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Sample records for alanine substitution mutants

  1. Structural features and activity of Brazzein and its mutants upon substitution of a surfaced exposed alanine.

    PubMed

    Ghanavatian, Parisa; Khalifeh, Khosrow; Jafarian, Vahab

    2016-12-01

    Brazzein (Brz) is a member of sweet-tasting protein containing four disulfide bonds. It was reported as a compact and heat-resistant protein. Here, we have used site-directed mutagenesis and replaced a surface-exposed alanine with aspartic acid (A19D mutant), lysine (A19K mutant) and glycine (A19G mutant). Activity comparisons of wild-type (WT) and mutants using taste panel test procedure showed that A19G variant has the same activity as WT protein. However, introduction of a positive charge in A19K mutant led to significant increase in Brz's sweetness, while A19D has reduced sweetness compared to WT protein. Docking studies showed that mutation at position 19 results in slight chain mobility of protein at the binding surface and changing the patterns of interactions toward more effective binding of E9K variant in the concave surface of sweet taste receptor. Far-UV CD data spectra have a characteristic shape of beta structure for all variants, however different magnitudes of spectra suggest that beta-sheet structure in WT and A19G is more stable than that of A19D and A19K. Equilibrium unfolding studies with fluorescence spectroscopy and using urea and dithiothritol (DTT) as chemical denaturants indicates that A19G mutant gains more stability against urea denaturation; while conformational stability of A19D and A19K decreases when compared with WT and A19G variants. We concluded that the positive charge at the surface of protein is important factor responsible for the interaction of protein with the human sweet receptor and Ala(19) can be considered as a key region for investigating the mechanism of the interaction of Brz with corresponding receptor.

  2. First-principles studies of pure and fluorine substituted alanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Sardar; Vaizie, Hamide; Rahnamaye Aliabad, H. A.; Ahmad, Rashid; Khan, Imad; Ali, Zahid; Jalali-Asadabadi, S.; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Khan, Amir Abdullah

    2016-05-01

    This paper communicates the structural, electronic and optical properties of L-alanine, monofluoro and difluoro substituted alanines using density functional calculations. These compounds exist in orthorhombic crystal structure and the calculated structural parameters such as lattice constants, bond angles and bond lengths are in agreement with the experimental results. L-alanine is an indirect band gap insulator, while its fluorine substituted compounds (monofluoroalanine and difluoroalanine) are direct band gap insulators. The substitution causes reduction in the band gap and hence these optically tailored direct wide band gap materials have enhanced optical properties in the ultraviolet (UV) region of electromagnetic spectrum. Therefore, optical properties like dielectric function, refractive index, reflectivity and energy loss function are also investigated. These compounds have almost isotropic nature in the lower frequency range while at higher energies, they have a significant anisotropic nature.

  3. Alanine substitutions of noncysteine residues in the cysteine-stabilized αβ motif

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying-Fang; Cheng, Kuo-Chang; Tsai, Ping-Hsing; Liu, Chung-Cheng; Lee, Tian-Ren; Ping-Chiang Lyu

    2009-01-01

    The protein scaffold is a peptide framework with a high tolerance of residue modifications. The cysteine-stabilized αβ motif (CSαβ) consists of an α-helix and an antiparallel triple-stranded β-sheet connected by two disulfide bridges. Proteins containing this motif share low sequence identity but high structural similarity and has been suggested as a good scaffold for protein engineering. The Vigna radiate defensin 1 (VrD1), a plant defensin, serves here as a model protein to probe the amino acid tolerance of CSαβ motif. A systematic alanine substitution is performed on the VrD1. The key residues governing the inhibitory function and structure stability are monitored. Thirty-two of 46 residue positions of VrD1 are altered by site-directed mutagenesis techniques. The circular dichroism spectrum, intrinsic fluorescence spectrum, and chemical denaturation are used to analyze the conformation and structural stability of proteins. The secondary structures were highly tolerant to the amino acid substitutions; however, the protein stabilities were varied for each mutant. Many mutants, although they maintained their conformations, altered their inhibitory function significantly. In this study, we reported the first alanine scan on the plant defensin containing the CSαβ motif. The information is valuable to the scaffold with the CSαβ motif and protein engineering. PMID:19533758

  4. The contribution of the methyl groups on thymine bases to binding specificity and affinity by alanine-rich mutants of the bZIP motif.

    PubMed

    Kise, K J; Shin, J A

    2001-09-01

    We have used fluorescence anisotropy to measure in situ the thermodynamics of binding of alanine-rich mutants of the GCN4 basic region/leucine zipper (bZIP) to short DNA duplexes, in which thymines were replaced with uracils, in order to quantify the contributions of the C5 methyl group on thymines with alanine methyl side chains. We simplified the alpha-helical GCN4 bZIP by alanine substitution: 4A, 11A, and 18A contain four, 11, and 18 alanine mutations in their DNA-binding basic regions, respectively. Titration of fluorescein-labeled duplexes with increasing amounts of protein yielded dissociation constants in the low-to-mid nanomolar range for all bZIP mutants in complex with the AP-1 target site (5'-TGACTCA-3'); binding to the nonspecific control duplex was >1000-fold weaker. Small changes of <1 kcal/mol in binding free energies were observed for wild-type bZIP and 4A mutant to uracil-containing AP-1, whereas 11A and 18A bound almost equally well to native AP-1 and uracil-containing AP-1. These modest changes in binding affinities may reflect the multivalent nature of protein-DNA interactions, as our highly mutated proteins still exhibit native-like behavior. These protein mutations may compensate for changes in enthalpic and entropic contributions toward DNA-binding in order to maintain binding free energies similar to that of the native protein-DNA complex.

  5. Alanine racemase mutants of Mycobacterium tuberculosis require D-alanine for growth and are defective for survival in macrophages and mice.

    PubMed

    Awasthy, Disha; Bharath, Sowmya; Subbulakshmi, Venkita; Sharma, Umender

    2012-02-01

    Alanine racemase (Alr) is an essential enzyme in most bacteria; however, some species (e.g. Listeria monocytogenes) can utilize d-amino acid transaminase (Dat) to generate d-alanine, which renders Alr non-essential. In addition to the conflicting reports on gene knockout of alr in Mycobacterium smegmatis, a recent study concluded that depletion of Alr does not affect the growth of M. smegmatis. In order to get an unambiguous answer on the essentiality of Alr in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and validate it as a drug target in vitro and in vivo, we have inactivated the alr gene of M. tuberculosis and found that it was not possible to generate an alr knockout in the absence of a complementing gene copy or d-alanine in the growth medium. The growth kinetics of the alr mutant revealed that M. tuberculosis requires very low amounts of d-alanine (5-10 µg ml(-1)) for optimum growth. Survival kinetics of the mutant in the absence of d-alanine indicated that depletion of this amino acid results in rapid loss of viability. The alr mutant was found to be defective for growth in macrophages. Analysis of phenotype in mice suggested that non-availability of d-alanine in mice leads to clearance of bacteria followed by stabilization of bacterial number in lungs and spleen. Additionally, reversal of d-cycloserine inhibition in the presence of d-alanine in M. tuberculosis suggested that Alr is the primary target of d-cycloserine. Thus, Alr of M. tuberculosis is a valid drug target and inhibition of Alr alone should result in loss of viability in vitro and in vivo.

  6. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis reveals a cytosine deaminase mutant with altered substrate preference.

    PubMed

    Mahan, Sheri D; Ireton, Greg C; Stoddard, Barry L; Black, Margaret E

    2004-07-20

    Suicide gene therapy of cancer is a method whereby cancerous tumors can be selectively eradicated while sparing damage to normal tissue. This is accomplished by delivering a gene, encoding an enzyme capable of specifically converting a nontoxic prodrug into a cytotoxin, to cancer cells followed by prodrug administration. The Escherichia coli gene, codA, encodes cytosine deaminase and is introduced into cancer cells followed by administration of the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC). Cytosine deaminase converts 5-FC into cytotoxic 5-fluorouracil, which leads to tumor-cell eradication. One limitation of this enzyme/prodrug combination is that 5-FC is a poor substrate for bacterial cytosine deaminase. The crystal structure of bacterial cytosine deaminase (bCD) reveals that a loop structure in the active site pocket of wild-type bCD comprising residues 310-320 undergoes a conformational change upon cytosine binding, making several contacts to the pyrimidine ring. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis was used to investigate the structure-function relationship of amino acid residues within this region, especially with regard to substrate specificity. Using an E. coli genetic complementation system, seven active mutants were identified (F310A, G311A, H312A, D314A, V315A, F316A, and P318A). Further characterization of these mutants reveals that mutant F316A is 14-fold more efficient than the wild-type at deaminating cytosine to uracil. The mutant D314A enzyme demonstrates a dramatic decrease in cytosine activity (17-fold) as well as a slight increase in activity toward 5-FC (2-fold), indicating that mutant D314A prefers the prodrug over cytosine by almost 20-fold, suggesting that it may be a superior suicide gene.

  7. Thiophenyl-substituted triazolyl-thione L-alanine: asymmetric synthesis, aggregation and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Saghyan, Ashot S; Simonyan, Hayarpi M; Petrosyan, Satenik G; Geolchanyan, Arpine V; Roviello, Giovanni N; Musumeci, Domenica; Roviello, Valentina

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we report the asymmetric synthesis and characterization of an artificial amino acid based on triazolyl-thione L-alanine, which was modified with a thiophenyl-substituted moiety, as well as in vitro studies of its nucleic acid-binding ability. We found, by dynamic light scattering studies, that the synthetic amino acid was able to form supramolecular aggregates having a hydrodynamic diameter higher than 200 nm. Furthermore, we demonstrated, by UV and CD experiments, that the heteroaromatic amino acid, whose enzymatic stability was demonstrated by HPLC analysis also after 24 h of incubation in human serum, was able to bind a RNA complex, which is a feature of biomedical interest in view of innovative antiviral strategies based on modulation of RNA-RNA molecular recognition.

  8. Alanine substitution of conserved residues in the cytoplasmic tail of herpes simplex virus gB can enhance or abolish cell fusion activity and viral entry

    SciTech Connect

    Ruel, Nancy . E-mail: n-ruel@northwestern.edu; Zago, Anna . E-mail: anna_zago@acgtinc.com; Spear, Patricia G. . E-mail: p-spear@northwestern.edu

    2006-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoprotein B (gB) is one of the four viral glycoproteins required for viral entry and cell fusion and is highly conserved among herpesviruses. Mutants of HSV type 2 gB were generated by substituting conserved residues in the cytoplasmic tail with alanine or by deleting 41 amino acids from the C-terminus. Some of the mutations abolished cell fusion activity and also prevented transport of gB to the cell surface, identifying residues in the gB cytoplasmic tail that are critical for intracellular transport of this glycoprotein. These mutations also prevented production of infectious virus, possibly because the mutant forms of gB were not transported to the site of envelopment. Other mutations, particularly the deletion, significantly enhanced cell fusion activity. These mutations, as well as others described previously, identify regions of the gB cytoplasmic domain that modulate cell fusion activity.

  9. Novel CDC34 (UBC3) ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme mutants obtained by charge-to-alanine scanning mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Pitluk, Z W; McDonough, M; Sangan, P; Gonda, D K

    1995-03-01

    CDC34 (UBC3) encodes a ubiquitin-conjugating (E2) enzyme required for transition from the G1 phase to the S phase of the budding yeast cell cycle. CDC34 consists of a 170-residue catalytic N-terminal domain onto which is appended an acidic C-terminal domain. A portable determinant of cell cycle function resides in the C-terminal domain, but determinants for specific function must reside in the N-terminal domain as well. We have explored the utility of "charge-to-alanine" scanning mutagenesis to identify novel N-terminal domain mutants of CDC34 that are enzymatically competent with respect to unfacilitated (E3-independent) ubiquitination but that nevertheless are defective with respect to its cell cycle function. Such mutants may reveal determinants of specific in vivo function, such as those required for interaction with substrates or trans-acting regulators of activity and substrate selectivity. Three of 18 "single-scan" mutants (in which small clusters of charged residues were mutated to alanine) were compromised with respect to in vivo function. One mutant (cdc34-109, 111, 113A) targeted a 12-residue segment of the Cdc34 protein not found in most other E2s and was unable to complement a cdc34 null mutant at low copy numbers but could complement a null mutant when overexpressed from an induced GAL1 promoter. Combining adjacent pairs of single-scan mutants to produce "double-scan" mutants yielded four additional mutants, two of which showed heat and cold sensitivity conditional defects. Most of the mutant proteins expressed in Escheria coli displayed unfacilitated (E3-independent) ubiquitin-conjugating activity, but two mutants differed from wild-type and other mutant Cdc34 proteins in the extent of multiubiquitination they catalyzed during an autoubiquitination reation-conjugating enzyme function and have identified additional mutant alleles of CDC34 that will be valuable in further genetic and biochemical studies of Cdc34-dependent ubiquitination.

  10. Assessing functional diversity in the soybean β-substituted alanine synthase enzyme family.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hankuil; Jez, Joseph M

    2012-11-01

    In plants, proteins of the β-substituted alanine synthase (BSAS) enzyme family perform a diverse range of reactions, including formation of cysteine from O-acetylserine and sulfide, detoxification of cyanide by its addition to cysteine, the breakdown of cysteine into pyruvate, ammonia, and sulfide, and the synthesis of S-sulfocysteine. With the completed genome sequence of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv. Williams 82), the functional diversity of the BSAS in this highly duplicated plant species was examined to determine whether soybean BSAS enzymes catalyze the various reactions connected to cysteine metabolism. The 16 soybean BSAS can be grouped into clades that are similar to those observed in Arabidopsis. Biochemical analysis of soybean BSAS proteins demonstrate that enzymes of clades I and III function as O-acetylserine sulfhydrylases for cysteine synthesis, clade II encodes cysteine desulfhydrase activity, and that clade V proteins function as β-cyanoalanine synthase for cyanide detoxification. Although clade IV is similar to Arabidopsis S-sulfocysteine synthase, this activity was not detected in the soybean homolog. Overall, our results show that bioinformatics approach provides a useful method to assess the biochemical properties of BSAS enzymes in plant species.

  11. Assessment of Metabolic Changes in Mycobacterium smegmatis Wild-Type and alr Mutant Strains: Evidence of a New Pathway of d-Alanine Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Darrell D; Halouska, Steven; Zinniel, Denise K; Fenton, Robert J; Kenealy, Katie; Chahal, Harpreet K; Rathnaiah, Govardhan; Barletta, Raúl G; Powers, Robert

    2017-03-03

    In mycobacteria, d-alanine is an essential precursor for peptidoglycan biosynthesis. The only confirmed enzymatic pathway to form d-alanine is through the racemization of l-alanine by alanine racemase (Alr, EC 5.1.1.1). Nevertheless, the essentiality of Alr in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis for cell survivability in the absence of d-alanine has been a point of controversy with contradictory results reported in the literature. To address this issue, we examined the effects of alr inactivation on the cellular metabolism of M. smegmatis. The M. smegmatis alr insertion mutant TAM23 exhibited essentially identical growth to wild-type mc(2)155 in the absence of d-alanine. NMR metabolomics revealed drastically distinct phenotypes between mc(2)155 and TAM23. A metabolic switch was observed for TAM23 as a function of supplemented d-alanine. In the absence of d-alanine, the metabolic response directed carbon through an unidentified transaminase to provide the essential d-alanine required for survival. The process is reversed when d-alanine is available, in which the d-alanine is directed to peptidoglycan biosynthesis. Our results provide further support for the hypothesis that Alr is not an essential function of M. smegmatis and that specific Alr inhibitors will have no bactericidal action.

  12. Modulation of DNA-Polyamide Interaction by β-alanine Substitutions: A Study of Positional Effects on Binding Affinity, Kinetics and Thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuo; Aston, Karl; Koeller, Kevin J.; Harris, G. Davis; Rath, Nigam P.

    2014-01-01

    Hairpin polyamides (PAs) are an important class of sequence-specific DNA minor groove binders, and frequently employ a flexible motif, β-alanine (β), to reduce the molecular rigidity to maintain the DNA recognition register. To better understand the diverse effects β can have on DNA-PA binding affinity, selectivity, and especially kinetics, which have rarely been reported, we have initiated a detailed study for an eight-heterocyclic hairpin PA and its β derivatives with their cognate and mutant sequences. With these derivatives, all internal pyrroles of the parent PA are systematically substituted with single or double βs. A set of complementary experiments have been conducted to evaluate the molecular interactions in detail: UV-melting, biosensor-surface plasmon resonance, circular dichroism and isothermal titration calorimetry. The β substitutions generally weaken the binding affinities of these PAs with cognate DNA, and have large and diverse influences on PA binding kinetics in a position- and number-dependent manner. The DNA base mutations have also shown positional effects on binding of a single PA. Besides the β substitutions, the monocationic Dp group [3-(dimethylamino) propylamine] in parent PA has been modified into a dicationic Ta group (3, 3'-Diamino-N-methyldipropylamine) to minimize the frequently observed PA aggregation with ITC experiments. The results clearly show that the Ta modification not only maintains the DNA binding mode and affinity of PA, but also significantly reduces PA aggregation and allows the complete thermodynamic signature of eight-ring hairpin PA to be determined for the first time. This combined set of results significantly extends our understanding of the energetic basis of specific DNA recognition by PAs. PMID:25141096

  13. Modulation of DNA-polyamide interaction by β-alanine substitutions: a study of positional effects on binding affinity, kinetics and thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Aston, Karl; Koeller, Kevin J; Harris, G Davis; Rath, Nigam P; Bashkin, James K; Wilson, W David

    2014-10-14

    Hairpin polyamides (PAs) are an important class of sequence-specific DNA minor groove binders, and frequently employ a flexible motif, β-alanine (β), to reduce the molecular rigidity to maintain the DNA recognition register. To better understand the diverse effects that β can have on DNA-PA binding affinity, selectivity, and especially kinetics, which have rarely been reported, we have initiated a detailed study for an eight-heterocyclic hairpin PA and its β derivatives with their cognate and mutant sequences. With these derivatives, all internal pyrroles of the parent PA are systematically substituted with single or double βs. A set of complementary experiments have been conducted to evaluate the molecular interactions in detail: UV-melting, biosensor-surface plasmon resonance, circular dichroism and isothermal titration calorimetry. The β substitutions generally weaken the binding affinities of these PAs with cognate DNA, and have large and diverse influences on PA binding kinetics in a position- and number-dependent manner. The DNA base mutations have also shown positional effects on the binding of a single PA. Besides the β substitutions, the monocationic Dp group [3-(dimethylamino)propylamine] in parent PA has been modified into a dicationic Ta group (3,3'-diamino-N-methyldipropylamine) to minimize the frequently observed PA aggregation with ITC experiments. The results clearly show that the Ta modification not only maintains the DNA binding mode and affinity of PA, but also significantly reduces PA aggregation and allows the complete thermodynamic signature of eight-ring hairpin PA to be determined for the first time. This combined set of results significantly extends our understanding of the energetic basis of specific DNA recognition by PAs.

  14. Exploiting the right side of the Ramachandran plot: substitution of glycines by D-alanine can significantly increase protein stability.

    PubMed

    Anil, Burcu; Song, Benben; Tang, Yuefeng; Raleigh, Daniel P

    2004-10-20

    A major goal of protein engineering is the enhancement of protein stability. Here we demonstrate a rational method for enhancing the stability of globular proteins by targeting glycine residues which adopt conformations with Phi > 0. Replacement of such a glycine by d-alanine can lead to a significant increase in stability. The approach is tested at three sites in two model proteins. NMR and CD indicated that the substitutions do not alter the structure. Replacement of glycine-24 of the N-terminal domain of L9 (NTL9) with d-Ala results in an increase in stability of 1.3 kcal mol-1, while replacement of glycine-34 of NTL9 leads to an increase of 1.9 kcal mol-1. Replacement of glycine-331 of the UBA domain with d-Ala leads to an increase in stability of 0.6 kcal mol-1.

  15. Impact of charged amino acid substitution in the transmembrane domain of L-alanine exporter, AlaE, of Escherichia coli on the L-alanine export.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seryoung; Ihara, Kohei; Katsube, Satoshi; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Yoneyama, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    The Escherichia coli alaE gene encodes the L-alanine exporter, AlaE, that catalyzes active export of L-alanine using proton electrochemical potential. The transporter comprises only 149 amino acid residues and four predicted transmembrane domains (TMs), which contain three charged amino acid residues. The AlaE-deficient L-alanine non-metabolizing cells (ΔalaE cells) appeared hypersusceptible to L-alanyl-L-alanine showing a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 2.5 µg/ml for the dipeptide due to a toxic accumulation of L-alanine. To elucidate the mechanism by which AlaE exports L-alanine, we replaced charged amino acid residues in the TMs, glutamic acid-30 (TM-I), arginine-45 (TM-II), and aspartic acid-84 (TM-III) with their respective charge-conserved amino acid or a net neutral cysteine. The ΔalaE cells producing R45K or R45C appeared hypersusceptible to the dipeptide, indicating that arginine-45 is essential for AlaE activity. MIC of the dipeptide in the ΔalaE cells expressing E30D and E30C was 156 µg/ml and >10,000 µg/ml, respectively, thereby suggesting that a negative charge at this position is not essential. The ΔalaE cells expressing D84E or D84C showed an MIC >10,000 and 78 µg/ml, respectively, implying that a negative charge is required at this position. These results were generally consistent with that of the L-alanine accumulation experiments in intact cells. We therefore concluded that charged amino acid residues (R45 and D84) in the AlaE transmembrane domain play a pivotal role in L-alanine export. Replacement of three cysteine residues at C22, C28 (both in TM-I), and C135 (C-terminal region) with alanine showed only a marginal effect on L-alanine export.

  16. Identical substitutions in magnesium chelatase paralogs result in chlorophyll deficient soybean mutants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) chlorophyll deficient line MinnGold is a spontaneous mutant characterized by yellow foliage. Map-based cloning and transgenic complementation revealed that the mutant phenotype is caused by a non-synonymous nucleotide substitution in the third exon of a Mg-chelat...

  17. Unique food-entrained circadian rhythm in cysteine414-alanine mutant mCRY1 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Okano, Satoshi; Yasui, Akira; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi; Nakajima, Osamu

    Food availability is a potent environmental cue that directs circadian locomotor activity in rodents. Daily scheduled restricted feeding (RF), in which the food available time is restricted for several hours each day, elicits anticipatory activity. This food-anticipatory activity (FAA) is controlled by a food-entrainable oscillator (FEO) that is distinct from the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master pacemaker in mammals. In an earlier report, we described generation of transgenic (Tg) mice ubiquitously overexpressing cysteine414-alanine mutant mCRY1. The Tg mice displayed long locomotor free-running periods (approximately 28 h) with rhythm splitting. Furthermore, their locomotor activity immediately re-adjusted to the advance of light-dark cycles (LD), suggesting some disorder in the coupling of SCN neurons. The present study examined the restricted feeding cycle (RF)-induced entrainment of locomotor activity in Tg mice in various light conditions. In LD, wild-type controls showed both FAA and LD-entrained activities. In Tg mice, almost all activity was eventually consolidated to a single bout before the feeding time. The result suggests a possibility that in Tg mice the feeding cycle dominates the LD cycle as an entrainment agent. In constant darkness (DD), wild-type mice exhibited robust free-run activity and FAA during RF. For Tg mice, only the rhythm entrained to RF was observed in DD. Furthermore, after returning to free feeding, the free-run started from the RF-entrained phase. These results suggest that the SCN of Tg mice is entrainable to RF and that the mCRY1 mutation alters the sensitivity of SCN to the cycle of nonphotic zeitgebers.

  18. Protein linear indices of the 'macromolecular pseudograph alpha-carbon atom adjacency matrix' in bioinformatics. Part 1: prediction of protein stability effects of a complete set of alanine substitutions in Arc repressor.

    PubMed

    Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Medina-Marrero, Ricardo; Castillo-Garit, Juan A; Romero-Zaldivar, Vicente; Torrens, Francisco; Castro, Eduardo A

    2005-04-15

    A novel approach to bio-macromolecular design from a linear algebra point of view is introduced. A protein's total (whole protein) and local (one or more amino acid) linear indices are a new set of bio-macromolecular descriptors of relevance to protein QSAR/QSPR studies. These amino-acid level biochemical descriptors are based on the calculation of linear maps on Rn[f k(xmi):Rn-->Rn] in canonical basis. These bio-macromolecular indices are calculated from the kth power of the macromolecular pseudograph alpha-carbon atom adjacency matrix. Total linear indices are linear functional on Rn. That is, the kth total linear indices are linear maps from Rn to the scalar R[f k(xm):Rn-->R]. Thus, the kth total linear indices are calculated by summing the amino-acid linear indices of all amino acids in the protein molecule. A study of the protein stability effects for a complete set of alanine substitutions in the Arc repressor illustrates this approach. A quantitative model that discriminates near wild-type stability alanine mutants from the reduced-stability ones in a training series was obtained. This model permitted the correct classification of 97.56% (40/41) and 91.67% (11/12) of proteins in the training and test set, respectively. It shows a high Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC=0.952) for the training set and an MCC=0.837 for the external prediction set. Additionally, canonical regression analysis corroborated the statistical quality of the classification model (Rcanc=0.824). This analysis was also used to compute biological stability canonical scores for each Arc alanine mutant. On the other hand, the linear piecewise regression model compared favorably with respect to the linear regression one on predicting the melting temperature (tm) of the Arc alanine mutants. The linear model explains almost 81% of the variance of the experimental tm (R=0.90 and s=4.29) and the LOO press statistics evidenced its predictive ability (q2=0.72 and scv=4.79). Moreover, the

  19. Effect of substituting arginine and lysine with alanine on antimicrobial activity and the mechanism of action of a cationic dodecapeptide (CL(14-25)), a partial sequence of cyanate lyase from rice.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masayuki; Takahashi, Nobuteru; Takayanagi, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Atsuo; Ishiyama, Yohei; Saitoh, Eiichi; Kato, Tetsuo; Ochiai, Akihito; Tanaka, Takaaki

    2014-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of analogs obtained by substituting arginine and lysine in CL(14-25), a cationic α-helical dodecapeptide, with alanine against Porphyromonas gingivalis, a periodontal pathogen, varied significantly depending on the number and position of cationic amino acids. The alanine-substituted analogs had no hemolytic activity, even at a concentration of 1 mM. The antimicrobial activities of CL(K20A) and CL(K20A, K25A) were 3.8-fold and 9.1-fold higher, respectively, than that of CL(14-25). The antimicrobial activity of CL(R15A) was slightly lower than that of CL(14-25), suggesting that arginine at position 15 is not essential but is important for the antimicrobial activity. The experiments in which the alanine-substituted analogs bearing the replacement of arginine at position 24 and/or lysine at position 25 were used showed that arginine at position 24 was crucial for the antimicrobial activity whenever lysine at position 25 was substituted with alanine. Helical wheel projections of the alanine-substituted analogs indicate that the hydrophobicity in the vicinity of leucine at position 16 and alanines at positions 18 and/or 21 increased by substituting lysine at positions 20 and 25 with alanine, respectively. The degrees of diSC3 -5 release from P. gingivalis cells and disruption of GUVs induced by the alanine-substituted analogs with different positive charges were not closely related to their antimicrobial activities. The enhanced antimicrobial activities of the alanine-substituted analogs appear to be mainly attributable to the changes in properties such as hydrophobicity and amphipathic propensity due to alanine substitution and not to their extents of positive charge (cationicity).

  20. Apolipoprotein A-I mutant proteins having cysteine substitutions and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Oda, Michael N.; Forte, Trudy M.

    2007-05-29

    Functional Apolipoprotein A-I mutant proteins, having one or more cysteine substitutions and polynucleotides encoding same, can be used to modulate paraoxonase's arylesterase activity. These ApoA-I mutant proteins can be used as therapeutic agents to combat cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis, acute phase response and other inflammatory related diseases. The invention also includes modifications and optimizations of the ApoA-I nucleotide sequence for purposes of increasing protein expression and optimization.

  1. Dipeptide Nanotubes Containing Unnatural Fluorine-Substituted β(2,3)-Diarylamino Acid and L-Alanine as Candidates for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Andrea; Pellegrino, Sara; Das, Priyadip; Yuran, Sivan; Bucci, Raffaella; Ferri, Nicola; Meneghetti, Fiorella; Castellano, Carlo; Reches, Meital; Gelmi, Maria Luisa

    2015-09-18

    The synthesis and the structural characterization of dipeptides composed of unnatural fluorine-substituted β(2,3)-diarylamino acid and L-alanine are reported. Depending on the stereochemistry of the β amino acid, these dipeptides are able to self-assemble into proteolytic stable nanotubes. These architectures were able to enter the cell and locate in the cytoplasmic/perinuclear region and represent interesting candidates for biomedical applications.

  2. Pleiotropic effects of hemagglutinin amino acid substitutions of H5 influenza escape mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Rudneva, Irina A.; Timofeeva, Tatiana A.; Ignatieva, Anna V.; Shilov, Aleksandr A.; Krylov, Petr S.; Ilyushina, Natalia A.; Kaverin, Nikolai V.

    2013-12-15

    In the present study we assessed pleiotropic characteristics of the antibody-selected mutations. We examined pH optimum of fusion, temperatures of HA heat inactivation, and in vitro and in vivo replication kinetics of the previously obtained influenza H5 escape mutants. Our results showed that HA1 N142K mutation significantly lowered the pH of fusion optimum. Mutations of the escape mutants located in the HA lateral loop significantly affected H5 HA thermostability (P<0.05). HA changes at positions 131, 144, 145, and 156 and substitutions at positions 131, 142, 145, and 156 affected the replicative ability of H5 escape mutants in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Overall, a co-variation between antigenic specificity and different HA phenotypic properties has been demonstrated. We believe that the monitoring of pleiotropic effects of the HA mutations found in H5 escape mutants is essential for accurate prediction of mutants with pandemic potential. - Highlights: • HA1 N142K mutation significantly lowered the pH of fusion optimum. • Mutations located in the HA lateral loop significantly affected H5 HA thermostability. • HA changes at positions 131, 142, 144, 145, and 156 affected the replicative ability of H5 mutants. • Acquisition of glycosylation site could lead to the emergence of multiple pleiotropic effects.

  3. Limits of cooperativity in a structurally modular protein: response of the Notch ankyrin domain to analogous alanine substitutions in each repeat.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Christina Marchetti; Barrick, Doug

    2002-11-22

    To determine the limits of cooperativity in a structurally modular protein, we characterized the structure and stability of glycine variants of the ankyrin repeat domain from the Drosophila melangaster Notch receptor. The substitutions are of analogous alanine residues to glycine in each repeat, and allow the same perturbation to be examined at different positions in the protein. The ankyrin domain is insensitive to substitution in repeat one, suggesting that the first repeat is not fully-folded. Glycine substitutions in repeat two through seven are strongly destabilizing, but the variants retain their overall secondary and tertiary structures. Spectroscopic and calorimetric data are consistent with two-state unfolding transitions for the repeat-two through repeat-five glycine variants, and for the wild-type protein. These data indicate that, despite its modular structure, the Notch ankyrin domain unfolds as a cooperative unit consisting of the six C-terminal repeats, and that this cooperativity is maintained in the presence of severely destabilizing substitutions in the N-terminal and central repeats. In contrast, glycine substitution in repeat six leads to a multi-state unfolding transition, suggesting that the coupling that gives rise to long-range cooperativity in the wild-type protein may have a weak link in the C-terminal region. Such behavior is captured by a simple statistical thermodynamic model in which an unstable C-terminal region is coupled to a stable N-terminal region through a strongly stabilizing interface.

  4. Structural analysis and mutant growth properties reveal distinctive enzymatic and cellular roles for the three major L-alanine transaminases of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Peña-Soler, Esther; Fernandez, Francisco J; López-Estepa, Miguel; Garces, Fernando; Richardson, Andrew J; Quintana, Juan F; Rudd, Kenneth E; Coll, Miquel; Vega, M Cristina

    2014-01-01

    In order to maintain proper cellular function, the metabolism of the bacterial microbiota presents several mechanisms oriented to keep a correctly balanced amino acid pool. Central components of these mechanisms are enzymes with alanine transaminase activity, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes that interconvert alanine and pyruvate, thereby allowing the precise control of alanine and glutamate concentrations, two of the most abundant amino acids in the cellular amino acid pool. Here we report the 2.11-Å crystal structure of full-length AlaA from the model organism Escherichia coli, a major bacterial alanine aminotransferase, and compare its overall structure and active site composition with detailed atomic models of two other bacterial enzymes capable of catalyzing this reaction in vivo, AlaC and valine-pyruvate aminotransferase (AvtA). Apart from a narrow entry channel to the active site, a feature of this new crystal structure is the role of an active site loop that closes in upon binding of substrate-mimicking molecules, and which has only been previously reported in a plant enzyme. Comparison of the available structures indicates that beyond superficial differences, alanine aminotransferases of diverse phylogenetic origins share a universal reaction mechanism that depends on an array of highly conserved amino acid residues and is similarly regulated by various unrelated motifs. Despite this unifying mechanism and regulation, growth competition experiments demonstrate that AlaA, AlaC and AvtA are not freely exchangeable in vivo, suggesting that their functional repertoire is not completely redundant thus providing an explanation for their independent evolutionary conservation.

  5. Arachnoid cyst and chronic subdural haematoma in a child with osteogenesis imperfecta type III resulting from the substitution of glycine 1006 by alanine in the pro alpha 2(I) chain of type I procollagen.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, W G; Lam, T P

    1996-01-01

    The features of a child with osteogenesis imperfecta type III (OI III) resulting from the heterozygous substitution of glycine 1006 by alanine in the pro alpha 2(I) chain of type I procollagen were studied. He was born at term with the clinical features of severe OI, including deep grey-blue sclerae. He had severe osteopenia and all long bones were smaller than normal with cortical thinning, metaphyseal expansion, poor metaphyseal modelling, and multiple fractures. However, the vertebrae, pelvis, and shoulder girdle were of normal shape and there were few rib fractures. Histological examination of the calvarium and tibial shaft showed woven bone without lamellar bone or Haversian systems. The shafts of the long bones were widened owing to repeated fractures. Progressive enlargement of the calvarium occurred between 3 and 4.5 months of age owing to bilateral chronic subdural haematomata and a large arachnoid cyst in the Sylvian fissure. The cyst was probably developmental in origin while the subdural collections were probably the result of perinatal skull trauma. The cyst and the subdural collections resolved following drainage but ventricular dilatation with normal cerebrospinal fluid pressure followed. The proband is the first reported case of OI with a glycine substitution by alanine in the pro alpha 2(I) chain of type I procollagen. Images PMID:8728690

  6. Citrate substitutes for homocitrate in nitrogenase of a nifV mutant of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Jihong; Madden, M.; Shah, V.K.; Burris, R.H. )

    1990-09-18

    An organic acid extracted from purified dinitrogenase isolated from a nifV mutant of Klebsiella pneumoniae has been identified as citric acid. H{sub 2} evolution by the citrate-containing dinitrogenase is partially inhibited by CO, and by some substrates for nitrogenase. The response of maximum velocities to changes in pH for both the wild-type and the NifV{sup {minus}} dinitrogenase was compared. No substantial differences between the enzymes were observed, but there are minor differences. Both enzymes are stable in the pH range 4.8-10, but the enzyme activities dropped dramatically below pH 6.2.

  7. Substituted tetrahydroquinolines as potent allosteric inhibitors of reverse transcriptase and its key mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Dai-Shi; Lim, John J.; Tinney, Elizabeth; Wan, Bang-Lin; Young, Mary Beth; Anderson, Kenneth D.; Rudd, Deanne; Munshi, Vandna; Bahnck, Carolyn; Felock, Peter J.; Lu, Meiqing; Lai, Ming-Tain; Touch, Sinoeun; Moyer, Gregory; DiStefano, Daniel J.; Flynn, Jessica A.; Liang, Yuexia; Sanchez, Rosa; Prasad, Sridhar; Yan, Youwei; Perlow-Poehnelt, Rebecca; Torrent, Maricel; Miller, Mike; Vacca, Joe P.; Williams, Theresa M.; Anthony, Neville J.; Merck

    2010-09-27

    Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are key elements of multidrug regimens, called HAART (Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy), that are used to treat HIV-1 infections. Elucidation of the structure-activity relationships of the thiocarbamate moiety of the previous published lead compound 2 provided a series of novel tetrahydroquinoline derivatives as potent inhibitors of HIV-1 RT with nanomolar intrinsic activity on the WT and key mutant enzymes and potent antiviral activity in infected cells. The SAR optimization, mutation profiles, preparation of compounds, and pharmacokinetic profile of compounds are described.

  8. Stereospecific suppression of active site mutants by methylphosphonate substituted substrates reveals the stereochemical course of site-specific DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Paul A; Kachroo, Aashiq H; Ma, Chien-Hui; Maciaszek, Anna D; Guga, Piotr; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2015-07-13

    Tyrosine site-specific recombinases, which promote one class of biologically important phosphoryl transfer reactions in DNA, exemplify active site mechanisms for stabilizing the phosphate transition state. A highly conserved arginine duo (Arg-I; Arg-II) of the recombinase active site plays a crucial role in this function. Cre and Flp recombinase mutants lacking either arginine can be rescued by compensatory charge neutralization of the scissile phosphate via methylphosphonate (MeP) modification. The chemical chirality of MeP, in conjunction with mutant recombinases, reveals the stereochemical contributions of Arg-I and Arg-II. The SP preference of the native reaction is specified primarily by Arg-I. MeP reaction supported by Arg-II is nearly bias-free or RP-biased, depending on the Arg-I substituent. Positional conservation of the arginines does not translate into strict functional conservation. Charge reversal by glutamic acid substitution at Arg-I or Arg-II has opposite effects on Cre and Flp in MeP reactions. In Flp, the base immediately 5' to the scissile MeP strongly influences the choice between the catalytic tyrosine and water as the nucleophile for strand scission, thus between productive recombination and futile hydrolysis. The recombinase active site embodies the evolutionary optimization of interactions that not only favor the normal reaction but also proscribe antithetical side reactions.

  9. Unique Aspects of Cryptochrome in Chronobiology and Metabolism, Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction, and Regeneration: Research into Cysteine414-Alanine Mutant CRY1

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochrome proteins (CRYs), which can bind noncovalently to cofactor (chromophore) flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), occur widely among organisms. CRYs play indispensable roles in the generation of circadian rhythm in mammals. Transgenic mice (Tg mice), ubiquitously expressing mouse CRY1 having a mutation in which cysteine414 (the zinc-binding site of CRY1) being replaced with alanine, display unique phenotypes in their circadian rhythms. Moreover, male Tg mice exhibit symptoms of diabetes characterized by beta-cell dysfunction, resembling human maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY). The lowered proliferation of β-cells is a primary cause of age-dependent β-cell loss. Furthermore, unusually enlarged duct-like structures developed prominently in the Tg mice pancreases. The duct-like structures contained insulin-positive cells, suggesting neogenesis of β-cells in the Tg mice. This review, based mainly on the author's investigation of the unique features of Tg mice, presents reported results and recent findings related to molecular processes associated with mammalian cryptochromes, especially their involvement in the regulation of metabolism. New information is described with emphasis on the aspects of islet architecture, pancreatic β-cell dysfunction, and regeneration. PMID:28105441

  10. Role of Intramolecular Aromatic π-π Interactions in the Self-Assembly of Di-l-Phenylalanine Dipeptide Driven by Intermolecular Interactions: Effect of Alanine Substitution.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Samala Murali Mohan; Shanmugam, Ganesh

    2016-09-19

    Although the role of intermolecular aromatic π-π interactions in the self-assembly of di-l-phenylalanine (l-Phe-l-Phe, FF), a peptide that is known for hierarchical structure, is well established, the influence of intramolecular π-π interactions on the morphology of the self-assembled structure of FF has not been studied. Herein, the role of intramolecular aromatic π-π interactions is investigated for FF and analogous alanine (Ala)-containing dipeptides, namely, l-Phe-l-Ala (FA) and l-Ala-l-Phe (AF). The results reveal that these dipeptides not only form self-assemblies, but also exhibit remarkable differences in structural morphology. The morphological differences between FF and the analogues indicate the importance of intramolecular π-π interactions, and the structural difference between FA and AF demonstrates the crucial role of the nature of intramolecular side-chain interactions (aromatic-aliphatic or aliphatic-aromatic), in addition to intermolecular interactions, in deciding the final morphology of the self-assembled structure. The current results emphasise that intramolecular aromatic π-π interaction may not be essential to induce self-assembly in smaller peptides, and π (aromatic)-alkyl or alkyl-π (aromatic) interactions may be sufficient. This work also illustrates the versatility of aromatic and a combination of aromatic and aliphatic residues in dipeptides in the formation of structurally diverse self-assembled structures.

  11. Alanine or aspartic acid substitutions at serine23/24 of cardiac troponin I decrease thin filament activation, with no effect on crossbridge detachment kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Mamidi, Ranganath; Gollapudi, Sampath K.; Mallampalli, Sri Lakshmi; Chandra, Murali

    2012-01-01

    Ala/Asp substitutions at Ser23/24 have been employed to investigate the functional impact of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA). Some limitations of previous studies include the use of heterologous proteins and confounding effects arising from phosphorylation of cardiac myosin binding protein-C. Our goal was to probe the effects of cTnI phosphorylation using a homologous assay, so that altered function could be solely attributed to changes in cTnI. We reconstituted detergent-skinned rat cardiac papillary fibers with homologous rat cardiac troponin subunits to study the impact of Ala and Asp substitutions at Ser23/24 of rat cTnI (RcTnI S23A/24A and RcTnI S23D/24D). Both RcTnI S23A/24A and RcTnI S23D/24D showed a ~36% decrease in Ca2+-activated maximal tension. Both RcTnI S23A/24A and RcTnI S23D/24D showed a ~18% decrease in ATPase activity. Muscle fiber stiffness measurements suggested that the decrease in thin filament activation observed in RcTnI S23A/24A and RcTnI S23D/24D was due to a decrease in the number of strongly-bound crossbridges. Another major finding was that Ala and Asp substitutions in cTnI did not affect crossbridge detachment kinetics. PMID:22684024

  12. Biological characteristics comparison of HBV rtA181T mutants with truncated or substituted HBsAg expression in vitro and in vivo model systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ling-Yun; Chen, En-Qiang; Wang, Meng-Lan; Chen, Lan-Lan; Liu, Cui-Ping; Zeng, Fan; Tang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus(HBV) polymerase rtA181T mutation is selected during long-term antiviral therapy. As the polymerase gene completely overlaps with the envelope (S) gene, HBV rtA181T mutation also carries sW172 mutations. In this study, we investigated whether there were biological differences between rtA181T/sW172* (coding truncated HBsAg) and rtA181T/sW172L (coding substituted HBsAg) mutants. In cell experiments, a slight decline of viral replication was observed in both two mutants as compared to wild-type strains, but the levels of supernatant HBsAg and HBV DNA in rtA181T/sW172* were significantly lower than those in rtA181T/sW172L transfected cells. In animal experiments, we were amazed to find that viral replication in rtA181T/sW172* mutant increased and maintained significantly longer than that in rtA181T/sW172L mutant, while no significant difference was observed between rtA181T/sW172L and wild-type strains. Compared with wild-type strains, there were intracellular accumulations of HBsAg and HBcAg in rtA181/sW172* but none in rtA181/sW172L mutant strains. Importantly, we also found that truncated HBsAg could increase the activity of HBV core promoter, but substituted HBsAg could not. In summary, the characteristics of above two rtA181T mutants mentioned above were significantly different, and it is necessary and important for us to distinguish sW172* truncated mutation from sW172L substituted mutation. PMID:27976732

  13. Thermodynamics of protein denaturation at temperatures over 100 °C: CutA1 mutant proteins substituted with hydrophobic and charged residues.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Yoshinori; Takehira, Michiyo; Joti, Yasumasa; Ogasahara, Kyoko; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Ono, Naoko; Kunishima, Naoki; Yutani, Katsuhide

    2015-10-26

    Although the thermodynamics of protein denaturation at temperatures over 100 °C is essential for the rational design of highly stable proteins, it is not understood well because of the associated technical difficulties. We designed certain hydrophobic mutant proteins of CutA1 from Escherichia coli, which have denaturation temperatures (Td) ranging from 101 to 113 °C and show a reversible heat denaturation. Using a hydrophobic mutant as a template, we successfully designed a hyperthermostable mutant protein (Td = 137 °C) by substituting six residues with charged ones. Thermodynamic analyses of these mutant proteins indicated that the hydrophobic mutants were stabilized by the accumulation of denaturation enthalpy (ΔH) with no entropic gain from hydrophobic solvation around 100 °C, and that the stabilization due to salt bridges resulted from both the increase in ΔH from ion-ion interactions and the entropic effect of the electrostatic solvation over 113 °C. This is the first experimental evidence that has successfully overcome the typical technical difficulties.

  14. Alanine water complexes.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, Vanesa; Sanz, M Eugenia; Peña, Isabel; Mata, Santiago; Cabezas, Carlos; López, Juan C; Alonso, José L

    2014-04-10

    Two complexes of alanine with water, alanine-(H2O)n (n = 1,2), have been generated by laser ablation of the amino acid in a supersonic jet containing water vapor and characterized using Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. In the observed complexes, water molecules bind to the carboxylic group of alanine acting as both proton donors and acceptors. In alanine-H2O, the water molecule establishes two intermolecular hydrogen bonds forming a six-membered cycle, while in alanine-(H2O)2 the two water molecules establish three hydrogen bonds forming an eight-membered ring. In both complexes, the amino acid moiety is in its neutral form and shows the conformation observed to be the most stable for the bare molecule. The microsolvation study of alanine-(H2O)n (n = 1,2) can be taken as a first step toward understanding bulk properties at a microscopic level.

  15. Degradation and adsorption characteristics of PHB depolymerase as revealed by kinetics of mutant enzymes with amino acid substitution in substrate-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Hiraishi, Tomohiro; Komiya, Naoya; Matsumoto, Nobuhiko; Abe, Hideki; Fujita, Masahiro; Maeda, Mizuo

    2010-01-11

    Extracelluar Poly[(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB) depolymerase (PhaZ(RpiT1)) from Ralstonia pickettii T1 adsorbs to PHB surface via its substrate-binding domain (SBD) to enhance PHB degradation. Our previous study combining PCR random mutagenesis with the determination of PHB degradation levels of mutant enzymes suggested that Ser, Tyr, Val, Ala, and Leu residues in SBD are probably involved in the enzymatic adsorption to and degradation of PHB. In the present study, the effects of mutations at Leu441, Tyr443, and Ser445 on PHB degradation were investigated because these residues were predicted to form a beta-sheet structure and orient in the same direction to interact possibly directly with the PHB surface. Purified L441H, Y443H, and S445C mutant enzymes were prepared, and their CD spectra and hydrolytic activities for water-soluble substrates were found to be identical to those of wild-type enzyme, indicating that these mutations have no influence on their structures and their ability to cleave the ester bond. In contrast, the PHB-degrading activity of these mutants differed from that of the wild type: L441H and Y443H enzymes had lower PHB-degrading activity than their wild-type counterpart, whereas S445C had higher activity. Kinetic analysis of PHB degradation by the mutants suggested that the hydrophobic residues at these positions are important for the enzyme adsorption to the PHB surface, and such substitutions as Y443H and S445C may more effectively disrupt the PHB surface to enhance the hydrolysis of PHB polymer chains than the wild-type enzyme. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis revealed that the three substitutions mentioned above altered the association phase rather than the dissociation phase in the enzyme adsorption to the polymer surface.

  16. A transitional hydrolase to glycosynthase mutant by Glu to Asp substitution at the catalytic nucleophile in a retaining glycosidase.

    PubMed

    Aragunde, Hugo; Castilla, Estela; Biarnés, Xevi; Faijes, Magda; Planas, Antoni

    2014-05-07

    Glycosynthases from more than 16 glycosidase families have been developed for the efficient synthesis of oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates. β-1,3-1,4-Glucan oligo- and polysaccharides with defined sequences can be quantitatively achieved with the glycosynthases derived from Bacillus licheniformis β-1,3-1,4-glucanase. The screening of a nucleophile saturation library of this enzyme yielded the unexpected E134D mutant which has high glycosynthase efficiency (25% higher kcat than the best glycosynthase to date, E134S) but also retains some hydrolase activity (2% relative to the wild-type enzyme). Here, we report the biochemical and structural analyses of this mutant compared to E134S and wild-type enzymes. E134D shows a pH profile of general base catalysis for the glycosynthase activity, with a kinetic pKa (on kcat/KM) assigned to Glu138 of 5.8, whereas the same residue acts as a general acid in the hydrolase activity with the same pKa value. The pKa of Glu138 in the wt enzyme was 7.0, a high value due to the presence of the catalytic nucleophile Glu134 which destabilizes the conjugate base of Glu138. Thus, the pKa of Glu138 drops 1.1 pH units in the mutant relative to the wild-type enzyme meaning that the larger distance between carboxylates in positions 138 and 134 (5.6Å for wt, 7.0Å for E134D) and/or a new hydrogen bonding interaction with a third Asp residue (Asp136) in the mutant reduces the effect of the negatively charged Asp134. In consequence, the pKa of Glu138 has a similar pKa value in the E134D mutant than in the other glycosynthase mutants having a neutral residue in position 134. The behavior of the E134D mutant shows that shortening the side chain of the nucleophile, despite maintaining a carboxylate group, confers glycosynthase activity. Therefore E134D is a transitional hydrolase to glycosynthase mutation.

  17. Evidence for Modified Mechanisms of Chloroethene Oxidation in Pseudomonas butanovora Mutants Containing Single Amino Acid Substitutions in the Hydroxylase α-Subunit of Butane Monooxygenase▿

    PubMed Central

    Halsey, Kimberly H.; Doughty, David M.; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A.; Bottomley, Peter J.; Arp, Daniel J.

    2007-01-01

    The properties of oxidation of dichloroethene (DCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) by three mutant strains of Pseudomonas butanovora containing single amino acid substitutions in the α-subunit of butane monooxygenase hydroxylase (BMOH-α) were compared to the properties of the wild-type strain (Rev WT). The rates of oxidation of three chloroethenes (CEs) were reduced in mutant strain G113N and corresponded with a lower maximum rate of butane oxidation. The rate of TCE degradation was reduced by one-half in mutant strain L279F, whereas the rates of DCE oxidation were the same as those in Rev WT. Evidence was obtained that the composition of products of CE oxidation differed between Rev WT and some of the mutant strains. For example, while Rev WT released nearly all available chlorine stoichiometrically during CE oxidation, strain F321Y released about 40% of the chlorine during 1,2-cis-DCE and TCE oxidation, and strain G113N released between 14 and 25% of the available chlorine during oxidation of DCE and 56% of the available chlorine during oxidation of TCE. Whereas Rev WT, strain L279F, and strain F321Y formed stoichiometric amounts of 1,2-cis-DCE epoxide during oxidation of 1,2-cis-DCE, only about 50% of the 1,2-cis-DCE oxidized by strain G113N was detected as the epoxide. Evidence was obtained that 1,2-cis-DCE epoxide was a substrate for butane monooxygenase (BMO) that was oxidized after the parent compound was consumed. Yet all of the mutant strains released less than 40% of the available 1,2-cis-DCE chlorine, suggesting that they have altered activity towards the epoxide. In addition, strain G113N was unable to degrade the epoxide. TCE epoxide was detected during exposure of Rev WT and strain F321Y to TCE but was not detected with strains L279F and G113N. Lactate-dependent O2 uptake rates were differentially affected by DCE degradation in the mutant strains, providing evidence that some products released by the altered BMOs reduced the impact of CE on cellular

  18. A porcine circovirus-2 mutant isolated in Brazil contains low-frequency substitutions in regions of immunoprotective epitopes in the capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Rafael Locatelli; Vidigal, Pedro Marcus Pereira; Gonzaga, Natalia F; de Souza, Luiz F L; Polêto, Marcelo D; Onofre, Thiago Souza; Eller, Monique R; Pereira, Carlos Eduardo Real; Fietto, Juliana L R; Bressan, Gustavo C; Guedes, Roberto M C; Almeida, Márcia R; Silva Júnior, Abelardo

    2015-11-01

    Porcine circovirus-2 (PCV2) is the etiologic agent of several diseases in pigs, including multi-systemic wasting syndrome (PMWS). In this work, a new mutant PCV2b was isolated from PMWS-affected pigs on a Brazilian farm. Its genome showed high sequence similarity (>99% identity) to those from a group of emerging mutants isolated from cases of PMWS outbreaks in vaccinated pigs in China, the USA and South Korea. Here, we show that these isolates share a combination of low-frequency substitutions (single amino acid polymorphisms with a frequency of ≤25%) in the viral capsid protein, mainly in regions of immunoprotective epitopes, and an additional lysine residue at position 234. These isolates were phylogenetically grouped in the PCV2b clade, reinforcing the idea of the emergence of a new group of mutants PCV2b associated with outbreaks worldwide. The identification of these polymorphisms in the viral capsid highlights the importance of considering these isolates for the development of more-effective vaccines.

  19. Role of the "helix clamp" in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase catalytic cycling as revealed by alanine-scanning mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Beard, W A; Minnick, D T; Wade, C L; Prasad, R; Won, R L; Kumar, A; Kunkel, T A; Wilson, S H

    1996-05-24

    Residues 259-284 of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase exhibit sequence homology with other nucleic acid polymerases and have been termed the "helix clamp" (Hermann, T., Meier, T., Gotte, M., and Heumann, H. (1994) Nucleic Acids Res. 22, 4625-4633), since crystallographic evidence indicates these residues are part of two alpha-helices (alpha H and alpha I) that interact with DNA. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis has previously demonstrated that several residues in alpha H make important interactions with nucleic acid and influence frameshift fidelity. To define the role of alpha I (residues 278-286) during catalytic cycling, we performed systematic site-directed mutagenesis from position 277 through position 287 by changing each residue, one by one, to alanine. Each mutant protein was expressed and, except for L283A and T286A, was soluble. The soluble mutant enzymes were purified and characterized. In contrast to alanine mutants of alpha H, alanine substitution in alpha I did not have a significant effect on template.primer (T.P) binding as revealed by a lack of an effect on Km, T.P, Ki for 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine 5'-triphosphate, koff, T.P and processivity. Consistent with these observations, the fidelity of the mutant enzymes was not influenced. However, alanine mutagenesis of alpha I lowered the apparent activity of every mutant relative to wild-type enzyme. Titration of two mutants exhibiting the lowest activity with T.P (L282A and R284A) demonstrated that these mutant enzymes could bind T.P stoichiometrically and tightly. In contrast, active site concentrations determined from "burst" experiments suggest that the lower activity is due to a smaller populations of enzyme bound productively to T.P. The putative electrostatic interactions between the basic side chains of the helix clamp and the DNA backbone are either very weak or kinetically silent. In contrast, interactions between several residues of alpha H and the DNA minor groove, 3-5 nucleotides from the 3

  20. GBF/Gea mutant with a single substitution sustains fungal growth in the absence of BIG/Sec7.

    PubMed

    Arst, Herbert N; Hernandez-Gonzalez, Miguel; Peñalva, Miguel A; Pantazopoulou, Areti

    2014-12-20

    Golgi Arf1-guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) belong to two subfamilies: GBF/Gea and BIG/Sec7. Both are conserved across eukaryotes, but the physiological role of each is not well understood. Aspergillus nidulans has a single member of the early Golgi GBF/Gea-subfamily, geaA, and the late Golgi BIG/Sec7-subfamily, hypB. Both geaA and hypB are essential. hypB5 conditionally blocks secretion. We sought extragenic hypB5 suppressors and obtained geaA1. geaA1 results in Tyr1022Cys within a conserved GBF/Gea-specific S(Y/W/F)(L/I) motif in GeaA. This mutation alters GeaA localization. Remarkably, geaA1 suppresses hypBΔ, indicating that a single mutant Golgi Arf1-GEF suffices for growth.

  1. Alanine scan of core positions in ubiquitin reveals links between dynamics, stability, and function.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shirley Y; Pullen, Lester; Virgil, Daniel J; Castañeda, Carlos A; Abeykoon, Dulith; Bolon, Daniel N A; Fushman, David

    2014-04-03

    Mutations at solvent-inaccessible core positions in proteins can impact function through many biophysical mechanisms including alterations to thermodynamic stability and protein dynamics. As these properties of proteins are difficult to investigate, the impacts of core mutations on protein function are poorly understood for most systems. Here, we determined the effects of alanine mutations at all 15 core positions in ubiquitin on function in yeast. The majority (13 of 15) of alanine substitutions supported yeast growth as the sole ubiquitin. Both the two null mutants (I30A and L43A) were less stable to temperature-induced unfolding in vitro than wild type (WT) but were well folded at physiological temperatures. Heteronuclear NMR studies indicated that the L43A mutation reduces temperature stability while retaining a ground-state structure similar to WT. This structure enables L43A to bind to common ubiquitin receptors in vitro. Many of the core alanine ubiquitin mutants, including one of the null variants (I30A), exhibited an increased accumulation of high-molecular-weight species, suggesting that these mutants caused a defect in the processing of ubiquitin-substrate conjugates. In contrast, L43A exhibited a unique accumulation pattern with reduced levels of high-molecular-weight species and undetectable levels of free ubiquitin. When conjugation to other proteins was blocked, L43A ubiquitin accumulated as free ubiquitin in yeast. Based on these findings, we speculate that ubiquitin's stability to unfolding may be required for efficient recycling during proteasome-mediated substrate degradation.

  2. Toxicology studies with recombinant staphylokinase and with SY 161-P5, a polyethylene glycol-derivatized cysteine-substitution mutant.

    PubMed

    Moons, L; Vanlinthout, I; Roelants, I; Moreadith, R; Collen, D; Rapold, H J

    2001-01-01

    SY 161-P5, a polyethylene glycol derivatized (PEGylated) mutant of the recombinant Staphylokinase (rSak) variant SakSTAR, exhibiting reduced antigenicity is in clinical development for treatment of acute myocardial infarction as a single bolus injection. A series of safety studies were performed in vivo as a routine toxicology program with SY 161-P5 (PEG-rSakSTAR) and with the recombinant Staphylokinase variant Sak42D (rSak42D). For both compounds, intravenous single bolus injections of up to 100-fold therapeutic equivalent, as well as repeated injections during 7 to 28 days revealed no significant pathological findings in mice, rats or hamsters. However, New Zealand white rabbits developed clinically silent, multifocal myocarditis following single or repeat doses of SY 161-P5 or of Sak42D. These findings were dose-independent and reversible. A similar species-specific cardiotoxic effect has previously been described for other proteolytic proteins, including the approved drugs Streptokinase and Acetylated Plasminogen Streptokinase Complex (APSAC). The large experience with these drugs, as well as the clinical data accumulated both with PEGylated and non-PEGylated rSak variants to date, do not indicate cardiotoxic hazards associated with the use of these drugs in humans.

  3. Inducible l-Alanine Exporter Encoded by the Novel Gene ygaW (alaE) in Escherichia coli ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Hatsuhiro; Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Tobe, Ryuta; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Katsumata, Ryoichi

    2011-01-01

    We previously isolated a mutant hypersensitive to l-alanyl-l-alanine from a non-l-alanine-metabolizing Escherichia coli strain and found that it lacked an inducible l-alanine export system. Consequently, this mutant showed a significant accumulation of intracellular l-alanine and a reduction in the l-alanine export rate compared to the parent strain. When the mutant was used as a host to clone a gene(s) that complements the dipeptide-hypersensitive phenotype, two uncharacterized genes, ygaW and ytfF, and two characterized genes, yddG and yeaS, were identified. Overexpression of each gene in the mutant resulted in a decrease in the intracellular l-alanine level and enhancement of the l-alanine export rate in the presence of the dipeptide, suggesting that their products function as exporters of l-alanine. Since ygaW exhibited the most striking impact on both the intra- and the extracellular l-alanine levels among the four genes identified, we disrupted the ygaW gene in the non-l-alanine-metabolizing strain. The resulting isogenic mutant showed the same intra- and extracellular l-alanine levels as observed in the dipeptide-hypersensitive mutant obtained by chemical mutagenesis. When each gene was overexpressed in the wild-type strain, which does not intrinsically excrete alanine, only the ygaW gene conferred on the cells the ability to excrete alanine. In addition, expression of the ygaW gene was induced in the presence of the dipeptide. On the basis of these results, we concluded that YgaW is likely to be the physiologically most relevant exporter for l-alanine in E. coli and proposed that the gene be redesignated alaE for alanine export. PMID:21531828

  4. An arginine to lysine substitution in the bZIP domain of an opaque-2 mutant in maize abolishes specific DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Aukerman, M J; Schmidt, R J; Burr, B; Burr, F A

    1991-02-01

    The opaque-2 (o2) locus in maize encodes a transcription factor involved in the regulation of zein storage proteins. We have shown previously that the O2 protein contains a leucine zipper domain that binds to promoters of 22-kD zein genes. In this paper we characterize an EMS-induced o2 allele, o2-676, that causes a 50% reduction in zein. We have found that the o2-676 mutant protein does not show specific recognition of zein promoter fragments because of the substitution of a lysine residue for an arginine residue within the bZIP domain of o2-676. This particular arginine is conserved within the bZIP domains of all mammalian, fungal, and plant DNA binding proteins of this class. The correlation between this mutation in o2 and the altered pattern of zein expression strongly suggests that O2 regulates transcription of certain members of the zein multigene family through direct interaction with the zein promoters and not through the transcriptional activation of some other regulator of zein gene expression.

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of three recombinant mutants of Vaccinia virus uracil DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Sartmatova, Darika; Nash, Taishayla; Schormann, Norbert; Nuth, Manunya; Ricciardi, Robert; Banerjee, Surajit; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2013-03-01

    Amino-acid residues located at a highly flexible area in the uracil DNA glycosylase of Vaccinia virus were mutated. In the crystal structure of wild-type D4 these residues lie at the dimer interface. Specifically, three mutants were generated: (i) residue Arg167 was replaced with an alanine (R167AD4), (ii) residues Glu171, Ser172 and Pro173 were substituted with three glycine residues (3GD4) and (iii) residues Glu171 and Ser172 were deleted (Δ171-172D4). Mutant proteins were expressed, purified and crystallized in order to investigate the effects of these mutations on the structure of the protein.

  6. Limited effect on NS3-NS4A protein cleavage after alanine substitutions within the immunodominant HLA-A2-restricted epitope of the hepatitis C virus genotype 3a non-structural 3/4A protease.

    PubMed

    Ahlén, Gustaf; Chen, Antony; Roe, Barbara; Falkeborn, Tina; Frelin, Lars; Hall, William W; Sällberg, Matti; Söderholm, Jonas

    2012-08-01

    It has been well established that immunological escape mutations within the hepatitis C virus genotype (gt) 1a non-structural (NS) 3/4A protease are partly prevented by a reduction in viral protease fitness. Surprisingly little is known about whether similar mutations affect proteases from other genotypes. In the present study, we assessed both the HLA-A2-restricted CTL response and gt3a NS3/4A protease fitness. Similar to gt1, the 1073-1081 epitope was immunodominant within the gt3a-specific HLA-A2-restricted CTL response, despite sequence similarity of only 56 % between the gt1a and gt3a genes. However, unlike the gt1a NS3/4A protease, all residues within the gt3a 1073-1081 epitope could be replaced sequentially by alanine while retaining protease activity, at least in part.

  7. Enzymatic characterization and crystal structure analysis of the D-alanine-D-alanine ligase from Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dalei; Zhang, Liang; Kong, Yunhua; Du, Jiamu; Chen, Shuai; Chen, Jing; Ding, Jianping; Jiang, Hualiang; Shen, Xu

    2008-09-01

    D-Alanine-D-alanine ligase is the second enzyme in the D-Ala branch of bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan assembly, and recognized as an attractive antimicrobial target. In this work, the D-Ala-D-Ala ligase of Helicobacter pylori strain SS1 (HpDdl) was kinetically and structurally characterized. The determined apparent K(m) of ATP (0.87 microM), the K(m1) (1.89 mM) and K(m2) of D-Ala (627 mM), and the k(cat) (115 min(-1)) at pH 8.0 indicated its relatively weak binding affinity and poor catalytic activity against the substrate D-Ala in vitro. However, by complementary assay of expressing HpDdl in Escherichia coli Delta ddl mutant, HpDdl was confirmed to be capable of D-Ala-D-Ala ligating in vivo. Through sequence alignment with other members of the D-Ala-D-X ligase superfamily, HpDdl keeps two conservatively substituted residues (Ile16 and Leu241) and two nonconserved residues (Leu308 and Tyr311) broadly located in the active region of the enzyme. Kinetic analyses against the corresponding HpDdl mutants (I16V, L241Y, L241F, L308T, and Y311S) suggested that these residues, especially Leu308 and Tyr311, might partly contribute to the unique catalytic properties of the enzyme. This was fairly proved by the crystal structure of HpDdl, which revealed that there is a 3(10)-helix (including residues from Gly306 to Leu312) near the D-Ala binding region in the C-terminal domain, where HpDdl has two sequence deletions compared with other homologs. Such 3(10)-helix may participate in D-Ala binding and conformational change of the enzyme. Our present work hopefully provides useful information for understanding the D-Ala-D-Ala ligase of Helicobacter pylori.

  8. Identification of the roles of individual amino acid residues of the helix E of the major antenna of photosystem II (LHCII) by alanine scanning mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng; Rao, Yan; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Chunhong

    2014-10-01

    The functions of the helix E (W97-F105), an amphiphilic lumenal 310 helix of the major antenna of photosystem II (LHCII), are still unidentified. To elucidate the roles of individual amino acid residue of the helix E, alanine scanning mutagenesis has been performed to mutate every residue of this domain to alanine. The influence of every alanine substitution on the structure and function of LHCII has been investigated biochemically and spectroscopically. The results show that all mutations have little impact on the pigment binding and configuration. However, many mutants presented decreased thermo- or photo-stability compared with the wild type, highlighting the significance of this helix to the stability of LHCII. The most critical residue for stability is W97. The mutant W97A yielded very fragile trimeric pigment protein complexes. The structural analysis revealed that the hydrogen bonding and aromatic interactions between W97, F195, F194 and a water molecule contributed greatly to the stability of LHCII. Moreover, Q103A and F105A have been identified to be able to reinforce the tendency of aggregation in vitro. The structural analysis suggested that the enhancement in aggregation formation for Q103A and F105A might be attributed to the changing hydrophobicity of the region.

  9. Knockout of the alanine racemase gene in Aeromonas hydrophila HBNUAh01 results in cell wall damage and enhanced membrane permeability.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Zhang, Lu; Xue, Wen; Wang, Yaping; Ju, Jiansong; Zhao, Baohua

    2015-07-01

    This study focused on the alanine racemase gene (alr-2), which is involved in the synthesis of d-alanine that forms the backbone of the cell wall. A stable alr-2 knockout mutant of Aeromonas hydrophila HBNUAh01 was constructed. When the mutant was supplemented with d-alanine, growth was unaffected; deprivation of d-alanine caused the growth arrest of the starved mutant cells, but not cell lysis. No alanine racemase activity was detected in the culture of the mutant. Additionally, a membrane permeability assay showed increasing damage to the cell wall during d-alanine starvation. No such damage was observed in the wild type during culture. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed deficiencies of the cell envelope and perforation of the cell wall. Leakage of UV-absorbing substances from the mutants was also observed. Thus, the partial viability of the mutants and their independence of d-alanine for growth indicated that inactivation of alr-2 does not impose an auxotrophic requirement for d-alanine.

  10. Glutamine Substitution at Alanine1649 in the S4–S5 Cytoplasmic Loop of Domain 4 Removes the Voltage Sensitivity of Fast Inactivation in the Human Heart Sodium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Lihui; Chehab, Nabil; Wieland, Steven J.; Kallen, Roland G.

    1998-01-01

    Normal activation–inactivation coupling in sodium channels insures that inactivation is slow at small but rapid at large depolarizations. M1651Q/M1652Q substitutions in the cytoplasmic loop connecting the fourth and fifth transmembrane segments of Domain 4 (S4–S5/D4) of the human heart sodium channel subtype 1 (hH1) affect the kinetics and voltage dependence of inactivation (Tang, L., R.G. Kallen, and R. Horn. 1996. J. Gen. Physiol. 108:89–104.). We now show that glutamine substitutions NH2-terminal to the methionines (L1646, L1647, F1648, A1649, L1650) also influence the kinetics and voltage dependence of inactivation compared with the wild-type channel. In contrast, mutations at the COOH-terminal end of the S4–S5/D4 segment (L1654, P1655, A1656) are without significant effect. Strikingly, the A1649Q mutation renders the current decay time constants virtually voltage independent and decreases the voltage dependences of steady state inactivation and the time constants for the recovery from inactivation. Single-channel measurements show that at negative voltages latency times to first opening are shorter and less voltage dependent in A1649Q than in wild-type channels; peak open probabilities are significantly smaller and the mean open times are shorter. This indicates that the rate constants for inactivation and, probably, activation are increased at negative voltages by the A1649Q mutation reminiscent of Y1494Q/ Y1495Q mutations in the cytoplasmic loop between the third and fourth domains (O'Leary, M.E., L.Q. Chen, R.G. Kallen, and R. Horn. 1995. J. Gen. Physiol. 106:641–658.). Other substitutions, A1649S and A1649V, decrease but fail to eliminate the voltage dependence of time constants for inactivation, suggesting that the decreased hydrophobicity of glutamine at either residues A1649 or Y1494Y1495 may disrupt a linkage between S4–S5/D4 and the interdomain 3–4 loop interfering with normal activation–inactivation coupling. PMID:9565402

  11. The polyproline II conformation in short alanine peptides is noncooperative.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kang; Liu, Zhigang; Kallenbach, Neville R

    2004-10-26

    The finding that short alanine peptides possess a high fraction of polyproline II (PII) structure (Phi=-75 degrees, Psi=+145 degrees ) at low temperature has broad implications for unfolded states of proteins. An important question concerns whether or not this structure is locally determined or cooperative. We have monitored the conformation of alanine in a series of model peptides AcGGAnGGNH2 (n=1-3) over a temperature range from -10 degrees C to +80 degrees C. Use of 15N-labeled alanine substitutions makes it possible to measure 3JalphaN coupling constants accurately over the full temperature range. Based on a 1D next-neighbor model, the cooperative parameter sigma of PII nucleation is evaluated from the coupling constant data. The finding that sigma is close to unity (1 +/- 0.2) indicates a noncooperative role for alanine in PII structure formation, consistent with statistical surveys of the Protein Data Bank that suggest that most PII structure occurs in isolated residues. Lack of cooperativity in these models implies that hydration effects that influence PII conformation in water are highly localized. Using a nuclear Overhauser effect ratio strategy to define the alanine Psi angle, we estimate that, at 40 degrees C, the time-averaged alanine conformation (Phi=-80 degrees, Psi=+170 degrees ) deviates from canonical PII structure, indicating that PII melts at high temperature. Thus, the high-temperature state of short alanine peptides seems to be an unfolded ensemble with higher distribution in the extended beta structure basin, but not a coil.

  12. Biaryl ethers as potent allosteric inhibitors of reverse transcriptase and its key mutant viruses: aryl substituted pyrazole as a surrogate for the pyrazolopyridine motif.

    PubMed

    Su, Dai-Shi; Lim, John J; Tinney, Elizabeth; Tucker, Thomas J; Saggar, Sandeep; Sisko, John T; Wan, Bang-Lin; Young, Mary Beth; Anderson, Kenneth D; Rudd, Deanne; Munshi, Vandna; Bahnck, Carolyn; Felock, Peter J; Lu, Meiquing; Lai, Ming-Tain; Touch, Sinoeun; Moyer, Gregory; Distefano, Daniel J; Flynn, Jessica A; Liang, Yuexia; Sanchez, Rosa; Perlow-Poehnelt, Rebecca; Miller, Mike; Vacca, Joe P; Williams, Theresa M; Anthony, Neville J

    2010-08-01

    Biaryl ethers were recently reported as potent NNRTIs. Herein, we disclose a detailed effort to modify the previously reported compound 1. We have designed and synthesized a series of novel pyrazole derivatives as a surrogate for pyrazolopyridine motif that were potent inhibitors of HIV-1 RT with nanomolar intrinsic activity on the WT and key mutant enzymes and potent antiviral activity in infected cells.

  13. Aspartic acid substitutions affect proton translocation by bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Mogi, T; Stern, L J; Marti, T; Chao, B H; Khorana, H G

    1988-01-01

    We have substituted each of the aspartic acid residues in bacteriorhodopsin to determine their possible role in proton translocation by this protein. The aspartic acid residues were replaced by asparagines; in addition, Asp-85, -96, -115, and -112 were changed to glutamic acid and Asp-212 was also replaced by alanine. The mutant bacteriorhodopsin genes were expressed in Escherichia coli and the proteins were purified. The mutant proteins all regenerated bacteriorhodopsin-like chromophores when treated with a detergent-phospholipid mixture and retinal. However, the rates of regeneration of the chromophores and their lambda max varied widely. No support was obtained for the external point charge model for the opsin shift. The Asp-85----Asn mutant showed not detectable proton pumping, the Asp-96----Asn and Asp-212----Glu mutants showed less than 10% and the Asp-115----Glu mutant showed approximately equal to 30% of the normal proton pumping. The implications of these findings for possible mechanisms of proton translocation by bacteriorhodopsin are discussed. PMID:3288985

  14. Identification of mutations associated with peroxisome-to-mitochondrion mistargeting of alanine/glyoxylate aminotransferase in primary hyperoxaluria type 1

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    We have previously shown that in some patients with primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1), disease is associated with mistargeting of the normally peroxisomal enzyme alanine/glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT) to mitochondria (Danpure, C.J., P.J. Cooper, P.J. Wise, and P.R. Jennings. J. Cell Biol. 108:1345-1352). We have synthesized, amplified, cloned, and sequenced AGT cDNA from a PH1 patient with mitochondrial AGT (mAGT). This identified three point mutations that cause amino acid substitutions in the predicted AGT protein sequence. Using PCR and allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization, a range of PH1 patients and controls were screened for these mutations. This revealed that all eight PH1 patients with mAGT carried at least one allele with the same three mutations. Two were homozygous for this allele and six were heterozygous. In at least three of the heterozygotes, it appeared that only the mutant allele was expressed. All three mutations were absent from PH1 patients lacking mAGT. One mutation encoding a Gly----Arg substitution at residue 170 was not found in any of the control individuals. However, the other two mutations, encoding Pro----Leu and Ile----Met substitutions at residues 11 and 340, respectively, cosegregated in the normal population at an allelic frequency of 5-10%. In an individual homozygous for this allele (substitutions at residues 11 and 340) only a small proportion of AGT appeared to be rerouted to mitochondria. It is suggested that the substitution at residue 11 generates an amphiphilic alpha-helix with characteristics similar to recognized mitochondrial targeting sequences, the full functional expression of which is dependent upon coexpression of the substitution at residue 170, which may induce defective peroxisomal import. PMID:1703535

  15. Characterization of the l-alanine exporter AlaE of Escherichia coli and its potential role in protecting cells from a toxic-level accumulation of l-alanine and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seryoung; Ihara, Kohei; Katsube, Satoshi; Hori, Hatsuhiro; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Yoneyama, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    We previously reported that the alaE gene of Escherichia coli encodes the l-alanine exporter AlaE. The objective of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of the AlaE exporter. The minimum inhibitory concentration of l-alanine and l-alanyl-l-alanine in alaE-deficient l-alanine-nonmetabolizing cells MLA301ΔalaE was 4- and >4000-fold lower, respectively, than in the alaE-positive parent cells MLA301, suggesting that AlaE functions as an efflux pump to avoid a toxic-level accumulation of intracellular l-alanine and its derivatives. Furthermore, the growth of the alaE-deficient mutant derived from the l-alanine-metabolizing strain was strongly inhibited in the presence of a physiological level of l-alanyl-l-alanine. Intact MLA301ΔalaE and MLA301ΔalaE/pAlaE cells producing plasmid-borne AlaE, accumulated approximately 200% and 50%, respectively, of the [(3) H]l-alanine detected in MLA301 cells, suggesting that AlaE exports l-alanine. When 200 mmol/L l-alanine-loaded inverted membrane vesicles prepared from MLA301ΔalaE/pAlaE were placed in a solution containing 200 mmol/L or 0.34 μmol/L l-alanine, energy-dependent [(3) H]l-alanine accumulation occurred under either condition. This energy-dependent uphill accumulation of [(3) H]l-alanine was strongly inhibited in the presence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone but not by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, suggesting that the AlaE-mediated l-alanine extrusion was driven by proton motive force. Based on these results, physiological roles of the l-alanine exporter are discussed.

  16. Generation of a Mutant Mucor hiemalis Endoglycosidase That Acts on Core-fucosylated N-Glycans.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Toshihiko; Katayama, Takane; Tomabechi, Yusuke; Nishikawa, Yoshihide; Kumada, Jyunichi; Matsuzaki, Yuji; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2016-10-28

    Endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase M (Endo-M), an endoglycosidase from the fungus Mucor hiemalis, is a useful tool for chemoenzymatic synthesis of glycoconjugates, including glycoprotein-based therapeutics having a precisely defined glycoform, by virtue of its transglycosylation activity. Although Endo-M has been known to act on various N-glycans, it does not act on core-fucosylated N-glycans, which exist widely in mammalian glycoproteins, thus limiting its application. Therefore, we performed site-directed mutagenesis on Endo-M to isolate mutant enzymes that are able to act on mammalian-type core-α1,6-fucosylated glycans. Among the Endo-M mutant enzymes generated, those in which the tryptophan at position 251 was substituted with alanine or asparagine showed altered substrate specificities. Such mutant enzymes exhibited increased hydrolysis of a synthetic α1,6-fucosylated trimannosyl core structure, whereas their activity on the afucosylated form decreased. In addition, among the Trp-251 mutants, the W251N mutant was most efficient in hydrolyzing the core-fucosylated substrate. W251N mutants could act on the immunoglobulin G-derived core-fucosylated glycopeptides and human lactoferrin glycoproteins. This mutant was also capable of transferring the sialyl glycan from an activated substrate intermediate (sialyl glyco-oxazoline) onto an α1,6-fucosyl-N-acetylglucosaminyl biotin. Furthermore, the W251N mutant gained a glycosynthase-like activity when a N175Q substitution was introduced and it caused accumulation of the transglycosylation products. These findings not only give insights into the substrate recognition mechanism of glycoside hydrolase family 85 enzymes but also widen their scope of application in preparing homogeneous glycoforms of core-fucosylated glycoproteins for the production of potent glycoprotein-based therapeutics.

  17. Regulation of the ald gene encoding alanine dehydrogenase by AldR in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ji-A; Baek, Eun-Young; Kim, Si Wouk; Choi, Jong-Soon; Oh, Jeong-Il

    2013-08-01

    The regulatory gene aldR was identified 95 bp upstream of the ald gene encoding L-alanine dehydrogenase in Mycobacterium smegmatis. The AldR protein shows sequence similarity to the regulatory proteins of the Lrp/AsnC family. Using an aldR deletion mutant, we demonstrated that AldR serves as both activator and repressor for the regulation of ald gene expression, depending on the presence or absence of L-alanine. The purified AldR protein exists as a homodimer in the absence of L-alanine, while it adopts the quaternary structure of a homohexamer in the presence of L-alanine. The binding affinity of AldR for the ald control region was shown to be increased significantly by L-alanine. Two AldR binding sites (O1 and O2) with the consensus sequence GA-N₂-ATC-N₂-TC and one putative AldR binding site with the sequence GA-N₂-GTT-N₂-TC were identified upstream of the ald gene. Alanine and cysteine were demonstrated to be the effector molecules directly involved in the induction of ald expression. The cellular level of L-alanine was shown to be increased in M. smegmatis cells grown under hypoxic conditions, and the hypoxic induction of ald expression appears to be mediated by AldR, which senses the intracellular level of alanine.

  18. Crystal structures of d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae alone and in complex with nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Doan, Thanh Thi Ngoc; Kim, Jin-Kwang; Ngo, Ho-Phuong-Thuy; Tran, Huyen-Thi; Cha, Sun-Shin; Min Chung, Kyung; Huynh, Kim-Hung; Ahn, Yeh-Jin; Kang, Lin-Woo

    2014-03-01

    D-Alanine-D-alanine ligase (DDL) catalyzes the biosynthesis of d-alanyl-d-alanine, an essential bacterial peptidoglycan precursor, and is an important drug target for the development of antibacterials. We determined four different crystal structures of DDL from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) causing Bacteria Blight (BB), which include apo, ADP-bound, ATP-bound, and AMPPNP-bound structures at the resolution between 2.3 and 2.0 Å. Similarly with other DDLs, the active site of XoDDL is formed by three loops from three domains at the center of enzyme. Compared with d-alanyl-d-alanine and ATP-bound TtDDL structure, the γ-phosphate of ATP in XoDDL structure was shifted outside toward solution. We swapped the ω-loop (loop3) of XoDDL with those of Escherichia coli and Helicobacter pylori DDLs, and measured the enzymatic kinetics of wild-type XoDDL and two mutant XoDDLs with the swapped ω-loops. Results showed that the direct interactions between ω-loop and other two loops are essential for the active ATP conformation for D-ala-phosphate formation.

  19. Novel 1,5-diphenylpyrazole nonnucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors with enhanced activity versus the delavirdine-resistant P236L mutant: lead identification and SAR of 3- and 4-substituted derivatives.

    PubMed

    Genin, M J; Biles, C; Keiser, B J; Poppe, S M; Swaney, S M; Tarpley, W G; Yagi, Y; Romero, D L

    2000-03-09

    Through computationally directed broad screening, a novel 1, 5-diphenylpyrazole (DPP) class of HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) has been discovered. Compound 2 (PNU-32945) was found to have good activity versus wild-type (IC(50) = 2.3 microM) and delavirdine-resistant P236L (IC(50) = 1.1 microM) reverse transcriptase (RT). Also, PNU-32945 has an ED(50) for inhibition of viral replication in cell cultures of 0.1 microM and was shown to be noncytotoxic with a CC(50) > 10 microM. Structure-activity relationship studies on the 3- and 4-positions of PNU-32945 led to interesting selectivity and activity within the class. In particular, the 3-hydroxyethyl-4-ethyl congener 29 is a potent inhibitor of the P236L mutant (IC(50) = 0.65 microM), whereas it is essentially inactive versus the wild-type enzyme (IC(50) > 50 microM). Furthermore, this compound was significantly more active versus the P236L mutant than delavirdine. The synthesis and RT inhibitory activity of various 3- and 4-substituted analogues are discussed.

  20. Isolation and characterisation of poliovirus mutants resistant to heating at 50 degrees Celsius for 30 min.

    PubMed

    Shiomi, Hiroshi; Urasawa, Tomoko; Urasawa, Shozo; Kobayashi, Nobumichi; Abe, Shibobu; Taniguchi, Koki

    2004-11-01

    Poliovirus is heat-labile; on heating at 50 degrees Celsius for 30 min its infectivity decreases drastically and its antigenicity reverts from N to H. However, mutants resistant to heating at 50 degrees Celsius for 30 min from the Sabin 1 and 2 viruses were isolated by repeating the process of incubation of the virus stock at 50 degrees Celsius for 30 min and multiplication of the remaining virus in a cell culture. The isolated mutants were stable genetically, and maintained the rct and d markers of the parent virus. On electron microscopical examination, the mutants were observed to retain the intact morphology after being heated at 50 degrees Celsius for 30 min, while the parent virus was converted to empty particles devoid of RNA under the same conditions. On determination of the nucleotide sequence of the P1 region, a single nucleotide sequence substitution was detected at nucleotide no. 2741, resulting in an amino acid change from valine to alanine at the 87th position of VP1. This amino acid might be associated with the heat-resistance of the mutants. Furthermore, it was found that the thermostable mutants obtained in this study, which are resistant to "high" temperature (50 degrees Celsius) for a short time (30 min), were not stable against heating at the ambient temperature (37 degrees Celsius) for a long time (5 or 7 days). This suggests that the inactivation at high temperature for a short time and that at ambient temperature for a long time involve different mechanisms.

  1. Characterization of alanine catabolism in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and its importance for proliferation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Boulette, Megan L; Baynham, Patricia J; Jorth, Peter A; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Longoria, Aissa; Barrera, Karla; Levesque, Roger C; Whiteley, Marvin

    2009-10-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes a variety of infections in immunocompromised individuals, including individuals with the heritable disease cystic fibrosis. Like the carbon sources metabolized by many disease-causing bacteria, the carbon sources metabolized by P. aeruginosa at the host infection site are unknown. We recently reported that l-alanine is a preferred carbon source for P. aeruginosa and that two genes potentially involved in alanine catabolism (dadA and dadX) are induced during in vivo growth in the rat peritoneum and during in vitro growth in sputum (mucus) collected from the lungs of individuals with cystic fibrosis. The goals of this study were to characterize factors required for alanine catabolism in P. aeruginosa and to assess the importance of these factors for in vivo growth. Our results reveal that dadA and dadX are arranged in an operon and are required for catabolism of l-alanine. The dad operon is inducible by l-alanine, d-alanine, and l-valine, and induction is dependent on the transcriptional regulator Lrp. Finally, we show that a mutant unable to catabolize dl-alanine displays decreased competitiveness in a rat lung model of infection.

  2. Inhibitors of alanine racemase enzyme: a review.

    PubMed

    Azam, Mohammed Afzal; Jayaram, Unni

    2016-08-01

    Alanine racemase is a fold type III PLP-dependent amino acid racemase enzyme catalysing the conversion of l-alanine to d-alanine utilised by bacterial cell wall for peptidoglycan synthesis. As there are no known homologs in humans, it is considered as an excellent antibacterial drug target. The standard inhibitors of this enzyme include O-carbamyl-d-serine, d-cycloserine, chlorovinyl glycine, alaphosphin, etc. d-Cycloserine is indicated for pulmonary and extra pulmonary tuberculosis but therapeutic use of drug is limited due to its severe toxic effects. Toxic effects due to off-target affinities of cycloserine and other substrate analogs have prompted new research efforts to identify alanine racemase inhibitors that are not substrate analogs. In this review, an updated status of known inhibitors of alanine racemase enzyme has been provided which will serve as a rich source of structural information and will be helpful in generating selective and potent inhibitor of alanine racemase.

  3. [Raman scattering study of DL-alanine].

    PubMed

    Gong, Yan; Wang, Wen-qing

    2006-01-01

    Studies of Raman vibration spectra are useful to obtaining information on biomolecular crystals. The cell dimensions of the L- and DL-alanine crystals are nearly identical, and both structures belong to the orthorhombic system, but the space group is P2(1) 2(1) 2(1) for the L-isomer, and Pna2(1) for the racemate crystal. The Raman spectrum of L-alanine has been measured by many authors. The present work is focusing on the Raman scattering study of DL-alanine powder. Based on the analysis of the differences between DL-alanine and L-alanine Raman spectra, the authors obtained indispensable information on hydrogen bond and the motion of the molecular conformation in alanine crystals.

  4. Vibrational dynamics of crystalline L-alanine

    SciTech Connect

    Bordallo, H.N.; Eckert, J.; Barthes, M.

    1997-11-01

    The authors report a new, complete vibrational analysis of L-alanine and L-alanine-d{sub 4} which utilizes IINS intensities in addition to frequency information. The use of both isotopomers resulted in a self-consistent force field for and assignment of the molecular vibrations in L-alanine. Some details of the calculation as well as a comparison of calculated and observed IINS spectra are presented. The study clarifies a number of important issues on the vibrational dynamics of this molecule and presents a self-consistent force field for the molecular vibrations in crystalline L-alanine.

  5. Anionic substitutes for catalytic aspartic acids in phosphoribulokinase.

    PubMed

    Runquist, Jennifer A; Miziorko, Henry M

    2002-09-15

    Mutagenic substitution of the invariant D42 and D169 residues in phosphoribulokinase (PRK) with amino acids that contain neutral side chains (e.g., alanine or asparagine) results in large decreases in catalytic efficiency (10(5)- and 10(4)-fold for replacement of D42 and D169, respectively). To further evaluate the importance of anionic side chains at residues 42 and 169, substitutions of glutamic acid (D42E, D169E) and cysteine (D42C and D169C in an otherwise cysteine-free protein) have been engineered. All purified mutant enzymes bind the fluorescent alternative substrate trinitrophenyl-ATP and the allosteric effector NADH similarly to wild-type PRK. For D42E and D42C, V(max) exhibits substantial decreases of 135- and 220-fold, respectively. Comparable substitutions for D169 result in smaller effects; D169E and D169C exhibit decreases in V(max) of 39- and 26-fold, respectively. Thus, regardless of the type of substitution, changes at D42 more profoundly affect catalytic rate than do comparable changes at D169. Precedent with enzymes in which cysteine replaces an acidic residue suggests that oxidation of the thiolate to a sulfinate can convert low-activity cysteine mutants into enzymes with improved activity. Periodate oxidation of cysteine-free PRK results in a slight decrease in activity. In contrast, comparable treatment of D42C and D169C proteins increases activity by 5- and 7-fold, respectively. Thus, for reasonably efficient catalysis, PRK requires anionic character in the side chains of residues 42 and 169. The enzyme can, however, tolerate substantial structural and chemical variability at these residues.

  6. Catalytic Stereoinversion of L-Alanine to Deuterated D-Alanine.

    PubMed

    Moozeh, Kimia; So, Soon Mog; Chin, Jik

    2015-08-03

    A combination of an achiral pyridoxal analogue and a chiral base has been developed for catalytic deuteration of L-alanine with inversion of stereochemistry to give deuterated D-alanine under mild conditions (neutral pD and 25 °C) without the use of any protecting groups. This system can also be used for catalytic deuteration of D-alanine with retention of stereochemistry to give deuterated D-alanine. Thus a racemic mixture of alanine can be catalytically deuterated to give an enantiomeric excess of deuterated D-alanine. While catalytic deracemization of alanine is forbidden by the second law of thermodynamics, this system can be used for catalytic deracemization of alanine with deuteration. Such green and biomimetic approach to catalytic stereocontrol provides insights into efficient amino acid transformations.

  7. Molecular interaction between lipoteichoic acids and Lactobacillus delbrueckii phages depends on D-alanyl and alpha-glucose substitution of poly(glycerophosphate) backbones.

    PubMed

    Räisänen, Liisa; Draing, Christian; Pfitzenmaier, Markus; Schubert, Karin; Jaakonsaari, Tiina; von Aulock, Sonja; Hartung, Thomas; Alatossava, Tapani

    2007-06-01

    Lipoteichoic acids (LTAs) have been shown to act as bacterial counterparts to the receptor binding proteins of LL-H, LL-H host range mutant LL-H-a21, and JCL1032. Here we have used LTAs purified by hydrophobic interaction chromatography from different phage-resistant and -sensitive strains of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis. Nuclear magnetic resonance analyses revealed variation in the degree of alpha-glucosyl and D-alanyl substitution of the 1,3-linked poly(glycerophosphate) LTAs between the phage-sensitive and phage-resistant strains. Inactivation of phages was less effective if there was a high level of D-alanine residues in the LTA backbones. Prior incubation of the LTAs with alpha-glucose-specific lectin inhibited the LL-H phage inactivation. The overall level of decoration or the specific spatial combination of alpha-glucosyl-substituted, D-alanyl-substituted, and nonsubstituted glycerol residues may also affect phage adsorption.

  8. Role of Alanine Dehydrogenase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during Recovery from Hypoxic Nonreplicating Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Giffin, Michelle M.; Shi, Lanbo; Gennaro, Maria L.; Sohaskey, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis can maintain a nonreplicating persistent state in the host for decades, but must maintain the ability to efficiently reactivate and produce active disease to survive and spread in a population. Among the enzymes expressed during this dormancy is alanine dehydrogenase, which converts pyruvate to alanine, and glyoxylate to glycine concurrent with the oxidation of NADH to NAD. It is involved in the metabolic remodeling of M. tuberculosis through its possible interactions with both the glyoxylate and methylcitrate cycle. Both mRNA levels and enzymatic activities of isocitrate lyase, the first enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, and alanine dehydrogenase increased during entry into nonreplicating persistence, while the gene and activity for the second enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, malate synthase were not. This could suggest a shift in carbon flow away from the glyoxylate cycle and instead through alanine dehydrogenase. Expression of ald was also induced in vitro by other persistence-inducing stresses such as nitric oxide, and was expressed at high levels in vivo during the initial lung infection in mice. Enzyme activity was maintained during extended hypoxia even after transcription levels decreased. An ald knockout mutant of M. tuberculosis showed no reduction in anaerobic survival in vitro, but resulted in a significant lag in the resumption of growth after reoxygenation. During reactivation the ald mutant had an altered NADH/NAD ratio, and alanine dehydrogenase is proposed to maintain the optimal NADH/NAD ratio during anaerobiosis in preparation of eventual regrowth, and during the initial response during reoxygenation. PMID:27203084

  9. Substitution of conserved cysteine residues in Wheat streak mosaic virus HC-Pro abolishes virus transmission by the wheat curl mite

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Substitutions in the amino-terminal region of Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) HC-Pro were evaluated for effects on transmission by the wheat curl mite (Aceria tosichella Keifer). Alanine substitution at cysteine residues 16, 46 and 49 abolished vector transmission. Although alanine substitution a...

  10. Alanine racemase is essential for the growth and interspecies competitiveness of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yuan; Qiu, Wei; Zhou, Xue-Dong; Zheng, Xin; Zhang, Ke-Ke; Wang, Shi-Da; Li, Yu-Qing; Cheng, Lei; Li, Ji-Yao; Xu, Xin; Li, Ming-Yun

    2016-01-01

    D-alanine (D-Ala) is an essential amino acid that has a key role in bacterial cell wall synthesis. Alanine racemase (Alr) is a unique enzyme that interconverts L-alanine and D-alanine in most bacteria, making this enzyme a potential target for antimicrobial drug development. Streptococcus mutans is a major causative factor of dental caries. The factors involved in the survival, virulence and interspecies interactions of S. mutans could be exploited as potential targets for caries control. The current study aimed to investigate the physiological role of Alr in S. mutans. We constructed alr mutant strain of S. mutans and evaluated its phenotypic traits and interspecies competitiveness compared with the wild-type strain. We found that alr deletion was lethal to S. mutans. A minimal supplement of D-Ala (150 μg·mL−1) was required for the optimal growth of the alr mutant. The depletion of D-alanine in the growth medium resulted in cell wall perforation and cell lysis in the alr mutant strain. We also determined the compromised competitiveness of the alr mutant strain relative to the wild-type S. mutans against other oral streptococci (S. sanguinis or S. gordonii), demonstrated using either conditioned medium assays or dual-species fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis. Given the importance and necessity of alr to the growth and competitiveness of S. mutans, Alr may represent a promising target to modulate the cariogenicity of oral biofilms and to benefit the management of dental caries. PMID:27740612

  11. Effects of endogenous D-alanine synthesis and autoinhibition of Bacillus anthracis germination on in vitro and in vivo infections.

    PubMed

    McKevitt, Matthew T; Bryant, Katie M; Shakir, Salika M; Larabee, Jason L; Blanke, Steven R; Lovchik, Julie; Lyons, C Rick; Ballard, Jimmy D

    2007-12-01

    Bacillus anthracis transitions from a dormant spore to a vegetative bacillus through a series of structural and biochemical changes collectively referred to as germination. The timing of germination is important during early steps in infection and may determine if B. anthracis survives or succumbs to responsive macrophages. In the current study experiments determined the contribution of endogenous D-alanine production to the efficiency and timing of B. anthracis spore germination under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Racemase-mediated production of endogenous D-alanine by B. anthracis altered the kinetics for initiation of germination over a range of spore densities and exhibited a threshold effect wherein small changes in spore number resulted in major changes in germination efficiency. This threshold effect correlated with D-alanine production, was prevented by an alanine racemase inhibitor, and required L-alanine. Interestingly, endogenous production of inhibitory levels of D-alanine was detected under experimental conditions that did not support germination and in a germination-deficient mutant of B. anthracis. Racemase-dependent production of D-alanine enhanced survival of B. anthracis during interaction with murine macrophages, suggesting a role for inhibition of germination during interaction with these cells. Finally, in vivo experiments revealed an approximately twofold decrease in the 50% lethal dose of B. anthracis spores administered in the presence of D-alanine, indicating that rates of germination may be directly influenced by the levels of this amino acid during early stages of disease.

  12. Alanine increases blood pressure during hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlay, L. A.; Maher, T. J.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of L-alanine administration on blood pressure (BP) during haemorrhagic shock was investigated using anesthetized rats whose left carotid arteries were cannulated for BP measurement, blood removal, and drug administration. It was found that L-alanine, in doses of 10, 25, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, increased the systolic BP of hypotensive rats by 38 to 80 percent (while 100 mg/kg pyruvate increased BP by only 9.4 mmhg, not significantly different from saline). The results suggest that L-alanine might influence cardiovascular function.

  13. Extreme heat- and pressure-resistant 7-kDa protein P2 from the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus is dramatically destabilized by a single-point amino acid substitution.

    PubMed

    Fusi, P; Goossens, K; Consonni, R; Grisa, M; Puricelli, P; Vecchio, G; Vanoni, M; Zetta, L; Heremans, K; Tortora, P

    1997-11-01

    This study reports the characterization of the recombinant 7-kDa protein P2 from Sulfolobus solfataricus and the mutants F31A and F31Y with respect to temperature and pressure stability. As observed in the NMR, FTIR, and CD spectra, wild-type protein and mutants showed substantially similar structures under ambient conditions. However, midpoint transition temperatures of the denaturation process were 361, 334, and 347 K for wild type, F31A, and F31Y mutants, respectively: thus, alanine substitution of phenylalanine destabilized the protein by as much as 27 K. Midpoint transition pressures for wild type and F31Y mutant could not be accurately determined because they lay either beyond (wild type) or close to (F31Y) 14 kbar, a pressure at which water undergoes a phase transition. However, a midpoint transition pressure of 4 kbar could be determined for the F31A mutant, implying a shift in transition of at least 10 kbar. The pressure-induced denaturation was fully reversible; in contrast, thermal denaturation of wild type and mutants was only partially reversible. To our knowledge, both the pressure resistance of protein P2 and the dramatic pressure and temperature destabilization of the F31A mutant are unprecedented. These properties may be largely accounted for by the role of an aromatic cluster where Phe31 is found at the core, because interactions among aromatics are believed to be almost pressure insensitive; furthermore, the alanine substitution of phenylalanine should create a cavity with increased compressibility and flexibility, which also involves an impaired pressure and temperature resistance.

  14. Production of Alanine by Fusarium moniliforme

    PubMed Central

    Carito, Sebastian L.; Pisano, Michael A.

    1966-01-01

    Fusarium moniliforme grown in a chemically defined medium in submerged culture accumulated amino acids extracellularly. Alanine and glutamic acid were present in greatest amounts, with traces of glycine, lysine, threonine, and valine detectable. Increasing the glucose and urea concentrations of the medium increased yields of alanine. Further increases in alanine production occurred with elevated levels of mineral salts in the medium, whereas the addition of a vitamin mixture proved to be inhibitory. Chemical changes resulting from the growth of F. moniliforme in the final fermentation medium disclosed maximal alanine production, mycelial weight, and glucose consumption after 72 hr of incubation at 28.5 C. Total soluble nitrogen, by contrast, was minimal at the same time period. The pH remained in the alkaline range throughout the fermentation. PMID:5914495

  15. Solved? The reductive radiation chemistry of alanine.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Ewald; De Cooman, Hendrik; Waroquier, Michel; Hole, Eli O; Sagstuen, Einar

    2014-02-14

    The structural changes throughout the entire reductive radiation-induced pathway of l-α-alanine are solved on an atomistic level with the aid of periodic DFT and nudged elastic band (NEB) simulations. This yields unprecedented information on the conformational changes taking place, including the protonation state of the carboxyl group in the "unstable" and "stable" alanine radicals and the internal transformation converting these two radical variants at temperatures above 220 K. The structures of all stable radicals were verified by calculating EPR properties and comparing those with experimental data. The variation of the energy throughout the full radiochemical process provides crucial insight into the reason why these structural changes and rearrangements occur. Starting from electron capture, the excess electron quickly localizes on the carbon of a carboxyl group, which pyramidalizes and receives a proton from the amino group of a neighboring alanine molecule, forming a first stable radical species (up to 150 K). In the temperature interval 150-220 K, this radical deaminates and deprotonates at the carboxyl group, the detached amino group undergoes inversion and its methyl group sustains an internal rotation. This yields the so-called "unstable alanine radical". Above 220 K, triggered by the attachment of an additional proton on the detached amino group, the radical then undergoes an internal rotation in the reverse direction, giving rise to the "stable alanine radical", which is the final stage in the reductive radiation-induced decay of alanine.

  16. Amino acid residues in the GerAB protein important in the function and assembly of the alanine spore germination receptor of Bacillus subtilis 168.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Gareth R; Moir, Anne

    2011-05-01

    The paradigm gerA operon is required for endospore germination in response to c-alanine as the sole germinant, and the three protein products, GerAA, GerAB, and GerAC are predicted to form a receptor complex in the spore inner membrane. GerAB shows homology to the amino acid-polyamine-organocation (APC) family of single-component transporters and is predicted to be an integral membrane protein with 10 membrane-spanning helices. Site-directed mutations were introduced into the gerAB gene at its natural location on the chromosome. Alterations to some charged or potential helix-breaking residues within membrane spans affected receptor function dramatically. In some cases, this is likely to reflect the complete loss of the GerA receptor complex, as judged by the absence of the germinant receptor protein GerAC, which suggests that the altered GerAB protein itself may be unstable or that the altered structure destabilizes the complex. Mutants that have a null phenotype for Instituto de Biotecnología de León, INBIOTEC, Parque Científico de León, Av. Real, 1, 24006 León, Spain-alanine germination but retain GerAC protein at near-normal levels are more likely to define amino acid residues of functional, rather than structural, importance. Single-amino-acid substitutions in each of the GerAB and GerAA proteins can prevent incorporation of GerAC protein into the spore; this provides strong evidence that the proteins within a specific receptor interact and that these interactions are required for receptor assembly. The lipoprotein nature of the GerAC receptor subunit is also important; an amino acid change in the prelipoprotein signal sequence in the gerAC1 mutant results in the absence of GerAC protein from the spore.

  17. Antimicrobial activity of antihypertensive food-derived peptides and selected alanine analogues.

    PubMed

    McClean, Stephen; Beggs, Louise B; Welch, Robert W

    2014-03-01

    This study evaluated four food-derived peptides with known antihypertensive activities for antimicrobial activity against pathogenic microorganisms, and assessed structure-function relationships using alanine analogues. The peptides (EVSLNSGYY, barley; PGTAVFK, soybean; TTMPLW, α-casein; VHLPP, α-zein) and the six alanine substitution peptides of PGTAVFK were synthesised, characterised and evaluated for antimicrobial activity using the bacteria, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Micrococcus luteus and the yeast, Candida albicans. The peptides TTMPLW and PGTAVFK inhibited growth of all four microorganisms tested, with activities of a similar order of magnitude to ampicillin and ethanol controls. EVSLNSGYY inhibited the growth of the bacteria, but VHLPP showed no antimicrobial activity. The alanine analogue, PGAAVFK showed the highest overall antimicrobial activity and PGTAVFA showed no activity; overall, the activities of the analogues were consistent with their structures. Some peptides with antihypertensive activity also show antimicrobial activity, suggesting that food-derived peptides may exert beneficial effects via a number of mechanisms.

  18. Qualitative analysis of collective mode frequency shifts in L-alanine using terahertz spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Taulbee, Anita R; Heuser, Justin A; Spendel, Wolfgang U; Pacey, Gilbert E

    2009-04-01

    We have observed collective mode frequency shifts in deuterium-substituted L-alanine, three of which have previously only been calculated. Terahertz (THz) absorbance spectra were acquired at room temperature in the spectral range of 66-90 cm(-1), or 2.0-2.7 THz, for L-alanine (L-Ala) and four L-Ala compounds in which hydrogen atoms (atomic mass = 1 amu) were substituted with deuterium atoms (atomic mass = 2 amu): L-Ala-2-d, L-Ala-3,3,3-d(3), L-Ala-2,3,3,3-d(4), and L-Ala-d(7). The absorbance maxima of two L-Ala collective modes in this spectral range were recorded for multiple spectral measurements of each compound, and the magnitude of each collective mode frequency shift due to increased mass of these specific atoms was evaluated for statistical significance. Calculations were performed which predict the THz absorbance frequencies based on the estimated reduced mass of the modes. The shifts in absorbance maxima were correlated with the location(s) of the substituted deuterium atom(s) in the L-alanine molecule, and the atoms contributing to the absorbing delocalized mode in the crystal structure were deduced using statistics described herein. The statistical analyses presented also indicate that the precision of the method allows reproducible frequency shifts as small as 1 cm(-1) or 0.03 THz to be observed and that these shifts are not random error in the measurement.

  19. Deciphering the Dynamics of Non-Covalent Interactions Affecting Thermal Stability of a Protein: Molecular Dynamics Study on Point Mutant of Thermus thermophilus Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Reetu; Sastry, G Narahari

    2015-01-01

    Thermus thermophilius isopropylmalate dehydrogenase catalyzes oxidative decarboxylation and dehydrogenation of isopropylmalate. Substitution of leucine to alanine at position 172 enhances the thermal stability among the known point mutants. Exploring the dynamic properties of non-covalent interactions such as saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions to explain thermal stability of a protein is interesting in its own right. In this study dynamic changes in the non-covalent interactions are studied to decipher the deterministic features of thermal stability of a protein considering a case study of a point mutant in Thermus thermophilus isopropylmalate dehydrogenase. A total of four molecular dynamic simulations of 0.2 μs were carried out on wild type and mutant's functional dimers at 300 K and 337 K. Higher thermal stability of the mutant as compared to wild type is revealed by root mean square deviation, root mean square fluctuations and Cα-Cα distance with an increase in temperature from 300 K to 337 K. Most of the regions of wild type fluctuate higher than the corresponding regions of mutant with an increase in temperature. Cα-Cα distance analysis suggests that long distance networks are significantly affected in wild type as compared to the mutant. Short lived contacts are higher in wild type, while long lived contacts are lost at 337 K. The mutant forms less hydrogen bonds with water as compared to wild type at 337 K. In contrast to wild type, the mutant shows significant increase in unique saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts at 337 K. The current study indicates that there is a strong inter-dependence of thermal stability on the way in which non-covalent interactions reorganize, and it is rewarding to explore this connection in single mutant studies.

  20. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  1. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  2. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  3. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  4. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  5. Structures of the G81A mutant form of the active chimera of (S)-mandelate dehydrogenase and its complex with two of its substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Sukumar, Narayanasami; Dewanti, Asteriani; Merli, Angelo; Rossi, Gian Luigi; Mitra, Bharati; Mathews, F. Scott

    2009-06-12

    (S)-Mandelate dehydrogenase (MDH) from Pseudomonas putida, a membrane-associated flavoenzyme, catalyzes the oxidation of (S)-mandelate to benzoylformate. Previously, the structure of a catalytically similar chimera, MDH-GOX2, rendered soluble by the replacement of its membrane-binding segment with the corresponding segment of glycolate oxidase (GOX), was determined and found to be highly similar to that of GOX except within the substituted segments. Subsequent attempts to cocrystallize MDH-GOX2 with substrate proved unsuccessful. However, the G81A mutants of MDH and of MDH-GOX2 displayed {approx}100-fold lower reactivity with substrate and a modestly higher reactivity towards molecular oxygen. In order to understand the effect of the mutation and to identify the mode of substrate binding in MDH-GOX2, a crystallographic investigation of the G81A mutant of the MDH-GOX2 enzyme was initiated. The structures of ligand-free G81A mutant MDH-GOX2 and of its complexes with the substrates 2-hydroxyoctanoate and 2-hydroxy-3-indolelactate were determined at 1.6, 2.5 and 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. In the ligand-free G81A mutant protein, a sulfate anion previously found at the active site is displaced by the alanine side chain introduced by the mutation. 2-Hydroxyoctanoate binds in an apparently productive mode for subsequent reaction, while 2-hydroxy-3-indolelactate is bound to the enzyme in an apparently unproductive mode. The results of this investigation suggest that a lowering of the polarity of the flavin environment resulting from the displacement of nearby water molecules caused by the glycine-to-alanine mutation may account for the lowered catalytic activity of the mutant enzyme, which is consistent with the 30 mV lower flavin redox potential. Furthermore, the altered binding mode of the indolelactate substrate may account for its reduced activity compared with octanoate, as observed in the crystalline state.

  6. Structures of the G81A mutant form of the active chimera of (S)-mandelate dehydrogenase and its complex with two of its substrates.

    PubMed

    Sukumar, Narayanasami; Dewanti, Asteriani; Merli, Angelo; Rossi, Gian Luigi; Mitra, Bharati; Mathews, F Scott

    2009-06-01

    (S)-Mandelate dehydrogenase (MDH) from Pseudomonas putida, a membrane-associated flavoenzyme, catalyzes the oxidation of (S)-mandelate to benzoylformate. Previously, the structure of a catalytically similar chimera, MDH-GOX2, rendered soluble by the replacement of its membrane-binding segment with the corresponding segment of glycolate oxidase (GOX), was determined and found to be highly similar to that of GOX except within the substituted segments. Subsequent attempts to cocrystallize MDH-GOX2 with substrate proved unsuccessful. However, the G81A mutants of MDH and of MDH-GOX2 displayed approximately 100-fold lower reactivity with substrate and a modestly higher reactivity towards molecular oxygen. In order to understand the effect of the mutation and to identify the mode of substrate binding in MDH-GOX2, a crystallographic investigation of the G81A mutant of the MDH-GOX2 enzyme was initiated. The structures of ligand-free G81A mutant MDH-GOX2 and of its complexes with the substrates 2-hydroxyoctanoate and 2-hydroxy-3-indolelactate were determined at 1.6, 2.5 and 2.2 A resolution, respectively. In the ligand-free G81A mutant protein, a sulfate anion previously found at the active site is displaced by the alanine side chain introduced by the mutation. 2-Hydroxyoctanoate binds in an apparently productive mode for subsequent reaction, while 2-hydroxy-3-indolelactate is bound to the enzyme in an apparently unproductive mode. The results of this investigation suggest that a lowering of the polarity of the flavin environment resulting from the displacement of nearby water molecules caused by the glycine-to-alanine mutation may account for the lowered catalytic activity of the mutant enzyme, which is consistent with the 30 mV lower flavin redox potential. Furthermore, the altered binding mode of the indolelactate substrate may account for its reduced activity compared with octanoate, as observed in the crystalline state.

  7. Monopeptide versus Monopeptoid: Insights on Structure and Hydration of Aqueous Alanine and Sarcosine via X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Uejio, Janel S.; Schwartz, Craig P.; Duffin, Andrew M.; England, Alice; Prendergast, David; Saykally, Richard J.

    2009-11-19

    Despite the obvious significance, the aqueous interactions of peptides remain incompletely understood. Their synthetic analogues called peptoids (poly-N-substituted glycines), have recently emerged as a promising biomimetic material, particularly due to their robust secondary structure and resistance to denaturation. We describe comparative near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy studies of aqueous sarcosine, the simplest peptoid, and alanine, its peptide isomer, interpreted by density functional theory calculations. The sarcosine nitrogen K-edge spectrum is blue-shifted with respect to that of alanine, in agreement with our calculations; we conclude that this shift results primarily from the methyl group substitution on the nitrogen of sarcosine. Our calculations indicate that the nitrogen K-edge spectrum of alanine differs significantly between dehydrated and hydrated scenarios, while that of the sarcosine zwitterion is less affected by hydration. In contrast, the computed sarcosine spectrum is greatly impacted by conformational variations, while the alanine spectrum is not. This relates to a predicted solvent dependence for alanine, as compared to sarcosine. Additionally, we show the theoretical nitrogen K-edge spectra to be sensitive to the degree of hydration, indicating that experimental X-ray spectroscopy may be able to distinguish between bulk and partial hydration, such as found in confined environments near proteins and in reverse micelles.

  8. Inhibiting Inosine Hydrolase and Alanine Racemase to Enhance the Germination of Bacillus anthracis Sterne Spores: Potential Spore Decontamination Strategies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-19

    hydrolase {lunH) defective mutant of Sterne strain with kanamycin insertion (Sterne iunh::O-kan-2) from Biology Department at Louisiana Tech University...40 50 60 Time (min) PBS PBS-H AI AI-H • iunH mutant (c) Fluorescent assay 300 *** 200 - Sterne 100 - iunH 0~------------~-------o 20 40 60...200 0 20 40 60 time -min 100 20 40 60 time -min Germination rate of iunH mutant spores initiated by L-alanine and inosine in presence of DCS 10

  9. Deciphering the Dynamics of Non-Covalent Interactions Affecting Thermal Stability of a Protein: Molecular Dynamics Study on Point Mutant of Thermus thermophilus Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Reetu; Sastry, G. Narahari

    2015-01-01

    Thermus thermophilius isopropylmalate dehydrogenase catalyzes oxidative decarboxylation and dehydrogenation of isopropylmalate. Substitution of leucine to alanine at position 172 enhances the thermal stability among the known point mutants. Exploring the dynamic properties of non-covalent interactions such as saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions to explain thermal stability of a protein is interesting in its own right. In this study dynamic changes in the non-covalent interactions are studied to decipher the deterministic features of thermal stability of a protein considering a case study of a point mutant in Thermus thermophilus isopropylmalate dehydrogenase. A total of four molecular dynamic simulations of 0.2 μs were carried out on wild type and mutant’s functional dimers at 300 K and 337 K. Higher thermal stability of the mutant as compared to wild type is revealed by root mean square deviation, root mean square fluctuations and Cα-Cα distance with an increase in temperature from 300 K to 337 K. Most of the regions of wild type fluctuate higher than the corresponding regions of mutant with an increase in temperature. Cα-Cα distance analysis suggests that long distance networks are significantly affected in wild type as compared to the mutant. Short lived contacts are higher in wild type, while long lived contacts are lost at 337 K. The mutant forms less hydrogen bonds with water as compared to wild type at 337 K. In contrast to wild type, the mutant shows significant increase in unique saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts at 337 K. The current study indicates that there is a strong inter-dependence of thermal stability on the way in which non-covalent interactions reorganize, and it is rewarding to explore this connection in single mutant studies. PMID:26657745

  10. Molecular characterization of the AdeI mutant of Chinese hamster ovary cells: a cellular model of adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Vliet, Lydia K; Wilkinson, Terry G; Duval, Nathan; Vacano, Guido; Graham, Christine; Zikánová, Marie; Skopova, Vaclava; Baresova, Veronika; Hnízda, Aleš; Kmoch, Stanislav; Patterson, David

    2011-01-01

    Adenylosuccinate lyase (ADSL, E. C. 4.3.2.2) carries out two non-sequential steps in de novo AMP synthesis, the conversion of succinylaminoimidazole carboxamide ribotide (SAICAR) to aminoimidazolecarboxamide ribotide (AICAR) and the conversion of succinyl AMP (AMPS) to AMP. In humans, mutations in ADSL lead to an inborn error of metabolism originally characterized by developmental delay, often with autistic features. There is no effective treatment for ADSL deficiency. Hypotheses regarding the pathogenesis include toxicity of high levels of SAICAR, AMPS, or their metabolites, deficiency of the de novo purine biosynthetic pathway, or lack of a completely functional purine cycle in muscle and brain. One important approach to understand ADSL deficiency is to develop cell culture models that allow investigation of the properties of ADSL mutants and the consequences of ADSL deficiency at the cellular level. We previously reported the isolation and initial characterization of mutants of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells (AdeI) that lack detectable ADSL activity, accumulate SAICAR and AMPS, and require adenine for growth. Here we report the cDNA sequences of ADSL from CHO-K1 and AdeI cells and describe a mutation resulting in an alanine to valine amino acid substitution at position 291 (A291V) in AdeI ADSL. This substitution lies in the "signature sequence" of ADSL, inactivates the enzyme, and validates AdeI as a cellular model of ADSL deficiency.

  11. 21 CFR 172.540 - DL-Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true DL-Alanine. 172.540 Section 172.540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents and Related Substances § 172.540 DL-Alanine. DL-Alanine (a racemic mixture of D- and...

  12. On the existence of ‘L-alanine cadmium bromide'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Bikshandarkoil R.

    2013-12-01

    It is argued that the recently reported nonlinear optical crystal L-alanine cadmium bromide, grown by slow solvent evaporation method at room temperature [P. Ilayabarathi, J. Chandrasekaran, Spectrochim. Acta 96A (2012) 684-689] is the well-known L-alanine crystal. The isolation of L-alanine crystal is explained due to fractional crystallization.

  13. On the existence of 'L-alanine cadmium bromide'.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Bikshandarkoil R

    2013-12-01

    It is argued that the recently reported nonlinear optical crystal L-alanine cadmium bromide, grown by slow solvent evaporation method at room temperature [P. Ilayabarathi, J. Chandrasekaran, Spectrochim. Acta 96A (2012) 684-689] is the well-known L-alanine crystal. The isolation of L-alanine crystal is explained due to fractional crystallization.

  14. A leucine-to-proline substitution causes a defective [alpha]-antichymotrypsin allele associated with familial obstructive lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Poller, W.; Scholz, S.; Fischer, M. ); Faber, J.P.; Tief, K.; Olek, K.; Kirchgesser, M. ); Weidinger, S. ); Heidtmann, H.H. )

    1993-09-01

    Using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and direct sequencing of amplified genomic DNA, the authors have identified two defective mutants of the human [alpha][sub 1]-antichymotrypsin (ACT) gene associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A leucine 55-to-proline substitution causing a defective ACT allele (Bochum-1) was observed in a family with COPD in three subsequent generations. Another mutation, proline 229-to-alanine (Bonn-1), was associated with ACT serum deficiency in four patients with a positive family history. These mutations were not detected among 100 healthy control subjects, suggesting a possible pathogenetic role of ACT gene defects in a subset of patients with COPD. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Mutation of glycine receptor subunit creates beta-alanine receptor responsive to GABA.

    PubMed

    Schmieden, V; Kuhse, J; Betz, H

    1993-10-08

    The amino acid at position 160 of the ligand-binding subunit, alpha 1, is an important determinant of agonist and antagonist binding to the glycine receptor. Exchange of the neighboring residues, phenylalanine at position 159 and tyrosine at position 161, increased the efficacy of amino acid agonists. Whereas wild-type alpha 1 channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes required 0.7 millimolar beta-alanine for a half-maximal response, the doubly mutated (F159Y,Y161F) alpha 1 subunit had an affinity for beta-alanine (which was more potent than glycine) that was 110-fold that of the wild type. Also, gamma-aminobutyric acid and D-serine, amino acids that do not activate wild-type alpha 1 receptors, efficiently gated the mutant channel. Thus, aromatic hydroxyl groups are crucial for ligand discrimination at inhibitory amino acid receptors.

  16. Structure-function relationship in the antifreeze activity of synthetic alanine-lysine antifreeze polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Wierzbicki, A; Knight, C A; Rutland, T J; Muccio, D D; Pybus, B S; Sikes, C S

    2000-01-01

    Recently antifreeze proteins (AFP) have been the subject of many structure-function relationship studies regarding their antifreeze activity. Attempts have been made to elucidate the structure-function relationship by various amino acid substitutions, but to our knowledge there has been no successful from first principles design of a polypeptide that would bind to designated ice planes along a specific direction. In this paper we show the results of our first attempt on an entirely de novo design of an alanine-lysine-rich antifreeze polypeptide. This 43 residue alanine-lysine peptide exhibits characteristic nonequilibrium freezing point depression and binds to the designated (210) planes of ice along the [122] vector. The structural and thermodynamic properties of this polypeptide were determined using circular dichroism spectroscopy and its nonequilibrium antifreeze properties were investigated using an ice-etching method and nanoliter osmometry.

  17. Structural and functional characterization of the alanine racemase from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2).

    PubMed

    Tassoni, Raffaella; van der Aart, Lizah T; Ubbink, Marcellus; van Wezel, Gilles P; Pannu, Navraj S

    2017-01-29

    The conversion of l-alanine (L-Ala) into d-alanine (D-Ala) in bacteria is performed by pyridoxal phosphate-dependent enzymes called alanine racemases. D-Ala is an essential component of the bacterial peptidoglycan and hence required for survival. The Gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor has at least one alanine racemase encoded by alr. Here, we describe an alr deletion mutant of S. coelicolor which depends on D-Ala for growth and shows increased sensitivity to the antibiotic d-cycloserine (DCS). The crystal structure of the alanine racemase (Alr) was solved with and without the inhibitors DCS or propionate, at 1.64 Å and 1.51 Å resolution, respectively. The crystal structures revealed that Alr is a homodimer with residues from both monomers contributing to the active site. The dimeric state of the enzyme in solution was confirmed by gel filtration chromatography, with and without L-Ala or d-cycloserine. The activity of the enzyme was 66 ± 3 U mg(-1) for the racemization of L- to D-Ala, and 104 ± 7 U mg(-1) for the opposite direction. Comparison of Alr from S. coelicolor with orthologous enzymes from other bacteria, including the closely related d-cycloserine-resistant Alr from S. lavendulae, strongly suggests that structural features such as the hinge angle or the surface area between the monomers do not contribute to d-cycloserine resistance, and the molecular basis for resistance therefore remains elusive.

  18. Functional characterization of Escherichia coli GlpG and additional rhomboid proteins using an aarA mutant of Providencia stuartii.

    PubMed

    Clemmer, Katy M; Sturgill, Gwen M; Veenstra, Alexander; Rather, Philip N

    2006-05-01

    The Providencia stuartii AarA protein is a member of the rhomboid family of intramembrane serine proteases and required for the production of an extracellular signaling molecule that regulates cellular functions including peptidoglycan acetylation, methionine transport, and cysteine biosynthesis. Additional aarA-dependent phenotypes include (i) loss of an extracellular yellow pigment, (ii) inability to grow on MacConkey agar, and (iii) abnormal cell division. Since these phenotypes are easily assayed, the P. stuartii aarA mutant serves as a useful host system to investigate rhomboid function. The Escherichia coli GlpG protein was shown to be functionally similar to AarA and rescued the above aarA-dependent phenotypes in P. stuartii. GlpG proteins containing single alanine substitutions at the highly conserved catalytic triad of asparagine (N154A), serine (S201A), or histidine (H254A) residues were nonfunctional. The P. stuartii aarA mutant was also used as a biosensor to demonstrate that proteins from a variety of diverse sources exhibited rhomboid activity. In an effort to further investigate the role of a rhomboid protein in cell physiology, a glpG mutant of E. coli was constructed. In phenotype microarray experiments, the glpG mutant exhibited a slight increase in resistance to the beta-lactam antibiotic cefotaxime.

  19. NQR in Alanine and Lysine Iodates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosyan, A. M.; Burbelo, V. M.; Tamazyan, R. A.; Karapetyan, H. A.; Sukiasyan, R. P.

    2000-02-01

    The structure o f iodates of α- and β-alanine ( Ala) (2(β-Ala • HIO3) • H2O , β-Ala-2HIO3 , D L-Ala• HIO3 • 2H2O, L-Ala • HIO3) and L-lysine (L-Lys) (L-Lys • HIO3, L-Lys • 2HIO3,L-Lys • 3HIO3, L-Lys • 6HIO3) have been investigated by means of iodine-127 NQR, IR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction

  20. Conserved aspartic acid 233 and alanine 231 are not required for poliovirus polymerase function in replicons

    PubMed Central

    Freistadt, Marion S; Eberle, Karen E

    2007-01-01

    Nucleic acid polymerases have similar structures and motifs. The function of an aspartic acid (conserved in all classes of nucleic acid polymerases) in motif A remains poorly understood in RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. We mutated this residue to alanine in a poliovirus replicon. The resulting mutant could still replicate, although at a reduced level. In addition, mutation A231C (also in motif A) yielded high levels of replication. Taken together these results show that poliovirus polymerase conserved residues D233 and A231 are not essential to poliovirus replicon function. PMID:17352827

  1. BarR, an Lrp-type transcription factor in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, regulates an aminotransferase gene in a β-alanine responsive manner.

    PubMed

    Liu, Han; Orell, Alvaro; Maes, Dominique; van Wolferen, Marleen; Lindås, Ann-Christin; Bernander, Rolf; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Charlier, Daniel; Peeters, Eveline

    2014-05-01

    In archaea, nothing is known about the β-alanine degradation pathway or its regulation. In this work, we identify and characterize BarR, a novel Lrp-like transcription factor and the first one that has a non-proteinogenic amino acid ligand. BarR is conserved in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and Sulfolobus tokodaii and is located in a divergent operon with a gene predicted to encode β-alanine aminotransferase. Deletion of barR resulted in a reduced exponential growth rate in the presence of β-alanine. Furthermore, qRT-PCR and promoter activity assays demonstrated that BarR activates the expression of the adjacent aminotransferase gene, but only upon β-alanine supplementation. In contrast, auto-activation proved to be β-alanine independent. Heterologously produced BarR is an octamer in solution and forms a single complex by interacting with multiple sites in the 170 bp long intergenic region separating the divergently transcribed genes. In vitro, DNA binding is specifically responsive to β-alanine and site-mutant analyses indicated that β-alanine directly interacts with the ligand-binding pocket. Altogether, this work contributes to the growing body of evidence that in archaea, Lrp-like transcription factors have physiological roles that go beyond the regulation of α-amino acid metabolism.

  2. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from Streptococcus mutans

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yong-Zhi; Sheng, Yu; Li, Lan-Fen; Tang, De-Wei; Liu, Xiang-Yu; Zhao, Xiaojun; Liang, Yu-He Su, Xiao-Dong

    2007-09-01

    A potential target for antibiotic drug design, d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from S. mutans, was expressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution. d-Alanine-d-alanine ligase is encoded by the gene ddl (SMU-599) in Streptococcus mutans. This ligase plays a very important role in cell-wall biosynthesis and may be a potential target for drug design. To study the structure and function of this ligase, the gene ddl was amplified from S. mutans genomic DNA and cloned into the expression vector pET28a. The protein was expressed in soluble form in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3). Homogeneous protein was obtained using a two-step procedure consisting of Ni{sup 2+}-chelating and size-exclusion chromatography. Purified protein was crystallized and the cube-shaped crystal diffracted to 2.4 Å. The crystal belongs to space group P3{sub 1}21 or P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 79.50, c = 108.97 Å. There is one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  3. Racemization of alanine by the alanine racemases from Salmonella typhimurium and Bacillus stearothermophilus: energetic reaction profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Faraci, W.S.; Walsh, C.T.

    1988-05-03

    Alanine racemases are bacterial pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) dependent enzymes providing D-alanine as an essential building block for biosynthesis of the peptidoglycan layer of the cell wall. Two isozymic alanine racemases, encoded by the dadB gene and the alr gene, from the Gram-negative mesophilic Salmonella typhimurium and one from the Gram-positive thermophilic Bacillus stearothermophilus have been examined for the racemization mechanism. Substrate deuterium isotope effects and solvent deuterium isotope effects have been measured in both L ..-->.. D and D..-->.. L directions for all three enzymes to assess the degree to which abstraction of the ..cap alpha..-proton or protonation of substrate PLP carbanion is limiting in catalysis. Additionally, experiments measuring internal return of ..cap alpha..-/sup 3/H from substrate to product and solvent exchange/substrate conversion experiments in /sup 3/H/sub 2/O have been used with each enzyme to examine the partitioning of substrate PLP carbanion intermediates and to obtain the relative heights of kinetically significant energy barriers in alanine racemase catalysis.

  4. R76 in transmembrane domain 3 of the aspartate:alanine transporter AspT is involved in substrate transport.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Satomi; Nanatani, Kei; Abe, Keietsu

    2016-01-01

    The L-aspartate:L-alanine antiporter of Tetragenococcus halophilus (AspT) possesses an arginine residue (R76) within the GxxxG motif in the central part of transmembrane domain 3 (TM3)-a residue that has been estimated to transport function. In this study, we carried out amino acid substitutions of R76 and used proteoliposome reconstitution for analyzing the transport function of each substitution. Both l-aspartate and l-alanine transport assays showed that R76K has higher activity than the AspT-WT (R76), whereas R76D and R76E have lower activity than the AspT-WT. These results suggest that R76 is involved in AspT substrate transport.

  5. Ring Substituents on Substituted Benzamide Ligands Indirectly Mediate Interactions with Position 7.39 of Transmembrane Helix 7 of the D4 Dopamine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ericksen, Spencer S.; Cummings, David F.; Teer, Michael E.; Amdani, Shahnawaz

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to delineate how specific molecular interactions of dopamine receptor ligand classes vary between D2-like dopamine receptor subtypes, a conserved threonine in transmembrane (TM) helix 7 (Thr7.39), implicated as a key ligand interaction site with biogenic amine G protein-coupled receptors, was substituted with alanine in D2 and D4 receptors. Interrogation of different ligand chemotypes for sensitivity to this substitution revealed enhanced affinity in the D4, but not the D2 receptor, specifically for substituted benzamides (SBAs) having polar 4- (para) and/or 5- (meta) benzamide ring substituents. D4-T7.39A was fully functional, and the mutation did not alter the sodium-mediated positive and negative allostery observed with SBAs and agonists, respectively. With the exception of the non-SBA ligand (+)-butaclamol, which, in contrast to certain SBAs, had decreased affinity for the D4-T7.39A mutant, the interactions of numerous other ligands were unaffected by this mutation. SBAs were docked into D4 models in the same mode as observed for eticlopride in the D3 crystal structure. In this mode, interactions with TM5 and TM6 residues constrain the SBA ring position that produces distal steric crowding between pyrrolidinyl/diethylamine moieties and D4-Thr7.39. Ligand-residue interaction energy profiles suggest this crowding is mitigated by substitution with a smaller alanine. The profiles indicate sites that contribute to the SBA binding interaction and site-specific energy changes imparted by the D4-T7.39A mutation. Substantial interaction energy changes are observed at only a few positions, some of which are not conserved among the dopamine receptor subtypes and thus seem to account for this D4 subtype-specific structure-activity relationship. PMID:22588261

  6. Solvent substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Office of Technology Development and the Air Force Engineering and Services Center convened the First Annual International Workshop on Solvent Substitution on December 4--7, 1990. The primary objectives of this joint effort were to share information and ideas among attendees in order to enhance the development and implementation of required new technologies for the elimination of pollutants associated with industrial use of hazardous and toxic solvents; and to aid in accelerating collaborative efforts and technology transfer between government and industry for solvent substitution. There were workshop sessions focusing on Alternative Technologies, Alternative Solvents, Recovery/Recycling, Low VOC Materials and Treatment for Environmentally Safe Disposal. The 35 invited papers presented covered a wide range of solvent substitution activities including: hardware and weapons production and maintenance, paint stripping, coating applications, printed circuit boards, metal cleaning, metal finishing, manufacturing, compliance monitoring and process control monitoring. This publication includes the majority of these presentations. In addition, in order to further facilitate information exchange and technology transfer, the US Air Force and DOE solicited additional papers under a general Call for Papers.'' These papers, which underwent review and final selection by a peer review committee, are also included in this combined Proceedings/Compendium. For those involved in handling, using or managing hazardous and toxic solvents, this document should prove to be a valuable resource, providing the most up-to-date information on current technologies and practices in solvent substitution. Individual papers are abstracted separated.

  7. International society of sports nutrition position stand: Beta-Alanine.

    PubMed

    Trexler, Eric T; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Stout, Jeffrey R; Hoffman, Jay R; Wilborn, Colin D; Sale, Craig; Kreider, Richard B; Jäger, Ralf; Earnest, Conrad P; Bannock, Laurent; Campbell, Bill; Kalman, Douglas; Ziegenfuss, Tim N; Antonio, Jose

    2015-01-01

    The International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) provides an objective and critical review of the mechanisms and use of beta-alanine supplementation. Based on the current available literature, the conclusions of the ISSN are as follows: 1) Four weeks of beta-alanine supplementation (4-6 g daily) significantly augments muscle carnosine concentrations, thereby acting as an intracellular pH buffer; 2) Beta-alanine supplementation currently appears to be safe in healthy populations at recommended doses; 3) The only reported side effect is paraesthesia (tingling), but studies indicate this can be attenuated by using divided lower doses (1.6 g) or using a sustained-release formula; 4) Daily supplementation with 4 to 6 g of beta-alanine for at least 2 to 4 weeks has been shown to improve exercise performance, with more pronounced effects in open end-point tasks/time trials lasting 1 to 4 min in duration; 5) Beta-alanine attenuates neuromuscular fatigue, particularly in older subjects, and preliminary evidence indicates that beta-alanine may improve tactical performance; 6) Combining beta-alanine with other single or multi-ingredient supplements may be advantageous when supplementation of beta-alanine is high enough (4-6 g daily) and long enough (minimum 4 weeks); 7) More research is needed to determine the effects of beta-alanine on strength, endurance performance beyond 25 min in duration, and other health-related benefits associated with carnosine.

  8. A hyperfusogenic F protein enhances the oncolytic potency of a paramyxovirus simian virus 5 P/V mutant without compromising sensitivity to type I interferon.

    PubMed

    Gainey, Maria D; Manuse, Mary J; Parks, Griffith D

    2008-10-01

    Viral fusogenic membrane proteins have been proposed as tools to increase the potency of oncolytic viruses, but there is a need for mechanisms to control the spread of fusogenic viruses in normal versus tumor cells. We have previously shown that a mutant of the paramyxovirus simian virus 5 (SV5) that harbors mutations in the P/V gene from the canine parainfluenza virus (P/V-CPI(-)) is a potent inducer of type I interferon (IFN) and apoptosis and is restricted for spread through normal but not tumor cells in vitro. Here, we have used the cytopathic P/V-CPI(-) as a backbone vector to test the hypothesis that a virus expressing a hyperfusogenic glycoprotein will be a more effective oncolytic vector but will retain sensitivity to IFN. A P/V mutant virus expressing an F protein with a glycine-to-alanine substitution in the fusion peptide (P/V-CPI(-)-G3A) was more fusogenic than the parental P/V-CPI(-) mutant. In two model prostate tumor cell lines which are defective in IFN production (LNCaP and DU145), the hyperfusogenic P/V-CPI(-)-G3A mutant had normal growth properties at low multiplicities of infection and was more effective than the parental P/V-CPI(-) mutant at cell killing in vitro. However, in PC3 cells which produce and respond to IFN, the hyperfusogenic P/V-CPI(-)-G3A mutant was attenuated for growth and spread. Killing of PC3 cells was equivalent between the parental P/V-CPI(-) mutant and the hyperfusogenic P/V-CPI(-)-G3A mutant. In a nude mouse model using LNCaP cells, the hyperfusogenic P/V-CPI(-)-G3A mutant was more effective than P/V-CPI(-) at reducing tumor burden. In the case of DU145 tumors, the two vectors based on P/V-CPI(-) were equally effective at limiting tumor growth. Together, our results provide proof of principle that a cytopathic SV5 P/V mutant can serve as an oncolytic virus and that the oncolytic effectiveness of P/V mutants can be enhanced by a fusogenic membrane protein without compromising sensitivity to IFN. The potential advantages of

  9. Alanine-Scanning Mutational Analysis of Durancin GL Reveals Residues Important for Its Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xingrong; Chen, Xinquan; Du, Lihui; Wu, Xueyou; Liu, Fang; Yuan, Jian

    2015-07-22

    Durancin GL is a novel class IIa bacteriocin with 43 residues produced by Enterococcus durans 41D. This bacteriocin demonstrates narrow inhibition spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against several Listeria monocytogenes strains, including nisin-resistant L. monocytogenes NR30. A systematic alanine-scanning mutational analysis with site-directed mutagenesis was performed to analyze durancin GL residues important for antimicrobial activity and specificity. Results showed that three mutations lost their antimicrobial activity, ten mutations demonstrated a decreased effect on the activity, and seven mutations exhibited relatively high activity. With regard to inhibitory spectrum, four mutants demonstrated a narrower antimicrobial spectrum than wild-type durancin GL. Another four mutants displayed a broader target cell spectrum and increased potency relative to wild-type durancin GL. These findings broaden our understanding of durancin GL residues important for its antimicrobial activity and contribute to future rational design of variants with increased potency.

  10. Alanine aminotransferase controls seed dormancy in barley

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Kazuhiro; Yamane, Miki; Yamaji, Nami; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Tagiri, Akemi; Schwerdt, Julian G.; Fincher, Geoffrey B.; Matsumoto, Takashi; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Komatsuda, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Dormancy allows wild barley grains to survive dry summers in the Near East. After domestication, barley was selected for shorter dormancy periods. Here we isolate the major seed dormancy gene qsd1 from wild barley, which encodes an alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT). The seed dormancy gene is expressed specifically in the embryo. The AlaAT isoenzymes encoded by the long and short dormancy alleles differ in a single amino acid residue. The reduced dormancy allele Qsd1 evolved from barleys that were first domesticated in the southern Levant and had the long dormancy qsd1 allele that can be traced back to wild barleys. The reduced dormancy mutation likely contributed to the enhanced performance of barley in industrial applications such as beer and whisky production, which involve controlled germination. In contrast, the long dormancy allele might be used to control pre-harvest sprouting in higher rainfall areas to enhance global adaptation of barley. PMID:27188711

  11. Crystal structure of the Apo form of D-Alanine:D-Alanine ligase (DDl) from Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yongzhi; Xu, Hongyan; Zhao, Xiaojun

    2010-08-01

    D-Alanine:D-Alanine ligase (DDl) catalyzes the formation of D-Alanine:D-Alanine dipeptide and is an essential enzyme in bacterial cell wall biosynthesis.. This enzyme does not have a human ortholog, making it an attractive target for developing new antibiotic drugs. We determined the crystal structure at 2.23 A resolution of DDl from Streptococcus mutans (SmDDl), the principal aetiological agent of human dental caries. This structure reveals that SmDDl is a dimer and has a disordered omega-loop region.

  12. Structural and biochemical analyses of alanine racemase from the multidrug-resistant Clostridium difficile strain 630.

    PubMed

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A; Nelson, Sarah K; Mootien, Sara; Lee, Yashang; Rezende, Wanderson C; Hyman, Daniel A; Matsumoto, Monica M; Reiling, Scott; Kelleher, Alan; Ledizet, Michel; Koski, Raymond A; Anthony, Karen G

    2014-07-01

    Clostridium difficile, a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium, is the leading cause of infectious diarrhea among hospitalized patients. C. difficile is frequently associated with antibiotic treatment, and causes diseases ranging from antibiotic-associated diarrhea to life-threatening pseudomembranous colitis. The severity of C. difficile infections is exacerbated by the emergence of hypervirulent and multidrug-resistant strains, which are difficult to treat and are often associated with increased mortality rates. Alanine racemase (Alr) is a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the reversible racemization of L- and D-alanine. Since D-alanine is an essential component of the bacterial cell-wall peptidoglycan, and there are no known Alr homologs in humans, this enzyme is being tested as an antibiotic target. Cycloserine is an antibiotic that inhibits Alr. In this study, the catalytic properties and crystal structures of recombinant Alr from the virulent and multidrug-resistant C. difficile strain 630 are presented. Three crystal structures of C. difficile Alr (CdAlr), corresponding to the complex with PLP, the complex with cycloserine and a K271T mutant form of the enzyme with bound PLP, are presented. The structures are prototypical Alr homodimers with two active sites in which the cofactor PLP and cycloserine are localized. Kinetic analyses reveal that the K271T mutant CdAlr has the highest catalytic constants reported to date for any Alr. Additional studies are needed to identify the basis for the high catalytic activity. The structural and activity data presented are first steps towards using CdAlr for the development of structure-based therapeutics for C. difficile infections.

  13. Alanine repeats influence protein localization in splicing speckles and paraspeckles.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shuo-Hsiu; Chang, Wei-Lun; Lu, Chia-Chen; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2014-12-16

    Mammalian splicing regulatory protein RNA-binding motif protein 4 (RBM4) has an alanine repeat-containing C-terminal domain (CAD) that confers both nuclear- and splicing speckle-targeting activities. Alanine-repeat expansion has pathological potential. Here we show that the alanine-repeat tracts influence the subnuclear targeting properties of the RBM4 CAD in cultured human cells. Notably, truncation of the alanine tracts redistributed a portion of RBM4 to paraspeckles. The alanine-deficient CAD was sufficient for paraspeckle targeting. On the other hand, alanine-repeat expansion reduced the mobility of RBM4 and impaired its splicing activity. We further took advantage of the putative coactivator activator (CoAA)-RBM4 conjoined splicing factor, CoAZ, to investigate the function of the CAD in subnuclear targeting. Transiently expressed CoAZ formed discrete nuclear foci that emerged and subsequently separated-fully or partially-from paraspeckles. Alanine-repeat expansion appeared to prevent CoAZ separation from paraspeckles, resulting in their complete colocalization. CoAZ foci were dynamic but, unlike paraspeckles, were resistant to RNase treatment. Our results indicate that the alanine-rich CAD, in conjunction with its conjoined RNA-binding domain(s), differentially influences the subnuclear localization and biogenesis of RBM4 and CoAZ.

  14. Mutant Proteins--Enzymes to Hydrolyze Toxic Organophosphates.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-15

    strains of infectious bacteria and the serine protease’ lytic protease. We also employ novel chemical modifications of ; mutant proteins to achieve...mutant RTEM -1 8-lactamase. We have previously generated and characterized mutants of RTEM -1 .- lactamase with all possible amino acid substitutions (site...denaturation than wild-type -lactamase. Uniquely among class A B- lactamases, the RTEM -1 (and RTEM -2) enzymes contain a single disulfide bond between Cys

  15. A single glycine-alanine exchange directs ligand specificity of the elephant progestin receptor.

    PubMed

    Wierer, Michael; Schrey, Anna K; Kühne, Ronald; Ulbrich, Susanne E; Meyer, Heinrich H D

    2012-01-01

    The primary gestagen of elephants is 5α-dihydroprogesterone (DHP), which is unlike all other mammals studied until now. The level of DHP in elephants equals that of progesterone in other mammals, and elephants are able to bind DHP with similar affinity to progesterone indicating a unique ligand-binding specificity of the elephant progestin receptor (PR). Using site-directed mutagenesis in combination with in vitro binding studies we here report that this change in specificity is due to a single glycine to alanine exchange at position 722 (G722A) of PR, which specifically increases DHP affinity while not affecting binding of progesterone. By conducting molecular dynamics simulations comparing human and elephant PR ligand-binding domains (LBD), we observed that the alanine methyl group at position 722 is able to push the DHP A-ring into a position similar to progesterone. In the human PR, the DHP A-ring position is twisted towards helix 3 of PR thereby disturbing the hydrogen bond pattern around the C3-keto group, resulting in a lower binding affinity. Furthermore, we observed that the elephant PR ligand-binding pocket is more rigid than the human analogue, which probably explains the higher affinity towards both progesterone and DHP. Interestingly, the G722A substitution is not elephant-specific, rather it is also present in five independent lineages of mammalian evolution, suggesting a special role of the substitution for the development of distinct mammalian gestagen systems.

  16. Production of D-Alanine by Corynebacterium fascians

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Shigeki; Maeshima, Haruko; Wada, Mitsuru; Chibata, Ichiro

    1973-01-01

    A strain identified as Corynebacterium fascians was found to accumulate extracellular D-alanine from glycerol. Cultural conditions for the accumulation of D-alanine were investigated and, as a result, a yield of 7 g of D-alanine per liter was obtained after a 96-h incubation in a medium containing 5% glycerol, 4% (NH4)2HPO4, and 0.3% corn steep liquor. Optical purity of D-alanine was dependent upon the concentration of corn steep liquor. At the optimal condition, almost optically pure D-alanine was formed and readily isolated (5 g/liter) from the fermentation broth. The product was not contaminated with any detectable amount of other amino acids, except for glycine which was present at a concentration of less than 1 percent. PMID:4699220

  17. The structure of alanine racemase from Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Davis, Emily; Scaletti-Hutchinson, Emma; Opel-Reading, Helen; Nakatani, Yoshio; Krause, Kurt L

    2014-09-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic Gram-negative bacterium which is a common cause of hospital-acquired infections. Numerous antibiotic-resistant strains exist, emphasizing the need for the development of new antimicrobials. Alanine racemase (Alr) is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate dependent enzyme that is responsible for racemization between enantiomers of alanine. As D-alanine is an essential component of the bacterial cell wall, its inhibition is lethal to prokaryotes, making it an excellent antibiotic drug target. The crystal structure of A. baumannii alanine racemase (AlrAba) from the highly antibiotic-resistant NCTC13302 strain has been solved to 1.9 Å resolution. Comparison of AlrAba with alanine racemases from closely related bacteria demonstrates a conserved overall fold. The substrate entryway and active site of the enzymes were shown to be highly conserved. The structure of AlrAba will provide the template required for future structure-based drug-design studies.

  18. Modulation of the immunogenicity of virus-like particles composed of mutant hepatitis B virus envelope subunits.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Wan-Shoo; Hyakumura, Michiko; Yuen, Lilly; Warner, Nadia; Locarnini, Stephen; Netter, Hans J

    2012-02-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) are non-infectious subviral protein complexes, which possess structural features identical or closely related to infectious virions. They are utilized as delivery tools for immunologically relevant antigenic sequences. In order to investigate whether mutant subunits can modulate the VLP immunogenicity, comparative immunization studies with wild-type and non-native VLPs were performed. To determine whether disulfide bonding impacts on the immunogenicity of hepatitis B virus envelope proteins (HBsAg), mutant HBsAg subunits with single, double and triple cysteine residue substitutions were generated. The mutant proteins were expressed in cell culture, secretion competent non-native VLPs generated, followed by immunization studies in mice to measure the cellular immune response. The reduced ability of mutant HBsAg proteins to form disulfide bonds does not interfere with their ability to assemble into secretion competent VLPs. Depending on specific cysteine to alanine changes, VLPs could be generated with or without an increased ratio of monomeric versus dimeric/oligomeric subunits compared to wild-type VLPs. The utilization of non-native VLPs resulted in enhanced cellular immune responses and does not seem to depend on the ratio between monomeric or dimeric/oligomeric subunits. Comparative immunization studies strongly indicate that changes in the disulfide bonding modulate the VLP immunogenicity most likely due to structural changes. We hypothesize that structural features have evolved with reduced immunogenicity to evade the constraints imposed by the immune system. Altering VLP conformation may represent an attractive strategy to modulate antigen processing resulting in an enhanced immune response and/or a changed hierarchy of epitope presentation.

  19. Comparison of EPR response of alanine and Gd₂O₃-alanine dosimeters exposed to TRIGA Mainz reactor.

    PubMed

    Marrale, M; Schmitz, T; Gallo, S; Hampel, G; Longo, A; Panzeca, S; Tranchina, L

    2015-12-01

    In this work we report some preliminary results regarding the analysis of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) response of alanine pellets and alanine pellets added with gadolinium used for dosimetry at the TRIGA research reactor in Mainz, Germany. Two set-ups were evaluated: irradiation inside PMMA phantom and irradiation inside boric acid phantom. We observed that the presence of Gd2O3 inside alanine pellets increases the EPR signal by a factor of 3.45 and 1.24 in case of PMMA and boric acid phantoms, respectively. We can conclude that in the case of neutron beam with a predominant thermal neutron component the addition of gadolinium oxide can significantly improve neutron sensitivity of alanine pellets. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of both response of alanine and Gd-added alanine pellets with FLUKA code were performed and a good agreement was achieved for pure alanine dosimeters. For Gd2O3-alanine deviations between MC simulations and experimental data were observed and discussed.

  20. Structures of the G81A mutant form of the active chimera of (S)-mandelate dehydrogenase and its complex with two of its substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Sukumar, Narayanasami; Dewanti, Asteriani; Merli, Angelo; Rossi, Gian Luigi; Mitra, Bharati; Mathews, F. Scott

    2009-06-01

    The crystal structure of the G81A mutant form of the chimera of (S)-mandelate dehydrogenase and of its complexes with two of its substrates reveal productive and non-productive modes of binding for the catalytic reaction. The structure also indicates the role of G81A in lowering the redox potential of the flavin co-factor leading to an ∼200-fold slower catalytic rate of substrate oxidation. (S)-Mandelate dehydrogenase (MDH) from Pseudomonas putida, a membrane-associated flavoenzyme, catalyzes the oxidation of (S)-mandelate to benzoylformate. Previously, the structure of a catalytically similar chimera, MDH-GOX2, rendered soluble by the replacement of its membrane-binding segment with the corresponding segment of glycolate oxidase (GOX), was determined and found to be highly similar to that of GOX except within the substituted segments. Subsequent attempts to cocrystallize MDH-GOX2 with substrate proved unsuccessful. However, the G81A mutants of MDH and of MDH-GOX2 displayed ∼100-fold lower reactivity with substrate and a modestly higher reactivity towards molecular oxygen. In order to understand the effect of the mutation and to identify the mode of substrate binding in MDH-GOX2, a crystallographic investigation of the G81A mutant of the MDH-GOX2 enzyme was initiated. The structures of ligand-free G81A mutant MDH-GOX2 and of its complexes with the substrates 2-hydroxyoctanoate and 2-hydroxy-3-indolelactate were determined at 1.6, 2.5 and 2.2 Å resolution, respectively. In the ligand-free G81A mutant protein, a sulfate anion previously found at the active site is displaced by the alanine side chain introduced by the mutation. 2-Hydroxyoctanoate binds in an apparently productive mode for subsequent reaction, while 2-hydroxy-3-indolelactate is bound to the enzyme in an apparently unproductive mode. The results of this investigation suggest that a lowering of the polarity of the flavin environment resulting from the displacement of nearby water molecules caused by

  1. Production of amino acids by analog-resistant mutants of the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis.

    PubMed Central

    Riccardi, G; Sora, S; Ciferri, O

    1981-01-01

    Mutants of Spirulina platensis resistant to 5-fluorotryptophan, beta-3-thienyl-alanine, ethionine, p-fluorophenylalanine, or azetidine-2-carboxylic acid were isolated. Some of these mutants appeared to be resistant to more than one analog and to overproduce the corresponding amino acids. A second group was composed of mutants that were resistant to one analog only. Of the latter mutants, one resistant to azetidine-2-carboxylic acid was found to overproduce proline only, whereas one resistant to fluorotryptophan and one resistant to ethionine did not overproduce any of the tested amino acids. PMID:6792182

  2. GMXPBSA 2.1: A GROMACS tool to perform MM/PBSA and computational alanine scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paissoni, C.; Spiliotopoulos, D.; Musco, G.; Spitaleri, A.

    2015-01-01

    GMXPBSA 2.1 is a user-friendly suite of Bash/Perl scripts for streamlining MM/PBSA calculations on structural ensembles derived from GROMACS trajectories, to automatically calculate binding free energies for protein-protein or ligand-protein complexes [R.T. Bradshaw et al., Protein Eng. Des. Sel. 24 (2011) 197-207]. GMXPBSA 2.1 is flexible and can easily be customized to specific needs and it is an improvement of the previous GMXPBSA 2.0 [C. Paissoni et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. (2014), 185, 2920-2929]. Additionally, it performs computational alanine scanning (CAS) to study the effects of ligand and/or receptor alanine mutations on the free energy of binding. Calculations require only for protein-protein or protein-ligand MD simulations. GMXPBSA 2.1 performs different comparative analyses, including a posteriori generation of alanine mutants of the wild-type complex, calculation of the binding free energy values of the mutant complexes and comparison of the results with the wild-type system. Moreover, it compares the binding free energy of different complex trajectories, allowing the study of the effects of non-alanine mutations, post-translational modifications or unnatural amino acids on the binding free energy of the system under investigation. Finally, it can calculate and rank relative affinity to the same receptor utilizing MD simulations of proteins in complex with different ligands. In order to dissect the different MM/PBSA energy contributions, including molecular mechanic (MM), electrostatic contribution to solvation (PB) and nonpolar contribution to solvation (SA), the tool combines two freely available programs: the MD simulations software GROMACS [S. Pronk et al., Bioinformatics 29 (2013) 845-854] and the Poisson-Boltzmann equation solver APBS [N.A. Baker et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A 98 (2001) 10037-10041]. All the calculations can be performed in single or distributed automatic fashion on a cluster facility in order to increase the

  3. Alanine and proline content modulate global sensitivity to discrete perturbations in disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Perez, Romel B; Tischer, Alexander; Auton, Matthew; Whitten, Steven T

    2014-12-01

    Molecular transduction of biological signals is understood primarily in terms of the cooperative structural transitions of protein macromolecules, providing a mechanism through which discrete local structure perturbations affect global macromolecular properties. The recognition that proteins lacking tertiary stability, commonly referred to as intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), mediate key signaling pathways suggests that protein structures without cooperative intramolecular interactions may also have the ability to couple local and global structure changes. Presented here are results from experiments that measured and tested the ability of disordered proteins to couple local changes in structure to global changes in structure. Using the intrinsically disordered N-terminal region of the p53 protein as an experimental model, a set of proline (PRO) and alanine (ALA) to glycine (GLY) substitution variants were designed to modulate backbone conformational propensities without introducing non-native intramolecular interactions. The hydrodynamic radius (R(h)) was used to monitor changes in global structure. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that the GLY substitutions decreased polyproline II (PP(II)) propensities relative to the wild type, as expected, and fluorescence methods indicated that substitution-induced changes in R(h) were not associated with folding. The experiments showed that changes in local PP(II) structure cause changes in R(h) that are variable and that depend on the intrinsic chain propensities of PRO and ALA residues, demonstrating a mechanism for coupling local and global structure changes. Molecular simulations that model our results were used to extend the analysis to other proteins and illustrate the generality of the observed PRO and alanine effects on the structures of IDPs.

  4. Function of the D-alanine:D-alanine ligase lid loop: a molecular modeling and bioactivity study.

    PubMed

    Hrast, Martina; Vehar, Blaž; Turk, Samo; Konc, Janez; Gobec, Stanislav; Janežič, Dušanka

    2012-08-09

    D-Alanine:D-alanine ligase (Ddl) is an essential ATP-dependent bacterial enzyme involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis. Discovery of Ddl inhibitors not competitive with ATP has proven to be difficult because the Ddl bimolecular d-alanine binding pocket is very restricted, as is accessibility to the active site for larger molecules in the catalytically active closed conformation of Ddl. A molecular dynamics study of the opening and closing of the Ddl lid loop informs future structure-based design efforts that allow for the flexibility of Ddl. A virtual screen on generated enzyme conformations yielded some hit inhibitors whose bioactivity was determined.

  5. Characterization of lipoteichoic acid structures from three probiotic Bacillus strains: involvement of D-alanine in their biological activity.

    PubMed

    Villéger, Romain; Saad, Naima; Grenier, Karine; Falourd, Xavier; Foucat, Loïc; Urdaci, Maria C; Bressollier, Philippe; Ouk, Tan-Sothea

    2014-10-01

    Probiotics represent a potential strategy to influence the host's immune system thereby modulating immune response. Lipoteichoic Acid (LTA) is a major immune-stimulating component of Gram-positive cell envelopes. This amphiphilic polymer, anchored in the cytoplasmic membrane by means of its glycolipid component, typically consists of a poly (glycerol-phosphate) chain with D-alanine and/or glycosyl substitutions. LTA is known to stimulate macrophages in vitro, leading to secretion of inflammatory mediators such as Nitric Oxide (NO). This study investigates the structure-activity relationship of purified LTA from three probiotic Bacillus strains (Bacillus cereus CH, Bacillus subtilis CU1 and Bacillus clausii O/C). LTAs were extracted from bacterial cultures and purified. Chemical modification by means of hydrolysis at pH 8.5 was performed to remove D-alanine. The molecular structure of native and modified LTAs was determined by (1)H NMR and GC-MS, and their inflammatory potential investigated by measuring NO production by RAW 264.7 macrophages. Structural analysis revealed several differences between the newly characterized LTAs, mainly relating to their D-alanylation rates and poly (glycerol-phosphate) chain length. We observed induction of NO production by LTAs from B. subtilis and B. clausii, whereas weaker NO production was observed with B. cereus. LTA dealanylation abrogated NO production independently of the glycolipid component, suggesting that immunomodulatory potential depends on D-alanine substitutions. D-alanine may control the spatial configuration of LTAs and their recognition by cell receptors. Knowledge of molecular mechanisms behind the immunomodulatory abilities of probiotics is essential to optimize their use.

  6. Molecular self-assembly in substituted alanine derivatives: XRD, Hirshfeld surfaces and DFT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajalakshmi, Periasamy; Srinivasan, Navaneethakrishnan; Sivaraman, Gandhi; Razak, Ibrahim Abdul; Rosli, Mohd Mustaqim; Krishnakumar, Rajaputi Venkatraman

    2014-06-01

    The molecular assemblage in the crystal structures of three modified chiral amino acids, two of which are isomeric D- and L-pairs boc-L-benzothienylalanine (BLA), boc-D-benzothienylalanine (BDA) and the other boc-D-naphthylalanine (NDA) differing from this pair very slightly in the chemical modification introduced, is accurately described. The aggregation of amino acid molecules is similar in all the crystals and may be described as a twisted double helical ladder in which two complementary long helical chains formed through O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds are interconnected through the characteristic head-to-tail N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds. Thus the molecular aggregation enabled through classical hydrogen bonds may be regarded as a mimic of the characteristic double helical structure of DNA. Also, precise structural information involving these amino acid molecules with lower symmetry exhibiting higher trigonal symmetry in their self-assembly is expected to throw light on the nature and strength of intermolecular interactions and their role in self-assembly of molecular aggregates, which are crucial in developing new or at least supplement existing crystal engineering strategies. Single crystal X-ray analysis and their electronic structures were calculated at the DFT level with a detailed analysis of Hirshfeld surfaces and fingerprint plots facilitating a comparison of intermolecular interactions in building different supramolecular architectures.

  7. D-Amino acid dipeptide production utilizing D-alanine-D-alanine ligases with novel substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masaru; Kirimura, Kohtaro; Kino, Kuniki

    2005-06-01

    D-Alanine-D-alanine ligase (Ddl) is an important enzyme in the synthesis of bacterial peptidoglycan. The genes encoding Ddls from Escherichia coli K12 (EcDdlB), Oceanobacillus iheyensis JCM 11309 (OiDdl), Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (SsDdl) and Thermotoga maritima ATCC 43589 (TmDdl), the genomic DNA sequences of which have been determined, were cloned and the substrate specificities of these recombinant Ddls were investigated. Although OiDdl had a high substrate specificity for D-alanine; EcDdlB, SsDdl and TmDdl showed broad substrate specificities for D-serine, D-threonine, D-cysteine and glycine, in addition to D-alanine. Four D-amino acid dipeptides were produced using EcDdlB, and D-amino acid homo-dipeptides were successfully produced at high yields except for D-threonyl-D-threonine.

  8. Oxidation of 3,4-dehydro-D-proline and other D-amino acid analogues by D-alanine dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Deutch, Charles E

    2004-09-15

    3,4-Dehydro-DL-proline is a toxic analogue of L-proline which has been useful in studying the uptake and metabolism of this key amino acid. When membrane fractions from Escherichia coli strain UMM5 (putA1::Tn5 proC24) lacking both L-proline dehydrogenase and L-Delta(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase were incubated with 3,4-dehydro-DL-proline, pyrrole-2-carboxylate was formed. There was no enzyme activity with 3,4-dehydro-L-proline, but activity was restored after racemization of the substrate. Oxidation of 3,4-dehydro-DL-proline by membrane fractions from strain UMM5 was induced by growth in minimal medium containing D- or L-alanine, had a pH optimum of 9, and was competitively inhibited by D-alanine. An E. coli strain with no D-alanine dehydrogenase activity due to the dadA237 mutation was unable to oxidize either 3,4-dehydro-D-proline or D-alanine, as were spontaneous Dad(-) mutants of E. coli strain UMM5. Membrane fractions containing D-alanine dehydrogenase also catalyzed the oxidation of D-2-aminobutyrate, D-norvaline, D-norleucine, cis-4-hydroxy-D-proline, and DL-ethionine. These results indicate that d-alanine dehydrogenase is responsible for the residual 3,4-dehydro-DL-proline oxidation activity in putA proC mutants of E. coli and provide further evidence that this enzyme plays a general role in the metabolism of D-amino acids and their analogues.

  9. Simple, heart-smart substitutions

    MedlinePlus

    Coronary artery disease - heart smart substitutions; Atherosclerosis - heart smart substitutions; Cholesterol - heart smart substitutions; Coronary heart disease - heart smart substitutions; Healthy diet - heart smart substitutions; Wellness - heart smart substitutions

  10. Noncovalent and covalent functionalization of a (5, 0) single-walled carbon nanotube with alanine and alanine radicals.

    PubMed

    Rajarajeswari, Muthusivarajan; Iyakutti, Kombiah; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2012-02-01

    We have systematically investigated the noncovalent and covalent adsorption of alanine and alanine radicals, respectively, onto a (5, 0) single-walled carbon nanotube using first-principles calculation. It was found that XH···π (X = N, O, C) interactions play a crucial role in the non-ovalent adsorption and that the functional group close to the carbon nanotube exhibits a significant influence on the binding strength. Noncovalent functionalization of the carbon nanotube with alanine enhances the conductivity of the metallic (5, 0) nanotube. In the covalent adsorption of each alanine radical onto a carbon nanotube, the binding energy depends on the adsorption site on CNT and the electronegative atom that binds with the CNT. The strongest complex is formed when the alanine radical interacts with a (5, 0) carbon nanotube through the amine group. In some cases, the covalent interaction of the alanine radical introduces a half-filled band at the Fermi level due to the local sp (3) hybridization, which modifies the conductivity of the tube.

  11. Structure of D-alanine-D-alanine ligase from Yersinia pestis: nucleotide phosphate recognition by the serine loop.

    PubMed

    Tran, Huyen Thi; Hong, Myoung Ki; Ngo, Ho Phuong Thuy; Huynh, Kim Hung; Ahn, Yeh Jin; Wang, Zhong; Kang, Lin Woo

    2016-01-01

    D-Alanyl-D-alanine is an essential precursor of bacterial peptidoglycan and is synthesized by D-alanine-D-alanine ligase (DDL) with hydrolysis of ATP; this reaction makes DDL an important drug target for the development of antibacterial agents. Five crystal structures of DDL from Yersinia pestis (YpDDL) were determined at 1.7-2.5 Å resolution: apo, AMP-bound, ADP-bound, adenosine 5'-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate-bound, and D-alanyl-D-alanine- and ADP-bound structures. YpDDL consists of three domains, in which four loops, loop 1, loop 2 (the serine loop), loop 3 (the ω-loop) and loop 4, constitute the binding sites for two D-alanine molecules and one ATP molecule. Some of them, especially the serine loop and the ω-loop, show flexible conformations, and the serine loop is mainly responsible for the conformational change in substrate nucleotide phosphates. Enzyme-kinetics assays were carried out for both the D-alanine and ATP substrates and a substrate-binding mechanism was proposed for YpDDL involving conformational changes of the loops.

  12. Improvement of crystal solubility and increasing toxicity against Caenorhabditis elegans by asparagine substitution in block 3 of Bacillus thuringiensis crystal protein Cry5Ba.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fenshan; Liu, Yingying; Zhang, Fengjuan; Chai, Lujun; Ruan, Lifang; Peng, Donghai; Sun, Ming

    2012-10-01

    The crystal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis are widely used for their specific toxicity against insects and nematodes. The highly conserved sequence blocks play an important role in Cry protein stability and flexibility, the basis of toxicity. The block 3 in Cry5Ba subfamily has a shorter sequence (only 12 residues) and more asparagine residues than that of others which harbor about 48 residues but only one asparagine. Based on the theoretical structure model of Cry5Ba, all three asparagines in block 3 are closely located in the interface of putative three domains, implying their probable importance in structure and function. In this study, all three asparagines in Cry5Ba2 block 3 were individually substituted with alanine by site-directed mutagenesis. The wild-type and mutant proteins were overexpressed and crystallized in acrystalliferous B. thuringiensis strain BMB171. However, the crystals formed in one of the mutants, designated N586A, abnormally disappeared and dissolved into the culture supernatant once the sporulation cells lysed, whereas the Cry5Ba crystal and the other mutant crystals were stable. The mutant N586A crystal, isolated from sporulation cells by the ultrasonic process, was found to be easily dissolved at wide range of pH value (5.0 to 10.0). Moreover, the toxicity assays showed that the mutant N586A exhibited nearly 9-fold-higher activity against nematodes and damaged the host's intestine more efficiently than the native Cry5Ba2. These data support the presumption that the amide residue Asn586 at the interface of domains might adversely affect the protein flexibility, solubility and resultant toxicity of Cry5Ba.

  13. Clinical features and viral quasispecies characteristics associated with infection by the hepatitis B virus G145R immune escape mutant.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yuan; Wang, Ming-Jie; Yang, Zhi-Tao; Yu, De-Min; Han, Yue; Huang, Dao; Zhang, Dong-Hua; Zhang, Xin-Xin

    2017-03-22

    Coexistence of the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and hepatitis B surface antibody (anti-HBs) is an uncommon phenomenon, and the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Amino-acid (aa) substitution from glycine to arginine at aa 145 (G145R), in the major hydrophilic region, has been reported in patients with HBsAg and anti-HBs coexistence. However, there is limited knowledge about the clinical features and viral quasispecies characteristics associated with G145R mutant hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. We herein describe the dynamic changes in the serological and virological markers in a case of hepatitis B with coexisting HBsAg and anti-HBs, caused by a G145R immune escape mutant (genotype C). Entecavir was administered during the 4th week after admission. Alanine aminotransferase peaked in the 16th week, while both the HBsAg and HBeAg declined rapidly. HBsAg clearance and hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)/hepatitis B e antibody (anti-HBe) seroconversion were achieved in the 36th week, and then entecavir was withdrawn. A follow-up of 96 weeks showed that HBV DNA remained undetectable and that anti-HBs was maintained above 100 mIU/mL. The quasispecies characteristics of the G145R mutant HBV were investigated via ultra-deep sequencing. The complexity and genetic distance of the S and RT regions were much higher in the 8th week than at baseline or in the 4th week. Moreover, the frequencies of mutations (L173P, Q181R and A184V) in cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes increased before entecavir treatment. These findings extend understanding of the evolution of HBV under host immune pressure and of the clinical outcomes of affected patients.

  14. Proteins with β-(thienopyrrolyl)alanines as alternative chromophores and pharmaceutically active amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Budisa, Nediljko; Alefelder, Stefan; Bae, Jae Hyun; Golbik, Ralph; Minks, Caroline; Huber, Robert; Moroder, Luis

    2001-01-01

    L-β-(Thieno[3,2-b]pyrrolyl)alanine and L-β-(thieno[2,3-b]pyrrolyl)alanine are mutually isosteric and pharmaceutically active amino acids that mimic tryptophan with the benzene ring in the indole moiety replaced by thiophene. Sulfur as a heteroatom causes physicochemical changes in these tryptophan surrogates that bring about completely new properties not found in the indole moiety. These synthetic amino acids were incorporated into recombinant proteins in response to the Trp UGG codons by fermentation in a Trp-auxotrophic Escherichia coli host strain using the selective pressure incorporation method. Related protein mutants expectedly retain the secondary structure of the native proteins but show significantly changed optical and thermodynamic properties. In this way, new spectral windows, fluorescence, polarity, thermodynamics, or pharmacological properties are inserted into proteins. Such an engineering approach by translational integration of synthetic amino acids with a priori defined properties, as shown in this study, proved to be a novel and useful tool for protein rational design. PMID:11420430

  15. Design of Deinococcus radiodurans thioredoxin reductase with altered thioredoxin specificity using computational alanine mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Obiero, Josiah; Sanders, David A R

    2011-06-01

    In this study, the X-ray crystal structure of the complex between Escherichia coli thioredoxin reductase (EC TrxR) and its substrate thioredoxin (Trx) was used as a guide to design a Deinococcus radiodurans TrxR (DR TrxR) mutant with altered Trx specificity. Previous studies have shown that TrxRs have higher affinity for cognate Trxs (same species) than that for Trxs from different species. Computational alanine scanning mutagenesis and visual inspection of the EC TrxR-Trx interface suggested that only four residues (F81, R130, F141, and F142) account for the majority of the EC TrxR-Trx interface stability. Individual replacement of equivalent residues in DR TrxR (M84, K137, F148, and F149) with alanine resulted in drastic changes in binding affinity, confirming that the four residues account for most of TrxR-Trx interface stability. When M84 and K137 were changed to match equivalent EC TrxR residues (K137R and M84F), the DR TrxR substrate specificity was altered from its own Trx to that of EC Trx. The results suggest that a small subset of the TrxR-Trx interface residues is responsible for the majority of Trx binding affinity and species-specific recognition.

  16. Tuning electronic transport via hepta-alanine peptides junction by tryptophan doping

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Cunlan; Yu, Xi; Refaely-Abramson, Sivan; Sepunaru, Lior; Bendikov, Tatyana; Pecht, Israel; Kronik, Leeor; Vilan, Ayelet; Sheves, Mordechai; Cahen, David

    2016-01-01

    Charge migration for electron transfer via the polypeptide matrix of proteins is a key process in biological energy conversion and signaling systems. It is sensitive to the sequence of amino acids composing the protein and, therefore, offers a tool for chemical control of charge transport across biomaterial-based devices. We designed a series of linear oligoalanine peptides with a single tryptophan substitution that acts as a “dopant,” introducing an energy level closer to the electrodes’ Fermi level than that of the alanine homopeptide. We investigated the solid-state electron transport (ETp) across a self-assembled monolayer of these peptides between gold contacts. The single tryptophan “doping” markedly increased the conductance of the peptide chain, especially when its location in the sequence is close to the electrodes. Combining inelastic tunneling spectroscopy, UV photoelectron spectroscopy, electronic structure calculations by advanced density-functional theory, and dc current–voltage analysis, the role of tryptophan in ETp is rationalized by charge tunneling across a heterogeneous energy barrier, via electronic states of alanine and tryptophan, and by relatively efficient direct coupling of tryptophan to a Au electrode. These results reveal a controlled way of modulating the electrical properties of molecular junctions by tailor-made “building block” peptides. PMID:27621456

  17. EPR/alanine dosimetry for two therapeutic proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrale, Maurizio; Carlino, Antonio; Gallo, Salvatore; Longo, Anna; Panzeca, Salvatore; Bolsi, Alessandra; Hrbacek, Jan; Lomax, Tony

    2016-02-01

    In this work the analysis of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) response of alanine pellets exposed to two different clinical proton beams employed for radiotherapy is performed. One beam is characterized by a passive delivery technique and is dedicated to the eyes treatment (OPTIS2 beam line). Alanine pellets were irradiated with a 70 MeV proton beam corresponding to 35 mm range in eye tissue. We investigated how collimators with different sizes and shape used to conform the dose to the planned target volume influence the delivered dose. For this purpose we performed measurements with varying the collimator size (Output Factor) and the results were compared with those obtained with other dosimetric techniques (such as Markus chamber and diode detector). This analysis showed that the dosimeter response is independent of collimator diameter if this is larger than or equal to 10 mm. The other beam is characterized by an active spot-scanning technique, the Gantry1 beam line (maximum energy 230 MeV), and is used to treat deep-seated tumors. The dose linearity of alanine response in the clinical dose range was tested and the alanine dose response at selected locations in depth was measured and compared with the TPS planned dose in a quasi-clinical scenario. The alanine response was found to be linear in the dose in the clinical explored range (from 10 to 70 Gy). Furthermore, a depth dose profile in a quasi-clinical scenario was measured and compared to the dose computed by the Treatment Planning System PSIPLAN. The comparison of calibrated proton alanine measurements and TPS dose shows a difference under 1% in the SOBP and a "quenching" effect up to 4% in the distal part of SOBP. The positive dosimetric characteristics of the alanine pellets confirm the feasibility to use these detectors for "in vivo" dosimetry in clinical proton beams.

  18. Potent Antiviral HIV-1 Protease Inhibitor GRL-02031 Adapts to the Structures of Drug Resistant Mutants with Its P1;#8242;-Pyrrolidinone Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yu-Chung E.; Yu, XiaXia; Zhang, Ying; Tie, Yunfeng; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Yashchuk, Sofiya; Ghosh, Arun K.; Harrison, Robert W.; Weber, Irene T.

    2012-11-14

    GRL-02031 (1) is an HIV-1 protease (PR) inhibitor containing a novel P1' (R)-aminomethyl-2-pyrrolidinone group. Crystal structures at resolutions of 1.25-1.55 {angstrom} were analyzed for complexes of 1 with the PR containing major drug resistant mutations, PR{sub I47V}, PR{sub L76V}, PR{sub V82A}, and PR{sub N88D}. Mutations of I47V and V82A alter residues in the inhibitor-binding site, while L76V and N88D are distal mutations having no direct contact with the inhibitor. Substitution of a smaller amino acid in PR{sub I47V} and PR{sub L76V} and the altered charge of PR{sub N88D} are associated with significant local structural changes compared to the wild-type PR{sub WT}, while substitution of alanine in PR{sub V82A} increases the size of the S1' subsite. The P1' pyrrolidinone group of 1 accommodates to these local changes by assuming two different conformations. Overall, the conformation and interactions of 1 with PR mutants resemble those of PR{sub WT} with similar inhibition constants in good agreement with the antiviral potency on multidrug resistant HIV-1.

  19. On the existence of ``l-threonine formate'', ``l-alanine lithium chloride'' and ``bis l-alanine lithium chloride'' crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosyan, A. M.; Ghazaryan, V. V.; Fleck, M.

    2013-03-01

    We argue that the recently reported crystals "L-threonine formate" as well as "L-alanine lithium chloride" and "bis L-alanine lithium chloride" actually are the well-known crystals L-threonine and L-alanine, respectively.

  20. [Effects of ß-alanine supplementation on athletic performance].

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Raúl; Hernández Lougedo, Juan; Maté-Muñoz, José Luis; Garnacho-Castaño, Manuel Vicente

    2014-10-06

    Carnosine, dipeptide formed by amino acids ß-alanine and L-histidine, has important physiological functions among which its antioxidant and related memory and learning. However, in connection with the exercise, the most important functions would be associated with muscle contractility, improving calcium sensitivity in muscle fibers, and the regulatory function of pH. Thus, it is proposed that carnosine is the major intracellular buffer, but could contribute to 7-10% in buffer or buffer capacity. Since carnosine synthesis seems to be limited by the availability of ß-alanine supplementation with this compound has been gaining increasing popularity among the athlete population. Therefore, the objective of this study literature review was to examine all those research works have shown the effect of ß-alanine supplementation on athletic performance. Moreover, it also has attempted to establish a specific dosage that maximizing the potential benefits, minimize paresthesia, the main side effect presented in response to supplementation.

  1. Atomic Layer Deposition of L-Alanine Polypeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yaqin; Li, Binsong; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Dunphy, Darren R.; Tsai, Andy; Tam, Siu-Yue; Fan, Hongyou Y.; Zhang, Hongxia; Rogers, David; Rempe, Susan; Atanassov, Plamen; Cecchi, Joseph L.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2014-10-30

    L-Alanine polypeptide thin films were synthesized via atomic layer deposition (ALD). Rather, instead of using an amino acid monomer as the precursor, an L-alanine amino acid derivatized with a protecting group was used to prevent self-polymerization, increase the vapor pressure, and allow linear cycle-by-cycle growth emblematic of ALD. Moreover, the successful deposition of a conformal polypeptide film has been confirmed by FTIR, TEM, and Mass Spectrometry, and the ALD process has been extended to polyvaline.

  2. Saccharomyces cerevisiae aldolase mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Z

    1984-01-01

    Six mutants lacking the glycolytic enzyme fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase have been isolated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by inositol starvation. The mutants grown on gluconeogenic substrates, such as glycerol or alcohol, and show growth inhibition by glucose and related sugars. The mutations are recessive, segregate as one gene in crosses, and fall in a single complementation group. All of the mutants synthesize an antigen cross-reacting to the antibody raised against yeast aldolase. The aldolase activity in various mutant alleles measured as fructose 1,6-bisphosphate cleavage is between 1 to 2% and as condensation of triose phosphates to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate is 2 to 5% that of the wild-type. The mutants accumulate fructose 1,6-bisphosphate from glucose during glycolysis and dihydroxyacetone phosphate during gluconeogenesis. This suggests that the aldolase activity is absent in vivo. PMID:6384192

  3. Stereoselective aminoacylation of a dinucleoside monophosphate by the imidazolides of DL-alanine and N-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)-DL-alanine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Profy, A. T.; Usher, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The aminoacylation of diinosine monophosphate was studied experimentally. When the acylating agent was the imidazolide of N-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)-DL-alanine, a 40 percent enantiomeric excess of the isomer was incorporated at the 2' site and the positions of equilibrium for the reversible 2'-3' migration reaction differed for the D and L enantiomers. The reactivity of the nucleoside hydroxyl groups was found to decrease on the order 2'(3') less than internal 2' and less than 5', and the extent of the reaction was affected by the concentration of the imidazole buffer. Reaction of IpI with imidazolide of unprotected DL-alanine, by contrast, led to an excess of the D isomer at the internal 2' site. Finally, reaction with the N-carboxy anhydride of DL-alanine occurred without stereoselection. These results are found to be relevant to the study of the evolution of optical chemical activity and the origin of genetically directed protein synthesis.

  4. [Regulation of key enzymes of L-alanine biosynthesis by Brevibacterium flavum producer strains].

    PubMed

    Melkonian, L O; Avetisova, G E; Ambartsumian, A A; Chakhalian, A Kh; Sagian, A S

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms of L-alanine overproduction by Brevibacterium flavum producer strains were studied. It was shown that beta-CI-L-alanine is an inhibitor of some key enzymes involved in the synthesis of L-alanine, including alanine transaminase and valine-pyruvate transaminase. Two highly active B. flavum GL1 and GL1 8 producer strains, which are resistant to the inhibitory effect of beta-Cl-L-alanine, were obtained using a parental B. flavum AA5 producer strain, characterized by a reduced activity of alanine racemase (>or=98%). It was demonstrated that the increased L-alanine synthesis efficiency observed in the producer strains developed in this work is associated with the absence of inhibition of alanine transaminase by the end product of the biosynthesis reaction, as well as with the effect of derepression of both alanine transaminase and valine-pyruvate transaminase synthesis by the studied compound.

  5. Identification of dietary alanine toxicity and trafficking dysfunction in a Drosophila model of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Matthew C W; West, Ryan J H; Lloyd-Evans, Emyr; Sweeney, Sean T

    2015-12-15

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 (HSAN1) is characterized by a loss of distal peripheral sensory and motorneuronal function, neuropathic pain and tissue necrosis. The most common cause of HSAN1 is due to dominant mutations in serine palmitoyl-transferase subunit 1 (SPT1). SPT catalyses the condensation of serine with palmitoyl-CoA, the initial step in sphingolipid biogenesis. Identified mutations in SPT1 are known to both reduce sphingolipid synthesis and generate catalytic promiscuity, incorporating alanine or glycine into the precursor sphingolipid to generate a deoxysphingoid base (DSB). Why either loss of function in SPT1, or generation of DSBs should generate deficits in distal sensory function remains unclear. To address these questions, we generated a Drosophila model of HSAN1. Expression of dSpt1 bearing a disease-related mutation induced morphological deficits in synapse growth at the larval neuromuscular junction consistent with a dominant-negative action. Expression of mutant dSpt1 globally was found to be mildly toxic, but was completely toxic when the diet was supplemented with alanine, when DSBs were observed in abundance. Expression of mutant dSpt1 in sensory neurons generated developmental deficits in dendritic arborization with concomitant sensory deficits. A membrane trafficking defect was observed in soma of sensory neurons expressing mutant dSpt1, consistent with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to Golgi block. We found that we could rescue sensory function in neurons expressing mutant dSpt1 by co-expressing an effector of ER-Golgi function, Rab1 suggesting compromised ER function in HSAN1 affected dendritic neurons. Our Drosophila model identifies a novel strategy to explore the pathological mechanisms of HSAN1.

  6. Identification of dietary alanine toxicity and trafficking dysfunction in a Drosophila model of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1

    PubMed Central

    Oswald, Matthew C. W.; West, Ryan J. H.; Lloyd-Evans, Emyr; Sweeney, Sean T.

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 (HSAN1) is characterized by a loss of distal peripheral sensory and motorneuronal function, neuropathic pain and tissue necrosis. The most common cause of HSAN1 is due to dominant mutations in serine palmitoyl-transferase subunit 1 (SPT1). SPT catalyses the condensation of serine with palmitoyl-CoA, the initial step in sphingolipid biogenesis. Identified mutations in SPT1 are known to both reduce sphingolipid synthesis and generate catalytic promiscuity, incorporating alanine or glycine into the precursor sphingolipid to generate a deoxysphingoid base (DSB). Why either loss of function in SPT1, or generation of DSBs should generate deficits in distal sensory function remains unclear. To address these questions, we generated a Drosophila model of HSAN1. Expression of dSpt1 bearing a disease-related mutation induced morphological deficits in synapse growth at the larval neuromuscular junction consistent with a dominant-negative action. Expression of mutant dSpt1 globally was found to be mildly toxic, but was completely toxic when the diet was supplemented with alanine, when DSBs were observed in abundance. Expression of mutant dSpt1 in sensory neurons generated developmental deficits in dendritic arborization with concomitant sensory deficits. A membrane trafficking defect was observed in soma of sensory neurons expressing mutant dSpt1, consistent with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to Golgi block. We found that we could rescue sensory function in neurons expressing mutant dSpt1 by co-expressing an effector of ER–Golgi function, Rab1 suggesting compromised ER function in HSAN1 affected dendritic neurons. Our Drosophila model identifies a novel strategy to explore the pathological mechanisms of HSAN1. PMID:26395456

  7. Structure of GroEL in Complex with an Early Folding Intermediate of Alanine Glyoxylate Aminotransferase*

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Armando; Yunta, Cristina; Arranz, Rocío; Peña, Álvaro; Salido, Eduardo; Valpuesta, José María; Martín-Benito, Jaime

    2010-01-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the alanine glyoxylate aminotransferase gene (AGXT). We have previously shown that P11L and I340M polymorphisms together with I244T mutation (AGXT-LTM) represent a conformational disease that could be amenable to pharmacological intervention. Thus, the study of the folding mechanism of AGXT is crucial to understand the molecular basis of the disease. Here, we provide biochemical and structural data showing that AGXT-LTM is able to form non-native folding intermediates. The three-dimensional structure of a complex between the bacterial chaperonin GroEL and a folding intermediate of AGXT-LTM mutant has been solved by cryoelectron microscopy. The electron density map shows the protein substrate in a non-native extended conformation that crosses the GroEL central cavity. Addition of ATP to the complex induces conformational changes on the chaperonin and the internalization of the protein substrate into the folding cavity. The structure provides a three-dimensional picture of an in vivo early ATP-dependent step of the folding reaction cycle of the chaperonin and supports a GroEL functional model in which the chaperonin promotes folding of the AGXT-LTM mutant protein through forced unfolding mechanism. PMID:20056599

  8. Formation of {gamma}-alumina nanorods in presence of alanine

    SciTech Connect

    Dabbagh, Hossein A.; Rasti, Elham; Yalfani, Mohammad S.; Medina, Francesc

    2011-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Nanorod aluminas with a possible hexagonal symmetry, high surface area and relatively narrow pore size distribution were obtained. Research highlights: {yields} Research highlights {yields} Boehmite was prepared using a green sol-gel process in the presence of alanine. {yields} Nanorod aluminas with a high surface area were obtained. {yields} Addition of alanine would shape the size of the holes and crevices. {yields} The morphologies of the nanorods were revealed by transmission electron microscope. -- Abstract: Boehmite and alumina nanostructures were prepared using a simple green sol-gel process in the presence of alanine in water medium at room temperature. The uncalcined (dried at 200 {sup o}C) and the calcined materials (at 500, 600 and 700 {sup o}C for 4 h) were characterized using XRD, TEM, SEM, N{sub 2} physisorption and TGA. Nanorod aluminas with a possible hexagonal symmetry, high surface area and relatively narrow pore size distribution were obtained. The surface area was enhanced and crystallization was retarded as the alanine content increased. The morphologies of the nanoparticles and nanorods were revealed by a transmission electron microscope (TEM).

  9. A theoretical study of alanine dipeptide and analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Head-Gordon, T.; Head-Gordon, M.; Brooks, C. III; Pople, J. ); Frisch, M.J. )

    1989-01-01

    We Present a preliminary report on the conformational and energetic analysis of the molecule (S)-2-acetylamino-N-methylpropanamide (alanine dipeptide) and an analog molecule, (S)-{alpha}-formylaminopropanamide, using high-quality ab initio methods. Alanine dipeptide and its analogs are of interest since they incorporate many of the structural features found in proteins, such as intramolecular hydrogen bonds, conformational flexibility, and a variety of chemical functionality. One purpose of this study is to provide a useful benchmark calculation, MP2/6-31+G{sup **}//HF/6-31+G{sup *}, for a number of conformations of the alanine system. Based on the comparison of these benchmark calculations with lower-level basis sets, HF/3-21G was chosen to generate a fully relaxed {phi}, {psi} dihedral map. These calculations are the first of their kind on systems of this size. Features of the {phi},{psi} alanine dipeptide map that are discussed include the energetically accessible conformations and possible pathways for their interconversion. In addition, we illustrate the importance of fully optimized geometries and the proper evaluation of correlation energies,

  10. Spectrophotometric readout for an alanine dosimeter for food irradiation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebraheem, S.; Beshir, W. B.; Eid, S.; Sobhy, R.; Kovács, A.

    2003-06-01

    The alanine-electron spin resonance (EPR) readout system is well known as a reference and transfer dosimetry system for the evaluation of high doses in radiation processing. The high cost of an EPR/alanine dosimetry system is a serious handicap for large-scale routine application in irradiation facilities. In this study, the use of a complex produced by dissolving irradiated L-alanine in 1,4-phenyl diammonium dichloride solution was investigated for dosimetry purposes. This complex—having a purple colour—has an increasing absorbance with increasing dose in the range of 1-20 kGy. The applicability of spectrophotometric evaluation was studied by measuring the absorbance intensity of this complex at 360 and 505 nm, respectively. Fluorimetric evaluation was also investigated by measuring the emission of the complex at 435 nm as a function of dose. The present method is easy for routine application. The effect of the dye concentration as well as the suitable amount of irradiated alanine has been studied. With respect to routine application, the stability of the product complex after its formation was also investigated.

  11. Computational alanine scanning with linear scaling semiempirical quantum mechanical methods.

    PubMed

    Diller, David J; Humblet, Christine; Zhang, Xiaohua; Westerhoff, Lance M

    2010-08-01

    Alanine scanning is a powerful experimental tool for understanding the key interactions in protein-protein interfaces. Linear scaling semiempirical quantum mechanical calculations are now sufficiently fast and robust to allow meaningful calculations on large systems such as proteins, RNA and DNA. In particular, they have proven useful in understanding protein-ligand interactions. Here we ask the question: can these linear scaling quantum mechanical methods developed for protein-ligand scoring be useful for computational alanine scanning? To answer this question, we assembled 15 protein-protein complexes with available crystal structures and sufficient alanine scanning data. In all, the data set contains Delta Delta Gs for 400 single point alanine mutations of these 15 complexes. We show that with only one adjusted parameter the quantum mechanics-based methods outperform both buried accessible surface area and a potential of mean force and compare favorably to a variety of published empirical methods. Finally, we closely examined the outliers in the data set and discuss some of the challenges that arise from this examination.

  12. The unresolved puzzle why alanine extensions cause disease.

    PubMed

    Winter, Reno; Liebold, Jens; Schwarz, Elisabeth

    2013-08-01

    The prospective increase in life expectancy will be accompanied by a rise in the number of elderly people who suffer from ill health caused by old age. Many diseases caused by aging are protein misfolding diseases. The molecular mechanisms underlying these disorders receive constant scientific interest. In addition to old age, mutations also cause congenital protein misfolding disorders. Chorea Huntington, one of the most well-known examples, is caused by triplet extensions that can lead to more than 100 glutamines in the N-terminal region of huntingtin, accompanied by huntingtin aggregation. So far, nine disease-associated triplet extensions have also been described for alanine codons. The extensions lead primarily to skeletal malformations. Eight of these proteins represent transcription factors, while the nuclear poly-adenylate binding protein 1, PABPN1, is an RNA binding protein. Additional alanines in PABPN1 lead to the disease oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). The alanine extension affects the N-terminal domain of the protein, which has been shown to lack tertiary contacts. Biochemical analyses of the N-terminal domain revealed an alanine-dependent fibril formation. However, fibril formation of full-length protein did not recapitulate the findings of the N-terminal domain. Fibril formation of intact PABPN1 was independent of the alanine segment, and the fibrils displayed biochemical properties that were completely different from those of the N-terminal domain. Although intranuclear inclusions have been shown to represent the histochemical hallmark of OPMD, their role in pathogenesis is currently unclear. Several cell culture and animal models have been generated to study the molecular processes involved in OPMD. These studies revealed a number of promising future therapeutic strategies that could one day improve the quality of life for the patients.

  13. Formation of simple biomolecules from alanine in ocean by impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Y.; Sekine, T.; Furukawa, Y.; Kakegawa, T.; Kobayashi, T.

    2013-12-01

    The biomolecules on the Earth are thought either to have originated from the extraterrestrial parts carried with flying meteorites or to have been formed from the inorganic materials on the Earth through given energy. From the standpoint to address the importance of impact energy, it is required to simulate experimentally the chemical reactions during impacts, because violent impacts may have occurred 3.8-4.0 Gyr ago to create biomolecules initially. It has been demonstrated that shock reactions among ocean (H2O), atmospheric nitrogen, and meteoritic constitution (Fe) can induce locally reduction environment to form simple bioorganic molecules such as ammonia and amino acid (Nakazawa et al., 2005; Furukawa et al., 2009). We need to know possible processes for alanine how chemical reactions proceed during repeated impacts and how complicated biomolecules are formed. Alanine can be formed from glycine (Umeda et al., in preparation). In this study, we carried out shock recovery experiments at pressures of 4.4-5.7 GPa to investigate the chemical reactions of alanine. Experiments were carried out with a propellant gun. Stainless steel containers (30 mm in diameter, 30 mm long) with 13C-labeled alanine aqueous solution immersed in olivine or hematite powders were used as targets. Air gap was present in the sample room (18 mm in diameter, 2 mm thick) behind the sample. The powder, solution, and air represent meteorite, ocean, and atmosphere on early Earth, respectively. Two powders of olivine and hematite help to keep the oxygen fugacity low and high during experiments, respectively in order to investigate the effect of oxygen fugacity on chemical processes of alanine. The recovered containers, after cleaned completely, were immersed into liquid nitrogen to freeze sample solution and then we drilled on the impact surface to extract water-soluble run products using pure water. Thus obtained products were analyzed by LC/MS for four amino acids (glycine, alanine, valine, and

  14. Kinetic mechanism and inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis D-alanine:D-alanine ligase by the antibiotic D-cycloserine.

    PubMed

    Prosser, Gareth A; de Carvalho, Luiz Pedro S

    2013-02-01

    D-cycloserine (DCS) is an antibiotic that is currently used in second-line treatment of tuberculosis. DCS is a structural analogue of D-alanine, and targets two enzymes involved in the cytosolic stages of peptidoglycan synthesis: alanine racemase (Alr) and D-alanine:D-alanine ligase (Ddl). The mechanisms of inhibition of DCS have been well-assessed using Alr and Ddl enzymes from various bacterial species, but little is known regarding the interactions of DCS with the mycobacterial orthologues of these enzymes. We have over-expressed and purified recombinant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ddl (MtDdl; Rv2981c), and report a kinetic examination of the enzyme with both its native substrate and DCS. MtDdl is activated by K(+), follows an ordered ter ter mechanism and displays distinct affinities for D-Ala at each D-Ala binding site (K(m,D-Ala1) = 0.075 mm, K(m,D-Ala2) = 3.6 mm). ATP is the first substrate to bind and is necessary for subsequent binding of D-alanine or DCS. The pH dependence of MtDdl kinetic parameters indicate that general base chemistry is involved in the catalytic step. DCS was found to competitively inhibit D-Ala binding at both MtDdl D-Ala sites with equal affinity (K(i,DCS1) = 14 μm, K(i,DCS2) = 25 μm); however, each enzyme active site can only accommodate a single DCS molecule at a given time. The pH dependence of K(i,DCS2) revealed a loss of DCS binding affinity at high pH (pK(a) = 7.5), suggesting that DCS binds optimally in the zwitterionic form. The results of this study may assist in the design and development of novel Ddl-specific inhibitors for use as anti-mycobacterial agents.

  15. Structure of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis D-Alanine:D-Alanine Ligase, a Target of the Antituberculosis Drug D-Cycloserine

    SciTech Connect

    Bruning, John B.; Murillo, Ana C.; Chacon, Ofelia; Barletta, Raúl G.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2011-09-28

    D-Alanine:D-alanine ligase (EC 6.3.2.4; Ddl) catalyzes the ATP-driven ligation of two D-alanine (D-Ala) molecules to form the D-alanyl:D-alanine dipeptide. This molecule is a key building block in peptidoglycan biosynthesis, making Ddl an attractive target for drug development. D-Cycloserine (DCS), an analog of D-Ala and a prototype Ddl inhibitor, has shown promise for the treatment of tuberculosis. Here, we report the crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ddl at a resolution of 2.1 {angstrom}. This structure indicates that Ddl is a dimer and consists of three discrete domains; the ligand binding cavity is at the intersection of all three domains and conjoined by several loop regions. The M. tuberculosis apo Ddl structure shows a novel conformation that has not yet been observed in Ddl enzymes from other species. The nucleotide and D-alanine binding pockets are flexible, requiring significant structural rearrangement of the bordering regions for entry and binding of both ATP and D-Ala molecules. Solution affinity and kinetic studies showed that DCS interacts with Ddl in a manner similar to that observed for D-Ala. Each ligand binds to two binding sites that have significant differences in affinity, with the first binding site exhibiting high affinity. DCS inhibits the enzyme, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC{sub 50}) of 0.37 mM under standard assay conditions, implicating a preferential and weak inhibition at the second, lower-affinity binding site. Moreover, DCS binding is tighter at higher ATP concentrations. The crystal structure illustrates potential drugable sites that may result in the development of more-effective Ddl inhibitors.

  16. Nucleophilic Aromatic Substitution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avila, Walter B.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Described is a microscale organic chemistry experiment which demonstrates one feasible route in preparing ortho-substituted benzoic acids and provides an example of nucleophilic aromatic substitution chemistry. Experimental procedures and instructor notes for this activity are provided. (CW)

  17. Alanine screening mutagenesis establishes the critical inactivating damage of irradiated E. coli lactose repressor.

    PubMed

    Goffinont, Stephane; Villette, Sandrine; Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie

    2012-06-01

    The function of the E. coli lactose operon requires the binding of lactose repressor to operator DNA. We have previously shown that γ rradiation destabilizes the repressor-operator complex because the repressor loses its DNA-binding ability. It was suggested that the observed oxidation of the four tyrosines (Y7, Y12, Y17, Y47) and the concomitant structural changes of the irradiated DNA-binding domains (headpieces) could be responsible for the inactivation. To pinpoint the tyrosine whose oxidation has the strongest effect, four headpieces containing the product of tyrosine oxidation, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), were simulated by molecular dynamics. We have observed that replacing Y47 by DOPA triggers the largest change of structure and stability of the headpiece and have concluded that Y47 oxidation is the greatest contributor to the decrease of repressor binding to DNA. To experimentally verify this conclusion, we applied the alanine screening mutagenesis approach. Tetrameric mutated repressors bearing an alanine instead of each one of the tyrosines were prepared and their binding to operator DNA was checked. Their binding ability is quite similar to that of the wild-type repressor, except for the Y47A mutant whose binding is strongly reduced. Circular dichroism determinations revealed small reductions of the proportion of α helices and of the melting temperature for Y7A, Y12A and Y17A headpieces, but much larger ones were revealed for Y47A headpiece. These results established the critical role of Y47 oxidation in modifying the structure and stability of the headpiece, and in reduction of the binding ability of the whole lactose repressor.

  18. Crystal structures of yeast beta-alanine synthase complexes reveal the mode of substrate binding and large scale domain closure movements.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Stina; Andersen, Birgit; Piskur, Jure; Dobritzsch, Doreen

    2007-12-07

    Beta-alanine synthase is the final enzyme of the reductive pyrimidine catabolic pathway, which is responsible for the breakdown of uracil and thymine in higher organisms. The fold of the homodimeric enzyme from the yeast Saccharomyces kluyveri identifies it as a member of the AcyI/M20 family of metallopeptidases. Its subunit consists of a catalytic domain harboring a di-zinc center and a smaller dimerization domain. The present site-directed mutagenesis studies identify Glu(159) and Arg(322) as crucial for catalysis and His(262) and His(397) as functionally important but not essential. We determined the crystal structures of wild-type beta-alanine synthase in complex with the reaction product beta-alanine, and of the mutant E159A with the substrate N-carbamyl-beta-alanine, revealing the closed state of a dimeric AcyI/M20 metallopeptidase-like enzyme. Subunit closure is achieved by a approximately 30 degrees rigid body domain rotation, which completes the active site by integration of substrate binding residues that belong to the dimerization domain of the same or the partner subunit. Substrate binding is achieved via a salt bridge, a number of hydrogen bonds, and coordination to one of the zinc ions of the di-metal center.

  19. Effect of lysine to alanine mutations on the phosphate activation and BPTES inhibition of glutaminase.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Charles J; Acheff, Eric; Kennedy, Ryan; Taylor, Lynn; Curthoys, Norman P

    2015-09-01

    The GLS1 gene encodes a mitochondrial glutaminase that is highly expressed in brain, kidney, small intestine and many transformed cells. Recent studies have identified multiple lysine residues in glutaminase that are sites of N-acetylation. Interestingly, these sites are located within either a loop segment that regulates access of glutamine to the active site or the dimer:dimer interface that participates in the phosphate-dependent oligomerization and activation of the enzyme. These two segments also contain the binding sites for bis-2[5-phenylacetamido-1,2,4-thiadiazol-2-yl]ethylsulfide (BPTES), a highly specific and potent uncompetitive inhibitor of this glutaminase. BPTES is also the lead compound for development of novel cancer chemotherapeutic agents. To provide a preliminary assessment of the potential effects of N-acetylation, the corresponding lysine to alanine mutations were constructed in the hGACΔ1 plasmid. The wild type and mutated proteins were purified by Ni(+)-affinity chromatography and their phosphate activation and BPTES inhibition profiles were analyzed. Two of the alanine substitutions in the loop segment (K311A and K328A) and the one in the dimer:dimer interface (K396A) form enzymes that require greater concentrations of phosphate to produce half-maximal activation and exhibit greater sensitivity to BPTES inhibition. By contrast, the K320A mutation results in a glutaminase that exhibits near maximal activity in the absence of phosphate and is not inhibited by BPTES. Thus, lysine N-acetylation may contribute to the acute regulation of glutaminase activity in various tissues and alter the efficacy of BPTES-type inhibitors.

  20. Alanine mutagenesis of the primary antigenic escape residue cluster, c1, of apical membrane antigen 1.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sheetij; Dlugosz, Lisa S; Clayton, Joshua W; Pool, Christopher D; Haynes, J David; Gasser, Robert A; Batchelor, Adrian H

    2010-02-01

    Antibodies against apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) inhibit invasion of Plasmodium merozoites into red cells, and a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms on AMA1 allow the parasite to escape inhibitory antibodies. The availability of a crystal structure makes it possible to test protein engineering strategies to develop a monovalent broadly reactive vaccine. Previously, we showed that a linear stretch of polymorphic residues (amino acids 187 to 207), localized within the C1 cluster on domain 1, conferred the highest level of escape from inhibitory antibodies, and these were termed antigenic escape residues (AER). Here we test the hypothesis that immunodampening the C1 AER will divert the immune system toward more conserved regions. We substituted seven C1 AER of the FVO strain Plasmodium falciparum AMA1 with alanine residues (ALA). The resulting ALA protein was less immunogenic than the native protein in rabbits. Anti-ALA antibodies contained a higher proportion of cross-reactive domain 2 and domain 3 antibodies and had higher avidity than anti-FVO. No overall enhancement of cross-reactive inhibitory activity was observed when anti-FVO and anti-ALA sera were compared for their ability to inhibit invasion. Alanine mutations at the C1 AER had shifted the immune response toward cross-strain-reactive epitopes that were noninhibitory, refuting the hypothesis but confirming the importance of the C1 cluster as an inhibitory epitope. We further demonstrate that naturally occurring polymorphisms that fall within the C1 cluster can predict escape from cross-strain invasion inhibition, reinforcing the importance of the C1 cluster genotype for antigenic categorization and allelic shift analyses in future phase 2b trials.

  1. Crystal structure of an extensively simplified variant of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor in which over one-third of the residues are alanines.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Monirul; Sohya, Shihori; Noguchi, Keiichi; Yohda, Masafumi; Kuroda, Yutaka

    2008-10-07

    We report the high-resolution crystal structures of an extensively simplified variant of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor containing 20 alanines (BPTI-20st) and a reference single-disulfide-bonded variant (BPTI-[5,55]st) at, respectively, 1.39 and 1.09 A resolutions. The sequence was simplified based on the results of an alanine scanning experiment, as reported previously. The effects of the multiple alanine substitutions on the overall backbone structure were surprisingly small (C(alpha) atom RMSD of 0.53 A) being limited to small local structural perturbations. Both BPTI variants retained a wild-type level of trypsin inhibitory activity. The side-chain configurations of residues buried in the hydrophobic cores (<30% accessible surface area) were almost perfectly retained in both BPTI-20st and BPTI-[5,55]st, indicating that neither multiple alanine replacements nor the removal of the disulfide bonds affected their precise placements. However, the side chains of three partially buried residues (Q31, R20, and to some extent Y21) and several unburied residues rearranged into alternative dense-packing structures, suggesting some plasticity in their shape complementarity. These results indicate that a protein sequence simplified over its entire length can retain its densely packed, native side-chain structure, and suggest that both the design and fold recognition of natively folded proteins may be easier than previously thought.

  2. PDGFRA-mutant syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Riccardo; Martini, Maurizio; Cenci, Tonia; Carbone, Arnaldo; Lanza, Paola; Biondi, Alberto; Rindi, Guido; Cassano, Alessandra; Larghi, Alberto; Persiani, Roberto; Larocca, Luigi M

    2015-07-01

    Germline PDGFRA mutations cause multiple heterogeneous gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors. In its familial form this disease, which was formerly termed intestinal neurofibromatosis/neurofibromatosis 3b (INF/NF3b), has been included among familial gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) because of its genotype, described when GIST was the only known PDGFRA-mutant gastrointestinal tumor. Shortly afterwards, however, inflammatory fibroid polyps also revealed PDGFRA mutations. Subsequently, gastrointestinal CD34+ 'fibrous tumors' of uncertain classification were described in a germline PDGFRA-mutant context. Our aim was to characterize the syndrome produced by germline PDGFRA mutations and establish diagnostic criteria and management strategies for this hitherto puzzling disease. We studied a kindred displaying multiple gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors, comparing it with published families/individuals with possible analogous conditions. We identified a novel inherited PDGFRA mutation (P653L), constituting the third reported example of familial PDGFRA mutation. In adult mutants we detected inflammatory fibroid polyps, gastric GISTs and gastrointestinal fibrous tumors of uncertain nosology. We demonstrate that the syndrome formerly defined as INF/NF3b (exemplified by the family reported herein) is simplistically considered a form of familial GIST, because inflammatory fibroid polyps often prevail. Fibrous tumors appear variants of inflammatory fibroid polyps. 'INF/NF3b' and 'familial GIST' are misleading terms which we propose changing to 'PDGFRA-mutant syndrome'. In this condition, unlike KIT-dependent familial GIST syndromes, if present, GISTs are stomach-restricted and diffuse Cajal cell hyperplasia is not observed. This restriction of GISTs to the stomach in PDGFRA-mutant syndrome: (i) focuses oncological concern on gastric masses, as inflammatory fibroid polyps are benign; (ii) supports a selective role of gastric environment for PDGFRA mutations to elicit GISTs

  3. Overexpression of the D-alanine racemase gene confers resistance to D-cycloserine in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed Central

    Cáceres, N E; Harris, N B; Wellehan, J F; Feng, Z; Kapur, V; Barletta, R G

    1997-01-01

    D-Cycloserine is an effective second-line drug against Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. To analyze the genetic determinants of D-cycloserine resistance in mycobacteria, a library of a resistant Mycobacterium smegmatis mutant was constructed. A resistant clone harboring a recombinant plasmid with a 3.1-kb insert that contained the glutamate decarboxylase (gadA) and D-alanine racemase (alrA) genes was identified. Subcloning experiments demonstrated that alrA was necessary and sufficient to confer a D-cycloserine resistance phenotype. The D-alanine racemase activities of wild-type and recombinant M. smegmatis strains were inhibited by D-cycloserine in a concentration-dependent manner. The D-cycloserine resistance phenotype in the recombinant clone was due to the overexpression of the wild-type alrA gene in a multicopy vector. Analysis of a spontaneous resistant mutant also demonstrated overproduction of wild-type AlrA enzyme. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the overproducing mutant revealed a single transversion (G-->T) at the alrA promoter, which resulted in elevated beta-galactosidase reporter gene expression. Furthermore, transformants of Mycobacterium intracellulare and Mycobacterium bovis BCG carrying the M. smegmatis wild-type alrA gene in a multicopy vector were resistant to D-cycloserine, suggesting that AlrA overproduction is a potential mechanism of D-cycloserine resistance in clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis and other pathogenic mycobacteria. In conclusion, these results show that one of the mechanisms of D-cycloserine resistance in M. smegmatis involves the overexpression of the alrA gene due to a promoter-up mutation. PMID:9260945

  4. Alanine scanning analyses of the three major loops in domain II of Bacillus thuringiensis mosquitocidal toxin Cry4Aa.

    PubMed

    Howlader, Mohammad Tofazzal Hossain; Kagawa, Yasuhiro; Miyakawa, Ai; Yamamoto, Ayaka; Taniguchi, Tetsuya; Hayakawa, Tohru; Sakai, Hiroshi

    2010-02-01

    Cry4Aa produced by Bacillus thuringiensis is a dipteran-specific toxin and is of great interest for developing a bioinsecticide to control mosquitoes. Therefore, it is very important to characterize the functional motif of Cry4Aa that is responsible for its mosquitocidal activity. In this study, to characterize a potential receptor binding site, namely, loops 1, 2, and 3 in domain II, we constructed a series of Cry4Aa mutants in which a residue in these three loops was replaced with alanine. A bioassay using Culex pipiens larvae revealed that replacement of some residues affected the mosquitocidal activity of Cry4Aa, but the effect was limited. This finding was partially inconsistent with previous results which suggested that replacement of the Cry4Aa loop 2 results in a significant loss of mosquitocidal activity. Therefore, we constructed additional mutants in which multiple (five or six) residues in loop 2 were replaced with alanine. Although the replacement of multiple residues also resulted in some decrease in mosquitocidal activity, the mutants still showed relatively high activity. Since the insecticidal spectrum of Cry4Aa is specific, Cry4Aa must have a specific receptor on the surface of the target tissue, and loss of binding to the receptor should result in a complete loss of mosquitocidal activity. Our results suggested that, unlike the receptor binding site of the well-characterized molecule Cry1, the receptor binding site of Cry4Aa is different from loops 1, 2, and 3 or that there are multiple binding sites that work cooperatively for receptor binding.

  5. Degradation of glycine and alanine on irradiated quartz.

    PubMed

    Pawlikowski, Maciej; Benko, Aleksandra; Wróbel, Tomasz P

    2013-04-01

    Recent researches suggest participation of minerals in the formation of life under primordial conditions. Among all of the minerals, quartz seems to be one of the most probable to take part in such processes. However, an external source of energy is needed, e.g. electric discharge. A device simulating the proposed conditions was designed and was used to simulate prebiotic conditions. Investigation of processes occurring during the stimulation of quartz with electric discharge was studied by means of Ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectroscopy, in order to monitor the generation kinetics of free radicals. Additionally, infrared spectroscopy was applied to identify chemical reaction products created in a solution of alanine or glycine, in the presence of quartz treated with electric discharge. Formation of increased amounts of free radicals, compared to experiments performed without quartz and/or amino acid, is reported, along with identification of possible degradation products of alanine. No synthetic reactions were observed.

  6. Clinical applications of alanine/electron spin resonance dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Baffa, Oswaldo; Kinoshita, Angela

    2014-05-01

    This paper discusses the clinical applications of electron spin resonance (ESR) dosimetry focusing on the ESR/alanine system. A review of few past studies in this area is presented offering a critical overview of the challenges and opportunities for extending this system into clinical applications. Alanine/ESR dosimetry fulfills many of the required properties for several clinical applications such as water-equivalent composition, independence of the sensitivity for the energy range used in therapy and high precision. Improvements in sensitivity and the development of minidosimeters coupled with the use of a spectrometer of higher microwave frequency expanded the possibilities for clinical applications to the new modalities of radiotherapy (intensity-modulated radiation therapy and radiosurgery) and to the detection of low doses such as those present in some radiological image procedures.

  7. Crystal Structures of Aedes Aegypt Alanine Glyoxylate Aminotransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Han,Q.; Robinson, H.; Gao, Y.; Vogelaar, N.; Wilson, S.; Rizzi, M.; Li, J.

    2006-01-01

    Mosquitoes are unique in having evolved two alanine glyoxylate aminotransferases (AGTs). One is 3-hydroxykynurenine transaminase (HKT), which is primarily responsible for catalyzing the transamination of 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) to xanthurenic acid (XA). Interestingly, XA is used by malaria parasites as a chemical trigger for their development within the mosquito. This 3-HK to XA conversion is considered the major mechanism mosquitoes use to detoxify the chemically reactive and potentially toxic 3-HK. The other AGT is a typical dipteran insect AGT and is specific for converting glyoxylic acid to glycine. Here we report the 1.75{angstrom} high-resolution three-dimensional crystal structure of AGT from the mosquito Aedes aegypti (AeAGT) and structures of its complexes with reactants glyoxylic acid and alanine at 1.75 and 2.1{angstrom} resolution, respectively. This is the first time that the three-dimensional crystal structures of an AGT with its amino acceptor, glyoxylic acid, and amino donor, alanine, have been determined. The protein is dimeric and adopts the type I-fold of pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP)-dependent aminotransferases. The PLP co-factor is covalently bound to the active site in the crystal structure, and its binding site is similar to those of other AGTs. The comparison of the AeAGT-glyoxylic acid structure with other AGT structures revealed that these glyoxylic acid binding residues are conserved in most AGTs. Comparison of the AeAGT-alanine structure with that of the Anopheles HKT-inhibitor complex suggests that a Ser-Asn-Phe motif in the latter may be responsible for the substrate specificity of HKT enzymes for 3-HK.

  8. Physiological hypercortisolemia increases proteolysis, glutamine, and alanine production

    SciTech Connect

    Darmaun, D.; Matthews, D.E.; Bier, D.M. Cornell Univ. Medical College, New York, NY )

    1988-09-01

    Physiological elevations of plasma cortisol levels, as are encountered in stress and severe trauma, were produced in six normal subjects by infusing them with hydrocortisone for 64 h. Amino acid kinetics were measured in the postabsorptive state using three 4-h infusions of L-(1-{sup 13}C)leucine, L-phenyl({sup 2}H{sub 5})phenylalanine, L-(2-{sup 15}N)glutamine, and L-(1-{sup 13}C)alanine tracers (1) before, (2) at 12 h, and (3) at 60 h of cortisol infusion. Before and throughout the study, the subjects ate a normal diet of adequate protein and energy intake. The cortisol infusion raised plasma cortisol levels significantly from 10 {plus minus} 1 to 32 {plus minus} 4 {mu}g/dl, leucine flux from 83 {plus minus} 3 to 97 {plus minus} 3 {mu}mol{center dot}kg{sup {minus}1}{center dot}h{sup {minus}1}, and phenylalanine flux from 34 {plus minus} 1 to 39 {plus minus} 1 (SE) {mu}mol{center dot}kg{sup {minus}1}{center dot}h{sup {minus}1} after 12 h of cortisol infusion. These increases were maintained until the cortisol infusion was terminated. These nearly identical 15% increases in two different essential amino acid appearance rates are reflective of increased whole body protein breakdown. Glutamine flux rose by 12 h of cortisol infusion and remained elevated at the same level at 64 h. The increase in flux was primarily due to a 55% increase in glutamine de novo synthesis. Alanine flux increased with acute hypercortisolemia and increased further at 60 h of cortisol infusion, a result primarily of increased alanine de novo synthesis. Insulin, alanine, and lactate plasma levels responded similarly with significant rises between the acute and chronic periods of cortisol infusion. Thus hypercortisolemia increases both protein breakdown and the turnover of important nonessential amino acids for periods of up to 64 h.

  9. Crystal structures of Aedes aegypti alanine glyoxylate aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Han, Qian; Robinson, Howard; Gao, Yi Gui; Vogelaar, Nancy; Wilson, Scott R; Rizzi, Menico; Li, Jianyong

    2006-12-01

    Mosquitoes are unique in having evolved two alanine glyoxylate aminotransferases (AGTs). One is 3-hydroxykynurenine transaminase (HKT), which is primarily responsible for catalyzing the transamination of 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) to xanthurenic acid (XA). Interestingly, XA is used by malaria parasites as a chemical trigger for their development within the mosquito. This 3-HK to XA conversion is considered the major mechanism mosquitoes use to detoxify the chemically reactive and potentially toxic 3-HK. The other AGT is a typical dipteran insect AGT and is specific for converting glyoxylic acid to glycine. Here we report the 1.75A high-resolution three-dimensional crystal structure of AGT from the mosquito Aedes aegypti (AeAGT) and structures of its complexes with reactants glyoxylic acid and alanine at 1.75 and 2.1A resolution, respectively. This is the first time that the three-dimensional crystal structures of an AGT with its amino acceptor, glyoxylic acid, and amino donor, alanine, have been determined. The protein is dimeric and adopts the type I-fold of pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP)-dependent aminotransferases. The PLP co-factor is covalently bound to the active site in the crystal structure, and its binding site is similar to those of other AGTs. The comparison of the AeAGT-glyoxylic acid structure with other AGT structures revealed that these glyoxylic acid binding residues are conserved in most AGTs. Comparison of the AeAGT-alanine structure with that of the Anopheles HKT-inhibitor complex suggests that a Ser-Asn-Phe motif in the latter may be responsible for the substrate specificity of HKT enzymes for 3-HK.

  10. Pancreatic stellate cells support tumour metabolism through autophagic alanine secretion.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cristovão M; Biancur, Douglas E; Wang, Xiaoxu; Halbrook, Christopher J; Sherman, Mara H; Zhang, Li; Kremer, Daniel; Hwang, Rosa F; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Ying, Haoqiang; Asara, John M; Evans, Ronald M; Cantley, Lewis C; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Kimmelman, Alec C

    2016-08-25

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive disease characterized by an intense fibrotic stromal response and deregulated metabolism. The role of the stroma in PDAC biology is complex and it has been shown to play critical roles that differ depending on the biological context. The stromal reaction also impairs the vasculature, leading to a highly hypoxic, nutrient-poor environment. As such, these tumours must alter how they capture and use nutrients to support their metabolic needs. Here we show that stroma-associated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are critical for PDAC metabolism through the secretion of non-essential amino acids (NEAA). Specifically, we uncover a previously undescribed role for alanine, which outcompetes glucose and glutamine-derived carbon in PDAC to fuel the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and thus NEAA and lipid biosynthesis. This shift in fuel source decreases the tumour’s dependence on glucose and serum-derived nutrients, which are limited in the pancreatic tumour microenvironment. Moreover, we demonstrate that alanine secretion by PSCs is dependent on PSC autophagy, a process that is stimulated by cancer cells. Thus, our results demonstrate a novel metabolic interaction between PSCs and cancer cells, in which PSC-derived alanine acts as an alternative carbon source. This finding highlights a previously unappreciated metabolic network within pancreatic tumours in which diverse fuel sources are used to promote growth in an austere tumour microenvironment.

  11. Characterization of psychrophilic alanine racemase from Bacillus psychrosaccharolyticus.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Y; Yokoigawa, K; Esaki, N; Soda, K; Kawai, H

    1999-03-16

    A psychrophilic alanine racemase gene from Bacillus psychrosaccharolyticus was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli SOLR with a plasmid pYOK3. The gene starting with the unusual initiation codon GTG showed higher preference for codons ending in A or T. The enzyme purified to homogeneity showed the high catalytic activity even at 0 degrees C and was extremely labile over 35 degrees C. The enzyme was found to have a markedly large Km value (5.0 microM) for the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) cofactor in comparison with other reported alanine racemases, and was stabilized up to 50 degrees C in the presence of excess amounts of PLP. The low affinity of the enzyme for PLP may be related to the thermolability, and may be related to the high catalytic activity, initiated by the transaldimination reaction, at low temperature. The enzyme has a distinguishing hydrophilic region around the residue no. 150 in the deduced amino acid sequence (383 residues), whereas the corresponding regions of other Bacillus alanine racemases are hydrophobic. The position of the region in the three dimensional structure of C atoms of the enzyme was predicted to be in a surface loop surrounding the active site. The region may interact with solvent and reduce the compactness of the active site.

  12. Probing alanine transaminase catalysis with hyperpolarized 13CD3-pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Barb, A.W.; Hekmatyar, S.K.; Glushka, J.N.; Prestegard, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Hyperpolarized metabolites offer a tremendous sensitivity advantage (>104 fold) when measuring flux and enzyme activity in living tissues by magnetic resonance methods. These sensitivity gains can also be applied to mechanistic studies that impose time and metabolite concentration limitations. Here we explore the use of hyperpolarization by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in mechanistic studies of alanine transaminase (ALT), a well-established biomarker of liver disease and cancer that converts pyruvate to alanine using glutamate as a nitrogen donor. A specific deuterated, 13C-enriched analog of pyruvic acid, 13C3D3-pyruvic acid, is demonstrated to have advantages in terms of detection by both direct 13C observation and indirect observation through methyl protons introduced by ALT-catalyzed H–D exchange. Exchange on injecting hyperpolarized 13C3D3-pyruvate into ALT dissolved in buffered 1H2O, combined with an experimental approach to measure proton incorporation, provided information on mechanistic details of transaminase action on a 1.5 s timescale. ALT introduced, on average, 0.8 new protons into the methyl group of the alanine produced, indicating the presence of an off-pathway enamine intermediate. The opportunities for exploiting mechanism-dependent molecular signatures as well as indirect detection of hyperpolarized 13C3-pyruvate and products in imaging applications are discussed. PMID:23357427

  13. Pressure-induced phase transitions in L-alanine, revisited.

    PubMed

    Tumanov, N A; Boldyreva, E V; Kolesov, B A; Kurnosov, A V; Quesada Cabrera, R

    2010-08-01

    The effect of pressure on L-alanine has been studied by X-ray powder diffraction (up to 12.3 GPa), single-crystal X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and optical microscopy (up to approximately 6 GPa). No structural phase transitions have been observed. At approximately 2 GPa the cell parameters a and b become accidentally equal to each other, but without a change in space-group symmetry. Neither of two transitions reported by others (to a tetragonal phase at approximately 2 GPa and to a monoclinic phase at approximately 9 GPa) was observed. The changes in cell parameters were continuous up to the highest measured pressures and the cells remained orthorhombic. Some important changes in the intermolecular interactions occur, which also manifest themselves in the Raman spectra. Two new orthorhombic phases could be crystallized from a MeOH/EtOH/H(2)O pressure-transmitting mixture in the pressure range 0.8-4.7 GPa, but only if the sample was kept at these pressures for at least 1-2 d. The new phases converted back to L-alanine on decompression. Judging from the Raman spectra and cell parameters, the new phases are most probably not L-alanine but its solvates.

  14. Thymidine kinase mutants obtained by random sequence selection.

    PubMed

    Munir, K M; French, D C; Loeb, L A

    1993-05-01

    Knowledge of the catalytic properties and structural information regarding the amino acid residues that comprise the active site of an enzyme allows one, in principle, to use site-specific mutagenesis to construct genes that encode enzymes with altered functions. However, such information about most enzymes is not known and the effects of specific amino acid substitutions are not generally predictable. An alternative approach is to substitute random nucleotides for key codons in a gene and to use genetic selection to identify new and interesting enzyme variants. We describe here the construction, selection, and characterization of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase mutants either with different catalytic properties or with enhanced thermostability. From a library containing 2 x 10(6) plasmid-encoded herpes thymidine kinase genes, each with a different nucleotide sequence at the putative nucleoside binding site, we obtained 1540 active mutants. Using this library and one previously constructed, we identified by secondary selection Escherichia coli harboring thymidine kinase mutant clones that were unable to grow in the presence of concentrations of 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) that permits colony formation by E. coli harboring the wild-type plasmid. Two of the mutant enzymes exhibited a reduced Km for AZT, one of which displayed a higher catalytic efficiency for AZT over thymidine relative to that of the wild type. We also identified one mutant with enhanced thermostability. These mutants may have clinical potential as the promise of gene therapy is increasingly becoming a reality.

  15. Isotopic effects in mechanistic studies of biotransformations of fluorine derivatives of L-alanine catalysed by L-alanine dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Szymańska-Majchrzak, Jolanta; Pałka, Katarzyna; Kańska, Marianna

    2017-05-01

    Synthesis of 3-fluoro-[2-(2)H]-L-alanine (3-F-[(2)H]-L-Ala) in reductive amination of 3-fluoropyruvic acid catalysed by L-alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) was described. Fluorine derivative was used to study oxidative deamination catalysed by AlaDH applied kinetic (for 3-F-L-Ala in H2O - KIE's on Vmax: 1.1; on Vmax/KM: 1.2; for 3-F-L-Ala in (2)H2O - on Vmax: 1.4; on Vmax/KM: 2.1) and solvent isotope effect methods (for 3-F-L-Ala - SIE's on Vmax: 1.0; on Vmax/KM: 0.87; for 3-F-[2-(2)H]-L-Ala - on Vmax: 1.4; on Vmax/KM: 1.5). Studies explain some details of reaction mechanism.

  16. A molecular mechanism of azoxystrobin resistance in Penicillium digitatum UV mutants and a PCR-based assay for detection of azoxystrobin-resistant strains in packing- or store-house isolates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhifang; Zhu, Zengrong; Ma, Zhonghua; Li, Hongye

    2009-05-31

    Sixty-five isolates of Pencillium digitatum (Pers.:Fr) Sacc., a causative agent of green mold of postharvest citrus, were collected from various locations in Zhejiang province in 2000, 2005 and 2006, and assayed for their sensitivity to the quinone outside inhibitor (QoI) fungicide azoxystrobin. The results showed that azoxystrobin is highly effective against P. digitatum, in vitro, and that the effective concentrations resulting in reduction of conidial germination and mycelial growth by 50% (EC(50)) averaged 0.0426 microg/ml and 0.0250 microg/ml, respectively. Twenty-eight azoxystrobin-resistant mutants were obtained by UV mutagenesis and subsequent selection on medium amended with azoxystrobin (12 microg/ml) and salicylhydroxamic acid. All obtained mutants were highly resistant to azoxystrobin and their resistance was genetically stable. Analysis of the cytochrome b gene structure of P. digitatum (Pdcyt b) showed the absence of type I intron in the first hot spot region of mutation. These results indicate that P. digitatum is likely to evolve high levels of resistance to azoxystrobin after its application. Analysis of partial sequences of Pdcyt b from both the azoxystrobin-sensitive parental isolate and the 28 azoxystrobin-resistant mutants revealed that a point mutation, which leads to the substitution at code 143 of alanine for glycine (G143A), is responsible for the observed azoxystrobin resistance in the laboratory mutants. Based on this point mutation, two allele-specific PCR primers were designed and optimized for allele-specific PCR detection of azoxystrobin-resistant isolates of P. digitatum.

  17. GMXPBSA 2.0: A GROMACS tool to perform MM/PBSA and computational alanine scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paissoni, C.; Spiliotopoulos, D.; Musco, G.; Spitaleri, A.

    2014-11-01

    GMXPBSA 2.0 is a user-friendly suite of Bash/Perl scripts for streamlining MM/PBSA calculations on structural ensembles derived from GROMACS trajectories, to automatically calculate binding free energies for protein-protein or ligand-protein complexes. GMXPBSA 2.0 is flexible and can easily be customized to specific needs. Additionally, it performs computational alanine scanning (CAS) to study the effects of ligand and/or receptor alanine mutations on the free energy of binding. Calculations require only for protein-protein or protein-ligand MD simulations. GMXPBSA 2.0 performs different comparative analysis, including a posteriori generation of alanine mutants of the wild-type complex, calculation of the binding free energy values of the mutant complexes and comparison of the results with the wild-type system. Moreover, it compares the binding free energy of different complexes trajectories, allowing the study the effects of non-alanine mutations, post-translational modifications or unnatural amino acids on the binding free energy of the system under investigation. Finally, it can calculate and rank relative affinity to the same receptor utilizing MD simulations of proteins in complex with different ligands. In order to dissect the different MM/PBSA energy contributions, including molecular mechanic (MM), electrostatic contribution to solvation (PB) and nonpolar contribution to solvation (SA), the tool combines two freely available programs: the MD simulations software GROMACS and the Poisson-Boltzmann equation solver APBS. All the calculations can be performed in single or distributed automatic fashion on a cluster facility in order to increase the calculation by dividing frames across the available processors. The program is freely available under the GPL license. Catalogue identifier: AETQ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETQ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing

  18. Mutant fatty acid desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2004-02-03

    The present invention relates to a method for producing mutants of a fatty acid desaturase having a substantially increased activity towards fatty acid substrates with chains containing fewer than 18 carbons relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon atom chain length substrate specificity. The method involves inducing one or more mutations in the nucleic acid sequence encoding the precursor desaturase, transforming the mutated sequence into an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph cell such as MH13 E. coli, culturing the cells in the absence of supplemental unsaturated fatty acids, thereby selecting for recipient cells which have received and which express a mutant fatty acid desaturase with an elevated specificity for fatty acid substrates having chain lengths of less than 18 carbon atoms. A variety of mutants having 16 or fewer carbon atom chain length substrate specificities are produced by this method. Mutant desaturases produced by this method can be introduced via expression vectors into prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and can also be used in the production of transgenic plants which may be used to produce specific fatty acid products.

  19. Transforming mutant v-mos protein kinases that are deficient in in vitro autophosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, R S; Donoghue, D J

    1989-01-01

    We investigated the importance of specific serine residues for autophosphorylation and transformation by serine-threonine protein kinase p37mos. When either serine 326 or 358 was replaced with alanine, the resulting mutant protein retained the ability to transform NIH 3T3 cells but failed to autophosphorylate in vitro. These studies represent the first functional uncoupling of these two activities for p37mos. Images PMID:2528689

  20. Characterization of serine hydroxymethyltransferase GlyA as a potential source of D-alanine in Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    De Benedetti, Stefania; Bühl, Henrike; Gaballah, Ahmed; Klöckner, Anna; Otten, Christian; Schneider, Tanja; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Henrichfreise, Beate

    2014-01-01

    For intracellular Chlamydiaceae, there is no need to withstand osmotic challenges, and a functional cell wall has not been detected in these pathogens so far. Nevertheless, penicillin inhibits cell division in Chlamydiaceae resulting in enlarged aberrant bodies, a phenomenon known as chlamydial anomaly. D-alanine is a unique and essential component in the biosynthesis of bacterial cell walls. In free-living bacteria like Escherichia coli, penicillin-binding proteins such as monofunctional transpeptidases PBP2 and PBP3, the putative targets of penicillin in Chlamydiaceae, cross-link adjacent peptidoglycan strands via meso-diaminopimelic acid and D-Ala-D-Ala moieties of pentapeptide side chains. In the absence of genes coding for alanine racemase Alr and DadX homologs, the source of D-Ala and thus the presence of substrates for PBP2 and PBP3 activity in Chlamydiaceae has puzzled researchers for years. Interestingly, Chlamydiaceae genomes encode GlyA, a serine hydroxymethyltransferase that has been shown to exhibit slow racemization of D- and L-alanine as a side reaction in E. coli. We show that GlyA from Chlamydia pneumoniae can serve as a source of D-Ala. GlyA partially reversed the D-Ala auxotrophic phenotype of an E. coli racemase double mutant. Moreover, purified chlamydial GlyA had racemase activity on L-Ala in vitro and was inhibited by D-cycloserine, identifying GlyA, besides D-Ala ligase MurC/Ddl, as an additional target of this competitive inhibitor in Chlamydiaceae. Proof of D-Ala biosynthesis in Chlamydiaceae helps to clarify the structure of cell wall precursor lipid II and the role of chlamydial penicillin-binding proteins in the development of non-dividing aberrant chlamydial bodies and persistence in the presence of penicillin.

  1. Topology of AspT, the aspartate:alanine antiporter of Tetragenococcus halophilus, determined by site-directed fluorescence labeling.

    PubMed

    Nanatani, Kei; Fujiki, Takashi; Kanou, Kazuhiko; Takeda-Shitaka, Mayuko; Umeyama, Hideaki; Ye, Liwen; Wang, Xicheng; Nakajima, Tasuku; Uchida, Takafumi; Maloney, Peter C; Abe, Keietsu

    2007-10-01

    The gram-positive lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus catalyzes the decarboxylation of L-aspartate (Asp) with release of L-alanine (Ala) and CO(2). The decarboxylation reaction consists of two steps: electrogenic exchange of Asp for Ala catalyzed by an aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) and intracellular decarboxylation of the transported Asp catalyzed by an L-aspartate-beta-decarboxylase (AspD). AspT belongs to the newly classified aspartate:alanine exchanger family (transporter classification no. 2.A.81) of transporters. In this study, we were interested in the relationship between the structure and function of AspT and thus analyzed the topology by means of the substituted-cysteine accessibility method using the impermeant, fluorescent, thiol-specific probe Oregon Green 488 maleimide (OGM) and the impermeant, nonfluorescent, thiol-specific probe [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl]methanethiosulfonate bromide. We generated 23 single-cysteine variants from a six-histidine-tagged cysteineless AspT template. A cysteine position was assigned an external location if the corresponding single-cysteine variant reacted with OGM added to intact cells, and a position was assigned an internal location if OGM labeling required cell lysis. The topology analyses revealed that AspT has a unique topology; the protein has 10 transmembrane helices (TMs), a large hydrophilic cytoplasmic loop (about 180 amino acids) between TM5 and TM6, N and C termini that face the periplasm, and a positively charged residue (arginine 76) within TM3. Moreover, the three-dimensional structure constructed by means of the full automatic modeling system indicates that the large hydrophilic cytoplasmic loop of AspT possesses a TrkA_C domain and a TrkA_C-like domain and that the three-dimensional structures of these domains are similar to each other even though their amino acid sequences show low similarity.

  2. Allosteric Features of KCNQ1 Gating Revealed by Alanine Scanning Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li-Juan; Ohmert, Iris; Vardanyan, Vitya

    2011-01-01

    Controlled opening and closing of an ion-selective pathway in response to changes of membrane potential is a fundamental feature of voltage-gated ion channels. In recent decades, various details of this process have been revealed with unprecedented precision based on studies of prototypic potassium channels. Though current scientific efforts are focused more on a thorough description of voltage-sensor movement, much less is known about the similarities and differences of the gating mechanisms among potassium channels. Here, we describe the peculiarities of the KCNQ1 gating process in parallel comparison to Shaker. We applied alanine scanning mutagenesis to the S4-S5 linker and pore region and followed the regularities of gating perturbations in KCNQ1. We found a fractional constitutive conductance for wild-type KCNQ1. This component increased significantly in mutants with considerably leftward-shifted steady-state activation curves. In contrast to Shaker, no correlation between V1/2 and Z parameters was observed for the voltage-dependent fraction of KCNQ1. Our experimental findings are explained by a simple allosteric gating scheme with voltage-driven and voltage-independent transitions. Allosteric features are discussed in the context of extreme gating adaptability of KCNQ1 upon interaction with KCNE β-subunits. PMID:21320432

  3. A mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking catabolic NAD-specific glutamate dehydrogenase. Growth characteristics of the mutant and regulation of enzyme synthesis in the wild-type strain.

    PubMed

    Middelhoven, W J; van Eijk, J; van Renesse, R; Blijham, J M

    1978-01-01

    NAD-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH-B) was induced in a wild-type strain derived of alpha-sigma 1278b by alpha-amino acids, the nitrogen of which according to known degradative pathways is transferred to 2-oxoglutarate. A recessive mutant (gdhB) devoid of GDH-B activity grew more slowly than the wild type if one of these amino acids was the sole source of nitrogen. Addition of ammonium chloride, glutamine, asparagine or serine to growth media with inducing alpha-amino acids as the main nitrogen source increased the growth rate of the gdhB mutant to the wild-type level and repressed GDH-B synthesis in the wild type. Arginine, urea and allantoin similarly increased the growth rate of the gdhB mutant and repressed GDH-B synthesis in the presence of glutamate, but not in the presence of aspartate, alanine or proline as the main nitrogen source. These observations are consistent with the view that GDH-B in vivo deaminates glutamate. Ammonium ions are required for the biosynthesis of glutamine, asparagine, arginine, histidine and purine and pyrimidine bases. Aspartate and alanine apparently are more potent inducers of GDH-B than glutamate. Anabolic NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH-A) can not fulfil the function of GDH-B in the gdhB mutant. This is concluded from the equal growth rates in glutamate, aspartate and proline media as observed with a gdhB mutant and with a gdhA, gdhB double mutant in which both glutamate dehydrogenases area lacking. The double mutant showed an anomalous growth behaviour, growth rates on several nitrogen sources being unexpectedly low.

  4. ABS-Scan: In silico alanine scanning mutagenesis for binding site residues in protein-ligand complex.

    PubMed

    Anand, Praveen; Nagarajan, Deepesh; Mukherjee, Sumanta; Chandra, Nagasuma

    2014-01-01

    Most physiological processes in living systems are fundamentally regulated by protein-ligand interactions. Understanding the process of ligand recognition by proteins is a vital activity in molecular biology and biochemistry. It is well known that the residues present at the binding site of the protein form pockets that provide a conducive environment for recognition of specific ligands. In many cases, the boundaries of these sites are not well defined. Here, we provide a web-server to systematically evaluate important residues in the binding site of the protein that contribute towards the ligand recognition through in silico alanine-scanning mutagenesis experiments. Each of the residues present at the binding site is computationally mutated to alanine. The ligand interaction energy is computed for each mutant and the corresponding ΔΔG values are calculated by comparing it to the wild type protein, thus evaluating individual residue contributions towards ligand interaction. The server will thus provide a ranked list of residues to the user in order to obtain loss-of-function mutations. This web-tool can be freely accessed through the following address: http://proline.biochem.iisc.ernet.in/abscan/.

  5. A transthyretin variant (alanine 49) associated with familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy in a French family.

    PubMed Central

    Benson, M D; Julien, J; Liepnieks, J; Zeldenrust, S; Benson, M D

    1993-01-01

    A transthyretin mutation was discovered in a French family with familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy originally described in 1983. The syndrome is of early onset (approximate age 35 to 40) with carpal tunnel syndrome. Death is from cardiac disease. By direct genomic DNA sequencing an A-->G mutation was found in the position corresponding to the first base of transthyretin codon 49. The predicted alanine for threonine substitution in the transthyretin protein was proven by amino acid sequencing of transthyretin isolated from the plasma of an affected subject. Since the DNA mutation does not result in the creation or abolition of a restriction endonuclease recognition site, a new DNA analysis technique was used in which site directed mutagenesis is used to create an RFLP when the introduced mutation is in proximity to the natural mutation. Using a 27 nucleotide mutagenesis primer in the PCR reaction, a new Bg1I site was created on amplification of the variant allele. Using this test, termed PCR-IMRA, four affected members of the family were shown to have the mutation. Images PMID:8095301

  6. Different Phenotypes of Walker-Like A Box Mutants of ParA Homolog IncC of Broad-Host-Range IncP Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Siddique, Azeem; Figurski, David H.

    2012-01-01

    The promiscuous IncPα plasmids RK2 and R995 encode a broad-host-range partition system, whose essential components include the incC and korB genes and a DNA site (OB) to which the korB product binds. IncC2, the smaller of the two incC products, is sufficient for stabilization of R995ΔincC. It is a member of the type Ia ParA family of partition ATPases. To better understand the role of ATP in partition, we constructed three alanine-substitution mutants of IncC2. Each mutation changed a different residue of the Walker-like ATP-binding and hydrolysis motif, including a lysine (K10) conserved solely among members of the ParA and MinD families. All three IncC2 mutants were defective in plasmid partition, but they differed from one another in other respects. The IncC2 T16A mutant, predicted to be defective in Mg2+ coordination, was severely impaired in all activities tested. IncC2 K10A, predicted to be defective in ATP hydrolysis, mediated enhanced incompatibility with R995 derivatives. IncC2 K15A, predicted to be defective in ATP binding, exhibited two distinct incompatibility properties depending on the genotype of the target plasmid. When in trans to plasmids carrying a complementable incC deletion, IncC2 K15A caused dramatic plasmid loss, even at low levels of expression. In trans to wild-type R995 or to R995ΔincC carrying a functional P1 partition system, IncC2 K15A-mediated incompatibility was significantly less than that caused by wild-type IncC2. All three Walker-like A box mutants were also defective for the host toxicity that normally results from co-overexpression of incC and korB. The phenotypes of the mutants support a model in which nucleotide hydrolysis is required for separation of paired plasmid complexes and possible interaction with a host factor. PMID:22579980

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of mutated Mycobacterium tuberculosis L-alanine dehydrogenase to illuminate the role of key residues.

    PubMed

    Ling, Baoping; Bi, Siwei; Sun, Min; Jing, Zhihong; Li, Xiaoping; Zhang, Rui

    2014-05-01

    L-Alanine dehydrogenase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (L-MtAlaDH) catalyzes the NADH-dependent interconversion of l-alanine and pyruvate, and it is considered to be a potential target for the treatment of tuberculosis. The experiment has verified that amino acid replacement of the conserved active-site residues which have strong stability and no great changes in biological evolutionary process, such as His96 and Asp270, could lead to inactive mutants [Ågren et al., J. Mol. Biol. 377 (2008) 1161-1173]. However, the role of these conserved residues in catalytic reaction still remains unclear. Based on the crystal structures, a series of mutant structures were constructed to investigate the role of the conserved residues in enzymatic reaction by using molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that whatever the conserved residues were mutated, the protein can still convert its conformation from open state to closed state as long as NADH is present in active site. Asp270 maintains the stability of nicotinamide ring and ribose of NADH through hydrogen bond interactions, and His96 is helpful to convert the protein conformation by interactions with Gln271, whereas, they would lead to the structural rearrangement in active site and lose the catalytic activity when they were mutated. Additionally, we deduce that Met301 plays a major role in catalytic reaction due to fixing the nicotinamide ring of NADH to prevent its rotation, and we propose that Met301 would be mutated to the hydrophobic residue with large steric hindrance in side chain to test the activity of the protein in future experiment.

  8. Sustainability and substitutability.

    PubMed

    Fenichel, Eli P; Zhao, Jinhua

    2015-02-01

    Developing a quantitative science of sustainability requires bridging mathematical concepts from fields contributing to sustainability science. The concept of substitutability is central to sustainability but is defined differently by different fields. Specifically, economics tends to define substitutability as a marginal concept while fields such as ecology tend to focus on limiting behaviors. We explain how to reconcile these different views. We develop a model where investments can be made in knowledge to increase the elasticity of substitution. We explore the set of sustainable and optimal trajectories for natural capital extraction and built and knowledge capital accumulation. Investments in substitutability through knowledge stock accumulation affect the value of natural capital. Results suggest that investing in the knowledge stock, which can enhance substitutability, is critical to desirable sustainable outcomes. This result is robust even when natural capital is not managed optimally. This leads us to conclude that investments in the knowledge stock are of first order importance for sustainability.

  9. Thermodynamics of Deca-alanine Folding in Water.

    PubMed

    Hazel, Anthony; Chipot, Christophe; Gumbart, James C

    2014-07-08

    The determination of the folding dynamics of polypeptides and proteins is critical in characterizing their functions in biological systems. Numerous computational models and methods have been developed for studying structure formation at the atomic level. Due to its small size and simple structure, deca-alanine is used as a model system in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The free energy of unfolding in vacuum has been studied extensively using the end-to-end distance of the peptide as the reaction coordinate. However, few studies have been conducted in the presence of explicit solvent. Previous results show a significant decrease in the free energy of extended conformations in water, but the α-helical state is still notably favored over the extended state. Although sufficient in vacuum, we show that end-to-end distance is incapable of capturing the full complexity of deca-alanine folding in water. Using α-helical content as a second reaction coordinate, we deduce a more descriptive free-energy landscape, one which reveals a second energy minimum in the extended conformations that is of comparable free energy to the α-helical state. Equilibrium simulations demonstrate the relative stability of the extended and α-helical states in water as well as the transition between the two states. This work reveals both the necessity and challenge of determining a proper reaction coordinate to fully characterize a given process.

  10. The effect of immunonutrition (glutamine, alanine) on fracture healing

    PubMed Central

    Küçükalp, Abdullah; Durak, Kemal; Bayyurt, Sarp; Sönmez, Gürsel; Bilgen, Muhammed S.

    2014-01-01

    Background There have been various studies related to fracture healing. Glutamine is an amino acid with an important role in many cell and organ functions. This study aimed to make a clinical, radiological, and histopathological evaluation of the effects of glutamine on fracture healing. Methods Twenty rabbits were randomly allocated into two groups of control and immunonutrition. A fracture of the fibula was made to the right hind leg. All rabbits received standard food and water. From post-operative first day for 30 days, the study group received an additional 2 ml/kg/day 20% L-alanine L-glutamine solution via a gastric catheter, and the control group received 2 ml/kg/day isotonic via gastric catheter. At the end of 30 days, the rabbits were sacrificed and the fractures were examined clinically, radiologically, and histopathologically in respect to the degree of union. Results Radiological evaluation of the control group determined a mean score of 2.5 according to the orthopaedists and 2.65 according to the radiologists. In the clinical evaluation, the mean score was 1.875 for the control group and 2.0 for the study group. Histopathological evaluation determined a mean score of 8.5 for the control group and 9.0 for the study group. Conclusion One month after orally administered glutamine–alanine, positive effects were observed on fracture healing radiologically, clinically, and histopathologically, although no statistically significant difference was determined.

  11. Formation of chloroform during chlorination of alanine in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wen-Hai; Gao, Nai-Yun; Deng, Yang; Dong, Bing-Zhi

    2009-11-01

    Currently, dissolved nitrogenous organic matters in water, important precursors of disinfection by-products (DBPs), are of significant concern. This study was to explore the formation of chloroform (CF) during chlorination of alanine (Ala), an important nitrogenous organic compound commonly present in water sources. Our results indicated that the CF yield reached a maximum value of 0.143% at the molar ratio of chlorine atom to nitrogen atom (Cl/N)=1.0 over a Cl/N range of 0.2-5.0 (pH=7.0, reaction time=5d, and initial Ala=0.1mM). At an acidic-neutral condition (pH 4-7), the formation of CF was suppressed. However, the highest CF yield (0.227%) occurred at weakly alkaline condition (pH 8.0) (initial Ala=0.1mM, and Cl/N=1.0). The increase of Br(-) in water can increase total trihalomethanes (THMs) and bromo-THMs. However, the bromo-THMs level reached a plateau at Br(-)/Cl>0.04. Finally, based on the computation of frontier electron density and identification and measurement of key intermediates during Ala chlorination, we proposed a formation pathway of CF from Ala chlorination: Ala-->monochloro-N-alanine (MC-N-Ala)-->acetaldehyde (AAld)-->monochloroacetaldehyde acetaldehyde (MCAld)-->dichloroacetaldehyde (DCAld)-->trichloroacetaldehyde (TCAld)-->CF.

  12. Involvement of alanine racemase in germination of Bacillus cereus spores lacking an intact exosporium.

    PubMed

    Venir, Elena; Del Torre, Manuela; Cunsolo, Vincenzo; Saletti, Rosaria; Musetti, Rita; Stecchini, Mara Lucia

    2014-02-01

    The L-alanine mediated germination of food isolated Bacillus cereus DSA 1 spores, which lacked an intact exosporium, increased in the presence of D-cycloserine (DCS), which is an alanine racemase (Alr) inhibitor, reflecting the activity of the Alr enzyme, capable of converting L-alanine to the germination inhibitor D-alanine. Proteomic analysis of the alkaline extracts of the spore proteins, which include exosporium and coat proteins, confirmed that Alr was present in the B. cereus DSA 1 spores and matched to that encoded by B. cereus ATCC 14579, whose spore germination was strongly affected by the block of conversion of L- to D-alanine. Unlike ATCC 14579 spores, L-alanine germination of B. cereus DSA 1 spores was not affected by the preincubation with DCS, suggesting a lack of restriction in the reactant accessibility.

  13. The Helical Alanine Controversy: An (Ala)6 Insertion Dramatically Increases Helicity

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jasper C.; Barua, Bipasha

    2013-01-01

    Employing chemical shift melts and hydrogen/deuterium exchange NMR techniques, we have determined the stabilization of the Trp-cage miniprotein due to multiple alanine insertions within the N-terminal α-helix. Alanine is shown to be uniquely helix-stabilizing and this stabilization is reflected in the global fold stability of the Trp-cage. The associated free energy change per alanine can be utilized to calculate the alanine propagation value. From the Lifson–Roig formulation, the calculated value (wAla = 1.6) is comparable to those obtained for short, solubilized, alanine-rich helices and is much larger than the values obtained by prior host–guest techniques or in N-terminally templated helices and peptides bearing long contiguous strings of alanines with no capping or solubilizing units present. PMID:15493925

  14. Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of Xoo0352, D-alanine-D-alanine ligase A, from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Doan, Thanh Thi Ngoc; Kim, Jin-Kwang; Kim, Hyesoon; Ahn, Yeh-Jin; Kim, Jeong-Gu; Lee, Byoung-Moo; Kang, Lin-Woo

    2008-12-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) causes bacterial blight (BB), which is one of the most devastating diseases of rice in most rice-growing countries. D-Alanine-D-alanine ligase A (DdlA), coded by the Xoo0352 gene, was expressed, purified and crystallized. DdlA is an enzyme that is involved in D-alanine metabolism and the biosynthesis of an essential bacterial peptidoglycan precursor, in which it catalyzes the formation of D-alanyl-D-alanine from two D-alanines, and is thus an attractive antibacterial drug target against Xoo. The DdlA crystals diffracted to 2.3 A resolution and belonged to the primitive tetragonal space group P4(3)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 83.0, c = 97.6 A. There is one molecule in the asymmetric unit, with a corresponding V(M) of 1.88 A(3) Da(-1) and a solvent content of 34.6%. The initial structure was determined by molecular replacement using D-alanine-D-alanine ligase from Staphylococcus aureus (PDB code 2i87) as a template model.

  15. Development and characterisation of highly antibiotic resistant Bartonella bacilliformis mutants

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Cláudia; Martínez-Puchol, Sandra; Ruiz-Roldán, Lidia; Pons, Maria J.; del Valle Mendoza, Juana; Ruiz, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to develop and characterise in vitro Bartonella bacilliformis antibiotic resistant mutants. Three B. bacilliformis strains were plated 35 or 40 times with azithromycin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin or rifampicin discs. Resistance-stability was assessed performing 5 serial passages without antibiotic pressure. MICs were determined with/without Phe-Arg-β-Napthylamide and artesunate. Target alterations were screened in the 23S rRNA, rplD, rplV, gyrA, gyrB, parC, parE and rpoB genes. Chloramphenicol and ciprofloxacin resistance were the most difficult and easiest (>37.3 and 10.6 passages) to be selected, respectively. All mutants but one selected with chloramphenicol achieved high resistance levels. All rifampicin, one azithromycin and one ciprofloxacin mutants did not totally revert when cultured without antibiotic pressure. Azithromycin resistance was related to L4 substitutions Gln-66 → Lys or Gly-70 → Arg; L4 deletion Δ62–65 (Lys-Met-Tyr-Lys) or L22 insertion 83::Val-Ser-Glu-Ala-His-Val-Gly-Lys-Ser; in two chloramphenicol-resistant mutants the 23S rRNA mutation G2372A was detected. GyrA Ala-91 → Val and Asp-95 → Gly and GyrB Glu474 → Lys were detected in ciprofloxacin-resistant mutants. RpoB substitutions Gln-527 → Arg, His-540 → Tyr and Ser-545 → Phe plus Ser-588 → Tyr were detected in rifampicin-resistant mutants. In 5 mutants the effect of efflux pumps on resistance was observed. Antibiotic resistance was mainly related to target mutations and overexpression of efflux pumps, which might underlie microbiological failures during treatments. PMID:27667026

  16. Development and characterisation of highly antibiotic resistant Bartonella bacilliformis mutants.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Cláudia; Martínez-Puchol, Sandra; Ruiz-Roldán, Lidia; Pons, Maria J; Del Valle Mendoza, Juana; Ruiz, Joaquim

    2016-09-26

    The objective was to develop and characterise in vitro Bartonella bacilliformis antibiotic resistant mutants. Three B. bacilliformis strains were plated 35 or 40 times with azithromycin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin or rifampicin discs. Resistance-stability was assessed performing 5 serial passages without antibiotic pressure. MICs were determined with/without Phe-Arg-β-Napthylamide and artesunate. Target alterations were screened in the 23S rRNA, rplD, rplV, gyrA, gyrB, parC, parE and rpoB genes. Chloramphenicol and ciprofloxacin resistance were the most difficult and easiest (>37.3 and 10.6 passages) to be selected, respectively. All mutants but one selected with chloramphenicol achieved high resistance levels. All rifampicin, one azithromycin and one ciprofloxacin mutants did not totally revert when cultured without antibiotic pressure. Azithromycin resistance was related to L4 substitutions Gln-66 → Lys or Gly-70 → Arg; L4 deletion Δ62-65 (Lys-Met-Tyr-Lys) or L22 insertion 83::Val-Ser-Glu-Ala-His-Val-Gly-Lys-Ser; in two chloramphenicol-resistant mutants the 23S rRNA mutation G2372A was detected. GyrA Ala-91 → Val and Asp-95 → Gly and GyrB Glu474 → Lys were detected in ciprofloxacin-resistant mutants. RpoB substitutions Gln-527 → Arg, His-540 → Tyr and Ser-545 → Phe plus Ser-588 → Tyr were detected in rifampicin-resistant mutants. In 5 mutants the effect of efflux pumps on resistance was observed. Antibiotic resistance was mainly related to target mutations and overexpression of efflux pumps, which might underlie microbiological failures during treatments.

  17. 40 CFR 721.981 - Substituted naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. 721.981 Section 721.981 Protection of Environment...-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. (a) Chemical substance and significant new... naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex (PMN P-93-1631) is subject...

  18. 40 CFR 721.981 - Substituted naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. 721.981 Section 721.981 Protection of Environment...-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. (a) Chemical substance and significant new... naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex (PMN P-93-1631) is subject...

  19. 40 CFR 721.981 - Substituted naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. 721.981 Section 721.981 Protection of Environment...-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. (a) Chemical substance and significant new... naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex (PMN P-93-1631) is subject...

  20. 40 CFR 721.981 - Substituted naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. 721.981 Section 721.981 Protection of Environment...-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. (a) Chemical substance and significant new... naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex (PMN P-93-1631) is subject...

  1. 40 CFR 721.981 - Substituted naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. 721.981 Section 721.981 Protection of Environment...-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. (a) Chemical substance and significant new... naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex (PMN P-93-1631) is subject...

  2. Sugar substitutes during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Eliza; Koren, Gideon; Bozzo, Pina

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Question I have a pregnant patient who regularly consumes sugar substitutes and she asked me if continuing their use would affect her pregnancy or child. What should I tell her, and are there certain options that are better for use during pregnancy? Answer Although more research is required to fully determine the effects of in utero exposure to sugar substitutes, the available data do not suggest adverse effects in pregnancy. However, it is recommended that sugar substitutes be consumed in moderate amounts, adhering to the acceptable daily intake standards set by regulatory agencies. PMID:25392440

  3. The zebrafish early arrest mutants.

    PubMed

    Kane, D A; Maischein, H M; Brand, M; van Eeden, F J; Furutani-Seiki, M; Granato, M; Haffter, P; Hammerschmidt, M; Heisenberg, C P; Jiang, Y J; Kelsh, R N; Mullins, M C; Odenthal, J; Warga, R M; Nüsslein-Volhard, C

    1996-12-01

    This report describes mutants of the zebrafish having phenotypes causing a general arrest in early morphogenesis. These mutants identify a group of loci making up about 20% of the loci identified by mutants with visible morphological phenotypes within the first day of development. There are 12 Class I mutants, which fall into 5 complementation groups and have cells that lyse before morphological defects are observed. Mutants at three loci, speed bump, ogre and zombie, display abnormal nuclei. The 8 Class II mutants, which fall into 6 complementation groups, arrest development before cell lysis is observed. These mutants seemingly stop development in the late segmentation stages, and maintain a body shape similar to a 20 hour embryo. Mutations in speed bump, ogre, zombie, specter, poltergeist and troll were tested for cell lethality by transplanting mutant cells into wild-type hosts. With poltergeist, transplanted mutant cells all survive. The remainder of the mutants tested were autonomously but conditionally lethal: mutant cells, most of which lyse, sometimes survive to become notochord, muscles, or, in rare cases, large neurons, all cell types which become postmitotic in the gastrula. Some of the genes of the early arrest group may be necessary for progression though the cell cycle; if so, the survival of early differentiating cells may be based on having their terminal mitosis before the zygotic requirement for these genes.

  4. Characterization of FNR* mutant proteins indicates two distinct mechanisms for altering oxygen regulation of the Escherichia coli transcription factor FNR.

    PubMed Central

    Bates, D M; Lazazzera, B A; Kiley, P J

    1995-01-01

    In order to gain insight into the mechanism by which the Escherichia coli transcription factor FNR* is activated in response to anaerobiosis, we have analyzed FNR mutant proteins which, unlike the wild-type protein, stimulate gene expression in the presence of oxygen in vivo. Cell extracts containing seven different FNR* mutant proteins were tested in vitro for the ability to bind to the FNR consensus DNA site in a gel retardation assay under aerobic conditions. At the concentration of protein tested, only extracts which contained FNR* mutant proteins with amino acid substitutions at position 154 showed significant DNA binding. The three position-154 FNR* mutant proteins could be further distinguished from the other mutant proteins by analysis of the in vivo phenotypes of FNR* proteins containing amino acid substitutions at either of two essential cysteine residues. In the presence of oxygen, FNR* mutant proteins with amino acid substitutions at position 154 were the least affected when either Cys-23 or Cys-122 was substituted for Ser. On the basis of these in vivo and in vitro analyses, FNR* mutant proteins appear to segregate into at least two classes. Thus, it appears that each class of FNR* substitutions alters the normal pathway of FNR activation in response to oxygen deprivation by a different mechanism. PMID:7608069

  5. Antibacterial Activity of Alanine-Derived Gemini Quaternary Ammonium Compounds.

    PubMed

    Piecuch, Agata; Obłąk, Ewa; Guz-Regner, Katarzyna

    The antibacterial activity of alanine-derived gemini quaternary ammonium salts (chlorides and bromides) with various spacer and alkyl chain lengths was investigated. The studied compounds exhibited a strong bactericidal effect, especially bromides with 10 and 12 carbon alkyl chains and 3 carbon spacer groups (TMPAL-10 Br and TMPAL-12 Br), with a short contact time. Both salts dislodged biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus epidermidis, and were lethal to adherent cells of S. epidermidis. Bromide with 2 carbon spacer groups and 12 carbon alkyl chains (TMEAL-12 Br) effectively reduced microbial adhesion by coating polystyrene and silicone surfaces. The results obtained suggest that, after further studies, gemini QAS might be considered as antimicrobial agents in medicine or industry.

  6. Charge dependent photodynamic activity of alanine based zinc phthalocyanines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ao; Li, Yejing; Zhou, Lin; Yuan, Linxin; Lu, Shan; Lin, Yun; Zhou, Jiahong; Wei, Shaohua

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, to minimize the effects of different structure, three alanine-based zinc phthalocyanines (Pcs) of differing charges were engineered and synthesized with the same basic structure. On this premise, the relationship between nature of charge and photodynamic activity was studied. Besides, further verification and explanation of some inconsistent results were also carried out. The results showed that charge can influence the aggregation state, singlet oxygen generation ability and cellular uptake of Pcs, thereby affecting their photodynamic activity. In addition, the biomolecules inside cells may interact with Pcs of differing charges, which can also influence the aggregation state and singlet oxygen generation of the Pcs, and then influence the relationship between nature of charge and photodynamic activity.

  7. Radiolysis of alanine adsorbed in a clay mineral

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Ovando, Ellen Y.; Negron-Mendoza, Alicia

    2013-07-03

    Optical activity in molecules is a chemical characteristic of living beings. In this work, we examine the hypothesis of the influence of different mineral surfaces on the development of a specific chirality in organic molecules when subjected to conditions simulating the primitive Earth during the period of chemical evolution. By using X-ray diffraction techniques and HPLC/ELSD to analyze aqueous suspensions of amino acids adsorbed on minerals irradiated in different doses with a cobalt-60 gamma source, the experiments attempt to prove the hypothesis that some solid surfaces (like clays and meteorite rocks) may have a concentration capacity and protective role against external sources of ionizing radiation (specifically {gamma}-ray) for some organic compounds (like some amino acids) adsorbed on them. Preliminary results show a slight difference in the adsorption and radiolysis of the D-and L-alanine.

  8. First-principles study of fluorination of L-Alanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreepad, H. R.; Ravi, H. R.; Ahmed, Khaleel; Dayananda, H. M.; Umakanth, K.; Manohara, B. M.

    2013-02-01

    First-principles calculations based on Density Functional Theory have been done on effect of fluorination of an important amino acid - L-Alanine. Its structure has been simulated. The unit cell is orthorhombic with lattice parameters a=5.90Å, b=13.85Å and c=5.75Å with volume 470 (Å)3. Bond lengths and bond angles have been estimated. Electronic Density of States calculations show that the material has a band gap of 4.47eV. Electronic band structure indicates that the material can be effectively used for NLO applications. The electronic contribution to the dielectric constant has been calculated and its average value comes out to be 2.165.

  9. Alanine Aminotransferase Variants Conferring Diverse NUE Phenotypes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Chandra H.; Good, Allen G.

    2015-01-01

    Alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT, E.C. 2.6.1.2), is a pyridoxal-5’-phosphate-dependent (PLP) enzyme that catalyzes the reversible transfer of an amino group from alanine to 2-oxoglutarate to produce glutamate and pyruvate, or vice versa. It has been well documented in both greenhouse and field studies that tissue-specific over-expression of AlaAT from barley (Hordeum vulgare, HvAlaAT) results in a significant increase in plant NUE in both canola and rice. While the physical phenotypes associated with over-expression of HvAlaAT have been well characterized, the role this enzyme plays in vivo to create a more N efficient plant remains unknown. Furthermore, the importance of HvAlaAT, in contrast to other AlaAT enzyme homologues in creating this phenotype has not yet been explored. To address the role of AlaAT in NUE, AlaAT variants from diverse sources and different subcellular locations, were expressed in the wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 background and alaat1;2 (alaat1-1;alaat2-1) knockout background in various N environments. The analysis and comparison of both the physical and physiological properties of AlaAT over-expressing transgenic plants demonstrated significant differences between plants expressing the different AlaAT enzymes under different external conditions. This analysis indicates that the over-expression of AlaAT variants other than HvAlaAT in crop plants could further increase the NUE phenotype(s) previously observed. PMID:25830496

  10. Alanine aminotransferase variants conferring diverse NUE phenotypes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chandra H; Good, Allen G

    2015-01-01

    Alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT, E.C. 2.6.1.2), is a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent (PLP) enzyme that catalyzes the reversible transfer of an amino group from alanine to 2-oxoglutarate to produce glutamate and pyruvate, or vice versa. It has been well documented in both greenhouse and field studies that tissue-specific over-expression of AlaAT from barley (Hordeum vulgare, HvAlaAT) results in a significant increase in plant NUE in both canola and rice. While the physical phenotypes associated with over-expression of HvAlaAT have been well characterized, the role this enzyme plays in vivo to create a more N efficient plant remains unknown. Furthermore, the importance of HvAlaAT, in contrast to other AlaAT enzyme homologues in creating this phenotype has not yet been explored. To address the role of AlaAT in NUE, AlaAT variants from diverse sources and different subcellular locations, were expressed in the wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 background and alaat1;2 (alaat1-1;alaat2-1) knockout background in various N environments. The analysis and comparison of both the physical and physiological properties of AlaAT over-expressing transgenic plants demonstrated significant differences between plants expressing the different AlaAT enzymes under different external conditions. This analysis indicates that the over-expression of AlaAT variants other than HvAlaAT in crop plants could further increase the NUE phenotype(s) previously observed.

  11. Mutant DnaAs of Escherichia coli that are refractory to negative control

    PubMed Central

    Chodavarapu, Sundari; Felczak, Magdalena M.; Simmons, Lyle A.; Murillo, Alec; Kaguni, Jon M.

    2013-01-01

    DnaA is the initiator of DNA replication in bacteria. A mutant DnaA named DnaAcos is unusual because it is refractory to negative regulation. We developed a genetic method to isolate other mutant DnaAs that circumvent regulation to extend our understanding of mechanisms that control replication initiation. Like DnaAcos, one mutant bearing a tyrosine substitution for histidine 202 (H202Y) withstands the regulation exerted by datA, hda and dnaN (β clamp), and both DnaAcos and H202Y resist inhibition by the Hda-β clamp complex in vitro. Other mutant DnaAs carrying G79D, E244K, V303M or E445K substitutions are either only partially sensitive or refractory to inhibition by the Hda-β clamp complex in vitro but are responsive to hda expression in vivo. All mutant DnaAs remain able to interact directly with Hda. Of interest, both DnaAcos and DnaAE244K bind more avidly to Hda. These mutants, by sequestrating Hda, may limit its availability to regulate other DnaA molecules, which remain active to induce extra rounds of DNA replication. Other evidence suggests that a mutant bearing a V292M substitution hyperinitiates by escaping the effect of an unknown regulatory factor. Together, our results provide new insight into the mechanisms that regulate replication initiation in Escherichia coli. PMID:23990329

  12. Synthesis of substituted pyrazines

    SciTech Connect

    Pagoria, Philip F.; Zhang, Mao Xi

    2016-10-04

    A method for synthesizing a pyrazine-containing material according to one embodiment includes contacting an iminodiacetonitrile derivative with a base and a reagent selected from a group consisting of hydroxylamine, a hydroxylamine salt, an aliphatic primary amine, a secondary amine, an aryl-substituted alkylamine a heteroaryl-substituted alkyl amine, an alcohol, an alkanolamine and an aryl alcoholamine. Additional methods and several reaction products are presented. ##STR00001##

  13. Efficient L-Alanine Production by a Thermo-Regulated Switch in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Deng, Can; Cui, Wen-Jing; Liu, Zhong-Mei; Zhou, Zhe-Min

    2016-01-01

    L-Alanine has important applications in food, pharmaceutical and veterinary and is used as a substrate for production of engineered thermoplastics. Microbial fermentation could reduce the production cost and promote the application of L-alanine. However, the presence of L-alanine significantly inhibit cell growth rate and cause a decrease in the ultimate L-alanine productivity. For efficient L-alanine production, a thermo-regulated genetic switch was designed to dynamically control the expression of L-alanine dehydrogenase (alaD) from Geobacillus stearothermophilus on the Escherichia coli B0016-060BC chromosome. The optimal cultivation conditions for the genetically switched alanine production using B0016-060BC were the following: an aerobic growth phase at 33 °C with a 1-h thermo-induction at 42 °C followed by an oxygen-limited phase at 42 °C. In a bioreactor experiment using the scaled-up conditions optimized in a shake flask, B0016-060BC accumulated 50.3 g biomass/100 g glucose during the aerobic growth phase and 96 g alanine/100 g glucose during the oxygen-limited phase, respectively. The L-alanine titer reached 120.8 g/l with higher overall and oxygen-limited volumetric productivities of 3.09 and 4.18 g/l h, respectively, using glucose as the sole carbon source. Efficient cell growth and L-alanine production were reached separately, by switching cultivation temperature. The results revealed the application of a thermo-regulated strategy for heterologous metabolic production and pointed to strategies for improving L-alanine production.

  14. Scratching below the surface: wound healing and alanine mutagenesis provide unique insights into interactions between eristostatin, platelets and melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    McLane, Mary Ann; Zhang, Xiaoming; Tian, Jing; Zelinskas, Claire; Srivastava, Apoorva; Hensley, Brett; Paquette-Straub, Carrie

    2005-01-01

    To study the molecular mechanism of the disintegrin eristostatin, cellular functional studies were performed using ten recombinant alanine mutants. ADP-induced platelet aggregation revealed critical contributions of seven residues within the 'RGD loop' (R24, R27, G28, N31) and C-terminus (W47, N48, G49) of this disintegrin. Using an in vitro scratch wound healing assay, four human melanoma cell lines yielded similar results when exposed to wildtype eristostatin. All eristostatin-treated cells healed less of the wounded area than control conditions. This phenomenon was reproduced when using fibronectin as the matrix. C8161 cells showed significant delay in wound closure with the N-terminal mutant P4A but not with R24A or G28A. Evidence from our laboratory and others suggests neither alpha IIb, alpha 4 nor alpha 5 integrins are directly involved in eristostatin's interactions. Eristostatin did not affect the number of melanoma cells in culture after 24 h or the development of apoptosis. However, phosphorylation studies performed after these melanoma cells were exposed to eristostatin revealed changes in several tyrosine phosphorylated molecules.

  15. E. coli histidine triad nucleotide binding protein 1 (ecHinT) is a catalytic regulator of D-alanine dehydrogenase (DadA) activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bardaweel, Sanaa; Ghosh, Brahma; Chou, Tsui-Fen; Sadowsky, Michael J; Wagner, Carston R

    2011-01-01

    Histidine triad nucleotide binding proteins (Hints) are highly conserved members of the histidine triad (HIT) protein superfamily. Hints comprise the most ancient branch of this superfamily and can be found in Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukaryota. Prokaryotic genomes, including a wide diversity of both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, typically have one Hint gene encoded by hinT (ycfF in E. coli). Despite their ubiquity, the foundational reason for the wide-spread conservation of Hints across all kingdoms of life remains a mystery. In this study, we used a combination of phenotypic screening and complementation analyses with wild-type and hinT knock-out Escherichia coli strains to show that catalytically active ecHinT is required in E. coli for growth on D-alanine as a sole carbon source. We demonstrate that the expression of catalytically active ecHinT is essential for the activity of the enzyme D-alanine dehydrogenase (DadA) (equivalent to D-amino acid oxidase in eukaryotes), a necessary component of the D-alanine catabolic pathway. Site-directed mutagenesis studies revealed that catalytically active C-terminal mutants of ecHinT are unable to activate DadA activity. In addition, we have designed and synthesized the first cell-permeable inhibitor of ecHinT and demonstrated that the wild-type E. coli treated with the inhibitor exhibited the same phenotype observed for the hinT knock-out strain. These results reveal that the catalytic activity and structure of ecHinT is essential for DadA function and therefore alanine metabolism in E. coli. Moreover, they provide the first biochemical evidence linking the catalytic activity of this ubiquitous protein to the biological function of Hints in Escherichia coli.

  16. Spontaneous Mutation at the Mtr Locus of Neurospora: The Spectrum of Mutant Types

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, D.; Macleod, H.; Dillon, D.

    1991-01-01

    We have isolated 135 strains of Neurospora which have mutations at the mtr locus resulting from independent spontaneous events. mtr is the structural gene for the neutral amino acid permease. The mutants have been characterized by their reversion behavior (both spontaneous and induced) and by hybridization studies of restriction digests of their DNA. About half of the mutants (54%) appear to result from single base-pair substitutions. Thirty-four percent have deletions, including some which extend into neighboring genes. Most of the remaining mutants have insertions. Several of the insertions are tandem duplications of 400-1000 bp and these mutants are unstable, reverting to mtr(+) with a high frequency. When tandem-duplication mutants go through a cross, they are modified: the mutant progeny are fully stable. This modification is probably due to RIP (repeat-induced point mutation). This process has an important bearing on the comparison of germinal to somatic mutation. PMID:1718818

  17. ECB deacylase mutants

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Frances H.; Shao, Zhixin; Zhao, Huimin; Giver, Lorraine J.

    2002-01-01

    A method for in vitro mutagenesis and recombination of polynucleotide sequences based on polymerase-catalyzed extension of primer oligonucleotides is disclosed. The method involves priming template polynucleotide(s) with random-sequences or defined-sequence primers to generate a pool of short DNA fragments with a low level of point mutations. The DNA fragments are subjected to denaturization followed by annealing and further enzyme-catalyzed DNA polymerization. This procedure is repeated a sufficient number of times to produce full-length genes which comprise mutants of the original template polynucleotides. These genes can be further amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and cloned into a vector for expression of the encoded proteins.

  18. 40 CFR 721.520 - Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-, salt. 721.520 Section 721.520 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.520 Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt. (a) Chemical substance... alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N- alkyl-, salt (P-89-336) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  19. 40 CFR 721.520 - Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-, salt. 721.520 Section 721.520 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.520 Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt. (a) Chemical substance... alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N- alkyl-, salt (P-89-336) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  20. Polymerization of alanine in the presence of a non-swelling montmorillonite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paecht-Horowitz, M.; Lahav, N.

    1977-01-01

    Alanine, starting from alanine-adenylate, has been polymerized in the presence of non-swelling Al-montmorillonite. The yield of polymerization is much lower than that obtained in the presence of swelling Na-montmorillonite. The possibility that the changing interlayer spacing in Na-montmorillonite might be responsible for its catalytic properties, is discussed.

  1. 40 CFR 721.520 - Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-, salt. 721.520 Section 721.520 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.520 Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt. (a) Chemical substance... alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N- alkyl-, salt (P-89-336) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  2. 40 CFR 721.520 - Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-, salt. 721.520 Section 721.520 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.520 Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt. (a) Chemical substance... alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N- alkyl-, salt (P-89-336) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  3. 40 CFR 721.520 - Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-, salt. 721.520 Section 721.520 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.520 Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt. (a) Chemical substance... alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N- alkyl-, salt (P-89-336) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  4. Electrostatic study of Alanine mutational effects on transcription: application to GATA-3:DNA interaction complex.

    PubMed

    El-Assaad, Atlal; Dawy, Zaher; Nemer, Georges

    2015-01-01

    Protein-DNA interaction is of fundamental importance in molecular biology, playing roles in functions as diverse as DNA transcription, DNA structure formation, and DNA repair. Protein-DNA association is also important in medicine; understanding Protein-DNA binding kinetics can assist in identifying disease root causes which can contribute to drug development. In this perspective, this work focuses on the transcription process by the GATA Transcription Factor (TF). GATA TF binds to DNA promoter region represented by `G,A,T,A' nucleotides sequence, and initiates transcription of target genes. When proper regulation fails due to some mutations on the GATA TF protein sequence or on the DNA promoter sequence (weak promoter), deregulation of the target genes might lead to various disorders. In this study, we aim to understand the electrostatic mechanism behind GATA TF and DNA promoter interactions, in order to predict Protein-DNA binding in the presence of mutations, while elaborating on non-covalent binding kinetics. To generate a family of mutants for the GATA:DNA complex, we replaced every charged amino acid, one at a time, with a neutral amino acid like Alanine (Ala). We then applied Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatic calculations feeding into free energy calculations, for each mutation. These calculations delineate the contribution to binding from each Ala-replaced amino acid in the GATA:DNA interaction. After analyzing the obtained data in view of a two-step model, we are able to identify potential key amino acids in binding. Finally, we applied the model to GATA-3:DNA (crystal structure with PDB-ID: 3DFV) binding complex and validated it against experimental results from the literature.

  5. Synthesis and GGCT Inhibitory Activity of N-Glutaryl-L-alanine Analogues.

    PubMed

    Ii, Hiromi; Yoshiki, Tatsuhiro; Hoshiya, Naoyuki; Uenishi, Jun'ichi

    2016-01-01

    γ-Glutamylcyclotransferase (GGCT) is an important enzyme that cleaves γ-glutamyl-amino acid in the γ-glutamyl cycle to release 5-oxoproline and amino acid. Eighteen N-acyl-L-alanine analogues including eleven new compounds have been synthesized and examined for their inhibitory activity against recombinant human GGCT protein. Simple N-glutaryl-L-alanine was found to be the most potent inhibitor for GGCT. Other N-glutaryl-L-alanine analogues having methyl and dimethyl substituents at the 2-position were moderately effective, while N-(3R-aminoglutary)-L-alanine, the substrate having an (R)-amino group at the 3-position or N-(N-methyl-3-azaglutaryl)-L-alanine, the substrate having an N-methyl substituent on the 3-azaglutaryl carbon, in constract, exhibited excellent inhibition properties.

  6. How similar is the electronic structures of β-lactam and alanine?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Subhojyoti; Ahmed, Marawan; Wang, Feng

    2016-02-01

    The C1s spectra of β-lactam i.e. 2-azetidinone (C3H5NO), a drug and L-alanine (C3H7NO2), an amino acid, exhibit striking similarities, which may be responsible for the competition between 2-azetidinone and the alanyl-alanine moiety in biochemistry. The present study is to reveal the degree of similarities and differences between their electronic structures of the two model molecular pairs. It is found that the similarities in C1s and inner valence binding energy spectra are due to their bonding connections but other properties such as ring structure (in 2-azetidinone) and chiral carbon (alanine) can be very different. Further, the inner valence region of ionization potential greater than 18 eV for 2-azetidinone and alanine is also significantly similar. Finally the strained lactam ring exhibits more chemical reactivity measured at all non-hydrogen atoms by Fukui functions with respect to alanine.

  7. Subcellular distribution of mutant movement proteins of Cucumber mosaic virus fused to green fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Canto, Tomas; Palukaitis, Peter

    2005-04-01

    The subcellular distribution of the movement proteins (MPs) of nine alanine-scanning mutants of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and expressed from CMV, was determined by confocal microscopy of infected epidermal cells of Nicotiana tabacum and Nicotiana benthamiana, as well as infected N. benthamiana protoplasts. Only those mutant MPs that were functional for movement in all host species tested localized to plasmodesmata of infected epidermal cells and to tubules extending from the surface of infected protoplasts, as for wild-type CMV 3a MP. Various mutant MPs that were either conditionally functional for movement or dysfunctional for movement did not localize to plasmodesmata and did not form tubules on the surface of infected protoplasts. Rather, they showed distribution to different extents throughout the infected cells, including the cytoplasm, nucleus or the plasma membrane. The CMV 3a MP also did not associate with microtubules.

  8. The substitutability of reinforcers

    PubMed Central

    Green, Leonard; Freed, Debra E.

    1993-01-01

    Substitutability is a construct borrowed from microeconomics that describes a continuum of possible interactions among the reinforcers in a given situation. Highly substitutable reinforcers, which occupy one end of the continuum, are readily traded for each other due to their functional similarity. Complementary reinforcers, at the other end of the continuum, tend to be consumed jointly in fairly rigid proportion, and therefore cannot be traded for one another except to achieve that proportion. At the center of the continuum are reinforcers that are independent with respect to each other; consumption of one has no influence on consumption of another. Psychological research and analyses in terms of substitutability employ standard operant conditioning paradigms in which humans and nonhumans choose between alternative reinforcers. The range of reinforcer interactions found in these studies is more readily accommodated and predicted when behavior-analytic models of choice consider issues of substitutability. New insights are gained into such areas as eating and drinking, electrical brain stimulation, temporal separation of choice alternatives, behavior therapy, drug use, and addictions. Moreover, the generalized matching law (Baum, 1974) gains greater explanatory power and comprehensiveness when measures of substitutability are included. PMID:16812696

  9. Metabolite profiling of Phycomyces blakesleeanus carotene mutants reveals global changes across intermediary metabolism.

    PubMed

    Alcalde, Eugenio; Fraser, Paul David

    2016-11-01

    The filamentous fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus provides a renewable biosource of industrial high-value compounds such as carotenes, other isoprenoids (ubiquinone and sterols), organic acids and fatty acids. Several Phycomyces mutants involved in the formation of β-carotene are available. For example, the carA mutants have a leaky mutation in the phytoene synthase and produce significantly lower amounts of carotenes, while the carB and carR mutants produce phytoene and lycopene, respectively, due to a null mutation in the genes encoding the phytoene dehydrogenase and lycopene cyclase, respectively. The carS mutants are mutated in the gene encoding the oxygenase responsible for the conversion of β-carotene into apocarotenoids and, as a result, β-carotene accumulates. In order to ascertain further the biochemical changes arising in these potential industrial strains, a metabolite profiling workflow was implemented for Phycomyces. GC-MS and ultra-performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array platforms enabled the identification of over 100 metabolites in 11 carA, carB, carR and carS mutant strains and their wild-type comparator. All mutant strains possessed decreased TCA cycle intermediates, galactose, alanine and ribitol, while dodecanol and valine showed a general increase. As predicted, other terpenoid levels were affected in the carB, carR and carS mutants but not in the carA mutants. The global changes across intermediary metabolism of the mutants suggest that complex metabolic networks exist between intermediary and secondary metabolism or that other mutations beyond the carotene pathway may exist in these mutants. These data show the utility of the methodology in metabolically phenotyping Phycomyces strains with potential industrial exploitation.

  10. Aryl substitution of pentacenes

    PubMed Central

    Waterloo, Andreas R; Sale, Anna-Chiara; Lehnherr, Dan; Hampel, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Summary A series of 11 new pentacene derivatives has been synthesized, with unsymmetrical substitution based on a trialkylsilylethynyl group at the 6-position and various aryl groups appended to the 13-position. The electronic and physical properties of the new pentacene chromophores have been analyzed by UV–vis spectroscopy (solution and thin films), thermoanalytical methods (DSC and TGA), cyclic voltammetry, as well as X-ray crystallography (for 8 derivatives). X-ray crystallography has been specifically used to study the influence of unsymmetrical substitution on the solid-state packing of the pentacene derivatives. The obtained results add to our ability to better predict substitution patterns that might be helpful for designing new semiconductors for use in solid-state devices. PMID:25161729

  11. Characterization of Escherichia coli d-Cycloserine Transport and Resistant Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Baisa, Gary; Stabo, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    d-Cycloserine (DCS) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic that inhibits d-alanine ligase and alanine racemase activity. When Escherichia coli K-12 or CFT073 is grown in minimal glucose or glycerol medium, CycA transports DCS into the cell. E. coli K-12 cycA and CFT073 cycA mutant strains display increased DCS resistance when grown in minimal medium. However, the cycA mutants exhibit no change in DCS sensitivity compared to their parental strains when grown in LB (CFT073 and K-12) or human urine (CFT073 only). These data suggest that cycA does not participate in DCS sensitivity when strains are grown in a non-minimal medium. The small RNA GvcB acts as a negative regulator of E. coli K-12 cycA expression when grown in LB. Three E. coli K-12 gcvB mutant strains failed to demonstrate a change in DCS sensitivity when grown in LB. This further suggests a limited role for cycA in DCS sensitivity. To aid in the identification of E. coli genes involved in DCS sensitivity when grown on complex media, the Keio K-12 mutant collection was screened for DCS-resistant strains. dadA, pnp, ubiE, ubiF, ubiG, ubiH, and ubiX mutant strains showed elevated DCS resistance. The phenotypes associated with these mutants were used to further define three previously characterized E. coli DCS-resistant strains (χ316, χ444, and χ453) isolated by Curtiss and colleagues (R. Curtiss, III, L. J. Charamella, C. M. Berg, and P. E. Harris, J. Bacteriol. 90:1238–1250, 1965). A dadA mutation was identified in both χ444 and χ453. In addition, results are presented that indicate for the first time that DCS can antagonize d-amino acid dehydrogenase (DadA) activity. PMID:23316042

  12. Bone graft substitutes.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Reena A; Rozental, Tamara D

    2012-11-01

    Replacement of missing bone stock is a reconstructive challenge to upper extremity surgeons and decision-making with regards to available choices remains difficult. Preference is often given to autograft in the form of cancellous, cortical, or corticocancellous grafts from donor sites. However, the available volume from such donor sites is limited and fraught with potential complications. Advances in surgical management and medical research have produced a wide array of potential substances that can be used for bone graft substitute. Considerations in selecting bone grafts and substitutes include characteristic capabilities, availability, patient morbidity, immunogenicity, potential disease transmission, and cost variability.

  13. Amino acid substitutions in GyrA affect quinolone susceptibility in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Kongsoi, Siriporn; Changkwanyeun, Ruchirada; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Nakajima, Chie; Changkaew, Kanjana; Suthienkul, Orasa; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2016-10-01

    The prevalence of quinolone-resistant Salmonella has become a public health concern. Amino acid substitutions have generally been found within the quinolone resistance-determining region in subunit A of DNA gyrase (GyrA) of Salmonella Typhimurium. However, direct evidence of the contribution of these substitutions to quinolone resistance remains to be shown. To investigate the significance of amino acid substitutions in S. Typhimurium GyrA to quinolone resistance, we expressed recombinant wild-type (WT) and five mutant DNA gyrases in Escherichia coli and characterized them in vitro. WT and mutant DNA gyrases were reconstituted in vitro by mixing recombinant subunits A and B of DNA gyrase. The correlation between the amino acid substitutions and resistance to quinolones ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, nalidixic acid, and sitafloxacin was assessed by quinolone-inhibited supercoiling assays. All mutant DNA gyrases showed reduced susceptibility to all quinolones when compared with WT DNA gyrases. DNA gyrase with a double amino acid substitution in GyrA, serine to phenylalanine at codon 83 and aspartic acid to asparagine at 87 (GyrA-S83F-D87N), exhibited the lowest quinolone susceptibility amongst all mutant DNA gyrases. The effectiveness of sitafloxacin was shown by the low inhibitory concentration required for mutant DNA gyrases, including the DNA gyrase with GyrA-S83F-D87N. We suggest sitafloxacin as a candidate drug for the treatment of salmonellosis caused by ciprofloxacin-resistant S. Typhimurium. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Porcine alanine transaminase after liver allo-and xenotransplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ekser, Burcin; Gridelli, Bruno; Cooper, David K.C.

    2013-01-01

    Aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) are measured following liver transplantation as indicators of hepatocellular injury. During a series of orthotopic liver allo-and xenotransplants, we observed that there was an increase in AST in all cases. The anticipated concomitant rise in ALT did not occur when a wild-type (WT) pig was the source of the liver graft, but did occur when a baboon or a genetically engineered (α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene-knockout [GTKO]) pig was the source of the graft. We hypothesized that the cience of Galα1,3 Gal in GTKO pig livers may render pig hepatocytes similar to human and baboon hepatocytes in their response to hepatocellular injury. Reviewing the literature, after WT pig liver allotransplantation or xenotransplantation, in the majority of reports, although changes in AST were reported, no mention was made of changes in ALT, suggesting that there was no change in ALT. However, Ramirez et al. reported two cases of liver xenotransplants from hCD55 pigs, following which there were increases in both AST and ALT, suggesting that it is not simply the cience of expression of Galα1,3 Gal that is the cause. We acknowledge that our observation is based on a small number of experiments, but we believe it is worth recording. PMID:22360753

  15. Porcine alanine transaminase after liver allo-and xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Ekser, Burcin; Gridelli, Bruno; Cooper, David K C

    2012-01-01

    Aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) are measured following liver transplantation as indicators of hepatocellular injury. During a series of orthotopic liver allo-and xenotransplants, we observed that there was an increase in AST in all cases. The anticipated concomitant rise in ALT did not occur when a wild-type (WT) pig was the source of the liver graft, but did occur when a baboon or a genetically engineered (α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene-knockout [GTKO]) pig was the source of the graft. We hypothesized that the cience of Galα1,3Gal in GTKO pig livers may render pig hepatocytes similar to human and baboon hepatocytes in their response to hepatocellular injury. Reviewing the literature, after WT pig liver allotransplantation or xenotransplantation, in the majority of reports, although changes in AST were reported, no mention was made of changes in ALT, suggesting that there was no change in ALT. However, Ramirez et al. reported two cases of liver xenotransplants from hCD55 pigs, following which there were increases in both AST and ALT, suggesting that it is not simply the cience of expression of Galα1,3Gal that is the cause. We acknowledge that our observation is based on a small number of experiments, but we believe it is worth recording.

  16. Alanine synthesis from glyceraldehyde and ammonium ion in aqueous solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    The formation of alanine (ala) form C(14)-glyceraldehyde and ammonium phosphate in the presence or absence of a thiol is reported. At ambient temperature, ala synthesis was six times more rapid in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid than in its absence (0.6 and 0.1 percent, respectively, after 60 days). Similarly, the presence of another thiol, N-acetylcysteinate, increased the production of ala, as well as of lactate. The reaction pathway of thiol-catalyzed synthesis of ala, with the lactic acid formed in a bypath, is suggested. In this, dehydration of glyceraldehyde is followed by the formation of hemithioacetal. In the presence of ammonia, an imine is formed, which eventually yields ala. This pathway is consistent with the observation that the rate ratio of ala/lactate remains constant throughout the process. The fact that the reaction takes place under anaerobic conditions in the presence of H2O and with the low concentrations of simple substrates and catalysts makes it an attractive model prebiotic reaction in the process of molecular evolution.

  17. The natural non-protein amino acid N-β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is incorporated into protein during synthesis.

    PubMed

    Glover, W Broc; Mash, Deborah C; Murch, Susan J

    2014-11-01

    N-β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is an amino acid produced by cyanobacteria and accumulated through trophic levels in the environment and natural food webs. Human exposure to BMAA has been linked to progressive neurodegenerative diseases, potentially due to incorporation of BMAA into protein. The insertion of BMAA and other non-protein amino acids into proteins may trigger protein misfunction, misfolding and/or aggregation. However, the specific mechanism by which BMAA is associated with proteins remained unidentified. Such studies are challenging because of the complexity of biological systems and samples. A cell-free in vitro protein synthesis system offers an excellent approach for investigation of changing amino acid composition in protein. In this study, we report that BMAA incorporates into protein as an error in synthesis when a template DNA sequence is used. Bicinchoninic acid assay of total protein synthesis determined that BMAA effectively substituted for alanine and serine in protein product. LC-MS/MS confirmed that BMAA was selectively inserted into proteins in place of other amino acids, but isomers N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine (AEG) and 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) did not share this characteristic. Incorporation of BMAA into proteins was significantly higher when genomic DNA from post-mortem brain was the template. About half of BMAA in the synthetic proteins was released with denaturation with sodium dodecylsulfonate and dithiothreitol, but the remaining BMAA could only be released by acid hydrolysis. Together these data demonstrate that BMAA is incorporated into the amino acid backbone of proteins during synthesis and also associated with proteins through non-covalent bonding.

  18. A comprehensive alanine-scanning mutagenesis study reveals roles for salt bridges in the structure and activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase.

    PubMed

    Bian, Fei; Yue, Shousong; Peng, Zhenying; Zhang, Xiaowei; Chen, Gao; Yu, Jinhui; Xuan, Ning; Bi, Yuping

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between salt bridges and stability/enzymatic activity is unclear. We studied this relationship by systematic alanine-scanning mutation analysis using the typical M4 family metalloprotease Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase (PAE, also known as pseudolysin) as a model. Structural analysis revealed seven salt bridges in the PAE structure. We constructed ten mutants for six salt bridges. Among these mutants, six (Asp189Ala, Arg179Ala, Asp201Ala, Arg205Ala, Arg245Ala and Glu249Ala) were active and four (Asp168Ala, Arg198Ala, Arg253Ala, and Arg279Ala) were inactive. Five mutants were purified, and their catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km), half-lives (t1/2) and thermal unfolding curves were compared with those of PAE. Mutants Asp189Ala and Arg179Ala both showed decreased thermal stabilities and increased activities, suggesting that the salt bridge Asp189-Arg179 stabilizes the protein at the expense of catalytic efficiency. In contrast, mutants Asp201Ala and Arg205Ala both showed slightly increased thermal stability and slightly decreased activity, suggesting that the salt bridge Asp201-Arg205 destabilizes the protein. Mutant Glu249Ala is related to a C-terminal salt bridge network and showed both decreased thermal stability and decreased activity. Furthermore, Glu249Ala showed a thermal unfolding curve with three discernable states [the native state (N), the partially unfolded state (I) and the unfolded state (U)]. In comparison, there were only two discernable states (N and U) in the thermal unfolding curve of PAE. These results suggest that Glu249 is important for catalytic efficiency, stability and unfolding cooperativity. This study represents a systematic mutational analyses of salt bridges in the model metalloprotease PAE and provides important insights into the structure-function relationship of enzymes.

  19. Modulation of anti-endotoxin property of Temporin L by minor amino acid substitution in identified phenylalanine zipper sequence.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Saurabh; Kumar, Amit; Tripathi, Amit Kumar; Tandon, Anshika; Ghosh, Jimut Kanti

    2016-11-01

    A 13-residue frog antimicrobial peptide Temporin L (TempL) possesses versatile antimicrobial activities and is considered a lead molecule for the development of new antimicrobial agents. To find out the amino acid sequences that influence the anti-microbial property of TempL, a phenylalanine zipper-like sequence was identified in it which was not reported earlier. Several alanine-substituted analogs and a scrambled peptide having the same composition of TempL were designed for evaluating the role of this motif. To investigate whether leucine residues instead of phenylalanine residues at 'a' and/or 'd' position(s) of the heptad repeat sequence could alter its antimicrobial property, several TempL analogs were synthesized after replacing these phenylalanine residues with leucine residues. Replacing phenylalanine residues with alanine residues in the phenylalanine zipper sequence significantly compromised the anti-endotoxin property of TempL. This is evident from the higher production of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated rat bone-marrow-derived macrophage cells in the presence of its alanine-substituted analogs than TempL itself. However, replacement of these phenylalanine residues with leucine residues significantly augmented anti-endotoxin property of TempL. A single alanine-substituted TempL analog (F8A-TempL) showed significantly reduced cytotoxicity but retained the antibacterial activity of TempL, while the two single leucine-substituted analogs (F5L-TempL and F8L-TempL), although exhibiting lower cytotoxicity, were able to retain the antibacterial activity of the parent peptide. The results demonstrate how minor amino acid substitutions in the identified phenylalanine zipper sequence in TempL could yield analogs with better antibacterial and/or anti-endotoxin properties with their plausible mechanism of action.

  20. Effects of Monovalent Cations on the Sodium-Alanine Interaction in Rabbit Ileum

    PubMed Central

    Frizzell, Raymond A.; Schultz, Stanley G.

    1970-01-01

    H, K, Rb, and Li inhibit Na-dependent alanine influx across the brush border of rabbit ileum. Kinetic analysis indicates that H and K behave as competitive inhibitors of influx so that increasing the concentration of H or K in the mucosal solution is kinetically indistinguishable from decreasing the Na concentration. In addition the coupling between alanine and Na influxes is markedly reduced at pH 2.5. With the exception of H and Li, none of these monovalent cations significantly affects carrier-mediated alanine influx in the absence of Na indicating that their inhibitory effects are largely restricted to the Na-dependent fraction of influx. Increasing H concentration from 0.03 to 3 mM does not affect influx in the absence of Na but markedly inhibits influx in the presence of Na. Li significantly enhances alanine influx in the absence of Na. Ag, UO2, and La also inhibit the Na-dependent fraction of alanine influx. These findings suggest that anionic groups having a pKa of approximately 4 are involved in the interaction between Na and the alanine-carrier complex; present evidence implicates carboxylate groups however, phosphoryl residues cannot be ruled out. The previously proposed kinetic model for the Na-alanine interaction has been extended to accommodate these effects of H and other monovalent cations. The mechanistic and physiological implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:5507092

  1. Revised mechanism of D-alanine incorporation into cell wall polymers in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Reichmann, Nathalie T; Cassona, Carolina Picarra; Gründling, Angelika

    2013-09-01

    Teichoic acids (TAs) are important for growth, biofilm formation, adhesion and virulence of Gram-positive bacterial pathogens. The chemical structures of the TAs vary between bacteria, though they typically consist of zwitterionic polymers that are anchored to either the peptidoglycan layer as in the case of wall teichoic acid (WTA) or the cell membrane and named lipoteichoic acid (LTA). The polymers are modified with D-alanines and a lack of this decoration leads to increased susceptibility to cationic antimicrobial peptides. Four proteins, DltA-D, are essential for the incorporation of d-alanines into cell wall polymers and it has been established that DltA transfers D-alanines in the cytoplasm of the cell onto the carrier protein DltC. However, two conflicting models have been proposed for the remainder of the mechanism. Using a cellular protein localization and membrane topology analysis, we show here that DltC does not traverse the membrane and that DltD is anchored to the outside of the cell. These data are in agreement with the originally proposed model for D-alanine incorporation through a process that has been proposed to proceed via a D-alanine undecaprenyl phosphate membrane intermediate. Furthermore, we found that WTA isolated from a Staphylococcus aureus strain lacking LTA contains only a small amount of D-alanine, indicating that LTA has a role, either direct or indirect, in the efficient D-alanine incorporation into WTA in living cells.

  2. Alanine-EPR as a transfer standard dosimetry system for low energy X radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoury, H. J.; da Silva, E. J.; Mehta, K.; de Barros, V. S.; Asfora, V. K.; Guzzo, P. L.; Parker, A. G.

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the use of alanine-EPR as a transfer standard dosimetry system for low energy X radiation, such as that in RS-2400, which operates in the range from 25 to 150 kV and 2 to 45 mA. Two types of alanine dosimeters were investigated. One is a commercial alanine pellets from Aérial-Centre de Ressources Technologiques, France and one was prepared in our laboratory (LMRI-DEN/UFPE). The EPR spectra of the irradiated dosimeters were recorded in the Nuclear Energy Department of UFPE, using a Bruker EMX10 EPR spectrometer operating in the X-band. The alanine-EPR dosimetry system was calibrated in the range of 20-220 Gy in this X-ray field, against an ionization chamber calibrated at the relevant X-ray energy with traceability to PTB. The results showed that both alanine dosimeters presented a linear dose response the same sensitivity, when the EPR signal was normalized to alanine mass. The total uncertainty in the measured dose was estimated to be about 3%. The results indicate that it is possible to use the alanine-EPR dosimetry system for validation of a low-energy X ray irradiator, such as RS-2400.

  3. No cheap substitutes.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Peter

    2016-06-15

    The Nuffield Trust report on reshaping the healthcare workforce was published last month. Its conclusions were widely reported as a recommendation to 'train up' nurses as a solution to junior doctor shortages, with support workers, in turn, substituting for registered nurses.

  4. The Age of Substitutability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goeller, H. E.; Weinberg, Alvin M.

    1976-01-01

    Dwindling mineral resources might cause a shift from nonrenewable resources to renewable resources and inexhaustible elements such as iron and aluminum. Alternative energy sources such as breeder, fusion, solar, and geothermal power must be developed for production and recycling of materials. Substitution and, hence, living standards ultimately…

  5. Performing Substitute Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bletzer, Keith V.

    2010-01-01

    Formal education is both a right and an obligation bestowed on young people in most all nations of the world. Teachers (adults) and students (youth) form a co-present dyadic contract that must be maintained within the classroom. Substitute teachers fill a role in sustaining the integrity of this teacher-student link, whenever teachers are absent.…

  6. Importance of intrahepatic mechanisms to gluconeogenesis from alanine during exercise and recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, D.H.; Williams, P.E.; Lacy, D.B.; Green, D.R.; Cherrington, A.D.

    1988-04-01

    These studies were performed to assess the importance of intrahepatic mechanisms to gluconeogenesis in the dog during 150 min of treadmill exercise and 90 min of recovery. Sampling catheters were implanted in an artery and portal and hepatic veins 16 days before experimentation. Infusions of (U-/sup 14/C)alanine, (3-/sup 3/H)glucose, and indocyanine green were used to assess gluconeogenesis. During exercise, a decline in arterial and portal vein plasma alanine and in hepatic blood flow led to a decrease in hepatic alanine delivery. During recovery, hepatic blood flow was restored to basal, causing an increase in hepatic alanine delivery beyond exercise rates but still below resting rates. Hepatic fractional alanine extraction increased from 0.26 +/- 0.02 at rest to 0.64 +/- 0.03 during exercise and remained elevated during recovery. Net hepatic alanine uptake was 2.5 +/- 0.2 mumol.kg-1.min-1 at rest and remained unchanged during exercise but was increased during recovery. The conversion rate of (/sup 14/C)alanine to glucose had increased by 248 +/- 38% by 150 min of exercise and had increased further during recovery. The efficiency with which alanine was channeled into glucose in the liver was accelerated to a rate of 338 +/- 55% above basal by 150 min of exercise but declined slightly during recovery. In conclusion, 1) gluconeogenesis from alanine is accelerated during exercise, due to an increase in the hepatic fractional extraction of the amino acid and through intrahepatic mechanisms that more efficiently channel it into glucose.

  7. Determination of D- and L-alanine concentrations using a pyruvic acid sensor.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Yohei; Hamada-Sato, Naoko; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Imada, Chiaki; Watanabe, Etsuo

    2003-08-01

    The concentrations of D- and L-alanine in bivalves are useful as indicators of environmental pollution. Amino acid oxidase with a low substrate specificity catalyzes the oxidation of various amino acids. Among the various amino acids, pyruvic acid can be generated from alanine only by the catalytic oxidative reaction of this oxidase. Therefore, in this study, the concentrations of D- and L-alanine were determined from the concentration of pyruvic acid, which was determined from the consumption of oxygen based on the oxidative reaction of pyruvate oxidase. From this point of view, there is a very strong possibility that biosensors utilizing enzymes with a low substrate specificity can be developed. The results obtained were as follows. (1) The optimum conditions for the use of pyruvic acid sensor were as follows: temperature of 25 degrees C, pH of 6.8, flow rate of 0.1 ml/min, thiamin diphosphate concentration of 1.5 mM, and injection volume of 50 microl. (2) D-Alanine and L-alanine optimally reacted with D- and L-amino acid oxidase at 30 degrees C, pH 8.2, for 30 min and at 37 degrees C, pH 7.8, for 90 min, respectively. (3) The linear relationships between the concentrations of D- and L-alanine and the output of the sensor were obtained at 3.56-106.8 microg of D-alanine and 5.34-71.3 microg of L-alanine. (4) The concentrations of D- and L-alanine in Meretrix iusoria, Patinopecten yessonsi, and Corbicula leana obtained by the proposed assay were in good agreement with those determined by a conventional method.

  8. Serum Alanine Aminotransferase Levels, Hematocrit Rate and Body Weight Correlations Before and After Hemodialysis Session

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Edmundo Pessoa; Sette, Luis Henrique B. C.; Sette, Jorge Bezerra C.; Luna, Carlos F.; Andrade, Amaro M.; Moraes, Maviael; Sette, Paulo C. A.; Menezes, Roberto; Cavalcanti, Rui L.; Conceição, Sergio C.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate alanine aminotransferase levels before and after a hemodialysis session and to correlate these values with the hematocrit rate and weight loss during hemodialysis. PATIENTS AND METHODS The serum alanine aminotransferase levels, hematocrit rate and body weight were measured and correlated before and after a single hemodialysis session for 146 patients with chronic renal failure. An receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for the serum alanine aminotransferase levels collected before and after hemodialysis was plotted to identify hepatitis C virus-infected patients. RESULTS The mean weight loss of the 146 patients during hemodialysis was 5.3% (p < 0.001). The mean alanine aminotransferase levels before and after hemodialysis were 18.8 and 23.9 IU/, respectively, denoting a significant 28.1% increase. An equally significant increase of 16.4% in the hematocrit rate also occurred after hemodialysis. The weight loss was inversely correlated with the rise in both the alanine aminotransferase level (r = 0.3; p < 0.001) and hematocrit rate (r = 0.5; p < 0.001). A direct correlation was found between the rise in alanine aminotransferase levels and the hematocrit during the hemodialysis session (r = 0.4; p < 0.001). Based on the ROC curve, the upper limit of the normal alanine aminotransferase level should be reduced by 40% relative to the upper limit of normal if the blood samples are collected before the hemodialysis session or by 60% if blood samples are collected after the session. CONCLUSION In the present study, significant elevations in the serum alanine aminotransferase levels and hematocrit rates occurred in parallel to a reduction in body weight after the hemodialysis session. These findings suggest that one of the factors for low alanine aminotransferase levels prior to hemodialysis could be hemodilution in patients with chronic renal failure. PMID:19841699

  9. An Expanded Transposon Mutant Library Reveals that Vibrio fischeri δ-Aminolevulinate Auxotrophs Can Colonize Euprymna scolopes.

    PubMed

    Lyell, Noreen L; Septer, Alecia N; Dunn, Anne K; Duckett, Drew; Stoudenmire, Julie L; Stabb, Eric V

    2017-03-01

    Libraries of defined mutants are valuable research tools but necessarily lack gene knockouts that are lethal under the conditions used in library construction. In this study, we augmented a Vibrio fischeri mutant library generated on a rich medium (LBS, which contains [per liter] 10 g of tryptone, 5 g of yeast extract, 20 g of NaCl, and 50 mM Tris [pH 7.5]) by selecting transposon insertion mutants on supplemented LBS and screening for those unable to grow on LBS. We isolated strains with insertions in alr, glr (murI), glmS, several heme biosynthesis genes, and ftsA, as well as a mutant disrupted 14 bp upstream of ftsQ Mutants with insertions in ftsA or upstream of ftsQ were recovered by addition of Mg(2+) to LBS, but their cell morphology and motility were affected. The ftsA mutant was more strongly affected and formed cells or chains of cells that appeared to wind back on themselves helically. Growth of mutants with insertions in glmS, alr, or glr was recovered with N-acetylglucosamine (NAG), d-alanine, or d-glutamate, respectively. We hypothesized that NAG, d-alanine, or d-glutamate might be available to V. fischeri in the Euprymna scolopes light organ; however, none of these mutants colonized the host effectively. In contrast, hemA and hemL mutants, which are auxotrophic for δ-aminolevulinate (ALA), colonized at wild-type levels, although mutants later in the heme biosynthetic pathway were severely impaired or unable to colonize. Our findings parallel observations that legume hosts provide Bradyrhizobium symbionts with ALA, but they contrast with virulence phenotypes of hemA mutants in some pathogens. The results further inform our understanding of the symbiotic light organ environment.IMPORTANCE By supplementing a rich yeast-based medium, we were able to recover V. fischeri mutants with insertions in conditionally essential genes, and further characterization of these mutants provided new insights into this bacterium's symbiotic environment. Most notably, we

  10. Progress towards an alanine/ESR therapy level reference dosimetry service at NPL.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, P H; Rajendran, K; Sephton, J P

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes work being carried out at the National Physical Laboratory towards the establishment of an alanine reference dosimetry service for radiotherapy applications. A precision fused quartz holder has been constructed to allow precise positioning of alanine dosimeters in the ESR cavity. A novel method of signal analysis based on spectrum fitting has been developed to minimize the effect of baseline distortions. Data are also presented on the relative response of alanine to 60Co gamma rays and high energy photons (4-12 MeV).

  11. Applicability of EPR/alanine dosimetry for quality assurance in proton eye radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Michalec, B; Mierzwinska, G; Ptaszkiewicz, M; Sowa, U; Stolarczyk, L; Weber, A

    2014-06-01

    A new quality assurance and quality control method for proton eye radiotherapy based on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)/alanine dosimetry has been developed. It is based on Spread-Out Bragg Peak entrance dose measurement with alanine detectors. The entrance dose is well correlated with the dose at the facility isocenter, where, during the therapeutic irradiation, the tumour is placed. The unique alanine detector features namely keeping the dose record in a form of stable radiation-induced free radicals trapped in the material structure, and the non-destructive read-out makes this type of detector a good candidate for additional documentation of the patient's exposure over the therapy course.

  12. Interactions of L-alanine with alumina as studied by vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ana R; de Barros, Ricardo Brito; Fidalgo, Alexandra; Ilharco, Laura M

    2007-09-25

    The interactions of L-alanine with gamma- and alpha-alumina have been investigated by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). L-alanine/alumina samples were dried from aqueous suspensions, at 36.5 degrees C, with two amino acid concentrations (0.4 and 0.8 mmol g-1) and at different pH values (1, 6, and 13). The vibrational spectra proved that the nature of L-alanine interactions with both aluminas is the same (hydrogen bonding), although the groups involved depend on the L-alanine form and on alumina surface groups, both controlled by the pH. For samples prepared at pH 1, cationic L-alanine [CH3CH(NH3+)COOH] displaces physisorbed water from alumina, and strong hydrogen bonds are established between the carbonyl groups of alanine, as electron donors, and the surface Al-OH2+ groups of alumina. This occurs at the expense of alanine dimer dissociation and breaking of intramolecular bonds. When samples are prepared at pH 6, the interacting groups are Al-OH2+ and the carboxylate groups of zwitterionic L-alanine [CH3CH(NH3+)COO-]. The affinity of L-alanine toward alumina decreases, as the strong NH3+...-OOC intermolecular hydrogen bonds prevail over the interactions with alumina. Thus, for a load of 0.8 mmol g-1, phase segregation is observed. On alpha-alumina, crystal deposition is even observed for a load of 0.4 mmol g-1. At pH 13, the carboxylate groups of anionic L-alanine [CH3CH(NH2)COO-] are not affected by alumina. Instead, hydrogen bond interactions occur between NH2 and the Al-OH surface groups of the substrate. Complementary N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms showed that adsorption of L-alanine occurs onto the alumina pore network for samples prepared at pH 1 and 13, whereas at pH 6 the amino acid/alumina interactions are not strong enough to promote adsorption. The mesoporous structure and the high specific surface area of gamma-alumina make it a more efficient substrate for adsorption of L-alanine. For each alumina, however, it is

  13. Temperature dependences of piezoelectric, elastic and dielectric constants of L-alanine crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tylczyński, Z.; Sterczyńska, A.; Wiesner, M.

    2011-09-01

    Temperature changes in the components of piezoelectric, elastic and dielectric tensors were studied in L-alanine crystals in the range 100-300 K. A jumpwise increase in the c55 component of the elastic stiffness accompanied by maxima in damping of all face-shear modes observed at 199 K in L-alanine crystal were interpreted as a result of changes in the NH3+ vibrations occurring through electron-phonon coupling. All components of the piezoelectric tensor show small anomalies in this temperature range. The components of the electromechanical coupling coefficient determined indicate that L-alanine is a weak piezoelectric.

  14. Optical and Spectral Studies on β Alanine Metal Halide Hybrid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweetlin, M. Daniel; Selvarajan, P.; Perumal, S.; Ramalingom, S.

    2011-10-01

    We have synthesized and grown β alanine metal halide hybrid crystals viz. β alanine cadmium chloride (BACC), an amino acid transition metal halide complex crystal and β alanine potassium chloride (BAPC), an amino acid alkali metal halide complex crystal by slow evaporation method. The grown crystals were found to be transparent and have well defined morphology. The optical characteristics of the grown crystals were carried out with the help of UV-Vis Spectroscopy. The optical transmittances of the spectrums show that BAPC is more transparent than BACC. The Photoluminescence of the materials were determined by the Photoluminescent Spectroscopy

  15. Temperature dependences of piezoelectric, elastic and dielectric constants of L-alanine crystal.

    PubMed

    Tylczyński, Z; Sterczyńska, A; Wiesner, M

    2011-09-07

    Temperature changes in the components of piezoelectric, elastic and dielectric tensors were studied in L-alanine crystals in the range 100-300 K. A jumpwise increase in the c(55) component of the elastic stiffness accompanied by maxima in damping of all face-shear modes observed at 199 K in L-alanine crystal were interpreted as a result of changes in the NH(3)(+) vibrations occurring through electron-phonon coupling. All components of the piezoelectric tensor show small anomalies in this temperature range. The components of the electromechanical coupling coefficient determined indicate that L-alanine is a weak piezoelectric.

  16. Solvation Free Energies of Alanine Peptides: The Effect of Flexibility

    SciTech Connect

    Kokubo, Hironori; Harris, Robert C.; Asthagiri, Dilip; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2013-12-03

    The electrostatic (?Gel), cavity-formation (?Gvdw), and total (?G) solvation free energies for 10 alanine peptides ranging in length (n) from 1 to 10 monomers were calculated. The free energies were computed both with xed, extended conformations of the peptides and again for some of the peptides without constraints. The solvation free energies, ?Gel, ?Gvdw, and ?G, were found to be linear in n, with the slopes of the best-fit lines being gamma_el, gamma_vdw, and gamma, respectively. Both gamma_el and gamma were negative for fixed and flexible peptides, and gamma_vdw was negative for fixed peptides. That gamma_vdw was negative was surprising, as experimental data on alkanes, theoretical models, and MD computations on small molecules and model systems generally suggest that gamma_vdw should be positive. A negative gamma_vdw seemingly contradicts the notion that ?Gvdw drives the initial collapse of the protein when it folds by favoring conformations with small surface areas, but when we computed ?Gvdw for the flexible peptides, thereby allowing the peptides to assume natural ensembles of more compact conformations, gamma-vdw was positive. Because most proteins do not assume extended conformations, a ?Gvdw that increases with increasing surface area may be typical for globular proteins. An alternative hypothesis is that the collapse is driven by intramolecular interactions. We show that the intramolecular van der Waal's interaction energy is more favorable for the flexible than for the extended peptides, seemingly favoring this hypothesis, but the large fluctuations in this energy may make attributing the collapse of the peptide to this intramolecular energy difficult.

  17. Rapid Ti(III) reduction of perchlorate in the presence of beta-alanine: kinetics, pH effect, complex formation, and beta-alanine effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Huang, Zhengdao; Lippincott, Lee; Meng, Xiaoguang

    2010-03-15

    Ti(III) reduction of perchlorate might be a useful method for the treatment of highly perchlorate-contaminated water. Though the reaction rate was usually low, we observed that beta-alanine (HOOCCH(2)CH(2)NH(2)) could significantly promote the reaction. A complete (>99.9%) perchlorate removal was obtained in a solution containing [ClO(4)(-)]=1.0mM, [Ti(III)]=40 mM, and [beta-alanine]=120 mM after 2.5h of reaction under 50 degrees C. The effects of both pH and complex formation on the reaction were then studied. The results showed that without beta-alanine the optimal pH was 2.3. When pH increased from 1.6 to 2.3, the reduction rate increased remarkably. In the pH range >2.3, however, the reduction was significantly inhibited, attributed to the formation of Ti(III) precipitate. The presence of beta-alanine at a molar ratio of [beta-alanine]:[Ti(III)]=3:1 significantly increased the reduction rate of perchlorate even at near neutral pH. This is because beta-alanine formed complexes with Ti(III), which greatly improved the total soluble [Ti(III)] in the pH range between 3.5 and 6. The findings may lead to the development of rapid treatment methods for intermittent and small stream of highly perchlorate-contaminated water, which are resulted from the manufacturing, storage, handling, use and/or disposal of large quantities of perchlorate salts.

  18. Principal component analysis of binding energies for single-point mutants of hT2R16 bound to an agonist correlate with experimental mutant cell response.

    PubMed

    Chen, Derek E; Willick, Darryl L; Ruckel, Joseph B; Floriano, Wely B

    2015-01-01

    Directed evolution is a technique that enables the identification of mutants of a particular protein that carry a desired property by successive rounds of random mutagenesis, screening, and selection. This technique has many applications, including the development of G protein-coupled receptor-based biosensors and designer drugs for personalized medicine. Although effective, directed evolution is not without challenges and can greatly benefit from the development of computational techniques to predict the functional outcome of single-point amino acid substitutions. In this article, we describe a molecular dynamics-based approach to predict the effects of single amino acid substitutions on agonist binding (salicin) to a human bitter taste receptor (hT2R16). An experimentally determined functional map of single-point amino acid substitutions was used to validate the whole-protein molecular dynamics-based predictive functions. Molecular docking was used to construct a wild-type agonist-receptor complex, providing a starting structure for single-point substitution simulations. The effects of each single amino acid substitution in the functional response of the receptor to its agonist were estimated using three binding energy schemes with increasing inclusion of solvation effects. We show that molecular docking combined with molecular mechanics simulations of single-point mutants of the agonist-receptor complex accurately predicts the functional outcome of single amino acid substitutions in a human bitter taste receptor.

  19. Structure of a mutant form of proliferating cell nuclear antigen that blocks translesion DNA synthesis †

    PubMed Central

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Ramaswamy, S.; Hingorani, Manju M.; Washington, M. Todd

    2009-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a homotrimeric protein that functions as a sliding clamp during DNA replication. Several mutant forms of PCNA that block translesion DNA synthesis have been identified in genetic studies in yeast. One such mutant protein (encoded by the rev6-1 allele) is a glycine to serine substitution at residue 178, located at the subunit interface of PCNA. To better understand how this substitution interferes with translesion synthesis, we have determined the X-ray crystal structure of the G178S PCNA mutant protein. This substitution has little effect on the structure of the domain in which the substitution occurs. Instead, significant, local structural changes are observed in the adjacent subunit. The most notable difference between mutant and wild-type structures is in a single, extended loop (comprising amino acid residues 105-110), which we call loop J. In the mutant protein structure, loop J adopts a very different conformation in which the atoms of the protein backbone have moved by as much as 6.5 Å from their positions in the wild-type structure. To better understand the functional consequences of this structural change, we have examined the ability of this mutant protein to stimulate nucleotide incorporation by DNA polymerase eta (pol η). Steady state kinetic studies show that while wild-type PCNA stimulates incorporation by pol η opposite an abasic site, the mutant PCNA protein actually inhibits incorporation opposite this DNA lesion. These results show that the position of loop J in PCNA plays an essential role in facilitating translesion synthesis. PMID:19053247

  20. ALS-linked SOD1 in glial cells enhances ß-N-Methylamino L-Alanine (BMAA)-induced toxicity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Islam, Rafique; Kumimoto, Emily L; Bao, Hong; Zhang, Bing

    2012-01-01

    Environmental factors have been implicated in the etiology of a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, the role of environmental agents in ALS remains poorly understood. To this end, we used transgenic fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) to explore the interaction between mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and chemicals such as ß-N-methylamino L-alanine (BMAA), the herbicide agent paraquat, and superoxide species. We expressed ALS-linked human SOD1 (hSOD1A4V, and hSOD1G85R), hSOD1wt as well as the Drosophila native SOD1 (dSOD1) in motoneurons (MNs) or in glial cells alone and simultaneously in both types of cells. We then examined the effect of BMAA (3 mM), paraquat (20 mM), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 1%) on the lifespan of SOD1-expressing flies. Our data show that glial expression of mutant and wild type hSOD1s reduces the ability of flies to climb. Further, we show that while all three chemicals significantly shorten the lifespan of flies, mutant SOD1 does not have a significant additional effect on the lifespan of flies fed on paraquat, but further shortens the lifespan of flies fed on H2O2. Finally, we show that BMAA shows a dramatic cell-type specific effect with mutant SOD1. Flies with expression of mutant hSOD1 in MNs survived longer on BMAA compared to control flies. In contrast, BMAA significantly shortened the lifespan of flies expressing mutant hSOD1 in glia. Consistent with a neuronal protection role, flies expressing these mutant hSOD1s in both MNs and glia also lived longer. Hence, our studies reveal a synergistic effect of mutant SOD1 with H2O2 and novel roles for mutant hSOD1s in neurons to reduce BMAA toxicity and in glia to enhance the toxicity of BMAA in flies.

  1. A comparative study on the growth and characterization of nonlinear optical amino acid crystals: L-alanine (LA) and L-alanine alaninium nitrate (LAAN).

    PubMed

    Aravindan, A; Srinivasan, P; Vijayan, N; Gopalakrishnan, R; Ramasamy, P

    2008-11-15

    A comparative study on the properties of L-alanine and LAAN crystals has been made and discussed. It may be concluded that the protonation of the amino group in the L-alanine molecule is the key factor in increasing the relative SHG efficiency of LAAN. The protonation is justified by the crystal structure analysis, FTIR and photoluminescence studies. The factor group vibrations are compared and found that there is an increase in vibrational modes of LA when reacted with nitric acid forming LAAN.

  2. Determination of the carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen contents of alanine and their uncertainties using the certified reference material L-alanine (NMIJ CRM 6011-a).

    PubMed

    Itoh, Nobuyasu; Sato, Ayako; Yamazaki, Taichi; Numata, Masahiko; Takatsu, Akiko

    2013-01-01

    The carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen (CHN) contents of alanine and their uncertainties were estimated using a CHN analyzer and the certified reference material (CRM) L-alanine. The CHN contents and their uncertainties, as measured using the single-point calibration method, were 40.36 ± 0.20% for C, 7.86 ± 0.13% for H, and 15.66 ± 0.09% for N; the results obtained using the bracket calibration method were also comparable. The method described in this study is reasonable, convenient, and meets the general requirement of having uncertainties ≤ 0.4%.

  3. Characterization of epitopes on the rabies virus glycoprotein by selection and analysis of escape mutants.

    PubMed

    Fallahi, Firouzeh; Wandeler, Alexander I; Nadin-Davis, Susan A

    2016-07-15

    The glycoprotein (G) is the only surface protein of the lyssavirus particle and the only viral product known to be capable of eliciting the production of neutralizing antibodies. In this study, the isolation of escape mutants resistant to monoclonal antibody (Mab) neutralization was attempted by a selection strategy employing four distinct rabies virus strains: the extensively passaged Evelyn Rokitnicki Abelseth (ERA) strain and three field isolates representing two bat-associated variants and the Western Canada skunk variant (WSKV). No escape mutants were generated from either of the bat-associated viral variants but two neutralization mutants were derived from the WSKV isolate. Seven independent ERA mutants were recovered using Mabs directed against antigenic sites I (four mutants) and IIIa (three mutants) of the glycoprotein. The cross-neutralization patterns of these viral mutants were used to determine the precise location and nature of the G protein epitopes recognized by these Mabs. Nucleotide sequencing of the G gene indicated that those mutants derived using Mabs directed to antigenic site (AS) III all contained amino acid substitutions in this site. However, of the four mutants selected with AS I Mabs, two bore mutations within AS I as expected while the remaining two carried mutations in AS II. WSKV mutants exhibited mutations at the sites appropriate for the Mabs used in their selection. All ERA mutant preparations were more cytopathogenic than the parental virus when propagated in cell culture; when in vivo pathogenicity in mice was examined, three of these mutants exhibited reduced pathogenicity while the remaining four mutants exhibited comparable pathogenic properties to those of the parent virus.

  4. Titration of Alanine Monitored by NMR Spectroscopy: A Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Francis J.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The experiment described here involves simultaneous monitoring of pH and NMR chemical shifts during an aqueous titration of alpha- and beta-alanine. This experiment is designed for use in an undergraduate biochemistry course. (MR)

  5. Second harmonic generation studies in L-alanine single crystals grown from solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boomadevi, Shanmugam; Pandiyan, Krishnamoorthy

    2014-01-01

    Single crystals of L-alanine of dimensions 2×1.1×0.5 cm3 were grown by evaporation method using deionised water as a solvent. The morphology of the grown crystals had (1 2 0) and (0 1 1) as their prominent faces. UV-vis-near IR spectrum shows the transparency range of L-alanine crystal available for frequency doubling from 250 to 1400 nm. Phase-matched second harmonic generation was observed in L-alanine sample by using 7 ns Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with OPO set up. In the present work, phase matching was achieved by angle and wavelength tuning. The angular and spectral phase-matching bandwidths were determined experimentally for a 1.5 mm thick L-alanine crystal and the results have been compared with their theoretical results. Further the possible reasons for the broadening of SHG spectrum have been discussed.

  6. Sensory Substitution for Wounded Servicemembers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-28

    traumatic brain injury (TBI) and two civilians, all with partial visual impairment , evaluated the vision sensory substitution systems. The servicemember...Mobility Augmentation; Wounded Service Members; Human-Centered Computing; Vision Augmentation, Vision , Balance and Hearing; Sensory Substitution-enabled...mitigation of vision sensory and mobility losses. 2) Improved the usefulness of available sensory substitution technologies for injured military

  7. Repeated Supramaximal Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress: Effect of β-Alanine Plus Creatine Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Belviranli, Muaz; Okudan, Nilsel; Revan, Serkan; Balci, Serdar; Gokbel, Hakki

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carnosine is a dipeptide formed from the β-alanine and histidine amino acids and found in mainly in the brain and muscle, especially fast twitch muscle. Carnosine and creatine has an antioxidant effect and carnosine accounts for about 10% of the muscle's ability to buffer the H+ ions produced by exercise. Objectives: The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of beta alanine and/or creatine supplementation on oxidant and antioxidant status during repeated Wingate tests (WTs). Patients and Methods: Forty four sedentary males participated in the study. Participants performed three 30s WTs with 2 minutes rest between exercise bouts. After the first exercise session, the subjects were assigned to one of four groups: Placebo, Creatine, Beta-alanine and Beta-alanine plus creatine. Participants ingested twice per day for 22 consecutive days, then four times per day for the following 6 days. After the supplementation period the second exercise session was applied. Blood samples were taken before and immediately after the each exercise session for the analysis of oxidative stress and antioxidant markers. Results: Malondialdehyde levels and superoxide dismutase activities were affected by neither supplementation nor exercise. During the pre-supplementation session, protein carbonyl reduced and oxidized glutathione (GSH and GSSG) levels increased immediately after the exercise. However, during the post-supplementation session GSH and GSSG levels increased in beta-alanine and beta-alanine plus creatine groups immediately after the exercise compared to pre-exercise. In addition, during the post-supplementation session total antioxidant capacity increased in beta-alanine group immediately after the exercise. Conclusions: Beta-alanine supplementation has limited antioxidant effect during the repeated WTs. PMID:27217925

  8. SU-E-T-643: Pure Alanine Dosimeter for Verification Dosimetry in IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Karmi, Anan M.; Zraiqat, Fadi

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study was evaluation of accuracy of pure alanine dosimeters measuring intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose distributions in a thorax phantom. Methods: Alanine dosimeters were prepared in the form of 110 mg pure L-α-alanine powder filled into clear tissue-equivalent polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) plastic tubes with the dimensions 25 mm length, 3 mm inner diameter, and 1 mm wall thickness. A dose-response calibration curve was established for the alanine by placing the dosimeters at 1.5 cm depth in a 30×30×30 cm{sup 3} solid water phantom and then irradiating on a linac with 6 MV photon beam at 10×10 cm{sup 2} field size to doses ranging from 1 to 5 Gy. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to determine the absorbed dose in alanine. An IMRT treatment plan was designed for a commercial heterogeneous CIRS thorax phantom and the dose values were calculated at three different points located in tissue, lung, and bone equivalent materials. A set of dose measurements was carried out to compare measured and calculated dose values by placing the alanine dosimeters at those selected locations inside the thorax phantom and delivering the IMRT to the phantom. Results: The alanine dose measurements and the IMRT plan dose calculations were found to be in agreement within ±2%. Specifically, the deviations were −0.5%, 1.3%, and −1.7% for tissue, lung, and bone; respectively. The slightly large deviations observed for lung and bone may be attributed to tissue inhomogeneity, steep dose gradients in these regions, and uncontrollable changes in spectrometer conditions. Conclusion: The results described herein confirmed that pure alanine dosimeter was suitable for in-phantom dosimetry of IMRT beams because of its high sensitivity and acceptable accuracy. This makes the dosimeter a promising option for quality control of the therapeutic beams, complementing the commonly used ionization chambers, TLDs, and films.

  9. Effect of abomasal glucose infusion on alanine metabolism and urea production in sheep.

    PubMed

    Obitsu, T; Bremner, D; Milne, E; Lobley, G E

    2000-08-01

    The effect of abomasal infusion of glucose (120 kJ/d per kg body weight (BW)0.75, 758 mmol/d) on urea production, plasma alanine-N flux rate and the conversion of alanine-N to urea was studied in sheep offered a low-N diet at limited energy intake (500 kJ/d per kg BW0.75), based on hay and grass pellets. Glucose provision reduced urinary N (P = 0.040) and urea (P = 0.009) elimination but this was offset by poorer N digestibility. Urea-N production was significantly reduced (822 v. 619 mmol/d, P = 0.024) by glucose while plasma alanine-N flux rate was elevated (295 v. 342 mmol/d, P = 0.011). The quantity of urea-N derived from alanine tended to be decreased by glucose (127 v. 95 mmol/d) but the fraction of urea production from alanine was unaltered (15%). Plasma urea and alanine concentrations (plus those of the branched chain amino acids) decreased in response to exogenous glucose, an effect probably related to enhanced anabolic usage of amino acids and lowered urea production.

  10. [Alanine solution as enzyme reaction buffer used in A to O blood group conversion].

    PubMed

    Li, Su-Bo; Zhang, Xue; Zhang, Yin-Ze; Tan, Ying-Xia; Bao, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Ying-Li; Ji, Shou-Ping; Gong, Feng; Gao, Hong-Wei

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of alanine solution as α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase enzyme reaction buffer on the enzymatic activity of A antigen. The binding ability of α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase with RBC in different reaction buffer such as alanine solution, glycine solution, normal saline (0.9% NaCl), PBS, PCS was detected by Western blot. The results showed that the efficiency of A to O conversion in alanine solution was similar to that in glycine solution, and Western blot confirmed that most of enzymes blinded with RBC in glycine or alanine solution, but few enzymes blinded with RBC in PBS, PCS or normal saline. The evidences indicated that binding of enzyme with RBC was a key element for A to O blood group conversion, while the binding ability of α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase with RBC in alanine or glycine solution was similar. It is concluded that alanine solution can be used as enzyme reaction buffer in A to O blood group conversion. In this buffer, the α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase is closely blinded with RBC and α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase plays efficient enzymatic activity of A antigen.

  11. Alterations of the degree of xylan acetylation in Arabidopsis xylan mutants

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chanhui; Teng, Quincy; Zhong, Ruiqin; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Xylan is the second most abundant polysaccharide in secondary walls of dicot plants and one of its structural features is the high degree of acetylation of xylosyl residues. In Arabidopsis, about 60% of xylosyl residues in xylan are acetylated and the biochemical mechanisms controlling xylan acetylation are largely unknown. A recent report by Yuan et al. (2013) revealed the essential role of a DUF231 domain-containing protein, ESKIMO1 (ESK1), in xylan acetylation in Arabidopsis as the esk1 mutation caused specific reductions in the degree of xylan 2-O or 3-O-monoacetylation and in the activity of xylan acetyltransferase. Interestingly, the esk1 mutation also resulted in an elevation of glucuronic acid (GlcA) substitutions in xylan. Since GlcA substitutions in xylan occur at the O-2 position of xylosyl residues, it is plausible that the increase in GlcA substitutions in the esk1 mutant is attributed to the reduction in acetylation at O-2 of xylosyl residues, which renders more O-2 positions available for GlcA substitutions. Here, we investigated the effect of removal of GlcA substitutions on the degree of xylan acetylation. We found that a complete loss of GlcA substitutions in the xylan of the gux1/2/3 triple mutant led to a significant increase in the degree of xylan acetylation, indicating that xylan acetyltransferases and glucuronyltransferases compete with each other for xylosyl residues for their acetylation or GlcA substitutions in planta. In addition, detailed structure analysis of xylan from the rwa1/2/3/4 quadruple mutant revealed that it had a uniform reduction of acetyl substitutions at different positions of the xylosyl residues, which is consistent with the proposed role of RWAs as acetyl coenzyme A transporters. The significance of these findings is discussed. PMID:24518588

  12. Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of D-alanine-D-alanine ligase from OXA-23-producing Acinetobacter baumannii K0420859.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Kim-Hung; Tran, Huyen-Thi; Pham, Tan-Viet; Ngo, Ho-Phuong-Thuy; Cha, Sun-Shin; Chung, Kyung Min; Lee, Sang Hee; Kang, Lin-Woo

    2014-04-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii causes bacteraemia, pneumonia, other respiratory-tract and urinary-tract infections in humans. OXA-23 carbapenemase-producing A. baumannii K0420859 (A. baumannii OXA-23) is resistant to carbapenem, a common antibacterial drug. To develop an efficient and novel antibacterial drug against A. baumannii OXA-23, D-alanine-D-alanine ligase, which is essential in bacterial cell-wall synthesis, is of interest. Here, the D-alanine-D-alanine ligase (AbDdl) gene from A. baumannii OXA-23 was cloned and expressed, and the AbDdl protein was purified and crystallized; this enzyme can be used as a novel target for an antibacterial drug against A. baumannii OXA-23. The AbDdl crystal diffracted to a resolution of 2.8 Å and belonged to the orthorhombic space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 113.4, b = 116.7, c = 176.5 Å, a corresponding VM of 2.8 Å(3) Da(-1) and a solvent content of 56.3%, and six protomers in the asymmetric unit.

  13. Characterization of SCO4439, a D-alanyl-D-alanine carboxypeptidase involved in spore cell wall maturation, resistance, and germination in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Rioseras, Beatriz; Yagüe, Paula; López-García, María Teresa; Gonzalez-Quiñonez, Nathaly; Binda, Elisa; Marinelli, Flavia; Manteca, Angel

    2016-01-01

    This work contributes to the understanding of cell wall modifications during sporulation and germination in Streptomyces by assessing the biological function and biochemical properties of SCO4439, a D-alanyl-D-alanine carboxypeptidase (DD-CPase) constitutively expressed during development. SCO4439 harbors a DD-CPase domain and a putative transcriptional regulator domain, separated by a putative transmembrane region. The recombinant protein shows that DD-CPase activity is inhibited by penicillin G. The spores of the SCO4439::Tn5062 mutant are affected in their resistance to heat and acid and showed a dramatic increase in swelling during germination. The mycelium of the SCO4439::Tn5062 mutant is more sensitive to glycopeptide antibiotics (vancomycin and teicoplanin). The DD-CPase domain and the hydrophobic transmembrane region are highly conserved in Streptomyces, and both are essential for complementing the wild type phenotypes in the mutant. A model for the biological mechanism behind the observed phenotypes is proposed, in which SCO4439 DD-CPase releases D-Ala from peptidoglycan (PG) precursors, thereby reducing the substrate pool for PG crosslinking (transpeptidation). PG crosslinking regulates spore physical resistance and germination, and modulates mycelium resistance to glycopeptides. This study is the first demonstration of the role of a DD-CPase in the maturation of the spore cell wall. PMID:26867711

  14. Subunit interface mutants of rabbit muscle aldolase form active dimers.

    PubMed Central

    Beernink, P. T.; Tolan, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    We report the construction of subunit interface mutants of rabbit muscle aldolase A with altered quaternary structure. A mutation has been described that causes nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia and produces a thermolabile aldolase (Kishi H et al., 1987, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 84:8623-8627). The disease arises from substitution of Gly for Asp-128, a residue at the subunit interface of human aldolase A. To elucidate the role of this residue in the highly homologous rabbit aldolase A, site-directed mutagenesis is used to replace Asp-128 with Gly, Ala, Asn, Gln, or Val. Rabbit aldolase D128G purified from Escherichia coli is found to be similar to human D128G by kinetic analysis, CD, and thermal inactivation assays. All of the mutant rabbit aldolases are similar to the wild-type rabbit enzyme in secondary structure and kinetic properties. In contrast, whereas the wild-type enzyme is a tetramer, chemical crosslinking and gel filtration indicate that a new dimeric species exists for the mutants. In sedimentation velocity experiments, the mutant enzymes as mixtures of dimer and tetramer at 4 degrees C. Sedimentation at 20 degrees C shows that the mutant enzymes are > 99.5% dimeric and, in the presence of substrate, that the dimeric species is active. Differential scanning calorimetry demonstrates that Tm values of the mutant enzymes are decreased by 12 degrees C compared to wild-type enzyme. The results indicate that Asp-128 is important for interface stability and suggest that 1 role of the quaternary structure of aldolase is to provide thermostability. PMID:7833800

  15. Identification and Partial Characterization of a Novel UDP-N-Acetylenolpyruvoylglucosamine Reductase/UDP-N-Acetylmuramate:l-Alanine Ligase Fusion Enzyme from Verrucomicrobium spinosum DSM 4136T

    PubMed Central

    Naqvi, Kubra F.; Patin, Delphine; Wheatley, Matthew S.; Savka, Michael A.; Dobson, Renwick C. J.; Gan, Han Ming; Barreteau, Hélène; Blanot, Didier; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Hudson, André O.

    2016-01-01

    The enzymes involved in synthesizing the bacterial cell wall are attractive targets for the design of antibacterial compounds, since this pathway is essential for bacteria and is absent in animals, particularly humans. A survey of the genome of a bacterium that belongs to the phylum Verrucomicrobia, the closest free-living relative to bacteria from the Chlamydiales phylum, shows genetic evidence that Verrucomicrobium spinosum possesses a novel fusion open reading frame (ORF) annotated by the locus tag (VspiD_010100018130). The ORF, which is predicted to encode the enzymes UDP-N-acetylenolpyruvoylglucosamine reductase (MurB) and UDP-N-acetylmuramate:l-alanine ligase (MurC) that are involved in the cytoplasmic steps of peptidoglycan biosynthesis, was cloned. In vivo analyses using functional complementation showed that the fusion gene was able to complement Escherichia coli murB and murC temperature sensitive mutants. The purified recombinant fusion enzyme (MurB/CVs) was shown to be endowed with UDP-N-acetylmuramate:l-alanine ligase activity. In vitro analyses demonstrated that the latter enzyme had a pH optimum of 9.0, a magnesium optimum of 10 mM and a temperature optimum of 44–46°C. Its apparent Km values for ATP, UDP-MurNAc, and l-alanine were 470, 90, and 25 μM, respectively. However, all attempts to demonstrate an in vitro UDP-N-acetylenolpyruvoylglucosamine reductase (MurB) activity were unsuccessful. Lastly, Hidden Markov Model-based similarity search and phylogenetic analysis revealed that this fusion enzyme could only be identified in specific lineages within the Verrucomicrobia phylum. PMID:27047475

  16. Residues Asp164 and Glu165 at the substrate entryway function potently in substrate orientation of alanine racemase from E. coli: Enzymatic characterization with crystal structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dalei; Hu, Tiancen; Zhang, Liang; Chen, Jing; Du, Jiamu; Ding, Jianping; Jiang, Hualiang; Shen, Xu

    2008-06-01

    Alanine racemase (Alr) is an important enzyme that catalyzes the interconversion of L-alanine and D-alanine, an essential building block in the peptidoglycan biosynthesis. For the small size of the Alr active site, its conserved substrate entryway has been proposed as a potential choice for drug design. In this work, we fully analyzed the crystal structures of the native, the D-cycloserine-bound, and four mutants (P219A, E221A, E221K, and E221P) of biosynthetic Alr from Escherichia coli (EcAlr) and studied the potential roles in substrate orientation for the key residues involved in the substrate entryway in conjunction with the enzymatic assays. Structurally, it was discovered that EcAlr is similar to the Pseudomonas aeruginosa catabolic Alr in both overall and active site geometries. Mutation of the conserved negatively charged residue aspartate 164 or glutamate 165 at the substrate entryway could obviously reduce the binding affinity of enzyme against the substrate and decrease the turnover numbers in both D- to L-Ala and L- to D-Ala directions, especially when mutated to lysine with the opposite charge. However, mutation of Pro219 or Glu221 had only negligible or a small influence on the enzymatic activity. Together with the enzymatic and structural investigation results, we thus proposed that the negatively charged residues Asp164 and Glu165 around the substrate entryway play an important role in substrate orientation with cooperation of the positively charged Arg280 and Arg300 on the opposite monomer. Our findings are expected to provide some useful structural information for inhibitor design targeting the substrate entryway of Alr.

  17. Analogue-resistant mutants of Azotobacter chroococcum derepressed for nitrogenase activity and early ammonia excretion having potential as inoculants for cereal crops.

    PubMed

    Lakshminarayana, K; Shukla, B; Sindhu, S S; Kumari, P; Narula, N; Sheoran, R K

    2000-04-01

    Spontaneous mutants resistant to methionine sulfoximine (Msx), methyl alanine (Mal) and methyl ammonium chloride (Mac) were derived from A. chroococcum strain A103. Msx and Mal-resistant mutants expressed 1.73 to 10.98% of the fully derepressed nitrogenase activity when grown in Burk's medium containing ammonium acetate. Mac-resistant mutants did not express nitrogenase activity in ammonium acetate supplemented medium. The mutants excreted ammonia even after 2 days of growth and some mutants excreted more ammonia as compared to the parent. Selected mutants were inoculated on wheat (Triticum aestivum) and barley (Hordeum vulgare) under field conditions. Majority of the derepressed mutants increased grain yield of wheat and barley varying from 1.2 to 33.3%. However, host-dependent effects on grain yield were observed with different mutants. Two mutants, Mal 27 and Mac 19 showed significant increase in grain yields of both the crops. The results suggest that metabolic analogue-resistant mutants of Azotobacter have potential for use as a biofertilizer for cereal crops.

  18. Topology of AspT, the Aspartate:Alanine Antiporter of Tetragenococcus halophilus, Determined by Site-Directed Fluorescence Labeling▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Nanatani, Kei; Fujiki, Takashi; Kanou, Kazuhiko; Takeda-Shitaka, Mayuko; Umeyama, Hideaki; Ye, Liwen; Wang, Xicheng; Nakajima, Tasuku; Uchida, Takafumi; Maloney, Peter C.; Abe, Keietsu

    2007-01-01

    The gram-positive lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus catalyzes the decarboxylation of l-aspartate (Asp) with release of l-alanine (Ala) and CO2. The decarboxylation reaction consists of two steps: electrogenic exchange of Asp for Ala catalyzed by an aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) and intracellular decarboxylation of the transported Asp catalyzed by an l-aspartate-β-decarboxylase (AspD). AspT belongs to the newly classified aspartate:alanine exchanger family (transporter classification no. 2.A.81) of transporters. In this study, we were interested in the relationship between the structure and function of AspT and thus analyzed the topology by means of the substituted-cysteine accessibility method using the impermeant, fluorescent, thiol-specific probe Oregon Green 488 maleimide (OGM) and the impermeant, nonfluorescent, thiol-specific probe [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl]methanethiosulfonate bromide. We generated 23 single-cysteine variants from a six-histidine-tagged cysteineless AspT template. A cysteine position was assigned an external location if the corresponding single-cysteine variant reacted with OGM added to intact cells, and a position was assigned an internal location if OGM labeling required cell lysis. The topology analyses revealed that AspT has a unique topology; the protein has 10 transmembrane helices (TMs), a large hydrophilic cytoplasmic loop (about 180 amino acids) between TM5 and TM6, N and C termini that face the periplasm, and a positively charged residue (arginine 76) within TM3. Moreover, the three-dimensional structure constructed by means of the full automatic modeling system indicates that the large hydrophilic cytoplasmic loop of AspT possesses a TrkA_C domain and a TrkA_C-like domain and that the three-dimensional structures of these domains are similar to each other even though their amino acid sequences show low similarity. PMID:17660287

  19. Mutants of staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome toxin 1: mitogenicity and recognition by a neutralizing monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, L; Choi, E M; Connolly, K; Thompson, M R; Bonventre, P F

    1990-01-01

    Toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1), a 22-kilodalton protein made by strains of Staphylococcus aureus harboring the chromosomal toxin gene, may elicit toxic shock syndrome in humans. In vitro, TSST-1 induces T cells to proliferate and macrophages to secrete interleukin-1. To conduct a structure-function analysis, point mutations on the TSST-1 gene were generated by site-directed mutagenesis to identify amino acids critical for activity of the toxin. Specific tyrosine and histidine residues were replaced by alanines. Wild-type and mutant TSST-1 gene constructs were expressed in Escherichia coli, and the products were tested for their mitogenic potential and reactivity with a TSST-1 neutralizing monoclonal antibody (MAb 8-5-7). Four of the mutants were similar to the wild type; i.e., the mutant toxins stimulated murine T cells and reacted with MAb 8-5-7 equally as well as the wild type. Two mutants exhibited a decrease in mitogenic activity, but one of these retained the capacity to bind with MAb 8-5-7 while the other was no longer recognized by the same antibody. One double mutant demonstrated minimal mitogenic activity and did not react in enzyme-linked immunosorbent and immunoblot assays with MAb 8-5-7. The data show that specific residues near the carboxy terminus of TSST-1 are essential for mitogenic activity and in forming the epitope recognized by neutralizing MAb 8-5-7. Images PMID:1696937

  20. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkyl amino substituted triazine...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkyl amino substituted triazine...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkyl amino substituted triazine...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkyl amino substituted triazine...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkyl amino substituted triazine...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10214 - Poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted carbomonocycle-.omega.-substituted carbomonocycle...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....-substituted carbomonocycle-.omega.-substituted carbomonocycle (generic). 721.10214 Section 721.10214... Poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted carbomonocycle-.omega.-substituted carbomonocycle (generic... identified generically as poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10214 - Poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted carbomonocycle-.omega.-substituted carbomonocycle...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....-substituted carbomonocycle-.omega.-substituted carbomonocycle (generic). 721.10214 Section 721.10214... Poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted carbomonocycle-.omega.-substituted carbomonocycle (generic... identified generically as poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10214 - Poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted carbomonocycle-.omega.-substituted carbomonocycle...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....-substituted carbomonocycle-.omega.-substituted carbomonocycle (generic). 721.10214 Section 721.10214... Poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted carbomonocycle-.omega.-substituted carbomonocycle (generic... identified generically as poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted...

  8. The membrane proximal external regions of gp41 from HIV-1 strains HXB2 and JRFL have different sensitivities to alanine mutation.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hyun Ah; Diaz-Rohrer, Barbara; Saminathan, Priyanka; Jacobs, Amy

    2015-03-03

    The transmembrane subunit (gp41) of the HIV envelope protein complex (Env) mediates the viral fusion step of HIV entry. The membrane proximal external region (MPER), one of the functional domains of gp41, has been the focus of a great deal of research because it is a target for neutralizing antibodies. In this study, we examined 23 amino acid residues in the MPER (660-683) in both a CXCR4 coreceptor-utilizing strain (HXB2) and a CCR5-utilizing strain (JRFL) by alanine scanning mutagenesis. Despite the high degree of gp41 sequence conservation, the effects of alanine mutation in the MPER were different between the two strains. Most mutations in HXB2 had fusogenicity and protein expression levels not less than 50% of that of the wild type in the case of cell-cell fusion. However, ∼30% of the mutants in HXB2 showed a severe defect in fusogenicity in viral entry. Mutations in the MPER of strain JRFL had more dramatic effects than that in HXB2 in cell-cell fusion and viral entry. The fact that there are large differences in the effects of mutation between two strains suggests the potential for the interaction of the MPER with nonconserved sequences such as the fusion peptide and/or other NHR domains as well as potential long-range structural effects on the conformational changes that occur with the Env complex during membrane fusion.

  9. Polyimides comprising substituted benzidines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Frank W. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A new class of polyimides and copolyimides made from substituted benzidines and aromatic dianhydrides and other aromatic diamines. The polyimides obtained with said diamines are distinguished by excellent thermal, excellent solubility, excellent electrical properties such as very low dielectric constants, excellent clarity and mechanical properties making the polyimides ideally suited as coating materials for microelectronic apparatii, as membranes for selective molecular or gas separation, as fibers in molecular composites, as high tensile strength, high compression strength fibers, as film castable coatings, or as fabric components.

  10. FTIR spectra and conformational structure of deutero-β-alanine isolated in argon matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanian, Stepan G.; Ivanov, Alexander Yu; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2016-02-01

    Low temperature FTIR spectra of β-alanine-d3 isolated in argon matrices are used to determine the conformational composition of this compound. UV irradiation of the matrix samples is found to change the relative populations of the β-alanine-d3 conformers. The populations of conformers I and II with an Nsbnd D⋯O intramolecular H-bond decrease after the UV irradiation while the populations of conformer V with an N⋯Dsbnd O H-bond and conformer IV which has no intramolecular H-bonds increase. This behavior of the β-alanine-d3 conformers are used to separate the bands of the different conformers. The analysis of the experimental FTIR spectra is based on the calculated harmonic B3LYP/6-311++G(df,pd) frequencies and on the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ frequencies calculated with a method that includes anharmonic effects. Polynomial scaling of the calculated frequencies is used to achieve better agreement with the experimental data. The observation of the wide band of the OD stretching vibration at 2201 cm-1 is a direct evidence of the presence of the β-alanine-d3 conformer V in the Ar matrix. In total ten bands of conformer V are detected. The influence of the matrix environment on the structures and the IR spectra of the β-alanine and β-alanine-d3 conformers is investigated. This involves performing calculations of the β-alanine conformers embedded in argon clusters containing from 163 to 166 argon atoms using the M06-2X and B3LYP(GD3BJ) density-functional methods. Good agreement between the calculated and the experimental matrix splitting is demonstrated.

  11. Glucose and Alanine Metabolism in Children with Maple Syrup Urine Disease

    PubMed Central

    Haymond, Morey W.; Ben-Galim, Ehud; Strobel, Karen E.

    1978-01-01

    In vitro studies have suggested that catabolism of branched chain amino acids is linked with alanine and glutamine formed in, and released from, muscle. To explore this possibility in vivo, static and kinetic studies were performed in three patients with classical, and one patient with partial, branched chain α-ketoacid decarboxylase deficiency (maple syrup urine disease, MSUD) and compared to similar studies in eight age-matched controls. The subjects underwent a 24-30-h fast, and a glucose-alanine flux study using stable isotopes. Basal plasma leucine concentrations were elevated (P <0.001) in patients with MSUD (1,140±125 μM vs. 155±18 μM in controls); and in contrast to the controls, branched chain amino acid concentrations in plasma increased during the fast in the MSUD patients. Basal plasma alanine concentrations were lower (P <0.01) in patients with classical MSUD (153±8 μM vs. 495±27 μM in controls). This discrepancy was maintained throughout the fast despite a decrease in alanine concentrations in both groups. Plasma alanine and leucine concentrations in the patient with partial MSUD were intermediate between those of the controls and the subjects with the classical form of the disease. Circulating ketone bodies and glucoregulatory hormones concentrations were similar in the MSUD and normal subjects during the fast. Alanine flux rates in two patients with classical MSUD (3.76 and 4.00 μmol/Kg per min) and the patient with partial MSUD (5.76 μmol/Kg per min) were clearly lower than those of the controls (11.72±2.53 [SD] μmol/Kg per min). After short-term starvation, glucose flux and fasting concentrations were similar in the MSUD patients and normal subjects. These data indicate that branched chain amino acid catabolism is an important rate limiting event for alanine production in vivo. PMID:670400

  12. Altered fermentative metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants lacking pyruvate formate lyase and both pyruvate formate lyase and alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Catalanotti, Claudia; Dubini, Alexandra; Subramanian, Venkataramanan; Yang, Wenqiang; Magneschi, Leonardo; Mus, Florence; Seibert, Michael; Posewitz, Matthew C; Grossman, Arthur R

    2012-02-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a unicellular green alga, often experiences hypoxic/anoxic soil conditions that activate fermentation metabolism. We isolated three Chlamydomonas mutants disrupted for the pyruvate formate lyase (PFL1) gene; the encoded PFL1 protein catalyzes a major fermentative pathway in wild-type Chlamydomonas cells. When the pfl1 mutants were subjected to dark fermentative conditions, they displayed an increased flux of pyruvate to lactate, elevated pyruvate decarboxylation, ethanol accumulation, diminished pyruvate oxidation by pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and lowered H(2) production. The pfl1-1 mutant also accumulated high intracellular levels of lactate, succinate, alanine, malate, and fumarate. To further probe the system, we generated a double mutant (pfl1-1 adh1) that is unable to synthesize both formate and ethanol. This strain, like the pfl1 mutants, secreted lactate, but it also exhibited a significant increase in the levels of extracellular glycerol, acetate, and intracellular reduced sugars and a decrease in dark, fermentative H(2) production. Whereas wild-type Chlamydomonas fermentation primarily produces formate and ethanol, the double mutant reroutes glycolytic carbon to lactate and glycerol. Although the metabolic adjustments observed in the mutants facilitate NADH reoxidation and sustained glycolysis under dark, anoxic conditions, the observed changes could not have been predicted given our current knowledge of the regulation of fermentation metabolism.

  13. Altered Fermentative Metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Mutants Lacking Pyruvate Formate Lyase and Both Pyruvate Formate Lyase and Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Catalanotti, C.; Dubini, A.; Subramanian, V.; Yang, W. Q.; Magneschi, L.; Mus, F.; Seibert, M.; Posewitz, M. C.; Grossman, A. R.

    2012-02-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a unicellular green alga, often experiences hypoxic/anoxic soil conditions that activate fermentation metabolism. We isolated three Chlamydomonas mutants disrupted for the pyruvate formate lyase (PFL1) gene; the encoded PFL1 protein catalyzes a major fermentative pathway in wild-type Chlamydomonas cells. When the pfl1 mutants were subjected to dark fermentative conditions, they displayed an increased flux of pyruvate to lactate, elevated pyruvate decarboxylation, ethanol accumulation, diminished pyruvate oxidation by pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and lowered H2 production. The pfl1-1 mutant also accumulated high intracellular levels of lactate, succinate, alanine, malate, and fumarate. To further probe the system, we generated a double mutant (pfl1-1 adh1) that is unable to synthesize both formate and ethanol. This strain, like the pfl1 mutants, secreted lactate, but it also exhibited a significant increase in the levels of extracellular glycerol, acetate, and intracellular reduced sugars and a decrease in dark, fermentative H2 production. Whereas wild-type Chlamydomonas fermentation primarily produces formate and ethanol, the double mutant reroutes glycolytic carbon to lactate and glycerol. Although the metabolic adjustments observed in the mutants facilitate NADH reoxidation and sustained glycolysis under dark, anoxic conditions, the observed changes could not have been predicted given our current knowledge of the regulation of fermentation metabolism.

  14. Substituted hydroxyapatites for bone repair.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Jennifer H; Shepherd, David V; Best, Serena M

    2012-10-01

    Calcium phosphates such as hydroxyapatite have a wide range of applications both in bone grafts and for the coating of metallic implants, largely as a result of their chemical similarity to the mineral component of bone. However, to more accurately mirror the chemistry, various substitutions, both cationic (substituting for the calcium) and anionic (substituting for the phosphate or hydroxyl groups) have been produced. Significant research has been carried out in the field of substituted apatites and this paper aims to summarise some of the key effect of substitutions including magnesium, zinc, strontium, silicon and carbonate on physical and biological characteristics. Even small substitutions have been shown to have very significant effects on thermal stability, solubility, osteoclastic and osteoblastic response in vitro and degradation and bone regeneration in vivo.

  15. Perturbation correction for alanine dosimeters in different phantom materials in high-energy photon beams.

    PubMed

    von Voigts-Rhetz, P; Anton, M; Vorwerk, H; Zink, K

    2016-02-07

    In modern radiotherapy the verification of complex treatments plans is often performed in inhomogeneous or even anthropomorphic phantoms. For dose verification small detectors are necessary and therefore alanine detectors are most suitable. Though the response of alanine for a wide range of clinical photon energies in water is well know, the knowledge about the influence of the surrounding phantom material on the response of alanine is sparse. Therefore we investigated the influence of twenty different surrounding/phantom materials for alanine dosimeters in clinical photon fields via Monte Carlo simulations. The relative electron density of the used materials was in the range [Formula: see text] up to 1.69, covering almost all materials appearing in inhomogeneous or anthropomorphic phantoms used in radiotherapy. The investigations were performed for three different clinical photon spectra ranging from 6 to 25 MV-X and Co-60 and as a result a perturbation correction [Formula: see text] depending on the environmental material was established. The Monte Carlo simulation show, that there is only a small dependence of [Formula: see text] on the phantom material and the photon energy, which is below  ±0.6%. The results confirm the good suitability of alanine detectors for in-vivo dosimetry.

  16. Theoretical and experimental study of valence photoelectron spectrum of D,L-alanine amino acid.

    PubMed

    Farrokhpour, H; Fathi, F; De Brito, A Naves

    2012-07-05

    In this work, the He-I (21.218 eV) photoelectron spectrum of D,L-alanine in the gas phase is revisited experimentally and theoretically. To support the experiment, the high level ab initio calculations were used to calculate and assign the photoelectron spectra of the four most stable conformers of gaseous alanine, carefully. The symmetry adapted cluster/configuration interaction (SAC-CI) method based on single and double excitation operators (SD-R) and its more accurate version, termed general-R, was used to separately calculate the energies and intensities of the ionization bands of the L- and D-alanine conformers. The intensities of ionization bands were calculated based on the monopole approximation. Also, natural bonding orbital (NBO) calculations were employed for better spectral band assignment. The relative electronic energy, Gibbs free energy, and Boltzmann population ratio of the conformers were calculated at the experimental temperature (403 K) using several theoretical methods. The theoretical photoelectron spectrum of alanine was calculated by summing over the spectra of individual D and L conformers weighted by different population ratios. Finally, the population ratio of the four most stable conformers of alanine was estimated from the experimental photoelectron spectrum using theoretical calculations for the first time.

  17. Perturbation correction for alanine dosimeters in different phantom materials in high-energy photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Voigts-Rhetz, P.; Anton, M.; Vorwerk, H.; Zink, K.

    2016-02-01

    In modern radiotherapy the verification of complex treatments plans is often performed in inhomogeneous or even anthropomorphic phantoms. For dose verification small detectors are necessary and therefore alanine detectors are most suitable. Though the response of alanine for a wide range of clinical photon energies in water is well know, the knowledge about the influence of the surrounding phantom material on the response of alanine is sparse. Therefore we investigated the influence of twenty different surrounding/phantom materials for alanine dosimeters in clinical photon fields via Monte Carlo simulations. The relative electron density of the used materials was in the range {{n}e}/{{n}e,\\text{w}}=0.20 up to 1.69, covering almost all materials appearing in inhomogeneous or anthropomorphic phantoms used in radiotherapy. The investigations were performed for three different clinical photon spectra ranging from 6 to 25 MV-X and Co-60 and as a result a perturbation correction {{k}\\text{env}} depending on the environmental material was established. The Monte Carlo simulation show, that there is only a small dependence of {{k}\\text{env}} on the phantom material and the photon energy, which is below  ±0.6%. The results confirm the good suitability of alanine detectors for in-vivo dosimetry.

  18. Absorbed dose determination in kilovoltage X-ray synchrotron radiation using alanine dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Butler, D J; Lye, J E; Wright, T E; Crossley, D; Sharpe, P H G; Stevenson, A W; Livingstone, J; Crosbie, J C

    2016-12-01

    Alanine dosimeters from the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in the UK were irradiated using kilovoltage synchrotron radiation at the imaging and medical beam line (IMBL) at the Australian Synchrotron. A 20 × 20 mm(2) area was irradiated by scanning the phantom containing the alanine through the 1 mm × 20 mm beam at a constant velocity. The polychromatic beam had an average energy of 95 keV and nominal absorbed dose to water rate of 250 Gy/s. The absorbed dose to water in the solid water phantom was first determined using a PTW Model 31014 PinPoint ionization chamber traceable to a graphite calorimeter. The alanine was read out at NPL using correction factors determined for (60)Co, traceable to NPL standards, and a published energy correction was applied to correct for the effect of the synchrotron beam quality. The ratio of the doses determined by alanine at NPL and those determined at the synchrotron was 0.975 (standard uncertainty 0.042) when alanine energy correction factors published by Waldeland et al. (Waldeland E, Hole E O, Sagstuen E and Malinen E, Med. Phys. 2010, 37, 3569) were used, and 0.996 (standard uncertainty 0.031) when factors by Anton et al. (Anton M, Büermann L., Phys Med Biol. 2015 60 6113-29) were used. The results provide additional verification of the IMBL dosimetry.

  19. Effect of 10 week beta-alanine supplementation on competition and training performance in elite swimmers.

    PubMed

    Chung, Weiliang; Shaw, Greg; Anderson, Megan E; Pyne, David B; Saunders, Philo U; Bishop, David J; Burke, Louise M

    2012-10-09

    Although some laboratory-based studies show an ergogenic effect with beta-alanine supplementation, there is a lack of field-based research in training and competition settings. Elite/Sub-elite swimmers (n = 23 males and 18 females, age = 21.7 ± 2.8 years; mean ± SD) were supplemented with either beta-alanine (4 weeks loading phase of 4.8 g/day and 3.2 g/day thereafter) or placebo for 10 weeks. Competition performance times were log-transformed, then evaluated before (National Championships) and after (international or national selection meet) supplementation. Swimmers also completed three standardized training sets at baseline, 4 and 10 weeks of supplementation. Capillary blood was analyzed for pH, bicarbonate and lactate concentration in both competition and training. There was an unclear effect (0.4%; ± 0.8%, mean, ± 90% confidence limits) of beta-alanine on competition performance compared to placebo with no meaningful changes in blood chemistry. While there was a transient improvement on training performance after 4 weeks with beta-alanine (-1.3%; ± 1.0%), there was an unclear effect at ten weeks (-0.2%; ± 1.5%) and no meaningful changes in blood chemistry. Beta-alanine supplementation appears to have minimal effect on swimming performance in non-laboratory controlled real-world training and competition settings.

  20. Explicit Substitutions and All That

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayala-Rincon, Mauricio; Munoz, Cesar; Busnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Explicit substitution calculi are extensions of the Lambda-calculus where the substitution mechanism is internalized into the theory. This feature makes them suitable for implementation and theoretical study of logic-based tools such as strongly typed programming languages and proof assistant systems. In this paper we explore new developments on two of the most successful styles of explicit substitution calculi: the lambda(sigma)- and lambda(s(e))-calculi.

  1. Explicit Substitutions and All That

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayala-Rincon, Mauricio; Munoz, Cesar

    2000-01-01

    Explicit substitution calculi are extensions of the lambda-calculus where the substitution mechanism is internalized into the theory. This feature makes them suitable for implementation and theoretical study of logic-based tools such as strongly typed programming languages and proof assistant systems. In this paper we explore new developments on two of the most successful styles of explicit substitution calculi: the lambda sigma- and lambda S(e)-calculi.

  2. Individual substitution mutations in the AID C terminus that ablate IgH class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Kadungure, Tatenda; Ucher, Anna J; Linehan, Erin K; Schrader, Carol E; Stavnezer, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential for class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) of Ig genes. The C terminus of AID is required for CSR but not for SHM, but the reason for this is not entirely clear. By retroviral transduction of mutant AID proteins into aid-/- mouse splenic B cells, we show that 4 amino acids within the C terminus of mouse AID, when individually mutated to specific amino acids (R190K, A192K, L196S, F198S), reduce CSR about as much or more than deletion of the entire C terminal 10 amino acids. Similar to ΔAID, the substitutions reduce binding of UNG to Ig Sμ regions and some reduce binding of Msh2, both of which are important for introducing S region DNA breaks. Junctions between the IgH donor switch (S)μ and acceptor Sα regions from cells expressing ΔAID or the L196S mutant show increased microhomology compared to junctions in cells expressing wild-type AID, consistent with problems during CSR and the use of alternative end-joining, rather than non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). Unlike deletion of the AID C terminus, 3 of the substitution mutants reduce DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) detected within the Sμ region in splenic B cells undergoing CSR. Cells expressing these 3 substitution mutants also have greatly reduced mutations within unrearranged Sμ regions, and they decrease with time after activation. These results might be explained by increased error-free repair, but as the C terminus has been shown to be important for recruitment of NHEJ proteins, this appears unlikely. We hypothesize that Sμ DNA breaks in cells expressing these C terminus substitution mutants are poorly repaired, resulting in destruction of Sμ segments that are deaminated by these mutants. This could explain why these mutants cannot undergo CSR.

  3. Mutant Analysis and Enzyme Subunit Complementation in Bacterial Bioluminescence in Photobacterium fischeri

    PubMed Central

    Nealson, Kenneth H.; Markovitz, Alvin

    1970-01-01

    Chemical mutagens were used to obtain mutants deficient in bioluminescence in the marine bacterium Photobacterium fischeri strain MAV. Acridine dyes were effective in the production of dark mutants but not in the production of auxotrophs. These dark mutants were all of one type and appeared to contain lesions blocking the synthesis of luciferase. ICR-191 was especially effective in the production of aldehyde mutants, i.e., dark strains that luminesce when a long-chain aldehyde such as n-decanal is added to them. However, other mutant types were isolated after treatment with ICR-191. N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine induced many bioluminescence-deficient types with respect to both the site of the lesion and the quantitative effect on the luminescent system. We characterized the dark and dim mutants with respect to their response to exogenous decanal, levels of in vivo and in vitro luminescence, and their rates of reversion to wild type. In addition, the luciferases of the mutant strains were examined by subunit complementation. On the basis of these analyses, we identified mutants which synthesize altered luciferase, strains which are deficient in synthesis of luciferase, and aldehyde mutants. The results of analysis of luciferase from the aldehyde mutants and the complementation studies indicate that the lesions in these strains are in the luciferase itself. Results obtained with wild-type cells grown in minimal medium, and aldehyde mutant cells grown either in complete or minimal medium, indicate that a “natural aldehyde factor” is involved in in vivo light emission. These same studies showed that the long-chain aldehyde(s) could only partially substitute for the natural “aldehyde factor.” The possibility that the in vivo aldehyde factor is not a long-chain aldehyde is discussed. PMID:5479452

  4. Novel mutations in β-tubulin gene in Trichoderma harzianum mutants resistant to methyl benzimidazol-2-yl carbamate.

    PubMed

    Li, M; Zhang, H Y; Liang, B

    2013-01-01

    Twelve-low resistant (LR) mutants of Trichoderma harzianum with the capability of grow fast at 0.8 μg/mL methyl benzimidazol-2-yl carbamate (MBC) were obtained using UV mutagenesis. MR and HR mutants which could grow fast at 10 and 100 μg/mL MBC, respectively, were isolated by step-up selection protocols in which UV-treated mutants were induced and mycelial sector screening was made in plates with growth medium. Subsequently, β-tubulin genes of 14 mutants were cloned to describe-the molecular lesion likely to be responsible-for MBC resistance. Comparison of the β-tubulin sequences of the mutant and sensitive strains of T. harzianum revealed 2 new MBC-binding sites differed from those in other plant pathogens. A single mutation at-amino acid 168, having Phe (TTC) instead of Ser (TCC)', was demonstrated for the HR mutant; a double mutation in amino acid 13 resulting in the substitution of Gly (GGC) by Val (GTG) was observed in β-tubulin gene of MR mutant. On the other hand, no substitutions were identified in the β-tubulin gene and its 5'-flanking regions in 12 LR mutants of T. harzianum.

  5. Substrate Specificity of the Aspartate:Alanine Antiporter (AspT) of Tetragenococcus halophilus in Reconstituted Liposomes*

    PubMed Central

    Sasahara, Ayako; Nanatani, Kei; Enomoto, Masaru; Kuwahara, Shigefumi; Abe, Keietsu

    2011-01-01

    The aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of the lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus is a member of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAEx) transporter family. T. halophilus AspT catalyzes the electrogenic exchange of l-aspartate1− with l-alanine0. Although physiological functions of AspT were well studied, l-aspartate1−:l-alanine0 antiport mechanisms are still unsolved. Here we report that the binding sites of l-aspartate and l-alanine are independently present in AspT by means of the kinetic studies. We purified His6-tagged T. halophilus AspT and characterized its kinetic properties when reconstituted in liposomes (Km = 0.35 ± 0.03 mm for l-aspartate, Km = 0.098 ± 0 mm for d-aspartate, Km = 26 ± 2 mm for l-alanine, Km = 3.3 ± 0.2 mm for d-alanine). Competitive inhibition by various amino acids of l-aspartate or l-alanine in self-exchange reactions revealed that l-cysteine selectively inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange but only weakly inhibited l-alanine self-exchange. Additionally, l-serine selectively inhibited l-alanine self-exchange but barely inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange. The aspartate analogs l-cysteine sulfinic acid, l-cysteic acid, and d-cysteic acid competitively and strongly inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange compared with l-alanine self-exchange. Taken together, these kinetic data suggest that the putative binding sites of l-aspartate and l-alanine are independently located in the substrate translocation pathway of AspT. PMID:21719707

  6. Substrate specificity of the aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of Tetragenococcus halophilus in reconstituted liposomes.

    PubMed

    Sasahara, Ayako; Nanatani, Kei; Enomoto, Masaru; Kuwahara, Shigefumi; Abe, Keietsu

    2011-08-19

    The aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of the lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus is a member of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAEx) transporter family. T. halophilus AspT catalyzes the electrogenic exchange of L-aspartate(1-) with L-alanine(0). Although physiological functions of AspT were well studied, L-aspartate(1-):L-alanine(0) antiport mechanisms are still unsolved. Here we report that the binding sites of L-aspartate and L-alanine are independently present in AspT by means of the kinetic studies. We purified His(6)-tagged T. halophilus AspT and characterized its kinetic properties when reconstituted in liposomes (K(m) = 0.35 ± 0.03 mm for L-aspartate, K(m) = 0.098 ± 0 mm for D-aspartate, K(m) = 26 ± 2 mm for L-alanine, K(m) = 3.3 ± 0.2 mm for D-alanine). Competitive inhibition by various amino acids of L-aspartate or L-alanine in self-exchange reactions revealed that L-cysteine selectively inhibited L-aspartate self-exchange but only weakly inhibited L-alanine self-exchange. Additionally, L-serine selectively inhibited L-alanine self-exchange but barely inhibited L-aspartate self-exchange. The aspartate analogs L-cysteine sulfinic acid, L-cysteic acid, and D-cysteic acid competitively and strongly inhibited L-aspartate self-exchange compared with L-alanine self-exchange. Taken together, these kinetic data suggest that the putative binding sites of L-aspartate and L-alanine are independently located in the substrate translocation pathway of AspT.

  7. Mutant CAG Repeats Effectively Targeted by RNA Interference in SCA7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fiszer, Agnieszka; Wroblewska, Joanna P.; Nowak, Bartosz M.; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J.

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7) is a human neurodegenerative polyglutamine (polyQ) disease caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the open reading frame of the ATXN7 gene. The allele-selective silencing of mutant transcripts using a repeat-targeting strategy has previously been used for several polyQ diseases. Herein, we demonstrate that the selective targeting of a repeat tract in a mutant ATXN7 transcript by RNA interference is a feasible approach and results in an efficient decrease of mutant ataxin-7 protein in patient-derived cells. Oligonucleotides (ONs) containing specific base substitutions cause the downregulation of the ATXN7 mutant allele together with the upregulation of its normal allele. The A2 ON shows high allele selectivity at a broad range of concentrations and also restores UCHL1 expression, which is downregulated in SCA7. PMID:27999335

  8. Sensitivity of alanine dosimeters with gadolinium exposed to 6 MV photons at clinical doses.

    PubMed

    Marrale, M; Longo, A; Spanò, M; Bartolotta, A; D'Oca, M C; Brai, M

    2011-12-01

    In this study we analyzed the ESR signal of alanine dosimeters with gadolinium exposed to 6 MV linear accelerator photons. We observed that the addition of gadolinium brings about an improvement in the sensitivity to photons because of its high atomic number. The experimental data indicated that the addition of gadolinium increases the sensitivity of the alanine to 6 MV photons. This enhancement was better observed at high gadolinium concentrations for which the tissue equivalence is heavily reduced. However, information about the irradiation setup and of the radiation beam features allows one to correct for this difference. Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to obtain information on the expected effect of the addition of gadolinium on the dose absorbed by the alanine molecules inside the pellets. These results are compared with the experimental values, and the agreement is discussed.

  9. On the roles of the alanine and serine in the β-sheet structure of fibroin.

    PubMed

    Carrascoza Mayen, Juan Francisco; Lupan, Alexandru; Cosar, Ciprian; Kun, Attila-Zsolt; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu

    2015-02-01

    In its silk II form, fibroin is almost exclusively formed from layers of β-sheets, rich in glycine, alanine and serine. Reported here are computational results on fibroin models at semi-empirical, DFT levels of theory and molecular dynamics (MD) for (Gly)10, (Gly-Ala)5 and (Gly-Ser)5 decapeptides. While alanine and serine introduce steric repulsions, the alanine side-chain adds to the rigidity of the sheet, allowing it to maintain a properly pleated structure even in a single β-sheet, and thus avoiding two alternative conformations which would interfere with the formation of the multi-layer pleated-sheet structure. The role of the serine is proposed to involve modulation of the hydrophobicity in order to construct the supramolecular assembly as opposed to random precipitation due to hydrophobicity.

  10. A photoactivable amino acid based on a novel functional coumarin-6-yl-alanine.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Andrea S C; Gonçalves, M Sameiro T; Costa, Susana P G

    2012-12-01

    A novel fluorescent amino acid, L-4-chloromethylcoumarin-6-yl-alanine, was obtained from tyrosine by a Pechmann reaction. The assembly of the heterocyclic ring at the tyrosine side chain could be achieved before or after incorporation of tyrosine into a dipeptide, and amino acid and dipeptide ester conjugates were obtained by coupling to a model N-protected alanine. The behaviour of one of the fluorescent conjugates towards irradiation was studied in a photochemical reactor at different wavelengths (254, 300, 350 and 419 nm). The photoreaction course in methanol/HEPES buffer solution (80:20) was followed by HPLC/UV monitoring. It was found that the novel unnatural amino acid could act as a fluorescent label, due to its fluorescence properties, and, more importantly, as a photoactivable unit, due to the short irradiation times necessary to cleave the ester bond between the model amino acid and the coumarin-6-yl-alanine.

  11. Intramitochondrial localization of alanine aminotransferase in rat-liver mitochondria: comparison with glutaminase and aspartate aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Masola, B; Devlin, T M

    1995-12-01

    The removal of the outer mitochondrial membrane and hence of constituents of the intermembrane space in rat-liver mitochondria using digitonin showed that phosphate-dependent glutaminase, alanine and aspartate aminotransferase were localized in the mitoplasts. Further fractionation of mitoplasts following their sonication resulted in 90% of glutaminase, 98% of alanine aminotransferase and 48% of aspartate aminotransferase being recovered in the soluble fraction while the remainder of each enzyme was recovered in the sonicated vesicles fraction. These results indicated that glutaminase and alanine aminotransferase were soluble matrix enzymes, the little of each enzyme recovered in the sonicated vesicles fraction being probably due to entrapment in the vesicles. Aspartate aminotransferase had dual localization, in the inner membrane and matrix with the high specific activity in sonicated vesicles confirming its association with the membrane. Activation experiments suggested that the membrane-bound enzyme was localized on the inner side of the inner mitochondrial membrane.

  12. Probing the Catalytic Charge-Relay System in Alanine Racemase with Genetically Encoded Histidine Mimetics.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vangmayee; Wang, Yane-Shih; Liu, Wenshe R

    2016-12-16

    Histidine is a unique amino acid with an imidazole side chain in which both of the nitrogen atoms are capable of serving as a proton donor and proton acceptor in hydrogen bonding interactions. In order to probe the functional role of histidine involved in hydrogen bonding networks, fine-tuning the hydrogen bonding potential of the imidazole side chain is required but not feasible through traditional mutagenesis methods. Here, we show that two close mimetics of histidine, 3-methyl-histidine and thiazole alanine, can be genetically encoded using engineered pyrrolysine incorporation machinery. Replacement of the three histidine residues predicted to be involved in an extended charge-relay system in alanine racemase with 3-methyl-histidine or thiazole alanine shows a dramatic loss in the enzyme's catalytic efficiency, implying the role of this extended charge-relay system in activating the active site residue Y265, a general acid/base catalyst in the enzyme.

  13. Nucleation kinetics, growth and studies of β-alanine single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanthi, D.; Selvarajan, P.; HemaDurga, K. K.; Lincy Mary Ponmani, S.

    2013-06-01

    Solubility and metastable zone width for the re-crystallized salt of β-alanine was determined. Induction period measurement for the selected supersaturation ratios at room temperature (31 °C) was carried out for supersaturated aqueous solutions of β-alanine and it is noticed that induction period decreases with increase of supersaturation ratio. The nucleation parameters such as Gibbs free energy change, radius and number of molecules of the critical nucleus, interfacial tension and the nucleation rate have been evaluated by classical nucleation theory. Single crystals of β-alanine were grown using the optimized nucleation parameters by solution method and grown crystals have been subjected to various studies like XRD studies, FTIR, optical, thermal and SHG studies.

  14. Exchange of aspartate and alanine. Mechanism for development of a proton-motive force in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Abe, K; Hayashi, H; Maloney, P C; Malone, P C

    1996-02-09

    We examined the idea that aspartate metabolism by Lactobacillus subsp. M3 is organized as a proton-motive metabolic cycle by using reconstitution to monitor the activity of the carrier, termed AspT, expected to carry out the electrogenic exchange of precursor (aspartate) and product (alanine). Membranes of Lactobacillus subsp. M3 were extracted with 1.25% octyl glucoside in the presence of 0. 4% Escherichia coli phospholipid and 20% glycerol. The extracts were then used to prepare proteoliposomes loaded with either aspartate or alanine. Aspartate-loaded proteoliposomes accumulated external [3H]aspartate by exchange with internal substrate; this homologous self-exchange (Kt = 0.4 mm) was insensitive to potassium or proton ionophores and was unaffected by the presence or absence of Na+, K+, or Mg2+. Alanine-loaded proteoliposomes also took up [3H]aspartate in a heterologous antiport reaction that was stimulated or inhibited by an inside-positive or inside-negative membrane potential, respectively. Several lines of evidence suggest that these homologous and heterologous exchange reactions were catalyzed by the same functional unit. Thus, [3H]aspartate taken up by AspT during self-exchange was released by a delayed addition of alanine. In addition, the spontaneous loss of AspT activity that occurs when a detergent extract is held at 37 degrees C prior to reconstitution was prevented by the presence of either aspartate (KD(aspartate) = 0.3 mm) or alanine (KD(alanine) > or = 10 mm), indicating that both substrates interact directly with AspT. These findings are consistent with operation of a proton-motive metabolic cycle during aspartate metabolism by Lactobacillus subsp. M3.

  15. Relative response of the alanine dosimeter to medium energy x-rays.

    PubMed

    Anton, M; Büermann, L

    2015-08-07

    The response of the alanine dosimeter to kilovoltage x-rays with respect to the dose to water was measured, relative to the response to Co-60 radiation.Two series of x-ray qualities were investigated, one ranging from 30 kV to 100 kV tube voltage (TW series), the other one ranging from 70 kV to 280 kV (TH series). Due to the use of the water calorimeter as a primary standard, the uncertainty of the delivered dose is significantly lower than for other published data. The alanine response was measured as described in a previous publication (Anton et al 2013 Phys. Med. Biol. 58 3259-82). The uncertainty component due to the alanine measurement and analysis is ⩽0.4%, the major part of the combined uncertainty of the relative response originates from the uncertainty of the delivered dose. The relative uncertainties of the relative response vary from ⩽2% for the TW series to ⩽1.1% for the TH series.Different from the behaviour of the alanine dosimeter for megavoltage x-rays or electrons, the relative response drops significantly from unity for Co-60 radiation to less than 64% for the TW quality with a tube voltage of 30 kV. In order to reproduce this behaviour through Monte Carlo simulations, not only the ratio of the absorbed dose to alanine to the absorbed dose to water has to be known, but also the intrinsic efficiency, i.e. the dependence of the number of free radicals generated per unit of absorbed dose on the photon energy. This quantity is not yet accessible for the TW series.For a possible use of the alanine dosimeter for kilovoltage x-rays, for example in electronic brachytherapy, users should rely on the measured data for the relative response which have become available with this publication.

  16. The crystal structure of the D-alanine-D-alanine ligase from Acinetobacter baumannii suggests a flexible conformational change in the central domain before nucleotide binding.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Kim-Hung; Hong, Myoung-ki; Lee, Clarice; Tran, Huyen-Thi; Lee, Sang Hee; Ahn, Yeh-Jin; Cha, Sun-Shin; Kang, Lin-Woo

    2015-11-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, which is emerging as a multidrug-resistant nosocomial pathogen, causes a number of diseases, including pneumonia, bacteremia, meningitis, and skin infections. With ATP hydrolysis, the D-alanine-D-alanine ligase (DDL) catalyzes the synthesis of D-alanyl-D-alanine, which is an essential component of bacterial peptidoglycan. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of DDL from A. baumannii (AbDDL) at a resolution of 2.2 Å. The asymmetric unit contained six protomers of AbDDL. Five protomers had a closed conformation in the central domain, while one protomer had an open conformation in the central domain. The central domain with an open conformation did not interact with crystallographic symmetry-related protomers and the conformational change of the central domain was not due to crystal packing. The central domain of AbDDL can have an ensemble of the open and closed conformations before the binding of substrate ATP. The conformational change of the central domain is important for the catalytic activity and the detail information will be useful for the development of inhibitors against AbDDL and putative antibacterial agents against A. baumannii. The AbDDL structure was compared with that of other DDLs that were in complex with potent inhibitors and the catalytic activity of AbDDL was confirmed using enzyme kinetics assays.

  17. A mutant ('lab strain') of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, lacking flagella, has unusual growth physiology.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Derrick L; Notey, Jaspreet S; Chandrayan, Sanjeev K; Loder, Andrew J; Lipscomb, Gina L; Adams, Michael W W; Kelly, Robert M

    2015-03-01

    A mutant ('lab strain') of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus DSM3638 exhibited an extended exponential phase and atypical cell aggregation behavior. Genomic DNA from the mutant culture was sequenced and compared to wild-type (WT) DSM3638, revealing 145 genes with one or more insertions, deletions, or substitutions (12 silent, 33 amino acid substitutions, and 100 frame shifts). Approximately, half of the mutated genes were transposases or hypothetical proteins. The WT transcriptome revealed numerous changes in amino acid and pyrimidine biosynthesis pathways coincidental with growth phase transitions, unlike the mutant whose transcriptome reflected the observed prolonged exponential phase. Targeted gene deletions, based on frame-shifted ORFs in the mutant genome, in a genetically tractable strain of P. furiosus (COM1) could not generate the extended exponential phase behavior observed for the mutant. For example, a putative radical SAM family protein (PF2064) was the most highly up-regulated ORF (>25-fold) in the WT between exponential and stationary phase, although this ORF was unresponsive in the mutant; deletion of this gene in P. furiosus COM1 resulted in no apparent phenotype. On the other hand, frame-shifting mutations in the mutant genome negatively impacted transcription of a flagellar biosynthesis operon (PF0329-PF0338).Consequently, cells in the mutant culture lacked flagella and, unlike the WT, showed minimal evidence of exopolysaccharide-based cell aggregation in post-exponential phase. Electron microscopy of PF0331-PF0337 deletions in P. furiosus COM1 showed that absence of flagella impacted normal cell aggregation behavior and, furthermore, indicated that flagella play a key role, beyond motility, in the growth physiology of P. furiosus.

  18. A novel histone H4 mutant defective in nuclear division and mitotic chromosome transmission.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M M; Yang, P; Santisteban, M S; Boone, P W; Goldstein, A T; Megee, P C

    1996-01-01

    The histone proteins are essential for the assembly and function of th e eukaryotic chromosome. Here we report the first isolation of a temperature-sensitive lethal histone H4 mutant defective in mitotic chromosome transmission Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The mutant requires two amino acid substitutions in histone H4: a lethal Thr-to-Ile change at position 82, which lies within one of the DNA-binding surfaces of the protein, and a substitution of Ala to Val at position 89 that is an intragenic suppressor. Genetic and biochemical evidence shows that the mutant histone H4 is temperature sensitive for function but not for synthesis, deposition, or stability. The chromatin structure of 2 micrometer circle minichromosomes is temperature sensitive in vivo, consistent with a defect in H4-DNA interactions. The mutant also has defects in transcription, displaying weak Spt- phenotypes. At the restrictive temperature, mutant cells arrest in the cell cycle at nuclear division, with a large bud, a single nucleus with 2C DNA content, and a short bipolar spindle. At semipermissive temperatures, the frequency of chromosome loss is elevated 60-fold in the mutant while DNA recombination frequencies are unaffected. High-copy CSE4, encoding an H3 variant related to the mammalian CENP-A kinetochore antigen, was found to suppress the temperature sensitivity of the mutant without suppressing the Spt- transcription defect. These genetic, biochemical, and phenotypic results indicate that this novel histone H4 mutant defines one or more chromatin-dependent steps in chromosome segregation. PMID:8622646

  19. Fragmentation of α- and β-alanine molecules by ions at Bragg-peak energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bari, S.; Sobocinski, P.; Postma, J.; Alvarado, F.; Hoekstra, R.; Bernigaud, V.; Manil, B.; Rangama, J.; Huber, B.; Schlathölter, T.

    2008-02-01

    The interaction of keV He+, He2+, and O5+ ions with isolated α and β isomers of the amino acid alanine was studied by means of high resolution coincidence time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We observed a strong isomer dependence of characteristic fragmentation channels which manifests in strongly altered branching ratios. Despite the ultrashort initial perturbation by the incoming ion, evidence for molecular rearrangement leading to the formation of H3+ was found. The measured kinetic energies of ionic alanine fragments can be sufficient to induce secondary damage to DNA in a biological environment.

  20. On the fragmentation of biomolecules: Fragmentation of alanine dipeptide along the polypeptide chain

    SciTech Connect

    Solov'yov, I. A. Yakubovich, A. V.; Solov'yov, A. V.; Greiner, W.

    2006-09-15

    The interaction potential between amino acids in alanine dipeptide has been studied for the first time taking into account exact molecular geometry. Ab initio calculation has been performed in the framework of density functional theory taking into account all electrons in the system. The fragmentation of dipeptide along the polypeptide chain, as well as the interaction between alanines, has been considered. The energy of the system has been analyzed as a function of the distance between fragments for all possible dipeptide fragmentation channels. Analysis of the energy barriers makes it possible to estimate the characteristic fragmentation times and to determine the degree of applicability of classical electrodynamics for describing the system energy.

  1. In vivo control of gluconeogenesis in wild-type Neurospora crassa and in the adenylate cyclase-deficient cr-1 (crisp) mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Neves, M J; Terenzi, H F

    1989-01-01

    The rate of cycloheximide-resistant incorporation of carbon from [14C]alanine and [14C]acetate into polysaccharidic material was used to study gluconeogenic activity in wild-type Neurospora crassa and in the adenylate cyclase-deficient cr-1 (crisp-1) mutant. The wild-type efficiently utilized alanine and acetate as gluconeogenic substrates, whereas the mutant used acetate efficiently but was unable to use alanine. Cycloheximide-resistant 14C-incorporating activity was sensitive to carbon catabolite effects (repression and inactivation) in the two strains, which suggested that cyclic AMP metabolism was not involved in these regulatory responses. In the wild type, gluconeogenesis was induced by incubation of the cells in the absence of a carbon source. In contrast, cr-1 required supplementation with acetate. This finding suggested that induction of gluconeogenesis in N. crassa could be mediated by metabolites formed in carbon-starved cells. The cr-1 mutant seemed to be deficient in this process and to depend on an exogenous effector to induce gluconeogenesis. Incubation of cr-1 with cyclic AMP partially overcame the acetate requirement for induction of gluconeogenesis. PMID:2522093

  2. Mutant power: using mutant allele collections for yeast functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Norman, Kaitlyn L; Kumar, Anuj

    2016-03-01

    The budding yeast has long served as a model eukaryote for the functional genomic analysis of highly conserved signaling pathways, cellular processes and mechanisms underlying human disease. The collection of reagents available for genomics in yeast is extensive, encompassing a growing diversity of mutant collections beyond gene deletion sets in the standard wild-type S288C genetic background. We review here three main types of mutant allele collections: transposon mutagen collections, essential gene collections and overexpression libraries. Each collection provides unique and identifiable alleles that can be utilized in genome-wide, high-throughput studies. These genomic reagents are particularly informative in identifying synthetic phenotypes and functions associated with essential genes, including those modeled most effectively in complex genetic backgrounds. Several examples of genomic studies in filamentous/pseudohyphal backgrounds are provided here to illustrate this point. Additionally, the limitations of each approach are examined. Collectively, these mutant allele collections in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the related pathogenic yeast Candida albicans promise insights toward an advanced understanding of eukaryotic molecular and cellular biology.

  3. Displacement, Substitution, Sublimation: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Sigmund Freund worked with the mechanisms of displacement, substitution, and sublimation. These mechanisms have many similarities and have been studied diagnostically and therapeutically. Displacement and substitution seem to fit in well with phobias, hysterias, somatiyations, prejudices, and scapegoating. Phobias, prejudices, and scapegoating…

  4. A Gsα mutant designed to inhibit receptor signaling through Gs

    PubMed Central

    Iiri, Taroh; Bell, Sean M.; Baranski, Thomas J.; Fujita, Toshiro; Bourne, Henry R.

    1999-01-01

    Hormonal signals activate trimeric G proteins by substituting GTP for GDP bound to the G protein α subunit (Gα), thereby generating two potential signaling molecules, Gα–GTP and free Gβγ. The usefulness of dominant negative mutations for investigating Ras and other monomeric G proteins inspired us to create a functionally analogous dominant negative Gα mutation. Here we describe a mutant α subunit designed to inhibit receptor-mediated hormonal activation of Gs, the stimulatory regulator of adenylyl cyclase. To construct this mutant, we introduced into the α subunit (αs) of Gs three separate mutations chosen because they impair αs function in complementary ways: the A366S mutant reduces affinity of αs for binding GDP, whereas the G226A and E268A mutations impair the protein’s ability to bind GTP and to assume an active conformation. The triple mutant robustly inhibits (by up to 80%) Gs-dependent hormonal stimulation of adenylyl cyclase in cultured cells. Inhibition is selective in that it does not affect cellular responses to expression of a constitutively active αs mutant (αs–R201C) or to agonists for receptors that activate Gq or Gi. This αs triple mutant and cognate Gα mutants should provide specific tools for dissection of G protein-mediated signals in cultured cells and transgenic animals. PMID:9892662

  5. How Do Substitute Teachers Substitute? An Empirical Study of Substitute-Teacher Labor Supply

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gershenson, Seth

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the daily labor supply of a potentially important, but often overlooked, source of instruction in U.S. public schools: substitute teachers. I estimate a sequential binary-choice model of substitute teachers' job-offer acceptance decisions using data on job offers made by a randomized automated calling system. Importantly, this…

  6. Alanine 310 is important for the activity of 1,4-α-glucan branching enzyme from Geobacillus thermoglucosidans STB02.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiting; Li, Caiming; Gu, Zhengbiao; Xin, Chenhao; Cheng, Li; Hong, Yan; Li, Zhaofeng

    2017-04-01

    1,4-α-Glucan branching enzyme (GBE) catalyzes the formation of α-1,6 branch points in starch or glycogen by hydrolyzing α-1,4-glucosidic linkages and then synthesizing α-1,6-glucosidic linkages. In the GBE from Geobacillus thermoglucosidans STB02, alanine 310 (Ala310) is located in conserved region II. An analysis of the amino acid sequence shows that Ala310 is highly conserved in the prokaryotic GBE subfamily. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to determine the function of Ala310 in GBE. Replacement of Ala310 with glycine, aspartate, asparagine, isoleucine, glutamate, or glutamine resulted in mutant enzymes with less than 10% to 25% of wild-type activity when amylopectin or amylose was used as substrate. Studies using high-performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD) showed that A310G mutant had no effect on the transfer pattern, but the branching activity had been repressed to a large extent. Kinetic analysis also showed that mutations of Ala310 had an effect on the KM value that changed the preferred substrate from amylopectin to amylose. These results show that Ala310 is important for the catalytic activity of the GBE from G. thermoglucosidans STB02.

  7. Effects of glycine, beta-alanine and diazepam upon morphine-tolerant-dependent mice.

    PubMed

    Contreras, E; Tamayo, L

    1980-05-01

    The effects in mice of glycine, beta-alanine and diazepam on the analgesic response to morphine, on the intensity of tolerance and on the physical dependence on the analgesic have been examined. The two amino acids increased the analgesic response to morphine in a dose-related manner. However, both compounds were ineffective in the analgesic test (hot plate) when administered without morphine. Diazepam was ineffective in the analgesic test and it did not alter morphine analgesia, except when administered in a high dose which decreased and analgesic response. Glycine, either in single or repeated doses, did not modify tolerance to morphine, whereas beta-alanine induced a dose-related partial antagonism, which promptly reached a plateau. Diazepam induced a small decrease in the intensity of tolerance to the analgesic. The abstinence syndrome to morphine, induced by naloxone administration to primed mice, was reduced by single doses of glycine or beta-alanine. Diazepam behaved as a weak inhibitor of the abstinence syndrome when administered at a high dose. The potentiation of morphine analgesia and the antagonism of the abstinence syndrome induced by the amino acids may be related to their hyperpolarizing action in the c.n. system. The effects of beta-alanine on morphine tolerance cannot be explained by the same mechanism.

  8. High-velocity intermittent running: effects of beta-alanine supplementation.

    PubMed

    Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Fukuda, David H; Stout, Jeffrey R; Kendall, Kristina L

    2012-10-01

    The use of β-alanine in sport is widespread. However, the effects across all sport activities are inconclusive. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of β-alanine supplementation on high-intensity running performance and critical velocity (CV) and anaerobic running capacity (ARC). Fifty recreationally trained men were randomly assigned, in a double-blind fashion, to a β-alanine group (BA, 2 × 800 mg tablets, 3 times daily; CarnoSyn; n = 26) or placebo group (PL, 2 × 800 mg maltodextrin tablets, 3 times daily; n = 24). A graded exercise test (GXT) was performed to establish peak velocity (PV). Three high-speed runs to exhaustion were performed at 110, 100, and 90% of PV, with 15 minutes of rest between bouts. The distances achieved were plotted over the time to exhaustion (TTE). Linear regression was used to determine the slope (CV) and y-intercept (ARC) of these relationships to assess aerobic and anaerobic performances, respectively. There were no significant treatment effects (p > 0.05) on CV or ARC for either men or women. Additionally, no TTE effects were evident for bouts at 90-110%PV lasting 1.95-5.06 minutes. There seems to be no ergogenic effect of β-alanine supplementation on CV, ARC, or high-intensity running lasting approximately 2-5 minutes in either men or women in the current study.

  9. Protein Homeostasis Defects of Alanine-Glyoxylate Aminotransferase: New Therapeutic Strategies in Primary Hyperoxaluria Type I

    PubMed Central

    Pey, Angel L.; Albert, Armando; Salido, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase catalyzes the transamination between L-alanine and glyoxylate to produce pyruvate and glycine using pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) as cofactor. Human alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase is a peroxisomal enzyme expressed in the hepatocytes, the main site of glyoxylate detoxification. Its deficit causes primary hyperoxaluria type I, a rare but severe inborn error of metabolism. Single amino acid changes are the main type of mutation causing this disease, and considerable effort has been dedicated to the understanding of the molecular consequences of such missense mutations. In this review, we summarize the role of protein homeostasis in the basic mechanisms of primary hyperoxaluria. Intrinsic physicochemical properties of polypeptide chains such as thermodynamic stability, folding, unfolding, and misfolding rates as well as the interaction of different folding states with protein homeostasis networks are essential to understand this disease. The view presented has important implications for the development of new therapeutic strategies based on targeting specific elements of alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase homeostasis. PMID:23956997

  10. Beta-alanine/alpha-ketoglutarate aminotransferase for 3-hydroxypropionic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Jessen, Holly Jean [Chanhassen, MN; Liao, Hans H [Eden Prairie, MN; Gort, Steven John [Apple Valley, MN; Selifonova, Olga V [Plymouth, MN

    2011-10-04

    The present disclosure provides novel beta-alanine/alpha ketoglutarate aminotransferase nucleic acid and protein sequences having increased biological activity. Also provided are cells containing such enzymes, as well as methods of their use, for example to produce malonyl semialdehyde and downstream products thereof, such as 3-hydroxypropionic acid and derivatives thereof.

  11. Influence of beta-alanine supplementation on skeletal muscle carnosine concentrations and high intensity cycling capacity.

    PubMed

    Hill, C A; Harris, R C; Kim, H J; Harris, B D; Sale, C; Boobis, L H; Kim, C K; Wise, J A

    2007-02-01

    Muscle carnosine synthesis is limited by the availability of beta-alanine. Thirteen male subjects were supplemented with beta-alanine (CarnoSyn) for 4 wks, 8 of these for 10 wks. A biopsy of the vastus lateralis was obtained from 6 of the 8 at 0, 4 and 10 wks. Subjects undertook a cycle capacity test to determine total work done (TWD) at 110% (CCT(110%)) of their maximum power (Wmax). Twelve matched subjects received a placebo. Eleven of these completed the CCT(110%) at 0 and 4 wks, and 8, 10 wks. Muscle biopsies were obtained from 5 of the 8 and one additional subject. Muscle carnosine was significantly increased by +58.8% and +80.1% after 4 and 10 wks beta-alanine supplementation. Carnosine, initially 1.71 times higher in type IIa fibres, increased equally in both type I and IIa fibres. No increase was seen in control subjects. Taurine was unchanged by 10 wks of supplementation. 4 wks beta-alanine supplementation resulted in a significant increase in TWD (+13.0%); with a further +3.2% increase at 10 wks. TWD was unchanged at 4 and 10 wks in the control subjects. The increase in TWD with supplementation followed the increase in muscle carnosine.

  12. Partial enzymatic elimination and quantification of sarcosine from alanine using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Burton, Casey; Gamagedara, Sanjeewa; Ma, Yinfa

    2013-04-01

    Since sarcosine and D,L-alanine co-elute on reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) columns and the tandem mass spectrometer cannot differentiate them due to equivalent parent and fragment ions, derivatization is often required for analysis of sarcosine in LC/MS systems. This study offers an alternative to derivatization by employing partial elimination of sarcosine by enzymatic oxidation. The decrease in apparent concentration from the traditionally merged sarcosine-alanine peak associated with the enzymatic elimination has been shown to be proportional to the total sarcosine present (R(2) = 0.9999), allowing for determinations of urinary sarcosine. Sarcosine oxidase was shown to eliminate only sarcosine in the presence of D,L-alanine, and was consequently used as the selective enzyme. This newly developed technique has a method detection limit of 1 μg/L (parts per billion) with a linear range of 3 ppb-1 mg/L (parts per million) in urine matrices. The method was further validated through spiked recoveries of real urine samples, as well as the analysis of 35 real urine samples. The average recoveries for low, middle, and high sarcosine concentration spikes were 111.7, 90.8, and 90.1 %, respectively. In conclusion, this simple enzymatic approach coupled with HPLC/MS/MS is able to resolve sarcosine from D,L-alanine leading to underivatized quantification of sarcosine.

  13. Synthesis, characterization, and biocompatible properties of alanine-grafted chitosan copolymers.

    PubMed

    Park, Gyu Han; Kang, Min-Sil; Knowles, Jonathan C; Gong, Myoung-Seon

    2016-04-01

    In order to overcome major problems regarding the lack of affinity to solvents and limited reactivity of the free amines of chitosan, introduction of appropriate spacer arms having terminal amine function is considered of interest. L-Alanine-N-carboxyanhydride was grafted onto chitosan via anionic ring-opening polymerization. The chemical and structural characterizations of L-alanine-grafted chitosan (Ala-g-Cts) were confirmed through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H NMR). In addition, the viscoelastic properties of Ala-g-Cts were examined by means of a rotational viscometer, and thermal analysis was carried out with a thermogravimetric analyzer and differential scanning calorimetry. Morphological changes in the chitosan L-alanine moiety were determined by x-ray diffraction. To determine the feasibility of using these films as biomedical materials, we investigated the effects of their L-alanine content on physical and mechanical properties. The biodegradation results of crosslinked Ala-g-Cts films were evaluated in phosphate-buffered solution containing lysozyme at 37℃. Proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells on crosslinked Ala-g-Cts films was also investigated with use of the CCK-8 assay.

  14. Effect of alpha interferon on glucose and alanine transport by rat renal brush border membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Batuman, V.; Chadha, I. New Jersey Medical School, Newark )

    1990-01-01

    To investigate the pathogenetic mechanisms of interferon nephrotoxicity, we studied the effect of recombinant interferon alfa-2b on the uptake of {sup 14}C-D-glucose and {sup 14}C-L-alanine by rat renal brush-border-membrane vesicles. Interferon significantly inhibited 20 sec. sodium-dependent and 5 and 10 min. equilibrium uptake of both glucose and alanine. The inhibitory effect was dose dependent with maximum effect achieved at interferon concentration of 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}8}M in the uptake media. The half-maximal inhibitory concentrations, IC{sub 50}, of interferon on glucose uptake was 1.8 {times} 10{sup {minus}8}M, and 5.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}9}M on alanine uptake. Dixon plot analysis of uptake data was consistent with pure non-competitive inhibition. The inhibition constants, K{sub i}, 1.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}8}M for glucose uptake, and 7.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}9}M for alanine uptake, derived from Dixon plots were in close agreement with the IC{sub 50}s calculated from the semilog dose response curves. These observations reveal that direct interactions at the proximal tubule cell membrane are involved in the pathogenesis of interferon nephrotoxicity, and that its mechanism of nephrotoxicity is similar to that of other low molecular weight proteins.

  15. Investigation on physical properties of L-alanine: An effect of Methylene blue dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkir, Mohd.; Yahia, I. S.; Al-Qahtani, A. M. A.; Ganesh, V.; AlFaify, S.

    2017-03-01

    In the present investigation, a bulk size (35 mm × 25 mm × 15 mm) single crystal of 0.1 wt% Methylene blue dye (MLB) added L-alanine is grown at room temperature using solution technique for the first time. The L-alanine crystals with higher concentrations of dye (0.5 and 1 wt%) were also grown. Solubility study was performed at different temperatures. Structural, vibrational and good quality was inveterate by powder XRD, FT-Raman and SEM analyses. High transmittance in dyed crystals was confirmed. The presence of MLB dye was confirmed by an absorption band centered at 650 nm. Optical band gap was calculated for pure and dyed L-alanine crystals and found to be 5.45 and 4.49 eV respectively. Photoluminescence intensity of UV-A emission band centered at 332 nm was found to be enhanced due to the presence of dye. The dielectric measurement was done in the wide frequency range. Furthermore, the third order nonlinear optical parameters are enhanced in dyed L-alanine crystals determined by Z-scan technique.

  16. Positron and electron scattering by glycine and alanine: Shape resonances and methylation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Fernanda B.; Bettega, Márcio H. F.; Sanchez, Sergio d'Almeida

    2016-12-01

    We report integral cross sections (ICSs) for both positron and electron scattering by glycine and alanine amino acids. These molecules differ only by a methyl group. We computed the scattering cross sections using the Schwinger multichannel method for both glycine and alanine in different levels of approximation for both projectiles. The alanine ICSs are greater in magnitude than the glycine ICSs for both positron and electron scattering, probably due to the larger size of the molecule. In electron scattering calculations, we found two resonances for each molecule. Glycine presents one at 1.8 eV, and another centered at around 8.5 eV, in the static-exchange plus polarization (SEP) approximation. The ICS for alanine shows one resonance at 2.5 eV and another at around 9.5 eV, also in SEP approximation. The results are in good agreement with most of the data present in the literature. The comparison of the electron scattering ICSs for both molecules indicates that the methylation of glycine destabilizes the resonances, shifting them to higher energies.

  17. 21 CFR 862.1030 - Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system. 862.1030 Section 862.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  18. 21 CFR 862.1030 - Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system. 862.1030 Section 862.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  19. 21 CFR 862.1030 - Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system. 862.1030 Section 862.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1030 - Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system. 862.1030 Section 862.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  1. 21 CFR 862.1030 - Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system. 862.1030 Section 862.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  2. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles using DL-alanine for ESR dosimetry applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidelli, Eder José; Ramos, Ana Paula; Zaniquelli, Maria Elisabete D.; Nicolucci, Patricia; Baffa, Oswaldo

    2012-03-01

    The potential use of alanine for the production of nanoparticles is presented here for the first time. Silver nanoparticles were synthesized using a simple green method, namely the thermal treatment of silver nitrate aqueous solutions with DL-alanine. The latter compound was employed both as a reducing and a capping agent. Particles with average size equal to 7.5 nm, face-centered cubic crystalline structure, narrow size distribution, and spherical shape were obtained. Interaction between the silver ions present on the surface of the nanoparticles and the amine group of the DL-alanine molecule seems to be responsible for reduction of the silver ions and for the stability of the colloid. The bio-hybrid nano-composite was used as an ESR dosimeter. The amount of silver nanoparticles in the nanocomposite was not sufficient to cause considerable loss of tissue equivalency. Moreover, the samples containing nanoparticles presented increased sensitivity and reduced energetic dependence as compared with pure DL-alanine, contributing to the construction of small-sized dosimeters.

  3. Growth and characterization of pure and semiorganic nonlinear optical Lithium Sulphate admixtured l-alanine crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vela, T.; Selvarajan, P.; Freeda, T. H.; Balasubramanian, K.

    2013-04-01

    Lithium sulphate admixtured l-alanine (LSLA) salt was synthesized and the solubility of the commercially available l-alanine and the synthesized LSLA sample was determined in de-ionized water at various temperatures. In accordance with the solubility data, the saturated aqueous solutions of l-alanine and lithium admixtured l-alanine were prepared separately and the single crystals of the samples were grown by the solution method with a slow evaporation technique. Studying single x-ray diffraction shows that pure and LSLA crystal belong to the orthorhombic system with a non-centrosymmetric space group P212121. Using the powder x-ray diffraction study, the crystallinity of the grown crystals is confirmed and the diffraction peaks are indexed. The various functional groups present in the pure and LSLA crystal are elucidated from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study. UV-visible transmittance is recorded to study the optical transmittance range for the grown crystals. The powder second harmonic generation test confirms the nonlinear optical property of the grown crystals. From the microhardness test, the hardness of the grown crystals is estimated. The dielectric behaviour, such as the dielectric constant and the loss of the sample, are measured as a function of temperature and frequency. The ac conductivity of the grown crystals is also studied and the activation energy is calculated.

  4. [Temperature-dependent optical activity and birefringence study of D-alanine single crystal].

    PubMed

    Li, Zong-Sheng; Gong, Yan; Wang, Wen-Qing; Du, Wei-Min

    2006-02-01

    The measurement of the anisotropy of optical acitivity and birefringence is one of the most important clues to studying physical properties of a biaxial crystal of D-alanine. In order to investigate a second-order phase transition predicted by A. Salam between two states of D-alanine, the behavior of birefringence and optical activity is useful for the phenomenological approach to the transition mechanism. The optical activity as a peculiar quantity can respond to the modulation of the crystal lattice and to the change in the bonding nature of constituent atoms. In the present paper, the authors use the PEM-90 photoelastic modulator to study the conformation change of D-alanine at the temperature ranging from 220 to 290 K. The temperature dependence of I(2f)/I(dc) showed that the conformation of D-alanine molecule in single crystal changed around 250 K. The obtained results provide an obvious evidence of optical rotation phase transition predicted by Salam.

  5. Probing the interaction of the amino acid alanine with the surface of ZnO(1010).

    PubMed

    Gao, Y K; Traeger, F; Shekhah, O; Idriss, H; Wöll, C

    2009-10-01

    The adsorption modes and stability of the amino acid alanine (NH(2)-CH(CH(3))-COOH) have been studied on the nonpolar single crystal surface of zinc oxide, ZnO(1010), experimentally by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and computationally using density functional theory (DFT). Deposition at 200 K was found to lead to the formation of multilayers identified by an XPS N1s peak at 401.7 eV assigned to the NH(3)(+) group, a fingerprint of the zwitterionic structure of alanine in the solid state. Heating to 300 K resulted in the removal of most of the multilayers with the remaining surface coverage estimated to 0.4 with respect to Zn cations. At this temperature most of the alanine molecules are found to be deprotonated (dissociated), yielding a carboxylate species (NH(2)-CH(CH(3))-COO(-) (a) + OH (s); where O is surface oxygen, (a) for adsorbed and (s) for surface species). Further heating of the surface resulted in a gradual decrease of the surface coverage and by 500 K a large fraction of adsorbed alanine molecules have desorbed from the surface. Total energy DFT computations of different adsorbate species identified two stable dissociative adsorption modes: bidentate and monodentate. The bidentate species with adsorption energy of 1.75 eV was found to be more stable than the monodentate species by about 0.7 eV.

  6. Spectral characterization of a non-centrosymmetric organic compound: D-(-)-alanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moovendaran, K.; Martin Britto Dhas, S. A.; Natarajan, S.

    2013-08-01

    The crystal growth of D-(-)-alanine (1), a non-centrosymmetric solid is reported. It was characterized by NMR, infrared, Raman, UV-Vis-NIR and CD spectra. Experimental vibrational frequencies are compared with theoretically calculated values. Second harmonic generation (SHG) and first hyperpolarizability measurements are reported.

  7. Spectral characterization of a non-centrosymmetric organic compound: D-(-)-alanine.

    PubMed

    Moovendaran, K; Martin Britto Dhas, S A; Natarajan, S

    2013-08-01

    The crystal growth of D-(-)-alanine (1), a non-centrosymmetric solid is reported. It was characterized by NMR, infrared, Raman, UV-Vis-NIR and CD spectra. Experimental vibrational frequencies are compared with theoretically calculated values. Second harmonic generation (SHG) and first hyperpolarizability measurements are reported.

  8. Beta-alanine/alpha-ketoglutarate aminotransferase for 3-hydroxypropionic acid production

    SciTech Connect

    Jessen, Holly Jean; Liao, Hans H; Gort, Steven John; Selifonova, Olga V

    2014-11-18

    The present disclosure provides novel beta-alanine/alpha ketoglutarate aminotransferase nucleic acid and protein sequences having increased biological activity. Also provided are cells containing such enzymes, as well as methods of their use, for example to produce malonyl semialdehyde and downstream products thereof, such as 3-hydroxypropionic acid and derivatives thereof.

  9. Serine 421 regulates mutant huntingtin toxicity and clearance in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kratter, Ian H.; Zahed, Hengameh; Lau, Alice; Daub, Aaron C.; Weiberth, Kurt F.; Gu, Xiaofeng; Humbert, Sandrine; Yang, X. William; Osmand, Alex; Steffan, Joan S.; Masliah, Eliezer

    2016-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a progressive, adult-onset neurodegenerative disease caused by a polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion in the N-terminal region of the protein huntingtin (HTT). There are no cures or disease-modifying therapies for HD. HTT has a highly conserved Akt phosphorylation site at serine 421, and prior work in HD models found that phosphorylation at S421 (S421-P) diminishes the toxicity of mutant HTT (mHTT) fragments in neuronal cultures. However, whether S421-P affects the toxicity of mHTT in vivo remains unknown. In this work, we used murine models to investigate the role of S421-P in HTT-induced neurodegeneration. Specifically, we mutated the human mHTT gene within a BAC to express either an aspartic acid or an alanine at position 421, mimicking tonic phosphorylation (mHTT-S421D mice) or preventing phosphorylation (mHTT-S421A mice), respectively. Mimicking HTT phosphorylation strongly ameliorated mHTT-induced behavioral dysfunction and striatal neurodegeneration, whereas neuronal dysfunction persisted when S421 phosphorylation was blocked. We found that S421 phosphorylation mitigates neurodegeneration by increasing proteasome-dependent turnover of mHTT and reducing the presence of a toxic mHTT conformer. These data indicate that S421 is a potent modifier of mHTT toxicity and offer in vivo validation for S421 as a therapeutic target in HD. PMID:27525439

  10. Problem-Solving Test: Tryptophan Operon Mutants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a problem-solving test that deals with the regulation of the "trp" operon of "Escherichia coli." Two mutants of this operon are described: in mutant A, the operator region of the operon carries a point mutation so that it is unable to carry out its function; mutant B expresses a "trp" repressor protein unable to bind…

  11. Glutamate Racemase Is the Primary Target of β-Chloro-d-Alanine in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rodenburg, Anne; Khoury, Hania; de Chiara, Cesira; Howell, Steve; Snijders, Ambrosius P.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing global prevalence of drug resistance among many leading human pathogens necessitates both the development of antibiotics with novel mechanisms of action and a better understanding of the physiological activities of preexisting clinically effective drugs. Inhibition of peptidoglycan (PG) biosynthesis and cross-linking has traditionally enjoyed immense success as an antibiotic target in multiple bacterial pathogens, except in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, where it has so far been underexploited. d-Cycloserine, a clinically approved antituberculosis therapeutic, inhibits enzymes within the d-alanine subbranch of the PG-biosynthetic pathway and has been a focus in our laboratory for understanding peptidoglycan biosynthesis inhibition and for drug development in studies of M. tuberculosis. During our studies on alternative inhibitors of the d-alanine pathway, we discovered that the canonical alanine racemase (Alr) inhibitor β-chloro–d-alanine (BCDA) is a very poor inhibitor of recombinant M. tuberculosis Alr, despite having potent antituberculosis activity. Through a combination of enzymology, microbiology, metabolomics, and proteomics, we show here that BCDA does not inhibit the d-alanine pathway in intact cells, consistent with its poor in vitro activity, and that it is instead a mechanism-based inactivator of glutamate racemase (MurI), an upstream enzyme in the same early stage of PG biosynthesis. This is the first report to our knowledge of inhibition of MurI in M. tuberculosis and thus provides a valuable tool for studying this essential and enigmatic enzyme and a starting point for future MurI-targeted antibacterial development. PMID:27480853

  12. Structural features and kinetic characterization of alanine racemase from Staphylococcus aureus (Mu50).

    PubMed

    Scaletti, Emma R; Luckner, Sylvia R; Krause, Kurt L

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic Gram-positive bacterium which causes a wide variety of diseases ranging from minor skin infections to potentially fatal conditions such as pneumonia, meningitis and septicaemia. The pathogen is a leading cause of nosocomial acquired infections, a problem that is exacerbated by the existence of methicillin- and glycopeptide antibiotic-resistant strains which can be challenging to treat. Alanine racemase (Alr) is a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent enzyme which catalyzes reversible racemization between enantiomers of alanine. As D-alanine is an essential component of the bacterial cell-wall peptidoglycan, inhibition of Alr is lethal to prokaryotes. Additionally, while ubiquitous amongst bacteria, this enzyme is absent in humans and most eukaryotes, making it an excellent antibiotic drug target. The crystal structure of S. aureus alanine racemase (Alr(Sas)), the sequence of which corresponds to that from the highly antibiotic-resistant Mu50 strain, has been solved to 2.15 Å resolution. Comparison of the Alr(Sas) structure with those of various alanine racemases demonstrates a conserved overall fold, with the enzyme sharing most similarity to those from other Gram-positive bacteria. Structural examination indicates that the active-site binding pocket, dimer interface and active-site entryway of the enzyme are potential targets for structure-aided inhibitor design. Kinetic constants were calculated in this study and are reported here. The potential for a disulfide bond in this structure is noted. This structural and biochemical information provides a template for future structure-based drug-development efforts targeting Alr(Sas).

  13. Single Amino Acid Substitutions at Specific Positions of the Heptad Repeat Sequence of Piscidin-1 Yielded Novel Analogs That Show Low Cytotoxicity and In Vitro and In Vivo Antiendotoxin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Tripathi, Amit Kumar; Kathuria, Manoj; Shree, Sonal; Tripathi, Jitendra Kumar; Purshottam, R. K.; Ramachandran, Ravishankar; Mitra, Kalyan

    2016-01-01

    Piscidin-1 possesses significant antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities. To recognize the primary amino acid sequence(s) in piscidin-1 that could be important for its biological activity, a long heptad repeat sequence located in the region from amino acids 2 to 19 was identified. To comprehend the possible role of this motif, six analogs of piscidin-1 were designed by selectively replacing a single isoleucine residue at a d (5th) position or at an a (9th or 16th) position with either an alanine or a valine residue. Two more analogs, namely, I5F,F6A-piscidin-1 and V12I-piscidin-1, were designed for investigating the effect of interchanging an alanine residue at a d position with an adjacent phenylalanine residue and replacing a valine residue with an isoleucine residue at another d position of the heptad repeat of piscidin-1, respectively. Single alanine-substituted analogs exhibited significantly reduced cytotoxicity against mammalian cells compared with that of piscidin-1 but appreciably retained the antibacterial and antiendotoxin activities of piscidin-1. All the single valine-substituted piscidin-1 analogs and I5F,F6A-piscidin-1 showed cytotoxicity greater than that of the corresponding alanine-substituted analogs, antibacterial activity marginally greater than or similar to that of the corresponding alanine-substituted analogs, and also antiendotoxin activity superior to that of the corresponding alanine-substituted analogs. Interestingly, among these peptides, V12I-piscidin-1 showed the highest cytotoxicity and antibacterial and antiendotoxin activities. Lipopolysaccharide (12 mg/kg of body weight)-treated mice, further treated with I16A-piscidin-1, the piscidin-1 analog with the highest therapeutic index, at a single dose of 1 or 2 mg/kg of body weight, showed 80 and 100% survival, respectively. Structural and functional characterization of these peptides revealed the basis of their biological activity and demonstrated that nontoxic piscidin-1 analogs with

  14. A preliminary optimization of alanine blends for ESR dosimetry in a mixed n-γ field: Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoseininaveh, M.; Ranjbar, A. H.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a preliminary work on the enhancement of ESR response of several arrangements of alanine and boron compounds, exposed to a thermal neutron beam, is presented using FLUKA code. A multi-layer dosimeter consist of consecutive layers of alanine and boron compounds showed that the amount of energy deposited in the alanine layers is maximized when their thickness is 5 μm and the thickness of boron compound layers are between 2 and 3 μm. Furthermore, the optimum number of 10B layers in the dosimeter was found to be 35 layers. Moreover, the alanine samples consisting of small spherical grains of boron compounds, arranged regularly in the middle plane of the dosimeters, exposed to a thermal neutron beam, were modeled. The dependence of energy deposition in the alanine material on the size of grains, and on their composition were also studied, as well.

  15. Isolation and Characterization of Two Cellulose Morphology Mutants of Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC23769 Producing Cellulose with Lower Crystallinity

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Ying; Nagachar, Nivedita; Fang, Lin; Luan, Xin; Catchmark, Jeffrey M.; Tien, Ming; Kao, Teh-hui

    2015-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter hansenii, a Gram-negative bacterium, produces and secrets highly crystalline cellulose into growth medium, and has long been used as a model system for studying cellulose synthesis in higher plants. Cellulose synthesis involves the formation of β-1,4 glucan chains via the polymerization of glucose units by a multi-enzyme cellulose synthase complex (CSC). These glucan chains assemble into ordered structures including crystalline microfibrils. AcsA is the catalytic subunit of the cellulose synthase enzymes in the CSC, and AcsC is required for the secretion of cellulose. However, little is known about other proteins required for the assembly of crystalline cellulose. To address this question, we visually examined cellulose pellicles formed in growth media of 763 individual colonies of G. hansenii generated via Tn5 transposon insertion mutagenesis, and identified 85 that produced cellulose with altered morphologies. X-ray diffraction analysis of these 85 mutants identified two that produced cellulose with significantly lower crystallinity than wild type. The gene disrupted in one of these two mutants encoded a lysine decarboxylase and that in the other encoded an alanine racemase. Solid-state NMR analysis revealed that cellulose produced by these two mutants contained increased amounts of non-crystalline cellulose and monosaccharides associated with non-cellulosic polysaccharides as compared to the wild type. Monosaccharide analysis detected higher percentages of galactose and mannose in cellulose produced by both mutants. Field emission scanning electron microscopy showed that cellulose produced by the mutants was unevenly distributed, with some regions appearing to contain deposition of non-cellulosic polysaccharides; however, the width of the ribbon was comparable to that of normal cellulose. As both lysine decarboxylase and alanine racemase are required for the integrity of peptidoglycan, we propose a model for the role of peptidoglycan in the

  16. Isolation and characterization of two cellulose morphology mutants of Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC23769 producing cellulose with lower crystallinity

    DOE PAGES

    Deng, Ying; Nagachar, Nivedita; Fang, Lin; ...

    2015-03-19

    Gluconacetobacter hansenii, a Gram-negative bacterium, produces and secrets highly crystalline cellulose into growth medium, and has long been used as a model system for studying cellulose synthesis in higher plants. Cellulose synthesis involves the formation of β-1,4 glucan chains via the polymerization of glucose units by a multi-enzyme cellulose synthase complex (CSC). These glucan chains assemble into ordered structures including crystalline microfibrils. AcsA is the catalytic subunit of the cellulose synthase enzymes in the CSC, and AcsC is required for the secretion of cellulose. However, little is known about other proteins required for the assembly of crystalline cellulose. To addressmore » this question, we visually examined cellulose pellicles formed in growth media of 763 individual colonies of G. hansenii generated via Tn5 transposon insertion mutagenesis, and identified 85 that produced cellulose with altered morphologies. X-ray diffraction analysis of these 85 mutants identified two that produced cellulose with significantly lower crystallinity than wild type. The gene disrupted in one of these two mutants encoded a lysine decarboxylase and that in the other encoded an alanine racemase. Solid-state NMR analysis revealed that cellulose produced by these two mutants contained increased amounts of non-crystalline cellulose and monosaccharides associated with non-cellulosic polysaccharides as compared to the wild type. Monosaccharide analysis detected higher percentages of galactose and mannose in cellulose produced by both mutants. Field emission scanning electron microscopy showed that cellulose produced by the mutants was unevenly distributed, with some regions appearing to contain deposition of non-cellulosic polysaccharides; however, the width of the ribbon was comparable to that of normal cellulose. As both lysine decarboxylase and alanine racemase are required for the integrity of peptidoglycan, we propose a model for the role of peptidoglycan

  17. Molecular defect of isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase in the skunk mutant of silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Urano, Kei; Daimon, Takaaki; Banno, Yutaka; Mita, Kazuei; Terada, Tohru; Shimizu, Kentaro; Katsuma, Susumu; Shimada, Toru

    2010-11-01

    The isovaleric acid-emanating silkworm mutant skunk (sku) was first studied over 30 years ago because of its unusual odour and prepupal lethality. Here, we report the identification and characterization of the gene responsible for the sku mutant. Because of its specific features and symptoms similar to human isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase (IVD) deficiency, also known as isovaleric acidaemia, IVD dysfunction in silkworms was predicted to be responsible for the phenotype of the sku mutant. Linkage analysis revealed that the silkworm IVD gene (BmIVD) was closely linked to the odorous phenotype as expected, and a single amino acid substitution (G376V) was found in BmIVD of the sku mutant. To investigate the effect of the G376V substitution on BmIVD function, wild-type and sku-type recombinants were constructed with a baculovirus expression system and the subsequent enzyme activity of sku-type BmIVD was shown to be significantly reduced compared with that of wild-type BmIVD. Molecular modelling suggested that this reduction in the enzyme activity may be due to negative effects of G376V mutation on FAD-binding or on monomer-monomer interactions. These observations strongly suggest that BmIVD is responsible for the sku locus and that the molecular defect in BmIVD causes the characteristic smell and prepupal lethality of the sku mutant. To our knowledge, this is, aside from humans, the first characterization of IVD deficiency in metazoa. Considering that IVD acts in the third step of leucine degradation and the sku mutant accumulates branched-chain amino acids in haemolymph, this mutant may be useful in the investigation of unique branched-chain amino acid catabolism in insects.

  18. Relative activities and stabilities of mutant Escherichia coli tryptophan synthase alpha subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Lim, W K; Shin, H J; Milton, D L; Hardman, J K

    1991-01-01

    In vitro mutagenesis of the Escherichia coli trpA gene has yielded 66 mutant tryptophan synthase alpha subunits containing single amino acid substitutions at 49 different residue sites and 29 double and triple amino acid substitutions at 16 additional sites, all within the first 121 residues of the protein. The 66 singly altered mutant alpha subunits encoded from overexpression vectors have been examined for their ability to support growth in trpA mutant host strains and for their enzymatic and stability properties in crude extracts. With the exception of mutant alpha subunits altered at catalytic residue sites Glu-49 and Asp-60, all support growth; this includes those (48 of 66) that have no enzymatic defects and those (18 of 66) that do. The majority of the enzymatically defective mutant alpha subunits have decreased capacities for substrate (indole-3-glycerol phosphate) utilization, typical of the early trpA missense mutants isolated by in vivo selection methods. These defects vary in severity from complete loss of activity for mutant alpha subunits altered at residue positions 49 and 60 to those, altered elsewhere, that are partially (up to 40 to 50%) defective. The complete inactivation of the proteins altered at the two catalytic residue sites suggest that, as found via in vitro site-specific mutagenesis of the Salmonella typhimurium tryptophan synthetase alpha subunit, both residues probably also participate in a push-pull general acid-base catalysis of indole-3-glycerol phosphate breakdown for the E. coli enzyme as well. Other classes of mutant alpha subunits include some novel types that are defective in their functional interaction with the other tryptophan synthetase component, the beta 2 subunit. Also among the mutant alpha subunits, 19 were found altered at one or another of the 34 conserved residue sites in this portion of the alpha polypeptide sequence; surprisingly, 10 of these have wild-type enzymatic activity, and 16 of these can satisfy growth

  19. Prion propagation in cells expressing PrP glycosylation mutants.

    PubMed

    Salamat, Muhammad K; Dron, Michel; Chapuis, Jérôme; Langevin, Christelle; Laude, Hubert

    2011-04-01

    Infection by prions involves conversion of a host-encoded cell surface protein (PrP(C)) to a disease-related isoform (PrP(Sc)). PrP(C) carries two glycosylation sites variably occupied by complex N-glycans, which have been suggested by previous studies to influence the susceptibility to these diseases and to determine characteristics of prion strains. We used the Rov cell system, which is susceptible to sheep prions, to generate a series of PrP(C) glycosylation mutants with mutations at one or both attachment sites. We examined their subcellular trafficking and ability to convert into PrP(Sc) and to sustain stable prion propagation in the absence of wild-type PrP. The susceptibility to infection of mutants monoglycosylated at either site differed dramatically depending on the amino acid substitution. Aglycosylated double mutants showed overaccumulation in the Golgi compartment and failed to be infected. Introduction of an ectopic glycosylation site near the N terminus fully restored cell surface expression of PrP but not convertibility into PrP(Sc), while PrP(C) with three glycosylation sites conferred cell permissiveness to infection similarly to the wild type. In contrast, predominantly aglycosylated molecules with nonmutated N-glycosylation sequons, produced in cells expressing glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchorless PrP(C), were able to form infectious PrP(Sc). Together our findings suggest that glycosylation is important for efficient trafficking of anchored PrP to the cell surface and sustained prion propagation. However, properly trafficked glycosylation mutants were not necessarily prone to conversion, thus making it difficult in such studies to discern whether the amino acid changes or glycan chain removal most influences the permissiveness to prion infection.

  20. Molecular Determinants of Mutant Phenotypes, Inferred from Saturation Mutagenesis Data

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Arti; Gupta, Kritika; Khare, Shruti; Jain, Pankaj C.; Patel, Siddharth; Kumar, Prasanth; Pulianmackal, Ajai J.; Aghera, Nilesh; Varadarajan, Raghavan

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how mutations affect protein activity and organismal fitness is a major challenge. We used saturation mutagenesis combined with deep sequencing to determine mutational sensitivity scores for 1,664 single-site mutants of the 101 residue Escherichia coli cytotoxin, CcdB at seven different expression levels. Active-site residues could be distinguished from buried ones, based on their differential tolerance to aliphatic and charged amino acid substitutions. At nonactive-site positions, the average mutational tolerance correlated better with depth from the protein surface than with accessibility. Remarkably, similar results were observed for two other small proteins, PDZ domain (PSD95pdz3) and IgG-binding domain of protein G (GB1). Mutational sensitivity data obtained with CcdB were used to derive a procedure for predicting functional effects of mutations. Results compared favorably with those of two widely used computational predictors. In vitro characterization of 80 single, nonactive-site mutants of CcdB showed that activity in vivo correlates moderately with thermal stability and solubility. The inability to refold reversibly, as well as a decreased folding rate in vitro, is associated with decreased activity in vivo. Upon probing the effect of modulating expression of various proteases and chaperones on mutant phenotypes, most deleterious mutants showed an increased in vivo activity and solubility only upon over-expression of either Trigger factor or SecB ATP-independent chaperones. Collectively, these data suggest that folding kinetics rather than protein stability is the primary determinant of activity in vivo. This study enhances our understanding of how mutations affect phenotype, as well as the ability to predict fitness effects of point mutations. PMID:27563054

  1. Characterization of the metabolic effect of β-alanine on markers of oxidative metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sunderland, Kyle L.; Kuennen, Matthew R.; Vaughan, Roger A.

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] β-alanine is a common component of numerous sports supplements purported to improve athletic performance through enhanced carnosine biosynthesis and related intracellular buffering. To date, the effects of β-alanine on oxidative metabolism remain largely unexplored. This work investigated the effects of β-alanine on the expression of proteins which regulate cellular energetics. [Methods] C2C12 myocytes were cultured and differentiated under standard conditions followed by treatment with either β-alanine or isonitrogenous non-metabolizable control D-alanine at 800μM for 24 hours. Metabolic gene and protein expression were quantified by qRT-PCR and immunoblotting, respectively. Glucose uptake and oxygen consumption were measured via fluorescence using commercially available kits. [Results] β-alanine-treated myotubes displayed significantly elevated markers of improved oxidative metabolism including elevated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ (PPARβ/δ) and mitochondrial transcription factor a (TFAM) which led to increased mitochondrial content (evidenced by concurrent increases in cytochrome c content). Additionally, β-alanine-treated cells exhibited significantly increased oxygen consumption compared to control in a PPARβ/δ-dependent manner. β-alanine significantly enhanced expression of myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF-2) leading to increased glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) content. [Conclusion] β-alanine appears to increase cellular oxygen consumption as well as the expression of several cellular proteins associated with improved oxidative metabolism, suggesting β-alanine supplementation may provide additional metabolic benefit (although these observations require in vivo experimental verification). PMID:27508152

  2. DESIGNING ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN SOLVENT SUBSTITUTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since the signing of 1987 Montreal Protocol, reducing and eliminating the use of harmful solvents has become an internationally imminent environmental protection mission. Solvent substitution is an effective way to achieve this goal. The Program for Assisting the Replacement of...

  3. Nucleophilic Substitution by Benzodithioate Anions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnans-Plaisance, Chantal; Gressier, Jean-Claude

    1988-01-01

    Describes a two-session experiment designed to provide a good illustration of, and to improve student knowledge of, the Grignard reaction and nucleophilic substitution. Discusses the procedure, experimental considerations, and conclusion of this experiment. (CW)

  4. Prediction of cancer rescue p53 mutants in silico using Naïve Bayes learning methodology.

    PubMed

    Ramani, R Geetha; Jacob, Shomona Gracia

    2013-11-01

    This research is focussed on predicting through Naïve Bayes learning, the possible p53 rescue mutants from amino-acid substitutions at the second, third and fourth site recombination that could reinstate normal p53 activity. The Naïve Bayes probability values of the amino-acid substitutions at the respective site-wise recombination were utilized to formulate the proposed Genetic Mutant Marker Extraction (GMME) technique that could unearth the hot spot cancer, strong rescue and weak rescue mutants. The p53 mutation records depicting the amino-acid substitutions obtained by yeast assays comprising of nearly 16,700 records, available at the University of California, Machine Learning Repository, were utilized as the training dataset for the GMME technique. The proposed GMME technique revealed the hot spot cancer mutants, strong rescue and weak rescue mutants leading to the detection of probable genetic markers for Cancer prediction from the surface regions 96-289 constituting the second, third and fourth site recombinations. Thus far, computational approaches have been able to predict rescue markers at region-specific mutations (96-105, 114-123, 130-156 and 223- 232) with respect to the second site recombination for three hot spot cancer mutants only viz, P152L, R158L and G245S. The GMME technique aimed at predicting possible rescue markers for p53 mutants at the second, third and fourth site recombinations revealing novel rescue markers for fourteen hot spot cancer mutants. Moreover, the GMME technique can be extended effectively to increasing number of recombinant sites that can be efficiently utilized to predict novel rescue markers.

  5. Design, synthesis and structure-activity relationships of substituted oxazole-benzamide antibacterial inhibitors of FtsZ.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Neil R; Baker, Nicola; Bennett, James M; Chauhan, Pramod K; Collins, Ian; Davies, David T; Gavade, Maruti; Kumar, Dushyant; Lancett, Paul; Macdonald, Rebecca; Macleod, Leanne; Mahajan, Anu; Mitchell, Jeffrey P; Nayal, Narendra; Nayal, Yashodanand Nandan; Pitt, Gary R W; Singh, Mahipal; Yadav, Anju; Srivastava, Anil; Czaplewski, Lloyd G; Haydon, David J

    2014-01-01

    The design, synthesis and structure-activity relationships of a series of oxazole-benzamide inhibitors of the essential bacterial cell division protein FtsZ are described. Compounds had potent anti-staphylococcal activity and inhibited the cytokinesis of the clinically-significant bacterial pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Selected analogues possessing a 5-halo oxazole also inhibited a strain of S. aureus harbouring the glycine-to-alanine amino acid substitution at residue 196 of FtsZ which conferred resistance to previously reported inhibitors in the series. Substitutions to the pseudo-benzylic carbon of the scaffold improved the pharmacokinetic properties by increasing metabolic stability and provided a mechanism for creating pro-drugs. Combining multiple substitutions based on the findings reported in this study has provided small-molecule inhibitors of FtsZ with enhanced in vitro and in vivo antibacterial efficacy.

  6. Ligand and proton exchange dynamics in recombinant human myoglobin mutants.

    PubMed

    Lambright, D G; Balasubramanian, S; Boxer, S G

    1989-05-05

    Site-specific mutants of human myoglobin have been prepared in which lysine 45 is replaced by arginine (K45R) and aspartate 60 by glutamate (D60E), in order to examine the influence of these residues and their interaction on the dynamics of the protein. These proteins were studied by a variety of methods, including one and two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, exchange kinetics for the distal and proximal histidine NH protons as a function of pH in the met cyano forms, flash photolysis of the CO forms, and ligand replacement kinetics. The electronic absorption and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the CO forms of these proteins are virtually identical, indicating that the structure of the heme pocket is unaltered by these mutations. There are, however, substantial changes in the dynamics of both CO binding and proton exchange for the mutant K45R, whereas the mutant D60E exhibits behavior indistinguishable from the reference human myoglobin. K45R has a faster CO bimolecular recombination rate and slower CO off-rate relative to the reference. The kinetics for CO binding are independent of pH (6.5 to 10) as well as ionic strength (0 to 1 M-NaCl). The exchange rate for the distal histidine NH is substantially lower for K45R than the reference, whereas the proximal histidine NH exchange rate is unaltered. The exchange behavior of the human proteins is similar to that reported for a comparison of the exchange rates for myoglobins having lysine at position 45 with sperm whale myoglobin, which has arginine at this position. This indicates that the differences in exchange rates reflects largely the Lys----Arg substitution. The lack of a simple correlation for the CO kinetics with this substitution means that these are sensitive to other factors as well. Specific kinetic models, whereby substitution of arginine for lysine at position 45 can affect ligand binding dynamics, are outlined. These experiments demonstrate that a relatively

  7. Structural characterization of V57D and V57P mutants of human cystatin C, an amyloidogenic protein

    SciTech Connect

    Orlikowska, Marta; Szymańska, Aneta; Skowron, Piotr; Jankowska, Elżbieta

    2013-04-01

    Val57 point mutants of human cystatin C, which were designed to assess the influence of changes in the properties of the L1 loop on the dimerization propensity, were structurally characterized. Wild-type human cystatin C (hCC wt) is a low-molecular-mass protein (120 amino-acid residues, 13 343 Da) that is found in all nucleated cells. Physiologically, it functions as a potent regulator of cysteine protease activity. While the biologically active hCC wt is a monomeric protein, all crystallization efforts to date have resulted in a three-dimensional domain-swapped dimeric structure. In the recently published structure of a mutated hCC, the monomeric fold was preserved by a stabilization of the conformationally constrained loop L1 caused by a single amino-acid substitution: Val57Asn. Additional hCC mutants were obtained in order to elucidate the relationship between the stability of the L1 loop and the propensity of human cystatin C to dimerize. In one mutant Val57 was substituted by an aspartic acid residue, which is favoured in β-turns, and in the second mutant proline, a residue known for broadening turns, was substituted for the same Val57. Here, 2.26 and 3.0 Å resolution crystal structures of the V57D andV57P mutants of hCC are reported and their dimeric architecture is discussed in terms of the stabilization and destabilization effects of the introduced mutations.

  8. Enzymological and mutational analysis of a complex primary hyperoxaluria type I phenotype involving alanine: Glyoxylate aminotransferase peroxisome-to-mitochondrion mistargeting and intraperoxisomal aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Danpure, C.J.; Purdue, P.E.; Allsop, J.; Lumb, M.J.; Jennings, P.R. ); Scheinman, J.I. ); Mauer, S.M. ); Davidson, N.O. )

    1993-08-01

    Primary hyperoxaluri type 1 (PH1) is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by a deficiency of the liver-specific peroxisomal enzyme alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT). Three unrelated PH1 patients, who possess a novel complex phenotype, are described. At the enzymological level, this phenotype is characterized by a complete, or nearly complete, absence of AGT catalytic activity and reduced AGT immunoreactivity. Unlike normal individuals in whom the AGT is confined to the peroxisomal matrix, the immunoreactive AGT in these three patients was distributed approximately equally between the peroxisomes and mitochondria. The peroxisomal AGT appeared to be aggregated into amorphous core-like structures in which no other peroxisomal enzymes could be identified. Mutational analysis of the AGT gene showed that two of the three patients were compound heterozygotes for two previously unrecognized point mutations which caused Gly41[yields]Arg and Phe152[yields]Iso amino acid substitutions. The third patient was shown to be a compound heterozygote for the Gly41[yields]Arg mutation and a previously recognized Gly170[yields]Arg mutation. All three patients were homozygous for the Pro11[yields]Leu polymorphism that had been found previously with a high allelic frequency in normal populations. It is suggested the the Phe152[yields]Iso and Gly170[yields]Arg substitutions, which are only eighteen residues apart and located in the same highly conserved internal region of 58 amino acids, might be involved in the inhibition of peroxisomal targeting and/or import of AGT and, in combination with the Pro11[yields]Leu polymorphism, be responsible for its aberrant mitochondrial compartmentalization. On the other hand, the Gly41[yields]Arg substitution, either in combination with the Pro11[yields]Leu polymorphism or by itself, is predicted to be responsible for the intraperoxisomal aggregation of the AGT protein. 50 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Expression and characterization of glycogen synthase kinase-3 mutants and their effect on glycogen synthase activity in intact cells.

    PubMed Central

    Eldar-Finkelman, H; Argast, G M; Foord, O; Fischer, E H; Krebs, E G

    1996-01-01

    In these studies we expressed and characterized wild-type (WT) GSK-3 (glycogen synthase kinase-3) and its mutants, and examined their physiological effect on glycogen synthase activity. The GSK-3 mutants included mutation at serine-9 either to alanine (S9A) or glutamic acid (S9E) and an inactive mutant, K85,86MA. Expression of WT and the various mutants in a cell-free system indicated that S9A and S9E exhibit increased kinase activity as compared with WT. Subsequently, 293 cells were transiently transfected with WT GSK-3 and mutants. Cells expressing the S9A mutant exhibited higher kinase activity (2.6-fold of control cells) as compared with cells expressing WT and S9E (1.8- and 2.0-fold, respectively, of control cells). Combined, these results suggest serine-9 as a key regulatory site of GSK-3 inactivation, and indicate that glutamic acid cannot mimic the function of the phosphorylated residue. The GSK-3-expressing cell system enabled us to examine whether GSK-3 can induce changes in the endogenous glycogen synthase activity. A decrease in glycogen synthase activity (50%) was observed in cells expressing the S9A mutant. Similarly, glycogen synthase activity was suppressed in cells expressing WT and the S9E mutant (20-30%, respectively). These studies indicate that activation of GSK-3 is sufficient to inhibit glycogen synthase in intact cells, and provide evidence supporting a physiological role for GSK-3 in regulating glycogen synthase and glycogen metabolism. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8816781

  10. Kinetics of NH(4) Assimilation in Zea mays: Preliminary Studies with a Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH1) Null Mutant.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, J R; Ju, G C; Rich, P J; Rhodes, D

    1990-10-01

    In higher plants it is now generally considered that glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) plays only a small or negligible role in ammonia assimilation. To test this specific point, comparative studies of (15)NH(4) (+) assimilation were undertaken with a GDH1-null mutant of Zea mays and a related (but not strictly isogenic) GDH1-positive wild type from which this mutant was derived. The kinetics of (15)NH(4) (+) assimilation into free amino acids and total reduced nitrogen were monitored in both roots and shoots of 2-week-old seedlings supplied with 5 millimolar 99% ((15)NH(4))(2)SO(4) via the aerated root medium in hydroponic culture over a 24-h period. The GDH1-null mutant, with a 10- to 15-fold lower total root GDH activity in comparison to the wild type, was found to exhibit a 40 to 50% lower rate of (15)NH(4) (+) assimilation into total reduced nitrogen. Observed rates of root ammonium assimilation were 5.9 and 3.1 micromoles per hour per gram fresh weight for the wild type and mutant, respectively. The lower rate of (15)NH(4) (+) assimilation in the mutant was associated with lower rates of labeling of several free amino acids (including glutamate, glutamine-amino N, aspartate, asparagine-amino N, and alanine) in both roots and shoots of the mutant in comparison to the wild type. Qualitatively, these labeling kinetics appear consistent with a reduced flux of (15)N via glutamate in the GDH1-null mutant. However, the responses of the two genotypes to the potent inhibitor of glutamine synthetase, methionine sulfoximine, and differences in morphology of the two genotypes (particularly a lower shoot:root ratio in the GDH1-null mutant) urge caution in concluding that GDH1 is solely responsible for these differences in ammonia assimilation rate.

  11. Isotope labeling studies on the formation of multiple addition products of alanine in the pyrolysis residue of glucose/alanine mixtures by high-resolution ESI-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Chu, Fong Lam; Sleno, Lekha; Yaylayan, Varoujan A

    2011-11-09

    Pyrolysis was used as a microscale sample preparation tool to generate glucose/alanine reaction products to minimize the use of expensive labeled precursors in isotope labeling studies. The residue remaining after the pyrolysis at 250 °C was analyzed by electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF-MS). It was observed that a peak at m/z 199.1445 in the ESI-TOF-MS spectrum appeared only when the model system contained at least 2-fold excess alanine. The accurate mass determination indeed indicated the presence of two nitrogen atoms in the molecular formula (C(10)H(18)N(2)O(2)). To verify the origin of the carbon atoms in this unknown compound, model studies with [(13)U(6)]glucose, [(13)C-1]alanine, [(13)C-2]alanine, [(13)C-3]alanine, and [(15)N]alanine were also performed. Glucose furnished six carbon atoms, and alanine provides four carbon (2 × C-2 and 2 × C-3) and two nitrogen atoms. When commercially available fructosylalanine (N-attached to C-1) was reacted with only 1 mol of alanine, a peak at m/z 199.1445 was once again observed. In addition, when 3-deoxyglucosone (3-DG) was reacted with a 2-fold excess of alanine, a peak at m/z 199.1433 was also generated, confirming the points of attachment of the two amino acids at C-1 and C-2 atoms of 3-DG. These studies have indicated that amino acids can undergo multiple addition reactions with 1,2-dicarbonyl compounds such as 3-deoxyglucosone and eventually form a tetrahydropyrazine moiety.

  12. Synthesis and evaluation of 18F labeled alanine derivatives as potential tumor imaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; Zha, Zhihao; Qu, Wenchao; Qiao, Hongwen; Lieberman, Brian P.; Plössl, Karl; Kung, Hank F.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction This paper reports the synthesis and labeling of 18F alanine derivatives. We also investigate their biological characteristics as potential tumor imaging agents mediated by alanine-serine-cysteine preferring (ASC) transporter system. Methods Three new 18F alanine derivatives were prepared from corresponding tosylate-precursors through a two-step labelling reaction. In vitro uptake studies to evaluate and to compare these three analogs were carried out in 9L glioma and PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines. Potential transport mechanisms, protein incorporation and stability of 3-(1-[18F]fluoromethyl)-L-alanine (L[18F]FMA) were investigated in 9L glioma cells. Its biodistribution was determined in a rat-bearing 9L tumor model. PET imaging studies were performed on rat bearing 9L glioma tumors and transgenic mouse carrying spontaneous generated M/tomND tumor (mammary gland adenocarcinoma). Results New 18F alanine derivatives were prepared with 7–34% uncorrected radiochemical yields, excellent enantiomeric purity (>99%) and good radiochemical purity (>99%). In vitro uptake of the L-[18F]FMA in 9L glioma and PC-3 prostate cancer cells was higher than those observed for other two alanine derivatives and [18F]FDG in first 1 h. Inhibition of cell uptake studies suggested that L-[18F]FMA uptake in 9L glioma was predominantly via transport system ASC. After entering into cells, L-[18F]FMA remained stable and was not incorporated into protein within 2 h. In vivo biodistribution studies demonstrated that L-[18F]FMA had relatively high uptake in liver and kidney. Tumor uptake was fast, reaching a maximum within 30 min. The tumor-to-muscle, tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-brain ratios at 60 min post injection were 2.2, 1.9 and 3.0, respectively. In PET imaging studies, tumors were visualized with L-[18F]FMA in both 9L rat and transgenic mouse. Conclusion L-[18F]FMA showed promising properties as a PET imaging agent for up-regulated ASC transporter associated with tumor

  13. β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) perturbs alanine, aspartate and glutamate metabolism pathways in human neuroblastoma cells as determined by metabolic profiling.

    PubMed

    Engskog, Mikael K R; Ersson, Lisa; Haglöf, Jakob; Arvidsson, Torbjörn; Pettersson, Curt; Brittebo, Eva

    2017-02-04

    β-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a non-proteinogenic amino acid that induces long-term cognitive deficits, as well as an increased neurodegeneration and intracellular fibril formation in the hippocampus of adult rodents following short-time neonatal exposure and in vervet monkey brain following long-term exposure. It has also been proposed to be involved in the etiology of neurodegenerative disease in humans. The aim of this study was to identify metabolic effects not related to excitotoxicity or oxidative stress in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. The effects of BMAA (50, 250, 1000 µM) for 24 h on cells differentiated with retinoic acid were studied. Samples were analyzed using LC-MS and NMR spectroscopy to detect altered intracellular polar metabolites. The analysis performed, followed by multivariate pattern recognition techniques, revealed significant perturbations in protein biosynthesis, amino acid metabolism pathways and citrate cycle. Of specific interest were the BMAA-induced alterations in alanine, aspartate and glutamate metabolism and as well as alterations in various neurotransmitters/neuromodulators such as GABA and taurine. The results indicate that BMAA can interfere with metabolic pathways involved in neurotransmission in human neuroblastoma cells.

  14. Quantitative analysis of residual folding and DNA binding in mutant p53 core domain: definition of mutant states for rescue in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Bullock, A N; Henckel, J; Fersht, A R

    2000-03-02

    The tumour suppressor p53 is mutated in half of all human cancers, most frequently with missense substitutions in its core domain. We present a new assessment of the mutation database based on quantitative folding and DNA-binding studies of the isolated core domain. Our data identify five distinct mutant classes that correlate with four well-defined regions of the core domain structure. On extrapolation to 37 degrees C the wild-type protein has a stability of 3.0 kcal/mol. This also emerges as an oncogenic threshold: all beta-sandwich mutants destabilized by this amount (50% denatured) are expected to promote cancer. Other weakly destabilizing mutations are restricted to loop 3 in the DNA-binding region. Drugs that stabilize mutant p53 folding have the potential to reactivate apoptotic signalling pathways in tumour cells either by transactivation-dependent or independent pathways. Using an affinity ligand as a proof of principle we have recovered the thermodynamic stability of the hotspot G245S. With reference states for the five mutant classes as a guide, future therapeutic strategies may similarly stabilize partially structured or binding states of mutant p53 that restore limited p53 pathways to tumour suppression.

  15. Crystal structure of the S187F variant of human liver alanine: glyoxylate [corrected] aminotransferase associated with primary hyperoxaluria type I and its functional implications.

    PubMed

    Oppici, Elisa; Fodor, Krisztian; Paiardini, Alessandro; Williams, Chris; Voltattorni, Carla Borri; Wilmanns, Matthias; Cellini, Barbara

    2013-08-01

    The substitution of Ser187, a residue located far from the active site of human liver peroxisomal alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT), by Phe gives rise to a variant associated with primary hyperoxaluria type I. Unexpectedly, previous studies revealed that the recombinant form of S187F exhibits a remarkable loss of catalytic activity, an increased pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) binding affinity and a different coenzyme binding mode compared with normal AGT. To shed light on the structural elements responsible for these defects, we solved the crystal structure of the variant to a resolution of 2.9 Å. Although the overall conformation of the variant is similar to that of normal AGT, we noticed: (i) a displacement of the PLP-binding Lys209 and Val185, located on the re and si side of PLP, respectively, and (ii) slight conformational changes of other active site residues, in particular Trp108, the base stacking residue with the pyridine cofactor moiety. This active site perturbation results in a mispositioning of the AGT-pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate (PMP) complex and of the external aldimine, as predicted by molecular modeling studies. Taken together, both predicted and observed movements caused by the S187F mutation are consistent with the following functional properties of the variant: (i) a 300- to 500-fold decrease in both the rate constant of L-alanine half-transamination and the kcat of the overall transamination, (ii) a different PMP binding mode and affinity, and (iii) a different microenvironment of the external aldimine. Proposals for the treatment of patients bearing S187F mutation are discussed on the basis of these results.

  16. Substitution at aspartic acid 1128 in the SARS coronavirus spike glycoprotein mediates escape from a S2 domain-targeting neutralizing monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Ng, Oi-Wing; Keng, Choong-Tat; Leung, Cynthia Sau-Wai; Peiris, J S Malik; Poon, Leo Lit Man; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2014-01-01

    The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is the etiological agent for the infectious disease, SARS, which first emerged 10 years ago. SARS-CoV is a zoonotic virus that has crossed the species barriers to infect humans. Bats, which harbour a diverse pool of SARS-like CoVs (SL-CoVs), are believed to be the natural reservoir. The SARS-CoV surface Spike (S) protein is a major antigenic determinant in eliciting neutralizing antibody production during SARS-CoV infection. In our previous work, we showed that a panel of murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target the S2 subunit of the S protein are capable of neutralizing SARS-CoV infection in vitro (Lip KM et al, J Virol. 2006 Jan; 80(2): 941-50). In this study, we report our findings on the characterization of one of these mAbs, known as 1A9, which binds to the S protein at a novel epitope within the S2 subunit at amino acids 1111-1130. MAb 1A9 is a broadly neutralizing mAb that prevents viral entry mediated by the S proteins of human and civet SARS-CoVs as well as bat SL-CoVs. By generating mutant SARS-CoV that escapes the neutralization by mAb 1A9, the residue D1128 in S was found to be crucial for its interaction with mAb 1A9. S protein containing the substitution of D1128 with alanine (D1128A) exhibited a significant decrease in binding capability to mAb 1A9 compared to wild-type S protein. By using a pseudotyped viral entry assay, it was shown that the D1128A substitution in the escape virus allows it to overcome the viral entry blockage by mAb 1A9. In addition, the D1128A mutation was found to exert no effects on the S protein cell surface expression and incorporation into virion particles, suggesting that the escape virus retains the same viral entry property as the wild-type virus.

  17. Substitution at Aspartic Acid 1128 in the SARS Coronavirus Spike Glycoprotein Mediates Escape from a S2 Domain-Targeting Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Oi-Wing; Keng, Choong-Tat; Leung, Cynthia Sau-Wai; Peiris, J. S. Malik; Poon, Leo Lit Man; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2014-01-01

    The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is the etiological agent for the infectious disease, SARS, which first emerged 10 years ago. SARS-CoV is a zoonotic virus that has crossed the species barriers to infect humans. Bats, which harbour a diverse pool of SARS-like CoVs (SL-CoVs), are believed to be the natural reservoir. The SARS-CoV surface Spike (S) protein is a major antigenic determinant in eliciting neutralizing antibody production during SARS-CoV infection. In our previous work, we showed that a panel of murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target the S2 subunit of the S protein are capable of neutralizing SARS-CoV infection in vitro (Lip KM et al, J Virol. 2006 Jan; 80(2): 941–50). In this study, we report our findings on the characterization of one of these mAbs, known as 1A9, which binds to the S protein at a novel epitope within the S2 subunit at amino acids 1111–1130. MAb 1A9 is a broadly neutralizing mAb that prevents viral entry mediated by the S proteins of human and civet SARS-CoVs as well as bat SL-CoVs. By generating mutant SARS-CoV that escapes the neutralization by mAb 1A9, the residue D1128 in S was found to be crucial for its interaction with mAb 1A9. S protein containing the substitution of D1128 with alanine (D1128A) exhibited a significant decrease in binding capability to mAb 1A9 compared to wild-type S protein. By using a pseudotyped viral entry assay, it was shown that the D1128A substitution in the escape virus allows it to overcome the viral entry blockage by mAb 1A9. In addition, the D1128A mutation was found to exert no effects on the S protein cell surface expression and incorporation into virion particles, suggesting that the escape virus retains the same viral entry property as the wild-type virus. PMID:25019613

  18. A genetic system to identify DNA polymerase β mutator mutants

    PubMed Central

    Washington, Stacy L.; Yoon, Margaret S.; Chagovetz, Alexander M.; Li, Shu-Xia; Clairmont, Caroline A.; Preston, Bradley D.; Eckert, Kristin A.; Sweasy, Joann B.

    1997-01-01

    DNA polymerase β (pol β) is a 39-kDa protein that functions in DNA repair processes in mammalian cells. As a first step toward understanding mechanisms of polymerase fidelity, we developed a genetic method to identify mammalian pol β mutator mutants. This screen takes advantage of a microbial genetics assay and the ability of rat pol β to substitute for Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I in DNA replication in vivo. Using this screen, we identified 13 candidate pol β mutator mutants. Three of the candidate mutator mutants were further characterized in vivo and shown to confer an increased spontaneous mutation frequency over that of wild-type pol β to our bacterial strain. Purification and subsequent analysis of one of our putative mutator proteins, the pol β-14 protein, showed that it possesses intrinsic mutator activity in four different assays that measure the fidelity of DNA synthesis. Therefore, residue 265, which is altered in pol β-14 and another of our mutant proteins, pol β-166, is probably critical for accurate DNA synthesis by pol β. Thus, our genetic method of screening for pol β mutator mutants is useful in identifying active mammalian DNA polymerase mutants that encode enzymes that catalyze DNA synthesis with altered fidelity compared with the wild-type pol β enzyme. PMID:9037051

  19. Compromised mutant EFEMP1 secretion associated with macular dystrophy remedied by proteostasis network alteration.

    PubMed

    Hulleman, John D; Kaushal, Shalesh; Balch, William E; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2011-12-01

    An Arg345Trp (R345W) mutation in epidermal growth factor-containing, fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1 (EFEMP1) causes its inefficient secretion and the macular dystrophy malattia leventinese/Doyne honeycomb retinal dystrophy (ML/DHRD). To understand the influence of the protein homeostasis (or proteostasis) network in rescuing mutant EFEMP1 misfolding and inefficient secretion linked to ML/DHRD, we developed a convenient and sensitive cell-based luminescence assay to monitor secretion versus intracellular accumulation. Fusing EFEMP1 to Gaussia luciferase faithfully recapitulates mutant EFEMP1 secretion defects observed previously using more cumbersome methodology. To understand what governs mutant intracellular retention, we generated a series of R345 mutants. These mutants revealed that aromatic residue substitutions (i.e., Trp, Tyr, and Phe) at position 345 cause significant EFEMP1 secretion deficiencies. These secretion defects appear to be caused, in part, by reduced native disulfide bonding in domain 6 harboring the 345 position. Finally, we demonstrate that mutant EFEMP1 secretion and proper disulfide formation are enhanced by adaptation of the cellular environment by a reduced growth temperature and/or translational attenuation. This study highlights the mechanisms underlying the inefficient secretion of R345W EFEMP1 and demonstrates that alteration of the proteostasis network may provide a strategy to alleviate or delay the onset of this macular dystrophy.

  20. Compromised mutant EFEMP1 secretion associated with macular dystrophy remedied by proteostasis network alteration

    PubMed Central

    Hulleman, John D.; Kaushal, Shalesh; Balch, William E.; Kelly, Jeffery W.

    2011-01-01

    An Arg345Trp (R345W) mutation in epidermal growth factor–containing, fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1 (EFEMP1) causes its inefficient secretion and the macular dystrophy malattia leventinese/Doyne honeycomb retinal dystrophy (ML/DHRD). To understand the influence of the protein homeostasis (or proteostasis) network in rescuing mutant EFEMP1 misfolding and inefficient secretion linked to ML/DHRD, we developed a convenient and sensitive cell-based luminescence assay to monitor secretion versus intracellular accumulation. Fusing EFEMP1 to Gaussia luciferase faithfully recapitulates mutant EFEMP1 secretion defects observed previously using more cumbersome methodology. To understand what governs mutant intracellular retention, we generated a series of R345 mutants. These mutants revealed that aromatic residue substitutions (i.e., Trp, Tyr, and Phe) at position 345 cause significant EFEMP1 secretion deficiencies. These secretion defects appear to be caused, in part, by reduced native disulfide bonding in domain 6 harboring the 345 position. Finally, we demonstrate that mutant EFEMP1 secretion and proper disulfide formation are enhanced by adaptation of the cellular environment by a reduced growth temperature and/or translational attenuation. This study highlights the mechanisms underlying the inefficient secretion of R345W EFEMP1 and demonstrates that alteration of the proteostasis network may provide a strategy to alleviate or delay the onset of this macular dystrophy. PMID:22031286

  1. Comparative metabolic flux analysis of an Ashbya gossypii wild type strain and a high riboflavin-producing mutant strain.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Bo-Young; Wittmann, Christoph; Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Enoch Y

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we analyzed the central metabolic pathway of an Ashbya gossypii wild type strain and a riboflavin over-producing mutant strain developed in a previous study in order to characterize the riboflavin over-production pathway. (13)C-Metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) was carried out in both strains, and the resulting data were fit to a steady-state flux isotopomer model using OpenFLUX. Flux to pentose-5-phosphate (P5P) via the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) was 9% higher in the mutant strain compared to the wild type strain. The flux from purine synthesis to riboflavin in the mutant strain was 1.6%, while that of the wild type strain was only 0.1%, a 16-fold difference. In addition, the flux from the cytoplasmic pyruvate pool to the extracellular metabolites, pyruvate, lactate, and alanine, was 2-fold higher in the mutant strain compared to the wild type strain. This result demonstrates that increased guanosine triphosphate (GTP) flux through the PPP and purine synthesis pathway (PSP) increased riboflavin production in the mutant strain. The present study provides the first insight into metabolic flux through the central carbon pathway in A. gossypii and sets the foundation for development of a quantitative and functional model of the A. gossypii metabolic network.

  2. Assembly of D-alanyl-lipoteichoic acid in Lactobacillus casei: mutants deficient in the D-alanyl ester content of this amphiphile

    SciTech Connect

    Ntamere, A.S.; Taron, D.J.; Neuhaus, F.C.

    1987-04-01

    D-Alanyl-lipoteichoic acid (D-alanyl-LTA) from Lactobacillus casei ATCC 7469 contains a poly(glycerophosphate) moiety that is acylated with D-alanyl ester residues. The physiological function of these residues is not well understood. Five mutant strains of this organism that are deficient in the esters of this amphiphile were isolated and characterized. When compared with the parent, strains AN-1 and AN-4 incorporated less than 10% of D-(/sup 14/C)alanine into LTA, whereas AN-2, AN-3, and AN-5 incorporated 50%. The synthesis of D-(/sup 14/C)alanyl-lipophilic LTA was virtually absent in the first group and was approximately 30% in the second group. The mutant strains synthesized and selected the glycolipid anchor for LTA assembly. In addition, all of the strains synthesized the poly(glycerophosphate) moiety of LTA to the same extent as did the parent or to a greater extent. It was concluded that the membranes from the mutant strains AN-1 and AN-4 are defective for D-alanylation of LTA even though acceptor LTA is present. Mutant strains AN-2 and AN-3 appear to be partially deficient in the amount of the D-alanine-activating enzyme. Aberrant morphology and defective cell separation appear to result from this deficiency in D-alanyl ester content.

  3. Selection of chemotaxis mutants of Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    A method has been developed for the efficient selection of chemotaxis mutants of Dictyostelium discoideum. Mutants defective in the chemotactic response to folate could be enriched up to 30-fold in one round of selection using a chamber in which a compartment that contained the chemoattractant was separated by a sandwich of four nitrocellulose filters from a compartment that contained buffer. Mutagenized cells were placed in the center of the filter layer and exposed to the attractant gradient built up between the compartments for a period of 3-4 h. While wild-type cells moved through the filters in a wave towards the compartment that contained attractant, mutant cells remained in the filter to which they were applied. After several repetitions of the selection procedure, mutants defective in chemotaxis made up 10% of the total cell population retained in that filter. Mutants exhibiting three types of alterations were collected: motility mutants with either reduced speed of movement, or altered rates of turning; a single mutant defective in production of the attractant- degrading enzyme, folate deaminase; and mutants with normal motility but reduced chemotactic responsiveness. One mutant showed drastically reduced sensitivity in folate-induced cGMP production. Morphogenetic alterations of mutants defective in folate chemotaxis are described. PMID:3793759

  4. Effect of glucose, independent of changes in insulin and glucagon secretion, on alanine metabolism in the conscious dog.

    PubMed Central

    Shulman, G I; Lacy, W W; Liljenquist, J E; Keller, U; Williams, P E; Cherrington, A D

    1980-01-01

    To study the effects of hyperglycemia on the metabolism of alanine and lactate independent of changes in plasma insulin and glucagon, glucose was infused into five 36-h-fasted dogs along with somatostatin and constant replacement amounts of both insulin and glucagon. Hepatic uptakes of alanine and lactate were calculated using the arteriovenous difference technique. [14C]Alanine was infused to measure the conversion of alanine and lactate into glucose. Hyperglycemia (delta 115 mg/dl) of 2 h duration caused the plasma alanine level to increase by over 50%. This change was caused by an increase in the inflow of alanine into plasma since the net hepatic uptake of the amino acid did not change. Taken together, the above findings indicate that glucose per se can significantly impair the fractional extraction of alanine by the liver. Hepatic extraction of lactate was also affected by hyperglycemia and had fallen to zero within 90 min of starting the glucose infusion. This fall was associated with a doubling of arterial lactate level. Conversion of [14C]-alanine and [14C]lactate into [14C]glucose was suppressed by 60 +/- 11% after 2 h of hyperglycemia, and because this fall could not be entirely accounted for by decreased lactate extraction an inhibitory effect of glucose on gluconeogenesis within the liver is suggested. These studies indicate that the plasma glucose level per se can be an important determinant of the level of alanine and lactate in plasma as well as the rate at which they are converted to glucose. PMID:7356691

  5. 14 CFR 1260.55 - Reports substitution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS General Special Conditions § 1260.55 Reports substitution. Reports Substitution October 2000 Technical Reports may be substituted for the required Performance Reports. The title page of such reports... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reports substitution. 1260.55 Section...

  6. 14 CFR 1260.55 - Reports substitution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS General Special Conditions § 1260.55 Reports substitution. Reports Substitution October 2000 Technical Reports may be substituted for the required Performance Reports. The title page of such reports... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reports substitution. 1260.55 Section...

  7. 14 CFR 1260.55 - Reports substitution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS General Special Conditions § 1260.55 Reports substitution. Reports Substitution October 2000 Technical Reports may be substituted for the required Performance Reports. The title page of such reports... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reports substitution. 1260.55 Section...

  8. 14 CFR 1260.55 - Reports substitution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS General Special Conditions § 1260.55 Reports substitution. Reports Substitution October 2000 Technical Reports may be substituted for the required Performance Reports. The title page of such reports... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Reports substitution. 1260.55 Section...

  9. Predicting a double mutant in the twilight zone of low homology modeling for the skeletal muscle voltage-gated sodium channel subunit beta-1 (Nav1.4 β1)

    PubMed Central

    Scior, Thomas; Paiz-Candia, Bertin; Islas, Ángel A.; Sánchez-Solano, Alfredo; Millan-Perez Peña, Lourdes; Mancilla-Simbro, Claudia; Salinas-Stefanon, Eduardo M.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular structure modeling of the β1 subunit of the skeletal muscle voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav1.4) was carried out in the twilight zone of very low homology. Structural significance can per se be confounded with random sequence similarities. Hence, we combined (i) not automated computational modeling of weakly homologous 3D templates, some with interfaces to analogous structures to the pore-bearing Nav1.4 α subunit with (ii) site-directed mutagenesis (SDM), as well as (iii) electrophysiological experiments to study the structure and function of the β1 subunit. Despite the distant phylogenic relationships, we found a 3D-template to identify two adjacent amino acids leading to the long-awaited loss of function (inactivation) of Nav1.4 channels. This mutant type (T109A, N110A, herein called TANA) was expressed and tested on cells of hamster ovary (CHO). The present electrophysiological results showed that the double alanine substitution TANA disrupted channel inactivation as if the β1 subunit would not be in complex with the α subunit. Exhaustive and unbiased sampling of “all β proteins” (Ig-like, Ig) resulted in a plethora of 3D templates which were compared to the target secondary structure prediction. The location of TANA was made possible thanks to another “all β protein” structure in complex with an irreversible bound protein as well as a reversible protein–protein interface (our “Rosetta Stone” effect). This finding coincides with our electrophysiological data (disrupted β1-like voltage dependence) and it is safe to utter that the Nav1.4 α/β1 interface is likely to be of reversible nature. PMID:25904995

  10. [Kinetics and equilibrium of reactions between nucleotides and methylol derivatives of beta-alanine].

    PubMed

    Khulordava, K G; Kosaganov, Iu N; Lazurkin, Iu S

    1978-01-01

    The rate constants of forward and reverse reactions between methylol derivatives of beta-alanine and deoxycytidine 5'-phosphate, deoxyadenosine 5'phosphate and deoxyguanosine 5'phosphate and the equilibrium constants of these reactions were determined by the spectrophotometric method at 39,5 degrees C and pH 6,95. Besides, the equilibrium constant of the reaction between beta-alanine and formaldehyde was determined. Unlike deoxycytidine and deoxyadenosine 5'-phosphates, interaction of deoxyguanosine 5'phosphate with methylol derivatives is more complicated. A model proposed for the interaction of deoxyguanosine 5'phosphate with methylol derivatives explains the behavior of this nucleotide in the reaction. The kinetic and equilibrium constants of the interaction of methylol derivatives with nucleotides investigated exceed by two or three orders of magnitude the corresponding constants of the interaction of formaldehyde with these nucleotides.

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of an alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus megaterium WSH-002.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaoyun; Yi, Qiufen; Zhang, Guofang; Zhu, Xianming; Zhou, Honggang; Dong, Hui

    2013-08-01

    Alanine dehydrogenase (L-AlaDH) from Bacillus megaterium WSH-002 catalyses the NAD⁺-dependent interconversion of L-alanine and pyruvate. The enzyme was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells and purified with a His6 tag by Ni²⁺-chelating affinity chromatography for X-ray crystallographic analysis. Crystals were grown in a solution consisting of 0.1 M HEPES pH 8.0, 12%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 8000, 8%(v/v) ethylene glycol at a concentration of 15 mg ml⁻¹ purified protein. The crystal diffracted to 2.35 Å resolution and belonged to the trigonal space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 125.918, c = 144.698 Å.

  12. Adsorption of di-l-alanine on Cu(110) investigated with scanning tunneling microscopy [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stensgaard, I.

    2003-11-01

    Sub-monolayer growth of a small chiral peptide, di- L-alanine, on Cu(1 1 0) was investigated by variable temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). At low coverage and for temperatures above ≈-220 K the molecules nucleate along the [ 3¯ 3 2] direction to form short, mainly one-dimensional islands. An increase in coverage leads to the formation of [ 3¯ 3 2]-directed, elongated islands. Images with sub-molecular resolution reveal that the orientation of the molecules within one particular island depends on the deposition temperature. At higher coverage, up to one monolayer, the islands coalesce, giving rise to phase boundaries between domains of opposite orientation. An atomic-scale model for di- L-alanine on Cu(1 1 0) is presented.

  13. Unusual hydroxyl migration in the fragmentation of β-alanine dication in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Piekarski, Dariusz Grzegorz; Delaunay, Rudy; Maclot, Sylvain; Adoui, Lamri; Martín, Fernando; Alcamí, Manuel; Huber, Bernd A; Rousseau, Patrick; Domaracka, Alicja; Díaz-Tendero, Sergio

    2015-07-14

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of the fragmentation of doubly positively charged β-alanine molecules in the gas phase. The dissociation of the produced dicationic molecules, induced by low-energy ion collisions, is analysed by coincidence mass spectrometric techniques; the coupling with ab initio molecular dynamics simulations allows rationalisation of the experimental observations. The present strategy gives deeper insights into the chemical mechanisms of multiply charged amino acids in the gas phase. In the case of the β-alanine dication, in addition to the expected Coulomb explosion and hydrogen migration processes, we have found evidence of hydroxyl-group migration, which leads to unusual fragmentation products, such as hydroxymethyl cation, and is necessary to explain some of the observed dominant channels.

  14. Formation of homochiral glycine/Cu(111) quantum corral array realized using alanine nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Miki; Huang, Hui; Kanazawa, Ken; Taninaka, Atsushi; Yoshida, Shoji; Takeuchi, Osamu; Shigekawa, Hidemi

    2015-08-01

    Glycine has enantiomeric isomers on a Cu(111) surface through the dissociation of hydrogen from the carboxyl group and forms an array of quantum corrals of ∼1.3 nm diameter. Stable homo-chiral glycinate trimers are formed in the first step, which subsequently form a network with a hexagonal arrangement. However, domains with R- or S-chirality coexist with the same probability. On the other hand, α-alanine has D- and L-chirality in nature and forms a similar quantum corral array on Cu(111) with R- and S-chirality, respectively. Here, by using α-alanine molecules as nuclei, the chirality of glycine molecules was controlled and a homochiral quantum corral array was successfully formed, which indicates the possibility that the optical isomers can be separated through a method such as preferential crystallization.

  15. Chiral effects on helicity studied via the energy landscape of short (D, L)-alanine peptides.

    PubMed

    Neelamraju, Sridhar; Oakley, Mark T; Johnston, Roy L

    2015-10-28

    The homochirality of natural amino acids facilitates the formation of regular secondary structures such as α-helices and β-sheets. Here, we study the relationship between chirality and backbone structure for the example of hexa-alanine. The most stable stereoisomers are identified through global optimisation. Further, the energy landscape, a database of connected low-energy local minima and transition points, is constructed for various neutral and zwitterionic stereoisomers of hexa-alanine. Three order parameters for partial helicity are applied and metric disconnectivity graphs are presented with partial helicity as a metric. We also apply the Zimm-Bragg model to derive average partial helicities for Ace-(L-Ala)6-NHMe, Ace-(D-Ala-L-Ala)3-NHMe, and Ace-(L-Ala)3-(D-Ala)3-NHMe from the database of local minima and compare with previous studies.

  16. Membrane topology of the electrogenic aspartate-alanine antiporter AspT of Tetragenococcus halophilus.

    PubMed

    Nanatani, Kei; Ohonishi, Fumito; Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Tasuku; Abe, Keietsu

    2005-03-04

    AspT is an electrogenic aspartate:alanine exchange protein that represents the vectorial component of a proton-motive metabolic cycle found in some strains of Tetragenococcus halophilus. AspT is the sole member of a new family, the Aspartate: Alanine Exchanger (AAE) family, in secondary transporters, according to the computational classification proposed by Saier et al. (http://www.biology.ucsd.edu/~msaier/transport/). We analyzed the topology of AspT biochemically, by using fusion methods in combination with alkaline phosphatase or beta-lactamase. These results suggested that AspT has a unique topology; 8 TMS, a large cytoplasmic loop (183 amino acids) between TMS5 and TMS6, and N- and C-termini that both face the periplasm. These results demonstrated a unique 2D-structure of AspT as the novel AAE family.

  17. The potential of mean force surface for the alanine dipeptide in aqueous solution: a theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery Pettitt, B.; Karplus, Martin

    1985-11-01

    Results of an application of integral equation theory to the determination of the intramolecular potential of mean force for the alanine dipeptide. N-methyl alanine acetamide, in aqueous solution are presented. The calculations are based on Ornstein—Zernike-like equations for polar systems with an intramolecular superposition approximation. The solvated free energy surface for the dipeptide as a function of the dihedral angles φ and ψ (Ramachandran plot) is determined and compared with the vaccum surface calculations. Conformations that are essentially forbidden in vaccum are found to be significant in aqueous solution. The solvent contributions to the free energy surface are decomposed into enthalpic and entropic terms. Possible applications and extensions of the method are outlined.

  18. Equine endurance exercise alters serum branched-chain amino acid and alanine concentrations.

    PubMed

    Trottier, N L; Nielsen, B D; Lang, K J; Ku, P K; Schott, H C

    2002-09-01

    Six 2-year-old Arabian horses were used to determine whether 60 km prolonged endurance exercise (approximately 4 h) alters amino acid concentrations in serum and muscle, and the time required for serum amino acid concentrations to return to basal resting values. Blood and muscle samples were collected throughout exercise and during a 3 day recovery period. Isoleucine concentration in muscle tended to increase and leucine and valine did not change due to exercise. Serum alanine concentrations did not increase immediately after exercise, but increased at 24, 48 and 72 h postexercise. Serum isoleucine, leucine, and valine concentrations decreased after exercise and time required to reach pre-exercising concentrations was 48 h. In conclusion, endurance exercise in the horse decreases serum isoleucine, leucine, and valine concentrations, and increases serum alanine concentration. The decrease in serum branched-chain amino acid concentrations did not correspond to a measurable increase in total muscle branched-chain amino acid concentrations.

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray data analysis of β-alanine synthase from Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Lundgren, Stina; Andersen, Birgit; Piškur, Jure; Dobritzsch, Doreen

    2007-10-01

    β-Alanine synthase catalyzes the last step in the reductive degradation pathway for uracil and thymine. Crystals of the recombinant enzyme from D. melanogaster belong to space group C2. Diffraction data to 3.3 Å resolution were collected and analyzed. β-Alanine synthase catalyzes the last step in the reductive degradation pathway for uracil and thymine, which represents the main clearance route for the widely used anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil. Crystals of the recombinant enzyme from Drosophila melanogaster, which is closely related to the human enzyme, were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. They diffracted to 3.3 Å at a synchrotron-radiation source, belong to space group C2 (unit-cell parameters a = 278.9, b = 95.0, c = 199.3 Å, β = 125.8°) and contain 8–10 molecules per asymmetric unit.

  20. Response of the alanine/ESR dosimeter to radiation from an Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy source.

    PubMed

    Anton, M; Hackel, T; Zink, K; von Voigts-Rhetz, P; Selbach, H-J

    2015-01-07

    The response of the alanine dosimeter to radiation from an Ir-192 source with respect to the absorbed dose to water, relative to Co-60 radiation, was determined experimentally as well as by Monte Carlo simulations. The experimental and Monte Carlo results for the response agree well within the limits of uncertainty. The relative response decreases with an increasing distance between the measurement volume and the source from approximately 98% at a 1 cm distance to 96% at 5 cm. The present data are more accurate, but agree well with data published by Schaeken et al (2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 6625-34). The decrease of the relative response with an increasing distance that had already been observed by these authors is confirmed. In the appendix, the properties of the alanine dosimeter with respect to volume and sensitivity corrections are investigated. The inhomogeneous distribution of the detection probability that was taken into account for the analysis was determined experimentally.

  1. An improved reversibly dimerizing mutant of the FK506-binding protein FKBP

    PubMed Central

    Barrero, Juan J.; Papanikou, Effrosyni; Casler, Jason C.; Day, Kasey J.; Glick, Benjamin S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT FK506-binding protein (FKBP) is a monomer that binds to FK506, rapamycin, and related ligands. The F36M substitution, in which Phe36 in the ligand-binding pocket is changed to Met, leads to formation of antiparallel FKBP dimers, which can be dissociated into monomers by ligand binding. This FKBP(M) mutant has been employed in the mammalian secretory pathway to generate aggregates that can be dissolved by ligand addition to create cargo waves. However, when testing this approach in yeast, we found that dissolution of FKBP(M) aggregates was inefficient. An improved reversibly dimerizing FKBP formed aggregates that dissolved more readily. This FKBP(L,V) mutant carries the F36L mutation, which increases the affinity of ligand binding, and the I90V mutation, which accelerates ligand-induced dissociation of the dimers. The FKBP(L,V) mutant expands the utility of reversibly dimerizing FKBP. PMID:27738551

  2. [High throughput screening atrazine chlorohydrolase mutants with enhanced activity through Haematococcus pluvialis expression system].

    PubMed

    Wang, Huizhuan; Chen, Xiwen; Hao, Xiaohua; Chen, Defu

    2011-04-01

    Developing a high-throughput screening method is of great importance for directed evolution of atrazine chlorohydrolase. A mutagenesis library of atzA from Pseudomonas sp. ADP and Arthrobacter sp. AD1 was constructed using error-prone PCR and DNA shuffling. Candidate mutants were screened through Haematococcus pluvialis expression system, using atrazine as selection pressure. Sequence analysis showed that mutations in the obtained 12 mutants with enhanced activity were all point-substitutions and scattered throughout the gene. Enzymatic activity analysis showed that the mutants all had higher activities than that of the wild type. The activities were 1.8-3.6 fold of the wild-type enzyme when cultured in BBM medium with 1 mg/L atrazine, whereas 1.8-2.6 fold with 2 mg/L atrazine. These results indicated that Haematococcus pluvialis expression system is an ideal high throughput screening system for directed evolution of atrazine chlorohydrolase.

  3. Sugar substitutes, chewing gum and dental caries--a review.

    PubMed

    Edgar, W M

    1998-01-10

    The prevalent use of chewing gum has prompted interest in its dental effects. Important defining aspects are the ability to use sugar substitutes in gum manufacture and the prolonged stimulation of a protective flow of saliva. The main sugar substitutes used are sorbitol and xylitol. Because it is not fermented by oral bacteria, xylitol is considered to be non-cariogenic, and while sorbitol in solution can be fermented slowly by mutants streptococci, chewing sorbitol-sweetened gum does not cause a fall in plaque pH. Effects of chewing sugar-free gum on the ability of plaque to form acid from sucrose are equivocal, although the tendency is for the plaque acidogenicity to be reduced with the use of xylitol gum for 2-3 weeks, due to its inhibitory effects on mutants streptococci. Gum-chewing also stimulates a protective salivary flow when used after an acidogenic stimulus, and may enhance salivary function, especially in subjects with low flow rates. Sorbitol and xylitol gums have similar beneficial effects in promoting enamel remineralisation in short-term in-situ experiments. Clinical trials indicate that xylitol gum has a useful anticaries role, superior to the effects of sorbitol gum. In conclusion, both sorbitol and xylitol chewing gums are non-cariogenic in contrast to sugared gum, and exhibit beneficial anticaries properties through salivary stimulation. In addition, xylitol's antibacterial properties seem likely to lead to caries reductions superior to the more modest reductions with sorbitol gum.

  4. Mutant lamin A links prophase to a p53 independent senescence program

    PubMed Central

    Moiseeva, Olga; Lessard, Frédéric; Acevedo-Aquino, Mariana; Vernier, Mathieu; Tsantrizos, Youla S; Ferbeyre, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Expression of oncogenes or short telomeres can trigger an anticancer response known as cellular senescence activating the p53 and RB tumor suppressor pathways. This mechanism is switched off in most tumor cells by mutations in p53 and RB signaling pathways. Surprisingly, p53 disabled tumor cells could be forced into senescence by expression of a mutant allele of the nuclear envelope protein lamin A. The pro-senescence lamin A mutant contains a deletion in the sequence required for processing by the protease ZMPSTE24 leading to accumulation of farnesylated lamin A in the nuclear envelope. In addition, the serine at position 22, a target for CDK1-dependent phosphorylation, was mutated to alanine, preventing CDK1-catalyzed nuclear envelope disassembly. The accumulation of this mutant lamin A compromised prophase to prometaphase transition leading to invaginations of the nuclear lamina, nuclear fragmentation and impaired chromosome condensation. Cells exited this impaired mitosis without cytokinesis and re-replicated their DNA ultimately arresting in interphase as polyploid cells with features of cellular senescence including increased expression of inflammatory gene products and a significant reduction of tumorigenicity in vivo. PMID:26029982

  5. Altered Fermentative Metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Mutants Lacking Pyruvate Formate Lyase and Both Pyruvate Formate Lyase and Alcohol Dehydrogenase[W

    PubMed Central

    Catalanotti, Claudia; Dubini, Alexandra; Subramanian, Venkataramanan; Yang, Wenqiang; Magneschi, Leonardo; Mus, Florence; Seibert, Michael; Posewitz, Matthew C.; Grossman, Arthur R.

    2012-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a unicellular green alga, often experiences hypoxic/anoxic soil conditions that activate fermentation metabolism. We isolated three Chlamydomonas mutants disrupted for the pyruvate formate lyase (PFL1) gene; the encoded PFL1 protein catalyzes a major fermentative pathway in wild-type Chlamydomonas cells. When the pfl1 mutants were subjected to dark fermentative conditions, they displayed an increased flux of pyruvate to lactate, elevated pyruvate decarboxylation, ethanol accumulation, diminished pyruvate oxidation by pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and lowered H2 production. The pfl1-1 mutant also accumulated high intracellular levels of lactate, succinate, alanine, malate, and fumarate. To further probe the system, we generated a double mutant (pfl1-1 adh1) that is unable to synthesize both formate and ethanol. This strain, like the pfl1 mutants, secreted lactate, but it also exhibited a significant increase in the levels of extracellular glycerol, acetate, and intracellular reduced sugars and a decrease in dark, fermentative H2 production. Whereas wild-type Chlamydomonas fermentation primarily produces formate and ethanol, the double mutant reroutes glycolytic carbon to lactate and glycerol. Although the metabolic adjustments observed in the mutants facilitate NADH reoxidation and sustained glycolysis under dark, anoxic conditions, the observed changes could not have been predicted given our current knowledge of the regulation of fermentation metabolism. PMID:22353371

  6. Influence of lysine content and pH on the stability of alanine-based copolypeptides.

    PubMed

    Vila, J A; Ripoll, D R; Scheraga, H A

    2001-03-01

    To account for the relative contributions of lysine and alanine residues to the stability of alpha-helices of copolymers of these two residues, conformational energy calculations were carried out for several hexadecapeptides at several pHs. All the calculations considered explicitly the coupling between the conformation of the molecule and the ionization equilibria as a function of pH. The total free energy function used in these calculations included terms that account for the solvation free energy and free energy of ionization. These terms were evaluated by means of a fast multigrid boundary element method. Reasonable agreement with experimental values was obtained for the helix contents and vicinal coupling constants ((3)J(HNalpha)). The helix contents were found to depend strongly on the lysine content, in agreement with recent experimental results of Williams et al. (Journal of the American Chemical Society, 1998, Vol. 120, pp. 11033-11043) In the lowest energy conformation computed for a hexadecapeptide containing 3 lysine residues at pH 6, the lysine side chains are preferentially hydrated; this decreases the hydration of the backbone CO and NH groups, thereby forcing the latter to form hydrogen bonds with each other in the helical conformation. The lowest energy conformation computed for a hexadecapeptide containing 6 lysine residues at pH 6 shows a close proximity between the NH3(+) groups of the lysine side chains, a feature that was previously observed in calculations of short alanine-based oligopeptides. The calculation on a blocked 16-mer of alanine shows a 7% helix content based on the Boltzmann averaged vicinal coupling constants computed from the dihedral angles phi, consistent with previous experimental evidence on triblock copolymers containing a central block of alanines, and with earlier theoretical calculations.

  7. Photochemical redox reactions of copper(II)-alanine complexes in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chen-Jui; Hsu, Chao-Sheng; Wang, Po-Yen; Lin, Yi-Liang; Lo, Yu-Shiu; Wu, Chien-Hou

    2014-05-19

    The photochemical redox reactions of Cu(II)/alanine complexes have been studied in deaerated solutions over an extensive range of pH, Cu(II) concentration, and alanine concentration. Under irradiation, the ligand-to-metal charge transfer results in the reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(I) and the concomitant oxidation of alanine, which produces ammonia and acetaldehyde. Molar absorptivities and quantum yields of photoproducts for Cu(II)/alanine complexes at 313 nm are characterized mainly with the equilibrium Cu(II) speciation where the presence of simultaneously existing Cu(II) species is taken into account. By applying regression analysis, individual Cu(I) quantum yields are determined to be 0.094 ± 0.014 for the 1:1 complex (CuL) and 0.064 ± 0.012 for the 1:2 complex (CuL2). Individual quantum yields of ammonia are 0.055 ± 0.007 for CuL and 0.036 ± 0.005 for CuL2. Individual quantum yields of acetaldehyde are 0.030 ± 0.007 for CuL and 0.024 ± 0.007 for CuL2. CuL always has larger quantum yields than CuL2, which can be attributed to the Cu(II) stabilizing effect of the second ligand. For both CuL and CuL2, the individual quantum yields of Cu(I), ammonia, and acetaldehyde are in the ratio of 1.8:1:0.7. A reaction mechanism for the formation of the observed photoproducts is proposed.

  8. Weak BMAA toxicity compares with that of the dietary supplement β-alanine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Moonhee; McGeer, Patrick L

    2012-07-01

    β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is routinely described in the literature as a potent neurotoxin and as a possible cause of neurodegenerative disorders of aging such as Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex (ALS-PDC) syndrome of Guam. To test for the toxicity of BMAA against human neurons, we chose 3 standard human neuronal cell lines for examination and compared the toxicity with the muscle-building nutritional supplement β-alanine, glutamic acid, and the established excitotoxins kainic acid, quisqualic acid, ibotenic acid, domoic acid, and quinolinic acid. Neurotoxicity was measured by the standard lactic dehydrogenase release assay after 5-day incubation of NT-2, SK-N-MC, and SH-SY5Y cells with BMAA and the comparative substances. The ED(50) of BMAA, corresponding to 50% death of neurons, varied from 1430 to 1604 μM while that of the nutritional supplement β-alanine was almost as low, varying from 1945 to 2134 μM. The ED(50) for glutamic acid and the 5 established excitotoxins was 200- to 360-fold lower, varying from 44 to 70 μM. These in vitro data are in accord with previously published in vivo data on BMAA toxicity in which mice showed no pathological effects from oral consumption of 500 mg/kg/day for more than 10 weeks. Because there are no known natural sources of BMAA that would make consumption of such amounts possible, and because the toxicity observed was in the same range as the nutritional supplement β-alanine, the hypothesis that BMAA is an environmental hazard and a contributor to degenerative neurological diseases becomes untenable.

  9. β-alanine supplementation improves isometric endurance of the knee extensor muscles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We examined the effect of four weeks of β-alanine supplementation on isometric endurance of the knee extensors at 45% maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). Methods Thirteen males (age 23 ± 6 y; height 1.80 ± 0.05 m; body mass 81.0 ± 10.5 kg), matched for pre-supplementation isometric endurance, were allocated to either a placebo (n = 6) or β-alanine (n = 7; 6.4 g·d-1 over 4 weeks) supplementation group. Participants completed an isometric knee extension test (IKET) to fatigue, at an intensity of 45% MVIC, before and after supplementation. In addition, two habituation tests were completed in the week prior to the pre-supplementation test and a further practice test was completed in the week prior to the post-supplementation test. MVIC force, IKET hold-time, and impulse generated were recorded. Results IKET hold-time increased by 9.7 ± 9.4 s (13.2%) and impulse by 3.7 ± 1.3 kN·s-1 (13.9%) following β-alanine supplementation. These changes were significantly greater than those in the placebo group (IKET: t(11) = 2.9, p ≤0.05; impulse: t(11) = 3.1, p ≤ 0.05). There were no significant changes in MVIC force in either group. Conclusion Four weeks of β-alanine supplementation at 6.4 g·d-1 improved endurance capacity of the knee extensors at 45% MVIC, which most likely results from improved pH regulation within the muscle cell as a result of elevated muscle carnosine levels. PMID:22697405

  10. Stabilization of helices in glycine and alanine dipeptides in a reaction field model of solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, H.S. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA ); Head-Gordon, T. )

    1994-02-23

    We present molecular orbital calculations of the full conformational space of blocked glycine and alanine dipeptide in the presence of a reaction field representation of water. Secondary structures of right- and left-handed helices are found, in contrast to recent gas-phase results, indicating that the origin of helical stabilization in dipeptides is strictly due to environment. Limitations of the reaction field model and the various implications of stabilization due to environment are discussed. 43 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Dosimétrie RPE alanine, étude de faisabilité et applications possibles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntz, F.; Chabanais, B.; Karamanoukian, D.; Delpech, J. P.; Marchioni, E.

    1998-04-01

    Alanine ESR dosimetry presents a great interest for quality controls in radiotherapy. This new developped water equivalent alamine dosimeter allows a reproducible dose measurement, by a non-destructif readout technique in a large dose range. In this paper the stability of the dosimeter response has been shown but also its independance with the energy or the dose rate of the absorbed radiation. Through this different studies, one can broaden the application field of alanine/ESR dosimetry especially for in-vivo dosimetry. The results of the experiments and the intra operative treatment, indicate that this kind of dosimetry seems to be a promising technique for in-vivo quality controls in electron beam, γ ray or X-ray radiotherapy. Le dosimètre à l'alanine dépouillé par Résonance Paramagnétique Électronique (EPE), est pratiquement équivalent tissu et présente plusieurs caractéristiques intéressantes : la reproductibilité de sa mesure, son dépouillement non destructif, son faible fading, sa large gamme de mesure de dose (0,5 à 100 kGy). La réponse de ce dosimètre est, de plus, indépendante du débit de dose du rayonnement qu'il a absorbé ainsi que de son énergie. À travers plusieurs études, et un essai in-viro, nous ouvrons un important champ d'applications, faisant de la dosimétie RPE/Alanine un Outil prometteur pour le contrôle de la qualité des traitements radiothérapeutiques par faisceaux d'électrons, rayonnement X et photons γ.

  12. Hepatic serine and alanine metabolism during endotoxin-induced fever in sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Southorn, B G; Thompson, J R

    1987-01-01

    Time course changes in plasma amino acid concentrations and the hepatic metabolism of serine and alanine were measured in six mature wethers during endotoxin-induced fever. In separate trials, the animals' responses to injections of saline and endotoxin were measured. The endotoxin was from Escherichia coli serotype 055:B5 and was injected intravenously (4 micrograms/kg body weight). Liver biopsies were obtained from the sheep at 6 h postinjection during both endotoxin and saline injection trials. Rectal temperature in the endotoxin treated animals was increased (P less than 0.05, above that in control animals from 4.25 h to 9 h postinjection, with a maximum rise of 2.43 degrees C at 5.5 h postinjection. Glucose concentration in jugular plasma decreased (P less than 0.05) by 3 h postinjection and remained depressed throughout the 24 h postinjection sampling period. Plasma serine concentration was decreased (P less than 0.05) by 3 h postinjection. Plasma alanine concentration was decreased significantly (P less than 0.05) only at 24 h postinjection. Endotoxin injection increased (P less than 0.05) hepatic oxidation of 14C-serine (162%) and the net incorporation of 14C-serine carbon into hepatic protein (173%) and glycogen (275%). The net incorporation of 14C-alanine carbon into hepatic protein (172%) and glycogen (323%) were increased (P less than 0.05) by endotoxin injection, while alanine oxidation was not affected by endotoxin treatment (P greater than 0.05). The increased hepatic use of serine may explain, in part, the dramatic decrease in plasma concentrations of this amino acid following endotoxin injection into sheep. PMID:3115552

  13. Structure and vibrational spectra of L-alanine L-alaninium picrate monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazaryan, V. V.; Fleck, M.; Petrosyan, A. M.

    2012-05-01

    Preparation, crystal and molecular structure as well as vibrational spectra of the crystal L-alanine L-alaninium picrate monohydrate are described. The title crystal is monoclinic, space group P21. The asymmetric unit contains one dimeric (L-Ala⋯L-Ala+) cation, one picrate anion and a water molecule. The O⋯O distance in the dimeric cation is equal to 2.553(2) Å. The IR and Raman spectra are interpreted based on the structure.

  14. Identification and expression analyses of the alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT) gene family in poplar seedlings.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhiru; Ma, Jing; Qu, Chunpu; Hu, Yanbo; Hao, Bingqing; Sun, Yan; Liu, Zhongye; Yang, Han; Yang, Chengjun; Wang, Hongwei; Li, Ying; Liu, Guanjun

    2017-04-05

    Alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT, E.C.2.6.1.2) catalyzes the reversible conversion of pyruvate and glutamate to alanine and α-oxoglutarate. The AlaAT gene family has been well studied in some herbaceous plants, but has not been well characterized in woody plants. In this study, we identified four alanine aminotransferase homologues in Populus trichocarpa, which could be classified into two subgroups, A and B. AlaAT3 and AlaAT4 in subgroup A encode AlaAT, while AlaAT1 and AlaAT2 in subgroup B encode glutamate:glyoxylate aminotransferase (GGAT), which catalyzes the reaction of glutamate and glyoxylate to α-oxoglutarate and glycine. Four AlaAT genes were cloned from P. simonii × P. nigra. PnAlaAT1 and PnAlaAT2 were expressed predominantly in leaves and induced by exogenous nitrogen and exhibited a diurnal fluctuation in leaves, but was inhibited in roots. PnAlaAT3 and PnAlaAT4 were mainly expressed in roots, stems and leaves, and was induced by exogenous nitrogen. The expression of PnAlaAT3 gene could be regulated by glutamine or its related metabolites in roots. Our results suggest that PnAlaAT3 gene may play an important role in nitrogen metabolism and is regulated by glutamine or its related metabolites in the roots of P. simonii × P. nigra.

  15. beta-Alanine elevates dopamine levels in the rat nucleus accumbens: antagonism by strychnine.

    PubMed

    Ericson, Mia; Clarke, Rhona B C; Chau, PeiPei; Adermark, Louise; Söderpalm, Bo

    2010-04-01

    Glycine receptors (GlyRs) in the nucleus accumbens (nAc) have recently been suggested to be involved in the reinforcing and dopamine-elevating properties of ethanol via a neuronal circuitry involving the VTA. Apart from ethanol, both glycine and taurine have the ability to modulate dopamine output via GlyRs in the same brain region. In the present study, we wanted to explore whether yet another endogenous ligand for the GlyR, beta-alanine, had similar effects. To this end, we monitored dopamine in the nAc by means of in vivo microdialysis and found that local perfusion of beta-alanine increased dopamine output. In line with previous observations investigating ethanol, glycine and taurine, the competitive GlyR antagonist strychnine completely blocked the dopamine elevation. The present results suggest that beta-alanine has the ability to modulate dopamine levels in the nAc via strychnine-sensitive GlyRs, and are consistent with previous studies suggesting the importance of this receptor for modulating dopamine output.

  16. VUV photodynamics and chiral asymmetry in the photoionization of gas phase alanine enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Tia, Maurice; Cunha de Miranda, Barbara; Daly, Steven; Gaie-Levrel, François; Garcia, Gustavo A; Nahon, Laurent; Powis, Ivan

    2014-04-17

    The valence shell photoionization of the simplest proteinaceous chiral amino acid, alanine, is investigated over the vacuum ultraviolet region from its ionization threshold up to 18 eV. Tunable and variable polarization synchrotron radiation was coupled to a double imaging photoelectron/photoion coincidence (i(2)PEPICO) spectrometer to produce mass-selected threshold photoelectron spectra and derive the state-selected fragmentation channels. The photoelectron circular dichroism (PECD), an orbital-sensitive, conformer-dependent chiroptical effect, was also recorded at various photon energies and compared to continuum multiple scattering calculations. Two complementary vaporization methods-aerosol thermodesorption and a resistively heated sample oven coupled to an adiabatic expansion-were applied to promote pure enantiomers of alanine into the gas phase, yielding neutral alanine with different internal energy distributions. A comparison of the photoelectron spectroscopy, fragmentation, and dichroism measured for each of the vaporization methods was rationalized in terms of internal energy and conformer populations and supported by theoretical calculations. The analytical potential of the so-called PECD-PICO detection technique-where the electron spectroscopy and circular dichroism can be obtained as a function of mass and ion translational energy-is underlined and applied to characterize the origin of the various species found in the experimental mass spectra. Finally, the PECD findings are discussed within an astrochemical context, and possible implications regarding the origin of biomolecular asymmetry are identified.

  17. Beta-alanine and taurine as endogenous agonists at glycine receptors in rat hippocampus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masahiro; Gähwiler, Beat H; Gerber, Urs

    2002-02-15

    Electrophysiological and pharmacological properties of glycine receptors were characterized in hippocampal organotypic slice cultures. In the presence of ionotropic glutamate and GABA(B) receptor antagonists, pressure-application of glycine onto CA3 pyramidal cells induced a current associated with increased chloride conductance, which was inhibited by strychnine. Similar chloride currents could also be induced with beta-alanine or taurine. Whole-cell glycine responses were significantly greater in CA3 pyramidal cells than in CA1 pyramidal cells and dentate granule cells, while responses to GABA were similar among these three cell types. Although these results demonstrate the presence of functional glycine receptors in the hippocampus, no evidence for their activation during synaptic stimulation was found. Gabazine, a selective GABA(A) receptor antagonist, totally blocked evoked IPSCs in CA3 pyramidal cells. Glycine receptor activation is not dependent on transporter-controlled levels of extracellular glycine, as no chloride current was observed in response to sarcosine, an inhibitor of glycine transporters. In contrast, application of guanidinoethanesulfonic acid, an uptake inhibitor of beta-alanine and taurine, induced strychnine-sensitive chloride current in the presence of gabazine. These data indicate that modulation of transporters for the endogenous amino acids, beta-alanine and taurine, can regulate tonic activation of glycine receptors, which may function in maintenance of inhibitory tone in the hippocampus.

  18. Exogenous alanine and/or glucose plus kanamycin kills antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Peng, Bo; Su, Yu-Bin; Li, Hui; Han, Yi; Guo, Chang; Tian, Yao-Mei; Peng, Xuan-Xian

    2015-02-03

    Multidrug-resistant bacteria are an increasingly serious threat to human and animal health. However, novel drugs that can manage infections by multidrug-resistant bacteria have proved elusive. Here we show that glucose and alanine abundances are greatly suppressed in kanamycin-resistant Edwardsiella tarda by GC-MS-based metabolomics. Exogenous alanine or glucose restores susceptibility of multidrug-resistant E. tarda to killing by kanamycin, demonstrating an approach to killing multidrug-resistant bacteria. The mechanism underlying this approach is that exogenous glucose or alanine promotes the TCA cycle by substrate activation, which in turn increases production of NADH and proton motive force and stimulates uptake of antibiotic. Similar results are obtained with other Gram-negative bacteria (Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and Gram-positive bacterium (Staphylococcus aureus), and the results are also reproduced in a mouse model for urinary tract infection. This study establishes a functional metabolomics-based strategy to manage infection by antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  19. Survivability and reactivity of glycine and alanine in early oceans: effects of meteorite impacts.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Yuhei; Fukunaga, Nao; Sekine, Toshimori; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kakegawa, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Takamichi; Nakazawa, Hiromoto

    2016-01-01

    Prebiotic oceans might have contained abundant amino acids, and were subjected to meteorite impacts, especially during the late heavy bombardment. It is so far unknown how meteorite impacts affected amino acids in the early oceans. Impact experiments were performed under the conditions where glycine was synthesized from carbon, ammonia, and water, using aqueous solutions containing (13)C-labeled glycine and alanine. Selected amino acids and amines in samples were analyzed with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS). In particular, the (13)C-labeled reaction products were analyzed to distinguish between run products and contaminants. The results revealed that both amino acids survived partially in the early ocean through meteorite impacts, that part of glycine changed into alanine, and that large amounts of methylamine and ethylamine were formed. Fast decarboxylation was confirmed to occur during such impact processes. Furthermore, the formation of n-butylamine, detected only in the samples recovered from the solutions with additional nitrogen and carbon sources of ammonia and benzene, suggests that chemical reactions to form new biomolecules can proceed through marine impacts. Methylamine and ethylamine from glycine and alanine increased considerably in the presence of hematite rather than olivine under similar impact conditions. These results also suggest that amino acids present in early oceans can contribute further to impact-induced reactions, implying that impact energy plays a potential role in the prebiotic formation of various biomolecules, although the reactions are complicated and depend upon the chemical environments as well.

  20. Identification and expression analyses of the alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT) gene family in poplar seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhiru; Ma, Jing; Qu, Chunpu; Hu, Yanbo; Hao, Bingqing; Sun, Yan; Liu, Zhongye; Yang, Han; Yang, Chengjun; Wang, Hongwei; Li, Ying; Liu, Guanjun

    2017-01-01

    Alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT, E.C.2.6.1.2) catalyzes the reversible conversion of pyruvate and glutamate to alanine and α-oxoglutarate. The AlaAT gene family has been well studied in some herbaceous plants, but has not been well characterized in woody plants. In this study, we identified four alanine aminotransferase homologues in Populus trichocarpa, which could be classified into two subgroups, A and B. AlaAT3 and AlaAT4 in subgroup A encode AlaAT, while AlaAT1 and AlaAT2 in subgroup B encode glutamate:glyoxylate aminotransferase (GGAT), which catalyzes the reaction of glutamate and glyoxylate to α-oxoglutarate and glycine. Four AlaAT genes were cloned from P. simonii × P. nigra. PnAlaAT1 and PnAlaAT2 were expressed predominantly in leaves and induced by exogenous nitrogen and exhibited a diurnal fluctuation in leaves, but was inhibited in roots. PnAlaAT3 and PnAlaAT4 were mainly expressed in roots, stems and leaves, and was induced by exogenous nitrogen. The expression of PnAlaAT3 gene could be regulated by glutamine or its related metabolites in roots. Our results suggest that PnAlaAT3 gene may play an important role in nitrogen metabolism and is regulated by glutamine or its related metabolites in the roots of P. simonii × P. nigra. PMID:28378825

  1. Surface chemistry of alanine on Cu{111}: Adsorption geometry and temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldanza, Silvia; Cornish, Alix; Nicklin, Richard E. J.; Zheleva, Zhasmina V.; Held, Georg

    2014-11-01

    Adsorption of L-alanine on the Cu{111} single crystal surface was investigated as a model system for interactions between small chiral modifier molecules and close-packed metal surfaces. Synchrotron-based X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy are used to determine the chemical state, bond coordination and out-of-plane orientation of the molecule on the surface. Alanine adsorbs in its anionic form at room temperature, whilst at low temperature the overlayer consists of anionic and zwitterionic molecules. NEXAFS spectra exhibit a strong angular dependence of the π* resonance associated with the carboxylate group, which allows determining the tilt angle of this group with respect to the surface plane (48° ± 2°) at room temperature. Low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) shows a p(2√{ 13} × 2√{ 13}) R 13 ° superstructure with only one domain, which breaks the mirror symmetry of the substrate and, thus, induces global chirality to the surface. Temperature-programmed XPS (TP-XPS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiments indicate that the zwitterionic form converts into the anionic species (alaninate) at 293 K. The latter desorbs/decomposes between 435 K and 445 K.

  2. Paradox of mistranslation of serine for alanine caused by AlaRS recognition dilemma.

    PubMed

    Guo, Min; Chong, Yeeting E; Shapiro, Ryan; Beebe, Kirk; Yang, Xiang-Lei; Schimmel, Paul

    2009-12-10

    Mistranslation arising from confusion of serine for alanine by alanyl-tRNA synthetases (AlaRSs) has profound functional consequences. Throughout evolution, two editing checkpoints prevent disease-causing mistranslation from confusing glycine or serine for alanine at the active site of AlaRS. In both bacteria and mice, Ser poses a bigger challenge than Gly. One checkpoint is the AlaRS editing centre, and the other is from widely distributed AlaXps-free-standing, genome-encoded editing proteins that clear Ser-tRNA(Ala). The paradox of misincorporating both a smaller (glycine) and a larger (serine) amino acid suggests a deep conflict for nature-designed AlaRS. Here we show the chemical basis for this conflict. Nine crystal structures, together with kinetic and mutational analysis, provided snapshots of adenylate formation for each amino acid. An inherent dilemma is posed by constraints of a structural design that pins down the alpha-amino group of the bound amino acid by using an acidic residue. This design, dating back more than 3 billion years, creates a serendipitous interaction with the serine OH that is difficult to avoid. Apparently because no better architecture for the recognition of alanine could be found, the serine misactivation problem was solved through free-standing AlaXps, which appeared contemporaneously with early AlaRSs. The results reveal unconventional problems and solutions arising from the historical design of the protein synthesis machinery.

  3. Pre-thymic somatic mutation leads to high mutant frequency at hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, J.

    1994-12-01

    While characterizing the background mutation spectrum of the Hypoxathine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene in a healthy population, an outlier with a high mutant frequency of thioguanine resistant lymphocytes was found. When studied at the age of 46, this individual had been smoking 60 cigarettes per day for 38 years. His mutant frequency was calculated at 3.6 and 4.2x10{sup {minus}4} for two sampling periods eight months apart. Sequencing analysis of the HPRT gene in his mutant thioguanine resistant T lymphocytes was done to find whether the cells had a high rate of mutation, or if the mutation was due to a single occurrence of mutation and, if so, when in the T lymphocyte development the mutation occurred. By T-cell receptor analysis it has been found that out of 35 thioguanine resistant clones there was no dominant gamma T cell receptor gene rearrangement. During my appointment in the Science & Engineering Research Semester, I found that 34 of those clones have the same base substitution of G{yields}T at cDNA position 197. Due to the consistent mutant frequency from both sampling periods and the varying T cell receptors, the high mutant frequency cannot be due to recent proliferation of a mature mutant T lymphocyte. From the TCR and DNA sequence analysis we conclude that the G{yields}T mutation must have occurred in a T lymphocyte precursor before thymic differentiation so that the thioguanine resistant clones share the same base substitution but not the same gamma T cell receptor gene.

  4. Increased D-allose production by the R132E mutant of ribose-5-phosphate isomerase from Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Soo-Jin; Seo, Eun-Sun; Kim, Yeong-Su; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2011-03-01

    Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase from Clostridium thermocellum converted D-psicose to D-allose, which may be useful as a pharmaceutical compound, with no by-product. The 12 active-site residues, which were obtained by molecular modeling on the basis of the solved three-dimensional structure of the enzyme, were substituted individually with Ala. Among the 12 Ala-substituted mutants, only the R132A mutant exhibited an increase in D-psicose isomerization activity. The R132E mutant showed the highest activity when the residue at position 132 was substituted with Ala, Gln, Ile, Lys, Glu, or Asp. The maximal activity of the wild-type and R132E mutant enzymes for D-psicose was observed at pH 7.5 and 80°C. The half-lives of the wild-type enzyme at 60°C, 65°C, 70°C, 75°C, and 80°C were 11, 7.0, 4.2, 1.5, and 0.6 h, respectively, whereas those of the R132E mutant enzymes were 13, 8.2, 5.1, 3.1, and 0.9 h, respectively. The specific activity and catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) of the R132E mutant for D-psicose were 1.4- and 1.5-fold higher than those of the wild-type enzyme, respectively. When the same amount of enzyme was used, the conversion yield of D-psicose to D-allose was 32% for the R132E mutant enzyme and 25% for the wild-type enzyme after 80 min.

  5. Magnesium substitution in brushite cements.

    PubMed

    Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Cabrejos-Azama, Jatsue; Rodríguez, Carmen Rueda; Jerez, Luis Blanco; Cabarcos, Enrique López

    2013-01-01

    The use of magnesium-doped ceramics has been described to modify brushite cements and improve their biological behavior. However, few studies have analyzed the efficiency of this approach to induce magnesium substitution in brushite crystals. Mg-doped ceramics composed of Mg-substituted β-TCP, stanfieldite and/or farringtonite were reacted with primary monocalcium phosphate (MCP) in the presence of water. The cement setting reaction has resulted in the formation of brushite and newberyite within the cement matrix. Interestingly, the combination of SAED and EDX analyses of single crystal has indicated the occurrence of magnesium substitution within brushite crystals. Moreover, the effect of magnesium ions on the structure, and mechanical and setting properties of the new cements was characterized as well as the release of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ions. Further research would enhance the efficiency of the system to incorporate larger amounts of magnesium ions within brushite crystals.

  6. Substitution systems and nonextensive statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Morales, V.

    2015-12-01

    Substitution systems evolve in time by generating sequences of symbols from a finite alphabet: At a certain iteration step, the existing symbols are systematically replaced by blocks of Nk symbols also within the alphabet (with Nk, a natural number, being the length of the kth block of the substitution). The dynamics of these systems leads naturally to fractals and self-similarity. By using B-calculus (García-Morales, 2012) universal maps for deterministic substitution systems both of constant and non-constant length, are formulated in 1D. It is then shown how these systems can be put in direct correspondence with Tsallis entropy. A 'Second Law of Thermodynamics' is also proved for these systems in the asymptotic limit of large words.

  7. Bone Graft Substitution and Augmentation.

    PubMed

    Nauth, Aaron; Lane, Joseph; Watson, J Tracy; Giannoudis, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Selection of appropriate bone graft or bone graft substitute requires careful recognition of the bone healing needs of the patient's specific clinical problem and a thorough understanding of the different properties possessed by the available bone grafts and substitutes. Although autogenous iliac crest bone graft remains the gold standard of treatment for delayed unions, nonunions, and bone defects, there are a number of promising alternatives available, and emerging evidence suggests that they can be very effective when used in the proper setting. Among these, reamer-irrigator-aspirator bone graft, bone marrow concentrate, bone morphogenetic proteins, and calcium phosphate cements have received a great deal of attention in the literature. This review describes these grafts in detail along with the evidence for their use. In addition, a framework is provided for selecting the appropriate graft or substitute based on their provided properties.

  8. Targeting ESR1-Mutant Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0360 TITLE: Targeting ESR1- Mutant Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Geoffrey L. Greene, Ph.D. CONTRACTING...ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE September 2015 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1 Sep 2014 - 31 Aug 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeting ESR1- Mutant ...approved hormonal therapies and that more potent, selective estrogen receptor degraders (SERDs) will enable complete inhibition of mutant ER signaling and

  9. Targeting ESR1-Mutant Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0359 TITLE: Targeting ESR1- Mutant Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Sarat Chandarlapaty CONTRACTING...31 Aug 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeting ESR1- Mutant Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0359 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...current FDA approved hormonal therapies and that more potent, selective estrogen receptor degraders (SERDs) will enable complete inhibition of mutant

  10. 40 CFR 721.2577 - Copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted phenyl) disulfonaphthyl azo, amine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Copper complex of (substituted... Copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted phenyl) disulfonaphthyl azo, amine salt... substances identified generically as copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted...

  11. 40 CFR 721.2577 - Copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted phenyl) disulfonaphthyl azo, amine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Copper complex of (substituted... Copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted phenyl) disulfonaphthyl azo, amine salt... substances identified generically as copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted...

  12. 40 CFR 721.2577 - Copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted phenyl) disulfonaphthyl azo, amine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Copper complex of (substituted... Copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted phenyl) disulfonaphthyl azo, amine salt... substances identified generically as copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted...

  13. 40 CFR 721.2577 - Copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted phenyl) disulfonaphthyl azo, amine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Copper complex of (substituted... Copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted phenyl) disulfonaphthyl azo, amine salt... substances identified generically as copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted...

  14. Electrophysiological study of Drosophila rhodopsin mutants

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Electrophysiological investigations were carried out on several independently isolated mutants of the ninaE gene, which encodes opsin in R1-6 photoreceptors, and a mutant of the ninaD gene, which is probably important in the formation of the rhodopsin chromophore. In these mutants, the rhodopsin content in R1-6 photoreceptors is reduced by 10(2)-10(6)-fold. Light-induced bumps recorded from even the most severely affected mutants are physiologically normal. Moreover, a detailed noise analysis shows that photoreceptor responses of both a ninaE mutant and a ninaD mutant follow the adapting bump model. Since any extensive rhodopsin-rhodopsin interactions are not likely in these mutants, the above results suggest that such interactions are not needed for the generation and adaptation of light-induced bumps. Mutant bumps are strikingly larger in amplitude than wild-type bumps. This difference is observed both in ninaD and ninaE mutants, which suggests that it is due to severe depletion of rhodopsin content, rather than to any specific alterations in the opsin protein. Lowering or buffering the intracellular calcium concentration by EGTA injection mimics the effects of the mutations on the bump amplitude, but, unlike the mutations, it also affects the latency and kinetics of light responses. PMID:3097245

  15. Identifying representative drug resistant mutants of HIV

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Drug resistance is one of the most important causes for failure of anti-AIDS treatment. During therapy, multiple mutations accumulate in the HIV genome, eventually rendering the drugs ineffective in blocking replication of the mutant virus. The huge number of possible mutants precludes experimental analysis to explore the molecular mechanisms of resistance and develop improved antiviral drugs. Results In order to solve this problem, we have developed a new algorithm to reveal the most representative mutants from the whole drug resistant mutant database based on our newly proposed unified protein sequence and 3D structure encoding method. Mean shift clustering and multiple regression analysis were applied on genotype-resistance data for mutants of HIV protease and reverse transcriptase. This approach successfully chooses less than 100 mutants with the highest resistance to each drug out of about 10K in the whole database. When considering high level resistance to multiple drugs, the numbers reduce to one or two representative mutants. Conclusion This approach for predicting the most representative mutants for each drug has major importance for experimental verification since the results provide a small number of representative sequences, which will be amenable for in vitro testing and characterization of the expressed mutant proteins. PMID:26678327

  16. Hypoxic radiosensitizers: substituted styryl derivatives.

    PubMed

    Nudelman, A; Falb, E; Odesa, Y; Shmueli-Broide, N

    1994-10-01

    A number of novel styryl epoxides, N-substituted-styryl-ethanolamines, N-mono and N,N'-bis-(2-hydroxyethyl)-cinnamamides--analogues to the known radiosensitizers RSU-1069, pimonidazole and etanidazole--display selective hypoxic radiosensitizing activity. The styryl group, especially when substituted by electron withdrawing groups, was found to be bioisosteric to the nitroimidazolyl functionality. The most active derivative 2-(2'-nitrophenyl)ethen-1-yl-oxirane 8a displayed a sensitizer enhancement ratio (SER) of 5 relative to misonidazole.

  17. β-alanine supplementation improves tactical performance but not cognitive function in combat soldiers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There are no known studies that have examined β-alanine supplementation in military personnel. Considering the physiological and potential neurological effects that have been reported during sustained military operations, it appears that β-alanine supplementation may have a potential benefit in maintaining physical and cognitive performance during high-intensity military activity under stressful conditions. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of 28 days of β-alanine ingestion in military personnel while fatigued on physical and cognitive performance. Methods Twenty soldiers (20.1 ± 0.9 years) from an elite combat unit were randomly assigned to either a β-alanine (BA) or placebo (PL) group. Soldiers were involved in advanced military training, including combat skill development, navigational training, self-defense/hand-to-hand combat and conditioning. All participants performed a 4-km run, 5-countermovement jumps using a linear position transducer, 120-m sprint, a 10-shot shooting protocol with assault rifle, including overcoming a misfire, and a 2-min serial subtraction test to assess cognitive function before (Pre) and after (Post) 28 days of supplementation. Results The training routine resulted in significant increases in 4-km run time for both groups, but no between group differences were seen (p = 0.597). Peak jump power at Post was greater for BA than PL (p = 0.034), while mean jump power for BA at Post was 10.2% greater (p = 0.139) than PL. BA had a significantly greater (p = 0.012) number of shots on target at Post (8.2 ± 1.0) than PL (6.5 ± 2.1), and their target engagement speed at Post was also significantly faster (p = 0.039). No difference in serial subtraction performance was seen between the groups (p = 0.844). Conclusion Results of this study indicate that 4-weeks of β-alanine ingestion in young, healthy soldiers did not impact cognitive performance, but did enhance power

  18. Clinical significance of hepatitis B surface antigen mutants

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, Nicola; Onorato, Lorenzo; Minichini, Carmine; Di Caprio, Giovanni; Starace, Mario; Sagnelli, Caterina; Sagnelli, Evangelista

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major public health problem in many countries, with nearly 300 million people worldwide carrying HBV chronic infection and over 1 million deaths per year due to cirrhosis and liver cancer. Several hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) mutations have been described, most frequently due to a single amino acid substitution and seldom to a nucleotide deletion. The majority of mutations are located in the S region, but they have also been found in the pre-S1 and pre-S2 regions. Single amino acid substitutions in the major hydrophilic region of HBsAg, called the “a” determinant, have been associated with immune escape and the consequent failure of HBV vaccination and HBsAg detection, whereas deletions in the pre-S1 or pre-S2 regions have been associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. This review article will focus on the HBsAg mutants and their biological and clinical implications. PMID:26644816

  19. Isolation and characterisation of transport-defective substrate-binding mutants of the tetracycline antiporter TetA(B)

    PubMed Central

    Wright, David J.; Tate, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    The tetracycline antiporter TetA(B) is a member of the Major Facilitator Superfamily which confers tetracycline resistance to cells by coupling the efflux of tetracycline to the influx of protons down their chemical potential gradient. Although it is a medically important transporter, its structure has yet to be determined. One possibility for why this has proven difficult is that the transporter may be conformationally heterogeneous in the purified state. To overcome this, we developed two strategies to rapidly identify TetA(B) mutants that were transport-defective and that could still bind tetracycline. Up to 9 amino acid residues could be deleted from the loop between transmembrane α-helices 6 and 7 with only a slight decrease in affinity of tetracycline binding as measured by isothermal titration calorimetry, although the mutant was transport-defective. Scanning mutagenesis where all the residues between 2 and 389 were mutated to either valine, alanine or glycine (VAG scan) identified 15 mutants that were significantly impaired in tetracycline transport. Of these mutants, 12 showed no evidence of tetracycline binding by isothermal titration calorimetry performed on the purified transporters. In contrast, the mutants G44V and G346V bound tetracycline 4–5 fold more weakly than TetA(B), with Kds of 28 μM and 36 μM, respectively, whereas the mutant R70G bound tetracycline 3-fold more strongly (Kd 2.1 μM). Systematic mutagenesis is thus an effective strategy for isolating transporter mutants that may be conformationally constrained and which represent attractive targets for crystallisation and structure determination. PMID:26143388

  20. Probing the energy landscape of alanine dipeptide and decalanine using temperature as a tunable parameter in molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, A.; Bhattacharya, S.

    2016-10-01

    We perform several molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of solvated alanine dipeptide and decalanine in vacuum with temperature as a tunable parameter and in the process, generate Markov state models (MSMs) at each temperature. An interesting observation that the kinetic rates appear to obey the Arrhenius rate law allows us to predict the dynamics of alanine dipeptide at 300 K at the microsecond timescales using the nanoseconds long high temperature calculations without actually performing MD simulations at 300 K. We conclude that the energy landscape of alanine dipeptide contains superbasins deeper than kBT and determine the energy barriers associated with the moves from the Arrhenius rate expression. Similar insights regarding the energy landscape associated with folding/unfolding pathways of a deca-alanine molecule are obtained using kinetic rates calculated at different temperatures.

  1. Alanine with the Precipitate of Tomato Juice Administered to Rats Enhances the Reduction in Blood Ethanol Levels.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Shunji; Shiiya, Sachie; Tokumaru, Yoshimi; Kanda, Tomomasa

    2015-01-01

    Delay in gastric emptying (GE) lowers the blood ethanol concentration (BEC) after alcohol administration. We previously demonstrated that water-insoluble fractions, mainly comprising dietary fiber derived from many types of botanical foods, possessed the ability to absorb ethanol-containing aqueous solutions. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between the absorption of ethanol and lowering of BEC because of delay in GE. Here we identified dietary nutrients that synergize with the water-insoluble fraction of tomatoes to lower BEC in rats. Consequently, unlike tomato juice without alanine, tomato juice with 5.0% alanine decreased BEC depending on the delay in GE and mediated the ethanol-induced decrease in the spontaneous motor activity (an indicator of drunkenness). Our findings indicate that the synergism between tomato juice and alanine to reduce the absorption of ethanol was attributable to the effect of alanine on precipitates such as the water-insoluble fraction of tomatoes.

  2. Alanine with the Precipitate of Tomato Juice Administered to Rats Enhances the Reduction in Blood Ethanol Levels

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Shunji; Shiiya, Sachie; Tokumaru, Yoshimi; Kanda, Tomomasa

    2015-01-01

    Delay in gastric emptying (GE) lowers the blood ethanol concentration (BEC) after alcohol administration. We previously demonstrated that water-insoluble fractions, mainly comprising dietary fiber derived from many types of botanical foods, possessed the ability to absorb ethanol-containing aqueous solutions. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between the absorption of ethanol and lowering of BEC because of delay in GE. Here we identified dietary nutrients that synergize with the water-insoluble fraction of tomatoes to lower BEC in rats. Consequently, unlike tomato juice without alanine, tomato juice with 5.0% alanine decreased BEC depending on the delay in GE and mediated the ethanol-induced decrease in the spontaneous motor activity (an indicator of drunkenness). Our findings indicate that the synergism between tomato juice and alanine to reduce the absorption of ethanol was attributable to the effect of alanine on precipitates such as the water-insoluble fraction of tomatoes. PMID:26713162

  3. Beta-alanine-hydrochloride (2:1) crystal: structure, 13C NMR and vibrational properties, protonation character.

    PubMed

    Godzisz, D; Ilczyszyn, M; Ciunik, Z

    2003-01-15

    The crystal structure of beta-alanine-hydrochloride (2:1) complex (2A-HCl) has been determined by X-ray diffraction method at 298 and 100 K as monoclinic, space group C2/c, Z=4. The crystal comprises chloride anions and protonated beta-alanine dimers: two beta-alanine zwitterions are joined by strong, symmetric (Ci) hydrogen bond with the O...O distance of 2.473 A at room temperature. Powder FT-IR and FT-Raman as well as solid state 13C NMR spectra provide insights into the solid structure of this complex, character of its hydrogen bonds and the beta-alanine protonation.

  4. Evidence for disorder in L-alanine lattice detected by Pulsed-EPR spectroscopy at cryogenic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Maltar-Strmecki, N; Rakvin, B

    2006-03-13

    The unusual behavior of lattice dynamics of L-alanine has been assigned to intermolecular dynamics and localization of vibrational energy. Recent heat capacity and Pulsed-EPR measurements support presence of thermally activated dynamic orientational disorder in the L-alanine lattice below 20 K. In the present study, the additional evidence for possible thermally activated disordered behavior of L-alanine lattice have been obtained by investigating dependences of longitudinal relaxation time of first stable L-alanine radical, SAR1, on sample cooling rates for the same low temperature interval. The obtained relaxation time by Pulsed-EPR shows clear dependence on cooling rates and this behavior can be explained within two types of suggested spin-lattice relaxation mechanisms for the paramagnetic centers in the hydrogen-bonded organic crystal.

  5. Staphylococcal enterotoxin type A internal deletion mutants: serological activity and induction of T-cell proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, T O; Hufnagle, W O; Betley, M J

    1993-01-01

    Previous findings indicate that the N-terminal region of staphylococcal enterotoxin type A (SEA) is required for its ability to induce T-cell proliferation. To better localize internal peptides of SEA that are important for induction of murine T-cell proliferation, SEA mutants that had internal deletions in their N-terminal third were constructed. A series of unique restriction enzyme sites were first engineered into sea; only one of these changes resulted in an amino acid substitution (the aspartic acid residue at position 60 of mature SEA was changed to a glycine [D60G]). Because the D60G substitution had no discernible effect on serological or biological activity, the sea allele encoding this mutant SEA was used to construct a panel of mutant SEAs lacking residues 3 to 17, 19 to 23, 24 to 28, 29 to 49, 50 to 55, 56 to 59, 61 to 73, 68 to 74, or 74 to 85. Recombinant plasmids with the desired mutations were constructed in Escherichia coli and transferred to Staphylococcus aureus. Staphylococcal culture supernatants containing the mutant SEAs were examined. Western immunoblot analysis with polyclonal anti-SEA antiserum revealed that each of the recombinant S. aureus strains produced a mutant SEA of the predicted size. All the mutant SEAs exhibited increased sensitivity to monkey stomach lavage fluid in vitro, which is consistent with these mutants having conformations unlike that of wild-type SEA or the SEA D60G mutant. In general, deletion of internal peptides had a deleterious effect on the ability to induce T-cell proliferation; only SEA mutants lacking either residues 3 to 17 or 56 to 59 consistently produced a statistically significant increase in the incorporation of [3H]thymidine. In the course of this work, two monoclonal antibodies that had different requirements for binding to SEA in Western blots were identified. The epitope for one monoclonal antibody was contained within residues 108 to 230 of mature SEA. Binding of the other monoclonal antibody to

  6. Mutant calreticulin requires both its mutant C-terminus and the thrombopoietin receptor for oncogenic transformation

    PubMed Central

    Elf, Shannon; Abdelfattah, Nouran S.; Chen, Edwin; Perales-Patón, Javier; Rosen, Emily A.; Ko, Amy; Peisker, Fabian; Florescu, Natalie; Giannini, Silvia; Wolach, Ofir; Morgan, Elizabeth A.; Tothova, Zuzana; Losman, Julie-Aurore; Schneider, Rebekka K.; Al-Shahrour, Fatima; Mullally, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations in calreticulin (CALR) are present in approximately 40% of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) but the mechanism by which mutant CALR is oncogenic remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that expression of mutant CALR alone is sufficient to engender MPN in mice and recapitulates the disease phenotype of CALR-mutant MPN patients. We further show that the thrombopoietin receptor, MPL is required for mutant CALR-driven transformation through JAK-STAT pathway activation, thus rendering mutant CALR-transformed hematopoietic cells sensitive to JAK2 inhibition. Finally, we demonstrate that the oncogenicity of mutant CALR is dependent on the positive electrostatic charge of the C-terminus of the mutant protein, which is necessary for physical interaction between mutant CALR and MPL. Together, our findings elucidate a novel paradigm of cancer pathogenesis and reveal how CALR mutations induce MPN. PMID:26951227

  7. Feasibility on using composite gel-alanine dosimetry on the validation of a multiple brain metastasis radiosurgery VMAT technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavoni, J. F.; Neves-Junior, W. F. P.; Silveira, M. A.; Ramos, P. A. M. M.; Haddad, C. M. K.; Baffa, O.

    2015-01-01

    This work presents an end-to-end test using a composite Gel-Alanine phantom, in order to validate 3-dimensionally the dose distribution delivered by a single isocenter VMAT technique on the simultaneous treatment of multiple brain metastases. The results obtained with the gel and alanine dosimeters are consistent with the expected by the treatment planning system, showing the potential of this multidosimetric approach and validating dosimetrically the multiple brain metastases treatment using VMAT.

  8. Barrier-Free Intermolecular Proton Transfer Induced by Excess Electron Attachment to the Complex of Alanine with Uracil

    SciTech Connect

    Dabkowska, Iwona; Rak, Janusz; Gutowski, Maciej S.; Nilles, J.M.; Stokes, Sarah; Bowen, Kit H.

    2004-04-01

    The photoelectron spectrum of the uracil-alanine anionic complex (UA)- has been recorded with 2.540 eV photons. This spectrum reveals a broad feature with a maximum between 1.6-2.1 eV. The vertical electron detachment energy is too large to be attributed to an (UA)- anionic complex in which an intact uracil anion is solvated by alanine, or vice versa. The neutral and anionic complexes of uracil and alanine were studied at the B3LYP and second order Moeller-Plesset level of theory with 6-31++G** basis sets. The neutral complexes form cyclic hydrogen bonds and the three most stable neutral complexes are bound by 0.72, 0.61 and 0.57 eV. The electron hole in complexes of uracil with alaninie is localized on uracil, but the formation of a complex with alanine strongly modulates the vertical ionization energy of uracil. The theoretical results indicate that the excess electron in (UA)- occupies a p* orbital localized on uracil. The excess electron attachment to the complex can induce a barrier-free proton transfer (BFPT) from the carboxylic group of alanine to the O8 atom of uracil. As a result, the four most stable structures of the uracil-alanine anionic complex can be characterized as the neutral radical of hydrogenated uracil solvated by the anion of deprotonated alanine. Our current results for the anionic complex of uracil with alanine are similar to our previous results for the anion of uracil with glycine [Eur. Phys. J. D 20, 431 (2002)], and together they indicate that the BFPT process is not very sensitive to the nature of the amino acid's hydrophobic residual group. The BFPT to the O8 atom of uracil may be relevant to the damage suffered by nucleic acid bases due to exposure to low energy electrons.

  9. Stimulation of [3H] GABA and beta-[3H] alanine release from rat brain slices by cis-4-aminocrotonic acid.

    PubMed

    Chebib, M; Johnston, G A

    1997-02-01

    cis-4-Aminocrotonic acid (CACA; 100 microM), an analogue of GABA in a folded conformation, stimulated the passive release of [3H] GABA from slices of rat cerebellum, cerebral cortex, retina, and spinal cord and of beta-[3H]alanine from slices of cerebellum and spinal cord without influencing potassium-evoked release. In contrast, CACA (100 microM) did not stimulate the passive release of [3H]taurine from slices of cerebellum and spinal cord or of D-[3H]aspartate from slices of cerebellum and did not influence potassium-evoked release of [3H]-taurine from the cerebellum and spinal cord and D-[3H]-aspartate from the cerebellum. These results suggest that the effects of CACA on GABA and beta-alanine release are due to CACA acting as a substrate for a beta-alanine-sensitive GABA transport system, consistent with CACA inhibiting the uptake of beta-[3H]alanine into slices of rat cerebellum and cerebral cortex. The observed Ki for CACA against beta-[3H]alanine uptake in the cerebellum was 750 +/- 60 microM. CACA appears to be 10-fold weaker as a substrate for the transporter system than as an agonist for the GABAc receptor. The effects of CACA on GABA and beta-alanine release provide indirect evidence for a GABA transporter in cerebellum, cerebral cortex, retina, and spinal cord that transports GABA, beta-alanine, CACA, and nipecotic acid that has a similar pharmacological profile to that of the GABA transporter, GAT-3, cloned from rat CNS. The structural similarities of GABA, beta-alanine, CACA, and nipecotic acid are demonstrated by computer-aided molecular modeling, providing information on the possible conformations of these substances being transported by a common carrier protein.

  10. The effect of beta-alanine supplementation on isokinetic force and cycling performance in highly trained cyclists.

    PubMed

    Howe, Samuel T; Bellinger, Phillip M; Driller, Matthew W; Shing, Cecilia M; Fell, James W

    2013-12-01

    Beta-alanine may benefit short-duration, high-intensity exercise performance. The aim of this randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study was to examine the effects of beta-alanine supplementation on aspects of muscular performance in highly trained cyclists. Sixteen highly trained cyclists (mean ± SD; age = 24 ± 7 yr; mass = 70 ± 7 kg; VO2max = 67 ± 4 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1)) supplemented with either beta-alanine (n = 8, 65 mg · kg - 1BM) or a placebo (n = 8; dextrose monohydrate) over 4 weeks. Pre- and postsupplementation cyclists performed a 4-minute maximal cycling test to measure average power and 30 reciprocal maximal isokinetic knee contractions at a fixed angular velocity of 180° · sec(-1) to measure average power/repetition, total work done (TWD), and fatigue index (%). Blood pH, lactate (La-) and bicarbonate (HCO3-) concentrations were measured pre- and postisokinetic testing at baseline and following the supplementation period. Beta-alanine supplementation was 44% likely to increase average power output during the 4-minute cycling time trial when compared with the placebo, although this was not statistically significant (p = .25). Isokinetic average power/repetition was significantly increased post beta-alanine supplementation compared with placebo (beta-alanine: 6.8 ± 9.9 W, placebo: -4.3 ± 9.5 W, p = .04, 85% likely benefit), while fatigue index was significantly reduced (p = .03, 95% likely benefit). TWD was 89% likely to be improved following beta-alanine supplementation; however, this was not statistically significant (p = .09). There were no significant differences in blood pH, lactate, and HCO3- between groups (p > .05). Four weeks of beta-alanine supplementation resulted in worthwhile changes in time-trial performance and short-duration muscular force production in highly trained cyclists.

  11. Effects of high-salinity seawater acclimation on the levels of D-alanine in the muscle and hepatopancreas of kuruma prawn, Marsupenaeus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Naoko; Yokoyama, Masahumi

    2015-12-10

    Changes in D- and L-alanine contents were determined in the muscle and hepatopancreas of kuruma prawn Marsupenaeus japonicus, during acclimation from seawater containing 100% salinity to artificial seawater containing 150% salinity. In the hepatopancreas, contents of both amino acids increased by approximately threefold. The activity of alanine racemase, which catalyzes the interconversion of D- and L-alanine, also increased in the high-salinity seawater. In addition, the expression of the gene encoding alanine racemase increased in the hepatopancreas with an increase in the alanine racemase activity. These data indicate that the biosynthesis of D- and L-alanine is controlled by the gene expression level of alanine racemase, and D-alanine in the hepatopancreas functions as a major osmolyte for isosmotic regulation. In contrast, the content of D-alanine and alanine racemase activity did not change in the muscle during hyper-osmotic acclimation. Therefore, we suggest that D-alanine, which exists in the several tissues of M. japonicus, is considered to be utilized in some different physiological phenomena in different tissues.

  12. 'Vegetable' substitutes for diesel fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-22

    Research programs in the US, Brazil, South Africa and the Philippines on efforts to find a vegetable oil substitute for diesel fuel are reported. A narrowing price gap with diesel fuel and a favourable energy balance improve the prospects for such fuels. Much of the current work is centered on blends, rather than the use of the pure oil.

  13. Substitute Teaching: Sink or Swim.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duebber, Diane

    2000-01-01

    Advises new substitute teachers to be prepared, tote emergency activity folders, dress professionally (but wear flamingo earrings), be early, figure out the game plan, communicate expectations to students, enforce consequences, have a gimmick to reward cooperation, relish the teachable moment, leave the room tidy, and believe in themselves. (MLH)

  14. Characteristics of the transport of alanine, serine and glutamine across the plasma membrane of isolated rat liver cells.

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, S K; Bradford, N M; McGivan, J D

    1978-01-01

    1. Alanine, glutamine and serine were actively accumulated in liver cells isolated from starved rats. 2. This accumulation was inhibited when either Na+ or HCO3- ions were omitted from the incubation medium. In general the degree of dependence on Na+ was quantitatively similar to that on HCO3-. 3. The apparent Km values for the transport of all three amino acids were in the range 3--5mM with Vmax. values in the range 15--25nmol/min per mg of cell protein at 37 degrees C. 4. Alanine and serine transport were mutually competitive; glutamine inhibited the transport of alanine and serine non-competitively. 5. The initial rate of transport of these amino acids was inhibited when the intracellular content of ATP was decreased. 6. Ouabain inhibited the rate of alanine transport without inhibiting the rate of alanine metabolism. 7. It is concluded that a minimum of three transport systems must be postulated to exist in the liver cell plasma membrane to account for the transport of alanine, serine and glutamine. The rate of transport of these amino acids in isolated hepatocytes is unlikely to limit the rate at which they are metabolized. PMID:747655

  15. Monoclonal antibodies recognizing single amino acid substitutions in hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Stanker, L.H.; Branscomb, E.; Vanderlaan, M.; Jensen, R.H.

    1986-06-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to non-human primate hemoglobin referred to as Cap-4, Cap-5, Rh-2, and Rh-4, and two mAb to human hemoglobin, referred to as H-1 and H-3 were isolated and were partially characterized. Binding studies with these mAb on a panel of hemoglobins and isolated ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. globin chains revealed a unique reactivity pattern for each mAb. Amino acid sequence analysis of the antigens used to generate the binding data suggests that the specific recognition of certain hemoglobin antigens by each mAb is controlled by the presence of a particular amino acid at a specific position within the epitope. The use of synthetic peptides as antigens confirmed this observation for five of the mAb. No synthetic peptides were tested with the sixth mAb, Rh-2. The amino acids required for binding of mAb Cap-4, Cap-5, Rh-4, and Rh-2 to hemoglobin are alanine at ..beta..5, threonine at ..beta..13, glutamine at ..beta..125, and leucine at ..cap alpha..68. The non-human primate hemoglobin antibodies require a specific amino acid that is not present in human hemoglobin. The amino acid required for binding of Cap-4, Cap-5, and Rh-4 could arise by a single base change in the ..beta.. globin gene, whereas the amino acid required for Rh-2 binding could only occur if two base changes occurred. Thus these mAb are candidate probes for a somatic cell mutation assay on the basis of the detection of peripheral blood red cells that possess single amino acid substituted hemoglobin as a result of single base substitutions in the globin genes of precursor cells.

  16. In vitro and in vivo activities of T4 endonuclease V mutants altered in the C-terminal aromatic region

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, M.; Kanamori, Y.; Hori, N.; Inaoka, T.; Ohtsuka, E. )

    1990-04-24

    Genes encoding mutants of the thymine photodimer repair enzyme from bacteriophage T4 (T4 endonuclease V) having an amino acid substitution (T127M, W128A, W128S, Y129A, K130L, Y131A, Y132A) were constructed by use of a previously obtained synthetic gene and expressed in Escherichia coli under the control of the E. coli tryptophan promoter. An in vitro assay of partially fractionated mutant proteins for glycosylase activity was performed with chemically synthesized substrates containing a thymine photodimer. T127M and K130L showed almost the same activity as the wild-type protein. Although W128S, Y131A, and Y132A were slightly active, W128A and Y129A lost activity. The results indicated that the aromatic amino acids around position 130 may be important for the glycosylase activity. Mutant T127M was purified, and the Km value was found to be of the same order as that of the wild type (10(-8) M). In vivo activities for all mutants were characterized with UV-sensitive E. coli. The results showed that substitution of Thr-127 with Met or Lys-130 with Leu did not have an effect on the survival of the bacteria but substitution of aromatic amino acids (128-132) had various effects on survival.

  17. Enhancers of Conidiation Mutants in Aspergillus Nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Gems, D. H.; Clutterbuck, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    Mutants at a number of loci, designated sthenyo, have been isolated as enhancers of the oligoconidial mutations at the medA locus. Two loci have been mapped: sthA on linkage group I, and sthB on linkage group V. Two probable alleles have been identified at each locus but two further mutants were unlinked to either sthA or sthB. Neither sthA nor sthB mutants have conspicuous effects on morphology on their own, nor could the sthA1 sthB2 double mutant be distinguished from wild type. Mutants at both loci also interact with the temperature-sensitive brlA42 mutant at the permissive temperature to give a phenotype described as ``Abacoid.'' sthA1 also induces a slight modification of the phenotype of an abaA mutant. We conclude that sthenyo genes act mainly at the phialide stage of conidiation. We also describe the isolation of new medA mutants arising spontaneously as outgrowths on brlA42 colonies. PMID:8056325

  18. Regulation of Mutant p53 Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumaran, Reshma; Tan, Kah Hin; Miranda, Panimaya Jeffreena; Haupt, Sue; Haupt, Ygal

    2015-01-01

    For several decades, p53 has been detected in cancer biopsies by virtue of its high protein expression level which is considered indicative of mutation. Surprisingly, however, mouse genetic studies revealed that mutant p53 is inherently labile, similar to its wild type (wt) counterpart. Consistently, in response to stress conditions, both wt and mutant p53 accumulate in cells. While wt p53 returns to basal level following recovery from stress, mutant p53 remains stable. In part, this can be explained in mutant p53-expressing cells by the lack of an auto-regulatory loop with Mdm2 and other negative regulators, which are pivotal for wt p53 regulation. Further, additional protective mechanisms are acquired by mutant p53, largely mediated by the co-chaperones and their paralogs, the stress-induced heat shock proteins. Consequently, mutant p53 is accumulated in cancer cells in response to chronic stress and this accumulation is critical for its oncogenic gain of functions (GOF). Building on the extensive knowledge regarding wt p53, the regulation of mutant p53 is unraveling. In this review, we describe the current understanding on the major levels at which mutant p53 is regulated. These include the regulation of p53 protein levels by microRNA and by enzymes controlling p53 proteasomal degradation.

  19. A halotolerant mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Gaxiola, R; Corona, M; Zinker, S

    1996-01-01

    FRD, a nuclear and dominant spontaneous mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae capable of growing in up to 2 M NaCl, was isolated. Compared with parental cells, the mutant cells have a lower intracellular Na+/K+ ratio, shorter generation times in the presence of 1 M NaCl, and alterations in gene expression. PMID:8631691

  20. A mutant (‘lab strain’) of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, lacking flagella, has unusual growth physiology

    DOE PAGES

    Lewis, Derrick L.; Notey, Jaspreet S.; Chandrayan, Sanjeev K.; ...

    2014-12-04

    In this paper, a mutant (‘lab strain’) of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus DSM3638 exhibited an extended exponential phase and atypical cell aggregation behavior. Genomic DNA from the mutant culture was sequenced and compared to wild-type (WT) DSM3638, revealing 145 genes with one or more insertions, deletions, or substitutions (12 silent, 33 amino acid substitutions, and 100 frame shifts). Approximately, half of the mutated genes were transposases or hypothetical proteins. The WT transcriptome revealed numerous changes in amino acid and pyrimidine biosynthesis pathways coincidental with growth phase transitions, unlike the mutant whose transcriptome reflected the observed prolonged exponential phase. Targetedmore » gene deletions, based on frame-shifted ORFs in the mutant genome, in a genetically tractable strain of P. furiosus (COM1) could not generate the extended exponential phase behavior observed for the mutant. For example, a putative radical SAM family protein (PF2064) was the most highly up-regulated ORF (>25-fold) in the WT between exponential and stationary phase, although this ORF was unresponsive in the mutant; deletion of this gene in P. furiosus COM1 resulted in no apparent phenotype. On the other hand, frame-shifting mutations in the mutant genome negatively impacted transcription of a flagellar biosynthesis operon (PF0329-PF0338).Consequently, cells in the mutant culture lacked flagella and, unlike the WT, showed minimal evidence of exopolysaccharide-based cell aggregation in post-exponential phase. Finally, electron microscopy of PF0331-PF0337 deletions in P. furiosus COM1 showed that absence of flagella impacted normal cell aggregation behavior and, furthermore, indicated that flagella play a key role, beyond motility, in the growth physiology of P. furiosus.« less

  1. Neuraminidase Receptor Binding Variants of Human Influenza A(H3N2) Viruses Resulting from Substitution of Aspartic Acid 151 in the Catalytic Site: a Role in Virus Attachment?▿

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi Pu; Gregory, Victoria; Collins, Patrick; Kloess, Johannes; Wharton, Stephen; Cattle, Nicholas; Lackenby, Angie; Daniels, Rodney; Hay, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Changes in the receptor binding characteristics of human H3N2 viruses have been evident from changes in the agglutination of different red blood cells (RBCs) and the reduced growth capacity of recently isolated viruses, particularly in embryonated eggs. An additional peculiarity of viruses circulating in 2005 to 2009 has been the poor inhibition of hemagglutination by postinfection ferret antisera for many viruses isolated in MDCK cells, including homologous reference viruses. This was shown not to be due to an antigenic change in hemagglutinin (HA) but was shown to be the result of a mutation in aspartic acid 151 of neuraminidase (NA) to glycine, asparagine, or alanine, which caused an oseltamivir-sensitive agglutination of RBCs. The D151G substitution was shown to cause a change in the specificity of NA such that it acquired the capacity to bind receptors, which were refractory to enzymatic cleavage, without altering its ability to remove receptors for HA. Thus, the inhibition of NA-dependent agglutination by the inclusion of oseltamivir carboxylate in the assay was effective in restoring the anti-HA specificity of the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay for monitoring antigenic changes in HA. Since the NA-dependent binding activity did not affect virus neutralization, and virus populations in clinical specimens possessed, at most, low levels of the “151 mutant,” the biological significance of this feature of NA in, for example, immune evasion is unclear. It is apparent, however, that an important role of aspartic acid 151 in the activity of NA may be to restrict the specificity of the NA interaction and its receptor-destroying activity to complement that of HA receptor binding. PMID:20410266

  2. 40 CFR Appendix B to Subpart G of... - Substitutes Subject to Use Restrictions and Unacceptable Substitutes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Use Conditions Substitutes Application Substitute Decision Conditions Comments Electronics Cleaning w.... Electronics cleaning w/CFC-113 Dibromomethane Unacceptable High ODP; other alternatives exist....

  3. 40 CFR Appendix B to Subpart G of... - Substitutes Subject to Use Restrictions and Unacceptable Substitutes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Use Conditions Substitutes Application Substitute Decision Conditions Comments Electronics Cleaning w.... Electronics cleaning w/CFC-113 Dibromomethane Unacceptable High ODP; other alternatives exist....

  4. Characterization of an arylsulfatase from a mutant library of Pseudoalteromonas carrageenovora arylsulfatase.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanbing; Liu, Han; Qiao, Chaochao; Li, Lijun; Jiang, Zedong; Xiao, Anfeng; Ni, Hui

    2017-03-01

    A library of Pseudoalteromonas carrageenovora arylsulfatase mutants was constructed by introducing random mutagenesis using error-prone PCR. After screening, one mutant strain was obtained whose arylsulfatase had improved thermal stability. Protein sequence analysis revealed one amino acid substitution of H260L. The mutant arylsulfatase (named H260L) retained higher residual activity than wild-type enzyme (named WT) after incubation at 45, 50, 55 and 60°C for 60min. Thermal inactivation analysis showed that the half-life (t1/2) value at 55°C for H260L was 40.6min, while that of WT was 9.1min. When p-nitrophenyl sulfate was used as a substrate, the optimal reaction temperature and pH for the mutant enzyme were 55°C and pH 8.0, respectively. H260L was stable over the pH range of 6.0-9.0. Inhibition assay with EDTA indicated that metal ions play an important role during the catalytic process of the mutant enzyme. The desulfation ratio against agar of Gracilaria lemaneiformis was 82%.

  5. Viable transmembrane region mutants of bacteriophage M13 coat protein prepared by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Deber, C M

    1991-10-31

    Bacteriophage M13 coat protein - a 50-residue protein located at the E. coli host membrane during phage reproduction - is subjected to cytoplasmic, membrane-bound, and DNA-interactive environments during the phage life cycle. In research to examine the specific features of primary/secondary structure in the effective transmembrane (TM) region of the protein (residues 21-39: YIGYAWAMVVVIVGATIGI) which modulate its capacity to respond conformationally to the progressive influences of these varying environments, we have prepared over two dozen viable mutant phages with alterations in their coat protein TM regions. Mutants were obtained through use of site-directed mutagenesis techniques in combination with three "randomized" oligonucleotides which spanned the TM region. No subcloning was required. Among mutations observed were those in which each of the four TM Val residues was changed to Ala, and several with increased Ser or Thr content, including one double Ser mutant (G23S-A25S). Polar substitutions arising at Gly23 and Tyr24-including G23D, Y24H, Y24D and Y24N-suggested that this local segment resides external to the host membrane. Milligram quantities of mutant coat proteins are obtained by growing M13 mutant phages in liter preparations, with isotopic (e.g., 13C) labelling at desired sites, for subsequent characterization and conformational analysis in membrane-mimetic media.

  6. crl mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae resemble both mutants affecting general control of amino acid biosynthesis and omnipotent translational suppressor mutants.

    PubMed

    McCusker, J H; Haber, J E

    1988-06-01

    Cyocloheximide resistant lethal (crl) mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, defining 22 unlinked complementation groups, are unable to grow at 37 degrees. They are also highly pleiotropic at their permissive temperature of 25 degrees. The mutants are all unable to arrest at the G1 stage of the cell cycle when grown to stationary phase or when starved for a single amino acid, though they do arrest at G1 when deprived of all nitrogen. The crl mutants are also hypersensitive to various amino acid analogs and to 3-aminotriazole. These mutants also "tighten" leaky auxotrophic mutations that permit wild-type cells to grow in the absence of the appropriate amino acid. All of these phenotypes are also exhibited by gcn mutants affecting general control of amino acid biosynthesis. In addition, the crl mutants are all hypersensitive to hygromycin B, an aminoglycoside antibiotic that stimulates translational misreading. The crl mutations also suppress one nonsense mutation which is phenotypically suppressed by hygromycin B. Many crl mutants are also osmotically sensitive. These are phenotypes which the crl mutations have in common with previously isolated omnipotent suppressors. We suggest that the the crl mutations all affect the fidelity of protein translation.

  7. Selective excision of 5-carboxylcytosine by a thymine DNA glycosylase mutant

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Hideharu; Zhang, Xing; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) excises the mismatched base, uracil, thymine, or 5-hydroxymethyluracil (5hmU), as well as removes 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) when paired with a guanine. In the previously solved structure of TDG in complex with DNA containing 5caC, the side chain of asparagine 157 (N157) contacts the 5-carboxyl moiety of 5caC via a weak hydrogen bond. We examined the role of N157 in recognition of 5caC by mutagenesis. The asparagine-to-alanine (N157A) mutant has no detectable base excision activity for a G:T mismatch, and its excision activity is reduced for other substrates including G:5caC. Unexpectedly, the asparagine-to-aspartate (N157D) mutant has a comparable base excision rate for G:5caC substrate to that of wild type, but it only has residual activity for G:U and no detectable activity for other substrates. We further show that the N157D mutant has higher activity for 5caC at a lower pH (6.0), suggesting that increased protonation of the carboxylate of 5caC and the aspartate facilitates base excision. The N157D mutant remains highly specific for 5caC even in the presence of large excess of genomic DNA, a property that can potentially be used for mapping the very low amount of 5caC in genomes. PMID:23337108

  8. Free Energy Landscapes of Alanine Oligopeptides in Rigid-Body and Hybrid Water Models.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Divya; Chakravarty, Charusita

    2015-08-27

    Replica exchange molecular dynamics is used to study the effect of different rigid-body (mTIP3P, TIP4P, SPC/E) and hybrid (H1.56, H3.00) water models on the conformational free energy landscape of the alanine oligopeptides (acAnme and acA5nme), in conjunction with the CHARMM22 force field. The free energy landscape is mapped out as a function of the Ramachandran angles. In addition, various secondary structure metrics, solvation shell properties, and the number of peptide-solvent hydrogen bonds are monitored. Alanine dipeptide is found to have similar free energy landscapes in different solvent models, an insensitivity which may be due to the absence of possibilities for forming i-(i + 4) or i-(i + 3) intrapeptide hydrogen bonds. The pentapeptide, acA5nme, where there are three intrapeptide backbone hydrogen bonds, shows a conformational free energy landscape with a much greater degree of sensitivity to the choice of solvent model, though the three rigid-body water models differ only quantitatively. The pentapeptide prefers nonhelical, non-native PPII and β-sheet populations as the solvent is changed from SPC/E to the less tetrahedral liquid (H1.56) to an LJ-like liquid (H3.00). The pentapeptide conformational order metrics indicate a preference for open, solvent-exposed, non-native structures in hybrid solvent models at all temperatures of study. The possible correlations between the properties of solvent models and secondary structure preferences of alanine oligopeptides are discussed, and the competition between intrapeptide, peptide-solvent, and solvent-solvent hydrogen bonding is shown to be crucial in the relative free energies of different conformers.

  9. Relative response of alanine dosemeters for high-energy electrons determined using a Fricke primary standard.

    PubMed

    Vörös, Sándor; Anton, Mathias; Boillat, Bénédicte

    2012-03-07

    A significant proportion of cancer patients is treated using MeV electron radiation. One of the measurement methods which is likely to furnish reliable dose values also under non-reference conditions is the dosimetry using alanine and read-out via electron spin resonance (ESR). The system has already proven to be suitable for QA purposes for modern radiotherapy involving megavoltage x-rays. In order to render the secondary standard measurement system of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt based on alanine/ESR useable for dosimetry in radiotherapy, the dose-to-water (D(W)) response of the dosemeter needs to be known for relevant radiation qualities. For MeV electrons, the D(W) response was determined using the Fricke primary standard of the Swiss Federal Office of Metrology. Since there were no citable detailed publications on the Swiss primary standard available, this measurement system is described in some detail. The experimental results for the D(W) response are compared to results of Monte Carlo simulations which model in detail the beams furnished by the electron accelerator as well as the geometry of the detectors. The agreement between experiment and simulation is very good, as well as the agreement with results published by the National Research Council of Canada which are based on a different primary standard. No significant dependence of the D(W) response was found in the range between 6 and 20 MeV. It is therefore suggested to use a unique correction factor k(E) for alanine for all MeV qualities of k(E) = 1.012 ± 0.010.

  10. Concerted modulation of alanine and glutamate metabolism in young Medicago truncatula seedlings under hypoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Limami, Anis M; Glévarec, Gaëlle; Ricoult, Claudie; Cliquet, Jean-Bernard; Planchet, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    The modulation of primary nitrogen metabolism by hypoxic stress was studied in young Medicago truncatula seedlings. Hypoxic seedlings were characterized by the up-regulation of glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GDH1) and mitochondrial alanine aminotransferase (mAlaAT), and down-regulation of glutamine synthetase 1b (GS1b), NADH-glutamate synthase (NADH-GOGAT), glutamate dehydrogenase 3 (GDH3), and isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) gene expression. Hypoxic stress severely inhibited GS activity and stimulated NADH-GOGAT activity. GDH activity was lower in hypoxic seedlings than in the control, however, under either normoxia or hypoxia, the in vivo activity was directed towards glutamate deamination. (15)NH(4) labelling showed for the first time that the adaptive reaction of the plant to hypoxia consisted of a concerted modulation of nitrogen flux through the pathways of both alanine and glutamate synthesis. In hypoxic seedlings, newly synthesized (15)N-alanine increased and accumulated as the major amino acid, asparagine synthesis was inhibited, while (15)N-glutamate was synthesized at a similar rate to that in the control. A discrepancy between the up-regulation of GDH1 expression and the down-regulation of GDH activity by hypoxic stress highlighted for the first time the complex regulation of this enzyme by hypoxia. Higher rates of glycolysis and ethanol fermentation are known to cause the fast depletion of sugar stores and carbon stress. It is proposed that the expression of GDH1 was stimulated by hypoxia-induced carbon stress, while the enzyme protein might be involved during post-hypoxic stress contributing to the regeneration of 2-oxoglutarate via the GDH shunt.

  11. A new method for ligand docking to flexible receptors by dual alanine scanning and refinement (SCARE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottegoni, Giovanni; Kufareva, Irina; Totrov, Maxim; Abagyan, Ruben

    2008-05-01

    Protein binding sites undergo ligand specific conformational changes upon ligand binding. However, most docking protocols rely on a fixed conformation of the receptor, or on the prior knowledge of multiple conformations representing the variation of the pocket, or on a known bounding box for the ligand. Here we described a general induced fit docking protocol that requires only one initial pocket conformation and identifies most of the correct ligand positions as the lowest score. We expanded a previously used diverse "cross-docking" benchmark to thirty ligand-protein pairs extracted from different crystal structures. The algorithm systematically scans pairs of neighbouring side chains, replaces them by alanines, and docks the ligand to each `gapped' version of the pocket. All docked positions are scored, refined with original side chains and flexible backbone and re-scored. In the optimal version of the protocol pairs of residues were replaced by alanines and only one best scoring conformation was selected from each `gapped' pocket for refinement. The optimal SCARE (SCan Alanines and REfine) protocol identifies a near native conformation (under 2 Å RMSD) as the lowest rank for 80% of pairs if the docking bounding box is defined by the predicted pocket envelope, and for as many as 90% of the pairs if the bounding box is derived from the known answer with ˜5 Å margin as used in most previous publications. The presented fully automated algorithm takes about 2 h per pose of a single processor time, requires only one pocket structure and no prior knowledge about the binding site location. Furthermore, the results for conformationally conserved pockets do not deteriorate due to substantial increase of the pocket variability.

  12. 3-Hydroxykynurenine transaminase identity with alanine glyoxylate transaminase. A probable detoxification protein in Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Han, Qian; Fang, Jianmin; Li, Jianyong

    2002-05-03

    This study describes the functional characterization of a specific mosquito transaminase responsible for catalyzing the transamination of 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) to xanthurenic acid (XA). The enzyme was purified from Aedes aegypti larvae by ammonium sulfate fractionation, heat treatment, and various chromatographic techniques, plus non-denaturing electrophoresis. The purified transaminase has a relative molecular mass of 42,500 by SDS-PAGE. N-terminal and internal sequencing of the purified protein and its tryptic fragments resolved a partial N-terminal sequence of 19 amino acid residues and 3 partial internal peptide sequences with 7, 10, and 7 amino acid residues. Using degenerate primers based on the partial internal sequences for PCR amplification and cDNA library screening, a full-length cDNA clone with a 1,167-bp open reading frame was isolated. Its deduced amino acid sequence consists of 389 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular mass of 43,239 and shares 45-46% sequence identity with mammalian alanine glyoxylate transaminases. Northern analysis shows the active transcription of the enzyme in larvae and developing eggs. Substrate specificity analysis of this mosquito transaminase demonstrates that the enzyme is active with 3-HK, kynurenine, or alanine substrates. The enzyme has greater affinity and catalytic efficiency for 3-HK than for kynurenine and alanine. The biochemical characteristics of the enzyme in conjunction with the profiles of 3-HK transaminase activity and XA accumulation during mosquito development clearly point out its physiological function in the 3-HK to XA pathway. Our data suggest that the mosquito transaminase was evolved in a manner precisely reflecting the physiological requirement of detoxifying 3-HK produced in the tryptophan oxidation pathway in the mosquito.

  13. Substitution of lysine for arginine at position 42 of human transforming growth factor-alpha eliminates biological activity without changing internal disulfide bonds.

    PubMed Central

    Defeo-Jones, D; Tai, J Y; Vuocolo, G A; Wegrzyn, R J; Schofield, T L; Riemen, M W; Oliff, A

    1989-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha) is a growth-promoting protein that binds to the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor. To identify critical residues that govern TGF-alpha-EGF receptor binding, we prepared site-specific substitution mutants of TGF-alpha. Mutant proteins were tested in receptor-binding and mitogenesis assays. Semiconservative substitutions at positions 4, 12, 18, and 45 decreased biological activity 2.1- to 14-fold. The conservative substitution of lysine for arginine at position 42 completely eliminated biological activity. Amino acid composition analysis of proteolytic fragments from TGF-alpha and the Lys-42 mutant indicated that these proteins contained the same disulfide bonds. These studies suggest that arginine 42 may be a contact point for TGF-alpha-EGF receptor interaction. PMID:2506441

  14. Inhibition study of alanine aminotransferase enzyme using sequential online capillary electrophoresis analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lina; Chen, Yuanfang; Yang, Li

    2014-12-15

    We report the study of several inhibitors on alanine aminotransferase (ALT) enzyme using sequential online capillary electrophoresis (CE) assay. Using metal ions (Na(+) and Mg(2+)) as example inhibitors, we show that evolution of the ALT inhibition reaction can be achieved by automatically and simultaneously monitoring the substrate consumption and product formation as a function of reaction time. The inhibition mechanism and kinetic constants of ALT inhibition with succinic acid and two traditional Chinese medicines were derived from the sequential online CE assay. Our study could provide valuable information about the inhibition reactions of ALT enzyme.

  15. Evaluation of alanine as a reference dosimeter for therapy level dose comparisons in megavoltage electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, Malcolm; Sharpe, Peter; Vörös, Sándor

    2015-04-01

    When comparing absorbed dose standards from different laboratories (e.g. National Measurement Institutes, NMIs, for Key or Supplementary comparisons) it is rarely possible to carry out a direct comparison of primary standard instruments, and therefore some form of transfer detector is required. Historically, air-filled, unsealed ionization chambers have been used because of the long history of using these instruments, very good stability over many years, and ease of transport. However, the use of ion chambers for therapy-level comparisons is not without its problems. Findings from recent investigations suggest that ion chambers are prone to non-random variations, they are not completely robust to standard courier practices, and failure at any step in a comparison can render all measurements potentially useless. An alternative approach is to identify a transfer system that is insensitive to some of these concerns—effectively a dosimeter that is inexpensive, simple to use, robust, but with sufficient precision and of a size relevant to the disseminated quantity in question. The alanine dosimetry system has been successfully used in a number of situations as an audit dosimeter and therefore the purpose of this investigation was to determine whether alanine could also be used as the transfer detector for dosimetric comparisons, which require a lower value for the measurement uncertainty. A measurement protocol was developed for comparing primary standards of absorbed dose to water in high-energy electron beams using alanine pellets irradiated in a water-equivalent plastic phantom. A trial comparison has been carried out between three NMIs and has indicated that alanine is a suitable alternative to ion chambers, with the system used achieving a precision of 0.1%. Although the focus of the evaluation was on the performance of the dosimeter, the comparison results are encouraging, showing agreement at the level of the combined uncertainties (~0.6%). Based on this

  16. Beta-alanine and beta-aminoisobutyric acid levels in two siblings with dihydropyrimidinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    van Kuilenburg, A B P; Stroomer, A E M; Bosch, A M; Duran, M

    2008-06-01

    Dihydropyrimidinase (DHP) deficiency is an inborn error of the pyrimidine degradation pathway, affecting the hydrolytic ring opening of the dihydropyrimidines. In two siblings with a complete DHP deficiency and a variable clinical presentation, a normal concentration of beta-alanine and strongly decreased levels of beta-aminoisobutyric acid were observed in plasma, urine and CSF. No major differences were observed for the concentrations of the beta-amino acids in plasma and urine between the symptomatic and asymptomatic sibling. Thus, the relevance of the shortage of beta-aminoisobutyric acid for the onset of a clinical phenotype in patients with DHP deficiency remains to be established.

  17. Amino acid oxidation and alanine production in rat hemidiaphragm in vitro. Effects of dichloroacetate.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, T N; Caldecourt, M A; Sugden, M C

    1984-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (an activator of pyruvate dehydrogenase) stimulates 14CO2 production from [U-14C]glucose, but not from [U-14C]glutamate, [U-14C]aspartate, [U-14C]- and [1-14C]-valine and [U-14C]- and [1-14C]-leucine. It is concluded (1) that pyruvate dehydrogenase is not rate-limiting in the oxidation to CO2 of amino acids that are metabolized to tricarboxylic acid-cycle intermediates, and (2) that carbohydrate (and not amino acids) is the main carbon precursor in alanine formation in muscle. PMID:6149743

  18. A quick solution structure determination of the fully oxidized double mutant K9-10A cytochrome c7 from Desulfuromonas acetoxidans and mechanistic implications.

    PubMed

    Assfalg, Michael; Bertini, Ivano; Turano, Paola; Bruschi, Mireille; Durand, Marie-Claire; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thérèse; Dolla, Alain

    2002-02-01

    Lysines 9 and 10 in Desulfuromonas acetoxidans cytochrome c7, which could be involved in the interaction mechanism with the redox partners, have been replaced by alanine residues using site-directed mutagenesis. The solution structure of the fully oxidized form of K9-10A cytochrome c7, which is paramagnetic with three paramagnetic centers, has been determined via 1H NMR. The assignment of the spectra has been performed through an automatic program whose algorithm and strategy are here described. The assignment of the NOESY spectra has been further extended by back calculating the NOESY maps. The final number of meaningful NOE-based upper distance limits was 1186. In the Restrained Energy Minimization calculations, 147 pseudocontact shift constraints were also included, which showed consistency with NOE-based constraints and therefore further contribute to validate the structure quality. A final family of 35 conformers was calculated with RMSD values with respect to the mean structure of 0.69 +/- 0.17 A and 1.05 +/- 0.14 A for the backbone and heavy atoms, respectively. The overall fold of the molecule is maintained with respect to the native protein. The loop present between heme III and heme IV results to be highly disordered also in the present structure although its overall shape mainly resembles that of the oxidized native protein, and the two strands which give rise to the short beta-sheet present at the N-terminus and connected by a turn containing the mutated residues, are less clearly defined. If this loop is neglected, the RMSD values are 0.52 +/- 0.07 A and 0.92 +/- 0.06 A for the backbone and heavy atoms, respectively, which represent a reasonable resolution. The relative distances and orientations of the three hemes are maintained, as well as the orientation of the imidazole rings of the axial histidine ligands, with the only exception of heme IV. Such difference probably reflects minor conformational changes due to the substitution of the vicinal Lys

  19. Insight into structure-function relationship in phenol-soluble modulins using an alanine screen of the phenol-soluble modulin (PSM) α3 peptide.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Gordon Y C; Kretschmer, Dorothee; Queck, Shu Y; Joo, Hwang-Soo; Wang, Rong; Duong, Anthony C; Nguyen, Thuan H; Bach, Thanh-Huy L; Porter, Adeline R; DeLeo, Frank R; Peschel, Andreas; Otto, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs) are a family of peptides with multiple functions in staphylococcal pathogenesis. To gain insight into the structural features affecting PSM functions, we analyzed an alanine substitution library of PSMα3, a strongly cytolytic and proinflammatory PSM of Staphylococcus aureus with a significant contribution to S. aureus virulence. Lysine residues were essential for both receptor-dependent proinflammatory and receptor-independent cytolytic activities. Both phenotypes also required additional structural features, with the C terminus being crucial for receptor activation. Biofilm formation was affected mostly by hydrophobic amino acid positions, suggesting that the capacity to disrupt hydrophobic interactions is responsible for the effect of PSMs on biofilm structure. Antimicrobial activity, absent from natural PSMα3, could be created by the exchange of large hydrophobic side chains, indicating that PSMα3 has evolved to exhibit cytolytic rather than antimicrobial activity. In addition to gaining insight into the structure-function relationship in PSMs, our study identifies nontoxic PSMα3 derivatives for active vaccination strategies and lays the foundation for future efforts aimed to understand the biological role of PSM recognition by innate host defense.

  20. Peptide aromatic interactions modulated by fluorinated residues: Synthesis, structure and biological activity of Somatostatin analogs containing 3-(3′,5′difluorophenyl)-alanine

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Gago, Pablo; Rol, Álvaro; Todorovski, Toni; Aragón, Eric; Martin-Malpartida, Pau; Verdaguer, Xavier; Vallès Miret, Mariona; Fernández-Carneado, Jimena; Ponsati, Berta; Macias, Maria J.; Riera, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Somatostatin is a 14-residue peptide hormone that regulates the endocrine system by binding to five G-protein-coupled receptors (SSTR1–5). We have designed six new Somatostatin analogs with L-3-(3′,5′-difluorophenyl)-alanine (Dfp) as a substitute of Phe and studied the effect of an electron-poor aromatic ring in the network of aromatic interactions present in Somatostatin. Replacement of each of the Phe residues (positions 6, 7 and 11) by Dfp and use of a D-Trp8 yielded peptides whose main conformations could be characterized in aqueous solution by NMR. Receptor binding studies revealed that the analog with Dfp at position 7 displayed a remarkable affinity to SSTR2 and SSTR3. Analogs with Dfp at positions 6 or 11 displayed a π-π interaction with the Phe present at 11 or 6, respectively. Interestingly, these analogs, particularly [D-Trp8,L-Dfp11]-SRIF, showed high selectivity towards SSTR2, with a higher value than that of Octreotide and a similar one to that of native Somatostatin. PMID:27271737

  1. A structural insight into the P1S1 binding mode of diaminoethylphosphonic and phosphinic acids, selective inhibitors of alanine aminopeptidases

    SciTech Connect

    Węglarz-Tomczak, Ewelina; Berlicki, Łukasz; Pawełczak, Małgorzata; Nocek, Bogusław; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Mucha, Artur

    2016-07-01

    N0 -substituted 1,2-diaminoethylphosphonic acids and 1,2-diaminoethylphosphinic dipeptides were explored to unveil the structural context of the unexpected selectivity of these inhibitors of M1 alanine aminopeptidases (APNs) versus M17 leucine aminopeptidase (LAP). The diaminophosphonic acids were obtained via aziridines in an improved synthetic procedure that was further expanded for the phosphinic pseudodipeptide system. The inhibitory activity, measured for three M1 and one M17 metalloaminopeptidases of different sources (bacterial, human and porcine), revealed several potent compounds (e.g., Ki ¼ 65 nM of 1u for HsAPN). Two structures of an M1 representative (APN from Neisseria meningitidis) in complex with N-benzyl-1,2-diaminoethylphosphonic acid and N-cyclohexyl-1,2- diaminoethylphosphonic acid were determined by the X-ray crystallography. The analysis of these structures and the models of the phosphonic acid complexes of the human ortholog provided an insight into the role of the additional amino group and the hydrophobic substituents of the ligands within the S1 active site region.

  2. Cytosine hypomethylation at CHG and CHH sites in the pleiotropic mutants of Mendelian inheritance in Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Renu; Yadav, Gitanjali; Sharma, Vishakha; Sharma, Vinay; Kumar, Sushil

    2013-12-01

    The 5S and 18S rDNA sequences of Catharanthus roseus cv 'Nirmal' (wild type) and its leafless inflorescence (lli), evergreen dwarf (egd) and irregular leaf lamina (ill) single mutants and lli egd, lli ill and egd ill double mutants were characterized. The lli, egd and ill mutants of Mendelian inheritance bore the names after their most conspicuous morphological feature(s). They had been chemically induced and isolated for their salt tolerance. The double mutants were isolated as morphological segregants from crosses between single mutants. The morphological features of the two parents accompanied salt tolerance in the double mutants. All the six mutants were hypomethylated at repeat sequences, upregulated and downregulated for many genes and carried pleiotropic alterations for several traits. Here the 5S and 18S rDNAs of C. roseus were found to be relatively low in cytosine content. Cytosines were preponderantly in CG context (53%) and almost all of them were methylated (97%). The cytosines in CHH and CHG (where H = A, T or C) contexts were largely demethylated (92%) in mutants. The demethylation was attributable to reduced expression of RDR2 and DRM2 led RNA dependant DNA methylation and CMT3 led maintenance methylation pathways. Mutants had gained some cytosines by substitution of C at T sites. These perhaps arose on account of errors in DNA replication, mediated by widespread cytosine demethylation at CHG and CHH sites. It was concluded that the regulation of cytosine ethylation mechanisms was disturbed in the mutants. ILL, EGD and LLI genes were identified as the positive regulators of other genes mediating the RdDM and CMT3 pathways, for establishment and maintenance of cytosine methylation in C. roseus.

  3. Amino Acid Substitutions in Cold-Adapted Proteins from Halorubrum lacusprofundi, an Extremely Halophilic Microbe from Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    DasSarma, Shiladitya; Capes, Melinda D.; Karan, Ram; DasSarma, Priya

    2013-01-01

    The halophilic Archaeon Halorubrum lacusprofundi, isolated from the perennially cold and hypersaline Deep Lake in Antarctica, was recently sequenced and compared to 12 Haloarchaea from temperate climates by comparative genomics. Amino acid substitutions for 604 H. lacusprofundi proteins belonging to conserved haloarchaeal orthologous groups (cHOGs) were determined and found to occur at 7.85% of positions invariant in proteins from mesophilic Haloarchaea. The following substitutions were observed most frequently: (a) glutamic acid with aspartic acid or alanine; (b) small polar residues with other small polar or non-polar amino acids; (c) small non-polar residues with other small non-polar residues; (d) aromatic residues, especially tryptophan, with other aromatic residues; and (e) some larger polar residues with other similar residues. Amino acid substitutions for a cold-active H. lacusprofundi β-galactosidase were then examined in the context of a homology modeled structure at residues invariant in homologous enzymes from mesophilic Haloarchaea. Similar substitutions were observed as in the genome-wide approach, with the surface accessible regions of β-galactosidase displaying reduced acidity and increased hydrophobicity, and internal regions displaying mainly subtle changes among smaller non-polar and polar residues. These findings are consistent with H. lacusprofundi proteins displaying amino acid substitutions that increase structural flexibility and protein function at low temperature. We discuss the likely mechanisms of protein adaptation to a cold, hypersaline environment on Earth, with possible relevance to life elsewhere. PMID:23536799

  4. Endonuclease IV (nfo) mutant of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, R P; Saporito, S M; Spitzer, S G; Weiss, B

    1986-01-01

    A cloned gene, designated nfo, caused overproduction of an EDTA-resistant endonuclease specific for apurinic-apyrimidinic sites in DNA. The sedimentation coefficient of the enzyme was similar to that of endonuclease IV. An insertion mutation was constructed in vitro and transferred from a plasmid to the Escherichia coli chromosome. nfo mutants had an increased sensitivity to the alkylating agents methyl methanesulfonate and mitomycin C and to the oxidants tert-butyl hydroperoxide and bleomycin. The nfo mutation enhanced the killing of xth (exonuclease III) mutants by methyl methanesulfonate, H2O2, tert-butyl hydroperoxide, and gamma rays, and it enhanced their mutability by methyl methanesulfonate. It also increased the temperature sensitivity of an xth dut (dUTPase) mutant that is defective in the repair of uracil-containing DNA. These results are consistent with earlier findings that endonuclease IV and exonuclease III both cleave DNA 5' to an apurinic-apyrimidinic site and that exonuclease III is more active. However, nfo mutants were more sensitive to tert-butyl hydroperoxide and to bleomycin than were xth mutants, suggesting that endonuclease IV might recognize some lesions that exonuclease III does not. The mutants displayed no marked increase in sensitivity to 254-nm UV radiation, and the addition of an nth (endonuclease III) mutation to nfo or nfo xth mutants did not significantly increase their sensitivity to any of the agents tested. Images PMID:2430946

  5. [Evolution of urinary bladder substitution].

    PubMed

    Kock, N G

    1992-11-01

    The historical background to the currently used methods for continent bladder substitution is shortly outlined. The significance for the patient's quality of life of various methods for bladder reconstruction or urinary diversion is briefly discussed. The importance of reservoir configuration for achieving a high compliant urinary receptacle is pointed out. Factors affecting reabsorption of urinary constituents are stressed and the significance of an antireflux mechanism is discussed. Currently the majority of patients undergoing cystectomy for cancer or for other reasons can be offered bladder substitutes providing continence and easy emptying; that is, complete control over voiding. This can be achieved by orthotopic bladder reconstruction or by diverting the urine to the augmented and valved rectum or to the skin via a continent intestinal reservoir.

  6. Verification of the pure alanine in PMMA tube dosimeter applicability for dosimetry of radiotherapy photon beams: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Al-Karmi, Anan M; Ayaz, Ali Asghar H; Al-Enezi, Mamdouh S; Abdel-Rahman, Wamied; Dwaikat, Nidal

    2015-09-01

    Alanine dosimeters in the form of pure alanine powder in PMMA plastic tubes were investigated for dosimetry in a clinical application. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to measure absorbed radiation doses by detection of signals from radicals generated in irradiated alanine. The measurements were performed for low-dose ranges typical for single-fraction doses often used in external photon beam radiotherapy. First, the dosimeters were irradiated in a solid water phantom to establish calibration curves in the dose range from 0.3 to 3 Gy for 6 and 18 MV X-ray beams from a clinical linear accelerator. Next, the dosimeters were placed at various locations in an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom to measure the dose delivery of a conventional four-field box technique treatment plan to the pelvis. Finally, the doses measured with alanine dosimeters were compared against the doses calculated with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS). The results showed that the alanine dosimeters have a highly sensitive dose response with good linearity and no energy dependence in the dose range and photon beams used in this work. Also, a fairly good agreement was found between the in-phantom dose measurements with alanine dosimeters and the TPS dose calculations. The mean value of the ratios of measured to calculated dose values was found to be near unity. The measured points in the in-field region passed dose-difference acceptance criterion of 3% and those in the penumbral region passed distance-to-agreement acceptance criterion of 3 mm. These findings suggest that the pure alanine powder in PMMA tube dosimeter is a suitable option for dosimetry of radiotherapy photon beams.

  7. Substitutes for School Nurses in Illinois

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollinger, Linda Jeno; Bergren, Martha Dewey; Belmonte-Mann, Frances

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to explore utilization of nurse substitutes in the school setting in Illinois. The literature described personnel who staff the school health office in the absence of the school nurse and the barriers to obtaining nurse substitutes. There were no empirical studies conducted on school nurse substitutes in…

  8. 40 CFR 721.5867 - Substituted phenol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted phenol. 721.5867 Section... Substances § 721.5867 Substituted phenol. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as substituted phenol (PMNs P-89-1125,...

  9. 40 CFR 721.4476 - Substituted imines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted imines. 721.4476 Section... Substances § 721.4476 Substituted imines. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as substituted imines (PMNs...

  10. 40 CFR 721.4476 - Substituted imines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted imines. 721.4476 Section... Substances § 721.4476 Substituted imines. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as substituted imines (PMNs...

  11. 40 CFR 721.4476 - Substituted imines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substituted imines. 721.4476 Section... Substances § 721.4476 Substituted imines. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as substituted imines (PMNs...

  12. 40 CFR 721.4476 - Substituted imines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted imines. 721.4476 Section... Substances § 721.4476 Substituted imines. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as substituted imines (PMNs...

  13. 40 CFR 721.4476 - Substituted imines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Substituted imines. 721.4476 Section... Substances § 721.4476 Substituted imines. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as substituted imines (PMNs...

  14. Tele-substitutions in Heterocyclic Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Tišler, Miha

    2011-03-01

    Particular and rare examples of aromatic nucleophilic substitution are described as tele-substitution. Usually strong nucleophiles are involved and the entering group is introduced at a position distant from the expected leaving group. Examples of tele-substitution in various heteroaromatic systems are presented.

  15. 40 CFR 721.4280 - Substituted hydrazine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substituted hydrazine. 721.4280... Substances § 721.4280 Substituted hydrazine. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted hydrazine (PMN P-90-594)...

  16. 40 CFR 721.4280 - Substituted hydrazine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Substituted hydrazine. 721.4280... Substances § 721.4280 Substituted hydrazine. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted hydrazine (PMN P-90-594)...

  17. 40 CFR 721.4280 - Substituted hydrazine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted hydrazine. 721.4280... Substances § 721.4280 Substituted hydrazine. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted hydrazine (PMN P-90-594)...

  18. 40 CFR 721.4280 - Substituted hydrazine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted hydrazine. 721.4280... Substances § 721.4280 Substituted hydrazine. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted hydrazine (PMN P-90-594)...

  19. 40 CFR 721.4280 - Substituted hydrazine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted hydrazine. 721.4280... Substances § 721.4280 Substituted hydrazine. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted hydrazine (PMN P-90-594)...

  20. 40 CFR 721.323 - Substituted acrylamide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substituted acrylamide. 721.323... Substances § 721.323 Substituted acrylamide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as substituted acrylamide (PMN P-90-1687)...