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Sample records for alaska native people

  1. Cardiovascular Disease Among Alaska Native Peoples

    PubMed Central

    Jolly, Stacey E.; Howard, Barbara V.; Umans, Jason G.

    2013-01-01

    Although Alaska Native peoples were thought to be protected from cardiovascular disease (CVD), data now show that this is not the case, despite traditional lifestyles and high omega-3 fatty acid intake. In this article, the current understanding of CVD and its risk factors among Alaska Native peoples, particularly among the Yupik and Inupiat populations, will be discussed, using data from three major studies funded by the National Institutes of Health: Genetics of Coronary Artery Disease among Alaska Natives (GOCADAN), Center for Native Health Research (CANHR), and Education and Research Towards Health (EARTH). Data from these epidemiologic studies have focused concern on CVD and its risk factors among Alaska Native peoples. This review will summarize the findings of these three principal studies and will suggest future directions for research and clinical practice. PMID:24367710

  2. Stroke Mortality Among Alaska Native People

    PubMed Central

    Horner, Ronnie D.; Day, Gretchen M.; Lanier, Anne P.; Provost, Ellen M.; Hamel, Rebecca D.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We aimed to describe the epidemiology of stroke among Alaska Natives, which is essential for designing effective stroke prevention and intervention efforts for this population. Methods. We conducted an analysis of death certificate data for the state of Alaska for the period 1984 to 2003, comparing age-standardized stroke mortality rates among Alaska Natives residing in Alaska vs US Whites by age category, gender, stroke type, and time. Results. Compared with US Whites, Alaska Natives had significantly elevated stroke mortality from 1994 to 2003 but not from 1984 to 1993. Alaska Native women of all age groups and Alaska Native men younger than 45 years of age had the highest risk, although the rates for those younger than 65 years were statistically imprecise. Over the 20-year study period, the stroke mortality rate was stable for Alaska Natives but declined for US Whites. Conclusions. Stroke mortality is higher among Alaska Natives, especially women, than among US Whites. Over the past 20 years, there has not been a significant decline in stroke mortality among Alaska Natives. PMID:19762671

  3. A History of Schooling for Alaska Native People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnhardt, Carol

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the geographic and demographic contexts of Alaska schooling, federal policies that have affected education in Alaska, and the evolution of schooling for Alaska Native people. Describes the development of a dual federal/territorial system of schools, the initiation of federal and state reform efforts, Native-sponsored educational…

  4. Tobacco Use Among Southwestern Alaska Native People

    PubMed Central

    Renner, Caroline C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: We examined the characteristics, attitudes, beliefs, and exposure to tobacco products in a cohort of rural dwelling Alaska Native (AN) people. Methods: We conducted a study of 400 of AN adult tobacco users and nonusers living in Southwestern Alaska. Questionnaires covered variables such as demographics, tobacco-use history, current tobacco use and dependence scales, general health status, attitudes and beliefs about tobacco, and quitting history. Results: The study population smoked 7.8 cigarettes per day compared with 16.8 on average for the U.S. population: a significant proportion of the population engaged in dual use of cigarettes and smokeless tobacco products. Over one third (40.9%), first tried tobacco at age 11 or younger. The mean measures of tobacco addiction (e.g., Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence, Severson Scale of Smokeless Tobacco Dependence) scores were lower compared with other U.S. populations. Conclusions: Very high tobacco-use prevalence, dual product use, and early tobacco use are observed in Southwestern AN people. Unexpectedly these did not appear to be correlated with heavier individual tobacco use or higher levels of addiction in this population. PMID:22949573

  5. Cancer Disparities Among Alaska Native People, 1970–2011

    PubMed Central

    Lanier, Anne P.; Schade, Teresa; Brantley, Jennifer; Starkey, B. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cancer is the leading cause of death among Alaska Native people. The objective of this study was to examine cancer incidence data for 2007–2011, age-specific rates for a 15-year period, incidence trends for 1970–2011, and mortality trends for 1990–2011. Methods US data were from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program SEER*Stat database and from the SEER Alaska Native Tumor Registry. Age-adjusted cancer incidence rates among Alaska Native people and US whites were compared using rate ratios. Trend analyses were performed using the Joinpoint Regression Program. Mortality data were from National Center for Health Statistics. Results During 2007–2011 the cancer incidence rate among Alaska Native women was 16% higher than the rate among US white women and was similar among Alaska Native men and US white men. Incidence rates among Alaska Native people exceeded rates among US whites for nasopharyngeal, stomach, colorectal, lung, and kidney cancer. A downward trend in colorectal cancer incidence among Alaska Native people occurred from 1999 to 2011. Significant declines in rates were not observed for other frequently diagnosed cancers or for all sites combined. Cancer mortality rates among Alaska Native people during 2 periods, 1990–2000 and 2001–2011, did not decline. Cancer mortality rates among Alaska Native people exceeded rates among US whites for all cancers combined; for cancers of the lung, stomach, pancreas, kidney, and cervix; and for colorectal cancer. Conclusion Increases in colorectal screening among Alaska Native people may be responsible for current declines in colorectal cancer incidence; however; improvements in treatment of colon and rectal cancers may also be contributing factors. PMID:25523352

  6. Cancer disparities among Alaska native people, 1970-2011.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Janet J; Lanier, Anne P; Schade, Teresa; Brantley, Jennifer; Starkey, B Michael

    2014-12-18

    Cancer is the leading cause of death among Alaska Native people. The objective of this study was to examine cancer incidence data for 2007-2011, age-specific rates for a 15-year period, incidence trends for 1970-2011, and mortality trends for 1990-2011. US data were from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program SEER*Stat database and from the SEER Alaska Native Tumor Registry. Age-adjusted cancer incidence rates among Alaska Native people and US whites were compared using rate ratios. Trend analyses were performed using the Joinpoint Regression Program. Mortality data were from National Center for Health Statistics. During 2007-2011 the cancer incidence rate among Alaska Native women was 16% higher than the rate among US white women and was similar among Alaska Native men and US white men. Incidence rates among Alaska Native people exceeded rates among US whites for nasopharyngeal, stomach, colorectal, lung, and kidney cancer. A downward trend in colorectal cancer incidence among Alaska Native people occurred from 1999 to 2011. Significant declines in rates were not observed for other frequently diagnosed cancers or for all sites combined. Cancer mortality rates among Alaska Native people during 2 periods, 1990-2000 and 2001-2011, did not decline. Cancer mortality rates among Alaska Native people exceeded rates among US whites for all cancers combined; for cancers of the lung, stomach, pancreas, kidney, and cervix; and for colorectal cancer. Increases in colorectal screening among Alaska Native people may be responsible for current declines in colorectal cancer incidence; however; improvements in treatment of colon and rectal cancers may also be contributing factors.

  7. Yesterday Still Lives...Our Native People Remember Alaska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMarco, Pat, Ed.; And Others

    In the summer of 1978, seven teenagers and several staff members from the Fairbanks Native Association-Johnson O'Malley program set out to record some of Alaska's past by interviewing a number of older Alaska Natives and writing their biographical sketches. Some of the students spent a week along the Yukon River taping and photographing people;…

  8. Yesterday Still Lives...Our Native People Remember Alaska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMarco, Pat, Ed.; And Others

    In the summer of 1978, seven teenagers and several staff members from the Fairbanks Native Association-Johnson O'Malley program set out to record some of Alaska's past by interviewing a number of older Alaska Natives and writing their biographical sketches. Some of the students spent a week along the Yukon River taping and photographing people;…

  9. Discovering unique tobacco use patterns among Alaska Native people.

    PubMed

    Dilley, Julia A; Peterson, Erin; Hiratsuka, Vanessa Y; Rohde, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Alaska Native people are disproportionately impacted by tobacco-related diseases in comparison to non-Native Alaskans. We used Alaska's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) to describe tobacco use among more than 4,100 Alaska Native adults, stratified by geographic region and demographic groups. Overall tobacco use was high: approximately 2 out of every 5 Alaska Native adults reported smoking cigarettes (41.2%) and 1 in 10 reported using smokeless tobacco (SLT, 12.3%). A small percentage overall (4.8%) reported using iq'mik, an SLT variant unique to Alaska Native people. When examined by geographic region, cigarette smoking was highest in remote geographic regions; SLT use was highest in the southwest region of the state. Use of iq'mik was primarily confined to a specific area of the state; further analysis showed that 1 in 3 women currently used iq'mik in this region. Our results suggest that different types of tobacco use are epidemic among diverse Alaska Native communities. Our results also illustrate that detailed analysis within racial/ethnic groups can be useful for public health programme planning to reduce health disparities.

  10. Discovering unique tobacco use patterns among Alaska Native people

    PubMed Central

    Dilley, Julia A.; Peterson, Erin; Hiratsuka, Vanessa Y.; Rohde, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Background Alaska Native people are disproportionately impacted by tobacco-related diseases in comparison to non-Native Alaskans. Design We used Alaska’s Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) to describe tobacco use among more than 4,100 Alaska Native adults, stratified by geographic region and demographic groups. Results Overall tobacco use was high: approximately 2 out of every 5 Alaska Native adults reported smoking cigarettes (41.2%) and 1 in 10 reported using smokeless tobacco (SLT, 12.3%). A small percentage overall (4.8%) reported using iq’mik, an SLT variant unique to Alaska Native people. When examined by geographic region, cigarette smoking was highest in remote geographic regions; SLT use was highest in the southwest region of the state. Use of iq’mik was primarily confined to a specific area of the state; further analysis showed that 1 in 3 women currently used iq’mik in this region. Conclusion Our results suggest that different types of tobacco use are epidemic among diverse Alaska Native communities. Our results also illustrate that detailed analysis within racial/ethnic groups can be useful for public health programme planning to reduce health disparities. PMID:23971010

  11. Proceedings of the Alaska-Russia Native Peoples Health and Social Issues Conference. May 1992, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Marshall, D L; Soule, S

    1993-04-01

    An Alaska-Russia Native People's Health and Social Issues Conference, sponsored by the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, the Alaska Native Foundation, the University of Anchorage Institute for Circumpolar Health Studies, the International Scientific Center "ARTIKA" (Magadan, Russia), the Associations of Native People of Chukotka and Kolyma, and the Magadan Native Association, was held in Wasilla, Alaska in May, 1992. The conference brought together Native people, primarily health and social services workers, to discuss differences and similarities in issues and approaches, and to lay the foundation for future collaboration. The primary participants came mostly from rural villages and small regional cities, and represented Native Health Corporations, Native Associations, and villages. Additional participants came from the University of Alaska, the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, the Indian Health Service, the Magadan Health Department, the Inuit Circumpolar Conference, and the International Union for Circumpolar Health. A Total of 39 people participated, including: eight Russian Natives (Chukchi, Even, and Siberian Yup'ik); three non-Native Russians; 18 Alaska Natives (Aleut, Athabaskan, Inupiat, Siberian Yup'ik, Yup'ik); nine non-Native Alaskans; one Canadian. The issues discussed in individual and panel presentations, and in small groups, included history, demography, settlement patterns, the cash and subsistence economies, mental and physical health (epidemiology, etiology, treatment and prevention), education, governance, culture and language. As the conference participants came to know each other better, the discussions became increasingly open, and, particularly around shared feelings of cultural oppression and loss, emotional.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Enhancing Cancer Education through the Arts: Building Connections with Alaska Native People, Cultures and Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cueva, Melany; Kuhnley, Regina; Cueva, Katie

    2012-01-01

    Building upon the dynamic traditions of Alaska Native people, which include the arts as a viable way of knowing, the expressive arts were woven into a five-day cancer education course for Alaska village-based Community Health Workers (CHWs). Cancer is the leading cause of mortality for Alaska Native people. Course learning modalities included…

  13. Enhancing Cancer Education through the Arts: Building Connections with Alaska Native People, Cultures and Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cueva, Melany; Kuhnley, Regina; Cueva, Katie

    2012-01-01

    Building upon the dynamic traditions of Alaska Native people, which include the arts as a viable way of knowing, the expressive arts were woven into a five-day cancer education course for Alaska village-based Community Health Workers (CHWs). Cancer is the leading cause of mortality for Alaska Native people. Course learning modalities included…

  14. Alaska Natives & the Land.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Robert D.; And Others

    Pursuant to the Native land claims within Alaska, this compilation of background data and interpretive materials relevant to a fair resolution of the Alaska Native problem seeks to record data and information on the Native peoples; the land and resources of Alaska and their uses by the people in the past and present; land ownership; and future…

  15. Colorectal Cancer in Alaska Native People, 2005–2009

    PubMed Central

    Alberts, Steven R.; Sacco, Frank; Lanier, Anne P.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most frequently diagnosed cancer among Alaska Native (AN) people, and the second leading cause of cancer death. The incidence rate for the combined years 1999 through 2003 was 30% higher than the rate among U.S. whites (USWs) for the same period. Current incidence rates may serve to monitor the impact of screening programs in reducing CRC in the AN population. METHODS: Incidence data are from the Alaska Native Tumor Registry and the National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program. We compared AN CRC incidence, survival rates, and stage at diagnosis with rates in USWs for cases diagnosed from 2005 through 2009. Relative survival calculations were produced in SEER*Stat by the actuarial method. RESULTS: The CRC age-adjusted incidence rate among AN men and women combined was higher than those in USW men and women (84 vs. 43/100,000; P < .05; AN:USW rate ratio [RR] = 2.0). The greatest differences between rates in AN people and USWs were for tumors in the hepatic flexure (RR = 3.1) and in the transverse (RR = 2.9) and sigmoid (RR = 2.5) regions of the colon. Rectal cancer rates among AN people were significantly higher than rates in USWs (21 vs.12/100,000). Five-year relative survival proportions by stage at diagnosis indicate that the CRC 5-year relative survival was similar in AN people and USWs for the period 2004 through 2009. CONCLUSIONS: The high rate of CRC in AN people emphasizes the need for screening programs and interventions to reduce known modifiable risks. Research in methods to promote healthy behaviors among AN people is greatly needed. PMID:23112882

  16. Gender differences among Alaska Native people seeking alcohol withdrawal treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bear, Ursula Running; Beals, Janette; Novins, Douglas K.; Manson, Spero M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Few studies focus on gender differences among patients who utilize detoxification services; even fewer focus on detoxification for Alaska Native people. This analysis focused on gender differences at admission among a sample of Alaska Native patients seeking alcohol withdrawal treatment. Methods The sample included 383 adult Alaska Native patients admitted to an inpatient alcohol detoxification unit during 2006 and 2007. Logistic regression was used to estimate unadjusted and adjusted associations with gender. Results Women were 88% more likely to have stable housing than men (odds ratio [OR] = 1.88, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.15, 3.05, P = .01). Women were 87% less likely to be seasonal workers (OR = 0.13, 95% CI = 0.03, 0.48, P = .003) and 50% less likely than men to be seeking employment (OR = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.29, 0.84, P = .01) at admission. Women had more than 5 times the odds of having children in the home at admission (OR = 5.64, 95% CI = 3.03, 10.56, P < .001) and almost 3 times the odds of experiencing physical abuse than men (OR = 2.96, 95% CI = 1.31, 6.66, P = .01). Additionally, women were 50% less likely to accept a referral to substance abuse treatment following detoxification (OR = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.30, 0.83, P = .01). Conclusions The study found significant differences based upon gender. For instance, women are in need of services that accommodate women with children and services that address histories of physical abuse. Conversely, men are in need of housing and employment opportunities. Post detoxification follow-up, case management, and transition to care should include gender as a factor in treatment planning. PMID:26731436

  17. A Map of the Native Peoples and Languages of Alaska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krauss, Michael E., Comp.

    Recommended for use in classrooms (no specific grade level is assigned) throughout Alaska, this base E sized wall map (4 feet by 3 feet) is color coded (number coded for the ERIC system) to reflect the 20 Alaska Native languages. Designating language dialect areas and boundaries, this map details the language relationships of the four Eskimo…

  18. Smoking-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors among Alaska Native people: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Rohde, Kristen; Boles, Myde; Bushore, Chris J.; Pizacani, Barbara A.; Maher, Julie E.; Peterson, Erin

    2013-01-01

    Background Several studies have shown that Alaska Native people have higher smoking prevalence than non-Natives. However, no population-based studies have explored whether smoking-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors also differ among Alaska Native people and non-Natives. Objective We compared current smoking prevalence and smoking-related knowledge, attitudes, and behavior of Alaska Native adults living in the state of Alaska with non-Natives. Methods We used Alaska Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data for 1996 to 2010 to compare smoking prevalence, consumption, and cessation- and second-hand smoke-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors among self-identified Alaska Native people and non-Natives. Results Current smoking prevalence was 41% (95% CI: 37.9%–44.4%) among Alaska Native people compared with 17.1% (95% CI: 15.9%–18.4%) among non-Natives. Among current every day smokers, Alaska Natives were much more likely to smoke less than 10 cigarettes per day (OR=5.0, 95% CI: 2.6–9.6) than non-Natives. Compared with non-Native smokers, Alaska Native smokers were as likely to have made a past year quit attempt (OR=1.4, 95% CI: 0.9–2.1), but the attempt was less likely to be successful (OR=0.5, 95% CI: 0.2–0.9). Among current smokers, Alaska Natives were more likely to believe second-hand smoke (SHS) was very harmful (OR=4.5, 95% CI: 2.8–7.2), to believe that smoking should not be allowed in indoor work areas (OR=1.9, 95% CI: 1.1–3.1) or in restaurants (OR=4.2, 95% CI: 2.5–6.9), to have a home smoking ban (OR=2.5, 95% CI: 1.6–3.9), and to have no home exposure to SHS in the past 30 days (OR=2.3, 95% CI: 1.5–3.6) than non-Natives. Conclusion Although a disparity in current smoking exists, Alaska Native people have smoking-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors that are encouraging for reducing the burden of smoking in this population. Programs should support efforts to promote cessation, prevent relapse, and establish smoke

  19. Smoking-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors among Alaska Native people: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Rohde, Kristen; Boles, Myde; Bushore, Chris J; Pizacani, Barbara A; Maher, Julie E; Peterson, Erin

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have shown that Alaska Native people have higher smoking prevalence than non-Natives. However, no population-based studies have explored whether smoking-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors also differ among Alaska Native people and non-Natives. We compared current smoking prevalence and smoking-related knowledge, attitudes, and behavior of Alaska Native adults living in the state of Alaska with non-Natives. We used Alaska Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data for 1996 to 2010 to compare smoking prevalence, consumption, and cessation- and second-hand smoke-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors among self-identified Alaska Native people and non-Natives. Current smoking prevalence was 41% (95% CI: 37.9%-44.4%) among Alaska Native people compared with 17.1% (95% CI: 15.9%-18.4%) among non-Natives. Among current every day smokers, Alaska Natives were much more likely to smoke less than 10 cigarettes per day (OR = 5.0, 95% CI: 2.6-9.6) than non-Natives. Compared with non-Native smokers, Alaska Native smokers were as likely to have made a past year quit attempt (OR = 1.4, 95% CI: 0.9-2.1), but the attempt was less likely to be successful (OR = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.2-0.9). Among current smokers, Alaska Natives were more likely to believe second-hand smoke (SHS) was very harmful (OR = 4.5, 95% CI: 2.8-7.2), to believe that smoking should not be allowed in indoor work areas (OR = 1.9, 95% CI: 1.1-3.1) or in restaurants (OR = 4.2, 95% CI: 2.5-6.9), to have a home smoking ban (OR = 2.5, 95% CI: 1.6-3.9), and to have no home exposure to SHS in the past 30 days (OR = 2.3, 95% CI: 1.5-3.6) than non-Natives. Although a disparity in current smoking exists, Alaska Native people have smoking-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors that are encouraging for reducing the burden of smoking in this population. Programs should support efforts to promote cessation, prevent relapse, and establish smoke-free environments.

  20. Metabolic Syndrome: Prevalence among American Indian and Alaska Native People Living in the Southwestern United States and in Alaska

    PubMed Central

    Ferucci, Elizabeth D.; Lanier, Anne P.; Slattery, Martha L.; Schraer, Cynthia D.; Raymer, Terry W.; Dillard, Denise; Murtaugh, Maureen A.; Tom-Orme, Lillian

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Metabolic syndrome occurs commonly in the United States. The purpose of this study was to measure the prevalence of metabolic syndrome among American Indian and Alaska Native people. Methods We measured the prevalence rates of metabolic syndrome, as defined by the National Cholesterol Education Program, among four groups of American Indian and Alaska Native people aged 20 years and older. One group was from the southwestern United States (Navajo Nation), and three groups resided within Alaska. Prevalence rates were age-adjusted to the U.S. adult 2000 population and compared to rates for U.S. whites (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey [NHANES] 1988–1994). Results Among participants from the southwestern United States, metabolic syndrome was found among 43.2% of men and 47.3% of women. Among Alaska Native people, metabolic syndrome was found among 26.5% of men and 31.2% of women. In Alaska, the prevalence rate varied by region, ranging among men from 18.9% (western Alaska) to 35.1% (southeast), and among women from 22.0% (western Alaska) to 38.4 % (southeast). Compared to U.S. whites, American Indian/Alaska Native men and women from all regions except western Alaska were more likely to have metabolic syndrome; men in western Alaska were less likely to have metabolic syndrome than U.S. whites, and the prevalence among women in western Alaska was similar to that of U.S. whites. Conclusion The prevalence rate of metabolic syndrome varies widely among different American Indian and Alaska Native populations. Differences paralleled differences in the prevalence rates of diabetes. PMID:19067530

  1. Visual Impairment and Eye Care among Alaska Native People

    PubMed Central

    Haymes, Sharon A.; Leston, Jessica D.; Ferucci, Elizabeth D.; Schumacher, Mary Catherine; Etzel, Ruth A.; Lanier, Anne P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the prevalence of visual impairment, eye disease and eye care in the Alaska Native (AN) population, by demographic and socioeconomic factors. Methods Population-based cross-sectional study of 3,793 Alaska Native (AN) adults aged 18-94 years enrolled in the Education and Research Towards Health (EARTH) Study from March 2004-March 2006. Data on self-reported visual impairment, cataract, glaucoma, diabetic eye disease and previous dilated eye examinations were collected using audio computer-assisted self-administered questionnaires. Results The unadjusted prevalence of self-reported visual impairment was 8.7% (95% CI: 7.9-9.7), cataract 5.9% (95% CI: 5.2-6.7), glaucoma 2.5% (95% CI: 2.0-3.0) and diabetic eye disease 1.3% (95% CI: 0.9-1.7). In all cases, age-sex adjusted prevalence estimates for the AN population were greater than available estimates for the general U.S. population. Prevalence of visual impairment and each eye disease increased with age (P < 0.01). Additional factors associated with visual impairment were education and annual household income. Overall, 70.0% (95% CI: 68.5-71.6) of participants reported a dilated eye examination within the previous two years. Dilated eye examination within the previous two years was associated with increasing age (P < 0.001). However, men and participants with lower formal education were less likely to report recent dilated eye examination. Among those with diabetes, only 67.7% (95% CI: 60.8-74.1) reported a dilated eye examination within the recommended previous one year. Conclusions Self-reported visual impairment, cataract, glaucoma and diabetic eye disease are prevalent in the AN population. These data may be useful in healthcare planning and education programs. PMID:19437311

  2. Using Digital Stories to Understand the Lives of Alaska Native Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wexler, Lisa; Eglinton, Kristen; Gubrium, Aline

    2014-01-01

    To better understand how young Alaska Native (Inupiaq) people are creatively responding to the tensions of growing up in a world markedly different from that of their parents and grandparents, the pilot study examined youth-produced digital stories as representations of their everyday lives, values, and identities. Two hundred and seventy-one…

  3. Using Digital Stories to Understand the Lives of Alaska Native Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wexler, Lisa; Eglinton, Kristen; Gubrium, Aline

    2014-01-01

    To better understand how young Alaska Native (Inupiaq) people are creatively responding to the tensions of growing up in a world markedly different from that of their parents and grandparents, the pilot study examined youth-produced digital stories as representations of their everyday lives, values, and identities. Two hundred and seventy-one…

  4. Impact of adaptive functioning on readmission to alcohol detoxification among Alaska Native People.

    PubMed

    Running Bear, Ursula; Anderson, Heather; Manson, Spero M; Shore, Jay H; Prochazka, Allan V; Novins, Douglas K

    2014-07-01

    This study examined predictors associated with readmission to detoxification in a sample of adult Alaska Native patients admitted to inpatient alcohol detoxification. Even though Alaska Native people diagnosed with alcoholism have been identified as frequent utilizers of the health care system and at elevated risk of death, little is known about factors associated with readmission to detoxification for this group. We sought to predict readmission using a retrospective cohort study. The sample included 383 adult Alaska Native patients admitted to an inpatient detoxification unit and diagnosed with alcohol withdrawal during 2006 and 2007. Cox proportional hazard modeling was used to estimate unadjusted and adjusted associations with time to readmission within one year. Forty-two percent of the patients were readmitted within one year. Global Assessment Functioning (GAF; Axis V in the multi-axial diagnostic system of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders [DSM IV]) score measured at the time of intake was associated with readmission. A one point increase in the GAF score (HR=.96, 95% CL=.94, .99, P=.002) was associated with a four percent decrease in readmission. The results also indicated that the GAF mediated the relationship between readmission and: employment and housing status. The GAF measures both illness severity and adaptive functioning, is part of standard behavioral health assessments, and is easy to score. Readmission rates potentially could be decreased by creating clinical protocols that account for differences in adaptive functioning and illness severity during detoxification treatment and aftercare. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A Prospective Cohort of American Indian and Alaska Native People: Study Design, Methods, and Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, M. L.; Schumacher, M. C.; Lanier, A. P.; Edwards, S.; Edwards, R.; Murtaugh, M. A.; Sandidge, J.; Day, G. E.; Kaufman, D.; Kanekar, S.; Tom-Orme, L.; Henderson, J. A.

    2008-01-01

    In 2001, the National Cancer Institute funded three centers to test the feasibility of establishing a cohort of American Indian and Alaska Native people. Participating tribal organizations named the study EARTH (Education and Research Towards Health). This paper describes the study methods. A computerized data collection and tracking system was developed using audio computer-assisted survey methodology with touch screens. Data were collected on diet, physical activity, lifestyle and cultural practices, medical and reproductive history, and family history of heart disease, diabetes, and cancer. In addition, a small panel of medical measurements was obtained, including height, weight, waist and hip circumferences, blood pressure, and a lipid panel plus glucose. At the completion of the enrollment visit, data were used to provide immediate health feedback to study participants. During the initial funding period, the authors anticipate enrolling 16,000 American Indian and Alaska Native participants. The age distribution of the study population was similar to that reported in the 2000 US Census for the relevant populations. A component critical to the success of the EARTH Study has been the partnerships with tribal members. The study has focused on involvement of American Indian and Alaska Native communities in development and implementation and on provision of feedback to participants and communities. PMID:17586578

  6. Disparities in Infectious Disease Hospitalizations for American Indian/Alaska Native People

    PubMed Central

    Holman, Robert C.; Folkema, Arianne M.; Singleton, Rosalyn J.; Redd, John T.; Christensen, Krista Y.; Steiner, Claudia A.; Schonberger, Lawrence B.; Hennessy, Thomas W.; Cheek, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives We described disparities in infectious disease (ID) hospitalizations for American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) people. Methods We analyzed hospitalizations with an ID listed as the first discharge diagnosis in 1998–2006 for AI/AN people from the Indian Health Service National Patient Information Reporting System and compared them with records for the general U.S. population from the Nationwide Inpatient Survey. Results The ID hospitalization rate for AI/AN people declined during the study period. The 2004–2006 mean annual age-adjusted ID hospitalization rate for AI/AN people (1,708 per 100,000 populiation) was slightly higher than that for the U.S. population (1,610 per 100,000 population). The rate for AI/AN people was highest in the Southwest (2,314 per 100,000 population), Alaska (2,063 per 100,000 population), and Northern Plains West (1,957 per 100,000 population) regions, and among infants (9,315 per 100,000 population). ID hospitalizations accounted for approximately 22% of all AI/AN hospitalizations. Lower-respiratory--tract infections accounted for the largest proportion of ID hospitalizations among AI/AN people (35%) followed by skin and soft tissue infections (19%), and infections of the kidney, urinary tract, and bladder (11%). Conclusions Although the ID hospitalization rate for AI/AN people has declined, it remains higher than that for the U.S. general population, and is highest in the Southwest, Northern Plains West, and Alaska regions. Lower-respiratory-tract infections; skin and soft tissue infections; and kidney, urinary tract, and bladder infections contributed most to these health disparities. Future prevention strategies should focus on high-risk regions and age groups, along with illnesses contributing to health disparities. PMID:21800745

  7. Validation of a Dietary History Questionnaire for American Indian and Alaska Native People

    PubMed Central

    Murtaugh, Maureen A.; Ma, Khe-ni; Greene, Tom; Redwood, Diana; Edwards, Sandra; Johnson, Jennifer; Tom-Orme, Lillian; Lanier, Anne P.; Henderson, Jeffrey A.; Slattery, Martha L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective We assessed reliability and relative validity of a self-administered computer-assisted dietary history questionnaire (DHQ) for use in a prospective study of diet, lifestyle, and chronic disease in American Indians in the Dakotas and Southwestern US and Alaska Native people. Design Reliability was assessed by one-month test-retest of the dietary history questionnaire. Validity was assessed by comparison of the weighted average of up to 12 monthly 24-hour recalls collected prospectively and a dietary history questionnaire completed in the 13th month. Participants Participants were recruited at the baseline visit of the Education and Research Toward Health Study in Alaska, the Northern Plains and the Dakotas. Results Reliability (Pearson correlation) of the DHQ ranged from r= 0.43 for vitamin A density to r=0.90 for energy intake. The association of nutrient and food estimates assessed by 24-hour recalls and the DHQ completed at the end of the year reflected no bias towards recent intake. Macronutrients expressed as density (nutrients per 1000 calories) did appear to be valid (r 0.50–0.71) as did several micronutrients (range r=.22 to 0.59), fiber (r=0.51), and servings of red meat (r=0.67). However, the DHQ overestimated intake and gross amounts of nutrients were not strongly associated with the weighted average of the 24-hour recalls. Conclusions The DHQ developed for estimation of dietary intake in American Indians and Native people in Alaska is reliable. Estimates of nutrient density appeared to have acceptable relative validity for use in epidemiologic studies. PMID:21305833

  8. Promoting Ethical Research With American Indian and Alaska Native People Living in Urban Areas

    PubMed Central

    Bartgis, Jami; Demers, Deirdre

    2014-01-01

    Most health research with American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) people has focused on tribal communities on reservation lands. Few studies have been conducted with AI/AN people living in urban settings despite their documented health disparities compared with other urban populations. There are unique considerations for working with this population. Engaging key stakeholders, including urban Indian health organization leaders, tribal leaders, research scientists and administrators, and policymakers, is critical to promoting ethical research and enhancing capacity of urban AI/AN communities. Recommendations for their involvement may facilitate an open dialogue and promote the development of implementation strategies. Future collaborations are also necessary for establishing research policies aimed at improving the health of the urban AI/AN population. PMID:25211730

  9. Cardiometabolic Correlates of Low Type 2 Diabetes Incidence in Western Alaska Native People -- the WATCH Study

    PubMed Central

    Koller, Kathryn R.; Metzger, Jesse S.; Jolly, Stacey E.; Umans, Jason G.; Hopkins, Scarlett E.; Kaufmann, Cristiane; Wilson, Amy S.; Ebbesson, Sven O. E.; Raymer, Terry W.; Austin, Melissa A.; Howard, Barbara V.; Boyer, Bert B.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Previously rare among Alaska Native (AN) people, type 2 diabetes (DM2) prevalence as indicated by registry data has increased by as much as 300% in some western Alaska regions. We sought to determine prevalence and incidence of DM2 and analyze associated cardiometabolic risk factors in western AN people. Methods DM2 and prediabetes prevalence and incidence were determined by the Western Alaska Tribal Collaborative for Health using consolidated data from cohort studies conducted during 2000–2010. Crude and age-adjusted incidence for DM2 and prediabetes were calculated using 2010 American Diabetes Association criteria. Effects of covariates on DM2 and prediabetes were determined using univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards analyses, adjusted for age and sex. Results Excluding baseline diabetes (n=124, 4.5%), 53 cases of new DM2 were identified among 2,630 participants. Age- and sex-adjusted DM2 incidence was 4.3/1,000 (95% CI 2.9, 5.0) person-years over an average 5.9-year follow up. After excluding baseline prediabetes, 387 new cases of prediabetes were identified among 1,841 participants; adjusted prediabetes incidence was 44.5/1,000 (95% CI 39.5, 49.5) person years. Independent predictors for DM2 included age, impaired fasting glucose, and metabolic syndrome; family history of diabetes and obesity were additional independent predictors for prediabetes. Conclusions DM2 incidence in western AN people is substantially lower than that for U.S. whites; however, incidence of prediabetes is more than 10-fold higher than western AN DM2 incidence and more closely aligned with U.S. rates. Interventions aimed at achieving healthy lifestyles are needed to minimize risk factors and maximize protective factors for DM2 in this population. PMID:25805711

  10. Cardiometabolic correlates of low type 2 diabetes incidence in western Alaska Native people - The WATCH study.

    PubMed

    Koller, Kathryn R; Metzger, Jesse S; Jolly, Stacey E; Umans, Jason G; Hopkins, Scarlett E; Kaufmann, Cristiane; Wilson, Amy S; Ebbesson, Sven O E; Raymer, Terry W; Austin, Melissa A; Howard, Barbara V; Boyer, Bert B

    2015-06-01

    Previously rare among Alaska Native (AN) people, type 2 diabetes (DM2) prevalence as indicated by registry data has increased by as much as 300% in some western Alaska regions. We sought to determine prevalence and incidence of DM2 and analyze associated cardiometabolic risk factors in western AN people. DM2 and prediabetes prevalence and incidence were determined by the Western Alaska Tribal Collaborative for Health using consolidated data from cohort studies conducted during 2000-2010. Crude and age-adjusted incidence for DM2 and prediabetes were calculated using 2010 American Diabetes Association criteria. Effects of covariates on DM2 and prediabetes were determined using univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards analyses, adjusted for age and sex. Excluding baseline diabetes (n=124, 4.5%), 53 cases of new DM2 were identified among 2630 participants. Age- and sex-adjusted DM2 incidence was 4.3/1000 (95% CI 2.9, 5.0) person-years over an average 5.9-year follow up. After excluding baseline prediabetes, 387 new cases of prediabetes were identified among 1841 participants; adjusted prediabetes incidence was 44.5/1000 (95% CI 39.5, 49.5) person years. Independent predictors for DM2 included age, impaired fasting glucose, and metabolic syndrome; family history of diabetes and obesity were additional independent predictors for prediabetes. DM2 incidence in western AN people is substantially lower than that for U.S. whites; however, incidence of prediabetes is more than 10-fold higher than western AN DM2 incidence and more closely aligned with U.S. rates. Interventions aimed at achieving healthy lifestyles are needed to minimize risk factors and maximize protective factors for DM2 in this population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Pneumonia and Influenza Mortality Among American Indian and Alaska Native People, 1990–2009

    PubMed Central

    Hennessy, Thomas W.; Singleton, Rosalyn J.; Butler, Jay C.; Holve, Stephen; Cheek, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We compared pneumonia and influenza death rates among American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) people with rates among Whites and examined geographic differences in pneumonia and influenza death rates for AI/AN persons. Methods. We adjusted National Vital Statistics Surveillance mortality data for racial misclassification of AI/AN people through linkages with Indian Health Service (IHS) registration records. Pneumonia and influenza deaths were defined as those who died from 1990 through 1998 and 1999 through 2009 according to codes for pneumonia and influenza from the International Classification of Diseases, 9th and 10th Revision, respectively. We limited the analysis to IHS Contract Health Service Delivery Area counties, and compared pneumonia and influenza death rates between AI/ANs and Whites by calculating rate ratios for the 2 periods. Results. Compared with Whites, the pneumonia and influenza death rate for AI/AN persons in both periods was significantly higher. AI/AN populations in the Alaska, Northern Plains, and Southwest regions had rates more than 2 times higher than those of Whites. The pneumonia and influenza death rate for AI/AN populations decreased from 39.6 in 1999 to 2003 to 33.9 in 2004 to 2009. Conclusions. Although progress has been made in reducing pneumonia and influenza mortality, disparities between AI/AN persons and Whites persist. Strategies to improve vaccination coverage and address risk factors that contribute to pneumonia and influenza mortality are needed. PMID:24754620

  12. Influenza Hospitalizations Among American Indian/Alaska Native People and in the United States General Population

    PubMed Central

    Gounder, Prabhu P.; Callinan, Laura S.; Holman, Robert C.; Cheng, Po-Yung; Bruce, Michael G.; Redd, John T.; Steiner, Claudia A.; Bresee, Joseph; Hennessy, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    Background.  Historically, American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) people have experienced a disproportionate burden of infectious disease morbidity compared with the general US population. We evaluated whether a disparity in influenza hospitalizations exists between AI/AN people and the general US population. Methods.  We used Indian Health Service hospital discharge data (2001–2011) for AI/AN people and 13 State Inpatient Databases (2001–2008) to provide a comparison to the US population. Hospitalization rates were calculated by respiratory year (July–June). Influenza-specific hospitalizations were defined as discharges with any influenza diagnoses. Influenza-associated hospitalizations were calculated using negative binomial regression models that incorporated hospitalization and influenza laboratory surveillance data. Results.  The mean influenza-specific hospitalization rate/100 000 persons/year during the 2001–2002 to 2007–2008 respiratory years was 18.6 for AI/AN people and 15.6 for the comparison US population. The age-adjusted influenza-associated hospitalization rate for AI/AN people (98.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 51.6–317.8) was similar to the comparison US population (58.2; CI, 34.7–172.2). By age, influenza-associated hospitalization rates were significantly higher among AI/AN infants (<1 year) (1070.7; CI, 640.7–2969.5) than the comparison US infant population (210.2; CI, 153.5–478.5). Conclusions.  American Indian/Alaska Native people had higher influenza-specific hospitalization rates than the comparison US population; a significant influenza-associated hospitalization rate disparity was detected only among AI/AN infants because of the wide CIs inherent to the model. Taken together, the influenza-specific and influenza-associated hospitalization rates suggest that AI/AN people might suffer disproportionately from influenza illness compared with the general US population. PMID:25734102

  13. Occurrence of pancreatic, biliary tract, and gallbladder cancers in Alaska Native people, 1973–2007

    PubMed Central

    Alberts, Steven R.; Kelly, Janet J.; Ashokkumar, Ramkumar; Lanier, Anne P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To describe the occurrence of pancreatic, biliary tract, and gallbladder cancers within the Alaska Native (AN) population. Study design Population-based analysis utilizing a tumor registry and comparative population data. Methods Pancreaticobiliary cancers rates for AN people during 1973–2007 were determined from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) AN Tumor Registry. Cancer incidence rates were age-adjusted to the World Standard Million and compared over 2 time periods with US white and black rates. Results During 1973–2007, 213 AN people developed pancreatic cancer, 73 gallbladder cancer and 61 biliary tract cancer. Pancreatic cancer occurs at similar rates in AN men and women, but data for 1993–2007 indicate that the rates among AN men may be increasing. The incidence rate in AN women (9.5/100,000) was statistically higher than in US white women (5.8/100,000). The incidence for biliary tract cancer in AN men and gallbladder cancer in AN men and women is statistically higher than that for US whites and blacks. Conclusions Pancreaticobiliary cancers, particularly biliary tract and gallbladder cancers, in both AN men and women and pancreatic cancer in women occur at an increased rate in AN people. Risk factors relating to the elevated rate are discussed. Certain factors are potentially modifiable, such as the use of tobacco and obesity. PMID:22456038

  14. Increasing trend in the rate of infectious disease hospitalisations among Alaska Native people

    PubMed Central

    Holman, Robert C.; Hennessy, Thomas W.; Haberling, Dana L.; Callinan, Laura S.; Singleton, Rosalyn J.; Redd, John T.; Steiner, Claudia A.; Bruce, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine the epidemiology of infectious disease (ID) hospitalisations among Alaska Native (AN) people. Methods Hospitalisations with a first-listed ID diagnosis for American Indians and ANs residing in Alaska during 2001–2009 were selected from the Indian Health Service direct and contract health service inpatient data. ID hospitalisations to describe the general US population were selected from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Annual and average annual (2007–2009) hospitalization rates were calculated. Results During 2007–2009, IDs accounted for 20% of hospitalisations among AN people. The 2007–2009 average annual age-adjusted ID hospitalisation rate (2126/100,000 persons) was higher than that for the general US population (1679/100,000; 95% CI 1639–1720). The ID hospitalisation rate for AN people increased from 2001 to 2009 (17%, p<0.001). Although the rate during 2001–2009 declined for AN infants (<1 year of age; p=0.03), they had the highest 2007–2009 average annual rate (15106/100,000), which was 3 times the rate for general US infants (5215/100,000; 95% CI 4783–5647). The annual rates for the age groups 1–4, 5–19, 40–49, 50–59 and 70–79 years increased (p<0.05). The highest 2007–2009 age-adjusted average annual ID hospitalisation rates were in the Yukon-Kuskokwim (YK) (3492/100,000) and Kotzebue (3433/100,000) regions; infant rates were 30422/100,000 and 26698/100,000 in these regions, respectively. During 2007–2009, lower respiratory tract infections accounted for 39% of all ID hospitalisations and approximately 50% of ID hospitalisations in YK, Kotzebue and Norton Sound, and 74% of infant ID hospitalisations. Conclusions The ID hospitalisation rate increased for AN people overall. The rate for AN people remained higher than that for the general US population, particularly in infants and in the YK and Kotzebue regions. Prevention measures to reduce ID morbidity among AN people should be increased in high

  15. Increasing trend in the rate of infectious disease hospitalisations among Alaska Native people.

    PubMed

    Holman, Robert C; Hennessy, Thomas W; Haberling, Dana L; Callinan, Laura S; Singleton, Rosalyn J; Redd, John T; Steiner, Claudia A; Bruce, Michael G

    2013-01-01

    To examine the epidemiology of infectious disease (ID) hospitalisations among Alaska Native (AN) people. Hospitalisations with a first-listed ID diagnosis for American Indians and ANs residing in Alaska during 2001-2009 were selected from the Indian Health Service direct and contract health service inpatient data. ID hospitalisations to describe the general US population were selected from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Annual and average annual (2007-2009) hospitalization rates were calculated. During 2007-2009, IDs accounted for 20% of hospitalisations among AN people. The 2007-2009 average annual age-adjusted ID hospitalisation rate (2126/100,000 persons) was higher than that for the general US population (1679/100,000; 95% CI 1639-1720). The ID hospitalisation rate for AN people increased from 2001 to 2009 (17%, p < 0.001). Although the rate during 2001-2009 declined for AN infants (< 1 year of age; p = 0.03), they had the highest 2007-2009 average annual rate (15106/100,000), which was 3 times the rate for general US infants (5215/100,000; 95% CI 4783-5647). The annual rates for the age groups 1-4, 5-19, 40-49, 50-59 and 70-79 years increased (p < 0.05). The highest 2007-2009 age-adjusted average annual ID hospitalisation rates were in the Yukon-Kuskokwim (YK) (3492/100,000) and Kotzebue (3433/100,000) regions; infant rates were 30422/100,000 and 26698/100,000 in these regions, respectively. During 2007-2009, lower respiratory tract infections accounted for 39% of all ID hospitalisations and approximately 50% of ID hospitalisations in YK, Kotzebue and Norton Sound, and 74% of infant ID hospitalisations. The ID hospitalisation rate increased for AN people overall. The rate for AN people remained higher than that for the general US population, particularly in infants and in the YK and Kotzebue regions. Prevention measures to reduce ID morbidity among AN people should be increased in high-risk regions and for diseases with high hospitalisation rates.

  16. Depression Prevalence and Associated Factors Among Alaska Native People: The Alaska Education and Research Towards Health (EARTH) Study

    PubMed Central

    Dillard, Denise A.; Smith, Julia J.; Ferucci, Elizabeth D.; Lanier, Anne P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Few studies have investigated depression among Alaska Native people (ANs). Depression prevalence and associated factors among EARTH Alaska study participants is described. Methods The nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) assessed depression among 3,771 ANs. Participants with PHQ-9 scores ≥ 10 out of 27 were classified as positive for depression. Logistic regression analyses evaluated odds of scoring positive versus negative for depression by demographic, cultural, then health and lifestyle factors. Results Twenty percent of women and thirteen percent of men scored positive for depression. Univariate and multivariate models were fit separately for men and women. Among demographic factors, below median income was associated with positive depression scores for both genders. Among men, odds of depression were higher if unmarried and/or if highest educational level was less than high school. Women 34 to 59 years of age had increased odds of scoring positive. Little or no identification with tribal tradition was associated with increased odds of depression in women and decreased odds in men. For both genders, chronic physical conditions and poorer self-reported health were associated with positive depression scores then binge alcohol drinking and current tobacco use increased odds of depression among women only. Limitations Factors analyzed were self-reported without clinician follow-up in a non-random convenience sample of adults. Conclusions Depression is common among ANs with rates comparable to other indigenous cross-sectional investigations. Depression is associated with lower income and poorer physical health. Prevention and intervention efforts should consider gender as other associated factors varied between men and women. PMID:22138285

  17. All-Cause, Cardiovascular, and Cancer Mortality in Western Alaska Native People: Western Alaska Tribal Collaborative for Health (WATCH)

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Jesse S.; Koller, Kathryn R.; Jolly, Stacey E.; Asay, Elvin D.; Wang, Hong; Wolfe, Abbie W.; Hopkins, Scarlett E.; Kaufmann, Cristiane; Raymer, Terry W.; Trimble, Brian; Provost, Ellen M.; Ebbesson, Sven O. E.; Austin, Melissa A.; Howard, William James; Umans, Jason G.; Boyer, Bert B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We determined all-cause, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and cancer mortality in western Alaska Native people and examined agreement between death certificate information and adjudicated cause of deaths. Methods. Data from 4 cohort studies were consolidated. Death certificates and medical records were reviewed and adjudicated according to standard criteria. We compared adjudicated CVD and cancer deaths with death certificates by calculating sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and κ statistics. Results. Men (n = 2116) and women (n = 2453), aged 18 to 95 years, were followed an average of 6.7 years. The major cause of death in men was trauma (25%), followed by CVD (19%) and cancer (13%). The major cause of death in women was CVD (24%), followed by cancer (19%) and trauma (8%). Stroke rates in both genders were higher than those of US Whites. Only 56% of deaths classified as CVD by death certificate were classified as CVD by standard criteria; discordance was higher among men (55%) than women (32%; κs = 0.4 and 0.7). Conclusions. We found lower rates for coronary heart disease death but high rates of stroke mortality. Death certificates overestimated CVD mortality; concordance between the 2 methods is better for cancer mortality. The results point to the importance of cohort studies in this population in providing data to assist in health care planning. PMID:24754623

  18. Safety behaviours among Alaskan Native and American Indian people living in Alaska.

    PubMed

    Redwood, D G; Hagan, K D; Perkins, R D; Stafford, H B; Orell, L J; Lanier, A P

    2009-02-01

    To examine self-reported safety behaviours among 3828 Alaskan Native and American Indian people enrolled in the Alaska Education and Research Towards Health (EARTH) Study, 2004-2006. A cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from a cohort study. A non-random sample of participants (2322 women and 1506 men) aged > or =18 years from three regions of Alaska completed questions on safety behaviours as part of a comprehensive health and lifestyle computer-assisted self-administered questionnaire. Most participants reported never driving after drinking (94.1%) or riding with a driver who had been drinking (91.3%). Fewer (74.1%) participants reported using a seatbelt always or almost always when riding in a vehicle. Only about half (55%) always kept to the speed limit when driving or used a personal flotation device when boating (51.5%). Even fewer (20.5%) reported using a helmet when riding on off-road vehicles, including four-wheelers and snowmobiles. Factors identified among those least likely to use safety devices and practise good safety behaviours are: younger age, lower household income and education, non-married, speaking only English at home, and a self-reported health status of poor to fair (p<0.05). Recommendations for future injury prevention efforts in this population are to increase use of personal flotation devices while boating and address the underuse of helmets with off-road vehicles. Limited prevention resources should be used to target those who engage in risky behaviours to maximise programme impact.

  19. Characterizing the Reproducibility and Reliability of Dietary Patterns among Yup’ik Alaska Native People

    PubMed Central

    Ryman, Tove K.; Boyer, Bert B.; Hopkins, Scarlett; Philip, Jacques; O’Brien, Diane; Thummel, Kenneth; Austin, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    Food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) data can be used to characterize dietary patterns for diet-disease association studies. Among a sample of Yup’ik people from Southwest Alaska, we evaluated three previously defined dietary patterns: “subsistence foods” and market-based “processed foods” and “fruits and vegetables”. We tested the reproducibility and reliability of the dietary patterns and tested associations of the patterns with dietary biomarkers and participant characteristics. We analyzed data from adult study participants who completed at least one FFQ with the Center for Alaska Native Health Research 9/2009–5/2013. To test reproducibility we conducted a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) of a hypothesized model using 18 foods to measure the dietary patterns (n=272). To test the reliability of the dietary patterns, we used CFA to measure the composite reliability (n=272) and intraclass correlation coefficients for test-retest reliability (n=113). Finally, to test associations we used linear regression (n=637). All CFA factor loadings, except one, indicated acceptable correlations between foods and dietary patterns (r > 0.40) and model fit criteria were greater than 0.90. Composite and test-retest reliability of dietary patterns were respectively 0.56 and 0.34 for subsistence foods, 0.73 and 0.66 for processed foods, and 0.72 and 0.54 for fruits and vegetables. In the multi-predictor analysis, dietary patterns were significantly associated with dietary biomarkers, community location, age, sex, and self-reported lifestyle. This analysis confirmed the reproducibility and reliability of the dietary patterns in this study population. These dietary patterns can be used for future research and development of dietary interventions in this underserved population. PMID:25656871

  20. Characterising the reproducibility and reliability of dietary patterns among Yup'ik Alaska Native people.

    PubMed

    Ryman, Tove K; Boyer, Bert B; Hopkins, Scarlett; Philip, Jacques; O'Brien, Diane; Thummel, Kenneth; Austin, Melissa A

    2015-02-28

    FFQ data can be used to characterise dietary patterns for diet-disease association studies. In the present study, we evaluated three previously defined dietary patterns--'subsistence foods', market-based 'processed foods' and 'fruits and vegetables'--among a sample of Yup'ik people from Southwest Alaska. We tested the reproducibility and reliability of the dietary patterns, as well as the associations of these patterns with dietary biomarkers and participant characteristics. We analysed data from adult study participants who completed at least one FFQ with the Center for Alaska Native Health Research 9/2009-5/2013. To test the reproducibility of the dietary patterns, we conducted a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) of a hypothesised model using eighteen food items to measure the dietary patterns (n 272). To test the reliability of the dietary patterns, we used the CFA to measure composite reliability (n 272) and intra-class correlation coefficients for test-retest reliability (n 113). Finally, to test the associations, we used linear regression (n 637). All factor loadings, except one, in CFA indicated acceptable correlations between foods and dietary patterns (r>0·40), and model-fit criteria were >0·90. Composite and test-retest reliability of the dietary patterns were, respectively, 0·56 and 0·34 for 'subsistence foods', 0·73 and 0·66 for 'processed foods', and 0·72 and 0·54 for 'fruits and vegetables'. In the multi-predictor analysis, the dietary patterns were significantly associated with dietary biomarkers, community location, age, sex and self-reported lifestyle. This analysis confirmed the reproducibility and reliability of the dietary patterns in the present study population. These dietary patterns can be used for future research and development of dietary interventions in this underserved population.

  1. Differences in cigarette and smokeless tobacco use among American Indian and Alaska Native people living in Alaska and the Southwest United States

    PubMed Central

    Lanier, Anne P.; Renner, Caroline; Smith, Julia; Tom-Orme, Lillian; Slattery, Martha L.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: This study analyzed self-reported tobacco use among American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) people enrolled in the Education and Research Towards Health Study in Alaska (n = 3,821) and the Southwest United States (n = 7,505) from 2004 to 2006. Methods: Participants (7,060 women and 4,266 men) completed a computer-assisted self-administered questionnaire on cigarette and smokeless tobacco (ST) use. Results: Current use of cigarettes was considerably higher in Alaska than in the Southwest United States (32% vs. 8%). Current ST use was also more common in Alaska than in the Southwest United States (18% vs. 8%). Additionally, smoking was more common among men, younger age, those who were not married, and who only spoke English at home, while ST use was more common among men, those with lower educational attainment and those who spoke an AI/AN language at home (p < .01). Compared with the U.S. general population, AI/AN people living in Alaska were more likely and those living in the Southwest United States were less likely to be current smokers. Rates of ST use, including homemade ST, in both regions were much higher than the U.S. general population. Discussion: Tobacco use among AI/AN people in the Southwest United States, who have a tradition of ceremonial tobacco use, was far lower than among Alaska Native people, who do not have a tribal tradition. Tobacco use is a key risk factor for multiple diseases. Reduction of tobacco use is a critical prevention measure to improve the health of AI/AN people. PMID:20525781

  2. Formative Evaluation to Assess Communication Technology Access and Health Communication Preferences of Alaska Native People

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Renee F.; Dillard, Denise A.; Hiratsuka, Vanessa Y.; Smith, Julia J.; Tierney, Steve; Avey, Jaedon P.; Buchwald, Dedra S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Information technology can improve the quality, safety, and efficiency of healthcare delivery by improving provider and patient access to health information. We conducted a nonrandomized, cross-sectional, self-report survey to determine whether Alaska Native and American Indian (AN/AI) people have access to the health communication technologies available through a patient-centered medical home. Methods In 2011, we administered a self-report survey in an urban, tribally owned and operated primary care center serving AN/AI adults. Patients in the center’s waiting rooms completed the survey on paper; center staff completed it electronically. Results Approximately 98% (n = 654) of respondents reported computer access, 97% (n = 650) email access, and 94% (n = 631) mobile phone use. Among mobile phone users, 60% had Internet access through their phones. Rates of computer access (p = .011) and email use (p = .005) were higher among women than men, but we found no significant gender difference in mobile phone access to the Internet or text messaging. Respondents in the oldest age category (65–80 years of age) were significantly less likely to anticipate using the Internet to schedule appointments, refill medications, or communicate with their health care providers (all p < .001). Conclusion Information on use of health communication technologies enables administrators to deploy these technologies more efficiently to address health concerns in AN/AI communities. Our results will drive future research on health communication for chronic disease screening and health management. PMID:27169131

  3. Formative Evaluation to Assess Communication Technology Access and Health Communication Preferences of Alaska Native People.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Renee F; Dillard, Denise A; Hiratsuka, Vanessa Y; Smith, Julia J; Tierney, Steve; Avey, Jaedon P; Buchwald, Dedra S

    Information technology can improve the quality, safety, and efficiency of healthcare delivery by improving provider and patient access to health information. We conducted a nonrandomized, cross-sectional, self-report survey to determine whether Alaska Native and American Indian (AN/AI) people have access to the health communication technologies available through a patient-centered medical home. In 2011, we administered a self-report survey in an urban, tribally owned and operated primary care center serving AN/AI adults. Patients in the center's waiting rooms completed the survey on paper; center staff completed it electronically. Approximately 98% (n = 654) of respondents reported computer access, 97% (n = 650) email access, and 94% (n = 631) mobile phone use. Among mobile phone users, 60% had Internet access through their phones. Rates of computer access (p = .011) and email use (p = .005) were higher among women than men, but we found no significant gender difference in mobile phone access to the Internet or text messaging. Respondents in the oldest age category (65-80 years of age) were significantly less likely to anticipate using the Internet to schedule appointments, refill medications, or communicate with their health care providers (all p < .001). Information on use of health communication technologies enables administrators to deploy these technologies more efficiently to address health concerns in AN/AI communities. Our results will drive future research on health communication for chronic disease screening and health management.

  4. The impact of patient and provider factors on depression screening of american Indian and alaska native people in primary care.

    PubMed

    Dillard, Denise A; Muller, Clemma J; Smith, Julia J; Hiratsuka, Vanessa Y; Manson, Spero M

    2012-04-01

    The US Preventive Services Task Force recommends routine depression screening in primary care, yet regular screening does not occur in most health systems serving Alaska Native and American Indian people. The authors examined factors associated with administration of depression screening among Alaska Native and American Indian people in a large urban clinic. Medical records of 18 625 Alaska Native and American Indian adults were examined 1 year after implementation of a depression screening initiative. Multilevel logistic regression models examined associations between patient and provider factors and administration of the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Forty-seven percent of patients were screened. Women were more likely than men to be screened (50% vs 43%, P < .001). Increased screening odds were associated with older age, increased service use, and chronic disease (P < .001) but not with substance abuse disorders or prior antidepressant dispensation. Women previously diagnosed with depression had higher odds of screening (P = .002). Men seen by male providers had higher odds of screening than did men seen by female providers (P = .040). Screening rates peaked among providers with 2 to 5 years of employment with the clinic. Cross-sectional analysis of medical record data was of unknown reliability; there were limited sociodemographic data. Even with significant organizational support for annual depression screening, primary care providers systematically missed men and patients with infrequent primary care visits. Outreach to male patients and additional supports for primary care providers, especially in the first years of practice, may improve screening and treatment for depression among Alaska Native and American Indian people.

  5. Prevalence of Hypertension and Associated Risk Factors in Western Alaska Native People: The Western Alaska Tribal Collaborative for Health (WATCH) Study

    PubMed Central

    Jolly, Stacey E.; Koller, Kathryn R.; Metzger, Jesse S.; Day, Gretchen M.; Silverman, Angela; Hopkins, Scarlett E.; Austin, Melissa A.; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Ebbesson, Sven O.E.; Boyer, Bert B.; Howard, Barbara V.; Umans, Jason G.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is a common chronic disease and a key risk factor in the development of cardiovascular disease. The Western Alaska Tribal Collaborative for Health Study consolidates baseline data from four major cohorts residing in the Norton Sound and Yukon-Kuskokwim regions of western Alaska. This consolidated cohort affords an opportunity for a systematic analysis of high blood pressure and its correlates in a unique population that has high stroke rates over a wide age range. While the prevalence of hypertension among western Alaska Native people (30%, age-standardized) is slightly less than that of the U.S. general population (33%), cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of mortality in this rural population. We found that improvement is needed in hypertension awareness as about two-thirds (64%) reported awareness and only 39% with hypertension were controlled on medication. Future analyses assessing risk and protective factors for incident hypertension in this population are indicated. PMID:25644577

  6. Prevalence of Hypertension and Associated Risk Factors in Western Alaska Native People: The Western Alaska Tribal Collaborative for Health (WATCH) Study.

    PubMed

    Jolly, Stacey E; Koller, Kathryn R; Metzger, Jesse S; Day, Gretchen M; Silverman, Angela; Hopkins, Scarlett E; Austin, Melissa A; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Ebbesson, Sven O E; Boyer, Bert B; Howard, Barbara V; Umans, Jason G

    2015-10-01

    Hypertension is a common chronic disease and a key risk factor in the development of cardiovascular disease. The Western Alaska Tribal Collaborative for Health study consolidates baseline data from four major cohorts residing in the Norton Sound and Yukon-Kuskokwim regions of western Alaska. This consolidated cohort affords an opportunity for a systematic analysis of high blood pressure and its correlates in a unique population with high stroke rates over a wide age range. While the prevalence of hypertension among western Alaska Native people (30%, age-standardized) is slightly less than that of the US general population (33%), cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of mortality in this rural population. The authors found that improvement is needed in hypertension awareness as about two thirds (64%) of patients reported awareness and only 39% with hypertension were controlled on medication. Future analyses assessing risk and protective factors for incident hypertension in this population are indicated. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Responsibilities and Roles of Governments and Native People in the Education of American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kickingbird, Kirke; Charleston, G. Mike

    This paper traces the development of the government-to-government relationship between the United States and Native peoples and examines the implications of that relationship for Native American education. In 1532, Francisco de Vitoria refuted the Doctrine of Discovery and laid out four principles to guide Spanish governmental relations with…

  8. Sex differences in obesity prevalence and cardiometabolic factors among Western Alaska Native people.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, S E; Austin, M A; Metzger, J S; Koller, K R; Umans, J G; Kaufmann, C; Wolfe, A W; Howard, B V; Boyer, B B

    2015-03-01

    Obesity is associated with increased risks of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and other chronic diseases. Prevalence estimates for metabolic disorders are well documented in many populations, but Alaska Native groups are understudied. The Western Alaska Tribal Collaborative for Health Study combines data from three Alaska Native study cohorts to assess differences in obesity prevalence and associations with cardiometabolic risk factors by sex. Analyses were based upon a sample of 3985 adult Yup'ik and Inupiat participants with a mean age of 40 years. Prevalence of obesity and metabolic risk factors was assessed according to nationally recognized guidelines. Regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between obesity and cardiometabolic risk factors, including lipids, blood pressure and glucose. The prevalence of obesity (BMI ≥ 30) was significantly higher in women (40%) than men (20%). Only 18.6% of men had a waist circumference (WC) > 102 cm, while 58% of women had a WC > 88 cm (p < 0.001). Women had higher mean HDL-C and triglyceride levels compared to men, while systolic and diastolic blood pressure, LDL-C, and glucose means were higher in men than in women. In multivariate analyses, BMI and WC were significantly associated with all of the cardiometabolic risk factors, although these associations were more pronounced in men than women. The high prevalence of obesity and central adiposity among AN women is an important public health concern. Differences in associations between obesity and cardiometabolic risk factors by sex warrants further investigation to develop effective intervention programs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Risk, Reward, and the Double-Edged Sword: Perspectives on Pharmacogenetic Research and Clinical Testing Among Alaska Native People

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Renee; Starks, Helene; Burke, Wylie; Dillard, Denise A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Pharmacogenetic research and clinical testing raise important concerns for individuals and communities, especially where past medical research and practice has perpetrated harm and cultivated distrust of health care systems and clinicians. We investigated perceptions of pharmacogenetics among Alaska Native (AN) people. Methods. We held four focus groups for 32 ANs in south central Alaska to elicit views about pharmacogenetics in general and for treatment of cardiovascular disease, breast cancer, depression, and nicotine addiction. We analyzed data for perceived risks and rewards of pharmacogenetics. Results. Potential risks of pharmacogenetics included health care rationing, misuse of information, and stigma to individuals and the AN community. Potential rewards included decreased care costs, improved outcomes, and community development. Participants also discussed 8 contingent conditions that could mitigate risks and increase pharmacogenetic acceptability. Conclusions. Alaska Natives perceive pharmacogenetics as potentially benefitting and harming individuals, communities, and health systems, depending on methods and oversight. Researchers, clinicians, and administrators, especially in community-based clinic and health care systems serving minority populations, must address this “double-edged sword” to effectively conduct pharmacogenetics. PMID:24134351

  10. The Dropout/Graduation Crisis among American Indian and Alaska Native Students: Failure to Respond Places the Future of Native Peoples at Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faircloth, Susan C.; Tippeconnic, John W., III

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the graduation/dropout crisis among American Indian and Alaska Native students using data from the National Center for Education Statistics. Data from 2005 is drawn from the seven states with the highest percentage of American Indian and Alaska Native students as well as five states in the Pacific and Northwestern regions of…

  11. 2009 Pandemic influenza A H1N1 in Alaska: temporal and geographic characteristics of spread and increased risk of hospitalization among Alaska Native and Asian/Pacific Islander people.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Jay D; Castrodale, Louisa J; Bruden, Dana L; Keck, James W; Zulz, Tammy; Bruce, Michael G; Fearey, Donna A; McLaughlin, Joe; Hurlburt, Debby; Hummel, Kim Boyd; Kitka, Sassa; Bentley, Steve; Thomas, Timothy K; Singleton, Rosalyn; Redd, John T; Layne, Larry; Cheek, James E; Hennessy, Thomas W

    2011-01-01

    Alaska Native people have suffered disproportionately from previous influenza pandemics. We evaluated 3 separate syndromic data sources to determine temporal and geographic patterns of spread of 2009 pandemic influenza A H1N1 (pH1N1) in Alaska, and reviewed records from persons hospitalized with pH1N1 disease in 3 areas in Alaska to characterize clinical and epidemiologic features of disease in Alaskans. A wave of pH1N1 disease swept through Alaska beginning in most areas in August or early September. In rural regions, where Alaska Native people comprise a substantial proportion of the population, disease occurred earlier than in other regions. Alaska Native people and Asian/Pacific Islanders (A/PI) were 2-4 times more likely to be hospitalized than whites. Alaska Native people and other minorities remain at high risk for early and substantial morbidity from pandemic influenza episodes. These findings should be integrated into plans for distribution and use of vaccine and antiviral agents.

  12. Alaska Native Arts Education Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naccereto, R. W.

    In 1987 the Alaska Department of Education conducted a survey of the state fine arts curriculum. The resulting information revealed an inconsistency in Alaska Native Arts Education throughout the state. To explore this situation further, the Arts in Education Program conducted its own survey in the spring of 1990, entitled, "Native Arts…

  13. Factors related to fruit, vegetable and traditional food consumption which may affect health among Alaska Native People in Western Alaska

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jennifer S.; Nobmann, Elizabeth D.; Asay, Elvin

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Determine intake of fruits, vegetables and traditional foods (TF), availability of foods, and attitudes towards increasing their consumption. Study design Establish community baseline through a cross-sectional sample of residents who were weighed, measured and interviewed. Village stores were surveyed for food availability, price and quality. Methods Eighty-eight respondents self-identified as the household member primarily responsible for food shopping and cooking were surveyed in 3 Western Alaska Native villages using a food frequency questionnaire, and village stores were evaluated using food environment surveys. Results Overweight (BMI[kg/m2] >25) was present in 68% of participants. Fruit and vegetable intake (3.3 median servings/day) was low in comparison to recommended intakes of 5–9 servings/d. Seventy-two per cent were eating less than 5 servings/d of fruits and vegetables combined. Thirty-four per cent of respondents were trying to eat more vegetables; 41% were trying to eat more fruits. The median number of servings of TF was 3.2/d (mean 4.3/d). Seventy-seven per cent of respondents reported that they ate enough TF. Conclusion Recommendations to continue use of TF and increase intake of fruits and vegetables are consistent with local attitudes. Our findings indicate that increasing the availability of fruits and vegetables would be well received. Information from this study provides a basis for nutrition education and food supplement programs that is responsive to the needs and perceptions of the residents. Continued TF intake and increased fruit and vegetable intake have the potential to benefit the health of rural residents. PMID:22456043

  14. 75 FR 53331 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... Interest to Hadohdleekaga, Incorporated, for the Native village of Hughes, Alaska, pursuant to the Alaska... Hughes, Alaska, and are located in: Kateel River Meridian, Alaska T. 9 N., R. 23 E., Sec. 5. Containing...

  15. Guideline concordant detection and management of depression among Alaska Native and American Indian people in primary care.

    PubMed

    Hiratsuka, Vanessa Y; Smith, Julia J; Norman, Sara M; Manson, Spero M; Dillard, Denise A

    2015-01-01

    A tribal health organization in Alaska implemented a primary care depression screening, detection and management initiative amongst 55,000 Alaska Native/American Indian people (AN/AIs). (a) To describe the proportion of AN/AIs screening positive for depression with depression noted or diagnosed and proportion with guideline concordant management and (b) to assess whether management varied by patient and provider factors. Secondary analysis of electronic and paper medical record information of 400 AN/AIs. Provider variables, patient demographics and patient clinical factors were electronically queried. Manual chart audits assessed depression notation, diagnoses and management within 12 weeks of positive screening. Multilevel ordinal logistic modelling assessed management by patient and provider factors. A depression diagnosis was present in 141 (35%) charts and 151 (38%) had depressive symptoms noted. Detection was higher among AN/AIs with moderate and severe depression (p<0.001). In total, 258 patients (66%) received guideline concordant management, 32 (8%) had some management, and 110 (28%) received no management. Younger patient age and increased provider tenure increased odds of management. Most AN/AIs screening positive for depression received initial guideline concordant management. Additional outreach to older patients and additional support for providers newer to practices appears warranted.

  16. Guideline concordant detection and management of depression among Alaska Native and American Indian people in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Hiratsuka, Vanessa Y.; Smith, Julia J.; Norman, Sara M.; Manson, Spero M.; Dillard, Denise A.

    2015-01-01

    Background A tribal health organization in Alaska implemented a primary care depression screening, detection and management initiative amongst 55,000 Alaska Native/American Indian people (AN/AIs). Objectives (a) To describe the proportion of AN/AIs screening positive for depression with depression noted or diagnosed and proportion with guideline concordant management and (b) to assess whether management varied by patient and provider factors. Research design Secondary analysis of electronic and paper medical record information of 400 AN/AIs. Measures Provider variables, patient demographics and patient clinical factors were electronically queried. Manual chart audits assessed depression notation, diagnoses and management within 12 weeks of positive screening. Multilevel ordinal logistic modelling assessed management by patient and provider factors. Results A depression diagnosis was present in 141 (35%) charts and 151 (38%) had depressive symptoms noted. Detection was higher among AN/AIs with moderate and severe depression (p<0.001). In total, 258 patients (66%) received guideline concordant management, 32 (8%) had some management, and 110 (28%) received no management. Younger patient age and increased provider tenure increased odds of management. Conclusions Most AN/AIs screening positive for depression received initial guideline concordant management. Additional outreach to older patients and additional support for providers newer to practices appears warranted. PMID:26519359

  17. Alcohol detoxification completion, acceptance of referral to substance abuse treatment, and entry into substance abuse treatment among Alaska Native people.

    PubMed

    Running Bear, Ursula; Beals, Janette; Novins, Douglas K; Manson, Spero M

    2017-02-01

    Little is known about factors associated with detoxification treatment completion and the transition to substance abuse treatment following detoxification among Alaska Native people. This study examined 3 critical points on the substance abuse continuum of care (alcohol detoxification completion, acceptance of referral to substance abuse treatment, entry into substance abuse treatment following detoxification). The retrospective cohort included 383 adult Alaska Native patients admitted to a tribally owned and managed inpatient detoxification unit. Three multiple logistic regression models estimated the adjusted associations of each outcome separately with demographic/psychosocial characteristics, clinical characteristics, use related behaviors, and health care utilization. Seventy-five percent completed detoxification treatment. Higher global assessment functioning scores, longer lengths of stay, and older ages of first alcohol use were associated with completing detoxification. A secondary drug diagnosis was associated with not completing detoxification. Thirty-six percent accepted a referral to substance abuse treatment following detoxification. Men, those with legal problems, and those with a longer length of stay were more likely to accept a referral to substance abuse treatment. Fifty-eight percent had a confirmed entry into a substance abuse treatment program at discharge. Length of stay was the only variable associated with substance abuse treatment entry. Services like motivational interviewing, counseling, development of therapeutic alliance, monetary incentives, and contingency management are effective in linking patients to services after detoxification. These should be considered, along with the factors associated with each point on the continuum of care when linking patients to follow-up services. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. 50 CFR 17.5 - Alaska natives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... resides in Alaska; or (2) Any non-native permanent resident of an Alaskan native village who is primarily... pursuant to paragraph (a) of this section may be sold in native villages or towns in Alaska for native consumption within native villages and towns in Alaska. (c) Non-edible by-products of endangered or...

  19. 75 FR 28816 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-24

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are located north of Fort Yukon, Alaska...: Bureau of Land Management, Alaska State Office, 222 West Seventh Avenue, 13, Anchorage, Alaska 99513-7504...

  20. Physical activity patterns of American Indian and Alaskan Native people living in Alaska and the Southwestern United States.

    PubMed

    Redwood, Diana; Schumacher, Mary C; Lanier, Anne P; Ferucci, Elizabeth D; Asay, Elvin; Helzer, Laurie J; Tom-Orme, Lillian; Edwards, Sandra L; Murtaugh, Maureen A; Slattery, Martha L

    2009-01-01

    Assessment of self-reported physical activity (PA) and effects on health measures. Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from a cohort study. Education and Research Towards Health study participants from Alaska and the Southwestern United States enrolled from 2004 to 2007. Total of 10,372 American Indian and Alaskan Native people (AI/AN) of at least 18 years. Participants completed computer-assisted, self-administered questionnaires, and anthropometric and health measurements were taken of each participant. Analysis of variance, chi2 tests, and multiple linear regressions were used. Almost 23% of participants reported less than 30 minutes per week of moderate or vigorous activities. Half (49%) reported no vigorous activities. Characteristics associated with more time spent performing vigorous activity were male gender, age less than 40 years, higher income and education levels, and living in a rural area. Almost 70% of Alaskan participants and 36% of Southwest participants engaged in wild food-harvesting activities. Participants with higher levels of activity had significantly better clinical characteristics (high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, body mass index, and waist circumference). AI/AN people engage in many different physical activities, including traditional harvesting activities. Women had lower levels of PA than men, and participation in vigorous PA was associated with better clinical characteristics. These data can be used to guide health promotion efforts in AI/AN populations.

  1. Associations between Diet and Cardiometabolic Risk among Yup’ik Alaska Native People using Food Frequency Questionnaire Dietary Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Ryman, TK; Boyer, BB; Hopkins, S; Philip, J; Beresford, SAA; Thompson, B; Heagerty, PJ; Pomeroy, JJ; Thummel, KE; Austin, MA

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims In previous analyses, we identified three dietary patterns from food frequency questionnaire data among a sample of Yup’ik Alaska Native people living in Southwest Alaska: a “subsistence foods” dietary pattern and two market-based dietary patterns “processed foods” and “fruits and vegetables”. In this analysis, we aimed to characterize the association between the dietary patterns and cardiometabolic (CM) risk factors (lipids, blood pressure, glucose, adiposity). Methods and Results We used multilevel linear regression to estimate the mean of each CM risk factor, comparing participants in the 4th to the 1st quartile of each dietary pattern (n=637). Models were adjusted for age, sex, past smoking, current smoking, and physical activity. Mean log triglyceride levels were significantly higher among participants in the 4th compared to the 1st quartile of the processed foods dietary pattern (β=0.11). Mean HbA1c percent was significantly lower (β=−0.08) and mean diastolic blood pressure (DBP) mm Hg was significantly higher (β=2.87) among participants in the 4th compared to the 1st quartile of the fruits and vegetables dietary pattern. Finally, mean log triglyceride levels and mean DBP mm Hg were significantly lower among participants in the 4th compared to the 1st quartile of the subsistence foods dietary pattern (β=−0.10 and β=−3.99 respectively). Conclusions We found increased CM risk, as reflected by increased triglycerides, associated with eating a greater frequency of processed foods, and reduced CM risk, as reflected by lower triglycerides and DBP, associated with eating a greater frequency of subsistence foods. PMID:26607703

  2. Associations between diet and cardiometabolic risk among Yup'ik Alaska Native people using food frequency questionnaire dietary patterns.

    PubMed

    Ryman, T K; Boyer, B B; Hopkins, S; Philip, J; Beresford, S A A; Thompson, B; Heagerty, P J; Pomeroy, J J; Thummel, K E; Austin, M A

    2015-12-01

    In previous analyses, we identified three dietary patterns from food frequency questionnaire data among a sample of Yup'ik Alaska Native people living in Southwest Alaska: a "subsistence foods" dietary pattern and two market-based dietary patterns "processed foods" and "fruits and vegetables". In this analysis, we aimed to characterize the association between the dietary patterns and cardiometabolic (CM) risk factors (lipids, blood pressure, glucose, adiposity). We used multilevel linear regression to estimate the mean of each CM risk factor, comparing participants in the 4th to the 1st quartile of each dietary pattern (n = 637). Models were adjusted for age, sex, past smoking, current smoking, and physical activity. Mean log triglyceride levels were significantly higher among participants in the 4th compared to the 1st quartile of the processed foods dietary pattern (β = 0.11). Mean HbA1c percent was significantly lower (β = -0.08) and mean diastolic blood pressure (DBP) mm Hg was significantly higher (β = 2.87) among participants in the 4th compared to the 1st quartile of the fruits and vegetables dietary pattern. Finally, mean log triglyceride levels and mean DBP mm Hg were significantly lower among participants in the 4th compared to the 1st quartile of the subsistence foods dietary pattern (β = -0.10 and β = -3.99 respectively). We found increased CM risk, as reflected by increased triglycerides, associated with eating a greater frequency of processed foods, and reduced CM risk, as reflected by lower triglycerides and DBP, associated with eating a greater frequency of subsistence foods. Copyright © 2015 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Text message reminders increased colorectal cancer screening in a randomized trial with Alaska Native and American Indian people.

    PubMed

    Muller, Clemma J; Robinson, Renee F; Smith, Julia J; Jernigan, Meghan A; Hiratsuka, Vanessa; Dillard, Denise A; Buchwald, Dedra

    2017-04-15

    Alaska Native and American Indian people (AN/AIs) have a high incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) and CRC-related mortality. Screening can prevent death from CRC, but screening rates are low in racially and ethnically diverse populations. The authors conducted a randomized controlled trial using text messaging to increase CRC screening among unscreened AN/AIs in a tribal health care system in Anchorage, Alaska. The intervention entailed up to 3 text messages sent 1 month apart. The authors randomized 2386 AN/AIs aged 40 to 75 years who were eligible for CRC screening to the intervention or usual-care control conditions. Screening status was ascertained from electronic health records 3 months and 6 months after the last text message. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention, stratified by age and sex. The intervention increased CRC screening for AN/AIs aged 50 to 75 years (HR, 1.42; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.97-2.09) and aged 40 to 49 years (HR, 1.24; 95% CI, 0.95-1.62). Within both age groups, the HRs were higher for women (HR, 1.69 [95% CI, 1.02-2.80] and HR, 1.37 [95% CI, 1.01-1.88]) compared with men (HR, 1.09 [95% CI, 0.59-1.99] and HR, 0.90 [95% CI, 0.54-1.53]). Interaction analysis yielded P values of .55 and .09, respectively, for age and sex. A simple text messaging intervention was found to increase CRC screening rates in AN/AIs, a group with high CRC morbidity and mortality. Text messaging may be a cost-effective means of reducing CRC screening disparities in AN/AIs and other populations. Cancer 2017;123:1382-1389. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  4. Patient and provider perspectives on using telemedicine for chronic disease management among Native Hawaiian and Alaska Native people.

    PubMed

    Hiratsuka, Vanessa; Delafield, Rebecca; Starks, Helene; Ambrose, Adrian Jacques; Mau, Marjorie Mala

    2013-01-01

    Among indigenous populations in remote locations who are at increased risk for chronic diseases such as diabetes, telemedicine has the potential to improve access to health care services and thus may reduce adverse health outcomes. Yet few studies are available on how best to use telemedicine technology in reducing ethnic and racial health care disparities. We examined perspectives of patients and providers in 2 indigenous populations in Alaska and Hawai'i about the use of telemedicine in primary care chronic disease management. Six focus groups with patients and providers at 2 sites (3 in Alaska and 3 in Hawai'i). Three broad themes were common to both sites: (a) benefits and barriers of using telemedicine; (b) building patient-provider relationships; and (c) elements of an acceptable telemedicine primary care encounter. Two key elements were endorsed by both patients and providers as important for an effective telemedicine encounter: (a) the initial patient-provider interaction should be face-to-face; and (b) patients must see the same provider on follow-up visits. The use of telemedicine in chronic disease management has potential to improve patient care in remote indigenous populations and may supplement patient-provider relationships.

  5. Patient and provider perspectives on using telemedicine for chronic disease management among Native Hawaiian and Alaska Native people

    PubMed Central

    Hiratsuka, Vanessa; Delafield, Rebecca; Starks, Helene; Ambrose, Adrian Jacques; Mau, Marjorie Mala

    2013-01-01

    Background Among indigenous populations in remote locations who are at increased risk for chronic diseases such as diabetes, telemedicine has the potential to improve access to health care services and thus may reduce adverse health outcomes. Yet few studies are available on how best to use telemedicine technology in reducing ethnic and racial health care disparities. Objective We examined perspectives of patients and providers in 2 indigenous populations in Alaska and Hawai'i about the use of telemedicine in primary care chronic disease management. Design Six focus groups with patients and providers at 2 sites (3 in Alaska and 3 in Hawai'i). Results Three broad themes were common to both sites: (a) benefits and barriers of using telemedicine; (b) building patient–provider relationships; and (c) elements of an acceptable telemedicine primary care encounter. Two key elements were endorsed by both patients and providers as important for an effective telemedicine encounter: (a) the initial patient–provider interaction should be face-to-face; and (b) patients must see the same provider on follow-up visits. Conclusion The use of telemedicine in chronic disease management has potential to improve patient care in remote indigenous populations and may supplement patient–provider relationships. PMID:23977642

  6. A Review of the Experience, Epidemiology, and Management of Pain among American Indian, Alaska Native, and Aboriginal Canadian Peoples

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Nathalia; Garroutte, Eva; Kundu, Anjana; Morales, Leo; Buchwald, Dedra

    2011-01-01

    Substantial literature suggests that diverse biological, psychological, and sociocultural mechanisms account for differences by race and ethnicity in the experience, epidemiology, and management of pain. Many studies have examined differences between Whites and minority populations, but American Indians (AIs), Alaska Natives (ANs), and Aboriginal peoples of Canada have been neglected both in studies of pain and in efforts to understand its bio-psychosocial and cultural determinants. This article reviews the epidemiology of pain and identifies factors that may affect clinical assessment and treatment in these populations. We searched for peer-reviewed articles focused on pain in these populations, using PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane, and the University of New Mexico Native Health Database. We identified 28 articles published 1990-2009 in 3 topic areas: epidemiology of pain, pain assessment and treatment, and healthcare utilization. A key finding is that AI/ANs have a higher prevalence of pain symptoms and painful conditions than the U.S. general population. We also found evidence for problems in provider-patient interactions that affect clinical assessment of pain, as well as indications that AI/AN patients frequently use alternative modalities to manage pain. Future research should focus on pain and comorbid conditions and develop conceptual frameworks for understanding and treating pain in these populations. Perspective We reviewed the literature on pain in AI/ANs and found a high prevalence of pain and painful conditions, along with evidence of poor patient-provider communication. We recommend further investigation of pain and comorbid conditions and development of conceptual frameworks for understanding and treating pain in this population. PMID:21330217

  7. Current Conditions in American Indian and Alaska Native Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szasz, Margaret Connell

    The school experience of American Indian and Alaska Native children hinges on the context in which their schooling takes place. This context includes the health and well-being of their families, communities, and governments, as well as the relationship between Native and non-Native people. Many Native children are in desperate straits because of…

  8. 75 FR 55344 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-10

    ...- L14100000-HY0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION... Ivisaapaagmiit Corporation, Koovukmeut Incorporated, and Isingmakmeut Incorporated, pursuant to the Alaska Native... of Ambler, Shungnak, and Kobuk, Alaska, and are located in: Kateel River Meridian, Alaska T. 21 N., R...

  9. 76 FR 8375 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... lands described below pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are in the vicinity of Mentasta Lake, Alaska, and are located in: Copper River Meridian, Alaska T. 11 N., R. 7 E., Secs...

  10. 75 FR 38537 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are in the vicinity of Manley Hot Springs, Alaska, and are located in: Fairbanks Meridian, Alaska T. 1 N, R. 15 W., Secs. 1 and 12. Containing 1,256.69...

  11. 76 FR 22414 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-21

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... described below pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are in the vicinity of Huslia, Alaska, and are located in: Kateel River Meridian, Alaska T. 6 N., R.12 E., Sec. 21, lots 1 and 2; Sec...

  12. 75 FR 53331 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... Corporation, pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are in the vicinity of Mary's Igloo, Alaska, and are located in: Kateel River Meridian, Alaska T. 6 S., R. 30 W., Secs. 13 and 22...

  13. 76 FR 5395 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-31

    ...-L14100000-HY0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION... pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are located east of Sand Point, Alaska, and... their rights. ADDRESSES: A copy of the decision may be obtained from: Bureau of Land Management, Alaska...

  14. 75 FR 27359 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... below pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The subsurface estate in these lands will be... are in the vicinity of Akutan, Alaska, and are located in: Seward Meridian, Alaska T. 70 S., R. 107 W...

  15. 77 FR 4057 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... described below pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq.). The lands are in the vicinity of Shageluk, Alaska, and are located in: Seward Meridian, Alaska T. 29 N., R. 55 W...

  16. 76 FR 13428 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The subsurface estate in these lands will be.... The lands are in the vicinity of Pedro Bay, Alaska, and are located in: Seward Meridian, Alaska T. 4 S...

  17. 75 FR 38536 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... Corporation, pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are in the vicinity of the Colville River, Alaska and are located: Umiat Meridian, Alaska T. 5 S., R. 9 W., Secs. 1, 7, 12, and 13...

  18. 75 FR 6694 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... certain lands for conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act will be issued to Doyon, Limited. The lands are in the vicinity of Tanana, Alaska, and are located in: Fairbanks Meridian, Alaska T...

  19. 76 FR 22414 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-21

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... described below pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are in the vicinity of Anvik, Alaska, and are located in: Seward Meridian, Alaska T. 29 N., R. 59 W., Sec. 36. Containing 597.36 acres...

  20. 75 FR 41511 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior...., pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act and the Act of January 2, 1976. The lands are in the vicinity of Healy, Alaska, and are located in: Fairbanks Meridian, Alaska T. 10 S., R. 9 W., Sec. 5...

  1. 75 FR 1801 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-13

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act will be issued to Kuukpik Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Nuiqsut, Alaska, and are located in: Umiat Meridian, Alaska T. 10 N., R. 2...

  2. 75 FR 8105 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act will be issued to Zho-Tse, Incorporated. The lands are in the vicinity of Shageluk, Alaska, and are located in: Seward Meridian, Alaska T. 28 N., R...

  3. 78 FR 57411 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-18

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... estates in the lands described below pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq.). The lands are in the vicinity of Umiat, Alaska, and are located in: Umiat Meridian, Alaska...

  4. 76 FR 13428 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... of surface estate in the lands described below pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act... vicinity of Gakona, Alaska, and are located in: Copper River Meridian, Alaska T. 8 N., R. 3 E., Sec. 22...

  5. 76 FR 47234 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The subsurface estate in these lands will be.... The lands are in the vicinity of Togiak, Alaska, and are located in: Seward Meridian, Alaska T. 11 S...

  6. 75 FR 43198 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The subsurface estate in these lands will be conveyed to Bristol Bay... vicinity of Aleknagik, Alaska, and are located in: Seward Meridian, Alaska T. 10 S., R. 55 W., Sec. 26, 27...

  7. 75 FR 69457 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-12

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... lands described below pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are in the vicinity of Eagle, Alaska, and are located in: Fairbanks Meridian, Alaska T. 1 S., R. 31 E., Sec. 36...

  8. 76 FR 53151 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-25

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... estate in the lands described below for conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act... Devil, Alaska, and are located in: Seward Meridian, Alaska T. 22 N., R. 44 W., Secs. 27 to 34, inclusive...

  9. 76 FR 53151 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-25

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... described below pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.). The lands are in the vicinity of Hughes, Alaska, and are located in: Kateel River Meridian, Alaska T. 7 N., R. 21 E...

  10. 75 FR 80838 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... described below pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are in the vicinity of Allakaket, Alaska, and are located in: Fairbanks Meridian, Alaska T. 22 N., R. 22 W., Secs 4, 5, 8, and 9...

  11. 75 FR 43199 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The subsurface estate in these lands will be conveyed to... vicinity of Beaver, Alaska, and are located in: Fairbanks Meridian, Alaska T. 16 N., R. 1 E., Secs. 1 to 20...

  12. 77 FR 20046 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-03

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... described below pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA) (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq.). The... Kassan, Alaska. The lands are located in: Copper River Meridian, Alaska T. 74 S., R. 85 E. Secs. 15, 16...

  13. 78 FR 27991 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq.). The subsurface estate in... Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Kotlik, Alaska, and are located in: ] Seward Meridian, Alaska T...

  14. 76 FR 53150 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-25

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... described below pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601 et seq). The lands are in the vicinity of Anvik, Alaska, and are located in: Seward Meridian, Alaska T. 29 N., R. 59 W., Sec...

  15. 76 FR 16805 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

    ... the lands described below pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act and the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act. The lands are in the vicinity of Clarks Point, Alaska, and are located in... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior...

  16. 77 FR 59220 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-26

    ...] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Decision... Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq). The subsurface estate in these lands will... Native Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Council, Alaska, and are located in: Lot 1, U.S...

  17. 78 FR 7807 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... below for conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq). The... estate is conveyed to Sitnasuak Native Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Nome, Alaska, and...

  18. 76 FR 57759 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1604 et seq.). The subsurface... conveyed to Sitnasuak Native Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Nome, Alaska, and are located in...

  19. 76 FR 43340 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ...; LLAK965000-L14100000-KC0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... Alaska Peninsula Corporation, Successor in Interest to Newhalen Native Corporation. The decision approves the surface estate in the lands described below for conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims...

  20. 76 FR 55414 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.). The subsurface... ] Bethel Native Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Bethel, Alaska, and are located in: Lots 33...

  1. 78 FR 26064 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... below for conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq). The... estate is conveyed to Unalakleet Native Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Unalakleet, Alaska...

  2. Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    Investigator 4 A. Introduction Parkinsonism (PS) is a syndrome characterized by tremor , rigidity, slowness of movement, and problems with walking...2011. The aims of this project are: Specific Aim 1: Identify cases of parkinsonism among Alaska Native people and populate a secure electronic...registry database. Specific Aim 2: Provide education on parkinsonism and its treatment to primary care physicians and other health care providers

  3. Advocacy for Native American Indian and Alaska Native Clients and Counselees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herring, Roger

    Helping professionals need to be more informed and more active advocates for proactive counseling strategies with Native American Indian and Alaska Native peoples. The paper discusses the major advocacy needs of these populations. The negative impact of historical and contemporary discriminatory policies and practices on Native peoples has…

  4. Sex, Adiposity, and Hypertension Status Modify the Inverse Effect of Marine Food Intake on Blood Pressure in Alaska Native (Yup’ik) People123

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu-Jones, Brendin R; O’Brien, Diane M; Hopkins, Scarlett E; Moore, Jason H; Boyer, Bert B; Gilbert-Diamond, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Background: Alaska Native people currently have a higher prevalence of hypertension than do nonnative Alaskans, although in the 1950s hypertension was rare among Alaska Native people. A novel biomarker of marine foods, the nitrogen isotope ratio (δ15N) in RBCs was shown to be negatively associated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Few studies have examined how individual characteristics modify the association of marine food intake with blood pressure. Objective: This exploratory analysis examined whether sex, adiposity, and hypertension modify the inverse association between marine food intake and blood pressure. Methods: We used covariate-adjusted linear models to describe the association between δ15N and blood pressure in 873 adult Alaska Native (Yup’ik) people who resided in 8 communities in southwest Alaska. We separately stratified by sex, body mass index (BMI) group, abdominal obesity, and hypertension status and assessed the interaction between δ15N and participant characteristics on blood pressure via likelihood ratio tests. Results: The association between δ15N and systolic blood pressure was modified by sex, BMI status, and abdominal obesity, with the inverse association observed only in the male (β = −1.5; 95% CI: −2.4, −0.6), nonobese BMI (β = −1.7; 95% CI: −2.5, −1.0), and non–abdominally obese (β = −1.6; 95% CI: −2.4, −0.9) strata (all P-interaction < 0.0001). A reduction in diastolic blood pressure associated with δ15N was observed in the nonobese BMI (β = −1.1; 95% CI: −1.7, −0.5) and non–abdominally obese (β = −1.1; 95% CI: −1.7, −0.5) strata, although only the interaction between BMI group and δ15N with diastolic blood pressure was significant. The inverse association between δ15N and both systolic and diastolic blood pressure was observed in nonhypertensive individuals, although the comparison had limited power. The results were consistent with those identified by using combined RBC

  5. Sex, Adiposity, and Hypertension Status Modify the Inverse Effect of Marine Food Intake on Blood Pressure in Alaska Native (Yup'ik) People.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu-Jones, Brendin R; O'Brien, Diane M; Hopkins, Scarlett E; Moore, Jason H; Boyer, Bert B; Gilbert-Diamond, Diane

    2015-05-01

    Alaska Native people currently have a higher prevalence of hypertension than do nonnative Alaskans, although in the 1950s hypertension was rare among Alaska Native people. A novel biomarker of marine foods, the nitrogen isotope ratio (δ¹⁵N) in RBCs was shown to be negatively associated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Few studies have examined how individual characteristics modify the association of marine food intake with blood pressure. This exploratory analysis examined whether sex, adiposity, and hypertension modify the inverse association between marine food intake and blood pressure. We used covariate-adjusted linear models to describe the association between δ¹⁵N and blood pressure in 873 adult Alaska Native (Yup'ik) people who resided in 8 communities in southwest Alaska. We separately stratified by sex, body mass index (BMI) group, abdominal obesity, and hypertension status and assessed the interaction between δ¹⁵N and participant characteristics on blood pressure via likelihood ratio tests. The association between δ¹⁵N and systolic blood pressure was modified by sex, BMI status, and abdominal obesity, with the inverse association observed only in the male (β = -1.5; 95% CI: -2.4, -0.6 : , nonobese BMI (β = -1.7; 95% CI: -2.5, -1.0), and non-abdominally obese (β = -1.6; 95% CI: -2.4, -0.9) strata (all P-interaction < 0.0001). A reduction in diastolic blood pressure associated with δ¹⁵N was observed in the nonobese BMI (β = -1.1; 95% CI: -1.7, -0.5) and non-abdominally obese (β = -1.1; 95% CI: -1.7, -0.5) strata, although only the interaction between BMI group and δ¹⁵N with diastolic blood pressure was significant. The inverse association between δ¹⁵N and both systolic and diastolic blood pressure was observed in nonhypertensive individuals, although the comparison had limited power. The results were consistent with those identified by using combined RBC concentrations of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic

  6. 75 FR 8105 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ...] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of decision... appealable decision approving the surface estates in certain lands for conveyance pursuant to the Alaska... in the vicinity of Buckland and Deering, Alaska, and are located in: Kateel River Meridian, Alaska T...

  7. 75 FR 45649 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are in the vicinity of Holy Cross, Alaska, and... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of decision approving lands for conveyance. SUMMARY: As required by 43 CFR...

  8. 76 FR 53150 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-25

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... certain lands pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.). The lands are located south west of Mountain Village, Alaska, and contain 9.04 acres. Notice of the decision will also...

  9. 78 FR 10634 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq.). The subsurface... Huna Totem Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Hoonah, Alaska, and are located in: Copper...

  10. 78 FR 35047 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... for conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq.). The... to The Kuskokwim Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Georgetown, Alaska, and are located in...

  11. 78 FR 50442 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq.). The lands are located north of Tuntutuliak, Alaska, and contain 4.81 acres. Notice of the decision will also be published once a...

  12. 78 FR 8582 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... in certain lands pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq). The lands are located northeast of New Stuyahok, Alaska, and contain 3.43 acres. Notice of the decision will...

  13. 75 FR 26785 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-12

    ...-KC0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... the surface and subsurface estates in certain lands to Doyon, Limited pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are in the vicinity of Rampart, Alaska, and are located in: Fairbanks...

  14. 75 FR 57493 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... approving the conveyance of surface estate for certain lands to Eklutna, Inc., pursuant to the Alaska Native.... when the surface estate is conveyed to Eklutna, Inc. The lands are in the vicinity of Birchwood, Alaska...

  15. 78 FR 7807 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... for conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq). The... to The Kuskokwim Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Napaimute, Alaska, and are located in...

  16. 76 FR 73657 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.). The subsurface estate in..., Inc. The lands are in the vicinity of Goodnews Bay, Alaska, and are located in: Seward Meridian...

  17. 77 FR 16256 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-20

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... certain lands pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.). The lands are located northwesterly of Mentasta, Alaska, and contain 7.25 acres. Notice of the decision will also be...

  18. 77 FR 33231 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-05

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq). The subsurface... Napakiak Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Napakiak, Alaska, and are located in: Seward...

  19. 75 FR 8106 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... certain lands pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act will be issued to The Aleut Corporation for 32.15 acres located on Adak Island, Alaska. Notice of the decision will also be published four...

  20. 75 FR 80838 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ...-962000-L14100000-HY0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are located on the Near Islands, west of Adak, Alaska, and aggregate 66.01 acres. Notice of the decision will also be published four times in the...

  1. 78 FR 8581 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... for conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq). The... to The Kuskokwim Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Sleetmute, Alaska, and are located in...

  2. 76 FR 55415 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ...-L14100000-HY0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION... pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.). The lands are located south west of Pilot Station, Alaska, and contain 24.99 acres. Notice of the decision will also be published...

  3. 76 FR 72212 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-22

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq). The subsurface... Arviq Incorporated. The lands are in the vicinity of Platinum, Alaska, and located in: Seward Meridian...

  4. 78 FR 54481 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-04

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq.). The subsurface... Evansville, Inc. The lands are in the vicinity of Evansville, Alaska, and are located in: Fairbanks Meridian...

  5. 75 FR 65644 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    ..., AA-11933, AA-11928, AA-11929, AA-11931, AA-11932; LLAK- 962000-L14100000-HY0000-P] Alaska Native... the conveyance of only the surface estate for certain lands pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are located on the Rat Islands, west of Adak, Alaska, aggregating 191.31 acres...

  6. 75 FR 65644 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... for certain lands pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are located southwesterly of Manokotak, Alaska, aggregating 31.96 acres. Notice of the decision will also be published four...

  7. 75 FR 38537 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ..., AA-11979, AA-11977; LLAK-962000-L14100000-HY0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of... estate for certain lands pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are located on the Rat Islands, west of Adak, Alaska, aggregating 370.81 acres. Notice of the decision will also be...

  8. 76 FR 45604 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... certain lands pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are located south west of Sheldon Point, Alaska, and contain 20.55 acres. Notice of the decision will also be published four times...

  9. 78 FR 65354 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq.). The subsurface... conveyed to Stuyahok, Limited. The lands are in the vicinity of New Stuyahok, Alaska, and are located in...

  10. 78 FR 16527 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-15

    ...-944000-L14100000-HY0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... Chugach Alaska Corporation. The ] decision will approve conveyance of the surface and subsurface estates in certain lands pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq). The...

  11. 76 FR 61736 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... certain lands pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.) The lands are located north of Tuluksak, Alaska, and contains 5.23 acres. Notice of the decision will also be published...

  12. 78 FR 42543 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... for conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq.). The... to The Kuskokwim Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Napaimute, Alaska, and are located in...

  13. 78 FR 10634 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ...-L14100000-HY0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION... hereby given that the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will issue an appealable decision to Chugach Alaska... pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq). The lands are located south...

  14. 76 FR 23834 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-28

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... Chugach Alaska Corporation. The decision will approve the conveyance of the surface and subsurface estates in certain lands pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are located east and...

  15. 77 FR 72383 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ...] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of decision... will approve conveyance of the surface and subsurface estates in certain lands pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq). The lands are located south of Napaskiak, Alaska...

  16. 78 FR 57411 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-18

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq.). The subsurface... Qanirtuuq, Inc. The lands are in the vicinity of Quinhagak, Alaska, and are located in: Seward Meridian...

  17. 75 FR 53332 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... Chugach Alaska Corporation. The decision will approve the conveyance of the surface and subsurface estates in certain lands pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are located southwest...

  18. 77 FR 21802 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq). The subsurface... Kongnikilnomuit Yuita Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Bill Moore's Slough, Alaska, and are located...

  19. 77 FR 72383 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq). The lands are located west of Newtok, Alaska, and contain 0.16 acres. Notice of the decision will also be published four times in the...

  20. 77 FR 21802 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... lands pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq). The lands are located north of Mountain Village, Alaska, and contain 3.11 acres. Notice of the decision will also be...

  1. 76 FR 14684 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-17

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... estates in certain lands pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are located north of Koyuk, Alaska, and aggregate 4.86 acres. Notice of the decision will also be published four times...

  2. 78 FR 49763 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-15

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... described below for conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq... surface estate is conveyed to Oceanside Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Perryville, Alaska...

  3. 76 FR 61737 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... in certain lands pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. et seq.). The lands are located southwest of Noatak, Alaska, and contain 4.14 acres. Notice of the decision will also be...

  4. Native timber harvests in southeast Alaska.

    Treesearch

    G. Knapp

    1992-01-01

    The Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act established 13 Native corporations in southeast Alaska. There are 12 "village" corporations and 1 "regional" corporation (Sealaska Corporation). The Native corporations were entitled to select about 540,000 acres of land out of the Tongass National Forest; about 95 percent have been conveyed. This study...

  5. Bill Demmert and Native Education in Alaska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnhardt, Ray

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the influences of William Demmert's formative years growing up in Alaska and his years as an educator of Native American students upon his career in Native education policy. It focuses on Alaska Native education during a ten-year period between 1980 and 1990 during which time he served as the director of the Center for…

  6. Bill Demmert and Native Education in Alaska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnhardt, Ray

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the influences of William Demmert's formative years growing up in Alaska and his years as an educator of Native American students upon his career in Native education policy. It focuses on Alaska Native education during a ten-year period between 1980 and 1990 during which time he served as the director of the Center for…

  7. Minority Women's Health: American Indians/Alaska Natives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Minority Women's Health > American Indians/Alaska Natives Minority Women's Health American Indians/Alaska Natives Related information How ... conditions common in American Indian and Alaska Native women Accidents Alcoholism and drug abuse Breast cancer Cancer ...

  8. 76 FR 23834 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-28

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... may be obtained from: Bureau of Land Management, Alaska State Office, 222 West Seventh Avenue, 13, Anchorage, Alaska 99513-7504. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: The BLM by phone at 907-271-5960 or by e-mail...

  9. 75 FR 69457 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-12

    ...-32, AA-8102-33, AA-8102-34, AA-8102-47; LLAK965000-L14100000-KC0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection... decision may be obtained from: Bureau of Land Management, Alaska State Office, 222 West Seventh Avenue, 13, Anchorage, Alaska 99513-7504 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: The BLM by phone at 907-271-5960, by e-mail at...

  10. 75 FR 51098 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ..., AA-11950, AA-11986, AA-11981, AA-11982, AA-12004, AA-12005; LLAK-962000-L14100000-HY0000-P] Alaska... will approve the conveyance of only the surface estate for certain lands pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are located on the Rat Islands, west of Adak, Alaska, aggregating 280.33...

  11. Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    Investigator Parkinsonism (PS) is a syndrome characterized by tremor , rigidity, slowness of movement, and problems with walking and balance...2. Developing an identification protocol. The primary source of parkinsonism cases will be the Indian Health Service (IHS) provider database, called...of parkinsonism among Alaska Natives. Status: Complete 3. Developing a secure Alaska Native parkinsonism registry database. Status: The database

  12. CYP2A6 and CYP2B6 genetic variation and its association with nicotine metabolism in South Western Alaska Native people

    PubMed Central

    Binnington, Matthew J.; Zhu, Andy Z.X.; Renner, Caroline C.; Lanier, Anne P.; Hatsukami, Dorothy K.; Benowitz, Neal L; Tyndale, Rachel F.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Alaska Native people (AN) have a high prevalence of tobacco use and associated morbidity and mortality when compared to the general U.S. population. Variation in the CYP2A6 and CYP2B6 genes, encoding enzymes responsible for nicotine metabolic inactivation and procarcinogen activation, has not been characterized in AN and may contribute to the increased risk. Methods AN people (n = 400) residing in the Bristol Bay region of South Western Alaska were recruited for a cross-sectional study on tobacco use. They were genotyped for CYP2A6*1X2A, *1X2B, *1B, *2, *4, *7, *8, *9, *10, *12, *17, *35 and CYP2B6*4, *6, *9 and provided plasma and urine samples for measurement of nicotine and metabolites. Results CYP2A6 and CYP2B6 variant frequencies among the AN Yupik people (n=361) were significantly different from other ethnicities. Nicotine metabolism (as measured by the plasma and urinary ratio of metabolites trans-3’hydroxycotinine to cotinine [(3HC/COT)] was significantly associated with CYP2A6 (P< 0.001) but not CYP2B6 genotype (P = 0.95) when controlling for known covariates. Of note, plasma 3HC/COT ratios were high in the entire Yupik people, and among the Yupik CYP2A6 wild-type participants they were substantially higher than previously characterized racial/ethnic groups (P < 0.001 vs. Caucasians and African Americans). Conclusions Yupik AN people have a unique CYP2A6 genetic profile which associated strongly with in vivo nicotine metabolism. More rapid CYP2A6-mediated nicotine and nitrosamine metabolism in the Yupik people may modulate tobacco-related disease risk. PMID:22569203

  13. Tobacco Cessation Intervention During Pregnancy Among Alaska Native Women

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a community-based participatory research program with Alaska Native people addressing a community need to reduce tobacco use among pregnant women and children. Tobacco use during pregnancy among Alaska Native women is described along with development of a community partnership, findings from a pilot tobacco cessation intervention, current work, and future directions. Among Alaska Native women residing in the Yukon Kuskokwim Delta region of western Alaska, the prevalence of tobacco use (cigarette smoking and/or use of smokeless tobacco) during pregnancy is 79%. Results from a pilot intervention study targeting pregnant women indicated low rates of participation and less than optimal tobacco abstinence outcomes. Developing alternative strategies to reach pregnant women and to enhance the efficacy of interventions is a community priority, and future directions are offered. PMID:22311690

  14. Tobacco cessation intervention during pregnancy among Alaska Native women.

    PubMed

    Patten, Christi A

    2012-04-01

    This paper describes a community-based participatory research program with Alaska Native people addressing a community need to reduce tobacco use among pregnant women and children. Tobacco use during pregnancy among Alaska Native women is described along with development of a community partnership, findings from a pilot tobacco cessation intervention, current work, and future directions. Among Alaska Native women residing in the Yukon Kuskokwim Delta region of western Alaska, the prevalence of tobacco use (cigarette smoking and/or use of smokeless tobacco) during pregnancy is 79%. Results from a pilot intervention study targeting pregnant women indicated low rates of participation and less than optimal tobacco abstinence outcomes. Developing alternative strategies to reach pregnant women and to enhance the efficacy of interventions is a community priority, and future directions are offered.

  15. 43 CFR 2091.9-1 - Alaska Native selections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Alaska Native selections. 2091.9-1 Section... Opening of Lands § 2091.9-1 Alaska Native selections. The segregation and opening of lands authorized for selection and selected by Alaska Natives under the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, as amended (43 U.S.C...

  16. 43 CFR 2091.9-1 - Alaska Native selections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Alaska Native selections. 2091.9-1 Section... Opening of Lands § 2091.9-1 Alaska Native selections. The segregation and opening of lands authorized for selection and selected by Alaska Natives under the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, as amended (43 U.S.C...

  17. 43 CFR 2091.9-1 - Alaska Native selections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Alaska Native selections. 2091.9-1 Section... Opening of Lands § 2091.9-1 Alaska Native selections. The segregation and opening of lands authorized for selection and selected by Alaska Natives under the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, as amended (43 U.S.C...

  18. 43 CFR 2091.9-1 - Alaska Native selections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Alaska Native selections. 2091.9-1 Section... Opening of Lands § 2091.9-1 Alaska Native selections. The segregation and opening of lands authorized for selection and selected by Alaska Natives under the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, as amended (43 U.S.C...

  19. 75 FR 9427 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-02

    ..., Limited. The lands are in the vicinity of Holy Cross and Huslia, Alaska, and are located in: Kateel River... Bureau of Land Management [AA-8103-63, AA-8103-65, F-21902-06, F-21903-54, F-21903-55, F-21903- 56; LLAK-96400-L14100000-KC0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management,...

  20. Postneonatal mortality among Alaska Native infants - Alaska, 1989-2009.

    PubMed

    2012-01-13

    Alaska's postneonatal mortality rate of 3.4 deaths per 1,000 live births during 2006-2008 was 48% higher than the 2007 U.S. rate of 2.3 per 1,000. Among American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) infants, the Alaska rate of 8.0 per 1,000 was 70% higher than the U.S. rate of 4.7. The Alaska Division of Public Health analyzed a linked birth-infant death file for 1989-2009 to examine temporal trends in postneonatal mortality in Alaska, specifically in the Alaska Native (AN) population. Overall and non-Alaska Native (non-AN) rates declined during the entire period, but no significant trends in AN-specific mortality were apparent. Infant mortality review committee findings indicated a decline during 1992-2007 among all postneonatal deaths attributed to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) or sudden unexplained infant death (SUID), but not for other causes. Lack of progress in reducing postneonatal mortality, particularly among AN infants, indicates a need for renewed emphasis within the Alaska health-care community. Current initiatives to reduce preventable causes of postneonatal mortality should be evaluated and successful models more widely implemented.

  1. Advancing Efforts to Energize Native Alaska (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-04-01

    This brochure describes key programs and initiatives of the DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs to advance energy efficiency, renewable energy, and energy infrastructure projects in Alaska Native villages.

  2. Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    Questionable 0 DK f. seborrheic dermatitis 0 Yes 0 No 0 Questionable 0 DK Exclusion criteria O Prominent postural instability in the first 3...4 A. Introduction Parkinsonism (PS) is a syndrome characterized by tremor, rigidity, slowness of movement, and problems with walking and balance...the Alaska Native Medical Center. B. Body The intent of this proposal is to establish a registry of parkinsonism cases among Alaska native

  3. Alaska Native Education: History and Adaptation in the New Millenium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawagley, Angayuqaq Oscar

    1999-01-01

    Examines ways of learning and knowing among the Yupiaq people of Alaska. Discusses traditional Yupiaq lifeways based on connection to nature, and the consequences of acculturation. Outlines suggestions for seasonal camps in which elders would teach Native language, culture, environmental knowledge, and subsistence skills, as well as the means of…

  4. Alaska Native Stories: Using Narrative to Introduce Expository Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Marilyn

    The reading program described in this lesson plan uses traditional stories of the Native peoples (narrative text) to introduce students to the study of animals in Alaska (expository text). During three 45-minute lessons, students will: complete a KWLQ (Know; Want to Know; Learn; Question) chart; listen and respond to a story (narrative text) by…

  5. Native Cultures and Language: Challenges for Land Managers in Alaska

    Treesearch

    Thomas J. Gallagher

    1992-01-01

    Many of the Aleuts, Inuits, and Indians of Alaska continue to live a traditional lifestyle. Eighty-eight percent of the land they use for subsistence activities, however, is managed by federal or state agencies. Clear communication across cultures is essential if Native people are to be represented in agency land management decisions. Problems in communication relate...

  6. Alaska Native Languages: Past, Present, and Future. Alaska Native Language Center Research Papers No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krauss, Michael E.

    Three papers (1978-80) written for the non-linguistic public about Alaska Native languages are combined here. The first is an introduction to the prehistory, history, present status, and future prospects of all Alaska Native languages, both Eskimo-Aleut and Athabaskan Indian. The second and third, presented as appendixes to the first, deal in…

  7. 43 CFR 2568.10 - What Alaska Native allotment benefits are available to certain Alaska Native veterans?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What Alaska Native allotment benefits are available to certain Alaska Native veterans? 2568.10 Section 2568.10 Public Lands: Interior Regulations... MANAGEMENT (2000) ALASKA OCCUPANCY AND USE Alaska Native Allotments For Certain Veterans Purpose § 2568.10...

  8. 43 CFR 2568.10 - What Alaska Native allotment benefits are available to certain Alaska Native veterans?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What Alaska Native allotment benefits are available to certain Alaska Native veterans? 2568.10 Section 2568.10 Public Lands: Interior Regulations... MANAGEMENT (2000) ALASKA OCCUPANCY AND USE Alaska Native Allotments For Certain Veterans Purpose § 2568.10...

  9. 43 CFR 2568.10 - What Alaska Native allotment benefits are available to certain Alaska Native veterans?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What Alaska Native allotment benefits are available to certain Alaska Native veterans? 2568.10 Section 2568.10 Public Lands: Interior Regulations... MANAGEMENT (2000) ALASKA OCCUPANCY AND USE Alaska Native Allotments For Certain Veterans Purpose § 2568.10...

  10. 43 CFR 2568.10 - What Alaska Native allotment benefits are available to certain Alaska Native veterans?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What Alaska Native allotment benefits are available to certain Alaska Native veterans? 2568.10 Section 2568.10 Public Lands: Interior Regulations... MANAGEMENT (2000) ALASKA OCCUPANCY AND USE Alaska Native Allotments For Certain Veterans Purpose § 2568.10...

  11. American Indians and Alaska Natives with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Marilyn J.

    American Indian and Alaska Native children with special needs experience the same ineffective and inefficient services as other minority language children. This paper discusses the special needs of Native children, assessment and curriculum issues, and recommendations for improvement. It provides statistics for various categories of handicaps and…

  12. Sociocultural stress and the American native in Alaska: an analysis of changing patterns of psychiatric illness and alcohol abuse among Alaska natives.

    PubMed

    Kraus, R F; Buffler, P A

    1979-06-01

    This paper presents selected morbidity and mortality statistics to outline developing trends and the current status of psychiatric illness and alcohol abuse among the Aleut, Athabascan, Yupik, Inupiat, Tlingit, Haida and Tsimpshian people of Alaska. Analysis of the records of the Indian Health Service, the Community Mental Health Centers and the Alaska Psychiatric Institute, the providers of care for Alaska Natives, shows that the number of individuals treated as inpatients and outpatients for psychiatric illness and alcohol abuse has been rising steadily. Accidental injury and suicidal behavior are common. The treated prevalence rates for these diagnoses exceed recorded rates for other American Native and non-Native groups. For each category of violent death, suicide, homicide, accidents and alcohol, rates for Alaska Natives are higher than rates for Alaska non-Natives, American Indians and the U.S. (all races) and are rising. The data suggest a public health problem in which the primary elements are behavioral disturbance and violent death.

  13. Alaska Natives and Alaska Higher Education, 1960-1972: A Descriptive Study. Alaska Native Human Resources Development Program, Publication 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacquot, Louis F.

    Utilizing data derived from numerous sources (institutions, Alaska Native organizations, Federal and State agencies, conferences, etc.), this descriptive study is divided into 6 chapters which trace the evolution of and the necessity for Alaska Native higher education. Following a detailed introduction, Chapter 2 describes the physical and…

  14. Alaska Native Villages and Rural Communities Water Grant Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Significant human health and water quality problems exist in Alaska Native Village and other rural communities in the state due to lack of sanitation. To address these issues, EPA created the Alaska Rural and Native Villages Grant Program.

  15. Trends in Alaska's People and Economy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leask, Linda; Killorin, Mary; Martin, Stephanie

    This booklet provides data on Alaska's population, economy, health, education, government, and natural resources, including specific information on Alaska Natives. Since 1960, Alaska's population has tripled and become more diverse, more stable, older, less likely to be male or married, and more concentrated. About 69 percent of the population…

  16. Sobriety and alcohol use among rural Alaska Native elders.

    PubMed

    Skewes, Monica C; Lewis, Jordan P

    2016-01-01

    Although notable health disparities related to alcohol use persist among Alaska Native people living in rural communities, there is a paucity of research examining drinking behaviour in particular segments of this population, including elders. One explanation for this is the distrust of behavioural health research in general and alcohol research in particular following the legacy of the Barrow Alcohol Study, still regarded as a notable example of ethics violations in cross-cultural research. The present study reports findings from one of the first research studies asking directly about alcohol abuse among rural Alaska Natives (AN) since the study in Barrow took place in 1979. We report findings regarding self-reported alcohol use included in an elder needs assessment conducted with 134 Alaska Native elders from 5 rural villages off the road system in Alaska. Data were collected in partnership between academic researchers and community members in accordance with the principles of Community-Based Participatory Research. Findings showed very high rates of sobriety and low rates of alcohol use, contradicting stereotypes of widespread alcohol abuse among AN. Possible explanations and future research directions are discussed. This research represents one step forward in mending academic-community relationships in rural Alaska to further research on alcohol use and related health disparities.

  17. Sobriety and alcohol use among rural Alaska Native elders

    PubMed Central

    Skewes, Monica C.; Lewis, Jordan P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although notable health disparities related to alcohol use persist among Alaska Native people living in rural communities, there is a paucity of research examining drinking behaviour in particular segments of this population, including elders. One explanation for this is the distrust of behavioural health research in general and alcohol research in particular following the legacy of the Barrow Alcohol Study, still regarded as a notable example of ethics violations in cross-cultural research. Objective The present study reports findings from one of the first research studies asking directly about alcohol abuse among rural Alaska Natives (AN) since the study in Barrow took place in 1979. Design We report findings regarding self-reported alcohol use included in an elder needs assessment conducted with 134 Alaska Native elders from 5 rural villages off the road system in Alaska. Data were collected in partnership between academic researchers and community members in accordance with the principles of Community-Based Participatory Research. Results Findings showed very high rates of sobriety and low rates of alcohol use, contradicting stereotypes of widespread alcohol abuse among AN. Possible explanations and future research directions are discussed. Conclusions This research represents one step forward in mending academic–community relationships in rural Alaska to further research on alcohol use and related health disparities. PMID:26850112

  18. 75 FR 13296 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [AA-6679-B, AA-6679-C, AA-6679-F, AA-6679-G, AA-6679-K, AA-6679-M, AA- 6679-A2, LLAK964000-L14100000-KC0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior...

  19. 76 FR 75899 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [AA-9915, AA-9916, AA-9921, AA-9936, AA-9937, AA-9965; LLAK-965000- L14100000-HY0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of...

  20. 76 FR 16804 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

    ...-8102-47; LLAK965000-L14100000-KC0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land... 99513-7504. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: The BLM by phone at 907-271-5960, by e-mail at ak.blm...

  1. 77 FR 24217 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-23

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior...), notice is hereby given that the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will issue an appealable decision to Iqfijouaq Company. The decision approves for conveyance the surface estate in the lands described...

  2. 75 FR 30051 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [F-14989-B, F-14989-C, F-14989-E2, F-14989-G2, F-14989-K2, F-14989-L2; LLAK965000-L14100000-KC0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior...

  3. 26 CFR 1.1502-81T - Alaska Native Corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alaska Native Corporations. 1.1502-81T Section... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Administrative Provisions and Other Rules § 1.1502-81T Alaska... under the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.)) is limited to the use on a...

  4. 26 CFR 1.1502-81T - Alaska Native Corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alaska Native Corporations. 1.1502-81T Section... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Administrative Provisions and Other Rules § 1.1502-81T Alaska... under the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.)) is limited to the use on a...

  5. 26 CFR 1.1502-81T - Alaska Native Corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alaska Native Corporations. 1.1502-81T Section... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Administrative Provisions and Other Rules § 1.1502-81T Alaska... under the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.)) is limited to the use on a...

  6. 26 CFR 1.1502-81T - Alaska Native Corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alaska Native Corporations. 1.1502-81T Section... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Administrative Provisions and Other Rules § 1.1502-81T Alaska... under the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.)) is limited to the use on a...

  7. Gaining Influence: Alaska Natives Assert Economic Clout amid Cultural Uncertainty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bristol, Tom

    1996-01-01

    Kake Tribal Corporation's purchase of a seafood cold storage facility in southeast Alaska is an example of the growing economic clout of Alaska's tribal corporations. However, many claim that the pro-development forces of corporations are weakening the subsistence economy and culture of Alaska Natives. Conflicts involve Native hunting and fishing…

  8. Alaska Native Population and Manpower: 1975. A Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bland, Laurel L.

    Numbering approximately 62,005 and representing 15.3% of the total Alaska population in 1975, Alaska Natives are a finite and predominately rural subpopulation. However, a significant portion of the Alaska Native Work Force (estimated at 13,854) now resides in the major urban areas and is available to the Statewide Work Force. Statistics from May,…

  9. Politics and Alaska Natives: One of a Series of Articles on the Native Land Claims.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napoleon, Harold

    As one in a series of eight articles written by different professionals concerned with Alaska Native land claims, this article focuses on utilization of Alaska Native political resources as a means to achieve beneficial legislation beyond that of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act of 1972. Designed to stimulate careful political and…

  10. Alaska Native Languages: A Bibliographical Catalogue. Part One: Indian Languages. Alaska Native Language Center Research Papers, Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krauss, Michael E.; McGary, Mary Jane

    This catalogue describes Alaska native language materials at the research library and archive of the Alaska Native Language Center, University of Alaska, Fairbanks. The volume covers the sections of the library devoted to Indian languages as well as the general and bibliography sections. Since the collection is almost exhaustive, the catalogue is…

  11. 76 FR 55414 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ...As required by 43 CFR 2650.7(d), notice is hereby given that the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will issue an appealable decision to Nunakauiak Yupik Corporation. The decision approves the surface estate in the lands described below for conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.). The subsurface estate in these lands will be conveyed to Calista......

  12. The Alaska Native Women's Wellness Project.

    PubMed

    Stillwater, B

    1999-01-01

    Alaska Native women have encountered many obstacles in the health care system which deter them from adhering to cancer screening recommendations. To improve access, it was necessary for us to listen to them and their attitudes about health care. As a result of this assessment, we changed our approach resulting in an overall increase in screening rates from 14% to 62%. A case example is presented to demonstrate barriers to cancer screening and our techniques for overcoming them.

  13. Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    1-0001 Brian A Trimble, MD Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry Principal Investigator A. Introduction Parkinsonism (PS) is a syndrome...characterized by tremor , rigidity, slowness of movement, and problems with walking and balance. Parkinson’s disease is the most common form of PS... parkinsonism cases will be the Indian Health Service (IHS) provider database, called the Resource and Patient Management System (RPMS), but the protocol will

  14. Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    W81XWH-07-1-0001 Brian A Trimble, MD Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry Principal Investigator A. Introduction Parkinsonism (PS) is a...syndrome characterized by tremor , rigidity, slowness of movement, and problems with walking and balance. Parkinson’s disease is the most common form...protocol. The primary source of parkinsonism cases will be the Indian Health Service (IHS) provider database, called the Resource and Patient Management

  15. Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    07-1-0001 TITLE: Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Caroline M. Tanner, M.D...The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author( s ) and should not be construed as an official Department...GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER E-Mail: 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING

  16. 77 FR 2998 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ...As required by 43 CFR 2650.7(d), notice is hereby given that the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will issue an appealable decision to Sea Lion Corporation. The decision approves the surface estate in the lands described below for conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq.). These lands lie entirely within the Clarence Rhode National Wildlife Refuge......

  17. Alaska Native Population and Manpower Perspectives on Native Labor Force Utilization: 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bland, Laurel L.

    As part of a long-term study of the utilization of Alaska Native manpower, new data is combined with that of a similar 1975 study to estimate the Alaska Native and non-Native civilian population and work force for 1978 and 1980. Contrary to 1975 predictions the population ratio of Alaska non-Natives to Natives remains constant at 82%/18%. The…

  18. Prevalence of Mixed Connective Tissue Disease in a Population-Based Registry of American Indian/Alaska Native People in 2007.

    PubMed

    Ferucci, Elizabeth D; Johnston, Janet M; Gordon, Caroline; Helmick, Charles G; Lim, S Sam

    2017-08-01

    To determine the prevalence of mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) in 2007 in the Indian Health Service (IHS) active clinical population from 3 regions of the US. The IHS Lupus Registry was designed to identify possible MCTD cases in addition to systemic lupus erythematosus cases. The population denominator for this report includes American Indian or Alaska Native adults within the IHS active clinical population in 2007, residing in select communities in 3 regions of the US. Potential MCTD cases were identified using a broad range of diagnostic codes and were confirmed by detailed medical record abstraction. Classification as MCTD for this analysis required both rheumatologist diagnosis of MCTD without diagnosis of other CTD, and documentation of the Alarcón-Segovia MCTD criteria in the medical record. Prevalence was also calculated using 2 alternate definitions of MCTD. The age-adjusted prevalence of MCTD using our primary definition was 6.4 per 100,000 (95% confidence interval 2.8-12.8). The prevalence was higher in women than in men using all 3 definitions of MCTD, and no men met the criteria for the primary definition of MCTD. The first population-based estimates of the prevalence of MCTD in the US American Indian/Alaska Native population show that the prevalence appears to be higher than in other populations. Additional population-based estimates are needed to better understand the epidemiology of MCTD. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  19. Poverty and Public Assistance among Alaska Natives: Implications for 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Matthew; Foster, Karen Pyle

    The Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA) distributed 44 million acres of land and nearly $1 billion to Alaska Natives. The land and equity is currently being held by 12 regional corporations and 150 village corporations formed by the act. Native shareholders, however, will be free to sell their stock in these corporations for the first time…

  20. Expanding Job Opportunities for Alaska Natives. (Interim Report).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDiarmid, G. Williamson; Goldsmith, Scott; Killorin, Mary; Sharp, Suzanne; Hild, Carl

    A majority of adults in most Alaska Native villages were without jobs in 1990, and the situation was probably not substantially better in 1998. This report summarizes current Alaska Native employment data and employment trends, provides information on public and private programs that target Native hire, and describes promising approaches for…

  1. Variation in Genes Controlling Warfarin Disposition and Response in American Indian and Alaska Native People: CYP2C9, VKORC1, CYP4F2, CYP4F11, GGCX

    PubMed Central

    Yracheta, Joseph; Dillard, Denise A.; Schilling, Brian; Khan, Burhan; Hopkins, Scarlett; Boyer, Bert; Black, Jynene; Wiener, Howard; Tiwari, Hemant K.; Gordon, Adam; Nickerson, Deborah; Tsai, Jesse M.; Farin, Federico M.; Thornton, Timothy A.; Rettie, Allan E.; Thummel, Kenneth E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Pharmacogenetic testing is projected to improve health outcomes and reduce the cost of care by increasing therapeutic efficacy and minimizing drug toxicity. American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) people historically have been excluded from pharmacogenetic research and its potential benefits, a deficiency we sought to address. The vitamin K antagonist warfarin is prescribed for prevention of thromboembolic events, although its narrow therapeutic index and wide inter-individual variability necessitate close monitoring of drug response. Therefore, we were interested in variation in CYP2C9, VKORC1, CYP4F2, CYP4F11, and GGCX, which encode enzymes important for the activity of warfarin and synthesis of vitamin K dependent blood clotting factors. Methods We resequenced these genes in 188 AI/AN people in partnership with Southcentral Foundation (SCF) in Anchorage, AK and 94 Yup'ik people living in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta of southwest Alaska to identify known or novel function-disrupting variation. We conducted genotyping for specific SNPs in larger cohorts of each study population (380 and 350, respectively). Results We identified high frequencies of the lower-warfarin dose VKORC1 haplotype (−1639G>A and 1173C>T) and the higher-warfarin dose CYP4F2*3 variant. We also identified two relatively common, novel, and potentially function-disrupting variants in CYP2C9 (M1L and N218I), which, along with CYP2C9*3, CYP2C9*2 and CYP2C9*29, predict that a significant proportion of AI/AN people will have decreased CYP2C9 activity. Conclusions Overall, we predict a lower average warfarin dose requirement in AI/AN populations in Alaska than that seen in non-AI/AN populations of the US, a finding consistent with clinical experience in Alaska. PMID:25946405

  2. Alaska Native Participation in the Civilian Conservation Corps. Alaska Historical Commission Studies in History No. 206.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Connor; And Others

    The report is a finding aid to the sources which document the 1937 federal policy decision mandating that 50% of the enrollees in the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) in Alaska must be Alaska Natives and provides a list of the Native CCC projects in Alaska. The finding aid section is organized according to the location of the collections and…

  3. Dental caries in rural Alaska Native children--Alaska, 2008.

    PubMed

    2011-09-23

    In April 2008, the Arctic Investigations Program (AIP) of CDC was informed by the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services (DHSS) of a large number of Alaska Native (AN) children living in a remote region of Alaska who required full mouth dental rehabilitations (FMDRs), including extractions and/or restorations of multiple carious teeth performed under general anesthesia. In this remote region, approximately 400 FMDRs were performed in AN children aged <6 years in 2007; the region has approximately 600 births per year. Dental caries can cause pain, which can affect children's normal growth and development. AIP and Alaska DHSS conducted an investigation of dental caries and associated risk factors among children in the remote region. A convenience sample of children aged 4-15 years in five villages (two with fluoridated water and three without) was examined to estimate dental caries prevalence and severity. Risk factor information was obtained by interviewing parents. Among children aged 4-5 years and 12-15 years who were evaluated, 87% and 91%, respectively, had dental caries, compared with 35% and 51% of U.S. children in those age groups. Among children from the Alaska villages, those aged 4-5 years had a mean of 7.3 dental caries, and those aged 12-15 years had a mean of 5.0, compared with 1.6 and 1.8 dental caries in same-aged U.S. children. Of the multiple factors assessed, lack of water fluoridation and soda pop consumption were significantly associated with dental caries severity. Collaborations between tribal, state, and federal agencies to provide effective preventive interventions, such as water fluoridation of villages with suitable water systems and provision of fluoride varnishes, should be encouraged.

  4. Address to Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta Regional Summit on Native Education (Bethel, Alaska, April 24, 2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ongtooguk, Paul

    Remarks of Alaska Native researcher and educator Paul Ongtooguk are presented. Alaska Native students perform worse on exit exams than any other population in the state. In the past, formal education was offered to Alaska Natives only if they gave up being Alaska Natives. The current system is not designed to solve the problems of Alaska Native…

  5. Native Alaska's Floating Factoryship--She Plies the Pacific Ocean for Native Alaska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wassaja, The Indian Historian, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Describes the history of the Al-Ind-Esk-A Sea, a floating fish processing factory representing a major hope for the economic independence of Alaska Natives residing outside the state. Discusses employment practices in effect on the ship. Notes interesting facts about the ship's engines and fittings. (SB)

  6. Native Alaska's Floating Factoryship--She Plies the Pacific Ocean for Native Alaska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wassaja, The Indian Historian, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Describes the history of the Al-Ind-Esk-A Sea, a floating fish processing factory representing a major hope for the economic independence of Alaska Natives residing outside the state. Discusses employment practices in effect on the ship. Notes interesting facts about the ship's engines and fittings. (SB)

  7. Children of the Midnight Sun: Young Native Voices of Alaska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Tricia

    For Native children, growing up in Alaska today means dwelling in a place where traditional customs sometimes mix oddly with modern conveniences. Through their own words, this book explores the lives of eight Alaska Native children, each representing a unique and ancient culture: Eskimo--Yupik and Inupiat; Aleut; and Indian--Athabascan, Tlingit,…

  8. American Indian/Alaska Native College Student Retention Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guillory, Raphael M.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents findings from a qualitative study examining the similarities and differences between American Indian/Alaska Native student perceptions and the perceptions of state representatives, university presidents, and faculty about persistence factors and barriers to degree completion specific to American Indian/Alaska Native students…

  9. A Summary of Changes in the Status of Alaska Natives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska Univ., Anchorage. Inst. of Social and Economic Research.

    Replication of 78 tables from the 1973 2(c) Report by the Secretary of the Interior using 1980 census information provided data to document the social and economic changes in the status of Alaska Natives since the passage of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. Comparison of 1970 and 1980 data showed an average 2.4% growth rate in the Native…

  10. Office of Management and Budget racial categories and implications for American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    PubMed Central

    Burhansstipanov, L; Satter, D E

    2000-01-01

    This commentary provides a brief overview of American Indian and Alaskan populations in the United States and selected data issues. The focus of this commentary is an excerpt of recommendations related to Office of Management and Budget Directive 15 (racial categories) and American Indians and Alaska Natives. Of paramount concern is not only that all federal, state, and local agencies collect data on American Indians and Alaska Natives, but also that reports, findings, and peer-reviewed publications include data on American Indians and Alaska Natives. It is of no use to recruit American Indians and Alaska Natives into studies and projects if their race/ethnicity-specific data are not disseminated. Collapsing racial/ethnic categories, such as Asians, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders, and American Indians and Alaska Natives, into a single racial category of "other" is of no benefit to public health policymakers, researchers, and tribal planners. Likewise, tribal affiliation should be collected whenever it is feasible to do so. Insufficient inclusion and inaccurate identification of American Indians and Alaska Natives in national surveys has also resulted in a dearth of baseline data in significant reports such as Healthy People 2010. PMID:11076238

  11. Encouraging Involvement of Alaska Natives in Geoscience Careers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanks, C. L.; Fowell, S. J.; Kowalsky, J.; Solie, D.

    2003-12-01

    Geologically, Alaska is a dynamic state, rich in mineral and energy resources. The impact of natural geologic hazards and mineral resource development can be especially critical in rural areas. While Alaska Natives comprise a large percentage of Alaska's rural population, few have the training to be leaders in the decision-making processes regarding natural hazard mitigation or mineral resource evaluation and exploitation. UAF, with funding from the National Science Foundation, has embarked on a three year integrated program aimed at encouraging young Alaska Natives to pursue geosciences as a career. The program combines the geologic expertise at UAF with established Alaska Native educational outreach programs. The Rural Alaska Honors Institute (RAHI) is a bridging program specifically designed to prepare rural high school students for college. To attract college-bound Alaska Native students into the geosciences, geoscience faculty have developed a college-level, field-intensive, introductory RAHI geoscience course that will fulfill geoscience degree requirements at UAF. In years two and three, this class will be supplemented by a one week field course that will focus on geologic issues encountered in most Alaskan rural communities, such as natural hazards, ground water, mineral and energy resources. In order to retain Alaska Native undergraduate students as geoscience majors, the program is providing scholarships and internship opportunities in cooperation with the Alaska Native Science and Engineering Program (ANSEP). Undergraduate geoscience majors participating in ANSEP can intern as teaching assistants for both the classroom and field courses. Besides being mentors for the RAHI students, the Alaska Native undergraduate geoscience majors have the opportunity to interact with faculty on an individual basis, examine the geologic issues facing Alaska Natives, and explore geology as a profession.

  12. Alcohol misuse and associations with childhood maltreatment and out-of-home placement among urban two-spirit American Indian and Alaska Native people.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Nicole P; Duran, Bonnie M; Walters, Karina L; Pearson, Cynthia R; Evans-Campbell, Tessa A

    2014-10-14

    This study examined associations between alcohol misuse and childhood maltreatment and out-of-home placement among urban lesbian, gay, and bisexual (referred to as two-spirit) American Indian and Alaska Native adults. In a multi-site study, data were obtained from 294 individuals who consumed alcohol during the past year. The results indicated that 72.3% of men and 62.4% of women engaged in hazardous and harmful alcohol use and 50.8% of men and 48.7% of women met criteria for past-year alcohol dependence. The most common types of childhood maltreatment were physical abuse among male drinkers (62.7%) and emotional abuse (71.8%) among female drinkers. Men and women reported high percentages of out-of-home placement (39% and 47%, respectively). Logistic multiple regressions found that for male drinkers boarding school attendance and foster care placement were significant predictors of past-year alcohol dependence. For female drinkers, being adopted was significantly associated with a decreased risk of past-year drinking binge or spree. Dose-response relationships, using number of childhood exposures as a predictor, were not significant. The results highlight the need for alcohol and violence prevention and intervention strategies among urban two-spirit individuals.

  13. Alcohol Misuse and Associations with Childhood Maltreatment and Out-of-Home Placement among Urban Two-Spirit American Indian and Alaska Native People

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Nicole P.; Duran, Bonnie M.; Walters, Karina L.; Pearson, Cynthia R.; Evans-Campbell, Tessa A.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined associations between alcohol misuse and childhood maltreatment and out-of-home placement among urban lesbian, gay, and bisexual (referred to as two-spirit) American Indian and Alaska Native adults. In a multi-site study, data were obtained from 294 individuals who consumed alcohol during the past year. The results indicated that 72.3% of men and 62.4% of women engaged in hazardous and harmful alcohol use and 50.8% of men and 48.7% of women met criteria for past-year alcohol dependence. The most common types of childhood maltreatment were physical abuse among male drinkers (62.7%) and emotional abuse (71.8%) among female drinkers. Men and women reported high percentages of out-of-home placement (39% and 47%, respectively). Logistic multiple regressions found that for male drinkers boarding school attendance and foster care placement were significant predictors of past-year alcohol dependence. For female drinkers, being adopted was significantly associated with a decreased risk of past-year drinking binge or spree. Dose-response relationships, using number of childhood exposures as a predictor, were not significant. The results highlight the need for alcohol and violence prevention and intervention strategies among urban two-spirit individuals. PMID:25317980

  14. Building Alaska's Science and Engineering Pipeline: Evaluation of the Alaska Native Science & Engineering Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Hamutal; Martin, Carlos; Eyster, Lauren; Anderson, Theresa; Owen, Stephanie; Martin-Caughey, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    The Urban Institute conducted an implementation and participant-outcomes evaluation of the Alaska Native Science & Engineering Program (ANSEP). ANSEP is a multi-stage initiative designed to prepare and support Alaska Native students from middle school through graduate school to succeed in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM)…

  15. 76 FR 3120 - Native American and Alaska Native Children in School Program; Office of English Language...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... Native American and Alaska Native Children in School Program; Office of English Language Acquisition, Language Enhancement, and Academic Achievement for Limited English Proficient Students; Overview... Secretary and Director, Office of English Language Acquisition, Language Enhancement, and Academic...

  16. Native Alaskan Dropouts in Western Alaska: Systemic Failure in Native Alaskan Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freed, Craig D.; Samson, Mary

    2004-01-01

    The number of Native Alaska secondary students choosing not to complete high school is of great concern to educators and Native communities. In this study, schools in small communities throughout western Alaska were observed while teachers and dropouts were interviewed concerning their perceptions of the education process. It became very clear…

  17. The Governance, Organization, and Financing of Education for Alaska Natives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dafoe, Don M.

    The history and current status of the governance, organization, and financing of education for Alaska natives are discussed in this report. The first chapter briefly summarizes key factors of geography, environment, economics, and population affecting educational development throughout Alaska's history. Chapter 2 covers the Russian period and the…

  18. Addressing Cancer Disparities Among American Indian and Alaska Native Populations

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer disparities and health equity research is a critical part of NCI’s research portfolio. The three researchers featured in this video receive funding from NCI to conduct research among American Indian and Alaska Native populations.

  19. Relationships between the health of Alaska Native communities and our environment -- phase 1, exploring and communicating

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Durelle

    2013-01-01

    Alaska Natives depend on local natural resources for nutritional and, for many, spiritual health. As a result, public health in Alaska is strongly influenced by the relationship between people and their surrounding physical, chemical, and biological environments. Alaska is vast with diverse wildlife and plant communities that are valued as subsistence foods (fig. 1). These resources are supported by equally diverse ecosystems and their underpinning landforms and geologies. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is attempting to integrate physical, chemical, and biological information to better describe current (2013) environments and project scenarios for the future. Integrating ecological data into the public health dialogue is challenging for the more than 280 rural communities of Alaska. This fact sheet reviews a recent USGS effort, the Geographic Information System (GIS) Native Health Project, to better incorporate scientific information into such dialogue.

  20. Cost-effectiveness analysis of hepatocellular carcinoma screening by combinations of ultrasound and alpha-fetoprotein among Alaska Native people, 1983-2012.

    PubMed

    Gounder, Prabhu P; Bulkow, Lisa R; Meltzer, Martin I; Bruce, Michael G; Hennessy, Thomas W; Snowball, Mary; Spradling, Philip R; Adhikari, Bishwa B; McMahon, Brian J

    2016-01-01

    The American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) recommends semi-annual hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) screening using ultrasound (US) in persons with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) virus infection at high risk for HCC such as Asian males aged ≥40 years and Asian females aged ≥50 years. To analyse the cost-effectiveness of 2 HCC screening methods in the Alaska Native (AN) health system: US-alone, or screening by alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) initially and switching to US for subsequent screenings if AFP >10 ng/mL (AFP→US). A spreadsheet-based model was developed for accounting the costs of 2 hypothetical HCC screening methods. We used epidemiologic data from a cohort of 839 AN persons with CHB who were offered HCC screening by AFP/US semi-annually during 1983-2012. We assumed that compared with AFP→US, US-alone identifies 33% more tumours at an early stage (defined as a single tumour ≤5 cm or ≤3 tumours ≤3 cm in diameter). Years of life gained (YLG) attributed to screening was estimated by comparing additional years of survival among persons with early- compared with late-stage tumours. Screening costs were calculated using Medicare reimbursement rates in 2012. Future screening costs and YLG were projected over a 30-year time horizon using a 3% discount rate. The total cost of screening for the cohort by AFP→US would have been approximately $357,000 ($36,000/early-stage tumour detected) compared to $814,000 ($59,000/early-stage tumour detected) by US-alone. The AFP→US method would have yielded an additional 27.8 YLG ($13,000/YLG) compared with 38.9 YLG ($21,000/YLG) for US-alone. Screening by US-alone would incur an additional $114,000 per extra early-tumour detected compared with AFP→US and $41,000 per extra YLG. Although US-alone HCC screening might have yielded more YLG than AFP→US, the reduced costs of the AFP→US method could expand access to HCC screening in resource constrained settings.

  1. A Process Evaluation of the Alaska Native Colorectal Cancer Family Outreach Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redwood, Diana; Provost, Ellen; Lopez, Ellen D. S.; Skewes, Monica; Johnson, Rhonda; Christensen, Claudia; Sacco, Frank; Haverkamp, Donald

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the results of a process evaluation of the Alaska Native (AN) Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Family Outreach Program, which encourages CRC screening among AN first-degree relatives (i.e., parents, siblings, adult children; hereafter referred to as relatives) of CRC patients. Among AN people incidence and death rates from CRC are the…

  2. Understanding Disabilities in American Indian and Alaska Native Communities. Toolkit Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Disability, Washington, DC.

    This "toolkit" document is intended to provide a culturally appropriate set of resources to address the unique political and legal concerns of people with disabilities in American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities. It provides information on education, health, vocational rehabilitation (VR), independent living, model approaches, and…

  3. A Process Evaluation of the Alaska Native Colorectal Cancer Family Outreach Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redwood, Diana; Provost, Ellen; Lopez, Ellen D. S.; Skewes, Monica; Johnson, Rhonda; Christensen, Claudia; Sacco, Frank; Haverkamp, Donald

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the results of a process evaluation of the Alaska Native (AN) Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Family Outreach Program, which encourages CRC screening among AN first-degree relatives (i.e., parents, siblings, adult children; hereafter referred to as relatives) of CRC patients. Among AN people incidence and death rates from CRC are the…

  4. Authentic Voices: Advice for Incorporating American Indians and Alaska Natives in the Elementary School Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rains, Frances V.; Swisher, Karen Gayton

    1999-01-01

    Questions the methods in which schools traditionally teach about American Indians and Alaska Natives. Offers alternatives to help eliminate the stereotypes and misconceptions often found in school curricula. Offers four recommendations to help teachers and teacher educators gain more knowledge about these indigenous peoples. (CMK)

  5. 76 FR 22413 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-21

    ...) to Afognak Native Corporation, Successor in Interest to Port Lions Native Corporation. The decision... surface estate is conveyed to Afognak Native Corporation, Successor in Interest to Port Lions...

  6. Tobacco use prevalence--disentangling associations between Alaska Native race, low socio-economic status and rural disparities.

    PubMed

    Dilley, Julia A; Peterson, Erin; Bobo, Matthew; Pickle, Kathryn E; Rohde, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco use rates are exceptionally high among indigenous people in North America. Alaska Native, low socio-economic status (SES) and rural communities are high-priority populations for Alaska's Tobacco Control program. For the purpose of better informing tobacco control interventions, we conducted a descriptive study to describe high-priority groups using prevalence-based and proportion-based approaches. With data from 22,311 adults interviewed for Alaska's 2006-2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), we used stratified analysis and logistic regression models to describe the current use of cigarettes and smokeless tobacco (SLT) (including iq'mik, a unique Alaska Native SLT product) among the 3 populations of interest. "Population segments" were created with combinations of responses for Alaska Native race, SES and community type. We identified the highest prevalence and highest proportion of tobacco users for each type of tobacco by "segment". For cigarette smoking, while the largest proportion (nearly one-third) of the state's smokers are non-Native, high SES and live in urban settings, this group also has lower smoking prevalence than most other groups. Alaska Native, low SES, rural residents had both high smoking prevalence (48%) and represented a large proportion of the state's smokers (nearly 10%). Patterns were similar for SLT, with non-Native high-SES urban residents making up the largest proportion of users despite lower prevalence, and Alaska Native, low SES, rural residents having high prevalence and making up a large proportion of users. For iq'mik use, Alaska Native people in rural settings were both the highest prevalence and proportion of users. While Alaska Native race, low SES status and community of residence can be considered alone when developing tobacco control interventions, creating "population segments" based on combinations of factors may be helpful for tailoring effective tobacco control strategies and messaging. Other

  7. Early Childhood Education in American Indian and Alaska Native Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Alice S.

    The expansion of early childhood education for American Indians and Alaska Natives has reflected the trend in the larger society. While efforts are being made to improve early childhood care and education for all children, deeper issues must be considered by Native Americans. First among them is the long history of forced assimilation and…

  8. American Indian and Alaska Native Cancer Data Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burhansstipanov, Linda; Tenney, Martha J.; Hampton, James W.

    1999-01-01

    Data on cancer among American Indians and Alaska Natives are sparse and riddled with misclassification errors, resulting in underreporting of cancer incidence and mortality. Incidence rates are discussed for various cancer types in seven Native nations. Barriers to participation in cancer prevention and control programs are examined. Contains…

  9. 26 CFR 1.1502-81T - Alaska Native Corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alaska Native Corporations. 1.1502-81T Section... Corporations. (a) General Rule. The application of section 60(b)(5) of the Tax Reform Act of 1984 and section 1804(e)(4) of the Tax Reform Act of 1986 (relating to Native Corporations established under the...

  10. "Our culture is medicine": perspectives of Native healers on posttrauma recovery among American Indian and Alaska Native patients.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Deborah; Tsosie, Ursula; Nannauck, Sweetwater

    2012-01-01

    American Indian and Alaska Native (Native) people experience more traumatic events and are at higher risk for developing posttraumatic stress disorder compared with the general population. We conducted in-depth interviews with six Native healers about their perspectives on traumatic injury and healing. We analyzed the interviews using an inductive approach to identify common themes. We categorized these themes into four categories: causes and consequences of traumatic injury, risk factors, protective factors, and barriers to care. The implications of our study include a need for improving cultural competence among health care and social services personnel working with Native trauma patients. Additional cumulative analyses of Native healers and trauma patients would contribute to a much-needed body of knowledge on improving recovery and promoting healing among Native trauma patients.

  11. Profiles of Native American and/or Alaska Native English Learners (ELs). Fast Facts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of English Language Acquisition, US Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The Office of English Language Acquisition (OELA) has synthesized key data on English learners (ELs) into two-page PDF sheets, by topic, with graphics, plus key contacts. The topics for this report on profiles of Native American and/or Alaska Native English Learners (ELs) include: (1) Largest Percentage of ELs Who Were Native American and/or…

  12. Native Peoples-Native Homelands Climate Change Workshop: Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy G.

    2003-01-01

    The Native Peoples-Native Homelands Climate Change Workshop was held on October 28 through November 01,1998, as part of a series of workshops being held around the U.S. to improve the understanding of the potential consequences of climate variability and change for the Nation. This workshop was specifically designed by Native Peoples to examine the impacts of climate change and extreme weather variability on Native Peoples and Native Homelands from an indigenous cultural and spiritual perspective and to develop recommendations as well as identify potential response actions. The workshop brought together interested Native Peoples, representatives of Tribal governments, traditional elders, Tribal leaders, natural resource managers, Tribal College faculty and students, and climate scientists fiom government agencies and universities. It is clear that Tribal colleges and universities play a unique and critical role in the success of these emerging partnerships for decision-making in addition to the important education function for both Native and non-Native communities such as serving as a culturally-appropriate vehicle for access, analysis, control, and protection of indigenous cultural and intellectual property. During the discussions between scientists and policy-makers from both Native and non-Native communities, a number of important lessons emerged which are key to building more effective partnerships between Native and non-Native communities for collaboration and decision-making for a more sustainable future. This talk summarizes the key issues, recommendations, and lessons learned during this workshop.

  13. Native Peoples-Native Homelands Climate Change Workshop: Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, N. G.

    2003-12-01

    The Native Peoples-Native Homelands Climate Change Workshop was held on October 28 through November 01, 1998, as part of a series of workshops being held around the U.S. to improve the understanding of the potential consequences of climate variability and change for the Nation. This workshop was specifically designed by Native Peoples to examine the impacts of climate change and extreme weather variability on Native Peoples and Native Homelands from an indigenous cultural and spiritual perspective and to develop recommendations as well as identify potential response actions. The workshop brought together interested Native Peoples, representatives of Tribal governments, traditional elders, Tribal leaders, natural resource managers, Tribal College faculty and students, and climate scientists from government agencies and universities. It is clear that Tribal colleges and universities play a unique and critical role in the success of these emerging partnerships for decision-making in addition to the important education function for both Native and non-Native communities such as serving as a culturally- appropriate vehicle for access, analysis, control, and protection of indigenous cultural and intellectual property. During the discussions between scientists and policy-makers from both Native and non-Native communities, a number of important lessons emerged which are key to building more effective partnerships between Native and non-Native communities for collaboration and decision-making for a more sustainable future. This talk summarizes the key issues, recommendations, and lessons learned during this workshop.

  14. Native Peoples-Native Homelands Climate Change Workshop: Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy G.

    2003-01-01

    The Native Peoples-Native Homelands Climate Change Workshop was held on October 28 through November 01,1998, as part of a series of workshops being held around the U.S. to improve the understanding of the potential consequences of climate variability and change for the Nation. This workshop was specifically designed by Native Peoples to examine the impacts of climate change and extreme weather variability on Native Peoples and Native Homelands from an indigenous cultural and spiritual perspective and to develop recommendations as well as identify potential response actions. The workshop brought together interested Native Peoples, representatives of Tribal governments, traditional elders, Tribal leaders, natural resource managers, Tribal College faculty and students, and climate scientists fiom government agencies and universities. It is clear that Tribal colleges and universities play a unique and critical role in the success of these emerging partnerships for decision-making in addition to the important education function for both Native and non-Native communities such as serving as a culturally-appropriate vehicle for access, analysis, control, and protection of indigenous cultural and intellectual property. During the discussions between scientists and policy-makers from both Native and non-Native communities, a number of important lessons emerged which are key to building more effective partnerships between Native and non-Native communities for collaboration and decision-making for a more sustainable future. This talk summarizes the key issues, recommendations, and lessons learned during this workshop.

  15. Use of online health information resources by American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    PubMed

    Geana, Mugur V; Daley, Christine Makosky; Nazir, Niaman; Cully, Lance; Etheridge, Jesse; Bledowski, Caroline; Choi, Won S; Greiner, K Allen

    2012-08-01

    According to the Office of Minority Health, an estimated 4.9 million people living in the United States consider themselves American Indian or Alaska Native, either alone or in combination with one or more races/ethnicities. American Indians or Alaska Natives comprise a racial/ethnic group experiencing serious health disparities, with little if any improvement in health outcomes over the past several decades. This study was designed to explore use of the Internet as a health information source among American Indians in the Central Plains region of the United States. The authors recruited 998 Natives in the region from May 2008 to December 2009 at powwows, health fairs, focus groups, career fairs and conferences, and other social and cultural events, and asked them to complete a self-administered survey. Although compared with data from the general population, American Indians or Alaska Natives in this sample may seem to be more frequent Internet users, their use of modern wireless devices is limited, and their use of the Internet to access health information is lower in comparison with the adult U.S. population. Natives living in the Central Plains region face generational differences in general and health-related use of the Internet. Inadequate availability of culturally appropriate health information websites may drive American Indians or Alaska Natives toward search engines and general information websites.

  16. The decrease in the unintentional injury mortality disparity between American Indians/Alaska Natives and non-American Indians/Alaska Natives in New Mexico, 1980 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Glenda; Pokhrel, Pallavi; Nielsen, Larry; Landen, Michael

    2013-04-01

    We tracked the unintentional injury death disparity between American Indians/Alaska Natives and non-American Indians/Alaska Natives in New Mexico, 1980 to 2009. We calculated age-adjusted rates and rate ratios for unintentional injury deaths and their external causes among American Indians/Alaska Natives and non-American Indians/Alaska Natives. We tested trend significance with the Mann-Kendall test. The unintentional injury death rate ratio of American Indians/Alaska Natives to non-American Indians/Alaska Natives declined from 2.9 in 1980-1982 to 1.5 in 2007-2009. The rate among American Indians/Alaska Natives decreased 47.2% from 1980-1982 to 1995-1997. Among non-American Indians/Alaska Natives, the rate declined 25.3% from 1980-1982 to 1992-1994, then increased 31.9% from 1992-1994 to 2007-2009. The motor vehicle traffic and pedestrian death rates decreased 57.8% and 74.6%, respectively, among American Indians/Alaska Natives from 1980-1982 to 2007-2009. The unintentional injury death rate disparity decreased substantially from 1980-1982 to 2007-2009 largely because of the decrease in motor vehicle crash and pedestrian death rates among American Indians/Alaska Natives and the increase in the poisoning death rate among non-American Indians/Alaska Natives.

  17. The Decrease in the Unintentional Injury Mortality Disparity Between American Indians/Alaska Natives and Non–American Indians/Alaska Natives in New Mexico, 1980 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    Pokhrel, Pallavi; Nielsen, Larry; Landen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We tracked the unintentional injury death disparity between American Indians/Alaska Natives and non–American Indians/Alaska Natives in New Mexico, 1980 to 2009. Methods. We calculated age-adjusted rates and rate ratios for unintentional injury deaths and their external causes among American Indians/Alaska Natives and non–American Indians/Alaska Natives. We tested trend significance with the Mann–Kendall test. Results. The unintentional injury death rate ratio of American Indians/Alaska Natives to non–American Indians/Alaska Natives declined from 2.9 in 1980–1982 to 1.5 in 2007–2009. The rate among American Indians/Alaska Natives decreased 47.2% from 1980–1982 to 1995–1997. Among non–American Indians/Alaska Natives, the rate declined 25.3% from 1980–1982 to 1992–1994, then increased 31.9% from 1992–1994 to 2007–2009. The motor vehicle traffic and pedestrian death rates decreased 57.8% and 74.6%, respectively, among American Indians/Alaska Natives from 1980–1982 to 2007–2009. Conclusions. The unintentional injury death rate disparity decreased substantially from 1980–1982 to 2007–2009 largely because of the decrease in motor vehicle crash and pedestrian death rates among American Indians/Alaska Natives and the increase in the poisoning death rate among non–American Indians/Alaska Natives. PMID:22994193

  18. 76 FR 3156 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ..., Alaska, and are located in: Seward Meridian, Alaska T. 26 N., R. 47 W., Sec. 3, those lands formerly...., R. 47 W., Sec. 34, those lands formerly within mining claim recordations AA-32360, AA-32361, and AA... Land Management by phone at 907-271-5960, by e-mail at ak.blm.conveyance@blm.gov , or by...

  19. 76 FR 38678 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... vicinity of Port Heiden, Alaska, and are located in: Seward Meridian, Alaska T. 40 S., R. 57 W., ] Secs. 18... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: The BLM by phone at 907-271-5960 or by e-mail at ak.blm.conveyance@blm.gov...

  20. 78 FR 76318 - Alaska Native Claims Selections

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-17

    ... Island, Alaska, and aggregate 45.57 acres. Notice of the decision will also be published once a week for..., Alaska State Office, 222 West Seventh Avenue, 13, Anchorage, AK 99513-7504. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: The BLM by phone at 907-271-5960 or by email at blm_ak_akso_public_room@blm.gov . Persons who use...

  1. The Way of the Human Being: Supporting Alaska Native Families Who Have a Child with a Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Susan; Murphy, Blanche; Harvey, Sandra; Nygren, Kristin; Kinavey, Erin; Ongtooguk, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Alaska Native peoples refer to themselves and their way of life as the "way of the human being" (Napolean, 1991). This term, referred to as "Yuuyaraq" by the Yup'ik Eskimo, speaks to the value the Yup'ik and other Alaskan Natives place on being fully human. Within the context of the "way of the human life," how can…

  2. Use of Large-Scale Data Sets to Study Educational Pathways of American Indian and Alaska Native Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faircloth, Susan C.; Alcantar, Cynthia M.; Stage, Frances K.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter discusses issues and challenges encountered in using large-scale data sets to study educational experiences and subsequent outcomes for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) students. In this chapter, we argue that the linguistic and cultural diversity of Native peoples, coupled with the legal and political ways in which education…

  3. Use of Large-Scale Data Sets to Study Educational Pathways of American Indian and Alaska Native Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faircloth, Susan C.; Alcantar, Cynthia M.; Stage, Frances K.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter discusses issues and challenges encountered in using large-scale data sets to study educational experiences and subsequent outcomes for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) students. In this chapter, we argue that the linguistic and cultural diversity of Native peoples, coupled with the legal and political ways in which education…

  4. Time for Change in the Education of Alaska Natives: A Statement of Preliminary Findings and Recommendations Relating to the Education of Alaska Natives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska Governor's Commission on Cross-Cultural Education, Juneau.

    The study presents findings and recommendations regarding education of Alaska natives (Eskimos, Indians, and Aleuts). The paper was prepared for the governor of Alaska by the Commission on Cross-Cultural Education of Alaska, which was designed to find ways to provide new meaning to education for Alaska's multicultural society and to provide…

  5. Time for Change in the Education of Alaska Natives: A Statement of Preliminary Findings and Recommendations Relating to the Education of Alaska Natives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska Governor's Commission on Cross-Cultural Education, Juneau.

    The study presents findings and recommendations regarding education of Alaska natives (Eskimos, Indians, and Aleuts). The paper was prepared for the governor of Alaska by the Commission on Cross-Cultural Education of Alaska, which was designed to find ways to provide new meaning to education for Alaska's multicultural society and to provide…

  6. Encephalitis-Associated Hospitalizations among American Indians and Alaska Natives

    PubMed Central

    Mehal, Jason M.; Holman, Robert C.; Vora, Neil M.; Blanton, Jesse; Gordon, Paul H.; Cheek, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Encephalitis produces considerable morbidity in the United States, but morbidity rates among American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) people have not been described. Hospitalization records listing an encephalitis diagnosis were analyzed by using Indian Health Service direct/contract inpatient data. For 1998–2010, there were 436 encephalitis-associated hospitalizations among AI/AN people, an average annual age-adjusted hospitalization rate of 3.1/100,000 population. The rate for infants (11.9) was more than double that for any other age group. Death occurred for 4.1% of hospitalizations. Consistent with reports for the general U.S. population, the rate was high among infants and most (53.9%) hospitalizations were of unexplained etiology. The average annual rate during the study period appeared lower than for the general U.S. population, due particularly to lower rates in the elderly. Future community-based surveillance and mortality studies are needed to confirm these findings and examine reasons underlying the low rates of encephalitis in AI/AN people. PMID:24515941

  7. 76 FR 67472 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ... lands are located east of Teller, Alaska, and contain 47.87 acres. Notice of the decision will also be... email at ak.blm.conveyance@blm.gov . Persons who use a Telecommunications Device for the Deaf (TDD) may...

  8. 78 FR 53158 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ...) to Sea Lion Corporation. The decision approves the surface estate in the lands described below for... Lion Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Hooper Bay, Alaska, and are located in:...

  9. Adipose tissue triglyceride fatty acids and atherosclerosis in Alaska Natives and non-Natives.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Joe; Middaugh, John; Boudreau, Donald; Malcom, Gray; Parry, Steve; Tracy, Richard; Newman, William

    2005-08-01

    Essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) of the omega-3 family are believed to protect against cardiovascular disease. A rich source of omega-3 PUFA is found in fish and marine mammals (seal, walrus, whale), which are a large part of the traditional diet of Alaska Natives (Eskimo, American Indians, Aleuts), a group that has been reported to have a lower mortality rate from cardiovascular disease than non-Natives. An autopsy study using standardized methods to evaluate the extent of atherosclerosis and its risk factors, and analyses of stored triglyceride fatty acids was conducted in a sample of Alaska Native subjects and non-Native subjects living in Alaska. Findings indicate that Alaska Natives had less advanced atherosclerosis in coronary arteries, along with higher proportions of omega-3 and lower proportions of omega-6 PUFA in adipose tissue, than did non-Natives. We conclude that high dietary intake of omega-3 PUFA may account for the lower extent of coronary artery atherosclerosis, contributing to the reported lower heart disease mortality among Alaska Natives.

  10. 33 CFR 203.16 - Federally recognized Indian Tribes and the Alaska Native Corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Tribes and the Alaska Native Corporations. 203.16 Section 203.16 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF..., NATURAL DISASTER PROCEDURES Introduction § 203.16 Federally recognized Indian Tribes and the Alaska Native... on lands of the Alaska Natives, may be submitted to the Corps directly by the affected federally...

  11. 33 CFR 203.16 - Federally recognized Indian Tribes and the Alaska Native Corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Tribes and the Alaska Native Corporations. 203.16 Section 203.16 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF..., NATURAL DISASTER PROCEDURES Introduction § 203.16 Federally recognized Indian Tribes and the Alaska Native... on lands of the Alaska Natives, may be submitted to the Corps directly by the affected federally...

  12. 33 CFR 203.16 - Federally recognized Indian Tribes and the Alaska Native Corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Tribes and the Alaska Native Corporations. 203.16 Section 203.16 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF..., NATURAL DISASTER PROCEDURES Introduction § 203.16 Federally recognized Indian Tribes and the Alaska Native... on lands of the Alaska Natives, may be submitted to the Corps directly by the affected federally...

  13. 33 CFR 203.16 - Federally recognized Indian Tribes and the Alaska Native Corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Tribes and the Alaska Native Corporations. 203.16 Section 203.16 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF..., NATURAL DISASTER PROCEDURES Introduction § 203.16 Federally recognized Indian Tribes and the Alaska Native... on lands of the Alaska Natives, may be submitted to the Corps directly by the affected federally...

  14. 36 CFR 219.15 - Interaction with American Indian tribes and Alaska Natives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Indian tribes and Alaska Natives. 219.15 Section 219.15 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST... Collaborative Planning for Sustainability § 219.15 Interaction with American Indian tribes and Alaska Natives... recognized American Indian tribes and Alaska Natives. (b) During planning, the responsible official must...

  15. 33 CFR 203.16 - Federally recognized Indian Tribes and the Alaska Native Corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Tribes and the Alaska Native Corporations. 203.16 Section 203.16 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF..., NATURAL DISASTER PROCEDURES Introduction § 203.16 Federally recognized Indian Tribes and the Alaska Native... on lands of the Alaska Natives, may be submitted to the Corps directly by the affected federally...

  16. 36 CFR 219.15 - Interaction with American Indian tribes and Alaska Natives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Collaborative Planning for Sustainability § 219.15 Interaction with American Indian tribes and Alaska Natives... recognized American Indian tribes and Alaska Natives. (b) During planning, the responsible official must consider the government-to-government relationship between American Indian or Alaska Native...

  17. Institutional innovation in less than ideal conditions: management of commons by an Alaska Native village corporation

    Treesearch

    Dixie Dayo; Gary Kofinas

    2010-01-01

    Alaska Natives have experienced less than ideal conditions for engaging in management of their homeland commons. During the first 100 years after the Treaty of Cession of 1867, Alaska Natives received limited recognition by the United States. The Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act of 1971 (ANCSA) was signed into law by President Richard Nixon after tedious...

  18. 76 FR 75899 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... Chignik Lagoon Native Corporation. The decision approves the surface estate in the lands described below... is conveyed to Chignik Lagoon Native Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Chignik Lagoon...

  19. 78 FR 70956 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Assessment of Native American, Alaska Native...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ..., Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Housing Needs AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer, HUD... Housing Needs. OMB Approval Number: 2528-0288. Type of Request: Revision of a currently approved collection. Form Number: None. Description of the need for the information and proposed use: The...

  20. Cultural Diversity and the Experiences of Alaska Native Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmon, Margaret E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this ethnonursing research study was to discover, describe, and systematically analyze the care expressions, practices, and patterns of Alaska Native nurses within the context of their nursing school experience. The goals of this study were to identify generic and professional care factors that promote the academic success of Alaska…

  1. Bibliography of Educational Publications for Alaska Native Languages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGary, Jane, Comp.

    Both Indian and Eskimo-Aleut languages are covered in this annotated bibliography of Alaska native languages. Listings for each language are broken down into general works, reference works, materials on bilingual education where there are any available, and educational materials. In many cases the last category is extensive enough to require…

  2. American Indian & Alaska Native Sources of Health Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Minority Health (PHS/DHHS), Washington, DC.

    This brief directory lists 28 agencies providing culturally sensitive printed health materials for American Indians and Alaska Natives. Each entry provides the agency's address; telephone number; fax number; and annotated titles available, with price. Many materials are free. There is also a subject index with these categories: adolescent…

  3. Alaska Native Community Energy Planning and Projects (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-06-01

    This fact sheet provides information on the Alaska Native villages selected to receive assistance from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy 2013 Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program, which provides technical expertise to support the development of next-generation energy projects on tribal lands.

  4. Cultural Diversity and the Experiences of Alaska Native Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmon, Margaret E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this ethnonursing research study was to discover, describe, and systematically analyze the care expressions, practices, and patterns of Alaska Native nurses within the context of their nursing school experience. The goals of this study were to identify generic and professional care factors that promote the academic success of Alaska…

  5. Cancer Prevention and Control in American Indians/Alaska Natives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, James W.

    1992-01-01

    Examines differences among American Indian tribes and Alaska Natives with regard to incidence and mortality rates for various types of cancer, particularly lung, cervix, breast, biliary, gastric, colorectal, prostate, and primary hepatic cancer. Discusses the influence of genetic and environmental factors, smoking, and inadequate medical…

  6. Source Document of Urban American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Urban Indian Council, Denver, CO.

    A source document on American Indians and Alaska Natives in urban areas, produced by the National Urban Indian Council, provides historical background on relocation to cities, comments on the trust relationship for off-reservation American Indians, discusses urban Indian organizations, and gives statistical information on American Indian…

  7. Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Argonne National Laboratory's Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students. Supported by the Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) in partnership with the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  8. Resource Guide of American Indian and Alaska Native Women, 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Owanah P., Comp.; Verble, Sedelta D., Comp.

    A resource listing of 678 prominent American Indian and Alaska Native women representing 159 tribes throughout the United States provides the following information: name, address, date and place of birth, tribal membership, field of interest, current occupation, Indian activities, women's advocacy, educational background and professional interest.…

  9. Cancer Prevention and Control in American Indians/Alaska Natives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, James W.

    1992-01-01

    Examines differences among American Indian tribes and Alaska Natives with regard to incidence and mortality rates for various types of cancer, particularly lung, cervix, breast, biliary, gastric, colorectal, prostate, and primary hepatic cancer. Discusses the influence of genetic and environmental factors, smoking, and inadequate medical…

  10. Alcohol Problems in Alaska Natives: Lessons from the Inuit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seale, J. Paul; Shellenberger, Sylvia; Spence, John

    2006-01-01

    In this Alaska Native study, cultural "insiders" analyzed problems associated with increased alcohol availability, factors which have reduced alcohol-related problems, and ideas for improving treatment in an Inuit community. Participants described frequent bingeing, blackouts, family violence, suicide, loss of child custody, and feelings…

  11. Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students

    SciTech Connect

    2010-03-05

    Argonne National Laboratory's Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students. Supported by the Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) in partnership with the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  12. 50 CFR 17.5 - Alaska natives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., POSSESSION, TRANSPORTATION, SALE, PURCHASE, BARTER, EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) ENDANGERED AND THREATENED WILDLIFE AND PLANTS Introduction and General Provisions § 17.5 Alaska... accomplished in a wasteful manner. (b) Edible portions of endangered or threatened wildlife taken or imported...

  13. 50 CFR 17.5 - Alaska natives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., POSSESSION, TRANSPORTATION, SALE, PURCHASE, BARTER, EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) ENDANGERED AND THREATENED WILDLIFE AND PLANTS Introduction and General Provisions § 17.5 Alaska... accomplished in a wasteful manner. (b) Edible portions of endangered or threatened wildlife taken or imported...

  14. 50 CFR 17.5 - Alaska natives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., POSSESSION, TRANSPORTATION, SALE, PURCHASE, BARTER, EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) ENDANGERED AND THREATENED WILDLIFE AND PLANTS Introduction and General Provisions § 17.5 Alaska... accomplished in a wasteful manner. (b) Edible portions of endangered or threatened wildlife taken or imported...

  15. 50 CFR 17.5 - Alaska natives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., POSSESSION, TRANSPORTATION, SALE, PURCHASE, BARTER, EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) ENDANGERED AND THREATENED WILDLIFE AND PLANTS Introduction and General Provisions § 17.5 Alaska... accomplished in a wasteful manner. (b) Edible portions of endangered or threatened wildlife taken or imported...

  16. 78 FR 64002 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... from: Bureau of Land Management, Alaska State Office, 222 West Seventh Avenue, 13, Anchorage, AK 99513... addition, the FIRS is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to leave a message or question with the BLM...

  17. 75 FR 2154 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-14

    ... also be published four times in the Tundra Drums. DATES: The time limits for filing an appeal are: 1. Any party claiming a property interest which is adversely affected by the decision shall have until.... ADDRESSES: A copy of the decision may be obtained from: Bureau of Land Management, Alaska State Office,...

  18. 77 FR 24217 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-23

    ... for conveyance lie partially within the Clarence Rhode National Wildlife Range in existence on the... lands are in the vicinity of Kotlik, Alaska and are described as: Lands within the Clarence Rhode... the Clarence Rhode National Wildlife Range (Public Land Order No. 4589), now known as the Yukon...

  19. 5 CFR 5501.103 - Gifts from federally recognized Indian tribes or Alaska Native villages or regional or village...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... tribes or Alaska Native villages or regional or village corporations. 5501.103 Section 5501.103... tribes or Alaska Native villages or regional or village corporations. (a) Tribal or Alaska Native gifts... Indian tribes or Alaska Native villages or regional or village corporations, provided that the...

  20. 5 CFR 5501.103 - Gifts from federally recognized Indian tribes or Alaska Native villages or regional or village...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... tribes or Alaska Native villages or regional or village corporations. 5501.103 Section 5501.103... tribes or Alaska Native villages or regional or village corporations. (a) Tribal or Alaska Native gifts... Indian tribes or Alaska Native villages or regional or village corporations, provided that the...

  1. 5 CFR 5501.103 - Gifts from federally recognized Indian tribes or Alaska Native villages or regional or village...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... tribes or Alaska Native villages or regional or village corporations. 5501.103 Section 5501.103... tribes or Alaska Native villages or regional or village corporations. (a) Tribal or Alaska Native gifts... Indian tribes or Alaska Native villages or regional or village corporations, provided that the...

  2. 5 CFR 5501.103 - Gifts from federally recognized Indian tribes or Alaska Native villages or regional or village...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... tribes or Alaska Native villages or regional or village corporations. 5501.103 Section 5501.103... tribes or Alaska Native villages or regional or village corporations. (a) Tribal or Alaska Native gifts... Indian tribes or Alaska Native villages or regional or village corporations, provided that the...

  3. 5 CFR 5501.103 - Gifts from federally recognized Indian tribes or Alaska Native villages or regional or village...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... tribes or Alaska Native villages or regional or village corporations. 5501.103 Section 5501.103... tribes or Alaska Native villages or regional or village corporations. (a) Tribal or Alaska Native gifts... Indian tribes or Alaska Native villages or regional or village corporations, provided that the...

  4. The Relationship between Academic and Practical Intelligence: A Case Study of the Tacit Knowledge of Native American Yup'ik People in Alaska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grigorenko, Elena L.; Meier, Elisa; Lipka, Jerry; Mohatt, Gerald; Yanez, Evelyn; Sternberg, Robert J.

    A growing body of empirical data suggests that there may be a true psychological distinction between academic and practical intelligence. If there is, then conventional ability tests used alone may reveal substantially less than we want to know about people's competence in everyday practical situations. Evidence to this effect is reviewed from…

  5. Cancer Education Resources for American Indians and Alaska Natives. Supplement to Native American Monograph No. 1: Documentation of the Cancer Research Needs of American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burhansstipanov, Linda, Comp.; Barry, Kathleen Cooleen, Comp.

    This directory provides information on cancer education materials that have been developed specifically for American Indians and Alaska Natives. The goal is to develop and implement culturally appropriate cancer prevention and control programs for Native Americans. The directory includes a matrix of cancer education materials that identifies…

  6. 20 CFR 668.100 - What is the purpose of the programs established to serve Native American peoples (INA programs...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...? 668.100 Section 668.100 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Policies § 668.100 What is the purpose of the programs established to serve Native American peoples (INA... support comprehensive employment and training activities for Indian, Alaska Native and Native...

  7. 76 FR 3156 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... to Bristol Bay Native Corporation when the surface estate is conveyed to Oceanside Corporation. The... times in the Bristol Bay Times. DATES: Any party claiming a property interest in the lands affected...

  8. Ethnic identity, drinking motives, and alcohol consequences among Alaska Native and non-Native college students.

    PubMed

    Skewes, Monica C; Blume, Arthur W

    2015-01-01

    This research involves the examination of drinking motives, alcohol consequences, and ethnic identity in a sample of Native and non-Native college student drinkers in Alaska. Although more Alaska Native students are abstinent from alcohol compared to any other ethnic group, Native students who do drink experience greater alcohol consequences and dependence symptoms. Therefore, we attempted to examine the influence of ethnic identity on alcohol consequences in a diverse sample of Native and non-Native students in Alaska. Findings showed that drinking motives, as measured by the Drinking Motives Questionnaire (social, coping, enhancement, and conformity), significantly predicted alcohol consequences after controlling for frequency of monthly binge drinking. In addition, after controlling for depression, binge drinking, and drinking motives, one aspect of ethnic identity (Affirmation, Belonging, and Commitment) was significantly negatively related to alcohol consequences, whereas another aspect of ethnic identity (Ethnic Identity Search) was not. Taken together, these findings suggest that interventions for college student alcohol misuse that target Native students should be culturally grounded and focused on enhancing the Affirmation, Belonging, and Commitment to one's ethnic heritage and should address drinking motives, especially drinking to cope, as a way to reduce alcohol related harm.

  9. Alaska sentinel surveillance study of Helicobacter pylori isolates from Alaska Native persons from 2000 to 2008.

    PubMed

    Tveit, Adrienne H; Bruce, Michael G; Bruden, Dana L; Morris, Julie; Reasonover, Alisa; Hurlburt, Debby A; Hennessy, Thomas W; McMahon, Brian

    2011-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is more common in Alaska Native persons than in the general U.S. population, with seroprevalence to H. pylori approaching 75%. Previous studies in Alaska have demonstrated elevated proportions of antimicrobial resistance among H. pylori isolates. We analyzed H. pylori data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's sentinel surveillance in Alaska from January 2000 to December 2008 to determine the proportion of culture-positive biopsy specimens with antimicrobial resistance from Alaska Native persons undergoing endoscopy. The aim of the present study was to monitor antimicrobial resistance of H. pylori isolates over time and by region in Alaska Native persons. Susceptibility testing of H. pylori isolates to metronidazole, clarithromycin, amoxicillin, and tetracycline was performed using agar dilution. Susceptibility testing for levofloxacin was performed by Etest. Overall, 45% (532/1,181) of persons undergoing upper endoscopy were culture positive for H. pylori. Metronidazole resistance was demonstrated in isolates from 222/531 (42%) persons, clarithromycin resistance in 159/531 (30%) persons, amoxicillin resistance in 10/531 (2%) persons, and levofloxacin resistance in 30/155 (19%) persons; no tetracycline resistance was documented. The prevalence of metronidazole, clarithromycin, and levofloxacin resistance varied by region. Female patients were more likely than male patients to demonstrate metronidazole (P < 0.05) and clarithromycin (P < 0.05) resistance. No substantial change in the proportion of persons with resistant isolates was observed over time. Resistance to metronidazole, clarithromycin, and levofloxacin is more common among H. pylori isolates from Alaska Native persons than those from elsewhere in the United States.

  10. American Indian-Alaska Native Youth Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blum, Robert W.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Surveyed 13,454 rural Native American adolescents. Found 2 percent reported poor physical health and high rates of health-compromising behaviors, which were significantly correlated with physical or sexual abuse, suicide attempts, substance abuse, poor school performance, and poor nutrition. Academic risk was strongly associated with physical,…

  11. We Have the Power to Prevent Diabetes: Tips for American Indians & Alaska Natives

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Asian Americans & Pacific Islanders) We Have the Power to Prevent Diabetes: Tips for American Indians & Alaska ... Indians and Alaska Natives, and we have the power to prevent type 2 diabetes. Science has proven ...

  12. Systems of Education for the Alaska Native Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darnell, Frank

    A history clearly unlike any other region in the U.S., an indigenous population with unique cultural patterns, and a physical environment that can only be described with positive and negative superlatives, have all combined to influence the making of a complex tripartite educational system for a large portion of Alaska's people. Two parts of the…

  13. Autoimmune hepatitis in the Alaska Native population: autoantibody profile and HLA associations.

    PubMed

    Ferucci, Elizabeth D; Choromanski, Tammy L; Hurlburt, Kathy J; Livingston, Stephen; Plotnik, Julia; Manns, Michael P; McMahon, Brian J; James, Judith A

    2014-09-01

    The Alaska Native population is one of few populations in the world with a high prevalence of autoimmune hepatitis. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency and HLA and clinical associations of autoantibodies in Alaska Native people with autoimmune hepatitis. Alaska Native individuals with autoimmune hepatitis were recruited in clinics conducted statewide. Sera were tested for the presence of autoantibodies described in either autoimmune hepatitis or rheumatic disease. Associations between autoantibodies and HLA alleles and clinical features were assessed. Seventy-one patients were included. At the study visit, 34 patients (47.9%) had antibodies to double-stranded DNA by immunofluorescence; 27 (38.0%) had anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies; and 11 (15.5%) had anti-Ro antibodies. Only one person had antibodies against soluble liver antigen, and in that person, anti-Ro was absent. Associations were found between autoantibodies and HLA alleles, including positive associations between HLA DR3 and anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies and between HLA DR14 and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies. There was no association between autoantibodies and clinical outcomes. As in other populations, the prevalence of anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies is high in Alaska Native people with autoimmune hepatitis. In contrast to data from other populations, there is a lower prevalence of anti-soluble liver antigen and a lack of association between anti-Ro and anti-soluble liver antigen. In addition, the HLA profile and associations with autoantibodies are unique. No clear prognostic implications of autoantibodies have emerged in this population. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Tobacco use prevalence – disentangling associations between Alaska Native race, low socio-economic status and rural disparities

    PubMed Central

    Dilley, Julia A.; Peterson, Erin; Bobo, Matthew; Pickle, Kathryn E.; Rohde, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Background Tobacco use rates are exceptionally high among indigenous people in North America. Alaska Native, low socio-economic status (SES) and rural communities are high-priority populations for Alaska's Tobacco Control program. Design For the purpose of better informing tobacco control interventions, we conducted a descriptive study to describe high-priority groups using prevalence-based and proportion-based approaches. Methods With data from 22,311 adults interviewed for Alaska's 2006–2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), we used stratified analysis and logistic regression models to describe the current use of cigarettes and smokeless tobacco (SLT) (including iq'mik, a unique Alaska Native SLT product) among the 3 populations of interest. Results “Population segments” were created with combinations of responses for Alaska Native race, SES and community type. We identified the highest prevalence and highest proportion of tobacco users for each type of tobacco by “segment”. For cigarette smoking, while the largest proportion (nearly one-third) of the state's smokers are non-Native, high SES and live in urban settings, this group also has lower smoking prevalence than most other groups. Alaska Native, low SES, rural residents had both high smoking prevalence (48%) and represented a large proportion of the state's smokers (nearly 10%). Patterns were similar for SLT, with non-Native high-SES urban residents making up the largest proportion of users despite lower prevalence, and Alaska Native, low SES, rural residents having high prevalence and making up a large proportion of users. For iq'mik use, Alaska Native people in rural settings were both the highest prevalence and proportion of users. Conclusion While Alaska Native race, low SES status and community of residence can be considered alone when developing tobacco control interventions, creating “population segments” based on combinations of factors may be helpful for tailoring

  15. Obesity and sexual abuse in American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    PubMed

    Levine, James A; McCrady-Spitzer, Shelly K; Bighorse, William

    2016-08-01

    Mainstream American culture frequently minimizes the prevalence and significance of sexual abuse. Unfortunately, this denial of extensive victimization of women is also present in many underserved populations. In June 2007, Amnesty International released its report on sexual abuse in indigenous women, which states that, "One in three Native American or Alaska Native women will be raped at some point in their lives. Most do not seek justice because they know they will be met with inaction or indifference." This report highlighted an infrequently discussed issue namely, very high levels of sexual abuse in Native American and Alaska Native women. The relationship between sexual abuse and obesity has been delineated in several studies; overall about one quarter to one half of women with high levels of obesity have been sexually abused and it has been postulated that weight-gain serves as an adaptive response for many survivors of sexual abuse. It is also well known in Native American and Alaskan Native women that there is a high prevalence of obesity (about 40% greater than the population average) and that this obesity is associated with a many-fold greater risk of diabetes and increased risks of hypertension, cancer and cardiovascular disease. The link between the concomitantly high rates of sexual abuse and obesity in this population may or may not be partial causality but the issue is nonetheless important. If approaches are to succeed in reversing the trend of increasing levels of obesity in Native American and Alaskan Native women, the high prevalence of sexual abuse will need to be specifically and comprehensively addressed.

  16. Remarks at the Alaska Native Education Summit (Anchorage, AK, November 30, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ongtooguk, Paul

    Remarks of Alaska Native researcher and educator Paul Ongtooguk are presented. Alaska Natives have successfully educated themselves for thousands of years. Along with the promise of preparing students for the future, schools have promoted the idea that Native cultures should be stripped from the minds of children in order to prepare them for a…

  17. Traditional living and cultural ways as protective factors against suicide: perceptions of Alaska Native university students.

    PubMed

    DeCou, Christopher R; Skewes, Monica C; López, Ellen D S

    2013-01-01

    Native peoples living in Alaska have one of the highest rates of suicide in the world. This represents a significant health disparity for indigenous populations living in Alaska. This research was part of a larger study that explored qualitatively the perceptions of Alaska Native university students from rural communities regarding suicide. This analysis explored the resilience that arose from participants' experiences of traditional ways, including subsistence activities. Previous research has indicated the importance of traditional ways in preventing suicide and strengthening communities. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 25 university students who had migrated to Fairbanks, Alaska, from rural Alaskan communities. An interview protocol was developed in collaboration with cultural and community advisors. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Participants were asked specific questions concerning the strengthening of traditional practices towards the prevention of suicide. Transcripts were analysed using the techniques of grounded theory. Participants identified several resilience factors against suicide, including traditional practices and subsistence activities, meaningful community involvement and an active lifestyle. Traditional practices and subsistence activities were perceived to create the context for important relationships, promote healthy living to prevent suicide, contrast with current challenges and transmit important cultural values. Participants considered the strengthening of these traditional ways as important in suicide prevention efforts. However, subsistence and traditional practices were viewed as a diminishing aspect of daily living in rural Alaska. Many college students from rural Alaska have been affected by suicide but are strong enough to cope with such tragic events. Subsistence living and traditional practices were perceived as important social and cultural processes with meaningful lifelong benefits for

  18. Blood Politics, Ethnic Identity, and Racial Misclassification among American Indians and Alaska Natives

    PubMed Central

    Haozous, Emily A.; Strickland, Carolyn J.; Palacios, Janelle F.; Solomon, Teshia G. Arambula

    2014-01-01

    Misclassification of race in medical and mortality records has long been documented as an issue in American Indian/Alaska Native data. Yet, little has been shared in a cohesive narrative which outlines why misclassification of American Indian/Alaska Native identity occurs. The purpose of this paper is to provide a summary of the current state of the science in racial misclassification among American Indians and Alaska Natives. We also provide a historical context on the importance of this problem and describe the ongoing political processes that both affect racial misclassification and contribute to the context of American Indian and Alaska Native identity. PMID:24669226

  19. Blood politics, ethnic identity, and racial misclassification among American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    PubMed

    Haozous, Emily A; Strickland, Carolyn J; Palacios, Janelle F; Solomon, Teshia G Arambula

    2014-01-01

    Misclassification of race in medical and mortality records has long been documented as an issue in American Indian/Alaska Native data. Yet, little has been shared in a cohesive narrative which outlines why misclassification of American Indian/Alaska Native identity occurs. The purpose of this paper is to provide a summary of the current state of the science in racial misclassification among American Indians and Alaska Natives. We also provide a historical context on the importance of this problem and describe the ongoing political processes that both affect racial misclassification and contribute to the context of American Indian and Alaska Native identity.

  20. U.S. Geological Survey Activities Related to American Indians and Alaska Natives: Fiscal Year 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marcus, Susan M.

    2007-01-01

    ), or other Federal agencies. The USGS routinely works with its sister bureaus in the Department of the Interior to provide the scientific information and expertise needed to meet the Department's science priorities. Some USGS activities described in this report are conducted as collateral tasks that result from USGS employees identifying and responding to perceived needs. These endeavors are usually prompted by employee interests and frequently involve educational activities. The education is often a reciprocal learning and teaching experience for USGS employees and for Native participants. Through these activities, USGS employees help to fulfill a mission of the USGS - to demonstrate scientific relevance - while helping their fellow citizens. Increasingly, some of the educational activities are becoming parts of formal USGS projects. USGS employees also take initiative in assisting American Indians and Alaska Natives by participating in several organizations that promote awareness of science career opportunities among Native peoples and help build support and communication networks. One such group is the American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES). USGS employees join this organization on a voluntary basis, bringing the benefits of this expanded network to the USGS, as many employees do with other professional organizations. The studies briefly described in this report span subsistence issues, wildlife health, water quality, mineral resources, monitoring and modeling to gather information and predict what may happen in the future. Although each project description relates to Native Americans in some way, the projects vary widely, including who conducted the work, the goals and products, the duration of the study, and whether it was local or covered a broad area. Each major organizational unit of the USGS has identified an American Indian/Alaska Native liaison. The USGS has a regional organizational structure, with Western, Central,

  1. Native Peoples. A Guide to Reference Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGill Univ., Montreal (Quebec). Libraries.

    This guide from McGill University (Quebec, Canada) emphasizes sources for ethnological research and includes materials reflecting concerns of social anthropology and historical approaches to the study of native peoples. Some government documents and map collections are included. Sources are arranged in the following categories: (1) handbooks and…

  2. Work of the Bureau of Education for the Natives of Alaska. Bulletin, 1925, No. 16

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, William

    1925-01-01

    This bulletin documents the work of the Alaska division of the Bureau of Education. It reports advance sheets for the biennial survey of education, 1922-1924. The Alaska division is required to make provision for the education of the natives of Alaska, extend to them all possible medical relief, train them to self-support, and, so far as possible,…

  3. The relevancy of community-based methods: using diet within Native American and Alaska Native adult populations as an example.

    PubMed

    Fialkowski, Marie K; Okoror, Titilayo A; Boushey, Carol J

    2012-06-01

    The rates of obesity, diabetes, and heart disease in Native Americans and Alaska Natives far exceed that of the general US population. There are many postulating reasons for these excessive rates including the transition from a traditional to a contemporary diet. Although information on the dietary intakes of Native American and Alaska Native communities are limited, there seems to be a consensus that the Native American and Alaska Native diet is high in total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, and sodium. Further information on the diet needs to be attained so that dietary interventions can effectively be implemented in these communities. An approach that is community based is proposed as the best solution to understanding the Native diet and developing culturally tailored interventions to sustainably improve diet. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Dermatology in the North American Indian/Alaska Native population.

    PubMed

    Kryatova, Maria S; Okoye, Ginette A

    2016-02-01

    Dermatology is greatly understudied in the American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) population. This topic deserves attention in light of the changing demographics of the United States and the healthcare disparities faced by AIAN, including access to dermatologic care. In this review, we discuss disorders that are more prevalent or otherwise important in the AIAN population, such as cutaneous malignancies, photodermatoses, acanthosis nigricans, connective tissue disorders, cutaneous infections, hypertrophic scar formation, and Heck's disease. We aim to provide an updated review and increase awareness of the dermatologic needs of the AIAN population.

  5. Advancing suicide prevention research with rural American Indian and Alaska Native populations.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Lisa; Chandler, Michael; Gone, Joseph P; Cwik, Mary; Kirmayer, Laurence J; LaFromboise, Teresa; Brockie, Teresa; O'Keefe, Victoria; Walkup, John; Allen, James

    2015-05-01

    As part of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention's American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) Task Force, a multidisciplinary group of AI/AN suicide research experts convened to outline pressing issues related to this subfield of suicidology. Suicide disproportionately affects Indigenous peoples, and remote Indigenous communities can offer vital and unique insights with relevance to other rural and marginalized groups. Outcomes from this meeting include identifying the central challenges impeding progress in this subfield and a description of promising research directions to yield practical results. These proposed directions expand the alliance's prioritized research agenda and offer pathways to advance the field of suicide research in Indigenous communities and beyond.

  6. Evaluation of the Alaska Native Science & Engineering Program (ANSEP). Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Hamutal; Martin, Carlos; Eyster, Lauren; Anderson, Theresa; Owen, Stephanie; Martin-Caughey, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    The Urban Institute conducted an implementation and participant-outcomes evaluation of the Alaska Native Science & Engineering Program (ANSEP). ANSEP is a multi-stage initiative designed to prepare and support Alaska Native students from middle school through graduate school to succeed in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM)…

  7. The Common Core Initiative, Education Outcomes, and American Indian/Alaska Native Students: Observations and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson-Barber, Sharon; Trumbull, Elise

    2015-01-01

    This monograph explores the ways in which large-scale school reform efforts play out in American Indian/Alaska Native communities and schools, starting from a historical and cultural perspective, and focusing on the translation of research into concrete steps leading to American Indian/Alaska Native student academic success and personal well-being.

  8. "It Was Bad or It Was Good:" Alaska Natives in Past Boarding Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirshberg, Diane

    2008-01-01

    In 2004 and 2005 my colleagues and I gathered information on the boarding school and boarding home experiences of 60 Alaska Native adults who attended boarding schools or participated in the urban boarding home program from the late 1940s through the early 1980s. From the early 1900s to the 1970s Alaska Natives were taken from rural communities…

  9. Village Alaska: One of a Series of Articles on the Native Land Claims.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napoleon, Harold

    As one in a series of eight articles written by different professionals concerned with Alaska Native land claims, this article focuses on the isolated rural village and its problems in understanding and acting upon the provisions of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act of 1972. Designed to stimulate careful political/historical reading and…

  10. Gaps in Data for American Indians and Alaska Natives in the National Healthcare Disparities Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moy, Ernest; Smith, Colleen Ryan; Johansson, Patrik; Andrews, Roxanne

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and quantify gaps in health care data for American Indians and Alaska Natives. Findings indicate that only 42% of measures of health care quality and access tracked in the National Healthcare Disparities Report could be used to assess disparities among American Indians and Alaska Natives. Patient safety data…

  11. Leadership Programs and Alaska Native Perspectives: A Study to Promote University Awareness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Kathryn A.; Fox, Robert M.

    Information for planning a university-sponsored Alaska Native leadership program was derived from a literature review and a review of leadership programs outside Alaska coupled with in-depth interviews with identified Native leaders (N=10 from a list of 90). Among the kinds of programs examined were: a leadership development program; the cultural…

  12. Tobacco use and preferences for wellness programs among health aides and other employees of an Alaska Native Health Corporation in Western Alaska.

    PubMed

    Patten, Christi A; Bronars, Carrie A; Scott, Matthew; Boyer, Rahnia; Lando, Harry; Clark, Matthew M; Resnicow, Kenneth; Decker, Paul A; Brockman, Tabetha A; Roland, Agnes; Hanza, Marcelo

    2017-06-01

    This study assessed health behaviors and preferences for wellness programs among employees of a worksite serving Alaska Native-people. Village-based Community Health Aides/Practitioners (CHA/Ps) were compared with all other employees on health indicators and program preferences. Using a cross-sectional design, all 1290 employees at the Yukon Kuskokwim Health Corporation (YKHC) in Western Alaska were invited in 2015 to participate in a 30-item online survey. Items assessed health behaviors, perceived stress, resiliency, and preferences for wellness topics and program delivery formats. Respondents (n = 429) were 77% female and 57% Alaska Natives. CHA/Ps (n = 46) were more likely than all other employees (n = 383) to currently use tobacco (59% vs. 36%; p = 0.003). After adjusting for covariates, greater stress levels were associated (p = 0.013) with increased likelihood of tobacco use. Employees reported lower than recommended levels of physical activity; 74% had a Body Mass Index (BMI) indicating overweight or obese. Top preferences for wellness topics were for eating healthy (55%), physical activity (50%), weight loss (49%), reducing stress (49%), and better sleep (41%). CHA/Ps reported greater interest in tobacco cessation than did other employees (37% vs. 21%; p = 0.016). Preferred program delivery format among employees was in-person (51%). The findings are important because tailored wellness programs have not been previously evaluated among employees of worksites serving Alaska Native people. Promoting healthy lifestyles among CHAP/s and other YKHC employees could ultimately have downstream effects on the health of Alaska Native patients and communities.

  13. History of NASA/Native People Native Homelands Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy

    2000-01-01

    This workshop is one of the follow-on local assessment activities from the US National Assessment on the Impact of Climate Change on the US. N. Maynard (for NASA) helped create and get under way an initiative which brought together climate change scientists from around the US with Native Americans to bring together classic Western European scientists with knowledge from native peoples - from such sources as oral histories of drought, major fires, etc. The purpose of this was to encourage not only joint science but also bring NASA resources and education materials to Tribal schools and encourage joint preparation of educational and training materials. N. Maynard's talk will provide history of that process and discuss possible ways to collaborate in the future, building on this effort.

  14. History of NASA/Native People Native Homelands Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy

    2000-01-01

    This workshop is one of the follow-on local assessment activities from the US National Assessment on the Impact of Climate Change on the US. N. Maynard (for NASA) helped create and get under way an initiative which brought together climate change scientists from around the US with Native Americans to bring together classic Western European scientists with knowledge from native peoples - from such sources as oral histories of drought, major fires, etc. The purpose of this was to encourage not only joint science but also bring NASA resources and education materials to Tribal schools and encourage joint preparation of educational and training materials. N. Maynard's talk will provide history of that process and discuss possible ways to collaborate in the future, building on this effort.

  15. American Indian and Alaska Native Access to Oral Health Care: A Potential Solution.

    PubMed

    Batliner, Terrence S

    2016-02-01

    American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) experience significant health disparities relative to the general U.S. In particular, oral diseases affect the majority of the AI/AN population and their prevalence is significantly greater than observed in other demographic sectors of the U.S. The reasons for these disparities are multiple but lack of access to dental care is clearly a contributing factor. The dentist-to-population ratio in many AI/AN communities is less than half the U.S. average. A solution has been developed in Alaska by AI/AN leaders: dental therapists, i.e., local people trained for two years to provide basic dental services. This solution is being fought by organized dentistry that sees the approach as an economic threat, but AI/AN organizations are committed to implementing this Native solution to their access problem. The Alaska experience indicates that access to oral health services can be improved through the addition of dental therapists to the dental team.

  16. Causes of Visual Impairment and Common Eye Problems in Northwest American Indians and Alaska Natives

    PubMed Central

    Mansberger, Steven L.; Romero, Francine C.; Smith, Nicole H.; Johnson, Chris A.; Cioffi, George A.; Edmunds, Beth; Choi, Dongseok; Becker, Thomas M.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives. Little information exists regarding the causes of visual impairment and the most common eye problems in American Indians/Alaska Natives. Methods. We randomly sampled American Indians/Alaska Natives older than 40 years from 3 tribes within the Northwest region. Results. We found a higher prevalence of visual impairment and normal-tension glaucoma, as well as a lower prevalence of ocular hypertension, in American Indians/Alaska Natives compared with previous results in other racial/ethnic groups. Conclusions. American Indians/Alaska Natives have a need for vision correction. Future interventions in American Indians/Alaska Natives should include providing spectacles for refractive error, detecting glaucoma, and preventing visual impairment from age-related maculopathy and cataracts. PMID:15855469

  17. Research Careers for American Indian/Alaska Native Nurses: Pathway to Elimination of Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Henly, Susan J.; Struthers, Roxanne; Dahlen, Barbara K.; Ide, Bette; Patchell, Beverly; Holtzclaw, Barbara J.

    2006-01-01

    The health status of American Indians/Alaska Natives lags behind that of the US population. American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) nurses are on the front lines of health services for AIAN people. They have the potential to make scientific contributions as well, but are under-represented among researchers working to understand health disparities. The AIAN MS-to-PhD Nursing Science Bridge, at the University of Minnesota, in partnership with the Universities of North Dakota and Oklahoma, provides support for AIAN nurses during the critical training transition from masters of science to doctoral programs. Partner schools collaborate with AIAN elders, medicine people/spiritual leaders, and academic consultants to (1) foster academic success and strengthen the AIAN identity of students during their research training and (2) bring about institutional change to optimize student experiences. Future research programs developed by this cadre of AIAN nurse scientists will contribute scientifically sound, culturally acceptable knowledge to effectively improve the health of AIAN people. PMID:16507731

  18. Pap prevalence and cervical cancer prevention among Alaska Native women.

    PubMed

    Lanier, A P; Kelly, J J; Holck, P

    1999-01-01

    The goals of the Alaska Native Women's Health Project (WHP) were to determine the following: (1) Pap prevalence based on chart review before and during an intervention period; (2) the level of understanding of cancer and cancer screening services with emphasis on cervical cancer; (3) use and satisfaction with current health maintenance services; and (4) improvement in knowledge and cancer screening rates following intervention. A random sample of 481 Alaska Native (Eskimo, Aleut, Indian) women living in Anchorage were interviewed face to face about their understanding of cancer risk factors (tobacco use, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), reproductive issues), cancer screening examinations (Pap test, breast self-examination (BSE), breast exam by a provider, mammography), and their attitudes about health care and health care services. Sixty-two percent of control women were documented to have had at least one Pap test within the 3-year period prior to the beginning of the study; however, only 9% were documented to have had annual Pap screening. The intervention included distribution of educational materials, counseling on any woman's health issue, special evening clinics, and reminders (mail/phone call) of scheduled Pap appointments.

  19. Dog bite injuries among American Indian and Alaska Native children.

    PubMed

    Bjork, Adam; Holman, Robert C; Callinan, Laura S; Hennessy, Thomas W; Cheek, James E; McQuiston, Jennifer H

    2013-06-01

    To examine dog bites among American Indian (AI) and Alaska Native (AN) children visiting Indian Health Service and tribal health facilities. We retrospectively analyzed hospitalizations and outpatient visits with a diagnosis of dog bite between 2001 and 2008 in AI/AN children aged <20 years. Rates of dog bite hospitalizations and outpatient visits were estimated by age group, sex, region, and number and location of open wounds using Indian Health Service data. Analyses of hospitalizations for the general US population aged<20 years used the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. The average annual dog bite hospitalization rate was higher among AI/AN children in Alaska (6.1/100,000 population) and the Southwest region (5.3/100,000) compared with the general US child population (3.1/100,000; 95% CI, 2.9-3.3/100,000). The average annual outpatient visit rate in AI/AN children was highest in the Alaska (596.4/100,000), Southwest (540.0/100,000), and Northern Plains West (537.6/100,000) regions. The hospitalization rate was highest in both AI/AN and US males aged<5 years, and outpatient visit rates were highest in AI/AN males aged 5-9 years. Open wounds diagnoses were most commonly seen on the head, neck, and face in hospitalized children (45.5% of open wounds in AI/AN children, 59.3% in US children; SE, 1.0%) and on the leg in AI/AN outpatients (35.6%). Dog bites represent a significant public health threat in AI/AN children in the Alaska, the Southwest, and Northern Plains West regions of the US. Enhanced animal control and education efforts should reduce dog bite injuries and associated problems with pets and stray dogs, such as emerging infectious diseases. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  20. 42 CFR 457.535 - Cost-sharing protection to ensure enrollment of American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... American Indians and Alaska Natives. 457.535 Section 457.535 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... § 457.535 Cost-sharing protection to ensure enrollment of American Indians and Alaska Natives. States... children who are American Indians or Alaska Natives, as defined in § 457.10. ...

  1. 42 CFR 457.535 - Cost-sharing protection to ensure enrollment of American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... American Indians and Alaska Natives. 457.535 Section 457.535 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... § 457.535 Cost-sharing protection to ensure enrollment of American Indians and Alaska Natives. States... children who are American Indians or Alaska Natives, as defined in § 457.10. ...

  2. 42 CFR 457.535 - Cost-sharing protection to ensure enrollment of American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... American Indians and Alaska Natives. 457.535 Section 457.535 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... § 457.535 Cost-sharing protection to ensure enrollment of American Indians and Alaska Natives. States... children who are American Indians or Alaska Natives, as defined in § 457.10. ...

  3. Streptococcus pneumoniae non-susceptibility and outpatient antimicrobial prescribing rates at the Alaska Native Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Ryan W; Wenger, Jay; Bulkow, Lisa; Bruce, Michael G

    2013-01-01

    American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) people suffer substantially higher rates of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) than the general US population. We evaluated antimicrobial prescribing data and their association with non-susceptibility in Streptococcus pneumoniae causing IPD in AI/AN people between 1992 and 2009. Antimicrobial use data were gathered from the electronic patient management system and included all prescriptions dispensed to Alaska Native patients aged 5 years and older from outpatient pharmacies at the Alaska Native Medical Center (ANMC). Antimicrobial susceptibility data were gathered from pneumococcal isolates causing IPD among Anchorage Service Unit AI/AN residents aged 5 years and older. Data were restricted to serotypes not contained in the pneumococcal vaccine (PCV7). Over the study period, overall antimicrobial prescribing increased 59% (285/1,000 persons/year in 1992 to 454/1,000 persons per year in 2009, p<0.001). Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole prescribing increased (43/1,000 persons/year in 1992 to 108/1,000 persons/year in 2009, p<0.001) and non-susceptibility to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole in AI/AN patients ≥5 years of age increased in non-PCV7 serotypes (0-12%, p<0.05). Similarly, prescribing rates increased for macrolide antibiotics (46/1,000 persons/year in 1992 to 84/1,000 persons/year in 2009, p<0.05). We observed no statistically significant change over time in erythromycin non-susceptibility among non-PCV7 serotypes in AI/AN patients aged 5 years or greater (0-7%, p=0.087). Antimicrobial prescribing patterns of some antibiotics in the AI/AN population corresponded to increased antimicrobial resistance in clinical isolates. This study highlights the on-going threat of antimicrobial resistance, the critical importance of judicious prescribing of antibiotics and the potential utility of prescribing data for addressing this issue.

  4. An Eagle's View: Sharing Successful American Indian/Alaska Native Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention Programs. Volumes I and II. The Drug-Free Schools and Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayne, Bill

    This document consists of two catalogues describing programs, events, and activities designed to prevent the use of alcohol and other drugs by American Indian and Alaska Native people, particularly adolescents and other young people. Together the catalogues include 61 descriptions of programs developed and implemented by the five agencies under…

  5. Pilot test of a cervical cancer prevention video developed for Alaska Native women.

    PubMed Central

    Stillwater, B; Echavarria, V A; Lanier, A P

    1995-01-01

    Cancer of the cervix is twice as likely to occur among Alaska Native women than among Caucasian women in the United State. To understand some of the factors associated with this high incidence, a random sample of 528 Alaska Native women were surveyed about their knowledge, attitudes, and behavior regarding cervical cancer and its risk factors. From the results of the Alaska Native Women's Health Project study, the need for more public education related to cervical cancer prevention was identified. A review of existing educational resources revealed that no culturally appropriate materials related to cervical cancer had been developed for Alaska Native women. To increase Native women's knowledge about cervical cancer and to motivate them to obtain annual Papanicolaou tests, a 12-minute videotape presentation was developed specifically for this population. The videotape portrayed Alaska Native women as role models from the community discussing cervical cancer and Papanicolaou tests and engaging in healthy lifestyles. The videotape was pilot tested with several groups of Alaska Native women. The women were surveyed before and after watching the video and were asked to rate the tape and make comments about it. The results of the posttest demonstrated a significant increase in the knowledge level of the participants. The videotape was well received because of its cultural sensitivity and appropriateness. On the basis of this study, the development of additional culturally appropriate educational materials related to cancer prevention of Alaska Native women is recommended. Images p213-a PMID:7631000

  6. Organization and Financing of Alcohol and Substance Abuse Programs for American Indians and Alaska Natives

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Bentson H.; Gabriel, Roy M.; Bigelow, Douglas A.; Walker, R. Dale

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. Although American Indians and Alaska Natives have high rates of substance abuse, few data about treatment services for this population are available. We used national data from 1997–2002 to describe recent trends in organizational and financial arrangements. Methods. Using data from the Indian Health Service (IHS), the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, and the Census Bureau, we estimated the number of American Indians served by substance abuse treatment programs that apparently are unaffiliated with either the IHS or tribal governments. We compared expected and observed IHS expenditures. Results. Half of the American Indians and Alaska Natives treated for substance abuse were served by programs (chiefly in urban areas) apparently unaffiliated with the IHS or tribal governments. IHS substance abuse expenditures were roughly what we expected. Medicaid participation by tribal programs was not universal. Conclusions. Many Native people with substance abuse problems are served by programs unaffiliated with the IHS. Medicaid may be key to expanding needed resources. PMID:16809606

  7. Organization and financing of alcohol and substance abuse programs for American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Bentson H; Gabriel, Roy M; Bigelow, Douglas A; Walker, R Dale

    2006-08-01

    Although American Indians and Alaska Natives have high rates of substance abuse, few data about treatment services for this population are available. We used national data from 1997-2002 to describe recent trends in organizational and financial arrangements. Using data from the Indian Health Service (IHS), the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, and the Census Bureau, we estimated the number of American Indians served by substance abuse treatment programs that apparently are unaffiliated with either the IHS or tribal governments. We compared expected and observed IHS expenditures. Half of the American Indians and Alaska Natives treated for substance abuse were served by programs (chiefly in urban areas) apparently unaffiliated with the IHS or tribal governments. IHS substance abuse expenditures were roughly what we expected. Medicaid participation by tribal programs was not universal. Many Native people with substance abuse problems are served by programs unaffiliated with the IHS. Medicaid may be key to expanding needed resources.

  8. A comparison of the diets of Siberian Chukotka and Alaska Native adults and recommendations for improved nutrition, a survey of selected previous studies.

    PubMed

    Nobmann, E D; Mamleeva, F Y; Klachkova, E V

    1994-07-01

    Diet plays an important role in the development of common diseases among Northern indigenous people, i.e. heart disease, cancer, diabetes and iron deficiency. Their unique diets may contribute to or protect from these diseases. The diets consumed by Siberian Chukotka Natives (Russia) and Alaska Natives (United States) during the 1980's are described. Traditional foods still play a major role, although the extent of their use varies. Alaska Natives' diets are more "western" than are those of Chukotka Natives. They consumed a greater proportion of kilocalories as carbohydrates and fat than Chukotka Natives. Coastal Chukotka Natives had lower average serum LDL-cholesterol and higher HDL-cholesterol levels than tundra Chukotka Natives, despite their high fat and kilocalorie intakes. Dietary recommendations common to both groups are presented which encourage the use of traditional foods as the foundation of the diet supplemented with western type foods of appropriate quality and quantity.

  9. College Pride, Native Pride: A Portrait of a Culturally Grounded Precollege Access Program for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keene, Adrienne J.

    2016-01-01

    In this article Adrienne J. Keene employs the portraiture methodology to explore the story of College Horizons. She examines this precollege access program for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian students to understand how a program rooted in Native cultures and identities can not only provide a space to create knowledge…

  10. College Pride, Native Pride: A Portrait of a Culturally Grounded Precollege Access Program for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keene, Adrienne J.

    2016-01-01

    In this article Adrienne J. Keene employs the portraiture methodology to explore the story of College Horizons. She examines this precollege access program for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian students to understand how a program rooted in Native cultures and identities can not only provide a space to create knowledge…

  11. 2016 American Indian/Alaska Native/Native Hawaiian Areas (AIANNH) Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The TIGER/Line shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census Bureau's Master Address File / Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing (MAF/TIGER) Database (MTDB). The MTDB represents a seamless national file with no overlaps or gaps between parts, however, each TIGER/Line shapefile is designed to stand alone as an independent data set, or they can be combined to cover the entire nation. The American Indian/Alaska Native/Native Hawaiian (AIANNH) Areas Shapefile includes the following legal entities: federally recognized American Indian reservations and off-reservation trust land areas, state-recognized American Indian reservations, and Hawaiian home lands (HHLs). The statistical entities included are Alaska Native village statistical areas (ANVSAs), Oklahoma tribal statistical areas (OTSAs), tribal designated statistical areas (TDSAs), and state designated tribal statistical areas (SDTSAs). Joint use areas are also included in this shapefile refer to areas that are administered jointly and/or claimed by two or more American Indian tribes. The Census Bureau designates both legal and statistical joint use areas as unique geographic entities for the purpose of presenting statistical data. The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) within the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) provides the list of federally recognized tribes and only provides legal boundary infor

  12. Stroke in American Indians and Alaska Natives: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Lonnie A.; Muller, Clemma; Buchwald, Dedra

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review of published studies on stroke epidemiology in American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs). We used MeSH terms and strict inclusion criteria to search PubMed, identifying a relevant sample of 57 refereed publications. We report a consensus view in which prevalent stroke is more common, and estimates of cerebrovascular risk factors are higher, among AI/ANs than among other US populations. Like other minority groups, AI/ANs suffer stroke at younger ages than do non-Hispanic Whites. However, data on AI/AN stroke mortality are significantly compromised by racial misclassification and nonrepresentative sampling. Studies correcting for these problems have found that stroke mortality rates among AI/ANs are among the highest of all US racial and ethnic groups. As with Black and non-Hispanic White stroke mortality, AI/AN stroke mortality varies by geographic region, with the highest rates in Alaska and the Northwest and the lowest in the Southwest. Our results underscore the need for a concerted national effort to collect accurate cross-sectional and longitudinal data on stroke in AI/ANs. PMID:26066955

  13. Substance abuse prevention in American Indian and Alaska Native communities.

    PubMed

    Whitbeck, Les B; Walls, Melissa L; Welch, Melissa L

    2012-09-01

    In this article we review three categories of American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) substance abuse prevention programs: (1) published empirical trials; (2) promising programs published and unpublished that are in the process of development and that have the potential for empirical trials; and (3) examples of innovative grassroots programs that originate at the local level and may have promise for further development. AIAN communities are taking more and more independent control of substance abuse prevention. We point out that European American prevention scientists are largely unaware of the numerous grassroots prevention work going on in AIAN communities and urge a paradigm shift from adapting European American prevention science "best practices" to creating cultural "best practices" by working from inside AIAN communities.

  14. Research with American Indian and Alaska Native populations: Measurement matters.

    PubMed

    Walls, Melissa L; Whitesell, Nancy Rumbaugh; Barlow, Allison; Sarche, Michelle

    2017-04-25

    Research is an important tool in addressing myriad American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) health disparities; however, tensions exist between common empirical measurement approaches that facilitate cross-cultural comparisons and measurement specificity that may be more valid locally and/or culturally appropriate. The tremendous diversity of AIAN communities, small population sizes of distinct AIAN cultural groups, and varying cultural contexts and worldviews should influence measurement decisions in health research. We provide a framework for guiding measurement in collaboration with AIAN communities using examples from substance abuse research for illustration. Our goal is to build upon ongoing efforts to advance measurement validity for AIAN research by engaging community-researcher partnerships and critical thinking in the selection, adaptation, creation, and implementation of measures.

  15. Helicobacter pylori infection and markers of gastric cancer risk in Alaska Native persons: A retrospective case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Keck, James W; Miernyk, Karen M; Bulkow, Lisa R; Kelly, Janet J; McMahon, Brian J; Sacco, Frank; Hennessy, Thomas W; Bruce, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alaska Native persons experience gastric cancer incidence and mortality rates that are three to four times higher than in the general United States population. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate pepsinogen I, pepsinogen I/II ratio, anti-Helicobacter pylori and cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) antibody levels, and blood group for their associations with gastric cancer development in Alaska Native people. METHODS: The present analysis was a retrospective case-control study that matched gastric cancers reported to the Alaska Native Tumor Registry from 1969 to 2008 to three controls on known demographic risk factors for H pylori infection, using sera from the Alaska Area Specimen Bank. Conditional logistic regression evaluated associations between serum markers and gastric cancer. RESULTS: A total of 122 gastric cancer cases were included, with sera predating cancer diagnosis (mean = 13 years) and 346 matched controls. One hundred twelve cases (91.8%) and 285 controls (82.4%) had evidence of previous or ongoing H pylori infection as measured by anti-H pylori antibody levels. Gastric cancer cases had a 2.63-fold increased odds of having positive anti-H pylori antibodies compared with their matched controls (P=0.01). In a multivariate model, non-cardia gastric cancer (n=94) was associated with anti-H pylori antibodies (adjusted OR 3.92; P=0.004) and low pepsinogen I level (adjusted OR 6.04; P=0.04). No association between gastric cancer and blood group, anti-CagA antibodies or pepsinogen I/II ratio was found. CONCLUSION: Alaska Native people with gastric cancer had increased odds of previous H pylori infection. Low pepsinogen I level may function as a precancer marker for noncardia cancer. PMID:24945184

  16. Helicobacter pylori infection and markers of gastric cancer risk in Alaska Native persons: a retrospective case-control study.

    PubMed

    Keck, James William; Miernyk, Karen M; Bulkow, Lisa R; Kelly, Janet J; McMahon, Brian J; Sacco, Frank; Hennessy, Thomas W; Bruce, Michael G

    2014-06-01

    Alaska Native persons experience gastric cancer incidence and mortality rates that are three to four times higher than in the general United States population. To evaluate pepsinogen I, pepsinogen I/II ratio, anti-Helicobacter pylori and cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) antibody levels, and blood group for their associations with gastric cancer development in Alaska Native people. The present analysis was a retrospective case-control study that matched gastric cancers reported to the Alaska Native Tumor Registry from 1969 to 2008 to three controls on known demographic risk factors for H pylori infection, using sera from the Alaska Area Specimen Bank. Conditional logistic regression evaluated associations between serum markers and gastric cancer. A total of 122 gastric cancer cases were included, with sera predating cancer diagnosis (mean = 13 years) and 346 matched controls. One hundred twelve cases (91.8%) and 285 controls (82.4%) had evidence of previous or ongoing H pylori infection as measured by anti-H pylori antibody levels. Gastric cancer cases had a 2.63-fold increased odds of having positive anti-H pylori antibodies compared with their matched controls (P=0.01). In a multivariate model, noncardia gastric cancer (n=94) was associated with anti-H pylori antibodies (adjusted OR 3.92; P=0.004) and low pepsinogen I level (adjusted OR 6.04; P=0.04). No association between gastric cancer and blood group, anti-CagA antibodies or pepsinogen I/II ratio was found. Alaska Native people with gastric cancer had increased odds of previous H pylori infection. Low pepsinogen I level may function as a precancer marker for noncardia cancer.

  17. Poverty and health disparities for American Indian and Alaska Native children: current knowledge and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Sarche, Michelle; Spicer, Paul

    2008-01-01

    This report explores the current state of knowledge regarding inequalities and their effect on American Indian and Alaska Native children, underscoring gaps in our current knowledge and the opportunities for early intervention to begin to address persistent challenges in young American Indian and Alaska Native children's development. This overview documents demographic, social, health, and health care disparities as they affect American Indian and Alaska Native children, the persistent cultural strengths that must form the basis for any conscientious intervention effort, and the exciting possibilities for early childhood interventions.

  18. Poverty and Health Disparities for American Indian and Alaska Native Children: Current Knowledge and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Sarche, Michelle; Spicer, Paul

    2008-01-01

    This report explores the current state of knowledge regarding inequalities and their effect on American Indian and Alaska Native children, underscoring gaps in our current knowledge and the opportunities for early intervention to begin to address persistent challenges in young American Indian and Alaska Native children’s development. This overview documents demographic, social, health, and health care disparities as they affect American Indian and Alaska Native children, the persistent cultural strengths that must form the basis for any conscientious intervention effort, and the exciting possibilities for early childhood interventions. PMID:18579879

  19. Unpacking Race, Culture, and Class in Rural Alaska: Native and Non-Native Multidisciplinary Professionals' Perceptions of Child Sexual Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bubar, Roe; Bundy-Fazioli, Kimberly

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to unpack notions of class, culture, and race as they relate to multidisciplinary team (MDT) professionals and their perceptions of prevalence in child sexual abuse cases in Native and non-Native rural Alaska communities. Power and privilege within professional settings is significant for all social work professionals…

  20. Unpacking Race, Culture, and Class in Rural Alaska: Native and Non-Native Multidisciplinary Professionals' Perceptions of Child Sexual Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bubar, Roe; Bundy-Fazioli, Kimberly

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to unpack notions of class, culture, and race as they relate to multidisciplinary team (MDT) professionals and their perceptions of prevalence in child sexual abuse cases in Native and non-Native rural Alaska communities. Power and privilege within professional settings is significant for all social work professionals…

  1. Alaska Native Students and College Success. ISER Occasional Paper No. 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinfeld, Judith

    Factors contributing to Native students' college success were examined in a study of 50 Native freshmen and 42 non-Native freshmen at the University of Alaska in the 1973-74 academic year. The study compared students in relation to three common explanations of college success: level of academic preparation, goal orientation, ease in the campus…

  2. Postsecondary Financial Aid for American Indians and Alaska Natives. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almeida, Deirdre A.

    This digest summarizes challenges that American Indian and Alaska Native students face in obtaining adequate postsecondary financial aid and describes general sources of aid for Native students. The number of Native college students is growing rapidly, but obtaining adequate financial aid is the most serious obstacle to completing postsecondary…

  3. Teaching American Indian and Alaska Native Languages in the Schools: What Has Been Learned. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peacock, Thomas D.; Day, Donald R.

    This digest considers issues, possible solutions, and successful efforts in dealing with Native language loss, maintenance, and restoration in American Indian and Alaska Native communities and schools. The preservation and maintenance of the remaining 210 tribal languages is a major cultural and education concern in Native communities. The problem…

  4. Hepatitis A Incidence and Hepatitis A Vaccination Among American Indians and Alaska Natives, 1990–2001

    PubMed Central

    Bialek, Stephanie R.; Thoroughman, Douglas A.; Hu, Diana; Simard, Edgar P.; Chattin, Jody; Cheek, Jim; Bell, Beth P.

    2004-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed the effect on trends in hepatitis A incidence of the 1996 recommendation for routine hepatitis A vaccination of American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) children. Methods. We examined trends in hepatitis A incidence among AIAN peoples during 1990–2001 and vaccination coverage levels among children on the largest American Indian reservation. Results. Hepatitis A rates among AIANs declined 20-fold during 1997–2001. Declines in hepatitis A incidence occurred among AIANs in reservation and metropolitan areas. Among 1956 children living on the Navajo Nation whose medical records were reviewed, 1508 (77.1%) had received at least one dose of hepatitis A vaccine, and 1020 (52.1%) had completed the vaccine series. Conclusions. Hepatitis A rates among AIAN peoples have declined dramatically coincident with implementation of routine hepatitis A vaccination of AIAN children. PMID:15249305

  5. Focus Groups of Alaska Native Adolescent Tobacco Users: Preferences for Tobacco Cessation Interventions and Barriers to Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patten, Christi A.; Enoch, Carrie; Renner, Caroline C.; Offord, Kenneth P.; Nevak, Caroline; Kelley, Stacy F.; Thomas, Janet; Decker, Paul A.; Hurt, Richard D.; Lanier, Anne; Kaur, Judith S.

    2009-01-01

    Tobacco cessation interventions developed for Alaska Native adolescents do not exist. This study employed focus group methodology to explore preferences for tobacco cessation interventions and barriers to participation among 49 Alaska Natives (61% female) with a mean age of 14.6 (SD = 1.6) who resided in western Alaska. Using content analysis,…

  6. Future Land Use Planning Alternatives for Alaska: One of a Series of Articles on the Native Land Claims.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Walter B.

    As one in a series of eight articles written by different professionals concerned with Alaska Native land claims, this article focuses on land use planning alternatives after December of 1976 when the configuration of Alaska lands will have been largely finalized under the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act of 1972. While this particular booklet…

  7. Focus Groups of Alaska Native Adolescent Tobacco Users: Preferences for Tobacco Cessation Interventions and Barriers to Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patten, Christi A.; Enoch, Carrie; Renner, Caroline C.; Offord, Kenneth P.; Nevak, Caroline; Kelley, Stacy F.; Thomas, Janet; Decker, Paul A.; Hurt, Richard D.; Lanier, Anne; Kaur, Judith S.

    2009-01-01

    Tobacco cessation interventions developed for Alaska Native adolescents do not exist. This study employed focus group methodology to explore preferences for tobacco cessation interventions and barriers to participation among 49 Alaska Natives (61% female) with a mean age of 14.6 (SD = 1.6) who resided in western Alaska. Using content analysis,…

  8. CHRNA5-A3-B4 genetic variants alter nicotine intake and interact with tobacco use to influence body weight in Alaska Native tobacco users.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Andy Z X; Renner, Caroline C; Hatsukami, Dorothy K; Benowitz, Neal L; Tyndale, Rachel F

    2013-10-01

    Gene variants in CHRNA5-A3-B4, which encode for the α5, α3 and β4 nicotinic receptor subunits, are associated with altered smoking behaviors in European Americans. Little is known about CHRNA5-A3-B4 and its association with smoking behaviors and weight in Alaska Native people, which is a population with high prevalence but low levels of tobacco consumption, extensive smokeless tobacco use and high rates of obesity. We investigated CHRNA5-A3-B4 haplotype structure and its association with nicotine intake and obesity in Alaska Native people. A cross-sectional study of 400 Alaska Native individuals, including 290 tobacco users. CHRNA5-A3-B4 genotype, body weight and tobacco consumption biomarkers such as plasma cotinine and urinary total nicotine equivalents (TNE). Alaska Native people have a distinct CHRNA5-A3-B4 haplotype structure compared with European/African Americans. In 290 Alaska Native tobacco users the 'G' allele of rs578776, which tagged a 30 kb haplotype in CHRNA5-A3-B4, was prevalent (16%) and associated significantly with nicotine intake (20% higher plasma cotinine, P < 0.001, 16% higher TNE, P = 0.076), while rs16969968 was not associated with nicotine intake. Rs578776 acted in combination with CYP2A6, the main nicotine-metabolizing enzyme, to increase nicotine intake by 1.8-fold compared with the low-risk group (P < 0.001). Furthermore, rs2869950, a single nucleotide polymorphism 5' to CHRNB4, was associated significantly with increased body mass index (P < 0.01) in the tobacco users even after controlling for differences in nicotine intake (P < 0.01). Genetic variants in CHRNA5-A3-B4 alter nicotine intake and body mass index in a population of Alaska Native people, who have a distinct haplotype structure, smoking behaviors and prevalence of obesity. © 2013 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  9. Consuming untreated water in four southwestern Alaska Native communities: reasons revealed and recommendations for change.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Troy L; Lopez, Ellen D S; Goldberger, Rachel; Dobson, Jennifer; Hickel, Korie; Smith, Jeffrey; Johnson, Rhonda M; Bersamin, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    In this article, the authors provide the first in-depth account of why some Alaska Native people drink untreated water when treated water is available. Their qualitative research was conducted in four Alaska Native village communities that have treated water available from a centralized distribution point. Most respondents (n = 172; 82%) reported that some of their household's drinking water came from an untreated source. Motives for drinking untreated water emerged from analysis of open-ended questions about drinking water practice and could be categorized into six themes: chemicals, taste, health, access, tradition, and cost. Importantly, some residents reported consuming untreated water because they both liked untreated water and disliked treated water. As such, interventions to increase safe water consumption should address this dichotomy by providing education about the benefits of treated water alongside the risks involved with drinking untreated water. Based on the findings, the authors provide specific recommendations for developing behavior change interventions that address influences at multiple social-ecological levels.

  10. Strategies for Successful Retention of Alaska Native and American Indian Study Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redwood, Diana; Leston, Jessica; Asay, Elvin; Ferucci, Elizabeth; Etzel, Ruth; Lanier, Anne P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the strategies used to track and follow 3,828 Alaska Native and American Indian study participants in the city of Anchorage and more rural areas of Alaska and provides characteristics of respondents and non-respondents. Over 88% were successfully followed-up, with 49% of respondents completed in three or fewer attempts.…

  11. The Educational Aspirations/Attainment Gap among Rural Alaska Native Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Aaron; Kleinfeld, Judith; Reyes, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Indigenous students in rural Alaska hold high educational aspirations and yet few students realize their educational goals (Hamilton & Seyfrit, 1993; Kleinfeld & McDiarmid, 1986; McDiarmid & Kleinfeld, 1981). Our purpose in this study was to understand why so many Alaska Native students from small, isolated communities…

  12. Strategies for Successful Retention of Alaska Native and American Indian Study Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redwood, Diana; Leston, Jessica; Asay, Elvin; Ferucci, Elizabeth; Etzel, Ruth; Lanier, Anne P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the strategies used to track and follow 3,828 Alaska Native and American Indian study participants in the city of Anchorage and more rural areas of Alaska and provides characteristics of respondents and non-respondents. Over 88% were successfully followed-up, with 49% of respondents completed in three or fewer attempts.…

  13. Correlates of Alaska Native Fatal and Nonfatal Suicidal Behaviors 1990-2001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wexler, Lisa; Hill, Ryan; Bertone-Johnson, Elizabeth; Fenaughty, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Factors correlated with suicidal behavior in a predominately Alaska Native region of Alaska are described, and the correlates relating to fatal and nonfatal suicide behaviors in this indigenous population are distinguished. Suicide data from the region (1990-2001) were aggregated and compared to 2000 U.S. Census Data using chi-squared tests.…

  14. Correlates of Alaska Native Fatal and Nonfatal Suicidal Behaviors 1990-2001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wexler, Lisa; Hill, Ryan; Bertone-Johnson, Elizabeth; Fenaughty, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Factors correlated with suicidal behavior in a predominately Alaska Native region of Alaska are described, and the correlates relating to fatal and nonfatal suicide behaviors in this indigenous population are distinguished. Suicide data from the region (1990-2001) were aggregated and compared to 2000 U.S. Census Data using chi-squared tests.…

  15. Native Language Dictionaries and Grammars of Alaska, Northern Canada, and Greenland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goniwiecha, Mark C.; Hales, David A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes recent political and social activities aimed at preserving the culture of Native Americans in Alaska, Northern Canada, and Greenland. An annotated bibliography of sources for the Eskimo Aleut, Tsimshian, Haida, Athabascan (Athapascan), Eyak and Tlingit languages is provided. (CLB)

  16. American Indian and Alaska native aboriginal use of alcohol in the United States.

    PubMed

    Abbott, P J

    1996-01-01

    Alcohol beverages prior to White contact originated with the Mayan and the Aztec Nations and spread to the American Indians of the Southwest. Surprisingly, there are a number of accounts of alcohol use among other American Indians and Alaska Natives. Beverages were limited to wine and beer, and included: balche, pulque, and "haren a pitahaya" wines, tulpi beer and other beverages. White contact brought dramatic shifts in the use and function of alcoholic beverages in American Indian and Alaska Native societies.

  17. Development of a tobacco cessation intervention for Alaska Native youth

    PubMed Central

    Patten, Christi A.; Fadahunsi, Oluwole; Hanza, Marcelo; Smith, Christina M.; Hughes, Christine A.; Brockman, Tabetha A.; Boyer, Rahnia; Decker, Paul A.; Luger, Elizabeth; Sinicrope, Pamela S.; Offord, Kenneth P.

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco cessation treatments have not been evaluated among Alaska Native (AN) adolescents. This pilot study evaluated the feasibility and acceptability of a targeted cessation intervention developed for AN youth. Intervention components were informed by prior focus groups assessing treatment preferences among AN youth, a social cognitive theoretical framework and feedback obtained from a teen advisory group. The intervention consisted of a weekend program where youth traveled by small airplane from their villages to stay overnight with other adolescents who quit tobacco use together. The program included recreational activities, talking circles, personal stories from elders and teen advisors, and cognitive behavioral counseling. Two intervention pilots were conducted from October 2010 to January 2011 using a non-randomized, uncontrolled study design with assessments at baseline and six-week follow-up. One village in Western Alaska was selected for each pilot with a targeted enrollment of 10 adolescents each. Participants were recruited for each pilot within five days, but recruitment challenges and ‘‘lessons learned’’ are described. The first pilot enrolled nine adolescents (all female) aged 13–16 years; all nine attended the intervention program and 78% (7/9) completed follow-up. The second pilot enrolled 12 adolescents (eight females, four males) aged 12–17 years, of which seven attended the intervention program. Six of these seven participants (86%) completed follow-up. In both pilots, participants rated the intervention as highly acceptable. A targeted cessation intervention was feasible and acceptable to AN youth. The intervention will be tested for efficacy in a subsequent randomized controlled trial. PMID:24058327

  18. Survival differences among American Indians/Alaska Natives with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dwojak, Sunshine M; Sequist, Thomas D; Emerick, Kevin; Deschler, Daniel G

    2013-08-01

    American Indians/Alaska Natives experience poor overall survival. Data are limited on American Indians/Alaska Natives with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We identified all cases of HNSCC among American Indians/Alaska Natives, and white patients from 1996 to 2007 using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Univariate, multivariate, and Cox models were fit to analyze racial differences in sex, age, stage, treatment, and survival. American Indians/Alaska Natives experienced decreased survival for oropharyngeal cancer (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.4; p = .008). After adjusting for demographic factors, survival was decreased for oral cavity cancer (HR = 1.3; p = .05) and hypopharyngeal/laryngeal cancer (HR = 1.6; p = .04). These disparities were eliminated after adjusting for treatment for oral cavity cancer (HR = 1.2; p = .17) and stage for hypopharyngeal/laryngeal cancer (HR = 1.4; p = .12). American Indians/Alaska Natives received less surgery for oral cavity cancer (78% vs 85%; p = .02). Disparities in survival exist among American Indians/Alaska Natives patients with HNSCC. They are related to stage and differential treatment patterns. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Establishing a culturally sensitive palliative care program in rural Alaska Native American communities.

    PubMed

    DeCourtney, Christine A; Jones, Kristina; Merriman, Melanie P; Heavener, Nina; Branch, P Kay

    2003-06-01

    End-of-life programs that provide an option for patients to die at home are available in most U.S. communities. However, Alaska Natives living in remote Alaska villages often die alone in hospitals and nursing homes hundreds of miles away from home. The Bristol Bay Area Health Corporation (BBAHC), a tribal organization, is the sole provider of comprehensive primary care services to 34 Alaska Native villages located within a 46,000 square mile area in southwest Alaska. The closest tertiary care hospital is 329 air miles away in Anchorage. Because of the high cost of, and difficulties encountered in trying to deliver end-of-life care services to remote communities, a village-focused, culturally sensitive, volunteer and primary care program combined with a regionally based physician and home health nurse to deliver multi-disciplinary palliative care was developed. The Helping Hands Program blends cultural practices with contemporary palliative care medicine to allow Alaska Natives and others living in remote communities to be cared for at home through the end of life. Since the program was implemented in 1999, the percentage of home deaths for selected causes has changed from 33% in 1997 to 77% in 2001. The Anchorage-based Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) and the Alaska Native Medical Center (ANMC) have recognized the importance and success of the BBAHC program and are investigating expanding the program to other parts of Alaska. Centralizing the program in Anchorage will allow staff trained in palliative care to travel to regional Alaska Native hospitals to help train health care professionals.

  20. Infectious Disease Hospitalizations Among American Indian/Alaska Native and Non-American Indian/Alaska Native Persons in Alaska, 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Gounder, Prabhu P; Holman, Robert C; Seeman, Sara M; Rarig, Alice J; McEwen, Mary; Steiner, Claudia A; Bartholomew, Michael L; Hennessy, Thomas W

    Reports about infectious disease (ID) hospitalization rates among American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) persons have been constrained by data limited to the tribal health care system and by comparisons with the general US population. We used a merged state database to determine ID hospitalization rates in Alaska. We combined 2010 and 2011 hospital discharge data from the Indian Health Service and the Alaska State Inpatient Database. We used the merged data set to calculate average annual age-adjusted and age-specific ID hospitalization rates for AI/AN and non-AI/AN persons in Alaska. We stratified the ID hospitalization rates by sex, age, and ID diagnosis. ID diagnoses accounted for 19% (6501 of 34 160) of AI/AN hospitalizations, compared with 12% (7397 of 62 059) of non-AI/AN hospitalizations. The average annual age-adjusted hospitalization rate was >3 times higher for AI/AN persons (2697 per 100 000 population) than for non-AI/AN persons (730 per 100 000 population; rate ratio = 3.7, P < .001). Lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI), which occurred in 38% (2486 of 6501) of AI/AN persons, was the most common reason for ID hospitalization. AI/AN persons were significantly more likely than non-AI/AN persons to be hospitalized for LRTI (rate ratio = 5.2, P < .001). A substantial disparity in ID hospitalization rates exists between AI/AN and non-AI/AN persons, and the most common reason for ID hospitalization among AI/AN persons was LRTI. Public health programs and policies that address the risk factors for LRTI are likely to benefit AI/AN persons.

  1. Health Promotion and Substance Abuse Prevention among American Indian and Alaska Native Communities: Issues in Cultural Competence. Cultural Competence Series 9. Special Collaborative Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trimble, Joseph E., Ed.; Beauvais, Fred, Ed.

    Substance abuse continues to be one of the most damaging and chronic health problems faced by Indian people. American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) substance abuse prevention and treatment programs must be framed within the broader context of the widening health disparities between AI/AN communities and the general population. Successful…

  2. Homicide Among American Indians/Alaska Natives, 1999-2009: Implications for Public Health Interventions.

    PubMed

    Herne, Mose A; Maschino, Alexandra C; Graham-Phillips, Anita L

    2016-01-01

    We determined estimates of homicide among American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) compared with non-Hispanic white people to characterize disparities and improve AI/AN classification in incidence and mortality reporting. We linked 1999-2009 death certificate data with Indian Health Service (IHS) patient registration data to examine death rates from homicide among AI/AN and non-Hispanic white people. Our analysis focused primarily on residents of IHS Contract Health Service Delivery Area counties and excluded Hispanic people to avoid underestimation of incidence and mortality in AI/ANs and for consistency in our comparisons. We used age-adjusted death rates per 100,000 population and stratified our analyses by sex, age, and IHS region. Death rates per 100,000 population from homicide were four times higher among AI/ANs (rate = 12.1) than among white people (rate = 2.8). Homicide rates for AI/ANs were highest in the Southwest (25.6 and 6.9 for males and females, respectively) and in Alaska (17.7 and 10.3 for males and females, respectively). Disparities between AI/ANs and non-Hispanic white people were highest in the Northern Plains region among men (rate ratio [RR] = 9.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 8.5, 11.3) and among those aged 25-44 years (RR59.0, 95% CI 7.5, 10.7) and 0-24 years (RR57.4, 95% CI 6.1, 8.9). Death rates from homicide among AI/ANs were higher than previously reported and varied by sex, age, and region. Violence prevention efforts involving a range of stakeholders are needed at the community level to address this important public health issue.

  3. Rickets and Vitamin D Deficiency in Alaska Native Children

    PubMed Central

    Singleton, Rosalyn; Lescher, Rachel; Gessner, Bradford D.; Benson, Matthew; Bulkow, Lisa; Rosenfeld, John; Thomas, Timothy; Holman, Robert C.; Haberling, Dana; Bruce, Michael; Bartholomew, Michael; Tiesinga, James

    2015-01-01

    Background Rickets and vitamin D deficiency appeared to increase in Alaskan children, starting in the 1990s. We evaluated the epidemiology of rickets and vitamin D deficiency in Alaska Native (AN) children in 2001-2010. Methods We analyzed 2001-2010 visits with rickets or vitamin D deficiency diagnosis for AN and American Indian children and the general U.S. population aged <10 years. We conducted a case-control study of AN rickets/vitamin D deficient cases and age- and region-matched controls. Results AN children annual rickets-associated hospitalization rate (2.23/100,000 children/year) was higher than general U.S. rate (1.23; 95% CI 1.08-1.39). Rickets incidence increased with latitude. Rickets/vitamin D deficiency cases were more likely to have malnutrition (OR 38.1; 95% CI 4.9-294), had similar breastfeeding prevalence, and were less likely to have received vitamin D supplementation (OR 0.23; 95% CI 0.1-0.87), than controls. Conclusions Our findings highlight the importance of latitude, malnutrition and lack of vitamin D supplementation as risk factors for rickets. PMID:25741788

  4. The Health Status of American Indian and Alaska Native Males

    PubMed Central

    Rhoades, Everett R.

    2003-01-01

    Objectives. This study summarizes current health status information relating to American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) males compared with that of AI/ANfemales. Methods. I analyzed published data from the Indian Health Service for 1994 through 1996 to determine sex differences in morbidity and mortality rates and use of health care facilities. Results. AI/AN males’ death rates exceed those of AI/AN females for every age up to 75 years and for 6 of the 8 leading causes of death. Accidents, suicide, and homicide are epidemic among AI/AN males. Paradoxically, AI/AN males contribute only 37.9% of outpatient visits, versus 62.1% for females, and only 47% of hospitalizations excluding childbirth. Conclusions. AI/AN males suffer inordinately from a combination of increased burden of illness and lack of utilization of health care services. Programs targeted to anomie, loss of traditional male roles, and violence and alcoholism are among the most urgently needed. PMID:12721143

  5. "Tied together like a woven hat:" Protective pathways to Alaska native sobriety

    PubMed Central

    Mohatt, Gerald V; Rasmus, S Michelle; Thomas, Lisa; Allen, James; Hazel, Kelly; Hensel, Chase

    2004-01-01

    Background The People Awakening Project (1RO1 AA 11446-03) had two purposes, completed in Phase I and Phase II of the project. The purpose of Phase I was to complete a qualitative study; the research objective was discovery oriented with the specific aim of identification of protective and recovery factors in Alaska Native sobriety. Results were used to develop a heuristic model of protective and recovery factors, and measures based on these factors. The research objective of Phase II was to pilot these measures and provide initial validity data. Methods Phase I utilized a life history methodology. People Awakening interviewed a convenience sample of 101 Alaska Natives who had either recovered from alcoholism (n = 58) or never had a drinking problem (n = 43). This later group included both lifetime abstainers (LAs) and non-problem drinkers (NPs). Life histories were transcribed and analyzed using grounded theory and consensual data analytic procedures within a participatory action research framework. Analyses were utilized to generate heuristic models of protection and recovery from alcohol abuse among Alaska Natives. Results Analyses generated a heuristic model of protective factors from alcohol abuse. The resulting multilevel and multi-factorial model describes interactive and reciprocal influences of (a) individual, family, and community characteristics; (b) trauma and the individual and contextual response to trauma, (c) experimental substance use and the person's social environment; and (d) reflective processes associated with a turning point, or a life decision regarding sobriety. The importance of cultural factors mediating all these protective processes is emphasized. For NPs, the resilience process drew from personal stores of self-confidence, self-efficacy, and self-mastery that derived from ability to successfully maneuver within stressful or potentially traumatizing environments. In contrast, for many LAs, efficacy was instead described in more socially

  6. "Tied together like a woven hat:" Protective pathways to Alaska native sobriety.

    PubMed

    Mohatt, Gerald V; Rasmus, S Michelle; Thomas, Lisa; Allen, James; Hazel, Kelly; Hensel, Chase

    2004-11-17

    BACKGROUND: The People Awakening Project (1RO1 AA 11446-03) had two purposes, completed in Phase I and Phase II of the project. The purpose of Phase I was to complete a qualitative study; the research objective was discovery oriented with the specific aim of identification of protective and recovery factors in Alaska Native sobriety. Results were used to develop a heuristic model of protective and recovery factors, and measures based on these factors. The research objective of Phase II was to pilot these measures and provide initial validity data. METHODS: Phase I utilized a life history methodology. People Awakening interviewed a convenience sample of 101 Alaska Natives who had either recovered from alcoholism (n = 58) or never had a drinking problem (n = 43). This later group included both lifetime abstainers (LAs) and non-problem drinkers (NPs). Life histories were transcribed and analyzed using grounded theory and consensual data analytic procedures within a participatory action research framework. Analyses were utilized to generate heuristic models of protection and recovery from alcohol abuse among Alaska Natives. RESULTS: Analyses generated a heuristic model of protective factors from alcohol abuse. The resulting multilevel and multi-factorial model describes interactive and reciprocal influences of (a) individual, family, and community characteristics; (b) trauma and the individual and contextual response to trauma, (c) experimental substance use and the person's social environment; and (d) reflective processes associated with a turning point, or a life decision regarding sobriety. The importance of cultural factors mediating all these protective processes is emphasized. For NPs, the resilience process drew from personal stores of self-confidence, self-efficacy, and self-mastery that derived from ability to successfully maneuver within stressful or potentially traumatizing environments. In contrast, for many LAs, efficacy was instead described in more

  7. Advancing Suicide Prevention Research With Rural American Indian and Alaska Native Populations

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Michael; Gone, Joseph P.; Cwik, Mary; Kirmayer, Laurence J.; LaFromboise, Teresa; Brockie, Teresa; O’Keefe, Victoria; Walkup, John; Allen, James

    2015-01-01

    As part of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention’s American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) Task Force, a multidisciplinary group of AI/AN suicide research experts convened to outline pressing issues related to this subfield of suicidology. Suicide disproportionately affects Indigenous peoples, and remote Indigenous communities can offer vital and unique insights with relevance to other rural and marginalized groups. Outcomes from this meeting include identifying the central challenges impeding progress in this subfield and a description of promising research directions to yield practical results. These proposed directions expand the alliance’s prioritized research agenda and offer pathways to advance the field of suicide research in Indigenous communities and beyond. PMID:25790403

  8. A qualitative study of motivation in Alaska Native Science and Engineering Program (ANSEP) precollege students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatchmeneff, Michele

    The dramatic underrepresentation of Alaska Natives in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) degrees and professions calls for rigorous research in how students access these fields. Research has shown that students who complete advanced mathematics and science courses while in high school are more academically prepared to pursue and succeed in STEM degree programs and professions. There is limited research on what motivates precollege students to become more academically prepared before they graduate from high school. In Alaska, Alaska Native precollege students regularly underperform on required State of Alaska mathematics and science exams when compared to non-Alaska Native students. Research also suggests that different things may motivate Alaska Native students than racial majority students. Therefore there is a need to better understand what motivates Alaska Native students to take and successfully complete advanced mathematics and science courses while in high school so that they are academically prepared to pursue and succeed in STEM degrees and professions. The Alaska Native Science & Engineering Program (ANSEP) is a longitudinal STEM educational enrichment program that works with Alaska Native students starting in middle school through doctoral degrees and further professional endeavors. Research suggests that Alaska Native students participating in ANSEP are completing STEM degrees at higher rates than before the program was available. ANSEP appears to be unique due to its longitudinal approach and the large numbers of Alaska Native precollege, university, and graduate students it supports. ANSEP provides precollege students with opportunities to take advanced high school and college-level mathematics and science courses and complete STEM related projects. Students work and live together on campus during the program components. Student outcome data suggests that ANSEP has been successful at motivating precollege participants to

  9. The American Indian and Alaska Native Higher Education Funding Guide. A Financial Guide to Undergraduate and Graduate Sources of Funding for American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Gregory W.

    This book provides American Indian and Alaska Native students with sources for securing financial aid for higher education. The first section covers sources of funding and grants for individuals who are pursuing undergraduate degrees. This financial support includes scholarships with state residency requirements, general undergraduate…

  10. The American Indian and Alaska Native Higher Education Funding Guide. A Financial Guide to Undergraduate and Graduate Sources of Funding for American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Gregory W.

    This book provides American Indian and Alaska Native students with sources for securing financial aid for higher education. The first section covers sources of funding and grants for individuals who are pursuing undergraduate degrees. This financial support includes scholarships with state residency requirements, general undergraduate…

  11. Risk and Protective Factors for Depression and Health Outcomes in American Indian and Alaska Native Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barney, David D.

    2001-01-01

    A study examined whether protective factors reduce the effects of depression in American Indian and Alaska Native adolescents. Surveys of 2,034 Native high school students from 33 states indicated that depression moderately influenced self-perceived health status and that caring and connectedness counteracted the risk factors from depression that…

  12. A Southeastern Conference on Native Education. Report (Juneau, Alaska, April 11-12, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demmert, William G., Ed.

    Representatives from villages, Native organizations, and educational institutions were participants at a conference that explored barriers encountered in the education of Southeastern Alaska Native students, identified problems, discussed solutions, and developed recommendations. The conference was the result of a concern that a major problem in…

  13. Cancer Incidence, Survival, and Mortality among American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horm, John W.; Burhansstipanov, Linda

    1992-01-01

    Overall cancer incidence among southwestern American Indians is less than half that of U.S. whites; Alaska Native and white rates are similar. However, both native groups have elevated rates for specific cancers (stomach, liver, and gallbladder), and Indians have low five-year survival rates. Data tables outline incidence, mortality, and survival…

  14. Early Education for American Indian and Alaska Native Children in Rural America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Nicole L.; Hare, R. Dwight

    2006-01-01

    Young American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) children are four times as likely to live in rural communities as in nonrural communities. The challenge of providing developmentally and culturally appropriate early childhood education to Native children living in rural areas is exacerbated by poverty. The author reviews the historic evolution of…

  15. Planning Services for Young Handicapped American Indian and Alaska Native Children. 1980 Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Marilyn J., Ed.; And Others

    Eight papers examine issues in providing special education services to young native American handicapped children. B. Ramirez and J. Walker ("Background, Rationale, and Overview to Early Childhood and Special Education Services for Indian and Alaska Native Children'" consider the needs of young children as well as such special program aspects as…

  16. The Development of a Curriculum Toolkit with American Indian and Alaska Native Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Nicole L.; Hare, Dwight; Sempier, Tracie T.; Grace, Cathy

    2008-01-01

    This article explains the creation of the "Growing and Learning with Young Native Children" curriculum toolkit. The curriculum toolkit was designed to give American Indian and Alaska Native early childhood educators who work in a variety of settings the framework for developing a research-based, developmentally appropriate, tribally…

  17. Cancer Incidence, Survival, and Mortality among American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horm, John W.; Burhansstipanov, Linda

    1992-01-01

    Overall cancer incidence among southwestern American Indians is less than half that of U.S. whites; Alaska Native and white rates are similar. However, both native groups have elevated rates for specific cancers (stomach, liver, and gallbladder), and Indians have low five-year survival rates. Data tables outline incidence, mortality, and survival…

  18. Work of the Bureau of Education for the Natives of Alaska. Bulletin, 1929, No. 12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, William

    1929-01-01

    In addition to maintaining schools for the native children of Alaska, the United States Bureau of Education aids entire communities by extending medical aid, by relieving destitution, by fostering commercial enterprises, by supervising the reindeer industry, and by promoting generally the interests of the natives. The organization of the Alaska…

  19. Youth-onset type 2 diabetes among american indians and alaska natives.

    PubMed

    Moore, Kelly

    2010-01-01

    Youth-onset type 2 diabetes has emerged as a significant public health concern for American Indians and Alaska Natives. Data from the National Institutes of Health longitudinal epidemiological study among the Pima Indians of southern Arizona and the Indian Health Service continue to document a rising incidence and prevalence of type 2 diabetes among American Indian and Alaska Native youth. Although national trends related to lack of physical activity and to unhealthy nutrition behaviors have contributed to the epidemic, the adverse conditions created by poverty, social injustice, trauma, and cultural disruption are also important in understanding the underlying causes for this public health crisis. This adverse environment is likely to provide little support for healthy nutrition and physical activity behaviors as well as other diabetes self-care behaviors. Known risk factors from the Pima Indian studies, such as intrauterine exposure to diabetes, bottle-feeding, and obesity, provide a basis for worthwhile intervention strategies. In this article, the author will review the current literature on the epidemiology of youth-onset type 2 diabetes among American Indians and Alaska Natives, discuss causes for the diabetes epidemic among American Indians and Alaska Natives, review risk factors for youth-onset type 2 diabetes in this population, and share promising youth physical activity promotion programs created and implemented specifically for American Indian and Alaska Native youth. However, more research on interventions to address the Native communities' psychosocial issues and concerns around youth-onset type 2 diabetes is urgently needed.

  20. Use of online health information resources by American Indians and Alaska Natives

    PubMed Central

    Geana, Mugur; Daley, Christine Makosky; Nazir, Niaman; Cully, Lance; Etheridge, Jesse; Bledowski, Caroline; Choi, Won S.; Greiner, K. Allen

    2012-01-01

    According to the Office of Minority Health, an estimated 4.9 million people living in the United States consider themselves American Indian or Alaska Native (AIAN), either alone or in combination with one or more races/ethnicities. AIAN are a racial/ethnic group experiencing serious health disparities, with very little if any improvement in health outcomes over the last several decades. This study was designed to explore use of the Internet as a health information source among American Indians in the Central Plains region of the United States. Nine hundred and ninety eight Natives in the region were recruited from May 2008 to December 2009 at pow wows, health fairs, through focus groups, career fairs and conferences, and other social and cultural events, and asked to complete a self-administered survey. Although compared with data from the general population, AIAN from our sample may seem heavier Internet users, their use of modern wireless devices is limited, and their usage of Internet to access health information is lower compared to the adult US population. Natives living in the Central Plains region face generational differences in both general and health-related use of the Internet. Inadequate availability of culturally appropriate health information websites may drive AIAN towards search engines and general information websites. PMID:22642739

  1. Chronic disease risk factors among American Indian/Alaska Native women of reproductive age.

    PubMed

    Amparo, Pamela; Farr, Sherry L; Dietz, Patricia M

    2011-11-01

    The magnitude of chronic conditions and risk factors among American Indian/Alaska Native women of reproductive age is unknown. The objective of our study was to estimate this magnitude. We analyzed data for 2,821 American Indian/Alaska Native women and 105,664 non-Hispanic white women aged 18 to 44 years from the 2005 and 2007 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. We examined prevalence of high cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes, body mass index (kg/m(2)) ≥25.0, physical inactivity, smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, and frequent mental distress, and the cumulative number of these chronic conditions and risk factors (≥3, 2, 1, or 0). In a multivariable, multinomial logistic regression model, we examined whether American Indian/Alaska Native race was associated with the cumulative number of chronic conditions and risk factors. American Indian/Alaska Native women, compared with white women, had significantly higher rates of high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, smoking, and frequent mental distress. Of American Indian/Alaska Native women, 41% had 3 or more chronic conditions or risk factors compared with 27% of white women (χ(2), P < .001). After adjustment for income, education, and other demographic variables, American Indian/Alaska Native race was not associated with having either 1, 2, or 3 or more chronic conditions or risk factors. Three out of every 5 American Indian/Alaska Native women aged 18 to 44 years have 3 or more chronic conditions or risk factors. Improving economic status and education for AI/AN women could help eliminate disparities in health status.

  2. Geographic variation of native people along the Pacific Coast.

    PubMed

    Hall, R L; Hall, D A

    1995-06-01

    Data gathered by Boas in the 1890s from 1749 adult males and 1056 adult females were subjected to anthropometric analyses to investigate possible effects of climatic adaptation. The subjects were native people from California, Oregon, Washington, the panhandle of Alaska, and British Columbia. They were categorized by their tribe's latitude and longitude (the center point of tribal distribution) and by habitat (characterized as coastal, western lowlands, and interior). Multiple R regressions were used to determine complex relationships between age, habitat, latitude, rainfall, mean January temperature, mean July temperature, and blood quantum, all of which affected some anthropometric variables to statistically significant degrees in both the male and the female samples. Body size and proportional differences support other studies of Bergmann's and Allen's rules, and variation in the nasal index supports prior studies of selection of longer, narrower noses in cold and dry climates and broader noses in warmer, moister ones. Recent disruption in the central portion of the study area was detectable in reduced size of subjects in these regions. Other complicating factors, such as ethnicity and the possibility of prior migrations and intermarriage between populations, are discussed.

  3. Exploring the Potential for Technology-Based Nutrition Education Among WIC Recipients in Remote Alaska Native Communities.

    PubMed

    Power, Julianne M; Braun, Kathryn L; Bersamin, Andrea

    Estimate media technology use in Alaska Native communities to inform the feasibility of technology-based nutrition education. A self-administered questionnaire was mailed to a random selection of about 50% of Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) authorized representatives in remote Alaska Native communities (n = 975). Media technology use, interest in media technology-based nutrition education, and potential barriers were assessed. Chi-square tests were used to investigate associations among technology use, age, and education. Technology use was common among respondents (n = 368); use was significantly more common among younger age groups and participants with a higher level of education. Smartphone (78.8%) and Facebook (95.8%) use was comparable to national averages, but having a computer at home (38.4%) was much less likely. Less than 50% of participants have Internet access at home. Findings shed light on new opportunities for WIC and other programs to deliver nutrition education to Alaska Native people in remote communities. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. TRADITIONAL FOODS AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY PATTERNS AND ASSOCIATIONS WITH CULTURAL FACTORS IN A DIVERSE ALASKA NATIVE POPULATION

    PubMed Central

    Redwood, Diana G; Ferucci, Elizabeth D; Schumacher, Mary C; Johnson, Jennifer S; Lanier, Anne P; Helzer, Laurie J; Tom-Orme, Lillian; Murtaugh, Maureen A; Slattery, Martha L

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To determine the prevalence of traditional food and physical activity use and associations with cultural factors among 3,830 Alaska Native and American Indian (AN/AI) people enrolled in the Education and Research Towards Health (EARTH) Study in 3 regions of Alaska. Study design Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from a cohort study. Methods Participants (2,323 women and 1,507 men) completed a computer-assisted self-administered questionnaire that included information on diet, physical activity, life-style and cultural factors. Results Over 92% of participants reported eating at least 1 traditional food in the past year. The top 3 traditional foods reported were fish, moose and agutaq (a mixture of berries and fat). The percentage of people who consumed traditional foods varied by region and age but not by sex (p<0.01). Almost 70% of participants engaged in at least one traditional harvesting physical activity. Picking berries or greens, cutting/smoking fish or meat and fishing were the most common activities. Participation in traditional physical activity was highest in south-west Alaska and was higher among men than women, but did not differ by age (p<0.01). Both traditional food and physical activity were associated with greater tribal self-identification, speaking a Native language at home, using traditional remedies and participating in or attending traditional events (p<0.05). Conclusions The EARTH Study found relationships between traditional food use, physical activities, cultural activities and behaviours. Consumption of a variety of traditional foods and participation in traditional physical activities remain an important part of the contemporary Alaska Native life-style. Efforts to promote and sustain these foods and activities in AN/AI populations may lead to improved health outcomes. PMID:19024803

  5. Unintentional Injury Mortality Among American Indians and Alaska Natives in the United States, 1990–2009

    PubMed Central

    Pokhrel, Pallavi; Worthington, Anne; Billie, Holly; Sewell, Mack; Bill, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We describe the burden of unintentional injury (UI) deaths among American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations in the United States. Methods. National Death Index records for 1990 to 2009 were linked with Indian Health Service registration records to identify AI/AN deaths misclassified as non-AI/AN deaths. Most analyses were restricted to Contract Health Service Delivery Area counties in 6 geographic regions of the United States. We compared age-adjusted death rates for AI/AN persons with those for Whites; Hispanics were excluded. Results. From 2005 to 2009, the UI death rate for AI/AN people was 2.4 times higher than for Whites. Death rates for the 3 leading causes of UI death—motor vehicle traffic crashes, poisoning, and falls—were 1.4 to 3 times higher among AI/AN persons than among Whites. UI death rates were higher among AI/AN males than among females and highest among AI/AN persons in Alaska, the Northern Plains, and the Southwest. Conclusions. AI/AN persons had consistently higher UI death rates than did Whites. This disparity in overall rates coupled with recent increases in unintentional poisoning deaths requires that injury prevention be a major priority for improving health and preventing death among AI/AN populations. PMID:24754624

  6. Trends and Disparities in Stroke Mortality by Region for American Indians and Alaska Natives

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Carma; Valderrama, Amy L.; Veazie, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated trends and disparities in stroke death rates for American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) and White people by Indian Health Service region. Methods. We identified stroke deaths among AI/AN persons and Whites (adults aged 35 years or older) using National Vital Statistics System data for 1990 to 2009. We used linkages with Indian Health Service patient registration data to adjust for misclassification of race for AI/AN persons. Analyses excluded Hispanics and focused on Contract Health Service Delivery Area (CHSDA) counties. Results. Stroke death rates among AI/AN individuals were higher than among Whites for both men and women in CHSDA counties and were highest in the youngest age groups. Rates and AI/AN:White rate ratios varied by region, with the highest in Alaska and the lowest in the Southwest. Stroke death rates among AI/AN persons decreased in all regions beginning in 2001. Conclusions. Although stroke death rates among AI/AN populations have decreased over time, rates are still higher for AI/AN persons than for Whites. Interventions that address reducing stroke risk factors, increasing awareness of stroke symptoms, and increasing access to specialty care for stroke may be more successful at reducing disparities in stroke death rates. PMID:24754653

  7. Native Peoples of Canada: A Guide to Reference Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGill Univ., Montreal (Quebec). McLennan Library.

    Brief annotations accompany the 104 entries in this bibliography which emphasizes sources for ethnological research about Native peoples of Canada dating from 1913 to 1985. Materials reflecting concerns of social anthropology and historical approaches to the study of Native peoples are also included, but linguistics and archaeology are covered…

  8. Cancer Journey for American Indians and Alaska Natives in the Pacific Northwest
.

    PubMed

    Haozous, Emily A; Doorenbos, Ardith; Alvord, Lori A; Flum, David R; Morris, Arden M

    2016-09-01

    To describe the experiences of American Indian and Alaska Native cancer survivors to improve understanding of the trajectory of cancer treatment. 
. Qualitative focus group research.
. Rural and geographically isolated American Indian and Alaska Native communities in the Pacific Northwest.
. 30 American Indian and Alaska Native cancer survivors or caregivers. 
. The authors analyzed data from two focus groups with cancer survivors by using thematic analysis informed by indigenous methodologies.
. Based on focus group findings, the authors developed a conceptual model of the cancer experience called Rough Waters. Participants described their cancer experience as a collective journey involving family and friends and requiring resources to offset challenges along the way. Dominant themes were delays, isolation, communication, money, advocacy, spirituality, and family involvement.
. American Indians and Alaska Natives in the Pacific Northwest have special cultural needs during cancer care. The current study provides examples that can guide patient-provider interactions.
. Using the metaphor of cancer as a journey, clinicians can begin a dialogue to identify what will impede or assist the cancer journey for their American Indian and Alaska Native patients.

  9. Cancer Journey for American Indians and Alaska Natives in the Pacific Northwest

    PubMed Central

    Haozous, Emily A.; Doorenbos, Ardith; Alvord, Lori A.; Flum, David R.; Morris, Arden M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To describe the experiences of American Indian and Alaska Native cancer survivors to improve understanding of the trajectory of cancer treatment. Research Approach Qualitative focus group research. Setting Rural and geographically isolated American Indian and Alaska Native communities in the Pacific Northwest. Participants 30 American Indian and Alaska Native cancer survivors or caregivers. Methodologic Approach The authors analyzed data from two focus groups with cancer survivors by using thematic analysis informed by indigenous methodologies. Findings Based on focus group findings, the authors developed a conceptual model of the cancer experience called Rough Waters. Participants described their cancer experience as a collective journey involving family and friends and requiring resources to offset challenges along the way. Dominant themes were delays, isolation, communication, money, advocacy, spirituality, and family involvement. Conclusions American Indians and Alaska Natives in the Pacific Northwest have special cultural needs during cancer care. The current study provides examples that can guide patient–provider interactions. Interpretation Using the metaphor of cancer as a journey, clinicians can begin a dialogue to identify what will impede or assist the cancer journey for their American Indian and Alaska Native patients. PMID:27541555

  10. Dietary and genetic influences on hemostasis in a Yup'ik Alaska Native population.

    PubMed

    Au, Nicholas T; Reyes, Morayma; Boyer, Bert B; Hopkins, Scarlett E; Black, Jynene; O'Brien, Diane; Fohner, Alison E; Yracheta, Joe; Thornton, Timothy; Austin, Melissa A; Burke, Wylie; Thummel, Kenneth E; Rettie, Allan E

    2017-01-01

    Fish and marine animals are important components of the subsistence diet of Alaska Native people, resulting in a high ω3 PUFA intake. The historical record for circumpolar populations highlights a tendency for facile bleeding, possibly related to ω3 PUFA effects on platelet activation and/or vitamin K-dependent clotting factors. To evaluate these two scenarios in Yup'ik people of southwestern Alaska, we examined the association between dietary ω3 PUFA intake and activities of clotting factor II, V, fibrinogen, PT, INR, PTT, and sP-selectin in 733 study participants, using the nitrogen isotope ratio of red blood cells as a biomarker of ω3 PUFA consumption. sP-selectin alone correlated strongly and inversely with ω3 PUFA consumption. Approximately 36% of study participants exhibited PIVKA-II values above the threshold of 2 ng/ml, indicative of low vitamin K status. To assess genetic influences on vitamin K status, study participants were genotyped for common vitamin K cycle polymorphisms in VKORC1, GGCX and CYP4F2. Only CYP4F2*3 associated significantly with vitamin K status, for both acute (plasma vitamin K) and long-term (PIVKA-II) measures. These findings suggest: (i) a primary association of ω3 PUFAs on platelet activation, as opposed to vitamin K-dependent clotting factor activity, (ii) that reduced CYP4F2 enzyme activity associates with vitamin K status. We conclude that high ω3 PUFA intake promotes an anti-platelet effect and speculate that the high frequency of the CYP4F2*3 allele in Yup'ik people (~45%) evolved in response to a need to conserve body stores of vitamin K due to environmental limitations on its availability.

  11. Dietary and genetic influences on hemostasis in a Yup’ik Alaska Native population

    PubMed Central

    Au, Nicholas T.; Reyes, Morayma; Boyer, Bert B.; Hopkins, Scarlett E.; Black, Jynene; O’Brien, Diane; Fohner, Alison E.; Yracheta, Joe; Thornton, Timothy; Austin, Melissa A.; Burke, Wylie; Thummel, Kenneth E.

    2017-01-01

    Fish and marine animals are important components of the subsistence diet of Alaska Native people, resulting in a high ω3 PUFA intake. The historical record for circumpolar populations highlights a tendency for facile bleeding, possibly related to ω3 PUFA effects on platelet activation and/or vitamin K-dependent clotting factors. To evaluate these two scenarios in Yup’ik people of southwestern Alaska, we examined the association between dietary ω3 PUFA intake and activities of clotting factor II, V, fibrinogen, PT, INR, PTT, and sP-selectin in 733 study participants, using the nitrogen isotope ratio of red blood cells as a biomarker of ω3 PUFA consumption. sP-selectin alone correlated strongly and inversely with ω3 PUFA consumption. Approximately 36% of study participants exhibited PIVKA-II values above the threshold of 2 ng/ml, indicative of low vitamin K status. To assess genetic influences on vitamin K status, study participants were genotyped for common vitamin K cycle polymorphisms in VKORC1, GGCX and CYP4F2. Only CYP4F2*3 associated significantly with vitamin K status, for both acute (plasma vitamin K) and long-term (PIVKA-II) measures. These findings suggest: (i) a primary association of ω3 PUFAs on platelet activation, as opposed to vitamin K-dependent clotting factor activity, (ii) that reduced CYP4F2 enzyme activity associates with vitamin K status. We conclude that high ω3 PUFA intake promotes an anti-platelet effect and speculate that the high frequency of the CYP4F2*3 allele in Yup’ik people (~45%) evolved in response to a need to conserve body stores of vitamin K due to environmental limitations on its availability. PMID:28376131

  12. Alaska Native Weatherization Training and Jobs Program First Steps Toward Tribal Weatherization – Human Capacity Development

    SciTech Connect

    Wiita, Joanne

    2013-07-30

    The Alaska Native Weatherization Training and Jobs Project expanded weatherization services for tribal members’ homes in southeast Alaska while providing weatherization training and on the job training (OJT) for tribal citizens that lead to jobs and most probably careers in weatherization-related occupations. The program resulted in; (a) 80 Alaska Native citizens provided with skills training in five weatherization training units that were delivered in cooperation with University of Alaska Southeast, in accordance with the U.S. Department of Energy Core Competencies for Weatherization Training that prepared participants for employment in three weatherizationrelated occupations: Installer, Crew Chief, and Auditor; (b) 25 paid OJT training opportunities for trainees who successfully completed the training course; and (c) employed trained personnel that have begun to rehab on over 1,000 housing units for weatherization.

  13. Development of a quantitative food frequency questionnaire for use among the Yup'ik people of Western Alaska.

    PubMed

    Kolahdooz, Fariba; Simeon, Desiree; Ferguson, Gary; Sharma, Sangita

    2014-01-01

    Alaska Native populations are experiencing a nutrition transition and a resulting decrease in diet quality. The present study aimed to develop a quantitative food frequency questionnaire to assess the diet of the Yup'ik people of Western Alaska. A cross-sectional survey was conducted using 24-hour recalls and the information collected served as a basis for developing a quantitative food frequency questionnaire. A total of 177 males and females, aged 13-88, in six western Alaska communities, completed up to three 24-hour recalls as part of the Alaska Native Dietary and Subsistence Food Assessment Project. The frequency of the foods reported in the 24-hour recalls was tabulated and used to create a draft quantitative food frequency questionnaire, which was pilot tested and finalized with input from community members. Store-bought foods high in fat and sugar were reported more frequently than traditional foods. Seven of the top 26 foods most frequently reported were traditional foods. A 150-item quantitative food frequency questionnaire was developed that included 14 breads and crackers; 3 cereals; 11 dairy products; 69 meats, poultry and fish; 13 fruit; 22 vegetables; 9 desserts and snacks; and 9 beverages. The quantitative food frequency questionnaire contains 39 traditional food items. This quantitative food frequency questionnaire can be used to assess the unique diet of the Alaska Native people of Western Alaska. This tool will allow for monitoring of dietary changes over time as well as the identification of foods and nutrients that could be promoted in a nutrition intervention program intended to reduce chronic disease.

  14. Development of a Quantitative Food Frequency Questionnaire for Use among the Yup'ik People of Western Alaska

    PubMed Central

    Kolahdooz, Fariba; Simeon, Desiree; Ferguson, Gary; Sharma, Sangita

    2014-01-01

    Alaska Native populations are experiencing a nutrition transition and a resulting decrease in diet quality. The present study aimed to develop a quantitative food frequency questionnaire to assess the diet of the Yup'ik people of Western Alaska. A cross-sectional survey was conducted using 24-hour recalls and the information collected served as a basis for developing a quantitative food frequency questionnaire. A total of 177 males and females, aged 13-88, in six western Alaska communities, completed up to three 24-hour recalls as part of the Alaska Native Dietary and Subsistence Food Assessment Project. The frequency of the foods reported in the 24-hour recalls was tabulated and used to create a draft quantitative food frequency questionnaire, which was pilot tested and finalized with input from community members. Store-bought foods high in fat and sugar were reported more frequently than traditional foods. Seven of the top 26 foods most frequently reported were traditional foods. A 150-item quantitative food frequency questionnaire was developed that included 14 breads and crackers; 3 cereals; 11 dairy products; 69 meats, poultry and fish; 13 fruit; 22 vegetables; 9 desserts and snacks; and 9 beverages. The quantitative food frequency questionnaire contains 39 traditional food items. This quantitative food frequency questionnaire can be used to assess the unique diet of the Alaska Native people of Western Alaska. This tool will allow for monitoring of dietary changes over time as well as the identification of foods and nutrients that could be promoted in a nutrition intervention program intended to reduce chronic disease. PMID:24963718

  15. The coming of the blessing: A successful cross-cultural collaborative effort for American Indian/Alaska Native families.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Carol M; Aragon, Denise; Shephard, Janet; Van Sell, Sharon L

    2011-01-01

    This case study describes how the desire of an American Indian community in Wyoming grew into an American Indian/Alaska Native women's advisory committee, a culturally appropriate prenatal education booklet, and a national initiative for a nonprofit organization. The work began by bringing together women from 13 different nations and tribes, gaining the trust of the American Indian/Alaska Native women and working together to create an award winning booklet and a national initiative to support culturally appropriate prenatal education to every young American Indian/Alaska Native woman across this nation. Reservations from Wisconsin to Alaska have received this program for their young women.

  16. American Indian and Alaska Native Men's Use of Sexual Health Services, 2006-2010.

    PubMed

    Cahn, Megan A; Harvey, S Marie; Town, Matthew A

    2017-07-31

    American Indian and Alaska Native men experience poorer sexual health than white men. Barriers related to their sex and racial identity may prevent them from seeking care; however, little is known about this population's use of sexual health services. Sexual health service usage was examined among 923 American Indian and Alaska Native men and 5,322 white men aged 15-44 who participated in the 2006-2010 National Survey of Family Growth. Logistic regression models explored differences in service use by race and examined correlates of use among American Indians and Alaska Natives. Among men aged 15-19 and those aged 35-44, men with incomes greater than 133% of the federal poverty level, men with private insurance, those living in the Northeast and those living in rural areas, American Indians and Alaska Natives were more likely than whites to use STD or HIV services (odds ratios, 1.5-3.2). The odds of birth control service use did not differ by race. Differences in service use were found among American Indian and Alaska Native men: For example, those with a usual source of care had elevated odds of using sexual health services (1.9-3.4), while those reporting no recent testicular exam had reduced odds of using these services (0.3-0.4). This study provides baseline data on American Indian and Alaska Native men's use of sexual health services. Research exploring these men's views on these services is needed to help develop programs that better serve them. Copyright © 2017 by the Guttmacher Institute.

  17. 78 FR 10636 - Task Force on Research on Violence Against American Indian and Alaska Native Women; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ... Force on Research on Violence Against American Indian and Alaska Native Women; Meeting AGENCY: Office on Violence Against Women, United States Department of Justice. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: This... Research on Violence Against American Indian and Alaska Native Women(hereinafter ``the Task Force'')....

  18. Status and Trends in the Education of American Indians and Alaska Natives: 2008. NCES 2008-084

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVoe, Jill Fleury; Darling-Churchill, Kristen E.

    2008-01-01

    This document examines the educational progress of American Indian/Alaska Native children and adults and challenges in their education. This report shows that over time more American Indian/Alaska Native students have gone on to college and that their attainment expectations have increased. Despite these gains, progress has been uneven and…

  19. 25 CFR 900.200 - May persons who are not Indians or Alaska Natives assert claims under FTCA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May persons who are not Indians or Alaska Natives assert claims under FTCA? 900.200 Section 900.200 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Claims § 900.200 May persons who are not Indians or Alaska Natives assert claims under FTCA? Yes. Non...

  20. 25 CFR 1000.282 - May persons who are not Indians or Alaska Natives assert claims under FTCA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May persons who are not Indians or Alaska Natives assert claims under FTCA? 1000.282 Section 1000.282 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS... Indians or Alaska Natives assert claims under FTCA? Yes, non-Indian individuals served under the self...

  1. Some thoughts about the epidemiology of alcohol and drug use among American Indian/Alaska Native populations.

    PubMed

    Young, Robert S; Joe, Jennie R

    2009-01-01

    Researchers have established that rates of alcohol and illicit drug use among American Indians/Alaska Natives vary by tribe, gender, and age group, making it difficult to get an accurate estimate of the actual extent of the problem of substance abuse within this population group. Although percentage rates of alcohol consumption are higher in non-Hispanic Whites, American Indians/Alaska Natives nevertheless have the highest alcohol-related mortality rates and rates of substance use and dependence of all ethnic groups. Alcohol-related motor vehicle accidents are especially high for American Indian/Alaska Natives. Similarly, illicit drug use is higher among American Indians/Alaska Natives across all age groups compared to non-Indians. Data indicate that American Indians/Alaska Natives have the highest rates of use for marijuana, cocaine, inhalants, hallucinogens, and non-medical use of psychotherapeutics compared to other ethnic groups. Anecdotally, use of amphetamine appears to be high within some American Indian/Alaska Native tribes and has become a serious concern for most American Indian/Alaska Native communities. The percentage of American Indian/Alaska Native women using illicit drugs is lower than that found in men, except in younger age groups, in which percentage rates of illicit drug use by women in some tribes are comparable to rates for men.

  2. Risk and Protective Factors for Substance Use among American Indian or Alaska Native Youths. The NSDUH Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Health and Human Services, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Recent reports have shown higher rates of substance use among American Indians or Alaska Natives compared with persons from other racial ethnic groups. Among American Indian or Alaska Native youths aged 12 to 17, the rates of past month cigarette use, binge drinking, and illicit drug use were higher than those from other racial ethnic groups.…

  3. Intimate Partner Violence in American Indian and/or Alaska Native Communities: A Social Ecological Framework of Determinants and Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oetzel, John; Duran, Bonnie

    2004-01-01

    This essay synthesizes the research on intimate partner violence (IPV) in American Indian and/or Alaska Native communities using a social ecological framework. The review of literature demonstrates that American Indian and/or Alaska Native women are at an elevated risk for IPV compared to non-American Indian women and thus this essay describes…

  4. Native College Success in the Seventies: Trends at the University of Alaska at Fairbanks. ISER Occasional Paper No. 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinfeld, Judith; And Others

    Researchers analyzed information from student records and student organizations to determine the academic success, dropout, and graduation rates of Alaska Natives at the University of Alaska at Fairbanks (UAF) throughout the late 1970's. Perhaps due to political, social, and policy changes, Native student success peaked in the early 1970's and…

  5. 5 CFR 5501.105 - Exemption for otherwise disqualifying financial interests derived from Indian or Alaska Native...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exemption for otherwise disqualifying financial interests derived from Indian or Alaska Native birthrights. 5501.105 Section 5501.105... financial interests derived from Indian or Alaska Native birthrights. (a) Under 18 U.S.C. 208(b)(4),...

  6. U.S. Geological Survey activities related to American Indians and Alaska Natives: Fiscal year 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,; Brunstein, F. Craig

    2006-01-01

    The USGS works in cooperation with American Indian and Alaska Native governments to conduct research on (1) water, energy, and mineral resources, (2) animals and plants that are important for traditional lifeways or have environmental or economic significance, and (3) natural hazards. This report describes most of the activities that the USGS conducted with American Indian and Alaska Native governments, educational institutions, and individuals during Federal fiscal year (FY) 2004. Most of these USGS activities were collaborations with Tribes, Tribal organizations, or professional societies. Other activities were conducted cooperatively with the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) or other Federal entities.

  7. U.S. Geological Survey activities related to American Indians and Alaska Natives: Fiscal years 2007 and 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marcus, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    In the late 1800s, John Wesley Powell, the second director of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), followed his interest in the tribes of the Great Basin and Colorado Plateau and studied their cultures, languages, and surroundings. From that early time, the USGS has recognized the importance of Native knowledge and living in harmony with nature as complements to the USGS mission to better understand the Earth. Combining traditional ecological knowledge with empirical studies allows the USGS and Native American governments, organizations, and people to increase their mutual understanding and respect for this land. The USGS is the earth and natural science bureau within the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) and is not responsible for regulations or land management. Climate change is a major current issue affecting Native lives and traditions throughout the United States. Climate projections for the coming century indicate an increasing probability for more frequent and more severe droughts in the Southwest, including the Navajo Nation. Erosion has claimed Native homes in Alaska. Fish have become inedible due to diseases that turn their flesh mushy. Native people who rely on or who are culturally sustained by hunting, fishing, and using local plants are living with climate change now. The traditional knowledge of Native peoples enriches and confirms the work of USGS scientists. The results are truly synergistic-greater than the sum of their parts. Traditional ecological knowledge is respected and increasingly used in USGS studies-when the holders of that knowledge choose to share it. The USGS respects the rights of Native people to maintain their patrimony of traditional ecological knowledge. The USGS studies can help Tribes, Native organizations, and natural resource professionals manage Native lands and resources with the best available unbiased data and information that can be added to their traditional knowledge. Wise Native leaders have noted that traditional

  8. Gifted and Talented American Indian and Alaska Native Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tonemah, Stuart

    Native American tribes have a critical need for effective leadership, which can be found in the brightest of their youth. However, the focus of federal and state Native programs has been to provide remedial education. Historically, Native students at federal boarding schools did not perform at high levels because of low teacher expectations,…

  9. Lifelong Learning and Cultural Identity: Canada's Native People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Brian; Steckley, John

    This paper focuses on lifelong learning and the cultural identity of Canada's native people. The introduction reviews educational programs instituted by indigenous minority groups in New Zealand and Hawaii. The second section reviews the importance of storytelling and ritual ceremonies in Native education. The third section discusses the tension…

  10. Discrimination and participation in traditional healing for American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    PubMed

    Moghaddam, Jacquelene F; Momper, Sandra L; Fong, Timothy

    2013-12-01

    Contemporary American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIs/ANs) who live in urban areas today face the daunting task of navigating an urban landscape while maintaining the facets of their respective Native cultures. While AIs/ANs continue to grapple with the intergenerational trauma associated with forced assimilation, relocation movements, and boarding schools, these traumas have manifested themselves in elevated rates of psychopathology. AIs/ANs have elevated rates of domestic abuse, poverty, suicide, and substance misuse. Furthermore, AIs/ANs, like many other minority cultures often face discrimination in their everyday lives. In light of the aversive experiences they face, AI/AN people have followed the tenets of ritual and traditional healing to address imbalances in the body, mind, and spirit. For providers working with AI/AN clients, it is important to understand who is using traditional healing and why they are using alternative services. Secondary data analyses of survey data from 389 urban AIs/ANs were utilized in order to determine the relationship between experiences of discrimination and traditional healing use. Analyses indicated that experiences of discrimination in healthcare settings were significantly associated with participation in traditional healing. Analyses also indicated that nearly a quarter of the sample reported discrimination in a healthcare setting, roughly half of the sample had used traditional healing, and that the majority of those who had used traditional healing were women, and ages 35-44 (27%). This study calls attention to the socio-demographic factors implicated in traditional healing use by urban AI/AN people, in addition to the clinical and demographic characteristics of this sample.

  11. Building Healthy Hearts for American Indians and Alaska Natives: A Background Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lising, Mimi

    In keeping with its priority to reduce the disproportionate burden of heart, lung, and blood diseases in minority populations, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has established an outreach project called Building Healthy Hearts for American Indians and Alaska Natives. This background report provides an overview of the cardiovascular…

  12. Perceptions of Child Neglect among Urban American Indian/Alaska Native Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans-Campbell, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    A survey of 101 American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) parents in Los Angeles was conducted to explore perceptions of child neglect among urban AIAN parents and factors associated with perceptions. Participants rated substance abuse by parents as the most serious type of neglect. Providing material necessities and providing adequate structure were…

  13. American Indian and Alaska Native Early Childhood Health, Development, and Education Assessment Research. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, Patricia Cahape; Demmert, William G., Jr.

    This digest reports on the very limited research that has focused specifically on early childhood issues in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) health, development, and education. Extant research focuses primarily on infant mortality, birth weight and growth, obesity, and hearing and speech. Beginning in 1985, a longitudinal study called the…

  14. American Indian and Alaska Native Substance Abuse: Co-Morbidity and Cultural Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Norma; Nye, Patricia S.

    2001-01-01

    The devastating impact of substance abuse on American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) is reviewed with an emphasis on psychological and physical effects. Co-morbidity of substance abuse, trans-generational trauma, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, and depression among AI/ANs is also discussed since each condition may cause, impact, and/or…

  15. Education of Indian and Alaska Native Children in Rural Areas: New Horizons?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mack, David P.

    Recent organizational changes in the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) as well as the formation of Alaska's Rural Education Attendance Areas (REAAs) have important implications for the education of rural Native American children. The Title XI Education Amendments passed in November, 1978 (P.L. 95-561) aim at solving some of the administrative…

  16. ADH and ALDH polymorphisms among Alaska Natives entering treatment for alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Segal, B

    1999-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHs) and aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) involved in alcohol metabolism are polymorphic. Different alleles encode subunits of the enzymes that are related to differences in alcohol metabolism with different ethnic groups. This study examined the allele frequencies at the ADH1, ADH2, ADH3 and ALDH2 loci in Alaska Natives entering treatment for alcoholism to determine if allele frequencies at these loci differ among five distinct Alaska Native groups: Yupik and Inupiat Eskimos, Athabascan, Tlingit and Aleut. It was found that all persons were homozygous for the ADH1*1, ADH2*1 and ALDH2*1 alleles. Variations, however, were found for the allele distribution of the ADH3 genotype. Comparison with a general population sample found no differences in allele distributions for ADHs and ALDH2*1, but differences were found when comparisons were made with four Asian Groups. The study's findings suggest that the Alaska Natives are not protected from the risk of alcoholism in the same way that Asians who possess the ALDH2*2 genotype are considered to have a negative risk factor. Nor, does there appear to be any generalized differences between Alaska Native alcoholics and members of the general population with respect to the ALDH and ADH polymorphisms studied herein.

  17. Emotional and Behavioral Aspects of Diabetes in American Indians/Alaska Natives: A Systematic Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scarton, Lisa J.; de Groot, Mary

    2017-01-01

    American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) bear a disproportionate burden of diabetes and associated long-term complications. Behavioral interventions play a vital role in promoting diabetes medical and psychological outcomes, yet the development of interventions for AI/AN communities has been limited. A systematic review was conducted of…

  18. Drug Abuse Prevention Research Needs among American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trimble, Joseph E.

    1984-01-01

    Summarizes the literature regarding alcohol and drug abuse among American Indians and Alaska Natives noting four major knowledge gaps in the literature. Discusses abuse prevention efforts among American Indians and notes research questions to be considered regarding primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention efforts. Makes eight recommendations…

  19. A Review of Child Psychiatric Epidemiology With Special Reference to American Indian and Alaska Native Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Ben Ezra; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Places the limited knowledge of the psychological problems of American Indian and Alaska Native children in context of general child psychiatric epidemiology, using the taxonomy of the American Psychiatric Association's third "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual." Available from: White Cloud Center, Gaines Hall UOHSC, 840 Southwest Gaines…

  20. The Politics of Education Provision in Rural Native Alaska: The Case of Yukon Village

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinero, Steven

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, I address the role of educational service provision as a mode of post-colonial assimilation and encapsulation in Native Alaska (USA). I argue that these services have historically served State interests above local interests, implemented with little regard for indigenous values or priorities. The role of education provision in one…

  1. The Circles of Care Evaluation: Doing Participatory Evaluation with American Indian and Alaska Native Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurman, Pamela Jumper; Allen, James; Deters, Pamela B.

    2004-01-01

    Little information exists regarding mental health and special needs related to American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) families. In this article we emphasize the use of oral tradition during the Circles of Care initiative, which was essential in understanding cultural history and historical trauma of AI/ANs while giving a greater understanding…

  2. Substance Use and Sexual Risk Behaviors among American Indian and Alaska Native High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Ravello, Lori; Everett Jones, Sherry; Tulloch, Scott; Taylor, Melanie; Doshi, Sonal

    2014-01-01

    Background: We describe the prevalence of behaviors that put American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) high school students at risk for teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and the relationships among race/ethnicity and these behaviors. Methods: We analyzed merged 2007 and 2009 data from the national Youth Risk Behavior…

  3. Body Mass Index and Cancer Screening in Older American Indian and Alaska Native Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muus, Kyle J.; Baker-Demaray, Twyla; McDonald, Leander R.; Ludtke, Richard L.; Allery, Alan J.; Bogart, T. Andy; Goldberg, Jack; Ramsey, Scott D.; Buchwald, Dedra S.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Regular screenings are important for reducing cancer morbidity and mortality. There are several barriers to receiving timely cancer screening, including overweight/obesity. No study has examined the relationship between overweight/obesity and cancer screening among American Indian/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs). Purpose: To describe the…

  4. Suicide Among Young Alaska Native Men: Community Risk Factors and Alcohol Control

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. I examined community risk factors that explained variation in suicide rates among young rural Alaska Native men, evaluating the effectiveness of local alcohol control as a public health policy to reduce this population’s historically high vulnerability. Methods. I compiled suicide data, alcohol control status, and community-level social, cultural, and economic characteristics for Alaska Native men aged 15 to 34 years in 178 small Alaska communities from 1980 to 2007. Poisson regression equations explained variation in suicide rates as a function of endogenous alcohol control and community characteristics. Results. Suicide rates were higher in communities prohibiting alcohol importation under state law, but the effect was not significant after controlling for other community characteristics. More remote communities, those with fewer non-Natives, and those with evidence of cultural divides had higher suicide risks. Communities with higher incomes, more married couples, and traditional elders had lower risks. Conclusions. Alcohol control is ineffective in preventing suicide among Alaska Natives; suicide instead appears related to particular complex community characteristics that are either protective or increase risk. Communities have limited means to pursue economic and cultural development strategies that might offer more protection. PMID:24754505

  5. Alcohol Use and American Indian/Alaska Native Student Academic Performance among Tribal Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cometsevah, Cecelia L.

    2013-01-01

    Student academic performance, persistence, and graduation among American Indian/Alaska Native students in higher education are very low compared to other racial groups. Studies have shown that American Indian students enter higher education with a lack of academic preparedness, financial challenges, lack of social skills development, and lack of…

  6. The Act of Claiming Higher Education as Indigenous Space: American Indian/Alaska Native Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windchief, Sweeney; Joseph, Darold H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the concept of claiming postsecondary education as Indigenous space using curriculum, American Indian student services, and digital media. The intention of this manuscript is to address the disparities that are the result of assimilative educational practices in higher education for American Indians and Alaska Natives by…

  7. Circle of Life HIV/AIDS-Prevention Intervention for American Indian and Alaska Native Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Carol E.; Litchfield, Anne; Schupman, Edwin; Mitchell, Christina M.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the objectives, theoretical bases, development process, and evaluation efforts to-date for the Circle of Life (COL) curricula, HIV/AIDS prevention interventions designed for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth. The curricula are based on Indigenous models of learning and behavior encompassing concepts of Western…

  8. Suicide among young Alaska Native men: community risk factors and alcohol control.

    PubMed

    Berman, Matthew

    2014-06-01

    I examined community risk factors that explained variation in suicide rates among young rural Alaska Native men, evaluating the effectiveness of local alcohol control as a public health policy to reduce this population's historically high vulnerability. I compiled suicide data, alcohol control status, and community-level social, cultural, and economic characteristics for Alaska Native men aged 15 to 34 years in 178 small Alaska communities from 1980 to 2007. Poisson regression equations explained variation in suicide rates as a function of endogenous alcohol control and community characteristics. Suicide rates were higher in communities prohibiting alcohol importation under state law, but the effect was not significant after controlling for other community characteristics. More remote communities, those with fewer non-Natives, and those with evidence of cultural divides had higher suicide risks. Communities with higher incomes, more married couples, and traditional elders had lower risks. Alcohol control is ineffective in preventing suicide among Alaska Natives; suicide instead appears related to particular complex community characteristics that are either protective or increase risk. Communities have limited means to pursue economic and cultural development strategies that might offer more protection.

  9. Summer Internship Program for American Indian and Native Alaska College Students

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Argonne National Laboratory's Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students. Supported by the Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) in partnership with the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  10. American Indian/Alaska Native Students' Use of a University Student Support Office

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Raymond K.; Byers, Steven R.; Fenton, Beverly

    2006-01-01

    American Indian/Alaska Native college students responded to two surveys: one assessing their overall psychological status; the other, their current commitment to the traditions they learned as children. Students described their psychological status in reliable, yet diverse ways: displaced and lost; comfortable and naturally embedded; sick,…

  11. 77 FR 13137 - Draft Policy on Consultation with Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act Corporations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-05

    ... to ensure consultation and coordination with Indian tribal governments on Federal actions that will... required to consult and coordinate with ANCSA corporations on the same basis as Indian tribes in developing...] shall hereafter consult with Alaska Native corporations on the same basis as Indian tribes...

  12. Preventing Substance Abuse in American Indian and Alaska Native Youth: Promising Strategies for Healthier Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Elizabeth H.; Cummins, Lillian H.; Marlatt, G. Alan

    2004-01-01

    Substance abuse has had profoundly devastating effects on the health and well-being of American Indians and Alaska Natives. A wide variety of intervention methods has been used to prevent or stem the development of alcohol and drug problems in Indian youth, but there is little empirical research evaluating these efforts. This article is an…

  13. Perceptions of Child Neglect among Urban American Indian/Alaska Native Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans-Campbell, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    A survey of 101 American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) parents in Los Angeles was conducted to explore perceptions of child neglect among urban AIAN parents and factors associated with perceptions. Participants rated substance abuse by parents as the most serious type of neglect. Providing material necessities and providing adequate structure were…

  14. Committee opinion no. 515: Health care for urban American Indian and Alaska Native women.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    Sixty percent of American Indian and Alaska Native women live in metropolitan areas. Most are not eligible for health care provided by the federal Indian Health Service (IHS). The IHS partly funds 34 Urban Indian Health Organizations, which vary in size and services. Some are small informational and referral sites that are limited even in the scope of outpatient services provided. Compared with other urban populations, urban American Indian and Alaska Native women have higher rates of teenaged pregnancy, late or no prenatal care, and alcohol and tobacco use in pregnancy. Their infants have higher rates of preterm birth, mortality, and sudden infant death syndrome than infants in the general population. Barriers to care experienced by American Indian and Alaska Native women should be addressed. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists encourages Fellows to be aware of the risk profile of their urban American Indian and Alaska Native patients and understand that they often are not eligible for IHS coverage and may need assistance in gaining access to other forms of coverage. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists also recommends that Fellows encourage their federal legislators to support adequate funding for the Indian Health Care Improvement Act, permanently authorized as part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

  15. Ohoyo One Thousand: A Resource Guide of American Indian/Alaska Native Women, 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Owanah

    The resource guide contains a listing of 1,004 notable American Indian/Alaska Native women who are willing to share their resource skills in 62 Indian-specific programs, Indian priority issues, and women's agenda issues. The women represent 321 tribes and bands and are from 44 states. Biographical briefs for each woman include personal data (name,…

  16. The American Indian and Alaska Native Population: 2000. Census 2000 Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogunwole, Stella U.

    This brief summarizes data from Census 2000 on the American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) population and discusses its distribution at national, regional, and state levels. This information is intended for all levels of government to use in implementing and evaluating programs related to education, employment, health care, job training, civil…

  17. Traditional and western healing practices for alcoholism in American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    PubMed

    Abbott, P J

    1998-11-01

    The American Indian and Alaska Native population is a culturally diverse population with a current census of 1,959,000. Prior to White contact, there was historically little use of alcoholic beverages except for American Indians in the Southwest. After White contact, use and misuse of alcohol escalated rapidly; however, the prevalence, patterns, and problems of drinking alcoholic beverages vary enormously even in tribes closely linked geographically. American Indians and Alaska Natives have preserved and revitalized a number of traditional healing practices and applied these to the treatment of alcohol-related problems. These healing practices include the following: nativistic movements, sacred dances, sweat lodges, talking circle, four circles, and cultural enhancement programs. Additionally, Western treatment approaches have been applied in the treatment of problems related to alcohol, such as medication for detoxification, disulfiram (Antabuse), Alcoholics Anonymous, and behavioral interventions. Several investigators have completed a small number of naturalistic follow-up studies, but no one has undertaken a randomized controlled trial looking at specific methods of alcohol treatment in American Indians or Alaska Natives. American Indian and Alaska Native communities have adapted and integrated both Traditional and Western approaches to fit their own unique sociocultural needs.

  18. Body Mass Index and Cancer Screening in Older American Indian and Alaska Native Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muus, Kyle J.; Baker-Demaray, Twyla; McDonald, Leander R.; Ludtke, Richard L.; Allery, Alan J.; Bogart, T. Andy; Goldberg, Jack; Ramsey, Scott D.; Buchwald, Dedra S.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Regular screenings are important for reducing cancer morbidity and mortality. There are several barriers to receiving timely cancer screening, including overweight/obesity. No study has examined the relationship between overweight/obesity and cancer screening among American Indian/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs). Purpose: To describe the…

  19. 76 FR 35221 - Epidemiology Program for American Indian/Alaska Native Tribes and Urban Indian Communities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Epidemiology Program for American Indian/Alaska Native Tribes and... Z. Gould, Federal Register Liaison Officer, Indian Health Service. BILLING CODE 4165-16-M...

  20. A Review of Psychological and Educational Assessment of Northern American Indian/Alaska Native Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amos, Terese Lipinski

    1997-01-01

    Reviews the literature on psychological and educational assessment of American Indian and Alaska Native children, including the background psychological factors of biological deprivation, motivation, attitudes toward self, and traditional nonformal education. Discusses brain hemispheres, visuospatial skills, otitis media, fetal alcohol syndrome,…

  1. A Review of Child Psychiatric Epidemiology With Special Reference to American Indian and Alaska Native Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Ben Ezra; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Places the limited knowledge of the psychological problems of American Indian and Alaska Native children in context of general child psychiatric epidemiology, using the taxonomy of the American Psychiatric Association's third "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual." Available from: White Cloud Center, Gaines Hall UOHSC, 840 Southwest Gaines…

  2. Information Processing Patterns of Postsecondary American Indian/Alaska Native Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aragon, Steven R.

    2004-01-01

    In the last of a three-part series, this study examined the information processing patterns of postsecondary American Indian/Alaska Native students attending community and tribal colleges in the Southwest. Using a survey design, students completed the Kolb Learning Style Inventory, the Briggs and Myers Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, and the Oltman,…

  3. With All My Relations: Counseling American Indians and Alaska Natives within a Familial Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Faith G.

    2011-01-01

    Statistics show that two thirds of American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIs/ANs) live outside of tribal areas, and 50% of those individuals who seek counseling services will not use tribal resources. There is a strong likelihood that counselors will have the opportunity to provide services to AI/AN clients. The review of the academic literature…

  4. Incorporating the Culture of American Indian/Alaska Native Students into the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guillory, Raphael M.; Williams, Garnet L.

    2014-01-01

    Focus group interviews were conducted with educators and stakeholders for American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) students, including teachers, elementary and high school principals, tribal community leaders, and parents, to determine a global definition of culture and ways of infusing culture into curriculum to better educate AI/AN students. Focus…

  5. Giving Back: An Analysis of Motivations of Aspiring American Indian/Alaska Native School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Linda R.; Rude, Harvey

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the motivations of American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) educators currently enrolled in an educational leadership preparation program aspiring to educational leadership positions within AI/AN communities. Understanding the motivation of AI/AN educators to become school leaders may assist in increasing the pool of AI/AN school…

  6. Indian Health Service: A Comprehensive Health Care Program for American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indian Health Service (PHS/HSA), Rockville, MD.

    Comprehensive health care (preventive, curative, rehabilitative, and environmental) for more than 930,000 eligible American Indians and Alaska Natives is the responsibility of the Indian Health Service (IHS). Since 1955, this agency of the U.S. Public Health Service has made notable progress in raising the health status of Indians and Alaska…

  7. Giving Back: An Analysis of Motivations of Aspiring American Indian/Alaska Native School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Linda R.; Rude, Harvey

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the motivations of American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) educators currently enrolled in an educational leadership preparation program aspiring to educational leadership positions within AI/AN communities. Understanding the motivation of AI/AN educators to become school leaders may assist in increasing the pool of AI/AN school…

  8. Emotional and Behavioral Aspects of Diabetes in American Indians/Alaska Natives: A Systematic Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scarton, Lisa J.; de Groot, Mary

    2017-01-01

    American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) bear a disproportionate burden of diabetes and associated long-term complications. Behavioral interventions play a vital role in promoting diabetes medical and psychological outcomes, yet the development of interventions for AI/AN communities has been limited. A systematic review was conducted of…

  9. Incorporating the Culture of American Indian/Alaska Native Students into the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guillory, Raphael M.; Williams, Garnet L.

    2014-01-01

    Focus group interviews were conducted with educators and stakeholders for American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) students, including teachers, elementary and high school principals, tribal community leaders, and parents, to determine a global definition of culture and ways of infusing culture into curriculum to better educate AI/AN students. Focus…

  10. Cultural Discontinuity between Home and School and American Indian and Alaska Native Children's Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, D. Diego

    2017-01-01

    An assumption of culture-based education with respect to American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) children is that discontinuity between home and school cultures is responsible for educational underachievement. Using data from the 2009 round of the National Indian Education Study, a subset of the larger National Assessment of Education Progress…

  11. With All My Relations: Counseling American Indians and Alaska Natives within a Familial Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Faith G.

    2011-01-01

    Statistics show that two thirds of American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIs/ANs) live outside of tribal areas, and 50% of those individuals who seek counseling services will not use tribal resources. There is a strong likelihood that counselors will have the opportunity to provide services to AI/AN clients. The review of the academic literature…

  12. Substance Use and Sexual Risk Behaviors among American Indian and Alaska Native High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Ravello, Lori; Everett Jones, Sherry; Tulloch, Scott; Taylor, Melanie; Doshi, Sonal

    2014-01-01

    Background: We describe the prevalence of behaviors that put American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) high school students at risk for teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and the relationships among race/ethnicity and these behaviors. Methods: We analyzed merged 2007 and 2009 data from the national Youth Risk Behavior…

  13. Invasive sweetclover (Melilotus alba) impacts native seeding recruitment along floodplains of interior Alaska

    Treesearch

    Blaine T. Spellman; Tricia L. Wurtz

    2011-01-01

    Sweetclover (Melilotus alba) is a nonnative legume that has formed dense and extensive patches along several rivers in Alaska. Our research objective was to determine if sweetclover impacts recruitment of native seedlings in floodplain habitats. To determine if sweetclover impacted recruitment, we conducted a removal experiment along two rivers in...

  14. A Review of Psychological and Educational Assessment of Northern American Indian/Alaska Native Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amos, Terese Lipinski

    1997-01-01

    Reviews the literature on psychological and educational assessment of American Indian and Alaska Native children, including the background psychological factors of biological deprivation, motivation, attitudes toward self, and traditional nonformal education. Discusses brain hemispheres, visuospatial skills, otitis media, fetal alcohol syndrome,…

  15. Preventing Substance Abuse in American Indian and Alaska Native Youth: Promising Strategies for Healthier Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Elizabeth H.; Cummins, Lillian H.; Marlatt, G. Alan

    2004-01-01

    Substance abuse has had profoundly devastating effects on the health and well-being of American Indians and Alaska Natives. A wide variety of intervention methods has been used to prevent or stem the development of alcohol and drug problems in Indian youth, but there is little empirical research evaluating these efforts. This article is an…

  16. Factors Affecting Entry into Substance Abuse Treatment: Gender Differences among Alcohol-Dependent Alaska Natives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parks, Cheryl A.; Hesselbrock, Michie N.; Hesselbrock, Victor M.; Segal, Bernard

    2003-01-01

    Investigates alcohol treatment among Alaska Natives. Time between age at diagnosis and first treatment was similar for men and women. Women were more likely to be parents and reported more contact with health and mental health providers. Among men, acting as a parent, lifetime depression, and type of professional consulted were significantly…

  17. The Act of Claiming Higher Education as Indigenous Space: American Indian/Alaska Native Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windchief, Sweeney; Joseph, Darold H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the concept of claiming postsecondary education as Indigenous space using curriculum, American Indian student services, and digital media. The intention of this manuscript is to address the disparities that are the result of assimilative educational practices in higher education for American Indians and Alaska Natives by…

  18. NCES Studies on American Indian and Alaska Native Education. NCES 2005-535

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The Office of Indian Education (OIE) helps support local education agencies, Indian tribes and organizations, postsecondary institutions, and other entities in their efforts to address the unique educational and culturally related academic needs of American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) so that these students can meet the same challenging…

  19. 25 CFR 163.40 - Indian and Alaska Native forestry education assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Secretary shall pay all costs for tuition, books, fees and living expenses incurred by a forester intern... students who are enrolled in secondary schools, tribal or Alaska Native community colleges, and other post... college preparatory course work, an accredited institution which grants bachelor degrees in forestry...

  20. 25 CFR 163.40 - Indian and Alaska Native forestry education assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Secretary shall pay all costs for tuition, books, fees and living expenses incurred by a forester intern... students who are enrolled in secondary schools, tribal or Alaska Native community colleges, and other post... college preparatory course work, an accredited institution which grants bachelor degrees in forestry...

  1. 25 CFR 163.40 - Indian and Alaska Native forestry education assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Secretary shall pay all costs for tuition, books, fees and living expenses incurred by a forester intern... students who are enrolled in secondary schools, tribal or Alaska Native community colleges, and other post... college preparatory course work, an accredited institution which grants bachelor degrees in forestry...

  2. 25 CFR 163.40 - Indian and Alaska Native forestry education assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Secretary shall pay all costs for tuition, books, fees and living expenses incurred by a forester intern... students who are enrolled in secondary schools, tribal or Alaska Native community colleges, and other post... college preparatory course work, an accredited institution which grants bachelor degrees in forestry...

  3. Information Processing Patterns of Postsecondary American Indian/Alaska Native Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aragon, Steven R.

    2004-01-01

    In the last of a three-part series, this study examined the information processing patterns of postsecondary American Indian/Alaska Native students attending community and tribal colleges in the Southwest. Using a survey design, students completed the Kolb Learning Style Inventory, the Briggs and Myers Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, and the Oltman,…

  4. Social and Emotional Distress among American Indian and Alaska Native Students: Research Findings. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Ardy SixKiller

    Many American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth are repeatedly exposed to opportunities to participate in self-destructive and illegal behaviors. This digest examines risk factors associated with four contexts: peers, family, school, and community. Recent research has shown that, relative to national averages, AI/AN youth have higher rates of…

  5. Alcohol Use and American Indian/Alaska Native Student Academic Performance among Tribal Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cometsevah, Cecelia L.

    2013-01-01

    Student academic performance, persistence, and graduation among American Indian/Alaska Native students in higher education are very low compared to other racial groups. Studies have shown that American Indian students enter higher education with a lack of academic preparedness, financial challenges, lack of social skills development, and lack of…

  6. Summer Internship Program for American Indian and Native Alaska College Students

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory's Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students. Supported by the Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) in partnership with the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  7. Indians: An Introduction to Canada's Native People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLean, Hope

    An introduction to Canada Natives briefly identifies the seven different culture areas which existed in Canada before the white man came, and the Indian tribes who lived in those areas. The booklet then gives more extensive description of the history and culture of the Huron (farmers of the Eastern Woodlands), the Blackfoot (Plains), the Ojibwa…

  8. Historical Writing on Native People in Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Robin

    1982-01-01

    Reviews recent studies of native Canadian history. Because of more adequate available documentation, findings showed the most extensive work was on European-Indian contacts resulting from the fur trade. The author cites the need for more work on individual Indian cultural histories as well as a good general history of Canada's indigenous groups.…

  9. Local perspectives of the ability of HIA stakeholder engagement to capture and reflect factors that impact Alaska Native health.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jen; Nix, Nancy A; Snyder, Elizabeth Hodges

    2014-01-01

    Health impact assessment (HIA) is a process used to inform planning and decision making in a range of sectors by identifying potential positive and negative health effects of proposed projects, programs, or policies. Stakeholder engagement is an integral component of HIA and requires careful consideration of participant diversity and appropriate methodologies. Ensuring that the engagement process is able to capture and address Indigenous worldviews and definitions of health is important where Indigenous populations are impacted, particularly in northern regions experiencing increases in natural resource development activities on Indigenous lands. Investigate local participant perspectives of an HIA of a proposed Alaska coal mine, with a focus on the ability of the HIA process to capture, reflect, and address health concerns communicated by Alaska Native participants. A qualitative approach guided by semi-structured interviews with purposeful sampling to select key informants who participated in the coal mine HIA stakeholder engagement process. QUALITATIVE DATA IDENTIFIED THREE KEY THEMES AS IMPORTANT FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF ALASKA NATIVE PARTICIPANTS IN THE ALASKA COAL MINE HIA STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT PROCESS: (i) the inability of the engagement process to recognize an Indigenous way of sharing or gathering information; (ii) the lack of recognizing traditional knowledge and its use for identifying health impacts and status; and (iii) the inability of the engagement process to register the relationship Indigenous people have with the environment in which they live. Issues of trust in the HIA process and of the HIA findings were expressed within each theme. Recommendations derived from the research identify the need to acknowledge and incorporate the history of colonialism and assimilation policies in an HIA when assessing health impacts of resource development on or near Indigenous lands. These historical contexts must be included in baseline conditions to understand

  10. Native Peoples of the Russian Far North.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vakhtin, Nikolai

    "Northern minorities" is an official term for 26 indigenous peoples who live in a vast northern and Arctic territory (58% of the new Russia, mostly Siberia). These peoples include very different ethnic groups with different cultures and languages, but today they all live in a situation best described as "ethnic catastrophe."…

  11. CHRNA5-A3-B4 genetic variants alter nicotine intake and interact with tobacco use to influence body weight in Alaska-Native tobacco users

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Andy Z.X.; Renner, Caroline C.; Hatsukami, Dorothy K.; Benowitz, Neal L.; Tyndale, Rachel F.

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims Gene variants in CHRNA5-A3-B4, which encode for the α5, α3 and β4 nicotinic receptor subunits, are associated with altered smoking behaviors in European-Americans. Little is known about CHRNA5-A3-B4 and its association with smoking behaviors and weight in Alaska-Native people, which is a population with high prevalence but low levels of tobacco consumption, extensive smokeless tobacco use, and high rates of obesity. We investigated CHRNA5-A3-B4 haplotype structure and its association with nicotine intake and obesity in Alaska-Native people. Design, Setting, Participants A cross sectional study of 400 Alaska-Native individuals including 290 tobacco users. Measurements CHRNA5-A3-B4 genotype, body weight, and tobacco consumption biomarkers such as plasma cotinine and urinary total nicotine equivalents (TNE). Findings Alaska-Native people have a distinct CHRNA5-A3-B4 haplotype structure compared with European/African-Americans. In 290 Alaska-Native tobacco users, the ‘G’ allele of rs578776, which tagged a 30kb haplotype in CHRNA5-A3-B4, was prevalent (16%) and significantly associated with nicotine intake (20% higher plasma cotinine, P<0.001, 16% higher TNE, P=0.076), while rs16969968 was not associated with nicotine intake. Rs578776 acted in combination with CYP2A6, the main nicotine-metabolizing enzyme, to increase nicotine intake by 1.8 fold compared with the low risk group (P<0.001). Furthermore rs2869950, a single nucleotide polymorphism 5′ to CHRNB4, was significantly associated with increased body mass index (P<0.01) in the tobacco users even after controlling for differences in nicotine intake (P<0.01). Conclusions Genetic variants in CHRNA5-A3-B4 alter nicotine intake and body mass index in a population of Alaska-Native people, who have a distinct haplotype structure, smoking behaviors and prevalence of obesity. PMID:23692359

  12. Alcohol control and injury death in Alaska native communities: wet, damp and dry under Alaska's local option law.

    PubMed

    Berman, M; Hull, T; May, P

    2000-03-01

    This article tests whether different forms of community-level alcohol control significantly affect injury deaths in a population with extremely high injury mortality. The 1981 Alaska local option law provides a natural experiment for studying how implementation of community level controls may be associated with changes in injury deaths, most of which are alcohol-related, among Alaska Natives living in small communities. The study compares population and community-specific death rates under different levels of alcohol control for the 97 communities that passed restrictions between 1980 and 1993 with the death rates in the same communities during periods when no restrictions were in place. Injury death rates were generally lower during periods when alcohol sales, importation or possession were restricted than when no restrictions were in place (wet). More restrictive controls (dry) significantly reduced homicides; less restrictive control options (damp) reduced suicides. Accident and homicide death rates fell, on average, by 74 and 66 per 100,000, respectively, for the 89 communities that banned sale and importation or possession. A control group of 61 small communities that did not change control status under the law showed no significant changes over time in accident or homicide death rates. The changes in accidental and homicide death rates are statistically significant, although these reduced rates remain 2.5 to 7 times national death rates. The isolated nature of Alaskan villages may explain why alcohol control has more effect in Alaska than has been found in studies of Native Americans living in other states.

  13. The Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act and the Alaskans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perret, Karen

    1978-01-01

    The article discusses: the ideological and juridical basis for U.S. relationships with Native Americans, examines some of the most significant provisions of the Act, suggests that those provisions are in conflict with Native cognitive systems, and suggests some effects of the Act in the light of fundamental U.S. ideology. (Author/NQ)

  14. Identifying Outstanding Talent in American Indian and Alaska Native Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Carolyn M.; McIntire, Jay A.

    This report reviews and synthesizes the most promising practices used to identify exceptionally talented students from the Native American population. Preliminary information includes an Indian Student Bill of Rights, discussion of the problem of talent identification, and discussion of special issues including diversity within the Native American…

  15. Funding and Resources for American Indian and Alaska Native Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brescia, William

    The Federal Government has a responsibility to fulfill treaty promises for Native education. However, spending for Native education has fallen since 1975, while overall educational spending has increased. Reversal of this trend must include a shift in focus from quantitative goals to qualitative goals and support of culturally relevant education.…

  16. Maynard Participation in Alaska Forum on the Environment Panel Discussion on Increasing Input to the US National Climate Assessment (NCA) and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Processes from Alaska, with Emphasis on Indigenous Peoples Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy G.

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Nancy Maynard was invited by the Alaska Forum on the Environment to participate in a Panel Discussion to discuss (1) background about what the US NCA and International IPCC assessments are, (2) the impact the assessments have on policy-making, (3) the process for participation in both assessments, (4) how we can increase participation by Indigenous Peoples such as Native Americans and Alaska Natives, (5) How we can increase historical and current impacts input from Native communities through stories, oral history, "grey" literature, etc. The session will be chaired by Dr. Bull Bennett, a cochair of the US NCA's chapter on "Native and Tribal Lands and Resources" and Dr. Maynard is the other co-chair of that chapter and they will discuss the latest activities under the NCA process relevant to Native Americans and Alaska Natives. Dr. Maynard is also a Lead Author of the "Polar Regions" chapter of the IPCC WG2 (5th Assessment) and she will describes some of the latest approaches by the IPCC to entrain more Indigenous peoples into the IPCC process.

  17. A Process Evaluation of the Alaska Native Colorectal Cancer Family Outreach Program

    PubMed Central

    Redwood, Diana; Provost, Ellen; Lopez, Ellen D. S.; Skewes, Monica; Johnson, Rhonda; Christensen, Claudia; Sacco, Frank; Haverkamp, Donald

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the results of a process evaluation of the Alaska Native (AN) Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Family Outreach Program, which encourages CRC screening among AN first-degree relatives (i.e., parents, siblings, adult children; hereafter referred to as relatives) of CRC patients. Among AN people incidence and death rates from CRC are the highest of any ethnic/racial group in the United States. Relatives of CRC patients are at increased risk; however, CRC can be prevented and detected early through screening. The evaluation included key informant interviews (August to November 2012) with AN and non-AN stakeholders and program document review. Five key process evaluation components were identified: program formation, evolution, outreach responses, strengths, and barriers and challenges. Key themes included an incremental approach that led to a fully formed program and the need for dedicated, culturally competent patient navigation. Challenges included differing relatives’ responses to screening outreach, health system data access and coordination, and the program impact of reliance on grant funding. This program evaluation indicated a need for more research into motivating patient screening behaviors, electronic medical records systems quality improvement projects, improved data-sharing protocols, and program sustainability planning to continue the dedicated efforts to promote screening in this increased risk population. PMID:26157041

  18. Assessing the Everyday Discrimination Scale Among American Indians and Alaska Natives

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Kelly L.; Noonan, Carolyn; Goins, R. Turner; Henderson, William G.; Beals, Janette; Manson, Spero M.; Acton, Kelly J.; Roubideaux, Yvette

    2015-01-01

    The Everyday Discrimination Scale (EDS) has been used widely as a measure of subjective experiences of discrimination. The usefulness of this measure for assessments of perceived experiences of discrimination by American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) peoples has not been explored. Data derived from the Special Diabetes Program for Indians – Healthy Heart Demonstration Project (SDPI-HH), a large-scale initiative to reduce cardiovascular risk among AI/ANs with Type 2 diabetes. Participants (N=3,039) completed a self-report survey that included the EDS and measures of convergent and divergent validity. Missing data were estimated by multiple imputation techniques. Reliability estimates for the EDS were calculated, yielding a single factor with high internal consistency (α=0.92). Younger, more educated respondents reported greater perceived discrimination; retired or widowed respondents reported less. Convergent validity was evidenced by levels of distress, anger, and hostility, which increased as the level of perceived discrimination increased (all p<0.001). Divergent validity was evidenced by the absence of an association between EDS and resilient coping. Resilient coping and insulin-specific diabetes knowledge were not significantly associated with perceived discrimination (p=0.61 and 0.16, respectively). However, general diabetes-related health knowledge was significantly associated with perceived discrimination (p=0.02). The EDS is a promising measure for assessing perceived experiences of discrimination among those AI/ANs who participated in the SDPI-HH. PMID:26146948

  19. Assessing the Everyday Discrimination Scale among American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Kelly L; Noonan, Carolyn; Goins, R Turner; Henderson, William G; Beals, Janette; Manson, Spero M; Acton, Kelly J; Roubideaux, Yvette

    2016-01-01

    The Everyday Discrimination Scale (EDS) has been used widely as a measure of subjective experiences of discrimination. The usefulness of this measure for assessments of perceived experiences of discrimination by American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) peoples has not been explored. Data derived from the Special Diabetes Program for Indians--Healthy Heart Demonstration Project (SDPI-HH), a large-scale initiative to reduce cardiovascular risk among AI/ANs with Type 2 diabetes. Participants (N = 3,039) completed a self-report survey that included the EDS and measures of convergent and divergent validity. Missing data were estimated by multiple imputation techniques. Reliability estimates for the EDS were calculated, yielding a single factor with high internal consistency (α = .92). Younger, more educated respondents reported greater perceived discrimination; retired or widowed respondents reported less. Convergent validity was evidenced by levels of distress, anger, and hostility, which increased as the level of perceived discrimination increased (all p < .001). Divergent validity was evidenced by the absence of an association between EDS and resilient coping. Resilient coping and insulin-specific diabetes knowledge were not significantly associated with perceived discrimination (p = .61 and 0.16, respectively). However, general diabetes-related health knowledge was significantly associated with perceived discrimination (p = .02). The EDS is a promising measure for assessing perceived experiences of discrimination among those AI/ANs who participated in the SDPI-HH. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Functional outcomes during inpatient rehabilitation for American Indian and Alaska Native children with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Molly M; Jimenez, Nathalia; Apkon, Susan D; Rivara, Frederick P

    2016-05-31

    American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) people have the highest traumatic brain injury (TBI)-related mortality in the United States, but little is known about AI/AN children who survive traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study compares function and factors associated with discharge function between AI/AN and White children with TBI during inpatient rehabilitation. Retrospective national cohort study of 114 AI/AN and 7,267 White children aged 6 months-18 years who received inpatient TBI rehabilitation between 2002-2012 at facilities utilizing the Uniform Data System for Medical Rehabilitation\\scriptsize®. The outcome measure was developmental functional quotients (DFQ is the FIM\\scriptsize® or WeeFIM\\scriptsize® score divided by age norms x 100) at discharge. AI/AN race was not associated with motor (regression coefficient (β) 0.18, 95% confidence interval (CI) -2.39, 2.76) or cognitive (β -1.54, 95% CI -3.75, 0.67) function. Among a subgroup with loss of consciousness > 24 hours (AI/AN n= 13, White n= 643), AI/AN race was associated with lower motor DFQ (β -12.83, 95% CI -25.39, -0.34). Overall, AI/AN race was not associated with inpatient rehabilitation function for children with TBI, but providers should not assume AI/ANs with more severe injuries have equitable outcomes.

  1. A Process Evaluation of the Alaska Native Colorectal Cancer Family Outreach Program.

    PubMed

    Redwood, Diana; Provost, Ellen; Lopez, Ellen D S; Skewes, Monica; Johnson, Rhonda; Christensen, Claudia; Sacco, Frank; Haverkamp, Donald

    2016-02-01

    This article presents the results of a process evaluation of the Alaska Native (AN) Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Family Outreach Program, which encourages CRC screening among AN first-degree relatives (i.e., parents, siblings, adult children; hereafter referred to as relatives) of CRC patients. Among AN people incidence and death rates from CRC are the highest of any ethnic/racial group in the United States. Relatives of CRC patients are at increased risk; however, CRC can be prevented and detected early through screening. The evaluation included key informant interviews (August to November 2012) with AN and non-AN stakeholders and program document review. Five key process evaluation components were identified: program formation, evolution, outreach responses, strengths, and barriers and challenges. Key themes included an incremental approach that led to a fully formed program and the need for dedicated, culturally competent patient navigation. Challenges included differing relatives' responses to screening outreach, health system data access and coordination, and the program impact of reliance on grant funding. This program evaluation indicated a need for more research into motivating patient screening behaviors, electronic medical records systems quality improvement projects, improved data-sharing protocols, and program sustainability planning to continue the dedicated efforts to promote screening in this increased risk population.

  2. An historical profile of American Indians and Alaska Natives in psychology.

    PubMed

    Trimble, Joseph E; Clearing-Sky, Mary

    2009-10-01

    The history of American Indian and Alaska Native psychology is a brief one in comparison with the rich histories of other U.S. ethnic groups. In the mid-1960s, there were probably 10 or so Indians and Natives with doctoral degrees in psychology; since then, that number has increased to about 350. The number of publications dealing with Indian and Native psychological topics also has increased significantly over the past 40 years. Appreciable gains have been made in the number of academic institutions that actively recruit and educate Indian and Native students in psychology and in the conduct of research and scholarly projects. The progress and developments generated and attained in Indian and Native psychology in the United States is summarized in this article. To add to the discussion, the voices and experiences of 5 notable American Indian elder psychologists also are featured.

  3. Unemployment, drug use, and HIV risk among American Indian and Alaska Native drug users.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, G L; Fisher, D G; Estrada, A L; Trotter, R

    2000-01-01

    American Indians and Alaska Natives have had low employment in recent history. Drug users also have low employment due to cycles of drug use and relapse,and the impact of the type of drug abused on levels of functioning. Drug use is associated with increased HIV risk through injection drug use, frequency of injection, and needle sharing. Data from three sites of the NIDA Cooperative Agreement for Community Based-Outreach/Intervention Research were analyzed to determine the relationship among race/ethnicity, age, and level of educational attainment on employment and unemployment at intake interview and six-month follow-up. HIV risk for those employed and unemployed was then assessed. American Indian and Alaska Native drug users were younger, less educated, and less likely to have a paid job at both intake and follow-up than non-Native drug users. Those participants who were unemployed at baseline interview who were American Indian/Alaska Native were less likely to transition to employment at six-month follow-up than other race/ethnicity groups in the cohort. However, all participants showed low levels of employment at follow-up. Individuals who were employed at baseline and those who transitioned to employment had lower levels of injection drug use and needle sharing than those who were unemployed at both baseline and follow-up. American Indian and Alaska Native drug users may be at risk for acquisition of HIV due to drug risk behaviors that appear to be associated with unemployment.

  4. A Report on the Status of American Indians and Alaska Natives in Education: Historical Legacy to Cultural Empowerment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trujillo, Octaviana V.; Alston, Denise A.

    2005-01-01

    On October 27, 2004, the National Education Association (NEA) joined with the National Indian Education Association (NIEA) to host "Moving from Research to Practice: A Summit on Indian Students." Over 100 American Indian and Alaska Native education practitioners and researchers from Alaska to Mississippi gathered to share their knowledge…

  5. Community-based research as a mechanism to reduce environmental health disparities in American Indian and Alaska Native communities

    EPA Science Inventory

    Racial and ethnic minority communities, including American Indian and Alaska Natives, have been disproportionately impacted by environmental pollution and contamination. This includes siting and location of point sources of pollution, legacies of contamination of drinking and re...

  6. American Indian and Alaska Native mental health: diverse perspectives on enduring disparities.

    PubMed

    Gone, Joseph P; Trimble, Joseph E

    2012-01-01

    As descendants of the indigenous peoples of the United States, American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) have experienced a resurgence in population and prospects since the beginning of the twentieth century. Today, tribally affiliated individuals number over two million, distributed across 565 federally recognized tribal communities and countless metropolitan and nonreservation rural areas. Although relatively little evidence is available, the existing data suggest that AI/AN adults and youth suffer a disproportionate burden of mental health problems compared with other Americans. Specifically, clear disparities have emerged for AI/AN substance abuse, posttraumatic stress, violence, and suicide. The rapid expansion of mental health services to AI/AN communities has, however, frequently preceded careful consideration of a variety of questions about critical components of such care, such as the service delivery structure itself, clinical treatment processes, and preventive and rehabilitative program evaluation. As a consequence, the mental health needs of these communities have easily outpaced and overwhelmed the federally funded agency designed to serve these populations, with the Indian Health Service remaining chronically understaffed and underfunded such that elimination of AI/AN mental health disparities is only a distant dream. Although research published during the past decade has substantially improved knowledge about AI/AN mental health problems, far fewer investigations have explored treatment efficacy and outcomes among these culturally diverse peoples. In addition to routine calls for greater clinical and research resources, however, AI/AN community members themselves are increasingly advocating for culturally alternative approaches and opportunities to address their mental health needs on their own terms.

  7. Native and Non-Native Teachers and Administrators for Elementary and Secondary Schools Serving American Indian and Alaska Native Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noley, Grayson

    This paper discusses issues in the recruitment, retention, and training of Native college students as teachers and school administrators. The number of Native educational professionals serving schools for Native students is extremely small, and there is evidence that even this number is declining relative to the increasing Native school…

  8. Impacts of fire on non-native plant recruitment in black spruce forests of interior Alaska.

    PubMed

    Walker, Xanthe J; Frey, Matthew D; Conway, Alexandra J; Jean, Mélanie; Johnstone, Jill F

    2017-01-01

    Climate change is expected to increase the extent and severity of wildfires throughout the boreal forest. Historically, black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.) forests in interior Alaska have been relatively free of non-native species, but the compounding effects of climate change and an altered fire regime could facilitate the expansion of non-native plants. We tested the effects of wildfire on non-native plant colonization by conducting a seeding experiment of non-native plants on different substrate types in a burned black spruce forest, and surveying for non-native plants in recently burned and mature black spruce forests. We found few non-native plants in burned or mature forests, despite their high roadside presence, although invasion of some burned sites by dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) indicated the potential for non-native plants to move into burned forest. Experimental germination rates were significantly higher on mineral soil compared to organic soil, indicating that severe fires that combust much of the organic layer could increase the potential for non-native plant colonization. We conclude that fire disturbances that remove the organic layer could facilitate the invasion of non-native plants providing there is a viable seed source and dispersal vector.

  9. Impacts of fire on non-native plant recruitment in black spruce forests of interior Alaska

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Alexandra J.; Jean, Mélanie

    2017-01-01

    Climate change is expected to increase the extent and severity of wildfires throughout the boreal forest. Historically, black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.) forests in interior Alaska have been relatively free of non-native species, but the compounding effects of climate change and an altered fire regime could facilitate the expansion of non-native plants. We tested the effects of wildfire on non-native plant colonization by conducting a seeding experiment of non-native plants on different substrate types in a burned black spruce forest, and surveying for non-native plants in recently burned and mature black spruce forests. We found few non-native plants in burned or mature forests, despite their high roadside presence, although invasion of some burned sites by dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) indicated the potential for non-native plants to move into burned forest. Experimental germination rates were significantly higher on mineral soil compared to organic soil, indicating that severe fires that combust much of the organic layer could increase the potential for non-native plant colonization. We conclude that fire disturbances that remove the organic layer could facilitate the invasion of non-native plants providing there is a viable seed source and dispersal vector. PMID:28158284

  10. Association of a genetic variant of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A with infections in Alaska Native children.

    PubMed

    Gessner, Bradford D; Gillingham, Melanie B; Wood, Thalia; Koeller, David M

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate whether the arctic variant (c.1436C→T) of carnitine palmitoyltransferase type 1A (CPT1A) is associated with a higher incidence of adverse health outcomes in Alaska Native infants and children. We evaluated health measures from birth certificates (n = 605) and Alaska Medicaid billing claims (n = 427) collected from birth to 2.5 years of age for a cohort of Alaska Native infants with known CPT1A genotype. To account for geographic variations in gene distribution and other variables, data also were evaluated in cohorts. When analysis was restricted to residents of nonhub communities in Western and Northern Alaska, children homozygous for the arctic variant experienced more episodes of lower respiratory tract infection than did heterozygous or noncarrier children (5.5 vs 3.7, P = .067) and were more likely to have had otitis media (86% vs 69%, 95% CI 1.4-8.9). Associations were weaker for more homogeneous cohorts. The association of the arctic variant of CPT1A with infectious disease outcomes in children between birth and 2.5 years of age suggests that this variant may play a role in the historically high incidence of these health outcomes among indigenous Arctic populations; further studies will need to assess if this association was confounded by other risk factors. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Curriculum Planning and Development for Native Americans and Alaska Natives in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inglebret, Ella; Pavel, D. Michael

    Following a historical review of Native American educational practices, this book chapter examines various approaches for increasing Native American representation in higher education, presented within the framework of three orientations to curriculum planning. First, Native students may be expected to change to fit the curriculum--to learn the…

  12. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Preterm Birth Among American Indian and Alaska Native Women.

    PubMed

    Raglan, Greta B; Lannon, Sophia M; Jones, Katherine M; Schulkin, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth disproportionately affects American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) women. This disparity in birth outcomes may stem from higher levels of exposure to psychosocial, sociodemographic, and medical risk factors. This paper reviews relevant research related to preterm birth in American Indian and Alaska Native women. This narrative review examines disparities in preterm birth rates between AI/AN and other American women, and addresses several maternal risk factors and barriers that contribute to elevated preterm birth rates among this racial minority group. Additionally, this paper focuses on recent evidence that geographical location can significantly impact preterm birth rates among AI/AN women. In particular, access to care among AI/AN women and differences between rural and urban areas are discussed.

  13. Reforming American Indian/Alaska Native Health Care Financing: The Role of Medicaid

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Andy

    2005-01-01

    Chronic underfunding of American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) health care by the federal government has weakened the capacity of the Indian Health Service, tribal governments, and the urban Indian health delivery system to meet the health care needs of the AIAN population. I describe the current role of Medicaid in financing health care services for American Indians/Alaska Natives and offer 3 suggestions for reforming Medicaid financing of AIAN health care: (1) apply a 100% federal matching rate to the cost of Medicaid services furnished by urban Indian health programs; (2) apply a 100% federal matching rate to the cost of Medicaid services furnished by referral to AIAN patients of hospitals or clinics operated by the Indian Health Service, tribes, tribal organizations, or urban Indian health programs; and (3) exempt AIAN Medicaid beneficiaries who receive services from such hospitals or clinics from state reductions in Medicaid eligibility and benefits. PMID:15855449

  14. Mental Health in Diabetes Prevention and Intervention Programs in American Indian/Alaska Native Communities.

    PubMed

    Whitegoat, Wynette; Vu, Jeremy; Thompson, Kellie; Gallagher, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    American Indian and Alaska Natives youth and adults experience higher rates of type 2 diabetes and mental health problems than the general United States population. Few studies have explored the relationship other than detail the two issues independently. The present review aims to identify programs that seek to prevent/treat type 2 diabetes and mental health disorders in the American Indian and Alaska Native population. Available programs were reviewed for AI/AN adults and youth who suffer with both. As part of the review process, databases were searched for peer reviewed published studies. It was found that very few programs effectively incorporate mental health into the existing diabetes program. Four recommendations for future research are offered based on this literature review.

  15. Residential Substance Abuse Treatment for Urban American Indians and Alaska Natives, Part II: Costs.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Bentson H; Walker, Dale; Silk-Walker, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    The present study examined costs of two residential substance abuse treatment programs designed for urban American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs). Costs for one agency were well within national norms, while costs at the other program were less than expected from nationwide data. Economies of scale accounted for much of the difference between observed and expected costs. Culturally specific residential substance abuse treatment services can be provided to urban AI/ANs within budgets typically found at mainstream programs.

  16. The influence of an Alaska Native accent and reputation on perceived therapist credibility.

    PubMed

    Swift, Joshua K; Mayra, Jenna; Justice, Chantel; Freitas-Murrell, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined the influence of an Alaska Native (AN) accent and reputation on perceived therapist credibility after controlling for universal-diverse orientation. Participants listened to and rated therapist audio recordings that differed in AN accent (strong, minimal) and reputational cues (expert, recent graduate, student). While credibility ratings of the accent conditions did not differ in the expert and recent graduate scenarios, the graduate student therapist was seen as less attractive and useful when she spoke with a strong accent.

  17. Providing culturally competent services for American Indian and Alaska Native veterans to reduce health care disparities.

    PubMed

    Noe, Timothy D; Kaufman, Carol E; Kaufmann, L Jeanne; Brooks, Elizabeth; Shore, Jay H

    2014-09-01

    We conducted an exploratory study to determine what organizational characteristics predict the provision of culturally competent services for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) veterans in Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health facilities. In 2011 to 2012, we adapted the Organizational Readiness to Change Assessment (ORCA) for a survey of 27 VA facilities in the Western Region to assess organizational readiness and capacity to adopt and implement native-specific services and to profile the availability of AI/AN veteran programs and interest in and resources for such programs. Several ORCA subscales (Program Needs, Leader's Practices, and Communication) statistically significantly predicted whether VA staff perceived that their facilities were meeting the needs of AI/AN veterans. However, none predicted greater implementation of native-specific services. Our findings may aid in developing strategies for adopting and implementing promising native-specific programs and services for AI/AN veterans, and may be generalizable for other veteran groups.

  18. Rural American Indian and Alaska Native veterans' telemental health: A model of culturally centered care.

    PubMed

    Goss, Cynthia W; Richardson, W J Buck; Dailey, Nancy; Bair, Byron; Nagamoto, Herbert; Manson, Spero M; Shore, Jay H

    2017-08-01

    American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) veterans living in rural areas have unique health care needs and face numerous barriers to accessing health care services. Among these needs is a disproportionate prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder and other mental illnesses. Since 2001, 14 rural communities have partnered with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and the Centers for American Indian and Alaska Native Health at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus to extend telemental health clinics to American Indian veterans. Administrative and, to some extent, clinical considerations of these clinics have been reviewed previously. This paper describes a model of care, evolved over a 14-year period, that weaves together evidence-based Western treatment, traditional Native healing, and rural Native communities into 4 main components: mental health care, technology, care coordination, and cultural facilitation. We delineate improvements to care made by addressing barriers such as system transference, provider-patient trust, and videoconferencing. Similarly, the discussion notes ways that the care model leverages strengths within Native communities, such as social cohesion and spirituality. Future steps include selection of appropriate performance indicators for systematic evaluation. The identification of key constructs of this care model will facilitate comparisons with other models of care in underserved populations with chronic and complex health conditions, and eventually advance the state of care for our warriors. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. The role of hope and optimism in suicide risk for American Indians/Alaska Natives.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, Victoria M; Wingate, LaRicka R

    2013-12-01

    There are some American Indian/Alaska Native communities that exhibit high rates of suicide. The interpersonal theory of suicide (Joiner, 2005) posits that lethal suicidal behavior is likely preceded by the simultaneous presence of thwarted belongingness, perceived burdensomeness, and acquired capability. Past research has shown that hope and optimism are negatively related to suicidal ideation, some of the constructs in the interpersonal theory of suicide, and suicide risk for the general population. This is the first study to investigate hope and optimism in relation to suicidal ideation, thwarted belongingness, perceived burdensomeness, and acquired capability for American Indians/Alaska Natives. Results showed that hope and optimism negatively predicted thwarted belongingness, perceived burdensomeness, and suicidal ideation. However, these results were not found for acquired capability. Overall, this study suggests that higher levels of hope and optimism are associated with lower levels of suicidal ideation, thwarted belongingness, and perceived burdensomeness in this American Indian/Alaska Native sample. © 2013 The American Association of Suicidology.

  20. Mashkiki: Old Medicine Nourishing the New. American Indians and Alaska Natives in Biomedical Research Careers--II. Proceedings of the Conference (Duluth, Minnesota, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haller, Edwin W., Ed.; Aitken, Larry P., Ed.

    This book consists of papers and panel discussions presented at a conference that focused on encouraging American Indian and Alaska Native students to enter the field of biomedical research. Research and treatment of diseases among Native populations can best be carried out by American Indian and Alaska Native researchers who have a background in…