mechanism mosquitoes use to detoxify the chemically reactive and potentially toxic 3-HK. The other AGT is a typical dipteran insect AGT and is specific for converting glyoxylic acid to glycine. Here we report the 1.75{angstrom} high-resolution three-dimensional crystal structure of AGT from the mosquito Aedes aegypti (AeAGT) and structures of its complexes with reactants glyoxylic acid and alanine at 1.75 and 2.1{angstrom} resolution, respectively. This is the first time that the three-dimensional crystal structures of an AGT with its amino acceptor, glyoxylic acid, and amino donor, alanine, have been determined. The protein is dimeric and adopts the type I-fold of pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP)-dependent aminotransferases. The PLP co-factor is covalently bound to the active site in the crystal structure, and its binding site is similar to those of other AGTs. The comparison of the AeAGT-glyoxylic acid structure with other AGT structures revealed that these glyoxylic acid binding residues are conserved in most AGTs. Comparison of the AeAGT-alanine structure with that of the Anopheles HKT-inhibitor complex suggests that a Ser-Asn-Phe motif in the latter may be responsible for the substrate specificity of HKT enzymes for 3-HK.

  10. N. sup. var epsilon. -acetyl-. beta. -lysine: An osmolyte synthesized by mothanogenic archaebacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Sowers, K.R.; Gunsalus, R.P. ); Robertson, D.E.; Noll, D.; Roberts, M.F. )

    1990-12-01

    Methanosarcina thermophila, a nonmarine methanogenic archaebacterium, can grow in a range of saline concentrations. At less than 0.4 M NaCl, Ms. thermophila accumulated glutamate in response to increasing osmotic stress. At greater than 0.4 M NaCl, this organism synthesized a modified {beta}-amino acid that was identified as N{sup {var epsilon}}-acetyl-{beta}-lysine by NMR spectroscopy and ion-exchange HPLC. This {beta}-amino acid derivative accumulated to high intracellular concentrations (up to 0.6 M) in Ms. thermophila and in another methanogen examined - Methanogenium cariaci, a marine species. The compound has features that are characteristic of a compatible solute: it is neutrally charged at physiological pH and it is highly soluble. When the cells were grown in the presence of exogenous glycine betaine, a physiological pH and it is highly soluble. When the cells were grown in the presence of exogenous glycine betaine, a physiological compatible solute, N{sup {var epsilon}}-acetyl-{beta}-lysine synthesis was repressed and glycine betaine was accumulated. N{sup {var epsilon}}-Acetyl-{beta}-lysine was synthesized by species from three phylogenetic families when grown in high solute concentrations, suggesting that it may be ubiquitous among the methanogens. The ability to control the biosynthesis of N{sup {var epsilon}}-acetyl-{beta}-lysine in response to extracellular solute concentration indicates that the methanogenic archaebacteria have a unique {beta}-amino acid biosynthetic pathway that is osmotically regulated.

  11. Mechanism of inactivation of alanine racemase by beta, beta, beta-trifluoroalanine

    SciTech Connect

    Faraci, W.S.; Walsh, C.T.

    1989-01-24

    The alanine racemases are a group of PLP-dependent bacterial enzymes that catalyze the racemization of alanine, providing D-alanine for cell wall synthesis. Inactivation of the alanine racemases from the Gram-negative organism Salmonella typhimurium and Gram-positive organism Bacillus stearothermophilus with beta, beta, beta-trifluoroalanine has been studied. The inactivation occurs with the same rate constant as that for formation of a broad 460-490-nm chromophore. Loss of two fluoride ions per mole of inactivated enzyme and retention of (1-/sup 14/C)trifluoroalanine label accompany inhibition, suggesting a monofluoro enzyme adduct. Partial denaturation (1 M guanidine) leads to rapid return of the initial 420-nm chromophore, followed by a slower (t1/2 approximately 30 min-1 h) loss of the fluoride ion and /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ release. At this point, reduction by NaB/sub 3/H/sub 4/ and tryptic digestion yield a single radiolabeled peptide. Purification and sequencing of the peptide reveals that lysine-38 is covalently attached to the PLP cofactor. A mechanism for enzyme inactivation by trifluoroalanine is proposed and contrasted with earlier results on monohaloalanines, in which nucleophilic attack of released aminoacrylate on the PLP aldimine leads to enzyme inactivation. For trifluoroalanine inactivation, nucleophilic attack of lysine-38 on the electrophilic beta-difluoro-alpha, beta-unsaturated imine provides an alternative mode of inhibition for these enzymes.

  12. Electrophysiological Signature of Homomeric and Heteromeric Glycine Receptor Channels.

    PubMed

    Raltschev, Constanze; Hetsch, Florian; Winkelmann, Aline; Meier, Jochen C; Semtner, Marcus

    2016-08-19

    Glycine receptors are chloride-permeable, ligand-gated ion channels and contribute to the inhibition of neuronal firing in the central nervous system or to facilitation of neurotransmitter release if expressed at presynaptic sites. Recent structure-function studies have provided detailed insights into the mechanisms of channel gating, desensitization, and ion permeation. However, most of the work has focused only on comparing a few isoforms, and among studies, different cellular expression systems were used. Here, we performed a series of experiments using recombinantly expressed homomeric and heteromeric glycine receptor channels, including their splice variants, in the same cellular expression system to investigate and compare their electrophysiological properties. Our data show that the current-voltage relationships of homomeric channels formed by the α2 or α3 subunits change upon receptor desensitization from a linear to an inwardly rectifying shape, in contrast to their heteromeric counterparts. The results demonstrate that inward rectification depends on a single amino acid (Ala(254)) at the inner pore mouth of the channels and is closely linked to chloride permeation. We also show that the current-voltage relationships of glycine-evoked currents in primary hippocampal neurons are inwardly rectifying upon desensitization. Thus, the alanine residue Ala(254) determines voltage-dependent rectification upon receptor desensitization and reveals a physio-molecular signature of homomeric glycine receptor channels, which provides unprecedented opportunities for the identification of these channels at the single cell level. PMID:27382060

  13. Synthesis of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Chunngai; Ye, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and non-histone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery. PMID:26258118

  14. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5118 Alanine. (a) Product. Alanine...

  15. Purification and characterization of the glycine receptor of pig spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, D.; Pfeiffer, F.; Simler, R.; Betz, H.

    1985-02-12

    A large-scale purification procedure was developed to isolate the glycine receptor of pig spinal cord by affinity chromatography on aminostrychnine agarose. After an overall purification of about 10,000-fold, the glycine receptor preparations contained three major polypeptides of Mr 48,000, 58,000, and 93,000. Photoaffinity labeling with (/sup 3/H)strychnine showed that the (/sup 3/H)strychnine binding site is associated with the Mr 48,000 and, to a much lesser extent, the Mr 58,000 polypeptides. (/sup 3/H)Strychnine binding to the purified receptor exhibited a dissociation constant K /sub D/ of 13.8 nM and was inhibited by the agonists glycine, taurine, and beta-alanine. Gel filtration and sucrose gradient centrifugation gave a Stokes radius of 7.1 nm and an apparent sedimentation coefficient of 9.6 S. Peptide mapping of the (/sup 3/H)strychnine-labeled Mr 48,000 polypeptides of purified pig and rat glycine receptor preparations showed that the strychnine binding region of this receptor subunit is highly conserved between these species. Also, three out of six monoclonal antibodies against the glycine receptor of rat spinal cord significantly cross-reacted with their corresponding polypeptides of the pig glycine receptor. These results show that the glycine receptor of pig spinal cord is very similar to the well-characterized rat receptor protein and can be purified in quantities sufficient for protein chemical analysis.

  16. Stimulation of Lysine Decarboxylase Production in Escherichia coli by Amino Acids and Peptides1

    PubMed Central

    Cascieri, T.; Mallette, M. F.

    1973-01-01

    A commercial hydrolysate of casein stimulated production of lysine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.18) by Escherichia coli B. Cellulose and gel chromatography of this hydrolysate yielded peptides which were variably effective in this stimulation. Replacement of individual, stimulatory peptides by equivalent amino acids duplicated the enzyme levels attained with those peptides. There was no indication of specific stimulation by any peptide. The peptides were probably taken up by the oligopeptide transport system of E. coli and hydrolyzed intracellularly by peptidases to their constituent amino acids for use in enzyme synthesis. Single omission of amino acids from mixtures was used to screen them for their relative lysine decarboxylase stimulating abilities. Over 100 different mixtures were evaluated in establishing the total amino acid requirements for maximal synthesis of lysine decarboxylase by E. coli B. A mixture containing all of the common amino acids except glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and alanine increased lysine decarboxylase threefold over an equivalent weight of casein hydrolysate. The nine most stimulatory amino acids were methionine, arginine, cystine, leucine, isoleucine, glutamine, threonine, tyrosine, and asparagine. Methionine and arginine quantitatively were the most important. A mixture of these nine was 87% as effective as the complete mixture. Several amino acids were inhibitory at moderate concentrations, and alanine (2.53 mM) was the most effective. Added pyridoxine increased lysine decarboxylase activity 30%, whereas other B vitamins and cyclic adenosine 5′-monophosphate had no effect. PMID:4588201

  17. Glycine Transporters and Their Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilfillan, Robert; Kerr, Jennifer; Walker, Glenn; Wishart, Grant

    Glycine plays a ubiquitous role in many biological processes. In the central nervous system it serves as an important neurotransmitter acting as an agonist at strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors and as an essential co-agonist with glutamate at the NMDA receptor complex. Control of glycine concentrations in the vicinity of these receptors is mediated by the specific glycine transporters, GlyT1 and GlyT2. Inhibition of these transporters has been postulated to be of potential benefit in several therapeutic indications including schizophrenia and pain. In this review we discuss our current knowledge of glycine transporters and focus on recent advances in the medicinal chemistry of GlyT1 and GlyT2 inhibitors.

  18. Role of Alanine Dehydrogenase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during Recovery from Hypoxic Nonreplicating Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Giffin, Michelle M.; Shi, Lanbo; Gennaro, Maria L.; Sohaskey, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis can maintain a nonreplicating persistent state in the host for decades, but must maintain the ability to efficiently reactivate and produce active disease to survive and spread in a population. Among the enzymes expressed during this dormancy is alanine dehydrogenase, which converts pyruvate to alanine, and glyoxylate to glycine concurrent with the oxidation of NADH to NAD. It is involved in the metabolic remodeling of M. tuberculosis through its possible interactions with both the glyoxylate and methylcitrate cycle. Both mRNA levels and enzymatic activities of isocitrate lyase, the first enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, and alanine dehydrogenase increased during entry into nonreplicating persistence, while the gene and activity for the second enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, malate synthase were not. This could suggest a shift in carbon flow away from the glyoxylate cycle and instead through alanine dehydrogenase. Expression of ald was also induced in vitro by other persistence-inducing stresses such as nitric oxide, and was expressed at high levels in vivo during the initial lung infection in mice. Enzyme activity was maintained during extended hypoxia even after transcription levels decreased. An ald knockout mutant of M. tuberculosis showed no reduction in anaerobic survival in vitro, but resulted in a significant lag in the resumption of growth after reoxygenation. During reactivation the ald mutant had an altered NADH/NAD ratio, and alanine dehydrogenase is proposed to maintain the optimal NADH/NAD ratio during anaerobiosis in preparation of eventual regrowth, and during the initial response during reoxygenation. PMID:27203084

  19. Role of Alanine Dehydrogenase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during Recovery from Hypoxic Nonreplicating Persistence.

    PubMed

    Giffin, Michelle M; Shi, Lanbo; Gennaro, Maria L; Sohaskey, Charles D

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis can maintain a nonreplicating persistent state in the host for decades, but must maintain the ability to efficiently reactivate and produce active disease to survive and spread in a population. Among the enzymes expressed during this dormancy is alanine dehydrogenase, which converts pyruvate to alanine, and glyoxylate to glycine concurrent with the oxidation of NADH to NAD. It is involved in the metabolic remodeling of M. tuberculosis through its possible interactions with both the glyoxylate and methylcitrate cycle. Both mRNA levels and enzymatic activities of isocitrate lyase, the first enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, and alanine dehydrogenase increased during entry into nonreplicating persistence, while the gene and activity for the second enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, malate synthase were not. This could suggest a shift in carbon flow away from the glyoxylate cycle and instead through alanine dehydrogenase. Expression of ald was also induced in vitro by other persistence-inducing stresses such as nitric oxide, and was expressed at high levels in vivo during the initial lung infection in mice. Enzyme activity was maintained during extended hypoxia even after transcription levels decreased. An ald knockout mutant of M. tuberculosis showed no reduction in anaerobic survival in vitro, but resulted in a significant lag in the resumption of growth after reoxygenation. During reactivation the ald mutant had an altered NADH/NAD ratio, and alanine dehydrogenase is proposed to maintain the optimal NADH/NAD ratio during anaerobiosis in preparation of eventual regrowth, and during the initial response during reoxygenation. PMID:27203084

  20. Lysine Biosynthesis in Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) 1

    PubMed Central

    Møller, Birger Lindberg

    1974-01-01

    Lysine biosynthesis in seedlings of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. var. Emir) was studied by direct injection of the following precursors into the endosperm of the seedlings: acetate-1-14C; acetate-2-14C; pyruvate-1-14C; pyruvate-2-14C; pyruvate-3-14C; alanine-1-14C; aspartic acid-1-14C; aspartic acid-2-14C; aspartic acid-3-14C; aspartic acid-4-14C; α-aminoadipic acid-1-14C; and α, ε-diaminopimelic acid-1-(7)-14C. The distribution of activity in the individual carbon atoms of lysine in the different biosynthetic experiments was determined by chemical degradation. The incorporation percentages and labeling patterns obtained are in agreement with the occurrence of the diaminopimelic acid pathway. The results do not fit the incorporation percentages and labeling patterns expected if the α-aminoadipic acid pathway was operating. However, the results show that barley seedlings are able to convert a small part of the α-aminoadipic acid administered directly to lysine. The labeling pattern of lysine was found to be symmetrical around carbon 4. This indicates that the biosynthetic pathway proceeds via a symmetrical intermediate like ll-α, ε-diaminopimelic acid, or includes compounds as 2, 3-dihydrodipicolinic acid or Δ1-piperideine-2, 6-dicarboxylic acid which probably isomerise with concomitant lack of asymmetry in the labeling. The percentages of incorporation show that both the mesoand ll-forms of α, ε-diaminopimelic acid are metabolically convertible to lysine in seedlings of barley. PMID:16658942

  1. Biochemical and structural characterization of alanine racemase from Bacillus anthracis (Ames)

    PubMed Central

    Couñago, Rafael M; Davlieva, Milya; Strych, Ulrich; Hill, Ryan E; Krause, Kurt L

    2009-01-01

    Background Bacillus anthracis is the causative agent of anthrax and a potential bioterrorism threat. Here we report the biochemical and structural characterization of B. anthracis (Ames) alanine racemase (AlrBax), an essential enzyme in prokaryotes and a target for antimicrobial drug development. We also compare the native AlrBax structure to a recently reported structure of the same enzyme obtained through reductive lysine methylation. Results B. anthracis has two open reading frames encoding for putative alanine racemases. We show that only one, dal1, is able to complement a D-alanine auxotrophic strain of E. coli. Purified Dal1, which we term AlrBax, is shown to be a dimer in solution by dynamic light scattering and has a Vmax for racemization (L- to D-alanine) of 101 U/mg. The crystal structure of unmodified AlrBax is reported here to 1.95 Å resolution. Despite the overall similarity of the fold to other alanine racemases, AlrBax makes use of a chloride ion to position key active site residues for catalysis, a feature not yet observed for this enzyme in other species. Crystal contacts are more extensive in the methylated structure compared to the unmethylated structure. Conclusion The chloride ion in AlrBax is functioning effectively as a carbamylated lysine making it an integral and unique part of this structure. Despite differences in space group and crystal form, the two AlrBax structures are very similar, supporting the case that reductive methylation is a valid rescue strategy for proteins recalcitrant to crystallization, and does not, in this case, result in artifacts in the tertiary structure. PMID:19695097

  2. Effect of ruminal ammonia supply on lysine utilization by growing steers.

    PubMed

    Hussein, A H; Batista, E D; Miesner, M D; Titgemeyer, E C

    2016-02-01

    Six ruminally cannulated Holstein steers (202 ± 15 kg) were used to study the effects of ruminal ammonia loading on whole-body lysine (Lys) utilization. Steers were housed in metabolism crates and used in a 6 × 6 Latin square design. All steers received 2.52 kg DM/d of a diet (10.1% CP) containing 82% soybean hulls, 8% wheat straw, 5% cane molasses, and 5% vitamins and minerals, and 10 g/d of urea (considered to be part of the basal diet) was ruminally infused continuously to ensure adequate ruminal ammonia concentrations. All steers were ruminally infused continuously with 200 g/d of acetic acid, 200 g/d of propionic acid, and 50 g/d of butyric acid and abomasally infused with 300 g/d of glucose continuously to increase energy supply without increasing microbial protein supply. Steers were also abomasally infused continuously with an excess of all essential AA except Lys to ensure that Lys was the only limiting AA. Treatments were arranged as a 3 × 2 factorial with 3 levels of urea (0, 40, or 80 g/d) continuously infused ruminally to induce ammonia loading and 2 levels of Lys (0 or 6 g/d) continuously infused abomasally. Treatments did not affect fecal N output ( = 0.37). Lysine supplementation decreased ( < 0.01) urinary N excretion from 51.9 g/d to 44.3 g/d, increased ( < 0.01) retained N from 24.8 to 33.8 g/d, increased ( < 0.01) plasma Lys, and decreased ( ≤ 0.05) plasma serine, tyrosine, valine, leucine, and phenylalanine. Lysine supplementation also tended ( = 0.09) to reduce plasma urea-N. Urea infusions linearly increased ( = 0.05) retained N (27.1, 29.3, and 31.5 g/d) and also linearly increased ( < 0.01) urinary N excretion (31.8, 48.1, and 64.4 g/d), urinary urea (21.9, 37.7, and 54.3 g/d), urinary ammonia (1.1, 1.4, and 1.9 g/d), and plasma urea (2.7, 4.0, and 5.1 mM), and linearly decreased plasma alanine ( = 0.04) and plasma glycine ( < 0.01). Assuming that retained protein is 6.25 × retained N and contains 6.4% Lys, the incremental

  3. Effect of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency on L-lysine production with Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Blombach, Bastian; Schreiner, Mark E; Moch, Matthias; Oldiges, Marco; Eikmanns, Bernhard J

    2007-09-01

    Intracellular precursor supply is a critical factor for amino acid productivity of Corynebacterium glutamicum. To test for the effect of improved pyruvate availability on L-lysine production, we deleted the aceE gene encoding the E1p enzyme of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) in the L-lysine-producer C. glutamicum DM1729 and characterised the resulting strain DM1729-BB1 for growth and L-lysine production. Compared to the host strain, C. glutamicum DM1729-BB1 showed no PDHC activity, was acetate auxotrophic and, after complete consumption of the available carbon sources glucose and acetate, showed a more than 50% lower substrate-specific biomass yield (0.14 vs 0.33 mol C/mol C), an about fourfold higher biomass-specific L-lysine yield (5.27 vs 1.23 mmol/g cell dry weight) and a more than 40% higher substrate-specific L-lysine yield (0.13 vs 0.09 mol C/mol C). Overexpression of the pyruvate carboxylase or diaminopimelate dehydrogenase genes in C. glutamicum DM1729-BB1 resulted in a further increase in the biomass-specific L-lysine yield by 6 and 56%, respectively. In addition to L-lysine, significant amounts of pyruvate, L-alanine and L-valine were produced by C. glutamicum DM1729-BB1 and its derivatives, suggesting a surplus of precursor availability and a further potential to improve L-lysine production by engineering the L-lysine biosynthetic pathway. PMID:17333167

  4. Vibrational dynamics of crystalline L-alanine

    SciTech Connect

    Bordallo, H.N.; Eckert, J.; Barthes, M.

    1997-11-01

    The authors report a new, complete vibrational analysis of L-alanine and L-alanine-d{sub 4} which utilizes IINS intensities in addition to frequency information. The use of both isotopomers resulted in a self-consistent force field for and assignment of the molecular vibrations in L-alanine. Some details of the calculation as well as a comparison of calculated and observed IINS spectra are presented. The study clarifies a number of important issues on the vibrational dynamics of this molecule and presents a self-consistent force field for the molecular vibrations in crystalline L-alanine.

  5. Glycine metabolism in rat kidney cortex slices.

    PubMed

    Rowsell, E V; Al-Naama, M M; Rowsell, K V

    1982-04-15

    When rat kidney cortex slices were incubated with glycine or [1-14C]glycine, after correcting for metabolite changes with control slices, product formation and glycine utilization fitted the requirements of the equation: 2 Glycine leads to ammonia + CO2 + serine. Evidence is presented that degradation via glyoxylate, by oxidation or transamination, is unlikely to have any significant role in kidney glycine catabolism. It is concluded that glycine metabolism in rat kidney is largely via glycine cleavage closely coupled with serine formation. 1-C decarboxylation and urea formation with glycine in rat hepatocyte suspensions were somewhat greater than decarboxylation or ammonia formation in kidney slices, showing that in the rat, potentially, the liver is quantitatively the more important organ in glycine catabolism. There was no evidence of ammonia formation from glycine with rat brain cortex, heart, spleen or diaphragm and 1-C decarboxylation was very weak. PMID:6810880

  6. Catalytic Stereoinversion of L-Alanine to Deuterated D-Alanine.

    PubMed

    Moozeh, Kimia; So, Soon Mog; Chin, Jik

    2015-08-01

    A combination of an achiral pyridoxal analogue and a chiral base has been developed for catalytic deuteration of L-alanine with inversion of stereochemistry to give deuterated D-alanine under mild conditions (neutral pD and 25 °C) without the use of any protecting groups. This system can also be used for catalytic deuteration of D-alanine with retention of stereochemistry to give deuterated D-alanine. Thus a racemic mixture of alanine can be catalytically deuterated to give an enantiomeric excess of deuterated D-alanine. While catalytic deracemization of alanine is forbidden by the second law of thermodynamics, this system can be used for catalytic deracemization of alanine with deuteration. Such green and biomimetic approach to catalytic stereocontrol provides insights into efficient amino acid transformations. PMID:26119066

  7. N epsilon-acetyl-beta-lysine: an osmolyte synthesized by methanogenic archaebacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Sowers, K R; Robertson, D E; Noll, D; Gunsalus, R P; Roberts, M F

    1990-01-01

    Methanosarcina thermophila, a nonmarine methanogenic archaebacterium, can grow in a range of saline concentrations. At less than 0.4 M NaCl, Ms. thermophila accumulated glutamate in response to increasing osmotic stress. At greater than 0.4 M NaCl, this organism synthesized a modified beta-amino acid that was identified as N epsilon-acetyl-beta-lysine by NMR spectroscopy and ion-exchange HPLC. This beta-amino acid derivative accumulated to high intracellular concentrations (up to 0.6 M) in Ms. thermophila and in another methanogen examined--Methanogenium cariaci, a marine species. The compound has features that are characteristic of a compatible solute: it is neutrally charged at physiological pH and it is highly soluble. When the cells were grown in the presence of exogenous glycine betaine, a physiological compatible solute, N epsilon-acetyl-beta-lysine synthesis was repressed and glycine betaine was accumulated. N epsilon-acetyl-beta-lysine was synthesized by species from three phylogenetic families when grown in high solute concentrations, suggesting that it may be ubiquitous among the methanogens. The ability to control the biosynthesis of N epsilon-acetyl-beta-lysine in response to extracellular solute concentration indicates that the methanogenic archaebacteria have a unique beta-amino acid biosynthetic pathway that is osmotically regulated. PMID:2123548

  8. Functional Characterization of Alanine Racemase from Schizosaccharomyces pombe: a Eucaryotic Counterpart to Bacterial Alanine Racemase

    PubMed Central

    Uo, Takuma; Yoshimura, Tohru; Tanaka, Naotaka; Takegawa, Kaoru; Esaki, Nobuyoshi

    2001-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe has an open reading frame, which we named alr1+, encoding a putative protein similar to bacterial alanine racemase. We cloned the alr1+ gene in Escherichia coli and purified the gene product (Alr1p), with an Mr of 41,590, to homogeneity. Alr1p contains pyridoxal 5′-phosphate as a coenzyme and catalyzes the racemization of alanine with apparent Km and Vmax values as follows: for l-alanine, 5.0 mM and 670 μmol/min/mg, respectively, and for d-alanine, 2.4 mM and 350 μmol/min/mg, respectively. The enzyme is almost specific to alanine, but l-serine and l-2-aminobutyrate are racemized slowly at rates 3.7 and 0.37% of that of l-alanine, respectively. S. pombe uses d-alanine as a sole nitrogen source, but deletion of the alr1+ gene resulted in retarded growth on the same medium. This indicates that S. pombe has catabolic pathways for both enantiomers of alanine and that the pathway for l-alanine coupled with racemization plays a major role in the catabolism of d-alanine. Saccharomyces cerevisiae differs markedly from S. pombe: S. cerevisiae uses l-alanine but not d-alanine as a sole nitrogen source. Moreover, d-alanine is toxic to S. cerevisiae. However, heterologous expression of the alr1+ gene enabled S. cerevisiae to grow efficiently on d-alanine as a sole nitrogen source. The recombinant yeast was relieved from the toxicity of d-alanine. PMID:11244061

  9. Two alanine aminotranferases link mitochondrial glycolate oxidation to the major photorespiratory pathway in Arabidopsis and rice.

    PubMed

    Niessen, Markus; Krause, Katrin; Horst, Ina; Staebler, Norma; Klaus, Stephanie; Gaertner, Stefanie; Kebeish, Rashad; Araujo, Wagner L; Fernie, Alisdair R; Peterhansel, Christoph

    2012-04-01

    The major photorespiratory pathway in higher plants is distributed over chloroplasts, mitochondria, and peroxisomes. In this pathway, glycolate oxidation takes place in peroxisomes. It was previously suggested that a mitochondrial glycolate dehydrogenase (GlcDH) that was conserved from green algae lacking leaf-type peroxisomes contributes to photorespiration in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, the identification of two Arabidopsis mitochondrial alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferases (ALAATs) that link glycolate oxidation to glycine formation are described. By this reaction, the mitochondrial side pathway produces glycine from glyoxylate that can be used in the glycine decarboxylase (GCD) reaction of the major pathway. RNA interference (RNAi) suppression of mitochondrial ALAAT did not result in major changes in metabolite pools under standard conditions or enhanced photorespiratroy flux, respectively. However, RNAi lines showed reduced photorespiratory CO(2) release and a lower CO(2) compensation point. Mitochondria isolated from RNAi lines are incapable of converting glycolate to CO(2), whereas simultaneous overexpression of GlcDH and ALAATs in transiently transformed tobacco leaves enhances glycolate conversion. Furthermore, analyses of rice mitochondria suggest that the side pathway for glycolate oxidation and glycine formation is conserved in monocotyledoneous plants. It is concluded that the photorespiratory pathway from green algae has been functionally conserved in higher plants. PMID:22268146

  10. Synthesis of beta-hydroxy-alpha-amino acids with a reengineered alanine racemase.

    PubMed

    Fesko, Kateryna; Giger, Lars; Hilvert, Donald

    2008-11-15

    The Y265A mutant of alanine racemase (alrY265A) was evaluated as a catalyst for the synthesis of beta-hydroxy-alpha-amino acids. It promotes the PLP-dependent aldol condensation of glycine with a range of aromatic aldehydes. The desired products were obtained with complete stereocontrol at C(alpha) (ee>99%, D) and moderate to high selectivity at C(beta) (up to 97% de). The designed enzyme is thus similar to natural d-threonine aldolases in its substrate specificity and stereoselectivity. Moreover, its ability to utilize alanine as an alternative donor suggests an expanded scope of potential utility for the production of biologically active compounds. PMID:18760921

  11. Structural and catalytic properties of L-alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Porumb, H; Vancea, D; Mureşan, L; Presecan, E; Lascu, I; Petrescu, I; Porumb, T; Pop, R; Bârzu, O

    1987-04-01

    Alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus cereus, a non-allosteric enzyme composed of six identical subunits, was purified to homogeneity by chromatography on blue-Sepharose and Sepharose 6B-CL. Like other pyridine-linked dehydrogenases, alanine dehydrogenase is inhibited by Cibacron blue, competitively with respect to NADH and noncompetitively with respect to pyruvate. The enzyme was inactivated by 0.1 M glycine/HCl (pH 2) and reactivated by 0.1 M phosphate (pH 8) supplemented with NAD+ or NADH. The reactivation was characterized by sigmoidal kinetics indicating a complex mechanism involving rate-limiting folding and association steps. Cibacron blue interfered with renaturation, presumably by competition with NADH. Chromatography on Sepharose 6B-CL of the partially renatured alanine dehydrogenase led to the separation of several intermediates, but only the hexamer was characterized by enzymatic activity. By immobilization on Sepharose 4B, alanine dehydrogenase from B. cereus retained 66% of the specific activity of the soluble enzyme. After denaturation of immobilized alanine dehydrogenase with 7 M urea, 37% of the initial protein was still bound to Sepharose, indicating that on the average the hexamer was attached to the matrix via, at most, two subunits. The ability of the denatured, immobilized subunits to pick up subunits from solution shows their capacity to fold back to the native conformation after urea treatment. The formation of "hybrids" between subunits of enzyme from B. cereus and Bacillus subtilis demonstrates the close resemblance of the tertiary and quaternary structures of alanine dehydrogenases from these species. PMID:3104322

  12. (L)-(Trimethylsilyl)alanine synthesis exploiting hydroxypinanone-induced diastereoselective alkylation.

    PubMed

    René, A; Vanthuyne, N; Martinez, J; Cavelier, F

    2013-08-01

    A new and efficient synthesis of (L)-(trimethylsilyl)alanine (TMSAla) with suitable protection for use in Solid Phase Peptide Synthesis (SPPS) has been accomplished starting from glycine tert-butyl ester and using hydroxypinanone as chiral inductor. The silylated side chain was introduced by alkylation of the Schiff base intermediate with iodomethyl(trimethylsilane) at -78 °C. Among the different synthetic routes that were tested including several chiral inductors and different Schiff bases, this strategy was selected and afforded (L)-TMSAla in good chemical overall yield with 98 % ee. PMID:23620077

  13. Influence of high glycine diets on the activity of glycine-catabolizing enzymes and on glycine catabolism in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Petzke, K.J.; Albrecht, V.; Przybilski, H.

    1986-05-01

    Male albino rats were adapted to isocaloric purified diets that differed mainly in their glycine and casein contents. Controls received a 30% casein diet. In experimental diets gelatin or gelatin hydrolysate was substituted for half of the 30% casein. An additional group was fed a glycine-supplemented diet, which corresponded in glycine level to the gelatin diet but in which the protein level was nearly the same as that of the casein control diet. Another group received a 15% casein diet. Rat liver glycine cleavage system, serine hydroxymethyltransferase and serine dehydratase activities were measured. /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production from the catabolism of /sup 14/C-labeled glycine was measured in vivo and in vitro (from isolated hepatocytes). Serine dehydratase and glycine cleavage system activities were higher in animals fed 30% casein diets than in those fed 15% casein diets. Serine hydroxymethyltransferase activity of the cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions was highest when a high glycine diet (glycine administered as pure, protein bound in gelatin or peptide bound in gelatin hydrolysate) was fed. /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ formation from (1-/sup 14/C)- and (2-/sup 14/C)glycine both in vivo and in isolated hepatocytes was higher when a high glycine diet was fed than when a casein diet was fed. These results suggest that glycine catabolism is dependent on and adaptable to the glycine content of the diet. Serine hydroxymethyltransferase appears to play a major role in the regulation of glycine degradation via serine and pyruvate.

  14. Protein Homeostasis Defects of Alanine-Glyoxylate Aminotransferase: New Therapeutic Strategies in Primary Hyperoxaluria Type I

    PubMed Central

    Pey, Angel L.; Albert, Armando; Salido, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase catalyzes the transamination between L-alanine and glyoxylate to produce pyruvate and glycine using pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) as cofactor. Human alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase is a peroxisomal enzyme expressed in the hepatocytes, the main site of glyoxylate detoxification. Its deficit causes primary hyperoxaluria type I, a rare but severe inborn error of metabolism. Single amino acid changes are the main type of mutation causing this disease, and considerable effort has been dedicated to the understanding of the molecular consequences of such missense mutations. In this review, we summarize the role of protein homeostasis in the basic mechanisms of primary hyperoxaluria. Intrinsic physicochemical properties of polypeptide chains such as thermodynamic stability, folding, unfolding, and misfolding rates as well as the interaction of different folding states with protein homeostasis networks are essential to understand this disease. The view presented has important implications for the development of new therapeutic strategies based on targeting specific elements of alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase homeostasis. PMID:23956997

  15. Oral administration of D-alanine in monkeys robustly increases plasma and cerebrospinal fluid levels but experimental D-amino acid oxidase inhibitors had minimal effect.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Camilo; Alt, Jesse; Ator, Nancy A; Wilmoth, Heather; Rais, Rana; Hin, Niyada; DeVivo, Michael; Popiolek, Michael; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Slusher, Barbara S

    2016-09-01

    Hypofunction of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is thought to exacerbate psychosis in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. Consistent with this hypothesis, D-alanine, a co-agonist at the glycine site of the NMDA receptor, was shown to improve positive and cognitive symptoms when used as add-on therapy for schizophrenia treatment. However, D-alanine had to be administered at high doses (~7 g) to observe clinical effects. One possible reason for the high dose is that D-alanine could be undergoing oxidation by D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) before it reaches the brain. If this is the case, the dose could be reduced by co-administration of D-alanine with a DAAO inhibitor (DAAOi). Early studies with rodents showed that co-administration of D-alanine with 5-chloro-benzo[d]isoxazol-3-ol (CBIO), a prototype DAAOi, significantly enhanced the levels of extracellular D-alanine in the frontal cortex compared with D-alanine alone. Further, the use of CBIO reduced the dose of D-alanine needed to attenuate prepulse inhibition deficits induced by dizocilpine. The objective of the work reported herein was to confirm the hypothesis that DAAO inhibition can enhance D-alanine exposure in a species closer to humans: non-human primates. We report that while oral D-alanine administration to baboons (10 mg/kg) enhanced D-alanine plasma and CSF levels over 20-fold versus endogenous levels, addition of experimental DAAOi to the regimen exhibited a 2.2-fold enhancement in plasma and no measurable effect on CSF levels. The results provide caution regarding the utility of DAAO inhibition to increase D-amino acid levels as treatment for patients with schizophrenia. PMID:27287825

  16. Proton Affinity of Isomeric Dipeptides Containing Lysine and Non-Proteinogenic Lysine Homologues.

    PubMed

    Batoon, Patrick; Ren, Jianhua

    2016-08-18

    Conformational effects on the proton affinity of oligopeptides have been studied using six alanine (A)-based acetylated dipeptides containing a basic probe that is placed closest to either the C- or the N-terminus. The basic probe includes Lysine (Lys) and two nonproteinogenic Lys-homologues, ornithine (Orn) and 2,3-diaminopropionic acid (Dap). The proton affinities of the peptides have been determined using the extended Cooks kinetic method in a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. Computational studies have been carried out to search for the lowest energy conformers and to calculate theoretical proton affinities as well as various molecular properties using the density functional theory. The dipeptides containing a C-terminal probe, ALys, AOrn, and ADap, were determined to have a higher proton affinity by 1-4 kcal/mol than the corresponding dipeptides containing an N-terminal probe, LysA, OrnA, and DapA. For either the C-probe peptides or the N-probe peptides, the proton affinity reduces systematically as the side-chain of the probe residue is shortened. The difference in the proton affinities between isomeric peptides is largely associated with the variation of the conformations. The peptides with higher values of the proton affinity adopt a relatively compact conformation such that the protonated peptides can be stabilized through more efficient internal solvation. PMID:27459294

  17. Glycine restores the anabolic response to leucine in a mouse model of acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ham, Daniel J; Caldow, Marissa K; Chhen, Victoria; Chee, Annabel; Wang, Xuemin; Proud, Christopher G; Lynch, Gordon S; Koopman, René

    2016-06-01

    Amino acids, especially leucine, potently stimulate protein synthesis and reduce protein breakdown in healthy skeletal muscle and as a result have received considerable attention as potential treatments for muscle wasting. However, the normal anabolic response to amino acids is impaired during muscle-wasting conditions. Although the exact mechanisms of this anabolic resistance are unclear, inflammation and ROS are believed to play a central role. The nonessential amino acid glycine has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties and preserves muscle mass in calorie-restricted and tumor-bearing mice. We hypothesized that glycine would restore the normal muscle anabolic response to amino acids under inflammatory conditions. Relative rates of basal and leucine-stimulated protein synthesis were measured using SUnSET methodology 4 h after an injection of 1 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Whereas leucine failed to stimulate muscle protein synthesis in LPS-treated mice pretreated with l-alanine (isonitrogenous control), leucine robustly stimulated protein synthesis (+51%) in mice pretreated with 1 g/kg glycine. The improvement in leucine-stimulated protein synthesis was accompanied by a higher phosphorylation status of mTOR, S6, and 4E-BP1 compared with l-alanine-treated controls. Despite its known anti-inflammatory action in inflammatory cells, glycine did not alter the skeletal muscle inflammatory response to LPS in vivo or in vitro but markedly reduced DHE staining intensity, a marker of oxidative stress, in muscle cross-sections and attenuated LPS-induced wasting in C2C12 myotubes. Our observations in male C57BL/6 mice suggest that glycine may represent a promising nutritional intervention for the attenuation of skeletal muscle wasting. PMID:27094036

  18. Persistent GABAA/C responses to gabazine, taurine and beta-alanine in rat hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Chesnoy-Marchais, D

    2016-08-25

    In hypoglossal motoneurons, a sustained anionic current, sensitive to a blocker of ρ-containing GABA receptors, (1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl)methylphosphinic acid (TPMPA) and insensitive to bicuculline, was previously shown to be activated by gabazine. In order to better characterize the receptors involved, the sensitivity of this atypical response to pentobarbital (30μM), allopregnanolone (0.3μM) and midazolam (0.5μM) was first investigated. Pentobarbital potentiated the response, whereas the steroid and the benzodiazepine were ineffective. The results indicate the involvement of hybrid heteromeric receptors, including at least a GABA receptor ρ subunit and a γ subunit, accounting for the pentobarbital-sensitivity. The effects of the endogenous β amino acids, taurine and β-alanine, which are released under various pathological conditions and show neuroprotective properties, were then studied. In the presence of the glycine receptor blocker strychnine (1μM), both taurine (0.3-1mM) and β-alanine (0.3mM) activated sustained anionic currents, which were partly blocked by TPMPA (100μM). Thus, both β amino acids activated ρ-containing GABA receptors in hypoglossal motoneurons. Bicuculline (20μM) reduced responses to taurine and β-alanine, but small sustained responses persisted in the presence of both strychnine and bicuculline. Responses to β-alanine were slightly increased by allopregnanolone, indicating a contribution of the bicuculline- and neurosteroid-sensitive GABAA receptors underlying tonic inhibition in these motoneurons. Since sustained activation of anionic channels inhibits most mature principal neurons, the ρ-containing GABA receptors permanently activated by taurine and β-alanine might contribute to some of their neuroprotective properties under damaging overexcitatory situations. PMID:27246441

  19. Monopeptide versus Monopeptoid: Insights on Structure and Hydration of Aqueous Alanine and Sarcosine via X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Uejio, Janel S.; Schwartz, Craig P.; Duffin, Andrew M.; England, Alice; Prendergast, David; Saykally, Richard J.

    2009-11-19

    Despite the obvious significance, the aqueous interactions of peptides remain incompletely understood. Their synthetic analogues called peptoids (poly-N-substituted glycines), have recently emerged as a promising biomimetic material, particularly due to their robust secondary structure and resistance to denaturation. We describe comparative near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy studies of aqueous sarcosine, the simplest peptoid, and alanine, its peptide isomer, interpreted by density functional theory calculations. The sarcosine nitrogen K-edge spectrum is blue-shifted with respect to that of alanine, in agreement with our calculations; we conclude that this shift results primarily from the methyl group substitution on the nitrogen of sarcosine. Our calculations indicate that the nitrogen K-edge spectrum of alanine differs significantly between dehydrated and hydrated scenarios, while that of the sarcosine zwitterion is less affected by hydration. In contrast, the computed sarcosine spectrum is greatly impacted by conformational variations, while the alanine spectrum is not. This relates to a predicted solvent dependence for alanine, as compared to sarcosine. Additionally, we show the theoretical nitrogen K-edge spectra to be sensitive to the degree of hydration, indicating that experimental X-ray spectroscopy may be able to distinguish between bulk and partial hydration, such as found in confined environments near proteins and in reverse micelles.

  20. Mechanism of adenylate kinase. Are the essential lysines essential?

    PubMed

    Tian, G C; Yan, H G; Jiang, R T; Kishi, F; Nakazawa, A; Tsai, M D

    1990-05-01

    Using site-specific mutagenesis, we have probed the structural and functional roles of lysine-21 and lysine-27 of adenylate kinase (AK) from chicken muscle expressed in Escherichia coli. The two residues were chosen since according to the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) model [Mildvan, A. S., & Fry, D. C. (1987) Adv. Enzymol. 58, 241-313], they are located near the alpha- and the gamma-phosphates, respectively, of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) in the AK-MgATP complex. In addition, a lysine residue (Lys-21 in the case of AK) along with a glycine-rich loop is considered "essential" in the catalysis of kinases and other nucleotide binding proteins. The Lys-27 to methionine (K27M) mutant showed only slight increases in kcat and Km, but a substantial increase (1.8 kcal/mol) in the free energy of unfolding, relative to the WT AK. For proper interpretation of the steady-state kinetic data, viscosity-dependent kinetics was used to show that the chemical step is partially rate-limiting in the catalysis of AK. Computer modeling suggested that the folded form of K27M could gain stability (relative to the wild type) via hydrophobic interactions of Met-27 with Val-179 and Phe-183 and/or formation of a charge-transfer complex between Met-27 and Phe-183. The latter was supported by an upfield shift of the methyl protons of Met-27 in 1H NMR. Other than this, the 1H NMR spectrum of K27M is very similar to that of WT, suggesting little perturbation in the global or even local conformations.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2161682

  1. Modulation of Recombinant Human α1 Glycine Receptors by Mono- and Disaccharides: A Kinetic Study.

    PubMed

    Breitinger, Ulrike; Sticht, Heinrich; Breitinger, Hans-Georg

    2016-08-17

    Glycine receptors (GlyRs) mediate fast synaptic inhibition in spinal cord, brainstem, and higher brain centers. Recently, glucose was identified as a positive modulator of GlyR-mediated currents. Here, we investigated extent and kinetics of the positive modulation of recombinant human α1 glycine receptors by different mono- and disaccharides and sorbitol using patch-clamp recording techniques. Glucose and fructose augmented glycine-mediated whole-cell currents with an EC50 of 6-7 mM. At concentrations > 10 mM, the maximum of current enhancement was reached within ∼30 min. Kinetics of GlyR modulation resemble those of protein glycation. On-rates were <0.5 h for saturating concentrations of monosaccharides and ∼1.5 h for disaccharides. Off-rates were considerably slower (>24 h). Galactose, the C4-epimer of glucose, and the sugar alcohol sorbitol had no effect on GlyR currents. Recent cryoelectron microscopy structures were used to identify a potential binding site for saccharides near the ivermectin binding pocket with lysine 143 as possible attachment site. The GlyR mutant α1(K143A) was not potentiated by glucose, suggesting an involvement of this residue in glycine receptor modulation by saccharides. PMID:27227552

  2. First Comprehensive Proteome Analyses of Lysine Acetylation and Succinylation in Seedling Leaves of Brachypodium distachyon L.

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Shoumin; Deng, Xiong; Wang, Jian; Zhu, Gengrui; Cao, Hui; Yuan, Linlin; Yan, Yueming

    2016-01-01

    Protein acetylation and succinylation are the most crucial protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) involved in the regulation of plant growth and development. In this study, we present the first lysine-acetylation and lysine-succinylation proteome analysis of seedling leaves in Brachypodium distachyon L (Bd). Using high accuracy nano LC-MS/MS combined with affinity purification, we identified a total of 636 lysine-acetylated sites in 353 proteins and 605 lysine-succinylated sites in 262 proteins. These proteins participated in many biology processes, with various molecular functions. In particular, 119 proteins and 115 sites were found to be both acetylated and succinylated, simultaneously. Among the 353 acetylated proteins, 148 had acetylation orthologs in Oryza sativa L., Arabidopsis thaliana, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, and Glycine max L. Among the 262 succinylated proteins, 170 of them were found to have homologous proteins in Oryza sativa L., Escherichia coli, Sacchayromyces cerevisiae, or Homo sapiens. Motif-X analysis of the acetylated and succinylated sites identified two new acetylated motifs (K---K and K-I-K) and twelve significantly enriched succinylated motifs for the first time, which could serve as possible binding loci for future studies in plants. Our comprehensive dataset provides a promising starting point for further functional analysis of acetylation and succinylation in Bd and other plant species. PMID:27515067

  3. Serine and glycine metabolism in cancer☆

    PubMed Central

    Amelio, Ivano; Cutruzzolá, Francesca; Antonov, Alexey; Agostini, Massimiliano; Melino, Gerry

    2014-01-01

    Serine and glycine are biosynthetically linked, and together provide the essential precursors for the synthesis of proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids that are crucial to cancer cell growth. Moreover, serine/glycine biosynthesis also affects cellular antioxidative capacity, thus supporting tumour homeostasis. A crucial contribution of serine/glycine to cellular metabolism is through the glycine cleavage system, which refuels one-carbon metabolism; a complex cyclic metabolic network based on chemical reactions of folate compounds. The importance of serine/glycine metabolism is further highlighted by genetic and functional evidence indicating that hyperactivation of the serine/glycine biosynthetic pathway drives oncogenesis. Recent developments in our understanding of these pathways provide novel translational opportunities for drug development, dietary intervention, and biomarker identification of human cancers. PMID:24657017

  4. Crystal Structures of Vertebrate Dihydropyrimidinase and Complexes from Tetraodon nigroviridis with Lysine Carbamylation

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yin-Cheng; Chen, Mei-Chun; Hsu, Ching-Chen; Chan, Sunney I.; Yang, Yuh-Shyong; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2013-01-01

    Lysine carbamylation, a post-translational modification, facilitates metal coordination for specific enzymatic activities. We have determined structures of the vertebrate dihydropyrimidinase from Tetraodon nigroviridis (TnDhp) in various states: the apoenzyme as well as two forms of the holoenzyme with one and two metals at the catalytic site. The essential active-site structural requirements have been identified for the possible existence of four metal-mediated stages of lysine carbamylation. Only one metal is sufficient for stabilizing lysine carbamylation; however, the post-translational lysine carbamylation facilitates additional metal coordination for the regulation of specific enzymatic activities through controlling the conformations of two dynamic loops, Ala69–Arg74 and Met158–Met165, located in the tunnel for the substrate entrance. The substrate/product tunnel is in the “open form” in the apo-TnDhp, in the “intermediate state” in the monometal TnDhp, and in the “closed form” in the dimetal TnDhp structure, respectively. Structural comparison also suggests that the C-terminal tail plays a role in the enzymatic function through interactions with the Ala69–Arg74 dynamic loop. In addition, the structures of the dimetal TnDhp in complexes with hydantoin, N-carbamyl-β-alanine, and N-carbamyl-β-amino isobutyrate as well as apo-TnDhp in complex with a product analog, N-(2-acetamido)-iminodiacetic acid, have been determined. These structural results illustrate how a protein exploits unique lysines and the metal distribution to accomplish lysine carbamylation as well as subsequent enzymatic functions. PMID:24005677

  5. Investigation of the alpha(1)-glycine receptor channel-opening kinetics in the submillisecond time domain.

    PubMed

    Grewer, C

    1999-08-01

    The activation and desensitization kinetics of the human alpha(1)-homooligomeric glycine receptor, which was transiently expressed in HEK 293 cells, were studied with a 100-microseconds time resolution to determine the rate and equilibrium constants of individual receptor reaction steps. Concentration jumps of the activating ligands glycine and beta-alanine were initiated by photolysis of caged, inactive precursors and were followed by neurotransmitter binding, receptor-channel opening, and receptor desensitization steps that were separated along the time axis. Analysis of the ligand concentration-dependence of these processes allows the determination of 1) the rate constants of glycine binding, k(+1) approximately 10(7) M(-1) s(-1), and dissociation, k(-1) = 1900 s(-1); 2) the rates of receptor-channel opening, k(op) = 2200 s(-1), and closing, k(cl) = 38 s(-1); 3) the receptor desensitization rate, alpha = 0.45 s(-1); 4) the number of occupied ligand binding sites necessary for receptor-channel activation and desensitization, n >/= 3; and 5) the maximum receptor-channel open probability, p(0) > 0.95. The kinetics of receptor-channel activation are insensitive to the transmembrane potential. A general model for glycine receptor activation explaining the experimental data consists of a sequential mechanism based on rapid ligand-binding steps preceding a rate-limiting receptor-channel opening reaction and slow receptor desensitization. PMID:10423421

  6. Production of L-lysine on different silage juices using genetically engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Neuner, Andreas; Wagner, Ines; Sieker, Tim; Ulber, Roland; Schneider, Konstantin; Peifer, Susanne; Heinzle, Elmar

    2013-01-20

    Corynebacterium glutamicum, the best established industrial producer organism for lysine was genetically modified to allow the production of lysine on grass and corn silages. The resulting strain C. glutamicum lysC(fbr)dld(Psod)pyc(Psod)malE(Psod)fbp(Psod)gapX(Psod) was based on earlier work (Neuner and Heinzle, 2011). That mutant carries a point mutation in the aspartokinase (lysC) regulatory subunit gene as well as overexpression of D-lactate dehydrogenase (dld), pyruvate carboxylase (pyc) and malic enzyme (malE) using the strong Psod promoter. Here, we additionally overexpressed fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (fbp) and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gapX) using the same promoter. The resulting strain grew readily on grass and corn silages with a specific growth rate of 0.35 h⁻¹ and lysine carbon yields of approximately 90 C-mmol (C-mol)⁻¹. Lysine yields were hardly affected by oxygen limitation whereas linear growth was observed under oxygen limiting conditions. Overall, this strain seems very robust with respect to the composition of silage utilizing all quantified low molecular weight substrates, e.g. lactate, glucose, fructose, maltose, quinate, fumarate, glutamate, leucine, isoleucine and alanine. PMID:22898177

  7. Adding a Lysine Mimic in the Design of Potent Inhibitors of Histone Lysine Methyltransferases

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yanqi; Ganesh, Thota; Horton, John R.; Spannhoff, Astrid; Liu, Jin; Sun, Aiming; Zhang, Xing; Bedford, Mark T.; Shinkai, Yoichi; Snyder, James P.; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2010-07-19

    Dynamic histone lysine methylation involves the activities of modifying enzymes (writers), enzymes removing modifications (erasers), and readers of the histone code. One common feature of these activities is the recognition of lysines in methylated and unmethylated states, whether they are substrates, reaction products, or binding partners. We applied the concept of adding a lysine mimic to an established inhibitor (BIX-01294) of histone H3 lysine 9 methyltransferases G9a and G9a-like protein by including a 5-aminopentyloxy moiety, which is inserted into the target lysine-binding channel and becomes methylated by G9a-like protein, albeit slowly. The compound enhances its potency in vitro and reduces cell toxicity in vivo. We suggest that adding a lysine or methyl-lysine mimic should be considered in the design of small-molecule inhibitors for other methyl-lysine writers, erasers, and readers.

  8. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  9. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  10. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  11. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  12. CPLM: a database of protein lysine modifications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zexian; Wang, Yongbo; Gao, Tianshun; Pan, Zhicheng; Cheng, Han; Yang, Qing; Cheng, Zhongyi; Guo, Anyuan; Ren, Jian; Xue, Yu

    2014-01-01

    We reported an integrated database of Compendium of Protein Lysine Modifications (CPLM; http://cplm.biocuckoo.org) for protein lysine modifications (PLMs), which occur at active ε-amino groups of specific lysine residues in proteins and are critical for orchestrating various biological processes. The CPLM database was updated from our previously developed database of Compendium of Protein Lysine Acetylation (CPLA), which contained 7151 lysine acetylation sites in 3311 proteins. Here, we manually collected experimentally identified substrates and sites for 12 types of PLMs, including acetylation, ubiquitination, sumoylation, methylation, butyrylation, crotonylation, glycation, malonylation, phosphoglycerylation, propionylation, succinylation and pupylation. In total, the CPLM database contained 203 972 modification events on 189 919 modified lysines in 45 748 proteins for 122 species. With the dataset, we totally identified 76 types of co-occurrences of various PLMs on the same lysine residues, and the most abundant PLM crosstalk is between acetylation and ubiquitination. Up to 53.5% of acetylation and 33.1% of ubiquitination events co-occur at 10 746 lysine sites. Thus, the various PLM crosstalks suggested that a considerable proportion of lysines were competitively and dynamically regulated in a complicated manner. Taken together, the CPLM database can serve as a useful resource for further research of PLMs. PMID:24214993

  13. Hemoglobin Labeled by Radioactive Lysine

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Bale, W. F.; Yuile, C. L.; DeLaVergne, L.; Miller, L. L.; Whipple, G. H.

    1949-12-08

    This paper reports on the utilization of tagged epsilon carbon of DL-lysine by a dog both anemic and hypoproteinemic due to repeated bleeding plus a diet low in protein. The experiment extended over period of 234 days, a time sufficient to indicate an erythrocyte life span of at least 115 days based upon the rate of replacement of labeled red cell proteins. The proteins of broken down red cells seem not to be used with any great preference for the synthesis of new hemoglobin.

  14. 75 FR 62141 - Glycine From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-07

    ... glycine from China (60 FR 16116). Following first five-year reviews by Commerce and the Commission... from China (65 FR 45752). Following second five-year reviews by Commerce and the Commission, effective... glycine from China (70 FR 69316). The Commission is now conducting a third review to determine...

  15. 21 CFR 172.812 - Glycine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Glycine. 172.812 Section 172.812 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.812 Glycine. The...

  16. 21 CFR 172.812 - Glycine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glycine. 172.812 Section 172.812 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.812 Glycine. The...

  17. 21 CFR 172.812 - Glycine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Glycine. 172.812 Section 172.812 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.812 Glycine. The...

  18. 21 CFR 172.812 - Glycine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glycine. 172.812 Section 172.812 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.812 Glycine. The...

  19. Conformational Structure of Tyrosine, Tyrosyl-Glycine, and Tyrosyl-Glycyl-Glycine by Double Resonance Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abo-Riziq, Ali; Grace, Louis; Crews, Bridgit; Callahan, Michael P,; van Mourik, Tanja; de Vries, Mattanjah S,

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the variation in conformation for the amino acid tyrosine (Y), alone and in the small peptides tyrosine-glycine (YC) and tyrosine-glycine-glycine (YGG), in the gas phase by using UV-UV and IR-UV double resonance spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. For tyrosine we found seven different conformations, for YG we found four different conformations, and for YGG we found three different conformations. As the peptides get larger, we observe fewer stable conformers, despite the increasing complexity and number of degrees of freedom. We find structural trends similar to those in phenylalanine-glycine glycine (FGG) and tryptophan-glycine-glycine (WGG)j however) the effect of dispersive forces in FGG for stabilizing a folded structure is replaced by that of hydrogen bonding in YGG.

  20. Conditions for the formation of dilysyl-dipyrrolones A and B, and novel yellow dipyrrolone derivatives formed from xylose and amino acids in the presence of lysine.

    PubMed

    Nomi, Yuri; Sakamoto, Junko; Takenaka, Makiko; Ono, Hiroshi; Murata, Masatsune

    2011-01-01

    Foods derived from plants contain pentose in addition to hexose. It is well known that pentose contributes more to browning by the Maillard reaction than hexose does. We have recently found novel yellow compounds formed from xylose and lysine under weakly acidic conditions, named dilysyldipyrrolones (dilysyl-DPLs) A and B. We indicate in this study that dilysyl-DPLs were specifically formed under weakly acidic conditions from pentose, but not hexose. Moreover, we found novel DPL derivatives which were formed from xylose and such amino acids as alanine, arginine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, isoleucine, leucine, phenylalanine, serine, and valine in the presence of lysine. PMID:21307606

  1. Engineering a Lysine-ON Riboswitch for Metabolic Control of Lysine Production in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li-Bang; Zeng, An-Ping

    2015-12-18

    Riboswitches are natural RNA elements that regulate gene expression by binding a ligand. Here, we demonstrate the possibility of altering a natural lysine-OFF riboswitch from Eschericia coli (ECRS) to a synthetic lysine-ON riboswitch and using it for metabolic control. To this end, a lysine-ON riboswitch library was constructed using tetA-based dual genetic selection. After screening the library, the functionality of the selected lysine-ON riboswitches was examined using a report gene, lacZ. Selected lysine-ON riboswitches were introduced into the lysE gene (encoding a lysine transport protein) of Corynebacterium glutamicum and used to achieve dynamic control of lysine transport in a recombinant lysine-producing strain, C. glutamicum LPECRS, which bears a deregulated aspartokinase and a lysine-OFF riboswitch for dynamic control of the enzyme citrate synthase. Batch fermentation results of the strains showed that the C. glutamicum LPECRS strain with an additional lysine-ON riboswitch for the control of lysE achieved a 21% increase in the yield of lysine compared to that of the C. glutamicum LPECRS strain and even a 89% increase in yield compared to that of the strain with deregulated aspartokinase. This work provides a useful approach to generate lysine-ON riboswitches for C. glutamicum metabolic engineering and demonstrates for the first time a synergetic effect of lysine-ON and -OFF riboswitches for improving lysine production in this industrially important microorganism. The approach can be used to dynamically control other genes and can be applied to other microorganisms. PMID:26300047

  2. Alanine transport across in vitro rabbit vagina.

    PubMed

    Hajjar, J J; Mroueh, A M

    1979-04-01

    Transmural flux of alanine across the vaginal epithelium of the rabbit is a specialized mechanism. There is a net serosal to mucosal translocation of the amino acid in the absence of a concentration gradient. Changes in reproductive cycle do not influence this mechanism but, in castrated animals, it is abolished. Transport properties of vaginal epithelium is important because of increasing utilization of intravaginal contraceptives. PMID:455986

  3. Earthworms accumulate alanine in response to drought.

    PubMed

    Holmstrup, Martin; Slotsbo, Stine; Henriksen, Per G; Bayley, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Earthworms have ecologically significant functions in tropical and temperate ecosystems and it is therefore important to understand how these animals survive during drought. In order to explore the physiological responses to dry conditions, we simulated a natural drought incident in a laboratory trial exposing worms in slowly drying soil for about one month, and then analyzed the whole-body contents of free amino acids (FAAs). We investigated three species forming estivation chambers when soils dry out (Aporrectodea tuberculata, Aporrectodea icterica and Aporrectodea longa) and one species that does not estivate during drought (Lumbricus rubellus). Worms subjected to drought conditions (< -2MPa) substantially increased the concentration of FAAs and in particular alanine that was significantly upregulated in all tested species. Alanine was the most important FAA reaching 250-650μmolg(-1) dry weight in dehydrated Aporrectodea species and 300μmolg(-1) dry weight in L. rubellus. Proline was only weakly upregulated in some species as were a few other FAAs. Species forming estivation chambers (Aporrectodea spp.) did not show a better ability to conserve body water than the non-estivating species (L. rubellus) at the same drought level. These results suggest that the accumulation of alanine is an important adaptive trait in drought tolerance of earthworms in general. PMID:27107492

  4. The influence of various cations on the catalytic properties of clays. [polymerization of alanine adenylate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paecht-Horowitz, M.

    1978-01-01

    The polymerization of alanine adenylate in the presence of the sodium form of various clays was studied, and hectorite was found to cause more polymerization than nontronite and montmorillonite (in that order) although the differences were not great. The effect on polymerization of presaturating montmorillonite with different cations was determined. Hectorite, with increased basicity of the interspatial planes, allows polymerization of lysine, which montmorillonite does not. The general trend is that, for the same amino acid, higher degrees of polymerization are obtained when the cation in the octahedral lattice of the clay is divalent rather than trivalent. With the exchangeable cations the order is reversed, for a reason that is explained. The main role of clays in the polymerization mechanism of amino acids is concentration and neutralization of charges.

  5. Linkages in thermal copolymers of lysine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Suzuki, F.

    1975-01-01

    The thermal copolymerization of lysine with other alpha-amino acids was studied. The identity of the second amino acid influences various properties of the polymer obtained, including the proportion of alpha and epsilon linkages of lysine. A review of linkages in proteinoids indicates alpha and beta linkages for aspartic acid, alpha and gamma linkages for glutamic acid, alpha and epsilon linkages for lysine, and alpha linkages for other amino acids. Thermal proteinoids are thus more complex in types of linkage than are proteins.

  6. Linkages in thermal copolymers of lysine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Suzuki, F.

    1976-01-01

    The thermal copolymerization of lysine with other alpha-amino acids has been studied further. The identity of the second amino acid influences various properties of the polymer obtained, including the proportion of alpha and epsilon linkages of lysine. A review of linkages in proteinoids indicates alpha and beta linkages for aspartic acid, alpha and gamma linkages for glutamic acid, alpha and epsilon linkages for lysine, and alpha linkages for other amino acids. Thermal proteinoids are thus more complex in types of linkage than are proteins

  7. The glycine deportation system and its pharmacological consequences.

    PubMed

    Beyoğlu, Diren; Idle, Jeffrey R

    2012-08-01

    The glycine deportation system is an essential component of glycine catabolism in man whereby 400 to 800mg glycine per day are deported into urine as hippuric acid. The molecular escort for this deportation is benzoic acid, which derives from the diet and from gut microbiota metabolism of dietary precursors. Three components of this system, involving hepatic and renal metabolism, and renal active tubular secretion help regulate systemic and central nervous system levels of glycine. When glycine levels are pathologically high, as in congenital nonketotic hyperglycinemia, the glycine deportation system can be upregulated with pharmacological doses of benzoic acid to assist in normalization of glycine homeostasis. In congenital urea cycle enzymopathies, similar activation of the glycine deportation system with benzoic acid is useful for the excretion of excess nitrogen in the form of glycine. Drugs which can substitute for benzoic acid as substrates for the glycine deportation system have adverse reactions that may involve perturbations of glycine homeostasis. The cancer chemotherapeutic agent ifosfamide has an unacceptably high incidence of encephalopathy. This would appear to arise as a result of the production of toxic aldehyde metabolites which deplete ATP production and sequester NADH in the mitochondrial matrix, thereby inhibiting the glycine deportation system and causing de novo glycine synthesis by the glycine cleavage system. We hypothesize that this would result in hyperglycinemia and encephalopathy. This understanding may lead to novel prophylactic strategies for ifosfamide encephalopathy. Thus, the glycine deportation system plays multiple key roles in physiological and neurotoxicological processes involving glycine. PMID:22584143

  8. The glycine deportation system and its pharmacological consequences☆

    PubMed Central

    Beyoğlu, Diren; Idle, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    The glycine deportation system is an essential component of glycine catabolism in man whereby 400 to 800 mg glycine per day are deported into urine as hippuric acid. The molecular escort for this deportation is benzoic acid, which derives from the diet and from gut microbiota metabolism of dietary precursors. Three components of this system, involving hepatic and renal metabolism, and renal active tubular secretion help regulate systemic and central nervous system levels of glycine. When glycine levels are pathologically high, as in congenital nonketotic hyperglycinemia, the glycine deportation system can be upregulated with pharmacological doses of benzoic acid to assist in normalization of glycine homeostasis. In congenital urea cycle enzymopathies, similar activation of the glycine deportation system with benzoic acid is useful for the excretion of excess nitrogen in the form of glycine. Drugs which can substitute for benzoic acid as substrates for the glycine deportation system have adverse reactions that may involve perturbations of glycine homeostasis. The cancer chemotherapeutic agent ifosfamide has an unacceptably high incidence of encephalopathy. This would appear to arise as a result of the production of toxic aldehyde metabolites which deplete ATP production and sequester NADH in the mitochondrial matrix, thereby inhibiting the glycine deportation system and causing de novo glycine synthesis by the glycine cleavage system. We hypothesize that this would result in hyperglycinemia and encephalopathy. This understanding may lead to novel prophylactic strategies for ifosfamide encephalopathy. Thus, the glycine deportation system plays multiple key roles in physiological and neurotoxicological processes involving glycine. PMID:22584143

  9. The kinetics of hydrolysis of some extended N-aminoacyl-l-lysine methyl esters.

    PubMed

    Green, G D; Tomalin, G

    1976-09-01

    1. The action of two active forms of bovine trypsin (alpha and beta-trypsin) on a series of specific methyl ester substrates of general formula: N-acetyl-(glycyl)n-L-lysine methyl ester (n = 0, 1, 2) and N2-benzoyl-L-arginine ethyl ester have been investigated. With the L-lysine methyl esters the catalytic rate constant for hydrolysis (kcat) was found to be significantly lower for alpha-trypsin than for beta-trypsin, whereas with N2-benzoyl-L-arginine ethyl ester there was no significant difference for the two enzymes. 2. By measurement of the kinetic constants (kcat and Km) in the presence of a nucleophile, which competes with water in the deacylation process, it has been shown that, in common with the specific ester substrates of trypsin, the rate-determining step for the extended L-lysine methyl esters is decaylation of the enzyme. 3. It has been found that by extending the aminoacyl group of N-acetyl-L-lysine methyl ester by one glycine residue (n = 1), a greatly enhanced deacylation rate constant is observed for both alpha and beta-trypsin. The higher rate constants were maintained at the higher levels by the addition of a further glycine residue (n = 2). These results have been interpreted in terms of the 'induced fit' hypothesis the substrates binding to an enzyme subsite adjacent to the active site. 4. The beta-trypsin-catalysed hydrolysis of the L-lysine substrates was investigated over a range of temperature (15--35 degrees C). The Arrhenius law was obeyed, within experimental error, by all three substrates allowing the estimation of the thermodynamic function of activation (delta S not equal to and deltaH note equal to) for the deacylation reactions. The significantly higher values of deltaS not equal to and deltaH not equal to obtained for the two extended substrates are interpreted in terms of additional hydrogen bonding between the longer aminoacyl chains and the enzyme molecule. The results are compared with those for non-extended specific substrates

  10. Further Characterization of Glycine-Containing Microcystins from the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Puddick, Jonathan; Prinsep, Michèle R.; Wood, Susanna A.; Cary, Stephen Craig; Hamilton, David P.; Holland, Patrick T.

    2015-01-01

    Microcystins are hepatotoxic cyclic peptides produced by several cyanobacterial genera worldwide. In 2008, our research group identified eight new glycine-containing microcystin congeners in two hydro-terrestrial mat samples from the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Eastern Antarctica. During the present study, high-resolution mass spectrometry, amino acid analysis and micro-scale thiol derivatization were used to further elucidate their structures. The Antarctic microcystin congeners contained the rare substitution of the position-1 d-alanine for glycine, as well as the acetyl desmethyl modification of the position-5 Adda moiety (3S-amino-9S-methoxy-2S,6,8S-trimethyl-10-phenyldeca-4E,6E-dienoic acid). Amino acid analysis was used to determine the stereochemistry of several of the amino acids and conclusively demonstrated the presence of glycine in the microcystins. A recently developed thiol derivatization technique showed that each microcystin contained dehydrobutyrine in position-7 instead of the commonly observed N-methyl dehydroalanine. PMID:25675414

  11. Evolution of threonine aldolases, a diverse family involved in the second pathway of glycine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangxiu; Zhang, Manxiao; Chen, Ximing; Zhang, Wei; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Qi

    2015-02-01

    Threonine aldolases (TAs) catalyze the interconversion of threonine and glycine plus acetaldehyde in a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent manner. This class of enzymes complements the primary glycine biosynthetic pathway catalyzed by serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT), and was shown to be necessary for yeast glycine auxotrophy. Because the reverse reaction of TA involves carbon-carbon bond formation, resulting in a β-hydroxyl-α-amino acid with two adjacent chiral centers, TAs are of high interests in synthetic chemistry and bioengineering studies. Here, we report systematic phylogenetic analysis of TAs. Our results demonstrated that L-TAs and D-TAs that are specific for L- and D-threonine, respectively, are two phylogenetically unique families, and both enzymes are different from their closely related enzymes SHMTs and bacterial alanine racemases (ARs). Interestingly, L-TAs can be further grouped into two evolutionarily distinct families, which share low sequence similarity with each other but likely possess the same structural fold, suggesting a convergent evolution of these enzymes. The first L-TA family contains enzymes of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic origins, and is related to fungal ARs, whereas the second contains only prokaryotic L-TAs. Furthermore, we show that horizontal gene transfer may occur frequently during the evolution of both L-TA families. Our results indicate the complex, dynamic, and convergent evolution process of TAs and suggest an updated classification scheme for L-TAs. PMID:25644973

  12. GABA and glycine in the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Ito, Susumu

    2016-09-01

    GABA and glycine are major inhibitory neurotransmitters in the CNS and act on receptors coupled to chloride channels. During early developmental periods, both GABA and glycine depolarize membrane potentials due to the relatively high intracellular Cl(-) concentration. Therefore, they can act as excitatory neurotransmitters. GABA and glycine are involved in spontaneous neural network activities in the immature CNS such as giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs) in neonatal hippocampal neurons, which are generated by the synchronous activity of GABAergic interneurons and glutamatergic principal neurons. GDPs and GDP-like activities in the developing brains are thought to be important for the activity-dependent functiogenesis through Ca(2+) influx and/or other intracellular signaling pathways activated by depolarization or stimulation of metabotropic receptors. However, if GABA and glycine do not shift from excitatory to inhibitory neurotransmitters at the birth and in maturation, it may result in neural disorders including autism spectrum disorders. PMID:26951057

  13. Druggability of methyl-lysine binding sites.

    PubMed

    Santiago, C; Nguyen, K; Schapira, M

    2011-12-01

    Structural modules that specifically recognize--or read--methylated or acetylated lysine residues on histone peptides are important components of chromatin-mediated signaling and epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Deregulation of epigenetic mechanisms is associated with disease conditions, and antagonists of acetyl-lysine binding bromodomains are efficacious in animal models of cancer and inflammation, but little is known regarding the druggability of methyl-lysine binding modules. We conducted a systematic structural analysis of readers of methyl marks and derived a predictive druggability landscape of methyl-lysine binding modules. We show that these target classes are generally less druggable than bromodomains, but that some proteins stand as notable exceptions. PMID:22146969

  14. SPOTing Acetyl-Lysine Dependent Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Picaud, Sarah; Filippakopoulos, Panagis

    2015-01-01

    Post translational modifications have been recognized as chemical signals that create docking sites for evolutionary conserved effector modules, allowing for signal integration within large networks of interactions. Lysine acetylation in particular has attracted attention as a regulatory modification, affecting chromatin structure and linking to transcriptional activation. Advances in peptide array technologies have facilitated the study of acetyl-lysine-containing linear motifs interacting with the evolutionary conserved bromodomain module, which specifically recognizes and binds to acetylated sequences in histones and other proteins. Here we summarize recent work employing SPOT peptide technology to identify acetyl-lysine dependent interactions and document the protocols adapted in our lab, as well as our efforts to characterize such bromodomain-histone interactions. Our results highlight the versatility of SPOT methods and establish an affordable tool for rapid access to potential protein/modified-peptide interactions involving lysine acetylation.

  15. A Method to determine lysine acetylation stoichiometries

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Wu, Si; Sydor, Michael A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Weitz, Karl K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Hixson, Kim K.; Kim, Jong Seo; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Ansong, Charles

    2014-07-21

    A major bottleneck to fully understanding the functional aspects of lysine acetylation is the lack of stoichiometry information. Here we describe a mass spectrometry method using a combination of isotope labeling and detection of a diagnostic fragment ion to determine the stoichiometry of lysine acetylation on proteins globally. Using this technique, we determined the modification occupancy on hundreds of acetylated peptides from cell lysates and cross-validated the measurements via immunoblotting.

  16. Biosynthetic pathways of the osmolytes N epsilon-acetyl-beta-lysine, beta-glutamine, and betaine in Methanohalophilus strain FDF1 suggested by nuclear magnetic resonance analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, M F; Lai, M C; Gunsalus, R P

    1992-01-01

    Methanohalophilus strain FDF1 synthesizes beta-glutamine, betaine, and N epsilon-acetyl-beta-lysine as osmoprotective agents when the cells are grown in high external concentrations of NaCl. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic analyses of 13CH3OH-12CO2 label incorporation by the cells provide information on the biosynthetic pathways of these organic osmolytes. The labeling studies indicate that Methanohalophilus strain FDF1 produces glutamate and beta-glutamine via a partial oxidative Krebs pathway. 13C labeling of betaine is consistent with methylation of glycine generated from serine (via serine hydroxymethyltransferase). The labeling pattern for N epsilon-acetyl-beta-lysine is consistent with the synthesis of its precursor alpha-lysine occurring by the diaminopimelate pathway in these cells. PMID:1400220

  17. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from Streptococcus mutans

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yong-Zhi; Sheng, Yu; Li, Lan-Fen; Tang, De-Wei; Liu, Xiang-Yu; Zhao, Xiaojun; Liang, Yu-He Su, Xiao-Dong

    2007-09-01

    A potential target for antibiotic drug design, d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from S. mutans, was expressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution. d-Alanine-d-alanine ligase is encoded by the gene ddl (SMU-599) in Streptococcus mutans. This ligase plays a very important role in cell-wall biosynthesis and may be a potential target for drug design. To study the structure and function of this ligase, the gene ddl was amplified from S. mutans genomic DNA and cloned into the expression vector pET28a. The protein was expressed in soluble form in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3). Homogeneous protein was obtained using a two-step procedure consisting of Ni{sup 2+}-chelating and size-exclusion chromatography. Purified protein was crystallized and the cube-shaped crystal diffracted to 2.4 Å. The crystal belongs to space group P3{sub 1}21 or P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 79.50, c = 108.97 Å. There is one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  18. Racemization of alanine by the alanine racemases from Salmonella typhimurium and Bacillus stearothermophilus: energetic reaction profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Faraci, W.S.; Walsh, C.T.

    1988-05-03

    Alanine racemases are bacterial pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) dependent enzymes providing D-alanine as an essential building block for biosynthesis of the peptidoglycan layer of the cell wall. Two isozymic alanine racemases, encoded by the dadB gene and the alr gene, from the Gram-negative mesophilic Salmonella typhimurium and one from the Gram-positive thermophilic Bacillus stearothermophilus have been examined for the racemization mechanism. Substrate deuterium isotope effects and solvent deuterium isotope effects have been measured in both L ..-->.. D and D..-->.. L directions for all three enzymes to assess the degree to which abstraction of the ..cap alpha..-proton or protonation of substrate PLP carbanion is limiting in catalysis. Additionally, experiments measuring internal return of ..cap alpha..-/sup 3/H from substrate to product and solvent exchange/substrate conversion experiments in /sup 3/H/sub 2/O have been used with each enzyme to examine the partitioning of substrate PLP carbanion intermediates and to obtain the relative heights of kinetically significant energy barriers in alanine racemase catalysis.

  19. Alteration of substrate specificity of alanine dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Puja; Aldeborgh, Hannah; Carlucci, Lauren; Walsh, Lauren; Wasserman, Jordan; Zhou, Edward; Lefurgy, Scott T.; Mundorff, Emily C.

    2015-01-01

    The l-alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) has a natural history that suggests it would not be a promising candidate for expansion of substrate specificity by protein engineering: it is the only amino acid dehydrogenase in its fold family, it has no sequence or structural similarity to any known amino acid dehydrogenase, and it has a strong preference for l-alanine over all other substrates. By contrast, engineering of the amino acid dehydrogenase superfamily members has produced catalysts with expanded substrate specificity; yet, this enzyme family already contains members that accept a broad range of substrates. To test whether the natural history of an enzyme is a predictor of its innate evolvability, directed evolution was carried out on AlaDH. A single mutation identified through molecular modeling, F94S, introduced into the AlaDH from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtAlaDH) completely alters its substrate specificity pattern, enabling activity toward a range of larger amino acids. Saturation mutagenesis libraries in this mutant background additionally identified a double mutant (F94S/Y117L) showing improved activity toward hydrophobic amino acids. The catalytic efficiencies achieved in AlaDH are comparable with those that resulted from similar efforts in the amino acid dehydrogenase superfamily and demonstrate the evolvability of MtAlaDH specificity toward other amino acid substrates. PMID:25538307

  20. Flow and Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of N-(Triethylene glycol)glycine Oligomers and Their Remarkable Cellular Transporter Activities.

    PubMed

    Jong, ThingSoon; Pérez-López, Ana M; Johansson, Emma M V; Lilienkampf, Annamaria; Bradley, Mark

    2015-08-19

    Peptidomimetics, such as oligo-N-alkylglycines (peptoids), are attractive alternatives to traditional cationic cell-penetrating peptides (such as R9) due to their robust proteolytic stability and reduced cellular toxicity. Here, monomeric N-alkylglycines, incorporating amino-functionalized hexyl or triethylene glycol (TEG) side chains, were synthesized via a three-step continuous-flow reaction sequence, giving the monomers N-Fmoc-(6-Boc-aminohexyl)glycine and N-Fmoc-((2-(2-Boc-aminoethoxy)ethoxy)ethyl)glycine in 49% and 41% overall yields, respectively. These were converted into oligomers (5, 7, and 9-mers) using an Fmoc-based solid-phase protocol and evaluated as cellular transporters. Hybrid oligomers, constructed of alternating units of the aminohexyl and amino-TEG monomers, were non-cytotoxic and exhibited remarkable cellular uptake activity compared to the analogous fully TEG or lysine-like compounds. PMID:26155805

  1. International society of sports nutrition position stand: Beta-Alanine.

    PubMed

    Trexler, Eric T; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Stout, Jeffrey R; Hoffman, Jay R; Wilborn, Colin D; Sale, Craig; Kreider, Richard B; Jäger, Ralf; Earnest, Conrad P; Bannock, Laurent; Campbell, Bill; Kalman, Douglas; Ziegenfuss, Tim N; Antonio, Jose

    2015-01-01

    The International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) provides an objective and critical review of the mechanisms and use of beta-alanine supplementation. Based on the current available literature, the conclusions of the ISSN are as follows: 1) Four weeks of beta-alanine supplementation (4-6 g daily) significantly augments muscle carnosine concentrations, thereby acting as an intracellular pH buffer; 2) Beta-alanine supplementation currently appears to be safe in healthy populations at recommended doses; 3) The only reported side effect is paraesthesia (tingling), but studies indicate this can be attenuated by using divided lower doses (1.6 g) or using a sustained-release formula; 4) Daily supplementation with 4 to 6 g of beta-alanine for at least 2 to 4 weeks has been shown to improve exercise performance, with more pronounced effects in open end-point tasks/time trials lasting 1 to 4 min in duration; 5) Beta-alanine attenuates neuromuscular fatigue, particularly in older subjects, and preliminary evidence indicates that beta-alanine may improve tactical performance; 6) Combining beta-alanine with other single or multi-ingredient supplements may be advantageous when supplementation of beta-alanine is high enough (4-6 g daily) and long enough (minimum 4 weeks); 7) More research is needed to determine the effects of beta-alanine on strength, endurance performance beyond 25 min in duration, and other health-related benefits associated with carnosine. PMID:26175657

  2. Organic foliar Milstop shows efficacy against soybean aphid (Aphis glycines) on soybean (Glycine max)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) has been produced in the United States since 1765. Soybean aphids (Aphis glycines Matsumura) were first detected on soybean in the United States in 2000 and now cause an estimated yield loss of up to US$4.9 billion annually. Organic soybean producers have few insecti...

  3. Glycine Polymerization on Oxide Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitadai, Norio; Oonishi, Hiroyuki; Umemoto, Koichiro; Usui, Tomohiro; Fukushi, Keisuke; Nakashima, Satoru

    2016-07-01

    It has long been suggested that mineral surfaces played an important role in peptide bond formation on the primitive Earth. However, it remains unclear which mineral species was key to the prebiotic processes. This is because great discrepancies exist among the reported catalytic efficiencies of minerals for amino acid polymerizations, owing to mutually different experimental conditions. This study examined polymerization of glycine (Gly) on nine oxide minerals (amorphous silica, quartz, α-alumina and γ-alumina, anatase, rutile, hematite, magnetite, and forsterite) using identical preparation, heating, and analytical procedures. Results showed that a rutile surface is the most effective site for Gly polymerization in terms of both amounts and lengths of Gly polymers synthesized. The catalytic efficiency decreased as rutile > anatase > γ-alumina > forsterite > α- alumina > magnetite > hematite > quartz > amorphous silica. Based on reported molecular-level information for adsorption of Gly on these minerals, polymerization activation was inferred to have arisen from deprotonation of the NH3 + group of adsorbed Gly to the nucleophilic NH2 group, and from withdrawal of electron density from the carboxyl carbon to the surface metal ions. The orientation of adsorbed Gly on minerals is also a factor influencing the Gly reactivity. The examination of Gly-mineral interactions under identical experimental conditions has enabled the direct comparison of various minerals' catalytic efficiencies and has made discussion of polymerization mechanisms and their relative influences possible Further systematic investigations using the approach reported herein (which are expected to be fruitful) combined with future microscopic surface analyses will elucidate the role of minerals in the process of abiotic peptide bond formation.

  4. The conserved glycine-rich segment linking the N-terminal fusion peptide to the coiled coil of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 transmembrane glycoprotein gp21 is a determinant of membrane fusion function.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kirilee A; Bär, Séverine; Maerz, Anne L; Alizon, Marc; Poumbourios, Pantelis

    2005-04-01

    Retroviral transmembrane proteins (TMs) contain an N-terminal fusion peptide that initiates virus-cell membrane fusion. The fusion peptide is linked to the coiled-coil core through a conserved sequence that is often rich in glycines. We investigated the functional role of the glycine-rich segment, Met-326 to Ser-337, of the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) TM, gp21, by alanine and proline scanning mutagenesis. Alanine substitution for the hydrophobic residue Ile-334 caused an approximately 90% reduction in cell-cell fusion activity without detectable effects on the lipid-mixing and pore formation phases of fusion. Alanine substitutions at other positions had smaller effects (Gly-329, Val-330, and Gly-332) or no effect on fusion function. Proline substitution for glycine residues inhibited cell-cell fusion function with position-dependent effects on the three phases of fusion. Retroviral glycoprotein fusion function thus appears to require flexibility within the glycine-rich segment and hydrophobic contacts mediated by this segment. PMID:15767455

  5. The Conserved Glycine-Rich Segment Linking the N-Terminal Fusion Peptide to the Coiled Coil of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Transmembrane Glycoprotein gp21 Is a Determinant of Membrane Fusion Function

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Kirilee A.; Bär, Séverine; Maerz, Anne L.; Alizon, Marc; Poumbourios, Pantelis

    2005-01-01

    Retroviral transmembrane proteins (TMs) contain an N-terminal fusion peptide that initiates virus-cell membrane fusion. The fusion peptide is linked to the coiled-coil core through a conserved sequence that is often rich in glycines. We investigated the functional role of the glycine-rich segment, Met-326 to Ser-337, of the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) TM, gp21, by alanine and proline scanning mutagenesis. Alanine substitution for the hydrophobic residue Ile-334 caused an ∼90% reduction in cell-cell fusion activity without detectable effects on the lipid-mixing and pore formation phases of fusion. Alanine substitutions at other positions had smaller effects (Gly-329, Val-330, and Gly-332) or no effect on fusion function. Proline substitution for glycine residues inhibited cell-cell fusion function with position-dependent effects on the three phases of fusion. Retroviral glycoprotein fusion function thus appears to require flexibility within the glycine-rich segment and hydrophobic contacts mediated by this segment. PMID:15767455

  6. Alanine aminotransferase controls seed dormancy in barley.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kazuhiro; Yamane, Miki; Yamaji, Nami; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Tagiri, Akemi; Schwerdt, Julian G; Fincher, Geoffrey B; Matsumoto, Takashi; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Komatsuda, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Dormancy allows wild barley grains to survive dry summers in the Near East. After domestication, barley was selected for shorter dormancy periods. Here we isolate the major seed dormancy gene qsd1 from wild barley, which encodes an alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT). The seed dormancy gene is expressed specifically in the embryo. The AlaAT isoenzymes encoded by the long and short dormancy alleles differ in a single amino acid residue. The reduced dormancy allele Qsd1 evolved from barleys that were first domesticated in the southern Levant and had the long dormancy qsd1 allele that can be traced back to wild barleys. The reduced dormancy mutation likely contributed to the enhanced performance of barley in industrial applications such as beer and whisky production, which involve controlled germination. In contrast, the long dormancy allele might be used to control pre-harvest sprouting in higher rainfall areas to enhance global adaptation of barley. PMID:27188711

  7. Alanine aminotransferase controls seed dormancy in barley

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Kazuhiro; Yamane, Miki; Yamaji, Nami; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Tagiri, Akemi; Schwerdt, Julian G.; Fincher, Geoffrey B.; Matsumoto, Takashi; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Komatsuda, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Dormancy allows wild barley grains to survive dry summers in the Near East. After domestication, barley was selected for shorter dormancy periods. Here we isolate the major seed dormancy gene qsd1 from wild barley, which encodes an alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT). The seed dormancy gene is expressed specifically in the embryo. The AlaAT isoenzymes encoded by the long and short dormancy alleles differ in a single amino acid residue. The reduced dormancy allele Qsd1 evolved from barleys that were first domesticated in the southern Levant and had the long dormancy qsd1 allele that can be traced back to wild barleys. The reduced dormancy mutation likely contributed to the enhanced performance of barley in industrial applications such as beer and whisky production, which involve controlled germination. In contrast, the long dormancy allele might be used to control pre-harvest sprouting in higher rainfall areas to enhance global adaptation of barley. PMID:27188711

  8. A Rigorous Attempt to Verify Interstellar Glycine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, L. E.; Lovas, F. J.; Hollis, J. M.; Friedel, D. N.; Jewell, P. R.; Remijan, A.; Ilyushin, V. V.; Alekseev, E. A.; Dyubko, S. F.

    2004-01-01

    In 2003, Kuan, Charnley, and co-workers reported the detection of interstellar glycine (NH2CH2COOH) based on observations of 27 lines in 19 different spectral bands in one or more of the sources Sgr BP(N-LMH), Orion KL, and W51 e1/e2. They supported their detection report with rotational temperature diagrams for all three sources. In this paper, we present essential criteria which can be used in a straightforward analysis technique to confirm the identity of an interstellar asymmetric rotor such as glycine. We use new laboratory measurements of glycine as a basis for applying this analysis technique, both to our previously unpublished 12 m telescope data and to the previously published SEST data of Nummelin and colleagues. We conclude that key lines necessary for an interstellar glycine identification have not yet been found. We identify several common molecular candidates that should be examined further as more likely carriers of the lines reported as glycine. Finally, we illustrate that rotational temperature diagrams used without the support of correct spectroscopic assignments are not a reliable tool for the identification of interstellar molecules. Subject headings: ISM: abundances - ISM: clouds - ISM: individual (Sagittarius B2[N-

  9. Extrinsic factors regulate partial agonist efficacy of strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Farroni, Jeffrey S; McCool, Brian A

    2004-01-01

    Background Strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors in many adult forebrain regions consist of alpha2 + beta heteromeric channels. This subunit composition is distinct from the alpha1 + beta channels found throughout the adult spinal cord. Unfortunately, the pharmacology of forebrain alpha2beta receptors are poorly defined compared to 'neonatal' alpha2 homomeric channels or 'spinal' alpha1beta heteromers. In addition, the pharmacologic properties of native alpha2beta glycine receptors have been generally distinct from receptors produced by heterologous expression. To identify subtype-specific pharmacologic tools for the forebrain alpha2beta receptors, it is important to identify a heterologous expression system that closely resembles these native glycine-gated chloride channels. Results While exploring pharmacological properties of alpha2beta glycine receptors compared to alpha2-homomers, we found that distinct heterologous expression systems appeared to differentially influence partial agonist pharmacology. The β-amino acid taurine possessed 30–50% efficacy for alpha2-containing receptor isoforms when expressed in HEK 293 cells. However, taurine efficacy was dramatically reduced in L-cell fibroblasts. Similar results were obtained for β-alanine. The efficacy of these partial agonists was also strongly reduced by the beta subunit. There were no significant differences in apparent strychnine affinity values calculated from concentration-response data between expression systems or subunit combinations. Nor did relative levels of expression correlate with partial agonist efficacy when compared within or between several different expression systems. Finally, disruption of the tubulin cytoskeleton reduced the efficacy of partial agonists in a subunit-dependent, but system-independent, fashion. Conclusions Our results suggest that different heterologous expression systems can dramatically influence the agonist pharmacology of strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors. In

  10. A Method to Determine Lysine Acetylation Stoichiometries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Wu, Si; Sydor, Michael A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Weitz, Karl K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Hixson, Kim K.; Kim, Jong-Seo; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; et al

    2014-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a common protein posttranslational modification that regulates a variety of biological processes. A major bottleneck to fully understanding the functional aspects of lysine acetylation is the difficulty in measuring the proportion of lysine residues that are acetylated. Here we describe a mass spectrometry method using a combination of isotope labeling and detection of a diagnostic fragment ion to determine the stoichiometry of protein lysine acetylation. Using this technique, we determined the modification occupancy for ~750 acetylated peptides from mammalian cell lysates. Furthermore, the acetylation on N-terminal tail of histone H4 was cross-validated by treating cells with sodiummore » butyrate, a potent deacetylase inhibitor, and comparing changes in stoichiometry levels measured by our method with immunoblotting measurements. Of note we observe that acetylation stoichiometry is high in nuclear proteins, but very low in mitochondrial and cytosolic proteins. In summary, our method opens new opportunities to study in detail the relationship of lysine acetylation levels of proteins with their biological functions.« less

  11. Lysine post-translational modifications of collagen

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Sricholpech, Marnisa

    2012-01-01

    Type I collagen is the most abundant structural protein in vertebrates. It is a heterotrimeric molecule composed of two α1 chains and one α2 chain, forming a long uninterrupted triple helical structure with short non-triple helical telopeptides at both the N- and C-termini. During biosynthesis, collagen acquires a number of post-translational modifications, including lysine modifications, that are critical to the structure and biological functions of this protein. Lysine modifications of collagen are highly complicated sequential processes catalysed by several groups of enzymes leading to the final step of biosynthesis, covalent intermolecular cross-linking. In the cell, specific lysine residues are hydroxylated to form hydroxylysine. Then specific hydroxylysine residues located in the helical domain of the molecule are glycosylated by the addition of galactose or glucose-galactose. Outside the cell, lysine and hydroxylysine residues in the N- and C-telopeptides can be oxidatively deaminated to produce reactive aldehydes that undergo a series of non-enzymatic condensation reactions to form covalent intra- and inter-molecular cross-links. Owing to the recent advances in molecular and cellular biology, and analytical technologies, the biological significance and molecular mechanisms of these modifications have been gradually elucidated. This chapter provides an overview on these enzymatic lysine modifications and subsequent cross-linking. PMID:22708567

  12. The 4′lysine in the putative channel lining domain affects desensitization but not the single-channel conductance of recombinant homomeric 5-HT3A receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gunthorpe, Martin J; Peters, John A; Gill, Catherine H; Lambert, Jeremy J; Lummis, Sarah C R

    2000-01-01

    The 5-HT3 receptor is a transmitter-gated ion channel of the Cys-loop superfamily. Uniquely, 5-HT3 receptor subunits (5-HT3A and 5-HT3B) possess a positively charged lysine residue within the putative channel lining M2 domain (4′ position). Using whole cell recording techniques, we examined the role of this residue in receptor function using wild-type (WT) and mutant 5-HT3A receptor subunits of murine origin transiently expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) cells. WT 5-HT3A receptors mediated rapidly activating currents in response to 5-HT (10–90 % rise time, 103 ms; EC50, 2.34 μm; Hill coefficient, nH, 2.87). The currents rectified inwardly, reversed in sign at a potential of −9 mV and desensitized in the continuous presence of agonist (half-time of desensitization, t1/2, 2.13 s). 5-HT3A receptor subunits in which the 4′lysine was mutated to arginine, glutamine, serine or glycine formed functional receptors. 5-HT EC50 values were approximately 2-fold lower than for WT 5-HT3A receptors, but Hill coefficients, kinetics of current activation, rectification, and reversal potentials were unaltered. Each of the mutants desensitized more slowly than the WT 5-HT3A receptor, with the arginine and glycine mutations exhibiting the greatest effect (5-fold reduction). The rank order of effect was arginine > glycine > serine > glutamine. The single-channel conductance of the WT 5-HT3A receptor, as assessed by fluctuation analysis of macroscopic currents, was 390 fS. A similar value was obtained for the 4′lysine mutant receptors. Thus it appears unlikely that 4′lysine is exposed to the channel lumen. Mutation of residues immediately adjacent to 4′lysine to glutamate or lysine resulted in lack of receptor expression or function. We conclude that 4′lysine does not form part of the channel lining, but may play an important role in 5-HT3 receptor desensitization. PMID:10639097

  13. Antidepressants modulate glycine action in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Khae Hawn; Kang, Ki-Woon; Kang, Yoo-Jin; Kim, Tae-Wook; Park, Hun-Kyung; Kim, Sung-Eun; Kim, Chang-Ju

    2015-12-01

    Antidepressants are drugs that relieve symptoms of depressive disorders. Fluoxetine, tianeptine, and milnacipran are different types of antidepressants, and they have widely been used for relieving of depression symptoms. In the present study, the effects of fluoxetine, tianeptine, and milnacipran on the glycine-induced ion current by nystatin-perforated patch clamp and on the amplitude of field potential in the hippocampal CA1 region by multichannel extracellular recording, MED64, system, were studied. In the present results, fluoxetine, tianeptine, and milnacipran reduced glycine-induced ion current in the hippocampal CA1 neurons in nystatin-perforated patch clamp method. These drugs enhanced the amplitude of the field potential in the hippocampal CA1 region in MED64 system. These results suggest that antidepressants may increase neuronal activity by enhancing field potential through inhibition on glycine-induced ion current. PMID:26730381

  14. Antidepressants modulate glycine action in rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Khae Hawn; Kang, Ki-Woon; Kang, Yoo-Jin; Kim, Tae-Wook; Park, Hun-Kyung; Kim, Sung-Eun; Kim, Chang-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Antidepressants are drugs that relieve symptoms of depressive disorders. Fluoxetine, tianeptine, and milnacipran are different types of antidepressants, and they have widely been used for relieving of depression symptoms. In the present study, the effects of fluoxetine, tianeptine, and milnacipran on the glycine-induced ion current by nystatin-perforated patch clamp and on the amplitude of field potential in the hippocampal CA1 region by multichannel extracellular recording, MED64, system, were studied. In the present results, fluoxetine, tianeptine, and milnacipran reduced glycine-induced ion current in the hippocampal CA1 neurons in nystatin-perforated patch clamp method. These drugs enhanced the amplitude of the field potential in the hippocampal CA1 region in MED64 system. These results suggest that antidepressants may increase neuronal activity by enhancing field potential through inhibition on glycine-induced ion current. PMID:26730381

  15. Chemical basis of glycine riboswitch cooperativity

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Miyun; Strobel, Scott A.

    2008-01-01

    The glycine binding riboswitch forms a unique tandem aptamer structure that binds glycine cooperatively. We employed nucleotide analog interference mapping (NAIM) and mutagenesis to explore the chemical basis of glycine riboswitch cooperativity. Based on the interference pattern, at least two sites appear to facilitate cooperative tertiary interactions, namely, the minor groove of the P1 helix from aptamer 1 and the major groove of the P3a helix from both aptamers. Mutation of these residues altered both the cooperativity and binding affinity of the riboswitch. The data support a model in which the P1 helix of the first aptamer participates in a tertiary interaction important for cooperativity, while nucleotides in the P1 helix of the second aptamer interface with the expression platform. These data have direct analogy to well-characterized mutations in hemoglobin, which provides a framework for considering cooperativity in this RNA-based system. PMID:18042658

  16. Insights into the Specificity of Lysine Acetyltransferases*

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Alex C.; Taylor, Keenan C.; Rank, Katherine C.; Rayment, Ivan; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C.

    2014-01-01

    Reversible lysine acetylation by protein acetyltransferases is a conserved regulatory mechanism that controls diverse cellular pathways. Gcn5-related N-acetyltransferases (GNATs), named after their founding member, are found in all domains of life. GNATs are known for their role as histone acetyltransferases, but non-histone bacterial protein acetytransferases have been identified. Only structures of GNAT complexes with short histone peptide substrates are available in databases. Given the biological importance of this modification and the abundance of lysine in polypeptides, how specificity is attained for larger protein substrates is central to understanding acetyl-lysine-regulated networks. Here we report the structure of a GNAT in complex with a globular protein substrate solved to 1.9 Å. GNAT binds the protein substrate with extensive surface interactions distinct from those reported for GNAT-peptide complexes. Our data reveal determinants needed for the recognition of a protein substrate and provide insight into the specificity of GNATs. PMID:25381442

  17. Defining the Orphan Functions of Lysine Acetyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Long known for their role in histone acetylation, recent studies have demonstrated that lysine acetyltransferases also carry out distinct “orphan” functions. These activities impact a wide range of biological phenomena including metabolism, RNA modification, nuclear morphology, and mitochondrial function. Here, we review the discovery and characterization of orphan lysine acetyltransferase functions. In addition to highlighting the evidence and biological role for these functions in human disease, we discuss the part emerging chemical tools may play in investigating this versatile enzyme superfamily. PMID:25591746

  18. Interfacing protein lysine acetylation and protein phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Hue T.; Uhrig, R. Glen; Nimick, Mhairi; Moorhead, Greg B.

    2012-01-01

    Recognition that different protein covalent modifications can operate in concert to regulate a single protein has forced us to re-think the relationship between amino acid side chain modifications and protein function. Results presented by Tran et al. 2012 demonstrate the association of a protein phosphatase (PP2A) with a histone/lysine deacetylase (HDA14) on plant microtubules along with a histone/lysine acetyltransferase (ELP3). This finding reveals a regulatory interface between two prevalent covalent protein modifications, protein phosphorylation and acetylation, emphasizing the integrated complexity of post-translational protein regulation found in nature. PMID:22827947

  19. Comparison of EPR response of alanine and Gd₂O₃-alanine dosimeters exposed to TRIGA Mainz reactor.

    PubMed

    Marrale, M; Schmitz, T; Gallo, S; Hampel, G; Longo, A; Panzeca, S; Tranchina, L

    2015-12-01

    In this work we report some preliminary results regarding the analysis of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) response of alanine pellets and alanine pellets added with gadolinium used for dosimetry at the TRIGA research reactor in Mainz, Germany. Two set-ups were evaluated: irradiation inside PMMA phantom and irradiation inside boric acid phantom. We observed that the presence of Gd2O3 inside alanine pellets increases the EPR signal by a factor of 3.45 and 1.24 in case of PMMA and boric acid phantoms, respectively. We can conclude that in the case of neutron beam with a predominant thermal neutron component the addition of gadolinium oxide can significantly improve neutron sensitivity of alanine pellets. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of both response of alanine and Gd-added alanine pellets with FLUKA code were performed and a good agreement was achieved for pure alanine dosimeters. For Gd2O3-alanine deviations between MC simulations and experimental data were observed and discussed. PMID:26315099

  20. Molecular dynamic and docking interaction study of Heterodera glycines serine proteinase with Vigna mungo proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Prasad, C V S Siva; Gupta, Saurabh; Gaponenko, Alex; Tiwari, Murlidhar

    2013-08-01

    Many plants do produce various defense proteins like proteinase inhibitors (PIs) to protect them against various pests. PIs function as pseudosubstrates of digestive proteinase, which inhibits proteolysis in pests and leads to amino acid deficiency-based mortality. This work reports the structural interaction studies of serine proteinase of Heterodera glycines (SPHG) with Vigna mungo proteinase inhibitor (VMPI). 3D protein structure modeling, validation of SPHG and VMPI, and their putative protein-protein binding sites were predicted. Protein-protein docking followed by molecular dynamic simulation was performed to find the reliable confirmation of SPHG-VMPI complex. Trajectory analysis of each successive conformation concludes better interaction of first loop in comparison with second loop. Lysine residues of first loop were actively participating in complex formation. Overall, this study discloses the structural aspects and interaction mechanisms of VMPI with SPHG, and it would be helpful in the development of pest-resistant genetically modified crops. PMID:23813339

  1. Conserved Glycine Residues in the Cytoplasmic Domain of the Aspartate Receptor Play Essential Roles in Kinase Coupling and On–Off Switching†

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Matthew D.; Bass, Randal B.; Mehan, Ryan S.; Falke, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    The aspartate receptor of the bacterial chemotaxis pathway serves as a scaffold for the formation of a multiprotein signaling complex containing the receptor and the cytoplasmic pathway components. Within this complex, the receptor regulates the autophosphorylation activity of histidine kinase CheA, thereby controlling the signals sent to the flagellar motor and the receptor adaptation system. The receptor cytoplasmic domain, which controls the on–off switching of CheA, possesses 14 glycine residues that are highly conserved in related receptors. In principle, these conserved glycines could be required for static turns, bends, or close packing in the cytoplasmic domain, or they could be required for conformational dynamics during receptor on–off switching. To determine which glycines are essential and to probe their functional roles, we have substituted each conserved glycine with both alanine and cysteine, and then measured the effects on receptor function in vivo and in vitro. The results reveal a subset of six glycines which are required for receptor function during cellular chemotaxis. Two of these essential glycines (G388 and G391) are located at a hairpin turn at the distal end of the folded cytoplasmic domain, where they are required for the tertiary fold of the signaling subdomain and for CheA kinase activation. Three other essential glycines (G338, G339, and G437) are located at the border between the adaptation and signaling subdomains, where they play key roles in CheA kinase activation and on–off switching. These three glycines form a ring around the four-helix bundle that comprises the receptor cytoplasmic domain, yielding a novel architectural feature termed a bundle hinge. The final essential glycine (G455) is located in the adaptation subdomain where it is required for on–off switching. Overall, the findings confirm that six of the 14 conserved cytoplasmic glycines are essential for receptor function because they enable helix turns and bends

  2. The conserved glycine residues in the transmembrane domain of the Semliki Forest virus fusion protein are not required for assembly and fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Maofu; Kielian, Margaret . E-mail: kielian@aecom.yu.edu

    2005-02-05

    The alphavirus Semliki Forest virus (SFV) infects cells via a low pH-triggered fusion reaction mediated by the viral E1 protein. Both the E1 fusion peptide and transmembrane (TM) domain are essential for membrane fusion, but the functional requirements for the TM domain are poorly understood. Here we explored the role of the five TM domain glycine residues, including the highly conserved glycine pair at E1 residues 415/416. SFV mutants with alanine substitutions for individual or all five glycine residues (5G/A) showed growth kinetics and fusion pH dependence similar to those of wild-type SFV. Mutants with increasing substitution of glycine residues showed an increasingly more stringent requirement for cholesterol during fusion. The 5G/A mutant showed decreased fusion kinetics and extent in fluorescent lipid mixing assays. TM domain glycine residues thus are not required for efficient SFV fusion or assembly but can cause subtle effects on the properties of membrane fusion.

  3. Behavior of peptides combining 1 alanine residue and 8 glycine residues on papain associated with structural fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko

    2011-12-01

    I investigated the behavior of the peptides combining 1 ALA residue and 8 GLY residues on papain associated with structural fluctuations via molecular dynamics and docking simulations. Although the chance of binding to sites near the active center of papain was reduced by replacing the GLY residue in 9GLY with ALA residue, binding stability was improved by the replacement. Furthermore, both the chance and binding stability were greatly affected by positioning of ALA residue in the peptides. Residue in peptides should be replaced in view of the balance between chance of binding to sites near active center and binding stability.

  4. Alanine Scanning Mutagenesis Identifies an Asparagine-Arginine-Lysine Triad Essential to Assembly of the Shell of the Pdu Microcompartment

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Sharmistha; Cheng, Shouqiang; Sung, Yea Won; McNamara, Dan E.; Sawaya, Michael R.; Yeates, Todd O.; Bobik, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial microcompartments (MCPs) are the simplest organelles known. They function to enhance metabolic pathways by confining several related enzymes inside an all protein envelope called the shell. In this study, we investigated the factors that govern MCP assembly by performing scanning mutagenesis on the surface residues of PduA, a major shell protein of the MCP used for 1,2-propanediol degradation. Biochemical, genetic and structural analysis of 20 mutants allowed us to determine that PduA K26, N29 and R79 are crucial residues that stabilize the shell of the 1,2-propanediol MCP. In addition, we identify two PduA mutants (K37A and K55A) that impair MCP function most likely by altering the permeability of its protein shell. These are the first studies to examine the phenotypic effects of shell protein structural mutations in a microcompartment system. The findings reported here may be applicable to engineering protein containers with improved stability for biotechnology applications. PMID:24747050

  5. Alanine Scanning Mutagenesis Identifies an Asparagine–Arginine–Lysine Triad Essential to Assembly of the Shell of the Pdu Microcompartment

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Sharmistha; Cheng, Shouqiang; Sung, Yea Won; McNamara, Dan E.; Sawaya, Michael R.; Yeates, Todd O.; Bobik, Thomas A.

    2014-06-01

    Bacterial microcompartments (MCPs) are the simplest organelles known. They function to enhance metabolic pathways by confining several related enzymes inside an all-protein envelope called the shell. In this study, we investigated the factors that govern MCP assembly by performing scanning mutagenesis on the surface residues of PduA, a major shell protein of the MCP used for 1,2-propanediol degradation. Biochemical, genetic, and structural analysis of 20 mutants allowed us to determine that PduA K26, N29, and R79 are crucial residues that stabilize the shell of the 1,2-propanediol MCP. In addition, we identify two PduA mutants (K37A and K55A) that impair MCP function most likely by altering the permeability of its protein shell. These are the first studies to examine the phenotypic effects of shell protein structural mutations in an MCP system. The findings reported here may be applicable to engineering protein containers with improved stability for biotechnology applications.

  6. A rare case of glycine encephalopathy unveiled by valproate therapy.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Velusamy; Kadiyala, Pramila; Hariharan, Praveen; Neeraj, E

    2015-01-01

    Glycine encephalopathy (GE) or nonketotic hyperglycinemia is an autosomal recessive disorder due to a primary defect in glycine cleavage enzyme system. It is characterized by elevated levels of glycine in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid usually presenting with seizures, hypotonia, and developmental delay. In our case, paradoxical increase in seizure frequency on starting sodium valproate led us to diagnose GE. PMID:26167219

  7. 21 CFR 520.550 - Glucose/glycine/electrolyte.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glucose/glycine/electrolyte. 520.550 Section 520...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.550 Glucose/glycine..., potassium citrate 0.12 gram, aminoacetic acid (glycine) 6.36 grams, and glucose 44.0 grams. (b) Sponsor....

  8. Identification of Rotylenchulus reniformis resistant Glycine lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identification of resistance to reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis) is the first step in developing resistant soybean (Glycine max) cultivars that will benefit growers in the Mid South. This study was conducted to identify soybean (G. max and G. soja) lines with resistance to this pathogen....

  9. 21 CFR 172.812 - Glycine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES... food additive glycine may be safely used for technological purposes in food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The additive meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals Codex,...

  10. Engineering and characterization of fluorogenic glycine riboswitches

    PubMed Central

    Ketterer, Simon; Gladis, Lukas; Kozica, Adnan; Meier, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    A set of 12 fluorogenic glycine riboswitches with different thermodynamic and kinetic response properties was engineered. For the design of functional riboswitches, a three-part RNA approach was applied based on the idea of linking a RNA sensor, transmitter and actuator part together. For the RNA sensor and actuator part, we used the tandem glycine aptamer structure from Bacillus subtillis, and fluorogenic aptamer Spinach, respectively. To achieve optimal signal transduction from the sensor to the actuator, a riboswitch library with variable transmitter was screened with a microfluidic large-scale integration chip. This allowed us to establish the complete thermodynamic binding profiles of the riboswitch library. Glycine dissociation constants of the 12 strong fluorescence response riboswitches varied between 99.7 and 570 μM. Furthermore, the kinetic glycine binding (kon), and dissociation (koff) rates, and corresponding energy barriers of the 10 strongest fluorescence response riboswitches were determined with the same chip platform. kon and koff were in the order of 10−3s−1 and 10−2s−1, respectively. Conclusively, we demonstrate that systematic screening of synthetic and natural linked RNA parts with microfluidic chip technology is an effective approach to rapidly generate fluorogenic metabolite riboswitches with a broad range of biophysical response properties. PMID:27220466

  11. Engineering and characterization of fluorogenic glycine riboswitches.

    PubMed

    Ketterer, Simon; Gladis, Lukas; Kozica, Adnan; Meier, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    A set of 12 fluorogenic glycine riboswitches with different thermodynamic and kinetic response properties was engineered. For the design of functional riboswitches, a three-part RNA approach was applied based on the idea of linking a RNA sensor, transmitter and actuator part together. For the RNA sensor and actuator part, we used the tandem glycine aptamer structure from Bacillus subtillis, and fluorogenic aptamer Spinach, respectively. To achieve optimal signal transduction from the sensor to the actuator, a riboswitch library with variable transmitter was screened with a microfluidic large-scale integration chip. This allowed us to establish the complete thermodynamic binding profiles of the riboswitch library. Glycine dissociation constants of the 12 strong fluorescence response riboswitches varied between 99.7 and 570 μM. Furthermore, the kinetic glycine binding (k(on)), and dissociation (k(off)) rates, and corresponding energy barriers of the 10 strongest fluorescence response riboswitches were determined with the same chip platform. k(on) and k(off) were in the order of 10(-3)s(-1) and 10(-2)s(-1), respectively. Conclusively, we demonstrate that systematic screening of synthetic and natural linked RNA parts with microfluidic chip technology is an effective approach to rapidly generate fluorogenic metabolite riboswitches with a broad range of biophysical response properties. PMID:27220466

  12. Glycine production in severe childhood undernutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Although nutritionally dispensable amino acids are not essential in the diet, from a biochemical standpoint, dispensable amino acids such as glycine are essential for life. This is especially true under unique circumstances, such as when the availability of labile nitrogen for dispensabl...

  13. Antimicrobial activity of chicken NK-lysin against Eimeria sporozoites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NK-lysin is an antimicrobial and antitumor polypeptide that is considered to play an important role during innate immunity. Chicken NK-lysin is a member of the saposin-like protein family and exhibits potent antitumor cell activity. To evaluate the antimicrobial properties of chicken NK-lysin, we ex...

  14. Radioactive Lysine in Protein Metabolism Studies

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Miller, L. L.; Bale, W. F.; Yuile, C. L.; Masters, R. E.; Tishkoff, G. H.; Whipple,, G. H.

    1950-01-09

    Studies of incorporation of DL-lysine in various body proteins of the dog; the time course of labeled blood proteins; and apparent rate of disappearance of labeled plasma proteins for comparison of behavior of the plasma albumin and globulin fractions; shows more rapid turn over of globulin fraction.

  15. 21 CFR 582.5411 - Lysine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lysine. 582.5411 Section 582.5411 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  16. 21 CFR 582.5411 - Lysine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lysine. 582.5411 Section 582.5411 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  17. Weight gain, feed conversion efficiency and plasma free lysine as response criteria in evaluating supplements of lysine plus threonine and lysine plus tryptophan to deficient diets for rats.

    PubMed

    Frydrych, Z; Heger, J

    1986-08-01

    Two experiments were conducted on growing male SPF-rats to compare weight gain, feed conversion efficiency and plasma free lysine concentration as response criteria in evaluating adequacy of lysine plus threonine and lysine plus tryptophan supplements to the deficient diets. Two basal semisynthetic diets were prepared limiting in lysine and threonine (Expt. 1) and lysine and tryptophan (Expt. 2). The addition of graded supplements to the basal diets of L-lysine X HCl alone (0.2; 0.4; 0.6; 0.8 and 1.0% of diet) induced imbalance of amino acids resulting in low level of daily weight gain and feed conversion efficiency. Plasma free lysine concentration started to grow linearly from the first supplement of L-lysine X HCl. If rats were fed the diets containing identical supplements of L-lysine X HCl in combination with two supplements of L-threonine (0.2 and 0.4% of diet, Expt. 1) or L-tryptophan (0.05 and 0.1% of diet, Expt. 2), plasma free lysine started to increase before supplements of amino acids were adequate to support maximum weight gain and feed conversion efficiency. this difference in response seems to be caused by different feeding regiment during the growth period of the experiments (ad libitum) and training period prior to blood sampling (feeding twice daily). PMID:3098208

  18. A Novel Glycinate-based Body Wash

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Jamie; Ananthapadmanabhan, K.P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the properties of a novel body wash containing the mild surfactant glycinate. Design: Biochemical and clinical assays. Setting: Research laboratories and clinical sites in the United States and Canada. Participants: Women 18 to 65 years of age (cleansing efficacy); male and female subjects 26 to 63 years of age with mild or moderate dryness and erythema (leg-controlled application test); subjects 5 to 65 years of age with mild-to-moderate eczema (eczema compatibility); and women 18 to 64 years of age (home use). Measurements: Assessments across studies included colorimetric dye exclusion to assess skin damage potential (corneosurfametry), efficacy of cosmetic product removal from skin, change from baseline in visual dryness, change from baseline in Eczema Area and Severity Index, and self-perceived eczema attributes and self-reported product preference. Results: The glycinate-based cleanser demonstrated mildness to skin components when evaluated in a corneosurfametry assay. Short-term use under exaggerated wash conditions in subjects with dryness scores <3 and erythema scores <2 (both on a 0-6 scale) indicated an initial reduction in visual dryness. In subjects with eczema, normal use resulted in significant improvements (p<0.05) at Week 4 compared with baseline in skin dryness (change from baseline = −0.73), rash (−0.56), itch (−0.927), tightness (−0.585), and all eczema (−0.756). The glycinate-based body wash removed 56 percent of a long-lasting cosmetic foundation from skin compared with less than 30 percent removed by two competitive products tested. The glycinate-based body wash was preferred over a competitive mild cleansing product overall. Conclusion: The patented glycinate-containing body wash demonstrated better product mildness and patient-preferred attributes and clinical benefits. PMID:23882306

  19. Glycine Betaine Biosynthesized from Glycine Provides an Osmolyte for Cell Growth and Spore Germination during Osmotic Stress in Myxococcus xanthus▿

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yoshio; Kawasaki, Shinji; Yoshimoto, Hinae; Takegawa, Kaoru

    2010-01-01

    Glycine sarcosine methyltransferase (Gsm) and sarcosine dimethylglycine methyltransferase (Sdm) catalyze glycine betaine synthesis from glycine. Disruption of the M. xanthus gsmA (MXAN 7068) or sdmA (MXAN 3190) gene, encoding Gsm or Sdm homologue proteins, respectively, generated mutants that exhibited a longer lag period of growth and delayed spore germination under osmostress. PMID:20023011

  20. REVERSAL OF d-CYCLOSERINE INHIBITION OF BACTERIAL GROWTH BY ALANINE

    PubMed Central

    Zygmunt, Walter A.

    1962-01-01

    Zygmunt, Walter A. (Mead Johnson & Co., Evansville, Ind.). Reversal of d-cycloserine inhibition of bacterial growth by alanine. J. Bacteriol. 84:154–156. 1962.—Reversal of the antibacterial activity of d-4-amino-3-isoxazolidone by alanine in bacterial cultures actively growing on chemically defined media was compared in cultures requiring exogenous alanine and those capable of its synthesis. dl-Alanine was the most effective reversal agent in Pediococcus cerevisiae, an alanine-requiring organism, and d-alanine was effective in Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, organisms synthesizing alanine. With all three cultures, l-alanine was the least effective reversal agent. PMID:16561951

  1. Identification in Marinomonas mediterranea of a novel quinoprotein with glycine oxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Campillo-Brocal, Jonatan Cristian; Lucas-Elio, Patricia; Sanchez-Amat, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A novel enzyme with lysine-epsilon oxidase activity was previously described in the marine bacterium Marinomonas mediterranea. This enzyme differs from other l-amino acid oxidases in not being a flavoprotein but containing a quinone cofactor. It is encoded by an operon with two genes lodA and lodB. The first one codes for the oxidase, while the second one encodes a protein required for the expression of the former. Genome sequencing of M. mediterranea has revealed that it contains two additional operons encoding proteins with sequence similarity to LodA. In this study, it is shown that the product of one of such genes, Marme_1655, encodes a protein with glycine oxidase activity. This activity shows important differences in terms of substrate range and sensitivity to inhibitors to other glycine oxidases previously described which are flavoproteins synthesized by Bacillus. The results presented in this study indicate that the products of the genes with different degrees of similarity to lodA detected in bacterial genomes could constitute a reservoir of different oxidases. PMID:23873697

  2. Metabolomics Analysis Identifies D-Alanine-D-alanine Ligase as the Primary Lethal Target of D-cycloserine in Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Halouska, Steven; Fenton, Robert J.; Zinniel, Denise K.; Marshall, Darrell D.; Barletta, Raúl G.; Powers, Robert

    2014-01-01

    D-cycloserine is an effective second line antibiotic used as a last resort to treat multi (MDR)- and extensively (XDR)- drug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. D-cycloserine interferes with the formation of peptidoglycan biosynthesis by competitive inhibition of Alanine racemase (Alr) and D-Alanine-D-alanine ligase (Ddl). Although, the two enzymes are known to be inhibited, the in vivo lethal target is still unknown. Our NMR metabolomics work has revealed that Ddl is the primary target of DCS, as cell growth is inhibited when the production of D-alanyl-D-alanine is halted. It is shown that inhibition of Alr may contribute indirectly by lowering the levels of D-alanine thus allowing DCS to outcompete D-alanine for Ddl binding. The NMR data also supports the possibility of a transamination reaction to produce D-alanine from pyruvate and glutamate, thereby bypassing Alr inhibition. Furthermore, the inhibition of peptidoglycan synthesis results in a cascading effect on cellular metabolism as there is a shift toward the catabolic routes to compensate for accumulation of peptidoglycan precursors. PMID:24303782

  3. Regulation of Transcription Factor Yin Yang 1 by SET7/9-mediated Lysine Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen-juan; Wu, Xiao-nan; Shi, Tao-tao; Xu, Huan-teng; Yi, Jia; Shen, Hai-feng; Huang, Ming-feng; Shu, Xing-yi; Wang, Fei-fei; Peng, Bing-ling; Xiao, Rong-quan; Gao, Wei-wei; Ding, Jian-cheng; Liu, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Yin Yang 1 (YY1) is a multifunctional transcription factor shown to be critical in a variety of biological processes. Although it is regulated by multiple types of post-translational modifications (PTMs), whether YY1 is methylated, which enzyme methylates YY1, and hence the functional significance of YY1 methylation remains completely unknown. Here we reported the first methyltransferase, SET7/9 (KMT7), capable of methylating YY1 at two highly conserved lysine (K) residues, K173 and K411, located in two distinct domains, one in the central glycine-rich region and the other in the very carboxyl-terminus. Functional studies revealed that SET7/9-mediated YY1 methylation regulated YY1 DNA-binding activity both in vitro and at specific genomic loci in cultured cells. Consistently, SET7/9-mediated YY1 methylation was shown to involve in YY1-regulated gene transcription and cell proliferation. Our findings revealed a novel regulatory strategy, methylation by lysine methyltransferase, imposed on YY1 protein, and linked YY1 methylation with its biological functions. PMID:26902152

  4. Isolation and characterization of a novel phage lysin active against Paenibacillus larvae, a honeybee pathogen

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Lucy; Nezami, Sara; Yost, Diane; Tsourkas, Philippos; Amy, Penny S

    2015-01-01

    Paenibacillus larvae is the causative agent of American foulbrood (AFB) disease which affects early larval stages during honeybee development. Due to its virulence, transmissibility, capacity to develop antibiotic resistance, and the inherent resilience of its endospores, Paenibacillus larvae is extremely difficult to eradicate from infected hives which often must be burned. AFB contributes to the worldwide decline of honeybee populations, which are crucial for pollination and the food supply. We have isolated a novel bacteriophage lysin, PlyPalA, from the genome of a novel Paenibacillus larvae bacteriophage originally extracted from an environmental sample. PlyPalA has an N-terminal N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase catalytic domain and possesses lytic activity against infectious strains of Paenibacillus larvae without harming commensal bacteria known to compose the honeybee larval microbiota. A single dose of PlyPalA rescued 75% of larvae infected with endospores, showing that it represents a powerful tool for future treatment of AFB. This represents the first time that lysins have been tested for therapeutic use in invertebrates. PMID:26904379

  5. Postirradiation effects in alanine dosimeter probes of two different suppliers.

    PubMed

    Anton, Mathias

    2008-03-01

    The measurand relevant for the dosimetry for radiation therapy is the absorbed dose to water, DW. The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) is establishing a secondary standard for DW for high-energy photon and electron radiation based on electron spin resonance (ESR) of the amino acid alanine. For practical applications, like, for example, intercomparison measurements using the ESR/alanine dosimetry system, the temporal evolution of the ESR signal of irradiated probes is an important issue. This postirradiation behaviour is investigated for alanine pellets of two different suppliers for different storage conditions. The influence of the storage conditions on the temporal evolution may be dependent on the type of probes used. The measurement and analysis method developed at the PTB is able to circumvent the apparent difficulties in the case of alanine/paraffin probes. Care has to be taken in case this method cannot be applied. PMID:18296760

  6. Bacterial Lysine Decarboxylase Influences Human Dental Biofilm Lysine Content, Biofilm Accumulation and Sub-Clinical Gingival Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lohinai, Z.; Keremi, B.; Szoko, E.; Tabi, T.; Szabo, C.; Tulassay, Z.; Levine, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Dental biofilms contain a protein that inhibits mammalian cell growth, possibly lysine decarboxylase from Eikenella corrodens. This enzyme decarboxylates lysine, an essential amino acid for dentally attached cell turnover in gingival sulci. Lysine depletion may stop this turnover, impairing the barrier to bacterial compounds. The aims of this study were to determine biofilm lysine and cadaverine contents before oral hygiene restriction (OHR), and their association with plaque index (PI) and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) after OHR for a week. Methods Laser-induced fluorescence after capillary electrophoresis was used to determine lysine and cadaverine contents in dental biofilm, tongue biofilm and saliva before OHR and in dental biofilm after OHR. Results Before OHR, lysine and cadaverine contents of dental biofilm were similar and 10-fold greater than in saliva or tongue biofilm. After a week of OHR, the biofilm content of cadaverine increased and that of lysine decreased, consistent with greater biofilm lysine decarboxylase activity. Regression indicated that PI and GCF exudation were positively related to biofilm lysine post-OHR, unless biofilm lysine exceeded the minimal blood plasma content in which case PI was further increased but GCF exudation was reduced. Conclusions After OHR, lysine decarboxylase activity seems to determine biofilm lysine content and biofilm accumulation. When biofilm lysine exceeds minimal blood plasma content after OHR, less GCF appeared despite more biofilm. Lysine appears important for biofilm accumulation and the epithelial barrier to bacterial proinflammatory agents. Clinical Relevance Inhibiting lysine decarboxylase may retard the increased GCF exudation required for microbial development and gingivitis. PMID:22141361

  7. Propofol restores the function of "hyperekplexic" mutant glycine receptors in Xenopus oocytes and mice.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Sean Michael; Becker, Lore; Weiher, Hans; Betz, Heinrich; Laube, Bodo

    2004-03-01

    Human hereditary hyperekplexia ("startle disease") is a neurological disorder characterized by exaggerated, convulsive movements in response to unexpected stimuli. Molecular genetic studies have shown that this disease is often caused by amino acid substitutions at arginine 271 to glutamine or leucine of the alpha1 subunit of the inhibitory glycine receptor (GlyR). When exogenously expressed in Xenopus oocytes, agonist responses of mutant alpha1(R271Q) and alpha1(R271L) GlyRs show higher EC50 values and lower maximal inducible responses (relative efficacies) compared with oocytes expressing wild-type alpha1 GlyR subunits. Here, we report that the maximal glycine-induced currents (I(max)) of mutant alpha1(R271Q) and alpha1(R271L) GlyRs were dramatically potentiated in the presence of the anesthetic propofol (PRO), whereas the I(max) of wild-type alpha(1) receptors was not affected. Quantitative analysis of the agonist responses of the isofunctionally substituted alpha1(R271K) mutant GlyR revealed that saturating concentrations of PRO decreased the EC50 values of both glycine and the partial agonist beta-alanine by >10-fold, with relative efficacies increasing by 4- and 16-fold, respectively. Transgenic (tg) mice carrying the alpha1(R271Q) mutation (tg271Q-300) have both spontaneous and induced tremor episodes that closely resemble the movements of startled hyperekplexic patients. After treatment with subanesthetic doses of PRO, the tg271Q-300 mutant mice showed temporary reflexive and locomotor improvements that made them indistinguishable from wild-type mice. Together, these results demonstrate that the functional and behavioral effects of hyperekplexia mutations can be effectively reversed by drugs that potentiate GlyR responses. PMID:14999083

  8. Aza-Glycine Induces Collagen Hyperstability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yitao; Malamakal, Roy M; Chenoweth, David M

    2015-10-01

    Hydrogen bonding is fundamental to life on our planet, and nature utilizes H-bonding in nearly all biomolecular interactions. Often, H-bonding is already maximized in natural biopolymer systems such as nucleic acids, where Watson-Crick H-bonds are fully paired in double-helical structures. Synthetic chemistry allows molecular editing of biopolymers beyond nature's capability. Here we demonstrate that substitution of glycine (Gly) with aza-glycine in collagen may increase the number of interfacial cross-strand H-bonds, leading to hyperstability in the triple-helical form. Gly is the only amino acid that has remained intolerant to substitution in collagen. Our results highlight the vital importance of maximizing H-bonding in higher order biopolymer systems using minimally perturbing alternatives to nature's building blocks. PMID:26368649

  9. Compositions containing poly ([gamma]glutamylcysteinyl)glycines

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, P.J.; Delhaize, E.; Robinson, N.J.; Unkefer, C.J.; Furlong, C.

    1992-02-18

    A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting the removal, and the apparatus used in effecting the removal are described. One or more of the polypeptides, poly ([gamma]glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly ([gamma]glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form. 1 figs.

  10. Compositions containing poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Paul J.; Delhaize, Emmanuel; Robinson, Nigel J.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Furlong, Clement

    1992-01-01

    A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

  11. Development of PEGylated Cysteine-Modified Lysine Dendrimers with Multiple Reduced Thiols To Prevent Hepatic Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Katsumi, Hidemasa; Nishikawa, Makiya; Hirosaki, Rikiya; Okuda, Tatsuya; Kawakami, Shigeru; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Yamamoto, Akira

    2016-08-01

    To inhibit hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury, we developed polyethylene glycol (PEG) conjugated (PEGylated) cysteine-modified lysine dendrimers with multiple reduced thiols, which function as scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Second, third, and fourth generation (K2, K3, and K4) highly branched amino acid spherical lysine dendrimers were synthesized, and cysteine (C) was conjugated to the outer layer of these lysine dendrimers to obtain K2C, K3C, and K4C dendrimers. Subsequently, PEG was reacted with the C residues of the dendrimers to obtain PEGylated dendrimers with multiple reduced thiols (K2C-PEG, K3C-PEG, and K4C-PEG). Radiolabeled K4C-PEG ((111)In-K4C-PEG) exhibited prolonged retention in the plasma, whereas (111)In-K2C-PEG and (111)In-K3C-PEG rapidly disappeared from the plasma. K4C-PEG significantly prevented the elevation of plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity, an index of hepatocyte injury, in a mouse model of hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury. In contrast, K2C-PEG, K3C-PEG, l-cysteine, and glutathione, the latter two of which are classical reduced thiols, hardly affected the plasma ALT activity. These findings indicate that K4C-PEG with prolonged circulation time is a promising compound to inhibit hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:27336683

  12. Expression of an L-alanine dehydrogenase gene in Zymomonas mobilis and excretion of L-alanine

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlenbusch, I.; Sahm, H.; Sprenger, G.A. )

    1991-05-01

    Gene alaD for L-alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus sphaericus was cloned and introduced into Z. mobilis. Under the control of the strong promoter of the pyruvate decarboxylase (pdc) gene, the enzyme was expressed up to a specific activity of nearly 1 {mu}mol {center dot} min{sup {minus}1} {center dot} mg of protein{sup {minus}1} in recombinant cells. As a result of this high L-alanine dehydrogenase activity, growing cells excreted up to 10 mmol of alanine per 280 mmol of glucose utilized into a mineral salts medium. By the addition of 85 mM NH{sub 4}{sup +} to the medium, growth of the recombinant cells stopped, and up to 41 mmol of alanine was secreted. As alanine dehydrogenase competed with pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) for the same substrate (pyruvate), PDC activity was reduced by starvation for the essential PDC cofactor thiamine PP{sub i}. A thiamine auxotrophy mutant of Z. mobilis which carried the alaD gene was starved for 40 h in glucose-supplemented mineral salts medium and then shifted to mineral salts medium with 85 mM NH {sub 4}{sup +} and 280 mmol of glucose. The recombinants excreted up to 84 mmol of alanine over 25 h. Alanine excretion proceeded at an initial velocity of 238 nmol {center dot} min{sup {minus}1} {center dot} mg(dry weight){sup {minus}1}. Despite this high activity, the excretion rate seemed to be a limiting factor, as the intracellular concentration of alanine was as high as 260 mM at the beginning of the excretion phase and decreased to 80 to 90 mM over 24 h.

  13. Knockout of Ste20-like proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) attenuates intestinal inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuchen; Viennois, Emilie; Xiao, Bo; Baker, Mark T; Yang, Stephen; Okoro, Ijeoma; Yan, Yutao

    2013-05-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are characterized by epithelial barrier disruption and alterations in immune regulation. Ste20-like proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) plays a role in intestinal inflammation, but the underlying mechanisms need to be defined. Herein, SPAK knockout (KO) C57BL/6 mice exhibited significant increases in intestinal transepithelial resistance, a marked decrease in paracellular permeability to fluorescence isothiocyanate-dextran, and altered apical side tight junction sodium ion selectivity, compared with wild-type mice. Furthermore, the expression of junction protein, claudin-2, decreased. In contrast, expressions of occludin, E-cadherin, β-catenin, and claudin-5 increased significantly, whereas no obvious change of claudin-1, claudin-4, zonula occludens protein 1, and zonula occludens protein 2 expressions was observed. In murine models of colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium and trinitrobenzene sulfuric acid, KO mice were more tolerant than wild-type mice, as demonstrated by colonoscopy features, histological characteristics, and myeloperoxidase activities. Consistent with these findings, KO mice showed increased IL-10 levels and decreased proinflammatory cytokine secretion, ameliorated bacterial translocation on treatment with dextran sulfate sodium, and regulation of with no lysine (WNK) kinase activity. Together, these features may reduce epithelial permeability. In conclusion, SPAK deficiency increases intestinal innate immune homeostasis, which is important for control or attenuation of pathological responses in inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:23499375

  14. Structure of D-alanine-D-alanine ligase from Yersinia pestis: nucleotide phosphate recognition by the serine loop.

    PubMed

    Tran, Huyen Thi; Hong, Myoung Ki; Ngo, Ho Phuong Thuy; Huynh, Kim Hung; Ahn, Yeh Jin; Wang, Zhong; Kang, Lin Woo

    2016-01-01

    D-Alanyl-D-alanine is an essential precursor of bacterial peptidoglycan and is synthesized by D-alanine-D-alanine ligase (DDL) with hydrolysis of ATP; this reaction makes DDL an important drug target for the development of antibacterial agents. Five crystal structures of DDL from Yersinia pestis (YpDDL) were determined at 1.7-2.5 Å resolution: apo, AMP-bound, ADP-bound, adenosine 5'-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate-bound, and D-alanyl-D-alanine- and ADP-bound structures. YpDDL consists of three domains, in which four loops, loop 1, loop 2 (the serine loop), loop 3 (the ω-loop) and loop 4, constitute the binding sites for two D-alanine molecules and one ATP molecule. Some of them, especially the serine loop and the ω-loop, show flexible conformations, and the serine loop is mainly responsible for the conformational change in substrate nucleotide phosphates. Enzyme-kinetics assays were carried out for both the D-alanine and ATP substrates and a substrate-binding mechanism was proposed for YpDDL involving conformational changes of the loops. PMID:26894530

  15. EPR/alanine dosimetry for two therapeutic proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrale, Maurizio; Carlino, Antonio; Gallo, Salvatore; Longo, Anna; Panzeca, Salvatore; Bolsi, Alessandra; Hrbacek, Jan; Lomax, Tony

    2016-02-01

    In this work the analysis of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) response of alanine pellets exposed to two different clinical proton beams employed for radiotherapy is performed. One beam is characterized by a passive delivery technique and is dedicated to the eyes treatment (OPTIS2 beam line). Alanine pellets were irradiated with a 70 MeV proton beam corresponding to 35 mm range in eye tissue. We investigated how collimators with different sizes and shape used to conform the dose to the planned target volume influence the delivered dose. For this purpose we performed measurements with varying the collimator size (Output Factor) and the results were compared with those obtained with other dosimetric techniques (such as Markus chamber and diode detector). This analysis showed that the dosimeter response is independent of collimator diameter if this is larger than or equal to 10 mm. The other beam is characterized by an active spot-scanning technique, the Gantry1 beam line (maximum energy 230 MeV), and is used to treat deep-seated tumors. The dose linearity of alanine response in the clinical dose range was tested and the alanine dose response at selected locations in depth was measured and compared with the TPS planned dose in a quasi-clinical scenario. The alanine response was found to be linear in the dose in the clinical explored range (from 10 to 70 Gy). Furthermore, a depth dose profile in a quasi-clinical scenario was measured and compared to the dose computed by the Treatment Planning System PSIPLAN. The comparison of calibrated proton alanine measurements and TPS dose shows a difference under 1% in the SOBP and a "quenching" effect up to 4% in the distal part of SOBP. The positive dosimetric characteristics of the alanine pellets confirm the feasibility to use these detectors for "in vivo" dosimetry in clinical proton beams.

  16. Exploring lysine riboswitch for metabolic flux control and improvement of L-lysine synthesis in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li-Bang; Zeng, An-Ping

    2015-06-19

    Riboswitch, a regulatory part of an mRNA molecule that can specifically bind a metabolite and regulate gene expression, is attractive for engineering biological systems, especially for the control of metabolic fluxes in industrial microorganisms. Here, we demonstrate the use of lysine riboswitch and intracellular l-lysine as a signal to control the competing but essential metabolic by-pathways of lysine biosynthesis. To this end, we first examined the natural lysine riboswitches of Eschericia coli (ECRS) and Bacillus subtilis (BSRS) to control the expression of citrate synthase (gltA) and thus the metabolic flux in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in E. coli. ECRS and BSRS were then successfully used to control the gltA gene and TCA cycle activity in a lysine producing strain Corynebacterium glutamicum LP917, respectively. Compared with the strain LP917, the growth of both lysine riboswitch-gltA mutants was slower, suggesting a reduced TCA cycle activity. The lysine production was 63% higher in the mutant ECRS-gltA and 38% higher in the mutant BSRS-gltA, indicating a higher metabolic flux into the lysine synthesis pathway. This is the first report on using an amino acid riboswitch for improvement of lysine biosynthesis. The lysine riboswitches can be easily adapted to dynamically control other essential but competing metabolic pathways or even be engineered as an "on-switch" to enhance the metabolic fluxes of desired metabolic pathways. PMID:25575181

  17. Charge Neutralization of the Central Lysine Cluster in Prion Protein (PrP) Promotes PrPSc-like Folding of Recombinant PrP Amyloids*

    PubMed Central

    Groveman, Bradley R.; Kraus, Allison; Raymond, Lynne D.; Dolan, Michael A.; Anson, Kelsie J.; Dorward, David W.; Caughey, Byron

    2015-01-01

    The structure of the infectious form of prion protein, PrPSc, remains unclear. Most pure recombinant prion protein (PrP) amyloids generated in vitro are not infectious and lack the extent of the protease-resistant core and solvent exclusion of infectious PrPSc, especially within residues ∼90–160. Polyanionic cofactors can enhance infectivity and PrPSc-like characteristics of such fibrils, but the mechanism of this enhancement is unknown. In considering structural models of PrPSc multimers, we identified an obstacle to tight packing that might be overcome with polyanionic cofactors, namely, electrostatic repulsion between four closely spaced cationic lysines within a central lysine cluster of residues 101–110. For example, in our parallel in-register intermolecular β-sheet model of PrPSc, not only would these lysines be clustered within the 101–110 region of the primary sequence, but they would have intermolecular spacings of only ∼4.8 Å between stacked β-strands. We have now performed molecular dynamics simulations predicting that neutralization of the charges on these lysine residues would allow more stable parallel in-register packing in this region. We also show empirically that substitution of these clustered lysine residues with alanines or asparagines results in recombinant PrP amyloid fibrils with extended proteinase-K resistant β-sheet cores and infrared spectra that are more reminiscent of bona fide PrPSc. These findings indicate that charge neutralization at the central lysine cluster is critical for the folding and tight packing of N-proximal residues within PrP amyloid fibrils. This charge neutralization may be a key aspect of the mechanism by which anionic cofactors promote PrPSc formation. PMID:25416779

  18. The structure of alanine racemase from Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Emily; Scaletti-Hutchinson, Emma; Opel-Reading, Helen; Nakatani, Yoshio; Krause, Kurt L.

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic Gram-negative bacterium which is a common cause of hospital-acquired infections. Numerous antibiotic-resistant strains exist, emphasizing the need for the development of new antimicrobials. Alanine racemase (Alr) is a pyridoxal 5′-phosphate dependent enzyme that is responsible for racemization between enantiomers of alanine. As d-alanine is an essential component of the bacterial cell wall, its inhibition is lethal to prokaryotes, making it an excellent antibiotic drug target. The crystal structure of A. baumannii alanine racemase (AlrAba) from the highly antibiotic-resistant NCTC13302 strain has been solved to 1.9 Å resolution. Comparison of AlrAba with alanine racemases from closely related bacteria demonstrates a conserved overall fold. The substrate entryway and active site of the enzymes were shown to be highly conserved. The structure of AlrAba will provide the template required for future structure-based drug-design studies. PMID:25195891

  19. Caramelization of maltose solution in presence of alanine.

    PubMed

    Fadel, H H M; Farouk, A

    2002-01-01

    Two solutions of maltose in water were used to prepare caramels. Alanine as a catalyst was added to one of these solutions. The caramelization was conducted at 130 degrees C for total time period 90 minutes. Convenient samples were taken of each caramel solution every 30 min and subjected to sensory analysis and isolation of volatile components. The odour and colour sensory tests were evaluated according to the international standard methods (ISO). The results showed that, the presence of alanine gave rise to a high significant (P < 0.01) decrease in acid attributes and remarkable increase in the sweet and caramel attributes, which are the most important caramel notes. On the other hand the increase in heating time in presence of alanine as a catalyst resulted in a high significant (P < 0.01) increase in the browning rate of caramel solution. The new technique Solid Phase Micro Extraction (SPME) was used for trapping the volatile components in the headspace of each caramel samples followed by thermal desorption and GC and GC - MS analysis. The 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (HMF), the main characteristic caramel product, showed its highest value in sample containing alanine after heating for 60 minutes. The best sensory results of the sample contains alanine were confirmed by the presence of high concentrations of the most potent odorants of caramel besides to the formation of some volatile compounds have caramel like flavours such as 2-acetyl pyrrole, 2-furanones and 1-(2-furanyl)1,2-propandione. PMID:12395187

  20. Evaluation of mechanical properties of some glycine complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraju, D.; Raja Shekar, P. V.; Chandra, Ch. Sateesh; Rao, K. Kishan; Krishna, N. Gopi

    2014-04-01

    The variation of Vickers hardness with load for (101) glycine zinc chloride (GZC), (001) glycine lithium sulphate (GLS), (001) triglycine sulphate (TGS) and (010) glycine phosphite (GPI) crystals was studied. From the cracks initiated along the corners of the indentation impression, crack lengths were measured and the fracture toughness value and brittle index number were determined. The hardness related parameters viz. yield strength and Young's modulus were also estimated. The anisotropic nature of the crystals was studied using Knoop indentation technique.

  1. Evaluation of mechanical properties of some glycine complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaraju, D.; Raja Shekar, P. V.; Chandra, Ch. Sateesh; Rao, K. Kishan; Krishna, N. Gopi

    2014-04-24

    The variation of Vickers hardness with load for (101) glycine zinc chloride (GZC), (001) glycine lithium sulphate (GLS), (001) triglycine sulphate (TGS) and (010) glycine phosphite (GPI) crystals was studied. From the cracks initiated along the corners of the indentation impression, crack lengths were measured and the fracture toughness value and brittle index number were determined. The hardness related parameters viz. yield strength and Young’s modulus were also estimated. The anisotropic nature of the crystals was studied using Knoop indentation technique.

  2. A l-Lysine Transporter of High Stereoselectivity of the Amino Acid-Polyamine-Organocation (APC) Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Jagdeep; Olkhova, Elena; Malviya, Viveka Nand; Grell, Ernst; Michel, Hartmut

    2014-01-01

    Membrane proteins of the amino acid-polyamine-organocation (APC) superfamily transport amino acids and amines across membranes and play an important role in the regulation of cellular processes. We report the heterologous production of the LysP-related transporter STM2200 from Salmonella typhimurium in Escherichia coli, its purification, and functional characterization. STM2200 is assumed to be a proton-dependent APC transporter of l-lysine. The functional interaction between basic amino acids and STM2200 was investigated by thermoanalytical methods, i.e. differential scanning and isothermal titration calorimetry. Binding of l-lysine to STM2200 in its solubilized monomer form is entropy-driven. It is characterized by a dissociation constant of 40 μm at pH 5.9 and is highly selective; no evidence was found for the binding of l-arginine, l-ornithine, l-2,4-diaminobutyric acid, and l-alanine. d-Lysine is bound 45 times more weakly than its l-chiral form. We thus postulate that STM2200 functions as a specific transport protein. Based on the crystal structure of ApcT (Shaffer, P. L., Goehring, A., Shankaranarayanan, A., and Gouaux, E. (2009) Science 325, 1010–1014), a proton-dependent amino acid transporter of the APC superfamily, a homology model of STM2200 was created. Docking studies allowed identification of possible ligand binding sites. The resulting predictions indicated that Glu-222 and Arg-395 of STM2200 are markedly involved in ligand binding, whereas Lys-163 is suggested to be of structural and functional relevance. Selected variants of STM2200 where these three amino acid residues were substituted using single site-directed mutagenesis showed no evidence for l-lysine binding by isothermal titration calorimetry, which confirmed the predictions. Molecular aspects of the observed ligand specificity are discussed. PMID:24257746

  3. Superoxide reductase from Desulfoarculus baarsii: reaction mechanism and role of glutamate 47 and lysine 48 in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Lombard, M; Houée-Levin, C; Touati, D; Fontecave, M; Nivière, V

    2001-04-24

    Superoxide reductase (SOR) is a small metalloenzyme that catalyzes reduction of O(2)(*)(-) to H(2)O(2) and thus provides an antioxidant mechanism against superoxide radicals. Its active site contains an unusual mononuclear ferrous center, which is very efficient during electron transfer to O(2)(*)(-) [Lombard, M., Fontecave, M., Touati, D., and Nivière, V. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 115-121]. The reaction of the enzyme from Desulfoarculus baarsii with superoxide was studied by pulse radiolysis methods. The first step is an extremely fast bimolecular reaction of superoxide reductase with superoxide, with a rate constant of (1.1 +/- 0.3) x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). A first intermediate is formed which is converted to a second one at a much slower rate constant of 500 +/- 50 s(-1). Decay of the second intermediate occurs with a rate constant of 25 +/- 5 s(-1). These intermediates are suggested to be iron-superoxide and iron-peroxide species. Furthermore, the role of glutamate 47 and lysine 48, which are the closest charged residues to the vacant sixth iron coordination site, has been investigated by site-directed mutagenesis. Mutation of glutamate 47 into alanine has no effect on the rates of the reaction. On the contrary, mutation of lysine 48 into an isoleucine led to a 20-30-fold decrease of the rate constant of the bimolecular reaction, suggesting that lysine 48 plays an important role during guiding and binding of superoxide to the iron center II. In addition, we report that expression of the lysine 48 sor mutant gene hardly restored to a superoxide dismutase-deficient Escherichia coli mutant the ability to grow under aerobic conditions. PMID:11305919

  4. Structural Basis of Cooperative Ligand Binding by the Glycine Riboswitch

    SciTech Connect

    E Butler; J Wang; Y Xiong; S Strobel

    2011-12-31

    The glycine riboswitch regulates gene expression through the cooperative recognition of its amino acid ligand by a tandem pair of aptamers. A 3.6 {angstrom} crystal structure of the tandem riboswitch from the glycine permease operon of Fusobacterium nucleatum reveals the glycine binding sites and an extensive network of interactions, largely mediated by asymmetric A-minor contacts, that serve to communicate ligand binding status between the aptamers. These interactions provide a structural basis for how the glycine riboswitch cooperatively regulates gene expression.

  5. Identification and characterization of heptapeptide modulators of the glycine receptor.

    PubMed

    Cornelison, Garrett L; Pflanz, Natasha C; Tipps, Megan E; Mihic, S John

    2016-06-01

    The glycine receptor is a member of the Cys-loop receptor superfamily of ligand-gated ion channels and is implicated as a possible therapeutic target for the treatment of diseases such as alcoholism and inflammatory pain. In humans, four glycine receptor subtypes (α1, α2, α3, and β) co-assemble to form pentameric channel proteins as either α homomers or αβ heteromers. To date, few agents have been identified that can selectively modulate the glycine receptor, especially those possessing subtype specificity. We used a cell-based method of phage display panning, coupled with two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology in Xenopus laevis oocytes, to identify novel heptapeptide modulators of the α1β glycine receptor. This involved a panning procedure in which the phage library initially underwent subtractive panning against Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK) 293 cells expressing alternative glycine receptor subtypes before panning the remaining library over HEK 293 cells expressing the target, the α1β glycine receptor. Peptides were identified that act with selectivity on α1β and α3β, compared to α2β, glycine receptors. In addition, peptide activity at the glycine receptor decreased when zinc was chelated by tricine, similar to previous observations of a decrease in ethanol's enhancing actions at the receptor in the absence of zinc. Comparisons of the amino acid sequences of heptapeptides capable of potentiating glycine receptor function revealed several consensus sequences that may be predictive of a peptide's enhancing ability. PMID:27038522

  6. Amino acid transport across the tonoplast of vacuoles isolated from barley mesophyll protoplasts: Uptake of alanine, leucine, and glutamine. [Hordeum vulgare L

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, K.J.; Jaeger, R.; Kaiser, G.; Martinoia, E. )

    1990-01-01

    Mesophyll protoplasts from leaves of well-fertilized barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) plants contained amino acids at concentrations as high as 120 millimoles per liter. With the exception of glutamic acid, which is predominantly localized in the cytoplasm, a major part of all other amino acids was contained inside the large central vacuole. Alanine, leucine, and glutamine are the dominant vacuolar amino acids in barley. Their transport into isolated vacuoles was studied using {sup 14}C-labeled amino acids. Uptake was slow in the absence of ATP. A three- to sixfold stimulation of uptake was observed after addition of ATP or adenylyl imidodiphosphate an ATP analogue not being hydrolyzed by ATPases. Other nucleotides were ineffective in increasing the rate of uptake. ATP-Stimulated amino acid transport was not dependent on the transtonoplast pH or membrane potential. p-Chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid and n-ethyl maleimide increased transport independently of ATP. Neutral amino acids such as valine or leucine effectively decreased the rate of alanine transport. Glutamine and glycine were less effective or not effective as competitive inhibitors of alanine transport. The results indicate the existence of a uniport translocator specific for neutral or basic amino acids that is under control of metabolic effectors.

  7. Protein lysine acetylation in bacteria: Current state of the art.

    PubMed

    Ouidir, Tassadit; Kentache, Takfarinas; Hardouin, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of proteins are key events in cellular metabolism and physiology regulation. Lysine acetylation is one of the best studied protein modifications in eukaryotes, but, until recently, ignored in bacteria. However, proteomic advances have highlighted the diversity of bacterial lysine-acetylated proteins. The current data support the implication of lysine acetylation in various metabolic pathways, adaptation and virulence. In this review, we present a broad overview of the current knowledge of lysine acetylation in bacteria. We emphasize particularly the significant contribution of proteomics in this field. PMID:26390373

  8. Global analysis of lysine acetylation in strawberry leaves

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xianping; Chen, Wenyue; Zhao, Yun; Ruan, Songlin; Zhang, Hengmu; Yan, Chengqi; Jin, Liang; Cao, Lingling; Zhu, Jun; Ma, Huasheng; Cheng, Zhongyi

    2015-01-01

    Protein lysine acetylation is a reversible and dynamic post-translational modification. It plays an important role in regulating diverse cellular processes including chromatin dynamic, metabolic pathways, and transcription in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Although studies of lysine acetylome in plants have been reported, the throughput was not high enough, hindering the deep understanding of lysine acetylation in plant physiology and pathology. In this study, taking advantages of anti-acetyllysine-based enrichment and high-sensitive-mass spectrometer, we applied an integrated proteomic approach to comprehensively investigate lysine acetylome in strawberry. In total, we identified 1392 acetylation sites in 684 proteins, representing the largest dataset of acetylome in plants to date. To reveal the functional impacts of lysine acetylation in strawberry, intensive bioinformatic analysis was performed. The results significantly expanded our current understanding of plant acetylome and demonstrated that lysine acetylation is involved in multiple cellular metabolism and cellular processes. More interestingly, nearly 50% of all acetylated proteins identified in this work were localized in chloroplast and the vital role of lysine acetylation in photosynthesis was also revealed. Taken together, this study not only established the most extensive lysine acetylome in plants to date, but also systematically suggests the significant and unique roles of lysine acetylation in plants. PMID:26442052

  9. Morphosynthesis of alanine mesocrystals by pH control.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yurong; Cölfen, Helmut; Antonietti, Markus

    2006-06-01

    Crystallization of DL-alanine is studied as a single polymorph model case to analyze the different modes of crystallization of polar organic molecules in absence of any structure directing additives. Depending on supersaturation, which is controlled either by temperature or by pH, and in the absence of additives, crystallization by mesoscale assembly of nanoparticles is found over a wide range of conditions, leading to so-called mesocrystals. This supplements the classical molecule-based crystallization mechanism, which is identified at lower supersaturations and at pH values away from the isoelectric point (IEP). The resulting alanine crystals are characterized by SEM, XRD, and single-crystal analysis. Time-resolved conductivity measurements and dynamic light scattering of the reaction solutions reveal information about precursor structures and reaction kinetics. A formation mechanism is proposed for the alanine mesocrystals. PMID:16771332

  10. First-principles studies of pure and fluorine substituted alanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Sardar; Vaizie, Hamide; Rahnamaye Aliabad, H. A.; Ahmad, Rashid; Khan, Imad; Ali, Zahid; Jalali-Asadabadi, S.; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Khan, Amir Abdullah

    2016-05-01

    This paper communicates the structural, electronic and optical properties of L-alanine, monofluoro and difluoro substituted alanines using density functional calculations. These compounds exist in orthorhombic crystal structure and the calculated structural parameters such as lattice constants, bond angles and bond lengths are in agreement with the experimental results. L-alanine is an indirect band gap insulator, while its fluorine substituted compounds (monofluoroalanine and difluoroalanine) are direct band gap insulators. The substitution causes reduction in the band gap and hence these optically tailored direct wide band gap materials have enhanced optical properties in the ultraviolet (UV) region of electromagnetic spectrum. Therefore, optical properties like dielectric function, refractive index, reflectivity and energy loss function are also investigated. These compounds have almost isotropic nature in the lower frequency range while at higher energies, they have a significant anisotropic nature.

  11. Enzymatic production of 5-aminovalerate from l-lysine using l-lysine monooxygenase and 5-aminovaleramide amidohydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pan; Zhang, Haiwei; Lv, Min; Hu, Mandong; Li, Zhong; Gao, Chao; Xu, Ping; Ma, Cuiqing

    2014-01-01

    5-Aminovalerate is a potential C5 platform chemical for synthesis of valerolactam, 5-hydroxyvalerate, glutarate, and 1,5-pentanediol. It is a metabolite of l-lysine catabolism through the aminovalerate pathway in Pseudomonas putida. l-Lysine monooxygenase (DavB) and 5-aminovaleramide amidohydrolase (DavA) play key roles in the biotransformation of l-lysine into 5-aminovalerate. Here, DavB and DavA of P. putida KT2440 were expressed, purified, and coupled for the production of 5-aminovalerate from l-lysine. Under optimal conditions, 20.8 g/L 5-aminovalerate was produced from 30 g/L l-lysine in 12 h. Because l-lysine is an industrial fermentation product, the two-enzyme coupled system presents a promising alternative for the production of 5-aminovalerate. PMID:25012259

  12. Linear free energy relationship rate constants and basicities of N-substituted phenyl glycines in positronium-glycine complex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rongti; Liang, Jiachang; Du, Youming; Cao, Chun; Yin, Dinzhen; Wang, Shuying; Zhang, Tianbao

    1987-06-01

    Complex formation between positronium and glycine derivatives in solution is discussed and the complex reaction rate constants obtained by means of a positron annihilation lifetime spectrometer with BaF 2 detectors. Rate constants mainly depend on the conjugation effect at the benzene ring and the induction effect of the substituents at the phenyl. There is a linear free energy relationship between rate constants and basicities of N-substituted phenyl glycines in orthopositronium-glycine complex formation.

  13. PlyC: A multimeric bacteriophage lysin

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Daniel; Schuch, Raymond; Chahales, Peter; Zhu, Shiwei; Fischetti, Vincent A.

    2006-01-01

    Lysins are murein hydrolases produced by bacteriophage that act on the bacterial host cell wall to release progeny phage. When added extrinsically in their purified form, these enzymes produce total lysis of susceptible Gram-positive bacteria within seconds, suggesting a unique antimicrobial strategy. All known Gram-positive lysins are produced as a single polypeptide containing a catalytic activity domain, which cleaves one of the four major peptidoglycan bonds, and a cell-wall-binding domain, which may bind a species-specific carbohydrate epitope in the cell wall. Here, we have cloned and expressed a unique lysin from the streptococcal bacteriophage C1, termed PlyC. Molecular characterization of the plyC operon reveals that PlyC is, surprisingly, composed of two separate gene products, PlyCA and PlyCB. Based on biochemical and biophysical studies, the catalytically active PlyC holoenzyme is composed of eight PlyCB subunits for each PlyCA. Inhibitor studies predicted the presence of an active-site cysteine, and bioinformatic analysis revealed a cysteine, histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase domain within PlyCA. Point mutagenesis confirmed that PlyCA is responsible for the observed catalytic activity, and Cys-333 and His-420 are the active-site residues. PlyCB was found to self-assemble into an octamer, and this complex alone was able to direct streptococcal cell-wall-specific binding. Similar to no other proteins in sequence databases, PlyC defines a previously uncharacterized structural family of cell-wall hydrolases. PMID:16818874

  14. Comprehensive profiling of lysine acetylproteome analysis reveals diverse functions of lysine acetylation in common wheat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yumei; Song, Limin; Liang, Wenxing; Mu, Ping; Wang, Shu; Lin, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation of proteins, a dynamic and reversible post-translational modification, plays a critical regulatory role in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Several researches have been carried out on acetylproteome in plants. However, until now, there have been no data on common wheat, the major cereal crop in the world. In this study, we performed a global acetylproteome analysis of common wheat variety (Triticum aestivum L.), Chinese Spring. In total, 416 lysine modification sites were identified on 277 proteins, which are involved in a wide variety of biological processes. Consistent with previous studies, a large proportion of the acetylated proteins are involved in metabolic process. Interestingly, according to the functional enrichment analysis, 26 acetylated proteins are involved in photosynthesis and Calvin cycle, suggesting an important role of lysine acetylation in these processes. Moreover, protein interaction network analysis reveals that diverse interactions are modulated by protein acetylation. These data represent the first report of acetylome in common wheat and serve as an important resource for exploring the physiological role of lysine acetylation in this organism and likely in all plants. PMID:26875666

  15. Bacteriophage phi11 lysin: physicochemical characterization and comparison with phage phi80a lysin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phage lytic enzymes are promising antimicrobial agents. Lysins of phage phi11 (LysPhi11) and phi80a (LysPhi80a) can lyse (destroy) biofilms and cells of antibiotic-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus. Stability of enzymes is one of the parameters making their practical use possible. The obj...

  16. Comprehensive profiling of lysine acetylproteome analysis reveals diverse functions of lysine acetylation in common wheat

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yumei; Song, Limin; Liang, Wenxing; Mu, Ping; Wang, Shu; Lin, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation of proteins, a dynamic and reversible post-translational modification, plays a critical regulatory role in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Several researches have been carried out on acetylproteome in plants. However, until now, there have been no data on common wheat, the major cereal crop in the world. In this study, we performed a global acetylproteome analysis of common wheat variety (Triticum aestivum L.), Chinese Spring. In total, 416 lysine modification sites were identified on 277 proteins, which are involved in a wide variety of biological processes. Consistent with previous studies, a large proportion of the acetylated proteins are involved in metabolic process. Interestingly, according to the functional enrichment analysis, 26 acetylated proteins are involved in photosynthesis and Calvin cycle, suggesting an important role of lysine acetylation in these processes. Moreover, protein interaction network analysis reveals that diverse interactions are modulated by protein acetylation. These data represent the first report of acetylome in common wheat and serve as an important resource for exploring the physiological role of lysine acetylation in this organism and likely in all plants. PMID:26875666

  17. Atomic Layer Deposition of L-Alanine Polypeptide

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fu, Yaqin; Li, Binsong; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Dunphy, Darren R.; Tsai, Andy; Tam, Siu-Yue; Fan, Hongyou Y.; Zhang, Hongxia; Rogers, David; Rempe, Susan; et al

    2014-10-30

    L-Alanine polypeptide thin films were synthesized via atomic layer deposition (ALD). Rather, instead of using an amino acid monomer as the precursor, an L-alanine amino acid derivatized with a protecting group was used to prevent self-polymerization, increase the vapor pressure, and allow linear cycle-by-cycle growth emblematic of ALD. Moreover, the successful deposition of a conformal polypeptide film has been confirmed by FTIR, TEM, and Mass Spectrometry, and the ALD process has been extended to polyvaline.

  18. Stereoselective aminoacylation of a dinucleoside monophosphate by the imidazolides of DL-alanine and N-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)-DL-alanine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Profy, A. T.; Usher, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The aminoacylation of diinosine monophosphate was studied experimentally. When the acylating agent was the imidazolide of N-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)-DL-alanine, a 40 percent enantiomeric excess of the isomer was incorporated at the 2' site and the positions of equilibrium for the reversible 2'-3' migration reaction differed for the D and L enantiomers. The reactivity of the nucleoside hydroxyl groups was found to decrease on the order 2'(3') less than internal 2' and less than 5', and the extent of the reaction was affected by the concentration of the imidazole buffer. Reaction of IpI with imidazolide of unprotected DL-alanine, by contrast, led to an excess of the D isomer at the internal 2' site. Finally, reaction with the N-carboxy anhydride of DL-alanine occurred without stereoselection. These results are found to be relevant to the study of the evolution of optical chemical activity and the origin of genetically directed protein synthesis.

  19. Enhancement of lysine acetylation accelerates wound repair

    PubMed Central

    Spallotta, Francesco; Cencioni, Chiara; Straino, Stefania; Sbardella, Gianluca; Castellano, Sabrina; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Martelli, Fabio; Gaetano, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    In physiopathological conditions, such as diabetes, wound healing is significantly compromised and chronic complications, including ulcers, may occur. In a mouse model of skin repair, we recently reported that wound treatment with Sirtuin activators and class I HDAC inhibitors induced keratinocyte proliferation and enhanced healing via a nitric oxide (NO) dependent mechanism. We observed an increase in total protein acetylation in the wound area, as determined by acetylation of α-tubulin and histone H3 Lysine 9. We reasoned that this process activated cell function as well as regulated gene expression to foster tissue repair. We report here that the direct activation of P300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF) by the histone acetylase activator pentadecylidenemalonate 1b (SPV-106) induced Lysine acetylation in the wound area. This intervention was sufficient to enhance repair process by a NO-independent mechanism. Hence, an impairment of PCAF and/or other GCN5 family acetylases may delay skin repair in physiopathological conditions. PMID:24265859

  20. Activation of presynaptic glycine receptors facilitates glycine release from presynaptic terminals synapsing onto rat spinal sacral dorsal commissural nucleus neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hyo-Jin; Jang, Il-Sung; Moorhouse, Andrew J; Akaike, Norio

    2003-01-01

    Glycine is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the spinal cord and brainstem. Here we report the novel finding that presynaptic glycine autoreceptors modulate release from terminals synapsing onto rat spinal sacral dorsal commissural nucleus (SDCN) neurons. In mechanically dissociated SDCN neurons, in which functional presynaptic nerve terminals remain adherent to the isolated neurons, exogenously applied glycine (3 μM) increased the frequency of glycinergic spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) without affecting their amplitudes or decay times. This suggests that glycine acts presynaptically to increase glycine release probability. Picrotoxin, at a concentration that had little direct effect on sIPSC frequency and amplitude (30 μM), significantly attenuated glycine-induced presynaptic sIPSC facilitation. The glycine-induced sIPSC frequency facilitation was completely abolished either in a Ca2+-free external solution or in the presence of 100 μM Cd2+, suggesting the involvement of extracellular Ca2+ influx into the nerve terminals. The glycine action was also completely occluded in the presence of 300 nM tetrodotoxin. In recordings from SDCN neurons in spinal cord slices, glycine (10 μM) increased evoked IPSC (eIPSC) amplitude and decreased the extent of paired-pulse facilitation. In response to brief high frequency stimulus trains the eIPSCs displayed a profound frequency-dependent facilitation that was greatly reduced by picrotoxin (30 μM). These results indicate that glycine acts at presynaptic autoreceptors, causing depolarization of the glycinergic nerve terminals, the subsequent activation of voltage-dependent Na+ and Ca2+ channels, and facilitation of glycine release. Furthermore, this presynaptic facilitation was observed under more physiological conditions, suggesting that these glycinergic autoreceptors may contribute to the integration of local inhibitory inputs to SDCN neurons. PMID:12754315

  1. New soybean accessions identified with resistance to Heterodera glycines populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean Cyst Nematode (SCN, Heterodera glycines Ichinohe) is a serious root-parasite of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], in USA and worldwide. Annual yield losses in USA are estimated to be nearly $1 billion. These losses have remained stable at current levels with the use of resistant cultivars bu...

  2. New soybean accessions evaluated for reaction to Heterodera glycines populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean Cyst Nematode (SCN, Heterodera glycines Ichinohe) is a serious pest of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] in the USA and worldwide. Annual yield losses in the USA are estimated to be over $1 billion. These losses have remained stable with the use of resistant cultivars but over time nematode...

  3. Glycine betaine as a direct substrate for methanogens (Methanococcoides spp.).

    PubMed

    Watkins, Andrew J; Roussel, Erwan G; Parkes, R John; Sass, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Nine marine methanogenic Methanococcoides strains, including the type strains of Methanococcoides methylutens, M. burtonii, and M. alaskense, were tested for the utilization of N-methylated glycines. Three strains (NM1, PM2, and MKM1) used glycine betaine (N,N,N-trimethylglycine) as a substrate for methanogenesis, partially demethylating it to N,N-dimethylglycine, whereas none of the strains used N,N-dimethylglycine or sarcosine (N-methylglycine). Growth rates and growth yields per mole of substrate with glycine betaine (3.96 g [dry weight] per mol) were similar to those with trimethylamine (4.11 g [dry weight] per mol). However, as glycine betaine is only partially demethylated, the yield per methyl group was significantly higher than with trimethylamine. If glycine betaine and trimethylamine are provided together, trimethylamine is demethylated to dimethyl- and methylamine with limited glycine betaine utilization. After trimethylamine is depleted, dimethylamine and glycine betaine are consumed rapidly, before methylamine. Glycine betaine extends the range of substrates that can be directly utilized by some methanogens, allowing them to gain energy from the substrate without the need for syntrophic partners. PMID:24162571

  4. Glycine receptor mechanism elucidated by electron cryo-microscopy.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Lü, Wei; Wu, Shenping; Cheng, Yifan; Gouaux, Eric

    2015-10-01

    The strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor (GlyR) mediates inhibitory synaptic transmission in the spinal cord and brainstem and is linked to neurological disorders, including autism and hyperekplexia. Understanding of molecular mechanisms and pharmacology of glycine receptors has been hindered by a lack of high-resolution structures. Here we report electron cryo-microscopy structures of the zebrafish α1 GlyR with strychnine, glycine, or glycine and ivermectin (glycine/ivermectin). Strychnine arrests the receptor in an antagonist-bound closed ion channel state, glycine stabilizes the receptor in an agonist-bound open channel state, and the glycine/ivermectin complex adopts a potentially desensitized or partially open state. Relative to the glycine-bound state, strychnine expands the agonist-binding pocket via outward movement of the C loop, promotes rearrangement of the extracellular and transmembrane domain 'wrist' interface, and leads to rotation of the transmembrane domain towards the pore axis, occluding the ion conduction pathway. These structures illuminate the GlyR mechanism and define a rubric to interpret structures of Cys-loop receptors. PMID:26344198

  5. 21 CFR 520.550 - Glucose/glycine/electrolyte.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glucose/glycine/electrolyte. 520.550 Section 520.550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.550 Glucose/glycine/electrolyte. (a) Specifications. The product...

  6. Glycine transporter2 inhibitors: Getting the balance right.

    PubMed

    Vandenberg, Robert J; Mostyn, Shannon N; Carland, Jane E; Ryan, Renae M

    2016-09-01

    Neurotransmitter transporters are targets for a wide range of therapeutically useful drugs. This is because they have the capacity to selectively manipulate the dynamics of neurotransmitter concentrations and thereby enhance or diminish signalling through particular brain pathways. High affinity glycine transporters (GlyTs) regulate extracellular concentrations of glycine and provide novel therapeutic targets for neurological disorders. PMID:26723543

  7. NECTAR COMPOSITION OF WILD PERENNIAL GLYCINE (SOYBEAN) SPECIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Glycine contains the cultivated annual soybean G. max, the wild annual, G. soja, and about 21 wild perennial Glycine species. The perennials are largely indigenous to Australia, but are found in Papua New Guinea, Timor, Philippines, Japan and Taiwan. Outcrossing rates in the cultivated s...

  8. Population genetic structure of the soybean aphid, Aphis glycines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) is an invasive pest of cultivated soybean [Glycine max (L.)] in North America. After the initial invasion in 2000, the aphid has quickly spread across most of the U.S. and Canada, suggesting large scale dispersals and rapid adaptations to new environment...

  9. Glycine Betaine as a Direct Substrate for Methanogens (Methanococcoides spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Andrew J.; Roussel, Erwan G.; Parkes, R. John

    2014-01-01

    Nine marine methanogenic Methanococcoides strains, including the type strains of Methanococcoides methylutens, M. burtonii, and M. alaskense, were tested for the utilization of N-methylated glycines. Three strains (NM1, PM2, and MKM1) used glycine betaine (N,N,N-trimethylglycine) as a substrate for methanogenesis, partially demethylating it to N,N-dimethylglycine, whereas none of the strains used N,N-dimethylglycine or sarcosine (N-methylglycine). Growth rates and growth yields per mole of substrate with glycine betaine (3.96 g [dry weight] per mol) were similar to those with trimethylamine (4.11 g [dry weight] per mol). However, as glycine betaine is only partially demethylated, the yield per methyl group was significantly higher than with trimethylamine. If glycine betaine and trimethylamine are provided together, trimethylamine is demethylated to dimethyl- and methylamine with limited glycine betaine utilization. After trimethylamine is depleted, dimethylamine and glycine betaine are consumed rapidly, before methylamine. Glycine betaine extends the range of substrates that can be directly utilized by some methanogens, allowing them to gain energy from the substrate without the need for syntrophic partners. PMID:24162571

  10. Respiration of [14C]alanine by the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus.

    PubMed

    Chalot, M; Brun, A; Finlay, R D; Söderström, B

    1994-08-01

    The ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus efficiently took up exogenously supplied [14C]alanine and rapidly converted it to pyruvate, citrate, succinate, fumarate and to CO2, thus providing direct evidence for the utilisation of alanine as a respiratory substrate. [14C]alanine was further actively metabolised to glutamate, glutamine and aspartate. Exposure to aminooxyacetate completely suppressed 14CO2 evolution and greatly reduced the flow of carbon from [14C]alanine to tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates and amino acids, suggesting that alanine aminotransferase plays a pivotal role in alanine metabolism in Paxillus involutus. PMID:8082830

  11. Spectrophotometric readout for an alanine dosimeter for food irradiation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebraheem, S.; Beshir, W. B.; Eid, S.; Sobhy, R.; Kovács, A.

    2003-06-01

    The alanine-electron spin resonance (EPR) readout system is well known as a reference and transfer dosimetry system for the evaluation of high doses in radiation processing. The high cost of an EPR/alanine dosimetry system is a serious handicap for large-scale routine application in irradiation facilities. In this study, the use of a complex produced by dissolving irradiated L-alanine in 1,4-phenyl diammonium dichloride solution was investigated for dosimetry purposes. This complex—having a purple colour—has an increasing absorbance with increasing dose in the range of 1-20 kGy. The applicability of spectrophotometric evaluation was studied by measuring the absorbance intensity of this complex at 360 and 505 nm, respectively. Fluorimetric evaluation was also investigated by measuring the emission of the complex at 435 nm as a function of dose. The present method is easy for routine application. The effect of the dye concentration as well as the suitable amount of irradiated alanine has been studied. With respect to routine application, the stability of the product complex after its formation was also investigated.

  12. Formation of {gamma}-alumina nanorods in presence of alanine

    SciTech Connect

    Dabbagh, Hossein A.; Rasti, Elham; Yalfani, Mohammad S.; Medina, Francesc

    2011-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Nanorod aluminas with a possible hexagonal symmetry, high surface area and relatively narrow pore size distribution were obtained. Research highlights: {yields} Research highlights {yields} Boehmite was prepared using a green sol-gel process in the presence of alanine. {yields} Nanorod aluminas with a high surface area were obtained. {yields} Addition of alanine would shape the size of the holes and crevices. {yields} The morphologies of the nanorods were revealed by transmission electron microscope. -- Abstract: Boehmite and alumina nanostructures were prepared using a simple green sol-gel process in the presence of alanine in water medium at room temperature. The uncalcined (dried at 200 {sup o}C) and the calcined materials (at 500, 600 and 700 {sup o}C for 4 h) were characterized using XRD, TEM, SEM, N{sub 2} physisorption and TGA. Nanorod aluminas with a possible hexagonal symmetry, high surface area and relatively narrow pore size distribution were obtained. The surface area was enhanced and crystallization was retarded as the alanine content increased. The morphologies of the nanoparticles and nanorods were revealed by a transmission electron microscope (TEM).

  13. Molecular cloning and characterization of chicken NK lysin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NK lysin is an anti microbial and anti tumor protein expressed by NK cells and T lymphocytes. In a previous report, we identified a set of overlapping expressed sequence tags constituting a contiguous sequence (contig 171) homologous to mammalian NK lysins. In the current report, a cDNA encoding N...

  14. Lysine carboxylation: unveiling a spontaneous post-translational modification

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Morales, David; Adamian, Larisa; Shi, Dashuang; Liang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    A computational method for the prediction of lysine carboxylation (KCX) in protein structures is described. The method accurately identifies misreported KCXs and predicts previously unknown KCX sites. The carboxylation of lysine residues is a post-translational modification (PTM) that plays a critical role in the catalytic mechanisms of several important enzymes. It occurs spontaneously under certain physicochemical conditions, but is difficult to detect experimentally. Its full impact is unknown. In this work, the signature microenvironment of lysine-carboxylation sites has been characterized. In addition, a computational method called Predictor of Lysine Carboxylation (PreLysCar) for the detection of lysine carboxylation in proteins with available three-dimensional structures has been developed. The likely prevalence of lysine carboxylation in the proteome was assessed through large-scale computations. The results suggest that about 1.3% of large proteins may contain a carboxylated lysine residue. This unexpected prevalence of lysine carboxylation implies an enrichment of reactions in which it may play functional roles. The results also suggest that by switching enzymes on and off under appropriate physicochemical conditions spontaneous PTMs may serve as an important and widely used efficient biological machinery for regulation.

  15. 40 CFR 721.10250 - Zirconium lysine complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Zirconium lysine complex (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10250 Zirconium lysine complex (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10250 - Zirconium lysine complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Zirconium lysine complex (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10250 Zirconium lysine complex (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10250 - Zirconium lysine complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Zirconium lysine complex (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10250 Zirconium lysine complex (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as...

  18. Cytochrome c catalyzes the in vitro synthesis of arachidonoyl glycine

    SciTech Connect

    McCue, Jeffrey M.; Driscoll, William J.; Mueller, Gregory P.

    2008-01-11

    Long chain fatty acyl glycines are an emerging class of biologically active molecules that occur naturally and produce a wide array of physiological effects. Their biosynthetic pathway, however, remains unknown. Here we report that cytochrome c catalyzes the synthesis of N-arachidonoyl glycine (NAGly) from arachidonoyl coenzyme A and glycine in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The identity of the NAGly product was verified by isotope labeling and mass analysis. Other heme-containing proteins, hemoglobin and myoglobin, were considerably less effective in generating arachidonoyl glycine as compared to cytochrome c. The reaction catalyzed by cytochrome c in vitro points to its potential role in the formation of NAGly and other long chain fatty acyl glycines in vivo.

  19. Nitrate and amino acid availability affects glycine betaine and mycosporine-2-glycine in response to changes of salinity in a halotolerant cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica.

    PubMed

    Waditee-Sirisattha, Rungaroon; Kageyama, Hakuto; Fukaya, Minoru; Rai, Vandna; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2015-12-01

    A halotolerant cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica thrives in extreme salinity with accumulation of a potent osmoprotectant glycine betaine. Recently, this cyanobacterium was shown to accumulate sunscreen molecule mycosporine-2-glycine significantly at high salinity. In this study, we investigated effects of nitrate and amino acid provision on the accumulation of glycine betaine and mycosporine-2-glycine. With elevated nitrate concentrations at high salinity, intracellular levels of both metabolites were enhanced. Six-fold high nitrate concentration increased the relative amounts of glycine betaine and mycosporine-2-glycine to be 1.5 and 2.0 folds compared with control condition : Increased levels were time- and dose-dependent manner. Exogenous supply of glycine/serine at high salinity resulted in the similar trends as observed in excess nitrate experiment. Intracellular level of glycine betaine increased ∼1.6 folds with glycine/serine supplementation. These supplementations also caused the increased level of mycosporine-2-glycine, namely 1.4 and 2 folds by glycine and serine, respectively. The transcription of glycine betaine and mycosporine-2-glycine biosynthetic genes was strongly induced under high-nitrate-salt condition. These results suggest the dependence of glycine betaine and mycosporine-2-glycine productions on substrate availability, and the effect of nitrate was possibly associated with stimulation of osmoprotectant increment in this extremophile. PMID:26474598

  20. Effect of protein restriction on (15)N transfer from dietary [(15)N]alanine and [(15)N]Spirulina platensis into urea.

    PubMed

    Hamadeh, M J; Hoffer, L J

    2001-08-01

    Six normal men consumed a mixed test meal while adapted to high (1.5 g. kg(-1) x day(-1)) and low (0.3 g. kg(-1) x day(-1)) protein intakes. They completed this protocol twice: when the test meals included 3 mg/kg of [(15)N]alanine ([(15)N]Ala) and when they included 30 mg/kg of intrinsically labeled [(15)N]Spirulina platensis ([(15)N]SPI). Six subjects with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) receiving conventional insulin therapy consumed the test meal with added [(15)N]Ala while adapted to their customary high-protein diet. Protein restriction increased serum alanine, glycine, glutamine, and methionine concentrations and reduced those of leucine. Whether the previous diet was high or low in protein, there was a similar increase in serum alanine, methionine, and branched-chain amino acid concentrations after the test meal and a similar pattern of (15)N enrichment in serum amino acids for a given tracer. When [(15)N]Ala was included in the test meal, (15)N appeared rapidly in serum alanine and glutamine, to a minor degree in leucine and isoleucine, and not at all in other circulating amino acids. With [(15)N]SPI, there was a slow appearance of the label in all serum amino acids analyzed. Despite the different serum amino acid labeling, protein restriction reduced the postmeal transfer of dietary (15)N in [(15)N]Ala or [(15)N]SPI into [(15)N]urea by similar amounts (38 and 43%, respectively, not significant). The response of the subjects with IDDM was similar to that of the normal subjects. Information about adaptive reductions in dietary amino acid catabolism obtained by adding [(15)N]Ala to a test meal appears to be equivalent to that obtained using an intrinsically labeled protein tracer. PMID:11440912

  1. Quantification of Nε-(2-Furoylmethyl)-L-lysine (furosine), Nε-(Carboxymethyl)-L-lysine (CML), Nε-(Carboxyethyl)-L-lysine (CEL) and total lysine through stable isotope dilution assay and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Troise, Antonio Dario; Fiore, Alberto; Wiltafsky, Markus; Fogliano, Vincenzo

    2015-12-01

    The control of Maillard reaction (MR) is a key point to ensure processed foods quality. Due to the presence of a primary amino group on its side chain, lysine is particularly prone to chemical modifications with the formation of Amadori products (AP), Nε-(Carboxymethyl)-L-lysine (CML), Nε-(Carboxyethyl)-L-lysine (CEL). A new analytical strategy was proposed which allowed to simultaneously quantify lysine, CML, CEL and the Nε-(2-Furoylmethyl)-L-lysine (furosine), the indirect marker of AP. The procedure is based on stable isotope dilution assay followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. It showed high sensitivity and good reproducibility and repeatability in different foods. The limit of detection and the RSD% were lower than 5 ppb and below 8%, respectively. Results obtained with the new procedure not only improved the knowledge about the reliability of thermal treatment markers, but also defined new insights in the relationship between Maillard reaction products and their precursors. PMID:26041204

  2. Histone Lysine Methylation Dynamics: Establishment, Regulation, and Biological Impact

    PubMed Central

    Black, Joshua C.; Van Rechem, Capucine; Whetstine, Johnathan R.

    2013-01-01

    Histone lysine methylation has emerged as a critical player in the regulation of gene expression, cell cycle, genome stability, and nuclear architecture. Over the past decade, a tremendous amount of progress has led to the characterization of methyl modifications and the lysine methyltransferases (KMTs) and lysine demethylases (KDMs) that regulate them. Here, we review the discovery and characterization of the KMTs and KDMs and the methyl modifications they regulate. We discuss the localization of the KMTs and KDMs as well as the distribution of lysine methylation throughout the genome. We highlight how these data have shaped our view of lysine methylation as a key determinant of complex chromatin states. Finally, we discuss the regulation of KMTs and KDMs by proteasomal degradation, posttranscriptional mechanisms, and metabolic status. We propose key questions for the field and highlight areas that we predict will yield exciting discoveries in the years to come. PMID:23200123

  3. Lysine catabolism in Rhizoctonia leguminicola and related fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Guengerich, F P; Broquist, H P

    1976-01-01

    The catabolism of lysine was studied in several yeasts and fungi. Results with cell-free extracts of Rhizoctonia leguminicola support a proposed pathway involving (D- and L-) EPSILON-N-acetyllysine, alpha-keto-epsilon-acetamidohexanoic acid, delta-acetamidovaleric acid, and delta-aminovaleric acid in the conversion of L-lysine to shortchain organic acids. Label from radioactive L-lysine was found to accumulate in D- and L-epsilon-N-acetyllysine, delta-acetamidovaleric acid, delta-aminovaleric acid, and glutaric acid in cultures of R. leguminicola, Neurospora crassa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Hansenula saturnus, suggesting that the proposed omega-acetyl pathway of lysine catabolism is generalized among yeasts and fungi. In N. crassa, as is the case in R. leguminicola, the major precursor of L-pipecolic acid was the L-isomer of lysine; 15N experiments were consistent with delta1-piperideine-2-carboxylic acid as an intermediate in the transformation. PMID:131119

  4. Role of several histone lysine methyltransferases in tumor development

    PubMed Central

    LI, JIFU; ZHU, SHUNQIN; KE, XIAO-XUE; CUI, HONGJUAN

    2016-01-01

    The field of cancer epigenetics has been evolving rapidly in recent decades. Epigenetic mechanisms include DNA methylation, histone modifications and microRNAs. Histone modifications are important markers of function and chromatin state. Aberrant histone methylation frequently occurs in tumor development and progression. Multiple studies have identified that histone lysine methyltransferases regulate gene transcription through the methylation of histone, which affects cell proliferation and differentiation, cell migration and invasion, and other biological characteristics. Histones have variant lysine sites for different levels of methylation, catalyzed by different lysine methyltransferases, which have numerous effects on human cancers. The present review focused on the most recent advances, described the key function sites of histone lysine methyltransferases, integrated significant quantities of data to introduce several compelling histone lysine methyltransferases in various types of human cancers, summarized their role in tumor development and discussed their potential mechanisms of action. PMID:26998265

  5. Beta-alanine supplementation in high-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Harris, Roger C; Sale, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Glycolysis involves the oxidation of two neutral hydroxyl groups on each glycosyl (or glucosyl) unit metabolised, yielding two carboxylic acid groups. During low-intensity exercise these, along with the remainder of the carbon skeleton, are further oxidised to CO(2) and water. But during high-intensity exercise a major portion (and where blood flow is impaired, then most) is accumulated as lactate anions and H(+). The accumulation of H(+) has deleterious effects on muscle function, ultimately impairing force production and contributing to fatigue. Regulation of intracellular pH is achieved over time by export of H(+) out of the muscle, although physicochemical buffers in the muscle provide the first line of defence against H(+) accumulation. In order to be effective during high-intensity exercise, buffers need to be present in high concentrations in muscle and have pK(a)s within the intracellular exercise pH transit range. Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is ideal for this role given that it occurs in millimolar concentrations within the skeletal muscle and has a pK(a) of 6.83. Carnosine is a cytoplasmic dipeptide formed by bonding histidine and β-alanine in a reaction catalysed by carnosine synthase, although it is the availability of β-alanine, obtained in small amounts from hepatic synthesis and potentially in greater amounts from the diet that is limiting to synthesis. Increasing muscle carnosine through increased dietary intake of β-alanine will increase the intracellular buffering capacity, which in turn might be expected to increase high-intensity exercise capacity and performance where this is pH limited. In this study we review the role of muscle carnosine as an H(+) buffer, the regulation of muscle carnosine by β-alanine, and the available evidence relating to the effects of β-alanine supplementation on muscle carnosine synthesis and the subsequent effects of this on high-intensity exercise capacity and performance. PMID:23075550

  6. The unresolved puzzle why alanine extensions cause disease.

    PubMed

    Winter, Reno; Liebold, Jens; Schwarz, Elisabeth

    2013-08-01

    The prospective increase in life expectancy will be accompanied by a rise in the number of elderly people who suffer from ill health caused by old age. Many diseases caused by aging are protein misfolding diseases. The molecular mechanisms underlying these disorders receive constant scientific interest. In addition to old age, mutations also cause congenital protein misfolding disorders. Chorea Huntington, one of the most well-known examples, is caused by triplet extensions that can lead to more than 100 glutamines in the N-terminal region of huntingtin, accompanied by huntingtin aggregation. So far, nine disease-associated triplet extensions have also been described for alanine codons. The extensions lead primarily to skeletal malformations. Eight of these proteins represent transcription factors, while the nuclear poly-adenylate binding protein 1, PABPN1, is an RNA binding protein. Additional alanines in PABPN1 lead to the disease oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). The alanine extension affects the N-terminal domain of the protein, which has been shown to lack tertiary contacts. Biochemical analyses of the N-terminal domain revealed an alanine-dependent fibril formation. However, fibril formation of full-length protein did not recapitulate the findings of the N-terminal domain. Fibril formation of intact PABPN1 was independent of the alanine segment, and the fibrils displayed biochemical properties that were completely different from those of the N-terminal domain. Although intranuclear inclusions have been shown to represent the histochemical hallmark of OPMD, their role in pathogenesis is currently unclear. Several cell culture and animal models have been generated to study the molecular processes involved in OPMD. These studies revealed a number of promising future therapeutic strategies that could one day improve the quality of life for the patients. PMID:23612654

  7. Engineering new mycobacterial vaccine design for HIV–TB pediatric vaccine vectored by lysine auxotroph of BCG

    PubMed Central

    Saubi, Narcís; Gea-Mallorquí, Ester; Ferrer, Pau; Hurtado, Carmen; Sánchez-Úbeda, Sara; Eto, Yoshiki; Gatell, Josep M; Hanke, Tomáš; Joseph, Joan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we have engineered a new mycobacterial vaccine design by using an antibiotic-free plasmid selection system. We assembled a novel Escherichia coli (E. coli)–mycobacterial shuttle plasmid p2auxo.HIVA, expressing the HIV-1 clade A immunogen HIVA. This shuttle vector employs an antibiotic resistance-free mechanism for plasmid selection and maintenance based on glycine complementation in E. coli and lysine complementation in mycobacteria. This plasmid was first transformed into glycine auxotroph of E. coli strain and subsequently transformed into lysine auxotroph of Mycobacterium bovis BCG strain to generate vaccine BCG.HIVA2auxo. We demonstrated that the episomal plasmid p2auxo.HIVA was stable in vivo over a 7-week period and genetically and phenotypically characterized the BCG.HIVA2auxo vaccine strain. The BCG.HIVA2auxo vaccine in combination with modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA). HIVA was safe and induced HIV-1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific interferon-γ-producing T-cell responses in adult BALB/c mice. Polyfunctional HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells, which produce interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α and express the degranulation marker CD107a, were induced. Thus, we engineered a novel, safer, good laboratory practice–compatible BCG-vectored vaccine using prototype immunogen HIVA. This antibiotic-free plasmid selection system based on “double” auxotrophic complementation might be a new mycobacterial vaccine platform to develop not only recombinant BCG-based vaccines expressing second generation of HIV-1 immunogens but also other major pediatric pathogens to prime protective response soon after birth. PMID:26015961

  8. CE-LIF determination of salivary cadaverine and lysine concentration ratio as an indicator of lysine decarboxylase enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Tábi, Tamás; Lohinai, Zsolt; Pálfi, Melinda; Levine, Martin; Szöko, Eva

    2008-05-01

    Salivary bacteria produce the enzyme lysine decarboxylase which converts lysine to cadaverine. In the absence of appropriate oral hygiene, overgrowth of these bacteria depletes lysine. This may contribute to gingival inflammation, while cadaverine contributes to oral malodor. A selective and sensitive capillary electrophoresis method with laser-induced fluorescence detection has been developed for the determination of cadaverine and lysine in saliva, as an indicator of lysine decarboxylase enzyme activity. The diamino compounds were separated in acidic background electrolyte in their mono-labeled form after derivatization with 4-fluoro-7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD-F). Linearity and reproducibility of the method in the range 1-50 μmol L(-1) have been demonstrated using saliva samples. The method was applied for the measurement of cadaverine and lysine in the saliva of healthy volunteers with or without proper oral hygiene. In the absence of oral hygiene, the mol fraction of cadaverine to cadaverine plus lysine in saliva increased significantly (0.65 ± 0.13 vs. 0.39 ± 0.18, P < 0.001), indicating the presence of higher amount of bacterial lysine decarboxylase, that may contribute to periodontal diseases. PMID:18389226

  9. The HIV-1 Tat Protein Is Monomethylated at Lysine 71 by the Lysine Methyltransferase KMT7.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ibraheem; Ramage, Holly; Boehm, Daniela; Dirk, Lynnette M A; Sakane, Naoki; Hanada, Kazuki; Pagans, Sara; Kaehlcke, Katrin; Aull, Katherine; Weinberger, Leor; Trievel, Raymond; Schnoelzer, Martina; Kamada, Masafumi; Houtz, Robert; Ott, Melanie

    2016-07-29

    The HIV-1 transactivator protein Tat is a critical regulator of HIV transcription primarily enabling efficient elongation of viral transcripts. Its interactions with RNA and various host factors are regulated by ordered, transient post-translational modifications. Here, we report a novel Tat modification, monomethylation at lysine 71 (K71). We found that Lys-71 monomethylation (K71me) is catalyzed by KMT7, a methyltransferase that also targets lysine 51 (K51) in Tat. Using mass spectrometry, in vitro enzymology, and modification-specific antibodies, we found that KMT7 monomethylates both Lys-71 and Lys-51 in Tat. K71me is important for full Tat transactivation, as KMT7 knockdown impaired the transcriptional activity of wild type (WT) Tat but not a Tat K71R mutant. These findings underscore the role of KMT7 as an important monomethyltransferase regulating HIV transcription through Tat. PMID:27235396

  10. Chiral assemblies of nickel lysinate via the corrosive adsorption of (S)-lysine on Ni/Au{111}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, K. E.; Baddeley, C. J.

    2014-11-01

    The adsorption of (S)-lysine onto submonolayer coverages of Ni on Au{111} was investigated by scanning tunnelling microscopy and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy. Arrays of two-dimensional Ni nanoclusters were prepared on the Au{111} surface. The sticking probability of (S)-lysine was found to increase by an order of magnitude on Au surfaces templated by Ni compared to the clean Au surface. (S)-lysine corrodes Ni from the edges of clusters forming nickel lysinate complexes which self-assemble to form ordered molecular arrays. Below a threshold coverage, the Ni clusters are completely destroyed by (S)-lysine adsorption. Under these conditions, extensive restructuring of the Au steps is observed. The implications of our work for understanding the role of chiral modifiers in Ni catalysed enantioselective catalysis are discussed.

  11. Iron release is reduced by mutations of lysines 206 and 296 in recombinant N-terminal half-transferrin.

    PubMed

    Steinlein, L M; Ligman, C M; Kessler, S; Ikeda, R A

    1998-09-29

    Human serum transferrin consists of two iron-binding lobes connected by a short peptide linker. While the high homology and structural similarity between the two halves of the molecule would suggest similar characteristics, it has been shown that the pH-dependent rate of release of iron from the N-terminal lobe is quite different from that of its C-terminal counterpart. This suggests that the N-lobe of human serum transferrin has a specific, pH-dependent, molecular mechanism for releasing iron. Sacchettini and co-workers using structural information have hypothesized that two lysines in the N-terminal lobe of ovotransferrin create a dilysine interaction and suggest that this is the trigger for pH-dependent iron release. To investigate this hypothesis, we used a Pichia pastoris expression system to produce large amounts of wild-type nTf, the single point mutants, nTfK206A (Lys 206 to alanine) and nTfK296A (Lys 296 to alanine), and the double mutant, nTfK206/296A. The purified recombinant proteins were then used to measure rates of iron release to pyrophosphate. It was found that the rate of iron release from all three mutant proteins at pH 5.7 (the pH at which nTf would normally release iron) was too slow to measure. Only when the pH was reduced to 5.0 could the rates of iron release from the mutant proteins be reliably determined. Although this precludes a direct comparison to wild-type nTf (the rate of iron release from nTf at pH 5.0 is too fast to measure), it implicates lysines 206 and 296 in the pH-dependent release of iron from nTf. PMID:9753457

  12. Structure of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis D-Alanine:D-Alanine Ligase, a Target of the Antituberculosis Drug D-Cycloserine

    SciTech Connect

    Bruning, John B.; Murillo, Ana C.; Chacon, Ofelia; Barletta, Raúl G.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2011-09-28

    D-Alanine:D-alanine ligase (EC 6.3.2.4; Ddl) catalyzes the ATP-driven ligation of two D-alanine (D-Ala) molecules to form the D-alanyl:D-alanine dipeptide. This molecule is a key building block in peptidoglycan biosynthesis, making Ddl an attractive target for drug development. D-Cycloserine (DCS), an analog of D-Ala and a prototype Ddl inhibitor, has shown promise for the treatment of tuberculosis. Here, we report the crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ddl at a resolution of 2.1 {angstrom}. This structure indicates that Ddl is a dimer and consists of three discrete domains; the ligand binding cavity is at the intersection of all three domains and conjoined by several loop regions. The M. tuberculosis apo Ddl structure shows a novel conformation that has not yet been observed in Ddl enzymes from other species. The nucleotide and D-alanine binding pockets are flexible, requiring significant structural rearrangement of the bordering regions for entry and binding of both ATP and D-Ala molecules. Solution affinity and kinetic studies showed that DCS interacts with Ddl in a manner similar to that observed for D-Ala. Each ligand binds to two binding sites that have significant differences in affinity, with the first binding site exhibiting high affinity. DCS inhibits the enzyme, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC{sub 50}) of 0.37 mM under standard assay conditions, implicating a preferential and weak inhibition at the second, lower-affinity binding site. Moreover, DCS binding is tighter at higher ATP concentrations. The crystal structure illustrates potential drugable sites that may result in the development of more-effective Ddl inhibitors.

  13. Positive Modulation of the Glycine Receptor by Means of Glycine Receptor–Binding Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Aneiros, Eduardo; Blank, Michael; Mueller, Johan; Nyman, Eva; Blind, Michael; Dabrowski, Michael A.; Andersson, Christin V.; Sandberg, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    According to the gate control theory of pain, the glycine receptors (GlyRs) are putative targets for development of therapeutic analgesics. A possible approach for novel analgesics is to develop a positive modulator of the glycine-activated Cl− channels. Unfortunately, there has been limited success in developing drug-like small molecules to study the impact of agonists or positive modulators on GlyRs. Eight RNA aptamers with low nanomolar affinity to GlyRα1 were generated, and their pharmacological properties analyzed. Cytochemistry using fluorescein-labeled aptamers demonstrated GlyRα1-dependent binding to the plasma membrane but also intracellular binding. Using a fluorescent membrane potential assay, we could identify five aptamers to be positive modulators. The positive modulation of one of the aptamers was confirmed by patch-clamp electrophysiology on L(tk) cells expressing GlyRα1 and/or GlyRα1β. This aptamer potentiated whole-cell Cl− currents in the presence of low concentrations of glycine. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration ever of RNA aptamers acting as positive modulators for an ion channel. We believe that these aptamers are unique and valuable tools for further studies of GlyR biology and possibly also as tools for assay development in identifying small-molecule agonists and positive modulators. PMID:26071243

  14. PKC-Dependent GlyT1 Ubiquitination Occurs Independent of Phosphorylation: Inespecificity in Lysine Selection for Ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Barrera, Susana P.; Castrejon-Tellez, Vicente; Trinidad, Margarita; Robles-Escajeda, Elisa; Vargas-Medrano, Javier; Varela-Ramirez, Armando; Miranda, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmitter transporter ubiquitination is emerging as the main mechanism for endocytosis and sorting of cargo into lysosomes. In this study, we demonstrate PKC-dependent ubiquitination of three different isoforms of the glycine transporter 1 (GlyT1). Incubation of cells expressing transporter with the PKC activator phorbol ester induced a dramatic, time-dependent increase in GlyT1 ubiquitination, followed by accumulation of GlyT1 in EEA1 positive early endosomes. This occurred via a mechanism that was abolished by inhibition of PKC. GlyT1 endocytosis was confirmed in both retinal sections and primary cultures of mouse amacrine neurons. Replacement of only all lysines in the N-and C-termini to arginines prevented ubiquitination and endocytosis, displaying redundancy in the mechanism of ubiquitination. Interestingly, a 40–50% reduction in glycine uptake was detected in phorbol-ester stimulated cells expressing the WT-GlyT1, whereas no significant change was for the mutant protein, demonstrating that endocytosis participates in the reduction of uptake. Consistent with previous findings for the dopamine transporter DAT, ubiquitination of GlyT1 tails functions as sorting signal to deliver transporter into the lysosome and removal of ubiquitination sites dramatically attenuated the rate of GlyT1 degradation. Finally, we showed for the first time that PKC-dependent GlyT1 phosphorylation was not affected by removal of ubiquitination sites, suggesting separate PKC-dependent signaling events for these posttranslational modifications. PMID:26418248

  15. Glycine and Folate Ameliorate Models of Congenital Sideroblastic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Murray, J Pedro; Prykhozhij, Sergey V; Dufay, J Noelia; Steele, Shelby L; Gaston, Daniel; Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Coombs, Andrew J; Liwski, Robert S; Fernandez, Conrad V; Berman, Jason N; McMaster, Christopher R

    2016-01-01

    Sideroblastic anemias are acquired or inherited anemias that result in a decreased ability to synthesize hemoglobin in red blood cells and result in the presence of iron deposits in the mitochondria of red blood cell precursors. A common subtype of congenital sideroblastic anemia is due to autosomal recessive mutations in the SLC25A38 gene. The current treatment for SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia is chronic blood transfusion coupled with iron chelation. The function of SLC25A38 is not known. Here we report that the SLC25A38 protein, and its yeast homolog Hem25, are mitochondrial glycine transporters required for the initiation of heme synthesis. To do so, we took advantage of the fact that mitochondrial glycine has several roles beyond the synthesis of heme, including the synthesis of folate derivatives through the glycine cleavage system. The data were consistent with Hem25 not being the sole mitochondrial glycine importer, and we identify a second SLC25 family member Ymc1, as a potential secondary mitochondrial glycine importer. Based on these findings, we observed that high levels of exogenous glycine, or 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-Ala) a metabolite downstream of Hem25 in heme biosynthetic pathway, were able to restore heme levels to normal in yeast cells lacking Hem25 function. While neither glycine nor 5-Ala could ameliorate SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia in a zebrafish model, we determined that the addition of folate with glycine was able to restore hemoglobin levels. This difference is likely due to the fact that yeast can synthesize folate, whereas in zebrafish folate is an essential vitamin that must be obtained exogenously. Given the tolerability of glycine and folate in humans, this study points to a potential novel treatment for SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia. PMID:26821380

  16. Glycine and Folate Ameliorate Models of Congenital Sideroblastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Dufay, J. Noelia; Steele, Shelby L.; Gaston, Daniel; Nasrallah, Gheyath K.; Coombs, Andrew J.; Liwski, Robert S.; Fernandez, Conrad V.; Berman, Jason N.; McMaster, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Sideroblastic anemias are acquired or inherited anemias that result in a decreased ability to synthesize hemoglobin in red blood cells and result in the presence of iron deposits in the mitochondria of red blood cell precursors. A common subtype of congenital sideroblastic anemia is due to autosomal recessive mutations in the SLC25A38 gene. The current treatment for SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia is chronic blood transfusion coupled with iron chelation. The function of SLC25A38 is not known. Here we report that the SLC25A38 protein, and its yeast homolog Hem25, are mitochondrial glycine transporters required for the initiation of heme synthesis. To do so, we took advantage of the fact that mitochondrial glycine has several roles beyond the synthesis of heme, including the synthesis of folate derivatives through the glycine cleavage system. The data were consistent with Hem25 not being the sole mitochondrial glycine importer, and we identify a second SLC25 family member Ymc1, as a potential secondary mitochondrial glycine importer. Based on these findings, we observed that high levels of exogenous glycine, or 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-Ala) a metabolite downstream of Hem25 in heme biosynthetic pathway, were able to restore heme levels to normal in yeast cells lacking Hem25 function. While neither glycine nor 5-Ala could ameliorate SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia in a zebrafish model, we determined that the addition of folate with glycine was able to restore hemoglobin levels. This difference is likely due to the fact that yeast can synthesize folate, whereas in zebrafish folate is an essential vitamin that must be obtained exogenously. Given the tolerability of glycine and folate in humans, this study points to a potential novel treatment for SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia. PMID:26821380

  17. DETECTABILITY OF GLYCINE IN SOLAR-TYPE SYSTEM PRECURSORS

    SciTech Connect

    Jiménez-Serra, Izaskun; Testi, Leonardo; Caselli, Paola; Viti, Serena E-mail: ltesti@eso.org E-mail: sv@star.ucl.ac.uk

    2014-06-01

    Glycine (NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COOH) is the simplest amino acid relevant to life. Its detection in the interstellar medium is key to understanding the formation mechanisms of pre-biotic molecules and their subsequent delivery onto planetary systems. Glycine has been extensively searched for toward hot molecular cores, although these studies did not yield any firm detection. In contrast to hot cores, low-mass star forming regions, in particular their earliest stages represented by cold pre-stellar cores, may be better suited for the detection of glycine as well as more relevant to the study of pre-biotic chemistry in young solar system analogs. We present one-dimensional spherically symmetric radiative transfer calculations of the glycine emission expected to arise from the low-mass pre-stellar core L1544. Water vapor has recently been reported toward this core, indicating that a small fraction of the grain mantles in L1544 (∼0.5%) has been injected into the gas phase. Assuming that glycine is photo-desorbed together with water in L1544, and considering a solid abundance of glycine on ices of ∼10{sup –4} with respect to water, our calculations reveal that several glycine lines between 67 GHz and 80 GHz have peak intensities larger than 10 mK. These results show for the first time that glycine could reach detectable levels in cold objects such as L1544. This opens up the possibility of detecting glycine, and other pre-biotic species, at the coldest and earliest stages in the formation of solar-type systems with near-future instrumentation such as the Band 2 receivers of ALMA.

  18. Lysine carboxylation: unveiling a spontaneous post-translational modification

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Morales, David; Adamian, Larisa; Shi, Dashuang; Liang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    The carboxylation of lysine residues is a post-translational modification (PTM) that plays a critical role in the catalytic mechanisms of several important enzymes. It occurs spontaneously under certain physicochemical conditions, but is difficult to detect experimentally. Its full impact is unknown. In this work, the signature microenvironment of lysine-carboxylation sites has been characterized. In addition, a computational method called Predictor of Lysine Carboxyl­ation (PreLysCar) for the detection of lysine carboxylation in proteins with available three-dimensional structures has been developed. The likely prevalence of lysine carboxylation in the proteome was assessed through large-scale computations. The results suggest that about 1.3% of large proteins may contain a carboxylated lysine residue. This unexpected prevalence of lysine carboxylation implies an enrichment of reactions in which it may play functional roles. The results also suggest that by switching enzymes on and off under appropriate physicochemical conditions spontaneous PTMs may serve as an important and widely used efficient biological machinery for regulation. PMID:24419378

  19. Solubility Behavior of Cyanophycin Depending on Lysine Content

    PubMed Central

    Wiefel, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Study of the synthesis of cyanophycin (CGP) in recombinant organisms focused for a long time mostly on the insoluble form of CGP, due to its easy purification and its putative use as a precursor for biodegradable chemicals. Recently, another form of CGP, which, in contrast to the insoluble form, was soluble at neutral pH, became interesting due to its high lysine content, which was also assumed to be the reason for the solubility of the polymer. In this study, we demonstrate that lysine incorporated into insoluble CGP affected the solubility of the polymer in relation to its lysine content. Insoluble CGP can be separated along a temperature gradient of 90°C to 30°C, where CGP showed an increasing lysine content corresponding to a decreasing temperature needed for solubilization. CGP with less than 3 to 4 mol% lysine did not become soluble even at 90°C, while CGP with 31 mol% lysine was soluble at 30°C. In lysine fractions at higher than 31 mol%, CGP was soluble. The temperature separation will be suitable for improving the downstream processing of CGP synthesized in large-scale fermentations, including faster and more efficient purification of CGP, as well as enrichment and separation of dipeptides and CGP with specific amino acid compositions. PMID:24271185

  20. Lysine mediation of neuroendocrine food regulation in guinea fowl.

    PubMed

    Payne, A; Wang, X; Ivy, M T; Stewart, A; Nelson, K; Darris, C; Nahashon, S N

    2016-02-01

    In poultry, obesity is partly influenced by food intake, and is increasingly becoming a nationwide problem. Hypothalamic food intake mechanisms are involved metabolically and neurologically via two peptide hormones, leptin and ghrelin, and the amino acid glutamate, which is enzymatically derived from lysine metabolism. We hypothesize that lysine homeostasis mediates regulation of feed intake and performance characteristics via the brain-liver axis through glutamate sensing. The objective was to examine the effects of lysine homeostasis in avian food regulation and performance through neuroendocrine signaling. One-day-old male French Guinea fowl (GF) keets (n = 270) were weighed and randomly assigned to 5 dietary treatments (0.80%, 0.86%, 0.92%, 1.10% control, and 1.22% lysine) in 3 replicates. At 4 and 8 wk of age 20% of experimental birds were randomly selected, weighed and euthanatized. The liver, pancreas, and hypothalamus were excised, snap frozen in liquid nitrogen and stored at -80°C until use. Tissue mRNA was extracted and cDNA synthesized for qPCR assays. Lysine at 0.80 and 0.86% hindered growth, development of digestive organs, expression of brain and liver glutamate and leptin receptors, and caused high mortality in GF. The fold change for metabotropic glutamate receptor I was lower (P < 0.05) in liver and higher in brain at 0.86 and 0.92% than the control (1.10%) and 1.22% lysine. The 1.22% lysine exhibited highest expression of ionotropic glutamate receptor, while brain ghrelin receptor expression was highest at 0.86 and 0.92% lysine. Therefore, dietary lysine concentration may influence signaling pathways regulating food intake in brain-liver axis via glutamate synthesis. PMID:26614682

  1. The natural non-protein amino acid N-β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is incorporated into protein during synthesis.

    PubMed

    Glover, W Broc; Mash, Deborah C; Murch, Susan J

    2014-11-01

    N-β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is an amino acid produced by cyanobacteria and accumulated through trophic levels in the environment and natural food webs. Human exposure to BMAA has been linked to progressive neurodegenerative diseases, potentially due to incorporation of BMAA into protein. The insertion of BMAA and other non-protein amino acids into proteins may trigger protein misfunction, misfolding and/or aggregation. However, the specific mechanism by which BMAA is associated with proteins remained unidentified. Such studies are challenging because of the complexity of biological systems and samples. A cell-free in vitro protein synthesis system offers an excellent approach for investigation of changing amino acid composition in protein. In this study, we report that BMAA incorporates into protein as an error in synthesis when a template DNA sequence is used. Bicinchoninic acid assay of total protein synthesis determined that BMAA effectively substituted for alanine and serine in protein product. LC-MS/MS confirmed that BMAA was selectively inserted into proteins in place of other amino acids, but isomers N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine (AEG) and 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) did not share this characteristic. Incorporation of BMAA into proteins was significantly higher when genomic DNA from post-mortem brain was the template. About half of BMAA in the synthetic proteins was released with denaturation with sodium dodecylsulfonate and dithiothreitol, but the remaining BMAA could only be released by acid hydrolysis. Together these data demonstrate that BMAA is incorporated into the amino acid backbone of proteins during synthesis and also associated with proteins through non-covalent bonding. PMID:25096519

  2. Serine Biosynthesis with One Carbon Catabolism and the Glycine Cleavage System Represents a Novel Pathway for ATP Generation

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Alexei; Markert, Elke K.; Oltvai, Zoltán N.

    2011-01-01

    Previous experimental evidence indicates that some cancer cells have an alternative glycolysis pathway with net zero ATP production, implying that upregulation of glycolysis in these cells may not be related to the generation of ATP. Here we use a genome-scale model of human cell metabolism to investigate the potential metabolic alterations in cells using net zero ATP glycolysis. We uncover a novel pathway for ATP generation that involves reactions from serine biosynthesis, one-carbon metabolism and the glycine cleavage system, and show that the pathway is transcriptionally upregulated in an inducible murine model of Myc-driven liver tumorigenesis. This pathway has a predicted two-fold higher flux rate in cells using net zero ATP glycolysis than those using standard glycolysis and generates twice as much ATP with significantly lower rate of lactate - but higher rate of alanine secretion. Thus, in cells using the standard - or the net zero ATP glycolysis pathways a significant portion of the glycolysis flux is always associated with ATP generation, and the ratio between the flux rates of the two pathways determines the rate of ATP generation and lactate and alanine secretion during glycolysis. PMID:22073143

  3. Examining the Impact of Gene Variants on Histone Lysine Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Van Rechem, Capucine; Whetstine, Johnathan R.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a boom in the amount of genome-wide sequencing data that has uncovered important and unappreciated links between certain genes, families of genes and enzymatic processes and diseases such as cancer. Such studies have highlighted the impact that chromatin modifying enzymes could have in cancer and other genetic diseases. In this review, we summarize characterized mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in histone lysine methyltransferases (KMTs), histone lysine demethylases (KDMs) and histones. We primarily focus on variants with strong disease correlations and discuss how they could impact histone lysine methylation dynamics and gene regulation. PMID:24859469

  4. Mutants of Saccharomycopsis lipolytica defective in lysine catabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Gaillardin, C; Fournier, P; Sylvestre, G; Heslot, H

    1976-01-01

    Wild-type strains of Saccharomycopsis lipolytica are able to use lysine as a carbon or a nitrogen source, but not as a unique source for both. Mutants were selected that could not use lysine either as a nitrogen or as a carbon source. Some of them, however, utilized N-6-acetyllysine or 5-aminovaleric acid. Many of the mutants appeared to be blocked in both utilizations, suggesting a unique pathway for lysine degradation (either as a carbon or as a nitrogen source). Genetic characterization of these mutants was achieved by complementation and recombination tests. PMID:1245461

  5. Physiological hypercortisolemia increases proteolysis, glutamine, and alanine production

    SciTech Connect

    Darmaun, D.; Matthews, D.E.; Bier, D.M. Cornell Univ. Medical College, New York, NY )

    1988-09-01

    Physiological elevations of plasma cortisol levels, as are encountered in stress and severe trauma, were produced in six normal subjects by infusing them with hydrocortisone for 64 h. Amino acid kinetics were measured in the postabsorptive state using three 4-h infusions of L-(1-{sup 13}C)leucine, L-phenyl({sup 2}H{sub 5})phenylalanine, L-(2-{sup 15}N)glutamine, and L-(1-{sup 13}C)alanine tracers (1) before, (2) at 12 h, and (3) at 60 h of cortisol infusion. Before and throughout the study, the subjects ate a normal diet of adequate protein and energy intake. The cortisol infusion raised plasma cortisol levels significantly from 10 {plus minus} 1 to 32 {plus minus} 4 {mu}g/dl, leucine flux from 83 {plus minus} 3 to 97 {plus minus} 3 {mu}mol{center dot}kg{sup {minus}1}{center dot}h{sup {minus}1}, and phenylalanine flux from 34 {plus minus} 1 to 39 {plus minus} 1 (SE) {mu}mol{center dot}kg{sup {minus}1}{center dot}h{sup {minus}1} after 12 h of cortisol infusion. These increases were maintained until the cortisol infusion was terminated. These nearly identical 15% increases in two different essential amino acid appearance rates are reflective of increased whole body protein breakdown. Glutamine flux rose by 12 h of cortisol infusion and remained elevated at the same level at 64 h. The increase in flux was primarily due to a 55% increase in glutamine de novo synthesis. Alanine flux increased with acute hypercortisolemia and increased further at 60 h of cortisol infusion, a result primarily of increased alanine de novo synthesis. Insulin, alanine, and lactate plasma levels responded similarly with significant rises between the acute and chronic periods of cortisol infusion. Thus hypercortisolemia increases both protein breakdown and the turnover of important nonessential amino acids for periods of up to 64 h.

  6. Characterization of psychrophilic alanine racemase from Bacillus psychrosaccharolyticus.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Y; Yokoigawa, K; Esaki, N; Soda, K; Kawai, H

    1999-03-16

    A psychrophilic alanine racemase gene from Bacillus psychrosaccharolyticus was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli SOLR with a plasmid pYOK3. The gene starting with the unusual initiation codon GTG showed higher preference for codons ending in A or T. The enzyme purified to homogeneity showed the high catalytic activity even at 0 degrees C and was extremely labile over 35 degrees C. The enzyme was found to have a markedly large Km value (5.0 microM) for the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) cofactor in comparison with other reported alanine racemases, and was stabilized up to 50 degrees C in the presence of excess amounts of PLP. The low affinity of the enzyme for PLP may be related to the thermolability, and may be related to the high catalytic activity, initiated by the transaldimination reaction, at low temperature. The enzyme has a distinguishing hydrophilic region around the residue no. 150 in the deduced amino acid sequence (383 residues), whereas the corresponding regions of other Bacillus alanine racemases are hydrophobic. The position of the region in the three dimensional structure of C atoms of the enzyme was predicted to be in a surface loop surrounding the active site. The region may interact with solvent and reduce the compactness of the active site. PMID:10080917

  7. ESR/alanine dosimetry applied to radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosse, D. C.

    The radiation processing of food products is specified in terms of absorbed dose, and processing quality is assessed on the basis of absorbed dose measurements. The validity of process quality control is highly dependent on the quality of the measurements and associated instrumentation; in this respect, dosimetry calibration by an Organization with official status provides an essential guarantee of validity to the quality control steps taken. The Laboratoire de Métrologie des Rayonnements Ionisants (L.M.R.I.) is the primary standards and evaluation laboratory approved by the Bureau National de Métrologie (B.N.M.), which is the French National Bureau of Standards. The LMRI implements correlation procedures in response to the various requirements which arise in connection with high doses and doserates. Such procedures are mainly based on ESR/alanine spectrometry, a dosimetry technique ideally suited to that purpose. Dosemeter geometry and design are tailored to operating conditions. "Photon" dosemeters consist of a detector material in powder or compacted form, and a wall with thickness and chemical composition consistent with the application. "Electron" dosemeters have a detector core of compacted alanine with thickness down to a few tenths of a millimeter. The ESR/alanine dosimetry technique, developed at LMRI is a flexible, reliable and accurate tool which effectively meets the various requirements arising in the field of reference dosimetry, where high doses and doserates are involved.

  8. Pancreatic stellate cells support tumour metabolism through autophagic alanine secretion.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cristovão M; Biancur, Douglas E; Wang, Xiaoxu; Halbrook, Christopher J; Sherman, Mara H; Zhang, Li; Kremer, Daniel; Hwang, Rosa F; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Ying, Haoqiang; Asara, John M; Evans, Ronald M; Cantley, Lewis C; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Kimmelman, Alec C

    2016-08-25

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive disease characterized by an intense fibrotic stromal response and deregulated metabolism. The role of the stroma in PDAC biology is complex and it has been shown to play critical roles that differ depending on the biological context. The stromal reaction also impairs the vasculature, leading to a highly hypoxic, nutrient-poor environment. As such, these tumours must alter how they capture and use nutrients to support their metabolic needs. Here we show that stroma-associated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are critical for PDAC metabolism through the secretion of non-essential amino acids (NEAA). Specifically, we uncover a previously undescribed role for alanine, which outcompetes glucose and glutamine-derived carbon in PDAC to fuel the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and thus NEAA and lipid biosynthesis. This shift in fuel source decreases the tumour’s dependence on glucose and serum-derived nutrients, which are limited in the pancreatic tumour microenvironment. Moreover, we demonstrate that alanine secretion by PSCs is dependent on PSC autophagy, a process that is stimulated by cancer cells. Thus, our results demonstrate a novel metabolic interaction between PSCs and cancer cells, in which PSC-derived alanine acts as an alternative carbon source. This finding highlights a previously unappreciated metabolic network within pancreatic tumours in which diverse fuel sources are used to promote growth in an austere tumour microenvironment. PMID:27509858

  9. HDAC inhibitors induce global changes in histone lysine and arginine methylation and alter expression of lysine demethylases.

    PubMed

    Lillico, Ryan; Sobral, Marina Gomez; Stesco, Nicholas; Lakowski, Ted M

    2016-02-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are cancer treatments that inhibit the removal of the epigenetic modification acetyllysine on histones, resulting in altered gene expression. Such changes in expression may influence other histone epigenetic modifications. We describe a validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method to quantify lysine acetylation and methylation and arginine methylation on histones extracted from cultured cells treated with HDAC inhibitors. The HDAC inhibitors vorinostat, mocetinostat and entinostat induced 400-600% hyperacetylation in HEK 293 and K562 cells. All HDAC inhibitors decreased histone methylarginines in HEK 293 cells but entinostat produced dose dependent reductions in asymmetric dimethylarginine, not observed in K562 cells. Vorinostat produced increases in histone lysine methylation and decreased expression of some lysine demethylases (KDM), measured by quantitative PCR. Entinostat had variable effects on lysine methylation and decreased expression of some KDM while increasing expression of others. Mocetinostat produced dose dependent increases in histone lysine methylation by LC-MS/MS. This was corroborated with a multiplex colorimetric assay showing increases in histone H3 lysine 4, 9, 27, 36 and 79 methylation. Increases in lysine methylation were correlated with dose dependent decreases in the expression of seven KDM. Mocetinostat functions as an HDAC inhibitor and a de facto KDM inhibitor. PMID:26721445

  10. Reactions of lysine with montmorillonite at 80 degrees C: implications for optical activity, H+ transfer and lysine-montmorillonite binding.

    PubMed

    Cuadros, Javier; Aldega, Luca; Vetterlein, Jonathan; Drickamer, Kurt; Dubbin, William

    2009-05-01

    Amino acid-smectite interaction may have catalyzed prebiotic reactions essential for the emergence of life. Lysine solutions (0.05 M) were reacted with Na-smectite in adsorption-desorption experiments. The lysine-smectite complexes were heated at 80 degrees C for 10 days to investigate (1) possible slow processes taking place at surface temperature that would be accelerated at higher temperature and (2) processes taking place in hydrothermal systems. Three sets of experiments were performed: thermal treatment in closed tubes and water added regularly; thermal treatment in closed tubes without adding water; and thermal treatment in open tubes and no added water. After lysine desorption (displacement with 0.1 M CaCl(2)), the solutions were investigated using circular dichroism (CD) and the smectite samples using FTIR and CHN elemental analysis. CD spectra were dependent on the solution pH, which was controlled by lysine protonation state. The lysine protonation state was altered by the adsorption-desorption process, with a higher Lys(+)/Lys(+/-) ratio after desorption. The CD and CHN analyses show that the thermal treatment in a moist state causes stronger smectite-lysine binding. FTIR data suggest that the stronger binding is caused by more or stronger H bonds between -NH(3)(+) lysine groups and smectite basal O atoms. PMID:19185874

  11. Benzyl isothiocyanate affects development, hatching and reproduction of the soybean cyst nematode Heterodera glycines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) applied at micromolar doses decreased Heterodera glycines J2 movement, H. glycines hatching, and reproduction of H. glycines on soybean, Glycine max. Direct exposure of J2 to 30 microM BITC caused an immediate decrease (17%; P < 0.05) in J2 movement relative to 1% methan...

  12. Metabolic engineering Corynebacterium glutamicum for the L-lysine production by increasing the flux into L-lysine biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianzhong; Han, Mei; Zhang, Junlan; Guo, Yanfeng; Zhang, Weiguo

    2014-09-01

    The experiments presented here were based on the conclusions of our previous results. In order to avoid introduction of expression plasmid and to balance the NADH/NAD ratio, the NADH biosynthetic enzyme, i.e., NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GADPH), was replaced by NADP-dependent GADPH, which was used to biosynthesize NADPH rather than NADH. The results indicated that the NADH/NAD ratio significantly decreased, and glucose consumption and L-lysine production drastically improved. Moreover, increasing the flux through L-lysine biosynthetic pathway and disruption of ilvN and hom, which involve in the branched amino acid and L-methionine biosynthesis, further improved L-lysine production by Corynebacterium glutamicum. Compared to the original strain C. glutamicum Lys5, the L-lysine production and glucose conversion efficiency (α) were enhanced to 81.0 ± 6.59 mM and 36.45% by the resulting strain C. glutamicum Lys5-8 in shake flask. In addition, the by-products (i.e., L-threonine, L-methionine and L-valine) were significantly decreased as results of genetic modification in homoserine dehydrogenase (HSD) and acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS). In fed-batch fermentation, C. glutamicum Lys5-8 began to produce L-lysine at post-exponential growth phase and continuously increased over 36 h to a final titer of 896 ± 33.41 mM. The L-lysine productivity was 2.73 g l(-1) h(-1) and the α was 47.06% after 48 h. However, the attenuation of MurE was not beneficial to increase the L-lysine production because of decreasing the cell growth. Based on the above-mentioned results, we get the following conclusions: cofactor NADPH, precursor, the flux through L-lysine biosynthetic pathway and DCW are beneficial to improve L-lysine production in C. glutamicum. PMID:24879631

  13. Anti-angiogenic poly-L-lysine dendrimer binds heparin and neutralizes its activity.

    PubMed

    Al-Jamal, Khuloud T; Al-Jamal, Wafa T; Kostarelos, Kostas; Turton, John A; Florence, Alexander T

    2012-01-01

    The interaction between heparin, a polyanion, and a polycationic dendrimer with a glycine core and lysine branches Gly-Lys63(NH2)64 has been investigated. Complexation was assessed by transmission electron microscopy, size and zeta potential measurements, methylene blue spectroscopy, and measuring the anti-coagulant activity of heparin in vitro and in vivo. Complete association between the heparin and the dendrimer occurred a 1:1 mass ratio (2:1 molar ratio or +/-charge ratio) with formation of quasi-spherical complexes in the size range of 99-147 nm with a negative zeta potential (-47 mV). Heparin-dendrimer (dendriplex) formation led to a concentration-dependent neutralization of the anticoagulant activity of heparin in human plasma in vitro, with complete loss of activity at a 1:1 mass ratio. The anticoagulant activity of the dendriplexes in Sprague-Dawley rats was also evaluated after subcutaneous administration with uncomplexed heparin as a comparator. The in vivo anticoagulant activity of heparin in plasma, evaluated using an antifactor Xa assay, was abolished after complexation. Measurement of [(3)H]-heparin showed that both free heparin and dendriplexes were present in plasma and in organs. Such data confirmed stably the formation of dendriplexes, which could be essential in developing novel dendrimer-based anti-angiogenic therapeutics suitable in combinatory therapeutics and theranostics. PMID:25755989

  14. Starvation induced alterations in hepatic lysine metabolism in different families of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lysine is the second limiting amino acid in fish meal based diets, second only to methionine. However, little is known about lysine metabolism in rainbow trout (RBT). Therefore, lysine catabolism by the lysine alpha-ketoglutarate reductase (LKR) pathway was studied. Additionally, since genetically i...

  15. Role of Charge and Solvation in the Structure and Dynamics of Alanine-Rich Peptide AKA2 in AOT Reverse Micelles.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Anna Victoria; Małolepsza, Edyta; Domínguez, Laura; Lu, Qing; Straub, John E

    2015-07-23

    The propensity of peptides to form α-helices has been intensely studied using theory, computation, and experiment. Important model peptides for the study of the coil-to-helix transition have been alanine-lysine (AKA) peptides in which the lysine residues are placed on opposite sides of the helix avoiding charge repulsion while enhancing solubility. In this study, the effects of capped versus zwitterionic peptide termini on the secondary structure of alanine-rich peptides in reverse micelles are explored. The reverse micelles are found to undergo substantial shape fluctuations, a property observed in previous studies of AOT reverse micelles in the absence of solvated peptide. The peptides are observed to interact with water, as well as the AOT surfactant, including interactions between the nonpolar residues and the aliphatic surfactant tails. Computation of IR spectra for the amide I band of the peptide allows for direct comparison with experimental spectra. The results demonstrate that capped AKA2 peptides form more stable α helices than zwitterionic AKA2 peptides in reverse micelles. The rotational anisotropy decay of water is found to be distinctly different in the presence or absence of peptide within the reverse micelle, suggesting that the introduction of peptide significantly alters the number of free waters within the reverse micelle nanopool. However, neither the nature of the peptide termini (capped or charged) nor the degree of peptide helicity is found to significantly alter the balance of interactions between the peptides and the environment. Observed changes in the degree of helicity in AKA2 peptides in bulk solution and in reverse micelle environments result from changes in peptide confinement and hydration as well as direct nonpolar and polar interactions with the water-surfactant interface. PMID:25337983

  16. PlyC, a novel bacteriophage lysin for compartment-dependent proteomics of group A streptococci.

    PubMed

    Köller, Thomas; Nelson, Daniel; Nakata, Masanobu; Kreutzer, Michael; Fischetti, Vincent A; Glocker, Michael O; Podbielski, Andreas; Kreikemeyer, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (Spy) (group A streptococci) is an important and exclusively human bacterial pathogen, which uses secreted and surface-associated proteins to circumvent the innate host defense mechanisms and to adhere and internalize into host cells. Thus, investigation of the bacterial extracellular compartments, including secreted and cell wall-associated subproteomes, is crucial for understanding adherence, invasion, and internalization mechanisms as major steps of Spy pathogenesis. Here, we compared a bacteriophage encoded cell wall hydrolase, PlyC, a multimeric lysin of the C1 bacteriophage, with the established glycosidase, mutanolysin, from Streptomyces globisporus for their suitability to efficiently digest Spy cell walls and release cell wall-anchored Spy proteins for subsequent proteome research. Our results show that PlyC is superior for cell wall protein extraction compared to mutanolysin due to its higher activity and specificity as an N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase. Furthermore, our experimental design allowed us to delineate the actual localization of the proteins despite contamination with intracellular proteins. PMID:18095374

  17. Data detailing the platelet acetyl-lysine proteome

    PubMed Central

    Aslan, Joseph E.; David, Larry L.; McCarty, Owen J.T.

    2015-01-01

    Here we detail proteomics data that describe the acetyl-lysine proteome of blood platelets (Aslan et al., 2015 [1]). An affinity purification – mass spectrometry (AP-MS) approach was used to identify proteins modified by Nε-lysine acetylation in quiescent, washed human platelets. The data provide insights into potential regulatory mechanisms of platelet function mediated by protein lysine acetylation. Additionally, as platelets are anucleate and lack histone proteins, they offer a unique and valuable system to study the regulation of cytosolic proteins by lysine acetylation. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (Vizcaino et al., 2014 [2]) via with PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD002332. PMID:26904711

  18. Data detailing the platelet acetyl-lysine proteome.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Joseph E; David, Larry L; McCarty, Owen J T

    2015-12-01

    Here we detail proteomics data that describe the acetyl-lysine proteome of blood platelets (Aslan et al., 2015 [1]). An affinity purification - mass spectrometry (AP-MS) approach was used to identify proteins modified by Nε-lysine acetylation in quiescent, washed human platelets. The data provide insights into potential regulatory mechanisms of platelet function mediated by protein lysine acetylation. Additionally, as platelets are anucleate and lack histone proteins, they offer a unique and valuable system to study the regulation of cytosolic proteins by lysine acetylation. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (Vizcaino et al., 2014 [2]) via with PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD002332. PMID:26904711

  19. Lysine fatty acylation promotes lysosomal targeting of TNF-α

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Lin, Hening

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a proinflammation cytokine secreted by various cells. Understanding its secretive pathway is important to understand the biological functions of TNF-α and diseases associated with TNF-α. TNF-α is one of the first proteins known be modified by lysine fatty acylation (e.g. myristoylation). We previously demonstrated that SIRT6, a member of the mammalian sirtuin family of enzymes, can remove the fatty acyl modification on TNF-α and promote its secretion. However, the mechanistic details about how lysine fatty acylation regulates TNF-α secretion have been unknown. Here we present experimental data supporting that lysine fatty acylation promotes lysosomal targeting of TNF-α. The result is an important first step toward understanding the biological functions of lysine fatty acylation. PMID:27079798

  20. Synthesis and sweetness characteristics of L-aspartyl-D-alanine fenchyl esters.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Y; Nagakura, A; Tsuruta, H

    2001-10-01

    Four isomers of the L-aspartyl-D-alanine fenchyl esters were prepared as potential peptide sweeteners. L-Aspartyl-D-alanine (+)-alpha-fenchyl ester and L-aspartyl-D-alanine (-)-beta-fenchyl ester showed sweetness with potencies 250 and 160 times higher than that of sucrose, respectively. In contrast, L-aspartyl-D-alanine (+)-beta-fenchyl ester and L-aspartyl-D-alanine (-)-alpha-fenchyl ester had the highest sweetness potencies at 5700 and 1100 times that of sucrose, respectively. In particular, L-aspartyl-D-alanine (-)-alpha-fenchyl ester had an excellent sweetness quality; but L-aspartyl-D-alanine (+)-beta-fenchyl ester did not have an excellent quality of sweetness because it displayed an aftertaste caused by the strong sweetness. PMID:11600060

  1. Spectral Luminescent Properties of the Glycine Molecule in a Gas Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    General, A. A.; Migovich, M. I.; Kelman, V. A.; Zhmenyak, Yu. V.; Zvenigorodsky, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    We have experimentally studied the luminescence spectra of glycine powder in the plasma of a repetitively pulsed longitudinal discharge in argon-glycine and helium-glycine mixtures. We have identified the main fragments of the glycine molecule emitting in the 200-1000 nm region. The emitting molecules due to fragmentation of glycine and dissociation of the carboxyl (-COOH) and amino (-NH2) groups are nitrogen, carbon monoxide, and cyanogen molecules.

  2. Tropomyosin lysine reactivities and relationship to coiled-coil structure.

    PubMed

    Hitchcock-DeGregori, S E; Lewis, S F; Chou, T M

    1985-06-18

    We have carried out a detailed analysis of tropomyosin structure using lysines as specific probes for the protein surface in regions of the molecule that have not been investigated by other methods. We have measured the relative reactivities of lysines in rabbit skeletal muscle alpha, alpha-tropomyosin with acetic anhydride using a competitive labeling procedure. We have identified 37 of 39 lysines and find that they range 20-fold in reactivity. The observed reactivities are related to the coiled-coil model of the tropomyosin molecule [Crick, F.H.C. (1953) Acta Crystallogr. 6, 689-697; McLachlan, A.D., Stewart, M., & Smillie, L.B. (1975) J. Mol. Biol. 98, 281-291] and other available chemical and physical information about the structure. In most cases, the observed lysine reactivities can be explained by allowable interactions with neighboring amino acid side chains on the same or facing alpha-helix. However, we found no correlation between reactivity and helical position of a given lysine. For example, lysines in the outer helical positions included lysines of low as well as high reactivity, indicating that they vary widely in their accessibility to solvent and that the coiled coil is heterogeneous along its length. Furthermore, the middle of the molecule (residues 126-182) that is susceptible to proteolysis and known to be the least stable region of the protein also contains some of the least and most reactive lysines. We have discussed the implications of our results on our understanding the structures of tropomyosin and other coiled-coil proteins as well as globular proteins containing helical regions. PMID:3927977

  3. Glycine receptor mechanism illuminated by electron cryo-microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Du, Juan; Lü, Wei; Wu, Shenping; Cheng, Yifan; Gouaux, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Summary The strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor (GlyR) mediates inhibitory synaptic transmission in the spinal cord and brainstem and is linked to neurological disorders including autism and hyperekplexia. Understanding of molecular mechanisms and pharmacology of GlyRs has been hindered by a dearth of high-resolution structures. Here we report electron cryo-microscopy structures of the α1 GlyR with strychnine, glycine, or glycine/ivermectin. Strychnine arrests the receptor in an antagonist-bound, closed ion channel state, glycine stabilizes the receptor in an agonist-bound open channel state, and the glycine/ivermectin complex adopts a potentially desensitized or partially open state. Relative to the glycine-bound state, strychnine expands the agonist-binding pocket via outward movement of the C loop, promotes rearrangement of the extracellular and transmembrane domain ‘wrist’ interface, and leads to rotation of the transmembrane domain toward the pore axis, occluding the ion conduction pathway. These structures illuminate GlyR mechanism and define a rubric to interpret structures of Cys-loop receptors. PMID:26344198

  4. Effect of temperature and pressure on the protonation of glycine

    PubMed Central

    Izatt, R. M.; Oscarson, J. L.; Gillespie, S. E.; Grimsrud, H.; Renuncio, J. A. R.; Pando, C.

    1992-01-01

    Flow calorimetry has been used to study the interaction of glycine with protons in water at temperatures of 298.15, 323.15, and 348.15 K and pressures up to 12.50 MPa. By combining the measured heat for glycine solutions titrated with NaOH with the heat of ionization for water, the enthalpy of protonation of glycine is obtained. The reaction is exothermic at all temperatures and pressures studied. The effect of pressure on the enthalpy of reaction is very small. The experimental heat data are analyzed to yield equilibrium constant (K), enthalpy change (ΔH), and entropy change (ΔS) values for the protonation reaction as a function of temperature. These values are compared with those reported previously at 298.15 K. The ΔH and ΔS values increase (become more positive), whereas log K values decrease, as temperature increases. The trends for ΔH and ΔS with temperature are opposite to those reported previously for the protonation of several alkanolamines. However, log K values for proton interaction with both glycine and the alkanolamines decrease with increasing temperature. The effect of the nitrogen atom substituent on log K for protonation of glycine and alkanolamines is discussed in terms of changes in long-range and short-range solvent effects. These effects are used to explain the difference in ΔH and ΔS trends between glycine protonation and those found earlier for alkanolamine protonation. PMID:19431832

  5. Glycine crystallization during spray drying: the pH effect on salt and polymorphic forms.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lian; Ng, Kingman

    2002-11-01

    Spray drying of aqueous solutions of glycine revealed a strong pH effect on the salt and polymorphic forms of the resulting powders. Adjusting pH by aqueous HCl or NaOH between 1.7 and 10.0 caused the glycine solutions to crystallize as two polymorphs (alpha and gamma) of the neutral glycine ((+)H(3)NCH(2)CO(2) (-)) and as three salts (diglycine HCl, (+)H(3)NCH(2)CO(2) (-). (+)H(3)NCH(2)CO(2)H. C1(-); glycine HCl, (+)H(3)NCH(2)CO(2)H. C1(-); and sodium glycinate, H(2)NCH(2)CO(2) (-). Na(+)). Although alpha-glycine crystallized from solutions without pH adjustment (pH 6.2), changing the pH to 4.0 and 8.0 caused gamma-glycine to crystallize as the preferred polymorph. This phenomenon is attributed to the pH effect on the dimeric growth unit of alpha-glycine. The formation of alpha-glycine by spray drying solutions of neutral glycine contrasts the outcome of freeze drying, which yields beta-glycine. Because gamma-glycine is thermodynamically more stable than alpha-glycine, the crystallization of gamma-glycine by pH adjustment provides a way to improve the physical stability of glycine-containing formulations. Spray drying at low pH yielded various mixtures of neutral glycine and its HCl salts: pH 3.0, gamma-glycine and diglycine HCl; pH 2.0, diglycine HCl; and pH 1.7 (the natural pH of glycine HCl), diglycine HCl (major component) and glycine HCl (minor component). Spray drying glycine HCl solutions (pH 1.7) yielded the same diglycine HCl/glycine HCl mixture as did spray drying neutral glycine solutions acidified to pH 1.7. Obtaining diglycine HCl by spray drying glycine HCl solutions indicates a 50% loss of HCl during processing. The extent of HCl loss could be altered by changing the inlet temperature of the spray drier. Spray drying glycine solutions at pH 9.0 and 10.0 gave predominantly gamma-glycine and an additional crystalline product, possibly sodium glycinate. The glycine powders spray dried at different pH had different particle morphologies and sizes, which

  6. HISTONE LYSINE DEMETHYLASES IN BREAST CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Paolicchi, Elisa; Crea, Francesco; Farrar, William L; Green, Jeffrey E; Danesi, Romano

    2013-01-01

    Histone lysine demethylases (KDMs) have been recently discovered in mammals and have been nicknamed “erasers” for their ability to remove methyl groups from histone substrates. In cancer cells, KDMs can activate or repress gene transcription, behaving as oncogenes or tumor suppressors depending upon the cellular context. In order to investigate the potential role of KDMs in Breast Cancer (BC), we queried the Oncomine database and determined that the expression of KDMs correlates with BC prognosis. High expression of KDM3B and KDM5A is associated with a better prognosis (no recurrence after mastectomy p=0.005 and response to docetaxel p=0.005); conversely, KDM6A is overexpressed in BC patients with an unfavorable prognosis (mortality at 1 year, p=8.65E-7). Our findings suggest that KDMs could be potential targets for BC therapy. Further, altering the interactions between KDMs and Polycomb Group genes (PcG) may provide novel avenues for therapy that specifically targets these genes in BC. PMID:23266085

  7. Water reuse in the l-lysine fermentation process

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, T.Y.; Glatz, C.E.

    1996-02-05

    L-Lysine is produced commercially by fermentation. As is typical for fermentation processes, a large amount of liquid waste is generated. To minimize the waste, which is mostly the broth effluent from the cation exchange column used for l-lysine recovery, the authors investigated a strategy of recycling a large fraction of this broth effluent to the subsequent fermentation. This was done on a lab-scale process with Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 21253 as the l-lysine-producing organisms. Broth effluent from a fermentation in a defined medium was able to replace 75% of the water for the subsequent batch; this recycle ratio was maintained for 3 sequential batches without affecting cell mass and l-lysine production. Broth effluent was recycled at 50% recycle ratio in a fermentation in a complex medium containing beet molasses. The first recycle batch had an 8% lower final l-lysine level, but 8% higher maximum cell mass. In addition to reducing the volume of liquid waste, this recycle strategy has the additional advantage of utilizing the ammonium desorbed from the ion-exchange column as a nitrogen source in the recycle fermentation. The major problem of recycling the effluent from the complex medium was in the cation-exchange operation, where column capacity was 17% lower for the recycle batch. The loss of column capacity probably results from the buildup of cations competing with l-lysine for binding.

  8. Biofortification of rice with lysine using endogenous histones.

    PubMed

    Wong, H W; Liu, Q; Sun, S S M

    2015-02-01

    Rice is the most consumed cereal grain in the world, but deficient in the essential amino acid lysine. Therefore, people in developing countries with limited food diversity who rely on rice as their major food source may suffer from malnutrition. Biofortification of stable crops by genetic engineering provides a fast and sustainable method to solve this problem. In this study, two endogenous rice lysine-rich histone proteins, RLRH1 and RLRH2, were over-expressed in rice seeds to achieve lysine biofortification. Their protein sequences passed an allergic sequence-based homology test. Their accumulations in rice seeds were raised to a moderate level by the use of a modified rice glutelin 1 promoter with lowered expression strength to avoid the occurrence of physiological abnormalities like unfolded protein response. The expressed proteins were further targeted to protein storage vacuoles for stable storage using a glutelin 1 signal peptide. The lysine content in the transgenic rice seeds was enhanced by up to 35 %, while other essential amino acids remained balanced, meeting the nutritional standards of the World Health Organization. No obvious unfolded protein response was detected. Different degrees of chalkiness, however, were detected in the transgenic seeds, and were positively correlated with both the levels of accumulated protein and lysine enhancement. This study offered a solution to the lysine deficiency in rice, while at the same time addressing concerns about food safety and physiological abnormalities in biofortified crops. PMID:25512028

  9. Selective cleavage enhanced by acetylating the side chain of lysine.

    PubMed

    Fu, Leixiaomeng; Chen, Tingting; Xue, Gaiqing; Zu, Lily; Fang, Weihai

    2013-01-01

    Selective cleavage is of great interest in mass spectrometry studies as it can help sequence identification by promoting simple fragmentation pattern of peptides and proteins. In this work, the collision-induced dissociation of peptides containing internal lysine and acetylated lysine residues were studied. The experimental and computational results revealed that multiple fragmentation pathways coexisted when the lysine residue was two amino acid residues away from N-terminal of the peptide. After acetylation of the lysine side-chain, b(n)+ ions were the most abundant primary fragment products and the Lys(Ac)-Gly amide bond became the dominant cleavage site via an oxazolone pathway. Acetylating the side-chain of lysine promoted the selective cleavage of Lys-Xxx amide bond and generated much more information of the peptide backbone sequence. The results re-evaluate the selective cleavage due to the lysine basic side-chain and provide information for studying the post-translational modification of proteins and other bio-molecules containing Lys residues. PMID:23303756

  10. Insights into the regulatory landscape of the lysine riboswitch

    PubMed Central

    Garst, Andrew D.; Porter, Ely B.; Batey, Robert T.

    2012-01-01

    A prevalent means of regulating gene expression in bacteria is by riboswitches found within mRNA leader sequences. Like protein repressors these RNA elements must bind an effector molecule with high specificity against a background of other cellular metabolites of similar chemical structure to elicit the appropriate regulatory response. Current crystal structures of the lysine riboswitch do not provide a complete understanding of selectivity as recognition is substantially mediated through main chain atoms of the amino acid. Using a directed set of lysine analogs and other amino acids, the relative contributions of the polar functional groups to binding affinity and the regulatory response have been determined. Our results reveal that the lysine riboswitch has >1,000-fold specificity for lysine over other amino acids. To achieve this specificity, the aptamer is highly sensitive to the precise placement of the ε-amino group and relatively tolerant of alterations to the main chain functional groups. At low NTP concentrations, we observe good agreement between the half-maximal regulatory activity (T50) and the affinity of the receptor for lysine (KD) as well many of its analogs. However, above 400 µM [NTP] the concentration of lysine required to elicit transcription termination rises, moving into the riboswitch into a kinetic control regime. These data demonstrate that under physiologically relevant conditions riboswitches can integrate both effector and NTP concentrations to generate a regulatory response appropriate for global metabolic state of the cell. PMID:22771573

  11. Insights into the regulatory landscape of the lysine riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Garst, Andrew D; Porter, Ely B; Batey, Robert T

    2012-10-12

    A prevalent means of regulating gene expression in bacteria is by riboswitches found within mRNA leader sequences. Like protein repressors, these RNA elements must bind an effector molecule with high specificity against a background of other cellular metabolites of similar chemical structure to elicit the appropriate regulatory response. Current crystal structures of the lysine riboswitch do not provide a complete understanding of selectivity as recognition is substantially mediated through main-chain atoms of the amino acid. Using a directed set of lysine analogs and other amino acids, we have determined the relative contributions of the polar functional groups to binding affinity and the regulatory response. Our results reveal that the lysine riboswitch has >1000-fold specificity for lysine over other amino acids. The aptamer is highly sensitive to the precise placement of the ε-amino group and relatively tolerant of alterations to the main-chain functional groups in order to achieve this specificity. At low nucleotide triphosphate (NTP) concentrations, we observe good agreement between the half-maximal regulatory activity (T(50)) and the affinity of the receptor for lysine (K(d)), as well as many of its analogs. However, above 400 μM [NTP], the concentration of lysine required to elicit transcription termination rises, moving into the riboswitch into a kinetic control regime. These data demonstrate that, under physiologically relevant conditions, riboswitches can integrate both effector and NTP concentrations to generate a regulatory response appropriate for global metabolic state of the cell. PMID:22771573

  12. Blockade of glycine transporter 1 by SSR-504734 promotes cognitive flexibility in glycine/NMDA receptor-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Nikiforuk, Agnieszka; Kos, Tomasz; Rafa, Dominik; Behl, Berthold; Bespalov, Anton; Popik, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that cognitive processes may be regulated by glycine concentration in the local environment of glutamate N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). The concentration of glycine is controlled, among other factors, by the glycine transporter 1 (GlyT1). While GlyT1 inhibitors are developed for a number of indications including cognitive improvement, little is known about their effects in tasks depending on prefrontal cortical function. We examined the effect of GlyT1 inhibitor SSR-504734 on cognitive flexibility assessed in the attentional set-shifting task in rats (ASST). The second goal was to elucidate whether SSR-504734 effect has been due to the compound's action at glycine/NMDAR site. Rats treated with SSR-504734 (3 and 10 mg/kg, IP) required significantly less trials to criteria during extra-dimensional shift (EDs) phase of the ASST. The effect of SSR-504734 (3 mg/kg) was completely prevented by the glycine/NMDAR site antagonist, L-687,414 (30 mg/kg, IP) that by itself exerted no effect on cognitive flexibility. Present study demonstrates that the elevation of glycine concentration through the blockade of its reuptake facilitates cognitive flexibility. As this effect was fully blocked by glycine/NMDAR antagonist, SSR-504734-induced cognitive improvement is likely mediated through glycine action at NMDAR. It is suggested that GlyT1 inhibitors like SSR-504734 may represent a useful pharmacological approach for cognitive enhancement, especially in domains critically affected in schizophrenia. PMID:21530555

  13. Comparative mapping of the wild perennial Glycine latifolia and soybean (G. max) reveals extensive chromosome rearrangements in the genus Glycine.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sungyul; Thurber, Carrie S; Brown, Patrick J; Hartman, Glen L; Lambert, Kris N; Domier, Leslie L

    2014-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max L. Mer.), like many cultivated crops, has a relatively narrow genetic base and lacks diversity for some economically important traits. Glycine latifolia (Benth.) Newell & Hymowitz, one of the 26 perennial wild Glycine species related to soybean in the subgenus Glycine Willd., shows high levels of resistance to multiple soybean pathogens and pests including Alfalfa mosaic virus, Heterodera glycines Ichinohe and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary. However, limited information is available on the genomes of these perennial Glycine species. To generate molecular resources for gene mapping and identification, high-density linkage maps were constructed for G. latifolia using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers generated by genotyping by sequencing and evaluated in an F2 population and confirmed in an F5 population. In each population, greater than 2,300 SNP markers were selected for analysis and segregated to form 20 large linkage groups. Marker orders were similar in the F2 and F5 populations. The relationships between G. latifolia linkage groups and G. max and common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) chromosomes were examined by aligning SNP-containing sequences from G. latifolia to the genome sequences of G. max and P. vulgaris. Twelve of the 20 G. latifolia linkage groups were nearly collinear with G. max chromosomes. The remaining eight G. latifolia linkage groups appeared to be products of multiple interchromosomal translocations relative to G. max. Large syntenic blocks also were observed between G. latifolia and P. vulgaris. These experiments are the first to compare genome organizations among annual and perennial Glycine species and common bean. The development of molecular resources for species closely related to G. max provides information into the evolution of genomes within the genus Glycine and tools to identify genes within perennial wild relatives of cultivated soybean that could be beneficial to soybean production. PMID

  14. Topological dispositions of lysine. alpha. 380 and lysine. gamma. 486 in the acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, B.P. )

    1991-04-23

    The locations have been determined, with respect to the plasma membrane, of lysine {alpha}380 and lysine {gamma}486 in the {alpha} subunit and the {gamma} subunit, respectively, of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica. Immunoadsorbents were constructed that recognize the carboxy terminus of the peptide GVKYIAE released by proteolytic digestion from positions 378-384 in the amino acid sequence of the {alpha} subunit of the acetylcholine receptor and the carboxy terminus of the peptide KYVP released by proteolytic digestion from positions 486-489 in the amino acid sequence of the {gamma} subunit. They were used to isolate these peptides from proteolytic digests of polypeptides from the acetylcholine receptor. Sealed vesicles containing the native acetylcholine receptor were labeled with pyridoxal phosphate and sodium ({sup 3}H)-borohydride. The effect of saponin on the incorporation of pyridoxamine phosphate into lysine {alpha}380 and lysine {gamma}486 from the acetylcholine receptor in these vesicles was assessed with the immunoadsorbents. The conclusions that follow from these results are that lysine {alpha}380 is on the inside surface of a vesicle and lysine {gamma}486 is on the outside surface. Because a majority (85%) of the total binding sites for {alpha}-bungarotoxin bind the toxin in the absence of saponin, the majority of the vesicles are right side out with the inside of the vesicle corresponding to the cytoplasmic surface and the outside of the vesicle corresponding to the extracytoplasmic, synaptic surface. Because lysine {alpha}380 and lysine {gamma}486 lie on opposite sides of the membrane, a membrane-spanning segment must be located between the two positions occupied by these two amino acids in the common sequence of a polypeptide of the acetylcholine receptor.

  15. Electronic structure analysis of glycine oligopeptides and glycine-tryptophan oligopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Yu, Shuai; Yang, Mengshi; Xu, Can; Wang, Yu; Chen, Liang

    2014-03-01

    Using the density functional theory (DFT), we have studied the energy gap, charge distribution, density of states and chemical activity of glycine (Gn) oligopeptides and glycine-tryptophan (GWn) oligopeptides. The results show that: (1) with the increasing of Gn residues, the chemical activity of Gn oligopeptides focuses on the terminal amino and carboxyl groups, which may be the main cause of self-assembly behaviors in Gn oligopeptide chains; (2) the chemical reaction activity has size effect. The size effect disappears when the residue number exceeds 7. The Gn oligopeptides with 7 residues is the shortest chain which has the same reaction activity as that of longer size peptide; (3) the activity of GWn oligopeptides presents size effect and odd-even effect. However, the size effect and odd-even effect both vanish when the chain of GWn oligopeptides is longer than 12 residues. (4) It is difficult in self-assembly for GWn oligopeptide chains, because its activity mainly focuses on the indole ring and the Gn residues at the end of oligopeptides. (5) The big side groups result in the very near energy level of LUMO and LUMO+1 of GWn oligopeptide chains. It shows that the electron-accepting ability of oligopeptide chainsis composed of two orbitals addition. The results in the paper may help us understand the changes of physical and chemical properties of peptide synthesis process.

  16. Perspective of future drugs targeting sterile 20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase for blood pressure control

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Gen-Min; Liu, Pang-Yen; Wu, Ching-Fen; Wang, Wen-Been; Han, Chih-Lu

    2015-01-01

    According to a genome-wide association study, intronic SNPs within the human sterile 20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) gene was linked to 20% of the general population and may be associated with elevated blood pressure. As cell volume changes, mammalian SPAK kinases respond to phosphorylate and regulate cation-coupled chloride co-transporter activity. To our knowledge, phosphorylation of upstream with-no-lysine (K) (WNK) kinases would activate SPAK kinases. The activation of WNK-OSR1/SPAK cascade on the kidneys and aortic tissue is related to the development of hypertension. Several regulators of the WNK pathway such as the Kelch kinase protein 3 - Cullin 3 E3 ligase, hyperinsulinemia, and low potassium intake to mediate hypertension have been identified. In addition, the SPAK kinases may affect the action of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system on blood pressure as well. In 2010, two SPAK knock-in and knock-out mouse models have clarified the pathogenesis of lowering blood pressure by influencing the receptors on the kidneys and aortic smooth muscle. More recently, two novel SPAK inhibitors for mice, Stock 1S-14279 and Closantel were discovered in 2014. Targeting of SPAK seems to be promising for future antihypertensive therapy. Therefore we raised some viewpoints for the issue for the antihypertensive therapy on the SPAK (gene or kinase). PMID:26131334

  17. Autolytic system of Staphylococcus simulans 22: influence of cationic peptides on activity of N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase.

    PubMed Central

    Bierbaum, G; Sahl, H G

    1987-01-01

    Pep 5 and nisin are cationic peptide antibiotics which in addition to their membrane-disruptive action induce autolysis in staphylococci. To investigate the mechanism of lysis induction, the influence of the peptides on the activity of the N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase of Staphylococcus simulans 22 was studied. In experiments with isolated cell walls at low ionic strength, the amidase activity was stimulated by the addition of Pep 5 and nisin, as well as by polylysine, streptomycin, and mono- and divalent cations. The concentrations necessary for activation depended on the nature of the cation and ranged from 5 microM for poly-L-lysine (n = 17) to 150 mM for Na+ at a cell wall concentration of 100 micrograms of cell walls per ml. No effect was observed if the cell walls were devoid of polyanionic constituents. Kinetic data suggested that the amidase bound to the teichoic and teichuronic acids of the cell wall and was thereby inhibited. Cationic molecules reversed this inhibition, most likely by displacing the enzyme from the polyanions. If the concentrations of the larger peptides were high in relation to cell wall concentration, the activation turned into inhibition, presumably by interfering with the access of the enzyme to its substrate. These experiments demonstrate that the activity of the amidase is modulated by basic peptides in vitro and help to explain how Pep 5 and nisin may cause lysis of treated cells. Images PMID:2890620

  18. Use of a tritium release assay to measure 6-N-trimethyl-L-lysine hydroxylase activity: synthesis of 6-N-(3-/sup 3/H)Trimethyl-DL-lysine

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, R.; England, S.

    1981-09-01

    6-N-(3-/sup 3/H)Trimethyl-DL-lysine was synthesized from 6-N-acetyl-L-lysine by the following chemical scheme: 6-N-acetyl-L-lysine ..-->.. 2-keto-6-N-acetylcaproic acid ..-->.. 2-(3-/sup 3/H)keto-6-N-acetylcaproic acid ..-->.. 2-(3-/sup 3/H)keto-6-N-acetylcaproic acid oxime ..-->.. 6-N-(3-/sup 3/H)acetyl-DL-lysine ..-->.. DL-(3-/sup 3/H)lysine ..-->.. 2-N-(3-/sup 3/H)formyl-DL-lysine ..-->.. 2-(3-/sup 3/H)formyl-6-N-trimethyl-DL-lysine ..-->.. 6-N-(3-/sup 3/H)trimethyl-DL-lysine. Using a 70% ammonium sulfate fraction obtained from a high-speed rate kidney supernatant, the cosubstrate and cofactor requirements for 6-N-trimethyl-L-lysine hydroxylase activity as measured by tritium release from 6-N-(3-/sup 3/H)trimethyl-DL-lysine were: ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate, ferrous ions, L-ascorbate, and oxygen, with added catalase showing a slight but distinct stimulatory effect. On incubation with the crude rat kidney preparation, the release of tritium from 6-N-(3-/sup 3/H)trimethyl-DL-lysine was linear with both time of incubation and protein concentration. Hydroxylation of 6-N-trimethyl-L-lysine, as measured by tritium release from the labeled substrate, was examined in rat kidney, heart, liver, and skeletal muscle tissues, and found to be most active in the kidney.

  19. High Affinity Binding of the Receptor-associated Protein D1D2 Domains with the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein (LRP1) Involves Bivalent Complex Formation: CRITICAL ROLES OF LYSINES 60 AND 191.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Joni M; Young, Patricia A; Strickland, Dudley K

    2016-08-26

    The LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is a large endocytic receptor that binds and mediates the endocytosis of numerous structurally diverse ligands. Currently, the basis for ligand recognition by LRP1 is not well understood. LRP1 requires a molecular chaperone, termed the receptor-associated protein (RAP), to escort the newly synthesized receptor from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi. RAP is a three-domain protein that contains the following two high affinity binding sites for LRP1: one is located within domains 1 and 2, and one is located in its third domain. Studies on the interaction of the RAP third domain with LRP1 reveal critical contributions by lysine 256 and lysine 270 for this interaction. From these studies, a model for ligand recognition by this class of receptors has been proposed. Here, we employed surface plasmon resonance to investigate the binding of RAP D1D2 to LRP1. Our results reveal that the high affinity of D1D2 for LRP1 results from avidity effects mediated by the simultaneous interactions of lysine 60 in D1 and lysine 191 in D2 with sites on LRP1 to form a bivalent D1D2-LRP1 complex. When lysine 60 and 191 are both mutated to alanine, the binding of D1D2 to LRP1 is ablated. Our data also reveal that D1D2 is able to bind to a second distinct site on LRP1 to form a monovalent complex. The studies confirm the canonical model for ligand recognition by this class of receptors, which is initiated by pairs of lysine residues that dock into acidic pockets on the receptor. PMID:27402839

  20. Diversity of endophytic fungi in Glycine max.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Elio Gomes; Pereira, Olinto Liparini; da Silva, Cynthia Cânedo; Bento, Claudia Braga Pereira; de Queiroz, Marisa Vieira

    2015-12-01

    Endophytic fungi are microorganisms that live within plant tissues without causing disease during part of their life cycle. With the isolation and identification of these fungi, new species are being discovered, and ecological relationships with their hosts have also been studied. In Glycine max, limited studies have investigated the isolation and distribution of endophytic fungi throughout leaves and roots. The distribution of these fungi in various plant organs differs in diversity and abundance, even when analyzed using molecular techniques that can evaluate fungal communities in different parts of the plants, such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Our results show there is greater species richness of culturable endophytic filamentous fungi in the leaves G. max as compared to roots. Additionally, the leaves had high values for diversity indices, i.e. Simpsons, Shannon and Equitability. Conversely, dominance index was higher in roots as compared to leaves. The fungi Ampelomyces sp., Cladosporium cladosporioides, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Diaporthe helianthi, Guignardia mangiferae and Phoma sp. were more frequently isolated from the leaves, whereas the fungi Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium solani and Fusarium sp. were prevalent in the roots. However, by evaluating the two communities by DGGE, we concluded that the species richness was higher in the roots than in the leaves. UPGMA analysis showed consistent clustering of isolates; however, the fungus Leptospora rubella, which belongs to the order Dothideales, was grouped among species of the order Pleosporales. The presence of endophytic Fusarium species in G. max roots is unsurprising, since Fusarium spp. isolates have been previously described as endophyte in other reports. However, it remains to be determined whether the G. max Fusarium endophytes are latent pathogens or non-pathogenic forms that benefit the plant. This study provides a broader knowledge of the distribution of the fungal

  1. Performance effects of acute β-alanine induced paresthesia in competitive cyclists.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, Phillip M; Minahan, Clare L

    2016-01-01

    β-alanine is a common ingredient in supplements consumed by athletes. Indeed, athletes may believe that the β-alanine induced paresthesia, experienced shortly after ingestion, is associated with its ergogenic effect despite no scientific mechanism supporting this notion. The present study examined changes in cycling performance under conditions of β-alanine induced paresthesia. Eight competitive cyclists (VO2max = 61.8 ± 4.2 mL·kg·min(-1)) performed three practices, one baseline and four experimental trials. The experimental trials comprised a 1-km cycling time trial under four conditions with varying information (i.e., athlete informed β-alanine or placebo) and supplement content (athlete received β-alanine or placebo) delivered to the cyclist: informed β-alanine/received β-alanine, informed placebo/received β-alanine, informed β-alanine/received placebo and informed placebo/received placebo. Questionnaires were undertaken exploring the cyclists' experience of the effects of the experimental conditions. A possibly likely increase in mean power was associated with conditions in which β-alanine was administered (±95% CL: 2.2% ± 4.0%), but these results were inconclusive for performance enhancement (p = 0.32, effect size = 0.18, smallest worthwhile change = 56% beneficial). A possibly harmful effect was observed when cyclists were correctly informed that they had ingested a placebo (-1.0% ± 1.9%). Questionnaire data suggested that β-alanine ingestion resulted in evident sensory side effects and six cyclists reported placebo effects. Acute ingestion of β-alanine is not associated with improved 1-km TT performance in competitive cyclists. These findings are in contrast to the athlete's "belief" as cyclists reported improved energy and the ability to sustain a higher power output under conditions of β-alanine induced paresthesia. PMID:25636080

  2. Conserved transmembrane glycine residues in the Shigella flexneri polysaccharide co-polymerase protein WzzB influence protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Magdalene; Tran, Elizabeth Ngoc Hoa; Murray, Gerald Laurence; Morona, Renato

    2016-06-01

    The O antigen (Oag) component of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) is crucial for virulence and Oag chain-length regulation is controlled by the polysaccharide co-polymerase class 1 (PCP1) proteins. Crystal structure analyses indicate that structural conservation among PCP1 proteins is highly maintained, however the mechanism of Oag modal-chain-length control remains to be fully elucidated. Shigella flexneri PCP1 protein WzzBSF confers a modal-chain length of 10-17 Oag repeat units (RUs), whereas the Salmonella enterica Typhimurium PCP1 protein WzzBST confers a modal-chain length of ~16-28 Oag RUs. Both proteins share >70 % overall sequence identity and contain two transmembrane (TM1 and TM2) regions, whereby a conserved proline-glycine-rich motif overlapping the TM2 region is identical in both proteins. Conserved glycine residues within TM2 are functionally important, as glycine to alanine substitutions at positions 305 and 311 confer very short Oag modal-chain length (~2-6 Oag RUs). In this study, WzzBSF was co-expressed with WzzBST in S. flexneri and a single intermediate modal-chain length of ~11-21 Oag RUs was observed, suggesting the presence of Wzz:Wzz interactions. Interestingly, co-expression of WzzBSF with WzzBG305A/G311A conferred a bimodal LPS Oag chain length (despite over 99 % protein sequence identity), and we hypothesized that the proteins fail to interact. Co-purification assays detected His6-WzzBSF co-purifying with FLAG-tagged WzzBST but not with FLAG-tagged WzzBG305A/G311A, supporting our hypothesis. These data indicate that the conserved glycine residues in TM2 are involved in Wzz:Wzz interactions, and provide insight into key interactions that drive Oag modal length control. PMID:27028755

  3. Mutations within the agonist-binding site convert the homomeric alpha1 glycine receptor into a Zn2+-activated chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Grudzinska, Joanna; Schumann, Tanja; Schemm, Rudolf; Betz, Heinrich; Laube, Bodo

    2008-01-01

    The divalent cation Zn2+ has been shown to regulate inhibitory neurotransmission in the mammalian CNS by affecting the activation of the strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor (GlyR). In spinal neurons and cells expressing recombinant GlyRs, low micromolar (<10 microM) concentrations of Zn2+ enhance glycine currents, whereas higher concentrations (>10 microM) have an inhibitory effect. Mutational studies have localized the Zn2+ binding sites mediating allosteric potentiation and inhibition of GlyRs in distinct regions of the N-terminal extracellular domain of the GlyR alpha-subunits. Here, we examined the Zn2+ sensitivity of different mutations within the agonist binding site of the homomeric alpha(1)-subunit GlyR upon heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes. This revealed that six substitutions within the ligand-binding pocket result in a total loss of Zn2+ inhibition. Furthermore, substitution of the positively charged residues arginine 65 and arginine 131 by alanine (alpha(1)(R65A), alpha(1)(R131A), or of the aromatic residue phenylalanine 207 by histidine (alpha(1)(F207H)), converted the alpha(1) GlyR into a chloride channel that was activated by Zn2+ alone. Dose-response analysis of the alpha(1)(F207H) GlyR disclosed an EC(50) value of 1.2 microM for Zn2+ activation; concomitantly the apparent glycine affinity was 1000-fold reduced. Thus, single point mutations within the agonist-binding site of the alpha(1) subunit convert the inhibitory GlyR from a glycine-gated into a selectively Zn2+-activated chloride channel. This might be exploited for the design of metal-specific biosensors by modeling-assisted mutagenesis. PMID:18690053

  4. Crystal Structure of the Lysine Riboswitch Regulatory mRNA Element*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Garst, Andrew D.; Héroux, Annie; Rambo, Robert P.; Batey, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    Riboswitches are metabolite-sensitive elements found in mRNAs that control gene expression through a regulatory secondary structural switch. Along with regulation of lysine biosynthetic genes, mutations within the lysine-responsive riboswitch (L-box) play a role in the acquisition of resistance to antimicrobial lysine analogs. To understand the structural basis for lysine binding, we have determined the 2.8Å resolution crystal structure of lysine bound to the Thermotoga maritima asd lysine riboswitch ligand-binding domain. The structure reveals a complex architecture scaffolding a binding pocket completely enveloping lysine. Mutations conferring antimicrobial resistance cluster around this site as well as highly conserved long range interactions, indicating that they disrupt lysine binding or proper folding of the RNA. Comparison of the free and bound forms by x-ray crystallography, small angle x-ray scattering, and chemical probing reveals almost identical structures, indicating that lysine induces only limited and local conformational changes upon binding. PMID:18593706

  5. Crystal structure of the lysine riboswitch regulatory mRNA element.

    PubMed

    Garst, Andrew D; Héroux, Annie; Rambo, Robert P; Batey, Robert T

    2008-08-15

    Riboswitches are metabolite-sensitive elements found in mRNAs that control gene expression through a regulatory secondary structural switch. Along with regulation of lysine biosynthetic genes, mutations within the lysine-responsive riboswitch (L-box) play a role in the acquisition of resistance to antimicrobial lysine analogs. To understand the structural basis for lysine binding, we have determined the 2.8 angstroms resolution crystal structure of lysine bound to the Thermotoga maritima asd lysine riboswitch ligand-binding domain. The structure reveals a complex architecture scaffolding a binding pocket completely enveloping lysine. Mutations conferring antimicrobial resistance cluster around this site as well as highly conserved long range interactions, indicating that they disrupt lysine binding or proper folding of the RNA. Comparison of the free and bound forms by x-ray crystallography, small angle x-ray scattering, and chemical probing reveals almost identical structures, indicating that lysine induces only limited and local conformational changes upon binding. PMID:18593706

  6. Crystal Structure of the Lysine Riboswitch Regulatory mRNA Element

    SciTech Connect

    Garst, A.; Heroux, A; Rambo, R; Batey, R

    2008-01-01

    Riboswitches are metabolite-sensitive elements found in mRNAs that control gene expression through a regulatory secondary structural switch. Along with regulation of lysine biosynthetic genes, mutations within the lysine-responsive riboswitch (L-box) play a role in the acquisition of resistance to antimicrobial lysine analogs. To understand the structural basis for lysine binding, we have determined the 2.8{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of lysine bound to the Thermotoga maritima asd lysine riboswitch ligand-binding domain. The structure reveals a complex architecture scaffolding a binding pocket completely enveloping lysine. Mutations conferring antimicrobial resistance cluster around this site as well as highly conserved long range interactions, indicating that they disrupt lysine binding or proper folding of the RNA. Comparison of the free and bound forms by x-ray crystallography, small angle x-ray scattering, and chemical probing reveals almost identical structures, indicating that lysine induces only limited and local conformational changes upon binding.

  7. Detection of serum AFB1-lysine adduct in Malaysia and its association with liver and kidney functions.

    PubMed

    Mohd Redzwan, S; Rosita, Jamaluddin; Mohd Sokhini, A M; Nurul 'Aqilah, A R; Wang, Jia-Sheng; Kang, Min-Su; Zuraini, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Aflatoxin is ubiquitously found in many foodstuffs and produced by Aspergillus species of fungi. Of many aflatoxin metabolites, AFB1 is classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as group one carcinogen and linked to the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The study on molecular biomarker of aflatoxin provides a better assessment on the extent of human exposure to aflatoxin. In Malaysia, the occurrences of aflatoxin-contaminated foods have been documented, but there is a lack of data on human exposure to aflatoxin. Hence, this study investigated the occurrence of AFB1-lysine adduct in serum samples and its association with liver and kidney functions. 5ml fasting blood samples were collected from seventy-one subjects (n=71) for the measurement of AFB1-lysine adduct, albumin, total bilirubin, AST (aspartate aminotransferase), ALT (alanine transaminase), ALP (alkaline phosphatase), GGT (gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase), creatinine and BUN (blood urea nitrogen). The AFB1-lysine adduct was detected in all serum samples (100% detection rate) with a mean of 6.85±3.20pg/mg albumin (range: 1.13-18.85pg/mg albumin). Male subjects (mean: 8.03±3.41pg/mg albumin) had significantly higher adduct levels than female subjects (mean: 5.64±2.46pg/mg albumin) (p<0.01). It was noteworthy that subjects with adduct levels greater than average (>6.85pg/mg albumin) had significantly elevated level of total bilirubin (p<0.01), GGT (p<0.05) and creatinine (p<0.01). Nevertheless, only the level of total bilirubin, (r=0.347, p-value=0.003) and creatinine (r=0.318, p-value=0.007) showed significant and positive correlation with the level of AFB1-lysine adduct. This study provides a valuable insight on human exposure to aflatoxin in Malaysia. Given that aflatoxin can pose serious problem to the health, intervention strategies should be implemented to limit/reduce human exposure to aflatoxin. Besides, a study with a big sample size should be warranted in

  8. A Role for Accumbal Glycine Receptors in Modulation of Dopamine Release by the Glycine Transporter-1 Inhibitor Org25935

    PubMed Central

    Lidö, Helga Höifödt; Ericson, Mia; Marston, Hugh; Söderpalm, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Accumbal glycine modulates basal and ethanol-induced dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens (nAc) as well as voluntary ethanol consumption. Also, systemic administration of the glycine transporter-1 inhibitor Org25935 elevates dopamine levels in nAc, prevents a further ethanol-induced dopamine elevation and robustly and dose-dependently decreases ethanol consumption in rats. Here we investigated whether Org25935 applied locally in nAc modulates dopamine release, and whether accumbal glycine receptors or NMDA receptors are involved in this tentative effect. We also addressed whether Org25935 and ethanol applied locally in nAc interact with dopamine levels, as seen after systemic administration. We used in vivo microdialysis coupled to HPLC-ED in freely moving male Wistar rats to monitor dopamine output in nAc after local perfusion of Org25935 alone, with ethanol, or Org25935-perfusion after pre-treatment with the glycine receptor antagonist strychnine or the NMDA receptor glycine site antagonist L-701.324. Local Org25935 increased extracellular dopamine levels in a subpopulation of rats. Local strychnine, but not systemic L-701.324, antagonized the dopamine-activating effect of Org25935. Ethanol failed to induce a dopamine overflow in the subpopulation responding to Org25935 with a dopamine elevation. The study supports a role for accumbal glycine receptors rather than NMDA receptor signaling in the dopamine-activating effect of Org25935. The results further indicate that the previously reported systemic Org25935–ethanol interaction with regard to accumbal dopamine is localized to the nAc. This adds to the growing evidence for the glycine receptor as an important player in the dopamine reward circuitry and in ethanol's effects within this system. PMID:21556278

  9. Caffeine–N-phthaloyl-β-alanine (1/1)

    PubMed Central

    Bhatti, Moazzam H.; Yunus, Uzma; Shah, Syed Raza; Flörke, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    The title co-crystal [systematic name: 3-(1,3-dioxoisoindolin-2-yl)propanoic acid–1,3,7-trimethyl-1H-purine-2,6(3H,7H)-dione (1/1)], C8H10N4O2·C11H9NO4, is the combination of 1:1 adduct of N-phthaloyl-β-alanine with caffeine. The phthalimide and purine rings in the N-phthaloyl-β-alanine and caffeine mol­ecules are essentially planar, with r.m.s. deviations of the fitted atoms of 0.0078 and 0.0118 Å, respectively. In the crystal, the two mol­ecules are linked via an O—H⋯N hydrogen bond involving the intact carb­oxy­lic acid (COOH) group. The crystal structure is consolidated by C—H⋯O inter­actions. The H atoms of a methyl group of the caffeine mol­ecule are disordered over two sets of sites of equal occupancy. PMID:22719646

  10. The effect of immunonutrition (glutamine, alanine) on fracture healing

    PubMed Central

    Küçükalp, Abdullah; Durak, Kemal; Bayyurt, Sarp; Sönmez, Gürsel; Bilgen, Muhammed S.

    2014-01-01

    Background There have been various studies related to fracture healing. Glutamine is an amino acid with an important role in many cell and organ functions. This study aimed to make a clinical, radiological, and histopathological evaluation of the effects of glutamine on fracture healing. Methods Twenty rabbits were randomly allocated into two groups of control and immunonutrition. A fracture of the fibula was made to the right hind leg. All rabbits received standard food and water. From post-operative first day for 30 days, the study group received an additional 2 ml/kg/day 20% L-alanine L-glutamine solution via a gastric catheter, and the control group received 2 ml/kg/day isotonic via gastric catheter. At the end of 30 days, the rabbits were sacrificed and the fractures were examined clinically, radiologically, and histopathologically in respect to the degree of union. Results Radiological evaluation of the control group determined a mean score of 2.5 according to the orthopaedists and 2.65 according to the radiologists. In the clinical evaluation, the mean score was 1.875 for the control group and 2.0 for the study group. Histopathological evaluation determined a mean score of 8.5 for the control group and 9.0 for the study group. Conclusion One month after orally administered glutamine–alanine, positive effects were observed on fracture healing radiologically, clinically, and histopathologically, although no statistically significant difference was determined.

  11. An Alternative Strategy for Pan-acetyl-lysine Antibody Generation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Yee; Sim, Choon Kiat; Zhang, Qiongyi; Tang, Hui; Brunmeir, Reinhard; Pan, Hong; Karnani, Neerja; Han, Weiping; Zhang, Kangling; Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is an important post-translational modification in cell signaling. In acetylome studies, a high-quality pan-acetyl-lysine antibody is key to successful enrichment of acetylated peptides for subsequent mass spectrometry analysis. Here we show an alternative method to generate polyclonal pan-acetyl-lysine antibodies using a synthesized random library of acetylated peptides as the antigen. Our antibodies are tested to be specific for acetyl-lysine peptides/proteins via ELISA and dot blot. When pooled, five of our antibodies show broad reactivity to acetyl-lysine peptides, complementing a commercial antibody in terms of peptide coverage. The consensus sequence of peptides bound by our antibody cocktail differs slightly from that of the commercial antibody. Lastly, our antibodies are tested in a proof-of-concept to analyze the acetylome of HEK293 cells. In total we identified 1557 acetylated peptides from 416 proteins. We thus demonstrated that our antibodies are well-qualified for acetylome studies and can complement existing commercial antibodies. PMID:27606599

  12. Seed-specific expression of a lysine-rich protein gene, GhLRP, from cotton significantly increases the lysine content in maize seeds.

    PubMed

    Yue, Jing; Li, Cong; Zhao, Qian; Zhu, Dengyun; Yu, Jingjuan

    2014-01-01

    Maize seed storage proteins are a major source of human and livestock consumption. However, these proteins have poor nutritional value, because they are deficient in lysine and tryptophan. Much research has been done to elevate the lysine content by reducing zein content or regulating the activities of key enzymes in lysine metabolism. Using the naturally lysine-rich protein genes, sb401 and SBgLR, from potato, we previously increased the lysine and protein contents of maize seeds. Here, we examined another natural lysine-rich protein gene, GhLRP, from cotton, which increased the lysine content of transgenic maize seeds at levels varying from 16.2% to 65.0% relative to the wild-type. The total protein content was not distinctly different, except in the six transgenic lines. The lipid and starch levels did not differ substantially in Gossypium hirsutum L. lysine-rich protein (GhLRP) transgenic kernels when compared to wild-type. The agronomic characteristics of all the transgenic maize were also normal. GhLRP is a high-lysine protein candidate gene for increasing the lysine content of maize. This study provided a valuable model system for improving maize lysine content. PMID:24681583

  13. Targeting Lysine Deacetylases (KDACs) in Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; Rosa, Bruce A.; Nare, Bakela; Powell, Kerrie; Valente, Sergio; Rotili, Dante; Mai, Antonello; Marshall, Garland R.; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2015-01-01

    Due to an increasing problem of drug resistance among almost all parasites species ranging from protists to worms, there is an urgent need to explore new drug targets and their inhibitors to provide new and effective parasitic therapeutics. In this regard, there is growing interest in exploring known drug leads of human epigenetic enzymes as potential starting points to develop novel treatments for parasitic diseases. This approach of repurposing (starting with validated targets and inhibitors) is quite attractive since it has the potential to reduce the expense of drug development and accelerate the process of developing novel drug candidates for parasite control. Lysine deacetylases (KDACs) are among the most studied epigenetic drug targets of humans, and a broad range of small-molecule inhibitors for these enzymes have been reported. In this work, we identify the KDAC protein families in representative species across important classes of parasites, screen a compound library of 23 hydroxamate- or benzamide-based small molecules KDAC inhibitors, and report their activities against a range of parasitic species, including the pathogen of malaria (Plasmodium falciparum), kinetoplastids (Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania donovani), and nematodes (Brugia malayi, Dirofilaria immitis and Haemonchus contortus). Compound activity against parasites is compared to that observed against the mammalian cell line (L929 mouse fibroblast) in order to determine potential parasite-versus-host selectivity). The compounds showed nanomolar to sub-nanomolar potency against various parasites, and some selectivity was observed within the small panel of compounds tested. The possible binding modes of the active compounds at the different protein target sites within different species were explored by docking to homology models to help guide the discovery of more selective, parasite-specific inhibitors. This current work supports previous studies that explored the use of KDAC inhibitors in

  14. Positron Binding Properties of Glycine and Its Aqueous Complexes.

    PubMed

    Nummela, Mikko; Raebiger, Hannes; Yoshida, Daisuke; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2016-06-16

    We investigate positron binding to glycine and its aqueous complexes by first-principles calculation. We show that while glycine in its ground state (Gly) does not bind positrons, several of its strongly polar conformers do, and in particular, its zwitterion form (GlyZI) binds positrons strongly. Aqueous complexes Gly·nH2O and GlyZI·nH2O also bind positrons, if their dipole moment μ > μcr. However, μ is not a sufficient quantity to describe positron binding to these complexes. We show that in addition to μ, positron binding strongly depends on the intramolecular bonding of glycine. In Gly·nH2O, positrons are weakly bound to the nitrogen in Gly, whereas in GlyZI·nH2O, the ionic oxygen in GlyZI is a strong "positron attractor". PMID:27232201

  15. Cometary Glycine Detected in Samples Returned by Stardust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, Jamie E.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2009-01-01

    Our previous analysis of cometary samples returned to Earth by NASA's Stardust spacecraft showed several amines and amino acids, but the or igin of these compounds could not be firmly established. Here, we pre sent the stable carbon isotopic ratios of glycine and E-amino-n-caproic acid (EACA), the two most abundant amino acids identified in Stardu st-returned foil samples measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrom etry coupled with isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The Delta C-13 value for glycine of +29 +/- ? 6%: strongly suggests an extraterrestrial origin For glycine, while the Delta C-13 value for EACA of -25 +/-2 % indicates terrestrial contamination by Nylon-6 during curation. This represents the first detection of a cometary amino acid.

  16. Decreased alanine aminotransferase activity in serum of man during gamma-acetylenic-GABA treatment.

    PubMed

    Olsen, R; Hørder, M

    1980-06-01

    Decreasing concentrations of alanine aminotransferase were observed in nine patients receiving gamma-acetylenic-GABA, an inhibitor of GABA aminotransferase. In vitro studies showed that preincubation at 37 degrees C of serum with gamma-acetylenic-GABA and with urine from a patient receiving the drug led to inhibition of alanine aminotransferase. This inhibition of alanine aminotransferase by gamma-acetylenic-GABA was neutralized by 1-analine, the natural substrate for the enzyme. The mechanism of inhibition may be a competition between the drug and 1-alanine for the substrate binding site of the enzyme. PMID:7414257

  17. Effect of β-alanine supplementation on high-intensity exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Harris, Roger C; Stellingwerff, Trent

    2013-01-01

    Carnosine is a dipeptide of β-alanine and L-histidine found in high concentrations in skeletal muscle. Combined with β-alanine, the pKa of the histidine imidazole ring is raised to ∼6.8, placing it within the muscle intracellular pH high-intensity exercise transit range. Combination with β-alanine renders the dipeptide inert to intracellular enzymic hydrolysis and blocks the histidinyl residue from participation in proteogenesis, thus making it an ideal, stable intracellular buffer. For vegetarians, synthesis is limited by β-alanine availability; for meat-eaters, hepatic synthesis is supplemented with β-alanine from the hydrolysis of dietary carnosine. Direct oral β-alanine supplementation will compensate for low meat and fish intake, significantly raising the muscle carnosine concentration. This is best achieved with a sustained-release formulation of β-alanine to avoid paresthesia symptoms and decreasing urinary spillover. In humans, increased levels of carnosine through β-alanine supplementation have been shown to increase exercise capacity and performance of several types, particularly where the high-intensity exercise range is 1-4 min. β-Alanine supplementation is used by athletes competing in high-intensity track and field cycling, rowing, swimming events and other competitions. PMID:23899755

  18. Multiple lysine methylation of PCAF by Set9 methyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Masatsugu, Toshihiro; Yamamoto, Ken

    2009-03-27

    The molecular functions of several non-histone proteins are regulated through lysine modification by histone methyltransferases. The p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF) is an acetyltransferase that has been implicated in many cellular processes. Here, we report that PCAF is a novel substrate of Set9 methyltransferase. In vitro mapping experiments revealed six lysine residues could be methylated by Set9. A comparison of amino acid sequences of target sites revealed the novel consensus motif which differs from previously identified Set9-consensus sequence. Further methyltransferase assays focusing on the six lysine residues showed that K78 and K89 are preferentially methylated in full-length PCAF in vitro. Using specific antibodies recognizing mono-methylated K89, in vivo PCAF methylation and its nuclear localization were demonstrated. Our data may lead to a new insight into PCAF functions and provide additional information to identify unknown targets of Set9.

  19. KATching-Up on Small Molecule Modulators of Lysine Acetyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Simon, Roman P; Robaa, Dina; Alhalabi, Zayan; Sippl, Wolfgang; Jung, Manfred

    2016-02-25

    The reversible acetylation of lysines is one of the best characterized epigenetic modifications. Its involvement in many key physiological and pathological processes has been documented in numerous studies. Lysine deacetylases (KDACs) and acetyltransferases (KATs) maintain the acetylation equilibrium at histones but also many other proteins. Besides acetylation, also other acyl groups are reversibly installed at the side chain of lysines in proteins. Because of their involvement in disease, KDACs and KATs were proposed to be promising drug targets, and for KDACs, indeed, five inhibitors are now approved for human use. While there is a similar level of evidence for the potential of KATs as drug targets, no inhibitor is in clinical trials. Here, we review the evidence for the diverse roles of KATs in disease pathology, provide an overview of structural features and the available modulators, including those targeting the bromodomains of KATs, and present an outlook. PMID:26701186

  20. Simultaneous detection of lysine metabolites by a single LC-MS/MS method: monitoring lysine degradation in mouse plasma.

    PubMed

    Pena, Izabella A; Marques, Lygia A; Laranjeira, Angelo B A; Yunes, José A; Eberlin, Marcos N; Arruda, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Detection and quantification of lysine degradation metabolites in plasma is necessary for the diagnosis and follow-up of diseases such as pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy. The principal metabolites involved in the disease are related to the first steps of lysine oxidation, either through the saccharopine or the pipecolate pathways. Currently, there are three different analytical methods used to assess the content of these metabolites in urine and plasma, but they require different sample preparations and analytical equipment. Here, we describe a protocol that calls for a simple sample preparation and uses liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) that allows simultaneous detection and quantification of underivatized l-saccharopine, l-aminoadipic acid, l-pipecolic acid, piperideine-6-carboxylate, l-glutamic acid, and pyridoxal-5-phosphate in plasma samples. To validate the method we analyzed the time course degradation after intraperitoneal injection of l-lysine in C57BL/6/J mice. We observed that the degradation of lysine through the saccharopine pathway reached a maximum within the first 2 h. At this time point there was an increase in the levels of the metabolites saccharopine, aminoadipic acid, and pipecolic acid by 3-, 24- and 3.4-fold, respectively, compared to time zero levels. These metabolites returned to basal levels after 4-6 h. In conclusion, we have developed a LC-MS/MS approach, which allows simultaneous analysis of lysine degradation metabolites without the need for derivatization. PMID:27026869

  1. Reactive lysine content in commercially available pet foods.

    PubMed

    van Rooijen, Charlotte; Bosch, Guido; van der Poel, Antonius F B; Wierenga, Peter A; Alexander, Lucille; Hendriks, Wouter H

    2014-01-01

    The Maillard reaction can occur during processing of pet foods. During this reaction, the ε-amino group of lysine reacts with reducing sugars to become unavailable for metabolism. The aim of the present study was to determine the reactive lysine (RL; the remaining available lysine) to total lysine (TL) ratio of commercial pet foods and to evaluate whether RL levels meet minimal lysine requirements (MLR). Sixty-seven extruded, canned and pelleted commercially available dog and cat foods for growth and maintenance were analysed for proximate nutrient composition, TL and RL. RL was expressed on a metabolisable energy basis and compared with the MLR for maintenance and growth. In dog foods, average RL:TL ratios were 0·87 (se 0·02) for extruded, 0·97 (se 0·02) for canned and 0·85 (se 0·01) for pelleted foods, with the lowest ratio of 0·77 in an extruded diet for growing dogs. In extruded and canned cat foods, the average ratio was 0·91 (se 0·02) and 0·90 (se 0·03), respectively, with the lowest ratio being 0·67 in an extruded diet for growing cats. Variation in the RL:TL ratio between and within processing type indicate that ingredients rather than processing might be the key factor influencing RL content in pet foods. Eight dry foods for growing dogs had RL contents between 96 and 138 % of MLR, indicating that RL has to be between 62 and 104 % digestible to meet the MLR. Considering the variability in RL digestibility, these foods could be at risk of not meeting the MLR for growing dogs. Ingredients and pet foods should be characterised with respect to the RL content and digestibility, to avoid limitations in the lysine supply to growing dogs. PMID:26101604

  2. Lysine fluxes across the jejunal epithelium in lysinuric protein intolerance.

    PubMed

    Desjeux, J F; Simell, R O; Dumontier, A M; Perheentupa, J

    1980-06-01

    Lysinuric protein intolerance (LPI) is one of a group of genetic diseases in which intestinal absorption of the diamino acids lysine, arginine, and ornithine is impaired. In LPI, the clinical symptoms are more severe than in the kindred disorders. The mechanism of lysine absorption was, therefore, investigated in vitro on peroral jejunal biopsy specimens in seven patients with LPI and 27 controls. The lysine concentration ratio between cell compartment and medium was significantly higher in the LPI group (mean+/-SEM, 7.17+/-0.60) than in the controls (5.44+/-0.51). This was also true for the intracellular Na concentration (LPI, 73.6+/-10.8 mM; controls 42.3+/-3.7 mM). The rate of unidirectional influx of lysine across the luminal membrane was Na dependent and was the same in the two groups. In the absence of an electrochemical gradient, net transepithelial lysine secretion was observed in LPI. This was entirely the result of a 60% reduction of the unidirectional flux from mucosa to serosa. Calculation of unidirectional fluxes revealed the most striking difference at the basolateral membrane, where the flux from cells to serosa was reduced by 62% and the corresponding permeability coefficient reduced by 71%. A progressive reduction in short-circuit current appeared in the epithelia of all four patients with LPI tested after addition of 3 mM lysine. Thus, LPI appears to be the first disease in which a genetically determined transport defect has been demonstrated at the basolateral membrane. PMID:6773985

  3. Sugar Substrates for l-Lysine Fermentation by Ustilago maydis

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Marroquín, A.; Ledezma, M.; Carreño, R.

    1970-01-01

    The extracellular production of l-lysine in media with cane sugar, blackstrap molasses, or clarified sugar-cane juice by a previously obtained mutant of Ustilago maydis was studied. Enzymatically inverted clarified juice (medium J-3) gave 2.9 g of lysine per liter under the following conditions: inoculum, 5%; pH 5.8; temperature, 30 C; KLa in the fermentors, 0.41 mmoles of O2 per liter per min; fermentation time, 72 hr. The concentrate, obtained by direct evaporation and drying of the fermentation broth, could be used as a possible feed supplement because of its amino-acid and vitamin content. PMID:5485081

  4. Sugar substrates for L-lysine fermentation by Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Marroquín, A; Ledezma, M; Carreño, R

    1970-11-01

    The extracellular production of l-lysine in media with cane sugar, blackstrap molasses, or clarified sugar-cane juice by a previously obtained mutant of Ustilago maydis was studied. Enzymatically inverted clarified juice (medium J-3) gave 2.9 g of lysine per liter under the following conditions: inoculum, 5%; pH 5.8; temperature, 30 C; K(La) in the fermentors, 0.41 mmoles of O(2) per liter per min; fermentation time, 72 hr. The concentrate, obtained by direct evaporation and drying of the fermentation broth, could be used as a possible feed supplement because of its amino-acid and vitamin content. PMID:5485081

  5. The pea seedling mitochondrial Nε-lysine acetylome.

    PubMed

    Smith-Hammond, Colin L; Hoyos, Elizabeth; Miernyk, Ján A

    2014-11-01

    Posttranslational lysine acetylation is believed to occur in all taxa and to affect thousands of proteins. In contrast to the hundreds of mitochondrial proteins reported to be lysine-acetylated in non-plant species, only a handful have been reported from the plant taxa previously examined. To investigate whether this reflects a biologically significant difference or merely a peculiarity of the samples thus far examined, we immunoenriched and analyzed acetylated peptides from highly purified pea seedling mitochondria using mass spectrometry. Our results indicate that a multitude of mitochondrial proteins, involved in a variety of processes, are acetylated in pea seedlings. PMID:24780491

  6. Calculating chemical equilibria in the heparin-Co2+ ion-glycine system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feofanova, M. A.; Frantseva, Yu. V.; Zhuravlev, E. V.; Ryasensky, S. S.; Baranova, N. V.

    2013-08-01

    Results from investigating interactions in the heparin-Co2+ ion-glycine system are presented. The stoichiometry of cobalt complexes with heparin and glycine compositions CoOHHtpGly4- and CoHepGly3- is established.

  7. Some Operational Characteristics of Glycine Release in Rat Retina: The Role of Reverse Mode Operation of Glycine Transporter Type-1 (GlyT-1) in Ischemic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Hanuska, Adrienn; Szénási, Gábor; Albert, Mihaly; Koles, Laszlo; Varga, Agoston; Szabo, Andras; Matyus, Peter; Harsing, Laszlo G

    2016-02-01

    Rat posterior eyecups containing the retina were prepared, loaded with [(3)H]glycine and superfused in order to determine its release originated from glycinergic amacrine cells and/or glial cells. Deprivation of oxygen and glucose from the Krebs-bicarbonate buffer used for superfusion evoked a marked increase of [(3)H]glycine release, an effect that was found to be external Ca(2+)-independent. Whereas oxygen and glucose deprivation increased [(3)H]glycine release, its uptake was reduced suggesting that energy deficiency shifts glycine transporter type-1 operation from normal to reverse mode. The increased release of [(3)H]glycine evoked by oxygen and glucose deprivation was suspended by addition of the non-competitive glycine transporter type-1 inhibitor NFPS and the competitive inhibitor ACPPB further suggesting the involvement of this transporter in the mediation of [(3)H]glycine release. Oxygen and glucose deprivation also evoked [(3)H]glutamate release from rat retina and the concomitantly occurring release of the NMDA receptor agonist glutamate and the coagonist glycine makes NMDA receptor pathological overstimulation possible in hypoxic conditions. [(3)H]Glutamate release was suspended by addition of the excitatory amino acid transporter inhibitor TBOA. Sarcosine, a substrate inhibitor of glycine transporter type-1, also increased [(3)H]glycine release probably by heteroexchange shifting transporter operation into reverse mode. This effect of sarcosine was also external Ca(2+)-independent and could be suspended by NFPS. Energy deficiency in retina induced by ouabain, an inhibitor of the Na(+)-K(+)-dependent ATPase, and by rotenone, a mitochondrial complex I inhibitor added with the glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxy-D-glucose, led to increase of retinal [(3)H]glycine efflux. These effects of ouabain and rotenone/2-deoxy-D-glucose could also be blocked by NFPS pointed to the preferential reverse mode operation of glycine transporter type-1 as a consequence of

  8. Radiolysis of alanine adsorbed in a clay mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Ovando, Ellen Y.; Negrón-Mendoza, Alicia

    2013-07-01

    Optical activity in molecules is a chemical characteristic of living beings. In this work, we examine the hypothesis of the influence of different mineral surfaces on the development of a specific chirality in organic molecules when subjected to conditions simulating the primitive Earth during the period of chemical evolution. By using X-ray diffraction techniques and HPLC/ELSD to analyze aqueous suspensions of amino acids adsorbed on minerals irradiated in different doses with a cobalt-60 gamma source, the experiments attempt to prove the hypothesis that some solid surfaces (like clays and meteorite rocks) may have a concentration capacity and protective role against external sources of ionizing radiation (specifically γ-ray) for some organic compounds (like some amino acids) adsorbed on them. Preliminary results show a slight difference in the adsorption and radiolysis of the D-and L-alanine.

  9. Radiolysis of alanine adsorbed in a clay mineral

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Ovando, Ellen Y.; Negron-Mendoza, Alicia

    2013-07-03

    Optical activity in molecules is a chemical characteristic of living beings. In this work, we examine the hypothesis of the influence of different mineral surfaces on the development of a specific chirality in organic molecules when subjected to conditions simulating the primitive Earth during the period of chemical evolution. By using X-ray diffraction techniques and HPLC/ELSD to analyze aqueous suspensions of amino acids adsorbed on minerals irradiated in different doses with a cobalt-60 gamma source, the experiments attempt to prove the hypothesis that some solid surfaces (like clays and meteorite rocks) may have a concentration capacity and protective role against external sources of ionizing radiation (specifically {gamma}-ray) for some organic compounds (like some amino acids) adsorbed on them. Preliminary results show a slight difference in the adsorption and radiolysis of the D-and L-alanine.

  10. Structural aspects of the solvation shell of lysine and acetylated lysine: A Car-Parrinello and classical molecular dynamics investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnevale, V.; Raugei, S.

    2009-12-01

    Lysine acetylation is a post-translational modification, which modulates the affinity of protein-protein and/or protein-DNA complexes. Its crucial role as a switch in signaling pathways highlights the relevance of charged chemical groups in determining the interactions between water and biomolecules. A great effort has been recently devoted to assess the reliability of classical molecular dynamics simulations in describing the solvation properties of charged moieties. In the spirit of these investigations, we performed classical and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations on lysine and acetylated-lysine in aqueous solution. A comparative analysis between the two computational schemes is presented with a focus on the first solvation shell of the charged groups. An accurate structural analysis unveils subtle, yet statistically significant, differences which are discussed in connection to the significant electronic density charge transfer occurring between the solute and the surrounding water molecules.

  11. Structural aspects of the solvation shell of lysine and acetylated lysine: A Car-Parrinello and classical molecular dynamics investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Carnevale, V.; Raugei, S.

    2009-12-14

    Lysine acetylation is a post-translational modification, which modulates the affinity of protein-protein and/or protein-DNA complexes. Its crucial role as a switch in signaling pathways highlights the relevance of charged chemical groups in determining the interactions between water and biomolecules. A great effort has been recently devoted to assess the reliability of classical molecular dynamics simulations in describing the solvation properties of charged moieties. In the spirit of these investigations, we performed classical and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations on lysine and acetylated-lysine in aqueous solution. A comparative analysis between the two computational schemes is presented with a focus on the first solvation shell of the charged groups. An accurate structural analysis unveils subtle, yet statistically significant, differences which are discussed in connection to the significant electronic density charge transfer occurring between the solute and the surrounding water molecules.

  12. Efficient L-Alanine Production by a Thermo-Regulated Switch in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Deng, Can; Cui, Wen-Jing; Liu, Zhong-Mei; Zhou, Zhe-Min

    2016-01-01

    L-Alanine has important applications in food, pharmaceutical and veterinary and is used as a substrate for production of engineered thermoplastics. Microbial fermentation could reduce the production cost and promote the application of L-alanine. However, the presence of L-alanine significantly inhibit cell growth rate and cause a decrease in the ultimate L-alanine productivity. For efficient L-alanine production, a thermo-regulated genetic switch was designed to dynamically control the expression of L-alanine dehydrogenase (alaD) from Geobacillus stearothermophilus on the Escherichia coli B0016-060BC chromosome. The optimal cultivation conditions for the genetically switched alanine production using B0016-060BC were the following: an aerobic growth phase at 33 °C with a 1-h thermo-induction at 42 °C followed by an oxygen-limited phase at 42 °C. In a bioreactor experiment using the scaled-up conditions optimized in a shake flask, B0016-060BC accumulated 50.3 g biomass/100 g glucose during the aerobic growth phase and 96 g alanine/100 g glucose during the oxygen-limited phase, respectively. The L-alanine titer reached 120.8 g/l with higher overall and oxygen-limited volumetric productivities of 3.09 and 4.18 g/l h, respectively, using glucose as the sole carbon source. Efficient cell growth and L-alanine production were reached separately, by switching cultivation temperature. The results revealed the application of a thermo-regulated strategy for heterologous metabolic production and pointed to strategies for improving L-alanine production. PMID:26453031

  13. A chemical proteomics approach for global analysis of lysine monomethylome profiling.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhixiang; Cheng, Zhongyi; Sun, Mingwei; Wan, Xuelian; Liu, Ping; He, Tieming; Tan, Minjia; Zhao, Yingming

    2015-02-01

    Methylation of lysine residues on histone proteins is known to play an important role in chromatin structure and function. However, non-histone protein substrates of this modification remain largely unknown. An effective approach for system-wide analysis of protein lysine methylation, particularly lysine monomethylation, is lacking. Here we describe a chemical proteomics approach for global screening for monomethyllysine substrates, involving chemical propionylation of monomethylated lysine, affinity enrichment of the modified monomethylated peptides, and HPLC/MS/MS analysis. Using this approach, we identified with high confidence 446 lysine monomethylation sites in 398 proteins, including three previously unknown histone monomethylation marks, representing the largest data set of protein lysine monomethylation described to date. Our data not only confirms previously discovered lysine methylation substrates in the nucleus and spliceosome, but also reveals new substrates associated with diverse biological processes. This method hence offers a powerful approach for dynamic study of protein lysine monomethylation under diverse cellular conditions and in human diseases. PMID:25505155

  14. Infrared laser induced conformational and structural changes of glycine and glycine·water complex in low-temperature matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coussan, Stéphane; Tarczay, György

    2016-01-01

    Conformational and structural changes of matrix-isolated glycine and glycine·water complexes induced by the selective MIR excitation of the fundamental OH and NH stretching vibrational modes were studied. The observed spectral changes are consistent with the former assignments based on matrix-isolation IR spectroscopy combined with NIR laser irradiation. Since fewer conformational barriers can be reached by MIR than by NIR excitations, fewer processes are promoted effectively by MIR radiation. The comparison of spectral changes induced by selective MIR and NIR excitations can facilitate the conformational analysis of complex molecular systems and it can also yield information on the barrier heights.

  15. Glycine max (soybean) roots and syncytia isolated by laser capture microdissection (LCM) exhibit differential gene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines) is an obligate parasite of soybean (Glycine max). It is the most destructive pathogen of G. max, accounting for approximately 0.46-0.82 billion dollars in crop losses, annually, in the U.S. Part of the infection process involves H. glycines establishin...

  16. Spectroscopic studies on covalent functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with glycine.

    PubMed

    Deborah, M; Jawahar, A; Mathavan, T; Kumara Dhas, M; Benial, A Milton Franklin

    2014-10-22

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have a great potential in a wide range of applications, but faces limitation in terms of dispersion feasibility. The functionalization process of SWCNTs with the amino acid, glycine involves oxidation reaction using a mild aqueous acid mixture of HNO3 and H2SO4 (1:3), via ultrasonication technique and the resulted oxidized SWCNTs were again treated with the amino acid glycine suspension. The resulted glycine functionalized carbon nanotubes have been characterized by XRD, UV-Vis, FTIR, EPR, SEM, and EDX, spectroscopic techniques. The enhanced XRD peak (002) intensity was observed for glycine functionalized SWCNTs compared with oxidized SWCNTs, which is likely due to sample purification by acid washing. The red shift was observed in the UV-Vis spectra of glycine functionalized SWCNTs, which reveals that the covalent bond formation between glycine molecule and SWCNTs. The functional groups of oxidized SWCNTs and glycine functionalized SWCNTs were identified and assigned. EPR results indicate that the unpaired electron undergoes reduction process in glycine functionalized SWCNTs. SEM images show that the increase in the diameter of the SWCNTs was observed for glycine functionalized SWCNTs, which indicates that the adsorption of glycine molecule on the sidewalls of oxidized SWCNTs. EDX elemental micro analysis confirms that the nitrogen element exists in glycine functionalized SWCNTs. The functionalization has been chosen due to CONH bioactive sites in glycine functionalized SWCNTs for future applications. PMID:25448929

  17. 77 FR 21532 - Glycine From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Partial Affirmative Determination of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ... find that Paras is not circumventing the Order because it is producing glycine from raw materials of... find that there is no record evidence that AICO self produces glycine from Indian raw materials... exported to the United States glycine that it produced only from Indian raw materials. For a...

  18. 21 CFR 520.550 - Glucose/glycine/electrolyte.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ingredients: Sodium chloride 8.82 grams, potassium phosphate 4.20 grams, citric acid anhydrous 0.5 gram, potassium citrate 0.12 gram, aminoacetic acid (glycine) 6.36 grams, and glucose 44.0 grams. (b) Sponsor....

  19. Heterodera glycines Population Development on Soybean Treated with Glyphosate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines) is a major yield limiting pest in all major soybean producing countries. In the last decade genetically modified soybean tolerant to glyphosate has become widely planted and postemergence application of glyphosate has increased exponentially. Genetically m...

  20. Pathway of Glycine Betaine Biosynthesis in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Lambou, Karine; Pennati, Andrea; Valsecchi, Isabel; Tada, Rui; Sherman, Stephen; Sato, Hajime; Beau, Remi

    2013-01-01

    The choline oxidase (CHOA) and betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) genes identified in Aspergillus fumigatus are present as a cluster specific for fungal genomes. Biochemical and molecular analyses of this cluster showed that it has very specific biochemical and functional features that make it unique and different from its plant and bacterial homologs. A. fumigatus ChoAp catalyzed the oxidation of choline to glycine betaine with betaine aldehyde as an intermediate and reduced molecular oxygen to hydrogen peroxide using FAD as a cofactor. A. fumigatus Badhp oxidized betaine aldehyde to glycine betaine with reduction of NAD+ to NADH. Analysis of the AfchoAΔ::HPH and AfbadAΔ::HPH single mutants and the AfchoAΔAfbadAΔ::HPH double mutant showed that AfChoAp is essential for the use of choline as the sole nitrogen, carbon, or carbon and nitrogen source during the germination process. AfChoAp and AfBadAp were localized in the cytosol of germinating conidia and mycelia but were absent from resting conidia. Characterization of the mutant phenotypes showed that glycine betaine in A. fumigatus functions exclusively as a metabolic intermediate in the catabolism of choline and not as a stress protectant. This study in A. fumigatus is the first molecular, cellular, and biochemical characterization of the glycine betaine biosynthetic pathway in the fungal kingdom. PMID:23563483

  1. Variable temperature NMR characterization of α-glycine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, R. E.; Dybowski, C.

    2008-10-01

    Proton NMR spin-lattice relaxation times in the laboratory frame ( T1) and in the rotating frame ( T1ρ) were measured as a function of temperature for a static sample of α-glycine. Both T1 and T1ρ data can be fit quantitatively by a single thermally-activated motion (the modulation of the dipolar coupling by random hopping about the threefold axis of the -NH 3 group), with no addition of other mechanisms at any temperature between 173 and 415 K. An activation energy of 21.7 ± 1 kJ/mol was extracted and is compared with previously reported values for both α- and γ-glycine. Such comparisons allow the correction of glycine polymorphs misidentified in the literature. The minimum in T1 at 325 K corresponds to a correlation time of 0.53 ns. Chemical shifts as a function of temperature were measured by 1H CRAMPS and by 13C and 15N CP/MAS experiments. These results are discussed relative to a previous report of anomalous electrical behavior in α-glycine within this temperature range.

  2. Evaluation of Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] F1 Hybrids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heterosis is an important factor in development of hybrid cultivars. Few heterosis studies have been done in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]. This is because manual cross-pollination is difficult and time consuming, and not conducive as an economical way to produce large quantities of hybrid seed...

  3. Phenotypic characterization of roots responding to Heterodera glycines CLE peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parasitism genes coding for secreted CLAVATA3/ESR(CLE)-like peptides are expressed in the dorsal gland cell of the soybean cyst nematode (SCN), Heterodera glycines, during syncytium induction and maintenance. Recent data indicate that there are two predominant forms of SCN CLEs, HgCLEA and HgCLEB, ...

  4. 21 CFR 522.518 - Cupric glycinate injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cupric glycinate injection. 522.518 Section 522.518 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS §...

  5. Dietary glycine and threonine interactive effects in broilers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is little information regarding the interaction of dietary threonine and glycine on potential metabolic sparing effects, live production, or breast meat yield of broilers. To test these potential interactions, 432 one-day-old Ross 308 male broilers were fed a common diet up to 21 days of age a...

  6. 21 CFR 520.550 - Glucose/glycine/electrolyte.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ingredients: Sodium chloride 8.82 grams, potassium phosphate 4.20 grams, citric acid anhydrous 0.5 gram, potassium citrate 0.12 gram, aminoacetic acid (glycine) 6.36 grams, and glucose 44.0 grams. (b) Sponsor....

  7. Lignin Degradation by Fusarium solani f. sp. glycines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sudden death syndrome (SDS), caused by the soilborne fungal pathogen Fusarium solani f. sp. glycines, is one of the most important diseases of soybean. Lignin degradation may play a role in the infection, colonization, and survival of the fungus in root tissue . Lignin degradation by F. solani f. sp...

  8. SSR diversity of vegetable soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edamame [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] is a type of soybean selected for fresh or frozen vegetable use at an immature stage. Since edamame has a similar protein content, milder flavor, nuttier texture, and is easier to cook when compared to grain soybean, it is being promoted as a new vegetable for global...

  9. Inactivation of 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)alanine decarboxylase by 2-(fluoromethyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)alanine.

    PubMed

    Maycock, A L; Aster, S D; Patchett, A A

    1980-02-19

    2-(Fluoromethyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)alanine [alpha-FM-Dopa (I)] causes rapid, time-dependent, stereospecific, and irreversible inhibition of hog kidney aromatic amino acid (Dopa) decarboxylase. The inactivation occurs with loss of both the carboxyl carbon and fluoride from I and results in the stoichimetric formation of a covalent enzyme-inhibitor adduct. The data are consistent with I being a suicide inactivator of the enzyme, and a plausible mechanism for the inactivation process is presented. The inactivation is highly efficient in that there is essentially no enzymatic turnover of I to produce the corresponding amine, 1-(fluoromethyl)-2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)ethylamine [alpha-FM-dopamine (II)]. Amine II is also a potent inactivator of the enzyme. In vivo compound I is found to inactivate both brain and peripheral (liver) Dopa decarboxylase activity. The possible significance of these data with respect to the known antihypertensive effect of I is discussed. PMID:7356954

  10. Catalytic properties of Sepharose-bound L-alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Mureşan, L; Vancea, D; Presecan, E; Porumb, H; Lascu, I; Oargă, M; Matinca, D; Abrudan, I; Bârzu, O

    1983-02-15

    (1) L-Alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus cereus was purified by a two-step chromatographic procedure involving Cibacron-Blue 3G-A Sepharose 4B-CL, and Sepharose 6B-CL, and immobilized on CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B. (2) Following immobilization via two of the six subunits, L-alanine dehydrogenase retained 66% of the specific activity of the soluble enzyme. The affinity of the immobilized enzyme for NH4+, pyruvate and L-alanine, was not different to that of the soluble form. The Km of the Sepharose-bound L-alanine dehydrogenase for pyridine coenzymes was 6-8-times higher than in the soluble case. (3) The stability of L-alanine dehydrogenase towards urea or thermal denaturation was increased by immobilization. (4) The incubation at 37 degrees C for 24 h of the immobilized L-alanine dehydrogenase with 3 M NH4Cl/NH4OH buffer (pH 9) released 70% of the enzyme. The specific activity and the affinity of the 'solubilized' L-alanine dehydrogenase for the pyridine coenzymes was the same as that obtained with the original, soluble L-alanine dehydrogenase. PMID:6404304

  11. Polymerization of alanine in the presence of a non-swelling montmorillonite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paecht-Horowitz, M.; Lahav, N.

    1977-01-01

    Alanine, starting from alanine-adenylate, has been polymerized in the presence of non-swelling Al-montmorillonite. The yield of polymerization is much lower than that obtained in the presence of swelling Na-montmorillonite. The possibility that the changing interlayer spacing in Na-montmorillonite might be responsible for its catalytic properties, is discussed.

  12. Initiation of Spore Germination in Bacillus subtilis: Relationship to Inhibition of l-Alanine Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Chandan

    1974-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of anthranilic acid esters (methyl anthranilate and N-methyl anthranilate) on the l-alanine-induced initiation of spore germination was examined in Bacillus subtilis 168. Methyl anthranilate irreversibly inhibited alanine initiation by a competitive mechanism. In its presence, the inhibition could be reversed only by the combined addition of d-glucose, d-fructose, and K+. Both l-alanine dehydrogenase and l-glutamate-pyruvate transaminase, enzymes which catalyze the first reaction in l-alanine metabolism, were competitively inhibited by methyl anthranilate. The Ki values for germination initiation (0.053 mM) and of l-glutamate-pyruvate transaminase (0.068 mM) were similar, whereas that for l-alanine dehydrogenase (0.4 mM) was six to seven times higher. Since a mutant lacking l-alanine dehydrogenase activity germinated normally in l-alanine alone, it is speculated that the major pathway of l-alanine metabolism during initiation may be via transmination reaction. PMID:4212093

  13. About the detectability of glycine in the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattelais, M.; Pauzat, F.; Pilmé, J.; Ellinger, Y.; Ceccarelli, C.

    2011-08-01

    Context. Glycine, the simplest of aminoacids, has been found in several carbonaceous meteorites. It remains unclear, however, wether glycine is formed in the interstellar medium (ISM) and therefore available everywhere in the Universe. For this reason, radioastronomers have searched for many years unsuccessfully to detect glycine in the ISM. Aims: We provide possible guidelines to optimize the return of these searches. Since, for most of the species observed so far in the ISM, the most abundant isomer of a given generic chemical formula is the most stable one (minimum energy principle (MEP)), we assess whether neutral glycine is the best molecule to search for or whether one of its isomers/conformers or ionic, protonated, or zwitterionic derivatives would have a higher probability of being detected. Methods: The question of the relative stability of these different species is addressed by means of quantum density functional theory (DFT) simulations within the hybrid B3LYP formalism. Each fully optimized structure is verified as a stationary point by means of a vibrational analysis. A comprehensive screening of 32 isomers/conformers of the C2H5O2N chemical formula (neutral, negative, and positive ions together with the corresponding protonated species and the possible zwitterionic structures) is carried out. In the sensitive case of the neutral compounds, more accurate relative energies were obtained by means of high level post Hartree-Fock coupled cluster calculations with large basis sets (CCSD(T)/cc-pVQZ). Results: We find that neutral glycine is not the most stable isomer and, therefore, probably not the most abundant one, which might explain why it has escaped detection so far. We find instead that N-methyl carbamic acid and methyl carbamate are the two most stable isomers and, therefore, probably the two most abundant ones. Among the non-neutral forms, we found that glycine is the most stable isomer only if protonated or zwitterionic if present in interstellar

  14. Preferential Pathway for Glycine Formation in Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilling, S.; Boechat-Roberty, H. M.; Baptista, L.; Santos A. C., F.

    Interstellar clouds, similar to that from which the solar system was formed, contain many organic molecules including aldehydes, acids, ketones, and sugars Ehrenfreund & Charnley (2000). Those organic compounds have important functions in terrestrial biochemistry and could also have been important in prebiotic synthesis. The simplest amino acid, glycine (NH2CH2COOH), was recently detected in the hot molecular cores Sgr B2(N-LMH), Orion KL, and W51 e1/e2 Kuan et al. (2003). The formic acid (HCOOH) and acetic acid(CH3COOH) have also been detected in those regions Liu et al. (2002), Remijan et al. (2004). The goal of this work is to study experimentally photoionization and photodissociation processes of glycine precursor molecules, acetic acid and formic acid to elucidate a possible preferentially in the glycine synthesis between ice and gas phase. The measurements were taken at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), employing soft X-ray photons from a toroidal grating monochromator TGM) beamline (100 - 310 eV). The experimental set up consists of a high vacuum chamber with a Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (TOF-MS). Mass spectra were obtained using PhotoElectron PhotoIon Coincidence (PEPICO) technique. Kinetic energy distributions and abundances for each ionic fragment have been obtained from the analysis of the corresponding peak shapes in the mass spectra. Dissociative and non-dissociative photoionization cross sections for both molecules were also determined Boechat-Roberty, Pilling & Santos (2005). Due to the high photodissociation cross section of formic acid it is possible that in PDRs regions, just after molecules evaporation from the grains surface, it is almost destructed by soft X-rays, justifying the observed low abundance of HCOOH in gaseous phase Ehrenfreund et al. (2001). Acetic acid have shown to be more stable to the ionizing field, and its main outcomes from dissociation process were the reactive ionic fragments COOH+ and CH3CO+. To

  15. Strictly Conserved Lysine of Prolyl-tRNA Synthetase Editing Domain Facilitates Binding and Positioning of Misacylated tRNAPro

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    To ensure high fidelity in translation, many aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, enzymes responsible for attaching specific amino acids to cognate tRNAs, require proof-reading mechanisms. Most bacterial prolyl-tRNA synthetases (ProRSs) misactivate alanine and employ a post-transfer editing mechanism to hydrolyze Ala-tRNAPro. This reaction occurs in a second catalytic site (INS) that is distinct from the synthetic active site. The 2′-OH of misacylated tRNAPro and several conserved residues in the Escherichia coli ProRS INS domain are directly involved in Ala-tRNAPro deacylation. Although mutation of the strictly conserved lysine 279 (K279) results in nearly complete loss of post-transfer editing activity, this residue does not directly participate in Ala-tRNAPro hydrolysis. We hypothesized that the role of K279 is to bind the phosphate backbone of the acceptor stem of misacylated tRNAPro and position it in the editing active site. To test this hypothesis, we carried out pKa, charge neutralization, and free-energy of binding calculations. Site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic studies were performed to verify the computational results. The calculations revealed a considerably higher pKa of K279 compared to an isolated lysine and showed that the protonated state of K279 is stabilized by the neighboring acidic residue. However, substitution of this acidic residue with a positively charged residue leads to a significant increase in Ala-tRNAPro hydrolysis, suggesting that enhancement in positive charge density in the vicinity of K279 favors tRNA binding. A charge-swapping experiment and free energy of binding calculations support the conclusion that the positive charge at position 279 is absolutely necessary for tRNA binding in the editing active site. PMID:24450765

  16. Bovine NK-lysin: Copy number variation and functional diversification

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junfeng; Huddleston, John; Buckley, Reuben M.; Malig, Maika; Lawhon, Sara D.; Skow, Loren C.; Lee, Mi Ok; Eichler, Evan E.; Andersson, Leif; Womack, James E.

    2015-01-01

    NK-lysin is an antimicrobial peptide and effector protein in the host innate immune system. It is coded by a single gene in humans and most other mammalian species. In this study, we provide evidence for the existence of four NK-lysin genes in a repetitive region on cattle chromosome 11. The NK2A, NK2B, and NK2C genes are tandemly arrayed as three copies in ∼30–35-kb segments, located 41.8 kb upstream of NK1. All four genes are functional, albeit with differential tissue expression. NK1, NK2A, and NK2B exhibited the highest expression in intestine Peyer’s patch, whereas NK2C was expressed almost exclusively in lung. The four peptide products were synthesized ex vivo, and their antimicrobial effects against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria were confirmed with a bacteria-killing assay. Transmission electron microcopy indicated that bovine NK-lysins exhibited their antimicrobial activities by lytic action in the cell membranes. In summary, the single NK-lysin gene in other mammals has expanded to a four-member gene family by tandem duplications in cattle; all four genes are transcribed, and the synthetic peptides corresponding to the core regions are biologically active and likely contribute to innate immunity in ruminants. PMID:26668394

  17. Bovine NK-lysin: Copy number variation and functional diversification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junfeng; Huddleston, John; Buckley, Reuben M; Malig, Maika; Lawhon, Sara D; Skow, Loren C; Lee, Mi Ok; Eichler, Evan E; Andersson, Leif; Womack, James E

    2015-12-29

    NK-lysin is an antimicrobial peptide and effector protein in the host innate immune system. It is coded by a single gene in humans and most other mammalian species. In this study, we provide evidence for the existence of four NK-lysin genes in a repetitive region on cattle chromosome 11. The NK2A, NK2B, and NK2C genes are tandemly arrayed as three copies in ∼30-35-kb segments, located 41.8 kb upstream of NK1. All four genes are functional, albeit with differential tissue expression. NK1, NK2A, and NK2B exhibited the highest expression in intestine Peyer's patch, whereas NK2C was expressed almost exclusively in lung. The four peptide products were synthesized ex vivo, and their antimicrobial effects against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria were confirmed with a bacteria-killing assay. Transmission electron microcopy indicated that bovine NK-lysins exhibited their antimicrobial activities by lytic action in the cell membranes. In summary, the single NK-lysin gene in other mammals has expanded to a four-member gene family by tandem duplications in cattle; all four genes are transcribed, and the synthetic peptides corresponding to the core regions are biologically active and likely contribute to innate immunity in ruminants. PMID:26668394

  18. Protein lysine methylation by seven-β-strand methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Falnes, Pål Ø; Jakobsson, Magnus E; Davydova, Erna; Ho, Angela; Małecki, Jędrzej

    2016-07-15

    Methylation of biomolecules is a frequent biochemical reaction within the cell, and a plethora of highly specific methyltransferases (MTases) catalyse the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) to various substrates. The posttranslational methylation of lysine residues, catalysed by numerous lysine (K)-specific protein MTases (KMTs), is a very common and important protein modification, which recently has been subject to intense studies, particularly in the case of histone proteins. The majority of KMTs belong to a class of MTases that share a defining 'SET domain', and these enzymes mostly target lysines in the flexible tails of histones. However, the so-called seven-β-strand (7BS) MTases, characterized by a twisted beta-sheet structure and certain conserved sequence motifs, represent the largest MTase class, and these enzymes methylate a wide range of substrates, including small metabolites, lipids, nucleic acids and proteins. Until recently, the histone-specific Dot1/DOT1L was the only identified eukaryotic 7BS KMT. However, a number of novel 7BS KMTs have now been discovered, and, in particular, several recently characterized human and yeast members of MTase family 16 (MTF16) have been found to methylate lysines in non-histone proteins. Here, we review the status and recent progress on the 7BS KMTs, and discuss these enzymes at the levels of sequence/structure, catalytic mechanism, substrate recognition and biological significance. PMID:27407169

  19. Identification and functional characterization of lysine methyltransferases of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Borbolla-Vázquez, Jessica; Orozco, Esther; Medina-Gómez, Christian; Martínez-Higuera, Aarón; Javier-Reyna, Rosario; Chávez, Bibiana; Betanzos, Abigail; Rodríguez, Mario A

    2016-07-01

    Lysine methylation of histones, a posttranslational modification catalyzed by lysine methyltransferases (HKMTs), plays an important role in the epigenetic regulation of transcription. Lysine methylation of non-histone proteins also impacts the biological function of proteins. Previously it has been shown that lysine methylation of histones of Entamoeba histolytica, the protozoan parasite that infects 50 million people worldwide each year and causing up to 100,000 deaths annually, is implicated in the epigenetic machinery of this microorganism. However, the identification and characterization of HKMTs in this parasite had not yet been determined. In this work we identified four HKMTs in E. histolytica (EhHKMT1 to EhHKMT4) that are expressed by trophozoites. Enzymatic assays indicated that all of them are able to transfer methyl groups to commercial histones. EhHKMT1, EhHKMT2 and EhHKMT4 were detected in nucleus and cytoplasm of trophozoites. In addition EhHKMT2 and EhHKMT4 were located in vesicles containing ingested cells during phagocytosis, and they co-immunoprecipitated with EhADH, a protein involved in the phagocytosis of this parasite. Results suggest that E. histolytica uses its HKMTs to regulate transcription by epigenetic mechanisms, and at least two of them could also be implicated in methylation of proteins that participate in phagocytosis. PMID:27062489

  20. Analytical continuation in coupling constant method; application to the calculation of resonance energies and widths for organic molecules: Glycine, alanine and valine and dimer of formic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, P.; Matejčík, Š.; Mach, P.; Urban, J.; Paidarová, I.; Horáček, J.

    2013-06-01

    The method of analytic continuation in the coupling constant (ACCC) in combination with use of the statistical Padé approximation is applied to the determination of resonance energy and width of some amino acids and formic acid dimer. Standard quantum chemistry codes provide accurate data which can be used for analytic continuation in the coupling constant to obtain the resonance energy and width of organic molecules with a good accuracy. The obtained results are compared with the existing experimental ones.

  1. Thermal decomposition behavior of potassium and sodium jarosite synthesized in the presence of methylamine and alanine

    SciTech Connect

    J. Michelle Kotler; Nancy W. Hinman; C. Doc Richardson; Jill R. Scott

    2010-10-01

    Biomolecules, methylamine and alanine, found associated with natural jarosite samples peaked the interest of astrobiologists and planetary geologists. How the biomolecules are associated with jarosite remains unclear although the mechanism could be important for detecting biosignatures in the rock record on Earth and other planets. A series of thermal gravimetric experiments using synthetic K-jarosite and Na-jarosite were conducted to determine if thermal analysis could differentiate physical mixtures of alanine and methylamine with jarosite from samples where the methylamine or alanine was incorporated into the synthesis procedure. Physical mixtures and synthetic experiments with methylamine and alanine could be differentiated from one another and from the standards by thermal analysis for both the K-jarosite and Na-jarosite end-member suites. Changes included shifts in on-set temperatures, total temperature changes from on-set to final, and the presence of indicator peaks for methylamine and alanine in the physical mixture experiments.

  2. How similar is the electronic structures of β-lactam and alanine?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Subhojyoti; Ahmed, Marawan; Wang, Feng

    2016-02-01

    The C1s spectra of β-lactam i.e. 2-azetidinone (C3H5NO), a drug and L-alanine (C3H7NO2), an amino acid, exhibit striking similarities, which may be responsible for the competition between 2-azetidinone and the alanyl-alanine moiety in biochemistry. The present study is to reveal the degree of similarities and differences between their electronic structures of the two model molecular pairs. It is found that the similarities in C1s and inner valence binding energy spectra are due to their bonding connections but other properties such as ring structure (in 2-azetidinone) and chiral carbon (alanine) can be very different. Further, the inner valence region of ionization potential greater than 18 eV for 2-azetidinone and alanine is also significantly similar. Finally the strained lactam ring exhibits more chemical reactivity measured at all non-hydrogen atoms by Fukui functions with respect to alanine.

  3. A single amino acid change (substitution of the conserved Glu-590 with alanine) in the C-terminal domain of rat liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase I increases its malonyl-CoA sensitivity close to that observed with the muscle isoform of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Napal, Laura; Dai, Jia; Treber, Michelle; Haro, Diego; Marrero, Pedro F; Woldegiorgis, Gebre

    2003-09-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPTI) catalyzes the conversion of long-chain fatty acyl-CoAs to acylcarnitines in the presence of l-carnitine. To determine the role of the highly conserved C-terminal glutamate residue, Glu-590, on catalysis and malonyl-CoA sensitivity, we separately changed the residue to alanine, lysine, glutamine, and aspartate. Substitution of Glu-590 with aspartate, a negatively charged amino acid with only one methyl group less than the glutamate residue in the wild-type enzyme, resulted in complete loss in the activity of the liver isoform of CPTI (L-CPTI). A change of Glu-590 to alanine, glutamine, and lysine caused a significant 9- to 16-fold increase in malonyl-CoA sensitivity but only a partial decrease in catalytic activity. Substitution of Glu-590 with neutral uncharged residues (alanine and glutamine) and/or a basic positively charged residue (lysine) significantly increased L-CPTI malonyl-CoA sensitivity to the level observed with the muscle isoform of the enzyme, suggesting the importance of neutral and/or positive charges in the switch of the kinetic properties of L-CPTI to the muscle isoform of CPTI. Since a conservative substitution of Glu-590 to aspartate but not glutamine resulted in complete loss in activity, we suggest that the longer side chain of glutamate is essential for catalysis and malonyl-CoA sensitivity. This is the first demonstration whereby a single residue mutation in the C-terminal region of the liver isoform of CPTI resulted in a change of its kinetic properties close to that observed with the muscle isoform of the enzyme and provides the rationale for the high malonyl-CoA sensitivity of muscle CPTI compared with the liver isoform of the enzyme. PMID:12826662

  4. Correlation of carnitine levels to methionine and lysine intake.

    PubMed

    Krajcovicová-Kudlácková, M; Simoncic, R; Béderová, A; Babinská, K; Béder, I

    2000-01-01

    Plasma carnitine levels were measured in two alternative nutrition groups--strict vegetarians (vegans) and lactoovovegetarians (vegetarians consuming limited amounts of animal products such as milk products and eggs). The results were compared to an average sample of probands on mixed nutrition (omnivores). Carnitine levels were correlated with the intake of essential amino acids, methionine and lysine (as substrates of its endogenous synthesis), since the intake of carnitine in food is negligible in the alternative nutrition groups (the highest carnitine content is in meat, lower is in milk products, while fruit, cereals and vegetables contain low or no carnitine at all). An average carnitine level in vegans was significantly reduced with hypocarnitinemia present in 52.9% of probands. Similarly, the intake of methionine and lysine was significantly lower in this group due to the exclusive consumption of plant proteins with reduced content of these amino acids. Carnitine level in lactoovovegetarians was also significantly reduced, but the incidence of values below 30 micromol/l was lower than in vegans representing 17.8% vs. 3.3% in omnivores. Intake of methionine and lysine was also significantly reduced in this group, but still higher compared to vegans (73% of protein intake covered by plant proteins). Significant positive correlation of carnitine levels with methionine and lysine intake in alternative nutrition groups indicates that a significant portion of carnitine requirement is covered by endogenous synthesis. Approximately two thirds of carnitine requirement in omnivores comes from exogenous sources. The results demonstrate the risks of alternative nutrition with respect to the intake of essential amino acids, methionine and lysine, and with respect to the intake and biosynthesis of carnitine. PMID:11043928

  5. Expression, purification, and characterization of alanine racemase from Pseudomonas putida YZ-26.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Lin; Liu, Xiao-Qin; Shi, Ya-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Alanine racemase catalyzes the interconversion of D: - and L: -alanine and plays an important role in supplying D: -alanine, a component of peptidoglycan biosynthesis, to most bacteria. Alanine racemase exists mostly in prokaryotes and is generally absent in higher eukaryotes; this makes it an attractive target for the design of new antibacterial drugs. Here, we present the cloning and characterization of a new gene-encoding alanine racemase from Pseudomonas putida YZ-26. An open reading frame (ORF) of 1,230 bp, encoding a protein of 410 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 44,217.3 Da, was cloned into modified vector pET32M to form the recombinant plasmid pET-alr. After introduction into E.coli BL21, the strain pET-alr/E.coli BL21 expressed His(6)-tagged alanine racemase. The recombinant alanine racemase was efficiently purified to homogeneity using Ni(2+)-NTA and a gel filtration column, with 82.5% activity recovery. The amino acid sequence deduced from the alanine racemase gene revealed identity similarities of 97.0, 93, 23, and 22.0% with from P. putida F1, P. putida200, P. aeruginosa, and Salmonella typhimurium, respectively. The recombinant alanine racemase is a monomeric protein with a molecular mass of 43 kDa. The enzyme exhibited activity with L: -alanine and L: -isoleucine, and showed higher specificity for the former compared with the latter. The enzyme was stable from pH 7.0-11.0; its optimum pH was at 9.0. The optimum temperature for the enzyme was 37°C, and its activity was rapidly lost at temperatures above 40°C. Divalent metals, including Sr(2+), Mn(2+), Co(2+), and Ni(2+) obviously enhanced enzymatic activity, while the Cu(2+) ion showed inhibitory effects. PMID:22806802

  6. Syncytium gene expression in Glycine max [PI88788} roots undergoing a resistant reaction of the parasitic nematode Heterodera glycines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) was used to isolate Heterodera glycines feeding sites (syncytia) from the (G. max) genotype PI 88788. Syncytia at various stages of the resistant response were isolated from roots 3, 6 and 9 days post infection (dpi). At 3 dpi, the analyses revealed highly induced...

  7. Genotype Response of Soybean (Glycine max) Whole Plants and Hairy Roots to Fusarium solani f. sp. glycines Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium solani f. sp. Glycines, a soilborne fungus, infects soybean roots and causes sudden death syndrome. The response of 13 soybean genotypes to the pathogen infection was tested with potted greenhouse grown plants and with cultured hairy roots. The taproots of all genotypes grown plants measure...

  8. The first seven amino acids encoded by the v-src oncogene act as a myristylation signal: Lysine 7 is a critical determinant

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, J.M.; Mardon, G.; Bishop, J.M.; Varmus, H.E.

    1988-06-01

    The transforming protein of Rous sarcoma virus, pp60/sup v-src/, is covalently coupled to myristic acid by an amide linkage to glycine 2. Myristylation promotes the association of pp60/sup v-src/ with cellular membranes, and this subcellular location is essential for transforming activity. The findings presented here, in conjunction with the previous reports of others, imply that the seventh amino acid encoded by v-src might be important in the myristlyation reaction. Replacement of lysine 7 by asparagine greatly reduced the myristylation, membrane association, and transforming activity of pp60/sup v-src/. In contrast, substitution of arginine at residue 7 had no effect on any of these properties of pp60/sup v-src/. Addition of amino acids 1 to 7 encoded by v-src was sufficient to cause myristylation of a src-pyruvate kinase function protein. The authors conclude that the recognition sequence for myristylation of pp60/sup v-src/ comprises amino acids 1 to 7 and that lysine 7 is a critical component of this sequence.

  9. Calibration of helical tomotherapy machine using EPR/alanine dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Perichon, Nicolas; Garcia, Tristan; Francois, Pascal; Lourenco, Valerie; Lesven, Caroline; Bordy, Jean-Marc

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: Current codes of practice for clinical reference dosimetry of high-energy photon beams in conventional radiotherapy recommend using a 10x10 cm{sup 2} square field, with the detector at a reference depth of 10 cm in water and 100 cm source to surface distance (SSD) (AAPM TG-51) or 100 cm source-to-axis distance (SAD) (IAEA TRS-398). However, the maximum field size of a helical tomotherapy (HT) machine is 40x5 cm{sup 2} defined at 85 cm SAD. These nonstandard conditions prevent a direct implementation of these protocols. The purpose of this study is twofold: To check the absorbed dose in water and dose rate calibration of a tomotherapy unit as well as the accuracy of the tomotherapy treatment planning system (TPS) calculations for a specific test case. Method: Both topics are based on the use of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) using alanine as transfer dosimeter between the Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNHB) {sup 60}Co-{gamma}-ray reference beam and the Institut Curie's HT beam. Irradiations performed in the LNHB reference {sup 60}Co-{gamma}-ray beam allowed setting up the calibration method, which was then implemented and tested at the LNHB 6 MV linac x-ray beam, resulting in a deviation of 1.6% (at a 1% standard uncertainty) relative to the reference value determined with the standard IAEA TRS-398 protocol. Results: HT beam dose rate estimation shows a difference of 2% with the value stated by the manufacturer at a 2% standard uncertainty. A 4% deviation between measured dose and the calculation from the tomotherapy TPS was found. The latter was originated by an inadequate representation of the phantom CT-scan values and, consequently, mass densities within the phantom. This difference has been explained by the mass density values given by the CT-scan and used by the TPS which were not the true ones. Once corrected using Monte Carlo N-Particle simulations to validate the accuracy of this process, the difference between corrected TPS

  10. Effects of alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase variants and pyridoxine sensitivity on oxalate metabolism in a cell-based cytotoxicity assay.

    PubMed

    Fargue, Sonia; Knight, John; Holmes, Ross P; Rumsby, Gill; Danpure, Christopher J

    2016-06-01

    The hereditary kidney stone disease primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) is caused by a functional deficiency of the liver-specific, peroxisomal, pyridoxal-phosphate-dependent enzyme, alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT). One third of PH1 patients, particularly those expressing the p.[(Pro11Leu; Gly170Arg; Ile340Met)] mutant allele, respond clinically to pharmacological doses of pyridoxine. To gain further insight into the metabolic effects of AGT dysfunction in PH1 and the effect of pyridoxine, we established an "indirect" glycolate cytotoxicity assay using CHO cells expressing glycolate oxidase (GO) and various normal and mutant forms of AGT. In cells expressing GO the great majority of glycolate was converted to oxalate and glyoxylate, with the latter causing the greater decrease in cell survival. Co-expression of normal AGTs and some, but not all, mutant AGT variants partially counteracted this cytotoxicity and led to decreased synthesis of oxalate and glyoxylate. Increasing the extracellular pyridoxine up to 0.3μM led to an increased metabolic effectiveness of normal AGTs and the AGT-Gly170Arg variant. The increased survival seen with AGT-Gly170Arg was paralleled by a 40% decrease in oxalate and glyoxylate levels. These data support the suggestion that the effectiveness of pharmacological doses of pyridoxine results from an improved metabolic effectiveness of AGT; that is the increased rate of transamination of glyoxylate to glycine. The indirect glycolate toxicity assay used in the present study has potential to be used in cell-based drug screening protocols to identify chemotherapeutics that might enhance or decrease the activity and metabolic effectiveness of AGT and GO, respectively, and be useful in the treatment of PH1. PMID:26854734

  11. Disposition and metabolism of 2-fluoro-beta-alanine conjugates of bile acids following secretion into bile.

    PubMed

    Zhang, R W; Barnes, S; Diasio, R B

    1991-04-15

    Since 2-fluoro-beta-alanine (FBAL) conjugates of bile acids (BA), the primary biliary metabolites of fluoropyrimidine (FP) drugs, have been suggested to be related to the hepatotoxicity which develops in patients receiving FP chemotherapy by intrahepatic arterial infusion (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84, 5439-5443, 1987), it was important to determine whether they undergo enterohepatic circulation and hence accumulate in the liver and biliary system. In initial studies, sensitivity of FBAL-BA conjugates to hydrolysis by pancreatic enzymes was examined. In subsequent in vivo studies, a model FBAL-BA conjugate, FBAL-chenodeoxycholate (FBAL-CDC), was introduced into the lumen of the small intestine of anesthetized rats with biliary fistulas to quantitate the intestinal absorption, metabolism and tissue distribution of the conjugate. The results indicated that: (1) FBAL-BA conjugates were resistant to hydrolysis by pancreatic enzymes (carboxypeptidase A, carboxypeptidase B and trypsin) and by human pancreatic juice, but were completely hydrolyzed by cholyglycine hydrolase. (2) At least one-half of the administered FBAL-CDC was deconjugated during the process of intestinal absorption, as shown by HPLC analysis of the radioactivity in portal venous blood. (3) Deconjugated FBAL or CDC was reconjugated in liver with other bile acids or amino acids (glycine and taurine), respectively, as shown by radiochromatography of bile. (4) FBAL, formed as a result of hydrolysis of FBAL-CDC, had a wide tissue distribution. In conclusion, FBAL-CDC has a rapid turnover during its enterohepatic circulation due to deconjugation in the intestine and reconjugation in the liver. PMID:1902118

  12. Identification of a mutation affecting an alanine-alpha-ketoisovalerate transaminase activity in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Falkinham, J O

    1979-10-01

    A mutation affecting alanine-alpha-ketoisovalerate transaminase activity has been shown to be cotransducible with ilv gene cluster. The transaminase deficiency results in conditional isoleucine auxotrophy in the presence of alanine. PMID:396446

  13. Glycine, a new regulator of glutamine metabolism in isolated rat-liver cells.

    PubMed

    Vincent, N; Martin, G; Baverel, G

    1992-12-15

    Glycine (0.1-10 mM) caused a dose-dependent increase in the removal of 5 mM [1-14C]glutamine by isolated rat-liver cells; at low concentrations of glycine, an increase in the formation of 14CO2, urea and glucose from glutamine occurred. At 2-10 mM, glycine also caused an accumulation of ammonia, a well-established activator of glutaminase (E.C. 3.5.1.2) and, at concentrations found in the presence of glutamine plus glycine, ammonia stimulated glutamine removal. The inhibition of urea synthesis from glutamine observed with 10 mM glycine was relieved by the addition of ornithine, suggesting that this inhibition occurred by reducing the availability of ornithine for the ornithine transcarbamoylase reaction. The metabolism of glycine as sole substrate led to a small increase in the accumulation of ammonia. Glycine did not alter hepatic glutaminase activity but swelling of rat hepatocytes, a factor considered to stimulate glutamine metabolism, was observed in the presence of glycine (1 mM). It is concluded that stimulation by glycine of hepatic utilization of glutamine is mediated by the accumulation of ammonia arising from both glycine and glutamine metabolism and by hepatocyte osmotic swelling secondary to glycine transport. PMID:1482692

  14. Alanine synthesis from glyceraldehyde and ammonium ion in aqueous solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    The formation of alanine (ala) form C(14)-glyceraldehyde and ammonium phosphate in the presence or absence of a thiol is reported. At ambient temperature, ala synthesis was six times more rapid in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid than in its absence (0.6 and 0.1 percent, respectively, after 60 days). Similarly, the presence of another thiol, N-acetylcysteinate, increased the production of ala, as well as of lactate. The reaction pathway of thiol-catalyzed synthesis of ala, with the lactic acid formed in a bypath, is suggested. In this, dehydration of glyceraldehyde is followed by the formation of hemithioacetal. In the presence of ammonia, an imine is formed, which eventually yields ala. This pathway is consistent with the observation that the rate ratio of ala/lactate remains constant throughout the process. The fact that the reaction takes place under anaerobic conditions in the presence of H2O and with the low concentrations of simple substrates and catalysts makes it an attractive model prebiotic reaction in the process of molecular evolution.

  15. Energy landscapes and global thermodynamics for alanine peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somani, Sandeep; Wales, David J.

    2013-09-01

    We compare different approaches for computing the thermodynamics of biomolecular systems. Techniques based on parallel replicas evolving via molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo simulations produce overlapping histograms for the densities of states. In contrast, energy landscape methods employ a superposition partition function constructed from local minima of the potential energy surface. The latter approach is particularly powerful for systems exhibiting broken ergodicity, and it is usually implemented using a harmonic normal mode approximation, which has not been extensively tested for biomolecules. The present contribution compares these alternative approaches for small alanine peptides modelled using the CHARMM and AMBER force fields. Densities of states produced from canonical sampling using multiple temperature replicas provide accurate reference data to evaluate the effect of the harmonic normal mode approximation in the superposition calculations. This benchmarking lays foundations for the application of energy landscape methods to larger biomolecules. It will also provide well characterised model systems for developing enhanced sampling methods, and for the treatment of anharmonicity corresponding to individual local minima.

  16. Estrogen-like osteoprotective effects of glycine in in vitro and in vivo models of menopause.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Ho; Kim, Hyung-Min; Jeong, Hyun-Ja

    2016-03-01

    Recently, the placenta mesotherapy has been widely used to treat menopause. Placenta contains amino acids, peptides, minerals, and estrogen. Here, we investigated the estrogen-like osteoprotective effects of glycine (a main ingredient of placenta) in in vitro and in vivo models of menopause. We assessed the effect of glycine on MG-63 osteoblast cell line, MCF-7 estrogen-dependent cell line, and ovariectomized (OVX) mice. Glycine significantly increased the MG-63 cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase were increased by glycine in MG-63 cells. Glycine also increased the BrdU-incorporation and Ki-67 mRNA expression in MCF-7 cells. Glycine induced the up-regulation of estrogen receptor-β mRNA expression and estrogen-response element-luciferase activity in MG-63 and MCF-7 cells. In OVX mice, glycine was administered orally at a daily dose of 10 mg/kg per day for 8 weeks. Glycine resulted in the greatest decrease in weight gain caused by ovariectomy. Meanwhile, vaginal weight reduced by ovariectomy was increased by glycine. Glycine significantly increased the ALP activity in OVX mice. MicroCT-analysis showed that glycine significantly enhanced bone mineral density, trabecular number, and connectivity density in OVX mice. Moreover, glycine significantly increased the serum 17β-estradiol levels reduced by ovariectomy. Glycine has an estrogen-like osteoprotective effect in menopause models. Therefore, we suggest that glycine may be useful for the treatment of menopause. PMID:26563333

  17. Alanine-EPR as a transfer standard dosimetry system for low energy X radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoury, H. J.; da Silva, E. J.; Mehta, K.; de Barros, V. S.; Asfora, V. K.; Guzzo, P. L.; Parker, A. G.

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the use of alanine-EPR as a transfer standard dosimetry system for low energy X radiation, such as that in RS-2400, which operates in the range from 25 to 150 kV and 2 to 45 mA. Two types of alanine dosimeters were investigated. One is a commercial alanine pellets from Aérial-Centre de Ressources Technologiques, France and one was prepared in our laboratory (LMRI-DEN/UFPE). The EPR spectra of the irradiated dosimeters were recorded in the Nuclear Energy Department of UFPE, using a Bruker EMX10 EPR spectrometer operating in the X-band. The alanine-EPR dosimetry system was calibrated in the range of 20-220 Gy in this X-ray field, against an ionization chamber calibrated at the relevant X-ray energy with traceability to PTB. The results showed that both alanine dosimeters presented a linear dose response the same sensitivity, when the EPR signal was normalized to alanine mass. The total uncertainty in the measured dose was estimated to be about 3%. The results indicate that it is possible to use the alanine-EPR dosimetry system for validation of a low-energy X ray irradiator, such as RS-2400.

  18. Sodium dependency of L-alanine absorption in canine Thiry-Vella loops.

    PubMed

    Fleshler, B; Nelson, R A

    1970-03-01

    The effect of sodium on the absorption of L-alanine in vivo was tested by measuring the absorption of L-alanine from Thiry-Vella loops in dogs. Solutions containing L-alanine (10 or 50 mM) sodium at concentrations of 0, 74, or 145 m-equiv/1 and mannitol, as needed to maintain isotonicity were instilled into the loops for 10 minutes. Similar studies were done with L-alanine 50 mM and either 0 or 145 m-equiv/1 of sodium for five minutes. Under all conditions absorption of alanine was significantly less from the solution initially free of sodium. Although these differences were statistically significant, the physiological significance was not great since the actual differences in amounts of L-alanine absorbed were small. Insorption of sodium was low from the fluid which initially had no sodium, but exsorption proceeded rapidly and was unaffected by the luminal sodium concentration. This resulted in a rapid rise of intraluminal sodium concentration when no sodium was initially present. This persistent exsorption of sodium was, therefore, adequate to provide sodium in the lumen to activate the sodium-dependent carrier, postulated on the basis of studies in vitro. These data in vivo are consistent with the view that sodium at the intraluminal surface is important in accelerating amino acid transport, but indicate that in the absence of added intraluminal sodium the gut mucosa itself, under normal circumstances, provides the sodium needed for L-alanine absorption. PMID:5423904

  19. Mitochondrial defects associated with β-alanine toxicity: relevance to hyper-beta-alaninemia.

    PubMed

    Shetewy, Aza; Shimada-Takaura, Kayoko; Warner, Danielle; Jong, Chian Ju; Mehdi, Abu-Bakr Al; Alexeyev, Mikhail; Takahashi, Kyoko; Schaffer, Stephen W

    2016-05-01

    Hyper-beta-alaninemia is a rare metabolic condition that results in elevated plasma and urinary β-alanine levels and is characterized by neurotoxicity, hypotonia, and respiratory distress. It has been proposed that at least some of the symptoms are caused by oxidative stress; however, only limited information is available on the mechanism of reactive oxygen species generation. The present study examines the hypothesis that β-alanine reduces cellular levels of taurine, which are required for normal respiratory chain function; cellular taurine depletion is known to reduce respiratory function and elevate mitochondrial superoxide generation. To test the taurine hypothesis, isolated neonatal rat cardiomyocytes and mouse embryonic fibroblasts were incubated with medium lacking or containing β-alanine. β-alanine treatment led to mitochondrial superoxide accumulation in conjunction with a decrease in oxygen consumption. The defect in β-alanine-mediated respiratory function was detected in permeabilized cells exposed to glutamate/malate but not in cells utilizing succinate, suggesting that β-alanine leads to impaired complex I activity. Taurine treatment limited mitochondrial superoxide generation, supporting a role for taurine in maintaining complex I activity. Also affected by taurine is mitochondrial morphology, as β-alanine-treated fibroblasts undergo fragmentation, a sign of unhealthy mitochondria that is reversed by taurine treatment. If left unaltered, β-alanine-treated fibroblasts also undergo mitochondrial apoptosis, as evidenced by activation of caspases 3 and 9 and the initiation of the mitochondrial permeability transition. Together, these data show that β-alanine mediates changes that reduce ATP generation and enhance oxidative stress, factors that contribute to heart failure. PMID:27023909

  20. Characterization of the l-alanine exporter AlaE of Escherichia coli and its potential role in protecting cells from a toxic-level accumulation of l-alanine and its derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seryoung; Ihara, Kohei; Katsube, Satoshi; Hori, Hatsuhiro; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Yoneyama, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that the alaE gene of Escherichia coli encodes the l-alanine exporter AlaE. The objective of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of the AlaE exporter. The minimum inhibitory concentration of l-alanine and l-alanyl-l-alanine in alaE-deficient l-alanine-nonmetabolizing cells MLA301ΔalaE was 4- and >4000-fold lower, respectively, than in the alaE-positive parent cells MLA301, suggesting that AlaE functions as an efflux pump to avoid a toxic-level accumulation of intracellular l-alanine and its derivatives. Furthermore, the growth of the alaE-deficient mutant derived from the l-alanine-metabolizing strain was strongly inhibited in the presence of a physiological level of l-alanyl-l-alanine. Intact MLA301ΔalaE and MLA301ΔalaE/pAlaE cells producing plasmid-borne AlaE, accumulated approximately 200% and 50%, respectively, of the [3H]l-alanine detected in MLA301 cells, suggesting that AlaE exports l-alanine. When 200 mmol/L l-alanine-loaded inverted membrane vesicles prepared from MLA301ΔalaE/pAlaE were placed in a solution containing 200 mmol/L or 0.34 μmol/L l-alanine, energy-dependent [3H]l-alanine accumulation occurred under either condition. This energy-dependent uphill accumulation of [3H]l-alanine was strongly inhibited in the presence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone but not by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, suggesting that the AlaE-mediated l-alanine extrusion was driven by proton motive force. Based on these results, physiological roles of the l-alanine exporter are discussed. PMID:26073055

  1. Characterization of the l-alanine exporter AlaE of Escherichia coli and its potential role in protecting cells from a toxic-level accumulation of l-alanine and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seryoung; Ihara, Kohei; Katsube, Satoshi; Hori, Hatsuhiro; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Yoneyama, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    We previously reported that the alaE gene of Escherichia coli encodes the l-alanine exporter AlaE. The objective of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of the AlaE exporter. The minimum inhibitory concentration of l-alanine and l-alanyl-l-alanine in alaE-deficient l-alanine-nonmetabolizing cells MLA301ΔalaE was 4- and >4000-fold lower, respectively, than in the alaE-positive parent cells MLA301, suggesting that AlaE functions as an efflux pump to avoid a toxic-level accumulation of intracellular l-alanine and its derivatives. Furthermore, the growth of the alaE-deficient mutant derived from the l-alanine-metabolizing strain was strongly inhibited in the presence of a physiological level of l-alanyl-l-alanine. Intact MLA301ΔalaE and MLA301ΔalaE/pAlaE cells producing plasmid-borne AlaE, accumulated approximately 200% and 50%, respectively, of the [(3) H]l-alanine detected in MLA301 cells, suggesting that AlaE exports l-alanine. When 200 mmol/L l-alanine-loaded inverted membrane vesicles prepared from MLA301ΔalaE/pAlaE were placed in a solution containing 200 mmol/L or 0.34 μmol/L l-alanine, energy-dependent [(3) H]l-alanine accumulation occurred under either condition. This energy-dependent uphill accumulation of [(3) H]l-alanine was strongly inhibited in the presence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone but not by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, suggesting that the AlaE-mediated l-alanine extrusion was driven by proton motive force. Based on these results, physiological roles of the l-alanine exporter are discussed. PMID:26073055

  2. Role of Charge and Solvation in the Structure and Dynamics of Alanine-Rich Peptide AKA2 in AOT Reverse Micelles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The propensity of peptides to form α-helices has been intensely studied using theory, computation, and experiment. Important model peptides for the study of the coil-to-helix transition have been alanine–lysine (AKA) peptides in which the lysine residues are placed on opposite sides of the helix avoiding charge repulsion while enhancing solubility. In this study, the effects of capped versus zwitterionic peptide termini on the secondary structure of alanine-rich peptides in reverse micelles are explored. The reverse micelles are found to undergo substantial shape fluctuations, a property observed in previous studies of AOT reverse micelles in the absence of solvated peptide. The peptides are observed to interact with water, as well as the AOT surfactant, including interactions between the nonpolar residues and the aliphatic surfactant tails. Computation of IR spectra for the amide I band of the peptide allows for direct comparison with experimental spectra. The results demonstrate that capped AKA2 peptides form more stable α helices than zwitterionic AKA2 peptides in reverse micelles. The rotational anisotropy decay of water is found to be distinctly different in the presence or absence of peptide within the reverse micelle, suggesting that the introduction of peptide significantly alters the number of free waters within the reverse micelle nanopool. However, neither the nature of the peptide termini (capped or charged) nor the degree of peptide helicity is found to significantly alter the balance of interactions between the peptides and the environment. Observed changes in the degree of helicity in AKA2 peptides in bulk solution and in reverse micelle environments result from changes in peptide confinement and hydration as well as direct nonpolar and polar interactions with the water–surfactant interface. PMID:25337983

  3. Dissociation of gaseous zwitterion glycine-betaine by slow electrons.

    PubMed

    Kopyra, J; Abdoul-Carime, H

    2010-05-28

    In this work, we investigate dissociation processes induced by low-energy electrons to gas phase N,N,N-trimethylglycine [glycine-betaine, (CH(3))(3)N(+)CH(2)COO(-)] molecules. Glycine-betaine represents a model system for zwitterions. All negative fragments are observed to be produced only at subelectronic excitation energies (<4 eV). With the exception of the loss of a neutral H atom that could arise from any C[Single Bond]H bond breaking, we tentatively suggest that the zwitterion dissociates exclusively from the fragmentation of the cation site of the molecule, subsequent to the attachment of the excess electron. Within the context of radiation induced damage to biological systems, the present findings contribute to a more complete description of the fragmentation mechanism occurring to amino acids, peptides, and proteins since they adopt usually a zwitterion structure. PMID:20515090

  4. Soft x-ray ionization induced fragmentation of glycine

    SciTech Connect

    Itälä, E.; Kooser, K.; Rachlew, E.; Huels, M. A.; Kukk, E.

    2014-06-21

    X-ray absorption commonly involves dissociative core ionization producing not only momentum correlated charged fragments but also low- and high-energy electrons capable of inducing damage in living tissue. This gives a natural motivation for studying the core ionization induced fragmentation processes in biologically important molecules such as amino acids. Here the fragmentation of amino acid glycine following carbon 1s core ionization has been studied. Using photoelectron-photoion-photoion coincidence technique, a detailed analysis on fragmentation of the sample molecule into pairs of momentum correlated cations has been carried out. The main characteristics of core ionization induced fragmentation of glycine were found to be the rupture of the C–C{sub α} bond and the presence of the CNH{sub 2}{sup +} fragment.

  5. Soft x-ray ionization induced fragmentation of glycine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itälä, E.; Kooser, K.; Rachlew, E.; Huels, M. A.; Kukk, E.

    2014-06-01

    X-ray absorption commonly involves dissociative core ionization producing not only momentum correlated charged fragments but also low- and high-energy electrons capable of inducing damage in living tissue. This gives a natural motivation for studying the core ionization induced fragmentation processes in biologically important molecules such as amino acids. Here the fragmentation of amino acid glycine following carbon 1s core ionization has been studied. Using photoelectron-photoion-photoion coincidence technique, a detailed analysis on fragmentation of the sample molecule into pairs of momentum correlated cations has been carried out. The main characteristics of core ionization induced fragmentation of glycine were found to be the rupture of the C-Cα bond and the presence of the CNH_2^+ fragment.

  6. Sodium tris(glycinium) bis(hexafluorosilicate) glycine trisolvate.

    PubMed

    Narayana, Moolya B; Rai, Chitharanjan; Dharmaprakash, S M; Harrison, William T A

    2007-07-01

    The title compound, Na(+) x 3C(2)H(6)NO(2)(+) x 2SiF(6)(2-) x 3C(2)H(5)NO(2), arose from an unexpected reaction of glycine and HF with the glass container. It is an unusual hybrid organic-inorganic network built up from chains of vertex-sharing NaF(4)O(2) and SiF(6) octahedra. A pair of glycinium/glycine molecules bridges the chains into a sheet via a centrosymmetric O...H...O link. The other organic species interact with the network by an extensive N-H...F hydrogen-bond network, including bifurcated and trifurcated bonds. Finally, an extremely short C-H...O interaction (H...O = 2.25 Angstrom) is seen in the crystal structure. The Na atom has site symmetry overline1. PMID:17609553

  7. [Molecular physiology of glycine receptors in nervous system of vertebrates].

    PubMed

    2014-03-01

    Glycine receptor is the anion-selective channel, providing fast synaptic transmission in the central nervous system of vertebrates. Together with the nicotinic acetylcholine, GABA and serotonin (5-HT3R) receptors, it belongs to the superfamily of pentameric cys-loop receptors. It has been cloned one beta and four alpha subunits of glycine receptor, which are specifically distributed in different areas of the nervous system. Due to their specific molecular properties and distribution, different subunits ensure important physiological functions: from control of motor activity and regulation of neuronal differentiation to sensory information processing and modulation of pain sensitivity. In this review we briefly describe main functions of these transmembrane proteins, their distribution and molecular architecture. Special attention is paid to recent studies on the molecular physiology of these receptors, as well as on presenting of molecular domains responsible for their modulation and dysfunction. PMID:25508361

  8. [Molecular physiology of glycine receptors in nervous system of vertebrates].

    PubMed

    Maleeva, G V; Brezhestovskiĭ, P D

    2014-03-01

    Glycine receptor is the anion-selective channel, providing fast synaptic transmission in the central nervous system of vertebrates. Together with the nicotinic acetylcholine, GABA and serotonin (5-HT3R) receptors, it belongs to the superfamily of pentameric cys-loop receptors. It has been cloned one beta and four alpha subunits of glycine receptor, which are specifically distributed in different areas of the nervous system. Due to their specific molecular properties and distribution, different subunits ensure important physiological functions: from control of motor activity and regulation of neuronal differentiation to sensory information processing and modulation of pain sensitivity. In this review we briefly describe main functions of these transmembrane proteins, their distribution and molecular architecture. Special attention is paid to recent studies on the molecular physiology of these receptors, as well as on presenting of molecular domains responsible for their modulation and dysfunction. PMID:25464730

  9. Restricticin, a novel glycine-containing antifungal agent.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, R E; Dufresne, C; Flor, J E; Kempf, A J; Wilson, K E; Lam, T; Onishi, J; Milligan, J; Fromtling, R A; Abruzzo, G K

    1991-05-01

    Restricticin (1) is a naturally-occurring antifungal agent which contains triene, pyran and glycine ester functionalities and is unrelated to any previously known family of natural products. This unstable compound, as well as its corresponding N,N-dimethyl derivative (2), have been produced and isolated from both solid and liquid fermentations of Penicillium restrictum. The desglycyl hydrolysis product, restrictinol (3), was produced via the hydrolysis of pure restricticin and as an artifact of the isolation of restricticin. PMID:2061189

  10. Microbial Community Responses to Glycine Addition in Kansas Prairie Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottos, E.; Roy Chowdhury, T.; White, R. A., III; Brislawn, C.; Fansler, S.; Kim, Y. M.; Metz, T. O.; McCue, L. A.; Jansson, J.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in sequencing technologies are rapidly expanding our abilities to unravel aspects of microbial community structure and function in complex systems like soil; however, characterizing the highly diverse communities is problematic, due primarily to challenges in data analysis. To tackle this problem, we aimed to constrain the microbial diversity in a soil by enriching for particular functional groups within a community through addition of "trigger substrates". Such trigger substrates, characterized by low molecular weight, readily soluble and diffusible in soil solution, representative of soil organic matter derivatives, would also be rapidly degradable. A relatively small energy investment to maintain the cell in a state of metabolic alertness for such substrates would be a better evolutionary strategy and presumably select for a cohort of microorganisms with the energetics and cellular machinery for utilization and growth. We chose glycine, a free amino acid (AA) known to have short turnover times (in the range of hours) in soil. As such, AAs are a good source of nitrogen and easily degradable, and can serve as building blocks for microbial proteins and other biomass components. We hypothesized that the addition of glycine as a trigger substrate will decrease microbial diversity and evenness, as taxa capable of metabolizing it are enriched in relation to those that are not. We tested this hypothesis by incubating three Kansas native prairie soils with glycine for 24 hours at 21 degree Celsius, and measured community level responses by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, metagenomics, and metatranscriptomics. Preliminary evaluation of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed minor changes in bacterial community composition in response to glycine addition. We will also present data on functional gene abundance and expression. The results of these analyses will be useful in designing sequencing strategies aimed at dissecting and deciphering complex microbial communities.

  11. Progress in the Development of Lysine Methyltransferase SETD8 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Milite, Ciro; Feoli, Alessandra; Viviano, Monica; Rescigno, Donatella; Mai, Antonello; Castellano, Sabrina; Sbardella, Gianluca

    2016-08-19

    SETD8/SET8/Pr-SET7/KMT5A is the only known lysine methyltransferase that monomethylates lysine 20 of histone H4 (H4K20) in vivo. The methyltransferase activity of SETD8 has been implicated in many essential cellular processes, including DNA replication, DNA damage response, transcription modulation, and cell cycle regulation. In addition to H4K20, SETD8 monomethylates non-histone substrates including proliferating cell nuclear antigen and p53. During the past decade, different structural classes of inhibitors targeting various lysine methyltransferases have been designed and developed. However, the development of SETD8 inhibitors is still in its infancy. This review covers the progress made to date in inhibiting the activity of SETD8 by small molecules, with an emphasis on their discovery, selectivity over other methyltransferases, and cellular activity. PMID:27411844

  12. Coacervate-like microspheres from lysine-rich proteinoid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohlfing, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    Microspheres form isothermally from lysine-rich proteinoid when the ionic strength of the solution is increased with NaCl or other salts. Studies with different monovalent anions and with polymers of different amino acid composition indicate that charge neutralization and hydrophobic bonding contribute to microsphere formation. The particles also form in sea water, especially if heated or made slightly alkaline. The microspheres differ from those made from acidic proteinoid but resemble coacervate droplets in some ways (isothermal formation, limited stability, stabilization by quinone, uptake of dyes). Because the constituent lysine-rich proteinoid is of simulated prebiotic origin, the study is interpreted to add emphasis to and suggest an evolutionary continuity for coacervation phenomena.

  13. The mitochondrial genome of the soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Tracey; Farrugia, Daniel; Barrett, Jeff; Chitwood, David J; Rowe, Janet; Subbotin, Sergei; Dowton, Mark

    2011-07-01

    We sequenced the entire coding region of the mitochondrial genome of Heterodera glycines. The sequence obtained comprised 14.9 kb, with PCR evidence indicating that the entire genome comprised a single, circular molecule of approximately 21-22 kb. The genome is the most T-rich nematode mitochondrial genome reported to date, with T representing over half of all nucleotides on the coding strand. The genome also contains the highest number of poly(T) tracts so far reported (to our knowledge), with 60 poly(T) tracts ≥ 12 Ts. All genes are transcribed from the same mitochondrial strand. The organization of the mitochondrial genome of H. glycines shows a number of similarities compared with Radopholus similis, but fewer similarities when compared with Meloidogyne javanica. Very few gene boundaries are shared with Globodera pallida or Globodera rostochiensis. Partial mitochondrial genome sequences were also obtained for Heterodera cardiolata (5.3 kb) and Punctodera chalcoensis (6.8 kb), and these had identical organizations compared with H. glycines. We found PCR evidence of a minicircular mitochondrial genome in P. chalcoensis, but at low levels and lacking a noncoding region. Such circularised genome fragments may be present at low levels in a range of nematodes, with multipartite mitochondrial genomes representing a shift to a condition in which these subgenomic circles predominate. PMID:21745140

  14. Coating Soybean Seed with Oxamyl for Control of Heterodera glycines

    PubMed Central

    Townshend, J. L.

    1990-01-01

    Oxamyl coated on soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv. Elgin) seeds in solutions of 20, 40, 80, and 160 mg/ml had no serious deleterious effects on seedling emergence and growth when planted in sterile soil. Seedling emergence on day 3 was less than that of the uncoated control, but by day 7 emergence was equal to, or greater than, the control. Shoot and root growth from seed coated with oxamyl in 40 and 80 mg/ml solutions was greater than that of the control. In soil infested with soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines, shoot weight of soybean plants from seeds coated with oxamyl in 80 mg/ml solution was 11 and 9% greater at weeks 3 and 7, respectively, than from uncoated seeds. Numbers of juveniles (J3 and J4) and adults of H. glycines observed on the roots of plants from oxamyl-coated seeds were 83, 42, and 49% less at weeks 3, 5, and 7, respectively, than numbers on the roots of the untreated control. Numbers of J2 extracted from the roots of plants from oxamyl-coated seeds were 75% less at weeks 5 and 7 than those extracted from roots of uncoated seeds. The numbers of J2 extracted from the soil planted to oxamyl-coated seeds were 51 and 33% less at weeks 5 and 7, respectively, than from soil planted to uncoated seed. PMID:19287713

  15. Glycine induced culture-harvesting strategy for Botryococcus braunii.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ying; Zhu, Wenzhe; Chen, Chaozhou; Nie, Yilei

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of culture conditions, including carbon sources and concentration, culture period, and precondition time, on the production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and its influence on microalgal flocculation. EPS are natural high molecule polymer, excreted by microalgae themselves. EPS can accelerate the formation of microbial aggregates through binding cells closely. Organic carbon sources, such as glucose, glycerol, acetate and glycine were compared to select the optimal source to stimulate EPS accumulation. Subsequently, the effect of culture period, glycine dose and precondition time on EPS production and its influence on biomass growth and flocculation efficiency were investigated. As the main parts of EPS, tightly bound EPS were found positively related to suspended solids concentration. However, the loosely bound EPS may weaken the floc structure, leading to poor water-cells separation. Under the optimal condition with culture period of 16 days, glycine dose of 0.5 g l(-1) and precondition time of 5 days, the biomass concentration increased from 1.49 to 2 g l(-1), and the maximum suspended solids concentration of 7.06% with biomass recovery rate of 70.6% was achieved. PMID:26553477

  16. Interaction between ATP, metal ions, glycine, and several minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rishpon, J.; Ohara, P. J.; Lawless, J. G.; Lahav, N.

    1982-01-01

    Interactions between ATP, glycine and montmorillonite and kaolinite clay minerals in the presence of various metal cations are investigated. The adsorption of adenine nucleotides on clays and Al(OH)3 was measured as a function of pH, and glycine condensation was followed in the presence of ATP, ZnCl2, MgCl2 and either kaolinite or montmorillonite. The amounts of ATP and ADP adsorbed are found to decrease with increasing Ph, and to be considerably enhanced in experiments with Mg(2+)- and Zn(2+)-montmorillonite with respect to Na(+)-montmorillonite. The effects of divalent cations are less marked in kaolinite. Results for Al(OH)3 show the importance of adsorption at clay platelet edges at high pH. The decomposition of ATP during drying at high temperature is observed to be inhibited by small amounts of clay, vacuum, or Mg(2+) or Zn(2+) ions, and to be accompanied by peptide formation in the presence of glycine. Results suggest the importance of Zn(2+) and Mg(2+) in chemical evolution.

  17. Cometary Glycine Detected in Stardust-Returned Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, Jamie E.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.

    2010-01-01

    In January 2006, NASA's Stardust spacecraft returned samples from comet 81P/Wild 2 to Earth. The Stardust cometary collector consisted of aerogel cells lined with aluminum foils designed to capture impacting particles and facilitate removal of the aerogel. Preliminary examinations of these comet-exposed materials revealed a suite of organic compounds, including several amines and amino acids which were later examined in more detail. Methylamine (NH2CH3) and ethylamine (NH2C2H5) were detected in the exposed aerogel at concentrations greatly exceeding those found in control samples, while the amino acid glycine (NH2CH2COOH) was detected in several foil samples as well as in the comet-exposed aerogel. None of these three compounds had been previously detected in comets, although methylamine had been observed in the interstellar medium. Although comparison with control samples suggested that the detected glycine was cometary. the previous work was not able to conclusively identify its origin. Here, we present the results of compound-specific carbon isotopic analysis of glycine in Stardust cometary collector foils. Several foils from the interstellar side of the Stardust collector were also analyzed for amino acid abundance, but concentrations were too low to perform isotopic ana!ysis.

  18. Accessibility and mobility of lysine residues in. beta. -lactoglobulin

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, E.M.; Pfeffer, P.E.; Kumosinski, T.F.; Greenberg, R.

    1988-07-26

    N/sup epsilon/-(/sup 2/H/sub 6/)Isopropyllysyl-..beta..-lactoglobulin was prepared by reductive alkylation of ..beta..-lactoglobulin with (/sup 2/H/sub 6/)acetone and NaBH/sub 4/ to provide a /sup 2/H (NMR) probe for the study of lysine involvement in lipid-protein interactions. Amino acid analysis showed 80% of the protein's 15 lysine residues to be labeled. Unmodified lysine residues were located through peptide maps produced from CNBr, tryptic, and chymotryptic digests of the labeled protein. Average correlation times calculated from /sup 2/H NMR spectra were 20 and 320 ps for 8.7 and 3.3 residues, respectively, in 6 M guanidine hydrochloride; in nondenaturing solution, values of 70 and 320 ps were obtained for 6.5 and 3.2 residues, respectively, with the remaining 2.3 modified residues not observed, suggesting that side chains of lysine residues in unordered or flexible regions were more mobile than those in stable periodic structures. /sup 2/H NMR spectra of the protein complexed with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine confirmed the extrinsic membrane protein type behavior of ..beta..-lactoglobulin previously reported from /sup 31/P NMR studies of the phospholipids complexed with ..beta..-lactoglobulin. Although no physiological function has yet been identified, comparison of these results with the X-ray structure supports the hypothesis that residues not accessible for modification may help to stabilize the cone-shaped ..beta..-barrel thought to contain binding sites for small lipid-soluble molecules.

  19. The self-assembly of a camptothecin-lysine nanotube.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuan; Shieh, Aileen; Kim, Se Hye; King, Samantha; Kim, Anne; Sun, Hui-Lung; Croce, Carlo M; Parquette, Jon R

    2016-06-15

    A simple, low molecular weight camptothecin-lysine conjugate is reported to self-assemble into nanotubes with diameters of 70-100nm and a drug loading level of 60.5%. The nanotubes exhibited promising in vitro cytotoxicity against cancer cell lines A549, NCI-H460 and NCI-H23. The release of active camptothecin was highly dependent on conjugate concentration, temperature and pH of the solution. PMID:27156772

  20. Heterodera glycines cysts contain an extensive array of endoproteases as well as inhibitors of proteases in H. glycines and Meloidogyne incognita infective juvenile stages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heterodera glycines cysts contain proteases, and inhibitors of protease activities in various nematode species. In this investigation, proteases in H. glycines cysts were identified using a commercially available FRET-peptide library comprising 512 peptide pools qualified to detect up to 4 endoprot...

  1. Inducible l-Alanine Exporter Encoded by the Novel Gene ygaW (alaE) in Escherichia coli ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Hatsuhiro; Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Tobe, Ryuta; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Katsumata, Ryoichi

    2011-01-01

    We previously isolated a mutant hypersensitive to l-alanyl-l-alanine from a non-l-alanine-metabolizing Escherichia coli strain and found that it lacked an inducible l-alanine export system. Consequently, this mutant showed a significant accumulation of intracellular l-alanine and a reduction in the l-alanine export rate compared to the parent strain. When the mutant was used as a host to clone a gene(s) that complements the dipeptide-hypersensitive phenotype, two uncharacterized genes, ygaW and ytfF, and two characterized genes, yddG and yeaS, were identified. Overexpression of each gene in the mutant resulted in a decrease in the intracellular l-alanine level and enhancement of the l-alanine export rate in the presence of the dipeptide, suggesting that their products function as exporters of l-alanine. Since ygaW exhibited the most striking impact on both the intra- and the extracellular l-alanine levels among the four genes identified, we disrupted the ygaW gene in the non-l-alanine-metabolizing strain. The resulting isogenic mutant showed the same intra- and extracellular l-alanine levels as observed in the dipeptide-hypersensitive mutant obtained by chemical mutagenesis. When each gene was overexpressed in the wild-type strain, which does not intrinsically excrete alanine, only the ygaW gene conferred on the cells the ability to excrete alanine. In addition, expression of the ygaW gene was induced in the presence of the dipeptide. On the basis of these results, we concluded that YgaW is likely to be the physiologically most relevant exporter for l-alanine in E. coli and proposed that the gene be redesignated alaE for alanine export. PMID:21531828

  2. Solvation free energies of alanine peptides: the effect of flexibility.

    PubMed

    Kokubo, Hironori; Harris, Robert C; Asthagiri, Dilipkumar; Pettitt, B Montgomery

    2013-12-27

    The electrostatic (ΔGel), van der Waals cavity-formation (ΔGvdw), and total (ΔG) solvation free energies for 10 alanine peptides ranging in length (n) from 1 to 10 monomers were calculated. The free energies were computed both with fixed, extended conformations of the peptides and again for some of the peptides without constraints. The solvation free energies, ΔGel, and components ΔGvdw, and ΔG, were found to be linear in n, with the slopes of the best-fit lines being γel, γvdw, and γ, respectively. Both γel and γ were negative for fixed and flexible peptides, and γvdw was negative for fixed peptides. That γvdw was negative was surprising, as experimental data on alkanes, theoretical models, and MD computations on small molecules and model systems generally suggest that γvdw should be positive. A negative γvdw seemingly contradicts the notion that ΔGvdw drives the initial collapse of the protein when it folds by favoring conformations with small surface areas. When we computed ΔGvdw for the flexible peptides, thereby allowing the peptides to assume natural ensembles of more compact conformations, γvdw was positive. Because most proteins do not assume extended conformations, a ΔGvdw that increases with increasing surface area may be typical for globular proteins. An alternative hypothesis is that the collapse is driven by intramolecular interactions. We find few intramolecular H-bonds but show that the intramolecular van der Waals interaction energy is more favorable for the flexible than for the extended peptides, seemingly favoring this hypothesis. The large fluctuations in the vdw energy may make attributing the collapse of the peptide to this intramolecular energy difficult. PMID:24328358

  3. Solvation Free Energies of Alanine Peptides: The Effect of Flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Kokubo, Hironori; Harris, Robert C.; Asthigiri, Dilipkumar; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2014-01-01

    The electrostatic (ΔGel), van der Waals cavity-formation (ΔGvdw), and total (ΔG) solvation free energies for 10 alanine peptides ranging in length (n) from 1 to 10 monomers were calculated. The free energies were computed both with fixed, extended conformations of the peptides and again for some of the peptides without constraints. The solvation free energies, ΔGel, and components ΔGvdw, and ΔG, were found to be linear in n, with the slopes of the best-fit lines being γel, γvdw, and γ, respectively. Both γel and γ were negative for fixed and flexible peptides, and γvdw was negative for fixed peptides. That γvdw was negative was surprising, as experimental data on alkanes, theoretical models, and MD computations on small molecules and model systems generally suggest that γvdw should be positive. A negative γvdw seemingly contradicts the notion that ΔGvdw drives the initial collapse of the protein when it folds by favoring conformations with small surface areas. When we computed ΔGvdw for the flexible peptides, thereby allowing the peptides to assume natural ensembles of more compact conformations, γvdw was positive. Because most proteins do not assume extended conformations, a ΔGvdw that increases with increasing surface area may be typical for globular proteins. An alternative hypothesis is that the collapse is driven by intramolecular interactions. We find few intramolecular h-bonds but show that the intramolecular van der Waal’s interaction energy is more favorable for the flexible than for the extended peptides, seemingly favoring this hypothesis. The large fluctuations in the vdw energy may make attributing the collapse of the peptide to this intramolecular energy difficult. PMID:24328358

  4. Solvation Free Energies of Alanine Peptides: The Effect of Flexibility

    SciTech Connect

    Kokubo, Hironori; Harris, Robert C.; Asthagiri, Dilip; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2013-12-03

    The electrostatic (?Gel), cavity-formation (?Gvdw), and total (?G) solvation free energies for 10 alanine peptides ranging in length (n) from 1 to 10 monomers were calculated. The free energies were computed both with xed, extended conformations of the peptides and again for some of the peptides without constraints. The solvation free energies, ?Gel, ?Gvdw, and ?G, were found to be linear in n, with the slopes of the best-fit lines being gamma_el, gamma_vdw, and gamma, respectively. Both gamma_el and gamma were negative for fixed and flexible peptides, and gamma_vdw was negative for fixed peptides. That gamma_vdw was negative was surprising, as experimental data on alkanes, theoretical models, and MD computations on small molecules and model systems generally suggest that gamma_vdw should be positive. A negative gamma_vdw seemingly contradicts the notion that ?Gvdw drives the initial collapse of the protein when it folds by favoring conformations with small surface areas, but when we computed ?Gvdw for the flexible peptides, thereby allowing the peptides to assume natural ensembles of more compact conformations, gamma-vdw was positive. Because most proteins do not assume extended conformations, a ?Gvdw that increases with increasing surface area may be typical for globular proteins. An alternative hypothesis is that the collapse is driven by intramolecular interactions. We show that the intramolecular van der Waal's interaction energy is more favorable for the flexible than for the extended peptides, seemingly favoring this hypothesis, but the large fluctuations in this energy may make attributing the collapse of the peptide to this intramolecular energy difficult.

  5. Phytate utilization by genetically engineered lysine-producing Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Tzvetkov, Mladen V; Liebl, Wolfgang

    2008-04-30

    Heterologous expression of a phytase gene (phyC) from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens DSM 7 enabled the growth of Corynebacterium glutamicum with phytate (myo-inositol-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate) as a new, sole source of phosphorus. Phytate was not used as a carbon source. During growth of the phyC-expressing amino acid (l-lysine)-producing strain C. glutamicum ATCC 21253 (pWLQ2::phyC) with phytate as the source of phosphorus, merely a small, transient accumulation of inorganic phosphate was observed in the fermentation broth. At the later stages of fermentation, free inorganic phosphate from phytate degradation was no longer detectable. Growth and l-lysine production by the phytase-producing strain C. glutamicum ATCC 21253 (pWLQ2::phyC) in phytate medium did not differ significantly from control experiments with strain C. glutamicum ATCC 21253 (pWLQ2) conducted with an excess of inorganic phosphate, demonstrating that there was no phosphate limitation when phytate was used as the phosphorus source. Under the expression conditions employed, only part of PhyC was secreted to the culture broth by C. glutamicum, but this did not significantly affect growth or lysine production. PMID:18374441

  6. Proteome-wide enrichment of proteins modified by lysine methylation

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Scott M; Moore, Kaitlyn E; Green, Erin M; Martín, Glòria Mas; Gozani, Or

    2015-01-01

    We present a protocol for using the triple malignant brain tumor domains of L3MBTL1 (3×MBT), which bind to mono- and di-methylated lysine with minimal sequence specificity, in order to enrich for such methylated lysine from cell lysates. Cells in culture are grown with amino acids containing light or heavy stable isotopic labels. Methylated proteins are enriched by incubating cell lysates with 3×MBT, or with the binding-null D355N mutant as a negative control. Quantitative liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) are then used to identify proteins that are specifically enriched by 3×MBT pull-down. The addition of a third isotopic label allows the comparison of protein lysine methylation between different biological conditions. Unlike most approaches, our strategy does not require a prior hypothesis of candidate methylated proteins, and it recognizes a wider range of methylated proteins than any available method using antibodies. Cells are prepared by growing in isotopic labeling medium for about 7 d; the process of enriching methylated proteins takes 3 d and analysis by LC-MS/MS takes another 1–2 d. PMID:24309976

  7. Selective Deletion of the Internal Lysine Residue from the Peptide Sequence by Collisional Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shibdas; Mazumdar, Shyamalava

    2012-11-01

    The gas-phase peptide ion fragmentation chemistry is always the center of attraction in proteomics to analyze the amino acid sequence of peptides and proteins. In this work, we describe the formation of an anomalous fragment ion, which corresponds to the selective deletion of the internal lysine residue from a series of lysine containing peptides upon collisional activation in the ion trap. We detected several water-loss fragment ions and the maximum number of water molecules lost from a particular fragment ion was equal to the number of lysine residues in that fragment. As a consequence of this water-loss phenomenon, internal lysine residues were found to be deleted from the peptide ion. The N,N-dimethylation of all the amine functional groups of the peptide stopped the internal lysine deletion reaction, but selective N-terminal α-amino acetylation had no effect on this process indicating involvement of the side chains of the lysine residues. The detailed mechanism of the lysine deletion was investigated by multistage CID of the modified and unmodified peptides, by isotope labeling and by energy resolved CID studies. The results suggest that the lysine deletion might occur through a unimolecular multistep mechanism involving a seven-membered cyclic imine intermediate formed by the loss of water from a lysine residue in the protonated peptide. This intermediate subsequently undergoes degradation reaction to deplete the interior imine ring from the peptide backbone leading to the deletion of an internal lysine residue.

  8. Cross-Link Formation and Peptidoglycan Lattice Assembly in the FemA Mutant of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus FemA mutant grown in the presence of an alanine-racemase inhibitor was labeled with d-[1-13C]alanine, l-[3-13C]alanine, [2-13C]glycine, and l-[5-19F]lysine to characterize some details of the peptidoglycan tertiary structure. Rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) NMR of isolated cell walls was used to measure internuclear distances between 13C-labeled alanines and 19F-labeled lysine incorporated in the peptidoglycan. The alanyl 13C labels were preselected for REDOR measurement by their proximity to the glycine label using 13C–13C spin diffusion. The observed 13C–13C and 13C–19F distances are consistent with a tightly packed, hybrid architecture containing both parallel and perpendicular stems in a repeating structural motif within the peptidoglycan. PMID:24517508

  9. A novel low molecular weight alanine aminotransferase from fasted rat liver.

    PubMed

    Vedavathi, M; Girish, K S; Kumar, M Karuna

    2006-01-01

    Alanine is the most effective precursor for gluconeogenesis among amino acids, and the initial reaction is catalyzed by alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT). Although the enzyme activity increases during fasting, this effect has not been studied extensively. The present study describes the purification and characterization of an isoform of AlaAT from rat liver under fasting. The molecular mass of the enzyme is 17.7 kD with an isoelectric point of 4.2; glutamine is the N-terminal residue. The enzyme showed narrow substrate specificity for L-alanine with Km values for alanine of 0.51 mM and for 2-oxoglutarate of 0.12 mM. The enzyme is a glycoprotein. Spectroscopic and inhibition studies showed that pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) and free -SH groups are involved in the enzymatic catalysis. PLP activated the enzyme with a Km of 0.057 mM. PMID:16487061

  10. Titration of Alanine Monitored by NMR Spectroscopy: A Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Francis J.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The experiment described here involves simultaneous monitoring of pH and NMR chemical shifts during an aqueous titration of alpha- and beta-alanine. This experiment is designed for use in an undergraduate biochemistry course. (MR)

  11. Distance Restraints from Crosslinking Mass Spectrometry: Mining a Molecular Dynamics Simulation Database to Evaluate Lysine-Lysine Distances

    SciTech Connect

    Merkley, Eric D.; Rysavy, Steven; Kahraman, Abdullah; Hafen, Ryan P.; Daggett, Valerie; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2014-03-18

    Integrative structural biology models the structures of protein complexes that are intractable by classical structural methods (because of extreme size, dynamics, or heterogeneity) by combining computational structural modeling with data from experimental methods. One such method is chemical cross-linking mass spectrometry (XL-MS), in which cross-linked peptides, derived from a covalently cross-linked protein complex and identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, pinpoint protein residues close in three-dimensional space. The commonly used lysine-reactive N-hydroxysuccinimide ester reagents disuccinimidylsuberate (DSS) and bis(sulfosuccinimidyl)suberate (BS3) have a linker arm that is 11.4 Å long when fully extended. However, XL-MS studies on proteins of known structure frequently report cross-links that exceed this distance. Typically, a tolerance of ~3 Å is added to the theoretical maximum to account for this observation, with little justification for the value chosen. We used the Dynameomics database, a repository of high-quality molecular dynamics simulations of 807 proteins representative of all protein folds, to investigate the change in lysine-lysine distances resulting from native-state dynamics on the time-scale of tens of nanoseconds. We conclude that observed cross-links are consistent with a protein structure if the distance between cross-linked lysine Nζ atoms is less than the cross-linker length plus 11.3 Å. For DSS or BS3, this corresponds to a Cα to Cα distance of 30.4 Å. This analysis provides a theoretical basis for the widespread practice of adding a tolerance to the crosslinker length when comparing XL-MS results to structures, and indicates the appropriate values of an XLMS derived distance constraint to use in structural modeling.

  12. Repeated Supramaximal Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress: Effect of β-Alanine Plus Creatine Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Belviranli, Muaz; Okudan, Nilsel; Revan, Serkan; Balci, Serdar; Gokbel, Hakki

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carnosine is a dipeptide formed from the β-alanine and histidine amino acids and found in mainly in the brain and muscle, especially fast twitch muscle. Carnosine and creatine has an antioxidant effect and carnosine accounts for about 10% of the muscle's ability to buffer the H+ ions produced by exercise. Objectives: The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of beta alanine and/or creatine supplementation on oxidant and antioxidant status during repeated Wingate tests (WTs). Patients and Methods: Forty four sedentary males participated in the study. Participants performed three 30s WTs with 2 minutes rest between exercise bouts. After the first exercise session, the subjects were assigned to one of four groups: Placebo, Creatine, Beta-alanine and Beta-alanine plus creatine. Participants ingested twice per day for 22 consecutive days, then four times per day for the following 6 days. After the supplementation period the second exercise session was applied. Blood samples were taken before and immediately after the each exercise session for the analysis of oxidative stress and antioxidant markers. Results: Malondialdehyde levels and superoxide dismutase activities were affected by neither supplementation nor exercise. During the pre-supplementation session, protein carbonyl reduced and oxidized glutathione (GSH and GSSG) levels increased immediately after the exercise. However, during the post-supplementation session GSH and GSSG levels increased in beta-alanine and beta-alanine plus creatine groups immediately after the exercise compared to pre-exercise. In addition, during the post-supplementation session total antioxidant capacity increased in beta-alanine group immediately after the exercise. Conclusions: Beta-alanine supplementation has limited antioxidant effect during the repeated WTs. PMID:27217925

  13. Internal bias field in triglycine sulphate crystals with L-, α-alanine grown at negative temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovidova, S. D.; Rogazinskaya, O. V.; Sidorkin, A. S.; Ionova, E. V.; Kirichenko, A. P.; Bavykin, S. A.

    2010-09-01

    The dielectric and pyroelectric properties of triglycine sulphate (TGS) crystals with L, α-alanine impurities grown at negative temperatures have been investigated. It is shown that a lower impurity concentration (2 mol % in solution) in this temperature range leads to the formation of internal bias fields of the same order of magnitude (˜800 V/cm) as for TGS crystals grown at T ⩽ 50°C but with an L, α-alanine concentration of 20 mol % in solution.

  14. EPR dosimetry of radiotherapy photon beams in inhomogeneous media using alanine films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helge Østerås, Bjørn; Olaug Hole, Eli; Rune Olsen, Dag; Malinen, Eirik

    2006-12-01

    In the current work, EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) dosimetry using alanine films (134 µm thick) was utilized for dose measurements in inhomogeneous phantoms irradiated with radiotherapy photon beams. The main phantom material was PMMA, while either Styrofoam or aluminium was introduced as an inhomogeneity. The phantoms were irradiated to a maximum dose of about 30 Gy with 6 or 15 MV photons. The performance of the alanine film dosimeters was investigated and compared to results from ion chamber dosimetry, Monte Carlo simulations and radiotherapy treatment planning calculations. It was found that the alanine film dosimeters had a linear dose response above approximately 5 Gy, while a background signal obscured the response at lower dose levels. For doses between 5 and 60 Gy, the standard deviation of single alanine film dose estimates was about 2%. The alanine film dose estimates yielded results comparable to those from the Monte Carlo simulations and the ion chamber measurements, with absolute differences between estimates in the order of 1 15%. The treatment planning calculations exhibited limited applicability. The current work shows that alanine film dosimetry is a method suitable for estimating radiotherapeutical doses and for dose measurements in inhomogeneous media.

  15. Association of Alanine Aminotransferase and Periodontitis: A Cross-Sectional Analysis—NHANES 2009–2012

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, R. Constance; Sambamoorthi, Usha; Jurevic, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Alanine Aminotransferase is an enzyme associated with not only liver diseases, liver conditions, and metabolic syndrome, but also inflammation. Periodontitis is associated with increased cytokines and other markers of inflammation. The purpose of this study is to determine if an independent association between Alanine Aminotransferase and periodontitis exists. Methods. Data from the 2009-2010 and 2011-2012 National Health and Nutrition Surveys (NHANES) were combined. Data concerning periodontitis and Alanine Aminotransferase were extracted and analyzed with Rao Scott Chi-square and logistic regressions. Serum Alanine Aminotransferase was dichotomized at 40 units/liter, and periodontitis was dichotomized to the presence or absence of periodontitis. Results. In bivariate Chi-square analyses, periodontitis and Alanine Aminotransferase were associated (p = 0.0360) and remained significant in unadjusted logistic regression (OR = 1.30 [95% CI: 1.02, 1.65]). However, when other known risk factors of periodontitis were included in the analyses, the relationship attenuated and failed to reach significance (adjusted OR = 1.17 [95% CI: 0.85, 1.60]). Conclusion. Our study adds to the literature a positive but attenuated association of serum Alanine Aminotransferase with periodontitis which failed to reach significance when other known, strong risk factors of periodontitis were included in the analysis. PMID:26981311

  16. Glycine's radiolytic destruction in ices: first in situ laboratory measurements for Mars.

    PubMed

    Gerakines, Perry A; Hudson, Reggie L

    2013-07-01

    We report new laboratory studies of the radiation-induced destruction of glycine-containing ices for a range of temperatures and compositions that allow extrapolation to martian conditions. In situ infrared spectroscopy was used to study glycine decay rates as a function of temperature (from 15 to 280 K) and initial glycine concentrations in six mixtures whose compositions ranged from dry glycine to H2O+glycine (300:1). Results are presented in several systems of units, with cautions concerning their use. The half-life of glycine under the surface of Mars is estimated as an extrapolation of this data set to martian conditions, and trends in decay rates are described as are applications to Mars' near-surface chemistry. PMID:23848469

  17. The hyperpolarizing impact of glycine on endothelial cells may be anti-atherogenic.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F; Barroso-Aranda, Jorge; Contreras, Francisco

    2009-08-01

    Studies to date indicate that endothelial cells express glycine-activated chloride channels, which promote hyperpolarization of the endothelial plasma membrane. If such channels are expressed by endothelial cells lining conduit arteries, glycine is likely to have anti-atherogenic activity. This reflects the fact that endothelial hyperpolarization promotes calcium influx, activating the endothelial isoform of nitric oxide synthase, while also down-regulating the activity of the membrane-bound NADPH oxidase, chief endothelial source of superoxide. Since macrophages express glycine-activated chloride channels that suppress production of oxidants and cytokines, glycine may also oppose atherogenesis by influencing intimal macrophage function. In rats, supplemental glycine exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic effects attributed to chloride channel activation. Administration of large daily doses of glycine would appear to be practical and safe, and has already been shown to inhibit protein glycation in human diabetics. PMID:19232835

  18. Branch-point stoichiometry can generate weak links in metabolism: the case of glycine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Melendez-Hevia, Enrique; Paz-Lugo, Patricia De

    2008-12-01

    Although the metabolic network permits conversion between almost any pair of metabolites,this versatility fails at certain sites because of chemical constraints (kinetic,thermodynamic and stoichiometric) that seriously restrict particular conversions. We call these sites weak links in metabolism,as they can interfere harmfully with management of matter and energy if the network as a whole does not include adequate safeguards. A critical weak link is created in glycine biosynthesis by the stoichiometry of the reaction catalyzed by glycine hydroxymethyltransferase (EC 2.1.2.1), which converts serine into glycine plus one C1 unit: this produces an absolute dependence of the glycine production flux on the utilization of C1 units for other metabolic pathways that do not work coordinately with glycine use. It may not be possible,therefore,to ensure that glycine is always synthesized in sufficient quantities to meet optimal metabolic requirements. PMID:19179765

  19. Derivation of glycine from threonine in Escherichia coli K-12 mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, J; Newman, E B

    1975-01-01

    Escherichia coli AT2046 has been shown previously to lack the enzyme serine transhydroxymethylase and to require exogenous glycine for growth as a consequence. Strains JEV73 and JEV73R, mutants derived from strain AT2046, are shown here to be serine transhydroxymethylase deficient, but able to derive their glycine from endogenously synthesized threonine. Leucine is shown to be closely involved in the regulation of biosynthesis of glycine, to spare glycine in strain AT2046T, to replace glycine in strain JEV73, and to increase threonine conversion to glycine in a representative prototroph of E. coli. An interpretation of strains JEV73 and JEV73R as regulatory mutants of strain AT2046 is given. A hypothesis as to the role of leucine as a signal for nitrogen scavenging is suggested. PMID:1097400

  20. Characterization and crystal structure of lysine insensitive Corynebacterium glutamicum dihydrodipicolinate synthase (cDHDPS) protein

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, E.A.; Bannon, G.A.; Glenn, K.C.; Jeong, S.S.; Sturman, E.J.; Rydel, T.J.

    2008-11-21

    The lysine insensitive Corynebacterium glutamicum dihydrodipicolinate synthase enzyme (cDHDPS) was recently successfully introduced into maize plants to enhance the level of lysine in the grain. To better understand lysine insensitivity of the cDHDPS, we expressed, purified, kinetically characterized the protein, and solved its X-ray crystal structure. The cDHDPS enzyme has a fold and overall structure that is highly similar to other DHDPS proteins. A noteworthy feature of the active site is the evidence that the catalytic lysine residue forms a Schiff base adduct with pyruvate. Analyses of the cDHDPS structure in the vicinity of the putative binding site for S-lysine revealed that the allosteric binding site in the Escherichia coli DHDPS protein does not exist in cDHDPS due to three non-conservative amino acids substitutions, and this is likely why cDHDPS is not feedback inhibited by lysine.

  1. Homology modeling, substrate docking, and molecular simulation studies of mycobacteriophage Che12 lysin A.

    PubMed

    Saadhali, Shainaba A; Hassan, Sameer; Hanna, Luke Elizabeth; Ranganathan, Uma Devi; Kumar, Vanaja

    2016-08-01

    Mycobacteriophages produce lysins that break down the host cell wall at the end of lytic cycle to release their progenies. The ability to lyse mycobacterial cells makes the lysins significant. Mycobacteriophage Che12 is the first reported temperate phage capable of infecting and lysogenising Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Gp11 of Che12 was found to have Chitinase domain that serves as endolysin (lysin A) for Che12. Structure of gp11 was modeled and evaluated using Ramachandran plot in which 98 % of the residues are in the favored and allowed regions. Che12 lysin A was predicted to act on NAG-NAM-NAG molecules in the peptidoglycan of cell wall. The tautomers of NAG-NAM-NAG molecule were generated and docked with lysin A. The stability and binding affinity of lysin A - NAG-NAM-NAG tautomers were studied using molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:27411553

  2. Glycated Lysine Residues: A Marker for Non-Enzymatic Protein Glycation in Age-Related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Nadeem A.; Moinuddin; Ali, Rashid

    2011-01-01

    Nonenzymatic glycosylation or glycation of macromolecules, especially proteins leading to their oxidation, play an important role in diseases. Glycation of proteins primarily results in the formation of an early stage and stable Amadori-lysine product which undergo further irreversible chemical reactions to form advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). This review focuses these products in lysine rich proteins such as collagen and human serum albumin for their role in aging and age-related diseases. Antigenic characteristics of glycated lysine residues in proteins together with the presence of serum autoantibodies to the glycated lysine products and lysine-rich proteins in diabetes and arthritis patients indicates that these modified lysine residues may be a novel biomarker for protein glycation in aging and age-related diseases. PMID:21725160

  3. β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) and isomers: Distribution in different food web compartments of Thau lagoon, French Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Réveillon, Damien; Abadie, Eric; Séchet, Véronique; Masseret, Estelle; Hess, Philipp; Amzil, Zouher

    2015-09-01

    The neurotoxin BMAA (β-N-methylamino-l-alanine) and its isomer DAB (2,4-diaminobutyric acid) have been detected in seafood worldwide, including in Thau lagoon (French Mediterranean Sea). A cluster of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a neurodegenerative disease associated with BMAA, has also been observed in this region. Mussels, periphyton (i.e. biofilms attached to mussels) and plankton were sampled between July 2013 and October 2014, and analyzed using HILIC-MS/MS. BMAA, DAB and AEG (N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine) were found in almost all the samples of the lagoon. BMAA and DAB were present at 0.58 and 0.83, 2.6 and 3.3, 4.0 and 7.2 μg g(-1) dry weight in plankton collected with nets, periphyton and mussels, respectively. Synechococcus sp., Ostreococcus tauri, Alexandrium catenella and eight species of diatoms were cultured and screened for BMAA and analogs. While Synechococcus sp., O. tauri and A. catenella did not produce BMAA under our culture conditions, four diatoms species contained both BMAA and DAB. Hence, diatoms may be a source of BMAA for mussels. Unlike other toxins produced by microalgae, BMAA and DAB were detected in significant amounts in tissues other than digestive glands in mussels. PMID:26254582

  4. Detection of cyanotoxins, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine and microcystins, from a lake surrounded by cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Banack, Sandra Anne; Caller, Tracie; Henegan, Patricia; Haney, James; Murby, Amanda; Metcalf, James S; Powell, James; Cox, Paul Alan; Stommel, Elijah

    2015-02-01

    A cluster of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has been previously described to border Lake Mascoma in Enfield, NH, with an incidence of ALS approximating 25 times expected. We hypothesize a possible association with cyanobacterial blooms that can produce β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a neurotoxic amino acid implicated as a possible cause of ALS/PDC in Guam. Muscle, liver, and brain tissue samples from a Lake Mascoma carp, as well as filtered aerosol samples, were analyzed for microcystins (MC), free and protein-bound BMAA, and the BMAA isomers 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) and N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine (AEG). In carp brain, BMAA and DAB concentrations were 0.043 μg/g ± 0.02 SD and 0.01 μg/g ± 0.002 SD respectively. In carp liver and muscle, the BMAA concentrations were 1.28 μg/g and 1.27 μg/g respectively, and DAB was not detected. BMAA was detected in the air filters, as were the isomers DAB and AEG. These results demonstrate that a putative cause for ALS, BMAA, exists in an environment that has a documented cluster of ALS. Although cause and effect have not been demonstrated, our observations and measurements strengthen the association. PMID:25643180

  5. Detection of Cyanotoxins, β-N-methylamino-l-alanine and Microcystins, from a Lake Surrounded by Cases of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Banack, Sandra Anne; Caller, Tracie; Henegan, Patricia; Haney, James; Murby, Amanda; Metcalf, James S.; Powell, James; Cox, Paul Alan; Stommel, Elijah

    2015-01-01

    A cluster of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has been previously described to border Lake Mascoma in Enfield, NH, with an incidence of ALS approximating 25 times expected. We hypothesize a possible association with cyanobacterial blooms that can produce β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), a neurotoxic amino acid implicated as a possible cause of ALS/PDC in Guam. Muscle, liver, and brain tissue samples from a Lake Mascoma carp, as well as filtered aerosol samples, were analyzed for microcystins (MC), free and protein-bound BMAA, and the BMAA isomers 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) and N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine (AEG). In carp brain, BMAA and DAB concentrations were 0.043 μg/g ± 0.02 SD and 0.01 μg/g ± 0.002 SD respectively. In carp liver and muscle, the BMAA concentrations were 1.28 μg/g and 1.27 μg/g respectively, and DAB was not detected. BMAA was detected in the air filters, as were the isomers DAB and AEG. These results demonstrate that a putative cause for ALS, BMAA, exists in an environment that has a documented cluster of ALS. Although cause and effect have not been demonstrated, our observations and measurements strengthen the association. PMID:25643180

  6. Complete genome sequence of Corynebacterium glutamicum B253, a Chinese lysine-producing strain.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yong; Li, Pengpeng; Zheng, Ping; Zhou, Wenjuan; Chen, Ning; Sun, Jibin

    2015-08-10

    We disclosed the complete genome sequence of Corynebacterium glutamicum B253, an important lysine-producing strain in China. The genome consists a circular chromosome (3,159,203bp) and a plasmid (24,775bp), encoding 2767 protein coding genes in total. The genome contains all genes for lysine biosynthesis, and some mutations potentially relevant to lysine production were detected in comparison with sequence of other C. glutamicum. PMID:25953304

  7. Characterization of the fibrinogen binding domain of bacteriophage lysin from Streptococcus mitis.

    PubMed

    Seo, Ho Seong; Sullam, Paul M

    2011-09-01

    The binding of bacteria to human platelets is a likely central mechanism in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. Platelet binding by Streptococcus mitis SF100 is mediated in part by a lysin encoded by the lysogenic bacteriophage SM1. In addition to its role in the phage life cycle, lysin mediates the binding of S. mitis to human platelets via its interaction with fibrinogen on the platelet surface. To better define the region of lysin mediating fibrinogen binding, we tested a series of purified lysin truncation variants for their abilities to bind this protein. These studies revealed that the fibrinogen binding domain of lysin is contained within the region spanned by amino acid residues 102 to 198 (lysin(102-198)). This region has no sequence homology to other known fibrinogen binding proteins. Lysin(102-198) bound fibrinogen comparably to full-length lysin and with the same selectivity for the fibrinogen Aα and Bβ chains. Lysin(102-198) also inhibited the binding in vitro of S. mitis to human fibrinogen and platelets. When assessed by platelet aggregometry, the disruption of the lysin gene in SF100 resulted in a significantly longer time to the onset of aggregation of human platelets than that of the parent strain. The preincubation of platelets with purified lysin(102-198) also delayed the onset of aggregation by SF100. These results indicate that the binding of lysin to fibrinogen is mediated by a specific domain of the phage protein and that this interaction is important for both platelet binding and aggregation by S. mitis. PMID:21690235

  8. Active transport of. gamma. -aminobutyric acid and glycine into synaptic vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Kish, P.E.; Fischer-Bovenkerk, C.; Ueda, T. )

    1989-05-01

    Although {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glycine are recognized as major amino acid inhibitory neurotransmitters in the central nervous system, their storage is poorly understood. In this study the authors have characterized vesicular GABA and glycine uptakes in the cerebrum and spinal cord, respectively. They present evidence that GABA and glycine are each taken up into isolated synaptic vesicles in an ATP-dependent manner and that the uptake is driven by an electrochemical proton gradient. Uptake for both amino acids exhibited kinetics with low affinity similar to a vesicular glutamate uptake. The ATP-dependent GABA uptake was not inhibited by the putative amino acid neurotransmitters glycine, taurine, glutamate, or aspartate or by GABA analogs, agonists, and antagonists. Similarly, ATP-dependent glycine uptake was hardly affected by GABA, taurine, glutamate, or aspartate or by glycine analogs or antagonists. The GABA uptake was not affected by chloride, which is in contrast to the uptake of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate, whereas the glycine uptake was slightly stimulated by low concentrations of chloride. Tissue distribution studies indicate that the vesicular uptake systems for GABA, glycine, and glutamate are distributed in different proportions in the cerebrum and spinal cord. These results suggest that the vesicular uptake systems for GABA, glycine, and glutamate are distinct from each other.

  9. Synthesis of water soluble glycine capped silver nanoparticles and their surface selective interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Agasti, Nityananda; Singh, Vinay K.; Kaushik, N.K.

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Synthesis of water soluble silver nanoparticles at ambient reaction conditions. • Glycine as stabilizing agent for silver nanoparticles. • Surface selective interaction of glycine with silver nanoparticles. • Glycine concentration influences crystalinity and optical property of silver nanoparticles. - Abstract: Synthesis of biocompatible metal nanoparticles has been an area of significant interest because of their wide range of applications. In the present study, we have successfully synthesized water soluble silver nanoparticles assisted by small amino acid glycine. The method is primarily based on reduction of AgNO{sub 3} with NaBH{sub 4} in aqueous solution under atmospheric air in the presence of glycine. UV–vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X–ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) techniques used for characterization of resulting silver nanoparticles demonstrated that, glycine is an effective capping agent to stabilize silver nanoparticles. Surface selective interaction of glycine on (1 1 1) face of silver nanoparticles has been investigated. The optical property and crystalline behavior of silver nanoparticles were found to be sensitive to concentration of glycine. X–ray diffraction studies ascertained the phase specific interaction of glycine on silver nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles synthesized were of diameter 60 nm. We thus demonstrated an efficient synthetic method for synthesis of water soluble silver nanoparticles capped by amino acid under mild reaction conditions with excellent reproducibility.

  10. Principal role of NR3 subunits in NR1/NR3 excitatory glycine receptor function.

    PubMed

    Madry, Christian; Mesic, Ivana; Bartholomäus, Ingo; Nicke, Annette; Betz, Heinrich; Laube, Bodo

    2007-03-01

    Calcium-permeable N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are tetrameric cation channels composed of glycine-binding NR1 and glutamate-binding NR2 subunits, which require binding of both glutamate and glycine for efficient channel gating. In contrast, receptors assembled from NR1 and NR3 subunits function as calcium-impermeable excitatory glycine receptors that respond to agonist application only with low efficacy. Here, we show that antagonists of and substitutions within the glycine-binding site of NR1 potentiate NR1/NR3 receptor function up to 25-fold, but inhibition or mutation of the NR3 glycine binding site reduces or abolishes receptor activation. Thus, glycine bound to the NR1 subunit causes auto-inhibition of NR1/NR3 receptors whereas glycine binding to the NR3 subunits is required for opening of the ion channel. Our results establish differential roles of the high-affinity NR3 and low-affinity NR1 glycine-binding sites in excitatory glycine receptor function. PMID:17214961

  11. Converting enzyme inhibition and the glomerular hemodynamic response to glycine in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Slomowitz, L A; Peterson, O W; Thomson, S C

    1999-07-01

    GFR normally increases during glycine infusion. This response is absent in humans and rats with established diabetes mellitus. In diabetic patients, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition (ACEI) restores the effect of glycine on GFR. To ascertain the glomerular hemodynamic basis for this effect of ACEI, micropuncture studies were performed in male Wistar-Froemter rats after 5 to 6 wk of insulin-treated streptozotocin diabetes. The determinants of single-nephron GFR (SNGFR) were assessed in each rat before and during glycine infusion. Studies were performed in diabetics, diabetics after 5 d of ACEI (enalapril in the drinking water), and weight-matched controls. Diabetic rats manifest renal hypertrophy and glomerular hyperfiltration but not glomerular capillary hypertension. ACEI reduced glomerular capillary pressure, increased glomerular ultrafiltration coefficient, and did not mitigate hyperfiltration. In controls, glycine increased SNGFR by 30% due to increased nephron plasma flow. In diabetics, glycine had no effect on any determinant of SNGFR. In ACEI-treated diabetics, the SNGFR response to glycine was indistinguishable from nondiabetics, but the effect of glycine was mediated by greater ultrafiltration pressure rather than by greater plasma flow. These findings demonstrate that: (1) The absent response to glycine in established diabetes does not indicate that renal functional reserve is exhausted by hyperfiltration; and (2) ACEI restores the GFR response to glycine in established diabetes, but this response is mediated by increased ultrafiltration pressure rather than by increased nephron plasma flow. PMID:10405200

  12. The abalone egg vitelline envelope receptor for sperm lysin is a giant multivalent molecule

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Willie J.; Vacquier, Victor D.

    1997-01-01

    Abalone sperm lysin is a 16-kDa acrosomal protein, which nonenzymatically and species selectively creates a hole in the egg vitelline envelope (VE) through which the sperm passes to reach the egg cell membrane. The crystal structures of both monomeric and dimeric lysins have been solved and the sequences of lysins from 20 abalone species have been determined. As a first step in understanding the molecular mechanism by which lysin creates a hole in the VE, its VE receptor was isolated. The VE receptor for lysin (VERL) is an unbranched, rod-like molecule with an approximate relative molecular mass of 2 million; half the mass being carbohydrate. Fluorescence polarization studies showed positive cooperativity in the binding of lysin to VERL (EC50 ≈9 nM) and were consistent with the species selectivity of lysin in dissolving VEs. Each molecule of VERL bound between 126 and 142 molecules of monomeric lysin (two independent assays), showing that VERL possesses repetitive lysin-binding motifs. PMID:9192632

  13. Growth and antioxidant status of broilers fed supplemental lysine and pyridoxine under high ambient temperature

    PubMed Central

    Khakpour Irani, Farzaneh; Daneshyar, Mohsen; Najafi, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Three levels of lysine (90, 100 and 110% of Ross requirement) and of pyridoxine (3, 6 and 9 mg kg-1) were used in a 3 × 3 factorial experiment to investigate the growth and blood antioxidant ability of broilers under high ambient temperature. None of the dietary supplements affected the weight gain during the starter and grower periods. Although no significant differences were detected between the treatments during the entire period, high lysine level fed birds had a lower weight gain. At any levels of pyridoxine, high lysine fed birds were lighter than others. Neither the lysine nor pyridoxine changed the feed intake or feed conversion ratio during the starter, grower and entire period. However there was no significant difference between the treatments for blood malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration, medium lysine fed birds had lower blood MDA than other ones. No significant effects on blood triglyceride, total protein and blood superoxide dismutase activity were indicated with addition of any lysine or pyridoxine level. Medium lysine fed birds had decreased blood glutathione peroxidase activity compared to the birds of other treatments. It was concluded that providing the proposed dietary lysine requirement of Ross strain during heat stress ensuring the best body weight gain and body antioxidant ability. Higher lysine level causes the retarded weight gain due to higher excretion of arginine from the body and consequently higher lipid peroxidation. PMID:26261713

  14. Molecular Basis for Lysine Specificity in the Yeast Ubiquitin-Conjugating Enzyme Cdc34 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Sadowski, Martin; Suryadinata, Randy; Lai, Xianning; Heierhorst, Jörg; Sarcevic, Boris

    2010-01-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub)-conjugating enzymes (E2s) and ubiquitin ligases (E3s) catalyze the attachment of Ub to lysine residues in substrates and Ub during monoubiquitination and polyubiquitination. Lysine selection is important for the generation of diverse substrate-Ub structures, which provides versatility to this pathway in the targeting of proteins to different fates. The mechanisms of lysine selection remain poorly understood, with previous studies suggesting that the ubiquitination site(s) is selected by the E2/E3-mediated positioning of a lysine(s) toward the E2/E3 active site. By studying the polyubiquitination of Sic1 by the E2 protein Cdc34 and the RING E3 Skp1/Cul1/F-box (SCF) protein, we now demonstrate that in addition to E2/E3-mediated positioning, proximal amino acids surrounding the lysine residues in Sic1 and Ub are critical for ubiquitination. This mechanism is linked to key residues composing the catalytic core of Cdc34 and independent of SCF. Changes to these core residues altered the lysine preference of Cdc34 and specified whether this enzyme monoubiquitinated or polyubiquitinated Sic1. These new findings indicate that compatibility between amino acids surrounding acceptor lysine residues and key amino acids in the catalytic core of ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes is an important mechanism for lysine selection during ubiquitination. PMID:20194622

  15. Selective potentiation of alpha 1 glycine receptors by ginkgolic acid

    PubMed Central

    Maleeva, Galyna; Buldakova, Svetlana; Bregestovski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Glycine receptors (GlyRs) belong to the superfamily of pentameric cys-loop receptor-operated channels and are involved in numerous physiological functions, including movement, vision, and pain. In search for compounds performing subunit-specific modulation of GlyRs we studied action of ginkgolic acid, an abundant Ginkgo biloba product. Using patch-clamp recordings, we analyzed the effects of ginkgolic acid in concentrations from 30 nM to 25 μM on α1–α3 and α1/β, α2/β configurations of GlyR and on GABAARs expressed in cultured CHO-K1 cells and mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells. Ginkgolic acid caused an increase in the amplitude of currents mediated by homomeric α1 and heteromeric α1/β GlyRs and provoked a left-shift of the concentration-dependent curves for glycine. Even at high concentrations (10–25 μM) ginkgolic acid was not able to augment ionic currents mediated by α2, α2/β, and α3 GlyRs, or by GABAAR consisting of α1/β2/γ2 subunits. Mutation of three residues (T59A/A261G/A303S) in the α2 GlyR subunit to the corresponding ones from the α1 converted the action of ginkgolic acid to potentiation with a distinct decrease in EC50 for glycine, suggesting an important role for these residues in modulation by ginkgolic acid. Our results suggest that ginkgolic acid is a novel selective enhancer of α1 GlyRs. PMID:26578878

  16. Direct and Osmolarity-Dependent Effects of Glycine on Preimplantation Bovine Embryos.

    PubMed

    Herrick, Jason R; Lyons, Sarah M; Greene, Alison F; Broeckling, Corey D; Schoolcraft, William B; Krisher, Rebecca L

    2016-01-01

    Concentrations of glycine (Gly) in embryo culture media are often lower (~0.1 mM) than those in oviductal or uterine fluids (≥1.2 mM). The objective of this study was to determine direct and osmolarity-dependent effects of physiological concentrations of Gly on blastocyst formation and hatching, cell allocation to the trophectoderm (TE) and inner cell mass (ICM), and metabolic activity of bovine embryos. In experiment 1, zygotes were cultured with 100 or 120 mM NaCl and 0 or 1 mM Gly for the first 72 h of culture. Blastocyst formation and hatching were improved (P<0.05) when embryos were cultured with 100 compared to 120 mM NaCl. Inclusion of 1 mM Gly improved (P<0.05) blastocyst formation compared to 0 mM Gly, but this effect was only significant (P<0.05) for embryos cultured with 120 mM NaCl, suggesting bovine embryos can utilize Gly as an osmolyte. In experiment 2, embryos were cultured with 0.1, 1.1, 2.1, or 4.1 mM Gly (100 mM NaCl) for the final 96 h of culture. Blastocyst development was not affected (P>0.05) by Gly, but hatching (0.1 mM Gly, 18.2%) was improved (P<0.05) when embryos were cultured with 1.1 (31.4%) or 2.1 (29.4%) mM Gly. Blastocyst, TE, and ICM cell numbers were not affected (P>0.05) by Gly in either experiment. Blastocysts produced alanine, glutamine, pyruvate, and urea and consumed aspartate, but this metabolic profile was not affected (P>0.05) by Gly. In conclusion, Gly (1.0 mM) improves the development of both early and late stage embryos, but beneficial effects are more pronounced for early embryos exposed to elevated osmolarity. PMID:27459477

  17. Direct and Osmolarity-Dependent Effects of Glycine on Preimplantation Bovine Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Sarah M.; Greene, Alison F.; Broeckling, Corey D.; Schoolcraft, William B.; Krisher, Rebecca L.

    2016-01-01

    Concentrations of glycine (Gly) in embryo culture media are often lower (~0.1 mM) than those in oviductal or uterine fluids (≥1.2 mM). The objective of this study was to determine direct and osmolarity-dependent effects of physiological concentrations of Gly on blastocyst formation and hatching, cell allocation to the trophectoderm (TE) and inner cell mass (ICM), and metabolic activity of bovine embryos. In experiment 1, zygotes were cultured with 100 or 120 mM NaCl and 0 or 1 mM Gly for the first 72 h of culture. Blastocyst formation and hatching were improved (P<0.05) when embryos were cultured with 100 compared to 120 mM NaCl. Inclusion of 1 mM Gly improved (P<0.05) blastocyst formation compared to 0 mM Gly, but this effect was only significant (P<0.05) for embryos cultured with 120 mM NaCl, suggesting bovine embryos can utilize Gly as an osmolyte. In experiment 2, embryos were cultured with 0.1, 1.1, 2.1, or 4.1 mM Gly (100 mM NaCl) for the final 96 h of culture. Blastocyst development was not affected (P>0.05) by Gly, but hatching (0.1 mM Gly, 18.2%) was improved (P<0.05) when embryos were cultured with 1.1 (31.4%) or 2.1 (29.4%) mM Gly. Blastocyst, TE, and ICM cell numbers were not affected (P>0.05) by Gly in either experiment. Blastocysts produced alanine, glutamine, pyruvate, and urea and consumed aspartate, but this metabolic profile was not affected (P>0.05) by Gly. In conclusion, Gly (1.0 mM) improves the development of both early and late stage embryos, but beneficial effects are more pronounced for early embryos exposed to elevated osmolarity. PMID:27459477

  18. N-[[(Mercaptoacetyl)amino]benzoyl]glycines as mucolytic agents.

    PubMed

    Martin, T A; Comer, W T

    1985-07-01

    m- and p-aminobenzoic acids were converted to the title compounds by sequential use of ClCH2COCl, SOCl2, glycine methyl or ethyl ester, AcSK, and hydrolysis. The title compounds and a number of salts were compared for mucolytic activity, toxicity, stability, and hygroscopicity. When compared to N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), the compounds exhibit several times the in vitro mucolytic activity of NAC on a molar basis. The most promising candidate appears to be the sodium salt 3.5H2O 2 of the meta series. PMID:4009614

  19. Gas-phase lithium cation affinity of glycine.

    PubMed

    Bourcier, Sophie; Chiaa, Ru Xuan; Mimbong, Rosa Ngo Biboum; Bouchoux, Guy

    2015-01-01

    The gas-phase lithium cation binding thermochemistry of glycine has been determined theoretically by quantum chemical calculations at the G4 level and experimentally by the extended kinetic method using electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry. The lithium cation affinity of glycine, ∆(Li)H°(298)(GLY), i.e. the∆(Li)H°(298) of the reaction GlyLi(+)→ Gly + Li(+)) given by the G4 method is equal to 241.4 kJ.mol(-1) if only the most stable conformer of glycine is considered or to 242.3 kJ.mol(-1) if the 298K equilibrium mixture of neutral conformers is included in the calculation. The ∆(Li)H°(298)(GLY) deduced from the extended kinetic method is obviously dependent on the choice of the Li(+) affinity scale, thus∆(Li)H°(298)(GLY) is equal to 228.7±0.9(2.0) kJ.mol(- 1) if anchored to the recently re-evaluated lithium cation affinity scale but shifted to 235.4±1.0 kJ.mol(-1) if G4 computed lithium cation affinities of the reference molecules is used. This difference of 6.3 kJ.mol(-1) may originate from a compression of the experimental lithium affinity scale in the high ∆(Li)H°(298) region. The entropy change associated with the reaction GlyLi(+)→Gly + Li(+) reveals a gain of approximately 15 J.mol(-) 1.K(-1) with respect to monodentate Li(+) acceptors. The origin of this excess entropy is attributed to the bidentate interaction between the Li(+) cation and both the carbonyl oxygen and the nitrogen atoms of glycine. The computed G4 Gibbs free energy,∆(Li)G°(298)(GLY) is equal to 205.3 kJ.mol(-1), a similar result, 201.0±3.4 kJ.mol(-1), is obtained from the experiment if the∆(Li)G°(298) of the reference molecules is anchored on the G4 results. PMID:26307695

  20. Glucose and Alanine Metabolism in Children with Maple Syrup Urine Disease

    PubMed Central

    Haymond, Morey W.; Ben-Galim, Ehud; Strobel, Karen E.

    1978-01-01

    In vitro studies have suggested that catabolism of branched chain amino acids is linked with alanine and glutamine formed in, and released from, muscle. To explore this possibility in vivo, static and kinetic studies were performed in three patients with classical, and one patient with partial, branched chain α-ketoacid decarboxylase deficiency (maple syrup urine disease, MSUD) and compared to similar studies in eight age-matched controls. The subjects underwent a 24-30-h fast, and a glucose-alanine flux study using stable isotopes. Basal plasma leucine concentrations were elevated (P <0.001) in patients with MSUD (1,140±125 μM vs. 155±18 μM in controls); and in contrast to the controls, branched chain amino acid concentrations in plasma increased during the fast in the MSUD patients. Basal plasma alanine concentrations were lower (P <0.01) in patients with classical MSUD (153±8 μM vs. 495±27 μM in controls). This discrepancy was maintained throughout the fast despite a decrease in alanine concentrations in both groups. Plasma alanine and leucine concentrations in the patient with partial MSUD were intermediate between those of the controls and the subjects with the classical form of the disease. Circulating ketone bodies and glucoregulatory hormones concentrations were similar in the MSUD and normal subjects during the fast. Alanine flux rates in two patients with classical MSUD (3.76 and 4.00 μmol/Kg per min) and the patient with partial MSUD (5.76 μmol/Kg per min) were clearly lower than those of the controls (11.72±2.53 [SD] μmol/Kg per min). After short-term starvation, glucose flux and fasting concentrations were similar in the MSUD patients and normal subjects. These data indicate that branched chain amino acid catabolism is an important rate limiting event for alanine production in vivo. PMID:670400

  1. Exchange interactions and magnetic dimension in Cu(L-alanine)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, R.; Passeggi, M. C. G.; Novak, M. A.; Symko, O. G.; Oseroff, S. B.; Nascimento, O. R.; Terrile, M. C.

    1991-01-01

    A study of the magnetic properties of the copper (II) complex of the amino acid l-alanine [Cu(l-alanine)2] is reported. The susceptibility of a powder sample has been measured between 0.013 and 240 K. A linear-spin-chain model with antiferromagnetic exchange coupling J=-0.52 K fits well the susceptibility data above 0.3 K. Room-temperature electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of single crystals of Cu(l-alanine)2 at 9 and 35 GHz show a single, exchange-narrowed resonance. The g tensor, with principal values g1=2.0554+/-0.0005, g2=2.1064+/-0.0005, and g3=2.2056+/-0.0005, reflects the crystal structure of Cu(l-alanine)2 and the electronic properties of the copper ions. The observed angular variation of the linewidth is attributed to the magnetic interactions, narrowed by the exchange coupling between copper ions, and shows a contribution characteristic of the dipole-dipole interaction in a spin system with a predominant two-dimensional spin dynamics. Considering the exchange-collapsed resonance corresponding to the two lattice sites for copper in Cu(l-alanine)2, we evaluate an exchange constant ||J(AB1)||=0.47 K between nonequivalent copper neighbors in a spin chain, similar to the value obtained from the susceptibility data. The one-dimensional magnetic behavior suggested by the susceptibility data in Cu(l-alanine)2, where the metal ions are distributed in layers, is explained by proposing that carboxylate bridges provide electronic paths for superexchange interactions between coppers. Considering the characteristics of the molecular structure of Cu(l-alanine)2, the layers seem to be magnetically split off into one-dimensional zigzag ribbons. The apparent disagreement between the one-dimensional behavior suggested by the susceptibility data and the two-dimensional behavior of the spin dynamics suggested by the EPR linewidth is analyzed.

  2. FTIR spectra and conformational structure of deutero-β-alanine isolated in argon matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanian, Stepan G.; Ivanov, Alexander Yu; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2016-02-01

    Low temperature FTIR spectra of β-alanine-d3 isolated in argon matrices are used to determine the conformational composition of this compound. UV irradiation of the matrix samples is found to change the relative populations of the β-alanine-d3 conformers. The populations of conformers I and II with an Nsbnd D⋯O intramolecular H-bond decrease after the UV irradiation while the populations of conformer V with an N⋯Dsbnd O H-bond and conformer IV which has no intramolecular H-bonds increase. This behavior of the β-alanine-d3 conformers are used to separate the bands of the different conformers. The analysis of the experimental FTIR spectra is based on the calculated harmonic B3LYP/6-311++G(df,pd) frequencies and on the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ frequencies calculated with a method that includes anharmonic effects. Polynomial scaling of the calculated frequencies is used to achieve better agreement with the experimental data. The observation of the wide band of the OD stretching vibration at 2201 cm-1 is a direct evidence of the presence of the β-alanine-d3 conformer V in the Ar matrix. In total ten bands of conformer V are detected. The influence of the matrix environment on the structures and the IR spectra of the β-alanine and β-alanine-d3 conformers is investigated. This involves performing calculations of the β-alanine conformers embedded in argon clusters containing from 163 to 166 argon atoms using the M06-2X and B3LYP(GD3BJ) density-functional methods. Good agreement between the calculated and the experimental matrix splitting is demonstrated.

  3. Lysine-specific histone demethylases in normal and malignant hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Andricovich, Jaclyn; Kai, Yan; Tzatsos, Alexandros

    2016-09-01

    The epigenetic control of gene expression is central to the development of the hematopoietic system and the execution of lineage-specific transcriptional programs. During the last 10 years, mounting evidence has implicated the family of lysine-specific histone demethylases as critical regulators of normal hematopoiesis, whereas their deregulation is found in a broad spectrum of hematopoietic malignancies. Here, we review recent findings on the role of these enzymes in normal and malignant hematopoiesis and highlight how aberrant epigenetic regulation facilitates hematopoietic cell transformation through subversion of cell fate and lineage commitment programs. PMID:27208808

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of lysine-vasopressin: structural constraints.

    PubMed

    Von Dreele, P H; Brewster, A I; Bovey, F A; Scheraga, H A; Ferger, M F; Du Vigneaud, V

    1971-12-01

    The 220-MHz proton NMR spectra of lysine-vasopressin and some related compounds are examined in deuterated dimethyl sulfoxide to obtain structural information that must be satisfied by any proposed conformation of the molecule. This structural information is in the form of dihedral angles (for rotation about the NH-C(alpha)H bonds) from coupling constants, possible hydrogen bonding of the CONH(2) and backbone amide groups from the temperature-dependence of the chemical shift, and aromatic ring-aromatic ring interaction from the effect of the magnetically anisotropic groups on the chemical shift. PMID:5289251

  5. On methylene-bridged cysteine and lysine residues in proteins.

    PubMed

    Ruszkowski, Milosz; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2016-09-01

    Cysteine residues ubiquitously stabilize tertiary and quaternary protein structure by formation of disulfide bridges. Here we investigate another linking interaction that involves sulfhydryl groups of cysteines, namely intra- and intermolecular methylene-bridges between cysteine and lysine residues. A number of crystal structures possessing such a linkage were identified in the Protein Data Bank. Inspection of the electron density maps and re-refinement of the nominated structures unequivocally confirmed the presence of Lys-CH2 -Cys bonds in several cases. PMID:27261771

  6. Felbamate increases [3H]glycine binding in rat brain and sections of human postmortem brain.

    PubMed

    McCabe, R T; Sofia, R D; Layer, R T; Leiner, K A; Faull, R L; Narang, N; Wamsley, J K

    1998-08-01

    The anticonvulsant compound felbamate (2-phenyl-1,3-propanediol dicarbamate; FBM) appears to inhibit the function of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor complex through an interaction with the strychnine-insensitive glycine recognition site. Since we have demonstrated previously that FBM inhibits the binding of [3H]5, 7-dichlorokynurenic acid (DCKA), a competitive antagonist at the glycine site, we assessed the ability of FBM to modulate the binding of an agonist, [3H]glycine, to rat forebrain membranes and human brain sections. In contrast to its ability to inhibit [3H]5,7-DCKA binding, FBM increased [3H]glycine binding (20 nM; EC50 = 485 microM; Emax = 211% of control; nH = 1.8). FBM, but not carbamazepine, phenytoin, valproic acid or phenobarbital, also increased [3H]glycine binding (50 nM; EC50 = 142 microM; Emax = 157% of control; nH = 1.6) in human cortex sections. Autoradiographic analysis of human brain slices demonstrated that FBM produced the largest increases in [3H]glycine binding in the cortex, hippocampus and the parahippocampal gyrus. Because various ions can influence the binding of glycine-site ligands, we assessed their effects on FBM-modulation of [3H]glycine binding. FBM-enhanced [3H]glycine binding was attenuated by Zn++ and not inhibited by Mg++ in human brain. These results suggest that FBM increases [3H]glycine binding in a manner sensitive to ions which modulate the NMDA receptor. These data support the hypothesis that FBM produces anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects by inhibiting NMDA receptor function, likely through an allosteric modulation of the glycine site. PMID:9694960

  7. Bacteriophage lysin mediates the binding of streptococcus mitis to human platelets through interaction with fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Seo, Ho Seong; Xiong, Yan Q; Mitchell, Jennifer; Seepersaud, Ravin; Bayer, Arnold S; Sullam, Paul M

    2010-01-01

    The binding of bacteria to human platelets is a likely central mechanism in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. We have previously found that platelet binding by Streptococcus mitis SF100 is mediated by surface components encoded by a lysogenic bacteriophage, SM1. We now demonstrate that SM1-encoded lysin contributes to platelet binding via its direct interaction with fibrinogen. Far Western blotting of platelets revealed that fibrinogen was the major membrane-associated protein bound by lysin. Analysis of lysin binding with purified fibrinogen in vitro confirmed that these proteins could bind directly, and that this interaction was both saturable and inhibitable. Lysin bound both the Aalpha and Bbeta chains of fibrinogen, but not the gamma subunit. Binding of lysin to the Bbeta chain was further localized to a region within the fibrinogen D fragment. Disruption of the SF100 lysin gene resulted in an 83+/-3.1% reduction (mean +/- SD) in binding to immobilized fibrinogen by this mutant strain (PS1006). Preincubation of this isogenic mutant with purified lysin restored fibrinogen binding to wild type levels. When tested in a co-infection model of endocarditis, loss of lysin expression resulted in a significant reduction in virulence, as measured by achievable bacterial densities (CFU/g) within vegetations, kidneys, and spleens. These results indicate that bacteriophage-encoded lysin is a multifunctional protein, representing a new class of fibrinogen-binding proteins. Lysin appears to be cell wall-associated through its interaction with choline. Once on the bacterial surface, lysin can bind fibrinogen directly, which appears to be an important interaction for the pathogenesis of endocarditis. PMID:20714354

  8. Isolation and characterization of cytosolic alanine aminotransferase isoforms from starved rat liver.

    PubMed

    Vedavathi, M; Girish, K S; Kumar, M Karuna

    2004-12-01

    Alanine is the most effective precursor for gluconeogenesis among amino acids and the initial reaction is catalyzed by alanine aminotransferases (AlaATs). It is a less extensively studied enzyme under starvation and known to that the enzyme activity increases in liver under starvation. The present study describes the purification and characterization of two isoforms of alanine aminotransferases from starved male rat liver under starvation. The molecular mass of isoforms was found to be 17.7 and 112.2 kDa with isoelectric points of 4.2 and 5.3 respectively for AlaAT I and AlaAT II. Both the enzymes showed narrow substrate specificity for L-alanine with different Km for alanine and 2-oxoglutarate. Both the enzymes were glycoprotein in nature. Inhibition, modification and spectroscopic studies showed that both PLP and free-SH groups are directly involved in the enzymatic catalysis. PLP activated both the enzymes with a Km 0.057 mM and 0.2 mM for AlaAT I and II respectively. PMID:15663181

  9. Purification and characterization of alanine dehydrogenase from a cyanobacterium, Phormidium lapideum.

    PubMed

    Sawa, Y; Tani, M; Murata, K; Shibata, H; Ochiai, H

    1994-11-01

    Alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) was purified to homogeneity from cell-free extracts of a non-N2-fixing filamentous cyanobacterium, Phormidium lapideum. The molecular mass of the native enzyme was 240 kDa, and SDS-PAGE revealed a minimum molecular mass of 41 kDa, suggesting a six-subunit structure. The NH2 terminal amino acid residues of the purified AlaDH revealed marked similarity with that of other AlaDHs. The enzyme was highly specific for L-alanine and NAD+, but showed relatively low amino-acceptor specificity. The pH optimum was 8.4 for reductive amination of pyruvate and 9.2 for oxidative deamination of L-alanine. The Km values were 5.0 mM for L-alanine and 0.04 mM for NAD+, 0.33 mM for pyruvate, 60.6 mM for NH4+ (pH 8.7), and 0.02 mM for NADH. Various L-amino acids including alanine, serine, threonine, and aromatic amino acids, inhibited the aminating reaction. The enzyme was inactivated upon incubation with pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) followed by reduction with sodium borohydride. The copresence of NADH and pyruvate largely protected the enzyme against the inactivation by PLP. PMID:7896761

  10. L-alanine in a droplet of water: a density-functional molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Degtyarenko, Ivan M; Jalkanen, Karl J; Gurtovenko, Andrey A; Nieminen, Risto M

    2007-04-26

    We report the results of a Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics study on an L-alanine amino acid in neutral aqueous solution. The whole system, the L-alanine zwitterion and 50 water molecules, was treated quantum mechanically. We found that the hydrophobic side chain (R = CH3) defines the trajectory path of the molecule. Initially fully hydrated in an isolated droplet of water, the amino acid moves to the droplet's surface, exposing its hydrophobic methyl group and alpha-hydrogen out of the water. The structure of an L-alanine with the methyl group exposed to the water surface was found to be energetically favorable compared to a fully hydrated molecule. The dynamic behavior of the system suggests that the first hydration shell of the amino acid is localized around carboxylate (CO2-) and ammonium (NH3+) functional groups; it is highly ordered and quite rigid. In contrast, the hydration shell around the side chain is much less structured, suggesting a modest influence of the methyl group on the structure of water. The number of water molecules in the first hydration shell of an alanine molecule is constantly changing; the average number was found to equal 7. The molecular dynamics results show that L-alanine in water does not have a preferred conformation, as all three of the molecule's functional sites (i.e., CH3, NH3+, CO2-) perform rotational movements around the C(alpha)-site bond. PMID:17407339

  11. Perturbation correction for alanine dosimeters in different phantom materials in high-energy photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Voigts-Rhetz, P.; Anton, M.; Vorwerk, H.; Zink, K.

    2016-02-01

    In modern radiotherapy the verification of complex treatments plans is often performed in inhomogeneous or even anthropomorphic phantoms. For dose verification small detectors are necessary and therefore alanine detectors are most suitable. Though the response of alanine for a wide range of clinical photon energies in water is well know, the knowledge about the influence of the surrounding phantom material on the response of alanine is sparse. Therefore we investigated the influence of twenty different surrounding/phantom materials for alanine dosimeters in clinical photon fields via Monte Carlo simulations. The relative electron density of the used materials was in the range {{n}e}/{{n}e,\\text{w}}=0.20 up to 1.69, covering almost all materials appearing in inhomogeneous or anthropomorphic phantoms used in radiotherapy. The investigations were performed for three different clinical photon spectra ranging from 6 to 25 MV-X and Co-60 and as a result a perturbation correction {{k}\\text{env}} depending on the environmental material was established. The Monte Carlo simulation show, that there is only a small dependence of {{k}\\text{env}} on the phantom material and the photon energy, which is below  ±0.6%. The results confirm the good suitability of alanine detectors for in-vivo dosimetry.

  12. Perturbation correction for alanine dosimeters in different phantom materials in high-energy photon beams.

    PubMed

    von Voigts-Rhetz, P; Anton, M; Vorwerk, H; Zink, K

    2016-02-01

    In modern radiotherapy the verification of complex treatments plans is often performed in inhomogeneous or even anthropomorphic phantoms. For dose verification small detectors are necessary and therefore alanine detectors are most suitable. Though the response of alanine for a wide range of clinical photon energies in water is well know, the knowledge about the influence of the surrounding phantom material on the response of alanine is sparse. Therefore we investigated the influence of twenty different surrounding/phantom materials for alanine dosimeters in clinical photon fields via Monte Carlo simulations. The relative electron density of the used materials was in the range [Formula: see text] up to 1.69, covering almost all materials appearing in inhomogeneous or anthropomorphic phantoms used in radiotherapy. The investigations were performed for three different clinical photon spectra ranging from 6 to 25 MV-X and Co-60 and as a result a perturbation correction [Formula: see text] depending on the environmental material was established. The Monte Carlo simulation show, that there is only a small dependence of [Formula: see text] on the phantom material and the photon energy, which is below  ±0.6%. The results confirm the good suitability of alanine detectors for in-vivo dosimetry. PMID:26758810

  13. Structure and Pharmacologic Modulation of Inhibitory Glycine Receptors.

    PubMed

    Burgos, Carlos F; Yévenes, Gonzalo E; Aguayo, Luis G

    2016-09-01

    Glycine receptors (GlyR) are inhibitory Cys-loop ion channels that contribute to the control of excitability along the central nervous system (CNS). GlyR are found in the spinal cord and brain stem, and more recently they were reported in higher regions of the CNS such as the hippocampus and nucleus accumbens. GlyR are involved in motor coordination, respiratory rhythms, pain transmission, and sensory processing, and they are targets for relevant physiologic and pharmacologic modulators. Several studies with protein crystallography and cryoelectron microscopy have shed light on the residues and mechanisms associated with the activation, blockade, and regulation of pentameric Cys-loop ion channels at the atomic level. Initial studies conducted on the extracellular domain of acetylcholine receptors, ion channels from prokaryote homologs-Erwinia chrysanthemi ligand-gated ion channel (ELIC), Gloeobacter violaceus ligand-gated ion channel (GLIC)-and crystallized eukaryotic receptors made it possible to define the overall structure and topology of the Cys-loop receptors. For example, the determination of pentameric GlyR structures bound to glycine and strychnine have contributed to visualizing the structural changes implicated in the transition between the open and closed states of the Cys-loop receptors. In this review, we summarize how the new information obtained in functional, mutagenesis, and structural studies have contributed to a better understanding of the function and regulation of GlyR. PMID:27401877

  14. Determination of Solubility Parameters of Ibuprofen and Ibuprofen Lysinate.

    PubMed

    Kitak, Teja; Dumičić, Aleksandra; Planinšek, Odon; Šibanc, Rok; Srčič, Stanko

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been a growing interest in formulating solid dispersions, which purposes mainly include solubility enhancement, sustained drug release and taste masking. The most notable problem by these dispersions is drug-carrier (in)solubility. Here we focus on solubility parameters as a tool for predicting the solubility of a drug in certain carriers. Solubility parameters were determined in two different ways: solely by using calculation methods, and by experimental approaches. Six different calculation methods were applied in order to calculate the solubility parameters of the drug ibuprofen and several excipients. However, we were not able to do so in the case of ibuprofen lysinate, as calculation models for salts are still not defined. Therefore, the extended Hansen's approach and inverse gas chromatography (IGC) were used for evaluating of solubility parameters for ibuprofen lysinate. The obtained values of the total solubility parameter did not differ much between the two methods: by the extended Hansen's approach it was δt = 31.15 MPa(0.5) and with IGC it was δt = 35.17 MPa(0.5). However, the values of partial solubility parameters, i.e., δd, δp and δh, did differ from each other, what might be due to the complex behaviour of a salt in the presence of various solvents. PMID:26633347

  15. SIRT5 regulates the mitochondrial lysine succinylome and metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Rardin, Matthew J; He, Wenjuan; Nishida, Yuya; Newman, John C; Carrico, Chris; Danielson, Steven R; Guo, Ailan; Gut, Philipp; Sahu, Alexandria K; Li, Biao; Uppala, Radha; Fitch, Mark; Riiff, Timothy; Zhu, Lei; Zhou, Jing; Mulhern, Daniel; Stevens, Robert D; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Newgard, Christopher B; Jacobson, Matthew P; Hellerstein, Marc; Goetzman, Eric S; Gibson, Bradford W; Verdin, Eric

    2013-12-01

    Reversible posttranslational modifications are emerging as critical regulators of mitochondrial proteins and metabolism. Here, we use a label-free quantitative proteomic approach to characterize the lysine succinylome in liver mitochondria and its regulation by the desuccinylase SIRT5. A total of 1,190 unique sites were identified as succinylated, and 386 sites across 140 proteins representing several metabolic pathways including β-oxidation and ketogenesis were significantly hypersuccinylated in Sirt5(-/-) animals. Loss of SIRT5 leads to accumulation of medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines and decreased β-hydroxybutyrate production in vivo. In addition, we demonstrate that SIRT5 regulates succinylation of the rate-limiting ketogenic enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase 2 (HMGCS2) both in vivo and in vitro. Finally, mutation of hypersuccinylated residues K83 and K310 on HMGCS2 to glutamic acid strongly inhibits enzymatic activity. Taken together, these findings establish SIRT5 as a global regulator of lysine succinylation in mitochondria and present a mechanism for inhibition of ketogenesis through HMGCS2. PMID:24315375

  16. Evolution of a novel lysine decarboxylase in siderophore biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Burrell, Matthew; Hanfrey, Colin C; Kinch, Lisa N; Elliott, Katherine A; Michael, Anthony J

    2012-10-01

    Structural backbones of iron-scavenging siderophore molecules include polyamines 1,3-diaminopropane and 1,5-diaminopentane (cadaverine). For the cadaverine-based desferroxiamine E siderophore in Streptomyces coelicolor, the corresponding biosynthetic gene cluster contains an ORF encoded by desA that was suspected of producing the cadaverine (decarboxylated lysine) backbone. However, desA encodes an l-2,4-diaminobutyrate decarboxylase (DABA DC) homologue and not any known form of lysine decarboxylase (LDC). The only known function of DABA DC is, together with l-2,4-aminobutyrate aminotransferase (DABA AT), to synthesize 1,3-diaminopropane. We show here that S. coelicolor desA encodes a novel LDC and we hypothesized that DABA DC homologues present in siderophore biosynthetic clusters in the absence of DABA AT ORFs would be novel LDCs. We confirmed this by correctly predicting the LDC activity of a DABA DC homologue from a Yersinia pestis siderophore biosynthetic pathway. The corollary was confirmed for a DABA DC homologue, adjacent to a DABA AT ORF in a siderophore pathway in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis, which was shown to be a bona fide DABA DC. These findings enable prediction of whether a siderophore pathway will utilize 1,3-diaminopropane or cadaverine, and suggest that the majority of bacteria use DABA AT and DABA DC for siderophore, rather than norspermidine/polyamine biosynthesis. PMID:22906379

  17. SIRT5 regulates the mitochondrial lysine succinylome and metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    Rardin, Matthew J.; He, Wenjuan; Nishida, Yuya; Newman, John C.; Carrico, Chris; Danielson, Steven R.; Guo, Ailan; Gut, Philipp; Sahu, Alexandria K.; Li, Biao; Uppala, Radha; Fitch, Mark; Riiff, Timothy; Zhu, Lei; Zhou, Jing; Mulhern, Daniel; Stevens, Robert D.; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Hellerstein, Marc; Goetzman, Eric S.; Gibson, Bradford W.; Verdin, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Summary Reversible posttranslational modifications are emerging as critical regulators of mitochondrial proteins and metabolism. Here, we use a label-free quantitative proteomic approach to characterize the lysine succinylome in liver mitochondria and its regulation by the desuccinylase SIRT5. A total of 1190 unique sites were identified as succinylated, and 386 sites across 140 proteins representing several metabolic pathways including β-oxidation and ketogenesis were significantly hypersuccinylated in Sirt5−/− animals. Loss of SIRT5 leads to accumulation of medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines and decreased β-hydroxybutyrate production in vivo. In addition, we demonstrate that SIRT5 regulates succinylation of the rate-limiting ketogenic enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase 2 (HMGCS2) both in vivo and in vitro. Finally, mutation of hypersuccinylated residues K83 and K310 on HMGCS2 to glutamic acid strongly inhibits enzymatic activity. Taken together, these findings establish SIRT5 as a global regulator of lysine succinylation in mitochondria and present a mechanism for inhibition of ketogenesis through HMGCS2. PMID:24315375

  18. Substrate Specificity of the Aspartate:Alanine Antiporter (AspT) of Tetragenococcus halophilus in Reconstituted Liposomes*

    PubMed Central

    Sasahara, Ayako; Nanatani, Kei; Enomoto, Masaru; Kuwahara, Shigefumi; Abe, Keietsu

    2011-01-01

    The aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of the lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus is a member of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAEx) transporter family. T. halophilus AspT catalyzes the electrogenic exchange of l-aspartate1− with l-alanine0. Although physiological functions of AspT were well studied, l-aspartate1−:l-alanine0 antiport mechanisms are still unsolved. Here we report that the binding sites of l-aspartate and l-alanine are independently present in AspT by means of the kinetic studies. We purified His6-tagged T. halophilus AspT and characterized its kinetic properties when reconstituted in liposomes (Km = 0.35 ± 0.03 mm for l-aspartate, Km = 0.098 ± 0 mm for d-aspartate, Km = 26 ± 2 mm for l-alanine, Km = 3.3 ± 0.2 mm for d-alanine). Competitive inhibition by various amino acids of l-aspartate or l-alanine in self-exchange reactions revealed that l-cysteine selectively inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange but only weakly inhibited l-alanine self-exchange. Additionally, l-serine selectively inhibited l-alanine self-exchange but barely inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange. The aspartate analogs l-cysteine sulfinic acid, l-cysteic acid, and d-cysteic acid competitively and strongly inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange compared with l-alanine self-exchange. Taken together, these kinetic data suggest that the putative binding sites of l-aspartate and l-alanine are independently located in the substrate translocation pathway of AspT. PMID:21719707

  19. Substrate specificity of the aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of Tetragenococcus halophilus in reconstituted liposomes.

    PubMed

    Sasahara, Ayako; Nanatani, Kei; Enomoto, Masaru; Kuwahara, Shigefumi; Abe, Keietsu

    2011-08-19

    The aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of the lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus is a member of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAEx) transporter family. T. halophilus AspT catalyzes the electrogenic exchange of L-aspartate(1-) with L-alanine(0). Although physiological functions of AspT were well studied, L-aspartate(1-):L-alanine(0) antiport mechanisms are still unsolved. Here we report that the binding sites of L-aspartate and L-alanine are independently present in AspT by means of the kinetic studies. We purified His(6)-tagged T. halophilus AspT and characterized its kinetic properties when reconstituted in liposomes (K(m) = 0.35 ± 0.03 mm for L-aspartate, K(m) = 0.098 ± 0 mm for D-aspartate, K(m) = 26 ± 2 mm for L-alanine, K(m) = 3.3 ± 0.2 mm for D-alanine). Competitive inhibition by various amino acids of L-aspartate or L-alanine in self-exchange reactions revealed that L-cysteine selectively inhibited L-aspartate self-exchange but only weakly inhibited L-alanine self-exchange. Additionally, L-serine selectively inhibited L-alanine self-exchange but barely inhibited L-aspartate self-exchange. The aspartate analogs L-cysteine sulfinic acid, L-cysteic acid, and D-cysteic acid competitively and strongly inhibited L-aspartate self-exchange compared with L-alanine self-exchange. Taken together, these kinetic data suggest that the putative binding sites of L-aspartate and L-alanine are independently located in the substrate translocation pathway of AspT. PMID:21719707

  20. 40 CFR 721.3848 - Glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-, monosodium salt. 721.3848 Section 721.3848 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3848 Glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt. (a... glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt (PMN P-00-469; CAS No. 141321-68-8) is subject...

  1. 40 CFR 721.3848 - Glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-, monosodium salt. 721.3848 Section 721.3848 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3848 Glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt. (a... glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt (PMN P-00-469; CAS No. 141321-68-8) is subject...

  2. Protease inhibition by Heterodera glycines cyst content: evidence for effects on the Meloidogyne incognita proteasome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteases from Heterodera glycines and Meloidogyne incognita juveniles were inhibited by heat-stable content of H. glycines female cysts (HglCE), and by the plant polyphenol epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). General protease activities detected using the nematode peptide KSAYMRFa were inhibited by EG...

  3. RESPONSES OF HETERODERA GLYCINES AND MELOIDOGYNE INCOGNITA TO EXOGENOUSLY APPLIED NEUROMODULATORS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The biogenic amines dopamine, octopamine and serotonin each have significant but differing effects on behavior in juveniles of the plant-parasitic nematodes Heterodera glycines and Meloidogyne incognita. Body movement frequency was increased 2-fold in H. glycines by 5mM dopamine (P = 0.00013), while...

  4. Heterodera glycines hatching behavior in field collections, laboratory culture and exposure to low temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heterodera glycines collected from fields in Maryland exhibited very low hatch and reproduction rates in the laboratory. When such eggs were used to establish a laboratory culture on Glycine max, low reproductive rates continued for 2 generations. However, after 2 generations, the field egg derived ...

  5. 21 CFR 170.50 - Glycine (aminoacetic acid) in food for human consumption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Glycine (aminoacetic acid) in food for human consumption. 170.50 Section 170.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 170.50 Glycine...

  6. Increased production of alpha-amylase by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens in the presence of glycine

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Q.; Tsukagoshi, N.; Miyashiro, S.; Udaka, S.

    1983-07-01

    The production of alpha-amylase by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens increased by a factor of 300 when glycine was added to a chemically defined simple medium at the early-logarithmic phase of growth. Glycine was not metabolized to a significant extent under the conditions used, but it considerably prevented the lowering of the pH of the culture. (Refs. 10).

  7. 76 FR 57951 - Glycine From the People's Republic of China: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ... Antidumping Duty Order: Glycine From the People's Republic of China, 60 FR 16116 (March 29, 1995). On October... of Five-Year (``Sunset'') Review, 75 FR 60731 (October 1, 2010). As a result of this sunset review... Expedited Sunset Review of the Antidumping Duty Order: Glycine From the People's Republic of China, 76...

  8. Cloning and characterization of mariner-like elements in the soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae) is currently the most important insect pest of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) in the United States and it causes significant economic damage worldwide. The adaptation to host plant resistance can lead to the evolution of soybean aphid ...

  9. 77 FR 73426 - Glycine From the People's Republic of China: Final Partial Affirmative Determination of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ... raw materials of Indian origin and exporting such merchandise to the United States. \\1\\ See Antidumping Duty Order: Glycine From the People's Republic of China, 60 FR 16116 (March 29, 1995) (Order... Department found that Paras was not circumventing the Order because it produced glycine from raw materials...

  10. Light intensity affects the uptake and metabolism of glycine by pakchoi (Brassica chinensis L.)

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qingxu; Cao, Xiaochuang; Wu, Lianghuan; Mi, Wenhai; Feng, Ying

    2016-01-01

    The uptake of glycine by pakchoi (Brassica chinensis L.), when supplied as single N-source or in a mixture of glycine and inorganic N, was studied at different light intensities under sterile conditions. At the optimal intensity (414 μmol m−2 s−1) for plant growth, glycine, nitrate, and ammonium contributed 29.4%, 39.5%, and 31.1% shoot N, respectively, and light intensity altered the preferential absorption of N sources. The lower 15N-nitrate in root but higher in shoot and the higher 15N-glycine in root but lower in shoot suggested that most 15N-nitrate uptake by root transported to shoot rapidly, with the shoot being important for nitrate assimilation, and the N contribution of glycine was limited by post-uptake metabolism. The amount of glycine that was taken up by the plant was likely limited by root uptake at low light intensities and by the metabolism of ammonium produced by glycine at high light intensities. These results indicate that pakchoi has the ability to uptake a large quantity of glycine, but that uptake is strongly regulated by light intensity, with metabolism in the root inhibiting its N contribution. PMID:26882864

  11. Life history and morphological plasticity of three biotypes of soybean aphid (Aphis glycines)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae), is a pest of soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr. (Fabaceae), from eastern Asia that was first reported in North America in 2000. The influence of temperature on plasticity of life history and morphological traits of the soybean aphid ha...

  12. Benzo(A)pyrene induced glycine N-methyltransferase messenger rna expression in Fundulus heteroclitus embryos

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT) is a mediator in the methionine and folate cycles, and is responsible for the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) to glycine forming S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) and sarcosine. All the known DNA methyltransferases use SAM as a methyl donor th...

  13. Light intensity affects the uptake and metabolism of glycine by pakchoi (Brassica chinensis L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qingxu; Cao, Xiaochuang; Wu, Lianghuan; Mi, Wenhai; Feng, Ying

    2016-02-01

    The uptake of glycine by pakchoi (Brassica chinensis L.), when supplied as single N-source or in a mixture of glycine and inorganic N, was studied at different light intensities under sterile conditions. At the optimal intensity (414 μmol m-2 s-1) for plant growth, glycine, nitrate, and ammonium contributed 29.4%, 39.5%, and 31.1% shoot N, respectively, and light intensity altered the preferential absorption of N sources. The lower 15N-nitrate in root but higher in shoot and the higher 15N-glycine in root but lower in shoot suggested that most 15N-nitrate uptake by root transported to shoot rapidly, with the shoot being important for nitrate assimilation, and the N contribution of glycine was limited by post-uptake metabolism. The amount of glycine that was taken up by the plant was likely limited by root uptake at low light intensities and by the metabolism of ammonium produced by glycine at high light intensities. These results indicate that pakchoi has the ability to uptake a large quantity of glycine, but that uptake is strongly regulated by light intensity, with metabolism in the root inhibiting its N contribution.

  14. 40 CFR 721.3848 - Glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-, monosodium salt. 721.3848 Section 721.3848 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3848 Glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt. (a... glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt (PMN P-00-469; CAS No. 141321-68-8) is subject...

  15. 40 CFR 721.3848 - Glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-, monosodium salt. 721.3848 Section 721.3848 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3848 Glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt. (a... glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt (PMN P-00-469; CAS No. 141321-68-8) is subject...

  16. 40 CFR 721.3848 - Glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-, monosodium salt. 721.3848 Section 721.3848 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3848 Glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt. (a... glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt (PMN P-00-469; CAS No. 141321-68-8) is subject...

  17. Transcriptional responses of tolerant and susceptible soybeans to soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) herbivory

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura, was introduced in 2000 to North America and has become one of the most significant pests to soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merrill, production. Possible solutions to this problem are the use of resistant plants and the understanding of the genes involved in pl...

  18. Light intensity affects the uptake and metabolism of glycine by pakchoi (Brassica chinensis L.).

    PubMed

    Ma, Qingxu; Cao, Xiaochuang; Wu, Lianghuan; Mi, Wenhai; Feng, Ying

    2016-01-01

    The uptake of glycine by pakchoi (Brassica chinensis L.), when supplied as single N-source or in a mixture of glycine and inorganic N, was studied at different light intensities under sterile conditions. At the optimal intensity (414 μmol m(-2) s(-1)) for plant growth, glycine, nitrate, and ammonium contributed 29.4%, 39.5%, and 31.1% shoot N, respectively, and light intensity altered the preferential absorption of N sources. The lower (15)N-nitrate in root but higher in shoot and the higher (15)N-glycine in root but lower in shoot suggested that most (15)N-nitrate uptake by root transported to shoot rapidly, with the shoot being important for nitrate assimilation, and the N contribution of glycine was limited by post-uptake metabolism. The amount of glycine that was taken up by the plant was likely limited by root uptake at low light intensities and by the metabolism of ammonium produced by glycine at high light intensities. These results indicate that pakchoi has the ability to uptake a large quantity of glycine, but that uptake is strongly regulated by light intensity, with metabolism in the root inhibiting its N contribution. PMID:26882864

  19. Determination of glycine in biofluid by hydrophilic interaction chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry and its application to the quantification of glycine released by embryonal carcinoma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ya-Bin; Teng, Lin; Sun, Fan; Wang, Xiao-Lin; Peng, Liang; Cui, Yong-Yao; Hu, Jin-Jia; Luan, Xin; Zhu, Liang; Chen, Hong-Zhuan

    2012-09-15

    Because glycine plays a prominent role in living creatures, an accurate and precise quantitative analysis method for the compound is needed. Herein, a new approach to analyze glycine by hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) was developed. This method avoids the use of derivatization and/or ion-pairing reagents. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) is used as the internal standard (IS). The mobile phase for the isocratic elution consisted of 10 mM ammonium formate in acetonitrile-water (70:30, v/v, adjusted to pH 2.8 with formic acid), and a flow rate of 250 μL/min was used. Two microliters of sample was injected for analysis. The signal was monitored in the positive multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The total run time was 5 min. The dynamic range was 40-2000 ng/mL for glycine in the biological matrix. The LLOQ (lower limit of quantification) of this method was 40 ng/mL (80 pg on column). The validated method was applied to determine the dynamic release of glycine from P19 embryonal carcinoma stem cells (ECSCs). Glycine spontaneously released from the ECSCs into the intercellular space gradually increased from 331.02±60.36 ng/mL at 2 min in the beginning to 963.52±283.80 ng/mL at 60 min and 948.27±235.09 ng/mL at 120 min, finally reaching a plateau, indicating that ECSCs consecutively release glycine until achieving equilibration between the release and the reuptake of the compound; on the contrary, the negative control NIH/3T3 embryonic fibroblast cells did not release glycine. This finding will help to improve our understanding of the novel effects of neurotransmitters, including glycine, on non-neural systems. PMID:22906796

  20. Improving lysine production by Corynebacterium glutamicum through DNA microarray-based identification of novel target genes.

    PubMed

    Sindelar, Georg; Wendisch, Volker F

    2007-09-01

    For the biotechnological production of L: -lysine, mainly strains of Corynebacterium glutamicum are used, which have been obtained by classical mutagenesis and screening or selection or by metabolic engineering. Gene targets for the amplification and deregulation of the lysine biosynthesis pathway, for the improvement of carbon precursor supply and of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (reduced form) (NADPH) regeneration, are known. To identify novel target genes to improve lysine production, the transcriptomes of the classically obtained lysine producing strain MH20-22B and several other C. glutamicum strains were compared. As lysine production by the classically obtained strain, which possesses feedback-resistant aspartokinase and is leucine auxotrophic, exceeds that of a genetically defined leucine auxotrophic wild-type derivative possessing feedback-resistant aspartokinase, additional traits beneficial for lysine production are present. NCgl0855, putatively encoding a methyltransferase, and the amtA-ocd-soxA operon, encoding an ammonium uptake system, a putative ornithine cyclodeaminase and an uncharacterized enzyme, were among the genes showing increased expression in the classically obtained strain irrespective of the presence of feedback-resistant aspartokinase. Lysine production could be improved by about 40% through overexpression of NCgl0855 or the amtA-ocd-soxA operon. Thus, novel target genes for the improvement of lysine production could be identified in a discovery-driven approach based on global gene expression analysis. PMID:17364200

  1. Differential lysine acetylation profiles of Erwinia amylovora strains revealed by proteomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein lysine acetylation (LysAc) in bacteria has recently been demonstrated to be widespread in E. coli and Salmonella and to broadly regulate bacterial physiology and metabolism. However, LysAc in plant pathogenic bacteria is largely unknown. Here we report the lysine acetylome of Erwinia amylovo...

  2. Lysine Acetylation Is a Widespread Protein Modification for Diverse Proteins in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lysine acetylation (LysAc), a form of reversible protein post translational modification previously known only for histone proteins in plants, is shown to be wide spread in Arabidopsis. Sixty five lysine modification sites were identified on 58 proteins, which operate in a wide variety of pathways/...

  3. Mapping and genotypic analysis of NK-lysin gene in chicken

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Antimicrobial peptides (AMP) are important elements of the first line of defence against pathogens in animals. NK-lysin is a cationic AMP that plays a critical role in innate immunity. The chicken NK-lysin gene has been cloned and its antimicrobial and anticancer activity has been descri...

  4. Mapping and genotypic analysis of NK-lysin gene in chicken

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NK-lysin is a cationic anti-microbial peptide that plays a critical role in innate immunity against infectious pathogens. Chicken NK-lysin has been cloned and its antimicrobial and anticancer activity has been described but its location in the chicken genome prior this study was unknown. A 6000 rad ...

  5. Carnitine biosynthesis in Neurospora crassa: enzymatic conversion of lysine to epsilon-N-trimethyllysine.

    PubMed Central

    Rebouche, C J; Broquist, H P

    1976-01-01

    The enzymatic conversion of L-lysine, epsilon-N-trimethyl-L-lysine the first series of reactions in the biosynthesis of carnitine in Neurospora crassa, proceeds via sequential methylation of free L-lysine, epsilon-N-methyl-L-lysine, and epsilon -N-dimethyl-L-lysine. The latter two compounds have been shown to be intermediates in the biosynthesis of carnitine by radioisotope dilution and incorporation experiments in growing cultures of N. crassa 33933 (lys-) and 38706 (met-). Methionine but not choline, has been recognized as an effective methyl donor in vivo. Inclusion of choline in the growth medium of strain 33933 does, however, enhance incorporation of the methyl groups of L-[methyl-3H]methionine into carnitine in an apparent "sparing" effect on methionine synthesis. Studies in cell-free extracts of the lysine auxotroph strain 33933 of N. crassa have established that lysine and epsilon-N-methyl and epsilon-N-dimethyllysine are enzymatically methylated, with S-adenosyl-L-methionine as the methyl group donor. The enzyme system appears to have no essential cofactors. Lysine does not induce synthesis of the enzyme system in the wild-type strain 262, whereas both carnitine and epsilon-N-trimethyllysine repress its synthesis in strain 33933. PMID:133101

  6. Global Profiling of Protein Lysine Malonylation in Escherichia coli Reveals Its Role in Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Qian, Lili; Nie, Litong; Chen, Ming; Liu, Ping; Zhu, Jun; Zhai, Linhui; Tao, Sheng-Ce; Cheng, Zhongyi; Zhao, Yingming; Tan, Minjia

    2016-06-01

    Protein lysine malonylation is a recently identified post-translational modification (PTM), which is evolutionarily conserved from bacteria to mammals. Although analysis of lysine malonylome in mammalians suggested that this modification was related to energy metabolism, the substrates and biological roles of malonylation in prokaryotes are still poorly understood. In this study, we performed qualitative and quantitative analyses to globally identify lysine malonylation substrates in Escherichia coli. We identified 1745 malonylation sites in 594 proteins in E. coli, representing the first and largest malonylome data set in prokaryotes up to date. Bioinformatic analyses showed that lysine malonylation was significantly enriched in protein translation, energy metabolism pathways and fatty acid biosynthesis, implying the potential roles of protein malonylation in bacterial physiology. Quantitative proteomics by fatty acid synthase inhibition in both auxotrophic and prototrophic E. coli strains revealed that lysine malonylation is closely associated with E. coli fatty acid metabolism. Protein structural analysis and mutagenesis experiment suggested malonylation could impact enzymatic activity of citrate synthase, a key enzyme in citric acid (TCA) cycle. Further comparative analysis among lysine malonylome, succinylome and acetylome data showed that these three modifications could participate in some similar enriched metabolism pathways, but they could also possibly play distinct roles such as in fatty acid synthesis. These data expanded our knowledge of lysine malonylation in prokaryotes, providing a resource for functional study of lysine malonylation in bacteria. PMID:27183143

  7. Heat-initiated prebiotic formation of peptides from glycine/aspartic acid and glycine/valine in aqueous environment and clay suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, Chandra Kala; Lata, Hem; Pathak, Hari Datt; Mehata, Mohan Singh

    2009-04-01

    The effect of heat on the reaction system of glycine/aspartic acid and glycine/valine in the aqueous environment as well as in montmorillonite clay suspension with or without divalent cations (Ca2+, Mg2+ and Ni2+) has been investigated at 85°C±5°C for varying periods under prebiotic drying and wetting conditions. The resulting products were analysed and characterized by chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. Peptide formation appears to depend on the duration of heat effect, nature of reactant amino acids and, to some extent, on montmorillonite clay incorporated with divalent cations. In the glycine/aspartic acid system, oligomerization of glycine was limited up to trimer level (Gly)3 along with the formation of glycyl-aspartic acid, while linear and cyclic peptides of aspartic acid were not formed, whereas the glycine/valine system preferentially elongated homo-oligopeptide of glycine up to pentamer level (Gly)5 along with formation of hetero-peptides (Gly-Val and Val-Gly). These studies are relevant in the context of the prebiotic origin of proteins and the role of clay and metal ions in condensation and oligomerization of amino acids. The length of the bio-oligomer chain depends upon the reaction conditions. However, condensation into even a small length seems significant, as the same process would have taken millions of years in the primitive era of the Earth, leading to the first proteins.

  8. Combined TL and 10B-alanine ESR dosimetry for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Bartolotta, A; D'Oca, M C; Lo Giudice, B; Brai, M; Borio, R; Forini, N; Salvadori, P; Manera, S

    2004-01-01

    The dosimetric technique described in this paper is based on electron spin resonance (ESR) detectors using an alanine-boric compound acid enriched with (10)B, and beryllium oxide thermoluminescent (TL) detectors; with this combined dosimetry, it is possible to discriminate the doses due to thermal neutrons and gamma radiation in a mixed field. Irradiations were carried out inside the thermal column of a TRIGA MARK II water-pool-type research nuclear reactor, also used for Boron Neutron Capture therapy (BNCT) applications, with thermal neutron fluence from 10(9) to 10(14) nth cm(-2). The ESR dosemeters using the alanine-boron compound indicated ESR signals about 30-fold stronger than those using only alanine. Moreover, a negligible correction for the gamma contribution, measured with TL detectors, almost insensitive to thermal neutrons, was necessary. Therefore, a simultaneous analysis of our TL and ESR detectors allows discrimination between thermal neutron and gamma doses, as required in BNCT. PMID:15353720

  9. Applicability of EPR/alanine dosimetry for quality assurance in proton eye radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Michalec, B; Mierzwinska, G; Ptaszkiewicz, M; Sowa, U; Stolarczyk, L; Weber, A

    2014-06-01

    A new quality assurance and quality control method for proton eye radiotherapy based on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)/alanine dosimetry has been developed. It is based on Spread-Out Bragg Peak entrance dose measurement with alanine detectors. The entrance dose is well correlated with the dose at the facility isocenter, where, during the therapeutic irradiation, the tumour is placed. The unique alanine detector features namely keeping the dose record in a form of stable radiation-induced free radicals trapped in the material structure, and the non-destructive read-out makes this type of detector a good candidate for additional documentation of the patient's exposure over the therapy course. PMID:24876341

  10. Theoretical Investigation on Alcohol Sensing of Glycine-Coated Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tao; Kussow, Gary; Kwon, Young-Kyun

    2007-03-01

    It has been observed that single walled carbon nanotube field effect transistors (SWNT-FET) coated with glycine can be used as alcohol sensors. The original semiconducting glycine-coated SWNT-FET have been changed to be metalic in the presence of alcohol. Using ab initio density functional theory, we compute the structural and electronic properties of carbon nanotubes coated with glycine in the absence or in the presence of alcohol (Isopropanol) to investigate alcohol sensing mechanism. To demonstrate specificity of such glycine-coated SWNT-FETs on alcohol, we also study those properties in the presence of other molecules, such as acetone and water. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of an external fields on glycine-coated SWNT with IPA, and indentify the gate-electric-field screening in SWNT-FET to be a major role for alcohol sensing.

  11. Velvetbean in Rotation with Soybean for Management of Heterodera glycines and Meloidogyne arenaria

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, D. B.; Rodríguez-Kábana, R.; Carden, E. L.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of previous crops - soybean (Glycine max) or velvetbean (Mucuna deeringiana) - and aldicarb on yield and nematode numbers for selected soybean cultivars was studied in a field infested with a mixture of Meloidogyne arenaria and Heterodera glycines. Soybean following velvetbean yielded 959 kg/ha more than soybean following soybean. Nematicide treatment resulted in increased yield, and there was no interaction between nematicide treatment and previous crop. Cultivars interacted significantly with nematicide treatment but not with previous crop for yield. Velvetbean reduced numbers of H. glycines but not M. arenaria. Cultivars interacted with previous crop, and the previous crop × nematicide x cultivar interaction was significant for both M. arenaria and H. glycines. We concluded that velvetbean is effective in reducing yield losses caused by mixed populations of M. arenaria and H. glycines, regardless of genetic resistance of soybean cultivar. PMID:19279845

  12. Structural, functional and optical studies on the amino acid doped glycine crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikandan, M. R.; Mahalingam, T.; Ravi, G.

    2012-06-01

    Single crystals of pure and amino acid (L-arginine) doped γ-glycine single crystals have been grown from aqueous solution by employing slow evaporation method. Morphological changes in different crystallographic planes were observed in the L-arginine doped γ-glycine crystals. Incorporation of L-arginine was confirmed qualitatively by FTIR spectroscopy. Powder X-ray diffraction was carried out to confirm γ-glycine and assess the single phase nature of the crystals. The lower cutoff wavelength was decreased by the influence of L-arginine in γ-glycine and this leads to an increase in the band gap. Nonlinear optical study revealed that L-arginine doping increases the SHG efficiency of the glycine crystal.

  13. Glycine Cleavage Powers Photoheterotrophic Growth of Chloroflexus aurantiacus in the Absence of H2

    PubMed Central

    He, Lian; Wang, Yaya; You, Le; Khin, Yadana; Tang, Joseph K.-H.; Tang, Yinjie J.

    2015-01-01

    Chloroflexus aurantiacus is an anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium. Its unique CO2 fixation pathway and primitive light-harvesting antenna complexes have attracted extensive research attentions. In this work, we investigated the photoheterotrophic growth of C. aurantiacus J-10-fl using acetate [at 55°C and without H2(g)]. The results indicate that glycine can promote anaerobic biomass production in a minimal medium by threefold to fivefold. Via 13C-metabolite analysis, we observed that glycine was involved in serine synthesis. Instead of being used as a major carbon source, glycine was degraded to produce C1 units and NAD(P)H. Tracer experiments also suggest that photoheterotrophic cultures growing with a exogenous glycine source exhibited capabilities of assimilating CO2 via multiple routes (including the 3-hydroxypropionate pathway). Finally, glycylglycine, a commonly used culture buffer, also significantly enhanced photoheterotrophic growth of C. aurantiacus, probably due to its thermal or enzymatic breakdown to glycine. PMID:26732979

  14. Host Suitability of Diverse Lines of Phaseolus vulgaris to Multiple Populations of Heterodera glycines

    PubMed Central

    Smith, James R.; Young, Lawrence D.

    2003-01-01

    The host suitability of diverse races and gene pools of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) for multiple isolates of Heterodera glycines was studied. Twenty P. vulgaris genotypes, representing three of the six races within the two major germplasm pools, were tested in greenhouse experiments to determine their host suitability to five H. glycines isolates. Phaseolus vulgaris genotypes differed in their host suitability to different H. glycines isolates. While some common bean lines were excellent hosts for some H. glycines isolates, no common bean line was a good host for all isolates. Some bean lines from races Durango and Mesoamerica, representing the Middle America gene pool, were resistant to all five nematode isolates. Other lines, from both the Andean and Middle America gene pools, had differential responses for host suitability to the different isolates of H. glycines. PMID:19265970

  15. Glycine as a d-amino acid surrogate in the K+-selectivity filter

    PubMed Central

    Valiyaveetil, Francis I.; Sekedat, Matthew; MacKinnon, Roderick; Muir, Tom W.

    2004-01-01

    The K+ channel-selectivity filter consists of two absolutely conserved glycine residues. Crystal structures show that the first glycine in the selectivity filter, Gly-77 in KcsA, is in a left-handed helical conformation. Although the left-handed helical conformation is not favorable for the naturally occurring l-amino acids, it is favorable for the chirally opposite d-amino acids. Here, we demonstrate that Gly-77 can be replaced by d-Ala with almost complete retention of function. In contrast, substitution with an l-amino acid results in a nonfunctional channel. This finding suggests that glycine is used as a surrogate d-amino acid in the selectivity filter. The absolute conservation of glycine in the K+-selectivity filter can be explained as a result of glycine being the only natural amino acid that can play this role. PMID:15563591

  16. Population-specific gene expression in the pathogenic nematode Hederodera glycines exists prior to infection and during the onset of a resistant or susceptible reaction in the roots of Glycine max.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Based on gene expression experiments, a single Glycine max (soybean) genotype (Peking) reacts differently to two different populations of Heterodera glycines (soybean cyst nematode) within the first twelve hours of infection. This suggested that H. glycines has population-specific gene expression si...

  17. New enzymatic methods for selective assay of L-lysine using an L-lysine specific decarboxylase/oxidase from Burkholderia sp. AIU 395.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Asami; Matsui, Daisuke; Yamada, Miwa; Asano, Yasuhisa; Isobe, Kimiyasu

    2015-03-01

    We developed new enzymatic methods for the selective assay of L-lysine by utilizing an oxidase reaction and a decarboxylation reaction by the L-lysine-specific decarboxylase/oxidase (L-Lys-DC/OD) from Burkholderia sp. AIU 395. The method utilizing the oxidase reaction of this enzyme was useful for determination of high concentrations of L-lysine. The method utilizing the decarboxylase reaction, which proceeded via the combination of the L-Lys-DC/OD and putrescine oxidase (PUO) from Micrococcus rubens, was effective for determination of low concentrations of L-lysine. Both methods showed good linearity, and neither was affected by other amino acids or amines. In addition, the within-assay and between-assay precisions of both methods were within the allowable range. The coupling of L-Lys-DC/OD with PUO was also useful for the differential assay of L-lysine and cadaverine. These newly developed methods were applied to the assay of L-lysine in biological samples and found to be effective. PMID:25282636

  18. Requirement for alanine in the amino acid control of deprivation-induced protein degradation in liver.

    PubMed Central

    Pösö, A R; Mortimore, G E

    1984-01-01

    Protein degradation in liver is actively controlled by a small group of inhibitory amino acids--leucine, tyrosine (or phenylalanine), glutamine, proline, histidine, tryptophan, and methionine. Other evidence, however, suggests that one or more of the remaining 12 noninhibitory amino acids is also required for suppression of proteolysis at normal concentrations. This question was investigated in livers of fed rats perfused in the single-pass mode. The deletion of alanine at normal (1x), but not at 4x or 10x normal, plasma amino acid concentrations evoked a near-maximal acceleration of protein degradation. No other noninhibitory amino acid was effective. Because alanine alone was not directly inhibitory and its omission was not associated with a decrease in inhibitory amino acid pools, alanine was presumed to act as a coregulator in the expression of inhibitory activity. When tested alone, the inhibitory group was as effective as the complete mixture at 0.5x and 4x levels, but it lost its suppressive ability within a narrow zone of concentration centered slightly above 1x. The addition of 1x (0.48 mM) alanine completely restored the inhibition. Pyruvate and lactate could be effectively substituted, but only at concentrations 10-20 times greater than that of alanine. These, together with earlier findings, indicate the existence of a regulatory complex that recognizes specific amino acids and transmits positive and negative signals to proteolytic sites. The results also suggest that alanine can provide an important regulatory link between energy demands and protein degradation. PMID:6589593

  19. Relative response of the alanine dosimeter to medium energy x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anton, M.; Büermann, L.

    2015-08-01

    The response of the alanine dosimeter to kilovoltage x-rays with respect to the dose to water was measured, relative to the response to Co-60 radiation. Two series of x-ray qualities were investigated, one ranging from 30 kV to 100 kV tube voltage (TW series), the other one ranging from 70 kV to 280 kV (TH series). Due to the use of the water calorimeter as a primary standard, the uncertainty of the delivered dose is significantly lower than for other published data. The alanine response was measured as described in a previous publication (Anton et al 2013 Phys. Med. Biol. 58 3259-82). The uncertainty component due to the alanine measurement and analysis is ⩽0.4%, the major part of the combined uncertainty of the relative response originates from the uncertainty of the delivered dose. The relative uncertainties of the relative response vary from ⩽2% for the TW series to ⩽1.1% for the TH series. Different from the behaviour of the alanine dosimeter for megavoltage x-rays or electrons, the relative response drops significantly from unity for Co-60 radiation to less than 64% for the TW quality with a tube voltage of 30 kV. In order to reproduce this behaviour through Monte Carlo simulations, not only the ratio of the absorbed dose to alanine to the absorbed dose to water has to be known, but also the intrinsic efficiency, i.e. the dependence of the number of free radicals generated per unit of absorbed dose on the photon energy. This quantity is not yet accessible for the TW series. For a possible use of the alanine dosimeter for kilovoltage x-rays, for example in electronic brachytherapy, users should rely on the measured data for the relative response which have become available with this publication.

  20. Relative response of the alanine dosimeter to medium energy x-rays.

    PubMed

    Anton, M; Büermann, L

    2015-08-01

    The response of the alanine dosimeter to kilovoltage x-rays with respect to the dose to water was measured, relative to the response to Co-60 radiation.Two series of x-ray qualities were investigated, one ranging from 30 kV to 100 kV tube voltage (TW series), the other one ranging from 70 kV to 280 kV (TH series). Due to the use of the water calorimeter as a primary standard, the uncertainty of the delivered dose is significantly lower than for other published data. The alanine response was measured as described in a previous publication (Anton et al 2013 Phys. Med. Biol. 58 3259-82). The uncertainty component due to the alanine measurement and analysis is ⩽0.4%, the major part of the combined uncertainty of the relative response originates from the uncertainty of the delivered dose. The relative uncertainties of the relative response vary from ⩽2% for the TW series to ⩽1.1% for the TH series.Different from the behaviour of the alanine dosimeter for megavoltage x-rays or electrons, the relative response drops significantly from unity for Co-60 radiation to less than 64% for the TW quality with a tube voltage of 30 kV. In order to reproduce this behaviour through Monte Carlo simulations, not only the ratio of the absorbed dose to alanine to the absorbed dose to water has to be known, but also the intrinsic efficiency, i.e. the dependence of the number of free radicals generated per unit of absorbed dose on the photon energy. This quantity is not yet accessible for the TW series.For a possible use of the alanine dosimeter for kilovoltage x-rays, for example in electronic brachytherapy, users should rely on the measured data for the relative response which have become available with this publication. PMID:26216572

  1. The effect of β-alanine supplementation on cycling time trials of different length.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, Phillip M; Minahan, Clare L

    2016-10-01

    The varying results reported in response to β-alanine supplementation may be related to the duration and nature of the exercise protocol employed. We investigated the effects of β-alanine supplementation on a wide range of cycling performance tests in order to produce a clear concise set of criteria for its efficacy. Fourteen trained cyclists (Age = 24.8 ± 6.7 years; VO2max = 65.4 ± 10.2 mL·kg·min(-1)) participated in this placebo-controlled, double-blind study. Prior to supplementation, subjects completed two (familiarization and baseline) supramaximal cycling bouts until exhaustion (120% pre-supplementation VO2max) and two 1-, 4- and 10-km cycling time trial (TT). Subjects then supplemented orally for 4 weeks with 6.4 g/d placebo or β-alanine and repeated the battery of performance tests. Blood lactate was measured pre-exercise, post-exercise and 5  min post-exercise. β-alanine supplementation elicited significant increases in time to exhaustion (TTE) (17.6 ± 11.5 s; p = 0.013, effect compared with placebo) and was likely to be beneficial to 4-km TT performance time (-7.8 ± 8.1 s; 94% likelihood), despite not being statistically different (p = 0.060). Performance times in the 1- and 10-km TT were not affected by treatment. For the highly trained cyclists in the current study, β-alanine supplementation significantly extended supramaximal cycling TTE and may have provided a worthwhile improvement to 4-km TT performance. However, 1- and 10-km cycling TT performance appears to be unaffected by β-alanine supplementation. PMID:26652037

  2. The energy dependence of lithium formate and alanine EPR dosimeters for medium energy x rays

    SciTech Connect

    Waldeland, Einar; Hole, Eli Olaug; Sagstuen, Einar; Malinen, Eirik

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To perform a systematic investigation of the energy dependence of alanine and lilthium formate EPR dosimeters for medium energy x rays. Methods: Lithium formate and alanine EPR dosimeters were exposed to eight different x-ray beam qualities, with nominal potentials ranging from 50 to 200 kV. Following ionometry based on standards of absorbed dose to water, the dosimeters were given two different doses of approximately 3 and 6 Gy for each radiation quality, with three dosimeters for each dose. A reference series was also irradiated to three different dose levels at a {sup 60}Co unit. The dose to water energy response, that is, the dosimeter reading per absorbed dose to water relative to that for {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays, was estimated for each beam quality. In addition, the energy response was calculated by Monte Carlo simulations and compared to the experimental energy response. Results: The experimental energy response estimates ranged from 0.89 to 0.94 and from 0.68 to 0.90 for lithium formate and alanine, respectively. The uncertainties in the experimental energy response estimates were typically 3%. The relative effectiveness, that is, the ratio of the experimental energy response to that following Monte Carlo simulations was, on average, 0.96 and 0.94 for lithium formate and alanine, respectively. Conclusions: This work shows that lithium formate dosimeters are less dependent on x-ray energy than alanine. Furthermore, as the relative effectiveness for both lithium formate and alanine were systematically less than unity, the yield of radiation-induced radicals is decreased following x-irradiation compared to irradiation with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays.

  3. Effect of irradiation on Nε-carboxymethyl-lysine and Nε-carboxyethyl-lysine formation in cooked meat products during storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ligang; He, Zhiyong; Zeng, Maomao; Zheng, Zongping; Chen, Jie

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the effects of irradiation on Nε-carboxymethyl-lysine (CML) and Nε-carboxyethyl-lysine (CEL) formation in cooked red and white meats during storage. The results showed that irradiation did not affect CML/CEL formation (0 weeks). After 6 weeks, CML/CEL contents in the irradiated samples exhibited a higher growth rate than the non-irradiated samples, especially the red meat. The results of electron spin resonance spectrometry and 2-Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances suggested irradiation had induced free-radical reactions and accelerated lipid oxidation during storage. A linear correlation (r=0.810-0.906, p<0.01) was found between the loss of polyunsaturated fatty acids content and increase of CML/CEL content in the irradiated samples after 0 and 6 weeks of storage. The results indicate that irradiation-induced lipid oxidation promotes CML/CEL formation, and CML/CEL formation by the lipid oxidation pathways may be an important pathway for CML/CEL accumulation in irradiated meat products during storage.

  4. Acetylome analysis reveals the involvement of lysine acetylation in diverse biological processes in Phytophthora sojae.

    PubMed

    Li, Delong; Lv, Binna; Tan, Lingling; Yang, Qianqian; Liang, Wenxing

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a dynamic and highly conserved post-translational modification that plays an important regulatory role in almost every aspects of cell metabolism in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Phytophthora sojae is one of the most important plant pathogens due to its huge economic impact. However, to date, little is known about the functions of lysine acetylation in this Phytopthora. Here, we conducted a lysine acetylome in P. sojae. Overall, 2197 lysine acetylation sites in 1150 proteins were identified. The modified proteins are involved in diverse biological processes and are localized to multiple cellular compartments. Importantly, 7 proteins involved in the pathogenicity or the secretion pathway of P. sojae were found to be acetylated. These data provide the first comprehensive view of the acetylome of P. sojae and serve as an important resource for functional analysis of lysine acetylation in plant pathogens. PMID:27412925

  5. Purification of L-lysine in simulated moving bed and fixed-bed chromatography.

    PubMed

    Robatjazi, Seyed Mortaza; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas; Karbasy, Seyed Mojtaba

    2004-07-01

    L-Lysine was produced by a microbial process utilizing a Corynebacterium glutamicum (ATCC 21799) strain. L-Lysine was purified from the cultivated medium by fixed-bed and simulated moving bed (SMB) chromatography. The separation conditions including pH, eluent concentration and Lys+ and Lys2+ adsorption isotherms were studied in batch adsorption. The column capacity, eluent flow rate and eluent concentration have been studied in fixed-bed chromatography. Maximum purification rate of lysine was obtained as 0.066 g/(g x h) (per gram resin and per hour) at an eluent flow rate of 10 mL/min in fixed-bed chromatography. The results obtained from SMB were 0.11 g/(g x h) for L-lysine purification rate and 96% for L-lysine recovery. PMID:15709427

  6. Smyd2 controls cytoplasmic lysine methylation of Hsp90 and myofilament organization

    PubMed Central

    Donlin, Laura T.; Andresen, Christian; Just, Steffen; Rudensky, Eugene; Pappas, Christopher T.; Kruger, Martina; Jacobs, Erica Y.; Unger, Andreas; Zieseniss, Anke; Dobenecker, Marc-Werner; Voelkel, Tobias; Chait, Brian T.; Gregorio, Carol C.; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Tarakhovsky, Alexander; Linke, Wolfgang A.

    2012-01-01

    Protein lysine methylation is one of the most widespread post-translational modifications in the nuclei of eukaryotic cells. Methylated lysines on histones and nonhistone proteins promote the formation of protein complexes that control gene expression and DNA replication and repair. In the cytoplasm, however, the role of lysine methylation in protein complex formation is not well established. Here we report that the cytoplasmic protein chaperone Hsp90 is methylated by the lysine methyltransferase Smyd2 in various cell types. In muscle, Hsp90 methylation contributes to the formation of a protein complex containing Smyd2, Hsp90, and the sarcomeric protein titin. Deficiency in Smyd2 results in the loss of Hsp90 methylation, impaired titin stability, and altered muscle function. Collectively, our data reveal a cytoplasmic protein network that employs lysine methylation for the maintenance and function of skeletal muscle. PMID:22241783

  7. Acetylome analysis reveals the involvement of lysine acetylation in diverse biological processes in Phytophthora sojae

    PubMed Central

    Li, Delong; Lv, Binna; Tan, Lingling; Yang, Qianqian; Liang, Wenxing

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a dynamic and highly conserved post-translational modification that plays an important regulatory role in almost every aspects of cell metabolism in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Phytophthora sojae is one of the most important plant pathogens due to its huge economic impact. However, to date, little is known about the functions of lysine acetylation in this Phytopthora. Here, we conducted a lysine acetylome in P. sojae. Overall, 2197 lysine acetylation sites in 1150 proteins were identified. The modified proteins are involved in diverse biological processes and are localized to multiple cellular compartments. Importantly, 7 proteins involved in the pathogenicity or the secretion pathway of P. sojae were found to be acetylated. These data provide the first comprehensive view of the acetylome of P. sojae and serve as an important resource for functional analysis of lysine acetylation in plant pathogens. PMID:27412925

  8. Total chemically available (free and intrachain) lysine and furosine in pea, bean, and lentil sprouts.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Carmen; Frías, Juana; Vidal-Valverde, Concepción; Hernández, Amelia

    2007-12-12

    The effect of the germination of peas, beans, and lentils under differing conditions of illumination for different times on parameters linked to the Maillard reaction (chemically available free and intrachain lysine, lysine availability, and furosine) was evaluated. The chemically available free lysine content in the raw seeds of the three legumes was quite small compared to the chemically available intrachain lysine content, and furosine was detectable only in the beans and the lentils. The effect of germination was to increase lysine availability compared with levels in the raw seeds in all of the germinated samples, the smallest increase taking place in the lentils. In addition, furosine became detectable in all of the germinated samples. Quantities varied depending on the germination conditions but in all cases were higher than the quantities observed in the raw seeds. Linear correlations were observed to exist between some of the parameters considered in the three legumes tested. PMID:17973449

  9. Impact of dry heating on physicochemical properties of corn starch and lysine mixture.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ying; Yu, Jicheng; Xu, Yongbin; Zhang, Yinghui

    2016-10-01

    Corn starch was modified with lysine by dry heat treatment and to investigate how they can affect the pasting and structural properties of the treated starches. Dry heating with lysine reduced the pasting temperature and resulting in viscosity increase. The particle size of heated starch-lysine mixture increased, suggesting that starch granules were cross-linked to lysine. After dry heating, the onset temperature, peak temperature and conclusion temperature of corn starch-lysine mixture were lower than those of other starches. The degree of crystallinity decreased for the starch after dry heat treatment while these heated starch samples still have the same X-ray diffraction types as the original starch. PMID:27311503

  10. Temperature-sensitive mutants of Escherichia coli K-12 with low activities of the L-alanine adding enzyme and the D-alanyl-D-alanine adding enzyme.

    PubMed

    Lugtenberg, E J; v Schijndel-van Dam, A

    1972-04-01

    A number of properties of temperature-sensitive mutants in murein synthesis are described. The mutants grow at 30 C but lyse at 42 C. One mutant possesses a temperature-sensitive d-alanyl-d-alanine adding enzyme, has an impaired rate of murein synthesis in vivo at both 30 and 42 C, and contains elevated levels of uridine diphosphate-N-acetyl-muramyl-tripeptide (UDP-MurNAc-l-Ala-d-Glu-m-diaminopimelic acid) at 42 C. The other mutant possesses an l-alanine adding enzyme with a very low in vitro activity at both 30 and 42 C. Its in vivo rate of murein synthesis is almost normal at 30 C but is much less at 42 C. When the murein precursors were isolated after incubation of the cells in the presence of (14)C-l-alanine, they contained only a fraction of the radioactivity that could be obtained from a wild-type strain. A genetic nomenclature for genes concerned with murein synthesis is proposed. PMID:4552998

  11. A THREE-PHASE CHEMICAL MODEL OF HOT CORES: THE FORMATION OF GLYCINE

    SciTech Connect

    Garrod, Robin T.

    2013-03-01

    A new chemical model is presented that simulates fully coupled gas-phase, grain-surface, and bulk-ice chemistry in hot cores. Glycine (NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COOH), the simplest amino acid, and related molecules such as glycinal, propionic acid, and propanal, are included in the chemical network. Glycine is found to form in moderate abundance within and upon dust-grain ices via three radical-addition mechanisms, with no single mechanism strongly dominant. Glycine production in the ice occurs over temperatures {approx}40-120 K. Peak gas-phase glycine fractional abundances lie in the range 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11}-8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9}, occurring at {approx}200 K, the evaporation temperature of glycine. A gas-phase mechanism for glycine production is tested and found insignificant, even under optimal conditions. A new spectroscopic radiative-transfer model is used, allowing the translation and comparison of the chemical-model results with observations of specific sources. Comparison with the nearby hot-core source NGC 6334 IRS1 shows excellent agreement with integrated line intensities of observed species, including methyl formate. The results for glycine are consistent with the current lack of a detection of this molecule toward other sources; the high evaporation temperature of glycine renders the emission region extremely compact. Glycine detection with ALMA is predicted to be highly plausible, for bright, nearby sources with narrow emission lines. Photodissociation of water and subsequent hydrogen abstraction from organic molecules by OH, and NH{sub 2}, are crucial to the buildup of complex organic species in the ice. The inclusion of alternative branches within the network of radical-addition reactions appears important to the abundances of hot-core molecules; less favorable branching ratios may remedy the anomalously high abundance of glycolaldehyde predicted by this and previous models.

  12. A Three-phase Chemical Model of Hot Cores: The Formation of Glycine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrod, Robin T.

    2013-03-01

    A new chemical model is presented that simulates fully coupled gas-phase, grain-surface, and bulk-ice chemistry in hot cores. Glycine (NH2CH2COOH), the simplest amino acid, and related molecules such as glycinal, propionic acid, and propanal, are included in the chemical network. Glycine is found to form in moderate abundance within and upon dust-grain ices via three radical-addition mechanisms, with no single mechanism strongly dominant. Glycine production in the ice occurs over temperatures ~40-120 K. Peak gas-phase glycine fractional abundances lie in the range 8 × 10-11-8 × 10-9, occurring at ~200 K, the evaporation temperature of glycine. A gas-phase mechanism for glycine production is tested and found insignificant, even under optimal conditions. A new spectroscopic radiative-transfer model is used, allowing the translation and comparison of the chemical-model results with observations of specific sources. Comparison with the nearby hot-core source NGC 6334 IRS1 shows excellent agreement with integrated line intensities of observed species, including methyl formate. The results for glycine are consistent with the current lack of a detection of this molecule toward other sources; the high evaporation temperature of glycine renders the emission region extremely compact. Glycine detection with ALMA is predicted to be highly plausible, for bright, nearby sources with narrow emission lines. Photodissociation of water and subsequent hydrogen abstraction from organic molecules by OH, and NH2, are crucial to the buildup of complex organic species in the ice. The inclusion of alternative branches within the network of radical-addition reactions appears important to the abundances of hot-core molecules; less favorable branching ratios may remedy the anomalously high abundance of glycolaldehyde predicted by this and previous models.

  13. Anaerobic Accumulation of γ-Aminobutyric Acid and Alanine in Radish Leaves (Raphanus sativus, L.)

    PubMed Central

    Streeter, John G.; Thompson, John F.

    1972-01-01

    In leaves, the anaerobic accumulation of alanine was accompanied by a loss of aspartate, and these changes preceded γ-aminobutyrate accumulation and glutamate loss. Changes in keto acid content did not appear to be the cause of amino acid changes. Accumulation of γ-aminobutyrate was due to acceleration of glutamate decarboxylation and arrest of γ-aminobutyrate transamination. Changes in enzyme content did not explain the changes in reaction rates in vivo. Most of the aspartate may be converted anaerobically to alanine via oxalacetate and pyruvate. PMID:16658004

  14. Steric effect exerted by the proline residue on the antecedent alanine residue.

    PubMed

    Siemión, I Z; Sobczyk, K; Nawrocka, E

    1982-05-01

    Five model tetrapeptides: Ala-Ala-Ala-Ala, Pro-Ala-Ala-Ala, Ala-Pro-Ala-Ala, Ala-Ala-Pro-Ala and Ala-Ala-Ala-Pro, were synthesized and measured in D2O by 13 C-n.m.r. spectroscopy. The spectra analysis led us to the conclusion that for each model (irrespective of pD) in conformational equilibrium, the predominant conformation is the one in which side methyl of alanine preceding proline residue eclipses alanine carbonyl group. The influence of pD changes in cis-trans isomerism of Ala-Pro amide bond was also investigated. PMID:7118413

  15. Molecular Evolution of Lysin Motif-Type Receptor-Like Kinases in Plants1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Wu, Xiaolei; Findley, Seth; Wan, Jinrong; Libault, Marc; Nguyen, Henry T.; Cannon, Steven B.; Stacey, Gary

    2007-01-01

    The lysin motif (LysM) domain is an ancient and ubiquitous protein module that binds peptidoglycan and structurally related molecules. A genomic survey in a large number of species spanning all kingdoms reveals that the combination of LysM and receptor kinase domains is present exclusively in plants. However, the particular biological functions and molecular evolution of this gene family remain largely unknown. We show that LysM domains in plant LysM proteins are highly diversified and that a minimum of six distinct types of LysM motifs exist in plant LysM kinase proteins and five additional types of LysM motifs exist in nonkinase plant LysM proteins. Further, motif similarities suggest that plant LysM motifs are ancient. Although phylogenetic signals are not sufficient to resolve the earliest relationships, plant LysM motifs may have arisen through common ancestry with LysM motifs in other kingdoms. Within plants, the gene family has evolved through local and segmental duplications. The family has undergone further duplication and diversification in legumes, where some LysM kinase genes function as receptors for bacterial nodulation factor. Two pairs of homeologous regions were identified in soybean (Glycine max) based on microsynteny and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Expression data show that most plant LysM kinase genes are expressed predominantly in the root and that orthologous LysM kinase genes share similar tissue expression patterns. We also examined synteny around plant LysM kinase genes to help reconstruct scenarios for the evolution of this important gene family. PMID:17449649

  16. Secondary fragmentation routes of glycine in ice under irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernet, A.; Pilme, J.; Ellinger, Y.

    2011-05-01

    The question of the relative stability of the complex organic molecules (COM) under the interstellar radiation field is a crucial question, especially in the context of the panspermia hypothesis for which their survival during the transfer from space to the Earth is a necessary condition for the appearance of life (Ehrenfreund et al 2001, 2002). Assuming that these species are originally embedded in interstellar grains, their resistance to the solar UV radiation in ice is a key issue. The case of glycine, H2NCH2COOH, has been considered recently in irradiation experiments carried out at the SOLEIL synchrotron facility. It appeared that glycine is partially protected by ice but also suffers some fragmentation leading in the end to CO2 and to CN containing species. Quantum chemical simulations have been performed in parallel for all the possible fragmentations of neutral, ionized, doubly ionized, protonated and zwitterionic glycine (Lattelais et al. 2010). This study has shown that the primary decomposition routes leading to fragments CH2COOH, H2NCH2, H2NCH2+, CH2COOH+, H2NCH3, and CO2 are energetically valid. The experiments have also shown that the role of water is mainly to increase the production of the end products in the photoreactions, most probably due to the reactions with the OH radicals formed during the irradiation of the ice. We present a theoretical study of the secondary fragmentation channels initiated by the OH radical by means of quantum chemical calculations using DFT and ab initio correlated methods (MP2,CCSD(T)). We have examined all the possible secondary fragmentations starting from the primary fragments mentioned above. We considered all species embedded in the dielectric continuum simulating an icy environment (comparison with the gas phase situation serves as reference). Thermodynamic stabilities as well as activation barriers have been determined. This study shows that the formation of the HCN molecule as end product is energetically

  17. Structural Insights Into Amino Acid Binding and Gene Control by a Lysine Riboswitch

    SciTech Connect

    Serganov, A.; Huang, L; Patel, D

    2008-01-01

    In bacteria, the intracellular concentration of several amino acids is controlled by riboswitches1, 2, 3, 4. One of the important regulatory circuits involves lysine-specific riboswitches, which direct the biosynthesis and transport of lysine and precursors common for lysine and other amino acids. To understand the molecular basis of amino acid recognition by riboswitches, here we present the crystal structure of the 174-nucleotide sensing domain of the Thermotoga maritima lysine riboswitch in the lysine-bound (1.9 A) and free (3.1 A) states. The riboswitch features an unusual and intricate architecture, involving three-helical and two-helical bundles connected by a compact five-helical junction and stabilized by various long-range tertiary interactions. Lysine interacts with the junctional core of the riboswitch and is specifically recognized through shape-complementarity within the elongated binding pocket and through several direct and K+-mediated hydrogen bonds to its charged ends. Our structural and biochemical studies indicate preformation of the riboswitch scaffold and identify conformational changes associated with the formation of a stable lysine-bound state, which prevents alternative folding of the riboswitch and facilitates formation of downstream regulatory elements. We have also determined several structures of the riboswitch bound to different lysine analogues5, including antibiotics, in an effort to understand the ligand-binding capabilities of the lysine riboswitch and understand the nature of antibiotic resistance. Our results provide insights into a mechanism of lysine-riboswitch-dependent gene control at the molecular level, thereby contributing to continuing efforts at exploration of the pharmaceutical and biotechnological potential of riboswitches.

  18. 40 CFR 174.533 - Glycine max Herbicide-Resistant Acetolactate Synthase (GM-HRA) inert ingredient; exemption from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Glycine max Herbicide-Resistant... Glycine max Herbicide-Resistant Acetolactate Synthase (GM-HRA) inert ingredient; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Glycine max herbicide-resistant acetolactate synthase (GM-HRA)...

  19. 40 CFR 174.533 - Glycine max Herbicide-Resistant Acetolactate Synthase (GM-HRA) inert ingredient; exemption from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Glycine max Herbicide-Resistant... Glycine max Herbicide-Resistant Acetolactate Synthase (GM-HRA) inert ingredient; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Glycine max herbicide-resistant acetolactate synthase (GM-HRA)...

  20. Interactions Between the Soybean Cyst Nematode and Fusarium solani f. sp. glycines Based on Greenhouse Factorial Experiments.

    PubMed

    Gao, X; Jackson, T A; Hartman, G L; Niblack, T L

    2006-12-01

    ABSTRACT The soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines, and the fungus that causes sudden death syndrome (SDS) of soybean, Fusarium solani f. sp. glycines, frequently co-infest soybean (Glycine max) fields. The interactions between H. glycines and F. solani f. sp. glycines were investigated in factorial greenhouse experiments with different inoculum levels of both organisms on a soybean cultivar susceptible to both pathogens. Measured responses included root and shoot dry weights, H. glycines reproduction, area under the SDS disease progress curve, and fungal colonization of roots. Both H. glycines and F. solani f. sp. glycines reduced the growth of soybeans. Reproduction of H. glycines was suppressed by high inoculum levels but not by low levels of F. solani f. sp. glycines. The infection of soybean roots by H. glycines did not affect root colonization by the fungus, as determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Although both pathogens reduced the growth of soybeans, H. glycines did not increase SDS foliar symptoms, and statistical interactions between the two pathogens were seldom significant. PMID:18943675