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Sample records for alanyl-trna synthetase alars

  1. Alar

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Alar ; CASRN 1596 - 84 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects ) a

  2. The Articulated Alar Rim Graft: Reengineering the Conventional Alar Rim Graft for Improved Contour and Support.

    PubMed

    Ballin, Annelyse C; Kim, Haena; Chance, Elizabeth; Davis, Richard E

    2016-08-01

    Surgical refinement of the wide nasal tip is challenging. Achieving an attractive, slender, and functional tip complex without destabilizing the lower nasal sidewall or deforming the contracture-prone alar rim is a formidable task. Excisional refinement techniques that rely upon incremental weakening of wide lower lateral cartilages (LLC) often destabilize the tip complex and distort tip contour. Initial destabilization of the LLC is usually further exacerbated by "shrink-wrap" contracture, which often leads to progressive cephalic retraction of the alar margin. The result is a misshapen tip complex accentuated by a conspicuous and highly objectionable nostril deformity that is often very difficult to treat. The "articulated" alar rim graft (AARG) is a modification of the conventional rim graft that improves treatment of secondary alar rim deformities, including postsurgical alar retraction (PSAR). Unlike the conventional alar rim graft, the AARG is sutured to the underlying tip complex to provide direct stationary support to the alar margin, thereby enhancing graft efficacy. When used in conjunction with a well-designed septal extension graft (SEG) to stabilize the central tip complex, lateral crural tensioning (LCT) to tighten the lower nasal sidewalls and minimize soft-tissue laxity, and lysis of scar adhesions to unfurl the retracted and scarred nasal lining, the AARG can eliminate PSAR in a majority of patients. The AARG is also highly effective for prophylaxis against alar retraction and in the treatment of most other contour abnormalities involving the alar margin. Moreover, the AARG requires comparatively little graft material, and complications are rare. We present a retrospective series of 47 consecutive patients treated with the triad of AARG, SEG, and LCT for prophylaxis and/or treatment of alar rim deformities. Outcomes were favorable in nearly all patients, and no complications were observed. We conclude the AARG is a simple and effective method for

  3. Isolated unilateral rupture of the alar ligament.

    PubMed

    Wong, Sui-To; Ernest, Kimberly; Fan, Grace; Zovickian, John; Pang, Dachling

    2014-05-01

    Only 6 cases of isolated unilateral rupture of the alar ligament have been previously reported. The authors report a new case and review the literature, morbid anatomy, and pathogenesis of this rare injury. The patient in their case, a 9-year-old girl, fell head first from a height of 5 feet off the ground. She presented with neck pain, a leftward head tilt, and severe limitation of right rotation, extension, and right lateral flexion of the neck. Plain radiographs and CT revealed no fracture but a shift of the dens toward the right lateral mass of C-1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed signal hyperintensity within the left dens-atlas space on both T1- and T2-weighted sequences and interruption of the expected dark signal representing the left alar ligament, suggestive of its rupture. After 12 weeks of immobilization in a Guilford brace, MRI showed lessened dens deviation, and the patient attained full and painless neck motion. Including the patient in this case, the 7 patients with this injury were between 5 and 21 years old, sustained the injury in traffic accidents or falls, presented with marked neck pain, and were treated with external immobilization. All patients had good clinical outcome. The mechanism of injury is hyperflexion with rotation. Isolated unilateral alar ligament rupture is a diagnosis made by excluding associated fracture, dislocation, or disruption of other major ligamentous structures in the craniovertebral junction. CT and MRI are essential in establishing the diagnosis. External immobilization is adequate treatment.

  4. Alar and Apples: Newspaper Coverage of a Major Risk Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Sharon M.; And Others

    A study reviewed coverage in 13 newspapers during 1989 of the issue of spraying the pesticide Alar on apples. Using VU/TEXT, a newspaper database, 297 articles in 13 newspapers that included the specified code words "Alar" with or without "apple" or "apples" were retrieved and analyzed using a 33-question coding instrument which recorded general…

  5. Further characterization of Escherichia coli alanyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Sood, S M; Slattery, C W; Filley, S J; Wu, M X; Hill, K A

    1996-04-15

    Selected physical and thermodynamic parameters for Escherichia coli alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AlaRS) have been determined primarily to assess the quaternary structure of this enzyme. The extinction coefficient (epsilon) at 280 nm was determined experimentally to be 0.71 ml mg-1 cm-1, and the partial specific volume (nu) was calculated from the amino acid composition to be 0.73 ml g-1. From viscosity experiments the intrinsic viscosity (eta) of AlaRS was extrapolated to be 3.4 ml g-1 and the degree of hydration (delta 1) estimated to be 0.67 gH2O g(-1)(AlaRS). Laser light-scattering studies indicated some heterogeneity; a radius of 6.3 nm was calculated for the major fraction with a diffusion coefficient (D20,W) of 3.89 x 10(-7) cm2 s-1. In 50 mM Hepes, pH 7.5, 20 mM KCl, 2 mM 2-mercaptoethanol and at a protein concentration of 4.2 mg ml-1 the sedimentation coefficient (S20,W) was 6.36 S; this value increased slightly when the protein concentration was decreased. The combination of S20,W and D20,W under these conditions yielded a molecular weight of approximately 186,000 Da, corresponding to a dimer. The S20,W was virtually independent of temperature in the range of 10-37 degrees C, while an Arrhenius plot of aminoacylation activity was biphasic. The isoelectric point was determined experimentally to be 4.9. Sedimentation equilibrium data were best fit to a decamer association complex in which dimeric AlaRS is the predominant species at 25 degrees C. PMID:8645007

  6. Relationship between Hyperactivity of Depressor Septi Nasi Muscle and Changes of Alar Base and Flaring during Smile

    PubMed Central

    Beiraghi-Toosi, Arash; Rezaei, Ezatollah; Zanjani, Elham

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hyperactivity of depressor septi nasi muscle leads to smiling deformity and nasal tip depression. Lateral fascicles of this muscle help in widening the nostrils. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the nasal length changes and the alar base and the alar flaring changes during smile. METHODS Standard photographs are performed in the face and lateral views with forward gaze in the repose and maximum smile. Nasal length, alar base, and alar flaring were measured on the prints of the photographs. To decrease possible errors in the size of the printed photographs, middle face height from glabella to ANS was measured in the lateral view and the interpupil distance in the face view to standardize the measurements. RESULTS Fifty cases were enrolled in this study. In 39 cases (78%), the nasal length was increased during smile. Forty-six cases (92%) had an increase in alar base diameter during smile. Alar flaring during smile increased in 48 cases (96%). Nasal length and alar base changes during smiling were not significantly correlated. Nasal length and alar flaring changes during smiling were not significantly related too. On the other hand, alar base and alar flaring changes during smile showed correlation. Alar base and alar flaring changes during smile were not significantly different in hyperactive and non-hyperactive cases. CONCLUSION Nasal length change during smiling and hypertrophy of the medial fascicles of depressor septi nasi were not related to alar base or alar flaring change during smile. PMID:27308240

  7. Delayed diagnosis of isolated alar ligament rupture: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Robin A; Marzi, Ingo; Vogl, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Ligament disruptions at the craniovertebral junction are typically associated with atlantoaxial rotatory dislocation during upper cervical spine injuries and require external orthoses or surgical stabilization. Only in few patients isolated ruptures of the alar ligament have been reported. Here we present a further case, in which the diagnosis was initially obscured by a misleading clinical symptomatology but finally established six month following the trauma, demonstrating the value of contrast-enhanced high resolution 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging in identifying this particular lesion. PMID:26516433

  8. Alanyl-tRNA synthetase genes of Vanderwaltozyma polyspora arose from duplication of a dual-functional predecessor of mitochondrial origin.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Pei; Tseng, Yi-Kuan; Ko, Chou-Yuan; Wang, Chien-Chia

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial forms of a given aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS) are typically encoded by two orthologous nuclear genes, one of eukaryotic origin and the other of mitochondrial origin. We herein report a novel scenario of aaRS evolution in yeast. While all other yeast species studied possess a single nuclear gene encoding both forms of alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AlaRS), Vanderwaltozyma polyspora, a yeast species descended from the same whole-genome duplication event as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, contains two distinct nuclear AlaRS genes, one specifying the cytoplasmic form and the other its mitochondrial counterpart. The protein sequences of these two isoforms are very similar to each other. The isoforms are actively expressed in vivo and are exclusively localized in their respective cellular compartments. Despite the presence of a promising AUG initiator candidate, the gene encoding the mitochondrial form is actually initiated from upstream non-AUG codons. A phylogenetic analysis further revealed that all yeast AlaRS genes, including those in V. polyspora, are of mitochondrial origin. These findings underscore the possibility that contemporary AlaRS genes in V. polyspora arose relatively recently from duplication of a dual-functional predecessor of mitochondrial origin.

  9. Mistranslation and its control by tRNA synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Schimmel, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases are ancient proteins that interpret the genetic material in all life forms. They are thought to have appeared during the transition from the RNA world to the theatre of proteins. During translation, they establish the rules of the genetic code, whereby each amino acid is attached to a tRNA that is cognate to the amino acid. Mistranslation occurs when an amino acid is attached to the wrong tRNA and subsequently is misplaced in a nascent protein. Mistranslation can be toxic to bacteria and mammalian cells, and can lead to heritable mutations. The great challenge for nature appears to be serine-for-alanine mistranslation, where even small amounts of this mistranslation cause severe neuropathologies in the mouse. To minimize serine-for-alanine mistranslation, powerful selective pressures developed to prevent mistranslation through a special editing activity imbedded within alanyl-tRNA synthetases (AlaRSs). However, serine-for-alanine mistranslation is so challenging that a separate, genome-encoded fragment of the editing domain of AlaRS is distributed throughout the Tree of Life to redundantly prevent serine-to-alanine mistranslation. Detailed X-ray structural and functional analysis shed light on why serine-for-alanine mistranslation is a universal problem, and on the selective pressures that engendered the appearance of AlaXps at the base of the Tree of Life. PMID:21930589

  10. Evolution of lanthipeptide synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Yu, Yi; Vélasquez, Juan E.; van der Donk, Wilfred A.

    2012-01-01

    Lanthionine-containing peptides (lanthipeptides) are a family of ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides containing (methyl)lanthionine residues. Here we present a phylogenomic study of the four currently known classes of lanthipeptide synthetases (LanB and LanC for class I, LanM for class II, LanKC for class III, and LanL for class IV). Although they possess very similar cyclase domains, class II–IV synthetases have evolved independently, and LanB and LanC enzymes appear to not always have coevolved. LanM enzymes from various phyla that have three cysteines ligated to a zinc ion (as opposed to the more common Cys-Cys-His ligand set) cluster together. Most importantly, the phylogenomic data suggest that for some scaffolds, the ring topology of the final lanthipeptides may be determined in part by the sequence of the precursor peptides and not just by the biosynthetic enzymes. This notion was supported by studies with two chimeric peptides, suggesting that the nisin and prochlorosin biosynthetic enzymes can produce the correct ring topologies of epilancin 15X and lacticin 481, respectively. These results highlight the potential of lanthipeptide synthetases for bioengineering and combinatorial biosynthesis. Our study also demonstrates unexplored areas of sequence space that may be fruitful for genome mining. PMID:23071302

  11. Purification of isopenicillin N synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Pang, C P; Chakravarti, B; Adlington, R M; Ting, H H; White, R L; Jayatilake, G S; Baldwin, J E; Abraham, E P

    1984-01-01

    Isopenicillin N synthetase was extracted from Cephalosporium acremonium and purified about 200-fold. The product showed one major protein band, coinciding with synthetase activity, when subjected to electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel. An isopenicillin N synthetase from Penicillium chrysogenum was purified about 70-fold by similar procedures. The two enzymes resemble each other closely in their Mr, in their mobility on electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel and in their requirement for Fe2+ and ascorbate for maximum activity. Preliminary experiments have shown that a similar isopenicillin N synthetase can be extracted from Streptomyces clavuligerus. PMID:6435606

  12. [Static-dynamic computerized tomography in the diagnosis of traumatic lesions of alar ligaments. Preliminary results].

    PubMed

    Urso, S; Pacciani, E; Ascani, E; Salsano, M L; Randisi, F; Fassari, F M

    1994-12-01

    The patients affected with cervical injuries often complain of cervical pain, headache and dizziness even when no bone fractures are detected. Such patients are likely to have a post-traumatic injury of the cervical ligaments. Twenty-five symptomatic patients (19 women and 6 men) were examined with upper spine CT and functional CT scans (right and left rotation) to detect ligament injuries and hypermotility of the craniocervical junction, both related to traumatic events. Eleven patients showed no alterations, while unilateral densitometric alterations of the alar ligaments were observed in 14 cases and thought to be related to trauma. On axial CT scans, the normal alar ligaments were identified as paramedian, quadrangular soft-tissue structures at the apex of the dens epistrophei and right above it. In 14 patients with alar ligament injuries, CT showed incomplete ligament interruption and thinning in 12 cases and its total absence on all images in 2 cases. The laterodental space in the affected side was hypodense due to fat tissue replacement. Of 14 patients with alar ligament injuries, only 14 patients with alar ligament injuries, only 4 exhibited rotatory hypermotility at C0-C1 and C1-C2. The low frequency of rotatory hypermotility is probably due to the high rate of incomplete alar ligament injuries as well as to cervical muscle stiffness, which is marked in some subjects. In conclusion, static and functional CT of the upper spine is not only useful to predict trauma outcome, but also allows the detection of the alar ligaments, of their morphodensitometric changes and of the segmental instability of the craniocervical junction. PMID:7878229

  13. Three-dimensional virtual simulation of alar width changes following bimaxillary osteotomies.

    PubMed

    Liebregts, J; Xi, T; Schreurs, R; van Loon, B; Bergé, S; Maal, T

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) soft tissue simulation of nose width changes following bimaxillary osteotomies and to identify patient- and surgery-related factors that may affect the accuracy of simulation. Sixty patients (mean age 26 years) who underwent bimaxillary osteotomies participated in this study. Cone beam computed tomography scans were acquired preoperatively and at 1-year postoperative. The 3D hard and soft tissue rendered preoperative and postoperative virtual head models were superimposed, after which the maxilla and mandible were segmented and aligned to the postoperative position. The postoperative changes in alar width were simulated using a mass tensor model (MTM)-based algorithm and compared with the postoperative outcome. 3D cephalometric analyses were used to quantify the simulation error. The postoperative alar width was increased by 1.6±1.1mm and the mean error between the 3D simulation and the actual postoperative alar width was 1.0±0.9mm. The predictability was not correlated to factors such as age, sex, alar cinch suture, VY closure, maxillary advancement, or a history of surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion. The MTM-based simulation model of postoperative alar width change was found to be reasonably accurate, although there is room for further improvement.

  14. Reconstruction of Congenital Isolated Alar Defect Using Mutaf Triangular Closure Technique in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Temel, Metin; Gunal, Ertan; Kahraman, Serif Samil

    2016-06-01

    Congenital isolated alar defects are extremely rare, occurring in approximately 1 in 20,000 to 40,000 live births. The patients are presented here of 2 pediatric patients operated on for congenital isolated alar defect. The reconstruction of congenital isolated alar defects was made in a 3-layered fashion. The skin defects were covered using the Mutaf triangular closure technique in which 2 cutaneous local flaps are designed in an unequal Z-plasty manner. Conchal cartilage graft was used between the skin and mucosal closure to replace the missing part of the lower lateral cartilage in these patients. The early results were promising in Patient 1, but sufficient improvement was detected in the alar cartilage postoperative follow-up period in Patient 2. Hence, this patient required revision 1 to 2 years postoperatively. This technique provides excellent aesthetic and functional results, except for this problem in Tessier 2 cleft patients. The use of the Stair step flap technique with Mutaf triangle closure technique achieved cosmetically and functionally excellent results in the reconstruction and repair of a large, irregular, narrow cleft, in the inadequate rotation of the lateral part of the lower lateral cartilage. However, because of this problem, evaluation of the long-term follow-up of patients is necessary. PMID:27192642

  15. Hominoid phalanges from the middle Miocene site of Paşalar, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ersoy, A; Kelley, J; Andrews, P; Alpagut, B

    2008-04-01

    Eleven proximal and ten intermediate partial or complete hominoid phalanges have been recovered from the middle Miocene site of Paşalar in Turkey. Based on species representation at Paşalar, it is likely that most or all of the phalanges belong to Griphopithecus alpani rather than Kenyapithecus kizili, but both species may be represented. All of the complete or nearly complete phalanges appear to be manual, so comparisons to extant and other fossil primate species were limited to manual phalanges. Comparisons were made to extant hominoid and cercopithecoid primate genera expressing a variety of positional repertoires and varying degrees of arboreality and terrestriality. The comparisons consisted of a series of bivariate indices derived from previous publications on Miocene catarrhine phalangeal morphology. The proximal phalanges have dorsally expanded proximal articular surfaces, which is characteristic of cercopithecoids and most other Miocene hominoids, and indicates that the predominant positional behaviors involved pronograde quadrupedalism. Among the extant primates, many of the proximal and intermediate phalangeal indices clearly distinguish more habitually terrestrial taxa from those that are predominantly arboreal, and especially from taxa that commonly engage in suspensory activities. For nearly every index, the values of the Paşalar phalanges occupy an intermediate position-most similar to values for Pan and, to a lesser extent, Macaca-indicating a generalized morphology and probably the use of both arboreal and terrestrial substrates. At least some terrestrial activity is also compatible with reconstructions of the Paşalar habitat. Most proximal and intermediate phalanges of other middle and late Miocene hominoids have similar index values to those of the Paşalar specimens, revealing broadly similar manual phalangeal morphology among many Miocene hominoids.

  16. Primary rhinocheiloplasty: Comparison of open and closed methods of alar cartilage reposition

    PubMed Central

    Yasonov, S. A.; Lopatin, A. V.; Kugushev, A. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To establish which rhinoplasty method for primary repairing of unilateral cleft lip (UCL) is better. Settings and Design: Two patient groups with cleft lip were compared. Each group was operated on either by McComb's technique as closed rhinoplasty method or by Vissarionov–Kosin technique as an open method. Subjects and Methods: First group included 29 patients and the second consisted of 31. All patients were operated on by single surgeon over 10 years. Randomization was based on wishes and intention of surgeon to use one of two methods. Evaluation of results was based on impartial data, and subjective information collected from respondents with different levels of knowledge about UCL. The objective scale was based on the evaluation of five noticeable residual deformations of nose that usually appear after primary lip-nose surgery: Alar flattening, low position of alar, widening or narrowing of nostril, and deformation of the upper part of nostril rim. Subjective evaluation was based on the opinion of respondents who were ranged every case depending on own judgment. Statistical Analysis: Was performed using Fisher method and Chi-square by Statistica 10.0, StatSoft Inc. Results: Approach with general analysis indicated no difference between two methods. Despite of absence of clear differences between two groups we consider the closed rhinoplasty more favorable due to less damage to alar cartilages and no scars inside nostrils. Conclusions: We think that mentioned scarring may complicate secondary rhinoplasty, which is often needed to correct nose deformation. PMID:27563601

  17. Structural Insights into the Polyphyletic Origins of Glycyl tRNA Synthetases.

    PubMed

    Valencia-Sánchez, Marco Igor; Rodríguez-Hernández, Annia; Ferreira, Ruben; Santamaría-Suárez, Hugo Aníbal; Arciniega, Marcelino; Dock-Bregeon, Anne-Catherine; Moras, Dino; Beinsteiner, Brice; Mertens, Haydyn; Svergun, Dmitri; Brieba, Luis G; Grøtli, Morten; Torres-Larios, Alfredo

    2016-07-01

    Glycyl tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) provides a unique case among class II aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, with two clearly widespread types of enzymes: a dimeric (α2) species present in some bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes; and a heterotetrameric form (α2β2) present in most bacteria. Although the differences between both types of GlyRS at the anticodon binding domain level are evident, the extent and implications of the variations in the catalytic domain have not been described, and it is unclear whether the mechanism of amino acid recognition is also dissimilar. Here, we show that the α-subunit of the α2β2 GlyRS from the bacterium Aquifex aeolicus is able to perform the first step of the aminoacylation reaction, which involves the activation of the amino acid with ATP. The crystal structure of the α-subunit in the complex with an analog of glycyl adenylate at 2.8 Å resolution presents a conformational arrangement that properly positions the cognate amino acid. This work shows that glycine is recognized by a subset of different residues in the two types of GlyRS. A structural and sequence analysis of class II catalytic domains shows that bacterial GlyRS is closely related to alanyl tRNA synthetase, which led us to define a new subclassification of these ancient enzymes and to propose an evolutionary path of α2β2 GlyRS, convergent with α2 GlyRS and divergent from AlaRS, thus providing a possible explanation for the puzzling existence of two proteins sharing the same fold and function but not a common ancestor.

  18. Structural Insights into the Polyphyletic Origins of Glycyl tRNA Synthetases*♦

    PubMed Central

    Valencia-Sánchez, Marco Igor; Rodríguez-Hernández, Annia; Ferreira, Ruben; Santamaría-Suárez, Hugo Aníbal; Arciniega, Marcelino; Dock-Bregeon, Anne-Catherine; Moras, Dino; Beinsteiner, Brice; Brieba, Luis G.; Grøtli, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Glycyl tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) provides a unique case among class II aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, with two clearly widespread types of enzymes: a dimeric (α2) species present in some bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes; and a heterotetrameric form (α2β2) present in most bacteria. Although the differences between both types of GlyRS at the anticodon binding domain level are evident, the extent and implications of the variations in the catalytic domain have not been described, and it is unclear whether the mechanism of amino acid recognition is also dissimilar. Here, we show that the α-subunit of the α2β2 GlyRS from the bacterium Aquifex aeolicus is able to perform the first step of the aminoacylation reaction, which involves the activation of the amino acid with ATP. The crystal structure of the α-subunit in the complex with an analog of glycyl adenylate at 2.8 Å resolution presents a conformational arrangement that properly positions the cognate amino acid. This work shows that glycine is recognized by a subset of different residues in the two types of GlyRS. A structural and sequence analysis of class II catalytic domains shows that bacterial GlyRS is closely related to alanyl tRNA synthetase, which led us to define a new subclassification of these ancient enzymes and to propose an evolutionary path of α2β2 GlyRS, convergent with α2 GlyRS and divergent from AlaRS, thus providing a possible explanation for the puzzling existence of two proteins sharing the same fold and function but not a common ancestor. PMID:27226617

  19. Formation of cadherin-expressing brain nuclei in diencephalic alar plate divisions.

    PubMed

    Yoon, M S; Puelles, L; Redies, C

    2000-11-01

    During the formation of brain nuclei, the vertebrate neural tube is partitioned into distinct embryonic divisions. In this study, the expression of three members of the cadherin family of adhesion molecules (cadherin-6B, cadherin-7, and R-cadherin) was mapped to study the differentiation of gray matter in the division so that diencephalic alar plate of chicken embryos from embryonic day 3 (E3) to E10. At early stages of development (E3-E4), each cadherin is expressed in restricted regions of the diencephalic wall of the neural tube. The borders of some of the expression domains coincide with divisional boundaries. As the mantle layer is formed and increases in thickness from E4 to E8, morphologically discernible aggregates of cells appear that express the three cadherins differentially. These aggregates represent the anlagen of specific diencephalic brain nuclei, e.g., the lateroanterior nucleus, the ventral geniculate nucleus, the nucleus rotundus, the perirotundic area, the principal precommissural nucleus, and the lateral spiriform nucleus. Most of the cadherin-expressing diencephalic nuclei studied in this work apparently derive from a single embryonic division and remain there. The divisional boundaries are replaced gradually by the borders of cadherin-expressing brain nuclei. The current results support the idea that cadherins confer differential adhesiveness to developing structures of gray matter in the diencephalic alar plate. Moreover, they suggest that each cadherin plays a role in the formation of specific brain nuclei within the diencephalic divisions.

  20. Formation of cadherin-expressing brain nuclei in diencephalic alar plate divisions.

    PubMed

    Yoon, M S; Puelles, L; Redies, C

    2000-06-12

    During the formation of brain nuclei, the vertebrate neural tube is partitioned into distinct embryonic divisions. In this study, the expression of three members of the cadherin family of adhesion molecules (cadherin-6B, cadherin-7, and R-cadherin) was mapped to study the differentiation of gray matter in the divisions of the diencephalic alar plate of chicken embryos from embryonic day 3 (E3) to E10. At early stages of development (E3-E4), each cadherin is expressed in restricted regions of the diencephalic wall of the neural tube. The borders of some of the expression domains coincide with divisional boundaries. As the mantle layer is formed and increases in thickness from E4 to E8, morphologically discernible aggregates of cells appear that express the three cadherins differentially. These aggregates represent the anlagen of specific diencephalic brain nuclei, e.g., the lateroanterior nucleus, the ventral geniculate nucleus, the nucleus rotundus, the perirotundic area, the principal precommissural nucleus, and the lateral spiriform nucleus. Most of the cadherin-expressing diencephalic nuclei studied in this work apparently derive from a single embryonic division and remain there. The divisional boundaries are replaced gradually by the borders of cadherin-expressing brain nuclei. The current results support the idea that cadherins confer differential adhesiveness to developing structures of gray matter in the diencephalic alar plate. Moreover, they suggest that each cadherin plays a role in the formation of specific brain nuclei within the diencephalic divisions.

  1. Radioimmune assay of human platelet prostaglandin synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, G.J.; Machuga, E.T.

    1982-02-01

    Normal platelet function depends, in part, on platelet PG synthesis. PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) catalyzes the first step in PG synthesis, the formation of PGH/sub 2/ from arachidonic acid. Inhibition of the enzyme by ASA results in an abnormality in the platelet release reaction. Patients with pparent congenital abnormalities in the enzyme have been described, and the effects have been referred to as ''aspirin-like'' defects of the platelet function. These patients lack platelet PG synthetase activity, but the actual content of PG synthetase protein in these individuals' platelets is unknown. Therefore an RIA for human platelet PG synthetase would provide new information, useful in assessing the aspirin-like defects of platelet function. An RIA for human platelet PG synthetase is described. The assay utilizes a rabbit antibody directed against the enzyme and (/sup 125/I)-labelled sheep PG synthetase as antigen. The human platelet enzyme is assayed by its ability to inhibit precipitation of the (/sup 125/I)antigen. The assay is sensitive to 1 ng of enzyme. By the immune assay, human platelets contain approximately 1200 ng of PG synethetase protein per 1.5 mg of platelet protein (approximately 10/sup 9/ platelets). This content corresponds to 10,000 enzyme molecules per platelet. The assay provides a rapid and convenient assay for the human platelet enzyme, and it can be applied to the assessment of patients with apparent platelet PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) deficiency.

  2. Sequence and Phylogenetic Analysis of FAD Synthetase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Luisa; Frago, Susana; Martínez-Júlvez, Marta; Medina, Milagros

    2006-08-01

    An evolutionary analysis of the sequences available till now for FAD synthetases has been carried out. Several identical conserved residues have been observed along the sequences of all the FAD synthetases analyzed, which might correlate with role for these residues in the catalytic activity of the enzyme. Phylogenetic analysis shows that FAD synthetase sequences can be organized in two main clusters. One of them mainly contains temperature, pressure or pH resistant organisms, whereas in the other one organisms with pathogenic character can be found.

  3. Neurospora crassa mutants deficient in asparagine synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    MacPhee, K G; Nelson, R E; Schuster, S M

    1983-01-01

    Neurospora crassa mutants deficient in asparagine synthetase were selected by using the procedure of inositol-less death. Complementation tests among the 100 mutants isolated suggested that their alterations were genetically allelic. Recombination analysis with strain S1007t, an asparagine auxotroph, indicated that the mutations were located near or within the asn gene on linkage group V. In vitro assays with a heterokaryon indicated that the mutation was dominant. Thermal instability of cell extracts from temperature-sensitive strains in an in vitro asparagine synthetase assay determined that the mutations were in the structural gene(s) for asparagine synthetase. PMID:6137480

  4. Gene encoding plant asparagine synthetase

    DOEpatents

    Coruzzi, Gloria M.; Tsai, Fong-Ying

    1993-10-26

    The identification and cloning of the gene(s) for plant asparagine synthetase (AS), an important enzyme involved in the formation of asparagine, a major nitrogen transport compound of higher plants is described. Expression vectors constructed with the AS coding sequence may be utilized to produce plant AS; to engineer herbicide resistant plants, salt/drought tolerant plants or pathogen resistant plants; as a dominant selectable marker; or to select for novel herbicides or compounds useful as agents that synchronize plant cells in culture. The promoter for plant AS, which directs high levels of gene expression and is induced in an organ specific manner and by darkness, is also described. The AS promoter may be used to direct the expression of heterologous coding sequences in appropriate hosts.

  5. Toward less misleading comparisons of uncertain risks: the example of aflatoxin and alar.

    PubMed Central

    Finkel, A M

    1995-01-01

    Critics of comparative risk assessment (CRA), the increasingly common practice of juxtaposing disparate risks for the purpose of declaring which one is the "larger" or the "more important," have long focused their concern on the difficulties in accommodating the qualitative differences among risks. To be sure, people may disagree vehemently about whether "larger" necessarily implies "more serious," but the attention to this aspect of CRA presupposes that science can in fact discern which of two risks has the larger statistical magnitude. This assumption, encouraged by the indiscriminate calculation of risk ratios using arbitrary point estimates, is often incorrect: the fact that environmental and health risks differ in unknown quantitative respects is at least as important a caution to CRA as the fact that risks differ in known qualitative ways. To show how misleading CRA can be when uncertainty is ignored, this article revisits the claim that aflatoxin contamination of peanut butter was "18 times worse" than Alar contamination of apple juice. Using Monte Carlo simulation, the number 18 is shown to lie within a distribution of plausible risk ratios that ranges from nearly 400:1 in favor of aflatoxin to nearly 40:1 in the opposite direction. The analysis also shows that the "best estimates" of the relative risk of aflatoxin to Alar are much closer to 1:1 than to 18:1. The implications of these findings for risk communication and individual and societal decision-making are discussed, with an eye toward improving the general practice of CRA while acknowledging that its outputs are uncertain, rather than abandoning it for the wrong reasons. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:7607139

  6. [Studies on regulation of glutamine synthetase activity from Streptomyces lincolnensis].

    PubMed

    Jin, Z; Jiao, R; Mao, Y

    2001-08-01

    Glutamine synthetase in crude extracts from Streptomyces lincolnensis growing under different nitrogen sources were studied. The results showed that NH4+ in high concentration repressed the biosynthesis of the enzyme. To determine whether Streptomyces lincolnensis has undergone covalent modification, a comparison of the glutamine synthetase isolated from cells grown on different nitrogen sources was made. No significant difference was observed in specific activity, pH optima, divalent cation response, and ultraviolet absorption spectra. Glutamine synthetase activity was not influenced by ammonia shock or snake venom phosphodiesterase treatment. Under these conditions, the activity of glutamine synthetase from K. aerogenes was markedly changed. There was therefore no evidence for enzymatic adenylylation of glutamine synthetase from Streptomyces lincolnensis. Glutamine synthetase was subject to feedback inhibition by end products of glutamine metabolism. Cumulative feedback inhibition of the Mn(2+)-dependent glutamine synthetase activity was demonstrated. These results suggest that glutamine synthetase from Streptomyces lincolnensis is an allosteric enzyme. PMID:12552916

  7. Peripheral communications of intercostobrachial nerve Peripheral communications of the intercostobrachial nerve in relation to the alar thoracic artery

    PubMed Central

    Rustagi, Shaifaly Madan; Sharma, Mona; Singh, Nidhi; Mehta, Vandana; Suri, Rajesh K; Rath, Gayatri

    2015-01-01

    The intercostobrachial nerve (ICBN) is often encountered during axillary dissection for axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) for diagnostic and therapeutic surgery for mastectomy. The present report is a case observed in the Department of Anatomy at Vardhman Mahavir Medical College, Delhi during routine dissection of the upper extremity of a male cadaver for first year undergraduate medical students. On the right side, the medial cord of brachial plexus gave two medial cutaneous nerves of arm. Both the nerves were seen communicating with the branches of the ICBN. The ICBN and one of its branches were surrounding the termination of an alar thoracic artery. These peripheral neural connections of the ICBN with the branches of the medial cord can be a cause of sensory impairment during axillary procedures done for mastectomy or exploration of long thoracic nerves. The alar thoracic artery found in relation to the ICBN could further be a cause of vascular complications during such procedures. PMID:25802820

  8. Peripheral communications of intercostobrachial nerve Peripheral communications of the intercostobrachial nerve in relation to the alar thoracic artery.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Shaifaly Madan; Sharma, Mona; Singh, Nidhi; Mehta, Vandana; Suri, Rajesh K; Rath, Gayatri

    2015-01-01

    The intercostobrachial nerve (ICBN) is often encountered during axillary dissection for axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) for diagnostic and therapeutic surgery for mastectomy. The present report is a case observed in the Department of Anatomy at Vardhman Mahavir Medical College, Delhi during routine dissection of the upper extremity of a male cadaver for first year undergraduate medical students. On the right side, the medial cord of brachial plexus gave two medial cutaneous nerves of arm. Both the nerves were seen communicating with the branches of the ICBN. The ICBN and one of its branches were surrounding the termination of an alar thoracic artery. These peripheral neural connections of the ICBN with the branches of the medial cord can be a cause of sensory impairment during axillary procedures done for mastectomy or exploration of long thoracic nerves. The alar thoracic artery found in relation to the ICBN could further be a cause of vascular complications during such procedures.

  9. Phosphorylation of eukaryotic aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases

    SciTech Connect

    Pendergast, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    The phosphorylation of the highly purified aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complex from rabbit reticulocytes was examined. The synthetase complex contained, in addition to eight aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, three unidentified proteins and was free of endogenous protein kinase activity. Incubation of the complex with casein kinase I in the presence of ATP resulted in the phosphorylation of four synthetases, the glutamyl-, isoleucyl-, methionyl-, and lysyl-tRNA synthetases. Phosphorylation by casein kinase I altered binding to tRNA-Sepharose such that the phosphorylated complex eluted at 190 mM NaCl instead of the 275 mM salt observed for the nonphosphorylated form. Phosphorylation by casein kinase I resulted in a significant inhibition of aminoacylation with the four synthetases; the activities of the nonphosphorylated synthetases were unchanged. One of the unidentified proteins in the complex (M/sub r/ 37,000) was also an excellent substrate for casein kinase I. A comparison of the properties and two-dimensional phosphopeptide pattern of this protein with that of casein kinase I suggest that the 37,000 dalton protein in the synthetase complex is an inactive form of casein kinase I. Two other protein kinases were shown to phosphorylate aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in the complex. The phosphorylation of threonyl-tRNA synthetase was also investigated. Five aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in the high molecular weight complex were shown to be phosphorylated in rabbit reticulocytes following labeling with (/sup 32/P)orthophosphate.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... important for the effective use of biotin, a B vitamin found in foods such as liver, egg yolks, and milk. Holocarboxylase synthetase attaches biotin to certain enzymes that are essential for the normal production and breakdown of proteins, fats, and carbohydrates in ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: glutathione synthetase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... PubMed Njålsson R. Glutathione synthetase deficiency. Cell Mol Life Sci. 2005 Sep;62(17):1938-45. Review. Citation on PubMed Ristoff E, Larsson A. Inborn errors in the metabolism of glutathione. Orphanet J Rare Dis. 2007 Mar 30;2:16. Review. Citation on PubMed or ...

  12. The deciduous dentition of Griphopithecus alpani from Paşalar, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Mortzou, Georgia; Andrews, Peter

    2008-04-01

    Seventy-four hominoid primary teeth have been recovered from the middle Miocene site of Paşalar, Turkey, constituting the largest sample of deciduous teeth for any species of fossil ape. Morphological features that characterize the permanent teeth of Griphopithecus alpani from the site have also been identified in some of these deciduous teeth, including a lingual pillar on the di(1)s. These features plus the overwhelming preponderance of G. alpani permanent teeth at the site suggest that all of the deciduous teeth belong to this species. Contrary to the situation in the permanent teeth, nothing in the morphology of the primary dentition suggests the representation of a second species. The age profile of the non-adult hominoids was reconstructed based on the degree and type of wear recorded on the dp4s, the most abundant deciduous tooth in the sample, assuming a similar eruption chronology to that of Pan troglodytes. This analysis indicates underrepresentation of very young individuals in the sample and high mortality for individuals belonging to the 3-5-years age cohort, a situation that could be due to the effects of stress related to weaning. The coefficient of variation and range-index values obtained for the majority of tooth types are equal to or greater than the comparable values in a sample of P. troglodytes, in some cases at much smaller sample sizes. One possible explanation for this is that there was greater sexual dimorphism in the G. alpani deciduous dentition than in Pan, which would mirror the condition of the permanent dentition.

  13. Are MRI high-signal changes of alar and transverse ligaments in acute whiplash injury related to outcome?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Upper neck ligament high-signal changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been found in patients with whiplash-associated disorders (WAD) but also in non-injured controls. The clinical relevance of such changes is controversial. Their prognostic role has never been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to examine if alar and transverse ligament high-signal changes on MRI immediately following the car accident are related to outcome after 12 months for patients with acute WAD grades 1-2. Methods Within 13 days after a car accident, 114 consecutive acute WAD1-2 patients without prior neck injury or prior neck problems underwent upper neck high-resolution proton-weighted MRI. High-signal changes of the alar and transverse ligaments were graded 0-3. A questionnaire including the impact of event scale for measuring posttraumatic stress response and questions on patients' expectations of recovery provided clinical data at injury. At 12 months follow-up, 111 (97.4%) patients completed the Neck Disability Index (NDI) and an 11-point numeric rating scale (NRS-11) on last week neck pain intensity. Factors potentially related to these outcomes were assessed using multiple logistic regression analyses. Results Among the 111 responders (median age 29.8 years; 63 women), 38 (34.2%) had grades 2-3 alar ligament changes and 25 (22.5%) had grades 2-3 transverse ligament changes at injury. At 12 months follow-up, 49 (44.1%) reported disability (NDI > 8) and 23 (20.7%) neck pain (NRS-11 > 4). Grades 2-3 ligament changes in the acute phase were not related to disability or neck pain at 12 months. More severe posttraumatic stress response increased the odds for disability (odds ratio 1.46 per 10 points on the impact of event scale, p = 0.007) and so did low expectations of recovery (odds ratio 4.66, p = 0.005). Conclusions High-signal changes of the alar and transverse ligaments close after injury did not affect outcome for acute WAD1-2 patients without previous

  14. Biosynthetic engineering of nonribosomal peptide synthetases.

    PubMed

    Kries, Hajo

    2016-09-01

    From the evolutionary melting pot of natural product synthetase genes, microorganisms elicit antibiotics, communication tools, and iron scavengers. Chemical biologists manipulate these genes to recreate similarly diverse and potent biological activities not on evolutionary time scales but within months. Enzyme engineering has progressed considerably in recent years and offers new screening, modelling, and design tools for natural product designers. Here, recent advances in enzyme engineering and their application to nonribosomal peptide synthetases are reviewed. Among the nonribosomal peptides that have been subjected to biosynthetic engineering are the antibiotics daptomycin, calcium-dependent antibiotic, and gramicidin S. With these peptides, incorporation of unnatural building blocks and modulation of bioactivities via various structural modifications have been successfully demonstrated. Natural product engineering on the biosynthetic level is not a reliable method yet. However, progress in the understanding and manipulation of biosynthetic pathways may enable the routine production of optimized peptide drugs in the near future. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Interproximal wear facets and tooth associations in the Paşalar hominoid sample.

    PubMed

    Gençturk, Insaf; Alpagut, Berna; Andrews, Peter

    2008-04-01

    Interproximal wear facets were examined on hominoid teeth from the middle Miocene site at Paşalar, Turkey. The aim was to find matches between adjacent premolar and molar teeth from single individuals that were collected in the field as isolated teeth and use them to reconstruct tooth rows. These were then used to investigate: (1) the wear gradient on the molar teeth; (2) the dispersal of teeth from single mandibles and maxillae; (3) the size ratios among the molars; and (4) the number of individuals represented by the hominoid sample. Facets were scored for size and shape and were assessed visually using photographs and superimposed outline drawings on acetate transparencies. Out of a sample of approximately 1,500 teeth collected between 1983 and 1996, 532 molars and 258 premolars produced apparent matches making up 160 tooth rows. These were then examined rigorously for morphological consistency and state of wear, and, employing the criterion that only the most unequivocal associations should be used, the final number was reduced to 48 tooth rows-31 mandibular and 17 maxillary. The tooth associations represent a minimum of 21 individuals and probably as many as 34. Molar wear was rapid, with M1s having almost twice as much wear as M3s, as measured by a wear-gradient index. The M2s are intermediate but generally closer to M1s in degree of wear, as are P4s. This wear pattern suggests either delayed eruption of M3s or extremely abrasive diets causing rapid, heavy wear. There is some indication that the wear patterns in Griphopithecus alpani and Kenyapithecus kizili are different, with the latter perhaps having a lower wear gradient, but the K. kizili sample is very small. In both species, the M2 is the largest molar and the M1 is the smallest. Separation of individual teeth in the 48 tooth associations varied from widely separated-up to 8.5m apart-to within a few centimeters of each other. One tooth row (D922) was found with the teeth in contact but the maxillary

  16. Peptide synthetase gene in Trichoderma virens.

    PubMed

    Wilhite, S E; Lumsden, R D; Straney, D C

    2001-11-01

    Trichoderma virens (synonym, Gliocladium virens), a deuteromycete fungus, suppresses soilborne plant diseases caused by a number of fungi and is used as a biocontrol agent. Several traits that may contribute to the antagonistic interactions of T. virens with disease-causing fungi involve the production of peptide metabolites (e.g., the antibiotic gliotoxin and siderophores used for iron acquisition). We cloned a 5,056-bp partial cDNA encoding a putative peptide synthetase (Psy1) from T. virens using conserved motifs found within the adenylate domain of peptide synthetases. Sequence similarities with conserved motifs of the adenylation domain, acyl transfer, and two condensation domains support identification of the Psy1 gene as a gene that encodes a peptide synthetase. Disruption of the native Psy1 gene through gene replacement was used to identify the function of this gene. Psy1 disruptants produced normal amounts of gliotoxin but grew poorly under low-iron conditions, suggesting that Psy1 plays a role in siderophore production. Psy1 disruptants cannot produce the major T. virens siderophore dimerum acid, a dipetide of acylated N(delta)-hydroxyornithine. Biocontrol activity against damping-off diseases caused by Pythium ultimum and Rhizoctonia solani was not reduced by the Psy1 disruption, suggesting that iron competition through dimerum acid production does not contribute significantly to disease suppression activity under the conditions used.

  17. Peptide Synthetase Gene in Trichoderma virens

    PubMed Central

    Wilhite, S. E.; Lumsden, R. D.; Straney, D. C.

    2001-01-01

    Trichoderma virens (synonym, Gliocladium virens), a deuteromycete fungus, suppresses soilborne plant diseases caused by a number of fungi and is used as a biocontrol agent. Several traits that may contribute to the antagonistic interactions of T. virens with disease-causing fungi involve the production of peptide metabolites (e.g., the antibiotic gliotoxin and siderophores used for iron acquisition). We cloned a 5,056-bp partial cDNA encoding a putative peptide synthetase (Psy1) from T. virens using conserved motifs found within the adenylate domain of peptide synthetases. Sequence similarities with conserved motifs of the adenylation domain, acyl transfer, and two condensation domains support identification of the Psy1 gene as a gene that encodes a peptide synthetase. Disruption of the native Psy1 gene through gene replacement was used to identify the function of this gene. Psy1 disruptants produced normal amounts of gliotoxin but grew poorly under low-iron conditions, suggesting that Psy1 plays a role in siderophore production. Psy1 disruptants cannot produce the major T. virens siderophore dimerum acid, a dipetide of acylated Nδ-hydroxyornithine. Biocontrol activity against damping-off diseases caused by Pythium ultimum and Rhizoctonia solani was not reduced by the Psy1 disruption, suggesting that iron competition through dimerum acid production does not contribute significantly to disease suppression activity under the conditions used. PMID:11679326

  18. Identity between palmitoyl-CoA synthetase and arachidonoyl-CoA synthetase in human platelet?

    PubMed Central

    Bakken, A M; Farstad, M; Holmsen, H

    1991-01-01

    Apparent Km values have been determined for the substrates ATP, CoA and fatty acids for the long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (EC 6.2.1.3) reaction in lysates of human blood platelets. The apparent Km for ATP was higher for saturated fatty acids (C12:0 to C18:0) than for unsaturated acids (C18:1 to C22:6). Other apparent Km values were very similar for all long-chain fatty acids tested. Palmitic acid inhibited the formation of [14C]arachidonoyl-CoA, and arachidonic acid inhibited the formation of [14C]palmitoyl-CoA, with [14C]arachidonate or [14C]palmitate respectively as substrate. After chromatography of Triton X-100-extracted platelet protein in several systems (hydroxyapatite, DEAE-Sepharose, Sephacryl S-200 HR, CoA-Sepharose, Sephadex G-100 and AcA 34), both arachidonoyl-CoA synthetase and palmitoyl-CoA synthetase activities were eluted together in the various protein peaks, and with approximately the same ratio of activities in all peaks. After some purification steps (DEAE-Sepharose and Sephacryl S-200 HR), the acyl-CoA synthetase activity was up to 37 nmol/min per mg of protein with [14C]palmitate as substrate, and up to 116 nmol/min per mg of protein with [14C]arachidonate as substrate. The purification was respectively about 8- and 10-fold. The results indicate that palmitoyl-CoA (or unspecific) synthetase and arachidonoyl-CoA (or specific) synthetase are in fact the same enzyme, in agreement with previously reported results from this laboratory. PMID:1848073

  19. Dexamethasone regulates glutamine synthetase expression in rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, Stephen R.; Konagaya, Masaaki; Konagaya, Yoko; Thomas, John W.; Banner, Carl; Vitkovic, Ljubisa

    1986-01-01

    The regulation of glutamine synthetase by glucocorticoids in rat skeletal muscles was studied. Administration of dexamethasone strikingly enhanced glutamine synthetase activity in plantaris and soleus muscles. The dexamethasone-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase activity was blocked to a significant extent by orally administered RU38486, a glucocorticoid antagonist, indicating the involvement of intracellular glucocorticoid receptors in the induction. Northern blot analysis revealed that dexamethasone-mediated enhancement of glutamine synthetase activity involves dramatically increased levels of glutamine synthetase mRNA. The induction of glutamine synthetase was selective in that glutaminase activity of soleus and plantaris muscles was not increased by dexamethasone. Furthermore, dexamethasone treatment resulted in only a small increase in glutamine synthetase activity in the heart. Accordingly, there was only a slight change in glutamine synthetase mRNA level in this tissue. Thus, glucocorticoids regulate glutamine synthetase gene expression in rat muscles at the transcriptional level via interaction with intracellular glutamine production by muscle and to mechanisms underlying glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy.

  20. Crystal structures of three protozoan homologs of tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Ethan A; Arakaki, Tracy L; Gillespie, Robert; Napuli, Alberto J; Kim, Jessica E; Buckner, Frederick S; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Fan, Erkang; Zucker, Frank; Hol, Wim G J

    2011-05-01

    Tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) is an essential enzyme that is recognizably conserved across all forms of life. It is responsible for activating and attaching tryptophan to a cognate tRNA(Trp) molecule for use in protein synthesis. In some eukaryotes this original core function has been supplemented or modified through the addition of extra domains or the expression of variant TrpRS isoforms. The three TrpRS structures from pathogenic protozoa described here represent three illustrations of this malleability in eukaryotes. The Cryptosporidium parvum genome contains a single TrpRS gene, which codes for an N-terminal domain of uncertain function in addition to the conserved core TrpRS domains. Sequence analysis indicates that this extra domain, conserved among several apicomplexans, is related to the editing domain of some AlaRS and ThrRS. The C. parvum enzyme remains fully active in charging tRNA(Trp) after truncation of this extra domain. The crystal structure of the active, truncated enzyme is presented here at 2.4Å resolution. The Trypanosoma brucei genome contains separate cytosolic and mitochondrial isoforms of TrpRS that have diverged in their respective tRNA recognition domains. The crystal structure of the T. brucei cytosolic isoform is presented here at 2.8Å resolution. The Entamoeba histolytica genome contains three sequences that appear to be TrpRS homologs. However one of these, whose structure is presented here at 3.0Å resolution, has lost the active site motifs characteristic of the Class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase catalytic domain while retaining the conserved features of a fully formed tRNA(Trp) recognition domain. The biological function of this variant E. histolytica TrpRS remains unknown, but, on the basis of a completely conserved tRNA recognition region and evidence for ATP but not tryptophan binding, it is tempting to speculate that it may perform an editing function. Together with a previously reported structure of an unusual Trp

  1. Morphology of the transverse ligament of the atlas and the alar ligaments in the silver fox (Vulpes vulpes var)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent new anatomical and histological features of craniocervical junction in dogs and cats were described providing evidence of differences between the carnivore species. No information on these structures in foxes exists. Results Two parts of the alar ligaments were found. A longer one aroused from dens of axis to the internal (medial) surface of the occipital condyles and was called apical part. A shorter part originated from the entire length of the lateral edge of the dens of axis and terminated on the internal wall of the vertebral foramen of atlas and thus was called the lateral part. The transverse ligament of the atlas was widened in the mid region, above the dens of axis, and thickened at enthesis. Periosteal fibrocartilage was detected in the transverse ligament of the atlas at the enthesis, and sesamoid fibrocartilage was present on periphery in the middle of the ligament. Conclusions The craniocervical junction in foxes differs in part from other carnivores such as dogs and cats but resembles that of mesaticephalic dogs. The sesamoid and periosteal fibrocartilage supports the transverse ligament of the atlas whereas the alar ligaments have no cartilage. PMID:23557095

  2. Prostaglandin synthetase and prostacyclin synthetase in mature rat skeletal muscles: immunohistochemical localisation to arterioles, tendons and connective tissues.

    PubMed Central

    McLennan, I S; Macdonald, R E

    1991-01-01

    Mature skeletal muscles produce appreciable quantities of prostacyclin (PGI2) and smaller amounts of PGF2 alpha and PGE2, but the sources of these prostaglandins within skeletal muscle are unknown. Monoclonal antibodies to prostaglandin synthetase and prostacyclin synthetase were used to determine which muscle cells produce prostaglandins. The antibody to prostacyclin synthetase stained the tendon, fascia, epimysium and the arteries leading to the muscles. The endothelia of arterioles were also stained in the tibialis anterior and cremaster but not in the soleus muscles. Only trace levels of immunoreactivity were observed with the antibody to prostaglandin synthetase in normal muscles. However, immunoreactivity was observed in the muscles of rats that had been pretreated with aspirin, a drug that inhibits and stabilises prostaglandin synthetase. In muscles of the aspirin-treated rats, all cell types that were stained by the antiprostacyclin synthetase also reacted weakly with the antibody to prostaglandin synthetase. In addition, some cells in the endomysium were strongly stained with the antiprostaglandin synthetase but not with the antiprostacyclin synthetase. We conclude that (1) at least one aspect of the regulation of blood flow in the microcirculation of slow muscles is different from that of fast muscles, (2) that the tendon and connective tissue is the major source of PGI2 in mature skeletal muscles, and (3) that the prostaglandin-dependent effects of insulin and some other stimuli on skeletal muscle may be mediated by the muscle's arterioles or connective tissue. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:1810931

  3. Characterization of inhibitors acting at the synthetase site of Escherichia coli asparagine synthetase B.

    PubMed

    Boehlein, S K; Nakatsu, T; Hiratake, J; Thirumoorthy, R; Stewart, J D; Richards, N G; Schuster, S M

    2001-09-18

    Asparagine synthetase catalyzes the ATP-dependent formation of L-asparagine from L-aspartate and L-glutamine, via a beta-aspartyl-AMP intermediate. Since interfering with this enzyme activity might be useful for treating leukemia and solid tumors, we have sought small-molecule inhibitors of Escherichia coli asparagine synthetase B (AS-B) as a model system for the human enzyme. Prior work showed that L-cysteine sulfinic acid competitively inhibits this enzyme by interfering with L-aspartate binding. Here, we demonstrate that cysteine sulfinic acid is also a partial substrate for E. coli asparagine synthetase, acting as a nucleophile to form the sulfur analogue of beta-aspartyl-AMP, which is subsequently hydrolyzed back to cysteine sulfinic acid and AMP in a futile cycle. While cysteine sulfinic acid did not itself constitute a clinically useful inhibitor of asparagine synthetase B, these results suggested that replacing this linkage by a more stable analogue might lead to a more potent inhibitor. A sulfoximine reported recently by Koizumi et al. as a competitive inhibitor of the ammonia-dependent E. coli asparagine synthetase A (AS-A) [Koizumi, M., Hiratake, J., Nakatsu, T., Kato, H., and Oda, J. (1999) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 121, 5799-5800] can be regarded as such a species. We found that this sulfoximine also inhibited AS-B, effectively irreversibly. Unlike either the cysteine sulfinic acid interaction with AS-B or the sulfoximine interaction with AS-A, only AS-B productively engaged in asparagine synthesis could be inactivated by the sulfoximine; free enzyme was unaffected even after extended incubation with the sulfoximine. Taken together, these results support the notion that sulfur-containing analogues of aspartate can serve as platforms for developing useful inhibitors of AS-B. PMID:11551215

  4. Retinal Vasculitis in Anti-Synthetase Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Christopher P; Pecen, Paula E; Baynes, Kimberly; Ehlers, Justis P; Srivastava, Sunil K

    2016-09-01

    A 31-year-old woman with a history of anti-synthetase syndrome-related myositis and interstitial lung disease presented with acute-onset blurry vision and rash on her hands and feet. Visual acuity was hand motion in her right eye and 20/40 in her left eye. Dilated fundus exam showed extensive retinal vasculitis, diffuse intraretinal hemorrhages, and subretinal fluid. Optical coherence tomography revealed significant macular thickening, and fluorescein angiography revealed vascular leakage with peripheral nonperfusion. Aggressive systemic immunosuppression was initiated, with gradual resolution of her disease during 8 months of follow-up. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:874-879.].

  5. Retinal Vasculitis in Anti-Synthetase Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Christopher P; Pecen, Paula E; Baynes, Kimberly; Ehlers, Justis P; Srivastava, Sunil K

    2016-09-01

    A 31-year-old woman with a history of anti-synthetase syndrome-related myositis and interstitial lung disease presented with acute-onset blurry vision and rash on her hands and feet. Visual acuity was hand motion in her right eye and 20/40 in her left eye. Dilated fundus exam showed extensive retinal vasculitis, diffuse intraretinal hemorrhages, and subretinal fluid. Optical coherence tomography revealed significant macular thickening, and fluorescein angiography revealed vascular leakage with peripheral nonperfusion. Aggressive systemic immunosuppression was initiated, with gradual resolution of her disease during 8 months of follow-up. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:874-879.]. PMID:27631486

  6. Characterization of Cereulide Synthetase, a Toxin-Producing Macromolecular Machine

    PubMed Central

    Alonzo, Diego A.; Magarvey, Nathan A.; Schmeing, T. Martin

    2015-01-01

    Cereulide synthetase is a two-protein nonribosomal peptide synthetase system that produces a potent emetic toxin in virulent strains of Bacillus cereus. The toxin cereulide is a depsipeptide, as it consists of alternating aminoacyl and hydroxyacyl residues. The hydroxyacyl residues are derived from keto acid substrates, which cereulide synthetase selects and stereospecifically reduces with imbedded ketoreductase domains before incorporating them into the growing depsipeptide chain. We present an in vitro biochemical characterization of cereulide synthetase. We investigate the kinetics and side chain specificity of α-keto acid selection, evaluate the requirement of an MbtH-like protein for adenylation domain activity, assay the effectiveness of vinylsulfonamide inhibitors on ester-adding modules, perform NADPH turnover experiments and evaluate in vitro depsipeptide biosynthesis. This work also provides biochemical insight into depsipeptide-synthesizing nonribosomal peptide synthetases responsible for other bioactive molecules such as valinomycin, antimycin and kutzneride. PMID:26042597

  7. Effects of two alar base suture techniques suture techniques on nasolabial changes after bimaxillary orthognathic surgery in Taiwanese patients with class III malocclusions.

    PubMed

    Chen, C Y-H; Lin, C C-H; Ko, E W-C

    2015-07-01

    A randomized controlled trial was designed to assess the effectiveness of two alar base cinch techniques on the changes in nasolabial morphology after bimaxillary orthognathic surgery. Sixty patients requiring a Le Fort I osteotomy to correct skeletal discrepancies were selected randomly to receive either conventional or modified alar base cinching during the intraoral wound closure procedure. Conventional cinching passed through nasalis muscle and anterior nasal spine. Modified cinching also passed through dermis tissue to increase the anchorage. Postoperative hard and soft tissue changes were evaluated using cone beam computed tomography and three-dimensional stereophotogrammetry at predefined time points. Forty-eight patients with a skeletal class III malocclusion were included. In the conventional group, there was an increase of 0.31 ± 1.31 mm in nasal width and an increase of 0.97 ± 1.60mm in columellar length. In the modified group, there was an increase of 0.81 ± 1.87 mm in the cutaneous height of the upper lip and a decrease of 0.76 ± 1.56 mm in lower prolabial width. Patients with an initial narrow nasal width, alar base width, and less vertical nostril show were more susceptible to a greater degree of change after surgery. Both alar base suture techniques are effective at controlling nasolabial form changes resulting from class III dual-jaw orthognathic surgery.

  8. Technique and nuances of an S-2 alar iliac screw for lumbosacral fixation in patients with transitional and normal anatomy.

    PubMed

    Ohya, Junichi; Vogel, Todd D; Dhall, Sanjay S; Berven, Sigurd; Mummaneni, Praveen V

    2016-07-01

    S-2 alar iliac (S2AI) screw fixation has recently been recognized as a useful technique for pelvic fixation. The authors demonstrate two cases where S2AI fixation was indicated: one case was a sacral insufficiency fracture following a long-segment fusion in a patient with a transitional S-1 vertebra; the other case involved pseudarthrosis following lumbosacral fixation. S2AI screws offer rigid fixation, low profile, and allow easy connection to the lumbosacral rod. The authors describe and demonstrate the surgical technique and nuances for the S2AI screw in a case with transitional S-1 anatomy and in a case with normal S-1 anatomy. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/Sj21lk13_aw . PMID:27364429

  9. Biosynthetic engineering of nonribosomal peptide synthetases.

    PubMed

    Kries, Hajo

    2016-09-01

    From the evolutionary melting pot of natural product synthetase genes, microorganisms elicit antibiotics, communication tools, and iron scavengers. Chemical biologists manipulate these genes to recreate similarly diverse and potent biological activities not on evolutionary time scales but within months. Enzyme engineering has progressed considerably in recent years and offers new screening, modelling, and design tools for natural product designers. Here, recent advances in enzyme engineering and their application to nonribosomal peptide synthetases are reviewed. Among the nonribosomal peptides that have been subjected to biosynthetic engineering are the antibiotics daptomycin, calcium-dependent antibiotic, and gramicidin S. With these peptides, incorporation of unnatural building blocks and modulation of bioactivities via various structural modifications have been successfully demonstrated. Natural product engineering on the biosynthetic level is not a reliable method yet. However, progress in the understanding and manipulation of biosynthetic pathways may enable the routine production of optimized peptide drugs in the near future. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27465074

  10. Comparative Biochemical and Immunological Studies of Bacterial Glutamine Synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Tronick, Steven R.; Ciardi, Joseph E.; Stadtman, E. R.

    1973-01-01

    Antisera prepared against adenylylated and unadenylylated Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase cross-reacted with the glutamine synthetases from a number of gram-negative bacteria and one gram-variable species as demonstrated by immunodiffusion and inhibition of enzyme activity. In contrast, the antisera did not cross-react with the glutamine synthetases from gram-positive bacteria (with one exception) nor with the synthetases of higher organisms. Modification of the various glutamine synthetases by covalent attachment of adenosine 5′-monophosphate (or other nucleotides) was tested for by determining whether or not snake venom phosphodiesterase altered catalytic activity in a manner similar to its effect on adenylylated E. coli glutamine synthetase. Only the activity of the glutamine synthetases from gram-negative bacteria grown with specific levels of nitrogen sources could be altered by snake venom phosphodiesterase. In addition, a relative order of antigenic homology between cross-reacting enzymes was suggested based on the patterns of spur formation in the immunodiffusion assay. Images PMID:4125585

  11. Energetics of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase catalysis.

    PubMed

    McQueney, M S; Anderson, K S; Markham, G D

    2000-04-18

    S-adenosylmethionine synthetase (ATP:L-methionine S-adenosyltransferase) catalyzes the only known route of biosynthesis of the primary biological alkylating agent. The internal thermodynamics of the Escherichia coli S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) synthetase catalyzed formation of AdoMet, pyrophosphate (PP(i)), and phosphate (P(i)) from ATP, methionine, and water have been determined by a combination of pre-steady-state kinetics, solvent isotope incorporation, and equilibrium binding measurements in conjunction with computer modeling. These studies provided the rate constants for substrate binding, the two chemical interconversion steps [AdoMet formation and subsequent tripolyphosphate (PPP(i)) hydrolysis], and product release. The data demonstrate the presence of a kinetically significant isomerization of the E.AdoMet.PP(i).P(i) complex before product release. The free energy profile for the enzyme-catalyzed reaction under physiological conditions has been constructed using these experimental values and in vivo concentrations of substrates and products. The free energy profile reveals that the AdoMet formation reaction, which has an equilibrium constant of 10(4), does not have well-balanced transition state and ground state energies. In contrast, the subsequent PPP(i) hydrolytic reaction is energetically better balanced. The thermodynamic profile indicates the use of binding energies for catalysis of AdoMet formation and the necessity for subsequent PPP(i) hydrolysis to allow enzyme turnover. Crystallographic studies have shown that a mobile protein loop gates access to the active site. The present kinetic studies indicate that this loop movement is rapid with respect to k(cat) and with respect to substrate binding at physiological concentrations. The uniformly slow binding rates of 10(4)-10(5) M(-)(1) s(-)(1) for ligands with different structures suggest that loop movement may be an intrinsic property of the protein rather than being ligand induced. PMID:10757994

  12. Molecular definition of bovine argininosuccinate synthetase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, J A; Healy, P J; Beaudet, A L; O'Brien, W E

    1989-01-01

    Citrullinemia is an inborn error of metabolism due to deficiency of the urea cycle enzyme, argininosuccinate synthetase [L-citrulline:L-aspartate ligase (AMP-forming), EC 6.3.4.5]. The disease was first described in humans but was recently reported in dairy cattle in Australia. Here we report the nucleotide sequence of the normal bovine cDNA for argininosuccinate synthetase and the mutation present in animals with citrullinemia. Analysis of DNA from affected animals by Southern blotting did not readily identify the mutation in the bovine gene. RNA (Northern) blotting revealed a major reduction in the steady-state amount of mRNA in the liver of affected animals to less than 5% of controls. The bovine cDNA was cloned and sequenced and revealed 96% identity with the deduced human sequence at the amino acid level. Starting with mutant bovine liver, the mRNA was reverse-transcribed; the cDNA product was amplified with the polymerase chain reaction, cloned, and sequenced. The sequence revealed a C----T transition converting arginine-86 (CGA) to a nonsense codon (TGA). A second C----T transition represented a polymorphism in proline-175 (CCC----CCT). The mutation and the polymorphism were confirmed by amplification of genomic DNA and demonstration with restriction endonuclease enzymes of both the loss of an Ava II site in DNA from mutant animals at codon 86 and the presence or absence of a Dde I site at codon 175. The loss of the Ava II site can be used for rapid, economical, nonradioactive detection of heterozygotes for bovine citrullinemia. Images PMID:2813370

  13. Genetics Home Reference: carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency ...

  14. [Regulation of glucosamine synthetase activity by cholesterol and hydrocortisone].

    PubMed

    Sharaev, P N; Ivanov, V G; Bogdanov, N G

    1988-09-01

    The effects of cholesterol and hydrocortisone (cortisol) on the activity of purified glucosamine synthetase from rat liver was studied in vitro. It was found that the enzyme activity is increased by cholesterol and inhibited by hydrocortisone. These steroids block the allosteric effect of vitamin K1 on the enzyme. There is evidence testifying to the allosteric type of cholesterol and hydrocortisone effects on glucosamine synthetase. PMID:3203113

  15. Function of the major synthetase subdomains of carbamyl-phosphate synthetase.

    PubMed

    Guy, H I; Evans, D R

    1996-06-01

    The amidotransferase domain (GLNase) of mammalian carbamyl-phosphate synthetase II hydrolyzes glutamine and transfers ammonia to the synthetase domain where carbamyl phosphate is formed in a three-step reaction sequence. The synthetase domain consists of two homologous subdomains, CPS.A and CPS.B. Recent studies suggest that CPS.A catalyzes the initial ATP dependent-activation of bicarbonate, whereas CPS.B uses a second ATP to form carbamyl phosphate. To establish the function of these substructural elements, we have cloned and expressed the mammalian protein and its subdomains in Escherichia coli. Recombinant CPSase (GLNase-CPS.A-CPS.B) was found to be fully functional. Two other proteins were made; the first consisted of only GLNase and CPS.A, whereas the second lacked CPS.A and had the GLNase domain fused directly to CPS.B. Remarkably, both proteins catalyzed the entire series of reactions involved in glutamine-dependent carbamyl phosphate synthesis. The stoichiometry, like that of the native enzyme, was 2 mol of ATP utilized per mol of carbamyl phosphate formed. GLN-CPS.B is allosterically regulated, whereas GLN-CPS.A was insensitive to effectors, a result consistent with evidence showing that allosteric effectors bind to CPS.B. These properties are not peculiar to the mammalian protein, because the separately cloned CPS.A subdomain of the E. coli enzyme was also found to catalyze carbamyl phosphate synthesis. Gel filtration chromatography and chemical cross-linking studies showed that these molecules are dimers, a structural organization that may be a prerequisite for the overall reaction. Thus, the homologous CPS.A and CPS.B subdomains are functionally equivalent, although in the native enzyme they may have different functions resulting from their juxtaposition relative to the other components in the complex. PMID:8662713

  16. Glucocorticoid receptor-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase in skeletal muscle cells in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, Stephen R.; Thomas, John W.; Banner, Carl; Vitkovic, Ljubisa; Konagaya, Masaaki

    1987-01-01

    The regulation by glucocorticoids of glutamine synthetase in L6 muscle cells in culture is studied. Glutamine synthetase activity was strikingly enhanced by dexamethasone. The dexamethasone-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase activity was blocked by RU38486, a glucocorticoid antagonist, indicating the involvement of intracellular glucocorticoid receptors in the induction process. RU38486 alone was without effect. Northern blot analysis revealed that dexamethasone-mediated enhancement of glutamine synthetase activity involves increased levels of glutamine synthetase mRNA. Glucocorticoids regulate the expression of glutamine synthetase mRNA in cultured muscle cells via interaction with intracellular receptors. Such regulation may be relevant to control of glutamine production by muscle.

  17. Allosteric dominance in carbamoyl phosphate synthetase.

    PubMed

    Braxton, B L; Mullins, L S; Raushel, F M; Reinhart, G D

    1999-02-01

    A linked-function analysis of the allosteric responsiveness of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS) from E. coli was performed by following the ATP synthesis reaction at low carbamoyl phosphate concentration. All three allosteric ligands, ornithine, UMP, and IMP, act by modifying the affinity of CPS for the substrate MgADP. Individually ornithine strongly promotes, and UMP strongly antagonizes, the binding of MgADP. IMP causes only a slight inhibition at 25 degreesC. When both ornithine and UMP were varied, models which presume a mutually exclusive binding relationship between these ligands do not fit the data as well as does one which allows both ligands (and substrate) to bind simultaneously. The same result was obtained with ornithine and IMP. By contrast, the actions of UMP and IMP together must be explained with a competitive model, consistent with previous reports that UMP and IMP bind to the same site. When ornithine is bound to the enzyme, its activation dominates the effects when either UMP or IMP is also bound. The relationship of this observation to the structure of CPS is discussed. PMID:9931004

  18. Glutamine Synthetase of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia1

    PubMed Central

    Tingey, Scott V.; Coruzzi, Gloria M.

    1987-01-01

    We have characterized the distinct forms of glutamine synthetase (GS) which are present in leaves and roots of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. Mature leaves contain a single GS polypeptide (44 kilodaltons in size) which is localized to the stroma of intact chloroplasts. In contrast, the GS polypeptide in roots is distinct in size (38 kilodaltons) and charge. A lectin stain of leaf soluble protein indicates that the size difference of these mature GS polypeptides is not the result of posttranslational glycosylation. cDNA clones encoding a GS mRNA of N. plumbaginifolia were characterized and used as molecular probes to examine GS transcripts in leaves and roots. GS mRNA hybrid-selected from leaves or roots translated in vitro into distinct GS primary translation products (49 or 38 kilodaltons). The 49 kilodalton GS primary translation product, specific to leaf poly(A)RNA is proposed to be a precursor to the mature 44 kilodalton chloroplast stromal GS polypeptide. The 38 kilodalton GS primary translation product encoded by root GS mRNA, corresponds in size to the polypeptide encoded by the GS cDNA clones characterized. Southern blot analysis of nuclear DNA indicates that there are several different genomic fragments encoding GS in N. plumbaginifolia. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:16665445

  19. Dihydrofolate synthetase and folylpolyglutamate synthetase: direct evidence for intervention of acyl phosphate intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, R.V.; Shane, B.; McGuire, J.J.; Coward, J.K.

    1988-12-13

    The transfer of /sup 17/O and/or /sup 18/O from (COOH-/sup 17/O or -/sup 18/O) enriched substrates to inorganic phosphate (P/sub i/) has been demonstrated for two enzyme-catalyzed reactions involved in folate biosynthesis and glutamylation. COOH-/sup 18/O-labeled folate, methotrexate, and dihydropteroate, in addition to (/sup 17/O)-glutamate, were synthesized and used as substrates for folylpolyglutamate synthetase (FPGS) isolated from Escherichia coli, hog liver, and rat liver and for dihydrofolate synthetase (DHFS) isolated from E. coli. P/sub i/ was purified from the reaction mixtures and converted to trimethyl phosphate (TMP), which was then analyzed for /sup 17/O and /sup 18/O enrichment by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and/or mass spectroscopy. In the reactions catalyzed by the E. coli enzymes, both NMR and quantitative mass spectral analyses established that transfer of the oxygen isotope from the substrate /sup 18/O-enriched carboxyl group to P/sub i/ occurred, thereby providing strong evidence for an acyl phosphate intermediate in both the FPGS- and DHFS-catalyzed reactions. Similar oxygen-transfer experiments were carried out by use of two mammalian enzymes. The small amounts of P/sub i/ obtained from reactions catalyzed by these less abundant FPGS proteins precluded the use of NMR techniques. However, mass spectral analysis of the TMP derived from the mammalian FPGS-catalyzed reactions showed clearly that /sup 18/O transfer had occurred.

  20. Kinetics profiling of gramicidin S synthetase A, a member of nonribosomal peptide synthetases.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xun; Li, Hao; Alfermann, Jonas; Mootz, Henning D; Yang, Haw

    2014-12-23

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) incorporate assorted amino acid substrates into complex natural products. The substrate is activated via the formation of a reactive aminoacyl adenylate and is subsequently attached to the protein template via a thioester bond. The reactive nature of such intermediates, however, leads to side reactions that also break down the high-energy anhydride bond. The off-pathway kinetics or their relative weights compared to that of the on-pathway counterpart remains generally elusive. Here, we introduce multiplatform kinetics profiling to quantify the relative weights of on- and off-pathway reactions. Using the well-defined stoichiometry of thioester formation, we integrate a mass spectrometry (MS) kinetics assay, a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay, and an ATP-pyrophosphate (PPi) exchange assay to map out a highly efficient on-pathway kinetics profile of the substrate activation and intermediate uploading (>98% relative weight) for wide-type gramicidin S synthetase A (GrsA) and a 87% rate profile for a cysteine-free GrsA mutant. Our kinetics profiling approach complements the existing enzyme-coupled byproduct-release assays, unraveling new mechanistic insights of substrate activation/channeling in NRPS enzymes.

  1. Glutamine synthetase in liver of the American alligator, Alligator mississippiensis.

    PubMed

    Smith, D D; Campbell, J W

    1987-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase was shown to be localized in liver mitochondria of the American alligator, Alligator mississippiensis, by immunofluorescent staining of frozen liver sections and by the detection of enzymatic activity and immunoreactive protein in the mitochondrial fraction following subcellular fractionation of liver tissue by differential centrifugation. The primary translation product of alligator liver glutamine synthetase mRNA was shown to have an Mr = 45,000 which is similar if not identical in size to that of the mature subunit. This mRNA was found to be heterogeneous in size with a major form corresponding to 2.8-3.0 kb and a lesser form corresponding to around 2 kb. Both are in excess of the size required to code for the glutamine synthetase subunit. The synthesis and presumably the mitochondrial import of glutamine synthetase in alligator liver are thus very similar to the same processes in avian liver. Despite the excretion of a high percentage of nitrogen as ammonia, the demonstration of a mitochondrial glutamine synthetase indicates the alligator has the typical avian-type uricotelic ammonia-detoxification system in liver. This suggests that the transition to uricotelism occurred in the sauropsid line of evolution and has persisted through both the lepidosaurian (snakes, lizards) and archosaurian (dinosaurs, crocodilians, birds) lines.

  2. Changes in the activity levels of glutamine synthetase, glutaminase and glycogen synthetase in rats subjected to hypoxic stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vats, P.; Mukherjee, A. K.; Kumria, M. M. L.; Singh, S. N.; Patil, S. K. B.; Rangnathan, S.; Sridharan, K.

    Exposure to high altitude causes loss of body mass and alterations in metabolic processes, especially carbohydrate and protein metabolism. The present study was conducted to elucidate the role of glutamine synthetase, glutaminase and glycogen synthetase under conditions of chronic intermittent hypoxia. Four groups, each consisting of 12 male albino rats (Wistar strain), were exposed to a simulated altitude of 7620 m in a hypobaric chamber for 6 h per day for 1, 7, 14 and 21 days, respectively. Blood haemoglobin, blood glucose, protein levels in the liver, muscle and plasma, glycogen content, and glutaminase, glutamine synthetase and glycogen synthetase activities in liver and muscle were determined in all groups of exposed and in a group of unexposed animals. Food intake and changes in body mass were also monitored. There was a significant reduction in body mass (28-30%) in hypoxia-exposed groups as compared to controls, with a corresponding decrease in food intake. There was rise in blood haemoglobin and plasma protein in response to acclimatisation. Over a three-fold increase in liver glycogen content was observed following 1 day of hypoxic exposure (4.76+/-0.78 mg.g-1 wet tissue in normal unexposed rats; 15.82+/-2.30 mg.g-1 wet tissue in rats exposed to hypoxia for 1 day). This returned to normal in later stages of exposure. However, there was no change in glycogen synthetase activity except for a decrease in the 21-days hypoxia-exposed group. There was a slight increase in muscle glycogen content in the 1-day exposed group which declined significantly by 56.5, 50.6 and 42% following 7, 14, and 21 days of exposure, respectively. Muscle glycogen synthetase activity was also decreased following 21 days of exposure. There was an increase in glutaminase activity in the liver and muscle in the 7-, 14- and 21-day exposed groups. Glutamine synthetase activity was higher in the liver in 7- and 14-day exposed groups; this returned to normal following 21 days of exposure

  3. The glutamine synthetase gene family in Populus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Glutamine synthetase (GS; EC: 6.3.1.2, L-glutamate: ammonia ligase ADP-forming) is a key enzyme in ammonium assimilation and metabolism of higher plants. The current work was undertaken to develop a more comprehensive understanding of molecular and biochemical features of GS gene family in poplar, and to characterize the developmental regulation of GS expression in various tissues and at various times during the poplar perennial growth. Results The GS gene family consists of 8 different genes exhibiting all structural and regulatory elements consistent with their roles as functional genes. Our results indicate that the family members are organized in 4 groups of duplicated genes, 3 of which code for cytosolic GS isoforms (GS1) and 1 which codes for the choroplastic GS isoform (GS2). Our analysis shows that Populus trichocarpa is the first plant species in which it was observed the complete GS family duplicated. Detailed expression analyses have revealed specific spatial and seasonal patterns of GS expression in poplar. These data provide insights into the metabolic function of GS isoforms in poplar and pave the way for future functional studies. Conclusions Our data suggest that GS duplicates could have been retained in order to increase the amount of enzyme in a particular cell type. This possibility could contribute to the homeostasis of nitrogen metabolism in functions associated to changes in glutamine-derived metabolic products. The presence of duplicated GS genes in poplar could also contribute to diversification of the enzymatic properties for a particular GS isoform through the assembly of GS polypeptides into homo oligomeric and/or hetero oligomeric holoenzymes in specific cell types. PMID:21867507

  4. Recurrent Isolated Neonatal Hemolytic Anemia: Think About Glutathione Synthetase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Signolet, Isabelle; Chenouard, Rachel; Oca, Florine; Barth, Magalie; Reynier, Pascal; Denis, Marie-Christine; Simard, Gilles

    2016-09-01

    Hemolytic anemia (HA) of the newborn should be considered in cases of rapidly developing, severe, or persistent hyperbilirubinemia. Several causes of corpuscular hemolysis have been described, among which red blood cell enzyme defects are of particular concern. We report a rare case of red blood cell enzyme defect in a male infant, who presented during his first months of life with recurrent and isolated neonatal hemolysis. All main causes were ruled out. At 6.5 months of age, the patient presented with gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization; fortuitously, urine organic acid chromatography revealed a large peak of 5-oxoproline. Before the association between HA and 5-oxoprolinuria was noted, glutathione synthetase deficiency was suspected and confirmed by a low glutathione synthetase concentration and a collapse of glutathione synthetase activity in erythrocytes. Moreover, molecular diagnosis revealed 2 mutations in the glutathione synthetase gene: a previously reported missense mutation (c.[656A>G]; p.[Asp219Gly]) and a mutation not yet described in the binding site of the enzyme (c.[902T>C]; p.[Leu301Pro]). However, 15 days later, a control sample revealed no signs of 5-oxoprolinuria and the clinical history discovered administration of acetaminophen in the 48 hours before hospitalization. Thus, in this patient, acetaminophen exposure allowed the diagnosis of a mild form of glutathione synthetase deficiency, characterized by isolated HA. Early diagnosis is important because treatment with bicarbonate, vitamins C and E, and elimination of trigger factors are recommended to improve long-term outcomes. Glutathione synthetase deficiency should be screened for in cases of unexplained newborn HA. PMID:27581854

  5. Phosphorylation of five aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in reticulocytes and identification of the protein kinases phosphorylating threonyl-tRNA synthetase from rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Pendergast, A.M.; Traugh, J.A.

    1986-05-01

    Five aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in the high molecular weight complex were phosphorylated in rabbit reticulocytes following labeling with /sup 32/P. The five synthetases phosphorylated were the glutamyl-, glutaminyl-, lysyl-, aspartyl- and methionyl-tRNA synthetases. In addition, a 37,000 dalton protein, associated with the synthetase complex and tentatively identified as casein kinase I, was also phosphorylated in intact cells. Phosphoamino acid analysis of the proteins indicated all of the phosphate was on seryl residues. Incubation of reticulocytes with /sup 32/P in the presence of 8-bromo-cAMP and o, the 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine resulted in a six-fold increase in phosphorylation of the glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase, a two-fold increase in phosphorylation of the aspartyl-tRNA synthetase, and a 50 to 60% decrease in phosphorylation of the glutamyl-, methionyl- and lysyl-tRNA synthetases and the M/sub r/ 37,000 protein. When the site(s) on the glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase phosphorylated in response to 8-bromo-cAMP was analyzed by two-dimensional tryptic phosphopeptide mapping, a single phosphopeptide was observed which was identical to that obtained in vitro upon phosphorylation with the cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Also, the authors identify here, the protein kinases phosphorylating threonyl-tRNA synthetase from rat liver. They are protease activated kinase I, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase and protein kinase C.

  6. The importance of cytosolic glutamine synthetase in nitrogen assimilation and recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, S.M.; Habash, D.Z.

    2009-07-02

    Glutamine synthetase assimilates ammonium into amino acids, thus it is a key enzyme for nitrogen metabolism. The cytosolic isoenzymes of glutamine synthetase assimilate ammonium derived from primary nitrogen uptake and from various internal nitrogen recycling pathways. In this way, cytosolic glutamine synthetase is crucial for the remobilization of protein-derived nitrogen. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase is encoded by a small family of genes that are well conserved across plant species. Members of the cytosolic glutamine synthetase gene family are regulated in response to plant nitrogen status, as well as to environmental cues, such as nitrogen availability and biotic/abiotic stresses. The complex regulation of cytosolic glutamine synthetase at the transcriptional to post-translational levels is key to the establishment of a specific physiological role for each isoenzyme. The diverse physiological roles of cytosolic glutamine synthetase isoenzymes are important in relation to current agricultural and ecological issues.

  7. Polyspecific pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetases from directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Guo, Li-Tao; Wang, Yane-Shih; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Eiler, Daniel; Kavran, Jennifer M; Wong, Margaret; Kiessling, Laura L; Steitz, Thomas A; O'Donoghue, Patrick; Söll, Dieter

    2014-11-25

    Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) and its cognate tRNA(Pyl) have emerged as ideal translation components for genetic code innovation. Variants of the enzyme facilitate the incorporation >100 noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) into proteins. PylRS variants were previously selected to acylate N(ε)-acetyl-Lys (AcK) onto tRNA(Pyl). Here, we examine an N(ε)-acetyl-lysyl-tRNA synthetase (AcKRS), which is polyspecific (i.e., active with a broad range of ncAAs) and 30-fold more efficient with Phe derivatives than it is with AcK. Structural and biochemical data reveal the molecular basis of polyspecificity in AcKRS and in a PylRS variant [iodo-phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (IFRS)] that displays both enhanced activity and substrate promiscuity over a chemical library of 313 ncAAs. IFRS, a product of directed evolution, has distinct binding modes for different ncAAs. These data indicate that in vivo selections do not produce optimally specific tRNA synthetases and suggest that translation fidelity will become an increasingly dominant factor in expanding the genetic code far beyond 20 amino acids.

  8. Polyspecific pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetases from directed evolution

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Li-Tao; Wang, Yane-Shih; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Eiler, Daniel; Kavran, Jennifer M.; Wong, Margaret; Kiessling, Laura L.; Steitz, Thomas A.; O’Donoghue, Patrick; Söll, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) and its cognate tRNAPyl have emerged as ideal translation components for genetic code innovation. Variants of the enzyme facilitate the incorporation >100 noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) into proteins. PylRS variants were previously selected to acylate Nε-acetyl-Lys (AcK) onto tRNAPyl. Here, we examine an Nε-acetyl-lysyl-tRNA synthetase (AcKRS), which is polyspecific (i.e., active with a broad range of ncAAs) and 30-fold more efficient with Phe derivatives than it is with AcK. Structural and biochemical data reveal the molecular basis of polyspecificity in AcKRS and in a PylRS variant [iodo-phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (IFRS)] that displays both enhanced activity and substrate promiscuity over a chemical library of 313 ncAAs. IFRS, a product of directed evolution, has distinct binding modes for different ncAAs. These data indicate that in vivo selections do not produce optimally specific tRNA synthetases and suggest that translation fidelity will become an increasingly dominant factor in expanding the genetic code far beyond 20 amino acids. PMID:25385624

  9. Genetic and Immunological Studies of Bacteriophage T4 Thymidylate Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, S. W.; Stollar, B. D.; Friedkin, M.

    1973-01-01

    Thymidylate synthetase, which appears after infection of Escherichia coli with bacteriophage T4, has been partially purified. The phage enzyme is immunologically distinct from the host enzyme and has a molecular weight of 50,000 in comparison to 68,000 for the host enzyme. A system has been developed to characterize T4 td mutants previously known to have impaired expression of phage thymidylate synthetase. For this system, an E. coli host lacking thymidylate synthetase was isolated. Known genetic suppressors were transduced into this host. The resulting isogenic hosts were infected with phage T4 td mutants. The specific activities and amounts of cross-reacting material induced by several different types of phage mutants under conditions of suppression or non-suppression have been examined. The results show that the phage carries the structural gene specifying the thymidylate synthetase which appears after phage infection, and that the combination of plaque morphology, enzyme activity assays, and an assay for immunologically cross-reacting material provides a means for identifying true amber mutants of the phage gene. Images PMID:4575286

  10. Variant human phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase altered in regulatory and catalytic functions.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, M A; Raivio, K O; Bakay, B; Adams, W B; Nyhan, W L

    1980-01-01

    An inherited, structurally abnormal and superactive form of the enzyme 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate (PP-ribose-P) synthetase (EC 2.7.6.1) has been characterized in fibroblasts cultured from a 14-yr-old male (S.M.) with clinical manifestations of uric acid overproduction present since infancy. PP-ribose-P synthetase from the cells of this child showed four- to fivefold greater than normal resistance to purine nucleotide (ADP and GDP) feedback inhibition of enzyme activity and hyperbolic rather than sigmoidal inorganic phosphate (Pi) activation in incompletely dialyzed extracts. Excessive maximal velocity of the enzyme reaction catalyzed by the mutant enzyme was indicated by: enzyme activities twice those of normal at all concentrations of Pi in chromatographed fibroblast extracts; normal affinity constants for substrates and for the activator, Mg2+; and twofold greater than normal activity per immunoreactive enzyme molecule. The mutant enzyme thus possessed deficient regulatory and superactive catalytic properties, two mechanisms previously demonstrated individually to underlie the excessive PPRribose-P and uric acid synthesis of affected members of families with superactive PP-ribose-P synthetases. Increased PP-ribose-P concentration (4-fold) and generation (2.7-fold) and enhanced rates of PP-ribose-P dependent purine synthetic reactions, including purine synthesis de novo, in S.M. fibroblasts confirmed the functional significance of this patient's mutant enzyme. Diminished stability of the variant PP-ribose-P synthetase was manifested in vitro by increased thermal lability and in vivo by deficiency of enzyme activity at Pi concentrations greater than 0.3 mM in hemolysates and by an accelerated, age-related decrement in enzyme activity in lysates of erythrocytes separated by specific density. Despite the diminished amount of PP-ribose-P synthetase in the S.M. erythrocyte population, S.M. erythrocytes had increased PP-ribose-P concentration and increased rates

  11. Hemolytic anemia and metabolic acidosis: think about glutathione synthetase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ben Ameur, Salma; Aloulou, Hajer; Nasrallah, Fehmi; Kamoun, Thouraya; Kaabachi, Naziha; Hachicha, Mongia

    2015-02-01

    Glutathione synthetase deficiency (GSSD) is a rare disorder of glutathione metabolism with varying clinical severity. Patients may present with hemolytic anemia alone or together with acidosis and central nervous system impairment. Diagnosis is made by clinical presentation and detection of elevated concentrations of 5-oxoproline in urine and low glutathione synthetase activity in erythrocytes or cultured skin fibroblasts. The prognosis seems to depend on early diagnosis and treatment. We report a 4 months old Tunisian male infant who presented with severe metabolic acidosis with high anion gap and hemolytic anemia. High level of 5-oxoproline was detected in her urine and diagnosis of GSSD was made. Treatment consists of the correction of acidosis, blood transfusion, and supplementation with antioxidants. He died of severe metabolic acidosis and sepsis at the age of 15 months.

  12. Glutamine synthetase gene evolution: A good molecular clock

    SciTech Connect

    Pesole, G.; Lanvave, C.; Saccone, C. ); Bozzetti, M.P. ); Preparata, G. )

    1991-01-15

    Glutamine synthetase gene evolution in various animals, plants, and bacteria was evaluated by a general stationary Markov model. The evolutionary process proved to be unexpectedly regular even for a time span as long as that between the divergence of prokaryotes from eukaryotes. This enabled us to draw phylogenetic trees for species whose phylogeny cannot be easily reconstructed from the fossil record. The calculation of the times of divergence of the various organelle-specific enzymes led us to hypothesize that the pea and bean chloroplast genes for these enzymes originated from the duplication of nuclear genes as a result of the different metabolic needs of the various species. The data indicate that the duplication of plastid glutamine synthetase genes occurred long after the endosymbiotic events that produced the organelles themselves.

  13. Inhibition of recombinant Pneumocystis carinii dihydropteroate synthetase by sulfa drugs.

    PubMed

    Hong, Y L; Hossler, P A; Calhoun, D H; Meshnick, S R

    1995-08-01

    Forty-four sulfa drugs were screened against crude preparations of recombinant Pneumocystis carinii dihydropteroate synthetase. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constants (Km) for p-aminobenzoic acid and 7,8-dihydro-6-hydroxymethylpterin pyrophosphate were 0.34 +/- 0.02 and 2.50 +/- 0.71 microM, respectively. Several sulfa drugs, including sulfathiazole, sulfachlorpyridazine, sulfamethoxypyridazine, and sulfathiourea, inhibited dihydropteroate synthetase approximately as well as sulfamethoxazole, as determined by the concentrations which cause 50% inhibition and/or by Ki. For all sulfones and sulfonamides tested, unsubstituted p-amino groups were necessary for activity, and sulfonamides containing an N1-heterocyclic substituent were found to be the most effective inhibitors. Folate biosynthesis in isolated intact P. carinii was approximately equally sensitive to inhibition by sulfamethoxazole, sulfachlorpyridazine, sulfamethoxypyridazine, sulfisoxazole, and sulfathiazole. Two of these drugs, sulfamethoxypyridazine and sulfisoxazole, are known to be less toxic than sulfamethoxazole and should be further evaluated for the treatment of P. carinii pneumonia.

  14. Glutathione production by recombinant Escherichia coli expressing bifunctional glutathione synthetase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dezheng; Wang, Cheng; Wu, Hui; Li, Zhimin; Ye, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is an important bioactive substance applied widely in pharmaceutical and food industries. Due to the strong product inhibition in the GSH biosynthetic pathway, high levels of intracellular content, yield and productivity of GSH are difficult to achieve. Recently, a novel bifunctional GSH synthetase was identified to be less sensitive to GSH. A recombinant Escherichia coli strain expressing gshF encoding the bifunctional glutathione synthetase of Streptococcus thermophilus was constructed for GSH production. In this study, efficient GSH production using this engineered strain was investigated. The cultivation process was optimized by controlling dissolved oxygen (DO), amino acid addition and glucose feeding. 36.8 mM (11.3 g/L) GSH were formed at a productivity of 2.06 mM/h when the amino acid precursors (75 mM each) were added and glucose was supplied as the sole carbon and energy source. PMID:26586402

  15. Glutamine synthetase gene evolution: a good molecular clock.

    PubMed Central

    Pesole, G; Bozzetti, M P; Lanave, C; Preparata, G; Saccone, C

    1991-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (EC 6.3.1.2) gene evolution in various animals, plants, and bacteria was evaluated by a general stationary Markov model. The evolutionary process proved to be unexpectedly regular even for a time span as long as that between the divergence of prokaryotes from eukaryotes. This enabled us to draw phylogenetic trees for species whose phylogeny cannot be easily reconstructed from the fossil record. Our calculation of the times of divergence of the various organelle-specific enzymes led us to hypothesize that the pea and bean chloroplast genes for these enzymes originated from the duplication of nuclear genes as a result of the different metabolic needs of the various species. Our data indicate that the duplication of plastid glutamine synthetase genes occurred long after the endosymbiotic events that produced the organelles themselves. PMID:1671172

  16. Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase Complexes in Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Havrylenko, Svitlana; Mirande, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are essential enzymes for interpreting the genetic code. They are responsible for the proper pairing of codons on mRNA with amino acids. In addition to this canonical, translational function, they are also involved in the control of many cellular pathways essential for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Association of several of these enzymes within supramolecular assemblies is a key feature of organization of the translation apparatus in eukaryotes. It could be a means to control their oscillation between translational functions, when associated within a multi-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complex (MARS), and nontranslational functions, after dissociation from the MARS and association with other partners. In this review, we summarize the composition of the different MARS described from archaea to mammals, the mode of assembly of these complexes, and their roles in maintenance of cellular homeostasis. PMID:25807264

  17. Recurrent adenylation domain replacement in the microcystin synthetase gene cluster

    PubMed Central

    Fewer, David P; Rouhiainen, Leo; Jokela, Jouni; Wahlsten, Matti; Laakso, Kati; Wang, Hao; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2007-01-01

    Background Microcystins are small cyclic heptapeptide toxins produced by a range of distantly related cyanobacteria. Microcystins are synthesized on large NRPS-PKS enzyme complexes. Many structural variants of microcystins are produced simulatenously. A recombination event between the first module of mcyB (mcyB1) and mcyC in the microcystin synthetase gene cluster is linked to the simultaneous production of microcystin variants in strains of the genus Microcystis. Results Here we undertook a phylogenetic study to investigate the order and timing of recombination between the mcyB1 and mcyC genes in a diverse selection of microcystin producing cyanobacteria. Our results provide support for complex evolutionary processes taking place at the mcyB1 and mcyC adenylation domains which recognize and activate the amino acids found at X and Z positions. We find evidence for recent recombination between mcyB1 and mcyC in strains of the genera Anabaena, Microcystis, and Hapalosiphon. We also find clear evidence for independent adenylation domain conversion of mcyB1 by unrelated peptide synthetase modules in strains of the genera Nostoc and Microcystis. The recombination events replace only the adenylation domain in each case and the condensation domains of mcyB1 and mcyC are not transferred together with the adenylation domain. Our findings demonstrate that the mcyB1 and mcyC adenylation domains are recombination hotspots in the microcystin synthetase gene cluster. Conclusion Recombination is thought to be one of the main mechanisms driving the diversification of NRPSs. However, there is very little information on how recombination takes place in nature. This study demonstrates that functional peptide synthetases are created in nature through transfer of adenylation domains without the concomitant transfer of condensation domains. PMID:17908306

  18. A Rationally Engineered Misacylating Aminoacyl-Trna Synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, T.L.; Rodriguez-Hernandez, A.; Corigliano, E.M.; Perona, J.J.

    2009-05-12

    Information transfer from nucleic acid to protein is mediated by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, which catalyze the specific pairings of amino acids with transfer RNAs. Despite copious sequence and structural information on the 22 tRNA synthetase families, little is known of the enzyme signatures that specify amino acid selectivities. Here, we show that transplanting a conserved arginine residue from glutamyl-tRNA synthetase (GluRS) to glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase (GlnRS) improves the K{sub M} of GlnRS for noncognate glutamate. Two crystal structures of this C229R GlnRS mutant reveal that a conserved twin-arginine GluRS amino acid identity signature cannot be incorporated into GlnRS without disrupting surrounding protein structural elements that interact with the tRNA. Consistent with these findings, we show that cumulative replacement of other primary binding site residues in GlnRS, with those of GluRS, only slightly improves the ability of the GlnRS active site to accommodate glutamate. However, introduction of 22 amino acid replacements and one deletion, including substitution of the entire primary binding site and two surface loops adjacent to the region disrupted in C229R, improves the capacity of Escherichia coli GlnRS to synthesize misacylated Glu-tRNA{sup Gln} by 16,000-fold. This hybrid enzyme recapitulates the function of misacylating GluRS enzymes found in organisms that synthesize Gln-tRNA{sup Gln} by an alternative pathway. These findings implicate the RNA component of the contemporary GlnRS-tRNA{sup Gln} complex in mediating amino acid specificity. This role for tRNA may persist as a relic of primordial cells in which the evolution of the genetic code was driven by RNA-catalyzed amino acid-RNA pairing.

  19. Identification of the glutamine synthetase adenylyltransferase of Azospirillum brasilense.

    PubMed

    Van Dommelen, Anne; Spaepen, Stijn; Vanderleyden, Jozef

    2009-04-01

    Glutamine synthetase, a key enzyme in nitrogen metabolism of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, is strictly regulated. One means of regulation is the modulation of activity through adenylylation catalyzed by adenylyltransferases. Using PCR primers based on conserved sequences in glutamine synthetase adenylyltransferases, we amplified part of the glnE gene of Azospirillum brasilense Sp7. The complete glnE sequence of A. brasilense Sp245 was retrieved from the draft genome sequence of this organism (http://genomics.ornl.gov/research/azo/). Adenylyltransferase is a bifunctional enzyme consisting of an N-terminal domain responsible for deadenylylation activity and a C-terminal domain responsible for adenylylation activity. Both domains are partially homologous to each other. Residues important for catalytic activity were present in the deduced amino acid sequence of the A. brasilense Sp245 glnE sequence. A glnE mutant was constructed in A. brasilense Sp7 by inserting a kanamycin resistance cassette between the two active domains of the enzyme. The resulting mutant was unable to adenylylate the glutamine synthetase enzyme and was impaired in growth when shifted from nitrogen-poor to nitrogen-rich medium.

  20. Turnover of bacterial glutamine synthetase: oxidative inactivation precedes proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Levine, R L; Oliver, C N; Fulks, R M; Stadtman, E R

    1981-04-01

    We partially purified a preparation from Escherichia coli that proteolytically degrades the enzyme glutamine synthetase [L-glutamate:ammonia ligase (ADP-forming), EC 6.3.1.2]. The degradation is at least a two-step process. First, the glutamine synthetase undergoes an oxidative modification. This modification leads to loss of catalytic activity and also renders the protein susceptible to proteolytic attack in the second step. The oxidative step displays characteristics of a mixed-function oxidation, requiring both molecular oxygen and a reduced nucleotide. This step can also be catalyzed by a purified, mammalian cytochrome P-450 system, as well as by a model system consisting of ascorbic acid and oxygen. Catalase blocks this oxidative modification step. Thus, the overall process of proteolytic degradation can be observed only if care is taken to remove catalase activity from the extracts. The inactivation reaction is dependent on the state of adenylylation of the glutamine synthetase, suggesting that this a physiologically important reaction. If so, then mixed-function oxidases are now implicated in the process of intracellular protein turnover.

  1. Turnover of bacterial glutamine synthetase: oxidative inactivation precedes proteolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Levine, R L; Oliver, C N; Fulks, R M; Stadtman, E R

    1981-01-01

    We partially purified a preparation from Escherichia coli that proteolytically degrades the enzyme glutamine synthetase [L-glutamate:ammonia ligase (ADP-forming), EC 6.3.1.2]. The degradation is at least a two-step process. First, the glutamine synthetase undergoes an oxidative modification. This modification leads to loss of catalytic activity and also renders the protein susceptible to proteolytic attack in the second step. The oxidative step displays characteristics of a mixed-function oxidation, requiring both molecular oxygen and a reduced nucleotide. This step can also be catalyzed by a purified, mammalian cytochrome P-450 system, as well as by a model system consisting of ascorbic acid and oxygen. Catalase blocks this oxidative modification step. Thus, the overall process of proteolytic degradation can be observed only if care is taken to remove catalase activity from the extracts. The inactivation reaction is dependent on the state of adenylylation of the glutamine synthetase, suggesting that this a physiologically important reaction. If so, then mixed-function oxidases are now implicated in the process of intracellular protein turnover. Images PMID:6113590

  2. Expression of glutamine synthetase in balloon cells: a basis of their antiepileptic role?

    PubMed

    Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Barba, Carmen; Giordano, Flavio; Baroni, Gianna; Genitori, Lorenzo; Guerrini, Renzo; Taddei, Gian Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase is an enzyme involved in the clearance of glutamate, the most potent excitatory neurotransmitter. We studied the immunohistochemical expression of glutamine synthetase in neocortical samples from 5 children who underwent surgery for pharmacoresistant epilepsy and a histological diagnosis of focal cortical dysplasia IIb. In all cases, balloon cells, but not dysmorphic neurons, were immunopositive for glutamine synthetase. This finding suggests that balloon cells can be involved in the neutralization of glutamate and play a protective anti-seizure role.

  3. Tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase: the first crystallization of a human mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnefond, Luc; Frugier, Magali; Touzé, Elodie; Lorber, Bernard; Florentz, Catherine; Giegé, Richard Rudinger-Thirion, Joëlle; Sauter, Claude

    2007-04-01

    Crystals of human mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase lacking the C-terminal S4-like domain diffract to 2.7 Å resolution and are suitable for structure determination. Human mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase and a truncated version with its C-terminal S4-like domain deleted were purified and crystallized. Only the truncated version, which is active in tyrosine activation and Escherichia coli tRNA{sup Tyr} charging, yielded crystals suitable for structure determination. These tetragonal crystals, belonging to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, were obtained in the presence of PEG 4000 as a crystallizing agent and diffracted X-rays to 2.7 Å resolution. Complete data sets could be collected and led to structure solution by molecular replacement.

  4. Functional expansion of human tRNA synthetases achieved by structural inventions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Min; Schimmel, Paul; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2010-01-21

    Known as an essential component of the translational apparatus, the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase family catalyzes the first step reaction in protein synthesis, that is, to specifically attach each amino acid to its cognate tRNA. While preserving this essential role, tRNA synthetases developed other roles during evolution. Human tRNA synthetases, in particular, have diverse functions in different pathways involving angiogenesis, inflammation and apoptosis. The functional diversity is further illustrated in the association with various diseases through genetic mutations that do not affect aminoacylation or protein synthesis. Here we review the accumulated knowledge on how human tRNA synthetases used structural inventions to achieve functional expansions.

  5. Adenine nucleotides as allosteric effectors of pea seed glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Knight, T J; Langston-Unkefer, P J

    1988-08-15

    The effects of adenine nucleotides on pea seed glutamine synthetase (EC 6.3.1.2) activity were examined as a part of our investigation of the regulation of this octameric plant enzyme. Saturation curves for glutamine synthetase activity versus ATP with ADP as the changing fixed inhibitor were not hyperbolic; greater apparent Vmax values were observed in the presence of added ADP than the Vmax observed in the absence of ADP. Hill plots of data with ADP present curved upward and crossed the plot with no added ADP. The stoichiometry of adenine nucleotide binding to glutamine synthetase was examined. Two molecules of [gamma-32P]ATP were bound per subunit in the presence of methionine sulfoximine. These ATP molecules were bound at an allosteric site and at the active site. One molecule of either [gamma-32P]ATP or [14C]ADP bound per subunit in the absence of methionine sulfoximine; this nucleotide was bound at an allosteric site. ADP and ATP compete for binding at the allosteric site, although ADP was preferred. ADP binding to the allosteric site proceeded in two kinetic phases. A Vmax value of 1.55 units/mg was measured for glutamine synthetase with one ADP tightly bound per enzyme subunit; a Vmax value of 0.8 unit/mg was measured for enzyme with no adenine nucleotide bound at the allosteric site. The enzyme activation caused by the binding of ADP to the allosteric sites was preceded by a lag phase, the length of which was dependent on the ADP concentration. Enzyme incubated in 10 mM ADP bound approximately 4 mol of ADP/mol of native enzyme before activation was observed; the activation was complete when 7-8 mol of ADP were bound per mol of the octameric, native enzyme. The Km for ATP (2 mM) was not changed by ADP binding to the allosteric sites. ADP was a simple competitive inhibitor (Ki = 0.05 mM) of ATP for glutamine synthetase with eight molecules of ADP tightly bound to the allosteric sites of the octamer. Binding of ATP to the allosteric sites led to marked

  6. Cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase: determination of the last E. coli aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase primary structure.

    PubMed Central

    Eriani, G; Dirheimer, G; Gangloff, J

    1991-01-01

    The gene coding for E. coli cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase (cysS) was isolated by complementation of a strain deficient in cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase activity at high temperature (43 degrees C). Sequencing of a 2.1 kbp DNA fragment revealed an open reading frame of 1383 bp coding for a protein of 461 amino acid residues with a Mr of 52,280, a value in close agreement with that observed for the purified protein, which behaves as a monomer. The sequence of CysRS bears the canonical His-Ile- Gly -His (HIGH) and Lys-Met-Ser-Lys-Ser (KMSKS) motifs characteristic of the group of enzymes containing a Rossmann fold; furthermore, it shows striking homologies with MetRS (an homodimer of 677 residues) and to a lesser extent with Ile-, Leu-, and ValRS (monomers of 939, 860, and 951 residues respectively). With its monomeric state and smaller size, CysRS is probably more closely related to the primordial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase from which all have diverged. Images PMID:2014166

  7. Regulation of glutamine synthetase, aspartokinase, and total protein turnover in Klebsiella aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Fulks, R M; Stadtman, E R

    1985-12-13

    When suspensions of Klebsiella aerogenes are incubated in a nitrogen-free medium there is a gradual decrease in the levels of acid-precipitable protein and of aspartokinase III (lysine-sensitive) and aspartokinase I (threonine-sensitive) activities. In contrast, the level of glutamine synthetase increases slightly and then remains constant. Under these conditions, the glutamine synthetase and other proteins continue to be synthesized as judged by the incorporation of [14C]leucine into the acid-precipitable protein fraction and into protein precipitated by anti-glutamine synthetase antibodies, by the fact that growth-inhibiting concentrations of chloramphenicol also inhibit the incorporation of [14C]leucine into protein and into protein precipitated by anti-glutamine synthetase antibody, and by the fact that chloramphenicol leads to acceleration in the loss of aspartokinases I and III and promotes a net decrease in the level of glutamine synthetase and its cross-reactive protein. The loss of aspartokinases I and III in cell suspensions is stimulated by glucose and is inhibited by 2,4-dinitrophenol. Glucose also stimulates the loss of aspartokinases and glutamine synthetase in the presence of chloramphenicol. Cell-free extracts of K. aerogenes catalyze rapid inactivation of endogenous glutamine synthetase as well as exogenously added pure glutamine synthetase. This loss of glutamine synthetase is not associated with a loss of protein that cross-reacts with anti-glutamine synthetase antibodies. The inactivation of glutamine synthetase in extracts is not due to adenylylation. It is partially prevented by sulfhydryl reagents, Mn2+, antimycin A, 2,4-dinitrophenol, EDTA, anaerobiosis and by dialysis. Following 18 h dialysis, the capacity of extracts to catalyze inactivation of glutamine synthetase is lost but can be restored by the addition of Fe2+ (or Ni2+) together with ATP (or other nucleoside di- and triphosphates. After 40-60 h dialysis Fe3+ together with NADH (but

  8. Response of transgenic poplar overexpressing cytosolic glutamine synthetase to phosphinothricin.

    PubMed

    Pascual, María Belén; Jing, Zhong Ping; Kirby, Edward G; Cánovas, Francisco M; Gallardo, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is the main enzyme involved in ammonia assimilation in plants and is the target of phosphinothricin (PPT), an herbicide commonly used for weed control in agriculture. As a result of the inhibition of GS, PPT also blocks photorespiration, resulting in the depletion of leaf amino acid pools leading to the plant death. Hybrid transgenic poplar (Populus tremula x P. alba INRA clone 7171-B4) overexpressing cytosolic GS is characterized by enhanced vegetative growth [Gallardo, F., Fu, J., Cantón, F.R., García-Gutiérrez, A., Cánovas, F.M., Kirby, E.G., 1999. Expression of a conifer glutamine synthetase gene in transgenic poplar. Planta 210, 19-26; Fu, J., Sampalo, R., Gallardo, F., Cánovas, F.M., Kirby, E.G., 2003. Assembly of a cytosolic pine glutamine synthetase holoenzyme in leaves of transgenic poplar leads to enhanced vegetative growth in young plants. Plant Cell Environ. 26, 411-418; Jing, Z.P., Gallardo, F., Pascual, M.B., Sampalo, R., Romero, J., Torres de Navarra, A., Cánovas, F.M., 2004. Improved growth in a field trial of transgenic hybrid poplar overexpressing glutamine synthetase. New Phytol. 164, 137-145], increased photosynthetic and photorespiratory capacities [El-Khatib, R.T., Hamerlynck, E.P., Gallardo, F., Kirby, E.G., 2004. Transgenic poplar characterized by ectopic expression of a pine cytosolic glutamine synthetase gene exhibits enhanced tolerance to water stress. Tree Physiol. 24, 729-736], enhanced tolerance to water stress (El-Khatib et al., 2004), and enhanced nitrogen use efficiency [Man, H.-M., Boriel, R., El-Khatib, R.T., Kirby, E.G., 2005. Characterization of transgenic poplar with ectopic expression of pine cytosolic glutamine synthetase under conditions of varying nitrogen availability. New Phytol. 167, 31-39]. In vitro plantlets of GS transgenic poplar exhibited enhanced resistance to PPT when compared with non-transgenic controls. After 30 days exposure to PPT at an equivalent dose of 275 g ha(-1), growth

  9. Methods and composition for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyltRNA synthetase pairs

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Anderson, John Christopher; Chin, Jason; Liu, David R.; Magliery, Thomas J.; Meggers, Eric L.; Mehl, Ryan Aaron; Pastrnak, Miro; Santoro, Steven William; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2008-04-08

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  10. Methods and composition for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyltRNA synthetase pairs

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Anderson, John Christopher; Chin, Jason; Liu, David R.; Magliery, Thomas J.; Meggers, Eric L.; Mehl, Ryan Aaron; Pastrnak, Miro; Santoro, Steven William; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2012-05-22

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  11. Methods and compositions for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pairs

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Anderson, John Christopher; Chin, Jason W.; Liu, David R.; Magliery, Thomas J.; Meggers, Eric L.; Mehl, Ryan Aaron; Pastrnak, Miro; Santoro, Stephen William; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2011-09-06

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  12. Methods and composition for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyltRNA synthetase pairs

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Anderson, John Christopher; Chin, Jason; Liu, David R.; Magliery, Thomas J.; Meggers, Eric L.; Mehl, Ryan Aaron; Pastrnak, Miro; Santoro, Stephen William; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2010-05-11

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  13. Mammalian long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Soupene, Eric; Kuypers, Frans A

    2008-05-01

    Acyl-CoA synthetase enzymes are essential for de novo lipid synthesis, fatty acid catabolism, and remodeling of membranes. Activation of fatty acids requires a two-step reaction catalyzed by these enzymes. In the first step, an acyl-AMP intermediate is formed from ATP. AMP is then exchanged with CoA to produce the activated acyl-CoA. The release of AMP in this reaction defines the superfamily of AMP-forming enzymes. The length of the carbon chain of the fatty acid species defines the substrate specificity for the different acyl-CoA synthetases (ACS). On this basis, five sub-families of ACS have been characterized. The purpose of this review is to report on the large family of mammalian long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSL), which activate fatty acids with chain lengths of 12 to 20 carbon atoms. Five genes and several isoforms generated by alternative splicing have been identified and limited information is available on their localization. The structure of these membrane proteins has not been solved for the mammalian ACSLs but homology to a bacterial form, whose structure has been determined, points at specific structural features that are important for these enzymes across species. The bacterial form acts as a dimer and has a conserved short motif, called the fatty acid Gate domain, that seems to determine substrate specificity. We will discuss the characterization and identification of the different spliced isoforms, draw attention to the inconsistencies and errors in their annotations, and their cellular localizations. These membrane proteins act on membrane-bound substrates probably as homo- and as heterodimer complexes but have often been expressed as single recombinant isoforms, apparently purified as monomers and tested in Triton X-100 micelles. We will argue that such studies have failed to provide an accurate assessment of the activity and of the distinct function of these enzymes in mammalian cells.

  14. Inhibition of Pneumocystis carinii dihydropteroate synthetase by sulfa drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Merali, S; Zhang, Y; Sloan, D; Meshnick, S

    1990-01-01

    A new reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography assay procedure for dihydropteroate synthetase (DHPS) that involves the elution of the enzyme incubation solution with a series of three solvents of decreasing polarity (ammonium phosphate buffer, 10% methanol, and 50% methanol) was designed. By this procedure DHPS was detected in Escherichia coli and Pneumocystis carinii with specific activities of 450 and 14 U/mg, respectively. A comparison of the effects of five sulfa drugs on P. carinii DHPS activity revealed that dapsone is the most potent of these drugs. PMID:2203302

  15. The evolution of Class II Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and the first code.

    PubMed

    Smith, Temple F; Hartman, Hyman

    2015-11-30

    Class II Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are a set of very ancient multi domain proteins. The evolution of the catalytic domain of Class II synthetases can be reconstructed from three peptidyl-hairpins. Further evolution from this primordial catalytic core leads to a split of the Class II synthetases into two divisions potentially associated with the operational code. The earliest form of this code likely coded predominantly Glycine (Gly), Proline (Pro), Alanine (Ala) and "Lysine"/Aspartic acid (Lys/Asp). There is a paradox in these synthetases beginning with a hairpin structure before the Genetic Code existed. A resolution is found in the suggestion that the primordial Aminoacyl synthetases formed in a transition from a Thioester world to a Phosphate ester world. PMID:26472323

  16. Holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency pre and post newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Donti, Taraka R; Blackburn, Patrick R; Atwal, Paldeep S

    2016-06-01

    Holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of biotin metabolism resulting in multiple carboxylase deficiency. The typical presentation described in the medical literature is of neonatal onset within hours to weeks of birth with emesis, hypotonia, lethargy, seizures, metabolic ketolactic acidosis, hyperammonemia, developmental delay, skin rash and alopecia. The condition is screened for by newborn screening (NBS) tandem mass spectroscopy by elevated hydroxypentanoylcarnitine on dried blood spots. Urine organic acid profile may demonstrate elevated lactic, 3-OH isovaleric, 3-OH propionic, 3-MCC, methylcitric acids, and tiglylglycine consistent with loss of function of the above carboxylases. Here we describe a cohort of patients, 2 diagnosed pre-NBS and 3 post-NBS with broad differences in initial presentation and phenotype. In addition, prior to the advent of NBS, there are isolated reports of late-onset holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency in the medical literature, which describe patients diagnosed between 1 and 8 years of life, however to our knowledge there are no reports of late-onset HCLS being missed by NBS. Also we report two cases, each with novel pathogenic variants HCLS, diagnosed at age 3 years and 21 months respectively. The first patient had a normal newborn screen whilst the second had an abnormal newborn screen but was misdiagnosed as 3-methylcrotonylcarboxylase (3-MCC) deficiency and subsequently lost to follow-up until they presented again with severe metabolic acidosis.

  17. Mammalian folylpoly-. gamma. -glutamate synthetase. 3. Specificity for folate analogues

    SciTech Connect

    George, S.; Cichowicz, D.J.; Shane, B.

    1987-01-27

    A variety of folate analogues were synthesized to explore the specificity of the folate binding site of hog liver folypolyglutamate synthetase and the requirements for catalysis. Modifications of the internal and terminal glutamate moieties of folate cause large drops in on rates and/or affinity for the protein. The only exceptions are glutamine, homocysteate, and ornithine analogues, indicating a less stringent specificity around the delta-carbon of glutamate. It is proposed that initial folate binding to the enzyme involves low-affinity interactions at a pterin and a glutamate site and that the first glutamate bound is the internal residue adjacent to the benzoyl group. Processive movement of the polyglutamate chain through the glutamate site and a possible conformational change in the protein when the terminal residue is bound would result in tight binding and would position the ..gamma..-carboxyl of the terminal glutamate in the correct position for catalysis. The 4-amino substitution of folate increases the on rate for monoglutamate derivatives but severely impairs catalysis with diglutamate derivatives. Pteroylornithine derivatives are the first potent and specific inhibitors of folylpolyglutamate synthetase to be identified and may act as analogues of reaction intermediates. Other folate derivatives with tetrahedral chemistry replacing the peptide bond, such as pteroyl-..gamma..-glutamyl-(psi,CH/sub 2/-NH)-glutamate, retain affinity for the protein but are considerably less effective inhibitors than the ornithine derivatives. Enzyme activity was assayed using (/sup 14/C)glutamate.

  18. Novel insights into regulation of asparagine synthetase in conifers.

    PubMed

    Canales, Javier; Rueda-López, Marina; Craven-Bartle, Blanca; Avila, Concepción; Cánovas, Francisco M

    2012-01-01

    Asparagine, a key amino acid for nitrogen storage and transport in plants, is synthesized via the ATP-dependent reaction catalyzed by the enzyme asparagine synthetase (AS; EC 6.3.5.4). In this work, we present the molecular analysis of two full-length cDNAs that encode asparagine synthetase in maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.), PpAS1, and PpAS2. Phylogenetic analyses of the deduced amino acid sequences revealed that both genes are class II AS, suggesting an ancient origin of these genes in plants. A comparative study of PpAS1 and PpAS2 gene expression profiles showed that PpAS1 gene is highly regulated by developmental and environmental factors, while PpAS2 is expressed constitutively. To determine the molecular mechanisms underpinning the differential expression of PpAS1, the promoter region of the gene was isolated and putative binding sites for MYB transcription factors were identified. Gel mobility shift assays showed that a MYB protein from Pinus taeda (PtMYB1) was able to interact with the promoter region of PpAS1. Furthermore, transient expression analyses in pine cells revealed a negative effect of PtMYB1 on PpAS1 expression. The potential role of MYB factors in the transcriptional regulation of PpAS1 in vascular cells is discussed.

  19. Inhibition of recombinant Pneumocystis carinii dihydropteroate synthetase by sulfa drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Y L; Hossler, P A; Calhoun, D H; Meshnick, S R

    1995-01-01

    Forty-four sulfa drugs were screened against crude preparations of recombinant Pneumocystis carinii dihydropteroate synthetase. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constants (Km) for p-aminobenzoic acid and 7,8-dihydro-6-hydroxymethylpterin pyrophosphate were 0.34 +/- 0.02 and 2.50 +/- 0.71 microM, respectively. Several sulfa drugs, including sulfathiazole, sulfachlorpyridazine, sulfamethoxypyridazine, and sulfathiourea, inhibited dihydropteroate synthetase approximately as well as sulfamethoxazole, as determined by the concentrations which cause 50% inhibition and/or by Ki. For all sulfones and sulfonamides tested, unsubstituted p-amino groups were necessary for activity, and sulfonamides containing an N1-heterocyclic substituent were found to be the most effective inhibitors. Folate biosynthesis in isolated intact P. carinii was approximately equally sensitive to inhibition by sulfamethoxazole, sulfachlorpyridazine, sulfamethoxypyridazine, sulfisoxazole, and sulfathiazole. Two of these drugs, sulfamethoxypyridazine and sulfisoxazole, are known to be less toxic than sulfamethoxazole and should be further evaluated for the treatment of P. carinii pneumonia. PMID:7486915

  20. Holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency pre and post newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Donti, Taraka R; Blackburn, Patrick R; Atwal, Paldeep S

    2016-06-01

    Holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of biotin metabolism resulting in multiple carboxylase deficiency. The typical presentation described in the medical literature is of neonatal onset within hours to weeks of birth with emesis, hypotonia, lethargy, seizures, metabolic ketolactic acidosis, hyperammonemia, developmental delay, skin rash and alopecia. The condition is screened for by newborn screening (NBS) tandem mass spectroscopy by elevated hydroxypentanoylcarnitine on dried blood spots. Urine organic acid profile may demonstrate elevated lactic, 3-OH isovaleric, 3-OH propionic, 3-MCC, methylcitric acids, and tiglylglycine consistent with loss of function of the above carboxylases. Here we describe a cohort of patients, 2 diagnosed pre-NBS and 3 post-NBS with broad differences in initial presentation and phenotype. In addition, prior to the advent of NBS, there are isolated reports of late-onset holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency in the medical literature, which describe patients diagnosed between 1 and 8 years of life, however to our knowledge there are no reports of late-onset HCLS being missed by NBS. Also we report two cases, each with novel pathogenic variants HCLS, diagnosed at age 3 years and 21 months respectively. The first patient had a normal newborn screen whilst the second had an abnormal newborn screen but was misdiagnosed as 3-methylcrotonylcarboxylase (3-MCC) deficiency and subsequently lost to follow-up until they presented again with severe metabolic acidosis. PMID:27114915

  1. Testis-specific transcription initiation sites of rat farnesyl pyrophosphate synthetase mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Teruya, J H; Kutsunai, S Y; Spear, D H; Edwards, P A; Clarke, C F

    1990-01-01

    A variety of rat tissues were screened at low stringency with a rat farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) synthetase cDNA. In testis, an FPP synthetase-related RNA was detected that was larger than the liver FPP synthetase mRNA and was present at very high levels comparable with liver FPP synthetase RNA levels obtained from rats fed diets supplemented with cholestyramine and mevinolin. Sequence analysis of testis cDNA clones, together with primer extension and S1 nuclease experiments, indicated that testis FPP synthetase transcripts contain an extended 5' untranslated region. The 5' extension contained one or two out-of-frame upstream ATGs, depending on the site of transcription initiation. Protein in vitro translation studies indicated that the extended 5' untranslated region may play a role in regulating the translation of the FPP synthetase polypeptide in rat testis. Southern blot analysis with a probe containing both testis and liver 5' untranslated sequences provided evidence that both liver and testis transcripts derive from the same gene. The data suggest that an upstream testis-specific promoter results in the abundant production of FPP synthetase transcripts that are translated at low efficiency; another promoter functions in liver and other somatic tissues and directs the regulated synthesis of shorter discrete transcripts. Images PMID:2325654

  2. Effect of Liver Damage and Hyperbaric Oxygenation on Glutamine Synthetase of Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Savilov, P N; Yakovlev, V N

    2016-01-01

    Activity of glutamine synthetase in the hepatocytes of healthy animals and animals with chronic CCl4-induced hepatitis was studied on white mature female rats after liver resection (15-20% of organ weight) and hyperbaric oxygenation (3 atm, 50 min, 3 times). Surgically operated left and non-operated middle lobes of the liver were analyzed on day 3 after liver resection and exposure to hyperbaric oxygenation. On day 65 of CCl4 poisoning, activity of glutamine synthetase decreased in both lobes and did not recover on day 3 after toxin cessation. Liver resection under conditions of CCl4-induced hepatitis restored reduced activity of glutamine synthetase in both liver lobes to the normal level. In healthy rats, the increase in glutamine synthetase activity after liver resection was found only in the middle lobe of the liver. Hyperbaric oxygenation enhanced the stimulatory effect of liver resection on glutamine synthetase activity in hepatocytes during chronic CCl4-induced hepatitis. In healthy animals with liver resection, activity of glutamine synthetase did not change after hyperbaric oxygenation, while normally oxygenation inhibited glutamine synthetase activity.

  3. Differential utilization of pyrrolizidine alkaloids by males of a danaid butterfly, Parantica sita, for the production of danaidone in the alar scent organ.

    PubMed

    Honda, Keiichi; Honda, Yasuyuki; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Omura, Hisashi

    2005-04-01

    Males of the chestnut tiger butterfly, Parantica sita, secrete danaidone as a major component from the alar androconial organ (sex brand). Since danaidone has been postulated to be derived from various pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs), which males ingest as adults from PA-containing plants, we conducted oral administration tests of several PAs to examine their availability for danaidone production by P. sita males. Males fed with a mixture of intermedine (80%) and lycopsamine (20%) produced danaidone at an average of 25.7 microg per individual, which was comparable to that found in field-caught males. In contrast, a smaller amount of danaidone (5.7 to 7.0 microg/ male) was formed when males ingested retronecine or heliotrine, and those fed with an HCI salt of monocrotaline or retrorsine produced only traces of danaidone (<0.5 microg/male). In addition, males showed a strong feeding response to intermedine/lycopsamine, whereas the other PAs elicited no positive feeding behavior. These results indicate that, unlike the arctiid moths, P. sita males can only successfully convert limited chemical types of PAs into danaidone, and further suggest that in the field, males selectively ingest particular PAs that are readily transformable into danaidone.

  4. Properties of Kaurene Synthetase from Marah macrocarpus1

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Russell G.; West, Charles A.

    1977-01-01

    The kaurene synthetase from immature seeds of Marah macrocarpus (Greene) Greene was partially purified from cell-free homogenates of endosperm by a combination of QAE-Sephadex A-25 chromatography and hydroxyapatite chromatography and freed of contaminating phosphatase activity. The two catalytic activities associated with kaurene synthetase, the cyclization of geranylgeranyl-pyrophosphate to copalyl-pyrophosphate (activity A) and the cyclization of copalyl-pyrophosphate to ent-kaurene (activity B), were not even partially resolved from one another during these procedures. Both activities had identical elution profiles from a calibrated Sepharose 4B column corresponding to a molecular weight less than that of ovalbumin (45,000). The A and B activities had pH optima of 7.3 and 6.9, respectively. Both activities required millimolar concentrations of the following divalent cations in the order: Mg2+ > Mn2+ > Co2+. Activities A and B were both sensitive to inhibition by Hg2+, Cu2+, p-hydroxymercuribenzoate, and N-ethylmaleimide, but activity B was much more sensitive than activity A. The average value of Km′ (apparent Km in the absence of substrate inhibition) for geranylgeranyl-pyrophosphate was 1.6 μm. Values of 0.5 and 0.6 μm were obtained for Km′ and Km, respectively, for copalyl-pyrophosphate. The Vm′ values for the two activities were similar: 12 and 9 pmol/minute·μg protein for activities A and B, respectively. N,N-Dimethylaminoethyl-2,2-diphenylpentanoate (SKF-525A) and N,N-dimethylaminoethyl-2,2-diphenylphentyl ether (SKF-3301A), tributyl-2,4-dichlorobenzylphosphonium chloride (Phosfon D), tributyl-2,4-dichlorobenzylammonium chloride (Phosfon S), 2′-isopropyl-4′-(trimethylammonium chloride)-5′-methylphenyl piperidine-1-carboxylate (Amo-1618), 2-(N,N-dimethyl-N-heptylammonium bromide)-p-methan-1-ol (Q-58), and 2-(N,N-dimethyl-N-octylammonium bromide)-p-methan-1-ol (Q-64), at concentrations from 1 to 5 μm, were effective inhibitors of kaurene

  5. Critical Evaluation of the Changes in Glutamine Synthetase Activity in Models of Cerebral Stroke.

    PubMed

    Jeitner, Thomas M; Battaile, Kevin; Cooper, Arthur J L

    2015-12-01

    The following article addresses some seemingly paradoxical observations concerning cerebral glutamine synthetase in ischemia-reperfusion injury. In the brain, this enzyme is predominantly found in astrocytes and catalyzes part of the glutamine-glutamate cycle. Glutamine synthetase is also thought to be especially sensitive to inactivation by the oxygen- and nitrogen-centered radicals generated during strokes. Despite this apparent sensitivity, glutamine synthetase specific activity is elevated in the affected tissues during reperfusion. Given the central role of the glutamine-glutamate cycle in the brain, we sought to resolve these conflicting observations with the view of providing an alternative perspective for therapeutic intervention in stroke.

  6. Effect of thromboxane synthetase inhibitor on feline infectious peritonitis in cats.

    PubMed

    Watari, T; Kaneshima, T; Tsujimoto, H; Ono, K; Hasegawa, A

    1998-05-01

    Two cats with abdominal effusion and anorexia were diagnosed as feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). We tried to evaluate the effect of thromboxane (Tx) synthetase inhibitor, ozagrel hydrochloride, on the progression of symptoms and clinicopathologic data characteristic to FIP. After administration of Tx synthetase inhibitor, improvement of appetite and activity, decreases of peritoneal effusion, reduction of leukocyte number to normal level, and improvement of hyper gamma-globulinemia were found in 2 cats with FIP. These findings suggest that the vasculitis in FIP can be successfully treated with Tx synthetase inhibitor which inhibits platelet aggregation.

  7. The MTCY428.08 Gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Codes for NAD+ Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Cantoni, Rita; Branzoni, Manuela; Labò, Monica; Rizzi, Menico; Riccardi, Giovanna

    1998-01-01

    The product of the MTCY428.08 gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis shows sequence homology with several NAD+ synthetases. The MTCY428.08 gene was cloned into the expression vectors pGEX-4T-1 and pET-15b. Expression in Escherichia coli led to overproduction of glutathione S-transferase fused and His6-tagged gene products, which were enzymatically assayed for NAD synthetase activity. Our results demonstrate that the MTCY428.08 gene of M. tuberculosis is the structural gene for NAD+ synthetase. PMID:9620974

  8. Altering the Enantioselectivity of Tyrosyl-tRNA Synthetase by Insertion of a Stereospecific Editing Domain.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Charles J; First, Eric A

    2016-03-15

    Translation of mRNAs by the ribosome is stereospecific, with only l-amino acids being incorporated into the nascent polypeptide chain. This stereospecificity results from the exclusion of d-amino acids at three steps during protein synthesis: (1) the aminoacylation of tRNA by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, (2) binding of aminoacyl-tRNAs to EF-Tu, and (3) recognition of aminoacyl-tRNAs by the ribosome. As a first step toward incorporating d-amino acids during protein synthesis, we have altered the enantioselectivity of tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase. This enzyme is unusual among aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, as it can aminoacylate tRNA with d-tyrosine (albeit at a reduced rate compared to l-tyrosine). To change the enantioselectivity of tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase, we introduced the post-transfer editing domain from Pyrococcus horikoshii phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase into the connective polypeptide 1 (CP1) domain of Geobacillus stearothermophilus tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (henceforth designated TyrRS-FRSed). We show that the phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase editing domain is stereospecific, hydrolyzing l-Tyr-tRNA(Tyr), but not d-Tyr-tRNA(Tyr). We further show that inserting the phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase editing domain into the CP1 domain of tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase decreases the activity of the synthetic site in tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase. This decrease in activity is critical, as it prevents the rate of synthesis from overwhelming the ability of the editing domain to hydrolyze the l-Tyr-tRNA(Tyr) product. Overall, inserting the phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase editing domain results in a 2-fold shift in the enantioselectivity of tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase toward the d-Tyr-tRNA(Tyr) product. When a 4-fold excess of d-tyrosine is used, approximately 40% of the tRNA(Tyr) is aminoacylated with d-tyrosine. PMID:26890980

  9. Characterization of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase of Streptomyces spp.

    PubMed

    Vaishnav, P; Randev, S; Jatiani, S; Aggarwal, S; Keharia, H; Vyas, P R; Nareshkumar, G; Archana, G

    2000-09-01

    Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS) activity in Streptomyces lividans was repressed (70%) by addition of arginine and uracil in the growth medium. Enzyme activity was also inhibited by UMP and activated by ornithine and IMP. Pattern of inhibition and activation was similar irrespective of whether the cells were grown in medium supplemented with arginine or with uracil. A mutant of S. coelicolor with dual auxotrophy for arginine and uracil possessed only about 20% of CPS activity compared to the wild-type strain. An activity staining protocol has been developed for CPS enzyme. Using this method a single CPS band has been observed in the crude extracts of Escherichia coli as well as in S. lividans. Taken together, our results supported the conclusion that Streptomyces species might possess a single CPS enzyme unlike other gram-positive bacteria, which show the presence of two pathway-specific isozymes (Bacillus) or none (Lactobacillus and Leuconostoc). PMID:12561954

  10. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase inhibitors as potential antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Vondenhoff, Gaston H M; Van Aerschot, Arthur

    2011-11-01

    Increasing resistance to antibiotics is a major problem worldwide and provides the stimulus for development of new bacterial inhibitors with preferably different modes of action. In search for new leads, several new bacterial targets are being exploited beside the use of traditional screening methods. Hereto, inhibition of bacterial protein synthesis is a long-standing validated target. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) play an indispensable role in protein synthesis and their structures proved quite conserved in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. However, some divergence has occurred allowing the development of selective aaRS inhibitors. Following an outline on the action mechanism of aaRSs, an overview will be given of already existing aaRS inhibitors, which are largely based on mimics of the aminoacyl-adenylates, the natural reaction intermediates. This is followed by a discussion on more recent developments in the field and the bioavailability problem.

  11. Oncogenic Myc Induces Expression of Glutamine Synthetase through Promoter Demethylation.

    PubMed

    Bott, Alex J; Peng, I-Chen; Fan, Yongjun; Faubert, Brandon; Zhao, Lu; Li, Jinyu; Neidler, Sarah; Sun, Yu; Jaber, Nadia; Krokowski, Dawid; Lu, Wenyun; Pan, Ji-An; Powers, Scott; Rabinowitz, Joshua; Hatzoglou, Maria; Murphy, Daniel J; Jones, Russell; Wu, Song; Girnun, Geoffrey; Zong, Wei-Xing

    2015-12-01

    c-Myc is known to promote glutamine usage by upregulating glutaminase (GLS), which converts glutamine to glutamate that is catabolized in the TCA cycle. Here we report that in a number of human and murine cells and cancers, Myc induces elevated expression of glutamate-ammonia ligase (GLUL), also termed glutamine synthetase (GS), which catalyzes the de novo synthesis of glutamine from glutamate and ammonia. This is through upregulation of a Myc transcriptional target thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG), which promotes active demethylation of the GS promoter and its increased expression. Elevated expression of GS promotes cell survival under glutamine limitation, while silencing of GS decreases cell proliferation and xenograft tumor growth. Upon GS overexpression, increased glutamine enhances nucleotide synthesis and amino acid transport. These results demonstrate an unexpected role of Myc in inducing glutamine synthesis and suggest a molecular connection between DNA demethylation and glutamine metabolism in Myc-driven cancers.

  12. Bisphosphonic acids as effective inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Kosikowska, Paulina; Bochno, Marta; Macegoniuk, Katarzyna; Forlani, Giuseppe; Kafarski, Paweł; Berlicki, Łukasz

    2016-12-01

    Inhibition of glutamine synthetase (GS) is one of the most promising strategies for the discovery of novel drugs against tuberculosis. Forty-three bisphosphonic and bis-H-phosphinic acids of various scaffolds, bearing aromatic substituents, were screened against recombinant GS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Most of the studied compounds exhibited activities in micromolar range, with N-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-2-aminoethylidenebisphoshonic acid, N-(3,5-difluorophenyl)-2-aminoethylidene-bisphoshonic acid and N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1-hydroxy-1,1-ethanebisphosphonic acid showing the highest potency with kinetic parameters similar to the reference compound - L-methionine-S-sulfoximine. Moreover, these inhibitors were found to be much more effective against pathogen enzyme than against the human ortholog. Thus, with the bone-targeting properties of the bisphosphonate compounds in mind, this activity/selectivity profile makes these compounds attractive agents for the treatment of bone tuberculosis.

  13. Astrocyte glutamine synthetase: pivotal in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Rose, Christopher F; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Parpura, Vladimir

    2013-12-01

    The multifunctional properties of astrocytes signify their importance in brain physiology and neurological function. In addition to defining the brain architecture, astrocytes are primary elements of brain ion, pH and neurotransmitter homoeostasis. GS (glutamine synthetase), which catalyses the ATP-dependent condensation of ammonia and glutamate to form glutamine, is an enzyme particularly found in astrocytes. GS plays a pivotal role in glutamate and glutamine homoeostasis, orchestrating astrocyte glutamate uptake/release and the glutamate-glutamine cycle. Furthermore, astrocytes bear the brunt of clearing ammonia in the brain, preventing neurotoxicity. The present review depicts the central function of astrocytes, concentrating on the importance of GS in glutamate/glutamine metabolism and ammonia detoxification in health and disease.

  14. Studies on the control of hexosamine biosynthesis by glucosamine synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Winterburn, P. J.; Phelps, C. F.

    1971-01-01

    1. The nature of the feedback inhibition of hexosamine biosynthesis on rat liver glucosamine synthetase (l-glutamine–d-fructose 6-phosphate aminotransferase, EC 2.6.1.16) by UDP-N-acetylglucosamine was investigated in detail. 2. Further modifiers of physiological importance are described. Glucose 6-phosphate and AMP potentiated the UDP-N-acetylglucosamine inhibition, and UTP behaved as an activator. These three compounds only exerted their action when the feedback inhibitor was bound to the enzyme. 3. ATP also inhibited the enzyme. 4. The actions of these various effectors are discussed in kinetic terms. 5. An interpretation of these findings with reference to the regulation of hexosamine biosynthesis is presented. PMID:5114979

  15. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in medicine and disease

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Peng; Fox, Paul L

    2013-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs) are essential and ubiquitous ‘house-keeping’ enzymes responsible for charging amino acids to their cognate tRNAs and providing the substrates for global protein synthesis. Recent studies have revealed a role of multiple ARSs in pathology, and their potential use as pharmacological targets and therapeutic reagents. The ongoing discovery of genetic mutations in human ARSs is increasing exponentially and can be considered an important determinant of disease etiology. Several chemical compounds target bacterial, fungal and human ARSs as antibiotics or disease-targeting medicines. Remarkably, ongoing exploration of noncanonical functions of ARSs has shown important contributions to control of angiogenesis, inflammation, tumourigenesis and other important physiopathological processes. Here, we summarize the roles of ARSs in human diseases and medicine, focusing on the most recent and exciting discoveries. PMID:23427196

  16. p59OASL, a 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase like protein: a novel human gene related to the 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase family.

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, R; Olsen, H S; Widder, S; Jorgensen, R; Justesen, J

    1998-01-01

    The 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetases form a well conserved family of interferon induced proteins, presumably present throughout the mammalian class. Using the Expressed Sequence Tag databases, we have identified a novel member of this family. This protein, which we named p59 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase-like protein (p59OASL), shares a highly conserved N-terminal domain with the known forms of 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetases, but differs completely in its C-terminal part. The C-terminus of p59OASL is formed of two domains of ubiquitin-like sequences. Here we present the characterisation of a full-length cDNA clone, the genomic sequence and the expression pattern of this gene. We have addressed the evolution of the 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase gene family, in the light of both this new member and new 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase sequence data from other species, which have recently appeared in the databases. PMID:9722630

  17. Activity of formylphosphate in the reaction catalyzed by formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Jahansouz, H.; Kofron, J.L.; Smithers, G.W.; Himes, R.H.; Reed, G.H.

    1986-05-01

    Formylphosphate (FP), a putative enzyme-bound intermediate in the reaction catalyzed by N/sup 10/-formylH/sub 4/folate synthetase, was synthesized from formylfluoride and Pi. Measurement of hydrolysis rates by /sup 31/P NMR showed that FP is very unstable with a half-life of 48 min at 20/sup 0/C and pH 7. At pH 7 hydrolysis occurs with O-P bond cleavage as shown by /sup 18/O incorporation from /sup 18/O-H/sub 2/O into Pi. The substrate activity of FP was tested in the reaction catalyzed by N/sup 10/-formylH/sub 4/folate synthetase isolated from Clostridium cylindrosporum. MgATP + H/sub 4/folate + HCOO/sup -/ in equilibrium MgADP + Pi +N/sup 10/-formylH/sub 4/folate FP supports the reaction in both the forward and reverse directions. Thus, N/sup 10/-formylH/sub 4/folate is produced from H/sub 4/-folate and FP but only if ADP is present, and ATP is produced from FP and ADP but only if H/sub 4/folate is present. The requirements for H/sub 4/folate in the synthesis of ATP from ADP and FP and for ADP in the synthesis of N/sup 10/-formylH/sub 4/folate from FP and H/sub 4/folate, are consistent with past kinetic and isotope exchange studies which showed that the reaction proceeds by a sequential mechanism and that all three substrates must be present for any reaction to occur.

  18. Identification of pantoate kinase and phosphopantothenate synthetase from Methanospirillum hungatei.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Hiroki; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Tokutake, Yuka; Hanada, Satoshi; Chohnan, Shigeru

    2013-04-01

    Pantothenate synthetase (PanC) and pantothenate kinase which function in the canonical coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthetic pathway cannot be found in most archaea. COG1829 and COG1701 intrinsic to archaea were proposed as the candidate proteins for producing 4'-phosphopantothenate instead, and the COG1701 protein from Methanosarcina mazei was assigned as PanC. Meanwhile, the Thermococcus kodakarensis COG1829 and COG1701 proteins were biochemically identified as novel enzymes, i.e., pantoate kinase (PoK) and phosphopantothenate synthetase (PPS). In this study, the functions of Mhun_0831 (COG1829) and Mhun_0832 (COG1701) from Methanospirillum hungatei were identified, and the recombinant enzymes were partially characterized. Plasmids simultaneously possessing the two genes encoding Mhun_0831 and Mhun_0832 complemented the poor growth of the temperature-sensitive Escherichia coli pantothenate kinase mutant ts9. The recombinant Mhun_0831 and Mhun_0832 expressed in E. coli cells exhibited PoK and PPS activities, respectively, being in accord with the functions of T. kodakarensis proteins. The PoK activity was most active at pH 8.5 and 40°C, and accepted ATP and UTP as a phosphate donor. Although CoA did not affect the PoK activity, the end product considerably accelerated the PPS activity. The homologs of both proteins are widely conserved in most archaeal genomes. Taken together, our findings indicate that archaea can synthesize CoA through the unique pathway involving PoK and PPS, in addition to the canonical one that the order Thermoplasmatales employs.

  19. Transformation of Bacillus Subtilis with cloned thymidylate synthetases

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, Edward M.

    1980-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis carries two genes, thyA and thyB, each encoding different protein products, with thymidylate synthetase (TSase) activity. Either of these genes alone is sufficient for thymidine independence in B. subtilis. In addition there exist two B. subtilis temperate bacteriophages which upon infection of thymine requiring auxotrophs results in conversion of the organism to thymine independence. Chimeric plasmids selected for Thy/sup +/ transforming activity in E. coli were constructed and then used as a source of defined highly enriched DNA with which to transform competent B. subtilis. These plasmids were studied for their: (1) abiility to transform B. subtilis to thymine independence; (2) site of integration within the B. subtilis chromosome upon transformation; (3) phenotype of Thy/sup +/ plasmid generated transformants; and (4) nucleotide sequence homology among the cloned DNA fragments conferring thymine independence. Plasmids containing the two bacteriophage thy genes displayed the phenotype associated with thyA, whereas the plasmids containing the cloned B. subtilis chromosomal genes displayed the phenotype associated with thyB. Utilizing similar technology, the ability of an entirely foreign hybred bacterial plasmiid to transform B. subtilis was examined. In this case the gene from E. coli encoding thymidylate synthetase was cloned in the plasmid pBR322. The resulting chimeric plasmid was effective in transforming both E. coli and B. subtilis to thymine prototrophy. Uncloned linear E. coli chromosomal DNA was unable to transform thymine requiring strains of B. subtilis to thymine independence. Although the Thy/sup +/ transformants of E. coli contained plasmid DNA, the Thy/sup +/ transformants derived from the transformation of B. subtilis did not contain detectable extrachromosomal DNA. Instead the DNA from the chimeric plasmid was integrated into the chromosome of B. subtilis. (ERB)

  20. Regulation of active site coupling in glutamine-dependent NAD[superscript +] synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    LaRonde-LeBlanc, Nicole; Resto, Melissa; Gerratana, Barbara

    2009-05-21

    NAD{sup +} is an essential metabolite both as a cofactor in energy metabolism and redox homeostasis and as a regulator of cellular processes. In contrast to humans, Mycobacterium tuberculosis NAD{sup +} biosynthesis is absolutely dependent on the activity of a multifunctional glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase, which catalyzes the ATP-dependent formation of NAD{sup +} at the synthetase domain using ammonia derived from L-glutamine in the glutaminase domain. Here we report the kinetics and structural characterization of M. tuberculosis NAD{sup +} synthetase. The kinetics data strongly suggest tightly coupled regulation of the catalytic activities. The structure, the first of a glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase, reveals a homooctameric subunit organization suggesting a tight dependence of catalysis on the quaternary structure, a 40-{angstrom} intersubunit ammonia tunnel and structural elements that may be involved in the transfer of information between catalytic sites.

  1. Evidence for two immunologically distinct acetyl-coenzyme A synthetases in yeast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satyanarayana, T.; Mandel, A. D.; Klein, H. P.

    1974-01-01

    Evidence is presented that clearly establishes the presence of two acetyl-CoA synthetases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one elaborated under 'aerobic' conditions, the other under 'nonaerobic' conditions. The antibody produced by each enzyme is immunologically specific.

  2. Diffuse glutamine synthetase overexpression restricted to areas of peliosis in a β-catenin-activated hepatocellular adenoma: a potential pitfall in glutamine synthetase interpretation.

    PubMed

    Berry, Ryan S; Gullapalli, Rama R; Wu, Jin; Morris, Katherine; Hanson, Joshua A

    2014-08-01

    Hepatocellular adenomas have recently been classified into four subtypes based on molecular findings: hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α (HNF1α) inactivated, inflammatory/telangiectatic, β-catenin activated, and unclassifiable. β-catenin-activated adenomas have the potential for malignant transformation and are thus important to recognize. Diffuse glutamine synthetase immunohistochemical positivity has been shown to be a reliable surrogate marker for β-catenin activation, though variations in staining patterns may be difficult to interpret. We report a case of a peliotic adenoma that was morphologically consistent with a β-catenin wild-type hepatocellular adenoma but harbored a β-catenin mutation by molecular analysis. The tumor lacked nuclear β-catenin positivity and demonstrated a hitherto undescribed pattern of glutamine synthetase overexpression restricted to areas of peliosis with mostly negative staining in non-peliotic areas. This pattern was initially interpreted as physiologic and may represent a potential pitfall in glutamine synthetase interpretation.

  3. Lack of protective effect of thromboxane synthetase inhibitor (CGS-13080) on single dose radiated canine intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Barter, J.F.; Marlow, D.; Kamath, R.K.; Harbert, J.; Torrisi, J.R.; Barnes, W.A.; Potkul, R.K.; Newsome, J.T.; Delgado, G. )

    1991-03-01

    The effect of a thromboxane A2 synthetase inhibitor (CGS-13080) on canine intestine was studied using a single dose of radiation, and radioactive microspheres were used to determine resultant blood flow. Thromboxane A2 causes vasospasm and platelet aggregation and may play a dominant role in radiation injury. However, there was no effect on the intestinal blood flow diminution occurring after radiation in this laboratory model using this thromboxane A2 synthetase inhibitor.

  4. Genetic Validation of Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases as Drug Targets in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Kalidas, Savitha; Cestari, Igor; Monnerat, Severine; Li, Qiong; Regmi, Sandesh; Hasle, Nicholas; Labaied, Mehdi; Parsons, Marilyn; Stuart, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is an important public health threat in sub-Saharan Africa. Current drugs are unsatisfactory, and new drugs are being sought. Few validated enzyme targets are available to support drug discovery efforts, so our goal was to obtain essentiality data on genes with proven utility as drug targets. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are known drug targets for bacterial and fungal pathogens and are required for protein synthesis. Here we survey the essentiality of eight Trypanosoma brucei aaRSs by RNA interference (RNAi) gene expression knockdown, covering an enzyme from each major aaRS class: valyl-tRNA synthetase (ValRS) (class Ia), tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS-1) (class Ib), arginyl-tRNA synthetase (ArgRS) (class Ic), glutamyl-tRNA synthetase (GluRS) (class 1c), threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS) (class IIa), asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase (AsnRS) (class IIb), and phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (α and β) (PheRS) (class IIc). Knockdown of mRNA encoding these enzymes in T. brucei mammalian stage parasites showed that all were essential for parasite growth and survival in vitro. The reduced expression resulted in growth, morphological, cell cycle, and DNA content abnormalities. ThrRS was characterized in greater detail, showing that the purified recombinant enzyme displayed ThrRS activity and that the protein localized to both the cytosol and mitochondrion. Borrelidin, a known inhibitor of ThrRS, was an inhibitor of T. brucei ThrRS and showed antitrypanosomal activity. The data show that aaRSs are essential for T. brucei survival and are likely to be excellent targets for drug discovery efforts. PMID:24562907

  5. The identification of new cytosolic glutamine synthetase and asparagine synthetase genes in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), and their expression during leaf senescence.

    PubMed

    Avila-Ospina, Liliana; Marmagne, Anne; Talbotec, Joël; Krupinska, Karin; Masclaux-Daubresse, Céline

    2015-04-01

    Glutamine synthetase and asparagine synthetase are two master enzymes involved in ammonium assimilation in plants. Their roles in nitrogen remobilization and nitrogen use efficiency have been proposed. In this report, the genes coding for the cytosolic glutamine synthetases (HvGS1) and asparagine synthetases (HvASN) in barley were identified. In addition to the three HvGS1 and two HvASN sequences previously reported, two prokaryotic-like HvGS1 and three HvASN cDNA sequences were identified. Gene structures were then characterized, obtaining full genomic sequences. The response of the five HvGS1 and five HvASN genes to leaf senescence was then studied. Developmental senescence was studied using primary and flag leaves. Dark-exposure or low-nitrate conditions were also used to trigger stress-induced senescence. Well-known senescence markers such as the chlorophyll and Rubisco contents were monitored in order to characterize senescence levels in the different leaves. The three eukaryotic-like HvGS1_1, HvGS1_2, and HvGS1_3 sequences showed the typical senescence-induced reduction in gene expression described in many plant species. By contrast, the two prokaryotic-like HvGS1_4 and HvGS1_5 sequences were repressed by leaf senescence, similar to the HvGS2 gene, which encodes the chloroplast glutamine synthetase isoenzyme. There was a greater contrast in the responses of the five HvASN and this suggested that these genes are needed for N remobilization in senescing leaves only when plants are well fertilized with nitrate. Responses of the HvASN sequences to dark-induced senescence showed that there are two categories of asparagine synthetases, one induced in the dark and the other repressed by the same conditions. PMID:25697791

  6. The identification of new cytosolic glutamine synthetase and asparagine synthetase genes in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), and their expression during leaf senescence.

    PubMed

    Avila-Ospina, Liliana; Marmagne, Anne; Talbotec, Joël; Krupinska, Karin; Masclaux-Daubresse, Céline

    2015-04-01

    Glutamine synthetase and asparagine synthetase are two master enzymes involved in ammonium assimilation in plants. Their roles in nitrogen remobilization and nitrogen use efficiency have been proposed. In this report, the genes coding for the cytosolic glutamine synthetases (HvGS1) and asparagine synthetases (HvASN) in barley were identified. In addition to the three HvGS1 and two HvASN sequences previously reported, two prokaryotic-like HvGS1 and three HvASN cDNA sequences were identified. Gene structures were then characterized, obtaining full genomic sequences. The response of the five HvGS1 and five HvASN genes to leaf senescence was then studied. Developmental senescence was studied using primary and flag leaves. Dark-exposure or low-nitrate conditions were also used to trigger stress-induced senescence. Well-known senescence markers such as the chlorophyll and Rubisco contents were monitored in order to characterize senescence levels in the different leaves. The three eukaryotic-like HvGS1_1, HvGS1_2, and HvGS1_3 sequences showed the typical senescence-induced reduction in gene expression described in many plant species. By contrast, the two prokaryotic-like HvGS1_4 and HvGS1_5 sequences were repressed by leaf senescence, similar to the HvGS2 gene, which encodes the chloroplast glutamine synthetase isoenzyme. There was a greater contrast in the responses of the five HvASN and this suggested that these genes are needed for N remobilization in senescing leaves only when plants are well fertilized with nitrate. Responses of the HvASN sequences to dark-induced senescence showed that there are two categories of asparagine synthetases, one induced in the dark and the other repressed by the same conditions.

  7. Effect of heat shock on poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase and DNA repair in Drosophila cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, N.L.; Kidwell, W.R.

    1982-04-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase, a chromatin-bound enzyme which attaches polyanionic chains of ADP-ribose to nuclear proteins, was found to be temperature sensitive in intact Drosophila melanogaster cells. The synthetase was completely inactivated by heat-shocking the cells at 37/sup 0/C for 5 min, a condition which had no appreciable effect on the subsequent growth of Drosophila cells at their physiological temperature. The heat-shock effect on synthetase was reversible; enzyme activity began to reappear about 2 hr post heat shock. During the 2-hr interval when poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase was absent, the cells were competent in repair of ..gamma..-ray-induced DNA strand breaks as shown by DNA sedimentation studies on alkaline sucrose gradients. It is thus concluded that poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis is unnecessary for repair of DNA strand breaks introduced by irradiation. The same conclusion was reached from the fact that two inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase 3-aminobenzamide and 5-methylnicotinamide, failed to block repair of ..gamma..-ray-induced DNA chain breaks even though both inhibitors reduced the amount of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesized in cells by 50-75%. Although it was found that the repair of DNA strand breaks is independent of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis, irradiation does activate the synthetase in control cells, as shown by radioimmunoassay of poly(ADP-ribose) levels.

  8. CTP synthetase and its role in phospholipid synthesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Fang; Carman, George M.

    2008-01-01

    CTP synthetase is a cytosolic-associated glutamine amidotransferase enzyme that catalyzes the ATP-dependent transfer of the amide nitrogen from glutamine to the C-4 position of UTP to form CTP. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the reaction product CTP is an essential precursor of all membrane phospholipids that are synthesized via the Kennedy (CDP-choline and CDP-ethanolamine branches) and CDP-diacylglycerol pathways. The URA7 and URA8 genes encode CTP synthetase in S. cerevisiae, and the URA7 gene is responsible for the majority of CTP synthesized in vivo. The CTP synthetase enzymes are allosterically regulated by CTP product inhibition. Mutations that alleviate this regulation result in an elevated cellular level of CTP and an increase in phospholipid synthesis via the Kennedy pathway. The URA7-encoded enzyme is phosphorylated by protein kinases A and C, and these phosphorylations stimulate CTP synthetase activity and increase cellular CTP levels and the utilization of the Kennedy pathway. The CTPS1 and CTPS2 genes that encode human CTP synthetase enzymes are functionally expressed in S. cerevisiae, and rescue the lethal phenotype of the ura7Δ ura8Δ double mutant that lacks CTP synthetase activity. The expression in yeast has revealed that the human CTPS1-encoded enzyme is also phosphorylated and regulated by protein kinases A and C. PMID:18439916

  9. Free Hand Insertion Technique of S2 Sacral Alar-Iliac Screws for Spino-Pelvic Fixation: Technical Note, Acadaveric Study.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Hwa; Hyun, Seung-Jae; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Jahng, Tae-Ahn

    2015-12-01

    A rigid spino-pelvic fixation to anchor long constructs is crucial to maintain the stability of long fusion in spinal deformity surgery. Besides obtaining immediate stability and proper biomechanical strength of constructs, the S2 alar-iliac (S2AI) screws have some more advantages. Four Korean fresh-frozen human cadavers were procured. Free hand S2AI screw placement is performed using anatomic landmarks. The starting point of the S2AI screw is located at the midpoint between the S1 and S2 foramen and 2 mm medial to the lateral sacral crest. Gearshift was advanced from the desired starting point toward the sacro-iliac joint directing approximately 20° angulation caudally in sagittal plane and 30° angulation horizontally in the coronal plane connecting the posterior superior iliac spine (PSIS). We made a S2AI screw trajectory through the cancellous channel using the gearshift. We measured caudal angle in the sagittal plane and horizontal angle in the coronal plane. A total of eight S2AI screws were inserted in four cadavers. All screws inserted into the iliac crest were evaluated by C-arm and naked eye examination by two spine surgeons. Among 8 S2AI screws, all screws were accurately placed (100%). The average caudal angle in the sagittal plane was 17.3±5.4°. The average horizontal angle in the coronal plane connecting the PSIS was 32.0±1.8°. The placement of S2AI screws using the free hand technique without any radiographic guidance appears to an acceptable method of insertion without more radiation or time consuming. PMID:26819698

  10. Actinobacterial Acyl Coenzyme A Synthetases Involved in Steroid Side-Chain Catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Casabon, Israël; Swain, Kendra; Crowe, Adam M.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial steroid catabolism is an important component of the global carbon cycle and has applications in drug synthesis. Pathways for this catabolism involve multiple acyl coenzyme A (CoA) synthetases, which activate alkanoate substituents for β-oxidation. The functions of these synthetases are poorly understood. We enzymatically characterized four distinct acyl-CoA synthetases from the cholate catabolic pathway of Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 and the cholesterol catabolic pathway of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Phylogenetic analysis of 70 acyl-CoA synthetases predicted to be involved in steroid metabolism revealed that the characterized synthetases each represent an orthologous class with a distinct function in steroid side-chain degradation. The synthetases were specific for the length of alkanoate substituent. FadD19 from M. tuberculosis H37Rv (FadD19Mtb) transformed 3-oxo-4-cholesten-26-oate (kcat/Km = 0.33 × 105 ± 0.03 × 105 M−1 s−1) and represents orthologs that activate the C8 side chain of cholesterol. Both CasGRHA1 and FadD17Mtb are steroid-24-oyl-CoA synthetases. CasG and its orthologs activate the C5 side chain of cholate, while FadD17 and its orthologs appear to activate the C5 side chain of one or more cholesterol metabolites. CasIRHA1 is a steroid-22-oyl-CoA synthetase, representing orthologs that activate metabolites with a C3 side chain, which accumulate during cholate catabolism. CasI had similar apparent specificities for substrates with intact or extensively degraded steroid nuclei, exemplified by 3-oxo-23,24-bisnorchol-4-en-22-oate and 1β(2′-propanoate)-3aα-H-4α(3″-propanoate)-7aβ-methylhexahydro-5-indanone (kcat/Km = 2.4 × 105 ± 0.1 × 105 M−1 s−1 and 3.2 × 105 ± 0.3 × 105 M−1 s−1, respectively). Acyl-CoA synthetase classes involved in cholate catabolism were found in both Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria. Overall, this study provides insight into the physiological roles of acyl-CoA synthetases in steroid catabolism and

  11. Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases in the Bacterial World.

    PubMed

    Giegé, Richard; Springer, Mathias

    2016-05-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are modular enzymes globally conserved in the three kingdoms of life. All catalyze the same two-step reaction, i.e., the attachment of a proteinogenic amino acid on their cognate tRNAs, thereby mediating the correct expression of the genetic code. In addition, some aaRSs acquired other functions beyond this key role in translation. Genomics and X-ray crystallography have revealed great structural diversity in aaRSs (e.g., in oligomery and modularity, in ranking into two distinct groups each subdivided in 3 subgroups, by additional domains appended on the catalytic modules). AaRSs show huge structural plasticity related to function and limited idiosyncrasies that are kingdom or even species specific (e.g., the presence in many Bacteria of non discriminating aaRSs compensating for the absence of one or two specific aaRSs, notably AsnRS and/or GlnRS). Diversity, as well, occurs in the mechanisms of aaRS gene regulation that are not conserved in evolution, notably between distant groups such as Gram-positive and Gram-negative Bacteria. The review focuses on bacterial aaRSs (and their paralogs) and covers their structure, function, regulation, and evolution. Structure/function relationships are emphasized, notably the enzymology of tRNA aminoacylation and the editing mechanisms for correction of activation and charging errors. The huge amount of genomic and structural data that accumulated in last two decades is reviewed, showing how the field moved from essentially reductionist biology towards more global and integrated approaches. Likewise, the alternative functions of aaRSs and those of aaRS paralogs (e.g., during cell wall biogenesis and other metabolic processes in or outside protein synthesis) are reviewed. Since aaRS phylogenies present promiscuous bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryal features, similarities and differences in the properties of aaRSs from the three kingdoms of life are pinpointed throughout the review and

  12. Expression of glutamine synthetase in the mouse kidney: localization in multiple epithelial cell types and differential regulation by hypokalemia.

    PubMed

    Verlander, Jill W; Chu, Diana; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Handlogten, Mary E; Weiner, I David

    2013-09-01

    Renal glutamine synthetase catalyzes the reaction of NH4+ with glutamate, forming glutamine and decreasing the ammonia available for net acid excretion. The purpose of the present study was to determine glutamine synthetase's specific cellular expression in the mouse kidney and its regulation by hypokalemia, a common cause of altered renal ammonia metabolism. Glutamine synthetase mRNA and protein were present in the renal cortex and in both the outer and inner stripes of the outer medulla. Immunohistochemistry showed glutamine synthetase expression throughout the entire proximal tubule and in nonproximal tubule cells. Double immunolabel with cell-specific markers demonstrated glutamine synthetase expression in type A intercalated cells, non-A, non-B intercalated cells, and distal convoluted tubule cells, but not in principal cells, type B intercalated cells, or connecting segment cells. Hypokalemia induced by feeding a nominally K+ -free diet for 12 days decreased glutamine synthetase expression throughout the entire proximal tubule and in the distal convoluted tubule and simultaneously increased glutamine synthetase expression in type A intercalated cells in both the cortical and outer medullary collecting duct. We conclude that glutamine synthetase is widely and specifically expressed in renal epithelial cells and that the regulation of expression differs in specific cell populations. Glutamine synthetase is likely to mediate an important role in renal ammonia metabolism.

  13. Differential expression of argininosuccinate synthetase in serous and non-serous ovarian carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Dong-Joo; Walts, Ann E; Beach, Jessica A; Lester, Jenny; Bomalaski, John S; Walsh, Christine S; Ruprecht Wiedemeyer, W; Karlan, Beth Y; Orsulic, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    The current standard of care for epithelial ovarian cancer does not discriminate between different histologic subtypes (serous, clear cell, endometrioid and mucinous) despite the knowledge that ovarian carcinoma subtypes do not respond uniformly to conventional platinum/taxane-based chemotherapy. Exploiting addictions and vulnerabilities in cancers with distinguishable molecular features presents an opportunity to develop individualized therapies that may be more effective than the current 'one size fits all' approach. One such opportunity is arginine depletion therapy with pegylated arginine deiminase, which has shown promise in several cancer types that exhibit low levels of argininosuccinate synthetase including hepatocellular and prostate carcinoma and melanoma. Based on the high levels of argininosuccinate synthetase previously observed in ovarian cancers, these tumours have been considered unlikely candidates for arginine depletion therapy. However, argininosuccinate synthetase levels have not been evaluated in the individual histologic subtypes of ovarian carcinoma. The current study is the first to examine the expression of argininosuccinate synthetase at the mRNA and protein levels in large cohorts of primary and recurrent ovarian carcinomas and ovarian cancer cell lines. We show that the normal fallopian tube fimbria and the majority of primary high-grade and low-grade serous ovarian carcinomas express high levels of argininosuccinate synthetase, which tend to further increase in recurrent tumours. In contrast to the serous subtype, non-serous ovarian carcinoma subtypes (clear cell, endometrioid and mucinous) frequently lack detectable argininosuccinate synthetase expression. The in vitro sensitivity of ovarian cancer cell lines to arginine depletion with pegylated arginine deiminase was inversely correlated with argininosuccinate synthetase expression. Our data suggest that the majority of serous ovarian carcinomas are not susceptible to therapeutic

  14. The prokaryotic FAD synthetase family: a potential drug target.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Ana; Ferreira, Patricia; Martínez-Júlvez, Marta; Medina, Milagros

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of cellular production of the flavin cofactors, flavin adenine mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide(FAD) will prevent the assembly of a large number of flavoproteins and flavoenzymes involved in key metabolic processes in all types of organisms. The enzymes responsible for FMN and FAD production in prokaryotes and eukaryotes exhibit various structural characteristics to catalyze the same chemistry, a fact that converts the prokaryotic FAD synthetase (FADS) in a potential drug target for the development of inhibitors endowed with anti-pathogenic activity. The first step before searching for selective inhibitors of FADS is to understand the structural and functional mechanisms for the riboflavin kinase and FMN adenylyltransferase activities of the prokaryotic enzyme, and particularly to identify their differential functional characteristics with regard to the enzymes performing similar functions in other organisms, particularly humans. In this paper, an overview of the current knowledge of the structure-function relationships in prokaryotic FADS has been presented, as well as of the state of the art in the use of these enzymes as drug targets.

  15. The aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiongming; Marygold, Steven J; Gharib, Walid H; Suter, Beat

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) ligate amino acids to their cognate tRNAs, allowing them to decode the triplet code during translation. Through different mechanisms aaRSs also perform several non-canonical functions in transcription, translation, apoptosis, angiogenesis and inflammation. Drosophila has become a preferred system to model human diseases caused by mutations in aaRS genes, to dissect effects of reduced translation or non-canonical activities, and to study aminoacylation and translational fidelity. However, the lack of a systematic annotation of this gene family has hampered such studies. Here, we report the identification of the entire set of aaRS genes in the fly genome and we predict their roles based on experimental evidence and/or orthology. Further, we propose a new, systematic and logical nomenclature for aaRSs. We also review the research conducted on Drosophila aaRSs to date. Together, our work provides the foundation for further research in the fly aaRS field. PMID:26761199

  16. Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase: a crooked path from substrates to products.

    PubMed

    Raushel, F M; Thoden, J B; Reinhart, G D; Holden, H M

    1998-10-01

    The formation of carbamoyl phosphate is catalyzed by a single enzyme using glutamine, bicarbonate and two molecules of ATP via a reaction mechanism that requires a minimum of four consecutive reactions and three unstable intermediates. The recently determined X-ray crystal structure of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase has revealed the location of three separate active sites connected by two molecular tunnels that run through the interior of the protein. It has been demonstrated that the amidotransferase domain within the small subunit of the enzyme from Escherichia coli hydrolyzes glutamine to ammonia via a thioester intermediate with Cys269. The ammonia migrates through the interior of the protein, where it reacts with carboxy phosphate to produce the carbamate intermediate. The carboxy phosphate intermediate is formed by the phosphorylation of bicarbonate by ATP at a site contained within the amino-terminal half of the large subunit. The carbamate intermediate is transported through the interior of the protein to a second site within the carboxy-terminal half of the large subunit, where it is phosphorylated by another ATP to yield the final product, carbamoyl phosphate. The entire journey from substrate to product covers a distance of nearly 100 A. PMID:9818189

  17. Regulation of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase by MAP kinase.

    PubMed

    Graves, L M; Guy, H I; Kozlowski, P; Huang, M; Lazarowski, E; Pope, R M; Collins, M A; Dahlstrand, E N; Earp, H S; Evans, D R

    2000-01-20

    The de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides is required for mammalian cells to proliferate. The rate-limiting step in this pathway is catalysed by carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS II), part of the multifunctional enzyme CAD. Here we describe the regulation of CAD by the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade. When phosphorylated by MAP kinase in vitro or activated by epidermal growth factor in vivo, CAD lost its feedback inhibition (which is dependent on uridine triphosphate) and became more sensitive to activation (which depends upon phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate). Both these allosteric regulatory changes favour biosynthesis of pyrimidines for growth. They were accompanied by increased epidermal growth factor-dependent phosphorylation of CAD in vivo and were prevented by inhibition of MAP kinase. Mutation of a consensus MAP kinase phosphorylation site abolished the changes in CAD allosteric regulation that were stimulated by growth factors. Finally, consistent with an effect of MAP kinase signalling on CPS II activity, epidermal growth factor increased cellular uridine triphosphate and this increase was reversed by inhibition of MAP kinase. Hence these studies may indicate a direct link between activation of the MAP kinase cascade and de novo biosynthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. PMID:10659854

  18. Purification and characterization of beef pancreatic asparagine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Luehr, C A; Schuster, S M

    1985-03-01

    Bovine pancreatic asparagine synthetase has been partially purified using ammonium sulfate fractionation, DEAE ion-exchange, Cibacron Blue affinity chromatography, and HPLC anion-exchange chromatography to a specific activity of 170 nmol asparagine produced min-1 mg protein-1, or 1400-fold, from a crude homogenate. Using HPLC size exclusion chromatography, an apparent molecular weight of 110,000-120,000 was determined. An aspartyl-adenylate intermediate was found to occur by demonstrating an 18O transfer from [18O]Asp to AMP that was detected with 31P NMR. A number of divalent metals were found to be able to replace magnesium with retention of activity, but none produced as high an activity as Mg2+, and the stoichiometry of the ATP/Mg2+ ratio was found to be 1. The chloride ion was found to stimulate the glutamine-dependent and glutaminase reactions, but the ammonia-dependent reaction was inhibited. Chloride appeared to be a competitive inhibitor with respect to ammonia and produced negative cooperativity. PMID:2858178

  19. In situ autoradiographic detection of folylpolyglutamate synthetase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sussman, D.J.; Milman, G.; Osborne, C.; Shane, B.

    1986-11-01

    The enzyme folylpolyglutamate synthetase (FPGS) catalyzes the conversion of folate (pteroylmonoglutamate) to the polyglutamate forms (pteroylpolyglutamates) that are required for folate retention by mammalian cells. A rapid in situ autoradiographic assay for FPGS was developed which is based on the folate cofactor requirement of thymidylate synthase. Chinese hamster AUX B1 mutant cells lack FPGS activity and are unable to accumulate folate. As a result, the conversion of (6-/sup 3/H)deoxyuridine to thymidine via the thymidylate synthase reaction is impaired in AUX B1 cells and no detectable label is incorporated into DNA. In contrast, FPGS in wild-type Chinese hamster CHO cells causes folate retention and enables the incorporation of (6-/sup 3/H)deoxyuridine into DNA. Incorporation may be detected by autoradiography of monolayer cultures or of colonies replica plated onto polyester discs. Introduction of Escherichia coli FPGS into AUX B1 cells restores the activity of the thymidylate synthase pathway and demonstrates that the E. coli FPGS enzyme can provide pteroylpolyglutamates which functions in mammalian cells.

  20. Secondary NAD+ deficiency in the inherited defect of glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liyan; Ibrahim, Khalid; Stucki, Martin; Frapolli, Michele; Shahbeck, Noora; Chaudhry, Farrukh A; Görg, Boris; Häussinger, Dieter; Penberthy, W Todd; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Häberle, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) deficiency is an ultra-rare inborn error of amino acid metabolism that has been described in only three patients so far. The disease is characterized by neonatal onset of severe encephalopathy, low levels of glutamine in blood and cerebrospinal fluid, chronic moderate hyperammonemia, and an overall poor prognosis in the absence of an effective treatment. Recently, enteral glutamine supplementation was shown to be a safe and effective therapy for this disease but there are no data available on the long-term effects of this intervention. The amino acid glutamine, severely lacking in this disorder, is central to many metabolic pathways in the human organism and is involved in the synthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) starting from tryptophan or niacin as nicotinate, but not nicotinamide. Using fibroblasts, leukocytes, and immortalized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) from a patient carrying a GLUL gene point mutation associated with impaired GS activity, we tested whether glutamine deficiency in this patient results in NAD(+) depletion and whether it can be rescued by supplementation with glutamine, nicotinamide or nicotinate. The present study shows that congenital GS deficiency is associated with NAD(+) depletion in fibroblasts, leukocytes and PBSC, which may contribute to the severe clinical phenotype of the disease. Furthermore, it shows that NAD(+) depletion can be rescued by nicotinamide supplementation in fibroblasts and leukocytes, which may open up potential therapeutic options for the treatment of this disorder.

  1. Chitin synthetase in encysting Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba invadens

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.; Gillin, F.D.

    1987-05-01

    Giardia lamblia (Gl) and Entamoeba invadens (Ei) are protozoan parasites with two morphologic stages in their life cycles. Motile trophozoites colonize the intestine of humans and reptiles respectively. Water resistant cysts, which can survive outside the host, transmit infection. In vitro cyst formation of Ei from trophozoites has been reported, and the authors have recently induced in vitro encystation of Gl. Although the cyst walls of both parasites contain chitin, it synthesis by encysting trophozoites has not been reported. The authors now show that encystation conditions greatly increase chitin synthetase (CS) specific activity (incorporation of /sup 3/H GlcNAc from UDP-GlcNAc into TCA-or alcohol-precipitable material). Extracts of encysting Gl incorporated 3.6 nmol/mg protein in 5 hr compared to < 0.005 in controls. Extracts of encysting Fi incorporated 4.8 n mol/mg protein, compared to 1.7 in the control. CS activity of both parasites requires preformed chitin. The Gl enzyme requires a reducing agent, is inhibited by digitonin and the CS inhibitors, polyoxin D and Nikkomycin, but not by tunicamycin. The product is digested by chitinase. Ei enzyme does not require a reducing agent and is stimulated by 1 mg/ml digitonin, but inhibited by higher concentrations. These studies demonstrate CS enzymes which may play important roles in encystation of Gl and Ei.

  2. The aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jiongming; Marygold, Steven J; Gharib, Walid H; Suter, Beat

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) ligate amino acids to their cognate tRNAs, allowing them to decode the triplet code during translation. Through different mechanisms aaRSs also perform several non-canonical functions in transcription, translation, apoptosis, angiogenesis and inflammation. Drosophila has become a preferred system to model human diseases caused by mutations in aaRS genes, to dissect effects of reduced translation or non-canonical activities, and to study aminoacylation and translational fidelity. However, the lack of a systematic annotation of this gene family has hampered such studies. Here, we report the identification of the entire set of aaRS genes in the fly genome and we predict their roles based on experimental evidence and/or orthology. Further, we propose a new, systematic and logical nomenclature for aaRSs. We also review the research conducted on Drosophila aaRSs to date. Together, our work provides the foundation for further research in the fly aaRS field. PMID:26761199

  3. Glutamine synthetase predicts adjuvant TACE response in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Liu, Kai; Zhang, Jian; Dong, Liwei; Jin, Zhichao; Zhang, Xinji; Xue, Feng; He, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Background: Adjuvant transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) is associated with better outcome and reduced tumor recurrence in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between glutamine synthetase (GS) expression and survival of HCC patients after postoperative adjuvant TACE. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 554 HCC patients in two independent cohorts who underwent curative resection. Immunohistochemistry assay was used to investigate the expression of GS protein and evaluate the association with survival and the response to adjuvant TACE. Results: In training cohort, patients with low GS expression who received postoperative adjuvant TACE showed a better overall survival (OS) (P<0.001) and less early phase recurrence (P=0.016). Adjuvant TACE was an independent prognostic factor for 5-year OS (HR=0.408, 95% CI 0.261-0.639, P<0.001) and early phase recurrence (HR=0.592, 95% CI 0.376-0.931, P=0.023). The same result was confirmed in validation cohort. Patients with high GS expression in both cohorts did not have a significant response to adjuvant TACE in OS and early phase recurrence. Conclusions: GS status in tumor might be a useful tool in the selection of HCC patients who would be likely to benefit from postoperative adjuvant TACE. PMID:26884995

  4. Versatility of acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetases.

    PubMed

    Beld, Joris; Finzel, Kara; Burkart, Michael D

    2014-10-23

    The acyl carrier protein (ACP) requires posttranslational modification with a 4'-phosphopantetheine arm for activity, and this thiol-terminated modification carries cargo between enzymes in ACP-dependent metabolic pathways. We show that acyl-ACP synthetases (AasSs) from different organisms are able to load even, odd, and unnatural fatty acids onto E. coli ACP in vitro. Vibrio harveyi AasS not only shows promiscuity for the acid substrate, but also is active upon various alternate carrier proteins. AasS activity also extends to functional activation in living organisms. We show that exogenously supplied carboxylic acids are loaded onto ACP and extended by the E. coli fatty acid synthase, including unnatural fatty acid analogs. These analogs are further integrated into cellular lipids. In vitro characterization of four different adenylate-forming enzymes allowed us to disambiguate CoA-ligases and AasSs, and further in vivo studies show the potential for functional application in other organisms. PMID:25308274

  5. Expression, purification, and characterization of recombinant human glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Listrom, C D; Morizono, H; Rajagopal, B S; McCann, M T; Tuchman, M; Allewell, N M

    1997-01-01

    A bacterial expression system has been engineered for human glutamine synthetase (EC 6.3.1.2) that produces approximately 60 mg of enzyme (20% of the bacterial soluble protein) and yields approx. 8 mg of purified enzyme per litre of culture. The recombinant enzyme was purified 5-fold to apparent homogeneity and characterized. It has a subunit molecular mass of approx. 45000 Da. The Vmax value obtained using a radioactive assay with ammonia and l-[G-3H]glutamic acid as substrates was 15.9 micromol/min per mg, 40% higher than that obtained in the colorimetric assay (9.9 micromol/min per mg) with hydroxylamine replacing ammonia as a substrate. Km values for glutamate were 3.0 mM and 3.5 mM, and for ATP they were 2.0 mM and 2. 9 mM for the radioactive and spectrophotometric assays respectively. The Km for ammonia in the radioactive assay was 0.15 mM. The midpoint of thermal inactivation was 49.7 degrees C. Hydroxylamine, Mg(II) and Mg(II)-ATP stabilized the enzyme against thermal inactivation, whereas ATP promoted inactivation. The pure enzyme is stable for several months in storage and provides a source for additional studies, including X-ray crystallography. PMID:9359847

  6. Oxidative inactivation of glutamine synthetase from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, G; Haehnel, W; Böger, P

    1997-01-01

    In crude extracts of the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis, glutamine synthetase (GS) could be effectively inactivated by the addition of NADH. GS inactivation was completed within 30 min. Both the inactivated GS and the active enzyme were isolated. No difference between the two enzyme forms was seen in sodium dodecyl sulfate-gels, and only minor differences were detectable by UV spectra, which excludes modification by a nucleotide. Mass spectrometry revealed that the molecular masses of active and inactive GS are equal. While the Km values of the substrates were unchanged, the Vmax values of the inactive GS were lower, reflecting the inactivation factor in the crude extract. This result indicates that the active site was affected. From the crude extract, a fraction mediating GS inactivation could be enriched by ammonium sulfate precipitation and gel filtration. GS inactivation by this fraction required the presence of NAD(P)H, Fe3+, and oxygen. In the absence of the GS-inactivating fraction, GS could be inactivated by Fe2+ and H2O2. The GS-inactivating fraction produced Fe2+ and H2O2, using NADPH, Fe3+, and oxygen. Accordingly, the inactivating fraction was inhibited by catalase and EDTA. This GS-inactivating system of Anabaena is similar to that described for oxidative GS inactivation in Escherichia coli. We conclude that GS inactivation by NAD(P)H is caused by irreversible oxidative damage and is not due to a regulatory mechanism of nitrogen assimilation. PMID:9006027

  7. Purification and some kinetic properties of rat liver glucosamine synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Winterburn, P. J.; Phelps, C. F.

    1971-01-01

    1. Glucosamine synthetase (l-glutamine–d-fructose 6-phosphate aminotransferase, EC 2.6.1.16) was purified about 300-fold from rat liver by two techniques. One procedure utilized the protective action of fructose 6-phosphate and gave a relatively stable preparation, the other yielded an unstable enzyme (half-life of about 20h), free of contaminant activities, on which kinetic experiments were performed. Although the properties of the two preparations showed slight differences, the unstabilized form could be converted into the stabilized form. 2. During preparation the enzyme retained its sensitivity to the feedback inhibitor, UDP-N-acetylglucosamine. 3. The reversibility of the enzyme-catalysed reaction could not be demonstrated. There was no apparent requirement for a cofactor. 4. The pH optimum was at 7.5, at which pH the reaction obeyed a Ping Pong Bi Bi rate equation. At pH values outside the range 6.9–7.6 and at temperatures below 29°C the velocity was described by an ordered Bi Bi rate equation. 5. The molecular weight of the enzyme, determined by two procedures, was 360000–400000. 6. The aminotransferase was unable to utilize ammonia as a substrate. PMID:4255955

  8. Inhibition of Plant Asparagine Synthetase by Monoterpene Cineoles1

    PubMed Central

    Romagni, Joanne G.; Duke, Stephen O.; Dayan, Franck E.

    2000-01-01

    Asparagine (Asn) synthetase (AS) is the key enzyme in Asn biosynthesis and plays an important role in nitrogen mobilization. Despite its important physiological function, little research has been done documenting inhibitors of plant AS. Plant growth inhibition caused by the natural monoterpene 1,4-cineole and its structurally related herbicide cinmethylin was reversed 65% and 55%, respectively, by providing 100 μm Asn exogenously. Reversion of the phytotoxic effect was dependent on the concentration of Asn. The presence of either 1,4-cineole or cinmethylin stimulated root uptake of [14C]Asn by lettuce (Lactuca sativa) seedlings. Although the physiological responses suggested that both compounds affected Asn biosynthesis, biochemical analysis of AS activity showed that the natural monoterpene was a potent inhibitor (I50 = approximately 0.5 μm) of the enzyme, whereas the commercial product was not inhibitory up to levels of 10 mm. Analysis of the putative metabolite, 2-hydroxy-1,4-cineole, showed that the cis-enantiomer was much more active than the trans-enantiomer, suggesting that the hydroxyl group was involved in the specific ligand/active site interaction. This is the first report that AS is a suitable herbicide target site, and that cinmethylin is apparently a proherbicide that requires metabolic bioactivation via cleavage of the benzyl-ether side chain. PMID:10859202

  9. Regulation of the activity of the Bacillus licheniformis A5 glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Donohue, T J; Bernlohr, R W

    1981-10-01

    The regulation of glutamine synthetase activity by positive and negative effectors of enzyme activity singularly and in combinations was studied by using a homogeneous enzyme preparation from Bacillus licheniformis A5. Phosphorylribosyl pyrophosphate at concentrations greater than 2mM stimulated glutamine synthetase activity by approximately 70%. The concentration of phosphorylribosyl pyrophosphate required for half-maximal stimulation of enzyme activity was 0.4 mM. Results obtained from studies of fractional inhibition of glutamine synthetase activity were consistent with the presence of one allosteric site for glutamine binding (apparent I0.5, 2.2mM) per active enzyme unit at a glutamate concentration of 50 mM. At a glutamate concentration of 30 mM or less, the data were consistent with the enzyme containing two binding sites for glutamine (one of which was an allosteric site with an apparent I0.5 of 0.4 mM). Bases on an analysis of the response of glutamine synthetase activity to positive and negative effectors in vitro and to the intracellular concentration of these effectors in vivo, the primary modulators of glutamine synthetase activity in B. licheniformis A5 appear to be glutamine and alanine (apparent I0.5, 5.2mM). PMID:6169702

  10. Glutamine Synthetase Sensitivity to Oxidative Modification during Nutrient Starvation in Prochlorococcus marinus PCC 9511.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Baena, Guadalupe; Domínguez-Martín, María Agustina; Donaldson, Robert P; García-Fernández, José Manuel; Diez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase plays a key role in nitrogen metabolism, thus the fine regulation of this enzyme in Prochlorococcus, which is especially important in the oligotrophic oceans where this marine cyanobacterium thrives. In this work, we studied the metal-catalyzed oxidation of glutamine synthetase in cultures of Prochlorococcus marinus strain PCC 9511 subjected to nutrient limitation. Nitrogen deprivation caused glutamine synthetase to be more sensitive to metal-catalyzed oxidation (a 36% increase compared to control, non starved samples). Nutrient starvation induced also a clear increase (three-fold in the case of nitrogen) in the concentration of carbonyl derivatives in cell extracts, which was also higher (22%) upon addition of the inhibitor of electron transport, DCMU, to cultures. Our results indicate that nutrient limitations, representative of the natural conditions in the Prochlorococcus habitat, affect the response of glutamine synthetase to oxidative inactivating systems. Implications of these results on the regulation of glutamine synthetase by oxidative alteration prior to degradation of the enzyme in Prochlorococcus are discussed. PMID:26270653

  11. Affinity chromatography of aminoacyl-transfer ribonucleic acid synthetases. Small organic ligands.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, C M; Knowles, J R

    1977-01-01

    The usefulness of affinity chromatography for the purification of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases was explored by using column ligands derived from the corresponding amino acid and aminoalkyladenylate, a non-labile analogue of the aminoacyladenylate reaction intermediate. Four modes of attachment of the aminoalkyladenylate to Sepharose were studied. The interaction between amino acid derivatives and the corresponding aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases is too weak to allow their use as ligands for affinity chromatography. Attachment of the aminoalkyladenylate via the alpha-nitrogen atom of the amino acid or via C-8 of the nucleotide abolishes synthetase binding, and immobilization via the oxidized ribose ring is only marginally useful. However, attachment of the aminoalkyladenylate to the matrix via N-6 of the nucleotide allows strong and specific synthetase binding, and the use of such columns permits the isolation of homogeneous synthetase from crude mixtures. The effect of non-specific adsorption and the utility of pre-columns and of specific substrate elution are investigated and discussed. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 7. PMID:597251

  12. Glutamine Synthetase Sensitivity to Oxidative Modification during Nutrient Starvation in Prochlorococcus marinus PCC 9511.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Baena, Guadalupe; Domínguez-Martín, María Agustina; Donaldson, Robert P; García-Fernández, José Manuel; Diez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase plays a key role in nitrogen metabolism, thus the fine regulation of this enzyme in Prochlorococcus, which is especially important in the oligotrophic oceans where this marine cyanobacterium thrives. In this work, we studied the metal-catalyzed oxidation of glutamine synthetase in cultures of Prochlorococcus marinus strain PCC 9511 subjected to nutrient limitation. Nitrogen deprivation caused glutamine synthetase to be more sensitive to metal-catalyzed oxidation (a 36% increase compared to control, non starved samples). Nutrient starvation induced also a clear increase (three-fold in the case of nitrogen) in the concentration of carbonyl derivatives in cell extracts, which was also higher (22%) upon addition of the inhibitor of electron transport, DCMU, to cultures. Our results indicate that nutrient limitations, representative of the natural conditions in the Prochlorococcus habitat, affect the response of glutamine synthetase to oxidative inactivating systems. Implications of these results on the regulation of glutamine synthetase by oxidative alteration prior to degradation of the enzyme in Prochlorococcus are discussed.

  13. Structure of the prolyl-tRNA synthetase from the eukaryotic pathogen Giardia lamblia

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Eric T.; Kim, Jessica E.; Napuli, Alberto J.; Verlinde, Christophe L. M. J.; Fan, Erkang; Zucker, Frank H.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Hol, Wim G. J.; Merritt, Ethan A.

    2012-09-01

    The structure of Giardia prolyl-tRNA synthetase cocrystallized with proline and ATP shows evidence for half-of-the-sites activity, leading to a corresponding mixture of reaction substrates and product (prolyl-AMP) in the two active sites of the dimer. The genome of the human intestinal parasite Giardia lamblia contains only a single aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase gene for each amino acid. The Giardia prolyl-tRNA synthetase gene product was originally misidentified as a dual-specificity Pro/Cys enzyme, in part owing to its unexpectedly high off-target activation of cysteine, but is now believed to be a normal representative of the class of archaeal/eukaryotic prolyl-tRNA synthetases. The 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of the G. lamblia enzyme presented here is thus the first structure determination of a prolyl-tRNA synthetase from a eukaryote. The relative occupancies of substrate (proline) and product (prolyl-AMP) in the active site are consistent with half-of-the-sites reactivity, as is the observed biphasic thermal denaturation curve for the protein in the presence of proline and MgATP. However, no corresponding induced asymmetry is evident in the structure of the protein. No thermal stabilization is observed in the presence of cysteine and ATP. The implied low affinity for the off-target activation product cysteinyl-AMP suggests that translational fidelity in Giardia is aided by the rapid release of misactivated cysteine.

  14. Glutamine Synthetase Sensitivity to Oxidative Modification during Nutrient Starvation in Prochlorococcus marinus PCC 9511

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Baena, Guadalupe; Domínguez-Martín, María Agustina; Donaldson, Robert P.; García-Fernández, José Manuel; Diez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase plays a key role in nitrogen metabolism, thus the fine regulation of this enzyme in Prochlorococcus, which is especially important in the oligotrophic oceans where this marine cyanobacterium thrives. In this work, we studied the metal-catalyzed oxidation of glutamine synthetase in cultures of Prochlorococcus marinus strain PCC 9511 subjected to nutrient limitation. Nitrogen deprivation caused glutamine synthetase to be more sensitive to metal-catalyzed oxidation (a 36% increase compared to control, non starved samples). Nutrient starvation induced also a clear increase (three-fold in the case of nitrogen) in the concentration of carbonyl derivatives in cell extracts, which was also higher (22%) upon addition of the inhibitor of electron transport, DCMU, to cultures. Our results indicate that nutrient limitations, representative of the natural conditions in the Prochlorococcus habitat, affect the response of glutamine synthetase to oxidative inactivating systems. Implications of these results on the regulation of glutamine synthetase by oxidative alteration prior to degradation of the enzyme in Prochlorococcus are discussed. PMID:26270653

  15. Effect of glucose deprivation on rat glutamine synthetase in cultured astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Rosier, F; Lambert, D; Mertens-Strijthagen, M

    1996-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase was purified from the cerebral cortex of adult rats and characterized. Polyclonal rabbit antibodies were raised against the enzyme, purified and their specific anti-(glutamine synthetase) activity determined. A primary astroglial culture was prepared from newborn Sprague-Dawley rats. Astrocytes at different ages of development were incubated in the presence and absence of glucose. In glucose-deprived conditions the specific activity of glutamine synthetase decreased. This decrease was more pronounced in 8-day-old than in 21-day-old cultures. Kinetic analysis demonstrated that the reduction in activity was mainly related to a decrease in Vmax. By immunoprecipitation, it was shown that the number of enzyme molecules in astrocytes was decreased in glucose-deprived conditions. On addition of glucose, a total recovery of glutamine synthetase was obtained after 36 h in 8-day-old culture. Rates of degradation and synthesis were investigated. When compared with an incubation in the presence of glucose, glucose deprivation increased enzyme turnover, as estimated from the first-order disappearance of radioactivity from glutamine synthetase. Synthesis rate was estimated from the incorporation of [35S]methionine during a 2 h incubation period and was decreased in glucose-deprived conditions. Trichloroacetate-precipitable proteins changed only slightly in the experimental conditions, and total protein did not vary significantly during the experimental period. A mathematical model is presented which attempts to integrate degradation and synthesis in our experimental model. PMID:8615836

  16. Effect of estrogen administration on rat liver 2-5A synthetase activity.

    PubMed

    Smekens, M; Dumont, J E; Degeyter, A; Galand, P

    1986-08-01

    Interferon-induced 2-5A synthetase is also present in various cells and tissues in the absence of any interferon treatment. The activity of this enzyme, which synthesizes a series of oligoadenylates, ppp(A2'p)n5'A (collectively referred to as 2-5A), was previously shown to vary with the growth status of liver tissue i.e., it decreased before and during the peak of DNA synthesis activity induced in rat liver by a two third hepatectomy. In the course of studies aimed at testing the hypothesis that 2-5A synthetase activity might exert negative control on normal cell growth and multiplication, we show here that a treatment of ovariectomized rats with a single dose of estradiol-17beta (100 micrograms/100 g body weight) induced a transient increase in the [3H]thymidine labelling index in the liver after 24 h and markedly decreased the 2-5A synthetase activity. A time course study revealed that 2-5A synthetase activity started to decrease after 3 h, reaching a minimal value (10% of the control level) after 12 h, then slowly increased to come back to control level at 48 h. These results, together with our similar data on regenerating liver, suggest that low 2-5A synthetase activity is permissive for acquisition of proliferative 'competence' by G0 cells. PMID:3730433

  17. Antimalarial Benzoxaboroles Target Plasmodium falciparum Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase.

    PubMed

    Sonoiki, Ebere; Palencia, Andres; Guo, Denghui; Ahyong, Vida; Dong, Chen; Li, Xianfeng; Hernandez, Vincent S; Zhang, Yong-Kang; Choi, Wai; Gut, Jiri; Legac, Jennifer; Cooper, Roland; Alley, M R K; Freund, Yvonne R; DeRisi, Joseph; Cusack, Stephen; Rosenthal, Philip J

    2016-08-01

    There is a need for new antimalarials, ideally with novel mechanisms of action. Benzoxaboroles have been shown to be active against bacteria, fungi, and trypanosomes. Therefore, we investigated the antimalarial activity and mechanism of action of 3-aminomethyl benzoxaboroles against Plasmodium falciparum Two 3-aminomethyl compounds, AN6426 and AN8432, demonstrated good potency against cultured multidrug-resistant (W2 strain) P. falciparum (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] of 310 nM and 490 nM, respectively) and efficacy against murine Plasmodium berghei infection when administered orally once daily for 4 days (90% effective dose [ED90], 7.4 and 16.2 mg/kg of body weight, respectively). To characterize mechanisms of action, we selected parasites with decreased drug sensitivity by culturing with stepwise increases in concentration of AN6426. Resistant clones were characterized by whole-genome sequencing. Three generations of resistant parasites had polymorphisms in the predicted editing domain of the gene encoding a P. falciparum leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS; PF3D7_0622800) and in another gene (PF3D7_1218100), which encodes a protein of unknown function. Solution of the structure of the P. falciparum LeuRS editing domain suggested key roles for mutated residues in LeuRS editing. Short incubations with AN6426 and AN8432, unlike artemisinin, caused dose-dependent inhibition of [(14)C]leucine incorporation by cultured wild-type, but not resistant, parasites. The growth of resistant, but not wild-type, parasites was impaired in the presence of the unnatural amino acid norvaline, consistent with a loss of LeuRS editing activity in resistant parasites. In summary, the benzoxaboroles AN6426 and AN8432 offer effective antimalarial activity and act, at least in part, against a novel target, the editing domain of P. falciparum LeuRS.

  18. Compositions of orthogonal glutamyl-tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pairs and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, J Christopher [San Francisco, CA; Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Santoro, Stephen [Cambridge, MA

    2009-05-05

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include glutamyl orthogonal tRNAs, glutamyl orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of glutamyl tRNAs/synthetases are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins using these orthogonal pairs.

  19. Methods and compositions for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase pairs

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter; Wang, Lei; Anderson, John Christopher; Chin, Jason; Liu, David R.; Magliery, Thomas J.; Meggers, Eric L.; Mehl, Ryan Aaron; Pastrnak, Miro; Santoro, Stephen William; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2006-08-01

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  20. Methods and composition for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase pairs

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Anderson, John Christopher; Chin, Jason W.; Liu, David R.; Magliery, Thomas J.; Meggers, Eric L.; Mehl, Ryan Aaron; Pastrnak, Miro; Santoro, Stephen William; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2012-05-08

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  1. Methods and compositions for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Anderson, John Christopher; Chin, Jason W.; Liu, David R.; Magliery, Thomas J.; Meggers, Eric L.; Mehl, Ryan Aaron; Pastrnak, Miro; Santoro, Stephen William; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2015-10-20

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  2. Affinity chromatography of aminoacyl-transfer ribonucleic acid synthetases. Cognate transfer ribonucleic acid as a ligand.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, C M; Knowles, J R

    1977-01-01

    The use of tRNA affinity columns for the purification of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases was investigated. A purification method for valyl-tRNA synthetase from Bacillus stearothermophilus is described that uses two affinity columns, one containing the pure cognate tRNA, and the other containing all tRNA species except the cognate tRNA. A method for the rapid preparation of the two columns was developed, which does not require prior isolation of cognate tRNA but makes use of the ability of the target synthetase to select its cognate tRNA. The usefulness of tRNA columns is compared with that of affinity columns derived from the aminoalkyladenylate reported in the preceding paper [Clarke & Knowles (1977) Biochem J. 167, 405-417]. PMID:23108

  3. Isolation and characterisation of a ferrirhodin synthetase gene from the sugarcane pathogen Fusarium sacchari.

    PubMed

    Munawar, Asifa; Marshall, James W; Cox, Russell J; Bailey, Andy M; Lazarus, Colin M

    2013-02-11

    FSN1, a gene isolated from the sugar-cane pathogen Fusarium sacchari, encodes a 4707-residue nonribosomal peptide synthetase consisting of three complete adenylation, thiolation and condensation modules followed by two additional thiolation and condensation domain repeats. This structure is similar to that of ferricrocin synthetase, which makes a siderophore that is involved in intracellular iron storage in other filamentous fungi. Heterologous expression of FSN1 in Aspergillus oryzae resulted in the accumulation of a secreted metabolite that was identified as ferrirhodin. This siderophore was found to be present in both mycelium and culture filtrates of F. sacchari, whereas ferricrocin is found only in the mycelium, thus suggesting that ferricrocin is an intracellular storage siderophore in F. sacchari, whereas ferrirhodin is used for iron acquisition. To our knowledge, this is the first report to characterise a ferrirhodin synthetase gene functionally.

  4. Nineteen-year follow-up of a patient with severe glutathione synthetase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Atwal, Paldeep S; Medina, Casey R; Burrage, Lindsay C; Sutton, V Reid

    2016-07-01

    Glutathione synthetase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting in low levels of glutathione and an increased susceptibility to oxidative stress. Patients with glutathione synthetase deficiency typically present in the neonatal period with hemolytic anemia, metabolic acidosis and neurological impairment. Lifelong treatment with antioxidants has been recommended in an attempt to prevent morbidity and mortality associated with the disorder. Here, we present a 19-year-old female who was diagnosed with glutathione synthetase deficiency shortly after birth and who has been closely followed in our metabolic clinic. Despite an initial severe presentation, she has had normal intellectual development and few complications of her disorder with a treatment regimen that includes polycitra (citric acid, potassium citrate and sodium citrate), vitamin C, vitamin E and selenium.

  5. SOLUBLE HEPATIC δ-AMINOLEVULINIC ACID SYNTHETASE: END-PRODUCT INHIBITION OF THE PARTIALLY PURIFIED ENZYME*

    PubMed Central

    Scholnick, Perry L.; Hammaker, Lydia E.; Marver, Harvey S.

    1969-01-01

    The present study confirms the existence of hepatic δ-aminolevulinic acid synthetase in the cytosol of the liver, suggests that this enzyme may be in transit to the mitochondria, and defines some of the characteristics of the partially purified enzyme. The substrate and cofactor requirements are similar to those of mitochondrial δ-aminolevulinic acid synthetase. Heme strongly inhibits the partially purified enzyme. A number of proteins that bind heme block this inhibition, which explains previous failures to demonstrate heme inhibition in crude systems. End-product inhibition of δ-aminolevulinic acid synthetase in the mitochondria may play an important role in the regulation of heme biosynthesis in eukaryotic cells. PMID:5257968

  6. Isolation and characterisation of a ferrirhodin synthetase gene from the sugarcane pathogen Fusarium sacchari.

    PubMed

    Munawar, Asifa; Marshall, James W; Cox, Russell J; Bailey, Andy M; Lazarus, Colin M

    2013-02-11

    FSN1, a gene isolated from the sugar-cane pathogen Fusarium sacchari, encodes a 4707-residue nonribosomal peptide synthetase consisting of three complete adenylation, thiolation and condensation modules followed by two additional thiolation and condensation domain repeats. This structure is similar to that of ferricrocin synthetase, which makes a siderophore that is involved in intracellular iron storage in other filamentous fungi. Heterologous expression of FSN1 in Aspergillus oryzae resulted in the accumulation of a secreted metabolite that was identified as ferrirhodin. This siderophore was found to be present in both mycelium and culture filtrates of F. sacchari, whereas ferricrocin is found only in the mycelium, thus suggesting that ferricrocin is an intracellular storage siderophore in F. sacchari, whereas ferrirhodin is used for iron acquisition. To our knowledge, this is the first report to characterise a ferrirhodin synthetase gene functionally. PMID:23307607

  7. Inhibition of Dihydropteroate Synthetase from Escherichia coli by Sulfones and Sulfonamides

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Jerry L.; Maren, Thomas H.

    1973-01-01

    The inhibitory action of various diphenylsulfones and sulfonamides on dihydropteroate synthetase partially purified from Escherichia coli was examined. 4,4′-Diaminodiphenylsulfone (DDS; I50 = 2 × 10−5 M) and the monosubstituted derivatives 4-amino-4′-formamidodiphenylsulfone (I50 = 5.8 × 10−5 M) and 4-amino-4′-acetamidodiphenylsulfone (I50 = 5.2 × 10−5 M) were effective inhibitors of dihydropteroate synthetase activity. Disubstitution of the arylamine groups of DDS (4,4′-diformamidodiphenylsulfone and 4,4′-diacetamidodiphenylsulfone) resulted in complete loss of inhibitory activity. Both DDS (KI = 5.9 × 10−6 M) and sulfadiazine (KI = 2.5 × 10−6 M) were found to be competitive inhibitors of dihydropteroate synthetase. These findings are discussed in regard to the Bell and Roblin theory of structure-activity relationships for p-aminobenzoic acid antagonists. PMID:4597736

  8. 19-Year Follow-up of A Patient With Severe Glutathione Synthetase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Atwal, Paldeep S.; Medina, Casey R.; Burrage, Lindsay C.; Sutton, V. Reid

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione synthetase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting in low levels of glutathione and an increased susceptibility to oxidative stress. Patients with glutathione synthetase deficiency typically present in the neonatal period with hemolytic anemia, metabolic acidosis and neurological impairment. Lifelong treatment with antioxidants has been recommended in an attempt to prevent morbidity and mortality associated with the disorder. Here we present a 19-year-old female who was diagnosed with glutathione synthetase deficiency shortly after birth and who has been closely followed in our metabolic clinic. Despite an initial severe presentation, she has had normal intellectual development and few complications of her disorder with a treatment regimen that includes polycitra (citric acid, potassium citrate and sodium citrate), vitamin C, vitamin E and selenium. PMID:26984560

  9. Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase: an ordinary enzyme but an outstanding genetic code expansion tool.

    PubMed

    Wan, Wei; Tharp, Jeffery M; Liu, Wenshe R

    2014-06-01

    The genetic incorporation of the 22nd proteinogenic amino acid, pyrrolysine (Pyl) at amber codon is achieved by the action of pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) together with its cognate tRNA(Pyl). Unlike most aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, PylRS displays high substrate side chain promiscuity, low selectivity toward its substrate α-amine, and low selectivity toward the anticodon of tRNA(Pyl). These unique but ordinary features of PylRS as an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase allow the Pyl incorporation machinery to be easily engineered for the genetic incorporation of more than 100 non-canonical amino acids (NCAAs) or α-hydroxy acids into proteins at amber codon and the reassignment of other codons such as ochre UAA, opal UGA, and four-base AGGA codons to code NCAAs. PMID:24631543

  10. Novel subunit-subunit interactions in the structure of glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Almassy, R J; Janson, C A; Hamlin, R; Xuong, N H; Eisenberg, D

    We present an atomic model for glutamine synthetase, an enzyme of central importance in bacterial nitrogen metabolism, from X-ray crystallography. The 12 identical subunits are arranged as the carbon atoms in two face-to-face benzene rings, with unusual subunit contacts. Our model, which places the active sites at the subunit interfaces, suggests a mechanism for the main functional role of glutamine synthetase: how the enzyme regulates the rate of synthesis of glutamine in response to covalent modification and feedback inhibition. PMID:2876389

  11. Acute Onset Anti-Synthetase Syndrome With Pericardial Effusion and Non-Specific Interstitial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Aditya; Patel, Samir R.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-synthetase syndrome (AS) is a clinical entity which is described classically by the triad of interstitial lung disease (ILD), inflammatory myositis and presence of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase antibodies (ASA). We describe a rare presentation of this condition with regard to the uncharacteristically acute nature of presentation, acute decompensation in clinical condition, development of acute interstitial pneumonitis requiring rescue extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and accompaniment of significant pericardial effusion on presentation, followed by rapid improvement with initiation of steroids. PMID:27540445

  12. A Novel Tryptophanyl-tRNA Synthetase Gene Confers High-Level Resistance to Indolmycin▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Vecchione, James J.; Sello, Jason K.

    2009-01-01

    Indolmycin, a potential antibacterial drug, competitively inhibits bacterial tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetases. An effort to identify indolmycin resistance genes led to the discovery of a gene encoding an indolmycin-resistant isoform of tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase. Overexpression of this gene in an indolmycin-sensitive strain increased the indolmycin MIC 60-fold. Its transcription and distribution in various bacterial genera were assessed. The level of resistance conferred by this gene was compared to that of a known indolmycin resistance gene and to those of genes with resistance-conferring point mutations. PMID:19546369

  13. Time course of the uridylylation and adenylylation states in the glutamine synthetase bicyclic cascade.

    PubMed Central

    Varón-Castellanos, R; Havsteen, B H; García-Moreno, M; Valero-Ruiz, E; Molina-Alarcón, M; García-Cánovas, F

    1993-01-01

    A kinetic analysis of the glutamine synthetase bicyclic cascade is presented. It includes the dependence on time from the onset of the reaction of both the uridylylation of Shapiro's regulatory protein and the adenylylation of the glutamine synthetase. The transient phase equations obtained allow an estimation of the time elapsed until the states of uridylylation and adenylylation reach their steady-states, and therefore an evaluation of the effective sensitivity of the system. The contribution of the uridylylation cycle to the adenylylation cycle has been studied, and an equation relating the state of adenylylation at any time to the state of uridylylation at the same instant has been derived. PMID:8104399

  14. The regulation of Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase revisited: role of 2-ketoglutarate in the regulation of glutamine synthetase adenylylation state.

    PubMed

    Jiang, P; Peliska, J A; Ninfa, A J

    1998-09-15

    The regulation of Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase (GS) by reversible adenylylation has provided one of the classical paradigms for signal transduction by cyclic cascades. Yet, many mechanistic features of this regulation remain to be elucidated. We examined the regulation of GS adenylylation state in a reconstituted system containing GS, adenylyltransferase (ATase), the PII signal transduction protein that controls ATase, and the uridylyltransferase/uridylyl-removing enzyme (UTase/UR), which has a role in regulating PII. In this reconstituted bicyclic cascade system, the adenylylation state of GS was regulated reciprocally by the small molecule effectors 2-ketoglutarate and glutamine at physiological effector concentrations. By examination of the individual regulatory monocycles and comparison to the bicyclic system and existing data, we could deduce that the only sensors of 2-ketoglutarate were PII and PII-UMP. At physiological conditions, we observed that the main role of 2-ketoglutarate in bringing about the deadenylylation of GS was to inhibit GS adenylylation, and this was due to the allosteric regulation of PII activity. Glutamine acted as an allosteric regulator of both ATase and UTase/UR. We also compared the regulation of GS adenylylation state to the regulation of phosphorylation state of the transcription factor NRI (NtrC) in a reconstituted bicyclic system containing NRI, the bifunctional kinase/phosphatase NRII (NtrB), PII, and the UTase/UR. This comparison indicated that, at a fixed 2-ketoglutarate concentration, the regulation of GS adenylylation state by glutamine was sharper and occurred at a higher concentration than did the regulation of NRI phosphorylation. The possible biological implications of this regulatory arrangement are discussed. PMID:9737857

  15. Post-transcriptional regulation of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase from its stored mRNA in germinated wheat embryos.

    PubMed

    Mathur, M; Saluja, D; Sachar, R C

    1991-06-24

    About 2-3-fold stimulation of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase was witnessed in germinated wheat embryos (48 h). The enhancement of enzyme activity was significantly inhibited by cycloheximide and amino acid analogues. Simultaneous addition of corresponding amino acids alleviated the inhibitory effect of amino acid analogues. Conclusive proof for the de novo synthesis of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase was obtained by labelling this enzyme with [35SO4]2- in vivo. Thus de novo enzyme synthesis seemed necessary for the rise in activity of AdoMet synthetase in wheat embryos. Curiously, blocking of transcription with cordycepin failed to repress the de novo synthesis of AdoMet synthetase in germinated wheat embryos. We envisage the presence of stored mRNA for AdoMet synthetase in wheat embryos. Thus the regulation of this enzyme occurs at the post-transcriptional level. L-Methionine, which is one of the substrates of AdoMet synthetase, stimulated the enzyme activity (2-2.4-fold) over that observed in control germinated embryos. L-Methionine promotes increased de novo synthesis of AdoMet synthetase. Preincubation of enzyme fraction with L-Methionine failed to activate or stabilize the activity of AdoMet synthetase. Three isozymes of AdoMet synthetase were physically separated by DE-52 ion-exchange chromatography. One of the isozymes of AdoMet synthetase has been purified (1529-fold) to electrophoretic homogeneity by resorting to phenyl Sepharose and ATP Sepharose affinity chromatography. The purified enzyme catalyzed the synthesis of S-adenosylmethionine and also exhibited tripolyphosphatase activity. The reaction product of the purified enzyme was chemically and enzymatically characterized as S-adenosylmethionine. The molecular weight of the native enzyme is 174,000 and that of its subunit is 84,000 as determined on SDS-PAGE. Thus the native enzyme seems to be dimeric in nature. PMID:1648405

  16. Crystal structure of glycyl-tRNA synthetase from Thermus thermophilus.

    PubMed Central

    Logan, D T; Mazauric, M H; Kern, D; Moras, D

    1995-01-01

    The sequence and crystal structure at 2.75 A resolution of the homodimeric glycyl-tRNA synthetase from Thermus thermophilus, the first representative of the last unknown class II synthetase subgroup, have been determined. The three class II synthetase sequence motifs are present but the structure was essential for identification of motif 1, which does not possess the proline previously believed to be an essential class II invariant. Nevertheless, crucial contacts with the active site of the other monomer involving motif 1 are conserved and a more comprehensive description of class II now becomes possible. Each monomer consists of an active site strongly resembling that of the aspartyl and seryl enzymes, a C-terminal anticodon recognition domain of 100 residues and a third domain unusually inserted between motifs 1 and 2 almost certainly interacting with the acceptor arm of tRNA(Gly). The C-terminal domain has a novel five-stranded parallel-antiparallel beta-sheet structure with three surrounding helices. The active site residues most probably responsible for substrate recognition, in particular in the Gly binding pocket, can be identified by inference from aspartyl-tRNA synthetase due to the conserved nature of the class II active site. Images PMID:7556056

  17. Leucyl-tRNA synthetase: double duty in amino acid sensing.

    PubMed

    Durán, Raúl V; Hall, Michael N

    2012-08-01

    The cellular response to amino acids is controlled at the molecular level by TORC1. While many of the elements that participate in TORC1 signaling are known, we still have no clear idea how cells sense amino acids. Two recent studies found that leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LRS) is a leucine sensor for TORC1, in both yeast and mammalian cells.

  18. Draft Genome Sequences of Five Novel Polyketide Synthetase-Containing Mouse Escherichia coli Strains

    PubMed Central

    Mannion, Anthony; Shen, Zeli; Feng, Yan; Garcia, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    We report herein the draft genomes of five novel Escherichia coli strains isolated from surveillance and experimental mice housed at MIT and the Whitehead Institute and describe their genomic characteristics in context with the polyketide synthetase (PKS)-containing pathogenic E. coli strains NC101, IHE3034, and A192PP.

  19. A novel therapeutic target for peripheral nerve injury-related diseases: aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Park, Byung Sun; Yeo, Seung Geun; Jung, Junyang; Jeong, Na Young

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AminoARSs) are essential enzymes that perform the first step of protein synthesis. Beyond their original roles, AminoARSs possess non-canonical functions, such as cell cycle regulation and signal transduction. Therefore, AminoARSs represent a powerful pharmaceutical target if their non-canonical functions can be controlled. Using AminoARSs-specific primers, we screened mRNA expression in the spinal cord dorsal horn of rats with peripheral nerve injury created by sciatic nerve axotomy. Of 20 AminoARSs, we found that phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase beta chain (FARSB), isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase (IARS) and methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MARS) mRNA expression was increased in spinal dorsal horn neurons on the injured side, but not in glial cells. These findings suggest the possibility that FARSB, IARS and MARS, as a neurotransmitter, may transfer abnormal sensory signals after peripheral nerve damage and become a new target for drug treatment. PMID:26692865

  20. Molecular cloning and primary structure of the Escherichia coli methionyl-tRNA synthetase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Dardel, F; Fayat, G; Blanquet, S

    1984-01-01

    The intact metG gene was cloned in plasmid pBR322 from an F32 episomal gene library by complementation of a structural mutant, metG83. The Escherichia coli strain transformed with this plasmid (pX1) overproduced methionyl-tRNA synthetase 40-fold. Maxicell analysis showed that three major polypeptides with MrS of 76,000, 37,000, and 29,000 were expressed from pX1. The polypeptide with an Mr of 76,000 was identified as the product of metG on the basis of immunological studies and was indistinguishable from purified methionyl-tRNA synthetase. In addition, DNA-DNA hybridization studies demonstrated that the metG regions were homologous on the E. coli chromosome and on the F32 episome. DNA sequencing of 642 nucleotides was performed. It completes the partial metG sequence already published (D. G. Barker, J. P. Ebel, R. Jakes, and C. J. Bruton, Eur. J. Biochem. 127:449-451, 1982). Examination of the deduced primary structure of methionyl-tRNA synthetase excludes the occurrence of any significant repeated sequences. Finally, mapping of mutation metG83 by complementation experiments strongly suggests that the central part of methionyl-tRNA synthetase is involved in methionine recognition. This observation is discussed in the light of the known three-dimensional crystallographic structure. Images PMID:6094501

  1. Pseudomonas syringae Phytotoxins: Mode of Action, Regulation, and Biosynthesis by Peptide and Polyketide Synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Carol L.; Alarcón-Chaidez, Francisco; Gross, Dennis C.

    1999-01-01

    Coronatine, syringomycin, syringopeptin, tabtoxin, and phaseolotoxin are the most intensively studied phytotoxins of Pseudomonas syringae, and each contributes significantly to bacterial virulence in plants. Coronatine functions partly as a mimic of methyl jasmonate, a hormone synthesized by plants undergoing biological stress. Syringomycin and syringopeptin form pores in plasma membranes, a process that leads to electrolyte leakage. Tabtoxin and phaseolotoxin are strongly antimicrobial and function by inhibiting glutamine synthetase and ornithine carbamoyltransferase, respectively. Genetic analysis has revealed the mechanisms responsible for toxin biosynthesis. Coronatine biosynthesis requires the cooperation of polyketide and peptide synthetases for the assembly of the coronafacic and coronamic acid moieties, respectively. Tabtoxin is derived from the lysine biosynthetic pathway, whereas syringomycin, syringopeptin, and phaseolotoxin biosynthesis requires peptide synthetases. Activation of phytotoxin synthesis is controlled by diverse environmental factors including plant signal molecules and temperature. Genes involved in the regulation of phytotoxin synthesis have been located within the coronatine and syringomycin gene clusters; however, additional regulatory genes are required for the synthesis of these and other phytotoxins. Global regulatory genes such as gacS modulate phytotoxin production in certain pathovars, indicating the complexity of the regulatory circuits controlling phytotoxin synthesis. The coronatine and syringomycin gene clusters have been intensively characterized and show potential for constructing modified polyketides and peptides. Genetic reprogramming of peptide and polyketide synthetases has been successful, and portions of the coronatine and syringomycin gene clusters could be valuable resources in developing new antimicrobial agents. PMID:10357851

  2. A NONSTEADY STATE MODEL FOR THE TIGHT-BINDING INHIBITION OF THYMIDYLATE SYNTHETASE BY 5-FLUOROURACIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    5-Fluorouracil (5_FU) is a widely used chemotherapeutic drug and tratogen that was chosen as a prototypic toxicant to contruct a biologically based dose-resonse (BBDR) model (Setzer et. al., 2001). Part of the BBDR model simulates the inhibition of thymidylate synthetase (TS), a...

  3. Activation of chitin synthetase in permeabilized cells of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking proteinase B.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, M P; Correa, J U; Cabib, E

    1982-01-01

    Digitonin treatment at 30 degrees C of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking proteinase B permeabilized the cells and caused rapid and extensive activation of chitin synthetase in situ. The same result was obtained with a mutant generally defective in vacuolar proteases. By lowering the temperature and using different permeabilization procedures, we showed that increases in permeability and activation are distinct processes. Activation was inhibited by the protease inhibitors antipain and leupeptin, but by pepstatin or chymostatin. Metal chelators were also inhibitory, and their effect was reversed by the addition of Ca2+ but not by Mg2+. Antipain added together with Ca2+ after incubation of the cells in the presence of a chelating agent prevented reversal of inhibition, a result that was interpreted as indicating that antipain acts either on the same step affected by Ca2+ or on a subsequent step. Efforts to obtain activation in cell-free extracts were unsuccessful, but it was possible to extract the synthetase, once activated, by breaking permeabilized cells with glass beads. Treatment of the cell-free extracts with trypsin led not only to increased activity of chitin synthetase, but also to a change in the pH-activity curve and a diminished requirement by the enzyme for free N-acetylglucosamine. These observations suggest that the modification undergone by the synthetase during endogenous activation is different from that brought about by trypsin treatment. Images PMID:6216245

  4. Nucleotide synthetase ribozymes may have emerged first in the RNA world

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wentao; Yu, Chunwu; Zhang, Wentao; Hu, Jiming

    2007-01-01

    Though the “RNA world” hypothesis has gained a central role in ideas concerning the origin of life, the scenario concerning its emergence remains uncertain. It has been speculated that the first scene may have been the emergence of a template-dependent RNA synthetase ribozyme, which catalyzed its own replication: thus, “RNA replicase.” However, the speculation remains uncertain, primarily because of the large sequence length requirement of such a replicase and the lack of a convincing mechanism to ensure its self-favoring features. Instead, we propose a nucleotide synthetase ribozyme as an alternative candidate, especially considering recent experimental evidence suggesting the possibility of effective nonenzymatic template-directed synthesis of RNA. A computer simulation was conducted to support our proposal. The conditions for the emergence of the nucleotide synthetase ribozyme are discussed, based on dynamic analysis on a computer. We suggest the template-dependent RNA synthetase ribozyme emerged later, perhaps after the emergence of protocells. PMID:17878321

  5. Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase activity affects growth and riboflavin production in Ashbya gossypii

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Alberto; Santos, María A; Revuelta, José L

    2008-01-01

    Background Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (PRPP) is a central compound for cellular metabolism and may be considered as a link between carbon and nitrogen metabolism. PRPP is directly involved in the de novo and salvage biosynthesis of GTP, which is the immediate precursor of riboflavin. The industrial production of this vitamin using the fungus Ashbya gossypii is an important biotechnological process that is strongly influenced by substrate availability. Results Here we describe the characterization and manipulation of two genes of A. gossypii encoding PRPP synthetase (AGR371C and AGL080C). We show that the AGR371C and AGL080C gene products participate in PRPP synthesis and exhibit inhibition by ADP. We also observed a major contribution of AGL080C to total PRPP synthetase activity, which was confirmed by an evident growth defect of the Δagl080c strain. Moreover, we report the overexpression of wild-type and mutant deregulated isoforms of Agr371cp and Agl080cp that significantly enhanced the production of riboflavin in the engineered A. gossypii strains. Conclusion It is shown that alterations in PRPP synthetase activity have pleiotropic effects on the fungal growth pattern and that an increase in PRPP synthetase enzymatic activity can be used to enhance riboflavin production in A. gossypii. PMID:18782443

  6. Role of Jo-1 in the Immunopathogenesis of the Anti-synthetase Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ascherman, Dana P

    2015-09-01

    Histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HRS = Jo-1) represents a key autoantibody target in the anti-synthetase syndrome that is marked by myositis as well as extra-muscular organ complications including interstitial lung disease (ILD). Over the last 25 years, a wealth of clinical, epidemiological, genetic, and experimental data have collectively supported a role for Jo-1 in mediating deleterious cell-mediated, adaptive immune responses contributing to the disease phenotype of the anti-synthetase syndrome. Complementing these studies, more recent work suggests that unique, non-enzymatic functional properties of Jo-1 also endow this antigen with the capacity to activate components of the innate immune system, particularly cell surface as well as endosomal Toll-like receptors and their downstream signaling pathways. Combining these facets of Jo-1-mediated immunity now supports a more integrated model of disease pathogenesis that should lead to improved therapeutic targeting in the anti-synthetase syndrome and related subsets of idiopathic inflammatory myopathy.

  7. Mutational analysis of the N-methyltransferase domain of the multifunctional enzyme enniatin synthetase.

    PubMed

    Hacker, C; Glinski, M; Hornbogen, T; Doller, A; Zocher, R

    2000-10-01

    N-Methylcyclopeptides like cyclosporins and enniatins are synthesized by multifunctional enzymes representing hybrid systems of peptide synthetases and S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet)-dependent N-methyltransferases. The latter constitute a new family of N-methyltransferases sharing high homology within procaryotes and eucaryotes. Here we describe the mutational analysis of the N-methyltransferase domain of enniatin synthetase from Fusarium scirpi to gain insight into the assembly of the AdoMet-binding site. The role of four conserved motifs (I, (2085)VLEIGTGSGMIL; II/Y, (2105)SYVGLDPS; IV, (2152)DLVVFNSVVQYFTPPEYL; and V, (2194)ATNGHFLAARA) in cofactor binding as measured by photolabeling was studied. Deletion of the first 21 N-terminal amino acid residues of the N-methyltransferase domain did not affect AdoMet binding. Further shortening close to motif I resulted in loss of binding activity. Truncation of 38 amino acids from the C terminus and also internal deletions containing motif V led to complete loss of AdoMet-binding activity. Point mutations converting the conserved Tyr(223) (corresponding to position 2106 in enniatin synthetase) in motif II/Y (close to motif I) into Val, Ala, and Ser, respectively, strongly diminished AdoMet binding, whereas conversion of this residue to Phe restored AdoMet-binding activity to approximately 70%, indicating that Tyr(223) is important for AdoMet binding and that the aromatic Tyr(223) may be crucial for AdoMet binding in N-methylpeptide synthetases.

  8. Functional analysis of a pyoverdine synthetase from Pseudomonas sp. MIS38.

    PubMed

    Lim, Siew Ping; Roongsawang, Niran; Washio, Kenji; Morikawa, Masaaki

    2007-08-01

    Fluorescent Pseudomonas sp. MIS38 produces a cyclic lipopeptide, arthrofactin. Arthrofactin is synthesized by a unique nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) with dual C/E-domains. In this study, another class of cyclic peptide, pyoverdine, was isolated from MIS38, viz., Pvd38. The main fraction of Pvd38 had an m/z value of 1,064.57 and contained Ala, Glu, Gly, (OHOrn), Ser, and Thr at a ratio of 2:1:1:(1):1:1 in the peptide part, suggesting a new structure compound. A gene encoding NRPS for the chromophore part of Pvd38 was identified, and we found that it contained a conventional E-domain. Gene disruption completely impaired the production of Pvd38, demonstrating that the synthetase is functional. This observation allows us to conclude that different NRPS systems with dual C/E-domains (in arthrofactin synthetase) and a conventional E-domain (in pyoverdine synthetase) are both functional in MIS38. PMID:17690457

  9. Effects of univalent cations on the activity of particulate starch synthetase.

    PubMed

    Nitsos, R E; Evans, H J

    1969-09-01

    An investigation was made to determine the univalent cation requirements of starch synthetase from a variety of plant species of economic importance. The particulate enzyme from sweet corn was shown to have an absolute requirement for potassium, with the optimum activation occurring at 0.05 M KCl. Rubidium, cesium, and ammonium were 80% as effective as potassium while sodium and lithium were respectively 21% and 8% as effective as potassium. The K(A) for potassium was determined to be 6 mM. In the case of the particulate starch synthetase from wheat, bush beans, field corn, soybeans, peas, or potatoes, considerable stimulation of enzyme activity was obtained by the addition of potassium to the reaction mixture. In these studies, low enzyme activity was observed in the absence of added potassium, but the content of endogenous univalent cations in the reactions may be sufficient to account for the activities observed. Anions of various types had no effect on starch synthetase activity. Divalent cations produced slight activation in the presence or absence of potassium. All efforts to show a potassium requirement for glycogen synthetase from rat liver have been negative.

  10. Asparagine Synthesis in Pea Leaves, and the Occurrence of an Asparagine Synthetase Inhibitor 1

    PubMed Central

    Joy, Kenneth W.; Ireland, Robert J.; Lea, Peter J.

    1983-01-01

    Asparagine is present in the mature leaves of young pea (Pisum sativum cv Little Marvel) seedlings, and is synthesized in detached shoots. This accumulation and synthesis is greatly enhanced by darkening. In detached control shoots, [14C]aspartate was metabolized predominantly to organic acids and, as other workers have shown, there was little labeling of asparagine (after 5 hours, 3.1% of metabolized label). Addition of the aminotransferase inhibitor aminooxyacetate decreased the flow of aspartate carbon to organic acids and enhanced (about 3-fold) the labeling of asparagine. The same treatment applied to darkened shoots resulted in a substantial conversion of [14C]aspartate to asparagine, over 10-fold greater than in control shoots (66% of metabolized label), suggesting that aspartate is the normal precursor of asparagine. Only traces of glutamine-dependent asparagine synthetase activity could be detected in pea leaf or root extracts; activity was not enhanced by sulfhydryl reagents, oxidizing conditions, or protease inhibitors. Asparagine synthetase is readily extracted from lupin cotyledons, but yield was greatly reduced by extraction in the presence of pea leaf tissue; pea leaf homogenates contained an inhibitor which produced over 95% inhibition of an asparagine synthetase preparation from lupin cotyledons. The inhibitor was heat stable, with a low molecular weight. Presence of an inhibitor may prevent detection of asparagine synthetase in pea extracts and in Asparagus, where a cyanide-dependent pathway has been proposed to account for asparagine synthesis: an inhibitor with similar properties was present in Asparagus shoot tissue. PMID:16663168

  11. Identification and molecular characterization of acyl-CoA synthetase in human erythrocytes and erythroid precursors.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, K T; Malhotra, K; Lubin, B H; Kuypers, F A

    1999-11-15

    Full-length cDNA species encoding two forms of acyl-CoA synthetase from a K-562 human erythroleukaemic cell line were cloned, sequenced and expressed. The first form, named long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 5 (LACS5), was found to be a novel, unreported, human acyl-CoA synthetase with high similarity to rat brain ACS2 (91% identical). The second form (66% identical with LACS5) was 97% identical with human liver LACS1. The LACS5 gene encodes a highly expressed 2.9 kb mRNA transcript in human haemopoietic stem cells from cord blood, bone marrow, reticulocytes and fetal blood cells derived from fetal liver. An additional 6.3 kb transcript is also found in these erythrocyte precursors; 2.9 and 9.6 kb transcripts of LACS5 are found in human brain, but transcripts are virtually absent from human heart, kidney, liver, lung, pancreas, spleen and skeletal muscle. The 78 kDa expressed LACS5 protein used the long-chain fatty acids palmitic acid, oleic acid and arachidonic acid as substrates. Antibodies directed against LACS5 cross-reacted with erythrocyte membranes. We conclude that early erythrocyte precursors express at least two different forms of acyl-CoA synthetase and that LACS5 is present in mature erythrocyte plasma membranes.

  12. The effect of portacaval anastomosis on the expression of glutamine synthetase and ornithine aminotransferase in perivenous hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Robin; Levillain, Oliver; Brosnan, John T; Araneda, Silvia; Brosnan, Margaret E

    2013-05-01

    There is functional zonation of metabolism across the liver acinus, with glutamine synthetase restricted to a narrow band of cells around the terminal hepatic venules. Portacaval anastomosis, where there is a major rerouting of portal blood flow from the portal vein directly to the vena cava bypassing the liver, has been reported to result in a marked decrease in the activity of glutamine synthetase. It is not known whether this represents a loss of perivenous hepatocytes or whether there is a specific loss of glutamine synthetase. To answer this question, we have determined the activity of glutamine synthetase and another enzyme from the perivenous compartment, ornithine aminotransferase, as well as the immunochemical localization of both glutamine synthetase and ornithine aminotransferase in rats with a portacaval shunt. The portacaval shunt caused a marked decrease in glutamine synthetase activity and an increase in ornithine aminotransferase activity. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the glutamine synthetase and ornithine aminotransferase proteins maintained their location in the perivenous cells. These results indicate that there is no generalized loss of perivenous hepatocytes, but rather, there is a significant alteration in the expression of these proteins and hence metabolism in this cell population. PMID:23656379

  13. The effect of portacaval anastomosis on the expression of glutamine synthetase and ornithine aminotransferase in perivenous hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Robin; Levillain, Oliver; Brosnan, John T; Araneda, Silvia; Brosnan, Margaret E

    2013-05-01

    There is functional zonation of metabolism across the liver acinus, with glutamine synthetase restricted to a narrow band of cells around the terminal hepatic venules. Portacaval anastomosis, where there is a major rerouting of portal blood flow from the portal vein directly to the vena cava bypassing the liver, has been reported to result in a marked decrease in the activity of glutamine synthetase. It is not known whether this represents a loss of perivenous hepatocytes or whether there is a specific loss of glutamine synthetase. To answer this question, we have determined the activity of glutamine synthetase and another enzyme from the perivenous compartment, ornithine aminotransferase, as well as the immunochemical localization of both glutamine synthetase and ornithine aminotransferase in rats with a portacaval shunt. The portacaval shunt caused a marked decrease in glutamine synthetase activity and an increase in ornithine aminotransferase activity. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the glutamine synthetase and ornithine aminotransferase proteins maintained their location in the perivenous cells. These results indicate that there is no generalized loss of perivenous hepatocytes, but rather, there is a significant alteration in the expression of these proteins and hence metabolism in this cell population.

  14. Phosphorylation of Human CTP Synthetase 1 by Protein Kinase A: IDENTIFICATION OF Thr455 AS A MAJOR SITE OF PHOSPHORYLATION*

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Mal-Gi; Carman, George M.

    2007-01-01

    CTP synthetase is an essential enzyme that generates the CTP required for the synthesis of nucleic acids and membrane phospholipids. In this work, we examined the phosphorylation of the human CTPS1-encoded CTP synthetase 1 by protein kinase A. CTP synthetase 1 was expressed and purified from a Saccharomyces cerevisiae ura7Δ ura8Δ double mutant that lacks CTP synthetase activity. Using purified CTP synthetase 1 as a substrate, protein kinase A activity was time- and dose-dependent. The phosphorylation, which primarily occurred on a threonine residue, was accompanied by a 50% decrease in CTP synthetase 1 activity. The synthetic peptide LGKRRTLFQT that contains the protein kinase A motif for Thr455 was a substrate for protein kinase A. A Thr455 to Ala (T455A) mutation in CTP synthetase 1 was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis and was expressed and purified from the S. cerevisiae ura7Δ ura8Δ mutant. The T455A mutation caused a 78% decrease in protein kinase A phosphorylation, and the loss of the phosphothreonine residue and a major phosphopeptide that were present in the purified wild type enzyme phosphorylated by protein kinase A. The CTP synthetase 1 activity of the T455A mutant enzyme was 2-fold higher than the wild type enzyme. In addition, the T455A mutation caused a 44% decrease in the amount of human CTP synthetase 1 that was phosphorylated in S. cerevisiae cells, and this was accompanied by a 2.5-fold increase in the cellular concentration of CTP and a 1.5-fold increase in the choline-dependent synthesis of phosphatidylcholine. PMID:17189248

  15. Regulation of the intersubunit ammonia tunnel in Mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine-dependent NAD[superscript +] synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Chuenchor, Watchalee; Doukov, Tzanko I.; Resto, Melissa; Chang, Andrew; Gerratana, Barbara

    2012-08-31

    Glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase is an essential enzyme and a validated drug target in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (mtuNadE). It catalyses the ATP-dependent formation of NAD{sup +} from NaAD{sup +} (nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide) at the synthetase active site and glutamine hydrolysis at the glutaminase active site. An ammonia tunnel 40 {angstrom} (1 {angstrom} = 0.1 nm) long allows transfer of ammonia from one active site to the other. The enzyme displays stringent kinetic synergism; however, its regulatory mechanism is unclear. In the present paper, we report the structures of the inactive glutaminase C176A variant in an apo form and in three synthetase-ligand complexes with substrates (NaAD{sup +}/ATP), substrate analogue {l_brace}NaAD{sup +}/AMP-CPP (adenosine 5'-[{alpha},{beta}-methylene]triphosphate){r_brace} and intermediate analogues (NaAD{sup +}/AMP/PPi), as well as the structure of wild-type mtuNadE in a product complex (NAD{sup +}/AMP/PPi/glutamate). This series of structures provides snapshots of the ammonia tunnel during the catalytic cycle supported also by kinetics and mutagenesis studies. Three major constriction sites are observed in the tunnel: (i) at the entrance near the glutaminase active site; (ii) in the middle of the tunnel; and (iii) at the end near the synthetase active site. Variation in the number and radius of the tunnel constrictions is apparent in the crystal structures and is related to ligand binding at the synthetase domain. These results provide new insight into the regulation of ammonia transport in the intermolecular tunnel of mtuNadE.

  16. The effect of glial glutamine synthetase inhibition on recognition and temporal memories in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kant, Deepika; Tripathi, Shweta; Qureshi, Munazah F; Tripathi, Shweta; Pandey, Swati; Singh, Gunjan; Kumar, Tankesh; Mir, Fayaz A; Jha, Sushil K

    2014-02-01

    The glutamate neurotransmitter is intrinsically involved in learning and memory. Glial glutamine synthetase enzyme synthesizes glutamine, which helps maintain the optimal neuronal glutamate level. However, the role of glutamine synthetase in learning and memory remains unclear. Using associative trace learning task, we investigated the effects of methionine sulfoximine (MSO) (glutamine synthetase inhibitor) on recognition and temporal memories. MSO and vehicle were injected (i.p.) three hours before training in separate groups of male Wistar rats (n=11). Animals were trained to obtain fruit juice after following a set of sequential events. Initially, house-light was presented for 15s followed by 5s trace interval. Thereafter, juice was given for 20s followed by 20s inter-presentation interval. A total of 75 presentations were made over five sessions during the training and testing periods. The average number of head entries to obtain juice per session and during individual phases at different time intervals was accounted as an outcome measure of recognition and temporal memories. The total head entries in MSO and vehicle treated animals were comparable on training and testing days. However, it was 174.90% (p=0.08), 270.61% (p<0.05), 143.20% (p<0.05) more on training day and 270.33% (p<0.05), 157.94% (p<0.05), 170.42% (p<0.05) more on testing day, during the house-light, trace-interval and inter-presentation interval phases in MSO animals. Glutamine synthetase inhibition did not induce recognition memory deficit, while temporal memory was altered, suggesting that glutamine synthetase modulates some aspects of mnemonic processes.

  17. Effect of treatment on erythrocyte phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase and glutathione reductase activity in patients with primary gout.

    PubMed Central

    Braven, J; Hardwell, T R; Hickling, P; Whittaker, M

    1986-01-01

    The activities of erythrocyte phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (PRPP) synthetase and glutathione reductase (GTR) were studied in 26 patients with primary gout who were receiving no treatment or treatment with either allopurinol or azapropazone, and compared with the activity in a group of healthy controls. The activity of PRPP synthetase was significantly higher in the gout group and was not influenced by either drug. No significant difference in the activity of GTR was observed. The failure of either drug to suppress the increased activity of PRPP synthetase associated with gout is discussed. PMID:3024593

  18. Active site nanospace of aminoacyl tRNA synthetase: difference between the class I and class II synthetases.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Saheb; Choudhury, Kaberi; Banik, Sindrila Dutta; Nandi, Nilashis

    2014-03-01

    The present work is aimed at understanding the origin of the difference in the molecular organization of the active site nanospaces of the class I and class II aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) which are tunnel-like structures. The active site encloses the cognate amino acid (AA) and the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to carry out aminoacylation reaction. Comparison of the structures of the active site of the class I and class II (aaRSs) shows that the nanodimensional tunnels are curved in opposite directions in the two classes. We investigated the origin of this difference using quantum mechanical computation of electrostatic potential (ESP) of substrates, surrounding residues and ions, using Atoms in Molecule (AIM) Theory and charge population analysis. We show that the difference is principally due to the variation in the spatial charge distribution of ATP in the two classes which correspond to extended and bent conformations of ATP. The present computation shows that the most feasible pathway for nucleophilic attack to alphaP is oppositely directed for class I and class II aaRSs. The available crystal structures show that the cognate AA is indeed located along the channel favorable for nucleophilic attack as predicted by the ESP analysis. It is also shown that the direction of the channel changes its orientation when the orientation of ATP is changed from extended to a bent like structure. We further used the AIM theory to confirm the direction of the approach of AA in each case and the results corroborate the results from the ESP analysis. The opposite curvatures of the active site nanospaces in class I and class II aaRSs are related with the influence of the charge distributions of the extended and bent conformations of ATP, respectively. The results of the computation of electrostatic potential by successive addition of active site residues show that their roles on the reaction are similar in both classes despite the difference in the organization of the

  19. Preparation of the multienzyme system gramicidin S-synthetase 2 with an aqueous three-phase system.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, A; Simonis, M; von Döhren, H

    1987-06-19

    The distribution of gramicidin S-synthetase activity from disrupted cells suspended in aqueous two- and three-phase systems was investigated. An optimized three-phase system containing 5% dextran, 8% Ficoll, 11% PEG and 6.7% disrupted cells was found to be effective in extracting gramicidin S-synthetase activity. The activity yield achieved was higher in comparison to other preparation methods, and the subsequent purification steps were greatly facilitated. The time needed for the preparation of the labile gramicidin S-synthetase was considerably reduced. The combination of the aqueous phase extraction with chromatographic methods yielded 19 mg gramicidin S-synthetase 2 in essentially pure form from 30 g (wet weight) of cells.

  20. Effects of experimental hypo- and hyperthyroidism on hepatic long-chain fatty acyl-CoA synthetase and hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Dang, A Q; Faas, F H; Carter, W J

    1989-07-01

    The effects of T3 treatment and thyroidectomy on rat liver microsomal long-chain fatty acyl-CoA (LCFA-CoA) synthetase and LCFA-CoA hydrolase activities were determined. Hyperthyroid rats had a 36-42% decrease in LCFA-CoA synthetase with no change in hydrolase activity. This may contribute to the redirection of fatty acids from esterification to oxidation reactions in hyperthyroidism. Thyroidectomized rats had a 40-44% decrease in synthetase and a 27-42% decrease in LCFA-CoA hydrolase activity. The decrease in both LCFA-CoA synthetase and hydrolase activities in hypothyroidism may indicate that the LCFA-CoA turnover in this futile cycle is decreased in the liver.

  1. Compositions of orthogonal lysyl-tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pairs and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, J. Christopher; Wu, Ning; Santoro, Stephen; Schultz, Peter G

    2014-03-11

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal lysyl-tRNAs, orthogonal lysyl-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of lysyl-tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate homoglutamines into proteins are provided in response to a four base codon. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with homoglutamines using these orthogonal pairs.

  2. Compositions of orthogonal lysyl-tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pairs and uses thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J. Christopher; Wu, Ning; Santoro, Stephen; Schultz, Peter G.

    2009-08-18

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal lysyl-tRNAs, orthogonal lysyl-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of lysyl-tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate homoglutamines into proteins are provided in response to a four base codon. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with homoglutamines using these orthogonal pairs.

  3. Peptides from aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases can cure the defects due to mutations in mt tRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Francisci, Silvia; Montanari, Arianna; De Luca, Cristina; Frontali, Laura

    2011-11-01

    Recent results from several laboratories have confirmed that human and yeast leucyl- and valyl-tRNA synthetases can rescue the respiratory defects due to mutations in mitochondrial tRNA genes. In this report we show that this effect cannot be ascribed to the catalytic activity per se and that isolated domains of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and even short peptides thereof have suppressing effects.

  4. Compositions of orthogonal lysyl-tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pairs and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, J. Christopher; Wu, Ning; Santoro, Stephen; Schultz, Peter G.

    2011-10-04

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal lysyl-tRNAs, orthogonal lysyl-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of lysyl-tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate homoglutamines into proteins are provided in response to a four base codon. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with homoglutamines using these orthogonal pairs.

  5. Compositions of orthogonal lysyl-tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pairs and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, J. Christopher; Wu, Ning; Santoro, Stephen; Schultz, Peter G.

    2009-12-29

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal lysyl-tRNAs, orthogonal lysyl-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of lysyl-tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate homoglutamines into proteins are provided in response to a four base codon. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with homoglutamines using these orthogonal pairs.

  6. [Inhibition of glutamine synthetase activity by biologically active derivatives of glutamic acid].

    PubMed

    Firsova, N A; Selivanova, K M; Alekseeva, L V; Evstigneeva, Z G

    1986-05-01

    The inhibition of activity of glutamine synthetase from Chlorella and porcine brain by 4-hydroxy-D-4-fluoro-D,L- and 4-amino-D,L-glutamic acids diastereoisomers was studied. Each compound was shown to exert the same inhibiting effect on glutamine synthetase from both sources. In case of threo-4-hydroxy-D-glutamic acid the inhibition of the Chlorella enzyme was of a competitive and of a completely mixed type. The enzyme inhibition by 4-fluoro-D, L-glutamic acids seemed to be of a completely non-competitive type. The Ki values for all inhibition reactions were determined. A comparison of biochemical parameters and biological activity revealed that the most effective inhibitors of the enzyme exert a most potent antitumour and antiviral action.

  7. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase dependent angiogenesis revealed by a bioengineered macrolide inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Mirando, Adam C; Fang, Pengfei; Williams, Tamara F; Baldor, Linda C; Howe, Alan K; Ebert, Alicia M; Wilkinson, Barrie; Lounsbury, Karen M; Guo, Min; Francklyn, Christopher S

    2015-08-14

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) catalyze an early step in protein synthesis, but also regulate diverse physiological processes in animal cells. These include angiogenesis, and human threonyl-tRNA synthetase (TARS) represents a potent pro-angiogenic AARS. Angiogenesis stimulation can be blocked by the macrolide antibiotic borrelidin (BN), which exhibits a broad spectrum toxicity that has discouraged deeper investigation. Recently, a less toxic variant (BC194) was identified that potently inhibits angiogenesis. Employing biochemical, cell biological, and biophysical approaches, we demonstrate that the toxicity of BN and its derivatives is linked to its competition with the threonine substrate at the molecular level, which stimulates amino acid starvation and apoptosis. By separating toxicity from the inhibition of angiogenesis, a direct role for TARS in vascular development in the zebrafish could be demonstrated. Bioengineered natural products are thus useful tools in unmasking the cryptic functions of conventional enzymes in the regulation of complex processes in higher metazoans.

  8. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase dependent angiogenesis revealed by a bioengineered macrolide inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Mirando, Adam C.; Fang, Pengfei; Williams, Tamara F.; Baldor, Linda C.; Howe, Alan K.; Ebert, Alicia M.; Wilkinson, Barrie; Lounsbury, Karen M.; Guo, Min; Francklyn, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) catalyze an early step in protein synthesis, but also regulate diverse physiological processes in animal cells. These include angiogenesis, and human threonyl-tRNA synthetase (TARS) represents a potent pro-angiogenic AARS. Angiogenesis stimulation can be blocked by the macrolide antibiotic borrelidin (BN), which exhibits a broad spectrum toxicity that has discouraged deeper investigation. Recently, a less toxic variant (BC194) was identified that potently inhibits angiogenesis. Employing biochemical, cell biological, and biophysical approaches, we demonstrate that the toxicity of BN and its derivatives is linked to its competition with the threonine substrate at the molecular level, which stimulates amino acid starvation and apoptosis. By separating toxicity from the inhibition of angiogenesis, a direct role for TARS in vascular development in the zebrafish could be demonstrated. Bioengineered natural products are thus useful tools in unmasking the cryptic functions of conventional enzymes in the regulation of complex processes in higher metazoans. PMID:26271225

  9. Multistep modeling of protein structure: application towards refinement of tyr-tRNA synthetase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, S.; Shibata, M.; Roychoudhury, M.; Rein, R.

    1987-01-01

    The scope of multistep modeling (MSM) is expanding by adding a least-squares minimization step in the procedure to fit backbone reconstruction consistent with a set of C-alpha coordinates. The analytical solution of Phi and Psi angles, that fits a C-alpha x-ray coordinate is used for tyr-tRNA synthetase. Phi and Psi angles for the region where the above mentioned method fails, are obtained by minimizing the difference in C-alpha distances between the computed model and the crystal structure in a least-squares sense. We present a stepwise application of this part of MSM to the determination of the complete backbone geometry of the 321 N terminal residues of tyrosine tRNA synthetase to a root mean square deviation of 0.47 angstroms from the crystallographic C-alpha coordinates.

  10. Inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum dihydropteroate synthetase and growth in vitro by sulfa drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y; Meshnick, S R

    1991-01-01

    The Michaelis-Menten inhibitory constants (Kis) and the concentrations required for 50% inhibition of the Plasmodium falciparum dihydropteroate synthetase were determined for six sulfa drugs. These drugs inhibited the in vitro growth of P. falciparum (50% lethal concentration) at concentrations of 30 to 500 nM; these concentrations were 100 to 1,000 times lower than the concentrations required for 50% inhibition and Kis (6 to 500 microM). The uptake of p-aminobenzoic acid was not inhibited by the sulfa drugs. However, infected erythrocytes took up more labeled sulfamethoxazole than did uninfected erythrocytes. Thus, the concentration of sulfa drugs by malaria parasites may explain how sulfa drugs inhibit in vitro growth of parasites through the inhibition of dihydropteroate synthetase. PMID:2024960

  11. Recoding aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases for synthetic biology by rational protein-RNA engineering.

    PubMed

    Hadd, Andrew; Perona, John J

    2014-12-19

    We have taken a rational approach to redesigning the amino acid binding and aminoacyl-tRNA pairing specificities of bacterial glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase. The four-stage engineering incorporates generalizable design principles and improves the pairing efficiency of noncognate glutamate with tRNA(Gln) by over 10(5)-fold compared to the wild-type enzyme. Better optimized designs of the protein-RNA complex include substantial reengineering of the globular core region of the tRNA, demonstrating a role for specific tRNA nucleotides in specifying the identity of the genetically encoded amino acid. Principles emerging from this engineering effort open new prospects for combining rational and genetic selection approaches to design novel aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that ligate noncanonical amino acids onto tRNAs. This will facilitate reconstruction of the cellular translation apparatus for applications in synthetic biology. PMID:25310879

  12. Effects of aeration on formation and localization of the acetyl coenzyme A synthetases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, H. P.; Jahnke, L.

    1979-01-01

    Previous studies on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have shown that two different forms of the enzyme acetyl coenzyme A synthetase (ACS) are present, depending on the conditions under which the cells are grown. The paper evaluates the usefulness of a method designed to assay both synthetases simultaneously in yeast homogenates. The data presented confirm the possibility of simultaneous detection and estimation of the amount of both ACSs of S. cerevisiae in crude homogenates of this strain, making possible the study of physiological factors involved in the formation of these isoenzymes. One important factor for specifying which of the two enzymes is found in these yeast cells is the presence or absence of oxygen in their environment. Aeration not only affects the ratio of the two ACSs but also appears to affect the cellular distribution of these enzymes. Most of the data presented suggest the possibility that the nonaerobic ACS may serve as a precursor to the aerobic form.

  13. Reassimilation of Photorespiratory Ammonium in Lotus japonicus Plants Deficient in Plastidic Glutamine Synthetase.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Delgado, Carmen M; García-Calderón, Margarita; Márquez, Antonio J; Betti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that the plastidic isoform of glutamine synthetase (GS2) is the enzyme in charge of photorespiratory ammonium reassimilation in plants. The metabolic events associated to photorespiratory NH4(+) accumulation were analyzed in a Lotus japonicus photorespiratory mutant lacking GS2. The mutant plants accumulated high levels of NH4(+) when photorespiration was active, followed by a sudden drop in the levels of this compound. In this paper it was examined the possible existence of enzymatic pathways alternative to GS2 that could account for this decline in the photorespiratory ammonium. Induction of genes encoding for cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GS1), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and asparagine synthetase (ASN) was observed in the mutant in correspondence with the diminishment of NH4(+). Measurements of gene expression, polypeptide levels, enzyme activity and metabolite levels were carried out in leaf samples from WT and mutant plants after different periods of time under active photorespiratory conditions. In the case of asparagine synthetase it was not possible to determine enzyme activity and polypeptide content; however, an increased asparagine content in parallel with the induction of ASN gene expression was detected in the mutant plants. This increase in asparagine levels took place concomitantly with an increase in glutamine due to the induction of cytosolic GS1 in the mutant, thus revealing a major role of cytosolic GS1 in the reassimilation and detoxification of photorespiratory NH4(+) when the plastidic GS2 isoform is lacking. Moreover, a diminishment in glutamate levels was observed, that may be explained by the induction of NAD(H)-dependent GDH activity.

  14. Glutamine synthetase immunor present in oligodendroglia of regions of the central nervous system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Amelio, Fernando; Eng, Lawrence F.; Gibbs, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase immunoreactive oligodendrocytes were identified in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, brain stem, and spinal cord. They were mostly confined to the gray matter, particularly close to neurons and processes. The white matter showed few immunoreactive oligodendroglia. It was suggested that some type of oligodendrocytes, specially those in perineuronal location, might fulfill a functional role more akin to astrocytes than to the normally myelinating oligodendroglia.

  15. Glutamine synthetase immunoreactivity is present in oligodendroglia of various regions of the central nervous system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Amelio, F.; Eng, L. F.; Gibbs, M. A.

    1990-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase immunoreactive oligodendrocytes were identified in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, brain stem, and spinal cord. They were mostly confined to the gray matter, particularly close to neurons and processes. The white matter showed few immunoreactive oligodendroglia. It was suggested that some type of oligodendrocytes, specially those in perineuronal location, might fulfill a functional role more akin to astrocytes than to the normally myelinating oligodendroglia.

  16. What is the oligoadenylate synthetases-like protein and does it have therapeutic potential for influenza?

    PubMed Central

    Alcorn, John F.; Sarkar, Saumendra N.

    2015-01-01

    Besides its pandemic potential, seasonal influenza infection is associated with an estimated 250,000 to 500,000 deaths worldwide every year. Part of this virulence of influenza virus can be attributed to its ability to evade the host innate immune response. Here we discuss the possibility of using a recently described mechanism of boosting the innate immunity by oligoadenylate synthetase-like protein, to combat influenza infections. PMID:25544107

  17. Glutamine synthetase gene expression during the regeneration of the annelid Enchytraeus japonensis.

    PubMed

    Niva, Cintia Carla; Lee, Jae Min; Myohara, Maroko

    2008-01-01

    Enchytraeus japonensis is a highly regenerative oligochaete annelid that can regenerate a complete individual from a small body fragment in 4-5 days. In our previous study, we performed complementary deoxyribonucleic acid subtraction cloning to isolate genes that are upregulated during E. japonensis regeneration and identified glutamine synthetase (gs) as one of the most abundantly expressed genes during this process. In the present study, we show that the full-length sequence of E. japonensis glutamine synthetase (EjGS), which is the first reported annelid glutamine synthetase, is highly similar to other known class II glutamine synthetases. EjGS shows a 61-71% overall amino acid sequence identity with its counterparts in various other animal species, including Drosophila and mouse. We performed detailed expression analysis by in situ hybridization and reveal that strong gs expression occurs in the blastemal regions of regenerating E. japonensis soon after amputation. gs expression was detectable at the cell layer covering the wound and was found to persist in the epidermal cells during the formation and elongation of the blastema. Furthermore, in the elongated blastema, gs expression was detectable also in the presumptive regions of the brain, ventral nerve cord, and stomodeum. In the fully formed intact head, gs expression was also evident in the prostomium, brain, the anterior end of the ventral nerve cord, the epithelium of buccal and pharyngeal cavities, the pharyngeal pad, and in the esophageal appendages. In intact E. japonensis tails, gs expression was found in the growth zone in actively growing worms but not in full-grown individuals. In the nonblastemal regions of regenerating fragments and in intact worms, gs expression was also detected in the nephridia, chloragocytes, gut epithelium, epidermis, spermatids, and oocytes. These results suggest that EjGS may play roles in regeneration, nerve function, cell proliferation, nitrogenous waste excretion

  18. Tryptophan boost caused by senescence occurred independently of cytoplasmic glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Park, Sangkyu; Lee, Kyungjin; Kang, Kiyoon; Kim, Young Soon; Lee, Sungbeom; Kweon, Soon-Jong; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2010-01-01

    We examined to determine whether senescence-induced tryptophan levels are positively associated with levels of glutamine synthetase (GS1), the initial enzyme in tryptophan biosynthesis. We generated transgenic rice plants in which GS1 was suppressed by RNA interference technology. The transgenic line showed a dramatic decrease in GS1 protein and glutamine content, but the levels of tryptophan and mRNA of the key tryptophan biosynthetic genes upon senescence were comparable to those of the wild type.

  19. Crystal structure of a human aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase cytokine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiang-Lei; Skene, Robert J; McRee, Duncan E; Schimmel, Paul

    2002-11-26

    The 20 aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases catalyze the first step of protein synthesis and establish the rules of the genetic code through aminoacylation reactions. Biological fragments of two human enzymes, tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS) and tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase, connect protein synthesis to cell-signaling pathways including angiogenesis. Alternative splicing or proteolysis produces these fragments. The proangiogenic N-terminal fragment mini-TyrRS has IL-8-like cytokine activity that, like other CXC cytokines, depends on a Glu-Leu-Arg motif. Point mutations in this motif abolish cytokine activity. The full-length native TyrRS lacks cytokine activity. No structure has been available for any mammalian tRNA synthetase that, in turn, might give insight into why mini-TyrRS and not TyrRS has cytokine activities. Here, the structure of human mini-TyrRS, which contains both the catalytic and the anticodon recognition domain, is reported to a resolution of 1.18 A. The critical Glu-Leu-Arg motif is located on an internal alpha-helix of the catalytic domain, where the guanidino side chain of R is part of a hydrogen-bonding network tethering the anticodon-recognition domain back to the catalytic site. Whereas the catalytic domains of the human and bacterial enzymes superimpose, the spatial disposition of the anticodon recognition domain relative to the catalytic domain is unique in mini-TyrRS relative to the bacterial orthologs. This unique orientation of the anticodon-recognition domain can explain why the fragment mini-TyrRS, and not full-length native TyrRS, is active in cytokine-signaling pathways. PMID:12427973

  20. Differential inactivation of alfalfa nodule glutamine synthetases by tabtoxinine-. beta. -lactam. [Pseudomonas syringae

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, T.J.; Unkefer, P.J.

    1987-04-01

    The presence of the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci within the rhizosphere of nodulated alfalfa plants results in an increase in N/sub 2/-fixation potential and growth, but a 40-50% decrease in nodule glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, as compared to nodulated control plants. Tabtoxinine-..beta..-Lactam an exocellular toxin produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv tabaci irreversibly inhibits glutamine synthetase. Partial purification of nodule GS by DEAE-cellulose chromatography reveals two enzyme forms are present (GS/sub n1/ and GS/sub n2/). In vitro inactivation of the two glutamine synthetases associated with the nodule indicates a differential sensitivity to T-..beta..-L. The nodule specific GS/sub n1/ is much less sensitive to T-..beta..-L than the GS/sub n2/ enzyme, which was found to coelute with the root enzyme (GS/sub r/). However, both GS/sub n1/ and GS/sub n2/ are rapidly inactivated by methionine sulfoximine, another irreversible inhibitor of GS.

  1. Examination of the mechanism of sucrose synthetase by positional isotope exchange.

    PubMed

    Singh, A N; Hester, L S; Raushel, F M

    1987-02-25

    The mechanism of the sucrose synthetase reaction has been probed by the technique of positional isotope exchange. [beta-18O2, alpha beta-18O]UDP-Glc has been synthesized starting from oxygen-18-labeled phosphate and the combined activities of carbamate kinase, hexokinase, phosphoglucomutase, and uridine diphosphoglucose pyrophosphorylase. The oxygen-18 at the alpha beta-bridge position of the labeled UDP-Glc has been shown to cause a 0.014 ppm upfield chemical shift in the 31P NMR spectrum of both the alpha- and beta-phosphorus atoms in UDP-Glc relative to the unlabeled compound. The chemical shift induced by each of the beta-nonbridge oxygen-18 atoms was 0.030 ppm. Incubation of [beta-18O2, alpha beta-18O]UDP-Glc with sucrose synthetase in the presence and absence of 2,5-anhydromannitol did not result in any significant exchange of an oxygen-18 from the beta-nonbridge position to the anomeric oxygen of the glucose moiety. It can thus be concluded that either sucrose synthetase does not catalyze the cleavage of the scissile carbon-oxygen bond of UDP-Glc in the absence of fructose or, alternatively, the beta-phosphoryl group of the newly formed UDP is rotationally immobilized. PMID:2950088

  2. Examination of the mechanism of sucrose synthetase by positional isotope exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, A.N.; Hester, L.S.; Raushel, F.M.

    1987-02-25

    The mechanism of the sucrose synthetase reaction has been probed by the technique of positional isotope exchange. (beta-/sup 18/O/sub 2/, alpha beta-/sup 18/O)UDP-Glc has been synthesized starting from oxygen-18-labeled phosphate and the combined activities of carbamate kinase, hexokinase, phosphoglucomutase, and uridine diphosphoglucose pyrophosphorylase. The oxygen-18 at the alpha beta-bridge position of the labeled UDP-Glc has been shown to cause a 0.014 ppm upfield chemical shift in the 31P NMR spectrum of both the alpha- and beta-phosphorus atoms in UDP-Glc relative to the unlabeled compound. The chemical shift induced by each of the beta-nonbridge oxygen-18 atoms was 0.030 ppm. Incubation of (beta-/sup 18/O/sub 2/, alpha beta-/sup 18/O)UDP-Glc with sucrose synthetase in the presence and absence of 2,5-anhydromannitol did not result in any significant exchange of an oxygen-18 from the beta-nonbridge position to the anomeric oxygen of the glucose moiety. It can thus be concluded that either sucrose synthetase does not catalyze the cleavage of the scissile carbon-oxygen bond of UDP-Glc in the absence of fructose or, alternatively, the beta-phosphoryl group of the newly formed UDP is rotationally immobilized.

  3. Brucella melitensis Methionyl-tRNA-Synthetase (MetRS), a Potential Drug Target for Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Ranade, Ranae M.; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Dranow, David M.; Myers, Janette B.; Choi, Ryan; Nakazawa Hewitt, Steve; Edwards, Thomas E.; Davies, Douglas R.; Lorimer, Donald; Boyle, Stephen M.; Barrett, Lynn K.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Fan, Erkang; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated Brucella melitensis methionyl-tRNA-synthetase (BmMetRS) with molecular, structural and phenotypic methods to learn if BmMetRS is a promising target for brucellosis drug development. Recombinant BmMetRS was expressed, purified from wild type Brucella melitensis biovar Abortus 2308 strain ATCC/CRP #DD-156 and screened by a thermal melt assay against a focused library of one hundred previously classified methionyl-tRNA-synthetase inhibitors of the blood stage form of Trypanosoma brucei. Three compounds showed appreciable shift of denaturation temperature and were selected for further studies on inhibition of the recombinant enzyme activity and cell viability against wild type B. melitensis strain 16M. BmMetRS protein complexed with these three inhibitors resolved into three-dimensional crystal structures and was analyzed. All three selected methionyl-tRNA-synthetase compounds inhibit recombinant BmMetRS enzymatic functions in an aminoacylation assay at varying concentrations. Furthermore, growth inhibition of B. melitensis strain 16M by the compounds was shown. Inhibitor-BmMetRS crystal structure models were used to illustrate the molecular basis of the enzyme inhibition. Our current data suggests that BmMetRS is a promising target for brucellosis drug development. However, further studies are needed to optimize lead compound potency, efficacy and safety as well as determine the pharmacokinetics, optimal dosage, and duration for effective treatment. PMID:27500735

  4. Structural basis for the binding of succinate to succinyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ji; Fraser, Marie E

    2016-08-01

    Succinyl-CoA synthetase catalyzes the only step in the citric acid cycle that provides substrate-level phosphorylation. Although the binding sites for the substrates CoA, phosphate, and the nucleotides ADP and ATP or GDP and GTP have been identified, the binding site for succinate has not. To determine this binding site, pig GTP-specific succinyl-CoA synthetase was crystallized in the presence of succinate, magnesium ions and CoA, and the structure of the complex was determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.2 Å resolution. Succinate binds in the carboxy-terminal domain of the β-subunit. The succinate-binding site is near both the active-site histidine residue that is phosphorylated in the reaction and the free thiol of CoA. The carboxy-terminal domain rearranges when succinate binds, burying this active site. However, succinate is not in position for transfer of the phosphoryl group from phosphohistidine. Here, it is proposed that when the active-site histidine residue has been phosphorylated by GTP, the phosphohistidine displaces phosphate and triggers the movement of the carboxylate of succinate into position to be phosphorylated. The structure shows why succinyl-CoA synthetase is specific for succinate and does not react appreciably with citrate nor with the other C4-dicarboxylic acids of the citric acid cycle, fumarate and oxaloacetate, but shows some activity with L-malate.

  5. Structural basis for the binding of succinate to succinyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ji; Fraser, Marie E

    2016-08-01

    Succinyl-CoA synthetase catalyzes the only step in the citric acid cycle that provides substrate-level phosphorylation. Although the binding sites for the substrates CoA, phosphate, and the nucleotides ADP and ATP or GDP and GTP have been identified, the binding site for succinate has not. To determine this binding site, pig GTP-specific succinyl-CoA synthetase was crystallized in the presence of succinate, magnesium ions and CoA, and the structure of the complex was determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.2 Å resolution. Succinate binds in the carboxy-terminal domain of the β-subunit. The succinate-binding site is near both the active-site histidine residue that is phosphorylated in the reaction and the free thiol of CoA. The carboxy-terminal domain rearranges when succinate binds, burying this active site. However, succinate is not in position for transfer of the phosphoryl group from phosphohistidine. Here, it is proposed that when the active-site histidine residue has been phosphorylated by GTP, the phosphohistidine displaces phosphate and triggers the movement of the carboxylate of succinate into position to be phosphorylated. The structure shows why succinyl-CoA synthetase is specific for succinate and does not react appreciably with citrate nor with the other C4-dicarboxylic acids of the citric acid cycle, fumarate and oxaloacetate, but shows some activity with L-malate. PMID:27487822

  6. Substrate Specificity of the Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase PvdD from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Ackerley, David F.; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T.; Lamont, Iain L.

    2003-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 secretes a siderophore, pyoverdinePAO, which contains a short peptide attached to a dihydroxyquinoline moiety. Synthesis of this peptide is thought to be catalyzed by nonribosomal peptide synthetases, one of which is encoded by the pvdD gene. The first module of pvdD was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the protein product was purified. l-Threonine, one of the amino acid residues in pyoverdinePAO, was an effective substrate for the recombinant protein in ATP-PPi exchange assays, showing that PvdD has peptide synthetase activity. Other amino acids, including d-threonine, l-serine, and l-allo-threonine, were not effective substrates, indicating that PvdD has a high degree of substrate specificity. A three-dimensional modeling approach enabled us to identify amino acids that are likely to be critical in determining the substrate specificity of PvdD and to explore the likely basis of the high substrate selectivity. The approach described here may be useful for analysis of other peptide synthetases. PMID:12700264

  7. Periportal zonation of the cytosolic acetyl-CoA synthetase of male rat liver.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, C T; Immerdal, L; Grunnet, N; Quistorff, B

    1992-02-15

    Several important metabolic functions of the mammalian liver have been shown to be located in zones with respect to the complex microcirculation of the organ. The zonal distribution of the cytosolic component of the acetyl-CoA synthetase activity has been investigated using the dual-digitonin-pulse-perfusion technique, which allows highly zone-selective sampling of cytosol from the periportal and perivenous zone of rat liver. Approximately 80% of the cytosolic enzymes are eluted from the hepatocytes in the periportal and perivenous sub-zones affected by digitonin, while less than 1% of the glutamate dehydrogenase activity (a marker enzyme of the mitochondrial compartment) is eluted. A twofold higher activity of the cytosolic form of acetyl-CoA synthetase is found in the periportal zone compared to the perivenous zone in fed male rats. Following a fasting/refeeding transition, this activity gradient is abolished in a manner similar to that observed for the enzyme acetyl-CoA carboxylase. Since the latter enzyme is utilizing the product of acetyl-CoA synthetase, acetyl-CoA, the similarity in the observed regulation suggests a functional coupling between cytosolic acetate activation and fatty-acid synthesis.

  8. Arginine deiminase PEG20 inhibits growth of small cell lung cancers lacking expression of argininosuccinate synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, M P; Jungbluth, A A; Wu, B-W; Bomalaski, J; Old, L J; Ritter, G

    2012-01-01

    Background: Some cancers have been shown to lack expression of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS), an enzyme required for the synthesis of arginine and a possible biomarker of sensitivity to arginine deprivation. Arginine deiminase (ADI) is a microbial enzyme capable of efficiently depleting peripheral blood arginine. Methods: Argininosuccinate synthetase expression was assessed in human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) by immunohistochemistry (IHC), with expression also assessed in a panel of 10 human SCLC by qRT-PCR and western blot. Proliferation assays and analyses of apoptosis and autophagy assessed the effect of pegylated ADI (ADI-PEG20) in vitro. The in vivo efficacy of ADI-PEG20 was determined in mice bearing SCLC xenografts. Results: Approximately 45% of SCLC tumours and 50% of cell lines assessed were negative for ASS. Argininosuccinate synthetase-deficient SCLC cells demonstrated sensitivity to ADI-PEG20, which was associated with the induction of autophagy and caspase-independent cell death. Arginine deiminase-PEG20 treatment of ASS-negative SCLC xenografts caused significant, dose-dependent inhibition of tumour growth of both small and established tumours. Conclusion: These results suggest a role for ADI-PEG20 in the treatment of SCLC, and a clinical trial exploring this therapeutic approach in patients with ASS-negative SCLC by IHC has now been initiated. PMID:22134507

  9. (p)ppGpp synthetases regulate the pathogenesis of zoonotic Streptococcus suis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiawen; Zhang, Tengfei; Su, Zhipeng; Li, Lu; Wang, Dong; Xiao, Ran; Teng, Muye; Tan, Meifang; Zhou, Rui

    2016-10-01

    (p)ppGpp-mediated stringent response is one of the main adaption mechanism in bacteria, and the ability to adapt to environment is linked to the pathogenesis of bacterial pathogens. In the zoonotic pathogen Streptococcus suis, there are two (p)ppGpp synthetases, RelA and RelQ. To investigate the regulatory functions of (p)ppGpp/(p)ppGpp synthetases on the pathogenesis of S. suis, the phenotypes of the [(p)ppGpp(0)] mutant ΔrelAΔrelQ and its parental strain were compared. Light and electron microscopy observation showed that the mutant strain had a longer chain-length than its parental strain. Disruption of relA and relQ led to decreased adhesive and invasive ability to HEp-2 cells, and increased sensitivity to the blood killing and phagocytosis. Mouse infection experiments showed that the mutant strain was attenuated and easier to be cleaned up in vivo. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis indicated that the expressions of virulence related genes involving in morphology and virulence were down-regulated in the mutant strain. Our study demonstrated that the (p)ppGpp synthetases or (p)ppGpp can regulate the pathogenesis of this important zoonotic pathogen.

  10. Brucella melitensis Methionyl-tRNA-Synthetase (MetRS), a Potential Drug Target for Brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Ojo, Kayode K; Ranade, Ranae M; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Dranow, David M; Myers, Janette B; Choi, Ryan; Nakazawa Hewitt, Steve; Edwards, Thomas E; Davies, Douglas R; Lorimer, Donald; Boyle, Stephen M; Barrett, Lynn K; Buckner, Frederick S; Fan, Erkang; Van Voorhis, Wesley C

    2016-01-01

    We investigated Brucella melitensis methionyl-tRNA-synthetase (BmMetRS) with molecular, structural and phenotypic methods to learn if BmMetRS is a promising target for brucellosis drug development. Recombinant BmMetRS was expressed, purified from wild type Brucella melitensis biovar Abortus 2308 strain ATCC/CRP #DD-156 and screened by a thermal melt assay against a focused library of one hundred previously classified methionyl-tRNA-synthetase inhibitors of the blood stage form of Trypanosoma brucei. Three compounds showed appreciable shift of denaturation temperature and were selected for further studies on inhibition of the recombinant enzyme activity and cell viability against wild type B. melitensis strain 16M. BmMetRS protein complexed with these three inhibitors resolved into three-dimensional crystal structures and was analyzed. All three selected methionyl-tRNA-synthetase compounds inhibit recombinant BmMetRS enzymatic functions in an aminoacylation assay at varying concentrations. Furthermore, growth inhibition of B. melitensis strain 16M by the compounds was shown. Inhibitor-BmMetRS crystal structure models were used to illustrate the molecular basis of the enzyme inhibition. Our current data suggests that BmMetRS is a promising target for brucellosis drug development. However, further studies are needed to optimize lead compound potency, efficacy and safety as well as determine the pharmacokinetics, optimal dosage, and duration for effective treatment. PMID:27500735

  11. Oxidative modification of glutamine synthetase. I. Inactivation is due to loss of one histidine residue.

    PubMed

    Levine, R L

    1983-10-10

    Intracellular proteolytic degradation of glutamine synthetase occurs in two distinct steps in Escherichia coli (Levine, R. L., Oliver, C. N., Fulks, R. M., and Stadtman, E. R. (1981) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 78, 2120-2124). In the first step, a mixed function oxidation modifies the glutamine synthetase. The modified enzyme, which is catalytically inactive, becomes susceptible to proteolytic attack. In the second step, a protease specific for the modified enzyme catalyzes the actual proteolytic degradation. The oxidatively modified glutamine synthetase was studied to determine the chemical differences between it and the native enzyme. Only a single alteration was found; one of sixteen histidine residues/subunit was altered by the oxidative modification. The modification introduced a carbonyl group into the protein, permitting isolation of a stable dinitrophenylhydrazone. No other differences were detected between the native and modified proteins. Specifically, the cysteine, methionine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan contents were not altered. A number of other prokaryotic and eukaryotic enzymes are also susceptible to oxidative modification. This covalent modification may be important in intracellular proteolysis, in mammalian host defense systems, in prevention of autolysis, in aging processes, and in oxygen toxicity.

  12. Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies and the Anti-Synthetase Syndrome: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Mahler, Michael; Miller, Frederick W.; Fritzler, Marvin J.

    2014-01-01

    Autoantibodies are a hallmark in the diagnosis of many systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARD) including idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM). Based on their specificity, autoantibodies in IIM are grouped into myositis specific (MSA) and myositis associated autoantibodies (MAA). Among the MSA, autoantibodies against aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARS) represent the most common antibodies and can be detected in 25–35 % of patients. The presence of ARS and other autoantibodies have become a key feature for classification and diagnosis of IIM and are increasingly used to define clinically distinguishable IIM subsets. For example, anti-ARS autoantibodies are the key features of what has become known as anti-synthetase syndrome (aSS), characterized by multiple organ involvement, primarily interstitial lung disease, often accompanied by myositis, non-erosive arthritis, Raynaud’s phenomenon, fever, and “mechanic’s hands”. Autoantibodies directed to eight different ARS have been described: Jo-1 (histidyl), PL-7 (threonyl), PL-12 (alanyl), OJ (isoleucyl), EJ (glycyl), KS (asparaginyl), Zo (phenylalanyl) and Ha (tyrosyl). Each anti-ARS antibody seems to define a distinctive clinical phenotype. Although several research methods and commercial tests are available, routine testing for anti-ARS autoantibodies (other than anti-Jo-1/histidyl-tRNA synthetase) is not widely available, sometimes leading to delays in diagnosis and poor disease outcomes. PMID:24424190

  13. Directed evolution of adenylosuccinate synthetase from Bacillus subtilis and its application in metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyue; Wang, Guanglu; Li, Xinli; Fu, Jing; Chen, Tao; Wang, Zhiwen; Zhao, Xueming

    2016-08-10

    Adenylosuccinate synthetase (EC. 6.3.4.4) encoded by purA in Bacillus subtilis, catalyzing the first step of the conversion of IMP to AMP, plays an important role in flux distribution in the purine biosynthetic pathway. In this study, we described the use of site saturation mutagenesis to obtain a desired enzyme activity of adenylosuccinate synthetase and its application in flux regulation. Based on sequence alignment and structural modeling, a library of enzyme variants was created by a semi-rational evolution strategy in position Thr238 and Pro242. Other than purA deletion, the leaky mutation purA(P242N) partially reduced the flux towards AMP derived from IMP and increased the riboflavin synthesis precursor GTP, while also kept the requirement of ATP synthesis for cell growth. PurA(P242N) was introduced into an inosine-producing strain and resulted in an approximately 4.66-fold increase in inosine production, from 0.088±0.009g/L to 0.41±0.051g/L, in minimal medium without hypoxanthine accumulation. These results underline that the directed evolution of adenylosuccinate synthetase could tailor its activities and adjust metabolic flux. This mutation may provide a promising application in purine-based product accumulation, like inosine, guanosine and folate which are directly stemming from purine pathway in B. subtilis. PMID:27234879

  14. Alternative splicing creates two new architectures for human tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhiyi; Xu, Zhiwen; Liu, Xiaotian; Lo, Wing-Sze; Ye, Fei; Lau, Ching-Fun; Wang, Feng; Zhou, Jie J; Nangle, Leslie A; Yang, Xiang-Lei; Zhang, Mingjie; Schimmel, Paul

    2016-02-18

    Many human tRNA synthetases evolved alternative functions outside of protein synthesis. These functions are associated with over 200 splice variants (SVs), most of which are catalytic nulls that engender new biology. While known to regulate non-translational activities, little is known about structures resulting from natural internal ablations of any protein. Here, we report analysis of two closely related, internally deleted, SVs of homodimeric human tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS). In spite of both variants ablating a portion of the catalytic core and dimer-interface contacts of native TyrRS, each folded into a distinct stable structure. Biochemical and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis showed that the internal deletion of TyrRSΔE2-4 SV gave an alternative, neomorphic dimer interface 'orthogonal' to that of native TyrRS. In contrast, the internal C-terminal splice site of TyrRSΔE2-3 prevented either dimerization interface from forming, and yielded a predominantly monomeric protein. Unlike ubiquitous TyrRS, the neomorphs showed clear tissue preferences, which were distinct from each other. The results demonstrate a sophisticated structural plasticity of a human tRNA synthetase for architectural reorganizations that are preferentially elicited in specific tissues. PMID:26773056

  15. Beneficial consequences of a selective glutamine synthetase inhibitor in oats and legumes

    SciTech Connect

    Langston-Unkefer, P.J.; Knight, T.J.; Sengupta-Gopalan, C.

    1988-01-01

    We report on the effects of administering a unique glutamine synthetase inhibitor to cereals and N/sub 2/-fixing legumes. A bacterium (Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci) delivers this inhibitor to provide extended treatment periods; we inoculated the root systems of oat and legume plants with pv. tabaci to provide for delivery of this inhibitor to their root or root/nodule systems. Inoculation of legumes is accompanied by increased plant growth, total plant nitrogen, nodulation, and nitrogen fixation activity. Inoculation of the oats is accompanied by either of two results depending upon the genotype of the oat plant. One result is inhibition of plant growth followed by plant death as consequences of the loss of all of the glutamine synthetase activities in the plant and the subsequent accumulation of ammonia and cessation of nitrate uptake. The second and opposite result is observed in a small population of oats screened from a commercial cultivar and includes increased plant growth and leaf protein. The effects of this inhibitor can be beneficial when applied to appropriate plant material. In an attempt to effectively communicate these findings to the reader, we first introduce the inhibitor (a novel amino acid) and its bacterial delivery systems, the target of the inhibitor (glutamine synthetase-catalyzed ammonia assimilation), and the two different nitrogen economics in the legume and cereal plants used experimentally. The physiological, biochemical, and molecular genetic consequences of the inhibitor action in cereals and legumes, as we presently understand them, are then presented. 18 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.,

  16. Effect of post-silking drought on nitrogen partitioning and gene expression patterns of glutamine synthetase and asparagine synthetase in two maize (Zea mays L.) varieties.

    PubMed

    Li, Yajun; Wang, Meiling; Zhang, Fengxia; Xu, Yadong; Chen, Xiaohong; Qin, Xiaoliang; Wen, Xiaoxia

    2016-05-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) and asparagine synthetase (AS) are proposed to have important function in plant nitrogen (N) remobilization, but their roles under drought stress are not well defined. In this study, the expression dynamics of GS and AS genes were analyzed in two maize varieties (ZD958 and NH101) in relation to post-silking drought stress induced nitrogen partitioning. ZD958 was a 'stay-green' variety with 5% nitrogen harvest index (NHI) lower than NH101. From silking to maturity, the amount of nitrogen remobilized from ear-leaves in ZD958 was evidently lower than NH101, and post-silking drought stress increased the nitrogen remobilization for both varieties. In ear-leaves, the expression of ZmGln1-3 was enhanced under drought stress. Three AS genes (ZmAS1, ZmAS2 and ZmAS3) were differentially regulated by post-silking drought treatment, of which the expression of ZmAS3 was stimulated at late stage of leaf senescence. In NH101, the expression level of ZmAS3 was markedly higher than that in ZD958. In developing grains, there were no significant differences in expression patterns of GS and AS genes between well water and drought treated plants. Drought stress altered maize N partitioning at the whole-plant level, and the up-regulation of GS and AS genes may contribute to the higher leaf nitrogen remobilization when exposed to drought treatments. PMID:26913793

  17. Effect of post-silking drought on nitrogen partitioning and gene expression patterns of glutamine synthetase and asparagine synthetase in two maize (Zea mays L.) varieties.

    PubMed

    Li, Yajun; Wang, Meiling; Zhang, Fengxia; Xu, Yadong; Chen, Xiaohong; Qin, Xiaoliang; Wen, Xiaoxia

    2016-05-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) and asparagine synthetase (AS) are proposed to have important function in plant nitrogen (N) remobilization, but their roles under drought stress are not well defined. In this study, the expression dynamics of GS and AS genes were analyzed in two maize varieties (ZD958 and NH101) in relation to post-silking drought stress induced nitrogen partitioning. ZD958 was a 'stay-green' variety with 5% nitrogen harvest index (NHI) lower than NH101. From silking to maturity, the amount of nitrogen remobilized from ear-leaves in ZD958 was evidently lower than NH101, and post-silking drought stress increased the nitrogen remobilization for both varieties. In ear-leaves, the expression of ZmGln1-3 was enhanced under drought stress. Three AS genes (ZmAS1, ZmAS2 and ZmAS3) were differentially regulated by post-silking drought treatment, of which the expression of ZmAS3 was stimulated at late stage of leaf senescence. In NH101, the expression level of ZmAS3 was markedly higher than that in ZD958. In developing grains, there were no significant differences in expression patterns of GS and AS genes between well water and drought treated plants. Drought stress altered maize N partitioning at the whole-plant level, and the up-regulation of GS and AS genes may contribute to the higher leaf nitrogen remobilization when exposed to drought treatments.

  18. Activation of 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase activity on induction of HL-60 leukemia cell differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, E L; Nilson, L A

    1989-01-01

    A 27-fold increase in 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase activity, an enzyme associated with the antiproliferative actions of interferon (IFN), was observed after treatment of HL-60 human leukemia cells with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), an inducer of granulocytic differentiation of the cells. Enzyme activity was elevated after 24 h of exposure to DMSO, was maximal at 48 hours, and declined thereafter. A comparable increase was observed after treatment with 1 U of alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) per ml or 8 U of beta interferon (IFN-beta) per ml. Elevated levels of expression of other IFN-inducible genes, including type I histocompatibility antigen (HLA-B) mRNA and 2',5'-oligoadenylate phosphodiesterase activity, were also observed with DMSO treatment. DMSO-treated HL-60 cells had an increased amount of a 1.8-kilobase mRNA for oligoadenylate [oligo(A)] synthetase when compared with that of control cells; both DMSO- and IFN-treated HL-60 cells also expressed 1.6-, 3.4-, and 4.3-kilobase mRNA. The increase in both oligo(A) synthetase activity and mRNA levels was inhibited by polyclonal antiserum to human IFN-alpha; however, no IFN-alpha mRNA could be detected in the cells. Antiserum to IFN-beta or gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) had no effect on oligo(A) synthetase expression or activity nor was there any detectable IFN-beta 1 or IFN-beta 2 mRNA in the cells. The anti-IFN-alpha serum did not block the elevation of HLA-B mRNA in DMSO-treated cells. These observations suggest that the increased expression of oligo(A) synthetase in DMSO-treated cells may be mediated by the release of an IFN-alpha-like factor; however, the levels of any IFN-alpha mRNA produced in the cells were extremely low. Images PMID:2476665

  19. Root of the universal tree of life based on ancient aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase gene duplications.

    PubMed

    Brown, J R; Doolittle, W F

    1995-03-28

    Universal trees based on sequences of single gene homologs cannot be rooted. Iwabe et al. [Iwabe, N., Kuma, K.-I., Hasegawa, M., Osawa, S. & Miyata, T. (1989) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 86, 9355-9359] circumvented this problem by using ancient gene duplications that predated the last common ancestor of all living things. Their separate, reciprocally rooted gene trees for elongation factors and ATPase subunits showed Bacteria (eubacteria) as branching first from the universal tree with Archaea (archaebacteria) and Eucarya (eukaryotes) as sister groups. Given its topical importance to evolutionary biology and concerns about the appropriateness of the ATPase data set, an evaluation of the universal tree root using other ancient gene duplications is essential. In this study, we derive a rooting for the universal tree using aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase genes, an extensive multigene family whose divergence likely preceded that of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. An approximately 1600-bp conserved region was sequenced from the isoleucyl-tRNA synthetases of several species representing deep evolutionary branches of eukaryotes (Nosema locustae), Bacteria (Aquifex pyrophilus and Thermotoga maritima) and Archaea (Pyrococcus furiosus and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius). In addition, a new valyl-tRNA synthetase was characterized from the protist Trichomonas vaginalis. Different phylogenetic methods were used to generate trees of isoleucyl-tRNA synthetases rooted by valyl- and leucyl-tRNA synthetases. All isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase trees showed Archaea and Eucarya as sister groups, providing strong confirmation for the universal tree rooting reported by Iwabe et al. As well, there was strong support for the monophyly (sensu Hennig) of Archaea. The valyl-tRNA synthetase gene from Tr. vaginalis clustered with other eukaryotic ValRS genes, which may have been transferred from the mitochondrial genome to the nuclear genome, suggesting that this amitochondrial trichomonad once harbored an

  20. Urea synthesis in the African lungfish Protopterus dolloi--hepatic carbamoyl phosphate synthetase III and glutamine synthetase are upregulated by 6 days of aerial exposure.

    PubMed

    Chew, Shit F; Ong, Tan F; Ho, Lilian; Tam, Wai L; Loong, Ai M; Hiong, Kum C; Wong, Wai P; Ip, Yuen K

    2003-10-01

    Like the marine ray Taeniura lymma, the African lungfish Protopterus dolloi possesses carbamoyl phosphate III (CPS III) in the liver and not carbamoyl phosphate I (CPS I), as in the mouse Mus musculus or as in other African lungfish reported elsewhere. However, similar to other African lungfish and tetrapods, hepatic arginase of P. dolloi is present mainly in the cytosol. Glutamine synthetase activity is present in both the mitochondrial and cytosolic fractions of the liver of P. dolloi. Therefore, we conclude that P. dolloi is a more primitive extant lungfish, which is intermediate between aquatic fish and terrestrial tetrapods, and represents a link in the fish-tetrapod continuum. During 6 days of aerial exposure, the ammonia excretion rate in P. dolloi decreased significantly to 8-16% of the submerged control. However, there were no significant increases in ammonia contents in the muscle, liver or plasma of specimens exposed to air for 6 days. These results suggest that (1). endogenous ammonia production was drastically reduced and (2). endogenous ammonia was detoxified effectively into urea. Indeed, there were significant decreases in glutamate, glutamine and lysine levels in the livers of fish exposed to air, which led to a decrease in the total free amino acid content. This indirectly confirms that the specimen had reduced its rates of proteolysis and/or amino acid catabolism to suppress endogenous ammonia production. Simultaneously, there were significant increases in urea levels in the muscle (8-fold), liver (10.5-fold) and plasma (12.6-fold) of specimens exposed to air for 6 days. Furthermore, there was an increase in the hepatic ornithine-urea cycle (OUC) capacity, with significant increases in the activities of CPS III (3.8-fold), argininosuccinate synthetase + lyase (1.8-fold) and, more importantly, glutamine synthetase (2.2-fold). This is the first report on the upregulation of OUC capacity and urea synthesis rate in an African lungfish exposed to air

  1. Urea Unfolding Study of E. coli Alanyl-tRNA Synthetase and Its Monomeric Variants Proves the Role of C-Terminal Domain in Stability

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Baisakhi; Banerjee, Rajat

    2015-01-01

    E. coli alanyl-tRNA exists as a dimer in its native form and the C-terminal coiled-coil part plays an important role in the dimerization process. The truncated N-terminal containing the first 700 amino acids (1–700) forms a monomeric variant possessing similar aminoacylation activity like wild type. A point mutation in the C-terminal domain (G674D) also produces a monomeric variant with a fivefold reduced aminoacylation activity compared to the wild type enzyme. Urea induced denaturation of these monomeric mutants along with another alaRS variant (N461 alaRS) was studied together with the full-length enzyme using various spectroscopic techniques such as intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, 1-anilino-8-naphthalene-sulfonic acid binding, near- and far-UV circular dichroism, and analytical ultracentrifugation. Aminoacylation activity assay after refolding from denatured state revealed that the monomeric mutants studied here were unable to regain their activity, whereas the dimeric full-length alaRS gets back similar activity as the native enzyme. This study indicates that dimerization is one of the key regulatory factors that is important in the proper folding and stability of E. coli alaRS. PMID:26617997

  2. The structures of cytosolic and plastid-located glutamine synthetases from Medicago truncatula reveal a common and dynamic architecture

    PubMed Central

    Torreira, Eva; Seabra, Ana Rita; Marriott, Hazel; Zhou, Min; Llorca, Óscar; Robinson, Carol V.; Carvalho, Helena G.; Fernández-Tornero, Carlos; Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa

    2014-01-01

    The first step of nitrogen assimilation in higher plants, the energy-driven incorporation of ammonia into glutamate, is catalyzed by glutamine synthetase. This central process yields the readily metabolizable glutamine, which in turn is at the basis of all subsequent biosynthesis of nitrogenous compounds. The essential role performed by glutamine synthetase makes it a prime target for herbicidal compounds, but also a suitable intervention point for the improvement of crop yields. Although the majority of crop plants are dicotyledonous, little is known about the structural organization of glutamine synthetase in these organisms and about the functional differences between the different isoforms. Here, the structural characterization of two glutamine synthetase isoforms from the model legume Medicago truncatula is reported: the crystallographic structure of cytoplasmic GSII-1a and an electron cryomicroscopy reconstruction of plastid-located GSII-2a. Together, these structural models unveil a decameric organization of dicotyledonous glutamine synthetase, with two pentameric rings weakly connected by inter-ring loops. Moreover, rearrangement of these dynamic loops changes the relative orientation of the rings, suggesting a zipper-like mechanism for their assembly into a decameric enzyme. Finally, the atomic structure of M. truncatula GSII-1a provides important insights into the structural determinants of herbicide resistance in this family of enzymes, opening new avenues for the development of herbicide-resistant plants. PMID:24699643

  3. The structures of cytosolic and plastid-located glutamine synthetases from Medicago truncatula reveal a common and dynamic architecture.

    PubMed

    Torreira, Eva; Seabra, Ana Rita; Marriott, Hazel; Zhou, Min; Llorca, Óscar; Robinson, Carol V; Carvalho, Helena G; Fernández-Tornero, Carlos; Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa

    2014-04-01

    The first step of nitrogen assimilation in higher plants, the energy-driven incorporation of ammonia into glutamate, is catalyzed by glutamine synthetase. This central process yields the readily metabolizable glutamine, which in turn is at the basis of all subsequent biosynthesis of nitrogenous compounds. The essential role performed by glutamine synthetase makes it a prime target for herbicidal compounds, but also a suitable intervention point for the improvement of crop yields. Although the majority of crop plants are dicotyledonous, little is known about the structural organization of glutamine synthetase in these organisms and about the functional differences between the different isoforms. Here, the structural characterization of two glutamine synthetase isoforms from the model legume Medicago truncatula is reported: the crystallographic structure of cytoplasmic GSII-1a and an electron cryomicroscopy reconstruction of plastid-located GSII-2a. Together, these structural models unveil a decameric organization of dicotyledonous glutamine synthetase, with two pentameric rings weakly connected by inter-ring loops. Moreover, rearrangement of these dynamic loops changes the relative orientation of the rings, suggesting a zipper-like mechanism for their assembly into a decameric enzyme. Finally, the atomic structure of M. truncatula GSII-1a provides important insights into the structural determinants of herbicide resistance in this family of enzymes, opening new avenues for the development of herbicide-resistant plants. PMID:24699643

  4. A common fold for peptide synthetases cleaving ATP to ADP: glutathione synthetase and D-alanine:d-alanine ligase of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Fan, C; Moews, P C; Shi, Y; Walsh, C T; Knox, J R

    1995-01-01

    Examination of x-ray crystallographic structures shows the tertiary structure of D-alanine:D-alanine ligase (EC 6.3.2.4). a bacterial cell wall synthesizing enzyme, is similar to that of glutathione synthetase (EC 6.32.3) despite low sequence homology. Both Escherichia coli enzymes, which convert ATP to ADP during ligation to produce peptide products, are made of three domains, each folded around a 4-to 6-stranded beta-sheet core. Sandwiched between the beta-sheets of the C-terminal and central domains of each enzyme is a nonclassical ATP-binding site that contains a common set of spatially equivalent amino acids. In each enzyme, two loops are proposed to exhibit a required flexibility that allows entry of ATP and substrates, provides protection of the acylphosphate intermediate and tetrahedral adduct from hydrolysis during catalysis, and then permits release of products. PMID:7862655

  5. Asparagine synthetase1, but not asparagine synthetase2, is responsible for the biosynthesis of asparagine following the supply of ammonium to rice roots.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Miwa; Ishiyama, Keiki; Kojima, Soichi; Konishi, Noriyuki; Nakano, Kentaro; Kanno, Keiichi; Hayakawa, Toshihiko; Yamaya, Tomoyuki

    2015-04-01

    Asparagine is synthesized from glutamine by the reaction of asparagine synthetase (AS) and is the major nitrogen form in both xylem and phloem sap in rice (Oryza sativa L.). There are two genes encoding AS, OsAS1 and OsAS2, in rice, but the functions of individual AS isoenzymes are largely unknown. Cell type- and NH4(+)-inducible expression of OsAS1 as well as analyses of knockout mutants were carried out in this study to characterize AS1. OsAS1 was mainly expressed in the roots, with in situ hybridization showing that the corresponding mRNA was specifically accumulated in the three cell layers of the root surface (epidermis, exodermis and sclerenchyma) in an NH4(+)-dependent manner. Conversely, OsAS2 mRNA was abundant in leaf blades and sheathes of rice. Although OsAS2 mRNA was detectable in the roots, its content decreased when NH4(+) was supplied. Retrotransposon-mediated knockout mutants lacking AS1 showed slight stimulation of shoot length and slight reduction in root length at the seedling stage. On the other hand, the mutation caused an approximately 80-90% reduction in free asparagine content in both roots and xylem sap. These results suggest that AS1 is responsible for the synthesis of asparagine in rice roots following the supply of NH4(+). Characteristics of the NH4(+)-dependent increase and the root surface cell-specific expression of OsAS1 gene are very similar to our previous results on cytosolic glutamine synthetase1;2 and NADH-glutamate synthase1 in rice roots. Thus, AS1 is apparently coupled with the primary assimilation of NH4(+) in rice roots. PMID:25634963

  6. Distribution of immunoreactive glutamine synthetase in the adult human and mouse brain. Qualitative and quantitative observations with special emphasis on extra-astroglial protein localization.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Bannier, Jana; Meyer-Lotz, Gabriela; Steiner, Johann; Keilhoff, Gerburg; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Walter, Martin; Bogerts, Bernhard

    2014-11-01

    Glutamine synthetase catalyzes the ATP-dependent condensation of ammonia and glutamate to form glutamine, thus playing a pivotal role in glutamate and glutamine homoeostasis. Despite a plethora of studies on this enzyme, knowledge about the regional and cellular distribution of this enzyme in human brain is still fragmentary. Therefore, we mapped fourteen post-mortem brains of psychically healthy individuals for the distribution of the glutamine synthetase immunoreactive protein. It was found that glutamine synthetase immunoreactivity is expressed in multiple gray and white matter astrocytes, but also in oligodendrocytes, ependymal cells and certain neurons. Since a possible extra-astrocytic expression of glutamine synthetase is highly controversial, we paid special attention to its appearance in oligodendrocytes and neurons. By double immunolabeling of mouse brain slices and cultured mouse brain cells for glutamine synthetase and cell-type-specific markers we provide evidence that besides astrocytes subpopulations of oligodendrocytes, microglial cells and neurons express glutamine synthetase. Moreover, we show that glutamine synthetase-immunopositive neurons are not randomly distributed throughout human and mouse brain, but represent a subpopulation of nitrergic (i.e. neuronal nitric oxide synthase expressing) neurons. Possible functional implications of an extra-astrocytic localization of glutamine synthetase are discussed.

  7. L-arginine recognition by yeast arginyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Cavarelli, J; Delagoutte, B; Eriani, G; Gangloff, J; Moras, D

    1998-01-01

    The crystal structure of arginyl-tRNA synthetase (ArgRS) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS), with L-arginine bound to the active site has been solved at 2.75 A resolution and refined to a crystallographic R-factor of 19.7%. ArgRS is composed predominantly of alpha-helices and can be divided into five domains, including the class I-specific active site. The N-terminal domain shows striking similarity to some completely unrelated proteins and defines a module which should participate in specific tRNA recognition. The C-terminal domain, which is the putative anticodon-binding module, displays an all-alpha-helix fold highly similar to that of Escherichia coli methionyl-tRNA synthetase. While ArgRS requires tRNAArg for the first step of the aminoacylation reaction, the results show that its presence is not a prerequisite for L-arginine binding. All H-bond-forming capability of L-arginine is used by the protein for the specific recognition. The guanidinium group forms two salt bridge interactions with two acidic residues, and one H-bond with a tyrosine residue; these three residues are strictly conserved in all ArgRS sequences. This tyrosine is also conserved in other class I aaRS active sites but plays several functional roles. The ArgRS structure allows the definition of a new framework for sequence alignments and subclass definition in class I aaRSs. PMID:9736621

  8. Synthesis of Glu-tRNA(Gln) by engineered and natural aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Hernández, Annia; Bhaskaran, Hari; Hadd, Andrew; Perona, John J

    2010-08-10

    A protein engineering approach to delineating which distinct elements of homologous tRNA synthetase architectures are responsible for divergent RNA-amino acid pairing specificities is described. Previously, we constructed a hybrid enzyme in which 23 amino acids from the catalytic domain of Escherichia coli glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase (GlnRS) were replaced with the corresponding residues of human glutamyl-tRNA synthetase (GluRS). The engineered hybrid (GlnRS S1/L1/L2) synthesizes Glu-tRNA(Gln) more than 10(4)-fold more efficiently than GlnRS. Detailed comparison of kinetic parameters between GlnRS S1/L1/L2 and the naturally occurring Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus GluRS(ND), which is also capable of Glu-tRNA(Gln) synthesis, now shows that both k(cat) and K(m) for glutamate are recapitulated in the engineered enzyme, but that K(m) for tRNA is 200-fold higher. Thus, the simultaneous optimization of paired amino acid and tRNA binding sites found in a naturally occurring enzyme is not recapitulated in a hybrid that is successfully engineered for amino acid complementarity. We infer that the GlnRS architecture has differentiated to match only cognate amino acid-RNA pairs, and that the substrate selection functions do not operate independently of each other. Design and characterization of four additional hybrids identify further residues involved in improving complementarity for glutamate and in communicating between amino acid and tRNA binding sites. The robust catalytic function demonstrated in this engineered system offers a novel platform for exploring the stereochemical origins of coding as a property of the ancient Rossmann fold.

  9. Discovery of amide (peptide) bond synthetic activity in Acyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Abe, Tomoko; Hashimoto, Yoshiteru; Hosaka, Hideaki; Tomita-Yokotani, Kaori; Kobayashi, Michihiko

    2008-04-25

    Acyl-CoA synthetase, which is one of the acid-thiol ligases (EC 6.2.1), plays key roles in metabolic and regulatory processes. This enzyme forms a carbon-sulfur bond in the presence of ATP and Mg(2+), yielding acyl-CoA thioesters from the corresponding free acids and CoA. This enzyme belongs to the superfamily of adenylate-forming enzymes, whose three-dimensional structures are analogous to one another. We here discovered a new reaction while studying the short-chain acyl-CoA synthetase that we recently reported (Hashimoto, Y., Hosaka, H., Oinuma, K., Goda, M., Higashibata, H., and Kobayashi, M. (2005) J. Biol. Chem. 280, 8660-8667). When l-cysteine was used as a substrate instead of CoA, N-acyl-l-cysteine was surprisingly detected as a reaction product. This finding demonstrated that the enzyme formed a carbon-nitrogen bond (EC 6.3.1 acid-ammonia (or amide) ligase (amide synthase); EC 6.3.2 acid-amino acid ligase (peptide synthase)) comprising the amino group of the cysteine and the carboxyl group of the acid. N-Acyl-d-cysteine, N-acyl-dl-homocysteine, and N-acyl-l-cysteine methyl ester were also synthesized from the corresponding cysteine analog substrates by the enzyme. Furthermore, this unexpected enzyme activity was also observed for acetyl-CoA synthetase and firefly luciferase, indicating the generality of the new reaction in the superfamily of adenylate-forming enzymes.

  10. Molecular cloning and characterization of an S-adenosylmethionine synthetase gene from Chorispora bungeana.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chenchen; Chen, Tao; Yang, Yu; Liu, Sha; Yan, Kan; Yue, Xiule; Zhang, Hua; Xiang, Yun; An, Lizhe; Chen, Shuyan

    2015-11-10

    S-adenosylmethionine synthetase (SAMS) catalyzes the formation of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) which is a molecule essential for polyamines and ethylene biosynthesis, methylation modifications of protein, DNA and lipids. SAMS also plays an important role in abiotic stress response. Chorispora bungeana (C. bungeana) is an alpine subnival plant species which possesses strong tolerance to cold stress. Here, we cloned and characterized an S-adenosylmethionine synthetase gene, CbSAMS (C. bungeana S-adenosylmethionine synthetase), from C. bungeana, which encodes a protein of 393 amino acids containing a methionine binding motif GHPDK, an ATP binding motif GAGDQG and a phosphate binding motif GGGAFSGDK. Furthermore, an NES (nuclear export signal) peptide was identified through bioinformatics analysis. To explore the CbSAMS gene expression regulation, we isolated the promoter region of CbSAMS gene 1919bp upstream the ATG start codon, CbSAMSp, and analyzed its cis-acting elements by bioinformatics method. It was revealed that a transcription start site located at 320 bp upstream the ATG start codon and cis-acting elements related to light, ABA, auxin, ethylene, MeJA, low temperature and drought had been found in the CbSAMSp sequence. The gene expression pattern of CbSAMS was then analyzed by TR-qPCR and GUS assay method. The result showed that CbSAMS is expressed in all examined tissues including callus, roots, petioles, leaves, and flowers with a significant higher expression level in roots and flowers. Furthermore, the expression level of CbSAMS was induced by low temperature, ethylene and NaCl. Subcellular localization revealed that CbSAMS was located in the cytoplasm and nucleus but has a significant higher level in the nucleus. These results indicated a potential role of CbSAMS in abiotic stresses and plant growth in C. bungeana.

  11. Characterisation of Drosophila CMP-sialic acid synthetase activity reveals unusual enzymatic properties

    PubMed Central

    Mertsalov, Ilya B.; Novikov, Boris N.; Scott, Hilary; Dangott, Lawrence; Panin, Vladislav M.

    2016-01-01

    CMP-sialic acid synthetase (CSAS) is a key enzyme of the sialylation pathway. CSAS produces the activated sugar donor, CMP-sialic acid, which serves as a substrate for sialyltransferases to modify glycan termini with sialic acid. Unlike other animal CMP-Sia synthetases that normally localize in the nucleus, Drosophila melanogaster CSAS (DmCSAS) localizes in the cell secretory compartment, predominantly in the Golgi, which suggests that this enzyme has properties distinct from those of its vertebrate counterparts. To test this hypothesis, we purified recombinant DmCSAS and characterised its activity in vitro. Our experiments revealed several unique features of this enzyme. DmCSAS displays specificity for N-acetylneuraminic acid as a substrate, shows preference for lower pH and can function with a broad range of metal cofactors. When tested at a pH corresponding to the Golgi compartment, the enzyme showed significant activity with several metal cations, including Zn2+, Fe2+, Co2+ and Mn2+, while the activity with Mg2+ was found to be low. Protein sequence analysis and site-specific mutagenesis identified an aspartic acid residue that is necessary for enzymatic activity and predicted to be involved in coordinating a metal cofactor. DmCSAS enzymatic activity was found to be essential in vivo for rescuing the phenotype of DmCSAS mutants. Finally, our experiments revealed a steep dependence of the enzymatic activity on temperature. Taken together, our results indicate that DmCSAS underwent evolutionary adaptation to pH and ionic environment different from that of counterpart synthetases in vertebrates. Our data also suggest that environmental temperatures can regulate Drosophila sialylation, thus modulating neural transmission. PMID:27114558

  12. Affinity chromatography and affinity labeling of rat liver succinyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Ball, D J; Nishimura, J S

    1980-11-25

    Succinyl-CoA synthetase has been purified to apparent homogeneity from rat liver. The key step in the purification procedure involved adsorption on a GDP dialdehyde (dial-GDP)-adipic dihydrazide-Sepharose 4B column and elution by GDP-Mg2+. Like the pig heart enzyme (Brownie, E. R., and Bridger, W. A. (1972) Can. J. Biochem. 50, 719--724), the rat liver enzyme was an alpha beta heterodimer and only the alpha subunit was phosphorylated by [gamma-32P]GTP. The A 280(0.1%) of the enzyme was determined to be 0.5. Amino acid analyses revealed significant similarities in 50% of the amino acid residues of rat liver and Escherichia coli succinyl-CoA synthetases. However, immunodiffusion analysis failed to reveal any antigenic identity between the two enzymes. Incubation with the affinity label, dial-GDP, in the presence of Mg2+ resulted in a biphasic inactivation of the enzyme. The extent of the rapid phase of inactivation appeared to be related to the extent of dephosphorylation of the enzyme and was prevented by preincubation of the enzyme with GTP-Mg2+. The presence of GDP-Mg2+ in the incubation medium prevented the slow phase of the inactivation and retarded the rapid phase. Dephosphorylated enzyme was approximately 2 orders of magnitude more susceptible to inactivation by dial-GDP than phosphorylated enzyme. Labeling of succinyl-CoA synthetase with [3H]dial-GDP gave a linear relationship between inactivation and incorporation of radioactivity with an extrapolated value of less than 1.2 mol of analog/mol of enzyme at 100% inactivation. The distribution of the label in enzyme that was inactivated 40% was approximately 60% in the alpha subunit and 40% in the beta subunit. Thus, while phosphorylation of the enzyme occurs exclusively in the alpha subunit, the nucleotide binding site appears to include components from both alpha and beta subunits. PMID:7430155

  13. Biochemical and Crystallographic Analysis of Substrate Binding and Conformational Changes in Acetyl-CoA Synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Reger,A.; Carney, J.; Gulick, A.

    2007-01-01

    The adenylate-forming enzymes, including acyl-CoA synthetases, the adenylation domains of non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS), and firefly luciferase, perform two half-reactions in a ping-pong mechanism. We have proposed a domain alternation mechanism for these enzymes whereby, upon completion of the initial adenylation reaction, the C-terminal domain of these enzymes undergoes a 140{sup o} rotation to perform the second thioester-forming half-reaction. Structural and kinetic data of mutant enzymes support this hypothesis. We present here mutations to Salmonella enterica acetyl-CoA synthetase (Acs) and test the ability of the enzymes to catalyze the complete reaction and the adenylation half-reaction. Substitution of Lys609 with alanine results in an enzyme that is unable to catalyze the adenylate reaction, while the Gly524 to leucine substitution is unable to catalyze the complete reaction yet catalyzes the adenylation half-reaction with activity comparable to the wild-type enzyme. The positions of these two residues, which are located on the mobile C-terminal domain, strongly support the domain alternation hypothesis. We also present steady-state kinetic data of putative substrate-binding residues and demonstrate that no single residue plays a dominant role in dictating CoA binding. We have also created two mutations in the active site to alter the acyl substrate specificity. Finally, the crystallographic structures of wild-type Acs and mutants R194A, R584A, R584E, K609A, and V386A are presented to support the biochemical analysis.

  14. The McbB component of microcin B17 synthetase is a zinc metalloprotein.

    PubMed

    Zamble, D B; McClure, C P; Penner-Hahn, J E; Walsh, C T

    2000-12-26

    The microcin B17 synthetase converts glycine, serine, and cysteine residues in a polypeptide precursor into oxazoles and thiazoles during the maturation of the Escherichia coli antibiotic Microcin B17. This multimeric enzyme is composed of three subunits (McbB, McbC, and McbD), and it employs both ATP and FMN as cofactors. The McbB subunit was purified as a fusion with the maltose-binding protein (MBP), and metal analysis revealed that this protein binds 0.91+/-0.17 zinc atoms. Upon incubation of MBP-McbB with excess zinc, the stoichiometry increased to two atoms of zinc bound, but metal binding to the second site resulted in a decrease in the heterocyclization activity when MBP-McbB was reconstituted with the other components of the synthetase. Apo-protein was prepared by using p-hydroxymercuriphenylsulfonic acid (PMPS), and loss of the metal caused a severe reduction in enzymatic activity. However, if dithiothreitol was added to the PMPS reactions within a few minutes, enzymatic activity was retained and MBP-McbB could be reconstituted with zinc. Spectroscopic analysis of the cobalt-containing protein and extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis of the zinc-containing protein both provide evidence for a tetrathiolate coordination sphere. Site-directed mutants of MBP-McbB as well as the synthetase tagged with the calmodulin-binding peptide were constructed. Activity assays and metal analysis were used to determine which of the six cysteines in McbB are metal ligands. These results suggest that the zinc cofactor in McbB plays a structural role.

  15. Xylan synthetase activity in differentiated xylem cells of sycamore trees (Acer pseudoplatanus).

    PubMed

    Dalessandro, G; Northcote, D H

    1981-01-01

    Particulate enzymic preparations obtained from homogenates of differentiated xylem cells isolated from sycamore trees, catalyzed the formation of a radioactive xylan in the presence of UDP-D-[U-(14)C]xylose as substrate. The synthesized xylan was not dialyzable through Visking cellophane tubing. Successive extraction with cold water, hot water and 5% NaOH dissolved respectively 15, 5 and 80% of the radioactive polymer. Complete acid hydrolysis of the water-insoluble polysaccharide synthesized from UDP-D-[U-(14)C]xylose released all the radioactivity as xylose. β-1,4-Xylodextrins, degree of polymerization 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, were obtained by partial acid hydrolysis (fuming HCl or 0.1 M HCl) of radioactive xylan. The polymer was hydrolysed to xylose, xylobiose and xylotriose by Driselase which contains 1,4-β xylanase activities. Methylation and then hydrolysis of the xylan released two methylated sugars which were identified as di-O-methyl[(14)C]xylose and tri-O-methyl-[(14)C]xylose, suggesting a 1→4-linked polymer. The linkage was confirmed by periodate oxidation studies. The apparent Km value of the synthetase for UDP-D-xylose was 0.4 mM. Xylan synthetase activity was not potentiated in the presence of a detergent. The enzymic activity was stimulated by Mg(2+) and Mn(2+) ions, although EDTA in the range of concentrations between 0.01 and 1 mM did not affect the reaction rate. It appears that the xylan synthetase system associated with membranes obtained from differentiated xylem cells of sycamore trees may serve for catalyzing the in vivo synthesis of the xylan main chain during the biogenesis of the plant cell wall.

  16. Bacterial expression of catalytically active fragments of the multifunctional enzyme enniatin synthetase.

    PubMed

    Haese, A; Pieper, R; von Ostrowski, T; Zocher, R

    1994-10-14

    Enniatin synthetase catalyzes the biosynthesis of N-methylated cyclohexadepsipeptides. The 347 kDa enzyme is encoded by the esyn1 gene of Fusarium scirpi and contains two domains (EA and EB) homologous to each other and to regions of other microbial peptide synthetases. Parts of the esyn1 gene were subcloned in frame to a small lacZ gene portion of Escherichia coli expression vectors. Overproduced recombinant proteins showed a high tendency towards inclusion body formation and could be only partially dissolved in 8 M urea or 6 M guanidine hydrochloride. After renaturation, a 121 kDa recombinant protein representing the N-terminal conserved domain EA of enniatin synthetase was shown to activate D-hydroxyisolvaleric acid via adenylation. Similarly, a 158 kDa recombinant protein comprising the C-terminal conserved domain EB catalyzed the activation of the substrate amino acid (e.g. L-valine). Moreover, this protein could be photolabeled with S-[methyl-14C]adenosyl-L-methionine, (AdoMet) indicating the presence of the methyltransferase. Both functions, L-valine activation and AdoMet binding, could be assigned to a 108 kDa recombinant protein encompassing the A and the M segment of domain EB. The fact that a 65 kDa recombinant protein representing the M portion could be photolabeled, indicated the localization of the methyltransferase in this region. Three deletion mutants of the 65 kDa protein were shown to be inactive with respect to UV-induced AdoMet labeling. PMID:7932733

  17. Molecular cloning and characterization of an S-adenosylmethionine synthetase gene from Chorispora bungeana.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chenchen; Chen, Tao; Yang, Yu; Liu, Sha; Yan, Kan; Yue, Xiule; Zhang, Hua; Xiang, Yun; An, Lizhe; Chen, Shuyan

    2015-11-10

    S-adenosylmethionine synthetase (SAMS) catalyzes the formation of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) which is a molecule essential for polyamines and ethylene biosynthesis, methylation modifications of protein, DNA and lipids. SAMS also plays an important role in abiotic stress response. Chorispora bungeana (C. bungeana) is an alpine subnival plant species which possesses strong tolerance to cold stress. Here, we cloned and characterized an S-adenosylmethionine synthetase gene, CbSAMS (C. bungeana S-adenosylmethionine synthetase), from C. bungeana, which encodes a protein of 393 amino acids containing a methionine binding motif GHPDK, an ATP binding motif GAGDQG and a phosphate binding motif GGGAFSGDK. Furthermore, an NES (nuclear export signal) peptide was identified through bioinformatics analysis. To explore the CbSAMS gene expression regulation, we isolated the promoter region of CbSAMS gene 1919bp upstream the ATG start codon, CbSAMSp, and analyzed its cis-acting elements by bioinformatics method. It was revealed that a transcription start site located at 320 bp upstream the ATG start codon and cis-acting elements related to light, ABA, auxin, ethylene, MeJA, low temperature and drought had been found in the CbSAMSp sequence. The gene expression pattern of CbSAMS was then analyzed by TR-qPCR and GUS assay method. The result showed that CbSAMS is expressed in all examined tissues including callus, roots, petioles, leaves, and flowers with a significant higher expression level in roots and flowers. Furthermore, the expression level of CbSAMS was induced by low temperature, ethylene and NaCl. Subcellular localization revealed that CbSAMS was located in the cytoplasm and nucleus but has a significant higher level in the nucleus. These results indicated a potential role of CbSAMS in abiotic stresses and plant growth in C. bungeana. PMID:26205258

  18. Recognition of Escherichia coli valine transfer RNA by its cognate synthetase: A fluorine-19 NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Wenchy; Horowitz, J. )

    1991-02-12

    Interactions of 5-fluorouracil-substituted Escherichia coli tRNA{sup Val} with its cognate synthetase have been investigated by fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance. Valyl-tRNA synthetase (VRS) (EC 6.1.1.9), purified to homogeneity from an overproducing strain of E. coli, differs somewhat from VRS previously isolated from E. coli K12. Its amino acid composition and N-terminal sequence agree well with results derived from the sequence of the VRS gene. Apparent K{sub M} and V{sub max} values of the purified VRS are the same for both normal and 5-fluorouracil (FUra)-substituted tRNA{sup Val}. Binding of VRS to (FUra)tRNA{sup Val} induces structural perturbations that are reflected in selective changes in the {sup 19}F NMR spectrum of the tRNA. Addition of increasing amounts of VRS results in a gradual loss of intensity at resonances corresponding to FU34, FU7, and FU67, with FU34, at the wobble position of the anticodon, being affected most. At higher VRS/tRNA ratios, a broadening and shifting of FU12 and of FU4 and/or FU8 occur. These results indicate that VRS interacts with tRNA{sup Val} along the entire inside of the L-shape molecule, from the acceptor stem to the anticodon. Valyl-tRNA synthetase also causes a splitting of resonances FU55 and FU64 in the T-loop and stem of tRNA{sup Val}, suggesting conformational changes in this part of the molecule. No {sup 19}F NMR evidence was found for formation of the Michael adduct between VRS and FU8 of 5-fluorouracil-substituted tRNA{sup Val} that has been proposed as a common intermediate in the aminoacylation reaction.

  19. Inhibition of human glutamine synthetase by L-methionine-S,R-sulfoximine-relevance to the treatment of neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Jeitner, Thomas M; Cooper, Arthur J L

    2014-12-01

    At high concentrations, the glutamine synthetase inhibitor L-methionine-S,R-sulfoximine (MSO) is a convulsant, especially in dogs. Nevertheless, sub-convulsive doses of MSO are neuroprotective in rodent models of hyperammonemia, acute liver disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and suggest MSO may be clinically useful. Previous work has also shown that much lower doses of MSO are required to produce convulsions in dogs than in primates. Evidence from the mid-20th century suggests that humans are also less sensitive. In the present work, the inhibition of recombinant human glutamine synthetase by MSO is shown to be biphasic-an initial reversible competitive inhibition (K i 1.19 mM) is followed by rapid irreversible inactivation. This K i value for the human enzyme accounts, in part, for relative insensitivity of primates to MSO and suggests that this inhibitor could be used to safely inhibit glutamine synthetase activity in humans.

  20. Purification, gene cloning, and characterization of γ-butyrobetainyl CoA synthetase from Agrobacterium sp. 525a.

    PubMed

    Fujimitsu, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Akira; Takubo, Sayaka; Fukui, Akiko; Okada, Kazuma; Mohamed Ahmed, Isam A; Arima, Jiro; Mori, Nobuhiro

    2016-08-01

    The report is the first of purification, overproduction, and characterization of a unique γ-butyrobetainyl CoA synthetase from soil-isolated Agrobacterium sp. 525a. The primary structure of the enzyme shares 70-95% identity with those of ATP-dependent microbial acyl-CoA synthetases of the Rhizobiaceae family. As distinctive characteristics of the enzyme of this study, ADP was released in the catalytic reaction process, whereas many acyl CoA synthetases are annotated as an AMP-forming enzyme. The apparent Km values for γ-butyrobetaine, CoA, and ATP were, respectively, 0.69, 0.02, and 0.24 mM. PMID:27125317

  1. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic study of DHNA synthetase from Geobacillus kaustophilus

    SciTech Connect

    Kanaujia, Shankar Prasad; Ranjani, Chellamuthu Vasuki; Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman; Baba, Seiki; Kuroishi, Chizu; Ebihara, Akio; Shinkai, Akeo; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Sekar, Kanagaraj; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2007-02-01

    DHNA synthetase from G. kaustophilus has been cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. The aerobic Gram-positive bacterium Geobacillus kaustophilus is a bacillus species that was isolated from deep-sea sediment from the Mariana Trench. 1,4-Dihydroxy-2-naphthoate (DHNA) synthetase plays a vital role in the biosynthesis of menaquinone (vitamin K{sub 2}) in this bacterium. DHNA synthetase from Geobacillus kaustophilus was crystallized in the orthorhombic space group C222{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 77.01, b = 130.66, c = 131.69 Å. The crystal diffracted to a resolution of 2.2 Å. Preliminary studies and molecular-replacement calculations reveal the presence of three monomers in the asymmetric unit.

  2. Inhibitors of methionyl-tRNA synthetase have potent activity against Giardia intestinalis trophozoites.

    PubMed

    Ranade, Ranae M; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Gillespie, J Robert; Shibata, Sayaka; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Hol, Wim G J; Fan, Erkang; Buckner, Frederick S

    2015-11-01

    The methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MetRS) is a novel drug target for the protozoan pathogen Giardia intestinalis. This protist contains a single MetRS that is distinct from the human cytoplasmic MetRS. A panel of MetRS inhibitors was tested against recombinant Giardia MetRS, Giardia trophozoites, and mammalian cell lines. The best compounds inhibited trophozoite growth at 500 nM (metronidazole did so at ∼5,000 nM) and had low cytotoxicity against mammalian cells, indicating excellent potential for further development as anti-Giardia drugs. PMID:26324270

  3. Total glutamine synthetase levels in cerebrospinal fluid of Alzheimer's disease patients are unchanged.

    PubMed

    Timmer, Nienke M; Herbert, Megan K; Claassen, Jurgen A H R; Kuiperij, H Bea; Verbeek, Marcel M

    2015-03-01

    Decreased cerebral protein and activity levels of glutamine synthetase (GS) have been reported for Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Using a recently established method, we quantified total GS levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from AD patients and control subjects. Furthermore, we investigated if total GS levels in CSF could differentiate AD from frontotemperal dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies patients. As we found no significantly altered total GS levels in any of the patient groups compared with control subjects, we conclude that levels of total GS in CSF have no diagnostic value for AD, dementia with Lewy bodies, or frontotemperal dementia.

  4. Overexpression of acetyl-CoA synthetase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae increases acetic acid tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jun; Holzwarth, Garrett; Penner, Michael H.; Patton-Vogt, Jana; Bakalinsky, Alan T.

    2015-01-01

    Acetic acid-mediated inhibition of the fermentation of lignocellulose-derived sugars impedes development of plant biomass as a source of renewable ethanol. In order to overcome this inhibition, the capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to synthesize acetyl-CoA from acetic acid was increased by overexpressing ACS2 encoding acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase. Overexpression of ACS2 resulted in higher resistance to acetic acid as measured by an increased growth rate and shorter lag phase relative to a wild-type control strain, suggesting that Acs2-mediated consumption of acetic acid during fermentation contributes to acetic acid detoxification. PMID:25673654

  5. Overexpression of acetyl-CoA synthetase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae increases acetic acid tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jun; Holzwarth, Garrett; Penner, Michael H; Patton-Vogt, Jana; Bakalinsky, Alan T

    2015-01-01

    Acetic acid-mediated inhibition of the fermentation of lignocellulose-derived sugars impedes development of plant biomass as a source of renewable ethanol. In order to overcome this inhibition, the capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to synthesize acetyl-CoA from acetic acid was increased by overexpressing ACS2 encoding acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase. Overexpression of ACS2 resulted in higher resistance to acetic acid as measured by an increased growth rate and shorter lag phase relative to a wild-type control strain, suggesting that Acs2-mediated consumption of acetic acid during fermentation contributes to acetic acid detoxification.

  6. Lipoic acid synthetase deficiency causes neonatal-onset epilepsy, defective mitochondrial energy metabolism, and glycine elevation.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Johannes A; Zimmermann, Franz A; Fauth, Christine; Bergheim, Christa; Meierhofer, David; Radmayr, Doris; Zschocke, Johannes; Koch, Johannes; Sperl, Wolfgang

    2011-12-01

    Lipoic acid is an essential prosthetic group of four mitochondrial enzymes involved in the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate, α-ketoglutarate, and branched chain amino acids and in the glycine cleavage. Lipoic acid is synthesized stepwise within mitochondria through a process that includes lipoic acid synthetase. We identified the homozygous mutation c.746G>A (p.Arg249His) in LIAS in an individual with neonatal-onset epilepsy, muscular hypotonia, lactic acidosis, and elevated glycine concentration in plasma and urine. Investigation of the mitochondrial energy metabolism showed reduced oxidation of pyruvate and decreased pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity. A pronounced reduction of the prosthetic group lipoamide was found in lipoylated proteins.

  7. A novel, enigmatic histone modification: biotinylation of histones by holocarboxylase synthetase.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Yousef I; Zempleni, Janos

    2008-12-01

    Holocarboxylase synthetase catalyzes the covalent binding of biotin to histones in humans and other eukaryotes. Eleven biotinylation sites have been identified in histones H2A, H3, and H4. K12-biotinylated histone H4 is enriched in heterochromatin, repeat regions, and plays a role in gene repression. About 30% of the histone H4 molecules are biotinylated at K12 in histone H4 in human fibroblast telomeres. The abundance of biotinylated histones at distinct genomic loci depends on biotin availability. Decreased histone biotinylation decreases life span and stress resistance in Drosophila. Low enrichment of biotinylated histones at transposable elements impairs repression of these elements.

  8. Tissue Distribution of Glutamate Synthase and Glutamine Synthetase in Rice Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Yamaya, Tomoyuki; Hayakawa, Toshihiko; Tanasawa, Keisuke; Kamachi, Kazunari; Mae, Tadahiko; Ojima, Kunihiko

    1992-01-01

    To further explore the function of NADH-dependent glutamate synthase (GOGAT), the tissue distribution of NADH-GOGAT protein and activity was investigated in rice (Oryza sativa L.) leaves. The distributions of ferredoxin (Fd)-dependent GOGAT, plastidic glutamine synthetase, and cytosolic glutamine synthetase proteins were also determined in the same tissues. High levels of NADH-GOGAT protein (33.1 μg protein/g fresh weight) and activity were detected in the 10th leaf blade before emergence. The unexpanded, nongreen portion of the 9th leaf blade contained more than 50% of the NADH-GOGAT protein and activity per gram fresh weight when compared with the 10th leaf. The expanding, green portion of the 9th leaf blade outside of the sheath contained a slightly lower abundance of NADH-GOGAT protein than the nongreen portion of the 9th blade on a fresh weight basis. The fully expanded leaf blades at positions lower than the 9th leaf had decreased NADH-GOGAT levels as a function of increasing age, and the oldest, 5th blade contained only 4% of the NADH-GOGAT protein compared with the youngest 10th leaf blade. Fd-GOGAT protein, on the other hand, was the major form of GOGAT in the green tissues, and the highest amount of Fd-GOGAT protein (111 μg protein/g fresh weight) was detected in the 7th leaf blade. In the nongreen 10th leaf blade, the content of Fd-GOGAT protein was approximately 7% of that found in the 7th leaf blade. In addition, the content of NADH-GOGAT protein in the 10th leaf blade was about 4 times higher than that of Fd-GOGAT protein. The content of plastidic glutamine synthetase polypeptide was also the highest in the 7th leaf blade (429 μg/g fresh weight) and lowest in nongreen blades and sheaths. On the other hand, the relative abundance of the cytosolic glutamine synthetase polypeptide was the highest in the oldest leaf blade, decreasing to 10 to 20% of that value in young, nongreen leaves. These results suggest that NADH-GOGAT is important for the

  9. Overexpression of acetyl-CoA synthetase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae increases acetic acid tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jun; Holzwarth, Garrett; Penner, Michael H; Patton-Vogt, Jana; Bakalinsky, Alan T

    2015-01-01

    Acetic acid-mediated inhibition of the fermentation of lignocellulose-derived sugars impedes development of plant biomass as a source of renewable ethanol. In order to overcome this inhibition, the capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to synthesize acetyl-CoA from acetic acid was increased by overexpressing ACS2 encoding acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase. Overexpression of ACS2 resulted in higher resistance to acetic acid as measured by an increased growth rate and shorter lag phase relative to a wild-type control strain, suggesting that Acs2-mediated consumption of acetic acid during fermentation contributes to acetic acid detoxification. PMID:25673654

  10. MbtH-like proteins as integral components of bacterial nonribosomal peptide synthetases.

    PubMed

    Felnagle, Elizabeth A; Barkei, John J; Park, Hyunjun; Podevels, Angela M; McMahon, Matthew D; Drott, Donald W; Thomas, Michael G

    2010-10-19

    The biosynthesis of many natural products of clinical interest involves large, multidomain enzymes called nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). In bacteria, many of the gene clusters coding for NRPSs also code for a member of the MbtH-like protein superfamily, which are small proteins of unknown function. Using MbtH-like proteins from three separate NRPS systems, we show that these proteins copurify with the NRPSs and influence amino acid activation. As a consequence, MbtH-like proteins are integral components of NRPSs.

  11. The structures of cytosolic and plastid-located glutamine synthetases from Medicago truncatula reveal a common and dynamic architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Torreira, Eva; Seabra, Ana Rita; Marriott, Hazel; Zhou, Min; Llorca, Óscar; Robinson, Carol V.; Carvalho, Helena G.; Fernández-Tornero, Carlos; Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa

    2014-04-01

    The experimental models of dicotyledonous cytoplasmic and plastid-located glutamine synthetases unveil a conserved eukaryotic-type decameric architecture, with subtle structural differences in M. truncatula isoenzymes that account for their distinct herbicide resistance. The first step of nitrogen assimilation in higher plants, the energy-driven incorporation of ammonia into glutamate, is catalyzed by glutamine synthetase. This central process yields the readily metabolizable glutamine, which in turn is at the basis of all subsequent biosynthesis of nitrogenous compounds. The essential role performed by glutamine synthetase makes it a prime target for herbicidal compounds, but also a suitable intervention point for the improvement of crop yields. Although the majority of crop plants are dicotyledonous, little is known about the structural organization of glutamine synthetase in these organisms and about the functional differences between the different isoforms. Here, the structural characterization of two glutamine synthetase isoforms from the model legume Medicago truncatula is reported: the crystallographic structure of cytoplasmic GSII-1a and an electron cryomicroscopy reconstruction of plastid-located GSII-2a. Together, these structural models unveil a decameric organization of dicotyledonous glutamine synthetase, with two pentameric rings weakly connected by inter-ring loops. Moreover, rearrangement of these dynamic loops changes the relative orientation of the rings, suggesting a zipper-like mechanism for their assembly into a decameric enzyme. Finally, the atomic structure of M. truncatula GSII-1a provides important insights into the structural determinants of herbicide resistance in this family of enzymes, opening new avenues for the development of herbicide-resistant plants.

  12. Prostaglandin endoperoxide synthetase and the activation of benzo(a)pyrene to reactive metabolites in vivo in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Garattini, E.; Coccia, P.; Romano, M.; Jiritano, L.; Noseda, A.; Salmona, M.

    1984-11-01

    The role of prostaglandin endoperoxide synthetase in the in vivo activation of benzo(a)pyrene to reactive metabolites capable of interacting irreversibly with cellular macromolecules was studied in guinea pig liver, lung, kidney, spleen, small intestine, colon, and brain. DNA and protein covalent binding experiments were made after systemic administration of acetylsalicylic acid (200 mg/kg) followed by radiolabeled benzo(a)pyrene (4 microgram/kg). Results are compared with a control situation in which the prostaglandin endoperoxide synthetase inhibitor (acetylsalicylic acid) was not administered. No decrease in the level of DNA or protein benzo(a)pyrene-derived covalent binding was observed in any of the tissues studied.

  13. Terminal Synthesis of Xanthommatin in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER. III. Mutational Pleiotropy and Pigment Granule Association of Phenoxazinone Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, John P.; Forrest, Hugh S.; Kulkarni, Anil D.

    1973-01-01

    Phenoxazinone synthetase, which catalyzes the condensation of 3-hydroxykynurenine to xanthommatin, the brown eye pigment of Drosophila, is shown to exist in association with a particle which resembles the cytologically defined Type I pigment granule. Several classical eye color mutants (v, cn, st, ltd, cd, w), including two which effect other enzymes in the xanthommatin pathway (v, cn), have low levels of phenoxazinone synthetase activity and disrupt the normal association of the enzyme with the pigment granule. A model is proposed depicting several structural and enzymatic interrelationships involved in the developmental control of xanthommatin synthesis in Drosophila. PMID:4631600

  14. Activity of interferon-dependent 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase in rat lymphoid cells under transformed environment conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostapchenko, L. I.; Mikhailik, I. V.; Prokopova, K. V.

    It is detected that interferon-dependent 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase is a sensitive index of immunocompetent cells functional state under transformed environment conditions. Microgravitation and ionising radiation induce increase of investigated enzyme activity in rat lymphocytes, which can be a result of lymphoid cells compensatory mechanisms starting in response to stress factors action. Administration of interferon inductors permits to stimulate the 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase, which enables one to correct pathological changes in the cells and to intensify adaptive reactions of immune systems.

  15. Heterogeneous clinical spectrum of interstitial lung disease in patients with anti-EJ anti-synthetase syndrome: a case series.

    PubMed

    Giannini, Margherita; Notarnicola, Antonella; Dastmalchi, Maryam; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Lopalco, Giuseppe; Iannone, Florenzo

    2016-09-01

    Auto-antibodies against aminoacyl-tRNA-synthetases (anti-ARS Abs) represent the hallmark of the anti-synthetase syndrome that is defined as the clinical association of fever, Raynaud's phenomenon, myositis, interstitial lung disease (ILD), arthritis and mechanic's hands. Recently, differences in clinical features depending on specific anti-ARS Abs have been reported. We describe three cases of anti-EJ (anti-glycyl) antibody-positive patients presenting with ILD as a common feature, but with heterogeneous histopathological and radiographic patterns and with different responses to treatment. Relapsing-remittent fever, refractory muscle involvement and seronegative arthritis were also striking clinical manifestations.

  16. Antipeptide antibodies that can distinguish specific subunit polypeptides of glutamine synthetase from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, X.; Henry, R. L.; Takemoto, L. J.; Guikema, J. A.; Wong, P. P.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of the beta and gamma subunit polypeptides of glutamine synthetase from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) root nodules are very similar. However, there are small regions within the sequences that are significantly different between the two polypeptides. The sequences between amino acids 2 and 9 and between 264 and 274 are examples. Three peptides (gamma 2-9, gamma 264-274, and beta 264-274) corresponding to these sequences were synthesized. Antibodies against these peptides were raised in rabbits and purified with corresponding peptide-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Western blot analysis of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of bean nodule proteins demonstrated that the anti-beta 264-274 antibodies reacted specifically with the beta polypeptide and the anti-gamma 264-274 and anti-gamma 2-9 antibodies reacted specifically with the gamma polypeptide of the native and denatured glutamine synthetase. These results showed the feasibility of using synthetic peptides in developing antibodies that are capable of distinguishing proteins with similar primary structures.

  17. The bifunctional active site of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase. Roles of the basic residues.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J C; Markham, G D

    2000-02-11

    S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) synthetase catalyzes a unique two-step enzymatic reaction leading to formation of the primary biological alkylating agent. The crystal structure of Escherichia coli AdoMet synthetase shows that the active site, which lies between two subunits, contains four lysines and one histidine as basic residues. In order to test the proposed charge and hydrogen bonding roles in catalytic function, each lysine has been changed to an uncharged methionine or alanine, and the histidine has been altered to asparagine. The resultant enzyme variants are all tetramers like the wild type enzyme; however, circular dichroism spectra show reductions in helix content for the K245*M and K269M mutants. (The asterisk denotes that the residue is in the second subunit.) Four mutants have k(cat) reductions of approximately 10(3)-10(4)-fold in AdoMet synthesis; however, the k(cat) of K165*M variant is only reduced 2-fold. In each mutant, there is a smaller catalytic impairment in the partial reaction of tripolyphosphate hydrolysis. The K165*A enzyme has a 100-fold greater k(cat) for tripolyphosphate hydrolysis than the wild type enzyme, but this mutant is not activated by AdoMet in contrast to the wild type enzyme. The properties of these mutants require reassessment of the catalytic roles of these residues. PMID:10660564

  18. Crystal Structure and Function of 5-Formaminoimidazole-4-carboxamide Ribonucleotide Synthetase from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yang; White, Robert H.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2008-08-06

    Purine biosynthesis requires 10 enzymatic steps in higher organisms, while prokaryotes require an additional enzyme for step 6. In most organisms steps 9 and 10 are catalyzed by the purH gene product, a bifunctional enzyme with both 5-formaminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (FAICAR) synthase and inosine monophosphate (IMP) cyclohydrolase activity. Recently it was discovered that Archaea utilize different enzymes to catalyze steps 9 and 10. An ATP-dependent FAICAR synthetase is encoded by the purP gene, and IMP cyclohydrolase is encoded by the purO gene. We have determined the X-ray crystal structures of FAICAR synthetase from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii complexed with various ligands, including the tertiary substrate complex and product complex. The enzyme belongs to the ATP grasp superfamily and is predicted to use a formyl phosphate intermediate formed by an ATP-dependent phosphorylation. In addition, we have determined the structures of a PurP orthologue from Pyrococcus furiosus, which is functionally unclassified, in three crystal forms. With approximately 50% sequence identity, P. furiosus PurP is structurally homologous to M. jannaschii PurP. A phylogenetic analysis was performed to explore the possible role of this functionally unclassified PurP.

  19. Structural homologies with ATP- and folate-binding enzymes in the crystal structure of folylpolyglutamate synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaolin; Bognar, Andrew L.; Baker, Edward N.; Smith, Clyde A.

    1998-01-01

    Folylpolyglutamate synthetase, which is responsible for the addition of a polyglutamate tail to folate and folate derivatives, is an ATP-dependent enzyme isolated from eukaryotic and bacterial sources, where it plays a key role in the retention of the intracellular folate pool. Here, we report the 2.4-Å resolution crystal structure of the MgATP complex of the enzyme from Lactobacillus casei. The structural analysis reveals that folylpolyglutamate synthetase is a modular protein consisting of two domains, one with a typical mononucleotide-binding fold and the other strikingly similar to the folate-binding enzyme dihydrofolate reductase. We have located the active site of the enzyme in a large interdomain cleft adjacent to an ATP-binding P-loop motif. Opposite this site, in the C domain, a cavity likely to be the folate binding site has been identified, and inspection of this cavity and the surrounding protein structure suggests that the glutamate tail of the substrate may project into the active site. A further feature of the structure is a well defined Ω loop, which contributes both to the active site and to interdomain interactions. The determination of the structure of this enzyme represents the first step toward the elucidation of the molecular mechanism of polyglutamylation of folates and antifolates. PMID:9618466

  20. Required allosteric effector site for N-acetylglutamate on carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase I.

    PubMed

    McCudden, C R; Powers-Lee, S G

    1996-07-26

    Carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase I (CPSase I) catalyzes the entry and rate-limiting step in the urea cycle, the pathway by which mammals detoxify ammonia. One facet of CPSase I regulation is a requirement for N-acetylglutamate (AGA), which induces an active enzyme conformation and does not participate directly in the chemical reaction. We have utilized labeling with carbodiimide-activated [14C]AGA to identify peptides 120-127, 234-237, 625-630, and 1351-1356 as potentially being near the binding site for AGA. Identification of peptide 1351-1356 confirms the previous demonstration (Rodriquez-Aparicio, L. B., Guadalajara, A. M., and Rubio, V.(1989) Biochemistry 28, 3070-3074) that the C-terminal region is involved in binding AGA. Identification of peptides 120-127 and 234-237 constitutes the first evidence that the N-terminal region of the synthetase is involved in ligand binding. Since peptides 631-638 and 1327-1348 have been identified near the ATP site of CPSase I (Potter, M. D., and Powers-Lee, S. G.(1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 2023-2031), the present finding of involvement of peptides 625-630 and 1351-1356 at an "allosteric" activator site was unexpected. The idea that portions of the AGA effector site might be derived from an ancestral glutamine substrate site via a gene duplication and diversification event was considered. PMID:8663466

  1. Regulation of an Escherichia coli/mammalian chimeric carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase.

    PubMed

    Sahay, N; Guy, H I; Liu, X; Evans, D R

    1998-11-20

    Carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase (CPSase) consists of a 120-kDa synthetase domain (CPS) that makes carbamoyl phosphate from ATP, bicarbonate, and ammonia usually produced by a separate glutaminase domain. CPS is composed of two subdomains, CPS.A and CPS.B. Although CPS.A and CPS.B have specialized functions in intact CPSase, the separately cloned subdomains can catalyze carbamoyl phosphate synthesis. This report describes the construction of a 58-kDa chimeric CPSase composed of Escherichia coli CPS.A catalytic subdomains and the mammalian regulatory subdomain. The catalytic parameters are similar to those of the E. coli enzyme, but the activity is regulated by the mammalian effectors and protein kinase A phosphorylation. The chimera has a single site that binds phosphoribosyl 5'-pyrophosphate (PRPP) with a dissociation constant of 25 microM. The dissociation constant for UTP of 0.23 mM was inferred from its effect on PRPP binding. Thus, the regulatory subdomain is an exchangeable ligand binding module that can control both CPS.A and CPS.B domains, and the pathway for allosteric signal transmission is identical in E. coli and mammalian CPSase. A deletion mutant that truncates the polypeptide within a postulated regulatory sequence is as active as the parent chimera but is insensitive to effectors. PRPP and UTP bind to the mutant, suggesting that the carboxyl half of the subdomain is essential for transmitting the allosteric signal but not for ligand binding. PMID:9813025

  2. Sirtuin-dependent reversible lysine acetylation of glutamine synthetases reveals an autofeedback loop in nitrogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    You, Di; Yin, Bin-Cheng; Li, Zhi-Hai; Zhou, Ying; Yu, Wen-Bang; Zuo, Peng; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2016-06-14

    In cells of all domains of life, reversible lysine acetylation modulates the function of proteins involved in central cellular processes such as metabolism. In this study, we demonstrate that the nitrogen regulator GlnR of the actinomycete Saccharopolyspora erythraea directly regulates transcription of the acuA gene (SACE_5148), which encodes a Gcn5-type lysine acetyltransferase. We found that AcuA acetylates two glutamine synthetases (GlnA1 and GlnA4) and that this lysine acetylation inactivated GlnA4 (GSII) but had no significant effect on GlnA1 (GSI-β) activity under the conditions tested. Instead, acetylation of GlnA1 led to a gain-of-function that modulated its interaction with the GlnR regulator and enhanced GlnR-DNA binding. It was observed that this regulatory function of acetylated GSI-β enzymes is highly conserved across actinomycetes. In turn, GlnR controls the catalytic and regulatory activities (intracellular acetylation levels) of glutamine synthetases at the transcriptional and posttranslational levels, indicating an autofeedback loop that regulates nitrogen metabolism in response to environmental change. Thus, this GlnR-mediated acetylation pathway provides a signaling cascade that acts from nutrient sensing to acetylation of proteins to feedback regulation. This work presents significant new insights at the molecular level into the mechanisms underlying the regulation of protein acetylation and nitrogen metabolism in actinomycetes. PMID:27247389

  3. Impaired Function is a Common Feature of Neuropathy-Associated Glycyl-tRNA Synthetase Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Laurie B.; Sakaguchi, Reiko; McGuigan, David; Gonzalez, Michael A.; Searby, Charles; Züchner, Stephan; Hou, Ya-Ming; Antonellis, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2D (CMT2D) is an autosomal dominant axonal peripheral neuropathy characterized by impaired motor and sensory function in the distal extremities. Mutations in the glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) gene cause CMT2D. GARS is a member of the ubiquitously expressed aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (ARS) family and is responsible for charging tRNA with glycine. To date, thirteen GARS mutations have been identified in patients with CMT disease. While functional studies have revealed loss-of-function characteristics, only four GARS mutations have been rigorously studied. Here, we report the functional evaluation of nine CMT-associated GARS mutations in tRNA charging, yeast complementation, and subcellular localization assays. Our results demonstrate that impaired function is a common characteristic of CMT-associated GARS mutations. Additionally, one mutation previously associated with CMT disease (p.Ser581Leu) does not demonstrate impaired function, was identified in the general population, and failed to segregate with disease in two newly identified families with CMT disease. Thus, we propose that this variant is not a disease-causing mutation. Together, our data indicate that impaired function is a key component of GARS-mediated CMT disease and emphasize the need for careful genetic and functional evaluation before implicating a variant in disease onset. PMID:25168514

  4. Reaction Mechanism of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Glutamine Synthetase Using Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Calculations.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Cátia; Ramos, Maria J; Fernandes, Pedro Alexandrino

    2016-06-27

    This paper is devoted to the understanding of the reaction mechanism of mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine synthetase (mtGS) with atomic detail, using computational quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods at the ONIOM M06-D3/6-311++G(2d,2p):ff99SB//B3LYP/6-31G(d):ff99SB level of theory. The complete reaction undergoes a three-step mechanism: the spontaneous transfer of phosphate from ATP to glutamate upon ammonium binding (ammonium quickly loses a proton to Asp54), the attack of ammonia on phosphorylated glutamate (yielding protonated glutamine), and the deprotonation of glutamine by the leaving phosphate. This exothermic reaction has an activation free energy of 21.5 kcal mol(-1) , which is consistent with that described for Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase (15-17 kcal mol(-1) ). The participating active site residues have been identified and their role and energy contributions clarified. This study provides an insightful atomic description of the biosynthetic reaction that takes place in this enzyme, opening doors for more accurate studies for developing new anti-tuberculosis therapies.

  5. Reaction Mechanism of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Glutamine Synthetase Using Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Calculations.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Cátia; Ramos, Maria J; Fernandes, Pedro Alexandrino

    2016-06-27

    This paper is devoted to the understanding of the reaction mechanism of mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine synthetase (mtGS) with atomic detail, using computational quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods at the ONIOM M06-D3/6-311++G(2d,2p):ff99SB//B3LYP/6-31G(d):ff99SB level of theory. The complete reaction undergoes a three-step mechanism: the spontaneous transfer of phosphate from ATP to glutamate upon ammonium binding (ammonium quickly loses a proton to Asp54), the attack of ammonia on phosphorylated glutamate (yielding protonated glutamine), and the deprotonation of glutamine by the leaving phosphate. This exothermic reaction has an activation free energy of 21.5 kcal mol(-1) , which is consistent with that described for Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase (15-17 kcal mol(-1) ). The participating active site residues have been identified and their role and energy contributions clarified. This study provides an insightful atomic description of the biosynthetic reaction that takes place in this enzyme, opening doors for more accurate studies for developing new anti-tuberculosis therapies. PMID:27225077

  6. Trans-oligomerization of duplicated aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases maintains genetic code fidelity under stress.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Miguel Ángel; Napolitano, Mauro; Ochoa de Alda, Jesús A G; Santamaría-Gómez, Javier; Patterson, Carl J; Foster, Andrew W; Bru-Martínez, Roque; Robinson, Nigel J; Luque, Ignacio

    2015-11-16

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) play a key role in deciphering the genetic message by producing charged tRNAs and are equipped with proofreading mechanisms to ensure correct pairing of tRNAs with their cognate amino acid. Duplicated aaRSs are very frequent in Nature, with 25,913 cases observed in 26,837 genomes. The oligomeric nature of many aaRSs raises the question of how the functioning and oligomerization of duplicated enzymes is organized. We characterized this issue in a model prokaryotic organism that expresses two different threonyl-tRNA synthetases, responsible for Thr-tRNA(Thr) synthesis: one accurate and constitutively expressed (T1) and another (T2) with impaired proofreading activity that also generates mischarged Ser-tRNA(Thr). Low zinc promotes dissociation of dimeric T1 into monomers deprived of aminoacylation activity and simultaneous induction of T2, which is active for aminoacylation under low zinc. T2 either forms homodimers or heterodimerizes with T1 subunits that provide essential proofreading activity in trans. These findings evidence that in organisms with duplicated genes, cells can orchestrate the assemblage of aaRSs oligomers that meet the necessities of the cell in each situation. We propose that controlled oligomerization of duplicated aaRSs is an adaptive mechanism that can potentially be expanded to the plethora of organisms with duplicated oligomeric aaRSs.

  7. Trans-oligomerization of duplicated aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases maintains genetic code fidelity under stress

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Miguel Ángel; Napolitano, Mauro; Ochoa de Alda, Jesús A. G.; Santamaría-Gómez, Javier; Patterson, Carl J.; Foster, Andrew W.; Bru-Martínez, Roque; Robinson, Nigel J.; Luque, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) play a key role in deciphering the genetic message by producing charged tRNAs and are equipped with proofreading mechanisms to ensure correct pairing of tRNAs with their cognate amino acid. Duplicated aaRSs are very frequent in Nature, with 25,913 cases observed in 26,837 genomes. The oligomeric nature of many aaRSs raises the question of how the functioning and oligomerization of duplicated enzymes is organized. We characterized this issue in a model prokaryotic organism that expresses two different threonyl-tRNA synthetases, responsible for Thr-tRNAThr synthesis: one accurate and constitutively expressed (T1) and another (T2) with impaired proofreading activity that also generates mischarged Ser-tRNAThr. Low zinc promotes dissociation of dimeric T1 into monomers deprived of aminoacylation activity and simultaneous induction of T2, which is active for aminoacylation under low zinc. T2 either forms homodimers or heterodimerizes with T1 subunits that provide essential proofreading activity in trans. These findings evidence that in organisms with duplicated genes, cells can orchestrate the assemblage of aaRSs oligomers that meet the necessities of the cell in each situation. We propose that controlled oligomerization of duplicated aaRSs is an adaptive mechanism that can potentially be expanded to the plethora of organisms with duplicated oligomeric aaRSs. PMID:26464444

  8. Search for primitive Methanopyrus based on genetic distance between Val- and Ile-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhiliang; Takai, Ken; Slesarev, Alexei; Xue, Hong; Wong, J Tze-Fei

    2009-10-01

    Since evidence indicates that the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA) was phylogenetically closest to Methanopyrus kandleri among living organisms with elucidated genomes, this study has been directed to a search for the most primitive Methanopyrus lineage. For this purpose, the divergence of valyl-tRNA synthetase (ValRS) and isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase (IleRS) was employed as a measure of primitivity. Comparison of Methanopyrus kandleri and the Methanopyrus isolates GC34 and GC37 from the Pacific Ocean and KOL6, TAG1, TAG11, and SNP6 from the Atlantic Ocean established that the Pacific lineages are more primitive than the Atlantic lineages. Both the groups, however, are younger than environmental genomes from the Kairei Field of Central Indian Ridge in the Indian Ocean. These results showed that different Methanopyrus isolates differ significantly with respect to ValRS-IleRS divergence. On this basis, genomes giving rise to the ValRS and IleRS gene fragments from the Central Indian Ridge represent the most primitive Methanopyrus, phylogenetically the oldest living lineage closest to LUCA. PMID:19841848

  9. Human Tyr-tRNA synthetase is a potent PARP-1 activating effector target for resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Sajish, Mathew; Schimmel, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol (RSV) is reported to extend life span1,2 and provide cardio-neuro-protective3, anti-diabetic4, and anti-cancer effects3,5 by initiating a stress response2 that induces survival genes. Because human tyrosyl tRNA synthetase (TyrRS) translocates to the nucleus under stress conditions6, we considered the possibility that the tyrosine-like phenolic ring of RSV might fit into the active site pocket to effect a nuclear role. Here we present a 2.1Å co-crystal structure of RSV bound to the active site of TyrRS. RSV nullified the catalytic activity and redirected TyrRS to a nuclear function, stimulating NAD+-dependent auto-poly-ADP-ribosylation of PARP-1. Downstream activation of key stress signaling pathways were causally connected to TyrRS-PARP-1-NAD+ collaboration. This collaboration was also demonstrated in the mouse, and was specifically blocked in vivo by a RSV-displacing tyrosyl adenylate analog. In contrast to functionally diverse tRNA synthetase catalytic nulls created by alternative splicing events that ablate active sites7, here a non-spliced TyrRS catalytic null reveals a new PARP-1- and NAD+-dependent dimension to the physiological mechanism of RSV. PMID:25533949

  10. Biosynthesis of Branched-Chain Amino Acids in Schizosaccharomyces pombe: Properties of Acetohydroxy Acid Synthetase1

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Roderick A.; Satyanarayana, T.; Kaplan, J. G.

    1973-01-01

    The regulatory properties of acetohydroxy acid synthetase (AHAS), the first enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway to valine and the second in the isoleucine pathway, were investigated in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The enzyme was partially purified from crude extracts by protamine sulfate treatment, ammonium sulfate fractionation, and gel filtration through Sephadex G-25. AHAS from S. pombe is unique in that its activity shows a single peak around pH 6.5; high sensitivity to feedback inhibition by valine at this pH (Ki = 0.1 mM) indicates that the enzyme is involved in valine biosynthesis. Pyruvate saturation kinetics of AHAS extracted from cells grown on glycerol as sole carbon and energy source were normal and hyperbolic. In contrast, the enzyme from glucose-grown cells exhibited sigmoidal saturation kinetics, an effect which disappeared when the synthetase from such cells was partially purified. This phenomenon was shown to be due to competition for pyruvate between AHAS and pyruvate decarboxylase; the latter enzyme is present in large amounts in cells fermenting glucose. Valine inhibition is noncompetitive in nature, and this effector exhibits homotropic cooperative effects; isoleucine is a less-potent inhibitor of AHAS activity. Mercurial treatment reversibly desensitized the enzyme to valine inhibition. On the basis of these data, the S. pombe AHAS appears to be an allosteric regulatory enzyme with the properties of a negative V system. PMID:4698210

  11. Regulation of Nodule Glutamine Synthetase by CO2 Levels in Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) 1

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, José-Luis; Sánchez, Federico; Soberón, Mario; Flores, Miguel Lara

    1992-01-01

    Nodulated bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) plants were grown for 17 days after infection in normal (0.02%) CO2 and from day 8 to 17 in high (0.1%) CO2 in order to increase nitrogen fixation and define how nodule glutamine synthetase (GS) isoforms are regulated by the ammonia derived from the bacteroid. Nitrogenase activity was detected by day 10, and by day 17 activity was over twofold higher in 0.1% of CO2 compared with plants grown in 0.02% CO2 and inoculated with Rhizobium wild-type strain CE3. Likewise, plant fresh weight increased in response to increased CO2, particularly in plants inoculated with the Rhizobium phaseoli mutant strain CFN037. Glutamine synthetase specific activity increased 2.5- to 6.5-fold from day 11 to 17. However, increased CO2 did not appear to have an effect on GS specific activity. Analysis of the nodule GS polypeptide composition revealed that the γ polypeptide was significantly reduced in response to high CO2, whereas the β polypeptide was not affected. The significance of this result in relation to the regulation of GS isoforms and their role in the assimilation of ammonia in the nodule is discussed in this paper. ImagesFigure 4 PMID:16668681

  12. Loss of editing activity during the evolution of mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Roy, Hervé; Ling, Jiqiang; Alfonzo, Juan; Ibba, Michael

    2005-11-18

    Accurate selection of amino acids is essential for faithful translation of the genetic code. Errors during amino acid selection are usually corrected by the editing activity of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases such as phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetases (PheRS), which edit misactivated tyrosine. Comparison of cytosolic and mitochondrial PheRS from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae suggested that the organellar protein might lack the editing activity. Yeast cytosolic PheRS was found to contain an editing site, which upon disruption abolished both cis and trans editing of Tyr-tRNA(Phe). Wild-type mitochondrial PheRS lacked cis and trans editing and could synthesize Tyr-tRNA(Phe), an activity enhanced in active site variants with improved tyrosine recognition. Possible trans editing was investigated in isolated mitochondrial extracts, but no such activity was detected. These data indicate that the mitochondrial protein synthesis machinery lacks the tyrosine proofreading activity characteristic of cytosolic translation. This difference between the mitochondria and the cytosol suggests that either organellar protein synthesis quality control is focused on another step or that translation in this compartment is inherently less accurate than in the cytosol. PMID:16162501

  13. Catalytic mechanism and allosteric regulation of an oligomeric (p)ppGpp synthetase by an alarmone.

    PubMed

    Steinchen, Wieland; Schuhmacher, Jan S; Altegoer, Florian; Fage, Christopher D; Srinivasan, Vasundara; Linne, Uwe; Marahiel, Mohamed A; Bange, Gert

    2015-10-27

    Nucleotide-based second messengers serve in the response of living organisms to environmental changes. In bacteria and plant chloroplasts, guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp) and guanosine pentaphosphate (pppGpp) [collectively named "(p)ppGpp"] act as alarmones that globally reprogram cellular physiology during various stress conditions. Enzymes of the RelA/SpoT homology (RSH) family synthesize (p)ppGpp by transferring pyrophosphate from ATP to GDP or GTP. Little is known about the catalytic mechanism and regulation of alarmone synthesis. It also is unclear whether ppGpp and pppGpp execute different functions. Here, we unravel the mechanism and allosteric regulation of the highly cooperative alarmone synthetase small alarmone synthetase 1 (SAS1) from Bacillus subtilis. We determine that the catalytic pathway of (p)ppGpp synthesis involves a sequentially ordered substrate binding, activation of ATP in a strained conformation, and transfer of pyrophosphate through a nucleophilic substitution (SN2) reaction. We show that pppGpp-but not ppGpp-positively regulates SAS1 at an allosteric site. Although the physiological significance remains to be elucidated, we establish the structural and mechanistic basis for a biological activity in which ppGpp and pppGpp execute different functional roles.

  14. [Modification of phenylalanyl-tRNA-synthetase from Escherichia coli MRE600 by adenosine-5'-trimetaphosphate].

    PubMed

    Khodyreva, S N; Nevinskiĭ, G A; Ankilova, V N; Lavrik, O I

    1983-01-01

    Modification of phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase from E. coli MRE600 by adenosine-5'-trimetaphosphate, phosphorylating analog of ATP was shown to bring about the enzyme inactivation in the reactions of tRNA aminoacylation and ATP-[32P]pyrophosphate exchange. ATP when added in the reaction mixture protects the enzyme against inactivation in both reactions and decreases the level of covalent attachment of the analog. Phenylalanine has no protective effect. tRNA exhibits slight protective effect. Adenosine-5'-trimetaphosphate modifies both types (alpha and beta) of subunits of phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase which is of alpha 2 beta 2 structure. ATP protects both types of the enzyme subunits against the covalent attachment of the analog. Disposition of the ATP-binding centers in the contact region of the nonequivalent subunits of the enzyme was proposed. The level of covalent attachment of the analog to the enzyme exceeds the number of the enzyme active sites that may be a consequence of the other nucleotide-binding center labeling. PMID:6361520

  15. The Enterococcal Cytolysin Synthetase Coevolves with Substrate for Stereoselective Lanthionine Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Weixin; Thibodeaux, Gabrielle N; van der Donk, Wilfred A

    2016-09-16

    Stereochemical control is critical in natural product biosynthesis. For ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs), the mechanism(s) by which stereoselectivity is achieved is still poorly understood. In this work, we focused on the stereoselective lanthionine synthesis in lanthipeptides, a major class of RiPPs formed by the addition of Cys residues to dehydroalanine (Dha) or dehydrobutyrine (Dhb). Nonenzymatic cyclization of the small subunit of a virulence lanthipeptide, the enterococcal cytolysin, resulted in the native modified peptide as the major product, suggesting that both regioselectivity and stereoselectivity are inherent to the dehydrated peptide sequence. These results support previous computational studies that a Dhx-Dhx-Xxx-Xxx-Cys motif (Dhx = Dha or Dhb; Xxx = any amino acid except Dha, Dhb, and Cys) preferentially cyclizes by attack on the Re face of Dha or Dhb. Characterization of the stereochemistry of the products formed enzymatically with substrate mutants revealed that the lanthionine synthetase actively reinforces Re face attack. These findings support the hypothesis of substrate-controlled selectivity in lanthionine synthesis but also reveal likely coevolution of substrates and lanthionine synthetases to ensure the stereoselective synthesis of lanthipeptides with defined biological activities. PMID:27348535

  16. Catalytic mechanism and allosteric regulation of an oligomeric (p)ppGpp synthetase by an alarmone

    PubMed Central

    Steinchen, Wieland; Schuhmacher, Jan S.; Altegoer, Florian; Fage, Christopher D.; Srinivasan, Vasundara; Linne, Uwe; Marahiel, Mohamed A.; Bange, Gert

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide-based second messengers serve in the response of living organisms to environmental changes. In bacteria and plant chloroplasts, guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp) and guanosine pentaphosphate (pppGpp) [collectively named “(p)ppGpp”] act as alarmones that globally reprogram cellular physiology during various stress conditions. Enzymes of the RelA/SpoT homology (RSH) family synthesize (p)ppGpp by transferring pyrophosphate from ATP to GDP or GTP. Little is known about the catalytic mechanism and regulation of alarmone synthesis. It also is unclear whether ppGpp and pppGpp execute different functions. Here, we unravel the mechanism and allosteric regulation of the highly cooperative alarmone synthetase small alarmone synthetase 1 (SAS1) from Bacillus subtilis. We determine that the catalytic pathway of (p)ppGpp synthesis involves a sequentially ordered substrate binding, activation of ATP in a strained conformation, and transfer of pyrophosphate through a nucleophilic substitution (SN2) reaction. We show that pppGpp—but not ppGpp—positively regulates SAS1 at an allosteric site. Although the physiological significance remains to be elucidated, we establish the structural and mechanistic basis for a biological activity in which ppGpp and pppGpp execute different functional roles. PMID:26460002

  17. Neddylation requires glycyl-tRNA synthetase to protect activated E2.

    PubMed

    Mo, Zhongying; Zhang, Qian; Liu, Ze; Lauer, Janelle; Shi, Yi; Sun, Litao; Griffin, Patrick R; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2016-08-01

    Neddylation is a post-translational modification that controls the cell cycle and proliferation by conjugating the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8 to specific targets. Here we report that glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS), an essential enzyme in protein synthesis, also plays a critical role in neddylation. In human cells, knockdown of GlyRS, but not knockdown of a different tRNA synthetase, decreased the global level of neddylation and caused cell-cycle abnormality. This function of GlyRS is achieved through direct interactions with multiple components of the neddylation pathway, including NEDD8, E1, and E2 (Ubc12). Using various structural and functional approaches, we show that GlyRS binds the APPBP1 subunit of E1 and captures and protects activated E2 (NEDD8-conjugated Ubc12) before the activated E2 reaches a downstream target. Therefore, GlyRS functions as a chaperone that critically supports neddylation. This function is probably conserved in all eukaryotic GlyRS enzymes and may contribute to the strong association of GlyRS with cancer progression. PMID:27348078

  18. Codon usage, amino acid usage, transfer RNA and amino-acyl-tRNA synthetases in Mimiviruses.

    PubMed

    Colson, Philippe; Fournous, Ghislain; Diene, Seydina M; Raoult, Didier

    2013-01-01

    Mimiviruses are giant viruses that infect phagocytic protists, including Acanthamoebae spp., which were discovered during the past decade. They are the current record holder among viruses for their large particle and genome sizes. One group is composed of three lineages, referred to as A, B and C, which include the vast majority of the Mimiviridae members. Cafeteria roenbergensis virus represents a second group, though the Mimiviridae family is still expanding. We analyzed the codon and amino acid usages in mimiviruses, as well as both the transfer RNA (tRNA) and amino acyl-tRNA synthetases. We confirmed that the codon and amino acid usages of these giant viruses are highly dissimilar to those in their amoebal host Acanthamoeba castellanii and are instead correlated with the high adenine and thymine (AT) content of Mimivirus genomes. We further describe that the set of tRNAs and amino acyl-tRNA synthetases in mimiviruses is globally not adapted to the codon and amino acid usages of these viruses. Notwithstanding, Leu(TAA)tRNA, present in several Mimivirus genomes and in multiple copies in some viral genomes, may complement the amoebal tRNA pool and may contribute to accommodate the viral AT-rich codons. In addition, we found that the genes most highly expressed at the beginning of the Mimivirus replicative cycle have a nucleotide content more adapted to the codon usage in A.castellanii.

  19. Analogs of natural aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase inhibitors clear malaria in vivo.

    PubMed

    Novoa, Eva Maria; Camacho, Noelia; Tor, Anna; Wilkinson, Barrie; Moss, Steven; Marín-García, Patricia; Azcárate, Isabel G; Bautista, José M; Mirando, Adam C; Francklyn, Christopher S; Varon, Sònia; Royo, Miriam; Cortés, Alfred; Ribas de Pouplana, Lluís

    2014-12-23

    Malaria remains a major global health problem. Emerging resistance to existing antimalarial drugs drives the search for new antimalarials, and protein translation is a promising pathway to target. Here we explore the potential of the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (ARS) family as a source of antimalarial drug targets. First, a battery of known and novel ARS inhibitors was tested against Plasmodium falciparum cultures, and their activities were compared. Borrelidin, a natural inhibitor of threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS), stands out for its potent antimalarial effect. However, it also inhibits human ThrRS and is highly toxic to human cells. To circumvent this problem, we tested a library of bioengineered and semisynthetic borrelidin analogs for their antimalarial activity and toxicity. We found that some analogs effectively lose their toxicity against human cells while retaining a potent antiparasitic activity both in vitro and in vivo and cleared malaria from Plasmodium yoelii-infected mice, resulting in 100% mice survival rates. Our work identifies borrelidin analogs as potent, selective, and unexplored scaffolds that efficiently clear malaria both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25489076

  20. Archaeal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases interact with the ribosome to recycle tRNAs.

    PubMed

    Godinic-Mikulcic, Vlatka; Jaric, Jelena; Greber, Basil J; Franke, Vedran; Hodnik, Vesna; Anderluh, Gregor; Ban, Nenad; Weygand-Durasevic, Ivana

    2014-04-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS) are essential enzymes catalyzing the formation of aminoacyl-tRNAs, the immediate precursors for encoded peptides in ribosomal protein synthesis. Previous studies have suggested a link between tRNA aminoacylation and high-molecular-weight cellular complexes such as the cytoskeleton or ribosomes. However, the structural basis of these interactions and potential mechanistic implications are not well understood. To biochemically characterize these interactions we have used a system of two interacting archaeal aaRSs: an atypical methanogenic-type seryl-tRNA synthetase and an archaeal ArgRS. More specifically, we have shown by thermophoresis and surface plasmon resonance that these two aaRSs bind to the large ribosomal subunit with micromolar affinities. We have identified the L7/L12 stalk and the proteins located near the stalk base as the main sites for aaRS binding. Finally, we have performed a bioinformatics analysis of synonymous codons in the Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus genome that supports a mechanism in which the deacylated tRNAs may be recharged by aaRSs bound to the ribosome and reused at the next occurrence of a codon encoding the same amino acid. These results suggest a mechanism of tRNA recycling in which aaRSs associate with the L7/L12 stalk region to recapture the tRNAs released from the preceding ribosome in polysomes.

  1. Trans-oligomerization of duplicated aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases maintains genetic code fidelity under stress.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Miguel Ángel; Napolitano, Mauro; Ochoa de Alda, Jesús A G; Santamaría-Gómez, Javier; Patterson, Carl J; Foster, Andrew W; Bru-Martínez, Roque; Robinson, Nigel J; Luque, Ignacio

    2015-11-16

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) play a key role in deciphering the genetic message by producing charged tRNAs and are equipped with proofreading mechanisms to ensure correct pairing of tRNAs with their cognate amino acid. Duplicated aaRSs are very frequent in Nature, with 25,913 cases observed in 26,837 genomes. The oligomeric nature of many aaRSs raises the question of how the functioning and oligomerization of duplicated enzymes is organized. We characterized this issue in a model prokaryotic organism that expresses two different threonyl-tRNA synthetases, responsible for Thr-tRNA(Thr) synthesis: one accurate and constitutively expressed (T1) and another (T2) with impaired proofreading activity that also generates mischarged Ser-tRNA(Thr). Low zinc promotes dissociation of dimeric T1 into monomers deprived of aminoacylation activity and simultaneous induction of T2, which is active for aminoacylation under low zinc. T2 either forms homodimers or heterodimerizes with T1 subunits that provide essential proofreading activity in trans. These findings evidence that in organisms with duplicated genes, cells can orchestrate the assemblage of aaRSs oligomers that meet the necessities of the cell in each situation. We propose that controlled oligomerization of duplicated aaRSs is an adaptive mechanism that can potentially be expanded to the plethora of organisms with duplicated oligomeric aaRSs. PMID:26464444

  2. Oxygen-dependent inactivation of gramicidin S synthetase in Bacillus brevis.

    PubMed Central

    Friebel, T E; Demain, A L

    1977-01-01

    Incorporation of L-[14C]ornithine into gramicidin S by crude, unfractionated lysozyme extracts of Bacillus brevis ATCC 9999 was shown to represent the activity of the gramicidin synthetase complex. Frozen-thawed cells were the source of active extracts, but when cells were shaken in air at 37 degrees C, they rapidly lost activity in a first-order reaction with a half-life of 13 min. Protease inhibitors and inhibitors of energy metabolism had no effect on the inactivation process in frozen-thawed cells. Stabilization was achieved when the cells were shaken in nitrogen or helium instead of air. The addition of dithiothreitol produced a moderate degree of stabilization. The L-ornithine- and D-phenylalanine-activating activities of the gramicidin S synthetase complex were also lost during aeration of the cells. Crude cell-free extracts also lost activity when they were shaken in oxygen, but, in this case, inactivation was slower (half-life of 80 min). Nitrogen also stabilized these cell-free extracts. PMID:68033

  3. Purification and characterization of recombinant Plasmodium falciparum adenylosuccinate synthetase expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jayalakshmi, R; Sumathy, K; Balaram, Hemalatha

    2002-06-01

    Most parasitic protozoa lack the de novo purine biosynthetic pathway and rely exclusively on the salvage pathway for their purine nucleotide requirements. Enzymes of the salvage pathway are, therefore, candidate drug targets. We have cloned the Plasmodium falciparum adenylosuccinate synthetase gene. In the parasite, adenylosuccinate synthetase is involved in the synthesis of AMP from IMP formed during the salvage of the purine base, hypoxanthine. The gene was shown to code for a functionally active protein by functional complementation in a purA mutant strain of Escherichia coli, H1238. This paper reports the conditions for hyperexpression of the recombinant protein in E. coli BL21(DE3) and purification of the protein to homogeneity. The enzyme was found to require the presence of dithiothreitol during the entire course of the purification for activity. Glycerol and EDTA were found to stabilize enzyme activity during storage. The specific activity of the purified protein was 1143.6 +/- 36.8 mUnits/mg. The K(M)s for the three substrates, GTP, IMP, and aspartate, were found to be 4.8 microM, 22.8 microM, and 1.4 mM, respectively. The enzyme was a dimer on gel filtration in buffers of low ionic strength but equilibrated between a monomer and a dimer in buffers of increased ionic strength.

  4. β-Lactam formation by a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase during antibiotic biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Gaudelli, Nicole M.; Long, Darcie H.; Townsend, Craig A.

    2014-01-01

    Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) are giant enzymes comprised of modules that house repeated sets of functional domains, which select, activate and couple amino acids drawn from a pool of nearly 500 potential building blocks.1 The structurally and stereochemically diverse peptides generated in this manner underlie the biosynthesis of a large sector of natural products. Many of their derived metabolites are bioactive such as the antibiotics vancomycin, bacitracin, daptomycin and the β-lactam-containing penicillins, cephalosporins and nocardicins. Although penicillins and cephalosporins are synthesised from a classically derived NRPS tripeptide (from ACVS, δ-(L-α-aminoadipyl)–L-cysteinyl–D-valine synthetase)2, we now report an unprecedented NRPS activity to both assemble a serine-containing peptide and mediate its cyclisation to the critical β-lactam ring of the nocardicin family of antibiotics. A histidine-rich condensation (C) domain, which typically carries out peptide bond formation during product assembly, was found to also synthesise the embedded 4-membered ring. Here, a mechanism is proposed and supporting experiments are described, which is distinct from the pathways that have evolved to the three other β-lactam antibiotic families: penicillin/cephalosporins, clavams and carbapenems. These findings raise the possibility that β-lactam rings can be regio- and stereospecifically integrated into engineered peptides for application as, for example, targeted protease inactivators.3,4 PMID:25624104

  5. Archaeal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases interact with the ribosome to recycle tRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Godinic-Mikulcic, Vlatka; Jaric, Jelena; Greber, Basil J.; Franke, Vedran; Hodnik, Vesna; Anderluh, Gregor; Ban, Nenad; Weygand-Durasevic, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS) are essential enzymes catalyzing the formation of aminoacyl-tRNAs, the immediate precursors for encoded peptides in ribosomal protein synthesis. Previous studies have suggested a link between tRNA aminoacylation and high-molecular-weight cellular complexes such as the cytoskeleton or ribosomes. However, the structural basis of these interactions and potential mechanistic implications are not well understood. To biochemically characterize these interactions we have used a system of two interacting archaeal aaRSs: an atypical methanogenic-type seryl-tRNA synthetase and an archaeal ArgRS. More specifically, we have shown by thermophoresis and surface plasmon resonance that these two aaRSs bind to the large ribosomal subunit with micromolar affinities. We have identified the L7/L12 stalk and the proteins located near the stalk base as the main sites for aaRS binding. Finally, we have performed a bioinformatics analysis of synonymous codons in the Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus genome that supports a mechanism in which the deacylated tRNAs may be recharged by aaRSs bound to the ribosome and reused at the next occurrence of a codon encoding the same amino acid. These results suggest a mechanism of tRNA recycling in which aaRSs associate with the L7/L12 stalk region to recapture the tRNAs released from the preceding ribosome in polysomes. PMID:24569352

  6. A comparative study to find out the relationship between the inner inter-canthal distance, interpupillary distance, inter-commissural width, inter-alar width, and the width of maxillary anterior teeth in Aryans and Mongoloids

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Meena Kumari; Singh, Raj Kumar; Suwal, Pramita; Parajuli, Prakash Kumar; Shrestha, Pragya; Baral, Dharanidhar

    2016-01-01

    Background One of the most confusing and difficult aspects of complete denture prosthodontics is the selection of appropriately sized maxillary anterior denture teeth. Various guidelines have been suggested for determining the size of anterior teeth, but different opinions have been reported regarding their significance. In the study reported here, the relationships between facial measurements and the width of maxillary anterior teeth in two ethnic groups, namely Aryans and Mongoloids, were determined. Objective The aims of the study were to determine the inner inter-canthal distance (ICAD), inter-pupillary distance (IPD), inter-commissural width (ICOW), inter-alar width (IAW), and the combined width of maxillary anterior teeth (CW) in Aryans and Mongoloids and to determine the relationships between these measurements. Materials and methods Impressions of the teeth of 170 dentulous subjects (85 males and 85 females) were made with alginate then Type IV gypsum product was poured in. Measurements of the cast maxillary anterior teeth at their widest dimension (contact areas) were made with the Boley gauge. ICAD, IPD, ICOW, and IAW distances were also measured with a Boley gauge. Results For all 170 subjects, 85 Aryans and 85 Mongoloids, Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r) for IAW, IPD, ICOW, ICAD, and CW was calculated. In Aryans, highly significant (P<0.001) but weak correlations were found between CW and IAW, IPD, and ICOW. In Mongoloids, a highly significant (P<0.001) and weak correlation was found only between CW and IPD. Conclusion Within the limitations of this study, the results suggest that the IAW, IPD, and ICOW for Aryans and IPD for Mongoloids can be used as a preliminary method for determining the width of the maxillary anterior teeth in edentulous patients. PMID:26955292

  7. Modulation of 2{prime}-5{prime} oligoadenylate synthetase by environmental stress in the marine sponge Geodia cydonium

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, H.C.; Wiens, M.; Mueller, W.E.G.; Kuusksalu, A.; Kelve, M.

    1997-07-01

    Recently the authors established the presence of relatively high amounts of 2{prime}-5{prime} oligoadenylates (2{prime}-5{prime} A) and 2{prime}-5{prime} oligoadenylate synthetase (2{prime}-5{prime} A synthetase) in the marine sponge Geodia cydonium. Here they determined by applying radioimmunoassay and high-performance liquid chromatographical methods that the concentration of 2{prime}-5{prime} A synthetase change following exposure of G. cydonium tissue to environmental stress. The 2{prime}-5{prime} A content and the activity of 2{prime}-5{prime} A synthetase, present in crude sponge extract, increase by up to three-fold after treating sponge cubes for 2 h with natural stressors including heat shock (26 C), cold shock (6 C), pH shock (pH 6), and hypertonic shock and subsequent incubation for 18 h under ambient conditions (16 C). No response was observed after exposure of sponges to an alkaline (pH 10) or hypotonic environment. Similar changes have been found for the expression of heat shock protein HSP70 in G. cydonium. These results show that 2{prime}-5{prime} A in sponges may be useful as a novel biomarker for environmental monitoring.

  8. p53-Dependent DNA damage response sensitive to editing-defective tRNA synthetase in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Song, Youngzee; Shi, Yi; Carland, Tristan M; Lian, Shanshan; Sasaki, Tomoyuki; Schork, Nicholas J; Head, Steven R; Kishi, Shuji; Schimmel, Paul

    2016-07-26

    Brain and heart pathologies are caused by editing defects of transfer RNA (tRNA) synthetases, which preserve genetic code fidelity by removing incorrect amino acids misattached to tRNAs. To extend understanding of the broader impact of synthetase editing reactions on organismal homeostasis, and based on effects in bacteria ostensibly from small amounts of mistranslation of components of the replication apparatus, we investigated the sensitivity to editing of the vertebrate genome. We show here that in zebrafish embryos, transient overexpression of editing-defective valyl-tRNA synthetase (ValRS(ED)) activated DNA break-responsive H2AX and p53-responsive downstream proteins, such as cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p21, which promotes cell-cycle arrest at DNA damage checkpoints, and Gadd45 and p53R2, with pivotal roles in DNA repair. In contrast, the response of these proteins to expression of ValRS(ED) was abolished in p53-deficient fish. The p53-activated downstream signaling events correlated with suppression of abnormal morphological changes caused by the editing defect and, in adults, reversed a shortened life span (followed for 2 y). Conversely, with normal editing activities, p53-deficient fish have a normal life span and few morphological changes. Whole-fish deep sequencing showed genomic mutations associated with the editing defect. We suggest that the sensitivity of p53 to expression of an editing-defective tRNA synthetase has a critical role in promoting genome integrity and organismal homeostasis.

  9. Acetoacetyl-CoA synthetase activity is controlled by a protein acetyltransferase with unique domain organization in Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Alex C; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C

    2013-01-01

    GCN5-type N-acetyltransferases (GNATs) are enzymes that catalyse the transfer of the acetyl group from acetyl-CoA to a primary amine. GNATs are conserved in all domains of life. Some members of this family of enzymes acetylate the side-chain of specific lysine residues in proteins of diverse function. In bacteria, GNAT-catalysed protein acetylation regulates carbon metabolism, RNA metabolism and transcriptional regulation. Metabolic regulation in Streptomyces species is of interest due to the role of these organisms in natural product synthesis. Here we identify SlPatA, a GNAT in Streptomyces lividans with unique domain organization, and a new acetylation target, namely acetoacetyl-CoA synthetase (SlAacS). The latter has homologues in all domains of life. In vitro and in vivo evidence show that SlAacS is a bona fide acetoacetyl-CoA synthetase. SlPatA acetylates SlAacS more efficiently than it does acetyl-CoA synthetase, an enzyme known to be under acetylation control. SlPatA acetylates SlAacS at the active-site residue Lys617 and acetylation inactivates SlAacS. Acetylated SlAacS was deacetylated by a sirtuin-type protein deacetylase. SlAacS acetylation/deacetylation may represent a conserved mechanism for regulation of acetoacetyl-CoA synthetase activity in all domains of life.

  10. The proofreading of hydroxy analogues of leucine and isoleucine by leucyl-tRNA synthetases from E. coli and yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Englisch, S; Englisch, U; von der Haar, F; Cramer, F

    1986-01-01

    Three analogues each of leucine and isoleucine carrying hydroxy groups in gamma- or delta- or gamma- and delta-position have been synthesized, and tested in the aminoacylation by leucyl-tRNA synthetases from E. coli and yeast. Hydrolytic proofreading, as proposed in the chemical proofreading model, of these analogues and of homocysteine should result in a lactonisation of these compounds and therefore provide information regarding the proofreading mechanism of the two leucyl-tRNA synthetases. Leucyl-tRNA synthetase from E. coli shows a high initial substrate discrimination. Only two analogues, gamma-hydroxyleucine and homocysteine are activated and transferred to tRNALeu where a post-transfer proofreading occurs. Lactonisation of gamma-hydroxyleucine and homocysteine could be detected. Leucyl-tRNA synthetase from yeast has a relatively poor initial discrimination of these substrates, which is compensated by a very effective pre-transfer proofreading on the aminoacyl-adenylate level. No lactonisation nor mischarged tRNALeu is detectable. Images PMID:3534789

  11. Uneven spread of cis- and trans-editing aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase domains within translational compartments of P. falciparum.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sameena; Sharma, Arvind; Jamwal, Abhishek; Sharma, Vinay; Pole, Anil Kumar; Thakur, Kamal Kishor; Sharma, Amit

    2011-01-01

    Accuracy of aminoacylation is dependent on maintaining fidelity during attachment of amino acids to cognate tRNAs. Cis- and trans-editing protein factors impose quality control during protein translation, and 8 of 36 Plasmodium falciparum aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS) assemblies contain canonical putative editing modules. Based on expression and localization profiles of these 8 aaRSs, we propose an asymmetric distribution between the parasite cytoplasm and its apicoplast of putative editing-domain containing aaRSs. We also show that the single copy alanyl- and threonyl-tRNA synthetases are dually targeted to parasite cytoplasm and apicoplast. This bipolar presence of two unique synthetases presents opportunity for inhibitor targeting their aminoacylation and editing activities in twin parasite compartments. We used this approach to identify specific inhibitors against the alanyl- and threonyl-tRNA synthetases. Further development of such inhibitors may lead to anti-parasitics which simultaneously block protein translation in two key parasite organelles, a strategy of wider applicability for pathogen control.

  12. Structural Analysis of the Active Site Geometry of N[superscript 5]-Carboxyaminoimidazole Ribonucleotide Synthetase from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Thoden, James B.; Holden, Hazel M.; Firestine, Steven M.

    2009-09-11

    N{sub 5}-Carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide synthetase (N{sub 5}-CAIR synthetase) converts 5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (AIR), MgATP, and bicarbonate into N{sub 5}-CAIR, MgADP, and P{sub i}. The enzyme is required for de novo purine biosynthesis in microbes yet is not found in humans suggesting that it represents an ideal and unexplored target for antimicrobial drug design. Here we report the X-ray structures of N{sub 5}-CAIR synthetase from Escherichia coli with either MgATP or MgADP/P{sub i} bound in the active site cleft. These structures, determined to 1.6-{angstrom} resolution, provide detailed information regarding the active site geometry before and after ATP hydrolysis. In both structures, two magnesium ions are observed. Each of these is octahedrally coordinated, and the carboxylate side chain of Glu238 bridges them. For the structure of the MgADP/P{sub i} complex, crystals were grown in the presence of AIR and MgATP. No electron density was observed for AIR, and the electron density corresponding to the nucleotide clearly revealed the presence of ADP and P{sub i} rather than ATP. The bound P{sub i} shifts by approximately 3 {angstrom} relative to the {gamma}-phosphoryl group of ATP and forms electrostatic interactions with the side chains of Arg242 and His244. Since the reaction mechanism of N{sub 5}-CAIR synthetase is believed to proceed via a carboxyphosphate intermediate, we propose that the location of the inorganic phosphate represents the binding site for stabilization of this reactive species. Using the information derived from the two structures reported here, coupled with molecular modeling, we propose a catalytic mechanism for N{sub 5}-CAIR synthetase.

  13. Structural modeling of tissue-specific mitochondrial alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AARS2) defects predicts differential effects on aminoacylation

    PubMed Central

    Euro, Liliya; Konovalova, Svetlana; Asin-Cayuela, Jorge; Tulinius, Már; Griffin, Helen; Horvath, Rita; Taylor, Robert W.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Schara, Ulrike; Thorburn, David R.; Suomalainen, Anu; Chihade, Joseph; Tyynismaa, Henna

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of mitochondrial protein synthesis is dependent on the coordinated action of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (mtARSs) and the mitochondrial DNA-encoded tRNAs. The recent advances in whole-exome sequencing have revealed the importance of the mtARS proteins for mitochondrial pathophysiology since nearly every nuclear gene for mtARS (out of 19) is now recognized as a disease gene for mitochondrial disease. Typically, defects in each mtARS have been identified in one tissue-specific disease, most commonly affecting the brain, or in one syndrome. However, mutations in the AARS2 gene for mitochondrial alanyl-tRNA synthetase (mtAlaRS) have been reported both in patients with infantile-onset cardiomyopathy and in patients with childhood to adulthood-onset leukoencephalopathy. We present here an investigation of the effects of the described mutations on the structure of the synthetase, in an effort to understand the tissue-specific outcomes of the different mutations. The mtAlaRS differs from the other mtARSs because in addition to the aminoacylation domain, it has a conserved editing domain for deacylating tRNAs that have been mischarged with incorrect amino acids. We show that the cardiomyopathy phenotype results from a single allele, causing an amino acid change R592W in the editing domain of AARS2, whereas the leukodystrophy mutations are located in other domains of the synthetase. Nevertheless, our structural analysis predicts that all mutations reduce the aminoacylation activity of the synthetase, because all mtAlaRS domains contribute to tRNA binding for aminoacylation. According to our model, the cardiomyopathy mutations severely compromise aminoacylation whereas partial activity is retained by the mutation combinations found in the leukodystrophy patients. These predictions provide a hypothesis for the molecular basis of the distinct tissue-specific phenotypic outcomes. PMID:25705216

  14. Isolation and characterization of rat liver microsomal R-ibuprofenoyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Brugger, R; García Alía, B; Reichel, C; Waibel, R; Menzel, S; Brune, K; Geisslinger, G

    1996-10-11

    Microsomal long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (EC 6.1.2.3.) has been suggested to be involved in the stereoselective formation of the CoA thioester of ibuprofen. In this study, we demonstrated that the microsomal enzyme from rat liver responsible for palmitoyl-CoA synthesis also catalyzes the formation of R-ibuprofenoyl-CoA in a Mg(2+)- and ATP-dependent process. Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase from rat liver microsomes was purified to homogeneity as evidenced by SDS-gel electrophoresis. Simultaneous measurements of palmitoyl-CoA and R-ibuprofenoyl-CoA formation with HPLC in various fractions and purification steps during protein isolation revealed a high correlation between both activities. The purification procedure included solubilization of the microsomes obtained from rat livers with Triton X-100 and subsequent chromatography of the 100,000 x g supernatant on blue-sepharose, hydroxyapatite, and phosphocellulose. The purified enzyme exhibited an apparent molecular weight of 72 kDa as estimated by SDS gel electrophoresis, with specific activities of 71 nmol.min-1.mg-1 protein and 901 nmol.min-1.mg-1 protein for formation of R-ibuprofenoyl-CoA and palmitoyl-CoA, respectively. Palmitoyl-CoA formation catalyzed by the purified enzyme exhibited biphasic kinetics indicative of two isoforms, a high-affinity (KM 0.13 +/- 0.11 microM), low-capacity form and a low-affinity (KM 81 +/- 11.5 microM), high-capacity form. In contrast, measurement of R-ibuprofenoyl-CoA synthesis over a concentration range from 5 to 3000 microM showed the participation of a single CoA ligase with a KM of 184 +/- 19 microM, corresponding to the low-affinity isoform of palmitoyl-CoA synthesis with a marked enantioselectivity towards the R-form of ibuprofen. R-ibuprofenoyl-CoA formation of the enzyme preparation was inhibited by palmitic acid (KI 13.5 +/- 0.5 microM) and S-ibuprofen (KI 405 +/- 10 microM). In summary, these data give strong evidence for the identity of R-ibuprofenoyl-CoA and long

  15. Distinctive properties and expression profiles of glutamine synthetase from a plant symbiotic fungus.

    PubMed Central

    Montanini, Barbara; Betti, Marco; Márquez, Antonio J; Balestrini, Raffaella; Bonfante, Paola; Ottonello, Simone

    2003-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences reported in this paper have been submitted to the GenBank(R)/EBI Nucleotide Sequence Databases with accession numbers AF462037 (glutamine synthetase) and AF462032 (glutamate synthase). Nitrogen retrieval and assimilation by symbiotic ectomycorrhizal fungi is thought to play a central role in the mutualistic interaction between these organisms and their plant hosts. Here we report on the molecular characterization of the key N-assimilation enzyme glutamine synthetase from the mycorrhizal ascomycete Tuber borchii (TbGS). TbGS displayed a strong positive co-operativity ( n =1.7+/-0.29) and an unusually high S(0.5) value (54+/-16 mM; S(0.5) is the substrate concentration value at which v =(1/2) V (max)) for glutamate, and a correspondingly low sensitivity towards inhibition by the glutamate analogue herbicide phosphinothricin. The TbGS mRNA, which is encoded by a single-copy gene in the Tuber genome, was up-regulated in N-starved mycelia and returned to basal levels upon resupplementation of various forms of N, the most effective of which was nitrate. Both responses were accompanied by parallel variations of TbGS protein amount and glutamine synthetase activity, thus indicating that TbGS levels are primarily controlled at the pre-translational level. As revealed by a comparative analysis of the TbGS mRNA and of the mRNAs for the metabolically related enzymes glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamate synthase, TbGS is not only the sole messenger that positively responds to N starvation, but also the most abundant under N-limiting conditions. A similar, but even more discriminating expression pattern, with practically undetectable glutamate dehydrogenase mRNA levels, was observed in fruitbodies. The TbGS mRNA was also found to be expressed in symbiosis-engaged hyphae, with distinctively higher hybridization signals in hyphae that were penetrating among and within root cells. PMID:12683951

  16. Mutation affecting regulation of synthesis of acetohydroxy acid synthetase in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, J H; Henderson, E K

    1975-01-01

    Altered regulation of synthesis of acetohydroxy acid synthetase (AHAS) was previously reported in a mutant of Escherichia coli strain K-12. The mutant strain, growing in minimal medium, exhibits a partial growth limiatation and derepression of AHAS, owing to deficient synthesis of isoleucine. The genetic lesion (ilvE503) causing the isoleucine limitation was shown to cause derepression of a valine-sensitive AHAS activity. The derepression effect of the ilvE503 mutation upon synthesis of AHAS was conclusively demonstrated by introducing both the ilvE503 allele and an altered AHAS (ilv-521) into the same cell. Evidence is presented that suggests the presence of multiple genetic regions for synthesis and control of the valine-sensitive AHAS activity. PMID:1089632

  17. Glutamine Triggers Acetylation-Dependent Degradation of Glutamine Synthetase via the Thalidomide Receptor Cereblon.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T Van; Lee, J Eugene; Sweredoski, Michael J; Yang, Seung-Joo; Jeon, Seung-Je; Harrison, Joseph S; Yim, Jung-Hyuk; Lee, Sang Ghil; Handa, Hiroshi; Kuhlman, Brian; Jeong, Ji-Seon; Reitsma, Justin M; Park, Chul-Seung; Hess, Sonja; Deshaies, Raymond J

    2016-03-17

    Cereblon (CRBN), a substrate receptor for the cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase 4 (CRL4) complex, is a direct protein target for thalidomide teratogenicity and antitumor activity of immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs). Here we report that glutamine synthetase (GS) is an endogenous substrate of CRL4(CRBN). Upon exposing cells to high glutamine concentration, GS is acetylated at lysines 11 and 14, yielding a degron that is necessary and sufficient for binding and ubiquitylation by CRL4(CRBN) and degradation by the proteasome. Binding of acetylated degron peptides to CRBN depends on an intact thalidomide-binding pocket but is not competitive with IMiDs. These findings reveal a feedback loop involving CRL4(CRBN) that adjusts GS protein levels in response to glutamine and uncover a new function for lysine acetylation. PMID:26990986

  18. Sub-unit structure and specificity of methionyl-transfer-ribonucleic acid synthetase from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Bruton, C. J.; Hartley, B. S.

    1968-01-01

    1. The purification of methionyl-transfer-RNA synthetase from Escherichia coli by a modified technique gives a 16% yield of a protein that appears homogeneous by the criteria of disc gel electrophoresis, ultracentrifugation and end-group analysis. 2. The molecular weight is 96000 and the protein consists of two sub-units of 48000, which appear to be identical. The amino acid composition and thiol content are reported. 3. Kinetic data are reported for analogues of methionine and for pure t-RNAF and t-RNAM, which are respectively the methionine transfer RNA that can exist in the formylmethionyl form and the one that can exist only in the methionyl form. The enzyme binds and acylates both species of transfer RNA identically. PMID:4874971

  19. Genomic insights into the distribution, genetic diversity and evolution of polyketide synthases and nonribosomal peptide synthetases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Sivonen, Kaarina; Fewer, David P

    2015-12-01

    Polyketides and nonribosomal peptides are important secondary metabolites that exhibit enormous structural diversity, have many pharmaceutical applications, and include a number of clinically important drugs. These complex metabolites are most commonly synthesized on enzymatic assembly lines of polyketide synthases and nonribosomal peptide synthetases. Genome-mining studies making use of the recent explosion in the number of genome sequences have demonstrated unexpected enzymatic diversity and greatly expanded the known distribution of these enzyme systems across the three domains of life. The wealth of data now available suggests that genome-mining efforts will uncover new natural products, novel biosynthetic mechanisms, and shed light on the origin and evolution of these important enzymes. PMID:26605685

  20. Cross-linking with diimidates of glutamine synthetase from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, T; Oshiro, S; Goingo, E M; Nosoh, Y

    1979-08-01

    Glutamine synthetase [EC 6.3.2.1] from Bacillus stearothermophilus was modified with diethyl malonimidate (DEM), dimethyl adipimidate (DMA), and dimethyl suberimidate (DMS). DMA modified most epsilon-amino groups. On modification with DMA, formation of 3 to 4 cross-links/subunit resulted in a large increase in thermostability. The activity, allosteric properties and fluorescence spectrum of the enzyme were not changed on cross-linking. The SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic profiles of DEM-, DMA-, and DMS-modified enzymes suggested that the interaction berween six subunits in each of the two hexagonal rings of the protein are heterologous and are different from those between the piled subunits on different rings. PMID:39071

  1. Active site coupling in Plasmodium falciparum GMP synthetase is triggered by domain rotation.

    PubMed

    Ballut, Lionel; Violot, Sébastien; Shivakumaraswamy, Santosh; Thota, Lakshmi Prasoona; Sathya, Manu; Kunala, Jyothirmai; Dijkstra, Bauke W; Terreux, Raphaël; Haser, Richard; Balaram, Hemalatha; Aghajari, Nushin

    2015-11-23

    GMP synthetase (GMPS), a key enzyme in the purine biosynthetic pathway performs catalysis through a coordinated process across two catalytic pockets for which the mechanism remains unclear. Crystal structures of Plasmodium falciparum GMPS in conjunction with mutational and enzyme kinetic studies reported here provide evidence that an 85° rotation of the GATase domain is required for ammonia channelling and thus for the catalytic activity of this two-domain enzyme. We suggest that conformational changes in helix 371-375 holding catalytic residues and in loop 376-401 along the rotation trajectory trigger the different steps of catalysis, and establish the central role of Glu374 in allostery and inter-domain crosstalk. These studies reveal the mechanism of domain rotation and inter-domain communication, providing a molecular framework for the function of all single polypeptide GMPSs and form a solid basis for rational drug design targeting this therapeutically important enzyme.

  2. Glutamine Triggers Acetylation-Dependent Degradation of Glutamine Synthetase via the Thalidomide Receptor Cereblon.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T Van; Lee, J Eugene; Sweredoski, Michael J; Yang, Seung-Joo; Jeon, Seung-Je; Harrison, Joseph S; Yim, Jung-Hyuk; Lee, Sang Ghil; Handa, Hiroshi; Kuhlman, Brian; Jeong, Ji-Seon; Reitsma, Justin M; Park, Chul-Seung; Hess, Sonja; Deshaies, Raymond J

    2016-03-17

    Cereblon (CRBN), a substrate receptor for the cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase 4 (CRL4) complex, is a direct protein target for thalidomide teratogenicity and antitumor activity of immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs). Here we report that glutamine synthetase (GS) is an endogenous substrate of CRL4(CRBN). Upon exposing cells to high glutamine concentration, GS is acetylated at lysines 11 and 14, yielding a degron that is necessary and sufficient for binding and ubiquitylation by CRL4(CRBN) and degradation by the proteasome. Binding of acetylated degron peptides to CRBN depends on an intact thalidomide-binding pocket but is not competitive with IMiDs. These findings reveal a feedback loop involving CRL4(CRBN) that adjusts GS protein levels in response to glutamine and uncover a new function for lysine acetylation.

  3. Glutamine synthetase desensitizes differentiated adipocytes to proinflammatory stimuli by raising intracellular glutamine levels.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Erika Mariana; Spera, Iolanda; Menga, Alessio; Infantino, Vittoria; Iacobazzi, Vito; Castegna, Alessandra

    2014-12-20

    The role of glutamine synthetase (GS) during adipocyte differentiation is unclear. Here, we assess the impact of GS on the adipocytic response to a proinflammatory challenge at different differentiation stages. GS expression at the late stages of differentiation desensitized mature adipocytes to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by increasing intracellular glutamine levels. Furthermore, LPS-activated mature adipocytes were unable to produce inflammatory mediators; LPS sensitivity was rescued following GS inhibition and the associated drop in intracellular glutamine levels. The ability of adipocytes to differentially respond to LPS during differentiation negatively correlates to GS expression and intracellular glutamine levels. Hence, modulation of intracellular glutamine levels by GS expression represents an endogenous mechanism through which mature adipocytes control the inflammatory response.

  4. S-Adenosylmethionine Synthetase 3 Is Important for Pollen Tube Growth1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Ting

    2016-01-01

    S-Adenosylmethionine is widely used in a variety of biological reactions and participates in the methionine (Met) metabolic pathway. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), one of the four S-adenosylmethionine synthetase genes, METHIONINE ADENOSYLTRANSFERASE3 (MAT3), is highly expressed in pollen. Here, we show that mat3 mutants have impaired pollen tube growth and reduced seed set. Metabolomics analyses confirmed that mat3 pollen and pollen tubes overaccumulate Met and that mat3 pollen has several metabolite profiles, such as those of polyamine biosynthesis, which are different from those of the wild type. Additionally, we show that disruption of Met metabolism in mat3 pollen affected transfer RNA and histone methylation levels. Thus, our results suggest a connection between metabolism and epigenetics. PMID:27482079

  5. Glutamine Synthetase in Legumes: Recent Advances in Enzyme Structure and Functional Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Betti, Marco; García-Calderón, Margarita; Pérez-Delgado, Carmen M.; Credali, Alfredo; Estivill, Guillermo; Galván, Francisco; Vega, José M.; Márquez, Antonio J.

    2012-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is the key enzyme involved in the assimilation of ammonia derived either from nitrate reduction, N2 fixation, photorespiration or asparagine breakdown. A small gene family is encoding for different cytosolic (GS1) or plastidic (GS2) isoforms in legumes. We summarize here the recent advances carried out concerning the quaternary structure of GS, as well as the functional relationship existing between GS2 and processes such as nodulation, photorespiration and water stress, in this latter case by means of proline production. Functional genomic analysis using GS2-minus mutant reveals the key role of GS2 in the metabolic control of the plants and, more particularly, in carbon metabolism. PMID:22942686

  6. 2'-phosphodiesterase and 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase activities in the lowest metazoans, sponge [porifera].

    PubMed

    Saby, Emilie; Poulsen, Jesper Buchhave; Justesen, Just; Kelve, Merike; Uriz, Maria Jesus

    2009-01-01

    Sponges [porifera], the most ancient metazoans, contain modules related to the vertebrate immune system, including the 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS). The components of the antiviral 2',5'-oligoadenylate (2-5A) system (OAS, 2'-Phosphodiesterase (2'-PDE) and RNAse L) of vertebrates have not all been identified in sponges. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that in addition to the OAS activity, sponges possess a 2'-PDE activity, which highlights the probable existence of a premature 2-5A system. Indeed, Suberites domuncula and Crella elegans exhibited this 2-5A degrading activity. Upon this finding, two out of three elements forming the 2-5A system have been found in sponges, only a endoribonuclease, RNAse L or similar, has to be found. We suspect the existence of a complex immune system in sponges, besides the self/non-self recognition system and the use of phagocytosis and secondary metabolites against pathogens.

  7. A radiochemical assay for argininosuccinate synthetase with [U-14C]aspartate.

    PubMed

    Ratner, S

    1983-12-01

    A simple and sensitive radiochemical procedure to assay argininosuccinate synthetase activity in crude tissue homogenates and lysates of cultured cells is described. The new method depends on the location of 14C, uniformly, in the four carbons of aspartate. On incubation in the presence of excess of L-[U-14C]aspartate, L-citrulline, ATP, and an ATP-generating system, argininosuccinase and arginase, the [14C]fumarate formed is measured as the sum of malate and fumarate. After acidification the latter two acids are separated from [14C]aspartate on a small Dowex-50 column by elution with a few milliliters of water; the unutilized amino acid substrates remain on the column. With a specific radioactivity of 9 X 10(4) cpm, 1 to 2 nmol of product can be accurately measured under kinetically optimum conditions. PMID:6660522

  8. Inhibition of Long Chain Fatty Acyl-CoA Synthetase (ACSL) and Ischemia Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Prior, Allan M.; Zhang, Man; Blakeman, Nina; Datta, Palika; Pham, Hung; Young, Lindon H.; Weis, Margaret T.; Hua, Duy H.

    2014-01-01

    Various triacsin C analogs, containing different alkenyl chains and carboxylic acid bioisoteres including 4-aminobenzoic acid, isothiazolidine dioxide, hydroxylamine, hydroxytriazene, and oxadiazolidine dione, were synthesized and their inhibitions of long chain fatty acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL) were examined. Two methods, a cell-based assay of ACSL activity and an in situ [14C]-palmitate incorporation into extractable lipids were used to study the inhibition. Using an in vivo leukocyte recruitment inhibition protocol, the translocation of one or more cell adhesion molecules from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane on either the endothelium or leukocyte or both was inhibited by inhibitors 1, 9, and triacsin C. The results suggest that inhibition of ACSL may attenuate the vascular inflammatory component associated with ischemia reperfusion injury and lead to a decrease of infarct expansion. PMID:24480468

  9. Bimodular Peptide Synthetase SidE Produces Fumarylalanine in the Human Pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Steinchen, Wieland; Lackner, Gerald; Yasmin, Sabiha; Schrettl, Markus; Dahse, Hans-Martin

    2013-01-01

    The filamentous mold Aspergillus fumigatus causes invasive aspergillosis, a potentially life-threatening infectious disease, in humans. The sidE gene encodes a bimodular peptide synthetase and was shown previously to be strongly upregulated during initiation of murine lung infection. In this study, we characterized the two adenylation domains of SidE with the ATP-[32P]pyrophosphate exchange assay in vitro, which identified fumarate and l-alanine, respectively, as the preferred substrates. Using full-length holo-SidE, fumarylalanine (FA) formation was observed in vitro. Furthermore, FA was identified in A. fumigatus culture supernatants under inducing conditions, unless sidE was genetically inactivated. As FA is structurally related to established pharmaceutical products exerting immunomodulatory activity, this work may contribute to our understanding of the virulence of A. fumigatus. PMID:23974138

  10. Barley chloroplast glutamine synthetase activity is not affected by CO sub 2 -concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Avila, C.; Forde, B.; Wallsgrove, R. )

    1990-05-01

    It has been reported that when photorespiration is suppressed by raising the concentration of CO{sub 2}, the expression of the chloroplast glutamine synthetase (GS2) gene in pea leaves is reduced (Plant Cell, 1, 241). We have examined this effect in barley (Hordeum vulgare), and confirm that plants grown continuously in 0.8% CO{sub 2}, or transferred to such conditions after growth in air, appear to have a reduced GS2 mRNA abundance. However, we were unable to detect any significant difference in the extractable GS2 activity, or any change in amount of GS2 protein (judged by Western blots). Whatever controls are operating on gS2 mRNA expression in response to changes is external CO{sub 2}, they do not affect the activity or amount of the enzyme in barley.

  11. CDP-diacylglycerol synthetase-controlled phosphoinositide availability limits VEGFA signaling and vascular morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Weijun; Pham, Van N.; Stratman, Amber N.; Castranova, Daniel; Kamei, Makoto; Kidd, Kameha R.; Lo, Brigid D.; Shaw, Kenna M.; Torres-Vazquez, Jesus; Mikelis, Constantinos M.; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Davis, George E.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that regulate angiogenesis and translating these into effective therapies are of enormous scientific and clinical interests. In this report, we demonstrate the central role of CDP-diacylglycerol synthetase (CDS) in the regulation of VEGFA signaling and angiogenesis. CDS activity maintains phosphoinositide 4,5 bisphosphate (PIP2) availability through resynthesis of phosphoinositides, whereas VEGFA, mainly through phospholipase Cγ1, consumes PIP2 for signal transduction. Loss of CDS2, 1 of 2 vertebrate CDS enzymes, results in vascular-specific defects in zebrafish in vivo and failure of VEGFA-induced angiogenesis in endothelial cells in vitro. Absence of CDS2 also results in reduced arterial differentiation and reduced angiogenic signaling. CDS2 deficit-caused phenotypes can be successfully rescued by artificial elevation of PIP2 levels, and excess PIP2 or increased CDS2 activity can promote excess angiogenesis. These results suggest that availability of CDS-controlled resynthesis of phosphoinositides is essential for angiogenesis. PMID:22649102

  12. Non-standard amino acid recognition by Escherichia coli leucyl-tRNA synthetase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinis, S. A.; Fox, G. E.

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant E. coli leucyl-tRNA synthetase was screened for amino acid-dependent pyrophosphate exchange activity using noncognate aliphatic amino acids including norvaline, homocysteine, norleucine, methionine, and homoserine. [32P]-labeled reaction products were separated by thin layer chromatography using a novel solvent system and then quantified by phosphorimaging. Norvaline which differs from leucine by only one methyl group stimulated pyrophosphate exchange activity as did both homocysteine and norleucine to a lesser extent. The KM parameters for leucine and norvaline were measured to be 10 micromoles and 1.5 mM, respectively. Experiments are in progress to determine if norvaline is transferred to tRNA(Leu) and/or edited by a pre- or post-transfer mechanism.

  13. Structural basis for full-spectrum inhibition of translational functions on a tRNA synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Pengfei; Yu, Xue; Jeong, Seung Jae; Mirando, Adam; Chen, Kaige; Chen, Xin; Kim, Sunghoon; Francklyn, Christopher S.; Guo, Min

    2015-01-01

    The polyketide natural product borrelidin displays antibacterial, antifungal, antimalarial, anticancer, insecticidal and herbicidal activities through the selective inhibition of threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS). How borrelidin simultaneously attenuates bacterial growth and suppresses a variety of infections in plants and animals is not known. Here we show, using X-ray crystal structures and functional analyses, that a single molecule of borrelidin simultaneously occupies four distinct subsites within the catalytic domain of bacterial and human ThrRSs. These include the three substrate-binding sites for amino acid, ATP and tRNA associated with aminoacylation, and a fourth ‘orthogonal’ subsite created as a consequence of binding. Thus, borrelidin competes with all three aminoacylation substrates, providing a potent and redundant mechanism to inhibit ThrRS during protein synthesis. These results highlight a surprising natural design to achieve the quadrivalent inhibition of translation through a highly conserved family of enzymes. PMID:25824639

  14. Diversity of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Genes in the Microbial Metagenomes of Marine Sponges

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel-Elardo, Sheila Marie; Grozdanov, Lubomir; Proksch, Sebastian; Hentschel, Ute

    2012-01-01

    Genomic mining revealed one major nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) phylogenetic cluster in 12 marine sponge species, one ascidian, an actinobacterial isolate and seawater. Phylogenetic analysis predicts its taxonomic affiliation to the actinomycetes and hydroxy-phenyl-glycine as a likely substrate. Additionally, a phylogenetically distinct NRPS gene cluster was discovered in the microbial metagenome of the sponge Aplysina aerophoba, which shows highest similarities to NRPS genes that were previously assigned, by ways of single cell genomics, to a Chloroflexi sponge symbiont. Genomic mining studies such as the one presented here for NRPS genes, contribute to on-going efforts to characterize the genomic potential of sponge-associated microbiota for secondary metabolite biosynthesis. PMID:22822366

  15. Chemical Probes Allow Structural Insight into the Condensation Reaction of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases.

    PubMed

    Bloudoff, Kristjan; Alonzo, Diego A; Schmeing, T Martin

    2016-03-17

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) synthesize a vast variety of small molecules, including antibiotics, antitumors, and immunosuppressants. The NRPS condensation (C) domain catalyzes amide bond formation, the central chemical step in nonribosomal peptide synthesis. The catalytic mechanism and substrate determinants of the reaction are under debate. We developed chemical probes to structurally study the NRPS condensation reaction. These substrate analogs become covalently tethered to a cysteine introduced near the active site, to mimic covalent substrate delivery by carrier domains. They are competent substrates in the condensation reaction and behave similarly to native substrates. Co-crystal structures show C domain-substrate interactions, and suggest that the catalytic histidine's principle role is to position the α-amino group for nucleophilic attack. Structural insight provided by these co-complexes also allowed us to alter the substrate specificity profile of the reaction with a single point mutation.

  16. Fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance and biochemical characterization of fluorotyrosine-labeled-thymidylate-synthetase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosson, Dan; Lewis, Charles A.; Ellis, Paul D.; Dunlap, R. Bruce

    1994-03-01

    Fluorotyrosine has been incorporated into thymidylate synthetase from Lactobacillus casei by growth of the bacterium in media containing 3-fluorotyrosine. The enzyme exhibited a specific activity 70% of that of the normal enzyme and formed a covalent binary complex with pyrimidine nucleotides, as well as a covalent ternary complex with 5-fluorodeoxyuridylate and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate. 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to follow the formation of these complexes. 5-Fluorodeoxyuridylate, dUMP, dTMP and dCMP produced identical conformational changes in the enzyme as monitored by the fluorotyrosyl resonances. Ternary complex formation of the fluorotyrosine-containing enzyme with 5-fluorodeoxyuridylate and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate resulted in further spectral changes.

  17. Active site coupling in Plasmodium falciparum GMP synthetase is triggered by domain rotation

    PubMed Central

    Ballut, Lionel; Violot, Sébastien; Shivakumaraswamy, Santosh; Thota, Lakshmi Prasoona; Sathya, Manu; Kunala, Jyothirmai; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Terreux, Raphaël; Haser, Richard; Balaram, Hemalatha; Aghajari, Nushin

    2015-01-01

    GMP synthetase (GMPS), a key enzyme in the purine biosynthetic pathway performs catalysis through a coordinated process across two catalytic pockets for which the mechanism remains unclear. Crystal structures of Plasmodium falciparum GMPS in conjunction with mutational and enzyme kinetic studies reported here provide evidence that an 85° rotation of the GATase domain is required for ammonia channelling and thus for the catalytic activity of this two-domain enzyme. We suggest that conformational changes in helix 371–375 holding catalytic residues and in loop 376–401 along the rotation trajectory trigger the different steps of catalysis, and establish the central role of Glu374 in allostery and inter-domain crosstalk. These studies reveal the mechanism of domain rotation and inter-domain communication, providing a molecular framework for the function of all single polypeptide GMPSs and form a solid basis for rational drug design targeting this therapeutically important enzyme. PMID:26592566

  18. A Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase-derived Iron(III) Complex from the Pathogenic Fungus Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wen-Bing; Baccile, Joshua A.; Bok, Jin Woo; Chen, Yiming; Keller, Nancy P.; Schroeder, Frank C.

    2013-01-01

    Small molecules (SMs) play central roles as virulence factors of pathogenic fungi and bacteria; however, genomic analyses suggest that the majority of microbial SMs have remained uncharacterized. Based on microarray analysis followed by comparative metabolomics of overexpression/knockout mutants we identified a tryptophan-derived iron(III)-complex, hexadehydroastechrome (HAS), as the major product of the cryptic has non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene cluster in the human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. Activation of the has cluster created a highly virulent A. fumigatus strain that increased mortality of infected mice. Comparative metabolomics of different mutant strains allowed to propose a pathway for HAS biosynthesis and further revealed cross-talk with another NRPS pathway producing the anti-cancer fumitremorgins. PMID:23360537

  19. Optimization of Inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Pantothenate Synthetase Based on Group Efficiency Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hung, Alvin W; Silvestre, H Leonardo; Wen, Shijun; George, Guillaume P C; Boland, Jennifer; Blundell, Tom L; Ciulli, Alessio; Abell, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Ligand efficiency has proven to be a valuable concept for optimization of leads in the early stages of drug design. Taking this one step further, group efficiency (GE) evaluates the binding efficiency of each appendage of a molecule, further fine-tuning the drug design process. Here, GE analysis is used to systematically improve the potency of inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis pantothenate synthetase, an important target in tuberculosis therapy. Binding efficiencies were found to be distributed unevenly within a lead molecule derived using a fragment-based approach. Substitution of the less efficient parts of the molecule allowed systematic development of more potent compounds. This method of dissecting and analyzing different groups within a molecule offers a rational and general way of carrying out lead optimization, with potential broad application within drug discovery.

  20. CMP-Sialic Acid Synthetase: The Point of Constriction in the Sialylation Pathway.

    PubMed

    Sellmeier, Melanie; Weinhold, Birgit; Münster-Kühnel, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Sialoglycoconjugates form the outermost layer of animal cells and play a crucial role in cellular communication processes. An essential step in the biosynthesis of sialylated glycoconjugates is the activation of sialic acid to the monophosphate diester CMP-sialic acid. Only the activated sugar is transported into the Golgi apparatus and serves as a substrate for the linkage-specific sialyltransferases. Interference with sugar activation abolishes sialylation and is embryonic lethal in mammals. In this chapter we focus on the enzyme catalyzing the activation of sialic acid, the CMP-sialic acid synthetase (CMAS), and compare the enzymatic properties of CMASs isolated from different species. Information concerning the reaction mechanism and active site architecture is included. Moreover, the unusual nuclear localization of vertebrate CMASs as well as the biotechnological application of bacterial CMAS enzymes is addressed.

  1. Plant growth is influenced by glutamine synthetase-catalyzed nitrogen metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Langston-Unkefer, P.J.

    1991-06-11

    Ammonia assimilation has been implicated as participating in regulation of nitrogen fixation in free-living bacteria. In fact, these simple organisms utilize an integrated regulation of carbon and nitrogen metabolism; we except to observe an integration of nitrogen and carbon fixation in plants; how could these complex systems grow efficiently and compete in the ecosystem without coordinating these two crucial activities We have been investigating the role of ammonia assimilation regulating the complex symbiotic nitrogen fixation of legumes. Just as is observed in the simple bacterial systems, perturbation of ammonia assimilation in legumes results in increased overall nitrogen fixation. The perturbed plants have increased growth and total nitrogen fixation capability. Because we have targeted the first enyzme in ammonia assimilation, glutamine synthetase, this provides a marker that could be used to assist selection or screening for increased biomass yield. 45 refs., 4 tabs.

  2. Probing the allosteric mechanism in pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase using energy-weighted network formalism.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Moitrayee; Vishveshwara, Saraswathi

    2011-07-19

    Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) is an atypical enzyme responsible for charging tRNA(Pyl) with pyrrolysine, despite lacking precise tRNA anticodon recognition. This dimeric protein exhibits allosteric regulation of function, like any other tRNA synthetases. In this study we examine the paths of allosteric communication at the atomic level, through energy-weighted networks of Desulfitobacterium hafniense PylRS (DhPylRS) and its complexes with tRNA(Pyl) and activated pyrrolysine. We performed molecular dynamics simulations of the structures of these complexes to obtain an ensemble conformation-population perspective. Weighted graph parameters relevant to identifying key players and ties in the context of social networks such as edge/node betweenness, closeness index, and the concept of funneling are explored in identifying key residues and interactions leading to shortest paths of communication in the structure networks of DhPylRS. Further, the changes in the status of important residues and connections and the costs of communication due to ligand induced perturbations are evaluated. The optimal, suboptimal, and preexisting paths are also investigated. Many of these parameters have exhibited an enhanced asymmetry between the two subunits of the dimeric protein, especially in the pretransfer complex, leading us to conclude that encoding of function goes beyond the sequence/structure of proteins. The local and global perturbations mediated by appropriate ligands and their influence on the equilibrium ensemble of conformations also have a significant role to play in the functioning of proteins. Taking a comprehensive view of these observations, we propose that the origin of many functional aspects (allostery and half-sites reactivity in the case of DhPylRS) lies in subtle rearrangements of interactions and dynamics at a global level.

  3. Caspase-dependent cleavage of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II during apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min; Kozlowski, Piotr; Collins, Matthew; Wang, Yanhong; Haystead, Timothy A; Graves, Lee M

    2002-03-01

    Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II (CPSII) is part of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase/aspartate transcarbamoylase/dihydroorotase (CAD), a multienzymatic protein required for the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides and cell growth. Herein, we identify CAD as a substrate for caspase-3 degradation in both in vitro and in vivo models of apoptosis. Withdrawal of interleukin-3 or incubation with staurosporine (STS) or doxorubicin (Dox) resulted in proteolytic cleavage of CAD in a myeloid precursor cell line (32D) or in a cell line over-expressing CAD. The rapid decline in the CPSII activity paralleled the degradation of CAD and preceded the appearance of Annexin-V-stained apoptotic cells and DNA fragmentation. These events correlated closely with the activation of caspase-3 in these cells and were prevented by the cell-permeable caspase inhibitor N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Asp-Glu-Val-Asp fluoromethyl ketone. Moreover, the incubation of purified CAD with recombinant caspase-3 in vitro generated CAD fragments that were similar to those obtained in vivo. Edman sequencing revealed that two of the major caspase-3 cleavage sites occurred at the sequences EAVD/G and VACD/G within the catalytic (B2) and allosteric (B3) domains of CAD, thus providing a potential mechanism for the rapid inactivation of CPSII during apoptosis. Consistent with this, an enhanced loss of the intracellular pyrimidines (UTP and CTP) was observed in response to STS or DOX-induced apoptosis. Therefore, these studies show that CAD is a novel target for caspase-dependent regulation during apoptosis and suggest that the selective inactivation of pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis accompanies the process of apoptosis. PMID:11854437

  4. Substrate activity of synthetic formyl phosphate in the reaction catalyzed by formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Smithers, G.W.; Jahansouz, H.; Kofron, J.L.; Himes, R.H.; Reed, G.H.

    1987-06-30

    Formyl phosphate, a putative enzyme-bound intermediate in the reaction catalyzed by formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase (EC 6.3.4.3), was synthesized from formyl fluoride and inorganic phosphate, and the product was characterized by /sup 31/P, /sup 1/H, and /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Measurement of hydrolysis rates by /sup 31/P NMR indicates that formyl phosphate is particularly labile, with a half-life of 48 min in a buffered neutral solution at 20 /sup 0/C. At pH 7, hydrolysis occurs with P-O bond cleavage, as demonstrated by /sup 18/O incorporation from H/sub 2//sup 18/O into P/sub i/, while at pH 1 and pH 13 hydrolysis occurs with C-O bond cleavage. The substrate activity of formyl phosphate was tested in the reaction catalyzed by formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase isolated from Clostridium cylindrosporum. Formyl phosphate supports the reaction in both the forward and reverse directions. Thus, N/sup 10/-formyltetrahydrofolate is produced from tetrahydrofolate and formyl phosphate in a reaction mixture that contains enzyme, Mg(II), and ADP, and ATP is produced from formyl phosphate and ADP with enzyme, Mg(II), and tetrahydrofolate present. The requirements for ADP and for tetrahydrofolate as cofactors in these reactions are consistent with previous steady-state kinetic and isotope exchange studies, which demonstrated that all substrate subsites must be occupied prior to catalysis. The k/sub cat/ values for both the forward and reverse directions, with formyl phosphate as the substrate, are much lower than those for the normal forward and reverse reactions. Kinetic analysis of the formyl phosphate supported reactions indicates that the low steady-state rates observed for the synthetic intermediate are most likely due to the sequential nature of the normal reaction.

  5. Adenosine 5'-tetraphosphate and adenosine 5'-pentaphosphate are synthesized by yeast acetyl coenzyme A synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Guranowski, A; Günther Sillero, M A; Sillero, A

    1994-01-01

    Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase (EC 6.2.1.1) catalyzes the synthesis of adenosine 5'-tetraphosphate (P4A) and adenosine 5'-pentaphosphate (p5A) from ATP and tri- or tetrapolyphosphate (P3 or P4), with relative velocities of 7:1, respectively. Of 12 nucleotides tested as potential donors of nucleotidyl moiety, only ATP, adenosine-5'-O-[3-thiotriphosphate], and acetyl-AMP were substrates, with relative velocities of 100, 62, and 80, respectively. The Km values for ATP, P3, and acetyl-AMP were 0.16, 4.7, and 1.8 mM, respectively. The synthesis of p4A could proceed in the absence of exogenous acetate but was stimulated twofold by acetate, with an apparent Km value of 0.065 mM. CoA did not participate in the synthesis of p4A (p5A) and inhibited the reaction (50% inhibitory concentration of 0.015 mM). At pH 6.3, which was optimum for formation of p4A (p5A), the rate of acetyl-CoA synthesis (1.84 mumol mg-1 min-1) was 245 times faster than the rate of synthesis of p4A measured in the presence of acetate. The known formation of p4A (p5A) in yeast sporulation and the role of acetate may therefore be related to acetyl-CoA synthetase. Images PMID:7910605

  6. Isolation of an acetyl-CoA synthetase gene (ZbACS2) from Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Fernando; Zeeman, Anne-Marie; Cardoso, Helena; Sousa, Maria João; Steensma, H Yde; Côrte-Real, Manuela; Leão, Cecília

    2004-03-01

    A gene homologous to Saccharomyces cerevisiae ACS genes, coding for acetyl-CoA synthetase, has been cloned from the yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii ISA 1307, by using reverse genetic approaches. A probe obtained by PCR amplification from Z. bailii DNA, using primers derived from two conserved regions of yeast ACS proteins, RIGAIHSVVF (ScAcs1p; 210-219) and RVDDVVNVSG (ScAcs1p; 574-583), was used for screening a Z. bailii genomic library. Nine clones with partially overlapping inserts were isolated. The sequenced DNA fragment contains a complete ORF of 2027 bp (ZbACS2) and the deduced polypeptide shares significant homologies with the products of ACS2 genes from S. cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis (81% and 82% identity and 84% and 89% similarity, respectively). Phylogenetic analysis shows that the sequence of Zbacs2 is more closely related to the sequences from Acs2 than to those from Acs1 proteins. Moreover, this analysis revealed that the gene duplication producing Acs1 and Acs2 proteins has occurred in the common ancestor of S. cerevisiae, K. lactis, Candida albicans, C. glabrata and Debaryomyces hansenii lineages. Additionally, the cloned gene allowed growth of S. cerevisiae Scacs2 null mutant, in medium containing glucose as the only carbon and energy source, indicating that it encodes a functional acetyl-CoA synthetase. Also, S. cerevisiae cells expressing ZbACS2 have a shorter lag time, in medium containing glucose (2%, w/v) plus acetic acid (0.1-0.35%, v/v). No differences in cell response to acetic acid stress were detected both by specific growth and death rates. The mode of regulation of ZbACS2 appears to be different from ScACS2 and KlACS2, being subject to repression by a glucose pulse in acetic acid-grown cells. PMID:15042592

  7. Comparison of histidine recognition in human and trypanosomatid histidyl-tRNA synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Cho Yeow; Wetzel, Allan B; de van der Schueren, Will J.; Hol, Wim G. J.

    2014-01-01

    As part of a project aimed at obtaining selective inhibitors and drug-like compounds targeting tRNA synthetases from trypanosomatids, we have elucidated the crystal structure of human cytosolic histidyl-tRNA synthetase (Hs-cHisRS) in complex with histidine in order to be able to compare human and parasite enzymes. The resultant structure of Hs-cHisRS·His represents the substrate-bound state (H-state) of the enzyme. It provides an interesting opportunity to compare with ligand-free and imidazole-bound structures Hs-cHisRS published recently, both of which represent the ligand-free state (F-state) of the enzyme. The H-state Hs-cHisRS undergoes conformational changes in active site residues and several conserved motif of HisRS, compared to F-state structures. The histidine forms eight hydrogen bonds with HisRS of which six engage the amino and carboxylate groups of this amino acid. The availability of published imidazole-bound structure provides a unique opportunity to dissect the structural roles of individual chemical groups of histidine. Remarkably, the analysis revealed the importance of the amino and carboxylate groups, of the histidine in leading to these dramatic conformational changes of the H-state. Further, comparison with previously published trypanosomatid HisRS structures reveals a pocket in the F-state of the parasite enzyme that may provide opportunities for developing specific inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei HisRS. PMID:25151410

  8. Murine bubblegum orthologue is a microsomal very long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Fraisl, Peter; Forss-Petter, Sonja; Zigman, Mihaela; Berger, Johannes

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that a gene termed bubblegum (Bgm), encoding an acyl-CoA synthetase, could be involved in the pathogenesis of the inherited neurodegenerative disorder X-ALD (X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy). The precise function of the ALDP (ALD protein) still remains unclear. Aldp deficiency in mammals and Bgm deficiency in Drosophila led to accumulation of VLCFAs (very long-chain fatty acids). As a first step towards studying this interaction in wild-type versus Aldp-deficient mice, we analysed the expression pattern of the murine orthologue of the Bgm gene. In contrast with the ubiquitously expressed Ald gene, Bgm expression is restricted to the tissues that are affected by X-ALD such as brain, testis and adrenals. During mouse brain development, Bgm mRNA was first detected by Northern-blot analysis on embryonic day 18 and increased steadily towards adulthood, whereas the highest level of Ald mRNA was found on embryonic day 12 and decreased gradually during differentiation. Protein fractionation and confocal laser imaging of Bgm-green fluorescent protein fusion proteins revealed a microsomal localization that was different from peroxisomes (where Aldp is detected), endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi. Mouse Bgm showed acyl-CoA synthetase activity towards a VLCFA substrate in addition to LCFAs, and this activity was enriched in the microsomal compartment. Speculating that Bgm expression could be regulated by Ald deficiency, we compared the abundance of Bgm mRNA in wild-type and Ald knockout mice but observed no difference. Although mouse Bgm is capable of activating VLCFA, we conclude that a direct interaction between the mouse Bgm and the Aldp seems unlikely. PMID:14516277

  9. A minimalist mitochondrial threonyl-tRNA synthetase exhibits tRNA-isoacceptor specificity during proofreading

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao-Long; Ruan, Zhi-Rong; Wang, Meng; Fang, Zhi-Peng; Wang, Yong; Chen, Yun; Liu, Ru-Juan; Eriani, Gilbert; Wang, En-Duo

    2014-01-01

    Yeast mitochondria contain a minimalist threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS) composed only of the catalytic core and tRNA binding domain but lacking the entire editing domain. Besides the usual tRNAThr2, some budding yeasts, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, also contain a non-canonical tRNAThr1 with an enlarged 8-nucleotide anticodon loop, reprograming the usual leucine CUN codons to threonine. This raises interesting questions about the aminoacylation fidelity of such ThrRSs and the possible contribution of the two tRNAThrs during editing. Here, we found that, despite the absence of the editing domain, S. cerevisiae mitochondrial ThrRS (ScmtThrRS) harbors a tRNA-dependent pre-transfer editing activity. Remarkably, only the usual tRNAThr2 stimulated pre-transfer editing, thus, establishing the first example of a synthetase exhibiting tRNA-isoacceptor specificity during pre-transfer editing. We also showed that the failure of tRNAThr1 to stimulate tRNA-dependent pre-transfer editing was due to the lack of an editing domain. Using assays of the complementation of a ScmtThrRS gene knockout strain, we showed that the catalytic core and tRNA binding domain of ScmtThrRS co-evolved to recognize the unusual tRNAThr1. In combination, the results provide insights into the tRNA-dependent editing process and suggest that tRNA-dependent pre-transfer editing takes place in the aminoacylation catalytic core. PMID:25414329

  10. Succinyl-CoA Synthetase: New Antigen Candidate of Bartonella bacilliformis

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Cláudia; Palma, Noemí; Pons, Maria J.; Magallón-Tejada, Ariel; Sandoval, Isabel; Tinco-Valdez, Carmen; Gutarra, Carlos; del Valle-Mendoza, Juana; Ruiz, Joaquim; Matsuoka, Mayumi

    2016-01-01

    Background Bartonella bacilliformis is the causative agent of Carrion’s disease, a neglected illness with mortality rates of 40–85% in the absence of treatment. The lack of a diagnostic technique to overcome misdiagnosis and treat asymptomatic carriers is of note. This study aimed to identify new B. bacilliformis antigenic candidates that could lead to a new diagnostic tool able to be implemented in endemic rural areas. Methodology/Principal Findings Blood (n = 198) and serum (n = 177) samples were collected in northern Peru. Clinical data were recorded. Specific 16S rRNA amplification by RT-PCR, IFA and ELISA for IgM/IgG with whole cells as antigens was done. Western blot analysis and N-terminal amino acid sequencing detected seroreactive proteins. ELISAs for IgM/IgG for the antigenic candidates were performed. Of the population 33.3% reported at least one symptom compatible with Carrion’s disease; 25.4% (IFA), 27.1% (ELISA-IgG), 33.9% (ELISA-IgM) and 38.9% (RT-PCR) of samples were positive. Four proteins were considered potential antigenic candidates, including two new antigenic candidates, succinyl-CoA synthetase subunit α (SCS-α) and succinyl-CoA synthetase subunit β (SCS-β). On Western blot both Pap31 and SCS-α interacted with IgM, while GroEL and SCS-β interacted with IgG. The presence of specific antibodies against the antigenic candidates varied from 34.5% (IgG against SCS-α) to 97.2% (IgM against Pap31). Conclusions/Significance RT-PCR and the high levels of positivity for specific ELISAs demonstrate high levels of B. bacilliformis exposure and asymptomatic carriers among inhabitants. The new antigens identified might be used as a new rapid diagnostic tool to diagnose acute Carrion’s disease and identify asymptomatic carriers. PMID:27627803

  11. The mRNA of human cytoplasmic arginyl-tRNA synthetase recruits prokaryotic ribosomes independently.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fang; Ji, Quan-Quan; Ruan, Liang-Liang; Ye, Qing; Wang, En-Duo

    2014-07-25

    There are two isoforms of cytoplasmic arginyl-tRNA synthetase (hcArgRS) in human cells. The long form is a component of the multiple aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complex, and the other is an N-terminal truncated form (NhcArgRS), free in the cytoplasm. It has been shown that the two forms of ArgRS arise from alternative translational initiation in a single mRNA. The short form is produced from the initiation at a downstream, in-frame AUG start codon. Interestingly, our data suggest that the alternative translational initiation of hcArgRS mRNA also takes place in Escherichia coli transformants. When the gene encoding full-length hcArgRS was overexpressed in E. coli, two forms of hcArgRS were observed. The N-terminal sequencing experiment identified that the short form was identical to the NhcArgRS in human cytoplasm. By constructing a bicistronic system, our data support that the mRNA encoding the N-terminal extension of hcArgRS has the capacity of independently recruiting E. coli ribosomes. Furthermore, two critical elements for recruiting prokaryotic ribosomes were identified, the “AGGA” core of the Shine-Dalgarno sequence and the “A-rich” sequence located just proximal to the alternative in-frame initiation site. Although the mechanisms of prokaryotic and eukaryotic translational initiation are distinct, they share some common features. The ability of the hcArgRS mRNA to recruit the prokaryotic ribosome may provide clues for shedding light on the mechanism of alternative translational initiation of hcArgRS mRNA in eukaryotic cells.

  12. Metabolic regulation of the gene encoding glutamine-dependent asparagine synthetase in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Lam, H M; Peng, S S; Coruzzi, G M

    1994-01-01

    Here, we characterize a cDNA encoding a glutamine-dependent asparagine synthetase (ASN1) from Arabidopsis thaliana and assess the effects of metabolic regulation on ASN1 mRNA levels. Sequence analysis shows that the predicted ASN1 peptide contains a purF-type glutamine-binding domain. Southern blot experiments and cDNA clone analysis suggest that ASN1 is the only gene encoding glutamine-dependent asparagine synthetase in A. thaliana. The ASN1 gene is expressed predominantly in shoot tissues, where light has a negative effect on its mRNA accumulation. This negative effect of light on ASN1 mRNA levels was shown to be mediated, at least in part, via the photoreceptor phytochrome. We also investigated whether light-induced changes in nitrogen to carbon ratios might exert a metabolic regulation of the ASN1 mRNA accumulation. These experiments demonstrated that the accumulation of ASN1 mRNA in dark-grown plants is strongly repressed by the presence of exogenous sucrose. Moreover, this sucrose repression of ASN1 expression can be partially rescued by supplementation with exogenous amino acids such as asparagine, glutamine, and glutamate. These findings suggest that the expression of the ASN1 gene is under the metabolic control of the nitrogen to carbon ratio in cells. This is consistent with the fact that asparagine, synthesized by the ASN1 gene product, is a favored compound for nitrogen storage and nitrogen transport in dark-grown plants. We have put forth a working model suggesting that when nitrogen to carbon ratios are high, the gene product of ASN1 functions to re-direct the flow of nitrogen into asparagine, which acts as a shunt for storage and/or long-distance transport of nitrogen. PMID:7846154

  13. Regulation of Synthesis of the Branched-Chain Amino Acids and Cognate Aminoacyl-Transfer Ribonucleic Acid Synthetases of Escherichia coli: a Common Regulatory Element

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Julius; Williams, L. S.; Umbarger, H. E.

    1974-01-01

    Regulation of isoleucine, valine, and leucine biosynthesis and isoleucyl-, valyl-, and leucyl-transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) synthetase formation was examined in two mutant strains of Escherichia coli. One mutant was selected for growth resistance to the isoleucine analogue, ketomycin, and the other was selected for growth resistance to both trifluoroleucine and valine. Control of the synthesis of the branched-chain amino acids by repression was altered in both of these mutants. They also exhibited altered control of formation of isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase (EC 6.1.15, isoleucine:sRNA ligase, AMP), valyl-tRNA synthetase (EC 6.1.1.9, valine:sRNA ligase, AMP), and leucyl-tRNA synthetase (EC 6.1.1.4, leucine:sRNA ligase, AMP). These results suggest the existence of a common element for the control of these two classes of enzymes in Escherichia coli. PMID:4612020

  14. Cloning and sequencing of the gene encoding glutamine synthetase I from the archaeum Pyrococcus woesei: anomalous phylogenies inferred from analysis of archaeal and bacterial glutamine synthetase I sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Tiboni, O; Cammarano, P; Sanangelantoni, A M

    1993-01-01

    The gene glnA encoding glutamine synthetase I (GSI) from the archaeum Pyrococcus woesei was cloned and sequenced with the Sulfolobus solfataricus glnA gene as the probe. An operon reading frame of 448 amino acids was identified within a DNA segment of 1,528 bp. The encoded protein was 49% identical with the GSI of Methanococcus voltae and exhibited conserved regions characteristic of the GSI family. The P. woesei GSI was aligned with available homologs from other archaea (S. solfataricus, M. voltae) and with representative sequences from cyanobacteria, proteobacteria, and gram-positive bacteria. Phylogenetic trees were constructed from both the amino acid and the nucleotide sequence alignments. In accordance with the sequence similarities, archaeal and bacterial sequences did not segregate on a phylogeny. On the basis of sequence signatures, the GSI trees could be subdivided into two ensembles. One encompassed the GSI of cyanobacteria and proteobacteria, but also that of the high-G + C gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor (all of which are regulated by the reversible adenylylation of the enzyme subunits); the other embraced the GSI of the three archaea as well as that of the low-G + C gram-positive bacteria (Clostridium acetobutilycum, Bacillus subtilis) and Thermotoga maritima (none of which are regulated by subunit adenylylation). The GSIs of the Thermotoga and the Bacillus-Clostridium lineages shared a direct common ancestor with that of P. woesei and the methanogens and were unrelated to their homologs from cyanobacteria, proteobacteria, and S. coelicolor. The possibility is presented that the GSI gene arose among the archaea and was then laterally transferred from some early methanogen to a Thermotoga-like organism. However, the relationship of the cyanobacterial-proteobacterial GSIs to the Thermotoga GSI and the GSI of low-G+C gram-positive bacteria remains unexplained. PMID:8098326

  15. Aminolaevulinate synthetase of Micrococcus denitrificans. Purification and properties of the enzyme, and the effect of growth conditions on the enzyme activity in cells.

    PubMed

    Tait, G H

    1973-02-01

    1. 5-Aminolaevulinate synthetase was detected in extracts of the non-photosynthetic bacterium Micrococcus denitrificans. 2. Activity is high in cells grown anaerobically in a defined nitrate medium, but is low in cells grown in an iron-deficient medium, and in cells grown aerobically. 3. Aminolaevulinate synthetase was purified extensively; it has a molecular weight of about 68000; apparent K(m) values for glycine, succinyl-CoA and pyridoxal phosphate are 12mm, 10mum and 11mum respectively; 2mum-haemin and 14mum-protoporphyrin inhibit by 50%. 4. The low activity of aminolaevulinate synthetase in iron-deficient cells increases on adding iron salts to cells only under conditions where protein synthesis can occur. 5. In defined nitrate medium with a high Ca(2+) concentration anaerobic growth yield is higher, but aminolaevulinate synthetase activity is lower than in cells grown in the medium with a low Ca(2+) concentration. In medium made from AnalaR constituents, growth yield is low and aminolaevulinate synthetase activity is high even in the presence of high concentrations of Ca(2+); on adding Cu(2+) (0.1mum) to the medium growth yield and aminolaevulinate synthetase activity become the same as in non-AnalaR medium. 6. Cells incubated under conditions where protein synthesis does not occur but where electron transport does, lose their aminolaevulinate synthetase activity rapidly. 7. The activities of aminolaevulinate dehydratase and succinic thiokinase do not change under any of the conditions of growth examined. 8. The possible mechanisms controlling aminolaevulinate synthetase activity and the role of this enzyme in controlling the synthesis of haem in this organism are discussed. PMID:4722442

  16. Loss of (2'-5')oligoadenylate synthetase activity by production of antisense RNA results in lack of protection by interferon from viral infections

    SciTech Connect

    De Benedetti, A.; Pytel, B.A.; Baglioni, C.

    1987-02-01

    An expression vector was constructed that carries part of the human BK papovavirus with 0.5 kilobases of (2'-5')oligoadenylate (2-5A) synthetase cDNA inserted in inverted orientation downstream from the virion proteins (VP) promoter and the neomycin-resistance gene neo under the control of a simian virus 40 promoter. Cells transfected with this vector and selected for resistance to the neomycin derivative G418 synthesized RNA complementary to 2-5A synthetase mRNA. These cells lacked 2-5A synthetase activity, and the enzyme was not inducible by interferon. In contrast, 2-5A synthetase was induced in cells transfected with a control vector without the cDNA insert. Such cells were protected by interferon from RNA viruses, whereas cells lacking 2-5A synthetase were not protected from encephalomyocarditis virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, and Sindbis virus but were fully protected from influenza virus. These findings show that a high level of 2-5A synthetase is required for interferon-induced protection from the cytoplasmic RNA viruses tested.

  17. Loss of (2'-5')oligoadenylate synthetase activity by production of antisense RNA results in lack of protection by interferon from viral infections.

    PubMed Central

    De Benedetti, A; Pytel, B A; Baglioni, C

    1987-01-01

    An expression vector was constructed that carries part of the human BK papovavirus with 0.5 kilobases of (2'-5')oligoadenylate (2-5A) synthetase cDNA inserted in inverted orientation downstream from the virion proteins (VP) promoter and the neomycin-resistance gene neo under the control of a simian virus 40 promoter. Cells transfected with this vector and selected for resistance to the neomycin derivative G418 synthesized RNA complementary to 2-5A synthetase mRNA. These cells lacked 2-5A synthetase activity, and the enzyme was not inducible by interferon. In contrast, 2-5A synthetase was induced in cells transfected with a control vector without the cDNA insert. Such cells were protected by interferon from RNA viruses, whereas cells lacking 2-5A synthetase were not protected from encephalomyocarditis virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, and Sindbis virus but were fully protected from influenza virus. These findings show that a high level of 2-5A synthetase is required for interferon-induced protection from the cytoplasmic RNA viruses tested. Images PMID:2433688

  18. Antitumor/Antifungal Celecoxib Derivative AR-12 is a Non-Nucleoside Inhibitor of the ANL-Family Adenylating Enzyme Acetyl CoA Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    AR-12/OSU-03012 is an antitumor celecoxib-derivative that has progressed to Phase I clinical trial as an anticancer agent and has activity against a number of infectious agents including fungi, bacteria and viruses. However, the mechanism of these activities has remained unclear. Based on a chemical-genetic profiling approach in yeast, we have found that AR-12 is an ATP-competitive, time-dependent inhibitor of yeast acetyl coenzyme A synthetase. AR-12-treated fungal cells show phenotypes consistent with the genetic reduction of acetyl CoA synthetase activity, including induction of autophagy, decreased histone acetylation, and loss of cellular integrity. In addition, AR-12 is a weak inhibitor of human acetyl CoA synthetase ACCS2. Acetyl CoA synthetase activity is essential in many fungi and parasites. In contrast, acetyl CoA is primarily synthesized by an alternate enzyme, ATP-citrate lyase, in mammalian cells. Taken together, our results indicate that AR-12 is a non-nucleoside acetyl CoA synthetase inhibitor and that acetyl CoA synthetase may be a feasible antifungal drug target. PMID:27088128

  19. Rheb Protein Binds CAD (Carbamoyl-phosphate Synthetase 2, Aspartate Transcarbamoylase, and Dihydroorotase) Protein in a GTP- and Effector Domain-dependent Manner and Influences Its Cellular Localization and Carbamoyl-phosphate Synthetase (CPSase) Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Tatsuhiro; Akasu, Hitomi; Shimono, Wataru; Matsu, Chisa; Fujiwara, Yuki; Shibagaki, Yoshio; Heard, Jeffrey J.; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; Hattori, Seisuke

    2015-01-01

    Rheb small GTPases, which consist of Rheb1 and Rheb2 (also known as RhebL1) in mammalian cells, are unique members of the Ras superfamily and play central roles in regulating protein synthesis and cell growth by activating mTOR. To gain further insight into the function of Rheb, we carried out a search for Rheb-binding proteins and found that Rheb binds to CAD protein (carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2, aspartate transcarbamoylase, and dihydroorotase), a multifunctional enzyme required for the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. CAD binding is more pronounced with Rheb2 than with Rheb1. Rheb binds CAD in a GTP- and effector domain-dependent manner. The region of CAD where Rheb binds is located at the C-terminal region of the carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase domain and not in the dihydroorotase and aspartate transcarbamoylase domains. Rheb stimulated carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase activity of CAD in vitro. In addition, an elevated level of intracellular UTP pyrimidine nucleotide was observed in Tsc2-deficient cells, which was attenuated by knocking down of Rheb. Immunostaining analysis showed that expression of Rheb leads to increased accumulation of CAD on lysosomes. Both a farnesyltransferase inhibitor that blocks membrane association of Rheb and knockdown of Rheb mislocalized CAD. These results establish CAD as a downstream effector of Rheb and suggest a possible role of Rheb in regulating de novo pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis. PMID:25422319

  20. Characterization of the Suillus grevillei quinone synthetase GreA supports a nonribosomal code for aromatic α-keto acids.

    PubMed

    Wackler, Barbara; Lackner, Gerald; Chooi, Yit Heng; Hoffmeister, Dirk

    2012-08-13

    The gene greA was cloned from the genome of the basidiomycete Suillus grevillei. It encodes a monomodular natural product biosynthesis protein composed of three domains for adenylation, thiolation, and thioesterase and, hence, is reminiscent of a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS). GreA was biochemically characterized in vitro. It was identified as atromentin synthetase and therefore represents one of only a limited number of biochemically characterized NRPS-like enzymes which accept an aromatic α-keto acid. Specificity-conferring amino acid residues--collectively referred to as the nonribosomal code--were predicted for the primary sequence of the GreA adenylation domain and were an unprecedented combination for aromatic α-keto acids. Plausible support for this new code came from in silico simulation of the adenylation domain structure. According to the model, the predicted residues line the active site and, therefore, very likely contribute to substrate specificity.

  1. Neurodegenerative disease-associated mutants of a human mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase present individual molecular signatures.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Claude; Lorber, Bernard; Gaudry, Agnès; Karim, Loukmane; Schwenzer, Hagen; Wien, Frank; Roblin, Pierre; Florentz, Catherine; Sissler, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in human mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are associated with a variety of neurodegenerative disorders. The effects of these mutations on the structure and function of the enzymes remain to be established. Here, we investigate six mutants of the aspartyl-tRNA synthetase correlated with leukoencephalopathies. Our integrated strategy, combining an ensemble of biochemical and biophysical approaches, reveals that mutants are diversely affected with respect to their solubility in cellular extracts and stability in solution, but not in architecture. Mutations with mild effects on solubility occur in patients as allelic combinations whereas those with strong effects on solubility or on aminoacylation are necessarily associated with a partially functional allele. The fact that all mutations show individual molecular and cellular signatures and affect amino acids only conserved in mammals, points towards an alternative function besides aminoacylation.

  2. Neurodegenerative disease-associated mutants of a human mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase present individual molecular signatures

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, Claude; Lorber, Bernard; Gaudry, Agnès; Karim, Loukmane; Schwenzer, Hagen; Wien, Frank; Roblin, Pierre; Florentz, Catherine; Sissler, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in human mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are associated with a variety of neurodegenerative disorders. The effects of these mutations on the structure and function of the enzymes remain to be established. Here, we investigate six mutants of the aspartyl-tRNA synthetase correlated with leukoencephalopathies. Our integrated strategy, combining an ensemble of biochemical and biophysical approaches, reveals that mutants are diversely affected with respect to their solubility in cellular extracts and stability in solution, but not in architecture. Mutations with mild effects on solubility occur in patients as allelic combinations whereas those with strong effects on solubility or on aminoacylation are necessarily associated with a partially functional allele. The fact that all mutations show individual molecular and cellular signatures and affect amino acids only conserved in mammals, points towards an alternative function besides aminoacylation. PMID:26620921

  3. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the seryl-tRNA synthetase from Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Rita; Barbosa Pereira, Pedro José; Santos, Manuel A S; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    The seryl-tRNA synthetase (SerRS) from Candida albicans exists naturally as two isoforms resulting from ambiguity in the natural genetic code. Both enzymes were crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using 3.2-3.4 M ammonium sulfate as precipitant. The crystals belonged to the hexagonal space group P6(1)22 and contained one monomer per asymmetric unit, despite the synthetase existing as a homodimer (with a molecular weight of ∼116 kDa) in solution. Diffraction data were collected to 2.0 Å resolution at a synchrotron source and the crystal structures of unliganded SerRS and of its complexes with ATP and with a seryl-adenylate analogue were solved by molecular replacement. The structure of C. albicans SerRS represents the first reported structure of a eukaryotic cytoplasmic SerRS. PMID:21206050

  4. Identification of the reactive cysteinyl residue and ATP binding site in Bacillus cereus glutamine synthetase by chemical modification.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Y; Itoh, M; Tanaka, E; Kimura, K

    1990-02-01

    Bacillus cereus glutamine synthetase was modified by reaction with a fluorescent SH reagent, N-[[(iodoacetyl)amino]ethyl]-5-naphthylamine-1-sulfonic acid (IAEDANS), or an ATP analog, 5'-p-fluorosulfonylbenzoyladenosine (FSBA). The locations of the specific binding sites of these reagents were identified. IAEDANS inactivated Mg2(+)-dependent activity and activated Mn2(+)-dependent activity. FSBA inactivated only Mn2(+)-dependent activity. Mg2+ plus Mn2(+)-dependent activity was inactivated by IAEDANS or FSBA. Amino acid sequence analysis of the single AEDANS-labeled proteolytic fragment showed the cysteinyl residue at position 306 to be the site of modification. Cys 306 is one of three cysteines that are unique to Bacillus glutamine synthetase. The result suggested that the cysteine has a role in the active site of the enzyme. We also report that the amino acid residue modified by FSBA was the lysyl residue at position 43.

  5. Severe respiratory failure as a presenting feature of an interstitial lung disease associated with anti-synthetase syndrome (ASS).

    PubMed

    Piroddi, Ines Maria Grazia; Ferraioli, Gianluca; Barlascini, Cornelius; Castagneto, Corrado; Nicolini, Antonello

    2016-07-01

    Anti-synthetase syndrome (ASS) is defined as a heterogeneous connective tissue disorder characterized by the association of an interstitial lung disease (ILD) with or without inflammatory myositis with the presence of anti-aminoacyl-tRNA-synthetase antibodies. ILD is one of the major extra-muscular manifestations of polymyositis and dermatomyositis. We report a case of a patient with dyspnea, cough, and intermittent fever as well as ILD associated ASS in the absence of muscular involvement. This patient was admitted to the emergency department with severe respiratory failure requiring non-invasive ventilation. Our patient's case demonstrates that the diagnosis of ASS may not be obvious. However, its diagnosis leads to appropriate and potentially life-saving treatment.

  6. Synthesis and in vitro/in vivo Evaluation of the Antitrypanosomal Activity of 3-Bromoacivicin, a Potent CTP Synthetase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Paola; Pinto, Andrea; Wong, Pui E; Major, Louise L; Tamborini, Lucia; Iannuzzi, Maria C; De Micheli, Carlo; Barrett, Michael P; Smith, Terry K

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The first convenient synthesis of enantiomerically pure (αS,5S)-α-amino-3-bromo-4,5-dihydroisoxazol-5-yl acetic acid (3-bromoacivicin) is described. We demonstrate that 3-bromoacivicin is a CTP synthetase inhibitor three times as potent as its 3-chloro analogue, the natural antibiotic acivicin. Because CTP synthetase was suggested to be a potential drug target in African trypanosomes, the in vitro/in vivo antitrypanosomal activity of 3-bromoacivicin was assessed in comparison with acivicin. Beyond expectation, we observed a 12-fold enhancement in the in vitro antitrypanosomal activity, while toxicity against mammalian cells remained unaffected. Despite its good in vitro activity and selectivity, 3-bromoacivicin proved to be trypanostatic and failed to completely eradicate the infection when tested in vivo at its maximum tolerable dose. PMID:21275056

  7. Ethylene-Induced Increase in Glutamine Synthetase Activity and mRNA Levels in Hevea brasiliensis Latex Cells.

    PubMed Central

    Pujade-Renaud, V.; Clement, A.; Perrot-Rechenmann, C.; Prevot, J. C.; Chrestin, H.; Jacob, J. L.; Guern, J.

    1994-01-01

    Ethylene, used as a stimulant of latex production in Hevea brasiliensis, significantly activates the regenerating metabolism within the laticiferous cells. In this context, attention was focused on glutamine synthetase (GS; EC 6.3.1.2), a key enzyme in nitrogen metabolism. A specific and significant activation of the cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GScyt) in the laticiferous cells after ethylene treatment parallels the increase of latex yield. A marked accumulation of the corresponding mRNA was found, but in contrast, a slight and variable increase of the polypeptide level is at the limit of detection by western blotting. The GS response to ethylene might be mediated by ammonia that increases in latex cytosol following ethylene treatment. The physiological significance for such a regulation by ethylene of the GScyt is discussed in terms of the nitrogen requirement for protein synthesis associated with latex regeneration. PMID:12232192

  8. Severe respiratory failure as a presenting feature of an interstitial lung disease associated with anti-synthetase syndrome (ASS).

    PubMed

    Piroddi, Ines Maria Grazia; Ferraioli, Gianluca; Barlascini, Cornelius; Castagneto, Corrado; Nicolini, Antonello

    2016-07-01

    Anti-synthetase syndrome (ASS) is defined as a heterogeneous connective tissue disorder characterized by the association of an interstitial lung disease (ILD) with or without inflammatory myositis with the presence of anti-aminoacyl-tRNA-synthetase antibodies. ILD is one of the major extra-muscular manifestations of polymyositis and dermatomyositis. We report a case of a patient with dyspnea, cough, and intermittent fever as well as ILD associated ASS in the absence of muscular involvement. This patient was admitted to the emergency department with severe respiratory failure requiring non-invasive ventilation. Our patient's case demonstrates that the diagnosis of ASS may not be obvious. However, its diagnosis leads to appropriate and potentially life-saving treatment. PMID:27424829

  9. Diagnostic of protein crystallization by dynamic light scattering; an application to an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikol, Vincent; Vincendon, Pascale; Eriani, Gilbert; Hirsch, Ernest; Giegé, Richard

    1991-03-01

    The apparent hydrodynamic radius of a truncated form of baker's yeast aspartyl-tRNA synthetase has been measured in various precipitating agent solutions as a function of the protein concentration by dynamic light scattering. In solvents containing ammonium sulfate or 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol as the precipitating agent the protein remains essentially monodisperse, whereas in the presence of polyethylene glycol interactions and aggregations between protein molecules are detected before reaching supersaturation. These data are indications of possible crystallizations of the protein by the two former precipitants and no crystallization by the latter one. Crystallization experiments indeed have shown that the truncated synthetase crystallizes in the presence of ammonium sulfate and that no crystals grow in solvents containing polyethylene glycol.

  10. Functional Characterization of PyrG, an Unusual Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Module from the Pyridomycin Biosynthetic Pathway.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tingting; Li, Lili; Brock, Nelson L; Deng, Zixin; Lin, Shuangjun

    2016-08-01

    Pyridomycin is an antimycobacterial cyclodepsipeptide assembled by a nonribosomal peptide synthetase/polyketide synthase hybrid system. Analysis of its cluster revealed a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) module, PyrG, that contains two tandem adenylation domains and a PKS-type ketoreductase domain. In this study, we biochemically validated that the second A domain recognizes and activates α-keto-β-methylvaleric acid (2-KVC) as the native substrate; the first A domain was not functional but might play a structural role. The KR domain catalyzed the reduction of the 2-KVC tethered to the peptidyl carrier protein of PyrG in the presence of the MbtH family protein, PyrH. PyrG was demonstrated to recognize many amino acids. This substrate promiscuity provides the potential to generate pyridomycin analogues with various enolic acids moiety; this is important for binding InhA, a critical enzyme for cell-wall biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  11. Effects of the chitin synthetase inhibitor plumbagin and its 2-demethyl derivative juglone on insect ecdysone 20-monooxygenase activity.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, M J; Smith, S L

    1988-12-01

    The chitin synthetase inhibitor plumbagin and its 2-demethyl derivative juglone were found to inhibit in a dose-response fashion the cytochrome P-450 dependent ecdysone 20-monooxygenase activity associated with adult female Aedes aegypti, wandering stage larvae of Drosophila melanogaster, and fat body and midgut from last instar larvae of Manduca sexta. The concentration of these naphthoquinones required to elicit a 50% inhibition of the steroid hydroxylase activity in all the insects was approximately 1 x 10(-4) M.

  12. Nanomolar inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine synthetase 1: synthesis, biological evaluation and X-ray crystallographic studies.

    PubMed

    Couturier, Cédric; Silve, Sandra; Morales, Renaud; Pessegue, Bernard; Llopart, Sylvie; Nair, Anil; Bauer, Armin; Scheiper, Bodo; Pöverlein, Christoph; Ganzhorn, Axel; Lagrange, Sophie; Bacqué, Eric

    2015-04-01

    A series of imidazo[1,2-a]indeno[1,2-e]pyrazin-4-ones that potently inhibit M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase (GlnA1) has been identified by high throughput screening. Exploration of this series was performed owing to a short chemistry program. Despite possibly nanomolar inhibitions, none of these compounds was active on whole cell Mtb, suggesting that GlnA1 may not be a suitable target to find new anti-tubercular drugs.

  13. p53-Dependent DNA damage response sensitive to editing-defective tRNA synthetase in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Song, Youngzee; Shi, Yi; Carland, Tristan M; Lian, Shanshan; Sasaki, Tomoyuki; Schork, Nicholas J; Head, Steven R; Kishi, Shuji; Schimmel, Paul

    2016-07-26

    Brain and heart pathologies are caused by editing defects of transfer RNA (tRNA) synthetases, which preserve genetic code fidelity by removing incorrect amino acids misattached to tRNAs. To extend understanding of the broader impact of synthetase editing reactions on organismal homeostasis, and based on effects in bacteria ostensibly from small amounts of mistranslation of components of the replication apparatus, we investigated the sensitivity to editing of the vertebrate genome. We show here that in zebrafish embryos, transient overexpression of editing-defective valyl-tRNA synthetase (ValRS(ED)) activated DNA break-responsive H2AX and p53-responsive downstream proteins, such as cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p21, which promotes cell-cycle arrest at DNA damage checkpoints, and Gadd45 and p53R2, with pivotal roles in DNA repair. In contrast, the response of these proteins to expression of ValRS(ED) was abolished in p53-deficient fish. The p53-activated downstream signaling events correlated with suppression of abnormal morphological changes caused by the editing defect and, in adults, reversed a shortened life span (followed for 2 y). Conversely, with normal editing activities, p53-deficient fish have a normal life span and few morphological changes. Whole-fish deep sequencing showed genomic mutations associated with the editing defect. We suggest that the sensitivity of p53 to expression of an editing-defective tRNA synthetase has a critical role in promoting genome integrity and organismal homeostasis. PMID:27402763

  14. Biochemical analyses of ppGpp effect on adenylosuccinate synthetases, key enzymes in purine biosynthesis in rice.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Yuhta; Nozawa, Akira; Tozawa, Yuzuru

    2014-01-01

    The ppGpp-signaling system functions in plant chloroplasts. In bacteria, a negative effect of ppGpp on adenylosuccinate synthetase (AdSS) has been suggested. Our biochemical analysis also revealed rice AdSS homologs are apparently sensitive to ppGpp. However, further investigation clarified that this phenomenon is cancelled by the high substrate affinity to the enzymes, leading to a limited effect of ppGpp on adenylosuccinate synthesis.

  15. Nonribosomal peptide synthetase genes pesL and pes1 are essential for Fumigaclavine C production in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    O'Hanlon, Karen A; Gallagher, Lorna; Schrettl, Markus; Jöchl, Christoph; Kavanagh, Kevin; Larsen, Thomas O; Doyle, Sean

    2012-05-01

    The identity of metabolites encoded by the majority of nonribosomal peptide synthetases in the opportunistic pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus, remains outstanding. We found that the nonribosomal peptide (NRP) synthetases PesL and Pes1 were essential for fumigaclavine C biosynthesis, the end product of the complex ergot alkaloid (EA) pathway in A. fumigatus. Deletion of either pesL (ΔpesL) or pes1 (Δpes1) resulted in complete loss of fumigaclavine C biosynthesis, relatively increased production of fumitremorgins such as TR-2, fumitremorgin C and verruculogen, increased sensitivity to H(2)O(2), and increased sensitivity to the antifungals, voriconazole, and amphotericin B. Deletion of pesL resulted in severely reduced virulence in an invertebrate infection model (P < 0.001). These findings indicate that NRP synthesis plays an essential role in mediating the final prenylation step of the EA pathway, despite the apparent absence of NRP synthetases in the proposed EA biosynthetic cluster for A. fumigatus. Liquid chromatography/diode array detection/mass spectrometry analysis also revealed the presence of fumiquinazolines A to F in both A. fumigatus wild-type and ΔpesL strains. This observation suggests that alternative NRP synthetases can also function in fumiquinazoline biosynthesis, since PesL has been shown to mediate fumiquinazoline biosynthesis in vitro. Furthermore, we provide here the first direct link between EA biosynthesis and virulence, in agreement with the observed toxicity associated with EA exposure. Finally, we demonstrate a possible cluster cross-talk phenomenon, a theme which is beginning to emerge in the literature. PMID:22344643

  16. Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Genes pesL and pes1 Are Essential for Fumigaclavine C Production in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    O'Hanlon, Karen A.; Gallagher, Lorna; Schrettl, Markus; Jöchl, Christoph; Kavanagh, Kevin; Larsen, Thomas O.

    2012-01-01

    The identity of metabolites encoded by the majority of nonribosomal peptide synthetases in the opportunistic pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus, remains outstanding. We found that the nonribosomal peptide (NRP) synthetases PesL and Pes1 were essential for fumigaclavine C biosynthesis, the end product of the complex ergot alkaloid (EA) pathway in A. fumigatus. Deletion of either pesL (ΔpesL) or pes1 (Δpes1) resulted in complete loss of fumigaclavine C biosynthesis, relatively increased production of fumitremorgins such as TR-2, fumitremorgin C and verruculogen, increased sensitivity to H2O2, and increased sensitivity to the antifungals, voriconazole, and amphotericin B. Deletion of pesL resulted in severely reduced virulence in an invertebrate infection model (P < 0.001). These findings indicate that NRP synthesis plays an essential role in mediating the final prenylation step of the EA pathway, despite the apparent absence of NRP synthetases in the proposed EA biosynthetic cluster for A. fumigatus. Liquid chromatography/diode array detection/mass spectrometry analysis also revealed the presence of fumiquinazolines A to F in both A. fumigatus wild-type and ΔpesL strains. This observation suggests that alternative NRP synthetases can also function in fumiquinazoline biosynthesis, since PesL has been shown to mediate fumiquinazoline biosynthesis in vitro. Furthermore, we provide here the first direct link between EA biosynthesis and virulence, in agreement with the observed toxicity associated with EA exposure. Finally, we demonstrate a possible cluster cross-talk phenomenon, a theme which is beginning to emerge in the literature. PMID:22344643

  17. Cocrystal Structures of Glycyl-tRNA Synthetase in Complex with tRNA Suggest Multiple Conformational States in Glycylation*

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xiangjing; Hao, Zhitai; Tian, Qingnan; Zhang, Zhemin; Zhou, Chun; Xie, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are an ancient enzyme family that specifically charges tRNA molecules with cognate amino acids for protein synthesis. Glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) is one of the most intriguing aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases due to its divergent quaternary structure and abnormal charging properties. In the past decade, mutations of human GlyRS (hGlyRS) were also found to be associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. However, the mechanisms of traditional and alternative functions of hGlyRS are poorly understood due to a lack of studies at the molecular basis. In this study we report crystal structures of wild type and mutant hGlyRS in complex with tRNA and with small substrates and describe the molecular details of enzymatic recognition of the key tRNA identity elements in the acceptor stem and the anticodon loop. The cocrystal structures suggest that insertions 1 and 3 work together with the active site in a cooperative manner to facilitate efficient substrate binding. Both the enzyme and tRNA molecules undergo significant conformational changes during glycylation. A working model of multiple conformations for hGlyRS catalysis is proposed based on the crystallographic and biochemical studies. This study provides insights into the catalytic pathway of hGlyRS and may also contribute to our understanding of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. PMID:24898252

  18. Impaired protein translation in Drosophila models for Charcot–Marie–Tooth neuropathy caused by mutant tRNA synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Niehues, Sven; Bussmann, Julia; Steffes, Georg; Erdmann, Ines; Köhrer, Caroline; Sun, Litao; Wagner, Marina; Schäfer, Kerstin; Wang, Guangxia; Koerdt, Sophia N.; Stum, Morgane; RajBhandary, Uttam L.; Thomas, Ulrich; Aberle, Hermann; Burgess, Robert W.; Yang, Xiang-Lei; Dieterich, Daniela; Storkebaum, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Dominant mutations in five tRNA synthetases cause Charcot–Marie–Tooth (CMT) neuropathy, suggesting that altered aminoacylation function underlies the disease. However, previous studies showed that loss of aminoacylation activity is not required to cause CMT. Here we present a Drosophila model for CMT with mutations in glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS). Expression of three CMT-mutant GARS proteins induces defects in motor performance and motor and sensory neuron morphology, and shortens lifespan. Mutant GARS proteins display normal subcellular localization but markedly reduce global protein synthesis in motor and sensory neurons, or when ubiquitously expressed in adults, as revealed by FUNCAT and BONCAT. Translational slowdown is not attributable to altered tRNAGly aminoacylation, and cannot be rescued by Drosophila Gars overexpression, indicating a gain-of-toxic-function mechanism. Expression of CMT-mutant tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase also impairs translation, suggesting a common pathogenic mechanism. Finally, genetic reduction of translation is sufficient to induce CMT-like phenotypes, indicating a causal contribution of translational slowdown to CMT. PMID:26138142

  19. Cocrystal structures of glycyl-tRNA synthetase in complex with tRNA suggest multiple conformational states in glycylation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiangjing; Hao, Zhitai; Tian, Qingnan; Zhang, Zhemin; Zhou, Chun; Xie, Wei

    2014-07-18

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are an ancient enzyme family that specifically charges tRNA molecules with cognate amino acids for protein synthesis. Glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) is one of the most intriguing aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases due to its divergent quaternary structure and abnormal charging properties. In the past decade, mutations of human GlyRS (hGlyRS) were also found to be associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. However, the mechanisms of traditional and alternative functions of hGlyRS are poorly understood due to a lack of studies at the molecular basis. In this study we report crystal structures of wild type and mutant hGlyRS in complex with tRNA and with small substrates and describe the molecular details of enzymatic recognition of the key tRNA identity elements in the acceptor stem and the anticodon loop. The cocrystal structures suggest that insertions 1 and 3 work together with the active site in a cooperative manner to facilitate efficient substrate binding. Both the enzyme and tRNA molecules undergo significant conformational changes during glycylation. A working model of multiple conformations for hGlyRS catalysis is proposed based on the crystallographic and biochemical studies. This study provides insights into the catalytic pathway of hGlyRS and may also contribute to our understanding of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

  20. MD Simulations of tRNA and Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases: Dynamics, Folding, Binding, and Allostery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rongzhong; Macnamara, Lindsay M.; Leuchter, Jessica D.; Alexander, Rebecca W.; Cho, Samuel S.

    2015-01-01

    While tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are classes of biomolecules that have been extensively studied for decades, the finer details of how they carry out their fundamental biological functions in protein synthesis remain a challenge. Recent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are verifying experimental observations and providing new insight that cannot be addressed from experiments alone. Throughout the review, we briefly discuss important historical events to provide a context for how far the field has progressed over the past few decades. We then review the background of tRNA molecules, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and current state of the art MD simulation techniques for those who may be unfamiliar with any of those fields. Recent MD simulations of tRNA dynamics and folding and of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase dynamics and mechanistic characterizations are discussed. We highlight the recent successes and discuss how important questions can be addressed using current MD simulations techniques. We also outline several natural next steps for computational studies of AARS:tRNA complexes. PMID:26184179

  1. Regulation of an Auxiliary, Antibiotic-Resistant Tryptophanyl-tRNA Synthetase Gene via Ribosome-Mediated Transcriptional Attenuation ▿

    PubMed Central

    Vecchione, James J.; Sello, Jason K.

    2010-01-01

    cis-Acting RNA elements in the leaders of bacterial mRNA often regulate gene transcription, especially in the context of amino acid metabolism. We determined that the transcription of the auxiliary, antibiotic-resistant tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase gene (trpRS1) in Streptomyces coelicolor is regulated by a ribosome-mediated attenuator in the 5′ leader of its mRNA region. This regulatory element controls gene transcription in response to the physiological effects of indolmycin and chuangxinmycin, two antibiotics that inhibit bacterial tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetases. By mining streptomycete genome sequences, we found several orthologs of trpRS1 that share this regulatory element; we predict that they are regulated in a similar fashion. The validity of this prediction was established through the analysis of a trpRS1 ortholog (SAV4725) in Streptomyces avermitilis. We conclude that the trpRS1 locus is a widely distributed and self-regulating antibiotic resistance cassette. This study provides insights into how auxiliary aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase genes are regulated in bacteria. PMID:20453096

  2. Species-specific immune responses generated by histidyl-tRNA synthetase immunization are associated with muscle and lung inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Katsumata, Yasuhiro; Ridgway, William M.; Oriss, Timothy; Gu, Xinyan; Chin, David; Wu, Yuehong; Fertig, Noreen; Oury, Tim; Vandersteen, Daniel; Clemens, Paula; Camacho, Carlos J.; Weinberg, Andrew; Ascherman, Dana P.

    2009-01-01

    Evidence implicating histidyl-tRNA synthetase (Jo-1) in the pathogenesis of the anti-synthetase syndrome includes established genetic associations linking the reproducible phenotype of muscle inflammation and interstitial lung disease with autoantibodies recognizing Jo-1. To better address the role of Jo-1-directed B and T cell responses in the context of different genetic backgrounds, we employed Jo-1 protein immunization of C57BL/6 and NOD congenic mice. Detailed analysis of early antibody responses following inoculation with human or murine Jo-1 demonstrates remarkable species-specifity, with limited cross recognition of Jo-1 from the opposite species. Complementing these results, immunization with purified peptides derived from murine Jo-1 generates B and T cells targeting species-specific epitopes contained within the amino terminal 120 amino acids of murine Jo-1. The eventual spreading of B cell epitopes that uniformly occurs 8 weeks post immunization with murine Jo-1 provides additional evidence of an immune response mediated by autoreactive, Jo-1-specific T cells. Corresponding to this self-reactivity, mice immunized with murine Jo-1 develop a striking combination of muscle and lung inflammation that replicates features of the human anti-synthetase syndrome. PMID:17826948

  3. The bifunctional active site of s-adenosylmethionine synthetase. Roles of the active site aspartates.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J C; Markham, G D

    1999-11-12

    S-Adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) synthetase catalyzes the biosynthesis of AdoMet in a unique enzymatic reaction. Initially the sulfur of methionine displaces the intact tripolyphosphate chain (PPP(i)) from ATP, and subsequently PPP(i) is hydrolyzed to PP(i) and P(i) before product release. The crystal structure of Escherichia coli AdoMet synthetase shows that the active site contains four aspartate residues. Aspartate residues Asp-16* and Asp-271 individually provide the sole protein ligand to one of the two required Mg(2+) ions (* denotes a residue from a second subunit); aspartates Asp-118 and Asp-238* are proposed to interact with methionine. Each aspartate has been changed to an uncharged asparagine, and the metal binding residues were also changed to alanine, to assess the roles of charge and ligation ability on catalytic efficiency. The resultant enzyme variants all structurally resemble the wild type enzyme as indicated by circular dichroism spectra and are tetramers. However, all have k(cat) reductions of approximately 10(3)-fold in AdoMet synthesis, whereas the MgATP and methionine K(m) values change by less than 3- and 8-fold, respectively. In the partial reaction of PPP(i) hydrolysis, mutants of the Mg(2+) binding residues have >700-fold reduced catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)), whereas the D118N and D238*N mutants are impaired less than 35-fold. The catalytic efficiency for PPP(i) hydrolysis by Mg(2+) site mutants is improved by AdoMet, like the wild type enzyme. In contrast AdoMet reduces the catalytic efficiency for PPP(i) hydrolysis by the D118N and D238*N mutants, indicating that the events involved in AdoMet activation are hindered in these methionyl binding site mutants. Ca(2+) uniquely activates the D271A mutant enzyme to 15% of the level of Mg(2+), in contrast to the approximately 1% Ca(2+) activation of the wild type enzyme. This indicates that the Asp-271 side chain size is a discriminator between the activating ability of Ca(2+) and the

  4. Induction of fatty acid synthetase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase by isolated rat liver cells.

    PubMed

    Porter, J W; Swenson, T L

    1983-01-01

    Current studies on the synthesis of long-chain fatty acids by isolated rat liver cells are largely concerned with the regulation of the activity of previously existing acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthetase, and with the regulation of the quantity of these enzymes. These studies have required the development of methods for obtaining high yields of viable hepatocytes that respond to hormonal treatment. Such methods have been developed over the past 10-15 years through the efforts of several laboratories. These studies have also required the development of a method to determine whether a change in the activity of an enzyme is due to a modification of preexisting enzyme or to a change in quantity of that enzyme. The most satisfactory method to use for such studies is immunotitration of enzyme activity. In recent years studies on the regulation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase have largely centered upon the effect of phosphorylation-dephosphorylation on the activity of this enzyme and whether glucagon inhibits the activity of this enzyme through this process. Much data from a number of laboratories have suggested that glucagon regulates the activity of this enzyme through phosphorylation-dephosphorylation. However, several of these studies involved the use of crude systems in which competing enzymes and substrates that can significantly interfere with acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity measurements were still present. Hence, a confirmation of these studies needs to be carried out under conditions in which the effects of competing enzymes and substrates are eliminated. Studies on changes in quantity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthetase have shown that these enzymes are induced by the fasting and refeeding of animals. They have also shown that insulin stimulates (10- to 30-fold) the induction of these enzymes. This induction appears to be due to a change in the quantity of translatable mRNA which may, in turn, be due to a change in the rate of

  5. Glutamic acid gamma-monohydroxamate and hydroxylamine are alternate substrates for Escherichia coli asparagine synthetase B.

    PubMed

    Boehlein, S K; Schuster, S M; Richards, N G

    1996-03-01

    Escherichia coli asparagine synthetase B (AS-B) catalyzes the synthesis of asparagine from aspartic acid and glutamine in an ATP-dependent reaction. The ability of this enzyme to employ hydroxylamine and L-glutamic acid gamma-monohydroxamate (LGH) as alternative substrates in place of ammonia and L-glutamine, respectively, has been investigated. The enzyme is able to function as an amidohydrolase, liberating hydroxylamine from LGH with high catalytic efficiency, as measured by k(cat)/K(M). In addition, the kinetic parameters determined for hydroxylamine in AS-B synthetase activity are very similar to those of ammonia. Nitrogen transfer from LGH to yield aspartic acid beta-monohydroxamate is also catalyzed by AS-B. While such an observation has been made for a few members of the trpG amidotransferase family, our results appear to be the first demonstration that nitrogen transfer can occur from glutamine analogs in a purF amidotransferase. However, k(cat)/K(M) for the ATP-dependent transfer of hydroxylamine from LGH to aspartic acid is reduced 3-fold relative to that for glutamine-dependent asparagine synthesis. Further, the AS-B mutant in which asparagine is replaced by alanine (N74A) can also use hydroxylamine as an alternate substrate to ammonia and catalyze the hydrolysis of LGH. The catalytic efficiencies (k(cat)/K(M)) of nitrogen transfer from LGH and L-glutamine to beta-aspartyl-AMP are almost identical for the N74A AS-B mutant. These observations support the proposal that Asn-74 plays a role in catalyzing glutamine-dependent nitrogen transfer. We interpret our kinetic data as further evidence against ammonia-mediated nitrogen transfer from glutamine in the purF amidotransferase AS-B. These results are consistent with two alternate chemical mechanisms that have been proposed for this reaction [Boehlein, S. K., Richards, N. G. J., Walworth, E. S., & Schuster, S. M. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 26789-26795].

  6. Lincosamide Synthetase—A Unique Condensation System Combining Elements of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase and Mycothiol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Janata, Jiri; Kadlcik, Stanislav; Koberska, Marketa; Ulanova, Dana; Kamenik, Zdenek; Novak, Petr; Kopecky, Jan; Novotna, Jitka; Radojevic, Bojana; Plhackova, Kamila; Gazak, Radek; Najmanova, Lucie

    2015-01-01

    In the biosynthesis of lincosamide antibiotics lincomycin and celesticetin, the amino acid and amino sugar units are linked by an amide bond. The respective condensing enzyme lincosamide synthetase (LS) is expected to be an unusual system combining nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) components with so far unknown amino sugar related activities. The biosynthetic gene cluster of celesticetin was sequenced and compared to the lincomycin one revealing putative LS coding ORFs shared in both clusters. Based on a bioassay and production profiles of S. lincolnensis strains with individually deleted putative LS coding genes, the proteins LmbC, D, E, F and V were assigned to LS function. Moreover, the newly recognized N-terminal domain of LmbN (LmbN-CP) was also assigned to LS as a NRPS carrier protein (CP). Surprisingly, the homologous CP coding sequence in celesticetin cluster is part of ccbZ gene adjacent to ccbN, the counterpart of lmbN, suggesting the gene rearrangement, evident also from still active internal translation start in lmbN, and indicating the direction of lincosamide biosynthesis evolution. The in vitro test with LmbN-CP, LmbC and the newly identified S. lincolnensis phosphopantetheinyl transferase Slp, confirmed the cooperation of the previously characterized NRPS A-domain LmbC with a holo-LmbN-CP in activation of a 4-propyl-L-proline precursor of lincomycin. This result completed the functional characterization of LS subunits resembling NRPS initiation module. Two of the four remaining putative LS subunits, LmbE/CcbE and LmbV/CcbV, exhibit low but significant homology to enzymes from the metabolism of mycothiol, the NRPS-independent system processing the amino sugar and amino acid units. The functions of particular LS subunits as well as cooperation of both NRPS-based and NRPS-independent LS blocks are discussed. The described condensing enzyme represents a unique hybrid system with overall composition quite dissimilar to any other known enzyme system

  7. Discovery of potent anti-tuberculosis agents targeting leucyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Gudzera, Olga I; Golub, Andriy G; Bdzhola, Volodymyr G; Volynets, Galyna P; Lukashov, Sergiy S; Kovalenko, Oksana P; Kriklivyi, Ivan A; Yaremchuk, Anna D; Starosyla, Sergiy A; Yarmoluk, Sergiy M; Tukalo, Michail A

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis is a serious infectious disease caused by human pathogen bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Bacterial drug resistance is a very significant medical problem nowadays and development of novel antibiotics with different mechanisms of action is an important goal of modern medical science. Leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) has been recently clinically validated as antimicrobial target. Here we report the discovery of small-molecule inhibitors of M. tuberculosis LeuRS. Using receptor-based virtual screening we have identified six inhibitors of M. tuberculosis LeuRS from two different chemical classes. The most active compound 4-{[4-(4-Bromo-phenyl)-thiazol-2-yl]hydrazonomethyl}-2-methoxy-6-nitro-phenol (1) inhibits LeuRS with IC50 of 6μM. A series of derivatives has been synthesized and evaluated in vitro toward M. tuberculosis LeuRS. It was revealed that the most active compound 2,6-Dibromo-4-{[4-(4-nitro-phenyl)-thiazol-2-yl]-hydrazonomethyl}-phenol inhibits LeuRS with IC50 of 2.27μM. All active compounds were tested for antimicrobial effect against M. tuberculosis H37Rv. The compound 1 seems to have the best cell permeability and inhibits growth of pathogenic bacteria with IC50=10.01μM and IC90=13.53μM.

  8. Chitin synthetases in Candida albicans: a review on their subcellular distribution and biological function.

    PubMed

    Martínez, J P; Gozalbo, D

    1994-09-01

    In the light of recent genetic advances, some results regarding chitin biosynthetic activities are reviewed in this paper. Genes coding for distinct enzymes displaying chitin synthetase activities have been characterized in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as well as in other fungal species including Candida albicans. Several activities seem to exist in the cells: (i) one zymogenic, located in cytoplasmic vesicles called chitosomes, although the presence of other types of vesicles with zymogenic activity cannot be completely discarded, and (ii) plasma membrane associated activities (the active enzyme and probably two distinct pools of zymogenic activity). Possible relationships between these activities, if any, remain to be determined. These multiplicity of enzymes is not surprising taking into account that chitin biosynthesis is required during very well defined temporal and spatial events of the cell cycle. A general repair function for one of the chitin biosynthetic activities is proposed as a possible salvage mechanism to warrant cell survival after wall damage has been caused, since chitin appears to be the most suitable polymer to carry out this function due to its particular physico-chemical properties.

  9. Characterization of the acetyl-CoA synthetase of Acetobacter aceti.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, J; Ettlinger, L

    1976-12-20

    The acetate activating system of Acetobacter aceti has been studied. The enzyme responsible, acetyl-CoA synthetase, has been purified about 500-fold from crude cell extracts and was approximately 85% pure as judged by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulphate. The purified enzyme showed optimal activity at pH 7.6 in both Tris-HCL and potassium phosphate buffers. In its purest form, the enzyme was stable at 4 degrees-C but denatured upon freezing. The Km values for CoA, ATP and acetate were found to be 0.104 mM, 0.36 mM and 0.25 mM respectively; propionate and acrylate were also activated by the enzyme but not butyrate, isobutyrate or valerate. GTP, UTP, CTP and ADP could not replace ATP in the reaction, and cysteine or pantetheine failed to replace CoA. The cationic requirements were studied and of the divalent cations tested, only Mn2+ could significantly replace Mg2+ in the reaction; K+ and NH4+ stimulated enzyme activity but inhibited at high concentrations; Na+ was a poor activator, but did not inhibit at higher concentrations. The effect of a number of glucose and other metabolites on enzyme activity has been tested. PMID:12800

  10. Inhibition of Long Chain Acyl Coenzyme A Synthetases during Fatty Acid Loading Induces Lipotoxicity in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Saraswathi, Viswanathan; Hasty, Alyssa H.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Obesity is often associated with hypertriglyceridemia and elevated free fatty acids (FFAs) which are independent risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. While impairment of cholesterol homeostasis is known to induce toxicity in macrophages, the consequence of altered fatty acid homeostasis is not clear. METHODS AND RESULTS Long chain acyl CoA synthetases (ACSLs) play a critical role in fatty acid homeostasis by channeling fatty acids to diverse metabolic pools. We treated mouse peritoneal macrophages (MPMs) with VLDL or FFAs in the presence of triacsin C, an inhibitor of the three ACSL isoforms present in macrophages. Treatment of macrophages with VLDL and triacsin C resulted in reduced TG accumulation but increased intracellular FFA levels which induced lipotoxicity characterized by induction of apoptosis. Treatment of MPMs with the saturated fatty acid stearic acid in the presence of triacsin C increased intracellular stearic acid and induced apoptosis. Stromal vascular cells collected from high fat diet-fed mice displayed foam cell morphology and exhibited increased mRNA levels of macrophage markers and ACSL1. Importantly, all of these changes were associated with increased FFA level in AT. CONCLUSIONS Inhibition of ACSLs during fatty acid loading results in apoptosis via accumulation of FFAs. Our data have implications in understanding the consequences of dysregulated fatty acid metabolism in macrophages. PMID:19679826

  11. Hyperammonemia in gene-targeted mice lacking functional hepatic glutamine synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Qvartskhava, Natalia; Lang, Philipp A.; Görg, Boris; Pozdeev, Vitaly I.; Ortiz, Marina Pascual; Lang, Karl S.; Bidmon, Hans J.; Lang, Elisabeth; Leibrock, Christina B.; Herebian, Diran; Bode, Johannes G.; Lang, Florian; Häussinger, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Urea cycle defects and acute or chronic liver failure are linked to systemic hyperammonemia and often result in cerebral dysfunction and encephalopathy. Although an important role of the liver in ammonia metabolism is widely accepted, the role of ammonia metabolizing pathways in the liver for maintenance of whole-body ammonia homeostasis in vivo remains ill-defined. Here, we show by generation of liver-specific Gln synthetase (GS)-deficient mice that GS in the liver is critically involved in systemic ammonia homeostasis in vivo. Hepatic deletion of GS triggered systemic hyperammonemia, which was associated with cerebral oxidative stress as indicated by increased levels of oxidized RNA and enhanced protein Tyr nitration. Liver-specific GS-deficient mice showed increased locomotion, impaired fear memory, and a slightly reduced life span. In conclusion, the present observations highlight the importance of hepatic GS for maintenance of ammonia homeostasis and establish the liver-specific GS KO mouse as a model with which to study effects of chronic hyperammonemia. PMID:25870278

  12. Genetic identification of essential indels and domains in carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Fox, Barbara A; Ristuccia, Jessica G; Bzik, David J

    2009-04-01

    New treatments need to be developed for the significant human diseases of toxoplasmosis and malaria to circumvent problems with current treatments and drug resistance. Apicomplexan parasites causing these lethal diseases are deficient in pyrimidine salvage, suggesting that selective inhibition of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis can lead to a severe loss of uridine 5'-monophosphate (UMP) and thymidine 5'-monophosphate (dTMP) pools, thereby inhibiting parasite RNA and DNA synthesis. Disruption of Toxoplasma gondii carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II (CPSII) induces a severe uracil auxotrophy with no detectable parasite replication in vitro and complete attenuation of virulence in mice. Here we show that a CPSII cDNA minigene efficiently complements the uracil auxotrophy of CPSII-deficient mutants, restoring parasite growth and virulence. Our complementation assays reveal that engineered mutations within, or proximal to, the catalytic triad of the N-terminal glutamine amidotransferase (GATase) domain inactivate the complementation activity of T. gondii CPSII and demonstrate a critical dependence on the apicomplexan CPSII GATase domain in vivo. Surprisingly, indels present within the T. gondii CPSII GATase domain as well as the C-terminal allosteric regulatory domain are found to be essential. In addition, several mutations directed at residues implicated in allosteric regulation in Escherichia coli CPS either abolish or markedly suppress complementation and further define the functional importance of the allosteric regulatory region. Collectively, these findings identify novel features of T. gondii CPSII as potential parasite-selective targets for drug development. PMID:18992249

  13. Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase: an amazing biochemical odyssey from substrate to product.

    PubMed

    Holden, H M; Thoden, J B; Raushel, F M

    1999-10-30

    Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS) catalyzes one of the most remarkable reactions ever described in biological chemistry, in which carbamoyl phosphate is produced from one molecule of bicarbonate, two molecules of Mg2+ ATP, and one molecule of either glutamine or ammonia. The carbamoyl phosphate so produced is utilized in the synthesis of arginine and pyrimidine nucleotides. It is also employed in the urea cycle in most terrestrial vertebrates. Due to its large size, its important metabolic role, and the fact that it is highly regulated, CPS has been the focus of intensive investigation for nearly 40 years. Numerous enzymological, biochemical, and biophysical studies by a variety of investigators have led to a quite detailed understanding of CPS. Perhaps one of the most significant advances on this topic within the last 2 years has been the successful X-ray crystallographic analysis of CPS from Escherichia coli. Quite unexpectedly, this structural investigation revealed that the three active sites on the protein are widely separated from one another. Furthermore, these active sites are connected by a molecular tunnel with a total length of approximately 100 A, suggesting that CPS utilizes this channel to facilitate the translocation of reaction intermediates from one site to another. In this review, we highlight the recent biochemical and X-ray crystallographic results that have led to a more complete understanding of this finely tuned instrument of catalysis. PMID:11212301

  14. The binding of inosine monophosphate to Escherichia coli carbamoyl phosphate synthetase.

    PubMed

    Thoden, J B; Raushel, F M; Wesenberg, G; Holden, H M

    1999-08-01

    Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS) from Escherichia coli catalyzes the formation of carbamoyl phosphate, which is subsequently employed in both the pyrimidine and arginine biosynthetic pathways. The reaction mechanism is known to proceed through at least three highly reactive intermediates: ammonia, carboxyphosphate, and carbamate. In keeping with the fact that the product of CPS is utilized in two competing metabolic pathways, the enzyme is highly regulated by a variety of effector molecules including potassium and ornithine, which function as activators, and UMP, which acts as an inhibitor. IMP is also known to bind to CPS but the actual effect of this ligand on the activity of the enzyme is dependent upon both temperature and assay conditions. Here we describe the three-dimensional architecture of CPS with bound IMP determined and refined to 2.1 A resolution. The nucleotide is situated at the C-terminal portion of a five-stranded parallel beta-sheet in the allosteric domain formed by Ser(937) to Lys(1073). Those amino acid side chains responsible for anchoring the nucleotide to the polypeptide chain include Lys(954), Thr(974), Thr(977), Lys(993), Asn(1015), and Thr(1017). A series of hydrogen bonds connect the IMP-binding pocket to the active site of the large subunit known to function in the phosphorylation of the unstable intermediate, carbamate. This structural analysis reveals, for the first time, the detailed manner in which CPS accommodates nucleotide monophosphate effector molecules within the allosteric domain. PMID:10428826

  15. Dissection of the conduit for allosteric control of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase by ornithine.

    PubMed

    Pierrat, Olivier A; Javid-Majd, Farah; Raushel, Frank M

    2002-04-01

    Ornithine is an allosteric activator of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS) from Escherichia coli. Nine amino acids in the vicinity of the binding sites for ornithine and potassium were mutated to alanine, glutamine, or lysine. The residues E783, T1042, and T1043 were found to be primarily responsible for the binding of ornithine to CPS, while E783 and E892, located within the carbamate domain of the large subunit, were necessary for the transmission of the allosteric signals to the active site. In the K loop for the binding of the monovalent cation potassium, only E761 was crucial for the exhibition of the allosteric effects of ornithine, UMP, and IMP. The mutations H781K and S792K altered significantly the allosteric properties of ornithine, UMP, and IMP, possibly by modifying the conformation of the K-loop structure. Overall, these mutations affected the allosteric properties of ornithine and IMP more than those of UMP. The mutants S792K and D1041A altered the allosteric regulation by ornithine and IMP in a similar way, suggesting common features in the activation mechanism exhibited by these two effectors. PMID:11913967

  16. Conformational changes involving ammonia tunnel formation and allosteric control in GMP synthetase.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Justin C; Gudihal, Ravidra; Burgner, John W; Pedley, Anthony M; Zwierko, Alexander T; Davisson, V Jo; Linger, Rebecca S

    2014-03-01

    GMP synthetase is the glutamine amidotransferase that catalyzes the final step in the guanylate branch of de novo purine biosynthesis. Conformational changes are required to efficiently couple distal active sites in the protein; however, the nature of these changes has remained elusive. Structural information derived from both limited proteolysis and sedimentation velocity experiments support the hypothesis of nucleotide-induced loop- and domain-closure in the protein. These results were combined with information from sequence conservation and precedents from other glutamine amidotransferases to develop the first structural model of GMPS in a closed, active state. In analyzing this Catalytic model, an interdomain salt bridge was identified residing in the same location as seen in other triad glutamine amidotransferases. Using mutagenesis and kinetic analysis, the salt bridge between H186 and E383 was shown to function as a connection between the two active sites. Mutations at these residues uncoupled the two half-reactions of the enzyme. The chemical events of nucleotide binding initiate a series of conformational changes that culminate in the establishment of a tunnel for ammonia as well as an activated glutaminase catalytic site. The results of this study provide a clearer understanding of the allostery of GMPS, where, for the first time, key substrate binding and interdomain contacts are modeled and analyzed. PMID:24434004

  17. A mutation that uncouples allosteric regulation of carbamyl phosphate synthetase in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Simmons, A J; Rawls, J M; Piskur, J; Davidson, J N

    1999-03-26

    In animals, UTP feedback inhibition of carbamyl phosphate synthetase II (CPSase) controls pyrimidine biosynthesis. Suppressor of black (Su(b) or rSu(b)) mutants of Drosophila melanogaster have elevated pyrimidine pools, and this mutation has been mapped to the rudimentary locus. We report that rSu(b) is a missense mutation resulting in a glutamate to lysine substitution within the second ATP binding site (i.e. CPS.B2 domain) of CPSase. This residue corresponds to Glu780 in the Escherichia coli enzyme (Glu1153 in hamster CAD) and is universally conserved among CPSases. When a transgene expressing the Glu-->Lys substitution was introduced into Drosophila lines homozygous for the black mutation, the resulting flies exhibited the Su(b) phenotype. Partially purified CPSase from rSu(b) and transgenic flies carrying this substitution exhibited a dramatic reduction in UTP feedback inhibition. The slight UTP inhibition observed with the Su(b) enzyme in vitro was due mainly to chelation of Mg2+ by UTP. However, the Km values for glutamate, bicarbonate, and ATP obtained from the Su(b) enzyme were not significantly different from wild-type values. From these experiments, we conclude that this residue plays an essential role in the UTP allosteric response, probably in propagating the response between the effector binding site and the ATP binding site. This is the first CPSase mutation found to abolish feedback inhibition without significantly affecting other enzyme catalytic parameters. PMID:10080891

  18. Regulation of Escherichia coli carbamyl phosphate synthetase. Evidence for overlap of the allosteric nucleotide binding sites.

    PubMed

    Boettcher, B; Meister, A

    1982-12-10

    Regulation of Escherichia coli carbamyl phosphate synthetase by UMP and IMP was examined in studies with various analogs of these nucleotides. Whereas UMP inhibits enzyme activity, the arabinose analog of UMP was found to be an activator. dUMP neither activates nor inhibits, but binds to the enzyme in a manner similar to UMP as evaluated by direct binding studies, sedimentation behavior, and ultraviolet difference spectral measurements. dUMP decreases inhibition by UMP and activation by IMP, but has no effect on activation by L-ornithine. The findings are in accord with the view that IMP and UMP bind to the same region of the enzyme; a possible general model for such overlapping binding sites is considered. Additional evidence is presented that inorganic phosphate can modulate regulation of the activity by nucleotides. Phosphate (and arsenate) markedly increase inhibition by UMP, decrease activation by IMP, but do not affect activation by L-ornithine. The extent of activation by IMP and by L-ornithine and that of inhibition by UMP are decreased when Mg2+ concentrations are increased relative to a fixed concentration of ATP. The findings suggest that the allosteric effectors may affect affinity of the enzyme for divalent metal ions as well as, as previously shown, the affinity of the enzyme for Mg-ATP. PMID:6754720

  19. Physiological Studies of Glutamine Synthetases I and III from Synechococcus sp. WH7803 Reveal Differential Regulation.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Martín, María Agustina; Díez, Jesús; García-Fernández, José M

    2016-01-01

    The marine picocyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. WH7803 possesses two glutamine synthetases (GSs; EC 6.3.1.2), GSI encoded by glnA and GSIII encoded by glnN. This is the first work addressing the physiological regulation of both enzymes in a marine cyanobacterial strain. The increase of GS activity upon nitrogen starvation was similar to that found in other model cyanobacteria. However, an unusual response was found when cells were grown under darkness: the GS activity was unaffected, reflecting adaptation to the environment where they thrive. On the other hand, we found that GSIII did not respond to nitrogen availability, in sharp contrast with the results observed for this enzyme in other cyanobacteria thus far studied. These features suggest that GS activities in Synechococcus sp. WH7803 represent an intermediate step in the evolution of cyanobacteria, in a process of regulatory streamlining where GSI lost the regulation by light, while GSIII lost its responsiveness to nitrogen. This is in good agreement with the phylogeny of Synechococcus sp. WH7803 in the context of the marine cyanobacterial radiation. PMID:27446010

  20. Glutamine synthetase in Medicago truncatula, unveiling new secrets of a very old enzyme.

    PubMed

    Seabra, Ana R; Carvalho, Helena G

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the first step at which nitrogen is brought into cellular metabolism and is also involved in the reassimilation of ammonium released by a number of metabolic pathways. Due to its unique position in plant nitrogen metabolism, GS plays essential roles in all aspects of plant development, from germination to senescence, and is a key component of nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) and plant yield. Understanding the mechanisms regulating GS activity is therefore of utmost importance and a great effort has been dedicated to understand how GS is regulated in different plant species. The present review summarizes exciting recent developments concerning the structure and regulation of GS isoenzymes, using the model legume Medicago truncatula. These include the understanding of the structural determinants of both the cytosolic and plastid located isoenzymes, the existence of a seed-specific GS gene unique to M. truncatula and closely related species and the discovery that GS isoenzymes are regulated by nitric oxide at the post-translational level. The data is discussed and integrated with the potential roles of the distinct GS isoenzymes within the whole plant context. PMID:26284094

  1. Human selenophosphate synthetase 1 has five splice variants with unique interactions, subcellular localizations and expression patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin Young; Lee, Kwang Hee; Shim, Myoung Sup; Shin, Hyein; Xu, Xue-Ming; Carlson, Bradley A.; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Lee, Byeong Jae

    2010-06-18

    Selenophosphate synthetase 1 (SPS1) is an essential cellular gene in higher eukaryotes. Five alternative splice variants of human SPS1 (major type, {Delta}E2, {Delta}E8, +E9, +E9a) were identified wherein +E9 and +E9a make the same protein. The major type was localized in both the nuclear and plasma membranes, and the others in the cytoplasm. All variants form homodimers, and in addition, the major type forms a heterodimer with {Delta}E2, and {Delta}E8 with +E9. The level of expression of each splice variant was different in various cell lines. The expression of each alternative splice variant was regulated during the cell cycle. The levels of the major type and {Delta}E8 were gradually increased until G2/M phase and then gradually decreased. {Delta}E2 expression peaked at mid-S phase and then gradually decreased. However, +E9/+E9a expression decreased gradually after cell cycle arrest. The possible involvement of SPS1 splice variants in cell cycle regulation is discussed.

  2. Glutamine synthetase activity and glutamate uptake in hippocampus and frontal cortex in portal hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Gabriela Beatriz; Fernández, María Alejandra; Roselló, Diego Martín; Tomaro, María Luján; Balestrasse, Karina; Lemberg, Abraham

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To study glutamine synthetase (GS) activity and glutamate uptake in the hippocampus and frontal cortex (FC) from rats with prehepatic portal vein hypertension. METHODS: Male Wistar rats were divided into sham-operated group and a portal hypertension (PH) group with a regulated stricture of the portal vein. Animals were sacrificed by decapitation 14 d after portal vein stricture. GS activity was determined in the hippocampus and FC. Specific uptake of radiolabeled L-glutamate was studied using synaptosome-enriched fractions that were freshly prepared from both brain areas. RESULTS: We observed that the activity of GS increased in the hippocampus of PH rats, as compared to control animals, and decreased in the FC. A significant decrease in glutamate uptake was found in both brain areas, and was more marked in the hippocampus. The decrease in glutamate uptake might have been caused by a deficient transport function, significantly and persistent increase in this excitatory neurotransmitter activity. CONCLUSION: The presence of moderate ammonia blood levels may add to the toxicity of excitotoxic glutamate in the brain, which causes alterations in brain function. Portal vein stricture that causes portal hypertension modifies the normal function in some brain regions. PMID:19533812

  3. Neuropathic Pain Model of Peripheral Neuropathies Mediated by Mutations of Glycyl-tRNA Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common inherited motor and sensory neuropathy. Previous studies have found that, according to CMT patients, neuropathic pain is an occasional symptom of CMT. However, neuropathic pain is not considered to be a significant symptom associated with CMT and, as a result, no studies have investigated the pathophysiology underlying neuropathic pain in this disorder. Thus, the first animal model of neuropathic pain was developed by our laboratory using an adenovirus vector system to study neuropathic pain in CMT. To this end, glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) fusion proteins with a FLAG-tag (wild type [WT], L129P and G240R mutants) were expressed in spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons using adenovirus vectors. It is known that GARS mutants induce GARS axonopathies, including CMT type 2D (CMT2D) and distal spinal muscular atrophy type V (dSMA-V). Additionally, the morphological phenotypes of neuropathic pain in this animal model of GARS-induced pain were assessed using several possible markers of pain (Iba1, pERK1/2) or a marker of injured neurons (ATF3). These results suggest that this animal model of CMT using an adenovirus may provide information regarding CMT as well as a useful strategy for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Graphical Abstract PMID:25120326

  4. Neuropathic pain model of peripheral neuropathies mediated by mutations of glycyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seo Jin; Seo, Ah Jung; Park, Byung Sun; Jo, Hyun Woo; Huh, Youngbuhm

    2014-08-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common inherited motor and sensory neuropathy. Previous studies have found that, according to CMT patients, neuropathic pain is an occasional symptom of CMT. However, neuropathic pain is not considered to be a significant symptom associated with CMT and, as a result, no studies have investigated the pathophysiology underlying neuropathic pain in this disorder. Thus, the first animal model of neuropathic pain was developed by our laboratory using an adenovirus vector system to study neuropathic pain in CMT. To this end, glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) fusion proteins with a FLAG-tag (wild type [WT], L129P and G240R mutants) were expressed in spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons using adenovirus vectors. It is known that GARS mutants induce GARS axonopathies, including CMT type 2D (CMT2D) and distal spinal muscular atrophy type V (dSMA-V). Additionally, the morphological phenotypes of neuropathic pain in this animal model of GARS-induced pain were assessed using several possible markers of pain (Iba1, pERK1/2) or a marker of injured neurons (ATF3). These results suggest that this animal model of CMT using an adenovirus may provide information regarding CMT as well as a useful strategy for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

  5. Glycyl-tRNA synthetase specifically binds to the poliovirus IRES to activate translation initiation

    PubMed Central

    Andreev, Dmitri E.; Hirnet, Juliane; Terenin, Ilya M.; Dmitriev, Sergey E.; Niepmann, Michael; Shatsky, Ivan N.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation to the host cell environment to efficiently take-over the host cell's machinery is crucial in particular for small RNA viruses like picornaviruses that come with only small RNA genomes and replicate exclusively in the cytosol. Their Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) elements are specific RNA structures that facilitate the 5′ end-independent internal initiation of translation both under normal conditions and when the cap-dependent host protein synthesis is shut-down in infected cells. A longstanding issue is which host factors play a major role in this internal initiation. Here, we show that the functionally most important domain V of the poliovirus IRES uses tRNAGly anticodon stem–loop mimicry to recruit glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) to the apical part of domain V, adjacent to the binding site of the key initiation factor eIF4G. The binding of GARS promotes the accommodation of the initiation region of the IRES in the mRNA binding site of the ribosome, thereby greatly enhancing the activity of the IRES at the step of the 48S initiation complex formation. Moonlighting functions of GARS that may be additionally needed for other events of the virus–host cell interaction are discussed. PMID:22373920

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase from E. Coli

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeev, V. I. Abramchik, Yu. A. Zhukhlistova, N. E. Kuranova, I. P.

    2015-09-15

    Enzymes of the phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase family (PRPPS, EC 2.7.6.1) catalyze the formation of 5-phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (5-PRPP) from adenosine triphosphate and ribose 5-phosphate. 5-Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate is an important intermediate in the synthesis of purine, pyrimidine, and pyridine nucleotides, as well as of the amino acids histidine and tryptophan. The crystallization conditions for E. coli PRPPS were found by the vapor-diffusion technique and were optimized to apply the capillary counter-diffusion technique. The X-ray diffraction data set was collected from the crystals grown by the counter-diffusion technique using a synchrotron radiation source to 3.1-Å resolution. The crystals of PRPPS belong to sp. gr. P6{sub 3}22 and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = b = 104.44 Å, c = 124.98 Å, α = β = 90°, γ = 120°. The collected X-ray diffraction data set is suitable for the solution of the three-dimensional structure of PRPPS at 3.1-Å resolution.

  7. Chemical modification of cysteine and tyrosine residues in formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase from Clostridium thermoaceticum

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, J.I.; Ljungdahl, L.G.

    1982-04-01

    The chemical modification of cysteine and tyrosine residues in formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase from Clostridium thermoaceticum has been examined relative to enzymatic activity and reactivity of these groups in the native protein. 4,4'-Dipyridyl disulfide, dansylaziridine, and fluorescein mercuric acetate all reacted with just one of six sulfhydryls per enzyme subunit, resulting in activities of 100, 95 and 70%, respectively. The K/sub m/ values for MgATP, formate, and tetrahydrofolate were unaltered in the modified enzymes. ATP did produce a 2.5-fold reduction in the rate of reaction between the enzyme and 4,4'-dipyridyl disulfide. Tetranitromethane reacted most rapidly with a single sulfhydryl group per subunit to produce a 20 to 30% loss in activity. Subsequent additions of tetranitromethane modified 2.2 tyrosines per subunit which was proportional to the loss of the remaining enzymatic activity. Folic acid, a competitive inhibitor, protected against modification of the tyrosines and the associated activity losses; however, the oxidation of the single sulfhydryl group and the initial 20 to 30% activity loss were unaffected. In the presence of folic acid, higher concentrations of tetranitromethane produced a loss of the remaining activity proportional to the modification of 1.2 tyrosines per subunit. It is proposed that at least 1 tyrosine critical for enzymatic activity is located at or near the folic acid/tetrahydrofolate binding site.

  8. Reculation of folylpolyglutamate synthetase in extracts of H35 hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, T.B.; Galivan, J.; Nair, M.G. )

    1987-05-01

    Folylpolyglutamate synthetase (FPGS) in extracts of H35 hepatoma cells was assayed using 250 {mu}M methotrexate (MTX) as the substrate under conditions where ({sup 3}H)glutamate incorporation was linear with respect to time and rotein concentration. Extracts from confluent cultures with reduced cellular folates exhibited nearly 1.7-fold higher FPGS specific activity than extracts of control cultures (600 pmol/hr/mg). Extracts of rapidly dividing cells (72 hrs) showed nearly a 2.3-fold increase. The addition of reduced exogenous folates such as folinic acid and 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (20 {mu}M, 24 hrs) to confluent cultures of folate-depleted cells typically lowered the FPGS activity in the resultant extracts by 40%, while a 42-hour exclusion of methionine from the media reduced the activity by half. The combination of methionine exclusion and folate addition for 42 hrs resulted in 75% lower FPGS activity vs extracts of control cultures of folate-depleted cells. These data suggest that the change sin the glutamylation rate of MTX in whole cells due to culture conditions such as folate restriction, reduced folate addition, methionine exclusion, and growth state are at least in part a consequence of alterations in FPGS activity. Using MTX or N{sup 10}-propargyl-5,8-dideazafolic acid (CB3717) as the starting substrate under appropriate assay conditions, FPGS from extracts catalyzed the formation of similar polyglutamate products as seen in analogous whole cell experiments.

  9. Nonribosomal peptide synthetase with a unique iterative-alternative-optional mechanism catalyzes amonabactin synthesis in Aeromonas.

    PubMed

    Esmaeel, Qassim; Chevalier, Mickael; Chataigné, Gabrielle; Subashkumar, Rathinasamy; Jacques, Philippe; Leclère, Valérie

    2016-10-01

    Based on the exploration of data generated by genome sequencing, a bioinformatics approach has been chosen to identify the biosynthetic pathway of the siderophores produced by Aeromonas species. The amonabactins, considered as a virulence factor, represent a family of four variants of catechol peptidic siderophores containing Dhb, Lys, Gly, and an aromatic residue either Trp or Phe in a D-configuration. The synthesis operon is constituted of seven genes named amoCEBFAGH and is iron-regulated. The cluster includes genes encoding proteins involved in the synthesis and incorporation of the Dhb monomer, and genes encoding specific nonribosomal peptide synthetases, which are responsible for the building of the peptidic moiety. The amonabactin assembly line displays a still so far not described atypical mode of synthesis that is iterative, alternative, and optional. A disruption mutant in the adenylation domain of AmoG was unable to synthesize any amonabactin and to grow in iron stress conditions while a deletion of amoH resulted in the production of only two over the four forms. The amo cluster is widespread among most of the Aeromonas species, only few species produces the enterobactin siderophore.

  10. Expression of glutathione and gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase mRNA is Jun dependent.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, K R; Meredith, M J; Kerr, L D; Soltaninassab, S R; Spitz, D R; Xu, Z Q; Freeman, M L

    1997-05-29

    The gene GLCLC encodes the catalytic subunit of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (glutamate-cysteine ligase E.C. 6.3.2.2), the rate limiting enzyme for glutathione synthesis. When HepG2 cells were exposed to the serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid (OA), increased expression of GLCLC was observed, as was the development of resistance to xenobiotic induced GSH depletion. Okadaic acid is known to activate both NF-kappaB and AP-1 activity. Inhibition of NF-kappaB activity by overexpression of an IkappaB alpha transdominant inhibitor or exposure to the protease inhibitor TLCK did not inhibit the OA mediated increase in GLCLC transcripts. Fibroblasts derived from a mouse containing a c-Jun null mutation exhibited diminished AP-1 binding activity, reduced levels of GLCLC message, and a correspondingly low GSH concentration compared to wild type cells. When the null cells, which express Jun B and Jun D, were exposed to OA, AP-1 binding activity increased, as did expression of GLCLC message. These results indicate that AP-1 transcription factors participate in the regulation of glutathione metabolism.

  11. Evolution of selenophosphate synthetases: emergence and relocation of function through independent duplications and recurrent subfunctionalization

    PubMed Central

    Mariotti, Marco; Santesmasses, Didac; Capella-Gutierrez, Salvador; Mateo, Andrea; Arnan, Carme; Johnson, Rory; D'Aniello, Salvatore; Yim, Sun Hee; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Serras, Florenci; Corominas, Montserrat; Gabaldón, Toni; Guigó, Roderic

    2015-01-01

    Selenoproteins are proteins that incorporate selenocysteine (Sec), a nonstandard amino acid encoded by UGA, normally a stop codon. Sec synthesis requires the enzyme Selenophosphate synthetase (SPS or SelD), conserved in all prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes encoding selenoproteins. Here, we study the evolutionary history of SPS genes, providing a map of selenoprotein function spanning the whole tree of life. SPS is itself a selenoprotein in many species, although functionally equivalent homologs that replace the Sec site with cysteine (Cys) are common. Many metazoans, however, possess SPS genes with substitutions other than Sec or Cys (collectively referred to as SPS1). Using complementation assays in fly mutants, we show that these genes share a common function, which appears to be distinct from the synthesis of selenophosphate carried out by the Sec- and Cys- SPS genes (termed SPS2), and unrelated to Sec synthesis. We show here that SPS1 genes originated through a number of independent gene duplications from an ancestral metazoan selenoprotein SPS2 gene that most likely already carried the SPS1 function. Thus, in SPS genes, parallel duplications and subsequent convergent subfunctionalization have resulted in the segregation to different loci of functions initially carried by a single gene. This evolutionary history constitutes a remarkable example of emergence and evolution of gene function, which we have been able to trace thanks to the singular features of SPS genes, wherein the amino acid at a single site determines unequivocally protein function and is intertwined to the evolutionary fate of the entire selenoproteome. PMID:26194102

  12. Evolution of selenophosphate synthetases: emergence and relocation of function through independent duplications and recurrent subfunctionalization.

    PubMed

    Mariotti, Marco; Santesmasses, Didac; Capella-Gutierrez, Salvador; Mateo, Andrea; Arnan, Carme; Johnson, Rory; D'Aniello, Salvatore; Yim, Sun Hee; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Serras, Florenci; Corominas, Montserrat; Gabaldón, Toni; Guigó, Roderic

    2015-09-01

    Selenoproteins are proteins that incorporate selenocysteine (Sec), a nonstandard amino acid encoded by UGA, normally a stop codon. Sec synthesis requires the enzyme Selenophosphate synthetase (SPS or SelD), conserved in all prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes encoding selenoproteins. Here, we study the evolutionary history of SPS genes, providing a map of selenoprotein function spanning the whole tree of life. SPS is itself a selenoprotein in many species, although functionally equivalent homologs that replace the Sec site with cysteine (Cys) are common. Many metazoans, however, possess SPS genes with substitutions other than Sec or Cys (collectively referred to as SPS1). Using complementation assays in fly mutants, we show that these genes share a common function, which appears to be distinct from the synthesis of selenophosphate carried out by the Sec- and Cys- SPS genes (termed SPS2), and unrelated to Sec synthesis. We show here that SPS1 genes originated through a number of independent gene duplications from an ancestral metazoan selenoprotein SPS2 gene that most likely already carried the SPS1 function. Thus, in SPS genes, parallel duplications and subsequent convergent subfunctionalization have resulted in the segregation to different loci of functions initially carried by a single gene. This evolutionary history constitutes a remarkable example of emergence and evolution of gene function, which we have been able to trace thanks to the singular features of SPS genes, wherein the amino acid at a single site determines unequivocally protein function and is intertwined to the evolutionary fate of the entire selenoproteome.

  13. Glutamine synthetase activity fuels nucleotide biosynthesis and supports growth of glutamine-restricted glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Tardito, Saverio; Oudin, Anaïs; Ahmed, Shafiq U; Fack, Fred; Keunen, Olivier; Zheng, Liang; Miletic, Hrvoje; Sakariassen, Per Øystein; Weinstock, Adam; Wagner, Allon; Lindsay, Susan L; Hock, Andreas K; Barnett, Susan C; Ruppin, Eytan; Mørkve, Svein Harald; Lund-Johansen, Morten; Chalmers, Anthony J; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Niclou, Simone P; Gottlieb, Eyal

    2015-12-01

    L-Glutamine (Gln) functions physiologically to balance the carbon and nitrogen requirements of tissues. It has been proposed that in cancer cells undergoing aerobic glycolysis, accelerated anabolism is sustained by Gln-derived carbons, which replenish the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (anaplerosis). However, it is shown here that in glioblastoma (GBM) cells, almost half of the Gln-derived glutamate (Glu) is secreted and does not enter the TCA cycle, and that inhibiting glutaminolysis does not affect cell proliferation. Moreover, Gln-starved cells are not rescued by TCA cycle replenishment. Instead, the conversion of Glu to Gln by glutamine synthetase (GS; cataplerosis) confers Gln prototrophy, and fuels de novo purine biosynthesis. In both orthotopic GBM models and in patients, (13)C-glucose tracing showed that GS produces Gln from TCA-cycle-derived carbons. Finally, the Gln required for the growth of GBM tumours is contributed only marginally by the circulation, and is mainly either autonomously synthesized by GS-positive glioma cells, or supplied by astrocytes.

  14. In vitro characterization of the NAD+ synthetase NadE1 from Herbaspirillum seropedicae.

    PubMed

    Laskoski, Kerly; Santos, Adrian R S; Bonatto, Ana C; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Souza, Emanuel M; Huergo, Luciano F

    2016-05-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide synthetase enzyme (NadE) catalyzes the amination of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide (NaAD) to form NAD(+). This reaction represents the last step in the majority of the NAD(+) biosynthetic routes described to date. NadE enzymes typically use either glutamine or ammonium as amine nitrogen donor, and the reaction is energetically driven by ATP hydrolysis. Given the key role of NAD(+) in bacterial metabolism, NadE has attracted considerable interest as a potential target for the development of novel antibiotics. The plant-associative nitrogen-fixing bacteria Herbaspirillum seropedicae encodes two putative NadE, namely nadE1 and nadE2. The nadE1 gene is linked to glnB encoding the signal transduction protein GlnB. Here we report the purification and in vitro characterization of H. seropedicae NadE1. Gel filtration chromatography analysis suggests that NadE1 is an octamer. The NadE1 activity was assayed in vitro, and the Michaelis-Menten constants for substrates NaAD, ATP, glutamine and ammonium were determined. Enzyme kinetic and in vitro substrate competition assays indicate that H. seropedicae NadE1 uses glutamine as a preferential nitrogen donor.

  15. Proximal tubule-specific glutamine synthetase deletion alters basal and acidosis-stimulated ammonia metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Osis, Gunars; Handlogten, Mary E; Lamers, Wouter H; Chaudhry, Farrukh A; Verlander, Jill W; Weiner, I David

    2016-06-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the recycling of NH4 (+) with glutamate to form glutamine. GS is highly expressed in the renal proximal tubule (PT), suggesting ammonia recycling via GS could decrease net ammoniagenesis and thereby limit ammonia available for net acid excretion. The purpose of the present study was to determine the role of PT GS in ammonia metabolism under basal conditions and during metabolic acidosis. We generated mice with PT-specific GS deletion (PT-GS-KO) using Cre-loxP techniques. Under basal conditions, PT-GS-KO increased urinary ammonia excretion significantly. Increased ammonia excretion occurred despite decreased expression of key proteins involved in renal ammonia generation. After the induction of metabolic acidosis, the ability to increase ammonia excretion was impaired significantly by PT-GS-KO. The blunted increase in ammonia excretion occurred despite greater expression of multiple components of ammonia generation, including SN1 (Slc38a3), phosphate-dependent glutaminase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, and Na(+)-coupled electrogenic bicarbonate cotransporter. We conclude that 1) GS-mediated ammonia recycling in the PT contributes to both basal and acidosis-stimulated ammonia metabolism and 2) adaptive changes in other proteins involved in ammonia metabolism occur in response to PT-GS-KO and cause an underestimation of the role of PT GS expression.

  16. Leishmania infantum Asparagine Synthetase A Is Dispensable for Parasites Survival and Infectivity.

    PubMed

    Faria, Joana; Loureiro, Inês; Santarém, Nuno; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Tavares, Joana; Cordeiro-da-Silva, Anabela

    2016-01-01

    A growing interest in asparagine (Asn) metabolism has currently been observed in cancer and infection fields. Asparagine synthetase (AS) is responsible for the conversion of aspartate into Asn in an ATP-dependent manner, using ammonia or glutamine as a nitrogen source. There are two structurally distinct AS: the strictly ammonia dependent, type A, and the type B, which preferably uses glutamine. Absent in humans and present in trypanosomatids, AS-A was worthy of exploring as a potential drug target candidate. Appealingly, it was reported that AS-A was essential in Leishmania donovani, making it a promising drug target. In the work herein we demonstrate that Leishmania infantum AS-A, similarly to Trypanosoma spp. and L. donovani, is able to use both ammonia and glutamine as nitrogen donors. Moreover, we have successfully generated LiASA null mutants by targeted gene replacement in L. infantum, and these parasites do not display any significant growth or infectivity defect. Indeed, a severe impairment of in vitro growth was only observed when null mutants were cultured in asparagine limiting conditions. Altogether our results demonstrate that despite being important under asparagine limitation, LiAS-A is not essential for parasite survival, growth or infectivity in normal in vitro and in vivo conditions. Therefore we exclude AS-A as a suitable drug target against L. infantum parasites.

  17. Identification of a phosphinothricin-resistant mutant of rice glutamine synthetase using DNA shuffling.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yong-Sheng; Xu, Jing; Zhao, Wei; Xing, Xiao-Juan; Fu, Xiao-Yan; Peng, Ri-He; Yao, Quan-Hong

    2015-10-23

    To date, only bar/pat gene derived from Streptomyces has been used to generate the commercial PPT-resistant crops currently available in the market. The limited source of bar/pat gene is probably what has caused the decrease in PPT-tolerance, which has become the main concern of those involved in field management programs. Although glutamine synthetase (GS) is the target enzyme of PPT, little study has been reported about engineering PPT-resistant plants with GS gene. Then, the plant-optimized GS gene from Oryza sativa (OsGS1S) was chemically synthesized in the present study by PTDS to identify a GS gene for developing PPT-tolerant plants. However, OsGS1S cannot be directly used for developing PPT-tolerant plants because of its poor PPT-resistance. Thus, we performed DNA shuffling on OsGS1S, and one highly PPT-resistant mutant with mutations in four amino acids (A63E, V193A, T293A and R295K) was isolated after three rounds of DNA shuffling and screening. Among the four amino acids substitutions, only R295K was identified as essential in altering PPT resistance. The R295K mutation has also never been previously reported as an important residue for PPT resistance. Furthermore, the mutant gene has been transformed into Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Arabidopsis to confirm its potential in developing PPT-resistant crops.

  18. Glutamine synthetase in Durum Wheat: Genotypic Variation and Relationship with Grain Protein Content.

    PubMed

    Nigro, Domenica; Fortunato, Stefania; Giove, Stefania L; Paradiso, Annalisa; Gu, Yong Q; Blanco, Antonio; de Pinto, Maria C; Gadaleta, Agata

    2016-01-01

    Grain protein content (GPC), is one of the most important trait in wheat and its characterized by a very complex genetic control. The identification of wheat varieties with high GPC (HGPC), as well as the characterization of central enzymes involved in these processes, are important for more sustainable agricultural practices. In this study, we focused on Glutamine synthetase (GS) as a candidate to study GPC in wheat. We analyzed GS expression and its enzymatic activity in different tissues and phenological stages in 10 durum wheat genotypes with different GPC. Although each genotype performed quite differently from the others, both because their genetic variability and their adaptability to specific environmental conditions, the highest GS activity and expression were found in genotypes with HGPC and vice versa the lowest ones in genotypes with low GPC (LGPC). Moreover, in genotypes contrasting in GPC bred at different nitrogen regimes (0, 60, 140 N Unit/ha) GS behaved differently in diverse organs. Nitrogen supplement increased GS expression and activity in roots of all genotypes, highlighting the key role of this enzyme in nitrogen assimilation and ammonium detoxification in roots. Otherwise, nitrogen treatments decreased GS expression and activity in the leaves of HGPC genotypes and did not affect GS in the leaves of LGPC genotypes. Finally, no changes in GS and soluble protein content occurred at the filling stage in the caryopses of all analyzed genotypes.

  19. Characterization of the acetyl-CoA synthetase of Acetobacter aceti.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, J; Ettlinger, L

    1976-12-20

    The acetate activating system of Acetobacter aceti has been studied. The enzyme responsible, acetyl-CoA synthetase, has been purified about 500-fold from crude cell extracts and was approximately 85% pure as judged by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulphate. The purified enzyme showed optimal activity at pH 7.6 in both Tris-HCL and potassium phosphate buffers. In its purest form, the enzyme was stable at 4 degrees-C but denatured upon freezing. The Km values for CoA, ATP and acetate were found to be 0.104 mM, 0.36 mM and 0.25 mM respectively; propionate and acrylate were also activated by the enzyme but not butyrate, isobutyrate or valerate. GTP, UTP, CTP and ADP could not replace ATP in the reaction, and cysteine or pantetheine failed to replace CoA. The cationic requirements were studied and of the divalent cations tested, only Mn2+ could significantly replace Mg2+ in the reaction; K+ and NH4+ stimulated enzyme activity but inhibited at high concentrations; Na+ was a poor activator, but did not inhibit at higher concentrations. The effect of a number of glucose and other metabolites on enzyme activity has been tested.

  20. An update to polyketide synthase and non-ribosomal synthetase genes and nomenclature in Fusarium.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Frederik T; Gardiner, Donald M; Lysøe, Erik; Fuertes, Patricia Romans; Tudzynski, Bettina; Wiemann, Philipp; Sondergaard, Teis Esben; Giese, Henriette; Brodersen, Ditlev E; Sørensen, Jens Laurids

    2015-02-01

    Members of the genus Fusarium produce a plethora of bioactive secondary metabolites, which can be harmful to humans and animals or have potential in drug development. In this study we have performed comparative analyses of polyketide synthases (PKSs) and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) from ten different Fusarium species including F. graminearum (two strains), F. verticillioides, F. solani, F. culmorum, F. pseudograminearum, F. fujikuroi, F. acuminatum, F. avenaceum, F. equiseti, and F. oxysporum (12 strains). This led to identification of 52 NRPS and 52 PKSs orthology groups, respectively, and although not all PKSs and NRPSs are assumed to be intact or functional, the analyses illustrate the huge secondary metabolite potential in Fusarium. In our analyses we identified a core collection of eight NRPSs (NRPS2-4, 6, 10-13) and two PKSs (PKS3 and PKS7) that are conserved in all strains analyzed in this study. The identified PKSs and NRPSs were named based on a previously developed classification system (www.FusariumNRPSPKS.dk). We suggest this system be used when PKSs and NRPSs have to be classified in future sequenced Fusarium strains. This system will facilitate identification of orthologous and non-orthologous NRPSs and PKSs from newly sequenced Fusarium genomes and will aid the scientific community by providing a common nomenclature for these two groups of genes/enzymes.

  1. Effect of bromochloromethane and fumarate on phylogenetic diversity of the formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase gene in bovine rumen.

    PubMed

    Mitsumori, Makoto; Matsui, Hiroki; Tajima, Kiyoshi; Shinkai, Takumi; Takenaka, Akio; Denman, Stuart E; McSweeney, Christopher S

    2014-01-01

    Effect of the methane inhibitor, bromochloromethane (BCM) and dietary substrate, fumarate, on microbial community structure of acetogen bacteria in the bovine rumen was investigated through analysis of the formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase gene (fhs). The fhs sequences obtained from BCM-untreated, BCM-treated, fumarate-untreated and fumarate-treated bovine rumen were categorized into homoacetogens and nonhomoacetogenic bacteria by homoacetogen similarity scores. Phylogenetic tree analysis indicated that most of the fhs sequences categorized into homoacetogens were divided into nine clusters, which were in close agreement with a result shown in a self-organizing map. The diversity of the fhs sequences from the BCM-treated rumen was significantly different from those from BCM-non-treated rumen. Principal component analysis also showed that addition of BCM to the rumen altered the population structure of acetogenic bacteria significantly but the effect of fumarate was comparatively minor. These results indicate that BCM affects diversity of actogens in the bovine rumen, and changes in acetogenic community structure in response to methane inhibitors may be caused by different mechanisms.

  2. Structural characterization of Helicobacter pylori dethiobiotin synthetase reveals differences between family members

    SciTech Connect

    Porebski, Przemyslaw J.; Klimecka, Maria; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Nicholls, Robert A.; Murzyn, Krzysztof; Cuff, Marianne E.; Xu, Xiaohui; Cymborowski, Marcin; Murshudov, Garib N.; Savchenko, Alexei; Edwards, Aled; Minor, Wladek

    2012-07-11

    Dethiobiotin synthetase (DTBS) is involved in the biosynthesis of biotin in bacteria, fungi, and plants. As humans lack this pathway, DTBS is a promising antimicrobial drug target. We determined structures of DTBS from Helicobacter pylori (hpDTBS) bound with cofactors and a substrate analog, and described its unique characteristics relative to other DTBS proteins. Comparison with bacterial DTBS orthologs revealed considerable structural differences in nucleotide recognition. The C-terminal region of DTBS proteins, which contains two nucleotide-recognition motifs, differs greatly among DTBS proteins from different species. The structure of hpDTBS revealed that this protein is unique and does not contain a C-terminal region containing one of the motifs. The single nucleotide-binding motif in hpDTBS is similar to its counterpart in GTPases; however, isothermal titration calorimetry binding studies showed that hpDTBS has a strong preference for ATP. The structural determinants of ATP specificity were assessed with X-ray crystallographic studies of hpDTBS-ATP and hpDTBS-GTP complexes. The unique mode of nucleotide recognition in hpDTBS makes this protein a good target for H. pylori-specific inhibitors of the biotin synthesis pathway.

  3. Gene expression profiling of selenophosphate synthetase 2 knockdown in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Li, Gaopeng; Liu, Liying; Li, Ping; Chen, Luonan; Song, Haiyun; Zhang, Yan

    2016-03-01

    Selenium (Se) is an important trace element for many organisms and is incorporated into selenoproteins as selenocysteine (Sec). In eukaryotes, selenophosphate synthetase SPS2 is essential for Sec biosynthesis. In recent years, genetic disruptions of both Sec biosynthesis genes and selenoprotein genes have been investigated in different animal models, which provide important clues for understanding the Se metabolism and function in these organisms. However, a systematic study on the knockdown of SPS2 has not been performed in vivo. Herein, we conducted microarray experiments to study the transcriptome of fruit flies with knockdown of SPS2 in larval and adult stages. Several hundred differentially expressed genes were identified in each stage. In spite that the expression levels of other Sec biosynthesis genes and selenoprotein genes were not significantly changed, it is possible that selenoprotein translation might be reduced without impacting the mRNA level. Functional enrichment and network-based analyses revealed that although different sets of differentially expressed genes were obtained in each stage, they were both significantly enriched in the carbohydrate metabolism and redox processes. Furthermore, protein-protein interaction (PPI)-based network clustering analysis implied that several hub genes detected in the top modules, such as Nimrod C1 and regucalcin, could be considered as key regulators that are responsible for the complex responses caused by SPS2 knockdown. Overall, our data provide new insights into the relationship between Se utilization and several fundamental cellular processes as well as diseases. PMID:26824785

  4. In vitro characterization of the NAD+ synthetase NadE1 from Herbaspirillum seropedicae.

    PubMed

    Laskoski, Kerly; Santos, Adrian R S; Bonatto, Ana C; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Souza, Emanuel M; Huergo, Luciano F

    2016-05-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide synthetase enzyme (NadE) catalyzes the amination of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide (NaAD) to form NAD(+). This reaction represents the last step in the majority of the NAD(+) biosynthetic routes described to date. NadE enzymes typically use either glutamine or ammonium as amine nitrogen donor, and the reaction is energetically driven by ATP hydrolysis. Given the key role of NAD(+) in bacterial metabolism, NadE has attracted considerable interest as a potential target for the development of novel antibiotics. The plant-associative nitrogen-fixing bacteria Herbaspirillum seropedicae encodes two putative NadE, namely nadE1 and nadE2. The nadE1 gene is linked to glnB encoding the signal transduction protein GlnB. Here we report the purification and in vitro characterization of H. seropedicae NadE1. Gel filtration chromatography analysis suggests that NadE1 is an octamer. The NadE1 activity was assayed in vitro, and the Michaelis-Menten constants for substrates NaAD, ATP, glutamine and ammonium were determined. Enzyme kinetic and in vitro substrate competition assays indicate that H. seropedicae NadE1 uses glutamine as a preferential nitrogen donor. PMID:26802007

  5. Modulation of phenolic metabolism under stress conditions in a Lotus japonicus mutant lacking plastidic glutamine synthetase

    PubMed Central

    García-Calderón, Margarita; Pons-Ferrer, Teresa; Mrázova, Anna; Pal'ove-Balang, Peter; Vilková, Mária; Pérez-Delgado, Carmen M.; Vega, José M.; Eliášová, Adriana; Repčák, Miroslav; Márquez, Antonio J.; Betti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    This paper was aimed to investigate the possible implications of the lack of plastidic glutamine synthetase (GS2) in phenolic metabolism during stress responses in the model legume Lotus japonicus. Important changes in the transcriptome were detected in a GS2 mutant called Ljgln2-2, compared to the wild type, in response to two separate stress conditions, such as drought or the result of the impairment of the photorespiratory cycle. Detailed transcriptomic analysis showed that the biosynthesis of phenolic compounds was affected in the mutant plants in these two different types of stress situations. For this reason, the genes and metabolites related to this metabolic route were further investigated using a combined approach of gene expression analysis and metabolite profiling. A high induction of the expression of several genes for the biosynthesis of different branches of the phenolic biosynthetic pathway was detected by qRT-PCR. The extent of induction was always higher in Ljgln2-2, probably reflecting the higher stress levels present in this genotype. This was paralleled by accumulation of several kaempferol and quercetine glycosides, some of them described for the first time in L. japonicus, and of high levels of the isoflavonoid vestitol. The results obtained indicate that the absence of GS2 affects different aspects of phenolic metabolism in L. japonicus plants in response to stress. PMID:26442073

  6. Structural characterization of antibiotic self-immunity tRNA synthetase in plant tumour biocontrol agent

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Shaileja; Palencia, Andrés; Virus, Cornelia; Schulwitz, Sarah; Temple, Brenda R.; Cusack, Stephen; Reader, John

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic-producing microbes evolved self-resistance mechanisms to avoid suicide. The biocontrol Agrobacterium radiobacter K84 secretes the Trojan Horse antibiotic agrocin 84 that is selectively transported into the plant pathogen A. tumefaciens and processed into the toxin TM84. We previously showed that TM84 employs a unique tRNA-dependent mechanism to inhibit leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS), while the TM84-producer prevents self-poisoning by expressing a resistant LeuRS AgnB2. We now identify a mechanism by which the antibiotic-producing microbe resists its own toxin. Using a combination of structural, biochemical and biophysical approaches, we show that AgnB2 evolved structural changes so as to resist the antibiotic by eliminating the tRNA-dependence of TM84 binding. Mutagenesis of key resistance determinants results in mutants adopting an antibiotic-sensitive phenotype. This study illuminates the evolution of resistance in self-immunity genes and provides mechanistic insights into a fascinating tRNA-dependent antibiotic with applications for the development of anti-infectives and the prevention of biocontrol emasculation. PMID:27713402

  7. Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma Parasites Are Inhibited by a Benzoxaborole Targeting Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ru-Juan; Lukarska, Maria; Gut, Jiri; Bougdour, Alexandre; Touquet, Bastien; Wang, En-Duo; Li, Xianfeng; Alley, M. R. K.; Freund, Yvonne R.; Rosenthal, Philip J.; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali

    2016-01-01

    The apicomplexan parasites Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma are serious threats to human health. Cryptosporidiosis is a severe diarrheal disease in malnourished children and immunocompromised individuals, with the only FDA-approved drug treatment currently being nitazoxanide. The existing therapies for toxoplasmosis, an important pathology in immunocompromised individuals and pregnant women, also have serious limitations. With the aim of developing alternative therapeutic options to address these health problems, we tested a number of benzoxaboroles, boron-containing compounds shown to be active against various infectious agents, for inhibition of the growth of Cryptosporidium parasites in mammalian cells. A 3-aminomethyl benzoxaborole, AN6426, with activity in the micromolar range and with activity comparable to that of nitazoxanide, was identified and further characterized using biophysical measurements of affinity and crystal structures of complexes with the editing domain of Cryptosporidium leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS). The same compound was shown to be active against Toxoplasma parasites, with the activity being enhanced in the presence of norvaline, an amino acid that can be mischarged by LeuRS. Our observations are consistent with AN6426 inhibiting protein synthesis in both Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma by forming a covalent adduct with tRNALeu in the LeuRS editing active site and suggest that further exploitation of the benzoxaborole scaffold is a valid strategy to develop novel, much needed antiparasitic agents. PMID:27431220

  8. Inactivation of a glycyl-tRNA synthetase leads to an arrest in plant embryo development.

    PubMed Central

    Uwer, U; Willmitzer, L; Altmann, T

    1998-01-01

    Embryo formation is the first patterning process during vegetative plant growth. Using transposons as insertional mutagens in Arabidopsis, we identified the mutant edd1 that shows embryo-defective development. The insertion mutation is lethal, arresting embryo growth between the globular and heart stages of embryonic development. The mutant phenotype cosegregates with a transposed Dissociation element. Sequences flanking the transposed element were isolated and used to isolate a full-length cDNA clone representing the wild-type EDD1 gene. Complementation of the mutant through Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer of an EDD1 wild-type copy as well as loss of the transposon concomitant with phenotypic reversion demonstrated that the transposon had caused the mutation. Based on homology to Escherichia coli, the EDD1 gene is predicted to encode a novel glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) that has not been identified previously in higher plants. An N-terminal portion of the plant protein is able to direct a marker protein into pea chloroplasts. Thus, the gene identified by the embryo-defective insertion mutation encodes a GlyRS homolog, probably acting within the plastidic compartment. PMID:9707529

  9. Argininosuccinate synthetase regulates hepatic AMPK linking protein catabolism and ureagenesis to hepatic lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Madiraju, Anila K.; Alves, Tiago; Zhao, Xiaojian; Cline, Gary W.; Zhang, Dongyan; Bhanot, Sanjay; Samuel, Varman T.; Kibbey, Richard G.; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2016-01-01

    A key sensor of cellular energy status, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), interacts allosterically with AMP to maintain an active state. When active, AMPK triggers a metabolic switch, decreasing the activity of anabolic pathways and enhancing catabolic processes such as lipid oxidation to restore the energy balance. Unlike oxidative tissues, in which AMP is generated from adenylate kinase during states of high energy demand, the ornithine cycle enzyme argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) is a principle site of AMP generation in the liver. Here we show that ASS regulates hepatic AMPK, revealing a central role for ureagenesis flux in the regulation of metabolism via AMPK. Treatment of primary rat hepatocytes with amino acids increased gluconeogenesis and ureagenesis and, despite nutrient excess, induced both AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylation. Antisense oligonucleotide knockdown of hepatic ASS1 expression in vivo decreased liver AMPK activation, phosphorylation of ACC, and plasma β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations. Taken together these studies demonstrate that increased amino acid flux can activate AMPK through increased AMP generated by ASS, thus providing a novel link between protein catabolism, ureagenesis, and hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:27247419

  10. Targeting argininosuccinate synthetase negative melanomas using combination of arginine degrading enzyme and cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Savaraj, Niramol; Wu, Chunjing; Li, Ying-Ying; Wangpaichitr, Medhi; You, Min; Bomalaski, John; He, Wei; Kuo, Macus Tien; Feun, Lynn G

    2015-03-20

    Loss of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) expression in melanoma makes these tumor cells vulnerable to arginine deprivation. Pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20) which degrades arginine to citrulline and ammonia has been used clinically and partial responses and stable disease have been noted with minimal toxicity. In order to improve the therapeutic efficacy of ADI-PEG20, we have combined ADI-PEG20 with a DNA damaging agent, cisplatin. We have shown that the combination of the two drugs together significantly improved the therapeutic efficacy when compared to ADI-PEG20 alone or cisplatin alone in 4 melanoma cell lines, regardless of their BRAF mutation. In-vivo study also exhibited the same effect as in-vitro with no added toxicity to either agent alone. The underlying mechanism is complex, but increased DNA damage upon arginine deprivation due to decreased DNA repair proteins, FANCD2, ATM, and CHK1/2 most likely leads to increased apoptosis. This action is further intensified by increased proapoptotic protein, NOXA, and decreased antiapoptotic proteins, SURVIVIN, BCL2 and XIAP. The autophagic process which protects cells from apoptosis upon ADI-PEG20 treatment also dampens upon cisplatin administration. Thus, the combination of arginine deprivation and cisplatin function in concert to kill tumor cells which do not express ASS without added toxicity to normal cells. PMID:25749046

  11. Glutamine synthetase in Durum Wheat: Genotypic Variation and Relationship with Grain Protein Content.

    PubMed

    Nigro, Domenica; Fortunato, Stefania; Giove, Stefania L; Paradiso, Annalisa; Gu, Yong Q; Blanco, Antonio; de Pinto, Maria C; Gadaleta, Agata

    2016-01-01

    Grain protein content (GPC), is one of the most important trait in wheat and its characterized by a very complex genetic control. The identification of wheat varieties with high GPC (HGPC), as well as the characterization of central enzymes involved in these processes, are important for more sustainable agricultural practices. In this study, we focused on Glutamine synthetase (GS) as a candidate to study GPC in wheat. We analyzed GS expression and its enzymatic activity in different tissues and phenological stages in 10 durum wheat genotypes with different GPC. Although each genotype performed quite differently from the others, both because their genetic variability and their adaptability to specific environmental conditions, the highest GS activity and expression were found in genotypes with HGPC and vice versa the lowest ones in genotypes with low GPC (LGPC). Moreover, in genotypes contrasting in GPC bred at different nitrogen regimes (0, 60, 140 N Unit/ha) GS behaved differently in diverse organs. Nitrogen supplement increased GS expression and activity in roots of all genotypes, highlighting the key role of this enzyme in nitrogen assimilation and ammonium detoxification in roots. Otherwise, nitrogen treatments decreased GS expression and activity in the leaves of HGPC genotypes and did not affect GS in the leaves of LGPC genotypes. Finally, no changes in GS and soluble protein content occurred at the filling stage in the caryopses of all analyzed genotypes. PMID:27468287

  12. Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma Parasites Are Inhibited by a Benzoxaborole Targeting Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase.

    PubMed

    Palencia, Andrés; Liu, Ru-Juan; Lukarska, Maria; Gut, Jiri; Bougdour, Alexandre; Touquet, Bastien; Wang, En-Duo; Li, Xianfeng; Alley, M R K; Freund, Yvonne R; Rosenthal, Philip J; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali; Cusack, Stephen

    2016-10-01

    The apicomplexan parasites Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma are serious threats to human health. Cryptosporidiosis is a severe diarrheal disease in malnourished children and immunocompromised individuals, with the only FDA-approved drug treatment currently being nitazoxanide. The existing therapies for toxoplasmosis, an important pathology in immunocompromised individuals and pregnant women, also have serious limitations. With the aim of developing alternative therapeutic options to address these health problems, we tested a number of benzoxaboroles, boron-containing compounds shown to be active against various infectious agents, for inhibition of the growth of Cryptosporidium parasites in mammalian cells. A 3-aminomethyl benzoxaborole, AN6426, with activity in the micromolar range and with activity comparable to that of nitazoxanide, was identified and further characterized using biophysical measurements of affinity and crystal structures of complexes with the editing domain of Cryptosporidium leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS). The same compound was shown to be active against Toxoplasma parasites, with the activity being enhanced in the presence of norvaline, an amino acid that can be mischarged by LeuRS. Our observations are consistent with AN6426 inhibiting protein synthesis in both Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma by forming a covalent adduct with tRNA(Leu) in the LeuRS editing active site and suggest that further exploitation of the benzoxaborole scaffold is a valid strategy to develop novel, much needed antiparasitic agents.

  13. Physiological and Kinetic Studies with Anthranilate Synthetase of Bacillus alvei1

    PubMed Central

    Catena, Anthony; DeMoss, R. D.

    1970-01-01

    Anthranilate synthetase from Bacillus alvei was partially purified by ammonium sulfate fractionation and was stabilized by glycerol. The reaction mechanism of the enzyme was found to be sequential with respect to substrate, and the enzyme formed a hydroxamic acid in the absence of Mg++. The Km for chorismic acid was 1.25 × 10−4m, and the Km for l-glutamine was 5.5 × 10−4m. Enzyme activity was inhibited by tryptophan noncompetitively with respect to chorismic acid and uncompetitively with respect to l-glutamine. An analysis of the inhibition patterns indicated that tryptophan may act as a dead end inhibitor and bind at the catalytic site. Enzyme activity could be completely inhibited in vitro and in vivo under the appropriate conditions, and enzyme synthesis was sensitive to repression by tryptophan. A sedimentation coefficient of 5.5S and an estimated molecular weight of 90,000 were obtained for the enzyme. PMID:5413822

  14. Oxidative stress diverts tRNA synthetase to nucleus for protection against DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Wei, Na; Shi, Yi; Truong, Lan N; Fisch, Kathleen M; Xu, Tao; Gardiner, Elisabeth; Fu, Guangsen; Hsu, Yun-Shiuan Olivia; Kishi, Shuji; Su, Andrew I; Wu, Xiaohua; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2014-10-23

    Tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS) is known for its essential aminoacylation function in protein synthesis. Here we report a function for TyrRS in DNA damage protection. We found that oxidative stress, which often downregulates protein synthesis, induces TyrRS to rapidly translocate from the cytosol to the nucleus. We also found that angiogenin mediates or potentiates this stress-induced translocalization. The nuclear-localized TyrRS activates transcription factor E2F1 to upregulate the expression of DNA damage repair genes such as BRCA1 and RAD51. The activation is achieved through direct interaction of TyrRS with TRIM28 to sequester this vertebrate-specific epigenetic repressor and its associated HDAC1 from deacetylating and suppressing E2F1. Remarkably, overexpression of TyrRS strongly protects against UV-induced DNA double-strand breaks in zebrafish, whereas restricting TyrRS nuclear entry completely abolishes the protection. Therefore, oxidative stress triggers an essential cytoplasmic enzyme used for protein synthesis to translocate to the nucleus to protect against DNA damage.

  15. Glutamine synthetase in Durum Wheat: Genotypic Variation and Relationship with Grain Protein Content

    PubMed Central

    Nigro, Domenica; Fortunato, Stefania; Giove, Stefania L.; Paradiso, Annalisa; Gu, Yong Q.; Blanco, Antonio; de Pinto, Maria C.; Gadaleta, Agata

    2016-01-01

    Grain protein content (GPC), is one of the most important trait in wheat and its characterized by a very complex genetic control. The identification of wheat varieties with high GPC (HGPC), as well as the characterization of central enzymes involved in these processes, are important for more sustainable agricultural practices. In this study, we focused on Glutamine synthetase (GS) as a candidate to study GPC in wheat. We analyzed GS expression and its enzymatic activity in different tissues and phenological stages in 10 durum wheat genotypes with different GPC. Although each genotype performed quite differently from the others, both because their genetic variability and their adaptability to specific environmental conditions, the highest GS activity and expression were found in genotypes with HGPC and vice versa the lowest ones in genotypes with low GPC (LGPC). Moreover, in genotypes contrasting in GPC bred at different nitrogen regimes (0, 60, 140 N Unit/ha) GS behaved differently in diverse organs. Nitrogen supplement increased GS expression and activity in roots of all genotypes, highlighting the key role of this enzyme in nitrogen assimilation and ammonium detoxification in roots. Otherwise, nitrogen treatments decreased GS expression and activity in the leaves of HGPC genotypes and did not affect GS in the leaves of LGPC genotypes. Finally, no changes in GS and soluble protein content occurred at the filling stage in the caryopses of all analyzed genotypes. PMID:27468287

  16. Overexpression of a glutamine synthetase gene affects growth and development in sorghum.

    PubMed

    Urriola, Jazmina; Rathore, Keerti S

    2015-06-01

    Nitrogen is a primary macronutrient in plants, and nitrogen fertilizers play a critical role in crop production and yield. In this study, we investigated the effects of overexpressing a glutamine synthetase (GS) gene on nitrogen metabolism, and plant growth and development in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L., Moench). GS catalyzes the ATP dependent reaction between ammonia and glutamate to produce glutamine. A 1,071 bp long coding sequence of a sorghum cytosolic GS gene (Gln1) under the control of the maize ubiquitin (Ubq) promoter was introduced into sorghum immature embryos by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Progeny of the transformants exhibited higher accumulation of the Gln1 transcripts and up to 2.2-fold higher GS activity compared to the non-transgenic controls. When grown under optimal nitrogen conditions, these Gln1 transgenic lines showed greater tillering and up to 2.1-fold increase in shoot vegetative biomass. Interestingly, even under greenhouse conditions, we observed a seasonal component to both these parameters and the grain yield. Our results, showing that the growth and development of sorghum Gln1 transformants are also affected by N availability and other environmental factors, suggest complexity of the relationship between GS activity and plant growth and development. A better understanding of other control points and the ability to manipulate these will be needed to utilize the transgenic technology to improve nitrogen use efficiency of crop plants.

  17. Acyl-CoA synthetase 1 deficiency alters cardiolipin species and impairs mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Grevengoed, Trisha J.; Martin, Sarah A.; Katunga, Lalage; Cooper, Daniel E.; Anderson, Ethan J.; Murphy, Robert C.; Coleman, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (ACSL1) contributes more than 90% of total cardiac ACSL activity, but its role in phospholipid synthesis has not been determined. Mice with an inducible knockout of ACSL1 (Acsl1T−/−) have impaired cardiac fatty acid oxidation and rely on glucose for ATP production. Because ACSL1 exhibited a strong substrate preference for linoleate, we investigated the composition of heart phospholipids. Acsl1T−/− hearts contained 83% less tetralinoleoyl-cardiolipin (CL), the major form present in control hearts. A stable knockdown of ACSL1 in H9c2 rat cardiomyocytes resulted in low incorporation of linoleate into CL and in diminished incorporation of palmitate and oleate into other phospholipids. Overexpression of ACSL1 in H9c2 and HEK-293 cells increased incorporation of linoleate into CL and other phospholipids. To determine whether increasing the content of linoleate in CL would improve mitochondrial respiratory function in Acsl1T−/− hearts, control and Acsl1T−/− mice were fed a high-linoleate diet; this diet normalized the amount of tetralinoleoyl-CL but did not improve respiratory function. Thus, ACSL1 is required for the normal composition of several phospholipid species in heart. Although ACSL1 determines the acyl-chain composition of heart CL, a high tetralinoleoyl-CL content may not be required for normal function. PMID:26136511

  18. Large-scale filament formation inhibits the activity of CTP synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Rachael M; Bitbol, Anne-Florence; Lorestani, Alexander; Charles, Emeric J; Habrian, Chris H; Hansen, Jesse M; Li, Hsin-Jung; Baldwin, Enoch P; Wingreen, Ned S; Kollman, Justin M; Gitai, Zemer

    2014-01-01

    CTP Synthetase (CtpS) is a universally conserved and essential metabolic enzyme. While many enzymes form small oligomers, CtpS forms large-scale filamentous structures of unknown function in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. By simultaneously monitoring CtpS polymerization and enzymatic activity, we show that polymerization inhibits activity, and CtpS's product, CTP, induces assembly. To understand how assembly inhibits activity, we used electron microscopy to define the structure of CtpS polymers. This structure suggests that polymerization sterically hinders a conformational change necessary for CtpS activity. Structure-guided mutagenesis and mathematical modeling further indicate that coupling activity to polymerization promotes cooperative catalytic regulation. This previously uncharacterized regulatory mechanism is important for cellular function since a mutant that disrupts CtpS polymerization disrupts E. coli growth and metabolic regulation without reducing CTP levels. We propose that regulation by large-scale polymerization enables ultrasensitive control of enzymatic activity while storing an enzyme subpopulation in a conformationally restricted form that is readily activatable. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03638.001 PMID:25030911

  19. Leishmania infantum Asparagine Synthetase A Is Dispensable for Parasites Survival and Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Joana; Loureiro, Inês; Santarém, Nuno; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Tavares, Joana; Cordeiro-da-Silva, Anabela

    2016-01-01

    A growing interest in asparagine (Asn) metabolism has currently been observed in cancer and infection fields. Asparagine synthetase (AS) is responsible for the conversion of aspartate into Asn in an ATP-dependent manner, using ammonia or glutamine as a nitrogen source. There are two structurally distinct AS: the strictly ammonia dependent, type A, and the type B, which preferably uses glutamine. Absent in humans and present in trypanosomatids, AS-A was worthy of exploring as a potential drug target candidate. Appealingly, it was reported that AS-A was essential in Leishmania donovani, making it a promising drug target. In the work herein we demonstrate that Leishmania infantum AS-A, similarly to Trypanosoma spp. and L. donovani, is able to use both ammonia and glutamine as nitrogen donors. Moreover, we have successfully generated LiASA null mutants by targeted gene replacement in L. infantum, and these parasites do not display any significant growth or infectivity defect. Indeed, a severe impairment of in vitro growth was only observed when null mutants were cultured in asparagine limiting conditions. Altogether our results demonstrate that despite being important under asparagine limitation, LiAS-A is not essential for parasite survival, growth or infectivity in normal in vitro and in vivo conditions. Therefore we exclude AS-A as a suitable drug target against L. infantum parasites. PMID:26771178

  20. Light represses transcription of asparagine synthetase genes in photosynthetic and nonphotosynthetic organs of plants

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Fongying; Coruzzi, G. )

    1991-10-01

    Asparagine synthetase (AS) mRNA in Pisum sativum accumulates preferentially in plants grown in the dark. Nuclear run-on experiments demonstrate that expression of both the AS1 and AS2 genes is negatively regulated by light at the level of transcription. A decrease in the transcriptional rate of the AS1 gene can be detected as early as 20 min after exposure to light. Time course experiments reveal that the levels of AS mRNA fluctuate dramatically during a normal light/dark cycle. This is due to a direct effect of light and not to changes associated with circadian rhythm. A novel finding is that the light-repressed expression of the AS1 gene is as dramatic nonphotosynthetic organs such as roots as it is in leaves. Experiments demonstrate that the small amount of light which passes through the soil is sufficient to repress AS1 expression in roots, indicating that light has a direct effect on AS1 gene expression in roots. The negative regulation of AS gene expression by light was shown to be a general phenomenon in plants which also occurs in nonlegumes such as Nicotiana plumbaginifolia and Nicotiana tabacum. Thus, the AS genes can serve as a model with which to dissect the molecular basis for light-regulated transcriptional repression in plants.

  1. Degenerate Connective Polypeptide 1 (CP1) Domain from Human Mitochondrial Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase*

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qing; Wang, Meng; Fang, Zhi-Peng; Ruan, Zhi-Rong; Ji, Quan-Quan; Zhou, Xiao-Long; Wang, En-Duo

    2015-01-01

    The connective polypeptide 1 (CP1) editing domain of leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) from various species either harbors a conserved active site to exclude tRNA mis-charging with noncognate amino acids or is evolutionarily truncated or lost because there is no requirement for high translational fidelity. However, human mitochondrial LeuRS (hmtLeuRS) contains a full-length but degenerate CP1 domain that has mutations in some residues important for post-transfer editing. The significance of such an inactive CP1 domain and a translational accuracy mechanism with different noncognate amino acids are not completely understood. Here, we identified the essential role of the evolutionarily divergent CP1 domain in facilitating hmtLeuRS's catalytic efficiency and endowing enzyme with resistance to AN2690, a broad-spectrum drug acting on LeuRSs. In addition, the canonical core of hmtLeuRS is not stringent for noncognate norvaline (Nva) and valine (Val). hmtLeuRS has a very weak tRNA-independent pre-transfer editing activity for Nva, which is insufficient to remove mis-activated Nva. Moreover, hmtLeuRS chimeras fused with a functional CP1 domain from LeuRSs of other species, regardless of origin, showed restored post-transfer editing activity and acquired fidelity during aminoacylation. This work offers a novel perspective on the role of the CP1 domain in optimizing aminoacylation efficiency. PMID:26272616

  2. Intestinal acyl-CoA synthetase 5: activation of long chain fatty acids and behind.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Christina; Jeon, Min Kyung; Kaemmerer, Elke; Gassler, Nikolaus

    2013-11-14

    The intestinal mucosa is characterized by a high complexity in terms of structure and functions and allows for a controlled demarcation towards the gut lumen. On the one hand it is responsible for pulping and selective absorption of alimentary substances ensuring the immunological tolerance, on the other hand it prevents the penetration of micro-organisms as well as bacterial outgrowth. The continuous regeneration of surface epithelia along the crypt-villus-axis in the small intestine is crucial to assuring these various functions. The core phenomena of intestinal epithelia regeneration comprise cell proliferation, migration, differentiation, and apoptosis. These partly contrarily oriented processes are molecularly balanced through numerous interacting signaling pathways like Wnt/β-catenin, Notch and Hedgehog, and regulated by various modifying factors. One of these modifiers is acyl-CoA synthetase 5 (ACSL5). It plays a key role in de novo lipid synthesis, fatty acid degradation and membrane modifications, and regulates several intestinal processes, primarily through different variants of protein lipidation, e.g., palmitoylation. ACSL5 was shown to interact with proapoptotic molecules, and besides seems to inhibit proliferation along the crypt-villus-axis. Because of its proapoptotic and antiproliferative characteristics it could be of significant relevance for intestinal homeostasis, cellular disorder and tumor development. PMID:24259967

  3. Assessment of glutamine synthetase activity by [13N]ammonia uptake in living rat brain.

    PubMed

    Momosaki, Sotaro; Ito, Miwa; Tonomura, Misato; Abe, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) plays an important role in glutamate neurotransmission or neurological disorder in the brain. [(13) N]Ammonia blood flow tracer has been reported to be metabolically trapped in the brain via the glutamate-glutamine pathway. The present study investigated the effect of an inhibitor of GS on [(13) N]ammonia uptake in order to clarify the feasibility of measuring GS activity in the living brain. l-Methionine sulfoximine (MSO), a selective GS inhibitor was microinjected into the ipsilateral striatum in rats. [(13) N]Ammonia uptake was quantified by autoradiography method as well as small animal positron emission tomography (PET) scans. The GS activity of the brain homogenate was assayed from the γ-glutamyl transferase reaction. Autoradiograms showed a decrease of [(13) N]ammonia radioactivity on the MSO-injected side compared with the saline-injected side of the striatum. This reduction could be detected with a small animal PET scanner. MSO had no effect on cerebral blood flow measured by uptake of [(15) O]H2 O. The reduction of [(13) N]ammonia uptake was closely related to the results of GS activity assay. These results indicated that [(13) N]ammonia may enable measurement of GS activity in the living brain.

  4. Formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase gene diversity in the guts of higher termites with different diets and lifestyles.

    PubMed

    Ottesen, Elizabeth A; Leadbetter, Jared R

    2011-05-01

    In this study, we examine gene diversity for formyl-tetrahydrofolate synthetase (FTHFS), a key enzyme in homoacetogenesis, recovered from the gut microbiota of six species of higher termites. The "higher" termites (family Termitidae), which represent the majority of extant termite species and genera, engage in a broader diversity of feeding and nesting styles than the "lower" termites. Previous studies of termite gut homoacetogenesis have focused on wood-feeding lower termites, from which the preponderance of FTHFS sequences recovered were related to those from acetogenic treponemes. While sequences belonging to this group were present in the guts of all six higher termites examined, treponeme-like FTHFS sequences represented the majority of recovered sequences in only two species (a wood-feeding Nasutitermes sp. and a palm-feeding Microcerotermes sp.). The remaining four termite species analyzed (a Gnathamitermes sp. and two Amitermes spp. that were recovered from subterranean nests with indeterminate feeding strategies and a litter-feeding Rhynchotermes sp.) yielded novel FTHFS clades not observed in lower termites. These termites yielded two distinct clusters of probable purinolytic Firmicutes and a large group of potential homoacetogens related to sequences previously recovered from the guts of omnivorous cockroaches. These findings suggest that the gut environments of different higher termite species may select for different groups of homoacetogens, with some species hosting treponeme-dominated homoacetogen populations similar to those of wood-feeding, lower termites while others host Firmicutes-dominated communities more similar to those of omnivorous cockroaches.

  5. Production of Non-Ribosomal Peptide Synthetase (NRPS)- Dependent Siderophore by Aeromonas Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Amsaveni, Ramasamy; Sureshkumar, Muthusamy; Aravinth, Arthanari; Mary, Joseph Reshma; Vivekanandhan, Govindasami

    2016-01-01

    Background: Aeromonas species are Gram-negative ubiquitous bacteria, facultative anaerobic rods that infect both invertebrates and vertebrates. Various fish species develop hemorrhagic disease and furunculosis due to Aeromonas spp. Aeromonas strains generate certain active compounds such as siderophores, which are the final products of non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) activity. The present study attempted to investigate the prevalence of Aeromonas isolates in marketed fish sources. We also examined the siderophore production ability of these isolates. Methods: Among the molecular tools, 16S rRNA analysis was used to identify Aeromonas species and their epidemiological distributions. The hemolytic activity of the strains and biochemical assays were used to confirm the identity of the isolates. We also determined the chemical nature of siderophores in these strains. Results: A total of seven Aeromonas isolates obtained from fish were included to determine the siderophore production. Of 7 isolates, 4 produced siderophore, and their chemical nature was also determined. The siderophore produced by Aeromonas was invariably found to be of hydroxamate. Four Aeromonas isolates were selected for PCR identification of NRPS-encoding gene. The conserved sequence was present in all four selected isolates. Furthermore, siderophores were qualitatively tested for their antibacterial activity against pathogenic bacteria and a significant level of inhibitory activity was observed in siderophores from the four isolates. Conclusion: Our results showed the ability of the isolated strains in production of siderophores with a high level of activity against Salmonella paratyphi. These siderophores could find applications in biomedical industries. PMID:27155016

  6. Evolution of selenophosphate synthetases: emergence and relocation of function through independent duplications and recurrent subfunctionalization.

    PubMed

    Mariotti, Marco; Santesmasses, Didac; Capella-Gutierrez, Salvador; Mateo, Andrea; Arnan, Carme; Johnson, Rory; D'Aniello, Salvatore; Yim, Sun Hee; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Serras, Florenci; Corominas, Montserrat; Gabaldón, Toni; Guigó, Roderic

    2015-09-01

    Selenoproteins are proteins that incorporate selenocysteine (Sec), a nonstandard amino acid encoded by UGA, normally a stop codon. Sec synthesis requires the enzyme Selenophosphate synthetase (SPS or SelD), conserved in all prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes encoding selenoproteins. Here, we study the evolutionary history of SPS genes, providing a map of selenoprotein function spanning the whole tree of life. SPS is itself a selenoprotein in many species, although functionally equivalent homologs that replace the Sec site with cysteine (Cys) are common. Many metazoans, however, possess SPS genes with substitutions other than Sec or Cys (collectively referred to as SPS1). Using complementation assays in fly mutants, we show that these genes share a common function, which appears to be distinct from the synthesis of selenophosphate carried out by the Sec- and Cys- SPS genes (termed SPS2), and unrelated to Sec synthesis. We show here that SPS1 genes originated through a number of independent gene duplications from an ancestral metazoan selenoprotein SPS2 gene that most likely already carried the SPS1 function. Thus, in SPS genes, parallel duplications and subsequent convergent subfunctionalization have resulted in the segregation to different loci of functions initially carried by a single gene. This evolutionary history constitutes a remarkable example of emergence and evolution of gene function, which we have been able to trace thanks to the singular features of SPS genes, wherein the amino acid at a single site determines unequivocally protein function and is intertwined to the evolutionary fate of the entire selenoproteome. PMID:26194102

  7. Structure of human carbamoyl phosphate synthetase: deciphering the on/off switch of human ureagenesis

    PubMed Central

    de Cima, Sergio; Polo, Luis M.; Díez-Fernández, Carmen; Martínez, Ana I.; Cervera, Javier; Fita, Ignacio; Rubio, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Human carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS1), a 1500-residue multidomain enzyme, catalyzes the first step of ammonia detoxification to urea requiring N-acetyl-L-glutamate (NAG) as essential activator to prevent ammonia/amino acids depletion. Here we present the crystal structures of CPS1 in the absence and in the presence of NAG, clarifying the on/off-switching of the urea cycle by NAG. By binding at the C-terminal domain of CPS1, NAG triggers long-range conformational changes affecting the two distant phosphorylation domains. These changes, concerted with the binding of nucleotides, result in a dramatic remodeling that stabilizes the catalytically competent conformation and the building of the ~35 Å-long tunnel that allows migration of the carbamate intermediate from its site of formation to the second phosphorylation site, where carbamoyl phosphate is produced. These structures allow rationalizing the effects of mutations found in patients with CPS1 deficiency (presenting hyperammonemia, mental retardation and even death), as exemplified here for some mutations. PMID:26592762

  8. Identification of a phosphinothricin-resistant mutant of rice glutamine synthetase using DNA shuffling

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yong-Sheng; Xu, Jing; Zhao, Wei; Xing, Xiao-Juan; Fu, Xiao-Yan; Peng, Ri-He; Yao, Quan-Hong

    2015-01-01

    To date, only bar/pat gene derived from Streptomyces has been used to generate the commercial PPT-resistant crops currently available in the market. The limited source of bar/pat gene is probably what has caused the decrease in PPT-tolerance, which has become the main concern of those involved in field management programs. Although glutamine synthetase (GS) is the target enzyme of PPT, little study has been reported about engineering PPT-resisitant plants with GS gene. Then, the plant-optimized GS gene from Oryza sativa (OsGS1S) was chemically synthesized in the present study by PTDS to identify a GS gene for developing PPT-tolerant plants. However, OsGS1S cannot be directly used for developing PPT-tolerant plants because of its poor PPT-resistance. Thus, we performed DNA shuffling on OsGS1S, and one highly PPT-resistant mutant with mutations in four amino acids (A63E, V193A, T293A and R295K) was isolated after three rounds of DNA shuffling and screening. Among the four amino acids substitutions, only R295K was identified as essential in altering PPT resistance. The R295K mutation has also never been previously reported as an important residue for PPT resistance. Furthermore, the mutant gene has been transformed into Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Arabidopsis to confirm its potential in developing PPT-resistant crops. PMID:26492850

  9. The Effect of Nitrogen Nutrition on the Cellular Localization of Glutamine Synthetase Isoforms in Barley Roots.

    PubMed Central

    Peat, L. J.; Tobin, A. K.

    1996-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) was detected by immunogold localization in the cytosol and plastids of roots of 7-d-old barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Klaxon) seedlings grown in the presence or absence of NO3- (15 mM) or NH4+ (30 mM). The number of GS polypeptides changed during root development, and this was affected by N nutrition. There was no evidence of a NO3--inducible root plastid GS.In apical 5- to 10-mm regions of the root the concentration of immunogold labeling of cytosolic GS was higher in the cortical parenchyma than in the vascular cells of the stele, irrespective of N nutrition. This labeling was at least 50% higher in both cell types in N-free compared with N-grown (either NO3- or NH4+) seedlings. In contrast, GS specific activity was highest in roots of NO3--grown seedlings. It is suggested that this indicates the presence of inactive GS in roots grown without N. This study has identified both cell- and development-specific responses of GS to N nutrition. PMID:12226350

  10. Structure of human carbamoyl phosphate synthetase: deciphering the on/off switch of human ureagenesis.

    PubMed

    de Cima, Sergio; Polo, Luis M; Díez-Fernández, Carmen; Martínez, Ana I; Cervera, Javier; Fita, Ignacio; Rubio, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Human carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS1), a 1500-residue multidomain enzyme, catalyzes the first step of ammonia detoxification to urea requiring N-acetyl-L-glutamate (NAG) as essential activator to prevent ammonia/amino acids depletion. Here we present the crystal structures of CPS1 in the absence and in the presence of NAG, clarifying the on/off-switching of the urea cycle by NAG. By binding at the C-terminal domain of CPS1, NAG triggers long-range conformational changes affecting the two distant phosphorylation domains. These changes, concerted with the binding of nucleotides, result in a dramatic remodeling that stabilizes the catalytically competent conformation and the building of the ~35 Å-long tunnel that allows migration of the carbamate intermediate from its site of formation to the second phosphorylation site, where carbamoyl phosphate is produced. These structures allow rationalizing the effects of mutations found in patients with CPS1 deficiency (presenting hyperammonemia, mental retardation and even death), as exemplified here for some mutations. PMID:26592762

  11. Cancer association study of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase signaling network in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Wan; Kwon, Changhyuk; Liu, Juinn-Lin; Kim, Se Hoon; Kim, Sunghoon

    2012-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs) and ARS-interacting multifunctional proteins (AIMPs) exhibit remarkable functional versatility beyond their catalytic activities in protein synthesis. Their non-canonical functions have been pathologically linked to cancers. Here we described our integrative genome-wide analysis of ARSs to show cancer-associated activities in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most aggressive malignant primary brain tumor. We first selected 23 ARS/AIMPs (together referred to as ARSN), 124 cancer-associated druggable target genes (DTGs) and 404 protein-protein interactors (PPIs) of ARSs using NCI's cancer gene index. 254 GBM affymetrix microarray data in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were used to identify the probe sets whose expression were most strongly correlated with survival (Kaplan-Meier plots versus survival times, log-rank t-test <0.05). The analysis identified 122 probe sets as survival signatures, including 5 of ARSN (VARS, QARS, CARS, NARS, FARS), and 115 of DTGs and PPIs (PARD3, RXRB, ATP5C1, HSP90AA1, CD44, THRA, TRAF2, KRT10, MED12, etc). Of note, 61 survival-related probes were differentially expressed in three different prognosis subgroups in GBM patients and showed correlation with established prognosis markers such as age and phenotypic molecular signatures. CARS and FARS also showed significantly higher association with different molecular networks in GBM patients. Taken together, our findings demonstrate evidence for an ARSN biology-dominant contribution in the biology of GBM.

  12. Molecular Evolution of Aminoacyl tRNA Synthetase Proteins in the Early History of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Gregory P.; Andam, Cheryl P.; Alm, Eric J.; Gogarten, J. Peter

    2011-12-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS) consist of several families of functionally conserved proteins essential for translation and protein synthesis. Like nearly all components of the translation machinery, most aaRS families are universally distributed across cellular life, being inherited from the time of the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA). However, unlike the rest of the translation machinery, aaRS have undergone numerous ancient horizontal gene transfers, with several independent events detected between domains, and some possibly involving lineages diverging before the time of LUCA. These transfers reveal the complexity of molecular evolution at this early time, and the chimeric nature of genomes within cells that gave rise to the major domains. Additionally, given the role of these protein families in defining the amino acids used for protein synthesis, sequence reconstruction of their pre-LUCA ancestors can reveal the evolutionary processes at work in the origin of the genetic code. In particular, sequence reconstructions of the paralog ancestors of isoleucyl- and valyl- RS provide strong empirical evidence that at least for this divergence, the genetic code did not co-evolve with the aaRSs; rather, both amino acids were already part of the genetic code before their cognate aaRSs diverged from their common ancestor. The implications of this observation for the early evolution of RNA-directed protein biosynthesis are discussed.

  13. A cyclic peptide synthetase gene required for pathogenicity of the fungus Cochliobolus carbonum on maize.

    PubMed Central

    Panaccione, D G; Scott-Craig, J S; Pocard, J A; Walton, J D

    1992-01-01

    Specificity in many plant-pathogen interactions is determined by single genes in pathogen and host. The single locus for host-selective pathogenicity (TOX2) in the fungus Cochliobolus carbonum governs production of a cyclic tetrapeptide named HC-toxin. We have isolated a chromosomal region, 22 kilobases (kb) long, that contains a 15.7-kb open reading frame (HTS1) encoding a multifunctional cyclic peptide synthetase. The 22-kb chromosomal region is duplicated in toxin-producing isolates of the fungus but is completely absent from the genomes of toxin-nonproducing isolates. Mutants of the fungus with disruptions in both copies of HTS1, at either of two different sites within HTS1, were engineered by DNA-mediated transformation. Disruption of both copies at either site resulted in loss of ability to produce HC-toxin and loss of host-selective pathogenicity, but the mutants displayed different biochemical phenotypes depending on the site of disruption. The results demonstrate that TOX2 encodes, at least in part, a large, multifunctional biosynthetic enzyme and that the evolution of host range in C. carbonum involved the insertion or deletion of a large piece of chromosomal DNA. Images PMID:11607305

  14. Argininosuccinate synthetase 1 suppression and arginine restriction inhibit cell migration in gastric cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Shan, Yan-Shen; Hsu, Hui-Ping; Lai, Ming-Derg; Yen, Meng-Chi; Chen, Wei-Ching; Fang, Jung-Hua; Weng, Tzu-Yang; Chen, Yi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer metastasis remains a major cause of cancer-related deaths. There is an urgent need to develop new therapeutic approaches targeting metastatic gastric cancer. Argininosuccinate synthetase 1 (ASS1) expression is increased in gastric cancer. We detected the protein expression of ASS1 in human gastric cancer cell lines (AGS, NCI-N87, and MKN45) and in murine gastric cancer cell lines (3I and 3IB2). We used vector-mediated short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression to silence ASS1 expression in the MKN45 and 3IB2 cell lines, and analyzed the effects of this protein on cell migration and metastasis. We demonstrated that ASS1 silencing suppressed cell migration in the MKN45 and 3IB2 cell lines. ASS1 knockdown significantly reduced liver metastasis in mice after the intrasplenic implantation of 3IB2 cancer cell clones. To determine whether arginine restriction may represent a therapeutic approach to treat gastric cancer, the sensitivity of tumor cells to arginine depletion was determined in gastric cancer cells. Arginine depletion significantly inhibited cell migration in the gastric cancer cell line. The silencing of ASS1 expression in MKN45 and 3IB2 gastric cancer cells markedly decreased STAT3 protein expression. In conclusion, our results indicate that the ASS1 protein is required for cell migration in gastric cancer cell lines. PMID:25928182

  15. Targeting argininosuccinate synthetase negative melanomas using combination of arginine degrading enzyme and cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Savaraj, Niramol; Wu, Chunjing; Li, Ying-Ying; Wangpaichitr, Medhi; You, Min; Bomalaski, John; He, Wei; Kuo, Macus Tien; Feun, Lynn G.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) expression in melanoma makes these tumor cells vulnerable to arginine deprivation. Pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20) which degrades arginine to citrulline and ammonia has been used clinically and partial responses and stable disease have been noted with minimal toxicity. In order to improve the therapeutic efficacy of ADI-PEG20, we have combined ADI-PEG20 with a DNA damaging agent, cisplatin. We have shown that the combination of the two drugs together significantly improved the therapeutic efficacy when compared to ADI-PEG20 alone or cisplatin alone in 4 melanoma cell lines, regardless of their BRAF mutation. In-vivo study also exhibited the same effect as in-vitro with no added toxicity to either agent alone. The underlying mechanism is complex, but increased DNA damage upon arginine deprivation due to decreased DNA repair proteins, FANCD2, ATM, and CHK1/2 most likely leads to increased apoptosis. This action is further intensified by increased proapoptotic protein, NOXA, and decreased antiapoptotic proteins, SURVIVIN, BCL2 and XIAP. The autophagic process which protects cells from apoptosis upon ADI-PEG20 treatment also dampens upon cisplatin administration. Thus, the combination of arginine deprivation and cisplatin function in concert to kill tumor cells which do not express ASS without added toxicity to normal cells. PMID:25749046

  16. Targeting argininosuccinate synthetase negative melanomas using combination of arginine degrading enzyme and cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Savaraj, Niramol; Wu, Chunjing; Li, Ying-Ying; Wangpaichitr, Medhi; You, Min; Bomalaski, John; He, Wei; Kuo, Macus Tien; Feun, Lynn G

    2015-03-20

    Loss of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) expression in melanoma makes these tumor cells vulnerable to arginine deprivation. Pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20) which degrades arginine to citrulline and ammonia has been used clinically and partial responses and stable disease have been noted with minimal toxicity. In order to improve the therapeutic efficacy of ADI-PEG20, we have combined ADI-PEG20 with a DNA damaging agent, cisplatin. We have shown that the combination of the two drugs together significantly improved the therapeutic efficacy when compared to ADI-PEG20 alone or cisplatin alone in 4 melanoma cell lines, regardless of their BRAF mutation. In-vivo study also exhibited the same effect as in-vitro with no added toxicity to either agent alone. The underlying mechanism is complex, but increased DNA damage upon arginine deprivation due to decreased DNA repair proteins, FANCD2, ATM, and CHK1/2 most likely leads to increased apoptosis. This action is further intensified by increased proapoptotic protein, NOXA, and decreased antiapoptotic proteins, SURVIVIN, BCL2 and XIAP. The autophagic process which protects cells from apoptosis upon ADI-PEG20 treatment also dampens upon cisplatin administration. Thus, the combination of arginine deprivation and cisplatin function in concert to kill tumor cells which do not express ASS without added toxicity to normal cells.

  17. Integrative Molecular Profiling Reveals Asparagine Synthetase Is a Target in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sircar, Kanishka; Huang, Heng; Hu, Limei; Cogdell, David; Dhillon, Jasreman; Tzelepi, Vassiliki; Efstathiou, Eleni; Koumakpayi, Ismaël H.; Saad, Fred; Luo, Dijun; Bismar, Tarek A.; Aparicio, Ana; Troncoso, Patricia; Navone, Nora; Zhang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The identification of new and effective therapeutic targets for the lethal, castration-resistant stage of prostate cancer (CRPC) has been challenging because of both the paucity of adequate frozen tissues and a lack of integrated molecular analysis. Therefore, in this study, we performed a genome-wide analysis of DNA copy number alterations from 34 unique surgical CRPC specimens and 5 xenografts, with matched transcriptomic profiling of 25 specimens. An integrated analysis of these data revealed that the asparagine synthetase (ASNS) gene showed a gain in copy number and was overexpressed at the transcript level. The overexpression of ASNS was validated by analyzing other public CRPC data sets. ASNS protein expression, as detected by reverse-phase protein lysate array, was tightly correlated with gene copy number. In addition, ASNS protein expression, as determined by IHC analysis, was associated with progression to a therapy-resistant disease state in TMAs that included 77 castration-resistant and 40 untreated prostate cancer patient samples. Knockdown of ASNS by small-interfering RNAs in asparagine-deprived media led to growth inhibition in both androgen-responsive (ie, LNCaP) and castration-resistant (ie, C4-2B) prostate cancer cell lines and in cells isolated from a CRPC xenograft (ie, MDA PCa 180-30). Together, our results suggest that ASNS is up-regulated in cases of CRPC and that depletion of asparagine using ASNS inhibitors will be a novel strategy for targeting CRPC cells. PMID:22245216

  18. Brugia malayi Asparaginyl - tRNA Synthetase Stimulates Endothelial Cell Proliferation, Vasodilation and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    D, Jeeva Jothi; Dhanraj, Muthu; Solaiappan, Shanmugam; Sivanesan, Sanjana; Kron, Michael; Dhanasekaran, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of chronic infection with lymphatic filarial parasites is the development of lymphatic disease which often results in permanent vasodilation and lymphedema, but all of the mechanisms by which filarial parasites induce pathology are not known. Prior work showed that the asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase (BmAsnRS) of Brugia malayi, an etiological agent of lymphatic filariasis, acts as a physiocrine that binds specifically to interleukin-8 (IL-8) chemokine receptors. Endothelial cells are one of the many cell types that express IL-8 receptors. IL-8 also has been reported previously to induce angiogenesis and vasodilation, however, the effect of BmAsnRS on endothelial cells has not been reported. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that BmAsnRS might produce physiological changes in endothelial by studying the in vitro effects of BmAsnRS using a human umbilical vein cell line EA.hy926 and six different endothelial cell assays. Our results demonstrated that BmAsnRS produces consistent and statistically significant effects on endothelial cells that are identical to the effects of VEGF, vascular endothelial growth factor. This study supports the idea that new drugs or immunotherapies that counteract the adverse effects of parasite-derived physiocrines may prevent or ameliorate the vascular pathology observed in patients with lymphatic filariasis. PMID:26751209

  19. Induced nitric oxide synthetase and peroxiredoxin expression in intramucosal poorly differentiated gastric cancer of young patients.

    PubMed

    Hirahashi, Minako; Koga, Yutaka; Kumagai, Reiko; Aishima, Shinichi; Taguchi, Kenichi; Oda, Yoshinao

    2014-04-01

    To investigate the relationship between oxidative stress and gastric carcinogenesis of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma in young patients, we analyzed the surgically resected specimens of 22 young patients (21-30 years) and 29 older patients (41-72 years) with intramucosal gastric cancer of the poorly differentiated type. We used immunohistochemical staining to evaluate the expression of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8OHdG), induced nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS), and antioxidant enzymes (thioredoxin [TRX] and peroxiredoxin [PRDX1, 2 and 3]). We assessed these proteins in the cancer, noncancerous gastric foveolar epithelium and noncancerous mucosal neck. In both the young and older patient groups, the 8OHdG and TRX expressions were gradually increased in cancer cells compared with the noncancerous foveolar epithelial cells and the noncancerous mucosal neck cells (P < 0.001). Although the iNOS and PRDXs expressions were increased in the noncancerous mucosal neck cells compared with the noncancerous foveolar epithelial cells, regardless of age (P < 0.001), the iNOS and PRDX2 expression in the cancer cells were significantly reduced in the young patients compared with the older patients (P < 0.001, P < 0.05). In conclusion, the reduced expression of iNOS or PRDX2 may play an important role in the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer associated with Helicobacter pylori-induced chronic active gastritis in young patients.

  20. Babesia bovis: a bipartite signal directs the glutamyl-tRNA synthetase to the apicoplast.

    PubMed

    Pedroni, Monica J; Luu, Tracy N K; Lau, Audrey O T

    2012-06-01

    Babesia bovis contains a prokaryotic derived organelle known as the apicoplast. Many participants of the metabolic pathways within the apicoplast are encoded in the nuclear genome and post-translationally imported with the help of a bipartite signal. Recently, an all encompassing algorithm was derived to predict apicoplast targeted proteins for many non-Plasmodium apicomplexans in which it reported the presence of 260 apicoplast targeted proteins in Babesia. One of these proteins is glutamyl tRNA synthetase (GltX). This study investigates if the putative bipartite signal of GltX alone is sufficient to direct proteins into the apicoplast. Using a transient transfection system consisting of a green fluorescent protein as the reporter, we tested the signal and transit portions of the bipartite signal in apicoplastic transport. We first identified the transcript of gltX to be expressed during the asexual blood stages and subsequently confirmed that the complete bipartite signal is responsible for directing the reporter protein into a compartment distinct from the nucleus and the mitochondrion. As GltX bipartite signal successfully guided the reporter protein into the apicoplast, our finding implies that it also directs native GltX into the same organelle.

  1. Plant nutritional status modulates glutamine synthetase levels in ripe tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum cv. Micro-Tom).

    PubMed

    Scarpeci, Telma E; Marro, Martin L; Bortolotti, Santiago; Boggio, Silvana B; Valle, Estela M

    2007-02-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit ripening implies that chloroplastic proteins are degraded and new proteins are synthesized. Supplementary nutrition is frequently required when tomato plants begin to fruit and continues until the end of the plant's life cycle. Ammonium assimilation is crucial in these fruit maturation and ripening processes. Glutamine synthetase (GS; EC 6.3.1.2), the main ammonium-fixing enzyme in plants, could not be detected in red fruits of several tomato varieties when growing under standard nutrition. In this paper, we analyze the influence of the nutritional status on the ammonium assimilation capacity of ripe tomato (cv. Micro-Tom) fruit. For this purpose, GS expression and protein profiles were followed in mature green and red fruits harvested from plants grown under standard or supplemented nutrition. Under standard nutrient regime (weekly supplied with 0.5 x Hoagland solution) GS activity was found in chloroplasts (GS2) of mature green fruits, but it was not detected either in the chromoplasts or in the cytosol of red fruits. When plants were shifted to a supplemented nutritional regime (daily supplied with 0.5 x Hoagland solution), GS was found in red fruits. Also, cytosolic transcripts (gs1) preferentially accumulated in red fruits under high nutrition. These results indicate that mature green Micro-Tom fruits assimilate ammonia through GS2 under standard nutrition, while ripe red fruits accumulate GS1 under high nutrition, probably in order to assimilate the extra N-compounds made available through supplemented nutrition.

  2. Argininosuccinate synthetase regulates hepatic AMPK linking protein catabolism and ureagenesis to hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Madiraju, Anila K; Alves, Tiago; Zhao, Xiaojian; Cline, Gary W; Zhang, Dongyan; Bhanot, Sanjay; Samuel, Varman T; Kibbey, Richard G; Shulman, Gerald I

    2016-06-14

    A key sensor of cellular energy status, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), interacts allosterically with AMP to maintain an active state. When active, AMPK triggers a metabolic switch, decreasing the activity of anabolic pathways and enhancing catabolic processes such as lipid oxidation to restore the energy balance. Unlike oxidative tissues, in which AMP is generated from adenylate kinase during states of high energy demand, the ornithine cycle enzyme argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) is a principle site of AMP generation in the liver. Here we show that ASS regulates hepatic AMPK, revealing a central role for ureagenesis flux in the regulation of metabolism via AMPK. Treatment of primary rat hepatocytes with amino acids increased gluconeogenesis and ureagenesis and, despite nutrient excess, induced both AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylation. Antisense oligonucleotide knockdown of hepatic ASS1 expression in vivo decreased liver AMPK activation, phosphorylation of ACC, and plasma β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations. Taken together these studies demonstrate that increased amino acid flux can activate AMPK through increased AMP generated by ASS, thus providing a novel link between protein catabolism, ureagenesis, and hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:27247419

  3. Arsenic and mercury tolerance and cadmium sensitivity in Arabidopsis plants expressing bacterial gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Li, Yujing; Dhankher, Om Parkash; Carreira, Laura; Balish, Rebecca S; Meagher, Richard B

    2005-06-01

    Cysteine sulfhydryl-rich peptide thiols are believed to play important roles in the detoxification of many heavy metals and metalloids such as arsenic, mercury, and cadmium in plants. The gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (gamma-ECS) catalyzes the synthesis of the dipeptidethiol gamma-glu-cys (gamma-EC), the first step in the biosynthesis of phytochelatins (PCs). Arabidopsis thaliana, engineered to express the bacterial gamma-ECS gene under control of a strong constitutive actin regulatory sequence (A2), expressed gamma-ECS at levels approaching 0.1% of total protein. In response to arsenic, mercury, and cadmium stresses, the levels of gamma-EC and its derivatives, glutathione (GSH) and PCs, were increased in the A2::ECS transgenic plants to three- to 20-fold higher concentrations than the increases that occurred in wild-type (WT). Compared to cadmium and mercury treatments, arsenic treatment most significantly increased levels of gamma-EC and PCs in both the A2::ECS transgenic and WT plants. The A2::ECS transgenic plants were highly resistant to arsenic and weakly resistant to mercury. Although exposure to cadmium produced three- to fivefold increases in levels of gamma-EC-related peptides in the A2::ECS lines, these plants were significantly more sensitive to Cd(II) than WT and trace levels of Cd(II) blocked resistance to arsenic and mercury. A few possible mechanisms for gamma-ECS-enhanced arsenic and mercury resistance and cadmium hypersensitivity are discussed. PMID:16117113

  4. Occurrence of Only One Form of Glutamine Synthetase in the Green Alga Monoraphidium braunii.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Fernandez, J. M.; Lopez-Ruiz, A.; Toribio, F.; Roldan, J. M.; Diez, J.

    1994-01-01

    Anion-exchange chromatography of crude extracts from the green alga Monoraphidium braunii yielded two glutamine synthetase (GS) activities. The ratio of activities was markedly different when crude extracts were subjected to various processing conditions but was not influenced by environmental factors of cell cultures. However, high performance liquid chromatography anion-exchange chromatograms showed only one GS if the crude extracts were processed immediately after cell disruption. Moreover, standard chromatography of crude extracts obtained in the absence of dithioerythritol, a reductant generally used in disruption buffers, yielded a single activity peak. Enzyme samples from the two activities obtained in the presence of dithioerythritol were purified for physicochemical characterization and antibody production. Both enzyme samples exhibited similar reactions to different inactivating agents and were undistinguishable by size-exclusion chromatography and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Additionally, the two GS preparations showed absolute antigenic identity as demonstrated by immunodiffusion and immunoblotting experiments. Immunocytochemistry of M. braunii cryosections evidenced a chloroplast-specific distribution of the enzyme, which rules out the existence of a cytoplasmic counterpart. All these results support the proposal that M. braunii possesses only one form of GS. PMID:12232093

  5. Glutamine synthetase activity fuels nucleotide biosynthesis and supports growth of glutamine-restricted glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Tardito, Saverio; Oudin, Anaïs; Ahmed, Shafiq U; Fack, Fred; Keunen, Olivier; Zheng, Liang; Miletic, Hrvoje; Sakariassen, Per Øystein; Weinstock, Adam; Wagner, Allon; Lindsay, Susan L; Hock, Andreas K; Barnett, Susan C; Ruppin, Eytan; Mørkve, Svein Harald; Lund-Johansen, Morten; Chalmers, Anthony J; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Niclou, Simone P; Gottlieb, Eyal

    2015-12-01

    L-Glutamine (Gln) functions physiologically to balance the carbon and nitrogen requirements of tissues. It has been proposed that in cancer cells undergoing aerobic glycolysis, accelerated anabolism is sustained by Gln-derived carbons, which replenish the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (anaplerosis). However, it is shown here that in glioblastoma (GBM) cells, almost half of the Gln-derived glutamate (Glu) is secreted and does not enter the TCA cycle, and that inhibiting glutaminolysis does not affect cell proliferation. Moreover, Gln-starved cells are not rescued by TCA cycle replenishment. Instead, the conversion of Glu to Gln by glutamine synthetase (GS; cataplerosis) confers Gln prototrophy, and fuels de novo purine biosynthesis. In both orthotopic GBM models and in patients, (13)C-glucose tracing showed that GS produces Gln from TCA-cycle-derived carbons. Finally, the Gln required for the growth of GBM tumours is contributed only marginally by the circulation, and is mainly either autonomously synthesized by GS-positive glioma cells, or supplied by astrocytes. PMID:26595383

  6. Physiological Studies of Glutamine Synthetases I and III from Synechococcus sp. WH7803 Reveal Differential Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez-Martín, María Agustina; Díez, Jesús; García-Fernández, José M.

    2016-01-01

    The marine picocyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. WH7803 possesses two glutamine synthetases (GSs; EC 6.3.1.2), GSI encoded by glnA and GSIII encoded by glnN. This is the first work addressing the physiological regulation of both enzymes in a marine cyanobacterial strain. The increase of GS activity upon nitrogen starvation was similar to that found in other model cyanobacteria. However, an unusual response was found when cells were grown under darkness: the GS activity was unaffected, reflecting adaptation to the environment where they thrive. On the other hand, we found that GSIII did not respond to nitrogen availability, in sharp contrast with the results observed for this enzyme in other cyanobacteria thus far studied. These features suggest that GS activities in Synechococcus sp. WH7803 represent an intermediate step in the evolution of cyanobacteria, in a process of regulatory streamlining where GSI lost the regulation by light, while GSIII lost its responsiveness to nitrogen. This is in good agreement with the phylogeny of Synechococcus sp. WH7803 in the context of the marine cyanobacterial radiation. PMID:27446010

  7. Nonribosomal peptide synthetase with a unique iterative-alternative-optional mechanism catalyzes amonabactin synthesis in Aeromonas.

    PubMed

    Esmaeel, Qassim; Chevalier, Mickael; Chataigné, Gabrielle; Subashkumar, Rathinasamy; Jacques, Philippe; Leclère, Valérie

    2016-10-01

    Based on the exploration of data generated by genome sequencing, a bioinformatics approach has been chosen to identify the biosynthetic pathway of the siderophores produced by Aeromonas species. The amonabactins, considered as a virulence factor, represent a family of four variants of catechol peptidic siderophores containing Dhb, Lys, Gly, and an aromatic residue either Trp or Phe in a D-configuration. The synthesis operon is constituted of seven genes named amoCEBFAGH and is iron-regulated. The cluster includes genes encoding proteins involved in the synthesis and incorporation of the Dhb monomer, and genes encoding specific nonribosomal peptide synthetases, which are responsible for the building of the peptidic moiety. The amonabactin assembly line displays a still so far not described atypical mode of synthesis that is iterative, alternative, and optional. A disruption mutant in the adenylation domain of AmoG was unable to synthesize any amonabactin and to grow in iron stress conditions while a deletion of amoH resulted in the production of only two over the four forms. The amo cluster is widespread among most of the Aeromonas species, only few species produces the enterobactin siderophore. PMID:27531515

  8. Evolution of the glutamine synthetase gene, one of the oldest existing and functioning genes.

    PubMed Central

    Kumada, Y; Benson, D R; Hillemann, D; Hosted, T J; Rochefort, D A; Thompson, C J; Wohlleben, W; Tateno, Y

    1993-01-01

    We performed molecular phylogenetic analyses of glutamine synthetase (GS) genes in order to investigate their evolutionary history. The analyses were done on 30 DNA sequences of the GS gene which included both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Two types of GS genes are known at present: the GSI gene found so far only in prokaryotes and the GSII gene found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Our study has shown that the two types of GS gene were produced by a gene duplication which preceded, perhaps by > 1000 million years, the divergence of eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The results are consistent with the facts that (i) GS is a key enzyme of nitrogen metabolism found in all extant life forms and (ii) the oldest biological fossils date back 3800 million years. Thus, we suggest that GS genes are one of the oldest existing and functioning genes in the history of gene evolution and that GSI genes should also exist in eukaryotes. Furthermore, our study may stimulate investigation on the evolution of "preprokaryotes," by which we mean the organisms that existed during the era between the origin of life and the divergence of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. PMID:8096645

  9. Disruption of a Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase in Aspergillus fumigatus Eliminates Gliotoxin Production

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Robert A.; Gamcsik, Michael P.; Brooking, Rhea M.; Najvar, Laura K.; Kirkpatrick, William R.; Patterson, Thomas F.; Balibar, Carl J.; Graybill, John R.; Perfect, John R.; Abraham, Soman N.; Steinbach, William J.

    2006-01-01

    The fungal secondary metabolite gliotoxin produced by Aspergillus fumigatus has been hypothesized to be important in the development of invasive aspergillosis. In this study, we addressed this hypothesis by disrupting a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) (encoded by gliP) predicted to be involved in gliotoxin production. Mutants with a disrupted gliP locus failed to produce gliotoxin, which confirmed the role of the NRPS encoded by gliP in gliotoxin biosynthesis. We found no morphological, developmental, or physiological defects in ΔgliP mutant strains. In addition, disruption of gliP resulted in down regulation of gene expression in the gliotoxin biosynthesis gene cluster, which was restored with addition of exogenous gliotoxin. This interesting result suggests a role for gliotoxin in regulating its own production. Culture filtrates from the ΔgliP mutant were unable to inhibit ionomycin-dependent degranulation of mast cells, suggesting a role for gliotoxin in suppressing mast cell degranulation and possibly in disease development. However, the ΔgliP mutant did not have an impact on survival or tissue burden in a murine inhalational model of invasive aspergillosis. This result suggests that gliotoxin is not required for virulence in an immunosuppressed host with an invasive pulmonary infection. PMID:16757745

  10. Over-expression of cytosolic glutamine synthetase increases photosynthesis and growth at low nitrogen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, S I; Allen, D J; Ortiz-Lopez, A; Hernández, G

    2001-05-01

    Nitrogen, which is a major limiting nutrient for plant growth, is assimilated as ammonium by the concerted action of glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT). GS catalyses the critical incorporation of inorganic ammonium into the amino acid glutamine. Two types of GS isozymes, located in the cytosol (GS1) and in the chloroplast (GS2) have been identified in plants. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) transformants, over-expressing GS1 driven by the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter were analysed. GS in leaves of GS-5 and GS-8 plants was up-regulated, at the level of RNA and proteins. These transgenic plants had six times higher leaf GS activity than controls. Under optimum nitrogen fertilization conditions there was no effect of GS over-expression on photosynthesis or growth. However, under nitrogen starvation the GS transgenics had c. 70% higher shoot and c. 100% greater root dry weight as well as 50% more leaf area than low nitrogen controls. This was achieved by the maintenance of photosynthesis at rates indistinguishable from plants under high nitrogen, while photosynthesis in control plants was inhibited by 40-50% by nitrogen deprivation. It was demonstrated that manipulation of GS activity has the potential to maintain crop photosynthetic productivity while reducing nitrogen fertilization and the concomitant pollution. PMID:11432923

  11. Diversity of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases Involved in the Biosynthesis of Lipopeptide Biosurfactants

    PubMed Central

    Roongsawang, Niran; Washio, Kenji; Morikawa, Masaaki

    2011-01-01

    Lipopeptide biosurfactants (LPBSs) consist of a hydrophobic fatty acid portion linked to a hydrophilic peptide chain in the molecule. With their complex and diverse structures, LPBSs exhibit various biological activities including surface activity as well as anti-cellular and anti-enzymatic activities. LPBSs are also involved in multi-cellular behaviors such as swarming motility and biofilm formation. Among the bacterial genera, Bacillus (Gram-positive) and Pseudomonas (Gram-negative) have received the most attention because they produce a wide range of effective LPBSs that are potentially useful for agricultural, chemical, food, and pharmaceutical industries. The biosynthetic mechanisms and gene regulation systems of LPBSs have been extensively analyzed over the last decade. LPBSs are generally synthesized in a ribosome-independent manner with megaenzymes called nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). Production of active-form NRPSs requires not only transcriptional induction and translation but also post-translational modification and assemblage. The accumulated knowledge reveals the versatility and evolutionary lineage of the NRPSs system. This review provides an overview of the structural and functional diversity of LPBSs and their different biosynthetic mechanisms in Bacillus and Pseudomonas, including both typical and unique systems. Finally, successful genetic engineering of NRPSs for creating novel lipopeptides is also discussed. PMID:21339982

  12. Arsenic and mercury tolerance and cadmium sensitivity in Arabidopsis plants expressing bacterial gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Li, Yujing; Dhankher, Om Parkash; Carreira, Laura; Balish, Rebecca S; Meagher, Richard B

    2005-06-01

    Cysteine sulfhydryl-rich peptide thiols are believed to play important roles in the detoxification of many heavy metals and metalloids such as arsenic, mercury, and cadmium in plants. The gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (gamma-ECS) catalyzes the synthesis of the dipeptidethiol gamma-glu-cys (gamma-EC), the first step in the biosynthesis of phytochelatins (PCs). Arabidopsis thaliana, engineered to express the bacterial gamma-ECS gene under control of a strong constitutive actin regulatory sequence (A2), expressed gamma-ECS at levels approaching 0.1% of total protein. In response to arsenic, mercury, and cadmium stresses, the levels of gamma-EC and its derivatives, glutathione (GSH) and PCs, were increased in the A2::ECS transgenic plants to three- to 20-fold higher concentrations than the increases that occurred in wild-type (WT). Compared to cadmium and mercury treatments, arsenic treatment most significantly increased levels of gamma-EC and PCs in both the A2::ECS transgenic and WT plants. The A2::ECS transgenic plants were highly resistant to arsenic and weakly resistant to mercury. Although exposure to cadmium produced three- to fivefold increases in levels of gamma-EC-related peptides in the A2::ECS lines, these plants were significantly more sensitive to Cd(II) than WT and trace levels of Cd(II) blocked resistance to arsenic and mercury. A few possible mechanisms for gamma-ECS-enhanced arsenic and mercury resistance and cadmium hypersensitivity are discussed.

  13. Isolation, structure and expression of mammalian genes for histidyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, F W; Siminovitch, L

    1987-01-01

    A full length cDNA clone that codes for human histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HRS) and cDNA clones that span the full length transcript of hamster HRS have been isolated. The full length human HRS cDNA was expressed after transfection into Cos 1 cells and a CHO ts mutant defective in the gene for HRS. The complete nucleotide sequence of the hamster and human gene were obtained and extensive homologies were observed in three regions on comparing these sequences between themselves and with the sequence of HRS derived from yeast. These results provide unequivocal evidence that we have indeed cloned the hamster and human gene for HRS. Three overlapping phage recombinants containing the complete hamster chromosomal gene for HRS have also been isolated. The genomic HRS is divided into 13 exons. The precise locations of each of the 5' and 3' exon-intron boundaries were defined by sequencing the appropriate regions of the cloned genomic DNA and aligning them with the sequence of HRS cDNAs. These studies provide the basis for future structural and functional analysis of the gene for HRS. In particular, it will be of interest to examine if different exons of HRS correlate to different domains of the HRS polypeptide. Images PMID:3554142

  14. Concentration-Dependent Processivity of Multiple Glutamate Ligations Catalyzed by Folylpoly-γ-glutamate Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Tomsho, John W.; Moran, Richard G.; Coward, James K.

    2010-01-01

    Folylpoly-γ-glutamate synthetase (FPGS, EC 6.3.2.17) is an ATP-dependent ligase that catalyzes formation of poly-γ-glutamate derivatives of reduced folates and anti-folates such as methotrexate and 5,10-dideaza-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate (DDAH4PteGlu1). While the chemical mechanism of the reaction catalyzed by FPGS is known, it is unknown whether single or multiple glutamate residues are added following each folate binding event. A very sensitive high performance liquid chromatography method has been used to analyze the multiple ligation reactions onto radiolabeled DDAH4PteGlu1 catalyzed by FPGS in order to distinguish between distributive or processive mechanisms of catalysis. Reaction time courses, substrate trapping, and pulse-chase experiments were used to measure folate release during multiple glutamate additions. Together, the results of these experiments indicate that hFPGS can catalyze the processive addition of approximately four glutamate residues onto DDAH4PteGlu1. The degree of processivity was determined to be dependent on the concentration of the folate substrate, thus suggesting a mechanism for the regulation of folate polyglutamate synthesis in cells. PMID:18672898

  15. Glutamine synthetase in the phloem plays a major role in controlling proline production

    PubMed Central

    Brugiere, N; Dubois, F; Limami, AM; Lelandais, M; Roux, Y; Sangwan, RS; Hirel, B

    1999-01-01

    To inhibit expression specifically in the phloem, a 274-bp fragment of a cDNA (Gln1-5) encoding cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GS1) from tobacco was placed in the antisense orientation downstream of the cytosolic Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase promoter of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. After Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, two transgenic N. tabacum lines exhibiting reduced levels of GS1 mRNA and GS activity in midribs, stems, and roots were obtained. Immunogold labeling experiments allowed us to verify that the GS protein content was markedly decreased in the phloem companion cells of transformed plants. Moreover, a general decrease in proline content in the transgenic plants in comparison with wild-type tobacco was observed when plants were forced to assimilate large amounts of ammonium. In contrast, no major changes in the concentration of amino acids used for nitrogen transport were apparent. A (15)NH(4)(+)-labeling kinetic over a 48-hr period confirmed that in leaves of transgenic plants, the decrease in proline production was directly related to glutamine availability. After 2 weeks of salt treatment, the transgenic plants had a pronounced stress phenotype, consisting of wilting and bleaching in the older leaves. We conclude that GS in the phloem plays a major role in regulating proline production consistent with the function of proline as a nitrogen source and as a key metabolite synthesized in response to water stress. PMID:10521528

  16. Regulation of Glutamate Dehydrogenase and Glutamine Synthetase in Avocado Fruit during Development and Ripening.

    PubMed Central

    Loulakakis, K. A.; Roubelakis-Angelakis, K. A.; Kanellis, A. K.

    1994-01-01

    The activity, protein, and isoenzymic profiles of glutamate de-hydrogenase (GDH) and glutamine synthetase (GS) were studied during development and ripening of avocado (Percea americana Mill. cv Hass) fruit. During fruit development, the activity and protein content of both GDH and GS remained relatively constant. In contrast, considerable changes in these enzymes were observed during ripening of avocado fruit. The specific activity of GDH increased about 4-fold, coincident with a similar increase in GDH protein content and mRNA levels. On the other hand, GS specific activity showed a decline at the end of the ripening process. On the isoenzymic profile of GDH, changes in the prevalence of the seven isoenzymes were found, with a predominance of the more cathodal isoenzymes in the unripe and of the most anodal isoenzymes in the ripe fruit. Two-dimensional electrophoresis revealed that avocado fruit GDH consists of two subunits whose association gives rise to seven isoenzymes. The results support the view that the predominance of the more anodal isoenzymes in the overripe fruit was due to the accumulation of the [alpha]-polypeptide. PMID:12232322

  17. Regulation of Glutamate Dehydrogenase and Glutamine Synthetase in Avocado Fruit during Development and Ripening.

    PubMed

    Loulakakis, K. A.; Roubelakis-Angelakis, K. A.; Kanellis, A. K.

    1994-09-01

    The activity, protein, and isoenzymic profiles of glutamate de-hydrogenase (GDH) and glutamine synthetase (GS) were studied during development and ripening of avocado (Percea americana Mill. cv Hass) fruit. During fruit development, the activity and protein content of both GDH and GS remained relatively constant. In contrast, considerable changes in these enzymes were observed during ripening of avocado fruit. The specific activity of GDH increased about 4-fold, coincident with a similar increase in GDH protein content and mRNA levels. On the other hand, GS specific activity showed a decline at the end of the ripening process. On the isoenzymic profile of GDH, changes in the prevalence of the seven isoenzymes were found, with a predominance of the more cathodal isoenzymes in the unripe and of the most anodal isoenzymes in the ripe fruit. Two-dimensional electrophoresis revealed that avocado fruit GDH consists of two subunits whose association gives rise to seven isoenzymes. The results support the view that the predominance of the more anodal isoenzymes in the overripe fruit was due to the accumulation of the [alpha]-polypeptide.

  18. Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma Parasites Are Inhibited by a Benzoxaborole Targeting Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase.

    PubMed

    Palencia, Andrés; Liu, Ru-Juan; Lukarska, Maria; Gut, Jiri; Bougdour, Alexandre; Touquet, Bastien; Wang, En-Duo; Li, Xianfeng; Alley, M R K; Freund, Yvonne R; Rosenthal, Philip J; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali; Cusack, Stephen

    2016-10-01

    The apicomplexan parasites Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma are serious threats to human health. Cryptosporidiosis is a severe diarrheal disease in malnourished children and immunocompromised individuals, with the only FDA-approved drug treatment currently being nitazoxanide. The existing therapies for toxoplasmosis, an important pathology in immunocompromised individuals and pregnant women, also have serious limitations. With the aim of developing alternative therapeutic options to address these health problems, we tested a number of benzoxaboroles, boron-containing compounds shown to be active against various infectious agents, for inhibition of the growth of Cryptosporidium parasites in mammalian cells. A 3-aminomethyl benzoxaborole, AN6426, with activity in the micromolar range and with activity comparable to that of nitazoxanide, was identified and further characterized using biophysical measurements of affinity and crystal structures of complexes with the editing domain of Cryptosporidium leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS). The same compound was shown to be active against Toxoplasma parasites, with the activity being enhanced in the presence of norvaline, an amino acid that can be mischarged by LeuRS. Our observations are consistent with AN6426 inhibiting protein synthesis in both Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma by forming a covalent adduct with tRNA(Leu) in the LeuRS editing active site and suggest that further exploitation of the benzoxaborole scaffold is a valid strategy to develop novel, much needed antiparasitic agents. PMID:27431220

  19. Structures of Two Distinct Conformations of holo-Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Eric J.; Miller, Bradley R.; Shi, Ce; Tarrasch, Jeffrey T.; Sundlov, Jesse A.; Allen, C. Leigh; Skiniotis, Georgios; Aldrich, Courtney C.; Gulick, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Many important natural products are produced by multidomain nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs)1–4. During synthesis, intermediates are covalently bound to integrated carrier domains and transported to neighboring catalytic domains in an assembly line fashion5. Understanding the structural basis for catalysis with NRPSs will facilitate bioengineering to create novel products. Here we describe the structures of two different holo-NRPSs modules, each revealing a distinct step in the catalytic cycle. One structure depicts the carrier domain cofactor bound to the peptide bond-forming condensation domain, whereas a second structure captures the installation of the amino acid onto the cofactor within the adenylation domain. These structures demonstrate that a conformational change within the adenylation domain guides transfer of intermediates between domains. Furthermore, one structure shows that the condensation and adenylation domains simultaneously adopt their catalytic conformations, increasing the overall efficiency in a revised structural cycle. These structures and single-particle electron microscopy analysis demonstrate a highly dynamic domain architecture and provide the foundation for understanding the structural mechanisms that could enable engineering novel NRPSs. PMID:26762461

  20. Comparative properties of glutamine synthetases I and II in Rhizobium and Agrobacterium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, R L; Keister, D L

    1980-01-01

    Some properties of glutamine synthetase I (GSI) and GSII are described for a fast-growing Rhizobium sp. (Rhizobium trifolii T1), a slow-growing Rhizobium sp. (Rhizobium japonicum USDA 83), and Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58. GSII of the fast-growing Rhizobium sp. and GSII of the Agrobacterium sp. were considerably more heat labile than GSII of the slow-growing Rhizobium sp. As previously shown in R. japonicum 61A76, GSI became adenylylated rapidly in all species tested in response to ammonium. GSII activity disappeared within one generation of growth in two of the strains, but the disappearance of GSII activity required two generations in another. Isoactivity points for transferase assay, which were derived from the pH curves of adenylylated GSI and deadenylylated GSI, were approximately pH 7.8 for both R. trifolii and A. tumefaciens. No isoactivity point was found for R. japonicum under the standard assay conditions used. When the feedback inhibitor glycine was used to inhibit differentially the adenylylated GSI and deadenylylated GSI of R. japonicum, an isoactivity point was observed at pH 7.3. Thus, the transferase activity of GSI could be determined independent of the state of adenylation. A survey of 23 strains of bacteria representing 11 genera indicated that only Rhizobium spp. and Agrobacterium spp. contained GSII. Thus, this enzyme appears to be unique for the Rhizobiaceae. PMID:6107288

  1. Broad-spectrum antiviral and cytocidal activity of cyclopentenylcytosine, a carbocyclic nucleoside targeted at CTP synthetase.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, E; Murase, J; Marquez, V E

    1991-06-15

    Cyclopentenylcytosine (Ce-Cyd) is a broad-spectrum antiviral agent active against DNA viruses [herpes (cytomegalo), pox (vaccinia)], (+)RNA viruses [picorna (polio, Coxsackie, rhino), toga (Sindbis, Semliki forest), corona], (-)RNA viruses [orthomyxo (influenza), paramyxo (parainfluenza, measles), arena (Junin, Tacaribe), rhabdo (vesicular stomatitis)] and (+/-)RNA viruses (reo). Ce-Cyd is a more potent antiviral agent than its saturated counterpart, cyclopentylcytosine (carbodine, C-Cyd). Ce-Cyd also has potent cytocidal activity against a number of tumor cell lines. The putative target enzyme for both the antiviral and antitumor action of Ce-Cyd is assumed to be the CTP synthetase that converts UTP to CTP. In keeping with this hypothesis was the finding that the antiviral and cytocidal effects of Ce-Cyd are readily reversed by Cyd and, to a lesser extent, Urd, but not by other nucleosides such as dThd or dCyd. In contrast, pyrazofurin and 6-azauridine, two nucleoside analogues that are assumed to interfere with OMP decarboxylase, another enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of pyrimidine ribonucleotides, potentiate the cytocidal activity of Ce-Cyd. Ce-Cyd should be further pursued, as such and in combination with OMP decarboxylase inhibitors, for its therapeutic potential in the treatment of both viral and neoplastic diseases. PMID:1710119

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase from E. Coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, V. I.; Abramchik, Yu. A.; Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes of the phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase family (PRPPS, EC 2.7.6.1) catalyze the formation of 5-phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (5-PRPP) from adenosine triphosphate and ribose 5-phosphate. 5-Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate is an important intermediate in the synthesis of purine, pyrimidine, and pyridine nucleotides, as well as of the amino acids histidine and tryptophan. The crystallization conditions for E. coli PRPPS were found by the vapor-diffusion technique and were optimized to apply the capillary counter-diffusion technique. The X-ray diffraction data set was collected from the crystals grown by the counter-diffusion technique using a synchrotron radiation source to 3.1-Å resolution. The crystals of PRPPS belong to sp. gr. P6322 and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = b = 104.44 Å, c = 124.98 Å, α = β = 90°, γ = 120°. The collected X-ray diffraction data set is suitable for the solution of the three-dimensional structure of PRPPS at 3.1-Å resolution.

  3. Detection of polyketide synthase and nonribosomal peptide synthetase biosynthetic genes from antimicrobial coral-associated actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Dong, Jun-De; Yang, Jian; Luo, Xiong-Ming; Zhang, Si

    2014-10-01

    The diversity and properties of actinobacteria, predominant residents in coral holobionts, have been rarely documented. In this study, we aimed to explore the species diversity, antimicrobial activities and biosynthetic potential of culturable actinomycetes within the tissues of the scleractinian corals Porites lutea, Galaxea fascicularis and Acropora millepora from the South China Sea. A total of 70 strains representing 13 families and 15 genera of actinobacteria were isolated. The antimicrobial activity and biosynthetic potential of fifteen representative filamentous actinomycetes were estimated. Crude fermentation extracts of 6 strains exhibited comparable or greater activities against Vibrio alginolyticus than ciprofloxacin. Seven of the 15 actinomycetes strains possess type I polyketide synthases (PKS-I) and/or nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) genes. Nine tested strains possess type II polyketide synthases (PKS-II). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that these PKS and NRPS gene screening positive strains belong to genera Nocardiopsis, Pseudonocardia, Streptomyces, Micromonospora, Amycolatopsis and Prauserella. One PKS-I and four NRPS fragments showed <70% similarity to their closest relatives, which suggested the novelty of these genes. This study helps uncover the genetic capacity of stony coral-associated actinomycetes to produce bioactive molecules.

  4. Novel nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) genes sequenced from intertidal mudflat bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tambadou, Fatoumata; Lanneluc, Isabelle; Sablé, Sophie; Klein, Géraldine L; Doghri, Ibtissem; Sopéna, Valérie; Didelot, Sandrine; Barthélémy, Cyrille; Thiéry, Valérie; Chevrot, Romain

    2014-08-01

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) are actively sought out, due to pharmacologically important activities of their metabolites. In marine environment, the most prevalent nonribosomal peptide antibiotic producers are sponges inhabiting microorganisms. Conversely, strains from marine sediments and more especially from intertidal mudflats have not been extensively screened for the presence of new NRPS. In this study, for the first time, a collection of one hundred intertidal mudflat bacterial isolates (Marennes-Oléron Bay, France) was assessed for (1) the presence of NRPS genes by degenerated PCR targeting conserved adenylation domains and (2) for their production of antimicrobial molecules. (1) Bacteria with adenylation domains (14 strains) were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and grouped into Firmicutes (one strain) and Proteobacteria (13 strains). In silico analysis of the NRPS amino acid sequences (n = 7) showed 41-58% ID with sequences found in the NCBI database. Three new putative adenylation domain signatures were found. (2) The culture supernatant of one of these strains, identified as a Bacillus, was shown to strongly inhibit the growth of Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, and Enterococcus faecalis. This study portends that the intertidal mudflat niche could be of interest for the discovery of new NRPS genes and antimicrobial producing strains. PMID:25039651

  5. Selective inhibition of apicoplast tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase causes delayed death in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Pasaje, Charisse Flerida A.; Cheung, Vanessa; Kennedy, Kit; Lim, Erin E.; Baell, Jonathan B.; Griffin, Michael D. W.; Ralph, Stuart A.

    2016-01-01

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum relies on efficient protein translation. An essential component of translation is the tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) that charges tRNAtrp. Here we characterise two isoforms of TrpRS in Plasmodium; one eukaryotic type localises to the cytosol and a bacterial type localises to the remnant plastid (apicoplast). We show that the apicoplast TrpRS aminoacylates bacterial tRNAtrp while the cytosolic TrpRS charges eukaryotic tRNAtrp. An inhibitor of bacterial TrpRSs, indolmycin, specifically inhibits aminoacylation by the apicoplast TrpRS in vitro, and inhibits ex vivo Plasmodium parasite growth, killing parasites with a delayed death effect characteristic of apicoplast inhibitors. Indolmycin treatment ablates apicoplast inheritance and is rescuable by addition of the apicoplast metabolite isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP). These data establish that inhibition of an apicoplast housekeeping enzyme leads to loss of the apicoplast and this is sufficient for delayed death. Apicoplast TrpRS is essential for protein translation and is a promising, specific antimalarial target. PMID:27277538

  6. Explorations of Catalytic Domains in Non-Ribosomal Peptide Synthetase Enzymology

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Gene H.; Vickery, Christopher R.; Burkart, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Many pharmaceuticals on the market today belong to a large class of natural products called nonribosomal peptides (NRPs). Originating from bacteria and fungi, these peptide-based natural products consist not only of the 20 canonical L-amino acids, but also non-proteinogenic amino acids, heterocyclic rings, sugars, and fatty acids, generating tremendous chemical diversity. As a result, these secondary metabolites exhibit a broad array of bioactivity ranging from antimicrobial to anticancer. The biosynthesis of these complex compounds is carried out by large multimodular megaenzymes called nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). Each module is responsible for incorporation of a monomeric unit into the natural product peptide and is composed of individual domains that perform different catalytic reactions. Biochemical and bioinformatic investigations of these enzymes have uncovered the key principles of NRP synthesis, expanding the pharmaceutical potential of their enzymatic processes. Progress has been made in the manipulation of this biosynthetic machinery to develop new chemoenzymatic approaches for synthesizing novel pharmaceutical agents with increased potency. This review focuses on the recent discoveries and breakthroughs in the structural elucidation, molecular mechanism, and chemical biology underlying the discrete domains within NRPSs. PMID:22802156

  7. Glutamine Synthetase activity fuels nucleotide biosynthesis and supports growth of glutamine-restricted glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Tardito, Saverio; Oudin, Anaïs; Ahmed, Shafiq U.; Fack, Fred; Keunen, Olivier; Zheng, Liang; Miletic, Hrvoje; Sakariassen, Per Øystein; Weinstock, Adam; Wagner, Allon; Lindsay, Susan L.; Hock, Andreas K.; Barnett, Susan C.; Ruppin, Eytan; Mørkve, Svein Harald; Lund-Johansen, Morten; Chalmers, Anthony J.; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Niclou, Simone P.; Gottlieb, Eyal

    2015-01-01

    L-Glutamine (Gln) functions physiologically to balance tissue requirements of carbon and nitrogen. It has been proposed that in cancer cells undergoing aerobic glycolysis, accelerated anabolism is sustained by Gln-derived carbons, which replenish the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (anaplerosis). However, it is shown here that in glioblastoma (GBM) cells, almost half of the Gln-derived glutamate (Glu) is secreted and does not enter the TCA cycle and, that inhibiting glutaminolysis does not affect proliferation. Moreover, Gln-starved cells are not rescued by TCA cycle replenishment. Instead, the conversion of Glu to Gln by Glutamine Synthetase (GS) (cataplerosis) confers Gln prototrophy, and fuels de novo purine biosynthesis. In both orthotopic GBM models and in patients, 13C-glucose tracing showed that GS produces Gln from TCA cycle-derived carbons. Finally, while it is contributed only marginally by the circulation, the Gln required for the growth of GBM tumours is either autonomously synthesized by GS-positive glioma cells, or supplied by astrocytes. PMID:26595383

  8. Sequence comparisons in the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases with emphasis on regions of likely homology with sequences in the Rossmann fold in the methionyl and tyrosyl enzymes.

    PubMed

    Walker, E J; Jeffrey, P D

    1988-02-01

    Amino acid sequences of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases specific for 12 different amino acids have now been published. Differences in origin at the species and organelle level result in 20 distinct sequences being available for comparison. Some of these were compared in small groups as they were determined and, although some homologies were detected, it was generally concluded that there was surprisingly little sequence homology in this functionally related group of enzymes. We have made comparisons of all of the available sequences by using a combination of computer and manual alignment methods and knowledge of the sequences in the Rossmann fold region of methionyl-tRNA synthetase from E. coli and tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase from B. stearothermophilus, enzymes whose three-dimensional structures have been described. It emerges that all of the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase sequences thus examined show considerable homology with each other over at least parts of this region, some over virtually all of it. We conclude that a great deal more similarity than had previously been suspected exists in these proteins. In particular, the alignments we have made strongly imply the existence of a mononucleotide binding site of the Rossmann fold configuration in all of the synthetases compared. PMID:3283733

  9. Determination of 2-5A synthetase and 2-5A phosphodiesterase in neuroblastoma cells by analytical capillary isotachophoresis: effects of cytokines and comparison with radioenzymatic methods.

    PubMed

    Bruchelt, G; Büdenbender, M; Schmidt, K H; Birk, A; Treuner, J; Niethammer, D

    1994-01-01

    2-5A Synthetase and 2-5A phosphodiesterase were determined by analytical capillary isotachophoresis in comparison to radioenzymatic methods. By means of isotachophoretic analysis, a frequently used radioenzymatic 2-5A synthetase assay was optimized and the results of both assays were compared. Using the isotachophoretic assay the influence of interferon-related cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-2) on 2-5A synthetase induction in neuroblastoma cells was estimated. In contrast to mononuclear blood cells, the tumor necrosis factor induced 2-5A synthetase in these cells. 2-5A Phosphodiesterase was determined using an isotachophoretic assay and a radioenzymatic method. Degradation of A2'p5'A2'p5'A (trimeric form of 2-5A core) was measured by isotachophoresis whereas degradation of a mixture of phosphorus-32 labeled 2-5A cores was registered by radioenzymatic assay. Activity of 2-5A phosphodiesterase was only insignificantly enhanced by interferon in mononuclear blood and neuroblastoma cells. In contrast to the radioenzymatic assays, an accurate determination of 2-5A synthetase as well as of 2-5A phosphodiesterase is possible using the isotachophoretic method because the reactions are followed by measuring the substrates ATP and A2'p5'A2'p5'A, respectively.

  10. Role of calcium as an inhibitor of rat liver carbamylphosphate synthetase I.

    PubMed

    Cerdan, S; Lusty, C J; Davis, K N; Jacobsohn, J A; Williamson, J R

    1984-01-10

    The mechanism of Ca2+ inhibition of carbamylphosphate synthetase I has been investigated using purified enzyme obtained from livers of rats fed a high protein diet. Binding of Mn2+ to the enzyme was measured by EPR techniques at pH 7.8, and Scatchard plots of the data indicated one Mn2+-binding site with a K'd of 13 microM. From competition studies between Mn2+ and Ca2+ or Mg2+ binding, values of 180 microM were obtained for K'd (Mg) and 193 microM for K'd (Ca). A nonlinear least squares curve fitting program was used to calculate the K'm for MgATP2- at the metal-nucleotide binding sites using a simplified rate equation of the enzyme reaction mechanism. Values of 140 and 2420 microM were obtained for K'm (MgATP) at the first and second sites, respectively, at pH 7.8, with a free Mg2+ of 1 mM and other substrates and activators present at saturating concentrations. Variations of the bicarbonate, N-acetylglutamate, and ammonia concentrations in the absence and presence of different amounts of total calcium, from which free Ca2+, free Mg2+, MgATP2-, and CaATP2- concentrations were calculated, permitted values for K'i (CaATP) to be obtained by graphic procedures. Mean values of 375 and 120 microM were obtained for K'i (CaATP) at the first and second sites, respectively. Using the above kinetic constants, a computer model of the enzyme reaction was constructed and tested using two further sets of kinetic data obtained by varying the concentrations of Mg2+, Ca2+, MgATP2-, and CaATP2-. Poor fits were obtained unless the formation of a mixed complex involving CaATP2- competition with MgATP2- at the second metal-nucleotide-binding site was incorporated into the rate equation. Nonlinear least squares curve fitting of both sets of experimental data gave a well determined value of 124 microM for this final CaATP2- inhibitory constant. Sensitivity tests for variation of the primary kinetic constants with the computer model showed that the inhibitory effect of free Ca2+ was weak

  11. Dissecting the Binding between Glutamine Synthetase and Its Two Natively Unfolded Protein Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pantoja-Uceda, David; Neira, José L; Saelices, Lorena; Robles-Rengel, Rocío; Florencio, Francisco J; Muro-Pastor, M Isabel; Santoro, Jorge

    2016-06-21

    Ammonium is incorporated into carbon skeletons by the sequential action of glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT) in cyanobacteria. The activity of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 GS type I is controlled by protein-protein interactions with two intrinsically disordered inactivating factors (IFs): the 65-residue (IF7) and the 149-residue one (IF17). In this work, we studied both IF7 and IF17 by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and we described their binding to GS by using NMR and biolayer interferometry. We assigned the backbone nuclei of all residues of IF7. Analyses of chemical shifts and the (15)N-{(1)H} NOEs at two field strengths suggest that IF7 region Thr3-Arg13 and a few residues around Ser27 and Phe41 populated helical conformations (although the percentage is smaller around Phe41). The two-dimensional (1)H-(15)N HSQC and CON experiments suggest that IF17 populated several conformations. We followed the binding between GS and IF7 by NMR at physiological pH, and the residues interacting first with IF7 were Gln6 and Ser27, belonging to those regions that appeared to be ordered in the isolated protein. We also determined the kon values and koff values for the binding of both IF7 and IF17 to GS, where the GS protein was bound to a biosensor. The measurements of the kinetic constants for the binding of IF7 to GS suggest that: (i) binding does not follow a kinetic two-state model ([Formula: see text]), (ii) there is a strong electrostatic component in the determined kon, and (iii) the binding is not diffusion-limited. PMID:27232663

  12. Investigating arsenic susceptibility from a genetic perspective in Drosophila reveals a key role for glutathione synthetase.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Jorge G Muñiz; Opoka, Robert; Kane, Daniel; Cartwright, Iain L

    2009-02-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic-contaminated drinking water can lead to a variety of serious pathological outcomes. However, differential responsiveness within human populations suggests that interindividual genetic variation plays an important role. We are using Drosophila to study toxic metal response pathways because of unrivalled access to varied genetic approaches and significant demonstrable overlap with many aspects of mammalian physiology and disease phenotypes. Genetic analysis (via chromosomal segregation and microsatellite marker-based recombination) of various wild-type strains exhibiting relative susceptibility or tolerance to the lethal toxic effects of arsenite identified a limited X-chromosomal region (16D-F) able to confer a differential response phenotype. Using an FRT-based recombination approach, we created lines harboring small, overlapping deficiencies within this region and found that relative arsenite sensitivity arose when the dose of the glutathione synthetase (GS) gene (located at 16F1) was reduced by half. Knockdown of GS expression by RNA interference (RNAi) in cultured S2 cells led to enhanced arsenite sensitivity, while GS RNAi applied to intact organisms dramatically reduced the concentration of food-borne arsenite compatible with successful growth and development. Our analyses, initially guided by observations on naturally occurring variants, provide genetic proof that an optimally functioning two-step glutathione (GSH) biosynthetic pathway is required in vivo for a robust defense against arsenite; the enzymatic implications of this are discussed in the context of GSH supply and demand under arsenite-induced stress. Given an identical pathway for human GSH biosynthesis, we suggest that polymorphisms in GSH biosynthetic genes may be an important contributor to differential arsenic sensitivity and exposure risk in human populations.

  13. Substrate specificity of mammalian folylpolyglutamate synthetase for 5,10-dideazatetrahydrofolate analogs.

    PubMed

    Habeck, L L; Mendelsohn, L G; Shih, C; Taylor, E C; Colman, P D; Gossett, L S; Leitner, T A; Schultz, R M; Andis, S L; Moran, R G

    1995-08-01

    The metabolism of 5,10-dideazatetrahydrofolate (DDATHF [lometrexol]) to polyglutamate derivatives by folylpoly-gamma-glutamate synthetase (FPGS) plays a central role in the activity of this compound as an antineoplastic agent. The availability of a series of DDATHF derivatives differing in structure throughout the molecule has allowed a study of the structural requirements for substrate activity with mouse liver and hog liver FPGS. Kinetics of the polyglutamation reaction in vitro have been related to the potency of these compounds as inhibitors of the growth of human CEM leukemic cells. The structure-activity relationships for enzyme from both sources were nearly identical. FPGS from both species showed a broad acceptance for structural changes in the pyridopyrimidine ring, in the phenyl group, and in the intermediate bridge region, with structural changes in these regions being reflected in changes in Km for FPGS but much more modest alterations in Vmax. The data suggested that the phenyl ring was not contributing to any pi-pi hydrophobic interactions. It appeared to function primarily in maintaining a favorable distance between the pyridopyrimidine ring and the glutamate side chain. The lowest Km values were found for DDATHF analogs in which there were small alterations at the 10 position, e.g., 5-deazatetrahydrofolate, 10-methyl-DDATHF, and 10-formyl-5-deazatetrahydrofolate; the first-order rate constants for these substrates were the highest in this series, an indication of the efficiency of polyglutamation at low substrate concentrations. After correction for the intrinsic inhibitory activity of the parent DDATHF analog as an inhibitor of the target enzyme, the first-order rate constants for FPGS were found to be predictive of the potency of tumor cell growth inhibition for most of the compounds in this structural series.

  14. Enzymatically active 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetases are widely distributed among Metazoa, including protostome lineage.

    PubMed

    Päri, Mailis; Kuusksalu, Anne; Lopp, Annika; Kjaer, Karina Hansen; Justesen, Just; Kelve, Merike

    2014-02-01

    2',5'-Oligoadenylate synthetases (OASs) belong to the nucleotidyl transferase family together with poly(A) polymerases, CCA-adding enzymes and the recently discovered cyclic-GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS). Mammalian OASs have been thoroughly characterized as components of the interferon-induced antiviral system. The OAS activity and the respective genes were also discovered in marine sponges where the interferon system is absent. In this study the recombinant OASs from several multicellular animals and their closest unicellular relative, a choanoflagellate, were expressed in a bacterial expression system and their enzymatic activities were examined. We demonstrated 2-5A synthesizing activities of OASs from the marine sponge Tedania ignis, a representative of the phylogenetically oldest metazoan phylum (Porifera), from an invertebrate of the protostome lineage, the mollusk Mytilus californianus (Mollusca), and from a vertebrate species, a cartilaginous fish Leucoraja erinacea (Chordata). However, the expressed proteins from an amphibian, the salamander Ambystoma mexicanum (Chordata), and from a protozoan, the marine choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis (Choanozoa), did not show 2-5A synthesizing activity. Differently from other studied OASs, OAS from the marine sponge T. ignis was able to catalyze the formation of oligomers having both 2',5'- and 3',5'-phosphodiester linkages. Our data suggest that OASs from sponges and evolutionarily higher animals have similar activation mechanisms which still include different affinities and possibly different structural requirements for the activating RNAs. Considering their 2'- and 3'-specificities, sponge OASs could represent a link between evolutionarily earlier nucleotidyl transferases and 2'-specific OASs from higher animals.

  15. The Roles of Compensatory Evolution and Constraint in Aminoacyl tRNA Synthetase Evolution.

    PubMed

    Adrion, Jeffrey R; White, P Signe; Montooth, Kristi L

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial protein translation requires interactions between transfer RNAs encoded by the mitochondrial genome (mt-tRNAs) and mitochondrial aminoacyl tRNA synthetase proteins (mt-aaRS) encoded by the nuclear genome. It has been argued that animal mt-tRNAs have higher deleterious substitution rates relative to their nuclear-encoded counterparts, the cytoplasmic tRNAs (cyt-tRNAs). This dynamic predicts elevated rates of compensatory evolution of mt-aaRS that interact with mt-tRNAs, relative to aaRS that interact with cyt-tRNAs (cyt-aaRS). We find that mt-aaRS do evolve at significantly higher rates (exemplified by higher dN and dN/dS) relative to cyt-aaRS, across mammals, birds, and Drosophila. While this pattern supports a model of compensatory evolution, the level at which a gene is expressed is a more general predictor of protein evolutionary rate. We find that gene expression level explains 10-56% of the variance in aaRS dN/dS, and that cyt-aaRS are more highly expressed in addition to having lower dN/dS values relative to mt-aaRS, consistent with more highly expressed genes being more evolutionarily constrained. Furthermore, we find no evidence of positive selection acting on either class of aaRS protein, as would be expected under a model of compensatory evolution. Nevertheless, the signature of faster mt-aaRS evolution persists in mammalian, but not bird or Drosophila, lineages after controlling for gene expression, suggesting some additional effect of compensatory evolution for mammalian mt-aaRS. We conclude that gene expression is the strongest factor governing differential amino acid substitution rates in proteins interacting with mitochondrial versus cytoplasmic factors, with important differences in mt-aaRS molecular evolution among taxonomic groups.

  16. N114S mutation causes loss of ATP-induced aggregation of human phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Honglin; Peng, Xiaohui; Zhao Fang; Zhang Guobin; Tao Ye; Luo Zhaofeng; Li Yang; Teng Maikun; Li Xu Wei Shiqiang

    2009-02-20

    This study examined recombinant wild-type human phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase 1 (wt-PRS1, EC 2.7.6.1) and the point mutant Asn114Ser PRS1 (N114S-Mutant) in cells of a patient with primary gout. Dynamic light-scattering and sedimentation velocity experiments indicated that the monomeric wt-PRS1 in solution was assembled into hexamers after adding the substrate ATP. However, this ATP-induced aggregation effect was not observed with N114S-Mutant, which has a 50% higher enzymatic activity than that of wt-PRS1. Synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed that the point mutation causes an increase of {alpha}-helix content and a decrease of turn content. Examination of the crystal structure of wt-PRS1 indicated that 12 hydrogen bonds formed by 6 pairs of N114 and D139 have an important role in stabilizing the hexamer. We suggest that the substitution of S114 for N114 in N114S-Mutant leads to the rupture of 12 hydrogen bonds and breakage of the PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} allosteric site where PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} functions as a fixer of the ATP-binding loop. Therefore, we consider that formation of the hexamer as the structural basis of the ADP allosteric inhibition is greatly weakened by the N114S mutation, and that alteration of the ATP-binding loop conformation is the key factor in the increased activity of N114S-Mutant. These two factors could be responsible for the high level of activity of N114S-Mutant in this patient.

  17. The role of Drosophila cytidine monophosphate-sialic acid synthetase in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Islam, Rafique; Nakamura, Michiko; Scott, Hilary; Repnikova, Elena; Carnahan, Mindy; Pandey, Dheeraj; Caster, Courtney; Khan, Saba; Zimmermann, Tina; Zoran, Mark J; Panin, Vladislav M

    2013-07-24

    While sialylation plays important functions in the nervous system, the complexity of glycosylation pathways and limitations of genetic approaches preclude the efficient analysis of these functions in mammalian organisms. Drosophila has recently emerged as a promising model for studying neural sialylation. Drosophila sialyltransferase, DSiaT, was shown to be involved in the regulation of neural transmission. However, the sialylation pathway was not investigated in Drosophila beyond the DSiaT-mediated step. Here we focused on the function of Drosophila cytidine monophosphate-sialic acid synthetase (CSAS), the enzyme providing a sugar donor for DSiaT. Our results revealed that the expression of CSAS is tightly regulated and restricted to the CNS throughout development and in adult flies. We generated CSAS mutants and analyzed their phenotypes using behavioral and physiological approaches. Our experiments demonstrated that mutant phenotypes of CSAS are similar to those of DSiaT, including decreased longevity, temperature-induced paralysis, locomotor abnormalities, and defects of neural transmission at neuromuscular junctions. Genetic interactions between CSAS, DSiaT, and voltage-gated channel genes paralytic and seizure were consistent with the hypothesis that CSAS and DSiaT function within the same pathway regulating neural excitability. Intriguingly, these interactions also suggested that CSAS and DSiaT have some additional, independent functions. Moreover, unlike its mammalian counterparts that work in the nucleus, Drosophila CSAS was found to be a glycoprotein-bearing N-glycans and predominantly localized in vivo to the Golgi compartment. Our work provides the first systematic analysis of in vivo functions of a eukaryotic CSAS gene and sheds light on evolutionary relationships among metazoan CSAS proteins.

  18. The molecular weight and thiol residues of acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase from ox heart mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Londesborough, John C.; Yuan, Sung Ling; Webster, Leslie T.

    1973-01-01

    1. A constant molecular weight of 57000 was obtained by gel filtration of highly purified acetyl-CoA synthetase over a 1000-fold range of enzyme concentrations. The amino acid analysis is reported. 2. With native enzyme at 20°C the relatively rapid reaction of four thiol residues with p-hydroxymercuribenzoate caused an immediate inhibition reversible by either CoA or mercaptoethanol. Other substrates did not protect against this rapid inhibition. 3. The much slower reaction of the remaining four thiol residues was independent of the concentration of the mercurial, first-order with respect to enzyme, and had a large energy of activation (+136kJ/mol), suggesting that a conformation change in the protein was rate-limiting. This slow phase of the reaction was accompanied by an irreversible inactivation of the enzyme. 4. The effects of substrates on this irreversible inactivation at pH7.0 in 5 mm-MgCl2 indicated strong binding of ATP and pyrophosphate by the enzyme (concentrations for half-maximal effects, K½, were <30μm and <10μm respectively) and weaker binding of acetyl-CoA (K½ about 1 mm), AMP (K½ about 2mm) and acetate. In the presence of acetate, MgCl2 and p-hydroxymercuribenzoate, titration of the enzyme with ATP revealed at least two ATP binding sites/mol. 5. The experiments suggest that reaction of the thiol residues with mercurial causes loss of enzymic activity by altering the structure of the enzyme, rather than that the thiol residues play a direct role in the catalysis. PMID:4737256

  19. Allosteric effects of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase from Escherichia coli are entropy-driven.

    PubMed

    Braxton, B L; Mullins, L S; Raushel, F M; Reinhart, G D

    1996-09-10

    When catalyzing the formation of MgATP and carbamate from MgADP and carbamoyl phosphate, Escherichia coli carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS) binds MgADP with a large negative change in heat capacity. The magnitude of this heat capacity change is not appreciably altered by the presence of a saturating concentration of either the allosteric activator ornithine or the inhibitor UMP despite the substantial and opposing effects these ligands have on the binding affinity for MgADP. By contrast, no detectable change in heat capacity is associated with the thermodynamic coupling between MgADP and either ornithine or UMP. The sign of the apparently constant enthalpic and entropic contributions to the coupling free energy for each of these ligands is opposite that of the coupling free energy, indicating that the observed allosteric phenomenology is in net opposed by the enthalpy of the interaction and instead arises from a change in entropy of the system. IMP produces only a very small allosteric effect as indicated by a near-zero value for the MgADP-IMP coupling free energy. However, the enthalpic and entropic contributions are individually larger in absolute value for the IMP coupling than for those pertaining to the other allosteric ligands, and entropy dominates the coupling free energy above 36 degrees C, causing IMP to become an activator at high temperature. In addition, the sign of the coupling enthalpy and entropy for IMP has the same sign as the coupling enthalpy and entropy produced by ornithine, suggesting that IMP and ornithine may similarly influence the enzyme at a molecular level despite binding to different allosteric sites on the enzyme. The data are consistent with a model in which the actions of the allosteric ligands arise primarily from changes in the conformational degeneracy introduced by each ligand. With this model, one can also rationalize the failure of these allosteric ligands to substantially influence kcat. PMID:8794775

  20. Mapping the structural domains of E. coli carbamoyl phosphate synthetase using limited proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Mareya, S M; Raushel, F M

    1995-05-01

    The structural and functional domains of Escherichia coli carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS) have been identified by limited proteolysis. Incubation of CPS with several proteases, including trypsin, chymotrypsin, subtilisin and endoproteinase Asp-N, under native conditions, causes a time-dependent loss of enzymatic activity and the generation of a common fragmentation pattern. Amino-terminal sequencing studies demonstrated that the initial cleavage event by trypsin occurred at the carboxy-terminal end of the large subunit. The ultimate fragments produced in most of the proteolysis studies, 35- and 45-kDa peptides, were derived from areas corresponding to the putative ATP binding regions. Substrate protection studies showed that the addition of ligands did not affect the final fragmentation pattern of the protein. However, ornithine and UMP were found to significantly reduce the rate of inactivation by inhibition of proteolytic cleavage. MgATP and IMP provided modest protection whereas bicarbonate and glutamine showed no overall effect on proteolysis. Limited proteolysis by endoproteinase Asp-N resulted in the production of a fragment (or multiple fragments) which contained enzymatic activity but had lost all regulation by the allosteric ligands, UMP and ornithine. The small subunit has been shown to be protected from proteolysis by the large subunit. Proteolysis of the isolated small subunit resulted in the generation of a stable 31-kDa species which contained 10% of the original glutaminase activity. These studies demonstrate that a portion of the C-terminal end of the large subunit can be excised without entirely destroying the ability of CPS to catalyze the formation of carbamoyl phosphate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7648201