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Sample records for alaska honors institute

  1. Honors and Institutional Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ransdell, Gary A.

    2015-01-01

    Honors colleges and programs often evolve in response to a mandate from boards of regents or trustees. Such mandates can lead to new or accelerated change within the institution, change that in many cases is linked to and represented by honors. Such has been the case at Western Kentucky University (WKU), where the honors program has played a key…

  2. Alaskan Exemplary Program The Rural Alaska Honors Institute (RAHI) A Quarter Century of Success of Educating, Nurturing, and Retaining Alaska Native and Rural Students An International Polar Year Adventure in Barrow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wartes, D.; Owens, G.

    2007-12-01

    RAHI, the Rural Alaska Honors Institute, began in 1983 after a series of meetings between the Alaska Federation of Natives and the University of Alaska, to discuss the retention rates of Alaska Native and rural students. RAHI is a six-week college-preparatory summer bridge program on the University of Alaska Fairbanks campus for Alaska Native and rural high school juniors and seniors. The student body is approximately 94 percent Alaska Native. RAHI students take classes that earn them seven to ten college credits, thus giving them a head start on college. Courses include: writing, study skills, desk top publishing, Alaska Native dance or swimming, and a choice of geoscience, biochemistry, math, business, rural development, or engineering. A program of rigorous academic activity combines with social, cultural, and recreational activities to make up the RAHI program of early preparation for college. Students are purposely stretched beyond their comfort levels academically and socially to prepare for the big step from home or village to a large culturally western urban campus. They are treated as honors students and are expected to meet all rigorous academic and social standards set by the program. All of this effort and activity support the principal goal of RAHI: promoting academic success for rural students in college. Over 25 years, 1,200 students have attended the program. Sixty percent of the RAHI alumni have entered four-year academic programs. Over 230 have earned a bachelors degree, twenty-nine have earned masters degrees, and seven have graduated with professional degrees (J.D., Ph.D., or M.D.), along with 110 associate degrees and certificates. In looking at the RAHI cohort, removing those students who have not been in college long enough to obtain a degree, 27.3 percent of RAHI alums have received a bachelors degree. An April 2006 report by the American Institutes for Research through the National Science Foundation found that: Rural Native students in the

  3. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-10-01

    More than a dozen AGU members are among 94 researchers announced by U.S. president Barack Obama on 26 September as recipients of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers. The award, which is coordinated by the Office of Science and Technology Policy within the Executive Office of the President, is considered the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on science and engineering professionals in the early stages of their independent research careers. This year's recipients include Jeffrey Book, Naval Research Laboratory; Jonathan Cirtain, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center; Fotini Katopodes Chow, University of California, Berkeley; Elizabeth Cochran, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS); Ian Howat, Ohio State University; Christiane Jablonowski, University of Michigan; Justin Kasper, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory; Elena Litchman, Michigan State University; James A. Morris Jr., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA); Erin M. Oleson, NOAA; Victoria Orphan, California Institute of Technology; Sasha Reed, USGS; David Shelly, USGS; and Feng Wang, University of California, Berkeley. Five AGU members are among 10 U.S. representatives recently selected for International Arctic Science Committee working groups. The AGU members, chosen as representatives through the U.S. National Academies review process, are Atmosphere Working Group member James Overland, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, NOAA; Cryosphere Working Group members Walter Meier, University of Colorado at Boulder, and Elizabeth Hunke, Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marine Working Group member Mary-Louise Timmermans, Yale University; and Terrestrial Working Group member Vanessa Lougheed, University of Texas at El Paso.

  4. Variability and Similarity in Honors Curricula across Institution Size and Type

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cognard-Black, Andrew J.; Savage, Hallie

    2016-01-01

    When a well-developed honors curriculum is paired with co-curricular opportunities, it serves to distinguish an institution's honors education. Together, these curricular and co-curricular experiences are described as best practices in the National Collegiate Honors Council's (NCHC's) "Basic Characteristics of a Fully Developed Honors…

  5. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-01-01

    Nine AGU members are among the 102 researchers that U.S. president Barack Obama announced on 23 December as recipients of the Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers, the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on science and engineering professionals in the early stages of their independent research careers.

  6. Access, Not Exclusion: Honors at a Public Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gee, E. Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Thanks to the high standards that the Honors College at West Virginia University and other campuses across the nation have established, we are witnessing a shift in the way honors colleges prepare the next great generation of thinkers and doers. Honors colleges give individual students access to the kind of educational opportunities and…

  7. Honors and Non-Honors Student Engagement: A Model of Student, Curricular, and Institutional Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckner, Ellen; Shores, Melanie; Sloane, Michael; Dantzler, John; Shields, Catherine; Shader, Karen; Newcomer, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to apply several measures of learning and engagement to a comparable cohort of honors and non-honors students in order to generate a preliminary model of student engagement. Specific purposes were the following: (1) to determine the feasibility for use of several measures of student characteristics that may affect…

  8. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-10-01

    Sean C. Solomon, director of Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, has been selected as one of 10 recipients of the National Medal of Science, the White House announced on 3 October. The medal is considered the highest U.S. honor for achievement and leadership in advancing the field of science. Solomon served as AGU president from 1996 to 1998 and currently is the principal investigator of NASA's MESSENGER mission to Mercury. He will receive the medal at a White House ceremony later this year.

  9. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-01-01

    Several AGU members are among scientists recently honored by the Royal Society of Canada (RSC). Keith Hipel, with the Department of Systems Design Engineering at the University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, received the Sir John William Dawson Medal in recognition of “important and sustained contributions in two domains of interest to RSC or in interdisciplinary research.” Andrew Weaver, with the School of Earth and Ocean Sciences at the University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, received the Miroslaw Romanowski Medal “for significant contributions to the resolution of scientific aspects of environmental problems or for important improvements to the quality of an ecosystem in all aspects—terrestrial, atmospheric and aqueous—brought about by scientific means.” In addition, the following AGU members were honored as new RSC fellows: Bernard Paul Boudreau, Department of Oceanography, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; Dante Canil, School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria; Raymond Desjardins, Research Branch, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Keiko Hattori, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; and Danny Summers, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada.

  10. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-03-01

    Four AGU members are among the 18 individuals the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) will honor during its 150th annual meeting in April. William J. Borucki, space scientist at the NASA Ames Research Laboratory and science principal investigator for the Kepler Mission, is the recipient of the Henry Draper Medal "for his founding concept and visionary leadership of Kepler." John Gosling, senior research associate in the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and retired laboratory fellow at Los Alamos National Laboratory, will receive the Arctowski Medal. Gosling was selected for his work on the generation of energetic solar events, including distinguishing solar flares and coronal mass ejections. David Karl, professor of oceanography at the University of Hawai`i, Mānoa, is the recipient of the Alexander Agassiz Medal. NAS notes Karl's leadership in establishing multidisciplinary ocean-observing systems, detecting decadal regime shifts in pelagic ecosystems, and insights on biogeochemical cycles in the ocean. J. William Schopf, distinguished professor of paleobiology at the University of California, Los Angeles, is the recipient of the NAS Award in Early Earth and Life Sciences, presented in 2013 with the Charles Doolittle Walcott Medal. Schopf is being honored for his studies of microscopic fossils that represent the earliest forms of life on Earth and for leadership of large collaborative research groups.

  11. Educational Programming at Alaska Psychiatric Institute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konopasek, Dean E.

    The background, organization, and operation of the Alaska Psychiatric Institute (API), a residential program for behavior disordered and emotionally disturbed children and adolescents, are described. Components of the educational program at API, including academic and social assessment, individual education plans, and elementary and secondary…

  12. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anonymous

    2012-05-01

    A number of AGU members were honored during the European Geosciences Union's (EGU) General Assembly, held on 22-27 April in Vienna. EGU Union awards were presented to the following people: Vincent Courtillot, University of Paris Diderot, France, received the 2012 Arthur Holmes Medal and EGU honorary membership for seminal contributions to geomagnetism and the geodynamics of mantle hot spots.Michael Ghil, University of California, Los Angeles, and École Normale Supérieure, France, received the 2012 Alfred Wegener Medal and EGU honorary membership for his leading contributions to theoretical climate dynamics; his innovative observational studies involving model assimilation of satellite data in meteorology, oceanography, and space physics; the breadth of his interdisciplinary studies, including macroeconomics; and his extensive supervision and mentoring of scores of graduate and postdoctoral students. Robin Clarke, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, received the 2012 Alexander von Humboldt Medal for fundamental contributions in statistical analysis and modeling of hydrological processes.Angioletta Coradini, Istituto Nazionale di Astrofsica, Italy, received the 2012 Jean Dominique Cassini Medal and EGU honorary membership in recognition of her important and wide range of work in planetary sciences and solar system formation and for her leading role in the development of space infrared instrumentation for planetary exploration.

  13. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-05-01

    A number of AGU members were honored during the European Geosciences Union's (EGU) General Assembly, held on 22-27 April in Vienna. EGU Union awards were presented to the following people: Vincent Courtillot, University of Paris Diderot, France, received the 2012 Arthur Holmes Medal and EGU honorary membership for seminal contributions to geomagnetism and the geodynamics of mantle hot spots. Michael Ghil, University of California, Los Angeles, and École Normale Supérieure, France, received the 2012 Alfred Wegener Medal and EGU honorary membership for his leading contributions to theoretical climate dynamics; his innovative observational studies involving model assimilation of satellite data in meteorology, oceanography, and space physics; the breadth of his interdisciplinary studies, including macroeconomics; and his extensive supervision and mentoring of scores of graduate and postdoctoral students. Robin Clarke, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, received the 2012 Alexander von Humboldt Medal for fundamental contributions in statistical analysis and modeling of hydrological processes. Angioletta Coradini, Istituto Nazionale di Astrofsica, Italy, received the 2012 Jean Dominique Cassini Medal and EGU honorary membership in recognition of her important and wide range of work in planetary sciences and solar system formation and for her leading role in the development of space infrared instrumentation for planetary exploration.

  14. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anonymous

    2011-10-01

    Three AGU members are among the 10 recipients of this year's Heinz Awards, announced on 13 September by Teresa Heinz and the Heinz Family Foundation. Richard Alley, Evan Pugh Professor of Geosciences at Pennsylvania State University, in University Park, was recognized for his polar ice discoveries that showed that abrupt climate change is possible and for engaging his students, policy makers, and the public.Joan Kleypas, a marine ecologist and geologist at the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration's National Center for Atmospheric Research, was honored for conducting seminal research on how changes in temperature and in seawater chemistry and acidity have affected coral reefs and for identifying ways to bolster coral reef health. Nancy Rabalais, executive director of the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium, in Chauvin, was cited for her pioneering research of severe oxygen depletion in the Gulf of Mexico and her commitment to reducing water pollution through education and public policy. The awards program "recognizes individuals creating and implementing workable solutions to the problems the world faces through invention, research, and education while inspiring the next generation of modern thinkers," according to the foundation. Each recipient receives an unrestricted cash prize of $100,000.

  15. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-10-01

    Three AGU members are among the 10 recipients of this year's Heinz Awards, announced on 13 September by Teresa Heinz and the Heinz Family Foundation. Richard Alley, Evan Pugh Professor of Geosciences at Pennsylvania State University, in University Park, was recognized for his polar ice discoveries that showed that abrupt climate change is possible and for engaging his students, policy makers, and the public. Joan Kleypas, a marine ecologist and geologist at the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration's National Center for Atmospheric Research, was honored for conducting seminal research on how changes in temperature and in seawater chemistry and acidity have affected coral reefs and for identifying ways to bolster coral reef health. Nancy Rabalais, executive director of the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium, in Chauvin, was cited for her pioneering research of severe oxygen depletion in the Gulf of Mexico and her commitment to reducing water pollution through education and public policy. The awards program “recognizes individuals creating and implementing workable solutions to the problems the world faces through invention, research, and education while inspiring the next generation of modern thinkers,” according to the foundation. Each recipient receives an unrestricted cash prize of $100,000.

  16. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-05-01

    Lisa Tauxe, distinguished professor of geophysics in the Geosciences Research Division and department chair and deputy director for education at Scripps Institution of Oceanography of the University of California, San Diego, received the Franklin Institute's Benjamin Franklin Medal in Earth and Environmental Science "for the development of observational techniques and theoretical models providing an improved understanding of the behavior of, and variations in intensity of, the Earth's magnetic field through geologic time."

  17. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-05-01

    Pascal Richet, a faculty member of the Physique des Minéraux et des Magmas, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, has been selected as the recipient of a Humboldt Research Award. Given by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, this award is conferred in recognition of lifetime achievements in research.

  18. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-06-01

    The U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) recently announced its 2013 class of new members. They include Gregory Asner, faculty scientist in the Department of Global Ecology at the Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, Calif.; Mark Cane, G. Unger Vetlesen Professor of Earth and Climate Sciences in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, Palisades, N. Y.; Kenneth Farley, W. M. Keck Foundation Professor of Geochemistry and chair of the Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology (Caltech), Pasadena; Terry Plank, professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Lamont-Doherty; and John Seinfeld, Louis E. Nohl Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering at Caltech.

  19. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-02-01

    Sallie Chisholm received the National Medal of Science from U.S. president Barack Obama during a 1 February ceremony at the White House. Chisholm, a biological oceanographer, was cited for her "contributions to the discovery and understanding of the dominant photosynthetic organisms in the ocean, promotion of the field of microbial oceanography and influence on marine policy and management." Chisholm is the Lee and Geraldine Martin Professor of Environmental Studies and a professor of biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  20. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-05-01

    Among the new members elected to the U.S. National Academy of Sciences in May are five AGU members: Richard Edwards, George and Orpha Gibson Chair of Earth Systems Sciences and Distinguished McKnight University Professor, Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis; T. Mark Harrison, director, Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, and professor of geology, Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles; David Sandwell, professor of geophysics, Institute for Geophysics and Planetary Physics, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla (president of the AGU Geodesy section); Benjamin Santer, physicist and atmospheric scientist, Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, Calif.; and Steven Wofsy, Abbott Lawrence Rotch Professor of Atmospheric and Environmental Science, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. Four AGU members are among the 2011 prizewinners announced by the Division for Planetary Sciences (DPS) of the American Astronomical Society on 19 May. The prizes will be presented at the joint meeting of DPS and the European Planetary Science Congress in October. William Ward of the Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, Tex., is the recipient of the Gerard P. Kuiper Prize for outstanding contributions to the field of planetary science. DPS indicated that Ward originally proposed and evaluated “many dynamical processes that are now cornerstones of current theories of how planets form and evolve” and that his “visionary ideas form the foundation for a significant portion of current work in planetary formation and dynamics.”

  1. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-12-01

    Twenty-three AGU members are among the newly elected fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, announced on 25 November 2013. They are Lance F. Bosart, University at Albany, State University of New York; William Henry Brune III, Pennsylvania State University; Robert H. Byrne, University of South Florida; Walter K. Dodds, Kansas State University; Sherilyn Claire Fritz, University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Kevin P. Furlong, Pennsylvania State University; Arnold L. Gordon, Columbia University; Thomas A. Herring, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Malcolm Hughes, University of Arizona; Thomas C. Johnson, University of Minnesota Duluth; Jack A. Kaye, NASA; Samuel P. Kounaves, Tufts University; Klaus S. Lackner, Columbia University; Yiqi Luo, University of Oklahoma; Jean-Bernard Minster, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego (UCSD); Kenneth H. Nealson, University of Southern California; Walter Clarkson Pitman III, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory; James E. Quick, Southern Methodist University; Ross J. Salawitch, University of Maryland, College Park; Didier Sornette, ETH Zürich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology); Michael Stein, University of Chicago; Bradley M. Tebo, Oregon Health and Science University; and Mark H. Thiemens, UCSD.

  2. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-08-01

    AGU president-elect Margaret Leinen has been selected as the new vice chancellor for marine sciences, director of Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and dean of the School of Marine Sciences at the University of California, San Diego (UC San Diego), the university announced on 25 July. Leinen, who is currently executive director of the Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute and associate provost of Marine and Environmental Initiatives at Florida Atlantic University, will join UC San Diego in October 2013. Leinen served as assistant director for geosciences and coordinator of environmental research and education at the National Science Foundation (NSF) from 2000 to 2007 and as dean of the Graduate School of Oceanography and vice provost for marine programs at the University of Rhode Island from 1991 to 2000. "Dr. Leinen's experience leading innovation and creating collaborative programs make[s] her the right choice for Scripps and a key campus partner in implementing UC San Diego's strategic plan," stated UC San Diego chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla.

  3. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anonymous

    2012-10-01

    Many AGU members are among the American Meteorological Society's (AMS) 2013 honorary members, awardees, lecturers, and fellows. Among the AMS honorary members is Susan Solomon, the Ellen Swallow Richards Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Dennis Hartmann, of the University of Washington, Seattle, is the recipient of AMS's Carl-Gustaf Rossby Research Medal "for significant contributions to the synthesis of knowledge of radiative and dynamical processes leading to a deeper understanding of the climate system." R. Alan Plumb, professor of meteorology at MIT, receives the Jule G. Charney Award "for fundamental contributions to the understanding of geophysical fluid dynamics, stratospheric dynamics, chemical transport, and the general circulation of the atmosphere and oceans." The Verner E. Suomi Award has been given to Richard Johnson, professor of atmospheric science at Colorado State University, Fort Collins, "for exquisite design of rawinsonde networks in field campaigns and insightful analysis of interactions between convective clouds and the largescale atmospheric circulation." W. Kendall Melville, professor of oceanography at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, has been awarded the Sverdrup Gold Medal Award "for pioneering contributions in advancing knowledge on the role of surface wave breaking and related processes in air-sea interaction." AMS announced that Laurence Armi, also a professor of oceanography at Scripps, is recipient of the Henry Stommel Research Award "for his deeply insightful studies of stratified flow, his pioneering work on boundary mixing and other turbulent mechanisms."

  4. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-01-01

    U.S. president Barack Obama recently announced his intent to appoint several people, four of whom are AGU members, to the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board, an independent agency of the U.S. federal government that provides independent scientific and technical oversight of the Department of Energy's program for managing and disposing of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. The appointees include Jean Bahr, professor in the Department of Geoscience at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; Susan Brantley, distinguished professor of geosciences and director of the Earth and Environmental Systems Institute at The Pennsylvania State University; Efi Foufoula-Georgiou, professor of civil engineering and director of the National Center for Earth-Surface Dynamics at the University of Minnesota; and Mary Lou Zoback, consulting professor in the Environmental Earth System Science Department at Stanford University.

  5. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-10-01

    Many AGU members are among the American Meteorological Society's (AMS) 2013 honorary members, awardees, lecturers, and fellows. Among the AMS honorary members is Susan Solomon, the Ellen Swallow Richards Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Dennis Hartmann, of the University of Washington, Seattle, is the recipient of AMS's Carl-Gustaf Rossby Research Medal “for significant contributions to the synthesis of knowledge of radiative and dynamical processes leading to a deeper understanding of the climate system.” R. Alan Plumb, professor of meteorology at MIT, receives the Jule G. Charney Award “for fundamental contributions to the understanding of geophysical fluid dynamics, stratospheric dynamics, chemical transport, and the general circulation of the atmosphere and oceans.” The Verner E. Suomi Award has been given to Richard Johnson, professor of atmospheric science at Colorado State University, Fort Collins, “for exquisite design of rawinsonde networks in field campaigns and insightful analysis of interactions between convective clouds and the largescale atmospheric circulation.” W. Kendall Melville, professor of oceanography at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, has been awarded the Sverdrup Gold Medal Award “for pioneering contributions in advancing knowledge on the role of surface wave breaking and related processes in air-sea interaction.” AMS announced that Laurence Armi, also a professor of oceanography at Scripps, is recipient of the Henry Stommel Research Award “for his deeply insightful studies of stratified flow, his pioneering work on boundary mixing and other turbulent mechanisms.”

  6. The Culture of Honors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Susan J.

    2015-01-01

    In this article Chancellor Susan Koch considers the value of the honors program at her institute, the University of Illinois at Springfield. She begins by reflecting on her own under graduate experience at her alma mater, Dakota State University and explains how her experience there helped her to create the honors program at the University of…

  7. 75 FR 37456 - Alaska Native/Native Hawaiian Institutions Assisting Communities (AN/NHAIC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-29

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Alaska Native/Native Hawaiian Institutions Assisting Communities (AN/NHAIC) AGENCY... expand their role and effectiveness in addressing community development needs in their ] localities, including neighborhood revitalization, housing, and economic development, principally for persons of low...

  8. Honor Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Good, Howard

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about "honor" and describes how the word has been taken for granted in schools. He explains that "honor" traditionally, has had two meanings, and that the National Honor Society (NHS) reflects the most ancient of them. Like Aristotle, who described honor in his "Nicomachean Ethics" as "the prize of virtue and the…

  9. GeoFORCE Alaska, A Successful Summer Exploring Alaska's Geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wartes, D.

    2012-12-01

    Thirty years old this summer, RAHI, the Rural Alaska Honors Institute is a statewide, six-week, summer college-preparatory bridge program at the University of Alaska Fairbanks for Alaska Native and rural high school juniors and seniors. This summer, in collaboration with the University of Texas Austin, the Rural Alaska Honors Institute launched a new program, GeoFORCE Alaska. This outreach initiative is designed to increase the number and diversity of students pursuing STEM degree programs and entering the future high-tech workforce. It uses Earth science to entice kids to get excited about dinosaurs, volcanoes and earthquakes, and includes physics, chemistry, math, biology and other sciences. Students were recruited from the Alaska's Arctic North Slope schools, in 8th grade to begin the annual program of approximately 8 days, the summer before their 9th grade year and then remain in the program for all four years of high school. They must maintain a B or better grade average and participate in all GeoFORCE events. The culmination is an exciting field event each summer. Over the four-year period, events will include trips to Fairbanks and Anchorage, Arizona, Oregon and the Appalachians. All trips focus on Earth science and include a 100+ page guidebook, with tests every night culminating with a final exam. GeoFORCE Alaska was begun by the University of Alaska Fairbanks in partnership with the University of Texas at Austin, which has had tremendous success with GeoFORCE Texas. GeoFORCE Alaska is managed by UAF's long-standing Rural Alaska Honors Institute, that has been successfully providing intense STEM educational opportunities for Alaskan high school students for over 30 years. The program will add a new cohort of 9th graders each year for the next four years. By the summer of 2015, GeoFORCE Alaska is targeting a capacity of 160 students in grades 9th through 12th. Join us to find out more about this exciting new initiative, which is enticing young Alaska Native

  10. University of Alaska Coastal Marine Institute annual report number 5, fiscal year 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, V.

    1998-12-18

    The University of Alaska Coastal Marine Institute (CMI) was created by a cooperative agreement between the University of Alaska and the Minerals Management Service (MMS) in June 1993 and the first full funding cycle began late in (federal) fiscal year 1994. CMI is pleased to present this 1998 Annual Report for studies ongoing in Oct 1997--Sep 1998. Only abstracts and study products for ongoing projects are included here. They include: An Economic Assessment of the Marine Biotechnology; Kachemak Bay Experimental and Monitoring Studies; Historical Changes in Trace Metals and Hydrocarbons in the Inner Shelf Sediments; Beaufort Sea: Prior and Subsequent to Petroleum-Related Industrial Developments; Physical-Biological Numerical Modeling on Alaskan Arctic Shelves; Defining Habitats for Juvenile Flatfishes in Southcentral Alaska; Relationship of Diet to Habitat Preferences of Juvenile Flatfishes, Phase 1; Subsistence Economies and North Slope Oil Development; Wind Field Representations and Their Effect on Shelf Circulation Models: A Case Study in the Chukchi Sea; Interaction between Marine Humic Matter and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Lower Cook Inlet and Port Valdez, Alaska; Correction Factor for Ringed Seal Surveys in Northern Alaska; Feeding Ecology of Maturing Sockeye Salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) in Nearshore Waters of the Kodiak Archipelago; and Circulation, Thermohaline Structure, and Cross-Shelf Transport in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea.

  11. Nontraditional Honors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinghorn, Janice Rye; Smith, Whitney Womack

    2013-01-01

    While honors programs and colleges often proclaim the importance of recruiting and retaining a diverse group of high-ability students, many are still exclusionary and predicated on assumptions about the student body that are no longer valid. The structure and programming of honors can thus prohibit the full participation of nontraditional students…

  12. Profit, Productivity, and Honors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuman, Sam

    2014-01-01

    In an ominously steady progression over the past decades, education in general, higher education in particular, and even honors education have increasingly been contextualized in the realm of the marketplace. Cost/benefit analyses of colleges and universities are examined; institutions in terms of their price to consumers (students and their…

  13. The Evolutionary Basis of Honor Cultures.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Andrzej; Gelfand, Michele J; Borkowski, Wojciech; Cohen, Dov; Hernandez, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Around the globe, people fight for their honor, even if it means sacrificing their lives. This is puzzling from an evolutionary perspective, and little is known about the conditions under which honor cultures evolve. We implemented an agent-based model of honor, and our simulations showed that the reliability of institutions and toughness of the environment are crucial conditions for the evolution of honor cultures. Honor cultures survive when the effectiveness of the authorities is low, even in very tough environments. Moreover, the results show that honor cultures and aggressive cultures are mutually dependent in what resembles a predator-prey relationship described in the renowned Lotka-Volterra model. Both cultures are eliminated when institutions are reliable. These results have implications for understanding conflict throughout the world, where Western-based strategies are exported, often unsuccessfully, to contexts of weak institutional authority wherein honor-based strategies have been critical for survival. PMID:26607976

  14. Courting the Best & the Brightest: Honors Colleges Mushroom across the Country in Both Two- and Four-Year Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Kendra

    2004-01-01

    Honors colleges and programs are as individual as the schools that host them, but they all share some features in common: small classes, usually less than 20 students; interdisciplinary classes, often team-taught; and some kind of experiential education unit, from study abroad to internships to service learning. This article focuses on the…

  15. Academic Integrity in Honor Code and Non-Honor Code Environments: A Qualitative Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Donald; Trevino, Linda Klebe; Butterfield, Kenneth D.

    1999-01-01

    Survey data from 4,285 students in 31 colleges and universities indicates students at schools with academic honor codes view the issue of academic integrity in a fundamentally different way than do students at non-honor code institutions. This difference seems to stem from the presence of an honor code and its influence on the way students think…

  16. Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Though it's not quite spring, waters in the Gulf of Alaska (right) appear to be blooming with plant life in this true-color MODIS image from March 4, 2002. East of the Alaska Peninsula (bottom center), blue-green swirls surround Kodiak Island. These colors are the result of light reflecting off chlorophyll and other pigments in tiny marine plants called phytoplankton. The bloom extends southward and clear dividing line can be seen west to east, where the bloom disappears over the deeper waters of the Aleutian Trench. North in Cook Inlet, large amounts of red clay sediment are turning the water brown. To the east, more colorful swirls stretch out from Prince William Sound, and may be a mixture of clay sediment from the Copper River and phytoplankton. Arcing across the top left of the image, the snow-covered Brooks Range towers over Alaska's North Slope. Frozen rivers trace white ribbons across the winter landscape. The mighty Yukon River traverses the entire state, beginning at the right edge of the image (a little way down from the top) running all the way over to the Bering Sea, still locked in ice. In the high-resolution image, the circular, snow-filled calderas of two volcanoes are apparent along the Alaska Peninsula. In Bristol Bay (to the west of the Peninsula) and in a couple of the semi-clear areas in the Bering Sea, it appears that there may be an ice algae bloom along the sharp ice edge (see high resolution image for better details). Ground-based observations from the area have revealed that an under-ice bloom often starts as early as February in this region and then seeds the more typical spring bloom later in the season.

  17. Alaska GeoFORCE, A New Geologic Adventure in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wartes, D.

    2011-12-01

    RAHI, the Rural Alaska Honors Institute is a statewide, six-week, summer college-preparatory bridge program at the University of Alaska Fairbanks for Alaska Native and rural high school juniors and seniors. A program of rigorous academic activity combines with social, cultural, and recreational activities. Students are purposely stretched beyond their comfort levels academically and socially to prepare for the big step from home or village to a large culturally western urban campus. This summer RAHI is launching a new program, GeoFORCE Alaska. This outreach initiative is designed to increase the number and diversity of students pursuing STEM degree programs and entering the future high-tech workforce. It uses Earth science as the hook because most kids get excited about dinosaurs, volcanoes and earthquakes, but it includes physics, chemistry, math, biology and other sciences. Students will be recruited, initially from the Arctic North Slope schools, in the 8th grade to begin the annual program of approximately 8 days, the summer before their 9th grade year and then remain in the program for all four years of high school. They must maintain a B or better grade average and participate in all GeoFORCE events. The carrot on the end of the stick is an exciting field event each summer. Over the four-year period, events will include trips to Fairbanks, Arizona, Oregon and the Appalachians. All trips are focused on Earth science and include a 100+ page guidebook, with tests every night culminating with a final exam. GeoFORCE Alaska is being launched by UAF in partnership with the University of Texas at Austin, which has had tremendous success with GeoFORCE Texas. GeoFORCE Alaska will be managed by UAF's long-standing Rural Alaska Honors Insitute (RAHI) that has been successfully providing intense STEM educational opportunities for Alaskan high school students for almost 30 years. The Texas program, with adjustments for differences in culture and environment, will be

  18. Adaptive governance and institutional strategies for climate-induced community relocations in Alaska.

    PubMed

    Bronen, Robin; Chapin, F Stuart

    2013-06-01

    This article presents governance and institutional strategies for climate-induced community relocations. In Alaska, repeated extreme weather events coupled with climate change-induced coastal erosion impact the habitability of entire communities. Community residents and government agencies concur that relocation is the only adaptation strategy that can protect lives and infrastructure. Community relocation stretches the financial and institutional capacity of existing governance institutions. Based on a comparative analysis of three Alaskan communities, Kivalina, Newtok, and Shishmaref, which have chosen to relocate, we examine the institutional constraints to relocation in the United States. We identify policy changes and components of a toolkit that can facilitate community-based adaptation when environmental events threaten people's lives and protection in place is not possible. Policy changes include amendment of the Stafford Act to include gradual geophysical processes, such as erosion, in the statutory definition of disaster and the creation of an adaptive governance framework to allow communities a continuum of responses from protection in place to community relocation. Key components of the toolkit are local leadership and integration of social and ecological well-being into adaptation planning.

  19. Adaptive governance and institutional strategies for climate-induced community relocations in Alaska

    PubMed Central

    Bronen, Robin; Chapin, F. Stuart

    2013-01-01

    This article presents governance and institutional strategies for climate-induced community relocations. In Alaska, repeated extreme weather events coupled with climate change-induced coastal erosion impact the habitability of entire communities. Community residents and government agencies concur that relocation is the only adaptation strategy that can protect lives and infrastructure. Community relocation stretches the financial and institutional capacity of existing governance institutions. Based on a comparative analysis of three Alaskan communities, Kivalina, Newtok, and Shishmaref, which have chosen to relocate, we examine the institutional constraints to relocation in the United States. We identify policy changes and components of a toolkit that can facilitate community-based adaptation when environmental events threaten people’s lives and protection in place is not possible. Policy changes include amendment of the Stafford Act to include gradual geophysical processes, such as erosion, in the statutory definition of disaster and the creation of an adaptive governance framework to allow communities a continuum of responses from protection in place to community relocation. Key components of the toolkit are local leadership and integration of social and ecological well-being into adaptation planning. PMID:23690592

  20. Adaptive governance and institutional strategies for climate-induced community relocations in Alaska.

    PubMed

    Bronen, Robin; Chapin, F Stuart

    2013-06-01

    This article presents governance and institutional strategies for climate-induced community relocations. In Alaska, repeated extreme weather events coupled with climate change-induced coastal erosion impact the habitability of entire communities. Community residents and government agencies concur that relocation is the only adaptation strategy that can protect lives and infrastructure. Community relocation stretches the financial and institutional capacity of existing governance institutions. Based on a comparative analysis of three Alaskan communities, Kivalina, Newtok, and Shishmaref, which have chosen to relocate, we examine the institutional constraints to relocation in the United States. We identify policy changes and components of a toolkit that can facilitate community-based adaptation when environmental events threaten people's lives and protection in place is not possible. Policy changes include amendment of the Stafford Act to include gradual geophysical processes, such as erosion, in the statutory definition of disaster and the creation of an adaptive governance framework to allow communities a continuum of responses from protection in place to community relocation. Key components of the toolkit are local leadership and integration of social and ecological well-being into adaptation planning. PMID:23690592

  1. Enhancing GIS Instruction at 1890 Institutions and HBCUs through Collaboration with the University of Alaska Fairbanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, A.; Sriharan, S.; Ozbay, G.; SanJuan, F.; Fan, C.; David, V.

    2013-12-01

    A cohort of 1890 land-grant institutions [Virginia State University (VSU) and Delaware State University (DSU)] and Historically Black Colleges and Universities [Elizabeth City State University (ECSU), Bethune-Cookman University (BCU), and Morgan State University (MSU)] have been collaborating for nearly a decade with a land grant institution [University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF)] for enhancing the instruction of Remote Sensing and Geographic Information System. The specific objectives included curriculum design, faculty development, student experiential learning, community outreach, and networking. Through a series of workshops funded by the US Department of Agriculture - National Institute for Food and Agriculture from 2004-2013 at UAF, the faculty members of the cohort institutions gained experience in integrating newer geospatial techniques in instruction. In particular participants learned how to collect differential GPS measurements and incorporate GPS observations onto web enabled maps. They also learned how to collect ground-truth data over a wide spectral range. In the optical wavelengths participants acquired high resolution photographs and measured the reflected components of various vegetation using photosynthetically active radiometer (PAR) sensors operating in the 400-700nm range. Faculty members used an ASD Spectrometer operating in 350-2500nm range to record reflectance spectra over a variety of natural targets. In the thermal infrared part of the spectrum they recorded emitted energy in the 7.5 - 13 micro-m broadband range from hot geothermal waters to cold ice targets. These experiences were used to enrich curricula materials offered at the cohort institutions. The early workshops were tailored for training only the faculty members from the cohort. The most recent workshop in 2013 for the first time brought together a faculty-student team from each member university for hands-on learning experiences in field data collection and image analysis

  2. Assessing Social Justice as a Learning Outcome in Honors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klos, Naomi Yavneh; Eskine, Kendall; Pashkevich, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Whether at public or private, secular or faith-based institutions, questions of social justice and civic engagement are an increasing focus of attention in honors education. The emphasis on modes of learning that are, in the terms of the National Collegiate Honors Council's 2014 "Definition of Honors Education," "measurably broader,…

  3. Costs and Benefits in the Economy of Honors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badenhausen, Richard

    2012-01-01

    To be in honors is to be engaged in many different economic arrangements and exchanges. Honors educators work in concert with their admissions offices while recruiting high-achieving students whose decisions often hinge on how much money the institution can offer in the form of discounts to tuition and financial aid. Honors programs that tie…

  4. Mission, Performance Indicators, and Assessment in U.S. Honors: A View from the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartelds, Vladimir; Drayer, Lyndsay; Wolfensberger, Marca V. C.

    2012-01-01

    A mission statement that identifies the goals and aims of an honors program is a key step in program development. The National Collegiate Honors Council's Basic Characteristics of a Fully Developed Honors Program states unequivocally that a successful honors program "has a clear mandate from the institution's administration in the form of a…

  5. A Handbook for Honors Programs at Two-Year Colleges. National Collegiate Honors Council Monograph Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Theresa A.

    2006-01-01

    This monograph is an idea book for two-year institutions thinking of adding an honors program to their list of academic offerings, and as such aspires to provide a useful description of the many options available to honors education for the several audiences who, as a matter of course, may become stakeholders in the operation of a two-year college…

  6. Encouraging Involvement of Alaska Natives in Geoscience Careers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanks, C. L.; Fowell, S. J.; Kowalsky, J.; Solie, D.

    2003-12-01

    Geologically, Alaska is a dynamic state, rich in mineral and energy resources. The impact of natural geologic hazards and mineral resource development can be especially critical in rural areas. While Alaska Natives comprise a large percentage of Alaska's rural population, few have the training to be leaders in the decision-making processes regarding natural hazard mitigation or mineral resource evaluation and exploitation. UAF, with funding from the National Science Foundation, has embarked on a three year integrated program aimed at encouraging young Alaska Natives to pursue geosciences as a career. The program combines the geologic expertise at UAF with established Alaska Native educational outreach programs. The Rural Alaska Honors Institute (RAHI) is a bridging program specifically designed to prepare rural high school students for college. To attract college-bound Alaska Native students into the geosciences, geoscience faculty have developed a college-level, field-intensive, introductory RAHI geoscience course that will fulfill geoscience degree requirements at UAF. In years two and three, this class will be supplemented by a one week field course that will focus on geologic issues encountered in most Alaskan rural communities, such as natural hazards, ground water, mineral and energy resources. In order to retain Alaska Native undergraduate students as geoscience majors, the program is providing scholarships and internship opportunities in cooperation with the Alaska Native Science and Engineering Program (ANSEP). Undergraduate geoscience majors participating in ANSEP can intern as teaching assistants for both the classroom and field courses. Besides being mentors for the RAHI students, the Alaska Native undergraduate geoscience majors have the opportunity to interact with faculty on an individual basis, examine the geologic issues facing Alaska Natives, and explore geology as a profession.

  7. Housing Honors. National Collegiate Honors Council Monograph Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Linda, Ed.; Kay, Lisa W., Ed.; Poe, Rachael, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    Honors administrators spend much of their time explaining and describing what honors is and does. When they talk about what honors looks like nationally, they should have answers to the following important questions: How pervasive is the model of separate honors facilities?; How pervasive are the legendary closets that honors programs have so…

  8. An Augustinian Culture of Learning for Interdisciplinary Honors Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ste. Antoine, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Any attempt to discern the purpose of honors education and to integrate it with the unique ethos of a Christian institution can prove to be difficult. Yet, describing and articulating a sense of purpose is essential for an honors program to justify itself. This essay contends that a philosophy of education based on Augustine's "Confessions" can…

  9. Can Faculty Afford Honors?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzy, Annmarie

    2012-01-01

    In "Costs and Benefits in the Economy of Honors," Richard Badenhausen identifies several pressing issues regarding the economic status of honors in the current financial climate of higher education, including the role of faculty in addressing those issues. In her response to Badenhausen's essay, Annmarie Guzy, a faculty member at the…

  10. The Honor System Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marie, Kristen L.

    2005-01-01

    An honor system library can be created inside the library media center (LMC). Where students can access free books and magazines that require no formal checkouts. The honor library system at Washington High School, Fremont, California, has become self-sustaining. As many students, parents and teachers donate quality material. No student is ever…

  11. Honors Programs at Colleges and Universities in the Southern Region of the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Dena Ann

    2010-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine the major characteristics of honors programs at colleges and universities in the southern region of the United States and to review the perceptions of honors programs directors relating to the effectiveness of and challenges facing honors programs at these institutions. A survey was administered to…

  12. Accommodating Diverse Language Needs within an Intensive English Language Program: A Study of the English Language Institute at Alaska Pacific University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Patricia Diane Palmer

    The English Language Institute (ELI) at Alaska Pacific University provides an intensive academic program designed primarily to prepare foreign students for successful participation in undergraduate or graduate programs. Students from the local international community have also been admitted to the program. These students have motivations, language…

  13. A Handbook for Honors Administrators. NCHC Monographs in Honors Education Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Ada

    1995-01-01

    This handbook is intended to serve as an on-campus companion and guide for honors administrators, helping them to define and solidify their positions within their institutions. "Everyone knows" what deans or department heads are: what their responsibilities are, how they fit into the institutional hierarchy, who reports to them and to…

  14. Honors Education and Global Citizenship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfensberger, Marca V. C.

    2012-01-01

    An issue of "Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council" devoted to "Honors Around the Globe" is an important opportunity to consider the role of honors in creating international awareness and understanding. Honors faculty and administrators have become increasingly active in global cross-communication through, for…

  15. American Indian/Alaska Native Voices in the Model of Institutional Adaptation to Student Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guillory, Raphael; Wolverton, Mimi; Appleton, Valerie

    2008-01-01

    Richardson and Skinner (1991) in their Model of Institutional Adaptation to Student Diversity (MIASD) assert that state higher education boards have significant influence on the degree to which institutions respond to student diversity. The purpose of the study (conducted in the 2001-2002 school year) reported in this article was to determine…

  16. Honoring our helpers

    PubMed Central

    Talanow, Roland; Giesel, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    This special issue of the Journal of Radiology Case Reports honors the reviewers who donated their time and expertise throughout the year 2013 to the high quality and success of this journal. PMID:24967015

  17. Honoring our helpers

    PubMed Central

    Talanow, Roland; Giesel, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    This special issue of the Journal of Radiology Case Reports honors the reviewers who donated their time and expertise throughout the year 2015 to the high quality and success of this journal. PMID:27200155

  18. Faculty and Academic Integrity: The Influence of Current Honor Codes and Past Honor Code Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Donald L.; Butterfield, Kenneth D.; Trevino, Linda Klebe

    2003-01-01

    Found that faculty at honor-code schools have more positive attitudes toward their schools' academic integrity policies and allow the system to take care of monitoring and disciplinary activities. Faculty in noncode institutions have less positive attitudes and are more likely to take personal actions designed to deal with cheaters. Faculty in…

  19. The CHROME Honors Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Eleanor

    2002-01-01

    The CHROME Honors Program was designed as a two-week residential program for 9th and 1Oth grade students participating in CHROME clubs. The curriculum focused on the health sciences with instruction from: (1) the science and health curriculum of the Dozoretz National Program for Minorities in Applied Sciences (DNIMAS) Program of Norfolk State University (NSU); (2) the humanities curriculum of the NSU Honors Program; (3) NASA-related curriculum in human physiology. An Advisory Committee was formed to work with the Project Coordinator in the design of the summer program.

  20. Civic Tolerance among Honors Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepherd, Gordon; Shepherd, Gary

    2014-01-01

    As important as cognitive outcomes are in assessing the educational merits of honors programs, the authors ask whether honors programs affect the values and social attitudes of their students differently than other students: in particular, whether honors students are more or less tolerant than other students and, if so, in what ways and why. There…

  1. The Catalytic Impact of Honors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, discussion about the value of honors education focuses on the outcomes for students: enhancement of skill sets that are (a) academic, (b) social, (c) leadership-oriented, (d) personal, and (e) vocational or professional. These are all real outcomes, but they can also be achieved outside honors. What makes honors special is that it…

  2. Honors Scholar Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehner, Margaret

    A proposal is presented for an Honors Scholar Program at Moraine Valley Community College in response to the need to provide gifted students with the extra challenges they seek. After providing a rationale for the program, the membership of the steering committee and curriculum committees that would develop and guide the program is designated.…

  3. The Honors Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Triplet, Rodney G.

    The Honors Program at Northern State University (South Dakota) is an ongoing, enriched program for academically talented and highly motivated students. Its purposes are to (1) stimulate creativity, intellectual curiosity, and critical evaluation of ideas and behavior; (2) enhance skills in critical research, writing, and speaking; and (3) develop…

  4. Honors: Getting Started.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etheridge, Sandra Y.

    This paper provides a description of the development of an honors program at Gulf Coast Community College (GCCC). The description is organized around three flow charts corresponding to different stages in the program's development, and which are followed by more detailed explanations. The first flow chart deals with program planning and…

  5. Honors as Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Dan R.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of honor societies and programs on a university campus is an important component of its reputation for excellence. While we may quibble with the methodologies employed by various rankings, reputation is one of the key drivers of choice when students and their families are making that all-important decision about which university to…

  6. Mothers in Honors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killinger, Mimi; Binder-Hathaway, Rachel; Mitchell, Paige; Patrick, Emily

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the experiences of four honors mothers as they offer sage advice. They argue convincingly that they are motivated, focused students who bring rich diversity to college programs. They further report disturbing marginalization and isolation that could be ameliorated with support and increased sensitivity on the part of…

  7. Undocumented in Honors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aramburo, Kimberly; Bhavsar, Suketu

    2013-01-01

    During her time at the Kellogg Honors College at Cal Poly Pomona, Suketu Bhavsar has encountered several high-achieving students who, after coming to trust her, have revealed themselves to her as undocumented. These students came to the United States as children through non-legal channels, generally brought by their families, who were searching…

  8. Honored Teacher Shows Commitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratte, Kathy

    1987-01-01

    Part of the acceptance speech of the 1985 National Council for the Social Studies Teacher of the Year, this article describes the censorship experience of this honored social studies teacher. The incident involved the showing of a videotape version of the feature film entitled "The Seduction of Joe Tynan." (JDH)

  9. Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Murray, Tom; Read, Cyrus

    2008-01-01

    Steam plume from the 2006 eruption of Augustine volcano in Cook Inlet, Alaska. Explosive ash-producing eruptions from Alaska's 40+ historically active volcanoes pose hazards to aviation, including commercial aircraft flying the busy North Pacific routes between North America and Asia. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) monitors these volcanoes to provide forecasts of eruptive activity. AVO is a joint program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAFGI), and the State of Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (ADGGS). AVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Augustine volcano and AVO at http://www.avo.alaska.edu.

  10. The Honors College Phenomenon. National Collegiate Honors Council Monograph Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sederberg, Peter C., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    One enduring, and perhaps endearing, characteristic of the National Collegiate Honors Council (NCHC) is its commitment to pluralism. NCHC recognizes that excellent honors educational opportunities can be cultivated across the diverse settings of American higher education from two-year community colleges through large, comprehensive research…

  11. Comparison of Characteristics of Selected College and University Honors Programs Throughout the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neidich, Alan

    A series of evaluative studies were conducted of the honors program of the College of Arts and Sciences of the University of South Carolina (USC) by the university's Counseling Bureau. In order to compare USC's honors program, which began in 1965, with those of other institutions, a questionnaire was mailed to 315 public and private colleges and…

  12. The Honors Program in English at Central High School, St. Joseph, Missouri.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Virginia F.

    High school honors programs can help meet the needs of students who have an extra measure of intellectual ability and the desire to learn in depth, become independent, and pursue special interests. This paper points out how little is done nationwide to help gifted students and urges schools to institute honors programs. It then describes an…

  13. How Effective Is Honor Code Reporting over Instructor- Implemented Measures? A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard-Brak, Lucy; Schmidt, Marcelo; Wei, Tianlan

    2013-01-01

    Honor codes have become increasingly popular at institutions of higher education as a means of reducing violations of academic integrity such as cheating and other academically dishonest acts. Previous research on honor code effectiveness has been limited to correlational research designs that preclude the examination of cause-and-effect…

  14. A Program Evaluation of a Summer Research Training Institute for American Indian and Alaska Native Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaback, Tosha; Becker, Thomas M.; Dignan, Mark B.; Lambert, William E.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a unique summer program to train American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) health professionals in a variety of health research-related skills, including epidemiology, data management, statistical analysis, program evaluation, cost-benefit analysis, community-based participatory research, grant writing, and…

  15. Honors Sells . . . But Who's Paying?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzy, Annmarie

    2014-01-01

    High school students on the college prep track are going to greater lengths to become competitive applicants for honors programs and their attendant scholarships, especially in the face of escalating college costs. All stakeholders in honors education--students, families, teachers, and administrators--face steeper financial challenges than they…

  16. Establishing Community College Honors Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heck, James

    Drawing from a literature review and survey of community colleges with honors programs, this paper presents a series of recommended strategies and tactics for the establishment and continuation of community college honors programs. The recommendations are structured around the five developmental stages of academic innovation identified by S. V.…

  17. Benjamin Banneker Honors College: Gateway to Scientific and Technical Doctorates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Elaine P.

    1990-01-01

    Illustrates the prominent role that historically Black institutions, such as Prairie View A & M University, play in Black progress in higher education. Programs like the Banneker Honors College of Prairie View can expand Black participation as researchers and practitioners in a highly technical society while also increasing the Black…

  18. Honoring the Trust: Quality and Cost Containment in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massy, William F.

    This book asserts that improvements in quality and cost containment are required not only for the well-being of individual institutions of higher education, but also to honor the trust placed in academe by society. The book outlines a practical program for improvement. The chapters of part 1, "The Case for Change," are: (1) "The Erosion of Trust";…

  19. Priorities for Quality Honors Education: A Delphi Study on Honors Program and College Certification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Patricia Joanne

    2013-01-01

    Honors education has grown exponentially across the country, and a great deal of variation currently exists among programs. The National Collegiate Honors Council (NCHC) has adopted lists of the Basic Characteristics of Fully Developed Honors Programs (Madden, 1994) and Honors Colleges (Sederberg, 2005) to guide new and developing programs, but no…

  20. Honors in the Master's: A New Perspective?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Ginkel, Stan; Van Eijl, Pierre; Pilot, Albert; Zubizarreta, John

    2012-01-01

    In Europe, there is a growing interest in honors education, not only in the bachelor's but also in the master's degree. The Dutch government, for instance, is actively promoting excellence in both bachelor's and master's degrees through honors programs (Siriusteam). Most Dutch universities have honors programs at the bachelor's level or are…

  1. PURSUIT OF EXCELLENCE--HONORS PROGRAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HEYMANN, HANS G.

    TO PROVIDE ADEQUATE INSTRUCTION FOR SUPERIOR STUDENTS THE FRESHMAN ENGLISH HONORS PROGRAM AT LENOIR RHYNE COLLEGE, NORTH CAROLINA, WAS ESTABLISHED IN 1965. THE NEED FOR LONG RANGE EVALUATION AND THE PRESENT METHOD OF EVALUATING THE HONORS PROGRAM ARE DISCUSSED. A BRIEF DESCRIPTION IS ALSO GIVEN OF THE METHOD BY WHICH HONOR STUDENTS ARE SELECTED…

  2. The Institutional Relations Review, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institutional Relations Review, 1998

    1998-01-01

    The Alaska Commission on Postsecondary Education's (ACPE) Institutional Relations Review seeks to provide the postsecondary schools in Alaska with information that pertains to the daily involvement with the Alaska Student Loan Programs (ASLP), Institutional Authorization, Compliance Audit functions and other related subjects. Four issues were…

  3. Eagle Feathers, the Highest Honor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaverhead, Pete

    Following his own advice that elders of the tribe share their knowledge so that "the way of the Indians would come back to the children of today," Pete Beaverhead (1899-1975) tells of the traditions of respect and honor surrounding the eagle feather in a booklet illustrated with black and white drawings. The eagle is an Indian symbol of power and…

  4. Alaska School District Cost Study Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuck, Bradford H.; Berman, Matthew; Hill, Alexandra

    2005-01-01

    The Legislative Budget and Audit Committee of the Alaska Legislature has asked The Institute of Social and Economic Research (ISER) at the University of Alaska Anchorage to make certain changes and adjustments to the Geographic Cost of Education Index (GCEI) that the American Institutes for Research (AIR) constructed and reported on in Alaska…

  5. If Honors Students Were People: Holistic Honors Education. National Collegiate Honors Council Monograph Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuman, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Although honors students are highly motivated and intellectually promising, they are not empty cognitive vessels ready to be filled with professorial knowledge. They are, instead, complex, multifaceted young people, sometimes troubled, often delighted and delightful. While at college they are learning how to live their lives not just as…

  6. An Agenda for the Future of Research in Honors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mariz, George

    2016-01-01

    Research in honors has become a priority for the National Collegiate Honors Council (NCHC), and the phrase presents the honors community with an interesting ambiguity about the appropriate focus for future studies. Potential topics might include the progress of honors students in comparison to their non-honors cohorts; the criteria for selecting…

  7. Congress Honors Glenn, Apollo 11 Crew

    NASA Video Gallery

    Congress honored storied NASA astronauts John Glenn, Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins and Buzz Aldrin on Wednesday, with the Gold Medal, Congress' highest expression of national appreciation for dis...

  8. Honors as a Transformative Experience: The Role of Liberal Arts Honors Programs in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    In the past, an honors program at a community college may have seemed like a contradiction in terms. After all, honors students at four-year colleges are thought to be the best of the best, while community college students are often considered "diamonds in the rough." Many community college honors students have intellectual abilities that may not…

  9. Fundrai$ing for Honor$: A Handbook. National Collegiate Honors Council Monograph Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Larry R.

    2009-01-01

    To many honors administrators, fundraising is alien and frightening. This monograph is directed primarily to honors deans and directors, who have widely varying experience with fundraising. It may also be useful reading for those staff members, faculty, and development officers who have some responsibility for honors fundraising. It focuses on…

  10. An Effective Honors Composition Class Improves Honors Retention Rates: Outcomes and Statistical Prestidigitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzy, Annmarie

    2014-01-01

    Annmarie Guzy teaches honors composition at the University of South Alabama. This essay discusses her observation that students who took her class were more likely to complete the honors program, which led to her wondering what elements of her course might give students an edge in honors program completion. As an English professor with training in…

  11. UNIT, ALASKA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana Arts and Science Center, Baton Rouge.

    THE UNIT DESCRIBED IN THIS BOOKLET DEALS WITH THE GEOGRAPHY OF ALASKA. THE UNIT IS PRESENTED IN OUTLINE FORM. THE FIRST SECTION DEALS PRINCIPALLY WITH THE PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY OF ALASKA. DISCUSSED ARE (1) THE SIZE, (2) THE MAJOR LAND REGIONS, (3) THE MOUNTAINS, VOLCANOES, GLACIERS, AND RIVERS, (4) THE NATURAL RESOURCES, AND (5) THE CLIMATE. THE…

  12. The Honors Thesis: A Handbook for Honors Directors, Deans, and Faculty Advisors. National Collegiate Honors Council Monograph Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Mark; Lyons, Karen; Weiner, Norman

    2014-01-01

    This handbook is intended to help all those who design, administer, and implement honors thesis programs--honors directors, deans, staff, faculty, and advisors--evaluate their thesis programs, solve pressing problems, select more effective requirements or procedures, or introduce an entirely new thesis program. The authors' goal is to provide…

  13. Keeping the Honor in Honorary Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Most American colleges and universities honor alumni, donors, and others through not only degrees, but also named buildings, chairs, and other forms of recognition. Recent controversies, however, suggest that boards should think twice before bestowing such honors. Trustees should establish transparent and consistent standards for the process by…

  14. Improving African American Achievement in Geometry Honors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mims, Adrian B.

    2010-01-01

    This case study evaluated the significance of implementing an enrichment mathematics course during the summer to rising African American ninth graders entitled, "Geometry Honors Preview." In the past, 60 to 70 percent of African American students in this school district had withdrawn from Geometry Honors by the second academic quarter. This study…

  15. Honors in Honduras: Engaged Learning in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folds-Bennett, Trisha; Twomey, Mary Pat

    2013-01-01

    A significant challenge in honors education is providing experiences through which students deeply engage ideas and content so that their analytical abilities and core beliefs and values are transformed. The College of Charleston Honors College aimed to stimulate critical thinking and examination of core values through a more holistic approach to…

  16. Honors as Whole-Person Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, William M.

    2015-01-01

    The Oral Roberts University Honors Program attracts a significant number of students each year, both as incoming freshmen and currently enrolled students, seeking a richer academic experience. While the honors program offers a higher-level academic challenge, its value lies beyond what is simply learned in the classroom. The program contributes to…

  17. Antiplagiarism Software Takes on the Honor Code

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasley, Paula

    2008-01-01

    Among the 100-odd colleges with academic honor codes, plagiarism-detection services raise a knotty problem: Is software compatible with a system based on trust? The answer frequently devolves to the size and culture of the university. Colleges with traditional student-run honor codes tend to "forefront" trust, emphasizing it above all else. This…

  18. A Prototype Two-tier Mentoring Program for Undergraduate Summer Interns from Minority-Serving Institutions at the University of Alaska Fairbanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gens, R.; Prakash, A.; Ozbay, G.; Sriharan, S.; Balazs, M. S.; Chittambakkam, A.; Starkenburg, D. P.; Waigl, C.; Cook, S.; Ferguson, A.; Foster, K.; Jones, E.; Kluge, A.; Stilson, K.

    2013-12-01

    The University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) is partnering with Delaware State University, Virginia State University, Elizabeth City State University, Bethune-Cookman University, and Morgan State University on a U.S. Department of Agriculture - National Institute for Food and Agriculture funded grant for ';Enhancing Geographic Information System Education and Delivery through Collaboration: Curricula Design, Faculty, Staff, and Student Training and Development, and Extension Services'. As a part of this grant, in summer 2013, UAF hosted a week long workshop followed by an intense two week undergraduate internship program. Six undergraduate students from partnering Universities worked with UAF graduate students as their direct mentors. This cohort of undergraduate mentees and graduate student mentors were in-turn counseled by the two UAF principal investigators who served as ';super-mentors'. The role of each person in the two-tier mentoring system was well defined. The super-mentors ensured that there was consistency in the way the internship was setup and resources were allocated. They also ensured that there were no technical glitches in the research projects and that there was healthy communication and interaction among participants. Mentors worked with the mentees ahead of time in outlining a project that aligned with the mentees research interest, provided basic reading material to the interns to get oriented, prepared the datasets required to start the project, and guided the undergraduates throughout the internship. Undergraduates gained hands-on experience in geospatial data collection and application of tools in their projects related to mapping geomorphology, landcover, geothermal sites, fires, and meteorological conditions. Further, they shared their research results and experiences with a broad university-wide audience at the end of the internship period. All participants met at lunch-time for a daily science talk from external speakers. The program offered

  19. School violence and the culture of honor.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ryan P; Osterman, Lindsey L; Barnes, Collin D

    2009-11-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that a sociocultural variable known as the culture of honor would be uniquely predictive of school-violence indicators. Controlling for demographic characteristics associated in previous studies with violent crime among adults, we found that high-school students in culture-of-honor states were significantly more likely than high-school students in non-culture-of-honor states to report having brought a weapon to school in the past month. Using data aggregated over a 20-year period, we also found that culture-of-honor states had more than twice as many school shootings per capita as non-culture-of-honor states. The data revealed important differences between school violence and general patterns of homicide and are consistent with the view that many acts of school violence reflect retaliatory aggression springing from intensely experienced social-identity threats.

  20. Could shame and honor save cooperation?

    PubMed

    Jacquet, Jennifer; Hauert, Christoph; Traulsen, Arne; Milinski, Manfred

    2012-03-01

    Shame and honor are mechanisms that expose behavior that falls outside the social norm. With recent six-player public goods experiments, we demonstrated that the threat of shame or the promise of honor led to increased cooperation. Participants were told in advance that after ten rounds two participants would be asked to come forward and write their names on the board in front of the fellow group members. In the shame treatment, the least cooperative players were exposed and wrote their names under the sentence "I donated least" while the honored participants wrote their name under "I donated most." In both the shame and honor treatments, participants contributed approximately 50% more to the public good, as compared with the control treatment in which all players retained their anonymity. Here, we also discuss how shame and honor differ from full transparency, and some of the challenges to understanding how anonymity and exposure modify behavior. PMID:22808336

  1. The Institutional Relations Review, December 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institutional Relations Review, 1997

    1997-01-01

    The Alaska Commission on Postsecondary Education's (ACPE) Institutional Relations Review seeks to provide the postsecondary schools in Alaska with information that pertains to the daily involvement with the Alaska Student Loan Programs, Institutional Authorization, Compliance Audit functions and other related subjects. This first edition also…

  2. Building a Workforce Development System in Alaska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spieker, Sally

    2004-01-01

    The Alaska Human Resources Investment Council developed a blueprint to guide a system that is needs-driven, accessible, interconnected, accountable, sustainable, and has collaborative governance. Vocational Technical Education Providers (VTEP) representing secondary education, technical schools, proprietary institutions, the University of Alaska,…

  3. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anonymous

    2013-07-01

    The Geological Society of America's (GSA) new class of medal and award recipients and fellows includes many AGU members. Medal and award recipients are Stephen G. Pollock, University of Southern Maine: GSA Distinguished Service Award; John R. Wheaton, Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology: John C. Frye Award; Clifford A. Jacobs, National Science Foundation (NSF): Outstanding Contributions Award, Geoinformatics Division; Peter Bird, University of California, Los Angeles (emeritus): George P. Woollard Award, Geophysics Division; Chunmiao Zheng, University of Alabama: O. E. Meinzer Award, Hydrogeology Division; Gerhard Wörner, Georg August Universität Göttingen: Distinguished Geologic Career Award, Mineralogy, Geochemistry, Petrology, and Volcanology Division; Alan D. Howard, University of Virginia: G. K. Gilbert Award, Planetary Geology Division; Michael E. Perkins, University of Utah: Kirk Bryan Award for Research Excellence, Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology Division; and Peter J. Hudleston, University of Minnesota: Career Contribution Award, Structural Geology and Tectonics Division.

  4. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-07-01

    S. Fred Singer, atmospheric and space physicist, received the Lifetime Achievement in Climate Science from the Non-Governmental International Panel on Climate Change at its Ninth International Conference on Climate Change, which took place on 7-9 July in Las Vegas, Nev.

  5. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-11-01

    Two AGU members are principal investigators on a project at the University of Colorado's National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) that recently received the 2011 Governor's Award for High-Impact Research from Colorado governor John Hickenlooper. NSIDC technical services manager David Gallaher and NSIDC director Mark Serreze have been involved with the center's Green Data Center, which has saved significant energy. Cornell University astronomy professor Steven Squyres is the new chairman of the NASA Advisory Council, which offers guidance and policy advice to the NASA administrator, the agency announced on 2 November. Squyres previously served on the council during the 1990s and also served as chairman of the former NASA Space Science Advisory Committee.

  6. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-09-01

    S. Bradley Moran has taken a post as assistant director, ocean sciences, for the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. He will focus on implementing the U.S. Ocean Science Policy and assume responsibility for a broad range of ocean, coastal, and marine resource-related matters. Moran is on leave as a professor at the University of Rhode Island's Graduate School of Oceanography. He most recently served as program director in the chemical oceanography program at the National Science Foundation.

  7. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-01-01

    Peter Molnar, professor of geological sciences at the University of Colorado at Boulder, is the recipient of the 2014 Crafoord Prize in Geosciences, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences (RAS) announced on 16 January. RAS noted that the award is being presented to Molnar "for his ground-breaking contribution to the understanding of global tectonics, in particular the deformation of continents and the structure and evolution of mountain ranges, as well as the impact of tectonic processes on ocean-atmosphere circulation and climate." The award, which comes with a prize of 4 million Swedish kronor (about US$600,000), was established in 1980 to promote international basic research in astronomy, mathematics, geosciences, biosciences, and rheumatoid arthritis. According to RAS, those disciplines were chosen to complement those for which the Nobel Prizes are awarded.

  8. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anonymous

    2012-10-01

    Two AGU members are among the 23 new MacArthur fellows for 2012, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation announced on 2 October. Geochemist Terry Plank, a professor in Columbia University's Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, was cited for "probing the usually invisible but remarkably powerful thermal and chemical forces deep below the Earth's crust that drive the motion of tectonic plate collisions." The MacArthur Foundation cited marine ecologist Nancy Rabalais, executive director and professor at the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium, for "documenting the environmental and economic consequences of hypoxic zones in the Gulf of Mexico and informing strategies for restoring the degraded waters of the Gulf and the Mississippi River basin." Each fellow will each receive $500,000 in no-strings-attached support over the next 5 years.

  9. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-10-01

    Two AGU members are among the 23 new MacArthur fellows for 2012, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation announced on 2 October. Geochemist Terry Plank, a professor in Columbia University's Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, was cited for “probing the usually invisible but remarkably powerful thermal and chemical forces deep below the Earth's crust that drive the motion of tectonic plate collisions.” The MacArthur Foundation cited marine ecologist Nancy Rabalais, executive director and professor at the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium, for “documenting the environmental and economic consequences of hypoxic zones in the Gulf of Mexico and informing strategies for restoring the degraded waters of the Gulf and the Mississippi River basin.” Each fellow will each receive $500,000 in no-strings-attached support over the next 5 years.

  10. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-08-01

    Julie Brigham-Grette, department head of the University of Massachusetts Amherst's Department of Geosciences, has been selected as the new chair of the Polar Research Board (PRB) of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, "with the responsibility of promoting excellence in polar science and providing independent scientific guidance to federal agencies and the nation on science issues in the Arctic, Antarctic and cold regions of the world."

  11. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-03-01

    Elizabeth Ambos is the new executive officer of the Council on Undergraduate Research, an international not-for-profit organization focused on increasing undergraduate research opportunities. Most recently, Ambos has served as Assistant Vice Chancellor for Research Initiatives and Partnerships for the California State University Chancellor's Office. Anthony Beasley has been appointed as the next director of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, a facility of the National Science Foundation (NSF), operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc. Beasley has served as chief operating officer and project manager of the National Ecological Observatory Network, an NSF-funded continental-scale observatory designed to detect ecological change and enable forecasting of its impacts.

  12. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-07-01

    Tim Killeen has been appointed president of the Research Foundation for the State University of New York (SUNY) and SUNY vice chancellor for research, effective 9 July. Killeen has been assistant director for geosciences at the U.S. National Science Foundation since July 2008. As SUNY's research foundation president, Killeen will be responsible for the supervision and operation of the largest, most comprehensive university-connected U.S. research foundation, according to a foundation statement. Killeen served as AGU president from 2006 to 2008 and was director of the National Center for Atmospheric Research from 2000 to 2008.

  13. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-12-01

    John W. Hess has been appointed the new president of the Geological Society of America Foundation beginning in 2015, succeeding Geoff Feiss. Hess is currently the executive director of the Geological Society of America.

  14. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-02-01

    Marshall Shepherd, professor of geography in the University of Georgia's Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, Athens, began a 1-year term as president-elect of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) on 22 January. In 2013 he will assume the presidency of the society. Also, five AGU members recently were elected as AMS councilors, with terms expiring in 2015: José Fuentes, Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park; Richard Johnson, Atmospheric Science Department, Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Christa Peters-Lidard, Hydrological Sciences Branch at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.; Wassila Thiaw, Climate Prediction Center, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Camp Springs, Md.; and Chidong Zhang, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, Fla.

  15. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-11-01

    The recently released list of 2013-2014 Fulbright Scholars includes 9 AGU members working on diverse topics. They include Michael Coe, senior scientist/coordinator of the Amazon group at the Woods Hole Research Center, whose topic is "Agricultural expansion in the Brazilian Cerrado and consequences for the water cycle"; Benjamin Crosby, associate professor, Department of Geosciences, Idaho State University, on the topic "Taking the pulse of Chilean rivers: Enhancing educational and academic opportunities in a time of rapid change"; David Fitzjarrald, senior research associate, Atmospheric Sciences Research Center, State University of New York at Albany, on the topic "Landscape heterogeneity and Amazonian mesoclimate: Fostering critical understanding of observations and model output"; and Syed Hasan, professor of geology, Department of Geosciences, University of Missouri-Kansas City, who will be teaching courses in waste management.

  16. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-10-01

    Agricultural ecologist David Lobell is among the 2103 class of MacArthur Fellows, the MacArthur Foundation announced on 25 September. Lobell, an associate professor in Stanford University's Department of Environmental Earth System Science, is one of 24 people to win the "genius award" this year. The citation for Lobell notes that he "unearths and connects richly informative sources of data to investigate the impact of climate change on crop production and food security around the globe. His multidisciplinary background in remote sensing, statistics, ecosystem modeling, land use, and agronomy informs his approach and enables him to draw significant insights from enormous and diverse data sets on weather, agricultural practices, and natural resources such as soil and water." Each MacArthur Fellow receives a no-strings-attached stipend of $625,000 over 5 years.

  17. The Mentor/Talented Students Honors Program at SUNY Rockland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Samuel; Hazelton, Nancy; McNamara, James; Kahn, Robert

    This paper consists of four sections by different authors. Section 1: History of Honors at SUNY Rockland. (by Samuel Draper, founder of Honor's Program). Discusses the development of the honors program at Rockland Community College from the late 1960's. Honors courses originated in the late 1960's and in 1977 the college founded the Mentor…

  18. Consider Your Man Card Reissued: Masculine Honor and Gun Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuffelton, Amy

    2015-01-01

    In this article, Amy Shuffelton addresses school shootings through an investigation of honor and masculinity. Drawing on recent scholarship on honor, including Bernard Williams's "Shame and Necessity" and Kwame Anthony Appiah's "The Honor Code," Shuffelton points out that honor has been misconstrued as exclusively a matter of…

  19. Honors Privatization: A Professor's and Three Students' Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nock, Destenie; Plummer, Justice; Wilson, Ashleigh R.; Cundall, Michael K., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Gary Bell's essay, "The Profit Motive in Honors Education," raises important questions about the future of honors education--questions that will have the greatest impact on honors students. The voices of those students are not typically included in discussions about the funding and administration of honors even though they have crucial…

  20. Fred Haise Honored at Aerospace Appreciation Night

    NASA Video Gallery

    Retired NASA astronaut and test pilot Fred Haise was honored recently by the Lancaster, Calif., Jethawks baseball team at its Aerospace Appreciation Night. Best known as one of the Apollo 13 crew, ...

  1. Honor crimes: review and proposed definition.

    PubMed

    Elakkary, Sally; Franke, Barbara; Shokri, Dina; Hartwig, Sven; Tsokos, Michael; Püschel, Klaus

    2014-03-01

    There is every reason to believe that honor based violence is one of the forms of domestic violence that is being practiced against females all over the world. This type of violence includes a wide range of crimes, the severest of which is honor killing. Many studies have adopted different definitions for the so-called honor killing. In this paper some of these definitions are discussed and a working definition is proposed. The scope of the problem worldwide is presented. Honor killing goes beyond ethnicity, class, and religion. It is a very old phenomenon that was practiced in ancient Rome, guided by penal codes. Some of the older as well as new penal codes are discussed concerning this matter from different regions of the world. The different efforts of international governmental and nongovernmental organizations in combating this problem are also presented.

  2. Honoring Pioneers in Breast Cancer Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Honoring Pioneers in Breast Cancer Research Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... Distinguished Medical Service Award for their pioneering breast cancer research. Photo courtesy of Bill Branson, NIH In this ...

  3. Building Alaska's Science and Engineering Pipeline: Evaluation of the Alaska Native Science & Engineering Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Hamutal; Martin, Carlos; Eyster, Lauren; Anderson, Theresa; Owen, Stephanie; Martin-Caughey, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    The Urban Institute conducted an implementation and participant-outcomes evaluation of the Alaska Native Science & Engineering Program (ANSEP). ANSEP is a multi-stage initiative designed to prepare and support Alaska Native students from middle school through graduate school to succeed in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM)…

  4. Honoring Leslie A. Geddes - Farewell ...

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Honor thy father and thy mother, say the Holy Scriptures[1], for they at least gave thee this biological life, but honor thy teachers, too, for they gave thee knowledge and example. Leslie Alexander Geddes took off on a long, long trip, Sunday October 25, 2009, leaving his body for medical and research use. The departing station was West Lafayette, Indiana, where he set foot in 1974, at Purdue University, stamping there a unique deep imprint, similar and probably more profound than the one left at Baylor College of Medicine (BCM), Houston, Texas, in the period 1955-1974. Memories came back as a flood the minute after a message broke the news to me: When I first met him visiting the Department of Physiology at BCM back in 1962, my first Classical Physiology with Modern Instrumentation Summer Course ... The versatile Physiograph was the main equipment, an electronic-mechanical three or four channel recorder that could pick up a variety of physiological variables. Les and his collaborators had introduced also the impedance pneumograph, which was a simplified version of previous developments made by others. It became a ubiquitous unit that trod many roads in the hands of eager and curious students. Ventricular fibrillation and especially its counterpart, defibrillation, stand out as subjects occupying his concern along the years. Many were the students recruited to such effort and long is the list of papers on the subject. Physiological signals attracted considerable part of his activities because one of his perennial mottos was measurement is essential in physiology. He has written thirteen books and over eight hundred scientific papers, receiving also several prizes and distinctions. Not only his interests stayed within the academic environment but an industrial hue was manifested in over 20 USA patents, all applied to medical use. History of science and technology was another area in which, often with Hebbel Hoff, he uncovered astounding and delightful information

  5. Shaded Relief Mosaic of Umnak Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This image is a shaded relief mosaic of Umnak Island in Alaska's Aleutian Islands.

    It was created with Airsar data that was geocoded and combined into this mosaic as part of a NASA-funded Alaska Digital Elevation Model Project at the Alaska Synthetic Aperture Radar Facility (ASF) at the University of Alaska Geophysical Institute in Fairbanks, Alaska.

    Airsar collected the Alaska data as part of its PacRim 2000 Mission, which took the instrument to French Polynesia, American and Western Samoa, Fiji, New Zealand, Australia, New Guinea, Indonesia, Malaysia, Cambodia, Philippines, Taiwan, South Korea, Japan, Northern Marianas, Guam, Palau, Hawaii and Alaska. Airsar, part of NASA's Airborne Science Program, is managed for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise by JPL. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  6. Perspective View of Umnak Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska (#1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This image is a perspective view of Umnak Island, one of Alaska's Aleutian Islands. The active Okmok volcano appears in the center of the island.

    The image was created by draping a Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper image over a digital elevation mosaic derived from Airsar data.

    This work was conducted as part of a NASA-funded Alaska Digital Elevation Model Project at the Alaska Synthetic Aperture Radar Facility (ASF) at the University of Alaska Geophysical Institute in Fairbanks, Alaska.

    Airsar collected the Alaska data as part of its PacRim 2000 Mission, which took the instrument to French Polynesia, American and Western Samoa, Fiji, New Zealand, Australia, New Guinea, Indonesia, Malaysia, Cambodia, Philippines, Taiwan, South Korea, Japan, Northern Marianas, Guam, Palau, Hawaii and Alaska. Airsar, part of NASA's Airborne Science Program, is managed for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise by JPL. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  7. Perspective View of Umnak Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska (#2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This image is a perspective view of Umnak Island, one of Alaska's Aleutian Islands. The active Okmok volcano appears in the center of the island.

    The image was created by draping a Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper image over a digital elevation mosaic derived from Airsar data.

    This work was conducted as part of a NASA-funded Alaska Digital Elevation Model Project at the Alaska Synthetic Aperture Radar Facility (ASF) at the University of Alaska Geophysical Institute in Fairbanks, Alaska.

    Airsar collected the Alaska data as part of its PacRim 2000 Mission, which took the instrument to French Polynesia, American and Western Samoa, Fiji, New Zealand, Australia, New Guinea, Indonesia, Malaysia, Cambodia, Philippines, Taiwan, South Korea, Japan, Northern Marianas, Guam, Palau, Hawaii and Alaska. Airsar, part of NASA's Airborne Science Program, is managed for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise by JPL. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  8. Honoring Controversy: Using Real-World Problems to Teach Critical Thinking in Honors Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cargas, Sarita

    2016-01-01

    In this article Sarita Cargas suggests that getting honors students used to analyzing controversies will contribute to their developing a disposition toward critical thinking. She goes on to say that the value of teaching critical-thinking skills complements the movement of many honors programs toward teaching more than just disciplinary content.…

  9. Alaska Resource Data File, Noatak Quadrangle, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grybeck, Donald J.; Dumoulin, Julie A.

    2006-01-01

    This report gives descriptions of the mineral occurrences in the Noatak 1:250,000-scale quadrangle, Alaska. The data presented here are maintained as part of a statewide database on mines, prospects and mineral occurrences throughout Alaska.

  10. Prioritizing Service to the Academically Talented: The Honors College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floyd, Deborah L.; Holloway, Alexandria

    2006-01-01

    This chapter describes community college honors programs and courses, emphasizing in particular the Honors College at Miami Dade College in Florida. The chapter discusses pros and cons of honors programs and courses in the context of their appropriateness to the community college mission of open access and egalitarianism. (Contains 1 table.)

  11. The Influence of the College Environment on Honors Students' Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wawrzynski, Matthew R.; Madden, Katherine; Jensen, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Honors programs at colleges and universities are one way to provide additional learning opportunities to enhance the undergraduate experience for students. Honors programs provide students academically enriching activities through small classes, research, internships, and community service (National Collegiate Honors Council, n.d.). To further the…

  12. Re-Envisioning the Honors Senior Project: Experience as Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, Kevin; Cureton, Zachary

    2014-01-01

    One of the National Collegiate Honors Council (NCHC) Basic Characteristics of a Fully Developed Honors Program is that it creates opportunities for undergraduate research, opportunities that frequently culminate in a senior thesis or capstone project. This article describes how the University of Texas at Arlington Honors College integrated…

  13. Badges of Honor or Hype?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dill, William R.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that specialized college accreditation has both benefits and drawbacks, and trustees must help decide which forms of accreditation their institutions really need. A series of questions are posed for consideration by governing boards, and areas of accreditation in which trustees may help initiate reform are identified. (MSE)

  14. Legal History Meets the Honors Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Robert B., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the "Law and Culture" course that he developed to teach in the Butler University Honors Program. The course looks at some landmark periods or events in legal history and explores how those events were the product of their culture, and how they affected their culture. Among the events or periods that the author…

  15. An Honorable Seduction: Thematic Studies in Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worby, Diana Z.

    By using a thematic approach and by drawing on other disciplines for breadth, English teachers can "honorably seduce" career-oriented students into a love affair with literature and draw them back into the English curriculum. For example, a teacher's conversation with a student focusing on fathers and sons led the teacher to suggest that the…

  16. Ben van der Veken Honor Issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durig, James

    2015-02-01

    In acclamation of Ben van der Veken, a former editor of Spectrochimica Acta, many co-authors and friends have submitted papers in his honor. He has collaborated with many scientists from the United States, Russia, England, Scotland as well as some in other countries. His research is known throughout the world.

  17. Honors Education and Stone-Campbell Heritage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willerton, Chris

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author explores the Stone-Campbell tradition, which produced the North American Disciples of Christ and Churches of Christ. In this tradition he finds the distinctive combination of three emphases to promote civic virtues in an honors context: (1) the individual pursuit of truth; (2) reliance on Scripture; and (3) the drive…

  18. Benedict Arnold: A Question of Honor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicolosi, Annie; O'Connell, Libby Haight; Rust, Mead

    2003-01-01

    The spring 2003 The Idea Book for Educators highlights television programming from the Arts and Entertainment Network (A&E), the History Channel, and the Biography Channel, with a focus on an A&E original movie premiere, "Benedict Arnold: A Question of Honor." The booklet contains the following materials: "A&E Study Guide: Benedict Arnold: A…

  19. Understanding Scientific Ideas: An Honors Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capps, Joan; Schueler, Paul

    At Raritan Valley Community College (RVCC) in New Jersey, an honors philosophy course was developed which taught mathematics and science concepts independent of computational skill. The course required that students complete a weekly writing assignment designed as a continuous refinement of logical reasoning development. This refinement was…

  20. Innovation Labs: A Professional Approach to Honors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bormans, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Honors education at Rotterdam University of Applied Sciences (RUAS) focuses on students who are willing to invest more in their study than the average student. Selection criteria are the students' willingness to develop beyond what is offered in the regular curriculum and are not based on previous accomplishments. The additional challenge of the…

  1. The Profit Motive in Honors Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Honors has specifically and historically done a commendable job of tailoring education to the special needs and challenges of the most intellectually and academically capable young people, the future leaders and innovators of society, but the introduction of an imperative to make money threatens to corrupt the whole enterprise. For this reason,…

  2. A Global Endeavor: Honors Undergraduate Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killinger, Mimi; Spies, Kate; Runyambo, Daniella

    2016-01-01

    Like many other universities of its kind, the University of Maine (UMaine) has a centralized body, the Center for Undergraduate Research (CUGR), charged with engaging motivated students in independent learning and in the creation of new knowledge. UMaine furthermore has an honors college that is likewise committed to fostering undergraduate…

  3. Honoring Our Veterans through Poetry Prewriting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolley, Jill

    This lesson uses the informational power of the Internet for a prewriting activity. Through various Internet sites, students gather information about the history and celebration practices associated with Veterans Day. Following the prewriting activity, students write content-rich poems that honor veterans. During the 45-minute prewriting session,…

  4. From Bhopal to Cold Fusion: A Case-Study Approach to Writing Assignments in Honors General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamely-Wiik, Donna M.; Haky, Jerome E.; Galin, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    Faculty from the chemistry and English departments have developed a combined second-semester honors general chemistry and college writing course that fosters critical thinking through challenging writing assignments. Examples of case-study writing assignments and guidelines are provided that faculty at other institutions can adapt in similar…

  5. They Come but Do They Finish? Program Completion for Honors Students at a Major Public University, 1998-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodstein, Lynne; Szarek Patricia

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the option of enrolling in honors programs and colleges at major public universities has increasingly become an alternative to elite private and public institutions for some of the brightest and most academically-talented high school graduates. To attract these high-achieving students, universities may offer applicants incentives…

  6. Northern Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Seasonal ice in the Beaufort Sea off Alaska's North Slope has begun its spring retreat. This true color MODIS image from March 18, 2002, shows the pack ice in the Chuckchi Sea (left) and Beaufort Sea (top) backing away from its winter position snug up against Alaska's coasts, beginning its retreat into the Arctic Ocean. While not as pronounced in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas as other part of the Arctic, scientists studying Arctic sea ice over the course of the century have documented dramatic changes in the extent of Arctic sea ice. It retreats farther in the summer and does not advance as far in the winter than it did a half-century ago. Both global warming and natural variation in regional weather systems have been proposed as causes. Along the coastal plain of the North Slope, gray-brown tracks (see high-resolution image) hint at melting rivers. South of the North Slope, the rugged mountains of the Brooks Range make a coast-to-coast arc across the state. Coming in at the lower right of the image, the Yukon River traces a frozen white path westward across half the image before veering south and out of view. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  7. Enrollment Trends at University of Alaska Community Campuses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsmith, Scott; Hill, Alexandra; Killorin, Mary

    2005-01-01

    In this report, Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, investigated the factors that explain change over time in enrollments and credit hours (participation) at the community campuses of the University of Alaska using both quantitative and qualitative methods. Sections include: (1) Background; (2) Factors…

  8. Alaska Education Directory, School Year 1999-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau.

    This 1999-2000 directory provides information on Alaska's public schools, school districts, education organizations, and institutions of higher education. A statistical summary indicates that in 1998-99, Alaska enrolled 132,905 students in 503 public schools. Breakdowns by grade configuration and enrollment show that about half the schools served…

  9. Cross Cultural Scientific Communication in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertram, K. B.

    2006-12-01

    An example of cross-cultural education is provided by the Aurora Alive curriculum. Aurora Alive communicates science to Alaska Native students through cross-cultural educational products used in Alaska schools for more than a decade, including (1) a CDROM that provides digital graphics, bilingual (English and Athabascan language) narration-over-text and interactive elements that help students visualize scientific concepts, and (2) Teacher's Manuals containing more than 150 hands-on activities aligned to national science standards, and to Alaska Standards for Culturally Responsive Schools. Created by Native Elders and teachers working together with University Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute scientists, Aurora Alive blends Native "ways of knowing" with current "western" research to teach the physics and math of the aurora.

  10. McBirney honored with Bowen Award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Bruce D.; McBirney, Alexander R.

    Alexander R. McBirney of the University of Oregon received the 1990 N. L. Bowen Award of the Volcanology, Geochemistry, and Petrology section of AGU for outstanding contributions to volcanic geology and to the understanding of physical processes in magmas. The citation, deliverd by Bruce D. Marsh on December 5 at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony in San Francisco, and McBirney's response are presented below.

  11. Armstrong Receives Space Medal of Honor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong receives the first Congressional Space Medal of Honor from President Jimmy Carter, assisted by Captain Robert Peterson. Armstrong, one of six astronauts to be presented the medal during ceremonies held in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), was awarded for his performance during the Gemini 8 mission and the Apollo 11 mission when he became the first human to set foot upon the Moon.

  12. Armstrong Awarded Space Medal of Honor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong receives the first Congressional Space Medal of Honor from President Jimmy Carter, assisted by Captain Robert Peterson. Armstrong, one of six astronauts to be presented the medal during ceremonies held in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), was awarded for his performance during the Gemini 8 mission and the Apollo 11 mission when he became the first human to set foot upon the Moon.

  13. Research Partnerships between Academic Institutions and American Indian and Alaska Native Tribes and Organizations: Effective Strategies and Lessons Learned in a Multi-Site CTN Study

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Lisa Rey; Rosa, Carmen; Forcehimes, Alyssa; Donovan, Dennis M.

    2012-01-01

    Community Based and Tribally Based Participatory Research (CBPR/TPR) are approaches that can be successful for developing ethical and effective research partnerships between academic institutions and Tribes and Native organizations. The NIDA Clinical Trials Network funded a multi-site, exploratory study using CBPR/TPR to begin to better understand substance abuse issues of concern to some Tribes and Native organizations as well as strengths and resources that exist in these communities to address these concerns. Each of the five sites is briefly described and a summary of the common themes for developing these collaborative research efforts is provided. PMID:21854275

  14. Impact of targeted health promotion on cardiovascular knowledge among American Indians and Alaska Natives

    PubMed Central

    Brega, Angela G.; Pratte, Katherine A.; Jiang, Luohua; Mitchell, Christina M.; Stotz, Sarah A.; LoudHawk-Hedgepeth, Crystal; Morse, Brad D.; Noe, Tim; Moore, Kelly R.; Beals, Janette

    2013-01-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute developed the Honoring the Gift of Heart Health (HGHH) curriculum to promote cardiovascular knowledge and heart-healthy lifestyles among American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs). Using data from a small randomized trial designed to reduce diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk among overweight/obese AI/ANs, we evaluated the impact of an adapted HGHH curriculum on cardiovascular knowledge. We also assessed whether the curriculum was effective across levels of health literacy (defined as the ‘capacity to obtain, process and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions’). We examined change in knowledge from baseline to 3 months for two groups: HGHH (N = 89) and control (N = 50). Compared with controls, HGHH participants showed significant improvement in heart attack knowledge and marginally significant improvement in stroke and general CVD knowledge. HGHH participants attending ≥1 class showed significantly greater improvement than controls on all three measures. Although HGHH participants with inadequate health literacy had worse heart attack and stroke knowledge at baseline and 3 months than did participants with adequate skills, the degree of improvement in knowledge did not differ by health literacy level. HGHH appears to improve cardiovascular knowledge among AI/ANs across health literacy levels. PMID:23660462

  15. Alaska's Children, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Dorothy, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    These four issues of the "Alaska's Children" provide information on the activities of the Alaska Head Start State Collaboration Project and other Head Start activities. Legal and policy changes affecting the education of young children in Alaska are also discussed. The Spring 1997 issue includes articles on brain development and the "I Am Your…

  16. Alaska's Economy: What's Ahead?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska Review of Social and Economic Conditions, 1987

    1987-01-01

    This review describes Alaska's economic boom of the early 1980s, the current recession, and economic projections for the 1990s. Alaska's economy is largely influenced by oil prices, since petroleum revenues make up 80% of the state government's unrestricted general fund revenues. Expansive state spending was responsible for most of Alaska's…

  17. Alaska Natives & the Land.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Robert D.; And Others

    Pursuant to the Native land claims within Alaska, this compilation of background data and interpretive materials relevant to a fair resolution of the Alaska Native problem seeks to record data and information on the Native peoples; the land and resources of Alaska and their uses by the people in the past and present; land ownership; and future…

  18. Alaska Women: A Databook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Karen; Baker, Barbara

    This data book uses survey and census information to record social and economic changes of the past three decades and their effects upon the role of Alaska women in society. Results show Alaska women comprise 47% of the state population, an increase of 9% since 1950. Marriage continues as the predominant living arrangement for Alaska women,…

  19. The Other Culture: Science and Mathematics Education in Honors. National Collegiate Honors Council Monograph Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckner, Ellen B., Ed.; Garbutt, Keith, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This monograph addresses the current needs for science education at all levels of higher education. It proceeds from assumptions that the national debate for scientific understanding matters. It explores science in society and strategies for curricular integration in honors. The hope is that this monograph will further the discussion of science…

  20. Honoring Progress: An Update on the NGA Center Honor States. Volume 1, Issue 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartney, Michael, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This bimonthly newsletter provides information about the progress of the Honor States Grant Program, a governor-led effort to improve college--and work-ready graduation rates. This issue explores efforts by governors and state policymakers to experiment with alternative compensation policies that can improve teacher quality. Compensation…

  1. Honoring Progress: An Update on the NGA Center Honor States. Volume 1, Issue 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartney, Michael, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This bimonthly newsletter provides information about the progress of the Honor States Grant Program, a governor-led effort to improve college- and work-ready graduation rates. This issue explores strategies that governors and state policymakers are using to define and assess college and work readiness, Progress of three states in assessment is…

  2. Honoring Progress: An Update on the NGA Center Honor States. Volume 1, Issue 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartney, Michael, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This bimonthly newsletter provides information about the progress of the Honor States Grant Program, a governor-led effort to improve college--and work-ready graduation rates. This issue spotlights the "supply-side" of high school redesign, exploring how state policymakers are working to expand the supply of high-quality high schools. The…

  3. Honoring Progress: An Update on the NGA Center Honor States. Volume 1, Issue 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shawe, Torrey, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    This bimonthly newsletter provides information about the progress of the Honor States Grant Program, a governor-led effort to improve college- and work-ready graduation rates. This issue explores science, technology, engineering, and math education (STEM), a priority for governors as they try to enhance workforce competitiveness in a global…

  4. Preparing Tomorrow's Global Leaders: Honors International Education. National Collegiate Honors Council Monograph Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvaney, Mary Kay, Ed.; Klein, Kim, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    In our diverse and interconnected world, expanding students' horizons beyond the classrooms and laboratories of home campuses is increasingly important. Even some of the brightest honors students remain naïve to the causes and ramifications of current world events and lack the necessary intercultural skills to become effective ethical leaders with…

  5. Mark of Leadership: Honoring the Peaceful Chiefs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trahant, Mark N.

    1997-01-01

    Profiles American Indian and Alaska Native leaders of the 1970s: Lucy Covington (Colville), who blocked tribal termination; Joe DeLaCruz (Quinault), Reuben Snake (Winnebago), and Peter MacDonald (Navajo), tribal presidents who enforced tribal sovereignty; Ada Deer (Menominee) and other graduates of the American Indian Law Center's summer programs;…

  6. H. R. 3277: Trans-Alaska Pipeline System Reform Act of 1989. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundredth First Congress, First Session, September 14, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The bill would improve Federal laws relating to the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System in light of the recent Valdez oil spill and its environmental consequences. The bill explains provisions for the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System fund and liability; the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System trust fund; improvement of the pipeline system (establishes a Presidential task force); Alaska oil spill recovery institute; penalties; provisions applicable to Alaska natives; and state laws and programs.

  7. Building a Vibrant Honors Community among Commuter Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Ginkel, Stan; van Eijl, Pierre; Pilot, Albert; Zubizarreta, John

    2012-01-01

    Research has shown that honors programs often provide active networks of students that contribute to the development of the students' talents (De Boer & van Eijl; van Eijl, Pilot & Wolfensberger). These contact networks are also described as "learning communities" (Wilson et al.) and "honors communities" (van Eijl,…

  8. Notes toward an Excellent Marxist-Elitist Honors Admissions Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herron, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    This essay demonstrates that the honors community is still primarily focused on maintaining the highest levels of academic quality and integrity, but this focus is in sharp contrast to the national dialogue outside academia that more often focuses on mere completion or credentials. The author, Jerry Herron of the honors college at Wayne State…

  9. Building Bridges between Science Courses Using Honors Organic Chemistry Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickey, Timothy; Pontrello, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Introductory undergraduate science courses are traditionally offered as distinct units without formalized student interaction between classes. To bridge science courses, the authors used three Honors Organic Chemistry projects paired with other science courses. The honors students delivered presentations to mainstream organic course students and…

  10. Survey of Honors Programs: A Resource Inventory and Directory, 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeague, Patricia M., Comp.; And Others

    Drawing from a 1984 survey conducted by Moraine Valley Community College, this report provides composite and individual descriptions of 19 community college honors programs. Section I provides an overview of the survey on community college honors programs, which sought information on the organization of the program; the curriculum; and honors…

  11. Editor's Essay: Honoring Native Languages, Defeating the Shame.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambler, Marjane

    2000-01-01

    Provides an overview of the articles in this issue of the Tribal College Journal, which demonstrate how tribal colleges are gradually creating places where Native languages are safe. Asserts that a place where the language is honored is a place that education, too, becomes honored, and that recognizing Native languages leads to self-esteem and…

  12. Meeting the Aims of Honors in the Online Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Melissa L.

    2013-01-01

    While little data-based research is available on the use of technology in the honors classroom, data on the nature of online honors courses are even rarer. In undergraduate education generally, enrollment in online courses has been increasing annually, outpacing enrollment in traditional, face-to-face environments. During fall 2011, more than 6.7…

  13. Career Paths of Postsecondary Honors Education Program Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humerickhouse, Kimberly D.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore the paths taken by individuals who hold administrative positions in post-secondary honors education programs. The research sought common professional and educational experiences that current honors education program administrators believe prepared them for the position. This study included the…

  14. Selecting for Honors Programs: A Matter of Motivational Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weerheijm, Ron; Weerheijm, Jeske

    2012-01-01

    The honors programs at the Universities of Applied Sciences in the Netherlands were almost all initiated around 2008 and thus so far have yielded few data about outcomes, but we have a broad consensus that the honors programs should provide a better-than-average professional for the workplace and should give students a chance to perform to the…

  15. Honors Dissertation Abstracts: A Bounded Qualitative Meta-Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holman, Debra K.; Banning, James H.

    2012-01-01

    A potential source of useful information about undergraduate honors education can be found in doctoral dissertation abstracts that focus on honors. Debra Holman and James Banning of Colorado State University sought to explore this resource by undertaking a bounded qualitative meta-study of such abstracts using document analysis. Three…

  16. Moral Decision Making and Nontoleration of Honor Code Offenses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roffey, Arthur E.; Porter, David B.

    1992-01-01

    Explored differences in moral development and attitudes toward nontoleration clause of Honor Code of U.S. Air Force Academy between cadets who were convicted honor violators (n=24) and control group of nonviolators (n=162). Found that, as cadet moral development increased from year to year, acceptance and internalization of principle of…

  17. Creating Opportunities for Peer Leadership in Honors Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leichliter, Marie E.

    2013-01-01

    Honors educators are privileged to work with exceptional students who are also some of the most engaged and motivated students on campus. These students often seek opportunities within their honors experience to study abroad, join community service organizations, conduct research, participate in internships, and develop their leadership skills.…

  18. The Problematics of Postmodernism: The Double-Voiced Honors Canon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCracken, Tim

    Honors education is not immune from the current controversy concerning the role of the literary canon. Indeed, the problem seems especially crucial for honors programs, for their curriculums are often multi-disciplinary in their approaches to culture and history. The solution may lie in what Linda Hutcheon calls the "poetics of the postmodern."…

  19. A Quality Instrument for Effective Honors Program Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Patricia Joanne

    2015-01-01

    Although the number of honors programs and colleges has grown dramatically over the last twenty years to over a thousand programs nationally, little has been done to develop consistency of standards in honors. In the interest of seeking consistency, the author designed a research study to provide initial insights into assessable measures that a…

  20. The Minority Honors Program in Energy-Related Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kish, Evelyn Rubio; Santa Rita, Emilio

    In 1984, Bronx Community College (BCC) established the Minority Honors Program in Energy Related Curricula, a partnership between their academic honors program and the U.S. Department of Energy. The program's goal is to increase the participation of minorities in the fields of Computer Science, Electrical Technology, Engineering Science, Data…

  1. Turning Points: Improving Honors Student Preparation for Thesis Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patino, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation is an action research study that had as its primary goal to increase retention of honors college students at Arizona State University by implementing an additional advising session during the fifth semester of their academic career. Introducing additional, strategically-timed support for the honors thesis and demystifying the…

  2. State of Alaska Student Financial Aid Programs: Annual Report, 1987-1988. Document Number 89-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Commission on Postsecondary Education, Juneau.

    This report summarizes the participation levels of the five postsecondary, financial assistance programs in the state of Alaska for 1987-88. The Alaska Student Loan Program (ASLP) awarded approximately 17,000 loans during the period; 53.8% of which went to students attending an institution in Alaska, while 26.7% were awarded to freshmen. The…

  3. The Tundra Is the Text: Using Alaska Native Contexts To Promote Cultural Relevancy in Teacher Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fickel, Letitia Hochstrasser; Jones, Ken

    In summer 2000, the University of Alaska Anchorage and cooperating professional development schools organized four summer institutes to enhance teachers' cultural and subject matter knowledge. This dual focus was prompted by the new Alaska Content Standards and by guidelines for preparing culturally responsive teachers, developed by Alaska Native…

  4. Opera subculture and suicide for honor.

    PubMed

    Stack, Steven

    2002-06-01

    The influence of music-based subcultures on suicidality has been the subject of much debate but little scholarly research. While previous work has documented that suicide is a remarkably frequent cause of death in opera, it has not explored the related consequences on opera's audience. In particular, the possible influence of the opera subculture on suicide acceptability has been largely unexplored. Suicide in the case of life without honor, the "Madame Butterfly Effect," is a theme in opera. Persons who are drawn into and/or influenced by the opera subculture of honor are hypothesized to be more accepting of suicide in the case of dishonor to one's family. Data are from the national general social surveys (N = 845). A multivariate logistic regression analysis finds that opera fans are 2.37 times more accepting of suicide because of dishonor than nonfans. Only two variables, religiosity and education, are more closely related to suicide acceptability than opera fanship. These are the first empirical results on the subject of opera and suicide acceptability.

  5. Honor Codes and Other Contextual Influences on Academic Integrity: A Replication and Extension to Modified Honor Code Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Donald L.; Trevino, Linda Klebe; Butterfield, Kenneth D.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated the influence of modified honor codes, an alternative to traditional codes that is gaining popularity on larger campuses. Also tested the model of student academic dishonesty previously suggested by McCabe and Trevino. Found that modified honor codes are associated with lower levels of student dishonesty and that the McCabe Trevino…

  6. Fear of the Loss of Honor: Implications of Honor-Based Violence for the Development of Youth and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedem, Mina; Ferrer-Wreder, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Background: Violence committed against young women, and in some cases young men, who are considered to have violated honor-based norms are reported in several countries, making honor-based violence (HBV) a global concern. This article is an overview of research in this area and summarizes key findings from a Swedish program of research dedicated…

  7. "Honor," collectivity, and agnation: emerging risk factors in "honor"-based violence.

    PubMed

    Payton, Joanne

    2014-11-01

    "Honor"-based violence (HBV) is increasingly recognized as form of violence against women and girls, but is neither fully conceptualized nor integrated into risk management strategies that are increasingly used to address gender-based violence in Europe and Anglophone states. This article will argue that there are grounds for the differentiation of HBV as a sub-category of gender-based violence which may affect risk management. Research was based in an analysis of 40 case files taken from Arabic- and Kurdish-speaking clients of a London nongovernment organization (NGO) providing services to women facing violence. Interrelations were found between "honor," agnation, and collectivity in their experiences of violence, with ramifications for service provision. PMID:24671044

  8. A Tradition Unlike Any Other: Research on the Value of an Honors Senior Thesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, H. Kay

    2016-01-01

    An honors senior thesis introduces students into a world of scholarship and professional activity in a way that no single course, either semester- or year-long, can do (Anderson, Lyons, and Weiner). Many honors educators consider honors thesis work to be the defining honors experience. For graduate schools, employers, and the students themselves,…

  9. Propensity Score Analysis of an Honors Program's Contribution to Students' Retention and Graduation Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Robert R.; Lacy, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    Honors directors and deans know or presume that retention and graduation rates of honors students substantially exceed those of non-honors students. In our research, we have attempted to better determine what portion of this success is attributable to the academic and other benefits of honors programs as opposed to the background characteristics…

  10. Alaska's renewable energy potential.

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2009-02-01

    This paper delivers a brief survey of renewable energy technologies applicable to Alaska's climate, latitude, geography, and geology. We first identify Alaska's natural renewable energy resources and which renewable energy technologies would be most productive. e survey the current state of renewable energy technologies and research efforts within the U.S. and, where appropriate, internationally. We also present information on the current state of Alaska's renewable energy assets, incentives, and commercial enterprises. Finally, we escribe places where research efforts at Sandia National Laboratories could assist the state of Alaska with its renewable energy technology investment efforts.

  11. Writing on Your Feet: Reflective Practices in City as Text™. A Tribute to the Career of Bernice Braid. National Collegiate Honors Council Monograph Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Ada, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    City as Text™ (CAT) is one of the earliest structural forms of experiential learning created and practiced in the United States. This monograph explores the centrality of writing in the process of active learning, focusing primarily on the Faculty Institutes and Honors Semesters that foster CAT experiences. All manifestations of this pedagogical…

  12. Perspective View of Okmok Volcano, Aleutian Islands, Alaska (#1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This perspective view shows the caldera of the Okmok volcano in Alaska's Aleutian Islands.

    The shaded relief was generated from and draped over an Airsar-derived digital elevation mosaic.

    Airsar collected the Alaska data as part of its PacRim 2000 Mission, which took the instrument to French Polynesia, American and Western Samoa, Fiji, New Zealand, Australia, New Guinea, Indonesia, Malaysia, Cambodia, Philippines, Taiwan, South Korea, Japan, Northern Marianas, Guam, Palau, Hawaii and Alaska. Airsar, part of NASA's Airborne Science Program, is managed for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise by JPL. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  13. Perspective View of Okmok Volcano, Aleutian Islands, Alaska (#2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This perspective view shows the caldera of the Okmok volcano in Alaska's Aleutian Islands.

    The shaded relief was generated from and draped over an Airsar-derived digital elevation mosaic.

    Airsar collected the Alaska data as part of its PacRim 2000 Mission, which took the instrument to French Polynesia, American and Western Samoa, Fiji, New Zealand, Australia, New Guinea, Indonesia, Malaysia, Cambodia, Philippines, Taiwan, South Korea, Japan, Northern Marianas, Guam, Palau, Hawaii and Alaska. Airsar, part of NASA's Airborne Science Program, is managed for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise by JPL. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  14. Vocational Education in Alaska. Central Issues and Problem Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska Review of Social and Economic Conditions, 1979

    1979-01-01

    To identify central problems in vocational education in Alaska, a study focused on the three sectors at the postsecondary school level: public or independent nonprofit institutions, private schools, and apprenticeship programs. Public and nonprofit institutions consider job preparation their primary goal in addition to skill upgrading and teaching…

  15. Alaska Library Directory, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Mary, Ed.

    This directory of Alaska's Libraries lists: members of the Alaska Library Association (AkLA) Executive Council and Committee Chairs; State Board of Education members; members of the Governor's Advisory Council on Libraries; school, academic and public libraries and their addresses, phone and fax numbers, and contact persons; personal,…

  16. Renewable Energy in Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-03-01

    This report examines the opportunities, challenges, and costs associated with renewable energy implementation in Alaska and provides strategies that position Alaska's accumulating knowledge in renewable energy development for export to the rapidly growing energy/electric markets of the developing world.

  17. Alaska geothermal bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Liss, S.A.; Motyka, R.J.; Nye, C.J.

    1987-05-01

    The Alaska geothermal bibliography lists all publications, through 1986, that discuss any facet of geothermal energy in Alaska. In addition, selected publications about geology, geophysics, hydrology, volcanology, etc., which discuss areas where geothermal resources are located are included, though the geothermal resource itself may not be mentioned. The bibliography contains 748 entries.

  18. And the Top Honor Goes to Voc Ed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hettinger, James

    1998-01-01

    Ray Chelewski is the first vocational-technical educator to win Walt Disney's top teaching honor. Chelewski is an agriculture teacher at the Presque Isle Regional Technology Center in northeast Maine. (JOW)

  19. Geophysical Institute. Biennial report, 1993-1994

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    The 1993-1994 Geophysical Institute Biennial Report was published in November 1995 by the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. It contains an overview of the Geophysical Institute, the Director`s Note, and research presentations concerning the following subjects: Scientific Predictions, Space Physics, Atmospheric Sciences, Snow, Ice and Permafrost, Tectonics and Sedimentation, Seismology, Volcanology, Remote Sensing, and other projects.

  20. Geophysical Institute. Biennial report, 1993-1994

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    The 1993-1994 Geophysical Institute Biennial Report was published in November 1995 by the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. It contains an overview of the Geophysical Institute, the Director`s Note, and research presentations concerning the following subjects: scientific predictions, space physics, atmospheric sciences, snow, ice and permafrost, tectonics and sedimentation, seismology, volcanology, remote sensing, and other projects.

  1. Alaska Volcano Observatory at 20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, J. C.

    2008-12-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) was established in 1988 in the wake of the 1986 Augustine eruption through a congressional earmark. Even within the volcanological community, there was skepticism about AVO. Populations directly at risk in Alaska were small compared to Cascadia, and the logistical costs of installing and maintaining monitoring equipment were much higher. Questions were raised concerning the technical feasibility of keeping seismic stations operating through the long, dark, stormy Alaska winters. Some argued that AVO should simply cover Augustine with instruments and wait for the next eruption there, expected in the mid 90s (but delayed until 2006), rather than stretching to instrument as many volcanoes as possible. No sooner was AVO in place than Redoubt erupted and a fully loaded passenger 747 strayed into the eruption cloud between Anchorage and Fairbanks, causing a powerless glide to within a minute of impact before the pilot could restart two engines and limp into Anchorage. This event forcefully made the case that volcano hazard mitigation is not just about people and infrastructure on the ground, and is particularly important in the heavily traveled North Pacific where options for flight diversion are few. In 1996, new funding became available through an FAA earmark to aggressively extend volcano monitoring far into the Aleutian Islands with both ground-based networks and round-the-clock satellite monitoring. Beyond the Aleutians, AVO developed a monitoring partnership with Russians volcanologists at the Institute of Volcanology and Seismology in Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky. The need to work together internationally on subduction phenomena that span borders led to formation of the Japan-Kamchatka-Alaska Subduction Processes (JKASP) consortium. JKASP meets approximately biennially in Sapporo, Petropavlovsk, and Fairbanks. In turn, these meetings and support from NSF and the Russian Academy of Sciences led to new international education and

  2. Institute of Higher Education: An Oral History (1964-2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fincher, Cameron

    This oral history is part of the celebration planned by the University of Georgia Institute of Higher Education to honor Cameron Fincher for his service to the field of higher education and the Institute. Dr, Fincher was interviewed by Delmer D. Dunn about the significant changes that have occurred in higher education over the past 50 years.…

  3. Alaska marine ice atlas

    SciTech Connect

    LaBelle, J.C.; Wise, J.L.; Voelker, R.P.; Schulze, R.H.; Wohl, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive Atlas of Alaska marine ice is presented. It includes information on pack and landfast sea ice and calving tidewater glacier ice. It also gives information on ice and related environmental conditions collected over several years time and indicates the normal and extreme conditions that might be expected in Alaska coastal waters. Much of the information on ice conditions in Alaska coastal waters has emanated from research activities in outer continental shelf regions under assessment for oil and gas exploration and development potential. (DMC)

  4. Libraries in Alaska: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/alaska.html Libraries in Alaska To use the sharing features on ... JavaScript. Anchorage University of Alaska Anchorage Alaska Medical Library 3211 Providence Drive Anchorage, AK 99508-8176 907- ...

  5. 75 FR 53331 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... Interest to Hadohdleekaga, Incorporated, for the Native village of Hughes, Alaska, pursuant to the Alaska... Hughes, Alaska, and are located in: Kateel River Meridian, Alaska T. 9 N., R. 23 E., Sec. 5....

  6. Alaska Native Rural Development: The NANA Experience. Occasional Paper No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaffney, Michael J.

    Faced with the need to build new social and economic institutions following the 1971 Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, Alaska Natives formed 12 regional non-profit making corporations. One of these, Northwest Arctic Inupiat (NANA), is bringing a human resources development approach to the area in an effort to develop enduring economic and…

  7. Evaluation of the Alaska Native Science & Engineering Program (ANSEP). Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Hamutal; Martin, Carlos; Eyster, Lauren; Anderson, Theresa; Owen, Stephanie; Martin-Caughey, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    The Urban Institute conducted an implementation and participant-outcomes evaluation of the Alaska Native Science & Engineering Program (ANSEP). ANSEP is a multi-stage initiative designed to prepare and support Alaska Native students from middle school through graduate school to succeed in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM)…

  8. Alaska telemedicine: growth through collaboration.

    PubMed

    Patricoski, Chris

    2004-12-01

    The last thirty years have brought the introduction and expansion of telecommunications to rural and remote Alaska. The intellectual and financial investment of earlier projects, the more recent AFHCAN Project and the Universal Service Administrative Company Rural Health Care Division (RHCD) has sparked a new era in telemedicine and telecommunication across Alaska. This spark has been flamed by the dedication and collaboration of leaders at he highest levels of organizations such as: AFHCAN member organizations, AFHCAN Office, Alaska Clinical Engineering Services, Alaska Federal Health Care Partnership, Alaska Federal Health Care Partnership Office, Alaska Native health Board, Alaska Native Tribal health Consortium, Alaska Telehealth Advisory Council, AT&T Alascom, GCI Inc., Health care providers throughout the state of Alaska, Indian Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of U.S. Senator Ted Steens, State of Alaska, U.S. Department of Homeland Security--United States Coast Guard, United States Department of Agriculture, United States Department of Defense--Air Force and Army, United States Department of Veterans Affairs, University of Alaska, and University of Alaska Anchorage. Alaska now has one of the largest telemedicine programs in the world. As Alaska moves system now in place become self-sustaining, and 2) collaborating with all stakeholders in promoting the growth of an integrated, state-wide telemedicine network.

  9. Alaska: A frontier divided

    SciTech Connect

    O'Dell, R. )

    1986-09-01

    The superlatives surrounding Alaska are legion. Within the borders of the 49th US state are some of the world's greatest concentrations of waterfowl, bald eagles, fur seals, walrus, sea lions, otters, and the famous Kodiak brown bear. Alaska features the highest peak of North America, the 20,320-foot Mount McKinley, and the longest archipelago of small islands, the Aleutians. The state holds the greatest percentage of protected wilderness per capita in the world. The expanse of some Alaskan glaciers dwarfs entire countries. Like the periodic advance and retreat of its glaciers, Alaska appears with some regularity on the national US agenda. It last achieved prominence when President Jimmy Carter signed the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act in 1980. Since then the conflict between environmental protection and economic development has been played out throughout the state, and Congress is expected to turn to Alaskan issues again in its next sessions.

  10. Characteristics of medical students completing an honors program in pathology.

    PubMed

    Fenderson, B A; Hojat, M; Damjanov, I; Rubin, E

    1999-11-01

    The Honors Program in pathology at Jefferson Medical College provides a voluntary enrichment opportunity for students who have demonstrated a superior ability to cope with the pathology curriculum and who rank in the upper fifth of their class. This study was performed to determine whether honor students possess cognitive and psychosocial attributes that distinguish them from their classmates. Students from five academic years (entering classes 1991 to 1995) were divided into 3 groups: (1) those who completed the Honors Program (n = 85), (2) those in the top 20% of the class who were offered the option but chose not to participate in the Honors Program (n = 128), and (3) students who did not qualify for the program (n = 953). Comparisons between these three groups were made on the basis of selected measures of academic achievement retrieved from the Jefferson Longitudinal Study database and psychosocial data obtained from a questionnaire completed during the first-year orientation. Students who completed the Honors Program in pathology had scored higher on the physical science section of the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) and had obtained higher first-year grade point averages than students in both of the other groups. Subsequently, they attained higher second-year grade point averages and scored higher on Step 1 and Step 2 of the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE), compared with their peers in the other groups. There were no significant differences in psychosocial measures between honor students and the rest of the cohort (group 3). However, students in the top 20% of the class who declined the invitation to participate in the Honors Program (group 2) showed higher scores on the Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale and the Eysenck Emotional Instability (Neuroticism) Scale than did their classmates. Despite these differences, students who completed the Honors Program (group 1) and eligible students who declined participation (group 2) selected

  11. Honor your father and your mother.

    PubMed

    Schuiling, G A

    2001-12-01

    While on the one hand there is much mutual love and care in the relationship between parents and their offspring, there may, on the other hand, be also much mutual 'sound and fury', which sometimes is far from 'signifying nothing' (William Shakespeare, Macbeth). Indeed, from conception on, individuals are confronted with parent-offspring conflicts of all kinds. Initially these conflicts concern physiological matters (implantation, nutrition, weaning, etc.), but later in life the accent is on psychological ('you must this', 'you must that', 'don't do that' etc.) and social affairs, and phenomena such as child abuse, infanticide and incest may occur. It is, therefore, certainly not self-evident that children honor their parents. To reinforce their position, parents (societies) may appeal to a 'divine' commandment which helps them make their children suppress any tendency to conflict toward them (and hence to their culture), so that children conform to their parents' norms and values. When such psychological and sociological parent-offspring conflicts are not resolved satisfactorily, it can be suggested, children may (consciously or unconsciously) have aggressive feelings toward their parents: Freud's 'Oedipus complex'. This complex, it is argued, can also be seen as a parent-offspring conflict. Given their biological basis, parent-offspring conflicts can hardly be considered as abnormal. Conflicts between adults and their offspring have always existed and will always exist, simply because it is inherent in our genetic make-up: parents and offspring of sexually reproducing species--humans included--are only about 50% genetically related and hence have different interests at all levels of being. Indeed, parent-offspring conflicts are such stuff as we are made on, and our little life is rounded with its consequences (adapted from William Shakespeare, The Tempest). PMID:11840575

  12. Honor killing attitudes amongst adolescents in Amman, Jordan.

    PubMed

    Eisner, Manuel; Ghuneim, Lana

    2013-01-01

    The present study examines attitudes towards honor crimes amongst a sample of 856 ninth grade students (mean age = 14.6, SD = 0.56) from 14 schools in Amman, Jordan. Descriptive findings suggest that about 40% of boys and 20% of girls believe that killing a daughter, sister, or wife who has dishonored the family can be justified. A number of theoretically meaningful predictors were examined: Findings suggest that attitudes in support of honor killings are more likely amongst adolescents who have collectivist and patriarchal world views, believe in the importance of female chastity amongst adolescents, and morally neutralize aggressive behavior in general. Findings for parental harsh discipline are mixed: While the father's harsh discipline is predictive of honor killing attitudes, the mother's behavior is not. Furthermore, support for honor killing is stronger amongst male adolescents and adolescents for low education backgrounds. After controlling for other factors religion and the intensity of religious beliefs are not associated with support for honor killings. Models were tested separately for male and female respondents and suggested no systematic differences in predictors. Limitations and implications are discussed.

  13. Alaska looks HOT!

    SciTech Connect

    Belcher, J.

    1997-07-01

    Production in Alaska has been sluggish in recent years, with activity in the Prudhoe Bay region in the North Slope on a steady decline. Alaska North Slope (ANS) production topped out in 1988 at 2.037 MMbo/d, with 1.6 MMbo/d from Prudhoe Bay. This year operators expect to produce 788 Mbo/d from Prudhoe Bay, falling to 739 Mbo/d next year. ANS production as a whole should reach 1.3 MMbo/d this year, sliding to 1.29 MMbo/d in 1998. These declining numbers had industry officials and politicians talking about the early death of the Trans-Alaskan Pipeline System-the vital link between ANS crude and markets. But enhanced drilling technology coupled with a vastly improved relationship between the state government and industry have made development in Alaska more economical and attractive. Alaska`s Democratic Gov. Tommy Knowles is fond of telling industry {open_quotes}we`re open for business.{close_quotes} New discoveries on the North Slope and in the Cook Inlet are bringing a renewed sense of optimism to the Alaska exploration and production industry. Attempts by Congress to lift a moratorium on exploration and production activity in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) have been thwarted thus far, but momentum appears to be with proponents of ANWR drilling.

  14. EarthScope Transportable Array Siting Outreach Activities in Alaska and Western Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardine, L.; Dorr, P. M.; Tape, C.; McQuillan, P.; Taber, J.; West, M. E.; Busby, R. W.

    2014-12-01

    The EarthScopeTransportable Array is working to locate over 260 stations in Alaska and western Canada. In this region, new tactics and partnerships are needed to increase outreach exposure. IRIS and EarthScope are partnering with the Alaska Earthquake Center, part of University of Alaska Geophysical Institute, to spread awareness of Alaska earthquakes and the benefits of the Transportable Array for Alaskans. Nearly all parts of Alaska are tectonically active. The tectonic and seismic variability of Alaska requires focused attention at the regional level, and the remoteness and inaccessibility of most Alaska villages and towns often makes frequent visits difficult. For this reason, Alaska outreach most often occurs at community events. When a community is accessible, every opportunity to engage the residents is made. Booths at state fairs and large cultural gatherings, such as the annual convention of the Alaska Federation of Natives, are excellent venues to distribute earthquake information and to demonstrate a wide variety of educational products and web-based applications related to seismology and the Transportable Array that residents can use in their own communities. Region-specific publications have been developed to tie in a sense of place for residents of Alaska. The Alaska content for IRIS's Active Earth Monitor will emphasize the widespread tectonic and seismic features and offer not just Alaska residents, but anyone interested in Alaska, a glimpse into what is going on beneath their feet. The concerted efforts of the outreach team will have lasting effects on Alaskan understanding of the seismic hazard and tectonics of the region. Efforts to publicize the presence of the Transportable Array in Alaska, western Canada, and the Lower 48 also continue. There have been recent articles published in university, local and regional newspapers; stories appearing in national and international print and broadcast media; and documentaries produced by some of the world

  15. Naming patterns reveal cultural values: patronyms, matronyms, and the U.S. culture of honor.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ryan P; Carvallo, Mauricio; Imura, Mikiko

    2014-02-01

    Four studies examined the hypothesis that honor norms would be associated with a pronounced use of patronyms, but not matronyms, for naming children. Study 1 shows that men who endorse honor values expressed a stronger desire to use patronyms (but not matronyms) for future children, an association that was mediated by patriarchal attitudes. Study 2 presents an indirect method for assessing state patronym and matronym levels. As expected, patronym scores were significantly higher in honor states and were associated with a wide range of variables linked previously to honor-related dynamics. Study 3a shows that following the terrorist attacks of 9/11, patronyms increased in honor states, but not in non-honor states. Likewise, priming men with a fictitious terrorist attack (Study 3b) increased the association between honor ideology and patronym preferences. Together, these studies reveal a subtle social signal that reflects the masculine values of an honor culture. PMID:24201292

  16. Alaska Resource Data File: Chignik quadrangle, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pilcher, Steven H.

    2000-01-01

    Descriptions of the mineral occurrences can be found in the report. See U.S. Geological Survey (1996) for a description of the information content of each field in the records. The data presented here are maintained as part of a statewide database on mines, prospects and mineral occurrences throughout Alaska. There is a website from which you can obtain the data for this report in text and Filemaker Pro formats

  17. 34 CFR 654.1 - What is the Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What is the Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship Program...) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ROBERT C. BYRD HONORS SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM General § 654.1 What is the Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship Program? Under the Robert C. Byrd...

  18. 34 CFR 654.1 - What is the Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What is the Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship Program...) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ROBERT C. BYRD HONORS SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM General § 654.1 What is the Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship Program? Under the Robert C. Byrd...

  19. 34 CFR 654.1 - What is the Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What is the Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship Program...) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ROBERT C. BYRD HONORS SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM General § 654.1 What is the Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship Program? Under the Robert C. Byrd...

  20. 34 CFR 654.1 - What is the Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What is the Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship Program...) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ROBERT C. BYRD HONORS SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM General § 654.1 What is the Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship Program? Under the Robert C. Byrd...

  1. Engaging Honors Students in Purposeful Planning through a Concept Mapping Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Melissa L.; Podjed, Stephanie; Taasan, Sean

    2013-01-01

    In Larry Clark's monograph chapter on the education of academically talented college students, he challenged honors educators to consider their role in helping students find their path, particularly through the addition of self-reflection and exploratory projects in honors courses. In an honors first-year experience (FYE) course for science,…

  2. Exploring Relationships of Metacognition and University Honors Students' Academic Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Susan Denise

    2012-01-01

    University honors programs emerged in the 1920s, growing to over 1,000 programs in existence today. Honors programs provide enhanced educational opportunities to students who excel academically. University honors students are experts who effectively apply metacognitive knowledge, strategies, and experiences to enhance academic behavior. Although…

  3. Committed to the Honor Code: An Investment Model Analysis of Academic Integrity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dix, Emily L.; Emery, Lydia F.; Le, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Educators worldwide face challenges surrounding academic integrity. The development of honor codes can promote academic integrity, but understanding how and why honor codes affect behavior is critical to their successful implementation. To date, research has not examined how students' "relationship" to an honor code predicts…

  4. ESO Receives Computerworld Honors Program 21st Century Achievement Award in Science Category

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-06-01

    Operations Division web page is at http://www.eso.org/org/dmd/. More information About the Computerworld Honors Program: Governed by the Computerworld Information Technology Awards Foundation, a Massachusetts not-for-profit corporation founded by International Data Group (IDG) in 1988, the Computerworld Honors Program searches for and recognizes individuals and organizations who have demonstrated vision and leadership as they strive to use information technology in innovative ways across 10 categories: Business and Related Services; Education and Academia; Environment, Energy and Agriculture; Finance, Insurance and Real Estate; Government and Non-Profit Organizations; Manufacturing; Media, Arts and Entertainment; Medicine; Science; and Transportation. Each year, the Computerworld Honors Chairmen's Committee nominates organizations that are using information technology to improve society for inclusion in the Computerworld Honors Online Archive and the Collections of the Global Archives. The Global Archives represents the 100-plus institutions from more than 30 countries that include the Computerworld Honors Collection in their archives and libraries.

  5. Development of a hybrid distance occupational therapy program in Alaska.

    PubMed

    Bracciano, Alfred; Lohman, Helene; Coppard, Brenda M; Bradberry, J Christopher; Easley, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    There are shortages of health professionals in rural states. Correspondingly, health professions education programs often do not exist in these areas. Students from rural areas seeking health professions degrees frequently move out of state or to urban areas for education. To address the shortage of occupational therapists in Alaska, Creighton University, a private, Jesuit university partnered with the University of Alaska Anchorage, a public institution, to deliver a hybrid occupational therapy program to students residing near or in Anchorage, Alaska. Characteristics for a successful interorganizational partnership include effective communication, a common goal, mutual needs, and trust. This academic program was designed by applying these characteristics and using agreed-upon benchmarks for web-based programs as described by Phipps and Merisotis. The collaborative program demonstrates a model, which could be used between two disparate institutions to meet the challenges and needs of rural and underserved areas for access to health education programs. PMID:21695369

  6. Flood frequency in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Childers, J.M.

    1970-01-01

    Records of peak discharge at 183 sites were used to study flood frequency in Alaska. The vast size of Alaska, its great ranges of physiography, and the lack of data for much of the State precluded a comprehensive analysis of all flood determinants. Peak stream discharges, where gaging-station records were available, were analyzed for 2-year, 5-year, 10-year, 25-year, and 50-year average-recurrence intervals. A regional analysis of the flood characteristics by multiple-regression methods gave a set of equations that can be used to estimate floods of selected recurrence intervals up to 50 years for any site on any stream in Alaska. The equations relate floods to drainage-basin characteristics. The study indicates that in Alaska the 50-year flood can be estimated from 10-year gaging- station records with a standard error of 22 percent whereas the 50-year flood can be estimated from the regression equation with a standard error of 53 percent. Also, maximum known floods at more than 500 gaging stations and miscellaneous sites in Alaska were related to drainage-area size. An envelope curve of 500 cubic feet per second per square mile covered all but 2 floods in the State.

  7. EarthScope Transportable Array Siting Outreach Activities in Alaska and Western Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorr, P. M.; Gardine, L.; Tape, C.; McQuillan, P.; Cubley, J. F.; Samolczyk, M. A.; Taber, J.; West, M. E.; Busby, R.

    2015-12-01

    The EarthScope Transportable Array is deploying about 260 stations in Alaska and western Canada. IRIS and EarthScope are partnering with the Alaska Earthquake Center, part of the University of Alaska's Geophysical Institute, and Yukon College to spread awareness of earthquakes in Alaska and western Canada and the benefits of the Transportable Array for people living in these regions. We provide an update of ongoing education and outreach activities in Alaska and Canada as well as continued efforts to publicize the Transportable Array in the Lower 48. Nearly all parts of Alaska and portions of western Canada are tectonically active. The tectonic and seismic variability of Alaska, in particular, requires focused attention at the regional level, and the remoteness and inaccessibility of most Alaskan and western Canadian villages and towns often makes frequent visits difficult. When a community is accessible, every opportunity to engage the residents is made. Booths at state fairs and large cultural gatherings, such as the annual convention of the Alaska Federation of Natives, are excellent venues to distribute earthquake information and to demonstrate a wide variety of educational products and web-based applications related to seismology and the Transportable Array that residents can use in their own communities. Meetings and interviews with Alaska Native Elders and tribal councils discussing past earthquakes has led to a better understanding of how Alaskans view and understand earthquakes. Region-specific publications have been developed to tie in a sense of place for residents of Alaska and the Yukon. The Alaska content for IRIS's Active Earth Monitor emphasizes the widespread tectonic and seismic features and offers not just Alaska residents, but anyone interested in Alaska, a glimpse into what is going on beneath their feet. The concerted efforts of the outreach team will have lasting effects on Alaskan and Canadian understanding of the seismic hazard and

  8. Accretion of southern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hillhouse, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    Paleomagnetic data from southern Alaska indicate that the Wrangellia and Peninsular terranes collided with central Alaska probably by 65 Ma ago and certainly no later than 55 Ma ago. The accretion of these terranes to the mainland was followed by the arrival of the Ghost Rocks volcanic assemblage at the southern margin of Kodiak Island. Poleward movement of these terranes can be explained by rapid motion of the Kula oceanic plate, mainly from 85 to 43 Ma ago, according to recent reconstructions derived from the hot-spot reference frame. After accretion, much of southwestern Alaska underwent a counterclockwise rotation of about 50 ?? as indicated by paleomagnetic poles from volcanic rocks of Late Cretaceous and Early Tertiary age. Compression between North America and Asia during opening of the North Atlantic (68-44 Ma ago) may account for the rotation. ?? 1987.

  9. Improving Retention and Fit by Honing an Honors Admissions Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Patricia Joanne; Zagurski, John Thomas Vitus

    2013-01-01

    Since SAT and ACT tests have been long-suspected and then shown to contain class and race biases while not accurately predicting retention, the Schedler Honors College at the University of Central Arkansas (UCA) shifted to a holistic, multi-criterion selection process, de-emphasizing standardized tests, and then analyzed the outcomes. This essay…

  10. Mentors, Muses, and Mutuality: Honoring Barbara Snell Dohrenwend

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvey, Anne

    2012-01-01

    I describe feminist community psychology principles that have the potential to expand and enrich mentoring and that honor Barbara Snell Dohrenwend, a leader who contributed to the research, theory, and profession of community psychology. I reflect on the affect that Barbara Dohrenwend had on life and on the development of feminist community…

  11. Honors Education and the Prospects for Academic Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennison, George M.

    2008-01-01

    Honors education has the potential to serve as the foundation for reform of undergraduate education. Calls for reform during the last three decades have not resulted in change, in large measure because of the failure to engage the faculty and students in the effort. While prescriptions for change have abounded, conditions on campus and within…

  12. Codes, Ciphers, and Cryptography--An Honors Colloquium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karls, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    At the suggestion of a colleague, I read "The Code Book", [32], by Simon Singh to get a basic introduction to the RSA encryption scheme. Inspired by Singh's book, I designed a Ball State University Honors Colloquium in Mathematics for both majors and non-majors, with material coming from "The Code Book" and many other sources. This course became…

  13. The Impact of Honors on the Campus Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Larry

    2015-01-01

    The development of an honors program at Rogers State University a decade ago brought about significant positive changes to the campus, where more than three-quarters of the students are the first in their families to attend college. Throughout the years, these young scholars have elevated academic discourse across campus and delivered an impact…

  14. Exploratory Honors Students: Academic Major and Career Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carduner, Jessie; Padak, Gary M.; Reynolds, Jamie

    2011-01-01

    In this qualitative study, we investigated the academic major and career decision-making processes of honors college students who were declared as "exploratory" students in their freshman year at a large, public, midwestern university. We used semistandardized interviews and document analysis as primary data collection methods to answer four…

  15. Against Teleology in an Honors Great Books Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlan-Haughey, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Chronologically presented courses that span centuries often catalyze unwitting buy-in to unexamined narratives of progress. While useful for helping students make connections between the human past, present, and future, Great Books honors curricula like the one used at the University of Maine have a few inherent problems that require careful…

  16. 38 CFR 3.802 - Medal of Honor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... certificate issued in which the right of the person named in the certificate to the special pension is set... have received during the period beginning the first day of the month after the date of the event for... payment using the monthly Medal of Honor pension rates in effect from the first day of the month after...

  17. Honors Futures Course: Orwell's "1984"--Myth or Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Barbara

    An overview is provided of an honors futures course offered at Isothermal Community College and entitled "Orwell's '1984': Myth or Reality." The paper traces the sequence of class activities, discussion topics, and student assignments for the 11-week course. The following issues are discussed, both within and outside of the context of related…

  18. Nontraditional Honors and the Hopefulness of Summer Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salas, Angela M.

    2013-01-01

    Having read the essay on "Nontraditional Honors" by Janice Rye Kinghorn and Whitney Womack Smith, author Angela Salas writes that it offered her reminders about the fears and insecurities students carry with them. It also offered Salas the opportunity to reconsider the behaviors she was seeing in her class. She grew to see student…

  19. Signifying Difference: The Nontraditional Student and the Honors Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichert, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    In their essay "Nontraditional Honors," Janice Rye Kinghorn and Whitney Womack Smith state that students who are "twenty-five-years of age and older are usually considered nontraditional." However, they first acknowledge that "traditional" and "nontraditional" are "constructed and slippery terms."…

  20. Communicating about Sexuality: An Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Honors Seminar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozema, Hazel J.

    A course in the honors program (a sophomore level social science seminar) at Millikin University offers an interdisciplinary approach to communication and sexuality, functions as a course in the Gender Studies Minor curriculum, and provides a needed source of sex education for the campus. The purpose of the course is to facilitate communication…

  1. An American Honors Program in the Arab Gulf

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yyelland, Byrad

    2012-01-01

    The first Western honors program to be established in the Arab Gulf is offered in Doha, Qatar, on a small satellite campus of an American university. Doha is the capital city of Qatar, a sovereign Arab state physically located on a small peninsula bordering Saudi Arabia in the south and jutting into the Persian Gulf. With a population of only 1.7…

  2. Laboratories for Educational Innovation: Honors Programs in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfensberger, Marca V. C.; Van Eijl, Pierre; Pilot, Albert

    2012-01-01

    In Dutch universities, honors programs are a fast growing development. The first such programs started in 1993. Twenty years later a large number of programs are implemented at nearly all research universities and also at many universities of applied sciences in the Netherlands. Recent data have revealed significant diversity in the types and…

  3. Thinking and Rethinking: The Practical Value of an Honors Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, James

    2015-01-01

    This article describes how James Herbert's career transition to working on the Educational EQuality Project for the College Board and the National Endowment for the Humanities confirmed his belief that a liberal education in honors was good preparation for life. He proposes that his work experience may be illuminating to those who are now…

  4. Hommage a Rene Jeanneret (Festschrift in Honor of Rene Jeanneret).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travaux Neuchatelois de Linguistique (TRANEL), 1992

    1992-01-01

    This festschrift in honor of Rene Jeanneret, administrator of the Center for Applied Linguistics at Neuchatel University (Switzerland), contains the following papers (all papers are written in French with two exceptions): "A Walk with Rene Jeanneret Through the Garden of Applied Linguistics"; "--Thank You.--No Thank You!"; "The Interface between…

  5. Community Building at Honors Programs in Continental Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinkel, Nico; van Rees, Floris; Ruis, Margit; Sloots, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Many universities in the United States and Europe offer honors programs to meet the demands of gifted and intelligent students. One of the standard goals of these programs is to build an intellectual learning community. Establishing a community can be difficult because it requires that students show an active attitude and initiative. Many…

  6. Honors Workshop for Middle School Science Teachers. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meisner, Gerald W.; Lee, Ernest W.

    The Honors Workshop for Middle School Science Teachers was designed to address teachers' conceptual understanding of basic scientific principles, student misconceptions and how to deal with them, and observation and measurement techniques. For 4 weeks in summer and on 6 Saturdays during 2 academic years, 30 leaders among science teachers from the…

  7. The Egalitarianism of Honors at a Polytechnic University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coley, Soraya M.

    2015-01-01

    The Kellogg Honors College (KHC) is a distinctive community within Cal Poly Pomona (CPP), a public university in Southern California and one of twenty-three universities in the California State University (CSU) system. With over 22,000 students, CPP is the second-largest polytechnic university in the United States. The university's goal is to…

  8. Honors and the Humanities: Necessary as Air and Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salas, Angela Marie

    2015-01-01

    In a cultural environment that maintains that post-secondary education ought to produce job ready graduates, the importance of the liberal arts and the competencies they teach, along with the questions they engage, often comes up for debate. In such a culture, honors may appear frivolous, elitist, and rear-guard. Angela Marie Salas defends both…

  9. Why Honors Is a Hard Sell in the Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelen-Eigles, Deborah; Milner, Janice Levinsohn

    2014-01-01

    At the college president's request and after attending the 2013 NCHC conference in New Orleans, the authors developed a comprehensive honors program framework and spent the spring semester of 2014 sharing it with units across the college for discussion and feedback. The response was overwhelmingly positive. Despite the many benefits of this…

  10. An Honors Koan: Selling Water by the River

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portnoy, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Since Jerry Herron begins his forum essay, "Notes toward an Excellent Marxist-Elitist Honors Admissions Policy," with his anecdotal True Genealogical Confessions, Jeffery Portnoy, writes here that he feels feel obligated to begin in a similar mode. One side of Portnoy's family was in the real estate business in St. Louis, and the other…

  11. Honors in Chile: New Engagements in the Higher Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skewes, Juan Carlos; Sampaio, Carlos Alberto Cioce; Conway, Frederick J.

    2012-01-01

    Honors programs are rare in Latin America, and in Chile they were unknown before 2003. At the Universidad Austral de Chile, an interdisciplinary group of scholars linked to environmental studies put forward a pilot project for implementing a new experience in higher education. Challenged by an educational environment where (i) apathy and…

  12. An Elusive Honor: Psychology, Behavior, and the Nobel Prize

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickren, Wade E.

    2003-01-01

    Apart from economics, the human sciences have not generally been rewarded with high honors from the world community. Psychology has been awarded the distinction of a Nobel Prize only when it has served a role in explicating human behavior in relation to economics. Yet psychological science has played no small part in the work of a number of Nobel…

  13. An Honors Interdisciplinary Community-Based Research Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunbar, David; Terlecki, Melissa; Watterson, Nancy; Ratmansky, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    This article describes how two faculty members at Cabrini College--one from biology and the other from psychology--incorporated interdisciplinary community-based research in an honors course on environmental watershed issues. The course, Environmental Psychology, was team-taught in partnership with a local watershed organization, the Valley Creek…

  14. First Regional Super ESPC: Success on Kodiak Island, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Federal Energy Management Program

    2001-05-16

    This case study about energy saving performance contacts (ESPCs) presents an overview of how the Coast Guard at Kodiak Island, Alaska, established an ESPC contract and the benefits derived from it. The Federal Energy Management Program instituted these special contracts to help federal agencies finance energy-saving projects at their facilities.

  15. Restructuring the University of Alaska Statewide System of Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaylord, Thomas A.; Rogers, Brian

    The radical restructuring of Alaska's public higher education system brought on by the state's 1986 economic collapse is discussed. The plan called for a merger of 11 community colleges with three universities into three multi-campus institutions. It realigned statewide programs in vocational technical education, fisheries and ocean sciences,…

  16. USGS Alaska State Mosaic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2008-01-01

    The Alaska State Mosaic consists of portions of scenes from the Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics 2001 (MRLC 2001) collection. The 172 selected scenes have been geometrically and radiometrically aligned to produce a seamless, relatively cloud-free image of the State. The scenes were acquired between July 1999 and September 2002, resampled to 120-meter pixels, and cropped to the State boundary. They were reprojected into a standard Alaska Albers projection with the U.S. National Elevation Dataset (NED) used to correct for relief.

  17. To Participate or Not to Participate: The Perceptions of Gifted Students regarding an Honors Program at a Private Southeastern University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Gerri Ann

    2010-01-01

    The number of students who become completers of an honors program on college campuses is low. A mixed methods approach was utilized to determine the perceptions of gifted students regarding an honors program at a private, Southeastern university. Students who were honors program participants, honors program drop-outs, and qualified…

  18. Alaska Glaciers and Rivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image on October 7, 2007, showing the Alaska Mountains of south-central Alaska already coated with snow. Purple shadows hang in the lee of the peaks, giving the snow-clad land a crumpled appearance. White gives way to brown on the right side of the image where the mountains yield to the lower-elevation Susitna River Valley. The river itself cuts a silver, winding path through deep green forests and brown wetlands and tundra. Extending from the river valley, are smaller rivers that originated in the Alaska Mountains. The source of these rivers is evident in the image. Smooth white tongues of ice extend into the river valleys, the remnants of the glaciers that carved the valleys into the land. Most of the water flowing into the Gulf of Alaska from the Susitna River comes from these mountain glaciers. Glacier melt also feeds glacier lakes, only one of which is large enough to be visible in this image. Immediately left of the Kahiltna River, the aquamarine waters of Chelatna Lake stand out starkly against the brown and white landscape.

  19. Alaska Mathematics Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska Department of Education & Early Development, 2012

    2012-01-01

    High academic standards are an important first step in ensuring that all Alaska's students have the tools they need for success. These standards reflect the collaborative work of Alaskan educators and national experts from the nonprofit National Center for the Improvement of Educational Assessment. Further, they are informed by public…

  20. Suicide in Northwest Alaska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travis, Robert

    1983-01-01

    Between 1975 and 1979 the Alaskan Native suicide rate (90.9 per 100,000) in Northwest Alaska was more than seven times the national average. Alienation, loss of family, low income, alcohol abuse, high unemployment, and more education were factors related to suicidal behavior. Average age for suicidal behavior was 22.5. (Author/MH)

  1. Alaska's Young Entrepreneurs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Marilyn R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes Edgecumbe Enterprises, a four-year-old fish exporting venture run by Mt. Edgecumbe High School in Sitka, Alaska, and the students' meeting with business leaders in Tokyo, Japan. The young entrepreneurs spent two weeks studying the Japanese marketing structure. (JOW)

  2. Seismology Outreach in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardine, L.; Tape, C.; West, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Despite residing in a state with 75% of North American earthquakes and three of the top 15 ever recorded, most Alaskans have limited knowledge about the science of earthquakes. To many, earthquakes are just part of everyday life, and to others, they are barely noticed until a large event happens, and often ignored even then. Alaskans are rugged, resilient people with both strong independence and tight community bonds. Rural villages in Alaska, most of which are inaccessible by road, are underrepresented in outreach efforts. Their remote locations and difficulty of access make outreach fiscally challenging. Teacher retention and small student bodies limit exposure to science and hinder student success in college. The arrival of EarthScope's Transportable Array, the 50th anniversary of the Great Alaska Earthquake, targeted projects with large outreach components, and increased community interest in earthquake knowledge have provided opportunities to spread information across Alaska. We have found that performing hands-on demonstrations, identifying seismological relevance toward career opportunities in Alaska (such as natural resource exploration), and engaging residents through place-based experience have increased the public's interest and awareness of our active home.

  3. Current Ethnomusicology in Alaska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Thomas F.

    The systematic study of Eskimo, Indian, and Aleut musical sound and behavior in Alaska, though conceded to be an important part of white efforts to foster understanding between different cultural groups and to maintain the native cultural heritage, has received little attention from Alaskan educators. Most existing ethnomusical studies lack one or…

  4. Alaska's Cold Desert.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brune, Jeff; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Explores the unique features of Alaska's Arctic ecosystem, with a focus on the special adaptations of plants and animals that enable them to survive in a stressful climate. Reviews the challenges facing public and private land managers who seek to conserve this ecosystem while accommodating growing demands for development. Includes classroom…

  5. Venetie, Alaska energy assessment.

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Richard Pearson; Baca, Michael J.; Schenkman, Benjamin L.; Brainard, James Robert

    2013-07-01

    This report summarizes the Energy Assessment performed for Venetie, Alaska using the principals of an Energy Surety Microgrid (ESM) The report covers a brief overview of the principals of ESM, a site characterization of Venetie, a review of the consequence modeling, some preliminary recommendations, and a basic cost analysis.

  6. Research Center Renaming Will Honor Senator Domenici

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-05-01

    New Mexico Tech and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) will rename the observatory's research center on the New Mexico Tech campus to honor retiring U.S. Senator Pete V. Domenici in a ceremony on May 30. The building that serves as the scientific, technical, and administrative center for the Very Large Array (VLA) and Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio telescopes will be named the "Pete V. Domenici Science Operations Center." The building previously was known simply as the "Array Operations Center." Sen. Pete V. Domenici Sen. Pete V. Domenici "The new name recognizes the strong and effective support for science that has been a hallmark of Senator Domenici's long career in public service," said Dr. Fred Lo, NRAO Director. New Mexico Tech President Daniel H. Lopez said Sen. Domenici has always been a supporter of science and research in Socorro and throughout the state. "He's been a statesman for New Mexico, the nation -- and without exaggeration -- for the world," Lopez said. "Anyone with that track record deserves this recognition." Van Romero, Tech vice president of research and economic development, has served as the university's main lobbyist in Washington, D.C., for more than a decade. He said Sen. Domenici has always been receptive to new ideas and willing to take risks. "Over the years, Sen. Domenici has always had time to listen to our needs and goals," Romero said. "He has served as a champion of New Mexico Tech's causes and we owe him a debt of gratitude for all his efforts over the decades." Originally dedicated in 1988, the center houses offices and laboratories that support VLA and VLBA operations. The center also supports work on the VLA modernization project and on the international Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) project. Work on ALMA at the Socorro center and at the ALMA Test Facility at the VLA site west of Socorro has focused on developing and testing equipment to be deployed at the ALMA site in Chile's Atacama

  7. Recent Ph.D.s; Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modeling studies of Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) survival during transportacross the Scotia Sea and Environs,Bettina A. Fach, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia, Eileen E. Hofmann, May 2003.Robin Canup has received the 2003 Harold C. Urey Prize, presented by the Division for Planetary Sciences of the American Astronomical Society for her ``groundbreaking research contributions on the Moon's origin and dynamical evolution.''Richard S. Fiske has received the Award for Outstanding Contribution to Public Understanding of the Geosciences, presented annually by The American Geological Institute (AGI) ``to a person, organization, or institution in recognition of an outstanding contribution to the public understanding of geology.''Dana W. Longcope has received the first Karen Harvey Prize, presented by the Solar Physics Division of the American Astronomical Society for his ``contributions to the study of the Sun's magnetism in the areas of separator reconnection and flux-tube physics.''George W. Wetherill has been awarded the 2003 Henry Norris Russell Lectureship by the American Astronomical Society. The award citation reads, in part, ``one of the truly original thinkers in planetary astronomy, George Wetherill pioneered the application of modern physics and numerical simulations to the formation and evolution of terrestrial planets.''

  8. Asthma and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Minority Population Profiles > American Indian/Alaska Native > Asthma Asthma and American Indians/Alaska Natives In 2014, 218, ... Native American adults reported that they currently have asthma. American Indian/Alaska Native children are 30% more ...

  9. Nontraditional Students and Institutions of Higher Education: A Conceptual Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exposito, Sara; Bernheimer, Susan

    2012-01-01

    This article provides a conceptual base for pedagogy that embraces and incorporates the assets of nontraditional students in higher education and advocates for practice that honors and builds on students' cultural and social capital. It describes the challenges and opportunities faced by nontraditional students within institutions of higher…

  10. Honors biomedical instrumentation--a course model for accelerated design.

    PubMed

    Madhok, Jai; Smith, Ryan J; Thakor, Nitish V

    2009-01-01

    A model for a 16-week Biomedical Instrumentation course is outlined. The course is modeled in such a way that students learn about medical devices and instrumentation through lecture and laboratory sessions while also learning basic design principles. Course material covers a broad range of topics from fundamentals of sensors and instrumentation, guided laboratory design experiments, design projects, and eventual protection of intellectual property, regulatory considerations, and entry into the commercial market. Students eventually complete two design projects in the form of a 'Challenge' design project as well as an 'Honors' design project. Sample problems students solve during the Challenge project and examples of past Honors projects from the course are highlighted. PMID:19964766

  11. Educating medical students for Alaska.

    PubMed

    Fortuine, R; Dimino, M J

    1998-01-01

    Because Alaska does not have its own medical school, it has become part of WAMI (Washington, Alaska, Montana, Idaho), an educational agreement with the University of Washington School of Medicine (UWSM). Each year, 10 Alaskans are accepted into the entering class of UWSM and spend their first year at the University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA). UWSM third- and fourth-year medical students can obtain some of their clinical experience in Alaska. To meet the needs of Alaska, students are chosen based on academic and personal records, as well as the likelihood of their returning to Alaska for practice. To this end, over the last seven years 30% of accepted students have come from rural communities and 10% are Alaska Natives. The curriculum for the first year includes several sessions dedicated to Alaska health problems, cross-cultural issues, and Alaska's unique rural health care delivery system. Students do two preceptorships--one with a private primary care physician and one with a physician at the Alaska Native Medical Center. Additionally, students have the option to spend a week at a rural site to learn about the community's health care system. An Alaska track is being developed whereby an Alaskan UWSM student can do most of the third year in state via clerkships in family medicine, obstetrics/gynecology, psychiatry, internal medicine, and pediatrics. All UWSM students at the end of their first year can elect to participate for one month in the R/UOP (Rural/Underserved Opportunities Program), which includes several Alaska sites. The overall goals of these approaches are to educate UWSM students, especially Alaskans, about the state's health needs and health care system and to encourage UWSM graduates to practice in the state.

  12. Career and Technology Center Honors Julie Hartman | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer On May 7, Julie Hartman was honored by the Frederick County Career and Technology Center (CTC) for her support of the CTC’s Biomedical Sciences Program. As an education program specialist for Outreach and Special Programs at NCI at Frederick, Hartman is responsible for NCI at Frederick’s participation in the program, which is designed to offer Frederick County high school students hands-on, practical laboratory experience beyond the typical classroom setting. 

  13. Alaska OCS (Outer Continental Shelf) social and economic studies program. Technical report Number 91. Effects of renewable resource harvest disruptions on socio-economic and socio-cultural systems: Wainwright, Alaska. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Luton, H.H.

    1985-01-01

    Contents include: ethnographic baseline, Wainright, Alaska; social institutions; the cash economy; kinship; subsistence task groups; subsistence economy; sharing; land mammals; marine mammals - Part 1 and 2; birds; fish, invertebrates, plants, minerals; ethnographic summary and conclusions.

  14. Significant Alaska minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, M.S.; Bundtzen, T.K.

    1982-01-01

    Alaska ranks in the top four states in gold production. About 30.5 million troy oz have been produced from lode and placer deposits. Until 1930, Alaska was among the top 10 states in copper production; in 1981, Kennecott Copper Company had prospects of metal worth at least $7 billion. More than 85% of the 20 million oz of silver derived have been byproducts of copper mining. Nearly all lead production has been as a byproduct of gold milling. Molybdenum is a future Alaskan product; in 1987 production is scheduled to be about 12% of world demand. Uranium deposits discovered in the Southeast are small but of high grade and easily accessible; farther exploration depends on improvement of a depressed market. Little has been done with Alaskan iron and zinc, although large deposits of the latter were discovered. Alaskan jade has a market among craftspeople. A map of the mining districts is included. 2 figures, 1 table.

  15. Seabirds in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatch, Scott A.; Piatt, John F.

    1995-01-01

    Techniques for monitoring seabird populations vary according to habitat types and the breeding behavior of individual species (Hatch and Hatch 1978, 1989; Byrd et al. 1983). An affordable monitoring program can include but a few of the 1,300 seabird colonies identified in Alaska, and since the mid-1970's, monitoring effotrts have emphasized a small selection of surface-feeding and diving species, primarily kittiwakes (Rissa spp.) and murres (Uria spp.). Little or no information on trends is available for other seabirds (Hatch 1993a). The existing monitoring program occurs largely on sites within the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge, which was established primarily for the conservation of marine birds. Data are collected by refuge staff, other state and federal agencies, private organizations, university faculty, and students.

  16. Coal resources of Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.B.

    1982-01-01

    In the late 1800s, whaling ships carried Alaskan coal, and it was used to thaw ground for placer gold mining. Unfortunate and costly political maneuvers in the early 1900s delayed coal removal, but the Alaska Railroad and then World War II provided incentives for opening mines. Today, 33 million acres (about 9% of the state) is classified as prospectively valuable for coal, much of it under federal title. Although the state's geology is poorly known, potential for discovery of new fields exists. The US Geological Survey estimates are outdated, although still officially used. The total Alaska onshore coal resource is estimated to be 216 to 4216 billion tons of which 141 billion tons are identified resources; an additional 1430 billion tons are believed to lie beneath Cook Inlet. Transportation over mountain ranges and wetlands is the biggest hurdle for removal. Known coal sources and types are described and mapped. 1 figure.

  17. Geologic map of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Frederic H.; Hults, Chad P.; Mull, Charles G.; Karl, Susan M.

    2015-12-31

    This Alaska compilation is unique in that it is integrated with a rich database of information provided in the spatial datasets and standalone attribute databases. Within the spatial files every line and polygon is attributed to its original source; the references to these sources are contained in related tables, as well as in stand-alone tables. Additional attributes include typical lithology, geologic setting, and age range for the map units. Also included are tables of radiometric ages.

  18. NWS Alaska Sea Ice Program: Operations and Decision Support Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, M. B.; Nelson, J. A., Jr.; Heim, R.

    2015-12-01

    The National Weather Service's Alaska Sea Ice Program is designed to service customers and partners operating and planning operations within Alaska waters. The Alaska Sea Ice Program offers daily sea ice and sea surface temperature analysis products. The program also delivers a five day sea ice forecast 3 times each week, provides a 3 month sea ice outlook at the end of each month, and has staff available to respond to sea ice related information inquiries. These analysis and forecast products are utilized by many entities around the state of Alaska and nationally for safety of navigation and community strategic planning. The list of current customers stem from academia and research institutions, to local state and federal agencies, to resupply barges, to coastal subsistence hunters, to gold dredgers, to fisheries, to the general public. Due to a longer sea ice free season over recent years, activity in the waters around Alaska has increased. This has led to a rise in decision support services from the Alaska Sea Ice Program. The ASIP is in constant contact with the National Ice Center as well as the United States Coast Guard (USCG) for safety of navigation. In the past, the ASIP provided briefings to the USCG when in support of search and rescue efforts. Currently, not only does that support remain, but our team is also briefing on sea ice outlooks into the next few months. As traffic in the Arctic increases, the ASIP will be called upon to provide more and more services on varying time scales to meet customer needs. This talk will address the many facets of the current Alaska Sea Ice Program as well as delve into what we see as the future of the ASIP.

  19. Aniakchak Crater, Alaska Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Walter R.

    1925-01-01

    The discovery of a gigantic crater northwest of Aniakchak Bay (see fig. 11) closes what had been thought to be a wide gap in the extensive series of volcanoes occurring at irregular intervals for nearly 600 miles along the axial line of the Alaska Peninsula and the Aleutian Islands. In this belt there are more active and recently active volcanoes than in all the rest of North America. Exclusive of those on the west side of Cook Inlet, which, however, belong to the same group, this belt contains at least 42 active or well-preserved volcanoes and about half as many mountains suspected or reported to be volcanoes. The locations of some of these mountains and the hot springs on the Alaska Peninsula and the Aleutian Islands are shown on a map prepared by G. A. Waring. Attention has been called to these volcanoes for nearly two centuries, but a record of their activity since the discovery of Alaska is far from being complete, and an adequate description of them as a group has never been written. Owing to their recent activity or unusual scenic beauty, some of the best known of the group are Mounts Katmai, Bogoslof, and Shishaldin, but there are many other beautiful and interesting cones and craters.

  20. Towards an Open Learning World: 50 Years. UNESCO Institute for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elfert, Maren, Ed.

    An historical account of the creation and development of the UNESCO Institute for Education (UIE) is presented. Written in honor of the 50th anniversary of UIE, this institutional history begins with a series of seven prefaces and memoir essays about the organization written by UIE administrators, board members and researchers. Two chapters detail…

  1. High-Impact Recruiting: A Focus Group of Prospective Honors Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhea, David M.; Goodwin, Kristy

    2014-01-01

    In 2013-2014, the Governors State University (GSU) Honors Program was faced with a need to evolve from a two-year honors program serving juniors and seniors only to a four-year honors program. This need was born out of the university's transition to a four-year university in 2014-2015. This mandate led to some concerns that the author, the newly…

  2. Life history, code of honor, and emotional responses to inequality in an economic game.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Eric J; Forster, Daniel E; McCullough, Michael E

    2014-10-01

    The code of honor, which is characterized by a preoccupation with reputation and willingness to take retaliatory action, has been used extensively to explain individual and cultural differences in peoples' tendencies to behave aggressively. However, research on the relationship between the code of honor and emotional responses to social interactions has been limited in scope, focusing primarily on anger in response to insults and reputational threats. Here we broaden this scope by examining the relationship between code of honor and emotional reactions in response to an unfair economic exchange that resulted in unequal monetary earnings among 3 laboratory participants. We found that endorsement of the code of honor was related to anger and envy in response to unfair monetary distributions. Interestingly, code of honor predicted envy above and beyond what could be accounted for by anger, but the converse was not the case. This suggests that the code of honor influenced perceptions of how subjects viewed their own earnings relative to those of others, which consequently was responsible for their apparent anger as a result of the economic transaction. Furthermore, the unique relationship between code of honor and envy was present only for subjects who received unfair treatment and not for subjects who merely witnessed unfair treatment. Additionally, we replicated previous findings that harsh childhood environmental conditions are associated with endorsement of the code of honor, highlighting the potential value of incorporating a life history theoretical approach to investigating individual differences in endorsement of the code of honor.

  3. A price to pay: Turkish and Northern American retaliation for threats to personal and family honor.

    PubMed

    Uskul, Ayse K; Cross, Susan E; Günsoy, Ceren; Gerçek-Swing, Berna; Alözkan, Cansu; Ataca, Bilge

    2015-01-01

    Two studies investigated retaliatory responses to actual honor threats among members of an honor culture (Turkey) and a dignity culture (northern United States). The honor threat in these studies was based on previous research which has shown that honesty is a key element of the conception of honor and that accusations of dishonesty are threatening to one's honor. In both studies, participants wrote an essay describing the role of honesty in their lives and received feedback on their essay accusing them of being dishonest (vs. neutral feedback). Turkish participants retaliated more strongly than did northern U.S. participants against the person who challenged their honesty by assigning him/her to solve more difficult tangrams over easy ones (Study 1) and by choosing sensory tasks of a higher level of intensity to complete (Study 2). Study 2 added a relational honor condition, in which participants wrote about honesty in their parents' lives and examined the role of individual differences in honor values in retaliation. Endorsement of honor values significantly predicted retaliation among Turkish participants in the relational honor attack condition, but not among northern U.S. participants.

  4. Life history, code of honor, and emotional responses to inequality in an economic game.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Eric J; Forster, Daniel E; McCullough, Michael E

    2014-10-01

    The code of honor, which is characterized by a preoccupation with reputation and willingness to take retaliatory action, has been used extensively to explain individual and cultural differences in peoples' tendencies to behave aggressively. However, research on the relationship between the code of honor and emotional responses to social interactions has been limited in scope, focusing primarily on anger in response to insults and reputational threats. Here we broaden this scope by examining the relationship between code of honor and emotional reactions in response to an unfair economic exchange that resulted in unequal monetary earnings among 3 laboratory participants. We found that endorsement of the code of honor was related to anger and envy in response to unfair monetary distributions. Interestingly, code of honor predicted envy above and beyond what could be accounted for by anger, but the converse was not the case. This suggests that the code of honor influenced perceptions of how subjects viewed their own earnings relative to those of others, which consequently was responsible for their apparent anger as a result of the economic transaction. Furthermore, the unique relationship between code of honor and envy was present only for subjects who received unfair treatment and not for subjects who merely witnessed unfair treatment. Additionally, we replicated previous findings that harsh childhood environmental conditions are associated with endorsement of the code of honor, highlighting the potential value of incorporating a life history theoretical approach to investigating individual differences in endorsement of the code of honor. PMID:24866523

  5. A price to pay: Turkish and Northern American retaliation for threats to personal and family honor.

    PubMed

    Uskul, Ayse K; Cross, Susan E; Günsoy, Ceren; Gerçek-Swing, Berna; Alözkan, Cansu; Ataca, Bilge

    2015-01-01

    Two studies investigated retaliatory responses to actual honor threats among members of an honor culture (Turkey) and a dignity culture (northern United States). The honor threat in these studies was based on previous research which has shown that honesty is a key element of the conception of honor and that accusations of dishonesty are threatening to one's honor. In both studies, participants wrote an essay describing the role of honesty in their lives and received feedback on their essay accusing them of being dishonest (vs. neutral feedback). Turkish participants retaliated more strongly than did northern U.S. participants against the person who challenged their honesty by assigning him/her to solve more difficult tangrams over easy ones (Study 1) and by choosing sensory tasks of a higher level of intensity to complete (Study 2). Study 2 added a relational honor condition, in which participants wrote about honesty in their parents' lives and examined the role of individual differences in honor values in retaliation. Endorsement of honor values significantly predicted retaliation among Turkish participants in the relational honor attack condition, but not among northern U.S. participants. PMID:26227549

  6. Rural Alaska Mentoring Project (RAMP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cash, Terry

    2011-01-01

    For over two years the National Dropout Prevention Center (NDPC) at Clemson University has been supporting the Lower Kuskokwim School District (LKSD) in NW Alaska with their efforts to reduce high school dropout in 23 remote Yup'ik Eskimo villages. The Rural Alaska Mentoring Project (RAMP) provides school-based E-mentoring services to 164…

  7. Alaska Native Land Claims. [Textbook].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Robert D.; And Others

    Written for students at the secondary level, this textbook on Alaska Native land claims includes nine chapters, eight appendices, photographs, maps, graphs, bibliography, and an index. Chapters are titled as follows: (1) Earliest Times (Alaska's first settlers, eighteenth century territories, and other claimants); (2) American Indians and Their…

  8. 2013 Alaska Performance Scholarship Outcomes Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rae, Brian

    2013-01-01

    In accordance with Alaska statute the departments of Education & Early Development (EED) and Labor and Workforce Development (DOLWD), the University of Alaska (UA), and the Alaska Commission on Postsecondary Education (ACPE) present this second annual report on the Alaska Performance Scholarship (APS). Among the highlights: (1) In the public…

  9. Geologic framework of the Alaska Peninsula, southwest Alaska, and the Alaska Peninsula terrane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Frederic H.; Detterman, Robert L.; DuBois, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    The boundaries separating the Alaska Peninsula terrane from other terranes are commonly indistinct or poorly defined. A few boundaries have been defined at major faults, although the extensions of these faults are speculative through some areas. The west side of the Alaska Peninsula terrane is overlapped by Tertiary s

  10. Geologic framework of the Alaska Peninsula, southwest Alaska, and the Alaska Peninsula terrane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Frederic H.; Detterman, Robert L.; DuBois, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    The boundaries separating the Alaska Peninsula terrane from other terranes are commonly indistinct or poorly defined. A few boundaries have been defined at major faults, although the extensions of these faults are speculative through some areas. The west side of the Alaska Peninsula terrane is overlapped by Tertiary sedimentary and volcanic rocks and Quaternary deposits.

  11. 78 FR 53137 - Flint Hills Resources Alaska, LLC, BP Pipelines (Alaska) Inc., ConocoPhillips Transportation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ...Phillips Transportation Alaska, Inc., ExxonMobil Pipeline Company; Notice of Complaint Take notice that on... formal complaint against BP Pipelines (Alaska) Inc., ConocoPhillips Transportation Alaska, Inc.,...

  12. DCEG Symposium to Honor Joseph F. Fraumeni, Jr. | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer On May 6, the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG) will sponsor a symposium to honor 50 years of leadership from its founding director, Joseph F. Fraumeni, Jr., M.D., who stepped down from the position in July 2012. The conference, entitled “Cancer Epidemiology: From Pedigrees to Populations,” will highlight critical findings in cancer epidemiology from the last 50 years, as well as opportunities for future research directions. Long History of Leadership and Discovery

  13. Property and the body: Applying Honoré

    PubMed Central

    Quigley, Muireann

    2007-01-01

    This paper argues that the new commercial and quasi‐commercial activities of medicine, scientists, pharmaceutical companies and industry with regard to human tissue has given rise to a whole new way of valuing our bodies. It is argued that a property framework may be an effective and constructive method of exploring issues arising from this. The paper refers to A M Honoré's theory of ownership and aims to show that we have full liberal ownership of our own bodies and as such can be considered to be self‐owners. PMID:17971463

  14. Nonprofit Board Membership for Health Care Professionals: Honor or Responsibility?

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joyce M; Calderwood, James A

    2016-09-01

    Physicians and other health care professionals are often invited to serve on nonprofit boards. Although service on a nonprofit board is an honor, it carries a large responsibility. Many health care professionals are unaware of the level of commitment and involvement board service requires, particularly fiduciary boards, which have accompanying risks and legal functions. In the present article, the authors describe the activities and responsibilities of a fiduciary board member. They also provide a checklist of questions to ask before agreeing to serve on a board and discuss how to decide whether one is the right fit for a specific board position. PMID:27571299

  15. A College Honors Seminar on Evolution and Intelligent Design: Successes and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Patricia H.

    2009-01-01

    College honors courses provide an opportunity to tackle controversial topics in an atmosphere that encourages active learning, critical thinking, and open discussion. This venue is particularly appropriate for examining the debate about teaching intelligent design (ID) in public school science classes. A one-credit honors enrichment seminar taught…

  16. A Guide to Newbery Medal Winners and Honor Books, 1977-1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinman, Judith R.; Henderson, Darwin L.

    Intended for use by teachers, librarians, and parents, this guide analyzes Newbery Award Medal and honor winning books (1977 through 1984) for sexism. Following a statement of criteria, established by the American Library Association concerning the type of book that should receive the medal and honor citations, and the guidelines used to determine…

  17. Achievement Motivation in Rural African-American Female High School Honor Graduates. Preliminary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Dale F.; And Others

    This report examines motivational variables and support structures that influenced the success of African American females who graduated with honors from a rural Georgia high school. Case studies focus on the nature of the honor graduates' friendships and the role that friendship may have played in motivating these students to become honor…

  18. The Challenge of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in Honors Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yager, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Students with autism are increasingly present on college campuses, and because many young adults with autism are cognitively gifted, it follows that honors programs and colleges are obliged to be aware of this "invisible" disability and be ready to accommodate, and educate, honors students on the autism spectrum. Susan Yager describes…

  19. The Role of the Honors Program in the Community College Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeague, Patricia M.

    Drawing from a literature review and experiences at Moraine Valley Community College, this paper examines the role of the community college honors program in meeting the special needs of superior students; analyzes the characteristics of effective and innovative programs and curricula; and discusses how an honors program can become…

  20. Honors Composition: A Possible Alternative in the Two-Year College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges, Jean Bolen

    Since 1975, an honors course in freshman composition has been offered at Emanuel County Junior College (ECJC), a unit of the University System of Georgia, for academically superior students whose needs may not be met by the standard curriculum. The process of identifying honors students involves screening entering students to identify those who…

  1. Dancing with the Stars: Stepping up and Stepping out in Honors Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinndorf, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most profound statements in James Herbert's lead essay-simple as it seems at the very beginning of his piece, "Thinking and Rethinking: The Practical Value of an Honors Education," concerns his discovery early in his career that "a liberal education in honors was good preparation for life." Stressing the importance…

  2. Effects of Participation in a Post-Secondary Honors Program with Covariate Adjustment Using Propensity Score

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furtwengler, Scott R.

    2015-01-01

    The present study sought to determine the extent to which participation in a post-secondary honors program affected academic achievement. Archival data were collected on three cohorts of high-achieving students at a large public university. Propensity scores were calculated on factors predicting participation in honors and used as the covariate.…

  3. Setting Them Free: Students as Co-Producers of Honors Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Gorp, Bouke; Wolfensberger, Marca V. C.; de Jong, Nelleke

    2012-01-01

    While the attractions and advantages of freedom that differentiates honors education from regular teaching are both theoretically and practically significant, the authors' experience at Utrecht University in the Netherlands has demonstrated drawbacks that need to be addressed and resolved in creating effective honors education. Freedom poses…

  4. The Cultural Encounters Model: Incorporating Campus Events into the Honors Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfrehm, James; Sullivan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Honors students are, almost by definition, committed to excellence. As a result, they tend to be overextended (Guzy). They also "tend to be more eager, exploratory, and experienced than their non-honors counterparts" (Achterberg 77). They typically take a full load of coursework while at the same time juggling clubs, learning…

  5. I Want Some Freedom for My People: Baptists, Great Texts, and Honors Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Thomas Hebert and Matthew T. McBee's (2007) recent study of gifted university students examines how an honors program can function as a community for social, intellectual, and psychological growth. In particular, they find that honors programs offer advantageous support for gifted students in navigating social isolation, in questioning traditional…

  6. Striving for Our Best and Brightest Selves: Making Honors Central to the Campus Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Steve

    2015-01-01

    The fall 2014 entering honors class as Westminster College was drawn from the largest applicant pool in the program's almost three-decade history. Far from focusing on perks, 68% of these entering students claimed it was the interesting honors curriculum that caused them to submit an application. As for the larger applicant pool itself, the top…

  7. Trans-Alaska pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    The Trans-Alaska Pipeline system transports nearly 25 percent of the nation's domestically produced crude oil. Since operations began in 1977, the system has delivered over 8 billion barrels of oil to Port Veldez for shipment. This paper reports that concerns have been raised about whether the system is meeting special engineering design and operations requirements imposed by federal and state regulators. GAO found that the five principal federal and state regulatory agencies have not pursued a systematic, disciplined, and coordinated approach to regulating the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System. Instead, these agencies have relied on the Alyeska Pipeline Service Company, which runs the system, to police itself. It was only after the Exxon Valdez spill and the discovery of corrosion that the regulators began to reevaluate their roles and focus on issues such as whether Alyeska's operating and maintenance procedures meet the pipelines, special engineering design and operating requirements, or whether Alyeska can adequately respond to a large oil spill. In January 1990, the regulators established a joint office to provide more effective oversight of the system. GAO believes that central leadership and a secured funding sources may help ensure that this office provides adequate oversight.

  8. The annual migration cycle of emperor geese in Western Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hupp, J.W.; Schmutz, J.A.; Ely, C.R.

    2008-01-01

    Most emperor geese (Chen canagica) nest in a narrow coastal region of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (YKD) in western Alaska, but their winter distribution extends more than 3000 km from Kodiak Island, Alaska, to the Commander Islands, Russia. We marked 53 adult female emperor geese with satellite transmitters on the YKD in 1999, 2002, and 2003 to examine whether chronology of migration or use of seasonal habitats differed among birds that wintered in different regions. Females that migrated relatively short distances (650-1010 km) between the YKD and winter sites on the south side of the Alaska Peninsula bypassed autumn staging areas on the Bering Sea coast of the Alaska Peninsula or used them for shorter periods (mean = 57 days) than birds that made longer migrations (1600-2640 km) to the western Aleutian Islands (mean = 97 days). Alaska Peninsula migrants spent more days at winter sites (mean =172 days, 95% CI: 129-214 days) than western Aleutian Island migrants (mean = 91 days, 95% CI: 83-99 days). Birds that migrated 930-1610 km to the eastern Aleutian Islands spent intermediate intervals at fall staging (mean = 77 days) and wintering areas (mean = 108 days, 95% CI: 95-119 days). Return dates to the YKD did not differ among birds that wintered in different regions. Coastal staging areas on the Alaska Peninsula may be especially important in autumn to prepare Aleutian migrants physiologically for long-distance migration to winter sites, and in spring to enable emperor geese that migrate different distances to reach comparable levels of condition before nesting. ?? The Arctic Institute of North America.

  9. Metamorphic facies map of Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Dusel-Bacon, C.; O-Rourke, E.F.; Reading, K.E.; Fitch, M.R.; Klute, M.A.

    1985-04-01

    A metamorphic-facies of Alaska has been compiled, following the facies-determination scheme of the Working Group for the Cartography of the Metamorphic Belts of the World. Regionally metamorphosed rocks are divided into facies series where P/T gradients are known and into facies groups where only T is known. Metamorphic rock units also are defined by known or bracketed age(s) of metamorphism. Five regional maps have been prepared at a scale of 1:1,000,000; these maps will provide the basis for a final colored version of the map at a scale of 1:2,500,000. The maps are being prepared by the US Geological Survey in cooperation with the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys. Precambrian metamorphism has been documented on the Seward Peninsula, in the Baird Mountains and the northeastern Kuskokwim Mountains, and in southwestern Alaska. Pre-Ordovician metamorphism affected the rocks in central Alaska and on southern Prince of Wales Island. Mid-Paleozoic metamorphism probably affected the rocks in east-central Alaska. Most of the metamorphic belts in Alaska developed during Mesozoic or early Tertiary time in conjuction with accretion of many terranes. Examples are Jurassic metamorphism in east-central Alaska, Early Cretaceous metamorphism in the southern Brooks Range and along the rim of the Yukon-Kovyukuk basin, and late Cretaceous to early Tertiary metamorphism in the central Alaska Range. Regional thermal metamorphism was associated with multiple episodes of Cretaceous plutonism in southeastern Alaska and with early Tertiary plutonism in the Chugach Mountains. Where possible, metamorphism is related to tectonism. Meeting participants are encouraged to comment on the present version of the metamorphic facies map.

  10. An Exploration of the Value of Service-Learning: Characteristics of Traditional and Honor Service-Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, Lori; Williams, Elizabeth; Russell, Brittany

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the value of service for undergraduate students enrolled in an Honors and a non-Honors section of a service-learning course. A quasi-experimental study was conducted to identify if students who participated in an Honors (n = 18) section of a service-learning course show greater gains in attitudes and skills associated with…

  11. The Impact of Involvement in Mortar Board Senior Honor Society on Lifelong Views of Civic Engagement and Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Daniel James

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the impact that involvement in Mortar Board National Senior Honor Society has on lifelong views of civic engagement and leadership. Mortar Board Senior Honor Society is a collegiate honor society established in 1918 that recognizes students for their outstanding contributions to their college or university community in the…

  12. Ubiquitous Laptop Usage in Higher Education: Effects on Student Achievement, Student Satisfaction, and Constructivist Measures in Honors and Traditional Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wurst, Christian; Smarkola, Claudia; Gaffney, Mary Anne

    2008-01-01

    Three years of graduating business honors cohorts in a large urban university were sampled to determine whether the introduction of ubiquitous laptop computers into the honors program contributed to student achievement, student satisfaction and constructivist teaching activities. The first year cohort consisted of honors students who did not have…

  13. Alaska's model program for surveillance and prevention of occupational injury deaths.

    PubMed Central

    Conway, G A; Lincoln, J M; Husberg, B J; Manwaring, J C; Klatt, M L; Thomas, T K

    1999-01-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) established its Alaska Field Station in Anchorage in 1991 after identifying Alaska as the highest-risk state for traumatic worker fatalities. Since then, the Field Station, working in collaboration with other agencies, organizations, and individuals, has established a program for occupational injury surveillance in Alaska and formed interagency working groups to address the risk factors leading to occupational death and injury in the state. Collaborative efforts have contributed to reducing crash rates and mortality in Alaska's rapidly expanding helicopter logging industry and have played an important supportive role in the substantial progress made in reducing the mortality rate in Alaska's commercial fishing industry (historically Alaska's and America's most dangerous industry). Alaska experienced a 46% overall decline in work-related acute traumatic injury deaths from 1991 to 1998, a 64% decline in commercial fishing deaths, and a very sharp decline in helicopter logging-related deaths. Extending this regional approach to other parts of the country and applying these strategies to the entire spectrum of occupational injury and disease hazards could have a broad effect on reducing occupational injuries. PMID:10670623

  14. Culture-Specific Institutions that Delayed the Growth of Common Schools in the Antebellum South, 1700-1860.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgson, Frank M.

    This paper discusses the southern approach to education during the period of 1700 to 1860. During this period there developed in the South three culture-specific institutions that helped delay the growth of Common Schools, and later Public Schools. Those institutions were the following: (1) a code of honor; (2) the development of a structured…

  15. Size and perspective in Alaska.

    PubMed

    Towle, Jim

    2006-01-01

    By far America's largest state, Alaska has only 350 members, so effective communication matters in overcoming distance. Alaska has led the way in direct reimbursement, diversity in leadership, member involvement, and a distinctive lifestyle for its practitioners. The tripartite structure of organized dentistry is crucial in building understanding the issues involved in providing oral health care to the members of this vast state. PMID:17585733

  16. Alaska Athabascan stellar astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, Christopher M.

    Stellar astronomy is a fundamental component of Alaska Athabascan cultures that facilitates time-reckoning, navigation, weather forecasting, and cosmology. Evidence from the linguistic record suggests that a group of stars corresponding to the Big Dipper is the only widely attested constellation across the Northern Athabascan languages. However, instruction from expert Athabascan consultants shows that the correlation of these names with the Big Dipper is only partial. In Alaska Gwich'in, Ahtna, and Upper Tanana languages the Big Dipper is identified as one part of a much larger circumpolar humanoid constellation that spans more than 133 degrees across the sky. The Big Dipper is identified as a tail, while the other remaining asterisms within the humanoid constellation are named using other body part terms. The concept of a whole-sky humanoid constellation provides a single unifying system for mapping the night sky, and the reliance on body-part metaphors renders the system highly mnemonic. By recognizing one part of the constellation the stargazer is immediately able to identify the remaining parts based on an existing mental map of the human body. The circumpolar position of a whole-sky constellation yields a highly functional system that facilitates both navigation and time-reckoning in the subarctic. Northern Athabascan astronomy is not only much richer than previously described; it also provides evidence for a completely novel and previously undocumented way of conceptualizing the sky---one that is unique to the subarctic and uniquely adapted to northern cultures. The concept of a large humanoid constellation may be widespread across the entire subarctic and have great antiquity. In addition, the use of cognate body part terms describing asterisms within humanoid constellations is similarly found in Navajo, suggesting a common ancestor from which Northern and Southern Athabascan stellar naming strategies derived.

  17. Alaska Interagency Ecosystem Health Work Group

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shasby, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The Alaska Interagency Ecosystem Health Work Group is a community of practice that recognizes the interconnections between the health of ecosystems, wildlife, and humans and meets to facilitate the exchange of ideas, data, and research opportunities. Membership includes the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, U.S. Geological Survey, Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation, Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Alaska Sea Life Center, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Alaska Department of Fish and Game.

  18. Operation IceBridge Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, C.

    2015-12-01

    The University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) has flown LiDAR missions for Operation IceBridge in Alaska each year since 2009, expanding upon UAF's airborne laser altimetry program which started in 1994. These observations show that Alaska's regional mass balance is -75+11/-16 Gt yr-1 (1994-2013) (Larsen et al., 2015). A surprising result is that the rate of surface mass loss observed on non-tidewater glaciers in Alaska is extremely high. At these rates, Alaska contributes ~1 mm to global sea level rise every 5 years. Given the present lack of adequate satellite resources, Operation IceBridge airborne surveys by UAF are the most effective and efficient method to monitor this region's impact on global sea level rise. Ice depth measurements using radar sounding have been part of these airborne surveys since 2012. Many of Alaska's tidewater glaciers are bedded significantly below sea level. The depth and extent of glacier beds below sea level are critical factors in the dynamics of tidewater retreat. Improved radar processing tools are being used to predict clutter using forward simulation. This is essential to properly sort out true bed returns, which are often masked or obscured by valley wall returns. This presentation will provide an overview of the program, highlighting recent findings and observations from the most recent campaigns, and focusing on techniques used for the extrapolation of surface elevation changes to regional mass balances.

  19. Improving Student Achievement in Alaska. Alaska Goals 2000 Annual Report, 1997-98.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau.

    Alaska Goals 2000 is part of a coordinated, statewide effort to improve public education for all students in Alaska. In 1997-1998, 90% of Alaska's federal funding was used to fund grants to local school districts, and 10% was used to fund state-level activities through the Alaska Department of Education. During 1997-1998, curriculum frameworks and…

  20. NASA honors Apollo 13 astronaut Fred Haise Jr.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Apollo 13 astronaut and Biloxi native Fred Haise Jr. smiles during a Dec. 2 ceremony at Gorenflo Elementary School in Biloxi honoring his space career. During the ceremony, Haise was presented with NASA's Ambassador of Exploration Award (an encased moon rock). He subsequently presented the moon rock to Gorenflo officials for display at the school. Haise is best known as one of three astronauts who nursed a crippled Apollo 13 spacecraft back to Earth during a perilous 1970 mission. Although he was unable to walk on the moon as planned for that mission, Haise ended his astronaut career having logged 142 hours and 54 minutes in space. During the ceremony, he praised all those who contributed to the space program.

  1. "Shades of Foreign Evil": "Honor Killings" and "Family Murders" in the Canadian Press.

    PubMed

    Shier, Allie; Shor, Eran

    2016-09-01

    This article compares murder cases labeled "honor killings" with cases labeled "family/spousal murders" in the Canadian news media, exploring the construction of boundaries between these two practices. We conducted a systematic qualitative content analysis, examining a sample of 486 articles from three major Canadian newspapers between 2000 and 2012. Our analysis shows that "honor killings" are framed in terms of culture and ethnic background, presenting a dichotomy between South Asian/Muslim and Western values. Conversely, articles presenting cases as "family/spousal murders" tend to focus on the perpetrators' personalities or psychological characteristics, often ignoring factors such as culture, patriarchy, honor, and shame. PMID:26712236

  2. Alaska Native Education Study: A Statewide Study of Alaska Native Values and Opinions Regarding Education in Alaska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDowell Group, Juneau, AK.

    This document contains four reports detailing a four-phase research project on Alaska Natives' attitudes and values toward education. A literature review examines the history of Native education in Alaska, issues in research on American Indian and Alaska Native education, dropout studies, student assessment, language and culture, learning styles,…

  3. Profile: American Indian/Alaska Native

    MedlinePlus

    ... million American Indians and Alaska Natives. Typically, this urban clientele has less accessibility to hospitals; health clinics ... IHS and tribal health programs. Studies on the urban American Indian and Alaska Native population have documented ...

  4. ESO Receives Computerworld Honors Program 21st Century Achievement Award in Science Category

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-06-01

    In a ceremony held in Washington, D.C. (USA) on June 6, 2005, ESO, the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the southern Hemisphere, received the coveted 21st Century Achievement Award from the Computerworld Honors Program for its visionary use of information technology in the Science category. Sybase, a main database server vendor and member of the Chairmen's Committee, nominated ESO's Data Flow System in recognition of its contributions to the global information technology revolution and its positive impact on society. The citations reads: "ESO has revolutionized the operations of ground-based astronomical observatories with a new end-to-end data flow system, designed to improve the transmission and management of astronomical observations and data over transcontinental distances." This year's awards, in 10 categories, were presented at a gala event at the National Building Museum, attended by over 250 guests, including leaders of the information technology industry, former award recipients, judges, scholars, and diplomats representing many of the 54 countries from which the 17-year-old program's laureates have come. "The Computerworld Honors Program 21st Century Achievement Awards are presented to companies from around the world whose visionary use of information technology promotes positive social, economic and educational change," said Bob Carrigan, president and CEO of Computerworld and chairman of the Chairmen's Committee of the Computerworld Honors Program. "The recipients of these awards are the true heroes of the information age and have been appropriately recognized by the leading IT industry chairmen as true revolutionaries in their fields." ESO PR Photo 18/05 ESO PR Photo 18/05 ESO Receives the Award in the Science Category [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 496 pix - 53k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 992 pix - 470k] [Full Res - JPEG: 1250 x 1550 pix - 1.1M] Caption: ESO PR Photo 18/05: Receiving the Computerworld 21st Century Achievement Award for Science

  5. Malaspina Glacier, Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This image from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite covers an area of 55 by 40 kilometers (34 by 25 miles) over the southwest part of the Malaspina Glacier and Icy Bay in Alaska. The composite of infrared and visible bands results in the snow and ice appearing light blue, dense vegetation is yellow-orange and green, and less vegetated, gravelly areas are in orange. According to Dr. Dennis Trabant (U.S. Geological Survey, Fairbanks, Alaska), the Malaspina Glacier is thinning. Its terminal moraine protects it from contact with the open ocean; without the moraine, or if sea level rises sufficiently to reconnect the glacier with the ocean, the glacier would start calving and retreat significantly. ASTER data are being used to help monitor the size and movement of some 15,000 tidal and piedmont glaciers in Alaska. Evidence derived from ASTER and many other satellite and ground-based measurements suggests that only a few dozen Alaskan glaciers are advancing. The overwhelming majority of them are retreating.

    This ASTER image was acquired on June 8, 2001. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next six years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high-resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, along-term research and

  6. Trends in Alaska's People and Economy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leask, Linda; Killorin, Mary; Martin, Stephanie

    This booklet provides data on Alaska's population, economy, health, education, government, and natural resources, including specific information on Alaska Natives. Since 1960, Alaska's population has tripled and become more diverse, more stable, older, less likely to be male or married, and more concentrated. About 69 percent of the population…

  7. Alaska Pipeline Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Crude oil moving through the 800-mile Trans-Alaska Pipeline must be kept at a relatively high temperature, about 180 degrees Fahrenheit, to maintain the fluidity of the oil. In Arctic weather, that demands highly effective insulation. General Electric Co.'s Space Division, Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, provided it with a spinoff product called Therm-O-Trol. Shown being installed on the pipeline, Therm-O-Trol is a metal-bonded polyurethane foam especially formulated for Arctic insulation. A second GE spinoff product, Therm-O-Case, solved a related problem involved in bringing hot crude oil from 2,000-foot-deep wells to the surface without transferring oil heat to the surrounding permafrost soil; heat transfer could melt the frozen terrain and cause dislocations that might destroy expensive well casings. Therm-O-Case is a double-walled oil well casing with multi-layered insulation which provides an effective barrier to heat transfer. Therm-O-Trol and Therm-O-Case are members of a family of insulating products which stemmed from technology developed by GE Space Division in heat transferlthermal control work on Gemini, Apollo and other NASA programs.

  8. Alexander Archipelago, Southeastern Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    West of British Columbia, Canada, and south of the Yukon Territory, the southeastern coastline of Alaska trails off into the islands of the Alexander Archipelago. The area is rugged and contains many long, U-shaped, glaciated valleys, many of which terminate at tidewater. The Alexander Archipelago is home to Glacier Bay National Park. The large bay that has two forks on its northern end is Glacier Bay itself. The eastern fork is Muir inlet, into which runs the Muir glacier, named for the famous Scottish-born naturalist John Muir. Glacier Bay opens up into the Icy Strait. The large, solid white area to the west is Brady Icefield, which terminates at the southern end in Brady's Glacier. To locate more interesting features from Glacier Bay National Park, take a look at the park service map. As recently as two hundred years ago, a massive ice field extended into Icy Strait and filled the Glacier Bay. Since that time, the area has experienced rapid deglaciation, with many large glaciers retreating 40, 60, even 80 km. While temperatures have increased in the region, it is still unclear whether the rapid recession is part of the natural cycle of tidewater glaciers or is an indicator of longer-term climate change. For more on Glacier Bay and climate change, read an online paper by Dr. Dorothy Hall, a MODIS Associate Science Team Member. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  9. Alaska Energy Inventory Project: Consolidating Alaska's Energy Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, K.; Clough, J.; Swenson, R.; Crimp, P.; Hanson, D.; Parker, P.

    2007-12-01

    Alaska has considerable energy resources distributed throughout the state including conventional oil, gas, and coal, and unconventional coalbed and shalebed methane, gas hydrates, geothermal, wind, hydro, and biomass. While much of the known large oil and gas resources are concentrated on the North Slope and in the Cook Inlet regions, the other potential sources of energy are dispersed across a varied landscape from frozen tundra to coastal settings. Despite the presence of these potential energy sources, rural Alaska is mostly dependent upon diesel fuel for both electrical power generation and space heating needs. At considerable cost, large quantities of diesel fuel are transported to more than 150 roadless communities by barge or airplane and stored in large bulk fuel tank farms for winter months when electricity and heat are at peak demands. Recent increases in the price of oil have severely impacted the price of energy throughout Alaska, and especially hard hit are rural communities and remote mines that are off the road system and isolated from integrated electrical power grids. Even though the state has significant conventional gas resources in restricted areas, few communities are located near enough to these resources to directly use natural gas to meet their energy needs. To address this problem, the Alaska Energy Inventory project will (1) inventory and compile all available Alaska energy resource data suitable for electrical power generation and space heating needs including natural gas, coal, coalbed and shalebed methane, gas hydrates, geothermal, wind, hydro, and biomass and (2) identify locations or regions where the most economic energy resource or combination of energy resources can be developed to meet local needs. This data will be accessible through a user-friendly web-based interactive map, based on the Alaska Department of Natural Resources, Land Records Information Section's (LRIS) Alaska Mapper, Google Earth, and Terrago Technologies' Geo

  10. Honor Societies: A Simple Role Concept and Some Suggestions for Chapters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Harry V.

    1975-01-01

    Article described three basic types of honor socities, with a few examples of each, and presented some general notions and practical suggestions for chapters based on the concept of intelligent partnership. (Author/RK)

  11. Honor Listing Update, 1990: A Variety Pack (Books for the Teenage Reader).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nilsen, Alleen Pace; Donelson, Ken

    1991-01-01

    Reviews eight books on the 1990 honor listing for adolescents including historical fiction, biographies, fictional stories of farm families, a personal experience account, a fantasy/occult romance, and a collection of short stories. (PRA)

  12. Special Issue on Signal Processing for Mechanical Systems in Honor of Professor Simon Braun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassois, Spilios D.

    2016-06-01

    This Special Issue is in honor of a pioneer of the area of Signal Processing for Mechanical Systems and, at the same time, Founding Editor of the Journal of Mechanical Systems and Signal Processing (MSSP), Professor Simon Braun.

  13. Honoring silence and valuing community: living leadership in 21st century teaching-learning.

    PubMed

    Backer Condon, Barbara; Hegge, Margaret

    2014-04-01

    Leadership is a very personal concept. The methods implemented by leaders often reflect philosophical beliefs and theoretical underpinnings. This column, while recognizing that leadership styles are indeed personal, proffers living leadership in nursing education through two key leadership attitudes. These attitudes are honoring silence and valuing community. Honoring silence is discussed as recognizing the multiple dimensions of silence, and valuing community is presented in light of the humanbecoming community models change concepts: moving-initiating, anchoring-shifting, and pondering-shaping.

  14. NCES Studies on American Indian and Alaska Native Education. NCES 2005-535

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The Office of Indian Education (OIE) helps support local education agencies, Indian tribes and organizations, postsecondary institutions, and other entities in their efforts to address the unique educational and culturally related academic needs of American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) so that these students can meet the same challenging…

  15. Alaska volcanoes guidebook for teachers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adleman, Jennifer N.

    2011-01-01

    Alaska’s volcanoes, like its abundant glaciers, charismatic wildlife, and wild expanses inspire and ignite scientific curiosity and generate an ever-growing source of questions for students in Alaska and throughout the world. Alaska is home to more than 140 volcanoes, which have been active over the last 2 million years. About 90 of these volcanoes have been active within the last 10,000 years and more than 50 of these have been active since about 1700. The volcanoes in Alaska make up well over three-quarters of volcanoes in the United States that have erupted in the last 200 years. In fact, Alaska’s volcanoes erupt so frequently that it is almost guaranteed that an Alaskan will experience a volcanic eruption in his or her lifetime, and it is likely they will experience more than one. It is hard to imagine a better place for students to explore active volcanism and to understand volcanic hazards, phenomena, and global impacts. Previously developed teachers’ guidebooks with an emphasis on the volcanoes in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (Mattox, 1994) and Mount Rainier National Park in the Cascade Range (Driedger and others, 2005) provide place-based resources and activities for use in other volcanic regions in the United States. Along the lines of this tradition, this guidebook serves to provide locally relevant and useful resources and activities for the exploration of numerous and truly unique volcanic landscapes in Alaska. This guidebook provides supplemental teaching materials to be used by Alaskan students who will be inspired to become educated and prepared for inevitable future volcanic activity in Alaska. The lessons and activities in this guidebook are meant to supplement and enhance existing science content already being taught in grade levels 6–12. Correlations with Alaska State Science Standards and Grade Level Expectations adopted by the Alaska State Department of Education and Early Development (2006) for grades six through eleven are listed at

  16. Teshekpuk Lake, Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This ASTER image of Teshekpuk Lake on Alaska's North Slope, within the National Petroleum Reserve, was acquired on August 15, 2000. It covers an area of 58.7 x 89.9 km, and is centered near 70.4 degrees north latitude, 153 degrees west longitude.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 58.7 by 89.9 kilometers (36.4 by 55.7 miles) Location: 70.4 degrees North latitude, 153 degrees West longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER Bands 3, 2, and 1 Original Data Resolution: ASTER 30 meters (98.4 feet) Dates Acquired: August 15, 2000

  17. IMPROVING SCIENCE EDUCATION AND CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN RURAL ALASKA:The Synergistic Connection between Educational Outreach Efforts in the Copper Valley, Alaska.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solie, D. J.; McCarthy, S.

    2004-12-01

    The objective of the High frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) Education Outreach is to enhance the science education opportunities in the Copper Valley region in Alaska. In the process, we also educate local residents about HAARP and its research. Funded jointly by US Air Force and Navy, HAARP is located at Gakona Alaska, a very rural region of central Alaska with a predominantly Native population. The main instrument at HAARP is a vertically directed, phased array RF transmitter which is primarily an ionospheric research tool, however, its geophysical research applications range from terrestrial to near-space. Research is conducted at HAARP in collaboration with scientists and institutions world-wide. The HAARP Education Outreach Program, run through the University of Alaska Geophysical Institute has been active for over six years and in that time has become an integral part of science education in the Copper Valley for residents of all ages. HAARP education outreach efforts are through direct involvement in local schools in the Copper River School District (CRSD) and the Prince William Sound Community College (PWSCC), as well as public lectures and workshops, and intern and student research programs. These outreach efforts require cooperation and coordination between the CRSD, PWSCC, the University of Alaska Fairbanks Physics Department and the NSF sponsored Alaska Native Science & Engineering Program (ANSEP) and HAARP researchers. The HAARP Outreach program also works with other organizations promoting science education in the region, such as the National Park Service (Wrangell- St. Elias National Park) and the Wrangell Institute for Science and Environment (WISE) a newly formed regional non-profit organization. We work closely with teachers in the schools, adapting to their needs and the particular scientific topic they are covering at the time. Because of time and logistic constraints, outreach visits to schools are episodic, occurring roughly

  18. On Einstein's Path, essays in honor of Engelbert Schucking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Alex

    This collection of essays in honor of Engelbert Schucking spans the gamut of research in general relativity and presents a lively and personal account of current work in the field. Contributions include: E.L. Schucking: Jordan, Pauli, Politics, Brecht... and a Variable Gravitational Constant J.L. Anderson: Thomson Scattering in an Expanding Universe A. Ashtekar & T.A. Schilling: Geometrical Formulation of Quantum Mechanics J. Baugh, D.R. Finkelstein, H. Saller, and Zhong Tang: General Covariance is Bose-Einstein Statistics S.L. Bazanski: The Split and Propagation of Light Rays in Relativity L. Bel: How to Define a Unique Vacuum in Cosmology P.G. Bergmann: EIH Theory and Noether's Theorem W.B. Bonnor: The Static Cylinder in General Relativity C.H. Brahns: Gravity and the Tenacious Scalar Field D. Brill: The Cavendish Experiment in General Relativity Y. Choquet-Bruhat: Wave Maps in General Relativity T. Damour: General Relativty and Experiment J. Ehlers: Some Developments in Newtonian Cosmology G.F.R. Ellis & H. van Elst: Deviation of Geodesics in FLRW Spacetime Geometries S. Frittelli & E.T. Newman: Poincar Pseudo-symmetries in Asymptotically Flat Spacetimes E.N. Glass: Taub Numbers and Asymptotic Invariants J.N. Goldberg: Second Class Constraints F.W. Hehl, A. Macias, E.W. Mielke, & Yu.N. Obukhov: On the Structure of the Energy-momentum and the Spin Currents in Dirac's Electron

  19. Tuberculosis among Children in Alaska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gessner, Bradford D.

    1997-01-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis among Alaskan children under 15 was more than twice the national rate, with Alaska Native children showing a much higher incidence. Children with household exposure to adults with active tuberculosis had a high risk of infection. About 22 percent of pediatric tuberculosis cases were identified through school…

  20. Tularemia in Alaska, 1938 - 2010

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Tularemia is a serious, potentially life threatening zoonotic disease. The causative agent, Francisella tularensis, is ubiquitous in the Northern hemisphere, including Alaska, where it was first isolated from a rabbit tick (Haemophysalis leporis-palustris) in 1938. Since then, F. tularensis has been isolated from wildlife and humans throughout the state. Serologic surveys have found measurable antibodies with prevalence ranging from < 1% to 50% and 4% to 18% for selected populations of wildlife species and humans, respectively. We reviewed and summarized known literature on tularemia surveillance in Alaska and summarized the epidemiological information on human cases reported to public health officials. Additionally, available F. tularensis isolates from Alaska were analyzed using canonical SNPs and a multi-locus variable-number tandem repeats (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) system. The results show that both F. t. tularensis and F. t. holarctica are present in Alaska and that subtype A.I, the most virulent type, is responsible for most recently reported human clinical cases in the state. PMID:22099502

  1. A Title I Refinement: Alaska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazelton, Alexander E.; And Others

    Through joint planning with a number of school districts and the Region X Title I Technical Assistance Center, and with the help of a Title I Refinement grant, Alaska has developed a system of data storage and retrieval using microcomputers that assists small school districts in the evaluation and reporting of their Title I programs. Although this…

  2. Adventures in the Alaska Economy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackstadt, Steve; Huskey, Lee

    This publication was developed to increase students' understanding of basic economic concepts and the historical development of Alaska's economy. Comics depict major historical events as they occurred, but specific characters are fictionalized. Each of nine episodes is accompanied by several pages of explanatory text, which enlarges on the episode…

  3. Tularemia in Alaska, 1938 - 2010.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Cristina M; Vogler, Amy J; Keim, Paul; Wagner, David M; Hueffer, Karsten

    2011-01-01

    Tularemia is a serious, potentially life threatening zoonotic disease. The causative agent, Francisella tularensis, is ubiquitous in the Northern hemisphere, including Alaska, where it was first isolated from a rabbit tick (Haemophysalis leporis-palustris) in 1938. Since then, F. tularensis has been isolated from wildlife and humans throughout the state. Serologic surveys have found measurable antibodies with prevalence ranging from < 1% to 50% and 4% to 18% for selected populations of wildlife species and humans, respectively. We reviewed and summarized known literature on tularemia surveillance in Alaska and summarized the epidemiological information on human cases reported to public health officials. Additionally, available F. tularensis isolates from Alaska were analyzed using canonical SNPs and a multi-locus variable-number tandem repeats (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) system. The results show that both F. t. tularensis and F. t. holarctica are present in Alaska and that subtype A.I, the most virulent type, is responsible for most recently reported human clinical cases in the state. PMID:22099502

  4. Inspiring Exemplary Teaching and Learning: Perspectives on Teaching Academically Talented College Students--A Companion Piece to "Teaching and Learning in Honors." National Collegiate Honors Council Monograph Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Larry, Ed.; Zubizarreta, John, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    This monograph is a companion piece to "Teaching and Learning in Honors." The authors in this monograph are dedicated to exploring the sometimes magical, sometimes ordinary, sometimes rewarding, sometimes challenging connections between good teaching and deep, lasting learning. Questions regarding students' learning, pedagogical…

  5. The McBride Honors Program in Public Affairs for Scientists and Engineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, W. J.; Miller, R. L.; Olds, B. M.; Sacks, A. B.

    2006-12-01

    The McBride Honors Program in Public Affairs at The Colorado School of Mines (CSM), instituted in 1978, is an award-winning exemplar in the liberal arts which provides a select number of CSM engineering students an opportunity to cross the boundaries of their technical expertise in engineering and applied science, and to gain the understanding and appreciation of the contexts in which engineering and applied science and all human systems reside, and specifically to explore and integrate the social, cultural, ethical and environmental implications of their future professional judgments and their roles as citizens in varied and complex settings. The 27 semester-hour program of seminars, courses, and off-campus activities features small seminars; a cross-disciplinary approach; and opportunities for one-on-one faculty tutorials, instruction and practice in oral and written communication, a Washington, D.C. public policy seminar, a practicum experience (internship or foreign study). Circumstances external to the McBride Program itself, which include the development and growth of the field of Public Affairs nationally and the persistence of legacy courses, have created the need to revitalize and refocus the historically cross-departmental Program. A recent curriculum reform effort has achieved a more thoroughly interdisciplinary learning experience to educate engineers and scientists who, as called for in the National Academy of Engineering's The Engineer of 2020 "will assume leadership positions from which they can serve as positive influences in the making of public policy and in the administration of government and industry". In this presentation we showcase best practices in curriculum reform, exemplified by a seminar in National policy analysis where students and faculty have recently investigated federal science funding decisions in support of natural hazards including earthquakes, tsunamis, wildland fires, and pandemic disease.

  6. The Star with My Name: The Alaska Rural Systemic Initiative and the Impact of Place-Based Education on Native Student Achievement. The Case for Place-Based. Rural Trust White Paper on Place-Based Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emekauwa, Emeka

    2004-01-01

    After nearly two centuries of denial within Western education institutions, the indigenous knowledge systems of Alaska's Natives are being recaptured through the work of the Alaska Rural Systemic Initiative. These knowledge systems, coupled with the best of Western science, form the foundation for a new type of education--one that is place-based,…

  7. The Expected Adjustment and Academic Outcomes of Honors College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington, Christina R.

    2012-01-01

    The transition to an institution of higher education can present challenges and difficulties, but it is a student's expectations that can ultimately predict adjustment (Jackson, Pancer, Pratt, & Hunsberger, 2000). A larger number of students who experience difficulties in their adjustment end up withdrawing from the institution (Baker…

  8. U.S. Geological Survey activities related to American Indians and Alaska Natives fiscal year 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,; Brunstein, F. Craig

    2006-01-01

    The USGS works in cooperation with American Indian and Alaska Native governments to conduct research on (1) water, energy, and mineral resources, (2) animals and plants that are important for traditional lifeways or have environmental or economic significance, and (3) natural hazards. This report describes most of the activities that the USGS conducted with American Indian and Alaska Native governments, educational institutions, and individuals during Federal fiscal year (FY) 2004. Most of these USGS activities were collaborations with Tribes, Tribal organizations, or professional societies. Other activities were conducted cooperatively with the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) or other Federal entities.

  9. Institution Closures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Mary F., Ed.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on the need to accelerate the closing of institutions for people with mental retardation. Articles are by both current and former residents of institutions and by professionals, and include: "The Realities of Institutions" (Tia Nelis); "I Cry Out So That I Won't Go Insane" (Mary F. Hayden); "Trends in…

  10. Minority Women's Health: American Indians/Alaska Natives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health > American Indians/Alaska Natives Minority Women's Health American Indians/Alaska Natives Related information How to Talk to ... disease. Return to top Health conditions common in American Indian and Alaska Native women Accidents Alcoholism and drug ...

  11. Science for Alaska: Public Understanding of University Research Priorities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, D.

    2015-12-01

    Science for Alaska: Public Understanding of Science D. L. Campbell11University of Alaska Fairbanks, USA Around 200 people brave 40-below-zero temperatures to listen to university researchers and scientists give lectures about their work at an event called the Science for Alaska Lecture Series, hosted by the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute. It is held once a week, for six weeks during the coldest part of a Fairbanks, Alaska, winter. The topics range from space physics to remote sensing. The lectures last for 45 minutes with 15 minutes for audience questions and answers. It has been popular for about 20 years and is one of many public outreach efforts of the institute. The scientists are careful in their preparations for presentations and GI's Public Relations staff chooses the speakers based on topic, diversity and public interest. The staff also considers the speaker's ability to speak to a general audience, based on style, clarity and experience. I conducted a qualitative research project to find out about the people who attended the event, why they attend and what they do with the information they hear about. The participants were volunteers who attended the event and either stayed after the lectures for an interview or signed up to be contacted later. I used used an interview technique with open-ended questions, recorded and transcribed the interview. I identified themes in the interviews, using narrative analysis. Preliminary data show that the lecture series is a form of entertainment for people who are highly educated and work in demanding and stressful jobs. They come with family and friends. Sometimes it's a date with a significant other. Others want to expose their children to science. The findings are in keeping with the current literature that suggests that public events meant to increase public understanding of science instead draws like-minded people. The findings are different from Campbell's hypothesis that attendance was based

  12. Forestry timber typing. Tanana demonstration project, Alaska ASVT. [Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrissey, L. A.; Ambrosia, V. G.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of using LANDSAT digital data in conjunction with topographic data to delineate commercial forests by stand size and crown closure in the Tanana River basin of Alaska was tested. A modified clustering approach using two LANDSAT dates to generate an initial forest type classification was then refined with topographic data. To further demonstrate the ability of remotely sensed data in a fire protection planning framework, the timber type data were subsequently integrated with terrain information to generate a fire hazard map of the study area. This map provides valuable assistance in initial attack planning, determining equipment accessibility, and fire growth modeling. The resulting data sets were incorporated into the Alaska Department of Natural Resources geographic information system for subsequent utilization.

  13. Framing Honors Physical Geology around Critical Thinking and Communication Exercises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunn, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    The honors section of freshman geology at LSU has 20-35 highly motivated students with ACT scores above 30. They are usually non-majors and have had no exposure to geosciences in high school. Teaching geology in Louisiana is challenging because there are virtually no rocks exposed at the surface and students with creationist beliefs are common. In addition to exams, this course requires a series of projects: plate reconstruction, minerals in the home, a metaphor for geologic time, volcano research paper, group project on volcanoes, water resources, and a comparison essay on Hurricane Katrina and the 1927 flood of the Mississippi river. The purpose of the projects is to promote critical thinking and communication skills as well as allow students to explore in greater depth topics relevant to their every day lives such as hurricanes. Critical thinking skills emphasized are interrelated processes and systems, variable temporal/spatial scales, and analysis of controversial topics such as the age of the Earth. This course is certified by LSU's Communication across the Curriculum (CxC) program as communication intensive in written and visual communication. CxC certification requires that 40% of grading depend on communication activities. Written communication exercises focus on organization, audience, incorporation and coordination of visual elements, and proper citation of sources. Visual communication exercises include working with maps, charts and graphs, and a group project where they create a poster and/or stand alone slide presentation on volcanoes geared to a middle school audience. Topics such as origin and quality of tap water, how much copper ore is used to build their home, and local geoharzards such as the Baton Rouge Fault generate a higher interest level and higher retention of information. Preliminary assessment is positive including improved exam results, higher student evaluations, recruitment of geology majors, and anecdotal evidence of long term

  14. Computational simulations of frictional losses in pipe networks confirmed in experimental apparatusses designed by honors students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlman, Nicholas A.; Hynes, Eric; Kutz, April

    2015-11-01

    Lectures in introductory fluid mechanics at NIU are a combination of students with standard enrollment and students seeking honors credit for an enriching experience. Most honors students dread the additional homework problems or an extra paper assigned by the instructor. During the past three years, honors students of my class have instead collaborated to design wet-lab experiments for their peers to predict variable volume flow rates of open reservoirs driven by gravity. Rather than learn extra, the honors students learn the Bernoulli head-loss equation earlier to design appropriate systems for an experimental wet lab. Prior designs incorporated minor loss features such as sudden contraction or multiple unions and valves. The honors students from Spring 2015 expanded the repertoire of available options by developing large scale set-ups with multiple pipe networks that could be combined together to test the flexibility of the student team's computational programs. The engagement of bridging the theory with practice was appreciated by all of the students such that multiple teams were able to predict performance within 4% accuracy. The challenges, schedules, and cost estimates of incorporating the experimental lab into an introductory fluid mechanics course will be reported.

  15. Third International Volcanological Field School in Kamchatka and Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, D.; Eichelberger, J.; Gordeev, E.; Malcolm, J.; Shipman, J.; Izbekov, P.

    2005-12-01

    The Kamchatka State University, Institute of Volcanology and Seismology FEB RAS (Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, Russia) and University of Alaska Fairbanks have developed an international field school focused on explosive volcanism of the North Pacific. The concept of the field school envisages joint field studies by young Russian scientists and their peers from the United States and Japan. Beyond providing first-hand experience with some of Earth's most remarkable volcanic features, the intent is to foster greater interest in language study, cultures, and ultimately in international research collaborations. The students receive both theoretical and practical knowledge of active volcanic systems, as well experience in working productively in a harsh environment. Each year, the class is offered in both Alaska and Kamchatka. The Alaska session is held in the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes, Katmai National Park, product of the greatest volcanic eruption of the 20th century. A highlight in 2005 was the discovery of a new 70-m crater atop Trident Volcano. Also this year, we added the Great Tolbachik Eruption of 1975-76 to the itinerary of the Kamchatka school. Day trips were conducted to summit craters of New Tolbachik volcanoes and Plosky Tolbachik, Tolbachik lava flows; fumarole fields of Mutnovsky volcano, and a geothermal area and 60 MWe power plant. Students who attended both the Alaska and Kamchatka sessions could ponder the implications of great lateral separation of active vents - 10 km at Katmai and 30 km at Tolbachik - with multiple magmas and non-eruptive caldera collapse at the associated stratocones. During the evenings and on days of bad weather, the school faculty conducted lectures on various topics of volcanology in either Russian or English, with translation. The field school is a strong stimulus for growth of young volcanologists and cooperation among Russia, USA and Japan, leading naturally to longer student exchange visits and to joint research projects.

  16. 76 FR 303 - Alaska: Adequacy of Alaska's Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Permit Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 239 and 258 Alaska: Adequacy of Alaska's Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Permit... proposes to approve Alaska's modification of its approved Municipal Solid Waste Landfill (MSWLF)...

  17. Fisheries Education in Alaska. Conference Report. Alaska Sea Grant Report 82-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smoker, William W., Ed.

    This conference was an attempt to have the fishing industry join the state of Alaska in building fisheries education programs. Topics addressed in papers presented at the conference include: (1) fisheries as a part of life in Alaska, addressing participation of Alaska natives in commercial fisheries and national efforts; (2) the international…

  18. Alaska Native Participation in the Civilian Conservation Corps. Alaska Historical Commission Studies in History No. 206.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Connor; And Others

    The report is a finding aid to the sources which document the 1937 federal policy decision mandating that 50% of the enrollees in the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) in Alaska must be Alaska Natives and provides a list of the Native CCC projects in Alaska. The finding aid section is organized according to the location of the collections and…

  19. Microscopic analysis of feather and hair fragments associated with human mummified remains from Kagamil Island, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dove, C.J.; Peurach, S.C.; Frohlich, Bruno; Harper, Albert B.; Gilberg, Rolf

    2002-01-01

    Human mummified remains of 34 different infant and adult individuals from Kagamil Island, Alaska, are accessioned in the Department of Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution. Kagamil Island is one of the small islands in the Island of Four Mountains group of the Aleutian Islands, Alaska and is well known for the mummy caves located on the southwest coast of the island. The Kagamil mummy holdings at the Smithsonian represent one of the largest, best documented and preserved collections of this type. Although these specimens are stored in ideal conditions, many small feather and hair fragments have become loose or disassociated from the actual mummies over the years. This preliminary investigation of fragmentary fiber material retrieved from these artifacts is the first attempt to identify bird and mammal species associated with the mummified remains of the Kagamil Island, Alaska collection and is part of the ongoing research connected with these artifacts.

  20. Unified Ecoregions of Alaska: 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nowacki, Gregory J.; Spencer, Page; Fleming, Michael; Brock, Terry; Jorgenson, Torre

    2003-01-01

    Major ecosystems have been mapped and described for the State of Alaska and nearby areas. Ecoregion units are based on newly available datasets and field experience of ecologists, biologists, geologists and regional experts. Recently derived datasets for Alaska included climate parameters, vegetation, surficial geology and topography. Additional datasets incorporated in the mapping process were lithology, soils, permafrost, hydrography, fire regime and glaciation. Thirty two units are mapped using a combination of the approaches of Bailey (hierarchial), and Omernick (integrated). The ecoregions are grouped into two higher levels using a 'tri-archy' based on climate parameters, vegetation response and disturbance processes. The ecoregions are described with text, photos and tables on the published map.

  1. Alaska Natural Gas Transportation System

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, V.T.

    1984-04-27

    The proven reserves of natural gas in Prudhoe Bay remain the single largest block of reserves under US control. The sponsors of the Alaska Natural Gas Transportation System, including The Williams Companies, remain convinced that Alaskan gas will be increasingly important to meet future needs here in the lower 48 states. Both Canada and the US will increasingly have to turn to more costly supplies of gas as the closer, traditional areas of gas supply are exhausted. A principal motivation for Canada's participation in the ANGTS was the prospect of a jointly sponsored pipeline through Canada which would facilitate bringing frontier gas to market - through the so-called Dempster lateral. The high cost of transportation systems in the Artic necessitates pipelines with large capacities in order to minimize the cost of transportation per unit of gas delivered. It is clear that Canada still strongly supports the ANGTS project as a means of opening up the frontier resources of both Alaska and Canada.

  2. 1964 Great Alaska Earthquake: a photographic tour of Anchorage, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thoms, Evan E.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Anderson, Rebecca D.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    On March 27, 1964, at 5:36 p.m., a magnitude 9.2 earthquake, the largest recorded earthquake in U.S. history, struck southcentral Alaska (fig. 1). The Great Alaska Earthquake (also known as the Good Friday Earthquake) occurred at a pivotal time in the history of earth science, and helped lead to the acceptance of plate tectonic theory (Cox, 1973; Brocher and others, 2014). All large subduction zone earthquakes are understood through insights learned from the 1964 event, and observations and interpretations of the earthquake have influenced the design of infrastructure and seismic monitoring systems now in place. The earthquake caused extensive damage across the State, and triggered local tsunamis that devastated the Alaskan towns of Whittier, Valdez, and Seward. In Anchorage, the main cause of damage was ground shaking, which lasted approximately 4.5 minutes. Many buildings could not withstand this motion and were damaged or collapsed even though their foundations remained intact. More significantly, ground shaking triggered a number of landslides along coastal and drainage valley bluffs underlain by the Bootlegger Cove Formation, a composite of facies containing variably mixed gravel, sand, silt, and clay which were deposited over much of upper Cook Inlet during the Late Pleistocene (Ulery and others, 1983). Cyclic (or strain) softening of the more sensitive clay facies caused overlying blocks of soil to slide sideways along surfaces dipping by only a few degrees. This guide is the document version of an interactive web map that was created as part of the commemoration events for the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Great Alaska Earthquake. It is accessible at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Alaska Science Center website: http://alaska.usgs.gov/announcements/news/1964Earthquake/. The website features a map display with suggested tour stops in Anchorage, historical photographs taken shortly after the earthquake, repeat photography of selected sites, scanned documents

  3. Change in abundance of pacific brant wintering in alaska: evidence of a climate warming effect?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, D.H.; Dau, C.P.; Lee, T.; Sedinger, J.S.; Anderson, B.A.; Hines, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    Winter distribution of Pacific Flyway brant (Branta bernicla nigricans) has shifted northward from lowtemperate areas to sub-Arctic areas over the last 42 years. We assessed the winter abundance and distribution of brant in Alaska to evaluate whether climate warming may be contributing to positive trends in the most northern of the wintering populations. Mean surface air temperatures during winter at the end of the Alaska Peninsula increased about 1??C between 1963 and 2004, resulting in a 23% reduction in freezing degree days and a 34% decline in the number of days when ice cover prevents birds from accessing food resources. Trends in the wintering population fluctuated with states of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, increasing during positive (warm) phases and decreasing during negative (cold) phases, and this correlation provides support for the hypothesis that growth in the wintering population of brant in Alaska is linked to climate warming. The size of the wintering population was negatively correlated with the number of days of strong northwesterly winds in November, which suggests that the occurrence of tailwinds favorable for migration before the onset of winter was a key factor in whether brant migrated from Alaska or remained there during winter. Winter distribution of brant on the Alaska Peninsula was highly variable and influenced by ice cover, particularly at the heavily used Izembek Lagoon. Observations of previously marked brant indicated that the Alaska wintering population was composed primarily of birds originating from Arctic breeding colonies that appear to be growing. Numbers of brant in Alaska during winter will likely increase as temperatures rise and ice cover decreases at high latitudes in response to climate warming. ?? The Arctic Institute of North America.

  4. Holocene coastal glaciation of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calkin, Parker E.; Wiles, Gregory C.; Barclay, David J.

    2001-01-01

    Holocene fluctuations of the three cirque glaciers on the Seward Peninsula and five groups of tidewater- and land-terminating glaciers along the northernmost Gulf of Alaska, provide a proxy record of late Holocene climatic change. Furthermore, the movements of the coastal glaciers were relevant to late Holocene native American migration. The earliest expansion was recorded about 6850 yr BP by Hubbard Glacier at the head of Yakutat Bay in the Gulf of Alaska; however, its down-fjord advance to the bay mouth was delayed until ˜2700 BP. Similarly, expansions of the Icy Bay, Bering, and McCarty glaciers occurred near their present termini by ˜3600-3000 BP, compatible with marked cooling and precipitation increases suggested by the Alaskan pollen record. Decrease in glacier activity ˜2000 BP was succeeded by advances of Gulf coastal glaciers between 1500 and 1300 BP, correlative with early Medieval expansions across the Northern Hemisphere. A Medieval Optimum, encompassing at least a few centuries prior to AD 1200 is recognized by general retreat of land-terminating glaciers, but not of all tidewater glaciers. Little Ice Age advances of land-based glaciers, many dated with the precision of tree-ring cross-dating, were centered on the middle 13th or early 15th centuries, the middle 17th and the last half of the 19th century A.D. Strong synchrony of these events across coastal Alaska is evident.

  5. Honors and High-Ability Students: Factors That Predict Academic Efficacy, Critical Thinking Skills, and Academic Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Jessica Lynn

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the quantitative study was threefold: (a) to examine high-ability students in and outside an honors program at a midwestern comprehensive university to determine differences in background and demographic characteristics between honors participants and nonparticipants of similar ability; (b) to determine differences in academic…

  6. 32 CFR 887.7 - Persons separated under other than honorable conditions (undesirable or bad conduct) or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Persons separated under other than honorable conditions (undesirable or bad conduct) or dishonorable discharge. 887.7 Section 887.7 National Defense... honorable conditions (undesirable or bad conduct) or dishonorable discharge. Those persons whose...

  7. 32 CFR 887.7 - Persons separated under other than honorable conditions (undesirable or bad conduct) or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Persons separated under other than honorable conditions (undesirable or bad conduct) or dishonorable discharge. 887.7 Section 887.7 National Defense... honorable conditions (undesirable or bad conduct) or dishonorable discharge. Those persons whose...

  8. 32 CFR 887.7 - Persons separated under other than honorable conditions (undesirable or bad conduct) or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Persons separated under other than honorable conditions (undesirable or bad conduct) or dishonorable discharge. 887.7 Section 887.7 National Defense... honorable conditions (undesirable or bad conduct) or dishonorable discharge. Those persons whose...

  9. 32 CFR 887.7 - Persons separated under other than honorable conditions (undesirable or bad conduct) or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Persons separated under other than honorable conditions (undesirable or bad conduct) or dishonorable discharge. 887.7 Section 887.7 National Defense... honorable conditions (undesirable or bad conduct) or dishonorable discharge. Those persons whose...

  10. 32 CFR 887.7 - Persons separated under other than honorable conditions (undesirable or bad conduct) or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Persons separated under other than honorable conditions (undesirable or bad conduct) or dishonorable discharge. 887.7 Section 887.7 National Defense... honorable conditions (undesirable or bad conduct) or dishonorable discharge. Those persons whose...

  11. Negotiating Institutional Performance and Change: Strategies for Engaged Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andes, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    This essay describes how University of Alaska Anchorage (a) mapped academic-based engagement activities into its institutional context and mission and (b) explored academic and administrative leadership strategies to reflect its commitment to engagement. Higher education governing bodies, legislators, administrators, and faculty increasingly…

  12. A Team Approach to Enhance Scholarship Among Honors Students in Nursing.

    PubMed

    Jukkala, Angela M; Miltner, Rebecca S; Morrison, Shannon L; Gisiger-Camata, Sylvia; Todd, Allison; Moneyham, Linda D; Meneses, Karen M

    2016-01-01

    Honors programs within schools of nursing have the potential to enhance young nurses' interest in developing programs of research early in their careers and can thus contribute to the successful development of nursing knowledge. Such programs also provide opportunities to enhance knowledge and skill in leadership and teamwork at a critical time during the development of their professional nurse identity. This article presents the successful approach one organization took when revising its honors program to meet the current needs of students, society, and the profession. PMID:27405203

  13. Honoring silence and valuing community: living leadership in 21st century teaching-learning.

    PubMed

    Backer Condon, Barbara; Hegge, Margaret

    2014-04-01

    Leadership is a very personal concept. The methods implemented by leaders often reflect philosophical beliefs and theoretical underpinnings. This column, while recognizing that leadership styles are indeed personal, proffers living leadership in nursing education through two key leadership attitudes. These attitudes are honoring silence and valuing community. Honoring silence is discussed as recognizing the multiple dimensions of silence, and valuing community is presented in light of the humanbecoming community models change concepts: moving-initiating, anchoring-shifting, and pondering-shaping. PMID:24740944

  14. A Team Approach to Enhance Scholarship Among Honors Students in Nursing.

    PubMed

    Jukkala, Angela M; Miltner, Rebecca S; Morrison, Shannon L; Gisiger-Camata, Sylvia; Todd, Allison; Moneyham, Linda D; Meneses, Karen M

    2016-01-01

    Honors programs within schools of nursing have the potential to enhance young nurses' interest in developing programs of research early in their careers and can thus contribute to the successful development of nursing knowledge. Such programs also provide opportunities to enhance knowledge and skill in leadership and teamwork at a critical time during the development of their professional nurse identity. This article presents the successful approach one organization took when revising its honors program to meet the current needs of students, society, and the profession.

  15. Honoring the 90th birthday of Academician I M Khalatnikov (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 21 October 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenshchik, Aleksandr Yu; Pokrovsky, Valery L.; Khriplovich, Iosif B.

    2010-06-01

    21 October 2009, in the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, a scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division was held honoring the 90th birthday of Academician I M Khalatnikov. The following talks were given at the session: (1) Andreev A F (Kapitza Institute of Physical Problems, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow) "Momentum deficit in quantum glasses" (2) Kamenshchik A Yu (Dipartimento di Fisica and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bologna, Italy; Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics RAS, Moscow) "The problem of singularities and chaos in cosmology" (3) Pokrovsky V L (Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, RAS, Moscow; Department of Physics, Texas A&M University, USA) "I M Khalatnikov's works on scattering of high-energy particles" (4) Khriplovich I B (Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk) "Screening and antiscreening of charge in gauge theories." Brief versions of talks 2-4 are given below. • The problem of singularities and chaos in cosmology, A Yu Kamenshchik Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 3, Pages 301-309 • Above the barriers (I M Khalatnikov's works on the scattering of high-energy particles), V L Pokrovsky Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 3, Pages 309-314 • Screening and antiscreening of charge in gauge theories, I B Khriplovich Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 3, Pages 315-316

  16. [Institutional Renewal].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Peggy, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    The theme of this journal issue is "Institutional Renewal." Projects designed to address the issues of the 1980s at 18 colleges are described, and 15 definitions of institutional renewal are presented. Participating colleges were provided expert advice through the Association of American College's (AAC) Project Lodestar (renamed Consultation and…

  17. Institutional History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohlstedt, Sally Gregory

    1985-01-01

    Discusses recent work on scientific institutions in the United States, indicating that although historians have explored the origins of institutions, few have pursued these organizations into their later and perhaps equally complex years. Learned/professional organizations, museums, publications, and philanthropy are among the major topic areas…

  18. Honoring Our Hospital's History: A Preservation and Digitization Initiative.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Kerry; Bass, Jordan; Maloney, Toby

    2016-01-01

    There is limited literature on hospital archives projects. Hospitals understandably have a strong focus on patient care, but there is still a critical need to keep institutional archives. Among their many uses, institutional archives preserve corporate memory, provide evidence of interactions with community, and assist in contemporary decision making. This column describes a university-hospital partnership to undertake a one-year project to preserve, detail, and digitize ten boxes, or approximately 3.8 meters, of materials dating from 1980 to 2006. This project serves as a model for other hospital or health care facilities wanting to preserve and more actively engage with their archival collections. PMID:27391184

  19. Bill Demmert and Native Education in Alaska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnhardt, Ray

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the influences of William Demmert's formative years growing up in Alaska and his years as an educator of Native American students upon his career in Native education policy. It focuses on Alaska Native education during a ten-year period between 1980 and 1990 during which time he served as the director of the Center for…

  20. Women's Legal Rights in Alaska. Reprint.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatter, Sue Ellen; Saville, Sandra K.

    This publication is intended to help women in Alaska learn about their legal rights. Some of the information is of a general nature and will be of interest to women in other states. Some of the laws and resources are relevant to Alaska only. The publication can serve as a model to other states wanting to develop a resource to inform women about…

  1. Culturally Responsive Guidelines for Alaska Public Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska Univ., Fairbanks. Alaska Native Knowledge Network.

    These guidelines are predicated on the belief that culturally appropriate service to indigenous peoples is a fundamental principle of Alaska public libraries. While the impetus for developing the guidelines was service to the Alaska Native community, they can also be applied to other cultural groups. A culturally responsive library environment is…

  2. Distance Learning in Alaska's Rural Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bramble, William J.

    1986-01-01

    The distance education and instructional technology projects that have been undertaken in Alaska over the last decade are detailed in this paper. The basic services offered by the "Learn Alaska Network" are described in relation to three user groups: K-12 education; postsecondary education; and general public education and information. The audio…

  3. 77 FR 16314 - Alaska Disaster #AK-00024

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-20

    ... ADMINISTRATION Alaska Disaster AK-00024 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Alaska dated 03/13/2012... INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409...

  4. 78 FR 39822 - Alaska Disaster #AK-00028

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... ADMINISTRATION Alaska Disaster AK-00028 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Alaska (FEMA-4122-DR... INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409...

  5. 75 FR 43199 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... approving the conveyance of surface estate for certain lands to Beaver Kwit'chin Corporation, pursuant to... Doyon, Limited when the surface estate is conveyed to Beaver Kwit'chin Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Beaver, Alaska, and are located in: Fairbanks Meridian, Alaska T. 16 N., R. 1 E., Secs. 1 to...

  6. 77 FR 21802 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... Kongnikilnomuit Yuita Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Bill Moore's Slough, Alaska, and are located... conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq). The subsurface... hours. Jennifer Noe, Land Law Examiner, Land Transfer Adjudication II Branch. BILLING CODE 4310-JA-P...

  7. Alaska Head Start. Annual Report for 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Community and Regional Affairs, Juneau.

    This annual report details the accomplishments of the Alaska Head Start Program for fiscal year 1998. The report begins with a graphic presentation of the locations of Alaska Head Start programs and a table delineating the administrative and program partners of Head Start, its service population, eligibility requirements, funding sources, service…

  8. Facts & Figures about Education in Alaska, 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau.

    This collection of tables presents selected facts and figures about education in Alaska. General and district school information about Alaska's 469 public schools in 54 districts and its 276 private and denominational schools is followed by tables of general student information, including average daily membership, enrollment, graduates, and…

  9. Integrating Intercultural Education: The Anchorage Alaska Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenton, Ray

    The desire for students to understand and respect each other is a primary motivation for the effort to integrate multicultural education into all aspects of the Anchorage School District (Alaska) curriculum. The Anchorage curriculum emphasizes the cultural heritage of Alaska Natives, other resident ethnic groups and Pacific Rim cultures. In recent…

  10. Viewpoints: Reflections on the Principalship in Alaska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagstrom, David A., Ed.

    In this collection, 32 Alaskan principals, retired principals, assistant principals, and principals-to-be share their experiences as administrators and reflect on their feelings about the nature of the work and about schooling issues in Alaska. Nine of the writings were selected from "Totem Tales," the newsletter of Alaska's Association of…

  11. Vulnerability and adaptation to climate-related fire impacts in rural and urban interior Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trainor, Sarah F.; Calef, Monika; Natcher, David; Chapin, F. Stuart; McGuire, Anthony; Huntington, Orville; Duffy, Paul A; Rupp, T. Scott; DeWilde, La'Ona; Kwart, Mary; Fresco, Nancy; Lovecraft, Amy Lauren

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores whether fundamental differences exist between urban and rural vulnerability to climate-induced changes in the fire regime of interior Alaska. We further examine how communities and fire managers have responded to these changes and what additional adaptations could be put in place. We engage a variety of social science methods, including demographic analysis, semi-structured interviews, surveys, workshops and observations of public meetings. This work is part of an interdisciplinary study of feedback and interactions between climate, vegetation, fire and human components of the Boreal forest social–ecological system of interior Alaska. We have learned that although urban and rural communities in interior Alaska face similar increased exposure to wildfire as a result of climate change, important differences exist in their sensitivity to these biophysical, climate-induced changes. In particular, reliance on wild foods, delayed suppression response, financial resources and institutional connections vary between urban and rural communities. These differences depend largely on social, economic and institutional factors, and are not necessarily related to biophysical climate impacts per se. Fire management and suppression action motivated by political, economic or other pressures can serve as unintentional or indirect adaptation to climate change. However, this indirect response alone may not sufficiently reduce vulnerability to a changing fire regime. More deliberate and strategic responses may be required, given the magnitude of the expected climate change and the likelihood of an intensification of the fire regime in interior Alaska.

  12. Native Pathways to Education: Alaska Rural Systemic Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska Univ., Fairbanks.

    The Alaska Federation of Natives, in cooperation with the University of Alaska, received funding to implement the Alaska Rural Systemic Initiative (AKRSI). Over a 5-year period (1995-2000), AKRSI initiatives are systematically documenting the indigenous knowledge systems of Alaska Native people and developing educational policies and practices…

  13. Infant Mortality and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heath & Mortality Infant Mortality and American Indians/Alaska Natives American Indian/Alaska Natives have 1.5 times the ... Cause of Death (By rank) # American Indian/Alaska Native Deaths American Indian/Alaska Native Death Rate #Non- Hispanic White ...

  14. The Alaska State Writing Consortium: The First Five Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parson, Gail

    This booklet documents the first 5 years of the Alaska State Writing Consortium, an association made up of 45 Alaska school districts, the Alaska Department of Education, and the University of Alaska. The Consortium, which oversees the organization and implementation of teacher training programs in writing and the teaching of writing, has five…

  15. Neither Honor nor Compensation: Faculty and Public Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaeger, Audrey J.; Thornton, Courtney H.

    2006-01-01

    Land-grant institutions that are also research extensive may face the unique position of asking faculty to fulfill a historical mission with low consideration of public service in the reward structure. This paradox between mission and reward results in the socialization of many faculty away from participation in public service. This article…

  16. Relevance, Rigor, and Return on Investment: How Honors Enhances Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    In an opening address to the university community a few years ago, Thomas Haas, President of Grand Valley State University set out three key concepts (three contemporary Rs) to guide thinking as the institution grows and develops. They all have to do with student success: relevance, rigor, and return on investment. Haas articulated that the…

  17. High Honors for the Educational Park. AIA School Plant Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferendino, A. J.

    1967-01-01

    One of a series of papers prepared by members of the American Institute of Architects Committee on School and College Architecture and by selected specialists to make laymen aware of school building problems and trends and to stimulate discussion. The article sees the educational park concept as deriving from, in its simplest form, the…

  18. For Whom the Business Bell Tolls: Honors in America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portnoy, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Fiscal responsibility matters at institutions of higher learning, especially when they are public and supported by taxpayers, but colleges are not businesses. The consequences of fiscal irresponsibility profoundly affect students, faculty, and staff, as well as teaching, research, and service activities. This essay gives a brief history of the…

  19. Visibility, Healing and Resistance: Voices from the 2005 Dena'ina Language Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Lindsay; Marlow, Patrick E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the complexities of institutional involvement in Native language programming by looking at a program in Kenai, Alaska. The work contrasts learner goals with stated grant goals in order to investigate the tensions between institutional (university, funding agency) and individual learner goals in a language revitalization effort.…

  20. Learning from the Histories of Rhetoric: Essays in Honor of Winifred Bryan Horner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enos, Theresa, Ed.

    This collection of 11 essays honors Winifred Bryan Horner for her sustained effort to establish that the special nature of rhetoric and composition leads teachers to theorize practice and to apply theory in their own classrooms. The collection urges those in the field to learn from histories of rhetoric in order to draw rhetoric and composition…

  1. The Newbery and Caldecott Awards: A Guide to the Medal and Honor Books. 2000 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    Each year the Newbery and Caldecott Medals are awarded by the American Library Association for the most distinguished American children's books published the previous year. With its annotations for all winning titles and honor books since the inception of the awards (Newbery in 1922 to be awarded annually to the author of the most distinguished…

  2. Milton M. Holland: Panola County Recipient of the Medal of Honor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jennifer, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This publication features an article about Milton M. Holland, a black American from East Texas, who is credited with being the first black Texan to have won the Congressional Medal of Honor during the U.S. Civil War. The articles in the issue concern Milton Holland and other black Americans who served in the Civil War. The articles include:…

  3. The Newbery and Caldecott Awards: A Guide to the Medal and Honor Books. 2011 Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ALA Editions, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Updated to include the 2011 award and honor books, this new edition of the annual guide to the Newbery and Caldecott awards gathers together the books deemed most distinguished in American children's literature and illustration since the inception of the renowned prizes. Librarians and teachers everywhere rely on this guidebook for quick reference…

  4. Information Literacy Instruction and Assessment in an Honors College Science Fundamentals Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Corey M.; Anelli, Carol M.; Galbraith, Betty J.; Green, Kimberly A.

    2011-01-01

    The Washington State University Honors College course, UH 290, "Science as a Way of Knowing," engages freshmen in scientific inquiry and scholarly literature research. The UH 290 instructor, a learning design consultant, and two librarians collaborated to develop and deliver the course's information literacy curriculum. The team used…

  5. When Poetry became Ethnography and Other Flying Pig Tales in Honor of Dell Hymes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahnmann-Taylor, Melisa

    2011-01-01

    Cahnmann-Taylor remembers her first encounter with Dell Hymes at an open mic event at the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association. She puzzles his complex stance on the role ethnographic poems might play in one's ethnographic project. In Dell Hymes's honor, she shares a poetic rendering of a speech event from her bilingual…

  6. The Fierce Urgency of now: Honoring Martin Luther King, Jr. in and out of the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazemek, Francis E.

    1988-01-01

    Explores how educators and their students can best honor Martin Luther King, Jr.'s, memory by using his life and works as a catalyst for acting upon school and society in a way that fosters social change. (Author/BJV)

  7. The Newbery and Caldecott Awards: A Guide to the Medal and Honor Books. 2012 Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ALA Editions, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Updated to include the 2012 award and honor books, this new edition of the annual guide to the Newbery and Caldecott awards gathers together the books deemed most distinguished in American children's literature and illustration since the inception of the renowned prizes. Librarians and teachers everywhere rely on this guidebook for quick reference…

  8. Access to Excellence: Assignment to Honors English Classes in the Transition from Middle to High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamoran, Adam

    A study examined the processes and criteria of assignment to honors English classes in the context of the transition from middle to high school. Five midwestern school districts--four public school districts and one Catholic diocese--participated in the study. Data consisted of interviews with school staff, school records, and student survey…

  9. Mobile Engagement at Scottsdale Community College: The Apple iPad in an English Honors Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tualla, Larry Tech

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation reports on an action research study that sought to discover how a new WiFi, tablet computing device, the Apple iPad, affected, enhanced, and impacted student engagement in an English Honors course at Scottsdale Community College. The researcher was also the instructor in the two semester, first-year, college composition sequence…

  10. Setting the Table for Diversity. National Collegiate Honors Council Monograph Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Lisa L., Ed.; Kotinek, Jonathan D., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    This monograph provides a cross section of policy and practice through the voices and experiences of honors faculty, staff, and students from across the nation. While far from comprehensive, this volume does pick up different strands of thinking on diversity to present a rich and complicated understanding of what diversity is, why it is important,…

  11. A Research-Focused Honors Program for High-Ability Teacher-Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howley, Marged; Howley, Aimee A.; Helfrich, Sara; Harrison, Lisa; Gillam, Mary Beth; Safran, Joan

    2012-01-01

    Honors programs represent one way that secondary schools and undergraduate programs address the needs of academically talented students. Evidence suggests that these programs contribute to positive student outcomes in terms of achievement, social development, and career preparation. Because colleges of education produce graduates who typically…

  12. More Than 100 Gather to Honor Joost Oppenheim on His 80th Birthday | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer They came from as far away as Russia and Japan, and from as nearby as the NCI at Frederick/Fort Detrick campus, Bethesda, and Baltimore, all with one purpose: to honor the mentor, colleague, and friend they have in Joost Oppenheim, as he celebrated his 80th birthday.

  13. Honoring the Personal Response: A Strategy for Serving the Public Hunger for Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ray

    2010-01-01

    Many groups of adult museum visitors welcome the invitation to make personal connections to works of art. Time for individual reflection and sharing with others may enable relationships to deepen and new insights to emerge. This article describes an approach to gallery teaching that honors the memories, associations, and emotions that visitors…

  14. Honors Student Perceptions of Self-Directed Learning: When Teacher becomes Facilitator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruitt, John

    2013-01-01

    In 1986, Paul Friedman and Reva Jenkins-Friedman introduced "Fostering Academic Excellence through Honors Programs" by warning readers that "One might assume that the brightest college undergraduates feel well served during their years on campus and that procedures for educating them are common knowledge." The research on the importance of honors…

  15. A Case Study of University Honors Students in Humanities through a Disciplinary Literacy Lens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cisco, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Students face challenging texts in higher education, whether they are discipline-specific journal articles or great works of literature. Building on research in content area reading and disciplinary literacy, this case study explores the various stances undergraduate honors students take when coping with challenging texts while enrolled in a…

  16. Librarian and Faculty Collaboration in Honors 301.88: An Interdisciplinary Computer Applications Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodard, Patricia

    1996-01-01

    Hunter College librarians and faculty collaborated in an interdisciplinary honors survey designed to familiarize undergraduates with electronic research tools and with statistical, geographical, desktop publishing, and graphics software. Participating librarians cited consumption of staff time, lack of a chain of command, and communications…

  17. Imagination and the Humanities in Honors across the Disciplines at a Jesuit University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraus, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Not every student has done honors work in the humanities, but all students experience research at a human level that necessarily recalls the work of the humanities. This article describes how Joe Kraus, a professor of literature at the University of Scranton, was inspired to see applied humanities in stories of human experiences, which helped him…

  18. Sea Lions and Honors Students: More in Common than You May Think

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindemann-Biolsi, Kristy L.

    2014-01-01

    One can easily find a link between the general principles of learning in relation to both nonhuman and human animals. What may be a more difficult but equally important parallel is how these learning principles are applied to the training of animals and the teaching of honors students. The author considers what teachers can learn from observing…

  19. Do Honors Students Have More Potential for Excellence in Their Professional Lives?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scager, Karin; Akkerman, Sanne F.; Keesen, Fried; Mainhard, M. Tim; Pilot, Albert; Wubbels, Theo

    2012-01-01

    Universities in many countries increasingly value talent, and do so by developing special honors programs for their top students. The selection process for these programs often relies on the students' prior achievements in school. Research has shown, however, that school grades do not sufficiently predict academic success. According to Renzulli's…

  20. Questionnaire Responses of High-School Honors Applicants Who Did Not Complete Any Course Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Ruth S.

    Los Angeles City College encourages twelfth-graders from nearby high schools, judged by their counselors to be capable of college course work, to request admission to classes in the High-School Honors program. Attrition, paricularly between submission of class requests and attendance past the first weeks of class, is great. The present study…

  1. Counting Coup: A True Story of Basketball and Honor on the Little Big Horn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colton, Larry

    In Plains Indian tradition, a warrior gained honor and glory by "counting coup," touching his enemy in battle and living to tell the tale. This is a modern story of counting coup that follows a talented young woman named Sharon LaForge, a gifted basketball player and a descendant of one of George Armstrong Custer's Indian scouts. Although the…

  2. Honoring the Past, Changing the Future: Bringing Native American Voices into Dance Theory Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prichard, Robin

    2016-01-01

    The inclusion of Native American perspectives adds an important voice in honoring the multiplicities of histories and cultures inherent in American society. And yet, teachers run the risk of committing unknown offenses if they are not familiar with the potential pitfalls that longstanding asymmetrical power relations between cultures can produce.…

  3. Playing with Light: Adventures in Optics and Spectroscopy for Honors and Majors General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Staveren, Marie N.; Edwards, Kimberly D.; Apkarian, V. A.

    2012-01-01

    A lab was developed for use in an undergraduate honors and majors general chemistry laboratory to introduce students to optics, spectroscopy, and the underlying principles of quantum mechanics. This lab includes four mini-experiments exploring total internal reflection, the tunneling of light, spectra of sparklers and colored candles, and emission…

  4. Comparison of Dental Students' Academic Performance Using Honors/Pass/Fail and Letter Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leske, Gary S.; Ripa, Louis

    1985-01-01

    Performance in a second-year course in pedodontics/orthodontics for three classes at the State University of New York at Stony Brook School of Dental Medicine who received grades under an honors/pass/fail system was compared to that of three academically comparable classes that received letter grades. (Author/MLW)

  5. The Tutorial Education Program: An Honors Program for Brazilian Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleith, Denise de Souza; Costa, Aderson Luiz, Jr.; de Alencar, Eunice M. L. Soriano

    2012-01-01

    The Tutorial Education Program is an honors program for Brazilian undergraduates, sponsored by the Ministry of Education. Based on philosophical principles of tutorial education in which small groups of academic talented students are guided by a tutor, the program is designed to support groups of undergraduates who demonstrate outstanding…

  6. Essential Characteristics of an Highly Resilient Judge: A Case Study of the Honorable Richard Jones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ericksen, Charles Aaron

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore judicial resiliency through the personal experiences and perspectives of an experienced trial court judge, the Honorable Richard Jones. This exploratory case study examined the coping skills, traits, and attributes exhibited by Judge Jones over his career and in particular through the experience of…

  7. A Service-Learning Project: Linking an Art Museum, Honors Students, and the Visual Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cempellin, Leda

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the structure, challenges, and outcomes of a service-learning project experimented by an art historian in an innovative special topics course Museum Experience, cross-listed with an Honors art appreciation course. The discussion includes: creating a new course content planned according to a multidisciplinary perspective…

  8. Collaborative Design: Building Task-Specific Rubrics in the Honors Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenow, Ce

    2014-01-01

    As someone who values collaboration with her students, supports students' ownership of their own learning, and looks for opportunities to increase their critical learning skills, Ce Rosenow finds many benefits to using task-specific rubrics that evolve from class discussion. She explains that this process is ideal for honors students because of…

  9. "The Endless Appetite": Honors Education and the Spirit of the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martino, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In a world that no longer privileges thinking, Andrew Martino writes here that we might need to consider what we are asking of our students--and why--when we ask them to think. This article presents a declaration of how Martino thinks honors education can serve as a resistant force against the increasing encroachment of a wholly utilitarian…

  10. Chladniite: A New Mineral Honoring the Father of Meteoritics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, T. J.; Steele, I. M.; Keil, K.; Leonard, B. F.; Endress, M.

    1993-07-01

    cell. A total of 17 lines were observed in the powder pattern. Chladniite is hexagonal, R 3(bar), a = 14.967 angstroms, c = 42.595 angstroms, beta = 120 degrees. Attempts to determine the structure of chladniite are in progress. Chladniite is named for Ernst Florens Friedrich Chladni (1756-1827), who is widely regarded as the "Father of Meteoritics." After his initial training as a lawyer, Chladni turned his attention to science, particularly problems in acoustics. He was not, however, able to obtain a permanent position and embarked upon the life of a nomad, traveling among the great cities of Europe lecturing about acoustics. During these travels, he eventually gained an interest in meteoritics. It was Chladni's pioneering book of 1794 that, for the first time, presented strong evidence for an extraterrestrial origin of meteoritic stones and irons [5]. In addition, Chladni argued that meteorites must have been the building blocks of all planets and argued that a large iron core must exist inside the Earth. During his extensive travels, Chladni also established a meteorite collection that can still be seen at Humboldt University in Berlin. It is appropriate that a mineral be named in his honor as we approach the 200th anniversary of the publication of his monumental work. References: [1] McCoy et al. (1993) Meteoritics, in press. [2] Fuchs et al. (1967) GCA, 21, 1711-1719. [3] Araki and Moore (1981) Am. Mineral., 66, 827-842. [4] Livingstone (1980) Min. Mag., 43, 833-836. [5] Chladni (1794) Riga, J. F. Hartknoch (in German); reprinted (with introduction by G. Hoppe) by Akad. Verlagsgesellschaft Geest & Portig K.-G. (1982) (in German).

  11. Metalliferous lode deposits of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berg, Henry C.; Cobb, Edward Huntington

    1967-01-01

    This report summarizes from repoAs of Federal and State agencies published before August 31, 1965, the geology of Alaska's metal-bearing lodes, including their structural or stratigraphic control, host rock, mode of origin, kinds of .Q minerals, grade, past production, and extent of exploration. In addition, the lists of mineral occurrences that accompany the 35 mineral-deposit location maps constitute an inventory of the State's known lodes. A total of 692 localities where m&alliferous deposits have been found are shown on the maps. The localities include 1,739 mines, prospects, and reported occurrences, of which 821 are described individually or otherwise cited in the text.

  12. 78 FR 57106 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska; Amendment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-17

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska; Amendment 95 to the Fishery Management Plan for... implement Amendment 95 to the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska (FMP). This proposed action would modify halibut prohibited species catch (PSC) management in the Gulf of Alaska...

  13. CSCAPES Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Alex Pothen

    2008-10-26

    We report on the progress made by researchers of the CSCAPES Institute at Old Dominion University for the years 2007 and 2008 in the areas of research, software creation, education and training, and outreach activities.

  14. Hyperspectral surveying for mineral resources in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; Graham, Garth E.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kelley, Karen D.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Hubbard, Bernard E.

    2016-07-07

    Alaska is a major producer of base and precious metals and has a high potential for additional undiscovered mineral resources. However, discovery is hindered by Alaska’s vast size, remoteness, and rugged terrain. New methods are needed to overcome these obstacles in order to fully evaluate Alaska’s geology and mineral resource potential. Hyperspectral surveying is one method that can be used to rapidly acquire data about the distributions of surficial materials, including different types of bedrock and ground cover. In 2014, the U.S. Geological Survey began the Alaska Hyperspectral Project to assess the applicability of this method in Alaska. The primary study area is a remote part of the eastern Alaska Range where porphyry deposits are exposed. In collaboration with the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the National Park Service, the U.S. Geological Survey is collecting and analyzing hyperspectral data with the goals of enhancing geologic mapping and developing methods to identify and characterize mineral deposits elsewhere in Alaska.

  15. Review: groundwater in Alaska (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Callegary, J.B.; Kikuchi, C.P.; Koch, J.C.; Lilly, M.R.; Leake, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater in the US state of Alaska is critical to both humans and ecosystems. Interactions among physiography, ecology, geology, and current and past climate have largely determined the location and properties of aquifers as well as the timing and magnitude of fluxes to, from, and within the groundwater system. The climate ranges from maritime in the southern portion of the state to continental in the Interior, and arctic on the North Slope. During the Quaternary period, topography and rock type have combined with glacial and periglacial processes to develop the unconsolidated alluvial aquifers of Alaska and have resulted in highly heterogeneous hydrofacies. In addition, the long persistence of frozen ground, whether seasonal or permanent, greatly affects the distribution of aquifer recharge and discharge. Because of high runoff, a high proportion of groundwater use, and highly variable permeability controlled in part by permafrost and seasonally frozen ground, understanding groundwater/surface-water interactions and the effects of climate change is critical for understanding groundwater availability and the movement of natural and anthropogenic contaminants.

  16. Scaphopoda from the Alexander Terrane, Southeast Alaska-The first occurrence of Scaphopoda in the Silurian

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rohr, D.M.; Blodgett, R.B.; Baichtal, J.

    2006-01-01

    The scaphopods Dentalium hecetaensis n. sp. and Rhytiodentalium cf. kentuckyensis Pojeta et Runnegar, 1979, are described from Ludlow-age strata of the Heceta Limestone on Prince of Wales Island, Southeast Alaska. This is the first occurrence of Silurian scaphopods known to date. They are part of a diverse macrobenthic fauna of the Alexander terrane, an accreted southern Alaskan terrane of Siberian or Uralian affinities. ?? 2006 Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, CAS.

  17. 77 FR 50712 - Information Collection: Southern Alaska Sharing Network and Subsistence Study; Proposed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Information Collection: Southern Alaska Sharing Network and Subsistence... in Alaska, ``Southern Alaska Sharing Network and Subsistence Study.'' DATES: Submit written comments.... Title: Southern Alaska Sharing Network and Subsistence Study. Abstract: The Bureau of Ocean...

  18. Geology of the Alaska-Juneau lode system, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twenhofel, William Stephens

    1952-01-01

    The Alaska-Juneau lode system for many years was one of the worlds leading gold-producing areas. Total production from the years 1893 to 1946 has amounted to about 94 million dollars, with principal values in contained gold but with some silver and lead values. The principal mine is the Alaska-Juneau mine, from which the lode system takes its name. The lode system is a part of a larger gold-bearing belt, generally referred to as the Juneau gold belt, along the western border of the Coast Range batholith. The rocks of the Alaska-Juneau lode system consist of a monoclinal sequence of steeply northeasterly dipping volcanic, state, and schist rocks, all of which have been metamorphosed by dynamic and thermal processes attendant with the intrusion of the Coast Range batholith. The rocks form a series of belts that trend northwest parallel to the Coast Range. In addition to the Coast Range batholith lying a mile to the east of the lode system, there are numerous smaller intrusives, all of which are sill-like in form and are thus conformable to the regional structure. The bedded rocks are Mesozoic in age; the Coast Range batholith is Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous in age. Some of the smaller intrusives pre-date the batholith, others post-date it. All of the rocks are cut by steeply dipping faults. The Alaska-Juneau lode system is confined exclusively to the footwall portion of the Perseverance slate band. The slate band is composed of black slate and black phyllite with lesser amounts of thin-bedded quartzite. Intrusive into the slate band are many sill-like bodies of rocks generally referred to as meta-gabbro. The gold deposits of the lode system are found both within the slate rocks and the meta-gabbro rocks, and particularly in those places where meta-gabbro bodies interfinger with slate. Thus the ore bodies are found in and near the terminations of meta-gabbro bodies. The ore bodies are quartz stringer-lodes composed of a great number of quartz veins from 6

  19. Columbia Glacier, Alaska, 1986-2011

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Columbia Glacier in Alaska is one of many vanishing around the world. Glacier retreat is one of the most direct and understandable effects of climate change. The consequences of the decline in ...

  20. 77 FR 35998 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-15

    ... Nunapiglluraq Corporation (Native Village of Hamilton). The decision approves the surface estate in the lands... is conveyed to Nunapiglluraq Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Hamilton, Alaska, and...

  1. Alaska Simulator - A Journey to Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Barbara; Pinggera, Jakob; Zugal, Stefan; Wild, Werner

    The Alaska Simulator is an interactive software tool developed at the University of Innsbruck which allows people to test, analyze and improve their own planning behavior. In addition, the Alaska Simulator can be used for studying research questions in the context of software project management and other related fields. Thereby, the Alaska Simulator uses a journey as a metaphor for planning a software project. In the context of software project management the simulator can be used to compare traditional rather plan-driven project management methods with more agile approaches. Instead of pre-planning everything in advance agile approaches spread planning activities throughout the project and provide mechanisms for effectively dealing with uncertainty. The biggest challenge thereby is to find the right balance between pre-planning activities and keeping options open. The Alaska Simulator allows to explore how much planning is needed under different circumstances.

  2. 76 FR 72212 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-22

    ... conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq). The subsurface... published four times in The Delta Discovery. DATES: Any party claiming a property interest in the...

  3. 78 FR 64002 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... for conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq.). The... decision will also be published once a week for four ] consecutive weeks in the Delta Discovery. DATES:...

  4. 77 FR 20046 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-03

    ... described below pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA) (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq.). The lands being approved for conveyance are lands originally selected under ANCSA in the withdrawal area...

  5. Advancing Efforts to Energize Native Alaska (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-04-01

    This brochure describes key programs and initiatives of the DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs to advance energy efficiency, renewable energy, and energy infrastructure projects in Alaska Native villages.

  6. Geotechnical reconnaissance of the 2002 Denali fault, Alaska, earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kayen, R.; Thompson, E.; Minasian, D.; Moss, R.E.S.; Collins, B.D.; Sitar, N.; Dreger, D.; Carver, G.

    2004-01-01

    The 2002 M7.9 Denali fault earthquake resulted in 340 km of ruptures along three separate faults, causing widespread liquefaction in the fluvial deposits of the alpine valleys of the Alaska Range and eastern lowlands of the Tanana River. Areas affected by liquefaction are largely confined to Holocene alluvial deposits, man-made embankments, and backfills. Liquefaction damage, sparse surrounding the fault rupture in the western region, was abundant and severe on the eastern rivers: the Robertson, Slana, Tok, Chisana, Nabesna and Tanana Rivers. Synthetic seismograms from a kinematic source model suggest that the eastern region of the rupture zone had elevated strong-motion levels due to rupture directivity, supporting observations of elevated geotechnical damage. We use augered soil samples and shear-wave velocity profiles made with a portable apparatus for the spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW) to characterize soil properties and stiffness at liquefaction sites and three trans-Alaska pipeline pump station accelerometer locations. ?? 2004, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  7. Don't tread on me: masculine honor ideology in the U.S. and militant responses to terrorism.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Collin D; Brown, Ryan P; Osterman, Lindsey L

    2012-08-01

    Using both college students and a national sample of adults, the authors report evidence linking the ideology of masculine honor in the U.S. with militant responses to terrorism. In Study 1, individuals' honor ideology endorsement predicted, among other outcomes, open-ended hostile responses to a fictitious attack on the Statue of Liberty and support for the use of extreme counterterrorism measures (e.g., severe interrogations), controlling for right-wing authoritarianism, social dominance orientation, and other covariates. In Study 2, the authors used a regional classification to distinguish honor state respondents from nonhonor state respondents, as has traditionally been done in the literature, and showed that students attending a southwestern university desired the death of the terrorists responsible for 9/11 more than did their northern counterparts. These studies are the first to show that masculine honor ideology in the U.S. has implications for the intergroup phenomenon of people's responses to terrorism.

  8. Don't tread on me: masculine honor ideology in the U.S. and militant responses to terrorism.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Collin D; Brown, Ryan P; Osterman, Lindsey L

    2012-08-01

    Using both college students and a national sample of adults, the authors report evidence linking the ideology of masculine honor in the U.S. with militant responses to terrorism. In Study 1, individuals' honor ideology endorsement predicted, among other outcomes, open-ended hostile responses to a fictitious attack on the Statue of Liberty and support for the use of extreme counterterrorism measures (e.g., severe interrogations), controlling for right-wing authoritarianism, social dominance orientation, and other covariates. In Study 2, the authors used a regional classification to distinguish honor state respondents from nonhonor state respondents, as has traditionally been done in the literature, and showed that students attending a southwestern university desired the death of the terrorists responsible for 9/11 more than did their northern counterparts. These studies are the first to show that masculine honor ideology in the U.S. has implications for the intergroup phenomenon of people's responses to terrorism. PMID:22551662

  9. Institution Morphisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goguen, Joseph; Rosu, Grigore; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Institutions formalize the intuitive notion of logical system, including both syntax and semantics. A surprising number of different notions of morphisim have been suggested for forming categories with institutions as objects, and a surprising variety of names have been proposed for them. One goal of this paper is to suggest a terminology that is both uniform and informative to replace the current rather chaotic nomenclature. Another goal is to investigate the properties and interrelations of these notions. Following brief expositions of indexed categories, twisted relations, and Kan extensions, we demonstrate and then exploit the duality between institution morphisms in the original sense of Goguen and Burstall, and the 'plain maps' of Meseguer, obtaining simple uniform proofs of completeness and cocompleteness for both resulting categories; because of this duality, we prefer the name 'comorphism' over 'plain map.' We next consider 'theoroidal' morphisms and comorphisims, which generalize signatures to theories, finding that the 'maps' of Meseguer are theoroidal comorphisms, while theoroidal morphisms are a new concept. We then introduce 'forward' and 'semi-natural' morphisms, and appendices discuss institutions for hidden algebra, universal algebra, partial equational logic, and a variant of order sorted algebra supporting partiality.

  10. Institutional betrayal.

    PubMed

    Smith, Carly Parnitzke; Freyd, Jennifer J

    2014-09-01

    A college freshman reports a sexual assault and is met with harassment and insensitive investigative practices leading to her suicide. Former grade school students, now grown, come forward to report childhood abuse perpetrated by clergy, coaches, and teachers--first in trickles and then in waves, exposing multiple perpetrators with decades of unfettered access to victims. Members of the armed services elect to stay quiet about sexual harassment and assault during their military service or risk their careers by speaking up. A Jewish academic struggles to find a name for the systematic destruction of his people in Nazi Germany during the Holocaust. These seemingly disparate experiences have in common trusted and powerful institutions (schools, churches, military, government) acting in ways that visit harm upon those dependent on them for safety and well-being. This is institutional betrayal. The purpose of this article is to describe psychological research that examines the role of institutions in traumatic experiences and psychological distress following these experiences. We demonstrate the ways in which institutional betrayal has been left unseen by both the individuals being betrayed as well as the field of psychology and introduce means by which to identify and address this betrayal. PMID:25197837

  11. Undignifying institutions

    PubMed Central

    Seedhouse, D; Gallagher, A

    2002-01-01

    Declarations of the importance of dignity in health care are commonplace in codes of practice and other mission statements, yet these documents never clarify dignity's meaning. Their vague aspirations are compared to comments from staff and patients about opportunities for and barriers against the promotion of dignity in elderly care institutions. These suggest that while nurses and health care assistants have an intuitive understanding of dignity, they either do not or cannot always bring it about in practice. Thus, despite stated intentions to promote dignity, it appears that the circumstances of at least some elderly care institutions cause patients to experience avoidable indignities. Such institutions are "undignifying institutions" because they fail to acknowledge dignity's basic components, focus excessively on quantifiable priorities, and have insufficient resources available to assure consistently dignifying care. As a partial solution, we argue that health workers should be taught to understand and specify the components of dignity, which will better prepare them to challenge undignifying practices and to recognise opportunities for dignity promotion. PMID:12468656

  12. Propagation measurements in Alaska using ACTS beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, Charles E.

    1991-01-01

    The placement of an ACTS propagation terminal in Alaska has several distinct advantages. First is the inclusion of a new and important climatic zone to the global propagation model. Second is the low elevation look angle from Alaska to ACTS. These two unique opportunities also present problems unique to the location, such as extreme temperatures and lower power levels. These problems are examined and compensatory solutions are presented.

  13. Mercury in polar bears from Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Lentfer, J.W.; Galster, W.A.

    1987-04-01

    Alaskan polar bear (Ursus maritimus) muscle and liver samples collected in 1972 were analyzed for total mercury. Bears north of Alaska had more mercury than bears west of Alaska. The only difference between young and adult animals was in the northern area where adults had more mercury in liver tissue than young animals. Levels were probably not high enough to be a serious threat to bears.

  14. Accretion tectonics and crustal structure in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coney, P.J.; Jones, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    The entire width of the North American Cordillera in Alaska is made up of "suspect terranes". Pre-Late Cretaceous paleogeography is poorly constrained and the ultimate origins of the many fragments which make up the state are unclear. The Prince William and Chugach terranes accreted since Late Cretaceous time and represent the collapse of much of the northeast Pacific Ocean swept into what today is southern Alaska. Greater Wrangellia, a composite terrane now dispersed into fragments scattered from Idaho to southern Alaska, apparently accreted into Alaska in Late Cretaceous time crushing an enormous deep-marine flysch basin on its inboard side. Most of interior eastern Alaska is the Yukon Tanana terrane, a very large entirely fault-bounded metamorphic-plutonic assemblage covering thousands of square kilometers in Canada as well as Alaska. The original stratigraphy and relationship to North America of the Yukon-Tanana terrane are both obscure. A collapsed Mesozoic flysch basin, similar to the one inboard of Wrangellia, lies along the northern margin. Much of Arctic Alaska was apparently a vast expanse of upper Paleozoic to Early Mesozoic deep marine sediments and mafic volcanic and plutonic rocks now scattered widely as large telescoped sheets and Klippen thrust over the Ruby geanticline and the Brooks Range, and probably underlying the Yukon-Koyukuk basin and the Yukon flats. The Brooks Range itself is a stack of north vergent nappes, the telescoping of which began in Early Cretaceous time. Despite compelling evidence for thousands of kilometers of relative displacement between the accreted terranes, and large amounts of telescoping, translation, and rotation since accretion, the resulting new continental crust added to North America in Alaska carries few obvious signatures that allow application of currently popular simple plate tectonic models. Intraplate telescoping and strike-slip translations, delamination at mid-crustal levels, and large-scale lithospheric

  15. Coastal geomorphology of arctic Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Peter W.; Rawlinson, Stuart E.; Reimnitz, Erk

    1988-01-01

    The treeless, tundra-plain of northern Alaska merges with the Arctic Ocean along a coastal area characterized by low tundra bluffs, and sparse coastal and delta dunes. Coastal engineering projects that aggrade or degrade permafrost will alter the geomorphology and rates of coastal processes by changing coastal stability. Similarly, projects that modify the ice environment (artificial islands) or the coastal configuration (causeways) will cause nature to readjust to the new process regime, resulting in modification of the coast. In this paper the authors describe the coastal geomorphology from Barrow to the Canadian border. In addition, they provide a general outline and extensive references of the major coastal processes operating in this environment that will be useful on coastal environments elsewhere in the Arctic.

  16. Exporting Alaska's oil and gas

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, S.F.; Copulos, M.; Watkins, D.J.

    1983-02-22

    Federal legislation that prohibits the commercial export of oil and gas is creating a glut and discouraging oil production in California, while raising energy costs by shipping the fuel to the East and Gulf Coasts. The historical security reasons for blocking the export of Alaskan oil no longer exist, yet they continue to impose costs for the taxpayer. The optimum solution appears to be to export liquefied natural gas, using a pipeline paralleling the oil pipeline to Valdez. This would encourage the use and manufacture in Alaska of urea and ammonia fertilizer for export to the Far East, which would enhance US/Japan relations. The possibility of exports of additional oil, bringing a higher return for producers, will encourage production, reduce the need for OPEC oil, and moderate world oil prices. 5 references.

  17. Geophysical Institute biennial report 1995--1996

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    The mission of the Geophysical Institute is to understand the basic physical processes governing Earth, especially as they occur in, or are relevant to the Arctic; to train graduate and undergraduate students to play leading roles in tomorrow`s society; to solve applied geophysical problems and develop resource-oriented technology of importance to the state and the nation; and to satisfy the intellectual and technological needs of fellow Alaskans through public service. The variety of subjects studied by the faculty, research staff members, and graduate students at the Geophysical Institute include auroral physics and chemistry, arctic haze, ice fog, atmospheric dynamics, ozone, Alaska weather patterns, regional meteorology and climatology, global climate change, cloud physics and radiation, permafrost, glaciers, sea ice, remote sensing, geothermal energy, tectonics, volcanoes and earthquakes. Summaries are presented of the projects undertaken by the Institute in these fields.

  18. Crustal structure of Bristol Bay Region, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, A.K.; McLean, H.; Marlow, M.S.

    1985-04-01

    Bristol Bay lies along the northern side of the Alaska Peninsula and extends nearly 600 km southwest from the Nushagak lowlands on the Alaska mainland to near Unimak Island. The bay is underlain by a sediment-filled crustal downwarp known as the north Aleutian basin (formerly Bristol basin) that dips southeast toward the Alaska Peninsula and is filled with more than 6 km of strata, dominantly of Cenozoic age. The thickest parts of the basin lie just north of the Alaska Peninsula and, near Port Mollar, are in fault contact with older Mesozoic sedimentary rocks. These Mesozoic rocks form the southern structural boundary of the basin and extend as an accurate belt from at least Cook Inlet to Zhemchug Canyon (central Beringian margin). Offshore multichannel seismic-reflection, sonobuoy seismic-refraction, gravity, and magnetic data collected by the USGS in 1976 and 1982 indicate that the bedrock beneath the central and northern parts of the basin comprises layered, high-velocity, and highly magnetic rocks that are locally deformed. The deep bedrock horizons may be Mesozoic(.) sedimentary units that are underlain by igneous or metamorphic rocks and may correlate with similar rocks of mainland western Alaska and the Alaska Peninsula. Regional structural and geophysical trends for these deep horizons change from northeast-southwest to northwest-southeast beneath the inner Bering shelf and may indicate a major crustal suture along the northern basin edge.

  19. Geologic Map of Central (Interior) Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Frederic H.; Dover, James H.; Bradley, Dwight C.; Weber, Florence R.; Bundtzen, Thomas K.; Haeussler, Peter J.

    1998-01-01

    Introduction: This map and associated digital databases are the result of a compilation and reinterpretation of published and unpublished 1:250,000- and limited 1:125,000- and 1:63,360-scale mapping. The map area covers approximately 416,000 sq km (134,000 sq mi) and encompasses 25 1:250,000-scale quadrangles in central Alaska. The compilation was done as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Surveys and Analysis project, whose goal is nationwide assemble geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and other data. This map is an early product of an effort that will eventually encompass all of Alaska, and is the result of an agreement with the Alaska Department of Natural Resources, Division of Oil And Gas, to provide data on interior basins in Alaska. A paper version of the three map sheets has been published as USGS Open-File Report 98-133. Two geophysical maps that cover the identical area have been published earlier: 'Bouguer gravity map of Interior Alaska' (Meyer and others, 1996); and 'Merged aeromagnetic map of Interior Alaska' (Meyer and Saltus, 1995). These two publications are supplied in the 'geophys' directory of this report.

  20. Alaska - Russian Far East connection in volcano research and monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izbekov, P. E.; Eichelberger, J. C.; Gordeev, E.; Neal, C. A.; Chebrov, V. N.; Girina, O. A.; Demyanchuk, Y. V.; Rybin, A. V.

    2012-12-01

    The Kurile-Kamchatka-Alaska portion of the Pacific Rim of Fire spans for nearly 5400 km. It includes more than 80 active volcanoes and averages 4-6 eruptions per year. Resulting ash clouds travel for hundreds to thousands of kilometers defying political borders. To mitigate volcano hazard to aviation and local communities, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) and the Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (IVS), in partnership with the Kamchatkan Branch of the Geophysical Survey of the Russian Academy of Sciences (KBGS), have established a collaborative program with three integrated components: (1) volcano monitoring with rapid information exchange, (2) cooperation in research projects at active volcanoes, and (3) volcanological field schools for students and young scientists. Cooperation in volcano monitoring includes dissemination of daily information on the state of volcanic activity in neighboring regions, satellite and visual data exchange, as well as sharing expertise and technologies between AVO and the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT). Collaboration in scientific research is best illustrated by involvement of AVO, IVS, and KBGS faculty and graduate students in mutual international studies. One of the most recent examples is the NSF-funded Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE)-Kamchatka project focusing on multi-disciplinary study of Bezymianny volcano in Kamchatka. This international project is one of many that have been initiated as a direct result of a bi-annual series of meetings known as Japan-Kamchatka-Alaska Subduction Processes (JKASP) workshops that we organize together with colleagues from Hokkaido University, Japan. The most recent JKASP meeting was held in August 2011 in Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky and brought together more than 130 scientists and students from Russia, Japan, and the United States. The key educational component of our collaborative program

  1. Low-Income and Minority Serving Institutions: Education Has Taken Steps to Improve Monitoring and Assistance, but Further Progress Is Needed--Statement of George A. Scott, Director Education, Workforce and Income Security Issues. Testimony before the Subcommittee on Higher Education, Lifelong Learning, and Competitiveness, Committee on Education and Labor, House of Representatives. GAO-07-926T

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, George A.

    2007-01-01

    Institutions that may receive funding under Titles III and V include Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), Tribal Colleges, Hispanic Serving Institutions, Alaska Native Serving Institutions, Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions, and other postsecondary institutions that serve low-income students. In fiscal year 2006, these programs…

  2. Alaska

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... This image appears three-dimensional when viewed through red/blue glasses with the red filter over the left eye. It may help to darken the room lights when viewing the image on a computer screen. The Yukon River is ...

  3. New/Emerging Pests in Alaska: Will Climate Change Favor Insect Expansion Into Alaska

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because of its geographical isolation and climatic constraints, Alaska agriculture is considered relatively free of diseases and insect pests. However, since 1973, the winter temperatures in Alaska have increased by 2-3 C'. It is logical to assume that continued global climate change could produce ...

  4. Systems Performance Analyses of Alaska Wind-Diesel Projects; Kotzebue, Alaska (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2009-04-01

    This fact sheet summarizes a systems performance analysis of the wind-diesel project in Kotzebue, Alaska. Data provided for this project include wind turbine output, average wind speed, average net capacity factor, and optimal net capacity factor based on Alaska Energy Authority wind data, estimated fuel savings, and wind system availability.

  5. Alaska Native Languages: Past, Present, and Future. Alaska Native Language Center Research Papers No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krauss, Michael E.

    Three papers (1978-80) written for the non-linguistic public about Alaska Native languages are combined here. The first is an introduction to the prehistory, history, present status, and future prospects of all Alaska Native languages, both Eskimo-Aleut and Athabaskan Indian. The second and third, presented as appendixes to the first, deal in…

  6. 2011 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Maharrey, J. Zebulon; Neal, Christina A.

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest at or near three separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2011. The year was highlighted by the unrest and eruption of Cleveland Volcano in the central Aleutian Islands. AVO annual summaries no longer report on activity at Russian volcanoes.

  7. 77 FR 2972 - City and Borough of Sitka, Alaska, Alaska; Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission City and Borough of Sitka, Alaska, Alaska; Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (Commission...

  8. 75 FR 3888 - Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ... Register on November 20, 2009 (74 FR 60228), to propose migratory bird subsistence harvest regulations in... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 92 RIN 1018-AW67 Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska During the 2010 Season AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife...

  9. US Department of Energy High School Student Supercomputing Honors Program: A follow-up assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The US DOE High School Student Supercomputing Honors Program was designed to recognize high school students with superior skills in mathematics and computer science and to provide them with formal training and experience with advanced computer equipment. This document reports on the participants who attended the first such program, which was held at the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) during August 1985.

  10. ESO Receives Computerworld Honors Program 21st Century Achievement Award in Science Category

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-06-01

    In a ceremony held in Washington, D.C. (USA) on June 6, 2005, ESO, the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, received the coveted 21st Century Achievement Award from the Computerworld Honors Program for its visionary use of information technology in the Science category. Sybase, a main database server vendor and member of the Chairmen's Committee, nominated ESO's Data Flow System in recognition of its contributions to the global information technology revolution and its positive impact on society.

  11. Dinner honoring John Herrington, the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Buffy Sainte-Marie sings during a dinner at the Debus Conference Center in the KSC Visitor Complex. The dinner honored John B. Herrington, the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113. In addition to the dinner at KSC, several hundred Native Americans from around the country attended a symposium in Orlando commemorating the launch event. Buffy Sainte-Marie is Cree.

  12. High-Pressure Research in Mineral Physics: A Volume in Honor of Syun-iti Akimoto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manghnani, Murli H.; Syono, Yasuhiko

    In recognition of the profound contributions made by Professor Syun-iti Akimoto in high pressure-high temperature research, which have enhanced our understanding of the earth's interior, and for his tireless efforts in furthering the U.S.-Japan cooperative research program, it is most fitting to dedicate this volume to him. This volume in honor of Professor Akimoto is a symbol of cooperation in international science that is exemplified by his contributions.

  13. Digital release of the Alaska Quaternary fault and fold database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, R. D.; Farrell, R.; Burns, P.; Combellick, R. A.; Weakland, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    The Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys (DGGS) has designed a Quaternary fault and fold database for Alaska in conformance with standards defined by the U.S. Geological Survey for the National Quaternary fault and fold database. Alaska is the most seismically active region of the United States, however little information exists on the location, style of deformation, and slip rates of Quaternary faults. Thus, to provide an accurate, user-friendly, reference-based fault inventory to the public, we are producing a digital GIS shapefile of Quaternary fault traces and compiling summary information on each fault. Here, we present relevant information pertaining to the digital GIS shape file and online access and availability of the Alaska database. This database will be useful for engineering geologic studies, geologic, geodetic, and seismic research, and policy planning. The data will also contribute to the fault source database being constructed by the Global Earthquake Model (GEM), Faulted Earth project, which is developing tools to better assess earthquake risk. We derived the initial list of Quaternary active structures from The Neotectonic Map of Alaska (Plafker et al., 1994) and supplemented it with more recent data where available. Due to the limited level of knowledge on Quaternary faults in Alaska, pre-Quaternary fault traces from the Plafker map are shown as a layer in our digital database so users may view a more accurate distribution of mapped faults and to suggest the possibility that some older traces may be active yet un-studied. The database will be updated as new information is developed. We selected each fault by reviewing the literature and georegistered the faults from 1:250,000-scale paper maps contained in 1970's vintage and earlier bedrock maps. However, paper map scales range from 1:20,000 to 1:500,000. Fault parameters in our GIS fault attribute tables include fault name, age, slip rate, slip sense, dip direction, fault line type

  14. The influence of culture of honor and emotional intelligence in the acculturation of Moroccan immigrant women.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Zafra, Esther; El Ghoudani, Karima

    2014-01-01

    Migration is a normal process of people seeking new opportunities, work, or leisure in societies. The way people adapt to a new country (acculturation) is a complex process in which immigrants' evaluations about the culture of origin and their perceptions of the host country interact. The combination of these two factors produces four types of acculturation: separation, assimilation, integration, and marginalization. Several variables, such as personality, attitudes, and emotional intelligence, have been studied to help explain this process. However, the impact of a culture of honor and its interaction with other variables remains an open question that may help to explain how migrants can better adjust to their host culture. In this study, we examine the influence of the culture of honor (social) and emotional intelligence (individual) on acculturation. In a sample of 129 Moroccan women (mean age = 29, SD = 9.40) immigrants in Spain (mean time in Spain = 6 years, SD = 3.60), we investigated the relations among the variables of interest. Our results show that no significant differences emerged in the scores given for culture of honor (CH) and the acculturation strategies of the Moroccan immigrant women F(3, 99) = .233; p = .87. However women who preferred the integration strategy scored highest on emotional intelligence (EI), whereas the assimilated immigrants showed the lowest scores for EI F(3, 92) = 4.63; p = .005. Additionally, only in the case of integration does EI mediate between CH and the value given to the immigrant's own and host cultures (p <.001).

  15. The influence of culture of honor and emotional intelligence in the acculturation of Moroccan immigrant women.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Zafra, Esther; El Ghoudani, Karima

    2014-01-01

    Migration is a normal process of people seeking new opportunities, work, or leisure in societies. The way people adapt to a new country (acculturation) is a complex process in which immigrants' evaluations about the culture of origin and their perceptions of the host country interact. The combination of these two factors produces four types of acculturation: separation, assimilation, integration, and marginalization. Several variables, such as personality, attitudes, and emotional intelligence, have been studied to help explain this process. However, the impact of a culture of honor and its interaction with other variables remains an open question that may help to explain how migrants can better adjust to their host culture. In this study, we examine the influence of the culture of honor (social) and emotional intelligence (individual) on acculturation. In a sample of 129 Moroccan women (mean age = 29, SD = 9.40) immigrants in Spain (mean time in Spain = 6 years, SD = 3.60), we investigated the relations among the variables of interest. Our results show that no significant differences emerged in the scores given for culture of honor (CH) and the acculturation strategies of the Moroccan immigrant women F(3, 99) = .233; p = .87. However women who preferred the integration strategy scored highest on emotional intelligence (EI), whereas the assimilated immigrants showed the lowest scores for EI F(3, 92) = 4.63; p = .005. Additionally, only in the case of integration does EI mediate between CH and the value given to the immigrant's own and host cultures (p <.001). PMID:25012470

  16. Cut throat injuries and honor killings: review of 15 cases in eastern Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Bora; Celbis, Osman; Kaya, Atılhan

    2013-05-01

    Throat cuts could be of homicidal, suicidal or accidental origin. In the cases of death from cut throat, suicide can be distinguished from homicide based on the type and location of the wound and crime scene investigation. The purpose of the current study is to attract attention to the instructive findings for origin determination in deaths by cut throat according to the number and characteristics of the wounds and crime scene investigation. We have reviewed the files of autopsies performed between the years of 2000 and 2010, and compared with previously published case reports; all results were summarized in the current study. The results showed that 60% of cases were male, 40% were female, with 27.9 years of average age. The mean number of wounds was calculated to be 34.3 per case for honor homicides, 7.4 per case for other homicides, and 2.0 per case for suicides. Numbers of wounds were approximately 5 times higher in the honor homicides compared to other homicides. If the number of wounds were excessive, possibility of honor killings should be taken into account. When the killer was a parent not in psychosis, hesitation cuts were detected. Additional lesions were present in 46.7% of the cases, and they were assessed as homicide. Presence of vertebral notch and spinal cord cuts, which require a substantial amount of force and pressure via sharp tools, indicates homicide.

  17. Glaciers of North America - Glaciers of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Molnia, Bruce F.

    2008-01-01

    Glaciers cover about 75,000 km2 of Alaska, about 5 percent of the State. The glaciers are situated on 11 mountain ranges, 1 large island, an island chain, and 1 archipelago and range in elevation from more than 6,000 m to below sea level. Alaska's glaciers extend geographically from the far southeast at lat 55 deg 19'N., long 130 deg 05'W., about 100 kilometers east of Ketchikan, to the far southwest at Kiska Island at lat 52 deg 05'N., long 177 deg 35'E., in the Aleutian Islands, and as far north as lat 69 deg 20'N., long 143 deg 45'W., in the Brooks Range. During the 'Little Ice Age', Alaska's glaciers expanded significantly. The total area and volume of glaciers in Alaska continue to decrease, as they have been doing since the 18th century. Of the 153 1:250,000-scale topographic maps that cover the State of Alaska, 63 sheets show glaciers. Although the number of extant glaciers has never been systematically counted and is thus unknown, the total probably is greater than 100,000. Only about 600 glaciers (about 1 percent) have been officially named by the U.S. Board on Geographic Names (BGN). There are about 60 active and former tidewater glaciers in Alaska. Within the glacierized mountain ranges of southeastern Alaska and western Canada, 205 glaciers (75 percent in Alaska) have a history of surging. In the same region, at least 53 present and 7 former large ice-dammed lakes have produced jokulhlaups (glacier-outburst floods). Ice-capped volcanoes on mainland Alaska and in the Aleutian Islands have a potential for jokulhlaups caused by subglacier volcanic and geothermal activity. Because of the size of the area covered by glaciers and the lack of large-scale maps of the glacierized areas, satellite imagery and other satellite remote-sensing data are the only practical means of monitoring regional changes in the area and volume of Alaska's glaciers in response to short- and long-term changes in the maritime and continental climates of the State. A review of the

  18. Gallstones in American Indian/Alaska Native Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Asian-Americans Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders American Indians/Alaska Natives Immigrant and migrant issues Taking care ... Enter email address Submit Home > Minority Women's Health > American Indians/Alaska Natives Minority Women's Health Gallstones Health conditions ...

  19. PREFACE: XIX International Scientific Symposium in honor of Academician M.A. Usov ''Problems of Geology and Subsurface Development''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, G. M.

    2015-11-01

    XIX International Scientific Symposium in honor of Academician M.A. Usov ''Problems of Geology and Subsurface Development'' (for students and young scientists) was organized under the guidance of the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation and the Russian Foundation for Fundamental Research within the National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University (NR TPU). TPU is one of the oldest technical higher education institutions in Russia, training specialists in the domain of geoscience and enhancing their further research in this area. The Institute of Natural Resources, National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University (INR TPU) was chosen to hold the International Scientific Symposium. In 2015 the Institute of Natural Resources celebrated its 114th anniversary. It was founded by V.A. Obruchev in 1901, first Siberian geologist, member of USSR Academy of Sciences, Hero of Socialist Labor, and first Laureate of the Lenin Prize. He was recognized as a prominent scientist in the area of geology all over the world. INR is the first institute of geological education and geosciences in Asian Russia. Even today the Siberian Mining and Geological School, established by V.A. Obruchev and M.A. Usov, has retained its significance in the discovery, exploration and development of mineral resources not only in Siberia, the Far East and North-East of Russia, but also in Central Asia. There are numerous outstanding scientists and engineers among alumni of The Institute of Natural Resources. The institute is proud of such outstanding people as: M.A. Usov, student and first postgraduate of V.A. Obruchev, first professor and academician in Siberia, whose name is associated with the mining industry in Siberia; Academician K.I. Satpaev, founder and first president of the Academy of Sciences of Kazakhstan; Professor N.N. Urvantsev, discoverer of the unique Norilsk ore deposits in the North of East Siberia and Professor M.K. Korovin, who, in the 30s of the 20th century

  20. Tsunami Inundation Mapping for Alaska Communities of Homer, Seldovia, and Seward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleimani, E.; Marriott, D.; Hansen, R.; Combellick, R.

    2003-12-01

    The Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys continue to participate in the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program by evaluating and mapping potential inundation of coastal communities in Alaska. The two Kachemak Bay communities of Homer and Seldovia were selected in coordination with the Alaska Division of Emergency Services. We considered two earthquake scenarios as potential sources of tsunami waves that can affect Homer and Seldovia. For both communities, we calculated the extent of maximum inundation for the two scenarios, depths of inundation on dry land, and the maximum velocity current distribution in the inundation zones. The work is under way for Seward, the next community on the list. One of the most significant sources of errors in tsunami inundation mapping is inaccuracy of topographic and bathymetric data used in the model. Many of the Alaskan communities of interest have topographic data of limited quality, and new data must be developed in order to produce accurate inundation maps. The Alaska Tsunami Modeling Team cooperated with the local USGS glaciology office to perform photogrammetry in the Seward area. Using ten air photos and the APEX software, along with several precisely located GPS points, we developed a new georeferenced and highly accurate DEM with a 5-meter grid spacing. A variety of techniques was used to remove the effects of buildings and trees to yield a bald earth model. Finally, we resampled the new DEM to match the finest resolution grid, and combined it with all other data, using the most recent and accurate data in each region. The new dataset has contours that deviate by more then 100 meters in some places from the contours in the previous dataset, showing significant improvement in accuracy for the purpose of tsunami modeling.

  1. Earthquake Hazard and Risk in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black Porto, N.; Nyst, M.

    2014-12-01

    Alaska is one of the most seismically active and tectonically diverse regions in the United States. To examine risk, we have updated the seismic hazard model in Alaska. The current RMS Alaska hazard model is based on the 2007 probabilistic seismic hazard maps for Alaska (Wesson et al., 2007; Boyd et al., 2007). The 2015 RMS model will update several key source parameters, including: extending the earthquake catalog, implementing a new set of crustal faults, updating the subduction zone geometry and reoccurrence rate. First, we extend the earthquake catalog to 2013; decluster the catalog, and compute new background rates. We then create a crustal fault model, based on the Alaska 2012 fault and fold database. This new model increased the number of crustal faults from ten in 2007, to 91 faults in the 2015 model. This includes the addition of: the western Denali, Cook Inlet folds near Anchorage, and thrust faults near Fairbanks. Previously the subduction zone was modeled at a uniform depth. In this update, we model the intraslab as a series of deep stepping events. We also use the best available data, such as Slab 1.0, to update the geometry of the subduction zone. The city of Anchorage represents 80% of the risk exposure in Alaska. In the 2007 model, the hazard in Alaska was dominated by the frequent rate of magnitude 7 to 8 events (Gutenberg-Richter distribution), and large magnitude 8+ events had a low reoccurrence rate (Characteristic) and therefore didn't contribute as highly to the overall risk. We will review these reoccurrence rates, and will present the results and impact to Anchorage. We will compare our hazard update to the 2007 USGS hazard map, and discuss the changes and drivers for these changes. Finally, we will examine the impact model changes have on Alaska earthquake risk. Consider risk metrics include average annual loss, an annualized expected loss level used by insurers to determine the costs of earthquake insurance (and premium levels), and the

  2. A History of Schooling for Alaska Native People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnhardt, Carol

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the geographic and demographic contexts of Alaska schooling, federal policies that have affected education in Alaska, and the evolution of schooling for Alaska Native people. Describes the development of a dual federal/territorial system of schools, the initiation of federal and state reform efforts, Native-sponsored educational…

  3. Chronic Liver Disease and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Chronic Liver Disease and American Indians/Alaska Natives Among American Indians and Alaska Natives, chronic liver disease is ... 54. 1 At a glance – Cancer Rates for American Indian/Alaska Natives (2008-2012) Cancer Incidence Rates per 100,000 – ...

  4. 50 CFR 18.94 - Pacific walrus (Alaska).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pacific walrus (Alaska). 18.94 Section 18... Marine Mammal Species § 18.94 Pacific walrus (Alaska). (a) Pursuant to sections 101(a)(3)(A) 103, and 109... walrus (Odobenus rosmarus) in waters or on lands subject to the jurisdiction of the State of Alaska,...

  5. 50 CFR 18.94 - Pacific walrus (Alaska).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pacific walrus (Alaska). 18.94 Section 18... Marine Mammal Species § 18.94 Pacific walrus (Alaska). (a) Pursuant to sections 101(a)(3)(A) 103, and 109... walrus (Odobenus rosmarus) in waters or on lands subject to the jurisdiction of the State of Alaska,...

  6. 50 CFR 18.94 - Pacific walrus (Alaska).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pacific walrus (Alaska). 18.94 Section 18... Marine Mammal Species § 18.94 Pacific walrus (Alaska). (a) Pursuant to sections 101(a)(3)(A) 103, and 109... walrus (Odobenus rosmarus) in waters or on lands subject to the jurisdiction of the State of Alaska,...

  7. 50 CFR 18.94 - Pacific walrus (Alaska).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pacific walrus (Alaska). 18.94 Section 18... Marine Mammal Species § 18.94 Pacific walrus (Alaska). (a) Pursuant to sections 101(a)(3)(A) 103, and 109... walrus (Odobenus rosmarus) in waters or on lands subject to the jurisdiction of the State of Alaska,...

  8. 50 CFR 18.94 - Pacific walrus (Alaska).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pacific walrus (Alaska). 18.94 Section 18... Marine Mammal Species § 18.94 Pacific walrus (Alaska). (a) Pursuant to sections 101(a)(3)(A) 103, and 109... walrus (Odobenus rosmarus) in waters or on lands subject to the jurisdiction of the State of Alaska,...

  9. Minorities in Higher Education. The Changing North: Alaska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinfeld, Judith; And Others

    This report examines the educational status of ethnic and racial minorities in Alaska and draws attention to the ways demographic changes in Alaska may affect these groups. The Alaska Native population, as opposed to other ethnic minorities, is the focal point of this study. This is the largest minority group in the state and the one experiencing…

  10. 47 CFR 80.387 - Frequencies for Alaska fixed stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequencies for Alaska fixed stations. 80.387... SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Frequencies Alaska Fixed Stations § 80.387 Frequencies for Alaska fixed stations. (a) The carrier frequencies listed in (b) of this section are assignable for...

  11. 47 CFR 80.387 - Frequencies for Alaska fixed stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequencies for Alaska fixed stations. 80.387... SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Frequencies Alaska Fixed Stations § 80.387 Frequencies for Alaska fixed stations. (a) The carrier frequencies listed in (b) of this section are assignable for...

  12. 47 CFR 80.387 - Frequencies for Alaska fixed stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequencies for Alaska fixed stations. 80.387... SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Frequencies Alaska Fixed Stations § 80.387 Frequencies for Alaska fixed stations. (a) The carrier frequencies listed in (b) of this section are assignable for...

  13. 47 CFR 80.387 - Frequencies for Alaska fixed stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequencies for Alaska fixed stations. 80.387... SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Frequencies Alaska Fixed Stations § 80.387 Frequencies for Alaska fixed stations. (a) The carrier frequencies listed in (b) of this section are assignable for...

  14. 30 CFR 716.6 - Coal mines in Alaska.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coal mines in Alaska. 716.6 Section 716.6... PROGRAM REGULATIONS SPECIAL PERFORMANCE STANDARDS § 716.6 Coal mines in Alaska. (a) Permittees of surface coal mining operations in Alaska from which coal has been mined on or after August 3, 1977,...

  15. 30 CFR 716.6 - Coal mines in Alaska.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coal mines in Alaska. 716.6 Section 716.6... PROGRAM REGULATIONS SPECIAL PERFORMANCE STANDARDS § 716.6 Coal mines in Alaska. (a) Permittees of surface coal mining operations in Alaska from which coal has been mined on or after August 3, 1977,...

  16. 30 CFR 716.6 - Coal mines in Alaska.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coal mines in Alaska. 716.6 Section 716.6... PROGRAM REGULATIONS SPECIAL PERFORMANCE STANDARDS § 716.6 Coal mines in Alaska. (a) Permittees of surface coal mining operations in Alaska from which coal has been mined on or after August 3, 1977,...

  17. 30 CFR 716.6 - Coal mines in Alaska.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coal mines in Alaska. 716.6 Section 716.6... PROGRAM REGULATIONS SPECIAL PERFORMANCE STANDARDS § 716.6 Coal mines in Alaska. (a) Permittees of surface coal mining operations in Alaska from which coal has been mined on or after August 3, 1977,...

  18. 30 CFR 716.6 - Coal mines in Alaska.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coal mines in Alaska. 716.6 Section 716.6... PROGRAM REGULATIONS SPECIAL PERFORMANCE STANDARDS § 716.6 Coal mines in Alaska. (a) Permittees of surface coal mining operations in Alaska from which coal has been mined on or after August 3, 1977,...

  19. 43 CFR 3101.5-3 - Alaska wildlife areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Alaska wildlife areas. 3101.5-3 Section... § 3101.5-3 Alaska wildlife areas. No lands within a refuge in Alaska open to leasing shall be available until the Fish and Wildlife Service has first completed compatability determinations....

  20. 43 CFR 3101.5-3 - Alaska wildlife areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Alaska wildlife areas. 3101.5-3 Section... § 3101.5-3 Alaska wildlife areas. No lands within a refuge in Alaska open to leasing shall be available until the Fish and Wildlife Service has first completed compatability determinations....