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  1. Measuring IPM Impacts in California and Arizona.

    PubMed

    Farrar, J J; Baur, M E; Elliott, S F

    2016-01-01

    Integrated pest management (IPM) is a method of reducing economic, human health, and environmental risks from pests and pest management strategies. There are questions about the long-term success of IPM programs in relation to continued use of pesticides in agriculture. Total pounds of pesticides applied is a mis-measure of the impact of IPM in agriculture. A more complete measurement of the long-term impact of IPM includes consideration of changes in agricultural production practices and productivity, toxicity of the pesticides used, risks from human exposure to pesticides, and environmental sampling for pesticides in air and water resources. In recent decades, agricultural IPM programs have evolved to address invasive pests, shifts in endemic pest pressures, reductions in pest damage tolerance in markets, and increases in crop yields. Additionally, pesticide use data from Arizona and California revealed reduced use of pesticides in some toxicity categories but increased use of pesticides in a couple of categories. Data from federal and California programs that monitored pesticide residue on food have documented low pesticide risk to consumers. Environmental monitoring programs documented decreased pesticide levels in surface water resources in agricultural watersheds in the western United States and low levels of pesticides in air resources in agricultural areas in California. The focus of IPM assessment should be on reducing economic, human health, and environmental risks, not on pounds of pesticides applied. More broadly, IPM programs have evolved to address changes in pests and agricultural production systems while continuing to reduce human health and environmental risk from pesticides.

  2. Measuring IPM Impacts in California and Arizona

    PubMed Central

    Farrar, J. J.; Baur, M. E.; Elliott, S. F.

    2016-01-01

    Integrated pest management (IPM) is a method of reducing economic, human health, and environmental risks from pests and pest management strategies. There are questions about the long-term success of IPM programs in relation to continued use of pesticides in agriculture. Total pounds of pesticides applied is a mis-measure of the impact of IPM in agriculture. A more complete measurement of the long-term impact of IPM includes consideration of changes in agricultural production practices and productivity, toxicity of the pesticides used, risks from human exposure to pesticides, and environmental sampling for pesticides in air and water resources. In recent decades, agricultural IPM programs have evolved to address invasive pests, shifts in endemic pest pressures, reductions in pest damage tolerance in markets, and increases in crop yields. Additionally, pesticide use data from Arizona and California revealed reduced use of pesticides in some toxicity categories but increased use of pesticides in a couple of categories. Data from federal and California programs that monitored pesticide residue on food have documented low pesticide risk to consumers. Environmental monitoring programs documented decreased pesticide levels in surface water resources in agricultural watersheds in the western United States and low levels of pesticides in air resources in agricultural areas in California. The focus of IPM assessment should be on reducing economic, human health, and environmental risks, not on pounds of pesticides applied. More broadly, IPM programs have evolved to address changes in pests and agricultural production systems while continuing to reduce human health and environmental risk from pesticides. PMID:27812396

  3. A Comparison of Advanced Placement Scores for Hispanic Students from California, Texas, and Arizona

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Bevan M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: One purpose of this study was to analyze the overall AP exam performance of Hispanic students of Mexican origin from California, Texas, and Arizona. A second purpose was to conduct a comparison of Hispanic student exam scores from California, Texas, and Arizona on mathematics and English exams. Specifically, the performance of Hispanic…

  4. 75 FR 64681 - Pistachios Grown in California, Arizona, and New Mexico; Continuance Referendum

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-20

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 983 Pistachios Grown in California..., Arizona, and New Mexico pistachio producers to determine whether they favor continuance of the marketing order regulating the handling of pistachios grown in California, Arizona, and New Mexico. DATES:...

  5. Baseline susceptibility of Bemisia tabaci B biotype (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) populations from California and Arizona to spiromesifen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Susceptibility to spiromesifen, a tetronic acid derivative, was determined for three imidacloprid-resistant strains and 12 geographically discrete natural populations of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (= Bemisia argentifolii Bellows and Perring) from California and Arizona by laboratory bioassays. Newl...

  6. Host plant resistance in melon to sweetpotato whitefly in California and Arizona

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sweetpotato whitefly biotype B (MEAM1 cryptic species of Bemisia tabaci; SPWF) feeding severely impacts fall season melon (Cucumis melo L.) yield and quality in the lower deserts of California and Arizona. Melon accessions PI 313970 and TGR 1551 (PI 482420) have been reported to exhibit host plant r...

  7. Host plant resistance in melon (Cucumis melo L.) to sweetpotato whitefly in California and Arizona

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sweetpotato whitefly (MEAM1 cryptic species of Bemisia tabaci; SPWF) feeding severely impacts fall season melon yield and quality in the lower deserts of California and Arizona. Melon accessions PI 313970 and TGR 1551 (PI 482420) have been reported to exhibit host plant resistance (HPR) to SPWF. Pot...

  8. 77 FR 21841 - Pistachios Grown in California, Arizona, and New Mexico; Decreased Assessment Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-12

    ... / Thursday, April 12, 2012 / Rules and Regulations#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 983 Pistachios Grown in California, Arizona, and New Mexico; Decreased Assessment Rate...: The Department of Agriculture (USDA) is adopting, as a final rule, without change, an interim...

  9. 76 FR 34181 - Pistachios Grown in California, Arizona, and New Mexico; Proposed Amendments to Marketing Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-13

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 983 Pistachios Grown in California, Arizona, and New Mexico; Proposed Amendments to Marketing Order AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: Four amendments to Marketing Agreement and Order No. 983, which regulates the handling of...

  10. 76 FR 60361 - Pistachios Grown in California, Arizona, and New Mexico; Decreased Assessment Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 983 Pistachios Grown in California, Arizona, and New Mexico; Decreased Assessment Rate AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Interim rule with request... per pound of assessed weight pistachios. The Committee locally administers the marketing order...

  11. Temperature logs of wells and test wells in the Yuma area, Arizona and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olmsted, F.H.

    1980-01-01

    This report consists of 310 temperature logs made in 266 wells and test wells in the Yuma area, Arizona and California during 1963-69. The work was done as part of a geohydrologic study, the results of which are reported in the 1973 U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 486-H; Geohydrology of the Yuma Area, Arizona and California, by Olmsted, Loeltz, and Irelan. Most of the logs are plotted from temperatures measured with two Whitney thermistors at depth intervals of 2 to 20 feet in downward succession in each well or test hole, using land surface as datum. A few logs were made with a truck-mounted wireline logger using thermistor probes and continuously recording equipment. All measurements were in degrees Fahrenheit, later converted to degrees Celsius, and were calibrated with a mercury-in-glass thermometer. Accuracy of most of the measurements was + or - 1.0F and precision was about + or - 0.2F. (USGS)

  12. Lead poisoning and the reintroduction of the California condor in northern Arizona.

    PubMed

    Hunt, W Grainger; Parish, Christopher N; Orr, Kathy; Aguilar, Roberto F

    2009-06-01

    Since 1996, The Peregrine Fund has released California condors (Gymnogyps californianus) in the Grand Canyon region of northern Arizona with the goal of establishing a self-sustaining population, disjunct from other released populations in California and Baja California. A free-ranging population of more than 60 individuals now ranges within northern Arizona and southern Utah and has produced 9 wild young. The most frequent cause of death is lead poisoning from the ingestion of lead bullet fragments and shotgun pellets in the remains of gun-killed animals. In response, the Arizona Game and Fish Department has effectively reduced lead occurrence within the foraging range of the condors through hunter education and the promotion of nonlead ammunition. Most hunters have participated in the program. Throughout the course of the reintroduction effort, veterinary science and application have played essential roles in diagnosing fatalities and treating lead-exposed condors, a species with such a low natural reproductive rate that every adult is significant to the population.

  13. Geologic Map of the Needles 7.5' Quadrangle, California and Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malmon, Daniel V.; Howard, Keith A.; Priest, Susan S.

    2009-01-01

    The Needles 7.5' quadrangle straddles the Colorado River in the southern part of the Mohave Valley, in Mohave County, Arizona, and San Bernardino County, California. The quadrangle contains part of the Havasu National Wildlife Refuge, sections of the Fort Mojave Indian Reservation, most of the city of Needles, and several major interstate highways and railroads. The quadrangle is underlain by structurally undeformed sediments of Pliocene and younger age that were deposited by the Colorado River, as well as alluvial fan deposits on the piedmonts that flank the Black Mountains (in Arizona) and the Sacramento Mountains (in California). Multiple cycles of aggradation of the Colorado River, each followed by episodes of downcutting, are recorded by Pliocene through historic deposits on the piedmonts that border the floodplain. Regionally, the complex stratigraphy related to the Colorado River has been the subject of geologic interest for over 150 years. The California and Arizona piedmont portions of the Needles quadrangle expose a subset of this incompletely understood stratigraphic record. Thus, the stratigraphic sequence presented on this map is a version of the stratigraphy of the Colorado River as interpreted locally. The deposits in the recently active Colorado River valley floor support riparian habitat and irrigated agriculture. The distributions of sand-rich channel deposits and mud-rich floodplain deposits in the valley are mapped on the basis of the history of the movement of the Colorado River in the quadrangle, which has been documented in sequential aerial photographs since 1937 and maps dating to 1857.

  14. Structural and stratigraphic evolution of late Cretaceous convergent margins of southern Alaska and California

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, T.H.

    1988-02-01

    The most prominent and well-preserved remnants of the convergent margins are present in southern Alaska and California. The southern Alaska convergent margin appears to have developed in response to northward-directed subduction of the Kula plate and the California margin in response to eastward-directed subduction of the Farallon plate. The chief elements of the southern Alaska convergent margin, on the basis of paleomagnetic data, appear to have subsequently migrated northward and rotated in the post-Cretaceous. The chief elements of the California margin have been disrupted by Neogene strike-slip displacements on the San Andreas fault system and accretion of younger terranes to the west. In both southern Alaska and California, the forearc-basin deposits are well preserved and produce major amounts of gas. The principal reservoirs in Alaska are Tertiary nonmarine deposits and in California are Late Cretaceous and Tertiary deep marine and deltaic deposits. The accretionary wedge in southern Alaska forms a remarkably well-preserved assemblage of trench and trench-slope deposits that extend for about 2000 km along the Gulf of Alaska, flanked oceanward by younger accreted terranes. The accretionary wedge in California consists of a great variety of older and younger terranes, including some fragments of ocean crust that originated in southern latitudes. Comparative structural and stratigraphic analyses of the two Late Cretaceous margins reveals the complexity of tectonic, depositional, and stratigraphic patterns associated with subduction of very large oceanic plates at the margins of very large continental plates.

  15. Western Pine Beetle Populations in Arizona and California Differ in the Composition of Their Aggregation Pheromones.

    PubMed

    Pureswaran, Deepa S; Hofstetter, Richard W; Sullivan, Brian T; Grady, Amanda M; Brownie, Cavell

    2016-05-01

    We compared pheromone production and response for populations of western pine beetle, Dendroctonus brevicomis LeConte, from sites in northern Arizona and northern California. Volatiles were collected from individuals of both sexes that had mined as a pair in a Pinus ponderosa log for 1 d, and they were subsequently analyzed by gas chromatography coupled to mass-spectrometry. Principal component analysis of quantities of Dendroctonus pheromone components indicated strong site-associated clustering of blend composition for females but not males. Much of the clustering in females evidently was due to differences in the production of endo- and exo-brevicomin, which occurred in average ratios of 0.1:1 and 19:1 for populations in the California and Arizona sites, respectively. In the California site, exo- was better than endo-brevicomin in enhancing trap catches of both sexes to lures containing the host-tree odor α-pinene and the male-produced aggregation pheromone component frontalin. In an identical test in the Arizona site, endo- was a better adjuvant than exo-brevicomin for male attraction, whereas females did not show a significant preference. At neither location were the isomers antagonistic to one another in activity. Thus, one aggregation pheromone has apparently diverged between these populations, concurrent with published evidence that D. brevicomis on either side of the Great Basin are genetically distinct and are possibly different species. Furthermore, production of and response to the isomers of brevicomin by flying Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann in the Arizona site were similar to those of sympatric D. brevicomis. This interspecific signal overlap is likely sustainable since joint species mass-attacks may assist both species in overcoming host defenses, thereby increasing host availability.

  16. Magnetic fabric, flow directions, and source area of the Lower Miocene Peach Springs Tuff in Arizona, California, and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hillhouse, J.W.; Wells, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Uses anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) to define the flow fabric and possible source area of the Peach Springs Tuff, a widespread rhyolitic ash flow tuff in the Mojave Desert and Great Basin of California, Arizona, and Nevada. Lineation and imbrication indicate a source region near the southern tip of Nevada. The optimum intersection of magnetic lineations lies in the southern Black Mountains of Arizona on the eastern side of the Colorado River extensional corridor. -from Authors

  17. Densities of Agrilus auroguttatus and Other Borers in California and Arizona Oaks

    PubMed Central

    Haavik, Laurel J.; Coleman, Tom W.; Flint, Mary Louise; Venette, Robert C.; Seybold, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated within-tree population density of a new invasive species in southern California, the goldspotted oak borer, Agrilus auroguttatus Schaeffer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), with respect to host species and the community of other borers present. We measured emergence hole densities of A. auroguttatus and other borers on the lower stem (bole) of naïve oaks at 18 sites in southern California and on co-evolved oaks at seven sites in southeastern Arizona. We sampled recently dead oaks in an effort to quantify the community of primary and secondary borers associated with mortality—species that were likely to interact with A. auroguttatus. Red oaks (Section Lobatae) produced greater densities of A. auroguttatus than white oaks (Section Quercus). On red oaks, A. auroguttatus significantly outnumbered native borers in California (mean ± SE of 9.6 ± 0.7 versus 4.5 ± 0.6 emergence holes per 0.09 m2 of bark surface), yet this was not the case in Arizona (0.9 ± 0.2 versus 1.1 ± 0.2 emergence holes per 0.09 m2). In California, a species that is taxonomically intermediate between red and white oaks, Quercus chrysolepis (Section Protobalanus), exhibited similar A. auroguttatus emergence densities compared with a co-occurring red oak, Q. kelloggii. As an invasive species in California, A. auroguttatus may affect the community of native borers (mainly Buprestidae and Cerambycidae) that feed on the lower boles of oaks, although it remains unclear whether its impact will be positive or negative. PMID:26462589

  18. Age of the Peach Springs Tuff, southeastern California and western Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nielson, J.E.; Lux, D.R.; Dalrymple, G.B.; Glazner, A.F.

    1990-01-01

    Sanidine separates from pumice of the early Miocene Peach Springs Tuff are concordantly dated at 18.5??0.2 Ma by two isotopic techniques. The Peach Springs Tuff is the only known unit that can be correlated between isolated outcrops of Miocene strata from the central Mojave Desert of southeastern California to the western Colorado Plateau in Arizona, across five structural provinces, a distance of 350 km. Thus, the age of the Peach Springs Tuff is important to structural and paleogeographic reconstructions of a large region. -from Authors

  19. Mammal mortality at Arizona, California, and Nevada gold mines using cyanide extraction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, D.R.; Hothem, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    Five-hundred nineteen mammals were reported dead at cyanide-extraction gold mines in Arizona [USA], California, and Nevada from 1984 through 1989. Most numerous were rodents (34.9%) and bats (33.7%); 'bat' was the most often reported category among 24 species or species groups. There are an estimated 160 cyanide-extraction gold mines in these three states, and the number is increasing. Ten mammal species listed as endangered, threatened, rare, protected, or species of special concern are known to have cyanide-extraction gold mines within their geographic ranges.

  20. Age and diet of fossil California condors in Grand Canyon, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Emslie, S.D.

    1987-08-14

    A dozen new radiocarbon dates, together with a thorough review of its fossil distribution, shed new light on the time and probable cause of extinction of the California condor, Gymnogyps californianus, in Grand Canyon, Arizona. The radiocarbon data indicate that this species became extinct in Grand Canyon, and other parts of the inland West, more than 10,000 years ago in coincidence with the extinction of megafauna (proboscidians, edentates, perissodactyls). That condors relied on the megafauna for food is suggested by the recovery of food bones from a late Pleistocene nest cave in Grand Canyon. These fossil data have relevance to proposed release and recovery programs of the present endangered population of California condors. 19 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  1. Age and diet of fossil california condors in grand canyon, Arizona.

    PubMed

    Emslie, S D

    1987-08-14

    A dozen new radiocarbon dates, together with a thorough review of its fossil distribution, shed new light on the time and probable cause of extinction of the California condor, Gymnogyps californianus, in Grand Canyon, Arizona. The radiocarbon data indicate that this species became extinct in Grand Canyon, and other parts of the inland West, more than 10,000 years ago in coincidence with the extinction of megafauna (proboscidians, edentates, perissodactyls). That condors relied on the megafauna for food is suggested by the recovery of food bones from a late Pleistocene nest cave in Grand Canyon. These fossil data have relevance to proposed release and recovery programs of the present endangered population of California condors.

  2. Enhancing drought resilience with conjunctive use and managed aquifer recharge in California and Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scanlon, Bridget R.; Reedy, Robert C.; Faunt, Claudia; Pool, Donald R.; Uhlman, Kristine;

    2016-01-01

    Projected longer‐term droughts and intense floods underscore the need to store more water to manage climate extremes. Here we show how depleted aquifers have been used to store water by substituting surface water use for groundwater pumpage (conjunctive use, CU) or recharging groundwater with surface water (Managed Aquifer Recharge, MAR). Unique multi‐decadal monitoring from thousands of wells and regional modeling datasets for the California Central Valley and central Arizona were used to assess CU and MAR. In addition to natural reservoir capacity related to deep water tables, historical groundwater depletion further expanded aquifer storage by ~44 km3 in the Central Valley and by ~100 km3 in Arizona, similar to or exceeding current surface reservoir capacity by up to three times. Local river water and imported surface water, transported through 100s of km of canals, is substituted for groundwater (≤15 km3/yr, CU) or is used to recharge groundwater (MAR, ≤1.5 km3/yr) during wet years shifting to mostly groundwater pumpage during droughts. In the Central Valley, CU and MAR locally reversed historically declining water‐level trends, which contrasts with simulated net regional groundwater depletion. In Arizona, CU and MAR also reversed historically declining groundwater level trends in Active Management Areas. These rising trends contrast with current declining trends in irrigated areas that lack access to surface water to support CU or MAR. Use of depleted aquifers as reservoirs could expand with winter flood irrigation or capturing flood discharges to the Pacific (0 – 1.6 km3/yr, 2000–2014) with additional infrastructure in California. Because flexibility and expanded portfolio options translate to resilience, CU and MAR enhance drought resilience through multi‐year storage, complementing shorter term surface reservoir storage, and facilitating water markets.

  3. Enhancing drought resilience with conjunctive use and managed aquifer recharge in California and Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, Bridget R.; Reedy, Robert C.; Faunt, Claudia C.; Pool, Donald; Uhlman, Kristine

    2016-03-01

    Projected longer-term droughts and intense floods underscore the need to store more water to manage climate extremes. Here we show how depleted aquifers have been used to store water by substituting surface water use for groundwater pumpage (conjunctive use, CU) or recharging groundwater with surface water (managed aquifer recharge, MAR). Unique multi-decadal monitoring from thousands of wells and regional modeling datasets for the California Central Valley and central Arizona were used to assess CU and MAR. In addition to natural reservoir capacity related to deep water tables, historical groundwater depletion further expanded aquifer storage by ˜44 km3 in the Central Valley and by ˜100 km3 in Arizona, similar to or exceeding current surface reservoir capacity by up to three times. Local river water and imported surface water, transported through 100s of km of canals, is substituted for groundwater (≤15 km3 yr-1, CU) or is used to recharge groundwater (MAR, ≤1.5 km3 yr-1) during wet years shifting to mostly groundwater pumpage during droughts. In the Central Valley, CU and MAR locally reversed historically declining water-level trends, which contrasts with simulated net regional groundwater depletion. In Arizona, CU and MAR also reversed historically declining groundwater level trends in active management areas. These rising trends contrast with current declining trends in irrigated areas that lack access to surface water to support CU or MAR. Use of depleted aquifers as reservoirs could expand with winter flood irrigation or capturing flood discharges to the Pacific (0-1.6 km3 yr-1, 2000-2014) with additional infrastructure in California. Because flexibility and expanded portfolio options translate to resilience, CU and MAR enhance drought resilience through multi-year storage, complementing shorter term surface reservoir storage, and facilitating water markets.

  4. Structural and stratigraphic evolution of late Cretaceous convergent margins of southern Alaska and California

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, T.H.

    1988-01-01

    Large portions of the Late Cretaceous continental margin of western North America were dominated by a convergent tectonic framework characterized by the development of trenches, accretionary wedges, forearc basins, magmatic arcs, and back arc basins. The most prominent and well-preserved remnants of the convergent margins are present in southern Alaska and California. The southern Alaska convergent margin appears to have developed in response to northward-directed subduction of the Kula plate and the California margin in response to eastward-directed subduction of the Farallon plate. The chief elements of the southern Alaska convergent margin, on the basis of paleomagnetic data, appear to have subsequently migrated northward and rotated in the post-Cretaceous. The chief elements of the California margin have been disrupted by Neogene strike-slip displacements on the San Andreas fault system and accretion of younger terranes to the west. In both southern Alaska and California, the forearc-basin deposits are well preserved and produce major amounts of gas. The principle reservoirs in Alaska are Tertiary nonmarine deposits and in California are Late Cretaceous and Tertiary deep marine and deltaic deposits.

  5. 77 FR 36119 - Pistachios Grown in California, Arizona, and New Mexico; Order Amending Marketing Order No. 983

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-18

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 983 Pistachios Grown in California, Arizona, and New Mexico; Order Amending Marketing Order No. 983 AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This final rule amends Marketing Agreement and Order No. 983 (order), which regulates the handling...

  6. Advanced Placement English Exam Scores: A Comparison of Scores for Hispanic Students from California, Texas, and Arizona

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Bevan; Slate, John R.; Moore, George W.

    2016-01-01

    We compared the performance of Hispanic students from California, Texas, and Arizona on the two Advanced Placement (AP) English exams (i.e., English Language and Composition and English Literature and Composition) using archival data from the College Board from 1997 through 2012. Pearson chi-square tests yielded statistically significant…

  7. Comparison of organochlorine contaminants among sea otter (Enhydra lutris) populations in California and Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, C.E.; Jarman, W.M.; Estes, J.A.; Simon, M.; Norstrom, R.J.

    1999-03-01

    Organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) including non-ortho PCBs, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) were measured in sea otter liver tissue from California, southeast Alaska, and the western Aleutian archipelago collected between 1988 and 1992. Average total dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane concentrations for California otters were over 20 times higher than in Aleutian otters and over 800 times higher than otters from southeast Alaska. Levels for total PCBs in Aleutian otters were 1.7 times higher than levels in California otters and 38 times higher than otters from southeast Alaska. Levels for PCDD and PCDF were extremely low in all otter populations. Levels of PCBs in Aleutian and Californian otters are abnormally high when compared with southeast Alaskan otters. The source of PCBs to the Aleutian Islands remains unclear and vital to understanding the potential impacts to sea otters.

  8. Tertiary basin development and tectonic implications, Whipple detachment system, Colorado River extensional corridor, California and Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielson, J. E.; Beratan, K. K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on geologic mapping, stratigraphic and structural observations, and radiometric dating of Miocene deposits of the Whipple detachment system, Colorado River extensional corridor of California and Arizona. From these data, four regions are distinguished in the study area that correspond to four Miocene depositional basins. It is shown that these basins developed in about the same positions, relative to each other and to volcanic sources, as they occupy at present. They formed in the early Miocene from a segmentation of the upper crust into blocks bounded by high-angle faults that trended both parallel and perpendicular to the direction of extension and which were terminated at middle crustal depths by a low-angle detachment fault.

  9. Geologic setting and tertiary structural evolution of southwestern Arizona and southeastern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrod, David R.; Tosdal, Richard M.

    1991-07-01

    Volcanic and sedimentary rocks and structures record the Tertiary structural evolution of the lower Colorado River region in southwestern Arizona and southeastern California. A late Eocene or early Oligocene (prior to ˜33 Ma) episode of faulting is indicated by medium- to coarse-grained arkosic rocks in the Chocolate and southern Trigo Mountains. Much of the area was relatively quiescent tectonically during extrusion of volcanic rocks from ˜33 to 22 Ma, but the southernmost part was periodically uplifted and eroded into its underlying crystalline rocks. A major episode of extensional deformation and tilting occurred after deposition of welded tuff about 22 Ma and affected the entire area from the Palo Verde Mountains on the west to the Kofa Mountains on the east. Extension-related faulting quickly waned and had largely ceased by about 20 Ma in the Kofa Mountains; elsewhere the timing is poorly constrained. By ˜13 Ma, thick alluvial fans filled many grabens and half grabens among tilted fault blocks throughout the area. Volcanism in the lower Colorado River region may have been coincident with a broad structural depression now oriented east-west. The northern limit of the volcanic terrane defines a tilt-domain boundary. The northern boundary, reaching from the New Water Mountains in Arizona to the little Chuckwalla Mountains in California, ultimately evolved to separate a terrane of relatively untilted crystalline horsts on the north from a series of east or northeast dipping fault blocks on the south. The southern margin is less well defined but is subparallel to the northern boundary and to the Chocolate Mountains anticlinorium.

  10. Use of Landsat Thematic Mapper images in regional correlation of syntectonic strata, Colorado river extensional corridor, California and Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beratan, K. K.; Blom, R. G.; Crippen, R. E.; Nielson, J. E.

    1990-01-01

    Enhanced Landsat TM images were used in conjunction with field work to investigate the regional correlation of Miocene rocks in the Colorado River extensional corridor of California and Arizona. Based on field investigations, four sequences of sedimentary and volcanic strata could be recognized in the Mohave Mountains (Arizona) and the eastern Whipple Mountains (California), which display significantly different relative volumes and organization of lithologies. The four sequences were also found to have distinctive appearances on the TM image. The recognition criteria derived from field mapping and image interpretation in the Mohave Mountains and Whipple Mountains were applied to an adjacent area in which stratigraphic affinities were less well known. The results of subsequent field work confirmed the stratigraphic and structural relations suggested by the Tm image analysis.

  11. Palinspastic reconstruction of southeastern California and southwestern Arizona for the middle Miocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Stephen M.

    1992-12-01

    A paleogeographic reconstruction of southeastern California and southwestern Arizona at 10 Ma was made based on available geologic and geophysical data. Clockwise rotation of 39 deg was reconstructed in the eastern Transverse Ranges, consistent with paleomagnetic data from late Miocene volcanic rocks, and with slip estimates for left-lateral faults within the eastern Transverse Ranges and NW-trending right lateral faults in the Mojave Desert. This domain of rotated rocks is bounded by the Pinto Mountain fault on the north. In the absence of evidence for rotation of the San Bernardino Mountains or for significant right slip faults within the San Bernardino Mountains, the model requires that the late Miocene Pinto Mountain fault become a thrust fault gaining displacement to the west. The Squaw Peak thrust system of Meisling and Weldon may be a western continuation of this fault system. The Sheep Hole fault bounds the rotating domain on the east. East of this fault an array of NW-trending right slip faults and south-trending extensional transfer zones has produced a basin and range physiography while accumulating up to 14 km of right slip. This maximum is significantly less than the 37.5 km of right slip required in this region by a recent reconstruction of the central Mojave Desert. Geologic relations along the southern boundary of the rotating domain are poorly known, but this boundary is interpreted to involve a series of curved strike slip faults and non-coaxial extension, bounded on the southeast by the Mammoth Wash and related faults in the eastern Chocolate Mountains. Available constraints on timing suggest that Quaternary movement on the Pinto Mountain and nearby faults is unrelated to the rotation of the eastern Transverse Ranges, and was preceded by a hiatus during part of Pliocene time which followed the deformation producing the rotation. The reconstructed Clemens Well fault in the Orocopia Mountains, proposed as a major early Miocene strand of the San

  12. Palinspastic reconstruction of southeastern California and southwestern Arizona for the middle Miocene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, Stephen M.

    1992-01-01

    A paleogeographic reconstruction of southeastern California and southwestern Arizona at 10 Ma was made based on available geologic and geophysical data. Clockwise rotation of 39 deg was reconstructed in the eastern Transverse Ranges, consistent with paleomagnetic data from late Miocene volcanic rocks, and with slip estimates for left-lateral faults within the eastern Transverse Ranges and NW-trending right lateral faults in the Mojave Desert. This domain of rotated rocks is bounded by the Pinto Mountain fault on the north. In the absence of evidence for rotation of the San Bernardino Mountains or for significant right slip faults within the San Bernardino Mountains, the model requires that the late Miocene Pinto Mountain fault become a thrust fault gaining displacement to the west. The Squaw Peak thrust system of Meisling and Weldon may be a western continuation of this fault system. The Sheep Hole fault bounds the rotating domain on the east. East of this fault an array of NW-trending right slip faults and south-trending extensional transfer zones has produced a basin and range physiography while accumulating up to 14 km of right slip. This maximum is significantly less than the 37.5 km of right slip required in this region by a recent reconstruction of the central Mojave Desert. Geologic relations along the southern boundary of the rotating domain are poorly known, but this boundary is interpreted to involve a series of curved strike slip faults and non-coaxial extension, bounded on the southeast by the Mammoth Wash and related faults in the eastern Chocolate Mountains. Available constraints on timing suggest that Quaternary movement on the Pinto Mountain and nearby faults is unrelated to the rotation of the eastern Transverse Ranges, and was preceded by a hiatus during part of Pliocene time which followed the deformation producing the rotation. The reconstructed Clemens Well fault in the Orocopia Mountains, proposed as a major early Miocene strand of the San

  13. Evapotranspiration estimates using remote-sensing data, Parker and Palo Verde valleys, Arizona and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raymond, Lee H.; Rezin, Kelly V.

    1989-01-01

    In 1981 the U.S. Geological Survey established an experimental project to assess the possible and practical use of remote-sensing data to estimate evapotranspiration as an approximation of consumptive use of water in the lower Colorado River flood plain. The project area was in Parker Valley, Arizona. The approach selected was to measure the areas covered by each type of vegetation, using remote-sensing data in various types of analyses, and to multiply each area by a predetermined water-use rate. Two calibration and six remote-sensing methods of classifying crop types were compared for cost, accuracy, consistency, and labor requirements. Included were one method each for field reconnaissance using 1982 data, low-altitude (less than 5,000 feet) aerial photography using 1982 data, and visual photointerpretation of Landsat satellite images using 1981 and 1982 data; two methods for medium-altitude (15,000-18,000 feet) aerial photography using 1982 data; and three methods for digital Landsat satellite images using 1981 data. A test of the most promising digital-processing method, which used three image dates, was made in part of Palo Verde Valley, California, where 1981 crop data were more complete than in Parker Valley. Of the eight methods studied, the two-date digital-processing method was the most consistent and least labor intensive for identifying two or three major crops; visual photointerpretation of Landsat images was the least expensive. Evapotranspiration estimates from crop classifications by all methods differed by a maximum of 6 percent. Total evapotranspiration calculated from crop data and phreatophyte maps in 1981 ranged from 11 percent lower in Palo Verde Valley to 17 percent lower in Parker Valley than consumptive use calculated by water budgets. The difference was greater in Parker Valley because the winter crop data were not included.

  14. Evapotranspiration estimates using remote-sensing data, Parker and Palo Verde valleys, Arizona and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raymond, L.H.; Rezin, K.V.

    1986-01-01

    In 1981 the U.S. Geological Survey established an experimental project to assess the possible and practical use of remote sensing data to estimate evapotranspiration as an approximation of consumptive use in the lower Colorado River flood plain. The project area was in Parker Valley, Arizona. The approach selected was to measure the areas covered by each type of vegetation using remote sensing data in various types of analyses and to multiply each area by a predetermined water use rate. Two calibration and six remote sensing methods of classifying crop types were compared for cost, accuracy, consistency, and labor requirements. Included were one method each for field reconnaissance using 1982 data, low altitude (< than 5,000 ft) aerial photography using 1982 data, and visual photointerpretation of Landsat satellite images using 1981 and 1982 data; two methods for medium-altitude (15,000-18,000 ft) aerial photography using 1982 data; and three methods for digital Landsat satellite images using 1981 data. A test of the most promising digital processing method, which used three image dates, was made in part of Palo Verde Valley, California, where 1981 crop data were more complete than in Parker Valley. Of the eight methods studied, the three-date digital processing method was the most consistent and least labor-intensive; visual photointerpretation of Landsat images was the least expensive. Evapotranspiration estimates from crop classifications by all methods differed by a maximum of 6%. Total evapotranspiration calculated from crop data and phreatophyte maps in 1981 ranged from 12% lower in Palo Verde Valley to 17% lower in Parker Valley than consumptive use calculated by water budgets. The difference was greater in Parker Valley because the winter crop data were not included. (Author 's abstract)

  15. Monitoring changes in Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) susceptibility to neonicotinoid insecticides in Arizona and California.

    PubMed

    Castle, S J; Prabhaker, N

    2013-06-01

    Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) biotype B is a highly prolific and polyphagous whitefly that established in much of North America during the 1980s. Neonicotinoid insecticides have been fundamental in regaining control over outbreak populations of B. tabaci, but resistance threatens their sustainability. Susceptibility of B. tabaci in the southwestern United States to four neonicotinoid insecticides varied considerably across populations within each year over a 3 yr period. Using a variability ratio of highest LC50 to lowest LC50 in field-collected whitefly adults from Arizona and California, the ranges of LC50(s) across all tests within compounds were highest to imidacloprid and lowest to thiamethoxam. Patterns of susceptibility were similar among all four neonicotinoid insecticides, but the greater variability in responses to imidacloprid and significantly higher LC50(s) attained indicated higher resistance levels to imidacloprid in all field populations. Further evidence of differential toxicities of neonicotinoids was observed in multiple tests of dinotefuran against imidacloprid-resistant lab strains that yielded significant differences in the LC50(s) of dinotefuran and imidacloprid in simultaneous bioassays. To test the possibility that resistance expression in field-collected insects was sometimes masked by stressful conditions, field strains cultured in a greenhouse without insecticide exposure produced significantly higher LC50(s) to all neonicotinoids compared with LC50(s) attained directly from the field. In harsh climates such as the American southwest, resistance expression in field-collected test insects may be strongly influenced by environmental stresses such as high temperatures, overcrowding, and declining host plant quality.

  16. Age of the Peach Springs Tuff, southeastern California and western Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, J.E.; Dalrymple, G.B. ); Lux, D.R. ); Glazner, A.F. )

    1990-01-10

    Sanidine separates from pumice of the early Miocene Peach Springs Tuff (PST) are concordantly dated at 18.5 {plus minus} 0.2 Ma by two isotopic techniques. The PST is the only known unit that can be correlated between isolated outcrops of Miocene strata from the central Mojave Desert of southeastern California to the western Colorado Plateau in Arizona, across five structural provinces, a distance of 350 km. Thus the age of the PST is important to structural and paleogeographic reconstructions of a large region. Biotite and sanidine separates from bulk samples of the PST from zones of welding and vapor-phase alteration have not produced consistent ages by the K-Ar method. Published ages of mineral separates from 17 localities ranged from 16.2 to 20.5 Ma. Discordant {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar incremental release spectra were obtained for one biotite and two of the sanidine separates. Ages that correspond to the last gas increments are old as 27 Ma. The {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar incremental release determinations on sanidine separated from blocks of PST pumice yield ages of 18.3 {plus minus} 0.3 and 18.6 {plus minus} 0.4 Ma. Laser fusion measurements yield a mean age of 18.51 {plus minus} 0.10. The results suggest that sanidine and biotite K-Ar ages older than about 18.5 Ma are due to inherited Ar from pre-Tertiary contaminants, which likely were incorporated into the tuff during deposition. Sanidine K-Ar ages younger than 18 Ma probably indicate incomplete extraction of radiogenic {sup 40}Ar, whereas laser fusion dates of biotite and hornblende younger than 18 Ma likely are due to postdepositional alteration.

  17. Constraints on the tectonics of the Mule Mountains thrust system, southeast California and southwest Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Tosdal, R.M. )

    1990-11-10

    The Mule Mountains thrust system crops out discontinuously over a 100-km-strike length in the Blythe-Quartzsite region of southeast California and southwest Arizona. Along the thrust system, middle and upper crustal metamorphic and plutonic rocks of Proterozoic and Mesozoic age are thrust north-northeastward (015{degree} to 035{degree}) over a lower plate metamorphic terrane that formed part of the Proterozoic North American craton, its Paleozoic sedimentary rock cover, overlying Mesozoic volcanic and sedimentary rocks, and the intruding Jurassic and Cretaceous granitic rocks. Stratigraphic, petrologic, and Pb isotopic ties for Jurassic granitoids and for Jurassic( ) and Cretaceous sedimentary rocks across the various parts of the thrust system indicate that related crustal blocks are superposed and preclude it from having large displacements. The thick-skinned thrust system is structurally symmetrical along its length with a central domain of synmetamorphic thrust faults that are flanked by western and eastern domains where lower plate domains where lower plate synclines underlie the thrusts. Deformation occurred under low greenschist facies metamorphic conditions in the upper crust. Movement along the thrust system was probably limited to no more than a few tens of kilometers and occurred between 79{plus minus}2 Ma and 70{plus minus}4 Ma. The superposition of related rocks and the geometry of the thrust system preclude it from being a major tectonic boundary of post-Middle Jurassic age, as has been previously proposed. Rather, the thrust system forms the southern boundary of the narrow zone of Cretaceous intracratonic deformation, and it is one of the last tectonic events in the zone prior to regional cooling.

  18. Field and geochemical investigations of the Peach Springs Tuff, southeastern California, western Arizona, and southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Buesch, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    Three separate studies are presented that involve the 18.5 Ma Peach Springs Tuff (PST), a wide-spread ignimbrite exposed in southeastern California, western Arizona, and southern Nevada. In Chapter I, electron microprobe analyses of feldspar phenocrysts in the PST and three other ignimbrites show that the feldspar geochemistry can distinguish the tephra units. Chapter 2 presents a detailed physical volcanology study of the formation of multiple lithic breccia horizons in the PST at a location at least 140 km from the proposed vent area. A model is proposed whereby (1) locally derived lithic fragments are incorporated into the boundary layer of the ash-rich pyroclastic flow, (2) the boundary layer decouples from the ash-rich pyroclastic flow, (3) lithic-laden density driven pyroclastic flows sweep down local topography, and (4) intermingle with the ash-rich pyroclastic flow in the valley bottoms. The lithic breccias are very similar in grain size, texture, and structure to breccias located in near vent regions and care must be taken when interpreting ancient breccia deposits. The influence on sedimentation in post-PST depositional environments is evaluated in Chapter 3. Criteria are used to infer that deposition was (1) shortly after deposition, or (2) an indeterminate amount of time after deposition of the PST. Lithofacies in pre- and post-PST sedimentary rocks show there is a thinning and fining upward trend in nearly all environments, except in narrow valleys adjacent to areas of high relief. The inferred shifts in depositional environments resulted from the lowering of the local base level in response to filling basins with ignimbrite. Formation of partially to densely welded tuff, and development of a vapor-phase lithified cap of nonwelded tuff (1) reduces incision by streams, (2) promotes lateral cutting of the streams and subsequent stripping of the nonwelded nonlithified tuff, and (3) significantly reduces the amount of tephra that can be eroded.

  19. Correlation of the Peach Springs Tuff, a large-volume Miocene ignimbrite sheet in California and Arizona ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glazner, A.F.; Nielson, J.E.; Howard, K.A.; Miller, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    The Peach Springs Tuff is a distinctive early Miocene ignimbrite deposit that was first recognized in western Arizona. Recent field studies and phenocryst analyses indicate that adjacent outcrops of similar tuff in the central and eastern Mojave Desert may be correlative. This proposed correlation implies that outcrops of the tuff are scattered over an area of at least 35 000 km2 from the western Colorado Plateau to Barstow, California, and that the erupted volume, allowing for posteruption crustal extension, was at least several hundred cubic kilometres. Thus, the Peach Springs Tuff may be a regional stratigraphic marker, useful for determining regional paleogeography and the time and extent of Tertiary crustal extension. -Authors

  20. Spatio-temporal covariability in coho salmon ( Oncorhynchus kisutch) survival, from California to southeast Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, Steven L. H.; Botsford, Louis W.; Hastings, Alan

    2009-12-01

    One of the motivations of the GLOBEC Northeast Pacific program is to understand the apparent inverse relationship between the increase in salmon catches in the Gulf of Alaska and concurrent declines in the California Current System (CCS). We therefore used coded wire tag (CWT) data to examine the spatial and temporal patterns of covariability in the survival of hatchery coho salmon along the coast from California to southeast Alaska between release years 1980 and 2004. There is substantial covariability in coho salmon survival between neighboring regions along the coast, and there is clear evidence for increased covariability within two main groups - a northern and southern group. The dividing line between the groups lies approximately at the north end of Vancouver Island. However, CWT survivals do not support inverse covariability in hatchery coho salmon survival between southeast Alaska and the CCS over this 25 year time span. Instead, the hatchery coho survival in southeast Alaska is relatively uncorrelated with coho survival in the California Current System on inter-annual time scales. The 50% correlation and e-folding scales (distances at which magnitude of correlations decreases to 50% and e -1 (32.8%), respectively) of pairwise correlations between individual hatcheries were 150 and 217 km, which are smaller than that reported for sockeye, pink, and chum salmon. The 50% correlation scale of coho salmon is also substantially smaller than those reported for upwelling indices and sea surface temperature. There are also periods of 5-10 years with high covariability between adjacent regions on the scale of hundreds of km, which may be of biological and physical significance.

  1. Can We Mitigate Climate Extremes using Managed Aquifer Recharge: Case Studies California Central Valley and South-Central Arizona, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, B. R.; Reedy, R. C.; Faunt, C. C.; Pool, D. R.; Uhlman, K.

    2015-12-01

    Frequent long-term droughts interspersed with intense floods in the southwestern U.S. underscore the need to store more water to manage these climate extremes. Here we show how managed aquifer recharge can enhance drought resilience in the southwestern U.S. with ~ 70% of California under extreme drought and 75% of Arizona under moderate drought. Data on water sources, transportation, and users were compiled for managed aquifer recharge systems in the Central Valley and south-central Arizona. Groundwater depletion of 115 to 145 km3 in the 1900s created large subsurface reservoirs in thick alluvial basins in these regions. Large canals and aqueducts up to several 100 km long allow water to be imported from reservoirs, mostly in more humid regions. Imported water is either used instead of groundwater or is applied in surface spreading basins primarily during wet periods (≤1.3 km3/yr Central Valley, ≤0.7 km3/yr Arizona) and is extracted during droughts. The dominant water users include irrigators and municipalities both within and outside the managed aquifer recharge systems. Groundwater modeling indicates that recharge basins significantly increase groundwater storage in the Central Valley. Managed aquifer recharge systems significantly enhance drought resilience and increase sustainability of water resources in semiarid regions, complementing surface water reservoirs and conjunctive surface water/groundwater use by providing longer term storage.

  2. Geologic map of the Topock 7.5’ quadrangle, Arizona and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, Keith A.; John, Barbara E.; Nielson, Jane E.; Miller, Julia M.G.; Wooden, Joseph L.

    2013-01-01

    The Topock quadrangle exposes a structurally complex part of the Colorado River extensional corridor and also exposes deposits that record landscape evolution during the history of the Colorado River. Paleoproterozoic gneisses and Mesoproterozoic granitoids and intrusive sheets are exposed through tilted cross-sectional thicknesses of many kilometers. Intruding them are a series of Mesozoic to Tertiary igneous rocks including dismembered parts of the Late Cretaceous Chemehuevi Mountains Plutonic Suite. Plutons of this suite in Arizona, if structurally restored for Miocene extension, formed cupolas capping the Chemehuevi Mountains batholith in California. Thick (1–3 km) Miocene sections of volcanic rocks, sedimentary breccias, conglomerate, and sandstone rest nonconformably on the Proterozoic rocks and record the structural and depositional evolution of the Colorado River extensional corridor. Four major Miocene low-angle normal faults and a steep block-bounding fault that developed during this episode divide the deformed rocks of the quadrangle into major structural plates and tilted blocks in and east of the Chemehuevi Mountains core complex. The low-angle faults attenuate crustal section, superposing supracrustal and upper crustal rocks against gneisses and granitoids originally from deeper crustal levels. The transverse block-bounding Gold Dome Fault Zone juxtaposes two large hanging-wall blocks, each tilted 90°, and the fault zone splays at its tip into folds in layered Miocene rocks. A synfaulting intrusion occupies the triangular zone where the folded strata detached from an inside corner along this fault between the tilt blocks. Post-extensional upper Miocene to Quaternary strata, locally deformed, record post-extensional landscape evolution, including several Pliocene and younger aggradational episodes in the Colorado River valley and intervening degradation episodes. The aggradational sequences include (1) the Bouse Formation, (2) fluvial deposits

  3. Sequentially and alternatively developed heights for two representative bench marks: near Palmdale, California and along the Bill Williams River, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilmore, Thomas D.; Elliot, Michael R.

    1985-01-01

    This report consists chiefly of 41 tables that both describe and fully document the reconstructions of a series of alternately developed heights based on levelings leading into two representative bench marks in the southwestern United States. One of these marks, 3219, Vincent, California (fig. 1), lies within the area of the Pacific-North American plate boundary; the other, 22Q, Bill Williams River, Arizona (fig. 1), falls within what is believed to be a singularly stable section of southwestern Arizona. Because the levelings that produced these heights were characterized by especially disparate routes with respect to both terrain and climate, the resulting heights provide a test for the existence and magnitude of path-dependent error in geodetic leveling. These two marks were chosen both because of their relative stability with respect to adjacent marks and because their tectonic stability (or instability) can be inferred from the geologic record. Specifically, we can reasonably speculate that 3219 may have sustained measurably significant tectonic displacements during the 20th century, whereas 22Q probably has remained virtually invariant with respect to any fixed datum during the same period. Bench mark 3219 is a standard Geological Survey iron post stamped "3219" near the Southern Pacific Railroad station at Vincent (U.S. Geological Survey, 1898, p. 392); 22Q is a brass cap stamped "22Q (MWD)" set in a concrete post located in a gully immediately north of the Bill Williams River, Arizona (USC&GS Quad. 34114). 3219 was established by the Geological Survey no later than 1897 (Gannett and Baldwin, 1907, p. 365); 22Q was established by the Metropolitan Water District of southern California in advance of the 1931 control surveys along the projected route of the Colorado River Aqueduct.

  4. Geologic Utility of LANSDAT-4 TM Data. [Death Valley, California and the Silver Bell area of southern Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M.; Kahle, A. B.; Gillespie, A.; Conel, J.; Lang, H.

    1985-01-01

    The performance of the TM vis-a-vis various geological applications was quantified by analyzing: (1) the geological utility of the data with respect to the increased spatial resolution and number of bands (compared to the MSS); (2) the geometric accuracy; (3) the radiometric performance of the TM scanner. Preliminary analyses were performed on TM scenes: over Death Valley, California, and over southern Arizona. Both scenes were acquired in CCT-PT format, where the data were geometrically and radiometrically corrected. Overall, the TM data appears to contain a marked increase in geologically useful information; however, a number of instrumental or processing artifacts may well limit the ability of the geologist to fully extract this information.

  5. Database for the east half of "Preliminary Geologic Map of the Blythe 30' by 60' quadrangle, California and Arizona"

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, Paul

    2006-01-01

    This digital map database was prepared from the published Preliminary Geologic Map of the Blythe 30' by 60' Quadrangle, California and Arizona (U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 90-497). This database represents the east half of the original published map. The database contains exactly the same scientific content as the original map; no data have been added to, subtracted from, or modified from the original map. Like the original paper map, this database represents the general distribution of bedrock and surficial deposits in the mapped area. It provides information on the geologic structure and stratigraphy of the area covered. The database delineates map units that are identified by general age and lithology following the stratigraphic nomenclature of the U.S. Geological Survey. The scale of the original published map limits the spatial resolution (scale) of the database to 1:100,000 or smaller.

  6. 75 FR 11998 - Open Meeting of the Area 7 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of Alaska, California...

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  16. Reaching Out: Proceedings from a Special Education Symposium on Cultural Differences and Parent Programs (Phoenix, Arizona, May 2-3, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Caroline, Ed.; And Others

    The document contains ten presentations (or summaries) given at a 1986 special education symposium on cultural differences and parent programs with emphasis on the Pacific states and territories of Alaska, American Samoa, Arizona, California, Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho, Oregon, Nevada, Trust Territory, and Washington. Two…

  17. Gulf of Alaska and California bamboo corals: Ba/Ca and Sr/Ca records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauthoff, W.; LaVigne, M.; Hill, T. M.; Roark, E.; Dunbar, R. B.; Guilderson, T. P.; Spero, H. J.

    2012-12-01

    Deep-sea bamboo coral communities form on seamounts and along continental margins with near global distribution. Bamboo [Isididae] corals record surrounding ocean geochemistry presenting reliable proxy records of changes in seawater conditions, including productivity and nutrient content. Here we investigate bamboo coral specimens from the California margin and Gulf of Alaska (634-1288 m water depth; ~37oN-48oN), to provide insight into latitudinal and temporal differences in eastern Pacific Ocean climate processes. Past oceanic conditions were reconstructed in this investigation by trace element analyses (Ba/Ca, Sr/Ca) using laser ablation ICP-MS, using a 85 μm spot size at 10 μm/s, 4.45 J/cm2 fluence, and 10 Hz repetition rate. Two California specimens show differences in mean Ba/Ca content: 13.73 compared to 18.55 μmol/mol, which we attribute to differences in collection depth (T1104 A10: 833 m and T1100 A04: 1288 m, respectively). Gulf of Alaska corals show a more subdued nutrient signal with lower mean Ba/Ca values of 10.56 and 10.05 μmol/mol across a narrower depth range (ALV3803 #3: 720 m; ALV3803 #5: 634 m, respectively). This trend of increasing Ba/Ca with depth is in consensus with eastern Pacific dissolved barium and California margin bamboo coral depth transects. Sr/Ca content was uniform between four coral specimens with values ranging from 3.01 to 3.06 mmol/mol. Coral chronologies were compared against indices of climate oscillations, including El Niño Southern Oscillation and Pacific Decadal Oscillation, using time series based upon radiocarbon dating. The corals investigated here show a limited connection with El Niño Southern Oscillation; longer-term changes related Pacific Decadal Oscillation may be evidenced in this climate archive.

  18. Field observations of bed shear stress and sediment resuspension on continental shelves, Alaska and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drake, D.E.; Cacchione, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Bed shear stress was estimated using wave and current measurements obtained with the GEOPROBE bottom-tripod system during resuspension events in Norton Sound, Alaska, and on the northern California shelf. The boundary-layer model of Grant and Madsen (1979, Journal of Geophysical Research, 84, 1797-1808) was used to compute the bed shear stress under combined wave-generated and quasi-steady currents. Resuspension events were identified by sudden, large increases in light scattering at 1.9 m above the sea floor. The shear-stress values were used to compute the Shields parameter (??). The results for Norton Sound are in excellent agreement with the Shields threshold criterion; the data for the California shelf plot somewhat above the Shields threshold curve, though generally within the scatter envelope. Although the surface sediments in each area contain substantial fine-grained fractions (mean diameters were 0.007 cm in Norton Sound and 0.002 cm on the California shelf), the results do not indicate significant cohesion, because the sediment was entrained at bed shear-stress values close to those predicted by the modified Shields curve for cohesionless fine-grained particles. We suspect that frequent wave stirring and observed plowing of the surface sediment by benthonic animals maintain a high water content and contribute to the ease with which these materials are resuspended. ?? 1986.

  19. Bartonella spp. exposure in northern and southern sea otters in Alaska and California.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Sebastian E; Chomel, Bruno B; Gill, Verena A; Doroff, Angela M; Miller, Melissa A; Burek-Huntington, Kathleen A; Kasten, Rickie W; Byrne, Barbara A; Goldstein, Tracey; Mazet, Jonna A K

    2014-12-01

    Since 2002, an increased number of northern sea otters (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) from southcentral Alaska have been reported to be dying due to endocarditis and/or septicemia with infection by Streptococcus infantarius subsp. coli. Bartonella spp. DNA was also detected in northern sea otters as part of mortality investigations during this unusual mortality event (UME) in Kachemak Bay, Alaska. To evaluate the extent of exposure to Bartonella spp. in sea otters, sera collected from necropsied and live-captured northern sea otters, as well as necropsied southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) unaffected by the UME, were analyzed using an immunofluorescent antibody assay. Antibodies against Bartonella spp. were detected in sera from 50% of necropsied and 34% of presumed healthy, live-captured northern sea otters and in 16% of necropsied southern sea otters. The majority of sea otters with reactive sera were seropositive for B. washoensis, with antibody titers ranging from 1:64 to 1:256. Bartonella spp. antibodies were especially common in adult northern sea otters, both free-living (49%) and necropsied (62%). Adult stranded northern sea otters that died from infectious causes, such as opportunistic bacterial infections, were 27 times more likely to be Bartonella seropositive than adult stranded northern sea otters that died from noninfectious causes (p<0.001; 95% confidence interval 2.62-269.4). Because Bartonella spp. antibodies were detected in necropsied northern sea otters from southcentral (44%) and southwestern (86%) stocks of Alaska, as well as in necropsied southern sea otters (16%) in southcentral California, we concluded that Bartonella spp. exposure is widely distributed among sea otter populations in the Eastern Pacific, providing context for investigating future disease outbreaks and monitoring of Bartonella infections for sea otter management and conservation.

  20. Bartonella spp. Exposure in Northern and Southern Sea Otters in Alaska and California

    PubMed Central

    Chomel, Bruno B.; Gill, Verena A.; Doroff, Angela M.; Miller, Melissa A.; Burek-Huntington, Kathleen A.; Kasten, Rickie W.; Byrne, Barbara A.; Goldstein, Tracey; Mazet, Jonna A.K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Since 2002, an increased number of northern sea otters (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) from southcentral Alaska have been reported to be dying due to endocarditis and/or septicemia with infection by Streptococcus infantarius subsp. coli. Bartonella spp. DNA was also detected in northern sea otters as part of mortality investigations during this unusual mortality event (UME) in Kachemak Bay, Alaska. To evaluate the extent of exposure to Bartonella spp. in sea otters, sera collected from necropsied and live-captured northern sea otters, as well as necropsied southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) unaffected by the UME, were analyzed using an immunofluorescent antibody assay. Antibodies against Bartonella spp. were detected in sera from 50% of necropsied and 34% of presumed healthy, live-captured northern sea otters and in 16% of necropsied southern sea otters. The majority of sea otters with reactive sera were seropositive for B. washoensis, with antibody titers ranging from 1:64 to 1:256. Bartonella spp. antibodies were especially common in adult northern sea otters, both free-living (49%) and necropsied (62%). Adult stranded northern sea otters that died from infectious causes, such as opportunistic bacterial infections, were 27 times more likely to be Bartonella seropositive than adult stranded northern sea otters that died from noninfectious causes (p<0.001; 95% confidence interval 2.62–269.4). Because Bartonella spp. antibodies were detected in necropsied northern sea otters from southcentral (44%) and southwestern (86%) stocks of Alaska, as well as in necropsied southern sea otters (16%) in southcentral California, we concluded that Bartonella spp. exposure is widely distributed among sea otter populations in the Eastern Pacific, providing context for investigating future disease outbreaks and monitoring of Bartonella infections for sea otter management and conservation. PMID:25514118

  1. Crustal extension and transform faulting in the southern Basin Range Province. [California, Arizona, and Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liggett, M. A. (Principal Investigator); Childs, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Field reconnaissance and study of geologic literature guided by analysis of ERTS-1 MSS imagery have led to a hypothesis of tectonic control of Miocene volcanism, plutonism, and related mineralization in part of the Basin Range Province of southern Nevada and northwestern Arizona. The easterly trending right-lateral Las Vegas Shear Zone separates two volcanic provinces believed to represent areas of major east-west crustal extension. One volcanic province is aligned along the Colorado River south of the eastern termination of the Las Vegas Shear Zone; the second province is located north of the western termination of the shear zone in southern Nye County, Nevada. Geochronologic, geophysical, and structural evidence suggests that the Las Vegas Shear Zone may have formed in response to crustal extension in the two volcanic provinces in a manner similar to the formation of a ridge-ridge transform fault, as recognized in ocean floor tectonics.

  2. Seroepidemiology of California and Bunyamwera serogroup (Bunyaviridae) virus infections in native populations of Alaska.

    PubMed

    Walters, L L; Tirrell, S J; Shope, R E

    1999-05-01

    This study investigated the geographic distribution and prevalence of antibodies to California and Bunyamwera serogroup viruses in Native populations of Alaska, and demographic and ecologic risk factors associated with exposure. Sera (n = 1,635) from 18 communities were screened using an ELISA. All age groups were tested for antibodies to Jamestown Canyon (JC), Inkoo (INK), snowshoe hare (SSH), and Northway (NOR) viruses; persons > or = 45 years old (n = 90) from six communities were additionally tested for antibodies to Tahyna (TAH), Batai (BAT), Cache Valley (CV), and Sindbis (SIN) viruses. Thirty free-ranging mammals were tested by a plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) for antibodies to all eight viruses and to Getah (GET) virus. In Natives, overall antibody prevalence was 24.9% (JC = 17.6%, monotypic JC = 6.5%, INK = 11.1%, monotypic INK = 0.6%, SSH = 6.8%, monotypic SSH = 3.5%, and NOR = 6.2%). Five TAH, CV, and BAT virus exposures may be serologic cross-reactions, and no SIN virus antibodies were detected. Sindbis-like virus antibodies were found in 30% of the mammals. Most mammals had antibodies to NOR (83.3%) and California serogroup (70.0%) viruses; no GET virus exposures were found. Significant risk factors for human bunyavirus exposures were age group, ethnic-linguistic group, biotic province, climate zone, terrestrial vegetation, and presence of some ungulates and small mammals in communities. Sex was not a significant risk factor.

  3. Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.C.; Sears, D.W.

    1981-10-01

    Twenty-five exploratory wells were drilled in Alaska in 1980. Five oil or gas discovery wells were drilled on the North Slope. One hundred and seventeen development and service wells were drilled and completed, primarily in the Prudhoe Bay and Kuparuk River fields on the North Slope. Geologic-geophysical field activity consisted of 115.74 crew months, an increase of almost 50% compared to 1979. These increases affected most of the major basins of the state as industry stepped up preparations for future lease sales. Federal acreage under lease increased slightly, while state lease acreage showed a slight decline. The year's oil production showed a increase of 16%, while gas production was down slightly. The federal land freeze in Alaska showed signs of thawing, as the US Department of Interior asked industry to identify areas of interest onshore for possible future leasing. National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska was opened to private exploration, and petroleum potential of the Arctic Wildlife Refuge will be studied. One outer continental shelf lease sale was held in the eastern Gulf of Alaska, and a series of state and federal lease sales were announced for the next 5 years. 5 figures, 5 tables.

  4. Asymmetric basin subsidence and horizontal-axis block rotations in the Miocene North Whipple Basin, SE California and W Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Dorsey, R.J.; Roberts, P. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    A thick, faulted sequence of post-18.5-Ma Miocene sedimentary and volcanic rocks is well exposed in the Aubrey Hills, W Arizona, and the northeastern Whipple Mountains, SE California. These strata were deposited in alluvial fans and playa lakes of a syntectonic sedimentary basin (North Whipple Basin), which evolved in the upper plate of the Whipple detachment fault on the north flank of the growing proto-Whipple Mountains. Sedimentary deposits reveal substantial lateral changes in thickness and depositional facies (lacustrine to proximal-fan) that provide a record of asymmetric basin subsidence and upper-plate block rotations during strong regional extension. Final uplift, exhumation and unroofing of lower-plate rocks occurred during this time, as evidenced by sandstone-petrographic and conglomerate clast-count studies. Two horizontal orthogonally oriented axes of synbasinal crustal rotation are recognized: extension-perpendicular (NW-SE), and extension-parallel (NE-SW). Rotation about extension-perpendicular axes occurred by displacements on NW-striking normal faults that formed classic half-graben basins in the extending upper plate. Evidence for rotation about an extension-parallel axis is seen in pronounced lateral thickening and coarsening of sedimentary lithofacies toward the SE in the Aubrey Hills. This was likely controlled by synbasinal growth of an extension-parallel syncline, which formed on the NW flank of the Whipple Mountain extension-parallel antiform.

  5. Solar energy system economic evaluation for Elcam-Tempe, Tempe, Arizona and Elcam-San Diego, San Diego, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The long term economic performance of the solar energy system at its installation site is analyzed and four additional locations selected to demonstrate the viability of the design over a broad range of environmental and economic conditions. The economic analysis of the solar energy systems that were installed at Tempe, Arizona and San Diego, California, is developed for these and four other sites typical of a wide range of environmental and economic conditions in the continental United States. This analysis is accomplished based on the technical and economic models in the f Chart design procedure with inputs based on the characteristics of the installed system and local conditions. The results are expressed in terms of the economic parameters of present worth of system cost over a projected twenty year life: life cycle savings; year of positive savings; and year of payback for the optimized solar energy system at each of the analysis sites. The sensitivity of the economic evaluation to uncertainites in constituent system and economic variables is also investigated. The results demonstrate that the solar energy system is economically viable at all of the sites for which the analysis was conducted.

  6. Anatomy of a metamorphic core complex: seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profiling in southeastern California and western Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, J.; Larkin, S.P.; Fuis, G.S.; Simpson, R.W.; Howard, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    The metamorphic core complex belt in southeastern California and western Arizona is a NW-SE trending zone of unusually large Tertiary extension and uplift. Midcrustal rocks exposed in this belt raise questions about the crustal thickness, crustal structure, and the tectonic evolution of the region. Three seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profiles were collected to address these issues. The results presented here, which focus on the Whipple and Buckskin-Rawhide mountains, yield a consistent three-dimensiional image of this part of the metamorphic core complex belt. The final model consists of a thin veneer (<2 km) of upper plate and fractured lower plate rocks (1.5-5.5 km s-1) overlying a fairly homogeneous basement (~6.0 km s-1) and a localized high-velocity (6.4 km s -1) body situated beneath the western Whipple Mountains. A prominent midcrustal reflection is identified beneath the Whipple and Buckskin Rawhide mountains between 10 and 20km depth. -from Authors

  7. Geothermal direct heat use: market potential/penetration analysis for Federal Region IX (Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada)

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, W.; Tang, K.

    1980-05-01

    A preliminary study was made of the potential for geothermal direct heat use in Arizona, California, Hawaii, and Nevada (Federal Region IX). The analysis for each state was performed by a different team, located in that state. For each state, the study team was asked to: (1) define the resource, based on the latest available data; (2) assess the potential market growth for geothermal energy; and (3) estimate the market penetration, projected to 2020. Each of the four states of interest in this study is unique in its own way. Rather than impose the same assumptions as to growth rates, capture rates, etc. on all of the study teams, each team was asked to use the most appropriate set of assumptions for its state. The results, therefore, should reflect the currently accepted views within each state. The four state reports comprise the main portion of this document. A brief regional overview section was prepared by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, following completion of the state reports.

  8. Persistent organic pollutants in the blood of free-ranging sea otters (Enhydra lutris ssp.) in Alaska and California.

    PubMed

    Jessup, David A; Johnson, Christine K; Estes, James; Carlson-Bremer, Daphne; Jarman, Walter M; Reese, Stacey; Dodd, Erin; Tinker, M Tim; Ziccardi, Michael H

    2010-10-01

    As part of tagging and ecologic research efforts in 1997 and 1998, apparently healthy sea otters of four age-sex classes in six locations in Alaska and three in California were sampled for persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and other chemicals of ecologic or environmental concern (COECs). Published techniques for the detection of POPs (specifically ∑polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs], ∑DDTs, ∑hexachlorocyclohexanes [HCHs], ∑polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons [PAHs], ∑chlordanes [CHLs], hexachlorobenzene [HCB], dieldrin, and mirex) in the tissue of dead otters were modified for use with serum from live sea otters. Toxic equivalencies (TEQs) were calculated for POPs with proven bioactivity. Strong location effects were seen for most POPs and COECs; sea otters in California generally showed higher mean concentrations than those in Alaska. Differences in contaminant concentrations were detected among age and sex classes, with high levels frequently observed in subadults. Very high levels of ∑DDT were detected in male sea otters in Elkhorn Slough, California, where strong freshwater outflow from agricultural areas occurs seasonally. All contaminants except mirex differed among Alaskan locations; only ∑DDT, HCB, and chlorpyrifos differed within California. High levels of ∑PCB (particularly larger, more persistent congeners) were detected at two locations in Alaska where associations between elevated PCBs and military activity have been established, while higher PCB levels were found at all three locations in California where no point source of PCBs has been identified. Although POP and COEC concentrations in blood may be less likely to reflect total body burden, concentrations in blood of healthy animals may be more biologically relevant and less influenced by state of nutrition or perimortem factors than other tissues routinely sampled.

  9. Persistent organic pollutants in the blood of free-ranging sea otters (Enhydra lutris ssp.) in Alaska and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jessup, David A.; Johnson, Christine K.; Estes, James; Carlson-Bremer, Daphne; Jarman, Walter M.; Reese, Stacey; Dodd, Erin; Tinker, M. Tim; Ziccardi, Michael H.

    2010-01-01

    As part of tagging and ecologic research efforts in 1997 and 1998, apparently healthy sea otters of four age-sex classes in six locations in Alaska and three in California were sampled for persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and other chemicals of ecologic or environmental concern (COECs). Published techniques for the detection of POPs (specifically Σpolychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs], ΣDDTs, Σhexachlorocyclohexanes [HCHs], Σpolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons [PAHs], Σchlordanes [CHLs], hexachlorobenzene [HCB], dieldrin, and mirex) in the tissue of dead otters were modified for use with serum from live sea otters. Toxic equivalencies (TEQs) were calculated for POPs with proven bioactivity. Strong location effects were seen for most POPs and COECs; sea otters in California generally showed higher mean concentrations than those in Alaska. Differences in contaminant concentrations were detected among age and sex classes, with high levels frequently observed in subadults. Very high levels of ΣDDT were detected in male sea otters in Elkhorn Slough, California, where strong freshwater outflow from agricultural areas occurs seasonally. All contaminants except mirex differed among Alaskan locations; only ΣDDT, HCB, and chlorpyrifos differed within California. High levels of ΣPCB (particularly larger, more persistent congeners) were detected at two locations in Alaska where associations between elevated PCBs and military activity have been established, while higher PCB levels were found at all three locations in California where no point source of PCBs has been identified. Although POP and COEC concentrations in blood may be less likely to reflect total body burden, concentrations in blood of healthy animals may be more biologically relevant and less influenced by state of nutrition or perimortem factors than other tissues routinely sampled.

  10. Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Though it's not quite spring, waters in the Gulf of Alaska (right) appear to be blooming with plant life in this true-color MODIS image from March 4, 2002. East of the Alaska Peninsula (bottom center), blue-green swirls surround Kodiak Island. These colors are the result of light reflecting off chlorophyll and other pigments in tiny marine plants called phytoplankton. The bloom extends southward and clear dividing line can be seen west to east, where the bloom disappears over the deeper waters of the Aleutian Trench. North in Cook Inlet, large amounts of red clay sediment are turning the water brown. To the east, more colorful swirls stretch out from Prince William Sound, and may be a mixture of clay sediment from the Copper River and phytoplankton. Arcing across the top left of the image, the snow-covered Brooks Range towers over Alaska's North Slope. Frozen rivers trace white ribbons across the winter landscape. The mighty Yukon River traverses the entire state, beginning at the right edge of the image (a little way down from the top) running all the way over to the Bering Sea, still locked in ice. In the high-resolution image, the circular, snow-filled calderas of two volcanoes are apparent along the Alaska Peninsula. In Bristol Bay (to the west of the Peninsula) and in a couple of the semi-clear areas in the Bering Sea, it appears that there may be an ice algae bloom along the sharp ice edge (see high resolution image for better details). Ground-based observations from the area have revealed that an under-ice bloom often starts as early as February in this region and then seeds the more typical spring bloom later in the season.

  11. The California-Arizona Minority Partnership for Astronomy Research and Education (CAMPARE): A New Model for Promoting Minority Participation in Astronomy Research and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Alexander L.; Impey, C. D.; Bieging, J. H.; Phillips, C. B.; Tieu, J.; Prather, E. E.; Povich, M. S.

    2013-01-01

    The California-Arizona Minority Partnership for Astronomy Research and Education (CAMPARE) program represents a new and innovative kind of research program for undergraduates: one that can effectively carry out the goal of recruiting qualified minority and female students to participate in Astronomy and Planetary Science research opportunities, while mentoring them in a way to maximize the chance that these students will persist in obtaining their undergraduate degrees in STEM fields, and potentially go on to obtain their PhDs or pursue careers in those fields. The members of CAMPARE comprise a network of comprehensive universities and community colleges in Southern California and Arizona (most of which are minority serving institutions), and four major research institutions (University of Arizona Steward Observatory, the SETI Institute, and JPL/Caltech). Most undergraduate research programs focus on a single research institution. By having multiple institutions, we significantly broaden the opportunities for students, both in terms of breadth of research topics and geographical location. In its first three years, the CAMPARE program has had 20 undergraduates from two CSU campuses, both Hispanic Serving Institutions, take part in research and educational activities at four research institutions, the University of Arizona Steward Observatory, the SETI Institute, and JPL/Caltech. Of the 20 participants, 9 are women and 11 are men, a much more even split than is typical in Astronomy research programs; 10 are Hispanic, 2 are African American, and 1 is part Native American, including 2 female Hispanic and 2 female African-American participants, an exceptionally high participation rate (65%) for students from underrepresented minority groups. Of the five participants who have graduated since the program began, two are in graduate programs in Physics or Astronomy, two are pursuing a K-12 teaching credential, and one has enlisted in the Nuclear Propulsion Officer Candidate

  12. The Orocopia-Pelona Schist Terrane, southern California and southwest Arizona: A Calibrated Target for Crustal Seismic Anisotropy Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxel, G.; Christensen, N.; Okaya, D.; Jacobsen, C.

    2003-12-01

    The Orocopia-Pelona Schist belt represents an enigmatic element within the Late Cretaceous to early Tertiary tectonic framework of the southern Cordillera. This oceanic supracrustal terrane is widely believed to underlie much of southern California and the southwest corner of Arizona. Alternative interpretations of geologic and geophysical data suggest that the schist may have a considerably more limited subsurface distribution, restricted to the vicinity of the curvilinear belt defined by the pre-San Andreas distribution of outcrops of the Orocopia and Pelona Schists. Regional depth and thickness, breadth, and large-scale internal configuration of the schist differ according to the current evolutionary models: (1) low-angle, eastward subduction, (2) trapping of marine rocks along a transpressional continental margin, or (3) tectonic burial of Great Valley-like forearc strata beneath overriding Mesozoic batholithic arc crust. The three-dimensional distribution of the schist could help to constrain these models, but is poorly known. The Orocopia-Pelona Schist is thus a promising candidate for mapping via crustal seismic anisotropy. The Orocopia-Pelona Schist terrane is exposed in some 15 tectonic windows, stretching from the central Transverse Ranges, California, to the Kofa region, southwest Arizona. Along the eastern two-thirds of its extent, exposures of the schist are tightly aligned along the Chocolate Mountains anticlinorium. The schist terrane comprises predominantly homogeneous quartzofeldspathic metagraywacke, with subordinate to minor interlayered metabasalt, metachert, siliceous marble, and ultramafic rock. The schist exhibits strong foliation and pronounced lineation, with regionally uniform orientation. Metamorphic mineral assemblages indicate tectonic burial to depths approx. 25 - 35 km. We have performed petrophysical laboratory measurements on samples of Orocopia Schist from the Chocolate and Trigo Mountains, determining seismic velocities and

  13. Food Insecurity and Obesity Among American Indians and Alaska Natives and Whites in California

    PubMed Central

    JERNIGAN, VALARIE BLUE BIRD; GARROUTTE, EVA; KRANTZ, ELIZABETH M.; BUCHWALD, DEDRA

    2015-01-01

    Food insecurity is linked to obesity among some, but not all, racial and ethnic populations. We examined the prevalence of food insecurity and the association between food insecurity and obesity among American Indians (AIs) and Alaska Natives (ANs) and a comparison group of whites. Using the 2009 California Health Interview Survey, we analyzed responses from 592 AIs/ANs and 7371 white adults with household incomes at or below 200% of the federal poverty level. Food insecurity was measured using a standard 6-item scale. Sociodemographics, exercise, and obesity were all obtained using self-reported survey data. Logistic regression was used to estimate associations. The prevalence of food insecurity was similar among AIs/ANs and whites (38.7% vs 39.3%). Food insecurity was not associated with obesity in either group in analyses adjusted for sociodemographics and exercise. The ability to afford high-quality foods is extremely limited for low-income Californians regardless of race. Health policy discussions must include increased attention on healthy food access among the poor, including AIs/ANs, for whom little data exist. PMID:26865900

  14. Chemical contaminants in gray whales (eschichtius robustus) stranded in Alaska, Washington, and California, USA. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Varanasi, U.; Stein, J.E.; Tilbury, K.L.; Meador, J.P.; Sloan, C.A.

    1993-08-01

    The concentrations of chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl) ethanes (DDTs), 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p- chlorophenyl) ethenes (DDEs), and chlordanes, and essential (e.g., zinc, selenium, copper) and toxic (e.g., mercury, lead) elements were measured in tissues and stomach contents from 22 gray whales (Eschrichtius robustus) stranded between 1988 and 1991. The stranding sites ranged from the relatively pristine areas of Kodiak Island, Alaska, to more urbanized areas in Puget Sound, Washington, and San Francisco Bay, California, with the majority of the sites on the Washington outer coast and in Puget Sound. Similar to concentrations in tissues, no significant differences were observed in concentrations of elements in stomach contents between whales stranded in Puget Sound and whales stranded at the more pristine sites. The lack of data from apparently healthy gray whales limits the assessment of whether the levels of anthropogenic contaminants found in tissues may have deleterious effects on the health of gray whales.

  15. Crumb rubber modifier (CRM) in asphalt pavement: Summary of practices in Arizona, California, and Florida. Interim report, 1 February-30 June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, R.G.; Lundy, J.R.; Leahy, R.B.; Hanson, D.; Epps, J.

    1995-09-01

    Highway agencies have been evaluating crumb rubber modifier (CRM) in hot mix asphalt (HMA) since the 1970`s. Three agencies, Arizona, California, and Florida, currently use CRM in HMA at levels that would approach or exceed the mandate in Section 1038 of the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991. This report documents the use of CRM in HMA in these three States. In particular, it addresses issues including thickness design, materials and mix design, construction procedure, including control, and pavement performance. The report also addresses the following questions: (1) What processes are used, (2) Why are they used, (3) How are they performing.

  16. Ferroaxinites from the Feather River area, northern California, and from the McGrath and Russian Mission quadrangles, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hietanen, Anna; Erd, Richard C.

    1978-01-01

    In the Feather River area, California, and in the McGrath quadrangle, Alaska, axinite-bearing veins occur as fracture fillings along or near the fault zones, suggesting that boron was introduced along the fractures. An unusual occurrence of axinite as a possible primary constituent of a plutonic rock is in the Russian Mission quadrangle, Alaska. The four analyzed axinites from these widely different localities and from different host rocks are surprisingly similar in chemistry and optics. All are ferroaxinites, having high iron and low manganese and magnesium contents. The number of calcium ions is very close to two, which is in agreement with the idealized formula Ca2 (Fe,Mn,Mg)Al2BSi4O15(OH). The indices of refraction increase slightly with increasing FeO:MgO ratio over the small range studied.

  17. Anatomy of a metamorphic core complex: Seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profiling in southeastern California and western Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Jill; Larkin, Steven P.; Fuis, Gary S.; Simpson, Robert W.; Howard, Keith A.

    1991-07-01

    The metamorphic core complex belt in southeastern California and western Arizona is a NW-SE trending zone of unusually large Tertiary extension and uplift. Midcrustal rocks exposed in this belt raise questions about the crustal thickness, crustal structure, and the tectonic evolution of the region. Three seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profiles, acquired and analyzed as a part of the U.S. Geological Survey's Pacific to Arizona Crustal Experiment, were collected to address these issues. The results presented here, which focus on the Whipple and Buckskin-Rawhide mountains, yield a consistent three-dimensional image of this part of the metamorphic core complex belt. The seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection data are of excellent quality and are characterized by six principal phases that can be observed on all three profiles. These phases include refractions from the near-surface and crystalline basement, reflections from boundaries in the middle and lower crust, and reflections and refractions from the upper mantle. The final model consists of a thin veneer (<2 km) of upper plate and fractured lower plate rocks (1.5-5.5 kms-1) overlying a fairly homogeneous basement (˜6.0 km s-1) and a localized high-velocity (6.4 km s-1) body situated beneath the western Whipple Mountains. A prominent midcrustal reflection is identified beneath the Whipple and Buckskin-Rawhide mountains between 10 and 20 km depth. This reflector has an arch-like shape and is centered beneath, or just west of, the metamorphic core complex belt. This event is underlain by a weaker, approximately subhorizontal reflection at 24 km depth. Together, these two discontinuities define a lens-shaped midcrustal layer with a velocity of 6.35-6.5 km s-1. The apex of this midcrustal layer corresponds roughly to a region of major tectonic denudation and uplift (˜10 km) defined by surface geologic mapping and petrologic barometry studies. The layer thins to the northeast and is absent in the Transition

  18. New species in the Sitalcina sura species group (Opiliones, Laniatores, Phalangodidae), with evidence for a biogeographic link between California desert canyons and Arizona sky islands

    PubMed Central

    DiDomenico, Angela; Hedin, Marshal

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The western United States is home to numerous narrowly endemic harvestman taxa (Arachnida, Opiliones), including members of the genus Sitalcina Banks, 1911. Sitalcina is comprised of three species groups, including the monospecific Sitalcina californica and Sitalcina lobata groups, and the Sitalcina sura group with eight described species. All species in the Sitalcina sura group have very small geographic distributions, with group members distributed like disjunct “beads on a string” from Monterey south to southern California and southeast to the sky-island mountain ranges of southern Arizona. Here, molecular phylogenetic and species delimitation analyses were conducted for all described species in the Sitalcina sura group, plus several newly discovered populations. Species trees were reconstructed using multispecies coalescent methods implemented in *BEAST, and species delimitation was accomplished using Bayes Factor Delimitation (BFD). Based on quantitative species delimitation results supported by consideration of morphological characters, two new species (Sitalcina oasiensis sp. n., Sitalcina ubicki sp. n.) are described. We also provide a description of the previously unknown male of Sitalcina borregoensis Briggs, 1968. Molecular phylogenetic evidence strongly supports distinctive desert versus coastal clades, with desert canyon taxa from southern California more closely related to Arizona taxa than to geographically proximate California coastal taxa. We hypothesize that southern ancestry and plate tectonics have played a role in the diversification history of this animal lineage, similar to sclerophyllous plant taxa of the Madro-Tertiary Geoflora. Molecular clock analyses for the Sitalcina sura group are generally consistent with these hypotheses. We also propose that additional Sitalcina species await discovery in the desert canyons of southern California and northern Baja, and the mountains of northwestern mainland Mexico. PMID:27199607

  19. New species in the Sitalcina sura species group (Opiliones, Laniatores, Phalangodidae), with evidence for a biogeographic link between California desert canyons and Arizona sky islands.

    PubMed

    DiDomenico, Angela; Hedin, Marshal

    2016-01-01

    The western United States is home to numerous narrowly endemic harvestman taxa (Arachnida, Opiliones), including members of the genus Sitalcina Banks, 1911. Sitalcina is comprised of three species groups, including the monospecific Sitalcina californica and Sitalcina lobata groups, and the Sitalcina sura group with eight described species. All species in the Sitalcina sura group have very small geographic distributions, with group members distributed like disjunct "beads on a string" from Monterey south to southern California and southeast to the sky-island mountain ranges of southern Arizona. Here, molecular phylogenetic and species delimitation analyses were conducted for all described species in the Sitalcina sura group, plus several newly discovered populations. Species trees were reconstructed using multispecies coalescent methods implemented in *BEAST, and species delimitation was accomplished using Bayes Factor Delimitation (BFD). Based on quantitative species delimitation results supported by consideration of morphological characters, two new species (Sitalcina oasiensis sp. n., Sitalcina ubicki sp. n.) are described. We also provide a description of the previously unknown male of Sitalcina borregoensis Briggs, 1968. Molecular phylogenetic evidence strongly supports distinctive desert versus coastal clades, with desert canyon taxa from southern California more closely related to Arizona taxa than to geographically proximate California coastal taxa. We hypothesize that southern ancestry and plate tectonics have played a role in the diversification history of this animal lineage, similar to sclerophyllous plant taxa of the Madro-Tertiary Geoflora. Molecular clock analyses for the Sitalcina sura group are generally consistent with these hypotheses. We also propose that additional Sitalcina species await discovery in the desert canyons of southern California and northern Baja, and the mountains of northwestern mainland Mexico.

  20. The application of ERTS imagery to mapping snow cover in the western United States. [Salt Verde in Arizona and Sierra Nevada California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, J. C. (Principal Investigator); Bowley, C. J.; Simmes, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. In much of the western United States a large part of the utilized water comes from accumulated mountain snowpacks; thus, accurate measurements of snow distributions are required for input to streamflow prediction models. The application of ERTS-1 imagery for mapping snow has been evaluated for two geographic areas, the Salt-Verde watershed in central Arizona and the southern Sierra Nevada in California. Techniques have been developed to identify snow and to differentiate between snow and cloud. The snow extent for these two drainage areas has been mapped from the MSS-5 (0.6 - 0.7 microns) imagery and compared with aerial survey snow charts, aircraft photography, and ground-based snow measurements. The results indicate that ERTS imagery has substantial practical applications for snow mapping. Snow extent can be mapped from ERTS-1 imagery in more detail than is depicted on aerial survey snow charts. Moreover, in Arizona and southern California cloud obscuration does not appear to be a serious deterrent to the use of satellite data for snow survey. The costs involved in deriving snow maps from ERTS-1 imagery appear to be very reasonable in comparison with existing data collection methods.

  1. Gulf of California Sediment and Proxy SST Records Suggest a Post 6 ka Development of the Arizona Monsoon and Solar Forcing of Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, J. A.; Bukry, D.

    2007-12-01

    Summer monsoonal rains in Arizona and adjacent areas are mainly due to pulses of moisture traveling northward up the Gulf of California (GOC). Modern studies reveal that northern GOC SSTs must exceed 26 deg. C before monsoonal rainfall develops in Arizona and western New Mexico, and over 80 percent of the rainfall in this region occurs after northern GOC SSTs exceed 28.5 deg. C. Warming of GOC occurs progressively from south to north in the late spring, as northwest winds, which dominate in the late fall to early spring, decrease in strength, and tropical waters penetrate northward along the western coast of the GOC. Sediment (CaCO3 and opal) and microfossil (diatom and silicoflagellate) proxies spanning the past 15,000 years from cores in the central GOC suggest that waters of the northern GOC were too cold between ca. 11 and 6 ka to allow development of monsoonal rains in Arizona. Evidence for a post 6 ka intensification of monsoonal rains in Arizona and adjacent areas includes: 1) increased frequency of arroyo cutting in Arizona after ca. 5 ka, 2) increased evidence of paleofloods in Arizona and SW Utah after ca. 6 ka, and 3) the renewal of aggradation of alluvial fans in the Mojave Dessert at ca. 6 ka after a lull in their formation between ca. 11 and 6 ka. Supportive pollen evidence includes : 1) the late Holocene appearance of summer flowering annuals and C-{4} grasses in SE Arizona, and 2) the post 6 ka appearance of a warm, mixed biome in the highlands of northwest Mexico. Other pollen evidence and the scarcity of early and middle Holocene packrat middens in the American southwest, however, have been cited as evidence of increased monsoonal rains during the early and middle parts of the Holocene It is likely that the Gulf of Mexico was the main source of monsoonal moisture in the American southwest prior to ca. 6 ka, especially in the regions east of Arizona. A northward displacement of the Intertropical Convergence Zone in the Caribbean prior to ca. 5.4 ka

  2. Ubiquitous tar balls with a California-source signature on the shorelines of Prince William Sound, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Hostettler, F.D.; Carlson, P.R.; Rapp, J.B.; Threlkeld, C.N.; Warden, A.

    1995-01-01

    Although the shorelines of Prince William Sound still bear traces of the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill, most of the flattened tar balls that can be found today on these shorelines are not residues of Exxon Valdez oil. Instead, the carbon-isotopic and hydrocarbon-biomarker signatures of 61 tar ball samples, collected from shorelines throughout the northern and western parts of the sound, are all remarkably similar and have characteristics consistent with those of oil products that originated from the Monterey Formation source rocks of California. The carbon-isotopic compositions of the tar balls are all closely grouped (??13CPDB = -23.7 ?? 0.2???), within the range found in crude oils from those rocks, but are distinct from isotopic compositions of 28 samples of residues from the Exxon Valdez oil spill (??13CPDB = -29.4 ?? 0.1???). Likewise, values for selected biomarker ratios in the tar balls are all similar but distinct from values of residues from the 1989 oil spill. Carbon-isotopic and biomarker signatures generally relate the tar balls to oil products used in Alaska before ???1970 for construction and pavements. How these tar balls with such similar geochemical characteristics became so widely dispersed throughout the northern and western parts of the sound is not known with certainty, but the great 1964 Alaska earthquake was undoubtedly an important trigger, causing spills from ruptured storage facilities of California-sourced asphalt and fuel oil into Prince William Sound.

  3. Creating a Culturally Appropriate Web-Based Behavioral Intervention for American Indian/Alaska Native Women in Southern California: The Healthy Women Healthy Native Nation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorman, Jessica R.; Clapp, John D.; Calac, Daniel; Kolander, Chelsea; Nyquist, Corinna; Chambers, Christina D.

    2013-01-01

    Health disparities in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) are of high importance to American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities. We conducted focus groups and interviews with 21 AI/AN women and key informants in Southern California to modify a brief, Web-based program for screening and prevention of prenatal alcohol use. This process…

  4. Combining Dynamic Earthquake and Tsunami Models With Case Studies Offshore Alaska and Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Kenny

    Earthquakes and their corresponding tsunamis pose significant hazard to popu- lated regions around the world. Therefore, it is critically important that we seek to more fully understand the physics of the combined earthquake-tsunami system. One way to address this goal is through numerical modeling. The work discussed herein focuses on combining dynamic earthquake and tsunami models through the use of the Finite Element Method (FEM) and the Finite Difference Method (FDM). Dynamic earthquake models ac- count for the force that the entire fault system exerts on each individual element of the model for each time step, so that earthquake rupture takes a path based on the physics of the model; dynamic tsunami models can incorporate water height variations to produce water wave formation, propagation, and inundation. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to some important concepts and equations of elastodynamics and fluid dynamics as well as a brief example of the FEM. In Chapter 2, we investigate the 3-D effects of realistic fault dynamics on slip, free surface deformation, and resulting tsunami formation from an Mw 9 megathrust earthquake offshore Southern Alaska. Corresponding tsunami models, which use a FDM to solve linear long-wave equations, match sea floor deformation, in time, to the free surface deformation from the rupture simulations. Tsunamis generated in this region could have large adverse effects on Pacific coasts. In Chapter 3, we construct a 3-D dynamic rupture model of an earthquake on a reverse fault structure offshore Southern California to model the resulting tsunami, with a goal of elucidating the seismic and tsunami hazard in this area. The corresponding tsunami model uses final seafloor displacements from the rupture model as initial conditions to compute local propagation and inundation, resulting in large peak tsunami amplitudes northward and eastward due to site and path effects. In Chapter 4, we begin to evaluate 2-D earthquake source parameters

  5. The SAFRR Tsunami Scenario: Improving Resilience for California from a Plausible M9 Earthquake near the Alaska Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, S.; Jones, L.; Wilson, R. I.; Bahng, B.; Barberopoulou, A.; Borrero, J. C.; Brosnan, D.; Bwarie, J.; Geist, E. L.; Johnson, L.; Kirby, S. H.; Knight, W.; Long, K.; Lynett, P. J.; Miller, K.; Mortensen, C. E.; Nicolsky, D.; Oglesby, D. D.; Perry, S. C.; Plumlee, G. S.; Porter, K. A.; Real, C. R.; Ryan, K. J.; Suleimani, E.; Thio, H. K.; Titov, V.; Wein, A. M.; Whitmore, P.; Wood, N. J.

    2013-12-01

    The SAFRR Tsunami Scenario models a hypothetical but plausible tsunami, created by an Mw9.1 earthquake occurring offshore from the Alaskan peninsula, and its impacts on the California coast. We present the likely inundation areas, current velocities in key ports and harbors, physical damage and repair costs, economic consequences, environmental impacts, social vulnerability, emergency management, and policy implications for California associated with the tsunami scenario. The intended users are those who must make mitigation decisions before and rapid decisions during future tsunamis. Around a half million people would be present in the scenario's inundation area in residences, businesses, public venues, parks and beaches. Evacuation would likely be ordered for the State of California's maximum mapped tsunami inundation zone, evacuating an additional quarter million people from residences and businesses. Some island and peninsula communities would face particular evacuation challenges because of limited access options and short warning time, caused by the distance between Alaska and California. Evacuations may also be a challenge for certain dependent-care populations. One third of the boats in California's marinas could be damaged or sunk, costing at least 700 million in repairs to boats and docks, and potentially much more to address serious issues due to sediment transport and environmental contamination. Fires would likely start at many sites where fuel and petrochemicals are stored in ports and marinas. Tsunami surges and bores may travel several miles inland up coastal rivers. Debris clean-up and recovery of inundated and damaged areas will take days, months, or years depending on the severity of impacts and the available resources for recovery. The Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach (POLA/LB) would be shut down for a miniμm of two days due to strong currents. Inundation of dry land in the ports would result in 100 million damages to cargo and additional

  6. Effectiveness of action to reduce exposure of free-ranging California condors in Arizona and Utah to lead from spent ammunition.

    PubMed

    Green, Rhys E; Hunt, W Grainger; Parish, Christopher N; Newton, Ian

    2008-01-01

    California condors (Gymnogyps californianus) released into the wild in Arizona ranged widely in Arizona and Utah. Previous studies have shown that the blood lead concentrations of many of the birds rise because of ingestion of spent lead ammunition. Condors were routinely recaptured and treated to reduce their lead levels as necessary but, even so, several died from lead poisoning. We used tracking data from VHF and satellite tags, together with the results of routine testing of blood lead concentrations, to estimate daily changes in blood lead level in relation to the location of each bird. The mean daily increment in blood lead concentration depended upon both the location of the bird and the time of year. Birds that spent time during the deer hunting season in two areas in which deer were shot with lead ammunition (Kaibab Plateau (Arizona) and Zion (Utah)) were especially likely to have high blood lead levels. The influence upon blood lead level of presence in a particular area declined with time elapsed since the bird was last there. We estimated the daily blood lead level for each bird and its influence upon daily mortality rate from lead poisoning. Condors with high blood lead over a protracted period were much more likely to die than birds with low blood lead or short-term elevation. We simulated the effect of ending the existing lead exposure reduction measures at Kaibab Plateau, which encourage the voluntary use of non-lead ammunition and removal of gut piles of deer and elk killed using lead ammunition. The estimated mortality rate due to lead in the absence of this program was sufficiently high that the condor population would be expected to decline rapidly. The extension of the existing lead reduction program to cover Zion (Utah), as well as the Kaibab plateau, would be expected to reduce mortality caused by lead substantially and allow the condor population to increase.

  7. Remote sensing reconnaissance of faulting in alluvium, Lake Mead to Lake Havasu, California, Nevada and Arizona. An application of ERTS-1 satellite imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechtold, I. C. (Principal Investigator); Liggett, M. A.; Childs, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Analysis of ERTS-1 MSS and other imagery for a 125 x 25 mile area in the southern part of the Basin-Range Province of southeastern California, southern Nevada, and northwestern Arizona indicates the presence of numerous color and contrast anomalies in alluvium. Field work guided by high altitude U-2 and side-looking aerial radar imagery confirmed that these anomalies are fault zones, many of which are believed to be of recent age. Few faults in alluvium have been reported from previous ground based geologic studies in the area. ERTS-1 imagery provides a synoptic perspective previously unavailable for regional geologic studies. The ability to conduct rapid and inexpensive reconnaissance of recent faulting has important applications to land use planning, ground water exploration, geologic hazards, and the siting and design of engineering projects.

  8. All Prime Contract Awards by State or Country, Place, and Contractor, FY83, Part 2 (Kingman, Arizona-Petaluma, California).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    TOTAL 4 394 COST CONSTRUCTION MANAGERS LUKE AFB ARIZONA 088342 0560 03 3 C OTAIO 0078 FO3048-63-000 A C E 5 2 2 Y119 000 C2 CONSTRUCTION/OTHER ADMIN & 5 6...AiC GAS TUBINES AND JET ENG EXC 8 A 4 5 A 1015 5 A J I J 906 3 J OFFS0 0041 F42600-81-G7513 B C A 5 2 2 2835 AFF AIC GAS TURBINES AND JET ENG EXC 8 A...OJA24 0118 F02600-83-COO6S A 0 E 5 2 2 Z199 000 C2 MAINT-REPAIR-ALTER/MISCELLAN 4 6 3 5 J 170 7 B J 1 I 218 COST CONSTRUCTION INC WILLIAMS AFS ARIZONA

  9. A new method for monitoring global volcanic activity. [Alaska, Hawaii, Washington, California, Iceland, Guatemala, El Salvador, and Nicaragua

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, P. L.; Endo, E.; Harlow, D. H.; Allen, R.; Eaton, J. P.

    1974-01-01

    The ERTS Data Collection System makes it feasible for the first time to monitor the level of activity at widely separated volcanoes and to relay these data rapidly to one central office for analysis. While prediction of specific eruptions is still an evasive goal, early warning of a reawakening of quiescent volcanoes is now a distinct possibility. A prototypical global volcano surveillance system was established under the ERTS program. Instruments were installed in cooperation with local scientists on 15 volcanoes in Alaska, Hawaii, Washington, California, Iceland, Guatemala, El Salvador and Nicaragua. The sensors include 19 seismic event counters that count four different sizes of earthquakes and six biaxial borehole tiltmeters that measure ground tilt with a resolution of 1 microradian. Only seismic and tilt data are collected because these have been shown in the past to indicate most reliably the level of volcano activity at many different volcanoes. Furthermore, these parameters can be measured relatively easily with new instrumentation.

  10. Predict ephemeral and perennial range quantity and quality during normal grazing season. [Arizona, California, Oregon, and Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bentley, R. G., Jr. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Collection and update of resource inventory data has historically been a difficult, time consuming task. Accurate resource data is necessary as a basis for wise management decisions made by a resource management agency such as the Bureau of Land Management. Black and white and color infrared composites of ERTS satellite imagery at 1:1,000,000 and enlarged scales can be used as data gathering tools. No investment in expensive sophisticated equipment is necessary. A photointerpreter can map boundaries of soils, plant communities, levels of forage production, areas revegetated by man, and areas burned by wildlife directly from satellite imagery. The ERTS system of producing and distributing imagery must be improved greatly before satellite imagery can be useful to the resource manager.

  11. Method to identify wells that yield water that will be replaced by Colorado River water in Arizona, California, Nevada, and Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Richard P.; Owen-Joyce, Sandra J.

    1994-01-01

    Accounting for the use of Colorado River water is required by the U.S. Supreme Court decree, 1964, Arizona v. California. Water pumped from wells on the flood plain and from certain wells on alluvial slopes outside the flood plain is presumed to be river water and is accounted for as Colorado River water. A method was developed to identify wells outside the f1ood plain of the lower Colorado River that yield water that will be replaced by water from the river. The method provides a uniform criterion of identification for all users pumping water from wells. Wells that have a static water-level elevation equal to or below the accounting surface are presumed to yield water that will be replaced by water from the river. Wells that have a static water-level elevation above the accounting surface are presumed to yield water that will be replaced by water from precipitation and inflow from tributary valleys. The method is based on the concept of a river aquifer and an accounting surface within the river aquifer. The river aquifer consists of permeable, partly saturated sediments and sedimentary rocks that are hydraulically connected to the Colorado River so that water can move between the river and the aquifer in response to withdrawal of water from the aquifer or differences in water-level elevations between the river and the aquifer. The accounting surface represents the elevation and slope of the unconfined static water table in the river aquifer outside the flood plain and reservoirs that would exist if the river were the only source of water to the river aquifer. Maps at a scale of 1:100,000 show the extent and elevation of the accounting surface from the area surrounding Lake Mead to Laguna Dam near Yuma, Arizona.

  12. The quality of our Nation's waters: Water quality in basin-fill aquifers of the southwestern United States: Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah, 1993-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thiros, Susan A.; Paul, Angela P.; Bexfield, Laura M.; Anning, David W.

    2015-01-01

    The Southwest Principal Aquifers consist of many basin-fill aquifers in California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, and Colorado. Demands for irrigation and drinking water have substantially increased groundwater withdrawals and irrigation return flow to some of these aquifers. These changes have increased the movement of contaminants from geologic and human sources to depths used to supply drinking water in several basin-fill aquifers in the Southwest.

  13. Method to identify wells that yield water that will be replaced by water from the Colorado River downstream from Laguna Dam in Arizona and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Owen-Joyce, Sandra J.; Wilson, Richard P.; Carpenter, Michael C.; Fink, James B.

    2000-01-01

    Accounting for the use of Colorado River water is required by the U.S. Supreme Court decree, 1964, Arizona v. California. Water pumped from wells on the flood plain and from certain wells on alluvial slopes outside the flood plain is presumed to be river water and is accounted for as Colorado River water. The accounting-surface method developed for the area upstream from Laguna Dam was modified for use downstream from Laguna Dam to identify wells outside the flood plain of the lower Colorado River that yield water that will be replaced by water from the river. Use of the same method provides a uniform criterion of identification for all users pumping water from wells by determining if the static water-level elevation in the well is above or below the elevation of the accounting surface. Wells that have a static water-level elevation equal to or below the accounting surface are presumed to yield water that will be replaced by water from the Colorado River. Wells that have a static water-level elevation above the accounting surface are presumed to yield river water stored above river level. The method is based on the concept of a river aquifer and an accounting surface within the river aquifer. The river aquifer consists of permeable sediments and sedimentary rocks that are hydraulically connected to the Colorado River so that water can move between the river and the aquifer in response to withdrawal of water from the aquifer or differences in water-level elevations between the river and the aquifer. The subsurface limit of the river aquifer is the nearly impermeable bedrock of the bottom and sides of the basins that underlie the Yuma area and adjacent valleys. The accounting surface represents the elevation and slope of the unconfined static water table in the river aquifer outside the flood plain of the Colorado River that would exist if the river were the only source of water to the river aquifer. The accounting surface was generated by using water

  14. Geometry of miocene extensional deformation, lower Colorado River Region, Southeastern California and Southwestern Arizona: Evidence for the presence of a regional low-angle normal fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tosdal, R. M.; Sherrod, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    The geometry of Miocene extensional deformation, which changes along a 120 km-long, northeast-trending transect from the southestern Chocolate Mountains, southeastern California, to the Trigo and southern Dome Rock Mountains, southwestern Arizona is discussed. Based upon regional differences in the structural response to extension and estimated extensional strain, the transet can be divided into three northwesterly-trending structural domains. From southwest to northeast, these domains are: (1) southestern Chocolate-southernmost Trigo Mountains; (2) central to northern Trigo Mountains; and (3) Trigo Peaks-southern Dome Rock Mountains. All structures formed during the deformation are brittle in style; fault rocks are composed of gouge, cohesive gouge, and local microbreccia. In each structural domain, exposed lithologic units are composed of Mesozoic crystalline rocks unconformably overlain by Oligocene to Early Miocene volcanic and minor interbedded sedimentary rocks. Breccia, conglomerate, and sandstone deposited synchronously with regional extension locally overlie the volcanic rocks. Extensional deformation largely postdated the main phase of volcanic activity, but rare rhyolitic tuff and flows interbedded with the syndeformational clastic rocks suggest that deformation began during the waning stages of valcanism. K-Ar isotopic ages indicate that deformation occurred in Miocene time, between about 22 and m.y. ago.

  15. Modeling Habitat of the Desert Tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) in the Mojave and Parts of the Sonoran Deserts of California, Nevada, Utah, and Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nussear, Kenneth E.; Esque, Todd C.; Inman, Richard D.; Gass, Leila; Thomas, Kathryn A.; Wallace, Cynthia S.A.; Blainey, Joan B.; Miller, David M.; Webb, Robert H.

    2009-01-01

    Habitat modeling is an important tool used to simulate the potential distribution of a species for a variety of basic and applied questions. The desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is a federally listed threatened species in the Mojave Desert and parts of the Sonoran Desert of California, Nevada, Utah, and Arizona. Land managers in this region require reliable information about the potential distribution of desert tortoise habitat to plan conservation efforts, guide monitoring activities, monitor changes in the amount and quality of habitat available, minimize and mitigate disturbances, and ultimately to assess the status of the tortoise and its habitat toward recovery of the species. By applying information from the literature and our knowledge or assumptions of environmental variables that could potentially explain variability in the quality of desert tortoise habitat, we developed a quantitative habitat model for the desert tortoise using an extensive set of field-collected presence data. Sixteen environmental data layers were converted into a grid covering the study area and merged with the desert tortoise presence data that we gathered for input into the Maxent habitat-modeling algorithm. This model provides output of the statistical probability of habitat potential that can be used to map potential areas of desert tortoise habitat. This type of analysis, while robust in its predictions of habitat, does not account for anthropogenic changes that may have altered habitat with relatively high potential into areas with lower potential.

  16. Read Arizona.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Library, Archives and Public Records, Phoenix.

    This manual, designed to help public libraries in Arizona to plan their summer reading programs for children, celebrates the 25th anniversary of the Arizona Reading Program. The material in the manual is prepared for libraries to adapt for their own uses. Chapters of the manual include: (1) Introductory Materials; (2) Goals, Objectives and…

  17. Novel poxvirus infection in northern and southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris kenyoni and Enhydra lutris neiris), Alaska and California, USA.

    PubMed

    Tuomi, Pamela A; Murray, Michael J; Garner, Michael M; Goertz, Caroline E C; Nordhausen, Robert W; Burek-Huntington, Kathleen A; Getzy, David M; Nielsen, Ole; Archer, Linda L; Maness, Heather T D; Wellehan, James F X; Waltzek, Thomas B

    2014-07-01

    Small superficially ulcerated skin lesions were observed between October 2009 and September 2011 during captive care of two orphaned sea otter pups: one northern (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) in Alaska and one southern (Enhydra lutris nereis) in California. Inclusions consistent with poxviral infection were diagnosed by histopathology in both cases. Virions consistent with poxvirus virions were seen on electron microscopy in the northern sea otter, and the virus was successfully propagated in cell culture. DNA extraction, pan-chordopoxviral PCR amplification, and sequencing of the DNA-dependent DNA polymerase gene revealed that both cases were caused by a novel AT-rich poxvirus. Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses found that the virus is divergent from other known poxviruses at a level consistent with a novel genus. These cases were self-limiting and did not appear to be associated with systemic illness. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a poxvirus in a mustelid species. The source of this virus, mode of transmission, zoonotic potential, and biological significance are undetermined.

  18. Geologic map of the west half of the Blythe 30' by 60' quadrangle, Riverside County, California and La Paz County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, Paul

    2006-01-01

    The Blythe 30' by 60' quadrangle is located along the Colorado River between southeastern California and western Arizona. This map depicts the geology of the west half of the Blythe quadrangle, which is mostly in California. The map area is a desert terrain consisting of mountain ranges surrounded by extensive alluvial fans and plains, including the flood plain of the Colorado River which covers the easternmost part of the area. Mountainous parts of the area, including the Big Maria, Little Maria, Riverside, McCoy, and Mule Mountains, consist of structurally complex rocks that range in age from Proterozoic to Miocene. Proterozoic gneiss and granite are overlain by Paleozoic to Early Jurassic metasedimentary rocks (mostly marble, quartzite, and schist) that are lithostratigraphically similar to coeval formations of the Colorado Plateau region to the east. The Paleozoic to Jurassic strata were deposited on the tectonically stable North American craton. These rocks are overlain by metamorphosed Jurassic volcanic rocks and are intruded by Jurassic plutonic rocks that represent part of a regionally extensive, northwest-trending magmatic arc. The overlying McCoy Mountains Formation, a very thick sequence of weakly metamorphosed sandstone and conglomerate of Jurassic(?) and Cretaceous age, accumulated in a rapidly subsiding depositional basin south of an east-trending belt of deformation and east of the north-trending Cretaceous Cordilleran magmatic arc. The McCoy Mountains Formation and older rocks were deformed, metamorphosed, and locally intruded by plutonic rocks in the Late Cretaceous. In Oligocene(?) to Miocene time, sedimentary and minor volcanic deposits accumulated locally, and the area was deformed by faulting. Tertiary rocks and their Proterozoic basement in the Riverside and northeastern Big Maria Mountains are in the upper plate of a low-angle normal (detachment) fault that lies within a region of major Early to Middle Miocene crustal extension. Surficial

  19. History of earthquakes and tsunamis along the eastern Aleutian-Alaska megathrust, with implications for tsunami hazards in the California Continental Borderland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryan, Holly F.; von Huene, Roland; Wells, Ray E.; Scholl, David W.; Kirby, Stephen; Draut, Amy E.; Dumoulin, J.A.; Dusel-Bacon, C.

    2012-01-01

    During the past several years, devastating tsunamis were generated along subduction zones in Indonesia, Chile, and most recently Japan. Both the Chile and Japan tsunamis traveled across the Pacific Ocean and caused localized damage at several coastal areas in California. The question remains as to whether coastal California, in particular the California Continental Borderland, is vulnerable to more extensive damage from a far-field tsunami sourced along a Pacific subduction zone. Assuming that the coast of California is at risk from a far-field tsunami, its coastline is most exposed to a trans-Pacific tsunami generated along the eastern Aleutian-Alaska subduction zone. We present the background geologic constraints that could control a possible giant (Mw ~9) earthquake sourced along the eastern Aleutian-Alaska megathrust. Previous great earthquakes (Mw ~8) in 1788, 1938, and 1946 ruptured single segments of the eastern Aleutian-Alaska megathrust. However, in order to generate a giant earthquake, it is necessary to rupture through multiple segments of the megathrust. Potential barriers to a throughgoing rupture, such as high-relief fracture zones or ridges, are absent on the subducting Pacific Plate between the Fox and Semidi Islands. Possible asperities (areas on the megathrust that are locked and therefore subject to infrequent but large slip) are identified by patches of high moment release observed in the historical earthquake record, geodetic studies, and the location of forearc basin gravity lows. Global Positioning System (GPS) data indicate that some areas of the eastern Aleutian-Alaska megathrust, such as that beneath Sanak Island, are weakly coupled. We suggest that although these areas will have reduced slip during a giant earthquake, they are not really large enough to form a barrier to rupture. A key aspect in defining an earthquake source for tsunami generation is determining the possibility of significant slip on the updip end of the megathrust near

  20. Chlorinated, brominated, and perfluorinated compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and trace elements in livers of sea otters from California, Washington, and Alaska (USA), and Kamchatka (Russia)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kannan, K.; Moon, H.-B.; Yun, S.-H.; Agusa, T.; Thomas, N.J.; Tanabe, S.

    2008-01-01

    Concentrations of organochlorine pesticides (DDTs, HCHs, and chlordanes), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), and 20 trace elements were determined in livers of 3- to 5-year old stranded sea otters collected from the coastal waters of California, Washington, and Alaska (USA) and from Kamchatka (Russia). Concentrations of organochlorine pesticides, PCBs, and PBDEs were high in sea otters collected from the California coast. Concentrations of DDTs were 10-fold higher in California sea otters than in otters from other locations; PCB concentrations were 5-fold higher, and PBDE concentrations were 2-fold higher, in California sea otters than in otters from other locations. Concentrations of PAHs were higher in sea otters from Prince William Sound than in sea otters from other locations. Concentrations of several trace elements were elevated in sea otters collected from California and Prince William Sound. Elevated concentrations of Mn and Zn in sea otters from California and Prince William Sound were indicative of oxidative stress-related injuries in these two populations. Concentrations of all of the target compounds, including trace elements, that were analyzed in sea otters from Kamchatka were lower than those found from the US coastal locations. ?? The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  1. Chlorinated, brominated, and perfluorinated compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and trace elements in livers of sea otters from California, Washington, and Alaska (USA), and Kamchatka (Russia).

    PubMed

    Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Moon, Hyo-Bang; Yun, Se Hun; Agusa, Tetsuro; Thomas, Nancy J; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2008-04-01

    Concentrations of organochlorine pesticides (DDTs, HCHs, and chlordanes), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), and 20 trace elements were determined in livers of 3- to 5-year old stranded sea otters collected from the coastal waters of California, Washington, and Alaska (USA) and from Kamchatka (Russia). Concentrations of organochlorine pesticides, PCBs, and PBDEs were high in sea otters collected from the California coast. Concentrations of DDTs were 10-fold higher in California sea otters than in otters from other locations; PCB concentrations were 5-fold higher, and PBDE concentrations were 2-fold higher, in California sea otters than in otters from other locations. Concentrations of PAHs were higher in sea otters from Prince William Sound than in sea otters from other locations. Concentrations of several trace elements were elevated in sea otters collected from California and Prince William Sound. Elevated concentrations of Mn and Zn in sea otters from California and Prince William Sound were indicative of oxidative stress-related injuries in these two populations. Concentrations of all of the target compounds, including trace elements, that were analyzed in sea otters from Kamchatka were lower than those found from the US coastal locations.

  2. Mesozoic and Cenozoic thermal history of the eastern Mojave Desert, California and western Arizona, with emphasis on the Old Woman Mountains area and the Chemehuevi metamorphic core complex

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    Mesozoic thickening and Cenozoic extension resulted in the juxtaposition of upper and middle crustal rocks in the eastern Mojave Desert, southeastern California and western Arizona. The application of {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar thermochronology and petrology/thermobarometry to rocks in this region provides information about the timing and nature of thrusting, plutonism, metamorphism, denudation, and detachment faulting. Orogenesis culminated during the Late Cretaceous when rocks exposed in the Old Woman-Piute, Chemehuevi, and Sacramento Mountains attained temperatures > 500C. High grade metamorphism of the Old Woman Mountains area was caused by the intrusion of the Old Woman-Piute batholith at 73 {plus minus} 1 Ma; Cretaceous mineral assemblages in Proterozoic pelites increase in grade from greenschist to upper amphibolite facies, and {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar hornblende ages from Proterozoic amphibolites decrease in age from {approximately} 1,600 Ma to 73 {plus minus} 1 Ma, in the direction of 73 Ma plutons. Pluton emplacement and metamorphism occurred at 3 to 3.5 kbars and 400 > 600C in the Piute Mountains, and 3.5 to 4.5 kbars and 530 to > 650C in the Old Woman Mountains. Following the Cretaceous, the eastern Mojave Desert underwent a period of cooling at a rate of 2 to 10C/Ma between 65 and 25 Ma. By 30 Ma rocks exposed in the Old Woman-Piute, Marble Ship, Clipper and Turtle Mountains were below {approximately} 100C. {sup 40}/{sup 39}Ar ages from the Sacramento Mountains suggest that mylonitization caused by the onset of regional extension occurred at 23 {plus minus} 1 Ma. When extension started in the Chemehuevi Mountains, rocks exposed in the southwestern and northeastern portions of footwall to the Chemehuevi detachment fault were at {approximately} 180C and {approximately} 350C, respectively which suggests that this fault initiated at a dip of 5 to 30{degree}.

  3. Geochemistry of ground water in alluvial basins of Arizona and adjacent parts of Nevada, New Mexico, and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Frederick N.

    1991-01-01

    Chemical and isotope analyses of ground water from 28 basins in the Basin and Range physiographic province of Arizona and parts of adjacent States were used to evaluate ground-water quality, determine processes that control ground-water chemistry, provide independent insight into the hydrologic flow system, and develop information transfer. The area is characterized by north- to northwest-trending mountains separated by alluvial basins that form a regional topography of alternating mountains and valleys. On the basis of ground-water divides or zones of minimal basin interconnection, the area was divided into 72 basins, each representing an individual aquifer system. These systems are joined in a dendritic pattern and collectively constitute the major water resource in the region. Geochemical models were developed to identify reactions and mass transfer responsible for the chemical evolution of the ground water. On the basis of mineralogy and chemistry of the two major rock associations of the area, a felsic model and a mafic model were developed to illustrate geologic, climatic, and physiographic effects on ground-water chemistry. Two distinct hydrochemical processes were identified: (1) reactions of meteoric water with minerals and gases in recharge areas and (2) reactions of ground water as it moves down the hydraulic gradient. Reactions occurring in recharge and downgradient areas can be described by a 13-component system. Major reactions are the dissolution and precipitation of calcite and dolomite, the weathering of feldspars and ferromagnesian minerals, the formation of montmorillonite, iron oxyhydroxides, and probably silica, and, in some basins, ion exchange. The geochemical modeling demonstrated that relatively few phases are required to derive the ground-water chemistry; 14 phases-12 mineral and 2 gas-consistently account for the chemical evolution in each basin. The final phases were selected through analysis of X-ray diffraction and fluorescence data

  4. Activity remotely triggered in volcanic and geothermal centers in California and Washington by the 3 November 2002 Mw=7.9 Alaska earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, D. P.; Prejean, S.; Oppenheimer, D.; Pitt, A. M.; S. D. Malone; Richards-Dinger, K.

    2002-12-01

    The M=7.9 Alaska earthquake of 3 November 2002 was followed by bursts of remotely triggered earthquakes at several volcanic and geothermal areas across the western United States at epicentral distances of 2,500 to 3,660 km. Husen et al. (this session) describe the triggered response for Yellowstone caldera, Wyoming. Here we highlight the triggered response for the Geysers geothermal field in northern California, Mammoth Mountain and Long Valley caldera in eastern California, the Coso geothermal field in southeastern California, and Mount Rainier in central Washington. The onset of triggered seismicity at each of these areas began 15 to 17 minutes after the Alaska earthquake during the S-wave coda and the early phases of the Love and Raleigh waves with periods of 5 to 40 seconds and dynamic strains of a few microstrain. In each case, the seismicity was characterized by spasmodic bursts of small (M<2 ), brittle-failure earthquakes. The activity persisted for just a few minutes at Mount Rainier and Mammoth Mountain and roughly 30 minutes at the Geysers and Coso geothermal fields. Many of the triggered earthquakes at all three sites were too small for reliable locations (magnitudes M<1), although their small S-P times indicate hypocentral locations within a few km of the nearest seismic station. Borehole dilatometers in vicinity of Mammoth Mountain recorded strain offsets on the order of 0.1 microstrain coincident in time with the triggered seismicity (Johnston et al. this session), and water level in the 3-km-deep LVEW well in the center of Long Valley caldera dropped by ~13 cm during passage of the seismic wave train from the Alaska earthquake followed by a gradual recovery. The Geysers, Coso, and Mount Rainier have no continuous, high-resolution strain instrumentation. A larger earthquake swarm that began 23.5 hours later (21:38 UT on the 4th) in the south moat of Long Valley caldera and included nine M>2 and one M=3.0 earthquake may represent a delayed response to

  5. Phase-equilibrium geobarometers for silicic rocks based on rhyolite-MELTS—Part 3: Application to the Peach Spring Tuff (Arizona-California-Nevada, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamukcu, Ayla S.; Gualda, Guilherme A. R.; Ghiorso, Mark S.; Miller, Calvin F.; McCracken, Reba G.

    2015-03-01

    Establishing the depths of magma accumulation is critical to understanding how magmas evolve and erupt, but developing methods to constrain these pressures is challenging. We apply the new rhyolite-MELTS phase-equilibria geobarometer—based on the equilibrium between melt, quartz, and two feldspars—to matrix glass compositions from Peach Spring Tuff (Arizona-California-Nevada, USA) high-silica rhyolite. We compare the results to those from amphibole geothermobarometry, projection of glass compositions onto the haplogranitic ternary, and glass SiO2 geobarometry. Quartz + 2 feldspar rhyolite-MELTS pressures span a relatively small range (185-230 MPa), consistent with nearly homogeneous crystal compositions, and are similar to estimates based on projection onto the haplogranitic ternary (250 ± 50 MPa) and on glass SiO2 (255-275 MPa). Amphibole geothermobarometry gives much wider pressure ranges (temperature-independent: ~65-300 MPa; temperature-dependent: ~75-295 MPa; amphibole-only: ~80-950 MPa); average Anderson and Smith (Am Mineral 80:549-559, 1995) + Blundy and Holland (Contrib Miner Petrol 104:208-224, 1990) or Holland and Blundy (Contrib Miner Petrol 116:433-447, 1994—Thermometer A, B) pressures are most similar to phase-equilibria results (~220, 210, 190 MPa, respectively). Crystallization temperatures determined previously with rhyolite-MELTS (742 °C), Zr-in-sphene (769 ± 20 °C), and zircon saturation (770-780 °C) geothermometry are similar, but temperatures from amphibole geothermometry (~450-955 °C) are notably different; the average Anderson and Smith + Holland and Blundy (1994—Thermometer B; ~710 °C) temperature is most consistent with previous estimates. The rhyolite-MELTS geobarometer effectively culls glass compositions affected by alteration or analytical issues; Peach Spring glass compositions that yield pressure estimates reveal a tight range of plausible Na2O and K2O contents, suggesting that low Na2O and high K2O contents of many

  6. Arizona Fires

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... and is currently the second largest fire in Arizona history. More than 2,000 people are working to contain the fire, which is being ... bright desert background. The areas with no data (shown in black and present at the oblique angles) are locations where the variable ...

  7. Dividing Arizona

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkel, Ed

    2010-01-01

    Amid all the national attention on Arizona these past few months, largely due to Senate Bill 1070 empowering police to take "reasonable" steps to verify the immigration status of criminal suspects, the state's K12 district administrators have been wrestling with a unique segregation issue, as well. Over the past two years, all districts…

  8. Scallopleaf sage (salvia vaseyi: Lamiaceae) discovered in Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cain, J.W.; Felger, R.S.; Jansen, B.D.; Krausman, P.R.

    2010-01-01

    During the course of field work in Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge, southwestern Arizona, in 2003, James Cain and Brian Jansen collected Salvia vaseyi, previously known only from the western edge of the Sonoran Desert in California and Baja California. Our findings indicate this shrub might be more widespread in southwestern Arizona mountains. Salvia vaseyi in Arizona seems to represent a relict population. There are other shrubby Salvia in Arizona, but S. vaseyi is the most xeric-mhabiting species and has the narrowest ecological and geographical range.

  9. Contamination status and accumulation profiles of organotins in sea otters (Enhydra lutris) found dead along the coasts of California, Washington, Alaska (USA), and Kamchatka (Russia).

    PubMed

    Murata, Satoko; Takahashi, Shin; Agusa, Tetsuro; Thomas, Nancy J; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2008-04-01

    Organotin compounds (OTs) including mono- to tri-butyltins, -phenyltins, and -octyltins were determined in the liver of adult sea otters (Enhydra lutris) found dead along the coasts of California, Washington, and Alaska in the USA and Kamchatka, Russia. Total concentrations of OTs in sea otters from California ranged from 34 to 4100ng/g on a wet weight basis. The order of concentrations of OTs in sea otters was total butyltins>total octyltins> or = total phenyltins. Elevated concentrations of butyltins (BTs) were found in some otters classified under 'infectious-disease' mortality category. Concentrations of BTs in few of these otters were close to or above the threshold levels for adverse health effects. Total butyltin concentrations decreased significantly in the livers of California sea otters since the 1990s. Based on the concentrations of organotins in sea otters collected from 1992 to 2002, the half-lives of tributyltin and total butyltins in sea otters were estimated to be approximately three years.

  10. Contamination status and accumulation profiles of organotins in sea otters (Enhydra lutris) found dead along the coasts of California, Washington, Alaska (USA), and Kamchatka (Russia)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murata, S.; Takahashi, S.; Agusa, T.; Thomas, N.J.; Kannan, K.; Tanabe, S.

    2008-01-01

    Organotin compounds (OTs) including mono- to tri-butyltins, -phenyltins, and -octyltins were determined in the liver of adult sea otters (Enhydra lutris) found dead along the coasts of California, Washington, and Alaska in the USA and Kamchatka, Russia. Total concentrations of OTs in sea otters from California ranged from 34 to 4100 ng/g on a wet weight basis. The order of concentrations of OTs in sea otters was total butyltins ??? total octyltins ??? total phenyltins. Elevated concentrations of butyltins (BTs) were found in some otters classified under 'infectious-disease' mortality category. Concentrations of BTs in few of these otters were close to or above the threshold levels for adverse health effects. Total butyltin concentrations decreased significantly in the livers of California sea otters since the 1990s. Based on the concentrations of organotins in sea otters collected from 1992 to 2002, the half-lives of tributyltin and total butyltins in sea otters were estimated to be approximately three years. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Arctic Animals of Alaska. First Grade Activity. Schools of California Online Resources for Education (SCORE): Connecting California's Classrooms to the World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boe, Sandra

    The Arctic is covered with ice and snow for most of the year. Animals that live in Alaska's arctic region must be able to survive long winters and very cold temperatures. Surprisingly, many animals live in the harsh, cold climate. This first-grade activity plan helps students learn about the animals of the far north. The plan gives six steps for…

  12. Mental health and substance abuse characteristics among a clinical sample of urban American Indian/Alaska native youths in a large California metropolitan area: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Daniel L; Johnson, Carrie L

    2012-02-01

    This study analyzes descriptive data among a clinical sample of American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) youths receiving mental health services in a large California metropolitan area. Among 118 urban AI/AN youths, mood disorders (41.5%) and adjustment disorder (35.4%) were the most common mental health diagnoses. Alcohol (69.2%) and marijuana (50.0%) were the most commonly used substances. Witnessing domestic violence (84.2%) and living with someone who had a substance abuse problem (64.7%) were reported. The majority of patients demonstrated various behavior and emotional problems. Enhancing culturally relevant mental health and substance abuse treatment and prevention programs for urban AI/AN youth is suggested.

  13. Combined Ice and Water Balances of Maclure Glacier, California, South Cascade Glacier, Washington, and Wolverine and Gulkana Glaciers, Alaska, 1967 Hydrologic Year

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tangborn, Wendell V.; Mayo, Lawrence R.; Scully, David R.; Krimmel, Robert M.

    1977-01-01

    Combined ice and water balances were measured in the 1967 hydrologic year (October 1-September 30) on four glaciers in western North America ranging in latitude from 37 deg to 63 deg N. This hydrologic year was characterized by heavier than normal winter precipitation in California and Washington and abnormally dry winter conditions in coastal Alaska. In summer the western conterminous states were abnormally dry and central and southern Alaska experienced very wet conditions. Maclure Glacier (lat 37 deg 45' N., 3,650-m (metres) mean equilibrium line altitude) had an above normal winter balance of 3.46 m and a positive annual balance of 1.05 m (metres of water equivalent). South Cascade Glacier (lat 48 deg 22' N., 1900-m mean equilibrium line altitude) had a winter balance of 3.28 m, slightly above average. Above normal summer ablation resulted in a final annual balance of -0.58 m, slightly more negative than has been the case for the past decade. Wolverine Glacier's (lat 60 deg 24' N., 1,200-m mean equilibrium line altitude) winter balance was 1.17 m, considerably below normal; the annual balance was -2.04 m. Gulkana Glacier (lat 63 deg 15' N., 1,700-m mean equilibrium line altitude) had a winter balance of 1.05 m, approximately normal for this glacier; the final annual balance was -0.30 m.

  14. Studies on California ants: a review of the genus Temnothorax (Hymenoptera, Formicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Snelling, Roy R.; Borowiec, Marek L.; Prebus, Matthew M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The following ten new species of the ant genus Temnothorax are described and illustrated: T. anaphalantus (California, Baja California), T. arboreus (California), T. caguatan (Oregon, California, Baja California), T. morongo (California, Baja California), T. myrmiciformis (California, Baja California), T. nuwuvi (Nevada), T. paiute (California, Nevada), T. pseudandrei (Arizona, California), T. quasimodo (California) and T. wardi (California). A key to workers of the twenty-two Temnothorax species known or expected to occur in California is provided. PMID:24493957

  15. State summaries: California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kohl, S. G.

    2006-01-01

    According to the United States Geological Survey (USGS), California ranked second behind Arizona among the states in nonfuel mineral production during 2005. It accounted for 7% of the US's total. The market value of mineral production for California amounted to $3.7 billion. During the year, California produced 30 varieties of industrial minerals. The nonfuel minerals came from 820 active mines.

  16. 75 FR 7541 - Open Meeting of the Area 7 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of Alaska, California...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Area 7 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of Alaska.... SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Area 7 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy...) that a meeting of the Area 7 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be held Wednesday, March 17, 2010, at 2...

  17. 76 FR 32023 - Open Meeting of the Area 7 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of Alaska, California...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Area 7 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of Alaska.... SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Area 7 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy... meeting of the Area 7 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be held Thursday, July 21, 2011, at 2 p.m. Pacific...

  18. 75 FR 47061 - Open Meeting of the Area 7 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of Alaska, California...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-04

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Area 7 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of Alaska.... SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Area 7 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy...) that a meeting of the Area 7 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be held Wednesday, September 15, 2010, at 2...

  19. 76 FR 17994 - Open Meeting of the Area 7 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of Alaska, California...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-31

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Area 7 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of Alaska.... SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Area 7 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy... meeting of the Area 7 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be held Thursday, May 19, 2011, at 2 p.m., Pacific...

  20. 76 FR 22170 - Open Meeting of the Area 7 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of Alaska, California...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-20

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Area 7 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of Alaska.... SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Area 7 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy... meeting of the Area 7 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be held Thursday, June 16, 2011, at 2 p.m. Pacific...

  1. Hydrogeologic framework refinement, ground-water flow and storage, water-chemistry analyses, and water-budget components of the Yuma area, southwestern Arizona and southeastern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dickinson, Jesse E.; Land, Michael; Faunt, Claudia C.; Leake, S.A.; Reichard, Eric G.; Fleming, John B.; Pool, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    The ground-water and surface-water system in the Yuma area in southwestern Arizona and southeastern California is managed intensely to meet water-delivery requirements of customers in the United States, to manage high ground-water levels in the valleys, and to maintain treaty-mandated water-quality and quantity requirements of Mexico. The following components in this report, which were identified to be useful in the development of a ground-water management model, are: (1) refinement of the hydrogeologic framework; (2) updated water-level maps, general ground-water flow patterns, and an estimate of the amount of ground water stored in the mound under Yuma Mesa; (3) review and documentation of the ground-water budget calculated by the Bureau of Reclamation, U.S. Department of the Interior (Reclamation); and (4) water-chemistry characterization to identify the spatial distribution of water quality, information on sources and ages of ground water, and information about the productive-interval depths of the aquifer. A refined three-dimensional digital hydrogeologic framework model includes the following hydrogeologic units from bottom to top: (1) the effective hydrologic basement of the basin aquifer, which includes the Pliocene Bouse Formation, Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary rocks, and pre-Tertiary metamorphic and plutonic rocks; (2) undifferentiated lower units to represent the Pliocene transition zone and wedge zone; (3) coarse-gravel unit; (4) lower, middle, and upper basin fill to represent the upper, fine-grained zone between the top of the coarse-gravel unit and the land surface; and (5) clay A and clay B. Data for the refined model includes digital elevation models, borehole lithology data, geophysical data, and structural data to represent the geometry of the hydrogeologic units. The top surface of the coarse-gravel unit, defined by using borehole and geophysical data, varies similarly to terraces resulting from the down cutting of the Colorado River. Clay A

  2. Usefulness of ERTS-1 satellite imagery as a data-gathering tool by resource managers in the Bureau of Land Management. [Arizona, California, Oregon, and Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bentley, R. G.

    1974-01-01

    ERTS-1 satellite imagery can be an effective data-gathering tool for resource managers. Techniques are developed which allow managers to visually analyze simulated color infrared composite images to map perennial and ephemeral (annual) plant communities. Tentative results indicate that ephemeral plant growth and development and potential to produce forage can be monitored.

  3. Automated thematic mapping and change detection of ERTS-A images. [farmlands, cities, and mountain identification in Utah, Washington, Arizona, and California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gramenopoulos, N. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A diffraction pattern analysis of MSS images led to the development of spatial signatures for farm land, urban areas and mountains. Four spatial features are employed to describe the spatial characteristics of image cells in the digital data. Three spectral features are combined with the spatial features to form a seven dimensional vector describing each cell. Then, the classification of the feature vectors is accomplished by using the maximum likelihood criterion. It was determined that the recognition accuracy with the maximum likelihood criterion depends on the statistics of the feature vectors. It was also determined that for a given geographic area the statistics of the classes remain invariable for a period of a month, but vary substantially between seasons. Three ERTS-1 images from the Phoenix, Arizona area were processed, and recognition rates between 85% and 100% were obtained for the terrain classes of desert, farms, mountains, and urban areas. To eliminate the need for training data, a new clustering algorithm has been developed. Seven ERTS-1 images from four test sites have been processed through the clustering algorithm, and high recognition rates have been achieved for all terrain classes.

  4. Cretaceous age of the upper part of the McCoy Mountains Formation, southeastern California and southwestern Arizona, and its tectonic significance: reconciliation of paleobotanical and paleomagnetic evidence.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, P.; Page, V.M.; Hamilton, W.; Howard, K.A.

    1987-01-01

    The upper part of the 7-km-thick McCoy Mountains Formation in southeastern California contains fossil angiosperm wood that closely resembles the genus Paraphyllanthoxylon, which is known only from strata of late Early Cretaceous and younger age. This wood, in conjunction with geologic field relations, supports previous interpretations that the upper part of the McCoy Mountains Formation is of late Early Cretaceous and/or Late Cretaceous age, in contrast to a more recent interpretation that the entire formation is of Jurassic age. Alternatives are therefore needed to the recent hypothesis that deposition, deformation, and metamorphism of the McCoy Mountains Formation were related to movement on the Jurassic Mojave-Sonora megashear. -Authors

  5. GeoFORCE Alaska, A Successful Summer Exploring Alaska's Geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wartes, D.

    2012-12-01

    Thirty years old this summer, RAHI, the Rural Alaska Honors Institute is a statewide, six-week, summer college-preparatory bridge program at the University of Alaska Fairbanks for Alaska Native and rural high school juniors and seniors. This summer, in collaboration with the University of Texas Austin, the Rural Alaska Honors Institute launched a new program, GeoFORCE Alaska. This outreach initiative is designed to increase the number and diversity of students pursuing STEM degree programs and entering the future high-tech workforce. It uses Earth science to entice kids to get excited about dinosaurs, volcanoes and earthquakes, and includes physics, chemistry, math, biology and other sciences. Students were recruited from the Alaska's Arctic North Slope schools, in 8th grade to begin the annual program of approximately 8 days, the summer before their 9th grade year and then remain in the program for all four years of high school. They must maintain a B or better grade average and participate in all GeoFORCE events. The culmination is an exciting field event each summer. Over the four-year period, events will include trips to Fairbanks and Anchorage, Arizona, Oregon and the Appalachians. All trips focus on Earth science and include a 100+ page guidebook, with tests every night culminating with a final exam. GeoFORCE Alaska was begun by the University of Alaska Fairbanks in partnership with the University of Texas at Austin, which has had tremendous success with GeoFORCE Texas. GeoFORCE Alaska is managed by UAF's long-standing Rural Alaska Honors Institute, that has been successfully providing intense STEM educational opportunities for Alaskan high school students for over 30 years. The program will add a new cohort of 9th graders each year for the next four years. By the summer of 2015, GeoFORCE Alaska is targeting a capacity of 160 students in grades 9th through 12th. Join us to find out more about this exciting new initiative, which is enticing young Alaska Native

  6. Alternative models for Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous paleogeography of the western Cordillera, California to SE Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, D.S. . Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    The Franciscan-Great Valley-Sierran triad is indisputable evidence for late Mesozoic, west-facing subduction along the California sector of the N. American margin. In the northwestern sector (N of 48[degree]N), however, neither the configuration of plate boundaries, nor the paleogeographic disposition of the Insular and Intermontane superterranes, is confidently established. Models divide into two groups. One set, based entirely on geologic evidence such as the age and nature of deformational events, or putative stratigraphic links among terranes, places the two superterranes exclusively to the north of the Franciscan-Sierran system from 150 to 90 Ma. These hypotheses, which ignore or reject paleomagnetic data from mid-Cretaceous rocks, yield a paleogeography not too different from today's, but they are incompatible with the Franciscan and Great Valley rocks caught between the superterranes in the mid-Cretaceous San Juan-Cascade thrust system. An alternative model fully respecting paleomagnetic data from mid-Cretaceous rocks with paleohorizontal control restores most of the Intermontane superterrane [approximately]1,200 km south of its expected (i.e. present) latitudinal position with respect to North America, and the Insular superterrane [approximately]2,900 km south, at 95--105 Ma. The mid-Cretaceous thrust system along the eastern margin of the Insular superterrane records the collision of Wrangellia et al. with the southern continuation of the Franciscan subduction zone. The thrust system, a silver of hanging wall, and the Insular superterrane were all subsequently translated > 2,500 km northward by post-80, pre-60 Ma coast-parallel dextral slip, accommodated on the proto-Pasayten and proto-Yalakom faults, and along or near the Coast Range shear zone.

  7. The development of folds and cleavages in slate belts by underplating in accretionary complexes: A comparison of the Kodiak Formation, Alaska and the Calaveras Complex, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, Scott R.; Sample, James C.

    1988-08-01

    The development of folds and cleavages in slate and graywacke belts is commonly attributed to arc-continent or continent-continent collisions. However, the Kodiak Formation of southern Alaska and the Calaveras Complex of the western Sierra Nevada, California, are two slate and graywacke belts in which folds and slaty cleavages developed during simple underthrusting and underplating within accretionary wedges. The Maastrichtian Kodiak Formation is composed dominantly of coherent turbidites but includes lesser pebbly mudstone, minor conglomerate, and rare chert. The Kodiak Formation is part of a large accretionary complex that youngs in age seaward, but bedding tops generally show landward younging. A progression of structures has been determined by crosscutting relationships and includes (1) syndeformational depositional features; (2) broken formation; (3) slaty cleavage, folds, and thrust faults; (4) crenulations and crenulation cleavage; (5) late brittle thrust faults; and (6) right-lateral strike-slip faults. Broken formation, slaty cleavage, thrust faults, and folds developed during underthrusting and underplating within an accretionary wedge. Crenulations and brittle thrust faults are related to subsequent intrawedge shortening. Based on peak metamorphism in the uppermost zeolite to prehnite-pumpellyite facies, underplating occurred at a minimum depth of 10 km. The Calaveras Complex is composed of argillite, chert, graywacke, pebbly mudstone, limestone, and volcanic rocks. Its age of deposition has a maximum range from Permian to Early Jurassic. Overall, the unit appears to young westward, but local facing indicators show eastward younging of individual blocks. The sequence of structures developed in the Calaveras Complex is (1) syn-depositional olistostromes; (2) broken formation; (3) slaty cleavage, folds, and thrust faults; and (4) younger Jura-Triassic folds and crenulation cleavages. Broken formation and slaty cleavage developed during underthrusting and

  8. Arizona Charter Schools Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Education, Phoenix.

    This handbook provides information and materials to assist applicants in preparing an application to establish a charter school in Arizona. The topics discussed reflect the technical requirements of Arizona's charter-school legislation. It does not necessarily reflect the selection requirements or the policies of the State Board of Education, the…

  9. Northern Arizona University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butcher, Michael F.; Saltonstall, Margot; Bickel, Sarah; Brandel, Rick

    2009-01-01

    Northern Arizona University (NAU) is a public university nestled below the San Francisco Peaks in Flagstaff, Arizona. It enrolls more than 21,000 undergraduate and graduate students at its main campus in Flagstaff, through its 35 statewide sites, and via online program offerings. Within the university organizational system, Student Affairs has a…

  10. Forgotten History: Mexican American School Segregation in Arizona from 1900-1951

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Jeanne M.

    2008-01-01

    This article documents the efforts by Mexican Americans to challenge school segregation in Arizona in the first half of the twentieth century. As in Texas and California, although state law never formally mandated the segregation of Mexican American students, school districts in Arizona often established separate "Mexican Schools" for…

  11. Distribution of carbonate-rock aquifers and the potential for their development, southern Nevada and adjacent parts of California, Arizona, and Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dettinger, M.D.; Harrill, J.R.; Schmidt, D.L.; Hess, J.W.

    1995-01-01

    In 1985, the State of Nevada entered into a cooperative effort with the U.S. Department of the Interior to study and test the State's carbonate- rock aquifers. The studies were focused on southern Nevada and were intended to address the following concerns: Where is water potentially available in the aquifers?; How much water potentially can bewithdrawn from aquifers?; and What effects might result from development of the aquifers? The studies included basic-data collection, geologic mapping, geophysical and geochemical analyses, well drilling, and aquifer testing. The studies showed that the carbonate rocks are continuous and extensive enough to form regional aquifer systems only beneath thecentral third of the region. About 130,000 acre-feet per year of ground water flows through all the aquifers in this corridor (carbonate and noncarbonate), and about 77,000 acre-feet per year discharges directly from the carbonate-rock aquifers at regional springs in southern Nevada or at discharge areas in Death Valley, California. A larger volume of water -as much as 6 million acre-feet in the upper 100 feet alone-is stored in the rocks. Once depleted, however, that resource would be replenished by natural processes only very slowly. Ultimately, long-term development of the carbonate-rock aquifers would result in depletion of stored water, or in the capture of water that otherwise would discharge from the aquifers of southern Nevada and vicinity, or both. In manyplaces, development might extract water from both carbonate-rock and basin-fill aquifers. Possible effects of developing the carbonate-rock aquifers include declining water levels, decreasing springflow rates, drying up of some streams, playas, and meadows, and changing water quality. Specific impacts would depend upon the magnitude and length of development and site-specific conditions around the areas where the water is withdrawn. Confidence in predictions of the potential effects ofdevelopment of the carbonate

  12. Reemergence of St. Louis Encephalitis Virus, California, 2015

    PubMed Central

    White, Gregory S.; Symmes, Kelly; Sun, Pu; Fang, Ying; Garcia, Sandra; Steiner, Cody; Smith, Kirk; Reisen, William K.

    2016-01-01

    St. Louis encephalitis virus infection was detected in summer 2015 in southern California after an 11-year absence, concomitant with an Arizona outbreak. Sequence comparisons showed close identity of California and Arizona isolates with 2005 Argentine isolates, suggesting introduction from South America and underscoring the value of continued arbovirus surveillance. PMID:27869600

  13. Salmonella arizona infections in Latinos associated with rattlesnake folk medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Waterman, S H; Juarez, G; Carr, S J; Kilman, L

    1990-01-01

    In 1987 two Los Angeles County (California) hospitals reported four Latino patients with serious Salmonella arizona (Salmonella subgroup 3) infections who gave a medical history of taking rattlesnake capsules prior to illness. Capsules supplied by the patients or household members grew Salmonella arizona. We reviewed surveillance data for this Salmonella species and conducted a case-control study to determine the magnitude of this public health problem. Eighteen (82 percent) of the 22 Latino cases in 1986 and 1987 who were questioned reported ingesting snake capsules compared to two (8 percent) of 24 matched Latino controls with non-subgroup 3 salmonellosis or shigellosis (matched pair odds ratio = 18.0, CI = 4.2, 76.3). An average of 18 cases per year of Salmonella arizona were reported in the county between 1980 and 1987. In this investigation the majority of S. arizona cases reporting snake capsule ingestion had underlying illnesses such as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), diabetes, arthritis, cancer. The capsules were obtained primarily from Tijuana, Mexico and from Los Angeles, California pharmacies in Latino neighborhoods. Despite publicity and attempts to remove the capsules from sale in California, Salmonella arizona cases associated with snake-capsule ingestion continue to occur. PMID:2305906

  14. Application of Geographic Information System Methods to Identify Areas Yielding Water that will be Replaced by Water from the Colorado River in the Vidal and Chemehuevi Areas, California, and the Mohave Mesa Area, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spangler, Lawrence E.; Angeroth, Cory E.; Walton, Sarah J.

    2008-01-01

    Relations between the elevation of the static water level in wells and the elevation of the accounting surface within the Colorado River aquifer in the vicinity of Vidal, California, the Chemehuevi Indian Reservation, California, and on Mohave Mesa, Arizona, were used to determine which wells outside the flood plain of the Colorado River are presumed to yield water that will be replaced by water from the Colorado River. Wells that have a static water-level elevation equal to or below the elevation of the accounting surface are presumed to yield water that will be replaced by water from the Colorado River. Geographic Information System (GIS) interpolation tools were used to produce maps of areas where water levels are above, below, and near (within ? 0.84 foot) the accounting surface. Calculated water-level elevations and interpolated accounting-surface elevations were determined for 33 wells in the vicinity of Vidal, 16 wells in the Chemehuevi area, and 35 wells on Mohave Mesa. Water-level measurements generally were taken in the last 10 years with steel and electrical tapes accurate to within hundredths of a foot. A Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) was used to determine land-surface elevations to within an operational accuracy of ? 0.43 foot, resulting in calculated water-level elevations having a 95-percent confidence interval of ? 0.84 foot. In the Vidal area, differences in elevation between the accounting surface and measured water levels range from -2.7 feet below to as much as 17.6 feet above the accounting surface. Relative differences between the elevation of the water level and the elevation of the accounting surface decrease from west to east and from north to south. In the Chemehuevi area, differences in elevation range from -3.7 feet below to as much as 8.7 feet above the accounting surface, which is established at 449.6 feet in the vicinity of Lake Havasu. In all of the Mohave Mesa area, the water-level elevation is near or below the

  15. An investigation into the utilization of HCMM thermal data for the descrimination of volcanic and Eolian geological units. [Craters of the Moon volcanic field, Idaho; San Francisco volcanic field, Arizona; High Desert, California; and the Cascade Range, California and Oregon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Head, J. W., III (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of HCMM data shows that the resolution provided by the thermal data is inadequate to permit the identification of individual lava flows within the volcanic test sites. Thermal data of southern California reveals that dune complexes at Kelso and Algodomes are found to be too small to permit adequate investigation of their structure. As part of the study of the San Francisco volcanic field, marked variations in the thermal properties of the region between Flagstaff and the Utah State border were observed. Several well-defined units within the Grand Canyon and the Colorado Plateau were recognized and appear to be very suitable for analysis with HCMM, SEASAT and LANDSAT images. Although individual volcanic constructs within the Cascade Range are too small to permit detailed characterization with the thermal data, the regional volcano/tectonic setting offers a good opportunity for comparing the possible thermal distinction between this area and sedimentary fold belts such as those found in the eastern United States. Strong intra-regional variations in vegetation cover were also tentatively identified for the Oregon test site.

  16. Clayheads in Arizona.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schubert, Thorne Erwin

    1990-01-01

    Describes how junior high school students in Arizona combine what they have learned in ceramic history class with ceramic production skills to create their own personal ceramic heads in their images. (KM)

  17. Cove, Arizona Mines: Factsheets

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This factsheet contains information about planned construction activities to mitigate surface erosion at the former transfer area located in the Cove/Red Valley Chapter of the Navajo Nation in eastern Arizona.

  18. Information Profiles of Indian Reservations in Arizona, Nevada, and Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Phoenix, AZ.

    Based on information provided by Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Agency Offices and by the Indian Health Service, this publication provides profiles of 46 Indian reservations located in Arizona, Nevada, and Utah. These profiles include data on reservations that are: (1) located partially or totally in the adjoining States of Oregon, California,…

  19. Information Profiles of Indian Reservations in Arizona, Nevada, & Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Phoenix, AZ.

    Based on information provided by Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Agency Offices and by the Indian Health Service, this publication provides profiles of 45 Indian reservations located in Arizona, Nevada, and Utah. These profiles include data on reservations located partially or totally in the adjoining states of Oregon, Idaho, California, and New…

  20. Turquoise mine and artifact correlation for snaketown site, Arizona.

    PubMed

    Sigleo, A C

    1975-08-08

    Trace element analyses on turquoise from 24 mines in the southwestern United States indicate that the turquoise artifacts from Snaketown site in south-central Arizona came from the Himalaya mine near Halloron Springs, California. The correlation of artifact and mine turquoise in the Southwest is a means of determining prehistoric exchange patterns.

  1. UNIT, ALASKA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana Arts and Science Center, Baton Rouge.

    THE UNIT DESCRIBED IN THIS BOOKLET DEALS WITH THE GEOGRAPHY OF ALASKA. THE UNIT IS PRESENTED IN OUTLINE FORM. THE FIRST SECTION DEALS PRINCIPALLY WITH THE PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY OF ALASKA. DISCUSSED ARE (1) THE SIZE, (2) THE MAJOR LAND REGIONS, (3) THE MOUNTAINS, VOLCANOES, GLACIERS, AND RIVERS, (4) THE NATURAL RESOURCES, AND (5) THE CLIMATE. THE…

  2. Alaska GeoFORCE, A New Geologic Adventure in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wartes, D.

    2011-12-01

    RAHI, the Rural Alaska Honors Institute is a statewide, six-week, summer college-preparatory bridge program at the University of Alaska Fairbanks for Alaska Native and rural high school juniors and seniors. A program of rigorous academic activity combines with social, cultural, and recreational activities. Students are purposely stretched beyond their comfort levels academically and socially to prepare for the big step from home or village to a large culturally western urban campus. This summer RAHI is launching a new program, GeoFORCE Alaska. This outreach initiative is designed to increase the number and diversity of students pursuing STEM degree programs and entering the future high-tech workforce. It uses Earth science as the hook because most kids get excited about dinosaurs, volcanoes and earthquakes, but it includes physics, chemistry, math, biology and other sciences. Students will be recruited, initially from the Arctic North Slope schools, in the 8th grade to begin the annual program of approximately 8 days, the summer before their 9th grade year and then remain in the program for all four years of high school. They must maintain a B or better grade average and participate in all GeoFORCE events. The carrot on the end of the stick is an exciting field event each summer. Over the four-year period, events will include trips to Fairbanks, Arizona, Oregon and the Appalachians. All trips are focused on Earth science and include a 100+ page guidebook, with tests every night culminating with a final exam. GeoFORCE Alaska is being launched by UAF in partnership with the University of Texas at Austin, which has had tremendous success with GeoFORCE Texas. GeoFORCE Alaska will be managed by UAF's long-standing Rural Alaska Honors Insitute (RAHI) that has been successfully providing intense STEM educational opportunities for Alaskan high school students for almost 30 years. The Texas program, with adjustments for differences in culture and environment, will be

  3. Arizona's School Asbestos Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charette, Mike L.

    1982-01-01

    The state of Arizona Department of Education operates a successful program to remove asbestos-containing building materials from schools, drawing from the expertise of the Department of Health Services, Bureau of Environmental Hygiene and Sanitation, Bureau of Waste Control, and eliciting cooperation of school officials. Includes an asbestos…

  4. Arizona Academic Standards, Kindergarten

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This publication contains Arizona public schools' academic standards for kindergarten. The contents of this document include the following: (1) The Arts Standard 2006--Kindergarten; (2) Comprehensive Health Education/Physical Activity Standards 1997--Readiness (Kindergarten); (3) Foreign and Native Language Standards 1997--Essentials (Grades 4-8);…

  5. Indians of Arizona.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    Briefly describing each tribe within Arizona's four major American Indian groups, this handbook presents information relative to the cultural background and socioeconomic development of the following tribes: (1) Athapascan Tribes (Navajos and Apaches); (2) Pueblo Indians (Hopis); (3) Desert Rancheria Tribes (Pimas, Yumas, Papagos, Maricopas,…

  6. Workforce Brief: Arizona

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    In Arizona, one of the country's fastest growing states, the demand for well-educated employees will only increase over the next several years. In the decade leading up to 2013, healthcare occupations will see growth of 50 percent. Almost 1,800 dentists will need to be hired to fill new posts and to cover retirement, for example. Teachers will be…

  7. Arizona's Application Service Provider.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Darla

    2002-01-01

    Describes the U.S.'s first statewide K-12 application service provider (ASP). The ASP, implemented by the Arizona School Facilities Board, provides access to productivity, communications, and education software programs from any Internet-enabled device, whether in the classroom or home. (EV)

  8. Arizona Academic Standards: Kindergarten

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This publication contains Arizona public schools' academic standards for kindergarten. The contents of this document include the following: (1) The Arts Standard 2006--Kindergarten; (2) Comprehensive Health Education/Physical Activity Standards 1997--Readiness (Kindergarten); (3) Foreign and Native Language Standards 1997--Readiness…

  9. The Arizona Migrant Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynes, J. O. (Rocky)

    Arizona's Migrant Child Education Program was initiated late in 1966 under the 1965 Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title I. The State Plan is designed to provide assistance to improve the instructional, nutritional, and health status of the migrant children in kindergarten through high school. Program components are career education…

  10. Solar energy system performance evaluation: Seasonal report for Elcam Tempe Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar system, Elcam-Tempe, was designed by Elcam Incorporated, Santa Barbara, California, to supply commercial domestic hot water heating systems to the Agriculture Department residence at Arizona State University. The building is a single story residence located at the agriculture experiment farm of the Arizona State University. The energy system's four modes of operation are described. Electrical energy savings at the site was a net of 5.54 million Btu after the 0.17 million Btu of operating energy required to operate collector loop circulating pump were subtracted. The energy savings due to solar was less than the system's potential. On an average, twice as much hot water could have been used with significant solar energy contribution. The system corrosion and deposits caused by using dissimilar metals in the collector loop was the only problem noted with the Elcam-Tempe system.

  11. Riparian restoration framework for the Upper Gila River, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orr, Bruce K.; Leverich, Glen L.; Diggory, Zooey E.; Dudley, Tom L.; Hatten, James R.; Hultine, Kevin R.; Johnson, Matthew P.; Orr, Devyn A.

    2014-01-01

    This technical report summarizes the methods and results of a comprehensive riparian restoration planning effort for the Gila Valley Restoration Planning Area, an approximately 53-mile portion of the upper Gila River in Arizona (Figure 1-1). This planning effort has developed a Restoration Framework intended to deliver science-based guidance on suitable riparian restoration actions within the ecologically sensitive river corridor. The framework development was conducted by a restoration science team, led by Stillwater Sciences with contributions from researchers at the Desert Botanical Garden (DBG), Northern Arizona University (NAU), University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB), and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). All work was coordinated by the Gila Watershed Partnership of Arizona (GWP), whose broader Upper Gila River Project Area is depicted in Figure 1-1, with funding from the Walton Family Foundation’s Freshwater Initiative Program.

  12. The Virtual Arizona Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, M. L.; Davis, R.; Conway, F. M.; Bellasai, R.

    2012-12-01

    To commemorate the once-in-a-lifetime event of Arizona's hundredth birthday, the Centennial Commission and the Governor of Arizona envisioned a museum and companion website that would capture the state's history, celebrate its people, and embrace its future. Working with world-renowned museum designers, the state began to seek ideas from across Arizona to create plans for a journey of discovery through science and the humanities. The museum would introduce visitors to some of the people who nurtured the state through its early years and others who are innovating its tomorrows. Showcases would include the resources and experiences that shaped the state's history and are transforming its present day, highlighting the ingenuity that tamed the wild frontier and is envisioning Arizona's next frontiers through science and technology. The Arizona Experience (www.arizonaexperience.org) was initially intended to serve as the web presence for the physical museum, but as delays occurred with the physical museum, the site has quickly developed an identify of its own as an interactive, multimedia experience, reaching a wider audience with functions that would be difficult or expensive to produce in a museum. As leaders in scientific and technological innovation in the state, the Arizona Geological Survey was tasked with designing and creating the Arizona Experience site. The general themes remain the same; however, the site has added content and applications that are better suited to the online environment in order to create a rich, dynamic supplement to a physical museum experience. The website offers the features and displays of the future museum with the interactive nature and learning environment of the web. This provides an encyclopedic overview of the State of Arizona by subject matter experts in a manner that is free and open to the public and erases socio-economic, political, and physical boundaries. Over the Centennial Year of 2012 the site will release a new theme and

  13. RATTLESNAKE ROADLESS AREA, ARIZONA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karlstrom, Thor N.V.; McColly, Robert

    1984-01-01

    There is little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources in the Rattlesnake Roadless Area, Arizona, as judged from field studies. Significant concentrations of minerals within the roadless area are not indicated by geologic mapping, geochemical sampling, or aeromagnetic studies. Basalt, volcanic cinders, sand and gravel, and sandstone that may be suitable for construction materials occur in the area, but are more readily accessible outside the roadless area boundary.

  14. Oil and gas exploration and development in Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Nations, D.; Doss, A.K.; Ubarra, R.

    1984-07-01

    Recent oil and gas exploration activity has been widespread throughout Arizona. Development drilling has continued in the Dineh-bi-keyah and Teec-nos-Pos fields in the northeastern corner, and exploratory drilling continues to test potential Paleozoic reservoirs elsewhere on the plateau. Several shallow wells north of the Grand Canyon encountered shows and limited recoveries of oil from Permian and Triassic rocks. The greatest activity has occurred along the Overthrust trend from northwestern to southeastern Arizona. Several million acres were leased and eight exploratory wells drilled along this trend. None were discoveries, but the presence of a Laramide thrust fault in the vicinity of Tombstone was established. The other tests have neither proved nor disproved the concept of the Overthrust belt in southern Arizona. Recent discoveries in the nonmarine Tertiary and marine Paleozoic of southern Nevada have stimulated interest in the oil potential of similar rocks and structures in the Basin and Range province of Arizona, which are coincident with the Overthrust trend. Reported gas discoveries by Pemex in Miocene marine sediments of the Gulf of California have stimulated leasing in the Yuma area, where one uncompleted well is reported to be a potential producer. The Pedregosa basin of extreme southeastern Arizona remains an area of great interest to explorationists because of the presence of a 25,000-ft (7600-m) sequence of Paleozoic marine sediments similar to those of the Permian basin, and Cretaceous marine rocks, including coral-rudist reefs, similar to those that produce in Texas and Mexico.

  15. Shaping Arizona's Future: Head Start in Arizona. Annual Report, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagle, Ami; Walker, Laura

    The Arizona Head Start Association is a federation of public and private organizations that provide Head Start programs and work to improve the conditions of children in the state. This annual report describes the operation of the Head Start program in Arizona for 2000-2001. Beginning with an introductory letter from the president of the Arizona…

  16. Eastern Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In this SeaWiFS image of eastern Alaska, the Aleutian Islands, Kodiak Island, Yukon and Tanana rivers are clearly visible. Also visible, but slightly hidden beneath the clouds, is a bloom in Bristol Bay. Credit: Provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  17. Resource inventory of marine and estuarine fishes of the West Coast and Alaska: A checklist of North Pacific and Arctic Ocean species from Baja California to the Alaska - Yukon border

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, Milton S.; Mecklenburg, Catherine W.; Mecklenburg, T. Anthony; Thorsteinson, Lyman K.

    2005-01-01

    This is a comprehensive inventory of the fish species recorded in marine and estuarine waters between the Alaska–Yukon Territory border in the Beaufort Sea and Cabo San Lucas at the southern end of Baja California and out about 300 miles from shore. Our westernmost range includes the eastern Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands. In addition, we have also included our best impressions of the species that might reasonably be expected to be members of the West Coast ichthyofauna but have not yet been captured or reported within our study area. These species are marked with an asterisk (*) and have been reported (1) in the western Bering Sea; (2) off Canada’s Yukon Territory and adjacent portions of the Northwest Territories; (3) along the southern-eastern tip (non-Pacific side) of Baja California; and (4) in waters somewhat beyond 300 miles from shore. Although the term West Coast usually refers to the coast of the continuous western states, our usage herein means the entire study area. The West Coast inventory within this range encompasses fish fauna from 44 orders, 232 families, and a minimum of 1,450 species. Please note that introduced and invasive fish species are marked by double asterisks (**) and that their scientific names are highlighted in gray. We have compiled this document because the most geographically inclusive previous inventories (Jordan and Evermann 1896a, Jordan et al. 1930) are largely of historical interest and are out of date. More recent lists and compilations have either focused on relatively narrow taxonomic groups (e. g., Kramer et al. 1995, Love et al. 2002), are regional in scope (e. g., Hart 1973, Hubbs et al. 1979, Mecklenburg et al. 2002), or focus on commonly observed species (e. g., Miller and Lea 1972, Eschmeyer and Herald 1983). With the explosion of coastal research and environmental assessments, beginning in the 1970s, and more recently, renewed scientific interest in biodiversity (e.g., effects of global climate change), our own

  18. SIERRA ANCHA WILDERNESS, ARIZONA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wrucke, Chester T.; Light, Thomas D.

    1984-01-01

    Mineral surveys show that the Sierra Ancha Wilderness in Arizona has demonstrated resources of uranium, asbestos, and iron; probable and substantiated resource potential for uranium, asbestos, and iron; and a probable resource potential for fluorspar. Uranium resources occur in vein and strata-bound deposits in siltstone that underlies much of the wilderness. Deposits of long-staple chrysotile asbestos are likely in parts of the wilderness adjacent to known areas of asbestos production. Magnetite deposits in the wilderness form a small iron resource. No fossil fuel resources were identified in this study.

  19. Thalenite from Arizona.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitzpatrick, J.; Pabst, A.

    1986-01-01

    Thalenite occurs as a minor constituent of a single small pegmatite within an extensive area of granite a few miles S of Kingman, Arizona. Partly crystalline and partly metamict, this thalenite has composition Y3(Si3O10)(OH), with extensive substitution of Y by REE, especially Dy, Er and Yb. Upon heating, even at moderate T, both the crystalline and the metamict thalenite are converted to a phase with a structure corresponding with that of thortveitite, Sc2Si2O7.-J.A.Z.

  20. MOUNT BALDY WILDERNESS, ARIZONA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finnell, Tommy L.; Soule, John H.

    1984-01-01

    The Mount Baldy Wilderness, Arizona, was surveyed for mineral resources and was judged to have little or no promise for the occurrence of mineral resources. No mineral deposits, mining claims, or concentrations of trace metals were recognized within the area. No oil test holes have been drilled within the area; holes drilled about 35 mi north of the area were not productive. Further study of the Mount Baldy Wilderness would seem warranted only in the event that economic deposits of minerals or petroleum are found in nearby areas.

  1. Arizona in Books for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choncoff, Mary, Comp.

    The bibliography of approximately 550 entries is a sample of those available on Arizona for elementary school students. Topics include Arizona history and culture, Mexican lore, and information about Navajo Indians. Although some of the titles are too difficult for the reading level of elementary school students, they are included because no other…

  2. Arizona Conserve Water Educators Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Project WET Foundation, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This award-winning, 350-page, full-color book provides a thorough study of Arizona water resources from a water conservation perspective. Its background section contains maps, graphs, diagrams and photos that facilitate the teaching of 15 interactive, multi-disciplinary lessons to K-12 students. In addition, 10 Arizona case studies are highlighted…

  3. Arizona land use experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winikka, C. C.; Schumann, H. H.

    1975-01-01

    Utilization of new sources of statewide remote sensing data, taken from high-altitude aircraft and from spacecraft is discussed along with incorporation of information extracted from these sources into on-going land and resources management programs in Arizona. Statewide cartographic applications of remote sensor data taken by NASA high-altitude aircraft include the development of a statewide semi-analytic control network, the production of nearly 1900 orthophotoquads (image maps) that are coincident in scale and area with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 7. 5 minute topographic quadrangle map series, and satellite image maps of Arizona produced from LANDSAt multispectral scanner imagery. These cartographic products are utilized for a wide variety of experimental and operational earth resources applications. Applications of the imagery, image maps, and derived information discussed include: soils and geologic mapping projects, water resources investigations, land use inventories, environmental impact studies, highway route locations and mapping, vegetation cover mapping, wildlife habitat studies, power plant siting studies, statewide delineation of irrigation cropland, position determination of drilling sites, pictorial geographic bases for thematic mapping, and court exhibits.

  4. Ecoregions of Arizona (poster)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffith, Glenn E.; Omernik, James M.; Johnson, Colleen Burch; Turner, Dale S.

    2014-01-01

    Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources; they are designed to serve as a spatial framework for the research, assessment, management, and monitoring of ecosystems and ecosystem components. By recognizing the spatial differences in the capacities and potentials of ecosystems, ecoregions stratify the environment by its probable response to disturbance. These general purpose regions are critical for structuring and implementing ecosystem management strategies across federal agencies, state agencies, and nongovernment organizations that are responsible for different types of resources within the same geographical areas. The Arizona ecoregion map was compiled at a scale of 1:250,000. It revises and subdivides an earlier national ecoregion map that was originally compiled at a smaller scale. The approach used to compile this map is based on the premise that ecological regions can be identified through the analysis of the spatial patterns and the composition of biotic and abiotic phenomena that affect or reflect differences in ecosystem quality and integrity. These phenomena include geology, physiography, vegetation, climate, soils, land use, wildlife, and hydrology. The relative importance of each characteristic varies from one ecological region to another regardless of the hierarchical level. A Roman numeral hierarchical scheme has been adopted for different levels of ecological regions. Level I is the coarsest level, dividing North America into 15 ecological regions. Level II divides the continent into 50 regions. At level III, the continental United States contains 105 ecoregions and the conterminous United States has 85 ecoregions. Level IV is a further subdivision of level III ecoregions. Arizona contains arid deserts and canyonlands, semiarid shrub- and grass-covered plains, woodland- and shrubland-covered hills, lava fields and volcanic plateaus, forested mountains, glaciated

  5. Alaska Resource Data File, Noatak Quadrangle, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grybeck, Donald J.; Dumoulin, Julie A.

    2006-01-01

    This report gives descriptions of the mineral occurrences in the Noatak 1:250,000-scale quadrangle, Alaska. The data presented here are maintained as part of a statewide database on mines, prospects and mineral occurrences throughout Alaska.

  6. 9 CFR 166.15 - State status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the feeding of treated garbage to swine: Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut... enforcement responsibility under the Act: Alabama, Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii..., Swine Health, 4700 River Road, Unit 37, Riverdale, Maryland 20737-1231, concerning the feeding...

  7. 9 CFR 166.15 - State status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the feeding of treated garbage to swine: Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut... enforcement responsibility under the Act: Alabama, Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii..., Swine Health, 4700 River Road, Unit 37, Riverdale, Maryland 20737-1231, concerning the feeding...

  8. 9 CFR 166.15 - State status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the feeding of treated garbage to swine: Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut... enforcement responsibility under the Act: Alabama, Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii..., Swine Health, 4700 River Road, Unit 37, Riverdale, Maryland 20737-1231, concerning the feeding...

  9. 9 CFR 166.15 - State status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the feeding of treated garbage to swine: Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut... enforcement responsibility under the Act: Alabama, Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii..., Swine Health, 4700 River Road, Unit 37, Riverdale, Maryland 20737-1231, concerning the feeding...

  10. WINCHESTER ROADLESS AREA, ARIZONA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keith, William J.; Kreidler, Terry J.

    1984-01-01

    The Winchester Roadless Area, located in northwestern Cochise County, Arizona, consists of 22 sq mi of Coronado National Forest in the Winchester Mountains. This study consisted of (1) field checking and modification of the existing geologic maps of the area, (2) field examination of all mines, prospects, and mineralized areas in and adjacent to the Winchester Roadless Area, (3) sampling of bedrock and stream sediments from drainage basins for geochemical analysis; and (4) examination and interpretation of available aeromagnetic and gravity data. Results of geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mining activity and production surveys indicate little promise for the occurrence of metallic and nonmetallic or energy resources in the area. Volcanic rocks cover the area to a thickness of 1000 to 2000 ft and possibly more, thus preventing inspection and evaluation of the underlying rock.

  11. PINE MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS, ARIZONA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Canney, Frank C.; Williams, Frank E.

    1984-01-01

    A geologic study and geochemical survey were made of the Pine Mountain Wilderness in Arizona. Only slight traces of mineralization of no apparent significance were found and the results of the geochemical survey were negative. The presence of important near-surface mineral deposits in the area is considered unlikely. No evidence of nonmetallic or energy resources was identified during the course of this study. Ore deposits, if present, are probably of the massive sulfide type, and buried deeply beneath the ground surface, beyond the range of the various geochemical and geophysical techniques used in routine exploration. Some of the newer geophysical methods might possibly be capable of detecting such hidden ore bodies if not buried too deeply.

  12. The Arizona Geological Survey | Home

    Science.gov Websites

    Aug 18, 2016 | AGI's EARTH Magazine releases 2012 interview with AZGS's Lee Allison. Aug 17, 2016 | Dr. M. Lee Allison (1948-2016), State Geologist and Director of the Arizona ...

  13. SIMULATED CHANGES IN RUNOFF AND SEDIMENT IN DEVELOPING AREAS NEAR BENSON, ARIZONA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Residential and commercial development is occurring with unprecedented speed throughout the American Southwest. It is projected that from 1995 to 2025, the population in the six Southwestern states of California, Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, Utah and Colorado will increase by mor...

  14. Articulation: Arizona Guidebook Can Lick Transfer "Sting."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lance, Robert E.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the Arizona "Course Equivalency Guide," a combined listing of courses at Arizona community colleges and universities, which enables students to evaluate whether and in what way each course is accepted for transfer at the universities.

  15. Libraries in Arizona: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/arizona.html Libraries in Arizona To use the sharing features on ... enable JavaScript. Cottonwood Verde Valley Medical Center Medical Library 269 South Candy Lane Cottonwood, AZ 86326 928- ...

  16. Rickettsia parkeri Rickettsiosis, Arizona, USA

    PubMed Central

    Herrick, Kristen L.; Pena, Sandra A.; Yaglom, Hayley D.; Layton, Brent J.; Moors, Amanda; Loftis, Amanda D.; Condit, Marah E.; Singleton, Joseph; Kato, Cecilia Y.; Denison, Amy M.; Ng, Dianna; Mertins, James W.

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, all previously reported cases of Rickettsia parkeri rickettsiosis have been linked to transmission by the Gulf Coast tick (Amblyomma maculatum). Here we describe 1 confirmed and 1 probable case of R. parkeri rickettsiosis acquired in a mountainous region of southern Arizona, well beyond the recognized geographic range of A. maculatum ticks. The likely vector for these 2 infections was identified as the Amblyomma triste tick, a Neotropical species only recently recognized in the United States. Identification of R. parkeri rickettsiosis in southern Arizona demonstrates a need for local ecologic and epidemiologic assessments to better understand geographic distribution and define public health risk. Education and outreach aimed at persons recreating or working in this region of southern Arizona would improve awareness and promote prevention of tickborne rickettsioses. PMID:27089251

  17. Diurnal cloud-to-ground lightning patterns in Arizona during the southwest monsoon

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, A.I.; Lopez, R.E.; Holle, R.L.

    1994-08-01

    Cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning shows great variability across Arizona from one year to the next as well as from one day to the next. Availability of moisture, location of the subtropical ridge axis, transitory troughs in both the westerlies and easterlies, and low-level moisture surges from the Gulf of California can affect thunderstorm occurrence, which, in turn, will affect lightning production. Diurnal CG lightning patterns in Arizona are also determined by daily heating cycles and topography. Six years of Bureau of Land Management CG flash data are used in this investigation. In Arizona, lightning usually starts first, on a daily basis, in the plateau region and extends in an arc from the White Mountains of eastern Arizona westward across the Mogollon Rim and then northward onto the Kaibab Plateau of northern Arizona. Flash activity moves in a more or less continuous fashion off the plateau, south and westward down the topography gradient, and enters the lower desert by early evening. At the same time, flash activity develops in the highlands of southeast Arizona and moves west-northwestward, reaching the lower desert by late afternoon. Precipitation and lightning are well correlated, except that precipitation seems to linger longer than lightning, probably due to the occasional development of mesoscale convective systems, which produce light stratiform precipitation during their dissipation stage.

  18. Arizona Charter Schools: Resegregating Public Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Casey D.; Glass, Gene V.

    An Arizona study examined whether charter schools contribute to the racial/ethnic segregation of students in publicly funded schools. Data included Arizona school enrollment data for 1996, 1998, and 2002; school addresses for 2002 charter schools; and other relevant information specific to charter schools, obtained from the Arizona Department of…

  19. The Effect of Arizona Language Policies on Arizona Indigenous Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Combs, Mary Carol; Nicholas, Sheilah E.

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the effect of Arizona's language policies on school districts serving Native American students. Although these policies were designed to restrict the access of Spanish-speaking immigrant and citizen students to bilingual education programs, their reach has extended into schools and school districts serving Native Americans.…

  20. Alaska's Children, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Dorothy, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    These four issues of the "Alaska's Children" provide information on the activities of the Alaska Head Start State Collaboration Project and other Head Start activities. Legal and policy changes affecting the education of young children in Alaska are also discussed. The Spring 1997 issue includes articles on brain development and the…

  1. Alaska's Economy: What's Ahead?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska Review of Social and Economic Conditions, 1987

    1987-01-01

    This review describes Alaska's economic boom of the early 1980s, the current recession, and economic projections for the 1990s. Alaska's economy is largely influenced by oil prices, since petroleum revenues make up 80% of the state government's unrestricted general fund revenues. Expansive state spending was responsible for most of Alaska's…

  2. Alaska Natives & the Land.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Robert D.; And Others

    Pursuant to the Native land claims within Alaska, this compilation of background data and interpretive materials relevant to a fair resolution of the Alaska Native problem seeks to record data and information on the Native peoples; the land and resources of Alaska and their uses by the people in the past and present; land ownership; and future…

  3. Turbidity trends at tucson, Arizona.

    PubMed

    Heidel, K

    1972-09-08

    Variations in atmospheric turbidity at Tucson, Arizona, since 1956 are similar to those at Mauna Loa in Hawaii, especially before January 1970. The turbidity at both locations increased markedly in 1963 after the Bali eruption. Since January 1970, the turbidity has returned to its pre-1963 level at Mauna Loa, but has remained relatively high at Tucson.

  4. Arizona Academic Standards: Grade 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This document contains the Arizona academic standards for Grade 7. The following 11 standards are reviewed: (1) The Arts Standard 2006 --Grade 7; (2) Comprehensive Health Education/Physical Activity Standards 1997--Essentials (Grades 4-8); (3) Foreign and Native Language Standards 1997--Essentials (Grades 4-8); (4) Reading Standard Articulated by…

  5. Arizona Academic Standards, Grade 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This publication contains an updated academic standards of Arizona public schools for grade 6. The contents of this document include the following: (1) The Arts Standard 2006--Grade 6; (2) Comprehensive Health Education/Physical Activity Standards 1997--Essentials (Grades 4-8); (3) Foreign and Native Language Standards 1997--Essentials (Grades…

  6. Arizona Academic Standards, Grade 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This publication contains Arizona public schools' academic standards for grade 4. The contents of this document include the following: (1) The Arts Standard 2006--Grade 4; (2) Comprehensive Health Education/Physical Activity Standards 1997--Essentials (Grades 4-8); (3) Foreign and Native Language Standards 1997--Essentials (Grades 4-8); (4)…

  7. Arizona Academic Standards, Grade 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This publication contains an updated academic standards of Arizona public schools for grade 5. The contents of this document include the following: (1) The Arts Standard 2006--Grade 5; (2) Comprehensive Health Education/Physical Activity Standards 1997--Essentials (Grades 4-8); (3) Foreign and Native Language Standards 1997--Foundations (Grades…

  8. Arizona Academic Standards, Grade 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This publication contains the updated academic standards of Arizona for Grade 8. The contents of this document include the following: (1) The Arts Standard 2006--Grade 8; (2) Comprehensive Health Education/Physical Activity Standards 1997--Essentials (Grades 4-8); (3) Foreign and Native Language Standards 1997--Essentials (Grades 4-8); (4) Reading…

  9. Arizona Academic Standards: Grade 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This publication contains Arizona public schools' academic standards for grade 4. The contents of this document include the following: (1) The Arts Standard 2006--Grade 4; (2) Comprehensive Health Education/Physical Activity Standards 1997--Essentials (Grades 4-8); (3) Foreign and Native Language Standards 1997--Essentials (Grades 4-8); (4)…

  10. Arizona TeleMedicine Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Univ., Tucson. Coll. of Medicine.

    Designed to provide health services for American Indians living on rurally isolated reservations, the Arizona TeleMedicine Project proposes to link Phoenix and Tucson medical centers, via a statewide telecommunications system, with the Hopi, San Carlos Apache, Papago, Navajo, and White Mountain Apache reservations. Advisory boards are being…

  11. Antidote: Civic Responsibility. Arizona Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phi Alpha Delta Law Fraternity International, Washington, DC.

    Designed for middle school through high school students, this unit contains eight lesson plans that focus on Arizona state law. The state lessons correspond to lessons in the volume, "Antidote: Civic Responsibility. Drug Avoidance Lessons for Middle School & High School Students." Developed to be presented by educators, law student,…

  12. Arizona Academic Standards, High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This publication contains Arizona public schools' updated academic standards for high school. The contents of this document contain: (1) The Arts Standard 2006--High School; (2) Comprehensive Health Education/Physical Activity Standards 1997--Proficiency and Distinction (Grades 9-12); (3) Foreign and Native Language Standards 1997--Proficiency and…

  13. Arizona Academic Standards, Grade 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This publication contains Arizona public schools' academic standards for grade 2. The contents of this document include the following: (1) The Arts Standard 2006--Grade 2; (2) Comprehensive Health Education/Physical Activity Standards 1997--Foundations (Grades 1-3); (3) Foreign and Native Language Standards 1997--Foundations (Grades 1-3); (4)…

  14. Arizona Academic Standards, Grade 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This publication contains Arizona public schools' academic standards for grade 3. The contents of this document include the following: (1) The Arts Standard 2006--Grade 3; (2) Comprehensive Health Education/Physical Activity Standards 1997--Foundations (Grades 1-3); (3) Foreign and Native Language Standards 1997--Foundations (Grades 1-3); (4)…

  15. Arizona Academic Standards, Grade 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This publication contains Arizona public schools' academic standards for Grade 1. The contents of this document include the following: (1) The Arts Standard 2006--Grade 1; (2) Comprehensive Health Education/Physical Activity Standards 1997--Foundations (Grades 1-3); (3) Foreign and Native Language Standards 1997--Foundations (Grades 1-3); (4)…

  16. 7 CFR 249.26 - SFMNP information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 903, Denver, Colorado 80204. (7) Alaska, American Samoa, Arizona, California, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho..., Dallas, Texas 75242. (6) Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South...

  17. 7 CFR 249.26 - SFMNP information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 903, Denver, Colorado 80204. (7) Alaska, American Samoa, Arizona, California, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho..., Dallas, Texas 75242. (6) Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South...

  18. 7 CFR 249.26 - SFMNP information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 903, Denver, Colorado 80204. (7) Alaska, American Samoa, Arizona, California, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho..., Dallas, Texas 75242. (6) Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South...

  19. 7 CFR 249.26 - SFMNP information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 903, Denver, Colorado 80204. (7) Alaska, American Samoa, Arizona, California, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho..., Dallas, Texas 75242. (6) Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South...

  20. 7 CFR 249.26 - SFMNP information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 903, Denver, Colorado 80204. (7) Alaska, American Samoa, Arizona, California, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho..., Dallas, Texas 75242. (6) Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South...

  1. 9 CFR 77.26 - Modified accredited States or zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... classification. 1 Send the information to National Animal Health Programs, Veterinary Services, APHIS, 4700 River...: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia,...

  2. 9 CFR 77.26 - Modified accredited States or zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... classification. 1 Send the information to National Animal Health Programs, Veterinary Services, APHIS, 4700 River...: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia,...

  3. 9 CFR 77.26 - Modified accredited States or zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... classification. 1 Send the information to National Animal Health Programs, Veterinary Services, APHIS, 4700 River...: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia,...

  4. 9 CFR 77.26 - Modified accredited States or zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... classification. 1 Send the information to National Animal Health Programs, Veterinary Services, APHIS, 4700 River...: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia,...

  5. Black brant from Alaska staging and wintering in Japan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Derksen, Dirk V.; Bollinger, K.S.; Ward, David H.; Sedinger, J.S.; Miyabayashi, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Black brant (Branta bernicla nigricans) nest in colonies in arctic Canada, Alaska, and Russia (Derksen and Ward 1993, Sedinger et al. 1993). Virtually the entire population stages in fall at Izembek Lagoon near the tip of the Alaska Peninsula (Bellrose 1976) before southward migration (Dau 1992) to winter habitats in British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, California, and Baja California (Subcommittee on Black Brant 1992). A small number of black brant winter in Japan, Korea, and China (Owen 1980). In Japan 3,000–5,000 brant of unknown origin stop over in fall, and a declining population (<1,000) of birds winter here, primarily in the northern islands (Brazil 1991, Miyabayashi et al. 1994). Here, we report sightings of brant in Japan that were marked in Alaska and propose a migration route based on historical and recent observations and weather patterns.

  6. California Water Resources Development.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-01-01

    some place in California on the average of about 4 redwoods 4 water resources development by tw corps of engineers In callfornia once a year . Although...A -Al3b 691 CALIFORYNIA WATER RESOURCES DEVELOPMENTIU) ARMY ENGINEER 13 DIS TRICT LOS ANGELES CA 1977 ULASSIEIED F/G 13/2 NL r I NI 1.2 21 . 4 ...by than any other part of the United States except Alaska. glaciers many thousands of years ago . In the northern Elevations range from 282 feet below

  7. An Analysis of How Restrictive Language Policies Are Interpreted by Arizona's Department of Education and Three Individual School Districts' Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimenez-Silva, Margarita; Bernstein, Katie A.; Baca, Evelyn C.

    2016-01-01

    Restrictive language policies for education have been passed in several states in the United States. In 1998, 2000, and 2002, California, Arizona, and Massachusetts passed the most restrictive of these policies, impacting 4.4 million students classified as English language learners (ELLs). This study examines how these policies are currently…

  8. Geothermal resource data base: Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Witcher, J.C.

    1995-09-01

    This report provides a compilation of geothermal well and spring information in Arizona up to 1993. This report and data base are a part of a larger congressionally-funded national effort to encourage and assist geothermal direct-use. In 1991, the US Department of Energy, Geothermal Division (DOE/GD) began a Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources and Technology Transfer Program. Phase 1 of this program includes updating the inventory of wells and springs of ten western states and placing these data into a digital format that is universally accessible to the PC. The Oregon Institute of Technology GeoHeat Center (OIT) administers the program and the University of Utah Earth Sciences and Resources Institute (ESRI) provides technical direction. In recent years, the primary growth in geothermal use in Arizona has occurred in aquaculture. Other uses include minor space heating and supply of warm mineral waters for health spas.

  9. Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Murray, Tom; Read, Cyrus

    2008-01-01

    Steam plume from the 2006 eruption of Augustine volcano in Cook Inlet, Alaska. Explosive ash-producing eruptions from Alaska's 40+ historically active volcanoes pose hazards to aviation, including commercial aircraft flying the busy North Pacific routes between North America and Asia. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) monitors these volcanoes to provide forecasts of eruptive activity. AVO is a joint program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAFGI), and the State of Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (ADGGS). AVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Augustine volcano and AVO at http://www.avo.alaska.edu.

  10. Shaking up the future of Hispanic students in rural southwest Arizona: A collaborative research/teaching effort creating a bridge between students and the geosciences.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, M. F.; Croxen, F.; Garrett, M.

    2002-12-01

    Arizona Western College, Yuma, Arizona, serves the largely Hispanic population of rural southwestern Arizona. The majority of our students are first-generation college students who frequently lack strong educational role models. We are constructing a geoscience education program for recruiting and mentoring Hispanic and Native American students from Yuma and La Paz counties, Arizona. This program will be structured around faculty-mentored, undergraduate research on the seismicity and related geologic phenomenon of the Salton Trough of southeastern California and northern Mexico. Yuma-area students are well-suited for this program, because they have strong footholds in the cultures and languages of the region. Our chief goal is to provide educational opportunities in geoscience for historically underrepresented minorities of southern Arizona and California. Ultimately, this should lead to leadership roles in the geoscience for Hispanics in the largely Hispanic communities of the desert southwest. Importantly, this geoscience education program has the support and collaboration of science educators from across the educational spectrum in southern Arizona and California, and northern Mexico.

  11. Alaska's renewable energy potential.

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2009-02-01

    This paper delivers a brief survey of renewable energy technologies applicable to Alaska's climate, latitude, geography, and geology. We first identify Alaska's natural renewable energy resources and which renewable energy technologies would be most productive. e survey the current state of renewable energy technologies and research efforts within the U.S. and, where appropriate, internationally. We also present information on the current state of Alaska's renewable energy assets, incentives, and commercial enterprises. Finally, we escribe places where research efforts at Sandia National Laboratories could assist the state of Alaska with its renewable energy technology investment efforts.

  12. Alaska geothermal bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Liss, S.A.; Motyka, R.J.; Nye, C.J.

    1987-05-01

    The Alaska geothermal bibliography lists all publications, through 1986, that discuss any facet of geothermal energy in Alaska. In addition, selected publications about geology, geophysics, hydrology, volcanology, etc., which discuss areas where geothermal resources are located are included, though the geothermal resource itself may not be mentioned. The bibliography contains 748 entries.

  13. Renewable Energy in Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-03-01

    This report examines the opportunities, challenges, and costs associated with renewable energy implementation in Alaska and provides strategies that position Alaska's accumulating knowledge in renewable energy development for export to the rapidly growing energy/electric markets of the developing world.

  14. Geothermal development plan: northern Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

    1981-01-01

    Much of the northern counties (Apache, Coconino, Gila, Mohave, Navajo and Yavapai) is located in the Colorado Plateau province, a region of low geothermal potential. Two areas that do show some potential are the Flagstaff - San Francisco Peaks area and the Springerville area. Flagstaff is rapidly becoming the manufacturing center of Arizona and will have many opportunities to use geothermal energy to satisfy part of its increasing need for energy. Using a computer simulation model, projections of geothermal energy on line as a function of time are made for both private and city-owned utility development of a resource.

  15. KANAB CREEK ROADLESS AREA, ARIZONA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Billingsley, George H.; Ellis, Clarence E.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey, the Kanab Creek Roadless Area in north-central Arizona has a probable mineral-resource potential for uranium and copper in four small areas around five collapse structures. Gypsum is abundant in layers along the canyon rim of Snake Gulch, but it is a fairly common mineral in the region outside the roadless area. There is little promise for the occurence of fossil fuels in the area. Studies of collapse structures in surrounding adjacent areas might reveal significant mineralization at depth, such as the recent discovery of the uranium ore body at depth in the Pigeon Pipe.

  16. Future Changes: Implications for Arizona's Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Roger L.

    One of the working papers in the final report of the Arizona Board of Regents' Task Force on Excellence, Efficiency and Competitiveness, this document focuses (in Part I) on the summary, conclusions, and recommendations of future changes and their relationship to the Arizona Universities; and, (in Part II) provides background materials for…

  17. 40 CFR 81.403 - Arizona.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Arizona. 81.403 Section 81.403 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.403 Arizona. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal...

  18. The Arizona Report, 1999-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Report, 2002

    2002-01-01

    This document contains the seven issues of "The Arizona Report" published in 1999-2002. A newsletter of the Mexican American Studies & Research Center (MASRC) at the University of Arizona, this publication reports on social, educational, health, and economic research on Mexican Americans and opportunities in higher education and…

  19. 21 CFR 808.53 - Arizona.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EXEMPTIONS FROM FEDERAL PREEMPTION OF STATE AND LOCAL MEDICAL DEVICE REQUIREMENTS Listing of Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.53 Arizona. The following Arizona medical device requirements are...

  20. 21 CFR 808.53 - Arizona.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EXEMPTIONS FROM FEDERAL PREEMPTION OF STATE AND LOCAL MEDICAL DEVICE REQUIREMENTS Listing of Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.53 Arizona. The following Arizona medical device requirements are...

  1. 21 CFR 808.53 - Arizona.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EXEMPTIONS FROM FEDERAL PREEMPTION OF STATE AND LOCAL MEDICAL DEVICE REQUIREMENTS Listing of Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.53 Arizona. The following Arizona medical device requirements are...

  2. 76 FR 45644 - Arizona Disaster #AZ-00016

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ... is hereby amended to modify the incident description for this disaster from Monument Fire to Monument... ADMINISTRATION Arizona Disaster AZ-00016 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Administrative declaration of disaster for the State of Arizona dated...

  3. 76 FR 42156 - Arizona Disaster #AZ-00016

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-18

    ... ADMINISTRATION Arizona Disaster AZ-00016 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Arizona dated 07/11/2011. Incident: Monument Fire. Incident Period: 06/12/2011 and continuing. Effective Date:...

  4. 78 FR 57923 - Arizona Disaster #AZ-00029

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-20

    ... ADMINISTRATION Arizona Disaster AZ-00029 AGENCY: Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Arizona dated 09/13/2013. Incident: Yarnell Hill Fire. Incident Period: 06/28/2013 through 07/10/2013. Effective Date:...

  5. Meeting Northern Arizona's Supported Employment Training Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, William E., Jr.; And Others

    In 1989 Northern Arizona University established a Supported Employment Training Center (SETC) to increase the number of trained job coaches in northern Arizona and provide knowledge and skills in supported employment to personnel from cooperating schools and agencies. First-year SETC activities focused on assessment of the training needs of…

  6. Arizona Reading Journal, 1999-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Karen, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    The two issues of the 1999-2000 "Arizona Reading Journal" provides information about reading in general and about the activities of the Arizona Reading Association. The Fall 1999 issue includes the following articles: "IRA Resolution on Class Size"; "Teaching Reading in Social Studies" (Marlow Ediger); "Examining the Role of Student-Written Texts…

  7. Arizona Migrant Child Education Teacher Exchange: Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynes, J. O., Jr.; Brink, Donald

    The Office of Migrant Child Education of the Arizona Department of Education participated in the annual Teacher Exchange Program by visiting Colorado, April 14-18, 1980. Sixteen teachers and/or program coordinators (selected by the project administrator) prepresented 13 Arizona Migrant Child Education Projects and traveled to Colorado under the…

  8. Alaska Problem Resource Manual: Alaska Future Problem Solving Program. Alaska Problem 1985-86.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorsuch, Marjorie, Ed.

    "Alaska's Image in the Lower 48," is the theme selected by a Blue Ribbon panel of state and national leaders who felt that it was important for students to explore the relationship between Alaska's outside image and the effect of that image on the federal programs/policies that impact Alaska. An overview of Alaska is presented first in…

  9. Libraries in Alaska: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/alaska.html Libraries in Alaska To use the sharing features on ... JavaScript. Anchorage University of Alaska Anchorage Alaska Medical Library 3211 Providence Drive Anchorage, AK 99508-8176 907- ...

  10. UAFSmoke Modeling in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuefer, M.; Grell, G.; Freitas, S.; Newby, G.

    2008-12-01

    Alaska wildfires have strong impact on air pollution on regional Arctic, Sub-Arctic and even hemispheric scales. In response to a high number of wildfires in Alaska, emphasis has been placed on developing a forecast system for wildfire smoke dispersion in Alaska. We have developed a University of Alaska Fairbanks WRF/Chem smoke (UAFSmoke) dispersion system, which has been adapted and initialized with source data suitable for Alaska. UAFSmoke system modules include detection of wildfire location and area using Alaska Fire Service information and satellite remote sensing data from the MODIS instrument. The fire emissions are derived from above ground biomass fuel load data in one-kilometer resolution. WRF/Chem Version 3 with online chemistry and online plume dynamics represents the core of the UAFSmoke system. Besides wildfire emissions and NOAA's Global Forecast System meteorology, WRF/Chem initial and boundary conditions are updated with anthropogenic and sea salt emission data from the Georgia Institute of Technology-Goddard Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) Model. System runs are performed at the Arctic Region Supercomputing Center's Sun Opteron cluster "Midnight". During the 2008 fire season once daily UAFSmoke runs were presented at a dedicated webpage at http://smoke.arsc.edu. We present examples from these routine runs and from the extreme 2004 Alaska wildfire season.

  11. 77 FR 11566 - State of Arizona Resource Advisory Council Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-27

    ... Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Arizona Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet in Phoenix... be held at the BLM National Training Center located at 9828 North 31st Avenue, Phoenix, Arizona 85051... Management, Arizona State Office, One North Central Avenue, Suite 800, Phoenix, Arizona 85004-4427,...

  12. 76 FR 67206 - State of Arizona Resource Advisory Council Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-31

    ... Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Arizona Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet in Phoenix... held at the BLM National Training Center ] located at 9828 North 31st Avenue, Phoenix, Arizona 85051... Management, Arizona State Office, One North Central Avenue, Suite 800, Phoenix, Arizona 85004-4427, (602)...

  13. 76 FR 18777 - State of Arizona Resource Advisory Council Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Arizona Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet in Phoenix... North 31st Avenue, Phoenix, Arizona 85051. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dorothea Boothe, Arizona RAC..., Phoenix, Arizona 85004-4427, 602-417- 9504. Persons who use a telecommunications device for the deaf...

  14. Geothermal resources in Arizona: a bibliography. Circular 23

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, S.S.

    1982-01-01

    This bibliography references all reports and maps generated by the Arizona Bureau of Geology and Mineral Technology and the Arizona Geothermal Commercialization Team of the Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Arizona. To provide a more comprehensive listing of geothermal energy in Arizona, all available geothermal papers from other sources have been included. A total of 224 references are presented. (MHR)

  15. Copycat Fever: California's Proposition 187 Epidemic Spreads to Other States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quiroga, Angelica

    1995-01-01

    Although blocked by a preliminary injunction, Proposition 187, also known as the Save Our State Initiative, would ban nonemergency health care, schooling, and other social services for illegal immigrants. Since its passage by the citizens of California in 1994, several states, such as Arizona, Washington, Oregon, and Florida, have begun to…

  16. Alaska marine ice atlas

    SciTech Connect

    LaBelle, J.C.; Wise, J.L.; Voelker, R.P.; Schulze, R.H.; Wohl, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive Atlas of Alaska marine ice is presented. It includes information on pack and landfast sea ice and calving tidewater glacier ice. It also gives information on ice and related environmental conditions collected over several years time and indicates the normal and extreme conditions that might be expected in Alaska coastal waters. Much of the information on ice conditions in Alaska coastal waters has emanated from research activities in outer continental shelf regions under assessment for oil and gas exploration and development potential. (DMC)

  17. Alaska geology revealed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Frederic H.; Labay, Keith A.

    2016-11-09

    This map shows the generalized geology of Alaska, which helps us to understand where potential mineral deposits and energy resources might be found, define ecosystems, and ultimately, teach us about the earth history of the State. Rock units are grouped in very broad categories on the basis of age and general rock type. A much more detailed and fully referenced presentation of the geology of Alaska is available in the Geologic Map of Alaska (http://dx.doi.org/10.3133/sim3340). This product represents the simplification of thousands of individual rock units into just 39 broad groups. Even with this generalization, the sheer complexity of Alaskan geology remains evident.

  18. Arizona black rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis cerberus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nowak, Erika M.

    2006-01-01

    The Arizona black rattlesnake makes its home at higher elevations in Arizona and far western New Mexico. The snake's use of high-altitude habitat and its black coloration as an adult distinguishes it from other subspecies of the western rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis), which prefer lower elevations and range from tan to reddish in color as adults. These physical and habitat differences are also reflected in genetic differences that suggest that the Arizona black rattlesnake may be a new species of rattlesnake. Despite the species's limited range, basic biological information needed to make management decisions is lacking for most Arizona black rattlesnake populations. To address this need, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists conducted research on the species in Arizona national park units from 2003 to 2005. The research examined relative population abundance, movement patterns, range requirements, dietary habits, and winter and summer habitat. Research in Arizona national parks was made possible through the support of the Western National Parks Association, Tonto National Monument, and the USGS Science Internships for Workforce Diversity Program. Importantly, the park-based research was used to augment a long-term mark-recapture study of the species that has been conducted by USGS biologists at sites near Flagstaff, Arizona, since 1999. USGS researchers were the first to conduct extensive studies of this species in the wild.

  19. Alaska telemedicine: growth through collaboration.

    PubMed

    Patricoski, Chris

    2004-12-01

    The last thirty years have brought the introduction and expansion of telecommunications to rural and remote Alaska. The intellectual and financial investment of earlier projects, the more recent AFHCAN Project and the Universal Service Administrative Company Rural Health Care Division (RHCD) has sparked a new era in telemedicine and telecommunication across Alaska. This spark has been flamed by the dedication and collaboration of leaders at he highest levels of organizations such as: AFHCAN member organizations, AFHCAN Office, Alaska Clinical Engineering Services, Alaska Federal Health Care Partnership, Alaska Federal Health Care Partnership Office, Alaska Native health Board, Alaska Native Tribal health Consortium, Alaska Telehealth Advisory Council, AT&T Alascom, GCI Inc., Health care providers throughout the state of Alaska, Indian Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of U.S. Senator Ted Steens, State of Alaska, U.S. Department of Homeland Security--United States Coast Guard, United States Department of Agriculture, United States Department of Defense--Air Force and Army, United States Department of Veterans Affairs, University of Alaska, and University of Alaska Anchorage. Alaska now has one of the largest telemedicine programs in the world. As Alaska moves system now in place become self-sustaining, and 2) collaborating with all stakeholders in promoting the growth of an integrated, state-wide telemedicine network.

  20. Proterozoic geology and ore deposits of Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karlstrom, Karl E.

    1991-01-01

    Proterozoic rocks in Arizona have been the focus of interest for geologists since the late 1800's. Early investigations, led by the U.S. Geological Survey, focused on the extensive ore deposits hosted by Proterozoic rocks. By the 1960's, these studies, combined with theses from academic institutions and the efforts of the Arizona Geological Survey, had produced a rich data base of geologic maps, primarily of the central part of the Transition Zone. The chronological significance of these maps became much better known with the application of U-Pb geochronology by L.Y. Silver and his students starting in the 1960's. The 1970's and early 1980's were marked by numerous contributions from Masters and Ph.D students at a variety of academic institutions, and continued work by the U.S. Geological Survey. Interest in ore deposits persisted and there was an increasing interest in interpretation of the tectonic history of Proterozoic rocks in terms of plate tectonic models, as summarized in papers by Phillip Anderson, Ed DeWitt, Clay Conway, Paul Lindberg, and J.L Anderson in the 1989 Arizona Geological Society Digest 17: "Geologic Evolution of Arizona". The present volume: "Proterozoic Geology and Ore deposits of Arizona" builds upon A.G.S. Digest 17, and presents the results of geologic investigations from the latter part of the 1980's. A number of the papers are condensed versions of MS theses done by students at Northern Arizona University. These papers are based upon 1:10,000 mapping and structural analysis of several areas in Arizona. The geologic maps from each of these studies are available separately as part of the Arizona Geological Survey Contributed Map Series. These detailed maps, plus the continuing mapping efforts of the U.S.G.S. and students at other academic institutions, form an ever improving data base for continuing attempts to understand the Proterozoic geology and ore deposits of Arizona

  1. Alaska Resource Data File, Nabesna quadrangle, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudson, Travis L.

    2003-01-01

    Descriptions of the mineral occurrences shown on the accompanying figure follow. See U.S. Geological Survey (1996) for a description of the information content of each field in the records. The data presented here are maintained as part of a statewide database on mines, prospects and mineral occurrences throughout Alaska.

  2. Alaska Resource Data File, Wiseman quadrangle, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Britton, Joe M.

    2003-01-01

    Descriptions of the mineral occurrences shown on the accompanying figure follow. See U.S. Geological Survey (1996) for a description of the information content of each field in the records. The data presented here are maintained as part of a statewide database on mines, prospects and mineral occurrences throughout Alaska.

  3. Alaska Resource Data File, Juneau quadrangle, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnett, John C.; Miller, Lance D.

    2003-01-01

    Descriptions of the mineral occurrences shown on the accompanying figure follow. See U.S. Geological Survey (1996) for a description of the information content of each field in the records. The data presented here are maintained as part of a statewide database on mines, prospects and mineral occurrences throughout Alaska.

  4. Navigation Improvement Design Memorandum Number 1, General Design for San Diego Harbor, San Diego County, California.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-02-28

    half of Arizona, New Mexico (less the eight northernmost counties), West Texas and the Mexican states of Chihuahua, Sonora and Baja California Norte...DESIGN MEMORANDUM NO. 1 GENERAL DESIGN FOR SAN DIEGO HARBOR ~3AN -DIEGO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA -- 4 U.S. ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, LOS ANGELES CORPS OF... CALIFORNIA S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 1 £,’ru~*,~ ta. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUME=") - ’ US ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS LOS ANGELES DISTRICT P.O. BOX 2711

  5. FOSSIL SPRINGS ROADLESS AREA, ARIZONA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beard, L.S.; Ellis, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    Based on field studies, the Fossil Springs Roadless Area in central Arizona is concluded to have little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources. Rocks in the Supai Formation (Pennsylvanian-Permian) near the central part of the roadless area contain widespread but spotty copper mineralization and trace amounts of uranium. Analyses obtained during the study define geochemical anomalies in two portions of the area that remain unexplained. The suites of anomalous metals suggest the possibility of hydrothermal veins and the presence of ultramafic rocks; neither were found in the field. Although there is little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources in the Fossil Springs Roadless Area, studies to identify the source of the geochemical anomalies could have valuable implications for regional studies and mineral exploration in the surrounding area.

  6. STRAWBERRY CRATER ROADLESS AREAS, ARIZONA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe, Edward W.; Light, Thomas D.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a mineral survey conducted in the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas, Arizona, indicate little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral or fossil fuel resources in the area. The area contains deposits of cinder, useful for the production of aggregate block, and for deposits of decorative stone; however, similar deposits occur in great abundance throughout the San Francisco volcanic field outside the roadless areas. There is a possibility that the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas may overlie part of a crustal magma chamber or still warm pluton related to the San Francisco Mountain stratovolcano or to basaltic vents of late Pleistocene or Holocene age. Such a magma chamber or pluton beneath the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas might be an energy source from which a hot-, dry-rock geothermal energy system could be developed, and a probable geothermal resource potential is therefore assigned to these areas. 9 refs.

  7. Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, E.W.; Light, T.D.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a mineral survey conducted in 1980 in the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas, Arizona, indicate little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral or fossil fuel resources in the area. The area contains deposits of cinder, useful for the production of aggregate block, and for deposits of decorative stone; however, similar deposits occur in great abundance throughout the San Francisco volcanic field outside the roadless areas. There is a possibility that the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas may overlie part of a crustal magma chamber or still warm pluton related to the San Francisco Mountain stratovolcano or to basaltic vents of late Pleistocene or Holocene age. Such a magma chamber or pluton beneath the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas might be an energy source from which a hot-, dry-rock geothermal energy system could be developed, and a probable geothermal resource potential is therefore assigned to these areas.

  8. Alaska: A frontier divided

    SciTech Connect

    O'Dell, R. )

    1986-09-01

    The superlatives surrounding Alaska are legion. Within the borders of the 49th US state are some of the world's greatest concentrations of waterfowl, bald eagles, fur seals, walrus, sea lions, otters, and the famous Kodiak brown bear. Alaska features the highest peak of North America, the 20,320-foot Mount McKinley, and the longest archipelago of small islands, the Aleutians. The state holds the greatest percentage of protected wilderness per capita in the world. The expanse of some Alaskan glaciers dwarfs entire countries. Like the periodic advance and retreat of its glaciers, Alaska appears with some regularity on the national US agenda. It last achieved prominence when President Jimmy Carter signed the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act in 1980. Since then the conflict between environmental protection and economic development has been played out throughout the state, and Congress is expected to turn to Alaskan issues again in its next sessions.

  9. Hawkweed Control in Alaska

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several hawkweed species from Europe have escaped ornamental planting and have colonized roadsides and grasslands in south central and southeast Alaska. These plants form near monotypic stands, reducing plant diversity and decreasing pasture productivity. A replicated greenhouse study was conducted ...

  10. California Dust

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... dramatically when forced through narrow canyons and mountain passes. Due to Southern California's uneven terrain, the strength of ... from a small fire located near the southern flank of Palomar Mountain in Southern California. This image was acquired during Terra orbit ...

  11. Alaska Resource Data File, Point Lay quadrangle, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grybeck, Donald J.

    2006-01-01

    This report gives descriptions of the mineral occurrences in the Point Lay 1:250,000-scale quadrangle, Alaska. The data presented here are maintained as part of a statewide database on mines, prospects and mineral occurrences throughout Alaska.

  12. Alaska looks HOT!

    SciTech Connect

    Belcher, J.

    1997-07-01

    Production in Alaska has been sluggish in recent years, with activity in the Prudhoe Bay region in the North Slope on a steady decline. Alaska North Slope (ANS) production topped out in 1988 at 2.037 MMbo/d, with 1.6 MMbo/d from Prudhoe Bay. This year operators expect to produce 788 Mbo/d from Prudhoe Bay, falling to 739 Mbo/d next year. ANS production as a whole should reach 1.3 MMbo/d this year, sliding to 1.29 MMbo/d in 1998. These declining numbers had industry officials and politicians talking about the early death of the Trans-Alaskan Pipeline System-the vital link between ANS crude and markets. But enhanced drilling technology coupled with a vastly improved relationship between the state government and industry have made development in Alaska more economical and attractive. Alaska`s Democratic Gov. Tommy Knowles is fond of telling industry {open_quotes}we`re open for business.{close_quotes} New discoveries on the North Slope and in the Cook Inlet are bringing a renewed sense of optimism to the Alaska exploration and production industry. Attempts by Congress to lift a moratorium on exploration and production activity in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) have been thwarted thus far, but momentum appears to be with proponents of ANWR drilling.

  13. Development of the Alaska Heritage Stewardship Program for protection of cultural resources at increased risk due to the Exxon Valdez oil spill. Restoration study number 104a. Exxon Valdez oil spill state/federal natural resource damage assessment final report

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, D.G.; Reger, D.

    1994-08-01

    The authors developed a stewardship program, based on functioning models in Arizona and Texas, to train interested local groups and individuals to protect cultural resources. The program was adapted to Alaska`s remoteness, sparse populations, and climate by giving Stewards greater flexibility to deal with local conditions. The State Office of History and Archaeology and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service are attempting to implement Stewardship in areas expressing interest.

  14. On Strike! Undocumented Workers in Arizona.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Tom

    1978-01-01

    Undocumented workers are organizing in Arizona to demand better wages and decent living conditions. The article discusses the conditions which led to the organization of this "illegal" workforce. (NQ)

  15. NASA's MISR Instrument Sees Arizona Wildfires Burn

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation from NASA’s Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on the Terra spacecraft show the Wallow and Horseshoe 2 Fires burning in Arizona mid-morning (local time) on Jun...

  16. California Fires

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Smoke Blankets Northern California     View Larger Image ... strikes sparked more than a thousand fires in northern California. This image was captured by the Multi-angle Imaging ... June 27, 2008 - Smoke from fires in northern California. project:  MISR category:  gallery ...

  17. Alaska Resource Data File: Chignik quadrangle, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pilcher, Steven H.

    2000-01-01

    Descriptions of the mineral occurrences can be found in the report. See U.S. Geological Survey (1996) for a description of the information content of each field in the records. The data presented here are maintained as part of a statewide database on mines, prospects and mineral occurrences throughout Alaska. There is a website from which you can obtain the data for this report in text and Filemaker Pro formats

  18. COMPARISONS OF PESTICIDE LEVELS AND EXPOSURES IN NHEXAS ARIZONA AND ARIZONA-MEXICO BORDER POPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The distributions of organophosphate (OP) insecticides chlorpyrifos and diazinon in exposure matrices such as indoor air, house dust, food, and water have been determined for 416 homes in the general Arizona population, and for 87 homes along the Arizona-Mexico border. The con...

  19. Views from Inside a Pediatric Clinic: How Arizona's Political Climate Has Impacted Arizona's Youngest Latino Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimenez-Silva, Margarita; Cheatham, Gregory A.; Gomez, Laura

    2013-01-01

    It is critical that we examine impacts that recent immigration policies such as SB1070 are having on Arizona's youngest Latino learners.The large number of Latinos under the age of five, and the impact that this upcoming generation of Latinos will have on all aspects of life in Arizona merits a closer look. In this qualitative study, we examined…

  20. Arizona Counselors' Perceptions of School to Work: Baseline Results. Arizona School to Work Briefing Paper #5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandegrift, Judith A.; Wright, Joel

    A baseline study of Arizona public school counselors ascertained the amount of time they spent individually with students and the nature of the counseling provided; it also measured their opinions and attitudes toward school-to-work (STW). Surveys were mailed to every Arizona high school and junior high/middle school, a random sample of elementary…

  1. 78 FR 13889 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-01

    ... no. 19765a). In 1943, L.F. Brady donated three Hopi prayer sticks (cat nos. E-1787-1789) to the Arizona State Museum. In 1958, Father Victor Stoner donated a Snake Dance kilt (cat no. E-3606) to the... part of an exchange. In 1965, the Arizona State Museum purchased a polychrome medicine bowl (cat no....

  2. Early Proterozoic ophiolite, central Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Dann, J.C. )

    1991-06-01

    The 1.73 Ga Payson ophiolite is a pseudostratigraphic sequence of mafic plutons, dike swarms, sheeted dikes, and submarine basalts that intruded and erupted upon a 1.75-1.76 Ga magmatic-arc complex. The composition of the sheeted dikes is tholeiitic basalt (minor andesite) with island-arc affinities. The submarine basalts are overlain by dacitic breccias and a thick section of turbidites with ca. 1.72 Ga ash beds. The entire sequence was deformed, intruded by ca. 1.70 Ga granites, and unconformably overlain by fluvial to shallow-shelf sediments. Although most of the 1.8-1.6 Ga juvenile crust of Arizona consists of magmatic-arc rocks, the Payson ophiolite is unique and is interpreted to have formed the floor of an intra-arc basin. The ophiolite developed in situ on the older arc basement, as opposed to being thrust over it. The basin was accreted to the continent by ca. 1.70 Ga.

  3. Population status of California sea otters

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-11-30

    The main objective of the study was to develop a simulation model to facilitate analysis of the risk of oil spills to the threatened California sea otter population. Existing data on the dynamics and demography of the population were synthesized. The additional data needed for model development were collected through radiotelemetry studies of sea otters in Alaska and California. The simulation model contains four interrelated stochastic submodels: a short-term population model, a long-term population model, a sea otter distribution model, and a sea otter movement model. The report includes a detailed description of the model, the data on which it is based, and an operating manual.

  4. Accretion of southern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hillhouse, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    Paleomagnetic data from southern Alaska indicate that the Wrangellia and Peninsular terranes collided with central Alaska probably by 65 Ma ago and certainly no later than 55 Ma ago. The accretion of these terranes to the mainland was followed by the arrival of the Ghost Rocks volcanic assemblage at the southern margin of Kodiak Island. Poleward movement of these terranes can be explained by rapid motion of the Kula oceanic plate, mainly from 85 to 43 Ma ago, according to recent reconstructions derived from the hot-spot reference frame. After accretion, much of southwestern Alaska underwent a counterclockwise rotation of about 50 ?? as indicated by paleomagnetic poles from volcanic rocks of Late Cretaceous and Early Tertiary age. Compression between North America and Asia during opening of the North Atlantic (68-44 Ma ago) may account for the rotation. ?? 1987.

  5. 2012 Alaska Performance Scholarship Outcomes Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rae, Brian

    2012-01-01

    As set forth in Alaska Statute 14.43.840, Alaska's Departments of Education & Early Development (EED) and Labor and Workforce Development (DOLWD), the University of Alaska (UA), and the Alaska Commission on Postsecondary Education (ACPE) present this first annual report on the Alaska Performance Scholarship to the public, the Governor, and the…

  6. The Condition of Pre-K-12 Education in Arizona: 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Education Policy Initiative, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This paper, the second annual report by the Arizona Education Policy Initiative (AEPI), is a collection of policy briefs on key issues in Arizona education. The authors of these briefs are on the faculty of Arizona's three public universities: Arizona State University (ASU), Northern Arizona University (NAU), and the University of Arizona (UA).…

  7. USGS Alaska State Mosaic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2008-01-01

    The Alaska State Mosaic consists of portions of scenes from the Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics 2001 (MRLC 2001) collection. The 172 selected scenes have been geometrically and radiometrically aligned to produce a seamless, relatively cloud-free image of the State. The scenes were acquired between July 1999 and September 2002, resampled to 120-meter pixels, and cropped to the State boundary. They were reprojected into a standard Alaska Albers projection with the U.S. National Elevation Dataset (NED) used to correct for relief.

  8. SOURCE PHENOMENOLOGY EXPERIMENTS IN ARIZONA

    SciTech Connect

    Jessie L. Bonner; Brian Stump; Mark Leidig; Heather Hooper; Xiaoning Yang; Rongmao Zhou; Tae Sung Kim; William R. Walter; Aaron Velasco; Chris Hayward; Diane Baker; C. L. Edwards; Steven Harder; Travis Glenn; Cleat Zeiler; James Britton; James F. Lewkowicz

    2005-09-30

    The Arizona Source Phenomenology Experiments (SPE) have resulted in an important dataset for the nuclear monitoring community. The 19 dedicated single-fired explosions and multiple delay-fired mining explosions were recorded by one of the most densely instrumented accelerometer and seismometer arrays ever fielded, and the data have already proven useful in quantifying confinement and excitation effects for the sources. It is very interesting to note that we have observed differences in the phenomenology of these two series of explosions resulting from the differences between the relatively slow (limestone) and fast (granodiorite) media. We observed differences at the two SPE sites in the way the rock failed during the explosions, how the S-waves were generated, and the amplitude behavior as a function of confinement. Our consortium's goal is to use the synergy of the multiple datasets collected during this experiment to unravel the phenomenological differences between the two emplacement media. The data suggest that the main difference between single-fired chemical and delay-fired mining explosion seismograms at regional distances is the increased surface wave energy for the latter source type. The effect of the delay-firing is to decrease the high-frequency P-wave amplitudes while increasing the surface wave energy because of the longer source duration and spall components. The results suggest that the single-fired explosions are surrogates for nuclear explosions in higher frequency bands (e.g., 6-8 Hz Pg/Lg discriminants). We have shown that the SPE shots, together with the mining explosions, are efficient sources of S-wave energy, and our next research stage is to postulate the possible sources contributing to the shear-wave energy.

  9. 4. VIEW SHOWING EXCAVATION IN ARIZONA CANAL, 8 MILES NORTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW SHOWING EXCAVATION IN ARIZONA CANAL, 8 MILES NORTHEAST OF PHOENIX. NOTE MEN DRILLING AND EXCAVATING IN OPERATION; CAMELBACK MOUNTAIN IN THE DISTANCE Photographer: Walter J. Lubken. No date - Arizona Canal, North of Salt River, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  10. 75 FR 28649 - State of Arizona Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ... Avenue in Phoenix from 8 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. Agenda items include: BLM State Director's update on... Central Avenue, Suite 800, Phoenix, Arizona 85004-4427, 602-417-9504. James G. Kenna, Arizona...

  11. 76 FR 584 - State of Arizona Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-05

    ... 31st Avenue in Phoenix from 8 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. Agenda items include: BLM State Director's update on..., Arizona State Office, One North Central Avenue, Suite 800, Phoenix, Arizona 85004-4427,...

  12. 9. VIEW SHOWING ARIZONA CANAL WITH CITRUS ORCHARDS, FACING NORTH. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW SHOWING ARIZONA CANAL WITH CITRUS ORCHARDS, FACING NORTH. CAMELBACK MOUNTAIN IS IN THE BACKGROUND Photographer: unknown. No date - Arizona Canal, North of Salt River, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  13. 52. VIEW SHOWING SITE OF ARIZONA FALL POWER PLANT, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. VIEW SHOWING SITE OF ARIZONA FALL POWER PLANT, LOOKING EAST. CURRENT LOCATION OF THE REAL-TIME WATER QUALITY MONITORING STATION Photographer: James Eastwood, July 1990 - Arizona Canal, North of Salt River, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  14. 51. Photocopy of construction drawing, Arizona Highway Department, May 1927, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. Photocopy of construction drawing, Arizona Highway Department, May 1927, microfiche of original drawing located at Arizona Department of Transportation, Phoenix AZ). STRESS DIAGRAMS. - Navajo Bridge, Spanning Colorado River at U.S. Highway 89 Alternate, Page, Coconino County, AZ

  15. 52. Photocopy of construction drawing, Arizona Highway Department, May 1927, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. Photocopy of construction drawing, Arizona Highway Department, May 1927, microfiche of original drawing located at Arizona Department of Transportation, Phoenix AZ). STRESS DIAGRAMS. - Navajo Bridge, Spanning Colorado River at U.S. Highway 89 Alternate, Page, Coconino County, AZ

  16. 30 CFR 903.700 - Arizona Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... bird without prior authorization of the Arizona Game and Fish Commission. A.R.S. section 17-236. (3) A... program for Arizona. The Director shall publish a notice to that effect in the Federal Register...

  17. 30 CFR 903.700 - Arizona Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... bird without prior authorization of the Arizona Game and Fish Commission. A.R.S. Section 17-236. (3) A... program for Arizona. The Director shall publish a notice to that effect in the Federal Register...

  18. 30 CFR 903.700 - Arizona Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... bird without prior authorization of the Arizona Game and Fish Commission. A.R.S. section 17-236. (3) A... program for Arizona. The Director shall publish a notice to that effect in the Federal Register...

  19. AERIAL VIEW OF USS ARIZONA ON THE EAST RIVER IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AERIAL VIEW OF USS ARIZONA ON THE EAST RIVER IN NEW YORK CITY NEAR BROOKLYN BRIDGE ON HER WAY TO SEA TRIALS. NOTE THE BIRD CAGE TOWERS, 1918. - USS Arizona, Submerged off Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  20. 61. Photocopy of construction drawing, Arizona Highway Department, May 1927, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. Photocopy of construction drawing, Arizona Highway Department, May 1927, microfiche of original drawing located at Arizona Department of Transportation, Phoenix AZ). HANDRAIL DESIGN. - Navajo Bridge, Spanning Colorado River at U.S. Highway 89 Alternate, Page, Coconino County, AZ

  1. Minerals yearbook, 1991: California. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Carrillo, F.V.; Davis, J.F.; Alfors, J.T.

    1993-05-01

    The report has been prepared under a Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Bureau of Mines, U.S. Department of the Interior, and the California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology, for collecting information on all nonfuel minerals. California ranked second among the States, after Arizona, in the value of nonfuel minerals produced in 1991, accounting for almost 10% of the U.S. total. The value of the commodities produced during the year decreased about 9% to $2.5 billion, following last year's 4% decline. California was the sole producer of boron and tungsten and led all States in the production of asbestos, portland cement, diatomite, calcined gypsum, rare-earth concentrates, and construction sand and gravel. It was second in natural calcium chloride, gold, magnesium compounds, pumice, industrial sand and gravel, and soda ash.

  2. New River and Phoenix City Streams, Arizona. Overall Master Plan.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    Design Part 3--New River Dam (including Apr. 1982 New River to Skunk Creek) Part 4--Skunk Creek and New and Apr. 1983 Agua Fria Rivers below the Arizona...66 G. Arizona Canal Diversion Channel............................. 67 H. Skunk Creek and the New and Agua Fria Rivers...1983 Agua Fria Rivers below the Arizona Canal Diversion Channel 1 Part 5--Arizona Canal Diversion I Dec. 1983 Channel (including Cave Creek Channel

  3. Arizona Department of Environmental Quality and Maricopa County Air Quality Department; Proposed Approval of Arizona Air Plan Revisions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ) and Maricopa County Air Quality District (MCAQD) portions of the Arizona State Implementation Plan (SIP).

  4. 76 FR 44602 - State of Arizona Resource Advisory Council Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ... Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Arizona Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet in Phoenix... 9828 North 31st Avenue, Phoenix, Arizona 85051. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dorothea Boothe..., Suite 800, Phoenix, Arizona 85004-4427, 602-417- 9504. Persons who use a telecommunications device...

  5. 77 FR 27795 - State of Arizona Resource Advisory Council Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Arizona Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet in Phoenix..., Phoenix, Arizona 85051. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Deborah Stevens, Acting DSD for Communications, the Bureau of Land Management, Arizona State Office, One North Central Avenue, Suite 800,...

  6. DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS OF THE NHEXAS-ARIZONA BORDER STUDY POPULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The NHEXAS-Arizona Border Study employed a population based probability design to recruit a representative cohort residing within 40 Km of the US-Mexico Border in Arizona. As an extension of the NHEXAS Arizona statewide survey, the border study was designed to determine the dis...

  7. Geothermal resources in Arizona: a bibliography. Circular 23

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, S.S.

    1982-01-01

    All reports and maps generated by the Geothermal Project of the Arizona Bureau of Geology and Mineral Technology and the Arizona Geothermal Commercialization Team of the University of Arizona are listed. In order to provide a more comprehensive listing of geothermal papers from other sources have been included. There are 224 references in the bibliography. (MHR)

  8. Kindergarten in Arizona: A Supplementary Handbook for Kindergarten Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Education, Phoenix.

    This handbook is a supplement to district-developed kindergarten teaching guides in Arizona. The history of kindergarten in the U.S. and Arizona and Arizona laws and regulations pertaining to kindergarten are related in the first section of the handbook. Subsequent sections offer basic information on: (1) children's intellectual, social/emotional,…

  9. The impaired physician: the Arizona experience.

    PubMed

    Geyser, M R

    1988-03-01

    The Arizona Board of Medical Examiners has developed in the past six years a program for rehabilitating impaired physicians who practice in the State of Arizona. The program is outlined in the article and the results show an 87.8 per cent rehabilitation rate for those doctors entering the program. Impaired physicians are required (with a few exceptions) to enter an approved inpatient program for three to four weeks; continue in an after care program following discharge from the inpatient program; and remain under Board control until rehabilitated. They are allowed to reenter practice following successful completion of the inpatient program.

  10. Energy Fuels Nuclear, Inc. Arizona Strip Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, T.C.

    1993-05-01

    Founded in 1975 by uranium pioneer, Robert W. Adams, Energy Fuels Nuclear, Inc. (EFNI) emerged as the largest US uranium mining company by the mid-1980s. Confronting the challenges of declining uranium market prices and the development of high-grade ore bodies in Australia and Canada, EFNI aggressively pursued exploration and development of breccia-pipe ore bodies in Northwestern Arizona. As a result, EFNI's production for the Arizona Strip of 18.9 million pounds U[sub 3]O[sub 8] over the period 1980 through 1991, maintained the company's status as a leading US uranium producer.

  11. Alaska's Cold Desert.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brune, Jeff; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Explores the unique features of Alaska's Arctic ecosystem, with a focus on the special adaptations of plants and animals that enable them to survive in a stressful climate. Reviews the challenges facing public and private land managers who seek to conserve this ecosystem while accommodating growing demands for development. Includes classroom…

  12. Alaska Mathematics Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska Department of Education & Early Development, 2012

    2012-01-01

    High academic standards are an important first step in ensuring that all Alaska's students have the tools they need for success. These standards reflect the collaborative work of Alaskan educators and national experts from the nonprofit National Center for the Improvement of Educational Assessment. Further, they are informed by public comments.…

  13. Alaska Glaciers and Rivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image on October 7, 2007, showing the Alaska Mountains of south-central Alaska already coated with snow. Purple shadows hang in the lee of the peaks, giving the snow-clad land a crumpled appearance. White gives way to brown on the right side of the image where the mountains yield to the lower-elevation Susitna River Valley. The river itself cuts a silver, winding path through deep green forests and brown wetlands and tundra. Extending from the river valley, are smaller rivers that originated in the Alaska Mountains. The source of these rivers is evident in the image. Smooth white tongues of ice extend into the river valleys, the remnants of the glaciers that carved the valleys into the land. Most of the water flowing into the Gulf of Alaska from the Susitna River comes from these mountain glaciers. Glacier melt also feeds glacier lakes, only one of which is large enough to be visible in this image. Immediately left of the Kahiltna River, the aquamarine waters of Chelatna Lake stand out starkly against the brown and white landscape.

  14. Venetie, Alaska energy assessment.

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Richard Pearson; Baca, Michael J.; Schenkman, Benjamin L.; Brainard, James Robert

    2013-07-01

    This report summarizes the Energy Assessment performed for Venetie, Alaska using the principals of an Energy Surety Microgrid (ESM) The report covers a brief overview of the principals of ESM, a site characterization of Venetie, a review of the consequence modeling, some preliminary recommendations, and a basic cost analysis.

  15. Alaska's Logging Camp School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millward, Robert E.

    1999-01-01

    A visit to Ketchikan, Alaska, reveals a floating, one-teacher logging-camp school that uses multiage grouping and interdisciplinary teaching. There are 10 students. The school gym and playground, bunkhouse, fuel tanks, mess hall, and students' homes bob up and down and are often moved to other sites. (MLH)

  16. Seismology Outreach in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardine, L.; Tape, C.; West, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Despite residing in a state with 75% of North American earthquakes and three of the top 15 ever recorded, most Alaskans have limited knowledge about the science of earthquakes. To many, earthquakes are just part of everyday life, and to others, they are barely noticed until a large event happens, and often ignored even then. Alaskans are rugged, resilient people with both strong independence and tight community bonds. Rural villages in Alaska, most of which are inaccessible by road, are underrepresented in outreach efforts. Their remote locations and difficulty of access make outreach fiscally challenging. Teacher retention and small student bodies limit exposure to science and hinder student success in college. The arrival of EarthScope's Transportable Array, the 50th anniversary of the Great Alaska Earthquake, targeted projects with large outreach components, and increased community interest in earthquake knowledge have provided opportunities to spread information across Alaska. We have found that performing hands-on demonstrations, identifying seismological relevance toward career opportunities in Alaska (such as natural resource exploration), and engaging residents through place-based experience have increased the public's interest and awareness of our active home.

  17. Willow Fire Near Payson, Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    On July 3, 2004, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite acquired this image of the Willow fire near Payson, Arizona. The image is being used by the United States Department of Agriculture's Forest Service Remote Sensing Applications Center (RSAC). The image combines data from the visible and infrared wavelength regions to highlight: the burned areas in dark red; the active fires in red-orange; vegetation in green; and smoke in blue.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. Science Team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long- term research effort dedicated to understanding the Earth as an integrated system and applying Earth System Science to improve prediction of climate, weather, and natural hazards using the unique vantage point of

  18. Arizona-sized Io Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    These images of Jupiter's volcanic moon, Io, show the results of a dramatic event that occurred on the fiery satellite during a five-month period. The changes, captured by the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft, occurred between the time Galileo acquired the left frame, during its seventh orbit of Jupiter, and the right frame, during its tenth orbit. A new dark spot, 400 kilometers (249 miles) in diameter, which is roughly the size of Arizona, surrounds a volcanic center named Pillan Patera. Galileo imaged a 120 kilometer (75 mile) high plume erupting from this location during its ninth orbit. Pele, which produced the larger plume deposit southwest of Pillan, also appears different than it did during the seventh orbit, perhaps due to interaction between the two large plumes. Pillan's plume deposits appear dark at all wavelengths. This color differs from the very red color associated with Pele, but is similar to the deposits of Babbar Patera, the dark feature southwest of Pele. Some apparent differences between the images are not caused by changes on Io's surface, but rather are due to differences in illumination, emission and phase angles. This is particularly apparent at Babbar Patera.

    North is to the top of the images. The left frame was acquired on April 4th, 1997, while the right frame was taken on Sept. 19th, 1997. The images were obtained at ranges of 563,000 kilometers (350,000 miles) for the left image, and 505,600 kilometers (314,165 miles) for the right.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo.

  19. Amphibian acoustic data from the Arizona 1, Pinenut, and Canyon breccia pipe uranium mines in Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinck, Jo E.; Hossack, Blake R.; Honeycutt, Richard

    2017-01-01

    The data consists of a summary of amphibian acoustic recordings at Canyon, Arizona 1, and Pinenut mines near the Grand Canyon. USGS is currently conducting biological surveys associated with uranium mines on federal lands in Arizona. These surveys include determining the composition of the local amphibian community. Original raw acoustic recordings used to create this summary data table are archived at Columbia Environmental Research Center.

  20. Arizona Public Library Statistics, 1995-1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Library, Archives and Public Records, Phoenix.

    The statistics in this document were provided by Arizona public libraries for 1995-96. The counties are grouped as follows: Apache, Cochise, and Coconino; Gila, Graham, Greenlee, and La Paz; Maricopa and Mohave; Navajo, Pima, and Pinal; and Santa Cruz, Yavapai, and Yuma. The following data is presented in table form for each of the five groups:…

  1. Arizona Public Library Statistics, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Jan, Comp.

    These statistics were compiled from information supplied by Arizona's public libraries. The document is divided according to the following county groups: Apache, Cochise; Coconino, Gila; Graham, Greenlee, La Paz; Maricopa; Mohave, Navajo; Pima, Pinal; Santa Cruz, Yavapai; and Yuma. Statistics are presented on the following: general information;…

  2. Arizona Public Library Statistics. 1994-1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Library and Archives, Phoenix.

    The statistics in this document were provided by Arizona public libraries for 1994-95. The counties are grouped as follows: Apache, Cochise,and Coconino; Gila, Graham, Greenlee, and La Paz; Maricopa and Mohave; Navajo, Pima, and Pinal; and Santa Cruz, Yavapai, and Yuma. The following data is presented in table form for each of the five groups: (1)…

  3. Arizona Public Library Statistics, 1998-1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Library, Archives and Public Records, Phoenix.

    The "Arizona Public Library Statistics, 1998-1999" is compiled from information supplied by the state's public libraries. The document is divided according to the following county groups: Apache, Cochise; Coconino, Gila; Graham, Greenlee, La Paz; Maricopa; Mohave, Navajo; Pima, Pinal; Santa Cruz, Yavapai; and Yuma. Within each of these…

  4. Arizona Public Library Statistics, 1996-1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Library, Archives and Public Records, Phoenix.

    This document is a compilation of information supplied by Arizona public libraries. Data is arranged by a separate index divider for each of these county groups: Apache, Cochise, and Coconino; Gila, Graham, Greenlee, and La Paz; Maricopa and Mohave; Navajo, Pima, and Pinal; and Santa Cruz, Yavapai, and Yuma. Each section contains tables of the…

  5. Arizona Public Library Statistics, 1999-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Library, Archives and Public Records, Phoenix.

    These statistics were compiled from information supplied by Arizona's public libraries. The document is divided according to the following county groups: Apache, Cochise; Coconino, Gila; Graham, Greenlee, La Paz; Maricopa; Mohave, Navajo; Pima, Pinal; Santa Cruz, Yavapai; Yuma. Statistics are presented on the following: general information;…

  6. Arizona's Forgotten Children: Promises To Keep.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Action Alliance, Phoenix, AZ.

    This report provides an Arizona perspective on the implications and effects of homelessness on children and youth, whether they live with their families or on their own. Statistics on homeless families are provided, and issues affecting homeless families are discussed. These issues involve shelters, child care, education, and health. Issues that…

  7. Ethnic Segregation in Arizona Charter Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Casey D.; Glass, Gene V.

    1999-01-01

    Addressed whether Arizona charter schools were more ethnically segregated than traditional public schools by studying 55 urban and 57 rural charter schools. Nearly half showed evidence of substantial ethnic segregation, and charter schools were higher in white enrollment than other public schools. (SLD)

  8. Kids Count Factbook: Arizona's Children 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierlein, Louann; And Others

    This report presents the second comprehensive look at the conditions of children and families in Arizona. Building upon information presented in the 1992 Factbook, this document presents and analyzes 48 indicators of child well-being. Following the executive summary and tables, chapter 1 provides an overview of the data for the state as a whole,…

  9. Agents of Culture in Rural Arizona.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albright, Penny

    1986-01-01

    Describes the Art in Arizona Towns Project, through which rural community colleges sponsor three- to six-day visits/residencies by performing artists who perform, lecture, and conduct classes and workshops for schools and community groups. Discusses the project's benefits for the rural communities and the artists, and logistical and financial…

  10. 40 CFR 81.303 - Arizona.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Arizona. 81.303 Section 81.303... Type Classification Date Type Phoenix Area: Maricopa County (part) 4/8/05 Attainment. Phoenix... Classification Date 1 Type Phoenix Area: Maricopa County (part) 6/14/05 Attainment Phoenix nonattainment...

  11. Stating the Case for CTE in Arizona

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses the academic success of CTE students in Arizona which is making a solid case for the role of career and technical education in America's high schools. When the Association for Career and Technical Education (ACTE) issued its position paper, "Reinventing the American High School for the 21st Century," it contained…

  12. Planning for Arizona's Future. Paper P-97.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amara, Roy

    The problem of how best to plan for Arizona's future is approached from two different angles. First, an outline is presented of 10 key assumptions regarding the most likely scenario for the United States in the 1980's. Assumptions are that there will be an unstable international environment but no nuclear war; fiscal conservatism in all areas of…

  13. Censorship and Arizona Schools: 1966-1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donelson, Kenneth L.

    1969-01-01

    This article reports the results of a survey of 277 secondary English teachers in 103 schools to determine the effect of censorship on English teaching in Arizona from 1966 to 1968. Listed are the numbers of teachers responding positively and negatively to each of 30 yes-or-no questions, revealing that 46.43% of the respondents had encountered…

  14. Schizochromism in a Peregrine Falcon from Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, D.H.; Oliphant, L.W.; Fackler, J.K.

    2002-01-01

    Herein, we report the first record of schizochromism in the Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus). Our example is a nestling from southern Arizona. The lack of dark brown pigment in this bird made it closely resemble the blue-gray plumage of an adult. Near fledging time, the bird was eaten by its nestmates, so this article also documents cannibalism.

  15. Rodeo and Chediski Fires in Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from Monday, June 24, 2002, shows the Rodeo and Chediski Fires (red dots) in Arizona (bottom center) and the immense smoke plumes they are creating. The plumes are moving north and appear to be mingling with smoke from other fires in southwest Colorado.

  16. Medical Cannabis in Arizona: Patient Characteristics, Perceptions, and Impressions of Medical Cannabis Legalization.

    PubMed

    Troutt, William D; DiDonato, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    Many advances have been made toward understanding the benefits of medical cannabis. However, less is known about medical cannabis patients themselves. Prior research has uncovered many important patient characteristics, but most of that work has been conducted with participants in California, who may not represent medical cannabis patients throughout the United States. Furthermore, it is unknown if medical cannabis legalization, which typically imposes strict regulations on cannabis cultivation and sale, impacts patients' experiences acquiring and using cannabis. The goal of this study was to address these limitations by (1) examining the characteristics, perceptions, and behaviors of medical cannabis patients in Arizona; and (2) questioning participants with a history of cannabis use regarding their experiences with cannabis before and after legalization. Patients in Arizona share many characteristics with those in California, but also key differences, such as average age and degree of cannabis consumption. Participants also had positive perceptions of the effect of medical cannabis legalization, reporting that feelings of safety and awareness were higher after legalization compared to before. The results are discussed in relation to evidence from patients in other states and in terms of their potential policy implications.

  17. Coal resources of Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.B.

    1982-01-01

    In the late 1800s, whaling ships carried Alaskan coal, and it was used to thaw ground for placer gold mining. Unfortunate and costly political maneuvers in the early 1900s delayed coal removal, but the Alaska Railroad and then World War II provided incentives for opening mines. Today, 33 million acres (about 9% of the state) is classified as prospectively valuable for coal, much of it under federal title. Although the state's geology is poorly known, potential for discovery of new fields exists. The US Geological Survey estimates are outdated, although still officially used. The total Alaska onshore coal resource is estimated to be 216 to 4216 billion tons of which 141 billion tons are identified resources; an additional 1430 billion tons are believed to lie beneath Cook Inlet. Transportation over mountain ranges and wetlands is the biggest hurdle for removal. Known coal sources and types are described and mapped. 1 figure.

  18. Seabirds in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatch, Scott A.; Piatt, John F.

    1995-01-01

    Techniques for monitoring seabird populations vary according to habitat types and the breeding behavior of individual species (Hatch and Hatch 1978, 1989; Byrd et al. 1983). An affordable monitoring program can include but a few of the 1,300 seabird colonies identified in Alaska, and since the mid-1970's, monitoring effotrts have emphasized a small selection of surface-feeding and diving species, primarily kittiwakes (Rissa spp.) and murres (Uria spp.). Little or no information on trends is available for other seabirds (Hatch 1993a). The existing monitoring program occurs largely on sites within the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge, which was established primarily for the conservation of marine birds. Data are collected by refuge staff, other state and federal agencies, private organizations, university faculty, and students.

  19. Geologic map of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Frederic H.; Hults, Chad P.; Mull, Charles G.; Karl, Susan M.

    2015-12-31

    This Alaska compilation is unique in that it is integrated with a rich database of information provided in the spatial datasets and standalone attribute databases. Within the spatial files every line and polygon is attributed to its original source; the references to these sources are contained in related tables, as well as in stand-alone tables. Additional attributes include typical lithology, geologic setting, and age range for the map units. Also included are tables of radiometric ages.

  20. West Nile Virus in California

    PubMed Central

    Lothrop, Hugh; Chiles, Robert; Madon, Minoo; Cossen, Cynthia; Woods, Leslie; Husted, Stan; Kramer, Vicki; Edman, John

    2004-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) was first isolated in California during July 2003 from a pool of Culex tarsalis collected near El Centro, Imperial County. WNV transmission then increased and spread in Imperial and Coachella Valleys, where it was tracked by isolation from pools of Cx. tarsalis, seroconversions in sentinel chickens, and seroprevalence in free-ranging birds. WNV then dispersed to the city of Riverside, Riverside County, and to the Whittier Dam area of Los Angeles County, where it was detected in dead birds and pools of Cx. pipiens quinquefasciatus. By October, WNV was detected in dead birds collected from riparian corridors in Los Angeles, west to Long Beach, and through inland valleys south from Riverside to San Diego County. WNV was reported concurrently from Arizona in mid-August and from Baja, Mexico, in mid-November. Possible mechanisms for virus introduction, amplification, and dispersal are discussed. PMID:15496236

  1. Poleward reach of the California Undercurrent extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Richard E.; Krassovski, Maxim V.

    2010-09-01

    The California Undercurrent is known to transport relatively warm, high-salinity, nutrient-rich water from the equatorial Pacific to Vancouver Island along the western continental slope of North America. This transport helps maintain the high productivity of the eastern boundary California Current system. In this study, we use several decades of water property survey data for the coasts of Oregon, Washington, British Columbia, and Alaska to show that equatorial Pacific water carried poleward by the undercurrent can eventually reach the Aleutian Islands, roughly 11,000 km from the source region. Long-term current meter records confirm the undercurrent as far north as Vancouver Island, where the current is found to be weakest in spring but then to strengthen through the summer and fall before merging with the wind-forced, poleward flowing Davidson Current in winter. The core depth of the equatorial water increases from 150 m ± 25 m off northwest Washington (near the northern end of the western North America coastal upwelling domain) to 225 m ± 25 m off southeast Alaska (near the southern end of the Gulf of Alaska coastal downwelling domain).

  2. The california poppy (eschscholtzia mexicana) as a copper indicator plant - a new example

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chaffee, M.A.; Gale, C.W.

    1976-01-01

    The abundance and distribution of the California poppy (Eschscholtzia mexicana) correlates closely with the copper-rich outcrop of a small porphyry-type deposit in Arizona. Chemical factors are probably more important than physical factors in determining why this species is sometimes found as a copper indicator plant. ?? 1976.

  3. 2013 Alaska Performance Scholarship Outcomes Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rae, Brian

    2013-01-01

    In accordance with Alaska statute the departments of Education & Early Development (EED) and Labor and Workforce Development (DOLWD), the University of Alaska (UA), and the Alaska Commission on Postsecondary Education (ACPE) present this second annual report on the Alaska Performance Scholarship (APS). Among the highlights: (1) In the public…

  4. Rural Alaska Mentoring Project (RAMP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cash, Terry

    2011-01-01

    For over two years the National Dropout Prevention Center (NDPC) at Clemson University has been supporting the Lower Kuskokwim School District (LKSD) in NW Alaska with their efforts to reduce high school dropout in 23 remote Yup'ik Eskimo villages. The Rural Alaska Mentoring Project (RAMP) provides school-based E-mentoring services to 164…

  5. Alaska provides icy training ground

    SciTech Connect

    Rintoul, B.

    1983-04-01

    Offshore oil drilling platforms and oil exploration off the coast of Alaska are discussed. Sohio is investigating the feasibility of platform supporters from shore such as icebreakers and air-cushion vehicles. At Prudhoe Bay Arco is embarking on the first tertiary oil recovery project to take place on Alaska's North Slope.

  6. Alaska High Altitude Photography Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Earl V.; Knutson, Martin A.; Ekstrand, Robert E.

    1986-01-01

    In 1978, the Alaska High Altitude Photography Program was initiated to obtain simultaneous black and white and color IR aerial photography of Alaska. Dual RC-10 and Zeiss camera systems were used for this program on NASA's U-2 and WB-57F, respectively. Data collection, handling, and distribution are discussed as well as general applications and the current status.

  7. Wildlife guilds in Arizona desert habitats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Short, Henry L.

    1983-01-01

    This report summarizes information produced from Interagency Agreement No. AA-851-IA1-27 between the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), USDI, and the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), USDI. The contract was instrumental in the final development of wildlife guilds for the Hualapai-Aquarius planning area of the BLM in westcentral Arizona, reported herein. The Arizona study area was selected for the application of the guilding technology because a thorough assessment of the floral and faunal resources had recently occurred in conjunction with the development of a grazing Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Thus, the association of wildlife species with habitat type was well known, which aided in the compilation of the data base necessary for the development of guilds. Some data were also available that described the vegetative structure of habitats. This was useful in the development of a model that evaluated the quality of habitat on the basis of the diversity of cover in those habitats (Short 1982).

  8. Concealed evaporite basin drilled in Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Rauzi, S.L.

    1996-10-21

    The White Mountains of Arizona are a high forested plateau underlain by volcanic rocks of Late Pliocene and Quaternary age on the south margin of the Colorado plateau province. Elevations range from 6,000--11,590 ft, with winter snow and summer rain but ideal conditions for much of the year. There was no evidence of a Permian evaporite basin concealed beneath the White Mountain volcanic field until 1993, when the Tonto 1 Alpine-Federal, a geothermal test well, was drilled. This test did not encounter thermal waters, but it did encounter a surprisingly thick and unexpected sequence of anhydrite, dolomite, and petroliferous limestone assigned to the Supai (Yeso) formation of Permian age. The Tonto test was continuously cored through the Permian section, providing invaluable information that is now stored at the Arizona Geological Survey in Tucson. The paper describes the area geology and the concealed basin.

  9. UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherfoord, John P.; Johns, Kenneth A.; Shupe, Michael A.; Cheu, Elliott C.; Varnes, Erich W.; Dienes, Keith; Su, Shufang; Toussaint, William Doug; Sarcevic, Ina

    2013-07-29

    The High Energy Physics Group at the University of Arizona has conducted forefront research in elementary particle physics. Our theorists have developed new ideas in lattice QCD, SUSY phenomenology, string theory phenomenology, extra spatial dimensions, dark matter, and neutrino astrophysics. The experimentalists produced significant physics results on the ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider and on the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. In addition, the experimentalists were leaders in detector development and construction, and on service roles in these experiments.

  10. A tick from a prehistoric Arizona coprolite.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Keith L; Reinhardt, Karl J; Sianto, Luciana; Araújo, Adauto; Gardner, Scott L; Janovy, John

    2008-02-01

    Ticks have never been reported in archaeological analyses. Here, we present the discovery of a tick from a coprolite excavated from Antelope Cave in extreme northwest Arizona. Dietary analysis indicates that the coprolite has a human origin. This archaeological occupation is associated with the Ancestral Pueblo culture (Anasazi). This discovery supports previous hypotheses that ticks were a potential source of disease and that ectoparasites were eaten by ancient people.

  11. Planning applications of remote sensing in Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, R. B.; Mouat, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    Planners in Arizona have been experiencing the inevitable problems which occur when large areas of rural and remote lands are converted to urban-recreational uses over a relatively short period of time. Among the planning problems in the state are unplanned and illegal subdivisions, surburban sprawl, surface hydrologic problems related to ephemeral stream overflow, rapidly changing land use patterns, large size of administrative units, and lack of land use inventory data upon which to base planning decisions.

  12. Water resources data, Arizona, water year 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCormack, H.F.; Fisk, G.G.; Duet, N.R.; Evans, D.W.; Roberts, W.P.; Castillo, N.K.

    2003-01-01

    The Arizona District water data report includes records on both surface water and ground water in the State for water year 2002. Specifically, it contains: (1) discharge records for 201 streamflow-gaging stations, for 29 crest-stage, partial-record streamflow stations, and 48 miscellaneous sites; (2) stage and (or) content only records for 10 lakes and reservoirs; (3) water-quality records for 21 streamflow-gaging stations and 65 wells; and (4) water levels for 18 wells.

  13. Geologic framework of the Alaska Peninsula, southwest Alaska, and the Alaska Peninsula terrane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Frederic H.; Detterman, Robert L.; DuBois, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    The boundaries separating the Alaska Peninsula terrane from other terranes are commonly indistinct or poorly defined. A few boundaries have been defined at major faults, although the extensions of these faults are speculative through some areas. The west side of the Alaska Peninsula terrane is overlapped by Tertiary sedimentary and volcanic rocks and Quaternary deposits.

  14. Roughness coefficients for stream channels in Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aldridge, B.N.; Garrett, J.M.

    1973-01-01

           n in which V = mean cross-sectional velocity of flow, in feet per second; R = hydraulic radius at a cross section, which is the cross-sectional area divided by the wetter perimeter, in feet; Se = energy slope; and n = coefficient of roughness. Many research studies have been made to determine "n" values for open-channel flow (Carter and others, 1963). Guidelines for selecting coefficient of roughness for stream channels are given in most of the literature of stream-channel hydraulics, but few of the data relate directly to streams of Arizona, The U.S> Geological Survey, at the request of the Arizona Highway Department, assembled the color photographs and tables of the Manning "n" values in this report to aid highway engineers in the selection of roughness coefficients for Arizona streams. Most of the photographs show channel reaches for which values of "n" have been assigned by experienced Survey personnel; a few photographs are included for reaches where "n" values have been verified. Verified "n" values are computed from a known discharge and measured channel geometry. Selected photographs of stream channels for which "n" values have been verified are included in U.S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 1849 (Barnes, 1967); stereoscopic slides of Barnes' (1967) photographs and additional photographs can be inspected at U.S> Geological Survey offices in: 2555 E. First Street, Tucson; and 5017 Federal Building, 230 N. First Avenue, Phoenix.

  15. University of Arizona Compressed Air Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Joseph; Muralidharan, Krishna

    2012-12-31

    Boiled down to its essentials, the grant’s purpose was to develop and demonstrate the viability of compressed air energy storage (CAES) for use in renewable energy development. While everyone agrees that energy storage is the key component to enable widespread adoption of renewable energy sources, the development of a viable scalable technology has been missing. The Department of Energy has focused on expanded battery research and improved forecasting, and the utilities have deployed renewable energy resources only to the extent of satisfying Renewable Portfolio Standards. The lack of dispatchability of solar and wind-based electricity generation has drastically increased the cost of operation with these components. It is now clear that energy storage coupled with accurate solar and wind forecasting make up the only combination that can succeed in dispatchable renewable energy resources. Conventional batteries scale linearly in size, so the price becomes a barrier for large systems. Flow batteries scale sub-linearly and promise to be useful if their performance can be shown to provide sufficient support for solar and wind-base electricity generation resources. Compressed air energy storage provides the most desirable answer in terms of scalability and performance in all areas except efficiency. With the support of the DOE, Tucson Electric Power and Science Foundation Arizona, the Arizona Research Institute for Solar Energy (AzRISE) at the University of Arizona has had the opportunity to investigate CAES as a potential energy storage resource.

  16. Cenozoic extension and magmatism in Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, S. J.; Spencer, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    The Basin and Range Province of Arizona was the site of two episodes of Cenozoic extension that can be distinguished on the basis of timing, direction and style of extension, and associated magmatism. The first episode of extension occurred during Oligocene to mid-Miocene time and resulted in the formation of low-angle detachment faults, ductile shear zones (metamorphic core complexes), and regional domains of tilted fault blocks. Evidence for extreme middle Tertiary crustal extension in a NE to SW to SW to ENE to WSW direction has been recognized in various parts of the Basin and Range of Arizona, especially in the Lake Mead area and along the belf of metamorphic core complexes that crosses southern Arizona from Parker to Tucson. New geologic mapping and scrutiny of published geologic maps indicates that significant middle Tertiary extension is more widely distributed than previously thought. The state can be subdivided into regional tilt-block domains in which middle Tertiary rocks dip consistently in one direction. The dip direction in any tilt-block domain is generally toward the breakaway of a low-angle detachment fault that underlies the tilt-block domain; we interpret this an indicating that normal faults in the upper plate of a detechment fault are generally synthetic, rather than antithetic, with respect to the detachment fault.

  17. Planned Parenthood of Southern Arizona v. Lawall.

    PubMed

    1999-01-01

    Court Decision: 180 Federal Reporter, 3d Series 1022; 1999 June 9 (date of decision). The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals held that an Arizona law requiring a minor to have parental consent for abortion was unconstitutional. Planned Parenthood of Southern Arizona had brought an action challenging the validity of the law, which contained a judicial bypass provision allowing minors to obtain an abortion in the absence of parental consent if approved by the court. Because the judicial bypass provision was open-ended and did not contain specific time frames or deadlines, it did not assure an expeditious alternative to parental consent. The Ninth Circuit found that the judicial bypass provision posed a substantial obstacle to abortion in a large fraction of cases and therefore unduly burdened a woman's right to an abortion. The Arizona statute also contained a medical emergency provision which allowed minors to avoid parental consent if an attending physician deemed an abortion medically necessary to the health and bodily function of the minor. Because the medical emergency provision relied on deadlines provided by the judicial bypass provision, and because the judicial bypass provision failed to specify deadlines in a manner that could be useful to physicians in making their decision concerning whether an abortion is medically necessary, the Ninth Circuit found the medical emergency provision unconstitutionally vague. The Ninth Circuit affirmed the District Court's decision by permanently enjoining the State from implementing or enforcing the statute.

  18. Effect of Race and Ethnicity Classification on Survey Estimates: Anomaly of the Weighted Totals of American Indians and Alaska Natives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sunghee; Satter, Delight E.; Ponce, Ninez A.

    2009-01-01

    Racial classification is a paramount concern in data collection and analysis for American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) and has far-reaching implications in health research. We examine how different racial classifications affect survey weights and consequently change health-related indicators for the AI/AN population in California. Using a…

  19. The April 2009 Gulf of Alaska Line-Transect Survey (Goals) in the Navy Training Exercise Area

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    K. B., Gabriele, C. M., LeDuc, R., Mattila, D., Rojas -Bracho, L., Straley, J. M., Taylor, B. L., Urbán, J., Weller, D., Witteveen, B. H.,Yamaguchi...cetaceans of the Prince William Sound, Alaska. Ph.D. dissert., University of California Santa Cruz , 101 p. Kasuya, T., and Miyashita, T. 1988

  20. Water quality in the central Arizona basins, Arizona, 1995-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cordy, Gail E.; Gellenbeck, Dorinda J.; Gebler, Joseph B.; Anning, David W.; Coes, Alissa L.; Edmonds, Robert J.; Rees, Julie A.H.; Sanger, H.W.

    2000-01-01

    The water quality in rivers and streams and in selected aquifers in central Arizona basins in Arizona is described and illustrated. Major ions, nitrogen and other nutrients, and pesticides and some of their breakdown compounds were analyzed in both surface and ground water. Biological communities that included fish, invertebrates, and algae, were described in relation to stream water quality. Volatile organic compounds that originate from fuels, solvents, and industry were analyzed from ground-water samples. Agricultural and urban land-use effects on shallow ground water are compared and contrasted.

  1. 75 FR 20623 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Arizona

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ... lands were officially filed in the Arizona State Office, Bureau of Land Management, Phoenix, Arizona, on... 800, Phoenix, Arizona 85004-4427. Dated: April 13, 2010. Stephen K. Hansen, Chief Cadastral...

  2. 76 FR 53940 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Arizona

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ... below is officially filed in the Arizona State Office, Bureau of Land Management, Phoenix, Arizona..., Suite 800, Phoenix, Arizona 85004-4427. Persons who use a telecommunications device for the deaf...

  3. Metamorphic facies map of Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Dusel-Bacon, C.; O-Rourke, E.F.; Reading, K.E.; Fitch, M.R.; Klute, M.A.

    1985-04-01

    A metamorphic-facies of Alaska has been compiled, following the facies-determination scheme of the Working Group for the Cartography of the Metamorphic Belts of the World. Regionally metamorphosed rocks are divided into facies series where P/T gradients are known and into facies groups where only T is known. Metamorphic rock units also are defined by known or bracketed age(s) of metamorphism. Five regional maps have been prepared at a scale of 1:1,000,000; these maps will provide the basis for a final colored version of the map at a scale of 1:2,500,000. The maps are being prepared by the US Geological Survey in cooperation with the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys. Precambrian metamorphism has been documented on the Seward Peninsula, in the Baird Mountains and the northeastern Kuskokwim Mountains, and in southwestern Alaska. Pre-Ordovician metamorphism affected the rocks in central Alaska and on southern Prince of Wales Island. Mid-Paleozoic metamorphism probably affected the rocks in east-central Alaska. Most of the metamorphic belts in Alaska developed during Mesozoic or early Tertiary time in conjuction with accretion of many terranes. Examples are Jurassic metamorphism in east-central Alaska, Early Cretaceous metamorphism in the southern Brooks Range and along the rim of the Yukon-Kovyukuk basin, and late Cretaceous to early Tertiary metamorphism in the central Alaska Range. Regional thermal metamorphism was associated with multiple episodes of Cretaceous plutonism in southeastern Alaska and with early Tertiary plutonism in the Chugach Mountains. Where possible, metamorphism is related to tectonism. Meeting participants are encouraged to comment on the present version of the metamorphic facies map.

  4. Remote Sensing of Arizona Monsoons: Application of GOES Infrared Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, S.; Christensen, P. R.; Cerveny, R. S.

    2013-12-01

    Large, violent thunder and dust storms occur in the Phoenix area during monsoon season. Currently, the best ways to predict these dangerous and potentially damaging storms are not very accurate. The primary goal of this investigation is to attempt to develop a new technique to identify and predict these storms before they reach Phoenix. In order to address this question, two data sets (remote sensing satellite imagery and ground-based weather information) will be analyzed and compared against one another using time as a corresponding variable. The goal is to discern any correlations between data sets which be used as an indicator of imminent large monsoons. The moisture needed for the storms is carried to Arizona by events known as gulf surges (from the California Gulf); these will be the target of investigation. These chutes of moisture surge through Arizona, primarily up through Yuma in a northeasterly direction towards central/south central Arizona. The main goal is to identify if satellite imagery can be used as an accurate identifier of moisture movements preceding a storm in areas where ground measurements are not available. Presently, ground measurements of dew points are the primary technique by which these moisture surges are identified. However, while these measurements do have a fairly high temporal resolution (once an hour) they cover an awfully poor spacial range. Furthermore, it is suspected that because of interference to the instruments, the ground point data may not be as accurate as is preferred. On the other hand, satellite imagery such as GOES - the instrument used in this investigation - has both a remarkably high temporal resolution and spacial coverage. If a correlation can be demonstrated, then the high temporal resolution of the remote sensing data could be used as an identifier of oncoming monsoon storms. In order to proceed in this research, a software package known as Java Mission-planning and Analysis for Remote Sensing (JMARS) for

  5. California Fires

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Wildfires Rage in Southern California     ... Image Large plumes of smoke rising from devastating wildfires burning near Los Angeles and San Diego on Sunday, October 26, 2003, ... at JPL October 26, 2003 - Smoke from wildfires near Los Angeles and San Diego. project:  MISR ...

  6. California Dreaming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Cathy Applefeld

    2011-01-01

    After getting her master's degree from UCLA, Nancy Wills dreamed of starting a school-based guitar program so she could teach students to make music on the instrument she'd loved since she was a kid growing up outside of Yosemite, California. She had a strong belief that guitar was perfect for schools, ideal for individualized playing but also…

  7. Distribution of high-temperature (>150 °C) geothermal resources in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, John H.; Priest, Susan S.

    2002-01-01

    California contains, by far, the greatest geothermal generating capacity in the United States, and with the possible exception of Alaska, the greatest potential for the development of additional resources. California has nearly 2/3 of the US geothermal electrical installed capacity of over 3,000 MW. Depending on assumptions regarding reservoir characteristics and future market conditions, additional resources of between 2,000 and 10,000 MWe might be developed (see e.g., Muffler, 1979).

  8. 77 FR 25737 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-01

    ... donated to the Arizona State Museum. The 30 unassociated funerary objects are 12 ceramic bowls, 8 ceramic jars, 1 ceramic ladle, 3 ceramic pitchers, 5 ceramic scoops, and 1 ceramic sherd. Queen Creek Ruin was... a ballcourt. Architectural features, the mortuary program, ceramic types, and other items...

  9. Arizona History Resource Guide: A Resource Guide for Arizona Classroom Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Education, Phoenix.

    The resource guide is structured for Arizona history and social studies teachers as an aid in planning classroom activities for kindergarten through grade 12. Developed as part of the Bicentennial program, the guide focuses on the themes of heritage, festival, and horizons. The heritage section furnishes a historical perspective for organizing…

  10. How Arizona's Dropout Crisis Affects Communities, Creates Economic Losses for the State of Arizona

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WestEd, 2014

    2014-01-01

    One-in-five of Arizona's youth did not complete high school and a similarly large proportion of the state's youth is disconnected from either work or education. These youth face higher risks of unemployment and economic insecurity and are more reliant on government supports. This situation, which fails to ensure that the state's youth are…

  11. Examining Arizona's Policy Response Post "Flores v. Arizona" in Educating K-12 English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimenez-Silva, Margarita; Gomez, Laura; Cisneros, Jesus

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an analysis of Arizona's policy response in educating English language learners by conducting a narrative review. A critical Latina/o theory approach was used to analyze the data. This study reveals 5 salient policy responses: (a) severely limit bilingual education, (b) develop controversial funding solutions, (c) implement a…

  12. Alaska Interagency Ecosystem Health Work Group

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shasby, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The Alaska Interagency Ecosystem Health Work Group is a community of practice that recognizes the interconnections between the health of ecosystems, wildlife, and humans and meets to facilitate the exchange of ideas, data, and research opportunities. Membership includes the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, U.S. Geological Survey, Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation, Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Alaska Sea Life Center, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Alaska Department of Fish and Game.

  13. Proceedings of West Coast Regional Coastal Design Conference Held on 7-8 November 1985 at Oakland, California.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    34 . ............................................ 73 Sung B. Yoon and Philip L-F. Liu Cornell University, Ithaca, New York "Interactions B/etween Water Waves and Currents in Shallow... Water " ................................................. 84 Carl D. Stormer US Army Corps of Engineers, Alaska District, Anchorage "The Alaska Coastal...and Richard C. Harding Earth Sciences Associates Palo Alto, California John M. Musser, Jr. Geo-Recon International Seattle, Washington "Geologic and

  14. The San Francisco volcanic field, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Priest, S.S.; Duffield, W.A.; Malis-Clark, Karen; Hendley, J. W.; Stauffer, P.H.

    2001-01-01

    Northern Arizona's San Francisco Volcanic Field, much of which lies within Coconino and Kaibab National Forests, is an area of young volcanoes along the southern margin of the Colorado Plateau. During its 6-million-year history, this field has produced more than 600 volcanoes. Their activity has created a topographically varied landscape with forests that extend from the Pi?on-Juniper up to the Bristlecone Pine life zones. The most prominent landmark is San Francisco Mountain, a stratovolcano that rises to 12,633 feet and serves as a scenic backdrop to the city of Flagstaff.

  15. Storage opportunities in Arizona bedded evaporites

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, J.T.; Rauzi, S.L.

    1996-10-01

    Arizona is endowed with incredibly diverse natural beauty, and has also been blessed with at least seven discrete deposits of bedded salt. These deposits are dispersed around the state and cover some 2, 500 square miles; they currently contain 14 LPG storage caverns, with preliminary plans for more in the future. The areal extent and thickness of the deposits creates the opportunity for greatly expanded storage of LPG, natural gas, and compressed air energy storage (CAES). The location of salt deposits near Tucson and Phoenix may make CAES an attractive prospect in the future. The diversity of both locations and evaporate characteristics allows for much tailoring of individual operations to meet specific requirements.

  16. Tropical squall lines of the Arizona monsoon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Walter P.; Gall, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    Three cases of squall lines composed of strong to severe thunderstorms that formed over Arizona, and Sonora (Mexico) on July, 16-17 and 17-18, 1984, and August 2-3, 1986, are examined. Data, which included satellite imagery, VISSR-derived fields, surface data, and records or cloud-to-ground lightning strikes, indicate that the initiation, growth, and dissipation of all three squall lines were very similar. Results indicate that these mesoscale convective systems developed in an environment of relatively strong low-level shear with very weak shear aloft and that they possessed almost all the properties of a typical tropical squall line.

  17. Water resources data, Arizona, water year 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisk, G.G.; Duet, N.R.; McGuire, E.H.; Angeroth, C.E.; Castillo, N.K.; Smith, C.F.

    2005-01-01

    The USGS Arizona Water Science Center water data report includes records on both surface water and ground water in the State for water year 2004. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for 206 streamflow-gaging stations and 21 crest-stage, partial-record streamflow stations; (2) stage and (or) content records for 8 lakes and reservoirs; (3) water-quality records for 20 streamflow-gaging stations; (4) ground-water levels and compaction values for 14 stations; and (5) water levels for 18 wells.

  18. Water Resources Data, Arizona, Water Year 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisk, G.G.; Duet, N.R.; Evans, D.W.; Angeroth, C.E.; Castillo, N.K.; Longsworth, S.A.

    2004-01-01

    The Arizona District water data report includes records on both surface water and ground water in the State for water year 2003. Specifically, it contains: (1) discharge records for 203 streamflow-gaging stations, for 29 crest-stage, partial-record streamflow stations, and 50 miscellaneous sites; (2) stage and (or) content only records for 9 lakes and reservoirs; (3) water-quality records for 29 streamflow-gaging stations; (4) ground-water levels and compaction values for 14 stations; and (5) water levels for 19 wells.

  19. Rodeo and Chediski Fires in Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Rodeo and Chediski fires in Arizona continued to send smoke skyward on Monday, June 24, 2002, when the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) acquired this image. The plumes from those fires stretch to the northeast in a broad swath to cross the state line into New Mexico. The densest part of this smoke pall is from 170 to 180 kilometers long and from 50 to 60 kilometers across. The grayish haze from other fires in the Four Corners region is also visible.

  20. 1. Photocopy of photograph (original print located at Arizona Historical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of photograph (original print located at Arizona Historical Society, Yuma, Arizona) Photographer unknown, circa 1890s. HORSE-DRAWN CART USED FOR DELIVERING WATER. - Yuma Main Street Water Treatment Plant, Jones Street at foot of Main Street, Yuma, Yuma County, AZ

  1. 4. Photocopy of photograph (original print located at Arizona Historical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Photocopy of photograph (original print located at Arizona Historical Society, Yuma, Arizona) Photographer unknown, circa 1893. INTERIOR VIEW OF YUMA WATER AND LIGHT COMPANY PLANT. - Yuma Main Street Water Treatment Plant, Jones Street at foot of Main Street, Yuma, Yuma County, AZ

  2. Transformational Leadership and Teacher Motivation in Southwestern Arizona High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Catherine L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between transformational leadership and teacher motivation in Southwestern Arizona high schools. Teachers in a school district in Southwestern Arizona comprised of high schools were surveyed using two instruments, Leithwood and Jantzi's (1998) The Leadership and Management of Schools in…

  3. 21 CFR 866.3035 - Arizona spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Arizona spp. serological reagents. 866.3035 Section 866.3035 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3035 Arizona...

  4. 21 CFR 866.3035 - Arizona spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arizona spp. serological reagents. 866.3035 Section 866.3035 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3035 Arizona...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3035 - Arizona spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Arizona spp. serological reagents. 866.3035 Section 866.3035 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3035 Arizona...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3035 - Arizona spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Arizona spp. serological reagents. 866.3035 Section 866.3035 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3035 Arizona...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3035 - Arizona spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Arizona spp. serological reagents. 866.3035 Section 866.3035 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3035 Arizona...

  8. Untangling the web...spiders in Arizona fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many kinds of arthropod natural enemies (predators and parasitoids) inhabit crop fields in Arizona and can have a large negative impact on several pest insect species that also infest these crops. Many different species of spiders are common in cotton, alfalfa and other crops in Arizona. Among the ...

  9. 58. Photocopy of construction drawing, Arizona Highway Department, May 1927, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    58. Photocopy of construction drawing, Arizona Highway Department, May 1927, microfiche of original drawing located at Arizona Department of Transportation, Phoenix AZ). ARCH DETAIL, U3 - U5. - Navajo Bridge, Spanning Colorado River at U.S. Highway 89 Alternate, Page, Coconino County, AZ

  10. Arizona State Capitol Museum. Teacher Resource Guide. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Library, Archives and Public Records, Phoenix.

    Information about Arizona's history, government, and state capitol is organized into two sections. The first section presents a timeline of Arizona history from the prehistoric era to 1992. Brief descriptions of the state's entrance into the Union and the city of Phoenix as the selection for the State Capitol are discussed. Details are given about…

  11. The Lost Generation: Students of Arizona's Structured English Immersion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lillie, Karen E.

    2016-01-01

    This study examines Arizona's restrictive language policy from the perspective of English learners (ELs) and reclassified fluent English proficient students who have been enrolled in the structured English immersion (SEI) model. While multiple scholars in the USA have analyzed Arizona's policy impact since its enactment in 2008, none to date have…

  12. 75 FR 60066 - Southern Arizona Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-29

    ... Forest Service Southern Arizona Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice... 10 a.m. to approximately 4 p.m. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Tucson Interagency Fire... Coordinator, Southern Arizona Resource Advisory Committee, do Coronado National Forest, 300 W....

  13. 77 FR 64350 - State of Arizona Resource Advisory Council Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ... Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Arizona Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet in Phoenix... held at the Phoenix District Office, and the ] meetings will be held at the BLM National Training Center located at 9828 North 31st Avenue, Phoenix, Arizona 85051. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  14. Efficiency of Support Services within the Arizona Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, George H.

    One of the working papers in the final report of the Arizona Board of Regents' Task Force on Excellence, Efficiency and Competitiveness, this document discusses the efficiency of the Arizona state universities' support services. Faculty, staff, and students were asked to rate the quality, importance, and change in quality of the services provided…

  15. 6. Photocopy of photograph original print located at Arizona Photographic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photocopy of photograph original print located at Arizona Photographic Associates, Inc., Phoenix, Arizona. Photographer: Herb McLaughlin, circa. 1965 AERIAL VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST TOWARD TEMPE BUTTE, SHOWING, FROM TOP, MILL AVENUE BRIDGE, ASH AVENUE BRIDGE, AND SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD BRIDGE - Ash Avenue Bridge, Spanning Salt River at Foot of Ash Avenue, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  16. 32 CFR 705.31 - USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor. 705.31... NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.31 USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor. (a) Limited space and the desirability of keeping the Memorial simple and dignified require...

  17. To Learn and Earn: Arizona's Unfinished Business in Human Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Raising Arizona was the challenge of the 20th century. Sustaining Arizona is now the challenge of the 21st. A crucial part of that task is not just understanding today's knowledge economy, but mastering it. Ray and Charles Eames, the creative geniuses behind many iconic 20th century designs, debuted their film "Powers of 10" in 1977. In…

  18. 76 FR 28210 - Eastern Arizona Counties Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-16

    ... committee is authorized under the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act (Pub. L. 110-343... Manager, Eastern Arizona Counties Resource Advisory Committee, Apache- Sitgreaves National Forests...-Sitgreaves National Forests, Attention RAC Program Manager, P.O. Box 640, Springerville, Arizona, or by...

  19. 48. Photocopy of construction drawing, Arizona Highway Department, May 1927, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. Photocopy of construction drawing, Arizona Highway Department, May 1927, microfiche of original drawing located at Arizona Department of Transportation, Phoenix AZ). PLAN AND PROFILE. - Navajo Bridge, Spanning Colorado River at U.S. Highway 89 Alternate, Page, Coconino County, AZ

  20. 32 CFR 705.31 - USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor. 705.31... NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.31 USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor. (a) Limited space and the desirability of keeping the Memorial simple and dignified require...

  1. 32 CFR 705.31 - USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor. 705.31... NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.31 USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor. (a) Limited space and the desirability of keeping the Memorial simple and dignified require...

  2. 32 CFR 705.31 - USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor. 705.31... NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.31 USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor. (a) Limited space and the desirability of keeping the Memorial simple and dignified require...

  3. 32 CFR 705.31 - USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor. 705.31... NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.31 USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor. (a) Limited space and the desirability of keeping the Memorial simple and dignified require...

  4. Your Rights: A Handbook for Native American Youth in Arizona.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Michael; And Others

    A handbook for Arizona Native Americans under 18 years old explains rights and responsibilities as young people, Native Americans, tribal members, and residents of Arizona. Rights are defined, ways of protecting rights outlined, and the fact that young people's rights are changing noted. Rights as a family member are discussed, as well as changes…

  5. 7 CFR 1131.2 - Arizona marketing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Arizona marketing area. 1131.2 Section 1131.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE ARIZONA MARKETING AREA Order...

  6. 7 CFR 1131.2 - Arizona marketing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Arizona marketing area. 1131.2 Section 1131.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MILK), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE ARIZONA MARKETING AREA Order...

  7. 7 CFR 1131.2 - Arizona marketing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Arizona marketing area. 1131.2 Section 1131.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE ARIZONA MARKETING AREA Order...

  8. Arizona TeleMedicine Network: System Procurement Specifications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atlantic Research Corp., Alexandria, VA.

    Providing general specifications and system descriptions for segments within the Arizona TeleMedicine Project (a telecommunication system designed to deliver health services to rurally isolated American Indians in Arizona), this document, when used with the appropriate route segment document, will completely describe the project's required…

  9. 50. Photocopy of construction drawing, Arizona Highway Department, May 1927, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. Photocopy of construction drawing, Arizona Highway Department, May 1927, microfiche of original drawing located at Arizona Department of Transportation, Phoenix AZ). STRESSES AND SECTIONS. - Navajo Bridge, Spanning Colorado River at U.S. Highway 89 Alternate, Page, Coconino County, AZ

  10. Innovations in Arizona's Accountability Policies and Frameworks for Alternative Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlessman, Amy

    2014-01-01

    This study presents Arizona's innovations in academic accountability policy and academic accountability frameworks for alternative schools. A timeline of statutes and regulations including the State Board of Education approved alternative school definition provides Arizona's context for alternative school accountability policy and frameworks.…

  11. 75 FR 3694 - Radio Broadcasting Services, Peach Springs, Arizona

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-22

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services, Peach Springs, Arizona AGENCY: Federal Communications... Media Licenses, LLC, proposing the allotment of FM Channel 281C3 at Peach Springs, Arizona. The...), Cochise Media Licenses, the tentative selectee in Auction 79 and applicant for a new FM station on...

  12. Minority Student Report 2005: A Snapshot of Arizona's Educational Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forester, Christine A.; Drake, Tonya M.

    2005-01-01

    This document, from the Arizona Minority Education Policy Analysis Center (AMEPAC), reports the educational achievement of minority students in Arizona, from kindergarten through college. As a snapshot it is simply a description of what is, and the data are, thus, open to interpretation. How the numbers look and what they mean may be two different…

  13. Applying Water-Level Difference Control to Central Arizona Project

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Central Arizona Project (CAP) has been supplying Colorado River water to Central Arizona for roughly 25 years. The CAP canal is operated remotely with a Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) System. Gate position changes are made either manually or through the use of automatic control...

  14. Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs 1974-75 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, Phoenix.

    The Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs 1974-75 Annual Report is issued to inform the Governor, State Legislature, and tribal governments of the proceedings, transactions, findings, and recommendations made by the commission. Included are: (1) a list of commission members, (2) a map showing the Indian reservations in Arizona, (3) a table listing…

  15. Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs Annual Report, 1989-90.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, Phoenix.

    This annual report describes the activities of the Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs for 1989-90. Objectives and accomplishments are outlined for each of several major goals: (1) studying the financial impact made by Indians on Arizona's economy; (2) creating awareness of major issues affecting state and tribal governments, particularly health…

  16. WATER SYSTEM OPERATOR TRAINING FOR THE CENTRAL ARIZONA PROJECT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Central Arizona Project (CAP) is designed to bring about 1.5 million acre-feet of Colorado River water per year to Maricopa, Pima, and Pinal counties in Arizona. CAP carries water from Lake Havasu down to Tucson. The CAP canal system is a 336-mile long system of aqueducts, tunnels, pumping pla...

  17. 62. VIEW SHOWING END OF THE ARIZONA CANAL AT SKUNK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    62. VIEW SHOWING END OF THE ARIZONA CANAL AT SKUNK CREEK, LOOKING WEST. DEMOSSING STATION IS LEFT OF CENTER AND DRAIN GATES ARE RIGHT OF CENTER Photographer: James Eastwood, July 1990 - Arizona Canal, North of Salt River, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  18. Arizona Lesson Observation and Evaluation (ALOE): Design Test Edition, 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fargo, J. Steven; And Others

    The Arizona Lesson Observation and Evaluation (ALOE) system of evaluating teaching is presented. ALOE was developed from Arizona adaptations of the Georgia Teacher Performance Assessment Instruments and, with G. Taylor's "Functional Elements Analysis of Teaching Skills" (FEATS), forms an integrated observation package which allows…

  19. A Study of Arizona's Teachers of English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rios-Aguilar, Cecilia; Gonzalez Canche, Manuel S.; Moll, Luis C.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Context: In September 2007, the Arizona State Board of Education adopted the Structured English Immersion (SEI) model proposed by the Arizona English Language Learner (ELL) Task Force.During the 2008-2009 academic year, it required all school districts to implement the SEI model.The SEI program, best known as the 4-hour English Language…

  20. 7 CFR 1131.2 - Arizona marketing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Arizona marketing area. 1131.2 Section 1131.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MILK), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE ARIZONA MARKETING AREA Order...

  1. An Alaska Soil Carbon Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kristofer; Harden, Jennifer

    2009-05-01

    Database Collaborator's Meeting; Fairbanks, Alaska, 4 March 2009; Soil carbon pools in northern high-latitude regions and their response to climate changes are highly uncertain, and collaboration is required from field scientists and modelers to establish baseline data for carbon cycle studies. The Global Change Program at the U.S. Geological Survey has funded a 2-year effort to establish a soil carbon network and database for Alaska based on collaborations from numerous institutions. To initiate a community effort, a workshop for the development of an Alaska soil carbon database was held at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. The database will be a resource for spatial and biogeochemical models of Alaska ecosystems and will serve as a prototype for a nationwide community project: the National Soil Carbon Network (http://www.soilcarb.net). Studies will benefit from the combination of multiple academic and government data sets. This collaborative effort is expected to identify data gaps and uncertainties more comprehensively. Future applications of information contained in the database will identify specific vulnerabilities of soil carbon in Alaska to climate change, disturbance, and vegetation change.

  2. Operation IceBridge Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, C.

    2015-12-01

    The University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) has flown LiDAR missions for Operation IceBridge in Alaska each year since 2009, expanding upon UAF's airborne laser altimetry program which started in 1994. These observations show that Alaska's regional mass balance is -75+11/-16 Gt yr-1 (1994-2013) (Larsen et al., 2015). A surprising result is that the rate of surface mass loss observed on non-tidewater glaciers in Alaska is extremely high. At these rates, Alaska contributes ~1 mm to global sea level rise every 5 years. Given the present lack of adequate satellite resources, Operation IceBridge airborne surveys by UAF are the most effective and efficient method to monitor this region's impact on global sea level rise. Ice depth measurements using radar sounding have been part of these airborne surveys since 2012. Many of Alaska's tidewater glaciers are bedded significantly below sea level. The depth and extent of glacier beds below sea level are critical factors in the dynamics of tidewater retreat. Improved radar processing tools are being used to predict clutter using forward simulation. This is essential to properly sort out true bed returns, which are often masked or obscured by valley wall returns. This presentation will provide an overview of the program, highlighting recent findings and observations from the most recent campaigns, and focusing on techniques used for the extrapolation of surface elevation changes to regional mass balances.

  3. Alaska's Children, 1998. Alaska Head Start State Collaboration Project, Quarterly Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Dorothy, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This document consists of four issues of the quarterly report "Alaska's Children," which provides information on the Alaska Head Start State Collaboration Project and updates on Head Start activities in Alaska. Regular features in the issues include a calendar of conferences and meetings, a status report on Alaska's children, reports…

  4. 77 FR 58731 - Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ... Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska During the 2013... Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska During the... and Wildlife Service (Service or we) proposes migratory bird subsistence harvest regulations in...

  5. Alaska Athabascan stellar astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Stellar astronomy is a fundamental component of Alaska Athabascan cultures that facilitates time-reckoning, navigation, weather forecasting, and cosmology. Evidence from the linguistic record suggests that a group of stars corresponding to the Big Dipper is the only widely attested constellation across the Northern Athabascan languages. However, instruction from expert Athabascan consultants shows that the correlation of these names with the Big Dipper is only partial. In Alaska Gwich'in, Ahtna, and Upper Tanana languages the Big Dipper is identified as one part of a much larger circumpolar humanoid constellation that spans more than 133 degrees across the sky. The Big Dipper is identified as a tail, while the other remaining asterisms within the humanoid constellation are named using other body part terms. The concept of a whole-sky humanoid constellation provides a single unifying system for mapping the night sky, and the reliance on body-part metaphors renders the system highly mnemonic. By recognizing one part of the constellation the stargazer is immediately able to identify the remaining parts based on an existing mental map of the human body. The circumpolar position of a whole-sky constellation yields a highly functional system that facilitates both navigation and time-reckoning in the subarctic. Northern Athabascan astronomy is not only much richer than previously described; it also provides evidence for a completely novel and previously undocumented way of conceptualizing the sky---one that is unique to the subarctic and uniquely adapted to northern cultures. The concept of a large humanoid constellation may be widespread across the entire subarctic and have great antiquity. In addition, the use of cognate body part terms describing asterisms within humanoid constellations is similarly found in Navajo, suggesting a common ancestor from which Northern and Southern Athabascan stellar naming strategies derived.

  6. The Tertiary and Quaternary pectens of California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arnold, Ralph

    1906-01-01

    This paper consists of two parts. The first is a brief outline of the different Tertiary and Pleistocene formations of California, giving the type localities, where, when, and by whom first described, their salient characters, where they and their supposed equiyalents are known to occur, the species of Pecten found in them, and their typical fauna as far as known. The second is devoted to the description and illustration of all of the known Tertiary, Pleistocene, and Recent Pectens of the western coast of North America from Alaska to and including the Gulf of California. With the description of each species is also given an account of its geologic and geographic range and, where practicable, its associated fauna.

  7. Transforming Education: Enabling Learning for All Arizona Students. The Arizona Long-Range Strategic Educational Technology Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Christopher G.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of The Arizona Long-Range Strategic Educational Technology Plan is to map the future of the "education support systems" necessary for Arizona's children to succeed in today's world. The plan details goals and strategies for policy makers, the State Board of Education, the State Department of Education, Institutions of Higher…

  8. 'Road rage' in Arizona: armed and dangerous.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthew; Azrael, Deborah; Hemenway, David; Solop, Frederic I

    2002-11-01

    Little is known about the relationship between firearm carrying and hostile behavior on the roadway. To explore a possible association between firearm carrying by drivers and hostile driving behavior we conducted a random-digit-dial survey of 790 licensed drivers in Arizona. In addition to demographic questions, we asked whether respondents had carried a gun while driving in the 12 months prior to the survey. Respondents were also asked if they, in anger, had personally made obscene gestures, cursed or shouted at other drivers, impeded another drivers progress with their vehicle, aggressively 'followed another driver too closely', or brandished a gun at another driver. We used multivariable logistic regression to explore correlates of hostile driving behavior while taking into account several demographic and behavioral characteristics. Overall 11% of drivers always (4%) or sometimes (7%) carried a gun with them in their vehicle; 34% report having made obscene gestures/cursed/shouted angrily; 28% report aggressively following or blocking other drivers with their vehicle. In both crude and multivariate adjusted analyses, self-report of engaging in hostile behavior while driving was significantly more common among men, young adults, and individuals who carried a firearm in their car. Our findings suggest that, at least among Arizona motorists, having a gun in the car is a strong marker for aggressive and illegal behavior behind the wheel.

  9. Planned Parenthood of Southern Arizona v. Lawall.

    PubMed

    2002-01-01

    Court Decision: 307 Federal Reporter, 3d Series 783; 2002 Oct 9 (date of decision). The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit agreed with the lower court that Arizona's parental consent abortion law was constitutional because it adequately protected a minor's right to choose and privacy interests. Planned Parenthood brought an action contesting the constitutionality of Arizona's parental consent abortion law because it claimed the confidentiality provision did not comport with anonymity requirements upheld by the Supreme Court and a woman's informational privacy rights. The Ninth Circuit held that the confidentiality provision satisfied the required standard for anonymity because it took reasonable steps to prevent the public from learning the minor's identity. The court noted that complete anonymity was not required and, for this reason, the confidentiality provision did not unduly burden a woman's right to choose. The court also held that the law did not violate a woman's right of "informational" privacy (a privacy interest in avoiding disclosure of sensitive personal information) because the information was used in a manner that advanced a legitimate state interest, the law was sufficiently tailored to meet state interests, and the law provided adequate protection against unauthorized disclosure of personal information.

  10. Effects of the catastrophic flood of December 1966, north rim area, eastern Grand Canyon, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooley, Maurice E.; Aldridge, B.N.; Euler, Robert C.

    1977-01-01

    Precipitation from the unusual storm of December 1966 was concentrated on highlands in northern Arizona, southwestern Utah , southern Nevada, and south-central California and caused widely scattered major floods in the four States. In Arizona the largest amount of precipitation was in the north rim area of eastern Grand Canyon, where about 14 inches was measured. The largest flows occurred along Bright Angel Creek and the MilK Creek-Dragon Creek part of the Crystal Creek drainage basin. The maximum effects of the flood were along Milk Creek-Dragon Creek, where a mudflow caused extensive channel modification. Floods that occurred in the Bright Angel and Crystal Creek basins have a recurrence interval of only once in several centuries. The streamflow that resulted from the storm on the Kaibab Plateau caused considerable local scouring and deepening of channels, including some renewed arroyo cutting. The most catastrophic effects of the 1966 floods were caused by two mudflows that extended from the edge of the Kaibab Plateau along Dragon Creek in the Crystal Creek basin and Lava Creek in the Chuar Creek basin to the Colorado River. More than 10 other large mudflows occurred in Nankoweap, Kwagunt, Crystal, and Shinumo Creek basins. About 80 large debris slides left conspicuous scars in the amphitheaters at the heads of the side gorges, and at least 10 small slides occurred on the Kaibab Plateau. (Woodard-USGS)

  11. International Symposium on Molecular Beams (14th) Held in Pacific Grove, California on June 7 -12, 1992.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-09

    of Chemistry Chemistry Department Dpt. Quimica Fisica Univ. of California, Berkeley University of Arizona F. Quimica Ciudad Universitaria Berkeley, CA...Urefla Franco Vecchiocatfivi b3ert von Helden Departamento do Quimica Fisica Dipartimento di Chimica Department of Chemistry Facultad do Ciencias Quimicas ...RAbanost *Departamento de Quimica Fisica. Facultad de Quimica . Universidad Complutense. 28040 Madrid, Spain. t Instituto de Estructura de la Materia (CSIC

  12. Migration And wintering areas Of Glaucous-winged Gulls From south-central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatch, Scott A.; Gill, V.A.; Mulcahy, Daniel M.

    2011-01-01

    We used satellite telemetry to investigate the migration patterns and wintering areas of Glaucous-winged Gulls (Larus glaucescens) from Middleton Island, Alaska, where this species' population increased tenfold from the 1970s to the 1990s. Fall migration spanned 11 weeks, including numerous stopovers en route, apparently for feeding. Spring migration from wintering sites to Middleton Island was shorter (4 weeks) and more direct. One juvenile spent several months in southern Prince William Sound. An adult spent several months near Craig, southeast Alaska, while three others overwintered in southern British Columbia. For all four wintering adults use of refuse-disposal sites was evident or strongly suggested. Commensalism with humans may have contributed to the increase on Middleton, but a strong case can also be made for a competing explanation-regional recruitment of gulls to high-quality nesting habitat in Alaska created after the earthquake of 1964. An analysis of band returns reveals broad overlap in the wintering grounds of gulls from different Alaska colonies and of gulls banded on the west coast from British Columbia to California. The seasonal movement of many gulls from Alaska is decidedly migratory, whereas gulls from British Columbia, Washington, and Oregon disperse locally in winter.

  13. Migration and wintering areas of glaucous-winged Gulls from south-central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatch, Shyla A.; Gill, V.A.; Mulcahy, D.M.

    2011-01-01

    We used satellite telemetry to investigate the migration patterns and wintering areas of Glaucouswinged Gulls (Larus glaucescens) from Middleton Island, Alaska, where this species' population increased tenfold from the 1970s to the 1990s. Fall migration spanned 11 weeks, including numerous stopovers en route, apparently for feeding. Spring migration from wintering sites to Middleton Island was shorter (4 weeks) and more direct. One juvenile spent several months in southern Prince William Sound. An adult spent several months near Craig, southeast Alaska, while three others overwintered in southern British Columbia. For all four wintering adults use of refuse-disposal sites was evident or strongly suggested. Commensalism with humans may have contributed to the increase on Middleton, but a strong case can also be made for a competing explanation-regional recruitment of gulls to high-quality nesting habitat in Alaska created after the earthquake of 1964. An analysis of band returns reveals broad overlap in the wintering grounds of gulls from different Alaska colonies and of gulls banded on the west coast from British Columbia to California. The seasonal movement of many gulls from Alaska is decidedly migratory, whereas gulls from British Columbia, Washington, and Oregon disperse locally in winter. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2011.

  14. Late Neogene marine incursions and the ancestral Gulf of California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDougall, K.

    2008-01-01

    The late Neogene section in the Salton Trough, California, and along the lower Colorado River in Arizona is composed of marine units bracketed by nonmarine units. Microfossils from the marine deposits indicate that a marine incursion inundated the Salton Trough during the late Miocene. Water depths increased rapidly in the Miocene and eventually flooded the region now occupied by the Colorado River as far north as Parker, Arizona. Marine conditions were restricted in the Pliocene as the Colorado River filled the Salton Trough with sediments and the Gulf of California assumed its present configuration. Microfossils from the early part of this incursion include a diverse assemblage of benthic foraminifers (Amphistegina gibbosa, Uvigerina peregrina, Cassidulina delicata, and Bolivina interjuncta), planktic foraminifers (Globigerinoides obliquus, G. extremus, and Globigerina nepenthes), and calcareous nannoplankton (Discoaster brouweri, Discoaster aff. Discoaster surculus, Sphenolithus abies, and S. neoabies), whereas microfossils in the final phase contain a less diverse assemblage of benthic foraminifers that are diagnostic of marginal shallow-marine conditions (Ammonia, Elphidium, Bolivina, Cibicides, and Quinqueloculina). Evidence of an earlier middle Miocene marine incursion comes from reworked microfossils found near Split Mountain Gorge in the Fish Creek Gypsum (Sphenolithus moriformis) and near San Gorgonio Pass (Cyclicargolithus floridanus and Sphenolithus heteromorphus and planktic foraminifers). The middle Miocene incursion may also be represented by the older marine sedimentary rocks encountered in the subsurface near Yuma, Arizona, where rare middle Miocene planktic foraminifers are found. ?? 2008 The Geological Society of America.

  15. 50 CFR 17.5 - Alaska natives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... resides in Alaska; or (2) Any non-native permanent resident of an Alaskan native village who is primarily... pursuant to paragraph (a) of this section may be sold in native villages or towns in Alaska for native consumption within native villages and towns in Alaska. (c) Non-edible by-products of endangered or...

  16. Alaska Women's Commission Regional Conferences 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Christine

    This booklet describes the work of the Alaska Women's Commission, a state agency dedicated to the achievement of equal legal, economic, social, and political status for women in Alaska. Since its inception, the Alaska Women's Commission has provided funding for regional women's conferences in rural parts of the state. The document describes four…

  17. 75 FR 45649 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are in the vicinity of Holy Cross, Alaska, and... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of decision approving lands for conveyance. SUMMARY: As required by 43 CFR...

  18. Alaska Performance Scholarship Outcome Report 2015

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rae, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The Alaska Performance Scholarship was established in state law in 2011 and first offered to Alaska high school graduates beginning with the class of 2011. Described as "an invitation to excellence" to Alaska's high school students, its goal was to inspire students to push themselves academically in areas that correlate to success in…

  19. Trends in Alaska's People and Economy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leask, Linda; Killorin, Mary; Martin, Stephanie

    This booklet provides data on Alaska's population, economy, health, education, government, and natural resources, including specific information on Alaska Natives. Since 1960, Alaska's population has tripled and become more diverse, more stable, older, less likely to be male or married, and more concentrated. About 69 percent of the population…

  20. How Arizona Compares: Real Numbers and Hot Topics. Policy Choices. 5th Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison Institute for Public Policy, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Morrison Institute for Public Policy is pleased to present "How Arizona Compares: Real Numbers and Hot Topics," the 5th edition of Arizona "Policy Choices." The Arizona "Policy Choices" volumes seek to do more than report. They are designed to assist decision making, stimulate debate, and serve as references. Arizona "Policy Choices" volumes have…

  1. The Condition of Pre-K-12 Education in Arizona: 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Education Policy Initiative, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This paper is a collection of ten policy briefs examining various key elements of the state's public education system. The authors, contributors, and reviewers of the briefs are, for the most part, on the faculty of Arizona's three public universities: Arizona State University, Northern Arizona University, and the University of Arizona. Michael…

  2. A spatial model of potential jaguar habitat in Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatten, J.R.; Averill-Murray, A.; van Pelt, W.E.

    2005-01-01

    The jaguar (Panthera onca) is an endangered species that occasionally visits the southwestern United States from Mexico. The number of jaguar sightings per decade has declined over the last 100 years in Arizona, USA, raising conservation concerns for the species at a local and national level. In 1997, state, federal, and local governments with land-management responsibilities agreed to characterize and identify potential jaguar habitat in Arizona and New Mexico. Specifically, the objectives of our analysis were 2-fold: (1) characterize potential jaguar habitat in Arizona from historic sighting records and (2) create a statewide habitat suitability map. We used a Geographic Information System (GIS) to characterize potential jaguar habitat by overlaying historic jaguar sightings (25) on landscape and habitat features believed important (e.g., vegetation biomes and series, elevation, terrain ruggedness, proximity to perennial or intermittent water sources, human density). The amount of Arizona (%) identified as potential jaguar habitat ranged from 21% to 30% depending on the input variables. Most jaguar sightings were in scrub grasslands between 1,220 and 1,829-m elevation in southeastern Arizona, in intermediately to extremely rugged terrain, and within 10 km of a water source. Conservation efforts should focus on protecting the most suitable jaguar habitat in southeastern Arizona (i.e., Santa Cruz, Pima, Cochise, Pinal, Graham counties), travel corridors within and outside Arizona, and jaguar habitat in the Sierra Madres of Sonora, Mexico.

  3. Plant-Wide Energy Efficiency Assessment at the Arizona Portland Cement Plant in Rillito, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen J. Coppinger, P.E.; Bruce Colburn, Ph.D., P.E., CEM

    2007-05-17

    A Department of Energy Plant-wide Assessment was undertaken by Arizona Portland Cement (APC) beginning in May 2005. The assessment was performed at APC’s cement production facility in Rillito, Arizona. The assessment included a compressed air evaluation along with a detailed process audit of plant operations and equipment. The purpose of this Energy Survey was to identify a series of energy cost savings opportunities at the Plant, and provide preliminary cost and savings estimates for the work. The assessment was successful in identifying projects that could provide annual savings of over $2.7 million at an estimated capital cost of $4.3 million. If implemented, these projects could amount to a savings of over 4.9 million kWh/yr and 384,420 MMBtu/year.

  4. Salt River Project`s participation in Arizona`s bald eagle conservation efforts

    SciTech Connect

    Nobel, T.A.

    1996-11-01

    Bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) conservation in Arizona, USA, is a prime example of a successful, cooperative environmental management effort. The Salt River Project (SRP) is an active participant in the statewide bald eagle management activities. This paper summarizes the major components of the statewide program and highlights SRP`s participation in these efforts. The Southwestern Bald Eagle Management Committee (SWBEMC) was formed as a means of coordinating interagency projects. Chaired by the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AGFD), the SWBEMC is comprised of 15 state, federal, tribal, and private agencies. Together, these agencies sponsor the Nest Watch Program, a unique and effective program dedicated to the study, conservation, and recovery of bald eagles in the southwest. Other significant components of the bald eagle management program include nest monitoring, nest search activities, winter counts, and demography studies. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Malaspina Glacier, Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This image from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite covers an area of 55 by 40 kilometers (34 by 25 miles) over the southwest part of the Malaspina Glacier and Icy Bay in Alaska. The composite of infrared and visible bands results in the snow and ice appearing light blue, dense vegetation is yellow-orange and green, and less vegetated, gravelly areas are in orange. According to Dr. Dennis Trabant (U.S. Geological Survey, Fairbanks, Alaska), the Malaspina Glacier is thinning. Its terminal moraine protects it from contact with the open ocean; without the moraine, or if sea level rises sufficiently to reconnect the glacier with the ocean, the glacier would start calving and retreat significantly. ASTER data are being used to help monitor the size and movement of some 15,000 tidal and piedmont glaciers in Alaska. Evidence derived from ASTER and many other satellite and ground-based measurements suggests that only a few dozen Alaskan glaciers are advancing. The overwhelming majority of them are retreating.

    This ASTER image was acquired on June 8, 2001. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next six years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high-resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, along-term research and

  6. Southwest Exotic Mapping Program 2007: Occurrence Summary and Maps of Select Invasive, Non-native Plants in Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Kathryn A.; Guertin, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    Introduction An important aspect of management of invasive, non-native plants (invasive plants) is information on the type, location, and magnitude of infestations. Regional development of this information requires an integrated program of data collection, management, and delivery. The Southwest Exotic Plant Mapping Program (SWEMP), coordinated through the U.S. Geological Survey's Southwest Biological Science Center, annually compiles occurrence records for infestations of invasive plants. Operating since 1998, the SWEMP team has accepted occurrence records contributed voluntarily by federal, tribal, state, and private collaborators and has compiled these contributions accumulatively with previous versions of SWEMP. The SWEMP 2007 regional database update, SWEMP07, contains 62,000 records for 221 plant species with records dating as far back as 1911 and up to December, 2006. Records include invasive plants in Arizona, eastern California, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah. SWEMP07 is available through the Southwest Exotic Plant Information Clearinghouse (http://sbsc.wr.usgs.gov/research/projects/swepic/swepic.asp, click SWEMP). Not all invasive plants are non-native and not all invasive plants are even invasive. The Arizona Invasive Species Advisory Council (2006) defined an invasive species as 'a species that is (1) non-native to the ecosystem under consideration and, (2) whose introduction causes or is likely to cause economic or environmental harm, or harm to human health'. SWEMP uses the U.S. Department of Agriculture PLANTS database (http://plants.usda.gov/) to determine if a plant is native or not to Arizona. As SWEMP does not independently assess the current or potential impact of invasive plants, we include most non-native plant records contributed. We have not included agricultural crops that are non-native, for example apples, oranges, etc. In this open-file-report, we use the SWEMP07 update to summarize the occurrence of invasive plants in Arizona and

  7. Accord near for offshore California oil shipments

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-15

    There are faint glimmers of hope again for offshore California operators. After more than a decade of often bitter strife over offshore oil and gas development and transportation issues, state officials and oil producers may be moving toward compromise solutions. One such solution may be forthcoming on offshore development. But the real change came with the turnabout of the California Coastal Commission (CCC), which last month approved a permit for interim tankering of crude from Point Arguello oil field in the Santa Barbara Channel to Los Angeles. The dispute over how to ship offshore California crude to market has dragged on since before Point Arguelo development plans were unveiled. The project's status has become a flashpoint in the U.S. debate over resource use and environmental concerns. The controversy flared anew in the wake of the 1989 Exxon Valdez tanker spill off Alaska, when CCC voided a Santa Barbara County permit for interim tankering, a move project operator Chevron Corp. linked to the Exxon Valdez accident. Faced with litigation, the state's economic devastation, and acrimonious debate over transporting California crude, Gov. Pete Wilson and other agencies approved the CCC permit. But there's a catch: A permanent pipeline must be built to handle full production within 3 years. The paper discusses permit concerns, the turnaround decision, the anger of environmental groups, and pipeline proposals.

  8. Salt deposits in Arizona promise gas-storage opportunities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rauzi, S.L.

    2002-01-01

    Massive salt formations and their proximity to pipeline systems and power plants make Arizona attractive for natural gas storage. Caverns dissolved in subsurface salt are used to store LPG at Ferrellgas Partners LP facility near Holbrook and the AmeriGas Partners LP facility near Glendale. Three other companies are investigating the feasibility of storing natural gas in Arizona salt: Copper Eagle Gas Storage LLC, Desert Crossing Gas Storage and Transportation System LLC, and Aquila Inc. The most extensive salt deposits are in the Colorado Plateau Province. Marine and nonmarine salt deposits are present in Arizona.

  9. Alaska Energy Inventory Project: Consolidating Alaska's Energy Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, K.; Clough, J.; Swenson, R.; Crimp, P.; Hanson, D.; Parker, P.

    2007-12-01

    Alaska has considerable energy resources distributed throughout the state including conventional oil, gas, and coal, and unconventional coalbed and shalebed methane, gas hydrates, geothermal, wind, hydro, and biomass. While much of the known large oil and gas resources are concentrated on the North Slope and in the Cook Inlet regions, the other potential sources of energy are dispersed across a varied landscape from frozen tundra to coastal settings. Despite the presence of these potential energy sources, rural Alaska is mostly dependent upon diesel fuel for both electrical power generation and space heating needs. At considerable cost, large quantities of diesel fuel are transported to more than 150 roadless communities by barge or airplane and stored in large bulk fuel tank farms for winter months when electricity and heat are at peak demands. Recent increases in the price of oil have severely impacted the price of energy throughout Alaska, and especially hard hit are rural communities and remote mines that are off the road system and isolated from integrated electrical power grids. Even though the state has significant conventional gas resources in restricted areas, few communities are located near enough to these resources to directly use natural gas to meet their energy needs. To address this problem, the Alaska Energy Inventory project will (1) inventory and compile all available Alaska energy resource data suitable for electrical power generation and space heating needs including natural gas, coal, coalbed and shalebed methane, gas hydrates, geothermal, wind, hydro, and biomass and (2) identify locations or regions where the most economic energy resource or combination of energy resources can be developed to meet local needs. This data will be accessible through a user-friendly web-based interactive map, based on the Alaska Department of Natural Resources, Land Records Information Section's (LRIS) Alaska Mapper, Google Earth, and Terrago Technologies' Geo

  10. Endophytic fungi associated with cacti in Arizona.

    PubMed

    Suryanarayanan, Trichur S; Wittlinger, Sally K; Faeth, Stanley H

    2005-05-01

    21 cactus species occurring in various localities within Arizona were screened for the presence of fungal endophytes. 900 endophyte isolates belonging to 22 fungal species were isolated. Cylindropuntia fulgida had the maximum endophyte species diversity, while C. ramosissima harboured the maximum number of endophyte isolates. Alternaria sp., Aureobasidium pullulans, and Phoma spp. were isolated from several cactus species. The diversity of the endophyte assemblages was low and no host specificity among endophytes was observed. However, the frequencies of colonization of the few endophyte species recovered were high and comparable to those reported for tropical plant hosts. Species of Colletotrichum, Phomopsis, and Phyllosticta, which are commonly isolated as endophytes from plants of more mesic habitats, were absent from these cacti.

  11. View of Phoenix, Arizona metropolitan area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A near vertical view of the Phoenix, Arizona metropolitan area is seen in this Skyalb 3 Earth Resources Experiments Package S190-B (five-inch earth terrain camera) photograph taken from the Skylab space station in earth orbit. Also in the picture are Scottsdale, Paradise Valley, Tempe, Mesa, Laveen, Komatke, Salt River Indian Reseravation, and part of the Gila River Indian Reservation. Features which can be detected from the photograph include: cultural patterns defined by commercial, industrial, agricultural and residential areas; transportation networks consisting of major corridors, primary, secondary, and feeder streets; major urban developments on the area such as airports, Squaw Peak CIty Park, Turf Paradise Race Track and the State Fair grounds.

  12. The Mesa Arizona Pupil Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    A computer-based Pupil Tracking/Teacher Monitoring System was designed for Mesa Public Schools, Mesa, Arizona. The established objectives of the system were to: (1) facilitate the economical collection and storage of student performance data necessary to objectively evaluate the relative effectiveness of teachers, instructional methods, materials, and applied concepts; and (2) identify, on a daily basis, those students requiring special attention in specific subject areas. The system encompasses computer hardware/software and integrated curricula progression/administration devices. It provides daily evaluation and monitoring of performance as students progress at class or individualized rates. In the process, it notifies the student and collects information necessary to validate or invalidate subject presentation devices, methods, materials, and measurement devices in terms of direct benefit to the students. The system utilizes a small-scale computer (e.g., IBM 1130) to assure low-cost replicability, and may be used for many subjects of instruction.

  13. Impact of Recent Extreme Arizona Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magirl, Christoper S.; Webb, Robert H.; Schaffner, Mike; Lyon, Steve W.; Griffiths, Peter G.; Shoemaker, Craig; Unkrich, Carl L.; Yatheendradas, Soni; Troch, Peter A.; Pytlak, Eric; Goodrich, Dave C.; Desilets, Sharon L. E.; Youberg, Ann; Pearthree, Phil A.

    2007-04-01

    Heavy rainfall on 27-31 July 2006 led to record flooding and triggered an historically unprecedented number of debris flows in the Santa Catalina Mountains north of Tucson, Ariz. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) documented record floods along four watercourses in the Tucson basin, and at least 250 hillslope failures spawned damaging debris flows in an area where less than 10 small debris flows had been documented in the past 25 years. At least 18 debris flows destroyed infrastructure in the heavily used Sabino Canyon Recreation Area (http://wwwpaztcn.wr.usgs.gov/rsch_highlight/articles/200611.html). In four adjacent canyons, debris flows reached the heads of alluvial fans at the boundary of the Tucson metropolitan area. While landuse planners in southeastern Arizona evaluate the potential threat of this previously little recognized hazard to residents along the mountain front, an interdisciplinary group of scientists has collaborated to better understand this extreme event.

  14. Impact of recent extreme Arizona storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Magirl, C.S.; Webb, R.H.; Schaffner, M.; Lyon, S.W.; Griffiths, P.G.; Shoemaker, C.; Unkrich, C.L.; Yatheendradas, S.; Troch, Peter A.; Pytlak, E.; Goodrich, D.C.; Desilets, S.L.E.; Youberg, A.; Pearthree, P.A.

    2007-01-01

    Heavy rainfall on 27–31 July 2006 led to record flooding and triggered an historically unprecedented number of debris flows in the Santa Catalina Mountains north of Tucson, Ariz. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) documented record floods along four watercourses in the Tucson basin, and at least 250 hillslope failures spawned damaging debris flows in an area where less than 10 small debris flows had been documented in the past 25 years. At least 18 debris flows destroyed infrastructure in the heavily used Sabino Canyon Recreation Area (http://wwwpaztcn.wr.usgs.gov/rsch_highlight/articles/20061 l.html). In four adjacent canyons, debris flows reached the heads of alluvial fans at the boundary of the Tucson metropolitan area. While landuse planners in southeastern Arizona evaluate the potential threat of this previously little recognized hazard to residents along the mountain front, an interdisciplinary group of scientists has collaborated to better understand this extreme event.

  15. Rodeo and Chediski Fires in Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Rodeo-Chediski Fire in east-central Arizona had grown to over 463,000 acres as of Monday, July 1, 2002. The fire is about 45 percent contained, and many evacuees have been allowed to return to their homes; however, the danger is still high. Most of the containment lines constructed so far are holding. True- and false-color images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) were captured on June 30. The true-color image on the left shows the thick smoke that billows from the fire, while the false-color image on the right shows the burned area. Vegetation is bright green, fire detection pixels are bright red, and the burned areas are reddish-brown.

  16. Satellite data-relay activities in Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boner, F.C.; Blee, J.W.; Shope, W.G.

    1985-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Arizona District collects data from automated streamflow stations for a wide variety of uses. Data from these stations are provided to Federal, State, and local agencies that have a responsibility to issue flood warnings; to generate forecasts of water availability; to monitor flow to insure compliance with treaties and other legal mandates; and to manage reservoirs for hydropower, flood abatement, and municipal and irrigation water supply. In the mid-1970's, the escalation of data collection costs and a need for more timely data led the Arizona District to examine alternatives for remote data acquisition. On the basis of successful data communications experiments with NASA 's Landsat satellite, an operational system for satellite-data relay was developed in 1976 using the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administrations 's (NOAA) Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES). A total of 62 data collection platforms (DCP's) was operated in 1983. Satellite telemetry operations are controlled at the remote data-collection stations by small battery-operated data collection platforms. The DCP 's periodically collect data from the sensors, store the data in computer memory, and at preset times transmit the data to the GOES satellite. The satellite retransmits the data to Earth where a ground-receive station transmits or transfers the data by land communications to the USGS computer in Reston, Virginia, for processing. The satellite relay transfers the data from sensor to computer in minutes; therefore, the data are available to users on a near real-time basis. (Author 's abstract)

  17. The Chuar Petroleum System, Arizona and Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lillis, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    The Neoproterozoic Chuar Group consists of marine mudstone, sandstone and dolomitic strata divided into the Galeros and Kwagunt Formations, and is exposed only in the eastern Grand Canyon, Arizona. Research by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in the late 1980s identified strata within the group to be possible petroleum source rocks, and in particular the Walcott Member of the Kwagunt Formation. Industry interest in a Chuar oil play led to several exploratory wells drilled in the 1990s in southern Utah and northern Arizona to test the overlying Cambrian Tapeats Sandstone reservoir, and confirm the existence of the Chuar in subcrop. USGS geochemical analyses of Tapeats oil shows in two wells have been tentatively correlated to Chuar bitumen extracts. Distribution of the Chuar in the subsurface is poorly constrained with only five well penetrations, but recently published gravity/aeromagnetic interpretations provide further insight into the Chuar subcrop distribution. The Chuar petroleum system was reexamined as part of the USGS Paradox Basin resource assessment in 2011. A map was constructed to delineate the Chuar petroleum system that encompasses the projected Chuar source rock distribution and all oil shows in the Tapeats Sandstone, assuming that the Chuar is the most likely source for such oil shows. Two hypothetical plays were recognized but not assessed: (1) a conventional play with a Chuar source and Tapeats reservoir, and (2) an unconventional play with a Chuar source and reservoir. The conventional play has been discouraging because most surface structures have been tested by drilling with minimal petroleum shows, and there is some evidence that petroleum may have been flushed by CO2 from Tertiary volcanism. The unconventional play is untested and remains promising even though the subcrop distribution of source facies within the Chuar Group is largely unknown.

  18. The Alaska SAR processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carande, R. E.; Charny, B.

    1988-01-01

    The Alaska SAR processor was designed to process over 200 100 km x 100 km (Seasat like) frames per day from the raw SAR data, at a ground resolution of 30 m x 30 m from ERS-1, J-ERS-1, and Radarsat. The near real time processor is a set of custom hardware modules operating in a pipelined architecture, controlled by a general purpose computer. Input to the processor is provided from a high density digital cassette recording of the raw data stream as received by the ground station. A two pass processing is performed. During the first pass clutter-lock and auto-focus measurements are made. The second pass uses the results to accomplish final image formation which is recorded on a high density digital cassette. The processing algorithm uses fast correlation techniques for range and azimuth compression. Radiometric compensation, interpolation and deskewing is also performed by the processor. The standard product of the ASP is a high resolution four-look image, with a low resolution (100 to 200 m) many look image provided simultaneously.

  19. Alaska Pipeline Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Crude oil moving through the 800-mile Trans-Alaska Pipeline must be kept at a relatively high temperature, about 180 degrees Fahrenheit, to maintain the fluidity of the oil. In Arctic weather, that demands highly effective insulation. General Electric Co.'s Space Division, Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, provided it with a spinoff product called Therm-O-Trol. Shown being installed on the pipeline, Therm-O-Trol is a metal-bonded polyurethane foam especially formulated for Arctic insulation. A second GE spinoff product, Therm-O-Case, solved a related problem involved in bringing hot crude oil from 2,000-foot-deep wells to the surface without transferring oil heat to the surrounding permafrost soil; heat transfer could melt the frozen terrain and cause dislocations that might destroy expensive well casings. Therm-O-Case is a double-walled oil well casing with multi-layered insulation which provides an effective barrier to heat transfer. Therm-O-Trol and Therm-O-Case are members of a family of insulating products which stemmed from technology developed by GE Space Division in heat transferlthermal control work on Gemini, Apollo and other NASA programs.

  20. Alexander Archipelago, Southeastern Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    West of British Columbia, Canada, and south of the Yukon Territory, the southeastern coastline of Alaska trails off into the islands of the Alexander Archipelago. The area is rugged and contains many long, U-shaped, glaciated valleys, many of which terminate at tidewater. The Alexander Archipelago is home to Glacier Bay National Park. The large bay that has two forks on its northern end is Glacier Bay itself. The eastern fork is Muir inlet, into which runs the Muir glacier, named for the famous Scottish-born naturalist John Muir. Glacier Bay opens up into the Icy Strait. The large, solid white area to the west is Brady Icefield, which terminates at the southern end in Brady's Glacier. To locate more interesting features from Glacier Bay National Park, take a look at the park service map. As recently as two hundred years ago, a massive ice field extended into Icy Strait and filled the Glacier Bay. Since that time, the area has experienced rapid deglaciation, with many large glaciers retreating 40, 60, even 80 km. While temperatures have increased in the region, it is still unclear whether the rapid recession is part of the natural cycle of tidewater glaciers or is an indicator of longer-term climate change. For more on Glacier Bay and climate change, read an online paper by Dr. Dorothy Hall, a MODIS Associate Science Team Member. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  1. Alaska volcanoes guidebook for teachers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adleman, Jennifer N.

    2011-01-01

    Alaska’s volcanoes, like its abundant glaciers, charismatic wildlife, and wild expanses inspire and ignite scientific curiosity and generate an ever-growing source of questions for students in Alaska and throughout the world. Alaska is home to more than 140 volcanoes, which have been active over the last 2 million years. About 90 of these volcanoes have been active within the last 10,000 years and more than 50 of these have been active since about 1700. The volcanoes in Alaska make up well over three-quarters of volcanoes in the United States that have erupted in the last 200 years. In fact, Alaska’s volcanoes erupt so frequently that it is almost guaranteed that an Alaskan will experience a volcanic eruption in his or her lifetime, and it is likely they will experience more than one. It is hard to imagine a better place for students to explore active volcanism and to understand volcanic hazards, phenomena, and global impacts. Previously developed teachers’ guidebooks with an emphasis on the volcanoes in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (Mattox, 1994) and Mount Rainier National Park in the Cascade Range (Driedger and others, 2005) provide place-based resources and activities for use in other volcanic regions in the United States. Along the lines of this tradition, this guidebook serves to provide locally relevant and useful resources and activities for the exploration of numerous and truly unique volcanic landscapes in Alaska. This guidebook provides supplemental teaching materials to be used by Alaskan students who will be inspired to become educated and prepared for inevitable future volcanic activity in Alaska. The lessons and activities in this guidebook are meant to supplement and enhance existing science content already being taught in grade levels 6–12. Correlations with Alaska State Science Standards and Grade Level Expectations adopted by the Alaska State Department of Education and Early Development (2006) for grades six through eleven are listed at

  2. 76 FR 47537 - Southern Arizona Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-05

    ... Center, 2646 E. Commerce Center Place, Tucson, Arizona 85706. Written comments may be submitted as... Street, Tucson, AZ 85701, or by e-mail to sldavis@fs.fed.us , or via facsimile to 520-388-8332. A...

  3. 75 FR 51840 - State of Arizona Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ... Phoenix from 8 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. Agenda items include: BLM State Director's update on statewide issues... North Central Avenue, Suite 800, Phoenix, Arizona 85004-4427, 602-417-9504. James G. Kenna,...

  4. NASA Meteor Cam Video of June 2, 2016 Arizona Fireball

    NASA Video Gallery

    Video obtained from the NASA meteor camera situated at the MMT Observatory on the site of the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, located on Mount Hopkins, Arizona, in the Santa Rita Mountains. Cred...

  5. NASA's TRMM Satellite Sees Heavy Rain in Arizona Thunderstorms

    NASA Video Gallery

    This simulated flyby of NASA's TRMM satellite on Sept. 8 saw rain falling at a rate of over 62 mm (2.4 inches) per hour in some downpours over Arizona. Some thunderstorm tops reached heights of 13....

  6. Alaska Resource Data File, Talkeetna Mountains quadrangle, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rogers, Robert K.; Schmidt, Jeanine M.

    2003-01-01

    Descriptions of the mineral occurrences shown on the accompanying figure follow. See U.S. Geological Survey (1996) for a description of the information content of each field in the records. The data presented here are maintained as part of a statewide database on mines, prospects and mineral occurrences throughout Alaska.

  7. Alaska Resource Data File, McCarthy quadrangle, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudson, Travis L.

    2003-01-01

    Descriptions of the mineral occurrences shown on the accompanying figure follow. See U.S. Geological Survey (1996) for a description of the information content of each field in the records. The data presented here are maintained as part of a statewide database on mines, prospects and mineral occurrences throughout Alaska.

  8. DOE-University of Arizona Faculty Development Project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fillerup, Joseph M.

    1980-09-08

    The DOE-University of Arizona Faculty Development Project on Energy successfully completed a faculty development program. There were three phases of the program consisting of: a three week energy workshop for teachers, participation and cooperation with Students for Safe Energy in presentation of an Alternative Energy Festival at the University of Arizona, and workshops for teachers conducted at Flowing Wells School District. Each of these is described. Attendees are listed and a director's evaluation of the workshop is given.

  9. 3. Photocopy of handcolored postcard original postcard located at Arizona ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photocopy of hand-colored postcard original postcard located at Arizona Historical Foundation, Tempe, Arizona. Photographer unknown, circa 1905 VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST FROM TEMPE BUTTE, SHOWING MARICOPA AND PHOENIX RAILROAD BRIDGE IN THE BACKGROUND; PHOENIX AND EASTERN RAILROAD BRIDGE IN FOREGROUND. THE ASH AVENUE BRIDGE WOULD BE BUILT MIDWAY BETWEEN THE RAILROAD BRIDGES IN 1911-1913 - Ash Avenue Bridge, Spanning Salt River at Foot of Ash Avenue, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  10. Remote sensing-arid lands workshop, Page, Arizona, June 10-12, 1986: Workshop summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, R.H.; Wobber, F.J.; Springer, E.P.

    1987-05-01

    This report describes research sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Research to evaluate advanced remote sensing technologies for environmental research. The program denoted as REFLEX (REmote FLuvial EXperiments) stresses new applications of remote sensing systems and advanced digital analysis to the solution of environmental problems from energy development. REFLEX experiments are being conducted at sites within the continental United States and Alaska. The experiments described here are being done on arid and semiarid sites in the western United States. Currently, two REFLEX experiments are being conducted in arid/semiarid ecosystems. At the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in Richland, Washington, the REFLEX experiment will test hypotheses on the prediction of evapotranspiration (ET) over arid landscapes. The heterogeneity of arid and semiarid landscapes makes estimation of ET over an area quite difficult, and remote sensing, both aerial and ground based, offers tremendous potential in solving this sampling problem. The second REFLEX experiment in arid/semiarid ecosystems is being conducted on surface hydrology and soil erosion in arid watersheds. Two study sites, the Plutonium Valley Watershed at the Nevada Test Site and Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed at Tombstone, Arizona, have been selected for the experiment. Remote sensing will be used to initialize and parameterize hydrologic models that can predict watershed responses to change on two spatial and temporal scales.

  11. Teshekpuk Lake, Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This ASTER image of Teshekpuk Lake on Alaska's North Slope, within the National Petroleum Reserve, was acquired on August 15, 2000. It covers an area of 58.7 x 89.9 km, and is centered near 70.4 degrees north latitude, 153 degrees west longitude.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 58.7 by 89.9 kilometers (36.4 by 55.7 miles) Location: 70.4 degrees North latitude, 153 degrees West longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER Bands 3, 2, and 1 Original Data Resolution: ASTER 30 meters (98.4 feet) Dates Acquired: August 15, 2000

  12. Dental caries in rural Alaska Native children--Alaska, 2008.

    PubMed

    2011-09-23

    In April 2008, the Arctic Investigations Program (AIP) of CDC was informed by the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services (DHSS) of a large number of Alaska Native (AN) children living in a remote region of Alaska who required full mouth dental rehabilitations (FMDRs), including extractions and/or restorations of multiple carious teeth performed under general anesthesia. In this remote region, approximately 400 FMDRs were performed in AN children aged <6 years in 2007; the region has approximately 600 births per year. Dental caries can cause pain, which can affect children's normal growth and development. AIP and Alaska DHSS conducted an investigation of dental caries and associated risk factors among children in the remote region. A convenience sample of children aged 4-15 years in five villages (two with fluoridated water and three without) was examined to estimate dental caries prevalence and severity. Risk factor information was obtained by interviewing parents. Among children aged 4-5 years and 12-15 years who were evaluated, 87% and 91%, respectively, had dental caries, compared with 35% and 51% of U.S. children in those age groups. Among children from the Alaska villages, those aged 4-5 years had a mean of 7.3 dental caries, and those aged 12-15 years had a mean of 5.0, compared with 1.6 and 1.8 dental caries in same-aged U.S. children. Of the multiple factors assessed, lack of water fluoridation and soda pop consumption were significantly associated with dental caries severity. Collaborations between tribal, state, and federal agencies to provide effective preventive interventions, such as water fluoridation of villages with suitable water systems and provision of fluoride varnishes, should be encouraged.

  13. Adventures in the Alaska Economy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackstadt, Steve; Huskey, Lee

    This publication was developed to increase students' understanding of basic economic concepts and the historical development of Alaska's economy. Comics depict major historical events as they occurred, but specific characters are fictionalized. Each of nine episodes is accompanied by several pages of explanatory text, which enlarges on the episode…

  14. Survey of Alaska Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Anda; Sokolov, Barbara J.

    This survey by the Arctic Environmental Information and Data Center at the University of Alaska identifies and describes information and data collections within Alaskan libraries and agency offices which pertain to fish and wildlife or their habitat. Included in the survey are descriptions of the location, characteristics, and availability of…

  15. Alaska and Bering Sea Bloom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Alaska was relatively clear as was part of the Bering Sea where the aquamarine bloom is still visible in this SeaWiFS image. Credit: Provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  16. Licensed Optometrists in Alaska 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources Administration (DHEW/PHS), Bethesda, MD. Div. of Manpower Intelligence.

    This report presents preliminary findings from a mail survey of all optometrists licensed to practice in the State of Alaska. The survey was conducted in 1973 by the International Association of Boards of Examiners in Optometry as part of a national endeavor to collect data on all optometrists in the United States. Since there was a 100 percent…

  17. Legal Guide for Alaska Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesbitt, Buell, Ed.; And Others

    This legal guide, developed by the Alaska Congress of Parents and Teachers, is intended for young citizens and parents to advise youth of their civil rights and explain what constitutes a criminal offense. The aim is to objectively state the law in understandable terms. The book is arranged in four sections. Section one explains the legal rights…

  18. Tuberculosis among Children in Alaska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gessner, Bradford D.

    1997-01-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis among Alaskan children under 15 was more than twice the national rate, with Alaska Native children showing a much higher incidence. Children with household exposure to adults with active tuberculosis had a high risk of infection. About 22 percent of pediatric tuberculosis cases were identified through school…

  19. Antidote: Civic Responsibility. Alaska Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phi Alpha Delta Law Fraternity International, Washington, DC.

    Designed for middle school through high school students, this unit contains eight lesson plans that focus on Alaska state law. The state lessons correspond to lessons in the volume, "Antidote: Civic Responsibility. Drug Avoidance Lessons for Middle School & High School Students." Developed to be presented by educators, law student,…

  20. Minority Women's Health: American Indians/Alaska Natives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Minority Women's Health > American Indians/Alaska Natives Minority Women's Health American Indians/Alaska Natives Related information How ... conditions common in American Indian and Alaska Native women Accidents Alcoholism and drug abuse Breast cancer Cancer ...

  1. Chronic Liver Disease and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    MedlinePlus

    ... American Indian/Alaska Native > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and American Indians/Alaska Natives Among American Indians and Alaska Natives, chronic liver disease is a leading cause of death. While ...

  2. Stroke Mortality Among Alaska Native People

    PubMed Central

    Horner, Ronnie D.; Day, Gretchen M.; Lanier, Anne P.; Provost, Ellen M.; Hamel, Rebecca D.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We aimed to describe the epidemiology of stroke among Alaska Natives, which is essential for designing effective stroke prevention and intervention efforts for this population. Methods. We conducted an analysis of death certificate data for the state of Alaska for the period 1984 to 2003, comparing age-standardized stroke mortality rates among Alaska Natives residing in Alaska vs US Whites by age category, gender, stroke type, and time. Results. Compared with US Whites, Alaska Natives had significantly elevated stroke mortality from 1994 to 2003 but not from 1984 to 1993. Alaska Native women of all age groups and Alaska Native men younger than 45 years of age had the highest risk, although the rates for those younger than 65 years were statistically imprecise. Over the 20-year study period, the stroke mortality rate was stable for Alaska Natives but declined for US Whites. Conclusions. Stroke mortality is higher among Alaska Natives, especially women, than among US Whites. Over the past 20 years, there has not been a significant decline in stroke mortality among Alaska Natives. PMID:19762671

  3. Sampson v. state of Alaska: in the Supreme Court of the state of Alaska.

    PubMed

    Bostrom, B A

    2001-01-01

    HELD: The Alaska Constitution's guarantees of privacy and liberty do not afford terminally ill persons the right to a physician's assistance in committing suicide and Alaska's statute prohibiting suicide assistance does not violate their right of equal protection.

  4. Epidemiology of Glomerular Disease in Southern Arizona

    PubMed Central

    Murugapandian, Sangeetha; Mansour, Iyad; Hudeeb, Mohammad; Hamed, Khaled; Hammode, Emad; Bijin, Babitha; Daheshpour, Sepehr; Thajudeen, Bijin; Kadambi, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Glomerulonephritis stands third in terms of the etiologies for end-stage kidney disease in the USA. The aim of this study was to look at the patterns of biopsy-proven glomerulonephritis based on data from a single center. Kidney biopsy specimens of all patients above the age of 18 years, over a 10-year period, who had diagnosis of nondiabetic glomerular disease, were selected for the study. The most common histopathological diagnosis was focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) (22.25%, 158/710) followed by membranous nephropathy (20.28%, 144/710) and immunoglobulin (Ig)A nephropathy (19.71%, 140/710). There was male preponderance in all histological variants except IgA nephropathy, lupus nephritis, and pauci-immune glomerulonephritis. The race distribution was uneven, and all histological variants, except minimal change disease and lupus nephritis, were more commonly seen in whites. In a separate analysis of the histological pattern in Hispanics, lupus nephritis was the most common pathology (28.70%, 62/216) followed by FSGS (18.05%, 39/216). In American Indian population, the most common pathology was IgA nephropathy (33.33%, 8/24) followed by FSGS (16.67%, 4/24). This study highlights the histopathological patterns of glomerular disease in southern Arizona. The data suggest regional and ethnic variations in glomerular disease that may point towards genetic or environmental influence in the pathogenesis of glomerular diseases. PMID:27149502

  5. MAZATZAL WILDERNESS AND CONTIGUOUS ROADLESS AREAS, ARIZONA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wrucke, Chester T.; Ellis, Clarence E.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey has shown that the Mazatzal Wilderness, Arizona has demonstrated resources of silver, gold, lead and mercury, small areas of substantiated mineral-resource potential for silver and copper, and areas of probable resource potential for resources of silver, copper, lead, mercury, and molybdenum. Gold, silver, and copper resources occur in small deposits in the north-central, eastern, and southern parts of the wilderness. A small demonstrated mercury resource is located at the Sunflower mine near the southeastern corner of the wilderness adjacent to the well-known Sunflower mining district. Molybdenum mineralization found during this study in the Tangle Creek area west of the Verde River may extend eastward into the roadless area and the wilderness. Tin occurrences not previously known in the Mazatzal region were found in the central part of the wilderness, and uranium was found near Horseshoe Reservoir, but there is little promise for the occurrence of tin and uranium resources. No potential for fossil fuel resources was identified in this study.

  6. Isotopic paleoecology of Clovis mammoths from Arizona.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, Jessica Z; Longstaffe, Fred J; Ballenger, Jesse A M; Haynes, C Vance

    2011-11-01

    The causes of megafaunal extinctions in North America have been widely debated but remain poorly understood. Mammoths (Mammuthus spp.) in the American Southwest were hunted by Clovis people during a period of rapid climate change, just before the regional onset of Younger Dryas cooling and mammoth extirpation. Thus, these mammoths may provide key insights into late Pleistocene extinction processes. Here we reconstruct the seasonal diet and climatic conditions experienced by mammoths in the San Pedro Valley of Arizona, using the carbon ((13)C/(12)C) and oxygen ((18)O/(16)O) isotope compositions of tooth enamel. These records suggest that Clovis mammoths experienced a warm, dry climate with sufficient summer rainfall to support seasonal C(4) plant growth. Monsoon intensity may have been reduced relative to the preceding time period, but there is no isotopic evidence for severe drought. However, it is possible that the "Clovis drought", inferred from stratigraphic evidence, occurred suddenly at the end of the animals' lives and thus was not recorded in the enamel isotopic compositions. Unlike mammoths that lived before the Last Glacial Maximum, Clovis mammoths regularly increased C(4) grass consumption during summer, probably seeking seasonally green grasslands farther from the river valley. This predictable seasonal behavior may have made mammoths easier to locate by Clovis hunters. Furthermore, Clovis mammoths probably had no previous experience of such sudden climatic change as is believed to have occurred at the time of their extinction.

  7. Geothermal development plan: northern Arizona counties

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

    1982-08-01

    The Northern Counties Area Development Plan evaluated the regional market potential for utilizing geothermal energy. This study identified five potential geothermal resource areas, four of which have low temperature (<90{sup 0}C, 194{sup 0}F) potential and one possible igneous system. The average population growth rate in the Northern Counties is expected to be five percent per year over the next 40 years, with Mohave and Yavapai Counties growing the fastest. Rapid growth is anticipated in all major employment sectors, including trade, service, manufacturing, mining and utilities. A regional energy use analysis is included, containing information on current energy use patterns for all user classes. Water supplies are expected to be adequate for expected growth generally, though Yavapai and Gila Counties will experience water deficiencies. A preliminary district heating analysis is included for the towns of Alpine and Springerville. Both communities are believed located on geothermal resource sites. The study also contains a section identifying potential geothermal resource users in northern Arizona.

  8. Causes of sinks near Tucson, Arizona, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffmann, J.P.; Pool, D.R.; Konieczki, A.D.; Carpenter, M.C.

    1998-01-01

    Land subsidence in the form of sinks has occurred on and near farmlands near Tucson, Pima County, Arizona, USA. The sinks occur in alluvial deposits along the flood plain of the Santa Cruz River, and have made farmlands dangerous and unsuitable for farming. More than 1700 sinks are confined to the flood plain of the Santa Cruz River and are grouped along two north-northwestward-trending bands that are approximately parallel to the river and other flood-plain drainages. An estimated 17,000 m3 of sediment have been removed in the formation of the sinks. Thirteen trenches were dug to depths of 4-6 m to characterize near-surface sediments in sink and nonsink areas. Sediments below about 2 m included a large percentage of dispersive clays in sink areas. Sediments in nonsink areas contain a large component of medium- to coarse-grained, moderately to well sorted sand that probably fills a paleochannel. Electromagnetic surveys support the association of silts and clays in sink areas that are highly electrically conductive relative to sand in nonsink areas. Sinks probably are caused by the near-surface process of subsurface erosion of dispersive sediments along pre-existing cracks in predominantly silt and clay sediments. The pre-existing cracks probably result from desiccation or tension that developed during periods of water-table decline and channel incision during the past 100 years or in earlier periods.

  9. Overview of the Arizona Quiet Pavement Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donavan, Paul; Scofield, Larry

    2005-09-01

    The Arizona Quiet Pavement Pilot Program (QP3) was initially implemented to reduce highway related traffic noise by overlaying most of the Phoenix metropolitan area Portland cement concrete pavement with a one inch thick asphalt rubber friction coarse. With FHWA support, this program represents the first time that pavement surface type has been allowed as a noise mitigation strategy on federally funded projects. As a condition of using pavement type as a noise mitigation strategy, ADOT developed a ten-year, $3.8 million research program to evaluate the noise reduction performance over time. Historically, pavement surface type was not considered a permanent solution. As a result, the research program was designed to specifically address this issue. Noise performance is being evaluated through three means: (1) conventional roadside testing within the roadway corridor (e.g., far field measurements within the right-of-way) (2) the use of near field measurements, both close proximity (CPX) and sound intensity (SI); and (3) far field measurements obtained beyond the noise barriers within the surrounding neighborhoods. This paper provides an overview of the program development, presents the research conducted to support the decision to overlay the urban freeway, and the status of current research.

  10. National uranium resource evaluation: Mesa quaddrangle, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Luning, R.H.; Thiede, D.S.; O'Neill, A.J.; Nystrom, R.J.; White, D.L.

    1982-06-01

    The Mesa Quadrangle (2/sup 0/), Arizona, was evaluated to a depth of 1500 meters to identify geologic environments and delineate surface and subsurface areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits. The criteria used to define uranium favorability were developed during the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. Surface and subsurface studies were augmented by aerial radiometric surveys and hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaisance studies. The results of the investigations identified three favorable areas: older Precambrian quartz monzonite near Horseshoe Dam; the gray unit of the Dripping Spring quartzite of Precambrian age in the Sierra Ancha, Salt River Canyon, and Mescal Mountain regions; and Tertiary lake beds near Cave Creek, Horseshoe Dam, and northeastern Tonto Basin. Unfavorable environments include nearly all older Precambrian crystalline and metamorphic rocks, most younger Precambrian igneous and sedimentary rocks, parts of the Paleozoic section, igneous intrusives of Laramide age. Tertiary volcanic rocks, and late Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The eastern third of the quadrangle remains unevaluated because access was prohibited or could not be obtained in time. Environments were unevaluated in older Precambrian volcanic, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks; the Naco and Supai Formations; Cretaceous sedimentary rocks; and many Tertiary sedimentary rocks in intermontane basins and within the southwestern portion of the quadrangle because of time constraints, land access restrictions, and sparsity of subsurface data.

  11. Isotopic paleoecology of Clovis mammoths from Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Jessica Z.; Longstaffe, Fred J.; Ballenger, Jesse A. M.; Vance Haynes, C., Jr.

    2011-11-01

    The causes of megafaunal extinctions in North America have been widely debated but remain poorly understood. Mammoths (Mammuthus spp.) in the American Southwest were hunted by Clovis people during a period of rapid climate change, just before the regional onset of Younger Dryas cooling and mammoth extirpation. Thus, these mammoths may provide key insights into late Pleistocene extinction processes. Here we reconstruct the seasonal diet and climatic conditions experienced by mammoths in the San Pedro Valley of Arizona, using the carbon (13C/12C) and oxygen (18O/16O) isotope compositions of tooth enamel. These records suggest that Clovis mammoths experienced a warm, dry climate with sufficient summer rainfall to support seasonal C4 plant growth. Monsoon intensity may have been reduced relative to the preceding time period, but there is no isotopic evidence for severe drought. However, it is possible that the "Clovis drought", inferred from stratigraphic evidence, occurred suddenly at the end of the animals' lives and thus was not recorded in the enamel isotopic compositions. Unlike mammoths that lived before the Last Glacial Maximum, Clovis mammoths regularly increased C4 grass consumption during summer, probably seeking seasonally green grasslands farther from the river valley. This predictable seasonal behavior may have made mammoths easier to locate by Clovis hunters. Furthermore, Clovis mammoths probably had no previous experience of such sudden climatic change as is believed to have occurred at the time of their extinction.

  12. Research Using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jull, A.; Donahue, D. J.; Burr, G. S.; Beck, W.; Hatheway, A. L.; Biddulph, D. L.; McHargue, L. R.

    2002-12-01

    An Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) facility has been operated at the University of Arizona since 1982. This is an excellent example of a facility which has benefitted from the NSF Earth Sciences Instrumentation and Facilities Program. AMS has many applications to the fields of geochronology, geoarchaeology, paleoclimatology. A wide range of climatic, geologic and archeological records can be characterized by measuring their 14C and 10Be concentrations, using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). These records are found not only in the traditional sampling sites such as lake sediments and ice cores, but also in diverse natural accumulates and biogeochemical products such as: loess/paleosol deposits, corals, speleothems, and forest-fire horizons. The in-situ production of cosmogenic radionuclides in terrestrial and extraterrestrial materials provides several possibilities of determining their chronology. Thes studies are important for understanding cosmic-ray production of radionuclides in rock surfaces, by which we can draw conclusions about exposure time and erosion. Studies on extraterrestrial materials such as lunar samples allow us to determine the solar and galactic cosmic-ray fluxes in the past, and the cosmogenic 14C and 10Be in meteorites can be used to determine terrestrial ages. In this paper, we will highlight some selected applications of AMS, including dating of some interesting art works and artifacts, to show some of the great range of studies which can be undertaken.

  13. Intercontinental migratory connectivity and population structuring of Dunlins from western Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gill, Robert E.; Handel, Colleen M.; Ruthrauff, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    The Dunlin (Calidris alpina) is a polytypic shorebird with complex patterns of distribution and migration throughout its holarctic range. We analyzed mark-re sighting data obtained between 1977 and 2010 from birds captured at two major staging areas in western Alaska to test the hypothesis that the migration patterns of Alaskan populations are a mixture of parallel and chain, similar to those of Dunlin populations in the western Palearctic. Birds marked on the Yukon—Kuskokwim Delta were found wintering in both Asia and North America, which documented the unexpected mixing of C. a. arcticola from northern Alaska and C. a. pacifica from western Alaska and contradicted our initial prediction of parallel migration pathways for these two subspecies. In its North American winter range C. a. pacifica segregated according to location of marking, confirming our prediction of a chain migration pattern within this population. Individuals of C. a. pacifica marked on the delta were resighted significantly farther north, mostly in southern British Columbia and Washington, than birds marked on the second, more southerly staging area on the Alaska Peninsula, which were resighted primarily in the San Francisco Bay area of northern California. We recommend additional studies use a combination of intrinsic and extrinsic markers to quantify the strength of migratory connectivity between breeding, staging, and wintering areas. Such information is needed to guide conservation efforts because the Dunlin and other waterbirds are losing intertidal habitats at an unprecedented rate and scale, particularly in the Yellow Sea and other parts of Asia.

  14. Fisheries Education in Alaska. Conference Report. Alaska Sea Grant Report 82-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smoker, William W., Ed.

    This conference was an attempt to have the fishing industry join the state of Alaska in building fisheries education programs. Topics addressed in papers presented at the conference include: (1) fisheries as a part of life in Alaska, addressing participation of Alaska natives in commercial fisheries and national efforts; (2) the international…

  15. Selected 1970 Census Data for Alaska Communities. Part 2 - Northwest Alaska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Community and Regional Affairs, Juneau. Div. of Community Planning.

    As 1 of 6 regional reports supplying statistical information on Alaska's incorporated and unincorporated communities (those of 25 or more people), this report on Northwest Alaska presents data derived from the 1970 U.S. Census first-count microfilm. Organized via the 3 Northwest Alaska census division, data are presented for the 32 communities of…

  16. 78 FR 53137 - Flint Hills Resources Alaska, LLC, BP Pipelines (Alaska) Inc., ConocoPhillips Transportation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Flint Hills Resources Alaska, LLC, BP Pipelines (Alaska) Inc., Conoco... Pipeline Proceedings, 18 CFR 343.2 (2013), Flint Hills Resources Alaska, LLC (FHR or Complainant) filed...

  17. 76 FR 68263 - Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-03

    ... Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 92 Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska During the 2012 Season; Proposed Rule #0;#0...-1231-9BPP-L2] RIN 1018-AX55 Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations...

  18. 78 FR 11988 - Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-21

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 92 RIN 1018-AY70 Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska During the 2013 Season AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service... migratory bird subsistence harvest regulations in Alaska for the 2013 season. These regulations enable...

  19. 77 FR 17353 - Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 92 RIN 1018-AX55 Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska During the 2012 Season AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service... migratory bird subsistence harvest regulations in Alaska for the 2012 season. These regulations will...

  20. 76 FR 303 - Alaska: Adequacy of Alaska's Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Permit Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-04

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 239 and 258 Alaska: Adequacy of Alaska's Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Permit... proposes to approve Alaska's modification of its approved Municipal Solid Waste Landfill (MSWLF) permit... Domenic Calabro, Office of Air, Waste, and Toxics, U.S. EPA, Region 10, 1200 Sixth Avenue, Suite...

  1. Ordovician "sphinctozoan" sponges from Prince of Wales Island, southeastern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rigby, J.K.; Karl, S.M.; Blodgett, R.B.; Baichtal, J.F.

    2005-01-01

    A faunule of silicified hypercalcified "sphinctozoan" sponges has been recovered from a clast of Upper Ordovician limestone out of the Early Devonian Karheen Formation on Prince of Wales Island in southeastern Alaska. Included in the faunule are abundant examples of the new genus Girtyocoeliana, represented by Girtyocoeliana epiporata (Rigby and Potter), and Corymbospongia adnata Rigby and Potter, along with rare Corymbospongia amplia n. sp., and Girtyocoelia(?) sp., plus common Amblysiphonella sp. 1 and rare Amblysiphonella(?) sp. 2. The assemblage is similar to that from Ordovician clasts from the eastern Klamath Mountains of northern California. This indicates that the Alexander terrane of southeastern Alaska is related paleogeographically to the lithologically and paleontologically similar terrane of the eastern Klamath Mountains. This lithology and fossil assemblage of the clast cannot be tied to any currently known local rock units on Prince of Wales Island. Other clasts in the conglomerate appear to have been locally derived, so it is inferred that the limestone clasts were also locally derived, indicating the presence of a previously undocumented Ordovician limestone unit on northern Prince of Wales Island. 

  2. Solar energy system performance evaluation: seasonal report for Elcam Tempe Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The analysis used is based on instrumented system data monitored and collected for at least one full season of operation. The objective of the analysis is to report the long-term field performance of the installed system and to make technical contributions to the definition of techniques and requirements for solar energy system design. The solar system, Elcam-Tempe, was designed to supply commercial domestic hot water heating systems that utilize two, four by eight foot flat plate collectors to heat water in a fifty-two gallon preheat tank or a fifty-two gallon domestic hot water (DHW) tank. The DHW tank provides hot water to the Agriculture Department residence at Arizona State University. The system uses an automatic cascade control system to control three independent actuators, the coolant circulation pump, the cascade valve, and the electric heating element. The system provides freeze protection by automatically circulating hot water from the hot water tank through the collectors when the collector outlet temperature is below a specified value. The building is a single story residence located at the agriculture experiment farm of the Arizona State University. The Elcam-Tempe Solar Energy System has four modes of operation.

  3. Forestry timber typing. Tanana demonstration project, Alaska ASVT. [Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrissey, L. A.; Ambrosia, V. G.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of using LANDSAT digital data in conjunction with topographic data to delineate commercial forests by stand size and crown closure in the Tanana River basin of Alaska was tested. A modified clustering approach using two LANDSAT dates to generate an initial forest type classification was then refined with topographic data. To further demonstrate the ability of remotely sensed data in a fire protection planning framework, the timber type data were subsequently integrated with terrain information to generate a fire hazard map of the study area. This map provides valuable assistance in initial attack planning, determining equipment accessibility, and fire growth modeling. The resulting data sets were incorporated into the Alaska Department of Natural Resources geographic information system for subsequent utilization.

  4. The Galileoscope project: community-based technology education in Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompea, Stephen M.; Fine, Leonard W.; Sparks, Robert T.; Walker, Constance E.; Dugan, Charles L.; Dokter, Erin F. C.

    2014-07-01

    A program model has been developed and implemented over the last three years to provide a robust optical technologybased science education program to students aged 9-11 years (5th grade), a formative time in the development of a student's interest in science and engineering. We have created well-tested and evaluated teaching kits for the classroom to teach about the basics of image formation and telescopes. In addition we provide professional development to the teachers of these students on principles of optics and on using the teaching kits. The program model is to reach every teacher and every student in a number of mid-sized rural communities across the state of Arizona. The Galileoscope telescope kit is a key part of this program to explore optics and the nature of science. The program grew out of Module 3 of the NSF-Supported Hands-On Optics project (SPIE, OSA, and NOAO) and from the Science Foundation Arizona-supported Hands-On Optics Arizona program. NOAO has conducted this program in Flagstaff, Yuma, Globe, and Safford, Arizona and is being expanded to sites across the entire state of Arizona (295,254 square kilometers). We describe the educational goals, evaluations, and logistical issues connected to the program. In particular, we proposed that this model can be adapted for any rural or urban locations in order to encourage interest in science, astronomy and optics.-

  5. Hazard-Ranking of Agricultural Pesticides for Chronic Health Effects in Yuma County, Arizona

    PubMed Central

    Sugeng, Anastasia J.; Beamer, Paloma I.; Lutz, Eric A.; Rosales, Cecilia B.

    2013-01-01

    With thousands of pesticides registered by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, it not feasible to sample for all pesticides applied in agricultural communities. Hazard-ranking pesticides based on use, toxicity, and exposure potential can help prioritize community-specific pesticide hazards. This study applied hazard-ranking schemes for cancer, endocrine disruption, and reproductive/developmental toxicity in Yuma County, Arizona. An existing cancer hazard-ranking scheme was modified, and novel schemes for endocrine disruption and reproductive/developmental toxicity were developed to rank pesticide hazards. The hazard-ranking schemes accounted for pesticide use, toxicity, and exposure potential based on chemical properties of each pesticide. Pesticides were ranked as hazards with respect to each health effect, as well as overall chronic health effects. The highest hazard-ranked pesticides for overall chronic health effects were maneb, metam sodium, trifluralin, pronamide, and bifenthrin. The relative pesticide rankings were unique for each health effect. The highest hazard-ranked pesticides differed from those most heavily applied, as well as from those previously detected in Yuma homes over a decade ago. The most hazardous pesticides for cancer in Yuma County, Arizona were also different from a previous hazard-ranking applied in California. Hazard-ranking schemes that take into account pesticide use, toxicity, and exposure potential can help prioritize pesticides of greatest health risk in agricultural communities. This study is the first to provide pesticide hazard-rankings for endocrine disruption and reproductive/developmental toxicity based on use, toxicity, and exposure potential. These hazard-ranking schemes can be applied to other agricultural communities for prioritizing community-specific pesticide hazards to target decreasing health risk. PMID:23783270

  6. Hazard-ranking of agricultural pesticides for chronic health effects in Yuma County, Arizona.

    PubMed

    Sugeng, Anastasia J; Beamer, Paloma I; Lutz, Eric A; Rosales, Cecilia B

    2013-10-01

    With thousands of pesticides registered by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, it not feasible to sample for all pesticides applied in agricultural communities. Hazard-ranking pesticides based on use, toxicity, and exposure potential can help prioritize community-specific pesticide hazards. This study applied hazard-ranking schemes for cancer, endocrine disruption, and reproductive/developmental toxicity in Yuma County, Arizona. An existing cancer hazard-ranking scheme was modified, and novel schemes for endocrine disruption and reproductive/developmental toxicity were developed to rank pesticide hazards. The hazard-ranking schemes accounted for pesticide use, toxicity, and exposure potential based on chemical properties of each pesticide. Pesticides were ranked as hazards with respect to each health effect, as well as overall chronic health effects. The highest hazard-ranked pesticides for overall chronic health effects were maneb, metam-sodium, trifluralin, pronamide, and bifenthrin. The relative pesticide rankings were unique for each health effect. The highest hazard-ranked pesticides differed from those most heavily applied, as well as from those previously detected in Yuma homes over a decade ago. The most hazardous pesticides for cancer in Yuma County, Arizona were also different from a previous hazard-ranking applied in California. Hazard-ranking schemes that take into account pesticide use, toxicity, and exposure potential can help prioritize pesticides of greatest health risk in agricultural communities. This study is the first to provide pesticide hazard-rankings for endocrine disruption and reproductive/developmental toxicity based on use, toxicity, and exposure potential. These hazard-ranking schemes can be applied to other agricultural communities for prioritizing community-specific pesticide hazards to target decreasing health risk.

  7. The 1964 Great Alaska Earthquake and tsunamis: a modern perspective and enduring legacies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brocher, Thomas M.; Filson, John R.; Fuis, Gary S.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Holzer, Thomas L.; Plafker, George; Blair, J. Luke

    2014-01-01

    The magnitude 9.2 Great Alaska Earthquake that struck south-central Alaska at 5:36 p.m. on Friday, March 27, 1964, is the largest recorded earthquake in U.S. history and the second-largest earthquake recorded with modern instruments. The earthquake was felt throughout most of mainland Alaska, as far west as Dutch Harbor in the Aleutian Islands some 480 miles away, and at Seattle, Washington, more than 1,200 miles to the southeast of the fault rupture, where the Space Needle swayed perceptibly. The earthquake caused rivers, lakes, and other waterways to slosh as far away as the coasts of Texas and Louisiana. Water-level recorders in 47 states—the entire Nation except for Connecticut, Delaware, and Rhode Island— registered the earthquake. It was so large that it caused the entire Earth to ring like a bell: vibrations that were among the first of their kind ever recorded by modern instruments. The Great Alaska Earthquake spawned thousands of lesser aftershocks and hundreds of damaging landslides, submarine slumps, and other ground failures. Alaska’s largest city, Anchorage, located west of the fault rupture, sustained heavy property damage. Tsunamis produced by the earthquake resulted in deaths and damage as far away as Oregon and California. Altogether the earthquake and subsequent tsunamis caused 129 fatalities and an estimated $2.3 billion in property losses (in 2013 dollars). Most of the population of Alaska and its major transportation routes, ports, and infrastructure lie near the eastern segment of the Aleutian Trench that ruptured in the 1964 earthquake. Although the Great Alaska Earthquake was tragic because of the loss of life and property, it provided a wealth of data about subductionzone earthquakes and the hazards they pose. The leap in scientific understanding that followed the 1964 earthquake has led to major breakthroughs in earth science research worldwide over the past half century. This fact sheet commemorates Great Alaska Earthquake and

  8. Integrated solid waste management of Scottsdale, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The subject document reports the results of an in-depth investigation of the fiscal year 1992 cost of the city of Scottsdale, Arizona, integrated municipal solid waste management (IMSWM) system, the energy consumed to operate the system, and the environmental performance requirements for each of the system`s waste-processing and disposal facilities. The document reports actual data from records kept by participants. Every effort was made to minimize the use of assumptions, and no attempt is made to interpret the data reported. Analytical approaches are documented so that interested analysts may per-form manipulation or further analysis of the data. As such, the report is a reference document for municipal solid waste (MSW) management professionals who are interested in the actual costs and energy consumption, for a 1-year period, of an operating IMSWM system. The report is organized into two main parts. The first part is the executive summary and case study portion of the report. The executive summary provides a basic description of the study area and selected economic and energy information. Within the case study are detailed descriptions of each component operating during the study period; the quantities of solid waste collected, processed, and marketed within the study boundaries; the cost of MSW in Scottsdale; an energy usage analysis; a review of federal, state, and local environmental requirement compliance; a reference section; and a glossary of terms. The second part of the report focuses on a more detailed discourse on the above topics. In addition, the methodology used to determine the economic costs and energy consumption of the system components is found in the second portion of this report. The methodology created for this project will be helpful for those professionals who wish to break out the costs of their own integrated systems.

  9. Flow in the unsaturated zone, Tucson, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graham, D.D.

    1988-01-01

    Field studies in Tucson, Arizona were conducted based on the discovery of contaminants in groundwater from a substantial number of municipal and private wells, and evidence that the presence of a thick unsaturated zone does not prevent the eventual migration of contaminants to regional groundwater systems. A pulse of water containing a tracer was monitored as it passed through the unsaturated zone by using six soil-moisture samplers (lysimeters) that were installed at depths of 11 to 45 ft, 10 ft apart, beneath a shallow, manmade, 3/4-acre recharge basin. The tracer was allowed to infiltrate into the ground for seven days, and water was collected from samplers at 12-hr intervals for about 30 days. Well defined tracer peaks, presented graphically as tracer breakthrough curves, were observed for all but one of the lysimeters installed at the site. Maximum tracer concentration showed no consistent relation with depth; tracer breakthrough sometimes occurred earlier in deep sampling locations than in shallow ones. Rather than moving straight down, water movement occurred along preferential flow paths, referred to as bypass or macropore flow, probably at low soil tension which occurs when the soil is near saturation. Under such conditions, contaminant arrival times can occur sooner than would be expected if flow was assumed to occur as a uniform wetting front that pushes ahead of it the water previously stored in the pores of the unsaturated sediments. Much of the water stored in the soil profile is not involved under conditions of bypass flow, and less interaction occurs between the recharge water and the solid matrix of the unsaturated zone. Therefore certain substances such as chlorinated hydrocarbons (trichloroethylene, pesticides) , other refractory organic compounds (detergents, humic acid), and microorganisms (bacteria) could pass into the underlying groundwater. Results of this study have applicability throughout the southwestern United States as well as in other

  10. Arizona Vegetation Resource Inventory (AVRI) accuracy assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Szajgin, John; Pettinger, L.R.; Linden, D.S.; Ohlen, D.O.

    1982-01-01

    A quantitative accuracy assessment was performed for the vegetation classification map produced as part of the Arizona Vegetation Resource Inventory (AVRI) project. This project was a cooperative effort between the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center. The objective of the accuracy assessment was to estimate (with a precision of ?10 percent at the 90 percent confidence level) the comission error in each of the eight level II hierarchical vegetation cover types. A stratified two-phase (double) cluster sample was used. Phase I consisted of 160 photointerpreted plots representing clusters of Landsat pixels, and phase II consisted of ground data collection at 80 of the phase I cluster sites. Ground data were used to refine the phase I error estimates by means of a linear regression model. The classified image was stratified by assigning each 15-pixel cluster to the stratum corresponding to the dominant cover type within each cluster. This method is known as stratified plurality sampling. Overall error was estimated to be 36 percent with a standard error of 2 percent. Estimated error for individual vegetation classes ranged from a low of 10 percent ?6 percent for evergreen woodland to 81 percent ?7 percent for cropland and pasture. Total cost of the accuracy assessment was $106,950 for the one-million-hectare study area. The combination of the stratified plurality sampling (SPS) method of sample allocation with double sampling provided the desired estimates within the required precision levels. The overall accuracy results confirmed that highly accurate digital classification of vegetation is difficult to perform in semiarid environments, due largely to the sparse vegetation cover. Nevertheless, these techniques show promise for providing more accurate information than is presently available for many BLM-administered lands.

  11. Unified Ecoregions of Alaska: 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nowacki, Gregory J.; Spencer, Page; Fleming, Michael; Brock, Terry; Jorgenson, Torre

    2003-01-01

    Major ecosystems have been mapped and described for the State of Alaska and nearby areas. Ecoregion units are based on newly available datasets and field experience of ecologists, biologists, geologists and regional experts. Recently derived datasets for Alaska included climate parameters, vegetation, surficial geology and topography. Additional datasets incorporated in the mapping process were lithology, soils, permafrost, hydrography, fire regime and glaciation. Thirty two units are mapped using a combination of the approaches of Bailey (hierarchial), and Omernick (integrated). The ecoregions are grouped into two higher levels using a 'tri-archy' based on climate parameters, vegetation response and disturbance processes. The ecoregions are described with text, photos and tables on the published map.

  12. USGS releases Alaska oil assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    With the U.S. Congress gearing up for a House-Senate conference committee battle about whether to open the Alaska National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) for oil drilling, a new assessment of the amount of oil in the federal portion of the U.S. National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NRPA) is influencing the debate.The U.S. Geological Survey has found that the NPRA holds "significantly greater" petroleum resources than had been estimated previously This finding was disclosed in a 16 May report. The assessment estimated that technically recoverable oil on NPRA federal lands are between 5.9 and 13.2 billion barrels of oil; a 1980 assessment estimated between 0.3 and 5.4 billion barrels.

  13. Age and tectonic setting of the Mesozoic McCoy Mountains Formation in western Arizona, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spencer, J.E.; Richard, S.M.; Gehrels, G.E.; Gleason, J.D.; Dickinson, W.R.

    2011-01-01

    The McCoy Mountains Formation consists of Upper Jurassic to Upper Cretaceous siltstone, sandstone, and conglomerate exposed in an east-west-trending belt in southwestern Arizona and southeastern California. At least three different tectonic settings have been proposed for McCoy deposition, and multiple tectonic settings are likely over the ~80 m.y. age range of deposition. U-Pb isotopic analysis of 396 zircon sand grains from at or near the top of McCoy sections in the southern Little Harquahala, Granite Wash, New Water, and southern Plomosa Mountains, all in western Arizona, identifi ed only Jurassic or older zircons. A basaltic lava fl ow near the top of the section in the New Water Mountains yielded a U-Pb zircon date of 154.4 ?? 2.1 Ma. Geochemically similar lava fl ows and sills in the Granite Wash and southern Plomosa Mountains are inferred to be approximately the same age. We interpret these new analyses to indicate that Mesozoic clastic strata in these areas are Upper Jurassic and are broadly correlative with the lowermost McCoy Mountains Formation in the Dome Rock, McCoy, and Palen Mountains farther west. Six samples of numerous Upper Jurassic basaltic sills and lava fl ows in the McCoy Mountains Formation in the Granite Wash, New Water, and southern Plomosa Mountains yielded initial ??Nd values (at t = 150 Ma) of between +4 and +6. The geochemistry and geochronology of this igneous suite, and detrital-zircon geochronology of the sandstones, support the interpretation that the lower McCoy Mountains Formation was deposited during rifting within the western extension of the Sabinas-Chihuahua-Bisbee rift belt. Abundant 190-240 Ma zircon sand grains were derived from nearby, unidentifi ed Triassic magmatic-arc rocks in areas that were unaffected by younger Jurassic magmatism. A sandstone from the upper McCoy Mountains Formation in the Dome Rock Mountains (Arizona) yielded numerous 80-108 Ma zircon grains and almost no 190-240 Ma grains, revealing a major

  14. 77 FR 27794 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Arizona

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... described lands were officially filed in the Arizona State Office, Bureau of Land Management, Phoenix..., Bureau of Land Management, One North Central Avenue, Suite 800, Phoenix, Arizona, 85004-4427. Persons...

  15. 77 FR 58862 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Arizona

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-24

    ... described lands were officially filed in the Arizona State Office, Bureau of Land Management, Phoenix..., Suite 800, Phoenix, Arizona, 85004-4427. Persons who use a telecommunications device for the deaf...

  16. 77 FR 27794 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Arizona

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... described lands were officially filed in the Arizona State Office, Bureau of Land Management, Phoenix..., Suite 800, Phoenix, Arizona, 85004-4427. Persons who use a telecommunications device for the deaf...

  17. 77 FR 47874 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Arizona

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ... described lands were officially filed in the Arizona State Office, Bureau of Land Management, Phoenix... State Office, Bureau of Land Management, One North Central Avenue, Suite 800, Phoenix, Arizona,...

  18. 78 FR 54676 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Arizona

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-05

    ... described lands were officially filed in the Arizona State Office, Bureau of Land Management, Phoenix..., Suite 800, Phoenix, Arizona, 85004-4427. Persons who use a telecommunications device for the deaf...

  19. 76 FR 38681 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Arizona

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... described lands were officially filed in the Arizona State Office, Bureau of Land Management, Phoenix..., Suite 800, Phoenix, Arizona 85004-4427. Persons who use a telecommunications device for the deaf...

  20. 77 FR 66478 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Arizona

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-05

    ... described lands were officially filed in the Arizona State Office, Bureau of Land Management, Phoenix..., Suite 800, Phoenix, Arizona 85004-4427. Persons who use a telecommunications device for the deaf...