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Sample records for alanine valine leucine

  1. An experimental and theoretical investigation of the chemical shielding tensors of (13)C(alpha) of alanine, valine, and leucine residues in solid peptides and in proteins in solution.

    PubMed

    Havlin, R H; Laws, D D; Bitter, H M; Sanders, L K; Sun, H; Grimley, J S; Wemmer, D E; Pines, A; Oldfield, E

    2001-10-24

    We have carried out a solid-state magic-angle sample-spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic investigation of the (13)C(alpha) chemical shielding tensors of alanine, valine, and leucine residues in a series of crystalline peptides of known structure. For alanine and leucine, which are not branched at the beta-carbon, the experimental chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) spans (Omega) are large, about 30 ppm, independent of whether the residues adopt helical or sheet geometries, and are in generally good accord with Omega values calculated by using ab initio Hartree-Fock quantum chemical methods. The experimental Omegas for valine C(alpha) in two peptides (in sheet geometries) are also large and in good agreement with theoretical predictions. In contrast, the "CSAs" (Deltasigma) obtained from solution NMR data for alanine, valine, and leucine residues in proteins show major differences, with helical residues having Deltasigma values of approximately 6 ppm while sheet residues have Deltasigma approximately 27 ppm. The origins of these differences are shown to be due to the different definitions of the CSA. When defined in terms of the solution NMR CSA, the solid-state results also show small helical but large sheet CSA values. These results are of interest since they lead to the idea that only the beta-branched amino acids threonine, valine, and isoleucine can have small (static) tensor spans, Omega (in helical geometries), and that the small helical "CSAs" seen in solution NMR are overwhelmingly dominated by changes in tensor orientation, from sheet to helix. These results have important implications for solid-state NMR structural studies which utilize the CSA span, Omega, to differentiate between helical and sheet residues. Specifically, there will be only a small degree of spectral editing possible in solid proteins since the spans, Omega, for the dominant nonbranched amino acids are quite similar. Editing on the basis of Omega will, however, be

  2. Identification of valine/leucine/isoleucine and threonine/alanine/glycine proton-spin systems of Escherichia coli adenylate kinase by selective deuteration and selective protonation.

    PubMed Central

    Bock-Möbius, I; Brune, M; Wittinghofer, A; Zimmermann, H; Leberman, R; Dauvergne, M T; Zimmermann, S; Brandmeier, B; Rösch, P

    1991-01-01

    Adenylate kinase from two types of Escherichia coli strains, a wild-type and a leucine-auxotrophic strain, was purified. On the one hand, growing the leucine-auxotrophic bacteria on a medium containing deuterated leucine yielded E. coli adenylate kinase with all leucine residues deuterated. On the other hand, by growing the wild-type bacteria on deuterated medium with phenylalanine, threonine and isoleucine present as protonated specimens, 80% randomly deuterated enzyme with protonated phenylalanine, threonine and isoleucine residues could be prepared. Use of these proteins enabled identification of the spin systems of these amino acid residues in the n.m.r. spectra of the protein. PMID:1991031

  3. Exogenous valine reduces conversion of leucine to 3-methyl-1-butanol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelis, R.; Weir, P.D.; Jones, R.R.M.; Umbarger, H.E.

    1983-02-01

    Mutant strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that require branched-chain amino acids must be supplemented with large concentrations (up to 10 mM) of these amino acids to satisfy their nutritional requirements. The utilization of one branched-chain amino acid, leucine, was examined in several leul strains of yeast grown aerobically in a glucose-ammonium salts minimal medium containing a limiting concentration (0.2 mM) of leucine. In this medium, the leucine requirement of the auxotrophic strains could be reduced by valine, another branched-chain amino acid. Increasing the valine concentration increased the cell yields of cultures and also reduced the levels of 3-methyl-1-butanol detected in the medium by gas chromatography. The concentration of 3-methyl-1-butanol was reduced from 122.0 to 48.9 ..mu..M when 5.0 mM valine was supplemented to limiting-leucine cultures. The amino acids isoleucine, threonine, norleucine, norvaline, ..cap alpha..-amino-butyrate, alanine, and glycine also spared the leucine requirement of leucine auxotrophs, most likely because they resemble leucine and competed for its uptake. We propose that leucine analogs restrict the entry and degradation of leucine and thus reduce its conversion to 3-methyl-1-butanol, a major component of fuel oil.

  4. Amino acid metabolism in the human fetus at term: leucine, valine, and methionine kinetics.

    PubMed

    van den Akker, Chris H P; Schierbeek, Henk; Minderman, Gardi; Vermes, Andras; Schoonderwaldt, Ernst M; Duvekot, Johannes J; Steegers, Eric A P; van Goudoever, Johannes B

    2011-12-01

    Human fetal metabolism is largely unexplored. Understanding how a healthy fetus achieves its fast growth rates could eventually play a pivotal role in improving future nutritional strategies for premature infants. To quantify specific fetal amino acid kinetics, eight healthy pregnant women received before elective cesarean section at term, continuous stable isotope infusions of the essential amino acids [1-13C,15N]leucine, [U-13C5]valine, and [1-13C]methionine. Umbilical blood was collected after birth and analyzed for enrichments and concentrations using mass spectrometry techniques. Fetuses showed considerable leucine, valine, and methionine uptake and high turnover rates. α-Ketoisocaproate, but not α-ketoisovalerate (the leucine and valine ketoacids, respectively), was transported at net rate from the fetus to the placenta. Especially, leucine and valine data suggested high oxidation rates, up to half of net uptake. This was supported by relatively low α-ketoisocaproate reamination rates to leucine. Our data suggest high protein breakdown and synthesis rates, comparable with, or even slightly higher than in premature infants. The relatively large uptakes of total leucine and valine carbon also suggest high fetal oxidation rates of these essential branched chain amino acids.

  5. Independent valine and leucine isotope labeling in Escherichia coli protein overexpression systems.

    PubMed

    Lichtenecker, Roman J; Weinhäupl, Katharina; Reuther, Lukas; Schörghuber, Julia; Schmid, Walther; Konrat, Robert

    2013-11-01

    The addition of labeled α-ketoisovalerate to the growth medium of a protein-expressing host organism has evolved into a versatile tool to achieve concomitant incorporation of specific isotopes into valine- and leucine- residues. The resulting target proteins represent excellent probes for protein NMR analysis. However, as the sidechain resonances of these residues emerge in a narrow spectral range, signal overlap represents a severe limitation in the case of high-molecular-weight NMR probes. We present a protocol to eliminate leucine labeling by supplying the medium with unlabeled α-ketoisocaproate. The resulting spectra of a model protein exclusively feature valine signals of increased intensity, confirming the method to be a first example of independent valine and leucine labeling employing α-ketoacid precursor compounds.

  6. Separate regulation of transport and biosynthesis of leucine, isoleucine, and valine in bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Quay, S C; Oxender, D L; Tsuyumu, S; Umbarger, H E

    1975-01-01

    Since both transport activity and the leucine biosynthetic enzymes are repressed by growth on leucine, the regulation of leucine, isoleucine, and valine biosynthetic enzymes was examined in Escherichia coli K-12 strain EO312, a constitutively derepressed branched-chain amino acid transport mutant, to determine if the transport derepression affected the biosynthetic enzymes. Neither the iluB gene product, acetohydroxy acid synthetase (acetolactate synthetase, EC 4.1.3.18), NOR THE LEUB gene product, 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (2-hydroxy-4-methyl-3-carboxyvalerate-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxido-reductase, EC 1.1.1.85), were significantly affected in their level of derepression or repression compared to the parental strain. A number of strains with alterations in the regulation of the branched-chain amino acid biosynthetic enzymes were examined for the regulation of the shock-sensitive transport system for these amino acids (LIV-I). When transport activity was examined in strains with mutations leading to derepression of the iluB, iluADE, and leuABCD gene clusters, the regulation of the LIV-I transport system was found to be normal. The regulation of transport in an E. coli strain B/r with a deletion of the entire leucine biosynthetic operon was normal, indicating none of the gene products of this operon are required for regulation of transport. Salmonella typhimurium LT2 strain leu-500, a single-site mutation affecting both promotor-like and operator-like function of the leuABCD gene cluster, also had normal regulation of the LIV-I transport system. All of the strains contained leucine-specific transport activity, which was also repressed by growth in media containing leucine, isoleucine and valine. The concentrated shock fluids from these strains grown in minimal medium or with excess leucine, isoleucine, and valine were examined for proteins with leucine-binding activity, and the levels of these proteins were found to be regulated normally. It appears

  7. [Leucine and alanine aminopeptidase activity in the organs of cattle, sheep and swine].

    PubMed

    Goranov, Kh

    1982-01-01

    Studied was the activity of leucine-aminopeptidase and alanine-aminopeptidase in fresh tissue homogenates of liver, spleen, kidney, heart, pancreas, femoral muscle, stomach (rumen), small intestine, and lung taken from 8 cattle, sheep, and pigs. Both enzymes showed ubiquity. Leucine-aminopeptidase exhibited highest activity in the spleen of pigs and the kidney of sheep and cattle. The kidneys of all investigated animal species showed 10 to 15 times higher alanine-aminopeptidase activity than the remaining organs. This pointed to the relative ubiquity of the enzyme with special reference to kidneys.

  8. Beneficial effects of l-leucine and l-valine on arrhythmias, hemodynamics and myocardial morphology in rats.

    PubMed

    Mitręga, Katarzyna; Zorniak, Michał; Varghese, Benoy; Lange, Dariusz; Nożynski, Jerzy; Porc, Maurycy; Białka, Szymon; Krzemiński, Tadeusz F

    2011-09-01

    Branched chain amino acids (BCAA) have been shown to have a general protective effect on the heart in different animal models as well as in humans. However, so far no attempt has been made to specifically elucidate their influence on arrhythmias. Our study was performed to evaluate whether an infusion of either l-leucine or l-valine in a dose of 1mgkg(-1)h(-1) 10min before a 7-min period of left anterior descending artery occlusion followed by 15min of reperfusion, had an effect on arrhythmias measured during the reperfusion phase in the ischemia- and reperfusion-induced arrhythmias model in rats in vivo. The effect of the infusion of these substances on mean arterial blood pressure was monitored throughout the experiment. Both of the tested amino acids exhibited significant antiarrhythmic properties. l-Leucine reduced the duration of ventricular fibrillation (P<0.05) and l-valine decreased the duration of ventricular fibrillation (P<0.001) and ventricular tachycardia (P<0.05). The two amino acids were generally hypotensive. l-Valine lowered blood pressure in all phases of the experiment (P<0.05) while l-leucine lowered this parameter mainly towards the end of occlusion and reperfusion (P<0.05). In addition, 30min infusion of the amino acids in the used dose did not produce any apparent adverse histological changes that were remarkably different from control. In summary, the results of our study suggest that l-leucine and l-valine in the dose that was used attenuates arrhythmias and are hypotensive in their influence. Our findings lend support to the many ongoing investigations into the benefit of the application of l-leucine and l-valine in cardiology like their addition to cardioplegic solutions.

  9. Comparison of deuterated leucine, valine, and lysine in the measurement of human apolipoprotein A-I and B-100 kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenstein, A.H.; Cohn, J.S.; Hachey, D.L.; Millar, J.S.; Ordovas, J.M.; Schaefer, E.J. )

    1990-09-01

    The production rates of apolipoprotein (apo)B-100 in very low density lipoprotein and in low density lipoprotein and apolipoprotein A-I in high density lipoprotein were determined using a primed-constant infusion of (5,5,5,-2H3)leucine, (4,4,4,-2H3)valine, and (6,6-2H2,1,2-13C2)lysine. The three stable isotope-labeled amino acids were administered simultaneously to determine whether absolute production rates calculated using a stochastic model were independent of the tracer species utilized. Three normolipidemic adult males were studied in the constantly fed state over a 15-h period. The absolute production rates of very low density lipoprotein apoB-100 were 11.4 +/- 5.8 (leucine), 11.2 +/- 6.8 (valine), and 11.1 +/- 5.4 (lysine) mg per kg per day (mean +/- SDM). The absolute production rates for low density lipoprotein apoB-100 were 8.0 +/- 4.7 (leucine), 7.5 +/- 3.8 (valine), and 7.5 +/- 4.2 (lysine) mg per kg per day. The absolute production rates for high density lipoprotein apoA-I were 9.7 +/- 0.2 (leucine), 9.4 +/- 1.7 (valine), and 9.1 +/- 1.3 (lysine) mg per kg per day. There were no statistically significant differences in absolute synthetic rates of the three apolipoproteins when the plateau isotopic enrichment values of very low density lipoprotein apoB-100 were used to define the isotopic enrichment of the intracellular precursor pool. Our data indicate that deuterated leucine, valine, or lysine provided similar results when used for the determination of apoA-I and apoB-100 absolute production rates within plasma lipoproteins as part of a primed-constant infusion protocol.

  10. Branched-chain amino acid interactions with reference to amino acid requirements in adult men: Valine metabolism at different leucine intakes

    SciTech Connect

    Pelletier, V.; Marks, L.; Wagner, D.A.; Hoerr, R.A.; Young, V.R. )

    1991-08-01

    The authors explored whether the oxidation of valine and by implication the physiological requirement for this amino acid are affected by changes in leucine intake over a physiological range. Six young adult men received, in random order, four L-amino acid-based diets for 5 d supplying either 20 or 10 mg valine.kg body wt-1.d-1, each in combination with 80 or 40 mg leucine.kg-1.d-1. On day 6 subjects were studied with an 8-h continuous intravenous infusion of (1-13C)valine (and (2H3)leucine) to determine valine oxidation in the fasted state (first 3 h) and fed state (last 5 h). Valine oxidation in the fasted state was similar among all diets but was lower (P less than 0.05) in the fed state for the 10 vs 20 mg valine.kg-1.d-1 intake. Leucine intake did not affect valine oxidation. Mean daily valine balance approximated +1.3 mg.kg-1.d-1 for the 20-mg intake and -1.6 mg.kg-1.d-1 for the 10-mg intake. These findings support our previously suggested mean valine requirement estimate of approximately 20 mg.kg-1.d-1.

  11. Incorporation of [3H]Leucine and [3H]Valine into Protein of Freshwater Bacteria: Uptake Kinetics and Intracellular Isotope Dilution

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Niels O. G.

    1992-01-01

    Incorporation of [3H]leucine and [3H]valine into proteins of freshwater bacteria was studied in two eutrophic lakes. Incorporation of both amino acids had a saturation level of about 50 nM external concentration. Only a fraction of the two amino acids taken up was used in protein synthesis. At 100 nM, the bacteria respired 91 and 78% of leucine and valine taken up, respectively. Respiration of 3H and 14C isotopes of leucine gave similar results. Most of the nonrespired leucine was recovered in bacterial proteins, while only up to one-half of the nonrespired valine occurred in proteins. In intracellular pools of the bacteria, [3H]leucine reached an isotope saturation of 88 to 100% at concentrations of >40 nM. For [3H]valine, an isotope equilibrium of about 90% was obtained at concentrations of >80 nM. Within an incubation period of typically 1 h, tritiated leucine and valine incorporated into proteins of the bacteria reached an isotope saturation of 2 to 6%. In a 99-h batch experiment, bacterial protein synthesis calculated from incorporation of leucine and valine corresponded to 31 and 51% (10 nM) and 89 and 97% (100 nM), respectively, of the chemically determined protein production. Measured conversion factors of 100 nM leucine and valine were 6.4 × 1016 and 6.6 × 1016 cells per mol, respectively, and fell within the expected theoretical values. The present study demonstrates that incorporation of both valine and leucine produces realistic measurements of protein synthesis in freshwater bacteria and that the incorporation can be used as a measure of bacterial production. PMID:16348807

  12. A NMR experiment for simultaneous correlations of valine and leucine/isoleucine methyls with carbonyl chemical shifts in proteins.

    PubMed

    Tugarinov, Vitali; Venditti, Vincenzo; Marius Clore, G

    2014-01-01

    A methyl-detected 'out-and-back' NMR experiment for obtaining simultaneous correlations of methyl resonances of valine and isoleucine/leucine residues with backbone carbonyl chemical shifts, SIM-HMCM(CGCBCA)CO, is described. The developed pulse-scheme serves the purpose of convenience in recording a single data set for all Ile(δ1), Leu(δ) and Val(γ) (ILV) methyl positions instead of acquiring two separate spectra selective for valine or leucine/isoleucine residues. The SIM-HMCM(CGCBCA)CO experiment can be used for ILV methyl assignments in moderately sized protein systems (up to ~100 kDa) where the backbone chemical shifts of (13)C(α), (13)Cβ and (13)CO are known from prior NMR studies and where some losses in sensitivity can be tolerated for the sake of an overall reduction in NMR acquisition time.

  13. Amino acid transport across the tonoplast of vacuoles isolated from barley mesophyll protoplasts: Uptake of alanine, leucine, and glutamine. [Hordeum vulgare L

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, K.J.; Jaeger, R.; Kaiser, G.; Martinoia, E. )

    1990-01-01

    Mesophyll protoplasts from leaves of well-fertilized barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) plants contained amino acids at concentrations as high as 120 millimoles per liter. With the exception of glutamic acid, which is predominantly localized in the cytoplasm, a major part of all other amino acids was contained inside the large central vacuole. Alanine, leucine, and glutamine are the dominant vacuolar amino acids in barley. Their transport into isolated vacuoles was studied using {sup 14}C-labeled amino acids. Uptake was slow in the absence of ATP. A three- to sixfold stimulation of uptake was observed after addition of ATP or adenylyl imidodiphosphate an ATP analogue not being hydrolyzed by ATPases. Other nucleotides were ineffective in increasing the rate of uptake. ATP-Stimulated amino acid transport was not dependent on the transtonoplast pH or membrane potential. p-Chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid and n-ethyl maleimide increased transport independently of ATP. Neutral amino acids such as valine or leucine effectively decreased the rate of alanine transport. Glutamine and glycine were less effective or not effective as competitive inhibitors of alanine transport. The results indicate the existence of a uniport translocator specific for neutral or basic amino acids that is under control of metabolic effectors.

  14. Examining the critical roles of human CB2 receptor residues Valine 3.32 (113) and Leucine 5.41 (192) in ligand recognition and downstream signaling activities.

    PubMed

    Alqarni, Mohammed; Myint, Kyaw Zeyar; Tong, Qin; Yang, Peng; Bartlow, Patrick; Wang, Lirong; Feng, Rentian; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2014-09-26

    We performed molecular modeling and docking to predict a putative binding pocket and associated ligand-receptor interactions for human cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2). Our data showed that two hydrophobic residues came in close contact with three structurally distinct CB2 ligands: CP-55,940, SR144528 and XIE95-26. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments and subsequent functional assays implicated the roles of Valine residue at position 3.32 (V113) and Leucine residue at position 5.41 (L192) in the ligand binding function and downstream signaling activities of the CB2 receptor. Four different point mutations were introduced to the wild type CB2 receptor: V113E, V113L, L192S and L192A. Our results showed that mutation of Val113 with a Glutamic acid and Leu192 with a Serine led to the complete loss of CB2 ligand binding as well as downstream signaling activities. Substitution of these residues with those that have similar hydrophobic side chains such as Leucine (V113L) and Alanine (L192A), however, allowed CB2 to retain both its ligand binding and signaling functions. Our modeling results validated by competition binding and site-directed mutagenesis experiments suggest that residues V113 and L192 play important roles in ligand binding and downstream signaling transduction of the CB2 receptor.

  15. Predicting Three-Dimensional Conformations of Peptides Constructed of Only Glycine, Alanine, Aspartic Acid, and Valine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Akifumi; Fukuyoshi, Shuichi

    2015-06-01

    The GADV hypothesis is a form of the protein world hypothesis, which suggests that life originated from proteins (Lacey et al. 1999; Ikehara 2002; Andras 2006). In the GADV hypothesis, life is thought to have originated from primitive proteins constructed of only glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and valine ([GADV]-proteins). In this study, the three-dimensional (3D) conformations of randomly generated short [GADV]-peptides were computationally investigated using replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations (Sugita and Okamoto 1999). Because the peptides used in this study consisted of only 20 residues each, they could not form certain 3D structures. However, the conformational tendencies of the peptides were elucidated by analyzing the conformational ensembles generated by REMD simulations. The results indicate that secondary structures can be formed in several randomly generated [GADV]-peptides. A long helical structure was found in one of the hydrophobic peptides, supporting the conjecture of the GADV hypothesis that many peptides aggregated to form peptide multimers with enzymatic activity in the primordial soup. In addition, these results indicate that REMD simulations can be used for the structural investigation of short peptides.

  16. Predicting three-dimensional conformations of peptides constructed of only glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and valine.

    PubMed

    Oda, Akifumi; Fukuyoshi, Shuichi

    2015-06-01

    The GADV hypothesis is a form of the protein world hypothesis, which suggests that life originated from proteins (Lacey et al. 1999; Ikehara 2002; Andras 2006). In the GADV hypothesis, life is thought to have originated from primitive proteins constructed of only glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and valine ([GADV]-proteins). In this study, the three-dimensional (3D) conformations of randomly generated short [GADV]-peptides were computationally investigated using replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations (Sugita and Okamoto 1999). Because the peptides used in this study consisted of only 20 residues each, they could not form certain 3D structures. However, the conformational tendencies of the peptides were elucidated by analyzing the conformational ensembles generated by REMD simulations. The results indicate that secondary structures can be formed in several randomly generated [GADV]-peptides. A long helical structure was found in one of the hydrophobic peptides, supporting the conjecture of the GADV hypothesis that many peptides aggregated to form peptide multimers with enzymatic activity in the primordial soup. In addition, these results indicate that REMD simulations can be used for the structural investigation of short peptides.

  17. Valine but not leucine or isoleucine supports neurotransmitter glutamate synthesis during synaptic activity in cultured cerebellar neurons.

    PubMed

    Bak, Lasse K; Johansen, Maja L; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2012-09-01

    Synthesis of neuronal glutamate from α-ketoglutarate for neurotransmission necessitates an amino group nitrogen donor; however, it is not clear which amino acid(s) serves this role. Thus, the ability of the three branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), leucine, isoleucine, and valine, to act as amino group nitrogen donors for synthesis of vesicular neurotransmitter glutamate was investigated in cultured mouse cerebellar (primarily glutamatergic) neurons. The cultures were superfused in the presence of (15) N-labeled BCAAs, and synaptic activity was induced by pulses of N-methyl-D-aspartate (300 μM), which results in release of vesicular glutamate. At the end of the superfusion experiment, the vesicular pool of glutamate was released by treatment with α-latrotoxin (3 nM, 5 min). This experimental paradigm allows a separate analysis of the cytoplasmic and vesicular pools of glutamate. Amount and extent of (15) N labeling of intracellular amino acids plus vesicular glutamate were analyzed employing HPLC and LC-MS analysis. Only when [(15) N]valine served as precursor did the labeling of both cytoplasmic and vesicular glutamate increase after synaptic activity. In addition, only [(15) N]valine was able to maintain the amount of vesicular glutamate during synaptic activity. This indicates that, among the BCAAs, only valine supports the increased need for synthesis of vesicular glutamate.

  18. Accumulation of D- vs. L-isomers of alanine and leucine in rat prostatic adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Conti, P.S.; Schmall, B.; Bigler, R.E.; Zanzonico, P.B.; Kleinert, E.; Whitmore, W.F. Jr.

    1985-05-01

    It has been reported that tumor tissue may accumulate some D-amino acids preferentially over the L-isomers. In order to investigate the potential use of carbon-11 labeled amino acid isomers for in vivo tumor studies with positron emission tomography in patients, the tissue distributions of alanine and leucine, substrates for the A-type and L-type amino acid transport systems, respectively, were studied in Copenhagen rates bearing the Dunning R3327G prostatic adenocarcinoma. The authors have previously reported differences in the accumulation of A-type vs. L-type amino acids in rat prostatic adenocarcinoma and normal tissues. All compounds were labeled with C-14 in the carboxyl position with specific activities of 30.0-56.6 mCi/mmol. Higher levels of C-14 activity (Relative Concentration (RC)=dpm found per gm tissue + dpm inject per gm animal mass) were observed in tumor tissue using D-alanine (0.71) compared to L- (0.21) or DL-alanine (0.27) at 45 min post-injection. While tumor/prostate and tumor/liver ratios were above 2 for all three substrates, tumor/blood and tumor/muscle were above one for only the D-isomer. Comparisons made with D-, L-, and DL-leucine also demonstrated a higher level of RC in tumor tissue with the D-isomer (0.84) vs. the L-(0.66) and DL-leucine (0.63). In this case, however, tumor/blood, tumor/prostate, and tumor/muscle ratios were above one for all three substrates, while tumor/liver ratios were below one. These results support the observation of a preferential accumulation of D-amino acids in tumor tissue over the natural L-isomers. Observed differences in the accumulation of the isomers in normal tissues are discussed.

  19. (19)F NMR studies of the leucine-isoleucine-valine binding protein: evidence that a closed conformation exists in solution.

    PubMed

    Salopek-Sondi, Branka; Vaughan, Mark D; Skeels, Matthew C; Honek, John F; Luck, Linda A

    2003-10-01

    The leucine-isoleucine-valine binding protein (LIV) found in the periplasmic space of E. coli has been used as a structural model for a number of neuronal receptors. This "venus fly trap" type protein has been characterized by crystallography in only the open form. Herein we have labeled LIV with 5-fluorotryptophan (5F-Trp) and difluoromethionine (DFM) in order to explore the structural dynamics of this protein and the application of DFM as a potential (19)F NMR structural probe for this family of proteins. Based on mass spectrometric analysis of the protein overproduced in the presence of DFM, approximately 30% of the five LIV methionine residues were randomly substituted with the fluorinated analog. Urea denaturation experiments imply a slight decrease in protein stability when DFM is incorporated into LIV. However, the fluorinated methionine did not alter leucine-binding activity upon its incorporation into the protein. Binding of L-leucine stabilizes both the unlabeled and DFM-labeled LIV, and induces the protein to adopt a three-state unfolding model in place of the two-state process observed for the free protein. The (19)F NMR spectrum of DFM-labeled LIV gave distinct resonances for the five Met residues found in LIV. 5F-Trp labeled LIV gave a well resolved spectrum for the three Trp residues. Trp to Phe mutants defined the resonances in the spectrum. The distinct narrowing in line width of the resonances when ligand was added identified the closed form of the protein.

  20. (19)F NMR studies of the leucine-isoleucine-valine binding protein: evidence that a closed conformation exists in solution.

    PubMed

    Salopek-Sondi, Branka; Vaughan, Mark D; Skeels, Matthew C; Honek, John F; Luck, Linda A

    2003-10-01

    The leucine-isoleucine-valine binding protein (LIV) found in the periplasmic space of E. coli has been used as a structural model for a number of neuronal receptors. This "venus fly trap" type protein has been characterized by crystallography in only the open form. Herein we have labeled LIV with 5-fluorotryptophan (5F-Trp) and difluoromethionine (DFM) in order to explore the structural dynamics of this protein and the application of DFM as a potential (19)F NMR structural probe for this family of proteins. Based on mass spectrometric analysis of the protein overproduced in the presence of DFM, approximately 30% of the five LIV methionine residues were randomly substituted with the fluorinated analog. Urea denaturation experiments imply a slight decrease in protein stability when DFM is incorporated into LIV. However, the fluorinated methionine did not alter leucine-binding activity upon its incorporation into the protein. Binding of L-leucine stabilizes both the unlabeled and DFM-labeled LIV, and induces the protein to adopt a three-state unfolding model in place of the two-state process observed for the free protein. The (19)F NMR spectrum of DFM-labeled LIV gave distinct resonances for the five Met residues found in LIV. 5F-Trp labeled LIV gave a well resolved spectrum for the three Trp residues. Trp to Phe mutants defined the resonances in the spectrum. The distinct narrowing in line width of the resonances when ligand was added identified the closed form of the protein. PMID:12956607

  1. Influence of the valine zipper region on the structure and aggregation of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain of activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5).

    PubMed

    Ciaccio, Natalie A; Reynolds, T Steele; Middaugh, C Russell; Laurence, Jennifer S

    2012-11-01

    Protein aggregation is a major problem for biopharmaceuticals. While the control of aggregation is critically important for the future of protein pharmaceuticals, mechanisms of aggregate assembly, particularly the role that structure plays, are still poorly understood. Increasing evidence indicates that partially folded intermediates critically influence the aggregation pathway. We have previously reported the use of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain of activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5) as a partially folded model system to investigate protein aggregation. This domain contains three regions with differing structural propensity: a N-terminal polybasic region, a central helical leucine zipper region, and a C-terminal extended valine zipper region. Additionally, a centrally positioned cysteine residue readily forms an intermolecular disulfide bond that reduces aggregation. Computational analysis of ATF5 predicts that the valine zipper region facilitates self-association. Here we test this hypothesis using a truncated mutant lacking the C-terminal valine zipper region. We compare the structure and aggregation of this mutant to the wild-type (WT) form under both reducing and nonreducing conditions. Our data indicate that removal of this region results in a loss of α-helical structure in the leucine zipper and a change in the mechanism of self-association. The mutant form displays increased association at low temperature but improved resistance to thermally induced aggregation.

  2. Influence of the valine zipper region on the structure and aggregation of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain of activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5).

    PubMed

    Ciaccio, Natalie A; Reynolds, T Steele; Middaugh, C Russell; Laurence, Jennifer S

    2012-11-01

    Protein aggregation is a major problem for biopharmaceuticals. While the control of aggregation is critically important for the future of protein pharmaceuticals, mechanisms of aggregate assembly, particularly the role that structure plays, are still poorly understood. Increasing evidence indicates that partially folded intermediates critically influence the aggregation pathway. We have previously reported the use of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain of activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5) as a partially folded model system to investigate protein aggregation. This domain contains three regions with differing structural propensity: a N-terminal polybasic region, a central helical leucine zipper region, and a C-terminal extended valine zipper region. Additionally, a centrally positioned cysteine residue readily forms an intermolecular disulfide bond that reduces aggregation. Computational analysis of ATF5 predicts that the valine zipper region facilitates self-association. Here we test this hypothesis using a truncated mutant lacking the C-terminal valine zipper region. We compare the structure and aggregation of this mutant to the wild-type (WT) form under both reducing and nonreducing conditions. Our data indicate that removal of this region results in a loss of α-helical structure in the leucine zipper and a change in the mechanism of self-association. The mutant form displays increased association at low temperature but improved resistance to thermally induced aggregation. PMID:23067245

  3. Influence of the Valine Zipper Region on the Structure and Aggregation of the Basic Leucine Zipper (bZIP) Domain of Activating Transcription Factor 5 (ATF5)

    PubMed Central

    Ciaccio, Natalie A.; Reynolds, T. Steele; Middaugh, C. Russell; Laurence, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a major problem for biopharmaceuticals. While the control of aggregation is critically important for the future of protein pharmaceuticals, mechanisms of aggregate assembly, particularly the role that structure plays, are still poorly understood. Increasing evidence indicates that partially folded intermediates critically influence the aggregation pathway. We have previously reported the use of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain of Activating Transcription Factor 5 (ATF5) as a partially folded model system to investigate protein aggregation. This domain contains three regions with differing structural propensity: a N-terminal polybasic region, a central helical leucine zipper region, and a C-terminal extended valine zipper region. Additionally, a centrally positioned cysteine residue readily forms an intermolecular disulfide bond that reduces aggregation. Computational analysis of ATF5 predicts that the valine zipper region facilitates self-association. Here we test this hypothesis using a truncated mutant lacking the C-terminal valine zipper region. We compare the structure and aggregation of this mutant to the wild-type (WT) form under both reducing and non-reducing conditions. Our data indicate that removal of this region results in a loss of alpha-helical structure in the leucine zipper and a change in the mechanism of self-association. The mutant form displays increased association at low temperature but improved resistance to thermally induced aggregation. PMID:23067245

  4. Methylmalonic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency: demonstration of defective valine and beta-alanine metabolism and reduced malonic semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity in cultured fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, R.G.; Pollitt, R.J.; Webley, J.

    1987-08-01

    Intact cultured fibroblasts from a child with a new metabolic disorder, thought to be due to a deficiency of methylmalonic semialdehyde dehydrogenase, produced labeled CO/sub 2/ normally from (1-/sup 14/C)valine but not from (2-/sup 14/C)valine. CO/sub 2/ production from labeled beta-alanine was also much reduced, confirming the suspicion that malonic semialdehyde dehydrogenase is also deficient in this condition. An assay for malonic semialdehyde dehydrogenase in cell homogenates showed low activity but it was impossible to assess the degree of reduction.

  5. Racemic synthesis and solid phase peptide synthesis application of the chimeric valine/leucine derivative 2-amino-3,3,4-trimethyl-pentanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Pelà, M; Del Zoppo, L; Allegri, L; Marzola, E; Ruzza, C; Calo, G; Perissutti, E; Frecentese, F; Salvadori, S; Guerrini, R

    2014-07-01

    The synthesis of non natural amino acid 2-amino-3,3,4-trimethyl-pentanoic acid (Ipv) ready for solid phase peptide synthesis has been developed. Copper (I) chloride Michael addition, followed by a Curtius rearrangement are the key steps for the lpv synthesis. The racemic valine/leucine chimeric amino acid was then successfully inserted in position 5 of neuropeptide S (NPS) and the diastereomeric mixture separated by reverse phase HPLC. The two diastereomeric NPS derivatives were tested for intracellular calcium mobilization using HEK293 cells stably expressing the mouse NPS receptor where they behaved as partial agonist and pure antagonist.

  6. Crystal Engineering of l-Alanine with l-Leucine Additive using Metal-Assisted and Microwave-Accelerated Evaporative Crystallization

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrated that the change in the morphology of l-alanine crystals can be controlled with the addition of l-leucine using the metal-assisted and microwave accelerated evaporative crystallization (MA-MAEC) technique. Crystallization experiments, where an increasing stoichiometric amount of l-leucine is added to initial l-alanine solutions, were carried out on circular poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) disks modified with a 21-well capacity silicon isolator and silver nanoparticle films using microwave heating (MA-MAEC) and at room temperature (control experiments). The use of the MA-MAEC technique afforded for the growth of l-alanine crystals with different morphologies up to ∼10-fold faster than those grown at room temperature. In addition, the length of l-alanine crystals was systematically increased from ∼380 to ∼2000 μm using the MA-MAEC technique. Optical microscope images revealed that the shape of l-alanine crystals was changed from tetragonal shape (without l-leucine additive) to more elongated and wire-like structures with the addition of the l-leucine additive. Further characterization of l-alanine crystals was undertaken by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) measurements. In order to elucidate the growth mechanism of l-alanine crystals, theoretical simulations of l-alanine’s morphology with and without l-leucine additive were carried out using Materials Studio software in conjunction with our experimental data. Theoretical simulations revealed that the growth of l-alanine’s {011} and {120} crystal faces were inhibited due to the incorporation of l-leucine into these crystal faces in selected positions. PMID:24839404

  7. Growth of transplastomic cells expressing D-amino acid oxidase in chloroplasts is tolerant to D-alanine and inhibited by D-valine.

    PubMed

    Gisby, Martin F; Mudd, Elisabeth A; Day, Anil

    2012-12-01

    Dual-conditional positive/negative selection markers are versatile genetic tools for manipulating genomes. Plastid genomes are relatively small and conserved DNA molecules that can be manipulated precisely by homologous recombination. High-yield expression of recombinant products and maternal inheritance of plastid-encoded traits make plastids attractive sites for modification. Here, we describe the cloning and expression of a dao gene encoding D-amino acid oxidase from Schizosaccharomyces pombe in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plastids. The results provide genetic evidence for the uptake of D-amino acids into plastids, which contain a target that is inhibited by D-alanine. Importantly, this nonantibiotic-based selection system allows the use of cheap and widely available D-amino acids, which are relatively nontoxic to animals and microbes, to either select against (D-valine) or for (D-alanine) cells containing transgenic plastids. Positive/negative selection with d-amino acids was effective in vitro and against transplastomic seedlings grown in soil. The dual functionality of dao is highly suited to the polyploid plastid compartment, where it can be used to provide tolerance against potential D-alanine-based herbicides, control the timing of recombination events such as marker excision, influence the segregation of transgenic plastid genomes, identify loci affecting dao function in mutant screens, and develop D-valine-based methods to manage the spread of transgenic plastids tagged with dao.

  8. Specific 13C labeling of leucine, valine and isoleucine methyl groups for unambiguous detection of long-range restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Fasshuber, Hannes Klaus; Demers, Jean-Philippe; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Here we present an isotopic labeling strategy to easily obtain unambiguous long-range distance restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies. The method is based on the inclusion of two biosynthetic precursors in the bacterial growth medium, α-ketoisovalerate and α-ketobutyrate, leading to the production of leucine, valine and isoleucine residues that are exclusively (13)C labeled on methyl groups. The resulting spectral simplification facilitates the collection of distance restraints, the verification of carbon chemical shift assignments and the measurement of methyl group dynamics. This approach is demonstrated on the type-three secretion system needle of Shigella flexneri, where 49 methyl-methyl and methyl-nitrogen distance restraints including 10 unambiguous long-range distance restraints could be collected. By combining this labeling scheme with ultra-fast MAS and proton detection, the assignment of methyl proton chemical shifts was achieved.

  9. Specific 13C labeling of leucine, valine and isoleucine methyl groups for unambiguous detection of long-range restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasshuber, Hannes Klaus; Demers, Jean-Philippe; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Here we present an isotopic labeling strategy to easily obtain unambiguous long-range distance restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies. The method is based on the inclusion of two biosynthetic precursors in the bacterial growth medium, α-ketoisovalerate and α-ketobutyrate, leading to the production of leucine, valine and isoleucine residues that are exclusively 13C labeled on methyl groups. The resulting spectral simplification facilitates the collection of distance restraints, the verification of carbon chemical shift assignments and the measurement of methyl group dynamics. This approach is demonstrated on the type-three secretion system needle of Shigella flexneri, where 49 methyl-methyl and methyl-nitrogen distance restraints including 10 unambiguous long-range distance restraints could be collected. By combining this labeling scheme with ultra-fast MAS and proton detection, the assignment of methyl proton chemical shifts was achieved.

  10. Compound-specific nitrogen isotope analysis of D-alanine, L-alanine, and valine: application of diastereomer separation to delta15N and microbial peptidoglycan studies.

    PubMed

    Takano, Yoshinori; Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Ogawa, Nanako O; Kitazato, Hiroshi; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2009-01-01

    We have developed an analytical method to determine the compound-specific nitrogen isotope compositions of individual amino acid enantiomers using gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry. A novel derivatization of amino acid diastereomers by optically active (R)-(-)-2-butanol or (S)-(+)-2-butanol offers two advantages for nitrogen isotope analysis. First, chromatographic chiral separation can be achieved without the use of chiral stationary-phase columns. Second, the elution order of these compounds on the chromatogram can be switched by a designated esterification reaction. We applied the method to the compound-specific nitrogen isotope analysis of D- and L-alanine in a peptidoglycan derived from the cell walls of cultured bacteria (Firmicutes and Actinobacteria; Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus staphylolyticus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus, and Streptomyces sp.), natural whole bacterial cells (Bacillus subtilis var. natto), (pseudo)-peptidoglycan from archaea (Methanobacterium sp.), and cell wall from eukaryota (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). We observed statistically significant differences in nitrogen isotopic compositions; e.g., delta15N ( per thousand vs air) in Staphylococcus staphylolyticus for d-alanine (19.2 +/- 0.5 per thousand, n = 4) and L-alanine (21.3 +/- 0.8 per thousand, n = 4) and in Bacillus subtilis for D-alanine (6.2 +/- 0.2 per thousand, n = 3) and L-alanine (8.2 +/- 0.4 per thousand, n = 3). These results suggest that enzymatic reaction pathways, including the alanine racemase reaction, produce a nitrogen isotopic difference in amino acid enantiomers, resulting in 15N-depleted D-alanine. This method is expected to facilitate compound-specific nitrogen isotope studies of amino acid stereoisomers.

  11. Interaction of L-alanyl-L-valine and L-valyl-L-alanine with organic vapors: thermal stability of clathrates, sorption capacity and the change in the morphology of dipeptide films.

    PubMed

    Ziganshin, Marat A; Gubina, Nadezhda S; Gerasimov, Alexander V; Gorbatchuk, Valery V; Ziganshina, Sufia A; Chuklanov, Anton P; Bukharaev, Anastas A

    2015-08-21

    The strong effect of the amino acid sequence in L-alanyl-L-valine and L-valyl-L-alanine on their sorption properties toward organic compounds and water, and the thermal stability of the inclusion compounds of these dipeptides have been found. Generally, L-valyl-L-alanine has a greater sorption capacity for the studied compounds, but the thermal stability of the L-alanyl-L-valine clathrates is higher. Unusual selectivity of L-valyl-L-alanine for vapors of few chloroalkanes was observed. The correlation between the change in the surface morphology of thin film of dipeptides and stoichiometry of their clathrates with organic compounds was found. This discovery may be used to predict the influence of vapors on the morphology of films of short-chain oligopeptides.

  12. Simultaneous determination of leucine, isoleucine and valine in Beagle dog plasma by HPLC-MS/MS and its application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Xie, Huiru; Chen, Xu; Jiang, Xuehua; Wang, Ling

    2015-10-10

    Leucine (Leu), isoleucine (Ile) and valine (Val) are three branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), which have been widely used as dietary supplements for professional athletes and patients with liver failure or catabolic diseases. To date, no pharmacokinetic studies of BCAAs in vivo useful for the assessment of clinical effect following daily intake has been reported. Thus in this study, an HPLC-MS/MS method for simultaneous determination of Leu, Ile and Val in Beagle dog plasma using homoarginine as the internal standard was developed and validated in terms of specificity, linearity, precision, accuracy, and stability. This assay method was then applied to a pharmacokinetic study of BCAAs in dogs following oral administration of 0.25 g/kg and 0.50 g/kg BCAAs. The HPLC-MS/MS method was found to be sensitive and reproducible for quantification of BCAAs in dog plasma and successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic study. All these BCAAs were well absorbed with a substantial increase in the plasma concentration after a baseline modification. No statistical significance was identified in different gender group and no drug accumulation was observed following multiple doses.

  13. Interactions between Equine Cyclin T1, Tat, and TAR Are Disrupted by a Leucine-to-Valine Substitution Found in Human Cyclin T1

    PubMed Central

    Taube, Ran; Fujinaga, Koh; Irwin, Dan; Wimmer, Jörg; Geyer, Matthias; Peterlin, B. Matija

    2000-01-01

    Transcriptional transactivators (Tat) from human immunodeficiency and equine infectious anemia viruses (HIV and EIAV) interact with their transactivation response elements (TAR) to increase the rates of viral transcription. Whereas the human cyclin T1 is required for the binding of Tat to TAR from HIV, it is unknown how Tat from EIAV interacts with its TAR. Furthermore, Tat from EIAV functions in equine and canine cells but not in human cells. In this study, we present sequences of cyclins T1 from horse and dog and demonstrate that their N-terminal 300 residues rescue the transactivation of Tat from EIAV in human cells. Although human and equine cyclins T1 bind to this Tat, only the equine cyclin T1 supports the binding of Tat to TAR from EIAV. Finally, a reciprocal exchange of the valine for the leucine at position 29 in human and equine cyclins T1, respectively, renders the human cyclin T1 active and the equine cyclin T1 inactive for Tat transactivation from EIAV. Thus, the collaboration between a specific cyclin T1 and Tat for their high-affinity interaction with TAR is a common theme of lentiviral transactivation. PMID:10623752

  14. Clusters of isoleucine, leucine, and valine side chains define cores of stability in high-energy states of globular proteins: Sequence determinants of structure and stability.

    PubMed

    Kathuria, Sagar V; Chan, Yvonne H; Nobrega, R Paul; Özen, Ayşegül; Matthews, C Robert

    2016-03-01

    Measurements of protection against exchange of main chain amide hydrogens (NH) with solvent hydrogens in globular proteins have provided remarkable insights into the structures of rare high-energy states that populate their folding free-energy surfaces. Lacking, however, has been a unifying theory that rationalizes these high-energy states in terms of the structures and sequences of their resident proteins. The Branched Aliphatic Side Chain (BASiC) hypothesis has been developed to explain the observed patterns of protection in a pair of TIM barrel proteins. This hypothesis supposes that the side chains of isoleucine, leucine, and valine (ILV) residues often form large hydrophobic clusters that very effectively impede the penetration of water to their underlying hydrogen bond networks and, thereby, enhance the protection against solvent exchange. The linkage between the secondary and tertiary structures enables these ILV clusters to serve as cores of stability in high-energy partially folded states. Statistically significant correlations between the locations of large ILV clusters in native conformations and strong protection against exchange for a variety of motifs reported in the literature support the generality of the BASiC hypothesis. The results also illustrate the necessity to elaborate this simple hypothesis to account for the roles of adjacent hydrocarbon moieties in defining stability cores of partially folded states along folding reaction coordinates.

  15. Dietary L-leucine and L-alanine supplementation have similar acute effects in the prevention of high-fat diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Freudenberg, Anne; Petzke, Klaus J; Klaus, Susanne

    2013-02-01

    High-protein diets have been shown to alleviate detrimental effects of high-fat diets and this effect can be partially mimicked by dietary L-leucine supplementation. Here, we aimed to elucidate the early mechanisms and the specificity of leucine effects. We performed a 1-week trial with male C57BL/6 mice fed ad libitum with semisynthetic high-fat diets containing an adequate (10 % w/w, AP) or high (50 % w/w, HP) amount of whey protein, or supplemented with L-leucine corresponding to the leucine content within the HP diet (Leu) or supplemented with equimolar L-alanine (Ala). Food and water intake were monitored continuously using a computer-controlled monitor system and body composition changes were assessed using quantitative NMR. HP completely prevented the AP-induced accumulation of body fat. Leu and Ala resulted in a similar reduction of body fat accumulation which was intermediate between AP and HP. There were no significant effects on plasma glucose or insulin. Triacylglycerol content and gene expression of lipogenesis enzymes in liver as well as plasma cholesterol were reduced by HP compared to AP with Leu and Ala again showing intermediate effects. Body fat gain and liver triacylglycerols were strongly correlated with total energy intake. Water intake was rapidly increased by HP feeding and total water intake correlated strongly with total amino nitrogen intake. We concluded that the positive effects of high-protein diets on metabolic syndrome associated traits are acutely due to effects on satiety possibly linked to amino nitrogen intake and on the subsequent suppression of liver lipogenesis without evidence for a specific leucine effect.

  16. Glial metabolism of valine.

    PubMed

    Murín, Radovan; Mohammadi, Ghasem; Leibfritz, Dieter; Hamprecht, Bernd

    2009-07-01

    The three essential amino acids, valine, leucine and isoleucine, constitute the group of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs). BCAAs are rapidly taken up into the brain parenchyma, where they serve several distinct functions including that as fuel material in brain energy metabolism. As one function of astrocytes is considered the production of fuel molecules that support the energy metabolism of adjacent neural cells in brain. Astroglia-rich primary cultures (APC) were shown to rapidly dispose of the BCAAs, including valine, contained in the culture medium. While the metabolisms of leucine and isoleucine by APC have already been studied in detail, some aspects of valine metabolism remained to be determined. Therefore, in the present study an NMR analysis was performed to identify the (13)C-labelled metabolites that are generated by APC during catabolism of [U-(13)C]valine and that are subsequently released into the incubation medium. The results presented show that APC (1) are potently disposing of the valine contained in the incubation medium; (2) are capable of degrading valine to the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle member succinyl-CoA; and (3) release into the extracellular milieu valine catabolites and compounds generated from them such as [U-(13)C]2-oxoisovalerate, [U-(13)C]3-hydroxyisobutyrate, [U-(13)C]2-methylmalonate, [U-(13)C]isobutyrate, and [U-(13)C]propionate as well as several TCA cycle-dependent metabolites including lactate.

  17. Regulation of Transaminase C Synthesis in Escherichia coli: Conditional Leucine Auxotrophy

    PubMed Central

    McGilvray, Derek; Umbarger, H. E.

    1974-01-01

    The regulation of synthesis of the valine-alanine-α-aminobutyrate transaminase (transaminase C) was studied in Escherichia coli mutants lacking the branched-chain amino acid transaminase (transaminase B). An investigation was made of two strains, CU2 and CU2002, each carrying the same transaminase B lesion but exhibiting different growth responses on a medium supplemented with branched-chain amino acids. Both had the absolute isoleucine requirement characteristic of ilvE auxotrophs, but growth of strain CU2 was stimulated by valine, whereas that of strain CU2002 was markedly inhibited by valine. Strain CU2002 behaved like a conditional leucine auxotroph in that the inhibition by valine was reversed by leucine. Results of enzymatic studies showed that synthesis of transaminase C was repressed by valine in strain CU2002 but not in strain CU2. Inhibition by valine in strain CU2002 appears to be the combined effect of repression on transaminase C synthesis and valine-dependent feedback inhibition of α-acetohydroxy acid synthase activity, causing α-ketoisovalerate (and hence leucine) limitation. The ilvE markers of strains CU2 and CU2002 were each transferred by transduction to a wild-type genetical background. All ilvE recombinants from both crosses resembled strain CU2002 and were inhibited by valine in the presence of isoleucine. Thus, strain CU2 carries an additional lesion that allows it to grow on a medium containing isoleucine plus valine. It is concluded that conditional leucine auxotrophy is characteristic of mutants carrying an ilvE lesion alone. PMID:4616947

  18. Optimisation of broiler chicken responses from 0 to 7 d of age to dietary leucine, isoleucine and valine using Taguchi and mathematical methods.

    PubMed

    Sedghi, M; Golian, A; Kolahan, F; Afsar, A

    2015-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted to evaluate the applicability of the Taguchi method (TM) and optimisation algorithms to optimise the branch chain amino acids (BCAA) requirements in 0 to 7 d broiler chicks. In the first experiment, the standardised digestible (SID) amino acids and apparent metabolisable energy (AME) values of maize, wheat and soya bean meal were evaluated. In the second experiment, three factors including leucine (Leu), isoleucine (Ile) and valine (Val), each at 4 levels, were selected, and an orthogonal array layout of L16 (4(3)) using TM was performed. After data collection, optimisation of average daily gain (ADG) and feed conversion ratio (FCR) were obtained using TM. The multiobjective genetic algorithm (MOGA) and random search algorithm (RSA) were also applied to predict the optimal combination of BCAA for broiler performance. In the third experiment, a growth study was conducted to evaluate the applicability of obtained optimum BCAA requirements data by TM, MOGA and RSA, and results were compared with those of birds fed with a diet formulated according to Ross 308 recommendations. In the second experiment, the TM resulted in 13.45 g/kg SID Leu, 8.5 g/kg SID Ile and 10.45 g/kg SID Val as optimum level for maximum ADG (21.57 g/bird/d) and minimum FCR (1.11 g feed/g gain) in 0- to 7-d-old broiler chickens. MOGA predicted the following combinations: SID Leu = 14.8, SID Ile = 9.1 and SID Val = 10.3 for maximum ADG (22.05) and minimum FCR (1.11). The optimisation using RSA predicted Leu = 16.0, Ile = 9.5 and Val = 10.2 for maximum ADG (22.67), and Leu = 15.5, Ile = 9.0 and Val = 10.4 to achieve minimum FCR (1.08). The validation experiment confirmed that TM, MOGA and RSA yielded optimum determination of dietary amino acid requirements and improved ADG and FCR as compared to Aviagen recommendations. However, based on the live animal validation trial, MOGA and RSA overpredicted the optimum requirement as compared to TM. In

  19. Engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for high-yield L-valine production under oxygen deprivation conditions.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Satoshi; Suda, Masako; Uematsu, Kimio; Natsuma, Yumi; Hiraga, Kazumi; Jojima, Toru; Inui, Masayuki; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2013-02-01

    We previously demonstrated efficient L-valine production by metabolically engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum under oxygen deprivation. To achieve the high productivity, a NADH/NADPH cofactor imbalance during the synthesis of l-valine was overcome by engineering NAD-preferring mutant acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase (AHAIR) and using NAD-specific leucine dehydrogenase from Lysinibacillus sphaericus. Lactate as a by-product was largely eliminated by disrupting the lactate dehydrogenase gene ldhA. Nonetheless, a few other by-products, particularly succinate, were still produced and acted to suppress the L-valine yield. Eliminating these by-products therefore was deemed key to improving theL-valine yield. By additionally disrupting the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene ppc, succinate production was effectively suppressed, but both glucose consumption and L-valine production dropped considerably due to the severely elevated intracellular NADH/NAD(+) ratio. In contrast, this perturbed intracellular redox state was more than compensated for by deletion of three genes associated with NADH-producing acetate synthesis and overexpression of five glycolytic genes, including gapA, encoding NADH-inhibited glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Inserting feedback-resistant mutant acetohydroxy acid synthase and NAD-preferring mutant AHAIR in the chromosome resulted in higher L-valine yield and productivity. Deleting the alanine transaminase gene avtA suppressed alanine production. The resultant strain produced 1,280 mM L-valine at a yield of 88% mol mol of glucose(-1) after 24 h under oxygen deprivation, a vastly improved yield over our previous best.

  20. CH3-specific NMR assignment of alanine, isoleucine, leucine and valine methyl groups in high molecular weight proteins using a single sample.

    PubMed

    Kerfah, Rime; Hamelin, Olivier; Boisbouvier, Jérôme; Marion, Dominique

    2015-12-01

    A new strategy for the NMR assignment of aliphatic side-chains in large perdeuterated proteins is proposed. It involves an alternative isotopic labeling protocol, the use of an out-and-back (13)C-(13)C TOCSY experiment ((H)C-TOCSY-C-TOCSY-(C)H) and an optimized non-uniform sampling protocol. It has long been known that the non-linearity of an aliphatic spin-system (for example Ile, Val, or Leu) substantially compromises the efficiency of the TOCSY transfers. To permit the use of this efficient pulse scheme, a series of optimized precursors were designed to yield linear (13)C perdeuterated side-chains with a single protonated CH3 group in these three residues. These precursors were added to the culture medium for incorporation into expressed proteins. For Val and Leu residues, the topologically different spin-systems introduced for the pro-R and pro-S methyl groups enable stereospecific assignment. All CH3 can be simultaneously assigned on a single sample using a TOCSY experiment. It only requires the tuning of a mixing delay and is thus more versatile than the relayed COSY experiment. Enhanced resolution and sensi-tivity can be achieved by non-uniform sampling combined with the removal of the large JCC coupling by deconvolution prior to the processing by iterative soft thresholding. This strategy has been used on malate synthase G where a large percentage of the CH3 groups could be correlated directly up to the backbone Ca. It is anticipated that this robust combined strategy can be routinely applied to large proteins.

  1. Continuous recovery of valine in a model mixture of amino acids and salt from Corynebacterium bacteria fermentation using a simulated moving bed chromatography.

    PubMed

    Park, Chanhun; Nam, Hee-Geun; Jo, Se-Hee; Wang, Nien-Hwa Linda; Mun, Sungyong

    2016-02-26

    The economical efficiency of valine production in related industries is largely affected by the performance of a valine separation process, in which valine is to be separated from leucine, alanine, and ammonium sulfate. Such separation is currently handled by a batch-mode hybrid process based on ion-exchange and crystallization schemes. To make a substantial improvement in the economical efficiency of an industrial valine production, such a batch-mode process based on two different separation schemes needs to be converted into a continuous-mode separation process based on a single separation scheme. To address this issue, a simulated moving bed (SMB) technology was applied in this study to the development of a continuous-mode valine-separation chromatographic process with uniformity in adsorbent and liquid phases. It was first found that a Chromalite-PCG600C resin could be eligible for the adsorbent of such process, particularly in an industrial scale. The intrinsic parameters of each component on the Chromalite-PCG600C adsorbent were determined and then utilized in selecting a proper set of configurations for SMB units, columns, and ports, under which the SMB operating parameters were optimized with a genetic algorithm. Finally, the optimized SMB based on the selected configurations was tested experimentally, which confirmed its effectiveness in continuous separation of valine from leucine, alanine, ammonium sulfate with high purity, high yield, high throughput, and high valine product concentration. It is thus expected that the developed SMB process in this study will be able to serve as one of the trustworthy ways of improving the economical efficiency of an industrial valine production process.

  2. Mutations Causing Slow-Channel Myasthenia Reveal That a Valine Ring in the Channel Pore of Muscle AChR is Optimized for Stabilizing Channel Gating.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xin-Ming; Okuno, Tatsuya; Milone, Margherita; Otsuka, Kenji; Takahashi, Koji; Komaki, Hirofumi; Giles, Elizabeth; Ohno, Kinji; Engel, Andrew G

    2016-10-01

    We identify two novel mutations in acetylcholine receptor (AChR) causing a slow-channel congenital myasthenia syndrome (CMS) in three unrelated patients (Pts). Pt 1 harbors a heterozygous βV266A mutation (p.Val289Ala) in the second transmembrane domain (M2) of the AChR β subunit (CHRNB1). Pts 2 and 3 carry the same mutation at an equivalent site in the ε subunit (CHRNE), εV265A (p.Val285Ala). The mutant residues are conserved across all AChR subunits of all species and are components of a valine ring in the channel pore, which is positioned four residues above the leucine ring. Both βV266A and εV265A reduce the amino acid size and lengthen the channel opening bursts by fourfold by enhancing gating efficiency by approximately 30-fold. Substitution of alanine for valine at the corresponding position in the δ and α subunit prolongs the burst duration four- and eightfold, respectively. Replacing valine at ε codon 265 either by a still smaller glycine or by a larger leucine also lengthens the burst duration. Our analysis reveals that each valine in the valine ring contributes to channel kinetics equally, and the valine ring has been optimized in the course of evolution to govern channel gating. PMID:27375219

  3. Mutations Causing Slow-Channel Myasthenia Reveal That a Valine Ring in the Channel Pore of Muscle AChR is Optimized for Stabilizing Channel Gating.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xin-Ming; Okuno, Tatsuya; Milone, Margherita; Otsuka, Kenji; Takahashi, Koji; Komaki, Hirofumi; Giles, Elizabeth; Ohno, Kinji; Engel, Andrew G

    2016-10-01

    We identify two novel mutations in acetylcholine receptor (AChR) causing a slow-channel congenital myasthenia syndrome (CMS) in three unrelated patients (Pts). Pt 1 harbors a heterozygous βV266A mutation (p.Val289Ala) in the second transmembrane domain (M2) of the AChR β subunit (CHRNB1). Pts 2 and 3 carry the same mutation at an equivalent site in the ε subunit (CHRNE), εV265A (p.Val285Ala). The mutant residues are conserved across all AChR subunits of all species and are components of a valine ring in the channel pore, which is positioned four residues above the leucine ring. Both βV266A and εV265A reduce the amino acid size and lengthen the channel opening bursts by fourfold by enhancing gating efficiency by approximately 30-fold. Substitution of alanine for valine at the corresponding position in the δ and α subunit prolongs the burst duration four- and eightfold, respectively. Replacing valine at ε codon 265 either by a still smaller glycine or by a larger leucine also lengthens the burst duration. Our analysis reveals that each valine in the valine ring contributes to channel kinetics equally, and the valine ring has been optimized in the course of evolution to govern channel gating.

  4. Raman study of poly(alanine-glycine)-based peptides containing tyrosine, valine, and serine as model for the semicrystalline domains of Bombyx mori silk fibroin.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Paola; Asakura, Tetsuo; Yao, Juming; Monti, Patrizia

    2004-11-01

    For a deeper insight into the structure of Bombyx mori silk fibroin, some model peptides containing tyrosine (Y), valine (V), and serine (S) in the basic (AG)n sequence were synthesized by the solid-phase method and analyzed by Raman spectroscopy in order to clarify their conformation and to evaluate the formation and/or disruption of the ordered structure typical of B. mori silk fibroin upon incorporation of Y, V, and S residues into the basic (AG)n sequence. The Raman results indicated that the silk I structure remains stable only when the Y residue is positioned near the chain terminus; otherwise, a silk I --> silk II conformational transition occurs. The peptides AGVGAGYGAGVGAGYGAGVGAGYG(AG)3 and (AG)3YG(AG)2VGYG(AG)3YG(AG)3 treated with LiBr revealed a prevalent silk II conformation; moreover, the former contained a higher amount of random coil than the latter. This result was explained in relation to the different degrees of interruption of the (AG)n sequence. The Raman analysis of the AGSGAG-containing samples confirmed that the AGSGAG hexapeptide is a good model for the silk II crystalline domain. As the number of AGSGAG repeating units decreased, the random coil content increased. The study of the Y domain (I850/I830 intensity ratio) allowed us to hypothesize that in the packing characteristic of Silk I and Silk II conformations the Y residues experience different environments and hydrogen-bonding arrangements; the packing typical of silk I structure traps the tyrosyl side chains in environments more unfavorable to phenoxyl hydrogen-bonding interactions.

  5. Pharmacology of Valinate and tert-Leucinate Synthetic Cannabinoids 5F-AMBICA, 5F-AMB, 5F-ADB, AMB-FUBINACA, MDMB-FUBINACA, MDMB-CHMICA, and Their Analogues.

    PubMed

    Banister, Samuel D; Longworth, Mitchell; Kevin, Richard; Sachdev, Shivani; Santiago, Marina; Stuart, Jordyn; Mack, James B C; Glass, Michelle; McGregor, Iain S; Connor, Mark; Kassiou, Michael

    2016-09-21

    Indole and indazole synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) featuring l-valinate or l-tert-leucinate pendant group have recently emerged as prevalent recreational drugs, and their use has been associated with serious adverse health effects. Due to the limited pharmacological data available for these compounds, 5F-AMBICA, 5F-AMB, 5F-ADB, AMB-FUBINACA, MDMB-FUBINACA, MDMB-CHMICA, and their analogues were synthesized and assessed for cannabimimetic activity in vitro and in vivo. All SCs acted as potent, highly efficacious agonists at CB1 (EC50 = 0.45-36 nM) and CB2 (EC50 = 4.6-128 nM) receptors in a fluorometric assay of membrane potential, with a general preference for CB1 activation. The cannabimimetic properties of two prevalent compounds with confirmed toxicity in humans, 5F-AMB and MDMB-FUBINACA, were demonstrated in vivo using biotelemetry in rats. Bradycardia and hypothermia were induced by 5F-AMB and MDMB-FUBINACA doses of 0.1-1 mg/kg (and 3 mg/kg for 5F-AMB), with MDMB-FUBINACA showing the most dramatic hypothermic response recorded in our laboratory for any SC (>3 °C at 0.3 mg/kg). Reversal of hypothermia by pretreatment with a CB1, but not CB2, antagonist was demonstrated for 5F-AMB and MDMB-FUBINACA, consistent with CB1-mediated effects in vivo. The in vitro and in vivo data indicate that these SCs act as highly efficacious CB receptor agonists with greater potency than Δ(9)-THC and earlier generations of SCs. PMID:27421060

  6. MICE EXPRESSING THE ADNFLE VALINE 287 LEUCINE MUTATION OF THE β2 NICOTINIC ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTOR SUBUNIT DISPLAY INCREASED SENSITIVITY TO ACUTE NICOTINE ADMINISTRATION AND ALTERED PRESYNAPTIC NICOTINIC RECEPTOR FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Heidi C.; Laverty, Duncan C.; Patzlaff, Natalie E.; Cohen, Bruce N.; Fonck, Carlos; McKinney, Sheri; McIntosh, J. Michael; Lindstrom, Jon M.; Lester, Henry A.; Grady, Sharon R.; Marks, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Several mutations in α4 or β2 nicotinic receptor subunits are linked to autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE). One such missense mutation in the gene encoding the β2 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunit (CHRNB2) is a valine-to-leucine substitution in the second transmembrane domain at position 287 (β2VL). Previous studies indicated that the β2VL mutation in mice alters circadian rhythm consistent with sleep alterations observed in ADNFLE patients (Xu et al., 2011). The current study investigates changes in nicotinic receptor function and expression that may explain the behavioral phenotype of β2VL mice. No differences in β2 mRNA expression were found between wild-type (WT) and heterozygous (HT) or homozygous mutant (MT) mice. However, antibody and ligand binding indicated that the mutation resulted in a reduction in receptor protein. Functional consequences of the β2VL mutation were assessed biochemically using crude synaptosomes. A gene-dose dependent increase in sensitivity to activation by acetylcholine and decrease in maximal nAChR-mediated [3H]-dopamine release and 86Rb efflux were observed. Maximal nAChR-mediated [3H]-GABA release in the cortex was also decreased in the MT, but maximal [3H]-GABA release was retained in the hippocampus. Behaviorally both HT and MT mice demonstrated increased sensitivity to nicotine-induced hypolocomotion and hypothermia. Furthermore, WT mice display only a tonic-clonic seizure (EEG recordable) 3 min after injection of a high dose of nicotine, while MT mice also display a dystonic arousal complex (non-EEG recordable) event 30 s after nicotine injection. Data indicate decreases in maximal response for certain measures are larger than expected given the decrease in receptor expression. PMID:23123803

  7. Mice expressing the ADNFLE valine 287 leucine mutation of the Β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit display increased sensitivity to acute nicotine administration and altered presynaptic nicotinic receptor function.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Heidi C; Laverty, Duncan C; Patzlaff, Natalie E; Cohen, Bruce N; Fonck, Carlos; McKinney, Sheri; McIntosh, J Michael; Lindstrom, Jon M; Lester, Henry A; Grady, Sharon R; Marks, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Several mutations in α4 or β2 nicotinic receptor subunits are linked to autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE). One such missense mutation in the gene encoding the β2 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunit (CHRNB2) is a valine-to-leucine substitution in the second transmembrane domain at position 287 (β2VL). Previous studies indicated that the β2VL mutation in mice alters circadian rhythm consistent with sleep alterations observed in ADNFLE patients (Xu et al., 2011). The current study investigates changes in nicotinic receptor function and expression that may explain the behavioral phenotype of β2VL mice. No differences in β2 mRNA expression were found between wild-type (WT) and heterozygous (HT) or homozygous mutant (MT) mice. However, antibody and ligand binding indicated that the mutation resulted in a reduction in receptor protein. Functional consequences of the β2VL mutation were assessed biochemically using crude synaptosomes. A gene-dose dependent increase in sensitivity to activation by acetylcholine and decrease in maximal nAChR-mediated [(3)H]-dopamine release and (86)Rb efflux were observed. Maximal nAChR-mediated [(3)H]-GABA release in the cortex was also decreased in the MT, but maximal [(3)H]-GABA release was retained in the hippocampus. Behaviorally both HT and MT mice demonstrated increased sensitivity to nicotine-induced hypolocomotion and hypothermia. Furthermore, WT mice display only a tonic-clonic seizure (EEG recordable) 3 min after injection of a high dose of nicotine, while MT mice also display a dystonic arousal complex (non-EEG recordable) event 30s after nicotine injection. Data indicate decreases in maximal response for certain measures are larger than expected given the decrease in receptor expression.

  8. Pharmacology of Valinate and tert-Leucinate Synthetic Cannabinoids 5F-AMBICA, 5F-AMB, 5F-ADB, AMB-FUBINACA, MDMB-FUBINACA, MDMB-CHMICA, and Their Analogues.

    PubMed

    Banister, Samuel D; Longworth, Mitchell; Kevin, Richard; Sachdev, Shivani; Santiago, Marina; Stuart, Jordyn; Mack, James B C; Glass, Michelle; McGregor, Iain S; Connor, Mark; Kassiou, Michael

    2016-09-21

    Indole and indazole synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) featuring l-valinate or l-tert-leucinate pendant group have recently emerged as prevalent recreational drugs, and their use has been associated with serious adverse health effects. Due to the limited pharmacological data available for these compounds, 5F-AMBICA, 5F-AMB, 5F-ADB, AMB-FUBINACA, MDMB-FUBINACA, MDMB-CHMICA, and their analogues were synthesized and assessed for cannabimimetic activity in vitro and in vivo. All SCs acted as potent, highly efficacious agonists at CB1 (EC50 = 0.45-36 nM) and CB2 (EC50 = 4.6-128 nM) receptors in a fluorometric assay of membrane potential, with a general preference for CB1 activation. The cannabimimetic properties of two prevalent compounds with confirmed toxicity in humans, 5F-AMB and MDMB-FUBINACA, were demonstrated in vivo using biotelemetry in rats. Bradycardia and hypothermia were induced by 5F-AMB and MDMB-FUBINACA doses of 0.1-1 mg/kg (and 3 mg/kg for 5F-AMB), with MDMB-FUBINACA showing the most dramatic hypothermic response recorded in our laboratory for any SC (>3 °C at 0.3 mg/kg). Reversal of hypothermia by pretreatment with a CB1, but not CB2, antagonist was demonstrated for 5F-AMB and MDMB-FUBINACA, consistent with CB1-mediated effects in vivo. The in vitro and in vivo data indicate that these SCs act as highly efficacious CB receptor agonists with greater potency than Δ(9)-THC and earlier generations of SCs.

  9. Metabolism of β-valine via a CoA-dependent ammonia lyase pathway.

    PubMed

    Otzen, Marleen; Crismaru, Ciprian G; Postema, Christiaan P; Wijma, Hein J; Heberling, Matthew M; Szymanski, Wiktor; de Wildeman, Stefaan; Janssen, Dick B

    2015-11-01

    Pseudomonas species strain SBV1 can rapidly grow on medium containing β-valine as a sole nitrogen source. The tertiary amine feature of β-valine prevents direct deamination reactions catalyzed by aminotransferases, amino acid dehydrogenases, and amino acid oxidases. However, lyase- or aminomutase-mediated conversions would be possible. To identify enzymes involved in the degradation of β-valine, a PsSBV1 gene library was prepared and used to complement the β-valine growth deficiency of a closely related Pseudomonas strain. This resulted in the identification of a gene encoding β-valinyl-coenzyme A ligase (BvaA) and two genes encoding β-valinyl-CoA ammonia lyases (BvaB1 and BvaB2). The BvaA protein demonstrated high sequence identity to several known phenylacetate CoA ligases. Purified BvaA enzyme did not convert phenyl acetic acid but was able to activate β-valine in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)- and CoA-dependent manner. The substrate range of the enzyme appears to be narrow, converting only β-valine and to a lesser extent, 3-aminobutyrate and β-alanine. Characterization of BvaB1 and BvaB2 revealed that both enzymes were able to deaminate β-valinyl-CoA to produce 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA, a common intermediate in the leucine degradation pathway. Interestingly, BvaB1 and BvaB2 demonstrated no significant sequence identity to known CoA-dependent ammonia lyases, suggesting they belong to a new family of enzymes. BLAST searches revealed that BvaB1 and BvaB2 show high sequence identity to each other and to several enoyl-CoA hydratases, a class of enzymes that catalyze a similar reaction with water instead of amine as the leaving group.

  10. Neutral penta- and hexacoordinate silicon(IV) complexes containing two bidentate ligands derived from the alpha-amino acids (S)-alanine, (S)-phenylalanine, and (S)-tert-leucine.

    PubMed

    Cota, Smaranda; Beyer, Matthias; Bertermann, Rüdiger; Burschka, Christian; Götz, Kathrin; Kaupp, Martin; Tacke, Reinhold

    2010-06-11

    The neutral hexacoordinate silicon(IV) complex 6 (SiO(2)N(4) skeleton) and the neutral pentacoordinate silicon(IV) complexes 7-11 (SiO(2)N(2)C skeletons) were synthesized from Si(NCO)(4) and RSi(NCO)(3) (R = Me, Ph), respectively. The compounds were structurally characterized by solid-state NMR spectroscopy (6-11), solution NMR spectroscopy (6 and 10), and single-crystal X-ray diffraction (8 and 11 were studied as the solvates 8 x CH(3)CN and 11 x C(5)H(12) x 0.5 CH(3)CN, respectively). The silicon(IV) complexes 6 (octahedral Si-coordination polyhedron) and 7-11 (trigonal-bipyramidal Si-coordination polyhedra) each contain two bidentate ligands derived from an alpha-amino acid: (S)-alanine, (S)-phenylalanine, or (S)-tert-leucine. The deprotonated amino acids act as monoanionic (6) or as mono- and dianionic ligands (7-11). The experimental investigations were complemented by computational studies of the stereoisomers of 6 and 7.

  11. Leucine acts as a nutrient signal to stimulate protein synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The postprandial rise in amino acids and insulin independently stimulates protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of piglets. Leucine is an important mediator of the response to amino acids. We have shown that the postprandial rise in leucine, but not isoleucine or valine, acutely stimulates muscle pro...

  12. Abiotic formation of valine peptides under conditions of high temperature and high pressure.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Otake, Tsubasa; Ishiguro, Takato; Nakazawa, Hiromoto; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the oligomerization of solid valine and the stabilities of valine and valine peptides under conditions of high temperature (150-200 °C) and high pressure (50-150 MPa). Experiments were performed under non-aqueous condition in order to promote dehydration reaction. After prolonged exposure of monomeric valine to elevated temperatures and pressures, the products were analyzed by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry comparing their retention times and masses. We identified linear peptides that ranged in size from dimer to hexamer, as well as a cyclic dimer. Previous studies that attempted abiotic oligomerization of valine in the absence of a catalyst have never reported valine peptides larger than a dimer. Increased reaction temperature increased the dissociative decomposition of valine and valine peptides to products such as glycine, β-alanine, ammonia, and amines by processes such as deamination, decarboxylation, and cracking. The amount of residual valine and peptide yields was greater at higher pressures at a given temperature, pressure, and reaction time. This suggests that dissociative decomposition of valine and valine peptides is reduced by pressure. Our findings are relevant to the investigation of diagenetic processes in prebiotic marine sediments where similar pressures occur under water-poor conditions. These findings also suggest that amino acids, such as valine, could have been polymerized to peptides in deep prebiotic marine sediments within a few hundred million years.

  13. Abiotic Formation of Valine Peptides Under Conditions of High Temperature and High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Otake, Tsubasa; Ishiguro, Takato; Nakazawa, Hiromoto; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the oligomerization of solid valine and the stabilities of valine and valine peptides under conditions of high temperature (150-200 °C) and high pressure (50-150 MPa). Experiments were performed under non-aqueous condition in order to promote dehydration reaction. After prolonged exposure of monomeric valine to elevated temperatures and pressures, the products were analyzed by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry comparing their retention times and masses. We identified linear peptides that ranged in size from dimer to hexamer, as well as a cyclic dimer. Previous studies that attempted abiotic oligomerization of valine in the absence of a catalyst have never reported valine peptides larger than a dimer. Increased reaction temperature increased the dissociative decomposition of valine and valine peptides to products such as glycine, β-alanine, ammonia, and amines by processes such as deamination, decarboxylation, and cracking. The amount of residual valine and peptide yields was greater at higher pressures at a given temperature, pressure, and reaction time. This suggests that dissociative decomposition of valine and valine peptides is reduced by pressure. Our findings are relevant to the investigation of diagenetic processes in prebiotic marine sediments where similar pressures occur under water-poor conditions. These findings also suggest that amino acids, such as valine, could have been polymerized to peptides in deep prebiotic marine sediments within a few hundred million years.

  14. [Regulation of key enzymes of L-alanine biosynthesis by Brevibacterium flavum producer strains].

    PubMed

    Melkonian, L O; Avetisova, G E; Ambartsumian, A A; Chakhalian, A Kh; Sagian, A S

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms of L-alanine overproduction by Brevibacterium flavum producer strains were studied. It was shown that beta-CI-L-alanine is an inhibitor of some key enzymes involved in the synthesis of L-alanine, including alanine transaminase and valine-pyruvate transaminase. Two highly active B. flavum GL1 and GL1 8 producer strains, which are resistant to the inhibitory effect of beta-Cl-L-alanine, were obtained using a parental B. flavum AA5 producer strain, characterized by a reduced activity of alanine racemase (>or=98%). It was demonstrated that the increased L-alanine synthesis efficiency observed in the producer strains developed in this work is associated with the absence of inhibition of alanine transaminase by the end product of the biosynthesis reaction, as well as with the effect of derepression of both alanine transaminase and valine-pyruvate transaminase synthesis by the studied compound.

  15. Triennial growth symposium: Leucine acts as a nutrient signal to stimulate protein synthesis in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The postprandial increases in AA and insulin independently stimulate protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of piglets. Leucine is an important mediator of the response to AA. We have shown that the postprandial increase in leucine, but not isoleucine or valine, acutely stimulates muscle protein synth...

  16. Isoleucine or valine deprivation stimulates fat loss via increasing energy expenditure and regulating lipid metabolism in WAT.

    PubMed

    Du, Ying; Meng, Qingshu; Zhang, Qian; Guo, Feifan

    2012-08-01

    There has been a growing interest in controlling body weight by increasing dietary levels of leucine recently. By contrast, we have focused on studying the effect of deficiency of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) leucine on lipid metabolism. We previously have shown that mice fed a leucine-deficient diet for 7 days exhibit significant changes in lipid metabolism as demonstrated by suppressed lipogenesis in the liver and increased fat mobilization in white adipose tissue, the latter of which was found to be caused by increased lipolysis in WAT and uncoupling protein 1 expression in brown adipose tissue. The goal of our current study is to investigate whether the above effects of leucine deficiency can be generalized to the deficiency of other BCAAs including valine and isoleucine. In our current study, we show that valine or isoleucine deficiency has similar effects on reducing fat mass to leucine deprivation, in a similar manner as those observed during leucine deprivation.

  17. Enteral leucine and protein synthesis in skeletal and cardiac muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are three members of the Branch Chain Amino Acids: leucine, isoleucine, and valine. As essential amino acids, these amino acids have important functions which include a primary role in protein structure and metabolism. It is intriguing that the requirement for BCAA in humans comprise about 40–...

  18. Ruthenium-Nitrosyl Complexes with Glycine, l-Alanine, l-Valine, l-Proline, d-Proline, l-Serine, l-Threonine, and l-Tyrosine: Synthesis, X-ray Diffraction Structures, Spectroscopic and Electrochemical Properties, and Antiproliferative Activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The reactions of [Ru(NO)Cl5]2– with glycine (Gly), l-alanine (l-Ala), l-valine (l-Val), l-proline (l-Pro), d-proline (d-Pro), l-serine (l-Ser), l-threonine (l-Thr), and l-tyrosine (l-Tyr) in n-butanol or n-propanol afforded eight new complexes (1–8) of the general formula [RuCl3(AA–H)(NO)]−, where AA = Gly, l-Ala, l-Val, l-Pro, d-Pro, l-Ser, l-Thr, and l-Tyr, respectively. The compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), 1H NMR, UV–visible and ATR IR spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and X-ray crystallography. X-ray crystallography studies have revealed that in all cases the same isomer type (from three theoretically possible) was isolated, namely mer(Cl),trans(NO,O)-[RuCl3(AA–H)(NO)], as was also recently reported for osmium analogues with Gly, l-Pro, and d-Pro (see Z. Anorg. Allg. Chem.2013, 639, 1590–1597). Compounds 1, 4, 5, and 8 were investigated by ESI-MS with regard to their stability in aqueous solution and reactivity toward sodium ascorbate. In addition, cell culture experiments in three human cancer cell lines, namely, A549 (nonsmall cell lung carcinoma), CH1 (ovarian carcinoma), and SW480 (colon carcinoma), were performed, and the results are discussed in conjunction with the lipophilicity of compounds. PMID:24555845

  19. A Heterospecific Leucine Zipper Tetramer

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Y.; Liu, J; Zheng, Q; Li, Q; Kallenbach, N; Lu, M

    2008-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions dictate the assembly of the macromolecular complexes essential for functional networks and cellular behavior. Elucidating principles of molecular recognition governing important interfaces such as coiled coils is a challenging goal for structural and systems biology. We report here that two valine-containing mutants of the GCN4 leucine zipper that fold individually as four-stranded coiled coils associate preferentially in mixtures to form an antiparallel, heterotetrameric structure. X-ray crystallographic analysis reveals that the coinciding hydrophobic interfaces of the hetero- and homotetramers differ in detail, explaining their partnering and structural specificity. Equilibrium disulfide exchange and thermal denaturation experiments show that the 50-fold preference for heterospecificity results from a combination of preferential packing and hydrophobicity. The extent of preference is sensitive to the side chains comprising the interface. Thus, heterotypic versus homotypic interaction specificity in coiled coils reflects a delicate balance in complementarity of shape and chemistry of the participating side chains.

  20. Specific labeling and assignment strategies of valine methyl groups for NMR studies of high molecular weight proteins.

    PubMed

    Mas, Guillaume; Crublet, Elodie; Hamelin, Olivier; Gans, Pierre; Boisbouvier, Jérôme

    2013-11-01

    The specific protonation of valine and leucine methyl groups in proteins is typically achieved by overexpressing proteins in M9/D2O medium supplemented with either labeled α-ketoisovalerate for the labeling of the four prochiral methyl groups or with 2-acetolactate for the stereospecific labeling of the valine and leucine side chains. However, when these labeling schemes are applied to large protein assemblies, significant overlap between the correlations of the valine and leucine methyl groups occurs, hampering the analysis of 2D methyl-TROSY spectra. Analysis of the leucine and valine biosynthesis pathways revealed that the incorporation of labeled precursors in the leucine pathway can be inhibited by the addition of exogenous l-leucine-d10. We exploited this property to label stereospecifically the pro-R and pro-S methyl groups of valine with minimal scrambling to the leucine residues. This new labeling protocol was applied to the 468 kDa homododecameric peptidase TET2 to decrease the complexity of its NMR spectra. All of the pro-S valine methyl resonances of TET2 were assigned by combining mutagenesis with this innovative labeling approach. The assignments were transferred to the pro-R groups using an optimally labeled sample and a set of triple resonance experiments. This improved labeling scheme enables us to overcome the main limitation of overcrowding in the NMR spectra of prochiral methyl groups, which is a prerequisite for the site-specific measurement of the structural and dynamic parameters or for the study of interactions in very large protein assemblies.

  1. The identification of enzyme targets for the optimization of a valine producing Corynebacterium glutamicum strain using a kinetic model.

    PubMed

    Magnus, Jørgen Barsett; Oldiges, Marco; Takors, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    The enzyme targets for the rational optimization of a Corynebacterium glutamicum strain constructed for valine production are identified by analyzing the control of flux in the valine/leucine pathway. The control analysis is based on measurements of the intracellular metabolite concentrations and on a kinetic model of the reactions in the investigated pathway. Data-driven and model-based methods are used and evaluated against each other. The approach taken gives a quantitative evaluation of the flux control and it is demonstrated how the understanding of flux control is used to reach specific recommendations for strain optimization. The flux control coefficients (FCCs) with respect to the valine excretion rate were calculated, and it was found that the control is distributed mainly between the acetohydroxyacid synthase enzyme (FCC = 0.32), the branched chain amino acid transaminase (FCC = 0.27), and the exporting translocase (FCC = 0.43). The availability of the precursor pyruvate has substantial influence on the valine flux, whereas the cometabolites are less important as demonstrated by the calculation of the respective response coefficients. The model is further used to make in-silico predictions of the change in valine flux following a change in enzyme level. A doubling of the enzyme level of valine translocase will result in an increase in valine flux of 31%. By optimizing the enzyme levels with respect to valine flux it was found that the valine flux can be increased by a factor 2.5 when the optimal enzyme levels are implemented.

  2. Sources of propionate for the biogenesis of ethyl-braced insect juvenile hormones: role of isoleucine and valine

    SciTech Connect

    Brindle, P.A.; Baker, F.C.; Tsai, L.W.; Reuter, C.C.; Schooley, D.A.

    1987-11-01

    Corpora allata from adult female Manduca sexta biosynthesis the sesquiterpenoid juvenile hormone (JH) III and the unusual ethyl-branched homologue JH II in vitro. The authors maintained corpora allata in medium 199 using (methyl-/sup 3/H)methionine as the source of the JH methyl ester moiety and as a mass marker. This allowed measurement of the relative contributions of /sup 14/C-labeled precursors to the biogenesis of JH II and III carbon skeletons. They showed efficient incorporation of a propionate equivalent, from isoleucine or valine catabolism, into the ethyl-branched portion of JH II, using double-label liquid scintillation counting of isolated JHs and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected ion monitoring of JH deuteromethoxyhydrin derivatives. Methionine was a poor source of propionate for JH II biosynthesis, while glucose, succinate, threonine, and ..beta..-alanine did not contribute propionate at all. Leucine, isoleucine, and glucose incorporated into JH III and the acetate-derivative portion of JH II.

  3. Suppressors of a genetic regulatory mutation affecting isoleucine-valine biosynthesis in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, J E; Calhoun, D H

    1978-01-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 mutant PS187 carries a mutation, ilvA538, in the structural gene for the biosynthetic L-threonine deaminase that leads to a leucine-sensitive growth phenotype, an isoleucine- and leucine-hypersensitive L-threonine deaminase, and pleiotropic effects resulting in abnormally low and invariant expression of some of the isoleucine-valine biosynthetic enzymes. Fifty-eight derivatives of strain PS187 were isolated as resistant to growth inhibition by leucine, by valine, or by valine plus glycly-valine and were biochemically, genetically, and physiologically characterized. All of these derivatives produced the feedback-hypersensitive L-threonine deaminase, and thus presumably possess the ilvA538 allele of the parent strain. Elevated synthesis of L-threonine deaminase was observed in 41 of the 58 isolates. Among 18 strains analyzed genetically, only those with mutations linked to the ilv gene clusters at 83 min produced elevated levels of L-threonine deaminase. One of the strains, MSR91, isolated as resistant to valine plus glycyl-valine, was chosen for more detailed study. The locus in strain MSR91 conferring resistance was located in four factor crosses between ilvE and rbs, and is in or near the ilvO gene postulated to be a site controlling the expression of the ilvEDA genes. Synthesis of the ilvEDA gene products in strain MSR91 is constitutive and derepressed approximately 200-fold relative to the parent strain, indicating that the genetic regulatory effects of the ilvA538 allele have been suppressed. Strain MSR91 should be suitable for use in purification of the ilvA538 gene product, since enzyme synthesis is fully derepressed and the suppressor mutation is clearly not located within the ilvA gene. PMID:361682

  4. Metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13869 for L-valine production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Li, Yanyan; Hu, Jinyu; Dong, Xunyan; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2015-05-01

    In this study, an L-valine-producing strain was developed from Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13869 through deletion of the three genes aceE, alaT and ilvA combined with the overexpression of six genes ilvB, ilvN, ilvC, lrp1, brnF and brnE. Overexpression of lrp1 alone increased L-valine production by 16-fold. Deletion of the aceE, alaT and ilvA increased L-valine production by 44-fold. Overexpression of the six genes ilvB, ilvN, ilvC, lrp1, brnE and brnF in the triple deletion mutant WCC003 further increased L-valine production. The strain WCC003/pJYW-4-ilvBNC1-lrp1-brnFE produced 243mM L-valine in flask cultivation and 437mM (51g/L) L-valine in fed-batch fermentation and lacked detectable amino-acid byproduct such as l-alanine and l-isoleucine that are usually found in the fermentation of L-valine-producing C. glutamicum.

  5. Thiamine-dependent Accumulation of Tetramethylpyrazine Accompanying a Mutation in the Isoleucine-Valine Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Demain, A. L.; Jackson, M.; Trenner, N. R.

    1967-01-01

    A mutant of Corynebacterium glutamicum was found to accumulate high concentrations of a material which crystallized upon cooling of the broth. The compound was identified as tetramethylpyrazine. The mutant was found to require isoleucine, valine, leucine, and pantothenate for growth. All four requirements probably result from the loss of a single enzyme of the isoleucine-valine pathway. Since similar mutants of Neurospora crassa accumulate acetoin, the present mutant probably forms tetramethylpyrazine from acetoin. Accumulation of tetramethylpyrazine was dependent upon addition of thiamine. This observation is consistent with the known activity of diphosphothiamine as a cofactor for the formation of acetolactate (a precursor of acetoin) from pyruvate. PMID:6039355

  6. Improvement of the redox balance increases L-valine production by Corynebacterium glutamicum under oxygen deprivation conditions.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Satoshi; Uematsu, Kimio; Natsuma, Yumi; Suda, Masako; Hiraga, Kazumi; Jojima, Toru; Inui, Masayuki; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2012-02-01

    Production of L-valine under oxygen deprivation conditions by Corynebacterium glutamicum lacking the lactate dehydrogenase gene ldhA and overexpressing the L-valine biosynthesis genes ilvBNCDE was repressed. This was attributed to imbalanced cofactor production and consumption in the overall L-valine synthesis pathway: two moles of NADH was generated and two moles of NADPH was consumed per mole of L-valine produced from one mole of glucose. In order to solve this cofactor imbalance, the coenzyme requirement for L-valine synthesis was converted from NADPH to NADH via modification of acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase encoded by ilvC and introduction of Lysinibacillus sphaericus leucine dehydrogenase in place of endogenous transaminase B, encoded by ilvE. The intracellular NADH/NAD(+) ratio significantly decreased, and glucose consumption and L-valine production drastically improved. Moreover, L-valine yield increased and succinate formation decreased concomitantly with the decreased intracellular redox state. These observations suggest that the intracellular NADH/NAD(+) ratio, i.e., reoxidation of NADH, is the primary rate-limiting factor for L-valine production under oxygen deprivation conditions. The L-valine productivity and yield were even better and by-products derived from pyruvate further decreased as a result of a feedback resistance-inducing mutation in the acetohydroxy acid synthase encoded by ilvBN. The resultant strain produced 1,470 mM L-valine after 24 h with a yield of 0.63 mol mol of glucose(-1), and the L-valine productivity reached 1,940 mM after 48 h.

  7. 21 CFR 582.5925 - Valine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Valine. 582.5925 Section 582.5925 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS... § 582.5925 Valine. (a) Product. Valine (L- and DL-forms). (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  8. 21 CFR 582.5925 - Valine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Valine. 582.5925 Section 582.5925 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS... § 582.5925 Valine. (a) Product. Valine (L- and DL-forms). (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  9. Suppression of Endogenous Glucose Production by Isoleucine and Valine and Impact of Diet Composition.

    PubMed

    Arrieta-Cruz, Isabel; Su, Ya; Gutiérrez-Juárez, Roger

    2016-02-15

    Leucine has been shown to acutely inhibit hepatic glucose production in rodents by a mechanism requiring its metabolism to acetyl-CoA in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH). In the early stages, all branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) are metabolized by a shared set of enzymes to produce a ketoacid, which is later metabolized to acetyl-CoA. Consequently, isoleucine and valine may also modulate glucose metabolism. To examine this possibility we performed intrahypothalamic infusions of isoleucine or valine in rats and assessed whole body glucose kinetics under basal conditions and during euglycemic pancreatic clamps. Furthermore, because high fat diet (HFD) consumption is known to interfere with central glucoregulation, we also asked whether the action of BCAAs was affected by HFD. We fed rats a lard-rich diet for a short interval and examined their response to central leucine. The results showed that both isoleucine and valine individually lowered blood glucose by decreasing liver glucose production. Furthermore, the action of the BCAA leucine was markedly attenuated by HFD feeding. We conclude that all three BCAAs centrally modulate glucose metabolism in the liver and that their action is disrupted by HFD-induced insulin resistance.

  10. Suppression of Endogenous Glucose Production by Isoleucine and Valine and Impact of Diet Composition

    PubMed Central

    Arrieta-Cruz, Isabel; Su, Ya; Gutiérrez-Juárez, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Leucine has been shown to acutely inhibit hepatic glucose production in rodents by a mechanism requiring its metabolism to acetyl-CoA in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH). In the early stages, all branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) are metabolized by a shared set of enzymes to produce a ketoacid, which is later metabolized to acetyl-CoA. Consequently, isoleucine and valine may also modulate glucose metabolism. To examine this possibility we performed intrahypothalamic infusions of isoleucine or valine in rats and assessed whole body glucose kinetics under basal conditions and during euglycemic pancreatic clamps. Furthermore, because high fat diet (HFD) consumption is known to interfere with central glucoregulation, we also asked whether the action of BCAAs was affected by HFD. We fed rats a lard-rich diet for a short interval and examined their response to central leucine. The results showed that both isoleucine and valine individually lowered blood glucose by decreasing liver glucose production. Furthermore, the action of the BCAA leucine was markedly attenuated by HFD feeding. We conclude that all three BCAAs centrally modulate glucose metabolism in the liver and that their action is disrupted by HFD-induced insulin resistance. PMID:26891318

  11. Determination of the dissociation constant of valine from acetohydroxy acid synthase by equilibrium partition in an aqueous two-phase system.

    PubMed

    Engel, S; Vyazmensky, M; Barak, Z; Chipman, D M; Merchuk, J C

    2000-06-23

    An aqueous polyethylene glycol/salt two-phase system was used to estimate the dissociation constant, K(dis), of the Escherichia coli isoenzyme AHAS III regulatory subunit, ilvH protein, from the feedback inhibitor valine. The amounts of the bound and free radioactive valine in the system were determined. A Scatchard plot of the data revealed a 1:1 valine-protein binding ratio and K(dis) of 133+/-14 microM. The protein did not bind leucine, and the ilvH protein isolated from a valine resistant mutant showed no valine binding. This method is very simple, rapid and requires only a small amounts of protein compared to the presently used equilibrium dialysis method.

  12. Purification and catalytic properties of L-valine dehydrogenase from Streptomyces cinnamonensis.

    PubMed Central

    Priestley, N D; Robinson, J A

    1989-01-01

    NAD+-dependent L-valine dehydrogenase was purified 180-fold from Streptomyces cinnamonensis, and to homogeneity, as judged by gel electrophoresis. The enzyme has an Mr of 88,000, and appears to be composed of subunits of Mr 41,200. The enzyme catalyses the oxidative deamination of L-valine, L-leucine, L-2-aminobutyric acid, L-norvaline and L-isoleucine, as well as the reductive amination of their 2-oxo analogues. The enzyme requires NAD+ as the only cofactor, which cannot be replaced by NADP+. The enzyme activity is significantly decreased by thiol-reactive reagents, although purine and pyrimidine bases, and nucleotides, do not affect activity. Initial-velocity and product-inhibition studies show that the reductive amination proceeds through a sequential ordered ternary-binary mechanism; NADH binds to the enzyme first, followed by 2-oxoisovalerate and NH3, and valine is released first, followed by NAD+. The Michaelis constants are as follows; L-valine, 1.3 mM; NAD+, 0.18 mM; NADH, 74 microM; 2-oxoisovalerate, 0.81 mM; and NH3, 55 mM. The pro-S hydrogen at C-4' of NADH is transferred to the substrate; the enzyme is B-stereospecific. It is proposed that the enzyme catalyses the first step of valine catabolism in this organism. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2803248

  13. Alanine water complexes.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, Vanesa; Sanz, M Eugenia; Peña, Isabel; Mata, Santiago; Cabezas, Carlos; López, Juan C; Alonso, José L

    2014-04-10

    Two complexes of alanine with water, alanine-(H2O)n (n = 1,2), have been generated by laser ablation of the amino acid in a supersonic jet containing water vapor and characterized using Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. In the observed complexes, water molecules bind to the carboxylic group of alanine acting as both proton donors and acceptors. In alanine-H2O, the water molecule establishes two intermolecular hydrogen bonds forming a six-membered cycle, while in alanine-(H2O)2 the two water molecules establish three hydrogen bonds forming an eight-membered ring. In both complexes, the amino acid moiety is in its neutral form and shows the conformation observed to be the most stable for the bare molecule. The microsolvation study of alanine-(H2O)n (n = 1,2) can be taken as a first step toward understanding bulk properties at a microscopic level.

  14. β-Alanine supplementation.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Jay R; Emerson, Nadia S; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2012-01-01

    β-Alanine is rapidly developing as one of the most popular sport supplements used by strength/power athletes worldwide. The popularity of β-alanine stems from its unique ability to enhance intramuscular buffering capacity and thereby attenuating fatigue. This review will provide an overview of the physiology that underlies the mechanisms of action behind β-alanine, examine dosing schemes, and examine the studies that have been conducted on the efficacy of this supplement. In addition, the effect that β-alanine has on body mass changes or whether it can stimulate changes in aerobic capacity also will be discussed. The review also will begin to explore the potential health benefits that β-alanine may have on older adult populations. Discussion will examine the potential adverse effects associated with this supplement as well as the added benefits of combining β-alanine with creatine.

  15. Leucine and alpha-Ketoisocaproic acid, but not norleucine, stimulate skeletal muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The branched-chain amino acid, leucine, acts as a nutrient signal to stimulate protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of young pigs. However, the chemical structure responsible for this effect has not been identified. We have shown that the other branched-chain amino acids, isoleucine and valine, are ...

  16. Final report on key comparison CCQM-K55.c (L-(+)-Valine): Characterization of organic substances for chemical purity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westwood, Steven; Josephs, Ralf; Choteau, Tiphaine; Daireaux, Adeline; Wielgosz, Robert; Davies, Stephen; Moad, Michael; Chan, Benjamin; Muñoz, Amalia; Conneely, Patrick; Ricci, Marina; Pires do Rego, Eliane Cristina; Garrido, Bruno C.; Violante, Fernando G. M.; Windust, Anthony; Dai, Xinhua; Huang, Ting; Zhang, Wei; Su, Fuhai; Quan, Can; Wang, Haifeng; Lo, Man-fung; Wong, Wai-fun; Gantois, Fanny; Lalerle, Béatrice; Dorgerloh, Ute; Koch, Matthias; Klyk-Seitz, Urszula-Anna; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Philipp, Rosemarie; Piechotta, Christian; Recknagel, Sebastian; Rothe, Robert; Yamazaki, Taichi; Zakaria, Osman Bin; Castro, E.; Balderas, M.; González, N.; Salazar, C.; Regalado, L.; Valle, E.; Rodríguez, L.; Ángel Laguna, L.; Ramírez, P.; Avila, M.; Ibarra, J.; Valle, L.; Pérez, M.; Arce, M.; Mitani, Y.; Konopelko, L.; Krylov, A.; Lopushanskaya, E.; Tang Lin, Teo; Liu, Qinde; Tong Kooi, Lee; Fernandes-Whaley, Maria; Prevoo-Franzsen, Désirée; Nhlapo, Nontete; Visser, Ria; Kim, Byungjoo; Lee, Hwashim; Kankaew, Pornhatai; Pookrod, Preeyaporn; Sudsiri, Nittaya; Shearman, Kittiya; Ceyhan Gören, Ahmet; Bilsel, Gökhan; Yilmaz, Hasibe; Bilsel, Mine; Çergel, Muhiddin; Gonca Çoskun, Fatma; Uysal, Emrah; Gündüz, Simay; Ün, Ilker; Warren, John; Bearden, Daniel W.; Bedner, Mary; Duewer, David L.; Lang, Brian E.; Lippa, Katrice A.; Schantz, Michele M.; Sieber, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Under the auspices of the Organic Analysis Working Group (OAWG) of the Comité Consultatif pour la Quantité de Matière (CCQM) a key comparison, CCQM K55.c, was coordinated by the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) in 2012. Twenty National Measurement Institutes or Designated Institutes and the BIPM participated. Participants were required to assign the mass fraction of valine present as the main component in the comparison sample for CCQM-K55.c. The comparison samples were prepared from analytical grade L-valine purchased from a commercial supplier and used as provided without further treatment or purification. Valine was selected to be representative of the performance of a laboratory's measurement capability for the purity assignment of organic compounds of low structural complexity [molecular weight range 100-300] and high polarity (pKOW > -2). The KCRV for the valine content of the material was 992.0 mg/g with a combined standard uncertainty of 0.3 mg/g. The key comparison reference value (KCRV) was assigned by combination of KCRVs assigned from participant results for each orthogonal impurity class. The relative expanded uncertainties reported by laboratories having results consistent with the KCRV ranged from 1 mg/g to 6 mg/g when using mass balance based approaches alone, 2 mg/g to 7 mg/g using quantitative 1H NMR (qNMR) based approaches and from 1 mg/g to 2.5 mg/g when a result obtained by a mass balance method was combined with a separate qNMR result. The material provided several analytical challenges. In addition to the need to identify and quantify various related amino acid impurities including leucine, isoleucine, alanine and α-amino butyrate, care was required to select appropriate conditions for performing Karl Fischer titration assay for water content to avoid bias due to in situ formation of water by self-condensation under the assay conditions. It also proved to be a challenging compound for purity assignment by qNMR techniques

  17. Cyclo(valine-valine) inhibits Vibrio cholerae virulence gene expression.

    PubMed

    Vikram, Amit; Ante, Vanessa M; Bina, X Renee; Zhu, Qin; Liu, Xinyu; Bina, James E

    2014-06-01

    Vibrio cholerae has been shown to produce a cyclic dipeptide, cyclo(phenylalanine-proline) (cFP), that functions to repress virulence factor production. The objective of this study was to determine if heterologous cyclic dipeptides could repress V. cholerae virulence factor production. To that end, three synthetic cyclic dipeptides that differed in their side chains from cFP were assayed for virulence inhibitory activity in V. cholerae. The results revealed that cyclo(valine-valine) (cVV) inhibited virulence factor production by a ToxR-dependent process that resulted in the repression of the virulence regulator aphA. cVV-dependent repression of aphA was found to be independent of known aphA regulatory genes. The results demonstrated that V. cholerae was able to respond to exogenous cyclic dipeptides and implicated the hydrophobic amino acid side chains on both arms of the cyclo dipeptide scaffold as structural requirements for inhibitory activity. The results further suggest that cyclic dipeptides have potential as therapeutics for cholera treatment.

  18. D-valine as an indicator for metabolic changes in L-valine

    SciTech Connect

    Faulhaber, P.; Bartlett, R.; Lathrop, K.A.; Harper, P.V.

    1985-05-01

    Racemic C-11-carboxyl labeled amino acids are easily prepared and have been proven useful as pancreatic imaging agents in humans. The authors are continuing an investigation of the biokinetics and metabolism of one of these, C-11 labeled valine using the D-enantiomer to measure tissue distribution of ''unchanged'' valine and comparing it to L-valine. Mice were injected IV with D-, L-, or D,L-valine, and data collected for various tissues, exhaled CO/sub 2/ and urine at intervals between 1 and 150 min. The % injected activity (IA) per organ for D-valine was multiplied by the ratio of the % retained activity (RA) for L-valine to % RA for D-valine. This value is assumed to represent ''unchanged'' L-valine; it was subtracted from the measured % IA for L-valine to give metabolized C-11. Greatest differences are an increasing excess of --15% for small intestine (SI) and an increasing deficit of --15% for muscle at 120 min. Muscle is apparently an active site for incorporation of C-11 from L-valine into other molecules which are then concentrated in the SI. Some tissues were homogenized in chloroform-methanol (2:1), mixed with a small amount of water, centrifuged, and the 3 resulting layers assayed for C-11. In the liver, for example, at 15 and 45 min there was no activity in the chloroform layer for D-, or L-valine. The aqueous layer contained 18% sample activity (SA) at 15 min and 10% SA at 45 min for L-valine, and --78% SA at both times for D-valine; the tissue layer contained 82% SA and 91% SA, for L-valine, and --22% SA for D-valine at both times. Use of enantiomers in this way gives the possibility of quantitating isolated metabolic processes.

  19. Leucine metabolism in human newborns

    SciTech Connect

    Denne, S.C.; Kalhan, S.C. )

    1987-12-01

    The present study was designed to (1) determine whether a relationship exists between newborn birth weight and leucine metabolism and (2) compare leucine and energy metabolism in a period of rapid growth and development (i.e., newborn) with a constant nongrowth period (i.e., adult). Leucine kinetics and energy expenditure were measured in the postabsorptive state in 12 normal full-term newborns in early neonatal life and in 11 normal adults using a primed constant L-(1-{sup 13}C)leucine infusion combined with respiratory calorimetry. A significant positive correlation between newborn birth weight and leucine flux was observed. These data suggest the following. (1) A relationship exists between newborn birth weight and protein metabolism, as reflected by the correlation between leucine flux when expressed as micromoles per kilogram per hour and birth weight. (2) The high rate of leucine flux measured in newborns probably reflects the rapid remodeling of protein that occurs in this period of development, even during fasting. (3) The similar values in newborns and adults of leucine kinetics and energy expenditure when normalized to metabolic body weight and the nearly equivalent allometric exponents relating body weight to leucine flux and energy expenditure support a close relationship between leucine and energy metabolism, at least at the extremes of human growth.

  20. Enhanced production of branched-chain amino acids by Gluconacetobacter europaeus with a specific regional deletion in a leucine responsive regulator.

    PubMed

    Akasaka, Naoki; Ishii, Yuri; Hidese, Ryota; Sakoda, Hisao; Fujiwara, Shinsuke

    2014-12-01

    Vinegar with increased amounts of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs; valine, leucine and isoleucine) is favorable for human health as BCAAs decrease diet-induced obesity and hyperglycemia. To construct Gluconacetobacter europaeus which produces BCAAs, leucine responsive regulator (GeLrp) is focused and two Gelrp mutants were constructed. Wild-type KGMA0119 didn't produce significant amount of valine (0.13 mM) and leucine (0 mM) and strain KGMA7110 which lacks complete Gelrp accumulated valine (0.48 mM) and leucine (0.11 mM) but showed impaired growth, and it was fully restored in the presence of essential amino acids. Strain KGMA7203 was then constructed with a nonsense mutation at codon Trp132 in the Gelrp, which leads a specific deletion at an estimated ligand-sensing region in the C-terminal domain. KGMA7203 produced greater quantities of valine (0.80 mM) and leucine (0.26 mM) and showed the same growth characteristics as KGMA0119. mRNA levels of BCAAs biosynthesis genes (ilvI and ilvC) and probable BCAAs efflux pump (leuE) were determined by quantitative reverse-transcription PCR. Expression rates of ilvI and ilvC in the two Gelrp disruptants were greater than those in KGMA0119. leuE was highly expressed in KGMA7110 only, suggesting that the accumulation in KGMA7110 culture was caused by increased expression of the biosynthesis genes and abnormal enhanced export of amino acids resulting in impaired cell growth. In contrast, KGMA7203 would achieve the high level production through enhanced expression of the biosynthesis genes without enhancing that for the efflux pump. KGMA7203 was considered advantageous for production of vinegar with higher amounts of valine and leucine.

  1. Reinvestigation of growth of 'L-valine zinc sulphate' crystal.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Bikshandarkoil R; Jyai, Rita N

    2014-01-01

    A reinvestigation of the growth of l-valine zinc sulphate crystal is reported. The slow evaporation of an aqueous solution containing l-valine and zinc sulphate heptahydrate results in the fractional crystallization of l-valine and not the organic inorganic hybrid nonlinear optical l-valine zinc sulphate crystal, as reported by Puhal Raj and Ramachandra Raja (2012).

  2. Biosensor-driven adaptive laboratory evolution of l-valine production in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Mahr, Regina; Gätgens, Cornelia; Gätgens, Jochem; Polen, Tino; Kalinowski, Jörn; Frunzke, Julia

    2015-11-01

    Adaptive laboratory evolution has proven a valuable strategy for metabolic engineering. Here, we established an experimental evolution approach for improving microbial metabolite production by imposing an artificial selective pressure on the fluorescent output of a biosensor using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Cells showing the highest fluorescent output were iteratively isolated and (re-)cultivated. The L-valine producer Corynebacterium glutamicum ΔaceE was equipped with an L-valine-responsive sensor based on the transcriptional regulator Lrp of C. glutamicum. Evolved strains featured a significantly higher growth rate, increased L-valine titers (~25%) and a 3-4-fold reduction of by-product formation. Genome sequencing resulted in the identification of a loss-of-function mutation (UreD-E188*) in the gene ureD (urease accessory protein), which was shown to increase L-valine production by up to 100%. Furthermore, decreased L-alanine formation was attributed to a mutation in the global regulator GlxR. These results emphasize biosensor-driven evolution as a straightforward approach to improve growth and productivity of microbial production strains.

  3. Biosensor-driven adaptive laboratory evolution of l-valine production in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Mahr, Regina; Gätgens, Cornelia; Gätgens, Jochem; Polen, Tino; Kalinowski, Jörn; Frunzke, Julia

    2015-11-01

    Adaptive laboratory evolution has proven a valuable strategy for metabolic engineering. Here, we established an experimental evolution approach for improving microbial metabolite production by imposing an artificial selective pressure on the fluorescent output of a biosensor using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Cells showing the highest fluorescent output were iteratively isolated and (re-)cultivated. The L-valine producer Corynebacterium glutamicum ΔaceE was equipped with an L-valine-responsive sensor based on the transcriptional regulator Lrp of C. glutamicum. Evolved strains featured a significantly higher growth rate, increased L-valine titers (~25%) and a 3-4-fold reduction of by-product formation. Genome sequencing resulted in the identification of a loss-of-function mutation (UreD-E188*) in the gene ureD (urease accessory protein), which was shown to increase L-valine production by up to 100%. Furthermore, decreased L-alanine formation was attributed to a mutation in the global regulator GlxR. These results emphasize biosensor-driven evolution as a straightforward approach to improve growth and productivity of microbial production strains. PMID:26453945

  4. Influence of L-isoleucine and pantothenate auxotrophy for L-valine formation in Corynebacterium glutamicum revisited by metabolome analyses.

    PubMed

    Bartek, Tobias; Makus, Pia; Klein, Bianca; Lang, Siegmund; Oldiges, Marco

    2008-04-01

    The effect of different amounts of supplemented L-isoleucine and pantothenate has been analysed with the auxotrophic strain Corynebacterium glutamicum DeltailvA DeltapanB, showing that the final biomass concentration of this preliminary L-valine production strain can be controlled by the amount of added L-isoleucine. One gramme cell dry weight is formed from 48 micromol L-isoleucine. Different amounts of available pantothenate affect the intracellular pyruvate concentration. By limiting pantothenate supplementation from 0.8 to 0.1 microM, a 35-fold increase of cytoplasmic pyruvate up to 14.2 mM can be observed, resulting in the increased formation of L-valine, L-alanine and organic acids in the presence of low pantothenate concentrations. These findings can be used to redirect the carbon flux from glycolysis via pyruvate to the TCA cycle towards the desired product L-valine.

  5. Reaction of dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids with valine and hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuewei; Wang, Shuguang; Xia, Qingsu; Gamboa da Costa, Gonçalo; Doerge, Daniel R; Cai, Lining; Fu, Peter P

    2014-10-20

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloid-containing plants are probably the most common poisonous plants affecting livestock, wildlife, and humans. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids exert toxicity through metabolism to dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids that bind to cellular protein and DNA, leading to hepatotoxicity, genotoxicity, and tumorigenicity. To date, it is not clear how dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids bind to cellular constituents, including amino acids and proteins, resulting in toxicity. Metabolism of carcinogenic monocrotaline, riddelliine, and heliotrine produces dehydromonocrotaline, dehyroriddelliine, and dehydroheliotrine, respectively, as primary reactive metabolites. In this study, we report that reaction of dehydromonocrotaline with valine generated four highly unstable 6,7-dihydro-7-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethyl-5H-pyrrolizine (DHP)-derived valine (DHP-valine) adducts. For structural elucidation, DHP-valine adducts were derivatized with phenyl isothiocyanate (PITC) to DHP-valine-PITC products. After HPLC separation, their structures were characterized by mass spectrometry, UV-visible spectrophotometry, (1)H NMR, and (1)H-(1)H COSY NMR spectral analysis. Two DHP-valine-PITC adducts, designated as DHP-valine-PITC-1 and DHP-valine-PITC-3, had the amino group of valine linked to the C7 position of the necine base, and the other two DHP-valine-PITC products, DHP-valine-PITC-2 and DHP-valine-PITC-4, linked to the C9 position of the necine base. DHP-valine-PITC-1 was interconvertible with DHP-valine-PITC-3, and DHP-valine-PITC-2 was interconvertible with DHP-valine-PITC-4. Reaction of dehydroriddelliine and dehydroheliotrine with valine provided similar results. However, reaction of valine and dehydroretronecine (DHR) under similar experimental conditions did not produce DHP-valine adducts. Reaction of dehydromonocrotaline with rat hemoglobin followed by derivatization with PITC also generated the same four DHP-valine-PITC adducts. This represents the first full structural elucidation of

  6. (L)-Valine production with minimization of by-products' synthesis in Corynebacterium glutamicum and Brevibacterium flavum.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiaohu; Chen, Xinde; Zhang, Yue; Qian, He; Zhang, Weiguo

    2012-12-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032 and Brevibacterium flavum JV16 were engineered for L-valine production by over-expressing ilvEBN ( r ) C genes at 31 °C in 72 h fermentation. Different strategies were carried out to reduce the by-products' accumulation in L-valine fermentation and also to increase the availability of precursor for L-valine biosynthesis. The native promoter of ilvA of C. glutamicum was replaced with a weak promoter MPilvA (P-ilvAM1CG) to reduce the biosynthetic rate of L-isoleucine. Effect of different relative dissolved oxygen on L-valine production and by-products' formation was recorded, indicating that 15 % saturation may be the most appropriate relative dissolved oxygen for L-valine fermentation with almost no L-lactic acid and L-glutamate formed. To minimize L-alanine accumulation, alaT and/or avtA was inactivated in C. glutamicum and B. flavum, respectively. Compared to high concentration of L-alanine accumulated by alaT inactivated strains harboring ilvEBN ( r ) C genes, L-alanine concentration was reduced to 0.18 g/L by C. glutamicum ATCC13032MPilvA△avtA pDXW-8-ilvEBN ( r ) C, and 0.22 g/L by B. flavum JV16avtA::Cm pDXW-8-ilvEBN ( r ) C. Meanwhile, L-valine production and conversion efficiency were enhanced to 31.15 g/L and 0.173 g/g by C. glutamicum ATCC13032MPilvA△avtA pDXW-8-ilvEBN ( r ) C, 38.82 g/L and 0.252 g/g by B. flavum JV16avtA::Cm pDXW-8-ilvEBN ( r ) C. This study provides combined strategies to improve L-valine yield by minimization of by-products' production.

  7. Valine adsorption and electrooxidation at carbon materials

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrova, L.R.; Andreev, V.N.; Bogdanovskaya, V.A.; Safronov, A.Yu.

    1987-08-01

    The authors study the electrochemical behavior of valine (which is contained on most proteins) at electrodes made of carbon materials. The electrochemical behavior of valine at carbon materials was studied potentiodynamically. Adsorption measurements involving radiotracers were performed. The valine with C/sub 1//sup 14/ label was 1% of the total amino acid concentration. Potentiodynamic curves measured at an electrode of BM-4 carbon in base electrolyte solution are presented. The results of measurements made in solutions of different pH and at different electrode materials are given. It is found that the mesoporous BM-4 carbon has the highest adsorption capacity for amino acid, while electrooxidation only occurs in neutral solutions, but at all types of carbon materials.

  8. Leucine modulation of mitochondrial mass and oxygen consumption in skeletal muscle cells and adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaocun; Zemel, Michael B

    2009-01-01

    Background The effects of dairy on energy metabolism appear to be mediated, in part, by leucine and calcium which regulate both adipocyte and skeletal muscle energy metabolism. We recently demonstrated that leucine and calcitriol regulate fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle cells in vitro, with leucine promoting and calcitriol suppressing fatty acid oxidation. Moreover, leucine coordinately regulated adipocyte lipid metabolism to promote flux of lipid to skeletal muscle and regulate metabolic flexibility. We have now investigated the role of mitochondrial biogenesis in mediating these effects. Methods We tested the effect of leucine, calcitriol and calcium in regulation of mitochondrial mass using a fluorescence method and tested mitochondrial biogenesis regulatory genes as well mitochondrial component genes using real-time PCR. We also evaluated the effect of leucine on oxygen consumption with a modified perfusion system. Results Leucine (0.5 mM) increased mitochondrial mass by 30% and 53% in C2C12 myocytes and 3T3-L1 adipocytes, respectively, while calcitriol (10 nM) decreased mitochondrial abundance by 37% and 27% (p < 0.02). Leucine also stimulated mitochondrial biogenesis genes SIRT-1, PGC-1α and NRF-1 as well as mitochondrial component genes UCP3, COX, and NADH expression by 3–5 fold in C2C12 cells (p < 0.003). Adipocyte-conditioned medium reduced mitochondrial abundance (p < 0.001) and decreased UCP3 but increased PGC-1α expression in myocytes, suggesting a feedback stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. Similar data were observed in C2C12 myocytes co-cultured with adipocytes, with co-culture markedly suppressing mitochondrial abundance (p < 0.02). Leucine stimulated oxygen consumption in both C2C12 cells and adipocytes compared with either control or valine-treated cells. Transfection of C2C12 myocytes with SIRT-1 siRNA resulted in parallel suppression of SIRT-1 expression and leucine-induced stimulation of PGC-1α and NRF-1, indicating that SIRT

  9. Valine radiolysis by MeV ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silveira, Enio

    2016-07-01

    Valine, (CH3)2 CHCH (NH2) COOH, is a protein amino acid that has been identified in extraterrestrial environments and in the Murchison meteorite [1]. The knowledge of half-lives of small organic molecules under ionizing radiation is important for the setup of models describing the spread out of prebiotics across the Solar System or the Galaxy. We have investigated typical effects of MeV cosmic ray ions on prebiotic molecules in laboratory by impinging ions produced by the PUC-Rio Van de Graaff accelerator. Pure valine films, deposited by evaporation on KBr substrates, were irradiated by H ^{+}, He ^{+} and N ^{+} ion beams, from 0.5 to 1.5 MeV and up to a fluence of 10 ^{15} projectiles/cm ^{2}. The sample temperature was varied from 10 K to 300 K. The irradiation was interrupted several times for Mid-FTIR analysis of the sample. The main findings are: 1- The column density of the valine decreases exponentially with fluence. 2- In some cases, a second exponential appears in the beginning of irradiation; this feature has been attributed to sample compaction by the ion beam [2]. 3- Destruction cross sections of valine are in the 10 ^{-15} cm ^{2} range, while compaction cross sections are in the 10 ^{-14} cm ^{2} range. 4- Destruction cross section increases with the stopping power of the beam and also with the sample temperature. 5- Surprisingly, during the radiolysis of valine, just CO _{2} is seen by as a daughter molecule formed in the bulk. 6- After long beam fluence, also a CO peak appears in the infrared spectrum; this species is however interpreted as a fragment of the formed CO2 molecules. 7- Considering the flux ratio between laboratory experiments and actual galactic cosmic rays, half-life of valine is predicted for ISM conditions [3]. This work on pure valine is the first measurement of a series. New experiments are planned for determining cross sections of valine dissolved in H _{2}O or CO _{2}, inspired by the study performed for glycine [4]. [1] P

  10. 21 CFR 582.5925 - Valine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Valine. 582.5925 Section 582.5925 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  11. 21 CFR 582.5925 - Valine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Valine. 582.5925 Section 582.5925 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  12. 21 CFR 582.5925 - Valine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Valine. 582.5925 Section 582.5925 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  13. Quantification of hydroxyl radical-derived oxidation products in peptides containing glycine, alanine, valine, and proline.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Philip E; Pattison, David I; Davies, Michael J

    2012-01-15

    Proteins are a major target for oxidation due to their abundance and high reactivity. Despite extensive investigation over many years, only limited quantitative data exist on the contributions of different pathways to the oxidation of peptides and proteins. This study was designed to obtain quantitative data on the nature and yields of oxidation products (alcohols, carbonyls, hydroperoxides, fragment species) formed by a prototypic oxidant system (HO(•)/O(2)) on small peptides of limited, but known, amino acid composition. Peptides composed of Gly, Ala, Val, and Pro were examined with particular emphasis on the peptide Val-Gly-Val-Ala-Pro-Gly, a repeat motif in elastin with chemotactic activity and metalloproteinase regulation properties. The data obtained indicate that hydroperoxide formation occurs nonrandomly (Pro > Val > Ala > Gly) with this inversely related to carbonyl yields (both peptide-bound and released). Multiple alcohols are generated at both side-chain and backbone sites. Backbone fragmentation has been characterized at multiple positions, with sites adjacent to Pro residues being of major importance. Summation of the product concentrations provides clear evidence for the occurrence of chain reactions in peptides exposed to HO(•)/O(2), with the overall product yields exceeding that of the initial HO(•) generated.

  14. Influence of a flooding dose of valine on key indicators of metabolic status in the growing pig.

    PubMed

    Libao-Mercado, A J; Columbus, D; de Lange, C F M

    2015-02-01

    A key concern with the flooding dose technique for measuring protein synthesis is that a large dose of amino acid (AA) can potentially change the animals' hormonal and nutritional status, which in turn can influence protein synthesis. Among stable isotope tracers, 1-[(13)C]-valine is the preferred AA for measuring protein synthesis in gut tissue and mucins. A study was conducted to determine the impact of a flooding dose of valine on the metabolic status of pigs. Six barrows [16.5 kg body weight (BW)] were randomly assigned to intravenous infusions of either 150 mM valine (1.5 mmol/kg BW) or physiological saline, following a crossover design. Blood samples were taken 10 min prior to infusion, at the end of infusion, at 10-min intervals for 60 min post-infusion, and at 90 and 120 min post-infusion. Plasma concentrations of insulin, glucose, AA, urea nitrogen and packed cell volume (PCV) were measured. Infusion of valine increased plasma valine concentrations (4129 vs. 582 μM; P < 0.05) but had no influence on PCV (26.4% vs. 27.2%) and plasma concentrations of glucose (6.0 vs. 5.8 mM) and insulin (8.2 vs. 8.5 μU/ml; P > 0.10). Plasma urea nitrogen concentration was reduced with valine infusion (8.5 vs. 7.8 mg/dl; P < 0.05). A flooding dose of valine had no impact on plasma concentrations of AA, and specifically branched-chain AA such as leucine (240 vs. 231 μM) and isoleucine (310 vs. 331 μM; P > 0.10). There was, however, a slight increase in the plasma concentrations of threonine (224 vs. 263 μM; P < 0.05) and a tendency towards reduced glycine (1387 vs. 1313 μM; P < 0.10). The results indicate that a flooding dose of valine does not cause a substantial change in the metabolic status of growing pigs and is therefore suitable for measuring protein synthesis rates.

  15. Application and microbial preparation of D-valine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Shi, Chao; Zhao, Jing; Gao, Ziqing; Zhang, Chunzhi

    2016-10-01

    D-Valine is an important organic chiral source and has extensive industrial application, which is used as intermediate for the synthesis of agricultural pesticides, semi-synthetic veterinary antibiotics and pharmaceutical drugs. Its derivatives have shown great activity in clinical use, such as penicillamine for the treatment of immune-deficiency diseases, and actinomycin D for antitumor therapy. Fluvalinate, a pyrethroid pesticide made from D-valine, is a broad-spectrum insecticide with low mammalian toxicity. Valnemulin, a semi-synthetic pleuromutilin derivative synthesized from D-valine, is an antibiotic for animals. Moreover, D-valine is also used in cell culture for selectively inhibiting fibroblasts proliferation. Due to its widespread application, D-valine is gaining more and more attention and some approaches for D-valine preparation have been investigated. In comparison with other approaches, microbial preparation of D-valine is more competitive and promising because of its high stereo selectivity, mild reaction conditions and environmental friendly process. So far, microbial preparation of D-valine can be mainly classified into three categories: microbial asymmetric degradation of DL-valine, microbial stereoselective hydrolysis of N-acyl-DL-valine by D-aminoacylase, and microbial specific hydrolysis of DL-5-isopropylhydantoin by D-hydantoinase coupled with D-carbamoylase. In this paper, the industrial application of D-valine and its microbial preparation are reviewed.

  16. Application and microbial preparation of D-valine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Shi, Chao; Zhao, Jing; Gao, Ziqing; Zhang, Chunzhi

    2016-10-01

    D-Valine is an important organic chiral source and has extensive industrial application, which is used as intermediate for the synthesis of agricultural pesticides, semi-synthetic veterinary antibiotics and pharmaceutical drugs. Its derivatives have shown great activity in clinical use, such as penicillamine for the treatment of immune-deficiency diseases, and actinomycin D for antitumor therapy. Fluvalinate, a pyrethroid pesticide made from D-valine, is a broad-spectrum insecticide with low mammalian toxicity. Valnemulin, a semi-synthetic pleuromutilin derivative synthesized from D-valine, is an antibiotic for animals. Moreover, D-valine is also used in cell culture for selectively inhibiting fibroblasts proliferation. Due to its widespread application, D-valine is gaining more and more attention and some approaches for D-valine preparation have been investigated. In comparison with other approaches, microbial preparation of D-valine is more competitive and promising because of its high stereo selectivity, mild reaction conditions and environmental friendly process. So far, microbial preparation of D-valine can be mainly classified into three categories: microbial asymmetric degradation of DL-valine, microbial stereoselective hydrolysis of N-acyl-DL-valine by D-aminoacylase, and microbial specific hydrolysis of DL-5-isopropylhydantoin by D-hydantoinase coupled with D-carbamoylase. In this paper, the industrial application of D-valine and its microbial preparation are reviewed. PMID:27565781

  17. Formation of simple biomolecules from alanine in ocean by impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Y.; Sekine, T.; Furukawa, Y.; Kakegawa, T.; Kobayashi, T.

    2013-12-01

    The biomolecules on the Earth are thought either to have originated from the extraterrestrial parts carried with flying meteorites or to have been formed from the inorganic materials on the Earth through given energy. From the standpoint to address the importance of impact energy, it is required to simulate experimentally the chemical reactions during impacts, because violent impacts may have occurred 3.8-4.0 Gyr ago to create biomolecules initially. It has been demonstrated that shock reactions among ocean (H2O), atmospheric nitrogen, and meteoritic constitution (Fe) can induce locally reduction environment to form simple bioorganic molecules such as ammonia and amino acid (Nakazawa et al., 2005; Furukawa et al., 2009). We need to know possible processes for alanine how chemical reactions proceed during repeated impacts and how complicated biomolecules are formed. Alanine can be formed from glycine (Umeda et al., in preparation). In this study, we carried out shock recovery experiments at pressures of 4.4-5.7 GPa to investigate the chemical reactions of alanine. Experiments were carried out with a propellant gun. Stainless steel containers (30 mm in diameter, 30 mm long) with 13C-labeled alanine aqueous solution immersed in olivine or hematite powders were used as targets. Air gap was present in the sample room (18 mm in diameter, 2 mm thick) behind the sample. The powder, solution, and air represent meteorite, ocean, and atmosphere on early Earth, respectively. Two powders of olivine and hematite help to keep the oxygen fugacity low and high during experiments, respectively in order to investigate the effect of oxygen fugacity on chemical processes of alanine. The recovered containers, after cleaned completely, were immersed into liquid nitrogen to freeze sample solution and then we drilled on the impact surface to extract water-soluble run products using pure water. Thus obtained products were analyzed by LC/MS for four amino acids (glycine, alanine, valine, and

  18. Enzymatic determination of carbon-14 labeled L-alanine in biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Serra, F.; Palou, A.; Pons, A.

    1987-07-15

    A method for determination of L-alanine-specific radioactivity in biological samples is presented. This method is based on the specific enzymatic transformation of L-alanine to pyruvic acid hydrazone catalyzed by the enzyme L-alanine dehydrogenase, formation of the pyruvic acid 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone derivative, and quantitative trapping in Amberlite XAD-7 columns, followed by radioactivity counting of the lipophilic eluate. No interferences from other UC-labeled materials such as D-glucose, glycerol, L-lactate, L-serine, L-glutamate, L-phenylalanine, glycine, L-leucine, and L-arginine were observed. This inexpensive and high-speed method is applicable to the simultaneous determination of L-alanine-specific radioactivity for a large number of samples.

  19. Leucine meal increases glutamine and total nitrogen release from forearm muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, T T; Brennan, M F; Fitzpatrick, G F; Knight, D C

    1981-01-01

    To assess the consequences of elevated branched chain amino acid levels on alanine, glutamine, and ammonia metabolism in muscle, L-leucine meals (14.7 g) were consumed by six normal postabsorptive individuals. Bilateral forearm studies were performed, and the dominant arm was subjected to 15 min of light exercise, using a calibrated dynamometer, beginning 45 min after the ingestion of the meal. Large uptakes of leucine were seen across both forearm muscle beds within 30 min of the meal. After exercise, blood flow in the dominant arm increased from 3.1 +/- 0.4 to 5.2 +/- 0.9 ml/100 ml forearm per minute (mean +/- SEM, P less than 0.005). Glutamine flux out of the dominant forearm increased threefold after the ingestion of the leucine meal and increased eightfold over base line after exercise. Less marked changes (significant only at 90 min) in the nonexercised, nondominant arm were also seen. Alanine flux out of the dominant forearm muscle bed increased modestly at 75 and 90 min. No significant change in ammonia flux across either forearm muscle bed was noted. Unexpectedly, large and significant net nitrogen loss from both forearm muscle beds was documented. Thus, following the ingestion of a leucine meal and light exercise, the primary means by which excess nitrogen is routed out of muscle is via glutamine formation and release with alanine and ammonia pathways playing relatively minor roles. More importantly, the ingestion of significant amounts of leucine by normal subjects, presumably in optimal nitrogen balance, results in a net loss of nitrogen from muscle. PMID:7320199

  20. Decarboxylation of [1-(13)C]leucine by hydroxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Guitton, J; Tinardon, F; Lamrini, R; Lacan, P; Desage, M; Francina, A

    1998-08-01

    The decarboxylation of [1-13C]leucine by hydroxyl radicals was studied by using gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) to follow the production of 13CO2. A Fenton reaction between a (Fe2+)-porphyrin and hydrogen peroxide under aerobic conditions yielded hydroxyl radicals. The decarboxylation rates (VLeu) measured by GC-IRMS were dependent on [1-13C]leucine, porphyrin and hydrogen peroxide concentrations. The 13CO2 production was also dependent on bicarbonate or carbon dioxide added in the reaction medium. Bicarbonate facilitated 13CO2 production, whereas carbon dioxide decreased 13CO2 production. Proton effects on some decarboxylation intermediates could explain bicarbonate or carbon dioxide effects. No effect on the decarboxylation rates was observed in the presence of the classical hydroxyl radicals scavengers dimethyl sulfoxide, mannitol, and uric acid. By contrast, a competitive effect with a strong decrease of the decarboxylation rates was observed in the presence of various amino acids: unlabeled leucine, valine, phenylalanine, cysteine, lysine, and histidine. Two reaction products, methyl-4 oxo-2 pentanoate and methyl-3 butanoate were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in comparison with standards. The present results suggest that [1-13C]leucine can participate to the coordination sphere of (Fe2+)-porphyrin, with a caged process of the hydroxyl radicals which cannot get out of the coordination sphere. PMID:9680180

  1. Leucine in Obesity: Therapeutic Prospects.

    PubMed

    Yao, Kang; Duan, Yehui; Li, Fengna; Tan, Bie; Hou, Yongqing; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2016-08-01

    Obesity develops from an imbalance of energy homeostasis and is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation in white adipose tissues (WAT). Inflammation is involved in the pathophysiology of many obesity-induced disorders including insulin resistance and diabetes. Increasing evidence has shown that dietary leucine supplementation positively affects the parameters associated with obesity and obesity-related metabolic disorders. The beneficial effects include increased loss of body weight, reduced WAT inflammation, improved lipid and glucose metabolism, enhanced mitochondrial function, and preserved lean body mass. Although these beneficial effects have not been clearly established, dietary leucine supplementation, either alone or as part of a therapeutic regimen, may be a good nutritional tool in the prevention and management of obesity and obesity-induced metabolic disorders. PMID:27256112

  2. Glycine restores the anabolic response to leucine in a mouse model of acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ham, Daniel J; Caldow, Marissa K; Chhen, Victoria; Chee, Annabel; Wang, Xuemin; Proud, Christopher G; Lynch, Gordon S; Koopman, René

    2016-06-01

    Amino acids, especially leucine, potently stimulate protein synthesis and reduce protein breakdown in healthy skeletal muscle and as a result have received considerable attention as potential treatments for muscle wasting. However, the normal anabolic response to amino acids is impaired during muscle-wasting conditions. Although the exact mechanisms of this anabolic resistance are unclear, inflammation and ROS are believed to play a central role. The nonessential amino acid glycine has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties and preserves muscle mass in calorie-restricted and tumor-bearing mice. We hypothesized that glycine would restore the normal muscle anabolic response to amino acids under inflammatory conditions. Relative rates of basal and leucine-stimulated protein synthesis were measured using SUnSET methodology 4 h after an injection of 1 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Whereas leucine failed to stimulate muscle protein synthesis in LPS-treated mice pretreated with l-alanine (isonitrogenous control), leucine robustly stimulated protein synthesis (+51%) in mice pretreated with 1 g/kg glycine. The improvement in leucine-stimulated protein synthesis was accompanied by a higher phosphorylation status of mTOR, S6, and 4E-BP1 compared with l-alanine-treated controls. Despite its known anti-inflammatory action in inflammatory cells, glycine did not alter the skeletal muscle inflammatory response to LPS in vivo or in vitro but markedly reduced DHE staining intensity, a marker of oxidative stress, in muscle cross-sections and attenuated LPS-induced wasting in C2C12 myotubes. Our observations in male C57BL/6 mice suggest that glycine may represent a promising nutritional intervention for the attenuation of skeletal muscle wasting.

  3. Functional mapping and implications of substrate specificity of the yeast high-affinity leucine permease Bap2.

    PubMed

    Usami, Yuki; Uemura, Satsohi; Mochizuki, Takahiro; Morita, Asami; Shishido, Fumi; Inokuchi, Jin-ichi; Abe, Fumiyoshi

    2014-07-01

    Leucine is a major amino acid in nutrients and proteins and is also an important precursor of higher alcohols during brewing. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, leucine uptake is mediated by multiple amino acid permeases, including the high-affinity leucine permease Bap2. Although BAP2 transcription has been extensively analyzed, the mechanisms by which a substrate is recognized and moves through the permease remain unknown. Recently, we determined 15 amino acid residues required for Tat2-mediated tryptophan import. Here we introduced homologous mutations into Bap2 amino acid residues and showed that 7 residues played a role in leucine import. Residues I109/G110/T111 and E305 were located within the putative α-helix break in TMD1 and TMD6, respectively, according to the structurally homologous Escherichia coli arginine/agmatine antiporter AdiC. Upon leucine binding, these α-helix breaks were assumed to mediate a conformational transition in Bap2 from an outward-open to a substrate-binding occluded state. Residues Y336 (TMD7) and Y181 (TMD3) were located near I109 and E305, respectively. Bap2-mediated leucine import was inhibited by some amino acids according to the following order of severity: phenylalanine, leucine>isoleucine>methionine, tyrosine>valine>tryptophan; histidine and asparagine had no effect. Moreover, this order of severity clearly coincided with the logP values (octanol-water partition coefficients) of all amino acids except tryptophan. This result suggests that the substrate partition efficiency to the buried Bap2 binding pocket is the primary determinant of substrate specificity rather than structural amino acid side chain recognition.

  4. A novel mutation of a leucine residue in coil 1A of keratin 9 in epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma.

    PubMed

    Endo, H; Hatamochi, A; Shinkai, H

    1997-07-01

    Keratin 9 mutation was examined in a Japanese kindred of epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK), which is a dominantly inherited autosomal disorder of keratinization characterized by diffuse thickening of the palms and soles and by epidermolytic hyperkeratosis histologically. We report herein a novel mutation, a C --> G transversion at nucleotide position 541 that converts a leucine residue (CTC) to a valine (GTC) at codon 159. As in all other reported cases of keratin 9 mutation in EPPK, this mutation lies within the highly conserved coil 1A of the rod domain, which is considered to play a role in the correct alignment of the coiled-coil molecules.

  5. Hypertrophy-Promoting Effects of Leucine Supplementation and Moderate Intensity Aerobic Exercise in Pre-Senescent Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zhi; Cholewa, Jason; Zhao, Yan; Yang, Yue-Qin; Shang, Hua-Yu; Guimarães-Ferreira, Lucas; Naimo, Marshall Alan; Su, Quan-Sheng; Zanchi, Nelo Eidy

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have indicated a positive influence of leucine supplementation and aerobic training on the aging skeletal muscle signaling pathways that control muscle protein balance and muscle remodeling. However, the effect of a combined intervention requires further clarification. Thirteen month old CD-1® mice were subjected to moderate aerobic exercise (45 min swimming per day with 3% body weight workload) and fed a chow diet with 5% leucine or 3.4% alanine for 8 weeks. Serum and plasma were prepared for glucose, urea nitrogen, insulin and amino acid profile analysis. The white gastrocnemius muscles were used for determination of muscle size and signaling proteins involved in protein synthesis and degradation. The results show that both 8 weeks of leucine supplementation and aerobic training elevated the activity of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) and its downstream target p70S6K and 4E-BP1, inhibited the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and increased fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) in white gastrocnemius muscle. Moreover, leucine supplementation in combination with exercise demonstrated more significant effects, such as greater CSA, protein content and altered phosphorylation (suggestive of increased activity) of protein synthesis signaling proteins, in addition to lower expression of proteins involved in protein degradation compared to leucine or exercise alone. The current study shows moderate aerobic training combined with 5% leucine supplementation has the potential to increase muscle size in fast-twitch skeletal muscle during aging, potentially through increased protein synthesis and decreased protein breakdown. PMID:27144582

  6. Hypertrophy-Promoting Effects of Leucine Supplementation and Moderate Intensity Aerobic Exercise in Pre-Senescent Mice.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhi; Cholewa, Jason; Zhao, Yan; Yang, Yue-Qin; Shang, Hua-Yu; Guimarães-Ferreira, Lucas; Naimo, Marshall Alan; Su, Quan-Sheng; Zanchi, Nelo Eidy

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have indicated a positive influence of leucine supplementation and aerobic training on the aging skeletal muscle signaling pathways that control muscle protein balance and muscle remodeling. However, the effect of a combined intervention requires further clarification. Thirteen month old CD-1(®) mice were subjected to moderate aerobic exercise (45 min swimming per day with 3% body weight workload) and fed a chow diet with 5% leucine or 3.4% alanine for 8 weeks. Serum and plasma were prepared for glucose, urea nitrogen, insulin and amino acid profile analysis. The white gastrocnemius muscles were used for determination of muscle size and signaling proteins involved in protein synthesis and degradation. The results show that both 8 weeks of leucine supplementation and aerobic training elevated the activity of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) and its downstream target p70S6K and 4E-BP1, inhibited the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and increased fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) in white gastrocnemius muscle. Moreover, leucine supplementation in combination with exercise demonstrated more significant effects, such as greater CSA, protein content and altered phosphorylation (suggestive of increased activity) of protein synthesis signaling proteins, in addition to lower expression of proteins involved in protein degradation compared to leucine or exercise alone. The current study shows moderate aerobic training combined with 5% leucine supplementation has the potential to increase muscle size in fast-twitch skeletal muscle during aging, potentially through increased protein synthesis and decreased protein breakdown. PMID:27144582

  7. Leucine metabolism in patients with Hepatic Encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    McGhee, A.S.; Kassouny, M.E.; Matthews, D.E.; Millikan, W.

    1986-03-01

    A primed continuous infusion of (/sup 15/N, 1-/sup 13/C)leucine was used to determine whether increased oxidation and/or protein synthesis of leucine occurs in patients with cirrhosis. Five controls and patients were equilibrated on a metabolic balance diet (0.6 g protein per kg ideal body weight (IBW)). An additional four patients were equilibrated in the same manner with the same type of diet with a protein level of 0.75 g per kg IBW. Plasma leucine and breath CO/sub 2/ enrichments were measured by mass spectrometry. Protein synthesis and leucine metabolism were identical in controls and patients when both were fed a diet with 0.6 g protein/kg IBW. Results indicate that systemic derangements of leucine metabolism are not the cause of Hepatic Encephalopathy.

  8. Optical Properties of TGS Crystal with L-Valine Admixture

    SciTech Connect

    Stadnyk, V. Yo. Romanyuk, N. A.; Kiryk, Yu. I.

    2010-11-15

    The thermal expansion and temperature and the spectral dependences of the refractive indices and birefringence of triglycine sulphate (TGS) crystals with a 5% L-valine admixture have been investigated. It is established that the introduction of L-valine weakens the temperature dependence of the refractive indices and the birefringence and thermal expansion of TGS crystals. The parameters of the Sellmeier formula, refractions, and electronic polarizabilities are calculated. The changes observed may be related to the increase in hardness of admixture-containing crystals, the decrease in the spontaneous polarization, the replacement of the refraction components of the valine bond, or the spontaneous electro-optic effect.

  9. Papain-Catalyzed Chemoenzymatic Synthesis of Telechelic Polypeptides Using Bis(Leucine Ethyl Ester) Initiator.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Kousuke; Numata, Keiji

    2016-07-01

    In order to construct unique polypeptide architectures, a novel telechelic-type initiator with two leucine ethyl ester units is designed for chemoenzymatic polymerization. Glycine or alanine ethyl ester is chemoenzymatically polymerized using papain in the presence of the initiator, and the propagation occurs at each leucine ethyl ester unit to produce the telechelic polypeptide. The formation of the telechelic polypeptides is confirmed by (1) H NMR and MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopies. It is revealed by AFM observation that long nanofibrils are formed from the telechelic polyalanine, whereas a conventional linear polyalanine with a similar degree of polymerization shows granule-like structures. The telechelic polyglycine and polyalanine show the crystalline structures of Polyglycine II and antiparallel β-sheet, respectively. It is demonstrated that this method to synthesize telechelic-type polypeptides potentially opens up a pathway to construct novel hierarchical structures by self-assembly. PMID:26947148

  10. Vibrational and photoionization spectroscopy of neutral valine clusters.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yongjun; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2009-07-30

    We report the first observation of infrared (IR) and mass spectra of neutral, aliphatic amino acid clusters: the example presented herein is for (valine)(n), n = 2-5. The clusters are generated in a supersonic expansion and their IR spectra are recorded in various fragment and (valine)(n-1)H(+) (n = 2-5) mass channels. The ions are created by single photon ionization with a VUV laser at 118 nm (10.5 eV/photon) following IR absorption in the single photon energy range 2500-4000 cm(-1). Mass channels obviously associated with valine clusters lose intensity and mass channels associated with valine monomers gain intensity under IR irradiation. No free OH modes are identified in any of these spectra suggesting that for (valine)(n), n = 1-5, all the OH groups are hydrogen bonded. The infrared transition for the hydrogen bonded OH moiety appears as a very broad, shifted feature ca. 3000 cm(-1) (approximately 2800 to approximately 3200 cm(-1)). Free and perturbed NH(2) modes can also be identified in the cluster spectra. CH modes ca. 3000 cm(-1) can be identified and appear to be coupled to the shifted and broadened OH modes of the clusters. Fragmentation pathways for three (valine)(2) isomers under 118 nm ionization are proposed and discussed.

  11. 9 CFR 319.5 - Mechanically Separated (Species).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR Part 51. ... paragraph, essential amino acid content includes isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine..., methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, valine, tyrosine, arginine, histidine, alanine, aspartic acid,...

  12. A leucine-supplemented diet restores the defective postprandial inhibition of proteasome-dependent proteolysis in aged rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Combaret, Lydie; Dardevet, Dominique; Rieu, Isabelle; Pouch, Marie-Noëlle; Béchet, Daniel; Taillandier, Daniel; Grizard, Jean; Attaix, Didier

    2005-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that skeletal muscle ubiquitin–proteasome-dependent proteolysis is dysregulated in ageing in response to feeding. In Experiment 1 we measured rates of proteasome-dependent proteolysis in incubated muscles from 8- and 22-month-old rats, proteasome activities, and rates of ubiquitination, in the postprandial and postabsorptive states. Peptidase activities of the proteasome decreased in the postabsorptive state in 22-month-old rats compared with 8-month-old animals, while the rate of ubiquitination was not altered. Furthermore, the down-regulation of in vitro proteasome-dependent proteolysis that prevailed in the postprandial state in 8-month-old rats was defective in 22-month-old rats. Next, we tested the hypothesis that the ingestion of a 5% leucine-supplemented diet may correct this defect. Leucine supplementation restored the postprandial inhibition of in vitro proteasome-dependent proteolysis in 22-month-old animals, by down-regulating both rates of ubiquitination and proteasome activities. In Experiment 2, we verified that dietary leucine supplementation had long-lasting effects by comparing 8- and 22-month-old rats that were fed either a leucine-supplemented diet or an alanine-supplemented diet for 10 days. The inhibited in vitro proteolysis was maintained in the postprandial state in the 22-month-old rats fed the leucine-supplemented diet. Moreover, elevated mRNA levels for ubiquitin, 14-kDa ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2, and C2 and X subunits of the 20S proteasome that were characteristic of aged muscle were totally suppressed in 22-month-old animals chronically fed the leucine-supplemented diet, demonstrating an in vivo effect. Thus the defective postprandial down-regulation of in vitro proteasome-dependent proteolysis in 22-month-old rats was restored in animals chronically fed a leucine-supplemented diet. PMID:16195315

  13. Transfer coefficients for L-valine and the rate of incorporation of L-(1-/sup 14/C) valine into proteins in normal adult rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Kirikae, M.; Diksic, M.; Yamamoto, Y.L.

    1988-08-01

    An autoradiographic method for the measurement of the rate of valine incorporation into brain proteins is described. The transfer coefficients for valine into and out of the brain and the rate of valine incorporation into normal rat brain proteins are given. The valine incorporation and the transfer constants of valine between different biological compartments are provided for 14 gray matter and 2 white matter structures of an adult rat brain. The rate of valine incorporation varies between 0.52 +/- 0.19 nmol/g/min in white matter and 1.94 +/- 0.47 in inferior colliculus (gray matter). Generally, the rate of valine incorporation is about three to four times higher in the gray matter than in the white matter structures.

  14. Synthesis of biodegradable chiral poly(ester-imide)s derived from valine-, leucine- and tyrosine-containing monomers.

    PubMed

    Mallakpour, Shadpour; Asadi, Parvin; Sabzalian, Mohammad R

    2011-11-01

    The present demand for a drastic reduction in environmental pollution is extended to qualitative change in the approach to development of biodegradable polymers. The aim of this article is to focus on the synthesis of biodegradable optically active poly(ester-imide)s (PEI)s, which compose of different amino acids in the main chain as well as in the side chain. These polymers were synthesized by polycondensation of diacid monomers such as 5-(2-phthalimidyl-3-methyl butanoylamino) isophthalic acid (1), 5-(4-methyl-2-phthalimidyl pentanoylamino)isophthalic acid (2) with N,N'-(pyromellitoyl)-bis-L: -tyrosine dimethyl ester (3) as a phenolic diol. The direct polycondensation reaction was carried out in a system of tosyl chloride, pyridine and N,N-dimethylformamide as a condensing agent under conventional heating conditions. The optically active PEIs were obtained in good yield and moderate inherent viscosity. The synthesized polymers were characterized by means of FT-IR, (1)H-NMR, elemental and thermo gravimetric analysis techniques. In addition, in vitro toxicity and soil burial test were employed for assessing the sensitivity of these compounds to microbial degradation. To this purpose, biodegradability behavior of the monomers and polymers were investigated in culture media and soil condition. The results of this study revealed that synthesized monomers and their derived polymers are biologically active and probably microbiologically biodegradable.

  15. Vibrational dynamics of crystalline L-alanine

    SciTech Connect

    Bordallo, H.N.; Eckert, J.; Barthes, M.

    1997-11-01

    The authors report a new, complete vibrational analysis of L-alanine and L-alanine-d{sub 4} which utilizes IINS intensities in addition to frequency information. The use of both isotopomers resulted in a self-consistent force field for and assignment of the molecular vibrations in L-alanine. Some details of the calculation as well as a comparison of calculated and observed IINS spectra are presented. The study clarifies a number of important issues on the vibrational dynamics of this molecule and presents a self-consistent force field for the molecular vibrations in crystalline L-alanine.

  16. Catalytic Stereoinversion of L-Alanine to Deuterated D-Alanine.

    PubMed

    Moozeh, Kimia; So, Soon Mog; Chin, Jik

    2015-08-01

    A combination of an achiral pyridoxal analogue and a chiral base has been developed for catalytic deuteration of L-alanine with inversion of stereochemistry to give deuterated D-alanine under mild conditions (neutral pD and 25 °C) without the use of any protecting groups. This system can also be used for catalytic deuteration of D-alanine with retention of stereochemistry to give deuterated D-alanine. Thus a racemic mixture of alanine can be catalytically deuterated to give an enantiomeric excess of deuterated D-alanine. While catalytic deracemization of alanine is forbidden by the second law of thermodynamics, this system can be used for catalytic deracemization of alanine with deuteration. Such green and biomimetic approach to catalytic stereocontrol provides insights into efficient amino acid transformations.

  17. Maintenance valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan requirements for poultry.

    PubMed

    de Lima, M B; Sakomura, N K; Dorigam, J C P; da Silva, E P; Ferreira, N T; Fernandes, J B K

    2016-04-01

    Poultry maintenance requirements for valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan were measured by nitrogen balance using different unit systems. The nitrogen balance trial lasted 5 d with 48 h of fasting (with roosters receiving only water+sucrose) and the last 72 h for feeding and excreta collection. Forty grams of each diet first-limiting in valine, isoleucine, or tryptophan was fed by tube each day (3 d) to give a range of intakes from 0 to 101, 0 to 119, and 0 to 34 mg/kg BW d of valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan, respectively. A nitrogen-free diet containing energy, vitamins, and minerals, meeting the rooster requirements, was offered ad libitum during these three d. To confirm that the amino acids studied were limiting, a treatment was added with a control diet formulated by adding 0.24 g/kg of L-valine, 0.21 g/kg of L-isoleucine, and 0.10 g/kg of L-tryptophan to the diets with lower amino acid level. Excreta were collected during the last 3 d of the balance period and the nitrogen content of the excreta was analyzed. For each amino acid, a linear regression between nitrogen retention (NR) and amino acid intake was performed. The equations from linear regression were: NR=-98.6 (±10.1)+2.4 (±0.2)×Val, NR=-46.9 (±7.1)+2.3 (±0.1)×Ile, NR=-39.5 (±7.7)+7.3 (±0.4)×Trp; where Val, Ile, and Trp are the intakes of valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan in mg/kg body weight per d, respectively. The valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan required to maintain the body at zero NR were calculated to be 41, 20, and 5 mg/kg body weight per d, respectively. For the system unit mg per kg of metabolic weight, the intake of valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan was 59, 32, and 9, respectively. Considering the degree of maturity of the animal and body protein content (BPm (0.73)×u), the amounts of valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan required for maintenance were calculated to be 247, 134, and 37 mg per unit of maintenance protein (BPm (0.73)×u) per d. Maintenance requirement is more

  18. Maintenance valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan requirements for poultry.

    PubMed

    de Lima, M B; Sakomura, N K; Dorigam, J C P; da Silva, E P; Ferreira, N T; Fernandes, J B K

    2016-04-01

    Poultry maintenance requirements for valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan were measured by nitrogen balance using different unit systems. The nitrogen balance trial lasted 5 d with 48 h of fasting (with roosters receiving only water+sucrose) and the last 72 h for feeding and excreta collection. Forty grams of each diet first-limiting in valine, isoleucine, or tryptophan was fed by tube each day (3 d) to give a range of intakes from 0 to 101, 0 to 119, and 0 to 34 mg/kg BW d of valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan, respectively. A nitrogen-free diet containing energy, vitamins, and minerals, meeting the rooster requirements, was offered ad libitum during these three d. To confirm that the amino acids studied were limiting, a treatment was added with a control diet formulated by adding 0.24 g/kg of L-valine, 0.21 g/kg of L-isoleucine, and 0.10 g/kg of L-tryptophan to the diets with lower amino acid level. Excreta were collected during the last 3 d of the balance period and the nitrogen content of the excreta was analyzed. For each amino acid, a linear regression between nitrogen retention (NR) and amino acid intake was performed. The equations from linear regression were: NR=-98.6 (±10.1)+2.4 (±0.2)×Val, NR=-46.9 (±7.1)+2.3 (±0.1)×Ile, NR=-39.5 (±7.7)+7.3 (±0.4)×Trp; where Val, Ile, and Trp are the intakes of valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan in mg/kg body weight per d, respectively. The valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan required to maintain the body at zero NR were calculated to be 41, 20, and 5 mg/kg body weight per d, respectively. For the system unit mg per kg of metabolic weight, the intake of valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan was 59, 32, and 9, respectively. Considering the degree of maturity of the animal and body protein content (BPm (0.73)×u), the amounts of valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan required for maintenance were calculated to be 247, 134, and 37 mg per unit of maintenance protein (BPm (0.73)×u) per d. Maintenance requirement is more

  19. A single valine residue plays an essential role in peripherin/rds targeting to photoreceptor outer segments.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Raquel Y; Baker, Sheila A; Gospe, Sidney M; Arshavsky, Vadim Y

    2013-01-01

    Peripherin/retinal degeneration slow (rds) is an integral membrane protein specifically localized to the light-sensing organelle of the photoreceptor cell, the outer segment. Within the outer segment, peripherin is found at the edges of photoreceptor discs, where it plays a critical role in disc morphogenesis and maintenance. Peripherin loss or mutations are often associated with severe forms of visual impairments. Like all other resident outer segment proteins, peripherin is synthesized in the photoreceptor cell body and subsequently transported to the outer segment. In an effort to further examine peripherin's delivery to outer segments, we undertook a careful examination of its targeting sequence. Using a fluorescently labeled reporter expressed in the rods of transgenic tadpoles, we narrowed peripherin's targeting sequence to ten amino acids within its C-terminal tail. This small stretch of amino acid residues is both necessary and sufficient for outer segment targeting. We also conducted alanine scanning of all residues within this sequence and found that only a single residue, valine at position 332, is essential for outer segment targeting. This valine is conserved in all species and its mutation is sufficient to completely abrogate the targeting of full-length peripherin in mouse rods.

  20. Directed evolution of leucine dehydrogenase for improved efficiency of L-tert-leucine synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin; Wu, Zhe; Jin, Jian-Ming; Tang, Shuang-Yan

    2016-07-01

    L-tert-Leucine and its derivatives are used as synthetic building blocks for pharmaceutical active ingredients, chiral auxiliaries, and ligands. Leucine dehydrogenase (LeuDH) is frequently used to prepare L-tert-leucine from the α-keto acid precursor trimethylpyruvate (TMP). In this study, a high-throughput screening method for the L-tert-leucine synthesis reaction based on a spectrophotometric approach was developed. Directed evolution strategy was applied to engineer LeuDH from Lysinibacillus sphaericus for improved efficiency of L-tert-leucine synthesis. After two rounds of random mutagenesis, the specific activity of LeuDH on the substrate TMP was enhanced by more than two-fold, compared with that of the wild-type enzyme, while the activity towards its natural substrate, leucine, decreased. The catalytic efficiencies (k cat/K m) of the best mutant enzyme, H6, on substrates TMP and NADH were all enhanced by more than five-fold as compared with that of the wild-type enzyme. The efficiency of L-tert-leucine synthesis by mutant H6 was significantly improved. A productivity of 1170 g/l/day was achieved for the mutant enzyme H6, compared with 666 g/l/day for the wild-type enzyme.

  1. Toxicity of leucine-containing peptides in Escherichia coli caused by circumvention of leucine transport regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Tavori, H; Kimmel, Y; Barak, Z

    1981-01-01

    A variety of leucine-containing peptides (LCP), Phe-Leu, Gly-Leu, Pro-Leu, Ala-Leu, Ala-Leu-Lys, Leu-Phe-Ala, Leu-Leu-Leu, and Leu-Gly-Gly, inhibited the growth of a prototrophic strain of Escherichia coli K-12 at concentrations between 0.05 and 0.28 mM. Toxicity requires normal uptake of peptides. When peptide transport was impaired by mutations, strains became resistant to the respective LCP. Inhibition of growth occurred immediately after the addition of LCP, and was relieved when 0.4 mM isoleucine was added. The presence of Gly-Leu in the medium correlated with the inhibition of growth, and the bacteria began to grow at the normal rate 70 min after Gly-Leu became undetectable. Disappearance of the peptide corresponded with the appearance of free leucine and glycine in the medium. The concentration of leucine inside the LCP-treated bacteria was higher than that in the leucine-treated and the control cultures. We suggest that entry of LCP into the cells via peptide transport systems circumvents the regulation of leucine transport, thereby causing abnormality high concentrations of leucine inside the cells. This accumulation of leucine interferes with the biosynthesis of isoleucine and inhibits the growth of the bacteria. Images PMID:7012134

  2. Effect of mixing, concentration and temperature on the formation of mesostructured solutions and their role in the nucleation of DL-valine crystals.

    PubMed

    Jawor-Baczynska, Anna; Moore, Barry D; Sefcik, Jan

    2015-01-01

    We report investigations on the formation of mesostructured solutions in DL-valine-water-2-propanol mixtures, and the crystallization of DL-valine from these solutions. Mesostructured liquid phases, similar to those previously observed in aqueous solutions of glycine and DL-alanine, were observed using Dynamic Light Scattering and Brownian microscopy, in both undersaturated and supersaturated solutions below a certain transition temperature. Careful experimentation was used to demonstrate that the optically clear mesostructured liquid phase, comprising colloidal mesoscale clusters dispersed within bulk solution, is thermodynamically stable and present in equilibrium with the solid phase at saturation conditions. Solutions prepared by slow cooling contained mesoscale clusters with a narrow size distribution and a mean hydrodynamic diameter of around 200 nm. Solutions of identical composition prepared by rapid isothermal mixing of valine aqueous solutions with 2-propanol contained mesoscale clusters which were significantly larger than those observed in slowly cooled solutions. The presence of larger mesoscale clusters was found to correspond to faster nucleation. Observed induction times were strongly dependent on the rapid initial mixing step, although solutions were left undisturbed afterwards and the induction times observed were up to two orders of magnitude longer than the initial mixing period. We propose that mesoscale clusters above a certain critical size are likely to be the location of productive nucleation events.

  3. Functional Characterization of Alanine Racemase from Schizosaccharomyces pombe: a Eucaryotic Counterpart to Bacterial Alanine Racemase

    PubMed Central

    Uo, Takuma; Yoshimura, Tohru; Tanaka, Naotaka; Takegawa, Kaoru; Esaki, Nobuyoshi

    2001-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe has an open reading frame, which we named alr1+, encoding a putative protein similar to bacterial alanine racemase. We cloned the alr1+ gene in Escherichia coli and purified the gene product (Alr1p), with an Mr of 41,590, to homogeneity. Alr1p contains pyridoxal 5′-phosphate as a coenzyme and catalyzes the racemization of alanine with apparent Km and Vmax values as follows: for l-alanine, 5.0 mM and 670 μmol/min/mg, respectively, and for d-alanine, 2.4 mM and 350 μmol/min/mg, respectively. The enzyme is almost specific to alanine, but l-serine and l-2-aminobutyrate are racemized slowly at rates 3.7 and 0.37% of that of l-alanine, respectively. S. pombe uses d-alanine as a sole nitrogen source, but deletion of the alr1+ gene resulted in retarded growth on the same medium. This indicates that S. pombe has catabolic pathways for both enantiomers of alanine and that the pathway for l-alanine coupled with racemization plays a major role in the catabolism of d-alanine. Saccharomyces cerevisiae differs markedly from S. pombe: S. cerevisiae uses l-alanine but not d-alanine as a sole nitrogen source. Moreover, d-alanine is toxic to S. cerevisiae. However, heterologous expression of the alr1+ gene enabled S. cerevisiae to grow efficiently on d-alanine as a sole nitrogen source. The recombinant yeast was relieved from the toxicity of d-alanine. PMID:11244061

  4. Metabolic fate of the carboxyl-carbon of valine

    SciTech Connect

    Lathrop, K.A.; Bartlett, R.D.; Faulhaber, P.F.; Harper, P.V.

    1984-01-01

    Although several C-11-carboxyl-labeled amino acids show promise for clinical use, few detailed biokinetic studies have been reported. Such information is necessary for the calculation of comprehensive radiation absorbed doses and may reveal additional clinical uses. The authors have collected data in mice at intervals between 1 and 90 m after i.v. injection of D,L-, L-, or D-valine for 22 whole organs or tissue samples and for CO/sub 2/ and urinary excretion. The enantiomers were cleanly separated by HPLC, but studies with the D,L- mixture were also done as additional assurance of purity for the separation (i.e., (D+L)/2=D,L). Elimination of C-11 from L-valine is restricted to the approx. =25% of injected activity (IA) observed as exhaled CO/sub 2/, the production of which appears completed in approx. =15 m, the exhalation in approx. =100m. The remaining 75% IA is available for incorporation directly into proteins or into coenzyme-A after deamination to 2-oxoisovalerate. The approx. =25% IA from D-valine that appears to be retained in the body probably is not converted to L-valine since virtually no CO/sub 2/ is recovered. The pancreatic content of approx. =8% of retained activity (RA) for both L- and D- valine at 90 m suggests similar localization mechanisms for the activity remaining in the body after excretion is ended. A similar correspondence of RA is seen in most other organs, the notable exceptions being the approx. =2 to 3 times higher %RA in blood and muscle for D-valine and in small intestine for L-valine. Studies such as this offer the possibility for quantitation of isolated metabolic processes, in this case production of CO/sub 2/ from 2-oxoisovalerate formed by deamination, and for separating metabolized from non-metabolized localization of C-11 when the D-amino acid can be shown to remain undegraded.

  5. 21 CFR 582.5406 - Leucine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Leucine. 582.5406 Section 582.5406 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  6. 21 CFR 582.5406 - Leucine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Leucine. 582.5406 Section 582.5406 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  7. 21 CFR 582.5406 - Leucine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Leucine. 582.5406 Section 582.5406 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  8. 21 CFR 582.5406 - Leucine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Leucine. 582.5406 Section 582.5406 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  9. 21 CFR 582.5406 - Leucine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Leucine. 582.5406 Section 582.5406 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  10. Role of leucine in hepatic ketogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kulaylat, M.N.; Frexes-Steed, M.; Geer, R.; Williams, P.E.; Abumrad, N.N.

    1988-03-01

    Isolated hepatocyte studies demonstrated that leucine can be a precursor of ketone bodies. In this study we examine the relative contribution of leucine to hepatic ketogenesis in vivo. Three groups of conscious dogs with long-term indwelling catheters in the femoral artery, hepatic vein, and portal vein were studied. Group I (n = 3) animals were fasted overnight for 24 hours, and those in groups II and III (n = 4, each) were fasted for 62 to 68 hours (designated 3-day fast). Groups I and III received intravenous saline solution (0.9%) and served as controls. In group II selective acute insulin deficiency (SAID) was induced by a peripheral intravenous somatostatin (SRIF) infusion and intraportal glucagon (0.55 ng/body weight/min). Net hepatic production (NHP) of ketone bodies (kb) and leucine (leu) was measured by the arteriovenous difference technique. Hepatic conversion of leucine to ketone bodies was measured by continuous infusion of L-U-(/sup 14/C)-leucine and by determination of the appearance of (/sup 14/C)-ketone bodies across the liver. In the group fasted overnight NHPleu was 0.02 +/- 0.01 mumol/kg/min, a value not different from zero. NHPkb was 3.1 +/- 0.1 mumol/kg/min and hepatic conversion of leucine to ketone bodies accounted for 3.5% of NHPkb. Insulin deficiency after 3 day's fasting resulted in a near 70% increase in NHPleu (from basal values of 0.31 +/- 0.1 mumol/kg/min to 0.52 +/- 0.06 mumol/kg/min during SAID, p less than 0.01). NHPkb increased from 11.0 +/- 1.0 to 15.5 mumol/kg/min (p less than 0.05). The rate of leucine conversion to ketone bodies (L-C) increased from 1.1 +/- 0.25 to 2.4 +/- 0.3 mumol/kg/min (p less than 0.01) with SAID.

  11. Valine-Resistance, a Potential Marker in Plant Cell Genetics. I. Distinction between Two Types of Valine-Resistant Tobacco Mutants Isolated from Protoplast-Derived Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bourgin, J. P.; Goujaud, J.; Missonier, C.; Pethe, C.

    1985-01-01

    In previous experiments, seven lines of valine-resistant plants were regenerated from protoplast-derived haploid tobacco mesophyll cells which had been UV mutagenized and submitted to selection by toxic concentrations of valine. In this study we described the transmission of valine-resistance to progeny and a preliminary phenotypical and biochemical characterization of the resistant plants.—Two types were thus distinguished among the seven mutant lines. Valine-resistance of the mutants of the first type (three lines) was transmitted as a single Mendelian dominant character (Vr1), whereas valine-resistance of the second type (four lines) was transmitted as a digenic recessive character (vr2 and vr3). Allelism tests revealed that the four recessive mutant lines yielded resistant progeny when intercrossed and, therefore, bear recessive mutant alleles at the same two unlinked loci.—When cultured at a density of 100 cell/ml, protoplast-derived cells of mutants of the first type had a low level of resistance to valine, whereas protoplast-derived cells of mutants of the second type displayed a high level of resistance to valine and to other amino acids.—According to the results of 14C-labelled amino acid uptake experiments, the amino acid resistance of mutants of the second type, but not valine-resistance of the first type, could be accounted for by reduced uptake of several amino acids. Possible uses of valine-resistance as a marker in plant cell genetics are discussed. PMID:17246252

  12. Alanine increases blood pressure during hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlay, L. A.; Maher, T. J.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of L-alanine administration on blood pressure (BP) during haemorrhagic shock was investigated using anesthetized rats whose left carotid arteries were cannulated for BP measurement, blood removal, and drug administration. It was found that L-alanine, in doses of 10, 25, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, increased the systolic BP of hypotensive rats by 38 to 80 percent (while 100 mg/kg pyruvate increased BP by only 9.4 mmhg, not significantly different from saline). The results suggest that L-alanine might influence cardiovascular function.

  13. Role of leucine zipper motif in apoE3 N-terminal domain lipid binding activity.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Taichi; Ryan, Robert O

    2006-09-01

    The N terminal domain of human apolipoprotein E3 (apoE3-NT) functions as a ligand for members of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) family. Whereas lipid-free apoE3-NT adopts a stable four-helix bundle conformation, a lipid binding induced conformational change is required for LDLR recognition. To investigate the role of a leucine zipper motif identified in the helix bundle on lipid binding activity, three leucine residues in helix 2 (Leu63, Leu71 and Leu78) were replaced by alanine. Recombinant "leucine to alanine" (LA) apoE3-NT was produced in E. coli, isolated and characterized. Stability studies revealed a transition midpoint of guanidine hydrochloride induced denaturation of 2.7 M and 2.1 M for wild type (WT) and LA apoE3-NT, respectively. Results from fluorescent dye binding assays revealed that, compared to WT apoE3-NT, LA apoE3-NT has an increased content of solvent exposed hydrophobic surfaces. In phospholipid vesicle solubilization assays, LA apoE3-NT was more effective than WT apoE3-NT at inducing a time-dependent decrease in dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol vesicle light scattering intensity. Likewise, in lipoprotein binding assays, LA apoE3-NT protected human low-density lipoprotein from phospholipase C induced aggregation to a greater extent than WT apoE3-NT. On the other hand, LA apoE3-NT and WT apoE3-NT were equivalent in terms of their ability to bind a soluble LDLR fragment. The results suggest that the leucine zipper motif confers stability to the apoE3-NT helix bundle state and may serve to modulate lipid binding activity of this domain and, thereby, influence the conformational transition associated with manifestation of LDLR binding activity.

  14. Solved? The reductive radiation chemistry of alanine.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Ewald; De Cooman, Hendrik; Waroquier, Michel; Hole, Eli O; Sagstuen, Einar

    2014-02-14

    The structural changes throughout the entire reductive radiation-induced pathway of l-α-alanine are solved on an atomistic level with the aid of periodic DFT and nudged elastic band (NEB) simulations. This yields unprecedented information on the conformational changes taking place, including the protonation state of the carboxyl group in the "unstable" and "stable" alanine radicals and the internal transformation converting these two radical variants at temperatures above 220 K. The structures of all stable radicals were verified by calculating EPR properties and comparing those with experimental data. The variation of the energy throughout the full radiochemical process provides crucial insight into the reason why these structural changes and rearrangements occur. Starting from electron capture, the excess electron quickly localizes on the carbon of a carboxyl group, which pyramidalizes and receives a proton from the amino group of a neighboring alanine molecule, forming a first stable radical species (up to 150 K). In the temperature interval 150-220 K, this radical deaminates and deprotonates at the carboxyl group, the detached amino group undergoes inversion and its methyl group sustains an internal rotation. This yields the so-called "unstable alanine radical". Above 220 K, triggered by the attachment of an additional proton on the detached amino group, the radical then undergoes an internal rotation in the reverse direction, giving rise to the "stable alanine radical", which is the final stage in the reductive radiation-induced decay of alanine.

  15. β-Alanine supplementation and military performance.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Jay R; Stout, Jeffrey R; Harris, Roger C; Moran, Daniel S

    2015-12-01

    During sustained high-intensity military training or simulated combat exercises, significant decreases in physical performance measures are often seen. The use of dietary supplements is becoming increasingly popular among military personnel, with more than half of the US soldiers deployed or garrisoned reported to using dietary supplements. β-Alanine is a popular supplement used primarily by strength and power athletes to enhance performance, as well as training aimed at improving muscle growth, strength and power. However, there is limited research examining the efficacy of β-alanine in soldiers conducting operationally relevant tasks. The gains brought about by β-alanine use by selected competitive athletes appears to be relevant also for certain physiological demands common to military personnel during part of their training program. Medical and health personnel within the military are expected to extrapolate and implement relevant knowledge and doctrine from research performed on other population groups. The evidence supporting the use of β-alanine in competitive and recreational athletic populations suggests that similar benefits would also be observed among tactical athletes. However, recent studies in military personnel have provided direct evidence supporting the use of β-alanine supplementation for enhancing combat-specific performance. This appears to be most relevant for high-intensity activities lasting 60-300 s. Further, limited evidence has recently been presented suggesting that β-alanine supplementation may enhance cognitive function and promote resiliency during highly stressful situations.

  16. Age Attenuates Leucine Oxidation after Eccentric Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Kullman, E. L.; Campbell, W. W.; Krishnan, R. K.; Yarasheski, K. E.; Evans, W. J.; Kirwan, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    Aging may alter protein metabolism during periods of metabolic and physiologic challenge. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of age on whole-body amino acid turnover in response to eccentric exercise and hyperglycemia-induced hyperinsulinemia. 16 healthy men were divided into young (N = 8) and older (N = 8) groups. Protein metabolism was assessed using a [1-13C]-leucine isotopic tracer approach. Measures were obtained under fasted basal conditions and during 3-h hyperglycemic clamps that were performed without (control) and 48 h after eccentric exercise. Exercise reduced leucine oxidation in the younger men (P < 0.05), but not in older men. Insulin sensitivity was inversely correlated with leucine oxidation (P < 0.05), and was lower in older men (P < 0.05). Healthy aging is associated with an impaired capacity to adjust protein oxidation in response to eccentric exercise. The decreased efficiency of protein utilization in older men may contribute to impaired maintenance, growth, and repair of body tissues with advancing age. PMID:23325713

  17. Desorption yield for valine as induced by fast heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Beining, P.; Scheer, J.; Nieschler, E.; Nees, B.; Voit, H.

    1988-11-01

    The dependence of the desorption yield for the amino acid valine on the energy of different MeV primary ions has been measured. The primary-ion energies cover a relatively large range with corresponding energy losses between 2 and 55 keV/(..mu..g/cm/sup 2/). The observed energy dependence can be understood in the framework of a simple macroscopic model.

  18. β-alanine biosynthesis in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Xu, Huimin; White, Robert H

    2014-08-01

    One efficient approach to assigning function to unannotated genes is to establish the enzymes that are missing in known biosynthetic pathways. One group of such pathways is those involved in coenzyme biosynthesis. In the case of the methanogenic archaeon Methanocaldococcus jannaschii as well as most methanogens, none of the expected enzymes for the biosynthesis of the β-alanine and pantoic acid moieties required for coenzyme A are annotated. To identify the gene(s) for β-alanine biosynthesis, we have established the pathway for the formation of β-alanine in this organism after experimentally eliminating other known and proposed pathways to β-alanine from malonate semialdehyde, l-alanine, spermine, dihydrouracil, and acryloyl-coenzyme A (CoA). Our data showed that the decarboxylation of aspartate was the only source of β-alanine in cell extracts of M. jannaschii. Unlike other prokaryotes where the enzyme producing β-alanine from l-aspartate is a pyruvoyl-containing l-aspartate decarboxylase (PanD), the enzyme in M. jannaschii is a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent l-aspartate decarboxylase encoded by MJ0050, the same enzyme that was found to decarboxylate tyrosine for methanofuran biosynthesis. A Km of ∼0.80 mM for l-aspartate with a specific activity of 0.09 μmol min(-1) mg(-1) at 70°C for the decarboxylation of l-aspartate was measured for the recombinant enzyme. The MJ0050 gene was also demonstrated to complement the Escherichia coli panD deletion mutant cells, in which panD encoding aspartate decarboxylase in E. coli had been knocked out, thus confirming the function of this gene in vivo.

  19. 21 CFR 172.540 - DL-Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false DL-Alanine. 172.540 Section 172.540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES....540 DL-Alanine. DL-Alanine (a racemic mixture of D- and L-alanine; CAS Reg. No. 302-72-7) may...

  20. Dietary Leucine Supplementation Improves the Mucin Production in the Jejunal Mucosa of the Weaned Pigs Challenged by Porcine Rotavirus

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xiangbing; Liu, Minghui; Tang, Jun; Chen, Hao; Chen, Daiwen; Yu, Bing; He, Jun; Yu, Jie; Zheng, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The present study was mainly conducted to determine whether dietary leucine supplementation could attenuate the decrease of the mucin production in the jejunal mucosa of weaned pigs infected by porcine rotavirus (PRV). A total of 24 crossbred barrows weaned at 21 d of age were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 diets supplemented with 1.00% L-leucine or 0.68% L-alanine (isonitrogenous control) for 17 d. On day 11, all pigs were orally infused PRV or the sterile essential medium. During the first 10 d of trial, dietary leucine supplementation could improve the feed efficiency (P = 0.09). The ADG and feed efficiency were impaired by PRV infusion (P<0.05). PRV infusion also increased mean cumulative score of diarrhea, serum rotavirus antibody concentration and crypt depth of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), and decreased villus height: crypt depth (P = 0.07), goblet cell numbers (P<0.05), mucin 1 and 2 concentrations (P<0.05) and phosphorylated mTOR level (P<0.05) of the jejunal mucosa in weaned pigs. Dietary leucine supplementation could attenuate the effects of PRV infusion on feed efficiency (P = 0.09) and mean cumulative score of diarrhea (P = 0.09), and improve the effects of PRV infusion on villus height: crypt depth (P = 0.06), goblet cell numbers (P<0.05), mucin 1 (P = 0.08) and 2 (P = 0.07) concentrations and phosphorylated mTOR level (P = 0.08) of the jejunal mucosa in weaned pigs. These results suggest that dietary 1% leucine supplementation alleviated the decrease of mucin production and goblet cell numbers in the jejunal mucosa of weaned pigs challenged by PRV possibly via activation of the mTOR signaling. PMID:26336074

  1. MHJ_0461 is a multifunctional leucine aminopeptidase on the surface of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Jarocki, Veronica M; Santos, Jerran; Tacchi, Jessica L; Raymond, Benjamin B A; Deutscher, Ania T; Jenkins, Cheryl; Padula, Matthew P; Djordjevic, Steven P

    2015-01-01

    Aminopeptidases are part of the arsenal of virulence factors produced by bacterial pathogens that inactivate host immune peptides. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is a genome-reduced pathogen of swine that lacks the genetic repertoire to synthesize amino acids and relies on the host for availability of amino acids for growth. M. hyopneumoniae recruits plasmin(ogen) onto its cell surface via the P97 and P102 adhesins and the glutamyl aminopeptidase MHJ_0125. Plasmin plays an important role in regulating the inflammatory response in the lungs of pigs infected with M. hyopneumoniae. We show that recombinant MHJ_0461 (rMHJ_0461) functions as a leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) with broad substrate specificity for leucine, alanine, phenylalanine, methionine and arginine and that MHJ_0461 resides on the surface of M. hyopneumoniae. rMHJ_0461 also binds heparin, plasminogen and foreign DNA. Plasminogen bound to rMHJ_0461 was readily converted to plasmin in the presence of tPA. Computational modelling identified putative DNA and heparin-binding motifs on solvent-exposed sites around a large pore on the LAP hexamer. We conclude that MHJ_0461 is a LAP that moonlights as a multifunctional adhesin on the cell surface of M. hyopneumoniae.

  2. MHJ_0461 is a multifunctional leucine aminopeptidase on the surface of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Jarocki, Veronica M.; Santos, Jerran; Tacchi, Jessica L.; Raymond, Benjamin B. A.; Deutscher, Ania T.; Jenkins, Cheryl; Padula, Matthew P.; Djordjevic, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    Aminopeptidases are part of the arsenal of virulence factors produced by bacterial pathogens that inactivate host immune peptides. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is a genome-reduced pathogen of swine that lacks the genetic repertoire to synthesize amino acids and relies on the host for availability of amino acids for growth. M. hyopneumoniae recruits plasmin(ogen) onto its cell surface via the P97 and P102 adhesins and the glutamyl aminopeptidase MHJ_0125. Plasmin plays an important role in regulating the inflammatory response in the lungs of pigs infected with M. hyopneumoniae. We show that recombinant MHJ_0461 (rMHJ_0461) functions as a leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) with broad substrate specificity for leucine, alanine, phenylalanine, methionine and arginine and that MHJ_0461 resides on the surface of M. hyopneumoniae. rMHJ_0461 also binds heparin, plasminogen and foreign DNA. Plasminogen bound to rMHJ_0461 was readily converted to plasmin in the presence of tPA. Computational modelling identified putative DNA and heparin-binding motifs on solvent-exposed sites around a large pore on the LAP hexamer. We conclude that MHJ_0461 is a LAP that moonlights as a multifunctional adhesin on the cell surface of M. hyopneumoniae. PMID:25589579

  3. Alanine racemase from the acidophile Acetobacter aceti.

    PubMed

    Francois, Julie A; Kappock, T Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Acetobacter aceti converts ethanol to acetic acid, and survives acetic acid exposure by tolerating cytoplasmic acidification. Alanine racemase (Alr) is a pyridoxal 5' phosphate (PLP) -dependent enzyme that catalyzes the interconversion of the d- and l-isomers of alanine and has a basic pH optimum. Since d-alanine is essential for peptidoglycan biosynthesis, Alr must somehow function in the acidic cytoplasm of A. aceti. We report the partial purification of native A. aceti Alr (AaAlr) and evidence that it is a rather stable enzyme. The C-terminus of AaAlr has a strong resemblance to the ssrA-encoded protein degradation signal, which thwarted initial protein expression experiments. High-activity AaAlr forms lacking a protease recognition sequence were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Biophysical and enzymological experiments confirm that AaAlr is intrinsically acid-resistant, yet has the catalytic properties of an ordinary Alr.

  4. Leucine supplementation improves skeletal muscle regeneration after cryolesion in rats.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Marcelo G; Baptista, Igor L; Carlassara, Eduardo O C; Moriscot, Anselmo S; Aoki, Marcelo S; Miyabara, Elen H

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken in order to provide further insight into the role of leucine supplementation in the skeletal muscle regeneration process, focusing on myofiber size and strength recovery. Young (2-month-old) rats were subjected or not to leucine supplementation (1.35 g/kg per day) started 3 days prior to cryolesion. Then, soleus muscles were cryolesioned and continued receiving leucine supplementation until 1, 3 and 10 days later. Soleus muscles from leucine-supplemented animals displayed an increase in myofiber size and a reduction in collagen type III expression on post-cryolesion day 10. Leucine was also effective in reducing FOXO3a activation and ubiquitinated protein accumulation in muscles at post-cryolesion days 3 and 10. In addition, leucine supplementation minimized the cryolesion-induced decrease in tetanic strength and increase in fatigue in regenerating muscles at post-cryolesion day 10. These beneficial effects of leucine were not accompanied by activation of any elements of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt/mechanistic target of rapamycin signalling pathway in the regenerating muscles. Our results show that leucine improves myofiber size gain and strength recovery in regenerating soleus muscles through attenuation of protein ubiquitination. In addition, leucine might have therapeutic effects for muscle recovery following injury and in some muscle diseases.

  5. Valine needs in starting and growing Cobb (500) broilers.

    PubMed

    Tavernari, F C; Lelis, G R; Vieira, R A; Rostagno, H S; Albino, L F T; Oliveira Neto, A R

    2013-01-01

    Two independent experiments were conducted with male Cobb × Cobb 500 broilers to determine the optimal valine-to-digestible-lysine ratio for broiler development. We conducted a randomized block experiment with 7 treatments, each with 8 replicates of 25 starter birds (8 to 21 d of age) and 20 finisher (30 to 43 d of age) birds. To prevent any excess of digestible lysine, 93% of the recommended level of digestible lysine was used to evaluate the valine-to-lysine ratio. The utilized levels of dietary digestible lysine were 10.7 and 9.40 g/kg for the starting and growing phases, respectively. A control diet with 100% of the recommended level of lysine and an adequate valine-to-lysine ratio was also used. The feed intake, weight gain, feed conversion ratio, and carcass parameters were evaluated. The treatments had no significant effect on the feed intakes or carcass parameters in the starter and finisher phases. However, during both of the studied phases, we observed a quadratic effect on weight gain and the feed conversion ratio. The broilers of both phases that were fed test diets with the lower valine-to-lysine (Val/Lys) ratio had poorer performance compared with those broilers fed control diets. However, when higher Val/Lys ratios were used for the starting and growing broilers that were fed test diets, the 2 groups had similar performance. During the starting phase, in broilers that were fed a higher Val/Lys ratio, weight gain, and the feed conversion ratio improved by 5.5% compared with broilers fed the basal diets. The broilers in the growing phase also had improved performance (by 7 to 8%) when the test diets had higher Val/Lys ratios. Based on the analysis of the starter phase data, we concluded that the optimal digestible Val/Lys ratio for Cobb × Cobb 500 broilers is 77%, whereas for birds in the finisher phase (30 to 43 d of age), a digestible Val/Lys ratio of 76% is suggested.

  6. L-alanine uptake in membrane vesicles from Mytilus edulis gills

    SciTech Connect

    Pajor, A.M.; Wright, S.H.

    1986-03-05

    Previous studies have shown that gills from M. edulis can accumulate L-alanine from seawater by a saturable process specific for ..cap alpha..-neutral amino acids. This uptake occurs against chemical gradients in excess of 10/sup 6/ to 1. To further characterize this uptake, membrane vesicles were prepared from M. edulis gill tissue by differential centrifugation. Enrichments of putative enzyme markers (relative to that in combined initial fractions) were as follows: ..gamma..-Glutamyltranspeptidase, 25-30x; Alkaline Phosphatase, 5-6x; K/sup +/-dependent para-Nitrophenyl Phosphatase, 3-5x; Succinate Dehydrogenase 0.1-0.2x. These results suggest that the preparation is enriched in plasma membranes, although histochemical studies will be needed to verify this. The time course of /sup 14/C-L-alanine uptake in the presence of inwardly-directed Na/sup +/ gradient showed a transient overshoot (3-5 fold) at 10 minutes which decreased to equilibrium after six hours. The size of the overshoot and early uptake rates depended on the size of the inwardly-directed Na/sup +/ gradient. No overshoot was seen in the presence of inwardly-directed gradients of LiCl or choline-Cl, or with equilibrium concentrations NaCl or mannitol. A reduced overshoot was seen with a gradient of NaSCN. A small overshoot was seen with an inwardly-directed gradient of KCl. Transport of L-alanine included saturable and diffusive components. Uptake of 6 ..mu..M L-alanine was inhibited more than 80% by 100 ..mu..M ..cap alpha..-zwitterionic amino acids (alanine, leucine, glycine); by 30 to 75% by proline, aspartate and lysine; and less than 20% by a ..beta..-amino acid, taurine. The results of these experiments agree with those from intact gill studies and support the hypothesis that L-alanine is transported into gill epithelial cells by a secondary active transport process involving Na/sup +/.

  7. Protein and leucine metabolism in maple syrup urine disease

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, G.N.; Bresson, J.L.; Pacy, P.J.; Bonnefont, J.P.; Walter, J.H.; Leonard, J.V.; Saudubray, J.M.; Halliday, D. )

    1990-04-01

    Constant infusions of (13C)leucine and (2H5)phenylalanine were used to trace leucine and protein kinetics, respectively, in seven children with maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) and eleven controls matched for age and dietary protein intake. Despite significant elevations of plasma leucine (mean 351 mumol/l, range 224-477) in MSUD subjects, mean whole body protein synthesis (3.78 +/- 0.42 (SD) g.kg-1. 24 h-1) and catabolism (4.07 +/- 0.46) were similar to control values (3.69 +/- 0.50 and 4.09 +/- 0.50, respectively). The relationship between phenylalanine and leucine fluxes was also similar in MSUD subjects (mean phenylalanine-leucine flux ratio 0.35 +/- 0.07) and previously reported adult controls (0.33 +/- 0.02). Leucine oxidation was undetectable in four of the MSUD subjects and very low in the other three (less than 4 mumol.kg-1.h-1; controls 13-20). These results show that persistent elevation in leucine concentration has no effect on protein synthesis. The marked disturbance in leucine metabolism in MSUD did not alter the relationship between rates of catabolism of protein to phenylalanine and leucine, which provides further support for the validity of the use of a single amino acid to trace whole body protein metabolism. The minimal leucine oxidation in MSUD differs from findings in other inborn metabolic errors and indicates that in patients with classical MSUD there is no significant route of leucine disposal other than through protein synthesis.

  8. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  9. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  10. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  11. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  12. 21 CFR 582.5118 - Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alanine. 582.5118 Section 582.5118 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  13. Infrared Spectroscopy of Alanine in Solid Parahydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toh, Shin Yi; Wong, Ying-Tung Angel; Djuricanin, Pavle; Momose, Takamasa

    2014-06-01

    Amino acids are the building blocks of biological molecules, and thus the investigation of their physical and chemical properties would allow for further understanding of their functions in biological systems. In addition, the existence of amino acids in interstellar space has been discussed for many years, but it is still under intense debate. The effect of UV radiation on amino acids is one of the keys for their search in interstellar space, where strong UV radiation exists. In this experiment, conformational compositions of alpha and beta alanine and their UV photolysis were investigated via matrix-isolation FTIR spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. Solid parahydrogen was used as the matrix, which provides higher resolution spectra than other noble gas matrices. We have identified several stable conformers for both alpha and beta alanine in solid parahydrogen. A clear correlation between conformational ratio and sublimation temperature was found for beta alanine. Furthermore, it was found that UV photolysis of alanine yields not only its conformational changes, but also photodissociation into a CO2 molecule and fragments. Observed spectra and their analysis will be discussed in relation to interstellar chemistry.

  14. Enzymology of the branched-chain amino acid oxidation disorders: the valine pathway.

    PubMed

    Wanders, Ronald J A; Duran, Marinus; Loupatty, Ference J

    2012-01-01

    Valine is one of the three branched-chain amino acids which undergoes oxidation within mitochondria. In this paper, we describe the current state of knowledge with respect to the enzymology of the valine oxidation pathway and the different disorders affecting oxidation.

  15. Valine entry into rat brain after diet-induced changes in plasma amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Tews, J.K.; Greenwood, J.; Pratt, O.E.; Harper, A.E.

    1987-01-01

    Passage of amino acids across the blood-brain barrier is assumed to be modified by amino acid composition of the blood. To gain a better understanding of the effects of protein intake on brain amino acid uptake, the authors examined associations among diet, plasma amino acid patterns, and the rate of entry of valine into the brain. Rats were fed diets containing 6, 18, or 50% casein before receiving one meal of a diet containing 0, 6, 18, or 50% casein. After 4-7 h, they were anesthetized and infused intravenously with (/sup 14/C)valine for 5 min before plasma and brain samples were taken for determination of radioactivity and content of individual amino acids. As protein content of the meal was increased from 0 to 50% casein, plasma and brain concentrations of valine and most other large neutral amino acid (LNAA) increased severalfold; also the ratio of (/sup 14/C)valine in brain to that in plasma decreased by >50%, and the rate of valine entry into the brain increased 3.5-fold. The increase in valine flux slowed as plasma levels of LNAA, competitors for valine transport, increased. The results were far more dependent on protein content of the final meal than on that of the adaptation diet; thus changes in protein intake, as reflected in altered plasma amino acid patterns, markedly altered valine entry into the brain.

  16. Β-alanine and l-histidine transport across the inner blood-retinal barrier: potential involvement in L-carnosine supply.

    PubMed

    Usui, Takuya; Kubo, Yoshiyuki; Akanuma, Shin-Ichi; Hosoya, Ken-Ichi

    2013-08-01

    The supply of L-carnosine, a bioactive dipeptide of β-alanine and l-histidine, to the retina across the blood-retinal barrier (BRB) was studied. The in vivo and in vitro studies revealed low uptake activities for [(3)H]Gly-Sar, a representative dipeptide, suggesting that l-carnosine transport plays only a minor role at the BRB. The in vivo study using rats showed approximately 18- and 23-fold greater retinal uptake indexes (RUI) for [(3)H]β-alanine and [(3)H]l-histidine compared with that of a paracellular marker, respectively. The RUI of [(3)H]β-alanine was taurine- and γ-aminobutyric acid-sensitive, and the in vitro uptake by TR-iBRB2 cells showed time- concentration- and temperature-dependent [(3)H]β-alanine uptake, suggesting that a carrier-mediated process was involved in β-alanine transport across the inner BRB. [(3)H]β-Alanine uptake was inhibited by taurine and β-guanidinopropionic acid, suggesting that taurine transporter (TAUT/SLC6A6) is responsible for the influx transport of β-alanine across the inner BRB. Regarding l-histidine, the l-leucine-sensitive RUI of [(3)H]l-histidine was identified, and the in vitro [(3)H]l-histidine uptake by TR-iBRB2 cells suggested that a carrier-mediated process was involved in l-histidine transport across the inner BRB. The inhibition profile suggested that L-type amino acid transporter (LAT1/SLC7A5) is responsible for the influx transport of l-histidine across the inner BRB. These results show that the influx transports of β-alanine and l-histidine across the inner BRB is carried out by TAUT and LAT1, respectively, suggesting that the retinal l-carnosine is supplied by enzymatic synthesis from two kinds of amino acids transported across the inner BRB.

  17. Leucine for retention of lean mass on a hypocaloric diet.

    PubMed

    Jitomir, Jean; Willoughby, Darryn S

    2008-12-01

    As obesity rates continue to climb, there is a pressing need for novel weight loss techniques. However, the energy-restricted diets recommended for weight loss typically result in significant amounts of lean tissue loss, in addition to the desired body fat loss. Leucine, a supported anticatabolic agent, has shown promise in research at many levels. First, leucine is known to stimulate the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, which initiates translation and protein synthesis in muscle cells. Furthermore, leucine may help to regulate blood glucose levels by promoting gluconeogenesis. Finally, several recent studies provide evidence that leucine aids in the retention of lean mass in a hypocaloric state. The aim of this paper is to review relevant leucine research in the three areas described and assess its potential as supplement for obese individuals. PMID:19053849

  18. Chirality of 4,4'-Biphenylene Bridged Polybissilsesquioxane Nanotubes Using the Dipeptides Derived from Valine.

    PubMed

    Sang, Yunsen; Guo, Yongmin; Wang, Hairui; Li, Yi; Li, Baozong; Yang, Yonggang

    2015-03-01

    Four dipeptides with alkyl chains derived from L- and D-valines were synthesized, the handedness of their self-assemblies were controlled by the valine chirality at the terminals. The stacking of the carbonyl groups plays an important in the formation of chiral organic self-assemblies. Chiral 4,4'-biphenylene bridged polybissilsesquioxane nanotubes were prepared using the self-assemblies of these dipeptides as the templates. The chirality of the polysilsesquioxane nanotubes was mainly controlled by the valines at the terminals of the dipeptides, which was transferred from the valines at the terminals through electrostatic interaction. The valines near the alkyl chains could also affect the polysilsesquioxane chirality through hydrogen bonding.

  19. Enantiomeric resolution of p-toluenesulfonate of valine benzyl ester by preferential crystallizaion.

    PubMed

    Munegumi, Toratane; Wakatsuki, Aiko; Takahashi, Yutaro

    2012-02-01

    Preferential crystallization of amino acid derivatives by seeding a pure enantiomer into racemic amino acid solutions has been studied for many years. However, few examples of valine derivatives have been reported so far. Although there have been some reports using valine hydrogen chloride with preferential crystallization, it is difficult to obtain optical isomers for valine derivatives using preferential crystallization. In this study, repeated preferential crystallization of p-toluenesulfonate valine benzyl ester with a 20% e.e. in 2-propanol gave a 94% e.e. on sonication. Sonication accelerated crystallization rate, but there was not a big difference in e.e. between with and without sonication. However, this research demonstrates the first preferential crystallization of p-toluenesulfonate of valine benzyl esters with an acceleration of crystallization using sonication.

  20. Experimental and computational thermochemical study of α-alanine (DL) and β-alanine.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Manuel A V Ribeiro; da Silva, Maria das Dores M C Ribeiro; Santos, Ana Filipa L O M; Roux, Maria Victoria; Foces-Foces, Concepción; Notario, Rafael; Guzmán-Mejía, Ramón; Juaristi, Eusebio

    2010-12-16

    This paper reports an experimental and theoretical study of the gas phase standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpies of formation, at T = 298.15 K, of α-alanine (DL) and β-alanine. The standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpies of formation of crystalline α-alanine (DL) and β-alanine were calculated from the standard molar energies of combustion, in oxygen, to yield CO2(g), N2(g), and H2O(l), measured by static-bomb combustion calorimetry at T = 298.15 K. The vapor pressures of both amino acids were measured as function of temperature by the Knudsen effusion mass-loss technique. The standard molar enthalpies of sublimation at T = 298.15 K was derived from the Clausius−Clapeyron equation. The experimental values were used to calculate the standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) enthalpy of formation of α-alanine (DL) and β-alanine in the gaseous phase, Δ(f)H(m)°(g), as −426.3 ± 2.9 and −421.2 ± 1.9 kJ·mol(−1), respectively. Standard ab initio molecular orbital calculations at the G3 level were performed. Enthalpies of formation, using atomization reactions, were calculated and compared with experimental data. Detailed inspections of the molecular and electronic structures of the compounds studied were carried out.

  1. Secretion of d-alanine by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Katsube, Satoshi; Sato, Kazuki; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Yoneyama, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Escherichia coli has an l-alanine export system that protects the cells from toxic accumulation of intracellular l-alanine in the presence of l-alanyl-l-alanine (l-Ala-l-Ala). When a DadA-deficient strain was incubated with 6.0 mM l-Ala-l-Ala, we detected l-alanine and d-alanine using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis at a level of 7.0 mM and 3.0 mM, respectively, after 48 h incubation. Treatment of the culture supernatant with d-amino acid oxidase resulted in the disappearance of a signal corresponding to d-alanine. Additionally, the culture supernatant enabled a d-alanine auxotroph to grow without d-alanine supplementation, confirming that the signal detected by HPLC was authentic d-alanine. Upon introduction of an expression vector harbouring the alanine racemase genes, alr or dadX, the extracellular level of d-alanine increased to 11.5 mM and 8.5 mM, respectively, under similar conditions, suggesting that increased metabolic flow from l-alanine to d-alanine enhanced d-alanine secretion. When high-density DadA-deficient cells preloaded with l-Ala-l-Ala were treated with 20 µM carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP), secretion of both l-alanine and d-alanine was enhanced ~twofold compared with that in cells without CCCP treatment. In contrast, the ATPase inhibitor dicyclohexylcarbodiimide did not exert such an effect on the l-alanine and d-alanine secretion. Furthermore, inverted membrane vesicles prepared from DadA-deficient cells lacking the l-alanine exporter AlaE accumulated [3H]D-alanine in an energy-dependent manner. This energy-dependent accumulation of [3H]D-alanine was strongly inhibited by CCCP. These results indicate that E. coli has a transport system(s) that exports d-alanine and that this function is most likely modulated by proton electrochemical potential. PMID:27166225

  2. 21 CFR 172.540 - DL-Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true DL-Alanine. 172.540 Section 172.540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents and Related Substances § 172.540 DL-Alanine. DL-Alanine (a racemic mixture of D- and...

  3. 21 CFR 172.540 - DL-Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false DL-Alanine. 172.540 Section 172.540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents and Related Substances § 172.540 DL-Alanine. DL-Alanine (a racemic mixture of D- and...

  4. On the existence of 'L-alanine cadmium bromide'.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Bikshandarkoil R

    2013-12-01

    It is argued that the recently reported nonlinear optical crystal L-alanine cadmium bromide, grown by slow solvent evaporation method at room temperature [P. Ilayabarathi, J. Chandrasekaran, Spectrochim. Acta 96A (2012) 684-689] is the well-known L-alanine crystal. The isolation of L-alanine crystal is explained due to fractional crystallization.

  5. 21 CFR 172.540 - DL-Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false DL-Alanine. 172.540 Section 172.540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents and Related Substances § 172.540 DL-Alanine. DL-Alanine (a racemic mixture of D- and...

  6. 21 CFR 172.540 - DL-Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false DL-Alanine. 172.540 Section 172.540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents and Related Substances § 172.540 DL-Alanine. DL-Alanine (a racemic mixture of D- and...

  7. Earthworms accumulate alanine in response to drought.

    PubMed

    Holmstrup, Martin; Slotsbo, Stine; Henriksen, Per G; Bayley, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Earthworms have ecologically significant functions in tropical and temperate ecosystems and it is therefore important to understand how these animals survive during drought. In order to explore the physiological responses to dry conditions, we simulated a natural drought incident in a laboratory trial exposing worms in slowly drying soil for about one month, and then analyzed the whole-body contents of free amino acids (FAAs). We investigated three species forming estivation chambers when soils dry out (Aporrectodea tuberculata, Aporrectodea icterica and Aporrectodea longa) and one species that does not estivate during drought (Lumbricus rubellus). Worms subjected to drought conditions (< -2MPa) substantially increased the concentration of FAAs and in particular alanine that was significantly upregulated in all tested species. Alanine was the most important FAA reaching 250-650μmolg(-1) dry weight in dehydrated Aporrectodea species and 300μmolg(-1) dry weight in L. rubellus. Proline was only weakly upregulated in some species as were a few other FAAs. Species forming estivation chambers (Aporrectodea spp.) did not show a better ability to conserve body water than the non-estivating species (L. rubellus) at the same drought level. These results suggest that the accumulation of alanine is an important adaptive trait in drought tolerance of earthworms in general. PMID:27107492

  8. Application of constrained aza-valine analogs for Smac mimicry.

    PubMed

    Chingle, Ramesh; Ratni, Sara; Claing, Audrey; Lubell, William D

    2016-05-01

    Constrained azapeptides were designed based on the Ala-Val-Pro-Ile sequence from the second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (Smac) protein and tested for ability to induce apoptosis in cancer cells. Diels-Alder cyclizations and Alder-ene reactions on azopeptides enabled construction of a set of constrained aza-valine dipeptide building blocks, that were introduced into mimics using effective coupling conditions to acylate bulky semicarbazide residues. Evaluation of azapeptides 7-11 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells indicated aza-cyclohexanylglycyine analog 11 induced cell death more efficiently than the parent tetrapeptide likely by a caspase-9 mediated apoptotic pathway. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 235-244, 2016.

  9. Leucine Supplementation Protects from Insulin Resistance by Regulating Adiposity Levels

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Elke; Bermúdez-Silva, Francisco J.; André, Caroline; Elie, Melissa; Romero-Zerbo, Silvana Y.; Leste-Lasserre, Thierry; Belluomo, llaria; Duchampt, Adeline; Clark, Samantha; Aubert, Agnes; Mezzullo, Marco; Fanelli, Flaminia; Pagotto, Uberto; Layé, Sophie; Mithieux, Gilles; Cota, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Background Leucine supplementation might have therapeutic potential in preventing diet-induced obesity and improving insulin sensitivity. However, the underlying mechanisms are at present unclear. Additionally, it is unclear whether leucine supplementation might be equally efficacious once obesity has developed. Methodology/Principal Findings Male C57BL/6J mice were fed chow or a high-fat diet (HFD), supplemented or not with leucine for 17 weeks. Another group of HFD-fed mice (HFD-pairfat group) was food restricted in order to reach an adiposity level comparable to that of HFD-Leu mice. Finally, a third group of mice was exposed to HFD for 12 weeks before being chronically supplemented with leucine. Leucine supplementation in HFD-fed mice decreased body weight and fat mass by increasing energy expenditure, fatty acid oxidation and locomotor activity in vivo. The decreased adiposity in HFD-Leu mice was associated with increased expression of uncoupling protein 3 (UCP-3) in the brown adipose tissue, better insulin sensitivity, increased intestinal gluconeogenesis and preservation of islets of Langerhans histomorphology and function. HFD-pairfat mice had a comparable improvement in insulin sensitivity, without changes in islets physiology or intestinal gluconeogenesis. Remarkably, both HFD-Leu and HFD-pairfat mice had decreased hepatic lipid content, which likely helped improve insulin sensitivity. In contrast, when leucine was supplemented to already obese animals, no changes in body weight, body composition or glucose metabolism were observed. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that leucine improves insulin sensitivity in HFD-fed mice by primarily decreasing adiposity, rather than directly acting on peripheral target organs. However, beneficial effects of leucine on intestinal gluconeogenesis and islets of Langerhans's physiology might help prevent type 2 diabetes development. Differently, metabolic benefit of leucine supplementation is lacking in

  10. Importance of NADPH supply for improved L-valine formation in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Bartek, Tobias; Blombach, Bastian; Zönnchen, Enrico; Makus, Pia; Lang, Siegmund; Eikmanns, Bernhard J; Oldiges, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Cofactor recycling is known to be crucial for amino acid synthesis. Hence, cofactor supply was now analyzed for L-valine to identify new targets for an improvement of production. The central carbon metabolism was analyzed by stoichiometric modeling to estimate the influence of cofactors and to quantify the theoretical yield of L-valine on glucose. Three different optimal routes for L-valine biosynthesis were identified by elementary mode (EM) analysis. The modes differed mainly in the manner of NADPH regeneration, substantiating that the cofactor supply may be crucial for efficient L-valine production. Although the isocitrate dehydrogenase as an NADPH source within the tricarboxylic acid cycle only enables an L-valine yield of Y(Val/Glc) = 0.5 mol L-valine/mol glucose (mol Val/mol Glc), the pentose phosphate pathway seems to be the most promising NADPH source. Based on the theoretical calculation of EMs, the gene encoding phosphoglucoisomerase (PGI) was deleted to achieve this EM with a theoretical yield Y(Val/Glc) = 0.86 mol Val/mol Glc during the production phase. The intracellular NADPH concentration was significantly increased in the PGI-deficient mutant. L-Valine yield increased from 0.49 +/- 0.13 to 0.67 +/- 0.03 mol Val/mol Glc, and, concomitantly, the formation of by-products such as pyruvate was reduced.

  11. Leucine supplementation of a chronically restricted protein and energy diet enhances mTOR pathway activation but not muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs.

    PubMed

    Manjarín, Rodrigo; Columbus, Daniel A; Suryawan, Agus; Nguyen, Hanh V; Hernandez-García, Adriana D; Hoang, Nguyet-Minh; Fiorotto, Marta L; Davis, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Suboptimal nutrient intake represents a limiting factor for growth and long-term survival of low-birth weight infants. The objective of this study was to determine if in neonates who can consume only 70 % of their protein and energy requirements for 8 days, enteral leucine supplementation will upregulate the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in skeletal muscle, leading to an increase in protein synthesis and muscle anabolism. Nineteen 4-day-old piglets were fed by gastric tube 1 of 3 diets, containing (kg body weight(-1) · day(-1)) 16 g protein and 190 kcal (CON), 10.9 g protein and 132 kcal (R), or 10.8 g protein + 0.2 % leucine and 136 kcal (RL) at 4-h intervals for 8 days. On day 8, plasma AA and insulin levels were measured during 6 post-feeding intervals, and muscle protein synthesis rate and mTOR signaling proteins were determined at 120 min post-feeding. At 120 min, leucine was highest in RL (P < 0.001), whereas insulin, isoleucine and valine were lower in RL and R compared to CON (P < 0.001). Compared to RL and R, the CON diet increased (P < 0.01) body weight, protein synthesis, phosphorylation of S6 kinase (p-S6K1) and 4E-binding protein (p-4EBP1), and activation of eukaryotic initiation factor 4 complex (eIF4E · eIF4G). RL increased (P ≤ 0.01) p-S6K1, p-4EBP1 and eIF4E · eIF4G compared to R. In conclusion, when protein and energy intakes are restricted for 8 days, leucine supplementation increases muscle mTOR activation, but does not improve body weight gain or enhance skeletal muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs.

  12. L-valine, an antialgal amino acid from Streptomyces jiujiangensis JXJ 0074(T).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing-Huo; Chen, Wei; Li, Han-Quan; Yang, Jian-Yuan; Zha, Dai-Ming; Duan, Yan-Qing; N Hozzein, Wael; Xiao, Min; Gao, Rui; Li, Wen-Jun

    2016-05-01

    An antialgal compound was isolated from the cultured broth of Streptomyces jiujiangensis JXJ 0074(T) by using bioassay methods. Based on the data of (1)H-NMR, (13)C-NMR, ESI-MS, and thin layer chromatography, the active compound was identified as L-valine, which showed antialgal activity mainly against Microcystis. L-valine exhibited greater antialgal activities than both L-lysine and copper sulfate (CuSO4) did on Microcystis aeruginosa lawn. However, M. aeruginosa recovered growth earlier with higher growth rate in L-valine treatment than in L-lysine treatment. L-valine dissipated completely within 2 days, much quicker than L-lysine (6 days), which resulted in the lysing of more than 80 % M. aeruginosa cells and the release of amount of intracellular microcystin-LR (MC-LR) within 2 days. As a resultant, the extracellular MC-LR content was more than twice of the control from day 1 to 5. Exposure to L-valine significantly promoted the synthesis of MC-LR. L-lysine also promoted the release and synthesis of MC-LR with much lesser efficiency than L-valine. L-valine could damage Microcystis severely, causing perforation and collapse of M. aeruginosa cells and decrease of the chlorophyll. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in L-valine-treated cells of M. aeruginosa initially increased with 32.94 ± 3.37 % higher than the control after 36 h and then decreased quickly. However, the increase rate of superoxide anion radical (O2 (-)) was much higher than that of SOD, which resulted in serious lipid peroxidation and accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA). To our knowledge, this is the first report showing L-valine active against cyanobacteria.

  13. Regulation of valine and. alpha. -ketoisocaproate metabolism in rat kidney mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.H.; Harper, A.E. )

    1988-10-01

    Activities of branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) aminotransferase (BCAT) and {alpha}-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKD) were assayed in mitochondria isolated from kidneys of rats. Rates of transamination of valine and oxidation of keto acids {alpha}-ketoisocaproate (KIC) or {alpha}-ketoisovalerate (KIV) were estimated using radioactive tracers of the appropriate substrate from amounts of {sup 14}C-labeled products formed. Because of the high mitochondrial BCAT activity, an amino acceptor for BCAT, {alpha}-ketoglutarate ({alpha}-KG) or KIC, was added to the assay medium when valine was the substrate. Rates of valine transamination and subsequent oxidation of the KIV formed were determined with 0.5 mM {alpha}-KG as the amino acceptor; these rates were 5- to 50-fold those without added {alpha}-KG. Rates of CO{sub 2} evolution from valine also increased when KIC was present; however, with KIC concentrations above 0.2 mM, rates of CO{sub 2} evolution from valine declined although rates of transamination continued to rise. When 0.05 mM KIC was added to the assay medium, oxidation of KIC was suppressed by inclusion of valine or glutamate in the medium. When valine was present KIC was not oxidized preferentially, presumably because it was also serving as an amino acceptor for BCAT. These results indicate that as the supply of amino acceptor, {alpha}-KG or KIC, is increased in mitochondria not only is the rate of valine transamination stimulated but also the rate of oxidation of the KIV formed from valine. Thus the rate of oxidation of BCAA can be controlled by factors that influence the rate and direction of BCAA transamination and, thereby, the supply of substrate for BCKD.

  14. Effect of substituting arginine and lysine with alanine on antimicrobial activity and the mechanism of action of a cationic dodecapeptide (CL(14-25)), a partial sequence of cyanate lyase from rice.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masayuki; Takahashi, Nobuteru; Takayanagi, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Atsuo; Ishiyama, Yohei; Saitoh, Eiichi; Kato, Tetsuo; Ochiai, Akihito; Tanaka, Takaaki

    2014-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of analogs obtained by substituting arginine and lysine in CL(14-25), a cationic α-helical dodecapeptide, with alanine against Porphyromonas gingivalis, a periodontal pathogen, varied significantly depending on the number and position of cationic amino acids. The alanine-substituted analogs had no hemolytic activity, even at a concentration of 1 mM. The antimicrobial activities of CL(K20A) and CL(K20A, K25A) were 3.8-fold and 9.1-fold higher, respectively, than that of CL(14-25). The antimicrobial activity of CL(R15A) was slightly lower than that of CL(14-25), suggesting that arginine at position 15 is not essential but is important for the antimicrobial activity. The experiments in which the alanine-substituted analogs bearing the replacement of arginine at position 24 and/or lysine at position 25 were used showed that arginine at position 24 was crucial for the antimicrobial activity whenever lysine at position 25 was substituted with alanine. Helical wheel projections of the alanine-substituted analogs indicate that the hydrophobicity in the vicinity of leucine at position 16 and alanines at positions 18 and/or 21 increased by substituting lysine at positions 20 and 25 with alanine, respectively. The degrees of diSC3 -5 release from P. gingivalis cells and disruption of GUVs induced by the alanine-substituted analogs with different positive charges were not closely related to their antimicrobial activities. The enhanced antimicrobial activities of the alanine-substituted analogs appear to be mainly attributable to the changes in properties such as hydrophobicity and amphipathic propensity due to alanine substitution and not to their extents of positive charge (cationicity).

  15. D-alanine incorporation into macromolecules and effects of D-alanine deprivation on active transport in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Clark, V L; Young, F E

    1978-03-01

    An auxotroph of Bacillus subtilis 168 unable to synthesize D-alanine loses the ability to support endogenously energized transport when deprived of D-alanine. Revertants of the mutant retain transport activity. The loss of transport is specific for substrates taken up by active transport; substrates taken up by group translocation are transported at normal rates. The loss of transport can be retarded by pretreatment of the cells with inhibitors of protein synthesis. Since the loss of transport could be due to an alteration in a D-alanine-containing polymer, we investigated the incorporation of D-[14C]alanine into macromolecules. The major D-alanine-containing polymers in B. subtilis are peptidoglycan and teichoic acid, with 4 to 6% of the D-[14C]alanine label found in trypsin-soluble material. Whereas the peptidoglycan and teichoic acid undergo turnover, the trypsin-soluble material does not. Treatment of the trypsin-soluble material with Pronase releases free D-alanine. Analysis of acid-hydrolyzed trypsin-soluble material indicated that approximately 75% of the radioactivity is present as D-alanine, with the remainder present as L-alanine. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of partially purified D-[14C]alanine-labeled membranes indicated the presence of two peaks of radioactivity (molecular weights, 230,000 and 80,000) that could be digested by trypsin. The results suggest that D-alanine may be covalently bound to cellular proteins.

  16. Leucine supplementation improves regeneration of skeletal muscles from old rats.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Marcelo G; Silva, Meiricris T; da Cunha, Fernanda M; Moriscot, Anselmo S; Aoki, Marcelo S; Miyabara, Elen H

    2015-12-01

    The decreased regenerative capacity of old skeletal muscles involves disrupted turnover of proteins. This study investigated whether leucine supplementation in old rats could improve muscle regenerative capacity. Young and old male Wistar rats were supplemented with leucine; then, the muscles were cryolesioned and examined after 3 and 10 days. Leucine supplementation attenuated the decrease in the expression of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) in young and old muscles on day 3 post-injury and promoted an increase in the cross-sectional area of regenerating myofibers from both young and old soleus muscles on day 10 post-injury. This supplementation decreased the levels of ubiquitinated proteins and increased the proteasome activity in young regenerating muscles, but the opposite effect was observed in old regenerating muscles. Moreover, leucine decreased the inflammation area and induced an increase in the number of proliferating satellite cells in both young and old muscles. Our results suggest that leucine supplementation improves the regeneration of skeletal muscles from old rats, through the preservation of certain biological responses upon leucine supplementation. Such responses comprise the decrease in the inflammation area, increase in the number of proliferating satellite cells and size of regenerating myofibers, combined with the modulation of components of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt-protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/Akt/mTOR) pathway and ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  17. Effect of exercise training on leucine oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrix, M.K.; Layman, D.K.

    1986-03-01

    Oxidation of the BCAA leucine is increased during a bout of exhaustive exercise. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of exercise training on leu oxidation during aerobic exercise. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a commercial diet ad lib and divided into sedentary and two trained groups. Animals were trained to run on a treadmill with a 10/sup 0/ incline at 28 m/min for 5 wks for either 50 or 120 min/day. There were no differences in food intake or body weight. After a 12 hr fast, animals were run for 50 or 120 min and changes in leu catabolism determined by measurement of in vivo leu oxidation and activity of branched chain keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKAD). For measurement of leu oxidation, rats were injected IP with 4 ..mu..Ci 1-/sup 14/C-leu during the last 15 min of exercise, placed in glass metabolic chambers, and /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ collected in 1 N NaOH for 30 min periods. Leu oxidation was increased by 40% after 50 min of exercise and by 79% after 120 min of exercise. Five weeks of training reduced the rate of leu oxidation during an exercise bout. The activity of the BCKAD was not increased in the trained animals after either 50 or 120 min of exercise. These data indicate that the rate of leu oxidation during exercises is dependent on the duration of the exercise and that training will reduce the magnitude of this effect.

  18. Fetoplacental deamination and decarboxylation of leucine

    SciTech Connect

    Loy, G.L.; Quick, A.N. Jr.; Hay, W.W. Jr.; Meschia, G.; Battaglia, F.C.; Fennessey, P.V. )

    1990-10-01

    Fetal and placental metabolism of leucine (Leu) and ketoisocaproic acid (KIC) were studied in seven fetal lambs at 132 +/- 1.3-days gestation. Fetal infusions of (1-13C)Leu, (1-14C)Leu, and antipyrine were carried out for 4 h. Uterine and umbilical blood flows were measured using the antipyrine steady-state diffusion technique. Leu and KIC concentrations, (14C)Leu-specific activities, 14CO2, (13C)Leu, and (13C)KIC enrichment (mole percent enrichment) were measured in the maternal artery, uterine vein, and umbilical artery and vein to calculate net fluxes of tracee and tracer molecules between fetus and placenta and between the uteroplacenta and the maternal circulation. There were net Leu and KIC fluxes into the fetus from the placenta with the KIC flux equal to approximately 19% of the combined Leu plus KIC flux. In addition, there was a net KIC flux into the uterine circulation. The fraction of infused tracer Leu escaping the placenta into the mother was small (approximately 6%). By contrast, there was a rapid exchange of tracer Leu carbon between placenta and fetus resulting in a significant flux of labeled KIC from placenta to fetus. Approximately 20% of the infused tracer carbon was converted to CO2 within the fetus. This rate of conversion was greater than 80% of the total fetoplacental conversion rate and significantly higher than the flux of KIC tracer carbon from placenta to fetus. Fetal KIC decarboxylation rate, calculated from the fetal KIC enrichment data, was 2.83 +/- 0.40 mumol.min-1.kg fetus-1 and approximately 60% of the combined net Leu and KIC flux into the fetus from the placenta.

  19. Partial molar volume of L-Valine in water under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawamura, Seiji

    2013-06-01

    Partial molar volume of L-valine in water was estimated up to 400 MPa from pressure coefficient of the solubility of the solute and molar volume of solid valine. The former was measured in a previous paper and the latter was measured in this article using a piston-cylinder typed cell. The partial molar volume increased with pressure and a maximum was observed around 250 MPa. It was compared with other amino acids.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from Streptococcus mutans

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yong-Zhi; Sheng, Yu; Li, Lan-Fen; Tang, De-Wei; Liu, Xiang-Yu; Zhao, Xiaojun; Liang, Yu-He Su, Xiao-Dong

    2007-09-01

    A potential target for antibiotic drug design, d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from S. mutans, was expressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution. d-Alanine-d-alanine ligase is encoded by the gene ddl (SMU-599) in Streptococcus mutans. This ligase plays a very important role in cell-wall biosynthesis and may be a potential target for drug design. To study the structure and function of this ligase, the gene ddl was amplified from S. mutans genomic DNA and cloned into the expression vector pET28a. The protein was expressed in soluble form in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3). Homogeneous protein was obtained using a two-step procedure consisting of Ni{sup 2+}-chelating and size-exclusion chromatography. Purified protein was crystallized and the cube-shaped crystal diffracted to 2.4 Å. The crystal belongs to space group P3{sub 1}21 or P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 79.50, c = 108.97 Å. There is one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  1. Alteration of substrate specificity of alanine dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Puja; Aldeborgh, Hannah; Carlucci, Lauren; Walsh, Lauren; Wasserman, Jordan; Zhou, Edward; Lefurgy, Scott T.; Mundorff, Emily C.

    2015-01-01

    The l-alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) has a natural history that suggests it would not be a promising candidate for expansion of substrate specificity by protein engineering: it is the only amino acid dehydrogenase in its fold family, it has no sequence or structural similarity to any known amino acid dehydrogenase, and it has a strong preference for l-alanine over all other substrates. By contrast, engineering of the amino acid dehydrogenase superfamily members has produced catalysts with expanded substrate specificity; yet, this enzyme family already contains members that accept a broad range of substrates. To test whether the natural history of an enzyme is a predictor of its innate evolvability, directed evolution was carried out on AlaDH. A single mutation identified through molecular modeling, F94S, introduced into the AlaDH from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtAlaDH) completely alters its substrate specificity pattern, enabling activity toward a range of larger amino acids. Saturation mutagenesis libraries in this mutant background additionally identified a double mutant (F94S/Y117L) showing improved activity toward hydrophobic amino acids. The catalytic efficiencies achieved in AlaDH are comparable with those that resulted from similar efforts in the amino acid dehydrogenase superfamily and demonstrate the evolvability of MtAlaDH specificity toward other amino acid substrates. PMID:25538307

  2. A leucine-to-proline substitution causes a defective [alpha]-antichymotrypsin allele associated with familial obstructive lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Poller, W.; Scholz, S.; Fischer, M. ); Faber, J.P.; Tief, K.; Olek, K.; Kirchgesser, M. ); Weidinger, S. ); Heidtmann, H.H. )

    1993-09-01

    Using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and direct sequencing of amplified genomic DNA, the authors have identified two defective mutants of the human [alpha][sub 1]-antichymotrypsin (ACT) gene associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A leucine 55-to-proline substitution causing a defective ACT allele (Bochum-1) was observed in a family with COPD in three subsequent generations. Another mutation, proline 229-to-alanine (Bonn-1), was associated with ACT serum deficiency in four patients with a positive family history. These mutations were not detected among 100 healthy control subjects, suggesting a possible pathogenetic role of ACT gene defects in a subset of patients with COPD. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. Spectroscopic studies on sidewall carboxylic acid functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with valine.

    PubMed

    Deborah, M; Jawahar, A; Mathavan, T; Dhas, M Kumara; Benial, A Milton Franklin

    2015-03-15

    The valine functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTS) were prepared and characterized by using XRD, UV-Vis, FT-IR, EPR, SEM, and EDX, spectroscopic techniques. The enhanced XRD peak (002) intensity was observed for valine functionalized MWCNTs compared with oxidized MWCNTs, which is likely due to sample purification by acid washing. UV-Vis study shows the formation of valine functionalized MWCNTs. FT-IR study confirms the presence of functional groups of oxidized MWCNTs and valine functionalized MWCNTs. The ESR line shape analysis indicates that the observed EPR line shape is a Gaussian line shape. The g-values indicate that the systems are isotropic in nature. The morphology study was carried out for oxidized MWCNTs and valine functionalized MWCNTs by using SEM. The EDX spectra revealed that the high purity of oxidized MWCNTs and valine functionalized MWCNTs. The functionalization has been chosen because, functionalization of CNTs with amino acids makes them soluble and biocompatible. Thus, they have potential applications in the field of biosensors and targeted drug delivery.

  4. Application of metabolic engineering for the biotechnological production of L-valine.

    PubMed

    Oldiges, Marco; Eikmanns, Bernhard J; Blombach, Bastian

    2014-07-01

    The branched chain amino acid L-valine is an essential nutrient for higher organisms, such as animals and humans. Besides the pharmaceutical application in parenteral nutrition and as synthon for the chemical synthesis of e.g. herbicides or anti-viral drugs, L-valine is now emerging into the feed market, and significant increase of sales and world production is expected. In accordance, well-known microbial production bacteria, such as Escherichia coli and Corynebacterium glutamicum strains, have recently been metabolically engineered for efficient L-valine production under aerobic or anaerobic conditions, and the respective cultivation and production conditions have been optimized. This review summarizes the state of the art in L-valine biosynthesis and its regulation in E. coli and C. glutamicum with respect to optimal metabolic network for microbial L-valine production, genetic strain engineering and bioprocess development for L-valine production, and finally, it will shed light on emerging technologies that have the potential to accelerate strain and bioprocess engineering in the near future.

  5. Spectroscopic studies on sidewall carboxylic acid functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with valine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deborah, M.; Jawahar, A.; Mathavan, T.; Dhas, M. Kumara; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2015-03-01

    The valine functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTS) were prepared and characterized by using XRD, UV-Vis, FT-IR, EPR, SEM, and EDX, spectroscopic techniques. The enhanced XRD peak (0 0 2) intensity was observed for valine functionalized MWCNTs compared with oxidized MWCNTs, which is likely due to sample purification by acid washing. UV-Vis study shows the formation of valine functionalized MWCNTs. FT-IR study confirms the presence of functional groups of oxidized MWCNTs and valine functionalized MWCNTs. The ESR line shape analysis indicates that the observed EPR line shape is a Gaussian line shape. The g-values indicate that the systems are isotropic in nature. The morphology study was carried out for oxidized MWCNTs and valine functionalized MWCNTs by using SEM. The EDX spectra revealed that the high purity of oxidized MWCNTs and valine functionalized MWCNTs. The functionalization has been chosen because, functionalization of CNTs with amino acids makes them soluble and biocompatible. Thus, they have potential applications in the field of biosensors and targeted drug delivery.

  6. Structural analysis and mutant growth properties reveal distinctive enzymatic and cellular roles for the three major L-alanine transaminases of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Peña-Soler, Esther; Fernandez, Francisco J; López-Estepa, Miguel; Garces, Fernando; Richardson, Andrew J; Quintana, Juan F; Rudd, Kenneth E; Coll, Miquel; Vega, M Cristina

    2014-01-01

    In order to maintain proper cellular function, the metabolism of the bacterial microbiota presents several mechanisms oriented to keep a correctly balanced amino acid pool. Central components of these mechanisms are enzymes with alanine transaminase activity, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes that interconvert alanine and pyruvate, thereby allowing the precise control of alanine and glutamate concentrations, two of the most abundant amino acids in the cellular amino acid pool. Here we report the 2.11-Å crystal structure of full-length AlaA from the model organism Escherichia coli, a major bacterial alanine aminotransferase, and compare its overall structure and active site composition with detailed atomic models of two other bacterial enzymes capable of catalyzing this reaction in vivo, AlaC and valine-pyruvate aminotransferase (AvtA). Apart from a narrow entry channel to the active site, a feature of this new crystal structure is the role of an active site loop that closes in upon binding of substrate-mimicking molecules, and which has only been previously reported in a plant enzyme. Comparison of the available structures indicates that beyond superficial differences, alanine aminotransferases of diverse phylogenetic origins share a universal reaction mechanism that depends on an array of highly conserved amino acid residues and is similarly regulated by various unrelated motifs. Despite this unifying mechanism and regulation, growth competition experiments demonstrate that AlaA, AlaC and AvtA are not freely exchangeable in vivo, suggesting that their functional repertoire is not completely redundant thus providing an explanation for their independent evolutionary conservation.

  7. International society of sports nutrition position stand: Beta-Alanine.

    PubMed

    Trexler, Eric T; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Stout, Jeffrey R; Hoffman, Jay R; Wilborn, Colin D; Sale, Craig; Kreider, Richard B; Jäger, Ralf; Earnest, Conrad P; Bannock, Laurent; Campbell, Bill; Kalman, Douglas; Ziegenfuss, Tim N; Antonio, Jose

    2015-01-01

    The International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) provides an objective and critical review of the mechanisms and use of beta-alanine supplementation. Based on the current available literature, the conclusions of the ISSN are as follows: 1) Four weeks of beta-alanine supplementation (4-6 g daily) significantly augments muscle carnosine concentrations, thereby acting as an intracellular pH buffer; 2) Beta-alanine supplementation currently appears to be safe in healthy populations at recommended doses; 3) The only reported side effect is paraesthesia (tingling), but studies indicate this can be attenuated by using divided lower doses (1.6 g) or using a sustained-release formula; 4) Daily supplementation with 4 to 6 g of beta-alanine for at least 2 to 4 weeks has been shown to improve exercise performance, with more pronounced effects in open end-point tasks/time trials lasting 1 to 4 min in duration; 5) Beta-alanine attenuates neuromuscular fatigue, particularly in older subjects, and preliminary evidence indicates that beta-alanine may improve tactical performance; 6) Combining beta-alanine with other single or multi-ingredient supplements may be advantageous when supplementation of beta-alanine is high enough (4-6 g daily) and long enough (minimum 4 weeks); 7) More research is needed to determine the effects of beta-alanine on strength, endurance performance beyond 25 min in duration, and other health-related benefits associated with carnosine. PMID:26175657

  8. International society of sports nutrition position stand: Beta-Alanine.

    PubMed

    Trexler, Eric T; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Stout, Jeffrey R; Hoffman, Jay R; Wilborn, Colin D; Sale, Craig; Kreider, Richard B; Jäger, Ralf; Earnest, Conrad P; Bannock, Laurent; Campbell, Bill; Kalman, Douglas; Ziegenfuss, Tim N; Antonio, Jose

    2015-01-01

    The International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) provides an objective and critical review of the mechanisms and use of beta-alanine supplementation. Based on the current available literature, the conclusions of the ISSN are as follows: 1) Four weeks of beta-alanine supplementation (4-6 g daily) significantly augments muscle carnosine concentrations, thereby acting as an intracellular pH buffer; 2) Beta-alanine supplementation currently appears to be safe in healthy populations at recommended doses; 3) The only reported side effect is paraesthesia (tingling), but studies indicate this can be attenuated by using divided lower doses (1.6 g) or using a sustained-release formula; 4) Daily supplementation with 4 to 6 g of beta-alanine for at least 2 to 4 weeks has been shown to improve exercise performance, with more pronounced effects in open end-point tasks/time trials lasting 1 to 4 min in duration; 5) Beta-alanine attenuates neuromuscular fatigue, particularly in older subjects, and preliminary evidence indicates that beta-alanine may improve tactical performance; 6) Combining beta-alanine with other single or multi-ingredient supplements may be advantageous when supplementation of beta-alanine is high enough (4-6 g daily) and long enough (minimum 4 weeks); 7) More research is needed to determine the effects of beta-alanine on strength, endurance performance beyond 25 min in duration, and other health-related benefits associated with carnosine.

  9. Vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) transports β-alanine.

    PubMed

    Juge, Narinobu; Omote, Hiroshi; Moriyama, Yoshinori

    2013-11-01

    Vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) is expressed in GABAergic and glycinergic neurons, and is responsible for vesicular storage and subsequent exocytosis of these inhibitory amino acids. In this study, we show that VGAT recognizes β-alanine as a substrate. Proteoliposomes containing purified VGAT transport β-alanine using Δψ but not ΔpH as a driving force. The Δψ-driven β-alanine uptake requires Cl(-). VGAT also facilitates Cl(-) uptake in the presence of β-alanine. A previously described VGAT mutant (Glu213Ala) that disrupts GABA and glycine transport similarly abrogates β-alanine uptake. These findings indicated that VGAT transports β-alanine through a mechanism similar to those for GABA and glycine, and functions as a vesicular β-alanine transporter. Vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) is expressed in GABAergic and glycinergic neurons, and is responsible for vesicular storage and subsequent exocytosis of these inhibitory amino acids. In the present study, we showed that proteoliposomes containing purified VGAT transport β-alanine using Δψ as a driving force. VGAT also facilitates Cl(-) uptake. Our findings indicated that VGAT functions as a vesicular β-alanine transporter.

  10. Di-Leucine Signals Mediate Targeting of Tyrosinase and Synaptotagmin to Synaptic-like Microvesicles within PC12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Blagoveshchenskaya, Anastasiya D.; Hewitt, Eric W.; Cutler, Daniel F.

    1999-01-01

    One pathway in forming synaptic-like microvesicles (SLMV) involves direct budding from the plasma membrane, requires adaptor protein 2 (AP2) and is brefeldin A (BFA) resistant. A second route leads from the plasma membrane to an endosomal intermediate from which SLMV bud in a BFA-sensitive, AP3-dependent manner. Because AP3 has been shown to bind to a di-leucine targeting signal in vitro, we have investigated whether this major class of targeting signals is capable of directing protein traffic to SLMV in vivo. We have found that a di-leucine signal within the cytoplasmic tail of human tyrosinase is responsible for the majority of the targeting of HRP-tyrosinase chimeras to SLMV in PC12 cells. Furthermore, we have discovered that a Met-Leu di-hydrophobic motif within the extreme C terminus of synaptotagmin I supports 20% of the SLMV targeting of a CD4-synaptotagmin chimera. All of the traffic to the SLMV mediated by either di-Leu or Met-Leu is BFA sensitive, strongly suggesting a role for AP3 and possibly for an endosomal intermediate in this process. The differential reduction in SLMV targeting for HRP-tyrosinase and CD4-synaptotagmin chimeras by di-alanine substitutions or BFA treatment implies that different proteins use the two routes to the SLMV to differing extents. PMID:10564285

  11. Fasting and postprandial phenylalanine and leucine kinetics in liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Tessari, P; Inchiostro, S; Barazzoni, R; Zanetti, M; Orlando, R; Biolo, G; Sergi, G; Pino, A; Tiengo, A

    1994-07-01

    To investigate body protein turnover and the pathogenesis of increased concentration of plasma phenylalanine in liver cirrhosis, we have studied phenylalanine and leucine kinetics in cirrhotic (diabetic and nondiabetic) patients, and in normal subjects, both in the postabsorptive state and during a mixed meal, using combined intravenous and oral isotope infusions. Postabsorptive phenylalanine concentration and whole body rate of appearance (Ra) were approximately 40% greater (P < 0.05) in patients than in controls. Leucine concentrations were comparable, but intracellular leucine Ra was also increased (P < 0.05), suggesting increased whole body protein breakdown. Postprandial phenylalanine Ra was also greater (P < 0.05) in the patients. This difference was due to a diminished fractional splanchnic uptake of the dietary phenylalanine (approximately 40% lower in the cirrhotics vs. controls, P < or = 0.05). Postprandial leucine Ra was also increased in the patients, but splanchnic uptake of dietary leucine was normal. Thus both increased body protein breakdown and decreased splanchnic extraction of dietary phenylalanine can account for the increased phenylalanine concentrations in liver cirrhosis.

  12. Alanine aminotransferase controls seed dormancy in barley

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Kazuhiro; Yamane, Miki; Yamaji, Nami; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Tagiri, Akemi; Schwerdt, Julian G.; Fincher, Geoffrey B.; Matsumoto, Takashi; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Komatsuda, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Dormancy allows wild barley grains to survive dry summers in the Near East. After domestication, barley was selected for shorter dormancy periods. Here we isolate the major seed dormancy gene qsd1 from wild barley, which encodes an alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT). The seed dormancy gene is expressed specifically in the embryo. The AlaAT isoenzymes encoded by the long and short dormancy alleles differ in a single amino acid residue. The reduced dormancy allele Qsd1 evolved from barleys that were first domesticated in the southern Levant and had the long dormancy qsd1 allele that can be traced back to wild barleys. The reduced dormancy mutation likely contributed to the enhanced performance of barley in industrial applications such as beer and whisky production, which involve controlled germination. In contrast, the long dormancy allele might be used to control pre-harvest sprouting in higher rainfall areas to enhance global adaptation of barley. PMID:27188711

  13. Alanine aminotransferase controls seed dormancy in barley.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kazuhiro; Yamane, Miki; Yamaji, Nami; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Tagiri, Akemi; Schwerdt, Julian G; Fincher, Geoffrey B; Matsumoto, Takashi; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Komatsuda, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Dormancy allows wild barley grains to survive dry summers in the Near East. After domestication, barley was selected for shorter dormancy periods. Here we isolate the major seed dormancy gene qsd1 from wild barley, which encodes an alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT). The seed dormancy gene is expressed specifically in the embryo. The AlaAT isoenzymes encoded by the long and short dormancy alleles differ in a single amino acid residue. The reduced dormancy allele Qsd1 evolved from barleys that were first domesticated in the southern Levant and had the long dormancy qsd1 allele that can be traced back to wild barleys. The reduced dormancy mutation likely contributed to the enhanced performance of barley in industrial applications such as beer and whisky production, which involve controlled germination. In contrast, the long dormancy allele might be used to control pre-harvest sprouting in higher rainfall areas to enhance global adaptation of barley. PMID:27188711

  14. Effects of dietary leucine supplementation in low crude protein diets on performance, nitrogen balance, whole-body protein turnover, carcass characteristics and meat quality of finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shihai; Chu, Licui; Qiao, Shiyan; Mao, Xiangbing; Zeng, Xiangfang

    2016-07-01

    Eighteen Duroc × Landrace × Yorkshire barrows, with an average initial body weight (BW) of 75.4 ± 2.0 kg, were randomly allotted to one of three diets with six replicates per treatment for 25 days. The diets comprised a normal protein diet (NP, 14.5% crude protein), a low crude protein diet supplemented with 0.27% alanine (LP + Ala, 10.0% crude protein), or a low crude protein diet supplemented with 0.40% leucine (LP + Leu, 10.0% crude protein). The whole-body protein synthesis rate, whole-body protein breakdown rate and protein deposition rate in pigs fed the LP + Leu diet were similar to the NP diet (P > 0.05), and both were significantly higher than pigs fed the LP + Ala diet (P < 0.05). The Longissimus muscle area (LMA) of pigs fed the LP + Leu diet was larger than those fed the LP + Ala diet (P = 0.05). In addition, drip loss and intramuscular fat of pigs fed the LP + Ala diet were higher than that of the others (P < 0.05). In conclusion, supplementation of leucine in low protein diet could stimulate protein deposition and improve the meat quality of finishing pigs more than an alanine-supplemented one. PMID:26597995

  15. Valine-Resistance, a Potential Marker in Plant Cell Genetics. II. Optimization of Uv Mutagenesis and Selection of Valine-Resistant Colonies Derived from Tobacco Mesophyll Protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Grandbastien, M A; Bourgin, J P; Caboche, M

    1985-02-01

    The induction and selection of valine-resistant mutants from haploid tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) mesophyll protoplast-derived cells have been studied. Using cells from an original mutant plant obtained previously, we performed reconstruction experiments in order to determine the best conditions for the recovery of resistant cells among a population of sensitive cells. Optimal selective conditions were shown to depend on various factors including cell density, time of addition of valine and seasonal variations affecting the mother plants.-Using cell densities of approximately 10( 4) cells/ml, we defined efficient selective conditions: more than 25% of the putative mutant clones selected from UV-mutagenized protoplasts were reproducibly confirmed to be valine resistant. Further characterization of some regenerated mutant plants indicated that valine-resistance was associated with an uptake deficiency, as in the case of the original mutant plant of the Val(r)-2 line used for reconstruction experiments. Spontaneous mutation rates for valine-resistance were below accurately detectable levels, i.e., less than 10(-6) per cell per generation. Induced mutation frequency varied nonlinearily with UV dose from 10(-5) to 5 x 10(-4) resistant clones per surviving colony. Two independent loci (vr2 and vr3) were previously shown to be involved in valine-resistance due to amino acid uptake deficiency. Haploid tobacco plants were produced through anther culture from an F(1) double-heterozygous plant obtained from a cross between the original mutant plant and a wild-type plant. Study of the level of resistance to valine of protoplast-derived cells allowed the classification of these haploid plants in four types: sensitive, resistant and two intermediary resistant types believed to result from the presence of a mutant allele at only one of the two loci involved. The frequencies of UV-induced mutations in cells derived from haploid plants of one of the intermediary types were

  16. Valine-Resistance, a Potential Marker in Plant Cell Genetics. II. Optimization of Uv Mutagenesis and Selection of Valine-Resistant Colonies Derived from Tobacco Mesophyll Protoplasts

    PubMed Central

    Grandbastien, M. A.; Bourgin, J. P.; Caboche, M.

    1985-01-01

    The induction and selection of valine-resistant mutants from haploid tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) mesophyll protoplast-derived cells have been studied. Using cells from an original mutant plant obtained previously, we performed reconstruction experiments in order to determine the best conditions for the recovery of resistant cells among a population of sensitive cells. Optimal selective conditions were shown to depend on various factors including cell density, time of addition of valine and seasonal variations affecting the mother plants.—Using cell densities of approximately 10 4 cells/ml, we defined efficient selective conditions: more than 25% of the putative mutant clones selected from UV-mutagenized protoplasts were reproducibly confirmed to be valine resistant. Further characterization of some regenerated mutant plants indicated that valine-resistance was associated with an uptake deficiency, as in the case of the original mutant plant of the Valr-2 line used for reconstruction experiments. Spontaneous mutation rates for valine-resistance were below accurately detectable levels, i.e., less than 10-6 per cell per generation. Induced mutation frequency varied nonlinearily with UV dose from 10-5 to 5 x 10-4 resistant clones per surviving colony. Two independent loci (vr2 and vr3) were previously shown to be involved in valine-resistance due to amino acid uptake deficiency. Haploid tobacco plants were produced through anther culture from an F1 double-heterozygous plant obtained from a cross between the original mutant plant and a wild-type plant. Study of the level of resistance to valine of protoplast-derived cells allowed the classification of these haploid plants in four types: sensitive, resistant and two intermediary resistant types believed to result from the presence of a mutant allele at only one of the two loci involved. The frequencies of UV-induced mutations in cells derived from haploid plants of one of the intermediary types were compared to

  17. Effect of L-valine supplementation to a wheat-based diet with leucine excess on performance, gene expression, and serum concentration of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Morales, A; García, H; Araiza, A; Htoo, J K; Cota, M; Arce, N; Cervantes, M

    2012-12-01

    Excess Leu in the diet reduces the expression of the cationic AA transporter b(0,+), absorption of Lys and Arg, feed intake, and ADG of pigs. Because Val competes with Leu for absorption, surplus Val may correct some of these effects. An experiment was conducted to analyze the effect of surplus Val in a basal wheat (Triticum aestivum) diet fortified with free Lys, Thr, and Met and containing excess Leu and Ile on performance, expression of genes encoding b(0,+), and serum concentrations of AA. Sixteen pigs (30.3 ± 2.1 kg BW) were used. Treatments were wheat based with excess Leu and Ile (T1) and T1 plus 0.44% L-Val (T2). At the end of the 21-d study, 12 pigs were euthanized; jugular blood was collected to analyze serum AA and jejunal mucosa to measure expression of b(0,+). Surplus Val increased (P < 0.05) ADG and G:F and serum Val, Lys, and Arg but did not affect (P > 0.10) b(0,+) expression. Although analyzed Val content in the basal diet was lower than calculated, the increased serum Lys and improved pig performance may suggest that excess Leu limits Val availability and that surplus Val could correct some of the negative effects of excess Leu.

  18. Inhibition of leucine transport in Saccharomyces by S-adenosylmethionine.

    PubMed

    Law, R E; Ferro, A J

    1980-07-01

    S-Adenoxyl-L-methionine (SAM) inhibited leucine transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By using a mutant defective in the active transport of SAM, we demonstrated that the inhibitory effect was exerted at an extracellular site. Cells preincubated wtih SAM for 120 min became refractory to its inhibitory effect, which was not a result of either the active transport or the metabolism of SAM. The quantitative recovery of labeled SAM from the incubation medium indicated that SAM, and not a metabolite, was the true inhibitory molecule. S-Adenosyl-L-homocysteine and S-adenosyl-L-ethionine also functioned as inhibitors of leucine transport, whereas S-adenosyl-D-methionine, S-adenosyl-D-homocystein, 5'-methylthioadenosine, 5'-dimethylthioadenosine, and adenosine lacked this property. Kinetic studies demonstrated that SAM was a competitive inhibitor of leucine transport.

  19. Inhibition of leucine transport in Saccharomyces by S-adenosylmethionine.

    PubMed Central

    Law, R E; Ferro, A J

    1980-01-01

    S-Adenoxyl-L-methionine (SAM) inhibited leucine transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By using a mutant defective in the active transport of SAM, we demonstrated that the inhibitory effect was exerted at an extracellular site. Cells preincubated wtih SAM for 120 min became refractory to its inhibitory effect, which was not a result of either the active transport or the metabolism of SAM. The quantitative recovery of labeled SAM from the incubation medium indicated that SAM, and not a metabolite, was the true inhibitory molecule. S-Adenosyl-L-homocysteine and S-adenosyl-L-ethionine also functioned as inhibitors of leucine transport, whereas S-adenosyl-D-methionine, S-adenosyl-D-homocystein, 5'-methylthioadenosine, 5'-dimethylthioadenosine, and adenosine lacked this property. Kinetic studies demonstrated that SAM was a competitive inhibitor of leucine transport. PMID:6995442

  20. Improvement of L-valine production at high temperature in Brevibacterium flavum by overexpressing ilvEBNrC genes.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiaohu; Ge, Xiangyang; Wu, Di; Qian, He; Zhang, Weiguo

    2012-01-01

    Brevibacterium flavum ATCC14067 was engineered for L: -valine production by overexpression of different ilv genes; the ilvEBN(r)C genes from B. flavum NV128 provided the best candidate for L: -valine production. In traditional fermentation, L: -valine production reached 30.08 ± 0.92 g/L at 31°C in 72 h with a low conversion efficiency of 0.129 g/g. To further improve the L: -valine production and conversion efficiency based on the optimum temperatures of L: -valine biosynthesis enzymes (above 35°C) and the thermotolerance of B. flavum, the fermentation temperature was increased to 34, 37, and 40°C. As a result, higher metabolic rate and L: -valine biosynthesis enzymes activity were obtained at high temperature, and the maximum L: -valine production, conversion efficiency, and specific L: -valine production rate reached 38.08 ± 1.32 g/L, 0.241 g/g, and 0.133 g g(-1) h(-1), respectively, at 37°C in 48 h fermentation. The strategy for enhancing L: -valine production by overexpression of key enzymes in thermotolerant strains may provide an alternative approach to enhance branched-chain amino acids production with other strains.

  1. Role for Free Isoleucine or Glycyl-Leucine in the Repression of Threonine Deaminase in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wasmuth, John J.; Umbarger, H. E.

    1974-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the three branched-chain amino acid activating enzymes appear to be essential for multivalent repression of the isoleucine- and valine-forming enzymes. The results of experiments with a mutant, strain CU18, having an altered threonine deaminase, indicate that free isoleucine and some form of threonine deaminase (the product of the ilvA gene) are also involved in multivalent repression. This strain exhibits abnormally high derepressibility but normal repressibility of its ilv gene products, and its threonine deaminase is inhibited only by high concentrations of isoleucine. In strain CU18, the isoleucine analogue, thiaisoleucine, is incapable of replacing isoleucine in the multivalent repression of the ilv genes, whereas the analogue can fully replace the natural amino acid in repression in other strains examined. The dipeptide, glycyl-leucine, which, like isoleucine, is a heterotropic negative effector of threonine deaminase but is not a substrate for isoleucyl-transfer ribonucleic acid synthetase, can completely prevent the accumulation of threonine deaminase-forming potential during isoleucine starvation in strains with normal threonine deaminases. It can not, however, prevent such accumulation in strain CU18 or in other strains in which threonine deaminase is insensitive to any concentration of isoleucine. PMID:4587610

  2. Dietary leucine requirement of juvenile Japanese seabass ( Lateolabrax japonicus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Cheng, Zhenyan; Mai, Kangsen; Ai, Qinghui

    2015-02-01

    A 56-day feeding trial was conducted to examine the dietary leucine requirement of juvenile Japanese seabass in seawater floating net cages (1.5 m × 1.5 m × 2.0 m). Six isonitrogenous (crude protein 40%) and isoenergetic (gross energy 20 kJ g-1) diets were formulated to contain different concentrations of leucine (0.9%, 1.49%, 2.07%, 2.70%, 3.30% and 3.88% of dry matter). Crystalline L-amino acids were supplemented to simulate the whole body amino acid pattern of Japanese seabass except for leucine. Three groups (30 fish individuals each, 8.0 g ± 0.20 g in initial weight) were fed to apparent satiation at 5:00 and 17:30 every day. During the experimental period, the water temperature ranged from 26 to 32δC and salinity from 26 to 30, and the dissolved oxygen was maintained at 7 mg L-1. The results showed that weight gain ( WG), nitrogen retention ( NR), feed efficiency ( FE) and protein efficiency ratio ( PER) were significantly increased when dietary leucine was increased from 0.90% to 2.70% of dry matter, and then declined. WG was the highest when fish were fed D4 containing 2.70% of leucine. No significant differences were observed in body composition among dietary treatments ( P > 0.05). Considering the change of WG, the optimum dietary leucine requirement of juvenile Japanese seabass was either 2.39% of dry matter or 5.68% of dietary protein.

  3. Leucine metabolism in cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    McGhee, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether increased oxidation of or protein synthesis requiring leucine occurs in cirrhotic patients. Five control subjects and four subjects with cirrhosis were equilibrated on a baseline diet (0.6 g protein per kg ideal body weight (IBW)) with sufficient nonprotein calories to preclude negative nitrogen balance. An additional four patients were equilibrated on the same type of diet with a higher protein level (0.75 g per kg IBW). Control subjects and the patients were then studied during continuous infusion of L-(/sup 15/N, 1-/sup 13/C) leucine in the fasted state and, in the fed state, with a Propac diet which had the same distribution of energy nutrients as the baseline diets. Plasma levels of L-(/sup 15/N, 1-/sup 13/C), L-(1-/sup 13/C) and L-(/sup 15/N) leucine were measured during isotopic steady state by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and fractional excretion of /sup 13/CO/sup 2/ in breath samples were analyzed by isotopic ratio mass spectrometry. During the fasted and fed states leucine metabolism was measured to quantitate rates of nitrogen flux (Q/sub N/), carbon flux (Q/sub c/) and oxidation to carbon dioxide and water (C). From these measured values, proteins breakdown (B), protein synthesis (S), deamination (X/sup 0/) and reamination (X/sub N/) were calculated. The results showed that protein synthesis and leucine metabolism were identical in controls and patients when both were fed a diet with 0.6 g protein/kg IBW and maintenance level of nonprotein calories. The data also showed that leucine metabolism can be quantitatively and reproducibly measured in subjects with cirrhosis.

  4. Alanine repeats influence protein localization in splicing speckles and paraspeckles.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shuo-Hsiu; Chang, Wei-Lun; Lu, Chia-Chen; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2014-12-16

    Mammalian splicing regulatory protein RNA-binding motif protein 4 (RBM4) has an alanine repeat-containing C-terminal domain (CAD) that confers both nuclear- and splicing speckle-targeting activities. Alanine-repeat expansion has pathological potential. Here we show that the alanine-repeat tracts influence the subnuclear targeting properties of the RBM4 CAD in cultured human cells. Notably, truncation of the alanine tracts redistributed a portion of RBM4 to paraspeckles. The alanine-deficient CAD was sufficient for paraspeckle targeting. On the other hand, alanine-repeat expansion reduced the mobility of RBM4 and impaired its splicing activity. We further took advantage of the putative coactivator activator (CoAA)-RBM4 conjoined splicing factor, CoAZ, to investigate the function of the CAD in subnuclear targeting. Transiently expressed CoAZ formed discrete nuclear foci that emerged and subsequently separated-fully or partially-from paraspeckles. Alanine-repeat expansion appeared to prevent CoAZ separation from paraspeckles, resulting in their complete colocalization. CoAZ foci were dynamic but, unlike paraspeckles, were resistant to RNase treatment. Our results indicate that the alanine-rich CAD, in conjunction with its conjoined RNA-binding domain(s), differentially influences the subnuclear localization and biogenesis of RBM4 and CoAZ.

  5. Beta-alanine as a small molecule neurotransmitter.

    PubMed

    Tiedje, K E; Stevens, K; Barnes, S; Weaver, D F

    2010-10-01

    This review discusses the role of beta-alanine as a neurotransmitter. Beta-alanine is structurally intermediate between alpha-amino acid (glycine, glutamate) and gamma-amino acid (GABA) neurotransmitters. In general, beta-alanine satisfies a number of the prerequisite classical criteria for being a neurotransmitter: beta-alanine occurs naturally in the CNS, is released by electrical stimulation through a Ca(2+) dependent process, has binding sites, and inhibits neuronal excitability. beta-Alanine has 5 recognized receptor sites: glycine co-agonist site on the NMDA complex (strychnine-insensitive); glycine receptor site (strychnine sensitive); GABA-A receptor; GABA-C receptor; and blockade of GAT protein-mediated glial GABA uptake. Although beta-alanine binding has been identified throughout the hippocampus, limbic structures, and neocortex, unique beta-alaninergic neurons with no GABAergic properties remain unidentified, and it is impossible to discriminate between beta-alaninergic and GABAergic properties in the CNS. Nevertheless, a variety of data suggest that beta-alanine should be considered as a small molecule neurotransmitter and should join the ranks of the other amino acid neurotransmitters. These realizations open the door for a more comprehensive evaluation of beta-alanine's neurochemistry and for its exploitation as a platform for drug design.

  6. The polarization of the G-protein activated potassium channel GIRK5 to the vegetal pole of Xenopus laevis oocytes is driven by a di-leucine motif.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Bello, Beatriz; Rangel-García, Claudia I; Salvador, Carolina; Carrisoza-Gaytán, Rolando; Escobar, Laura I

    2013-01-01

    The G protein-coupled inwardly-rectifying potassium channels (known as GIRK or Kir3) form functional heterotetramers gated by G-βγ subunits. GIRK channels participate in heart rate modulation and neuronal postsynaptic inhibition in mammals. In Xenopus laevis oocytes, GIRK5 is a functional homomultimer. Previously, we found that phosphorylation of a tyrosine (Y16) at its N-terminus downregulates the surface expression of GIRK5. In this work, we elucidated the subcellular localization and trafficking of GIRK5 in oocytes. Several EGFP-GIRK5 chimeras were produced and an ECFP construct was used to identify the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Whereas GIRK5-WT was retained in the ER at the animal pole, the phospho-null GIRK5-Y16A was localized to the vegetal pole. Interestingly, a construct with an N-terminal Δ25 deletion produced an even distribution of the channel in the whole oocyte. Through an alanine-scan, we identified an acidic cluster/di-leucine sorting-signal recognition motif between E17 and I22. We quantified the effect of each amino acid residue within this di-leucine motif in determining the distribution of GIRK5 to the animal and vegetal poles. We found that Y16 and I22 contributed to functional expression and were dominant in the polarization of GIRK5. We thus conclude that the N-terminal acidic di-leucine motif of GIRK5 determines its retention and polarized trafficking within Xl oocytes.

  7. The Polarization of the G-Protein Activated Potassium Channel GIRK5 to the Vegetal Pole of Xenopus laevis Oocytes Is Driven by a Di-Leucine Motif

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Bello, Beatriz; Rangel-García, Claudia I.; Salvador, Carolina; Carrisoza-Gaytán, Rolando; Escobar, Laura I.

    2013-01-01

    The G protein-coupled inwardly-rectifying potassium channels (known as GIRK or Kir3) form functional heterotetramers gated by G-βγ subunits. GIRK channels participate in heart rate modulation and neuronal postsynaptic inhibition in mammals. In Xenopus laevis oocytes, GIRK5 is a functional homomultimer. Previously, we found that phosphorylation of a tyrosine (Y16) at its N-terminus downregulates the surface expression of GIRK5. In this work, we elucidated the subcellular localization and trafficking of GIRK5 in oocytes. Several EGFP-GIRK5 chimeras were produced and an ECFP construct was used to identify the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Whereas GIRK5-WT was retained in the ER at the animal pole, the phospho-null GIRK5-Y16A was localized to the vegetal pole. Interestingly, a construct with an N-terminal Δ25 deletion produced an even distribution of the channel in the whole oocyte. Through an alanine-scan, we identified an acidic cluster/di-leucine sorting-signal recognition motif between E17 and I22. We quantified the effect of each amino acid residue within this di-leucine motif in determining the distribution of GIRK5 to the animal and vegetal poles. We found that Y16 and I22 contributed to functional expression and were dominant in the polarization of GIRK5. We thus conclude that the N-terminal acidic di-leucine motif of GIRK5 determines its retention and polarized trafficking within Xl oocytes. PMID:23717539

  8. Mechanisms of itch evoked by β-alanine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qin; Sikand, Parul; Ma, Chao; Tang, Zongxiang; Han, Liang; Li, Zhe; Sun, Shuohao; LaMotte, Robert H; Dong, Xinzhong

    2012-10-17

    β-Alanine, a popular supplement for muscle building, induces itch and tingling after consumption, but the underlying molecular and neural mechanisms are obscure. Here we show that, in mice, β-alanine elicited itch-associated behavior that requires MrgprD, a G-protein-coupled receptor expressed by a subpopulation of primary sensory neurons. These neurons exclusively innervate the skin, respond to β-alanine, heat, and mechanical noxious stimuli but do not respond to histamine. In humans, intradermally injected β-alanine induced itch but neither wheal nor flare, suggesting that the itch was not mediated by histamine. Thus, the primary sensory neurons responsive to β-alanine are likely part of a histamine-independent itch neural circuit and a target for treating clinical itch that is unrelieved by anti-histamines.

  9. Use of β-alanine as an ergogenic aid.

    PubMed

    Derave, Wim

    2013-01-01

    Despite the large variety of so-called ergogenic supplements used by the sporting community, only few of them are effectively supported by scientific proof. One of the recent evidence-based supplements that entered the market is β-alanine. β-Alanine is the rate-limiting precursor for the synthesis of the dipeptide carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) in human muscle. The chronic daily ingestion of β-alanine can markedly elevate muscle carnosine content, which results in improved exercise capacity, especially in sports that include high-intensity exercise episodes. The use of β-alanine is exponentially growing in recent years. This chapter aims to (1) discuss the scientific basis and physiological background of β-alanine and its synthesis product carnosine, and (2) translate these scientific findings to practical applications in sports.

  10. Ion formation upon electron collisions with valine embedded in helium nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberger, Nikolaus; Ralser, Stefan; Renzler, Michael; Harnisch, Martina; Kaiser, Alexander; Denifl, Stefan; Böhme, Diethard K.; Scheier, Paul

    2016-04-01

    We report here experimental results for the electron ionization of large superfluid helium nanodroplets with sizes of about 105 atoms that are doped with valine and clusters of valine. Spectra of both cations and anions were monitored with high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (mass resolution >4000). Clear series of peaks with valine cluster sizes up to at least 40 and spaced by the mass of a valine molecule are visible in both the cation and anion spectra. Ion efficiency curves are presented for selected cations and anions at electron energies up to about 40 eV and these provide insight into the mode of ion formation. The measured onset of 24.59 eV for cations is indicative of valine ionization by He+ whereas broad resonances at 2, 10 and 22 eV (and beyond) in the formation of anions speak to the occurrence of various modes of dissociative electron attachment by collisions with electrons or He*- and the influence of droplet size on the relative importance of these processes. Comparisons are also made with gas phase results and these provide insight into a matrix effect within the superfluid helium nanodroplet. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  11. Production of L-(1-/sup 11/C)valine by HPLC resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Washburn, L.C.; Sun, T.T.; Byrd, B.L.; Callahan, A.P.

    1982-01-01

    Based on a recently developed analytical technique, preparative high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) resolution of DL-(1-/sup 11/C)valine has been achieved. A conventional reverse-phase HPLC column and a chiral mobile phase (aqueous solution of L-proline, cupric acetate, and sodium acetate) were used. The copper can be removed from the L-valine fraction by precipitation as the sulfide, and final purification by cation-exchange chromatography yields L-(1-/sup 11/C)valine in a form that is acceptable for clinical positron tomographic studies. This purification method does not remove the L-proline introduced in the resolution process, but added L-proline did not affect the tissue distribution of L-(1-/sup 14/C)valine in rats. We have produced up to 60 mCi of L-(1-/sup 11/C)valine in an overall synthesis and resolution time of 50 min. This procedure should be adaptable to the rapid resolution of other C-/sup 11/-labeled amino acid racemates.

  12. Production of L-(1-/sup 11/C)valine by HPLC resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Washburn, L.C.; Sun, T.T.; Byrd, B.L.; Callahan, A.P.

    1982-01-01

    Based on a recently developed analytical technique, preparative high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) resolution of DL-(1-/sup 11/C)valine has been achieved. A conventional reverse-phase HPLC column and a chiral mobile phase (aqueous solution of L-proline, cupric acetate, and sodium acetate) were used. The copper can be removed from the L-valine fraction by precipitation as the sulfide, and final purification by cation-exchange chromatography yields L-(1-/sup 11/C)valine in a form that is acceptable for clinical positron tomographic studies. This purification method does not remove the L-proline introduced in the resolution process, but added L-proline did not affect the tissue distribution of L-(1-/sup 14/C)valine in rats. We have produced up to 60 mCi of L-(1-/sup 11/C)valine in an overall synthesis and resolution time of 50 min. This procedure should be adapable to the rapid resolution of other C-11-labeled amino acid racemates.

  13. Comparison of EPR response of alanine and Gd₂O₃-alanine dosimeters exposed to TRIGA Mainz reactor.

    PubMed

    Marrale, M; Schmitz, T; Gallo, S; Hampel, G; Longo, A; Panzeca, S; Tranchina, L

    2015-12-01

    In this work we report some preliminary results regarding the analysis of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) response of alanine pellets and alanine pellets added with gadolinium used for dosimetry at the TRIGA research reactor in Mainz, Germany. Two set-ups were evaluated: irradiation inside PMMA phantom and irradiation inside boric acid phantom. We observed that the presence of Gd2O3 inside alanine pellets increases the EPR signal by a factor of 3.45 and 1.24 in case of PMMA and boric acid phantoms, respectively. We can conclude that in the case of neutron beam with a predominant thermal neutron component the addition of gadolinium oxide can significantly improve neutron sensitivity of alanine pellets. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of both response of alanine and Gd-added alanine pellets with FLUKA code were performed and a good agreement was achieved for pure alanine dosimeters. For Gd2O3-alanine deviations between MC simulations and experimental data were observed and discussed. PMID:26315099

  14. Comparison of EPR response of alanine and Gd₂O₃-alanine dosimeters exposed to TRIGA Mainz reactor.

    PubMed

    Marrale, M; Schmitz, T; Gallo, S; Hampel, G; Longo, A; Panzeca, S; Tranchina, L

    2015-12-01

    In this work we report some preliminary results regarding the analysis of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) response of alanine pellets and alanine pellets added with gadolinium used for dosimetry at the TRIGA research reactor in Mainz, Germany. Two set-ups were evaluated: irradiation inside PMMA phantom and irradiation inside boric acid phantom. We observed that the presence of Gd2O3 inside alanine pellets increases the EPR signal by a factor of 3.45 and 1.24 in case of PMMA and boric acid phantoms, respectively. We can conclude that in the case of neutron beam with a predominant thermal neutron component the addition of gadolinium oxide can significantly improve neutron sensitivity of alanine pellets. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of both response of alanine and Gd-added alanine pellets with FLUKA code were performed and a good agreement was achieved for pure alanine dosimeters. For Gd2O3-alanine deviations between MC simulations and experimental data were observed and discussed.

  15. Anorexia in rats caused by a valine-deficient diet is not ameliorated by systemic ghrelin treatment.

    PubMed

    Goto, S; Nagao, K; Bannai, M; Takahashi, M; Nakahara, K; Kangawa, K; Murakami, N

    2010-03-10

    Rodents exhibit aversive behavior toward a diet that lacks at least one of the essential amino acids. We sought to determine whether the particular form of anorexia caused by such diets could be ameliorated by the administration of orexigenic peptides while simultaneously analyzing the neural mechanisms underlying anorexia. Rats were fed a valine-deficient diet, which induced severe anorexia (reducing food consumption by 80%). The severe anorexia was associated with a significant decrease in the cerebrospinal fluid valine concentration and hyper-ghrelinemia. Between 6 and 12 days after initiation of the valine-deficient diet, we injected rats twice daily with valine and/or an orexigenic peptide (ghrelin, neuropeptide Y, or agouti-related protein) either i.p. or i.c.v.. We then measured dietary intake. An i.c.v. valine injection allowed earlier food intake compared with an i.p valine injection and increased the density of c-Fos-positive ependymal cells lining the third ventricle. Whereas an i.c.v. injection of ghrelin or neuropeptide Y increased consumption of the valine-deficient diet, i.p injection of ghrelin or i.c.v. injection of agouti-related protein did not. Following i.c.v. administration of either valine or ghrelin, we did not observe complete recovery of consumption of the valine-deficient diet. This may be due to the ineffectiveness of peripheral ghrelin and central agouti-related protein and/or to conditioned aversion to the valine-deficient diet. Since ghrelin is known to be involved in food anticipatory activities, whether the hyper-ghrelinemia observed in valine-deficient rats play role in foraging behavior other than food intake is the future study to be investigated.

  16. Design, synthesis, and fungicidal activities of imino diacid analogs of valine amide fungicides.

    PubMed

    Sun, Man; Yang, Hui-Hui; Tian, Lei; Li, Jian-Qiang; Zhao, Wei-Guang

    2015-12-15

    The novel imino diacid analogs of valine amides were synthesized via several steps, including the protection, amidation, deprotection, and amino alkylation of valine, with the resulting structures confirmed by (1)H and (13)C NMR and HRMS. Bioassays showed that some of these compounds exhibited good fungicidal activity. Notably, isopropyl 2-((1-((1-(3-fluorophenyl)ethyl)amino)-3-methyl-1-oxobutan-2-yl)amino)propanoate 5i displayed significant levels of control, at 50%, against Erysiphe graminis at 3.9μM as well as a level of potency very similar to the reference azoxystrobin, which gave 60% activity at this concentration. The present work demonstrates that imino diacid analogs of valine amides could be potentially useful key compounds for the development of novel fungicides against wheat powdery mildew.

  17. Decomposition of L-valine under nonthermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingying; Kojtari, Arben; Friedman, Gary; Brooks, Ari D; Fridman, Alex; Ji, Hai-Feng

    2014-02-13

    L-Valine solutions in water and phosphate buffer were treated with nonthermal plasma generated by using a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) device and the products generated after plasma treatments were characterized by (1)H NMR and GC-MS. Our results demonstrate that L-valine is decomposed to acetone, formic acid, acetic acid, threo-methylaspartic acid, erythro-methlyaspartic acid, and pyruvic acid after direct exposure to DBD plasma. The concentrations of these compounds are time-dependent with plasma treatment. The mechanisms of L-valine under the DBD plasma are also proposed in this study. Acetone, pyruvic acid, and organic radicals (•)CHO, CH3COCH2OO(•) (acetonylperoxy), and CH3COC(OH)2OO(•) (1,1-dihydroxypropan-2-one peroxy) may be the determining chemicals in DNA damage.

  18. Chiral Asymmetric Structures in Aspartic Acid and Valine Crystals Assessed by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Teschke, Omar; Soares, David Mendez

    2016-03-29

    Structures of crystallized deposits formed by the molecular self-assembly of aspartic acid and valine on silicon substrates were imaged by atomic force microscopy. Images of d- and l-aspartic acid crystal surfaces showing extended molecularly flat sheets or regions separated by single molecule thick steps are presented. Distinct orientation surfaces were imaged, which, combined with the single molecule step size, defines the geometry of the crystal. However, single molecule step growth also reveals the crystal chirality, i.e., growth orientations. The imaged ordered lattice of aspartic acid (asp) and valine (val) mostly revealed periodicities corresponding to bulk terminations, but a previously unreported molecular hexagonal lattice configuration was observed for both l-asp and l-val but not for d-asp or d-val. Atomic force microscopy can then be used to identify the different chiral forms of aspartic acid and valine crystals.

  19. Dosimetry of D- and L-enantiomers of /sup 11/C-labeled tryptophan and valine

    SciTech Connect

    Washburn, L.C.; Byrd, B.L.; Sun, T.T.; Crook, J.E.; Hubner, K.F.; Coffey, J.L.; Watson, E.E.

    1985-01-01

    We have previously reported the radiation dosimetry of /sup 11/C-labeled DL-tryptophan and DL-valine, as well as clinical pancreatic imaging studies with these agents. Because of significant uptake in both normal pancreas and in pancreatic tumors (thought to be due to the presence of the D-enantiomer), differential diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma was not feasible. High-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) methods were developed for rapid resolution of /sup 11/C-labeled DL-tryptophan and DL-valine. Radiation dose estimates to the various organs in man were calculated for the D- and L-enantiomers of /sup 11/C-labeled tryptophan and valine, based on tissue distribution data in rats. The dose estimates were sufficiently low that 20-mCi doses of each of the enantiomeric amino acids were approved by the FDA for intravenous administration to humans. 21 refs., 3 tabs.

  20. Analytical continuation in coupling constant method; application to the calculation of resonance energies and widths for organic molecules: Glycine, alanine and valine and dimer of formic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, P.; Matejčík, Š.; Mach, P.; Urban, J.; Paidarová, I.; Horáček, J.

    2013-06-01

    The method of analytic continuation in the coupling constant (ACCC) in combination with use of the statistical Padé approximation is applied to the determination of resonance energy and width of some amino acids and formic acid dimer. Standard quantum chemistry codes provide accurate data which can be used for analytic continuation in the coupling constant to obtain the resonance energy and width of organic molecules with a good accuracy. The obtained results are compared with the existing experimental ones.

  1. The apo-structure of the leucine sensor Sestrin2 is still elusive.

    PubMed

    Saxton, Robert A; Knockenhauer, Kevin E; Schwartz, Thomas U; Sabatini, David M

    2016-01-01

    Sestrin2 is a GATOR2-interacting protein that directly binds leucine and is required for the inhibition of mTORC1 under leucine deprivation, indicating that it is a leucine sensor for the mTORC1 pathway. We recently reported the structure of Sestrin2 in complex with leucine [Protein Data Bank (PDB) ID, 5DJ4] and demonstrated that mutations in the leucine-binding pocket that alter the affinity of Sestrin2 for leucine result in a corresponding change in the leucine sensitivity of mTORC1 in cells. A lower resolution structure of human Sestrin2 (PDB ID, 5CUF), which was crystallized in the absence of exogenous leucine, showed Sestrin2 to be in a nearly identical conformation as the leucine-bound structure. On the basis of this observation, it has been argued that leucine binding does not affect the conformation of Sestrin2 and that Sestrin2 may not be a sensor for leucine. We show that simple analysis of the reported "apo"-Sestrin2 structure reveals the clear presence of prominent, unmodeled electron density in the leucine-binding pocket that exactly accommodates the leucine observed in the higher resolution structure. Refining the reported apo-structure with leucine eliminated the large Fobs-Fcalc difference density at this position and improved the working and free R factors of the model. Consistent with this result, our own structure of Sestrin2 crystallized in the absence of exogenous leucine also contained electron density that is best explained by leucine. Thus, the structure of apo-Sestrin2 remains elusive. PMID:27649739

  2. The apo-structure of the leucine sensor Sestrin2 is still elusive

    PubMed Central

    Saxton, Robert A.; Knockenhauer, Kevin E.; Schwartz, Thomas U.; Sabatini, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Sestrin2 is a GATOR2 interacting protein that directly binds leucine and is required for the inhibition of mTORC1 under leucine deprivation, indicating that it is a leucine sensor for the mTORC1 pathway. We recently reported the structure of Sestrin2 in complex with leucine (PDB ID: 5DJ4), and demonstrated that mutations in the leucine-binding pocket alter the affinity of Sestrin2 for leucine and result in a corresponding change in the leucine sensitivity of mTORC1 in cells. A lower resolution structure of human Sestrin2 (PDB ID: 5CUF), which was crystallized in the absence of exogenous leucine, showed Sestrin2 to be in a nearly identical conformation as the leucine-bound structure. Based on this observation, it has been argued that leucine binding does not affect the conformation of Sestrin2 and thus that Sestrin2 may not be a sensor for leucine. Here, we show that simple analysis of the reported “apo”-Sestrin2 structure reveals the clear presence of prominent, unmodeled electron density in the leucine-binding pocket that exactly accommodates the leucine observed in the higher resolution structure. Refining the reported “apo”-structure with leucine eliminates the large FO-FC difference density at this position and improves the working and free R-factors of the model. Consistent with this, our own structure of Sestrin2 crystallized in the absence of exogenous leucine also contains electron density that is best explained by leucine. Thus, the structure of apo-Sestrin2 remains elusive. PMID:27649739

  3. The apo-structure of the leucine sensor Sestrin2 is still elusive.

    PubMed

    Saxton, Robert A; Knockenhauer, Kevin E; Schwartz, Thomas U; Sabatini, David M

    2016-09-20

    Sestrin2 is a GATOR2-interacting protein that directly binds leucine and is required for the inhibition of mTORC1 under leucine deprivation, indicating that it is a leucine sensor for the mTORC1 pathway. We recently reported the structure of Sestrin2 in complex with leucine [Protein Data Bank (PDB) ID, 5DJ4] and demonstrated that mutations in the leucine-binding pocket that alter the affinity of Sestrin2 for leucine result in a corresponding change in the leucine sensitivity of mTORC1 in cells. A lower resolution structure of human Sestrin2 (PDB ID, 5CUF), which was crystallized in the absence of exogenous leucine, showed Sestrin2 to be in a nearly identical conformation as the leucine-bound structure. On the basis of this observation, it has been argued that leucine binding does not affect the conformation of Sestrin2 and that Sestrin2 may not be a sensor for leucine. We show that simple analysis of the reported "apo"-Sestrin2 structure reveals the clear presence of prominent, unmodeled electron density in the leucine-binding pocket that exactly accommodates the leucine observed in the higher resolution structure. Refining the reported apo-structure with leucine eliminated the large Fobs-Fcalc difference density at this position and improved the working and free R factors of the model. Consistent with this result, our own structure of Sestrin2 crystallized in the absence of exogenous leucine also contained electron density that is best explained by leucine. Thus, the structure of apo-Sestrin2 remains elusive.

  4. β-Alanine supplementation for athletic performance: an update.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, Phillip M

    2014-06-01

    β-alanine supplementation has become a common practice among competitive athletes participating in a range of different sports. Although the mechanism by which chronic β-alanine supplementation could have an ergogenic effect is widely debated, the popular view is that β-alanine supplementation augments intramuscular carnosine content, leading to an increase in muscle buffer capacity, a delay in the onset of muscular fatigue, and a facilitated recovery during repeated bouts of high-intensity exercise. β-alanine supplementation appears to be most effective for exercise tasks that rely heavily on ATP synthesis from anaerobic glycolysis. However, research investigating its efficacy as an ergogenic aid remains equivocal, making it difficult to draw conclusions as to its effectiveness for training and competition. The aim of this review was to update, summarize, and critically evaluate the findings associated with β-alanine supplementation and exercise performance with the most recent research available to allow the development of practical recommendations for coaches and athletes. A critical review of the literature reveals that when significant ergogenic effects have been found, they have been generally shown in untrained individuals performing exercise bouts under laboratory conditions. The body of scientific data available concerning highly trained athletes performing single competition-like exercise tasks indicates that this type of population receives modest but potentially worthwhile performance benefits from β-alanine supplementation. Recent data indicate that athletes may not only be using β-alanine supplementation to enhance sports performance but also as a training aid to augment bouts of high-intensity training. β-alanine supplementation has also been shown to increase resistance training performance and training volume in team-sport athletes, which may allow for greater overload and superior adaptations compared with training alone. The ergogenic

  5. Water adsorption on etched hydrophobic surfaces of L-, D- and DL-valine crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segura, J. J.; Verdaguer, A.; Fraxedas, J.

    2014-03-01

    The adsorption of water on etched (001) surfaces of L-, D- and DL-valine crystals has been characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) using different operational modes (contact, non-contact and electrostatic) above and below the dew point, the temperature at which water vapor from humid air condenses into liquid water at constant atmospheric pressure. The analysis of the images suggests the formation of aggregates of solvated valine molecules that easily diffuse on the hydrophobic terraces only constrained by step barriers of the well-defined chiral parallelepipedic patterns induced by the etching process.

  6. Fed-batch culture of Escherichia coli for L-valine production based on in silico flux response analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Hwan; Kim, Tae Yong; Lee, Kwang Ho; Lee, Sang Yup

    2011-04-01

    We have previously reported the development of a 100% genetically defined engineered Escherichia coli strain capable of producing L-valine from glucose with a high yield of 0.38 g L-valine per gram glucose (0.58 mol L-valine per mol glucose) by batch culture. Here we report a systems biological strategy of employing flux response analysis in bioprocess development using L-valine production by fed-batch culture as an example. Through the systems-level analysis, the source of ATP was found to be important for efficient L-valine production. There existed a trade-off between L-valine production and biomass formation, which was optimized for the most efficient L-valine production. Furthermore, acetic acid feeding strategy was optimized based on flux response analysis. The final fed-batch cultivation strategy allowed production of 32.3 g/L L-valine, the highest concentration reported for E. coli. This approach of employing systems-level analysis of metabolic fluxes in developing fed-batch cultivation strategy would also be applicable in developing strategies for the efficient production of other bioproducts.

  7. Preparation and Characterisation of Pva Doped with Beta Alanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuvaneshwari, R.; Karthikeyan, S.; Rajeswari, N.; Selvasekarapandian, S.; Sanjeeviraja, C.

    2013-07-01

    Pure PVA has been doped with different amount of β - alanine. Film has been prepared by Solution Casting Technique using water as a solvent. The Complex formation between the PVA and β - alanine has been confirmed by FTIR. The Pure PVA conductivity is in the order 10-10 Scm-1 at ambient temperature. The conductivity has been found to increase to the order 10-6 when doped with 10% β - alanine. In this paper characterization of a PVA doped with β-ala has been studied using XRD, FTIR, AC impedance analysis and the results are reported.

  8. REVERSAL OF d-CYCLOSERINE INHIBITION OF BACTERIAL GROWTH BY ALANINE

    PubMed Central

    Zygmunt, Walter A.

    1962-01-01

    Zygmunt, Walter A. (Mead Johnson & Co., Evansville, Ind.). Reversal of d-cycloserine inhibition of bacterial growth by alanine. J. Bacteriol. 84:154–156. 1962.—Reversal of the antibacterial activity of d-4-amino-3-isoxazolidone by alanine in bacterial cultures actively growing on chemically defined media was compared in cultures requiring exogenous alanine and those capable of its synthesis. dl-Alanine was the most effective reversal agent in Pediococcus cerevisiae, an alanine-requiring organism, and d-alanine was effective in Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, organisms synthesizing alanine. With all three cultures, l-alanine was the least effective reversal agent. PMID:16561951

  9. Short-term and long-term ethanol administration inhibits the placental uptake and transport of valine in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Patwardhan, R.V.; Schenker, S.; Henderson, G.I.; Abou-Mourad, N.N.; Hoyumpa, A.M. Jr.

    1981-08-01

    Ethanol ingestion during pregnancy causes a pattern of fetal/neonatal dysfunction called the FAS. The effects of short- and long-term ethanol ingestion on the placental uptake and maternal-fetal transfer of valine were studied in rats. The in vivo placental uptake and fetal uptake were estimated after injection of 0.04 micromol of /sub 14/C-valine intravenously on day 20 of gestation in Sprague-Dawley rats. Short-term ethanol ingestion (4 gm/kg) caused a significant reduction in the placental uptake of /sub 14/C-valine by 33%, 60%, and 30%, and 31% at 2.5, 5, 10, and 15 min after valine administration, respectively (p less than 0.01), and a similar significant reduction occurred in the fetal uptake of /sub 14/C-valine (p less than 0.01). Long-term ethanol ingestion prior to and throughout gestation resulted in a 47% reduction in placental valine uptake (p less than 0.01) and a 46% reduction in fetal valine uptake (p less than 0.01). Long-term ethanol feeding from day 4 to day 20 of gestation caused a 32% reduction in placental valine uptake (p less than 0.01) and a 26% reduction in fetal valine uptake (p less than 0.01). We conclude that both short- and long-term ingestion of ethanol inhibit the placental uptake and maternal-fetal transfer of an essential amino acid--valine. An alteration of placental function may contribute to the pathogenesis of the FAS.

  10. Valine and isoleucine requirement of 20- to 45-kilogram pigs.

    PubMed

    Waguespack, A M; Bidner, T D; Payne, R L; Southern, L L

    2012-07-01

    Three experiments were conducted to determine the Val and Ile requirements in low-CP, corn-soybean meal (C-SBM) AA-supplemented diets for 20- to 45-kg pigs. All experiments were conducted for 26 to 27 d with purebred or crossbred barrows and gilts, which were blocked by initial BW. Treatments were replicated with 5 or 6 pens of 3 or 4 pigs per pen. At the beginning of Exp. 1 and the end of all experiments, blood samples were obtained from all pigs to determine plasma urea N (PUN) concentrations. All diets were C-SBM with 0.335% supplemental Lys to achieve 0.83% standardized ileal digestible (SID) Lys, which is the Lys requirement of these pigs. In Exp. 1, 0, 0.02, 0.04, 0.06, 0.08, or 0.10% L-Val was supplemented to achieve 0.51, 0.53, 0.55, 0.57, 0.59, or 0.61% dietary SID Val, and Thr, Trp, Met, and Ile were supplemented to maintain Thr:Lys, Trp:Lys, TSAA:Lys, and Ile:Lys ratios of 0.71, 0.20, 0.62, and 0.60, respectively. Also, supplemental Gly and Glu were added to all diets to achieve 1.66% Gly + Ser and 3.28% Glu, which is equal to the Gly + Ser and Glu content of a previously validated positive control diet that contained no supplemental AA. Treatment differences were considered significant at P < 0.10. Valine addition increased ADG, ADFI, and G:F in pigs fed 0.51 to 0.59% SID Val (linear, P < 0.08), but ADG and ADFI were decreased at 0.61% SID Val (quadratic, P ≤ 0.10). On the basis of ADG and G:F, the SID Val requirement is between 0.56 and 0.58% in a C-SBM diet supplemented with AA. In Exp. 2 and 3, 0, 0.02, 0.04, 0.06, or 0.08% L-Ile was supplemented to achieve 0.43, 0.45, 0.47, 0.49, or 0.51% dietary SID Ile, and Thr, Trp, Met, and Ile were supplemented to maintain Thr:Lys, Trp:Lys, TSAA:Lys, and Val:Lys ratios of 0.71, 0.20, 0.62, and 0.74, respectively. Also, supplemental Gly and Glu were added to achieve 1.66% Gly + Ser and 3.28% Glu as in Exp. 1. Data from Exp. 2 and 3 were combined and analyzed as 1 data set. Daily BW gain, ADFI, and G:F were not

  11. Dose response of alanine detectors irradiated with carbon ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Rochus; Jaekel, Oliver; Palmans, Hugo; Sharpe, Peter; Bassler, Niels

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The dose response of the alanine detector shows a dependence on particle energy and type when irradiated with ion beams. The purpose of this study is to investigate the response behavior of the alanine detector in clinical carbon ion beams and compare the results to model predictions. Methods: Alanine detectors have been irradiated with carbon ions with an energy range of 89-400 MeV/u. The relative effectiveness of alanine has been measured in this regime. Pristine and spread out Bragg peak depth-dose curves have been measured with alanine dosimeters. The track structure based alanine response model developed by Hansen and Olsen has been implemented in the Monte Carlo code FLUKA and calculations were compared to experimental results. Results: Calculations of the relative effectiveness deviate less than 5% from the measured values for monoenergetic beams. Measured depth-dose curves deviate from predictions in the peak region, most pronounced at the distal edge of the peak. Conclusions: The used model and its implementation show a good overall agreement for quasimonoenergetic measurements. Deviations in depth-dose measurements are mainly attributed to uncertainties of the detector geometry implemented in the Monte Carlo simulations.

  12. Marginality and needs of dietary valine for broilers fed certain all-vegetable diets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Valine is likely the fourth limiting amino acid in most diets based of corn and soybean meal. However, its exact needs are not well known, and information regarding it is sparse. A series of studies were conducted to validate valine’s limitation in all-vegetable diets fed to broilers, and subseque...

  13. Spin-trap-radical chromatography of spin adducts produced from L-valine by. gamma. -irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Makiino, K.; Suzuki, N.; Moriya, F.; Rokushika, S.; Hatano, H.

    1980-01-01

    Diastereomeric spin adducts produced by reaction of 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane with the short-lived radicals from L-valine by ..gamma..-irradiation could be separated and identified by means of high performance liquid chromatography and ESR spectroscopy. 6 figures.

  14. Structural basis for leucine sensing by the Sestrin2-mTORC1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Saxton, Robert A.; Knockenhauer, Kevin E.; Wolfson, Rachel L.; Chantranupong, Lynne; Pacold, Michael E.; Wang, Tim; Schwartz, Thomas U.; Sabatini, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells coordinate growth with the availability of nutrients through mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), a master growth regulator. Leucine is of particular importance and activates mTORC1 via the Rag GTPases and their regulators GATOR1 and GATOR2. Sestrin2 interacts with GATOR2 and is a leucine sensor. We present the 2.7-Å crystal structure of Sestrin2 in complex with leucine. Leucine binds through a single pocket that coordinates its charged functional groups and confers specificity for the hydrophobic side chain. A loop encloses leucine and forms a lid-latch mechanism required for binding. A structure-guided mutation in Sestrin2 that decreases its affinity for leucine leads to a concomitant increase in the leucine concentration required for mTORC1 activation in cells. These results provide a structural mechanism of amino acid sensing by the mTORC1 pathway. PMID:26586190

  15. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for leucine and methionine enkephalins

    SciTech Connect

    Zamboni, G.; Jones, C.A.; Hughes, J.

    1983-04-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for enkephalins was developed by coupling the peptides to a carrier molecule (bovine serum albumin) in order to allow the antibody-antigen reaction to take place in the solid phase. The assay was shown to be highly reproducible. Its sensitivity was 14 nmol/liter for leucine enkephalin and 27 nmol/liter for methionine enkephalin, which is similar to that obtained when the same antibodies were used in radioimmunoassay.

  16. Noncovalent and covalent functionalization of a (5, 0) single-walled carbon nanotube with alanine and alanine radicals.

    PubMed

    Rajarajeswari, Muthusivarajan; Iyakutti, Kombiah; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2012-02-01

    We have systematically investigated the noncovalent and covalent adsorption of alanine and alanine radicals, respectively, onto a (5, 0) single-walled carbon nanotube using first-principles calculation. It was found that XH···π (X = N, O, C) interactions play a crucial role in the non-ovalent adsorption and that the functional group close to the carbon nanotube exhibits a significant influence on the binding strength. Noncovalent functionalization of the carbon nanotube with alanine enhances the conductivity of the metallic (5, 0) nanotube. In the covalent adsorption of each alanine radical onto a carbon nanotube, the binding energy depends on the adsorption site on CNT and the electronegative atom that binds with the CNT. The strongest complex is formed when the alanine radical interacts with a (5, 0) carbon nanotube through the amine group. In some cases, the covalent interaction of the alanine radical introduces a half-filled band at the Fermi level due to the local sp (3) hybridization, which modifies the conductivity of the tube.

  17. Structure of D-alanine-D-alanine ligase from Yersinia pestis: nucleotide phosphate recognition by the serine loop.

    PubMed

    Tran, Huyen Thi; Hong, Myoung Ki; Ngo, Ho Phuong Thuy; Huynh, Kim Hung; Ahn, Yeh Jin; Wang, Zhong; Kang, Lin Woo

    2016-01-01

    D-Alanyl-D-alanine is an essential precursor of bacterial peptidoglycan and is synthesized by D-alanine-D-alanine ligase (DDL) with hydrolysis of ATP; this reaction makes DDL an important drug target for the development of antibacterial agents. Five crystal structures of DDL from Yersinia pestis (YpDDL) were determined at 1.7-2.5 Å resolution: apo, AMP-bound, ADP-bound, adenosine 5'-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate-bound, and D-alanyl-D-alanine- and ADP-bound structures. YpDDL consists of three domains, in which four loops, loop 1, loop 2 (the serine loop), loop 3 (the ω-loop) and loop 4, constitute the binding sites for two D-alanine molecules and one ATP molecule. Some of them, especially the serine loop and the ω-loop, show flexible conformations, and the serine loop is mainly responsible for the conformational change in substrate nucleotide phosphates. Enzyme-kinetics assays were carried out for both the D-alanine and ATP substrates and a substrate-binding mechanism was proposed for YpDDL involving conformational changes of the loops.

  18. Structure of D-alanine-D-alanine ligase from Yersinia pestis: nucleotide phosphate recognition by the serine loop.

    PubMed

    Tran, Huyen Thi; Hong, Myoung Ki; Ngo, Ho Phuong Thuy; Huynh, Kim Hung; Ahn, Yeh Jin; Wang, Zhong; Kang, Lin Woo

    2016-01-01

    D-Alanyl-D-alanine is an essential precursor of bacterial peptidoglycan and is synthesized by D-alanine-D-alanine ligase (DDL) with hydrolysis of ATP; this reaction makes DDL an important drug target for the development of antibacterial agents. Five crystal structures of DDL from Yersinia pestis (YpDDL) were determined at 1.7-2.5 Å resolution: apo, AMP-bound, ADP-bound, adenosine 5'-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate-bound, and D-alanyl-D-alanine- and ADP-bound structures. YpDDL consists of three domains, in which four loops, loop 1, loop 2 (the serine loop), loop 3 (the ω-loop) and loop 4, constitute the binding sites for two D-alanine molecules and one ATP molecule. Some of them, especially the serine loop and the ω-loop, show flexible conformations, and the serine loop is mainly responsible for the conformational change in substrate nucleotide phosphates. Enzyme-kinetics assays were carried out for both the D-alanine and ATP substrates and a substrate-binding mechanism was proposed for YpDDL involving conformational changes of the loops. PMID:26894530

  19. Glutamine, arginine, and leucine signaling in the intestine.

    PubMed

    Marc Rhoads, J; Wu, Guoyao

    2009-05-01

    Glutamine and leucine are abundant constituents of plant and animal proteins, whereas the content of arginine in foods and physiological fluids varies greatly. Besides their role in protein synthesis, these three amino acids individually activate signaling pathway to promote protein synthesis and possibly inhibit autophagy-mediated protein degradation in intestinal epithelial cells. In addition, glutamine and arginine stimulate the mitogen-activated protein kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)/p70 (s6) kinase pathways, respectively, to enhance mucosal cell migration and restitution. Moreover, through the nitric oxide-dependent cGMP signaling cascade, arginine regulates multiple physiological events in the intestine that are beneficial for cell homeostasis and survival. Available evidence from both in vitro and in vivo animal studies shows that glutamine and arginine promote cell proliferation and exert differential cytoprotective effects in response to nutrient deprivation, oxidative injury, stress, and immunological challenge. Additionally, when nitric oxide is available, leucine increases the migration of intestinal cells. Therefore, through cellular signaling mechanisms, arginine, glutamine, and leucine play crucial roles in intestinal growth, integrity, and function.

  20. Leucine incorporation into mixed skeletal muscle protein in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, K.S.; Halliday, D.; Griggs, R.C. Clinical Research Centre, Harrow )

    1988-02-01

    Fractional mixed skeletal muscle protein synthesis (FMPS) was estimated in 10 postabsorptive healthy men by determining the increment in the abundance of ({sup 13}C)-leucine in quadriceps muscle protein during an intravenous infusion of L-(1-{sup 13}C)leucine. Whole-body muscle protein synthesis (MPS) was calculated based on the estimation of muscle mass from creatinine excretion and compared with whole-body protein synthesis (WBPS) calculated from the nonoxidative portion of leucine flux. A significant correlation was found between MPS. The contribution of MPS to WBPS was 27 {plus minus} 1%, which is comparable to the reports in other species. Morphometric analyses of adjacent muscle samples in eight subjects demonstrated that the biopsy specimens consisted of 86.5 {plus minus} 2% muscular as opposed to other tissues. Because fiber type composition varies between biopsies, the authors examined the relationship between proportions of each fiber type and FMPS. Variation in the composition of biopsies and in fiber-type proportion did not affect the estimation of muscle protein synthesis rate. They conclude that stable isotope techniques using serial needle biopsies permit the direct measurement of FMPS in humans and that this estimation is correlated with an indirect estimation of WBPS.

  1. Escherichia coli W as a new platform strain for the enhanced production of L-valine by systems metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Hwan; Jang, Yu-Sin; Lee, Jeong Wook; Lee, Sang Yup

    2011-05-01

    A less frequently employed Escherichia coli strain W, yet possessing useful metabolic characteristics such as less acetic acid production and high L-valine tolerance, was metabolically engineered for the production of L-valine. The ilvA gene was deleted to make more pyruvate, a key precursor for L-valine, available for enhanced L-valine biosynthesis. The lacI gene was deleted to allow constitutive expression of genes under the tac or trc promoter. The ilvBN(mut) genes encoding feedback-resistant acetohydroxy acid synthase (AHAS) I and the L-valine biosynthetic ilvCED genes encoding acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase, dihydroxy acid dehydratase, and branched chain amino acid aminotransferase, respectively, were amplified by plasmid-based overexpression. The global regulator Lrp and L-valine exporter YgaZH were also amplified by plasmid-based overexpression. The engineered E. coli W (ΔlacI ΔilvA) strain overexpressing the ilvBN(mut) , ilvCED, ygaZH, and lrp genes was able to produce an impressively high concentration of 60.7 g/L L-valine by fed-batch culture in 29.5 h, resulting in a high volumetric productivity of 2.06 g/L/h. The most notable finding is that there was no other byproduct produced during L-valine production. The results obtained in this study suggest that E. coli W can be a good alternative to Corynebacterium glutamicum and E. coli K-12, which have so far been the most efficient L-valine producer. Furthermore, it is expected that various bioproducts including other amino acids might be more efficiently produced by this revisited platform strain of E. coli.

  2. Cellular and Physiological Effects of Dietary Supplementation with β-Hydroxy-β-Methylbutyrate (HMB) and β-Alanine in Late Middle-Aged Mice.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Julian; Spence, Madoka; Cheng, An-Lin; Brotto, Leticia; Edens, Neile K; Garvey, Sean M; Brotto, Marco

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that severe decline of skeletal muscle mass and function with age may be mitigated by exercise and dietary supplementation with protein and amino acid ingredient technologies. The purposes of this study were to examine the effects of the leucine catabolite, beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB), in C2C12 myoblasts and myotubes, and to investigate the effects of dietary supplementation with HMB, the amino acid β-alanine and the combination thereof, on muscle contractility in a preclinical model of pre-sarcopenia. In C2C12 myotubes, HMB enhanced sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium release beyond vehicle control in the presence of all SR agonists tested (KCl, P<0.01; caffeine, P = 0.03; ionomycin, P = 0.03). HMB also improved C2C12 myoblast viability (25 μM HMB, P = 0.03) and increased proliferation (25 μM HMB, P = 0.04; 125 μM HMB, P<0.01). Furthermore, an ex vivo muscle contractility study was performed on EDL and soleus muscle from 19 month old, male C57BL/6nTac mice. For 8 weeks, mice were fed control AIN-93M diet, diet with HMB, diet with β-alanine, or diet with HMB and β-alanine. In β-alanine fed mice, EDL muscle showed a 7% increase in maximum absolute force compared to the control diet (202 ± 3vs. 188± 5 mN, P = 0.02). At submaximal frequency of stimulation (20 Hz), EDL from mice fed HMB plus β-alanine showed an 11% increase in absolute force (88.6 ± 2.2 vs. 79.8 ± 2.4 mN, P = 0.025) and a 13% increase in specific force (12.2 ± 0.4 vs. 10.8 ± 0.4 N/cm2, P = 0.021). Also in EDL muscle, β-alanine increased the rate of force development at all frequencies tested (P<0.025), while HMB reduced the time to reach peak contractile force (TTP), with a significant effect at 80 Hz (P = 0.0156). In soleus muscle, all experimental diets were associated with a decrease in TTP, compared to control diet. Our findings highlight beneficial effects of HMB and β-alanine supplementation on skeletal muscle function in aging mice.

  3. Cellular and Physiological Effects of Dietary Supplementation with β-Hydroxy-β-Methylbutyrate (HMB) and β-Alanine in Late Middle-Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vallejo, Julian; Spence, Madoka; Cheng, An-Lin; Brotto, Leticia; Edens, Neile K.; Garvey, Sean M.; Brotto, Marco

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that severe decline of skeletal muscle mass and function with age may be mitigated by exercise and dietary supplementation with protein and amino acid ingredient technologies. The purposes of this study were to examine the effects of the leucine catabolite, beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB), in C2C12 myoblasts and myotubes, and to investigate the effects of dietary supplementation with HMB, the amino acid β-alanine and the combination thereof, on muscle contractility in a preclinical model of pre-sarcopenia. In C2C12 myotubes, HMB enhanced sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium release beyond vehicle control in the presence of all SR agonists tested (KCl, P<0.01; caffeine, P = 0.03; ionomycin, P = 0.03). HMB also improved C2C12 myoblast viability (25 μM HMB, P = 0.03) and increased proliferation (25 μM HMB, P = 0.04; 125 μM HMB, P<0.01). Furthermore, an ex vivo muscle contractility study was performed on EDL and soleus muscle from 19 month old, male C57BL/6nTac mice. For 8 weeks, mice were fed control AIN-93M diet, diet with HMB, diet with β-alanine, or diet with HMB and β-alanine. In β-alanine fed mice, EDL muscle showed a 7% increase in maximum absolute force compared to the control diet (202 ± 3vs. 188± 5 mN, P = 0.02). At submaximal frequency of stimulation (20 Hz), EDL from mice fed HMB plus β-alanine showed an 11% increase in absolute force (88.6 ± 2.2 vs. 79.8 ± 2.4 mN, P = 0.025) and a 13% increase in specific force (12.2 ± 0.4 vs. 10.8 ± 0.4 N/cm2, P = 0.021). Also in EDL muscle, β-alanine increased the rate of force development at all frequencies tested (P<0.025), while HMB reduced the time to reach peak contractile force (TTP), with a significant effect at 80 Hz (P = 0.0156). In soleus muscle, all experimental diets were associated with a decrease in TTP, compared to control diet. Our findings highlight beneficial effects of HMB and β-alanine supplementation on skeletal muscle function in aging mice. PMID

  4. EPR/alanine dosimetry for two therapeutic proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrale, Maurizio; Carlino, Antonio; Gallo, Salvatore; Longo, Anna; Panzeca, Salvatore; Bolsi, Alessandra; Hrbacek, Jan; Lomax, Tony

    2016-02-01

    In this work the analysis of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) response of alanine pellets exposed to two different clinical proton beams employed for radiotherapy is performed. One beam is characterized by a passive delivery technique and is dedicated to the eyes treatment (OPTIS2 beam line). Alanine pellets were irradiated with a 70 MeV proton beam corresponding to 35 mm range in eye tissue. We investigated how collimators with different sizes and shape used to conform the dose to the planned target volume influence the delivered dose. For this purpose we performed measurements with varying the collimator size (Output Factor) and the results were compared with those obtained with other dosimetric techniques (such as Markus chamber and diode detector). This analysis showed that the dosimeter response is independent of collimator diameter if this is larger than or equal to 10 mm. The other beam is characterized by an active spot-scanning technique, the Gantry1 beam line (maximum energy 230 MeV), and is used to treat deep-seated tumors. The dose linearity of alanine response in the clinical dose range was tested and the alanine dose response at selected locations in depth was measured and compared with the TPS planned dose in a quasi-clinical scenario. The alanine response was found to be linear in the dose in the clinical explored range (from 10 to 70 Gy). Furthermore, a depth dose profile in a quasi-clinical scenario was measured and compared to the dose computed by the Treatment Planning System PSIPLAN. The comparison of calibrated proton alanine measurements and TPS dose shows a difference under 1% in the SOBP and a "quenching" effect up to 4% in the distal part of SOBP. The positive dosimetric characteristics of the alanine pellets confirm the feasibility to use these detectors for "in vivo" dosimetry in clinical proton beams.

  5. Alanine 32 in PilA is important for PilA stability and type IV pili function in Myxococcus xanthus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhe; Hu, Wei; Chen, Kevin; Wang, Jing; Lux, Renate; Zhou, Z. Hong

    2011-01-01

    Type IV pili (TFP) are membrane-anchored filaments with a number of important biological functions. In the model organism Myxococcus xanthus, TFP act as molecular engines that power social (S) motility through cycles of extension and retraction. TFP filaments consist of several thousand copies of a protein called PilA or pilin. PilA contains an N-terminal α-helix essential for TFP assembly and a C-terminal globular domain important for its activity. The role of the PilA sequence and its structure–function relationship in TFP-dependent S motility remain active areas of research. In this study, we identified an M. xanthus PilA mutant carrying an alanine to valine substitution at position 32 in the α-helix, which produced structurally intact but retraction-defective TFP. Characterization of this mutant and additional single-residue variants at this position in PilA demonstrated the critical role of alanine 32 in PilA stability, TFP assembly and retraction. PMID:21493683

  6. Identification of a highly conserved valine-glycine-phenylalanine amino acid triplet required for HIV-1 Nef function

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Nef protein of HIV facilitates virus replication and disease progression in infected patients. This role as pathogenesis factor depends on several genetically separable Nef functions that are mediated by interactions of highly conserved protein-protein interaction motifs with different host cell proteins. By studying the functionality of a series of nef alleles from clinical isolates, we identified a dysfunctional HIV group O Nef in which a highly conserved valine-glycine-phenylalanine (VGF) region, which links a preceding acidic cluster with the following proline-rich motif into an amphipathic surface was deleted. In this study, we aimed to study the functional importance of this VGF region. Results The dysfunctional HIV group O8 nef allele was restored to the consensus sequence, and mutants of canonical (NL4.3, NA-7, SF2) and non-canonical (B2 and C1422) HIV-1 group M nef alleles were generated in which the amino acids of the VGF region were changed into alanines (VGF→AAA) and tested for their capacity to interfere with surface receptor trafficking, signal transduction and enhancement of viral replication and infectivity. We found the VGF motif, and each individual amino acid of this motif, to be critical for downregulation of MHC-I and CXCR4. Moreover, Nef’s association with the cellular p21-activated kinase 2 (PAK2), the resulting deregulation of cofilin and inhibition of host cell actin remodeling, and targeting of Lck kinase to the trans-golgi-network (TGN) were affected as well. Of particular interest, VGF integrity was essential for Nef-mediated enhancement of HIV virion infectivity and HIV replication in peripheral blood lymphocytes. For targeting of Lck kinase to the TGN and viral infectivity, especially the phenylalanine of the triplet was essential. At the molecular level, the VGF motif was required for the physical interaction of the adjacent proline-rich motif with Hck. Conclusion Based on these findings, we propose that this highly

  7. Role of a short tandem leucine/arginine repeat in strong mutator phenotype acquisition in a clinical isolate of Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Le Bars, Hervé; Bousarghin, Latifa; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne

    2013-01-01

    In this prospective study, a strong mutator strain of Salmonella Typhimurium was isolated from a collection of 130 human clinical strains of Salmonella. Sequence analysis of the mutS, mutL, and mutH genes, which encode three proteins that are essential for initiation of methyl-directed DNA mismatch repair, revealed insertion of a short tandem repeat (STR) of leucine/alanine in the histidine kinase-like ATPase domain of MutL. The role of this STR in the acquisition of the strong mutator phenotype was confirmed by the construction of an isogenic mutant (6bpinsmutL) from a normomutator strain of Salmonella Heidelberg. This result adds to the sparse body of knowledge about strong mutators and highlights the role of this STR as a hotspot for the acquisition of a strong mutator phenotype in Salmonella.

  8. On the existence of "L-threonine formate", "L-alanine lithium chloride" and "bis L-alanine lithium chloride" crystals.

    PubMed

    Petrosyan, A M; Ghazaryan, V V; Fleck, M

    2013-03-15

    We argue that the recently reported crystals "L-threonine formate" as well as "L-alanine lithium chloride" and "bis L-alanine lithium chloride" actually are the well-known crystals L-threonine and L-alanine, respectively.

  9. Post-Irradiation Study of the Alanine Dosimeter

    PubMed Central

    Desrosiers, Marc F.

    2014-01-01

    Post-irradiation stability of high-dose dosimeters has traditionally been an important measurement influence quantity. Though the exceptional stability of the alanine dosimeter response with time has rendered this factor a non-issue for routine work, the archival quality of the alanine dosimeter has not been characterized. Here the alanine pellet dosimeter response is measured up to seven years post-irradiation for a range of absorbed doses. This long-term study is accompanied by an examination of the environmental influence quantities (e.g., ambient light) on the relatively short-term (3–4 month) stability of both pellet and film commercial dosimeters. Both dosimeter types demonstrated exceptional stability in the short term and proved to be relatively insensitive to common influence quantities. The long-term data revealed a complex dose-dependent response trend. PMID:26601033

  10. Morphosynthesis of alanine mesocrystals by pH control.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yurong; Cölfen, Helmut; Antonietti, Markus

    2006-06-01

    Crystallization of DL-alanine is studied as a single polymorph model case to analyze the different modes of crystallization of polar organic molecules in absence of any structure directing additives. Depending on supersaturation, which is controlled either by temperature or by pH, and in the absence of additives, crystallization by mesoscale assembly of nanoparticles is found over a wide range of conditions, leading to so-called mesocrystals. This supplements the classical molecule-based crystallization mechanism, which is identified at lower supersaturations and at pH values away from the isoelectric point (IEP). The resulting alanine crystals are characterized by SEM, XRD, and single-crystal analysis. Time-resolved conductivity measurements and dynamic light scattering of the reaction solutions reveal information about precursor structures and reaction kinetics. A formation mechanism is proposed for the alanine mesocrystals. PMID:16771332

  11. First-principles studies of pure and fluorine substituted alanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Sardar; Vaizie, Hamide; Rahnamaye Aliabad, H. A.; Ahmad, Rashid; Khan, Imad; Ali, Zahid; Jalali-Asadabadi, S.; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Khan, Amir Abdullah

    2016-05-01

    This paper communicates the structural, electronic and optical properties of L-alanine, monofluoro and difluoro substituted alanines using density functional calculations. These compounds exist in orthorhombic crystal structure and the calculated structural parameters such as lattice constants, bond angles and bond lengths are in agreement with the experimental results. L-alanine is an indirect band gap insulator, while its fluorine substituted compounds (monofluoroalanine and difluoroalanine) are direct band gap insulators. The substitution causes reduction in the band gap and hence these optically tailored direct wide band gap materials have enhanced optical properties in the ultraviolet (UV) region of electromagnetic spectrum. Therefore, optical properties like dielectric function, refractive index, reflectivity and energy loss function are also investigated. These compounds have almost isotropic nature in the lower frequency range while at higher energies, they have a significant anisotropic nature.

  12. Tolerance of Arc repressor to multiple-alanine substitutions.

    PubMed

    Brown, B M; Sauer, R T

    1999-03-01

    Arc repressor mutants containing from three to 15 multiple-alanine substitutions have spectral properties expected for native Arc proteins, form heterodimers with wild-type Arc, denature cooperatively with Tms equal to or greater than wild type, and, in some cases, fold as much as 30-fold faster and unfold as much as 50-fold slower than wild type. Two of the mutants, containing a total of 14 different substitutions, also footprint operator DNA in vitro. The stability of some of the proteins with multiple-alanine mutations is significantly greater than that predicted from the sum of the single substitutions, suggesting that a subset of the wild-type residues in Arc may interact in an unfavorable fashion. Overall, these results show that almost half of the residues in Arc can be replaced by alanine en masse without compromising the ability of this small, homodimeric protein to fold into a stable, native-like structure. PMID:10051581

  13. [Effects of ß-alanine supplementation on athletic performance].

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Raúl; Hernández Lougedo, Juan; Maté-Muñoz, José Luis; Garnacho-Castaño, Manuel Vicente

    2014-10-06

    Carnosine, dipeptide formed by amino acids ß-alanine and L-histidine, has important physiological functions among which its antioxidant and related memory and learning. However, in connection with the exercise, the most important functions would be associated with muscle contractility, improving calcium sensitivity in muscle fibers, and the regulatory function of pH. Thus, it is proposed that carnosine is the major intracellular buffer, but could contribute to 7-10% in buffer or buffer capacity. Since carnosine synthesis seems to be limited by the availability of ß-alanine supplementation with this compound has been gaining increasing popularity among the athlete population. Therefore, the objective of this study literature review was to examine all those research works have shown the effect of ß-alanine supplementation on athletic performance. Moreover, it also has attempted to establish a specific dosage that maximizing the potential benefits, minimize paresthesia, the main side effect presented in response to supplementation.

  14. Effects of insulin on ovine fetal leucine kinetics and protein metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Milley, J R

    1994-01-01

    Fetuses of eight pregnant ewes (114-117 d of gestation) were used to study whether fetal insulin concentration affects fetal protein accretion and, if so, whether such changes are caused by effects on protein synthesis or protein breakdown. Fetal leucine kinetics were measured by infusion of [1-14C]leucine during each of three protocols: (I) low vs. normal insulin concentration; (II) low vs. high insulin concentration; and (III) low vs. high insulin concentration during amino acid infusion to keep leucine concentration constant. Fetal leucine concentration (233 +/- 20 vs. 195 +/- 18 microM) and clearance (48.3 +/- 4.4 vs. 54.2 +/- 5.5 ml/kg per min) were the only aspects of fetal leucine kinetics that changed during protocol I. During protocol II, insulin infusion decreased fetal leucine concentration (222 +/- 22 vs. 175 +/- 22), decreased fetal leucine disposal (11.63 +/- 0.89 vs. 12.55 +/- 0.89 mumol/kg per min), increased leucine clearance (48.0 +/- 4.2 vs. 57.6 +/- 6.5 ml/kg per min), decreased leucine decarboxylation (1.77 +/- 0.17 vs. 2.04 +/- 0.21 mumol/kg per min), decreased nonoxidative leucine disposal (9.81 +/- 0.78 vs. 10.51 +/- 0.74 mumol/kg per min), decreased release of leucine from fetal protein (7.43 +/- 1.08 vs. 8.38 +/- 0.84 mumol/kg per min), but did not change the accretion of leucine into protein. In contrast, when leucine concentrations (205 +/- 25 vs. 189 +/- 23) were maintained (protocol III), insulin infusion did not change fetal leucine disposal, decarboxylation, or nonoxidative disposal although leucine clearance still rose (55.4 +/- 5.0 vs. 64.4 +/- 5.9 ml/kg/min). Fetal release of leucine from protein, however, decreased (7.46 +/- 0.83 vs. 8.57 +/- 0.71 mumol/kg per min) and the accretion of leucine into protein increased (3.27 +/- 0.30 vs. 1.80 +/- 0.32 mumol/kg/min). These findings show that insulin decreases fetal protein breakdown. If insulin-induced hypoaminoacidemia occurs, protein synthesis decreases so that no net accretion of

  15. Atomic Layer Deposition of L-Alanine Polypeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yaqin; Li, Binsong; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Dunphy, Darren R.; Tsai, Andy; Tam, Siu-Yue; Fan, Hongyou Y.; Zhang, Hongxia; Rogers, David; Rempe, Susan; Atanassov, Plamen; Cecchi, Joseph L.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2014-10-30

    L-Alanine polypeptide thin films were synthesized via atomic layer deposition (ALD). Rather, instead of using an amino acid monomer as the precursor, an L-alanine amino acid derivatized with a protecting group was used to prevent self-polymerization, increase the vapor pressure, and allow linear cycle-by-cycle growth emblematic of ALD. Moreover, the successful deposition of a conformal polypeptide film has been confirmed by FTIR, TEM, and Mass Spectrometry, and the ALD process has been extended to polyvaline.

  16. beta-hydroxyisobutyryl coenzyme A deacylase deficiency: a defect in valine metabolism associated with physical malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.K.; Hunt, S.M.; Scholem, R.; Fowler, K.; Grimes, A.; Mercer, J.F.; Truscott, R.M.; Cotton, R.G.; Rogers, J.G.; Danks, D.M.

    1982-10-01

    An infant, born to parents who were first cousins had multiple physical malformations. An associated biochemical abnormality was suggested by the urinary excretion of cysteine and cysteamine conjugates of methacrylic acid. The coenzyme A (CoA) ester of this compound is an intermediate in the pathway of valine oxidation. Subsequent investigation revealed a deficiency of beta-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA deacylase, an enzyme unique to valine metabolism. The enzyme defect results in accumulation of methacrylyl-CoA, a highly reactive compound, which readily undergoes addition reactions with free sulfhydryl groups. Tissue damage due to reactions between methacrylyl-CoA and important sulfhydryl-containing enzymes and cofactors may account for the teratogenic effects seen in this patient.

  17. Glucose and leucine kinetics in idiopathic ketotic hypoglycaemia

    PubMed Central

    Bodamer, O A; Hussein, K; Morris, A A; Langhans, C‐D; Rating, D; Mayatepek, E; Leonard, J V

    2006-01-01

    Aims To investigate glucose and leucine kinetics in association with metabolic and endocrine investigations in children with ketotic hypoglycaemia (KH) in order to elucidate the underlying pathophysiology. Methods Prospective interventional study using stable isotope tracer in nine children (mean age 4.23 years, range 0.9–9.8 years; seven males) with KH and 11 controls (mean age 4.57 years, range 0.16–12.3 years; four males). Results Plasma insulin levels were significantly lower in KH compared to subjects in the non‐KH group. Plasma ketone body levels were significantly higher in KH than in non‐KH. Basal metabolic rate was significantly higher in subjects with KH (45.48±7.41 v 31.81±6.72 kcal/kg/day) but the respiratory quotients were similar in both groups (KH v non‐KH, 0.84±0.05 v 0.8±0.04. Leucine oxidation rates were significantly lower in children with KH (12.25±6.25 v 31.96±8.59 μmol/kg/h). Hepatic glucose production rates were also significantly lower in KH (3.84±0.46 v 6.6±0.59 mg/kg/min). Conclusions KH is caused by a failure to sustain hepatic glucose production rather than by increased glucose oxidation rates. Energy demand is significantly increased, whereas leucine oxidation is reduced. PMID:16443613

  18. Treatment with L-valine ameliorates liver fibrosis and restores thrombopoiesis in rats exposed to carbon tetrachloride.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Chikashi; Doi, Hideyuki; Katsura, Kazunori; Satomi, Susumu

    2010-06-01

    It has been reported that treatment with branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) increases the survival rates in cirrhotic patients. In this study, we investigated the effect of L-valine, one of BCAAs, on liver fibrosis in rat. To induce liver fibrosis, male Wistar rats were injected carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) intraperitoneally (2.0 mL/kg) twice a week for 12 weeks. The rats (seven to fifteen rats for each group) were then administered 1.688 g/kg/day of L-valine intravenously for 7 days or 10% amino acid preparation that provided the same amount of nitrogen. Seven days after the last administration, blood platelet counts and bone marrow megakaryocyte counts were significantly higher in the valine group than in the control group (131.2 +/- 38.3 vs. 106.3 +/- 14.5 x 10(4)/microL, p = 0.04; 18.0 +/- 2.1 vs. 13.5 +/- 2.2 per field, p < 0.01, respectively). Importantly, the mRNA level of thrombopoietin, a key regulator of thrombopoiesis, was significantly higher in the liver of the valine group than the control group. Furthermore, hepatic fibrosis was significantly reduced in the valine group, and the mRNA levels of factors associated with liver fibrosis such as procollagen alpha1(III), transforming growth factor-beta1 and connective tissue growth factor were significantly lower in the liver of the valine group 10 days after the last administration. These results indicate that L-valine treatment ameliorates liver fibrosis and restores thrombopoiesis in rats exposed to CCl(4). Therefore, L-valine supplementation may be helpful for patients with liver cirrhosis.

  19. Cytosolic re-localization and optimization of valine synthesis and catabolism enables inseased isobutanol production with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The branched chain alcohol isobutanol exhibits superior physicochemical properties as an alternative biofuel. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae naturally produces low amounts of isobutanol as a by-product during fermentations, resulting from the catabolism of valine. As S. cerevisiae is widely used in industrial applications and can easily be modified by genetic engineering, this microorganism is a promising host for the fermentative production of higher amounts of isobutanol. Results Isobutanol production could be improved by re-locating the valine biosynthesis enzymes Ilv2, Ilv5 and Ilv3 from the mitochondrial matrix into the cytosol. To prevent the import of the three enzymes into yeast mitochondria, N-terminally shortened Ilv2, Ilv5 and Ilv3 versions were constructed lacking their mitochondrial targeting sequences. SDS-PAGE and immunofluorescence analyses confirmed expression and re-localization of the truncated enzymes. Growth tests or enzyme assays confirmed enzymatic activities. Isobutanol production was only increased in the absence of valine and the simultaneous blockage of the mitochondrial valine synthesis pathway. Isobutanol production could be even more enhanced after adapting the codon usage of the truncated valine biosynthesis genes to the codon usage of highly expressed glycolytic genes. Finally, a suitable ketoisovalerate decarboxylase, Aro10, and alcohol dehydrogenase, Adh2, were selected and overexpressed. The highest isobutanol titer was 0.63 g/L at a yield of nearly 15 mg per g glucose. Conclusion A cytosolic isobutanol production pathway was successfully established in yeast by re-localization and optimization of mitochondrial valine synthesis enzymes together with overexpression of Aro10 decarboxylase and Adh2 alcohol dehydrogenase. Driving forces were generated by blocking competition with the mitochondrial valine pathway and by omitting valine from the fermentation medium. Additional deletion of pyruvate decarboxylase genes

  20. Histochemistry of leucine aminonaphthylamidase (LAN) in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bouck, Gerald R.

    1979-01-01

    The histochemistry of leucine aminonaphthylamidase (LAN) was studied in frozen tissue sections of rainbow trout both in yearling and adult fish. Age of fish had relatively little effect upon the results. The most intense LAN color production was in epithelial cells of midgut, pyloric ceca, hindgut, and in some segments of kidney tubules. Lower levels of LAN were evident in liver cells of Kupffer, and still lower or slight levels of LAN activity were found in blood cells, muscle, nerve, connective tissue, gonad, and pancreas. The results indicate that LAN might be useful in assessing histotoxicity to LAN-rich areas of the body.

  1. Involvement of a di-leucine motif in targeting of ABCC1 to the basolateral plasma membrane of polarized epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Emi, Yoshikazu; Harada, Yasue; Sakaguchi, Masao

    2013-11-01

    Localization of ATP-binding cassette transporter isoform C1 (ABCC1) to the basolateral membrane of polarized cells is crucial for export of a variety of cellular metabolites; however, the mechanism regulating basolateral targeting of the transporter is poorly understood. Here we describe identification of a basolateral targeting signal in the first cytoplasmic loop domain (CLD1) of human ABCC1. Comparison of the CLD1 amino acid sequences from ABCC1 to ABCC2 revealed that ABCC1 possesses a characteristic sequence, E(295)EVEALI(301), which is comprised of a cluster of acidic glutamate residues followed by a di-leucine motif. This characteristic sequence is highly conserved among vertebrate ABCC1 orthologs and is positioned at a site that is structurally equivalent to the apical targeting signal previously described in ABCC2. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of this sequence in full-length human ABCC1 showed that both L(300) and I(301) residues were required for basolateral targeting of ABCC1 in polarized HepG2 and MDCK cells. Conversely, E(295), E(296), and E(298) residues were not required for basolateral localization of the transporter. Therefore, a di-leucine motif within the CLD1 is a basolateral targeting determinant of ABCC1.

  2. A Co 2O 2 metallacycle exclusively supported by L-valine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galán-Mascarós, J. R.; Martí-Gastaldo, C.; Murcia-Martínez, A.

    2008-12-01

    [Co 2(OH) 2( L-valine) 4]·2.5H 2O has been prepared under hydrothermal conditions and constitutes the first example of a [Co 2O 2] core supported exclusively by aminoacids. This synthetic dimetallic model for redox active metalloenzymes is one of the few binary aminoacid compounds of biologically relevant metal ions that has been structurally characterized, showing the possibilities of this synthetic approach for preparation of models in bioinorganic chemistry.

  3. Baicalein reverts L-valine-induced persistent sodium current up-modulation in primary cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Caioli, Silvia; Candelotti, Elena; Pedersen, Jens Z; Saba, Luana; Antonini, Alessia; Incerpi, Sandra; Zona, Cristina

    2016-04-01

    L-valine is a branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) largely used as dietary integrator by athletes and involved in some inherited rare diseases such as maple syrup urine disease. This pathology is caused by an altered BCAA metabolism with the accumulation of toxic keto acids in tissues and body fluids with consequent severe neurological symptoms. In animal models of BCAA accumulation, increased oxidative stress levels and lipid peroxidation have been reported. The aim of this study was to analyze both whether high BCAA concentrations in neurons induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and whether, by performing electrophysiological recordings, the neuronal functional properties are modified. Our results demonstrate that in primary cortical cultures, a high dose of valine increases ROS production and provokes neuronal hyperexcitability because the action potential frequencies and the persistent sodium current amplitudes increase significantly compared to non-treated neurons. Since Baicalein, a flavone obtained from the Scutellaria root, has been shown to act as a strong antioxidant with neuroprotective effects, we evaluated its possible antioxidant activity in primary cortical neurons chronically exposed to L-valine. The preincubation of cortical neurons with Baicalein prevents the ROS production and is able to revert both the neuronal hyperexcitability and the increase of the persistent sodium current, indicating a direct correlation between the ROS production and the altered physiological parameters. In conclusion, our data show that the electrophysiological alterations of cortical neurons elicited by high valine concentration are due to the increase in ROS production, suggesting much caution in the intake of BCAA dietary integrators. PMID:26721313

  4. Raman spectroscopic study of DL valine under pressure up to 20 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rêgo, F. S. C.; Lima, J. A.; Freire, P. T. C.; Melo, F. E. A.; Mendes Filho, J.; Polian, A.

    2016-04-01

    DL-valine crystal was studied by Raman spectroscopy under hydrostatic pressure using a diamond anvil cell from ambient pressure up to 19.4 GPa in the spectral range from 40 to 3300 cm-1. Modifications in the spectra furnished evidence of the occurrence of two structural phase transitions undergone by this racemic amino acid crystal. The classification of the vibrational modes, the behavior of their wavenumber as a function of the pressure and the reversibility of the phase transitions are discussed.

  5. Baicalein reverts L-valine-induced persistent sodium current up-modulation in primary cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Caioli, Silvia; Candelotti, Elena; Pedersen, Jens Z; Saba, Luana; Antonini, Alessia; Incerpi, Sandra; Zona, Cristina

    2016-04-01

    L-valine is a branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) largely used as dietary integrator by athletes and involved in some inherited rare diseases such as maple syrup urine disease. This pathology is caused by an altered BCAA metabolism with the accumulation of toxic keto acids in tissues and body fluids with consequent severe neurological symptoms. In animal models of BCAA accumulation, increased oxidative stress levels and lipid peroxidation have been reported. The aim of this study was to analyze both whether high BCAA concentrations in neurons induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and whether, by performing electrophysiological recordings, the neuronal functional properties are modified. Our results demonstrate that in primary cortical cultures, a high dose of valine increases ROS production and provokes neuronal hyperexcitability because the action potential frequencies and the persistent sodium current amplitudes increase significantly compared to non-treated neurons. Since Baicalein, a flavone obtained from the Scutellaria root, has been shown to act as a strong antioxidant with neuroprotective effects, we evaluated its possible antioxidant activity in primary cortical neurons chronically exposed to L-valine. The preincubation of cortical neurons with Baicalein prevents the ROS production and is able to revert both the neuronal hyperexcitability and the increase of the persistent sodium current, indicating a direct correlation between the ROS production and the altered physiological parameters. In conclusion, our data show that the electrophysiological alterations of cortical neurons elicited by high valine concentration are due to the increase in ROS production, suggesting much caution in the intake of BCAA dietary integrators.

  6. Knockout of leucine aminopeptidase in Toxoplasma gondii using CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Jia, Honglin; Zheng, Yonghui

    2015-02-01

    Leucine aminopeptidases of the M17 peptidase family represent ideal drug targets for therapies directed against the pathogens Plasmodium, Babesia and Trypanosoma. Previously, we characterised Toxoplasma gondii leucine aminopeptidase and demonstrated its role in regulating the levels of free amino acids. In this study, we evaluated the potential of T. gondii leucine aminopeptidase as a drug target in T. gondii by a knockout method. Existing knockout methods for T. gondii have many drawbacks; therefore, we developed a new technique that takes advantage of the CRISPR/Cas9 system. We first chose a Cas9 target site in the gene encoding T. gondii leucine aminopeptidase and then constructed a knockout vector containing Cas9 and the single guide RNA. After transfection, single tachyzoites were cloned in 96-well plates by limiting dilution. Two transfected strains derived from a single clone were cultured in Vero cells, and then subjected to expression analysis by western blotting. The phenotypic analysis revealed that knockout of T. gondii leucine aminopeptidase resulted in inhibition of attachment/invasion and replication; both the growth and attachment/invasion capacity of knockout parasites were restored by complementation with a synonymously substituted allele of T. gondii leucine aminopeptidase. Mouse experiments demonstrated that T. gondii leucine aminopeptidase knockout somewhat reduced the pathogenicity of T. gondii. An enzymatic activity assay showed that T. gondii leucine aminopeptidase knockout reduced the processing of a leucine aminopeptidase-specific substrate in T. gondii. The absence of leucine aminopeptidase activity could be slightly compensated for in T. gondii. Overall, T. gondii leucine aminopeptidase knockout influenced the growth of T. gondii, but did not completely block parasite development, virulence or enzymatic activity. Therefore, we conclude that leucine aminopeptidase would be useful only as an adjunctive drug target in T. gondii.

  7. Effects of leucine supplemented diet on intestinal absorption in tumor bearing pregnant rats

    PubMed Central

    Ventrucci, Gislaine; de Mello, Maria Alice Roston; Gomes-Marcondes, Maria Cristina Cintra

    2002-01-01

    Background It is known that amino acid oxidation is increased in tumor-bearing rat muscles and that leucine is an important ketogenic amino acid that provides energy to the skeletal muscle. Methods To evaluate the effects of a leucine supplemented diet on the intestinal absorption alterations produced by Walker 256, growing pregnant rats were distributed into six groups. Three pregnant groups received a normal protein diet (18% protein): pregnant (N), tumor-bearing (WN), pair-fed rats (Np). Three other pregnant groups were fed a diet supplemented with 3% leucine (15% protein plus 3% leucine): leucine (L), tumor-bearing (WL) and pair-fed with leucine (Lp). Non pregnant rats (C), which received a normal protein diet, were used as a control group. After 20 days, the animals were submitted to intestinal perfusion to measure leucine, methionine and glucose absorption. Results Tumor-bearing pregnant rats showed impairment in food intake, body weight gain and muscle protein content, which were less accentuated in WL than in WN rats. These metabolic changes led to reduction in both fetal and tumor development. Leucine absorption slightly increased in WN group. In spite of having a significant decrease in leucine and methionine absorption compared to L, the WL group has shown a higher absorption rate of methionine than WN group, probably due to the ingestion of the leucine supplemented diet inducing this amino acid uptake. Glucose absorption was reduced in both tumor-bearing groups. Conclusions Leucine supplementation during pregnancy in tumor-bearing rats promoted high leucine absorption, increasing the availability of the amino acid for neoplasic cells and, mainly, for fetus and host utilization. This may have contributed to the better preservation of body weight gain, food intake and muscle protein observed in the supplemented rats in relation to the non-supplemented ones. PMID:11955290

  8. Stereoselective aminoacylation of a dinucleoside monophosphate by the imidazolides of DL-alanine and N-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)-DL-alanine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Profy, A. T.; Usher, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The aminoacylation of diinosine monophosphate was studied experimentally. When the acylating agent was the imidazolide of N-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)-DL-alanine, a 40 percent enantiomeric excess of the isomer was incorporated at the 2' site and the positions of equilibrium for the reversible 2'-3' migration reaction differed for the D and L enantiomers. The reactivity of the nucleoside hydroxyl groups was found to decrease on the order 2'(3') less than internal 2' and less than 5', and the extent of the reaction was affected by the concentration of the imidazole buffer. Reaction of IpI with imidazolide of unprotected DL-alanine, by contrast, led to an excess of the D isomer at the internal 2' site. Finally, reaction with the N-carboxy anhydride of DL-alanine occurred without stereoselection. These results are found to be relevant to the study of the evolution of optical chemical activity and the origin of genetically directed protein synthesis.

  9. Enhanced valine production in Corynebacterium glutamicum with defective H+-ATPase and C-terminal truncated acetohydroxyacid synthase.

    PubMed

    Wada, Masaru; Hijikata, Nowaki; Aoki, Ryo; Takesue, Nobuchika; Yokota, Atsushi

    2008-11-01

    We have reported increased glutamate production by a mutant of Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC14067 (strain F172-8) with reduced H(+)-ATPase activity under biotin-limiting culture conditions (Aoki et al. Biosci. Biotechnol. Biochem., 69, 1466-1472 (2005)). In the present study, we examined valine production by an H(+)-ATPase-defective mutant of C. glutamicum. Using the double-crossover chromosome replacement technique, we constructed a newly defined H(+)-ATPase-defective mutant from ATCC13032. After transforming the new strain (A-1) with a C-terminal truncation of acetohydroxyacid synthase gene (ilvBN), valine production increased from 21.7 mM for the wild-type strain to 46.7 mM for the A-1 in shaking flask cultures with 555 mM glucose. Increased production of the valine intermediate acetoin was also observed in A-1, and was reduced by inserting acetohydroxyacid isomeroreductase gene (ilvC) into the ilvBN plasmid. After transformation with this new construct, valine production increased from 38.3 mM for the wild-type strain to 95.7 mM for A-1 strain. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report indicating that an H(+)-ATPase-defective mutant of C. glutamicum is capable of valine production. Our combined results with glutamate and valine suggest that the H(+)-ATPase defect is also effective in the fermentative production of other practical compounds.

  10. Valine and phenylalanine as precursors in the biosynthesis of alkamides in Acmella radicans.

    PubMed

    Cortez-Espinosa, Nancy; Aviña-Verduzco, Judit A; Ramírez-Chávez, Enrique; Molina-Torres, Jorge; Ríos-Chávez, Patricia

    2011-06-01

    Acmella radicans (Asteraceae) produces at least seven alkamides, most with either an isobutyl- or phenylethyl group as the amine moiety. These moieties suggest that the amino acids valine and phenylalanine are the biosynthetic precursors of these alkamides. On the basis of labeled feeding experiments using either L-[2H8]valine or L-[2H8]phenylalanine we present evidence for the involvement of these two amino acids in the biosynthesis of (2E,6Z,8E)-N-isobutyl-2,6,8-decatrienamide (affinin) (1), (2Z,4E)-N-(2-phenylethyl)-2,4-octadienamide (2), (2E)-N-(2-phenylethyl)-nona-2-en-6,8-diynamide (3), and 3-phenyl-N-(2-phenylethyl)-2-propenamide (4). Alkamides were isolated from young A. radicans plants and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Additionally, in cell free in vitro experiments based on isobutyl and phenylethylamide biosynthesis, using a colorimetric assay and GC-MS, valine and phenylalanine decarboxylase activities were assayed in the soluble extract of A. radicans leaves.

  11. ECHS1 mutations in Leigh disease: a new inborn error of metabolism affecting valine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Peters, Heidi; Buck, Nicole; Wanders, Ronald; Ruiter, Jos; Waterham, Hans; Koster, Janet; Yaplito-Lee, Joy; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Pitt, James

    2014-11-01

    Two siblings with fatal Leigh disease had increased excretion of S-(2-carboxypropyl)cysteine and several other metabolites that are features of 3-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA hydrolase (HIBCH) deficiency, a rare defect in the valine catabolic pathway associated with Leigh-like disease. However, this diagnosis was excluded by HIBCH sequencing and normal enzyme activity. In contrast to HIBCH deficiency, the excretion of 3-hydroxyisobutyryl-carnitine was normal in the children, suggesting deficiency of short-chain enoyl-CoA hydratase (ECHS1 gene). This mitochondrial enzyme is active in several metabolic pathways involving fatty acids and amino acids, including valine, and is immediately upstream of HIBCH in the valine pathway. Both children were compound heterozygous for a c.473C > A (p.A158D) missense mutation and a c.414+3G>C splicing mutation in ECHS1. ECHS1 activity was markedly decreased in cultured fibroblasts from both siblings, ECHS1 protein was undetectable by immunoblot analysis and transfection of patient cells with wild-type ECHS1 rescued ECHS1 activity. The highly reactive metabolites methacrylyl-CoA and acryloyl-CoA accumulate in deficiencies of both ECHS1 and HIBCH and are probably responsible for the brain pathology in both disorders. Deficiency of ECHS1 or HIBCH should be considered in children with Leigh disease. Urine metabolite testing can detect and distinguish between these two disorders.

  12. Leucine supplementation improves muscle protein synthesis in elderly men independently of hyperaminoacidaemia

    PubMed Central

    Rieu, Isabelle; Balage, Michèle; Sornet, Claire; Giraudet, Christophe; Pujos, Estelle; Grizard, Jean; Mosoni, Laurent; Dardevet, Dominique

    2006-01-01

    The present study was designed to assess the effects of dietary leucine supplementation on muscle protein synthesis and whole body protein kinetics in elderly individuals. Twenty healthy male subjects (70 ± 1 years) were studied before and after continuous ingestion of a complete balanced diet supplemented or not with leucine. A primed (3.6 μmol kg−1) constant infusion (0.06 μmol kg−1 min−1) of l-[1-13C]phenylalanine was used to determine whole body phenylalanine kinetics as well as fractional synthesis rate (FSR) in the myofibrillar fraction of muscle proteins from vastus lateralis biopsies. Whole body protein kinetics were not affected by leucine supplementation. In contrast, muscle FSR, measured over the 5-h period of feeding, was significantly greater in the volunteers given the leucine-supplemented meals compared with the control group (0.083 ± 0.008 versus 0.053 ± 0.009% h−1, respectively, P < 0.05). This effect was due only to increased leucine availability because only plasma free leucine concentration significantly differed between the control and leucine-supplemented groups. We conclude that leucine supplementation during feeding improves muscle protein synthesis in the elderly independently of an overall increase of other amino acids. Whether increasing leucine intake in old people may limit muscle protein loss during ageing remains to be determined. PMID:16777941

  13. Eating a healthy lunch improves serum alanine aminotransferase activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nutritional guidance and diet control play important roles in the treatment of obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver. However, in Japan, nutritional guidance is difficult to provide in practice. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of providing the ‘once-a-day’ intervention of a healthy lunch on various metabolic parameters. Methods For a 1-month preparatory period, 10 subjects generally consumed the lunches that were provided by the worksite cafeteria. This was followed by a 1-week washout period, after which, the subjects consumed healthy, low-calorie, well-balanced lunches for a 1-month test period. After the preparatory and test periods, blood samples were obtained from all subjects. The serum levels of indices relevant to metabolic syndrome and fatty liver were measured. Results Serum alanine aminotransferase activity significantly decreased by 20.3% after the healthy intervention. However, the indices of metabolic syndrome did not significantly change. Analysis of the relationship between serum alanine aminotransferase activity and nutrient content indicated that the improvement of serum alanine aminotransferase status was due to the higher vegetable content and lower animal-source protein of the meals provided. Conclusions In summary, the ‘once-a-day’ intervention of providing a healthy lunch improved serum alanine aminotransferase status. A diet high in vegetables and low in animal-based protein is important in maintaining a healthy condition. PMID:24034595

  14. Formation of {gamma}-alumina nanorods in presence of alanine

    SciTech Connect

    Dabbagh, Hossein A.; Rasti, Elham; Yalfani, Mohammad S.; Medina, Francesc

    2011-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Nanorod aluminas with a possible hexagonal symmetry, high surface area and relatively narrow pore size distribution were obtained. Research highlights: {yields} Research highlights {yields} Boehmite was prepared using a green sol-gel process in the presence of alanine. {yields} Nanorod aluminas with a high surface area were obtained. {yields} Addition of alanine would shape the size of the holes and crevices. {yields} The morphologies of the nanorods were revealed by transmission electron microscope. -- Abstract: Boehmite and alumina nanostructures were prepared using a simple green sol-gel process in the presence of alanine in water medium at room temperature. The uncalcined (dried at 200 {sup o}C) and the calcined materials (at 500, 600 and 700 {sup o}C for 4 h) were characterized using XRD, TEM, SEM, N{sub 2} physisorption and TGA. Nanorod aluminas with a possible hexagonal symmetry, high surface area and relatively narrow pore size distribution were obtained. The surface area was enhanced and crystallization was retarded as the alanine content increased. The morphologies of the nanoparticles and nanorods were revealed by a transmission electron microscope (TEM).

  15. Spectrophotometric readout for an alanine dosimeter for food irradiation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebraheem, S.; Beshir, W. B.; Eid, S.; Sobhy, R.; Kovács, A.

    2003-06-01

    The alanine-electron spin resonance (EPR) readout system is well known as a reference and transfer dosimetry system for the evaluation of high doses in radiation processing. The high cost of an EPR/alanine dosimetry system is a serious handicap for large-scale routine application in irradiation facilities. In this study, the use of a complex produced by dissolving irradiated L-alanine in 1,4-phenyl diammonium dichloride solution was investigated for dosimetry purposes. This complex—having a purple colour—has an increasing absorbance with increasing dose in the range of 1-20 kGy. The applicability of spectrophotometric evaluation was studied by measuring the absorbance intensity of this complex at 360 and 505 nm, respectively. Fluorimetric evaluation was also investigated by measuring the emission of the complex at 435 nm as a function of dose. The present method is easy for routine application. The effect of the dye concentration as well as the suitable amount of irradiated alanine has been studied. With respect to routine application, the stability of the product complex after its formation was also investigated.

  16. Sestrin regulation of TORC1: Is Sestrin a leucine sensor?

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Hee; Cho, Uhn-Soo; Karin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Sestrins are highly conserved, stress-inducible proteins that inhibit target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) signaling. After their transcriptional induction, both vertebrate and invertebrate Sestrins turn on the adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which activates the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), a key inhibitor of TORC1 activation. However, Sestrin overexpression, on occasion, can result in TORC1 inhibition even in AMPK-deficient cells. This effect has been attributed to Sestrin's ability to bind the TORC1-regulating GATOR2 protein complex, which was postulated to control trafficking of TORC1 to lysosomes. How the binding of Sestrins to GATOR2 is regulated and how it contributes to TORC1 inhibition are unknown. New findings suggest that the amino acid leucine specifically disrupts the association of Sestrin2 with GATOR2, thus explaining how leucine and related amino acids stimulate TORC1 activity. We discuss whether and how these findings fit what has already been learned about Sestrin-mediated TORC1 inhibition from genetic studies conducted in fruit flies and mammals. PMID:27273098

  17. The matricellular functions of small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs).

    PubMed

    Merline, Rosetta; Schaefer, Roland M; Schaefer, Liliana

    2009-12-01

    The small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) are biologically active components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), consisting of a protein core with leucine rich-repeat (LRR) motifs covalently linked to glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains. The diversity in composition resulting from the various combinations of protein cores substituted with one or more GAG chains along with their pericellular localization enables SLRPs to interact with a host of different cell surface receptors, cytokines, growth factors, and other ECM components, leading to modulation of cellular functions. SLRPs are capable of binding to: (i) different types of collagens, thereby regulating fibril assembly, organization, and degradation; (ii) Toll-like receptors (TLRs), complement C1q, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha), regulating innate immunity and inflammation; (iii) epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R), insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR), and c-Met, influencing cellular proliferation, survival, adhesion, migration, tumor growth and metastasis as well as synthesis of other ECM components; (iv) low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP-1) and TGF-beta, modulating cytokine activity and fibrogenesis; and (v) growth factors such as bone morphogenic protein (BMP-4) and Wnt-I-induced secreted protein-1 (WISP-1), controlling cell proliferation and differentiation. Thus, the ability of SLRPs, as ECM components, to directly or indirectly regulate cell-matrix crosstalk, resulting in the modulation of various biological processes, aptly qualifies these compounds as matricellular proteins.

  18. Valine partitioning and kinetics between the gastrointestinal tract and hind limbs in lambs with an adult Trichostrongylus colubriformis burden.

    PubMed

    Bermingham, E N; McNabb, W C; Sinclair, B R; Tavendale, M H; Roy, N C

    2011-11-01

    Intestinal parasitic infection increases the demand for AA because of increased protein synthesis in the intestine and increased luminal losses of AA, and these increased demands may be supported by increased mobilization of AA from the skeletal muscles. Two experiments were conducted to determine the effects of parasitic infection on valine kinetics within the gastrointestinal tract and hind limbs of lambs fed fresh forages. On d 1, lambs were given 6,000 stage-3 Trichostrongylus colubriformis larvae per day for 6 d (n = 6) or kept as parasite-free controls (n = 6) and fed fresh lucerne (Medicago sativa; Exp. 1) or fresh sulla (Hedysarum coronarium; Exp. 2). On d 48, valine kinetics within the mesenteric- (MDV) and portal-drained viscera (PDV) and hind limbs were obtained by carrying out concurrent infusions of para-amminohippuric acid into the mesenteric vein and indocyanin green into the abdominal aorta (for blood flow), and [3,4-(3)H]valine into the jugular vein and [1-(13)C]valine into the abomasum for 8 h (for kinetics). During the infusions, blood was collected from the mesenteric and portal veins and from the mesenteric artery and vena cava, and plasma was harvested. After the 8-h infusion, lambs were euthanized, ileal digesta were collected, and tissues were sampled from the intestine and muscle (biceps femoris). Tissues, digesta, and plasma were analyzed for valine concentration, specific radioactivity, and isotopic enrichment. In both experiments, intestinal worm burdens on d 48 were greater in parasitized lambs (P = 0.0001 and 0.003). In Exp. 1, parasitic infection increased (P = 0.03) the total valine irreversible loss rate (ILR) in the MDV and PDV. In Exp. 2, luminal ILR of valine in the MDV was reduced (P = 0.01); however, ILR of valine in the PDV was unaffected. Despite these changes within the MDV and PDV, parasitic infection did not affect the ILR of valine within the hind limbs, and valine transport rates were largely unchanged. We suggest that

  19. The unresolved puzzle why alanine extensions cause disease.

    PubMed

    Winter, Reno; Liebold, Jens; Schwarz, Elisabeth

    2013-08-01

    The prospective increase in life expectancy will be accompanied by a rise in the number of elderly people who suffer from ill health caused by old age. Many diseases caused by aging are protein misfolding diseases. The molecular mechanisms underlying these disorders receive constant scientific interest. In addition to old age, mutations also cause congenital protein misfolding disorders. Chorea Huntington, one of the most well-known examples, is caused by triplet extensions that can lead to more than 100 glutamines in the N-terminal region of huntingtin, accompanied by huntingtin aggregation. So far, nine disease-associated triplet extensions have also been described for alanine codons. The extensions lead primarily to skeletal malformations. Eight of these proteins represent transcription factors, while the nuclear poly-adenylate binding protein 1, PABPN1, is an RNA binding protein. Additional alanines in PABPN1 lead to the disease oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). The alanine extension affects the N-terminal domain of the protein, which has been shown to lack tertiary contacts. Biochemical analyses of the N-terminal domain revealed an alanine-dependent fibril formation. However, fibril formation of full-length protein did not recapitulate the findings of the N-terminal domain. Fibril formation of intact PABPN1 was independent of the alanine segment, and the fibrils displayed biochemical properties that were completely different from those of the N-terminal domain. Although intranuclear inclusions have been shown to represent the histochemical hallmark of OPMD, their role in pathogenesis is currently unclear. Several cell culture and animal models have been generated to study the molecular processes involved in OPMD. These studies revealed a number of promising future therapeutic strategies that could one day improve the quality of life for the patients.

  20. Beta-alanine supplementation in high-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Harris, Roger C; Sale, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Glycolysis involves the oxidation of two neutral hydroxyl groups on each glycosyl (or glucosyl) unit metabolised, yielding two carboxylic acid groups. During low-intensity exercise these, along with the remainder of the carbon skeleton, are further oxidised to CO(2) and water. But during high-intensity exercise a major portion (and where blood flow is impaired, then most) is accumulated as lactate anions and H(+). The accumulation of H(+) has deleterious effects on muscle function, ultimately impairing force production and contributing to fatigue. Regulation of intracellular pH is achieved over time by export of H(+) out of the muscle, although physicochemical buffers in the muscle provide the first line of defence against H(+) accumulation. In order to be effective during high-intensity exercise, buffers need to be present in high concentrations in muscle and have pK(a)s within the intracellular exercise pH transit range. Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is ideal for this role given that it occurs in millimolar concentrations within the skeletal muscle and has a pK(a) of 6.83. Carnosine is a cytoplasmic dipeptide formed by bonding histidine and β-alanine in a reaction catalysed by carnosine synthase, although it is the availability of β-alanine, obtained in small amounts from hepatic synthesis and potentially in greater amounts from the diet that is limiting to synthesis. Increasing muscle carnosine through increased dietary intake of β-alanine will increase the intracellular buffering capacity, which in turn might be expected to increase high-intensity exercise capacity and performance where this is pH limited. In this study we review the role of muscle carnosine as an H(+) buffer, the regulation of muscle carnosine by β-alanine, and the available evidence relating to the effects of β-alanine supplementation on muscle carnosine synthesis and the subsequent effects of this on high-intensity exercise capacity and performance.

  1. Dietary leucine requirement for juvenile large yellow croaker Pseudosciaena crocea (Richardson, 1846)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Ai, Qinghui; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Cheng, Zhenyan; He, Zhigang

    2010-12-01

    Dietary leucine requirement for juvenile large yellow croaker, Pseudosciaena crocea Richardson 1846 (initial body weight 6.0 g ± 0.1 g) was determined using dose-response method. Six isonitogenous (crude protein 43%) and isoenergetic (19 kJ g-1) practical diets containing six levels of leucine (Diets 1-6) ranging from 1.23% to 4.80% (dry matter) were made at about 0.7% increment of leucine. Equal amino acid nitrogen was maintained by replacing leucine with glutamic acid. Triplicate groups of 60 individuals were fed to apparent satiation by hand twice daily (05:00 and 17:30). The water temperature was 26-32°C, salinity 26-30 and dissolved oxygen approximately 7 mg L-1 during the experimental period. Final weight (FW) of large yellow croaker initially increased with increasing level of dietary leucine but then decreased at further higher level of leucine. The highest FW was obtained in fish fed diet with 3.30% Leucine (Diet 4). FW of fish fed the diet with 4.80% Leucine (Diet 6) was significantly lower than those fed Diet 4. However, no significant differences were observed between the other dietary treatments. Feed efficiency (FE) and whole body composition were independent of dietary leucine contents ( P > 0.05). The results indicated that leucine was essential for growth of juvenile large yellow croaker. On the basis of FW, the optimum dietary leucine requirement for juvenile large yellow croaker was estimated to be 2.92% of dry matter (6.79% of dietary protein).

  2. Biosynthesis of higher alcohol flavour compounds by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: impact of oxygen availability and responses to glucose pulse in minimal growth medium with leucine as sole nitrogen source.

    PubMed

    Espinosa Vidal, Esteban; de Morais, Marcos Antonio; François, Jean Marie; de Billerbeck, Gustavo M

    2015-01-01

    Higher alcohol formation by yeast is of great interest in the field of fermented beverages. Among them, medium-chain alcohols impact greatly the final flavour profile of alcoholic beverages, even at low concentrations. It is widely accepted that amino acid metabolism in yeasts directly influences higher alcohol formation, especially the catabolism of aromatic and branched-chain amino acids. However, it is not clear how the availability of oxygen and glucose metabolism influence the final higher alcohol levels in fermented beverages. Here, using an industrial Brazilian cachaça strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we investigated the effect of oxygen limitation and glucose pulse on the accumulation of higher alcohol compounds in batch cultures, with glucose (20 g/l) and leucine (9.8 g/l) as the carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. Fermentative metabolites and CO2 /O2 balance were analysed in order to correlate the results with physiological data. Our results show that the accumulation of isoamyl alcohol by yeast is independent of oxygen availability in the medium, depending mainly on leucine, α-keto-acids and/or NADH pools. High-availability leucine experiments showed a novel and unexpected accumulation of isobutanol, active amyl alcohol and 2-phenylethanol, which could be attributed to de novo biosynthesis of valine, isoleucine and phenylalanine and subsequent outflow of these pathways. In carbon-exhausted conditions, our results also describe, for the first time, the metabolization of isoamyl alcohol, isobutanol, active amyl alcohol but not of 2-phenylethanol, by yeast strains in stationary phase, suggesting a role for these higher alcohols as carbon source for cell maintenance and/or redox homeostasis during this physiological phase.

  3. Alanine radicals, part 3: properties of the components contributing to the EPR spectrum of X-irradiated alanine dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Malinen, Eirik; Heydari, Mojgan Z; Sagstuen, Einar; Hole, Eli O

    2003-01-01

    The amino acid l-alpha-alanine has attracted considerable interest for use in radiation dosimetry and has been formally accepted as a secondary standard for high-dose and transfer dosimetry. Recent results have shown that the alanine EPR spectrum consists of contributions from three different radicals. A set of benchmark spectra describing the essential spectral features of these three radical components was used for reconstructions of the experimental spectra. In the present work, these basis spectra have been used to investigate the differential effects of variations in radiation doses and microwave power, as well as the dependence upon temperature annealing and UV illumination. The results presented here, based solely on relatively low-energy (60-80 keV) X rays, indicate that the three components behave very similarly with respect to radiation dose at room temperature. However, with respect to the thermal annealing/fading behavior and microwave power saturation properties, the three species behave significantly differently. It is concluded that even if it is now realized that three different radicals contribute to the composite EPR alanine spectrum, this has a minor impact on the established protocols for present-day applications (high-dose) of EPR/alanine dosimetry. However, some care should be exercised when e.g. constructing calibration curves, since fading and power saturation behavior may vary over the dose range in question. New results from UV-illumination experiments suggest a possible procedure for experimental spectral separation of the EPR signals due to the three radicals.

  4. Experimental evaluation of the effect of a modified port-location mode on the performance of a three-zone simulated moving-bed process for the separation of valine and isoleucine.

    PubMed

    Park, Chanhun; Nam, Hee-Geun; Kim, Pung-Ho; Mun, Sungyong

    2014-06-01

    The removal of isoleucine from valine has been a key issue in the stage of valine crystallization, which is the final step in the valine production process in industry. To address this issue, a three-zone simulated moving-bed (SMB) process for the separation of valine and isoleucine has been developed previously. However, the previous process, which was based on a classical port-location mode, had some limitations in throughput and valine product concentration. In this study, a three-zone SMB process based on a modified port-location mode was applied to the separation of valine and isoleucine for the purpose of making a marked improvement in throughput and valine product concentration. Computer simulations and a lab-scale process experiment showed that the modified three-zone SMB for valine separation led to >65% higher throughput and >160% higher valine concentration compared to the previous three-zone SMB for the same separation.

  5. Studies on spin-trapped radicals in. gamma. -irradiated aqueous L-valine solutions by high-performance liquid chromatography and ESR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Makino, K.

    1980-05-01

    Short-lived radicals produced in ..gamma..-irradiated aqueous L-valine solution were investigated by the method of spin trapping and subsequently by means of high-performance liquid chromatography combined with ESR spectroscopy. Four spin adducts due to L-valine could be identified. Among them, even the diastereoisomeric spin adducts due to L-valine could be separated. In addition, the effect of pH on the change in the spectra of the diastereoisomers is discussed.

  6. Structure of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis D-Alanine:D-Alanine Ligase, a Target of the Antituberculosis Drug D-Cycloserine

    SciTech Connect

    Bruning, John B.; Murillo, Ana C.; Chacon, Ofelia; Barletta, Raúl G.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2011-09-28

    D-Alanine:D-alanine ligase (EC 6.3.2.4; Ddl) catalyzes the ATP-driven ligation of two D-alanine (D-Ala) molecules to form the D-alanyl:D-alanine dipeptide. This molecule is a key building block in peptidoglycan biosynthesis, making Ddl an attractive target for drug development. D-Cycloserine (DCS), an analog of D-Ala and a prototype Ddl inhibitor, has shown promise for the treatment of tuberculosis. Here, we report the crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ddl at a resolution of 2.1 {angstrom}. This structure indicates that Ddl is a dimer and consists of three discrete domains; the ligand binding cavity is at the intersection of all three domains and conjoined by several loop regions. The M. tuberculosis apo Ddl structure shows a novel conformation that has not yet been observed in Ddl enzymes from other species. The nucleotide and D-alanine binding pockets are flexible, requiring significant structural rearrangement of the bordering regions for entry and binding of both ATP and D-Ala molecules. Solution affinity and kinetic studies showed that DCS interacts with Ddl in a manner similar to that observed for D-Ala. Each ligand binds to two binding sites that have significant differences in affinity, with the first binding site exhibiting high affinity. DCS inhibits the enzyme, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC{sub 50}) of 0.37 mM under standard assay conditions, implicating a preferential and weak inhibition at the second, lower-affinity binding site. Moreover, DCS binding is tighter at higher ATP concentrations. The crystal structure illustrates potential drugable sites that may result in the development of more-effective Ddl inhibitors.

  7. Kinetic mechanism and inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis D-alanine:D-alanine ligase by the antibiotic D-cycloserine.

    PubMed

    Prosser, Gareth A; de Carvalho, Luiz Pedro S

    2013-02-01

    D-cycloserine (DCS) is an antibiotic that is currently used in second-line treatment of tuberculosis. DCS is a structural analogue of D-alanine, and targets two enzymes involved in the cytosolic stages of peptidoglycan synthesis: alanine racemase (Alr) and D-alanine:D-alanine ligase (Ddl). The mechanisms of inhibition of DCS have been well-assessed using Alr and Ddl enzymes from various bacterial species, but little is known regarding the interactions of DCS with the mycobacterial orthologues of these enzymes. We have over-expressed and purified recombinant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ddl (MtDdl; Rv2981c), and report a kinetic examination of the enzyme with both its native substrate and DCS. MtDdl is activated by K(+), follows an ordered ter ter mechanism and displays distinct affinities for D-Ala at each D-Ala binding site (K(m,D-Ala1) = 0.075 mm, K(m,D-Ala2) = 3.6 mm). ATP is the first substrate to bind and is necessary for subsequent binding of D-alanine or DCS. The pH dependence of MtDdl kinetic parameters indicate that general base chemistry is involved in the catalytic step. DCS was found to competitively inhibit D-Ala binding at both MtDdl D-Ala sites with equal affinity (K(i,DCS1) = 14 μm, K(i,DCS2) = 25 μm); however, each enzyme active site can only accommodate a single DCS molecule at a given time. The pH dependence of K(i,DCS2) revealed a loss of DCS binding affinity at high pH (pK(a) = 7.5), suggesting that DCS binds optimally in the zwitterionic form. The results of this study may assist in the design and development of novel Ddl-specific inhibitors for use as anti-mycobacterial agents.

  8. Differential effects of long-term leucine infusion on tissue protein synthesis in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leucine is unique among the amino acids in its ability to promote protein synthesis by activating translation initiation via the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Previously, we showed that leucine infusion acutely stimulates protein synthesis in fast-twitch glycolytic muscle of neonatal...

  9. The intra-hippocampal leucine administration impairs memory consolidation and LTP generation in rats.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Viviane; Carlini, Valeria P; Gabach, Laura; Ghersi, Marisa; de Barioglio, Susana Rubiales; Ramirez, Oscar A; Perez, Mariela F; Latini, Alexandra

    2010-10-01

    Leucine accumulates in fluids and tissues of patients affected by maple syrup urine disease, an inherited metabolic disorder, predominantly characterized by neurological dysfunction. Although, a variable degree of cognition/psychomotor delay/mental retardation is found in a considerable number of individuals affected by this deficiency, the mechanisms underlying the neuropathology of these alterations are still not defined. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of acute intra-hippocampal leucine administration in the step-down test in rats. In addition, the leucine effects on the electrophysiological parameter, long-term potentiation generation, and on the activities of the respiratory chain were also investigated. Male Wistar rats were bilaterally administrated with leucine (80 nmol/hippocampus; 160 nmol/rat) or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (controls) into the hippocampus immediately post-training in the behavioral task. Twenty-four hours after training in the step-down test, the latency time was evaluated and afterwards animals were sacrificed for assessing the ex vivo biochemical measurements. Leucine-treated animals showed impairment in memory consolidation and a complete inhibition of long-term potentiation generation at supramaximal stimulation. In addition, a significant increment in complex IV activity was observed in hippocampus from leucine-administered rats. These data strongly indicate that leucine compromise memory consolidation, and that impairment of long-term potentiation generation and unbalance of the respiratory chain may be plausible mechanisms underlying the deleterious leucine effect on cognition.

  10. Dietary L-leucine improves the anemia in a mouse model for Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

    PubMed

    Jaako, Pekka; Debnath, Shubhranshu; Olsson, Karin; Bryder, David; Flygare, Johan; Karlsson, Stefan

    2012-09-13

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a congenital erythroid hypoplasia caused by a functional haploinsufficiency of genes encoding for ribosomal proteins. Recently, a case study reported a patient who became transfusion-independent in response to treatment with the amino acid L-leucine. Therefore, we have validated the therapeutic effect of L-leucine using our recently generated mouse model for RPS19-deficient DBA. Administration of L-leucine significantly improved the anemia in Rps19-deficient mice (19% improvement in hemoglobin concentration; 18% increase in the number of erythrocytes), increased the bone marrow cellularity, and alleviated stress hematopoiesis. Furthermore, the therapeutic response to L-leucine appeared specific for Rps19-deficient hematopoiesis and was associated with down-regulation of p53 activity. Our study supports the rationale for clinical trials of L-leucine as a therapeutic agent for DBA.

  11. Evolution of the Leucine Gene Cluster in Buchnera aphidicola: Insights from Chromosomal Versions of the Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Sabater-Muñoz, Beatriz; van Ham, Roeland C. H. J.; Moya, Andrés; Silva, Francisco J.; Latorre, Amparo

    2004-01-01

    In Buchnera aphidicola strains associated with the aphid subfamilies Thelaxinae, Lachninae, Pterocommatinae, and Aphidinae, the four leucine genes (leuA, -B, -C, and -D) are located on a plasmid. However, these genes are located on the main chromosome in B. aphidicola strains associated with the subfamilies Pemphiginae and Chaitophorinae. The sequence of the chromosomal fragment containing the leucine cluster and flanking genes has different positions in the chromosome in B. aphidicola strains associated with three tribes of the subfamily Pemphiginae and one tribe of the subfamily Chaitophorinae. Due to the extreme gene order conservation of the B. aphidicola genomes, the variability in the position of the leucine cluster in the chromosome may be interpreted as resulting from independent insertions from an ancestral plasmid-borne leucine gene. These findings do not support a chromosomal origin for the leucine genes in the ancestral B. aphidicola and do support a back transfer evolutionary scenario from a plasmid to the main chromosome. PMID:15090505

  12. Leucine supplementation via drinking water reduces atherosclerotic lesions in apoE null mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Dai, Xiao-yan; Zhou, Zhou; Zhao, Ge-xin; Wang, Xian; Xu, Ming-jiang

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Recent evidence suggests that the essential amino acid leucine may be involved in systemic cholesterol metabolism. In this study, we investigated the effects of leucine supplementation on the development of atherosclerosis in apoE null mice. Methods: ApoE null mice were fed with chow supplemented with leucine (1.5% w/v) in drinking water for 8 week. Aortic atherosclerotic lesions were examined using Oil Red O staining. Plasma lipoprotein-cholesterol levels were measured with fast protein liquid chromatography. Hepatic gene expression was detected using real-time PCR and Western blot analyses. Results: Leucine supplementation resulted in 57.6% reduction of aortic atherosclerotic lesion area in apoE null mice, accompanied by 41.2% decrease of serum LDL-C levels and 40.2% increase of serum HDL-C levels. The body weight, food intake and blood glucose level were not affected by leucine supplementation. Furthermore, leucine supplementation increased the expression of Abcg5 and Abcg8 (that were involved in hepatic cholesterol efflux) by 1.28- and 0.86-fold, respectively, and significantly increased their protein levels. Leucine supplementation also increased the expression of Srebf1, Scd1 and Pgc1b (that were involved in hepatic triglyceride metabolism) by 3.73-, 1.35- and 1.71-fold, respectively. Consequently, leucine supplementation resulted in 51.77% reduction of liver cholesterol content and 2.2-fold increase of liver triglyceride content. Additionally, leucine supplementation did not affect the serum levels of IL-6, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-10 and IL-12, but markedly decreased the serum level of MCP-1. Conclusion: Leucine supplementation effectively attenuates atherosclerosis in apoE null mice by improving the plasma lipid profile and reducing systemic inflammation. PMID:26687933

  13. Effect of leucine uptake on hepatic and skeletal muscle gene expression in rats: a microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Wookwang

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to explore the physiological functions of leucine by exploring genes with leucine-dependent variability using DNA microarray. [Methods] Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 20) were separated into a HPD (30% High Protein Diet, n = 10) group and a NPD (0% Non Protein Diet, n = 10) group and fed a protein diet for 2 weeks. At the end of the 2-week period, the rats were fasted for 12-16 hours, further separated into subgroups within the HPD (Saline, n = 5, Leucine, n = 5) and NPD (Saline, n = 5, Leucine, n = 5) groups and administered with a leucine solution. The liver and muscles were harvested after 2 hours for RNA extraction. RNA purification from the isolated muscles and target gene identification using DNA chip were performed. The target gene was determined based on the results of the DNA chip experiment, and mRNA expression of the target gene was analyzed using Real-Time PCR. [Results] In the skeletal muscle, 27 genes were upregulated while 52 genes were down regulated after leucine administration in the NPD group. In the liver, 160 genes were up-regulated while 126 were down-regulated. The per2 gene was one of the genes with leucine-dependent induction in muscles and liver. [Conclusion] This study was performed to explore the physiological functions of leucine, however, a large number of genes showed variability. Therefore, it was difficult to definitively identify the genes linked with a particular physiological function. Various nutritional effects of leucine were observed. High variability in cytokines, receptors, and various membrane proteins were observed, which suggests that leucine functions as more than a nutrient. The interpretation may depend on investigators’ perspectives, therefore, discussion with relevant experts and the BCAA (Branched-Chain Amino Acids) society may be needed for effective utilization of this data. PMID:26244133

  14. Study on the EPR/dosimetric properties of some substituted alanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gancheva, Veselka; Sagstuen, Einar; Yordanov, Nicola D.

    2006-02-01

    Polycrystalline phenyl-alanine and perdeuterated L- α-alanine ( L- α-alanine-d 4) were studied as potential high-energy radiation-sensitive materials (RSM) for solid state/EPR dosimetry. It was found that phenyl-alanine exhibits a linear dose response in the dose region 0.1-17 kGy. However, phenyl-alanine is about 10 times less sensitive to γ-irradiation than standard L- α-alanine irradiated at the same doses. Moreover, the EPR response from phenyl-alanine is unstable and, independent of the absorbed dose, decreases by about 50% within 20 days after irradiation upon storage at room temperature. γ-irradiated polycrystalline perdeuterated L- α-alanine (CD 3CD(NH 2)COOH) has not previously been studied at room temperature by EPR spectroscopy. The first part of the present analysis was with respect to the structure of the EPR spectrum. By spectrum simulations, the presence of at least two radiation induced free radicals, R 1=CH 3C •(H)COOH and R 2=H 3N +-C •(CH 3)COO -, was confirmed very clearly. Both these radicals were suggested previously from EPR and ENDOR studies of standard alanine crystals. The further investigations into the potential use of alanine-d 4 as RSM, after choosing optimal EPR spectrometer settings parameters for this purpose, show that it is ca. two times more sensitive than standard L- α-alanine.

  15. Measurement of local rates of brain protein synthesis by quantitative autoradiography: validation with L-(/sup 3/H)valine

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, B.E.; Donatoni, P.; Wasterlain, C.G.

    1982-12-01

    Following the injection of 4-day old rats with 150 mM L-(3,4-/sup 3/H)valine (10 mumol/g, IP) the incorporation of /sup 3/H into protein was linear 2 hours. Valine specific activity in the brain acid-soluble fraction was constant between 30 and 120 min after injection with a mean value of 82.3% of the injectate. Significant amounts of tritated metabolites accumulated in the brain acid-soluble fraction (41.4% of radioactivity at 120 min) but do not prove an impediment to measuring rates of protein synthesis. The rate of protein synthesis in cerebral cortex of the 4-day old rat was measured by quantitative autoradiography using (/sup 3/H)valine and /sup 3/H-sensitive film. The measured rate shows excellent agreement with that found previously using L-(1-/sup 14/C)valine. Our results suggest that (/sup 3/H)valine can be a useful precursor to measure local rates of brain protein synthesis by quantitative autoradiography.

  16. A new general pathway for synthesis of reference compounds of N-terminal valine-isocyanate adducts.

    PubMed

    Davies, Ronnie; Rydberg, Per; Westberg, Emelie; Motwani, Hitesh V; Johnstone, Erik; Törnqvist, Margareta

    2010-03-15

    Adducts to Hb could be used as biomarkers to monitor exposure to isocyanates. Particularly useful is the measurement of carbamoylation of N-terminal valines in Hb, after detachment as hydantoins. The synthesis of references from the reactive isocyanates, especially diisocyanates, has been problematic due to side reactions and polymerization of the isocyanate starting material. A simpler, safer, and more general method for the synthesis of valine adducts of isocyanates has been developed using N-[(4-nitrophenyl)carbamate]valine methylamide (NPCVMA) as the key precursor to adducts of various mono- and diisocyanates of interest. By reacting NPCVMA with a range of isocyanate-related amines, carbamoylated valines are formed without the use of the reactive isocyanates. The carbamoylated products synthesized here were cyclized with good yields of the formed hydantoins. The carbamoylated derivative from phenyl isocyanate also showed quantitative yield in a test with cyclization under the conditions used in blood. This new pathway for the preparation of N-carbamoylated model compounds overcomes the above-mentioned problems in the synthesis and is a general and simplified approach, which could make such reference compounds of adducts to N-terminal valine from isocyanates accessible for biomonitoring purposes. The synthesized hydantoins corresponding to adducts from isocyanic acid, methyl isocyanate, phenyl isocyanate, and 2,6-toluene diisocyanate were characterized by LC-MS analysis. The background level of the hydantoin from isocyanic acid in human blood was analyzed with the LC-MS conditions developed.

  17. Degradation of glycine and alanine on irradiated quartz.

    PubMed

    Pawlikowski, Maciej; Benko, Aleksandra; Wróbel, Tomasz P

    2013-04-01

    Recent researches suggest participation of minerals in the formation of life under primordial conditions. Among all of the minerals, quartz seems to be one of the most probable to take part in such processes. However, an external source of energy is needed, e.g. electric discharge. A device simulating the proposed conditions was designed and was used to simulate prebiotic conditions. Investigation of processes occurring during the stimulation of quartz with electric discharge was studied by means of Ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectroscopy, in order to monitor the generation kinetics of free radicals. Additionally, infrared spectroscopy was applied to identify chemical reaction products created in a solution of alanine or glycine, in the presence of quartz treated with electric discharge. Formation of increased amounts of free radicals, compared to experiments performed without quartz and/or amino acid, is reported, along with identification of possible degradation products of alanine. No synthetic reactions were observed.

  18. A mutational analysis of the Abetaz/Aalphad major histocompatibility complex class II molecule that restricts autoreactive T cells in (NZBxNZW)F1 mice. The critical influence of alanine at position 69 in the Aalphad chain.

    PubMed

    Sai, T; Mine, M; Fukuoka, M; Koarada, S; Kimoto, M

    1999-03-01

    Autoimmune symptoms of (NZBxNZW)F1 (H-2d/z) mice are reported to be critically related to the heterozygosity at the H-2 complex of the murine major histocompatibility complex (MHC). We previously showed that several Abetaz/Aalphad MHC class II molecule-restricted autoreactive T-cell clones from B/WF1 mice were pathogenic upon transfer to preautoimmune B/WF1 mice. In this study, to identify the crucial amino acid residues in Abetaz/Aalphad molecules for T-cell activation, we generated a panel of transfectant cell lines. These transfectant cell lines express the Abetaz/Aalphad MHC molecules with a mutation at each residue alpha11, alpha28, alpha57, alpha69, alpha70, alpha76 of Aalphad chain and beta86 of Abetaz chain. Replacing alpha69 alanine with threonine, valine or serine completely eliminated the ability to stimulate autoreactive T-cell clones without affecting the ability to present foreign antigen keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH) or L-plastin peptide to specific T-cell clones. Replacing beta86 valine with aspartic acid resulted in a decrease in the stimulation for antigen-reactive as well as autoreactive T-cell clones. Substitutions at other residues had minimal or no effect on the stimulation of either auto- or antigen-reactive T-cell clones. These results suggest that alanine at residue 69 of the Aalphad chain is critical for the activation of autoreactive Abetaz/Aalphad-restricted T-cell clones. Possible explanations for this are discussed. PMID:10233712

  19. Crystal Structures of Aedes Aegypt Alanine Glyoxylate Aminotransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Han,Q.; Robinson, H.; Gao, Y.; Vogelaar, N.; Wilson, S.; Rizzi, M.; Li, J.

    2006-01-01

    Mosquitoes are unique in having evolved two alanine glyoxylate aminotransferases (AGTs). One is 3-hydroxykynurenine transaminase (HKT), which is primarily responsible for catalyzing the transamination of 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) to xanthurenic acid (XA). Interestingly, XA is used by malaria parasites as a chemical trigger for their development within the mosquito. This 3-HK to XA conversion is considered the major mechanism mosquitoes use to detoxify the chemically reactive and potentially toxic 3-HK. The other AGT is a typical dipteran insect AGT and is specific for converting glyoxylic acid to glycine. Here we report the 1.75{angstrom} high-resolution three-dimensional crystal structure of AGT from the mosquito Aedes aegypti (AeAGT) and structures of its complexes with reactants glyoxylic acid and alanine at 1.75 and 2.1{angstrom} resolution, respectively. This is the first time that the three-dimensional crystal structures of an AGT with its amino acceptor, glyoxylic acid, and amino donor, alanine, have been determined. The protein is dimeric and adopts the type I-fold of pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP)-dependent aminotransferases. The PLP co-factor is covalently bound to the active site in the crystal structure, and its binding site is similar to those of other AGTs. The comparison of the AeAGT-glyoxylic acid structure with other AGT structures revealed that these glyoxylic acid binding residues are conserved in most AGTs. Comparison of the AeAGT-alanine structure with that of the Anopheles HKT-inhibitor complex suggests that a Ser-Asn-Phe motif in the latter may be responsible for the substrate specificity of HKT enzymes for 3-HK.

  20. Methionine uptake in Corynebacterium glutamicum by MetQNI and by MetPS, a novel methionine and alanine importer of the NSS neurotransmitter transporter family.

    PubMed

    Trötschel, Christian; Follmann, Martin; Nettekoven, Jeannine A; Mohrbach, Tobias; Forrest, Lucy R; Burkovski, Andreas; Marin, Kay; Krämer, Reinhard

    2008-12-01

    The soil bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum is a model organism in amino acid biotechnology. Here we present the identification of two different L-methionine uptake systems including the first characterization of a bacterial secondary methionine carrier. The primary carrier MetQNI is a high affinity ABC-type transporter specific for l-methionine. Its expression is under the control of the transcription factor McbR, the global regulator of sulfur metabolism in C. glutamicum. Besides MetQNI, a novel secondary methionine uptake system of the NSS (neurotransmitter:sodium symporter) family was identified and named MetP. The MetP system is characterized by a lower affinity for methionine and uses Na(+) ions for energetic coupling. It is also the main alanine transporter in C. glutamicum and is expressed constitutively. These observations are consistent with models of methionine, alanine, and leucine bound to MetP, derived from the X-ray crystal structure of the LeuT transporter from Aquifex aeolicus. Complementation studies show that MetP consists of two components, a large subunit with 12 predicted transmembrane segments and, surprisingly, an additional subunit with one predicted transmembrane segment only. Thus, this new member of the NSS transporter family adds a novel feature to this class of carriers, namely, the functional dependence on an additional small subunit.

  1. Freezing capture of polymorphic aggregates of bolaamphiphilic (L)-valine-based molecular hydrogelators.

    PubMed

    Nebot, Vicent J; Díaz-Oltra, Santiago; Smets, Johan; Fernández Prieto, Susana; Miravet, Juan F; Escuder, Beatriu

    2014-05-01

    Nanostructured xerogels have been prepared by the freeze-drying of hydrogels and aggregates formed by bolaamphiphilic L-valine derivatives after aging under different environmental conditions. A wide variety of shapes and sizes has been achieved by a simple methodology. These nanostructures have been studied by SEM and WAXD and a dramatic influence of structural flexibility on the kinetics of aggregation has been observed. Such flexibility and a modulation of the hydrophobic effect have shown a profound influence in the packing of these compounds and revealed a high degree of polymorphism.

  2. Use of the valine biosynthetic pathway to convert glucose into isobutanol.

    PubMed

    Savrasova, Ekaterina A; Kivero, Aleksander D; Shakulov, Rustem S; Stoynova, Nataliya V

    2011-09-01

    Microbiological synthesis of higher alcohols (1-butanol, isobutanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, etc.) from plant biomass is critically important due to their advantages over ethanol as a motor fuel. In recent years, the use of branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) biosynthesis pathways together with heterologous Ehrlich pathway enzyme system (Hazelwood et al. in Appl Environ Microbiol 74:2259-2266, 2008) has been proposed by the Liao group as an alternative approach to aerobic production of higher alcohols as new-generation biofuels (Atsumi et al. in Nature 451:86-90, 2008; Atsumi et al. in Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 85:651-657, 2010; Cann and Liao in Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 81:89-98, 2008; Connor and Liao in Appl Environ Microbiol 74:5769-5775, 2008; Shen and Liao in Metab Eng 10:312-320, 2008; Yan and Liao in J Ind Microbiol Biotechnol 36:471-479, 2009). On the basis of these remarkable investigations, we re-engineered Escherichia coli valine-producing strain H-81, which possess overexpressed ilvGMED operon, for the aerobic conversion of sugar into isobutanol. To redirect valine biosynthesis to the production of alcohol, we also--as has been demonstrated previously (Atsumi et al. in Nature 451:86-90, 2008; Atsumi et al. in Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 85:651-657, 2010; Cann and Liao in Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 81:89-98, 2008; Connor and Liao in Appl Environ Microbiol 74:5769-5775, 2008; Shen and Liao in Metab Eng 10:312-320, 2008; Yan and Liao in J Ind Microbiol Biotechnol 36:471-479, 2009)--used enzymes of Ehrlich pathway. In particular, in our study, the following heterologous proteins were exploited: branched-chain 2-keto acid decarboxylase (BCKAD) encoded by the kdcA gene from Lactococcus lactis with rare codons substituted, and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) encoded by the ADH2 gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that expression of both of these genes in the valine-producing strain H-81 results in accumulation of isobutanol instead of valine. Expression of BCKAD

  3. The development of inversion in wh-questions: a reply to Van Valin.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Caroline F; Pine, Julian M

    2003-02-01

    Van Valin (Journal of Child Language 29, 2002, 161-75) presents a critique of Rowland & Pine (Journal of Child Language 27, 2000, 157-81) and argues that the wh-question data from Adam (in Brown, A first language, Cambridge, MA, 1973) cannot be explained in terms of input frequencies as we suggest. Instead, he suggests that the data can be more successfully accounted for in terms of Role and Reference Grammar. In this note we re-examine the pattern of inversion and uninversion in Adam's wh-questions and argue that the RRG explanation cannot account for some of the developmental facts it was designed to explain.

  4. Increased isobutanol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by overexpression of genes in valine metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Isobutanol can be a better biofuel than ethanol due to its higher energy density and lower hygroscopicity. Furthermore, the branched-chain structure of isobutanol gives a higher octane number than the isomeric n-butanol. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was chosen as the production host because of its relative tolerance to alcohols, robustness in industrial fermentations, and the possibility for future combination of isobutanol production with fermentation of lignocellulosic materials. Results The yield of isobutanol was improved from 0.16 to 0.97 mg per g glucose by simultaneous overexpression of biosynthetic genes ILV2, ILV3, and ILV5 in valine metabolism in anaerobic fermentation of glucose in mineral medium in S. cerevisiae. Isobutanol yield was further improved by twofold by the additional overexpression of BAT2, encoding the cytoplasmic branched-chain amino-acid aminotransferase. Overexpression of ILV6, encoding the regulatory subunit of Ilv2, in the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain decreased isobutanol production yield by threefold. In aerobic cultivations in shake flasks in mineral medium, the isobutanol yield of the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain and the reference strain were 3.86 and 0.28 mg per g glucose, respectively. They increased to 4.12 and 2.4 mg per g glucose in yeast extract/peptone/dextrose (YPD) complex medium under aerobic conditions, respectively. Conclusions Overexpression of genes ILV2, ILV3, ILV5, and BAT2 in valine metabolism led to an increase in isobutanol production in S. cerevisiae. Additional overexpression of ILV6 in the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain had a negative effect, presumably by increasing the sensitivity of Ilv2 to valine inhibition, thus weakening the positive impact of overexpression of ILV2, ILV3, and ILV5 on isobutanol production. Aerobic cultivations of the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain and the reference strain showed that supplying amino acids in cultivation media gave a substantial

  5. Refractometry of uniaxially compressed triglycine sulphate crystals doped with L-valine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadnyk, V. Yo.; Kiryk, Yu. I.

    2012-05-01

    The temperature and spectral dependences of the refractive indices n i of triglycine sulphate (TGS) crystals doped with L-valine have been investigated. Doping is found to weaken the temperature dependence of n i of TGS crystals. The electronic polarizabilities α i , refractions R i , and parameters of UV oscillators (λ0 i , B 1 i ) of mechanically distorted doped TGS crystals have been calculated. The temperature coefficients of the shift of the phase-transition point, ∂ T c /∂σ m , are found to be somewhat smaller than those for pure TGS crystals, which is confirmed by the increase in the hardness of TGS crystals after doping.

  6. The roles of electronic and nuclear stopping in the desorption valine negative molecular ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, J.E.; Salehpour, M.; Fishel, D.L.; Tou, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    The yield of valine negative molecular ions has been measured as a function of Xe/sup +/, Kr/sup +/, and Ar/sup +/ primary ion velocity. The electronic and nuclear stopping powers are comparable in magnitude and opposite in slope in the experimental velocity region. The yield data are explained in terms of electronic stopping power alone, with no contribution from nuclear stopping power within the experimental error. Low molecular weight atomic species are found to be best described by a nuclear stopping power related process. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Pancreatic stellate cells support tumour metabolism through autophagic alanine secretion.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cristovão M; Biancur, Douglas E; Wang, Xiaoxu; Halbrook, Christopher J; Sherman, Mara H; Zhang, Li; Kremer, Daniel; Hwang, Rosa F; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Ying, Haoqiang; Asara, John M; Evans, Ronald M; Cantley, Lewis C; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Kimmelman, Alec C

    2016-08-25

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive disease characterized by an intense fibrotic stromal response and deregulated metabolism. The role of the stroma in PDAC biology is complex and it has been shown to play critical roles that differ depending on the biological context. The stromal reaction also impairs the vasculature, leading to a highly hypoxic, nutrient-poor environment. As such, these tumours must alter how they capture and use nutrients to support their metabolic needs. Here we show that stroma-associated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are critical for PDAC metabolism through the secretion of non-essential amino acids (NEAA). Specifically, we uncover a previously undescribed role for alanine, which outcompetes glucose and glutamine-derived carbon in PDAC to fuel the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and thus NEAA and lipid biosynthesis. This shift in fuel source decreases the tumour’s dependence on glucose and serum-derived nutrients, which are limited in the pancreatic tumour microenvironment. Moreover, we demonstrate that alanine secretion by PSCs is dependent on PSC autophagy, a process that is stimulated by cancer cells. Thus, our results demonstrate a novel metabolic interaction between PSCs and cancer cells, in which PSC-derived alanine acts as an alternative carbon source. This finding highlights a previously unappreciated metabolic network within pancreatic tumours in which diverse fuel sources are used to promote growth in an austere tumour microenvironment. PMID:27509858

  8. Characterization of psychrophilic alanine racemase from Bacillus psychrosaccharolyticus.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Y; Yokoigawa, K; Esaki, N; Soda, K; Kawai, H

    1999-03-16

    A psychrophilic alanine racemase gene from Bacillus psychrosaccharolyticus was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli SOLR with a plasmid pYOK3. The gene starting with the unusual initiation codon GTG showed higher preference for codons ending in A or T. The enzyme purified to homogeneity showed the high catalytic activity even at 0 degrees C and was extremely labile over 35 degrees C. The enzyme was found to have a markedly large Km value (5.0 microM) for the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) cofactor in comparison with other reported alanine racemases, and was stabilized up to 50 degrees C in the presence of excess amounts of PLP. The low affinity of the enzyme for PLP may be related to the thermolability, and may be related to the high catalytic activity, initiated by the transaldimination reaction, at low temperature. The enzyme has a distinguishing hydrophilic region around the residue no. 150 in the deduced amino acid sequence (383 residues), whereas the corresponding regions of other Bacillus alanine racemases are hydrophobic. The position of the region in the three dimensional structure of C atoms of the enzyme was predicted to be in a surface loop surrounding the active site. The region may interact with solvent and reduce the compactness of the active site. PMID:10080917

  9. Pancreatic stellate cells support tumour metabolism through autophagic alanine secretion.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cristovão M; Biancur, Douglas E; Wang, Xiaoxu; Halbrook, Christopher J; Sherman, Mara H; Zhang, Li; Kremer, Daniel; Hwang, Rosa F; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Ying, Haoqiang; Asara, John M; Evans, Ronald M; Cantley, Lewis C; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Kimmelman, Alec C

    2016-08-25

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive disease characterized by an intense fibrotic stromal response and deregulated metabolism. The role of the stroma in PDAC biology is complex and it has been shown to play critical roles that differ depending on the biological context. The stromal reaction also impairs the vasculature, leading to a highly hypoxic, nutrient-poor environment. As such, these tumours must alter how they capture and use nutrients to support their metabolic needs. Here we show that stroma-associated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are critical for PDAC metabolism through the secretion of non-essential amino acids (NEAA). Specifically, we uncover a previously undescribed role for alanine, which outcompetes glucose and glutamine-derived carbon in PDAC to fuel the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and thus NEAA and lipid biosynthesis. This shift in fuel source decreases the tumour’s dependence on glucose and serum-derived nutrients, which are limited in the pancreatic tumour microenvironment. Moreover, we demonstrate that alanine secretion by PSCs is dependent on PSC autophagy, a process that is stimulated by cancer cells. Thus, our results demonstrate a novel metabolic interaction between PSCs and cancer cells, in which PSC-derived alanine acts as an alternative carbon source. This finding highlights a previously unappreciated metabolic network within pancreatic tumours in which diverse fuel sources are used to promote growth in an austere tumour microenvironment.

  10. Probing alanine transaminase catalysis with hyperpolarized 13CD3-pyruvate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barb, A. W.; Hekmatyar, S. K.; Glushka, J. N.; Prestegard, J. H.

    2013-03-01

    Hyperpolarized metabolites offer a tremendous sensitivity advantage (>104 fold) when measuring flux and enzyme activity in living tissues by magnetic resonance methods. These sensitivity gains can also be applied to mechanistic studies that impose time and metabolite concentration limitations. Here we explore the use of hyperpolarization by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in mechanistic studies of alanine transaminase (ALT), a well-established biomarker of liver disease and cancer that converts pyruvate to alanine using glutamate as a nitrogen donor. A specific deuterated, 13C-enriched analog of pyruvic acid, 13C3D3-pyruvic acid, is demonstrated to have advantages in terms of detection by both direct 13C observation and indirect observation through methyl protons introduced by ALT-catalyzed H-D exchange. Exchange on injecting hyperpolarized 13C3D3-pyruvate into ALT dissolved in buffered 1H2O, combined with an experimental approach to measure proton incorporation, provided information on mechanistic details of transaminase action on a 1.5 s timescale. ALT introduced, on average, 0.8 new protons into the methyl group of the alanine produced, indicating the presence of an off-pathway enamine intermediate. The opportunities for exploiting mechanism-dependent molecular signatures as well as indirect detection of hyperpolarized 13C3-pyruvate and products in imaging applications are discussed.

  11. Alanine-dependent reactions of 5'-deoxypyridoxal in water.

    PubMed

    Go, Maybelle K; Richard, John P

    2008-12-01

    The non-enzymatic reaction of 5'-deoxypyridoxal (DPL) with l-alanine in water at 25 degrees C was investigated. DPL reacts with alanine to form an imine, which then undergoes deprotonation at the alpha-amino carbon of alanine to form a resonance delocalized DPL-stabilized carbanion. At early reaction times the only detectable products are pyruvate and the dimeric species formed by addition of the alpha-pyridine stabilized carbanion to DPL. No Claisen-type products of addition of the alpha-amino carbanion to DPL, as was previously reported to form from the reaction between DPL and glycine [K. Toth, T.L. Amyes, J.P. Richard, J.P.G. Malthouse, M.E. Ni Beilliu, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 126 (2004) 10538-10539], are observed. The electrophile reacts instead at the alpha-pyridyl carbon. This dimer is in chemical equilibrium with reactants. At longer reaction times about 50% of DPL is converted to 5'-deoxypyridoxamine, the thermodynamically favored product of formal transamination of DPL.

  12. Effect of L-Valine on the growth and characterization of Sodium Acid Phthalate (SAP) single crystals.

    PubMed

    Nirmala, L Ruby; Thomas Joseph Prakash, J

    2013-06-01

    Undoped and amino acid doped good quality single crystals of Sodium Acid Phthalate crystals (SAP) were grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique which are semiorganic in nature. The effect of amino acid (L-Valine) dopant on the growth and the properties of SAP single crystal was investigated. The single crystal X-ray diffraction studies and FT-IR studies were carried out to identify the crystal structure and the presence of functional groups in undoped and L-Valine doped SAP crystals. The transparent nature of the grown crystal was observed using UV-Visible spectrum. The thermal decomposition of the doped SAP crystals was investigated by thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The enhancement in the NLO property of the undoped and L-Valine doped SAP crystals using KDP crystal as a reference was studied using SHG measurements. Vickers micro hardness measurements are used for the study of mechanical strength of the grown crystals.

  13. Effect of L-Valine on the growth and characterization of Sodium Acid Phthalate (SAP) single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirmala, L. Ruby; Prakash, J. Thomas Joseph

    2013-06-01

    Undoped and amino acid doped good quality single crystals of Sodium Acid Phthalate crystals (SAP) were grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique which are semiorganic in nature. The effect of amino acid (L-Valine) dopant on the growth and the properties of SAP single crystal was investigated. The single crystal X-ray diffraction studies and FT-IR studies were carried out to identify the crystal structure and the presence of functional groups in undoped and L-Valine doped SAP crystals. The transparent nature of the grown crystal was observed using UV-Visible spectrum. The thermal decomposition of the doped SAP crystals was investigated by thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The enhancement in the NLO property of the undoped and L-Valine doped SAP crystals using KDP crystal as a reference was studied using SHG measurements. Vickers micro hardness measurements are used for the study of mechanical strength of the grown crystals.

  14. L-Leucine for gold nanoparticles synthesis and their cytotoxic effects evaluation.

    PubMed

    Berghian-Grosan, Camelia; Olenic, Liliana; Katona, Gabriel; Perde-Schrepler, Maria; Vulcu, Adriana

    2014-11-01

    This work reports the preparation of water-soluble leucine capped gold nanoparticles by two single-step synthesis methods. The first procedure involves a citrate reduction approach where the citrate is used as reducing agent and leucine as capping/stabilizing agent. Different sizes of gold nanoparticles, citrate reduced and stabilized by leucine, Leu-AuNPs-C, with the mean diameters in the range of 21-56 nm, were obtained by varying the macroscopic parameters such as: concentration of the gold precursor solution, Au (III):citrate molar ratio and leucine pH. In the second procedure, leucine acts both as reducing and stabilizing agent, allowing us to obtain spherical gold nanoparticles, Leu-AuNPs, with a majority of 80 % (with the mean diameter of 63 nm). This proves that leucine is an appropriate reductant for the formation of water-soluble and stable gold nanoparticles colloids. The characterization of the leucine coated gold nanoparticles was carried out by TEM, UV-Vis and FT-IR analysis. The cytotoxic effect of Leu-AuNPs-C and Leu-AuNPs was also evaluated. PMID:25092048

  15. Leucine supplementation improves leptin sensitivity in high-fat diet fed rats

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xue-Wei; Han, Shu-Fen; Zhang, Jian-Wei; Xu, Jia-Ying; Qin, Li-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Background Several studies have reported the favorable effect of leucine supplementation on insulin resistance or insulin sensitivity. However, whether or not leucine supplementation improves leptin sensitivity remains unclear. Design Forty-eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with either a high-fat diet (HFD) or HFD supplemented with 1.5, 3.0, and 4.5% leucine for 16 weeks. At the end of the experiment, serum leptin level was measured by ELISA, and leptin receptor (ObR) in the hypothalamus was examined by immunohistochemistry. The protein expressions of ObR and leptin-signaling pathway in adipose tissues were detected by western blot. Results No significant differences in body weight and food/energy intake existed among the four groups. Serum leptin levels were significantly lower, and ObR expression in the hypothalamus and adipose tissues was significantly higher in the three leucine groups than in the control group. These phenomena suggested that leptin sensitivity was improved in the leucine groups. Furthermore, the expressions of JAK2 and STAT3 (activated by ObR) were significantly higher, and that of SOCS3 (inhibits leptin signaling) was significantly lower in the three leucine groups than in the control group. Conclusions Leucine supplementation improves leptin sensitivity in rats on HFD likely by promoting leptin signaling. PMID:26115673

  16. Leucine Supplementation Accelerates Connective Tissue Repair of Injured Tibialis Anterior Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Marcelo G.; Silva, Meiricris T.; Carlassara, Eduardo O. C.; Gonçalves, Dawit A.; Abrahamsohn, Paulo A.; Kettelhut, Isis C.; Moriscot, Anselmo S.; Aoki, Marcelo S.; Miyabara, Elen H.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of leucine supplementation on the skeletal muscle regenerative process, focusing on the remodeling of connective tissue of the fast twitch muscle tibialis anterior (TA). Young male Wistar rats were supplemented with leucine (1.35 g/kg per day); then, TA muscles from the left hind limb were cryolesioned and examined after 10 days. Although leucine supplementation induced increased protein synthesis, it was not sufficient to promote an increase in the cross-sectional area (CSA) of regenerating myofibers (p > 0.05) from TA muscles. However, leucine supplementation reduced the amount of collagen and the activation of phosphorylated transforming growth factor-β receptor type I (TβR-I) and Smad2/3 in regenerating muscles (p < 0.05). Leucine also reduced neonatal myosin heavy chain (MyHC-n) (p < 0.05), increased adult MyHC-II expression (p < 0.05) and prevented the decrease in maximum tetanic strength in regenerating TA muscles (p < 0.05). Our results suggest that leucine supplementation accelerates connective tissue repair and consequent function of regenerating TA through the attenuation of TβR-I and Smad2/3 activation. Therefore, future studies are warranted to investigate leucine supplementation as a nutritional strategy to prevent or attenuate muscle fibrosis in patients with several muscle diseases. PMID:25268835

  17. Effect of D-valine and cytosine arabinoside on (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation in rat and rabbit epididymal epithelial cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Orgebin-Crist, M.C.; Jonas-Davies, J.; Storey, P.; Olson, G.E.

    1984-01-01

    Epithelial cell enriched primary cultures were established from the rat and the rabbit epididymis. Epithelial cell aggregates, obtained after pronase digestion of minced epididymis, attached to the culture dish and after 72 h in vitro spread out to form discrete patches of cells. These cells have an epithelioid morphology and form a monolayer of closely apposed polygonal cells where DNA synthesis, as judged by (/sup 3/H)thymidine uptake, is very low. In L-valine medium the nonepithelial cell contamination was no more than 10% in rat and rabbit epididymal primary cultures. The labeling index of rat epididymal cells cultured in D-valine medium was significantly lower than that of cells cultured in L-valine medium. In contrast, the labeling index of rabbit epididymal cells cultured in D-valine medium was significantly higher than that of cells cultured in L-valine medium. Cytosine arabinoside decreased the number of labeled cells in both L-valine and D-valine cultures. From these results, it appears that D-valine is a selective agent for rat epididymal epithelial cells, but not for rabbit epithelial cells, and that cytosine arabinoside is a simple and effective means to control the proliferation of fibroblast-like cells in both rat and rabbit epididymal cell cultures.

  18. Intracellular leucine zipper interactions suggest c-Myc hetero-oligomerization.

    PubMed Central

    Dang, C V; Barrett, J; Villa-Garcia, M; Resar, L M; Kato, G J; Fearon, E R

    1991-01-01

    The physiological significance of in vitro leucine zipper interactions was studied by the use of two strategies which detect specific protein-protein interactions in mammalian cells. Fusion genes were constructed which produce chimeric proteins containing leucine zipper domains from several proteins fused either to the DNA-binding domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae GAL4 protein or to the transcriptional activation domain of the herpes simplex virus VP16 protein. Previous studies in mammalian cells have demonstrated that a single chimeric polypeptide containing these two domains will activate transcription of a reporter gene present downstream of the GAL4 DNA-binding site. Similarly, if the GAL4 DNA-binding domain of a chimeric protein could be complexed through leucine zipper interactions with the VP16 activation domain of another chimeric protein, then transcriptional activation of the reporter gene would be detected. Using this strategy for detecting leucine zipper interactions, we observed homo-oligomerization between leucine zipper domains of the yeast protein GCN4 and hetero-oligomerization between leucine zipper regions from the mammalian transcriptional regulating proteins c-Jun and c-Fos. In contrast, homo-oligomerization of the leucine zipper domain from c-Myc was not detectable in cells. The inability of the c-Myc leucine zipper to homo-oligomerize strongly in cells was confirmed independently. The second strategy to detect leucine zipper interactions takes advantage of the observation that the addition of nuclear localization sequences to a cytoplasmic protein will allow the cytoplasmic protein to be transported to and retained in the nucleus. Chimeric genes encoding proteins with sequences from a cytoplasmic protein fused either to the GCN4 or c-Myc leucine zipper domains were constructed. Experiments with the c-Myc chimeric protein failed to demonstrate transport of the cytoplasmic marker protein to the nucleus in cells expressing the wild-type c

  19. Determination of the safety of leucine supplementation in healthy elderly men.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Betina; Gilbert, Erin; Turki, Abrar; Madden, Kenneth; Elango, Rajavel

    2016-07-01

    Leucine, a branched-chain amino acid (BCAA), has been shown to stimulate muscle protein synthesis, and thus has been proposed to prevent age-related muscle atrophy (sarcopenia). Therefore, leucine supplementation may have potential benefits in elderly populations to preserve muscle mass. The tolerable upper intake level (UL) for leucine intake in young men has recently been determined to be 500 mg kg(-1) day(-1), and increases in blood ammonia concentrations were seen at intake levels above 500 mg kg(-1) day(-1); the UL for leucine in elderly is unknown. The objective of the current study was to determine the safety of leucine supplementation in healthy elderly men. Six healthy elderly men (72.2 ± 3.5 years) received graded stepwise increases in leucine intakes ranging from 50 to 750 mg kg(-1) day(-1), on eight separate study days. Plasma and urinary biochemical variables, including blood ammonia, and an oral primed-continuous protocol of L-1-(13)C-Leucine was performed. Blood ammonia concentrations above normal values (35 µmol/L) were observed at leucine intakes >550 mg kg(-1) day(-1). Leucine oxidation measured as a F(13)CO2 (rate of label tracer oxidation) increased with increasing leucine intakes and started to plateau after 450 mg kg(-1) day(-1). Two-phased linear regression analysis of the F(13)CO2 data revealed a breakpoint of 431 mg kg(-1) day(-1) (R (2) = 0.73), suggesting that the upper limit to oxidize leucine was reached at that point. Taking the data together the upper limit for leucine intake in healthy elderly could be set similar to young men at 500 mg kg(-1) day(-1) or ~35 g/day for an individual weighing 70 kg. PMID:27138628

  20. Leucine and Protein Metabolism in Obese Zucker Rats

    PubMed Central

    She, Pengxiang; Olson, Kristine C.; Kadota, Yoshihiro; Inukai, Ayami; Shimomura, Yoshiharu; Hoppel, Charles L.; Adams, Sean H.; Kawamata, Yasuko; Matsumoto, Hideki; Sakai, Ryosei; Lang, Charles H.; Lynch, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are circulating nutrient signals for protein accretion, however, they increase in obesity and elevations appear to be prognostic of diabetes. To understand the mechanisms whereby obesity affects BCAAs and protein metabolism, we employed metabolomics and measured rates of [1-14C]-leucine metabolism, tissue-specific protein synthesis and branched-chain keto-acid (BCKA) dehydrogenase complex (BCKDC) activities. Male obese Zucker rats (11-weeks old) had increased body weight (BW, 53%), liver (107%) and fat (∼300%), but lower plantaris and gastrocnemius masses (−21–24%). Plasma BCAAs and BCKAs were elevated 45–69% and ∼100%, respectively, in obese rats. Processes facilitating these rises appeared to include increased dietary intake (23%), leucine (Leu) turnover and proteolysis [35% per g fat free mass (FFM), urinary markers of proteolysis: 3-methylhistidine (183%) and 4-hydroxyproline (766%)] and decreased BCKDC per g kidney, heart, gastrocnemius and liver (−47–66%). A process disposing of circulating BCAAs, protein synthesis, was increased 23–29% by obesity in whole-body (FFM corrected), gastrocnemius and liver. Despite the observed decreases in BCKDC activities per gm tissue, rates of whole-body Leu oxidation in obese rats were 22% and 59% higher normalized to BW and FFM, respectively. Consistently, urinary concentrations of eight BCAA catabolism-derived acylcarnitines were also elevated. The unexpected increase in BCAA oxidation may be due to a substrate effect in liver. Supporting this idea, BCKAs were elevated more in liver (193–418%) than plasma or muscle, and per g losses of hepatic BCKDC activities were completely offset by increased liver mass, in contrast to other tissues. In summary, our results indicate that plasma BCKAs may represent a more sensitive metabolic signature for obesity than BCAAs. Processes supporting elevated BCAA]BCKAs in the obese Zucker rat include increased dietary intake, Leu and

  1. Molecular structure of leucine aminopeptidase at 2. 7- angstrom resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Burley, S.K. Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA ); David, P.R.; Lipscomb, W.N. ); Taylor, A. )

    1990-09-01

    The three-dimensional structure of bovine lens leucine aminopeptidase complexed with bestatin, a slow-binding inhibitor, has been solved to 3.0-{angstrom} resolution by the multiple isomorphous replacement method with phase combination and density modification. In addition, the structure of the isomorphous native enzyme has been refined at 2.7-{angstrom} resolution, and the current crystallographic R factor is 0.169 for a model that includes the two zinc ions and all 487 amino acid residues comprising the asymmetric unit. The enzyme is physiologically active as a hexamer, which has 32 symmetry and is triangular in shape with a triangle edge length of 115 {angstrom} and maximal thickness of 90 {angstrom}. The monomers are crystallographically equivalent and each is folded into two unequal {alpha}/{beta} domains connected by an {alpha}-helix to give a comma-like shape with approximate maximal dimensions of 90 x 55 x 55 {angstrom}{sup 3}. The secondary structural composition is 40% {alpha}-helix and 19% {beta}-strand. The active site also contains two positively charged residues, Lys-250 and Arg-336. The six active sites are themselves located in the interior of the hexamer, where they line a disk-shaped cavity of radius 15 {angstrom} and thickness 10 {angstrom}. Access to this cavity is provided by solvent channels that run along the twofold symmetry axes.

  2. Glucocorticoid Induced Leucine Zipper inhibits apoptosis of cardiomyocytes by doxorubicin

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, David; Strom, Joshua; Chen, Qin M.

    2014-04-01

    Doxorubicin (Dox) is an indispensable chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of various forms of neoplasia such as lung, breast, ovarian, and bladder cancers. Cardiotoxicity is a major concern for patients receiving Dox therapy. Previous work from our laboratory indicated that glucocorticoids (GCs) alleviate Dox-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. Here we have found Glucocorticoid-Induced Leucine Zipper (GILZ) to be a mediator of GC-induced cytoprotection. GILZ was found to be induced in cardiomyocytes by GC treatment. Knocking down of GILZ using siRNA resulted in cancelation of GC-induced cytoprotection against apoptosis by Dox treatment. Overexpressing GILZ by transfection was able to protect cells from apoptosis induced by Dox as measured by caspase activation, Annexin V binding and morphologic changes. Western blot analyses indicate that GILZ overexpression prevented cytochrome c release from mitochondria and cleavage of caspase-3. When bcl-2 family proteins were examined, we found that GILZ overexpression causes induction of the pro-survival protein Bcl-xL. Since siRNA against Bcl-xL reverses GC induced cytoprotection, Bcl-xL induction represents an important event in GILZ-induced cytoprotection. Our data suggest that GILZ functions as a cytoprotective gene in cardiomyocytes. - Highlights: • Corticosteroids act as a cytoprotective agent in cardiomyocytes • Corticosteroids induce GILZ expression in cardiomyocytes • Elevated GILZ results in resistance against apoptosis induced by doxorubicin • GILZ induces Bcl-xL protein without inducing Bcl-xL mRNA.

  3. Specific formation of negative ions from leucine and isoleucine molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, Peter; Shchukin, Pavel; Matejčík, Štefan

    2010-01-01

    Dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to gas phase leucine (Leu) and isoleucine (Ile) molecules was studied using experimental and quantum-chemical methods. The relative partial cross sections for DEA have been measured using crossed electron/molecular beams technique. Supporting ab initio calculations of the structure, energies of neutral molecules, fragments, and negative ions have been carried out at G3MP2 and B3LYP levels in order to interpret the experimental data. Leu and Ile exhibit several common features. The negative ionic fragments from both molecules are formed in the electron energy range from 0 to approximately 14 eV via three resonances (1.2, 5.5, and 8 eV). The relative partial cross sections for DEA Leu and Ile are very similar. The dominant negative ions formed were closed shell negative ions (M-H)- (m/z=130) formed preferentially via low electron energy resonance of 1.23 eV. Additional negative ions with m/z=115, 114, 113, 112, 84, 82, 74, 45, 26, and 17 have been detected.

  4. Inhibition of human insulin gene transcription and MafA transcriptional activity by the dual leucine zipper kinase

    PubMed Central

    Stahnke, Marie-Jeannette; Dickel, Corinna; Schröder, Sabine; Kaiser, Diana; Blume, Roland; Stein, Roland; Pouponnot, Celio; Oetjen, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Insulin biosynthesis is an essential β-cell function and inappropriate insulin secretion and biosynthesis contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus type 2. Previous studies showed that the dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK) induces β-cell apoptosis. Since β-cell dysfunction precedes β-cell loss, in the present study the effect of DLK on insulin gene transcription was investigated in the HIT-T15 β-cell line. Downregulation of endogenous DLK increased whereas overexpression of DLK decreased human insulin gene transcription. 5′- and 3′-deletion human insulin promoter analyses resulted in the identification of a DLK responsive element that mapped to the DNA binding-site for the β-cell specific transcription factor MafA. Overexpression of DLK wild-type but not its kinase-dead mutant inhibited MafA transcriptional activity conferred by its transactivation domain. Furthermore, in the non-β-cell line JEG DLK inhibited MafA overexpression-induced human insulin promoter activity. Overexpression of MafA and DLK or its kinase-dead mutant into JEG cells revealed that DLK but not its mutant reduced MafA protein content. Inhibition of the down-stream DLK kinase c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) by SP600125 attenuated DLK-induced MafA loss. Furthermore, mutation of the serine 65 to alanine, shown to confer MafA protein stability, increased MafA-dependent insulin gene transcription and prevented DLK-induced MafA loss in JEG cells. These data suggest that DLK by activating JNK triggers the phosphorylation and degradation of MafA thereby attenuating insulin gene transcription. Given the importance of MafA for β-cell function, the inhibition of DLK might preserve β-cell function and ultimately retard the development of diabetes mellitus type 2. PMID:24726898

  5. Ergogenic effects of β-alanine and carnosine: proposed future research to quantify their efficacy.

    PubMed

    Caruso, John; Charles, Jessica; Unruh, Kayla; Giebel, Rachel; Learmonth, Lexis; Potter, William

    2012-07-01

    β-alanine is an amino acid that, when combined with histidine, forms the dipeptide carnosine within skeletal muscle. Carnosine and β-alanine each have multiple purposes within the human body; this review focuses on their roles as ergogenic aids to exercise performance and suggests how to best quantify the former's merits as a buffer. Carnosine normally makes a small contribution to a cell's total buffer capacity; yet β-alanine supplementation raises intracellular carnosine concentrations that in turn improve a muscle's ability to buffer protons. Numerous studies assessed the impact of oral β-alanine intake on muscle carnosine levels and exercise performance. β-alanine may best act as an ergogenic aid when metabolic acidosis is the primary factor for compromised exercise performance. Blood lactate kinetics, whereby the concentration of the metabolite is measured as it enters and leaves the vasculature over time, affords the best opportunity to assess the merits of β-alanine supplementation's ergogenic effect. Optimal β-alanine dosages have not been determined for persons of different ages, genders and nutritional/health conditions. Doses as high as 6.4 g day(-1), for ten weeks have been administered to healthy subjects. Paraesthesia is to date the only side effect from oral β-alanine ingestion. The severity and duration of paraesthesia episodes are dose-dependent. It may be unwise for persons with a history of paraesthesia to ingest β-alanine. As for any supplement, caution should be exercised with β-alanine supplementation.

  6. Performance effects of acute β-alanine induced paresthesia in competitive cyclists.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, Phillip M; Minahan, Clare L

    2016-01-01

    β-alanine is a common ingredient in supplements consumed by athletes. Indeed, athletes may believe that the β-alanine induced paresthesia, experienced shortly after ingestion, is associated with its ergogenic effect despite no scientific mechanism supporting this notion. The present study examined changes in cycling performance under conditions of β-alanine induced paresthesia. Eight competitive cyclists (VO2max = 61.8 ± 4.2 mL·kg·min(-1)) performed three practices, one baseline and four experimental trials. The experimental trials comprised a 1-km cycling time trial under four conditions with varying information (i.e., athlete informed β-alanine or placebo) and supplement content (athlete received β-alanine or placebo) delivered to the cyclist: informed β-alanine/received β-alanine, informed placebo/received β-alanine, informed β-alanine/received placebo and informed placebo/received placebo. Questionnaires were undertaken exploring the cyclists' experience of the effects of the experimental conditions. A possibly likely increase in mean power was associated with conditions in which β-alanine was administered (±95% CL: 2.2% ± 4.0%), but these results were inconclusive for performance enhancement (p = 0.32, effect size = 0.18, smallest worthwhile change = 56% beneficial). A possibly harmful effect was observed when cyclists were correctly informed that they had ingested a placebo (-1.0% ± 1.9%). Questionnaire data suggested that β-alanine ingestion resulted in evident sensory side effects and six cyclists reported placebo effects. Acute ingestion of β-alanine is not associated with improved 1-km TT performance in competitive cyclists. These findings are in contrast to the athlete's "belief" as cyclists reported improved energy and the ability to sustain a higher power output under conditions of β-alanine induced paresthesia.

  7. Differential Assimilation of Inorganic Carbon and Leucine by Prochlorococcus in the Oligotrophic North Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    PubMed Central

    Björkman, Karin M.; Church, Matthew J.; Doggett, Joseph K.; Karl, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The light effect on photoheterotrophic processes in Prochlorococcus, and primary and bacterial productivity in the oligotrophic North Pacific Subtropical Gyre was investigated using 14C-bicarbonate and 3H-leucine. Light and dark incubation experiments were conducted in situ throughout the euphotic zone (0–175 m) on nine expeditions to Station ALOHA over a 3-year period. Photosynthetrons were also used to elucidate rate responses in leucine and inorganic carbon assimilation as a function of light intensity. Taxonomic group and cell-specific rates were assessed using flow cytometric sorting. The light:dark assimilation rate ratios of leucine in the top 150 m were ∼7:1 for Prochlorococcus, whereas the light:dark ratios for the non-pigmented bacteria (NPB) were not significant different from 1:1. Prochlorococcus assimilated leucine in the dark at per cell rates similar to the NPB, with a contribution to the total community bacterial production, integrated over the euphotic zone, of approximately 20% in the dark and 60% in the light. Depth-resolved primary productivity and leucine incorporation showed that the ratio of Prochlorococcus leucine:primary production peaked at 100 m then declined steeply below the deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM). The photosynthetron experiments revealed that, for Prochlorococcus at the DCM, the saturating irradiance (Ek) for leucine incorporation was reached at approximately half the light intensity required for light saturation of 14C-bicarbonate assimilation. Additionally, high and low red fluorescing Prochlorococcus populations (HRF and LRF), co-occurring at the DCM, had similar Ek values for their respective substrates, however, maximum assimilation rates, for both leucine and inorganic carbon, were two times greater for HRF cells. Our results show that Prochlorococcus contributes significantly to bacterial production estimates using 3H-leucine, whether or not the incubations are conducted in the dark or light, and this should be

  8. Differential Assimilation of Inorganic Carbon and Leucine by Prochlorococcus in the Oligotrophic North Pacific Subtropical Gyre.

    PubMed

    Björkman, Karin M; Church, Matthew J; Doggett, Joseph K; Karl, David M

    2015-01-01

    The light effect on photoheterotrophic processes in Prochlorococcus, and primary and bacterial productivity in the oligotrophic North Pacific Subtropical Gyre was investigated using (14)C-bicarbonate and (3)H-leucine. Light and dark incubation experiments were conducted in situ throughout the euphotic zone (0-175 m) on nine expeditions to Station ALOHA over a 3-year period. Photosynthetrons were also used to elucidate rate responses in leucine and inorganic carbon assimilation as a function of light intensity. Taxonomic group and cell-specific rates were assessed using flow cytometric sorting. The light:dark assimilation rate ratios of leucine in the top 150 m were ∼7:1 for Prochlorococcus, whereas the light:dark ratios for the non-pigmented bacteria (NPB) were not significant different from 1:1. Prochlorococcus assimilated leucine in the dark at per cell rates similar to the NPB, with a contribution to the total community bacterial production, integrated over the euphotic zone, of approximately 20% in the dark and 60% in the light. Depth-resolved primary productivity and leucine incorporation showed that the ratio of Prochlorococcus leucine:primary production peaked at 100 m then declined steeply below the deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM). The photosynthetron experiments revealed that, for Prochlorococcus at the DCM, the saturating irradiance (E k) for leucine incorporation was reached at approximately half the light intensity required for light saturation of (14)C-bicarbonate assimilation. Additionally, high and low red fluorescing Prochlorococcus populations (HRF and LRF), co-occurring at the DCM, had similar E k values for their respective substrates, however, maximum assimilation rates, for both leucine and inorganic carbon, were two times greater for HRF cells. Our results show that Prochlorococcus contributes significantly to bacterial production estimates using (3)H-leucine, whether or not the incubations are conducted in the dark or light, and this should

  9. [Somatostatin does not modify 3-oxymethylglucose and leucine uptake by rat enterocytes].

    PubMed

    Crespo, C A; Martínez-Sapiña, J; Taboada, M C

    1988-09-01

    The effects of somatostatin on 3-oxymethylglucose (3-OMG) and leucine uptake by rat enterocytes were examined. Somatostatin did not decrease the 3-OMG enterocyte uptake. When the 3-OMG active transport was inhibited by phloridzin, Somatostatin presented no significant modifications. Somatostatin showed a slight decrease in 3-OMG release through the basolateral membrane, when such a release was inhibited with theophylline. Somatostatin did not modify the intestinal leucine uptake or its inhibition by methionine.

  10. Isolation and characterization of awamori yeast mutants with L-leucine accumulation that overproduce isoamyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hiroshi; Hashida, Keisuke; Watanabe, Daisuke; Nasuno, Ryo; Ohashi, Masataka; Iha, Tomoya; Nezuo, Maiko; Tsukahara, Masatoshi

    2015-02-01

    Awamori shochu is a traditional distilled alcoholic beverage made from steamed rice in Okinawa, Japan. Although it has a unique aroma that is distinguishable from that of other types of shochu, no studies have been reported on the breeding of awamori yeasts. In yeast, isoamyl alcohol (i-AmOH), known as the key flavor of bread, is mainly produced from α-ketoisocaproate in the pathway of L-leucine biosynthesis, which is regulated by end-product inhibition of α-isopropylmalate synthase (IPMS). Here, we isolated mutants resistant to the L-leucine analog 5,5,5-trifluoro-DL-leucine (TFL) derived from diploid awamori yeast of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Some of the mutants accumulated a greater amount of intracellular L-leucine, and among them, one mutant overproduced i-AmOH in awamori brewing. This mutant carried an allele of the LEU4 gene encoding the Ser542Phe/Ala551Val variant IPMS, which is less sensitive to feedback inhibition by L-leucine. Interestingly, we found that either of the constituent mutations (LEU4(S542F) and LEU4(A551V)) resulted in the TFL tolerance of yeast cells and desensitization to L-leucine feedback inhibition of IPMS, leading to intracellular L-leucine accumulation. Homology modeling also suggested that L-leucine binding was drastically inhibited in the Ser542Phe, Ala551Val, and Ser542Phe/Ala551Val variants due to steric hindrance in the cavity of IPMS. As we expected, awamori yeast cells expressing LEU4(S542F), LEU4(A551V), and LEU4(S542F/A551V) showed a prominent increase in extracellular i-AmOH production, compared with that of cells carrying the vector only. The approach described here could be a practical method for the breeding of novel awamori yeasts to expand the diversity of awamori taste and flavor. PMID:25060730

  11. Light dependence of [3H]leucine incorporation in the oligotrophic North Pacific ocean.

    PubMed

    Church, Matthew J; Ducklow, Hugh W; Karl, David M

    2004-07-01

    The influence of irradiance on bacterial incorporation of [(3)H]leucine was evaluated at Station ALOHA in the oligotrophic North Pacific subtropical gyre. Six experiments were conducted on three cruises to Station ALOHA to examine how [(3)H]leucine incorporation varied as a function of irradiance. Two experiments were also conducted to assess the photoautotrophic response to irradiance (based on photosynthetic uptake of [(14)C]bicarbonate) in both the upper and lower photic zones. Rates of [(3)H]leucine incorporation responded to irradiance in a photosynthesis-like manner, increasing sharply at low light and then saturating and sometimes declining with increasing light intensity. The influence of irradiance on bacterial growth was evaluated in both the well-lit (5 to 25 m) and dimly lit regions of the upper ocean (75 to 100 m) to determine whether the bacterial response to irradiance differed along the depth-dependent light gradient of the photic zone. [(3)H]leucine incorporation rates were analyzed with a photosynthesis-irradiance model for a quantitative description of the relationships between [(3)H]leucine incorporation and irradiance. Maximum rates of [(3)H]leucine incorporation in the upper photic zone increased 48 to 92% relative to those of dark-incubated samples, with [(3)H]leucine incorporation saturating at light intensities between 58 and 363 micromol of quanta m(-2) s(-1). Rates of [(3)H]leucine incorporation in the deep photic zone were photostimulated 53 to 114% and were susceptible to photoinhibition, with rates declining at light intensities of >100 micromol of quanta m(-2) s(-1). The results of these experiments revealed that sunlight directly influences bacterial growth in this open-ocean ecosystem.

  12. Leucine induced dephosphorylation of Sestrin2 promotes mTORC1 activation.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Scot R; Gordon, Bradley S; Moyer, Jenna E; Dennis, Michael D; Jefferson, Leonard S

    2016-08-01

    The studies described herein were designed to explore the role of Sestrin2 in mediating the selective action of leucine to activate mTORC1. The results demonstrate that Sestrin2 is a phosphoprotein and that its phosphorylation state is responsive to the availability of leucine, but not other essential amino acids. Moreover, leucine availability-induced alterations in Sestrin2 phosphorylation correlated temporally and dose dependently with the activation state of mTORC1, there being a reciprocal relationship between the degree of phosphorylation of Sestrin2 and the extent of repression of mTORC1. With leucine deprivation, Sestrin2 became more highly phosphorylated and interacted more strongly with proteins of the GATOR2 complex. Notably, in cells lacking the protein kinase ULK1, the activation state of mTORC1 was elevated in leucine-deficient medium, such that the effect of re-addition of the amino acid was blunted. In contrast, overexpression of ULK1 led to hyperphosphorylation of Sestrin2 and enhanced its interaction with GATOR2. Neither rapamycin nor Torin2 had any effect on Sestrin2 phosphorylation, suggesting that leucine deprivation-induced repression of mTORC1 was not responsible for the action of ULK1 on Sestrin2. Mass spectrometry analysis of Sestrin2 revealed three phosphorylation sites that are conserved across mammalian species. Mutation of the three sites to phospho-mimetic amino acids in exogenously expressed Sestrin2 promoted its interaction with GATOR2 and dramatically repressed mTORC1 even in the presence of leucine. Overall, the results support a model in which leucine selectively promotes dephosphorylation of Sestrin2, causing it to dissociate from and thereby activate GATOR2, leading to activation of mTORC1.

  13. Comparative 13C metabolic flux analysis of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-deficient, L-valine-producing Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Bartek, Tobias; Blombach, Bastian; Lang, Siegmund; Eikmanns, Bernhard J; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Oldiges, Marco; Nöh, Katharina; Noack, Stephan

    2011-09-01

    L-Valine can be formed successfully using C. glutamicum strains missing an active pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme complex (PDHC). Wild-type C. glutamicum and four PDHC-deficient strains were compared by (13)C metabolic flux analysis, especially focusing on the split ratio between glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Compared to the wild type, showing a carbon flux of 69% ± 14% through the PPP, a strong increase in the PPP flux was observed in PDHC-deficient strains with a maximum of 113% ± 22%. The shift in the split ratio can be explained by an increased demand of NADPH for l-valine formation. In accordance, the introduction of the Escherichia coli transhydrogenase PntAB, catalyzing the reversible conversion of NADH to NADPH, into an L-valine-producing C. glutamicum strain caused the PPP flux to decrease to 57% ± 6%, which is below the wild-type split ratio. Hence, transhydrogenase activity offers an alternative perspective for sufficient NADPH supply, which is relevant for most amino acid production systems. Moreover, as demonstrated for L-valine, this bypass leads to a significant increase of product yield due to a concurrent reduction in carbon dioxide formation via the PPP.

  14. Sestrin2 is a leucine sensor for the mTORC1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wolfson, Rachel L.; Chantranupong, Lynne; Saxton, Robert A.; Shen, Kuang; Scaria, Sonia M.; Cantor, Jason R.; Sabatini, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Leucine is a proteogenic amino acid that also regulates many aspects of mammalian physiology, in large part by activating the mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) protein kinase, a master growth controller. Amino acids signal to mTORC1 through the Rag guanine triphosphatases (GTPases). Several factors regulate the Rags, including GATOR1, a GTPase activating protein (GAP); GATOR2, a positive regulator of unknown function; and Sestrin2, a GATOR2-interacting protein that inhibits mTORC1 signaling. We find that leucine, but not arginine, disrupts the Sestrin2-GATOR2 interaction by binding to Sestrin2 with a Kd of 20 µM, which is the leucine concentration that half-maximally activates mTORC1. The leucine-binding capacity of Sestrin2 is required for leucine to activate mTORC1 in cells. These results indicate that Sestrin2 is a leucine sensor for the mTORC1 pathway. PMID:26449471

  15. Use of the entire spectrum of irradiated alanine for dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Dolo, J M; Moignau, F

    2005-02-01

    Alanine is an amino acid commonly used in ESR dosimetry as a reference detector. The classic approach for the measurement of irradiated samples is to determine the amplitude of the central peak of the first derivative spectrum. It is generally considered that this technique represents the best and most reproducible solution for achieving an accurate proportionality between the concentration of free radicals inside the resonant cavity, characterized by the amplitude, and the dose. It is also accepted that this central peak corresponds to the free radical CH3CHCOO-. The hyperfine structure of this radical in the spectrum shows five main peaks with the approximate ratios 1:4:6:4:1 as regards coupling. This paper presents another approach featuring analysis of the entire spectrum: (i) ratios of identified peaks, (ii) ratio variation vs time with regard to several parameters affecting fading. These variations in the alanine spectrum are probably correlated with the variation of the concentrations of different free radical species. These variations and their positions in the spectrum are very important constraints that increase the uncertainty of this type of measurement.

  16. The effect of immunonutrition (glutamine, alanine) on fracture healing

    PubMed Central

    Küçükalp, Abdullah; Durak, Kemal; Bayyurt, Sarp; Sönmez, Gürsel; Bilgen, Muhammed S.

    2014-01-01

    Background There have been various studies related to fracture healing. Glutamine is an amino acid with an important role in many cell and organ functions. This study aimed to make a clinical, radiological, and histopathological evaluation of the effects of glutamine on fracture healing. Methods Twenty rabbits were randomly allocated into two groups of control and immunonutrition. A fracture of the fibula was made to the right hind leg. All rabbits received standard food and water. From post-operative first day for 30 days, the study group received an additional 2 ml/kg/day 20% L-alanine L-glutamine solution via a gastric catheter, and the control group received 2 ml/kg/day isotonic via gastric catheter. At the end of 30 days, the rabbits were sacrificed and the fractures were examined clinically, radiologically, and histopathologically in respect to the degree of union. Results Radiological evaluation of the control group determined a mean score of 2.5 according to the orthopaedists and 2.65 according to the radiologists. In the clinical evaluation, the mean score was 1.875 for the control group and 2.0 for the study group. Histopathological evaluation determined a mean score of 8.5 for the control group and 9.0 for the study group. Conclusion One month after orally administered glutamine–alanine, positive effects were observed on fracture healing radiologically, clinically, and histopathologically, although no statistically significant difference was determined.

  17. Formation of chloroform during chlorination of alanine in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wen-Hai; Gao, Nai-Yun; Deng, Yang; Dong, Bing-Zhi

    2009-11-01

    Currently, dissolved nitrogenous organic matters in water, important precursors of disinfection by-products (DBPs), are of significant concern. This study was to explore the formation of chloroform (CF) during chlorination of alanine (Ala), an important nitrogenous organic compound commonly present in water sources. Our results indicated that the CF yield reached a maximum value of 0.143% at the molar ratio of chlorine atom to nitrogen atom (Cl/N)=1.0 over a Cl/N range of 0.2-5.0 (pH=7.0, reaction time=5d, and initial Ala=0.1mM). At an acidic-neutral condition (pH 4-7), the formation of CF was suppressed. However, the highest CF yield (0.227%) occurred at weakly alkaline condition (pH 8.0) (initial Ala=0.1mM, and Cl/N=1.0). The increase of Br(-) in water can increase total trihalomethanes (THMs) and bromo-THMs. However, the bromo-THMs level reached a plateau at Br(-)/Cl>0.04. Finally, based on the computation of frontier electron density and identification and measurement of key intermediates during Ala chlorination, we proposed a formation pathway of CF from Ala chlorination: Ala-->monochloro-N-alanine (MC-N-Ala)-->acetaldehyde (AAld)-->monochloroacetaldehyde acetaldehyde (MCAld)-->dichloroacetaldehyde (DCAld)-->trichloroacetaldehyde (TCAld)-->CF.

  18. Effects of leucine and citrulline versus non-essential amino acids on muscle protein synthesis in fasted rat: a common activation pathway?

    PubMed

    Le Plénier, Servane; Walrand, Stéphane; Noirt, Richard; Cynober, Luc; Moinard, Christophe

    2012-09-01

    Leucine (LEU) is recognized as a major regulator of muscle protein synthesis (MPS). Citrulline (CIT) is emerging as a potent new regulator. The aim of our study was to compare MPS modulation by CIT and LEU in food-deprived rats and to determine whether their action was driven by similar mechanisms. Rats were either freely fed (F, n = 10) or food deprived for 18 h. Food-deprived rats were randomly assigned to one of four groups and received per os, i.e., gavage, saline (S, n = 10), L: -leucine (1.35 g/kg, LEU, n = 10), L: -citrulline (1.80 g/kg CIT, n = 10) or isonitrogenous non-essential amino acids (NEAA, n = 10). After gavage, the rats were injected with a flooding dose of [(13)C] valine to determine MPS. The rats were killed 50 min after the injection of the flooding dose. Blood was collected for amino acid, glucose and insulin determinations. Tibialis anterior muscles were excised for determination of MPS and for Western blot analyses of the PI3K/Akt, mTORC1, ERK1/2/MAPK pathways and AMP kinase component. MPS was depressed by 61% in starved rats (Saline vs. Fed, P < 0.05). Administration of amino acids (NEAA, LEU or CIT) completely abolished this decrease (NEAA, CIT, LEU vs. Fed, NS). Food deprivation affected the phosphorylation status of the mTORC1 pathway and AMP kinase (Saline vs. Fed, P < 0.05). LEU and CIT administration differently stimulated the mTORC1 pathway (LEU > CIT). LEU but not CIT increased the phosphorylation of rpS6 at serine 235/236. Our findings clearly demonstrated that both CIT and LEU were able to stimulate MPS, but this effect was likely related to the nitrogen load. LEU, CIT and NEAA may have different actions on MPS in this model as they share different mTORC1 regulation capacities.

  19. Crystal growth and characterization of L-valine cadmium acetate a semiorganic NLO crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekaran, J.; Ilayabarathi, P.; Maadeswaran, P.

    2012-08-01

    A new semiorganic nonlinear optical material, L-valine cadmium acetate, was grown successfully from aqueous solution by slow evaporation method. The grown crystals characterized by using Powder X-ray diffraction analysis confirms the structure of the grown title compound. The functional groups have been identified using FTIR spectral data. Transmittance compound was analyzed by using UV-vis spectrum. The thermal behavior of the grown crystal was determined with the aid of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential thermal analysis (DTA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The dielectric constant was studied as a function of frequency for various temperatures. The grown crystal has positive photoconductivity nature. The fluorescence spectrum of the crystal was recorded and its optical band gap is about 3.4479 eV. Second order nonlinear optical property of the grown crystal has been confirmed by modified Kurtz-Perry powder second harmonic generation (SHG) test.

  20. Crystal structure of fac-aquatricarbonyl[(S)-valin-ato-κ(2) N,O]-rhenium(I).

    PubMed

    Piletska, Kseniia O; Domasevitch, Kostiantyn V; Shtemenko, Alexander V

    2016-04-01

    In the mol-ecule of the title compound, [Re(C5H10NO2)(CO)3(H2O)], the Re(I) atom adopts a distorted octa-hedral coordination sphere defined by one aqua and three carbonyl ligands as well as one amino N and one carboxyl-ate O atom of the chelating valinate anion. The carbonyl ligands are arranged in a fac-configuration around the Re(I) ion. In the crystal, an intricate hydrogen-bonding system under participation of two O-H, two N-H and one C-H donor groups and the carboxyl-ate and carbonyl O atoms as acceptor groups contribute to the formation of a three-dimensional supra-molecular network. PMID:27375894

  1. Involvement of alanine racemase in germination of Bacillus cereus spores lacking an intact exosporium.

    PubMed

    Venir, Elena; Del Torre, Manuela; Cunsolo, Vincenzo; Saletti, Rosaria; Musetti, Rita; Stecchini, Mara Lucia

    2014-02-01

    The L-alanine mediated germination of food isolated Bacillus cereus DSA 1 spores, which lacked an intact exosporium, increased in the presence of D-cycloserine (DCS), which is an alanine racemase (Alr) inhibitor, reflecting the activity of the Alr enzyme, capable of converting L-alanine to the germination inhibitor D-alanine. Proteomic analysis of the alkaline extracts of the spore proteins, which include exosporium and coat proteins, confirmed that Alr was present in the B. cereus DSA 1 spores and matched to that encoded by B. cereus ATCC 14579, whose spore germination was strongly affected by the block of conversion of L- to D-alanine. Unlike ATCC 14579 spores, L-alanine germination of B. cereus DSA 1 spores was not affected by the preincubation with DCS, suggesting a lack of restriction in the reactant accessibility.

  2. Influence of valine and other amino acids on total diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione levels during fermentation of brewer's wort.

    PubMed

    Krogerus, Kristoffer; Gibson, Brian R

    2013-08-01

    Undesirable butter-tasting vicinal diketones are produced as by-products of valine and isoleucine biosynthesis during wort fermentation. One promising method of decreasing diacetyl production is through control of wort valine content since valine is involved in feedback inhibition of enzymes controlling the formation of diacetyl precursors. Here, the influence of valine supplementation, wort amino acid profile and free amino nitrogen content on diacetyl formation during wort fermentation with the lager yeast Saccharomyces pastorianus was investigated. Valine supplementation (100 to 300 mg L(-1)) resulted in decreased maximum diacetyl concentrations (up to 37 % lower) and diacetyl concentrations at the end of fermentation (up to 33 % lower) in all trials. Composition of the amino acid spectrum of the wort also had an impact on diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione production during fermentation. No direct correlation between the wort amino acid concentrations and diacetyl production was found, but rather a negative correlation between the uptake rate of valine (and also other branched-chain amino acids) and diacetyl production. Fermentation performance and yeast growth were unaffected by supplementations. Amino acid addition had a minor effect on higher alcohol and ester composition, suggesting that high levels of supplementation could affect the flavour profile of the beer. Modifying amino acid profile of wort, especially with respect to valine and the other branched-chain amino acids, may be an effective way of decreasing the amount of diacetyl formed during fermentation.

  3. Quantitative measurements of regional glucose utilization and rate of valine incorporation into proteins by double-tracer autoradiography in the rat brain tumor model

    SciTech Connect

    Kirikae, M.; Diksic, M.; Yamamoto, Y.L.

    1989-02-01

    We examined the rate of glucose utilization and the rate of valine incorporation into proteins using 2-(/sup 18/F)fluoro-2-deoxyglucose and L-(1-14C)-valine in a rat brain tumor model by quantitative double-tracer autoradiography. We found that in the implanted tumor the rate of valine incorporation into proteins was about 22 times and the rate of glucose utilization was about 1.5 times that in the contralateral cortex. (In the ipsilateral cortex, the tumor had a profound effect on glucose utilization but no effect on the rate of valine incorporation into proteins.) Our findings suggest that it is more useful to measure protein synthesis than glucose utilization to assess the effectiveness of antitumor agents and their toxicity to normal brain tissue. We compared two methods to estimate the rate of valine incorporation: kinetic (quantitation done using an operational equation and the average brain rate coefficients) and washed slices (unbound labeled valine removed by washing brain slices in 10% trichloroacetic acid). The results were the same using either method. It would seem that the kinetic method can thus be used for quantitative measurement of protein synthesis in brain tumors and normal brain tissue using (/sup 11/C)-valine with positron emission tomography.

  4. A Novel Di-Leucine Motif at the N-Terminus of Human Organic Solute Transporter Beta Is Essential for Protein Association and Membrane Localization

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shuhua; Soroka, Carol J.; Sun, An-Qiang; Backos, Donald S.; Mennone, Albert; Suchy, Frederick J.; Boyer, James L.

    2016-01-01

    The heteromeric membrane protein Organic Solute Transporter alpha/beta is the major bile acid efflux transporter in the intestine. Physical association of its alpha and beta subunits is essential for their polarized basolateral membrane localization and function in the transport of bile acids and other organic solutes. We identified a highly conserved acidic dileucine motif (-EL20L21EE) at the extracellular amino-tail of organic solute transporter beta from multiple species. To characterize the role of this protein interacting domain in the association of the human beta and alpha subunits and in membrane localization of the transporter, Leu20 and Leu21 on the amino-tail of human organic solute transporter beta were replaced with alanines by site-directed mutagenesis. Co-immunoprecipitation study in HEK293 cells demonstrated that substitution of the leucine residues with alanines prevented the interaction of the human beta mutant with the alpha subunit. Membrane biotinylation demonstrated that the LL/AA mutant eliminated membrane expression of both subunits. Computational-based modelling of human organic solute transporter beta suggested that the LL/AA mutation substantially alters both the structure and lipophilicity of the surface, thereby not only affecting the interaction with the alpha subunit but also possibly impacting the capacity of the beta subunit to traffick through the cell and interact with the membrane. In summary, our findings indicate that the dileucine motif in the extracellular N-terminal region of human organic solute transporter beta subunit plays a critical role in the association with the alpha subunit and in its polarized plasma membrane localization. PMID:27351185

  5. Flow cytometric assessment of specific leucine incorporation in the open Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talarmin, A.; van Wambeke, F.; Catala, P.; Courties, C.; Lebaron, P.

    2011-02-01

    The surface of the Mediterranean Sea is a low-phosphate-low-chlorophyll marine area where marine heterotrophic prokaryotes significantly contribute to the biogeochemical cycles of all biogenic elements such as carbon, notably through the mineralization of dissolved organic compounds. Cell-specific leucine incorporation rates were determined in early summer in the open stratified Mediterranean Sea. The bulk leucine incorporation rate was on average 5 ± 4 pmol leu l-1 h-1 (n=30). Cell-specific 3H-leucine incorporation rates were assayed using flow cytometry coupled to cell sorting. Heterotrophic prokaryotes (Hprok) were divided into cytometric groups according to their side scatter and green fluorescence properties: high nucleic acid containing cells (HNA) with high scatter (HNA-hs) and low scatter (HNA-ls) and low nucleic acid containing cells (LNA). Cell-specific leucine incorporation rates of these cytometric groups ranged from 2 to 54, 0.9 to 11, and 1 to 12 × 10-21 mol cell-1 h-1, respectively. LNA cells represented 45 to 63% of the Hprok abundance, and significantly contributed to the bulk leucine incorporation rates, from 12 to 43%. HNA/LNA ratios of cell-specific leucine incorporation were on average 2.0 ± 0.7 (n=30). In surface layers (from 0 m down to the deep chlorophyll depth, DCM), cell-specific rates of HNA-hs were elevated (7 and 13 times greater than LNA and HNA-ls, respectively). Nevertheless, on average HNA-hs (26%) and LNA (27%) equally contributed to the bulk leucine incorporation in these layers. Prochlorococcus cells were easily sorted near the DCM and displayed cell-specific leucine incorporation rates ranging from 3 to 55 × 10-21 mol leu cell-1 h-1, i.e. as high as HNA-hs'. These sorted groups could therefore be defined as key-players in the process of leucine incorporation into proteins. The mixotrophic features of certain photosynthetic prokaryotes and the high contribution of LNA cells to leucine incorporation within the microbial

  6. Two Arabidopsis Genes (IPMS1 and IPMS2) Encode Isopropylmalate Synthase, the Branchpoint Step in the Biosynthesis of Leucine1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    de Kraker, Jan-Willem; Luck, Katrin; Textor, Susanne; Tokuhisa, James G.; Gershenzon, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Heterologous expression of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) IPMS1 (At1g18500) and IPMS2 (At1g74040) cDNAs in Escherichia coli yields isopropylmalate synthases (IPMSs; EC 2.3.3.13). These enzymes catalyze the first dedicated step in leucine (Leu) biosynthesis, an aldol-type condensation of acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) and 2-oxoisovalerate yielding isopropylmalate. Most biochemical properties of IPMS1 and IPMS2 are similar: broad pH optimum around pH 8.5, Mg2+ as cofactor, feedback inhibition by Leu, Km for 2-oxoisovalerate of approximately 300 μm, and a Vmax of approximately 2 × 103 μmol min−1 g−1. However, IPMS1 and IPMS2 differ in their Km for acetyl-CoA (45 μm and 16 μm, respectively) and apparent quaternary structure (dimer and tetramer, respectively). A knockout insertion mutant for IPMS1 showed an increase in valine content but no changes in Leu content; two insertion mutants for IPMS2 did not show any changes in soluble amino acid content. Apparently, in planta each gene can adequately compensate for the absence of the other, consistent with available microarray and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction data that show that both genes are expressed in all organs at all developmental stages. Both encoded proteins accept 2-oxo acid substrates in vitro ranging in length from glyoxylate to 2-oxohexanoate, and catalyze at a low rate the condensation of acetyl-CoA and 4-methylthio-2-oxobutyrate, i.e. a reaction involved in glucosinolate chain elongation normally catalyzed by methylthioalkylmalate synthases. The evolutionary relationship between IPMS and methylthioalkylmalate synthase enzymes is discussed in view of their amino acid sequence identity (60%) and overlap in substrate specificity. PMID:17189332

  7. High Leucine Diets Stimulate Cerebral Branched-Chain Amino Acid Degradation and Modify Serotonin and Ketone Body Concentrations in a Pig Model

    PubMed Central

    Wessels, Anna G.; Kluge, Holger; Hirche, Frank; Kiowski, Andreas; Schutkowski, Alexandra; Corrent, Etienne; Bartelt, Jörg; König, Bettina; Stangl, Gabriele I.

    2016-01-01

    In addition to its role as an essential protein component, leucine (Leu) displays several other metabolic functions such as activation of protein synthesis. This property makes it an interesting amino acid for the therapy of human muscle atrophy and for livestock production. However, Leu can stimulate its own degradation via the branched-chain keto acid dehydrogenase complex (BCKDH). To examine the response of several tissues to excessive Leu, pigs were fed diets containing two- (L2) and four-fold (L4) higher Leu contents than the recommended amount (control). We found that the L4 diet led to a pronounced increase in BCKDH activity in the brain (2.5-fold, P < 0.05), liver (1.8-fold, P < 0.05) and cardiac muscle (1.7-fold, P < 0.05), whereas we found no changes in enzyme activity in the pancreas, skeletal muscle, adipose tissue and intestinal mucosa. The L2 diet had only weak effects on BCKDH activity. Both high Leu diets reduced the concentrations of free valine and isoleucine in nearly all tissues. In the brain, high Leu diets modified the amount of tryptophan available: for serotonin synthesis. Compared to the controls, pigs treated with the high Leu diets consumed less food, showed increased plasma concentrations of 3-hydroxybutyrate and reduced levels of circulating serotonin. In conclusion, excessive Leu can stimulate BCKDH activity in several tissues, including the brain. Changes in cerebral tryptophan, along with the changes in amino acid-derived metabolites in the plasma may limit the use of high Leu diets to treat muscle atrophy or to increase muscle growth. PMID:26930301

  8. High Leucine Diets Stimulate Cerebral Branched-Chain Amino Acid Degradation and Modify Serotonin and Ketone Body Concentrations in a Pig Model.

    PubMed

    Wessels, Anna G; Kluge, Holger; Hirche, Frank; Kiowski, Andreas; Schutkowski, Alexandra; Corrent, Etienne; Bartelt, Jörg; König, Bettina; Stangl, Gabriele I

    2016-01-01

    In addition to its role as an essential protein component, leucine (Leu) displays several other metabolic functions such as activation of protein synthesis. This property makes it an interesting amino acid for the therapy of human muscle atrophy and for livestock production. However, Leu can stimulate its own degradation via the branched-chain keto acid dehydrogenase complex (BCKDH). To examine the response of several tissues to excessive Leu, pigs were fed diets containing two- (L2) and four-fold (L4) higher Leu contents than the recommended amount (control). We found that the L4 diet led to a pronounced increase in BCKDH activity in the brain (2.5-fold, P < 0.05), liver (1.8-fold, P < 0.05) and cardiac muscle (1.7-fold, P < 0.05), whereas we found no changes in enzyme activity in the pancreas, skeletal muscle, adipose tissue and intestinal mucosa. The L2 diet had only weak effects on BCKDH activity. Both high Leu diets reduced the concentrations of free valine and isoleucine in nearly all tissues. In the brain, high Leu diets modified the amount of tryptophan available: for serotonin synthesis. Compared to the controls, pigs treated with the high Leu diets consumed less food, showed increased plasma concentrations of 3-hydroxybutyrate and reduced levels of circulating serotonin. In conclusion, excessive Leu can stimulate BCKDH activity in several tissues, including the brain. Changes in cerebral tryptophan, along with the changes in amino acid-derived metabolites in the plasma may limit the use of high Leu diets to treat muscle atrophy or to increase muscle growth. PMID:26930301

  9. NMR analyses of the conformations of L-isoleucine and L-valine bound to Escherichia coli isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Kohda, D.; Kawai, G.; Yokoyama, S.; Kawakami, M.; Mizushima, S.; Miyazawa, T.

    1987-10-06

    The 400-MHz /sup 1/H NMR spectra of L-isoleucine and L-valine were measured in the presence of Escherichia coli isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase (IleRS). Because of chemical exchange of L-isoleucine or L-valine between the free state and the IleRS-bound state, a transferred nuclear Overhauser effect (TRNOE) was observed among proton resonances of L-isoleucine or L-valine. However, in the presence of isoleucyl adenylate tightly bound to the amino acid activation site of IleRS, no TRNOE for L-isoleucine or L-valine was observed. This indicates that the observed TRNOE is due to the interaction of L-isoleucine or L-valine with the amino acid activation site of IleRS. The conformations of these amino acids in the amino acid activation site of IleRS were determined by the analyses of time dependences of TRNOEs and TRNOE action spectra. The IleRS-bound L-isoleucine takes the gauche/sup +/ form about the C/sub ..cap alpha../-C/sub ..beta../ bond and the trans form about the C/sub ..beta../-C/sub ..gamma../sub 1// bond. The IleRS-bound L-valine takes the guache/sup -/ form about the C/sub ..cap alpha../-C/sub ..beta../ bond. Thus, the conformation of the IleRS-bound L-valine is the same as that of IleRS-bound L-isoleucine except for the delta-methyl group. The side chain of L-isoleucine or L-valine lies in an aliphatic hydrophobic pocket of the active site of IleRS. Such hydrophobic interaction with IleRS is more significant for L-isoleucine than for L-valine. The TRNOE analysis is useful for studying the amino acid discrimination mechanism of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases.

  10. Use of alanine-silicone pellets for electron paramagnetic resonance gamma dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, J.; Galindo, S. )

    1991-03-01

    Silicone is proposed as an alternative binding substance in the production of D-L alanine pellets used in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry of gamma rays. The dosimeters are manufactured at room temperature, making the production simple. Examination by EPR silicone-alanine pellets irradiated with 60Co gamma rays in the dose range 10 to 10(6) Gy shows that the proposed silicone binder does not affect typical alanine dose-response curves. Thermal stability of the pellets below 40 degrees C is good, but their pre-dose EPR signal amplitude is slightly higher than for nonirradiated alanine.

  11. Effect of β-alanine supplementation on high-intensity exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Harris, Roger C; Stellingwerff, Trent

    2013-01-01

    Carnosine is a dipeptide of β-alanine and L-histidine found in high concentrations in skeletal muscle. Combined with β-alanine, the pKa of the histidine imidazole ring is raised to ∼6.8, placing it within the muscle intracellular pH high-intensity exercise transit range. Combination with β-alanine renders the dipeptide inert to intracellular enzymic hydrolysis and blocks the histidinyl residue from participation in proteogenesis, thus making it an ideal, stable intracellular buffer. For vegetarians, synthesis is limited by β-alanine availability; for meat-eaters, hepatic synthesis is supplemented with β-alanine from the hydrolysis of dietary carnosine. Direct oral β-alanine supplementation will compensate for low meat and fish intake, significantly raising the muscle carnosine concentration. This is best achieved with a sustained-release formulation of β-alanine to avoid paresthesia symptoms and decreasing urinary spillover. In humans, increased levels of carnosine through β-alanine supplementation have been shown to increase exercise capacity and performance of several types, particularly where the high-intensity exercise range is 1-4 min. β-Alanine supplementation is used by athletes competing in high-intensity track and field cycling, rowing, swimming events and other competitions.

  12. Effect of β-alanine supplementation on high-intensity exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Harris, Roger C; Stellingwerff, Trent

    2013-01-01

    Carnosine is a dipeptide of β-alanine and L-histidine found in high concentrations in skeletal muscle. Combined with β-alanine, the pKa of the histidine imidazole ring is raised to ∼6.8, placing it within the muscle intracellular pH high-intensity exercise transit range. Combination with β-alanine renders the dipeptide inert to intracellular enzymic hydrolysis and blocks the histidinyl residue from participation in proteogenesis, thus making it an ideal, stable intracellular buffer. For vegetarians, synthesis is limited by β-alanine availability; for meat-eaters, hepatic synthesis is supplemented with β-alanine from the hydrolysis of dietary carnosine. Direct oral β-alanine supplementation will compensate for low meat and fish intake, significantly raising the muscle carnosine concentration. This is best achieved with a sustained-release formulation of β-alanine to avoid paresthesia symptoms and decreasing urinary spillover. In humans, increased levels of carnosine through β-alanine supplementation have been shown to increase exercise capacity and performance of several types, particularly where the high-intensity exercise range is 1-4 min. β-Alanine supplementation is used by athletes competing in high-intensity track and field cycling, rowing, swimming events and other competitions. PMID:23899755

  13. Alanine Aminotransferase-Old Biomarker and New Concept: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhengtao; Que, Shuping; Xu, Jing; Peng, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) is a common, readily available, and inexpensive laboratory assay in clinical practice. ALT activity is not only measured to detect liver disease, but also to monitor overall health. ALT activity is influenced by various factors, including viral hepatitis, alcohol consumption, and medication. Recently, the impact of metabolic abnormalities on ALT variation has raised concern due to the worldwide obesity epidemic. The normal ranges for ALT have been updated and validated considering the metabolic covariates in the various ethnic districts. The interaction between metabolic and demographic factors on ALT variation has also been discussed in previous studies. In addition, an extremely low ALT value might reflect the process of aging, and frailty in older adults has been raised as another clinically significant feature of this enzyme, to be followed with additional epidemiologic investigation. Timely updated, comprehensive, and systematic introduction of ALT activity is necessary to aid clinicians make better use of this enzyme. PMID:25013373

  14. Charge dependent photodynamic activity of alanine based zinc phthalocyanines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ao; Li, Yejing; Zhou, Lin; Yuan, Linxin; Lu, Shan; Lin, Yun; Zhou, Jiahong; Wei, Shaohua

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, to minimize the effects of different structure, three alanine-based zinc phthalocyanines (Pcs) of differing charges were engineered and synthesized with the same basic structure. On this premise, the relationship between nature of charge and photodynamic activity was studied. Besides, further verification and explanation of some inconsistent results were also carried out. The results showed that charge can influence the aggregation state, singlet oxygen generation ability and cellular uptake of Pcs, thereby affecting their photodynamic activity. In addition, the biomolecules inside cells may interact with Pcs of differing charges, which can also influence the aggregation state and singlet oxygen generation of the Pcs, and then influence the relationship between nature of charge and photodynamic activity.

  15. Radiolysis of alanine adsorbed in a clay mineral

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Ovando, Ellen Y.; Negron-Mendoza, Alicia

    2013-07-03

    Optical activity in molecules is a chemical characteristic of living beings. In this work, we examine the hypothesis of the influence of different mineral surfaces on the development of a specific chirality in organic molecules when subjected to conditions simulating the primitive Earth during the period of chemical evolution. By using X-ray diffraction techniques and HPLC/ELSD to analyze aqueous suspensions of amino acids adsorbed on minerals irradiated in different doses with a cobalt-60 gamma source, the experiments attempt to prove the hypothesis that some solid surfaces (like clays and meteorite rocks) may have a concentration capacity and protective role against external sources of ionizing radiation (specifically {gamma}-ray) for some organic compounds (like some amino acids) adsorbed on them. Preliminary results show a slight difference in the adsorption and radiolysis of the D-and L-alanine.

  16. Alanine aminotransferase variants conferring diverse NUE phenotypes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chandra H; Good, Allen G

    2015-01-01

    Alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT, E.C. 2.6.1.2), is a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent (PLP) enzyme that catalyzes the reversible transfer of an amino group from alanine to 2-oxoglutarate to produce glutamate and pyruvate, or vice versa. It has been well documented in both greenhouse and field studies that tissue-specific over-expression of AlaAT from barley (Hordeum vulgare, HvAlaAT) results in a significant increase in plant NUE in both canola and rice. While the physical phenotypes associated with over-expression of HvAlaAT have been well characterized, the role this enzyme plays in vivo to create a more N efficient plant remains unknown. Furthermore, the importance of HvAlaAT, in contrast to other AlaAT enzyme homologues in creating this phenotype has not yet been explored. To address the role of AlaAT in NUE, AlaAT variants from diverse sources and different subcellular locations, were expressed in the wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 background and alaat1;2 (alaat1-1;alaat2-1) knockout background in various N environments. The analysis and comparison of both the physical and physiological properties of AlaAT over-expressing transgenic plants demonstrated significant differences between plants expressing the different AlaAT enzymes under different external conditions. This analysis indicates that the over-expression of AlaAT variants other than HvAlaAT in crop plants could further increase the NUE phenotype(s) previously observed.

  17. Effects of beta-alanine supplementation on sprint endurance.

    PubMed

    Jagim, Andrew R; Wright, Glenn A; Brice, A Glenn; Doberstein, Scott T

    2013-02-01

    Recent research has shown that beta-alanine (BA) supplementation can increase intramuscular carnosine levels. Carnosine is an intramuscular buffer, and it has been linked to improvements in performance, specifically during bouts of high-intensity exercise that are likely limited by muscle acidosis. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the effect of BA supplementation on sprint endurance at 2 different supramaximal intensities. Twenty-one anaerobically trained (rugby players [n = 4], wrestlers [n = 11], and recreationally strength trained athletes [n = 6]) college-aged men participated in a double-blind, placebo controlled study. The subjects performed an incremental VO2max test and 2 sprint to exhaustion tests set at 115 and 140% of their VO2max on a motorized treadmill before (PRE) and after (POST) a 5-week supplementation period. During this time, the subjects ingested either a BA supplement or placebo (PLA) with meals. The subjects ingested 4 g·d(-1) of BA or PLA during the first week and 6 g·d(-1) the following 4 weeks. Capillary blood samples were taken before and after each sprint to determine blood lactate response to the sprint exercise. No significant group (BA, PLA) × intensity (115%, 140%; p = 0.60), group by time (PRE, POST; p = 0.72), or group × intensity × time (p = 0.74) interactions were observed for time to exhaustion. In addition, similar nonsignificant observations were made for lactate response to the sprints (group × intensity, p = 0.43; group × time, p = 0.33, group × intensity × time, p = 0.56). From the results of this study, it was concluded that beta-alanine supplementation did not have a significant effect on sprint endurance at supramaximal intensities.

  18. Radiation dose measurements with alanine/agarose gel and thin alanine films around a 192Ir brachytherapy source, using ESR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Olsson, S; Bergstrand, E S; Carlsson, A K; Hole, E O; Lund, E

    2002-04-21

    Alanine/agarose gel and alanine films in stacks have been used for measurements of absorbed dose around an HDR 192Ir source in a vaginal cylinder-applicator, with and without a 180 degrees tungsten shield. The gel and the films were analysed by means of ESR spectroscopy and calibrated against an ion chamber in a 4 MV photon beam to obtain absolute dose values. The gel serves as both dosimeter and phantom material, and the thin (130 microm) films are used to achieve an improved spatial resolution in the dose estimations. Experimental values were compared with Monte Carlo simulations using two different codes. Results from the measurements generally agree with the simulations to within 5%, for both the alanine/agarose gel and the alanine films.

  19. Efficient L-Alanine Production by a Thermo-Regulated Switch in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Deng, Can; Cui, Wen-Jing; Liu, Zhong-Mei; Zhou, Zhe-Min

    2016-01-01

    L-Alanine has important applications in food, pharmaceutical and veterinary and is used as a substrate for production of engineered thermoplastics. Microbial fermentation could reduce the production cost and promote the application of L-alanine. However, the presence of L-alanine significantly inhibit cell growth rate and cause a decrease in the ultimate L-alanine productivity. For efficient L-alanine production, a thermo-regulated genetic switch was designed to dynamically control the expression of L-alanine dehydrogenase (alaD) from Geobacillus stearothermophilus on the Escherichia coli B0016-060BC chromosome. The optimal cultivation conditions for the genetically switched alanine production using B0016-060BC were the following: an aerobic growth phase at 33 °C with a 1-h thermo-induction at 42 °C followed by an oxygen-limited phase at 42 °C. In a bioreactor experiment using the scaled-up conditions optimized in a shake flask, B0016-060BC accumulated 50.3 g biomass/100 g glucose during the aerobic growth phase and 96 g alanine/100 g glucose during the oxygen-limited phase, respectively. The L-alanine titer reached 120.8 g/l with higher overall and oxygen-limited volumetric productivities of 3.09 and 4.18 g/l h, respectively, using glucose as the sole carbon source. Efficient cell growth and L-alanine production were reached separately, by switching cultivation temperature. The results revealed the application of a thermo-regulated strategy for heterologous metabolic production and pointed to strategies for improving L-alanine production.

  20. Reduction in plasma leucine after sprint exercise is greater in males than in females.

    PubMed

    Esbjörnsson, M; Rooyackers, O; Norman, B; Rundqvist, H C; Nowak, J; Bülow, J; Simonsen, L; Jansson, E

    2012-06-01

    There is a pronounced gender difference in the accumulation of plasma ammonia after sprint exercise. Ammonia is a key intermediate in amino acid metabolism, which implies that gender-related differences in plasma and muscle amino acid concentrations after sprint exercise exist. To study this, three bouts of 30-s sprint exercise were performed by healthy females (n=8) and males (n=6). Blood leucine and muscle leucine were collected over the exercise period. Basal arterial plasma and skeletal muscle leucine were 40% higher in males than females (P<0.010 and P<0.020). Plasma, but not muscle, leucine decreased by sprint exercise and more so in males than females (g × t: P=0.025). Increase in ammonia was higher in males than females in both plasma and muscle (g × t: P<0.001 and P=0.003). An opposite pattern was shown for plasma glutamine, where an increase was found in females (P<0.001), but not in males. In conclusion, the lower plasma ammonia after sprint exercise in females seems to be explained by a lower accumulation of ammonia in skeletal muscle and by a buffering of ammonia in the form of glutamine in females. The greater reduction in plasma leucine in males seems to be related to their greater increase in muscle ammonia after sprint exercise. PMID:22612362

  1. Amperometric bienzyme screen-printed biosensor for the determination of leucine.

    PubMed

    Labroo, Pratima; Cui, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Leucine plays an important role in protein synthesis, brain functions, building muscle mass, and helping the body when it undergoes stress. Here, we report a new amperometric bienzyme screen-printed biosensor for the determination of leucine, by coimmobilizing p-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase (HBH) and leucine dehydrogenase (LDH) on a screen-printed electrode with NADP(+) and p-hydroxybenzoate as the cofactors. The detection principle of the sensor is that LDH catalyzes the specific dehydrogenation of leucine by using NADP(+) as a cofactor. The product, NADPH, triggers the hydroxylation of p-hydroxybenzoate by HBH in the presence of oxygen to produce 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate, which results in a change in electron concentration at the working carbon electrode, which is detected by the potentiostat. The sensor shows a linear detection range between 10 and 600 μM with a detection limit of 2 μM. The response is reproducible and has a fast measuring time of 5-10 s after the addition of a given concentration of leucine. PMID:24220759

  2. Glutamine and leucine nitrogen kinetics and their relation to urea nitrogen in newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Parimi, Prabhu S; Devapatla, Srisatish; Gruca, Lourdes; O'Brien, Alicia M; Hanson, Richard W; Kalhan, Satish C

    2002-03-01

    Glutamine kinetics and its relation to transamination of leucine and urea synthesis were quantified in 16 appropriate-for-gestational-age infants, four small-for-gestational-age infants, and seven infants of diabetic mothers. Kinetics were measured between 4 and 5 h after the last feed (fasting) and in response to formula feeding using [5-(15)N]glutamine, [1-(13)C,(15)N]leucine, [(2)H(5)]phenylalanine, and [(15)N(2)]urea tracers. Leucine nitrogen and glutamine kinetics during fasting were significantly higher than those reported in adults. De novo synthesis accounted for approximately 85% of glutamine turnover. In response to formula feeding, a significant increase (P = 0.04) in leucine nitrogen turnover was observed, whereas a significant decrease (P = 0.002) in glutamine and urea rate of appearance was seen. The rate of appearance of leucine nitrogen was positively correlated (r(2) = 0.59, P = 0.001) with glutamine turnover. Glutamine flux was negatively correlated (r(2) = 0.39, P = 0.02) with the rate of urea synthesis. These data suggest that, in the human newborn, glutamine turnover is related to a high anaplerotic flux into the tricarboxylic acid cycle as a consequence of a high rate of protein turnover. The negative relationship between glutamine turnover and the irreversible oxidation of protein (urea synthesis) suggests an important role of glutamine as a nitrogen source for other synthetic processes and accretion of body proteins.

  3. Reviewing the Effects of l-Leucine Supplementation in the Regulation of Food Intake, Energy Balance, and Glucose Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Pedroso, João A.B.; Zampieri, Thais T.; Donato, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Leucine is a well-known activator of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Because mTOR signaling regulates several aspects of metabolism, the potential of leucine as a dietary supplement for treating obesity and diabetes mellitus has been investigated. The objective of the present review was to summarize and discuss the available evidence regarding the mechanisms and the effects of leucine supplementation on the regulation of food intake, energy balance, and glucose homeostasis. Based on the available evidence, we conclude that although central leucine injection decreases food intake, this effect is not well reproduced when leucine is provided as a dietary supplement. Consequently, no robust evidence indicates that oral leucine supplementation significantly affects food intake, although several studies have shown that leucine supplementation may help to decrease body adiposity in specific conditions. However, more studies are necessary to assess the effects of leucine supplementation in already-obese subjects. Finally, although several studies have found that leucine supplementation improves glucose homeostasis, the underlying mechanisms involved in these potential beneficial effects remain unknown and may be partially dependent on weight loss. PMID:26007339

  4. Preferential utilization of exogenously supplied leucine for protein synthesis in estradiol-induced and uninduced cockerel liver explants.

    PubMed Central

    Gehrke, L; Ilan, J

    1983-01-01

    A cockerel liver explant system has been used to study protein synthesis and ribosome transit times. After a 2-hr preincubation of explant tissue in the presence of a large concentration of nonradioactive leucine, a small quantity of [3H]leucine was added and the kinetics of uptake of [3H]leucine into the intracellular acid-soluble leucine pool was compared to the incorporation of [3H]leucine into protein. Incorporation of [3H]leucine into protein reaches a linear rate almost immediately after addition of label, whereas the acid-soluble pool does not reach constant specific activity until much later. The length of time needed to reach a linear rate of incorporation of [3H]leucine into protein is approximately equal to the length of time needed to equilibrate nascent polypeptide chains with labeled precursor--that is, one average ribosome transit time. Therefore, it seems that the immediate precursor pool for protein synthesis reaches constant specific activity almost instantly after addition of [3H]leucine. The results indicate that at least part of the supply of leucine for protein synthesis is derived directly from the exogenous incubation medium and not from the intracellular acid-soluble amino acid pool. Images PMID:6574484

  5. Regulation of the ald gene encoding alanine dehydrogenase by AldR in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ji-A; Baek, Eun-Young; Kim, Si Wouk; Choi, Jong-Soon; Oh, Jeong-Il

    2013-08-01

    The regulatory gene aldR was identified 95 bp upstream of the ald gene encoding L-alanine dehydrogenase in Mycobacterium smegmatis. The AldR protein shows sequence similarity to the regulatory proteins of the Lrp/AsnC family. Using an aldR deletion mutant, we demonstrated that AldR serves as both activator and repressor for the regulation of ald gene expression, depending on the presence or absence of L-alanine. The purified AldR protein exists as a homodimer in the absence of L-alanine, while it adopts the quaternary structure of a homohexamer in the presence of L-alanine. The binding affinity of AldR for the ald control region was shown to be increased significantly by L-alanine. Two AldR binding sites (O1 and O2) with the consensus sequence GA-N₂-ATC-N₂-TC and one putative AldR binding site with the sequence GA-N₂-GTT-N₂-TC were identified upstream of the ald gene. Alanine and cysteine were demonstrated to be the effector molecules directly involved in the induction of ald expression. The cellular level of L-alanine was shown to be increased in M. smegmatis cells grown under hypoxic conditions, and the hypoxic induction of ald expression appears to be mediated by AldR, which senses the intracellular level of alanine.

  6. Polymerization of alanine in the presence of a non-swelling montmorillonite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paecht-Horowitz, M.; Lahav, N.

    1977-01-01

    Alanine, starting from alanine-adenylate, has been polymerized in the presence of non-swelling Al-montmorillonite. The yield of polymerization is much lower than that obtained in the presence of swelling Na-montmorillonite. The possibility that the changing interlayer spacing in Na-montmorillonite might be responsible for its catalytic properties, is discussed.

  7. 40 CFR 721.520 - Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...)(4), (c)(4) (where N = 100). The requirement of 40 CFR 721.91(a)(4) that the amount of the substance... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.520 Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt. (a) Chemical...

  8. 40 CFR 721.520 - Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...)(4), (c)(4) (where N = 100). The requirement of 40 CFR 721.91(a)(4) that the amount of the substance... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.520 Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt. (a) Chemical...

  9. 40 CFR 721.520 - Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...)(4), (c)(4) (where N = 100). The requirement of 40 CFR 721.91(a)(4) that the amount of the substance... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.520 Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt. (a) Chemical...

  10. 40 CFR 721.520 - Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...)(4), (c)(4) (where N = 100). The requirement of 40 CFR 721.91(a)(4) that the amount of the substance... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.520 Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt. (a) Chemical...

  11. 40 CFR 721.520 - Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...)(4), (c)(4) (where N = 100). The requirement of 40 CFR 721.91(a)(4) that the amount of the substance... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.520 Alanine, N-(2-carboxyethyl)-N-alkyl-, salt. (a) Chemical...

  12. Insulin effect on (/sup 14/C)-valine incorporation and its relation to hexokinase activity in developing brain

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, N.; Bessman, S.P.

    1988-07-15

    Using minced brain cortex from fetal and postnatal rats, we studied the incorporation of (/sup 14/C)-valine into protein in the presence of insulin. We also assayed the particle bound and soluble hexokinase in these tissues. Insulin significantly stimulated the incorporation of (/sup 14/C)-valine into brain proteins from fetal stage upto 2 days of life. After this period the insulin effect was minimal, with no effect by day 5. The particle bound (40,000g pellet) brain hexokinase, on the other hand, remained low till about 2 days of life and then increased to almost adult level by 5 days. Our results show that there is an inverse relation between this anabolic effect of insulin and the particle bound hexokinase activity in the cortex of developing rat brain.

  13. Effect of antidepressants on ATP content, 3H-valine incorporation and cell morphometry of astrocytes cultured from rat brain.

    PubMed

    Trzeciak, H I; Pudełko, A; Gabryel, B; Małecki, A; Kozłowski, A; Ciesślik, P

    1995-01-01

    ATP is a potential marker of cell vialibility and growth. The content of ATP and 3H-valine incorporation into proteins were measured and the morphometry was performed after antidepressant treatment of astrocytes cultured in vitro with or without dibutyryl 3'5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (dB-cAMP). Antidepressants were added into the culture medium (for 24 h) at a final concentration of 10(-4)M (imipramine, amitriptyline, clomipramine, doxepine, mianserin) or 10(-5)M (maprotiline). It was shown that all antidepressants except maprotiline and imipramine increased ATP level and decreased 3H-valine incorporation into astrocytes. All drugs except clomipramine and maprotiline, diminished cell area and perimeter of astrocytes. The addition of dB-cAMP to cultures caused an increase of astrocyte form factor. It can be concluded that antidepressants have a significant effect on energy metabolism and differentiation of astrocytes cultured in vitro. PMID:8829918

  14. How similar is the electronic structures of β-lactam and alanine?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Subhojyoti; Ahmed, Marawan; Wang, Feng

    2016-02-01

    The C1s spectra of β-lactam i.e. 2-azetidinone (C3H5NO), a drug and L-alanine (C3H7NO2), an amino acid, exhibit striking similarities, which may be responsible for the competition between 2-azetidinone and the alanyl-alanine moiety in biochemistry. The present study is to reveal the degree of similarities and differences between their electronic structures of the two model molecular pairs. It is found that the similarities in C1s and inner valence binding energy spectra are due to their bonding connections but other properties such as ring structure (in 2-azetidinone) and chiral carbon (alanine) can be very different. Further, the inner valence region of ionization potential greater than 18 eV for 2-azetidinone and alanine is also significantly similar. Finally the strained lactam ring exhibits more chemical reactivity measured at all non-hydrogen atoms by Fukui functions with respect to alanine.

  15. Thermal decomposition behavior of potassium and sodium jarosite synthesized in the presence of methylamine and alanine

    SciTech Connect

    J. Michelle Kotler; Nancy W. Hinman; C. Doc Richardson; Jill R. Scott

    2010-10-01

    Biomolecules, methylamine and alanine, found associated with natural jarosite samples peaked the interest of astrobiologists and planetary geologists. How the biomolecules are associated with jarosite remains unclear although the mechanism could be important for detecting biosignatures in the rock record on Earth and other planets. A series of thermal gravimetric experiments using synthetic K-jarosite and Na-jarosite were conducted to determine if thermal analysis could differentiate physical mixtures of alanine and methylamine with jarosite from samples where the methylamine or alanine was incorporated into the synthesis procedure. Physical mixtures and synthetic experiments with methylamine and alanine could be differentiated from one another and from the standards by thermal analysis for both the K-jarosite and Na-jarosite end-member suites. Changes included shifts in on-set temperatures, total temperature changes from on-set to final, and the presence of indicator peaks for methylamine and alanine in the physical mixture experiments.

  16. X-ray scattering indicates that the leucine zipper is a coiled coil.

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, R; Benvegnu, D; O'Shea, E K; Kim, P S; Alber, T

    1991-01-01

    Dimerization of the bZIP class of eukaryotic transcriptional control proteins requires a sequence motif called the leucine zipper. We have grown two distinct crystal forms of a 33-amino acid peptide corresponding to the leucine zipper of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4. This peptide is known to form a dimer of parallel helices in solution. X-ray scattering from both crystal forms shows reflections that are diagnostic of coiled coils. The most notable reflections occur at approximately 5.2 A resolution and correspond to the pitch of helices in coiled coils. There is no diffraction maximum near 5.4 A, the characteristic pitch of straight helices. Our results provide direct evidence that the leucine zipper of GCN4 is a coiled coil. Images PMID:1988953

  17. Incorporation of fucose and leucine into PNS myelin proteins in nerves undergoing early Wallerian degeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, R.G.; Baughman, S.; Scheidler, D.M.

    1981-02-01

    The simultaneous incorporation of (/sup 3/H)fucose and (1-/sup 14/C)leucine into normal rat sciatic nerve was examined using an in vitro incubation model. A linear rate of protein precursor uptake was found in purified myelin protein over 1/2-6 hr of incubation utilizing a supplemented medium containing amino acids. This model was then used to examine myelin protein synthesis in nerves undergoing degeneration at 1-4 days following a crush injury. Data showed a statistically significant decrease in the ratio of fucose to leucine at 2, 3, and 4 days of degeneration, which was the consequence of a significant increase in leucine uptake. These results, plus substantial protein recovery in axotomized nerves, are indicative of active synthesis of proteins that purify with myelin during early Wallerian degeneration.

  18. Asymmetric photolysis of /RS/-leucine with circularly polarized ultraviolet light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, J. J.; Bonner, W. A.; Massey, G. A.

    1977-01-01

    (RS)-leucine in 0.1 M HCl solution has been subjected to photolysis with 212.8-nm right (R-) and left circularly polarized light (LCPL) obtained from a laser source. RCPL preferentially photolyzed the (R)-leucine component and LCPL the (S)-leucine component of the RS substrate. The enantiomeric excess produced were 1.98% for the 59% conversion with RCPL and 2.50% for the 75% conversion with LCPL. These 'equal and opposite' effects represent the second highest enantiomeric enrichments yet reported for an asymmetric photolysis and the first ever reported for a prebiotically important substrate - an amino acid. Implications regarding the origin of optical activity are briefly discussed.

  19. Role of uptake of (14C)valine into protein in the development of tolerance to diisopropylphosphorofluoridate (DFP) toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.C.; Dettbarn, W.D.

    1986-07-01

    In a subchronic toxicity study male Sprague-Dawley rats were daily treated with diisopropylphosphorofluoridate (DFP) (0.5 mg/kg, sc) for 14 days. Maximum signs of anticholinesterase toxicity were observed during Days 4 and 5 comparable to those seen 10-15 min following a single sublethal dosage (1.5 mg DFP/kg, sc). Signs disappeared after Days 6-7 of exposure and rats became apparently normal during the remainder of the treatment period. Significant hypothermia was seen following the second to fifth doses with maximum effect after the fifth injection. Subsequent injections of DFP did not cause any reduction in temperature. Incorporation of (/sup 14/C)valine was measured 24 hr after the 5th and 14th injections of DFP, at a time when body temperature had recovered to control values. The rate of in vivo incorporation of (/sup 14/C)valine was measured 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 hr after a subcutaneous injection of L-(1-/sup 14/C)valine at a dose of 5 microCi/mmol/100 g body wt. After five injections the rate of L-(1-/sup 14/C)valine uptake into the free amino acid pool and the incorporation into the protein bound pool was significantly (p less than 0.01) reduced in discrete brain regions, liver, kidney, and skeletal muscles. At the end of the 14-day treatment, protein synthesis in all the skeletal muscles tested had recovered completely (p greater than 0.01) to the values of nontreated control animals. In brain, liver, and kidney, however, no recovery was seen during this period. The recovery of protein synthesis in skeletal muscle may be one of the mechanisms that lead to tolerance development during prolonged administration of subacute concentrations of DFP.

  20. Plasma arginine and leucine kinetics and urea production rates in burn patients.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y M; Young, V R; Castillo, L; Chapman, T E; Tompkins, R G; Ryan, C M; Burke, J F

    1995-05-01

    We measured plasma arginine and leucine kinetics and rates of urea production (appearance) in 12 severely burned patients (mean body surface burn area, 48%) during a basal state (low-dose intravenous glucose) and while receiving routine, total parenteral nutrition ([TPN] fed state) including an L-amino acid mixture, supplying a generous level of nitrogen (mean, 0.36 g N.kg-1.d-1). The two nutritional states were studied in random order using a primed 4-hour constant intravenous tracer infusion protocol. Stable-nuclide-labeled tracers were L-[guanidino-13C]arginine, L-[1-13C]leucine, [18O]urea, and NaH13CO3 (prime only), with blood and expired air samples drawn at intervals to determine isotopic abundance of arginine, citrulline, ornithine, alpha-ketoisocaproate ([KIC] for leucine), and urea in plasma and 13CO2 in breath. Results are compared with data obtained in these laboratories in healthy adults. Leucine kinetics (flux and disappearance into protein synthesis) indicated the expected higher turnover in burn patients than in healthy controls. Mean leucine oxidation rates are also higher and compared well with values predicted from urea production rates, provided that urea nitrogen recycling via intestinal hydrolysis is taken into account. The plasma urea flux was also higher than for normal subjects. Arginine fluxes as measured in the systemic whole body, via the plasma pool, were correspondingly higher in burned patients than in healthy controls and were in good agreement with values predicted from leucine-KIC kinetics. However, systemic whole-body arginine flux measured via the plasma pool was only 20% of the arginine flux estimated from the urea flux plus the rate of protein synthesis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7752916

  1. Post-meal responses of elongation factor 2 (eEF2) and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) to leucine and carbohydrate supplements for regulating protein synthesis duration and energy homeostasis in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Gabriel J; Moulton, Christopher J; Garlick, Peter J; Anthony, Tracy G; Layman, Donald K

    2012-11-13

    Previous research demonstrates that the anabolic response of muscle protein synthesis (MPS) to a meal is regulated at the level of translation initiation with signals derived from leucine (Leu) and insulin to activate mTORC1 signaling. Recent evidence suggests that the duration of the meal response is limited by energy status of the cell and inhibition of translation elongation factor 2 (eEF2). This study evaluates the potential to extend the anabolic meal response with post-meal supplements of Leu or carbohydrates. Adult (~256 g) male Sprague-Dawley rats were food deprived for 12 h, then either euthanized before a standard meal (time 0) or at 90 or 180 min post-meal. At 135 min post-meal, rats received one of five oral supplements: 270 mg leucine (Leu270), 80:40:40 mg leucine, isoleucine, and valine (Leu80), 2.63 g carbohydrates (CHO2.6), 1 g carbohydrates (CHO1.0), or water (Sham control). Following the standard meal, MPS increased at 90 min then declined to pre-meal baseline at 180 min. Rats administered Leu270, Leu80, CHO2.6, or CHO1.0 maintained elevated rates of MPS at 180 min, while Sham controls declined from peak values. Leu80 and CHO1.0 treatments maintained MPS, but with values intermediate between Sham controls and Leu270 and CHO2.6 supplements. Consistent with MPS findings, the supplements maintained elongation activity and cellular energy status by preventing increases in AMP/ATP and phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), acetyl-CoA carboxylase ACC and eEF2. The impact of the supplements on MPS and cellular energy status was in proportion to the energy content within the individual treatments (i.e., Leu270 > Leu80; CHO2.6 > CHO1.0), but the Leu supplements produced a disproportionate anabolic stimulation of MPS, eEF2 and energy status with significantly lower energy content. In summary, the incongruity between MPS and translation initiation at 180 min reflects a block in translation elongation due to reduced

  2. Valine, a branched-chain amino Acid, reduced HCV viral load and led to eradication of HCV by interferon therapy in a decompensated cirrhotic patient.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Takumi; Torimura, Takuji; Takata, Akio; Satomi, Susumu; Sata, Michio

    2012-09-01

    A decreased serum level of branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) is a distinctive metabolic disorder in patients with liver cirrhosis. Recently, BCAA has been reported to exert various pharmacological activities, and valine, which is a BCAA, has been shown to affect lipid metabolism and the immune system in in vivo experiments. However, the clinical impact of valine supplementation on viral hepatitis C virus (HCV) load has never been reported. Here, we first describe a case of HCV-related advanced liver cirrhosis that was treated by an oral valine agent. The administration of valine resulted in an improvement of fatigue and a reduction in hepatic fibrosis indexes as well as serum α-fetoprotein level. Furthermore, a marked reduction in HCV RNA levels was seen after valine treatment. The patient was then treated by interferon β, resulting in the successful eradication of chronic HCV infection. Thus, valine may be involved in the reduction of HCV viral load and could support a sustained virologic response to interferon therapy. PMID:23185147

  3. Metabolic responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to valine and ammonium pulses during four-stage continuous wine fermentations.

    PubMed

    Clement, T; Perez, M; Mouret, J R; Sanchez, I; Sablayrolles, J M; Camarasa, C

    2013-04-01

    Nitrogen supplementation, which is widely used in winemaking to improve fermentation kinetics, also affects the products of fermentation, including volatile compounds. However, the mechanisms underlying the metabolic response of yeast to nitrogen additions remain unclear. We studied the consequences for Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism of valine and ammonium pulses during the stationary phase of four-stage continuous fermentation (FSCF). This culture technique provides cells at steady state similar to that of the stationary phase of batch wine fermentation. Thus, the FSCF device is an appropriate and reliable tool for individual analysis of the metabolic rerouting associated with nutrient additions, in isolation from the continuous evolution of the environment in batch processes. Nitrogen additions, irrespective of the nitrogen-containing compound added, substantially modified the formation of fermentation metabolites, including glycerol, succinate, isoamyl alcohol, propanol, and ethyl esters. This flux redistribution, fulfilling the requirements for precursors of amino acids, was consistent with increased protein synthesis resulting from increased nitrogen availability. Valine pulses, less efficient than ammonium addition in increasing the fermentation rate, were followed by a massive conversion of this amino acid in isobutanol and isobutyl acetate through the Ehrlich pathway. However, additional routes were involved in valine assimilation when added in stationary phase. Overall, we found that particular metabolic changes may be triggered according to the nature of the amino acid supplied, in addition to the common response. Both these shared and specific modifications should be considered when designing strategies to modulate the production of volatile compounds, a current challenge for winemakers.

  4. Metabolic Responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Valine and Ammonium Pulses during Four-Stage Continuous Wine Fermentations

    PubMed Central

    Clement, T.; Perez, M.; Mouret, J. R.; Sanchez, I.; Sablayrolles, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen supplementation, which is widely used in winemaking to improve fermentation kinetics, also affects the products of fermentation, including volatile compounds. However, the mechanisms underlying the metabolic response of yeast to nitrogen additions remain unclear. We studied the consequences for Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism of valine and ammonium pulses during the stationary phase of four-stage continuous fermentation (FSCF). This culture technique provides cells at steady state similar to that of the stationary phase of batch wine fermentation. Thus, the FSCF device is an appropriate and reliable tool for individual analysis of the metabolic rerouting associated with nutrient additions, in isolation from the continuous evolution of the environment in batch processes. Nitrogen additions, irrespective of the nitrogen-containing compound added, substantially modified the formation of fermentation metabolites, including glycerol, succinate, isoamyl alcohol, propanol, and ethyl esters. This flux redistribution, fulfilling the requirements for precursors of amino acids, was consistent with increased protein synthesis resulting from increased nitrogen availability. Valine pulses, less efficient than ammonium addition in increasing the fermentation rate, were followed by a massive conversion of this amino acid in isobutanol and isobutyl acetate through the Ehrlich pathway. However, additional routes were involved in valine assimilation when added in stationary phase. Overall, we found that particular metabolic changes may be triggered according to the nature of the amino acid supplied, in addition to the common response. Both these shared and specific modifications should be considered when designing strategies to modulate the production of volatile compounds, a current challenge for winemakers. PMID:23417007

  5. Metabolic responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to valine and ammonium pulses during four-stage continuous wine fermentations.

    PubMed

    Clement, T; Perez, M; Mouret, J R; Sanchez, I; Sablayrolles, J M; Camarasa, C

    2013-04-01

    Nitrogen supplementation, which is widely used in winemaking to improve fermentation kinetics, also affects the products of fermentation, including volatile compounds. However, the mechanisms underlying the metabolic response of yeast to nitrogen additions remain unclear. We studied the consequences for Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism of valine and ammonium pulses during the stationary phase of four-stage continuous fermentation (FSCF). This culture technique provides cells at steady state similar to that of the stationary phase of batch wine fermentation. Thus, the FSCF device is an appropriate and reliable tool for individual analysis of the metabolic rerouting associated with nutrient additions, in isolation from the continuous evolution of the environment in batch processes. Nitrogen additions, irrespective of the nitrogen-containing compound added, substantially modified the formation of fermentation metabolites, including glycerol, succinate, isoamyl alcohol, propanol, and ethyl esters. This flux redistribution, fulfilling the requirements for precursors of amino acids, was consistent with increased protein synthesis resulting from increased nitrogen availability. Valine pulses, less efficient than ammonium addition in increasing the fermentation rate, were followed by a massive conversion of this amino acid in isobutanol and isobutyl acetate through the Ehrlich pathway. However, additional routes were involved in valine assimilation when added in stationary phase. Overall, we found that particular metabolic changes may be triggered according to the nature of the amino acid supplied, in addition to the common response. Both these shared and specific modifications should be considered when designing strategies to modulate the production of volatile compounds, a current challenge for winemakers. PMID:23417007

  6. Facile fabrication of superhydrophobic flower-like polyaniline architectures by using valine as a dopant in polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jun; Bi, Hong

    2012-03-01

    A facile method was developed to fabricate superhydrophobic, flower-like polyanline (PANI) architectures with hierarchical nanostructures by adding valine in polymerization as a dopant. The water contact angle of the prepared PANI film was measured to be 155.3°, and the hydrophobic surface of the PANI architectures can be tuned easily by varying the polymerization time as well as valine doping quantity. It is believed that valine plays an important role in not only growth of the hierarchical PANI structures but also formation of the superhydrophobic surface, for it provides functional groups such as sbnd COOH, sbnd NH2 and a hydrophobic terminal group which may further increase intra-/inter-molecular interactions including hydrogen bonding, π-π stacking and hydrophobic properties. Similar flower-like PANI architectures have been prepared successfully by employing other amino acids such as threonine, proline and arginine. This method makes it possible for widespread applications of superhydrophobic PANI film due to its simplicity and practicability.

  7. Calibration of helical tomotherapy machine using EPR/alanine dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Perichon, Nicolas; Garcia, Tristan; Francois, Pascal; Lourenco, Valerie; Lesven, Caroline; Bordy, Jean-Marc

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: Current codes of practice for clinical reference dosimetry of high-energy photon beams in conventional radiotherapy recommend using a 10x10 cm{sup 2} square field, with the detector at a reference depth of 10 cm in water and 100 cm source to surface distance (SSD) (AAPM TG-51) or 100 cm source-to-axis distance (SAD) (IAEA TRS-398). However, the maximum field size of a helical tomotherapy (HT) machine is 40x5 cm{sup 2} defined at 85 cm SAD. These nonstandard conditions prevent a direct implementation of these protocols. The purpose of this study is twofold: To check the absorbed dose in water and dose rate calibration of a tomotherapy unit as well as the accuracy of the tomotherapy treatment planning system (TPS) calculations for a specific test case. Method: Both topics are based on the use of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) using alanine as transfer dosimeter between the Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNHB) {sup 60}Co-{gamma}-ray reference beam and the Institut Curie's HT beam. Irradiations performed in the LNHB reference {sup 60}Co-{gamma}-ray beam allowed setting up the calibration method, which was then implemented and tested at the LNHB 6 MV linac x-ray beam, resulting in a deviation of 1.6% (at a 1% standard uncertainty) relative to the reference value determined with the standard IAEA TRS-398 protocol. Results: HT beam dose rate estimation shows a difference of 2% with the value stated by the manufacturer at a 2% standard uncertainty. A 4% deviation between measured dose and the calculation from the tomotherapy TPS was found. The latter was originated by an inadequate representation of the phantom CT-scan values and, consequently, mass densities within the phantom. This difference has been explained by the mass density values given by the CT-scan and used by the TPS which were not the true ones. Once corrected using Monte Carlo N-Particle simulations to validate the accuracy of this process, the difference between corrected TPS

  8. Increased synthesis of eicosanoids by human monocytes following leucine and methionine enkephalin administration

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederhold, M.D.; Ou, D.W.

    1986-03-05

    Regulation of eicosanoid biosynthesis by neuropeptides was investigated in human peripheral blood monocytes from normal donors. Metabolites of /sup 3/H-arachidonic acid (/sup 3/H-AA) were analyzed by thin layer and high pressure liquid chromatography following exposure to 0.2 ..mu..gm/ml and 2.0 ..mu..gm/ml of leucine (L-ENK) and methionine (M-ENK) enkephalin. Supernatants of cultured cells were analyzed. The data indicate that both leucine and methionine enkephalin can stimulate eicosanoid biosynthesis in human monocytes, and may indicate a possible regulatory mechanism between the central nervous system and the reticuloendothelial system.

  9. Alanine racemase mutants of Mycobacterium tuberculosis require D-alanine for growth and are defective for survival in macrophages and mice.

    PubMed

    Awasthy, Disha; Bharath, Sowmya; Subbulakshmi, Venkita; Sharma, Umender

    2012-02-01

    Alanine racemase (Alr) is an essential enzyme in most bacteria; however, some species (e.g. Listeria monocytogenes) can utilize d-amino acid transaminase (Dat) to generate d-alanine, which renders Alr non-essential. In addition to the conflicting reports on gene knockout of alr in Mycobacterium smegmatis, a recent study concluded that depletion of Alr does not affect the growth of M. smegmatis. In order to get an unambiguous answer on the essentiality of Alr in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and validate it as a drug target in vitro and in vivo, we have inactivated the alr gene of M. tuberculosis and found that it was not possible to generate an alr knockout in the absence of a complementing gene copy or d-alanine in the growth medium. The growth kinetics of the alr mutant revealed that M. tuberculosis requires very low amounts of d-alanine (5-10 µg ml(-1)) for optimum growth. Survival kinetics of the mutant in the absence of d-alanine indicated that depletion of this amino acid results in rapid loss of viability. The alr mutant was found to be defective for growth in macrophages. Analysis of phenotype in mice suggested that non-availability of d-alanine in mice leads to clearance of bacteria followed by stabilization of bacterial number in lungs and spleen. Additionally, reversal of d-cycloserine inhibition in the presence of d-alanine in M. tuberculosis suggested that Alr is the primary target of d-cycloserine. Thus, Alr of M. tuberculosis is a valid drug target and inhibition of Alr alone should result in loss of viability in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Mycobacterium smegmatis L-alanine dehydrogenase (Ald) is required for proficient utilization of alanine as a sole nitrogen source and sustained anaerobic growth.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhengyu; Cáceres, Nancy E; Sarath, Gautam; Barletta, Raúl G

    2002-09-01

    NAD(H)-dependent L-alanine dehydrogenase (EC 1.4.1.1) (Ald) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of L-alanine and the reductive amination of pyruvate. To assess the physiological role of Ald in Mycobacterium smegmatis, we cloned the ald gene, identified its promoter, determined the protein expression levels, and analyzed the combined effects of nutrient supplementation, oxygen availability, and growth stage on enzyme activity. High Ald activities were observed in cells grown in the presence of L- or D-alanine regardless of the oxygen availability and growth stage. In exponentially growing cells under aerobic conditions, supplementation with alanine resulted in a 25- to 50-fold increase in the enzyme activity. In the absence of alanine supplementation, 23-fold-higher Ald activities were observed in cells grown exponentially under anaerobic conditions. Furthermore, M. smegmatis ald null mutants were constructed by targeted disruption and were shown to lack any detectable Ald activity. In contrast, the glycine dehydrogenase (EC 1.4.1.10) (Gdh) activity in mutant cells remained at wild-type levels, indicating that another enzyme protein is responsible for the physiologically relevant reductive amination of glyoxylate. The ald mutants grew poorly in minimal medium with L-alanine as the sole nitrogen source, reaching a saturation density 100-fold less than that of the wild-type strain. Likewise, mutants grew to a saturation density 10-fold less than that of the wild-type strain under anaerobic conditions. In summary, the phenotypes displayed by the M. smegmatis ald mutants suggest that Ald plays an important role in both alanine utilization and anaerobic growth.

  11. Isobutanol production in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae by overexpression of 2-ketoisovalerate decarboxylase and valine biosynthetic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Heong; Seo, Seung-Oh; Bae, Yi-Hyun; Nan, Hong; Jin, Yong-Su; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2012-11-01

    Engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce advanced biofuels such as isobutanol has received much attention because this yeast has a natural capacity to produce higher alcohols. In this study, construction of isobutanol production systems was attempted by overexpression of effective 2-keto acid decarboxylase (KDC) and combinatorial overexpression of valine biosynthetic enzymes in S. cerevisiae D452-2. Among the six putative KDC enzymes from various microorganisms, 2-ketoisovalerate decarboxylase (Kivd) from L. lactis subsp. lactis KACC 13877 was identified as the most suitable KDC for isobutanol production in the yeast. Isobutanol production by the engineered S. cerevisiae was assessed in micro-aerobic batch fermentations using glucose as a sole carbon source. 93 mg/L isobutanol was produced in the Kivd overexpressing strain, which corresponds to a fourfold improvement as compared with the control strain. Isobutanol production was further enhanced to 151 mg/L by additional overexpression of acetolactate synthase (Ilv2p), acetohydroxyacid reductoisomerase (Ilv5p), and dihydroxyacid dehydratase (Ilv3p) in the cytosol.

  12. Enhanced Cellular Uptake and Pharmacokinetic Characteristics of Doxorubicin-Valine Amide Prodrug.

    PubMed

    Park, Yohan; Park, Ju-Hwan; Park, Suryeon; Lee, Song Yi; Cho, Kwan Hyung; Kim, Dae-Duk; Shim, Won-Sik; Yoon, In-Soo; Cho, Hyun-Jong; Maeng, Han-Joo

    2016-09-22

    In this study, we synthesized the valine (Val)-conjugated amide prodrug of doxorubicin (DOX) by the formation of amide bonds between DOX and Val. The synthesis of the DOX-Val prodrug was identified by a proton nuclear magnetic resonance (¹H-NMR) assay. In the MCF-7 cells (human breast adenocarcinoma cell; amino acid transporter-positive cell), the cellular accumulation efficiency of DOX-Val was higher than that of DOX according to the flow cytometry analysis data. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) imaging, it was confirmed that DOX-Val as well as DOX was mainly distributed in the nucleus of cancer cells. DOX-Val was intravenously administered to rats at a dose of 4 mg/kg, and the plasma concentrations of DOX-Val (prodrug) and DOX (formed metabolite) were quantitatively determined. Based on the systemic exposure (represented as area under the curve (AUC) values) of DOX-Val (prodrug) and DOX (formed metabolite), approximately half of DOX-Val seemed to be metabolized into DOX. However, it is expected that the remaining DOX-Val may exert improved cellular uptake efficiency in cancer cells after its delivery to the cancer region.

  13. Differentiation of Norvaline and Valine in Peptides by Hot Electron Capture Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiang; Zhong, Wendy

    2016-06-01

    During the production of recombinant proteins, misincorporation of Nva (norvaline) is common and causes heterogeneity or even toxicity. To characterize Nva and differentiate it from Val (Valine), a systematic study was conducted using hot electron capture dissociation (HECD) and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry. The thorough investigation of the fragmentation behaviors of a set of model peptides led us to reveal the characteristic/diagnostic fragment ions, w ions, which can be used to differentiate Val and Nva. However, when both Nva and Val were present in one peptide, the observation of interfering ions may mislead the interpretation. Interestingly, HECD also produced v ions, which have the same nominal mass as the M+1 isotope of the w ion and can only be determined by MS with ultrahigh mass resolution and high mass accuracy. The energy-dependent study of the v ion provided an unambiguous identification of Nva and Val since the v ion was generated only when Val was present, not Nva within the electron energy range we studied. In addition, an electron energy-dependent curve provided an overall picture on how w ions and v ions, as well as interfering ions, behaved as the electron energy increased from 1.5 to 14 eV. The results suggest that careful selection of electron energy during a HECD experiment is crucial for the unambiguous differentiation of Val and Nva.

  14. Etching, micro hardness and laser damage threshold studies of a nonlinear optical material L-valine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbuchezhiyan, M.; Ponnusamy, S.; Muthamizhchelvan, C.; Kanakam, C. C.; Singh, S. P.; Pal, P. K.; Datta, P. K.

    2012-04-01

    A nonlinear optical crystal of L-valine was grown from an aqueous solution containing a small amount of phosphoric acid by the slow evaporation method. The grown crystal was characterized by a single crystal X-ray diffraction to determine the unit cell parameters. The powder X-ray diffraction analysis also confirmed the lattice parameters to be a = 9.6687(7) Å, b = 5.2709(4) Å, c = 12.0371(10) Å and β = 90.805(4)°. The results of the Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICPOES) indicate the presence of a small amount of phosphorus in the grown crystal. The Vickers micro hardness test was performed to study the mechanical strength of the crystals. Chemical etching studies were carried out to analyze the dislocation structure. The laser damaged threshold of the grown crystal was measured to be 11.11 GW/cm2 for 10 ns pulse at 1064 nm, which is higher than that of the standard nonlinear optical crystals like KDP. Second harmonic generation of the grown crystals was also 1.44 times that of KDP.

  15. Study on optical properties of L-valine doped ADP crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, R. N.; Anis, Mohd.; Shirsat, M. D.; Hussaini, S. S.

    2015-02-01

    Single crystal of L-valine doped ammonium dihydrogen phosphate has been grown by slow evaporation method at room temperature. The crystalline nature of the grown crystal was confirmed using powder X-ray diffraction technique. The different functional groups of the grown crystal were identified using Fourier transform infrared analysis. The UV-visible studies were employed to examine the high optical transparency and influential optical constants for tailoring materials suitability for optoelectronics applications. The cutoff wavelength of the title crystal was found to be 280 nm with wide optical band gap of 4.7 eV. The dielectric measurements were carried to determine the dielectric constant and dielectric loss at room temperature. The grown crystal has been characterized by thermogravimetric analysis. The second harmonic generation efficiency of the grown crystal was determined by the classical Kurtz powder technique and it is found to be 1.92 times that of potassium dihydrogen phosphate. The grown crystal was identified as third order nonlinear optical material employing Z-scan technique using He-Ne laser operating at 632.8 nm.

  16. Enhanced Cellular Uptake and Pharmacokinetic Characteristics of Doxorubicin-Valine Amide Prodrug.

    PubMed

    Park, Yohan; Park, Ju-Hwan; Park, Suryeon; Lee, Song Yi; Cho, Kwan Hyung; Kim, Dae-Duk; Shim, Won-Sik; Yoon, In-Soo; Cho, Hyun-Jong; Maeng, Han-Joo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we synthesized the valine (Val)-conjugated amide prodrug of doxorubicin (DOX) by the formation of amide bonds between DOX and Val. The synthesis of the DOX-Val prodrug was identified by a proton nuclear magnetic resonance (¹H-NMR) assay. In the MCF-7 cells (human breast adenocarcinoma cell; amino acid transporter-positive cell), the cellular accumulation efficiency of DOX-Val was higher than that of DOX according to the flow cytometry analysis data. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) imaging, it was confirmed that DOX-Val as well as DOX was mainly distributed in the nucleus of cancer cells. DOX-Val was intravenously administered to rats at a dose of 4 mg/kg, and the plasma concentrations of DOX-Val (prodrug) and DOX (formed metabolite) were quantitatively determined. Based on the systemic exposure (represented as area under the curve (AUC) values) of DOX-Val (prodrug) and DOX (formed metabolite), approximately half of DOX-Val seemed to be metabolized into DOX. However, it is expected that the remaining DOX-Val may exert improved cellular uptake efficiency in cancer cells after its delivery to the cancer region. PMID:27669201

  17. Nonlinear effects in desorption of valine with fast incident molecular ions

    SciTech Connect

    Salehpour, M.; Fishel, D.L.; Hunt, J.E.

    1988-12-15

    Fast molecular ions as primary particles have been used to study secondary-ion desorption from organic layers. The secondary molecular-ion yield of the amino acid valine (molecular weight, 117) has been measured as a function of the velocity of primary atomic and molecular incident ions. The primary ions used were C/sup +/, O/sup +/, Ar/sup +/, C/sub 2//sup +/, O/sub 2//sup +/ , CO/sup +/, CO/sub 2//sup +/, CH/sup +/, CH/sub 3//sup +/, CF/sup +/, CF/sub 3//sup +/, C/sub 3/F/sub 5//sup +/, and C/sub 4/F/sub 7//sup +/ in the energy range 600 keV--3.7 MeV. The secondary molecular-ion yields, when compared to yields for atomic constituents, unambiguously show that collective effects exist in desorption with incident molecular ions. Results are discussed in the framework of enhancement in the electronic stopping power per atom for molecular ions due to the vicinage of the fast-moving charges in the material. The resulting high-yield enhancements, especially with the use of large incident ions such as C/sub 3/F/sub 5//sup +/ and C/sub 4/F/sub 7//sup +/, are very encouraging for the future of mass spectrometry of large organic molecules.

  18. Tb(3+)-triggered luminescence in a supramolecular gel and its use as a fluorescent chemoprobe for proteins containing alanine.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sung Ho; Kim, Ka Young; Woo, Dong Kyun; Lee, Shim Sung; Jung, Jong Hwa

    2014-11-01

    A tetracarboxylic acid-appended thiacalix[4]arene-based ligand with Tb(3+) formed a supramolecular gel which showed novel fluorogenic sensor capability for probing alanine and proteins containing alanine.

  19. Providing a diet deficient in valine but with excess leucine results in a rapid decrease in feed intake and modifies the postprandial plasma amino acid and α-keto acid concentrations in pigs.

    PubMed

    Gloaguen, M; Le Floc'h, N; Corrent, E; Primot, Y; van Milgen, J

    2012-09-01

    Indispensable AA are involved in the control of feed intake. When a diet deficient in Val is offered to pigs, feed intake is typically reduced. This effect is aggravated when dietary Leu is supplied in excess of the requirement. If an unbalanced supply of branched-chain AA (BCAA) is harmful, an anorectic response may serve as a mechanism to prevent this situation. We verified this hypothesis by measuring the voluntary feed intake of a balanced diet offered during the 30-min period 1 h after ingestion of a test meal deficient or not in Val (Val- and Val+) with an excess of Leu. Twelve and four 6-wk-old crossbred female pigs were used in Exp. 1 and 2, respectively. Prior ingestion of the Val- test meal resulted in a 14% reduction in feed intake compared with that observed after ingestion of the Val+ test meal (P = 0.06) in Exp. 1, indicating that the signal to reduce feed intake occurred within 1 h. It is possible that the plasma concentration of the limiting AA serves as a signal for the dietary AA deficiency. We therefore determined the postprandial plasma concentrations of BCAA and their α-keto acids after ingestion of Val- and Val+ in 4 pigs in Exp. 2. After ingestion of the Val- diet, plasma concentrations of Val and its keto acid were reduced compared with values observed after ingestion of the Val+ diet. The peak concentration occurred earlier after ingestion of the Val- diet compared with that of the Val+ diet. Although the plasma concentration increased after the meal, it declined rapidly in pigs offered Val-, and the Val concentration 4 h after ingestion of the meal was even less than that observed in the fasted state. In conclusion, it appears that the pig is able to detect a deficient supply of Val within 1 h after ingestion. The plasma concentration of Val or its concentration relative to the other BCAA during the postprandial period may act as a signal indicating the AA deficiency.

  20. Energy landscapes and global thermodynamics for alanine peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somani, Sandeep; Wales, David J.

    2013-09-01

    We compare different approaches for computing the thermodynamics of biomolecular systems. Techniques based on parallel replicas evolving via molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo simulations produce overlapping histograms for the densities of states. In contrast, energy landscape methods employ a superposition partition function constructed from local minima of the potential energy surface. The latter approach is particularly powerful for systems exhibiting broken ergodicity, and it is usually implemented using a harmonic normal mode approximation, which has not been extensively tested for biomolecules. The present contribution compares these alternative approaches for small alanine peptides modelled using the CHARMM and AMBER force fields. Densities of states produced from canonical sampling using multiple temperature replicas provide accurate reference data to evaluate the effect of the harmonic normal mode approximation in the superposition calculations. This benchmarking lays foundations for the application of energy landscape methods to larger biomolecules. It will also provide well characterised model systems for developing enhanced sampling methods, and for the treatment of anharmonicity corresponding to individual local minima.

  1. Alanine synthesis from glyceraldehyde and ammonium ion in aqueous solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    The formation of alanine (ala) form C(14)-glyceraldehyde and ammonium phosphate in the presence or absence of a thiol is reported. At ambient temperature, ala synthesis was six times more rapid in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid than in its absence (0.6 and 0.1 percent, respectively, after 60 days). Similarly, the presence of another thiol, N-acetylcysteinate, increased the production of ala, as well as of lactate. The reaction pathway of thiol-catalyzed synthesis of ala, with the lactic acid formed in a bypath, is suggested. In this, dehydration of glyceraldehyde is followed by the formation of hemithioacetal. In the presence of ammonia, an imine is formed, which eventually yields ala. This pathway is consistent with the observation that the rate ratio of ala/lactate remains constant throughout the process. The fact that the reaction takes place under anaerobic conditions in the presence of H2O and with the low concentrations of simple substrates and catalysts makes it an attractive model prebiotic reaction in the process of molecular evolution.

  2. Folding simulations of alanine-based peptides with lysine residues.

    PubMed Central

    Sung, S S

    1995-01-01

    The folding of short alanine-based peptides with different numbers of lysine residues is simulated at constant temperature (274 K) using the rigid-element Monte Carlo method. The solvent-referenced potential has prevented the multiple-minima problem in helix folding. From various initial structures, the peptides with three lysine residues fold into helix-dominated conformations with the calculated average helicity in the range of 60-80%. The peptide with six lysine residues shows only 8-14% helicity. These results agree well with experimental observations. The intramolecular electrostatic interaction of the charged lysine side chains and their electrostatic hydration destabilize the helical conformations of the peptide with six lysine residues, whereas these effects on the peptides with three lysine residues are small. The simulations provide insight into the helix-folding mechanism, including the beta-bend intermediate in helix initiation, the (i, i + 3) hydrogen bonds, the asymmetrical helix propagation, and the asymmetrical helicities in the N- and C-terminal regions. These findings are consistent with previous studies. PMID:7756550

  3. Leucine Promotes Proliferation and Differentiation of Primary Preterm Rat Satellite Cells in Part through mTORC1 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jie-Min; Yu, Mu-Xue; Shen, Zhen-Yu; Guo, Chu-Yi; Zhuang, Si-Qi; Qiu, Xiao-Shan

    2015-05-08

    Signaling through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in response to leucine modulates many cellular and developmental processes. However, in the context of satellite cell proliferation and differentiation, the role of leucine and mTORC1 is less known. This study investigates the role of leucine in the process of proliferation and differentiation of primary preterm rat satellite cells, and the relationship with mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activation. Dissociation of primary satellite cells occurred with type I collagenase and trypsin, and purification, via different speed adherence methods. Satellite cells with positive expression of Desmin were treated with leucine and rapamycin. We observed that leucine promoted proliferation and differentiation of primary satellite cells and increased the phosphorylation of mTOR. Rapamycin inhibited proliferation and differentiation, as well as decreased the phosphorylation level of mTOR. Furthermore, leucine increased the expression of MyoD and myogenin while the protein level of MyoD decreased due to rapamycin. However, myogenin expressed no affect by rapamycin. In conclusion, leucine may up-regulate the activation of mTORC1 to promote proliferation and differentiation of primary preterm rat satellite cells. We have shown that leucine promoted the differentiation of myotubes in part through the mTORC1-MyoD signal pathway.

  4. Differential effects of leucine supplementation in young and aged mice at the onset of skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Perry, Richard A; Brown, Lemuel A; Lee, David E; Brown, Jacob L; Baum, Jamie I; Greene, Nicholas P; Washington, Tyrone A

    2016-07-01

    Aging decreases the ability of skeletal muscle to respond to injury. Leucine has been demonstrated to target protein synthetic pathways in skeletal muscle thereby enhancing this response. However, the effect of aging on leucine-induced alterations in protein synthesis at the onset of skeletal muscle regeneration has not been fully elucidated. The purpose of this study was to determine if aging alters skeletal muscle regeneration and leucine-induced alterations in markers of protein synthesis. The tibialis anterior of young (3 months) and aged (24 months) female C57BL/6J mice were injected with either bupivacaine or PBS, and the mice were given ad libitum access to leucine-supplemented or normal drinking water. Protein and gene expression of markers of protein synthesis and degradation, respectively, were analyzed at three days post-injection. Following injury in young mice, leucine supplementation was observed to elevate only p-p70S6K. In aged mice, leucine was shown to elicit higher p-mTOR content with and without injury, and p-4EBP-1 content post-injury. Additionally in aged mice, leucine was shown to elicit higher content of relative p70S6K post-injury. Our study shows that leucine supplementation affects markers of protein synthesis at the onset of skeletal muscle regeneration differentially in young and aged mice. PMID:27327351

  5. Alanine-EPR as a transfer standard dosimetry system for low energy X radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoury, H. J.; da Silva, E. J.; Mehta, K.; de Barros, V. S.; Asfora, V. K.; Guzzo, P. L.; Parker, A. G.

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the use of alanine-EPR as a transfer standard dosimetry system for low energy X radiation, such as that in RS-2400, which operates in the range from 25 to 150 kV and 2 to 45 mA. Two types of alanine dosimeters were investigated. One is a commercial alanine pellets from Aérial-Centre de Ressources Technologiques, France and one was prepared in our laboratory (LMRI-DEN/UFPE). The EPR spectra of the irradiated dosimeters were recorded in the Nuclear Energy Department of UFPE, using a Bruker EMX10 EPR spectrometer operating in the X-band. The alanine-EPR dosimetry system was calibrated in the range of 20-220 Gy in this X-ray field, against an ionization chamber calibrated at the relevant X-ray energy with traceability to PTB. The results showed that both alanine dosimeters presented a linear dose response the same sensitivity, when the EPR signal was normalized to alanine mass. The total uncertainty in the measured dose was estimated to be about 3%. The results indicate that it is possible to use the alanine-EPR dosimetry system for validation of a low-energy X ray irradiator, such as RS-2400.

  6. Revised mechanism of D-alanine incorporation into cell wall polymers in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Reichmann, Nathalie T; Cassona, Carolina Picarra; Gründling, Angelika

    2013-09-01

    Teichoic acids (TAs) are important for growth, biofilm formation, adhesion and virulence of Gram-positive bacterial pathogens. The chemical structures of the TAs vary between bacteria, though they typically consist of zwitterionic polymers that are anchored to either the peptidoglycan layer as in the case of wall teichoic acid (WTA) or the cell membrane and named lipoteichoic acid (LTA). The polymers are modified with D-alanines and a lack of this decoration leads to increased susceptibility to cationic antimicrobial peptides. Four proteins, DltA-D, are essential for the incorporation of d-alanines into cell wall polymers and it has been established that DltA transfers D-alanines in the cytoplasm of the cell onto the carrier protein DltC. However, two conflicting models have been proposed for the remainder of the mechanism. Using a cellular protein localization and membrane topology analysis, we show here that DltC does not traverse the membrane and that DltD is anchored to the outside of the cell. These data are in agreement with the originally proposed model for D-alanine incorporation through a process that has been proposed to proceed via a D-alanine undecaprenyl phosphate membrane intermediate. Furthermore, we found that WTA isolated from a Staphylococcus aureus strain lacking LTA contains only a small amount of D-alanine, indicating that LTA has a role, either direct or indirect, in the efficient D-alanine incorporation into WTA in living cells.

  7. Importance of intrahepatic mechanisms to gluconeogenesis from alanine during exercise and recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, D.H.; Williams, P.E.; Lacy, D.B.; Green, D.R.; Cherrington, A.D.

    1988-04-01

    These studies were performed to assess the importance of intrahepatic mechanisms to gluconeogenesis in the dog during 150 min of treadmill exercise and 90 min of recovery. Sampling catheters were implanted in an artery and portal and hepatic veins 16 days before experimentation. Infusions of (U-/sup 14/C)alanine, (3-/sup 3/H)glucose, and indocyanine green were used to assess gluconeogenesis. During exercise, a decline in arterial and portal vein plasma alanine and in hepatic blood flow led to a decrease in hepatic alanine delivery. During recovery, hepatic blood flow was restored to basal, causing an increase in hepatic alanine delivery beyond exercise rates but still below resting rates. Hepatic fractional alanine extraction increased from 0.26 +/- 0.02 at rest to 0.64 +/- 0.03 during exercise and remained elevated during recovery. Net hepatic alanine uptake was 2.5 +/- 0.2 mumol.kg-1.min-1 at rest and remained unchanged during exercise but was increased during recovery. The conversion rate of (/sup 14/C)alanine to glucose had increased by 248 +/- 38% by 150 min of exercise and had increased further during recovery. The efficiency with which alanine was channeled into glucose in the liver was accelerated to a rate of 338 +/- 55% above basal by 150 min of exercise but declined slightly during recovery. In conclusion, 1) gluconeogenesis from alanine is accelerated during exercise, due to an increase in the hepatic fractional extraction of the amino acid and through intrahepatic mechanisms that more efficiently channel it into glucose.

  8. Characterization of the l-alanine exporter AlaE of Escherichia coli and its potential role in protecting cells from a toxic-level accumulation of l-alanine and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seryoung; Ihara, Kohei; Katsube, Satoshi; Hori, Hatsuhiro; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Yoneyama, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    We previously reported that the alaE gene of Escherichia coli encodes the l-alanine exporter AlaE. The objective of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of the AlaE exporter. The minimum inhibitory concentration of l-alanine and l-alanyl-l-alanine in alaE-deficient l-alanine-nonmetabolizing cells MLA301ΔalaE was 4- and >4000-fold lower, respectively, than in the alaE-positive parent cells MLA301, suggesting that AlaE functions as an efflux pump to avoid a toxic-level accumulation of intracellular l-alanine and its derivatives. Furthermore, the growth of the alaE-deficient mutant derived from the l-alanine-metabolizing strain was strongly inhibited in the presence of a physiological level of l-alanyl-l-alanine. Intact MLA301ΔalaE and MLA301ΔalaE/pAlaE cells producing plasmid-borne AlaE, accumulated approximately 200% and 50%, respectively, of the [(3) H]l-alanine detected in MLA301 cells, suggesting that AlaE exports l-alanine. When 200 mmol/L l-alanine-loaded inverted membrane vesicles prepared from MLA301ΔalaE/pAlaE were placed in a solution containing 200 mmol/L or 0.34 μmol/L l-alanine, energy-dependent [(3) H]l-alanine accumulation occurred under either condition. This energy-dependent uphill accumulation of [(3) H]l-alanine was strongly inhibited in the presence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone but not by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, suggesting that the AlaE-mediated l-alanine extrusion was driven by proton motive force. Based on these results, physiological roles of the l-alanine exporter are discussed.

  9. Shock synthesis of amino acids in simulated primitive environments.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Nun, A.; Bar-Nun, N.; Bauer, S. H.; Sagan, C.

    1971-01-01

    A single pulse shock tube of a uniform bore was used in the experiments. The reaction mixture consisted of 3.3 per cent methane, 11 per cent ethane, and 5.6 per cent ammonia, diluted with ultra-pure argon. The formation of glycine, alanine, valine, and leucine under conditions of shock heating was observed. Thermodynamic relations are discussed together with questions of conversion efficiency.

  10. Applicability of EPR/alanine dosimetry for quality assurance in proton eye radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Michalec, B; Mierzwinska, G; Ptaszkiewicz, M; Sowa, U; Stolarczyk, L; Weber, A

    2014-06-01

    A new quality assurance and quality control method for proton eye radiotherapy based on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)/alanine dosimetry has been developed. It is based on Spread-Out Bragg Peak entrance dose measurement with alanine detectors. The entrance dose is well correlated with the dose at the facility isocenter, where, during the therapeutic irradiation, the tumour is placed. The unique alanine detector features namely keeping the dose record in a form of stable radiation-induced free radicals trapped in the material structure, and the non-destructive read-out makes this type of detector a good candidate for additional documentation of the patient's exposure over the therapy course.

  11. Progress towards an alanine/ESR therapy level reference dosimetry service at NPL.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, P H; Rajendran, K; Sephton, J P

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes work being carried out at the National Physical Laboratory towards the establishment of an alanine reference dosimetry service for radiotherapy applications. A precision fused quartz holder has been constructed to allow precise positioning of alanine dosimeters in the ESR cavity. A novel method of signal analysis based on spectrum fitting has been developed to minimize the effect of baseline distortions. Data are also presented on the relative response of alanine to 60Co gamma rays and high energy photons (4-12 MeV).

  12. Optical and Spectral Studies on β Alanine Metal Halide Hybrid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweetlin, M. Daniel; Selvarajan, P.; Perumal, S.; Ramalingom, S.

    2011-10-01

    We have synthesized and grown β alanine metal halide hybrid crystals viz. β alanine cadmium chloride (BACC), an amino acid transition metal halide complex crystal and β alanine potassium chloride (BAPC), an amino acid alkali metal halide complex crystal by slow evaporation method. The grown crystals were found to be transparent and have well defined morphology. The optical characteristics of the grown crystals were carried out with the help of UV-Vis Spectroscopy. The optical transmittances of the spectrums show that BAPC is more transparent than BACC. The Photoluminescence of the materials were determined by the Photoluminescent Spectroscopy

  13. Treponema denticola cystalysin exhibits significant alanine racemase activity accompanied by transamination: mechanistic implications.

    PubMed Central

    Bertoldi, Mariarita; Cellini, Barbara; Paiardini, Alessandro; Di Salvo, Martino; Borri Voltattorni, Carla

    2003-01-01

    To obtain information on the reaction specificity of cystalysin from the spirochaete bacterium Treponema denticola, the interaction with L- and D-alanine has been investigated. Binding of both alanine enantiomers leads to the appearance of an external aldimine absorbing at 429 nm and of a band absorbing at 498 nm, indicative of a quinonoid species. Racemization and transamination reactions were observed to occur with both alanine isomers as substrates. The steady-state kinetic parameters for racemization, k (cat) and K (m), for L-alanine are 1.05+/-0.03 s(-1) and 10+/-1 mM respectively, whereas those for D-alanine are 1.4+/-0.1 s(-1) and 10+/-1 mM. During the reaction of cystalysin with L- or D-alanine, a time-dependent loss of beta-elimination activity occurs concomitantly with the conversion of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) coenzyme into pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate (PMP). The catalytic efficiency of the half-transamination of L-alanine is found to be 5.3x10(-5) mM(-1) x s(-1), 5-fold higher when compared with that of D-alanine. The partition ratio between racemization and half-transamination reactions is 2.3x10(3) for L-alanine and 1.4x10(4) for D-alanine. The pH dependence of the kinetic parameters for both the reactions shows that the enzyme possesses a single ionizing residue with p K values of 6.5-6.6, which must be unprotonated for catalysis. Addition of pyruvate converts the PMP form of the enzyme back into the PLP form and causes the concomitant recovery of beta-elimination activity. In contrast with other PLP enzymes studied so far, but similar to alanine racemases, the apoform of the enzyme abstracted tritium from C4' of both (4' S)- and (4' R)-[4'-(3)H]PMP in the presence of pyruvate. Together with molecular modelling of the putative binding sites of L- and D-alanine at the active site of the enzyme, the implications of these studies for the mechanisms of the side reactions catalysed by cystalysin are discussed. PMID:12519070

  14. Leucine: tRNA Ligase from Cultured Cells of Nicotiana tabacum var. Xanthi

    PubMed Central

    Gore, Nigel R.; Wray, John L.

    1978-01-01

    Leucine:tRNA ligase was assayed in extracts from cultured tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) XD cells by measuring the initial rate of aminoacylation of transfer RNA with l-[4,5-3H]leucine. Transfer RNA was purified from tobacco XD cells after the method of Vanderhoef et al. (Phytochemistry 9: 2291-2304). The buoyant density of leucine:tRNA ligase from cells grown for 100 generations in 2.5 mm [15N]nitrate and 30% deuterium oxide was 1.3397. After transfer of cells into light medium (2.5 mm [14N]nitrate and 100% H2O) the ligase activity increased and the buoyant density decreased with time to 1.3174 at 72 hours after transfer. It was concluded that leucine:tRNA ligase molecules were synthesized de novo from light amino acids during the period of activity increase. The width at half-peak height of the enzyme distribution profiles following isopycnic equilibrium centrifugation in caesium chloride remained constant at all times after transfer into light medium providing evidence for the loss of preexisting functional ligase molecules. It was concluded that during the period of activity increase the cellular level of enzyme activity was determined by a balance between de novo synthesis and the loss of functional enzyme molecules due to either inactivation or degradation. PMID:16660229

  15. Identification and mapping of nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat resistance gene analogs in bermudagrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty-one bermudagrass (Cynodon spp.) disease resistance gene homologs (BRGH) were cloned and sequenced from diploid, triploid, and hexaploid bermudagrass using degenerate primers to target the nucleotide binding site (NBS) of the NBS- leucine rich repeat (LRR) resistance gene family. Alignment of ...

  16. Impact of prolonged leucine supplementation on protein synthesis and lean growth in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most low-birth weight infants experience extrauterine growth failure due to reduced nutrient intake as a result of feeding intolerance. The objective of this study was to determine whether prolonged enteral leucine supplementation improves lean growth in neonatal pigs fed a restricted protein diet. ...

  17. Autophagy and leucine promote chronological longevity and respiration proficiency during calorie restriction in yeast.

    PubMed

    Aris, John P; Alvers, Ashley L; Ferraiuolo, Roy A; Fishwick, Laura K; Hanvivatpong, Amanda; Hu, Doreen; Kirlew, Christine; Leonard, Michael T; Losin, Kyle J; Marraffini, Michelle; Seo, Arnold Y; Swanberg, Veronica; Westcott, Jennifer L; Wood, Michael S; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Dunn, William A

    2013-10-01

    We have previously shown that autophagy is required for chronological longevity in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here we examine the requirements for autophagy during extension of chronological life span (CLS) by calorie restriction (CR). We find that autophagy is upregulated by two CR interventions that extend CLS: water wash CR and low glucose CR. Autophagy is required for full extension of CLS during water wash CR under all growth conditions tested. In contrast, autophagy was not uniformly required for full extension of CLS during low glucose CR, depending on the atg allele and strain genetic background. Leucine status influenced CLS during CR. Eliminating the leucine requirement in yeast strains or adding supplemental leucine to growth media extended CLS during CR. In addition, we observed that both water wash and low glucose CR promote mitochondrial respiration proficiency during aging of autophagy-deficient yeast. In general, the extension of CLS by water wash or low glucose CR was inversely related to respiration deficiency in autophagy-deficient cells. Also, autophagy is required for full extension of CLS under non-CR conditions in buffered media, suggesting that extension of CLS during CR is not solely due to reduced medium acidity. Thus, our findings show that autophagy is: (1) induced by CR, (2) required for full extension of CLS by CR in most cases (depending on atg allele, strain, and leucine availability) and, (3) promotes mitochondrial respiration proficiency during aging under CR conditions.

  18. Nutritional and regulatory roles of leucine in muscle growth and fat reduction.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yehui; Li, Fengna; Liu, Hongnan; Li, Yinghui; Liu, Yingying; Kong, Xiangfeng; Zhang, Yuzhe; Deng, Dun; Tang, Yulong; Feng, Zemeng; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    The metabolic roles for L-leucine, an essential branched-chain amino acid (BCAA), go far beyond serving exclusively as a building block for de novo protein synthesis. Growing evidence shows that leucine regulates protein and lipid metabolism in animals. Specifically, leucine activates the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, including the 70 kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1) to stimulate protein synthesis in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue and to promote mitochondrial biogenesis, resulting in enhanced cellular respiration and energy partitioning. Activation of cellular energy metabolism favors fatty acid oxidation to CO2 and water in adipocytes, lean tissue gain in young animals, and alleviation of muscle protein loss in aging adults, lactating mammals, and food-deprived subjects. As a functional amino acid, leucine holds great promise to enhance the growth, efficiency of food utilization, and health of animals and humans.  PMID:25553480

  19. 'Zipbody' leucine zipper-fused Fab in E. coli in vitro and in vivo expression systems.

    PubMed

    Ojima-Kato, Teruyo; Fukui, Kansuke; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Hashimura, Dai; Miyake, Shiro; Hirakawa, Yuki; Yamasaki, Tomomi; Kojima, Takaaki; Nakano, Hideo

    2016-04-01

    A small antibody fragment, fragment of antigen binding (Fab), is favorable for various immunological assays. However, production efficiency of active Fab in microorganisms depends considerably on the clones. In this study, leucine zipper-peptide pairs that dimerize in parallel (ACID-p1 (LZA)/BASE-p1 (LZB) or c-Jun/c-Fos) were fused to the C-terminus of heavy chain (Hc, VH-CH1) and light chain (Lc, VL-CL), respectively, to accelerate the association of Hc and Lc to form Fab in Escherichia coli in vivo and in vitro expression systems. The leucine zipper-fused Fab named 'Zipbody' was constructed using anti-E. coli O157 monoclonal antibody obtained from mouse hybridoma and produced in both in vitro and in vivo expression systems in an active form, whereas Fab without the leucine zipper fusion was not. Similarly, Zipbody of rabbit monoclonal antibody produced in in vitro expression showed significant activity. The purified, mouse Zipbody produced in the E. coli strain Shuffle T7 Express had specificity toward the antigen; in bio-layer interferometry analysis, the KD value was measured to be 1.5-2.0 × 10(-8) M. These results indicate that leucine zipper fusion to Fab C-termini markedly enhances active Fab formation in E. coli.

  20. Leucine pulses enhance skeletal muscle protein synthesis during continuous feeding in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infants unable to maintain oral feeding can be nourished by orogastric tube. We have shown that orogastric continuous feeding restricts muscle protein synthesis compared with intermittent bolus feeding in neonatal pigs. To determine whether leucine leu infusion can be used to enhance protein synthes...

  1. 3D Printing of Protein Models in an Undergraduate Laboratory: Leucine Zippers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Scott C.

    2015-01-01

    An upper-division undergraduate laboratory experiment is described that explores the structure/function relationship of protein domains, namely leucine zippers, through a molecular graphics computer program and physical models fabricated by 3D printing. By generating solvent accessible surfaces and color-coding hydrophobic, basic, and acidic amino…

  2. FLCN Maintains the Leucine Level in Lysosome to Stimulate mTORC1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi; Ji, Xin; Qiao, Xianfeng; Jin, Yaping; Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The intracellular amino acid pool within lysosome is a signal that stimulates the nutrient-sensing mTORC1 signalling pathway. The signal transduction cascade has garnered much attention, but little is known about the sequestration of the signalling molecules within the lysosome. Using human HEK293 cells as a model, we found that suppression of the BHD syndrome gene FLCN reduced the leucine level in lysosome, which correlated with decreased mTORC1 activity. Both consequences could be reversed by supplementation with high levels of leucine, but not other tested amino acids. Conversely, overexpressed FLCN could sequester lysosomal leucine and stimulate mTORC1 in an amino acid limitation environment. These results identify a novel function of FLCN: it controls mTORC1 by modulating the leucine signal in lysosome. Furthermore, we provided evidence that FLCN exerted this role by inhibiting the accumulation of the amino acid transporter PAT1 on the lysosome surface, thereby maintaining the signal level within the organelle. PMID:27280402

  3. Prolonged leucine infusion differentially affects tissue protein synthesis in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leucine (Leu) acutely stimulates protein synthesis by activating the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway. To determine whether Leu can stimulate protein synthesis in muscles of different fiber types and visceral tissues of the neonate for a prolonged period and to determine the ...

  4. Role of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) in bone acquisition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) have both anabolic and catabolic effects on bone. However, no GC anabolic effect mediator has been identified to date. In this report, we provide the first evidence that glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ), a GC anti-inflammatory effect mediator, can enhance bone forma...

  5. Increasing dietary leucine intake reduces diet-induced obesity and improves glucose and cholesterol metabolism in mice via multimechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiying; Guo, Kaiying; LeBlanc, Robert E; Loh, Daniella; Schwartz, Gary J; Yu, Yi-Hao

    2007-06-01

    Leucine, as an essential amino acid and activator of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin), promotes protein synthesis and suppresses protein catabolism. However, the effect of leucine on overall glucose and energy metabolism remains unclear, and whether leucine has beneficial effects as a long-term dietary supplement has not been examined. In the present study, we doubled dietary leucine intake via leucine-containing drinking water in mice with free excess to either a rodent chow or a high-fat diet (HFD). While it produced no major metabolic effects in chow-fed mice, increasing leucine intake resulted in up to 32% reduction of weight gain (P < 0.05) and a 25% decrease in adiposity (P < 0.01) in HFD-fed mice. The reduction of adiposity resulted from increased resting energy expenditure associated with increased expression of uncoupling protein 3 in brown and white adipose tissues and in skeletal muscle, while food intake was not decreased. Increasing leucine intake also prevented HFD-induced hyperglycemia, which was associated with improved insulin sensitivity, decreased plasma concentrations of glucagon and glucogenic amino acids, and downregulation of hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase. Additionally, plasma levels of total and LDL cholesterol were decreased by 27% (P < 0.001) and 53% (P < 0.001), respectively, in leucine supplemented HFD-fed mice compared with the control mice fed the same diet. The reduction in cholesterol levels was largely independent of leucine-induced changes in adiposity. In conclusion, increases in dietary leucine intake substantially decrease diet-induced obesity, hyperglycemia, and hypercholesterolemia in mice with ad libitum consumption of HFD likely via multiple mechanisms.

  6. Amino acid uptake by yeasts. IV. Effect of thiol reagents on L-leucine transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ramos, E H; De Bongioanni, L C; Wainer, S R; Stoppani, A O

    1983-06-10

    (1) N-Ethylmaleimide (a penetrating SH- reagent) inactivated L-[14C]leucine entrance (binding and translocation) into Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the extent of inhibition depending on the time of preincubation with N-ethylmaleimide, N-ethylmaleimide concentration, the amino acid external and internal concentration, and the energization state of the yeast cells. With D-glucose-energized yeast, N-ethylmaleimide inhibited L-[14C]leucine entrance in all the assayed experimental conditions, but with starved yeast and low (0.1 mM) amino acid concentration, it did not inhibit L-[14C]leucine binding, except when the cells were preincubated with L-leucine. With the rho- respiratory-deficient mutant (energized cells), N-ethylmaleimide inhibited L-[14C]leucine entrance as with the energized wild-type, though to a lesser extent. (2) Analysis of the N-ethylmaleimide effect as a function of L-[14C]leucine concentration showed a significant decrease of Jmax values of the high- (S1) and low- (S2) affinity amino acid transport systems, but KT values were not significantly modified. (3) When assayed in the presence of D-glucose, N-ethylmaleimide inhibition of D-glucose uptake and respiration contributed significantly to inactivation of L-[14C]leucine entrance. Pretreatment of yeast cells with 2,4-dinitrophenol enhanced the effect of L-[14C]leucine binding and translocation. (4) Bromoacetylsulfanilic acid and bromoacetylaminoisophthalic acid, two non-penetrating SH- reagents, did not inactivate L-[14C]leucine entrance, while p-chloromercuribenzoate, a slowly penetrating SH-reagent, inactivated it to a limited extent. When compared with the effect of N-ethylmaleimide, these negative results indicate that thiol groups of the L-[14C]leucine carrier were not exposed on the outer surface of the yeast cell permeability barrier.

  7. Leucine minimizes denervation-induced skeletal muscle atrophy of rats through akt/mtor signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Carolina B.; Christofoletti, Daiane C.; Pezolato, Vitor A.; de Cássia Marqueti Durigan, Rita; Prestes, Jonato; Tibana, Ramires A.; Pereira, Elaine C. L.; de Sousa Neto, Ivo V.; Durigan, João L. Q.; da Silva, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of leucine treatment (0.30 mM) on muscle weight and signaling of myoproteins related to synthesis and degradation pathways of soleus muscle following seven days of complete sciatic nerve lesion. Wistar rats (n = 24) of 3–4 months of age (192 ± 23 g) were used. The animals were randomly distributed into four experimental groups (n = 6/group): control, treated with leucine (L), denervated (D) and denervated treated with leucine (DL). Dependent measures were proteins levels of AKT, AMPK, mTOR, and ACC performed by Western blot. Leucine induced a reduction in the phosphorylation of AMPK (p < 0.05) by 16% in the L and by 68% in the DL groups as compared with control group. Denervation increased AMPK by 24% in the D group as compared with the control group (p < 0.05). AKT was also modulated by denervation and leucine treatment, highlighted by the elevation of AKT phosphorylation in the D (65%), L (98%) and DL (146%) groups as compared with the control group (p < 0.05). AKT phosphorylation was 49% higher in the D group as compared with the DL group. Furthermore, denervation decreased mTOR phosphorylation by 29% in the D group as compared with the control group. However, leucine treatment induced an increase of 49% in the phosphorylation of mTOR in the L group as compared with the control group, and an increase of 154% in the DL as compared with the D group (p < 0.05). ACC phosphorylation was 20% greater in the D group than the control group. Furthermore, ACC in the soleus was 22% lower in the in the L group and 50% lower in the DL group than the respective control group (p < 0.05). In conclusion, leucine treatment minimized the deleterious effects of denervation on rat soleus muscle by increasing anabolic (AKT and mTOR) and decreasing catabolic (AMPK) pathways. These results may be interesting for muscle recovery following acute denervation, which may contribute to musculoskeletal rehabilitation after denervation

  8. Alanine-aminotransferase: an early marker for insulin resistance?

    PubMed

    Salazar, Martin R; Carbajal, Horacio A; Curciarello, Jose O; Aizpurua, Marcelo; Adrover, Raul E; Riondet, Beatriz

    2007-01-01

    In a population-based sample, after excluding alcohol consumption, hepatotoxic drugs and hepatitis B and C infected, we investigated if alanine-aminotransferase (ALT) was associated with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance, and if this association was caused by non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The sample (432 female and 119 male) was divided into two ALT thresholds corresponding to the 50th and 75th percentiles (P) (female > or = 15 and > or = 19 U/L; male > or = 17 and > or = 23 U/I, respectively). Blood pressure, body mass index, waist circumference, cholesterol, HDL cholesterol (HDLc), triglyceride (TG), TG/HDLc ratio, glycemia and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were compared between those above and below each ALT threshold. Female placed above the 50th P of ALT had higher levels of TG/HDLc ratio (p=0.029), glycemia (p=0.028), and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, (p=0.045), and above the 75th P had higher SBP (p=0.036), DBP (p=0.018), TG (p=0.024), TG/HDLc ratio (p=0.028), glycemia (p=0.004) and HOMA-IR (p=0.0014). Male placed above the 50th P of ALT had higher BMI (p=0.017) and TG/HDLc ratio (p=0.048), and above the 75th P had lower values of HDLc (p=0.042). Only 16.5% of women and 14.5% of men, above the 75th P of ALT, showed an increase in liver brightness in the echography. This work shows in woman an early association of ALT with TG/HDLc ratio and HOMA-IR. Since the last two are independent predictors of cardiovascular risk, attention should be drawn to ALT values near the upper limit of the normal range even in the absence of NAFLD and obesity. PMID:17593595

  9. Solvation Free Energies of Alanine Peptides: The Effect of Flexibility

    SciTech Connect

    Kokubo, Hironori; Harris, Robert C.; Asthagiri, Dilip; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2013-12-03

    The electrostatic (?Gel), cavity-formation (?Gvdw), and total (?G) solvation free energies for 10 alanine peptides ranging in length (n) from 1 to 10 monomers were calculated. The free energies were computed both with xed, extended conformations of the peptides and again for some of the peptides without constraints. The solvation free energies, ?Gel, ?Gvdw, and ?G, were found to be linear in n, with the slopes of the best-fit lines being gamma_el, gamma_vdw, and gamma, respectively. Both gamma_el and gamma were negative for fixed and flexible peptides, and gamma_vdw was negative for fixed peptides. That gamma_vdw was negative was surprising, as experimental data on alkanes, theoretical models, and MD computations on small molecules and model systems generally suggest that gamma_vdw should be positive. A negative gamma_vdw seemingly contradicts the notion that ?Gvdw drives the initial collapse of the protein when it folds by favoring conformations with small surface areas, but when we computed ?Gvdw for the flexible peptides, thereby allowing the peptides to assume natural ensembles of more compact conformations, gamma-vdw was positive. Because most proteins do not assume extended conformations, a ?Gvdw that increases with increasing surface area may be typical for globular proteins. An alternative hypothesis is that the collapse is driven by intramolecular interactions. We show that the intramolecular van der Waal's interaction energy is more favorable for the flexible than for the extended peptides, seemingly favoring this hypothesis, but the large fluctuations in this energy may make attributing the collapse of the peptide to this intramolecular energy difficult.

  10. Rapid Ti(III) reduction of perchlorate in the presence of beta-alanine: kinetics, pH effect, complex formation, and beta-alanine effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Huang, Zhengdao; Lippincott, Lee; Meng, Xiaoguang

    2010-03-15

    Ti(III) reduction of perchlorate might be a useful method for the treatment of highly perchlorate-contaminated water. Though the reaction rate was usually low, we observed that beta-alanine (HOOCCH(2)CH(2)NH(2)) could significantly promote the reaction. A complete (>99.9%) perchlorate removal was obtained in a solution containing [ClO(4)(-)]=1.0mM, [Ti(III)]=40 mM, and [beta-alanine]=120 mM after 2.5h of reaction under 50 degrees C. The effects of both pH and complex formation on the reaction were then studied. The results showed that without beta-alanine the optimal pH was 2.3. When pH increased from 1.6 to 2.3, the reduction rate increased remarkably. In the pH range >2.3, however, the reduction was significantly inhibited, attributed to the formation of Ti(III) precipitate. The presence of beta-alanine at a molar ratio of [beta-alanine]:[Ti(III)]=3:1 significantly increased the reduction rate of perchlorate even at near neutral pH. This is because beta-alanine formed complexes with Ti(III), which greatly improved the total soluble [Ti(III)] in the pH range between 3.5 and 6. The findings may lead to the development of rapid treatment methods for intermittent and small stream of highly perchlorate-contaminated water, which are resulted from the manufacturing, storage, handling, use and/or disposal of large quantities of perchlorate salts. PMID:19864064

  11. Rapid Ti(III) reduction of perchlorate in the presence of beta-alanine: kinetics, pH effect, complex formation, and beta-alanine effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Huang, Zhengdao; Lippincott, Lee; Meng, Xiaoguang

    2010-03-15

    Ti(III) reduction of perchlorate might be a useful method for the treatment of highly perchlorate-contaminated water. Though the reaction rate was usually low, we observed that beta-alanine (HOOCCH(2)CH(2)NH(2)) could significantly promote the reaction. A complete (>99.9%) perchlorate removal was obtained in a solution containing [ClO(4)(-)]=1.0mM, [Ti(III)]=40 mM, and [beta-alanine]=120 mM after 2.5h of reaction under 50 degrees C. The effects of both pH and complex formation on the reaction were then studied. The results showed that without beta-alanine the optimal pH was 2.3. When pH increased from 1.6 to 2.3, the reduction rate increased remarkably. In the pH range >2.3, however, the reduction was significantly inhibited, attributed to the formation of Ti(III) precipitate. The presence of beta-alanine at a molar ratio of [beta-alanine]:[Ti(III)]=3:1 significantly increased the reduction rate of perchlorate even at near neutral pH. This is because beta-alanine formed complexes with Ti(III), which greatly improved the total soluble [Ti(III)] in the pH range between 3.5 and 6. The findings may lead to the development of rapid treatment methods for intermittent and small stream of highly perchlorate-contaminated water, which are resulted from the manufacturing, storage, handling, use and/or disposal of large quantities of perchlorate salts.

  12. Pushing product formation to its limit: metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for L-leucine overproduction.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Michael; Haas, Sabine; Klaffl, Simon; Polen, Tino; Eggeling, Lothar; van Ooyen, Jan; Bott, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Using metabolic engineering, an efficient L-leucine production strain of Corynebacterium glutamicum was developed. In the wild type of C. glutamicum, the leuA-encoded 2-isopropylmalate synthase (IPMS) is inhibited by low L-leucine concentrations with a K(i) of 0.4 mM. We identified a feedback-resistant IMPS variant, which carries two amino acid exchanges (R529H, G532D). The corresponding leuA(fbr) gene devoid of the attenuator region and under control of a strong promoter was integrated in one, two or three copies into the genome and combined with additional genomic modifications aimed at increasing L-leucine production. These modifications involved (i) deletion of the gene encoding the repressor LtbR to increase expression of leuBCD, (ii) deletion of the gene encoding the transcriptional regulator IolR to increase glucose uptake, (iii) reduction of citrate synthase activity to increase precursor supply, and (iv) introduction of a gene encoding a feedback-resistant acetohydroxyacid synthase. The production performance of the resulting strains was characterized in bioreactor cultivations. Under fed-batch conditions, the best producer strain accumulated L-leucine to levels exceeding the solubility limit of about 24 g/l. The molar product yield was 0.30 mol L-leucine per mol glucose and the volumetric productivity was 4.3 mmol l⁻¹ h⁻¹. These values were obtained in a defined minimal medium with a prototrophic and plasmid-free strain, making this process highly interesting for industrial application. PMID:24333966

  13. Crystal Structure of a Super Leucine Zipper an Extended Two-Stranded Super Long Coiled Coil

    SciTech Connect

    J Diao

    2011-12-31

    Coiled coil is a ubiquitous structural motif in proteins, with two to seven alpha helices coiled together like the strands of a rope, and coiled coil folding and assembly is not completely understood. A GCN4 leucine zipper mutant with four mutations of K3A, D7A, Y17W, and H18N has been designed, and the crystal structure has been determined at 1.6 {angstrom} resolution. The peptide monomer shows a helix trunk with short curved N- and C-termini. In the crystal, two monomers cross in 35{sup o} and form an X-shaped dimer, and each X-shaped dimer is welded into the next one through sticky hydrophobic ends, thus forming an extended two-stranded, parallel, super long coiled coil rather than a discrete, two-helix coiled coil of the wild-type GCN4 leucine zipper. Leucine residues appear at every seventh position in the super long coiled coil, suggesting that it is an extended super leucine zipper. Compared to the wild-type leucine zipper, the N-terminus of the mutant has a dramatic conformational change and the C-terminus has one more residue Glu 32 determined. The mutant X-shaped dimer has a large crossing angle of 35{sup o} instead of 18{sup o} in the wild-type dimer. The results show a novel assembly mode and oligomeric state of coiled coil, and demonstrate that mutations may affect folding and assembly of the overall coiled coil. Analysis of the formation mechanism of the super long coiled coil may help understand and design self-assembling protein fibers.

  14. Leucine transport in brush border membrane vesicles from freshwater insect larvae.

    PubMed

    Forcella, Matilde; Berra, Elisa; Giacchini, Roberto; Parenti, Paolo

    2006-11-01

    Leucine transport across brush border membrane vesicles prepared from four insect species common to European freshwater streams has been characterized. The species studied were: Ephemera danica (Ephemeroptera: Ephemeridae), Isoperla grammatica (Plecoptera: Perlodidae), Hydropsyche pellucidula (Trichoptera: Hydropsychidae), and Hybomitra bimaculata (Diptera: Tabanidae). The transport differed among the studied taxa for several features, including pH and sodium dependence, substrate affinity and specificity, and efficiency. In H. pellucidula and E. danica, leucine uptake was higher at pH 7.4 than at more alkaline or acidic pH values, whereas in I. grammatica and H. bimaculata, the uptake was rather constant when pH varied from 5.0 to 7.4, then strongly decreased at pH 8.8. All but E. danica displayed a transient intravescicular leucine accumulation in the presence of sodium, suggesting the existence of a cation-leucine symport mechanism. The sodium dependence ranged according to the following order: H. pellucidula > I. grammatica > H. bimaculata > E. danica. Moreover, in H. pellucidula and I. grammatica, the sodium-dependence was stronger at pH 8.8 than at pH 7.4. In E. danica, leucine uptake was sodium-independent at all pH values. The highest value of V(max) (45.3 pmol.s(-1).mg proteins(-1)) was in E. danica, which, however, displayed the lowest affinity (K(m) 137 muM) when compared to the kinetic parameters of other taxa. The V(max) and K(m) values were: 40 and 52.5, 32.1 and 12.5, and 4.5 and 230 for H. bimaculata, H. pellucidula, and I. grammatica, respectively. The obtained results are discussed within our current knowledge of amino acid transport systems in insects.

  15. Determination of the carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen contents of alanine and their uncertainties using the certified reference material L-alanine (NMIJ CRM 6011-a).

    PubMed

    Itoh, Nobuyasu; Sato, Ayako; Yamazaki, Taichi; Numata, Masahiko; Takatsu, Akiko

    2013-01-01

    The carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen (CHN) contents of alanine and their uncertainties were estimated using a CHN analyzer and the certified reference material (CRM) L-alanine. The CHN contents and their uncertainties, as measured using the single-point calibration method, were 40.36 ± 0.20% for C, 7.86 ± 0.13% for H, and 15.66 ± 0.09% for N; the results obtained using the bracket calibration method were also comparable. The method described in this study is reasonable, convenient, and meets the general requirement of having uncertainties ≤ 0.4%.

  16. A novel low molecular weight alanine aminotransferase from fasted rat liver.

    PubMed

    Vedavathi, M; Girish, K S; Kumar, M Karuna

    2006-01-01

    Alanine is the most effective precursor for gluconeogenesis among amino acids, and the initial reaction is catalyzed by alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT). Although the enzyme activity increases during fasting, this effect has not been studied extensively. The present study describes the purification and characterization of an isoform of AlaAT from rat liver under fasting. The molecular mass of the enzyme is 17.7 kD with an isoelectric point of 4.2; glutamine is the N-terminal residue. The enzyme showed narrow substrate specificity for L-alanine with Km values for alanine of 0.51 mM and for 2-oxoglutarate of 0.12 mM. The enzyme is a glycoprotein. Spectroscopic and inhibition studies showed that pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) and free -SH groups are involved in the enzymatic catalysis. PLP activated the enzyme with a Km of 0.057 mM. PMID:16487061

  17. Effect of beta-alanine supplementation on repeated sprint performance during the Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle Test.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Bryan; Sale, Craig; Harris, Roger C; Sunderland, Caroline

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of β-alanine supplementation on repeated sprint performance during an intermittent exercise protocol designed to replicate games play. Sixteen elite and twenty non-elite game players performed the Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle Test (LIST) on two separate occasions. Trials were separated by 4 weeks of supplementation with either β-alanine (BA) or maltodextrin (MD). There was no deterioration in sprint times from Set 1 to Set 6 of the LIST in either group prior to supplementation (elite: P=0.92; non-elite: P=0.12). Neither BA nor MD supplementation affected sprint times. Blood lactate concentrations were elevated during exercise in both groups, with no effect of supplementation. β-Alanine supplementation did not significantly improve sprint performance during the LIST. Neither group showed a performance decrement prior to supplementation, which might have masked any benefit from increased muscle buffering capacity due to β-alanine supplementation.

  18. Titration of Alanine Monitored by NMR Spectroscopy: A Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Francis J.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The experiment described here involves simultaneous monitoring of pH and NMR chemical shifts during an aqueous titration of alpha- and beta-alanine. This experiment is designed for use in an undergraduate biochemistry course. (MR)

  19. Alanine blends for ESR measurements of thermal neutron fluence in a mixed radiation field.

    PubMed

    Marrale, M; Brai, M; Gennaro, G; Triolo, A; Bartolotta, A; D'Oca, M C; Rosi, G

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the results of a study on the electron spin resonance (ESR) dosimetry to measure thermal neutron fluence in a mixed radiation field (neutron and photons) are presented. The ESR responses of alanine dosemeters with different additives are compared. In particular, the (10)B-acid boric and the Gd-oxide were chosen to enhance the sensitivity of alanine dosemeters to thermal neutrons. Irradiations were carried out inside the thermal column of the TAPIRO reactor of the ENEA center, Casaccia Rome. The main results are a greater neutron sensitivity and a smaller lowest detectable fluence for the dosemeters with gadolinium than for dosemeters of alanine with (10)B, which is well known to be much more sensitive to thermal neutrons than simple alanine.

  20. An automated system for the measurement of alanine/EPR dosimeters

    PubMed

    Sharpe; Sephton

    2000-05-01

    NPL for several years has offered mailed reference dosimetry services based on alanine/EPR dosimeters, both at industrial and therapy dose levels. Compared to other methods of reference dosimetry, operator involvement in alanine/EPR has been found to be relatively high, and contributes significantly to the overall economics of the process. Commercially available sample changers are not suitable for high accuracy applications, and it has proved necessary to develop a dedicated automation system to handle NPL alanine dosimeter pellets. In this paper we describe an automatic sample changer for placing and retrieving alanine pellets into and out of the cavity of a standard research grade EPR spectrometer. Up to 32 pellets can be held in each removable sample tray. The sample changer software has been interfaced into the spectrometer control software to enable complete automation of the measurement process, including the optimization of spectrometer settings and rotation of the sample within the cavity.

  1. Alanine as an end product during fermentation of monosaccharides by Clostridium strain P2.

    PubMed

    Orlygsson, J; Anderson, R; Svensson, B H

    1995-11-01

    The thermophilic Clostridium P2 was isolated from a semi-continuously fed reactor with high ammonium concentration. This bacterium formed substantial amounts of L-alanine as a major fermentation product from glucose, fructose and mannose. Low amounts of acetate, butyrate, carbon dioxide and hydrogen were also formed. A high partial pressure of hydrogen inhibited the degradation of the monosaccharides, whereas hydrogen removal, in the form of methanogenesis was found to be stimulatory. However, the amount of alanine produced per mole of hexose degraded did not change. Hexose degradation and alanine production were favoured by high ammonium concentrations. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies provided strong evidence that an active Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway existed and that alanine was produced via an amination of pyruvate.

  2. Repeated Supramaximal Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress: Effect of β-Alanine Plus Creatine Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Belviranli, Muaz; Okudan, Nilsel; Revan, Serkan; Balci, Serdar; Gokbel, Hakki

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carnosine is a dipeptide formed from the β-alanine and histidine amino acids and found in mainly in the brain and muscle, especially fast twitch muscle. Carnosine and creatine has an antioxidant effect and carnosine accounts for about 10% of the muscle's ability to buffer the H+ ions produced by exercise. Objectives: The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of beta alanine and/or creatine supplementation on oxidant and antioxidant status during repeated Wingate tests (WTs). Patients and Methods: Forty four sedentary males participated in the study. Participants performed three 30s WTs with 2 minutes rest between exercise bouts. After the first exercise session, the subjects were assigned to one of four groups: Placebo, Creatine, Beta-alanine and Beta-alanine plus creatine. Participants ingested twice per day for 22 consecutive days, then four times per day for the following 6 days. After the supplementation period the second exercise session was applied. Blood samples were taken before and immediately after the each exercise session for the analysis of oxidative stress and antioxidant markers. Results: Malondialdehyde levels and superoxide dismutase activities were affected by neither supplementation nor exercise. During the pre-supplementation session, protein carbonyl reduced and oxidized glutathione (GSH and GSSG) levels increased immediately after the exercise. However, during the post-supplementation session GSH and GSSG levels increased in beta-alanine and beta-alanine plus creatine groups immediately after the exercise compared to pre-exercise. In addition, during the post-supplementation session total antioxidant capacity increased in beta-alanine group immediately after the exercise. Conclusions: Beta-alanine supplementation has limited antioxidant effect during the repeated WTs. PMID:27217925

  3. [Alanine solution as enzyme reaction buffer used in A to O blood group conversion].

    PubMed

    Li, Su-Bo; Zhang, Xue; Zhang, Yin-Ze; Tan, Ying-Xia; Bao, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Ying-Li; Ji, Shou-Ping; Gong, Feng; Gao, Hong-Wei

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of alanine solution as α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase enzyme reaction buffer on the enzymatic activity of A antigen. The binding ability of α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase with RBC in different reaction buffer such as alanine solution, glycine solution, normal saline (0.9% NaCl), PBS, PCS was detected by Western blot. The results showed that the efficiency of A to O conversion in alanine solution was similar to that in glycine solution, and Western blot confirmed that most of enzymes blinded with RBC in glycine or alanine solution, but few enzymes blinded with RBC in PBS, PCS or normal saline. The evidences indicated that binding of enzyme with RBC was a key element for A to O blood group conversion, while the binding ability of α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase with RBC in alanine or glycine solution was similar. It is concluded that alanine solution can be used as enzyme reaction buffer in A to O blood group conversion. In this buffer, the α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase is closely blinded with RBC and α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase plays efficient enzymatic activity of A antigen.

  4. EPR dosimetry of radiotherapy photon beams in inhomogeneous media using alanine films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helge Østerås, Bjørn; Olaug Hole, Eli; Rune Olsen, Dag; Malinen, Eirik

    2006-12-01

    In the current work, EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) dosimetry using alanine films (134 µm thick) was utilized for dose measurements in inhomogeneous phantoms irradiated with radiotherapy photon beams. The main phantom material was PMMA, while either Styrofoam or aluminium was introduced as an inhomogeneity. The phantoms were irradiated to a maximum dose of about 30 Gy with 6 or 15 MV photons. The performance of the alanine film dosimeters was investigated and compared to results from ion chamber dosimetry, Monte Carlo simulations and radiotherapy treatment planning calculations. It was found that the alanine film dosimeters had a linear dose response above approximately 5 Gy, while a background signal obscured the response at lower dose levels. For doses between 5 and 60 Gy, the standard deviation of single alanine film dose estimates was about 2%. The alanine film dose estimates yielded results comparable to those from the Monte Carlo simulations and the ion chamber measurements, with absolute differences between estimates in the order of 1 15%. The treatment planning calculations exhibited limited applicability. The current work shows that alanine film dosimetry is a method suitable for estimating radiotherapeutical doses and for dose measurements in inhomogeneous media.

  5. EPR dosimetry of radiotherapy photon beams in inhomogeneous media using alanine films.

    PubMed

    Osterås, Bjørn Helge; Hole, Eli Olaug; Olsen, Dag Rune; Malinen, Eirik

    2006-12-21

    In the current work, EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) dosimetry using alanine films (134 microm thick) was utilized for dose measurements in inhomogeneous phantoms irradiated with radiotherapy photon beams. The main phantom material was PMMA, while either Styrofoam or aluminium was introduced as an inhomogeneity. The phantoms were irradiated to a maximum dose of about 30 Gy with 6 or 15 MV photons. The performance of the alanine film dosimeters was investigated and compared to results from ion chamber dosimetry, Monte Carlo simulations and radiotherapy treatment planning calculations. It was found that the alanine film dosimeters had a linear dose response above approximately 5 Gy, while a background signal obscured the response at lower dose levels. For doses between 5 and 60 Gy, the standard deviation of single alanine film dose estimates was about 2%. The alanine film dose estimates yielded results comparable to those from the Monte Carlo simulations and the ion chamber measurements, with absolute differences between estimates in the order of 1-15%. The treatment planning calculations exhibited limited applicability. The current work shows that alanine film dosimetry is a method suitable for estimating radiotherapeutical doses and for dose measurements in inhomogeneous media. PMID:17148820

  6. Identification and synthesis of [1-asparagine, 5-valine, 9-glycine] angiotensin I produced from plasma of American eel Anguilla rostrata.

    PubMed

    Khosla, M C; Nishimura, H; Hasegawa, Y; Bumpus, F M

    1985-02-01

    The major peptide produced by incubation of American eel (Anguilla rostrata) plasma with the eel kidney extract was identified as [1-asparagine, 5-valine, 9-glycine] angiotensin I (I). Two minor peptides were also identified as [1-aspartic acid, 5-valine, 9-glycine] angiotensin I (II) and [5-valine, 9-glycine] angiotensin I-(3-10)-octapeptide (III). These structures were further confirmed by comparison of these peptides on high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) with the synthetic peptides and the tryptic and chymotryptic digests of the synthetic and natural angiotensins. In the rat pressor bioassays, the synthetic decapeptides I and II possessed 45.4 and 52.2%, respectively, of the pressor activity of [1-aspartic acid, 5-isoleucine] angiotensin II. The pressor activity of I and II was blocked with the converting enzyme inhibitor captopril. Study of the conversion of asparaginyl decapeptide into aspartyl decapeptide in eel plasma indicated that the presence of thimerosal (sodium ethylmercurithiosalicylate) in the incubation mixture inhibited the conversion of I into II. These results suggest that (a) I is the natural form of angiotensin inherent in the American eel while II may be formed during incubation with plasma; (b) eel plasma contains an enzyme which is capable of converting asparaginyl angiotensins into aspartyl angiotensins; and (c) pressor activity of I and II is due to their conversion into the corresponding octapeptides. In a previous work when thimerosal was not included in the incubation mixture, the major peptide produced by incubation of Japanese eel (Anguilla japonica) plasma with its kidney extract was identified as II. (Y. Hasegawa, T. Nakajima, and H. Sokabe, 1983, Biomed. Res. 4, 417-420).

  7. Effect of strength training session on plasma amino acid concentration following oral ingestion of leucine, BCAAs or glutamine in men.

    PubMed

    Mero, Antti; Leikas, Anne; Knuutinen, Juha; Hulmi, Juha J; Kovanen, Vuokko

    2009-01-01

    We examined the acute effects of a 1-h strength training session (STS) on plasma amino acid concentration following orally ingestion of leucine, branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) or glutamine in nine physically active men who participated in double-blinded and randomised experiments. The subjects took placebo, leucine, BCAAs, or glutamine capsules (50 mg/kg) in either rest (REST) or STS condition. Blood samples were taken before and at 30, 60, 90, and 120 min after the beginning of the treatment and they were assayed for plasma amino acids with HPLC. Following both leucine and BCAA ingestion the peak concentration of leucine was similar at rest (524 +/- 46 and 530 +/- 29 nmol/ml, respectively) and similar after STS (398 +/- 43 and 387 +/- 46 nmol/ml, respectively) but the rest and STS concentrations differed from each other (P < 0.01-0.001). The modelled polynomial data for the leucine treatment showed that the peak concentration of leucine occurred at 67 min at rest and at 90 min in STS (difference between REST and STS: P = 0.012). For the BCAA treatment the polynomial data showed that the peak concentration of leucine occurred at 72 min at rest and at 78 min in STS (P = 0.067). The peak concentration of glutamine was similar in both rest and STS condition and occurred at 60 min at rest and at 57 min in STS. In conclusion, 1-h of STS slows the increase in the peak concentration of plasma leucine similarly after oral ingestion of leucine or BCAAs but after oral ingestion of glutamine it has no slowing effect on glutamine concentration. PMID:19015870

  8. Glial cells transform glucose to alanine, which fuels the neurons in the honeybee retina.

    PubMed

    Tsacopoulos, M; Veuthey, A L; Saravelos, S G; Perrottet, P; Tsoupras, G

    1994-03-01

    The retina of honeybee drone is a nervous tissue with a crystal-like structure in which glial cells and photoreceptor neurons constitute two distinct metabolic compartments. The phosphorylation of glucose and its subsequent incorporation into glycogen occur in glia, whereas O2 consumption (QO2) occurs in the photoreceptors. Experimental evidence showed that glia phosphorylate glucose and supply the photoreceptors with metabolic substrates. We aimed to identify these transferred substrates. Using ion-exchange and reversed-phase HPLC and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, we demonstrated that more than 50% of 14C(U)-glucose entering the glia is transformed to alanine by transamination of pyruvate with glutamate. In the absence of extracellular glucose, glycogen is used to make alanine; thus, its pool size in isolated retinas is maintained stable or even increased. Our model proposes that the formation of alanine occurs in the glia, thereby maintaining the redox potential of this cell and contributing to NH3 homeostasis. Alanine is released into the extracellular space and is then transported into photoreceptors using an Na(+)-dependent transport system. Purified suspensions of photoreceptors have similar alanine aminotransferase activity as glial cells and transform 14C-alanine to glutamate, aspartate, and CO2. Therefore, the alanine entering photoreceptors is transaminated to pyruvate, which in turn enters the Krebs cycle. Proline also supplies the Krebs cycle by making glutamate and, in turn, the intermediate alpha-ketoglutarate. Light stimulation caused a 200% increase of QO2 and a 50% decrease of proline and of glutamate. Also, the production of 14CO2 from 14C-proline was increased. The use of these amino acids would sustain about half of the light-induced delta QO2, the other half being sustained by glycogen via alanine formation. The use of proline meets a necessary anaplerotic function in the Krebs cycle, but implies high NH3 production. The results showed

  9. A lepidopteran-specific gene family encoding valine-rich midgut proteins.

    PubMed

    Odman-Naresh, Jothini; Duevel, Margret; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam; Merzendorfer, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Many lepidopteran larvae are serious agricultural pests due to their feeding activity. Digestion of the plant diet occurs mainly in the midgut and is facilitated by the peritrophic matrix (PM), an extracellular sac-like structure, which lines the midgut epithelium and creates different digestive compartments. The PM is attracting increasing attention to control lepidopteran pests by interfering with this vital function. To identify novel PM components and thus potential targets for insecticides, we performed an immunoscreening with anti-PM antibodies using an expression library representing the larval midgut transcriptome of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. We identified three cDNAs encoding valine-rich midgut proteins of M. sexta (MsVmps), which appear to be loosely associated with the PM. They are members of a lepidopteran-specific family of nine VMP genes, which are exclusively expressed in larval stages in M. sexta. Most of the MsVMP transcripts are detected in the posterior midgut, with the highest levels observed for MsVMP1. To obtain further insight into Vmp function, we expressed MsVMP1 in insect cells and purified the recombinant protein. Lectin staining and glycosidase treatment indicated that MsVmp1 is highly O-glycosylated. In line with results from qPCR, immunoblots revealed that MsVmp1 amounts are highest in feeding larvae, while MsVmp1 is undetectable in starving and molting larvae. Finally using immunocytochemistry, we demonstrated that MsVmp1 localizes to the cytosol of columnar cells, which secrete MsVmp1 into the ectoperitrophic space in feeding larvae. In starving and molting larvae, MsVmp1 is found in the gut lumen, suggesting that the PM has increased its permeability. The present study demonstrates that lepidopteran species including many agricultural pests have evolved a set of unique proteins that are not found in any other taxon and thus may reflect an important adaptation in the highly specialized lepidopteran digestive tract facing

  10. The leucine-rich repeat superfamily of synaptic adhesion molecules: LRRTMs and Slitrks.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jaewon

    2012-10-01

    Synapses are asymmetric intercellular junctions connected by multiple synaptic cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). Synaptic CAMs function in various stages of synaptogenesis - the process of synapse creation - encompassing synapse formation, maturation, refinement, plasticity, and elimination. The list of synaptic CAMs has rapidly grown, although their precise functions of most CAMs at synapses remain incomplete. Members of an emerging class of transmembrane proteins containing leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains have received considerable recent research attention. In this minireview, I discuss recent findings on LRR-containing synaptic CAMs that impact synapse development and circuit formation, focusing on two families of LRR synaptic CAMs: leucine-rich transmembrane proteins (LRRTMs) and Slit and Trk-like family (Slitrks). Their basic biochemical properties, proposed functions at synapses, physiological significances, and open questions are summarized.

  11. The metabolism of histamine in the Drosophila optic lobe involves an ommatidial pathway: β-alanine recycles through the retina.

    PubMed

    Borycz, Janusz; Borycz, Jolanta A; Edwards, Tara N; Boulianne, Gabrielle L; Meinertzhagen, Ian A

    2012-04-15

    Flies recycle the photoreceptor neurotransmitter histamine by conjugating it to β-alanine to form β-alanyl-histamine (carcinine). The conjugation is regulated by Ebony, while Tan hydrolyses carcinine, releasing histamine and β-alanine. In Drosophila, β-alanine synthesis occurs either from uracil or from the decarboxylation of aspartate but detailed roles for the enzymes responsible remain unclear. Immunohistochemically detected β-alanine is present throughout the fly's entire brain, and is enhanced in the retina especially in the pseudocone, pigment and photoreceptor cells of the ommatidia. HPLC determinations reveal 10.7 ng of β-alanine in the wild-type head, roughly five times more than histamine. When wild-type flies drink uracil their head β-alanine increases more than after drinking l-aspartic acid, indicating the effectiveness of the uracil pathway. Mutants of black, which lack aspartate decarboxylase, cannot synthesize β-alanine from l-aspartate but can still synthesize it efficiently from uracil. Our findings demonstrate a novel function for pigment cells, which not only screen ommatidia from stray light but also store and transport β-alanine and carcinine. This role is consistent with a β-alanine-dependent histamine recycling pathway occurring not only in the photoreceptor terminals in the lamina neuropile, where carcinine occurs in marginal glia, but vertically via a long pathway that involves the retina. The lamina's marginal glia are also a hub involved in the storage and/or disposal of carcinine and β-alanine.

  12. β-alanine improves punch force and frequency in amateur boxers during a simulated contest.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Tim; Ballam, Tim; Morton, James P; Close, Graeme L

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that ß-alanine supplementation improves punch power and frequency in amateur boxers during a simulated contest. Sixteen amateur boxers (each approximately 6 yr experience) were assigned to ß-alanine (n = 8; 1.5 g 4 times/d for 4 wk) or placebo supplementation (n = 8) after initially being assessed for baseline punch performance. Before and after the supplementation period, all boxers completed a simulated contest consisting of 3 × 3-min rounds (interspersed with 60-s rests) on a punching bag (with a force transducer attached). Each round involved performing 2 min 50 s standardized punching (standardized jab, cross combination) based on notation analysis, whereas the last 10 s involved maximal-output punching (standardized jab, cross combination), during which time punch force and frequency were recorded. Postcontest blood lactate was significantly increased in the ß-alanine group (presupplementation 9.5 ± 0.9 mmol/L, postsupplementation 12.6 ± 0.5 mmol/L, p < .05), whereas the placebo group showed no change (presupplementation 8 ± 2.8 mmol/L, postsupplementation 7.0 ± 2.7 mmol/L; p > .05). During the 10-s maximal-output punching, changes in mean punch force (ß-alanine 20 ± 1.01 kg, placebo 1 ± 1 kg) and punch frequency (ß-alanine 5 ± 4, placebo -2 ± 3) were greater (p < .05) in the ß-alanine-supplemented group. The authors conclude that ß-alanine supplementation improves punching performance in amateur boxers and suggest that this supplementation protocol may also prove ergogenic for other combat-related sports.

  13. Effects of β-alanine supplementation on exercise performance: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hobson, R M; Saunders, B; Ball, G; Harris, R C; Sale, C

    2012-07-01

    Due to the well-defined role of β-alanine as a substrate of carnosine (a major contributor to H+ buffering during high-intensity exercise), β-alanine is fast becoming a popular ergogenic aid to sports performance. There have been several recent qualitative review articles published on the topic, and here we present a preliminary quantitative review of the literature through a meta-analysis. A comprehensive search of the literature was employed to identify all studies suitable for inclusion in the analysis; strict exclusion criteria were also applied. Fifteen published manuscripts were included in the analysis, which reported the results of 57 measures within 23 exercise tests, using 18 supplementation regimes and a total of 360 participants [174, β-alanine supplementation group (BA) and 186, placebo supplementation group (Pla)]. BA improved (P=0.002) the outcome of exercise measures to a greater extent than Pla [median effect size (IQR): BA 0.374 (0.140-0.747), Pla 0.108 (-0.019 to 0.487)]. Some of that effect might be explained by the improvement (P=0.013) in exercise capacity with BA compared to Pla; no improvement was seen for exercise performance (P=0.204). In line with the purported mechanisms for an ergogenic effect of β-alanine supplementation, exercise lasting 60-240 s was improved (P=0.001) in BA compared to Pla, as was exercise of >240 s (P=0.046). In contrast, there was no benefit of β-alanine on exercise lasting <60 s (P=0.312). The median effect of β-alanine supplementation is a 2.85% (-0.37 to 10.49%) improvement in the outcome of an exercise measure, when a median total of 179 g of β-alanine is supplemented.

  14. FTIR spectra and conformational structure of deutero-β-alanine isolated in argon matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanian, Stepan G.; Ivanov, Alexander Yu; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2016-02-01

    Low temperature FTIR spectra of β-alanine-d3 isolated in argon matrices are used to determine the conformational composition of this compound. UV irradiation of the matrix samples is found to change the relative populations of the β-alanine-d3 conformers. The populations of conformers I and II with an Nsbnd D⋯O intramolecular H-bond decrease after the UV irradiation while the populations of conformer V with an N⋯Dsbnd O H-bond and conformer IV which has no intramolecular H-bonds increase. This behavior of the β-alanine-d3 conformers are used to separate the bands of the different conformers. The analysis of the experimental FTIR spectra is based on the calculated harmonic B3LYP/6-311++G(df,pd) frequencies and on the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ frequencies calculated with a method that includes anharmonic effects. Polynomial scaling of the calculated frequencies is used to achieve better agreement with the experimental data. The observation of the wide band of the OD stretching vibration at 2201 cm-1 is a direct evidence of the presence of the β-alanine-d3 conformer V in the Ar matrix. In total ten bands of conformer V are detected. The influence of the matrix environment on the structures and the IR spectra of the β-alanine and β-alanine-d3 conformers is investigated. This involves performing calculations of the β-alanine conformers embedded in argon clusters containing from 163 to 166 argon atoms using the M06-2X and B3LYP(GD3BJ) density-functional methods. Good agreement between the calculated and the experimental matrix splitting is demonstrated.

  15. Site reactivity in the free radicals induced damage to leucine residues: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Medina, M E; Galano, A; Alvarez-Idaboy, J R

    2015-02-21

    Several recent computational studies have tried to explain the observed selectivity in radical damage to proteins. In this work we use Density Functional Theory and Transition State Theory including tunnelling corrections, reaction path degeneracy, the effect of diffusion, and the role of free radicals to get further insights into this important topic. The reaction between a leucine derivative and free radicals of biological significance, in aqueous and lipid media, has been investigated. Both thermochemical and kinetic analyses, in both hydrophilic and hydrophobic environments, have been carried out. DPPH, ˙OOH, ˙OOCH3, ˙OOCH2Cl, ˙OOCHCl2 and ˙OOCHCH2 radicals do not react with the target molecule. The reactions are proposed to be kinetically controlled. The leucine gamma site was the most reactive for the reactions with ˙N3, ˙OOCCl3, ˙OCH3, ˙OCH2Cl, and ˙OCHCl2 radicals, with rate constants equal to 1.97 × 10(5), 3.24 × 10(4), 6.68 × 10(5), 5.98 × 10(6) and 8.87 × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1), respectively, in aqueous solution. The ˙Cl, ˙OH and ˙OCCl3 radicals react with leucine at the beta, gamma, and delta positions at rates close to the diffusion limit with the alpha position which is the slowest path and the most thermodynamically favored. The presented results confirm that the Bell-Evans-Polanyi principle does not apply for the reactions between amino acid residues and free radicals. Regarding the influence of the environment on the reactivity of the studied series of free radicals towards leucine residues, it is concluded that hydrophilic media slightly lower the reactivity of the studied radicals, compared to hydrophobic ones, albeit the trends in reactivity are very similar.

  16. Dietary Leucine - An Environmental Modifier of Insulin Resistance Acting on Multiple Levels of Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Macotela, Yazmin; Emanuelli, Brice; Bång, Anneli M.; Espinoza, Daniel O.; Boucher, Jeremie; Beebe, Kirk; Gall, Walter; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Environmental factors, such as the macronutrient composition of the diet, can have a profound impact on risk of diabetes and metabolic syndrome. In the present study we demonstrate how a single, simple dietary factor—leucine—can modify insulin resistance by acting on multiple tissues and at multiple levels of metabolism. Mice were placed on a normal or high fat diet (HFD). Dietary leucine was doubled by addition to the drinking water. mRNA, protein and complete metabolomic profiles were assessed in the major insulin sensitive tissues and serum, and correlated with changes in glucose homeostasis and insulin signaling. After 8 weeks on HFD, mice developed obesity, fatty liver, inflammatory changes in adipose tissue and insulin resistance at the level of IRS-1 phosphorylation, as well as alterations in metabolomic profile of amino acid metabolites, TCA cycle intermediates, glucose and cholesterol metabolites, and fatty acids in liver, muscle, fat and serum. Doubling dietary leucine reversed many of the metabolite abnormalities and caused a marked improvement in glucose tolerance and insulin signaling without altering food intake or weight gain. Increased dietary leucine was also associated with a decrease in hepatic steatosis and a decrease in inflammation in adipose tissue. These changes occurred despite an increase in insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of p70S6 kinase indicating enhanced activation of mTOR, a phenomenon normally associated with insulin resistance. These data indicate that modest changes in a single environmental/nutrient factor can modify multiple metabolic and signaling pathways and modify HFD induced metabolic syndrome by acting at a systemic level on multiple tissues. These data also suggest that increasing dietary leucine may provide an adjunct in the management of obesity-related insulin resistance. PMID:21731668

  17. Lysine and Leucine Deficiencies Affect Myocytes Development and IGF Signaling in Gilthead Sea Bream (Sparus aurata).

    PubMed

    Azizi, Sheida; Nematollahi, Mohammad Ali; Mojazi Amiri, Bagher; Vélez, Emilio J; Lutfi, Esmail; Navarro, Isabel; Capilla, Encarnación; Gutiérrez, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    Optimizing aquaculture production requires better knowledge of growth regulation and improvement in diet formulation. A great effort has been made to replace fish meal for plant protein sources in aquafeeds, making necessary the supplementation of such diets with crystalline amino acids (AA) to cover the nutritional requirements of each species. Lysine and Leucine are limiting essential AA in fish, and it has been demonstrated that supplementation with them improves growth in different species. However, the specific effects of AA deficiencies in myogenesis are completely unknown and have only been studied at the level of hepatic metabolism. It is well-known that the TOR pathway integrates the nutritional and hormonal signals to regulate protein synthesis and cell proliferation, to finally control muscle growth, a process also coordinated by the expression of myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs). This study aimed to provide new information on the impact of Lysine and Leucine deficiencies in gilthead sea bream cultured myocytes examining their development and the response of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), MRFs, as well as key molecules involved in muscle growth regulation like TOR. Leucine deficiency did not cause significant differences in most of the molecules analyzed, whereas Lysine deficiency appeared crucial in IGFs regulation, decreasing significantly IGF-I, IGF-II and IGF-IRb mRNA levels. This treatment also down-regulated the gene expression of different MRFs, including Myf5, Myogenin and MyoD2. These changes were also corroborated by a significant decrease in proliferation and differentiation markers in the Lysine-deficient treatment. Moreover, both Lysine and Leucine limitation induced a significant down-regulation in FOXO3 gene expression, which deserves further investigation. We believe that these results will be relevant for the production of a species as appreciated for human consumption as it is gilthead sea bream and demonstrates the importance of

  18. Structural and functional evolution of isopropylmalate dehydrogenases in the leucine and glucosinolate pathways of Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yan; Galant, Ashley; Pang, Qiuying; Strul, Johanna M.; Balogun, Sherifat F.; Jez, Joseph M.; Chen, Sixue

    2012-10-24

    The methionine chain-elongation pathway is required for aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis in plants and evolved from leucine biosynthesis. In Arabidopsis thaliana, three 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenases (AtIPMDHs) play key roles in methionine chain-elongation for the synthesis of aliphatic glucosinolates (e.g. AtIPMDH1) and leucine (e.g. AtIPMDH2 and AtIPMDH3). Here we elucidate the molecular basis underlying the metabolic specialization of these enzymes. The 2.25 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of AtIPMDH2 was solved to provide the first detailed molecular architecture of a plant IPMDH. Modeling of 3-isopropylmalate binding in the AtIPMDH2 active site and sequence comparisons of prokaryotic and eukaryotic IPMDH suggest that substitution of one active site residue may lead to altered substrate specificity and metabolic function. Site-directed mutagenesis of Phe-137 to a leucine in AtIPMDH1 (AtIPMDH1-F137L) reduced activity toward 3-(2'-methylthio)ethylmalate by 200-fold, but enhanced catalytic efficiency with 3-isopropylmalate to levels observed with AtIPMDH2 and AtIPMDH3. Conversely, the AtIPMDH2-L134F and AtIPMDH3-L133F mutants enhanced catalytic efficiency with 3-(2'-methylthio)ethylmalate {approx}100-fold and reduced activity for 3-isopropylmalate. Furthermore, the altered in vivo glucosinolate profile of an Arabidopsis ipmdh1 T-DNA knock-out mutant could be restored to wild-type levels by constructs expressing AtIPMDH1, AtIPMDH2-L134F, or AtIPMDH3-L133F, but not by AtIPMDH1-F137L. These results indicate that a single amino acid substitution results in functional divergence of IPMDH in planta to affect substrate specificity and contributes to the evolution of specialized glucosinolate biosynthesis from the ancestral leucine pathway.

  19. Impact of prolonged leucine supplementation on protein synthesis and lean growth in neonatal pigs

    PubMed Central

    Columbus, Daniel A.; Steinhoff-Wagner, Julia; Suryawan, Agus; Nguyen, Hanh V.; Hernandez-Garcia, Adriana; Fiorotto, Marta L.

    2015-01-01

    Most low-birth weight infants experience extrauterine growth failure due to reduced nutrient intake as a result of feeding intolerance. The objective of this study was to determine whether prolonged enteral leucine supplementation improves lean growth in neonatal pigs fed a restricted protein diet. Neonatal pigs (n = 14–16/diet, 5 days old, 1.8 ± 0.3 kg) were fed by gastric catheter a whey-based milk replacement diet with either a high protein (HP) or restricted protein (RP) content or RP supplemented with leucine to the same level as in the HP diet (RPL). Pigs were fed 40 ml·kg body wt−1·meal−1 every 4 h for 21 days. Feeding the HP diet resulted in greater total body weight and lean body mass compared with RP-fed pigs (P < 0.05). Masses of the longissimus dorsi muscle, heart, and kidneys were greater in the HP- than RP-fed pigs (P < 0.05). Body weight, lean body mass, and masses of the longissimus dorsi, heart, and kidneys in pigs fed the RPL diet were intermediate to RP- and HP-fed pigs. Protein synthesis and mTOR signaling were increased in all muscles with feeding (P < 0.05); leucine supplementation increased mTOR signaling and protein synthesis rate in the longissimus dorsi (P < 0.05). There was no effect of diet on indices of protein degradation signaling in any tissue (P > 0.05). Thus, when protein intake is chronically restricted, the capacity for leucine supplementation to enhance muscle protein accretion in neonatal pigs that are meal-fed milk protein-based diets is limited. PMID:26374843

  20. LRRCE: a leucine-rich repeat cysteine capping motif unique to the chordate lineage

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hosil; Huxley-Jones, Julie; Boot-Handford, Ray P; Bishop, Paul N; Attwood, Teresa K; Bella, Jordi

    2008-01-01

    Background The small leucine-rich repeat proteins and proteoglycans (SLRPs) form an important family of regulatory molecules that participate in many essential functions. They typically control the correct assembly of collagen fibrils, regulate mineral deposition in bone, and modulate the activity of potent cellular growth factors through many signalling cascades. SLRPs belong to the group of extracellular leucine-rich repeat proteins that are flanked at both ends by disulphide-bonded caps that protect the hydrophobic core of the terminal repeats. A capping motif specific to SLRPs has been recently described in the crystal structures of the core proteins of decorin and biglycan. This motif, designated as LRRCE, differs in both sequence and structure from other, more widespread leucine-rich capping motifs. To investigate if the LRRCE motif is a common structural feature found in other leucine-rich repeat proteins, we have defined characteristic sequence patterns and used them in genome-wide searches. Results The LRRCE motif is a structural element exclusive to the main group of SLRPs. It appears to have evolved during early chordate evolution and is not found in protein sequences from non-chordate genomes. Our search has expanded the family of SLRPs to include new predicted protein sequences, mainly in fishes but with intriguing putative orthologs in mammals. The chromosomal locations of the newly predicted SLRP genes would support the large-scale genome or gene duplications that are thought to have occurred during vertebrate evolution. From this expanded list we describe a new class of SLRP sequences that could be representative of an ancestral SLRP gene. Conclusion Given its exclusivity the LRRCE motif is a useful annotation tool for the identification and classification of new SLRP sequences in genome databases. The expanded list of members of the SLRP family offers interesting insights into early vertebrate evolution and suggests an early chordate evolutionary

  1. Relations among arginine, citrulline, ornithine, and leucine kinetics in adult burn patients.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y M; Ryan, C M; Burke, J F; Tompkins, R G; Young, V R

    1995-11-01

    Plasma fluxes of arginine, citrulline, and leucine, and the rate of conversion of labeled citrulline to arginine (Qcit-->arg) were determined in nine severely burned patients (mean: 56% body surface burn area, mean 10 d postinjury) while they received total parenteral nutrition (TPN) including an L-amino acid mixture that supplied a generous amount of nitrogen (mean: 0.39 +/- 0.02 g.kg-1.d-1). Plasma fluxes were also studied in these patients during a basal state (low-dose intravenous glucose) by using a primed, 4-h constant intravenous tracer-infusion protocol. Stable-nuclide labeled tracers were L-[15N-15N-guanidino,5,5,2H2]arginine; L-[13C-ureido]citrulline; L-[1-13C]leucine; and NaH13CO3 (prime only), with blood and expired air samples drawn at intervals to determine isotopic abundance of arginine, citrulline, ornithine, and alpha-ketoisocaproate (KIC; for leucine) in plasma and 13CO2 in breath. Leucine kinetics (flux and disappearance into protein synthesis) confirmed the anticipated higher protein turnover in these burn patients compared with healthy control subjects. The plasma arginine fluxes were correspondingly higher in burn patients than in healthy control subjects. However, the citrulline flux and rate of conversion of citrulline to arginine were not higher than values obtained in our laboratories in healthy adult subjects. We hypothesize that the higher rates of arginine loss from the body after burn injury would need to be balanced by an appropriate exogenous intake of preformed arginine to maintain protein homeostasis and promote recovery from this catabolic condition. PMID:7572742

  2. Impact of prolonged leucine supplementation on protein synthesis and lean growth in neonatal pigs.

    PubMed

    Columbus, Daniel A; Steinhoff-Wagner, Julia; Suryawan, Agus; Nguyen, Hanh V; Hernandez-Garcia, Adriana; Fiorotto, Marta L; Davis, Teresa A

    2015-09-15

    Most low-birth weight infants experience extrauterine growth failure due to reduced nutrient intake as a result of feeding intolerance. The objective of this study was to determine whether prolonged enteral leucine supplementation improves lean growth in neonatal pigs fed a restricted protein diet. Neonatal pigs (n = 14-16/diet, 5 days old, 1.8 ± 0.3 kg) were fed by gastric catheter a whey-based milk replacement diet with either a high protein (HP) or restricted protein (RP) content or RP supplemented with leucine to the same level as in the HP diet (RPL). Pigs were fed 40 ml·kg body wt(-1)·meal(-1) every 4 h for 21 days. Feeding the HP diet resulted in greater total body weight and lean body mass compared with RP-fed pigs (P < 0.05). Masses of the longissimus dorsi muscle, heart, and kidneys were greater in the HP- than RP-fed pigs (P < 0.05). Body weight, lean body mass, and masses of the longissimus dorsi, heart, and kidneys in pigs fed the RPL diet were intermediate to RP- and HP-fed pigs. Protein synthesis and mTOR signaling were increased in all muscles with feeding (P < 0.05); leucine supplementation increased mTOR signaling and protein synthesis rate in the longissimus dorsi (P < 0.05). There was no effect of diet on indices of protein degradation signaling in any tissue (P > 0.05). Thus, when protein intake is chronically restricted, the capacity for leucine supplementation to enhance muscle protein accretion in neonatal pigs that are meal-fed milk protein-based diets is limited.

  3. Lysine and Leucine Deficiencies Affect Myocytes Development and IGF Signaling in Gilthead Sea Bream (Sparus aurata)

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Sheida; Nematollahi, Mohammad Ali; Mojazi Amiri, Bagher; Vélez, Emilio J.; Lutfi, Esmail; Navarro, Isabel; Capilla, Encarnación; Gutiérrez, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    Optimizing aquaculture production requires better knowledge of growth regulation and improvement in diet formulation. A great effort has been made to replace fish meal for plant protein sources in aquafeeds, making necessary the supplementation of such diets with crystalline amino acids (AA) to cover the nutritional requirements of each species. Lysine and Leucine are limiting essential AA in fish, and it has been demonstrated that supplementation with them improves growth in different species. However, the specific effects of AA deficiencies in myogenesis are completely unknown and have only been studied at the level of hepatic metabolism. It is well-known that the TOR pathway integrates the nutritional and hormonal signals to regulate protein synthesis and cell proliferation, to finally control muscle growth, a process also coordinated by the expression of myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs). This study aimed to provide new information on the impact of Lysine and Leucine deficiencies in gilthead sea bream cultured myocytes examining their development and the response of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), MRFs, as well as key molecules involved in muscle growth regulation like TOR. Leucine deficiency did not cause significant differences in most of the molecules analyzed, whereas Lysine deficiency appeared crucial in IGFs regulation, decreasing significantly IGF-I, IGF-II and IGF-IRb mRNA levels. This treatment also down-regulated the gene expression of different MRFs, including Myf5, Myogenin and MyoD2. These changes were also corroborated by a significant decrease in proliferation and differentiation markers in the Lysine-deficient treatment. Moreover, both Lysine and Leucine limitation induced a significant down-regulation in FOXO3 gene expression, which deserves further investigation. We believe that these results will be relevant for the production of a species as appreciated for human consumption as it is gilthead sea bream and demonstrates the importance of

  4. Fragment-Based Discovery of Type I Inhibitors of Maternal Embryonic Leucine Zipper Kinase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Fragment-based drug design was successfully applied to maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK). A low affinity (160 μM) fragment hit was identified, which bound to the hinge region with an atypical binding mode, and this was optimized using structure-based design into a low-nanomolar and cell-penetrant inhibitor, with a good selectivity profile, suitable for use as a chemical probe for elucidation of MELK biology. PMID:25589925

  5. Characteristics and Development of Leucine Transport Activity in the Scutellum of Germinating Barley Grain 1

    PubMed Central

    Sopanen, Tuomas; Uuskallio, Marjukka; Nyman, Seija; Mikola, Juhani

    1980-01-01

    Scutella separated from grains of Himalaya barley after germination for 3 days rapidly took up l-leucine from aerated incubation media; with 1 millimolar leucine the rate varied between 4 and 14 micromoles per gram per hour and the pH optimum was at 3.5 to 5, both depending on buffer composition and prewashing time. The rate of the uptake increased with increasing concentration of leucine in a complex manner, which could be interpreted as multiphasic kinetics with apparent Km values of 3.4 and 15.5 millimolar below and above 3 millimolar leucine, respectively. The uptake took place against a concentration difference (highest estimated ratio 270: 1) and was strongly inhibited by dinitrophenol. Uptake was apparently due to active transport requiring metabolic energy. The development of the uptake activity during germination was studied using Pirkka barley. A low activity was present in the scutella of ungerminated grains. It began to increase after 6 hours imbibition, and the increase was biphasic, the major changes occurring during days 0 to 3 and 4 to 6. The total increase was about 20-fold. The regulation of the development was studied by allowing separated embryos to germinate on agar gel. The increase of uptake activity was strongly inhibited by inhibitors of RNA or protein synthesis. Increase did not require the presence of the embryo proper, and was not affected by gibberellic or abscisic acid. Removal of the endosperm greatly accelerated the increase of uptake activity, and the presence of 5 or 20 millimolar glutamine counteracted the removal of the endosperm. The results suggest that the availability of glutamine or amino acids in general in the endosperm may regulate the development or the activity of the transport system. PMID:16661169

  6. The SAGA histone acetyltransferase complex regulates leucine uptake through the Agp3 permease in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hidekazu; Sun, Xiaoying; Hamamoto, Makiko; Yashiroda, Yoko; Yoshida, Minoru

    2012-11-01

    Metabolic responses of unicellular organisms are mostly acute, transient, and cell-autonomous. Regulation of nutrient uptake in yeast is one such rapid response. High quality nitrogen sources such as NH(4)(+) inhibit uptake of poor nitrogen sources, such as amino acids. Both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms operate in nutrient uptake regulation; however, many components of this system remain uncharacterized in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Here, we demonstrate that the Spt-Ada-Gcn acetyltransferase (SAGA) complex modulates leucine uptake. Initially, we noticed that a branched-chain amino acid auxotroph exhibits a peculiar adaptive growth phenotype on solid minimal media containing certain nitrogen sources. In fact, the growth of many auxotrophic strains is inhibited by excess NH(4)Cl, possibly through nitrogen-mediated uptake inhibition of the corresponding nutrients. Surprisingly, DNA microarray analysis revealed that the transcriptional reprogramming during the adaptation of the branched-chain amino acid auxotroph was highly correlated with reprogramming observed in deletions of the SAGA histone acetyltransferase module genes. Deletion of gcn5(+) increased leucine uptake in the prototrophic background and rendered the leucine auxotroph resistant to NH(4)Cl. Deletion of tra1(+) caused the opposite phenotypes. The increase in leucine uptake in the gcn5Δ mutant was dependent on an amino acid permease gene, SPCC965.11c(+). The closest budding yeast homolog of this permease is a relatively nonspecific amino acid permease AGP3, which functions in poor nutrient conditions. Our analysis identified the regulation of nutrient uptake as a physiological function for the SAGA complex, providing a potential link between cellular metabolism and chromatin regulation.

  7. Maple syrup urine disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... break down the amino acids leucine, isoleucine, and valine. This leads to a buildup of these chemicals ... levels of the amino acids leucine, isoleucine, and valine. People with this condition must remain on a ...

  8. Serine- and threonine/valine-dependent activation of PDK and Tor orthologs converge on Sch9 to promote aging.

    PubMed

    Mirisola, Mario G; Taormina, Giusi; Fabrizio, Paola; Wei, Min; Hu, Jia; Longo, Valter D

    2014-02-01

    Dietary restriction extends longevity in organisms ranging from bacteria to mice and protects primates from a variety of diseases, but the contribution of each dietary component to aging is poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that glucose and specific amino acids promote stress sensitization and aging through the differential activation of the Ras/cAMP/PKA, PKH1/2 and Tor/S6K pathways. Whereas glucose sensitized cells through a Ras-dependent mechanism, threonine and valine promoted cellular sensitization and aging primarily by activating the Tor/S6K pathway and serine promoted sensitization via PDK1 orthologs Pkh1/2. Serine, threonine and valine activated a signaling network in which Sch9 integrates TORC1 and Pkh signaling via phosphorylation of threonines 570 and 737 and promoted intracellular relocalization and transcriptional inhibition of the stress resistance protein kinase Rim15. Because of the conserved pro-aging role of nutrient and growth signaling pathways in higher eukaryotes, these results raise the possibility that similar mechanisms contribute to aging in mammals.

  9. An electrochemical biosensor for fructosyl valine for glycosylated hemoglobin detection based on core-shell magnetic bionanoparticles modified gold electrode.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Sheetal; Pundir, Chandra Shekhar

    2011-04-15

    A high-performance amperometric fructosyl valine (FV) biosensor was developed, based on immobilization of fructosyl amino-acid oxidase (FAO) on core-shell magnetic bionanoparticles modified gold electrode. Chitosan was used to introduce amino groups onto the surface of core-shell magnetic bionanoparticles (MNPs). With FAO as an enzyme model, a new fructosyl valine biosensor was fabricated. The biosensor showed optimum response, when operated at 50 mVs(-1) in 0.1M potassium phosphate buffer, pH 7.5 and 35°C. The biosensor exhibited excellent sensitivity [the detection limit is down to 0.1mM for FV], fast response time (less than 4s), wide linear range (from 0 to 2mM). Analytical recovery of added FV was 95.00-98.50%. Within batch and between batch coefficients of variation were <2.58% and <5.63%, respectively. The enzyme electrode was used 250 times over 3 months, when stored at 4°C.

  10. Serine- and threonine/valine-dependent activation of PDK and Tor orthologs converge on Sch9 to promote aging.

    PubMed

    Mirisola, Mario G; Taormina, Giusi; Fabrizio, Paola; Wei, Min; Hu, Jia; Longo, Valter D

    2014-02-01

    Dietary restriction extends longevity in organisms ranging from bacteria to mice and protects primates from a variety of diseases, but the contribution of each dietary component to aging is poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that glucose and specific amino acids promote stress sensitization and aging through the differential activation of the Ras/cAMP/PKA, PKH1/2 and Tor/S6K pathways. Whereas glucose sensitized cells through a Ras-dependent mechanism, threonine and valine promoted cellular sensitization and aging primarily by activating the Tor/S6K pathway and serine promoted sensitization via PDK1 orthologs Pkh1/2. Serine, threonine and valine activated a signaling network in which Sch9 integrates TORC1 and Pkh signaling via phosphorylation of threonines 570 and 737 and promoted intracellular relocalization and transcriptional inhibition of the stress resistance protein kinase Rim15. Because of the conserved pro-aging role of nutrient and growth signaling pathways in higher eukaryotes, these results raise the possibility that similar mechanisms contribute to aging in mammals. PMID:24516402

  11. Serine- and Threonine/Valine-Dependent Activation of PDK and Tor Orthologs Converge on Sch9 to Promote Aging

    PubMed Central

    Fabrizio, Paola; Wei, Min; Hu, Jia; Longo, Valter D.

    2014-01-01

    Dietary restriction extends longevity in organisms ranging from bacteria to mice and protects primates from a variety of diseases, but the contribution of each dietary component to aging is poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that glucose and specific amino acids promote stress sensitization and aging through the differential activation of the Ras/cAMP/PKA, PKH1/2 and Tor/S6K pathways. Whereas glucose sensitized cells through a Ras-dependent mechanism, threonine and valine promoted cellular sensitization and aging primarily by activating the Tor/S6K pathway and serine promoted sensitization via PDK1 orthologs Pkh1/2. Serine, threonine and valine activated a signaling network in which Sch9 integrates TORC1 and Pkh signaling via phosphorylation of threonines 570 and 737 and promoted intracellular relocalization and transcriptional inhibition of the stress resistance protein kinase Rim15. Because of the conserved pro-aging role of nutrient and growth signaling pathways in higher eukaryotes, these results raise the possibility that similar mechanisms contribute to aging in mammals. PMID:24516402

  12. Dose and time dependent effects of morphine on the incorporation of (3H)valine into soluble brain and liver proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Roennbaeck, L.; Hansson, E.; Cupello, A.

    1983-03-01

    Morphine (10(-6)-10(-5) M) causes an increase in incorporation of (/sup 3/H)valine into soluble proteins during 4 hr in rat brain cortical slices, liver slices and cultivated astroglial cells. The effects are dose-dependent. They are neither cell specific nor strictly related to classical opiate receptors. Pulse-labeling with (/sup 3/H)valine for 60 min after incubation in 10(-6)-10(-5) M morphine, resolves time-dependent changes in incorporation, with both increases and decreases in protein metabolism.

  13. Amino Acid Availability and Age Affect the Leucine Stimulation of Protein Synthesis and eIF4F Formation in Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, Jeffery; Frank, Jason W.; Suryawan, Agus; Nguyen, Hanh V.; Davis, Teresa A.

    2009-01-01

    We have previously shown that a physiological increase in plasma leucine for 60- and 120-min increases translation initiation factor activation in muscle of neonatal pigs. Although muscle protein synthesis is increased by leucine at 60 min, it is not maintained at 120 min, perhaps due to the decrease in plasma amino acids (AA). In the current study, 7- and 26-day-old pigs were fasted overnight and infused with leucine (0 or 400 µmol· kg−1· h−1) for 120 min to raise leucine within the postprandial range. The leucine was infused in the presence or absence of a replacement AA mixture (without leucine) to maintain baseline plasma AA levels. AA administration prevented the leucine-induced reduction in plasma AA in both age groups. At 7 days, leucine infusion alone increased eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4E binding protein-1 (4E-BP1) phosphorylation, decreased inactive 4E-BP1·eIF4E complex abundance, and increased active eIF4G·eIF4E complex formation in skeletal muscle; leucine infusion with replacement AA also stimulated these, as well as S6K1, rpS6, and eIF4G phosphorylation. At 26 days, leucine infusion alone increased 4E-BP1 phosphorylation and decreased the inactive 4E-BP1·eIF4E complex only; leucine with AA also stimulated these, as well as S6K1 and rpS6 phosphorylation. Muscle protein synthesis was increased in 7-day-old (+60%) and 26-day-old (+40%) pigs infused with leucine and replacement AA, but not with leucine alone. Thus, the ability of leucine to stimulate eIF4F formation and protein synthesis in skeletal muscle is dependent on AA availability and age. PMID:17878223

  14. Incorporation of l-[14C]leucine into egg proteins by liver slices from cod

    PubMed Central

    Plack, P. A.; Fraser, N. W.

    1971-01-01

    1. Liver slices from cod (Gadus morhua L.) were incubated with l-[14C]leucine and the incorporation of label into total protein, precipitated with trichloroacetic acid, and into egg proteins, precipitated with an antibody after addition of carrier egg proteins, was measured. 2. Liver slices from immature male or female cod, and from male fish with developing testes, did not incorporate significant amounts of l-[14C]leucine into egg proteins, whereas with slices from female cod with developing ovaries the rate of incorporation into egg proteins was 8% of the rate of incorporation into total protein. 3. Liver slices from immature male or female fish that had received an intramuscular injection of oestradiol benzoate (1mg/kg) 5–8 days previously incorporated l-[14C]leucine into egg proteins at about 26% of the rate of incorporation into total protein. 4. Incorporation into total protein and into egg proteins was inhibited by puromycin, and 1.2 and 0.13μg of puromycin/mg of tissue protein, respectively, gave 50% inhibition. PMID:16742749

  15. Sunlight Effects on the Osmotrophic Uptake of DMSP-Sulfur and Leucine by Polar Phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-González, Clara; Galí, Martí; Sintes, Eva; Herndl, Gerhard J.; Gasol, Josep M.; Simó, Rafel

    2012-01-01

    Even though the uptake and assimilation of organic compounds by phytoplankton has been long recognized, very little is still known about its potential ecological role in natural marine communities and whether it varies depending on the light regimes the algae experience. We combined measurements of size-fractionated assimilation of trace additions of 3H-leucine and 35S-dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) with microautoradiography to assess the extent and relevance of osmoheterotrophy in summer phytoplankton assemblages from Arctic and Antarctic waters, and the role of solar radiation on it was further investigated by exposing samples to different radiation spectra. Significant assimilation of both substrates occurred in the size fraction containing most phytoplankton (>5 µm), sunlight exposure generally increasing 35S-DMSP-sulfur assimilation and decreasing 3H-leucine assimilation. Microautoradiography revealed that the capacity to take up both organic substrates seemed widespread among different polar algal phyla, particularly in pennate and centric diatoms, and photosynthetic dinoflagellates. Image analysis of the microautoradiograms showed for the first time interspecific variability in the uptakes of 35S-DMSP and 3H-leucine by phytoplankton depending on the solar spectrum. Overall, these results suggest that the role of polar phytoplankton in the utilization of labile dissolved organic matter may be significant under certain conditions and further confirm the relevance of solar radiation in regulating heterotrophy in the pelagic ocean. PMID:23029084

  16. Gentamicin and leucine inhalable powder: what about antipseudomonal activity and permeation through cystic fibrosis mucus?

    PubMed

    Russo, Paola; Stigliani, Mariateresa; Prota, Lucia; Auriemma, Giulia; Crescenzi, Carlo; Porta, Amalia; Aquino, Rita P

    2013-01-20

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the permeation properties of gentamicin (G) in a novel dry powder form for inhalation through an artificial mucus model. Moreover, since respiratory infections sustained by Pseudomonas are a major cause of sickness and death in CF patients, the susceptibility of P. aeruginosa to engineered G powders was investigated. Micronized G and G/leucine (85:15) formulations were produced by co-spray-drying, using process parameters and conditions previously set. Powders were characterized in terms of yield, drug content and aerodynamic profiles, analyzed by Andersen Cascade Impactor. Different mucus models were prepared, showing composition and viscosity similar to those of the native CF mucus. To investigate the impact on drug permeation, Franz-type vertical diffusion cells were used; the powders were applied directly on a synthetic membrane with or without the interposition of the artificial mucus layer. In buffer, gentamicin showed a diffusion controlled release; the presence of leucine reduced powder wettability and, consequently, the permeation rate. Otherwise, mucus delayed drug permeation from both G and G/leucine formulations, with a faint influence of the aminoacid. Antimicrobial tests revealed that G/leu engineered particles are able to preserve the antipseudomonal activity, even in presence of the mucus.

  17. Leucine incorporation by aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria in the Delaware estuary

    PubMed Central

    Stegman, Monica R; Cottrell, Matthew T; Kirchman, David L

    2014-01-01

    Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP) bacteria are well known to be abundant in estuaries, coastal regions and in the open ocean, but little is known about their activity in any aquatic ecosystem. To explore the activity of AAP bacteria in the Delaware estuary and coastal waters, single-cell 3H-leucine incorporation by these bacteria was examined with a new approach that combines infrared epifluorescence microscopy and microautoradiography. The approach was used on samples from the Delaware coast from August through December and on transects through the Delaware estuary in August and November 2011. The percent of active AAP bacteria was up to twofold higher than the percentage of active cells in the rest of the bacterial community in the estuary. Likewise, the silver grain area around active AAP bacteria in microautoradiography preparations was larger than the area around cells in the rest of the bacterial community, indicating higher rates of leucine consumption by AAP bacteria. The cell size of AAP bacteria was 50% bigger than the size of other bacteria, about the same difference on average as measured for activity. The abundance of AAP bacteria was negatively correlated and their activity positively correlated with light availability in the water column, although light did not affect 3H-leucine incorporation in light–dark experiments. Our results suggest that AAP bacteria are bigger and more active than other bacteria, and likely contribute more to organic carbon fluxes than indicated by their abundance. PMID:24824666

  18. Molecular Characterization of the Leucine Cluster in Buchnera sp. Strain PSY, a Primary Endosymbiont of the Aphid Pemphigus spyrothecae

    PubMed Central

    Sabater-Muñoz, Beatriz; Gómez-Valero, Laura; van Ham, Roeland C. H. J.; Silva, Francisco J.; Latorre, Amparo

    2002-01-01

    Buchnera strains from most aphid subfamilies studied to date have been found to carry the leucine gene cluster (leuA, -B, -C, and -D) on a plasmid, an organization unique among bacteria. Here, however, we demonstrate a classical chromosomal location of the cluster in Buchnera sp. strain PSY from the aphid Pemphigus spyrothecae (subfamily Pemphiginae). The genes that flank leuABCD in Buchnera sp. strain PSY appear to be adjacent in the genome of Buchnera sp. strain APS, a strain carrying a leucine plasmid. We propose that the presence of a leucine plasmid predates the diversification of symbiotic Buchnera and that the chromosomal location observed in Buchnera sp. strain PSY arose by a transfer of the leucine genes from a plasmid to the chromosome. PMID:11976137

  19. Autophagy proteins play cytoprotective and cytocidal roles in leucine starvation-induced cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Dziedzic, Slawomir A.; Caplan, Allan B.

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is essential for prolonging yeast survival during nutrient deprivation; however, this report shows that some autophagy proteins may also be accelerating population death in those conditions. While leucine starvation caused YCA1-mediated apoptosis characterized by increased annexin V staining, nitrogen deprivation triggered necrotic death characterized by increased propidium iodide uptake. Although a Δatg8 strain died faster than its parental strain during nitrogen starvation, this mutant died slower than its parent during leucine starvation. Conversely, a Δatg11 strain died slower than its parent during nitrogen starvation, but faster during leucine starvation. Curiously, although GFP-Atg8 complemented the Δatg8 mutation, this protein made ATG8 cells more sensitive to nitrogen starvation, and less sensitive to leucine starvation. These results were difficult to explain if autophagy only extended life but could be an indication that a second form of autophagy could concurrently facilitate either apoptotic or necrotic cell death. PMID:22361650

  20. Defective regulation of autophagy upon leucine deprivation reveals a targetable liability of human melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, Joon-Ho; Zoncu, Roberto; Kim, Dohoon; Sabatini, David M.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Autophagy is of increasing interest as a target for cancer therapy. We find that leucine deprivation causes the caspase-dependent apoptotic death of melanoma cells because it fails to appropriately activate autophagy. Hyperactivation of the RAS-MEK pathway, which is common in melanoma, prevents leucine deprivation from inhibiting mTORC1, the main repressor of autophagy under nutrient-rich conditions. In an in vivo tumor xenograft model, the combination of a leucine-free diet and an autophagy inhibitor synergistically suppresses the growth of human melanoma tumors and triggers widespread apoptosis of the cancer cells. Together, our study represents proof of principle that anti-cancer effects can be obtained with a combination of autophagy inhibition and strategies to deprive tumors of leucine. PMID:21575862

  1. Impact of Leucine Supplementation on Exercise Training Induced Anti-Cardiac Remodeling Effect in Heart Failure Mice

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Wilson Max Almeida Monteiro; Melara, Thaís Plasti; de Souza, Pamella Ramona Moraes; de Salvi Guimarães, Fabiana; Bozi, Luiz Henrique Marchesi; Brum, Patricia Chakur; Medeiros, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Leucine supplementation potentiates the effects of aerobic exercise training (AET) on skeletal muscle; however, its potential effects associated with AET on cardiac muscle have not been clarified yet. We tested whether leucine supplementation would potentiate the anti-cardiac remodeling effect of AET in a genetic model of sympathetic hyperactivity-induced heart failure in mice (α2A/α2CARKO). Mice were assigned to five groups: wild type mice treated with placebo and sedentary (WT, n = 11), α2A/α2CARKO treated with placebo and sedentary (KO, n = 9), α2A/α2CARKO treated with leucine and sedentary (KOL, n = 11), α2A/α2CARKO treated with placebo and AET (KOT, n = 12) or α2A/α2CARKO treated with leucine and AET (KOLT, n = 12). AET consisted of four weeks on a treadmill with 60 min sessions (six days/week, 60% of maximal speed) and administration by gavage of leucine (1.35 g/kg/day) or placebo (distilled water). The AET significantly improved exercise capacity, fractional shortening and re-established cardiomyocytes’ diameter and collagen fraction in KOT. Additionally, AET significantly prevented the proteasome hyperactivity, increased misfolded proteins and HSP27 expression. Isolated leucine supplementation displayed no effect on cardiac function and structure (KOL), however, when associated with AET (KOLT), it increased exercise tolerance to a higher degree than isolated AET (KOT) despite no additional effects on AET induced anti-cardiac remodeling. Our results provide evidence for the modest impact of leucine supplementation on cardiac structure and function in exercised heart failure mice. Leucine supplementation potentiated AET effects on exercise tolerance, which might be related to its recognized impact on skeletal muscle. PMID:25988767

  2. Lean body mass change over 6 years is associated with dietary leucine intake in an older Danish population.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Cameron Keith; Ankarfeldt, Mikkel Z; Capra, Sandra; Bauer, Judy; Raymond, Kyle; Heitmann, Berit Lilienthal

    2016-05-01

    Higher protein intake, and particularly higher leucine intake, is associated with attenuated loss of lean body mass (LBM) over time in older individuals. Dietary leucine is thought to be a key mediator of anabolism. This study aimed to assess this relationship over 6 years among younger and older adult Danes. Dietary leucine intake was assessed at baseline and after 6 years in men and women, aged 35-65 years, participating in the Danish cohort of the WHO-MONICA (Multinational MONItoring of trends and determinants in CArdiovascular disease) study (n 368). Changes in LBM over the 6 years were measured by bioelectrical impedance using equations developed for this Danish population. The association between leucine and LBM changes was examined using multivariate linear regression and ANCOVA analyses adjusted for potential confounders. After adjustment for baseline LBM, sex, age, energy intake and physical activity, leucine intake was associated with LBM change in those older than 65 years (n 79), with no effect seen in those younger than 65 years. Older participants in the highest quartile of leucine intake (7·1 g/d) experienced LBM maintenance, whereas lower intakes were associated with LBM loss over 6 years (for trend: β=0·434, P=0·03). Sensitivity analysis indicated no effect modification of sex or the presence of CVD. Greater leucine intake in conjunction with adequate total protein intake was associated with long-term LBM retention in a healthy older Danish population. This study corroborates findings from laboratory investigations in relation to protein and leucine intakes and LBM change. A more diverse and larger sample is needed for confirmation of these results. PMID:26979049

  3. Isolation and characterization of cytosolic alanine aminotransferase isoforms from starved rat liver.

    PubMed

    Vedavathi, M; Girish, K S; Kumar, M Karuna

    2004-12-01

    Alanine is the most effective precursor for gluconeogenesis among amino acids and the initial reaction is catalyzed by alanine aminotransferases (AlaATs). It is a less extensively studied enzyme under starvation and known to that the enzyme activity increases in liver under starvation. The present study describes the purification and characterization of two isoforms of alanine aminotransferases from starved male rat liver under starvation. The molecular mass of isoforms was found to be 17.7 and 112.2 kDa with isoelectric points of 4.2 and 5.3 respectively for AlaAT I and AlaAT II. Both the enzymes showed narrow substrate specificity for L-alanine with different Km for alanine and 2-oxoglutarate. Both the enzymes were glycoprotein in nature. Inhibition, modification and spectroscopic studies showed that both PLP and free-SH groups are directly involved in the enzymatic catalysis. PLP activated both the enzymes with a Km 0.057 mM and 0.2 mM for AlaAT I and II respectively. PMID:15663181

  4. Purification and characterization of alanine dehydrogenase from a cyanobacterium, Phormidium lapideum.

    PubMed

    Sawa, Y; Tani, M; Murata, K; Shibata, H; Ochiai, H

    1994-11-01

    Alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) was purified to homogeneity from cell-free extracts of a non-N2-fixing filamentous cyanobacterium, Phormidium lapideum. The molecular mass of the native enzyme was 240 kDa, and SDS-PAGE revealed a minimum molecular mass of 41 kDa, suggesting a six-subunit structure. The NH2 terminal amino acid residues of the purified AlaDH revealed marked similarity with that of other AlaDHs. The enzyme was highly specific for L-alanine and NAD+, but showed relatively low amino-acceptor specificity. The pH optimum was 8.4 for reductive amination of pyruvate and 9.2 for oxidative deamination of L-alanine. The Km values were 5.0 mM for L-alanine and 0.04 mM for NAD+, 0.33 mM for pyruvate, 60.6 mM for NH4+ (pH 8.7), and 0.02 mM for NADH. Various L-amino acids including alanine, serine, threonine, and aromatic amino acids, inhibited the aminating reaction. The enzyme was inactivated upon incubation with pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) followed by reduction with sodium borohydride. The copresence of NADH and pyruvate largely protected the enzyme against the inactivation by PLP. PMID:7896761

  5. Theoretical and experimental study of valence photoelectron spectrum of D,L-alanine amino acid.

    PubMed

    Farrokhpour, H; Fathi, F; De Brito, A Naves

    2012-07-01

    In this work, the He-I (21.218 eV) photoelectron spectrum of D,L-alanine in the gas phase is revisited experimentally and theoretically. To support the experiment, the high level ab initio calculations were used to calculate and assign the photoelectron spectra of the four most stable conformers of gaseous alanine, carefully. The symmetry adapted cluster/configuration interaction (SAC-CI) method based on single and double excitation operators (SD-R) and its more accurate version, termed general-R, was used to separately calculate the energies and intensities of the ionization bands of the L- and D-alanine conformers. The intensities of ionization bands were calculated based on the monopole approximation. Also, natural bonding orbital (NBO) calculations were employed for better spectral band assignment. The relative electronic energy, Gibbs free energy, and Boltzmann population ratio of the conformers were calculated at the experimental temperature (403 K) using several theoretical methods. The theoretical photoelectron spectrum of alanine was calculated by summing over the spectra of individual D and L conformers weighted by different population ratios. Finally, the population ratio of the four most stable conformers of alanine was estimated from the experimental photoelectron spectrum using theoretical calculations for the first time.

  6. Perturbation correction for alanine dosimeters in different phantom materials in high-energy photon beams.

    PubMed

    von Voigts-Rhetz, P; Anton, M; Vorwerk, H; Zink, K

    2016-02-01

    In modern radiotherapy the verification of complex treatments plans is often performed in inhomogeneous or even anthropomorphic phantoms. For dose verification small detectors are necessary and therefore alanine detectors are most suitable. Though the response of alanine for a wide range of clinical photon energies in water is well know, the knowledge about the influence of the surrounding phantom material on the response of alanine is sparse. Therefore we investigated the influence of twenty different surrounding/phantom materials for alanine dosimeters in clinical photon fields via Monte Carlo simulations. The relative electron density of the used materials was in the range [Formula: see text] up to 1.69, covering almost all materials appearing in inhomogeneous or anthropomorphic phantoms used in radiotherapy. The investigations were performed for three different clinical photon spectra ranging from 6 to 25 MV-X and Co-60 and as a result a perturbation correction [Formula: see text] depending on the environmental material was established. The Monte Carlo simulation show, that there is only a small dependence of [Formula: see text] on the phantom material and the photon energy, which is below  ±0.6%. The results confirm the good suitability of alanine detectors for in-vivo dosimetry.

  7. Perturbation correction for alanine dosimeters in different phantom materials in high-energy photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Voigts-Rhetz, P.; Anton, M.; Vorwerk, H.; Zink, K.

    2016-02-01

    In modern radiotherapy the verification of complex treatments plans is often performed in inhomogeneous or even anthropomorphic phantoms. For dose verification small detectors are necessary and therefore alanine detectors are most suitable. Though the response of alanine for a wide range of clinical photon energies in water is well know, the knowledge about the influence of the surrounding phantom material on the response of alanine is sparse. Therefore we investigated the influence of twenty different surrounding/phantom materials for alanine dosimeters in clinical photon fields via Monte Carlo simulations. The relative electron density of the used materials was in the range {{n}e}/{{n}e,\\text{w}}=0.20 up to 1.69, covering almost all materials appearing in inhomogeneous or anthropomorphic phantoms used in radiotherapy. The investigations were performed for three different clinical photon spectra ranging from 6 to 25 MV-X and Co-60 and as a result a perturbation correction {{k}\\text{env}} depending on the environmental material was established. The Monte Carlo simulation show, that there is only a small dependence of {{k}\\text{env}} on the phantom material and the photon energy, which is below  ±0.6%. The results confirm the good suitability of alanine detectors for in-vivo dosimetry.

  8. Effect of 10 week beta-alanine supplementation on competition and training performance in elite swimmers.

    PubMed

    Chung, Weiliang; Shaw, Greg; Anderson, Megan E; Pyne, David B; Saunders, Philo U; Bishop, David J; Burke, Louise M

    2012-10-09

    Although some laboratory-based studies show an ergogenic effect with beta-alanine supplementation, there is a lack of field-based research in training and competition settings. Elite/Sub-elite swimmers (n = 23 males and 18 females, age = 21.7 ± 2.8 years; mean ± SD) were supplemented with either beta-alanine (4 weeks loading phase of 4.8 g/day and 3.2 g/day thereafter) or placebo for 10 weeks. Competition performance times were log-transformed, then evaluated before (National Championships) and after (international or national selection meet) supplementation. Swimmers also completed three standardized training sets at baseline, 4 and 10 weeks of supplementation. Capillary blood was analyzed for pH, bicarbonate and lactate concentration in both competition and training. There was an unclear effect (0.4%; ± 0.8%, mean, ± 90% confidence limits) of beta-alanine on competition performance compared to placebo with no meaningful changes in blood chemistry. While there was a transient improvement on training performance after 4 weeks with beta-alanine (-1.3%; ± 1.0%), there was an unclear effect at ten weeks (-0.2%; ± 1.5%) and no meaningful changes in blood chemistry. Beta-alanine supplementation appears to have minimal effect on swimming performance in non-laboratory controlled real-world training and competition settings.

  9. Conformational composition and population analysis of β-alanine isolated in solid parahydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel Wong, Y. T.; Toh, Shin Y.; Djuricanin, Pavle; Momose, Takamasa

    2015-04-01

    The conformational composition and the change in conformational ratio induced by UV irradiation of β-alanine have been investigated using solid parahydrogen FT-IR matrix isolation spectroscopy for the first time. In order to assign the observed spectra, the vibrational wavenumbers and intensities of the eleven lowest energy β-alanine conformers were calculated at the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory. In-situ UV photo-irradiation of β-alanine in solid parahydrogen was used to assist the spectral assignment. Out of the eleven lowest energy conformers, conformers I, II, III, IV, and VII were identified in the solid parahydrogen matrix, with conformer III observed in a matrix environment for the first time. Argon matrix FT-IR spectra of β-alanine were also recorded for comparison and only four conformers, conformers I, II, IV and VII, were found, as reported previously. Conformational changes to higher energy structures were observed when β-alanine was irradiated with UV radiation. These changes were more pronounced in parahydrogen matrices than in argon matrices, indicating the usefulness of solid parahydrogen matrix isolation spectroscopy for the conformational study of amino acids.

  10. UV-induced isomerization of β-alanine isolated in argon matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanian, Stepan G.; Ivanov, Alexander Yu.; Smyrnova, Daryna A.; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2012-10-01

    We have employed low-temperature matrix-isolation FTIR spectroscopy, the density functional theory and ab initio calculations at the MP2 and CCSD(T) levels of theory to determine the conformational composition of the simplest β-amino acid, β-alanine. UV irradiation and thermal annealing of the samples together with the FTIR spectra of deuterated β-alanine were used to separate bands of different conformers. A detailed study of the potential energy surface of β-alanine obtained at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory reveals twenty β-alanine conformers, but only five of them may exist in matrices due to their sufficiently high relative stabilities and low energy barriers separating them from each other. An analysis of the FTIR spectra allows us to confirm the presence of four β-alanine conformers in argon matrices with certainty. Two of them, conformers I and II, have an Nsbnd H⋯O intramolecular H-bond, the third, conformer V, has an N⋯Hsbnd O H-bond, and the fourth, conformer IV, has no intramolecular H-bonds. The relative populations of the conformers determined using the relative Gibbs free energies calculated at the CCSD(T)/CBS level of theory at 420 K are 48.1%, 23.7%, 16.8% and 3.2% for the conformers I, II, IV, and V, respectively. Some trace amount of conformer VII was also detected.

  11. Biochemical characterization of alanine racemase--a spore protein produced by Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Kanodia, Shivani; Agarwal, Shivangi; Singh, Priyanka; Agarwal, Shivani; Singh, Preeti; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2009-01-31

    Alanine racemase catalyzes the interconversion of L-alanine and D-alanine and plays a crucial role in spore germination and cell wall biosynthesis. In this study, alanine racemase produced by Bacillus anthracis was expressed and purified as a monomer in Escherichia coli and the importance of lysine 41 in the cofactor binding octapeptide and tyrosine 270 in catalysis was evaluated. The native enzyme exhibited an apparent K(m) of 3 mM for L-alanine, and a V(max) of 295 micromoles/min/mg, with the optimum activity occurring at 37 degrees C and a pH of 8-9. The activity observed in the absence of exogenous pyridoxal 5'-phosphate suggested that the cofactor is bound to the enzyme. Additionally, the UV-visible absorption spectra indicated that the activity was pH independece, of VV-visible absorption spectra suggests that the bound PLP exists as a protonated Schiff's base. Furthermore, the loss of activity observed in the apoenzyme suggested that bound PLP is required for catalysis. Finally, the enzyme followed non-competitive and mixed inhibition kinetics for hydroxylamine and propionate with a K(i) of 160 microM and 30 mM, respectively. [BMB reports 2009; 42(1): 47-52]. PMID:19192393

  12. Role of Alanine Dehydrogenase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during Recovery from Hypoxic Nonreplicating Persistence.

    PubMed

    Giffin, Michelle M; Shi, Lanbo; Gennaro, Maria L; Sohaskey, Charles D

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis can maintain a nonreplicating persistent state in the host for decades, but must maintain the ability to efficiently reactivate and produce active disease to survive and spread in a population. Among the enzymes expressed during this dormancy is alanine dehydrogenase, which converts pyruvate to alanine, and glyoxylate to glycine concurrent with the oxidation of NADH to NAD. It is involved in the metabolic remodeling of M. tuberculosis through its possible interactions with both the glyoxylate and methylcitrate cycle. Both mRNA levels and enzymatic activities of isocitrate lyase, the first enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, and alanine dehydrogenase increased during entry into nonreplicating persistence, while the gene and activity for the second enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, malate synthase were not. This could suggest a shift in carbon flow away from the glyoxylate cycle and instead through alanine dehydrogenase. Expression of ald was also induced in vitro by other persistence-inducing stresses such as nitric oxide, and was expressed at high levels in vivo during the initial lung infection in mice. Enzyme activity was maintained during extended hypoxia even after transcription levels decreased. An ald knockout mutant of M. tuberculosis showed no reduction in anaerobic survival in vitro, but resulted in a significant lag in the resumption of growth after reoxygenation. During reactivation the ald mutant had an altered NADH/NAD ratio, and alanine dehydrogenase is proposed to maintain the optimal NADH/NAD ratio during anaerobiosis in preparation of eventual regrowth, and during the initial response during reoxygenation. PMID:27203084

  13. ald of Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes both the alanine dehydrogenase and the putative glycine dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Giffin, Michelle M; Modesti, Lucia; Raab, Ronald W; Wayne, Lawrence G; Sohaskey, Charles D

    2012-03-01

    The putative glycine dehydrogenase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis catalyzes the reductive amination of glyoxylate to glycine but not the reverse reaction. The enzyme was purified and identified as the previously characterized alanine dehydrogenase. The Ald enzyme was expressed in Escherichia coli and had both pyruvate and glyoxylate aminating activities. The gene, ald, was inactivated in M. tuberculosis, which resulted in the loss of all activities. Both enzyme activities were found associated with the cell and were not detected in the extracellular filtrate. By using an anti-Ald antibody, the protein was localized to the cell membrane, with a smaller fraction in the cytosol. None was detected in the extracellular medium. The ald knockout strain grew without alanine or glycine and was able to utilize glycine but not alanine as a nitrogen source. Transcription of ald was induced when alanine was the sole nitrogen source, and higher levels of Ald enzyme were measured. Ald is proposed to have several functions, including ammonium incorporation and alanine breakdown.

  14. Role of Alanine Dehydrogenase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during Recovery from Hypoxic Nonreplicating Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Giffin, Michelle M.; Shi, Lanbo; Gennaro, Maria L.; Sohaskey, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis can maintain a nonreplicating persistent state in the host for decades, but must maintain the ability to efficiently reactivate and produce active disease to survive and spread in a population. Among the enzymes expressed during this dormancy is alanine dehydrogenase, which converts pyruvate to alanine, and glyoxylate to glycine concurrent with the oxidation of NADH to NAD. It is involved in the metabolic remodeling of M. tuberculosis through its possible interactions with both the glyoxylate and methylcitrate cycle. Both mRNA levels and enzymatic activities of isocitrate lyase, the first enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, and alanine dehydrogenase increased during entry into nonreplicating persistence, while the gene and activity for the second enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, malate synthase were not. This could suggest a shift in carbon flow away from the glyoxylate cycle and instead through alanine dehydrogenase. Expression of ald was also induced in vitro by other persistence-inducing stresses such as nitric oxide, and was expressed at high levels in vivo during the initial lung infection in mice. Enzyme activity was maintained during extended hypoxia even after transcription levels decreased. An ald knockout mutant of M. tuberculosis showed no reduction in anaerobic survival in vitro, but resulted in a significant lag in the resumption of growth after reoxygenation. During reactivation the ald mutant had an altered NADH/NAD ratio, and alanine dehydrogenase is proposed to maintain the optimal NADH/NAD ratio during anaerobiosis in preparation of eventual regrowth, and during the initial response during reoxygenation. PMID:27203084

  15. Biosynthesis of 4-methyleneglutamic acid by peanut seedlings: Evidence for the involvement of a distinct source of leucine

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, H.C.; Dekker, E.E. )

    1989-04-01

    Germinating peanut seeds accumulate 4-methyleneglutamic acid its {gamma}-amide(MeGlx), as well as 4-methylglutamic acid(MGlu) for which leucine has been implicated as a precursor. When we incubated detached peanut cotyledons with {sup 14}C-leucine for 24-96 hr, most of the label was found in non-extractable components, while small but significant amounts were present in MeGlx, MGlu, and free leucine. The level of leucine in storage protein of ungerminated seeds is similar to the maximum level of MeGlx found in germinated seeds; further correlations were observed in various peanut tissues between rapid accumulation of MeGlx and the presence of high levels of glyoxysomal enzymes (catalase and isocitrate lyase). These results suggest that during germination, most of the leucine in the seed storage protein is converted to MeGlx, possibly by a glyoxysomal oxidase system in cotyledons, whereas most of the free leucine for protein synthesis is formed de novo.

  16. Synthesis and antimicrobial activity in vitro of new amino acids and peptides containing thiazole and oxazole moieties.

    PubMed

    Stanchev, M; Tabakova, S; Videnov, G; Golovinsky, E; Jung, G

    1999-09-01

    2-(Pyrrolidinyl)thiazole-4-carboxylic acid 5d, 2-(1-aminoalkyl)thiazole-4-carboxamides and hydrazides 8, 10 have been synthesized using alanine, valine, and proline as educts. In addition oxazole amino acids derived from leucine 20a and alanine 20b and some peptides 13, 14, 16 containing the 5-ring heterocyclic backbone modifications have been prepared. The thiazole and oxazole containing amino acids and peptides showed moderate antibacterial activity in vitro against various Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, etc.) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Protens vulgaris, etc.) bacteria, fungi (Candida albicans), and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisae, etc.). PMID:10520298

  17. Mechanism of mercurial inhibition of sodium-coupled alanine uptake in liver plasma membrane vesicles from Raja erinacea

    SciTech Connect

    Sellinger, M.; Ballatori, N.; Boyer, J.L. )

    1991-02-01

    In mammalian hepatocytes the L-alanine carrier contains a sulfhydryl group that is essential for its activity and is inhibited by mercurials. In hepatocytes of the evolutionarily primitive little skate (Raja erinacea), HgCl2 inhibits Na(+)-dependent alanine uptake and Na+/K(+)-ATPase and increase K+ permeability. To distinguish between direct effects of HgCl2 on the Na(+)-alanine cotransporter and indirect effects on membrane permeability, (3H)alanine transport was studied in plasma membrane vesicles. (3H)Alanine uptake was stimulated by an out-to-in Na+ but not K+ gradient and was saturable confirming the presence of Na(+)-alanine cotransport in liver plasma membranes from this species. Preincubation of the vesicles with HgCl2 for 5 min reduced initial rates of Na(+)-dependent but not Na(+)-independent alanine uptake in a dose-dependent manner (10-200 microM). In the presence of equal concentrations of NaCl or KCl inside and outside of the vesicles, 75 microM HgCl2 directly inhibited sodium-dependent alanine-(3H)alanine exchange, demonstrating that HgCl2 directly affected the alanine cotransporter. Inhibition of Na(+)-dependent alanine uptake by 30 microM HgCl2 was reversed by dithiothreitol (1 mM). HgCl2 (10-30 microM) also increased initial rates of 22Na uptake (at 5 sec), whereas 22Na uptake rates were decreased at HgCl2 concentrations greater than 50 microM. Higher concentrations of HgCl2 (100-200 microM) produced nonspecific effects on vesicle integrity. These studies indicate that HgCl2 inhibits Na(+)-dependent alanine uptake in skate hepatocytes by three different concentration-dependent mechanisms: direct interaction with the transporters, dissipation of the driving force (Na+ gradient), and loss of membrane integrity.

  18. Role of Valine 464 in the Flavin Oxidation Reaction Catalyzed by Choline Oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Finnegan, Steffan; Agniswamy, Johnson; Weber, Irene T.; Gadda, Giovanni

    2010-11-03

    The oxidation of reduced flavin cofactors by oxygen is a very important reaction that is central to the chemical versatility of hundreds of flavoproteins classified as monooxygenases and oxidases. These enzymes are characterized by bimolecular rate constants {ge} 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} and produce water and hydrogen peroxide, respectively. A hydrophobic cavity close to the reactive flavin C(4a) atom has been previously identified in the 3D structure of monooxygenases but not in flavoprotein oxidases. In the present study, we have investigated by X-ray crystallography, mutagenesis, steady-state, and rapid reaction approaches the role of Val464, which is <6 {angstrom} from the flavin C(4a) atom in choline oxidase. The 3D structure of the Val464Ala enzyme was essentially identical to that of the wild-type enzyme as shown by X-ray crystallography. Time-resolved anaerobic substrate reduction of the enzymes showed that replacement of Val464 with alanine or threonine did not affect the reductive half-reaction. Steady-state and rapid kinetics as well as enzyme-monitored turnovers indicated that the oxidative half-reaction in the Ala464 and Thr464 enzymes was decreased by 50-fold with respect to the wild-type enzyme. We propose that the side chain of Val464 in choline oxidase provides a nonpolar site that is required to guide oxygen in proximity of the C(4a) atom of the flavin, where it will subsequently react via electrostatic catalysis. Visual analysis of available structures suggests that analogous nonpolar sites are likely present in most flavoprotein oxidases. Mechanistic considerations provide rationalization for the differences between sites in monooxygenases and oxidases.

  19. A common fold for peptide synthetases cleaving ATP to ADP: glutathione synthetase and D-alanine:d-alanine ligase of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Fan, C; Moews, P C; Shi, Y; Walsh, C T; Knox, J R

    1995-01-01

    Examination of x-ray crystallographic structures shows the tertiary structure of D-alanine:D-alanine ligase (EC 6.3.2.4). a bacterial cell wall synthesizing enzyme, is similar to that of glutathione synthetase (EC 6.32.3) despite low sequence homology. Both Escherichia coli enzymes, which convert ATP to ADP during ligation to produce peptide products, are made of three domains, each folded around a 4-to 6-stranded beta-sheet core. Sandwiched between the beta-sheets of the C-terminal and central domains of each enzyme is a nonclassical ATP-binding site that contains a common set of spatially equivalent amino acids. In each enzyme, two loops are proposed to exhibit a required flexibility that allows entry of ATP and substrates, provides protection of the acylphosphate intermediate and tetrahedral adduct from hydrolysis during catalysis, and then permits release of products. PMID:7862655

  20. On the roles of the alanine and serine in the β-sheet structure of fibroin.

    PubMed

    Carrascoza Mayen, Juan Francisco; Lupan, Alexandru; Cosar, Ciprian; Kun, Attila-Zsolt; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu

    2015-02-01

    In its silk II form, fibroin is almost exclusively formed from layers of β-sheets, rich in glycine, alanine and serine. Reported here are computational results on fibroin models at semi-empirical, DFT levels of theory and molecular dynamics (MD) for (Gly)10, (Gly-Ala)5 and (Gly-Ser)5 decapeptides. While alanine and serine introduce steric repulsions, the alanine side-chain adds to the rigidity of the sheet, allowing it to maintain a properly pleated structure even in a single β-sheet, and thus avoiding two alternative conformations which would interfere with the formation of the multi-layer pleated-sheet structure. The role of the serine is proposed to involve modulation of the hydrophobicity in order to construct the supramolecular assembly as opposed to random precipitation due to hydrophobicity.