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Sample records for alara center alara

  1. BNL ALARA Center: ALARA Notes, No. 9

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, T.A.; Xie, J.W.; Beckman, M.C.

    1994-02-01

    This issue of the Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Alara Notes includes the agenda for the Third International Workshop on ALARA and specific instructions on the use of the on-line fax-on-demand service provided by BNL. Other topics included in this issue are: (1) A discussion of low-level discharges from Canadian nuclear plants, (2) Safety issues at French nuclear plants, (3) Acoustic emission as a means of leak detection, (4) Replacement of steam generators at Doel-3, Beaznau, and North Anna-1, (5) Remote handling equipment at Bruce, (6) EPRI`s low level waste program, (7) Radiation protection during concrete repairs at Savannah River, (8) Reactor vessel stud removal/repair at Comanche Peak-1, (9) Rework of reactor coolant pump motors, (10) Restoration of service water at North Anna-1 and -2, (11) Steam generator tubing problems at Mihama-1, (12) Full system decontamination at Indian Point-2, (13) Chemical decontamination at Browns Ferry-2, and (14) Inspection methodolody in France and Japan.

  2. ALARA Center of Technology -- resource guide

    SciTech Connect

    Waggoner, L.O.

    1998-02-05

    The purpose is to provide a source of information that can be used to assist personnel in the planning, training, and execution of radiological work using the principles of ALARA. This document is not intended to replace HNF or WHC Control Manual requirements. The ALARA Tools-List provides detailed information on the use and procurement of engineered controls, mockup training guidelines, and good radiological work practices that have been proven to be ALARA.

  3. The alara center and its information service--ACE

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.

    1991-08-01

    In compliance with its congressional mandate to oversee the radiation safety of workers at nuclear power plants, the NRC asked Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to create a center to help monitor efforts that were likely to reduce occupational radiation exposure. The NRC project required the ALARA Center to evaluate dose-reduction research and the ALARA-related programs, and to note any areas where additional effort may be fruitful. The Center also was directed to inform the NRC on promising research and developments related to ALARA that were being carried out abroad, and to examine areas where international collaboration may be valuable. This document discusses the objectives of the ALARA Center.

  4. Fluor Hanford ALARA Center is a D and D Resource

    SciTech Connect

    Waggoner, L.O.

    2008-01-15

    The mission at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation changed when the last reactor plant was shut down in 1989 and work was started to place all the facilities in a safe condition and begin decontamination, deactivation, decommissioning, and demolition (D and D). These facilities consisted of old shutdown reactor plants, spent fuel pools, processing facilities, and 177 underground tanks containing 53 million gallons of highly radioactive and toxic liquids and sludge. New skills were needed by the workforce to accomplish this mission. By 1995, workers were in the process of getting the facilities in a safe condition and it became obvious improvements were needed in their tools, equipment and work practices. The Hanford ALARA Program looked good on paper, but did little to help contractors that were working in the field. The Radiological Control Director decided that the ALARA program needed to be upgraded and a significant improvement could be made if workers had a place they could visit that had samples of the latest technology and could talk to experienced personnel who have had success doing D and D work. Two senior health physics personnel who had many years experience in doing radiological work were chosen to obtain tools and equipment from vendors and find a location centrally located on the Hanford site. Vendors were asked to loan their latest tools and equipment for display. Most vendors responded and the Hanford ALARA Center of Technology opened on October 1, 1996. Today, the ALARA Center includes a classroom for conducting training and a mockup area with gloveboxes. Two large rooms have a containment tent, several glove bags, samples of fixatives/expandable foam, coating displays, protective clothing, heat stress technology, cutting tools, HEPA filtered vacuums, ventilation units, pumps, hydraulic wrenches, communications equipment, shears, nibblers, shrouded tooling, and several examples of innovative tools developed by the Hanford facilities. See Figures I and

  5. ALARA development in Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, M.A.M.

    1995-03-01

    Even though the ALARA philosophy was formally implemented in the early 1980`s, to some extent, ALARA considerations already had been incorporated into the design of most commercial equipment and facilities based on experience and engineering development. In Mexico, the design of medical and industrial facilities were based on international recommendations containing those considerations. With the construction of Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Station, formal ALARA groups were created to review some parts of its design, and to prepare the ALARA Program and related procedures necessary for its commercial operation. This paper begins with a brief historical description of ALARA development in Mexico, and then goes on to discuss our regulatory frame in Radiation Protection, some aspects of the ALARA Program, efforts in controlling and reducing of sources of radiation, and finally, future perspectives in the ALARA field.

  6. The program of the ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    In 1984 the Brookhaven National Laboratory was asked by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to set up a Center to monitor dose-reduction efforts in the US and abroad and to focus the industry's attention on ALARA. The paper summarizes the main work of the ALARA Center between 1984 and 1992. The Center maintains nine data bases for the NRC and the Nuclear Power Industry. These databases are constantly updated and access to them is provided through a personal computer and a modem and by periodic publications in the form of a newsletter and NUREG reports. Also described briefly are eight other projects related to dose-reduction at nuclear power plants that the Center has carried out for the NRC. Among these are projects that analyze the cost-effectiveness of engineering modifications, look at worldwide activities at dose reduction and compare US and foreign dose experience, examine high-dose worker groups and high-dose jobs, develop optimum techniques to control contamination at nuclear plants, and look at the doses being received by men and women in all sectors of the nuclear industry.

  7. The program of the ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.

    1993-04-01

    In 1984 the Brookhaven National Laboratory was asked by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to set up a Center to monitor dose-reduction efforts in the US and abroad and to focus the industry`s attention on ALARA. The paper summarizes the main work of the ALARA Center between 1984 and 1992. The Center maintains nine data bases for the NRC and the Nuclear Power Industry. These databases are constantly updated and access to them is provided through a personal computer and a modem and by periodic publications in the form of a newsletter and NUREG reports. Also described briefly are eight other projects related to dose-reduction at nuclear power plants that the Center has carried out for the NRC. Among these are projects that analyze the cost-effectiveness of engineering modifications, look at worldwide activities at dose reduction and compare US and foreign dose experience, examine high-dose worker groups and high-dose jobs, develop optimum techniques to control contamination at nuclear plants, and look at the doses being received by men and women in all sectors of the nuclear industry.

  8. Practical and effective ALARA.

    PubMed

    Bevelacqua, Joseph John

    2010-05-01

    The ALARA Principle ensures that the total effective dose equivalent is minimized subject to economic and social factors. Effective ALARA programs must include the participation of all facility workgroups, management support, teamwork, and strong leadership. The development and sustainability of effective ALARA programs require the establishment and monitoring of goals, rewarding the successful achievement of those goals, and incorporating lessons learned from tasks that fail to meet their goals.

  9. ALARA: Progress and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper has two main topics. The first part describes the establishment and work of the ALARA Center; the second part presents some results of studies at the Center with international data on doses at PWR plants. This data then is used to reach a preliminary understanding of some of the factors that are causing high doses at PWRs. This approach should help in reducing occupational exposures in a more effective manner.

  10. Fluor hanford ALARA center -showcases- tools, equipment, and work practices used during D and D work

    SciTech Connect

    Waggoner, L.O.

    2007-07-01

    In 1996, Fluor established the ALARA Center at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State to 'showcase' tools and equipment used to support the principle of As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). Much of the work was being done by workers who used hand tools while dressed in multiple sets of protective clothing. The Center was opened so that workers could see and handle the latest tools and equipment and have experienced personnel to help them plan work evolutions. Experienced personnel who were familiar with the ALARA concept as well as new technology were assigned to the Center. In addition, vendors were asked to display their products so the Hanford workers could experience state-of-the-art tools and equipment for doing work in a radiological environment. Since opening, the ALARA Center has evolved into a tremendous resource - not only for Hanford, but also most of the entire DOE Complex, as well as contractors around the world. Classes in fundamental radiological work practices are presented when the facilities recognize a need. The ALARA Center has a variety of products that range from simple hand tools to robots, video scopes, and gamma cameras. The tools and equipment on display are used in these training classes to train the workers on the work practices to operate them, take them apart to determine how they work and decide how to maintain them. Many facilities invite the ALARA Center staff to attend planning meetings at the facilities and participate in job walk-downs. Generally, ALARA Center personnel provide several options on how the radiological work can be accomplished safely and recommend the option that is ALARA and safest for the workers. A few years ago, it became obvious that the work scope was changing and many facilities had a new job to clean out the facilities and demolish them. The ALARA Center began contacting vendors who had tools and equipment that could be used for D and D work. Today, the ALARA

  11. What is ALARA

    SciTech Connect

    Auxier, J.A.; Dickson, H.W.

    1981-01-01

    The as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) philosophy as it applies to personnel radiation exposure has been with us for a long time. The essential tenets of this philosophy surfaced quite early in the history of the Manhattan Project. Although the terminology has suffered through various translations and the application has seen many organizations and agencies come and go, the principles remain as valid today as ever. It is regretable that some regulatory agencies claim ALARA as their newfound miracle drug and that application according to their prescriptions will result in endless rounds of cyclical improvement in radiation protection practices. Others have taken advantage of the popularity of ALARA and have bastardized the philosophy to mean whatever is expedient for their purposes. In this paper, we review briefly the history of ALARA and what it seemingly means to different interest groups and offer a balanced viewpoint that health physicists should adopt.

  12. Applied ALARA techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Waggoner, L.O.

    1998-02-05

    The presentation focuses on some of the time-proven and new technologies being used to accomplish radiological work. These techniques can be applied at nuclear facilities to reduce radiation doses and protect the environment. The last reactor plants and processing facilities were shutdown and Hanford was given a new mission to put the facilities in a safe condition, decontaminate, and prepare them for decommissioning. The skills that were necessary to operate these facilities were different than the skills needed today to clean up Hanford. Workers were not familiar with many of the tools, equipment, and materials needed to accomplish:the new mission, which includes clean up of contaminated areas in and around all the facilities, recovery of reactor fuel from spent fuel pools, and the removal of millions of gallons of highly radioactive waste from 177 underground tanks. In addition, this work has to be done with a reduced number of workers and a smaller budget. At Hanford, facilities contain a myriad of radioactive isotopes that are 2048 located inside plant systems, underground tanks, and the soil. As cleanup work at Hanford began, it became obvious early that in order to get workers to apply ALARA and use hew tools and equipment to accomplish the radiological work it was necessary to plan the work in advance and get radiological control and/or ALARA committee personnel involved early in the planning process. Emphasis was placed on applying,ALARA techniques to reduce dose, limit contamination spread and minimize the amount of radioactive waste generated. Progress on the cleanup has,b6en steady and Hanford workers have learned to use different types of engineered controls and ALARA techniques to perform radiological work. The purpose of this presentation is to share the lessons learned on how Hanford is accomplishing radiological work.

  13. ALARA training at DOE contractor facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Neeser, J.L.

    1992-05-22

    ALARA training is an important element of a sound ALARA program. ALARA training at a nuclear facility needs to be conducted for all occupational workers, for radiation workers, for radiation protection technicians, and for all other employees who have ALARA responsibilities. Each of these groups needs to receive ALARA training specific to their responsibilities. This report describes how to develop this training. It also outlines what should be included in an acceptable ALARA training program.

  14. Innovative ALARA Techniques Used at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2002-02-08

    An ALARA Center of Technology was established at Hanford to show workers the latest tools, equipment, and work practices used in the industry in an effort to improve how radiological work gets accomplished using better engineered controls.

  15. Chernobyl Deconstruction ALARA Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shipler, Dillard B.; Batiy, Valeriy; Povlovsky, Leonid; Schmidt, John P.; Schmieman, Eric A.

    2004-03-24

    The Bechtel/EDF/Battelle Consortium has recently completed the conceptual design for the Chernobyl New Safe Confinement (NSC). Battelle has the scope of work related to environment and safety of the design. As part of the safety analysis, an ALARA analysis was performed for deconstruction of the major, unstable elements of the Shelter Object over the destroyed Unit 4 of the reactor complex. The major elements addressed in the analysis included the current roof sections and the major beams supporting the roof sections. The analysis was based on the existing configuration of the Shelter Object, the developing conceptual design of the NSC arch structure, the developing conceptual design of the facilities within and associated with the NSC (including handling and processing of deconstructed elements, and waste management), and existing Ukranian regulations and working processes and procedures. KSK (a Ukranian Consortium) is a subcontractor to the Bechtel/EDF/Battelle Consortium and performed much of the dose analysis. The analysis concluded that ALARA could be achieved with appropriate implementation of existing Ukrainian regulations and procedures, and developing conceptual design criteria and features.

  16. Project W-320 ALARA Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Harty, W.M.

    1995-06-06

    This supporting document establishes the As Low As Reasonable Achievable (ALARA) Plan to be followed during Sluicing Project W-320 design and construction activities to minimize personnel exposure to radiation and hazardous materials.

  17. ALARA in European nuclear installations

    SciTech Connect

    Lefaure, C.; Croft, J.; Pfeffer, W.; Zeevaert, T.

    1995-03-01

    For over a decade the Commission of the European Community has sponsored research projects on the development and practical implementation of the Optimization principle, or as it is often referred to, ALARA. These projects have given rise to a series of successful international Optimization training courses and have provided a significant input to the periodic European Seminars on Optimization, the last one of which took place in April 1993. This paper reviews the approaches to Optimization that have development within Europe and describes the areas of work in the current project. The on-going CEC research project addresses the problem of ALARA and internal exposures, and tries to define procedures for ALARA implementation, taking account of the perception of the hazard as well as the levels of probability of exposure. The relationships between ALARA and work management, and ALARA and decommissioning of installations appear to be other fruitful research areas. Finally, this paper introduces some software for using ALARA decision aiding techniques and databases containing feed back experience developed in Europe.

  18. ALARA Center of Technology promotes good radiological work practices at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Waggoner, L.O., Westinghouse Hanford, Richland, WA

    1997-10-31

    The central Radiological Control Organization, originally under the previous Management and Operations contractor (Westinghouse Hanford Company) decided that a significant improvement in ALARA implementation would result if examples of engineered controls used for radiological work were assembled in one location to provide a ``showcase`` for workers and managers. The facility would be named the ALARA Center of Technology (ACT) and would include the latest technologies used to accomplish radiological work, as well as proven techniques, tools, and equipment. A location for the Center was selected in the 200 East Area of Hanford in a central location to be easily accessible to all facilities and contractors. Since there was little money available for this project, a decision was made to contact several vendors and request loans of their tools, equipment, and materials. In return, the center would help market products on site and assist with product demonstrations when the vendors visited Hanford. Out of 28 vendors originally contacted, 16 responded with offers to loan products. This included a containment tent, several glove bags, BEPA filtered vacuum cleaners, portable ventilation systems, fixatives, temporary shielding, pumps, and several special tools. Vendors who could not provide products sent videos and brochures. Westinghouse Hanford Company began using the ACT in June 1996. Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc., the present Management and Integrating Contractor for the Hanford Site, held the formal opening ceremony of the ALARA Center of Technology on October 1, 1996. The Center now has about 1200 ft{sup 2} of floor space fi Iled with tools, equipment and material used to perform radiological work.

  19. ALARA and planning of interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Rocaboy, A.

    1995-03-01

    The implementation of ALARA programs implies integration of radiation protection criterion at all stages of outage management. Within the framework of its ALARA policy, Electricide de France (EDF) has given an incentive to all of its nuclear power plants to develop {open_quotes}good practices{close_quotes} in this domain, and to exchange their experience by the way of a national feed back file. Among the developments in the field of outage organization, some plants have focused on the planning stage of activities because of its influence on the radiological conditions of interventions and on the good succession of tasks within the radiological controlled areas. This paper presents the experience of Chinon nuclear power plant. At Chinon, we are pursuing this goal through careful outage planning. We want the ALARA program during outages to be part of the overall maintenance task planning. This planning includes the provision of the availability of every safety-related component, and of the variations of water levels in hthereactor and steam generators to take advantage of the shield created by the water. We have developed a computerized data base with the exact position of all the components in the reactor building in order to avoid unnecessary interactions between different tasks performed in the same room. A common language between Operation and Maintenance had been established over the past years, using {open_quotes}Milestones and Corridors{close_quotes}. A real time dose rate counting system enables the Radiation Protection (RP) Department to do an accurate and efficient follow up during the outage for all the {open_quotes}ALARA{close_quotes} maintenance tasks.

  20. ALARA at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    Implementation of the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) principle at nuclear power plants presents a continuing challenge for health physicists at utility corporate and plant levels, for plant designers, and for regulatory agencies. The relatively large collective doses at some plants are being addressed though a variety of dose reduction techniques. It is planned that this report will include material on historical aspects, management, valuation of dose reduction, quantitative and qualitative aspects of optimization, design, operational considerations, and training. The status of this work is summarized in this report. 30 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  1. Savannah River Site ALARA Program appraisals

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.R.

    1992-06-01

    ALARA Program audits are recommended in PNL-6566, ``Health Physics Manual of Good Practices for Reducing Radiation Exposure to Levels that are As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA).`` The Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.11, ``Radiation Protection For Occupational Workers,`` requires contractors to conduct internal audits of all functional elements of the radiological protection program, which includes the ALARA program, as often as necessary, but at a minimum every three years. At the Savannah River Site (SRS), these required audits are performed as part of the Health Protection Internal Appraisal Program. This program was established to review the Site radiological protection program, which includes the ALARA program, on an ongoing basis and to provide recommendations for improvement directly to senior Health Protection management. This paper provides an overview of the SRS Health Protection Internal Appraisal program. In addition, examples of specific performance criteria and detailed appraisal guidelines used ALARA appraisals are provided.

  2. Savannah River Site ALARA Program appraisals

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    ALARA Program audits are recommended in PNL-6566, Health Physics Manual of Good Practices for Reducing Radiation Exposure to Levels that are As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA).'' The Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection For Occupational Workers,'' requires contractors to conduct internal audits of all functional elements of the radiological protection program, which includes the ALARA program, as often as necessary, but at a minimum every three years. At the Savannah River Site (SRS), these required audits are performed as part of the Health Protection Internal Appraisal Program. This program was established to review the Site radiological protection program, which includes the ALARA program, on an ongoing basis and to provide recommendations for improvement directly to senior Health Protection management. This paper provides an overview of the SRS Health Protection Internal Appraisal program. In addition, examples of specific performance criteria and detailed appraisal guidelines used ALARA appraisals are provided.

  3. ALARA engineering at Department of Energy facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    SciTech Connect

    Dionne, B.J.; Khan, T.A.; Lane, S.G.; Baum, J.W.

    1991-03-01

    This report is the second in the series of bibliographies supporting the efforts at the Brookhaven National Laboratory ALARA Center on dose reduction at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The BNL ALARA Center was originally established in 1983 under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to monitor dose-reduction research and ALARA activities at nuclear power plants. This effort was expanded in 1988 by the DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health to include DOE nuclear facilities. Abstracts for this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy Data Base, and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Information that the reader feels should be included in the next volume of this bibliography may be submitted to the BNL ALARA Center. These abstracts, which have a bearing on dose reduction, consolidates information from publications pertinent to Radiological Engineers and Operational Health Physicists. Volume 2 contains 127 abstracts numbered from 69 through 195 as well as author and subject indices. The subject index contains the abstract numbers from both the previous volume and the current volume, the latter being indicated in boldface.

  4. ALARA engineering at Department of Energy facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    SciTech Connect

    Dionne, B.J.; Khan, T.A.; Lane, S.G.; Baum, J.W.

    1991-05-01

    Promoting the exchange of information related to implementation of the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) philosophy is a continuing objective for the Department of Energy (DOE). This report, prepared by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ALARA Center for the DOE Office of Health, is the second in a series of bibliographies on dose reduction at DOE facilities. This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose reduction activities, with a specific focus towards DOE facilities. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste; uranium enrichment; fuel fabrication, storage, and reprocessing; facility decommissioning; hot laboratories; tritium production; research, test and production reactors; weapons fabrication and testing; and accelerators. Material on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, job planning, improved operational techniques, and other topics has also been included. This volume (Volume 2 of the series) contains 127 abstracts numbered from 69 through 195, as well as author and subject indices. The subject index contains the abstract numbers from both the previous volume and the current volume, the latter being indicated in boldface. Information that the reader feels should be included in the next volume of this bibliography should be submitted to the BNL ALARA Center.

  5. ALARA: Analytic and Laplacian adaptive radioactivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Paul Philip Hood

    While many codes have been written to compute the induced activation and changes in composition caused by neutron irradiation, most of those which are still being updated are only slowly adding functionality and not improving the accuracy, speed and usability of their existing methods. ALARA moves forward in all four of these areas, with primary importance being placed on the accuracy and speed of solution. By carefully analyzing the various ways to model the physical system, the methods to solve the mathematical problem and the interaction between these two issues, ALARA chooses an optimum combination to achieve high accuracy, fast computation, and enhanced versatility and ease of use. In addition to a set of base features, standard to any activation code, ALARA offers a number of extensions, including arbitrary hierarchical irradiation schedules and a form of reverse problem for calculating the detailed activation of specific isotopes. The physical system is modeled using advanced linear chains, which include the contributions from straightened loops in the reaction scheme, while the truncation philosophy minimizes the discrepancies between the model and the real problem. The mathematical method is then adaptively chosen based on the characteristics of each linear chain to use analytically exact methods when possible and an accurate expansion technique otherwise. ALARA has been successfully validated against established fusion activation codes using a standard activation benchmark problem. In addition to demonstrating ALARA 's accuracy, this validation excerise has demonstrated its speed. Furthermore, by extending the benchmark problem to validate its advanced features, ALARA 's flexibility has been proven. With its modern computational techniques and continuing development, it is hoped that ALARA will become a widely used code for the activation analysis of nuclear systems.

  6. Pacific Northwest Laboratory ALARA report for CY 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Ceffalo, G.M.; Oxley, C.L.; Wright, P.A.

    1992-05-01

    This report provides summary results of the CY 1990 ALARA Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Information has been included regarding whole-body exposures to radiation, skin contaminations, and the nonradiological ALARA program.

  7. The organization of ALARA program at a DOE facility

    SciTech Connect

    Setaro, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    The organization of an ALARA Program at a DOE Facility (Oak Ridge National Laboratory), it's relationship with laboratory management, facility operators, and the radiation protection program is described. The use of chartered ALARA committees at two distinct levels is discussed.

  8. ALARA implementation throughout project life cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, M.J.

    1995-03-01

    A strength of radiation protection programs generally has been endorsement and application of the ALARA principle. In Ontario Hydro, which currently operates 20 commercial size nuclear units, great strides have been made in the last three decades in reducing occupational radiation exposure per unit of electricity generated. This paper will discuss specific applications of elements of the overall ALARA program which have most contributed to dose reduction as the nuclear program has expanded. This includes such things as management commitment, ALARA application in the design phase and major rehabilitation work, the benefits of the self protection concept, a specific example of elimination (or reduction) of the source term and the importance of dose targets. Finally, it is concluded that the major opportunities for further improvements may lie in the area of information management.

  9. ALARA efforts in nordic BWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Ingemansson, T.; Lundgren, K.; Elkert, J.

    1995-03-01

    Some ALARA-related ABB Atom projects are currently under investigation. One of the projects has been ordered by the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute, and two others by the Nordic BWR utilities. The ultimate objective of the projects is to identify and develop methods to significantly decrease the future exposure levels in the Nordic BWRS. As 85% to 90% of the gamma radiation field in the Nordic BWRs originates from Co-60, the only way to significantly decrease the radiation doses is to effect Co and Co-60. The strategy to do this is to map the Co sources and estimate the source strength of Co from these sources, and to study the possibility to affect the release of Co-60 from the core surfaces and the uptake on system surfaces. Preliminary results indicate that corrosion/erosion of a relatively small number of Stellite-coated valves and/or dust from grinding of Stellite valves may significantly contribute to the Co input to the reactors. This can be seen from a high measured Co/Ni ratio in the feedwater and in the reactor water. If stainless steel is the only source of Co, the Co/Ni ratio would be less than 0.02 as the Co content in the steel is less than 0.2%. The Co/Ni ratio in the reactor water, however, is higher than 0.1, indicating that the major fraction of the Co originates from Stellite-coated valves. There are also other possible explanations for an increase of the radiation fields. The Co-60 inventory on the core surfaces increases approximately as the square of the burn-up level. If the burn-up is increased from 35 to 5 MWd/kgU, the Co-60 inventory on the core surfaces will be doubled. Also the effect on the behavior of Co-60 of different water chemistry and materials conditions is being investigated. Examples of areas studied are Fe and Zn injection, pH-control, and different forms of surface pre-treatments.

  10. Shippingport station decommissioning project ALARA Program

    SciTech Connect

    Crimi, F.P.

    1995-03-01

    Properly planned and implemented ALARA programs help to maintain nuclear worker radiation exposures {open_quotes}As Low As Reasonably Achievable.{close_quotes}. This paper describes the ALARA program developed and implemented for the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. The elements required for a successful ALARA program are discussed along with examples of good ALARA practices. The Shippingport Atomic Power Station (SAPS) was the first commercial nuclear power plant to be built in the United States. It was located 35 miles northwest of Pittsburgh, PA on the south bank of the Ohio river. The reactor plant achieved initial criticality in December 1959. During its 25-year life, it produced 7.5 billion kilowatts of electricity. The SAPS was shut down in October 1982 and was the first large-scale U.S. nuclear power plant to be totally decommissioned and the site released for unrestricted use. The Decommission Project was estimated to take 1,007 man-rem of radiation exposure and $.98.3 million to complete. Physical decommissioning commenced in September 1985 and was completed in September 1989. The actual man-rem of exposure was 155. The project was completed 6 months ahead of schedule at a cost of $91.3 million.

  11. ALARA Review for the 221-U Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    T. A. Edwards

    1998-11-10

    The following ALARA review provides a description of the engineeringand administrative controls used to manage personnel exposure; controlcontamination levels, and control airborne radioactivity concentrationswhile conducting surveillance and maintenance and Canyon DispositionInitiative effort activities at the U Plant 221-U Building locatedin the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site.

  12. TRADE ALARA for design and operations engineers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This product has been developed by the Training Resources and Data Exchange (TRADE) network for use at Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractor facilities. The TRADE network encourages and facilitates the exchange of ideas, techniques, and resources for improving training and development and serves as a forum for the discussion of issues of interest to the DOE community. This TRADE product has been developed for DOE contractor employees who are asked to deliver training to Design and Operations Engineers on the concept of As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). The ALARA concept is an approach to radiation protection to control or manage exposures as low as social, technical, economic, practical, public policy, and other considerations permit. Worldwide panels of radiation experts have concluded that it is conservative to assume that a proportional relationship exists between radiation dose (exposure) and the biological effects resulting from it. This assumption implies that every dose received, no matter how small, carries some risk: the higher the dose, the higher the risk. The federal government, including agencies such as DOE, subscribes to the concept of ALARA and requires its facilities to subscribe to it as well. This course was developed to introduce engineers to the fundamentals of radiation and contamination reduction that they will use when designing or modifying plant facilities. The course was developed by the ALARA Program group and the Radiation Protection Monitoring/Training Group of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. We wish to express our appreciation to Emily Copenhaver, Scott Taylor, and Janet Westbrook at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for their willingness to share their labors with the rest of the DOE community and for technical support during the development of the TRADE ALARA for Design and Operations Engineers Course Manual.

  13. Integration of Formal Job Hazard Analysis & ALARA Work Practice

    SciTech Connect

    NELSEN, D.P.

    2002-09-01

    ALARA work practices have traditionally centered on reducing radiological exposure and controlling contamination. As such, ALARA policies and procedures are not well suited to a wide range of chemical and human health issues. Assessing relative risk, identifying appropriate engineering/administrative controls and selecting proper Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for non nuclear work activities extends beyond the limitations of traditional ALARA programs. Forging a comprehensive safety management program in today's (2002) work environment requires a disciplined dialog between health and safety professionals (e.g. safety, engineering, environmental, quality assurance, industrial hygiene, ALARA, etc.) and personnel working in the field. Integrating organizational priorities, maintaining effective pre-planning of work and supporting a team-based approach to safety management represents today's hallmark of safety excellence. Relying on the mandates of any single safety program does not provide industrial hygiene with the tools necessary to implement an integrated safety program. The establishment of tools and processes capable of sustaining a comprehensive safety program represents a key responsibility of industrial hygiene. Fluor Hanford has built integrated safety management around three programmatic attributes: (1) Integration of radiological, chemical and ergonomic issues under a single program. (2) Continuous improvement in routine communications among work planning/scheduling, job execution and management. (3) Rapid response to changing work conditions, formalized work planning and integrated worker involvement.

  14. ALARA pre-job studies using the VISIPLAN 3D ALARA planning tool.

    PubMed

    Vermeersch, Fernand

    2005-01-01

    The optimisation of the radiation protection for the workers in nuclear industry is an important part of the safety culture. The application of the ALARA concept (to keep exposures as low as reasonably achievable) is not always straightforward as it is influenced by the site geometry, source distribution and work organisation. A good ALARA pre-job study must therefore be performed and should contain predicted doses for the different suggested work scenarios and provide a quantitative basis to select between various alternative work scenarios for a specific operation. In order to handle this information, SCK-CEN developed the VISIPLAN 3D ALARA planning tool. The tool makes it possible to evaluate the dose due to external gamma exposure based on the simulation of work scenarios taking into account worker positions and subsequent geometry and source distribution changes in a three-dimensional environment.

  15. Proceedings of the Department of Energy ALARA Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Dionne, B.J.; Baum, J.W.

    1992-12-31

    The report contains summaries of papers, discussions, and operational exercises presented at the first Department of Energy ALARA Workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York on April 21--22, 1992. The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum for, and enhance communication among, ALARA personnel, as well as to inform DOE`s field office and contractor personnel about the Office of Health`s programs and expectations from the entire DOE complex efforts in the ALARA area.The two-day workshop consisted of one day dedicated to presentations on implementing various elements of a formal ALARA program at the DOE contractors` facilities, regulatory aspects of ALARA programs, and DOE Headquarters` ALARA expectations/initiatives. The second day was devoted to detailed discussions on ALARA improvements and problems, and operational exercises on cost-benefit analyses and on ALARA job/experiment reviews. At this workshop, 70 health physicists and radiation safety engineers from 5 DOE Headquarter Offices, 7 DOE operations/area offices, and 27 contractor facilities exchanged information, which is expected to stimulate further improvement in the DOE contractors` ALARA programs. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  16. Proceedings of the Department of Energy ALARA Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Dionne, B.J.; Baum, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    The report contains summaries of papers, discussions, and operational exercises presented at the first Department of Energy ALARA Workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York on April 21--22, 1992. The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum for, and enhance communication among, ALARA personnel, as well as to inform DOE's field office and contractor personnel about the Office of Health's programs and expectations from the entire DOE complex efforts in the ALARA area.The two-day workshop consisted of one day dedicated to presentations on implementing various elements of a formal ALARA program at the DOE contractors' facilities, regulatory aspects of ALARA programs, and DOE Headquarters' ALARA expectations/initiatives. The second day was devoted to detailed discussions on ALARA improvements and problems, and operational exercises on cost-benefit analyses and on ALARA job/experiment reviews. At this workshop, 70 health physicists and radiation safety engineers from 5 DOE Headquarter Offices, 7 DOE operations/area offices, and 27 contractor facilities exchanged information, which is expected to stimulate further improvement in the DOE contractors' ALARA programs. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  17. Pacific Northwest Laboratory ALARA report for CY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Ceffalo, G.M.

    1993-09-01

    This report provides summary results of the CY 1992 As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL).(a) This report includes information regarding whole-body exposures to radiation, skin contaminations, and the nonradiological ALARA program.

  18. Pacific Northwest Laboratory ALARA report for CY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Ceffalo, G.M.

    1992-09-01

    This report provides summary results of the CY 1991 As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL).(a) This report includes information regarding whole-body exposures to radiation, skin contaminations, and the nonradiological ALARA program.

  19. The organization of ALARA program at a DOE facility

    SciTech Connect

    Setaro, J.A.

    1992-05-01

    The organization of an ALARA Program at a DOE Facility (Oak Ridge National Laboratory), it`s relationship with laboratory management, facility operators, and the radiation protection program is described. The use of chartered ALARA committees at two distinct levels is discussed.

  20. ALARA and an integrated approach to radiation protection.

    PubMed

    Hendee, W R; Edwards, F M

    1986-04-01

    Exposures of individuals to ionizing radiation have been restricted for many years by a number of guidelines and rules developed by various advisory and regulatory groups. Accompanying these restrictions has been an evolving principle that exposures to individuals and groups should be kept "as low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA), consistent with provision of the benefits of radiation use to society. Although the ALARA concept is a laudable goal in principle, its implementation in a clinical facility has not been a straightforward process. Problems of implementing ALARA have been confounded further by the efforts of regulatory agencies to incorporate the ALARA concept into regulations governing radiation exposures. To facilitate the implementation of ALARA as a workable construct in a clinical facility, guidelines are needed for its application to both individual and collective exposures to radiation. The provision of such guidelines, including action and inaction levels for both individual and collective exposures, are presented here.

  1. Westinghouse Hanford Company ALARA year-end report, Calendar Year 1994: Revision 3, Radiological engineering and ALARA

    SciTech Connect

    Berglund, O.D.

    1995-04-01

    It has long been DOE`s Policy that radiation exposures should be maintained as far below the dose limits as is reasonably achievable. This policy, known as the ALARA Principle of radiation protection, maintains that radiation exposures should be maintained as low as reasonably achievable, taking into account social, technical, economic, practical, and public policy considerations. The ALARA Principle is based on the hypothesis that even very low radiation doses carry some risk. As a result, it is not enough to maintain doses at/or slightly below limits; the lower the doses, the lower the risks. Because it is not possible to reduce all doses at DOE facilities to zero, economic and social factors must be considered to determine the optimal level of radiation doses. According to the ALARA principle, if doses are too high, resources should be well spent to reduce them. At some point, the resources being spent to maintain low doses are exactly balanced by the risks avoided. Reducing doses below this point results in a misallocation of resources; the resources could be spent elsewhere and have a greater impact on health and safety. The WHC ALARA sitewide goals were developed by the WHC ALARA Council and the ALARA/CCIP Program Office, while the facility/organizational level ALARA goals were developed by the facility/organizational ALARA committees. Goal statuses have been approved by facility management or their representative and transmitted verbatim in this report. These goals reflect a commitment by management to ensure a quality ALARA program driven by an emphasis on safety, the health of workers, and the protection of the environment. The final status, performance, and lessons learned of ALARA goals developed for Calendar Year (CY) 1994, are provided in this report.

  2. Applying ALARA to cleanup criteria for a mixed waste site

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonell, M.; Peterson, J.; Haroun, L.; Blunt, D.; Dunning, D.; Green, S.

    1993-11-01

    The process of reducing exposures to levels as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) is applied by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to the management of radioactive materials. A site-specific application of the ALARA process was incorporated into the development of cleanup criteria for both surface water and soil at a DOE environmental restoration site. Factoring ALARA considerations into the development of cleanup criteria demonstrated DOE`s commitment to maintaining both protectiveness and reason, and it also provided a working range for verifying residual levels after the cleanup actions have been completed.

  3. Electricite de France`s ALARA policy

    SciTech Connect

    Stricker, L.; Rollin, P.

    1995-03-01

    In 1992, Electricite de France - EDF decided to improve the degree to which radiological protection is incorporated in overall management of the utility and set itself the objective of ensuring the same level of protection for workers from contractors as for those from EDF. This decision was taken in a context marked by a deterioration in exposure figures for French plants and by the new recommendations issued by the ICRP. This document describes the policy adopted by EDF at both corporate and plant level to meet these objectives, by: (1) setting up management systems which were responsive but not cumbersome; (2) a broad policy of motivation; (3) the development and use of suitable tools. The document then describes some quite positive results of EDF`s ALARA policy, giving concrete examples and analyzing the changes in global indicators.

  4. Environmental ALARA Program at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Jannik, G.T.

    1993-08-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) follows the ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) philosophy of keeping radiation doses to the general public as low as practical by minimizing radioactive releases to the environment. SRS accomplishes this goal by establishing challenging sitewide and area-specific Environmental ALARA Release Guides and trending radioactive releases against these guides on a monthly basis. The SRS Environmental ALARA Program, mandated by DOE Order 5400.5, is a dose-based program that has gone through many changes and improvements in recent years. A description of the SRS Environmental ALARA Program and its performance is presented in this paper. Recent SRS studies of the ``Zero Release`` option also are described.

  5. [The ALARA-principle. Backgrounds and enforcement in dental practices].

    PubMed

    Berkhout, W E R

    2015-05-01

    Optimization of radiation protection began soon after the discovery of X-rays. The optimization-concept has been refined more and more as a result of increa-sing knowledge of radiation and its effect on people. Since 1973 the acronym ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) has been used to designate the optimization of X-ray doses. For the dentist the ALARA-principle entails the obligation to minimize the radiation dose to patient and surroundings to a level as low as reasonably achievable. Currently in radiology the acronym ALADA is also used: As Low As Diagnostically Acceptable. To establish ALARA goals Diagnostic Reference Levels are employed in medical radiology. These Diagnostic Reference Levels are also being introduced in dental radiology. Practical measures for ALARA/ALADA in dental practice comprise an awareness of the field of view (for all types of imaging, including cone beam computed tomography) exposure time, and relation to anatomy and diagnostic justification, and shielding.

  6. ALARA ASSESSMENT OF SETTLER SLUDGE SAMPLING METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    NELSEN LA

    2009-01-30

    The purpose of this assessment is to compare underwater and above water settler sludge sampling methods to determine if the added cost for underwater sampling for the sole purpose of worker dose reductions is justified. Initial planning for sludge sampling included container, settler and knock-out-pot (KOP) sampling. Due to the significantly higher dose consequence of KOP sludge, a decision was made to sample KOP underwater to achieve worker dose reductions. Additionally, initial plans were to utilize the underwater sampling apparatus for settler sludge. Since there are no longer plans to sample KOP sludge, the decision for underwater sampling for settler sludge needs to be revisited. The present sampling plan calls for spending an estimated $2,500,000 to design and construct a new underwater sampling system (per A21 C-PL-001 RevOE). This evaluation will compare and contrast the present method of above water sampling to the underwater method that is planned by the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) and determine if settler samples can be taken using the existing sampling cart (with potentially minor modifications) while maintaining doses to workers As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) and eliminate the need for costly redesigns, testing and personnel retraining.

  7. Using Weibull Distribution Analysis to Evaluate ALARA Performance

    SciTech Connect

    E. L. Frome, J. P. Watkins, and D. A. Hagemeyer

    2009-10-01

    As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) is the underlying principle for protecting nuclear workers from potential health outcomes related to occupational radiation exposure. Radiation protection performance is currently evaluated by measures such as collective dose and average measurable dose, which do not indicate ALARA performance. The purpose of this work is to show how statistical modeling of individual doses using the Weibull distribution can provide objective supplemental performance indicators for comparing ALARA implementation among sites and for insights into ALARA practices within a site. Maximum likelihood methods were employed to estimate the Weibull shape and scale parameters used for performance indicators. The shape parameter reflects the effectiveness of maximizing the number of workers receiving lower doses and is represented as the slope of the fitted line on a Weibull probability plot. Additional performance indicators derived from the model parameters include the 99th percentile and the exceedance fraction. When grouping sites by collective total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) and ranking by 99th percentile with confidence intervals, differences in performance among sites can be readily identified. Applying this methodology will enable more efficient and complete evaluation of the effectiveness of ALARA implementation.

  8. Using Weibull Distribution Analysis to Evaluate ALARA Performance

    SciTech Connect

    E. L. Frome, J. P. Watkins, and D. A. Hagemeyer

    2009-10-01

    As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) is the underlying principle for protecting nuclear workers from potential health outcomes related to occupational radiation exposure. Radiation protection performance is currently evaluated by measures such as collective dose and average measurable dose, which do not indicate ALARA performance. The purpose of this work is to show how statistical modeling of individual doses using the Weibull distribution can provide objective supplemental performance indicators for comparing ALARA implementation among sites and for insights into ALARA practices within a site. Maximum likelihood methods were employed to estimate the Weibull shape and scale parameters used for performance indicators. The shape parameter reflects the effectiveness of maximizing the number of workers receiving lower doses and is represented as the slope of the fitted line on a Weibull probability plot. Additional performance indicators derived from the model parameters include the 99th percentile and the exceedance fraction. When grouping sites by collective total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) and ranking by 99th percentile with confidence intervals, differences in performance among sites can be readily identified. Applying this methodology will enable more efficient and complete evaluation of the effectiveness of ALARA implementation.

  9. An effective ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) Awareness Program

    SciTech Connect

    Aldridge, T.L.; Hammond, D.A.

    1990-10-01

    Following the January 1, 1989 issue of the US Department of Energy (DOE) revised Order 5480.1, Chapter XI (DOE 1985), the Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) Program Office (APO) began an aggressive ALARA Awareness Campaign. The revised DOE Order 5480.11 (DOE 1988) required the documentation and tracking of ALARA practices and principles. This major challenge for compliance to the new requirements necessitated an enhanced awareness of the goals and objectives of the APO. The Westinghouse Hanford APO began the expansion of the ALARA Program. The classic concept'' of radiological exposure minimization, which began in the early 1940's, increased in scope to include the new concept of exposure minimization for all hazardous materials and conditions commensurate with sound economics and operating practices. This expansion could only be implemented by bringing about a cultural change. Therefore, the attempt to introduce this change in thinking created a second major challenge for the Westinghouse Hanford APO. The direct result of the identification of these two major goals was the creation of an effective ALARA Awareness for Westinghouse Hanford. This paper describes this program. 3 refs.

  10. Westinghouse Hanford Company ALARA year-end report, Calendar Year 1994: Revision 3A, Radiological engineering and ALARA

    SciTech Connect

    Berglund, O.D.

    1995-06-01

    It has long been the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Policy that radiation doses should be maintained as far below the dose limits as is reasonably achievable. This policy, known as the ``ALARA Principle of radiation protection,`` maintains that radiation exposures should be maintained as low as reasonably achievable, taking into account social, technical, economic, practical, and public policy considerations. The ALARA Principle is based on the hypothesis that even very low radiation doses carry some risk. As a result, it is not enough to maintain doses at/or slightly below limits; the lower the doses, the lower the risks. Because it is not possible to reduce all doses at DOE facilities to zero, economic and social factors must be considered to determine the optimal level of radiation doses. According to the ALARA Principle, if doses are too high, resources should be well spent to reduce them. At some point, the resources being spent to maintain low doses are exactly balanced by the risks avoided. Reducing doses below this point results in a misallocation of resources; the resources could be spent elsewhere and have a greater positive impact on health and safety. The objective of the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) ALARA/Contamination Control Improvement Project (CCIP) Program is to manage and control exposures (both individual and collective) to the work force, the general public, and the environment to levels as low as is reasonable using the aforementioned ALARA Principle.

  11. ANI/MAELU engineering inspection criteria 8.3 ALARA

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, L.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this criteria section is to provide guidelines for programs whose intent is to achieve occupational doses and doses to members of the public that are as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA). The success that has been achieved by applying ALARA concepts at nuclear power plants is clearly illustrated by the major reductions in the annual cumulative dose to workers at many sites over the last few years. This success is the combined result of the general maturity of the nuclear industry, the intensive study of dose reduction practices by industry groups, and the successful sharing of experience and practices among plants. Source term reduction should be used as a primary ALARA mechanism. Methods which should be considered include: satellite and cobalt reduction, chemistry control, decontamination, submicron filters, zinc addition, hot spot reduction and permanent or temporary shielding.

  12. Report on the PWR-radiation protection/ALARA Committee

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, D.J.

    1995-03-01

    In 1992, representatives from several utilities with operational Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) formed the PWR-Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee. The mission of the Committee is to facilitate open communications between member utilities relative to radiation protection and ALARA issues such that cost effective dose reduction and radiation protection measures may be instituted. While industry deregulation appears inevitable and inter-utility competition is on the rise, Committee members are fully committed to sharing both positive and negative experiences for the benefit of the health and safety of the radiation worker. Committee meetings provide current operational experiences through members providing Plant status reports, and information relative to programmatic improvements through member presentations and topic specific workshops. The most recent Committee workshop was facilitated to provide members with defined experiences that provide cost effective ALARA performance.

  13. Five-year ALARA review of dosimetry results :

    SciTech Connect

    Paulus, Luke R.

    2013-08-01

    A review of personnel dosimetry (external and internal) and environmental monitoring results from 1 January 2008 through 31 December 2012 performed at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico was conducted to demonstrate that radiation protection methods used are compliant with regulatory limits and conform with the ALARA philosophy. ALARA is the philosophical approach to radiation protection by managing and controlling radiation exposures (individual and collective) to the work force and to the general public to levels that are As Low As is Reasonably Achievable taking social, technical, economic, practical, and public policy considerations into account. ALARA is not a dose limit but a process which has the objective of attaining doses as far below applicable dose limits As Low As is Reasonably Achievable.

  14. Pacific Northwest Laboratory ALARA Report for Calendar Year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, S.L.

    1994-07-01

    This report provides summary results of the Calendar Year (CY) 1993 As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This report includes information regarding whole-body exposures to radiation, and skin contaminations. The collective whole-body radiation dose to employees during 1993 was 0.58 person-sievert (58 person-rem). This dose was 11 percent lower than the projected dose of 0.65 person-sievert (65 person-rem). The Radiation Protection Section`s Field Dosimetry Services group projected that no PNL employee`s dose would exceed 0.02 sievert (2 rem) based on dosimeters processed during the year; no worker actually exceeded the limit by the end of CY 1993. There were 15 reported cases of skin contamination for PNL employees during 1993. This number of 60 percent of the projected total of 25 cases. There were an additional 21 cases of personal-effects contamination to PNL staff: Nine of these contamination events occurred at the 324 Building, nine occurred at the 325 Building, one occurred in the 327 Building, one occurred in the 3720 Building, and one occurred in the 326 Building. Line management set numerous challenging and production ALARA goals for their facilities. Appendix A describes the final status of the 1993 ALARA goals. Appendix B describes the radiological ALARA goals for 1994. The Radiation Protection Section of the Laboratory Safety Dept. routinely perform audits of radiological ALARA requirements for specific facilities with significant potential for exposure. These ALARA audits are part of a comprehensive safety audit of the facility, designed to evaluate and improve total safety performance.

  15. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Study of ALARA programs. Status 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Dionne, B.J.; Meinhold, C.B.; Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.

    1992-08-01

    This report provides the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors with information that will be useful for reducing occupational radiation doses at DOE`s nuclear facilities. In 1989 and 1990, health physicists from the Brookhaven National Laboratory`s (BNL) ALARA Center visited twelve DOE contractor facilities with annual collective dose equivalents greater than 100 person-rem (100 person-cSv). The health physicists interviewed radiological safety staff, engineers, and training personnel who were responsible for dose control. The status of ALARA practices at the major contractor facilities was compared with the requirements and recommendation in DOE Order 5480.11 ``Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers`` and PNL-6577 ``Health Physics Manual of Good Practices for Reducing Radiation Exposure to Levels that are as Low as Reasonably Achievable.`` The information and data collected are described and examples of successful practices are presented. The findings on the status of the DOE Contractor ALARA Programs are summarized and evaluated. In addition, the supplement to this report contains examples of good-practice documents associated with implementing the major elements of a formally documented ALARA program for a major DOE contractor facility.

  16. Practice of ALARA in the pediatric interventional suite.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Bairbre; Racadio, John; Towbin, Richard

    2006-09-01

    As interventional procedures have become progressively more sophisticated and lengthy, the potential for high patient radiation dose has increased. Staff exposure arises from patient scatter, so steps to minimize patient dose will in turn reduce operator and staff dose. The practice of ALARA in an interventional radiology (IR) suite, therefore, requires careful attention to technical detail in order to reduce patient dose. The choice of imaging modality should minimize radiation when and where possible. In this paper practical steps are outlined to reduce patient dose. Further details are included that specifically reduce operator exposure. Challenges unique to pediatric intervention are reviewed. Reference is made to experience from modern pediatric interventional suites. Given the potential for high exposures, the practice of ALARA is a team responsibility. Various measures are outlined for consideration when implementing a quality assurance (QA) program for an IR service.

  17. Proceedings: Decommissioning, Decontamination, ALARA, and Worker Safety Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    2000-09-01

    This workshop on decontamination, ALARA, and worker safety was the sixth in a series initiated by EPRI to aid utility personnel in assessing the technologies for decommissioning nuclear power plants. The workshop focused on specific aspects of decommissioning related to the management of worker radiation exposure and safety. The information presented will help individual utilities assess benefits of programs in these areas for their projects, including their potential to reduce decommissioning costs.

  18. LANL Environmental ALARA Program Status Report for CY 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Whicker, Jeffrey Jay; Mcnaughton, Michael; Gillis, Jessica Mcdonnel; Ruedig, Elizabeth

    2016-03-29

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) ensures that radiation exposures to members of the public and the environment from LANL operations, past and present, are below regulatory thresholds and are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) through compliance with DOE Order 458.1 Radiation Protection for the Public and the Environment, and LANL Policy 412 Environmental Radiation Protection. In 2007, a finding (RL.2-F-1) and observation (RL.2-0-1) in the NNSA/ LASO report, September 2007, Release of Property (Land) Containing Residual Radioactive Material Self-Assessment Report, indicated that LANL had no policy or documented process in place for the release of property containing residual radioactive material. In response, LANL developed PD410, Los Alamos National Laboratory Environmental ALARA Program. The most recent version of this document became effective on September 28, 2011. The document provides program authorities, responsibilities, descriptions, processes, and thresholds for conducting qualitative and quantitative ALARA analyses for prospective and actual radiation exposures to the public and t o the environment resulting from DOE activities conducted on the LANL site.

  19. Effective use of metrics in an ALARA program

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, B.B. Jr.

    1996-07-01

    ALARA radiological protection programs require metrics to meet their objectives. Sources of metrics include; external dosimetry; internal dosimetry; radiological occurrences from the occurrence reporting and processing system (ORPS); and radiological incident reports (RIR). The sources themselves contain an abundance of specific ``indicators``. To choose the site-specific indicators that will be tracked and trended requires careful review. This required the end users to expend valuable time and effort to locate the data they needed. To address this problem, a central metrics database has been developed so that customers can have all their questions addressed quickly and correctly. The database was developed in the beginning to answer some of the customer`s most frequently asked questions. It is now also a tool to communicate the status of the radiation protection program to facility managers. Finally it also addresses requirements contained in the Rad Con manual and the 10CFR835 implementation guides. The database uses currently available, ``user friendly``, software and contains information from RIR`s, ORPS, and external dosimetry records specific to ALARA performance indicators. The database is expandable to allow new metrics input. Specific reports have been developed to assist customers in their tracking and trending of ALARA metrics.

  20. Single center experience with application of the ALARA concept to serial imaging studies after blunt renal trauma in children--is ultrasound enough?

    PubMed

    Eeg, Kurt R; Khoury, Antoine E; Halachmi, Sarel; Braga, Luis H P; Farhat, Walid A; Bägli, Darius J; Pippi Salle, Joao L; Lorenzo, Armando J

    2009-04-01

    After properly staged renal injury many children will undergo radiological reevaluation with computerized tomography, the modality frequently favored for its widespread availability and anatomical detail. The ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) concept attempts to balance the potential future risk of radiation induced malignancy with the added information obtained by the study. At our institution ultrasound has been increasingly adopted as the followup imaging technique of choice. We sought to evaluate this practice in pediatric blunt renal trauma management. We retrospectively analyzed the trauma database of a pediatric referral center for patients treated between 1997 and 2007. A total of 73 children with blunt renal trauma were identified. Associated injuries, mechanism of trauma, type of management, imaging studies, complications and delayed/missed injuries were evaluated. Mean patient age was 10.5 years and the male-to-female ratio was 3:2. In all patients the mechanism was blunt trauma. Average grade of injury at hospitalization was 2.4, with high grade injury observed in 32% of patients. Repeat computerized tomography was obtained in 11 patients (9 for nonurological injuries). Three nephrectomies were done in the setting of hemodynamic instability and 1 pseudoaneurysm was embolized. Four enlarging symptomatic urinomas were suspected by ultrasound. No clinically important injuries or complications due to delayed diagnosis were detected in patients followed with ultrasound. Our experience suggests that after initial computerized tomography for accurate staging of pediatric blunt renal trauma monitoring can be performed with ultrasound in most patients (excluding those with hemodynamic instability or deemed to require computerized tomography for associated injuries). Selective reevaluation with computerized tomography can be reserved for those with serial or ambiguous abnormalities detected on ultrasound, thus decreasing exposure to radiation.

  1. History and Culture of Alara--The Action Learning and Action Research Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuber-Skerritt, Ortrun; Passfield, Ron

    2016-01-01

    As co-founders of the Action Learning and Action Research Association (ALARA), we tell the story of this international network organisation through our personal experience. Our history traces the evolution of ALARA from origins at the first World Congress in 1990 in Brisbane, Australia, through development over two and a half decades, to its…

  2. History and Culture of Alara--The Action Learning and Action Research Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuber-Skerritt, Ortrun; Passfield, Ron

    2016-01-01

    As co-founders of the Action Learning and Action Research Association (ALARA), we tell the story of this international network organisation through our personal experience. Our history traces the evolution of ALARA from origins at the first World Congress in 1990 in Brisbane, Australia, through development over two and a half decades, to its…

  3. ALARA Review of 233-S Process Hood D D and Related Activities

    SciTech Connect

    S. D. Landsman.

    1999-03-18

    This document is an as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) review of design packages for planned work at the 233-S Facility. The ALARA review was initiated in accordance with the Bechtel Hanford, Inc. (BHI) Integrated Environmental, Safety, and Health Management System (ISMS) workflow process.

  4. ALARA radiation considerations for the AP600 reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, F.L.

    1995-03-01

    The radiation design of the AP600 reactor plant is based on an average annual occupational radiation exposure (ORE) of 100 man-rem. As a design goal we have established a lower value of 70 man-rem per year. And, with our current design process, we expect to achieve annual exposures which are well below this goal. To accomplish our goal we have established a process that provides criteria, guidelines and customer involvement to achieve the desired result. The criteria and guidelines provide the shield designer, as well as the systems and plant layout designers with information that will lead to an integrated plant design that minimizes personnel exposure and yet is not burdened with complicated shielding or unnecessary component access limitations. Customer involvement is provided in the form of utility input, design reviews and information exchange. Cooperative programs with utilities in the development of specific systems or processes also provides for an ALARA design. The results are features which include ALARA radiation considerations as an integral part of the plant design and a lower plant ORE. It is anticipated that a further reduction in plant personnel exposures will result through good radiological practices by the plant operators. The information in place to support and direct the plant designers includes the Utility Requirements Document (URD), Federal Regulations, ALARA guidelines, radiation design information and radiation and shielding design criteria. This information, along with the utility input, design reviews and information feedback, will contribute to the reduction of plant radiation exposure levels such that they will be less than the stated goals.

  5. Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, T.A.; Vulin, D.S.; Lane, S.G.; Baum, J.W. )

    1991-10-01

    In the continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants, the ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA. This is the sixth report in that series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings and conferences, journals, research reports, and searches of information databases of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges from the use of robotics, to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Also included is material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations, as well as on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. This report contains 266 abstracts along with subject and author indices. The author index is exclusively for this volume. The subject index contains headings for this volume in bold face, as well as reference to previous volumes. All information in this and previous volumes of the series is also available through our on-line information system called ACE (ALARA Center Exchange). ACE is accessible through fax machines or personal computers interfaced with modems. The bibliography database and other databases are kept current with new abstracts, information on research projects, and recent news of international events related to ALARA at nuclear power plants. Access to the system is provided freely to the ALARA community. For password certification, manuals, and other information about our system, please contact the ALARA CENTER, Building 703M, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973, or call (516) 282-3228.

  6. Decommissioning ALARA programs Cintichem decommissioning experience

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, J.J.; LaGuardia, T.S.

    1995-03-01

    The Cintichem facility, originally the Union Carbide Nuclear Company (UCNC) Research Center, consisted primarily of a 5MW pool type reactor linked via a four-foot-wide by twelve-foot-deep water-filled canal to a bank of five adjacent hot cells. Shortly after going into operations in the early 1960s, the facility`s operations expanded to provide various reactor-based products and services to a multitude of research, production, medical, and education groups. From 1968 through 1972, the facility developed a process of separating isotopes from mixed fission products generated by irradiating enriched Uranium target capsules. By the late 1970s, 20 to 30 capsules were being processed weekly, with about 200,000 curies being produced per week. Several isotopes such as Mo{sup 99}, I{sup 131}, and Xe{sup 133} were being extracted for medical use.

  7. ALARA input into the design of modifications at Philadelphia Electric Company

    SciTech Connect

    Robb, J.T.; Mallon, J.

    1988-01-01

    The engineering and research department of Philadelphia Electric Company (PECo) has recently instituted changes in the design process for major plant modifications at the company's nuclear units. These changes support the design engineer and allow for greater input of as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) considerations in the design of modifications. At PECo the input of ALARA considerations in the design of modifications has always been a part of design practices as provided in engineering procedures. The need to establish a more formal framework for the input of ALARA criteria into the design of modifications was identified by the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). In order to address the INPO concerns and in keeping with PECo's strong commitment to maintaining ALARA plant personnel radiation exposures, the engineering and research department has formalized a procedure to allow for an ALARA review of major plant modifications. A formal framework for the input of ALARA criteria aids the design engineer by clearly identifying systems or areas that generally represent the greatest ALARA concern.

  8. ALARA assessment of spent fuel and nuclear waste transportation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, S. H.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) on transportation system costs were evaluated for LWR spent fuel, high-level commercial and defense wastes, and remotely handled TRU waste. Three dose rate specifications were used: 10 mrem/h at 2m, 5 mrem/h, and 2 mrem/h. The evaluation was done for wastes and LWR spent fuel 1, 3, 5, and 10 years old. Gamma shield materials were depleted uranium, lead, and steel; the neutron shield material was water. Results for a 7-element PWR cask show that uranium shielding is the lightest, and that the increased weight of the low dose rate casks results in 1 to 2 million dollars increase in lifetime transportation costs. 6 figures, 3 tables. (DLC)

  9. Application of ALARA principles to shipment of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Greenborg, J.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Murphy, D.W. Burnett, R.A.; Lewis, J.R.

    1980-05-01

    The public exposure from spent fuel shipment is very low. In view of this low exposure and the perfect safety record for spent fuel shipment, existing systems can be considered satisfactory. On the other hand, occupational exposure reduction merits consideration and technology improvement to decrease dose should concentrate on this exposure. Practices that affect the age of spent fuel in shipment and the number of times the fuel must be shipped prior to disposal have the largest impact. A policy to encourage a 5-year spent fuel cooling period prior to shipment coupled with appropriate cask redesign to accommodate larger loads would be consistent with ALARA and economic principles. And finally, bypassing high population density areas will not in general reduce shipment dose.

  10. Ethics of randomized clinical trials and the 'ALARA' approach.

    PubMed

    Zwitter, M

    1999-01-01

    A balanced discussion on the ethics of randomized clinical trials should not be based on a single ethical aspect such as respect for the patient's autonomy. Rather, the analysis should consider the four ethical principles--respect for autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice--as applicable to all groups of persons concerned. We present the ethical benefits and costs of the present practice of randomized clinical trials for four groups: patients involved in clinical trials, patients not involved in trials, participating physicians and society. The ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) approach is then introduced and practical measures to achieve a positive balance between ethical benefits and costs of randomized trials are proposed.

  11. Multilateral analysis of increasing collective dose and new ALARA programme.

    PubMed

    Oumi, Tadashi; Morii, Yasuki; Imai, Toshirou

    2011-07-01

    JAPC (The Japan Atomic Power Company) is the only electric power company that operates different types of nuclear reactors in Japan; it operates two BWRs (boiling water reactors), one pressurised water reactor and one gas cooled reactor. JAPC has been conducting various activities aimed at reducing radiation dose received by workers for over 45 y. Recently, the collective dose resulting from periodic maintenance has increased at each plant because of the replacement of large equipment and the unexpected extension of the outage period. In particular, the collective dose at Tokai-2 is one of the highest among Japanese BWR plants((1)), owing to the replacement and strengthening of equipment to meet earthquake-proof requirements. In this study, the authors performed a multilateral analysis of unacceptably a large collective dose and devised a new ALARA programme that includes a 3D dose prediction map and the development of machines to assist workers.

  12. Reducing patient radiation exposure during paediatric SVT ablations: use of CARTO® 3 in concert with "ALARA" principles profoundly lowers total dose.

    PubMed

    Pass, Robert H; Gates, Gregory G; Gellis, Laura A; Nappo, Lynn; Ceresnak, Scott R

    2015-06-01

    "ALARA--As Low As Reasonably Achievable" protocols reduce patient radiation dose. Addition of electroanatomical mapping may further reduce dose. From 6/11 to 4/12, a novel ALARA protocol was utilised for all patients undergoing supraventricular tachycardia ablation, including low frame rates (2-3 frames/second), low fluoro dose/frame (6-18 nGy/frame), and other techniques to reduce fluoroscopy (ALARA). From 6/12 to 3/13, use of CARTO® 3 (C3) with "fast anatomical mapping" (ALARA+C3) was added to the ALARA protocol. Intravascular echo was not utilised. Demographics, procedural, and radiation data were analysed and compared between the two protocols. A total of 75 patients were included: 42 ALARA patients, and 33 ALARA+C3 patients. Patient demographics were similar between the two groups. The acute success rate in ALARA was 95%, and 100% in ALARA+C3; no catheterisation-related complications were observed. Procedural time was 125.7 minutes in the ALARA group versus 131.4 in ALARA+C3 (p=0.36). Radiation doses were significantly lower in the ALARA+C3 group with a mean air Kerma in ALARA+C3 of 13.1±28.3 mGy (SD) compared with 93.8±112 mGy in ALARA (p<0.001). Mean dose area product was 92.2±179 uGym2 in ALARA+C3 compared with 584±687 uGym2 in ALARA (p<0.001). Of the 33 subjects (42%) in the ALARA+C3 group, 14 received ⩽1 mGy exposure. The ALARA+C3 dosages are the lowest reported for a combined electroanatomical-fluoroscopy technique. Addition of CARTO® 3 to ALARA protocols markedly reduced radiation exposure to young people undergoing supraventricular tachycardia ablation while allowing for equivalent procedural efficacy and safety.

  13. ALARA Council: Sharing our resources and experiences to reduce doses at Commonwealth Edison Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Rescek, F.

    1995-03-01

    Commonwealth Edison Company is an investor-owned utility company supplying electricity to over three million customers (eight million people) in Chicago and northern Illinois, USA. The company operates 16 generating stations which have the capacity to produce 22,522 megawatts of electricity. Six of these generating stations, containing 12 nuclear units, supply 51% of this capacity. The 12 nuclear units are comprised of four General Electric boiling water (BWR-3) reactors, two General Electric BWR-5 reactors, and six Westinghouse four-loop pressurized water reactors (PWR). In August 1993, Commonwealth Edison created an ALARA Council with the responsibility to provide leadership and guidance that results in an effective ALARA Culture within the Nuclear Operations Division. Unlike its predecessor, the Corporate ALARA Committee, the ALARA Council is designed to bring together senior managers from the six nuclear stations and corporate to create a collaborative effort to reduce occupational doses at Commonwealth Edison`s stations.

  14. ALARA Review for the Sediment Relocation and Removal from the 105-N Fuel Storage Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Demers, J.W.

    1998-03-01

    This as low as reasonable achievable (ALARA) review revision provides a description of the engineering and administrative controls used to manage personnel exposure, control contamination levels, and airborne radioactivity concentrations during sediment relocation and removal in the 105-N Fuel Storage Basin. This document updates and supercedes the ALARA review of the sediment-related activities contained in 100-N Basin Stabilization Project As Low As Reasonably Achievable Plan (BHI 1995).

  15. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA; Volume 5

    SciTech Connect

    Dionne, B.J.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    Promoting the exchange of information related to implementation of the As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) philosophy is a continuing objective for the Department of Energy (DOE). This report was prepared by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ALARA Center for the DOE Office of Health. It contains the fifth in a series of bibliographies on dose reduction at DOE facilities. The BNL ALARA Center was originally established in 1983 under the sponsorship of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to monitor dose-reduction research and ALARA activities at nuclear power plants. This effort was expanded in 1988 by the DOE`s Office of Environment, Safety and Health, to include DOE nuclear facilities. This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose-reduction activities, with a specific focus on DOE facilities. Abstracts included in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy, Science and Technology Database (in general, the citation and abstract information is presented as obtained from this database), and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel storage and reprocessing, facility decommissioning, hot laboratories, tritium production, research, test and production reactors, weapons fabrication and testing, fusion, uranium and plutonium processing, radiography, and accelerators. Information on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, source prevention and control, job planning, improved operational and design techniques, as well as on other topics, has been included. In addition, DOE/EH reports not included in previous volumes of the bibliography are in this volume (abstracts 611 to 684). This volume (Volume 5 of the series) contains 217 abstracts.

  16. Fuel transfer system ALARA design review - Project A.15

    SciTech Connect

    KUEBERTH, L.R.

    2001-11-12

    One mission of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project is to move the SNF from the K Basins in the Hanford 100K Area to an interim dry storage at the Canister Storage Building (CSB) in the Hanford 200 East Area. The Fuel Transfer System (FTS) is a subproject that will move the SNF from the 105K East (KE) Facility to the 105K West (KW) Facility. The SNF will be treated for shipment to the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) facility at the KW Basin. The SNF canisters will be loaded underwater into a Shielded Transfer Cask (STC) in the KE Basin. The fully loaded STC will be brought out of the water and placed into a Cask Transfer Overpack (CTO) by the STC Straddle Carrier. As the STC is removed from the water, it will be washed down with demineralized water by an manual rinse system. The CTO with the STC inside will be placed on a transport trailer and transferred to the KW Basin as an intra-facility transfer. The CTO will be unloaded from the shipping trailer at the KW Basin and the STC will be removed from the CTO. The STC will then be lowered into the KW Basin water and the fuel will be removed. The SNF will then be processed for shipment to the CVD. As soon as all of the fuel has been removed from the STC, the cask will be removed from the KW Basin water and placed into the CTO. The CTO will again be placed on the trailer for transport back to the KE Basin where the entire cycle will be repeated approximately 400 times. This document records the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) findings and design recommendations/requirements by the SNF Project noted during the Final Design Review of the STC, CTO, STC Transfer System, Annexes and Roadways for support of FTS. This document is structured so that all statements that include the word ''shall'' represent design features that have been or will be implemented within the project scope. Statements that include the words ''should'' or ''recommend'' represent ALARA design features to be evaluated for future implementation.

  17. Interpretation of ALARA in the Canadian regulatory framework

    SciTech Connect

    Utting, R.

    1995-03-01

    The Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) is responsible for the regulation of all aspects of atomic energy in Canada. This includes the complete nuclear fuel cycle from uranium mining to long-term disposal of nuclear fuel, as well as the medical and industrial utilization of radioisotopes. Clearly, the regulatory approach will differ from practice to practice but, as far as possible, the AECB has attempted to minimize the degree of prescription of regulatory requirements. The traditional modus operandi of the AECB has been to have broad general principles enshrined in regulations with the requirement that licensees submit specific operating policies and procedures to the AECB for approval. In the large nuclear facilities with their sophisticated technical infrastructures, this policy has been largely successful although in a changing legal and political milieu the AECB is finding that a greater degree of proactive regulation is becoming necessary. With the smaller users, the AECB has for a long time found it necessary to have a greater degree of prescription in its regulatory function. Forthcoming General Amendments to the Atomic Energy Control Regulations will, amongst other things, formally incorporate the concept of ALARA into the Canadian regulatory framework. Within the broad range of practices licensed by the AECB it is not practical to provide detailed guidance on optimization that will be relevant and appropriate to all licensees, however the following general principles are proposed.

  18. Department of Energy ALARA implementation guide. Response to the Health Physics Society

    SciTech Connect

    Connelly, J.M.

    1995-03-01

    In the August 1993 Health Physics Society (HPS) newsletter, the HPS Scientific and Public Issues Committee published a Position Statement entitled {open_quotes}Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment.{close_quotes}. In this article, this HPS committee made the statement that they were deeply concerned by the trend for agencies to incorporate the ALARA concept as a regulatory requirements, without providing specific guidance as to what it means and how to implement it consistently. The HPS position paper was in response to the DOE notice on proposed rulemaking for Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 834, {open_quotes}Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment{close_quotes} (10 CFR 834). In the notice of proposed rulemaking for 10 CFR 834, the Department of Energy (DOE) defined ALARA as follows: {open_quotes}As used in this part, ALARA is not a dose limit, but rather a process which has the objective of attaining doses as far below the applicable limit of this part as is reasonably achievable{close_quotes} (10 CFR 834.2, p. 16283 of the Federal Register). The HPS position paper continues, {open_quotes}The section goes on to elaborate on what is meant by a process without providing sufficient guidance to assure uniform applicability of the process.{close_quotes}. Although this concern is directed towards the ALARA process as it relates to the environment, the Office of Health, which is responsible for occupational workers, shares the same definition for ALARA.

  19. ALARA and decommissioning: The Fort St. Vrain experience

    SciTech Connect

    Borst, T.; Niehoff, M.; Zachary, M.

    1995-03-01

    The Fort St. Vrain Nuclear Generating Station, the first and only commercial High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor to operate in the United States, completed initial fuel loading in late 1973 and initial startup in early 1974. Due to a series of non-nuclear technical problems, Fort St. Vrain never operated consistently, attaining a lifetime capacity factor of slightly less than 15%. In August of 1989, the decision was made to permanently shut down the plant due to control rod drive and steam generator ring header failures. Public Service Company of Colorado elected to proceed with early dismantlement (DECON) as opposed to SAFSTOR on the bases of perceived societal benefits, rad waste, and exposure considerations, regulatory uncertainties associated with SAFSTOR, and cost. The decommissioning of Fort St. Vrain began in August of 1992, and is scheduled to be completed in early 1996. Decommissioning is being conducted by a team consisting of Westinghouse, MK-Ferguson, and Scientific Ecology Group. Public Service Company of Colorado as the licensee provides contract management and oversight of contractor functions. An aggressive program to maintain project radiation exposures As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) has been established, with the following program elements: temporary and permanent shielding contamination control; mockup training; engineering controls; worker awareness; integrated work package reviews communication; special instrumentation; video camera usage; robotics application; and project committees. To date, worker exposures have been less than project estimates. from the start of the project through Februrary of 1994, total exposure has been 98.666 person-rem, compared to the project estimate of 433 person-rem and goal of 347 person-rem. The presentation will discuss the site characterization efforts, the radiological performance indicator program, and the final site release survey plans.

  20. The Alara Metriscan phalangeal densitometer: evaluation and triage thresholds.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, J A; Steel, S A

    2008-10-01

    The Metriscan (Alara Inc, CA) is a compact digital radiographic absorptiometry device capable of determining phalangeal bone mineral density in arbitrary units (BMD(au)) from the second phalanges of the middle three digits. We have examined the utility and the in vitro and in vivo performances of the Metriscan, and established triage thresholds based on the UK's National Osteoporosis Society guidelines on peripheral densitometry. 170 white female participants (70 osteoporotic and 100 non-osteoporotic at the hip or spine) aged between 55 years and 70 years were recruited from patients attending for routine dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) examination. All participants underwent two scans of the non-dominant hand (with repositioning) and one of the dominant hand. An additional 10 participants were excluded owing to finger or hand deformities. Radiation exposure to the patient per scan was <0.1 microSv, and a controlled area of 1 m was established around the device. Phantom-based in vitro short-term precision (%CV) was 0.17% without, and 0.22% with, repositioning. Long-term in vitro precision was 0.31% over a 6-month period. In vivo short-term precision was 1.42% for the group as a whole, and 1.30% and 2.23% for the non-osteoporotic and osteoporotic groups, respectively. Triage thresholds for reassurance/referral or referral/treatment were 54.30 BMD(au) and 46.89 BMD(au), respectively, for the non-dominant hand, and 55.02 BMD(au) and 48.73 BMD(au) for the dominant hand. The dominant side proved superior for triage purposes, with a triage referral rate of 44%, compared with 48% for the non-dominant hand. The Metriscan is suitable for use on post-menopausal women in a community-based setting preferably in a triage role as an adjunct to axial BMD.

  1. Methodology for making environmental as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.C.; Speer, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    An overall evaluation concept for use in making differential cost-benefit analyses in environmental as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) determinations is being implemented by Rockwell Hanford Operations. This evaluation includes consideration of seven categories: (1) capital costs; (2) operating costs; (3) state of the art; (4) safety; (5) accident or upset consequences; (6) reliability, operability, and maintainability; and (7) decommissionability. Appropriate weighting factors for each of these categories are under development so that ALARA determinations can be made by comparing scores of alternative proposals for facility design, operations, and upgrade. This method of evaluation circumvents the traditional basis of a stated monetary sum per person-rem of dose commitment. This alternative was generated by advice from legal counsel who advised against formally pursuing this avenue of approach to ALARA for environmental and occupational dose commitments.

  2. Five-Year ALARA Review of Dosimetry Results 1 January 2009 through 31 December 2013.

    SciTech Connect

    Paulus, Luke R

    2014-08-01

    A review of dosimetry results from 1 January 2009 through 31 December 2013 was conducted to demonstrate that radiation protection methods used are compliant with regulatory limits and conform to the ALARA philosophy. This included a review and evaluation of personnel dosimetry (external and internal) results at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico as well as at Sandia National Laboratories, California. Additionally, results of environmental monitoring efforts at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico were reviewed. ALARA is a philosophical approach to radiation protection by managing and controlling radiation exposures (individual and collective) to the work force and to the general public to levels that are As Low As is Reasonably Achievable taking social, technical, economic, practical, and public policy considerations into account. ALARA is not a dose limit but a process which has the objective of attaining doses as far below applicable dose limits As Low As is Reasonably Achievable.

  3. Five-Year ALARA Review of Dosimetry Results 1 January 2010 through 31 December 2014.

    SciTech Connect

    Paulus, Luke R.

    2015-06-01

    A review of dosimetry results from 1 January 2010 through 31 December 2014 was conducted to demonstrate that radiation protection methods used are compliant with regulatory limits and conform to the philosophy to keep exposures to radiation As Low As is Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). This included a review and evaluation of personnel dosimetry (external and internal) results at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico as well as at Sandia National Laboratories, California. Additionally, results of environmental monitoring efforts at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico were reviewed. ALARA is a philosophical approach to radiation protection by managing and controlling radiation exposures (individual and collective) to the work force and to the general public to levels that are As Low As is Reasonably Achievable taking social, technical, economic, practical, and public policy considerations into account. ALARA is not a dose limit but a process which has the objective of attaining doses as far below applicable dose limits As Low As is Reasonably Achievable.

  4. ALARA Review for Concrete Sampling and Robot Deployment at221-U

    SciTech Connect

    T. A. Edwards.

    1999-05-28

    This document is an as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) review for performing characterization activities at 221-U Plant (U-Plant) in support of the Canyon Disposition Initiative. The scope of work includes sampling concrete and deployment of the robot into the ventilation tunnel to support characterization activities. While performing a radiological review of the work scope, it was determined that contamination levels in the work area may exceed the Level 2 ALARA review trigger levels specified in BHI-SH-02, Volume 1, Safety and Health Procedures, Procedure 1.22, Planning Radiological Work. This ALARA review provides a description of the engineering and administrative controls used to manage personnel exposure, control contamination levels, and control airborne radioactivity concentrations while conducting characterization and sampling activities at the 221-U Plant (U-Plant).

  5. Proceedings of the Third International Workshop on the implementation of ALARA at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, T.A.; Roecklein, A.K.

    1995-03-01

    This report contains the papers presented and the discussions that took place at the Third International Workshop on ALARA Implementation at Nuclear Power Plants, held in Hauppauge, Long Island, New York from May 8--11, 1994. The purpose of the workshop was to bring together scientists, engineers, health physicists, regulators, managers and other persons who are involved with occupational dose control and ALARA issues. The countries represented were: Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Korea, Mexico, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States. The workshop was organized into twelve sessions and three panel discussions. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  6. High level waste tank closure project: ALARA applications at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Steven B; Butler, Richard; Butterworth, Steven W; Quigley, Keith D

    2005-05-01

    Bechtel BWXT Idaho, Maintenance and Operating Contractor for the Department of Energy at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, has emptied, cleaned, and sampled six of the eleven 1.135 x 10(6) L high level waste underground storage tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, well ahead of the State of Idaho Consent Order cleaning schedule. Cleaning of a seventh tank is expected to be complete by the end of calendar year 2004. The tanks, with associated vaults, valve boxes, and distribution systems, are being closed to meet Resource Conservation and Recovery Act regulations and Department of Energy orders. The use of remotely operated equipment placed in the tanks through existing tank riser access points, sampling methods and application of as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) principles have proven effective in keeping personnel dose low during equipment removal, tank, vault, and valve box cleaning, and sampling activities, currently at 0.03 Sv.

  7. Implementation of the principle of as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) for medical and dental personnel

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    This report is part of a series prepared under the auspices of Scientific Committee 46, Operational Radiation Safety. It provides guidance on the process of implementing the as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) principle for the use of radiation by medical and dental personnel. The use of cost-benefit analysis is recommended as a basic method upon which to base ALARA decisions. Examples are provided to illustrate the ALARA principle as a process of optimization and to provide a starting point for the development of individualized ALARA programs. NCRP Report No. 91, Recommendations on Limits for Exposure to Ionizing Radiation, calls for the use of reference ranges for occupational exposures. This report recommends the use of 2 reference ranges, one based on individual dose equivalents, and the other based on collective dose equivalent. In accordance with the recommendations of NCRP Report No. 82, SI Units in Radiation Protection and Measurements, as of January 1990, only SI units are used in the text. Readers needing factors for conversion of SI to conventional units are encouraged to consult Report No. 82. 84 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

  8. Westinghouse Hanford Company radiological protection dose summary and ALARA [As Low As Reasonably Achievable] goal report, calendar year 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomb, J.L.; Hammond, D.A.

    1990-05-01

    Each year a Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) goals are developed and reported to the Department of Energy, Richland Operations (DOE-RL). In addition to providing DOE-RL with goal status, these reports provide Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) management with a dose summary and status of annual ALARA goals. The CY-89 ALARA collective dose goal of 520 person-rem for compliance workers was easily met. A large contribution to the saved collective dose resulted from special ALARA practices and principles used by N Reactor during the tube inspection process which resulted in a significant reduction of 73 person-rem from the projected dose. No significant skin contaminations were incurred by WHC workers in CY-89. This report provide detailed information about the distribution of radiation dose and presents the apportionment of those doses to separate facilities. By combining the dose summary and the ALARA dosimetry goal status per facilities, some areas within specific WHC organizations were found no to be represented by ALARA teams. This caused some discrepancies in the report. These areas are clearly labeled in each organizational subsection with an asterisk. ALARA facility team chairs are currently investigating within their own organizations how to resolve representation for organizations. 11 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Health physics manual of good practices for reducing radiation exposure to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)

    SciTech Connect

    Herrington, W.N.; Higby, D.P.; Kathren,., R.L.; Merwin, S.E.; Stoetzel, G.A.

    1988-06-01

    A primary objective of the US Department of Energy (DOE) health physics and radiation protection program has been to limit radiation exposures to those levels that are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). As a result, the ALARA concept developed into a program and a set of operational principles to ensure that the objective was consistently met. Implementation of these principles required that a guide be produced. The original ALARA guide was issued by DOE in 1980 to promote improved understanding of ALARA concepts within the DOE community and to assist those responsible for operational ALARA activities in attaining their goals. Since 1980, additional guidance has been published by national and international organizations to provide further definition and clarification to ALARA concepts. As basic ALARA experience increased, the value and role of the original guide prompted the DOE Office of Nuclear Safety (ONS) to support a current revision. The revised manual of good practices includes six sections: 1.0 Introduction, 2.0 Administration, 3.0 Optimization, 4.0 Setting and Evaluating ALARA Goals, 5.0 Radiological Design, and 6.0 Conduct of Operations. The manual is directed primarily to contractor and DOE staff who are responsible for conduct and overview of radiation protection and ALARA programs at DOE facilities. The intent is to provide sufficient guidance such that the manual, if followed, will ensure that radiation exposures are maintained as low as reasonably achievable and will establish the basis for a formally structured and auditable program. 118 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Operational radiation protection in high-energy physics accelerators: implementation of ALARA in design and operation of accelerators.

    PubMed

    Fassò, A; Rokni, S

    2009-11-01

    This paper considers the historical evolution of the concept of optimisation of radiation exposures, as commonly expressed by the acronym ALARA, and discusses its application to various aspects of radiation protection at high-energy accelerators.

  11. ALARA database value in future outage work planning and dose management

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.W.; Green, W.H.

    1995-03-01

    ALARA database encompassing job-specific duration and man-rem plant specific information over three refueling outages represents an invaluable tool for the outage work planner and ALARA engineer. This paper describes dose-management trends emerging based on analysis of three refueling outages at Clinton Power Station. Conclusions reached based on hard data available from a relational database dose-tracking system is a valuable tool for planning of future outage work. The system`s ability to identify key problem areas during a refueling outage is improving as more outage comparative data becomes available. Trends over a three outage period are identified in this paper in the categories of number and type of radiation work permits implemented, duration of jobs, projected vs. actual dose rates in work areas, and accuracy of outage person-rem projection. The value of the database in projecting 1 and 5 year station person-rem estimates is discussed.

  12. FUNDAMENTAL ALARA TECHNIQUES & HAZARD ANALYSIS AT DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) SITES

    SciTech Connect

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2005-01-24

    There are many members of the Health Physics Society that will argue that low level of radiation are not harmful and too much money and time are spent trying to reduce dose. During this presentation we are not going to debate this issue. This presentation will cover the fundamental principles of As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) and how hazards need to be analyzed to ensure safety of the environment and the public. As radiation safety specialists, we are all bound by law to have an ALARA program in place and even though dose limits may change in the future, we need to implement programs that protect our workers, the public, and the environment.

  13. CSER 95-002: ALARA shielding for IAEA SNM container movement

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, E.M.

    1995-03-07

    This CSER qualifies use of a 5% borated, lead foil lined polyethylene 1 inch annulus as a bucket and in a small carrier to move sealed containers of plutonium. The containers are Oversize Cans or smaller containing plutonium limited in mass and H/Pu ratio by PFP storage and transportation CPS`s. These ALARA shielding units reduce personnel exposure to the radiation from the containers as they are moved for assay and other required activities.

  14. Guide to reducing radiation exposure to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)

    SciTech Connect

    Kathren, R.L.

    1980-04-01

    This document is designed to provide DOE contractor personnel with general guidance regarding programs and techniques to reduce radiation exposures to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Thus it is directed towards a broad audience, and should have special relevance and interest for operating management as well as radiation protection personnel. It is well recognized that each contractor has needs specific and critical to its radiation protection program. Hence no single set of specific and detailed criteria can be set down as a prescription for achieving the ALARA goal. Rather, general guidance in the form of broad principles is given in order to acquaint management with ALARA needs and concepts. The purpose is to encourage maximum management support of the technical personnel responsible for carrying out day-to-day radiation protection activities. Although primarily written for management, this document also contains technical guidance of potential value to those directly involved in radiation protection activities. Again it should be stressed that what is provided is guidance, and is therefore not mandatory.

  15. Current practices for maintaining occupational exposures ALARA at low-level waste disposal sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hadlock, D.E.; Herrington, W.N.; Hooker, C.D.; Murphy, D.W.; Gilchrist, R.L.

    1983-12-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission contracted with Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to provide technical assistance in establishing operational guidelines, with respect to radiation control programs and methods of minimizing occupational radiation exposure, at Low-Level Waste (LLW) disposal sites. The PNL, through site visits, evaluated operations at LLW disposal sites to determine the adequacy of current practices in maintaining occupational exposures as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA). The data sought included the specifics of: ALARA programs, training programs, external exposure control, internal exposure control, respiratory protection, surveillance, radioactive waste management, facilities and equipment, and external dose analysis. The results of the study indicated the following: The Radiation Protection and ALARA programs at the three commercial LLW disposal sites were observed to be adequate in scope and content compared to similar programs at other types of nuclear facilities. However, it should be noted that there were many areas that could be improved upon to help ensure the health and safety of occupationally exposed individuals.

  16. ALARA Review of the Spallation Neutron Source Accumulator Ring and Transfer Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Haire, M.J.

    2003-06-30

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is designed to meet the growing need for new tools that will deepen our understanding in materials science, life science, chemistry, fundamental and nuclear physics, earth and environmental sciences, and engineering sciences. The SNS is an accelerator-based neutron-scattering facility that when operational will produce an average beam power of 2 MW at a repetition rate of 60 Hz. The accelerator complex consists of the front-end systems, which will include an ion source; a 1-GeV full-energy linear accelerator; a single accumulator ring and its transfer lines; and a liquid mercury target. This report documents an as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) review of the accumulator ring and transfer lines at their early design stage. An ALARA working group was formed and conducted a review of the SNS ring and transfer lines at the {approx}25% complete design stage to help ensure that ALARA principles are being incorporated into the design. The radiological aspects of the SNS design criteria were reviewed against regulatory requirements and ALARA principles. Proposed features and measures were then reviewed against the SNS design criteria. As part of the overall review, the working group reviewed the design manual; design drawings and process and instrumentation diagrams; the environment, safety, and health manual; and other related reports and literature. The group also talked with SNS design engineers to obtain explanations of pertinent subject matter. The ALARA group found that ALARA principles are indeed being incorporated into the early design stage. Radiation fields have been characterized, and shielding calculations have been performed. Radiological issues are being adequately addressed with regard to equipment selection, access control, confinement structure and ventilation, and contamination control. Radiation monitoring instrumentation for worker and environment protection are also being considered--a good practice at this

  17. ALARA Design Review for the Resumption of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Cementation Process Project Activities

    SciTech Connect

    DAYLEY, L.

    2000-06-14

    The requirements for the performance of radiological design reviews are codified in 10CFR835, Occupational Radiation Protection. The basic requirements for the performance of ALARA design reviews are presented in the Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM). The HSRCM has established trigger levels requiring radiological reviews of non-routine or complex work activities. These requirements are implemented in site procedures HNF-PRO-1622 and 1623. HNF-PRO-1622 Radiological Design Review Process requires that ''radiological design reviews [be performed] of new facilities and equipment and modifications of existing facilities and equipment''. In addition, HNF-PRO-1623 Radiological Work Planning Process requires a formal ALARA Review for planned activities that are estimated to exceed 1 person-rem total Dose Equivalent (DE). The purpose of this review is to validate that the original design for the PFP Cementation Process ensures that the principles of ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) were included in the original project design. That is, that the design and operation of existing Cementation Process equipment and processes allows for the minimization of personnel exposure in its operation, maintenance and decommissioning and that the generation of radioactive waste is kept to a minimum.

  18. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    SciTech Connect

    Dionne, B.J.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W.

    1993-12-01

    This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose reduction activities, with a focus on DOE facilities. Abstracts included in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy, Science and Technology Database (in general, the citation and abstract information is presented as obtained from this database), and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel storage and reprocessing, facility decommissioning, hot laboratories, tritium production, research, test and production reactors, weapons fabrication and testing, fusion, uranium and plutonium processing, radiography, and aocelerators. Information on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, source prevention and control, job planning, improved operational and design techniques, as well as on other topics, has been included. In addition, DOE/EH reports not included in previous volumes of the bibliography are in this volume (abstracts 611 to 684). This volume (Volume 5 of the series) contains 217 abstracts. An author index and a subject index are provided to facilitate use. Both indices contain the abstract numbers from previous volumes, as well as the current volume. Information that the reader feels might be included in the next volume of this bibliography should be submitted to the BNL ALARA Center.

  19. Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA. Volume 7

    SciTech Connect

    Kaurin, D.G.; Khan, T.A.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W.

    1993-07-01

    The ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA in the continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants. This is volume 7 of the series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings and conferences, journals, research reports, and searches of the Energy Science and Technology database of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges from use of robotics to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations is included, as well as information on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. Volume 7 contains 293 abstract, an author index, and a subject index. The author index is specific for this volume. The subject index is cumulative and lists all abstract numbers from volumes 1 to 7. The numbers in boldface indicate the abstracts in this volume; the numbers not in boldface represent abstracts in previous volumes.

  20. Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA. Volume 8

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, S.G.; Khan, T.A.; Xie, J.W.

    1995-05-01

    The ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA in a continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants. This volume 8 of the series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected form proceedings of technical meetings and conference journals, research reports, and searches of the Energy Science and Technology database of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to the many aspects of radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges form use of robotics, to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations is included, as well as information on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. Volume 8 contains 232 abstracts, an author index, and a subject index. The author index is specific for this volume. The subject index is cumulative and lists all abstract numbers from volumes 1 to 8. The numbers in boldface indicate the abstracts in this volume; the numbers not in boldface represent abstracts in previous volumes.

  1. Report on the BWR owners group radiation protection/ALARA Committee

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrich, L.R.

    1995-03-01

    Radiation protection programs at U.S. boiling water reactor (BWR) stations have evolved during the 1980s and early 1990s from a regulatory adherence-based endeavor to a proactive, risk-based radiation protection and prevention mission. The objectives are no longer to merely monitor and document exposure to radiation and radioactive materials. The focus of the current programs is the optimization of radiation protection of occupational workers consistent with the purpose of producing cost-effective electric power. The newly revised 10 CFR 20 defines the term ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) to take into account the state of technology, the economics of improvements in relation to the state of the technology, and the benefits to the public health and safety. The BWR Owners Group (BWROG) initially formed the Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee in January 1990 to evaluate methods of reducing occupational radiation exposure during refueling outages. Currently, twenty U.S. BWR owner/operators (representing 36 of the operational 37 domestic BWR units), as well as three foreign BWR operators (associate members), have broadened the scope to promote information exchange between BWR radiation protection professionals and develop good practices which will affect optimization of their radiation protection programs. In search of excellence and the challenge of becoming {open_quotes}World Class{close_quotes} performers in radiation protection, the BWROG Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee has recently accepted a role in assisting the member utilities in improving radiation protection performance in a cost-effective manner. This paper will summarize the recent activities of this Committee undertaken to execute their role of exchanging information in pursuit of optimizing the improvement of their collective radiation protection performance.

  2. ALARA Analysis of Radiological Control Criteria Associated with Alternatives for Disposal of Hazardous Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Bilyard, Gordon R.; Branch, Kristi M.; Lavender, Jay C.; Miller, Peter L.

    2002-05-15

    This ALARA analysis of Radiological Control Criteria (RCC) considers alternatives to continued storage of certain DOE mixed wastes. It also considers the option of treating hazardous wastes generated by DOE facilities, which have a very low concentration of radionuclide contaminants, as purely hazardous waste. Alternative allowable contaminant levels examined correspond to doses to an individual ranging from 0.01 mrem/yr to 10 to 20 mrem/yr. Generic waste inventory data and radionuclide source terms are used in the assessment. Economic issues, potential health and safety issues, and qualitative factors relating to the use of RCCs are considered.

  3. The ALARA principle in the context of a radiological or nuclear emergency.

    PubMed

    Musolino, Stephen V; DeFranco, Joseph; Schlueck, Richard

    2008-02-01

    Traditionally, the concept of As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) has been applied to the workplace and to protect the public. The goals are to minimize small incremental exposures on a daily basis or per specific task, and on a yearly basis, thereby to keep the total annual dose equivalent as far below regulatory limits as practical. In an extreme emergency caused by radiological or nuclear terrorism, or a large scale radiological accident, it is proposed that the same principles can be applied to protect First Responders against potentially large exposures.

  4. Cone-beam computed tomography: Time to move from ALARA to ALADA.

    PubMed

    Jaju, Prashant P; Jaju, Sushma P

    2015-12-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is routinely recommended for dental diagnosis and treatment planning. CBCT exposes patients to less radiation than does conventional CT. Still, lack of proper education among dentists and specialists is resulting in improper referral for CBCT. In addition, aiming to generate high-quality images, operators may increase the radiation dose, which can expose the patient to unnecessary risk. This letter advocates appropriate radiation dosing during CBCT to the benefit of both patients and dentists, and supports moving from the concept of "as low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA) to "as low as diagnostically acceptable" (ALADA).

  5. Cone-beam computed tomography: Time to move from ALARA to ALADA

    PubMed Central

    Jaju, Sushma P.

    2015-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is routinely recommended for dental diagnosis and treatment planning. CBCT exposes patients to less radiation than does conventional CT. Still, lack of proper education among dentists and specialists is resulting in improper referral for CBCT. In addition, aiming to generate high-quality images, operators may increase the radiation dose, which can expose the patient to unnecessary risk. This letter advocates appropriate radiation dosing during CBCT to the benefit of both patients and dentists, and supports moving from the concept of "as low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA) to "as low as diagnostically acceptable" (ALADA). PMID:26730375

  6. ALARA: is there a cause for alarm? Reducing radiation risks from computed tomography scanning in children.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nikhil Bharat; Platt, Shari L

    2008-06-01

    Radiation exposure from computed tomography is associated with a small but significant increase in risk for fatal cancer over a child's lifetime. This review aims to heighten awareness and spearhead efforts to reduce unnecessary computed tomography scans in children. The use of pediatric computed tomography continues to grow despite evidence on known risks of computed tomography-related radiation and induction of fatal cancers in children. More than 60 million computed tomography scans are estimated to be performed annually in the USA, with 7 million in children. Pediatric radiologists apply the practice of ALARA ('as low as reasonably achievable') to reduce radiation exposure. Education and advocacy directed to the referring clinician reinforce these principles. Radiation exposure may be further reduced by developing clinical pathways limiting computed tomography scanning and encourage alternate, nonradiation imaging modalities, such as ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. Although individual risk estimates are small, widespread use of computed tomography in the population may implicate a future public health issue. Advocacy by pediatric healthcare providers to promote intelligent dose reduction based on the principles of ALARA and the judicious use of computed tomography scanning is essential to foster the safest possible care of children.

  7. ALARA Overview System at Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Station.

    PubMed

    Kline, K B; Cope, W B

    1995-08-01

    During the Spring of 1994 the Health Physics Department at Florida Power Company used video and audio equipment to support remote health physics coverage for their Crystal River Unit 3 refueling outage (Refuel 9). The system consisted of eight cameras with audio interface linked to a control center located in a low-dose area. The system allowed health physics personnel to monitor steam generator and refueling activities with minimum exposure in high-dose areas, cutting by half the dose from the previous outage. B&W Nuclear Technologies provided complete setup, maintenance and tear-down, as well as assuming responsibilities for contaminated video and audio equipment.

  8. ALARA plan for the Old Hydrofracture Facility tanks contents removal project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    The purpose of the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) Tanks Contents Removal Project is to remove the liquid low-level waste from the five underground storage tanks located at OHF and transfer the resulting slurry to the Melton Valley Storage Tanks facility for treatment and disposal. Among the technical objectives for the OHF Project, there is a specific provision to maintain personnel exposures as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) during each activity of the project and to protect human health and the environment. The estimated doses and anticipated conditions for accomplishing this project are such that an ALARA Plan is necessary to facilitate formal radiological review of the campaign. This ALARA Plan describes the operational steps necessary for accomplishing the job together with the associated radiological impacts and planned controls. Individual and collective dose estimates are also provided for the various tasks. Any significant changes to this plan (i.e., planned exposures that are greater than 10% of original dose estimates) will require formal revision and concurrence from all parties listed on the approval page. Deviations from this plan (i.e., work outside the scope covered by this plan) also require the preparation of a task-specific ALARA Review that will be amended to this plan with concurrence from all parties listed on the approval page.

  9. ALARA considerations for the whole body neutron irradiation facility source removal project at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Patrick T

    2006-02-01

    This paper describes the activities that were involved with the safe removal of fourteen PuBe sources from the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Whole Body Neutron Irradiation Facility (WBNIF). As part of a Department of Energy and BNL effort to reduce the radiological inventory, the WBNIF was identified as having no future use. In order to deactivate the facility and eliminate the need for nuclear safety management and long-term surveillance, it was decided to remove the neutron sources and dismantle the facility. In addition, the sources did not have DOT Special Form documentation so they would need to be encapsulated once removed for offsite storage or disposal. The planning and the administrative as well as engineering controls put in place enabled personnel to safely remove and encapsulate the sources while keeping exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA).

  10. ALARA in pediatric interventional and fluoroscopic imaging: striving to keep radiation doses as low as possible during fluoroscopy of pediatric patients--a white paper executive summary.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Keith J; Kaste, Sue C

    2006-09-01

    Pediatric patients might be as much as 10 times more radiosensitive than adults. Thus, adherence to the principle of "As low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA) represents a practice mandate that minimizes ionizing radiation exposure while optimizing imaging results. This symposium is the third multidisciplinary program that focused on the ALARA principle in pediatric imaging and addressed issues associated with pediatric fluoroscopy and interventional imaging techniques.

  11. The optimisation approach of ALARA in nuclear practice: an early application of the precautionary principle. Scientific uncertainty versus legal uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Lierman, S; Veuchelen, L

    2005-01-01

    The late health effects of exposure to low doses of ionising radiation are subject to scientific controversy: one view finds threats of high cancer incidence exaggerated, while the other view thinks the effects are underestimated. Both views have good scientific arguments in favour of them. Since the nuclear field, both industry and medicine have had to deal with this controversy for many decades. One can argue that the optimisation approach to keep the effective doses as low as reasonably achievable, taking economic and social factors into account (ALARA), is a precautionary approach. However, because of these stochastic effects, no scientific proof can be provided. This paper explores how ALARA and the Precautionary Principle are influential in the legal field and in particular in tort law, because liability should be a strong incentive for safer behaviour. This so-called "deterrence effect" of liability seems to evaporate in today's technical and highly complex society, in particular when dealing with the late health effects of low doses of ionising radiation. Two main issues will be dealt with in the paper: 1. How are the health risks attributable to "low doses" of radiation regulated in nuclear law and what lessons can be learned from the field of radiation protection? 2. What does ALARA have to inform the discussion of the Precautionary Principle and vice-versa, in particular, as far as legal sanctions and liability are concerned? It will be shown that the Precautionary Principle has not yet been sufficiently implemented into nuclear law.

  12. Implementation of ALARA radiation protection on the ISS through polyethylene shielding augmentation of the Service Module Crew Quarters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavers, M. R.; Zapp, N.; Barber, R. E.; Wilson, J. W.; Qualls, G.; Toupes, L.; Ramsey, S.; Vinci, V.; Smith, G.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2004-01-01

    With 5-7 month long duration missions at 51.6° inclination in Low Earth Orbit, the ionizing radiation levels to which International Space Station (ISS) crewmembers are exposed will be the highest planned occupational exposures in the world. Even with the expectation that regulatory dose limits will not be exceeded during a single tour of duty aboard the ISS, the "as low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA) precept requires that radiological risks be minimized when possible through a dose optimization process. Judicious placement of efficient shielding materials in locations where crewmembers sleep, rest, or work is an important means for implementing ALARA for spaceflight. Polyethylene (C nH n) is a relatively inexpensive, stable, and, with a low atomic number, an effective shielding material that has been certified for use aboard the ISS. Several designs for placement of slabs or walls of polyethylene have been evaluated for radiation exposure reduction in the Crew Quarters (CQ) of the Zvezda (Star) Service Module. Optimization of shield designs relies on accurate characterization of the expected primary and secondary particle environment and modeling of the predicted radiobiological responses of critical organs and tissues. Results of the studies shown herein indicate that 20% or more reduction in equivalent dose to the CQ occupant is achievable. These results suggest that shielding design and risk analysis are necessary measures for reducing long-term radiological risks to ISS inhabitants and for meeting legal ALARA requirements. Verification of shield concepts requires results from specific designs to be compared with onboard dosimetry.

  13. Implementation of ALARA radiation protection on the ISS through polyethylene shielding augmentation of the Service Module crew quarters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavers, M.; Zapp, N.; Barber, R.; Wilson, J.; Qualls, G.; Toupes, L.; Ramsey, S.; Vinci, V.; Smith, G.; Cucinotta, F.

    With 5 to 7-month long duration missions at 51.6° inclination in Low Earth Orbit, the ionizing radiation levels to which International Space Station (ISS) crewmembers are exposed will be the highest planned occupational exposures in the world. Even with the expectation that regulatory dose limits will not be exceeded during a single tour of duty aboard the ISS, the "as low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA) precept requires that radiological risks be minimized when possible through an dose optimization process. Judicious placement of efficient shielding materials in locations where crewmembers sleep, rest, or work is an important means for implementing ALARA for spaceflight. Polyethylene (Cn Hn ), is a relatively inexpensive, stable, and, with a low atomic number, an effective shielding material that has been certified for use aboard the ISS. Several designs for placement of slabs or walls of polyethylene have been evaluated for radiation exposure reduction in the Crew Quarters (CQ) of the Zvezda (Star) Service Module. Optimization of shield designs relies on accurate characterization of the expected primary and secondary particle environment and modeling of the predicted radiobiological responses of critical organs and tissues. Results of the studies shown herein indicate that 20% or more reduction in dose equivalent to the CQ occupant is achievable. These results suggest that shielding design and risk analysis are necessary measures for reducing long-term radiological risks to ISS inhabitants and for meeting legal ALARA requirements. Verification of shield concepts requires results from specific designs to be compared with onboard dosimetry.

  14. The ALARA concept in pediatric cardiac catheterization: techniques and tactics for managing radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Justino, Henri

    2006-09-01

    The cardiac catheterization laboratory plays an important role in the management of children with congenital heart disease by not only enabling diagnosis but, in many cases, providing definitive therapy. The goal of the ALARA (As Low as Reasonably Achievable) concept as it applies to cardiac catheterization is to provide maximal diagnostic and therapeutic benefit while requiring the lowest possible radiation dose. A number of specific challenges unique to the setting of pediatric cardiac catheterization, such as higher heart rates, smaller cardiovascular structures, smaller body size, and wider variety of unusual anatomic variants with the potential need for relatively lengthy and complex studies, result in relatively high radiation doses (to the patient and, consequently, to laboratory personnel). In addition, the improved survival of patients with complex anatomy (e.g., palliated single ventricle anatomies) implies that many such children with chronic cardiac disease require frequent catheterizations within the first few years of life. These factors, coupled with the increased radiosensitivity of children and a longer lifespan ahead of them in which to possibly develop radiation-related sequelae, converge to create potentially ominous consequences. Attention to basic rules of radiation safety is, therefore, of tremendous importance in the pediatric cardiac catheterization laboratory. This review focuses on the importance of adequate planning of the study, optimizing image formation, management of fluoroscopy and cine angiography parameters, and the use of certain equipment features that might allow the cardiologist to lower the radiation dose without sacrificing image quality.

  15. Review of ALARA plan for activities at the 105 K-East fuel storage basin

    SciTech Connect

    Vargo, G.J.; Durham, J.S.; Hickey, E.E.; Stansbury, P.S.; Cicotte, G.R.

    1994-09-01

    As part of its ongoing efforts to reduce doses to workers to levels as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) tasked the Health Protection Department of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to review operations at the 105 K-East Fuel Storage Basin (105 K-East). This review included both routine operations and a proposed campaign to encapsulate N-Reactor fuel stored there. This report summarizes the results of PNL`s reviews of policy, procedures, and practices for operations at 105 K-East as well as an evaluation of the major sources of occupational radiation exposures. Where possible, data previously collected by WHC and its predecessors were used. In addition, PNL staff developed a three-dimensional model of the radiological environment within 105 K-East to assess the relative contributions of different radiation sources to worker dose and to provide a decision tool for use in evaluating alternative methods of dose rate reduction. The model developed by PNL indicates that for most areas in the basin the primary source of occupational radiation exposure is the contaminated concrete surfaces of the basin near the waterline. Basin cooling water piping represents a significant source in a number of areas, particularly the Technical Viewing Pit. This report contains specific recommendations to reduce the impact of these sources of occupational radiation exposure in 105 K-East. Other recommendations to reduce doses to workers during activities such as filter changes and filter sampling are also included.

  16. Commissioning of experimental enclosures (Hutches) at the Advanced Photon Source - A to Z ALARA.

    SciTech Connect

    Vacca, J.; Job, P. K.; Rauchas, A.; Justus, A.; Veluri, V. R.

    2000-11-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS), 7 GeV electron Storage Ring at the Argonne National Laboratory is designed to be a major national user facility providing high-brilliance x-ray beams. Figure 1 shows a plan view of the APS. At completion, APS will have 35 bending magnet (BM) beamlines and 35 insertion device (ID) beamlines. A typical x-ray beamline at APS comprises of a front end (FE) that confines the beam; a first optics enclosure (FOE) which houses optics to filter and monochromatize the beam; and beam transports, additional optics, and the experiment stations. Figure 2 shows a section of the storage ring with the layout of the ID and BM beamlines and typical experiment stations. The first x-ray beam was delivered to an experiment station in 1995. Ever since, to date, over 120 experimental stations (hutches) have been commissioned and are receiving intense x-ray beams of varying energies for various experiments. This paper describes in some detail the steps involved in the process of commissioning experimental stations and the implementation of the ALARA at each step.

  17. An ALARA approach to the radiological control of foodstuffs following an accidental release.

    PubMed

    Lombard, J; Coulon, R; Despres, A

    1988-06-01

    This article presents a methodology based on two complementary approaches, thus allowing a selection of maximal concentration in foodstuffs for determining appropriate countermeasures. The first approach is based on a minimal and maximal per capita intervention level and takes into account the annual intake of each product. The second one is based on a cost-benefit analysis, comparing the advantages of a countermeasure concerning those products presenting a contamination higher than a given maximal concentration (in terms of reduction of cost of the detriment associated with the risk), with its drawbacks (in terms of cost of the products) in order to select the "ALARA" maximal concentration. This second approach is used as a complement to the first one. The results obtained through these two approaches are given for four products (milk, meat, fresh vegetables, and corn) and two nuclides (Cs-137 and I-131). These are presented for various scenarios: one or various products contaminated by one or various radionuclides. It is concluded that these two approaches are complementary, the first one being related to individual risk and the second to collective risk. Therefore, these approaches are both of interest in the context of the elaboration of modalities for the radiological control of foodstuffs following an accidental release and both methods may be useful for determining appropriate countermeasures.

  18. INNOVATIVE ALARA TECHNIQUES & WORK PRACTICES USED AT HANFORD FOR D & D

    SciTech Connect

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2005-01-05

    The Department of Energy's Hanford Site has several nuclear facilities in the process of decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) with many more to follow. These facilities contain hazardous and highly radioactive materials in plant systems, gloveboxes, hot cells, rooms, collection tanks, ventilation ducts, fuel pools and outside these facilities. Some of the radioactive isotopes are fissile material and have to be closely guarded and require special handling. To safely work in this environment, workers had to learn new skills and develop innovative techniques to decontaminate, remove all equipment and demolish these radioactive work facilities without spreading contamination to the environment. Changing the workscope and worker attitudes involves a culture change for workers, managers, Department of Energy (DOE) and support organizations. D&D involves making different types of risk-based decisions than were made when the plants were operated or sitting dormant. Management involvement, use of the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), communications and sharing lessons learned are essential ingredients in developing a successful D&D strategy. New technologies have to be learned including the use of robotic devices and manipulative arms due to high dose rates and amount of radioactive contamination. Minimizing the amount of Transuranic and Mixed radioactive waste and learning how to ship the large quantities of waste are additional skills the Hanford workers have had to learn. D&D work at Hanford is in progress and Hanford Contractors have completed some very difficult and intense D&D work. This presentation will provide information on the best As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) protective measures, work practices, and the lessons learned to date.

  19. Implementation of ALARA radiation protection on the ISS through polyethylene shielding augmentation of the Service Module Crew Quarters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shavers, M. R.; Zapp, N.; Barber, R. E.; Wilson, J. W.; Qualls, G.; Toupes, L.; Ramsey, S.; Vinci, V.; Smith, G.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2004-01-01

    With 5-7 month long duration missions at 51.6 degrees inclination in Low Earth Orbit, the ionizing radiation levels to which International Space Station (ISS) crewmembers are exposed will be the highest planned occupational exposures in the world. Even with the expectation that regulatory dose limits will not be exceeded during a single tour of duty aboard the ISS, the "as low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA) precept requires that radiological risks be minimized when possible through a dose optimization process. Judicious placement of efficient shielding materials in locations where crewmembers sleep, rest, or work is an important means for implementing ALARA for spaceflight. Polyethylene (CnHn) is a relatively inexpensive, stable, and, with a low atomic number, an effective shielding material that has been certified for use aboard the ISS. Several designs for placement of slabs or walls of polyethylene have been evaluated for radiation exposure reduction in the Crew Quarters (CQ) of the Zvezda (Star) Service Module. Optimization of shield designs relies on accurate characterization of the expected primary and secondary particle environment and modeling of the predicted radiobiological responses of critical organs and tissues. Results of the studies shown herein indicate that 20% or more reduction in equivalent dose to the CQ occupant is achievable. These results suggest that shielding design and risk analysis are necessary measures for reducing long-term radiological risks to ISS inhabitants and for meeting legal ALARA requirements. Verification of shield concepts requires results from specific designs to be compared with onboard dosimetry. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Implementation of ALARA radiation protection on the ISS through polyethylene shielding augmentation of the Service Module Crew Quarters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shavers, M. R.; Zapp, N.; Barber, R. E.; Wilson, J. W.; Qualls, G.; Toupes, L.; Ramsey, S.; Vinci, V.; Smith, G.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2004-01-01

    With 5-7 month long duration missions at 51.6 degrees inclination in Low Earth Orbit, the ionizing radiation levels to which International Space Station (ISS) crewmembers are exposed will be the highest planned occupational exposures in the world. Even with the expectation that regulatory dose limits will not be exceeded during a single tour of duty aboard the ISS, the "as low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA) precept requires that radiological risks be minimized when possible through a dose optimization process. Judicious placement of efficient shielding materials in locations where crewmembers sleep, rest, or work is an important means for implementing ALARA for spaceflight. Polyethylene (CnHn) is a relatively inexpensive, stable, and, with a low atomic number, an effective shielding material that has been certified for use aboard the ISS. Several designs for placement of slabs or walls of polyethylene have been evaluated for radiation exposure reduction in the Crew Quarters (CQ) of the Zvezda (Star) Service Module. Optimization of shield designs relies on accurate characterization of the expected primary and secondary particle environment and modeling of the predicted radiobiological responses of critical organs and tissues. Results of the studies shown herein indicate that 20% or more reduction in equivalent dose to the CQ occupant is achievable. These results suggest that shielding design and risk analysis are necessary measures for reducing long-term radiological risks to ISS inhabitants and for meeting legal ALARA requirements. Verification of shield concepts requires results from specific designs to be compared with onboard dosimetry. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Implementation of ALARA radiation protection on the ISS through polyethylene shielding augmentation of the Service Module Crew Quarters.

    PubMed

    Shavers, M R; Zapp, N; Barber, R E; Wilson, J W; Qualls, G; Toupes, L; Ramsey, S; Vinci, V; Smith, G; Cucinotta, F A

    2004-01-01

    With 5-7 month long duration missions at 51.6 degrees inclination in Low Earth Orbit, the ionizing radiation levels to which International Space Station (ISS) crewmembers are exposed will be the highest planned occupational exposures in the world. Even with the expectation that regulatory dose limits will not be exceeded during a single tour of duty aboard the ISS, the "as low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA) precept requires that radiological risks be minimized when possible through a dose optimization process. Judicious placement of efficient shielding materials in locations where crewmembers sleep, rest, or work is an important means for implementing ALARA for spaceflight. Polyethylene (CnHn) is a relatively inexpensive, stable, and, with a low atomic number, an effective shielding material that has been certified for use aboard the ISS. Several designs for placement of slabs or walls of polyethylene have been evaluated for radiation exposure reduction in the Crew Quarters (CQ) of the Zvezda (Star) Service Module. Optimization of shield designs relies on accurate characterization of the expected primary and secondary particle environment and modeling of the predicted radiobiological responses of critical organs and tissues. Results of the studies shown herein indicate that 20% or more reduction in equivalent dose to the CQ occupant is achievable. These results suggest that shielding design and risk analysis are necessary measures for reducing long-term radiological risks to ISS inhabitants and for meeting legal ALARA requirements. Verification of shield concepts requires results from specific designs to be compared with onboard dosimetry. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Reducing patient radiation dosage during pediatric SVT ablations using an "ALARA" radiation reduction protocol in the modern fluoroscopic era.

    PubMed

    Gellis, Laura A; Ceresnak, Scott R; Gates, Gregory J; Nappo, Lynn; Pass, Robert H

    2013-06-01

    Ablation for supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) relies upon fluoroscopy (fluoro), which exposes the patient and staff to ionizing radiation. The objective of this work was to present a new "ALARA--As Low As Reasonably Achievable" protocol with alterations to fluoroscopic x-ray parameters to reduce dose without an electroanatomical (EAM) approach. All patients <21 years of age undergoing ablation of SVT at our institution from June 2011 to April 2012 were included. EAM was not utilized in any case. An ALARA protocol of low frame rates (2 or 3 fps), low fluoro dose/frame (10-18 nGy/frame), and other techniques aimed at reducing use of fluoroscopy were employed. Demographics, procedural, and radiation data were analyzed. Forty-two patients underwent ablation and were studied. Median age was 14.1 years (range 4.8-21.1 years), weight was 51 kg (range 18.2-75 kg), and body surface area was 1.51 m(2) (range 0.72- 1.94 m(2)). Seventeen (41%) had Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, 14 (33%) atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia, and 11 (26%) concealed pathways. Median procedural time was 114 minutes (57-246 minutes). Median dose area product (DAP) for posterioanterior and lateral fluoroscopy was 343.2 uGym(2) (range 38.2-3,172 uGym(2)); the median air Kerma product (K) was 45.4 mGy (range 6.7-567.5 mGy). DAP and K are lower than prior data from EAM and fluoroscopy techniques. The acute success rate was 95%; no procedural complications. An ALARA protocol for ablation of SVT reduced radiation to below levels previously reported for combined EAM/fluoro approaches. Success rates were excellent with no complications and without the costs of EAM. ©2013, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s hazardous waste management facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dionne, B.J.; Morris, S. III; Baum, J.W.

    1998-03-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an {open_quotes}As Low as Reasonably Achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique.

  4. Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s hazardous waste management facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dionne, B.J.; Morris, S.C. III; Baum, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an {open_quotes}As Low as Reasonably Achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique. This document contains the Appendices for the report.

  5. Lessons Learned at Envirocare of Utah's Containerized Waste Facility (CWF): Dose Minimization Through ALARA Techniques and Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Heckman, J.; Gardner, J.; Ledoux, M. R.

    2003-02-24

    Envirocare of Utah, Inc. (Envirocare) commenced operation of its Class A Containerized Waste Facility (CWF) on October 25, 2001. The opening of this facility began a new era for Envirocare, in that; their core business had always been low level, high volume, bulk radioactive waste. The CWF commenced operations to dispose of low level, low volume, high activity, containerized radioactive waste. Due to the potential for high dose rates on the waste disposal containers, the ALARA principle (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) plays an important role in the operation of the CWF and its mission to properly dispose of waste while minimizing doses to the workers, public, and the environment. This paper will enumerate some of the efforts made by the management and staff of the CWF that have contributed to significant dose reductions.

  6. [Place of the radiation safety officer in the implementation of the ALARA principle through European directive 97-43 items].

    PubMed

    Mozziconacci, J G; Ayivi, J; Loat, A; Ifergan, J; Mourbrun, M; Drevet, B

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to define the role of the radiation safety officer in raising the awareness of the radiology staff to the ALARA (As low as reasonable achievable) principle specified in European directive 97-43. The actions taken and the techniques used in our hospital, as well as the potential improvements that could be achieved with extra funding, will be presented. The didactic value of flow charts recording technical factors and fluoroscopy times for quality improvement will be demonstrated. In the future, a dosimeter incorporated on the new equipment could allow direct recording of the dose. The different items presented in this paper should allow routine implementation of the required elements described in the law 2003-270, i.e the French translation of European Directive 97-43.

  7. Clinical application of 'Justification' and 'Optimization' principle of ALARA in pediatric CT imaging: "How many children can be protected from unnecessary radiation?".

    PubMed

    Sodhi, Kushaljit S; Krishna, Satheesh; Saxena, Akshay K; Sinha, Anindita; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Lee, Edward Y

    2015-09-01

    Practice of ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle in the developed world is currently well established. However, there is striking lack of published data regarding such experience in the developing countries. Therefore, the goal of this study is to prospectively evaluate CT request forms to assess how many children could be protected from harmful radiation exposure if 'Justification' and 'Optimization' principles of ALARA are applied before obtaining CT imaging in a developing country. This can save children from potential radiation risks including development of brain cancer and leukemia. Consecutive CT request forms over a six month study period (May 16, 2013 to November 15, 2013) in a tertiary pediatric children's hospital in India were prospectively reviewed by two pediatric radiologists before obtaining CT imaging. First, 'Justification' of CT was evaluated and then 'Optimization' was applied for evaluation of appropriateness of the requested CT studies. The number (and percentage) of CT studies avoided by applying 'Justification' and 'Optimization' principle of ALARA were calculated. The difference in number of declined and optimized CT requests between CT requests from inpatient and outpatient departments was compared using Chi-Square test. A total of 1302 consecutive CT request forms were received during the study period. Some of the request forms (n=86; 6.61%) had requests for more than one (multiple) anatomical regions, hence, a total of 1392 different anatomical CT requests were received. Based on evaluation of the CT request forms for 'Justification' and 'Optimization' principle of ALARA by pediatric radiology reviewers, 111 individual anatomic part CT requests from 105 pediatric patients were avoided. Therefore, 8.06% (105 out of 1302 pediatric patients) were protected from unnecessary or additional radiation exposure.The rates of declined or optimized CT requests from inpatient department was significantly higher than that from outpatient

  8. IMPROVED WELL PLUGGING EQUIPMENT AND WASTE MANGEMENT TECHNIQUES EXCEED ALARA GOALS AT THE OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteside, R.; Pawlowicz, R.; Whitehead, L.; Arnseth, R.

    2002-02-25

    In 2000, Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) contracted Tetra Tech NUS, Inc. (TtNUS) and their sub-contractor, Texas World Operations, Inc. (TWO), to plug and abandon (P&A) 111 wells located in the Melton Valley area of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). One hundred and seven of those wells were used to monitor fluid movement and subsurface containment of the low level radioactive liquid waste/grout slurry that was injected into the Pumpkin Valley Shale Formation, underlying ORNL. Four wells were used as hydrofracture injection wells to emplace the waste in the shale formation. Although the practice of hydrofracturing was and is considered by many to pose no threat to human health or the environment, the practice was halted in 1982 after the Federal Underground Injection Control regulations were enacted by United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) making it necessary to properly close the wells. The work is being performed for the United States Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations (DOE ORO). The project team is using the philosophy of minimum waste generation and the principles of ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) as key project goals to minimize personnel and equipment exposure, waste generation, and project costs. Achievement of these goals was demonstrated by the introduction of several new pieces of custom designed well plugging and abandonment equipment that were tested and used effectively during field operations. Highlights of the work performed and the equipment used are presented.

  9. ALARA Controls and the Radiological Lessons Learned During the Uranium Fuel Removal Projects at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Gilliam, B. J.; Chapman, J. A.; Jugan, M. R.

    2002-02-26

    The removal of uranium-233 (233 U) from the auxiliary charcoal bed (ACB) of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE), performed from January through May 2001, created both unique radiological challenges and widely-applicable lessons learned. In addition to the criticality concerns and alpha contamination, 233U has an associated intense gamma photon from the cocontaminant uranium-232 (232U) decaying to thallium-208 (208Tl). Therefore, rigorous contamination controls and significant shielding were implemented. Extensive, timed mock-up training was also imperative to minimize individual and collective personnel exposures. Back-up shielding and containment techniques (that had been previously developed for defense in depth) were used successfully to control significant, changed conditions. Additional controls were placed on tests and on recovery designs to assure a higher level of safety throughout the removal operations. This paper delineates the manner in which each difficulty was solved, while relating the relevance of the results and the methodology to other projects with high dose-rate, highly-contaminated ionizing radiation hazards. Because of the distinctive features of and current interest in molten salt technology, a brief overview is provided. Also presented is the detailed, practical application of radiological controls integrated into, rather than added after, each evolution of the project--thus demonstrating the broad-based benefits of radiological engineering and ALARA reviews. The resolution of the serious contamination-control problems caused by unexpected uranium hexafluoride (UF6) gaseous diffusion is also explicated. Several tables and figures document the preparations, equipment and operations. A comparison of the pre-job dose calculations for the various functions of the uranium deposit removal (UDR) and the post-job dose-rate data are included in the conclusion.

  10. Exposure reduction through faster speed film-screen systems and a review of A.L.A.R.A. (as low as reasonably achievable).

    PubMed

    Nickoli, P C

    1993-08-01

    One of the most talked about and recognized practices for dose reduction is the "as low as reasonably achievable" (A.L.A.R.A.) concept initiated by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Many new technologists, however, are neither familiar with the concept nor recognize how important their part is in its implementation. In addition, some experienced technologists may need to refresh their knowledge of certain practices and how they relate to the A.L.A.R.A. concept. This article reviews the literature and presents new data on exposure technique reduction through film-screen speed combinations. The latest 250- and 600-speed film-screen combinations were obtained from leading manufacturers and tested to determine what new techniques would provide adequate radiographs using lower exposures. Comparisons were made between the 100- and 250-speed systems and the 400- and 600-speed systems. These comparisons were objectively based on aluminum stepwedge exposures measured by densitometry and subjectively based on exposure of 3M phantoms utilizing the newly established techniques with the higher speed film-screen system compared to the original techniques using the lower speed film-screen system. It was found that using a 250-speed system instead of a 100-speed system will reduce exposure dose by 36 to 60 per cent; using a 600-speed system in place of a 400-speed system exposure dose is reduced by 31 to 63 per cent. There is no apparent loss of resolution for either film-screen combination.

  11. INNOVATIVE ALARA TOOLS AND WORK PRACTICES USED AT THE DOE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect

    WAGGONER LO

    2010-02-12

    The Hanford Nuclear Reservation occupies an area of 586 square miles in southeastern Washington state. The site was created as part of the World War II Manhattan Project to produce weapons grade plutonium. A multitude of old reactor plants, processing facilities, underground tank farms, contaminated soil and ground water remain and are part of an on-going environmental cleanup mission of the site. The Columbia River bisects Hanford, and the concern is that the river will become contaminated if the sources of contamination are not removed. Currently facilities are being removed, the ground water is being treated, and contaminated soil is being transferred to an approved burial ground about 15 miles away from the River located in the center of the Hanford Site The remaining facilities and adjacent structures are undergoing D&D (decontaminate and demolish) and to date, significant progress has been made. During this presentation, I will discuss how we are using innovative tools and work practices to D&D these Hanford Site facilities.

  12. ALARA notes, Number 8

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.; Beckman, M.C.

    1993-10-01

    This document contains information dealing with the lessons learned from the experience of nuclear plants. In this issue the authors tried to avoid the `tyranny` of numbers and concentrated on the main lessons learned. Topics include: filtration devices for air pollution abatement, crack repair and inspection, and remote handling equipment.

  13. ALARA and work management

    SciTech Connect

    Schieber, C.; Perin, M.; Saumon, P.

    1995-03-01

    At the request of Electricite de France (EDF) and Framatome, the Nuclear Protection Evaluation Centre (CEPN) developed a three-year research project, between 1991 and 1993, to evaluate the impact of various work management factors that can influence occupational exposures in nuclear power plants (NPPs) and to assess the effectiveness of protective actions implemented to reduce them. Three different categories of factors have been delineated: those linked to working conditions (such as ergonomic of work areas and protective suits), those characterizing the operators (qualification, experience level, motivation, etc.). In order to quantify the impact of these factors, a detailed survey was carried out in five French NPPs, focusing on three types of operations: primary valves maintenance, decontamination of reactor cavity, and specialized maintenance operations on the steam generator. This survey was augmented by a literature review on the influence of {open_quotes}hostile{close_quotes} environment on working conditions. Finally, a specific study was performed in order to quantify the impact of various types of protective suits used in French nuclear installations according to the type of work to be done. All of these factors have been included in a model aiming at quantifying the effectiveness of protection actions, both from dosimetric and economic point of views.

  14. TRITIUM EXTRACTION FACILITY ALARA

    SciTech Connect

    Joye, BROTHERTON

    2005-04-19

    The primary mission of the Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) is to extract tritium from tritium producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs) that have been irradiated in a commercial light water reactor and to deliver tritium-containing gas to the Savannah River Site Facility 233-H. The tritium extraction segment provides the capability to deliver three (3) kilograms per year to the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile. The TEF includes processes, equipment and facilities capable of production-scale extraction of tritium while minimizing personnel radiation exposure, environmental releases, and waste generation.

  15. Pediatric patient radiation dosage during endomyocardial biopsies and right heart catheterization using a standard "ALARA" radiation reduction protocol in the modern fluoroscopic era.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Nicole J; Lamour, Jacqueline; Gellis, Laura A; Pass, Robert H

    2014-01-01

    Surveillance endomyocardial biopsy (EMB) with right heart catheterization (RHC) is the standard of care for the assessment of post cardiac transplantation rejection. This procedure has traditionally relied upon fluoroscopy, which exposes both patient and staff to the risks of ionizing radiation. These risks may be of particular concern in the transplant patient who must undergo many such procedures lifelong. We present data on a new "ALARA - As Low As Reasonably Achievable" protocol to reduce radiation exposure during the performance of RHC with EMB. All cardiac transplantation patients < 21 years of age who underwent RHC with EMB at The Children's Hospital at Montefiore from 6/11-12/11 were included. EMB was performed after all right heart pressures including wedge pressure and thermodilution cardiac output were measured. A novel ALARA protocol consisting of multiple features including ultra-low frame rates (2-3 fps), low fluoro dose/frame (10-18 nGy/frame), use of the "air-gap" technique for patients < 20 kg, and multiple other techniques aimed at minimizing use of fluoroscopy were employed in all cases. Demographics, procedural data and patient radiation exposure levels were collected and analyzed. 18 patients underwent 45 surveillance RHC with EMB in the study period and were the subject of this analysis. The mean age was 5.9 ± 6.1 years, weight was 20.4 kg ± 16.6 kg, and BSA was 0.75 ± 45 m(2) . PA fluoroscopy was used exclusively in 45/45. Vascular access was RFV (21/45; 47%), RIJV (17/45; 38%), LFV (4/45; 9%) and LIJV (3/45; 7%). The median number of EMB specimens obtained was 5 (range, 4-7). The median fluoroscopy time was 3.7 min (range, 1.2-9). The median air Kerma product (K) was 1.4 mGy (range, 0.4-14), and dose area product (DAP) was 15.8 uGym(2) (range, 3.5-144.5). The K and DAP are substantially lower than any prior published data for RHC/EMB in this patient group. There were no procedural complications. The use of a novel ALARA protocol for RHC

  16. ALARA plan for the Old Hydrofracture Facility tanks contents removal project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Amendment 1 for Appendix B: Install flex-pipe on tank riser spools

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-13

    This amendment to Appendix B contains the specific ALARA evaluations for installing flex-pipe on riser spools to accommodate ventilation duct connections to the north risers of each tank. The work will be a routine task that is part of the Equipment Installation and Mobilization phase of the project. The dose rates were estimated using the recent Radiological Surveillance Section radiological survey: SAAS-97-063S. Task B-6 has been added to the OHF Project ALARA review process to address a field decision to modify an approach to installing the tank ventilation system. The revised approach will incorporate 12-in. diameter, 36-in. long, stainless steel flex-pipe connected to each north riser spool to address the problem of pipe fitting multiple bends and turns expected with the 12-in. PVC duct. This improved approach will reduce the time necessary to install the duct system between the tanks and the ventilation skid. However, the task includes opening the 12-in. riser spool connections to replace the currently installed blind gaskets. Since a riser spool for each tank will be opened, there is a potential for significant personnel exposure and spread of contamination that will addressed through this ALARA review process.

  17. Maintaining radiation exposures as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) for dental personnel operating portable hand-held x-ray equipment.

    PubMed

    McGiff, Thomas J; Danforth, Robert A; Herschaft, Edward E

    2012-08-01

    Clinical experience indicates that newly available portable hand-held x-ray units provide advantages compared to traditional fixed properly installed and operated x-ray units in dental radiography. However, concern that hand-held x-ray units produce higher operator doses than fixed x-ray units has caused regulatory agencies to mandate requirements for use of hand-held units that go beyond those recommended by the manufacturer and can discourage the use of this technology. To assess the need for additional requirements, a hand-held x-ray unit and a pair of manikins were used to measure the dose to a simulated operator under two conditions: exposures made according to the manufacturer's recommendations and exposures made according to manufacturer's recommendation except for the removal of the x-ray unit's protective backscatter shield. Dose to the simulated operator was determined using an array of personal dosimeters and a pair of pressurized ion chambers. The results indicate that the dose to an operator of this equipment will be less than 0.6 mSv y⁻¹ if the device is used according to the manufacturer's recommendations. This suggests that doses to properly trained operators of well-designed, hand-held dental x-ray units will be below 1.0 mSv y⁻¹ (2% of the annual occupational dose limit) even if additional no additional operational requirements are established by regulatory agencies. This level of annual dose is similar to those reported as typical dental personnel using fixed x-ray units and appears to satisfy the ALARA principal for this class of occupational exposures.

  18. Virtual radiation fields for ALARA determination

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, T.W.

    1995-12-31

    As computing power has increased, so too has the ability to model and simulate complex systems and processes. In addition, virtual reality technology has made it possible to visualize and understand many complex scientific and engineering problems. For this reason, a virtual dosimetry program called Virtual Radiation Fields (VRF) is developed to model radiation dose rate and cumulative dose to a receptor operating in a virtual radiation environment. With the design and testing of many facilities and products taking place in the virtual world, this program facilitates the concurrent consideration of radiological concerns during the design process. Three-dimensional (3D) graphical presentation of the radiation environment is made possible through the use of IGRIP, a graphical modeling program developed by Deneb Robotics, Inc. The VRF simulation program was designed to model and display a virtual dosimeter. As a demonstration of the program`s capability, the Hanford tank, C-106, was modeled to predict radiation doses to robotic equipment used to remove radioactive waste from the tank. To validate VRF dose predictions, comparison was made with reported values for tank C-106, which showed agreement to within 0.5%. Graphical information is presented regarding the 3D dose rate variation inside the tank. Cumulative dose predictions were made for the cleanup operations of tank C-106. A four-dimensional dose rate map generated by VRF was used to model the dose rate not only in 3D space but also as a function of the amount of waste remaining in the tank. This allowed VRF to predict dose rate at any stage in the waste removal process for an accurate simulation of the radiological conditions throughout the tank cleanup procedure.

  19. Peach bottom recirculation piping replacement ALARA program

    SciTech Connect

    Englesson, G.A.; Hilsmeier, A.E.; Mann, B.J.

    1986-01-01

    In late 1983, Philadelphia Electric Company (PECo) began detailed planning to replace the recirculation, residual heat removal, and part of the reactor water cleanup piping of the Peach Bottom Unit 2 reactor. Included in this work was an estimate of the collective exposure expected during piping replacement. That initial estimate, 1945 man-rem, is compared with the actual collective dose incurred during the piping replacement program. Also included are the exposures incurred during two additional tasks (safe end replacement and recirculation pump disassembly and decontamination) not considered in the initial estimate.

  20. Sentinel node biopsy: ALARA and other considerations.

    PubMed

    Strzelczyk, I; Finlayson, C

    2004-02-01

    For a majority of solid tumors, the most powerful and predictive prognostic factor is the status of the regional lymph nodes. Sentinel lymph node sampling continues to gain in popularity as patients and their physicians seek to avoid the potential morbidity associated with standard axillary node dissection. Lymphoscintigraphy, one of the recently explored techniques of lymphatic mapping, involves pre-operative intradermal or subcutaneous administration of a radiopharmaceutical. While this approach is gaining widely spread acceptance, there is still a lack of consensus on which radiopharmaceutical agent has the most ideal properties. By far, the most commonly used agents are 99mTc labeled colloids, but other agents are also used clinically and are under investigation or development worldwide. A number of other clinical, technical, dosimetric, and logistical considerations regarding this procedure remain. They include questions such as who should be performing the procedure, what precautions to take during surgery, how to better isolate "hot" nodes and thus improve the efficacy of determining metastases to the draining lymph node, what precautions to take when handling surgical specimens, etc. There is clearly a need to review as low as reasonably achievable considerations and other issues that arise as this technique evolves and finds its role in the evaluation of various types of cancers. This paper, based on our own experiences and those of others, fills this gap.

  1. Boeing Michigan Aeronautical Research Center (BOMARC) Missile Shelters and Bunkers Scoping Survey Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    Instruction AFIOH Air Force Institute for Operational Health ALARA as low as reasonably achievable ARAR applicable or relevant and appropriate...with shelters 208 and 210 under ALARA . Many of these actions were completed in 2009. Based on this survey and minor remedial actions, additional...more likely than not. 15 5.5 ALARA . The “as low as reasonably achievable” ( ALARA ) principle has been applied to the remediation of soils on

  2. Boeing Michigan Aeronautical Research Center (BOMARC) Missile Shelters and Bunkers Scoping Survey Workplan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    AF Air Force AFI Air Force Instruction AFIOH Air Force Institute for Operational Health ALARA as low as reasonably achievable ARAR...4.5 ALARA . The as low as reasonably achievable ( ALARA ) has been applied to the remediation of soils on the site, and for consistency should be

  3. Experience with ALARA and ALARA procedures in a nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Abrahamse, J.C.

    1995-03-01

    The nuclear power plant Borssele is a Siemens two-loop Pressurized Water Reactor having a capacity of 480 MWe and in operation since 1973. The nuclear power plant Borssle is located in the southwest of the Netherlands, near the Westerschelde River. In the first nine years of operation the radiation level in the primary system increased, reaching a maximum in 1983. The most important reason for this high radiation level was the cobalt content of the grid assemblies of the fuel elements. After resolving this problem, the radiation level decreased to a level comparable with that of other nuclear power plants.

  4. Occupational doses and ALARA - recent developments in Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Godas, T.; Viktorsson, C.

    1995-03-01

    Sweden has traditionally experienced very slow doses to workers in the nuclear industry. However, this trend has since last year been broken mainly due to significant maintenance and repair work. This paper will describe occupational dose trends in Sweden and discuss actions that are being implemented to control this new situation.

  5. Applying the ALARA concept to the evaluation of vesicoureteric reflux.

    PubMed

    Lee, Richard S; Diamond, David A; Chow, Jeanne S

    2006-09-01

    The voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) is a widely used study to define lower urinary tract anatomy and to diagnose vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) in children. We examine the technical advances in the VCUG and other examinations for reflux that have reduced radiation exposure of children, and we give recommendations for the use of imaging studies in four groups of children: (1) children with urinary tract infection, (2) siblings of patients with VUR, (3) infants with antenatal hydronephrosis (ANH), and (4) children with a solitary functioning kidney. By performing examinations with little to no radiation, carefully selecting only the children who need imaging studies and judiciously timing follow-up examinations, we can reduce the radiation exposure of children being studied for reflux.

  6. ALARA study of teaching effectiveness on reducing radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Feigenbaum, K; Ellett, M L; Miller, R; Hyland, L

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the effectiveness of radiation safety instruction and the impact on radiation film badge levels. A convenience sample of 144 endoscopy nurses and technicians was pretested for radiation safety knowledge, given a course in radiation safety, and then posttested immediately after the course and then 6 months later. Radiation badges were analyzed for radiation exposure at preinstruction, 1 month postinstruction, and 6 months postinstruction. Results showed that the instruction was effective. There was only a slight decrease in radiation badge readings; the decrease, however, was not statistically significant.

  7. Savannah River Site Radiological Technology Center's Efforts Supporting Waste Minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberger, K. H.; Smith, L. S.; Bates, R. L.

    2003-02-25

    This paper describes the efforts of the newly formed Radiological Technology Center (RTC) at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) to support waste minimization. The formation of the RTC was based upon the highly successful ALARA Center at the DOE Hanford Site. The RTC is tasked with evaluation and dissemination of new technologies and techniques for radiological hazard reduction and waste minimization. Initial waste minimization efforts have focused on the promotion of SRS containment fabrication capabilities, new personal protective equipment and use of recyclable versus disposable materials.

  8. Planning Guidance for Response to a Nuclear Detonation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-16

    91 1 Acronym List AC Assembly Center AFRRI Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute ALARA ...significantly reduces radiation dose to occupants during an extended period ALARA – (Acronym for “As Low As Reasonably Achievable”) –A process to control or...employ the “as low as reasonably achievable” ( ALARA ) principle when responding to an incident. Protocols for maintaining ALARA doses should include the

  9. Planning Guidance for Response to a Nuclear Detonation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-16

    91 1 Acronym List AC Assembly Center AFRRI Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute ALARA As Low...reduces radiation dose to occupants during an extended period ALARA – (Acronym for “As Low As Reasonably Achievable”) –A process to control or...as low as reasonably achievable” ( ALARA ) principle when responding to an incident. Protocols for maintaining ALARA doses should include the

  10. An overview of ALARA considerations during Yankee Atomic`s Component Removal Project

    SciTech Connect

    Granados, B.; Babineau, G.; Colby, B.; Cox, B.

    1995-03-01

    In Februrary 1992, Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC) permanently shutdown Yankee Nuclear Power Station in Rowe, Massachusetts, after thirty-two years of efficient operation. Yankee`s plan decommissioning is to defer dismantlement until a low level radioactive waste (LLRW) disposal facility is available. The plant will be maintained in a safe storage condition until a firm contract for the disposal of LLRW generated during decommissioning can be secured. Limited access to a LLRW disposal facility may occur during the safe storage period. Yankee intends to use these opportunities to remove components and structures. A Component Removal Project (CRP) was initiated in 1993 to take advantage of one of these opportunities. A Componenet Removal Project (CRP) was initiated in 1993 to take advantage of one of these opportunities. The CRP includes removal of four steam generators, the pressurizer, and segmentation of reactor vessel internals and preparation of LLRW for shipment and disposal at Chem-Nuclear`s Barnwell, South Carolina facility. The CRP is projected to be completed by June 1994 at an estimated total worker exposure of less than 160 person-rem.

  11. Implementation of ALARA at the design stage of Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Brissaud, A.; Ridoux, P.

    1995-03-01

    In the 1970s, Electricite de France (EdF) had limited knowledge and experience of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Electricity generation by nuclear units was oriented towards gas-graphite reactors, even though EdF had a share in the PWR unit of CHOOZ A-1 (250 MWe, later upgraded to 320 MWe). Some facts about the origin of doses in that king of reactor were known to the research and development (R&D) support staff of EdF, which mainly comprises the French Atomic Commission (CEA), but only a few of EdF`s engineers were aware of these facts. One has to bear in mind that CHOOZ A-1 only went critical in April 1967 and was officially connected to the grid in May 1970 after some important problems had been solved. Meanwhile, the nuclear program was launched at full speed, beginning with the order for FESSENHEIM 1 in 1970, FESSENHEIM 2 and BUGEY 2 and 3 in 1971. TIHANGE 1, in which EdF had a share, went on-line in September 1975. Also, supposing that EdF had had such knowledge and experience, it is quite evident that it would have been very difficult to modify the lay-out inside the reactor building.

  12. A user friendly database for use in ALARA job dose assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Zodiates, A.M.; Willcock, A.

    1995-03-01

    The pressurized water reactor (PWR) design chosen for adoption by Nuclear Electric plc was based on the Westinghouse Standard Nuclear Unit Power Plant (SNUPPS). This design was developed to meet the United Kingdom requirements and these improvements are embodied in the Sizewell B plant which will start commercial operation in 1994. A user-friendly database was developed to assist the station in the dose and ALARP assessments of the work expected to be carried out during station operation and outage. The database stores the information in an easily accessible form and enables updating, editing, retrieval, and searches of the information. The database contains job-related information such as job locations, number of workers required, job times, and the expected plant doserates. It also contains the means to flag job requirements such as requirements for temporary shielding, flushing, scaffolding, etc. Typical uses of the database are envisaged to be in the prediction of occupational doses, the identification of high collective and individual dose jobs, use in ALARP assessments, setting of dose targets, monitoring of dose control performance, and others.

  13. Neutron field measurements for alara purposes around a Van de Graaff accelerator building.

    PubMed

    Kockerols, P; Lebacq, A L; Gasparro, J; Hult, M; Janssens, H; Lövestam, G; Vanhavere, F

    2004-01-01

    The Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements operates a 7.0 MV Van de Graaff accelerator to generate monoenergetic neutron radiation for experimental applications. Owing to increased intensities of generated neutron fields and the more stringent regulation related to the maximum dose for the public, a concrete shielding wall surrounding the experimental building was constructed. This paper presents a study aiming at evaluating the effect of the shielding on the neutron field outside the wall. For this purpose, the following measurements were carried out around the building: (1) cartography of the neutron field for different experimental conditions; (2) measurement of neutron spectra using multiple Bonner spheres; (3) activation measurements using gold discs followed by low-level gamma spectrometry. From the measurements, it can be concluded that the wall fulfils its purpose to reduce the neutron dose rate to the surrounding area to an acceptable level.

  14. Radiation therapy for children: evolving technologies in the era of ALARA.

    PubMed

    Kun, Larry E; Beltran, Chris

    2009-02-01

    The evolution of ever more sophisticated oncologic imaging and technologies providing far more precise radiation therapy have combined to increase the utilization of sophisticated radiation therapy in childhood cancer. For a majority of children with common central nervous system, soft tissue, bone, and dysontogenic neoplasms, local irradiation is fundamental to successful multi-disciplinary management. Along with more precise target volume definition and radiation delivery, new technologies provide added certainty of patient positioning (electronic portal imaging, cone beam CT) and conformality of dose delivery (3-D conformal irradiation, intensity modulated radiation therapy, proton beam therapy). Each of the major areas of technology development are able to better confine the high-dose region to the intended target, but they are also associated with the potential for larger volumes of uninvolved tissues being exposed to low radiation doses. The latter issue plays a role in documented levels of secondary carcinogenesis, sometimes with greater anticipated incidence than that seen in conventional radiation therapy. Parameters related to carcinogenesis, such as dose-volume relationships and neutron contamination that accompanies high-energy photon irradiation and proton therapy, can be identified, sometimes modulated, and accepted as part of the clinical decision process in fine tuning radiation therapy in this more vulnerable age group.

  15. The application of non-parametric statistical techniques to an ALARA programme.

    PubMed

    Moon, J H; Cho, Y H; Kang, C S

    2001-01-01

    For the cost-effective reduction of occupational radiation dose (ORD) at nuclear power plants, it is necessary to identify what are the processes of repetitive high ORD during maintenance and repair operations. To identify the processes, the point values such as mean and median are generally used, but they sometimes lead to misjudgment since they cannot show other important characteristics such as dose distributions and frequencies of radiation jobs. As an alternative, the non-parametric analysis method is proposed, which effectively identifies the processes of repetitive high ORD. As a case study, the method is applied to ORD data of maintenance and repair processes at Kori Units 3 and 4 that are pressurised water reactors with 950 MWe capacity and have been operating since 1986 and 1987 respectively, in Korea and the method is demonstrated to be an efficient way of analysing the data.

  16. Characterization of workplaces in interventional radiology using active dosemeters ALARA OD.

    PubMed

    Prlić, I; Surić-Mihić, M; Milković-Kraus, S; Mestrović, T; Vrtar, M

    2007-01-01

    Because of progressive development and extended use of interventional radiology (IR) procedures it is highly recommended that all individuals involved in the process should be aware of the potential for both stochastic and deterministic effects due to occupational exposure. IR procedures are performed in such a manner that certain number of medical staff are always needed near the patient, near the X-ray unit. The new challenge to regular radiation protection is to ensure 'safe' working environment in such radiation X-ray field geometry. In this work the patient is physically regarded as a secondary radiation source emitting scattered X-rays. Passive dosemeters will give us clear data only about the monthly integrated occupational dose; there is concern over the frequency and duration, actual pattern of receiving this dose. We have developed active electronic dosemeter (AED) device, which provides additional dosimetry data about the frequency and duration of professional low level X-ray exposure burden.

  17. ALARA: Impact of Practice Quality Improvement Initiative on Dose Reduction in Pediatric Voiding Cystourethrogram.

    PubMed

    Jaju, Alok; Shaw, Hillary L; Don, Steven; Bowling, Rebecca Hulett; Hildebolt, Charles F

    2015-10-01

    This practice quality improvement study of pediatric voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) investigated the adequacy of substituting last-image capture for digital-spot images and dose reduction when this substitution was implemented and determined correlations between dose-area products (DAPs), patient ages, and fluoroscopy times. The study consisted of three phases: phase 1 documented baseline data and evaluated diagnostic accuracy between last-image capture and digital-spot images. Phase 2 documented the change in dose after substituting last-image capture for digital-spot images. Phase 3 measured doses 3 years later. Each phase-1 VCUG study was segregated into two image sets: last-image capture and digital-spot images. Three radiologists graded vesicoureteral reflux on each side using the international grading scale. Weighted kappa statistics assessed grading differences between image sets. Patient age, fluoroscopy time, and DAP were assessed with parametric and nonparametric statistics. Seventy-seven, 65, and 71 VCUGs were assessed for phases 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Weighted κ = 0.94-0.99 indicated nearly perfect agreement between last-image-capture and digital-spot-image interpretations. For phase 2, last-image capture was substituted for digital-spot images for early-filling and voiding images. DAP decreased for all three radiologists (p ≤ 0.01). Five of six (83%) correlations between DAP and age were higher than the correlations between DAP and fluoroscopy time. The dose remained significantly lower in phase 3. This project changed practice by substituting last-image capture for digital-spot images without affecting vesicoureteral reflux grading while reducing radiation exposure. Monitoring DAP is a better assessment of radiation exposure than is fluoroscopy time.

  18. Intraoperative radiation safety in orthopaedics: a review of the ALARA (As low as reasonably achievable) principle.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Daniel J; Patel, Jay N; Liporace, Frank A; Yoon, Richard S

    2016-01-01

    The use of fluoroscopy has become commonplace in many orthopaedic surgery procedures. The benefits of fluoroscopy are not without risk of radiation to patient, surgeon, and operating room staff. There is a paucity of knowledge by the average orthopaedic resident in terms proper usage and safety. Personal protective equipment, proper positioning, effective communication with the radiology technician are just of few of the ways outlined in this article to decrease the amount of radiation exposure in the operating room. This knowledge ensures that the amount of radiation exposure is as low as reasonably achievable. Currently, in the United States, guidelines for teaching radiation safety in orthopaedic surgery residency training is non-existent. In Europe, studies have also exhibited a lack of standardized teaching on the basics of radiation safety in the operating room. This review article will outline the basics of fluoroscopy and educate the reader on how to safe fluoroscopic image utilization.

  19. Patient-centered Care.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, April

    2009-01-01

    Patient-centered care focuses on the patient and the individual's particular health care needs. The goal of patient-centered health care is to empower patients to become active participants in their care. This requires that physicians, radiologic technologists and other health care providers develop good communication skills and address patient needs effectively. Patient-centered care also requires that the health care provider become a patient advocate and strive to provide care that not only is effective but also safe. For radiologic technologists, patient-centered care encompasses principles such as the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) concept and contrast media safety. Patient-centered care is associated with a higher rate of patient satisfaction, adherence to suggested lifestyle changes and prescribed treatment, better outcomes and more cost-effective care. This article is a Directed Reading. Your access to Directed Reading quizzes for continuing education credit is determined by your area of interest. For access to other quizzes, go to www.asrt.org/store. According to one theory, most patients judge the quality of their healthcare much like they rate an airplane flight. They assume that the airplane is technically viable and is being piloted by competent people. Criteria for judging a particular airline are personal and include aspects like comfort, friendly service and on-time schedules. Similarly, patients judge the standard of their healthcare on nontechnical aspects, such as a healthcare practitioner's communication and "soft skills." Most are unable to evaluate a practitioner's level of technical skill or training, so the qualities they can assess become of the utmost importance in satisfying patients and providing patient-centered care.(1).

  20. Addressing as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) issues: investigation of worker collective external and extremity dose data

    DOE PAGES

    Cournoyer, Michael Edward; Costigan, Stephen Andrew; Schreiber, Stephen Bruce

    2017-03-17

    Plutonium emits both neutrons and photons and when it is stored or handled inside a glovebox, both photons and neutrons are significant external radiation hazards. Doses to the extremities are usually dominated by gamma radiation in typical plutonium glovebox operations. Excess external dose can generates stochastic effects consisting of cancer and benign tumors in some organs. Direct doses from radiation sources external to the body are measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) placed on the glovebox worker between the neck and waist. Wrist dosimeters are used to assess externally penetrating radiation including neutrons and provide an estimate of neutron radiation exposuremore » to the extremities. Both TLDs and wrist dosimeters are processed monthly for most glovebox workers. Here, worker collective extremity and external dose data have been analyzed to prevent and mitigate external radiation events through the use of Lean Manufacturing and Six Sigma business practices (LSS). Employing LSS, statistically significant variations (trends) are identified in worker collective extremity and external dose data. Finally, the research results presented in this paper are pivotal to the ultimate focus of this program, which is to minimize external radiation events.« less

  1. Operational Radiation Protection in High-Energy Physics Accelerators: Implementation of ALARA in Design and Operation of Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Fasso, A.; Rokni, S.; /SLAC

    2011-06-30

    It used to happen often, to us accelerator radiation protection staff, to be asked by a new radiation worker: ?How much dose am I still allowed?? And we smiled looking at the shocked reaction to our answer: ?You are not allowed any dose?. Nowadays, also thanks to improved training programs, this kind of question has become less frequent, but it is still not always easy to convince workers that staying below the exposure limits is not sufficient. After all, radiation is still the only harmful agent for which this is true: for all other risks in everyday life, from road speed limits to concentration of hazardous chemicals in air and water, compliance to regulations is ensured by keeping below a certain value. It appears that a tendency is starting to develop to extend the radiation approach to other pollutants (1), but it will take some time before the new attitude makes it way into national legislations.

  2. Evaluation of DUF{sub 6}-G-Q-STU-001 (ALARA analysis supporting approval of authorized limits).

    SciTech Connect

    Ranek, N. L.; Croff, A. G.; Cheng, J.-J.; Gillette, J. L.; Avci, H. I.

    2004-06-29

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected Uranium Disposition Services, LLC (UDS) to proceed with disposition of the inventory of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) for which DOE has management responsibility. To accomplish this task, UDS will construct and operate facilities at two DOE-owned sites, one near Paducah, Kentucky, and another near Portsmouth, Ohio, to convert DUF{sub 6} to uranium oxide (principally U{sub 3}O{sub 8}). The off-gas treatment system for the conversion process will produce aqueous hydrogen fluoride (AqHF), also known as hydrofluoric acid, and a relatively small amount of calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}), each containing some residual radioactive material. As part of its contractual charge, UDS must identify and implement a disposition for all three products generated by the DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities: uranium oxide, AqHF, and CaF{sub 2}. The UDS DUF{sub 6} Conversion Product Management Plan (DUF{sub 6}-UDS-PLN-004, September 2003) concludes that a viable commercial market exists for AqHF, which, if not sold, would have to be neutralized, producing a relatively large quantity of additional CaF{sub 2}. Although CaF{sub 2} has very limited market potential, there is some possibility that it also could be sold. If these potential markets could be developed, DOE would save the costs of neutralizing AqHF and/or disposing of the CaF{sub 2} neutralization product. Accordingly, UDS has decided to seek approval from DOE for unrestricted release of both AqHF and CaF{sub 2} that would be generated if AqHF could not be sold or if sales were interrupted. If AqHF were sold, the relatively small quantity of CaF{sub 2} still being generated by the DUF{sub 6} conversion process off-gas treatment system would most likely be disposed of as waste. The main product of conversion, depleted uranium oxide, will be reused to the extent possible or disposed of as waste, if no practical reuse option is found.

  3. Novel real-time 3D radiological mapping solution for ALARA maximization, D and D assessments and radiological management

    SciTech Connect

    Dubart, Philippe; Hautot, Felix; Morichi, Massimo; Abou-Khalil, Roger

    2015-07-01

    Good management of dismantling and decontamination (D and D) operations and activities is requiring safety, time saving and perfect radiological knowledge of the contaminated environment as well as optimization for personnel dose and minimization of waste volume. In the same time, Fukushima accident has imposed a stretch to the nuclear measurement operational approach requiring in such emergency situation: fast deployment and intervention, quick analysis and fast scenario definition. AREVA, as return of experience from his activities carried out at Fukushima and D and D sites has developed a novel multi-sensor solution as part of his D and D research, approach and method, a system with real-time 3D photo-realistic spatial radiation distribution cartography of contaminated premises. The system may be hand-held or mounted on a mobile device (robot, drone, e.g). In this paper, we will present our current development based on a SLAM technology (Simultaneous Localization And Mapping) and integrated sensors and detectors allowing simultaneous topographic and radiological (dose rate and/or spectroscopy) data acquisitions. This enabling technology permits 3D gamma activity cartography in real-time. (authors)

  4. ALARA Analysis for Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 Fuel Storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB)

    SciTech Connect

    LEWIS, M.E.

    2000-04-06

    The addition of Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Core 2 Blanket Fuel Assembly storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB) will increase the total cumulative CSB personnel exposure from receipt and handling activities. The loaded Shippingport Spent Fuel Canisters (SSFCs) used for the Shippingport fuel have a higher external dose rate. Assuming an MCO handling rate of 170 per year (K East and K West concurrent operation), 24-hr CSB operation, and nominal SSFC loading, all work crew personnel will have a cumulative annual exposure of less than the 1,000 mrem limit.

  5. U.S. Department of Energy National Center of Excellence for Metals Recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, V.; Bennett, M.; Bishop, L.

    1998-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) National Center of Excellence for Metals Recycle has recently been established. The vision of this new program is to develop a DOE culture that promotes pollution prevention by considering the recycle and reuse of metal as the first and primary disposition option and burial as a last option. The Center of Excellence takes the approach that unrestricted release of metal is the first priority because it is the most cost-effective disposition pathway. Where this is not appropriate, restricted release, beneficial reuse, and stockpile of ingots are considered. Current recycling activities include the sale of 40,000 tons of scrap metal from the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly K-25 Plant) K-770 scrap yard, K-1064 surplus equipment and machinery, 7,000 PCB-contaminated drums, 12,000 tons of metal from the Y-l2 scrap yard, and 1,000 metal pallets. In addition, the Center of Excellence is developing a toolbox for project teams that will contain a number of specific tools to facilitate metals recycle. This Internet-based toolbox will include primers, computer programs, and case studies designed to help sites to perform life cycle analysis, perform ALARA (As Low As is Reasonably Achievable) analysis for radiation exposures, provide pollution prevention information and documentation, and produce independent government estimates. The use of these tools is described for two current activities: disposition of scrap metal in the Y-12 scrapyard, and disposition of PCB-contaminated drums.

  6. Utilizing 3D-visualization to apply compulsory ALARA principles in nuclear power plant design and day-to-day operation

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R. L.; Lake, J. E.

    2006-07-01

    The development of an advanced visualization and simulation tool to support both design as well as day-to-day operation is presented. This tool exploits cutting edge computer graphics, physics-based effects modeling, virtual reality, and gaming technologies to establish a system that can eventually be used for the administrative planning and training of plant operators and design engineers. (authors)

  7. Effectiveness of a staged US and CT protocol for the diagnosis of pediatric appendicitis: reducing radiation exposure in the age of ALARA.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthi, Rajesh; Ramarajan, Naresh; Wang, Nancy E; Newman, Beverley; Rubesova, Erika; Mueller, Claudia M; Barth, Richard A

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a staged ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography (CT) imaging protocol for the accurate diagnosis of suspected appendicitis in children and the opportunity for reducing the number of CT examinations and associated radiation exposure. This retrospective study was compliant with HIPAA, and a waiver of informed consent was approved by the institutional review board. This study is a review of all imaging studies obtained in children suspected of having appendicitis between 2003 and 2008 at a suburban pediatric emergency department. A multidisciplinary staged US and CT imaging protocol for the diagnosis of appendicitis was implemented in 2003. In the staged protocol, US was performed first in patients suspected of having appendicitis; follow-up CT was recommended when US findings were equivocal. Of 1228 pediatric patients who presented to the emergency department for suspected appendicitis, 631 (287 boys, 344 girls; age range, 2 months to 18 years; median age, 10 years) were compliant with the imaging pathway. The sensitivity, specificity, negative appendectomy rate (number of appendectomies with normal pathologic findings divided by the number of surgeries performed for suspected appendicitis), missed appendicitis rate, and number of CT examinations avoided by using the staged protocol were analyzed. The sensitivity and specificity of the staged protocol were 98.6% and 90.6%, respectively. The negative appendectomy rate was 8.1% (19 of 235 patients), and the missed appendicitis rate was less than 0.5% (one of 631 patients). CT was avoided in 333 of the 631 patients (53%) in whom the protocol was followed and in whom the US findings were definitive. A staged US and CT imaging protocol in which US is performed first in children suspected of having acute appendicitis is highly accurate and offers the opportunity to substantially reduce radiation. © RSNA, 2011.

  8. Measurement of neutron dose distribution for a passive scattering nozzle at the Proton Medical Research Center (PMRC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayama, Ryuichi; Fujita, Yasuo; Tadokoro, Masahiro; Fujimaki, Hisataka; Sakae, Takeji; Terunuma, Toshiyuki

    2006-08-01

    For a passive scattering nozzle at the Proton Medical Research Center (PMRC), the distribution of the neutron dose equivalent in the direction transverse to the proton beam line was measured for 200 MeV protons using a tissue equivalent proportional counter REM500. The neutron dose equivalent per Gray of proton-absorbed dose at the isocenter was approximately 2.3 mSv/Gy. The neutron dose outside of the treatment field was approximately 2 mSv/Gy, at maximum and it should be reduced as low as possible according to the ALARA principle. The aperture size of the multi-leaf collimator (MLC), which is a pre-collimator for shielding unwanted protons and mounted at a position upstream from the patient bolus and collimator, was varied in order to investigate its reduction effect on the neutron dose equivalent outside of the treatment field. We confirmed that the neutron dose equivalent outside of the treatment field can be limited depending on the aperture size of the MLC. This could be considered in future treatment planning optimization and patient treatment. MCNPX calculations showed good agreement with the measurements within 10%.

  9. U.S. Department of Energy National Center of Excellence for Metals Recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, V.; Bennett, M.; Bishop, L.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) National Center of Excellence for Metals Recycle has recently been established. The vision of this new program is to develop a DOE culture that promotes pollution prevention by considering the recycle and reuse of metal as the first and primary disposition option and burial as a last option. The Center of Excellence takes the approach that unrestricted release of metal is the first priority because it is the most cost-effective disposition pathway. Where this is not appropriate, restricted release, beneficial reuse, and stockpile of ingots are considered. The Center has gotten off to a fast start. Current recycling activities include the sale of 40,000 tons of scrap metal from the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly K-25 Plant) K-770 scrap yard, K-1064 surplus equipment and machinery, 7,000 PCB-contaminated drums, 12,000 tons of metal from the Y-12 scrap yard, and 1,000 metal pallets. In addition, the Center of Excellence is developing a toolbox for project teams that will contain a number of specific tools to facilitate metals recycle. This Internet-based toolbox will include primers, computer software, and case studies designed to help sites to perform life cycle analysis, perform ALARA (As Low As is Reasonably Achievable) analysis for radiation exposures, produce pollution prevention information and documentation, manage their materials inventory, produce independent government estimates, and implement sale/service contracts. The use of these tools is described for two current activities: disposition of scrap metal in the Y-12 scrap yard, and disposition of PCB-contaminated drums. Members of the Center look forward to working with all DOE sites, regulatory authorities, the private sector, and other stakeholders to achieve the metals recycle goals.

  10. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project dose management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Bergsman, K.H.

    1996-03-01

    This dose management plan facilitates meeting the dose management and ALARA requirements applicable to the design activities of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project, and establishes consistency of information used by multiple subprojects in ALARA evaluations. The method for meeting the ALARA requirements applicable to facility designs involves two components. The first is each Spent Nuclear Fuel Project subproject incorporating ALARA principles, ALARA design optimizations, and ALARA design reviews throughout the design of facilities and equipment. The second component is the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project management providing overall dose management guidance to the subprojects and oversight of the subproject dose management efforts.

  11. 10 CFR 20.1702 - Use of other controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... shall, consistent with maintaining the total effective dose equivalent ALARA, increase monitoring and... an ALARA analysis to determine whether or not respirators should be used, the licensee may consider...

  12. Efficient Cryosolid Positron Moderators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    parameters for cryogenic solids ........19 xiii LIST OF ACRONYMS ALARA ...gamma radiation shielding under the ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) operating philosophy [58]. The half-life of 22Na is t½ = 2.60 years [1

  13. 10 CFR 20.1702 - Use of other controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... shall, consistent with maintaining the total effective dose equivalent ALARA, increase monitoring and... an ALARA analysis to determine whether or not respirators should be used, the licensee may consider...

  14. 75 FR 3760 - Draft Regulatory Guide: Issuance, Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-22

    ... maintain occupational exposures as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) in medical institutions. In a... exposures ALARA, whether the patients are animal or human. II. Further Information The NRC staff is...

  15. 10 CFR 20.1702 - Use of other controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... shall, consistent with maintaining the total effective dose equivalent ALARA, increase monitoring and... an ALARA analysis to determine whether or not respirators should be used, the licensee may consider...

  16. 10 CFR 835.1001 - Design and control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) Measures shall be taken to maintain radiation exposure in controlled areas ALARA through engineered and... demonstrated to be impractical, administrative controls shall be used to maintain radiation exposures ALARA. ...

  17. 10 CFR 835.1001 - Design and control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) Measures shall be taken to maintain radiation exposure in controlled areas ALARA through engineered and... demonstrated to be impractical, administrative controls shall be used to maintain radiation exposures ALARA. ...

  18. 10 CFR 20.1702 - Use of other controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... shall, consistent with maintaining the total effective dose equivalent ALARA, increase monitoring and... an ALARA analysis to determine whether or not respirators should be used, the licensee may consider...

  19. 10 CFR 835.1001 - Design and control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) Measures shall be taken to maintain radiation exposure in controlled areas ALARA through engineered and... demonstrated to be impractical, administrative controls shall be used to maintain radiation exposures ALARA. ...

  20. 10 CFR 835.1001 - Design and control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) Measures shall be taken to maintain radiation exposure in controlled areas ALARA through engineered and... demonstrated to be impractical, administrative controls shall be used to maintain radiation exposures ALARA. ...

  1. 10 CFR 20.1702 - Use of other controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... shall, consistent with maintaining the total effective dose equivalent ALARA, increase monitoring and... an ALARA analysis to determine whether or not respirators should be used, the licensee may consider...

  2. 10 CFR 835.1001 - Design and control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) Measures shall be taken to maintain radiation exposure in controlled areas ALARA through engineered and... demonstrated to be impractical, administrative controls shall be used to maintain radiation exposures ALARA. ...

  3. 76 FR 25725 - Final Regulatory Guide: Issuance, Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    ... maintain occupational exposures as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) in medical institutions. In a... exposures ALARA, whether the patients are animal or human. II. Further Information In January 2010, DG-8037...

  4. 10 CFR 835.1002 - Facility design and modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... occupational exposure is maintained ALARA in developing and justifying facility design and physical controls... occupancy differs from the above shall be ALARA and shall not exceed 20 percent of the applicable standards... control the inhalation of such material by workers to levels that are ALARA; confinement and ventilation...

  5. 10 CFR 835.1002 - Facility design and modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... occupational exposure is maintained ALARA in developing and justifying facility design and physical controls... occupancy differs from the above shall be ALARA and shall not exceed 20 percent of the applicable standards... control the inhalation of such material by workers to levels that are ALARA; confinement and ventilation...

  6. 10 CFR 835.1002 - Facility design and modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... occupational exposure is maintained ALARA in developing and justifying facility design and physical controls... occupancy differs from the above shall be ALARA and shall not exceed 20 percent of the applicable standards... control the inhalation of such material by workers to levels that are ALARA; confinement and ventilation...

  7. A Revised Health Risk Assessment for the Use of Hexachloroethane Smoke on an Army Training Area.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    actions to lower them where necessary. It is recommended that the Army adopt a policy of "as low as reasonably achievable," or ALARA . 4. The Army should...be committed to a policy similar to ALARA for troop and civilian exposure to toxic substances. The ALARA principle provides concrete guidelines for

  8. 10 CFR 835.1002 - Facility design and modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... occupational exposure is maintained ALARA in developing and justifying facility design and physical controls... occupancy differs from the above shall be ALARA and shall not exceed 20 percent of the applicable standards... control the inhalation of such material by workers to levels that are ALARA; confinement and ventilation...

  9. 10 CFR 835.1002 - Facility design and modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... occupational exposure is maintained ALARA in developing and justifying facility design and physical controls... occupancy differs from the above shall be ALARA and shall not exceed 20 percent of the applicable standards... control the inhalation of such material by workers to levels that are ALARA; confinement and ventilation...

  10. Improving Automotive Safety: The Role of Industry, the Government, and the Driver,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    low as reasonably achievable’r-( ALARA ) is the most applicable risk reduction strategy within the context of improving automotive safety. By applying...the ALARA principle to past and proposed safety improvements, we demonstrate that the most lives saved per dollar spent would occur if drivers modified...2 Identifying Alternative Risk Reduction Goals .............. 2. Why ALARA

  11. Subjecting Radiologic Imaging to the Linear No-Threshold Hypothesis: A Non Sequitur of Non-Trivial Proportion.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Jeffry A; Pennington, Charles W; Sacks, Bill

    2017-01-01

    Radiologic imaging is claimed to carry an iatrogenic risk of cancer, based on an uninformed commitment to the 70-y-old linear no-threshold hypothesis (LNTH). Credible evidence of imaging-related low-dose (<100 mGy) carcinogenic risk is nonexistent; it is a hypothetical risk derived from the demonstrably false LNTH. On the contrary, low-dose radiation does not cause, but more likely helps prevent, cancer. The LNTH and its offspring, ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable), are fatally flawed, focusing only on molecular damage while ignoring protective, organismal biologic responses. Although some grant the absence of low-dose harm, they nevertheless advocate the "prudence" of dose optimization (i.e., using ALARA doses); but this is a radiophobia-centered, not scientific, approach. Medical imaging studies achieve a diagnostic purpose and should be governed by the highest science-based principles and policies. The LNTH is an invalidated hypothesis, and its use, in the form of ALARA dosing, is responsible for misguided concerns promoting radiophobia, leading to actual risks far greater than the hypothetical carcinogenic risk purportedly avoided. Further, the myriad benefits of imaging are ignored. The present work calls for ending the radiophobia caused by those asserting the need for dose optimization in imaging: the low-dose radiation of medical imaging has no documented pathway to harm, whereas the LNTH and ALARA most assuredly do. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  12. Low-Level Radiation: Are Chemical Officers Adequately Trained

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-17

    84 vii ACRONYMS ALARA As Low As Reasonably Achievable BEIR Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation CBOLC Chemical Basic Officer Leadership...exposure levels as low as reasonably achievable ( ALARA ). Commanders can factor the units RES into their 36 decision-making process and consider...acronyms. JP 1-02 does not define the key terms RDD, LLR, DU, or ALARA in the definition section of the publication and RDD is the only one of the

  13. An Evaluation of a Networked Radiation Detection System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    Assessment Team ALARA As Low As Reasonably Achievable AMDS/SGPB Aerospace Medicine Squadron/ Bioenvironmental Engineering Flight AUM...dose equivalent. As a result, leaders must keep their survey members’ dose equivalents as low as reasonably achievable ( ALARA ). As a matter of

  14. Design features of the cold vacuum drying facility to keep worker doses as low as reasonably achievable

    SciTech Connect

    NELSON, J.V.

    1999-06-24

    This report describes the design features and steps taken to ensure that the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility satisfies regulatory requirements that personnel doses be kept as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). This report also documents an analysis of worker doses and demonstrates that the ALARA goal of limiting individual doses to 500 mrem per year can be met.

  15. Wireless Robotic Communications in Urban Environments: Issues for the Fire Service

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    Highly radioactive chunks may be scattered about the immediate area. Responder exposure should be kept as low as reasonably achievable ( ALARA ...the contamination in the interim. Minimizing responder exposure is critical to both keeping exposures ALARA , and to maximize the efficient use of

  16. Occupational Survey Report, Bioenvironmental Engineering, AFSC 4B0X1, OSSN: 2501

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-10-01

    Inspect radiation safety programs of X-ray facilities 100 D0233 Conduct as-low-as-reasonably-achievable ( ALARA ) training 100 D0214 Perform...as-low-as-reasonably-achievable ( ALARA ) training 60 C0154 Perform quantitative fit-testings, such as port-a-count, other than gas masks 60 36 TABLE

  17. Engineering study of riser equipment contamination

    SciTech Connect

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-08-25

    This Engineering Study was to evaluate the current equipment and operating procedures to determine if changes could be made to improve ALARA and evaluate the feasibility of implementing the proposed solutions. As part of this study input from the cognizant characterization engineers and operating sampling crews was obtained and evaluated for ALARA improvements.

  18. Unshielded Facility Nondestructive Inspection (NDI) Radiation Protection Survey for Homestead ARB, FL

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-09

    and where workers have completed ALARA training. U, Uncontrolled Area; An area not controlled or monitored by the NDI section and where...workers have not completed ALARA training. bMax dose estimate for 1 h = (updated reading [mrem/h])*(exposure duration [h]). cAnnual dose

  19. A Feasibility Study for the Laboratory Reduction of Low Level Radioactive Wastes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    achievable) Program is described and covers ALARA policy, program responsibility and authority, training, facility and equipment design, procedures, controls...reviewed and compared to the expected features of the ashing, storage and packaging system being developed. It is also recommended that an ALARA

  20. Unshielded and Shielded Facility Nondestructive Inspection (NDI) Radiation Protection Survey for F.S. Gabreski ANGB, NY

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-06

    an area controlled by the NDI section and where workers have completed ALARA training. bMax Dose Estimate for 1 h = (Net Reading in mR/h...completed ALARA training. bMax Dose Estimate for 1 h = (Net Reading in mR/h)*[Exposure Duration (h)]. cAnnual Dose Estimate = (Net Reading (mR/h...RSO provided ALARA training (T.O. 33B-1-1, 6.8.2.1) 3. Ensure personnel are removed during exposures 4. Survey

  1. DOE 2010 Occupational Radiation Exposure November 2011

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Analysis

    2011-11-11

    This report discusses radiation protection and dose reporting requirements, presents the 2010 occupational radiation dose data trended over the past 5 years, and includes instructions to submit successful ALARA projects.

  2. DOE 2011 Occupational Radiation Exposure report, _Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security. December 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Derek Hagemeyer, Yolanda McCormick

    2012-12-12

    This report discusses radiation protection and dose reporting requirements, presents the 2011 occupational radiation dose data along with trends over the past 5 years, and provides instructions to submit successful as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) projects.

  3. [Dose optimization in CT examination of children].

    PubMed

    Hojreh, A; Prosch, H

    2012-10-01

    Problems arise due to the increased clinical use of computed tomography (CT) and the high radiosensitivity of children. The ALARA concept (as low as reasonably achievable) prevails in pediatric radiology. Justified indications and full utilization of available dose optimization methods. Medical physicists and the manufacturers should support pediatric radiology in the implementation of the ALARA concept. The referring physicians and radiology staff should be integrated into training programs. Sufficient diagnostic image quality is paramount and not the pretty images.

  4. Limiting human exposures through the ``as low as reasonably achievable`` process at a Department of Energy mixed waste site

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonell, M.; Peterson, J.; Haroun, L.; Blunt, D.; Dunning, D.

    1994-09-01

    Applying a process to reduce human exposures to levels as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) is a cornerstone of the US Department of Energy`s radiation protection program, and this process is being used to develop cleanup levels for contaminated sites across the country. Under the ALARA process, exposures and risks are reduced as far below protective criteria as can reasonably be achieved--considering technical, economic, and social factors. Risk-based cleanup levels have been developed for radionuclides and chemicals in surface water and soil at the Weldon Spring site in Missouri, following explicit applications of the ALARA process. Among the lessons learned during these applications were the importance of three factors: (1) soliciting early input from the parties involved--because the ALARA process involves a range of technical and nontechnical issues; (2) maintaining site specificity for the ALARA analyses--because contaminant types and distributions will vary, as will local conditions and constraints; and (3) identifying cleanup levels in the planning phase that are distinct from those developed for the field phase--because remedies can be over-designed if the decision levels are the same as the ALARA goals for field work, such that little increased risk reduction is achieved for substantially higher costs.

  5. Training Workers to use Localized Ventilation for Radiological Work

    SciTech Connect

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2000-09-01

    Work on radiological systems and components needs to be accomplished using techniques that reduce radiation dose to workers, limit contamination spread, and minimize radioactive waste. One of the best methods to control contamination spread is to use localized ventilation to capture radioactive material and keep it from spreading. The Fluor Hanford ALARA Center teaches workers how to use ventilation in partnership with other engineered controls and this has resulted in improved work practices, minimized the impact on adjacent work operations, and decreased the amount of radioactive waste generated. This presentation will emphasize how the workers are trained to use localized ventilation for contamination control.

  6. Center on Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah System Approach to Individualized Learning Project.

    Classroom areas organized into centers for specific study purposes are discussed. These centers are used for individual or small group work. The physical arrangement of the area used for a study center is described, including the organization of furniture, materials, and preferred locations. Suggestions are made for the management and stocking of…

  7. Operational Aspects of Space Radiation Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weyland, M. D.; Johnson, A. S.; Semones, E. J.; Shelfer, T.; Dardano, C.; Lin, T.; Zapp, N. E.; Rutledge, R.; George, T.

    2005-01-01

    Minimizing astronaut's short and long-term medical risks arising from exposure to ionizing radiation during space missions is a major concern for NASA's manned spaceflight program, particularly exploration missions. For ethical and legal reasons, NASA follows the "as low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA) principal in managing astronaut's radiation exposures. One implementation of ALARA is the response to space weather events. Of particular concern are energetic solar particle events, and in low Earth orbit (LEO), electron belt enhancements. To properly respond to these events, NASA's Space Radiation Analysis Group (SRAG), in partnership with the NOAA Space Environment Center (SEC), provides continuous flight support during U.S. manned missions. In this partnership, SEC compiles space weather data from numerous ground and space based assets and makes it available in near real-time to SRAG (along with alerts and forecasts), who in turn uses these data as input to models to calculate estimates of the resulting exposure to astronauts. These calculations and vehicle instrument data form the basis for real-time recommendations to flight management. It is also important to implement ALARA during the design phase. In order to appropriately weigh the risks associated with various shielding and vehicle configuration concepts, the expected environment must be adequately characterized for nominal and worst case scenarios for that portion of the solar cycle and point in space. Even with the best shielding concepts and materials in place (unlikely), there will be numerous occasions where the crew is at greater risk due to being in a lower shielded environment (short term transit or lower shielded vehicles, EVAs), so that accurate space weather forecasts and nowcasts, of particles at the relevant energies, will be crucial to protecting crew health and safety.

  8. Center Size and Center Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helburn, Suzanne; Morris, John

    1996-01-01

    Examined the impact of child care center size on cost, quality, and profits per child. Examined centers ranging from 40 to 80 children and found total cost and revenue per child were similar for small, medium, and large centers. Found profits per child were highest in large centers and that there was no relationship between center quality and…

  9. Applications of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery: An Overview of Published Indications and Clinical Usage in United States Academic Centers and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Practices.

    PubMed

    Carter, Jeffrey B; Stone, Jeffrey D; Clark, Robert S; Mercer, James E

    2016-04-01

    The American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons appointed a task force to study the indications, safety, and clinical practice patterns of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS). The charge was to review the published applications of CBCT in OMS, identify the current position of academic thought leaders in the field, and research the adoption and usage of the technology at the clinical practitioner level. This study reviewed the CBCT world literature and summarized published indications for the modality. A nationwide survey of academic thought leaders and practicing oral and maxillofacial surgeons was compiled to determine how the modality is currently being used and adopted by institutions and practices. This report summarizes published applications of CBCT that have been vetted by the academic and practicing OMS community to define current indications. The parameters of patient safety, radiation exposure, accreditation, and legal issues are reviewed. An overview of third-party adoption of CBCT is presented. CBCT is displacing 2-dimensional imaging in the published literature, academia, and private practice. Best practices support reading the entire scan volume with a written report defining results, patient exposure, and field of view. Issues of patient safety, ALARA ("as low as reasonably achievable"), accreditation, and the legal and regulatory environment are reviewed. Third-party patterns for reimbursements vary widely and seem to lack consistency. There is much confusion within the provider community about indications, authorizations, and payment policies. The current medical and dental indications for CBCT in the clinical practice of OMS are reviewed and an industry guideline is proposed. These guidelines offer a clear way of differentiating consensus medical indications and common dental uses for clinicians. This matrix should bring a predictable logic to third-party authorizations, billing, and predictable

  10. Environmental Assessment For Cleanup and Closure of the Energy Technology Engineering Center. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2003-03-01

    DOE analyzed two cleanup and closure alternatives and the No Action Alternative, in accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality regulations implementing NEPA (40 CFR Parts 1500-1508) and DOE's NEPA implementing regulations (10 CFR Part 1021). Under Alternative 1, DOE is proposing to clean up the remaining ETEC facilities using the existing site specific cleanup standard of 15 mrem/yr. (plus DOE's As Low As Reasonably Achievable--ALARA-principle) for decontamination of radiological facilities and surrounding soils (Alternative 1). An annual 15-millirem additional radiation dose to the maximally exposed individual (assumed to be an individual living in a residential setting on Area IV) from all exposure pathways (air, soil, groundwater) equates to an additional theoretical lifetime cancer risk of no more than 3 x 10-4 (3 in 10,000). For perspective, it is estimated that the average individual in the United States receives a dose of about 300 millirem each year from natural sources of radiation. However, actual exposures generally will be much lower as a result of the application of the ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) principle. Based on post-remediation verification sampling previous cleanups have generally resulted in a 2 x 10-6 level of residual risk. DOE would decontaminate, decommission, and demolish the remaining radiological facilities. DOE would also decommission and demolish the one remaining sodium facility and all of the remaining uncontaminated support buildings for which it is responsible. The ongoing RCRA corrective action program, including groundwater treatment (interim measures), would continue. Other environmental impacts would include 2.5 x 10-3 fatalities as a result of LLW shipments and 6.0 x 10-3 fatalities as a result of emission exhaust from all shipments. DOE would also decommission and demolish the remaining sodium facility and decommission and demolish all of the remaining

  11. Process optimization of solid rad waste management at the Shelter object transformation to the ecologically safety system

    SciTech Connect

    Batiy, V.G.; Stojanov, A.I.; Schmieman, E.

    2007-07-01

    Methodological approach of optimization of schemes of solid radwaste management of the Object Shelter (Shelter) and ChNPP industrial site during transformation to the ecologically safe system was developed. On the basis of the conducted models researches the ALARA-analysis was carried out for the choice of optimum variant of schemes and technologies of solid radwaste management. The criteria of choice of optimum schemes, which are directed on optimization of doses and financial expenses, minimization of amount of the formed radwaste etc, were developed for realization of this ALARA-analysis. (authors)

  12. Strategies for reducing radiation dose in CT.

    PubMed

    McCollough, Cynthia H; Primak, Andrew N; Braun, Natalie; Kofler, James; Yu, Lifeng; Christner, Jodie

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, the media has focused on the potential danger of radiation exposure from CT, even though the potential benefit of a medically indicated CT far outweighs the potential risks. This attention has reminded the radiology community that doses must be as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) while maintaining diagnostic image quality. To satisfy the ALARA principle, the dose reduction strategies described in this article must be well understood and properly used. The use of CT must also be justified for the specific diagnostic task.

  13. Skills Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canter, Patricia; And Others

    The services of the Living Skills Center for the Visually Handicapped, a habilitative service for blind young adults, are described. It is explained that the Center houses its participants in their own apartments in a large complex and has served over 70 young people in 4 years. The evaluation section describes such assessment instruments as an…

  14. Coastal Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The U.S. Geological Survey dedicated its new Center for Coastal Geology June 12 at the University of South Florida in St. Petersburg. Robert Halley leads the staff of nine USGS scientists studying coastal erosion and pollution and underwater mineral resources in cooperation with the university's Marine Science Department. Current research is on erosion along Lake Michigan and the Gulf Coast of Louisiana. The number of USGS scientists at the center should increase to 30 over five years.

  15. Manpower development and man-machine interface - practice in Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Bereznai, G.T.; Ryder, J.; Woodhead, L.W.

    1985-01-01

    Ontario Hydro's comprehensive manpower development program was started in the 1950's for Canada's first nuclear-electric station (25 MWe) which has operated with high reliability since 1962. The manpower program has grown to serve a large and successful commercial CANDU nuclear program (6847 MWe in-service and 6941 MWe under construction). Two major Training Centers are located very close to the five 4-unit stations they serve. These facilities include 5 full-scope replica simulators. Ontario Hydro's nuclear training is intensive for all categories of operating, maintenance and technical support staff. Intensive radiation protection training is provided for all staff to support the ALARA principle and to minimize the total number of people required for efficient, effective and safe operation. Ontario Hydro recognizes the need for attention to, and improvement of the man-machine interface. This applies throughout a nuclear station, not just in the control room.

  16. Evaluation of multiple emission point facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Miltenberger, R.P.; Hull, A.P.; Strachan, S.; Tichler, J.

    1988-01-01

    In 1970, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) assumed responsibility for the environmental aspect of the state's regulatory program for by-product, source, and special nuclear material. The major objective of this study was to provide consultation to NYSDEC and the US NRC to assist NYSDEC in determining if broad-based licensed facilities with multiple emission points were in compliance with NYCRR Part 380. Under this contract, BNL would evaluate a multiple emission point facility, identified by NYSDEC, as a case study. The review would be a nonbinding evaluation of the facility to determine likely dispersion characteristics, compliance with specified release limits, and implementation of the ALARA philosophy regarding effluent release practices. From the data collected, guidance as to areas of future investigation and the impact of new federal regulations were to be developed. Reported here is the case study for the University of Rochester, Strong Memorial Medical Center and Riverside Campus.

  17. WIPP waste acceptance criteria and transportation system

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C.F.; Ward, T.R.; Gregory, P.C.

    1991-12-31

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located near Carlsbad, New Mexico, USA, is a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility designed as a permanent repository for transuranic wastes in the center of a 2,000-foot-thick salt bed situated 2,150 feet underground. Construction of the facility started in 1975, under a congressional act of site selection. In 1979, demonstration of safe disposal at the WIPP was authorized by Public Law 96-164. The operational philosophy and practice at the facility are: (1) start clean -- stay clean, (2) meet or exceed regulatory requirements, and (3) control radiation exposure levels to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Strict safety measures must be taken in the areas of waste preparation, transportation, and facility operation.

  18. 75 FR 42292 - List of Approved Spent Fuel Storage Casks: NAC-MPC System, Revision 6

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-21

    ... undamaged and damaged fuel assemblies; minor design modifications to the Vertical Concrete Cask (VCC... as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) principles; an increase in the concrete pad compression... in the concrete pad compression strength from 4,000 psi to 6,000 psi; (6) added justification for...

  19. The development and application of advanced analytical methods to commercial ICF reactor chambers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cousseau, P.; Engelstad, R.; Henderson, D.L.

    1997-10-01

    Progress is summarized in this report for each of the following tasks: (1) multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics computer code development; (2) 2D radiation-hydrodynamic code development; (3) ALARA: analytic and Laplacian adaptive radioactivity analysis -- a complete package for analysis of induced activation; (4) structural dynamics modeling of ICF reactor chambers; and (5) analysis of self-consistent target chamber clearing.

  20. Vegetation management 1994 fiscal year end report

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J.M.

    1995-02-01

    This year-end report evaluates vegetation management operations on the Hanford reservation conducted during fiscal year (FY) 1994 and proposed control methods to be used in FY 1995 and following years. The 1995 control methods proposed are based on an evaluation of past and current ALARA principles, employee safety, environmental impacts, applicable regulations, site esthetics, and other site-specific factors.

  1. RCT: 2.05 Contamination Control, Course #8770

    SciTech Connect

    Hillmer, Kurt T.

    2016-05-23

    This report focuses on the detection and control of radioactive contamination, which are an integral part of an aggressive ALARA program and provide an indication of the effectiveness of engineering controls and proper work practices in preventing the release of radioactive material. Radioactive contamination, if undetected or not properly controlled, can be spread and contaminate areas, equipment, personnel, and the environment.

  2. Cean air and clear responsibility

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, K.C.

    1995-02-01

    This paper is the text of the address given by Commissioner Kenneth C. rogers, USNRC, at the 23rd DOE/NRC Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference. Mr. Rogers reviews the regulatory approach to the subject, discussing the requirements of 10CFR20 and ALARA principles. A discussion of the talk follows the text.

  3. Health physics aspects of advanced reactor licensing reviews

    SciTech Connect

    Hinson, C.S.

    1995-03-01

    The last Construction Permit to be issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for a U.S. light water reactor (LWR) was granted in the late 1970s. In 1989 the NRC issued 10 CFR Part 52 which is intended to serve as a framework for the licensing of future reactor designs. The NRC is currently reviewing four different future on {open_quotes}next-generation{close_quotes} reactor designs. Two of these designs are classified as evolutionary designs (modified versions of current generation LWRs) and two are advanced designs (reactors incorporating simplified designs and passive means for accident mitigation). These {open_quotes}next-generation{close_quotes} reactor designs incorporate many innovative design features which are intended to maintain personnel doses ALARA and ensure that the annual average collective dose at these reactors does not exceed 100 person-rems (1 person-sievert) per year. This paper discusses some of the ALARA design features which are incorporated in the four {open_quotes}next-generation{close_quotes} reactor designs incorporate many innovative design features which are intended to maintain personnel doses ALARA and ensure that the annual average collective dose at these reactors does not exceed 100 person-rems (1 person-sievert) per year. This paper discusses some of the ALARA design features which are incorporated in the four {open_quotes}next-generation{close_quotes} reactor designs currently being reviewed by the NRC.

  4. Recommended Radiation Protection Practices for Low-Level Waste Disposal Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hadlock, D. E.; Hooker, C. D.; Herrington, W. N.; Gilchrist, R. L.

    1983-12-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission contracted with Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to provide technical assistance in estsblishing operational guidelines, with respect to radiation control programs and methods of minimizing occupational radiation exposure, at Low-Level Waste (LLW) dis- posal sites. The PNL, through site visits, evaluated operations at LLW dis- posal sites to determine the adequacy of current practices in maintaining occupational exposures as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA). The data sought included the specifics of: ALARA programs, training programs, external exposure control , internal exposure control , respiratory protection, survei 1 - lance, radioactive waste management, facilities and equipment, and external dose analysis. The results of the study indicated the following: The Radiation Protection and ALARA programs at the three commercial LLW disposal sites were observed to be adequate in scope and content compared to similar programs at other types of nuclear facilities. However, it should be noted that there were many areas that could be improved upon to help ensure the health and safety of the occupa- tionally exposed individuals. As a result, radiation protection practices were recommended with related rationales in order to reduce occupational exposures as far below specified radiation limits as is reasonably achievable. In addition, recommendations were developed for achieving occupational exposure ALARA under the Regulatory Requirements issued in 10 CFR Part 61.

  5. Occupational radiation dose assessment for the DOE spent-fuel storage facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, J.; Eble, R.G. Jr.

    1997-12-01

    To expedite the licensing process of the centralized interim storage facility (CISF), the U.S. Department of Energy has completed a CISF topical safety analysis report (TSAR). The TSAR will be used in licensing the CISF when a site is designated. An occupational radiation dose assessment of the facility operations is performed as part of the CISF design. The first phase of the CISF has the capability to receive, transfer, and store spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in dual-purpose casks. Currently, there are five vendor technologies under consideration. The preliminary dose assessment is based on estimated occupational exposures using traditional power plant independent spent-fuel storage installation (ISFSI) and transport cask-handling processes. The second step in the process is to recommend as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) techniques to reduce potential exposures. A final dose assessment is completed implementing the ALARA techniques, and a review is performed to ensure that the design is in compliance with regulatory criteria. The dose assessment and ALARA evaluation are determined using the following input information: dose estimates from vendor safety analysis reports, ISFSI experience with similar systems, traditional methods of operations, expected CISF cask receipt rates, and feasible ALARA techniques.

  6. Radiological Worker Computer Based Training

    SciTech Connect

    Butala, Stephen W.; Cullen, James J.; Corsolini, Jams; Zach, Karen; Przyzycki, Edward

    2003-02-06

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed an interactive computer based training (CBT) version of the standardized DOE Radiological Worker training program. This CD-ROM based program utilizes graphics, animation, photographs, sound and video to train users in ten topical areas: radiological fundamentals, biological effects, dose limits, ALARA, personnel monitoring, controls and postings, emergency response, contamination controls, high radiation areas, and lessons learned.

  7. Radiation dose and radiation protection principle awareness: a survey among Nigerian paediatricians.

    PubMed

    Famurewa, O C; Obiajunwa, P O; Elusiyan, J B; Ibitoye, B O

    2014-03-01

    This study is aimed at determining the knowledge of Paediatricians in Nigeria about the basic principle of radiation protection ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) and their knowledge of the radiation doses that children receive during some common radiological procedures. Two hundred and fifty questionnaires were circulated among paediatricians at the 2012 annual Paediatricians' Association of Nigeria Conference. The questionnaires contain 10 questions designed to asses the pediatricians' general knowledge on : ionising radiation and the risks, doses children receive during some common radiological procedures and awareness of the radiation protection principle, ALARA ( As Low As Reasonably Achievable). Of the 162 Paediatricians that participated, 69% named at least one non medical source of ionising radiation, 54.9% would not recommend CXR to screen an apparently healthy child for tuberculosis and 87% believe that children are at greater risk of adverse effects of ionising radiation. For dose estimation, 51.9% and 51.2% of the paediatricians underestimated doses received during Cranial and abdominal computerised tomography respectively while 13.6% and 37% respectively erroneously believed that abdominal ultrasound and brain magnetic resonance imaging utilise ionising radiation. 13.6% gave the correct meaning of the Acronym ALARA. The Paediatricians' knowledge about the basic principle of radiation protection ALARA and the doses that children receive during some common radiological procedures is poor. There is need to ensure adequate training on radiation hazards and protection at all levels of medical education.

  8. Tests Conducted with Strippable Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    K. E. Archibald; R. L. Demmer

    1999-08-01

    This report details the testing and evaluation of several strippable coatings and their use in decontamination. Pentek 604, Bartlett (TLC), and ALARA 1146 were products examined for their overall effectiveness and ease of use. Conclusions were reached about the effective use of these coatings, and field test examples, with radioactive contamination are incorporated.

  9. Addendum to the performance assessment analysis for low-level waste disposal in the 200 west area active burial grounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, M.I., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-12-20

    An addendum was completed to the performance assessment (PA) analysis for the active 200 West Area low-level solid waste burial grounds. The addendum includes supplemental information developed during the review of the PA analysis, an ALARA analysis, a comparison of PA results with the Hanford Groundwater Protection Strategy, and a justification for the assumption of 500 year deterrence to the inadvertent intruder.

  10. Progress report on the management of the NEA ISOE system

    SciTech Connect

    Lazo, E.

    1995-03-01

    The Information System on Occupational Exposure (ISOE) was launched by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) on 1 January, 1992, to facilitate the communication of dosimetric and ALARA implementation data among nuclear utilities around the world. After two years of operation the System has become a mature interactive network for transfer of data and experience. Currently, 37 utilities from 12 countries, representing 289 power plants, and 12 national regulatory authorities participate in ISOE. Agreements for cooperation also exist between the NEA and the Commission of the European Communities (CEC), and the Paris Center of the WOrld Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO-PC). In addition, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is acting as a co-sponsor of ISOE for the participation of non-NEA member countries. Three Regional Technical Centres, Europe, Asia, and Non-NEA member countries, serve to administer the system. The ISOE Network is comprised of three data bases and a communications network at several levels. The three ISOE data bases include the following types of information: NEA1 - annual plant dosimetric information; NEA2 - plant operational characteristics for dose and dose rate reduction; and NEA3 - job specific ALARA practices and experiences. The ISOE communications network has matured greatly during 1992 and 1993. In addition to having access to the above mentioned data bases, participants may now solicit information on new subjects, through the Technical Centres, from all other participants on a real-time basis. Information Sheets on these studies are produced for distribution to all participants. In addition, Topical Reports on areas of interest are produced, and Topical Meetings are held annually.

  11. LERF Basin 44 Process Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    LUECK, K.J.

    1999-08-31

    This document presents a plan to process a portion of the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) Basin 44 wastewater through the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). The objective of this process test is to determine the most effective/efficient method to treat the wastewater currently stored in LERF Basin 44. The process test will determine the operational parameters necessary to comply with facility effluent discharge permit limits (Ecology 1995) and the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) acceptance criteria (BHI-00139), while achieving ALARA goals and maintaining the integrity of facility equipment. A major focus of the test plan centers on control of contamination due to leaks and/or facility maintenance. As a pre-startup item, all known leaks will be fixed before the start of the test. During the course of the test, a variety of contamination control measures will be evaluated for implementation during the treatment of the remaining Basin 44 inventory. Of special interest will be techniques and tools used to prevent contamination spread during sampling and when opening contaminated facility equipment/piping. At the conclusion of the test, a post ALARA review will be performed to identify lessons learned from the test run which can be applied to the treatment of the remaining Basin 44 inventory. The volume of wastewater to be treated during this test run is 500,000 gallons. This volume limit is necessary to maintain the ETF radiological inventory limits per the approved authorization basis. The duration of the process test is approximately 30 days.

  12. GUMNET - A new subsurface observatory in the Guadarrama Mountains, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, V.

    2012-04-01

    This year GUadarrama Monintoring NETwork Initiative (GUMNET), a highly interdisciplinary group of scientists was funded for setting up an observational network in the Sierra de Guadarrama north of Madrid. This mountain range is part of the central system, and reaches maximal heights more than 2400 m. It is regarded as a zone of regionally high meteorological, climatological, and environmental significance. The monitoring network aims at long-term meteorological, climatological, and environmental observations. Though primarily targeting the experimental investigation of atmosphere-land interactions in mountainous areas, it will provide an unique environment for a wide spectrum of scientific investigations. The network comprises a large number of meteorological and environmental observation sites, concentrated in, but not restricted to, the area of the Peñalara Natural Park. In particular, several (up to 6) of these complete meteorological observation sites will be complemented by shallow (20 m) boreholes, where temperature and soil moisture are monitored. Additionally, there will be the opportunity to do (repeated) temperature logging in deeper boreholes (up to 700 m) on a profile across the mountain range, which were drilled several years ago as part of the pre-site investigations for the nearly 30 km long Guadarrama railway tunnel. This initiative is part of the Moncloa Campus (http://www.campusmoncloa.es/en/), and comprises groups from the Complutense (UCM) and Polytechnic (UPM) universities of Madrid, Spain's State Meteorological Agency (AEMET), the CIEMAT research center, and the Peñalara Natural Park. However, most of the data will be available to the scientific community, and interested researchers will be welcome to use this framework for their own research.

  13. Tradeoffs between image quality and dose.

    PubMed

    Seibert, J Anthony

    2004-10-01

    Image quality takes on different perspectives and meanings when associated with the concept of as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), which is chiefly focused on radiation dose delivered as a result of a medical imaging procedure. ALARA is important because of the increased radiosensitivity of children to ionizing radiation and the desire to keep the radiation dose low. By the same token, however, image quality is also important because of the need to provide the necessary information in a radiograph in order to make an accurate diagnosis. Thus, there are tradeoffs to be considered between image quality and radiation dose, which is the main topic of this article. ALARA does not necessarily mean the lowest radiation dose, nor, when implemented, does it result in the least desirable radiographic images. With the recent widespread implementation of digital radiographic detectors and displays, a new level of flexibility and complexity confronts the technologist, physicist, and radiologist in optimizing the pediatric radiography exam. This is due to the separation of the acquisition, display, and archiving events that were previously combined by the screen-film detector, which allows for compensation for under- and overexposures, image processing, and on-line image manipulation. As explained in the article, different concepts must be introduced for a better understanding of the tradeoffs encountered when dealing with digital radiography and ALARA. In addition, there are many instances during the image acquisition/display/interpretation process in which image quality and associated dose can be compromised. This requires continuous diligence to quality control and feedback mechanisms to verify that the goals of image quality, dose and ALARA are achieved.

  14. Mississippi Technology Transfer Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The Mississippi Technology Transfer Center at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., was officially dedicated in 1987. The center is home to several state agencies as well as the Center For Higher Learning.

  15. Center Director's Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-01

    In the Space Shuttle Atlantis exhibit facility at the Kennedy Space Center's Visitor Complex, center director Bob Cabana, in the center background, speaks to guests as he updates community leaders on current and future activities at the space center.

  16. The Watergate Learning Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training in Business and Industry, 1971

    1971-01-01

    The Watergate Learning Center, recently opened by Sterling Learning Center in Washington, D. C., blueprints the plan established by Sterling and Marriott Hotels for a national chain of learning centers with much the same facilities. (EB)

  17. The Watergate Learning Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training in Business and Industry, 1971

    1971-01-01

    The Watergate Learning Center, recently opened by Sterling Learning Center in Washington, D. C., blueprints the plan established by Sterling and Marriott Hotels for a national chain of learning centers with much the same facilities. (EB)

  18. Children's cancer centers

    MedlinePlus

    Pediatric cancer center; Pediatric oncology center; Comprehensive cancer center ... Treating childhood cancer is not the same as treating adult cancer. The cancers are different. So are the treatments and the ...

  19. Dryden Flight Research Center: Center Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnayake, Nalin

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes a general overview of Dryden Flight Research Center. Strategic partnerships, Dryden's mission activity, exploration systems and aeronautics research programs are also described.

  20. Student Success Center Toolkit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jobs For the Future, 2014

    2014-01-01

    "Student Success Center Toolkit" is a compilation of materials organized to assist Student Success Center directors as they staff, launch, operate, and sustain Centers. The toolkit features materials created and used by existing Centers, such as staffing and budgeting templates, launch materials, sample meeting agendas, and fundraising…

  1. Conceptualizing the Learning Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Gary T.

    The learning center is an integrated, fully-coordinated facility, combining a number of traditional library, media development, and personalized learning functions. Conceptualizing the learning center is facilitated through a description of the premises for such a center, the components, and guidelines for developing a learning center. De Anza…

  2. Teacher Education Centers: The CMTEC Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sentz, Erma I.; Perry, Floyd

    Central Minnesota Teacher Education Council (CMTEC) Centers are public school districts under contract with CMTEC who designate "cluster buildings" that serve a minimum of 10 student teachers per quarter each. In all CMTEC Centers, emphasis is placed on providing opportunities for student teachers to teach under guidance in both major and minor…

  3. From Teacher Centered to Student Centered Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockemy, M. J.; Summers, Sylvia

    In 1991, staff at the Business Resource Center (BRC) at Tacoma Community College, in Washington, began to reevaluate their approach to serving students. Up to that point, the BRC had been teacher centered, with staff operating under the assumptions that only the students who succeeded were actually "college material," that students would cheat if…

  4. NIST Diffusion Data Center

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Diffusion Data Center (Web, free access)   The NIST Diffusion Data Center is a collection of over 14,100 international papers, theses, and government reports on diffusion published before 1980.

  5. Regional Instrumentation Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cromie, William J.

    1980-01-01

    Focuses on the activities of regional instrumentation centers that utilize the state-of-the-art instruments and methodology in basic scientific research. The emphasis is on the centers involved in mass spectroscopy, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, lasers, and accelerators. (SA)

  6. Evaluating Teacher Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feiman, Sharon

    1977-01-01

    Considers what teacher centers actually are, what they do, what they are supposed to do, and how they are formed. Discusses three types of centers, their organizational structure and function, and the theory underlying them. (Editor/RK)

  7. ACTS data center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syed, Ali; Vogel, Wolfhard J.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on ACTS Data Center status report are included. Topics covered include: ACTS Data Center Functions; data flow overview; PPD flow; RAW data flow; data compression; PPD distribution; RAW Data Archival; PPD Audit; and data analysis.

  8. Nonschool Learning Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Doris B.

    1972-01-01

    Describes a privately financed science center, museum and planetarium - observatory in Twin Falls, Idaho. Centers three hour program includes a lecture on archaeology, time to look at displays, a lunch break, and a planetarium lecture. (RB)

  9. Automating the Media Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, Mary A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the need to develop more efficient information retrieval skills by the use of new technology. Lists four stages used in automating the media center. Describes North Carolina's pilot programs. Proposes benefits and looks at the media center's future. (MVL)

  10. Nonschool Learning Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Doris B.

    1972-01-01

    Describes a privately financed science center, museum and planetarium - observatory in Twin Falls, Idaho. Centers three hour program includes a lecture on archaeology, time to look at displays, a lunch break, and a planetarium lecture. (RB)

  11. BKG Data Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorandt, Volkmar; Wojdziak, Reiner

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities and background information of the IVS Data Center for the year 2012. Included is information about functions, structure, technical equipment, and staff members of the BKG Data Center.

  12. Regional Instrumentation Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cromie, William J.

    1980-01-01

    Focuses on the activities of regional instrumentation centers that utilize the state-of-the-art instruments and methodology in basic scientific research. The emphasis is on the centers involved in mass spectroscopy, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, lasers, and accelerators. (SA)

  13. Tornadoes: A Center Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christman-Rothlein, Liz; Meinbach, Anita M.

    1981-01-01

    Information is given on how to put together a learning center. Discusses information and activity packets for a complete learning center on tornadoes including objectives, directions, materials, photographs of physical arrangements, and posttest. (DC)

  14. The Comprehensive Learning Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Gary T.

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a study of community college learning resource centers as they exist today and examines some emerging functions which point toward the role of the center in the future. (DC)

  15. Language Resource Centers Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Postsecondary Education, US Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Language Resource Centers (LRC) program provides grants to institutions of higher education to establish, strengthen, and operate resource centers that serve to improve the nation's capacity to teach and learn foreign languages. Eligible applicants are institutions of higher education. Duration of the grant is four years. Center activities…

  16. Equality of Fitness Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swoyer, Jesse O.

    2008-01-01

    The author, who has been a personal trainer for the past ten years, recently realized that all fitness centers are not equal. In February, he was able to participate in the grand opening of the Center for Independent Living of Central PA (CILCP), a fitness center that is designed to accommodate persons with disabilities living in the Central…

  17. Data center cooling method

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Dang, Hien P.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.; Sharma, Arun

    2015-08-11

    A method aspect for removing heat from a data center may use liquid coolant cooled without vapor compression refrigeration on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack. The method may also include regulating liquid coolant flow to the data center through a range of liquid coolant flow values with a controller-apparatus based upon information technology equipment temperature threshold of the data center.

  18. Center Director's Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-01

    In the Space Shuttle Atlantis exhibit facility at the Kennedy Space Center's Visitor Complex, guests get a close-up look at a plant growth experiment similar to one aboard the International Space Station. This followed a presentation by center director Bob Cabana who updated community leaders on current and future activities at the space center.

  19. A call center primer.

    PubMed

    Durr, W

    1998-01-01

    Call centers are strategically and tactically important to many industries, including the healthcare industry. Call centers play a key role in acquiring and retaining customers. The ability to deliver high-quality and timely customer service without much expense is the basis for the proliferation and expansion of call centers. Call centers are unique blends of people and technology, where performance indicates combining appropriate technology tools with sound management practices built on key operational data. While the technology is fascinating, the people working in call centers and the skill of the management team ultimately make a difference to their companies.

  20. Emergency Operations Center at Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caylor, Gary C.

    1997-01-01

    In June 1966, at the start of the Gulf Coast hurricane season, the Johnson Space Center (JSC) celebrated the opening of its new 4,000-square foot, state-of-the-art Emergency Operations Center (EOC). The new EOC has been upgraded and enhanced to support a wide spectrum of emergencies affecting JSC and neighboring communities. One of the main features of the EOC is its premier computerized dispatch center. The new system unites many of JSC's critical emergency functions into one integrated network. It automatically monitors fire alarms, security entrances, and external cameras. It contains the JSC inventory of hazardous materials, by building and room, and can call up Material Safety Data Sheets for most of the generic hazardous materials used on-site. The EOC is available for community use during area emergencies such as hurricanes and is a welcome addition to the Clear Lake/Galveston Bay Area communities' emergency response resources.

  1. Emergency Operations Center at Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caylor, Gary C.

    1997-01-01

    In June 1966, at the start of the Gulf Coast hurricane season, the Johnson Space Center (JSC) celebrated the opening of its new 4,000-square foot, state-of-the-art Emergency Operations Center (EOC). The new EOC has been upgraded and enhanced to support a wide spectrum of emergencies affecting JSC and neighboring communities. One of the main features of the EOC is its premier computerized dispatch center. The new system unites many of JSC's critical emergency functions into one integrated network. It automatically monitors fire alarms, security entrances, and external cameras. It contains the JSC inventory of hazardous materials, by building and room, and can call up Material Safety Data Sheets for most of the generic hazardous materials used on-site. The EOC is available for community use during area emergencies such as hurricanes and is a welcome addition to the Clear Lake/Galveston Bay Area communities' emergency response resources.

  2. Strategy proposed by Electricite de France in the development of automatic tools

    SciTech Connect

    Castaing, C.; Cazin, B.

    1995-03-01

    The strategy proposed by EDF in the development of a means to limit personal and collective dosimetry is recent. It follows in the steps of a policy that consisted of developing remote operation means for those activities of inspection and maintenance on the reactor, pools bottom, steam generators (SGs), also reactor building valves; target activities because of their high dosimetric cost. One of the main duties of the UTO (Technical Support Department), within the EDF, is the maintenance of Pressurized Water Reactors in French Nuclear Power Plant Operations (consisting of 54 units) and the development and monitoring of specialized tools. To achieve this, the UTO has started a national think-tank on the implementation of the ALARA process in its field of activity and created an ALARA Committee responsible for running and monitoring it, as well as a policy for developing tools. This point will be illustrated in the second on reactor vessel heads.

  3. Maximum voltage gradient technique for optimization of ablation for typical atrial flutter with zero-fluoroscopy approach.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Karol; Śledź, Janusz; Mazij, Mariusz; Ludwik, Bartosz; Labus, Michał; Karbarz, Dariusz; Pasicka, Bernadetta; Chrabąszcz, Michał; Śledź, Arkadiusz; Klank-Szafran, Monika; Vitali-Sendoz, Laura; Kameczura, Tomasz; Śpikowski, Jerzy; Stec, Piotr; Ujda, Marek; Stec, Sebastian

    2017-06-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is an established effective method for the treatment of typical cavo-tricuspid isthmus (CTI)-dependent atrial flutter (AFL). The introduction of 3-dimensional electro-anatomic systems enables RFCA without fluoroscopy (No-X-Ray [NXR]). The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of CTI RFCA during implementation of the NXR approach and the maximum voltage-guided (MVG) technique for ablation of AFL.Data were obtained from prospective standardized multicenter ablation registry. Consecutive patients with the first RFCA for CTI-dependent AFL were recruited. Two navigation approaches (NXR and fluoroscopy based as low as reasonable achievable [ALARA]) and 2 mapping and ablation techniques (MVG and pull-back technique [PBT]) were assessed. NXR + MVG (n  =  164; age: 63.7 ± 9.5; 30% women), NXR + PBT (n  =  55; age: 63.9 ± 10.7; 39% women); ALARA + MVG (n  =  36; age: 64.2 ± 9.6; 39% women); and ALARA + PBT (n  =  205; age: 64.7 ± 9.1; 30% women) were compared, respectively. All groups were simplified with a 2-catheter femoral approach using 8-mm gold tip catheters (Osypka AG, Germany or Biotronik, Germany) with 15 min of observation. The MVG technique was performed using step-by-step application by mapping the largest atrial signals within the CTI.Bidirectional block in CTI was achieved in 99% of all patients (P  =  NS, between groups). In NXR + MVG and NXR + PBT groups, the procedure time decreased (45.4 ± 17.6 and 47.2 ± 15.7 min vs. 52.6 ± 23.7 and 59.8 ± 24.0 min, P < .01) as compared to ALARA + MVG and ALARA + PBT subgroups. In NXR + MVG and NXR + PBT groups, 91% and 98% of the procedures were performed with complete elimination of fluoroscopy. The NXR approach was associated with a significant reduction in fluoroscopy exposure (from 0.2 ± 1.1 [NXR + PBT] and 0.3 ± 1.6 [NXR + MVG] to 7.7 ± 6.0 min [ALARA + MVG] and 9

  4. [Radiation Protection in Orthodontics: relevant data].

    PubMed

    Foucart, Jean-Michel; Felizardo, Rufino; Pizelle, Christophe

    2012-03-01

    For the past 30 years X-Ray images have effected a veritable revolution in medical practice. Using them practitioners cannot only make reliable and precise diagnoses when they begin a course of treatment but also accurately follow the progress of therapy. Orthodontics is one of the specialties that has benefited from the innovations in medical radiography. At the same time we have learned more about the risks that the use of ionizing radiation entails and are, accordingly, basing our radiological practice on the ALARA principle ("As Low As Reasonably Achievable"). Even though this concept is embodied in much national and European legislation, practitioners will enhance their daily use of radiology by acquiring an understanding of the scientific basis for ALARA. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2012.

  5. Dose reduction at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, J.W.; Dionne, B.J.

    1983-01-01

    The collective dose equivalent at nuclear power plants increased from 1250 rem in 1969 to nearly 54,000 rem in 1980. This rise is attributable primarily to an increase in nuclear generated power from 1289 MW-y to 29,155 MW-y; and secondly, to increased average plant age. However, considerable variation in exposure occurs from plant to plant depending on plant type, refueling, maintenance, etc. In order to understand the factors influencing these differences, an investigation was initiated to study dose-reduction techniques and effectiveness of as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) planning at light water plants. Objectives are to: identify high-dose maintenance tasks and related dose-reduction techniques; investigate utilization of high-reliability, low-maintenance equipment; recommend improved radioactive waste handling equipment and procedures; examine incentives for dose reduction; and compile an ALARA handbook.

  6. The Texas Solution to the Nation's Disposal Needs for Irradiated Hardware - 13337

    SciTech Connect

    Britten, Jay M.

    2013-07-01

    The closure of the disposal facility in Barnwell, South Carolina, to out-of-compact states in 2008 left commercial nuclear power plants without a disposal option for Class B and C irradiated hardware. In 2012, Waste Control Specialists LLC (WCS) opened a highly engineered facility specifically designed and built for the disposal of Class B and C waste. The WCS facility is the first Interstate Compact low-level radioactive waste disposal facility to be licensed and operated under the Low-level Waste Policy Act of 1980, as amended in 1985. Due to design requirements of a modern Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) facility, traditional methods for disposal were not achievable at the WCS site. Earlier methods primarily utilized the As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) concept of distance to accomplish worker safety. The WCS method required the use of all three ALARA concepts of time, distance, and shielding to ensure the safe disposal of this highly hazardous waste stream. (authors)

  7. Maximum voltage gradient technique for optimization of ablation for typical atrial flutter with zero-fluoroscopy approach

    PubMed Central

    Deutsch, Karol; Śledź, Janusz; Mazij, Mariusz; Ludwik, Bartosz; Labus, Michał; Karbarz, Dariusz; Pasicka, Bernadetta; Chrabąszcz, Michał; Śledź, Arkadiusz; Klank-Szafran, Monika; Vitali-Sendoz, Laura; Kameczura, Tomasz; Śpikowski, Jerzy; Stec, Piotr; Ujda, Marek; Stec, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is an established effective method for the treatment of typical cavo-tricuspid isthmus (CTI)-dependent atrial flutter (AFL). The introduction of 3-dimensional electro-anatomic systems enables RFCA without fluoroscopy (No-X-Ray [NXR]). The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of CTI RFCA during implementation of the NXR approach and the maximum voltage-guided (MVG) technique for ablation of AFL. Data were obtained from prospective standardized multicenter ablation registry. Consecutive patients with the first RFCA for CTI-dependent AFL were recruited. Two navigation approaches (NXR and fluoroscopy based as low as reasonable achievable [ALARA]) and 2 mapping and ablation techniques (MVG and pull-back technique [PBT]) were assessed. NXR + MVG (n  =  164; age: 63.7 ± 9.5; 30% women), NXR + PBT (n  =  55; age: 63.9 ± 10.7; 39% women); ALARA + MVG (n  =  36; age: 64.2 ± 9.6; 39% women); and ALARA + PBT (n  =  205; age: 64.7 ± 9.1; 30% women) were compared, respectively. All groups were simplified with a 2-catheter femoral approach using 8-mm gold tip catheters (Osypka AG, Germany or Biotronik, Germany) with 15 min of observation. The MVG technique was performed using step-by-step application by mapping the largest atrial signals within the CTI. Bidirectional block in CTI was achieved in 99% of all patients (P  =  NS, between groups). In NXR + MVG and NXR + PBT groups, the procedure time decreased (45.4 ± 17.6 and 47.2 ± 15.7 min vs. 52.6 ± 23.7 and 59.8 ± 24.0 min, P < .01) as compared to ALARA + MVG and ALARA + PBT subgroups. In NXR + MVG and NXR + PBT groups, 91% and 98% of the procedures were performed with complete elimination of fluoroscopy. The NXR approach was associated with a significant reduction in fluoroscopy exposure (from 0.2 ± 1.1 [NXR + PBT] and 0.3 ± 1.6 [NXR + MVG] to 7.7 ± 6.0 min [ALARA

  8. EROS Data Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1980-01-01

    The Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center, located in Sioux Falls, SD, is a data management, systems development, and research field center of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Mapping Division. The Center was established in the early 1970's to receive, process, and distribute data from National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Landsat satellites. The Center holds the world's largest collection of space and aircraft acquired imagery of the Earth. These holdings include over 2 million images acquired from satellites and over 8 million aerial photographs. The Center is also a major focal point for information concerning the holdings of foreign Landsat ground reception stations and data acquired by other countries' Earth observing satellites. The central U.S. location provides the Center with a unique capability to receive real-time electronic signals from Earth orbiting satellites, used for developing data sets of most of the North American continent.

  9. Relativistic Guiding Center Equations

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.; Gobbin, M.

    2014-10-01

    In toroidal fusion devices it is relatively easy that electrons achieve relativistic velocities, so to simulate runaway electrons and other high energy phenomena a nonrelativistic guiding center formalism is not sufficient. Relativistic guiding center equations including flute mode time dependent field perturbations are derived. The same variables as used in a previous nonrelativistic guiding center code are adopted, so that a straightforward modifications of those equations can produce a relativistic version.

  10. Test Control Center exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Have you ever wondered how the engineers at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., test fire a Space Shuttle Main Engine? The Test Control Center exhibit at StenniSphere can answer your questions by simulating the test firing of a Space Shuttle Main Engine. A recreation of one of NASA's test control centers, the exhibit explains and portrays the 'shake, rattle and roar' that happens during a real test firing.

  11. Forensic Science Center

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, B.; Grant, P.M.

    1994-03-01

    Since 1991, the Laboratory's Forensic Science Center has focused a comprehensive range of analytical expertise on issues related to non proliferation, counterterrorism, and domestic law enforcement. During this short period, LLNL's singular combination of human and technological resources has made the Center among the best of its kind in the world. The Forensic Science Center houses a variety of state-of-the-art analytical tools ranging from gas chromatograph/mass spectrometers to ultratrace DNA detection techniques. The Center's multidisciplinary staff provides expertise in organic and inorganic analytical chemistry, nuclear science, biochemistry, and genetics useful for supporting law enforcement and for verifying compliance with international treaties and agreements.

  12. Data Center at NICT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichikawa, Ryuichi; Sekido, Mamoru

    2013-01-01

    The Data Center at the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) archives and releases the databases and analysis results processed at the Correlator and the Analysis Center at NICT. Regular VLBI sessions of the Key Stone Project VLBI Network were the primary objective of the Data Center. These regular sessions continued until the end of November 2001. In addition to the Key Stone Project VLBI sessions, NICT has been conducting geodetic VLBI sessions for various purposes, and these data are also archived and released by the Data Center.

  13. 13. SAC command center, weather center, underground structure, building 501, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. SAC command center, weather center, underground structure, building 501, undated - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Command Center, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  14. Technical basis for implementation of remote reading capabilities for radiological control instruments at tank farms

    SciTech Connect

    PIERSON, R.M.

    1999-10-27

    This document provides the technical basis for use of remote reading capabilities with radiological control instruments at River Protection Project facilities. The purpose of this document is to evaluate applications of remote reading capabilities with Radiological Control instrumentation to allow continuous monitoring of radiation dose rates at River Protection Project (RPP) facilities. In addition this document provides a technical basis and implementing guidelines for remote monitoring of dose rates and their potential contribution to maintaining radiation exposures ALARA.

  15. Engineering report for simulated riser installation

    SciTech Connect

    Brevick, C.H., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-09

    The simulated riser installation field tests demonstrated that new access ports (risers) can be installed safely, quickly, and economically in the concrete domes of existing underground single- shell waste storage tanks by utilizing proven rotary drilling equipment and vacuum excavation techniques. The new riser installation will seal against water intrusion, provide as table riser anchored to the tank dome, and be installed in accordance with ALARA principles. The information contained in the report will apply to actual riser installation activity in the future.

  16. Panthere V2: Multipurpose Simulation Software for 3D Dose Rate Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penessot, Gaël; Bavoil, Éléonore; Wertz, Laurent; Malouch, Fadhel; Visonneau, Thierry; Dubost, Julien

    2017-09-01

    PANTHERE is a multipurpose radiation protection software developed by EDF to calculate gamma dose rates in complex 3D environments. PANTHERE takes a key role in the EDF ALARA process, enabling to predict dose rates and to organize and optimize operations in high radiation environments. PANTHERE is also used for nuclear waste characterization, transport of nuclear materials, etc. It is used in most of the EDF engineering units and their design service providers and industrial partners.

  17. W-320 waste retrieval sluicing system transfer line flushing volume and frequency calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J.W.

    1997-11-05

    The calculations contained in this analysis document establish the technical basis for the volume, frequency, and flushing fluid to be utilized for routine Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS) process line flushes. The WRSS was installed by Project W-320, Tank 24 I-C-106 Sluicing. The double contained pipelines being flushed have 4 inch stainless steel primary pipes. The flushes are intended to prevent hydrogen build up in the transfer lines and to provide ALARA conditions for maintenance personnel.

  18. Contamination a major problem in nuclear medicine imaging: How to investigate, handle and avoid it?

    PubMed

    Kumar, Narvesh; Verma, Shashwat; Singh, Rani Kunti Randhir; Datta, Deepanksha; Kheruka, Subhash Chand; Gambhir, Sanjay

    2017-04-13

    We submitted this study to describe the pattern of contamination of the collimator and motion artifact, and measures needed for its identification and confirmation, to emphasise the importance of detection of potential sources of false positive results associated with the nuclear scans. It is important for the nuclear medicine technologist and physicians to recognize the various patterns of sources of error associated in a specific study in order to avoid the unnecessary radiation exposure to the patients (according to the ALARA).

  19. Tumulus Disposal Demonstration Project assessment plan for potential worker exposure: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Styers, D.R.

    1989-03-01

    The purpose of the ''Assessment Plan for Potential Worker Exposure'' is to determine the potential radiological exposures to the workers as they dispose of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) on the Tumulus Disposal Demonstration Project (TDDP). An evaluation of the work procedures and precautions will be made so as to maintain the exposure levels As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). 10 refs., 10 figs.

  20. Basic radiation protection considerations in dental practice.

    PubMed

    Michel, R; Zimmerman, T L

    1999-11-01

    This article provides basic guidance to radiation safety professionals unfamiliar with dental radiography on how to optimize the use of x-ray equipment and maintain occupational and non-occupational doses ALARA. Topics discussed in this article include basic protective measures commonly used to minimize the patient and operator's exposure to radiation, recommendations for the development of operating procedures, and the performance of compliance audits in dental practice.

  1. Decontamination demonstration facility (D. D. F) modularization/mobility study

    SciTech Connect

    FitzPatrick, V.F.; Butts, H.L.; Moles, R.G.; Lundgren, R.A.

    1980-11-01

    The component decontamination technology, developed under the DOE sponsored TRU Waste Decontamination Program, has potential benefits to nuclear utility owners in four strategic areas: (1) Meeting ALARA Criteria for Maintenance/Operations; (2) Management of wastes and waste forms; (3) Accident Response; (4) Decommissioning. The most significant step in transferring this technology directly to the nuclear industry is embodied in the TMI Decontamination Demonstration Facility (D.D.F.).

  2. Radiation dosage during pediatric diagnostic or interventional cardiac catheterizations using the "air gap technique" and an aggressive "as low as reasonably achievable" radiation reduction protocol in patients weighing <20 kg.

    PubMed

    Osei, Frank A; Hayman, Joshua; Sutton, Nicole J; Pass, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac catheterizations expose both the patient and staff to the risks of ionizing radiation. Studies using the "air gap" technique (AGT) in various radiological procedures indicate that its use leads to reduction in radiation exposure but there are no data on its use for pediatric cardiac catheterization. The aim of this study was to retrospectively review the radiation exposure data for children weighing <20 kg during cardiac catheterizations using AGT and an "as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)" radiation reduction protocol. All patients weighing <20 kg who underwent cardiac catheterization at the Children's Hospital at Montefiore (CHAM), New York, the United States from 05/2011 to 10/2013 were included. Transplant patients who underwent routine endomyocardial biopsy and those who had surgical procedures at the time of the catheterizations were excluded. The ALARA protocol was used in concert with AGT with the flat panel detector positioned 110 cm from the patient. Demographics, procedural data, and patient radiation exposure levels were collected and analyzed. One-hundred and twenty-seven patients underwent 151 procedures within the study period. The median age was 1.2 years (range: 1 day to 7.9 years) and median weight was 8.8 kg (range: 1.9-19.7). Eighty-nine (59%) of the procedures were interventional. The median total fluoro time was 13 min [interquartile range (IQR) 7.3-21.8]. The median total air Kerma (K) product was 55.6 mGy (IQR 17.6-94.2) and dose area product (DAP) was 189 Gym2 (IQR 62.6-425.5). Use of a novel ALARA and AGT protocol for cardiac catheterizations in children markedly reduced radiation exposure to levels far below recently reported values. AGT: Air gap technique, ALARA: As low as reasonably achievable.

  3. Radiation dosage during pediatric diagnostic or interventional cardiac catheterizations using the “air gap technique” and an aggressive “as low as reasonably achievable” radiation reduction protocol in patients weighing <20 kg

    PubMed Central

    Osei, Frank A; Hayman, Joshua; Sutton, Nicole J; Pass, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiac catheterizations expose both the patient and staff to the risks of ionizing radiation. Studies using the “air gap” technique (AGT) in various radiological procedures indicate that its use leads to reduction in radiation exposure but there are no data on its use for pediatric cardiac catheterization. The aim of this study was to retrospectively review the radiation exposure data for children weighing <20 kg during cardiac catheterizations using AGT and an “as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)” radiation reduction protocol. Patients and Methods: All patients weighing <20 kg who underwent cardiac catheterization at the Children's Hospital at Montefiore (CHAM), New York, the United States from 05/2011 to 10/2013 were included. Transplant patients who underwent routine endomyocardial biopsy and those who had surgical procedures at the time of the catheterizations were excluded. The ALARA protocol was used in concert with AGT with the flat panel detector positioned 110 cm from the patient. Demographics, procedural data, and patient radiation exposure levels were collected and analyzed. Results: One-hundred and twenty-seven patients underwent 151 procedures within the study period. The median age was 1.2 years (range: 1 day to 7.9 years) and median weight was 8.8 kg (range: 1.9-19.7). Eighty-nine (59%) of the procedures were interventional. The median total fluoro time was 13 min [interquartile range (IQR) 7.3-21.8]. The median total air Kerma (K) product was 55.6 mGy (IQR 17.6-94.2) and dose area product (DAP) was 189 Gym2 (IQR 62.6-425.5). Conclusion: Use of a novel ALARA and AGT protocol for cardiac catheterizations in children markedly reduced radiation exposure to levels far below recently reported values. Abbreviations: AGT: Air gap technique, ALARA: As low as reasonably achievable. PMID:27011686

  4. SU-E-I-36: A Study to Compare Operator Dosimeter Exposure versus Fluoroscopic Time and Air Kerma in Fluoroscopically Guided Interventional Procedures.

    PubMed

    McKetty, M

    2012-06-01

    The total effective dose equivalent limit for occupationally radiation exposed persons has remained at 50 millisieverts per year since the 1960s. There is ongoing discussion whether this limit should be lowered. Whether or not it is lowered, all facilities have to adhere to the principle of ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable). In a hospital environment, the workers who typically have exposures which Result in ALARA investigations having to be performed include interventional radiologists, cardiologists, and mobile C-arm operators. At our institution there are a limited number of interventional radiologists with one person being responsible for performing the majority of the procedures and sometimes exceeding the ALARA investigational levels. A limited study was performed to compare the number, type of studies, cumulative air kerma, and fluoroscopic time versus the exposure measured by the personnel dosimeters worn by the radiologists. This was also related to the type of angiographic equipment in use. The length of fluoroscopic time and cumulative air kerma and cumulative DAP appeared to be related to the higher exposures received by the operator. The number of procedures performed did not correlate with the personnel dosimeter exposure; rather it was the type and complexity of a study and the length of fluoroscopic time that was related. The number of ALARA investigations required has decreased gradually. This could be attributed to several factors. These include increased use of available safety items. With an increase in the number of interventionalists the work load is distributed more equitably. The purchase of new angiographic equipment has resulted in better image quality and more shielding options for the operators. The operators are periodically reminded to keep fluoroscopic time to a minimum and use appropriate settings on the equipment. The equipment is calibrated to provide adequate image quality at mid-dose settings. © 2012 American Association of

  5. Handbook for Learning Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norwalk Board of Education, CT.

    The handbook for learning centers contains guidelines, forms, and supplementary information to be used with all children identified as having a learning disability, mild retardation, or sensory deprivation in the Norwalk, Connecticut public schools. It is stressed that the learning center should provide supportive services for at least 35 minutes…

  6. Outfitting Campus Fitness Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fickes, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Explains how universities and colleges, both private and public, are including fitness centers as ways of increasing their student enrollment levels. Comments are provided on school experiences in fitness-center design, equipment purchasing, and maintenance and operating-costs issues. (GR)

  7. Simple Machine Science Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chessin, Debby

    2007-01-01

    Science centers can engage students; accommodate different learning styles and individual interests; help students become independent and confident learners; and encourage social skills among students. In this article, the author worked with third-grade students as they completed activities at learning centers during a week-long unit on simple…

  8. Science Center and Attitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daneshamooz, Saeed; Alamolhodaei, Hassan; Darvishian, Saeed; Daneshamooz, Soniya

    2013-01-01

    The project team gathered data with the assistance of Recreational and Cultural Organization of Mashhad Municipality, Organization of Mashhad Municipality and Science and Astronomy Science Center of Mashhad Municipality, Khorasan Razavi, Islamic Republic of Iran. This paper discusses the effect of science center on attitude of students who visit…

  9. Accredited Birth Centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bellingham, WA 98225 360-752-2229 Accredited since July 2015 Best Start Birth Center Accredited 3343 4th Avenue San Diego, CA 92103 619-299-0840 ... Corvallis, OR 97330 541-286-4030 Accredited since July 2017 Dar a Luz Birth and Health Center Accredited 7708 4th Street NW Los Ranchos, NM 87107 505-924- ...

  10. Assessing the Assessment Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRue, James

    1989-01-01

    Describes the historical use of assessment centers as staff development and promotional tools and their current use in personnel selection. The elements that constitute a true assessment center are outlined, and a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages for employers and applicants focuses on positions in library administration. (10…

  11. NASA News Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-31

    The NASA News Center, seen here, is the hub of news operations for the media, providing information and contacts about Space Shuttle processing and other activities around KSC. News Center staff also conduct media tours, escorting journalists and photo/videographers to key sites such as the launch pads and Vehicle Assembly Building as needed.

  12. Developing a Teacher Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Theodore W.

    This paper begins by outlining six functions of a teacher center that are seen as generally accepted and by remarking on certain realities, like the overworked teacher and dearth of funds, that are pertinent to establishing a teacher center. The majority of the text is devoted to an explanation of a large number of specific principles that should…

  13. The Alexandria Research Center

    Treesearch

    John T. Cassady; William F. Mann

    1954-01-01

    This booklet describes the work of the Alexandria Research Center. The Center is a field unit of the Southern Forest Experiment Station, Forest Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture. Its special mission is to find practical solutions to the most urgent land-management problems of the cutover longleaf pine lands west of the Mississippi River. The...

  14. Student Media Center Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Dorothy Ann

    A simple guide to using the schools media center is provided. Students are told how to find and use the print and nonprint resources in the media center, including the card catalog, microfilm, video and audio equipment, and films and filmstrips. (SK)

  15. Simple Machine Science Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chessin, Debby

    2007-01-01

    Science centers can engage students; accommodate different learning styles and individual interests; help students become independent and confident learners; and encourage social skills among students. In this article, the author worked with third-grade students as they completed activities at learning centers during a week-long unit on simple…

  16. GSFC VLBI Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, David; Ma, Chopo; MacMillan, Dan; Gipson, John; Bolotin, Sergei; Le Bail, Karine; Baver, Karen

    2013-01-01

    This report presents the activities of the GSFC VLBI Analysis Center during 2012. The GSFC VLBI Analysis Center analyzes all IVS sessions, makes regular IVS submissions of data and analysis products, and performs research and software development aimed at improving the VLBI technique.

  17. World Saver Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Theresa; And Others

    Conservation is a concern for all cultures, and children are familiar with this concept because of recycling in their homes and home towns. The World Saver Center, an example of the thematic approach to learning, is designed to allow children to experiment with concepts of conservation in a familiar setting. The center, designed to resemble an…

  18. One Stop Career Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Patricia

    With the aid of a U.S. Department of Labor grant, a number of one-stop career centers are being developed or have been implemented in California. A one-stop career center is a physical and electronic site where comprehensive services to job seekers and employers are available. These services include the following: assessment and eligibility…

  19. Early Childhood Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butin, Dan; Woolums, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Early childhood centers have become a common and necessary part of millions of Americans' lives. More women in the workforce, longer workweeks, and educational research supporting the importance of early education have all contributed to the rise of early childhood centers throughout the United States. Today, more than 30 percent of children under…

  20. GSFC VLBI Analysis center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, David; Ma, Chopo; MacMillan, Dan; Petrov, Leonid; Baver, Karen

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the activities of the GSFC VLBI Analysis Center during 2004. The GSFC Analysis Center analyzes all IVS sessions, makes regular IVS submissions of data and analysis products, and performs research and software development activities aimed at improving the VLBI technique.

  1. The Revitalized Tutoring Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koselak, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    One high-leverage strategy rooted in a strong research base--the revitalized tutoring center--provides a wealth of opportunity to students who may be otherwise underserved. This embedded, open-all-day tutoring center supports collaborative teacher teams by using peer tutors and community volunteers. By centralizing resources and providing supports…

  2. Science Center and Attitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daneshamooz, Saeed; Alamolhodaei, Hassan; Darvishian, Saeed; Daneshamooz, Soniya

    2013-01-01

    The project team gathered data with the assistance of Recreational and Cultural Organization of Mashhad Municipality, Organization of Mashhad Municipality and Science and Astronomy Science Center of Mashhad Municipality, Khorasan Razavi, Islamic Republic of Iran. This paper discusses the effect of science center on attitude of students who visit…

  3. The Revitalized Tutoring Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koselak, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    One high-leverage strategy rooted in a strong research base--the revitalized tutoring center--provides a wealth of opportunity to students who may be otherwise underserved. This embedded, open-all-day tutoring center supports collaborative teacher teams by using peer tutors and community volunteers. By centralizing resources and providing supports…

  4. Assessing the Assessment Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRue, James

    1989-01-01

    Describes the historical use of assessment centers as staff development and promotional tools and their current use in personnel selection. The elements that constitute a true assessment center are outlined, and a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages for employers and applicants focuses on positions in library administration. (10…

  5. National Technology Transfer Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, Lee W.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the National Technology Transfer Center (NTTC) are provided. The NTTC mission is to serve as a hub for the nationwide technology-transfer network to expedite the movement of federally developed technology into the stream of commerce. A description of the Center is provided.

  6. NASA Propagation Information Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ernest K.; Flock, Warren L.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Information Center became formally operational in July 1988. It is located in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. The Center is several things: a communications medium for the propagation with the outside world, a mechanism for internal communication within the program, and an aid to management.

  7. Tribal Business Assistance Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lansdowne, Michele

    The Salish Kootenai College Tribal Business Assistance Center was established in 1994 to provide technical assistance to individuals who are pursuing a small business. The center assists the entrepreneur by way of individual consultation with business advisors, small business workshops, and business administration courses that have been created…

  8. Funding Opportunity: Genomic Data Centers

    Cancer.gov

    Funding Opportunity CCG, Funding Opportunity Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG, Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG RFA, Center for cancer genomics rfa, genomic data analysis network, genomic data analysis network centers,

  9. ARO Geoscience Center fellowships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonderhaar, Thomas H.; Behunek, Jan L.; Bringi, Viswanathan N.; Brubaker, Thomas H.; Julien, Pierre Y.

    1992-01-01

    The fellowship grant was supported by the ARO Center for Geosciences located at the Foothills Campus at Colorado State University under the auspices of the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA). The center for Geosciences at Colorado State University was established in collaboration with the Army Research Office on October 1, 1986. The center brought together a wide range of expertise into one focused multidisciplinary research framework. Under the administrative structure of CIRA, the center involved investigators from the University's Departments of Atmospheric Science, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Earth Resources, Forest and Wood Science, Physics, and Psychology. The technical components of the center are in atmospheric and surface remote and in-situ sensing; atmospheric modeling; hydrologic modeling; and geoscience information extraction.

  10. Energy efficient data centers

    SciTech Connect

    Tschudi, William; Xu, Tengfang; Sartor, Dale; Koomey, Jon; Nordman, Bruce; Sezgen, Osman

    2004-03-30

    Data Center facilities, prevalent in many industries and institutions are essential to California's economy. Energy intensive data centers are crucial to California's industries, and many other institutions (such as universities) in the state, and they play an important role in the constantly evolving communications industry. To better understand the impact of the energy requirements and energy efficiency improvement potential in these facilities, the California Energy Commission's PIER Industrial Program initiated this project with two primary focus areas: First, to characterize current data center electricity use; and secondly, to develop a research ''roadmap'' defining and prioritizing possible future public interest research and deployment efforts that would improve energy efficiency. Although there are many opinions concerning the energy intensity of data centers and the aggregate effect on California's electrical power systems, there is very little publicly available information. Through this project, actual energy consumption at its end use was measured in a number of data centers. This benchmark data was documented in case study reports, along with site-specific energy efficiency recommendations. Additionally, other data center energy benchmarks were obtained through synergistic projects, prior PG&E studies, and industry contacts. In total, energy benchmarks for sixteen data centers were obtained. For this project, a broad definition of ''data center'' was adopted which included internet hosting, corporate, institutional, governmental, educational and other miscellaneous data centers. Typically these facilities require specialized infrastructure to provide high quality power and cooling for IT equipment. All of these data center types were considered in the development of an estimate of the total power consumption in California. Finally, a research ''roadmap'' was developed through extensive participation with data center professionals, examination of case

  11. Westinghouse Hanford Company health and safety performance report. Fourth quarter calendar year 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Lansing, K.A.

    1995-03-01

    Detailed information pertaining to As Low As Reasonably Achievable/Contamination Control Improvement Project (ALARA/CCIP) activities are outlined. Improved commitment to the WHC ALARA/CCIP Program was experienced throughout FY 1994. During CY 1994, 17 of 19 sitewide ALARA performance goals were completed on or ahead of schedule. Estimated total exposure by facility for CY 1994 is listed in tables by organization code for each dosimeter frequency. Facilities/areas continue to utilize the capabilities of the RPR tracking system in conjunction with the present site management action-tracking system to manage deficiencies, trend performance, and develop improved preventive efforts. Detailed information pertaining to occupational injuries/illnesses are provided. The Industrial Safety and Hygiene programs are described which have generated several key initiatives that are believed responsible for improved safety performance. A breakdown of CY 1994 occupational injuries/illnesses by type, affected body group, cause, job type, age/gender, and facility is provided. The contributing experience of each WHC division/department in attaining this significant improvement is described along with tables charting specific trends. The Radiological Control Program is on schedule to meet all RL Site Management System milestones and program commitments.

  12. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Radiological Control performance indicator report: First quarter, calendar year 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Aitken, S.B.

    1995-07-01

    The INEL Radiological Control Performance Indicator Report is provided quarterly, inaccordance with Article 133 of the INEL Radiological Control Manual. Indicators are used as a measure of performance of the Radiological Control Program and as a motivation for improvement, not as a goal in themselves. These indicators should be used by management to assist in focusing priorities and attention and adherence to As-Low-As-Reasonably-Achievable (ALARA) practices. The ALARA Committees establish ALARA goals for the INEL based on forecasts and goals provided by each facility organizational manager or supervisor.Performance goals are realistic and measurable. Stringent goals are set at least annually to reflect expected workloads and improvement of radiological performance. Goals higher than previous goals may occasionally be set due to changes in work scope or mission. The INEL Radiological Control Performance Indicators consist of: Collective dose in person-rem; average worker dose, maximum dose to a worker, and maximum neutron dose to a worker;the number of skin and clothing contaminations, including the number of contaminated wounds and facial contaminations; the number of radioactive material intakes; the area of Contamination, High Contamination, and Airborne Radioactivity Areas in square feet; and airborne radioactivity events and spills.

  13. OPERATOR DEPENDENCY OF THE RADIATION EXPOSURE IN CARDIAC INTERVENTIONS: FEASIBILITY OF ULTRA LOW DOSE LEVELS.

    PubMed

    Ozpelit, Mehmet Emre; Ercan, Ertugrul; Ozpelit, Ebru; Pekel, Nihat; Tengiz, Istemihan; Ozyurtlu, Ferhat; Yilmaz, Akar

    2017-04-15

    Mean radiation exposure in invasive cardiology varies greatly between different centres and interventionists. The International Commission on Radiological Protection and the EURATOM Council stipulate that, despite reference values, 'All medical exposure for radiodiagnostic purposes shall be kept as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA). The purpose of this study is to establish the effects of the routine application of ALARA principles and to determine operator and procedure impact on radiation exposure in interventional cardiology. A total of 240 consecutive cardiac interventional procedures were analysed. Five operators performed the procedures, two of whom were working in accordance with ALARA principles (Group 1 operators) with the remaining three working in a standard manner (Group 2 operators). Radiation exposure levels of these two groups were compared. Total fluoroscopy time and the number of radiographic runs were similar between groups. However, dose area product and cumulative dose were significantly lower in Group 1 when compared with Group 2. Radiation levels of Group 1 were far below even the reference levels in the literature, thus representing an ultra-low-dose radiation exposure in interventional cardiology. By use of simple radiation reducing techniques, ultra-low-dose radiation exposure is feasible in interventional cardiology. Achievability of such levels depends greatly on operator awareness, desire, knowledge and experience of radiation protection. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Radiation safety education in vascular surgery training.

    PubMed

    Bordoli, Stefano J; Carsten, Christopher G; Cull, David L; Johnson, Brent L; Taylor, Spence M

    2014-03-01

    Endovascular volume during vascular surgery training has increased profoundly over recent decades, providing heavy exposure to ionizing radiation. The study purpose was to examine the radiation safety training and practices of current vascular surgery trainees. An anonymous survey was distributed to all current U.S. trainees. Responses were compared according to the presence of formal radiation safety training and also the trainees' perception of their attendings' adherence to As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) strategies. The response rate was 14%. Forty-five percent had no formal radiation safety training, 74% were unaware of the radiation safety policy for pregnant females, 48% did not know their radiation safety officer's contact information, and 43% were unaware of the yearly acceptable levels of radiation exposure. Trained residents knew more basic radiation safety information, and more likely wore their dosimeter badges (P < .05). Trained residents found their radiation safety officer helpful in developing safety habits; untrained residents relied on other residents (P < .05). Trainees who felt their attendings consistently practiced ALARA strategies more likely practiced ALARA themselves (P < .05). The lack of formal radiation safety training in respondents may reflect an inadequate state of radiation safety education and practices among U.S. vascular surgery residents. Copyright © 2014 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Visualization Center Dedicated

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-17

    The dedication ceremony of the University of Southern Mississippi Center of Higher Learning (CHL) High-Performance Visualization Center at SSC was held Oct. 17. The center's RAVE II 3-D visualization system, available to both on- and off-site scientists, turns data into a fully immersive environment for the user. Cutting the ribbon are, from left, Rear Adm. Thomas Donaldson, commander of the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command; Jim Meredith, former director of the CHL; USM President Dr. Shelby Thames; Lt. Gov. Amy Tuck; Dr. Peter Ranelli, director of the CHL; Dewey Herring, chairman of the policy board for the CHL; and former Sen. Cecil Burge.

  16. Visualization Center Dedicated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The dedication ceremony of the University of Southern Mississippi Center of Higher Learning (CHL) High-Performance Visualization Center at SSC was held Oct. 17. The center's RAVE II 3-D visualization system, available to both on- and off-site scientists, turns data into a fully immersive environment for the user. Cutting the ribbon are, from left, Rear Adm. Thomas Donaldson, commander of the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command; Jim Meredith, former director of the CHL; USM President Dr. Shelby Thames; Lt. Gov. Amy Tuck; Dr. Peter Ranelli, director of the CHL; Dewey Herring, chairman of the policy board for the CHL; and former Sen. Cecil Burge.

  17. Visitors Center activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Astronaut Katherine Hire and LEGO-Master Model Builders assisted children from Mississippi, Louisiana and Mississippi in the building of a 12-foot tall Space Shuttle made entirely from tiny LEGO bricks at the John C. Stennis Space Center Visitors Center in South Mississippi. The shuttle was part of an exhibit titled ' Travel in Space' World Show which depicts the history of flight and space travel from the Wright brothers to future generations of space vehicles. For more information concerning hours of operation or Visitors Center educational programs, call 1-800-237-1821 in Mississippi and Louisiana or (601) 688-2370.

  18. Visitors Center activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    More than 2,000 children and adults from Mississippi, Louisiana and Alabama recently build a 12-foot tall Space Shuttle made entirely from tiny LEGO bricks at the John C. Stennis Space Center Visitors Center in South Mississippi. The shuttle was part of an exhibit titled 'Travel in Space' World Show which depicts the history of flight and space travel from the Wright brothers to future generations of space vehicles. For more information concerning hours of operation or Visitors Center educational programs, call 1-800-237-1821 in Mississippi and Louisiana or (601) 688-2370.

  19. Facility Focus: Athletic Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the designs of the Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium at Ohio State University and the fitness center of Scottsdale Community College in Arizona. Discusses design goals and unique features and includes photographs. (EV)

  20. NMA Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierulf, Halfdan Pascal; Andersen, Per Helge

    2013-01-01

    The Norwegian Mapping Authority (NMA) has during the last few years had a close cooperation with Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (FFI) in the analysis of space geodetic data using the GEOSAT software. In 2012 NMA has taken over the full responsibility for the GEOSAT software. This implies that FFI stopped being an IVS Associate Analysis Center in 2012. NMA has been an IVS Associate Analysis Center since 28 October 2010. NMA's contributions to the IVS as an Analysis Centers focus primarily on routine production of session-by-session unconstrained and consistent normal equations by GEOSAT as input to the IVS combined solution. After the recent improvements, we expect that VLBI results produced with GEOSAT will be consistent with results from the other VLBI Analysis Centers to a satisfactory level.

  1. Precision Joining Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, John W.

    1991-01-01

    The establishment of a Precision Joining Center (PJC) is proposed. The PJC will be a cooperatively operated center with participation from U.S. private industry, the Colorado School of Mines, and various government agencies, including the Department of Energy's Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC). The PJC's primary mission will be as a training center for advanced joining technologies. This will accomplish the following objectives: (1) it will provide an effective mechanism to transfer joining technology from the NWC to private industry; (2) it will provide a center for testing new joining processes for the NWC and private industry; and (3) it will provide highly trained personnel to support advance joining processes for the NWC and private industry.

  2. Principal Center Updates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, William

    2001-01-01

    NASA's Occupational Health Program Manager briefed attendees on current Agency initiatives and projects affecting Center Occupational Health personnel. Plans, insight, and expectations for the coming year will be discussed.

  3. Tsukuba VLBI Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurihara, Shinobu; Nozawa, Kentaro

    2013-01-01

    The Tsukuba Analysis Center is funded by the Geospatial Information Authority of Japan (GSI). The c5++ analysis software is regularly used for the IVS-INT2 analysis and the ultra-rapid EOP experiments.

  4. America's Blood Centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spokesperson Biographies Statements Logo & Style Guidelines Every two seconds someone needs blood. It's About Life. Please Donate ... from the Foundation for America’s Blood Centers. 2 SECONDS Every 2 seconds, someone in the United States ...

  5. Advanced Cancer Detection Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Vasculitis Clinical Research Network - Dr. Peter A. Merkel -- Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH - Rare Lung Diseases Clinical...cytopenias, including granular lymphocyte leukemia, pure red cell aplasia, and myelodysplastic syndromes; vasculitis disorders; inborn defects in steroid

  6. Proteome Characterization Centers - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    The centers, a component of NCI’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium, will analyze a subset of TCGA samples to define proteins translated from cancer genomes and their related biological processes.

  7. Mental Health Screening Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... to help us make DBSAlliance.org better! Go! Mental Health Screening Center These online screening tools are not ... you have any concerns, see your doctor or mental health professional. Depression This screening form was developed from ...

  8. The EROS Data Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1975-01-01

    The EROS Data Center, 16 miles (25 km) northeast of Sioux Falls, South Dakota, is operated by the EROS Program to provide access to NASA's LANDSAT [formerly Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS)] imagery, aerial photography acquired by the U.S. Department of the Interior, and photography and imagery acquired by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) from research aircraft and from Skylab, Apollo, and Gemini spacecraft. The primary functions of the Center are data storage and reproduction, and user assistance and training. This publication describes the Data Center operations, data products, services, and procedures for ordering remotely sensed data. The EROS Data Center and its principal facility, the 120,000-square-foot (11,200 m2) Karl E. Mundt Federal Building, were dedicated August 7, 1973.

  9. Soviet Mission Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This photo is an overall view of the Mission Control Center in Korolev, Russia during the Expedition Seven mission. The Expedition Seven crew launched aboard a Soyez spacecraft on April 26, 2003. Photo credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

  10. Chapels/Worship Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the design of notable school chapels and worship centers, including the educational context and design goals. Includes information on architects, suppliers, and cost, as well as photographs. (EV)

  11. Fermi Galactic Center Zoom

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This animation zooms into an image of the Milky Way, shown in visible light, and superimposes a gamma-ray map of the galactic center from NASA's Fermi. Raw data transitions to a view with all known...

  12. Test Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    At the test observation periscope in the Test Control Center exhibit in StenniSphere at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., visitors can observe a test of a Space Shuttle Main Engine exactly as test engineers might see it during a real engine test. The Test Control Center exhibit exactly simulates not only the test control environment, but also the procedure of testing a rocket engine. Designed to entertain while educating, StenniSphere includes informative dispays and exhibits from NASA's lead center for rocket propulsion and remote sensing applications. StenniSphere is open free of charge from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

  13. Science Center Goes Underground

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modern Schools, 1977

    1977-01-01

    A unique underground science center at Bluffton College, designed to save energy and preserve trees, rolling landscape, and other environmental features of the campus, is under construction in Bluffton, Ohio. (Author)

  14. Facility Focus: Athletic Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the designs of the Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium at Ohio State University and the fitness center of Scottsdale Community College in Arizona. Discusses design goals and unique features and includes photographs. (EV)

  15. Test Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    At the test observation periscope in the Test Control Center exhibit in StenniSphere at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., visitors can observe a test of a Space Shuttle Main Engine exactly as test engineers might see it during a real engine test. The Test Control Center exhibit exactly simulates not only the test control environment, but also the procedure of testing a rocket engine. Designed to entertain while educating, StenniSphere includes informative dispays and exhibits from NASA's lead center for rocket propulsion and remote sensing applications. StenniSphere is open free of charge from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

  16. A Center for All.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leisner, Hava

    2002-01-01

    Describes the building of Princeton University's $42 million Frist Student Center, which incorporates the original physics building, Palmer Hall, and a new addition. Provides information on the architect, construction manager, and product suppliers. Includes photographs. (EV)

  17. Test Control Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-10-25

    At the test observation periscope in the Test Control Center exhibit in StenniSphere at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., visitors can observe a test of a Space Shuttle Main Engine exactly as test engineers might see it during a real engine test. The Test Control Center exhibit exactly simulates not only the test control environment, but also the procedure of testing a rocket engine. Designed to entertain while educating, StenniSphere includes informative dispays and exhibits from NASA's lead center for rocket propulsion and remote sensing applications. StenniSphere is open free of charge from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

  18. Reliability Centered Maintenance - Methodologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kammerer, Catherine C.

    2009-01-01

    Journal article about Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) methodologies used by United Space Alliance, LLC (USA) in support of the Space Shuttle Program at Kennedy Space Center. The USA Reliability Centered Maintenance program differs from traditional RCM programs because various methodologies are utilized to take advantage of their respective strengths for each application. Based on operational experience, USA has customized the traditional RCM methodology into a streamlined lean logic path and has implemented the use of statistical tools to drive the process. USA RCM has integrated many of the L6S tools into both RCM methodologies. The tools utilized in the Measure, Analyze, and Improve phases of a Lean Six Sigma project lend themselves to application in the RCM process. All USA RCM methodologies meet the requirements defined in SAE JA 1011, Evaluation Criteria for Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) Processes. The proposed article explores these methodologies.

  19. Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpkins, Patrick A.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the importance of the Kennedy Space Center both in terms to the economy of Florida and to spaceflight. It reviews the general NASA direction,the challenges of the coming year and the accomplishments.

  20. Soviet Mission Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This photo is an overall view of the Mission Control Center in Korolev, Russia during the Expedition Seven mission. The Expedition Seven crew launched aboard a Soyez spacecraft on April 26, 2003. Photo credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

  1. Advanced Cancer Detection Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    flSttfiferrces ReferentHistory Alternative Medicine Alternative and Complementary/Integrative Nutritional Therapies in Cancer Prevention and Treatment ...to meet a clear and compelling need to respond to Florida’s "cancer epidemic." Building a major cancer research and treatment center at the... Medicine . This Department includes all the basic science faculty recruited by the Cancer Center and will be the academic home for a new interdisciplinary

  2. Transportation Systems Center

    SciTech Connect

    Greer, G.S.

    1992-07-01

    The Transportation Systems Center at Sandia Laboratory performs research, development, and implementation of technologies that enhance the safe movement of people, goods, and information. Our focus is on systems engineering. However, we realize that to understand the puzzle, you must also understand the pieces. This brochure describes some of the activities currently underway at the Center and presents the breadth and depth of our capabilities. Please contact the noted, individuals for more, information.

  3. Data center cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J; Dang, Hien P; Parida, Pritish R; Schultz, Mark D; Sharma, Arun

    2015-03-17

    A data center cooling system may include heat transfer equipment to cool a liquid coolant without vapor compression refrigeration, and the liquid coolant is used on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack housed in the data center. The system may also include a controller-apparatus to regulate the liquid coolant flow to the liquid cooled information technology equipment rack through a range of liquid coolant flow values based upon information technology equipment temperature thresholds.

  4. Patient-centered Communication

    PubMed Central

    Swenson, Sara L; Buell, Stephanie; Zettler, Patti; White, Martha; Ruston, Delaney C; Lo, Bernard

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate patient preferences for a patient-centered or a biomedical communication style. DESIGN Randomized study. SETTING Urgent care and ambulatory medicine clinics in an academic medical center. PARTICIPANTS We recruited 250 English-speaking adult patients, excluding patients whose medical illnesses prevented evaluation of the study intervention. INTERVENTION Participants watched one of three videotaped scenarios of simulated patient-physician discussions of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Each participant watched two versions of the scenario (biomedical vs. patient-centered communication style) and completed written and oral questionnaires to assess outcome measurements. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Main outcome measures were 1) preferences for a patient-centered versus a biomedical communication style; and 2) predictors of communication style preference. Participants who preferred the patient-centered style (69%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 63 to 75) tended to be younger (82%[51/62] for age < 30; 68%[100/148] for ages 30–59; 55%[21/38] for age > 59; P < .03), more educated (76%[54/71] for postcollege education; 73%[94/128] for some college; 49%[23/47] for high school only; P = .003), use CAM (75%[140/188] vs. 55%[33/60] for nonusers; P = .006), and have a patient-centered physician (88%[74/84] vs. 30%[16/54] for those with a biomedical physician; P < .0001). On multivariate analysis, factors independently associated with preferring the patient-centered style included younger age, use of herbal CAM, having a patient-centered physician, and rating a “doctor's interest in you as a person” as “very important.” CONCLUSIONS Given that a significant proportion of patients prefer a biomedical communication style, practicing physicians and medical educators should strive for flexible approaches to physician-patient communication. PMID:15566435

  5. Patient Safety Center Organization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    Enterectomy Bariatric 7/20/05 4 hours/course (28 hours/year) Surgery R 7 Dr. Karen Horvath R5 Lap Enterectomy & Colectomy 11/30/05 4...areas in the UW Schools of Nursing and Dentistry, at the Harborview Research Center Microvascular Surgery lab, with the Seattle Children’s Hospital and...1 laboratory complex (2500 sq ft) has been designed within the University of Washington Medical Center, in the Surgery Pavilion complex

  6. Center for Space Construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Renjeng

    1998-01-01

    The Center for Space Construction (CSC) at University of Colorado at Boulder is one of eight University Space Engineering Research Centers established by NASA in 1988. The mission of the Center is to conduct research into space technology and to directly contribute to space engineering education. The Center reports to the Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences and resides in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences. The College has a long and successful track record of cultivating multi-disciplinary research and education programs. The Center for Space Construction represents prominent evidence of this record. The basic concept on which the Center was founded is the in-space construction of large space systems, such as space stations, interplanetary space vehicles, and extraterrestrial space structures. Since 1993, the scope of CSC research has evolved to include the design and construction of all spacecraft, large and small. With the broadened scope our research projects seek to impact the technological basis for spacecraft such as remote sensing satellites, communication satellites and other special-purpose spacecraft, as well as large space platforms. A summary of accomplishments, including student participation and degrees awarded, during the contract period is presented.

  7. Radiation safety analysis of the ISS bone densitometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Paul; Vellinger, John C.; Barton, Kenneth; Faget, Paul

    A Bone Densitometer (BD) has been developed for installation on the International Space Station (ISS) with delivery by the Space-X Dragon spacecraft planned for mid 2014. After initial tests on orbit the BD will be used in longitudinal measurements of bone mineral density in experimental mice as a means of evaluating countermeasures to bone loss. The BD determines bone mineral density (and other radiographic parameters) by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). In a single mouse DEXA “scan” its 80 kV x-ray tube is operated for 15 seconds at 35 kV and 3 seconds at 80 kV in four repetitions, giving the subject a total dose of 2.5 mSv. The BD is a modification of a commercial mouse DEXA product known as PIXImus(TM). Before qualifying the BD for utilization on ISS it was necessary to evaluate its radiation safety features and any level of risk to ISS crew members. The BD design reorients the PIXImus so that it fits in an EXPRESS locker on ISS with the x-ray beam directed into the crew aisle. ISS regulation SSP 51700 considers the production of ionizing radiation to be a catastrophic-level hazard. Accidental exposure is prevented by three independent levels of on-off control as required for a catastrophic hazard. The ALARA (As Low as Reasonably Achievable) principle was applied to the BD hazard just as would be done on the ground, so deliberate exposure is limited by lead shielding according to ALARA. Hot spots around the BD were identified by environmental dosimetry using a Ludlum 9DP pressurized ionization chamber survey meter. Various thicknesses of lead were applied to the BD housing in areas where highest dose-per-scan readings were made. It was concluded that 0.4 mm of lead shielding at strategic locations, adding only a few kg of mass to the payload, would accomplish ALARA. With shielding in place the BD now exposes a crew member floating 40 cm away to less than 0.08 microSv per mouse scan. There is an upper limit of 20 scans per day, or 1.6 microSv per day

  8. Lens auto-centering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamontagne, Frédéric; Desnoyers, Nichola; Doucet, Michel; Côté, Patrice; Gauvin, Jonny; Anctil, Geneviève; Tremblay, Mathieu

    2015-09-01

    In a typical optical system, optical elements usually need to be precisely positioned and aligned to perform the correct optical function. This positioning and alignment involves securing the optical element in a holder or mount. Proper centering of an optical element with respect to the holder is a delicate operation that generally requires tight manufacturing tolerances or active alignment, resulting in costly optical assemblies. To optimize optical performance and minimize manufacturing cost, there is a need for a lens mounting method that could relax manufacturing tolerance, reduce assembly time and provide high centering accuracy. This paper presents a patent pending lens mounting method developed at INO that can be compared to the drop-in technique for its simplicity while providing the level of accuracy close to that achievable with techniques using a centering machine (usually < 5 μm). This innovative auto-centering method is based on the use of geometrical relationship between the lens diameter, the lens radius of curvature and the thread angle of the retaining ring. The autocentering principle and centering test results performed on real optical assemblies are presented. In addition to the low assembly time, high centering accuracy, and environmental robustness, the INO auto-centering method has the advantage of relaxing lens and barrel bore diameter tolerances as well as lens wedge tolerances. The use of this novel lens mounting method significantly reduces manufacturing and assembly costs for high performance optical systems. Large volume productions would especially benefit from this advancement in precision lens mounting, potentially providing a drastic cost reduction.

  9. "Infotonics Technology Center"

    SciTech Connect

    Fritzemeier, L.; Boysel, M. B.; Smith, D. R.

    2004-09-30

    During this grant period July 15, 2002 thru September 30, 2004, the Infotonics Technology Center developed the critical infrastructure and technical expertise necessary to accelerate the development of sensors, alternative lighting and power sources, and other specific subtopics of interest to Department of Energy. Infotonics fosters collaboration among industry, universities and government and operates as a national center of excellence to drive photonics and microsystems development and commercialization. A main goal of the Center is to establish a unique, world-class research and development facility. A state-of-the-art microsystems prototype and pilot fabrication facility was established to enable rapid commercialization of new products of particular interest to DOE. The Center has three primary areas of photonics and microsystems competency: device research and engineering, packaging and assembly, and prototype and pilot-scale fabrication. Center activities focused on next generation optical communication networks, advanced imaging and information sensors and systems, micro-fluidic systems, assembly and packaging technologies, and biochemical sensors. With targeted research programs guided by the wealth of expertise of Infotonics business and scientific staff, the fabrication and packaging facility supports and accelerates innovative technology development of special interest to DOE in support of its mission and strategic defense, energy, and science goals.

  10. Survey: National Meteorological Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The National Meteorological Center (NMC) is comprised of three operational divisions (Development, Automation, and Forecast) and an Administrative Division. The Development Division develops and implements mathematical models for forecasting the weather. The Automation Division provides the software and processing services to accommodate the models used in daily forecasts. The Forecasting Division applies a combination of numerical and manual techniques to produce analyses and prognoses up to 120 hr into the future. This guidance material is combined with severe storm information from the National Hurricane Center and the National Severe Storms Forecasting Center to develop locally tailored forecasts by the Weather Service Forecast Offices and, in turn, by the local Weather Service Offices. A very general flow of this information is shown. A more detailed illustration of data flow into, within, and from the NMC is given. The interrelations are depicted between the various meteorological organizations and activities.

  11. International Water Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The urban district of Nancy and the Town of Nancy, France, have taken the initiative of creating an International Center of Water (Centre International de l'Eau à Nancy—NAN.C.I.E.) in association with two universities, six engineering colleges, the Research Centers of Nancy, the Rhine-Meuse Basin Agency, and the Chamber of Commerce and Industry. The aim of this center is to promote research and technology transfer in the areas of water and sanitation. In 1985 it will initiate a research program drawing on the experience of 350 researchers and engineers of various disciplines who have already been assigned to research in these fields. The research themes, the majority of which will be multidisciplinary, concern aspects of hygiene and health, the engineering of industrial processes, water resources, and the environment and agriculture. A specialist training program offering five types of training aimed at university graduates, graduates of engineering colleges, or experts, will start in October 1984.

  12. Earth Science Information Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1991-01-01

    An ESIC? An Earth Science Information Center. Don't spell it. Say it. ESIC. It rhymes with seasick. You can find information in an information center, of course, and you'll find earth science information in an ESIC. That means information about the land that is the Earth, the land that is below the Earth, and in some instances, the space surrounding the Earth. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates a network of Earth Science Information Centers that sell earth science products and data. There are more than 75 ESIC's. Some are operated by the USGS, but most are in other State or Federal agencies. Each ESIC responds to requests for information received by telephone, letter, or personal visit. Your personal visit.

  13. MARS Mission research center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Mars Mission Research Center (M2RC) is one of nine University Space Engineering Research Centers established by NASA in June 1988. It is a cooperative effort between NCSU and A&T in Greensboro. The goal of the Center is to focus on research and educational technologies for planetary exploration with particular emphasis on Mars. The research combines Mission Analysis and Design, Hypersonic Aerodynamics and Propulsion, Structures and Controls, Composite Materials, and Fabrication Methods in a cross-disciplined program directed towards the development of space transportation systems for lunar and planetary travel. The activities of the students and faculty in the M2RC for the period 1 Jul. 1990 to 30 Jun. 1991 are described.

  14. Virtual center arraying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, L. J.; Lipes, R. G.; Miller, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    Methods to increase the amount of data that can be received from outer planet missions are described with emphasis on antenna arraying systems designed to increase the total effective aperture of the receiving system. One such method is virtual center arraying (VCA). In VCA, a combined carrier reference is derived at a point that is, conceptually, the geometric center of the array. This point need not coincide with any of the actual antennas of the array. A noise analysis of the VCA system is given along with formulas for the phase jitter as a function of loop bandwidths and the amount of loop damping. If the ratio of the loop bandwidths of the center loop to the vertex loops is greater than 100, then the jitter is very nearly equal to that expected for ideal combined carrier referencing.

  15. Hospitals report on cancer centers.

    PubMed

    Rees, T

    2001-01-01

    Woman's Hospital, Baton Rouge, La., is first-place winner among cancer centers. Holy Cross Hospital's Michael and Dianne Bienes Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., is named second; and, Cardinal Health System's Ball Cancer Center, Muncie, Ind., third.

  16. Mars mission research center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The Mars Mission Research Center is one of nine University Space Engineering Research Centers established by NASA to broaden the nation's engineering capability to meet the critical needs of the civilian space program. It has the goal of focusing on research and training technologies for planetary exploration with particular emphasis on Mars. The research combines: (1) composite materials and fabrication, (2) light weight structures and controls, and (3) hypersonic aerodynamics and propulsion in a cross disciplined program directed towards the development of the space transportation system for planetary travel.

  17. Vet Centers. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-03-02

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) adopts as final an interim final rule that amends its medical regulation that governs Vet Center services. The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013 (the 2013 Act) requires Vet Centers to provide readjustment counseling services to broader groups of veterans, members of the Armed Forces, including a member of a reserve component of the Armed Forces, and family members of such veterans and members. This final rule adopts as final the regulatory criteria to conform to the 2013 Act, to include new and revised definitions.

  18. Ocean Pollution Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The Ocean Pollution Research Center (OPRC) is a University of Miami center based at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS) and with significant involvement by the College of Engineering. It was formed in 1992 out of concerns for potential oil spills placing at risk the fragile ecosystems of the Florida Keys. OPRC's scope also includes the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, and the South Atlantic Bight. Focus is on the physical transport of oil spills and information management for response operations. Studies of the fates and effects of oil spills are also undertaken.

  19. Minor Planet Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsden, Brian G.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports on the activities of the Minor Planet Center for the year of 1998. The main product of this center is the Minor Planet Circulars, augmented by the Minor Planet Circulars Supplement which is a new series introduced in 1997 to include the actual observations, which are now only summarized MPC. The introduction of the Daily Orbit Update (DOU) lists all the orbits computed and identification found since the previous issue. There has been a fivefold increase in the reported Near Earth Objects, which includes the addition of 55 potentially hazardous asteroids.

  20. Emergency Operation Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinea, Anoushka Z.

    1995-01-01

    The Emergency Operation Center (EOC) is a site from which NASA LaRC Emergency Preparedness Officials exercise control and direction in an emergency. Research was conducted in order to determine what makes an effective EOC. Specifically information concerning the various types of equipment and communication capability that an efficient EOC should contain (i.e., computers, software, telephone systems, radio systems, etc.) was documented. With this information a requirements document was written stating a brief description of the equipment and required quantity to be used in an EOC and then compared to current capabilities at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  1. Towards cheaper control centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baize, Lionel

    1994-01-01

    Today, any approach to the design of new space systems must take into consideration an important constraint, namely costs. This approach is our guideline for new missions and also applies to the ground segment, and particularly to the control center. CNES has carried out a study on a recent control center for application satellites in order to take advantage of the experience gained. This analysis, the purpose of which is to determine, a posteriori, the costs of architecture needs and choices, takes hardware and software costs into account and makes a number of recommendations.

  2. Lied Transplant Center

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The Department of Energy has prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1143) evaluating the construction, equipping and operation of the proposed Lied Transplant Center at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Nebraska. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Statement in not required.

  3. Control Center Technology Conference Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Conference papers and presentations are compiled and cover evolving architectures and technologies applicable to flight control centers. Advances by NASA Centers and the aerospace industry are presented.

  4. Employability Skills Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweetwater Union High School District, Chula Vista, CA.

    The Employability Skills Center (ESC) of the Division of Adult and Continuing Education (DACE) of the Sweetwater Union High School District (California) was created out of a need to help adult students develop the basic skills that are required for success in their chosen vocational programs but not taught in regular adult basic education classes.…

  5. Starting a sleep center.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Lawrence J; Valentine, Paul S

    2010-05-01

    The demand for sleep medicine services has grown tremendously during the last decade and will likely continue. To date, growth in demand has been met by growth in the number of new sleep centers. The need for more new centers will be dependent on market drivers that include increasing regulatory requirements, personnel shortages, integration of home sleep testing, changes in reimbursement, a shift in emphasis from diagnostics to treatment, and an increased consumer focus on sleep. The decision to open a new center should be based on understanding the market dynamics, completing a market analysis, and developing a business plan. The business plan should include an overview of the facility, a personnel and organizational structure, an evaluation of the business environment, a financial plan, a description of services provided, and a strategy for obtaining, managing, and extending a referral base. Implementation of the business plan and successful operation require ongoing planning and monitoring of operational parameters. The need for new sleep centers will likely continue, but the shifting market dynamics indicate a greater need for understanding the marketplace and careful planning.

  6. Queering the Writing Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denny, Harry

    2010-01-01

    Composition classrooms and writing centers are spaces where negotiation of academic, social, cultural, and political identities are ubiquitous, yet research has not produced adequate theory and practice to help tutors and writers navigate identity production and its politics. This article seeks to begin conversations that might lead to better…

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    SciTech Connect

    2013-06-01

    Fact sheet describes the Alternative Fuels Data Center, which provides information, data, and tools to help fleets and other transportation decision makers find ways to reduce petroleum consumption through the use of alternative and renewable fuels, advanced vehicles, and other fuel-saving measures.

  8. Johnson Space Center Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gafka, Tammy; Terrier, Doug; Smith, James

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation is a review of the work of Johnson Space Center. It includes a section on technology development areas, (i.e., composite structures, non-destructive evaluation, applied nanotechnology, additive manufacturing, and fracture and fatigue analytical methods), a section on structural analysis capabilities within NASA/JSC and a section on Friction stir welding and laser peening.

  9. Community Learning Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Wayne

    2005-01-01

    The Community Learning Centers plan provides a systemically changed model for the 21st century. This top-to-bottom transformation of current education addresses all aspects of schools with a detailed framework to guide serious educational reformers. This fresh approach to principles of learning, curriculum, staffing, facilities, student as…

  10. National Response Center

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The NRC is the federal government's national communications center, which is staffed 24 hours a day by U.S. Coast Guard officers and marine science technicians. Sole federal point of contact for reporting all hazardous substance releases and oil spills

  11. Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center is the largest astronomical institution in Poland, located in Warsaw and founded in 1956. At present it is a government-funded research institute supervised by the Polish Academy of Sciences and licensed by the government of Poland to award PhD and doctor habilitatus degrees in astronomy and astrophysics. In September 1999 staff included 21 senior scientist...

  12. Carolinas Energy Career Center

    SciTech Connect

    Classens, Anver; Hooper, Dick; Johnson, Bruce

    2013-03-31

    Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC), located in Charlotte, North Carolina, established the Carolinas Energy Career Center (Center) - a comprehensive training entity to meet the dynamic needs of the Charlotte region's energy workforce. The Center provides training for high-demand careers in both conventional energy (fossil) and renewable energy (nuclear and solar technologies/energy efficiency). CPCC completed four tasks that will position the Center as a leading resource for energy career training in the Southeast: • Development and Pilot of a New Advanced Welding Curriculum, • Program Enhancement of Non-Destructive Examination (NDE) Technology, • Student Support through implementation of a model targeted toward Energy and STEM Careers to support student learning, • Project Management and Reporting. As a result of DOE funding support, CPCC achieved the following outcomes: • Increased capacity to serve and train students in emerging energy industry careers; • Developed new courses and curricula to support emerging energy industry careers; • Established new training/laboratory resources; • Generated a pool of highly qualified, technically skilled workers to support the growing energy industry sector.

  13. A Learner Centered Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, Florence N.

    This paper proposes a learner-centered educational system, focusing on aspects that are intrinsically associated with the modern educational system, such as the curriculum, school community, parents, learners, and educational support personnel. It examines: primary level preparation (literacy, numeracy, and basic knowledge; examination and…

  14. Mobile PET Center Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhikova, O.; Naumov, N.; Sergienko, V.; Kostylev, V.

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography is the most promising technology to monitor cancer and heart disease treatment. Stationary PET center requires substantial financial resources and time for construction and equipping. The developed mobile solution will allow introducing PET technology quickly without major investments.

  15. Dayton's neighborhood school centers.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Dick

    2009-01-01

    When Dayton Public Schools committed to return to neighborhood K-8 schools, the community organized to refocus many youth programs in schools and neighborhoods. This article describes the planning and implementation of Dayton's Neighborhood School Centers. Special emphasis is placed on the role of the University of Dayton, especially the Fitz Center for Leadership in Community. The Fitz Center plays a pivotal role in implementing this highly collaborative effort, including project leadership; community organizing; coaching of five site coordinators at neighborhood school sites; and faculty-mentored student interns to assist with programming for student success, family support, health and team sports, and extensive service-learning coordination. The Dayton Foundation, Dayton Public Schools, City of Dayton, Montgomery County, and sixteen foundation and corporate supporters are partners with the Fitz Center in a bold initiative to reconnect five Dayton public elementary schools to their neighborhoods, after more than thirty years of court-ordered busing, and create full-service, year-round opportunities for neighborhood families and youth at these new schools. More than forty programs have been started at each site, all emphasizing youth and community assets.

  16. Libraries/Media Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents K-12 and college libraries/media centers considered outstanding in a competition, which judged the most outstanding learning environments at educational institutions nationwide. Jurors spent two days reviewing projects, highlighting concepts and ideas that made them exceptional. For each citation, the article offers information on the…

  17. The Pupil Appraisal Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilborn, Bobbie; Gentile, Lance M.

    The primary purpose of the Pupil Appraisal Center (PAC) is to promote teacher education by providing teachers and students direct experience in resolving behavioral disorders and learning problems. PAC provides specialized teacher training in counseling, reading, hearing, speech, and language development and provides service to area schools for…

  18. Remodeling the Media Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baule, Steven M.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses items that need to be considered when remodeling a school media center. Highlights include space and location for various functions, including projections of print versus electronic media; electrical and data wiring needs; lighting; security and supervision; and reuse of existing furniture and equipment. (LRW)

  19. Gullo Student Center, California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Clifford A.

    2001-01-01

    Highlights a new college student center in California that serves as a physical and social hub for its campus and has helped transform a bland, bunker-like commuter school into a place that engages students, faculty, and visitors. Examines facility planning and design features; includes photographs and site plans. (GR)

  20. School Based Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Aid Society, 2012

    2012-01-01

    School Based Health Centers (SBHC) are considered by experts as one of the most effective and efficient ways to provide preventive health care to children. Few programs are as successful in delivering health care to children at no cost to the patient, and where they are: in school. For many underserved children, The Children's Aid Society's…

  1. INTERMOUNTAIN INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    MELINDA KRAHENBUHL

    2010-05-28

    The U. S. Department of Energy’s Intermountain Industrial Assessment Center (IIAC) at the University of Utah has been providing eligible small- and medium-sized manufacturers with no-cost plant assessments since 2001, offering cost-effective recommendations for improvements in the areas of energy efficiency, pollution prevention, and productivity improvement.

  2. Vocabulary at the Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Amy; Crow, John T.

    2009-01-01

    In "Vocabulary at the Center," Amy Benjamin and John T. Crow identify the most effective methods for extending the use of new words--in every grade level and across all subjects. This book shows teachers how to use context-driven exercises to incorporate new words into other areas of study. This book contains information about the authors, an…

  3. Dayton's Neighborhood School Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Dick

    2009-01-01

    When Dayton Public Schools committed to return to neighborhood K-8 schools, the community organized to refocus many youth programs in schools and neighborhoods. This article describes the planning and implementation of Dayton's Neighborhood School Centers. Special emphasis is placed on the role of the University of Dayton, especially the Fitz…

  4. Science and Technology Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danilov, Victor J.

    Science and technology centers, which are relative newcomers to the museum field, differ from traditional museums in a number of respects. They are concerned with furthering public understanding and appreciation of the physical and biological sciences, engineering, technology, and health and seek to accomplish this goal by making museums both…

  5. Learning Center Unlimited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vivrette, Lyndon

    Cuesta College's Learning Center is designed to totally support the instructional methods of each instructor, to meet the individual learning and study needs of each student, and to provide cultural and educational resource opportunities to the community. The facility is to be a traditional library, whose total media storage and retrieval capacity…

  6. Research: Hyperactivity, Placement Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nation's Schools and Colleges, 1975

    1975-01-01

    A diet that emphasizes the elimination of food containing artificial coloring and flavoring from meals served to hyperactive children has met with success in preliminary studies; college placement centers are advised to shift their emphasis from job research and counseling. (Author/MLF)

  7. The Physics Tutorial Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Karen L.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes the function, management and facilities of the Physics Tutorial Center (PTC) at North Carolina State University. A primary function of the PTC is to provide immediate and individualized response to learning problems identified by the students. The operational philosophy is to guide the student to the solution by asking questions and not…

  8. Evidence-Centered Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow-Leong, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Assessing student understanding is a critical part of a teacher's routine. Most assessments are reviewed with a quick eye, but the evidence-centered assessment strategy encourages us to slow down and look more carefully at student work samples. In this article, the author proposes guidelines for the close examination of student work. These…

  9. Developing a Career Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feller, Rich, Ed.

    This 12-section handbook, based on information for Colorado but applicable to other states as well, contains resources and lists and explains procedures to establish or expand a career guidance center in a school, government office, or organization. The 12 sections cover the following topics: (1) purpose and philosophy; (2) assessment, advisory…

  10. Vocabulary at the Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Amy; Crow, John T.

    2009-01-01

    In "Vocabulary at the Center," Amy Benjamin and John T. Crow identify the most effective methods for extending the use of new words--in every grade level and across all subjects. This book shows teachers how to use context-driven exercises to incorporate new words into other areas of study. This book contains information about the authors, an…

  11. Resource Centers; Some Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klitzke, Dwight Mark; Starkey, John

    Teachers, Principals, and other public school personnel interested in establishing learning resource centers are provided with guidelines and a framework within which they can structure their efforts. Professional literature, observation, and experimental trials serve as the sources from which observations are drawn. The advantages of the resource…

  12. Science and Technology Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danilov, Victor J.

    Science and technology centers, which are relative newcomers to the museum field, differ from traditional museums in a number of respects. They are concerned with furthering public understanding and appreciation of the physical and biological sciences, engineering, technology, and health and seek to accomplish this goal by making museums both…

  13. National Farm Medicine Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinic Research Institute Careers Contact Us Patient Rights Privacy Location Our System Marshfield Clinic Marshfield Clinic Division of Education Marshfield Labs Security Health Plan Family Health Center Our Partners ... Website Privacy | Terms of Use | Non-discrimination Statement Copyright © 2012 - ...

  14. The Precarious Question of Black Cultural Centers Versus Multicultural Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Princes, Carolyn D. W.

    This paper discusses the role of black cultural centers on university campuses, focusing on whether black cultural centers or multicultural centers best meet the needs of an increasingly diverse student body and society. It examines the historical role of black cultural centers as vehicles to promote educational opportunity, student retention, and…

  15. User-Centered Design through Learner-Centered Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altay, Burçak

    2014-01-01

    This article initially demonstrates the parallels between the learner-centered approach in education and the user-centered approach in design disciplines. Afterward, a course on human factors that applies learner-centered methods to teach user-centered design is introduced. The focus is on three tasks to identify the application of theoretical and…

  16. User-Centered Design through Learner-Centered Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altay, Burçak

    2014-01-01

    This article initially demonstrates the parallels between the learner-centered approach in education and the user-centered approach in design disciplines. Afterward, a course on human factors that applies learner-centered methods to teach user-centered design is introduced. The focus is on three tasks to identify the application of theoretical and…

  17. Economics of data center optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Lisa

    2016-03-01

    Traffic to and from data centers is now reaching Zettabytes/year. Even the smallest of businesses now rely on data centers for revenue generation. And, the largest data centers today are orders of magnitude larger than the supercomputing centers of a few years ago. Until quite recently, for most data center managers, optical data centers were nice to dream about, but not really essential. Today, the all-optical data center - perhaps even an all-single mode fiber (SMF) data center is something that even managers of medium-sized data centers should be considering. Economical transceivers are the key to increased adoption of data center optics. An analysis of current and near future data center optics economics will be discussed in this paper.

  18. American Overseas Research Centers Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Postsecondary Education, US Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The American Overseas Research Centers Program provides grants to overseas research centers that are consortia of U.S. institutions of higher education to enable the centers to promote postgraduate research, exchanges, and area studies. Eligible applicants are those consortia of U.S. institutions of higher education centers that: (1) Receive more…

  19. Center for Healthcare Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Carrano, A.V.

    1994-03-01

    In the U.S., we now spend about 13% of the gross domestic product (CDP) on healthcare. This figure represents nearly $3000 per year per man, woman, and child. Moreover, this expenditure is projected to grow to about 20% of the GDP by the year 2000. Medical research and development accounts for only about 3% of national healthcare spending, and technology development represents only a small fraction of that 3%. New technologies that are far more cost-effective than previous ones - such as minimally invasive surgical procedures, advanced automated diagnostics, and better information systems - could save the nation billions of dollars per year to say nothing of the potential reductions in pain and suffering. A center is described that will coordinate ongoing Laboratory research aimed at developing more cost-effective tools for use by the healthcare community. The new Center for Healthcare Technologies will have many long-term benefits for the region and the nation.

  20. Bahrain's offshore banking center

    SciTech Connect

    Gerakis, A.S.; Roncesvalles, O.

    1983-01-01

    The economic effects of Bahrain's schemes for licensing offshore banking units (OBUs) were the immediate response of major international banks and the financial services the banking center has rendered by improving regional money and exchange markets at a time when a Middle East link was needed to service the increasing demand for oil-wealth banking services. Bahrain's leadership also created a favorable climate. Aggressive competition from banks in Kuwait and Saudi Arabia have caused some friction, but informal supervision by the Bahrain Monetary Agency (BMA) should be able to avoid serious difficulty. Bahrain's success required a banking infrastructure, a free-enterprise system, a willingness to maintain banking standards, a country small enough to benefit directly from OBU income, and a gap in nearby competing centers. 39 references, 1 figure, 5 tables. (DCK)

  1. The STEREO Science Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, M. L.; Thompson, W. T.; Kucera, T. A.

    2007-05-01

    The STEREO Science Center (SSC), at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, is the "one-stop shopping" location for STEREO data, observation plans, analysis software, and links to other mission resources. Along with the other data products, a special "Space Weather Beacon" telemetry stream, relayed through an array of antenna partners coordinated by NOAA, provides near-real-time images, and will soon also provide near-real- time radio and in-situ data. Through interaction with the Solar Software library, the SSC also acts as a focal point for software coordination. The SSC is closely integrated with the Virtual Solar Observatory, making data easily accessible to users. Details on access to the SSC will be given and examples of the various types of data available at the SSC will be shown.

  2. Aperture center energy showcase

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, J. J.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia and Forest City have established a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), and the partnership provides a unique opportunity to take technology research and development from demonstration to application in a sustainable community. A project under that CRADA, Aperture Center Energy Showcase, offers a means to develop exhibits and demonstrations that present feedback to community members, Sandia customers, and visitors. The technologies included in the showcase focus on renewable energy and its efficiency, and resilience. These technologies are generally scalable, and provide secure, efficient solutions to energy production, delivery, and usage. In addition to establishing an Energy Showcase, support offices and conference capabilities that facilitate research, collaboration, and demonstration were created. The Aperture Center project focuses on establishing a location that provides outreach, awareness, and demonstration of research findings, emerging technologies, and project developments to Sandia customers, visitors, and Mesa del Sol community members.

  3. National Data Buoy Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC), part of the National Weather Service, is an agency within the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and is supported by personnel and ships of the U.S. Coast Guard. NDBC operates automated observing systems that measure environmental conditions from coastal and remote marine areas. These measurements support the requirements of national and international scope and are used for forecasting, public advisories and warning, and in climate and research programs.

  4. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    DAVENPORT,J.

    2004-11-01

    The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security.

  5. Dryden Flight Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostyk, Christopher Barry

    2007-01-01

    As part of a session at the 2007 Thermal & Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS), an overview of the operations at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center was given. Mission support at this site includes the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD); Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD), Science - ER-2; Science - G3 UAVSAR; Science - Ikhana and Space Operations. In addition, the presentation describes TFAWS related work at Dryden.

  6. NRH Neuroscience Research Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    of studies on stroke rehabilita- Koudstaal Pi. Oral anticoagulants versus antiplatelet tion. I Chronic Dis. 1982;35(2):133-149. therapy for...Stroke Center and served as an associate professor of Neurology, Occupational, and Physical Therapy . Widely published, Dr. Dromerick’s research activities...projects: "• Submitted "o NIH ROl: "Effects of Early Niacin-Statin Multi- Therapy on Dyslipidemia, Pre-Clinical Vascular Disease, and Early Osteopenia After

  7. IAA Correlator Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surkis, Igor; Ken, Voitsekh; Melnikov, Alexey; Mishin, Vladimir; Sokolova, Nadezda; Shantyr, Violet; Zimovsky, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    The activities of the six-station IAA RAS correlator include regular processing of national geodetic VLBI programs Ru-E, Ru-U, and Ru-F. The Ru-U sessions have been transferred in e-VLBI mode and correlated in the IAA Correlator Center automatically since 2011. The DiFX software correlator is used at the IAA in some astrophysical experiments.

  8. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    BNL

    2008-08-12

    Staff from Brookhaven's new Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) describe how this advanced facility will focus on the development and understanding of nanoscale materials. The CFN provides state-of-the-art capabilities for the fabrication and study of nanoscale materials, with an emphasis on atomic-level tailoring to achieve desired properties and functions. The overarching scientific theme of the CFN is the development and understanding of nanoscale materials that address the Nation's challenges in energy security.

  9. Advanced Cancer Detection Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-05-25

    Establish a center to expand cancer screening and education programs; find cancers in the population early enough to make a difference in morbidity and mortality; research and implement high quality, high technology, and cost effective communication delivery methods via telemedicine and teleconferencing; and implement basic science investigations of early genetic and biochemical transformations related to cancer that can be detected early in the disease process.

  10. National Data Buoy Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC), part of the National Weather Service, is an agency within the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and is supported by personnel and ships of the U.S. Coast Guard. NDBC operates automated observing systems that measure environmental conditions from coastal and remote marine areas. These measurements support the requirements of national and international scope and are used for forecasting, public advisories and warning, and in climate and research programs.

  11. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    ScienceCinema

    BNL

    2016-07-12

    Staff from Brookhaven's new Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) describe how this advanced facility will focus on the development and understanding of nanoscale materials. The CFN provides state-of-the-art capabilities for the fabrication and study of nanoscale materials, with an emphasis on atomic-level tailoring to achieve desired properties and functions. The overarching scientific theme of the CFN is the development and understanding of nanoscale materials that address the Nation's challenges in energy security.

  12. NRH Neuroscience Research Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    Dr. James Young MD Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center Rush-Presbyterian Washington, DC 1725 West Harrison Suite 1018 Phone: 202 782-3132 Chicago...determine percentage of codes found in chart documentation vs. those coded by the data collector. This will provide a picture of ICD-9 code...outcomes among stroke patients cared for in veterans hospitals. Health Serv Res. 2001 Feb;35(6): 1293-318. 10 Duncan PW, Homer RE), Reker DM, Samsa GP

  13. Swiftly Computing Center Strings

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The center string (or closest string) problem is a classic computer science problem with important applications in computational biology. Given k input strings and a distance threshold d, we search for a string within Hamming distance at most d to each input string. This problem is NP complete. Results In this paper, we focus on exact methods for the problem that are also swift in application. We first introduce data reduction techniques that allow us to infer that certain instances have no solution, or that a center string must satisfy certain conditions. We describe how to use this information to speed up two previously published search tree algorithms. Then, we describe a novel iterative search strategy that is effecient in practice, where some of our reduction techniques can also be applied. Finally, we present results of an evaluation study for two different data sets from a biological application. Conclusions We find that the running time for computing the optimal center string is dominated by the subroutine calls for d = dopt -1 and d = dopt. Our data reduction is very effective for both, either rejecting unsolvable instances or solving trivial positions. We find that this speeds up computations considerably. PMID:21504573

  14. At the Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-27

    The north pole of Saturn sits at the center of its own domain. Around it swirl the clouds, driven by the fast winds of Saturn. Beyond that orbits Saturn's retinue of moons and the countless small particles that form the ring. Although the poles of Saturn are at the center of all of this motion, not everything travels around them in circles. Some of the jet-stream patterns, such as the hexagon-shaped pattern seen here, have wavy, uneven shapes. The moons as well have orbits that are elliptical, some quite far from circular. This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 26 degrees above the ring plane. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on Dec. 2, 2016 using a spectral filter which preferentially admits wavelengths of near-infrared light centered at 890 nanometers. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 619,000 miles (996,000 kilometers) from Saturn. Image scale is 37 miles (60 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20520

  15. 36. James River Visitor Center. View of visitor center entrance, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. James River Visitor Center. View of visitor center entrance, bench, and drinking fountain. Looking west. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  16. CUPOLA, CENTER RIGHT; GONDOLA LIFT MECHANISM, CENTER LEFT. NOTE PARTIAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CUPOLA, CENTER RIGHT; GONDOLA LIFT MECHANISM, CENTER LEFT. NOTE PARTIAL VIEW OF LAMELLA DOME FRAMING COMPRESSION RING AT CROWN AT LOWER RIGHT. - Houston Astrodome, 8400 Kirby Drive, Houston, Harris County, TX

  17. 3. FLAME DEFLECTOR AT CENTER, CONNECTING TUNNEL AT CENTER RIGHT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. FLAME DEFLECTOR AT CENTER, CONNECTING TUNNEL AT CENTER RIGHT, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  18. Solar Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, Bob

    2011-04-27

    The Department of Energy, Golden Field Office, awarded a grant to the UNLV Research Foundation (UNLVRF) on August 1, 2005 to develop a solar and renewable energy information center. The Solar Technology Center (STC) is to be developed in two phases, with Phase I consisting of all activities necessary to determine feasibility of the project, including design and engineering, identification of land access issues and permitting necessary to determine project viability without permanently disturbing the project site, and completion of a National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Environmental Assessment. Phase II is the installation of infrastructure and related structures, which leads to commencement of operations of the STC. The STC is located in the Boulder City designated 3,000-acre Eldorado Valley Energy Zone, approximately 15 miles southwest of downtown Boulder City and fronting on Eldorado Valley Drive. The 33-acre vacant parcel has been leased to the Nevada Test Site Development Corporation (NTSDC) by Boulder City to accommodate a planned facility that will be synergistic with present and planned energy projects in the Zone. The parcel will be developed by the UNLVRF. The NTSDC is the economic development arm of the UNLVRF. UNLVRF will be the entity responsible for overseeing the lease and the development project to assure compliance with the lease stipulations established by Boulder City. The STC will be operated and maintained by University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) and its Center for Energy Research (UNLV-CER). Land parcels in the Eldorado Valley Energy Zone near the 33-acre lease are committed to the construction and operation of an electrical grid connected solar energy production facility. Other projects supporting renewable and solar technologies have been developed within the energy zone, with several more developments in the horizon.

  19. [Client centered psychotherapy].

    PubMed

    Werthmann, H V

    1979-01-01

    In the discussion concerning which psychotherapeutic methods should come under the auspices of the medical health system in West Germany, the question is raised regarding the client-centered therapy of Carl Rogers. Can it be considered a distinct psychotherapeutic method? A review of the scientific literature dealing with this method shows that it provides neither a theory of mental illness nor a theory of clinical application based on individual cases or specific neurotic disturbances, Therefore it should be categorized as a useful method of communication in the field of psychology and not as a therapeutic method for treating mental illness.

  20. INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    ASFAW BEYENE

    2008-09-29

    Since its establishment in 1990, San Diego State University’s Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) has served close to 400 small and medium-sized manufacturing plants in Southern California. SDSU/IAC’s efforts to transfer state-of-the-art technologies to industry have increased revenues, cultivated creativity, improved efficiencies, and benefited the environment. A substantial benefit from the program has been the ongoing training of engineering faculty and students. During this funding cycle, SDSU/IAC has trained 31 students, 7 of the graduate. A total of 92 assessments and 108 assessment days were completed, resulting in 638 assessment recommendations.

  1. Interferometry science center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargent, A. I.

    2002-01-01

    The Interferometry Science Center (ISC) is operated jointly by Caltech and JPL and is part of NASA's Navigator Program. The ISC has been created to facilitate the timely and successful execution of scientific investigations within the Navigator program, particularly those that rely on observations from NASA's interferometer projects. Currently, ISC is expected to provide full life cycle support for the Keck Interferometer, the Starlight mission, the Space Interferometry Mission, and the Terrestrial Planet Finder Mission. The nature and goals of ISc will be described.

  2. Seafloor manifold center installed

    SciTech Connect

    Edmiston, K.

    1982-07-01

    The Shell/Esso Underwater Manifold Center (UMC), designed and tested as a diverless production facility, is a significant step toward really deep water oil and gas production. In May 1982, the 2100 metric ton unit was towed 645 miles from its Dutch fabrication yard and precisely emplaced in 500 ft water in the Cormorant field in only 6 days. When fully installed with all of its wells drilled and testing completed, the UMC will have cost an estimated $700 million. During its anticipated 25 yr operating life, the UMC is expected to produce ca 110 million bbl from the central Cormorant area. Design and operational criteria are described.

  3. Russian Mission Control Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-20

    Helen Conijn, fiancée of European Space Agency astronaut Andre Kuipers of the Netherlands, far right, joins Renita Fincke, second from right, wife of Expedition 9 Flight Engineer and NASA International Space Station Science Officer Michael Fincke, along with family members at the Russian Mission Control Center outside Moscow, Wednesday, April 21, 2004 to view the docking of the Soyuz capsule to the International Space Station that brought Kuipers, Fincke and Expedition 9 Commander Gennady Padalka to the complex following their launch Monday from Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  4. PMD IVS Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tornatore, Vincenza

    2013-01-01

    The main activities carried out at the PMD (Politecnico di Milano DIIAR) IVS Analysis Center during 2012 are briefly higlighted, and future plans for 2013 are sketched out. We principally continued to process European VLBI sessions using different approaches to evaluate possible differences due to various processing choices. Then VLBI solutions were also compared to the GPS ones as well as the ones calculated at co-located sites. Concerning the observational aspect, several tests were performed to identify the most suitable method to achieve the highest possible accuracy in the determination of GNSS (GLOBAL NAVIGATION SATELLITE SYSTEM) satellite positions using the VLBI technique.

  5. A center's callosities.

    PubMed

    Adams, B B; Lucky, A W

    2001-02-01

    We present a case report of a 14-year-old white male who developed hyperkeratotic plaques on the distal aspects of 2 toes. He was referred by his primary care physician for the treatment of onychomycosis. With questioning, the patient stated that he played center for his high school basketball team. After physical examination, he was diagnosed with callosities caused by his basketball activities. Proper nail hygiene and wearing of larger footwear resulted in improvement of his callosities. Sports-related cutaneous injuries should be included in the differential diagnosis of nail and toe abnormalities.

  6. Interferometry science center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargent, A. I.

    2002-01-01

    The Interferometry Science Center (ISC) is operated jointly by Caltech and JPL and is part of NASA's Navigator Program. The ISC has been created to facilitate the timely and successful execution of scientific investigations within the Navigator program, particularly those that rely on observations from NASA's interferometer projects. Currently, ISC is expected to provide full life cycle support for the Keck Interferometer, the Starlight mission, the Space Interferometry Mission, and the Terrestrial Planet Finder Mission. The nature and goals of ISc will be described.

  7. Grouped centers in corundum

    SciTech Connect

    Gul'chuk, P.P.; Chernina, E.A.; Lituinov, L.A.; Petrenko, P.V.

    1986-01-01

    The authors consider emission from unirradiated corundum in the region 510-595 nm. The centers emitting in this region are examined and the growth and treatment conditions of the nominally pure corundum single crystals are shown. The fluorescence spectra for excitation in the 313- and 436-nm bands for white sapphires grown by Stepanov's method in helium containing CO, by Kyropoulos' method, and by Verneuil's method with subsequent heat treatment in aluminum vapor are shown. All the crystals show emission peaking at 550 nm.

  8. National Center tour guide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1979-01-01

    On behalf of each employee at the Geological Survey's National Center, I [H. William Menard, Director] extend a warm welcome to you during our Centennial Year. We hope that your visit to our headquarters will be a pleasant and rewarding experience. Our scientific research is directed towards helping to solve some of the critical environmental and natural resource problems that face our Nation today. We want you to see some aspects of this work, and we hope you will visit us again. As part of the Federal Government, we are deeply committed to the concept of public service. We are proud to serve you.

  9. Southeast Ecological Science Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pawlitz, Rachel J.

    2010-01-01

    Aquatic ecosystems, from deep sea reefs and coastal marshes to freshwater springs and wetlands, are home to diverse assemblages of life. These commercially and ecologically important systems are part of our national heritage, and are often treasured places or refuges that protect rare or threatened species. In the water-rich Southeastern United States, managers face the challenge of understanding how water and land use affect the region's aquatic life. The Southeast Ecological Science Center (SESC) helps address that challenge by providing objective science that can be used to evaluate proposed actions and develop management strategies.

  10. The EROS Data Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1972-01-01

    The EROS Data Center in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, is operated for the Earth Resources Observation Systems Program of the Department of the Interior by the Topographic Division of the Geological Survey to provide access to Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS) imagery, USGS aerial photography, and NASA aircraft data for the general public, domestic government agencies at all levels, and foreign government agencies at all levels, and foreign governments. Facilities are available for data storage, retrieval, reproduction, and dissemination, and for user assistance and training.

  11. Trap centers in molybdates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spassky, D. A.; Nagirnyi, V.; Mikhailin, V. V.; Savon, A. E.; Belsky, A. N.; Laguta, V. V.; Buryi, M.; Galashov, E. N.; Shlegel, V. N.; Voronina, I. S.; Zadneprovski, B. I.

    2013-10-01

    Charge carrier trapping centers have been studied in molybdates CaMoO4, SrMoO4 and PbMoO4 with the scheelite crystal structure as well as in ZnMoO4, which crystallize in a-ZnMoO4 structural type. The trap parameters such as activation energies and frequency factors have been determined. It is shown for the first time that both electrons and holes are trapped by the elements of regular crystal structure in ZnMoO4. The effect of the charge carrier trapping on luminescence properties is demonstrated. Potential influence of the traps on the scintillation process is discussed.

  12. Financing a Simulation Center.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Shawn; Mohsin, Adnan; Jones, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    As simulation-based training has become established within medical and health professional disciplines, skills training laboratories have become a standard in surgery training programs. In 2008, the American College of Surgeons and Association of Program Directors in Surgery developed a simulation-based surgical skills curriculum; the Residency Review Committee for Surgery of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education mandated access to skills laboratories for all surgery programs. Establishing a surgical skills laboratory and adapting the training curriculum requires a significant amount of resources. This article discusses the financial aspects of establishing a training center, from funding opportunities to budgeting considerations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2005-11-01

    The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include, for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security. To achieve our goals we have established a close alliance with applied mathematicians and computer scientists at Stony Brook and Columbia Universities.

  14. Computer Center Reference Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-20

    introduction to the operating systems of the Cray X -MP (COS), DEC VAxcluster (VMS), and CDC (NOS) for applications programmers. Some information has been...Cray X -MP / 24 1-1-2 CDC CYBER 180 model 860A 1-1-2 DEC VAXcluster 1-1-3 DEC Remote Mini 1-1-3 The Integrated Supercomputer Network 1-1-4 User Interface...ADP Control Center 1-2-3 ( Software Available 1-3-1 2 The Cray X -MP 2-1-1 COS Version 1.16 2-1-1 Accessing the Cray X -MP 2-1-1 Cray Detasets 2-1-1

  15. Data base on dose reduction research projects for nuclear power plants. Volume 5

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, T.A.; Yu, C.K.; Roecklein, A.K.

    1994-05-01

    This is the fifth volume in a series of reports that provide information on dose reduction research and health physics technology or nuclear power plants. The information is taken from two of several databases maintained by Brookhaven National Laboratory`s ALARA Center for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The research section of the report covers dose reduction projects that are in the experimental or developmental phase. It includes topics such as steam generator degradation, decontamination, robotics, improvements in reactor materials, and inspection techniques. The section on health physics technology discusses dose reduction efforts that are in place or in the process of being implemented at nuclear power plants. A total of 105 new or updated projects are described. All project abstracts from this report are available to nuclear industry professionals with access to a fax machine through the ACEFAX system or a computer with a modem and the proper communications software through the ACE system. Detailed descriptions of how to access all the databases electronically are in the appendices of the report.

  16. Determining the applicability of the Landauer nanoDot as a general public dosimeter in a research imaging facility.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Michael A; Thoreson, Kelly F; Cerecero, Jennifer A

    2012-11-01

    The Research Imaging Institute (RII) building at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA) houses two cyclotron particle accelerators, positron emission tomography (PET) machines, and a fluoroscopic unit. As part of the radiation protection program (RPP) and meeting the standard for achieving ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable), it is essential to minimize the ionizing radiation exposure to the general public through the use of controlled areas and area dose monitoring. Currently, thirty-four whole body Luxel+ dosimeters, manufactured by Landauer, are being used in various locations within the RII to monitor dose to the general public. The intent of this research was to determine if the nanoDot, a single point dosimeter, can be used as a general public dosimeter in a diagnostic facility. This was tested by first verifying characteristics of the nanoDot dosimeter including dose linearity, dose rate dependence, angular dependence, and energy dependence. Then, the response of the nanoDot dosimeter to the Luxel+ dosimeter when placed in a continuous, low dose environment was investigated. Finally, the nanoDot was checked for appropriate response in an acute, high dose environment. Based on the results, the current recommendation is that the nanoDot should not replace the Luxel+ dosimeter without further work to determine the energy spectra in the RII building and without considering the limitation of the microStar reader, portable on-site OSL reader, at doses below 0.1 mGy (10 mrad).

  17. Clinical effectiveness in the diagnosis and acute management of pediatric nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Van Batavia, Jason P; Tasian, Gregory E

    2016-12-01

    The incidence of pediatric nephrolithiasis has risen over the past few decades leading to a growing public health burden. Children and adolescents represent a unique patient population secondary to their higher risks from radiation exposure as compared to adults, high risk of recurrence, and longer follow up time given their longer life expectancies. Ultrasound imaging is the first-line modality for diagnosing suspected nephrolithiasis in children. Although data is limited, the best evidence based medicine supports the use of alpha-blockers as first-line MET in children, especially when stones are small and in a more distal ureteral location. Surgical management of pediatric nephrolithiasis is similar to that in adults with ESWL and URS first-line for smaller stones and PCNL reserved for larger renal stone burden. Clinical effectiveness in minimizing risks in children and adolescents with nephrolithiasis centers around ED pathways that limit CT imaging, strict guidance to ALARA principles or use of US during surgical procedures, and education of both patients and families on the risks of repeat ionizing radiation exposures during follow up and acute colic events. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Calculation of Absorbed Dose in Target Tissue and Equivalent Dose in Sensitive Tissues of Patients Treated by BNCT Using MCNP4C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamani, M.; Kasesaz, Y.; Khalafi, H.; Pooya, S. M. Hosseini

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is used for treatment of many diseases, including brain tumors, in many medical centers. In this method, a target area (e.g., head of patient) is irradiated by some optimized and suitable neutron fields such as research nuclear reactors. Aiming at protection of healthy tissues which are located in the vicinity of irradiated tissue, and based on the ALARA principle, it is required to prevent unnecessary exposure of these vital organs. In this study, by using numerical simulation method (MCNP4C Code), the absorbed dose in target tissue and the equiavalent dose in different sensitive tissues of a patiant treated by BNCT, are calculated. For this purpose, we have used the parameters of MIRD Standard Phantom. Equiavelent dose in 11 sensitive organs, located in the vicinity of target, and total equivalent dose in whole body, have been calculated. The results show that the absorbed dose in tumor and normal tissue of brain equal to 30.35 Gy and 0.19 Gy, respectively. Also, total equivalent dose in 11 sensitive organs, other than tumor and normal tissue of brain, is equal to 14 mGy. The maximum equivalent doses in organs, other than brain and tumor, appear to the tissues of lungs and thyroid and are equal to 7.35 mSv and 3.00 mSv, respectively.

  19. 17. Station Power Center 1 and Load Center 1, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Station Power Center 1 and Load Center 1, view to the northwest. The power center is the cabinet on the right and the load center is the cabinet on the left of the photograph. A door to the generator barrel of Unit 1 is visible in the background. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Cabinet Gorge Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, North Bank of Clark Fork River at Cabinet Gorge, Cabinet, Bonner County, ID

  20. Backgrounds Data Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, William A.; Gursky, Herbert; Heckathorn, Harry M.; Lucke, Bob L.; Dorland, Bryan N.; Kessel, R. A.; Berg, S. L.; Dombrowski, E. G.

    1994-09-01

    The Backgrounds Data Center (BDC) is the designated archive for backgrounds data collected by Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) programs, some of which include ultraviolet sensors. Currently, the BDC holds ultraviolet data from the IBSS, UVPI, UVLIM, and FUVCAM sensors. The BDC will also be the prime archive for Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) data and is prepared to negotiate with program managers to handle other datasets. The purpose of the BDC is to make data accessible to users and to assist them in analyzing it. The BDC maintains the Science Catalog Information Exchange System (SCIES) allowing remote users to log in, read or post notices about current programs, search the catalogs for datasets of interest, and submit orders for data. On-site facilities are also available for the analysis of data, and consist of VMS and UNIX workstations with access to software analysis packages such as IDL, IRAF, and Khoros. Either on-site or remotely, users can employ the BDC-developed graphical user interface called the Visual Interface for Space and Terrestrial Analysis (VISTA) to generate catalog queries and to display and analyze data. SCIES and VISTA permit nearly complete access to BDC services and capabilities without the need to be physically present at the data center.

  1. Core Research Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hicks, Joshua; Adrian, Betty

    2009-01-01

    The Core Research Center (CRC) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), located at the Denver Federal Center in Lakewood, Colo., currently houses rock core from more than 8,500 boreholes representing about 1.7 million feet of rock core from 35 States and cuttings from 54,000 boreholes representing 238 million feet of drilling in 28 States. Although most of the boreholes are located in the Rocky Mountain region, the geologic and geographic diversity of samples have helped the CRC become one of the largest and most heavily used public core repositories in the United States. Many of the boreholes represented in the collection were drilled for energy and mineral exploration, and many of the cores and cuttings were donated to the CRC by private companies in these industries. Some cores and cuttings were collected by the USGS along with other government agencies. Approximately one-half of the cores are slabbed and photographed. More than 18,000 thin sections and a large volume of analytical data from the cores and cuttings are also accessible. A growing collection of digital images of the cores are also becoming available on the CRC Web site Internet http://geology.cr.usgs.gov/crc/.

  2. Patient-centered Radiology.

    PubMed

    Itri, Jason N

    2015-10-01

    Patient-centered care (ie, care organized around the patient) is a model in which health care providers partner with patients and families to identify and satisfy patients' needs and preferences. In this model, providers respect patients' values and preferences, address their emotional and social needs, and involve them and their families in decision making. Radiologists have traditionally been characterized as "doctor-to-doctor" consultants who are distanced from patients and work within a culture that does not value patient centeredness. As medicine becomes more patient driven and the trajectory of health care is toward increasing patient self-reliance, radiologists must change the perception that they are merely consultants and become more active participants in patient care by embracing greater patient interaction. The traditional business model for radiology practices, which devalues interaction between patients and radiologists, must be transformed into a patient-centered model in which radiologists are reintegrated into direct patient care and imaging processes are reorganized around patients' needs and preferences. Expanding radiology's core assets to include direct patient care may be the most effective deterrent to the threat of commoditization. As the assault on the growth of Medicare spending continues, with medical imaging as a highly visible target, radiologists must adapt to the changing landscape by focusing on their most important consumer: the patient. This may yield substantial benefits in the form of improved quality and patient safety, reduced costs, higher-value care, improved patient outcomes, and greater patient and provider satisfaction.

  3. Cryogenic Information Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohling, Robert A.; Marquardt, Eric D.; Fusilier, Fred C.; Fesmire, James E.

    2003-01-01

    The Cryogenic Information Center (CIC) is a not-for-profit corporation dedicated to preserving and distributing cryogenic information to government, industry, and academia. The heart of the CIC is a uniform source of cryogenic data including analyses, design, materials and processes, and test information traceable back to the Cryogenic Data Center of the former National Bureau of Standards. The electronic database is a national treasure containing over 146,000 specific bibliographic citations of cryogenic literature and thermophysical property data dating back to 1829. A new technical/bibliographic inquiry service can perform searches and technical analyses. The Cryogenic Material Properties (CMP) Program consists of computer codes using empirical equations to determine thermophysical material properties with emphasis on the 4-300K range. CMP's objective is to develop a user-friendly standard material property database using the best available data so government and industry can conduct more accurate analyses. The CIC serves to benefit researchers, engineers, and technologists in cryogenics and cryogenic engineering, whether they are new or experienced in the field.

  4. Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodden, Lee; Pease, Phil; Bedet, Jean-Jacques; Rosen, Wayne

    1993-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center Version 0 Distributed Active Archive Center (GSFC V0 DAAC) is being developed to enhance and improve scientific research and productivity by consolidating access to remote sensor earth science data in the pre-EOS time frame. In cooperation with scientists from the science labs at GSFC, other NASA facilities, universities, and other government agencies, the DAAC will support data acquisition, validation, archive and distribution. The DAAC is being developed in response to EOSDIS Project Functional Requirements as well as from requirements originating from individual science projects such as SeaWiFS, Meteor3/TOMS2, AVHRR Pathfinder, TOVS Pathfinder, and UARS. The GSFC V0 DAAC has begun operational support for the AVHRR Pathfinder (as of April, 1993), TOVS Pathfinder (as of July, 1993) and the UARS (September, 1993) Projects, and is preparing to provide operational support for SeaWiFS (August, 1994) data. The GSFC V0 DAAC has also incorporated the existing data, services, and functionality of the DAAC/Climate, DAAC/Land, and the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) Systems.

  5. Sustainable Biofuels Development Center

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, Kenneth F.

    2015-03-01

    The mission of the Sustainable Bioenergy Development Center (SBDC) is to enhance the capability of America’s bioenergy industry to produce transportation fuels and chemical feedstocks on a large scale, with significant energy yields, at competitive cost, through sustainable production techniques. Research within the SBDC is organized in five areas: (1) Development of Sustainable Crops and Agricultural Strategies, (2) Improvement of Biomass Processing Technologies, (3) Biofuel Characterization and Engine Adaptation, (4) Production of Byproducts for Sustainable Biorefining, and (5) Sustainability Assessment, including evaluation of the ecosystem/climate change implication of center research and evaluation of the policy implications of widespread production and utilization of bioenergy. The overall goal of this project is to develop new sustainable bioenergy-related technologies. To achieve that goal, three specific activities were supported with DOE funds: bioenergy-related research initiation projects, bioenergy research and education via support of undergraduate and graduate students, and Research Support Activities (equipment purchases, travel to attend bioenergy conferences, and seminars). Numerous research findings in diverse fields related to bioenergy were produced from these activities and are summarized in this report.

  6. The Backgrounds Data Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, W. A.; Gursky, H.; Heckathorn, H. M.; Lucke, R. L.; Berg, S. L.; Dombrowski, E. G.; Kessel, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization has created data centers for midcourse, plumes, and backgrounds phenomenologies. The Backgrounds Data Center (BDC) has been designated as the prime archive for data collected by SDIO programs. The BDC maintains a Summary Catalog that contains 'metadata,' that is, information about data, such as when the data were obtained, what the spectral range of the data is, and what region of the Earth or sky was observed. Queries to this catalog result in a listing of all data sets (from all experiments in the Summary Catalog) that satisfy the specified criteria. Thus, the user can identify different experiments that made similar observations and order them from the BDC for analysis. On-site users can use the Science Analysis Facility (SAFE for this purpose. For some programs, the BDC maintains a Program Catalog, which can classify data in as many ways as desired (rather than just by position, time, and spectral range as in the Summary Catalog). For example, data sets could be tagged with such diverse parameters as solar illumination angle, signal level, or the value of a particular spectral ratio, as long as these quantities can be read from the digital record or calculated from it by the ingest program. All unclassified catalogs and unclassified data will be remotely accessible.

  7. Data center coolant switch

    DOEpatents

    Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.

    2015-10-06

    A data center cooling system is operated in a first mode; it has an indoor portion wherein heat is absorbed from components in the data center, and an outdoor heat exchanger portion wherein outside air is used to cool a first heat transfer fluid (e.g., water) present in at least the outdoor heat exchanger portion of the cooling system during the first mode. The first heat transfer fluid is a relatively high performance heat transfer fluid (as compared to the second fluid), and has a first heat transfer fluid freezing point. A determination is made that an appropriate time has been reached to switch from the first mode to a second mode. Based on this determination, the outdoor heat exchanger portion of the data cooling system is switched to a second heat transfer fluid, which is a relatively low performance heat transfer fluid, as compared to the first heat transfer fluid. It has a second heat transfer fluid freezing point lower than the first heat transfer fluid freezing point, and the second heat transfer fluid freezing point is sufficiently low to operate without freezing when the outdoor air temperature drops below a first predetermined relationship with the first heat transfer fluid freezing point.

  8. Telemedicine information analysis center.

    PubMed

    Zajtchuk, Joan T; Zajtchuk, Russ; Petrovic, Joseph J; Gutz, Ryan P; Walrath, Benjamin D

    2004-01-01

    Congress mandated a pilot project to demonstrate the feasibility of establishing a Department of Defense (DoD) telemedicine information analysis center (TIAC). The project developed a medical information support system to show the core capabilities of a TIAC. The productivity and effectiveness of telemedicine researchers and clinical practitioners can be enhanced by the existence of an information analysis center (IACs) devoted to the collection, analysis, synthesis, and dissemination of worldwide scientific and technical information related to the field of telemedicine. The work conducted under the TIAC pilot project establishes the basic IAC functions and assesses the utility of the TIAC to the military medical departments. The pilot project capabilities are Web-based and include: (1) applying the science of classification (taxonomy) to telemedicine to identify key words; (2) creating a relational database of this taxonomy to a bibliographic database using these key words; (3) developing and disseminating information via a public TIAC Web site; (4) performing a specific baseline technical area task for the U.S. Army Medical Command; and (5) providing analyses by subject matter experts.

  9. MISR Center Block Time Tool

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-01

      MISR Center Block Time Tool The misr_time tool calculates the block center times for ... in Exelis Visual Information Solutions IDL programming language. It can be run either with a licensed version of the IDL package or by ...

  10. Center for Beam Physics, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This report contains the following information on the center for beam physics: Facilities; Organizational Chart; Roster; Profiles of Staff; Affiliates; Center Publications (1991--1993); and 1992 Summary of Activities.

  11. Italy INAF Data Center Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negusini, M.; Sarti, P.

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Italian INAF VLBI Data Center. Our Data Center is located in Bologna, Italy and belongs to the Institute of Radioastronomy, which is part of the National Institute of Astrophysics.

  12. Matera CGS VLBI Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanotte, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the VLBI data analysis activities at the Space Geodesy Center (CGS), Matera, from January 2012 through December 2012, and the contributions that the CGS intends to provide for the future as an IVS Analysis Center.

  13. The runaway center as community mental health center.

    PubMed

    Gordon, J S

    1978-08-01

    The runaway centers that evolved in the late 1960s in response to the needs of troubled young people are fulfilling many of the goals of the community mental health center (CMHC) movement. These centers provide their young clients the five basic CMHC services--inpatient services, outpatient services, emergency services, partial hospitalization, and consultation and education--in an individualized and economical manner. They can serve as a model for a variety of community services, such as drop-in centers for troubled individuals, mediation centers for families, shelters for battered women, and residences for people suffering an acute psychotic break.

  14. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2006-11-01

    Computational Science is an integral component of Brookhaven's multi science mission, and is a reflection of the increased role of computation across all of science. Brookhaven currently has major efforts in data storage and analysis for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the ATLAS detector at CERN, and in quantum chromodynamics. The Laboratory is host for the QCDOC machines (quantum chromodynamics on a chip), 10 teraflop/s computers which boast 12,288 processors each. There are two here, one for the Riken/BNL Research Center and the other supported by DOE for the US Lattice Gauge Community and other scientific users. A 100 teraflop/s supercomputer will be installed at Brookhaven in the coming year, managed jointly by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, and funded by a grant from New York State. This machine will be used for computational science across Brookhaven's entire research program, and also by researchers at Stony Brook and across New York State. With Stony Brook, Brookhaven has formed the New York Center for Computational Science (NYCCS) as a focal point for interdisciplinary computational science, which is closely linked to Brookhaven's Computational Science Center (CSC). The CSC has established a strong program in computational science, with an emphasis on nanoscale electronic structure and molecular dynamics, accelerator design, computational fluid dynamics, medical imaging, parallel computing and numerical algorithms. We have been an active participant in DOES SciDAC program (Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing). We are also planning a major expansion in computational biology in keeping with Laboratory initiatives. Additional laboratory initiatives with a dependence on a high level of computation include the development of hydrodynamics models for the interpretation of RHIC data, computational models for the atmospheric transport of aerosols, and models for combustion and for energy utilization. The CSC was formed to bring together

  15. Industrial Assessment Center Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kolarik, William J.

    2007-02-26

    Over the five-year period (2002-2006) the Oklahoma State University Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) performed energy assessments for 106 different clients, writing 835 recommendations, for a total of $23,937,099 in potential estimated annual savings. IAC clients served consisted of small and medium-sized manufacturers ranging from food manufactures to foundries. The OSU IAC served clients in Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas. In addition to client service, student training and instruction was a major accomplishment. The OSU IAC employed (and trained) 12 baccalaureate-level students, 17 masters-level graduate students, and 7 doctoral-level graduate students. Most are practicing in the energy management area. Training was focused on both energy assessment and safety. Safety training was both center-based training as well as on-site training. Energy management related training was focused on classroom (for academic credit) work at both the undergraduate and graduate level. IEM 4923 (Energy and Water Management) was developed to serve both the IAC as well as non-IAC students. It was delivered once per year, with enrollments of typically 10 to 20 students. This course was required for IAC student employees, both undergraduate and graduate. This course was patterned after the AEE CEM (five-day) course for practicing professionals. IEM 4923 required each student to attend at least one on-site assessment and write at least one recommendation for their client’s report. Hence, a hands-on approach was practiced. Advance level courses were used to train graduate students. Two courses played major roles here: IEM 5923 (Advanced Energy and Water Management) and IEM 5943 (Hazardous Material and Waste). Graduate student participation in these courses helped the IAC to gain additional perspectives in on-site assessment and resulting recommendations. Numerous hands-on demonstration/training was conducted by directors and graduate students in order to gain

  16. Industry Invests in Research Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploch, Margie

    1983-01-01

    Universities and industry are forging new relationships to support academic research and industrial research and development, including the establishment of university/cooperative research centers. Discusses various cooperative projects at these research centers. Includes a list of representative R&D centers in biotechnology, building…

  17. Industry Invests in Research Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploch, Margie

    1983-01-01

    Universities and industry are forging new relationships to support academic research and industrial research and development, including the establishment of university/cooperative research centers. Discusses various cooperative projects at these research centers. Includes a list of representative R&D centers in biotechnology, building…

  18. Industrial Assessment Center Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Dereje Agonafer

    2007-11-30

    The work described in this report was performed under the direction of the Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) at University of Texas at Arlington. The IAC at The University of Texas at Arlington is managed by Rutgers University under agreement with the United States Department of Energy Office of Industrial Technology, which financially supports the program. The objective of the IAC is to identify, evaluate, and recommend, through analysis of an industrial plant’s operations, opportunities to conserve energy and prevent pollution, thereby reducing the associated costs. IAC team members visit and survey the plant. Based upon observations made in the plant, preventive/corrective actions are recommended. At all times we try to offer specific and quantitative recommendations of cost savings, energy conservation, and pollution prevention to the plants we serve.

  19. Supernova Science Center

    SciTech Connect

    S. E. Woosley

    2008-05-05

    The Supernova Science Center (SNSC) was founded in 2001 to carry out theoretical and computational research leading to a better understanding of supernovae and related transients. The SNSC, a four-institutional collaboration, included scientists from LANL, LLNL, the University of Arizona (UA), and the University of California at Santa Cruz (UCSC). Intitially, the SNSC was funded for three years of operation, but in 2004 an opportunity was provided to submit a renewal proposal for two years. That proposal was funded and subsequently, at UCSC, a one year no-cost extension was granted. The total operational time of the SNSC was thus July 15, 2001 - July 15, 2007. This document summarizes the research and findings of the SNSC and provides a cummulative publication list.

  20. Concurrent engineering research center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, John R.

    1995-01-01

    The projects undertaken by The Concurrent Engineering Research Center (CERC) at West Virginia University are reported and summarized. CERC's participation in the Department of Defense's Defense Advanced Research Project relating to technology needed to improve the product development process is described, particularly in the area of advanced weapon systems. The efforts committed to improving collaboration among the diverse and distributed health care providers are reported, along with the research activities for NASA in Independent Software Verification and Validation. CERC also takes part in the electronic respirator certification initiated by The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, as well as in the efforts to find a solution to the problem of producing environment-friendly end-products for product developers worldwide. The 3M Fiber Metal Matrix Composite Model Factory Program is discussed. CERC technologies, facilities,and personnel-related issues are described, along with its library and technical services and recent publications.

  1. Industrial Assessment Center

    SciTech Connect

    J. Kelly Kissock; Becky Blust

    2007-04-17

    The University of Dayton (UD) performed energy assessments, trained students and supported USDOE objectives. In particular, the UD Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) performed 96 industrial energy assessment days for mid-sized manufacturers. The average identified and implemented savings on each assessment were $261,080 per year and $54,790 per year. The assessments served as direct training in industrial energy efficiency for 16 UD IAC students. The assessments also served as a mechanism for the UD IAC to understand manufacturing energy use and improve upon the science of manufacturing energy efficiency. Specific research results were published in 16 conference proceedings and journals, disseminated in 22 additional invited lectures, and shared with the industrial energy community through the UD IAC website.

  2. Interactive design center.

    SciTech Connect

    Pomplun, Alan R. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-07-01

    Sandia's advanced computing resources provide researchers, engineers and analysts with the ability to develop and render highly detailed large-scale models and simulations. To take full advantage of these multi-million data point visualizations, display systems with comparable pixel counts are needed. The Interactive Design Center (IDC) is a second generation visualization theater designed to meet this need. The main display integrates twenty-seven projectors in a 9-wide by 3-high array with a total display resolution of more than 35 million pixels. Six individual SmartBoard displays offer interactive capabilities that include on-screen annotation and touch panel control of the facility's display systems. This report details the design, implementation and operation of this innovative facility.

  3. The Satellite Situation Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teague, M. J.; Sawyer, D. M.; Vette, J. I.

    1982-01-01

    Considerations related to the early planning for the International Magnetospheric Study (IMS) took into account the desirability of an establishment of specific entities for generating and disseminating coordination information for both retrospective and predictive periods. The organizations established include the IMS/Satellite Situation Center (IMS/SSC) operated by NASA. The activities of the SSC are related to the preparation of reports on predicted and actually achieved satellite positions, the response to inquiries, the compilation of information on satellite experiments, and the issue of periodic status summaries. Attention is given to high-altitude satellite services, other correlative satellite services, non-IMS activities of the SSC, a summary of the SSC request activity, and post-IMS and future activities.

  4. The Atomki accelerator center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajda, I.; Fülöp, Zs.; Biri, S.

    2017-06-01

    Particle accelerators are the driving forces of nuclear physics laboratories and MTA Atomki, the Institute for Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences is no exception. The Atomki Accelerator Center (AAC) incorporates several low-energy charged-particle accelerators, offering the possibility of choosing ions with various charge states, energies and beam intensities. Currently, the AAC has six main facilities: a cyclotron (K=20), two Van de Graaff accelerators (1 MV, 5 MV), an ECR ion source, an electromagnetic isotope separator and a 2 MV Tandetron installed in 2015. The accelerators, spanning a range of beam energies from 50 eV to 27 MeV, have been designed for a broad range of research projects and applications in various fields - mainly in nuclear and atomic physics, materials science, environmental research and archaeology. The structure of the laboratory with a short description of the most important topics, education and outreach activities are presented.

  5. RIKEN BNL Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samios, Nicholas

    2014-09-01

    Since its inception in 1997, the RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) has been a major force in the realms of Spin Physics, Relativistic Heavy Ion Physics, large scale Computing Physics and the training of a new generation of extremely talented physicists. This has been accomplished through the recruitment of an outstanding non-permanent staff of Fellows and Research associates in theory and experiment. RBRC is now a mature organization that has reached a steady level in the size of scientific and support staff while at the same time retaining its vibrant youth. A brief history of the scientific accomplishments and contributions of the RBRC physicists will be presented as well as a discussion of the unique RBRC management structure.

  6. Regional Warning Center Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundstedt, Henrik

    RWC-Sweden is operated by the Lund division of the Swedish Institute of Space Physics located at IDEON, a Science Research Technology Park. The Institute of Technology of Lund and Lund University are just adjacent to IDEON. This creates a lot of synergy effects. Copenhagen, with the Danish National Space Center DNSC), and Atmosphere Space Research Division of Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI), is 45 min away via the bridge. The new LOIS Space Centre is located two hours away by car, north of Lund and just outside V¨xj¨. The IRF Lund a o division is aiming at becoming a "Solar and Space Weather Center". We focus on solar magnetic activity, its influence on climate and on space weather effects such the effect of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC). Basic research: A PostDoc position on "Solar Magnetic Activity: Topology and Predictions has recently been created. Research is carried on to improve predictions of solar magnetic activity. Preparations for using upcoming SDO vector magnetic fields are ongoing. Predictions: RWC-Sweden offers real-time forecasts of space weather and space weather effects based on neural networks. We participated in the NASA/NOAA Cycle 24 Prediction Panel. We have also participated in several ESA/EU solar-climate projects New observation facilities: Distributed, wide-area radio facility (LOIS) for solar (and other space physics) observations and a guest prof: Radio facility about 200 km distant, outside V¨xj¨ (Sm˚ a o aland), in Ronneby (Blekinge) and Lund (Sk˚ ane) is planned to be used for tracking of CMEs and basic solar physics studies of the corona. The LOIS station outside V¨xj¨ has a o been up and running for the past three years. Bo Thidé has joined the Lund division e as a guest prof. A new magnetometer at Risinge LOIS station has been installed an calibrated and expected to be operational in March, 2008.

  7. National Technology Center and photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlannes, Nickolas P.

    1992-05-01

    A National Technology Center is proposed in order to meet the international challenges to the economy and security of the United States. This center would be tasked with the acquisition, analysis, assessment, and dissemination of worldwide scientific and technical information and data; technology transfer to the United States; and research and development in information and library sciences and technology. The National Technology Center would form a national network linking centers of excellence and expertise, and maintain a national technology library. With these functions, the National Technology Center has inherent requirements for technologies based on photonics, and will further motivate developments in this field.

  8. Finding Center: How Learning Centers Evolved in a Secondary Student-Centered Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Movitz, Allison P.; Holmes, Kerry P.

    2007-01-01

    The authors elaborate on the experience of creating for high school students effective multisensory, hands-on learning centers that address a full range of elements from the English language arts curriculum. Allison P. Movitz and Kerry P. Holmes detail the centers Movitz designed for a Mostly Medieval unit to show how learning centers can help…

  9. Finding Center: How Learning Centers Evolved in a Secondary Student-Centered Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Movitz, Allison P.; Holmes, Kerry P.

    2007-01-01

    The authors elaborate on the experience of creating for high school students effective multisensory, hands-on learning centers that address a full range of elements from the English language arts curriculum. Allison P. Movitz and Kerry P. Holmes detail the centers Movitz designed for a Mostly Medieval unit to show how learning centers can help…

  10. Launch Vehicle Control Center Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Epps, Amy; Woodruff, Van; Vachon, Michael Jacob; Monreal, Julio; Williams, Randall; McLaughlin, Tom

    2014-01-01

    This analysis is a survey of control center architectures of the NASA Space Launch System (SLS), United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V and Delta IV, and the European Space Agency (ESA) Ariane 5. Each of these control center architectures have similarities in basic structure, and differences in functional distribution of responsibilities for the phases of operations: (a) Launch vehicles in the international community vary greatly in configuration and process; (b) Each launch site has a unique processing flow based on the specific configurations; (c) Launch and flight operations are managed through a set of control centers associated with each launch site, however the flight operations may be a different control center than the launch center; and (d) The engineering support centers are primarily located at the design center with a small engineering support team at the launch site.

  11. Agricultural origins: centers and noncenters.

    PubMed

    Harlan, J R

    1971-10-29

    I propose the theory that agriculture originated independently in three different areas and that, in each case, there was a system composed of a center of origin and a noncenter, in which activities of domestication were dispersed over a span of 5,000 to 10,000 kilometers. One system includes a definable Near East center and a noncenter in Africa; another system includes a North Chinese center and a noncenter in Southeast Asia and the South Pacific; the third system includes a Mesoamerican center and a South American noncenter. There are suggestions that, in each case, the center and noncenter interact with each other. Crops did not necessarily originate in centers (in any conventional concept of the term), nor did agriculture necessarily develop in a geographical "center."

  12. INFINITY Science Center taking shape

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-09-06

    Construction of the new INFINITY Science Center is proceeding just west of the Mississippi Welcome Center at exit 2 on Interstate 10. Roy Anderson Corp. of Gulfport is building the 72,000-squarefoot, $43 million science and education center, which will feature a space gallery and an Earth gallery to showcase the science underpinning missions of the agencies at Stennis Space Center. The project is being spearheaded by INFINITY Science Center, Inc., a non-profit corporation led by Gulfport Mayor George Schloegel and Apollo 13 astronaut Fred Haise, in partnership with NASA, the state of Mississippi and private donors. When completed, it will serve as the official Stennis visitors center and will be home to the NASA Educator Resource Center.

  13. Kennedy Space Center Director Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-06

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Community leaders, business executives, educators, and state and local government leaders were updated on NASA Kennedy Space Center programs and accomplishments during Center Director Bob Cabana’s Center Director Update at the Debus Center at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. From left, Scott Thurston, Kennedy deputy of the spacecraft office of the Commercial Crew Program, talks with Scott Colloredo, director of the Center Planning and Development Directorate. Attendees talked with Cabana and other senior Kennedy managers and visited displays featuring updates on Kennedy programs and projects, including International Space Station, Commercial Crew, Ground System Development and Operations, Launch Services, Center Planning and Development, Technology, KSC Swamp Works and NASA Education. The morning concluded with a tour of the new Space Shuttle Atlantis exhibit at the visitor complex. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper

  14. Kennedy Space Center Director Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-06

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Community leaders, business executives, educators, and state and local government leaders were updated on NASA Kennedy Space Center programs and accomplishments during Center Director Bob Cabana’s Center Director Update at the Debus Center at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. Attendees talk with Trey Carlson, Kennedy Master Planner, at the Center Planning and Development Directorate, or CPDD, display. In the background is Mario Busacca, chief of CPDD’s Spaceport Planning Office. Attendees talked with Cabana and other senior Kennedy managers and visited displays featuring updates on Kennedy programs and projects, including International Space Station, Commercial Crew, Ground System Development and Operations, Launch Services, Center Planning and Development, Technology, KSC Swamp Works and NASA Education. The morning concluded with a tour of the new Space Shuttle Atlantis exhibit at the visitor complex. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper

  15. Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    Among 2011's many accomplishments, we safely retired the Space Shuttle Program after 30 incredible years; completed the International Space Station and are taking steps to enable it to reach its full potential as a multi-purpose laboratory; and helped to expand scientific knowledge with missions like Aquarius, GRAIL, and the Mars Science Laboratory. Responding to national budget challenges, we are prioritizing critical capabilities and divesting ourselves of assets no longer needed for NASA's future exploration programs. Since these facilities do not have to be maintained or demolished, the government saves money. At the same time, our commercial partners save money because they do not have to build new facilities. It is a win-win for everyone. Moving forward, 2012 will be even more historically significant as we celebrate the 50th Anniversary of Kennedy Space Center. In the coming year, KSC will facilitate commercial transportation to low-Earth orbit and support the evolution of the Space Launch System and Orion crew vehicle as they ready for exploration missions, which will shape how human beings view the universe. While NASA's Vision is to lead scientific and technological advances in aeronautics and space for a Nation on the frontier of discovery KSC's vision is to be the world's preeminent launch complex for government and commercial space access, enabling the world to explore and work in space. KSC's Mission is to safely manage, develop, integrate, and sustain space systems through partnerships that enable innovative, diverse access to space and inspires the Nation's future explorers.

  16. Space Operations Learning Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lui, Ben; Milner, Barbara; Binebrink, Dan; Kuok, Heng

    2012-01-01

    The Space Operations Learning Center (SOLC) is a tool that provides an online learning environment where students can learn science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) through a series of training modules. SOLC is also an effective media for NASA to showcase its contributions to the general public. SOLC is a Web-based environment with a learning platform for students to understand STEM through interactive modules in various engineering topics. SOLC is unique in its approach to develop learning materials to teach schoolaged students the basic concepts of space operations. SOLC utilizes the latest Web and software technologies to present this educational content in a fun and engaging way for all grade levels. SOLC uses animations, streaming video, cartoon characters, audio narration, interactive games and more to deliver educational concepts. The Web portal organizes all of these training modules in an easily accessible way for visitors worldwide. SOLC provides multiple training modules on various topics. At the time of this reporting, seven modules have been developed: Space Communication, Flight Dynamics, Information Processing, Mission Operations, Kids Zone 1, Kids Zone 2, and Save The Forest. For the first four modules, each contains three components: Flight Training, Flight License, and Fly It! Kids Zone 1 and 2 include a number of educational videos and games designed specifically for grades K-6. Save The Forest is a space operations mission with four simulations and activities to complete, optimized for new touch screen technology. The Kids Zone 1 module has recently been ported to Facebook to attract wider audience.

  17. Aerial view of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This Shuttle/Gantry mockup and Post Show Dome anchor the northeast corner of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. The Astronaut Memorial is located just above. Sprawling across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast, the complex is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. The building at the upper left is the Theater Complex. Other exhibits and buildings on the site are the Center for Space Education, Cafeteria, Space Flight Exhibit Building, Souvenir Sales Building, Spaceport Central, Ticket Pavilion and Center for Space Education.

  18. Establishing cost centers within libraries of medical centers.

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, C K

    1983-01-01

    Medical centers that educate students, treat patients, and perform medical research usually adopt accounting methods for separating those functions financially--designating each function as a cost center. Faculty members who participate in more than one of the separately charged activities have their salaries apportioned accordingly. Cost-shared services, such as a computer facility or a power plant, may also be apportioned among the cost centers. Given this approach to accounting, the shared services of the medical center's library should be included in such an apportionment. Whether such is the case, why the matter is of concern, and how such accounting can be performed were recently studied. PMID:6860398

  19. Aerial view of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This Shuttle/Gantry mockup and Post Show Dome anchor the northeast corner of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. The Astronaut Memorial is located just above. Sprawling across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast, the complex is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. The building at the upper left is the Theater Complex. Other exhibits and buildings on the site are the Center for Space Education, Cafeteria, Space Flight Exhibit Building, Souvenir Sales Building, Spaceport Central, Ticket Pavilion and Center for Space Education.

  20. Kennedy Space Center Director Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-06

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Community leaders, business executives, educators, and state and local government leaders were updated on NASA Kennedy Space Center programs and accomplishments during Center Director Bob Cabana’s Center Director Update at the Debus Center at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. An attendee talks with Trent Smith, program manager, and Tammy Belk, a program specialist, at the ISS Ground Processing and Research Office display. Attendees talked with Cabana and other senior Kennedy managers and visited displays featuring updates on Kennedy programs and projects, including International Space Station, Commercial Crew, Ground System Development and Operations, Launch Services, Center Planning and Development, Technology, KSC Swamp Works and NASA Education. The morning concluded with a tour of the new Space Shuttle Atlantis exhibit at the visitor complex. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper

  1. Kennedy Space Center Director Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-06

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Community leaders, business executives, educators, and state and local government leaders were updated on NASA Kennedy Space Center programs and accomplishments during KSC Center Director Bob Cabana’s Center Director Update at the Debus Center at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. Attendees talked with Cabana and other senior Kennedy managers and visited displays featuring updates on Kennedy programs and projects, including International Space Station, Commercial Crew, Ground System Development and Operations, Launch Services, Center Planning and Development, Technology, KSC Swamp Works and NASA Education. The morning concluded with a tour of the new Space Shuttle Atlantis exhibit at the visitor complex. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper

  2. Kennedy Space Center Director Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-06

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Community leaders, business executives, educators, and state and local government leaders were updated on NASA Kennedy Space Center programs and accomplishments during Center Director Bob Cabana’s Center Director Update at the Debus Center at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. Attendees talked with Cabana and other senior Kennedy managers and visited displays featuring updates on Kennedy programs and projects, including International Space Station, Commercial Crew, Ground System Development and Operations, Launch Services, Center Planning and Development, Technology, KSC Swamp Works and NASA Education. The morning concluded with a tour of the new Space Shuttle Atlantis exhibit at the visitor complex. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper

  3. Kennedy Space Center Director Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-06

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Community leaders, business executives, educators, and state and local government leaders were updated on NASA Kennedy Space Center programs and accomplishments during Center Director Bob Cabana’s Center Director Update at the Debus Center at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. Rob Mueller, a senior technologist, talks to an attendee about Kennedy’s Swamp Works Laboratory. Attendees talked with Cabana and other senior Kennedy managers and visited displays featuring updates on Kennedy programs and projects, including International Space Station, Commercial Crew, Ground System Development and Operations, Launch Services, Center Planning and Development, Technology, KSC Swamp Works and NASA Education. The morning concluded with a tour of the new Space Shuttle Atlantis exhibit at the visitor complex. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper

  4. Kennedy Space Center Director Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-06

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Community leaders, business executives, educators, and state and local government leaders were updated on NASA Kennedy Space Center programs and accomplishments during Center Director Bob Cabana’s Center Director Update at the Debus Center at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. Rob Mueller, senior technologist, talks with attendees at the Swamp Works display. Attendees talked with Cabana and other senior Kennedy managers and visited displays featuring updates on Kennedy programs and projects, including International Space Station, Commercial Crew, Ground System Development and Operations, Launch Services, Center Planning and Development, Technology, KSC Swamp Works and NASA Education. The morning concluded with a tour of the new Space Shuttle Atlantis exhibit at the visitor complex. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper

  5. Kennedy Space Center Director Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-06

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Community leaders, business executives, educators, and state and local government leaders were updated on NASA Kennedy Space Center programs and accomplishments during Center Director Bob Cabana’s Center Director Update at the Debus Center at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. An attendee talks with Scott Thurston, Kennedy deputy of the spacecraft office at the Commercial Crew Program display. Attendees talked with Cabana and other senior Kennedy managers and visited displays featuring updates on Kennedy programs and projects, including International Space Station, Commercial Crew, Ground System Development and Operations, Launch Services, Center Planning and Development, Technology, KSC Swamp Works and NASA Education. The morning concluded with a tour of the new Space Shuttle Atlantis exhibit at the visitor complex. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper

  6. Kennedy Space Center Director Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-06

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Community leaders, business executives, educators, and state and local government leaders were updated on NASA Kennedy Space Center programs and accomplishments during Center Director Bob Cabana’s Center Director Update at the Debus Center at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. An attendee talks with engineers Jason Hopkins and Lisa Lutz, at the Ground Systems Development and Operations display. Attendees talked with Cabana and other senior Kennedy managers and visited displays featuring updates on Kennedy programs and projects, including International Space Station, Commercial Crew, Ground System Development and Operations, Launch Services, Center Planning and Development, Technology, KSC Swamp Works and NASA Education. The morning concluded with a tour of the new Space Shuttle Atlantis exhibit at the visitor complex. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper

  7. Kennedy Space Center Director Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-06

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Community leaders, business executives, educators, and state and local government leaders were updated on NASA Kennedy Space Center programs and accomplishments during Center Director Bob Cabana’s Center Director Update at the Debus Center at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. At left, Susan Fernandez from the Office of Senator Marco Rubio talks with another attendee near the Education display. Attendees talked with Cabana and other senior Kennedy managers and visited displays featuring updates on Kennedy programs and projects, including International Space Station, Commercial Crew, Ground System Development and Operations, Launch Services, Center Planning and Development, Technology, KSC Swamp Works and NASA Education. The morning concluded with a tour of the new Space Shuttle Atlantis exhibit at the visitor complex. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper

  8. Kennedy Space Center Director Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-06

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Community leaders, business executives, educators, and state and local government leaders were updated on NASA Kennedy Space Center programs and accomplishments during Center Director Bob Cabana’s Center Director Update at the Debus Center at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. Attendees mingled and visited various displays, including Ground Systems Development and Operations Program and Education Office displays. Attendees talked with Cabana and other senior Kennedy managers and visited displays featuring updates on Kennedy programs and projects, including International Space Station, Commercial Crew, Ground System Development and Operations, Launch Services, Center Planning and Development, Technology, KSC Swamp Works and NASA Education. The morning concluded with a tour of the new Space Shuttle Atlantis exhibit at the visitor complex. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper

  9. ROSAT Science Data Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Stephen; Pisarski, Ryszard L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) ROSAT SCIENCE DATA CENTER (RSDC) activities for the recent years of our contract. Details have already been reported in the monthly reports. The SAO was responsible for the High Resolution Imager (HRI) detector on ROSAT. We also provided and supported the HRI standard analysis software used in the pipeline processing (SASS). Working with our colleagues at the Max Planck in Garching Germany (MPE), we fixed bugs and provided enhancements. The last major effort in this area was the port from VMS/VAX to VMS/ALPHA architecture. In 1998, a timing bug was found in the HRI standard processing system which degraded the positional accuracy because events accessed incorrect aspect solutions. The bug was fixed and we developed off-line correction routines and provided them to the community. The Post Reduction Off-line Software (PROS) package was developed by SAO and runs in the IRAF environment. Although in recent years PROS was not a contractual responsibility of the RSDC, we continued to maintain the system and provided new capabilities such as the ability to deal with simulated AXAF data in preparation for the NASA call for proposals for Chandra. Our most recent activities in this area included the debugging necessary for newer versions of IRAF which broke some of our software. At SAO we have an operating version of PROS and hope to release a patch even though almost all functionality that was lost was subsequently recovered via an IRAF patch (i.e. most of our problems were caused by an IRAF bug).

  10. Optical Measurement Center Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, H.; Abercromby, K.; Mulrooney, M.; Barker, E.

    2007-01-01

    Beginning in 2005, an optical measurement center (OMC) was created to measure the photometric signatures of debris pieces. Initially, the OMC was equipped with a 300 W xenon arc lamp, a SBIG 512 x 512 ST8X MEI CCD camera with standard Johnson filters, and a Lynx 6 robotic arm with five degrees of freedom. As research progressed, modifications were made to the equipment. A customized rotary table was built to overcome the robot s limitation of 180 degree wrist rotation and provide complete 360 degree rotation with little human interaction. This change allowed an initial phase angle (source-object-camera angle) of roughly 5 degrees to be adjusted to 7, 10, 15, 18, 20, 25, or 28 degrees. Additionally, the Johnson R and I CCD filters were replaced with the standard astronomical filters suite (Bessell R,I). In an effort to reduce object saturation, the two generic aperture stops were replaced with neutral density filters. Initially data were taken with aluminum debris pieces from the European Space Operations Centre ESOC2 ground test and more recently with samples from a thermal multi-layered insulation (MLI) commonly used on rocket bodies and satellites. The ESOC2 data provided light curve analysis for one type of material but many different shapes, including flat, bent, curled, folded, and torn. The MLI samples are roughly the same size and shape, but have different surfaces that give rise to interesting photometric light curves. In addition, filter photometry was conducted on the MLI pieces, a process that also will be used on the ESOC2 samples. While obtaining light curve data an anomalous drop in intensity was observed when the table revolved through the second 180 degree rotation. Investigation revealed that the robot s wrist rotation is not reliable past 80 degrees, thus the object may be at slightly different angles at the 180 degree transition. To limit this effect, the initial rotation position begins with the object s minimal surface area facing the camera.

  11. Satellite medical centers project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Arvind

    2002-08-01

    World class health care for common man at low affordable cost: anywhere, anytime The project envisages to set up a national network of satellite Medical centers. Each SMC would be manned by doctors, nurses and technicians, six doctors, six nurses, six technicians would be required to provide 24 hour cover, each SMC would operate 24 hours x 7 days. It would be equipped with the Digital telemedicine devices for capturing clinical patient information and investigations in the form of voice, images and data and create an audiovisual text file - a virtual Digital patient. Through the broad band connectivity the virtual patient can be sent to the central hub, manned by specialists, specialists from several specialists sitting together can view the virtual patient and provide a specialized opinion, they can see the virtual patient, see the examination on line through video conference or even PCs, talk to the patient and the doctor at the SMC and controlle capturing of information during examination and investigations of the patient at the SMC - thus creating a virtual Digital consultant at the SMC. Central hub shall be connected to the doctors and consultants in remote locations or tertiary care hospitals any where in the world, thus creating a virtual hub the hierarchical system shall provide upgradation of knowledge to thedoctors in central hub and smc and thus continued medical education and benefit the patient thru the world class treatment in the smc located at his door step. SMC shall be set up by franchisee who shall get safe business opportunity with high returns, patients shall get Low cost user friendly worldclass health care anywhere anytime, Doctors can get better meaningful selfemplyment with better earnings, flexibility of working time and place. SMC shall provide a wide variety of services from primary care to world class Global consultation for difficult patients.

  12. Fleet Logistics Center, Puget Sound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Supply Systems Command,Fleet Logistics Center, Puget Sound,467 W Street , Bremerton ,WA,98314-5100 8... Bremerton , WA Established: October 1967 Name Changes: Naval Supply Center Puget Sound, Fleet and Industrial Supply Center Puget...or Sasebo) deployed Ships in the Western Pacific (WestPac) Naval Base Kitsap at Bremerton and Bangor (NBK at Bremerton or Bangor) Navy Region

  13. Patient-centered healthcare design.

    PubMed

    Stichler, Jaynelle F

    2011-12-01

    Patient-centered care focuses on the patient's and family's experience in the hospital, and the design of the healthcare environment should support the patient-centered care concept. The purpose of this facility design department is to expand nurse leaders' knowledge and competencies in health facility design and enable them to take leadership roles in design efforts. This article focuses on healthcare design guiding principles and features to support organizational cultural initiatives such as patient- and family-centered care and Planetree.

  14. Center for Advanced Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Center for Advanced Space Propulsion (CASP) is part of the University of Tennessee-Calspan Center for Aerospace Research (CAR). It was formed in 1985 to take advantage of the extensive research faculty and staff of the University of Tennessee and Calspan Corporation. It is also one of sixteen NASA sponsored Centers established to facilitate the Commercial Development of Space. Based on investigators' qualifications in propulsion system development, and matching industries' strong intent, the Center focused its efforts in the following technical areas: advanced chemical propulsion, electric propulsion, AI/Expert systems, fluids management in microgravity, and propulsion materials processing. This annual report focuses its discussion in these technical areas.

  15. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medicare Medicaid/CHIP Medicare-Medicaid Coordination Private Insurance Innovation Center Regulations & Guidance Research, Statistics, Data & Systems Outreach & Education CMS.gov Covering more Americans Making ...

  16. Liver transplant center risk tolerance.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Scott R; Karp, Seth J; Curry, Michael P; Barugel, Martin; Rodrigue, James R; Mandelbrot, Didier A; Rogers, Christin P; Hanto, Douglas W

    2012-01-01

    Recent changes in Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) condition for participation, using benchmark volume/outcomes requirements for certification, have been implemented. Consequently, the ability of a transplant center to assess its risk tolerance is important in successful management. An analysis of SRTR data was performed to determine donor/recipient risk factors for graft loss or patient death in the first year. Each transplant performed was then assigned a prospective relative risk (RR) of failure. Using a Monte-Carlo simulation, transplants were selected at random that met the centers' acceptable risk tolerance. Transplant center volume was fixed and its risk tolerance was adjusted to determine the impact on outcomes. The model was run 1000 times on centers with varying volume. The modeling demonstrates that centers with smaller annual volumes must use a more risk taking strategy than larger volume centers to avoid being flagged for CMS volume requirements. The modeling also demonstrates optimal risk taking strategies for centers based upon volume to minimize the probability of being flagged for not meeting volume or outcomes benchmarks. Small volume centers must perform higher risk transplants to meet current CMS requirements and are at risk for adverse action secondary to chance alone.

  17. National Center for Farmworker Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Access Data Health Centers Population Estimates Resources Performance Management & Governance Tool Box > Administrative Governance Human Resources Needs Assessment Service Delivery Emergency Preparedness Call for ...

  18. 5. Log calving barn (center), loafing shed (right of center), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Log calving barn (center), loafing shed (right of center), and wood-frame garage (far right). View to southwest. - William & Lucina Bowe Ranch, County Road 44, 0.1 mile northeast of Big Hole River Bridge, Melrose, Silver Bow County, MT

  19. Clean Energy Application Center

    SciTech Connect

    Freihaut, Jim

    2013-09-30

    The Mid Atlantic Clean Energy Application Center (MACEAC), managed by The Penn State College of Engineering, serves the six states in the Mid-Atlantic region (Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia) plus the District of Columbia. The goals of the Mid-Atlantic CEAC are to promote the adoption of Combined Heat and Power (CHP), Waste Heat Recovery (WHR) and District Energy Systems (DES) in the Mid Atlantic area through education and technical support to more than 1,200 regional industry and government representatives in the region. The successful promotion of these technologies by the MACEAC was accomplished through the following efforts; (1)The MACEAC developed a series of technology transfer networks with State energy and environmental offices, Association of Energy Engineers local chapters, local community development organizations, utilities and, Penn State Department of Architectural Engineering alumni and their firms to effectively educate local practitioners about the energy utilization, environmental and economic advantages of CHP, WHR and DES; (2) Completed assessments of the regional technical and market potential for CHP, WHR and DE technologies application in the context of state specific energy prices, state energy and efficiency portfolio development. The studies were completed for Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Maryland and included a set of incentive adoption probability models used as a to guide during implementation discussions with State energy policy makers; (3) Using the technical and market assessments and adoption incentive models, the Mid Atlantic CEAC developed regional strategic action plans for the promotion of CHP Application technology for Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Maryland; (4) The CHP market assessment and incentive adoption model information was discussed, on a continuing basis, with relevant state agencies, policy makers and Public Utility Commission organizations resulting in CHP favorable incentive

  20. NASA New England Outreach Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA New England Outreach Center in Nashua, New Hampshire was established to serve as a catalyst for heightening regional business awareness of NASA procurement, technology and commercialization opportunities. Emphasis is placed on small business participation, with the highest priority given to small disadvantaged businesses, women-owned businesses, HUBZone businesses, service disabled veteran owned businesses, and historically black colleges and universities and minority institutions. The Center assists firms and organizations to understand NASA requirements and to develop strategies to capture NASA related procurement and technology opportunities. The establishment of the NASA Outreach Center serves to stimulate business in a historically underserved area. NASA direct business awards have traditionally been highly present in the West, Midwest, South, and Southeast areas of the United States. The Center guides and assists businesses and organizations in the northeast to target opportunities within NASA and its prime contractors and capture business and technology opportunities. The Center employs an array of technology access, one-on-one meetings, seminars, site visits, and targeted conferences to acquaint Northeast firms and organizations with representatives from NASA and its prime contractors to learn about and discuss opportunities to do business and access the inventory of NASA technology. This stimulus of interaction also provides firms and organizations the opportunity to propose the use of their developed technology and ideas for current and future requirements at NASA. The Center provides a complement to the NASA Northeast Regional Technology Transfer Center in developing prospects for commercialization of NASA technology. In addition, the Center responds to local requests for assistance and NASA material and documents, and is available to address immediate concerns and needs in assessing opportunities, timely support to interact with NASA Centers on